Ecologie: Hypocrites de tous les pays, unissez-vous ! (Guess who keep lecturing us about climate change, but flaunt carbon footprints 300 times bigger than the rest of us ?)

10 novembre, 2019

View image on Twitter

Image result for Di Caprio greta Thunberg"
Image result for Greta Thunberg mural istanbul"

Chers journalistes qui nous avez traités d’hypocrites, vous avez raison. Notre empreinte carbone est élevée et celle des industries dont nous faisons partie est énorme. Comme vous, et tous les autres, nous sommes coincés dans une économie basée sur l’énergie fossile et sans changement radical, nos styles de vie continueront à endommager le climat et l’écologie. Il y a cependant une histoire plus urgente sur laquelle nos profils et nos plates-formes peuvent attirer l’attention. Le changement climatique arrive plus vite et plus fort que prévu ; des millions de personnes en souffrent, quittent leur maison pour arriver à nos frontières en tant que réfugiés. Aux côtés de ces personnes qui payent déjà le prix de notre économie basée sur l’énergie fossile, il y a des millions d’enfants – appelés par Greta Thunberg – qui nous implorent, nous les personnes de pouvoir et d’influence, de nous battre pour leur futur qui est déjà dévasté. Nous ne pouvons ignorer leur appel. Même si en leur répondant nous nous retrouvons dans votre ligne de mire. Les médias existent pour dire la vérité aux gens. En ce moment, il n’y a pas de besoin plus urgent que de vous renseigner sur le CEE (Climate and Ecology Emergency) et que vous utilisiez votre voix pour atteindre de nouveaux publics avec la vérité. Collectif de célébrités
C’est grâce à Greta et aux jeunes militants du monde entier que je suis optimiste quant à l’avenir. C’était un honneur de passer du temps avec Greta. Elle et moi nous sommes fait la promesse de nous supporter l’un et l’autre, dans l’espoir de créer un avenir plus réjouissant pour notre planète. Leonardo DiCaprio
C’était fantastique de rencontrer la semaine dernière @GretaThunberg, mon amie et mon héroïne, et de faire ensemble un tour de Santa Monica à vélo. J’étais tellement excité à l’idée de la présenter à ma fille Christina. Continue de nous inspirer Greta!  Arnold Schwarzenegger
Ce que je veux, c’est que les gens réalisent que nous devons faire quelque chose pour le monde. Sinon, ce sera le début de notre extinction. Quel est le message derrière? Peut-être de lancer la conversation avec des amis: ‘Vous avez vu la peinture murale de Greta? A quel sujet ? Le changement climatique.’ Andres “Cobre” Petreselli
The Kadıköy Municipality, run by [the main opposition Republican People’s Party] CHP, painted a mural of Greta Thunberg, who officially filed a complaint against Turkey at the United Nations. The mayor must put an end to this mural scandal of the girl who is the enemy of Turks! Aydoğan Ahıakın (AKP)
Let’s cut off the electricity, natural gas and Internet at her house in Stockholm, take away her smart phone, then watch her vignette full of mimicry that she rehearses in front of a mirror. Cem Toker (Turkey’s Liberal Party)
Greta, who had been portrayed as a sympathetic and respected young woman by the vast majority of the Turkish media before the UNGA sessions in New York City, submitted a legal complaint against five countries including Turkey to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, accusing them of “recklessly causing and perpetuating life-threatening climate change [and] failing to take necessary preventive and precautionary measures to respect, protect, and fulfill the petitioners’ rights.” “16-year-old girl files complaint against Turkey at UN” dominated the headlines in Turkey, and a campaign to discredit her was kicked off on social and government-controlled mass media immediately afterwards. Many Twitter users — apparently nationalists and supporters of the government — reposted a doctored image of her posing with George Soros, who Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan once described as a famous Hungarian Jew who attempted to overthrow his government in 2013. The original image, in fact, was a photo on Greta’s Instagram account with Al Gore. Banu Avar, an ultranationalist journalist known for her conspiracy theories and xenophobia, tweeted that the powers behind Greta were Bill Gates and George Soros, referring to the Nya Tider website, the media outlet of a Nazi organization called Nordiska motståndsrörelsen, (Nordic Resistance Movement) in Sweden. İsmail Kılıçarslan of the pro-government Yeni Şafak daily claimed that Greta Thunberg had surpassed her namesake, world-famous Swedish-American film actress Greta Garbo, in making a splash and posted a chart on carbon emissions showing Turkey was already far behind many developing countries. However Thunberg’s submission to the UN had nothing to do with carbon emissions. Kılıçaraslan also added Greta to a list of people who are allegedly trying to tarnish Turkey’s image at home and abroad. Melih Altınok, a columnist for the Sabah daily, which is run by the Erdoğan family, accused Greta’s parents of child abuse and described her efforts as a part of a Stockholm-style environmentalism that claims “cow farts” will cause the end of the world. Mevlüt Tezel of Sabah wrote in his column titled “Project girl, haven’t you found another country to blame?” that Greta, who he described as a polished setup girl, became popular only after US President Donald Trump made fun of her. Conspiracist and columnist for the same daily Ferhat Ünlü mentioned her in his last column about HAARP (High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program), which was claimed to be a US project to produce weapons that trigger earthquakes, writing “… those who made a child who reportedly has Asperger’s Syndrome speak at the UN on the condition of accusing Turkey and similar countries hesitate to discuss HAARP.” No doubt, the most extreme reaction came from a politician, namely, Aydoğan Ahıakın, head of the governing Justice and Development Party (AKP) branch in Kadıköy, one the biggest districts in İstanbul. Ahıakın tweeted that “the Kadıköy Municipality, run by [the main opposition Republican People’s Party] CHP, painted a mural of Greta Thunberg, who officially filed a complaint against Turkey at the United Nations. The mayor [Şerdil Dara Odabaşı] must put an end to this mural scandal of the girl who is the enemy of Turks!” Ahıakın did not forget to mention Turkey’s Interior Ministry, which supervises municipalities in Turkey. The ministry recently removed several mayors in prominent Kurdish cities. Journalist and television host Ahmet Hakan Coşkun, who works for the pro-government Hürriyet daily and disreputable CNN-Türk, wrote in his column that he found Greta so unnatural, he simply was unable to develop a good feeling for her. Calling her a poseur and crabby, Çoşkun likened her to children who went crazy while reading epic poems. Meanwhile, there are those who discredit and oppose Greta ideologically as well. Hüseyin Vodinalı, a columnist for Aydınlık, the media outlet of Turkey’s neo-nationalist Homeland Party, said that “capitalism is hiding behind Greta.” Accusing her of roleplaying, Vodinalı wrote that global finance barons representing $118 trillion were using a small girl as a screen. Vodinalı also claimed that Greta’s mother, father and grandfather were all actors (which is not true) and that that was why her acting was so realistic. Gaffar Yakınca, another Aydınlık columnist, wrote two pieces on Greta. Yakınca portayed Greta as the new face of imperialism. Referring to her Asperger’s Syndrome, Yakınca claimed she had been dismayed by disaster scenarios since she was 8, adding that as an abused child she had fallen under the responsibility of Sweden’s ministry of social affairs. In his second column Yakınca likened Greta to Private Ryan, the main character of the movie “Saving Private Ryan,” which tells the story of a mentally ill American soldier who was rescued by the US Army during wartime. Yakınca claims that Greta is the last member of the same army. Greta’s peers were also hardhearted. The Union of High School Students, an organization affiliated with the Homeland Party, issued a statement accusing the West of using the old tactic of sending children to the fight first. Despite a note stating that Greta was not their addressee but rather her global masters, it is full of defamation and humiliation of the young activist. It would be incorrect to say that only pro-government journalists and ultranationalists were trying to defame the 16-year-old activist. For instance, Cem Toker, the former chairman of Turkey’s Liberal Party, wrote on his Twitter account in response to a user who expressed support for Greta, “Let’s cut off the electricity, natural gas and Internet at her house in Stockholm, take away her smart phone, then watch her vignette full of mimicry that she rehearses in front of a mirror.” Greta continues to travel the world. Turkey would be an amazing destination for her, departing from Stockholm, sailing the Mediterranean on a zero carbon yacht, meeting with activists whom she previously acknowledged for their protest of a gold mining company. However, it would be wise to postpone it for as long as xenophobia is on the rise in Turkey. Nordicmonitor
C’est ce qui s’appelle une boulette ! L’acteur oscarisé pour son rôle dans The Revenant s’est attiré les foudres de tous les écologistes samedi 21 mai 2016, en faisant un aller-retour entre Cannes et New York en jet privé pour aller chercher un prix. Banal, pour une star multimillionnaire. Oui, sauf quand il s’agit de recevoir une récompense en faveur de la planète… Alors qu’il était sur la Croisette pour le 69ème Festival de Cannes, Leonardo DiCaprio a dû s’éclipser quelques jours pour se rendre au Riverkeeper Fishermen’s Ball, un événement écologiste qui se déroulait à New York, soit à plus de 6000 kilomètres de Cannes. Pour faire l’aller-retour rapidement et récupérer son prix « green » des mains de Robert De Niro, l’acteur n’a pas trouvé d’autre solution que de prendre son jet privé. Une initiative qui fait désordre, surtout quand on sait qu’une heure de vol dans un jet privé brûle autant de carburant qu’une année entière de conduite d’une voiture, à en croire les rapports écologistes. Pourtant, Leonardo Dicaprio est plein de bonnes intentions pour la protection de notre belle planète. Le 20 janvier 2016, lors du dernier World Economic Forum, il signait un chèque de 15 millions de dollars en faveur des causes environnementales. Pendant la dernière cérémonie des Oscars, en février dernier, il profitait de son discours pour rappeler que « le changement climatique est réel. Cela arrive maintenant, et c’est la plus urgente menace pour notre espèce ». Ces démonstrations pour l’écologie avaient conduit le comédien à recevoir ce fameux prix vert le mercredi 18 mai 2016. Fier de sa récompense, l’acteur avait aussitôt publié une photo de son trophée sur son compte Instagram en se disant « honoré » d’avoir été invité à participer à un tel événement et en affirmant sa volonté de « créer et protéger un monde plus sain pour des millions de gens ». L’acteur star de Titanic, revenu sur la Croisette le jeudi 19 mai 2016 pour prononcer un discours lors du gala de l’amfAR contre le Sida, était loin de se douter que sa petite virée allait faire autant de vagues. Le porte-parole de l’acteur a pris sa défense en déclarant que Leonardo Dicaprio aurait en réalité profité d’un vol qu’effectuait un de ces amis, lequel faisait lui aussi l’aller-retour Cannes-New York. Orange
They lecture other people about the need to take action on climate change but then climb aboard private jets. Celebrity “super-emitters” have carbon footprints up to 300 times bigger than the average person and may encourage others to adopt their dirty habits by flaunting their frequent flying on social media, a study says. Bill Gates, the Microsoft billionaire, has the biggest carbon footprint of the ten celebrities whose travel habits were examined by the study. He took 59 flights in 2017, travelling 343,000km (213,000 miles). The study assumed he flew in his private jet, which he has described as his “guilty pleasure” and “big splurge”, and calculated his flying produced 1,600 tonnes of carbon dioxide, compared to a global average of less than five tonnes per person. Other celebrity frequent flyers included in the study by Lund University in Sweden include Paris Hilton who took 68 flights and travelled 275,000km, Jennifer Lopez 77 flights and 224,000km, and Oprah Winfrey 29 flights and 134,000km. The researchers examined the Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts of ten celebrities to establish their movements and looked at media reports and other sources to try to establish the type of plane in which they had travelled. Steffan Gossling, the lead author, said the example of Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate change activist who has vowed not to fly and has herself become famous, had “broken the convention” that celebrities were expected to travel in style. The emergence of the concept of flygskam, which is Swedish for “flight shame”, had also prompted more questions about the impact of frequent flyers, he said. He called on governments to “stem the growing class of very affluent people who contribute very significantly to emissions and encourage everyone else to aspire to such damaging lifestyles”. He added: “It’s increasingly looking like the climate crisis can’t be addressed while a small but growing group of super-emitters continue to increase their energy consumption and portray such lifestyles as desirable through their social media channels “As Greta Thunberg affirmed early on, ‘The bigger your carbon footprint, the bigger your moral duty’. And flying, as a very energy-intensive activity, has been identified as particularly harmful and socially undesirable.” Emma Watson, the actress and the only British celebrity among the ten, had the lowest carbon footprint as she flew only 14 times in 2017 and travelled 68,000km, all on scheduled airlines. But her carbon footprint of 15 tonnes from flying alone was still more than three times that of the average person from all activities. A spokesman said that Watson pays to offset the carbon emissions of the flights that she takes through the organisation. The study, published in the journal Annals of Tourism Research, added: “Scheduled air traffic, even though twice as energy-intense in business/first class, requires only a fraction of the energy consumed by private jets.” Mr Gossling said he had given up flying for leisure more than 20 years ago when he became aware of its damaging impact. However, he admitted to taking a flight yesterday from Germany to Denmark to attend an academic conference. He said he did not have the time to make the outward journey by rail but intended to spend 13 hours on trains tomorrow on the return journey. Ben Webster

Charité bien ordonnée commence par soi-même !

A l’heure où …

De Bristol à Istanbul et San Francisco

Et par fresques géantes interposées …

Se poursuit la béatification santo subito de la jeune activiste du climat suédoise Greta Thunberg …

Comment ne pas se réjouir …

De voir ses amis de la jet set …

Aux empreintes carbone jusqu’à 300 fois la nôtre …

Commencer enfin à appliquer à eux-mêmes

Les leçons d’écologie qu’ils nous avaient jusqu’ici si généreusement offertes ?

VIDEO. Plusieurs stars affirment être « hypocrites » face au changement climatique

ECOLOGIE Ce sont elles qui le disent dans une lettre ouverte publiée par Extinction Rebellion

20 Minutes
17/10/19

Plusieurs célébrités ont signé une lettre publiée par Extinction Rebellion dans laquelle elles admettent être « hypocrites » face au combat contre le changement climatique. De Benedict Cumberbatch au chanteur de Radiohead, Thom Yorke, en passant par Lily Allen, ils s’adressent aux journalistes qui les ont épinglés sur leurs habitudes de vie peu compatibles avec la protection de l’environnement.

« Chers journalistes qui nous avez traités d’hypocrites, vous avez raison. Notre empreinte carbone est élevée et celle des industries dont nous faisons partie est énorme. Comme vous, et tous les autres, nous sommes coincés dans une économie basée sur l’énergie fossile et sans changement radical, nos styles de vie continueront à endommager le climat et l’écologie », peut-on lire dans cette lettre relayée par plusieurs médias, dont la BBC.

Tous avec Greta Thunberg

Ils apportent également leur soutien à Greta Thunberg. « Le changement climatique arrive plus vite et plus fort que prévu ; des millions de personnes en souffrent, quittent leur maison pour arriver à nos frontières en tant que réfugiés. Aux côtés de ces personnes qui payent déjà le prix de notre économie basée sur l’énergie fossile, il y a des millions d’enfants – appelés par Greta Thunberg – qui nous implorent, nous les personnes de pouvoir et d’influence, de nous battre pour leur futur qui est déjà dévasté. Nous ne pouvons ignorer leur appel. Même si en leur répondant nous nous retrouvons dans votre ligne de mire », ajoutent-ils.

L’interprète de Sherlock Holmes et les autres ont également une requête adressée aux journalistes. « Les médias existent pour dire la vérité aux gens. En ce moment, il n’y a pas de besoin plus urgent que de vous renseigner sur le CEE (Climate and Ecology Emergency) et que vous utilisiez votre voix pour atteindre de nouveaux publics avec la vérité », peut-on lire également.

Voir aussi:

Jet-setting stars exposed over hypocrisy on climate change
Ben Webster, Environment Editor
October 24 2019
The Times

They lecture other people about the need to take action on climate change but then climb aboard private jets.

Celebrity “super-emitters” have carbon footprints up to 300 times bigger than the average person and may encourage others to adopt their dirty habits by flaunting their frequent flying on social media, a study says.

Bill Gates, the Microsoft billionaire, has the biggest carbon footprint of the ten celebrities whose travel habits were examined by the study. He took 59 flights in 2017, travelling 343,000km (213,000 miles).

The study assumed he flew in his private jet, which he has described as his “guilty pleasure” and “big splurge”, and calculated his flying produced 1,600 tonnes of carbon dioxide, compared to a global average of less than five tonnes…

They lecture other people about the need to take action on climate change but then climb aboard private jets.

Celebrity “super-emitters” have carbon footprints up to 300 times bigger than the average person and may encourage others to adopt their dirty habits by flaunting their frequent flying on social media, a study says.

Bill Gates, the Microsoft billionaire, has the biggest carbon footprint of the ten celebrities whose travel habits were examined by the study. He took 59 flights in 2017, travelling 343,000km (213,000 miles).

The study assumed he flew in his private jet, which he has described as his “guilty pleasure” and “big splurge”, and calculated his flying produced 1,600 tonnes of carbon dioxide, compared to a global average of less than five tonnes per person.

Other celebrity frequent flyers included in the study by Lund University in Sweden include Paris Hilton who took 68 flights and travelled 275,000km, Jennifer Lopez 77 flights and 224,000km, and Oprah Winfrey 29 flights and 134,000km.

The researchers examined the Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts of ten celebrities to establish their movements and looked at media reports and other sources to try to establish the type of plane in which they had travelled.

Steffan Gossling, the lead author, said the example of Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate change activist who has vowed not to fly and has herself become famous, had “broken the convention” that celebrities were expected to travel in style.

The emergence of the concept of flygskam, which is Swedish for “flight shame”, had also prompted more questions about the impact of frequent flyers, he said.

He called on governments to “stem the growing class of very affluent people who contribute very significantly to emissions and encourage everyone else to aspire to such damaging lifestyles”.

He added: “It’s increasingly looking like the climate crisis can’t be addressed while a small but growing group of super-emitters continue to increase their energy consumption and portray such lifestyles as desirable through their social media channels

“As Greta Thunberg affirmed early on, ‘The bigger your carbon footprint, the bigger your moral duty’. And flying, as a very energy-intensive activity, has been identified as particularly harmful and socially undesirable.”

Emma Watson, the actress and the only British celebrity among the ten, had the lowest carbon footprint as she flew only 14 times in 2017 and travelled 68,000km, all on scheduled airlines.

But her carbon footprint of 15 tonnes from flying alone was still more than three times that of the average person from all activities. A spokesman said that Watson pays to offset the carbon emissions of the flights that she takes through the organisation ClimateCare.org.

The study, published in the journal Annals of Tourism Research, added: “Scheduled air traffic, even though twice as energy-intense in business/first class, requires only a fraction of the energy consumed by private jets.”

Mr Gossling said he had given up flying for leisure more than 20 years ago when he became aware of its damaging impact. However, he admitted to taking a flight yesterday from Germany to Denmark to attend an academic conference.

He said he did not have the time to make the outward journey by rail but intended to spend 13 hours on trains tomorrow on the return journey.

Voir également:

Eco-campaigner Leonardo DiCaprio, 44, finally ditches private jet and deigns to fly commercial with girlfriend Camila Morrone, 21, at JFK Airport

 He has been criticized before for his use of private jets despite his interest in environmental causes.

But it seems like Leonardo DiCaprio has turned over a new leaf.

The 44-year-old actor was spotted heading to a commercial flight out of JFK Airport in New York on Sunday alongside 21-year-old girlfriend Camila Morrone.

As the actor has been criticized over his carbon footprint despite being an advocate for environmental issues, he made a much more conscious decision in taking a regular flight out.

Leo attempted to keep it low-key as he sported a black hoodie and matching puffer jacket, TUMI pack and Dodgers cap.

Camila looked fashionable in a  bright red puffer jacket as she followed her Oscar-winning boyfriend.

The model and the Hollywood icon were first linked in December 2017 when DiCaprio was pictured leaving her Los Angeles home.

The actor is a staunch supporter of environmental issues and used his acceptance speech at the 2016 Academy Awards to urge lawmakers to ‘stop procrastinating’ about the issues surrounding climate change.

The Revenant star has set up the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, which is ‘dedicated to the long-term health and well-being of the Earth’s inhabitants’ and has been largely praised for his conservation work.

 He has been criticized in the past for his use of private jets as in 2014, emails hacked from film studio Sony revealed he took six private flights in just six weeks which cost $177,550. This travel included two round trips from Los Angeles to New York, and one from LA to Las Vegas.

Outspoken: The actor – pictured 2018 in Las Vegas –  is a staunch supporter of environmental issues and used his acceptance speech at the 2016 Academy Awards to urge lawmakers to ‘stop procrastinating’ about the issues surrounding climate change

The actor is no stranger to dating models, with his previous conquests including the likes of Nina Agdal, Kelly Rohrbach, Toni Garrn, Gisele Bündchen, and Bar Refaeli.

His longest term relationship was with Brazilian supermodel Gisele, 37 – now married to New England Patriots star Tom Brady, 40 – from 1999 to 2005.

DiCaprio also dated Israeli catwalk queen, Bar Refaeli, 32, for six years from 2005 to 2011.

The actor’s most recent serious relationship was with Danish beauty Nina Agdal, 25, for a year.

DiCaprio has cast his previous type aside for brief romances with pop princess Rihanna, 29, and Gossip Girl star Blake Lively, 30.

Voir de plus:

Leonardo DiCaprio écolo : il voyage en jet privé pour aller récupérer son prix
Hélène Garçon
Orange
19 mai 2016

C’est ce qui s’appelle une boulette ! L’acteur oscarisé pour son rôle dans The Revenant s’est attiré les foudres de tous les écologistes samedi 21 mai 2016, en faisant un aller-retour entre Cannes et New York en jet privé pour aller chercher un prix. Banal, pour une star multimillionnaire. Oui, sauf quand il s’agit de recevoir une récompense en faveur de la planète…

Alors qu’il était sur la Croisette pour le 69ème Festival de Cannes, Leonardo DiCaprio a dû s’éclipser quelques jours pour se rendre au Riverkeeper Fishermen’s Ball, un événement écologiste qui se déroulait à New York, soit à plus de 6000 kilomètres de Cannes. Pour faire l’aller-retour rapidement et récupérer son prix « green » des mains de Robert De Niro, l’acteur n’a pas trouvé d’autre solution que de prendre son jet privé. Une initiative qui fait désordre, surtout quand on sait qu’une heure de vol dans un jet privé brûle autant de carburant qu’une année entière de conduite d’une voiture, à en croire les rapports écologistes.

Pourtant, Leonardo Dicaprio est plein de bonnes intentions pour la protection de notre belle planète. Le 20 janvier 2016, lors du dernier World Economic Forum, il signait un chèque de 15 millions de dollars en faveur des causes environnementales. Pendant la dernière cérémonie des Oscars, en février dernier, il profitait de son discours pour rappeler que « le changement climatique est réel. Cela arrive maintenant, et c’est la plus urgente menace pour notre espèce« . Ces démonstrations pour l’écologie avaient conduit le comédien à recevoir ce fameux prix vert le mercredi 18 mai 2016.

Fier de sa récompense, l’acteur avait aussitôt publié une photo de son trophée sur son compte Instagram en se disant « honoré » d’avoir été invité à participer à un tel événement et en affirmant sa volonté de « créer et protéger un monde plus sain pour des millions de gens« .

L’acteur star de Titanic, revenu sur la Croisette le jeudi 19 mai 2016 pour prononcer un discours lors du gala de l’amfAR contre le Sida, était loin de se douter que sa petite virée allait faire autant de vagues. Le porte-parole de l’acteur a pris sa défense en déclarant que Leonardo Dicaprio aurait en réalité profité d’un vol qu’effectuait un de ces amis, lequel faisait lui aussi l’aller-retour Cannes-New York.

Voir encore:

Leonardo DiCaprio et Greta Thunberg, la rencontre
Paris Match
02/11/2019

L’acteur de 44 ans et la militante de 16 ans se sont rencontrés à Los Angeles. Leonardo DiCaprio lui a dédié un message sur Instagram.

Une rencontre entre deux défenseurs de la nature. Vendredi, la jeune militante suédoise Greta Thunberg a rencontré Leonardo DiCaprio à Los Angeles. Messager de la Paix pour la protection du climat, l’acteur de 44 ans est également à la tête de sa propre fondation dédiée à la protection de la planète. «Il y a peu de moments dans l’Histoire où des voix ont un impact à des moments aussi cruciaux [qu’aujourd’hui] et à l’aube d’une transformation, mais Greta Thunberg est devenue une leadeuse de notre époque», a écrit la star hollywoodienne sur son compte Instagram.

Il a poursuivi son message en faisant comprendre aux détracteurs de la fondatrice des «FridaysForFuture» qu’ils portaient un mauvais jugement envers elle : «L’histoire nous jugera pour ce que nous faisons aujourd’hui afin de garantir que les générations futures puissent jouir de la même planète habitable que nous avons si ostensiblement tenue pour acquise. J’espère que le message de Greta sonne l’avertissement des dirigeants du monde où le temps de l’inaction est révolu. Avant de conclure: «C’est grâce à Greta et aux jeunes militants du monde entier que je suis optimiste quant à l’avenir. Ce fut un honneur de passer du temps avec Greta. Elle et moi sommes engagés à nous soutenir mutuellement, dans l’espoir d’assurer un avenir meilleur à notre planète». Des actions communes à venir ? Mystère

Greta veut se rendre à Madrid

Greta Thunberg poursuit son combat à travers le monde. Aux Etats-Unis depuis fin août, elle cherche désormais à revenir en Europe par la voie maritime. «J’ai besoin de trouver un moyen pour traverser l’Atlantique en novembre… Si quelqu’un pouvait me trouver un moyen de transport, je serais extrêmement reconnaissante», a tweeté l’adolescente de 16 ans, qui refuse de prendre l’avion, moyen de transport très polluant. Elle veut se rendre à Madrid, où se déroulera la conférence internationale sur le climat, COP25, initialement prévue au Chili.

Voir aussi:

Lutte pour le climat : après DiCaprio, Greta Thunberg a rencontré Schwarzenegger
De passage aux Etats-Unis, la militante suédoise a rencontré successivement deux des monuments du cinéma américain engagés dans la lutte pour le climat.
Le Parisien
5 novembre 2019

Le duo est presque improbable. L’acteur américain Arnold Schwarzenegger a posté ce mardi des clichés de lui, pédalant dans les rues de Santa Monica aux côtés de la jeune activiste suédoise Greta Thunberg. « C’était fantastique de rencontrer la semaine dernière @GretaThunberg, mon amie et mon héroïne, et de faire ensemble un tour de Santa Monica à vélo. J’étais tellement excité à l’idée de la présenter à ma fille Christina. Continue de nous inspirer Greta! », a tweeté, visiblement très enthousiaste, l’interprète de Terminator et ancien gouverneur de Californie.

Leur rencontre est loin d’être anodine : comme Greta Thunberg, arrivée à bord d’un voilier aux Etats-Unis en septembre, pour poursuivre son plaidoyer en faveur de la lutte contre le réchauffement climatique, Arnold Schwarzenegger s’active depuis près d’une décennie pour promouvoir R20, l’ONG spécialisée dans la défense de l’environnement dont il est à l’origine.

« C’était un honneur de passer du temps avec Greta »

Avant sa rencontre avec « Schwartzie », de 53 ans son aîné, la jeune suédoise avait déjà été vue en compagnie d’un autre monument du cinéma américain. Vendredi, Leonardo DiCaprio, lui aussi fervent défenseur de l’écologie, a posté sur Instagram une photo de lui, posant près de l’adolescente.

Un cliché accompagné d’un commentaire laudateur. « C’est grâce à Greta et aux jeunes militants du monde entier que je suis optimiste quant à l’avenir », écrit l’acteur quadragénaire. « C’était un honneur de passer du temps avec Greta. Elle et moi nous sommes fait la promesse de nous supporter l’un et l’autre, dans l’espoir de créer un avenir plus réjouissant pour notre planète. »

La jeune Suédoise doit dorénavant rejoindre l’Espagne, pays hôte de la prochaine COP25, initialement prévue au Chili. Elle cherche toujours un moyen d’y parvenir sans exploser son bilan carbone.

Voir par ailleurs:

Greta Thunberg mise à l’honneur dans une impressionnante peinture murale à Bristol

Un street-artiste britannique a peint la jeune activiste suédoise sur un mur de Bristol pour saluer son combat pour le climat.

Morgane Guillou
Huffington Post

INTERNATIONAL – Un street-artiste britannique a honoré Greta Thunberg dans une étonnante peinture murale dans la ville de Bristol au sud-ouest de l’Angleterre, comme le montre la vidéo en tête d’article.

La jeune activiste suédoise pour le climat y apparaît le corps et le visage à moitié recouverts par les eaux de glaciers fondants derrière elle, sous un ciel noir et orageux. Ce paysage symbolise le réchauffement climatique et certaines de ses conséquences les plus inquiétantes, à savoir la fonte des glaciers et la récurrence d’épisodes climatiques désastreux.

Le street-artiste Jody Thomas a voulu saluer Greta Thunberg pour son combat sur le climat. À mesure qu’il avançait dans l’élaboration de son oeuvre, il s’est étonné du nombre de personnes qui semblaient reconnaître la jeune militante de 16 ans.

Cette dernière s’est récemment illustrée au Parlement européen et dans plusieurs pays où elle a donné des discours sur l’inquiétude des jeunes générations face à l’avenir de la planète et de l’humanité.

Cette peinture murale en son honneur a été très acclamée par une large partie du public de Bristol, haut lieu du street art et connue pour être la ville natale de Banksy.

Greta Thunberg a été invitée pour juillet à l’Assemblée nationale française par les députés membres du collectif transpartisan pour le climat “Accélérons”.

Voir aussi:

Greta Thunberg, activiste suédoise pour le climat, reçoit une fresque à San Francisco

Le muraliste argentin Andres Iglesias, qui signe son art avec le pseudonyme de Cobre, devrait achever l’oeuvre de l’artiste suédois de 16 ans sur la place de la ville, Union Square, la semaine prochaine.

Cobre a confié au site d’information SFGate qu’il donnait de son temps pour achever les travaux et qu’il espérait que la murale aiderait les gens à comprendre « nous devons prendre soin du monde ».

Cobre a déclaré qu’il cherchait un bâtiment pour une nouvelle peinture murale lorsque One Atmosphere, un organisme sans but lucratif responsable de l’environnement, l’a approché à propos du projet.

Le directeur exécutif, Paul Scott, a déclaré qu’il pensait que Cobre était le choix idéal pour créer le premier de ce que l’organisation espère être une série de travaux rendant hommage aux activistes du changement climatique.

Mme Thunberg elle-même avait passé la journée à un rassemblement sur les changements climatiques à Charlotte, en Caroline du Nord, et avait arrêté une démérite qui essayait de perturber son discours.

« Je pense que si vous voulez parler avec moi personnellement, peut-être que vous pourrez le faire plus tard », a déclaré Mme Thunberg avant que la foule n’éclate en scandant son prénom.

La jeune femme, âgée de 16 ans, qui voyageait en Amérique du Nord pour sensibiliser l’opinion au changement climatique, implorait d’autres leaders de la jeunesse de s’exprimer dans la lutte contre le réchauffement climatique lorsqu’elle a fait une pause alors qu’une personne proche de la scène tentait de s’exprimer à son sujet.

« Dans de telles circonstances, il peut être difficile de trouver de l’espoir, je peux vous le dire », a déclaré Mme Thunberg.

« Et je peux vous dire que je n’ai pas trouvé beaucoup d’espoir dans les politiciens et les entreprises. Ce sont désormais les gens qui constituent notre plus grande source d’espoir.

« Même si nous, les jeunes, ne sommes peut-être pas en mesure de voter ou de prendre des décisions aujourd’hui, nous avons quelque chose d’aussi puissant », a-t-elle déclaré. « Et ce sont nos voix. Et nous devons les utiliser. »

Comme dans ses discours précédents, Mme Thunberg a réprimandé les adultes pour leur inaction dans la lutte contre le changement climatique.

« Ce sont nous les jeunes qui formons l’avenir », a-t-elle poursuivi.

« Nous n’avons pas assez de temps pour attendre que nous grandissions et que nous devenions les responsables, car nous devons faire face à l’urgence climatique et écologique dès maintenant.

« Si les adultes et les personnes au pouvoir sont trop immatures pour s’en rendre compte, alors nous devons leur faire savoir. »

Voir enfin:

Celebrities backing Extinction Rebellion say ‘yes, we are all hypocrites’ in open letter to media

Email: press@risingup.org.uk

Phone: +44(0) 7811 183633

#EverybodyNow  #ExtinctionRebellion

  • Open letter signed by more than 100 high-profile names, including actors Jude Law, Benedict Cumberbatch and Jamie Winstone, musicians Mel B, Natalie Imbruglia and Thom Yorke, and comedians Steve Coogan and Ruby Wax
  • List of notable names admit hypocrisy and urge that attention is drawn to the more pressing issue of the Climate and Ecological Emergency
  • Signatories stand firm that they will continue to speak out on the issue despite the criticisms they face from the media

Celebrities have issued a mea culpa to the media today in response to criticism that they are guilty of being hypocrites for backing Extinction Rebellion and continuing to live high carbon lives. The open letter has been signed by more than 100 high profile names, including actors, musicians, comedians, writers and even a former Archbishop of Canterbury.

Countless notable figures have chosen to back Extinction Rebellion in recent weeks, including a number who have visited the Rebellion sites. In almost all cases there has been a follow-up article in the media criticising them for being hypocrites.

Sarah Lunnon of Extinction Rebellion said: “We are so impressed by these personalities for coming forward. It’s easy to call people out for being hypocrites but that’s really a distraction from the much bigger, and perhaps more confronting conversation we need to have about the unworkable system in which we live. None of us is perfect. What matters is that more and more people are ready to talk about transforming how we relate to the planet, and we are prepared to put our liberty on the line to do so.”

The letter starts:

Dear journalists who have called us hypocrites,

‘You’re right. 

‘We live high carbon lives and the industries that we are part of have huge carbon footprints. Like you – and everyone else – we are stuck in this fossil-fuel economy and without systemic change, our lifestyles will keep on causing climate and ecological harm.

Despite the criticism they face, the signatories say that they are resolute in still speaking out on the issue of the climate and ecological emergency. The letter also urges the media to do more to support the cause. The letter goes on to say: ‘The stories that you write calling us climate hypocrites will not silence us.

‘The media exists to tell the public the truth. Right now there has never been a more urgent need for you to educate yourselves on the CEE (Climate and Ecological Emergency) and to use your voices to reach new audiences with the truth.’

Steve Coogan said: “Extinction Rebellion is a grassroots movement that should be applauded for putting this issue at the top of the agenda where it belongs.

“I stand in full support of these brave, determined activists who are making a statement on behalf of us all.”

Actor Jaime Winstone said: “I will continue to change my life for the greater good for the planet.

“I will continue to push for climate justice…we all need to change the way we live our lives for a healthier living planet and stop living in denial that climate crisis isn’t real.

“It’s happening. We all need to make changes if we want to survive and our children to thrive.”

The full text of the letter reads:

Dear journalists who have called us hypocrites,

You’re right. 

We live high carbon lives and the industries that we are part of have huge carbon footprints. Like you – and everyone else – we are stuck in this fossil-fuel economy and without systemic change, our lifestyles will keep on causing climate and ecological harm. 

There is, however, a more urgent story that our profiles and platforms can draw attention to.

Life on earth is dying.  We are living in the midst of the 6th mass extinction. For those who still doubt the severity of our situation, here is the International Monetary Fund on 10th October 2019 :

“Global warming causes major damage to the global economy and the natural world and engenders risks of catastrophic and irreversible outcomes”

And here is Sir David Attenborough on 3rd December 2018 : 

“Right now, we are facing a man-made disaster of global scale. Our greatest threat in thousands of years. Climate change. If we don’t take action, the collapse of our civilisations and the extinction of much of the natural world is on the horizon.”

Climate change is happening faster and more furiously than was predicted; millions of people are suffering, leaving their homes and arriving on our borders as refugees. 

Alongside these people who are already paying the price for our fossil fuelled economy, there are millions of children – called to action by Greta Thunberg – who are begging us, the people with power and influence, to stand up and fight for their already devastated future.

We cannot ignore their call.  Even if by answering them we put ourselves in your firing line.

The stories that you write calling us climate hypocrites will not silence us.  

The media exists to tell the public the truth. Right now there has never been a more urgent need for you to educate yourselves on the CEE (Climate and Ecological Emergency) and to use your voices to reach new audiences with the truth. 

We invite all people with platforms and profiles to join us and move beyond fear, to use your voices fearlessly to amplify the real story.

Thousands of ordinary people are risking their freedom by taking part in non-violent civil disobedience.  We’ve been inspired by their courage to speak out and join them. We beg you to do the same.

With love,

Riz Ahmed (actor), Simon Amstell (comedien), Mel B – Spice Girls (musician), Matt Berry (actor), Melanie Blatt – All Saints (musician), Baroness Rosie Boycott, Rory Bremner (comedien), Tom Burke (actor), David Byrne – Talking Heads (musician),  Peter Capaldi (actor), Jake Chapman (artist), Mary Charteris (model / musician/ DJ), Grace Chatto – Clean Bandit (musician), Adam Clayton – U2 (musician), Jarvis Cocker (musician), Lily Cole (actor & model), Steve Coogan (actor), Laura Crane (pro surfer & model), Alfonso Cuaron (director), Benedict Cumberbatch (actor), Stephen Daldry (director), Poppy Delevingne (actor / model), Jeremy Deller (artist), Emily Eavis (Glastonbury Festival), Katy England (fashion stylist), Brian Eno (musician),  Paapa Essiedu (actor), Livia Firth (Eco Age – founder), Jerome Flynn (actor), Stephen Frears (director), Bella Freud (designer), Sonia Friedman OBE (producer), Neil Gaiman (writer), Bob Geldof (musician and campaigner), Aileen Getty (activist and philanthropist),  Simon Green – Bonobo (musician), Natalie Imbruglia (singer), Helena Kennedy QC, Idris Khan OBE (artist), Vanessa Kirby (actor), Nan Goldin (artist), Antony Gormley (artist), Jack and Finn Harries (film-makers and influencers), MJ Harper (dancer), Paul and Phil Hartnoll – Orbital (musicians), Lena Headly (actor), Imogen Heap (musician), Dr. Pam Hogg (fashion designer), Jon Hopkins (musician), Nick Hornby (writer), Julietthe Larthe (producer), Jude Law (actor), Howard and Guy Lawrence – Disclosure (musicians), Daisy Lowe (model), Phil Manzanera – Roxy Music (musician), Simon McBurney OBE (theatre maker), Ian McEwan (writer), Fernando Meirelles (director), Sienna Miller (actor), George Monbiot (journalist), David Morrissey (actor), Sir Michael and Lady Clare Morpurgo (writer), Sophie Muller (director), Robert Del Naja – Massive Attack (musician), Andrea (Andi) Oliver (TV chef), Chris Packham (conservationist), Amanda Palmer (musician), Cornelia Ann Parker OBE (artist), Bill Paterson (actor), Caius Pawson (Young Turks – Founder and XL Recordings – A&R Director), Grayson Perry (artist & broadcaster),  Gilles Peterson (DJ & broadcaster), Yannis Philippakis and Edwin Congreave – Foals (musicians), Jason Pierce – Spiritualized (musician), Heydon Prowse (writer and director), Jonathan Pryce (actor), Gareth Pugh (designer), Sir Mark Rylance (actor), Nitin Sawney (musician), Tracey Seaward (film producer), Wilf Scolding (actor), Alison Steadman (actor), Juliet Stevenson (actor), Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi (Preen by Thornton Bregazzi, designers), Geoff Travis (Rough Trade, founder), Gavin Turk (artist), Mark Wallinger (artist), Ruby Wax (writer, performer and comedian), Rowan Williams (theologian), Jaime Winstone (actor), Ray Winstone (actor), Jeanette Winterstone (writer), Thom Yorke (musician), Dan Haggis, Matthew Murphy & Tord Øverland Knudsen – The Wombats (musicians), Deborah Curtis (artist),   and Lady Clare Morpurgo, Geoff Jukes (music manager), Joe Murphy (playwright), David Lan (theatre writer and producer), Alice Aedy (photographer), Kate Fahy (actor), Fay Milton – Savages (musician), Johnny Flynn (actor and musician), William Rees – Mystery Jets (musician), Flora Starkey (floral artist), MJ Delaney (director), Brian Ogle (architect),James Suckling (fashion consultant), Miquita Oliver (presenter), A Fletcher Cowan (presenter), Eliza Caird (musician), Lee Sharrock (PR and curator), Joe Robertson (playwright), Olivia Calverley (TV producer), Tia Grazette (creative director), Sam Conniff (author and pirate), Stefan Bartlett (designer), Matt Lambert (artist), J. Doyne Farmer (Baillie Gifford Professor, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford), Carolyn Benson (Benson Studios Interior Design), Georgina Goodwin (broadcaster), Jon McClure – Reverend and the Makers (musician), Ruth Daniel (cultural producer), David Graeber (anthropologist and writer), George Hencken (film maker), Ebe Oke (musician), Evgeny Morozov (writer), Anthony Barnett, (Co-Founder, openDemocracy), Henry Porter (novelist), Warren Ellis – Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (musician), Jonathan Reekie (Somerset House, director), Theresa Boden (actor/writer), Nick Welsh (designer/producer), Louis Savage (A&R rep), Guy Standing (economist), Pippa Small MBE (designer), Peter Marston (designer), Richard Sennett OBE FBA, Clare Kenny (musician), Ginevra Elkann (director), John Reynolds (music producer), Laurence Bell (Domino Records, founder), Margy Fenwick (landscape gardener), Seb Rochford (musician), Nick Laird-Clowes (musician), Roman Krznaric (philosopher), Will McEwan (scientist), Beth Orton (musician), Dawn Starin (anthropologist), Charlotte Trench (actor and director), Jonathan Glazer (director), Iain Forsyth (artist), Jane Pollard (artist), Ian Rickson (director),Sam Lee (musician), ​David Lan – ​DL (producer and writer), Liz Jensen (author), Michael Pawlyn (architect), Simon Stephens (playwrite), Kobi Prempeh (curator), Steve Tompkins (architect), Annie Morris (artist), Conrad Shawcross (artist), Mira Calix (artist), Andy Holden (artist), Andrew O’Hagan (writer), David Lan – DL (producer and writer), Alison Brooks (architect), Prof Sadie Morgan (architect), Ackroyd & Harvey (Artists), Eva Wiseman (editor), Mark Wallinger (artist), Carson McCol (artist), Ivan Harbour (architect), Angharad Cooper (producer), Jem Finer (musician and artist), Rauol Martinez (writer and filmmaker), Francesca Martinez (comedien and writer), Glen Hansard (musician), Frances Stoner Saunders (writer), Geeta Dayal (writer), Amanda Levete (architect) Jack Penate (singer) and Ted Cullinan MBE RDI RA (architect).


Columbus Day/527e: Cherchez le massacre ! (Looking back at the holiday that helped Italians join the white race)

14 octobre, 2019

Chagall-Tabernacles-1916Le premier repas de Thanksgiving (novembre 1621), par Jean Leon Gerome FerrisImage result for Canadian Thanksgiving Oct 14 2019Related imagehttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/88/1891_New_Orleans_Italian_lynching.jpg?uselang=frMontgomery Advertiser, Vol. LXXVII, Issue 21, p. 4.https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0c/Biblioteca_del_Senado_de_la_Provincia_-_52_-_Por_una_raza_fuerte%2C_laboriosa%2C_pacifista_y_soberana.jpg

Image result for Columbus day NY 2019Related imageImage result for Columbus day NY 2019Image result for Columbus day NY 2019Image result for Columbus day NY 2019Image result for Columbus day NY 2019
Related imageImage result for Wanted anti Columbus poster genocideRelated imageImage result for Wanted anti Columbus poster genocideImage result for Columbus day Thanksgiving Fourth of July genocideImage result for diseases of the columbian exchangePost image

No photo description available.

Le quinzième jour du septième mois, quand vous récolterez les produits du pays, vous célébrerez donc une fête à l’Éternel (…) et vous vous réjouirez devant l’Éternel, votre Dieu, pendant sept jours. (…) Vous demeurerez pendant sept jours sous des tentes … afin que vos descendants sachent que j’ai fait habiter sous des tentes les enfants d’Israël, après les avoir fait sortir du pays d’Égypte. Je suis l’Éternel, votre Dieu. Lévitique 23: 39-43
Si l’image nous révolte tant, c’est parce que nous en sommes tous collectivement responsables (…) cette scène, ces mots, ce comportement sont d’une violence et d’une haine inouïes. Mais par notre lâcheté, par nos renoncements, nous avons contribué, petit à petit, à les laisser passer, à les accepter. Cette femme a été « publiquement piétinée, chosifiée, déshumanisée, devant le groupe d’enfants qu’elle accompagnait bénévolement (…) Quelles seront les conséquences d’une telle humiliation publique si ce n’est renvoyer à cet enfant qu’il demeure un citoyen de seconde zone, indigne d’être pleinement français et reconnu comme tel ? Où est l’indignation générale ? Où sont les émissions de télévision, de radio, hormis quelques billets et tribunes comme celle-ci pour condamner cette agression ? Où est la parole publique de premier niveau, celle de nos élus, des partis politiques, celle des ministres, celle du président de la République pour refuser l’inacceptable ? Ne nous y trompons donc pas. L’extrême droite a fait de la haine contre les musulmans un outil majeur de sa propagande, mais elle n’en a pas le monopole. Des membres de la droite et de la gauche dites républicaines n’hésitent pas à stigmatiser les musulmans, et en premier lieu les femmes portant le voile, souvent -au nom de la laïcité-. Jusqu’où laisserons-nous passer ces haines ? (…) Jusqu’à quand allons-nous accepter que la laïcité, socle de notre République, soit instrumentalisée pour le compte d’une vision ségrégationniste, raciste, xénophobe, mortifère de notre société ? Acceptons-nous de nous laisser sombrer collectivement ou disons-nous stop maintenant, tant qu’il est encore temps ? Nous demandons urgemment au Président de la République de condamner publiquement l’agression dont cette femme a été victime devant son propre fils (…) de refuser que nos concitoyens musulmans soient fichés, stigmatisés, dénoncés pour la simple pratique de leur religion et d’exiger solennellement que cessent les discriminations et les amalgames envers une partie de notre communauté nationale. 90 personnalités
Dans une tribune publiée ce mardi sur lemonde.fr, 90 personnalités, dont l’acteur Omar Sy, le rappeur Nekfeu, le réalisateur Mathieu Kassovitz, ou encore la députée LFI Danièle Obono demandent au Chef de l’Etat d’intervenir pour condamner fermement « l’agression » dont a été victime la mère voilée vendredi dernier après la vidéo tournée par un élu RN au Conseil régional de Bourgogne-Franche-Comté. Parmi les 90 personnalités signataires : Rokhaya Diallo, journaliste et réalisatrice, DJ Snake, artiste, Marina Foïs, actrice, Mathieu Kassovitz, acteur et réalisateur, Kyan Khojandi, auteur, Tonie Marshall, réalisatrice, productrice, Guillaume Meurice, humoriste, Géraldine Nakache, actrice et réalisatrice, Nekfeu, artiste, Danièle Obono, députée (La France insoumise), Alessandra Sublet, animatrice, Omar Sy, acteur… France bleu
Columbus makes Hitler look like a juvenile delinquent. Russell Means
It’s almost obscene to celebrate Columbus because it’s an unmitigated record of horror. We don’t have to celebrate a man who was really — from an Indian point of view — worse than Attila the Hun. Hans Koning
The evidence of Aztec cannibalism has largely been ignored and consciously or unconsciously covered up. Michael Harner (New School for Social Research)
Dr. Harner’s theory of nutritional need is based on a recent revision in the number of people thought to have been sacrificed by the Aztecs. Dr. Woodrow Borah an authority on the demography of ancient Mexico at the University of California, Berkeley, has recently estimated that the Aztecs sacrificed 250,000 people a year. This consituted about 1 percent of the region’s population of 25 million. (…) He argues that cannibalism, which may have begun for purely religious reasons, appears to have grown to serve nutritional needs because the Aztecs, unlike nearly all other civilizations, lacked domesticated herbivores such as pigs or cattle. Staples of the Aztec diet were corn and beans supplemented with a few vegetables, lizards, snakes and worms. There were some domesticated turkeys and hairless dogs. Poor people gathered floating mats of vegetation from lakes. (…) In contemporary sources, however, such as the writings of Hernando Cortes, who conquered the Aztecs in 1521, and Bernal Diaz, who accompanied Cortes, Dr. Hamer says there is abundant evidence that human sacrifice was a common event in every town and that the limbs of the victims were boiled or roasted and eaten. Diaz, who is regarded by anthropologists as a highly reliable source, wrote in “The Conquest of New Spain,” for example, that in the town of Tlaxcala “we found wooden cages made of lattice‐work in which men and women were imprisoned and fed until they were fat enough to be sacrificed and eaten. These prison cages existed throughout the country.” The sacrifices, carried out by priests, took place atop the hundreds of steepwalled pyramids scattered about the Valley of Mexico. According to Diaz, the victims were taken up the pyramids where the priests “laid them down on their backs on some narrow stones of sacrifice and, cutting open their chests, drew out their palpitating hearts which they offered to the idols before them. Then they kicked the bodies down the steps, and the Indian butchers who were waiting below cut off their arms and legs. Then they ate their flesh with a sauce of peppers and tomatoes.” (…) Diaz’s accounts indicate that the Aztecs ate only the limbs of their victims. The torsos were fed to carnivores in zoos. According to Dr. Harner, the Aztecs never sacrificed their own people. Instead they battled neighboring nations, using tactics that minimized deaths in battle and maximized the number of prisoners. The traditional explanation for Aztec human sacrifice has been that it was religious—a way of winning the support of the gods for success in battle. Victories procured even more victims, thus winning still more divine support in the next war. (…) Traditional anthropological accounts indicate that to win more favor from the gods during the famine the Aztecs arranged with their neighbors to stage battles for prisoners who could be sacrificed. The Aztecs’ neighbors, sharing similar religious tenets, wanted to sacrifice Aztecs to their gods. The NYT
Specialists in Mesoamerican history are going to be upset about this for obvious reasons. They’re not going to have the people they study looking like cannibals. They’re clinging to a very romantic point of view about the Aztecs. It’s the Hiawatha syndrome. Michael Harner
Some conquistadors wrote about the tzompantli and its towers, estimating that the rack alone contained 130,000 skulls. But historians and archaeologists knew the conquistadors were prone to exaggerating the horrors of human sacrifice to demonize the Mexica culture. As the centuries passed, scholars began to wonder whether the tzompantli had ever existed. Archaeologists at the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) here can now say with certainty that it did. Beginning in 2015, they discovered and excavated the remains of the skull rack and one of the towers underneath a colonial period house on the street that runs behind Mexico City’s cathedral. (The other tower, they suspect, lies under the cathedral’s back courtyard.) The scale of the rack and tower suggests they held thousands of skulls, testimony to an industry of human sacrifice unlike any other in the world. Science
Some post-conquest sources report that at the re-consecration of Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan in 1487, the Aztecs sacrificed about 80,400 prisoners over the course of four days. This number is considered by Ross Hassig, author of Aztec Warfare, to be an exaggeration. Hassig states « between 10,000 and 80,400 persons » were sacrificed in the ceremony. The higher estimate would average 15 sacrifices per minute during the four-day consecration. Four tables were arranged at the top so that the victims could be jettisoned down the sides of the temple. Nonetheless, according to Codex Telleriano-Remensis, old Aztecs who talked with the missionaries told about a much lower figure for the reconsecration of the temple, approximately 4,000 victims in total. Michael Harner, in his 1977 article The Enigma of Aztec Sacrifice, cited an estimate by Borah of the number of persons sacrificed in central Mexico in the 15th century as high as 250,000 per year which may have been one percent of the population. Fernando de Alva Cortés Ixtlilxochitl, a Mexica descendant and the author of Codex Ixtlilxochitl, estimated that one in five children of the Mexica subjects was killed annually. Victor Davis Hanson argues that a claim by Don Carlos Zumárraga of 20,000 per annum is « more plausible ». Wikipedia
Certains chercheurs ont émis l’hypothèse que l’apport en protéines des aliments dont disposaient les Aztèques était insuffisant, en raison de l’absence de grands mammifères terrestres domesticables, et que les sacrifices humains avaient pour fonction principale de pallier cette carence nutritionnelle. Cette théorie, en particulier quand elle a été diffusée par le New York Times, a été critiquée par la majorité des spécialistes de la Mésoamérique. Michael Harner a notamment accusé les chercheurs mexicains de minimiser le cannibalisme aztèque par nationalisme ; Bernardo R. Ortiz de Montellano, en particulier, a publié en 1979 un article détaillant les failles de l’analyse de Harner, en démontrant notamment que le régime alimentaire aztèque était équilibré, varié et suffisamment riche en protéines, grâce à la pêche d’une abondante faune aquatique et la chasse de nombreux oiseaux, et que donc l’anthropophagie ne pouvait pas être une nécessité, car elle n’aurait pas pu améliorer significativement un apport en protéines déjà suffisant. Michel Graulich a apporté d’autres éléments de critique. Il affirme que si cette théorie était exacte, la chair des victimes aurait dû être distribuée au moins autant aux gens modestes qu’aux puissants, mais il semble que ce n’était pas le cas ; il ajoute que seules les grandes villes pratiquaient le sacrifice humain de masse, et que ce phénomène n’a pas été prouvé dans la plupart des autres populations mésoaméricaines, dont l’alimentation semble pourtant comparable à celle des Aztèques. Wikipedia
Considérant que c’est le devoir de toutes les Nations de reconnaître la providence de Dieu Tout-puissant, d’obéir à sa volonté, d’être reconnaissantes pour ses bienfaits, et humblement implorer sa protection et sa faveur, et tandis que les deux Chambres du Congrès m’ont, par leur Comité mixte, demandé de recommander au Peuple des États-Unis qu’un jour public d’action de grâce et de prières soit observé en reconnaissance aux nombreux signes de faveur de Dieu Tout-puissant, particulièrement en ayant donné au Peuple les moyens d’établir pacifiquement une forme de gouvernement pour sa sûreté et son bonheur. Maintenant donc, je recommande et assigne que le premier jeudi après le 26e jour de novembre soit consacré par le Peuple de ces États au service du grand et glorieux Être, qui est l’Auteur bienfaisant de tout ce qu’il y a eu, qu’il y a et qu’il y aura de bon. Nous pouvons alors tous nous unir en lui donnant notre sincère et humble merci, pour son soin et sa protection, appréciés du Peuple de ce Pays, avant que celui-ci ne soit devenu une Nation de pitié ; pour les interpositions favorables de sa Providence lors de nos épreuves durant le cours et la fin de la récente guerre ; pour le grand degré de tranquillité, d’union, et d’abondance, que nous avons depuis appréciées ; pour le pacifisme et la raison qui nous ont été conférés pour nous permettre d’établir des constitutions de gouvernement pour notre sûreté et notre bonheur, en particulier la Loi nationale récemment instituée, ; pour la liberté civile et la liberté religieuse formant à elles seules une vraie bénédiction ; pour les moyens que nous avons d’acquérir et de répandre la connaissance utile ; et d’une manière générale pour toutes les grandes et diverses faveurs qu’il nous a bien heureusement conférées. Nous pouvons alors nous unir en offrant le plus humblement nos prières et supplications au grand Seigneur et Gouverneur des Nations et le solliciter pour pardonner nos transgressions nationales et autres transgressions ; pour nous permettre à tous, en poste public ou privé, de remplir nos nombreuses fonctions respectives, correctement et ponctuellement ; pour permettre à notre gouvernement national de rendre bénédiction à toutes les personnes, en étant constamment un Gouvernement de lois sages, justes, et constitutionnelles, discrètement et loyalement exécutées et obéies ; pour protéger, guider et bénir tous les Souverains et toutes les Nations (particulièrement celles qui ont montré de la bonté envers nous), afin de leur assurer paix et concordance, et assurer un bon gouvernement ; pour favoriser la connaissance et la pratique vraies de la religion et de la vertu, ainsi que davantage de science parmi eux et nous, et accorder généralement à toute l’Humanité un tel degré de prospérité temporelle comme lui seul sait pour être le meilleur. « Donné sous ma main à la Ville de New-York le troisième jour d’octobre par année 1789 de notre Seigneur. George Washington
The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequalled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consciousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the Eighty-eighth. Abraham Lincoln
Whereas by a joint resolution approved June 29, 1892, it was resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled— That the President of the United States be authorized and directed to issue a proclamation recommending to the people the observance in all their localities of the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America, on the 21st of October, 1892, by public demonstrations and by suitable exercises in their schools and other places of assembly. Now, therefore, I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, in pursuance of the aforesaid joint resolution, do hereby appoint Friday, October 21, 1892, the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus, as a general holiday for the people of the United States. On that day let the people, so far as possible, cease from toil and devote themselves to such exercises as may best express honor to the discoverer and their appreciation of the great achievements of the four completed centuries of American life. Columbus stood in his age as the pioneer of progress and enlightenment. The system of universal education is in our age the most prominent and salutary feature of the spirit of enlightenment, and it is peculiarly appropriate that the schools be made by the people the center of the day’s demonstration. Let the national flag float over every schoolhouse in the country and the exercises be such as shall impress upon our youth the patriotic duties of American citizenship. In the churches and in the other places of assembly of the people let there be expressions of gratitude to Divine Providence for the devout faith of the discoverer and for the divine care and guidance which has directed our history and so abundantly blessed our people. (…) Done at the city of Washington, this 21st day of July, A.D. 1892, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and seventeenth. US president Benjamin Harrison
Of all the bedtime-story versions of American history we teach, the tidy Thanksgiving pageant may be the one stuffed with the heaviest serving of myth. This iconic tale is the main course in our nation’s foundation legend, complete with cardboard cutouts of bow-carrying Native American cherubs and pint-size Pilgrims in black hats with buckles. And legend it largely is. In fact, what had been a New England seasonal holiday became more of a “national” celebration only during the Civil War, with Lincoln’s proclamation calling for “a day of thanksgiving” in 1863. That fall, Lincoln had precious little to be thankful for. The Union victory at Gettysburg the previous July had come at a dreadful cost – a combined 51,000 estimated casualties, with nearly 8,000 dead. Enraged by draft laws and emancipation, rioters in Northern cities like New York went on bloody rampages. And the president and his wife, Mary, were still mourning the loss of their 11-year-old son, Willie, who had died the year before. So it might seem odd that Lincoln chose this moment to announce a national day of thanksgiving, to be marked on the last Thursday in November. His Oct. 3, 1863, proclamation read: “In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity … peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere, except in the theater of military conflict.” But it took another year for the day to really catch hold. In 1864 Lincoln issued a second proclamation, which read, “I do further recommend to my fellow-citizens aforesaid that on that occasion they do reverently humble themselves in the dust.”(…) What prompted Lincoln to issue these proclamations – the first two in an unbroken string of presidential Thanksgiving proclamations – is uncertain. He was not the first president to do so. George Washington and James Madison had earlier issued “thanksgiving” proclamations, calling for somber days of prayer. Perhaps Lincoln saw an opportunity to underscore shared American traditions – a theme found in the “mystic chords of memory” stretching from “every patriot grave” in his first inaugural. Or he may have been responding to the passionate entreaties of Sara Josepha Hale, editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book – the Good Housekeeping of its day. Hale, who contributed to American folkways as the author of “Mary had a Little Lamb,” had been advocating in the magazine for a national day of Thanksgiving since 1837. (…)  But one crucial piece remained: The elevation of Thanksgiving to a true national holiday, a feat accomplished by Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1939, with the nation still struggling out of the Great Depression, the traditional Thanksgiving Day fell on the last day of the month – a fifth Thursday. Worried retailers, for whom the holiday had already become the kickoff to the Christmas shopping season, feared this late date. Roosevelt agreed to move his holiday proclamation up one week to the fourth Thursday, thereby extending the critical shopping season. Some states stuck to the traditional last Thursday date, and other Thanksgiving traditions, such as high school and college football championships, had already been scheduled. This led to Roosevelt critics deriding the earlier date as “Franksgiving.” With 32 states joining Roosevelt’s “Democratic Thanksgiving, ” 16 others stuck with the traditional date, or “Republican Thanksgiving.” After some congressional wrangling, in December 1941, Roosevelt signed the legislation making Thanksgiving a legal holiday on the fourth Thursday in November. And there it has remained. Kenneth C. Davis
Le 14 mars 1891, à la Nouvelle-Orléans, en Louisiane, onze Italiens furent lynchés par la foule en raison du rôle qu’ils avaient supposément joué dans le meurtre du commissaire de police David Hennessy. Ce lynchage, qui restera comme le lynchage de masse le plus important de toute l’histoire des États-Unis, eut lieu le lendemain du procès de neuf sur les dix-neuf hommes inculpés dans cette affaire de meurtre. Six de ces prévenus furent alors acquittés, et le jugement fut ajourné concernant les trois autres, pour défaut d’unanimité dans le jury sur le verdict. Croyant que le jury avait été soudoyé, une foule d’émeutiers fit irruption dans la prison où les hommes étaient détenus et tuèrent onze d’entre eux. Ce lynchage apparaît inhabituel en ceci que les émeutiers étaient au nombre de plusieurs milliers et que dans leurs rangs figuraient quelques-uns parmi les citoyens les plus en vue de la ville. La couverture de l’événement par la presse américaine fut d’ailleurs largement complaisante, et les responsables du lynchage ne furent jamais poursuivis. Le New York Times félicita les meurtriers, car la mort des Italiens « accroissait la sécurité des biens et de la vie des habitants de La Nouvelle-Orléans ». Le Washington Post assura que le lynchage mettrait un terme au « règne de la terreur » qu’imposerait les Italiens. Selon le Saint Louis Globe Democrat, les lyncheurs n’avaient fait qu’exercer « les droits légitimes de la souveraineté populaire ». L’incident eut de graves répercussions au plan national. L’Italie suspendit ses relations diplomatiques avec les États-Unis après le refus du président Benjamin Harrison d’ouvrir une enquête fédérale. La presse et la rumeur publique propagèrent l’idée que la marine italienne s’apprêtait à attaquer les ports américains et des milliers de volontaires se présentèrent pour faire la guerre à l’Italie3. La recrudescence des sentiments anti-italiens s’accompagna d’appels à une restriction de l’immigration. Le vocable mafia fit son entrée dans le lexique des Américains, et le stéréotype du mafioso italo-américain s’implanta durablement dans l’imaginaire populaire. En 1955, un homme d’affaires, décédé cette année-là, reconnut dans une lettre que l’assassinat du policier avait été organisé par un comité d’une cinquantaine d’hommes d’affaires anglo-saxons qui entendaient se débarrasser d’hommes d’affaires rivaux italiens. Ces lynchages constituent l’argument du téléfilm Vendetta, produit en 1999 par HBO et adapté d’un ouvrage de Richard Gambino paru en 1977, avec Christopher Walken dans le rôle principal. Wikipedia
La première célébration du jour de Christophe Colomb s’est faite dans la ville de San Francisco, en 1869, par une communauté majoritairement italo-américaine. Pourtant, le premier État tout entier à célébrer cette fête fut le Colorado, en 1907. Trente ans après, Franklin D. Roosevelt instaure ce jour comme un jour de fête nationale aux États-Unis. Il faudra cependant attendre la Proclamation du président George W. Bush du 4 octobre 2007 pour que le jour de Christophe Colomb soit officiellement fixé au deuxième lundi du mois d’octobre de chaque année. Christophe Colomb était au service de l’Espagne cependant il était d’origine italienne. « Cristoforo Colombo » est né en 1451 sur le territoire de la République de Gênes. Les Italiens ont été les premiers à célébrer le jour de Christophe Colomb lors de leur immigration vers les États-Unis. L’Empire State Building se pare alors des couleurs du drapeau italien (vert, blanc et rouge). Le Jour de Christophe Colomb (Columbus Day) est un jour férié fédéral aux États-Unis. Il est organisé depuis 1929 par la Columbus Citizens Foundation. Chaque État célèbre différemment le jour de Christophe Colomb. Cette fête a lieu sous forme de parades dans les rues américaines, il y a plusieurs défilés. Une Columbus Day Parade est organisée dans plusieurs villes comme à Denver. À New York, la Columbus Day Parade a lieu depuis 1915 le long de la célèbre 5e avenue à la hauteur de la 44e rue et continue sur la célèbre avenue de la Big Apple jusqu’au niveau de la 86e rue. On retrouve ainsi des fanfares, des chars, et différentes manifestations et fêtes dans tous les quartiers aux alentours de la route de la parade. À Washington, devant la Gare de l’Union a lieu une cérémonie officielle devant le Mémorial de Christophe Colomb. Les festivités commencent juste après le dépôt de gerbes aux pieds de ce monument. Ce n’est pas un jour férié dans tous les États des États-Unis, comme en Alaska, dans le Nevada, à Hawaï et dans le Dakota du Sud. Ces États ne reconnaissent pas le Jour de Christophe Colomb et fêtent d’autres événements. Cette fête est contestée aux États-Unis. Nombreux sont ceux rappelant que derrière la découverte de l’Amérique par Christophe Colomb se cachent des faits moins glorieux, tels que la colonisation ou encore le massacre des Indiens d’Amérique. Le Jour de Christophe Colomb est plus communément appelé « Jour de la Race » (Día de la Raza) dans les pays d’Amérique Latine comme le Brésil, le Guatemala, le Paraguay, Porto Rico, le Nicaragua ou la République Dominicaine. Il se déroule généralement le 12 octobre et est considéré, pour de nombreux pays, comme un anti-Colombus Day. Il célèbre la résistance à l’arrivée des européens dans le Nouveau Monde et est aussi utilisé pour commémorer les cultures indigènes. Au cours de cette journée des festivités sont organisées pour lutter contre le racisme, se souvenir des cultures et des traditions des peuples précolombiens. En Argentine la fête est appelée « Journée de la Diversité Culturelle » (Día de la Diversidad Cultural). Elle se veut être la naissance d’une nouvelle identité, issue de la fusion entre les peuples d’origine et les colonisateurs espagnols. Le 24 septembre 1892, le Congrès mexicain décréta le 12 octobre jour de fête nationale. Depuis 1917 à l’initiative de Venustiano Carranza il porte le nom de Día de la Raza. Le président Emilio Portes Gil lui donna le nom de Día de la Raza y Aniversario del Descubrimiento de América en 1929. Ce jour n’est plus un jour férié officiel actuellement, mais il donne lieu a de nombreuses festivités. L’Espagne est la seule à utiliser le nom de « Jour de l’Hispanité » (Día de la Hispanidad) pour célébrer cette fête. Le terme « hispanité » a été défini à la fin du XIXe siècle par des intellectuels. Il est officialisé fête nationale par Alfonso XIII en 1918 sous l’appellation «Fête de la Race » (Día de la Raza) en contradiction avec les idées progressistes. Après la restauration de la monarchie en 1981, un arrêté royal publié dans le premier Bulletin Officiel de l’État en 1982, officialise la date de 12 octobre en tant que Fête Nationale de l’Espagne et Jour de l’Hispanité. Cet événement est très cher au cœur des Espagnols puisque le navigateur est venu chercher la grande majorité de son équipage en Espagne. Wikipedia
Sans pouvoir préciser avec certitude l’ampleur de l’impact des maladies infectieuses chez les Amérindiens, le taux de mortalité aurait atteint 90 pour cent pour certaines populations durement affectées. Les Amérindiens, qui n’étaient pas immunisés contre des virus et maladies comme la coqueluche, la rougeole ou la variole qui sévissaient depuis des millénaires dans l’Ancien Monde, auraient été foudroyés par des épidémies plusieurs décennies avant que des colons arrivent dans des territoires apparemment peu peuplés de l’intérieur. N’ayant aucune connaissance sur les virus à l’époque, les Européens n’ont donc aucunement profité en connaissance de cause des faiblesses immunitaires des populations autochtones. Le processus a commencé dès les années 1500 et a emporté des centaines de milliers de vies. En 1520 et 1521, une épidémie de variole toucha les habitants de Tenochtitlan et fut l’un des principaux facteurs de la chute de la ville au moment du siège. En effet, on estime entre 10 et 50 % la part de la population de la cité qui serait morte à cause de cette maladie en deux semaines. Deux autres épidémies affectèrent la vallée de Mexico : la variole en 1545-1548 et le typhus en 1576-1581. Les Espagnols, pour compenser la diminution de la population, ont rassemblé les survivants des petites villes de la vallée de Mexico dans de plus grandes cités. Cette migration a brisé le pouvoir des classes supérieures, mais n’a pas dissous la cohésion de la société indigène dans un Mexique plus grand. Les épidémies de variole, de typhus, de grippe, de diphtérie de rougeole, de peste auraient tué entre 50 et 66 % de la population indigène selon les régions de Amérique latine. En 1617-1619, une épidémie de peste bubonique ravage la Nouvelle-Angleterre. Le bilan de ces épidémies est difficile à donner avec exactitude. Les sources sont inexistantes et les historiens ne sont pas d’accord sur les estimations. Certains avancent 10 millions d’Amérindiens pour tout le continent ; d’autres pensent plutôt à 90 millions, dont 10 pour l’Amérique du Nord. Le continent américain entier (de l’Alaska au Cap Horn) aurait abrité environ 50 millions d’habitants en 1492 ; pour comparaison, il y avait 20 millions de Français au XVIIe siècle. Les chiffres avancés pour le territoire des États-Unis d’aujourd’hui sont compris entre 7 et 12 millions d’habitants. Environ 500 000 Amérindiens peuplaient la côte Est de cet espace. Ils ne sont plus que 100 000 au début du XVIIIe siècle. Dans l’Empire espagnol, la mortalité des Amérindiens était telle qu’elle fut l’un des motifs de la traite des Noirs, permettant d’importer dans le « Nouveau Monde » de la main-d’œuvre pour les mines et les plantations. Wikipedia
Celebration of Christopher Columbus’s voyage in the early United States is recorded from as early as 1792. In that year, the Tammany Society in New York City (for whom it became an annual tradition) and the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston celebrated the 300th anniversary of Columbus’ landing in the New World. For the 400th anniversary in 1892, following a lynching in New Orleans where a mob had murdered 11 Italian immigrants, President Benjamin Harrison declared Columbus Day as a one-time national celebration. The proclamation was part of a wider effort after the lynching incident to placate Italian Americans and ease diplomatic tensions with Italy. During the anniversary in 1892, teachers, preachers, poets and politicians used rituals to teach ideals of patriotism. These rituals took themes such as citizenship boundaries, the importance of loyalty to the nation, and the celebration of social progress. Many Italian-Americans observe Columbus Day as a celebration of their heritage, and the first such celebration had already been held in New York City on October 12, 1866. The day was first enshrined as a legal holiday in the United States through the lobbying of Angelo Noce, a first generation Italian, in Denver. The first statewide holiday was proclaimed by Colorado governor Jesse F. McDonald in 1905, and it was made a statutory holiday in 1907. In April 1937, as a result of lobbying by the Knights of Columbus and New York City Italian leader Generoso Pope, Congress and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt proclaimed October 12 be a federal holiday under the name Columbus Day. Since 1971 (Oct. 11), the holiday has been attributed to the second Monday in October,[20] coincidentally exactly the same day as Thanksgiving in neighboring Canada since 1957. It is generally observed nowadays by banks, the bond market, the U.S. Postal Service, other federal agencies, most state government offices, many businesses, and most school districts. Some businesses and some stock exchanges remain open, and some states and municipalities abstain from observing the holiday. The traditional date of the holiday also adjoins the anniversary of the United States Navy (founded October 13, 1775), and thus both occasions are customarily observed by the Navy and the Marine Corps with either a 72- or 96-hour liberty period. Actual observance varies in different parts of the United States, ranging from large-scale parades and events to complete non-observance. Most states do not celebrate Columbus Day as an official state holiday. Some mark it as a « Day of Observance » or « Recognition.” Most states that celebrate Columbus Day will close state services, while others operate as normal. San Francisco claims the nation’s oldest continuously existing celebration with the Italian-American community’s annual Columbus Day Parade, which was established by Nicola Larco in 1868, while New York City boasts the largest, with over 35,000 marchers and one million viewers around 2010. As in the mainland United States, Columbus Day is a legal holiday in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico. In the United States Virgin Islands, the day is celebrated as both Columbus Day and « Puerto Rico Friendship Day. » Virginia also celebrates two legal holidays on the day, Columbus Day and Yorktown Victory Day, which honors the final victory at the Siege of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War. The celebration of Columbus Day in the United States began to decline at the end of the 20th century, although many Italian-Americans, and others, continue to champion it. The states of Florida, Hawaii, Alaska, Vermont, South Dakota, New Mexico, Maine, Wisconsin, and parts of California including, for example, Los Angeles County do not recognize it and have each replaced it with celebrations of Indigenous People’s Day (in Hawaii, « Discoverers’ Day », in South Dakota, « Native American Day »). A lack of recognition or a reduced level of observance for Columbus Day is not always due to concerns about honoring Native Americans. For example, a community of predominantly Scandinavian descent may observe Leif Erikson Day instead. In the state of Oregon, Columbus Day is not an official holiday. Iowa and Nevada do not celebrate Columbus Day as an official holiday, but the states’ respective governors are « authorized and requested » by statute to proclaim the day each year. Several states have removed the day as a paid holiday for state government workers, while still maintaining it—either as a day of recognition, or as a legal holiday for other purposes, including California and Texas. The practice of U.S. cities eschewing Columbus Day to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day began in 1992 with Berkeley, California. The list of cities which have followed suit as of 2018 includes Austin, Boise, Cincinnati, Denver, Los Angeles, Mankato, Minnesota, Portland, Oregon, San Francisco, Santa Fe, New Mexico, Seattle, St. Paul, Minnesota, Phoenix, Tacoma, and « dozens of others. » Columbus, Ohio has chosen to honor veterans instead of Christopher Columbus, and removed Columbus Day as a city holiday. Various tribal governments in Oklahoma designate the day as Native American Day, or name it after their own tribe. Wikipedia
In a country of diverse religious faiths and national origins like the United States, it made sense to develop a holiday system that was not entirely tied to a religious calendar. (Christmas survives here, of course, but in law it’s a secular holiday much like New Year’s Day.) So Americans do not all leave for the shore on August 15th, the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin, the way Italians do; and while St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated by many Americans, it is not a legal holiday in any of the states. The American system of holidays was constructed mostly around a series of great events and persons in our nation’s history. The aim was to instill a feeling of civic pride. Holidays were chosen as occasions to bring everyone together, not for excluding certain people. They were supposed to be about the recognition of our society’s common struggles and achievements. Civic religion is often used to describe the principle behind America’s calendar of public holidays. Consider the range and variability of the meanings of our holidays. Certainly they have not always been occasions for celebration: Memorial Day and Veterans’ Day involve mourning for the dead and wounded. Labor Day commemorated significant hardships in the decades when unions were struggling to organize. Having grown up in the 1960s I remember how Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday (now lumped in with Presidents’ Day, and with some of its significance transferred to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day) took on special meaning during the Civil Rights movement and after the JFK assassination. When thinking about the Columbus Day holiday it helps to remember the good intentions of the people who put together the first parade in New York. Columbus Day was first proclaimed a national holiday by President Benjamin Harrison in 1892, 400 years after Columbus’s first voyage. The idea, lost on present-day critics of the holiday, was that this would be a national holiday that would be special for recognizing both Native Americans, who were here before Columbus, and the many immigrants—including Italians—who were just then coming to this country in astounding numbers. It was to be a national holiday that was not about the Founding Fathers or the Civil War, but about the rest of American history. Like the Columbian Exposition dedicated in Chicago that year and opened in 1893, it was to be about our land and all its people. Harrison especially designated the schools as centers of the Columbus celebration because universal public schooling, which had only recently taken hold, was seen as essential to a democracy that was seriously aiming to include everyone and not just preserve a governing elite. You won’t find it in the public literature surrounding the first Columbus Day in 1892, but in the background lay two recent tragedies, one involving Native Americans, the other involving Italian Americans. The first tragedy was the massacre by U.S. troops of between 146 and 200 Lakota Sioux, including men, women and children, at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, on December 29, 1890. Shooting began after a misunderstanding involving an elderly, deaf Sioux warrior who hadn’t heard and therefore did not understand that he was supposed to hand over his rifle to the U.S. Cavalry. The massacre at Wounded Knee marked the definitive end of Indian resistance in the Great Plains. The episode was immediately seen by the government as potentially troubling, although there was much popular sentiment against the Sioux. An inquiry was held, the soldiers were absolved, and some were awarded medals that Native Americans to this day are seeking to have rescinded. A second tragedy in the immediate background of the 1892 Columbus celebration took place in New Orleans. There, on March 14, 1891—only 10 weeks after the Wounded Knee Massacre—11 Italians were lynched in prison by a mob led by prominent Louisiana politicians. A trial for the murder of the New Orleans police chief had ended in mistrials for three of the Italians and the acquittal of the others who were brought to trial. Unhappy with the verdict and spurred on by fear of the “Mafia” (a word that had only recently entered American usage), civic leaders organized an assault on the prison to put the Italians to death. This episode was also troubling to the U.S. Government. These were legally innocent men who had been killed. But Italians were not very popular, and even Theodore Roosevelt was quoted as saying that he thought the New Orleans Italians “got what they deserved.” A grand jury was summoned, but no one was charged with a crime. President Harrison, who would proclaim the Columbus holiday the following year, was genuinely saddened by the case, and over the objections of some members of congress he paid reparations to the Italian government for the deaths of its citizens. Whenever I hear of protests about the Columbus Day holiday—protests that tend to pit Native Americans against Italian Americans, I remember these tragedies that occurred so soon before the first Columbus Day holiday, and I shake my head. President Harrison did not allude to either of these sad episodes in his proclamation of the holiday, but the idea for the holiday involved a vision of an America that would get beyond the prejudice that had led to these deaths. Columbus Day was supposed to recognize the greatness of all of America’s people, but especially Italians and Native Americans. Consider how the first Columbus Day parade in New York was described in the newspapers. It consisted mostly of about 12,000 public school students grouped into 20 regiments, each commanded by a principal. The boys marched in school uniforms or their Sunday best, while the girls, dressed in red, white and blue, sat in bleachers. Alongside the public schoolers there were military drill squads and 29 marching bands, each of 30 to 50 instruments. After the public schools, there followed 5,500 students from the Catholic schools. Then there were students from the private schools wearing school uniforms. These included the Hebrew Orphan Asylum, the Barnard School Military Corps, and the Italian and American Colonial School. The Dante Alighieri Italian College of Astoria was dressed entirely in sailor outfits. These were followed by the Native American marching band from the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania, which, according to one description, included “300 marching Indian boys and 50 tall Indian girls.” That the Native Americans came right after the students from the Dante Alighieri School speaks volumes about the spirit of the original Columbus Day. (…) So Columbus Day is for all Americans. It marks the first encounter that brought together the original Americans and the future ones. A lot of suffering followed, and a lot of achievement too. That a special role has been reserved for Italians in keeping the parades and the commemoration alive for well over a century seems right, since Columbus was Italian (…) So much for his ethnicity. What about his moral standing? In the late 19th century an international movement, led by a French priest, sought to have Columbus canonized for bringing Christianity to the New World. To the Catholic Church’s credit, this never got very far. It sometimes gets overlooked in current discussions that we neither commemorate Columbus’s birthday (as was the practice for Presidents Washington and Lincoln, and as we now do with Martin Luther King, Jr.) nor his death date (which is when Christian saints are memorialized), but rather the date of his arrival in the New World. The historical truth about Columbus—the short version suitable for reporters who are pressed for time—is that Columbus was Italian, but he was no saint. The holiday marks the event, not the person. What Columbus gets criticized for nowadays are attitudes that were typical of the European sailing captains and merchants who plied the Mediterranean and the Atlantic in the 15th century. Within that group he was unquestionably a man of daring and unusual ambition. But what really mattered was his landing on San Salvador, which was a momentous, world-changing occasion such as has rarely happened in human history. William J. Connell
These sneaking and cowardly Sicilians, the descendants of bandits and assassins, who have transported to this country the lawless passions, the cutthroat practices … are to us a pest without mitigations. Our own rattlesnakes are as good citizens as they. Our own murderers are men of feeling and nobility compared to them. The Times
Congress envisioned a white, Protestant and culturally homogeneous America when it declared in 1790 that only “free white persons, who have, or shall migrate into the United States” were eligible to become naturalized citizens. The calculus of racism underwent swift revision when waves of culturally diverse immigrants from the far corners of Europe changed the face of the country. As the historian Matthew Frye Jacobson shows in his immigrant history “Whiteness of a Different Color,” the surge of newcomers engendered a national panic and led Americans to adopt a more restrictive, politicized view of how whiteness was to be allocated. Journalists, politicians, social scientists and immigration officials embraced the habit, separating ostensibly white Europeans into “races.” Some were designated “whiter” — and more worthy of citizenship — than others, while some were ranked as too close to blackness to be socially redeemable. The story of how Italian immigrants went from racialized pariah status in the 19th century to white Americans in good standing in the 20th offers a window onto the alchemy through which race is constructed in the United States, and how racial hierarchies can sometimes change. Darker skinned southern Italians endured the penalties of blackness on both sides of the Atlantic. In Italy, Northerners had long held that Southerners — particularly Sicilians — were an “uncivilized” and racially inferior people, too obviously African to be part of Europe. Racist dogma about Southern Italians found fertile soil in the United States. As the historian Jennifer Guglielmo writes, the newcomers encountered waves of books, magazines and newspapers that “bombarded Americans with images of Italians as racially suspect.” They were sometimes shut out of schools, movie houses and labor unions, or consigned to church pews set aside for black people. They were described in the press as “swarthy,” “kinky haired” members of a criminal race and derided in the streets with epithets like “dago,” “guinea” — a term of derision applied to enslaved Africans and their descendants — and more familiarly racist insults like “white nigger” and “nigger wop.” The penalties of blackness went well beyond name-calling in the apartheid South. Italians who had come to the country as “free white persons” were often marked as black because they accepted “black” jobs in the Louisiana sugar fields or because they chose to live among African-Americans. This left them vulnerable to marauding mobs like the ones that hanged, shot, dismembered or burned alive thousands of black men, women and children across the South. The federal holiday honoring the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus — celebrated on Monday — was central to the process through which Italian-Americans were fully ratified as white during the 20th century. The rationale for the holiday was steeped in myth, and allowed Italian-Americans to write a laudatory portrait of themselves into the civic record. Few who march in Columbus Day parades or recount the tale of Columbus’s voyage from Europe to the New World are aware of how the holiday came about or that President Benjamin Harrison proclaimed it as a one-time national celebration in 1892 — in the wake of a bloody New Orleans lynching that took the lives of 11 Italian immigrants. The proclamation was part of a broader attempt to quiet outrage among Italian-Americans, and a diplomatic blowup over the murders that brought Italy and the United States to the brink of war. (…) Italian immigrants were welcomed into Louisiana after the Civil War, when the planter class was in desperate need of cheap labor to replace newly emancipated black people, who were leaving backbreaking jobs in the fields for more gainful employment. These Italians seemed at first to be the answer to both the labor shortage and the increasingly pressing quest for settlers who would support white domination in the emerging Jim Crow state. Louisiana’s romance with Italian labor began to sour when the new immigrants balked at low wages and dismal working conditions. The newcomers also chose to live together in Italian neighborhoods, where they spoke their native tongue, preserved Italian customs and developed successful businesses that catered to African-Americans, with whom they fraternized and intermarried. In time, this proximity to blackness would lead white Southerners to view Sicilians, in particular, as not fully white and to see them as eligible for persecution — including lynching — that had customarily been imposed on African-Americans. (…) The carnage in New Orleans was set in motion in the fall of 1890, when the city’s popular police chief, David Hennessy, was assassinated on his way home one evening. Hennessy had no shortage of enemies. The historian John V. Baiamonte Jr. writes that he had once been tried for murder in connection with the killing of a professional rival. He is also said to have been involved in a feud between two Italian businessmen. On the strength of a clearly suspect witness who claimed to hear Mr. Hennessy say that “dagoes” had shot him, the city charged 19 Italians with complicity in the chief’s murder. That the evidence was distressingly weak was evident from the verdicts that were swiftly handed down: Of the first nine to be tried, six were acquitted; three others were granted mistrials. The leaders of the mob that then went after them advertised their plans in advance, knowing full well that the city’s elites — who coveted the businesses the Italians had built or hated the Italians for fraternizing with African-Americans — would never seek justice for the dead. After the lynching, a grand jury investigation pronounced the killings praiseworthy, turning that inquiry into what the historian Barbara Botein describes as “possibly one of the greatest whitewashes in American history. (…) President Harrison would have ignored the New Orleans carnage had the victims been black. But the Italian government made that impossible. It broke off diplomatic relations and demanded an indemnity that the Harrison administration paid. Harrison even called on Congress in his 1891 State of the Union to protect foreign nationals — though not black Americans — from mob violence. Harrison’s Columbus Day proclamation in 1892 opened the door for Italian-Americans to write themselves into the American origin story, in a fashion that piled myth upon myth. As the historian Danielle Battisti shows in “Whom We Shall Welcome,” they rewrote history by casting Columbus as “the first immigrant” — even though he never set foot in North America and never immigrated anywhere (except possibly to Spain), and even though the United States did not exist as a nation during his 15th-century voyage. The mythologizing, carried out over many decades, granted Italian-Americans “a formative role in the nation-building narrative.” It also tied Italian-Americans closely to the paternalistic assertion, still heard today, that Columbus “discovered” a continent that was already inhabited by Native Americans. But in the late 19th century, the full-blown Columbus myth was yet to come. The New Orleans lynching solidified a defamatory view of Italians generally, and Sicilians in particular, as irredeemable criminals who represented a danger to the nation. The influential anti-immigrant racist Representative Henry Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts, soon to join the United States Senate, quickly appropriated the event. He argued that a lack of confidence in juries, not mob violence, had been the real problem in New Orleans. “Lawlessness and lynching are evil things,” he wrote, “but a popular belief that juries cannot be trusted is even worse.” Facts aside, Lodge argued, beliefs about immigrants were in themselves sufficient to warrant higher barriers to immigration. Congress ratified that notion during the 1920s, curtailing Italian immigration on racial grounds, even though Italians were legally white, with all of the rights whiteness entailed. The Italian-Americans who labored in the campaign that overturned racist immigration restrictions in 1965 used the romantic fictions built up around Columbus to political advantage. This shows yet again how racial categories that people mistakenly view as matters of biology grow out of highly politicized myth making. NYT

Attention: un massacre peut en cacher beaucoup d’autres !

En cette journée où, entre Israël, les Etats-Unis et le Canada, voire les pays hispaniques, coïncident les célébrations de plusieurs traditions culturelles différentes …

Et où, énième illustration de la division toujours plus grande des Etats-Unis par nos déconstructeurs postmodernes obsédés par un prétendu génocide indien – pire qu’Attila et Hitler réunis !

Dû pour l’essentiel à un choc microbien, un nombre croissant d’états ne la fêtent plus ou l’ont même remplacée par la Journée des peuples indigènes  …

Pendant qu’après l’égorgement de quatre policiers du renseignement de la lutte anti-islamique et quelque 250 victimes de la barbarie islamiste …

Nos courageux enfants gâtés du showbiz dénonçaient dès le lendemain l’agression « d’une violence et d’une haine inouïes » que l’on sait …

Retour …

Sans parler, avant et après Colomb ou Cortez, des centaines de milliers de sacrifices humains de nos amis aztèques et mayas

Sur le massacre …

Et pratiquement plus grand lynchage, avec 11 immigrants italiens extraits manu militari de leur prison de la Nouvelle Orléans et sommairement abattus, de l’histoire américaine …

Qui comme après la fête du Thanksgiving du président Lincoln suite aux centaines de milliers de morts de la Guerre civile américaine …

Et à l’instar de la Saint Patrick d’une communauté irlandaise elle aussi initialement discriminée …

Lança nationalement, au moins pour une journée, cette véritable marche des fiertés

Qu’est devenue le Columbus Day pour une communauté italo-américaine et notamment sicilienne …

Jusque-là assimilée non seulement à une race de criminels …

Mais à une sous-race à peine au-dessus des esclaves affranchis et des emplois méprisés …

Qu’ils étaient venus remplacer dans un Sud tout récemment sorti du traumatisme d’une guerre civile meurtrière…

How Italians Became ‘White’
Vicious bigotry, reluctant acceptance: an American story.

Brent Staples Mr. Staples is a member of the editorial board.
NYT
Oct. 12, 2019

Congress envisioned a white, Protestant and culturally homogeneous America when it declared in 1790 that only “free white persons, who have, or shall migrate into the United States” were eligible to become naturalized citizens. The calculus of racism underwent swift revision when waves of culturally diverse immigrants from the far corners of Europe changed the face of the country.

As the historian Matthew Frye Jacobson shows in his immigrant history “Whiteness of a Different Color,” the surge of newcomers engendered a national panic and led Americans to adopt a more restrictive, politicized view of how whiteness was to be allocated. Journalists, politicians, social scientists and immigration officials embraced the habit, separating ostensibly white Europeans into “races.” Some were designated “whiter” — and more worthy of citizenship — than others, while some were ranked as too close to blackness to be socially redeemable. The story of how Italian immigrants went from racialized pariah status in the 19th century to white Americans in good standing in the 20th offers a window onto the alchemy through which race is constructed in the United States, and how racial hierarchies can sometimes change.

Darker skinned southern Italians endured the penalties of blackness on both sides of the Atlantic. In Italy, Northerners had long held that Southerners — particularly Sicilians — were an “uncivilized” and racially inferior people, too obviously African to be part of Europe.

Racist dogma about Southern Italians found fertile soil in the United States. As the historian Jennifer Guglielmo writes, the newcomers encountered waves of books, magazines and newspapers that “bombarded Americans with images of Italians as racially suspect.” They were sometimes shut out of schools, movie houses and labor unions, or consigned to church pews set aside for black people. They were described in the press as “swarthy,” “kinky haired” members of a criminal race and derided in the streets with epithets like “dago,” “guinea” — a term of derision applied to enslaved Africans and their descendants — and more familiarly racist insults like “white nigger” and “nigger wop.”

The penalties of blackness went well beyond name-calling in the apartheid South. Italians who had come to the country as “free white persons” were often marked as black because they accepted “black” jobs in the Louisiana sugar fields or because they chose to live among African-Americans. This left them vulnerable to marauding mobs like the ones that hanged, shot, dismembered or burned alive thousands of black men, women and children across the South.

The federal holiday honoring the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus — celebrated on Monday — was central to the process through which Italian-Americans were fully ratified as white during the 20th century. The rationale for the holiday was steeped in myth, and allowed Italian-Americans to write a laudatory portrait of themselves into the civic record.

Few who march in Columbus Day parades or recount the tale of Columbus’s voyage from Europe to the New World are aware of how the holiday came about or that President Benjamin Harrison proclaimed it as a one-time national celebration in 1892 — in the wake of a bloody New Orleans lynching that took the lives of 11 Italian immigrants. The proclamation was part of a broader attempt to quiet outrage among Italian-Americans, and a diplomatic blowup over the murders that brought Italy and the United States to the brink of war.

Historians have recently showed that America’s dishonorable response to this barbaric event was partly conditioned by racist stereotypes about Italians promulgated in Northern newspapers like The Times. A striking analysis by Charles Seguin, a sociologist at Pennsylvania State University, and Sabrina Nardin, a doctoral student at the University of Arizona, shows that the protests lodged by the Italian government inspired something that had failed to coalesce around the brave African-American newspaper editor and anti-lynching campaigner Ida B. Wells — a broad anti-lynching effort.

A Black ‘Brute’ Lynched

The lynchings of Italians came at a time when newspapers in the South had established the gory convention of advertising the far more numerous public murders of African-Americans in advance — to attract large crowds — and justifying the killings by labeling the victims “brutes,” “fiends,” “ravishers,” “born criminals” or “troublesome Negroes.” Even high-minded news organizations that claimed to abhor the practice legitimized lynching by trafficking in racist stereotypes about its victims.

As Mr. Seguin recently showed, many Northern newspapers were “just as complicit” in justifying mob violence as their Southern counterparts. For its part, The Times made repeated use of the headline “A Brutal Negro Lynched,” presuming the victims’ guilt and branding them as congenital criminals. Lynchings of black men in the South were often based on fabricated accusations of sexual assault. As the Equal Justice Initiative explained in its 2015 report on lynching in America, a rape charge could occur in the absence of an actual victim and might arise from minor violations of the social code — like complimenting a white woman on her appearance or even bumping into her on the street.

The Times was not owned by the family that controls it today when it dismissed Ida B. Wells as a “slanderous and nasty-minded mulattress” for rightly describing rape allegations as “a thread bare lie” that Southerners used against black men who had consensual sexual relationships with white women. Nevertheless, as a Times editorialist of nearly 30 years standing — and a student of the institution’s history — I am outraged and appalled by the nakedly racist treatment my 19th-century predecessors displayed in writing about African-Americans and Italian immigrants.

When Wells took her anti-lynching campaign to England in the 1890s, Times editors rebuked her for representing “black brutes” abroad in an editorial that joked about what they described as “the practice of roasting Negro ravishers alive and boring out their eyes with red-hot pokers.” The editorial slandered African-Americans generally, referring to rape as “a crime to which Negroes are particularly prone.” The Times editors may have lodged objections to lynching — but they did so in a rhetoric firmly rooted in white supremacy.
‘Assassins by Nature’

Italian immigrants were welcomed into Louisiana after the Civil War, when the planter class was in desperate need of cheap labor to replace newly emancipated black people, who were leaving backbreaking jobs in the fields for more gainful employment.

These Italians seemed at first to be the answer to both the labor shortage and the increasingly pressing quest for settlers who would support white domination in the emerging Jim Crow state. Louisiana’s romance with Italian labor began to sour when the new immigrants balked at low wages and dismal working conditions.

The newcomers also chose to live together in Italian neighborhoods, where they spoke their native tongue, preserved Italian customs and developed successful businesses that catered to African-Americans, with whom they fraternized and intermarried. In time, this proximity to blackness would lead white Southerners to view Sicilians, in particular, as not fully white and to see them as eligible for persecution — including lynching — that had customarily been imposed on African-Americans.

Nevertheless, as the historian Jessica Barbata Jackson showed recently in the journal Louisiana History, Italian newcomers were still well thought of in New Orleans in the 1870s when negative stereotypes were being established in the Northern press.

The Times, for instance, described them as bandits and members of the criminal classes who were “wretchedly poor and unskilled,” “starving and wholly destitute.” The stereotype about inborn criminality is plainly evident in an 1874 story about Italian immigrants seeking vaccinations that refers to one immigrant as a “burly fellow, whose appearance was like that of the traditional brigand of the Abruzzi.”

A Times story in 1880 described immigrants, including Italians, as “links in a descending chain of evolution.” These characterizations reached a defamatory crescendo in an 1882 editorial that appeared under the headline “Our Future Citizens.” The editors wrote:

“There has never been since New York was founded so low and ignorant a class among the immigrants who poured in here as the Southern Italians who have been crowding our docks during the past year.”

The editors reserved their worst invective for Italian immigrant children, whom they described as “utterly unfit — ragged, filthy, and verminous as they were — to be placed in the public primary schools among the decent children of American mechanics.”

The racist myth that African-Americans and Sicilians were both innately criminal drove an 1887 Times story about a lynching victim in Mississippi whose name was given as “Dago Joe” — “dago” being a slur directed at Italian and Spanish-speaking immigrants. The victim was described as a “half breed” who “was the son of a Sicilian father and a mulatto mother, and had the worst characteristics of both races in his makeup. He was cunning, treacherous and cruel, and was regarded in the community where he lived as an assassin by nature.”
Sicilians as ‘Rattlesnakes’

The carnage in New Orleans was set in motion in the fall of 1890, when the city’s popular police chief, David Hennessy, was assassinated on his way home one evening. Hennessy had no shortage of enemies. The historian John V. Baiamonte Jr. writes that he had once been tried for murder in connection with the killing of a professional rival. He is also said to have been involved in a feud between two Italian businessmen. On the strength of a clearly suspect witness who claimed to hear Mr. Hennessy say that “dagoes” had shot him, the city charged 19 Italians with complicity in the chief’s murder.

That the evidence was distressingly weak was evident from the verdicts that were swiftly handed down: Of the first nine to be tried, six were acquitted; three others were granted mistrials. The leaders of the mob that then went after them advertised their plans in advance, knowing full well that the city’s elites — who coveted the businesses the Italians had built or hated the Italians for fraternizing with African-Americans — would never seek justice for the dead. After the lynching, a grand jury investigation pronounced the killings praiseworthy, turning that inquiry into what the historian Barbara Botein describes as “possibly one of the greatest whitewashes in American history.”

The blood of the New Orleans victims was scarcely dry when The Times published a cheerleading news story — “Chief Hennessy Avenged: Eleven of his Italian Assassins Lynched by a Mob” — that reveled in the bloody details. It reported that the mob had consisted “mostly of the best element” of New Orleans society. The following day, a scabrous Times editorial justified the lynching — and dehumanized the dead, with by-now-familiar racist stereotypes.

“These sneaking and cowardly Sicilians,” the editors wrote, “the descendants of bandits and assassins, who have transported to this country the lawless passions, the cutthroat practices … are to us a pest without mitigations. Our own rattlesnakes are as good citizens as they. Our own murderers are men of feeling and nobility compared to them.” The editors concluded of the lynching that it would be difficult to find “one individual who would confess that privately he deplores it very much.”
Lynchers in 1891 storming the New Orleans city jail, where they killed 11 Italian-Americans accused in the fatal shooting of Chief Hennessy. Italian Tribune

President Harrison would have ignored the New Orleans carnage had the victims been black. But the Italian government made that impossible. It broke off diplomatic relations and demanded an indemnity that the Harrison administration paid. Harrison even called on Congress in his 1891 State of the Union to protect foreign nationals — though not black Americans — from mob violence.

Harrison’s Columbus Day proclamation in 1892 opened the door for Italian-Americans to write themselves into the American origin story, in a fashion that piled myth upon myth. As the historian Danielle Battisti shows in “Whom We Shall Welcome,” they rewrote history by casting Columbus as “the first immigrant” — even though he never set foot in North America and never immigrated anywhere (except possibly to Spain), and even though the United States did not exist as a nation during his 15th-century voyage. The mythologizing, carried out over many decades, granted Italian-Americans “a formative role in the nation-building narrative.” It also tied Italian-Americans closely to the paternalistic assertion, still heard today, that Columbus “discovered” a continent that was already inhabited by Native Americans.

But in the late 19th century, the full-blown Columbus myth was yet to come. The New Orleans lynching solidified a defamatory view of Italians generally, and Sicilians in particular, as irredeemable criminals who represented a danger to the nation. The influential anti-immigrant racist Representative Henry Cabot Lodge of Massachusetts, soon to join the United States Senate, quickly appropriated the event. He argued that a lack of confidence in juries, not mob violence, had been the real problem in New Orleans. “Lawlessness and lynching are evil things,” he wrote, “but a popular belief that juries cannot be trusted is even worse.”

Facts aside, Lodge argued, beliefs about immigrants were in themselves sufficient to warrant higher barriers to immigration. Congress ratified that notion during the 1920s, curtailing Italian immigration on racial grounds, even though Italians were legally white, with all of the rights whiteness entailed.

The Italian-Americans who labored in the campaign that overturned racist immigration restrictions in 1965 used the romantic fictions built up around Columbus to political advantage. This shows yet again how racial categories that people mistakenly view as matters of biology grow out of highly politicized myth making.

Voir aussi:

What Columbus Day Really Means

If you think the holiday pits Native Americans against Italian Americans, consider the history behind its origin

William J. Connell
American scholar
October 4, 2012

During the run-up to Columbus Day I usually get a call from at least one and sometimes several newspaper reporters who are looking for the latest on what has become one of the most controversial of our national holidays. Rather than begin with whatever issues the media are covering—topics like the number of deaths in the New World caused by the European discovery; or the attitude of Columbus toward the indigenous inhabitants of the Caribbean (whom he really did want to use as forced laborers); or whether syphilis really came from the Americas to Europe; or whether certain people (the cast of The Sopranos, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia) deserve to be excluded from or honored in the parade in New York—I always try to remind the reporters that Columbus Day is just a holiday.

Leave the parades aside. The most evident way in which holidays are celebrated is by taking a day off from work or school. Our system of holidays, which developed gradually over time and continues to evolve, is founded upon the recognition that weekends are not sufficient, that some jobs don’t offer much time off, and that children and teachers need a break now and then in the course of the school year. One characteristic of holidays is that unless they are observed widely, which is to say by almost everyone, many of us wouldn’t take them. There are so many incremental reasons for not taking time off (to make some extra money, to impress the boss, or because we’re our own bosses and can’t stop ourselves) that a lot of us would willingly do without a day’s vacation that would have been good both for us and for society at large if we had taken it. That is why there are legal holidays.

But which days should be holidays? Another way of posing the question would be to say, “Given that holidays are necessary, but that left to their own devices people would simply work, how do you justify a legal holiday so that it does not appear completely arbitrary, and so that people will be encouraged to observe it?” Most of the media noise around the Columbus Day holiday is about the holiday’s excuse, not the holiday itself. Realizing that helps to put matters in perspective.

In a country of diverse religious faiths and national origins like the United States, it made sense to develop a holiday system that was not entirely tied to a religious calendar. (Christmas survives here, of course, but in law it’s a secular holiday much like New Year’s Day.) So Americans do not all leave for the shore on August 15th, the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin, the way Italians do; and while St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated by many Americans, it is not a legal holiday in any of the states. The American system of holidays was constructed mostly around a series of great events and persons in our nation’s history. The aim was to instill a feeling of civic pride. Holidays were chosen as occasions to bring everyone together, not for excluding certain people. They were supposed to be about the recognition of our society’s common struggles and achievements. Civic religion is often used to describe the principle behind America’s calendar of public holidays.

Consider the range and variability of the meanings of our holidays. Certainly they have not always been occasions for celebration: Memorial Day and Veterans’ Day involve mourning for the dead and wounded. Labor Day commemorated significant hardships in the decades when unions were struggling to organize. Having grown up in the 1960s I remember how Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday (now lumped in with Presidents’ Day, and with some of its significance transferred to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day) took on special meaning during the Civil Rights movement and after the JFK assassination.

When thinking about the Columbus Day holiday it helps to remember the good intentions of the people who put together the first parade in New York. Columbus Day was first proclaimed a national holiday by President Benjamin Harrison in 1892, 400 years after Columbus’s first voyage. The idea, lost on present-day critics of the holiday, was that this would be a national holiday that would be special for recognizing both Native Americans, who were here before Columbus, and the many immigrants—including Italians—who were just then coming to this country in astounding numbers. It was to be a national holiday that was not about the Founding Fathers or the Civil War, but about the rest of American history. Like the Columbian Exposition dedicated in Chicago that year and opened in 1893, it was to be about our land and all its people. Harrison especially designated the schools as centers of the Columbus celebration because universal public schooling, which had only recently taken hold, was seen as essential to a democracy that was seriously aiming to include everyone and not just preserve a governing elite.

You won’t find it in the public literature surrounding the first Columbus Day in 1892, but in the background lay two recent tragedies, one involving Native Americans, the other involving Italian Americans. The first tragedy was the massacre by U.S. troops of between 146 and 200 Lakota Sioux, including men, women and children, at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, on December 29, 1890. Shooting began after a misunderstanding involving an elderly, deaf Sioux warrior who hadn’t heard and therefore did not understand that he was supposed to hand over his rifle to the U.S. Cavalry. The massacre at Wounded Knee marked the definitive end of Indian resistance in the Great Plains. The episode was immediately seen by the government as potentially troubling, although there was much popular sentiment against the Sioux. An inquiry was held, the soldiers were absolved, and some were awarded medals that Native Americans to this day are seeking to have rescinded.

A second tragedy in the immediate background of the 1892 Columbus celebration took place in New Orleans. There, on March 14, 1891—only 10 weeks after the Wounded Knee Massacre—11 Italians were lynched in prison by a mob led by prominent Louisiana politicians. A trial for the murder of the New Orleans police chief had ended in mistrials for three of the Italians and the acquittal of the others who were brought to trial. Unhappy with the verdict and spurred on by fear of the “Mafia” (a word that had only recently entered American usage), civic leaders organized an assault on the prison to put the Italians to death. This episode was also troubling to the U.S. Government. These were legally innocent men who had been killed. But Italians were not very popular, and even Theodore Roosevelt was quoted as saying that he thought the New Orleans Italians “got what they deserved.” A grand jury was summoned, but no one was charged with a crime. President Harrison, who would proclaim the Columbus holiday the following year, was genuinely saddened by the case, and over the objections of some members of congress he paid reparations to the Italian government for the deaths of its citizens.

Whenever I hear of protests about the Columbus Day holiday—protests that tend to pit Native Americans against Italian Americans, I remember these tragedies that occurred so soon before the first Columbus Day holiday, and I shake my head. President Harrison did not allude to either of these sad episodes in his proclamation of the holiday, but the idea for the holiday involved a vision of an America that would get beyond the prejudice that had led to these deaths. Columbus Day was supposed to recognize the greatness of all of America’s people, but especially Italians and Native Americans.

Consider how the first Columbus Day parade in New York was described in the newspapers. It consisted mostly of about 12,000 public school students grouped into 20 regiments, each commanded by a principal. The boys marched in school uniforms or their Sunday best, while the girls, dressed in red, white and blue, sat in bleachers. Alongside the public schoolers there were military drill squads and 29 marching bands, each of 30 to 50 instruments. After the public schools, there followed 5,500 students from the Catholic schools. Then there were students from the private schools wearing school uniforms. These included the Hebrew Orphan Asylum, the Barnard School Military Corps, and the Italian and American Colonial School. The Dante Alighieri Italian College of Astoria was dressed entirely in sailor outfits. These were followed by the Native American marching band from the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania, which, according to one description, included “300 marching Indian boys and 50 tall Indian girls.” That the Native Americans came right after the students from the Dante Alighieri School speaks volumes about the spirit of the original Columbus Day.

I teach college kids, and since they tend to be more skeptical about Columbus Day than younger students, it’s nice to point out that the first Columbus Day parade had a “college division.” Thus 800 New York University students played kazoos and wore mortarboards. In between songs they chanted “Who are we? Who are we? New York Universitee!” The College of Physicians and Surgeons wore Skeletons on their hats. And the Columbia College students marched in white hats and white sweaters, with a message on top of their hats that spelled out “We are the People.”

So Columbus Day is for all Americans. It marks the first encounter that brought together the original Americans and the future ones. A lot of suffering followed, and a lot of achievement too. That a special role has been reserved for Italians in keeping the parades and the commemoration alive for well over a century seems right, since Columbus was Italian—although even in the 1890s his nationality was being contested. Some people, who include respectable scholars, still argue, based on elements of his biography and family history, that Columbus must really have been Spanish, Portuguese, Jewish, or Greek, instead of, or in addition to, Italian. One lonely scholar in the 1930s even wrote that Columbus, because of a square jaw and dirty blond hair in an old portrait, must have been Danish. The consensus, however, is that he was an Italian from outside of Genoa.

So much for his ethnicity. What about his moral standing? In the late 19th century an international movement, led by a French priest, sought to have Columbus canonized for bringing Christianity to the New World. To the Catholic Church’s credit, this never got very far. It sometimes gets overlooked in current discussions that we neither commemorate Columbus’s birthday (as was the practice for Presidents Washington and Lincoln, and as we now do with Martin Luther King, Jr.) nor his death date (which is when Christian saints are memorialized), but rather the date of his arrival in the New World. The historical truth about Columbus—the short version suitable for reporters who are pressed for time—is that Columbus was Italian, but he was no saint.

The holiday marks the event, not the person. What Columbus gets criticized for nowadays are attitudes that were typical of the European sailing captains and merchants who plied the Mediterranean and the Atlantic in the 15th century. Within that group he was unquestionably a man of daring and unusual ambition. But what really mattered was his landing on San Salvador, which was a momentous, world-changing occasion such as has rarely happened in human history. Sounds to me like a pretty good excuse for taking a day off from work.

Voir également:

Study traces origins of syphilis in Europe to New World

New evidence from the jungles of Guyana suggests Christopher Columbus and his crewmates carried syphilis-causing bacteria from America to Europe, triggering a massive epidemic that killed more than five million people there.

The findings — which scientists said are the first attempt to use molecular genetics to address the problem of the origin of the venereal disease — were published Monday in the online journal Public Library of Science/Neglected Tropical Disease.

They suggest that Columbus and his crew of explorers brought the deadly disease back from the New World during their famous voyage in 1492 while a non-sexually transmitted subspecies was already in existence in Renaissance Europe, or the Old World.

The study was based around an exceptionally large specimen provided by Canadian infectious disease specialist Dr. Michael Silverman, who leads a medical team into the rainforests of Guyana each year to treat villagers who have virtually no contact with the outside world.

There, he discovered children with ulcer-like lesions on their arms and legs, « just like you get with syphilis but in the wrong place, » he told CBC.

Blood tests confirmed the children had yaws, an infectious skin disease believed to be extinct in the Western Hemisphere, though still present in parts of Africa and southeast Asia.

Yaws is considered the cousin of syphilis as they are both distinct varieties of the same bacterium.

Further testing by researchers in the United States suggested that yaws, in fact, was the elder cousin — an ancient infection that evolved from a harmless skin-to-skin condition of the limbs into a devastating sexually transmitted disease around the time of contact with Europeans.

« They couldn’t really catch it because they had long sleeves, long pants, » Silverman said. « So the only way they could get it, the only time they would expose their skin and might touch somebody was when they dropped their pants to have sex. »

Upon the Europeans’ return, many of them joined the army of Charles VIII in 1495 and invaded Italy. After their victory in Naples, the army — mostly made of mercenaries — returned home and spread syphilis across the Continent, culminating in the Great Pox.

This first outbreak of syphilis, documented just two years after Columbus and his men sailed the ocean blue in 1492, is believed to have killed more than five million Europeans.

« In this case we have an example of a disease that went the other way, from Native Americans to Europeans, » said Dr. Kristin Harper, a researcher in molecular genetics at Atlanta’s Emory University and the principal investigator in the study published Monday.

« So that’s especially interesting, I think. »

Syphilis is usually transmitted through sexual contact and initially results in a painless, open sore or ulcer in the area of exposure. The second stage consists of a rash on the palms of the hands or soles of the feet.

Left untreated, the disease eventually attacks the heart, eyes and brain and can lead to mental illness, blindness and death.

Voir de plus:

Case Closed? Columbus Introduced Syphilis to Europe

Syphilis was one of the first global diseases, and understanding where it came from and how it spread may help us combat diseases today

In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, but when he returned from ‘cross the seas, did he bring with him a new disease?

New skeletal evidence suggests Columbus and his crew not only introduced the Old World to the New World, but brought back syphilis as well, researchers say.

Syphilis is caused by Treponema pallidum bacteria, and is usually curable nowadays with antibiotics. Untreated, it can damage the heart, brain, eyes and bones; it can also be fatal.

The first known epidemic of syphilis occurred during the Renaissance in 1495. Initially its plague broke out among the army of Charles the VIII after the French king invaded Naples. It then proceeded to devastate Europe, said researcher George Armelagos, a skeletal biologist at Emory University in Atlanta.

« Syphilis has been around for 500 years, » said researcher Molly Zuckerman at Mississippi State University. « People started debating where it came from shortly afterward, and they haven’t stopped since. It was one of the first global diseases, and understanding where it came from and how it spread may help us combat diseases today. »

Stigmatized disease

The fact that syphilis is a stigmatized sexually transmitted disease has added to the controversy over its origins. People often seem to want to blame some other country for it, said researcher Kristin Harper, an evolutionary biologist at Emory. [Top 10 Stigmatized Health Disorders]

Armelagos originally doubted the so-called Columbian theory for syphilis when he first heard about it decades ago. « I laughed at the idea that a small group of sailors brought back this disease that caused this major European epidemic, » he recalled. Critics of the Columbian theory have proposed that syphilis had always bedeviled the Old World but simply had not been set apart from other rotting diseases such as leprosy until 1500 or so.

However, upon further investigation, Armelagos and his colleagues got a shock — all of the available evidence they found supported the Columbian theory, findings they published in 1988. « It was a paradigm shift, » Armelagos says. Then in 2008, genetic analysis by Armelagos and his collaborators of syphilis’s family of bacteria lent further support to the theory.

Still, there have been reports of 50 skeletons from Europe dating back from before Columbus set sail that apparently showed the lesions of chronic syphilis. These seemed to be evidence that syphilis originated in the Old World and that Columbus was not to blame.

Armelagos and his colleagues took a closer look at all the data from these prior reports. They found most of the skeletal material didn’t actually meet at least one of the standard diagnostic criteria for chronic syphilis, such as pitting on the skull, known as caries sicca, and pitting and swelling of the long bones.

In the seafood?

The 16 reports that did meet the criteria for syphilis came from coastal regions where seafood was a large part of the diet. This seafood contains « old carbon » from deep, upwelling ocean waters. As such, they might fall prey to the so-called « marine reservoir effect » that can throw off radiocarbon dating of a skeleton by hundreds or even thousands of years. To adjust for this effect, the researchers figured out the amount of seafood these individuals ate when alive. Since our bodies constantly break down and rebuild our bones, measurements of bone-collagen protein can provide a record of diet.

« Once we adjusted for the marine signature, all of the skeletons that showed definite signs of treponemal disease appeared to be dated to after Columbus returned to Europe, » Harper said, findings detailed in the current Yearbook of Physical Anthropology.

« What it really shows to me is that globalization of disease is not a modern condition, » Armelagos said. « In 1492, you had the transmission of a number of diseases from Europe that decimated Native Americans, and you also had disease from Native Americans to Europe. »

« The lesson we can learn for today from history is that these epidemics are the result of unrest, » Armelagos added. « With syphilis, wars were going on in Europe at the time, and all the turmoil set the stage for the disease. Nowadays, a lot of diseases jump the species barrier due to environmental unrest. »

« The origin of syphilis is a fascinating, compelling question, » Zuckerman said. « The current evidence is pretty definitive, but we shouldn’t close the book and say we’re done with the subject. The great thing about science is constantly being able to understand things in a new light. »

Of all the bedtime-story versions of American history we teach, the tidy Thanksgiving pageant may be the one stuffed with the heaviest serving of myth. This iconic tale is the main course in our nation’s foundation legend, complete with cardboard cutouts of bow-carrying Native American cherubs and pint-size Pilgrims in black hats with buckles. And legend it largely is.

In fact, what had been a New England seasonal holiday became more of a “national” celebration only during the Civil War, with Lincoln’s proclamation calling for “a day of thanksgiving” in 1863.

That fall, Lincoln had precious little to be thankful for. The Union victory at Gettysburg the previous July had come at a dreadful cost – a combined 51,000 estimated casualties, with nearly 8,000 dead. Enraged by draft laws and emancipation, rioters in Northern cities like New York went on bloody rampages. And the president and his wife, Mary, were still mourning the loss of their 11-year-old son, Willie, who had died the year before.

So it might seem odd that Lincoln chose this moment to announce a national day of thanksgiving, to be marked on the last Thursday in November. His Oct. 3, 1863, proclamation read: “In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity … peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere, except in the theater of military conflict.”

But it took another year for the day to really catch hold. In 1864 Lincoln issued a second proclamation, which read, “I do further recommend to my fellow-citizens aforesaid that on that occasion they do reverently humble themselves in the dust.” Around the same time, the heads of Union League clubs – Theodore Roosevelt’s father among them – led an effort to provide a proper Thanksgiving meal, including turkey and mince pies, for Union troops. As the Civil War raged on, four steamers sailed out of New York laden with 400,000 pounds of ham, canned peaches, apples and cakes – and turkeys with all the trimmings. They arrived at Ulysses S. Grant’s headquarters in City Point, Va., then one of the busiest ports in the world, to deliver dinner to the Union’s “gallant soldiers and sailors.”

This Thanksgiving delivery was an unprecedented effort – a huge fund-raising and food-collection drive. One soldier said, “It isn’t the turkey, but the idea we care for.”

The good people of nearby Petersburg, Va., had no turkey. Surrounded and besieged by Grant’s armies since June, they were lucky to eat at all. The local flocks of pigeons had all mysteriously disappeared and “starvation parties” were a form of mordant entertainment in this once cosmopolitan town.

What prompted Lincoln to issue these proclamations – the first two in an unbroken string of presidential Thanksgiving proclamations – is uncertain. He was not the first president to do so. George Washington and James Madison had earlier issued “thanksgiving” proclamations, calling for somber days of prayer. Perhaps Lincoln saw an opportunity to underscore shared American traditions – a theme found in the “mystic chords of memory” stretching from “every patriot grave” in his first inaugural.

Or he may have been responding to the passionate entreaties of Sara Josepha Hale, editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book – the Good Housekeeping of its day. Hale, who contributed to American folkways as the author of “Mary had a Little Lamb,” had been advocating in the magazine for a national day of Thanksgiving since 1837. Even as many states had begun to observe Thanksgiving, she wrote in 1860, “It will no longer be a partial and vacillating commemoration of our gratitude to our Heavenly Father, observed in one section or State, while other portions of our common country do not sympathize in the gratitude and gladness.”

So how did the lore of that Pilgrim repast get connected to Lincoln’s wartime proclamations?

The Plymouth “first Thanksgiving” dates from an October 1621 harvest celebration, an event at which the surviving passengers of the Mayflower – about half of the approximately 100 on board — were able to mark their communal harvest with a shared feast. By the account of the Pilgrim leader Edward Winslow, this event was no simple sit-down dinner, but a three-day revel. “Amongst other recreations,” Winslow wrote, “we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which we brought to the plantation.”

There is nothing novel or uniquely American — and nothing especially “Pilgrim”– about giving thanks for a successful harvest. Certainly it has been done by people throughout history and surely by earlier Europeans in America as well as Native Americans.

But New Englanders, who had long marked a Founders Day as a celebration of the Pilgrim and Puritan arrivals, began to move across America and took this tradition – and their singular version of history — with them. Essentially a churchgoing day with a meal that followed, the celebration of that legendary feast gradually evolved into the Thanksgiving we know.

Eventually, it was commingled with Lincoln’s first proclamation. During the post-Civil War period, the iconic Thanksgiving meal and the connection to the Pilgrims were cemented in the popular imagination, through artistic renderings of black-cloaked, churchgoing, gun-toting Puritans, a militant, faithful past that most likely rang familiar for many Civil War Americans.

But one crucial piece remained: The elevation of Thanksgiving to a true national holiday, a feat accomplished by Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1939, with the nation still struggling out of the Great Depression, the traditional Thanksgiving Day fell on the last day of the month – a fifth Thursday. Worried retailers, for whom the holiday had already become the kickoff to the Christmas shopping season, feared this late date. Roosevelt agreed to move his holiday proclamation up one week to the fourth Thursday, thereby extending the critical shopping season.

Some states stuck to the traditional last Thursday date, and other Thanksgiving traditions, such as high school and college football championships, had already been scheduled. This led to Roosevelt critics deriding the earlier date as “Franksgiving.” With 32 states joining Roosevelt’s “Democratic Thanksgiving, ” 16 others stuck with the traditional date, or “Republican Thanksgiving.” After some congressional wrangling, in December 1941, Roosevelt signed the legislation making Thanksgiving a legal holiday on the fourth Thursday in November. And there it has remained.


Kenneth C. Davis is the author of “Don’t Know Much About History” and “America’s Hidden History.” His forthcoming book, “The Hidden History of America At War: Untold Tales from Yorktown to Fallujah,” includes an account of the siege of Petersburg, Va.


Populisme: Les sionistes ont même inventé le nationalisme ! (From the Tower of Babel to the latest anti-Israeli UN resolution, the independent national state, as an alternative to empire and tribalism, begins with the Hebrew Bible, but is again threatened by transnational elites, says Israeli political philosopher Yoram Hazony)

28 juillet, 2019

 

No photo description available.

Toi qui as fixé les frontières, dressé les bornes de la terre, tu as créé l’été, l’hiver !  Psaumes 74: 17
Où tu iras j’irai, où tu demeureras je demeurerai; ton peuple sera mon peuple, et ton Dieu sera mon Dieu. Ruth (Ruth 1: 16)
Un peuple connait, aime et défend toujours plus ses moeurs que ses lois. Montesquieu
L’arbre de la liberté doit être revivifié de temps en temps par le sang des patriotes et des tyrans. Jefferson
Condamner le nationalisme parce qu’il peut mener à la guerre, c’est comme condamner l’amour parce qu’il peut conduire au meurtre. C.K. Chesterton
Le patriotisme est l’exact contraire du nationalisme. Le nationalisme est l’exact contraire du patriotisme, il en est sa trahison. Emmanuel Macron
Les démocrates radicaux veulent remonter le temps, rendre de nouveau le pouvoir aux mondialistes corrompus et avides de pouvoir. Vous savez qui sont les mondialistes? Le mondialiste est un homme qui veut qu’il soit bon de vivre dans le monde entier sans, pour dire le vrai, se soucier de notre pays. Cela ne nous convient pas. (…) Vous savez, il y a un terme devenu démodé dans un certain sens, ce terme est « nationaliste ». Mais vous savez qui je suis? Je suis un nationaliste. OK? Je suis nationaliste. Saisissez-vous de ce terme! Donald Trump
We have a very clear policy. We want to preserve Hungary as a Hungarian country. We have a right for that. It’s a sovereign right of Hungary to decide whom we would like to allow to enter the territory of the country, and with whom we would like to live together. That must be a national decision … a matter of national sovereignty, and we don’t want to give that up. And we do not accept either Brussels, New York or Geneva taking these kinds of decisions instead of us. (…) We think that the illegal migration is a threat to the European future, a threat to the European culture and to the European civilization. We are a country which sticks strictly to national identity, which would like to preserve religious heritage, historic heritage and cultural heritage. We do not want to lose them. Péter Szijjártó (Hungary’s foreign minister)
So apparently Donald Trump wants to make this an election about what it means to be American. He’s got his vision of what it means to be American, and he’s challenging the rest of us to come up with a better one. In Trump’s version, “American” is defined by three propositions. First, to be American is to be xenophobic. The basic narrative he tells is that the good people of the heartland are under assault from aliens, elitists and outsiders. Second, to be American is to be nostalgic. America’s values were better during some golden past. Third, a true American is white. White Protestants created this country; everybody else is here on their sufferance. When you look at Trump’s American idea you realize that it contradicts the traditional American idea in every particular. In fact, Trump’s national story is much closer to the Russian national story than it is toward our own. It’s an alien ideology he’s trying to plant on our soil. ​ Trump’s vision is radically anti-American.​ The real American idea is not xenophobic, nostalgic or racist; it is pluralistic, future-oriented and universal. America is exceptional precisely because it is the only nation on earth that defines itself by its future, not its past. America is exceptional because from the first its citizens saw themselves in a project that would have implications for all humankind. America is exceptional because it was launched with a dream to take the diverse many and make them one — e pluribus unum.​ (…) Trump’s campaign is an attack on that dream. The right response is to double down on that ideal. The task before us is to create the most diverse mass democracy in the history of the planet — a true universal nation. It is precisely to weave the social fissures that Trump is inclined to tear. David Brooks
In the matter of immigration, mark this conservative columnist down as strongly pro-deportation. The United States has too many people who don’t work hard, don’t believe in God, don’t contribute much to society and don’t appreciate the greatness of the American system. They need to return whence they came. I speak of Americans whose families have been in this country for a few generations. Complacent, entitled and often shockingly ignorant on basic points of American law and history, they are the stagnant pool in which our national prospects risk drowning.​ (…) Bottom line: So-called real Americans are screwing up America. Maybe they should leave, so that we can replace them with new and better ones: newcomers who are more appreciative of what the United States has to offer, more ambitious for themselves and their children, and more willing to sacrifice for the future. In other words, just the kind of people we used to be — when “we” had just come off the boat.​ O.K., so I’m jesting about deporting “real Americans” en masse. (Who would take them in, anyway?) But then the threat of mass deportations has been no joke with this administration.​ On Thursday, the Department of Homeland Security seemed prepared to extend an Obama administration program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which allows the children of illegal immigrants — some 800,000 people in all — to continue to study and work in the United States. The decision would have reversed one of Donald Trump’s ugly campaign threats to deport these kids, whose only crime was to have been brought to the United States by their parents. Yet the administration is still committed to deporting their parents, and on Friday the D.H.S. announced that even DACA remains under review — another cruel twist for young immigrants wondering if they’ll be sent back to “home” countries they hardly ever knew, and whose language they might barely even speak.​ Beyond the inhumanity of toying with people’s lives this way, there’s also the shortsightedness of it. We do not usually find happiness by driving away those who would love us. Businesses do not often prosper by firing their better employees and discouraging job applications. So how does America become great again by berating and evicting its most energetic, enterprising, law-abiding, job-creating, idea-generating, self-multiplying and God-fearing people?​ Because I’m the child of immigrants and grew up abroad, I have always thought of the United States as a country that belongs first to its newcomers — the people who strain hardest to become a part of it because they realize that it’s precious; and who do the most to remake it so that our ideas, and our appeal, may stay fresh.​ That used to be a cliché, but in the Age of Trump it needs to be explained all over again. We’re a country of immigrants — by and for them, too. Americans who don’t get it should get out.​ Bret Stephens
Obama est le premier président américain élevé sans attaches culturelles, affectives ou intellectuelles avec la Grande-Bretagne ou l’Europe. Les Anglais et les Européens ont été tellement enchantés par le premier président américain noir qu’ils n’ont pu voir ce qu’il est vraiment: le premier président américain du Tiers-Monde. The Daily Mail
Culturellement, Obama déteste la Grande-Bretagne. Il a renvoyé le buste de Churchill sans la moindre feuille de vigne d’une excuse. Il a insulté la Reine et le Premier ministre en leur offrant les plus insignifiants des cadeaux. A un moment, il a même refusé de rencontrer le Premier ministre. Dr James Lucier (ancien directeur du comité des Affaire étrangères du sénat américain)
We want our country back ! Marion Maréchal
La jeune génération n’est pas encouragée à aimer notre héritage. On leur lave le cerveau en leur faisant honte de leur pays. (…) Nous, Français, devons nous battre pour notre indépendance. Nous ne pouvons plus choisir notre politique économique ou notre politique d’immigration et même notre diplomatie. Notre liberté est entre les mains de l’Union européenne. (…) Notre liberté est maintenant entre les mains de cette institution qui est en train de tuer des nations millénaires. Je vis dans un pays où 80%, vous m’avez bien entendu, 80% des lois sont imposées par l’Union européenne. Après 40 ans d’immigration massive, de lobbyisme islamique et de politiquement correct, la France est en train de passer de fille aînée de l’Eglise à petite nièce de l’islam. On entend maintenant dans le débat public qu’on a le droit de commander un enfant sur catalogue, qu’on a le droit de louer le ventre d’une femme, qu’on a le droit de priver un enfant d’une mère ou d’un père. (…) Aujourd’hui, même les enfants sont devenus des marchandises (…) Un enfant n’est pas un droit (…) Nous ne voulons pas de ce monde atomisé, individualiste, sans sexe, sans père, sans mère et sans nation. (…) Nous devons faire connaitre nos idées aux médias et notre culture, pour stopper la domination des libéraux et des socialistes. C’est la raison pour laquelle j’ai lancé une école de sciences politiques. (…) Nous devons faire connaitre nos idées aux médias et notre culture, pour stopper la domination des libéraux et des socialistes. C’est la raison pour laquelle j’ai lancé une école de sciences politiques. (…) La Tradition n’est pas la vénération des cendres, elle est la passation du feu. (…)Je ne suis pas offensée lorsque j’entends le président Donald Trump dire ‘l’Amérique d’abord’. En fait, je veux l’Amérique d’abord pour le peuple américain, je veux la Grande-Bretagne d’abord pour le peuple britannique et je veux la France d’abord pour le peuple français. Comme vous, nous voulons reprendre le contrôle de notre pays. Vous avez été l’étincelle, il nous appartient désormais de nourrir la flamme conservatrice. Marion Maréchal
En Europe comme aux Etats-Unis, la contestation émerge sur les territoires les plus éloignés des métropoles mondialisées. La « France périphérique » est celle des petites villes, des villes moyennes et des zones rurales. En Grande-Bretagne, c’est aussi la « Grande-Bretagne périphérique » qui a voté pour le Brexit. Attention : il ne s’agit pas d’un rapport entre « urbains » et « ruraux ». La question est avant tout sociale, économique et culturelle. Ces territoires illustrent la sortie de la classe moyenne des catégories qui en constituaient hier le socle : ouvriers, employés, petits paysans, petits indépendants. Ces catégories ont joué le jeu de la mondialisation, elles ont même au départ soutenu le projet européen. Cependant, après plusieurs décennies d’adaptation aux normes de l’économie-monde, elles font le constat d’une baisse ou d’une stagnation de leur niveau de vie, de la précarisation des conditions de travail, du chômage de masse et, in fine, du blocage de l’ascenseur social. Sans régulation d’un libre-échange qui défavorise prioritairement ces catégories et ces territoires, le processus va se poursuivre. C’est pourquoi la priorité est de favoriser le développement d’un modèle économique complémentaire (et non alternatif) sur ces territoires qui cumulent fragilités socio-économiques et sédentarisation des populations. Cela suppose de donner du pouvoir et des compétences aux élus et collectivités de ces territoires. En adoptant le système économique mondialisé, les pays développés ont accouché de son modèle sociétal : le multiculturalisme. En la matière, la France n’a pas fait mieux (ni pire) que les autres pays développés. Elle est devenue une société américaine comme les autres, avec ses tensions et ses paranoïas identitaires. Il faut insister sur le fait que sur ces sujets, il n’y a pas d’un côté ceux qui seraient dans l’ouverture et de l’autre ceux qui seraient dans le rejet. Si les catégories supérieures et éduquées ne basculent pas dans le populisme, c’est parce qu’elles ont les moyens de la frontière invisible avec l’Autre. Ce sont d’ailleurs elles qui pratiquent le plus l’évitement scolaire et résidentiel. La question du rapport à l’autre n’est donc pas seulement posée pour les catégories populaires. Poser cette question comme universelle – et qui touche toutes les catégories sociales – est un préalable si l’on souhaite faire baisser les tensions. Cela implique de sortir de la posture de supériorité morale que les gens ne supportent plus. J’avais justement conçu la notion d’insécurité culturelle pour montrer que, notamment en milieu populaire, ce n’est pas tant le rapport à l’autre qui pose problème qu’une instabilité démographique qui induit la peur de devenir minoritaire et de perdre un capital social et culturel très important. Une peur qui concerne tous les milieux populaires, quelles que soient leurs origines. C’est en partant de cette réalité qu’il convient de penser la question du multiculturalisme. Christophe Guilluy
Pour la première fois, le modèle mondialisé des classes dominantes, dont Hillary Clinton était le parangon, a été rejeté dans le pays qui l’a vu naître. Fidèles à leurs habitudes, les élites dirigeantes déprécient l’expression de la volonté populaire quand elles en perdent le contrôle. Ainsi, les médias, à travers le cas de la Pennsylvanie – l’un des swing states qui ont fait le succès de Trump -, ont mis l’accent sur le refus de mobilité de la working class blanche, les fameux « petits Blancs », comme cause principale de la précarité et du déclassement. Le « bougisme », qui est la maladie de Parkinson de la mondialisation, confond les causes et les conséquences. Il est incapable de comprendre que, selon la formule de Christopher Lasch, « le déracinement déracine tout, sauf le besoin de racines ». L’élection de Trump, c’est le cri de révolte des enracinés du local contre les agités du global. (…) La gauche progressiste n’a eu de cesse, depuis les années 1980, que d’évacuer la question sociale en posant comme postulat que ce n’est pas la pauvreté qui interdit d’accéder à la réussite ou à l’emploi, mais uniquement l’origine ethnique. Pourtant, l’actuelle dynamique des populismes ne se réduit pas à la seule révolte identitaire. En contrepoint de la protestation du peuple-ethnos, il y a la revendication du peuple-démos, qui aspire à être rétabli dans ses prérogatives de sujet politique et d’acteur souverain de son destin. Le populisme est aussi et peut-être d’abord un hyperdémocratisme, selon le mot de Taguieff, une demande de démocratie par quoi le peuple manifeste sa volonté d’être représenté et gouverné selon ses propres intérêts. Or notre postdémocratie oscille entre le déni et le détournement de la volonté populaire. (…) Au XIXe siècle, la bourgeoisie a eu recours à la loi pour imposer le suffrage censitaire. Aujourd’hui, les classes dominantes n’en éprouvent plus la nécessité, elles l’obtiennent de facto : il leur suffit de neutraliser le vote populiste en l’excluant de toute représentation par le mode de scrutin et de provoquer l’abstention massive de l’électorat populaire, qui, convaincu de l’inutilité du vote, se met volontairement hors jeu. Ne vont voter lors des élections intermédiaires que les inclus, des fonctionnaires aux cadres supérieurs, et surtout les plus de 60 ans, qui, dans ce type de scrutin, représentent autour de 35 % des suffrages exprimés, alors qu’ils ne sont que 22 % de la population. Ainsi, l’écosystème de la génération de 68 s’est peu à peu transformé en un egosystème imposé à l’ensemble de la société. Dans notre postdémocratie, c’est le cens qui fait sens et se traduit par une surreprésentation des classes favorisées aux dépens de la France périphérique, de la France des invisibles. (…) On est arrivé à une situation où la majorité n’est plus une réalité arithmétique, mais un concept politique résultant d’une application tronquée du principe majoritaire. Dans l’Assemblée élue en 2012 avec une participation de 55 %, la majorité parlementaire socialiste ne représente qu’un peu plus de 16 % des inscrits. La majorité qui fait et défait les lois agit au nom d’à peine plus de 1 Français sur 6 ! Nous vivons sous le régime de ce qu’André Tardieu appelait déjà avant-guerre le « despotisme d’une minorité légale ». On assiste, avec le système de l’alternance unique entre les deux partis de gouvernement, à une privatisation du pouvoir au bénéfice d’une partitocratie dont la légitimité ne cesse de s’éroder. (…) Plus les partis ont perdu en légitimité, plus s’est imposée à eux l’obligation de verrouiller le système de crainte que la sélection des candidats à l’élection présidentielle ne leur échappe. Avec la crise de la représentation, le système partisan n’a plus ni l’autorité ni la légitimité suffisante pour imposer ses choix sans un simulacre de démocratie. Les primaires n’ont pas d’autre fonction que de produire une nouvelle forme procédurale de légitimation. En pratique, cela revient à remettre à une minorité partisane le pouvoir de construire l’offre politique soumise à l’ensemble du corps électoral. Entre 3 et 4 millions de citoyens vont préorienter le choix des 46 millions de Français en âge de voter. Or la sociologie des électeurs des primaires à droite comme à gauche ne fait guère de doute : il s’agit des catégories supérieures ou moyennes, qui entretiennent avec la classe politique un rapport de proximité. Les primaires auront donc pour effet d’aggraver la crise de représentation en renforçant le poids politique des inclus au moment même où il faudrait rouvrir le jeu démocratique. (…) D’un tel processus de sélection ne peuvent sortir que des produits de l’endogamie partisane, des candidats façonnés par le conformisme de la doxa et gouvernés par l’économisme. Des candidats inaccessibles à la dimension symbolique du pouvoir et imperméables aux legs de la tradition et de l’Histoire nationale. Sarkozy et Hollande ont illustré l’inaptitude profonde des candidats sélectionnés par le système à se hisser à la hauteur de la fonction. Dans ces conditions, il est à craindre que, quel que soit l’élu, l’élection de 2017 ne soit un coup à blanc, un coup pour rien. D’autant que les hommes de la classe dirigeante n’ont ni les repères historiques ni les bases culturelles pour défendre les sociabilités protectrices face aux ravages de la mondialisation. En somme, ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils font parce qu’ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils défont. Quant au FN, privé de toute espérance du pouvoir, contrairement à ce qu’on voudrait nous faire croire, il offre un repoussoir utile à la classe dirigeante, qui lui permet de se survivre à bon compte. Il est à ce jour encore la meilleure assurance-vie du système. Patrick Buisson
Les «élites» françaises, sous l’inspiration et la domination intellectuelle de François Mitterrand, on voulu faire jouer au Front National depuis 30 ans, le rôle, non simplement du diable en politique, mais de l’Apocalypse. Le Front National représentait l’imminence et le danger de la fin des Temps. L’épée de Damoclès que se devait de neutraliser toute politique «républicaine». Cet imaginaire de la fin, incarné dans l’anti-frontisme, arrive lui-même à sa fin. Pourquoi? Parce qu’il est devenu impossible de masquer aux Français que la fin est désormais derrière nous. La fin est consommée, la France en pleine décomposition, et la république agonisante, d’avoir voulu devenir trop bonne fille de l’Empire multiculturel européen. Or tout le monde comprend bien qu’il n’a nullement été besoin du Front national pour cela. Plus rien ou presque n’est à sauver, et c’est pourquoi le Front national fait de moins en moins peur, même si, pour cette fois encore, la manœuvre du «front républicain», orchestrée par Manuel Valls, a été efficace sur les électeurs socialistes. Les Français ont compris que la fin qu’on faisait incarner au Front national ayant déjà eu lieu, il avait joué, comme rôle dans le dispositif du mensonge généralisé, celui du bouc émissaire, vers lequel on détourne la violence sociale, afin qu’elle ne détruise pas tout sur son passage. Remarquons que le Front national s’était volontiers prêté à ce dispositif aussi longtemps que cela lui profitait, c’est-à-dire jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Le parti anti-système a besoin du système dans un premier temps pour se légitimer. Nous approchons du point où la fonction de bouc émissaire, théorisée par René Girard  va être entièrement dévoilée et où la violence ne pourra plus se déchaîner vers une victime extérieure. Il faut bien mesurer le danger social d’une telle situation, et la haute probabilité de renversement qu’elle secrète: le moment approche pour ceux qui ont désigné la victime émissaire à la vindicte du peuple, de voir refluer sur eux, avec la vitesse et la violence d’un tsunami politique, la frustration sociale qu’ils avaient cherché à détourner. Les élections régionales sont sans doute un des derniers avertissements en ce sens. Les élites devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française. Y-a-t-il une solution pour échapper à une telle issue? Avouons que cette responsabilité est celle des élites en place, ayant entonné depuis 30 ans le même refrain. A supposer cependant que nous voulions les sauver, nous pourrions leur donner le conseil suivant: leur seule possibilité de survivre serait d’anticiper la violence refluant sur elles en faisant le sacrifice de leur innocence. Elles devraient anticiper la colère d’un peuple qui se découvre de plus en plus floué, et admettre qu’elles ont produit le système de la victime émissaire, afin de détourner la violence et la critique à l’égard de leur propre action. Pour cela, elles devraient cesser d’ostraciser le Front national, et accepter pleinement le débat avec lui, en le réintégrant sans réserve dans la vie politique républicaine française. Pour cela, elles devraient admettre de déconstruire la gigantesque hallucination collective produite autour du Front national, hallucination revenant aujourd’hui sous la forme inversée du Sauveur. Ce faisant, elles auraient tort de se priver au passage de souligner la participation du Front national au dispositif, ce dernier s’étant prêté de bonne grâce, sous la houlette du Père, à l’incarnation de la victime émissaire. Il faut bien avouer que nos élites du PS comme des Républicains ne prennent pas ce chemin, démontrant soit qu’elles n’ont strictement rien compris à ce qui se passe dans ce pays depuis 30 ans, soit qu’elles l’ont au contraire trop bien compris, et ne peuvent plus en assumer le dévoilement, soit qu’elles espèrent encore prospérer ainsi. Il n’est pas sûr non plus que le Front national soit prêt à reconnaître sa participation au dispositif. Il y aurait intérêt pourtant pour pouvoir accéder un jour à la magistrature suprême. Car si un tel aveu pourrait lui faire perdre d’un côté son «aura» anti-système, elle pourrait lui permettre de l’autre, une alliance indispensable pour dépasser au deuxième tour des présidentielles le fameux «plafond de verre». Il semble au contraire après ces régionales que tout changera pour que rien ne change. Deux solutions qui ne modifient en rien le dispositif mais le durcissent au contraire se réaffirment. La première solution, empruntée par le PS et désirée par une partie des Républicains, consiste à maintenir coûte que coûte le discours du front républicain en recherchant un dépassement du clivage gauche/droite. Une telle solution consiste à aller plus loin encore dans la désignation de la victime émissaire, et à s’exposer à un retournement encore plus dévastateur. (…) Car sans même parler des effets dévastateurs que pourrait avoir, a posteriori, un nouvel attentat, sur une telle déclaration, comment ne pas remarquer que les dernières décisions du gouvernement sur la lutte anti-terroriste ont donné rétrospectivement raison à certaines propositions du Front national? On voit mal alors comment on pourrait désormais lui faire porter le chapeau de ce dont il n’est pas responsable, tout en lui ôtant le mérite des solutions qu’il avait proposées, et qu’on n’a pas hésité à lui emprunter! La deuxième solution, défendue par une partie des Républicains suivant en cela Nicolas Sarkozy, consiste à assumer des préoccupations communes avec le Front national, tout en cherchant à se démarquer un peu par les solutions proposées. Mais comment faire comprendre aux électeurs un tel changement de cap et éviter que ceux-ci ne préfèrent l’original à la copie? Comment les électeurs ne remarqueraient-ils pas que le Front national, lui, n’a pas changé de discours, et surtout, qu’il a précédé tout le monde, et a eu le mérite d’avoir raison avant les autres, puisque ceux-ci viennent maintenant sur son propre terrain? Comment d’autre part concilier une telle proximité avec un discours diabolisant le Front national et cherchant l’alliance au centre? Curieuses élites, qui ne comprennent pas que la posture «républicaine», initiée par Mitterrand, menace désormais de revenir comme un boomerang les détruire. Christopher Lasch avait écrit La révolte des élites, pour pointer leur sécession d’avec le peuple, c’est aujourd’hui le suicide de celles-ci qu’il faudrait expliquer, dernière conséquence peut-être de cette sécession. Vincent Coussedière
With their politicization of their victory, their expletive-filled speech, and their publicly expressed contempt for half their fellow citizens, the women of the U.S. women’s soccer team succeeded in endearing themselves to America’s left. But they earned the rest of the country’s disdain, which is sad. We really wanted to love the team. What we have here is yet another example of perhaps the most important fact in the contemporary world: Everything the left touches, it ruins. Dennis Prager
The San Francisco Board of Education recently voted to paint over, and thus destroy, a 1,600-square-foot mural of George Washington’s life in San Francisco’s George Washington High School. Victor Arnautoff, a communist Russian-American artist and Stanford University art professor, had painted “Life of Washington” in 1936, commissioned by the New Deal’s Works Progress Administration. A community task force appointed by the school district had recommended that the board address student and parent objections to the 83-year-old mural, which some viewed as racist for its depiction of black slaves and Native Americans. Nike pitchman and former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick recently objected to the company’s release of a special Fourth of July sneaker emblazoned with a 13-star Betsy Ross flag. The terrified Nike immediately pulled the shoe off the market. The New York Times opinion team issued a Fourth of July video about “the myth of America as the greatest nation on earth.” The Times’ journalists conceded that the United States is “just OK.” During a recent speech to students at a Minnesota high school, Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) offered a scathing appraisal of her adopted country, which she depicted as a disappointment whose racism and inequality did not meet her expectations as an idealistic refugee. Omar’s family had fled worn-torn Somalia and spent four-years in a Kenyan refugee camp before reaching Minnesota, where Omar received a subsidized education and ended up a congresswoman. The U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team won the World Cup earlier this month. Team stalwart Megan Rapinoe refused to put her hand over heart during the playing of the national anthem, boasted that she would never visit the “f—ing White House” and, with others, nonchalantly let the American flag fall to the ground during the victory celebration. The city council in St. Louis Park, a suburb of Minneapolis, voted to stop reciting the Pledge of Allegiance before its meeting on the rationale that it wished not to offend a “diverse community.” The list of these public pushbacks at traditional American patriotic customs and rituals could be multiplied. They follow the recent frequent toppling of statues of 19th-century American figures, many of them from the South, and the renaming of streets and buildings to blot out mention of famous men and women from the past now deemed illiberal enemies of the people. Such theater is the street version of what candidates in the Democratic presidential primary have been saying for months. They want to disband border enforcement, issue blanket amnesties, demand reparations for descendants of slaves, issue formal apologies to groups perceived to be the subjects of discrimination, and rail against American unfairness, inequality, and a racist and sexist past. In their radical progressive view — shared by billionaires from Silicon Valley, recent immigrants and the new Democratic Party — America was flawed, perhaps fatally, at its origins. Things have not gotten much better in the country’s subsequent 243 years, nor will they get any better — at least not until America as we know it is dismantled and replaced by a new nation predicated on race, class and gender identity-politics agendas. In this view, an “OK” America is no better than other countries. As Barack Obama once bluntly put it, America is only exceptional in relative terms, given that citizens of Greece and the United Kingdom believe their own countries are just as exceptional. In other words, there is no absolute standard to judge a nation’s excellence. About half the country disagrees. It insists that America’s sins, past and present, are those of mankind. But only in America were human failings constantly critiqued and addressed. (…) The traditionalists see American history as a unique effort to overcome human weakness, bias and sin. That effort is unmatched by other cultures and nations, and explains why millions of foreign nationals swarm into the United States, both legally and illegally. (…) If progressives and socialists can at last convince the American public that their country was always hopelessly flawed, they can gain power to remake it based on their own interests. These elites see Americans not as unique individuals but as race, class and gender collectives, with shared grievances from the past that must be paid out in the present and the future. Victor Davis Hanson
America is changing. By 2043, we’ll be a nation [that’s] majority people of color, and that’s — that is the game here — that’s what folks don’t want to understand what’s happening in this country. Roland Martin (African-American journalist)
How’d we lose the working class? Ask yourself, what did we do for them? You called them stupid. You marginalized them, took them for granted and you didn’t talk to them. For 20 years, the right wing has invested tremendous amounts of money in talk radio, in television, in every possible platform to be in their ears, before their eyes, and on their minds. And they don’t call them stupid. Rick Smith (talk-show host)
On several polarizing issues, Democrats are refusing to offer the reassurances to moderate opinion that they once did. They’re not saying: We will secure the border and insist on an orderly asylum process, but do it in a humane way; we will protect the right to abortion while working to make it less common; we will protect gun rights while setting sensible limits on them. The old rhetorical guardrails — trust us, there’s a hard stop on how far left we’ll go — are gone. Ramesh Ponnuru
Trump also highlighted a basic fact about the nature of leftist ideology. Just as the Iranian regime views the United States and Israel as two sides of the same coin, with the ayatollahs dubbing the U.S. “the Great Satan” and Israel, “the Little Satan,” so the radical left views the U.S. and Israel – the most powerful democracy in the world and the only democracy in the Middle East – as states with no moral foundation for existing. Although other presidents have spoken out against hatred of Jews and Israel on the one hand and hatred of America on the other, it is hard to think of another example of a U.S. leader making the case that the two hatreds are linked as Trump did this week. This is important, because they are linked. The haters see both America and the Jews as all-powerful forces who use their power to bend the world to their nefarious, avaricious, greedy aims. They stereotype both Americans and pro-Israel and traditional Jews as vulgar and fascist. Pew Research Center studies of European perspectives on Jews and Americans show a massive overlap between anti-Semitic attitudes and anti-American ones. As the American left has become more radical, it has also become more aligned with those toxic European attitudes towards both the United States and Israel. One example is evident at the U.S.-Mexico border. The left’s opposition to enforcing American immigration laws goes hand-in-hand with the view that the Jewish people have no right to national self-determination in their homeland and that the Jewish state has no right to exist. As political philosopher Yoram Hazony argued in his book, The Virtue of Nationalism, nationalism — and, indeed, the concept of a nation itself — is a biblical concept. The nation of Israel is the first nation. And the American Founding Fathers’ conception of the United States and the American nation was rooted in the biblical concept of nationhood and nationalism of the Jews. Hazony contends that anti-nationalism is both inherently antisemitic and anti-American. And it is also imperialist. Anti-nationalists support international and transnational legal constructs and institutions that deny distinct nations large and small the ability to determine their own unique course in the world. As repositories of the concept of distinct nations, nation-states are, in Hazony’s view, inherently freer and more cohesive societies than imperialist societies that insist that one-size-fits-all and that there are people better equipped than the people themselves to decide what is good for them. As Trump tweeted, the four sirens of the socialist revolution are a dire threat to the Democratic Party. By embracing the likes of Reps. Omar and Tlaib with their repeated statements against the United States, Jews and Israel and their tolerance for terrorist groups and terrorists, and by embracing Ocasio-Cortez who likens America to Nazi Germany, replete with “concentration camps,” the Democratic Party is indeed embracing anti-Americanism and anti-Semitism. And, as Trump tweeted, it is the Democrats, not the Republicans — and certainly not the president — who are making Israel a partisan issue. They are doing so by abandoning Israel and embracing antisemitic conceptions of nationalism and of the Jewish and American nations. Trump’s tweet storm, however controversial, showed that he is personally committed to fighting hatred of Jews and Israel. As he was being targeted as a racist by Democrats, the Department of Justice was holding a conference on combatting antisemitism. The conference, which placed a spotlight on campus antisemitism, did not shy away from discussing and condemning antisemitism on the left as well as on the right, and Islamic antisemitism. In his remarks before the conference, Attorney General Willian Barr discussed the galloping hostility Jewish students face in U.S. universities today. In his words, “On college campuses today, Jewish students who support Israel are frequently targeted for harassment, Jewish student organizations are marginalized, and progressive Jewish students are told they must denounce their beliefs and their heritage in order to be part of ‘intersectional’ causes.” (…) It is a testament to the left’s increasing embrace of anti-Jewish bigotry, and its rejection of America’s right to borders, — and through them, to self-government and self-determination — that Trump is being branded a racist for standing up to these distressing trends. And it is a testament to Trump’s moral courage that he is willing to speak the truth about antisemitism and anti-Americanism even at the cost of wall-to-wall calumny by Democrats and the media. Caroline Glick
This month, Netroots Nation met in Philadelphia. The choice was no accident. Pennsylvania will probably be the key swing state in 2020. Donald Trump won it by only 44,000 votes or seven-tenths of a percentage point. He lost the prosperous Philadelphia suburbs by more than Mitt Romney did in 2012 but more than made up for it with new support in “left behind” blue-collar areas such as Erie and Wilkes-Barre. You’d think that this history would inform activists at Netroots Nation about the best strategy to follow in 2020. Not really. Instead, Netroots events seemed to alternate between pandering presentations by presidential candidates and a bewildering array of “intersectionality” and identity-politics seminars. Senator Elizabeth Warren pledged that, if elected, she would immediately investigate crimes committed by border-control agents. Julian Castro, a former Obama-administration cabinet member, called for decriminalizing illegal border crossings. But everyone was topped by Washington governor Jay Inslee. “My first act will be to ask Megan Rapinoe to be my secretary of State,” he promised. Naming the woke, purple-haired star of the championship U.S. Women’s Soccer team, he said, would return “love rather than hate” to the center of America’s foreign policy. It is true that a couple of panels tried to address how the Left could appeal to voters who cast their ballots for Barack Obama in 2012 but switched to Trump in 2016. (…)  But that kind of introspection was rare at Netroots Nation. Elizabeth Warren explicitly rejected calls to keep Democrats from moving too far to the left in the next campaign (…) Warren and her supporters point to polls showing that an increasing number of Americans are worried about income inequality, climate change, and America’s image around the world. But are those the issues that actually motivate people to vote, or are they peripheral issues that aren’t central to the decision most voters make? Consider a Pew Research poll taken last year that asked respondents to rank 23 “policy priorities” from terrorism to global trade in order of importance. Climate change came in 22nd out of 23. There is a stronger argument that Democrats will have trouble winning over independent voters if they sprinting so far to the left that they go over a political cliff. (…) Many leftists acknowledge that Democrats are less interested than they used to be in trimming their sails to appeal to moderates. Such trimming is no longer necessary, as they see it, because the changing demographics of the country give them a built-in advantage. Almost everyone I encountered at Netroots Nation was convinced that President Trump would lose in 2020. (…) It’s a common mistake on both the right and the left to assume that minority voters will a) always vote in large numbers and b) will vote automatically for Democrats. Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 in part because black turnout fell below what Barack Obama was able to generate. There is no assurance that black turnout can be restored in 2020. As for other ethnic groups, a new poll by Politico/Morning Consult this month found that Trump’s approval among Hispanics is at 42 percent. An Economist/YouGov poll showed Trump at 32 percent among Hispanics; another poll from The Hill newspaper and HarrisX has it at 35 percent. In 2016, Trump won only 29 to 32 percent of the Hispanic vote. Netroots Nation convinced me that progressive activists are self-confident, optimistic about the chances for a progressive triumph, and assured that a Trump victory was a freakish “black swan” event. But they are also deaf to any suggestion that their PC excesses had anything to do with Trump’s being in the White House. That is apt to be the progressive blind spot going into the 2020 election. John Fund
The immigrant is the pawn of Latin American governments who view him as inanimate capital, someone who represents thousands of dollars in future foreign-exchange remittances, as well as one less mouth to feed at home — if he crosses the border, legality be damned. If that sounds a cruel or cynical appraisal, then why would the Mexican government in 2005 print a comic booklet (“Guide for the Mexican Migrant”) with instructions to its citizens on how best to cross into the United States — urging them to break American law and assuming that they could not read? Yet for all the savagery dealt out to the immigrant — the callousness of his government, the shakedowns of the coyotes and cartels, the exploitation of his labor by new American employers — the immigrant himself is not entirely innocent. He knows — or does not care to know — that by entering the U.S., he has taken a slot from a would-be legal immigrant, one, unlike himself, who played by the rules and waited years in line for his chance to become an American. He knowingly violates U.S. immigration law. And when the first act of an immigrant is to enter the U.S. illegally, the second to reside there unlawfully, and the third so often to adopt false identities, he undermines American law on the expectation that he will receive exemptions not accorded to U.S. citizens, much less to other legal immigrants. In terms of violations of federal law, and crimes such as hit-and-run accidents and identity theft, the illegal immigrant is overrepresented in the criminal-justice system, and indeed in federal penitentiaries. Certainly, no Latin American government would allow foreigners to enter, reside, and work in their own country in the manner that they expect their own citizens to do so in America. Historically, the Mexican constitution, to take one example, discriminates in racial terms against both the legal and illegal immigrants, in medieval terms of ethnic essence. Some $30 billion in remittances are sent back by mostly illegal aliens to Central American governments and roughly another $30 billion to Mexico. But the full implications of that exploitation are rarely appreciated. Most impoverished illegal aliens who send such staggering sums back not only entered the United States illegally and live here illegally, but they often enjoy some sort of local, state, or federal subsidy. They work at entry-level jobs with the understanding that they are to scrimp and save, with the assistance of the American taxpayer, whose laws they have shredded, so that they can send cash to their relatives and friends back home. In other words, the remitters are like modern indentured servants, helots in hock to their governments that either will not or cannot help their families and are excused from doing so thanks to such massive remittances. In sum, they promote illegal immigration to earn such foreign exchange, to create an expatriate community in the United States that will romanticize a Guatemala or Oaxaca — all the more so,  the longer and farther they are away from it. Few of the impoverished in Mexico paste a Mexican-flag sticker on their window shield; many do so upon arrival in the United States. Illegal immigration is a safety valve, by which dissidents are thanked for marching north rather than on their own nations’ capitals. Latin American governments really do not care that much that their poor are raped while crossing the Mexican desert, or sold off by the drug cartels, or that they drown in the Rio Grande, but they suddenly weep when they reach American detention centers — a cynicism that literally cost hundreds their lives. America is increasingly becoming not so much a nonwhite nation as an assimilated, integrated, and intermarried country. Race, skin color, and appearance, if you will, are becoming irrelevant. The construct of “Latino” — Mexican-American? Portuguese? Spanish? Brazilian? — is becoming immaterial as diverse immigrants soon cannot speak Spanish, lose all knowledge of Latin America, and become indistinguishable in America from the descendants of southern Europeans, Armenians, or any other Mediterranean immigrant group. In other words, a Lopez or Martinez was rapidly becoming as relevant or irrelevant in terms of grievance politics, or perceived class, as a Pelosi, Scalise, De Niro, or Pacino. If Pelosi was named “Ocasio-Cortez” and AOC “Pelosi,” then no one would know, or much care, from their respective superficial appearance, who was of Puerto Rican background and who of Italian ancestry. Such a melting-pot future terrifies the ethnic activists in politics, academia, and the media who count on replenishing the numbers of unassimilated “Latinos,” in order to announce themselves the champions of collective grievance and disparity and thereby find careerist advantage. When 1 million of some of the most impoverished people on the planet arrive without legality, a high-school diploma, capital, or English, then they are likely to remain poor for a generation. And their poverty then offers supposed proof that America is a nativist or racist society for allowing such asymmetry to occur — a social-justice crime remedied best the by Latino caucus, the Chicano-studies department, the La Raza lawyers association, or the former National Council of La Raza. Yet, curb illegal immigration, and the entire Latino race industry goes the way of the Greek-, Armenian-, or Portuguese-American communities that have all found parity once massive immigration of their impoverished countrymen ceased and the formidable powers of the melting pot were uninterrupted. Democrats once were exclusionists — largely because they feared that illegal immigration eroded unionization and overtaxed the social-service resources of their poor citizen constituents. Cesar Chavez, for example, sent his thugs to the border to club illegal aliens and drive them back into Mexico, as if they were future strike breakers. Until recently, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton called for strict border enforcement, worried that the wages of illegal workers were driving down those of inner-city or barrio American youth. What changed? Numbers. Once the pool of illegal aliens reached a likely 20 million, and once their second-generation citizen offspring won anchor-baby legality and registered to vote, a huge new progressive constituency rose in the American Southwest — one that was targeted by Democrats, who alternately promised permanent government subsidies and sowed fears with constant charges that right-wing Republicans were abject racists, nativists, and xenophobes. Due to massive influxes of immigrants, and the flight of middle-class citizens, the California of Ronald Reagan, George Deukmejian, and Pete Wilson long ago ceased to exist. Indeed, there are currently no statewide Republican office-holders in California, which has liberal supermajorities in both state legislatures and a mere seven Republicans out of 53 congressional representatives. Nevada, New Mexico, and Colorado are becoming Californized. Soon open borders will do the same to Arizona and Texas. No wonder that the Democratic party has been willing to do almost anything to become the enabler of open borders, whether that is setting up over 500 sanctuary-city jurisdictions, suing to block border enforcement in the courts, or extending in-state tuition, free medical care, and driver’s licenses to those who entered and reside in America illegally. If most immigrants were right-wing, middle-class, Latino anti-Communists fleeing Venezuela or Cuba, or Eastern European rightists sick of the EU, or angry French and Germans who were tired of their failed socialist governments, the Democratic party would be the party of closed borders and the enemy of legal, meritocratic, diverse, and measured immigration. Employers over the past 50 years learned fundamental truths about illegal immigrants. The impoverished young male immigrant, arriving without English, money, education, and legality, will take almost any job to survive, and so he will work all the harder once he’s employed. For 20 years or so, young immigrant workers remain relatively healthy. But once physical labor takes its toll on the middle-aged immigrant worker, the state always was expected to step in to assume the health care, housing, and sustenance cost of the injured, ill, and aging worker — thereby empowering the employer’s revolving-door use of a new generation of young workers. Illegality — at least until recently, with the advent of sanctuary jurisdictions — was seen as convenient, ensuring asymmetry between the employee and the employer, who could always exercise the threat of deportation for any perceived shortcoming in his alien work force. Note that those who hire illegal aliens claim that no Americans will do such work, at least at the wages they are willing to, or can, pay. That is the mea culpa that employers voice when accused of lacking empathy for out-of-work Americans. If employers were fined for hiring illegal aliens, or held financially responsible for their immigrant workers’ health care and retirements, or if they found that such workers were not very industrious and made poor entry-level laborers, then both the Wall Street Journal and the Chamber of Commerce would be apt to favor strict enforcement of immigration laws.  Wealthy progressives favor open borders and illegal immigration for a variety of reasons. The more immigrants, the cheaper, more available, and more industrious are nannies, housekeepers, caregivers, and gardeners — the silent army that fuels the contemporary, two-high-income, powerhouse household. Championing the immigrant poor, without living among them and without schooling one’s children with them or socializing among them, is the affluent progressive’s brand. And to the degree that the paradox causes any guilt, the progressive virtue-signals his loud outrage at border detentions, at separations between parents in court and children in custody, and at the contrast between the burly ICE officers and vulnerable border crossers. In medieval fashion, the farther the liberal advocate of open borders is from the objects of his moral concern, the louder and more empathetic he becomes. Most progressives also enjoy a twofer: inexpensive immigrant “help” and thereby enough brief exposure to the Other to authenticate their 8-to-5 caring. If border crossers were temporarily housed in vacant summer dorms at Stanford, Harvard, or Yale, or were accorded affordable-housing tracts for immigrant communities in the vast open spaces of Portola Valley and the Boulder suburbs, or if immigrant children were sent en masse to language-immersion programs at St. Paul’s, Sidwell Friends, or the Menlo School, then the progressive social-justice warrior would probably go mute. Victor Davis Hanson
À bien des égards, ce que l’on pourrait appeler la classe intellectuelle conservatrice s’est trouvée à la traîne et même parfois à contre-courant de la dernière campagne. Le Weekly Standard, hebdomadaire néoconservateur fondé par Bill Kristol — l’une des voix de droite les plus violemment critiques de l’administration —, en a payé le prix en cessant il y a peu de paraître. Une fois Trump élu, le pragmatisme a toutefois dominé l’attitude de cette galaxie d’institutions vis-à-vis de la Maison Blanche. Ne leur devant pas sa victoire ni son programme, le président a, quant à lui, su utiliser leurs ressources et leurs compétences quand elles lui étaient utiles. L’illustration la plus frappante de cette relation fut la place centrale qu’il donna aux recommandations de la Heritage Foundation (le plus grand think tank conservateur à Washington) et de la Federalist Society (une association influente rassemblant plus de 40 000 juristes conservateurs) pour la nomination des juges à la Cour Suprême (Neil Gorsuch et Brett Kavanaugh) et dans les degrés inférieurs du système judiciaire. Malgré un style de gouvernement indéniablement nouveau, Trump ne semblait donc pas avoir profondément affecté l’infrastructure institutionnelle d’où s’élaborent la majorité des politiques publiques aux États-Unis. Envisagé comme un phénomène personnel qui disparaîtrait avec lui, certains pouvaient encore penser qu’il ne laisserait avec son départ pas d’héritage profond sur les plans institutionnels et intellectuels. Une conférence comme il s’en organise pourtant des dizaines chaque année à Washington DC vient peut-être de changer la donne. Et si, de manière pour le moins inattendue, Trump s’avérait être depuis Reagan le président ayant eu le plus d’impact sur la fabrique des idées et des élites dans son pays? Le chercheur israélien à l’origine de l’événement, Yoram Hazony, s’est fait connaître à l’automne dernier en publiant The Virtue of Nationalism [La vertu du nationalisme], un livre où il s’emploie à critiquer l’idéal post-national qui a dominé l’éducation politique des élites ces dernières décennies. En organisant ce rassemblement d’intellectuels, de journalistes et d’hommes politiques, il entend désormais jeter les bases d’un mouvement intellectuel, le «conservatisme national», dont il propagera les idées au travers de la Edmund Burke Foundation — créée en janvier en vue de préparer l’événement. Le programme mélange des invités prestigieux (l’entrepreneur Peter Thiel, le présentateur de Fox News Tucker Carlson), des étoiles montantes (le jeune sénateur Josh Hawley et J. D. Vance, l’auteur du best-seller Hillbilly Elegy) et des figures établies (Rusty Reno de la revue First Things ou encore Christopher DeMuth, l’ancien responsable du think tank AEI). S’il est évident que de nombreuses divergences existent entre ces invités, notamment sur les questions de politique étrangère, ils s’accordent assez largement autour de certains points fondamentaux qui constituent à des degrés divers des changements d’orientation profonds par rapport au consensus conservateur antérieur. Ce consensus, aussi connu sous le nom de «fusionnisme», reposait sur la compatibilité de la défense du marché et du libre-échange avec celle des valeurs familiales et religieuses. Libertariens et conservateurs pouvaient ainsi agir côte à côte afin de laisser d’un côté l’État hors de l’entreprise et de l’autre, hors de la famille — attitude résumée par la formule lapidaire de Reagan: «Le gouvernement n’est pas la solution à nos problèmes. Le gouvernement est le problème.» Pour les tenants du «conservatisme national» le danger vient non plus principalement de l’État mais du secteur privé, et plus particulièrement des GAFA et de Wall Street. C’est également à l’État qu’ils s’en remettent pour préserver l’existence nationale de l’ingérence croissante des institutions supranationales. Étonnante dans le paysage politique américain, cette défense de l’État réaffirme la primauté du politique et avec lui du vecteur d’action collective qu’est la nation. La question n’est plus de savoir si l’intervention de l’État est intrinsèquement mauvaise et la liberté du marché intrinsèquement bonne, mais de déterminer dans chaque cas laquelle des deux correspond à l’intérêt et à la volonté de la nation. Le critère permettant de juger une mesure politique n’est plus sa conformité à l’intérêt économique ou aux droits de l’homme mais sa capacité à protéger et renforcer la citoyenneté. Car les normes au fondement de l’État de droit, les principes économiques du capitalisme, n’ont de validité pratique qu’en raison des sentiments communs et des qualités partagées qui constituent les modes de vie des populations qui les adoptent. En déconnectant l’individu de ses solidarités concrètes, une pratique aveugle du libéralisme a selon eux dépossédé les citoyens de ce mode de vie et de leur capacité d’action sur les plans individuels et collectifs. L’objectif du «conservatisme national» est de leur restituer ces deux choses. Or, des hommes que ne relie rien d’autre que le fait d’être porteurs des mêmes droits ne suffisent pas à faire une nation. Et c’est parce que l’existence de cette dernière ne peut plus être prise pour acquis que le danger qui pèse sur elle nécessite une action politique spécifique en rupture avec le consensus des libéraux et conservateurs traditionnels. Les réflexions sur le devenir des nations ne sont pas nouvelles, surtout en France, où des auteurs comme Pierre Manent ont depuis les années 90 mené une critique écoutée des conservateurs américains à l’égard du projet post-national. Ce qui est inédit, c’est qu’une action aussi structurée émerge en vue de former une nouvelle classe dirigeante sur le fondement de ces constats. Adversaires ou alliés de l’actuel président feraient bien de surveiller cette initiative. Si elle réalise son ambition la Edmund Burke Foundation pourrait parvenir à associer au changement immédiat impulsé par Donald Trump une éducation politique susceptible d’affecter sur le long terme la formation des élites américaines, ce à quoi son style de gouvernement et les techniques de communication qui le caractérisent ne sauraient parvenir à eux seuls. Le sénateur Josh Hawley, âgé de 39 ans (ancien procureur général de l’état du Missouri), fait figure de symbole de cette classe politique en devenir: «Une nation républicaine requiert une économie républicaine […] Une économie fondée sur les échanges monétaires à Wall Street ne bénéficie en dernier ressort qu’à ceux qui possèdent déjà de l’argent. Une telle économie ne saurait soutenir une grande nation.» Hostile à l’inflation des diplômes universitaires et aux multinationales, favorable aux droits de douane, défenseur de «l’Amérique moyenne», il représente peut-être ce que pourrait devenir le «trumpisme» sans Trump. Alexis Carré
President Trump is often accused of creating a needless rift with America’s European allies. The secretary-general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Jens Stoltenberg, expressed a different view recently when he told a joint session of Congress: “Allies must spend more on defense—this has been the clear message from President Trump, and this message is having a real impact.” Mr. Stoltenberg’s remarks reflect a growing recognition that strategic and economic realities demand a drastic change in the way the U.S. conducts foreign policy. The unwanted cracks in the Atlantic alliance are primarily a consequence of European leaders, especially in Germany and France, wishing to continue living in a world that no longer exists. The U.S. cannot serve as the enforcer for the Europeans’ beloved “rules-based international order” any more. Even in the 1990s, it was doubtful the U.S. could indefinitely guarantee the security of all nations, paying for George H.W. Bush’s “new world order” principally with American soldiers’ lives and American taxpayers’ dollars. Today a $22 trillion national debt and the voting public’s indifference to the dreams of world-wide liberal empire have depleted Washington’s ability to wage pricey foreign wars. At a time of escalating troubles at home, America’s estimated 800 overseas bases in 80 countries are coming to look like a bizarre misallocation of resources. And the U.S. is politically fragmented to an extent unseen in living memory, with uncertain implications in the event of a major war. This explains why the U.S. has not sent massive, Iraq-style expeditionary forces to defend Ukraine’s integrity or impose order in Syria. If there’s trouble on Estonia’s border with Russia, would the U.S. have the will to deploy tens of thousands of soldiers on an indefinite mission 85 miles from St. Petersburg? Although Estonia joined NATO in 2004, the certainties of 15 years ago have broken down. On paper, America has defense alliances with dozens of countries. But these are the ghosts of a rivalry with the Soviet Union that ended three decades ago, or the result of often reckless policies adopted after 9/11. These so-called allies include Turkey and Pakistan, which share neither America’s values nor its interests, and cooperate with the U.S. only when it serves their purposes. Other “allies” refuse to develop a significant capacity for self-defense, and are thus more accurately regarded as American dependencies or protectorates. Liberal internationalists are right about one thing, however: America cannot simply turn its back on the world. Pearl Harbor and 9/11 demonstrated that the U.S. can and will be targeted on its own soil. An American strategic posture aimed at minimizing the danger from rival powers needs to focus on deterring Russia and China from wars of expansion; weakening China relative to the U.S. and thereby preventing it from attaining dominance over the world economy; and keeping smaller hostile powers such as North Korea and Iran from obtaining the capacity to attack America or other democracies. To attain these goals, the U.S. will need a new strategy that is far less costly than anything previous administrations contemplated. Mr. Trump has taken a step in the right direction by insisting that NATO allies “pay their fair share” of the budget for defending Europe, increasing defense spending to 2% of gross domestic product in accordance with NATO treaty obligations. But this framing of the issue doesn’t convey the problem’s true nature or its severity. The real issue is that the U.S. can no longer afford to assume responsibility for defending entire regions if the people living in them aren’t willing and able to build up their own credible military deterrent. The U.S. has a genuine interest, for example, in preventing the democratic nations of Eastern Europe from being absorbed into an aggressive Russian imperial state. But the principal interested parties aren’t Americans. The members of the Visegrád Group—the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia—have a combined population of 64 million and a 2017 GDP of $2 trillion (about 50% of Russia’s, according to CIA estimates). The principal strategic question is therefore whether these countries are willing to do what is necessary to maintain their own national independence. If they are—at a cost that could well exceed the 2% figure devised by NATO planners—then they could eventually shed their dependent status and come to the table as allies of the kind the U.S. could actually use: strong frontline partners in deterring Russian expansion. The same is true in other regions. Rather than carelessly accumulate dependencies, the U.S. must ask where it can develop real allies—countries that share its commitment to a world of independent nations, pursue democratic self-determination (although not necessarily liberalism) at home, and are willing to pay the price for freedom by taking primary responsibility for their own defense and shouldering the human and economic costs involved. Nations that demonstrate a commitment to these shared values and a willingness to fight when necessary should benefit from relations that may include the supply of advanced armaments and technologies, diplomatic cover in dealing with shared enemies, preferred partnership in trade, scientific and academic cooperation, and the joint development of new technologies. Fair-weather friends and free-riding dependencies should not. Perhaps the most important candidate for such a strategic alliance is India. Long a dormant power afflicted by poverty, socialism and an ideology of “nonalignment,” India has become one of the world’s largest and fastest-expanding economies. In contrast to the political oppression of the Chinese communist model, India has succeeded in retaining much of its religious conservatism while becoming an open and diverse country—by far the world’s most populous democracy—with a solid parliamentary system at both the federal and state levels. India is threatened by Islamist terrorism, aided by neighboring Pakistan; as well as by rapidly increasing Chinese influence, emanating from the South China Sea, the Pakistani port of Gwadar, and Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, where the Chinese navy has established its first overseas base. India’s values, interests and growing wealth could establish an Indo-American alliance as the central pillar of a new alignment of democratic national states in Asia, including a strengthened Japan and Australia. But New Delhi remains suspicious of American intentions, and with good reason: Rather than unequivocally bet on an Indian partnership, the U.S. continues to play all sides, haphazardly switching from confrontation to cooperation with China, and competing with Beijing for influence in fanaticism-ridden Pakistan. The rationalizations for these counterproductive policies tend to focus on Pakistan’s supposed logistical contributions to the U.S. war in Afghanistan—an example of how tactical considerations and the demands of bogus allies can stand in the way of meeting even the most pressing strategic needs. A similar confusion characterizes America’s relationship with Turkey. A U.S. ally during the Cold War, Turkey is now an expansionist Islamist power that has assisted the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas, al Qaeda and even ISIS; threatened Greece and Cyprus; sought Russian weapons; and recently expressed its willingness to attack U.S. forces in Syria. In reality, Turkey is no more an ally than Russia or China. Yet its formal status as the second-largest military in NATO guarantees that the alliance will continue to be preoccupied with pretense and make-believe, rather than the interests of democratic nations. Meanwhile, America’s most reliable Muslim allies, the Kurds, live under constant threat of Turkish invasion and massacre. The Middle East is a difficult region, in which few players share American values and interests, although all of them—including Turkey, Iraq, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and even Iran—are willing to benefit from U.S. arms, protection or cash. Here too Washington should seek alliances with national states that share at least some key values and are willing to shoulder most of the burden of defending themselves while fighting to contain Islamist radicalism. Such natural regional allies include Greece, Israel, Ethiopia and the Kurds. A central question for a revitalized alliance of democratic nations is which way the winds will blow in Western Europe. For a generation after the Berlin Wall’s fall in 1989, U.S. administrations seemed willing to take responsibility for Europe’s security indefinitely. European elites grew accustomed to the idea that perpetual peace was at hand, devoting themselves to turning the EU into a borderless utopia with generous benefits for all. But Europe has been corrupted by its dependence on the U.S. Germany, the world’s fifth-largest economic power (with a GDP larger than Russia’s), cannot field more than a handful of operational combat aircraft, tanks or submarines. Yet German leaders steadfastly resist American pressure for substantial increases in their country’s defense capabilities, telling interlocutors that the U.S. is ruining a beautiful friendship. None of this is in America’s interest—and not only because the U.S. is stuck with the bill. When people live detached from reality, they develop all sorts of fanciful theories about how the world works. For decades, Europeans have been devising “transnationalist” fantasies to explain how their own supposed moral virtues, such as their rejection of borders, have brought them peace and prosperity. These ideas are then exported to the U.S. and the rest of the democratic world via international bodies, universities, nongovernmental organizations, multinational corporations and other channels. Having subsidized the creation of a dependent socialist paradise in Europe, the U.S. now has to watch as the EU’s influence washes over America and other nations. For the moment, it is hard to see Germany or Spain becoming American allies in the new, more realistic sense of the term we have proposed. France is a different case, maintaining significant military capabilities and a willingness to deploy them at times. But the governments of these and other Western European countries remain ideologically committed to transferring ever-greater powers to international bodies and to the concomitant degradation of national independence. That doesn’t make them America’s enemies, but neither are they partners in defending values such as national self-determination. It is difficult to foresee circumstances under which they would be willing or able to arm themselves in keeping with the actual security needs of an emerging alliance of independent democratic nations. The prospects are better with respect to Britain, whose defense spending is already significantly higher, and whose public asserted a desire to regain independence in the Brexit referendum of 2016. With a population of more than 65 million and a GDP of $3 trillion (75% of Russia’s), the U.K. may yet become a principal partner in a leaner but more effective security architecture for the democratic world. Isolationists are also right about one thing: The U.S. cannot be, and should not try to be, the world’s policeman. Yet it does have a role to play in awakening democratic nations from their dependence-induced torpor, and assisting those that are willing to make the transition to a new security architecture based on self-determination and self-reliance. An alliance including the U.S., the U.K. and the frontline Eastern European nations, as well as India, Israel, Japan and Australia, among others, would be strong enough to exert sustained pressure on China, Russia and hostile Islamist groups. Helping these democratic nations become self-reliant regional actors would reduce America’s security burden, permitting it to close far-flung military installations and making American military intervention the exception rather than the rule. At the same time, it would free American resources for the long struggle to deny China technological superiority, as well as for unforeseen emergencies that are certain to arise. Yoram Hazony and Ofir Haivry
In a universal political order . . . in which a single standard of right is held to be in force everywhere, tolerance for diverse political and religious standpoints must necessarily decline. (…) We should not let a hairbreadth of our freedom be given over to foreign bodies under any name whatsoever, or to foreign systems of law that are not determined by our own nations. (…) “the European Union has caused severe damage to the principle that originally granted legitimacy to Israel as an independent national state: the principle of national freedom and self-determination. Yoram Hazony
Aujourd’hui, on ne cesse de nous répéter que le nationalisme a provoqué les deux guerres mondiales, et on lui impute même la responsabilité de la Shoah. Mais cette lecture historique n’est pas satisfaisante. J’appelle «nationaliste» quelqu’un qui souhaite vivre dans un monde constitué de nations indépendantes. De sorte qu’à mes yeux, Hitler n’était pas le moins du monde nationaliste. Il était même tout le contraire: Hitler méprisait la vision nationaliste, et il appelle dans Mein Kampf à détruire les autres Etats-nations européens pour que les Allemands soient les maîtres du monde. Dès son origine, le nazisme est une entreprise impérialiste, pas nationaliste. Quant à la Première Guerre mondiale, le nationalisme est loin de l’avoir déclenchée à lui seul! Le nationalisme serbe a fourni un prétexte, mais en réalité c’est la visée impérialiste des grandes puissances européennes (l’Allemagne, la France, l’Angleterre) qui a transformé ce conflit régional en une guerre planétaire. Ainsi, le principal moteur des deux guerres mondiales était l’impérialisme, pas le nationalisme. (…) Le nationalisme est en effet en vogue en ce moment: c’est du jamais-vu depuis 1990, date à laquelle Margaret Thatcher a été renversée par son propre camp à cause de son hostilité à l’Union européenne. Depuis plusieurs décennies, les principaux partis politiques aux Etats-Unis et en Europe, de droite comme de gauche, ont souscrit à ce que l’on pourrait appeler «l’impérialisme libéral», c’est-à-dire l’idée selon laquelle le monde entier devrait être régi par une seule et même législation, imposée si besoin par la contrainte. Mais aujourd’hui, une génération plus tard, une demande de souveraineté nationale émerge et s’est exprimée avec force aux Etats-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, en Italie, en Europe de l’Est et ailleurs encore. Avec un peu de chance et beaucoup d’efforts, cet élan nationaliste peut aboutir à un nouvel ordre politique, fondé sur la cohabitation de nations indépendantes et souveraines. Mais nous devons aussi être lucides: les élites «impérialistes libérales» n’ont pas disparu, elles sont seulement affaiblies. Si, en face d’eux, le camp nationaliste ne parvient pas à faire ses preuves, elles ne tarderont pas à revenir dans le jeu. (…) Historiquement, le «nationalisme» décrit une vision du monde où le meilleur système de gouvernement serait la coexistence de nations indépendantes, et libres de tracer leur propre route comme elles l’entendent. On l’oppose à «l’impérialisme», qui cherche à apporter au monde la paix et la prospérité en unifiant l’humanité, autant que possible, sous un seul et même régime politique. Les dirigeants de l’Union européenne, de même que la plupart des élites américaines, croient dur comme fer en l’impérialisme. Ils pensent que la démocratie libérale est la seule forme admissible de gouvernement, et qu’il faut l’imposer progressivement au monde entier. C’est ce que l’on appelle souvent le «mondialisme», et c’est précisément ce que j’entends par «nouvel empire libéral». (…) En Europe, on se désolidarise du militarisme américain: les impérialistes allemands ou bruxellois préfèrent d’autres formes de coercition… mais leur objectif est le même. Regardez comment l’Allemagne cherche à imposer son programme économique à la Grèce ou à l’Italie, ou sa vision immigrationniste à la République tchèque, la Hongrie ou la Pologne. En Italie, le budget a même été rejeté par la Commission européenne! (…) Le conflit entre nationalisme et impérialisme est aussi vieux que l’Occident lui-même. La vision nationaliste est l’un des enseignements politiques fondamentaux de la Bible hébraïque: le Dieu d’Israël fut le premier qui donna à son peuple des frontières, et Moïse avertit les Hébreux qu’ils seraient punis s’ils tentaient de conquérir les terres de leurs voisins, car Yahvé a donné aussi aux autres nations leur territoire et leur liberté. Ainsi, la Bible propose le nationalisme comme alternative aux visées impérialistes des pharaons, mais aussi des Assyriens, des Perses ou, bien sûr, des Babyloniens. Et l’histoire du Moyen Âge ou de l’époque moderne montre que la plupart des grandes nations européennes – la France, l’Angleterre, les Pays-Bas… – se sont inspirées de l’exemple d’Israël. Mais le nationalisme de l’Ancien Testament ne fut pas tout de suite imité par l’Occident. La majeure partie de l’histoire occidentale est dominée par un modèle politique inverse: celui de l’impérialisme romain. C’est de là qu’est né le Saint Empire romain germanique, qui a toujours cherché à étendre sa domination, tout comme le califat musulman. Les Français aussi ont par moments été tentés par l’impérialisme et ont cherché à conquérir le monde: Napoléon, par exemple, était un fervent admirateur de l’Empire romain et n’avait pour seul but que d’imposer son modèle de gouvernement «éclairé» à tous les pays qu’il avait conquis. Ainsi a-t-il rédigé de nouvelles constitutions pour nombre d’entre eux: les Pays-Bas, l’Allemagne, l’Italie, l’Espagne… Son projet, en somme, était le même que celui de l’Union européenne aujourd’hui : réunir tous les peuples sous une seule et même législation. (…) [le modèle nationaliste] permet à chaque nation de décider ses propres lois en vertu de ses traditions particulières. Un tel modèle assure une vraie diversité politique, et permet à tous les pays de déployer leur génie à montrer que leurs institutions et leurs valeurs sont les meilleures. Un tel équilibre international ressemblerait à celui qui s’est établi en Europe après les traités de Westphalie signés en 1648, et qui ont permis l’existence d’une grande diversité de points de vue politiques, institutionnels et religieux. Ces traités ont donné aux nations européennes un dynamisme nouveau: grâce à cette diversité, les nations sont devenues autant de laboratoires d’idées dans lesquels ont été expérimentés, développés et éprouvés les théories philosophiques et les systèmes politiques que l’on associe aujourd’hui au monde occidental. À l’évidence, toutes ces expériences ne se valent pas et certaines n’ont bien sûr pas été de grands succès. Mais la réussite de l’une seule d’entre elles – la France, par exemple – suffit pour que les autres l’imitent et apprennent grâce à son exemple. Tandis que, par contraste, un gouvernement impérialiste comme celui de l’Union européenne tue toute forme de diversité dans l’œuf. Les élites bruxelloises sont persuadées de savoir déjà avec exactitude la façon dont le monde entier doit vivre. Il est pourtant manifeste que ce n’est pas le cas… (…) La diversité des points de vue, et, partant, chacun de ces désaccords, sont une conséquence nécessaire de la liberté humaine, qui fait que chaque nation a ses propres valeurs et ses propres intérêts. La seule manière d’éviter ces désaccords est de faire régner une absolue tyrannie – et c’est du reste ce dont l’Union européenne se rend peu à peu compte: seules les mesures coercitives permettent d’instaurer une relative uniformité entre les États membres. (…) Mais nous devons alors reconnaître, tout aussi humblement, que les mouvements universalistes ne sont pas exempts non plus d’une certaine inclination à la haine ou au sectarisme. Chacun des grands courants universels de l’histoire en a fait montre, qu’il s’agisse du christianisme, de l’islam ou du marxisme. En bâtissant leur empire, les universalistes ont souvent rejeté les particularismes nationaux qui se sont mis en travers de leur chemin et ont refusé d’accepter leur prétention à apporter à l’humanité entière la paix et la prospérité. Cette détestation du particulier, qui est une constante dans tous les grands universalismes, est flagrante aujourd’hui dès lors qu’un pays sort du rang: regardez le torrent de mépris et d’insultes qui s’est répandu contre les Britanniques qui ont opté pour le Brexit, contre Trump, contre Salvini, contre la Hongrie, l’Autriche et la Pologne, contre Israël… Les nouveaux universalistes vouent aux gémonies l’indépendance nationale. (…) un nationaliste ne prétend pas savoir ce qui est bon pour n’importe qui, n’importe où dans le monde. Il fait preuve d’une grande humilité, lui, au moins. N’est-ce pas incroyable de vouloir dicter à tous les pays qui ils doivent choisir pour ministre, quel budget ils doivent voter, et qui sera en droit de traverser leurs frontières? Face à cette arrogance vicieuse, je considère en effet le nationalisme comme une vertu. (…) le nationaliste est vertueux, car il limite sa propre arrogance et laisse les autres conduire leur vie à leur guise. (…) Si les différents gouvernements nationalistes aujourd’hui au pouvoir dans le monde parviennent à prouver leur capacité à diriger un pays de manière responsable, et sans engendrer de haine ou de tensions, alors ils viendront peut-être à bout de l’impérialisme libéral. Ils ont une chance de restaurer un ordre du monde fondé sur la liberté des nations. Il ne tient désormais qu’à eux de la saisir, et je ne peux prédire s’ils y parviendront: j’espère seulement qu’ils auront assez de sagesse et de talent pour cela. Yoram Hazony
Custom quite often wears the mask of nature, and we are taken in [by this] to the point that the practices adopted by nations, based solely on custom, frequently come to seem like natural and universal laws of mankind. John Selden
Selden, and the other profoundly learned men, who drew this petition of right, were as well acquainted, at least, with all the general theories concerning the “rights of men” [as any defenders of the revolution in France]. . . . But, for reasons worthy of that practical wisdom which superseded their theoretic science, they preferred this positive, recorded, hereditary title to all which can be dear to the man and the citizen, to that vague speculative right, which exposed their sure inheritance to be scrambled for and torn to pieces by every wild, litigious spirit. Edmund Burke
I believe the British government forms the best model the world ever produced. Hamilton
Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us. It was not reason that discovered the singular and admirable mechanism of the English constitution…. Accidents probably produced these discoveries, and experience has given a sanction to them. John Dickinson
It yet remains a problem to be solved in human affairs, whether any free government can be permanent, where the public worship of God, and the support of religion, constitute no part of the policy or duty of the state in any assignable shape. John Story
The liberty of the whole earth was depending on the issue of the contest. . . . Rather than it should have failed, I would have seen half the earth desolated. Thomas Jefferson
The year 2016 marked a dramatic change of political course for the English-speaking world, with Britain voting for independence from Europe and the United States electing a president promising a revived American nationalism. Critics see both events as representing a dangerous turn toward “illiberalism” and deplore the apparent departure from “liberal principles” or “liberal democracy,” themes that surfaced repeatedly in conservative publications over the past year. Perhaps the most eloquent among the many spokesmen for this view has been William Kristol, who, in a series of essays in the Weekly Standard, has called for a new movement to arise “in defense of liberal democracy.” In his eyes, the historic task of American conservatism is “to preserve and strengthen American liberal democracy,” and what is needed now is “a new conservatism based on old conservative—and liberal—principles.” Meanwhile, the conservative flagship Commentary published a cover story by the Wall Street Journal’s Sohrab Ahmari entitled “Illiberalism: The Worldwide Crisis,” seeking to raise the alarm about the dangers to liberalism posed by Brexit, Trump, and other phenomena. (…) But we see this confusion of conservatism with liberalism as historically and philosophically misguided. Anglo-American conservatism is a distinct political tradition—one that predates Locke by centuries. Its advocates fought for and successfully established most of the freedoms that are now exclusively associated with Lockean liberalism, although they did so on the basis of tenets very different from Locke’s. Indeed, when Locke published his Two Treatises of Government in 1689, offering the public a sweeping new rationale for the traditional freedoms already known to Englishmen, most defenders of these freedoms were justly appalled. They saw in this new doctrine not a friend to liberty but a product of intellectual folly that would ultimately bring down the entire edifice of freedom. Thus, liberalism and conservatism have been opposed political positions in political theory since the day liberal theorizing first set foot in England. Today’s confusion of conservative political thought with liberalism is in a way understandable, however. In the great twentieth-century battles against totalitarianism, conservatives and liberals were allies: They fought together, along with the Communists, against Nazism. After 1945, conservatives and liberals remained allies in the war against Communism. Over these many decades of joint struggle, what had for centuries been a distinction of vital importance was treated as if it were not terribly important, and in fact, it was largely forgotten. But since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, these circumstances have changed. The challenges facing the Anglo-American tradition are now coming from other directions entirely. Radical Islam, to name one such challenge, is a menace that liberals, for reasons internal to their own view of the political world, find difficult to regard as a threat and especially difficult to oppose in an effective manner. But even more important is the challenge arising from liberalism itself. It is now evident that liberal principles contribute little or nothing to those institutions that were for centuries the bedrock of the Anglo-American political order: nationalism, religious tradition, the Bible as a source of political principles and wisdom, and the family. Indeed, as liberalism has emerged victorious from the battles of the last century, the logic of its doctrines has increasingly turned liberals against all of these conservative institutions. On both of these fronts, the conservative and liberal principles of the Anglo-American tradition are now painfully at cross-purposes. The twentieth-century alliance between conservatism and liberalism is proving increasingly difficult to maintain. Among the effects of the long alliance between conservatism and liberalism has been a tendency of political figures, journalists, and academics to slip back and forth between conservative terms and ideas and liberal ones as if they were interchangeable. And until recently, there seemed to be no great harm in this. Now, however, it is becoming obvious that this lack of clarity is crippling our ability to think about a host of issues, from immigration and foreign wars to the content of the Constitution and the place of religion in education and public life. (…) Living in very different periods, these individuals nevertheless shared common ideas and principles and saw themselves as part of a common tradition of English, and later Anglo-American, constitutionalism. A politically traditionalist outlook of this kind was regarded as the mainstream in both England and America up until the French Revolution and only came to be called “conservative” during the nineteenth century, as it lost ground and became one of two rival camps. Because the name conservative dates from this time of decline, it is often wrongly asserted that those who continued defending the Anglo-American tradition after the revolution—men such as Burke and Hamilton—were the “first conservatives.” (…) The emergence of the Anglo-American conservative tradition can be identified with the words and deeds of a series of towering political and intellectual figures, among whom we can include individuals such as Sir John Fortescue, Richard Hooker, Sir Edward Coke, John Selden, Sir Matthew Hale, Sir William Temple, Jonathan Swift, Josiah Tucker, Edmund Burke, John Dickinson, and Alexander Hamilton. Men such as George Washington, John Adams, and John Marshall, often hastily included among the liberals, would also have placed themselves in this conservative tradition rather than with its opponents, whom they knew all too well.According to Fortescue, the English constitution provides for what he calls “political and royal government,” by which he means that English kings do not rule by their own authority alone (i.e., “royal government”), but together with the representatives of the nation in Parliament and in the courts (i.e., “political government”). In other words, the powers of the English king are limited by the traditional laws of the English nation, in the same way—as Fortescue emphasizes—that the powers of the Jewish king in the Mosaic constitution in Deuteronomy are limited by the traditional laws of the Israelite nation. This is in contrast with the Holy Roman Empire of Fortescue’s day, which was supposedly governed by Roman law, and therefore by the maxim that “what pleases the prince has the force of law,” and in contrast with the kings of France, who governed absolutely. Among other things, the English law is described as providing for the people’s representatives, rather than the king, to determine the laws of the realm and to approve requests from the king for taxes. In addition to this discussion of what later tradition would call the separation of powers and the system of checks and balances, Fortescue also devotes extended discussion to the guarantee of due process under law, which he explores in his discussion of the superior protections afforded to the individual under the English system of trial by jury. Crucially, Fortescue consistently connects the character of a nation’s laws and their protection of private property to economic prosperity, arguing that limited government bolsters such prosperity, while an absolute government leads the people to destitution and ruin. In another of his writings, The Difference between an Absolute and a Limited Monarchy (also known as The Governance of England, c. 1471), he starkly contrasts the well-fed and healthy English population living under their limited government with the French, whose government was constantly confiscating their property and quartering armies in their towns—at the residents’ expense—by unilateral order of the king. (…) Like later conservative tradition, Fortescue does not believe that either scripture or human reason can provide a universal law suitable for all nations. We do find him drawing frequently on the Mosaic constitution and the biblical “Four Books of Kings” (1–2 Samuel and 1–2 Kings) to assist in understanding the political order and the English constitution. Nevertheless, Fortescue emphasizes that the laws of each realm reflect the historic experience and character of each nation, just as the English common law is in accord with England’s historic experience. Thus, for example, Fortescue argues that a nation that is self-disciplined and accustomed to obeying the laws voluntarily rather than by coercion is one that can productively participate in the way it is governed. This, Fortescue proposes, was true of the people of England, while the French, who were of undisciplined character, could be governed only by the harsh and arbitrary rule of absolute royal government. On the other hand, Fortescue also insisted, again in keeping with biblical precedent and later conservative tradition, that this kind of national character was not set in stone, and that such traits could be gradually improved or worsened over time. (…) Fortescue wrote in the decades before the Reformation, and as a firm Catholic. But every page of his work breathes the spirit of English nationalism—the belief that through long centuries of experience, and thanks to a powerful ongoing identification with Hebrew Scripture, the English had succeeded in creating a form of government more conducive to human freedom and flourishing than any other known to man. First printed around 1545, Fortescue’s Praise of the Laws of England spoke in a resounding voice to that period of heightened nationalist sentiment in which English traditions, now inextricably identified with Protestantism, were pitted against the threat of invasion by Spanish-Catholic forces aligned with the Holy Roman Emperor. This environment quickly established Fortescue as England’s first great political theorist, paving the way for him to be read by centuries of law students in both England and America and by educated persons wherever the broader Anglo-American conservative tradition struck root. (…) the decisive chapter in the formation of modern Anglo-American conservatism: the great seventeenth-century battle between defenders of the traditional English constitution against political absolutism on one side, and against the first advocates of a Lockean universalist rationalism on the other (…) is dominated by the figure of John Selden (1584–1654), probably the greatest theorist of Anglo-American conservatism. (…) In 1628, Selden played a leading role in drafting and passing an act of Parliament called the Petition of Right, which sought to restore and safeguard “the divers rights and liberties of the subjects” that had been known under the traditional English constitution. Among other things, it asserted that “your subjects have inherited this freedom, that they should not be compelled to contribute to any tax . . . not set by common consent in Parliament”; that “no freeman may be taken or imprisoned or be disseized of his freehold or liberties, or his free customs . . . but by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land”; and that no man “should be put out of his land or tenements, nor taken, nor imprisoned, nor disinherited nor put to death without being brought to answer by due process of law.” In the Petition of Right, then, we find the famous principle of “no taxation without representation,” as well as versions of the rights enumerated in the Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Amendments of the American Bill of Rights—all declared to be ancient constitutional English freedoms and unanimously approved by Parliament, before Locke was even born. Although not mentioned in the Petition explicitly, freedom of speech had likewise been reaffirmed by Coke as “an ancient custom of Parliament” in the 1590s and was the subject of the so-called Protestation of 1621 that landed Coke, then seventy years old, in the Tower of London for nine months. In other words, Coke, Eliot, and Selden risked everything to defend the same liberties that we ourselves hold dear in the face of an increasingly authoritarian regime. (…) But they did not do so in the name of liberal doctrines of universal reason, natural rights, or “self-evident” truths. These they explicitly rejected because they were conservatives, not liberals. (…) Selden sought to defend conservative traditions, including the English one, not only against the absolutist doctrines of the Stuarts but also against the claims of a universalist rationalism, according to which men could simply consult their own reason, which was the same for everyone, to determine the best constitution for mankind. This rationalist view had begun to collect adherents in England among followers of the great Dutch political theorist Hugo Grotius, whose On the Law of War and Peace (1625) suggested that it might be possible to do away with the traditional constitutions of nations by relying only on the rationality of the individual. (…) Selden responds to the claims of universal reason by arguing for a position that can be called historical empiricism. On this view, our reasoning in political and legal matters should be based upon inherited national tradition. This permits the statesman or jurist to overcome the small stock of observation and experience that individuals are able to accumulate during their own lifetimes (“that kind of ignorant infancy, which our short lives alone allow us”) and to take advantage of “the many ages of former experience and observation,” which permit us to “accumulate years to us, as if we had lived even from the beginning of time.” In other words, by consulting the accumulated experience of the past, we overcome the inherent weakness of individual judgement, bringing to bear the many lifetimes of observation by our forebears, who wrestled with similar questions under diverse conditions. (…)  Recalling the biblical Jeremiah’s insistence on an empirical study of the paths of old (Jer. 6:16), Selden argues that the correct method is that “all roads must be carefully examined. We must ask about the ancient paths, and only what is truly the best may be chosen.”  (…) Selden recognizes that, in making these selections from the traditions of the past, we tacitly rely upon a higher criterion for selection, a natural law established by God, which prescribes “what is truly best” for mankind in the most elementary terms. In his Natural and National Law, Selden explains that this natural law has been discovered over long generations since the biblical times and has come down to us in various versions. Of these, the most reliable is that of the Talmud, which describes the seven laws of the children of Noah prohibiting murder, theft, sexual perversity, cruelty to beasts, idolatry and defaming God, and requiring courts of law to enforce justice. The experience of thousands of years has taught us that these laws frame the peace and prosperity that is the end of all nations, and that they are the unseen root from which the diverse laws of all the nations ultimately derive. (…) In doing so, he seeks to gradually approach, by trial and error, the best that is possible for each nation. (…)  But (…) Stuart absolutism eventually pressed England toward civil war and, finally, to a Puritan military dictatorship that not only executed the king but destroyed Parliament and the constitution as well. Selden did not live to see the constitution restored. The regicide regime subsequently offered England several brand-new constitutions, none of which proved workable, and within eleven years it had collapsed. In 1660, two eminent disciples of Selden, Edward Hyde (afterward Earl of Clarendon) and Sir Matthew Hale, played a leading role in restoring the constitution and the line of Stuart kings. When the Catholic James II succeeded to the throne in 1685, fear of a relapse into papism and even of a renewed attempt to establish absolutism moved the rival political factions of the country to unite in inviting the next Protestants in line to the throne. The king’s daughter Mary and her husband, Prince William of Orange, the Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic, crossed the channel to save Protestant England and its constitution. Parliament, having confirmed the willingness of the new joint monarchs to protect the English from “all other attempts upon their religion, rights and liberties,” in 1689 established the new king and queen on the throne and ratified England’s famous Bill of Rights. This new document reasserted the ancient rights invoked in the earlier Petition of Right, among other things affirming the right of Protestant subjects to “have arms for their defense” and the right of “freedom of speech and debates” in Parliament, and that “excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted”—the basis for the First, Second, and Eighth Amendments of the American Bill of Rights. Freedom of speech was quickly extended to the wider public, with the termination of English press licensing laws a few years later. The restoration of a Protestant monarch and the adoption of the Bill of Rights were undertaken by a Parliament united around Seldenian principles. What came to be called the “Glorious Revolution” was glorious precisely because it reaffirmed the traditional English constitution and protected the English nation from renewed attacks on “their religion, rights and liberties.” Such attacks came from absolutists like Sir Robert Filmer on the one hand, whose Patriarcha (published posthumously, 1680) advocated authoritarian government as the only legitimate one, and by radicals like John Locke on the other. Locke’s Two Treatises of Government (1689) responded to the crisis by arguing for the right of the people to dissolve the traditional constitution and reestablish it according to universal reason. Over the course of the seventeenth century, English conservatism was formed into a coherent and unmistakable political philosophy utterly opposed both to the absolutism of the Stuarts, Hobbes, and Filmer (what would later be called “the Right”), as well as to liberal theories of universal reason advanced first by Grotius and then by Locke (“the Left”). The centrist conservative view was to remain the mainstream understanding of the English constitution for a century and a half, defended by leading Whig intellectuals in works from William Atwood’s Fundamental Constitution of the English Government (1690) to Josiah Tucker’s A Treatise of Civil Government (1781), which strongly opposed both absolutism and Lockean theories of universal rights. This is the view upon which men like Blackstone, Burke, Washington, and Hamilton were educated. Not only in England but in British America, lawyers were trained in the common law by studying Coke’s Institutes of the Lawes of England (1628–44) and Hale’s History of the Common Law of England (1713). In both, the law of the land was understood to be the traditional English constitution and common law, amended as needed for local purposes. (…)  We have described the Anglo-American conservative tradition as subscribing to a historical empiricism, which proposes that political knowledge is gained by examining the long history of the customary laws of a given nation and the consequences when these laws have been altered in one direction or another. Conservatives understand that a jurist must exercise reason and judgment, of course. But this reasoning is about how best to adapt traditional law to present circumstances, making such changes as are needed for the betterment of the state and of the public, while preserving as much as possible the overall frame of the law. To this we have opposed a standpoint that can be called rationalist. Rationalists have a different view of the role of reason in political thought, and in fact a different understanding of what reason itself is. Rather than arguing from the historical experience of nations, they set out by asserting general axioms that they believe to be true of all human beings, and that they suppose will be accepted by all human beings examining them with their native rational abilities. From these they deduce the appropriate constitution or laws for all men. (…) Locke is known philosophically as an empiricist. But his reputation in this regard is based largely on his Essay concerning Human Understanding (1689), which is an influential exercise in empirical psychology. His Second Treatise of Government is not, however, a similar effort to bring an empirical standpoint to the theory of the state. Instead, it begins with a series of axioms that are without any evident connection to what can be known from the historical and empirical study of the state. Among other things, Locke asserts that, (1) prior to the establishment of government, men exist in a “state of nature,” in which (2) “all men are naturally in a state of perfect freedom,” as well as in (3) a “state of perfect equality, where naturally there is no superiority or jurisdiction of one over another.” Moreover, (4) this state of nature “has a law of nature to govern it”; and (5) this law of nature is, as it happens, nothing other than human “reason” itself, which “teaches all mankind, who will but consult it.” It is this universal reason, the same among all mankind, that leads them to (6) terminate the state of nature, “agreeing together mutually to enter into . . . one body politic” by an act of free consent. From these six axioms, Locke then proceeds to deduce the proper character of the political order for all nations on earth. (…)  Faced with this mass of unverifiable assertions, empiricist political theorists such as Hume, Smith, and Burke rejected all of Locke’s axioms and sought to rebuild political philosophy on the basis of things that can be known from history and from an examination of actual human societies and governments. (…) While Locke’s rationalist theories made limited headway in England, they were all the rage in France. Rousseau’s On the Social Contract (1762) went where others had feared to tread, embracing Locke’s system of axioms for correct political thought and calling upon mankind to consent only to the one legitimate constitution dictated by reason. Within thirty years, Rousseau, Voltaire, and the other French imitators of Locke’s rationalist politics received what they had demanded in the form of the French Revolution. The 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was followed by the Reign of Terror for those who would not listen to reason. Napoleon’s imperialist liberalism rapidly followed, bringing universal reason and the “rights of man” to the whole of continental Europe by force of arms, at a cost of millions of lives. In 1790, a year after the beginning of the French Revolution, the Anglo-Irish thinker and Whig parliamentarian Edmund Burke composed his famous defense of the English constitutional tradition against the liberal doctrines of universal reason and universal rights, entitled Reflections on the Revolution in France. Burke’s argument is frequently quoted today by conservatives who assume that his target was Rousseau and his followers in France. But Burke’s attack was not primarily aimed at Rousseau, who had few enthusiasts in Britain or America at the time. The actual target of his attack was contemporary followers of Grotius and Locke—individuals such as Richard Price, Joseph Priestley, Charles James Fox, Charles Grey, Thomas Paine, and Thomas Jefferson. Price, who was the explicit subject of Burke’s attack in the first pages of Reflections on the Revolution in France, had opened his Observations on the Nature of Civil Liberty (1776) with the assertion that “the principles on which I have argued form the foundation of every state as far as it is free; and are the same with those taught by Mr. Locke.” And much the same could be said of the others, all of whom followed Locke in claiming that the only true foundation for political and constitutional thought was precisely in those “general theories concerning the rights of men” that Burke believed would bring turmoil and death to one country after another. The carnage taking place in France triggered a furious debate in England. It pitted supporters of the conservatism of Coke and Selden (both Whigs and Tories) against admirers of Locke’s universal rights theories (the so-called New Whigs). The conservatives insisted that these theories would uproot every traditional political and religious institution in England, just as they were doing in France. (…) Burke’s conservative defense of the traditional English constitution enjoyed a large measure of success in Britain, where it was continued after his death by figures such as Canning, Wellington, and Disraeli. That this is so is obvious from the fact that institutions such as the monarchy, the House of Lords, and the established Church of England, not to mention the common law itself, were able to withstand the gale winds of universal reason and universal rights, and to this day have their staunch supporters. But what of America? Was the American revolution an upheaval based on Lockean universal reason and universal rights? To hear many conservatives talk today, one would think this were so, and that there never were any conservatives in the American mainstream, only liberals of different shades. The reality, however, was rather different. When the American English, as Burke called them, rebelled against the British monarch, there were already two distinct political theories expressed among the rebels, and the opposition between these two camps only grew with time. First, there were those who admired the English constitution that they had inherited and studied. Believing they had been deprived of their rights under the English constitution, their aim was to regain these rights. Identifying themselves with the tradition of Coke and Selden, they hoped to achieve a victory against royal absolutism comparable to what their English forefathers had achieved in the Petition of Right and Bill of Rights. To individuals of this type, the word revolution still had its older meaning, invoking something that “revolves” and would, through their efforts, return to its rightful place—in effect, a restoration. Alexander Hamilton was probably the best-known exponent of this kind of conservative politics (…) And it is evident that they were quietly supported behind the scenes by other adherents of this view, among them the president of the convention, General George Washington. Second, there were true revolutionaries, liberal followers of Locke such as Jefferson, who detested England and believed—just as the French followers of Rousseau believed—that the dictates of universal reason made the true rights of man evident to all. For them, the traditional English constitution was not the source of their freedoms but rather something to be swept away before the rights dictated by universal reason. And indeed, during the French Revolution, Jefferson and his supporters embraced it as a purer version of what the Americans had started. (…) The tension between these conservative and liberal camps finds rather dramatic expression in America’s founding documents: The Declaration of Independence, drafted by Jefferson in 1776, is famous for resorting, in its preamble, to the Lockean doctrine of universal rights as “self-evident” before the light of reason. Similarly, the Articles of Confederation, negotiated the following year as the constitution of the new United States of America, embody a radical break with the traditional English constitution. These Articles asserted the existence of thirteen independent states, at the same time establishing a weak representative assembly over them without even the power of taxation, and requiring assent by nine of thirteen states to enact policy. The Articles likewise made no attempt at all to balance the powers of this assembly, effectively an executive, with separate legislative or judicial branches of government. The Articles of Confederation came close to destroying the United States. After a decade of disorder in both foreign and economic affairs, the Articles were replaced by the Constitution, drafted at a convention initiated by Hamilton and James Madison, and presided over by a watchful Washington, while Jefferson was away in France. Anyone comparing the Constitution that emerged with the earlier Articles of Confederation immediately recognizes that what took place at this convention was a reprise of the Glorious Revolution of 1689. Despite being adapted to the American context, the document that the convention produced proposed a restoration of the fundamental forms of the English constitution: a strong president, designated by an electoral college (in place of the hereditary monarchy); the president balanced in strikingly English fashion by a powerful bicameral legislature with the power of taxation and legislation; the division of the legislature between a quasi-aristocratic, appointed Senate and a popularly elected House; and an independent judiciary. Even the American Bill of Rights of 1789 is modeled upon the Petition of Right and the English Bill of Rights, largely elaborating the same rights that had been described by Coke and Selden and their followers, and breathing not a word anywhere about universal reason or universal rights. The American Constitution did depart from the traditional English constitution, however, adapting it to local conditions on certain key points. The Americans, who had no nobility and no tradition of hereditary office, declined to institute these now. Moreover, the Constitution of 1787 allowed slavery, which was forbidden in England—a wretched innovation for which America would pay a price the framers could not have imagined in their wildest nightmares. Another departure—or apparent departure—was the lack of a provision for a national church, enshrined in the First Amendment in the form of a prohibition on congressional legislation “respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” The English constitutional tradition, of course, gave a central role to the Protestant religion, which was held to be indispensable and inextricably tied to English identity (although not incompatible with a broad measure of toleration). But the British state, in certain respects federative, permitted separate, officially established national churches in Scotland and Ireland. This British acceptance of a diversity of established churches is partially echoed in the American Constitution, which permitted the respective states to support their own established churches, or to require that public offices in the state be held by Protestants or by Christians, well into the nineteenth century. When these facts are taken into account, the First Amendment appears less an attempt to put an end to established religion than a provision for keeping the peace among the states by delegating forms of religious establishment to the state level. As early as 1802, however, Jefferson, now president, announced  that the First Amendment’s rejection of a national church in fact should be interpreted as an “act of the whole American people . . . building a wall of separation between church and state.” This characterization of the American Constitution as endorsing a “separation of church and state” was surely overwrought, and more compatible with French liberalism—which regarded public religion as abhorrent to reason—than with the actual place of state religion among “the whole American people” at the time. Yet on this point, Jefferson has emerged victorious. In the years that followed, his “wall of separation between church and state” interpretation was increasingly considered to be an integral part of the American Constitution, even if one that had not been included in the actual text. Lockean liberalism grew increasingly dominant in America after Jefferson’s election. Hamilton’s death in a duel in 1804, at the age of 47, was an especially heavy blow that left American conservatism without its most able spokesman. Nevertheless, the tradition of Selden and Burke was taken up by Americans of the next generation, including two of the country’s most prominent jurists, New York chancellor James Kent (1763–1847) and Supreme Court justice Joseph Story (1779–1845). Story’s influence was especially significant. Although appointed to the Supreme Court by Jefferson in the hope of undermining Chief Justice John Marshall, Story’s opinions almost immediately displayed the opposite inclination, and continued to do so throughout his thirty-four-year tenure on the court. Perhaps Story’s greatest contribution to the American conservative tradition is his famous Commentaries on the Constitution (3 vols., 1833), which were dedicated to Marshall and went on to be the most important and influential interpretation of the American constitutional tradition in the nineteenth century. These were overtly conservative in spirit, citing Burke with approval and repeatedly criticizing not only Locke’s theories but Jefferson himself. Among other things, Story forcefully rejected Jefferson’s claim that the American founding had been based on universal rights determined by reason, emphasizing that it was the rights of the English traditional law that Americans had always recognized and continued to recognize. (…) With Selden, we believe that, in their campaign for universal “liberal democracy,” liberals have confused certain historical-empirical principles of the traditional Anglo-American constitution, painstakingly developed and inculcated over centuries (Principle 1), for universal truths that are equally accessible to all human beings, regardless of historical or cultural circumstances. This means that, like all rationalists, they are engaged in applying local truths, which may hold good under certain conditions, to quite different situations and circumstances, where they often go badly wrong. For conservatives, these failures—for example, the repeated collapse of liberal constitutions in places such as Mexico, France, Germany, Italy, Nigeria, Russia, and Iraq, among many others—suggest that the principles in question have been overextended and should be regarded as true only within a narrower range of conditions. Liberals, on the other hand, explain such failures as a result of “poor implementation,” leaving liberal democracy as a universal truth that remains untouched by experience and unassailable, no matter what the circumstances. (…) Burke and Hamilton belonged to a generation that was still educated in the significance of the Anglo-American tradition as a whole. Only a few decades later, this had begun to change, and by the end of the nineteenth century, conservative views were increasingly in the minority and defensive both in Britain and America. But conservatism was really only broken in a decisive way by Franklin Roosevelt in America in 1932, and by Labour in Britain in 1945. At this point, socialism displaced liberalism as the worldview of the parties of the “Left,” driving some liberals to join with the last vestiges of the conservative tradition in the parties of the “Right.” In this environment, new leaders and movements did arise and succeed from time to time in raising the banner of Anglo-American conservatism once more. But these conservatives were living on a shattered political and philosophical landscape, having lost much of the chain of transmission that had connected earlier conservatives to their forefathers. Thus their roots remained shallow, and their victories, however impressive, brought about no long-term conservative restoration. The most significant of these conservative revivals was, of course, the one that reached its peak in the 1980s under Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Ronald Reagan. Thatcher and Reagan were genuine and instinctive conservatives, displaying traditional Anglo-American conservative attachments to nation and religion, as well as to limited government and individual freedom. They also recognized and gave voice to the profound “special relationship” that binds Britain and America together. Coming to power at a time of deep crisis in the struggle against Communism, their renewed conservatism succeeded in winning the Cold War and freeing foreign nations from oppression, in addition to liberating their own economies, which had long been shackled by socialism. In both countries, these triumphs shifted political discourse rightward for a generation. Yet the Reagan-Thatcher moment, for all its success, failed to touch the depths of the political culture in America and Britain. Confronted by a university system devoted almost exclusively to socialist and liberal theorizing, their movement at no point commanded the resources needed to revive Anglo-American conservatism as a genuine force in fundamental arenas such as jurisprudence, political theory, history, philosophy, and education—disciplines without which a true restoration was impossible. Throughout the conservative revival of the 1980s, academic training in government and political theory, for instance, continued to maintain its almost complete boycott of conservative thinkers such as Fortescue, Coke, Selden, and Hale, just as it continued its boycott of the Bible as a source of English and American political principles. Similarly, academic jurisprudence remained a subject that is taught as a contest among abstract liberal theories. Education of this kind meant that a degree from a prestigious university all but guaranteed one’s ignorance of the Anglo-American conservative tradition, but only a handful of conservative intellectual figures, most visibly Russell Kirk and Irving Kristol, seem to have been alert to the seriousness of this problem. On the whole, the conservative revival of those years remained resolutely focused on the pressing policy issues of the day, leaving liberalism virtually unchallenged as the worldview that conservatives were taught at university or when they picked up a book on the history of ideas. (…) There may have been genuine advantages to soft-pedaling differences between conservatives and liberals until the 1980s, when all the strength that could be mustered had to be directed toward defeating Communism abroad and socialism at home. But we are no longer living in the 1980s. Those battles were won, and today we face new dangers. The most important among these is the inability of countries such as America and Britain, having been stripped of the nationalist and religious traditions that held them together for centuries, to sustain themselves while a universalist liberalism continues, year after year, to break down these historic foundations of their strength. Under such conditions of internal disintegration, there is a palpable danger that liberal rationalism, having established itself in a monopoly position in the state, will drive a broad public that cannot accept its regimented view of the world into the hands of genuinely authoritarian movements. Liberals of various persuasions have, in their own way, sought to warn us about this, from Fareed Zakaria’s “The Rise of Illiberal Democracy” in Foreign Affairs (1997) to the Economist’s “Illiberalism: Playing with Fear” (2016) and Commentary’s “Illiberalism: The Worldwide Crisis,” mentioned earlier. These and many other publications have made intensive use of the term illiberal as an epithet to describe those who have strayed from the path of Lockean liberalism. In so doing, they divide the political universe into two: there are liberals—those decent persons who are willing to exercise reason in the universally accepted manner and come to the appropriate liberal conclusions; and there are those others—the “illiberals,” who, out of ignorance, resentment, or some atavistic hatred, will not get with the program. When things are divided up this way, the latter group ends up including everyone from Brexiteers, Trump supporters, Evangelical Christians, and Orthodox Jews to dictators, Iranian ayatollahs, and Nazis. Once things are framed in this way, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that everyone in that second group is in some degree a threat that must be combated. We conservatives, however, have our own preferred division of the political universe: one in which Anglo-American conservatism appears as a distinct political category that is obviously neither authoritarian nor liberal. With the rest of the Anglo-American conservative tradition, we uphold the principles of limited government and individual liberties. But we also see clearly (again, in keeping with our conservative tradition) that the only forces that give the state its internal coherence and stability, holding limited government in place while staving off authoritarianism, are our nationalist and religious traditions. These nationalist and religious principles are not liberal. They are prior to liberalism, in conflict with liberalism, and presently being destroyed by liberalism. Our world desperately needs to hear a clear conservative voice. Any continued confusion of conservative principles with the liberalism on our Left, or with the authoritarianism on our Right, can only do harm. The time has arrived when conservatives must speak in our own voice again. In doing so, we will discover that we can provide the political foundations that so many now seek, but have been unable to find.
In our own day, we recognize the clash between conservatism and liberalism in the following areas, among others (here described only very briefly, and so in overly simple terms): Liberal Empire. Because liberalism is thought to be a dictate of universal reason, liberals tend to believe that any country not already governed as a liberal democracy should be pressed—or even coerced—to adopt this form of government. Conservatives, on the other hand, recognize that different societies are held together and kept at peace in different ways, so that the universal application of liberal doctrines often brings collapse and chaos, doing more harm than good. International Bodies. Similarly, liberals believe that, since liberal principles are universal, there is little harm done in reassigning the powers of government to international bodies. Conservatives, on the other hand, believe that such international organizations possess no sound governing traditions and no loyalty to particular national populations that might restrain their spurious theorizing about universal rights. They therefore see such bodies as inevitably tending to arbitrariness and autocracy. Immigration. Liberals believe that, since liberal principles are accessible to all, there is nothing to be feared in large-scale immigration from countries with national and religious traditions very different from ours. Conservatives see successful large-scale immigration as possible only where the immigrants are strongly motivated to integrate and assisted in assimilating the national traditions of their new home country. In the absence of these conditions, the result will be chronic intercultural tension and violence. Law. Liberals regard the laws of a nation as emerging from the tension between positive law and the pronouncements of universal reason, as expressed by the courts. Conservatives reject the supposed universal reason of judges, which often amounts to little more than their succumbing to passing fashion. But conservatives also oppose an excessive regard for written documents, which leads, for example, to the liberal mythology of America as a “creedal nation” (or a “propositional nation”) created and defined solely by the products of abstract reason that are supposedly found in the American Declaration of Independence and Constitution. Economy. Liberals regard the universal market economy, operating without regard to borders, as a dictate of universal reason and applicable equally to all nations. They therefore recognize no legitimate economic aims other than the creation of a “level field” on which all nations participate in accordance with universal, rational rules. Conservatives regard the market economy and free enterprise as indispensable for the advancement of the nation in its wealth and wellbeing. But they see economic arrangements as inevitably varying from one country to another, reflecting the particular historical experiences and innovations of each nation as it competes to gain advantage for its people. Education. Liberals believe that schools should teach students to recognize the Lockean goods of liberty and equality as the universal aims of political order, and to see America’s founding political documents as having largely achieved these aims. Conservatives believe education should focus on the particular character of the Anglo-American constitutional and religious tradition, with its roots in the Bible, and on the way in which this tradition has given rise to a unique family of nations with a distinctive political thought and practice that has influenced the world. Public Religion. Liberals believe that universal reason is the necessary and sufficient basis for just and moral government. This means that the religious traditions of the nation, which had earlier been the basis for a public understanding of justice and right, can be replaced in public discourse by universal reason itself. In its current form, liberalism asserts that all governments should embrace a Jeffersonian “wall separating church and state,” whose purpose is to banish the influence of religion from public life, relegating it to the private sphere. Conservatives hold that none of this is true. They see human reason as producing a constant profusion of ever-changing views concerning justice and morals—a fact that is evident today in the constant assertion of new and rapidly multiplying human rights. Conservatives hold that the only stable basis for national independence, justice, and public morals is a strong biblical tradition in government and public life. They reject the doctrine of separation of church and state, instead advocating an integration of religion into public life that also offers broad toleration of diverse religious views.
Hazony reviews the history of the conflict between nationalism and imperialism, from the Tower of Babel to the latest anti-Israeli U.N. resolution. The political concept of the independent national state, as an alternative to empire and tribalism, begins with the Hebrew Bible. Ancient Israel was a national state posed against empires in Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, Persia, and Rome. Hazony de­clares that the Israelite nation was not based on race but on a “shared understanding of history, language, and religion.” He cites Exodus, noting that some Egyptians joined the Hebrews in fleeing Pharaoh, and points out that other foreigners joined the Jewish people once they had accepted “Israel’s God, laws, and understanding of history.” In Hazony’s telling, after the fall of the Roman imperium, the ideal of a universal empire lived on in the papacy and in the German-led Holy Roman Empire. The emergence of Protestantism resurrected the Hebrew Bible’s concept of the national state. For example, Dutch Protestant rebels in their war with imperial Spain modeled themselves on ancient Israelis fighting for national freedom against the Egyptian and Babylonian empires. The Thirty Years’ War was not simply a religious conflict but a struggle that pitted nationalism against imperialism, with the states of France (Catholic), the Netherlands (Calvinist), and Sweden (Lutheran) fighting against the German-Spanish Hapsburg empire.  Hazony describes a new “Protestant construction” of the West inspired by the Hebrew Bible. It was based on two core principles: national self-determination and a “moral minimum” order, roughly corresponding to recognizing the Ten Commandments as natural law. This Protestant construction has been challenged by a “liberal construction” based on individual rights and a universal order. Beginning in the Enlightenment with Locke and Kant, but particularly since World War II, the liberal construction has largely replaced the Protestant construction among Western elites, though Hazony optimistically remarks that the ideas of the Protestant construction are still strong in the U.S. and Britain. Further, the liberal construction has proved to be illiberal, leading to the suppression of free speech, “public shaming” campaigns, and “heresy hunts.” Hazony laments that “Western democracies are rapidly becoming one big university campus.” Hazony asserts that the “neutral state is a myth.” While the national state has historically been successful, a purely “neutral” or “civic” state based only on formal law and abstract principles and without attachments to a particular culture, language, religion, tradition, history, or shared sacrifice is unable to inspire the necessary mutual loyalty and national cohesion required for a free society to survive. He identifies the United States, Britain, and France as national, as opposed to neutral or civic, states.  One of Hazony’s most powerful insights is his understanding of the role that hatred plays in the conflict between nationalists and globalists. One hears repeatedly that nationalism means hatred of the “other.” Hazony, however, successfully flips the argument. He notes that “anti-nationalist hate” is as great as or greater than the hatred emanating from nationalists. In fact, the forces supporting universalism hate the particular, especially when particularist resistance to globalist homogenization “proves itself resilient and enduring.” Thus, “liberal internationalism is not merely a positive agenda. . . . It is an imperialist ideology that incites against . . . nationalists, seeking their delegitimization wherever they appear” throughout the West. Nowhere is this clearer than in the intense antipathy such liberal internationalists feel towards Israel. (…) He concludes that since World War II, and particularly since the 1990s, in elite circles in the West, a Kantian post-national moral paradigm has replaced the old liberal-nationalist paradigm of a world of independent states in which the Zionist dream was born.  This new paradigm insists that national states should increasingly cede sovereignty to supranational institutions, especially in matters of war and peace. In the new paradigm, Israel’s use of force to defend itself is seen as morally illegitimate. The leadership of the European Union and American progressives, for the most part, adheres to the new post-national paradigm; hence, they constantly excoriate Israeli attempts at self-defense.  Hazony declares that “the European Union has caused severe damage to the principle that originally granted legitimacy to Israel as an independent national state: the principle of national freedom and self-determination.” (There is also a faction of Americans, Hazony writes, who favor a different, more muscular type of imperialist project: the establishment of a pax Americana in which America would serve as a contemporary Roman empire, providing peace and security for the entire world and policing the internal affairs of recalcitrant national states that are insufficiently liberal.)  For the EU and Western progressives, Hazony explains, the horror of Auschwitz was the result of atrocities committed by a national state, Germany, infused with a fanatical nationalism. But, as Hazony argues, Hitler’s genocide was inspired by a belief in Aryan racial superiority and imperialism. Hitler cared little for the German nation per se. For example, near the end of World War II, he told his confidant Albert Speer not to “worry” about the “German people”; they might as well perish, for “they had proven to be the weaker [nation] and the future belongs solely to the stronger eastern nation.” Not exactly the sentiments of a true nationalist. On the other hand, Hazony says, for Israelis, Auschwitz was the result of powerlessness: Jews did not have their own national state and the requisite military capability to protect themselves. (…) It is exactly this very human aspiration for national independence hailed by the liberal nationalists of yesteryear (e.g., Garibaldi, Kossuth, Herzl) that the new imperialists of 21st-century globalism (Merkel, Juncker, Soros) scorn. Hazony writes that other nations too have been subject to campaigns of vilification from European and transnational elites when they have ignored supranational authority and acted as independent national states. The United States, in particular, has been excoriated (since long before the Trump administration) for refusing to join the Interna­tional Criminal Court and the Kyoto Protocol and for deciding for itself when its national interest requires the use of force. Recently, globalist wrath “has been extended to Britain” because it returned “to a course of national independence and self-determination and to nations such as Czechia, Hungary, and Poland that insist on maintaining an immigration policy of their own that does not conform to the European Union’s theories concerning refugee resettlement. John Fonte
Aujourd’hui, on ne cesse de nous répéter que le nationalisme a provoqué les deux guerres mondiales, et on lui impute même la responsabilité de la Shoah. Mais cette lecture historique n’est pas satisfaisante. J’appelle «nationaliste» quelqu’un qui souhaite vivre dans un monde constitué de nations indépendantes. De sorte qu’à mes yeux, Hitler n’était pas le moins du monde nationaliste. Il était même tout le contraire: Hitler méprisait la vision nationaliste, et il appelle dans Mein Kampf à détruire les autres Etats-nations européens pour que les Allemands soient les maîtres du monde. Dès son origine, le nazisme est une entreprise impérialiste, pas nationaliste. Quant à la Première Guerre mondiale, le nationalisme est loin de l’avoir déclenchée à lui seul! Le nationalisme serbe a fourni un prétexte, mais en réalité c’est la visée impérialiste des grandes puissances européennes (l’Allemagne, la France, l’Angleterre) qui a transformé ce conflit régional en une guerre planétaire. Ainsi, le principal moteur des deux guerres mondiales était l’impérialisme, pas le nationalisme. (…) Le nationalisme est en effet en vogue en ce moment: c’est du jamais-vu depuis 1990, date à laquelle Margaret Thatcher a été renversée par son propre camp à cause de son hostilité à l’Union européenne. Depuis plusieurs décennies, les principaux partis politiques aux Etats-Unis et en Europe, de droite comme de gauche, ont souscrit à ce que l’on pourrait appeler «l’impérialisme libéral», c’est-à-dire l’idée selon laquelle le monde entier devrait être régi par une seule et même législation, imposée si besoin par la contrainte. Mais aujourd’hui, une génération plus tard, une demande de souveraineté nationale émerge et s’est exprimée avec force aux Etats-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, en Italie, en Europe de l’Est et ailleurs encore. Avec un peu de chance et beaucoup d’efforts, cet élan nationaliste peut aboutir à un nouvel ordre politique, fondé sur la cohabitation de nations indépendantes et souveraines. Mais nous devons aussi être lucides: les élites «impérialistes libérales» n’ont pas disparu, elles sont seulement affaiblies. Si, en face d’eux, le camp nationaliste ne parvient pas à faire ses preuves, elles ne tarderont pas à revenir dans le jeu. (…) Historiquement, le «nationalisme» décrit une vision du monde où le meilleur système de gouvernement serait la coexistence de nations indépendantes, et libres de tracer leur propre route comme elles l’entendent. On l’oppose à «l’impérialisme», qui cherche à apporter au monde la paix et la prospérité en unifiant l’humanité, autant que possible, sous un seul et même régime politique. Les dirigeants de l’Union européenne, de même que la plupart des élites américaines, croient dur comme fer en l’impérialisme. Ils pensent que la démocratie libérale est la seule forme admissible de gouvernement, et qu’il faut l’imposer progressivement au monde entier. C’est ce que l’on appelle souvent le «mondialisme», et c’est précisément ce que j’entends par «nouvel empire libéral». (…) En Europe, on se désolidarise du militarisme américain: les impérialistes allemands ou bruxellois préfèrent d’autres formes de coercition… mais leur objectif est le même. Regardez comment l’Allemagne cherche à imposer son programme économique à la Grèce ou à l’Italie, ou sa vision immigrationniste à la République tchèque, la Hongrie ou la Pologne. En Italie, le budget a même été rejeté par la Commission européenne! (…) Le conflit entre nationalisme et impérialisme est aussi vieux que l’Occident lui-même. La vision nationaliste est l’un des enseignements politiques fondamentaux de la Bible hébraïque: le Dieu d’Israël fut le premier qui donna à son peuple des frontières, et Moïse avertit les Hébreux qu’ils seraient punis s’ils tentaient de conquérir les terres de leurs voisins, car Yahvé a donné aussi aux autres nations leur territoire et leur liberté. Ainsi, la Bible propose le nationalisme comme alternative aux visées impérialistes des pharaons, mais aussi des Assyriens, des Perses ou, bien sûr, des Babyloniens. Et l’histoire du Moyen Âge ou de l’époque moderne montre que la plupart des grandes nations européennes – la France, l’Angleterre, les Pays-Bas… – se sont inspirées de l’exemple d’Israël. Mais le nationalisme de l’Ancien Testament ne fut pas tout de suite imité par l’Occident. La majeure partie de l’histoire occidentale est dominée par un modèle politique inverse: celui de l’impérialisme romain. C’est de là qu’est né le Saint Empire romain germanique, qui a toujours cherché à étendre sa domination, tout comme le califat musulman. Les Français aussi ont par moments été tentés par l’impérialisme et ont cherché à conquérir le monde: Napoléon, par exemple, était un fervent admirateur de l’Empire romain et n’avait pour seul but que d’imposer son modèle de gouvernement «éclairé» à tous les pays qu’il avait conquis. Ainsi a-t-il rédigé de nouvelles constitutions pour nombre d’entre eux: les Pays-Bas, l’Allemagne, l’Italie, l’Espagne… Son projet, en somme, était le même que celui de l’Union européenne aujourd’hui : réunir tous les peuples sous une seule et même législation. (…) [le modèle nationaliste] permet à chaque nation de décider ses propres lois en vertu de ses traditions particulières. Un tel modèle assure une vraie diversité politique, et permet à tous les pays de déployer leur génie à montrer que leurs institutions et leurs valeurs sont les meilleures. Un tel équilibre international ressemblerait à celui qui s’est établi en Europe après les traités de Westphalie signés en 1648, et qui ont permis l’existence d’une grande diversité de points de vue politiques, institutionnels et religieux. Ces traités ont donné aux nations européennes un dynamisme nouveau: grâce à cette diversité, les nations sont devenues autant de laboratoires d’idées dans lesquels ont été expérimentés, développés et éprouvés les théories philosophiques et les systèmes politiques que l’on associe aujourd’hui au monde occidental. À l’évidence, toutes ces expériences ne se valent pas et certaines n’ont bien sûr pas été de grands succès. Mais la réussite de l’une seule d’entre elles – la France, par exemple – suffit pour que les autres l’imitent et apprennent grâce à son exemple. Tandis que, par contraste, un gouvernement impérialiste comme celui de l’Union européenne tue toute forme de diversité dans l’œuf. Les élites bruxelloises sont persuadées de savoir déjà avec exactitude la façon dont le monde entier doit vivre. Il est pourtant manifeste que ce n’est pas le cas… (…) La diversité des points de vue, et, partant, chacun de ces désaccords, sont une conséquence nécessaire de la liberté humaine, qui fait que chaque nation a ses propres valeurs et ses propres intérêts. La seule manière d’éviter ces désaccords est de faire régner une absolue tyrannie – et c’est du reste ce dont l’Union européenne se rend peu à peu compte: seules les mesures coercitives permettent d’instaurer une relative uniformité entre les États membres. (…) Mais nous devons alors reconnaître, tout aussi humblement, que les mouvements universalistes ne sont pas exempts non plus d’une certaine inclination à la haine ou au sectarisme. Chacun des grands courants universels de l’histoire en a fait montre, qu’il s’agisse du christianisme, de l’islam ou du marxisme. En bâtissant leur empire, les universalistes ont souvent rejeté les particularismes nationaux qui se sont mis en travers de leur chemin et ont refusé d’accepter leur prétention à apporter à l’humanité entière la paix et la prospérité. Cette détestation du particulier, qui est une constante dans tous les grands universalismes, est flagrante aujourd’hui dès lors qu’un pays sort du rang: regardez le torrent de mépris et d’insultes qui s’est répandu contre les Britanniques qui ont opté pour le Brexit, contre Trump, contre Salvini, contre la Hongrie, l’Autriche et la Pologne, contre Israël… Les nouveaux universalistes vouent aux gémonies l’indépendance nationale. (…) un nationaliste ne prétend pas savoir ce qui est bon pour n’importe qui, n’importe où dans le monde. Il fait preuve d’une grande humilité, lui, au moins. N’est-ce pas incroyable de vouloir dicter à tous les pays qui ils doivent choisir pour ministre, quel budget ils doivent voter, et qui sera en droit de traverser leurs frontières? Face à cette arrogance vicieuse, je considère en effet le nationalisme comme une vertu. (…) le nationaliste est vertueux, car il limite sa propre arrogance et laisse les autres conduire leur vie à leur guise. (…) Si les différents gouvernements nationalistes aujourd’hui au pouvoir dans le monde parviennent à prouver leur capacité à diriger un pays de manière responsable, et sans engendrer de haine ou de tensions, alors ils viendront peut-être à bout de l’impérialisme libéral. Ils ont une chance de restaurer un ordre du monde fondé sur la liberté des nations. Il ne tient désormais qu’à eux de la saisir, et je ne peux prédire s’ils y parviendront: j’espère seulement qu’ils auront assez de sagesse et de talent pour cela. Yoram Hazony

Après l’école, Supermanl’humourla fête nationale, Thanksgiving, les droits civiques, les Harlem globetrotters et le panier à trois points, le soft power, l’Amérique, le génocide et même eux-mêmes  et sans parler des chansons de Noël et de la musique pop ou d’Hollywood, la littérature, les poupées Barbie… le look WASP, … la nation  !

Y a-t-il une élite intellectuelle trumpiste?
Alexis Carré

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – La tenue de la National Conservatism Conference réunissant des intellectuels conservateurs américains invite le politologue Alexis Carré à se demander s’il existe une élite intellectuelle représentative des idées de Donald Trump.

Alexis Carré est doctorant en philosophie politique à l’École normale supérieure. Il travaille sur les mutations de l’ordre libéral. Suivez-le sur Twitter et sur son site.


La victoire de Donald J. Trump ne fut pas exactement celle d’un intellectuel. Contrairement à celle de Ronald Reagan, elle n’a pas non plus été précédée par la création ou la mobilisation de think tanks et autres organismes de recherche qui structurent habituellement la discussion publique aux États-Unis, tout en servant d’écurie de formation pour les futurs cadres gouvernementaux. À bien des égards, ce que l’on pourrait appeler la classe intellectuelle conservatrice s’est trouvée à la traîne et même parfois à contre-courant de la dernière campagne. Le Weekly Standard, hebdomadaire néoconservateur fondé par Bill Kristol — l’une des voix de droite les plus violemment critiques de l’administration —, en a payé le prix en cessant il y a peu de paraître.

Une fois Trump élu, le pragmatisme a toutefois dominé l’attitude de cette galaxie d’institutions vis-à-vis de la Maison Blanche. Ne leur devant pas sa victoire ni son programme, le président a, quant à lui, su utiliser leurs ressources et leurs compétences quand elles lui étaient utiles. L’illustration la plus frappante de cette relation fut la place centrale qu’il donna aux recommandations de la Heritage Foundation (le plus grand think tank conservateur à Washington) et de la Federalist Society (une association influente rassemblant plus de 40 000 juristes conservateurs) pour la nomination des juges à la Cour Suprême (Neil Gorsuch et Brett Kavanaugh) et dans les degrés inférieurs du système judiciaire. Malgré un style de gouvernement indéniablement nouveau, Trump ne semblait donc pas avoir profondément affecté l’infrastructure institutionnelle d’où s’élaborent la majorité des politiques publiques aux États-Unis. Envisagé comme un phénomène personnel qui disparaîtrait avec lui, certains pouvaient encore penser qu’il ne laisserait avec son départ pas d’héritage profond sur les plans institutionnels et intellectuels. Une conférence comme il s’en organise pourtant des dizaines chaque année à Washington DC vient peut-être de changer la donne. Et si, de manière pour le moins inattendue, Trump s’avérait être depuis Reagan le président ayant eu le plus d’impact sur la fabrique des idées et des élites dans son pays?

Une force de frappe en devenir

Le chercheur israélien à l’origine de l’événement, Yoram Hazony, s’est fait connaître à l’automne dernier en publiant The Virtue of Nationalism [La vertu du nationalisme], un livre où il s’emploie à critiquer l’idéal post-national qui a dominé l’éducation politique des élites ces dernières décennies. En organisant ce rassemblement d’intellectuels, de journalistes et d’hommes politiques, il entend désormais jeter les bases d’un mouvement intellectuel, le «conservatisme national», dont il propagera les idées au travers de la Edmund Burke Foundation — créée en janvier en vue de préparer l’événement.

Le programme mélange des invités prestigieux (l’entrepreneur Peter Thiel, le présentateur de Fox News Tucker Carlson), des étoiles montantes (le jeune sénateur Josh Hawley et J. D. Vance, l’auteur du best-seller Hillbilly Elegy) et des figures établies (Rusty Reno de la revue First Things ou encore Christopher DeMuth, l’ancien responsable du think tank AEI). S’il est évident que de nombreuses divergences existent entre ces invités, notamment sur les questions de politique étrangère, ils s’accordent assez largement autour de certains points fondamentaux qui constituent à des degrés divers des changements d’orientation profonds par rapport au consensus conservateur antérieur.

La fin du consensus libéral et conservateur à droite 

Ce consensus, aussi connu sous le nom de «fusionnisme», reposait sur la compatibilité de la défense du marché et du libre-échange avec celle des valeurs familiales et religieuses. Libertariens et conservateurs pouvaient ainsi agir côte à côte afin de laisser d’un côté l’État hors de l’entreprise et de l’autre, hors de la famille — attitude résumée par la formule lapidaire de Reagan: «Le gouvernement n’est pas la solution à nos problèmes. Le gouvernement

est le problème.» Pour les tenants du «conservatisme national» le danger vient non plus principalement de l’État mais du secteur privé, et plus particulièrement des GAFA et de Wall Street. C’est également à l’État qu’ils s’en remettent pour préserver l’existence nationale de l’ingérence croissante des institutions supranationales. Étonnante dans le paysage politique américain, cette défense de l’État réaffirme la primauté du politique et avec lui du vecteur d’action collective qu’est la nation.

La question n’est plus de savoir si l’intervention de l’État est intrinsèquement mauvaise et la liberté du marché intrinsèquement bonne, mais de déterminer dans chaque cas laquelle des deux correspond à l’intérêt et à la volonté de la nation. Le critère permettant de juger une mesure politique n’est plus sa conformité à l’intérêt économique ou aux droits de l’homme mais sa capacité à protéger et renforcer la citoyenneté. Car les normes au fondement de l’État de droit, les principes économiques du capitalisme, n’ont de validité pratique qu’en raison des sentiments communs et des qualités partagées qui constituent les modes de vie des populations qui les adoptent.

En déconnectant l’individu de ses solidarités concrètes, une pratique aveugle du libéralisme a selon eux dépossédé les citoyens de ce mode de vie et de leur capacité d’action sur les plans individuels et collectifs. L’objectif du «conservatisme national» est de leur restituer ces deux choses. Or, des hommes que ne relie rien d’autre que le fait d’être porteurs des mêmes droits ne suffisent pas à faire une nation. Et c’est parce que l’existence de cette dernière ne peut plus être prise pour acquis que le danger qui pèse sur elle nécessite une action politique spécifique en rupture avec le consensus des libéraux et conservateurs traditionnels.

Vers une nouvelle élite?

Les réflexions sur le devenir des nations ne sont pas nouvelles, surtout en France, où des auteurs comme Pierre Manent ont depuis les années 90 mené une critique écoutée des conservateurs américains à l’égard du projet post-national. Ce qui est inédit, c’est qu’une action aussi structurée émerge en vue de former une nouvelle classe dirigeante sur le fondement de ces constats. Adversaires ou alliés de l’actuel président feraient bien de surveiller cette initiative. Si elle réalise son ambition la Edmund Burke Foundation pourrait parvenir à associer au changement immédiat impulsé par Donald Trump une éducation politique susceptible d’affecter sur le long terme la formation des élites américaines, ce à quoi son style de gouvernement et les techniques de communication qui le caractérisent ne sauraient parvenir à eux seuls.

Le sénateur Josh Hawley, âgé de 39 ans (ancien procureur général de l’état du Missouri), fait figure de symbole de cette classe politique en devenir: «Une nation républicaine requiert une économie républicaine […] Une économie fondée sur les échanges monétaires à Wall Street ne bénéficie en dernier ressort qu’à ceux qui possèdent déjà de l’argent. Une telle économie ne saurait soutenir une grande nation.» Hostile à l’inflation des diplômes universitaires et aux multinationales, favorable aux droits de douane, défenseur de «l’Amérique moyenne», il représente peut-être ce que pourrait devenir le «trumpisme» sans Trump.

Voir aussi:

Yoram Hazony : «Les nouveaux universalistes vouent aux gémonies l’indépendance nationale»
Paul Sugy
Le Figaro

21/12/2018

FIGAROVOX/GRAND ENTRETIEN – Le nationalisme est sur toutes les lèvres, et pourtant, affirme Yoram Hazony, ce concept n’a jamais été aussi mal compris. Le philosophe entend réhabiliter la «vertu du nationalisme», qu’il oppose à la «tentation impérialiste», et promouvoir la vision d’un monde fondé sur l’indépendance et la liberté des nations.

Yoram Hazony est spécialiste de la Bible et docteur en philosophie politique.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoram_Hazony

Il a fondé le Herzl Institute et enseigne la philosophie et la théologie à Jérusalem.

Ce penseur de la droite israélienne est également auteur de nombreux articles publiés dans les journaux américains les plus prestigieux, du New York Times au Wall Street Journal.

Presque inconnu en France, son livre The Virtue of Nationalism a suscité un vif débat aux Etats-Unis.

LE FIGARO MAGAZINE. – Le 11 novembre dernier, Emmanuel Macron déclarait aux chefs d’Etat du monde entier: «Le nationalisme est la trahison du patriotisme.» Qu’en pensez-vous?

Yoram HAZONY. –

Aujourd’hui, on ne cesse de nous répéter que le nationalisme a provoqué les deux guerres mondiales, et on lui impute même la responsabilité de la Shoah.

Mais cette lecture historique n’est pas satisfaisante.

J’appelle «nationaliste» quelqu’un qui souhaite vivre dans un monde constitué de nations indépendantes.

De sorte qu’à mes yeux, Hitler n’était pas le moins du monde nationaliste.

Il était même tout le contraire: Hitler méprisait la vision nationaliste, et il appelle dans Mein Kampf à détruire les autres Etats-nations européens pour que les Allemands soient les maîtres du monde.

Dès son origine, le nazisme est une entreprise impérialiste, pas nationaliste.

Quant à la Première Guerre mondiale, le nationalisme est loin de l’avoir déclenchée à lui seul!

Le nationalisme serbe a fourni un prétexte, mais en réalité c’est la visée impérialiste des grandes puissances européennes (l’Allemagne, la France, l’Angleterre) qui a transformé ce conflit régional en une guerre planétaire.

Ainsi, le principal moteur des deux guerres mondiales était l’impérialisme, pas le nationalisme.

Donald Trump, lui, avait déclaré il y a quelques semaines: «Je suis nationaliste.» Y a-t-il aujourd’hui un retour du nationalisme?

Le nationalisme est en effet en vogue en ce moment: c’est du jamais-vu depuis 1990, date à laquelle Margaret Thatcher a été renversée par son propre camp à cause de son hostilité à l’Union européenne.

Depuis plusieurs décennies, les principaux partis politiques aux Etats-Unis et en Europe, de droite comme de gauche, ont souscrit à ce que l’on pourrait appeler «l’impérialisme libéral», c’est-à-dire l’idée selon laquelle le monde entier devrait être régi par une seule et même législation, imposée si besoin par la contrainte.

Mais aujourd’hui, une génération plus tard, une demande de souveraineté nationale émerge et s’est exprimée avec force aux Etats-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, en Italie, en Europe de l’Est et ailleurs encore.

Avec un peu de chance et beaucoup d’efforts, cet élan nationaliste peut aboutir à un nouvel ordre politique, fondé sur la cohabitation de nations indépendantes et souveraines.

Mais nous devons aussi être lucides: les élites «impérialistes libérales» n’ont pas disparu, elles sont seulement affaiblies.

Si, en face d’eux, le camp nationaliste ne parvient pas à faire ses preuves, elles ne tarderont pas à revenir dans le jeu.

Quel est ce «nouvel empire libéral» dont vous parlez? Et qu’entendez-vous exactement par «impérialisme»?

Historiquement, le «nationalisme» décrit une vision du monde où le meilleur système de gouvernement serait la coexistence de nations indépendantes, et libres de tracer leur propre route comme elles l’entendent.

On l’oppose à «l’impérialisme», qui cherche à apporter au monde la paix et la prospérité en unifiant l’humanité, autant que possible, sous un seul et même régime politique.

Les dirigeants de l’Union européenne, de même que la plupart des élites américaines, croient dur comme fer en l’impérialisme.

Ils pensent que la démocratie libérale est la seule forme admissible de gouvernement, et qu’il faut l’imposer progressivement au monde entier.

C’est ce que l’on appelle souvent le «mondialisme», et c’est précisément ce que j’entends par «nouvel empire libéral».

Bien sûr, tous les «impérialistes libéraux» ne sont pas d’accord entre eux sur la stratégie à employer!

L’impérialisme américain a voulu imposer de force la démocratie dans un certain nombre de pays, comme en Yougoslavie, en Irak, en Libye ou en Afghanistan.

En Europe, on se désolidarise du militarisme américain: les impérialistes allemands ou bruxellois préfèrent d’autres formes de coercition… mais leur objectif est le même.

Regardez comment l’Allemagne cherche à imposer son programme économique à la Grèce ou à l’Italie, ou sa vision immigrationniste à la République tchèque, la Hongrie ou la Pologne.

En Italie, le budget a même été rejeté par la Commission européenne!

Est-ce que, selon vous, le nationalisme et l’impérialisme sont deux visions de l’ordre mondial qui s’affrontaient déjà dans la Bible?

Le conflit entre nationalisme et impérialisme est aussi vieux que l’Occident lui-même.

La vision nationaliste est l’un des enseignements politiques fondamentaux de la Bible hébraïque: le Dieu d’Israël fut le premier qui donna à son peuple des frontières, et Moïse avertit les Hébreux qu’ils seraient punis s’ils tentaient de conquérir les terres de leurs voisins, car Yahvé a donné aussi aux autres nations leur territoire et leur liberté.

Ainsi, la Bible propose le nationalisme comme alternative aux visées impérialistes des pharaons, mais aussi des Assyriens, des Perses ou, bien sûr, des Babyloniens.

Et l’histoire du Moyen Âge ou de l’époque moderne montre que la plupart des grandes nations européennes – la France, l’Angleterre, les Pays-Bas… – se sont inspirées de l’exemple d’Israël.

Mais le nationalisme de l’Ancien Testament ne fut pas tout de suite imité par l’Occident.

La majeure partie de l’histoire occidentale est dominée par un modèle politique inverse: celui de l’impérialisme romain.

C’est de là qu’est né le Saint Empire romain germanique, qui a toujours cherché à étendre sa domination, tout comme le califat musulman.

Les Français aussi ont par moments été tentés par l’impérialisme et ont cherché à conquérir le monde: Napoléon, par exemple, était un fervent admirateur de l’Empire romain et n’avait pour seul but que d’imposer son modèle de gouvernement «éclairé» à tous les pays qu’il avait conquis.

Ainsi a-t-il rédigé de nouvelles constitutions pour nombre d’entre eux: les Pays-Bas, l’Allemagne, l’Italie, l’Espagne…

Son projet, en somme, était le même que celui de l’Union européenne aujourd’hui : réunir tous les peuples sous une seule et même législation.

Pourquoi le modèle nationaliste est-il meilleur, selon vous?

Parce que ce modèle permet à chaque nation de décider ses propres lois en vertu de ses traditions particulières.

Un tel modèle assure une vraie diversité politique, et permet à tous les pays de déployer leur génie à montrer que leurs institutions et leurs valeurs sont les meilleures.

Un tel équilibre international ressemblerait à celui qui s’est établi en Europe après les traités de Westphalie signés en 1648, et qui ont permis l’existence d’une grande diversité de points de vue politiques, institutionnels et religieux.

Ces traités ont donné aux nations européennes un dynamisme nouveau: grâce à cette diversité, les nations sont devenues autant de laboratoires d’idées dans lesquels ont été expérimentés, développés et éprouvés les théories philosophiques et les systèmes politiques que l’on associe aujourd’hui au monde occidental.

À l’évidence, toutes ces expériences ne se valent pas et certaines n’ont bien sûr pas été de grands succès.

Mais la réussite de l’une seule d’entre elles – la France, par exemple – suffit pour que les autres l’imitent et apprennent grâce à son exemple.

Tandis que, par contraste, un gouvernement impérialiste comme celui de l’Union européenne tue toute forme de diversité dans l’œuf.

Les élites bruxelloises sont persuadées de savoir déjà avec exactitude la façon dont le monde entier doit vivre.

Il est pourtant manifeste que ce n’est pas le cas…

Mais ce «nouvel ordre international» n’a-t-il pas permis, malgré tout, un certain nombre de progrès en facilitant les échanges marchands ou en créant une justice pénale internationale, par exemple?

Peut-être, mais nous n’avons pas besoin d’un nouvel impérialisme pour permettre l’essor du commerce international ou pour traîner en justice les criminels.

Des nations indépendantes sont tout à fait capables de se coordonner entre elles.

Alors, certes, il y aura toujours quelques désaccords à surmonter, et il faudra pour cela un certain nombre de négociations.

Et je suis tout à fait capable de comprendre que d’aucuns soient tentés de se dire que, si on crée un gouvernement mondial, on s’épargne toutes ces frictions.

Mais c’est là une immense utopie.

La diversité des nations rend strictement impossible de convenir, universellement, d’une vision unique en matière de commerce et d’immigration, de justice, de religion, de guerre ou de paix.

La diversité des points de vue, et, partant, chacun de ces désaccords, sont une conséquence nécessaire de la liberté humaine, qui fait que chaque nation a ses propres valeurs et ses propres intérêts.

La seule manière d’éviter ces désaccords est de faire régner une absolue tyrannie – et c’est du reste ce dont l’Union européenne se rend peu à peu compte: seules les mesures coercitives permettent d’instaurer une relative uniformité entre les États membres.

Ne redoutez-vous pas la compétition accrue à laquelle se livreraient les nations dans un monde tel que vous le souhaitez? Au risque de renforcer le rejet ou la haine de ses voisins?

Dans mon livre, je consacre un chapitre entier à cette objection qui m’est souvent faite.

Il arrive parfois qu’à force de vouloir le meilleur pour les siens, on en vienne à haïr les autres, lorsque ceux-ci sont perçus comme des rivaux.

Mais nous devons alors reconnaître, tout aussi humblement, que les mouvements universalistes ne sont pas exempts non plus d’une certaine inclination à la haine ou au sectarisme.

Chacun des grands courants universels de l’histoire en a fait montre, qu’il s’agisse du christianisme, de l’islam ou du marxisme. En bâtissant leur empire, les universalistes ont souvent rejeté les particularismes nationaux qui se sont mis en travers de leur chemin et ont refusé d’accepter leur prétention à apporter à l’humanité entière la paix et la prospérité.

Cette détestation du particulier, qui est une constante dans tous les grands universalismes, est flagrante aujourd’hui dès lors qu’un pays sort du rang: regardez le torrent de mépris et d’insultes qui s’est répandu contre les Britanniques qui ont opté pour le Brexit, contre Trump, contre Salvini, contre la Hongrie, l’Autriche et la Pologne, contre Israël…

Les nouveaux universalistes vouent aux gémonies l’indépendance nationale.

En quoi le nationalisme est-il une «vertu»?

Dans le sens où un nationaliste ne prétend pas savoir ce qui est bon pour n’importe qui, n’importe où dans le monde.

Il fait preuve d’une grande humilité, lui, au moins.

N’est-ce pas incroyable de vouloir dicter à tous les pays qui ils doivent choisir pour ministre, quel budget ils doivent voter, et qui sera en droit de traverser leurs frontières?

Face à cette arrogance vicieuse, je considère en effet le nationalisme comme une vertu.

Le nationaliste, lui, dessine une frontière par terre et dit au reste du monde: «Au-delà de cette limite, je renonce à faire imposer ma volonté. Je laisse mes voisins libres d’être différents.»

Un universaliste répondra que c’est immoral, car c’est la marque d’une profonde indifférence à l’égard des autres.

Mais c’est en réalité tout l’inverse: le nationaliste est vertueux, car il limite sa propre arrogance et laisse les autres conduire leur vie à leur guise.

Que vous inspirent les difficultés qu’ont les Britanniques à mettre en œuvre le Brexit? N’est-il pas déjà trop tard pour revenir en arrière?

Non, il n’est pas trop tard.

Si les différents gouvernements nationalistes aujourd’hui au pouvoir dans le monde parviennent à prouver leur capacité à diriger un pays de manière responsable, et sans engendrer de haine ou de tensions, alors ils viendront peut-être à bout de l’impérialisme libéral.

Ils ont une chance de restaurer un ordre du monde fondé sur la liberté des nations.

Il ne tient désormais qu’à eux de la saisir, et je ne peux prédire s’ils y parviendront: j’espère seulement qu’ils auront assez de sagesse et de talent pour cela.

Voir également:

In Defense of Nations
John Fonte
National Review
September 13, 2018

The Virtue of Nationalism, by Yoram Hazony (Basic, 304 pp., $18.99)

If the great struggle of the 20th century was between Western liberal democracy and totalitarianism, the major fault line of the 21st century is within the democratic family, pitting those who believe nations should be self-governing and sovereign against powerful forces advancing “global governance” by supranational authorities.

In a new book that will become a classic, Israeli political philosopher Yoram Hazony identifies this conflict as one “between nationalism and imperialism,” which he describes as “two irreconcilably opposed ways of thinking about political order.” Further, “the debate between nationalism and imperialism is upon us.” This “fault line” at “the heart of Western public life is not going away,” and one must “choose.”

Hazony poses the question: What would the best political order for the world look like? A universal empire with global law? A collection of autonomous tribes? Or an order of independent national states? He chooses the last model over universalism (i.e., empire, including the soft “global governance” variety) and tribalism. He explains that, first, unlike the rule of tribes, the national state establishes internal security and order and reduces the threat of violence. Second, unlike empire, the scope of the national state is limited, because it is confined to exercising authority within its borders.

Third, it provides for what Bill Buckley’s Yale mentor Willmoore Kendall called the greatest right of all, national freedom, the collective right of a free people to rule themselves. Fourth, national freedom permits nations to develop their own institutions “that may be tested through painstaking trial and error over centuries.” Thus, what might be called the sovereigntist option tends toward a realistic empirical style of governance as opposed to a utopian rationalist outlook. Hazony contrasts Margaret Thatcher’s empirical approach to economics, for example, with an overly rationalistic perspective that often leads to unworkable utopianism (e.g., socialist economics in practice).

Fifth, Hazony, quoting John Stuart Mill, argues that, historically, individual rights have been protected best in national states, particularly in England and America. He maintains that in a “universal political order . . . in which a single standard of right is held to be in force everywhere, tolerance for diverse political and religious standpoints must necessarily decline.” This is exactly what has happened as transnational progressive elites, including organs of the EU, the U.N., and, significantly, the American Bar Association, have promoted a “global rule of law” that is intolerant of longstanding religious and patriotic beliefs.

Hazony boldly declares that we should resist all efforts to establish supranational global institutions: “We should not let a hairbreadth of our freedom be given over to foreign bodies under any name whatsoever, or to foreign systems of law that are not determined by our own nations.” 

Hazony reviews the history of the conflict between nationalism and imperialism, from the Tower of Babel to the latest anti-Israeli U.N. resolution. The political concept of the independent national state, as an alternative to empire and tribalism, begins with the Hebrew Bible. Ancient Israel was a national state posed against empires in Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, Persia, and Rome. Hazony de­clares that the Israelite nation was not based on race but on a “shared understanding of history, language, and religion.” He cites Exodus, noting that some Egyptians joined the Hebrews in fleeing Pharaoh, and points out that other foreigners joined the Jewish people once they had accepted “Israel’s God, laws, and understanding of history.”

In Hazony’s telling, after the fall of the Roman imperium, the ideal of a universal empire lived on in the papacy and in the German-led Holy Roman Empire. The emergence of Protestantism resurrected the Hebrew Bible’s concept of the national state. For example, Dutch Protestant rebels in their war with imperial Spain modeled themselves on ancient Israelis fighting for national freedom against the Egyptian and Babylonian empires. The Thirty Years’ War was not simply a religious conflict but a struggle that pitted nationalism against imperialism, with the states of France (Catholic), the Netherlands (Calvinist), and Sweden (Lutheran) fighting against the German-Spanish Hapsburg empire.

Hazony describes a new “Protestant construction” of the West inspired by the Hebrew Bible. It was based on two core principles: national self-determination and a “moral minimum” order, roughly corresponding to recognizing the Ten Commandments as natural law. This Protestant construction has been challenged by a “liberal construction” based on individual rights and a universal order. Beginning in the Enlightenment with Locke and Kant, but particularly since World War II, the liberal construction has largely replaced the Protestant construction among Western elites, though Hazony optimistically remarks that the ideas of the Protestant construction are still strong in the U.S. and Britain. Further, the liberal construction has proved to be illiberal, leading to the suppression of free speech, “public shaming” campaigns, and “heresy hunts.” Hazony laments that “Western democracies are rapidly becoming one big university campus.”

Hazony asserts that the “neutral state is a myth.” While the national state has historically been successful, a purely “neutral” or “civic” state based only on formal law and abstract principles and without attachments to a particular culture, language, religion, tradition, history, or shared sacrifice is unable to inspire the necessary mutual loyalty and national cohesion required for a free society to survive. He identifies the United States, Britain, and France as national, as opposed to neutral or civic, states. 

One of Hazony’s most powerful insights is his understanding of the role that hatred plays in the conflict between nationalists and globalists. One hears repeatedly that nationalism means hatred of the “other.” Hazony, however, successfully flips the argument. He notes that “anti-nationalist hate” is as great as or greater than the hatred emanating from nationalists. In fact, the forces supporting universalism hate the particular, especially when particularist resistance to globalist homogenization “proves itself resilient and enduring.”

Thus, “liberal internationalism is not merely a positive agenda. . . . It is an imperialist ideology that incites against . . . nationalists, seeking their delegitimization wherever they appear” throughout the West. Nowhere is this clearer than in the intense antipathy such liberal internationalists feel towards Israel.

As a proud nationalist, Hazony de­clares, “My first concern is for Israel.” He examines the hostility directed at the Jewish state by “many” in Europe and, increasingly, in America. He concludes that since World War II, and particularly since the 1990s, in elite circles in the West, a Kantian post-national moral paradigm has replaced the old liberal-nationalist paradigm of a world of independent states in which the Zionist dream was born. 

This new paradigm insists that national states should increasingly cede sovereignty to supranational institutions, especially in matters of war and peace. In the new paradigm, Israel’s use of force to defend itself is seen as morally illegitimate. The leadership of the European Union and American progressives, for the most part, adheres to the new post-national paradigm; hence, they constantly excoriate Israeli attempts at self-defense.

Hazony declares that “the European Union has caused severe damage to the principle that originally granted legitimacy to Israel as an independent national state: the principle of national freedom and self-determination.” (There is also a faction of Americans, Hazony writes, who favor a different, more muscular type of imperialist project: the establishment of a pax Americana in which America would serve as a contemporary Roman empire, providing peace and security for the entire world and policing the internal affairs of recalcitrant national states that are insufficiently liberal.)

For the EU and Western progressives, Hazony explains, the horror of Auschwitz was the result of atrocities committed by a national state, Germany, infused with a fanatical nationalism. But, as Hazony argues, Hitler’s genocide was inspired by a belief in Aryan racial superiority and imperialism. Hitler cared little for the German nation per se. For example, near the end of World War II, he told his confidant Albert Speer not to “worry” about the “German people”; they might as well perish, for “they had proven to be the weaker [nation] and the future belongs solely to the stronger eastern nation.” Not exactly the sentiments of a true nationalist.

On the other hand, Hazony says, for Israelis, Auschwitz was the result of powerlessness: Jews did not have their own national state and the requisite military capability to protect themselves. Hazony quotes David Ben-Gurion’s famous World War II address in November 1942. He noted that there was “no Jewish army” and declared: Give us the right to fight and die as Jews. . . . We demand the right . . . to a homeland and independence.” It is exactly this very human aspiration for national independence hailed by the liberal nationalists of yesteryear (e.g., Garibaldi, Kossuth, Herzl) that the new imperialists of 21st-century globalism (Merkel, Juncker, Soros) scorn. 

Hazony writes that other nations too have been subject to campaigns of vilification from European and transnational elites when they have ignored supranational authority and acted as independent national states. The United States, in particular, has been excoriated (since long before the Trump administration) for refusing to join the Interna­tional Criminal Court and the Kyoto Protocol and for deciding for itself when its national interest requires the use of force. Recently, globalist wrath “has been extended to Britain” because it returned “to a course of national independence and self-determination and to nations such as Czechia, Hungary, and Poland that insist on maintaining an immigration policy of their own that does not conform to the European Union’s theories concerning refugee resettlement.”

A serious scholar, Hazony is a consistent thinker and is intellectually honest to a fault. As a result, many potential allies in the political-ideological struggle against transnational progressivism might well object to his critical portrayal of, for example, Friedrich Hayek, Ludwig von Mises, Ayn Rand, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, Konrad Adenauer, Charles Krauthammer, the British Empire, a pax Americana, the papacy, and medieval Christianity, to say nothing of the World Trade Organi­zation and President George H. W. Bush’s “new world order.”

My only serious substantive difference with Hazony concerns his interpretation of John Locke and natural rights, a subject directly related to the American Founding and, therefore, to the crux of American nationalism. Hazony presents Locke as overly focused on individual autonomy and detached from the national state and the culture necessary to sustain it. However, in his famous Second Treatise, Locke explicitly favors the nationalist over the imperialist perspective, lauding “an entire, free, independent society, to be governed by its own laws” and decrying “the delivery . . . of the people into the subjection of a foreign power, either by the prince or the legislature.”

Locke in his other writing also emphasizes the centrality of morality, religion, and family, as well as individual rights, thereby supporting Hazony’s “moral minimum” for the well-being of any independent commonwealth. In any case, it should be stressed that the philosophical basis of the American Founding is much more than the theories of John Locke (as Hazony agrees). Leo Strauss, Harry Jaffa, and, recently, Thomas G. West in his brilliant and definitive work The Political Theory of the American Founding have argued that from the beginning, the American regime has contained pre-Enlighten­ment, pre-liberal, non-rational elements that are essential to its vitality and success.

Further, the law of nature and the natural rights envisioned by the American Founders were held to be accompanied by an equal set of duties and virtues commensurate with those rights, including the republican virtue of patriotism. Neither Locke nor, certainly, the Founders were utopian, but instead they balanced a belief in reason with an empirical outlook and a realistic view of human nature.

Caveats aside, Yoram Hazony has written a magnificent affirmation of democratic nationalism and sovereignty. The book is a tour de force that has the potential to significantly shape the debate between the supporters of supranational globalism and those of national-state democracy. The former will attempt to marginalize Hazony. Crucial will be the response of the Western (particularly American) center-right intelligentsia. Will mainstream conservatives embrace Hazony’s core thesis (with requisite qualifications) and recognize that they have been given a powerful intellectual and moral argument, or will this opportunity be squandered in sectarian squabbling over exactly what Locke meant and how to redefine “liberalism” in the 21st-century global world? 

Voir de plus:

What Is Conservatism?

May 20, 2017

The year 2016 marked a dramatic change of political course for the English-speaking world, with Britain voting for independence from Europe and the United States electing a president promising a revived American nationalism. Critics see both events as representing a dangerous turn toward “illiberalism” and deplore the apparent departure from “liberal principles” or “liberal democracy,” themes that surfaced repeatedly in conservative publications over the past year. Perhaps the most eloquent among the many spokesmen for this view has been William Kristol, who, in a series of essays in the Weekly Standard, has called for a new movement to arise “in defense of liberal democracy.” In his eyes, the historic task of American conservatism is “to preserve and strengthen American liberal democracy,” and what is needed now is “a new conservatism based on old conservative—and liberal—principles.” Meanwhile, the conservative flagship Commentary published a cover story by the Wall Street Journal’s Sohrab Ahmari entitled “Illiberalism: The Worldwide Crisis,” seeking to raise the alarm about the dangers to liberalism posed by Brexit, Trump, and other phenomena.

These and similar examples demonstrate once again that more than a few prominent conservatives in America and Britain today consider themselves to be not only conservatives but also liberals at the same time. Or, to get to the heart of the matter, they see conservatism as a branch or species of liberalism—to their thinking, the “classical” and most authentic form of liberalism. According to this view, the foundations of conservatism are to be found, in significant measure, in the thought of the great liberal icon John Locke and his followers. It is to this tradition, they say, that we must turn for the political institutions—including the separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism—that secure the freedoms of religion, speech, and the press; the right of private property; and due process under law. In other words, if we want limited government and, ultimately, the American Constitution, then there is only one way to go: Lockean liberalism provides the theoretical basis for the ordered freedom that conservatives strive for, and liberal democracy is the only vehicle for it.

Many of those who have been most outspoken on this point have been our long-time friends. We admire and are grateful for their tireless efforts on behalf of conservative causes, including some in which we have worked together as partners. But we see this confusion of conservatism with liberalism as historically and philosophically misguided. Anglo-American conservatism is a distinct political tradition—one that predates Locke by centuries. Its advocates fought for and successfully established most of the freedoms that are now exclusively associated with Lockean liberalism, although they did so on the basis of tenets very different from Locke’s. Indeed, when Locke published his Two Treatises of Government in 1689, offering the public a sweeping new rationale for the traditional freedoms already known to Englishmen, most defenders of these freedoms were justly appalled. They saw in this new doctrine not a friend to liberty but a product of intellectual folly that would ultimately bring down the entire edifice of freedom. Thus, liberalism and conservatism have been opposed political positions in political theory since the day liberal theorizing first set foot in England.

Today’s confusion of conservative political thought with liberalism is in a way understandable, however. In the great twentieth-century battles against totalitarianism, conservatives and liberals were allies: They fought together, along with the Communists, against Nazism. After 1945, conservatives and liberals remained allies in the war against Communism. Over these many decades of joint struggle, what had for centuries been a distinction of vital importance was treated as if it were not terribly important, and in fact, it was largely forgotten.

But since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, these circumstances have changed. The challenges facing the Anglo-American tradition are now coming from other directions entirely. Radical Islam, to name one such challenge, is a menace that liberals, for reasons internal to their own view of the political world, find difficult to regard as a threat and especially difficult to oppose in an effective manner. But even more important is the challenge arising from liberalism itself. It is now evident that liberal principles contribute little or nothing to those institutions that were for centuries the bedrock of the Anglo-American political order: nationalism, religious tradition, the Bible as a source of political principles and wisdom, and the family. Indeed, as liberalism has emerged victorious from the battles of the last century, the logic of its doctrines has increasingly turned liberals against all of these conservative institutions. On both of these fronts, the conservative and liberal principles of the Anglo-American tradition are now painfully at cross-purposes. The twentieth-century alliance between conservatism and liberalism is proving increasingly difficult to maintain.

Among the effects of the long alliance between conservatism and liberalism has been a tendency of political figures, journalists, and academics to slip back and forth between conservative terms and ideas and liberal ones as if they were interchangeable. And until recently, there seemed to be no great harm in this. Now, however, it is becoming obvious that this lack of clarity is crippling our ability to think about a host of issues, from immigration and foreign wars to the content of the Constitution and the place of religion in education and public life. In these and other areas, America, Britain, and their allies can neither recognize the difficulties ahead nor develop appropriate responses to them without a strong and intellectually capable conservatism. But to have a strong and intellectually capable conservatism, we must be able to see clearly what the Anglo-American conservative tradition is and what it is about. And to do this, we have to disentangle it from its old opponent—liberalism.

In this essay, we seek to clarify the historical and philosophical differences between the two major Anglo-American political traditions, conservative and liberal. We will begin by looking at some important events in the emergence of Anglo-American conservatism and its conflict with liberalism. After that, we will use these historical events as a basis for drawing some political distinctions that will be highly relevant for our own political context.

Fortescue and the Birth of Anglo-American Conservatism

The emergence of the Anglo-American conservative tradition can be identified with the words and deeds of a series of towering political and intellectual figures, among whom we can include individuals such as Sir John Fortescue, Richard Hooker, Sir Edward Coke, John Selden, Sir Matthew Hale, Sir William Temple, Jonathan Swift, Josiah Tucker, Edmund Burke, John Dickinson, and Alexander Hamilton. Men such as George Washington, John Adams, and John Marshall, often hastily included among the liberals, would also have placed themselves in this conservative tradition rather than with its opponents, whom they knew all too well.

Living in very different periods, these individuals nevertheless shared common ideas and principles and saw themselves as part of a common tradition of English, and later Anglo-American, constitutionalism. A politically traditionalist outlook of this kind was regarded as the mainstream in both England and America up until the French Revolution and only came to be called “conservative” during the nineteenth century, as it lost ground and became one of two rival camps.

Because the name conservative dates from this time of decline, it is often wrongly asserted that those who continued defending the Anglo-American tradition after the revolution—men such as Burke and Hamilton—were the “first conservatives.” But one has to view history in a peculiar and distorted way to see these men as having founded the tradition they were defending. In fact, neither the principles they upheld nor the arguments with which they defended them were new. They read them in the books of earlier thinkers and political figures such as Fortescue, Coke, Selden, and Hale. These men, the intellectual and political forefathers of Burke and Hamilton, are conservatives in just the same way that John Locke is a liberal. The term was not yet in use, but the ideas that it designates are easily recognizable in their writings, their speeches, and their deeds.

Where does the tradition of Anglo-American conservatism begin? Any date one chooses will be somewhat arbitrary. Even the earliest surviving English legal compilations, dating from the twelfth century, are arguably recognizable as forerunners of this conservative tradition. But we will not make the case for this claim here. Instead, we will begin on what seems to us indisputable ground—with the writings of Sir John Fortescue, which date from the late fifteenth century. Fortescue (c. 1394–1479) occupies a position in the Anglo-American conservative tradition somewhat analogous to Locke in the later liberal tradition: although not the founder of this tradition, he is nonetheless its first truly outstanding expositor and the model in light of which the entire subsequent tradition developed.1 It is here that any conservative should begin his or her education in the Anglo-American tradition.

For eight years during the Wars of the Roses, beginning in 1463, John Fortescue lived in France with the court of the young prince Edward of Lancaster, the “Red Rose” claimant to the English throne, who had been driven into exile by the “White Rose” king Edward IV of York. Fortescue had been a member of Parliament and for nearly two decades chief justice of the King’s Bench, the English Supreme Court. In the exiled court, he became the nominal chancellor of England. While in exile, Fortescue composed several treatises on the constitution and laws of England, foremost among them a small book entitled Praise of the Laws of England.

Although Praise of the Laws of England is often mischaracterized as a work on law, anyone picking it up will immediately recognize it for what it is: an early great work of English political philosophy. Far from being a sterile rehearsal of existing law, it is written as a dialogue between the chancellor of England and the young prince he is educating, so that he may wisely rule his realm. It offers a theorist’s explanation of the reasons for regarding the English constitution as the best model of political government known to man. (Those who have been taught that it was Montesquieu who first argued that, of all constitutions, the English constitution is the one best suited for human freedom will be dismayed to find that this argument is presented more clearly by Fortescue nearly three hundred years earlier, in a work with which Montesquieu was probably familiar.)

According to Fortescue, the English constitution provides for what he calls “political and royal government,” by which he means that English kings do not rule by their own authority alone (i.e., “royal government”), but together with the representatives of the nation in Parliament and in the courts (i.e., “political government”). In other words, the powers of the English king are limited by the traditional laws of the English nation, in the same way—as Fortescue emphasizes—that the powers of the Jewish king in the Mosaic constitution in Deuteronomy are limited by the traditional laws of the Israelite nation. This is in contrast with the Holy Roman Empire of Fortescue’s day, which was supposedly governed by Roman law, and therefore by the maxim that “what pleases the prince has the force of law,” and in contrast with the kings of France, who governed absolutely. Among other things, the English law is described as providing for the people’s representatives, rather than the king, to determine the laws of the realm and to approve requests from the king for taxes.

In addition to this discussion of what later tradition would call the separation of powers and the system of checks and balances, Fortescue also devotes extended discussion to the guarantee of due process under law, which he explores in his discussion of the superior protections afforded to the individual under the English system of trial by jury. Crucially, Fortescue consistently connects the character of a nation’s laws and their protection of private property to economic prosperity, arguing that limited government bolsters such prosperity, while an absolute government leads the people to destitution and ruin. In another of his writings, The Difference between an Absolute and a Limited Monarchy (also known as The Governance of England, c. 1471), he starkly contrasts the well-fed and healthy English population living under their limited government with the French, whose government was constantly confiscating their property and quartering armies in their towns—at the residents’ expense—by unilateral order of the king. The result of such arbitrary taxation and quartering is, as Fortescue writes, that the French people have been “so impoverished and destroyed that they may hardly live. . . . Verily, they live in the most extreme poverty and misery, and yet they dwell in one of the most fertile parts of the world.”

Like later conservative tradition, Fortescue does not believe that either scripture or human reason can provide a universal law suitable for all nations. We do find him drawing frequently on the Mosaic constitution and the biblical “Four Books of Kings” (1–2 Samuel and 1–2 Kings) to assist in understanding the political order and the English constitution. Nevertheless, Fortescue emphasizes that the laws of each realm reflect the historic experience and character of each nation, just as the English common law is in accord with England’s historic experience. Thus, for example, Fortescue argues that a nation that is self-disciplined and accustomed to obeying the laws voluntarily rather than by coercion is one that can productively participate in the way it is governed. This, Fortescue proposes, was true of the people of England, while the French, who were of undisciplined character, could be governed only by the harsh and arbitrary rule of absolute royal government. On the other hand, Fortescue also insisted, again in keeping with biblical precedent and later conservative tradition, that this kind of national character was not set in stone, and that such traits could be gradually improved or worsened over time.

Fortescue was eventually permitted to return to England, but his loyalty to the defeated House of Lancaster meant that he never returned to power. He was to play the part of chancellor of England only in his philosophical dialogue, Praise of the Laws of England. His book, however, went on to become one of the most influential works of political thought in history. Fortescue wrote in the decades before the Reformation, and as a firm Catholic. But every page of his work breathes the spirit of English nationalism—the belief that through long centuries of experience, and thanks to a powerful ongoing identification with Hebrew Scripture, the English had succeeded in creating a form of government more conducive to human freedom and flourishing than any other known to man. First printed around 1545, Fortescue’s Praise of the Laws of England spoke in a resounding voice to that period of heightened nationalist sentiment in which English traditions, now inextricably identified with Protestantism, were pitted against the threat of invasion by Spanish-Catholic forces aligned with the Holy Roman Emperor. This environment quickly established Fortescue as England’s first great political theorist, paving the way for him to be read by centuries of law students in both England and America and by educated persons wherever the broader Anglo-American conservative tradition struck root.

The Greatest Conservative: John Selden

We turn now to the decisive chapter in the formation of modern Anglo-American conservatism: the great seventeenth-century battle between defenders of the traditional English constitution against political absolutism on one side, and against the first advocates of a Lockean universalist rationalism on the other. This chapter in the story is dominated by the figure of John Selden (1584–1654), probably the greatest theorist of Anglo-American conservatism.

Under the reign of Elizabeth Tudor, Fortescue’s account of the virtues of England’s traditional institutions had become an integral part of the self-understanding of a politically independent English nation. But in 1603, Elizabeth died childless and was succeeded by her distant relative, the king of Scotland, James Stuart. The Stuart kings had little patience for English theories of “political and royal rule.” In fact, James, himself a thinker of some ability, had four years earlier penned a political treatise of his own, in which he explained that kings rule by divine right and the laws of the realm are, as the title of his book suggested, a Basilikon Doron (Greek for “Royal Gift”). In other words, the laws are the king’s freely given gift, which he can choose to make or revoke as he pleases. James was too prudent a man to openly press for his absolutist theories among his English subjects, and he insisted that he meant to respect their traditional constitution. But the English, who had bought thousands of copies of the king’s book when he ascended to their throne, were never fully convinced. Indeed, the policies of James and, later, his son Charles I constantly rekindled suspicions that the Stuarts’ aim was a creeping authoritarianism that would eventually leave England as bereft of freedom as France.

When this question finally came to a head, most of the members of the English Parliament and common lawyers proved willing to risk their careers, their freedom, and even their lives in the defense of Fortescue’s “political and royal rule.” Among these were eminent names such as Sir John Eliot and the chief justice of the King’s Bench, Sir Edward Coke. But in the generation that bore the full brunt of the new absolutist ideas, it was John Selden who stood above all others. The most important common lawyer of his generation, he was also a formidable political philosopher and polymath who knew more than twenty languages. Selden became a prominent leader in Parliament, where he joined the older Coke in a series of clashes with the king. In this period, Parliament denied the king’s right to imprison Englishmen without showing cause, to impose taxes and forced loans without the approval of Parliament, to quarter soldiers in private homes, and to wield martial law in order to circumvent the laws of the land.

In 1628, Selden played a leading role in drafting and passing an act of Parliament called the Petition of Right, which sought to restore and safeguard “the divers rights and liberties of the subjects” that had been known under the traditional English constitution. Among other things, it asserted that “your subjects have inherited this freedom, that they should not be compelled to contribute to any tax . . . not set by common consent in Parliament”; that “no freeman may be taken or imprisoned or be disseized of his freehold or liberties, or his free customs . . . but by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land”; and that no man “should be put out of his land or tenements, nor taken, nor imprisoned, nor disinherited nor put to death without being brought to answer by due process of law.”

In the Petition of Right, then, we find the famous principle of “no taxation without representation,” as well as versions of the rights enumerated in the Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Amendments of the American Bill of Rights—all declared to be ancient constitutional English freedoms and unanimously approved by Parliament, before Locke was even born. Although not mentioned in the Petition explicitly, freedom of speech had likewise been reaffirmed by Coke as “an ancient custom of Parliament” in the 1590s and was the subject of the so-called Protestation of 1621 that landed Coke, then seventy years old, in the Tower of London for nine months.

In other words, Coke, Eliot, and Selden risked everything to defend the same liberties that we ourselves hold dear in the face of an increasingly authoritarian regime. (In fact, John Eliot was soon to die in the king’s prison.) But they did not do so in the name of liberal doctrines of universal reason, natural rights, or “self-evident” truths. These they explicitly rejected because they were conservatives, not liberals. Let’s try to understand this.

Selden saw himself as an heir to Fortescue and, in fact, was involved in republishing the Praise for the Laws of England in 1616. His own much more extensive theoretical defense of English national traditions appeared in the form of short historical treatises on English law, as well as in a series of massive works (begun while Selden was imprisoned on ill-defined sedition charges for his activities in the 1628–29 Parliament) examining political theory and law in conversation with classical rabbinic Judaism. The most famous of these was his monumental Natural and National Law (1640). In these works, Selden sought to defend conservative traditions, including the English one, not only against the absolutist doctrines of the Stuarts but also against the claims of a universalist rationalism, according to which men could simply consult their own reason, which was the same for everyone, to determine the best constitution for mankind. This rationalist view had begun to collect adherents in England among followers of the great Dutch political theorist Hugo Grotius, whose On the Law of War and Peace (1625) suggested that it might be possible to do away with the traditional constitutions of nations by relying only on the rationality of the individual.

Then as now, conservatives could not understand how such a reliance on alleged universal reason could be remotely workable, and Selden’s Natural and National Law includes an extended attack on such theories in its first pages. There Selden argues that, everywhere in history, “unrestricted use of pure and simple reason” has led to conclusions that are “intrinsically inconsistent and dissimilar among men.” If we were to create government on the basis of pure reason alone, this would not only lead to the eventual dissolution of government but to widespread confusion, dissention, and perpetual instability as one government is changed for another that appears more reasonable at a given moment. Indeed, following Fortescue, Selden rejects the idea that a universally applicable system of rights is even possible. As he writes in an earlier work, what “may be most convenient or just in one state may be as unjust and inconvenient in another, and yet both excellently as well framed as governed.” With regard to those who believe that their reasoning has produced the universal truths that should be evident to all men, he shrewdly warns that

custom quite often wears the mask of nature, and we are taken in [by this] to the point that the practices adopted by nations, based solely on custom, frequently come to seem like natural and universal laws of mankind.

Selden responds to the claims of universal reason by arguing for a position that can be called historical empiricism. On this view, our reasoning in political and legal matters should be based upon inherited national tradition. This permits the statesman or jurist to overcome the small stock of observation and experience that individuals are able to accumulate during their own lifetimes (“that kind of ignorant infancy, which our short lives alone allow us”) and to take advantage of “the many ages of former experience and observation,” which permit us to “accumulate years to us, as if we had lived even from the beginning of time.” In other words, by consulting the accumulated experience of the past, we overcome the inherent weakness of individual judgement, bringing to bear the many lifetimes of observation by our forebears, who wrestled with similar questions under diverse conditions.

This is not to say that Selden is willing to accept the prescription of the past blindly. He pours scorn on those who embrace errors originating in the distant past, which, he says, have often been accepted as true by entire communities and “adopted without protest, and loaded onto the shoulders of posterity like so much baggage.” Recalling the biblical Jeremiah’s insistence on an empirical study of the paths of old (Jer. 6:16), Selden argues that the correct method is that “all roads must be carefully examined. We must ask about the ancient paths, and only what is truly the best may be chosen.” But for Selden, the instrument for such examination and selection is not the wild guesswork of individual speculation concerning various hypothetical possibilities. In the life of a nation, the inherited tradition of legal opinions and legislation preserves a multiplicity of perspectives from different times and circumstances, as well as the consequences for the nation when the law has been interpreted one way or another. Looking back upon these varied and changing positions within the tradition, and considering their real-life results, one can distinguish the true precepts of the law from the false turns that have been taken in the past. As Selden explains:

The way to find out the Truth is by others’ mistakings: For if I [wish] to go to such [and such] a place, and [some]one had gone before me on the right-hand [side], and he was out, [while] another had gone on the left-hand, and he was out, this would direct me to keep the middle way that peradventure would bring me to the place I desired to go.

Selden thus turns, much as the Hebrew Bible does, to a form of pragmatism to explain what is meant when statesmen and jurists speak of truth. The laws develop through a process of trial and error over generations, as we come to understand how peace and prosperity (“what is truly best,” “the place I desired to go”) arise from one turn rather than another.

Selden recognizes that, in making these selections from the traditions of the past, we tacitly rely upon a higher criterion for selection, a natural law established by God, which prescribes “what is truly best” for mankind in the most elementary terms. In his Natural and National Law, Selden explains that this natural law has been discovered over long generations since the biblical times and has come down to us in various versions. Of these, the most reliable is that of the Talmud, which describes the seven laws of the children of Noah prohibiting murder, theft, sexual perversity, cruelty to beasts, idolatry and defaming God, and requiring courts of law to enforce justice. The experience of thousands of years has taught us that these laws frame the peace and prosperity that is the end of all nations, and that they are the unseen root from which the diverse laws of all the nations ultimately derive.

Nonetheless, Selden emphasizes that no nation can govern itself by directly appealing to such fundamental law, because “diverse nations, as diverse men, have their diverse collections and inferences, and so make their diverse laws to grow to what they are, out of one and the same root.” Each nation thus builds its own unique effort to implement the natural law according to an understanding based on its own unique experience and conditions. It is thus wise to respect the different laws found among nations, both those that appear right to us and those that appear mistaken, for different perspectives may each have something to contribute to our pursuit of the truth. (Selden’s treatment of the plurality of human knowledge is cited by Milton as a basis for his defense of freedom of speech in Areopagitica.)

Selden thus offers us a picture of a philosophical parliamentarian or jurist. He must constantly maintain the strength and stability of the inherited national edifice as a whole—but also recognize the need to make repairs and improvements where these are needed. In doing so, he seeks to gradually approach, by trial and error, the best that is possible for each nation.

Selden’s view of the underlying principles of what was to become the Anglo-American traditional constitution is perhaps the most balanced and sophisticated ever written. But neither his intellectual powers nor his personal bravery, nor that of his colleagues in Parliament, were enough to save the day. Stuart absolutism eventually pressed England toward civil war and, finally, to a Puritan military dictatorship that not only executed the king but destroyed Parliament and the constitution as well. Selden did not live to see the constitution restored. The regicide regime subsequently offered England several brand-new constitutions, none of which proved workable, and within eleven years it had collapsed.

In 1660, two eminent disciples of Selden, Edward Hyde (afterward Earl of Clarendon) and Sir Matthew Hale, played a leading role in restoring the constitution and the line of Stuart kings. When the Catholic James II succeeded to the throne in 1685, fear of a relapse into papism and even of a renewed attempt to establish absolutism moved the rival political factions of the country to unite in inviting the next Protestants in line to the throne. The king’s daughter Mary and her husband, Prince William of Orange, the Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic, crossed the channel to save Protestant England and its constitution. Parliament, having confirmed the willingness of the new joint monarchs to protect the English from “all other attempts upon their religion, rights and liberties,” in 1689 established the new king and queen on the throne and ratified England’s famous Bill of Rights. This new document reasserted the ancient rights invoked in the earlier Petition of Right, among other things affirming the right of Protestant subjects to “have arms for their defense” and the right of “freedom of speech and debates” in Parliament, and that “excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted”—the basis for the First, Second, and Eighth Amendments of the American Bill of Rights. Freedom of speech was quickly extended to the wider public, with the termination of English press licensing laws a few years later.

The restoration of a Protestant monarch and the adoption of the Bill of Rights were undertaken by a Parliament united around Seldenian principles. What came to be called the “Glorious Revolution” was glorious precisely because it reaffirmed the traditional English constitution and protected the English nation from renewed attacks on “their religion, rights and liberties.” Such attacks came from absolutists like Sir Robert Filmer on the one hand, whose Patriarcha (published posthumously, 1680) advocated authoritarian government as the only legitimate one, and by radicals like John Locke on the other. Locke’s Two Treatises of Government (1689) responded to the crisis by arguing for the right of the people to dissolve the traditional constitution and reestablish it according to universal reason.

The Challenge from Locke and Liberalism

Over the course of the seventeenth century, English conservatism was formed into a coherent and unmistakable political philosophy utterly opposed both to the absolutism of the Stuarts, Hobbes, and Filmer (what would later be called “the Right”), as well as to liberal theories of universal reason advanced first by Grotius and then by Locke (“the Left”). The centrist conservative view was to remain the mainstream understanding of the English constitution for a century and a half, defended by leading Whig intellectuals in works from William Atwood’s Fundamental Constitution of the English Government (1690) to Josiah Tucker’s A Treatise of Civil Government (1781), which strongly opposed both absolutism and Lockean theories of universal rights. This is the view upon which men like Blackstone, Burke, Washington, and Hamilton were educated. Not only in England but in British America, lawyers were trained in the common law by studying Coke’s Institutes of the Lawes of England (1628–44) and Hale’s History of the Common Law of England (1713). In both, the law of the land was understood to be the traditional English constitution and common law, amended as needed for local purposes.

Because Locke is today recognized as the decisive figure in the liberal tradition, it is worth looking more carefully at why his political theory was so troubling for conservatives. We have described the Anglo-American conservative tradition as subscribing to a historical empiricism, which proposes that political knowledge is gained by examining the long history of the customary laws of a given nation and the consequences when these laws have been altered in one direction or another. Conservatives understand that a jurist must exercise reason and judgment, of course. But this reasoning is about how best to adapt traditional law to present circumstances, making such changes as are needed for the betterment of the state and of the public, while preserving as much as possible the overall frame of the law. To this we have opposed a standpoint that can be called rationalist. Rationalists have a different view of the role of reason in political thought, and in fact a different understanding of what reason itself is. Rather than arguing from the historical experience of nations, they set out by asserting general axioms that they believe to be true of all human beings, and that they suppose will be accepted by all human beings examining them with their native rational abilities. From these they deduce the appropriate constitution or laws for all men.

Locke is known philosophically as an empiricist. But his reputation in this regard is based largely on his Essay concerning Human Understanding (1689), which is an influential exercise in empirical psychology. His Second Treatise of Government is not, however, a similar effort to bring an empirical standpoint to the theory of the state. Instead, it begins with a series of axioms that are without any evident connection to what can be known from the historical and empirical study of the state. Among other things, Locke asserts that, (1) prior to the establishment of government, men exist in a “state of nature,” in which (2) “all men are naturally in a state of perfect freedom,” as well as in (3) a “state of perfect equality, where naturally there is no superiority or jurisdiction of one over another.” Moreover, (4) this state of nature “has a law of nature to govern it”; and (5) this law of nature is, as it happens, nothing other than human “reason” itself, which “teaches all mankind, who will but consult it.” It is this universal reason, the same among all mankind, that leads them to (6) terminate the state of nature, “agreeing together mutually to enter into . . . one body politic” by an act of free consent. From these six axioms, Locke then proceeds to deduce the proper character of the political order for all nations on earth.

Three important things should be noticed about this set of axioms. The first is that the elements of Locke’s political theory are not known from experience. The “perfect freedom” and “perfect equality” that define the state of nature are ideal forms whose relationship with empirical reality is entirely unclear. Nor can the identity of natural law with reason, or the assertion that the law dictated by reason “teaches all mankind,” or the establishment of the state by means of purely consensual social contract, be known empirically. All of these things are stipulated as when setting out a mathematical system.

The second thing to notice is that there is no reason to think that any of Locke’s axioms are in fact true. Faced with this mass of unverifiable assertions, empiricist political theorists such as Hume, Smith, and Burke rejected all of Locke’s axioms and sought to rebuild political philosophy on the basis of things that can be known from history and from an examination of actual human societies and governments.

Third, Locke’s theory not only dispenses with the historical and empirical basis for the state, it also implies that such inquiries are, if not entirely unnecessary, then of secondary importance. If there exists a form of reason that is accessible to “all mankind, who will but consult it,” and that reveals to all the universal laws of nature governing the political realm, then there will be little need for the historically and empirically grounded reasoning of men such as Fortescue, Coke, and Selden. All men, if they will just gather together and consult with their own reason, can design a government that will be better than anything that “the many ages of experience and observation” produced in England. On this view, the Anglo-American conservative tradition—far from having brought into being the freest and best constitution ever known to mankind—is in fact shot through with unwarranted prejudice and an obstacle to a better life for all. Locke’s theory thus pronounces, in other words, the end of Anglo-American conservatism, and the end of the traditional constitution that conservatives still held to be among the most precious things on earth.

While Locke’s rationalist theories made limited headway in England, they were all the rage in France. Rousseau’s On the Social Contract (1762) went where others had feared to tread, embracing Locke’s system of axioms for correct political thought and calling upon mankind to consent only to the one legitimate constitution dictated by reason. Within thirty years, Rousseau, Voltaire, and the other French imitators of Locke’s rationalist politics received what they had demanded in the form of the French Revolution. The 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was followed by the Reign of Terror for those who would not listen to reason. Napoleon’s imperialist liberalism rapidly followed, bringing universal reason and the “rights of man” to the whole of continental Europe by force of arms, at a cost of millions of lives.2

In 1790, a year after the beginning of the French Revolution, the Anglo-Irish thinker and Whig parliamentarian Edmund Burke composed his famous defense of the English constitutional tradition against the liberal doctrines of universal reason and universal rights, entitled Reflections on the Revolution in France. In one passage, Burke asserted that

Selden, and the other profoundly learned men, who drew this petition of right, were as well acquainted, at least, with all the general theories concerning the “rights of men” [as any defenders of the revolution in France]. . . . But, for reasons worthy of that practical wisdom which superseded their theoretic science, they preferred this positive, recorded, hereditary title to all which can be dear to the man and the citizen, to that vague speculative right, which exposed their sure inheritance to be scrambled for and torn to pieces by every wild, litigious spirit.

In this passage, Burke correctly emphasizes that Selden and the other great conservative figures of his day had been quite familiar with the “general theories concerning the ‘rights of men’” that had now been used to overthrow the state in France. He then goes on to endorse Selden’s argument that universal rights, since they are based only on reason rather than “positive, recorded, hereditary title,” can be said to give everyone a claim to absolutely anything. Adopting a political theory based on such universal rights has one obvious meaning: that the “sure inheritance” of one’s nation will immediately be “scrambled for and torn to pieces” by “every wild litigious spirit” who knows how to use universal rights to make ever new demands.

Burke’s argument is frequently quoted today by conservatives who assume that his target was Rousseau and his followers in France. But Burke’s attack was not primarily aimed at Rousseau, who had few enthusiasts in Britain or America at the time. The actual target of his attack was contemporary followers of Grotius and Locke—individuals such as Richard Price, Joseph Priestley, Charles James Fox, Charles Grey, Thomas Paine, and Thomas Jefferson. Price, who was the explicit subject of Burke’s attack in the first pages of Reflections on the Revolution in France, had opened his Observations on the Nature of Civil Liberty (1776) with the assertion that “the principles on which I have argued form the foundation of every state as far as it is free; and are the same with those taught by Mr. Locke.” And much the same could be said of the others, all of whom followed Locke in claiming that the only true foundation for political and constitutional thought was precisely in those “general theories concerning the rights of men” that Burke believed would bring turmoil and death to one country after another.

The carnage taking place in France triggered a furious debate in England. It pitted supporters of the conservatism of Coke and Selden (both Whigs and Tories) against admirers of Locke’s universal rights theories (the so-called New Whigs). The conservatives insisted that these theories would uproot every traditional political and religious institution in England, just as they were doing in France. It is against the backdrop of this debate that Burke reportedly stated in Parliament that, of all the books ever written, the Second Treatise was “one of the worst.”

 Liberalism and Conservatism in America

Burke’s conservative defense of the traditional English constitution enjoyed a large measure of success in Britain, where it was continued after his death by figures such as Canning, Wellington, and Disraeli. That this is so is obvious from the fact that institutions such as the monarchy, the House of Lords, and the established Church of England, not to mention the common law itself, were able to withstand the gale winds of universal reason and universal rights, and to this day have their staunch supporters.

But what of America? Was the American revolution an upheaval based on Lockean universal reason and universal rights? To hear many conservatives talk today, one would think this were so, and that there never were any conservatives in the American mainstream, only liberals of different shades. The reality, however, was rather different. When the American English, as Burke called them, rebelled against the British monarch, there were already two distinct political theories expressed among the rebels, and the opposition between these two camps only grew with time.

First, there were those who admired the English constitution that they had inherited and studied. Believing they had been deprived of their rights under the English constitution, their aim was to regain these rights. Identifying themselves with the tradition of Coke and Selden, they hoped to achieve a victory against royal absolutism comparable to what their English forefathers had achieved in the Petition of Right and Bill of Rights. To individuals of this type, the word revolution still had its older meaning, invoking something that “revolves” and would, through their efforts, return to its rightful place—in effect, a restoration. Alexander Hamilton was probably the best-known exponent of this kind of conservative politics, telling the assembled delegates to the constitutional convention of 1787, for example, that “I believe the British government forms the best model the world ever produced.” Or, as John Dickinson told the convention: “Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us. It was not reason that discovered the singular and admirable mechanism of the English constitution…. Accidents probably produced these discoveries, and experience has given a sanction to them.” And it is evident that they were quietly supported behind the scenes by other adherents of this view, among them the president of the convention, General George Washington.

Second, there were true revolutionaries, liberal followers of Locke such as Jefferson, who detested England and believed—just as the French followers of Rousseau believed—that the dictates of universal reason made the true rights of man evident to all. For them, the traditional English constitution was not the source of their freedoms but rather something to be swept away before the rights dictated by universal reason. And indeed, during the French Revolution, Jefferson and his supporters embraced it as a purer version of what the Americans had started. As he wrote in a notorious letter in 1793 justifying the revolution in France: “The liberty of the whole earth was depending on the issue of the contest. . . . [R]ather than it should have failed, I would have seen half the earth desolated.”

The tension between these conservative and liberal camps finds rather dramatic expression in America’s founding documents: The Declaration of Independence, drafted by Jefferson in 1776, is famous for resorting, in its preamble, to the Lockean doctrine of universal rights as “self-evident” before the light of reason. Similarly, the Articles of Confederation, negotiated the following year as the constitution of the new United States of America, embody a radical break with the traditional English constitution. These Articles asserted the existence of thirteen independent states, at the same time establishing a weak representative assembly over them without even the power of taxation, and requiring assent by nine of thirteen states to enact policy. The Articles likewise made no attempt at all to balance the powers of this assembly, effectively an executive, with separate legislative or judicial branches of government.

The Articles of Confederation came close to destroying the United States. After a decade of disorder in both foreign and economic affairs, the Articles were replaced by the Constitution, drafted at a convention initiated by Hamilton and James Madison, and presided over by a watchful Washington, while Jefferson was away in France. Anyone comparing the Constitution that emerged with the earlier Articles of Confederation immediately recognizes that what took place at this convention was a reprise of the Glorious Revolution of 1689. Despite being adapted to the American context, the document that the convention produced proposed a restoration of the fundamental forms of the English constitution: a strong president, designated by an electoral college (in place of the hereditary monarchy); the president balanced in strikingly English fashion by a powerful bicameral legislature with the power of taxation and legislation; the division of the legislature between a quasi-aristocratic, appointed Senate and a popularly elected House; and an independent judiciary. Even the American Bill of Rights of 1789 is modeled upon the Petition of Right and the English Bill of Rights, largely elaborating the same rights that had been described by Coke and Selden and their followers, and breathing not a word anywhere about universal reason or universal rights.

The American Constitution did depart from the traditional English constitution, however, adapting it to local conditions on certain key points. The Americans, who had no nobility and no tradition of hereditary office, declined to institute these now. Moreover, the Constitution of 1787 allowed slavery, which was forbidden in England—a wretched innovation for which America would pay a price the framers could not have imagined in their wildest nightmares.

Another departure—or apparent departure—was the lack of a provision for a national church, enshrined in the First Amendment in the form of a prohibition on congressional legislation “respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” The English constitutional tradition, of course, gave a central role to the Protestant religion, which was held to be indispensable and inextricably tied to English identity (although not incompatible with a broad measure of toleration). But the British state, in certain respects federative, permitted separate, officially established national churches in Scotland and Ireland. This British acceptance of a diversity of established churches is partially echoed in the American Constitution, which permitted the respective states to support their own established churches, or to require that public offices in the state be held by Protestants or by Christians, well into the nineteenth century. When these facts are taken into account, the First Amendment appears less an attempt to put an end to established religion than a provision for keeping the peace among the states by delegating forms of religious establishment to the state level.

As early as 1802, however, Jefferson, now president, announced  that the First Amendment’s rejection of a national church in fact should be interpreted as an “act of the whole American people . . . building a wall of separation between church and state.” This characterization of the American Constitution as endorsing a “separation of church and state” was surely overwrought, and more compatible with French liberalism—which regarded public religion as abhorrent to reason—than with the actual place of state religion among “the whole American people” at the time. Yet on this point, Jefferson has emerged victorious. In the years that followed, his “wall of separation between church and state” interpretation was increasingly considered to be an integral part of the American Constitution, even if one that had not been included in the actual text.

Lockean liberalism grew increasingly dominant in America after Jefferson’s election. Hamilton’s death in a duel in 1804, at the age of 47, was an especially heavy blow that left American conservatism without its most able spokesman. Nevertheless, the tradition of Selden and Burke was taken up by Americans of the next generation, including two of the country’s most prominent jurists, New York chancellor James Kent (1763–1847) and Supreme Court justice Joseph Story (1779–1845). Story’s influence was especially significant. Although appointed to the Supreme Court by Jefferson in the hope of undermining Chief Justice John Marshall, Story’s opinions almost immediately displayed the opposite inclination, and continued to do so throughout his thirty-four-year tenure on the court. Perhaps Story’s greatest contribution to the American conservative tradition is his famous Commentaries on the Constitution (3 vols., 1833), which were dedicated to Marshall and went on to be the most important and influential interpretation of the American constitutional tradition in the nineteenth century. These were overtly conservative in spirit, citing Burke with approval and repeatedly criticizing not only Locke’s theories but Jefferson himself. Among other things, Story forcefully rejected Jefferson’s claim that the American founding had been based on universal rights determined by reason, emphasizing that it was the rights of the English traditional law that Americans had always recognized and continued to recognize. As he wrote:

[This] has been the uniform doctrine in America ever since the settlement of the colonies. The universal principle (and the practice has conformed to it) has been, that the common law is our birthright and inheritance, and that our ancestors brought hither with them upon their emigration all of it, which was applicable to their situation. The whole structure of our present jurisprudence stands upon the original foundations of the common law.

Regarding the American Constitution’s deviation from English tradition in the matter of a national religion, Story’s view was appropriately balanced. On the one hand, he confirmed “the right of private judgment in matters of religion, and of the freedom of public worship according to the dictates of one’s conscience” as an integral part of the nation’s constitutional heritage. At the same time, he asserted the traditional Anglo-American conservative view that “the right of a society or government to interfere in matters of religion will hardly be contested by any persons, who believe that piety, religion, and morality are intimately connected with the well-being of the state, and indispensable to the administration of civil justice.” For this reason, he was confident that the ongoing circumstances of his day, in which some of the states continued to “support and sustain, in some form, the Christian religion,” as being “without the slightest suspicion that it was against the principles of public law or republican liberty.” Story thus recognized no wall of separation between the government and religion at the state level as being either required by the American constitution or desirable.

As for the breach in conservative principles that had opened up with the barring of an establishment of religion at the national level, Story wrote with prescient concern:

It yet remains a problem to be solved in human affairs, whether any free government can be permanent, where the public worship of God, and the support of religion, constitute no part of the policy or duty of the state in any assignable shape.

Principles of the Conservative Tradition

As we have seen, the period between John Selden and Edmund Burke gave rise to two highly distinct and conflicting Anglo-American political traditions, conservative and liberal. Both were opposed to royal absolutism and devoted to freedom. But they were bitterly divided on theoretical grounds, as well as on a wide range of policy matters. Indeed, many of the principal issues that divided these two traditions continue to divide liberals and conservatives today.

What is the substance of the Anglo-American conservative political tradition? We can summarize the principles of conservatism as they appeared in the writings and deeds of the early architects of this tradition as follows:

(1) Historical Empiricism. The authority of government derives from constitutional traditions known, through the long historical experience of a given nation, to offer stability, well-being, and freedom. These traditions are refined through trial and error over many centuries, with repairs and improvements being introduced where necessary, while maintaining the integrity of the inherited national edifice as a whole. Such empiricism entails a skeptical standpoint with regard to the divine right of the rulers, the universal rights of man, or any other abstract, universal systems. Written documents express and consolidate the constitutional traditions of the nation, but they can neither capture nor define this political tradition in its entirety.

(2) Nationalism. The diversity of national experiences means that different nations will have different constitutional and religious traditions. The Anglo-American tradition harkens back to principles of a free and just national state, charting its own course without foreign interference, whose origin is in the Bible. These include a conception of the nation as arising out of diverse tribes, its unity anchored in common traditional law and religion. Such nationalism is not based on race, embracing new members who declare that “your people is my people, and your God is my God” (Ruth 1:16).

(3) Religion. The state upholds and honors the biblical God and religious practices common to the nation. These are the centerpiece of the national heritage and indispensable for justice and public morals. At the same time, the state offers wide toleration to religious and social views that do not endanger the integrity and well-being of the nation as a whole.

(4) Limited Executive Power. The powers of the king (or president) are limited by the laws of the nation, which he neither determines nor adjudicates. The powers of the king (or president) are limited by the representatives of the people, whose advice and consent he must obtain both respecting the laws and taxation.

(5) Individual Freedoms. The security of the individual’s life and property is mandated by God as the basis for a society that is both peaceful and prosperous, and is to be protected against arbitrary actions of the state. The ability of the nation to seek truth and conduct sound policy depends on freedom of speech and debate. These and other fundamental rights and liberties are guaranteed by law, and may be infringed upon only by due process of law.

These principles can serve as a useful summary of the conservative political tradition as it existed long before Locke and long before liberalism, serving as the basis for the restoration of the English constitution in 1689, and for the restoration that was the ratification of the American Constitution of 1787. Moreover, we see them as principles that we can affirm today, and which can serve as a sound basis for political conservatism in Britain, America, and other countries in our time.

Conservatism versus Liberalism in Current Affairs

How do these conservative principles conflict with those of liberalism? We understand the crucial differences between ourselves and our liberal friends in the following way:

Liberalism is a political doctrine based on the assumption that reason is everywhere the same and accessible, in principle, to all individuals; and that one need only consult reason to arrive at the one form of government that is everywhere the best, for all mankind. In its current form, liberalism asserts that this one best form of government is “liberal democracy.” This is a term popularized in the 1920s to describe a type kind of government that borrows certain principles from the earlier Anglo-American conservative tradition, including those limiting executive power and guaranteeing individual freedoms (Principles 4 and 5 above). But liberalism regards these principles as stand-alone entities, detachable from the broader Anglo-American tradition in which they arose. Liberals thus tend to have few, if any, qualms about discarding the national and religious foundations of Anglo-American government (Principles 2 and 3), regarding these as unnecessary, if not simply contrary to universal reason.

With Selden, we believe that, in their campaign for universal “liberal democracy,” liberals have confused certain historical-empirical principles of the traditional Anglo-American constitution, painstakingly developed and inculcated over centuries (Principle 1), for universal truths that are equally accessible to all human beings, regardless of historical or cultural circumstances. This means that, like all rationalists, they are engaged in applying local truths, which may hold good under certain conditions, to quite different situations and circumstances, where they often go badly wrong. For conservatives, these failures—for example, the repeated collapse of liberal constitutions in places such as Mexico, France, Germany, Italy, Nigeria, Russia, and Iraq, among many others—suggest that the principles in question have been overextended and should be regarded as true only within a narrower range of conditions. Liberals, on the other hand, explain such failures as a result of “poor implementation,” leaving liberal democracy as a universal truth that remains untouched by experience and unassailable, no matter what the circumstances.

The liberal assertion that Principles 4 and 5 are universal truths that are readily recognized by all human beings has had far-reaching consequences even in the United States and Britain. The fact is that what is now called “liberal democracy” refers not to the traditional Anglo-American constitution but to a rationalist reconstruction of it that has been entirely detached from the Protestant religion and the Anglo-American nationalist tradition.  Far from being a time-tested form of government, this liberal-democratic ideal is something new to both America and Britain, dating only from the mid-twentieth century. The claim that liberal-democratic regimes of this kind can be maintained for long without the conservative principles they have blithely discarded is a hypothesis now being tested for the first time. Those who believe that a favorable outcome of this experiment is assured draw this conclusion not from historical or empirical evidence, for we have none. Rather, their confidence derives from the closed Lockean-rationalist system that holds them captive, preventing them from being able to anticipate any of the other quite possible outcomes before us.

These pronounced differences between conservatives and liberals do not, of course, remain at the rarified level of political theory. They quickly lead to disagreements over proposed policy, expressed in somewhat different ways from one generation to the next. In our own day, we recognize the clash between conservatism and liberalism in the following areas, among others (here described only very briefly, and so in overly simple terms):

Liberal Empire. Because liberalism is thought to be a dictate of universal reason, liberals tend to believe that any country not already governed as a liberal democracy should be pressed—or even coerced—to adopt this form of government. Conservatives, on the other hand, recognize that different societies are held together and kept at peace in different ways, so that the universal application of liberal doctrines often brings collapse and chaos, doing more harm than good.

International Bodies. Similarly, liberals believe that, since liberal principles are universal, there is little harm done in reassigning the powers of government to international bodies. Conservatives, on the other hand, believe that such international organizations possess no sound governing traditions and no loyalty to particular national populations that might restrain their spurious theorizing about universal rights. They therefore see such bodies as inevitably tending to arbitrariness and autocracy.

Immigration. Liberals believe that, since liberal principles are accessible to all, there is nothing to be feared in large-scale immigration from countries with national and religious traditions very different from ours. Conservatives see successful large-scale immigration as possible only where the immigrants are strongly motivated to integrate and assisted in assimilating the national traditions of their new home country. In the absence of these conditions, the result will be chronic intercultural tension and violence.

Law. Liberals regard the laws of a nation as emerging from the tension between positive law and the pronouncements of universal reason, as expressed by the courts. Conservatives reject the supposed universal reason of judges, which often amounts to little more than their succumbing to passing fashion. But conservatives also oppose an excessive regard for written documents, which leads, for example, to the liberal mythology of America as a “creedal nation” (or a “propositional nation”) created and defined solely by the products of abstract reason that are supposedly found in the American Declaration of Independence and Constitution.

Economy. Liberals regard the universal market economy, operating without regard to borders, as a dictate of universal reason and applicable equally to all nations. They therefore recognize no legitimate economic aims other than the creation of a “level field” on which all nations participate in accordance with universal, rational rules. Conservatives regard the market economy and free enterprise as indispensable for the advancement of the nation in its wealth and wellbeing. But they see economic arrangements as inevitably varying from one country to another, reflecting the particular historical experiences and innovations of each nation as it competes to gain advantage for its people.

Education. Liberals believe that schools should teach students to recognize the Lockean goods of liberty and equality as the universal aims of political order, and to see America’s founding political documents as having largely achieved these aims. Conservatives believe education should focus on the particular character of the Anglo-American constitutional and religious tradition, with its roots in the Bible, and on the way in which this tradition has given rise to a unique family of nations with a distinctive political thought and practice that has influenced the world.

Public Religion. Liberals believe that universal reason is the necessary and sufficient basis for just and moral government. This means that the religious traditions of the nation, which had earlier been the basis for a public understanding of justice and right, can be replaced in public discourse by universal reason itself. In its current form, liberalism asserts that all governments should embrace a Jeffersonian “wall separating church and state,” whose purpose is to banish the influence of religion from public life, relegating it to the private sphere. Conservatives hold that none of this is true. They see human reason as producing a constant profusion of ever-changing views concerning justice and morals—a fact that is evident today in the constant assertion of new and rapidly multiplying human rights. Conservatives hold that the only stable basis for national independence, justice, and public morals is a strong biblical tradition in government and public life. They reject the doctrine of separation of church and state, instead advocating an integration of religion into public life that also offers broad toleration of diverse religious views.

The Restoration of Conservatism?

Burke and Hamilton belonged to a generation that was still educated in the significance of the Anglo-American tradition as a whole. Only a few decades later, this had begun to change, and by the end of the nineteenth century, conservative views were increasingly in the minority and defensive both in Britain and America. But conservatism was really only broken in a decisive way by Franklin Roosevelt in America in 1932, and by Labour in Britain in 1945. At this point, socialism displaced liberalism as the worldview of the parties of the “Left,” driving some liberals to join with the last vestiges of the conservative tradition in the parties of the “Right.” In this environment, new leaders and movements did arise and succeed from time to time in raising the banner of Anglo-American conservatism once more. But these conservatives were living on a shattered political and philosophical landscape, having lost much of the chain of transmission that had connected earlier conservatives to their forefathers. Thus their roots remained shallow, and their victories, however impressive, brought about no long-term conservative restoration.

The most significant of these conservative revivals was, of course, the one that reached its peak in the 1980s under Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Ronald Reagan. Thatcher and Reagan were genuine and instinctive conservatives, displaying traditional Anglo-American conservative attachments to nation and religion, as well as to limited government and individual freedom. They also recognized and gave voice to the profound “special relationship” that binds Britain and America together. Coming to power at a time of deep crisis in the struggle against Communism, their renewed conservatism succeeded in winning the Cold War and freeing foreign nations from oppression, in addition to liberating their own economies, which had long been shackled by socialism. In both countries, these triumphs shifted political discourse rightward for a generation.

Yet the Reagan-Thatcher moment, for all its success, failed to touch the depths of the political culture in America and Britain. Confronted by a university system devoted almost exclusively to socialist and liberal theorizing, their movement at no point commanded the resources needed to revive Anglo-American conservatism as a genuine force in fundamental arenas such as jurisprudence, political theory, history, philosophy, and education—disciplines without which a true restoration was impossible. Throughout the conservative revival of the 1980s, academic training in government and political theory, for instance, continued to maintain its almost complete boycott of conservative thinkers such as Fortescue, Coke, Selden, and Hale, just as it continued its boycott of the Bible as a source of English and American political principles. Similarly, academic jurisprudence remained a subject that is taught as a contest among abstract liberal theories. Education of this kind meant that a degree from a prestigious university all but guaranteed one’s ignorance of the Anglo-American conservative tradition, but only a handful of conservative intellectual figures, most visibly Russell Kirk and Irving Kristol, seem to have been alert to the seriousness of this problem. On the whole, the conservative revival of those years remained resolutely focused on the pressing policy issues of the day, leaving liberalism virtually unchallenged as the worldview that conservatives were taught at university or when they picked up a book on the history of ideas.

This is why conservative discourse today is so often just a pastiche of liberal themes and principles, with the occasional reference to Burke or Hamilton thrown in as a rhetorical ornament. We have not made the effort necessary to understand the intellectual and political heritage for which these great Anglo-American conservatives stood their ground, to know what it was and what it was about. As a consequence, conservatives remain uprooted from the wisdom of past generations and speak so unpersuasively when they talk of passing the tradition to future generations. For one cannot pass on what one does not have.

There may have been genuine advantages to soft-pedaling differences between conservatives and liberals until the 1980s, when all the strength that could be mustered had to be directed toward defeating Communism abroad and socialism at home. But we are no longer living in the 1980s. Those battles were won, and today we face new dangers. The most important among these is the inability of countries such as America and Britain, having been stripped of the nationalist and religious traditions that held them together for centuries, to sustain themselves while a universalist liberalism continues, year after year, to break down these historic foundations of their strength. Under such conditions of internal disintegration, there is a palpable danger that liberal rationalism, having established itself in a monopoly position in the state, will drive a broad public that cannot accept its regimented view of the world into the hands of genuinely authoritarian movements.

Liberals of various persuasions have, in their own way, sought to warn us about this, from Fareed Zakaria’s “The Rise of Illiberal Democracy” in Foreign Affairs (1997) to the Economist’s “Illiberalism: Playing with Fear” (2016) and Commentary’s “Illiberalism: The Worldwide Crisis,” mentioned earlier. These and many other publications have made intensive use of the term illiberal as an epithet to describe those who have strayed from the path of Lockean liberalism. In so doing, they divide the political universe into two: there are liberals—those decent persons who are willing to exercise reason in the universally accepted manner and come to the appropriate liberal conclusions; and there are those others—the “illiberals,” who, out of ignorance, resentment, or some atavistic hatred, will not get with the program. When things are divided up this way, the latter group ends up including everyone from Brexiteers, Trump supporters, Evangelical Christians, and Orthodox Jews to dictators, Iranian ayatollahs, and Nazis. Once things are framed in this way, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that everyone in that second group is in some degree a threat that must be combated.

We conservatives, however, have our own preferred division of the political universe: one in which Anglo-American conservatism appears as a distinct political category that is obviously neither authoritarian nor liberal. With the rest of the Anglo-American conservative tradition, we uphold the principles of limited government and individual liberties. But we also see clearly (again, in keeping with our conservative tradition) that the only forces that give the state its internal coherence and stability, holding limited government in place while staving off authoritarianism, are our nationalist and religious traditions. These nationalist and religious principles are not liberal. They are prior to liberalism, in conflict with liberalism, and presently being destroyed by liberalism.

Our world desperately needs to hear a clear conservative voice. Any continued confusion of conservative principles with the liberalism on our Left, or with the authoritarianism on our Right, can only do harm. The time has arrived when conservatives must speak in our own voice again. In doing so, we will discover that we can provide the political foundations that so many now seek, but have been unable to find.

This article originally appeared in American Affairs Volume I, Number 2 (Summer 2017): 219–46.

Notes

Fortescue is now available in an easily readable edition, transcribed in modern English spelling. See John Fortescue, On the Laws and Governance of England, ed. Shelley Lockwood (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).2 Our account diverges here from that of Leo Strauss, who presents Rousseau as a critic of Locke and asserts that “the first crisis of modernity occurred in the thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau.” See Natural Right and History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1953), 252. Strauss is right in seeing Rousseau, especially in his Discourses, as demanding a return to the cohesive community of classical antiquity, as well as to the virtues that are required to maintain such social cohesion and to wage wars in defense of the community. But it is a mistake to regard this demand as initiating “the first crisis of modernity.” What is now regarded as political modernity is more accurately regarded as emerging from the conservative tradition represented by Fortescue, Coke, and Selden. The first crisis of modernity is that which universalist-rationalists such as Grotius and Locke initiate against this conservative tradition. In certain ways, Rousseau does side with earlier conservative tradition, which likewise held that Lockean rationalism would make social cohesion impossible and destroy the possibility of virtue. But while Rousseau believed he could revive social cohesion and virtue while retaining Locke’s liberal axioms as a point of departure, Anglo-American conservatism regards this entire effort as futile. The intractable contradictions in Rousseau’s thought derive from the fact that there is no way to square this circle. Once liberal axioms are accepted, there is neither any need for, nor any possibility of, the social cohesion and virtue that Rousseau insists are necessary. Rousseau’s “civil religion” and his nation-state have no hope of playing the role that the traditional religion and nation play in conservative thought. These are ersatz creations of the Lockean universe, in which Rousseau’s thought remains imprisoned.

Voir par ailleurs:

Why America Needs New Alliances

Yoram Hazony and Ofir Haivry
Wal Street Journal
June 11, 2019

President Trump is often accused of creating a needless rift with America’s European allies. The secretary-general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Jens Stoltenberg, expressed a different view recently when he told a joint session of Congress: “Allies must spend more on defense—this has been the clear message from President Trump, and this message is having a real impact.”

Mr. Stoltenberg’s remarks reflect a growing recognition that strategic and economic realities demand a drastic change in the way the U.S. conducts foreign policy. The unwanted cracks in the Atlantic alliance are primarily a consequence of European leaders, especially in Germany and France, wishing to continue living in a world that no longer exists. The U.S. cannot serve as the enforcer for the Europeans’ beloved “rules-based international order” any more. Even in the 1990s, it was doubtful the U.S. could indefinitely guarantee the security of all nations, paying for George H.W. Bush’s “new world order” principally with American soldiers’ lives and American taxpayers’ dollars.

Today a $22 trillion national debt and the voting public’s indifference to the dreams of world-wide liberal empire have depleted Washington’s ability to wage pricey foreign wars. At a time of escalating troubles at home, America’s estimated 800 overseas bases in 80 countries are coming to look like a bizarre misallocation of resources. And the U.S. is politically fragmented to an extent unseen in living memory, with uncertain implications in the event of a major war.

This explains why the U.S. has not sent massive, Iraq-style expeditionary forces to defend Ukraine’s integrity or impose order in Syria. If there’s trouble on Estonia’s border with Russia, would the U.S. have the will to deploy tens of thousands of soldiers on an indefinite mission 85 miles from St. Petersburg? Although Estonia joined NATO in 2004, the certainties of 15 years ago have broken down.

On paper, America has defense alliances with dozens of countries. But these are the ghosts of a rivalry with the Soviet Union that ended three decades ago, or the result of often reckless policies adopted after 9/11. These so-called allies include Turkey and Pakistan, which share neither America’s values nor its interests, and cooperate with the U.S. only when it serves their purposes. Other “allies” refuse to develop a significant capacity for self-defense, and are thus more accurately regarded as American dependencies or protectorates.

Liberal internationalists are right about one thing, however: America cannot simply turn its back on the world. Pearl Harbor and 9/11 demonstrated that the U.S. can and will be targeted on its own soil. An American strategic posture aimed at minimizing the danger from rival powers needs to focus on deterring Russia and China from wars of expansion; weakening China relative to the U.S. and thereby preventing it from attaining dominance over the world economy; and keeping smaller hostile powers such as North Korea and Iran from obtaining the capacity to attack America or other democracies.

To attain these goals, the U.S. will need a new strategy that is far less costly than anything previous administrations contemplated. Mr. Trump has taken a step in the right direction by insisting that NATO allies “pay their fair share” of the budget for defending Europe, increasing defense spending to 2% of gross domestic product in accordance with NATO treaty obligations.

But this framing of the issue doesn’t convey the problem’s true nature or its severity. The real issue is that the U.S. can no longer afford to assume responsibility for defending entire regions if the people living in them aren’t willing and able to build up their own credible military deterrent.

The U.S. has a genuine interest, for example, in preventing the democratic nations of Eastern Europe from being absorbed into an aggressive Russian imperial state. But the principal interested parties aren’t Americans. The members of the Visegrád Group—the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia—have a combined population of 64 million and a 2017 GDP of $2 trillion (about 50% of Russia’s, according to CIA estimates). The principal strategic question is therefore whether these countries are willing to do what is necessary to maintain their own national independence. If they are—at a cost that could well exceed the 2% figure devised by NATO planners—then they could eventually shed their dependent status and come to the table as allies of the kind the U.S. could actually use: strong frontline partners in deterring Russian expansion.

The same is true in other regions. Rather than carelessly accumulate dependencies, the U.S. must ask where it can develop real allies—countries that share its commitment to a world of independent nations, pursue democratic self-determination (although not necessarily liberalism) at home, and are willing to pay the price for freedom by taking primary responsibility for their own defense and shouldering the human and economic costs involved.

Nations that demonstrate a commitment to these shared values and a willingness to fight when necessary should benefit from relations that may include the supply of advanced armaments and technologies, diplomatic cover in dealing with shared enemies, preferred partnership in trade, scientific and academic cooperation, and the joint development of new technologies. Fair-weather friends and free-riding dependencies should not.

Perhaps the most important candidate for such a strategic alliance is India. Long a dormant power afflicted by poverty, socialism and an ideology of “nonalignment,” India has become one of the world’s largest and fastest-expanding economies. In contrast to the political oppression of the Chinese communist model, India has succeeded in retaining much of its religious conservatism while becoming an open and diverse country—by far the world’s most populous democracy—with a solid parliamentary system at both the federal and state levels. India is threatened by Islamist terrorism, aided by neighboring Pakistan; as well as by rapidly increasing Chinese influence, emanating from the South China Sea, the Pakistani port of Gwadar, and Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, where the Chinese navy has established its first overseas base.

India’s values, interests and growing wealth could establish an Indo-American alliance as the central pillar of a new alignment of democratic national states in Asia, including a strengthened Japan and Australia. But New Delhi remains suspicious of American intentions, and with good reason: Rather than unequivocally bet on an Indian partnership, the U.S. continues to play all sides, haphazardly switching from confrontation to cooperation with China, and competing with Beijing for influence in fanaticism-ridden Pakistan. The rationalizations for these counterproductive policies tend to focus on Pakistan’s supposed logistical contributions to the U.S. war in Afghanistan—an example of how tactical considerations and the demands of bogus allies can stand in the way of meeting even the most pressing strategic needs.

A similar confusion characterizes America’s relationship with Turkey. A U.S. ally during the Cold War, Turkey is now an expansionist Islamist power that has assisted the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas, al Qaeda and even ISIS; threatened Greece and Cyprus; sought Russian weapons; and recently expressed its willingness to attack U.S. forces in Syria. In reality, Turkey is no more an ally than Russia or China. Yet its formal status as the second-largest military in NATO guarantees that the alliance will continue to be preoccupied with pretense and make-believe, rather than the interests of democratic nations. Meanwhile, America’s most reliable Muslim allies, the Kurds, live under constant threat of Turkish invasion and massacre.

The Middle East is a difficult region, in which few players share American values and interests, although all of them—including Turkey, Iraq, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and even Iran—are willing to benefit from U.S. arms, protection or cash. Here too Washington should seek alliances with national states that share at least some key values and are willing to shoulder most of the burden of defending themselves while fighting to contain Islamist radicalism. Such natural regional allies include Greece, Israel, Ethiopia and the Kurds.

A central question for a revitalized alliance of democratic nations is which way the winds will blow in Western Europe. For a generation after the Berlin Wall’s fall in 1989, U.S. administrations seemed willing to take responsibility for Europe’s security indefinitely. European elites grew accustomed to the idea that perpetual peace was at hand, devoting themselves to turning the EU into a borderless utopia with generous benefits for all.

But Europe has been corrupted by its dependence on the U.S. Germany, the world’s fifth-largest economic power (with a GDP larger than Russia’s), cannot field more than a handful of operational combat aircraft, tanks or submarines. Yet German leaders steadfastly resist American pressure for substantial increases in their country’s defense capabilities, telling interlocutors that the U.S. is ruining a beautiful friendship.

None of this is in America’s interest—and not only because the U.S. is stuck with the bill. When people live detached from reality, they develop all sorts of fanciful theories about how the world works. For decades, Europeans have been devising “transnationalist” fantasies to explain how their own supposed moral virtues, such as their rejection of borders, have brought them peace and prosperity. These ideas are then exported to the U.S. and the rest of the democratic world via international bodies, universities, nongovernmental organizations, multinational corporations and other channels. Having subsidized the creation of a dependent socialist paradise in Europe, the U.S. now has to watch as the EU’s influence washes over America and other nations.

For the moment, it is hard to see Germany or Spain becoming American allies in the new, more realistic sense of the term we have proposed. France is a different case, maintaining significant military capabilities and a willingness to deploy them at times. But the governments of these and other Western European countries remain ideologically committed to transferring ever-greater powers to international bodies and to the concomitant degradation of national independence. That doesn’t make them America’s enemies, but neither are they partners in defending values such as national self-determination. It is difficult to foresee circumstances under which they would be willing or able to arm themselves in keeping with the actual security needs of an emerging alliance of independent democratic nations.

The prospects are better with respect to Britain, whose defense spending is already significantly higher, and whose public asserted a desire to regain independence in the Brexit referendum of 2016. With a population of more than 65 million and a GDP of $3 trillion (75% of Russia’s), the U.K. may yet become a principal partner in a leaner but more effective security architecture for the democratic world.

Isolationists are also right about one thing: The U.S. cannot be, and should not try to be, the world’s policeman. Yet it does have a role to play in awakening democratic nations from their dependence-induced torpor, and assisting those that are willing to make the transition to a new security architecture based on self-determination and self-reliance. An alliance including the U.S., the U.K. and the frontline Eastern European nations, as well as India, Israel, Japan and Australia, among others, would be strong enough to exert sustained pressure on China, Russia and hostile Islamist groups.

Helping these democratic nations become self-reliant regional actors would reduce America’s security burden, permitting it to close far-flung military installations and making American military intervention the exception rather than the rule. At the same time, it would free American resources for the long struggle to deny China technological superiority, as well as for unforeseen emergencies that are certain to arise.

Voir aussi:

Jaco Gericke’s ‘The Hebrew Bible and Philosophy of Religion’

Yoram Hazony
Jerusalem letters
November 7, 2013

The universities are no “ivory tower.” They are more like radio towers, broadcasting certain ways of looking at the world into the society we live in. Of course, radio waves are difficult to detect. If you don’t know what to look for, you’ll think there’s nothing going on at all. And the same thing is true for the academic transmission of ideas, which takes place through the medium of our children. While at university, our children are immersed in a particular range of ideas, and it is ideas within this range that they usually end up seeing as normal and legitimate. Show me the ideas that are ascendant in the universities of America and Europe today, and I will show you the thoughts that will dominate public discourse throughout the Western world—including Israel, of course—a generation or two from now.

That’s why I like to keep track of trends in ideas at the universities, even in disciplines far removed from the things I am presently writing about myself. I like to know what is going to happen in the world. I like to know what everyone is going to be thinking a generation from now.

Perhaps surprisingly, one of the most important intellectual trends taking place in the universities right now is a pronounced shift toward a greater openness to the Hebrew Bible (“Tanach”), belief in God, and religion generally. This is happening slowly, but the indicators are clear. In a previous letter, I wrote about the rise of Christian theology as a legitimate discipline in mainstream philosophy departments. In this letter, I want to touch on another significant indicator in the same direction.

As is well known, university treatments of the Bible have for generations focused on attempts at reconstructing the compositional histories of various biblical texts. The devotion of vast resources to this project over the last two hundred years has yielded little in the way of firm answers as to how the Bible was really composed. But what it has done is to divert attention from what I take to be the most interesting and important parts of Biblical Studies: Figuring out the ideas that the Hebrew Scriptures were meant to bring into the world, and working out their place in the intellectual history of mankind down to our own day.

In the last generation, however, there has been a growing interest in academic scholarship aimed at trying to understand the ideas of the Bible—the metaphysics, theory of knowledge, ethics, and political thought that are in fact characteristic of the biblical worldview. Among the most recent entries in this project are my own The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture(Cambridge 2012)which has just won the second place award for best book in Theology and Religion in 2012 given by the Association of American Publishers, academic division; Dru Johnson’s Biblical Knowing (Wipf and Stock, 2013); and Jaco Gericke’s The Hebrew Bible and Philosophy of Religion (Society of Biblical Literature, 2012). The interest in such books by leading academic presses, at academic conferences, in academic journals, and on prize committees is a clear indication that something new and potentially quite significant is taking place.

Below is a review of Gericke’s book that I wrote at the request of the German theological journal Theologische Literaturzeitung, and which appeared in print a few weeks ago. But before getting into my thoughts on the book itself, I’d like to say a few words about its author, Jaco Gericke. Jaco (pronounced “Yaku”) is a young Old Testament scholar at North-West University in South Africa. He entered a graduate program in theology in order to become a Christian minister, but academic Bible study ended up destroying his Christian faith rather than deepening it. When he finished his Ph.D. in 2003, Jaco added an appendix to his doctoral dissertation called “Autobiography of a Died-Again Christian,” in which he declared the end of his allegiance with Christianity.

It is fascinating and painful reading. But perhaps more fascinating is what happened afterward. Over the next decade, Jaco gradually constructed a new agenda for his intellectual life. Boldly declaring that university “biblical scholars have not made a beginning in coming to terms with the conceptual content” of the Hebrew Scriptures—an assessment that is surely right—Jaco remade himself into an intellectual historian of the ideas of the Bible. His aim now is to try to initiate a “new era” in academic research and instruction into the Hebrew Bible by seeking an objective clarification of the philosophy explicit and implicit in the biblical texts.

I very much admire this fellow, whom I met this summer for the first time at a Bible conference organized by my new institute, the Herzl Institute / Machon Herzl in Jerusalem. I admire the fact that, unlike others who have broken with Christianity, Jaco has rebuilt his life so as to try and contribute something truly positive to our understanding of the Bible. He is back in the game, lecturing with a winning gentleness that masks an extraordinary passion to understand what the Bible really was all about.

Moved by his life’s journey and his academic work, I invited Jaco over for Shabbat and had him tell his story to my children. Changing what the Western world thinks of the Bible is a prodigious undertaking. It means moving a mountain. Yet in face to face conversation, you get the feeling that despite the disappointments he has experienced, or perhaps because of them, Jaco Gericke is someone who may be able to pull this off.

So here is my review of Gericke’s book, The Hebrew Bible and the Philosophy of Religion. His next book is going to be about the biblical God.

II.

In academia, philosophy and Bible studies tend to react to one another like oil and water. Each discipline possesses a finely tuned repertoire of arguments for why the other is not really relevant to its concerns. Some of these arguments go back centuries and speak to deeply held premises that guide scholars in each field. But Jacko Gericke wants to change all that, and his new book The Hebrew Bible and Philosophy of Religion presents a compelling case for why we would be better off if the wall separating the study of Hebrew Scripture from philosophical investigation were torn down.

Gericke’s book is in two parts: The first argues that philosophy (or more exactly, “philosophy of religion”) is crucial to the study of the Hebrew Bible. The second consists of case studies in the theology, metaphysics, epistemology and ethics of Hebrew Scripture, which seek to show that the theoretical discussion in the first half of the book is more than just talk. Both parts reflect a staggering quantity of reading in the relevant disciplines, and Gericke’s careful citations are going to be a crucial roadmap for anyone approaching the question of the relationship between Bible and philosophy from now on.

Are philosophical tools really crucial for the study of the Hebrew Bible? Gericke’s argument is refreshingly candid: The biblical texts, he says, are riddled with concepts and assumptions—“metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical assumptions about the nature of reality, existence, life, knowledge, truth, belief, good and evil, value, and so on”—that are different from our own. Without a conscious effort to reconstruct these concepts and assumptions, we cannot “prevent ourselves from reading our own anachronistic philosophical-theological assumptions into and onto the biblical discourse.” Tools for engaging in such philosophical reconstruction are familiar and are commonly employed by scholars who seek to describe the views of other ancient philosophies and religions, but “for a number of historical reasons, the study of ancient Israelite religion has been one of the few” such areas of study that have remained “utterly lacking in a philosophical approach.” Consequently, there exists a “yawning philosophical gap in research on the Hebrew Bible.”

Gericke believes that Old Testament scholars have frequently expended their energies on anachronistic readings that have forced the texts to express late theological conceptions that were entirely unknown to the biblical authors. His hope is that with the introduction of philosophical techniques for reconstructing the actual ideas found in the biblical texts, we can enter into a “new era” in the academic study of the Bible—“one in which both believer and skeptic can together read the ancient texts” from a “relatively neutral” perspective such as that which is normally accepted when approaching the study of Greek philosophy or any other ancient culture.

Gericke is at his best when he is cataloguing and demolishing various anachronisms that have been dragged into current readings of the Hebrew Bible from medieval or modern theology. Among these are “dualist metaphysical assumptions,” including the distinctions between supernatural and naturaltranscendent and immanentreality and appearance,religious and secular. The absence of such oppositions means, for example, that the Bible knows of no “other” world, and that gods, far from being “ineffable,” are for the biblical authors a “natural kind.” Similarly, Gericke turns time and again to debunking the claims of “perfect being” theology to be describing the God of Hebrew Scripture. He shows that medieval conceptions of God’s perfection are responsible for creating the so-called “problem of evil,” and that theodicy in the modern sense is unknown in the Hebrew Scriptures because the biblical God is not assumed to be all-powerful, all-knowing, or all-good. Gericke also questions whether the biblical authors would have recognized a distinction between “revelation” and “nature,” and suggests that in biblical narrative, worldly events may have been accepted as evidence that God has “spoken.”

Gericke offers some powerful constructive arguments, especially in the area of ethics. He rejects the common belief that the biblical ethics is a form of “divine command theory” (i.e., that God’s will defines what is morally right), and shows convincingly that the Bible assumes a standard of right that is independent of God’s will. But he is not as confident in his claims about biblical metaphysics and epistemology. For instance, Gericke makes a great case for the need for a careful clarification of the biblical concept of a “god,” but the results of his study on the subject are inconclusive. His tentative suggestion that the authors of the biblical narratives may have known that what they were writing was fiction covers old ground, and I don’t think Gericke’s version of this proposal is any more persuasive than its predecessors. A more credible and interesting suggestion, also presented tentatively, is that the biblical texts tend to rely on an evidentialist theory of knowledge—that is, the view that one’s beliefs can only be justified by evidence.

Overall, Gericke’s case studies are more successful in clarifying what the Bible does not say than in reconstructing what it does. I don’t see this as an objection to the book. Gericke says his constructive proposals are preliminary. His principal aim is to propose a research agenda that will introduce profound changes in the way the Hebrew Bible is studied and taught in the university setting, and to describe methods by which this agenda can be pursued. And this he does in a manner that is compelling and much needed.

I do have some questions about the way Gericke frames his vision for a “new era” in Bible scholarship. In particular, I wonder at Gericke’s references to the “folk philosophical presuppositions” of the biblical texts, and to their “precritical” or “prephilosophical” character. Occasionally, he will also mention that the texts are “naïve” or “primitive” as well. All of this makes it sound as though the authors of the Bible were only capable of dim premonitions concerning the metaphysical or ethical issues that we later readers are fortunate enough to have firmly in our grasp.

But if Gericke is right that modern “biblical scholars have not made a beginning in coming to terms with the conceptual content” of the Hebrew Bible, then all these judgments about the supposedly naïve and uncritical nature of biblical thought may be premature. Perhaps an impartial philosophical elucidation of the Hebrew Bible such as Gericke proposes will lead to the conclusion that the prophets and scholars who assembled these texts were in fact quite conscious of the positions they were advancing in opposition to their surroundings and to one another? Perhaps what Gericke is calling the “philosophical assumptions” of the biblical texts, or at least some of them, are actually the intended philosophical teachings of these works? Indeed, the fact that such a possibility is so foreign to so many scholars may be a consequence of the very same prejudices that Gericke is at such pains to combat.

This is a wonderful book, brimming with intellectual energy. I cannot help marveling at the love of the Hebrew Bible that Gericke continues to exhibit, given the pain and disappointments in his personal spiritual life, which he is trusting enough to mention to his readers in passing. I have no doubt that there will be others who will be moved by the vision he articulates, and who will wish to take part in pursuing it.

Voir enfin:

Trump’s Tweetstorm Correctly Linked Anti-Americanism to Antisemitism
President Donald Trump’s tweets on Sunday drew predictable condemnation. But aside from the partisan debate about whether they were racist, they contained an important truth: hatred of Jews and hatred of America are linked
Caroline Glick
Breitbart
17 Jul 2019

Trump told the so-called “squad” of radical Democrats — Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) — they could leave the country if they hate it so much. He drew criticism because he said that they came from foreign countries; in fact, only Omar did.

But Trump also highlighted a basic fact about the nature of leftist ideology. Just as the Iranian regime views the United States and Israel as two sides of the same coin, with the ayatollahs dubbing the U.S. “the Great Satan” and Israel, “the Little Satan,” so the radical left views the U.S. and Israel – the most powerful democracy in the world and the only democracy in the Middle East – as states with no moral foundation for existing.

Although other presidents have spoken out against hatred of Jews and Israel on the one hand and hatred of America on the other, it is hard to think of another example of a U.S. leader making the case that the two hatreds are linked as Trump did this week.

This is important, because they are linked. The haters see both America and the Jews as all-powerful forces who use their power to bend the world to their nefarious, avaricious, greedy aims. They stereotype both Americans and pro-Israel and traditional Jews as vulgar and fascist.

Pew Research Center studies of European perspectives on Jews and Americans show a massive overlap between anti-Semitic attitudes and anti-American ones. As the American left has become more radical, it has also become more aligned with those toxic European attitudes towards both the United States and Israel.

One example is evident at the U.S.-Mexico border. The left’s opposition to enforcing American immigration laws goes hand-in-hand with the view that the Jewish people have no right to national self-determination in their homeland and that the Jewish state has no right to exist. As political philosopher Yoram Hazony argued in his book, The Virtue of Nationalism, nationalism — and, indeed, the concept of a nation itself — is a biblical concept. The nation of Israel is the first nation. And the American Founding Fathers’ conception of the United States and the American nation was rooted in the biblical concept of nationhood and nationalism of the Jews.

Hazony contends that anti-nationalism is both inherently antisemitic and anti-American. And it is also imperialist. Anti-nationalists support international and transnational legal constructs and institutions that deny distinct nations large and small the ability to determine their own unique course in the world. As repositories of the concept of distinct nations, nation-states are, in Hazony’s view, inherently freer and more cohesive societies than imperialist societies that insist that one-size-fits-all and that there are people better equipped than the people themselves to decide what is good for them.

As Trump tweeted, the four sirens of the socialist revolution are a dire threat to the Democratic Party. By embracing the likes of Reps. Omar and Tlaib with their repeated statements against the United States, Jews and Israel and their tolerance for terrorist groups and terrorists, and by embracing Ocasio-Cortez who likens America to Nazi Germany, replete with “concentration camps,” the Democratic Party is indeed embracing anti-Americanism and anti-Semitism.

And, as Trump tweeted, it is the Democrats, not the Republicans — and certainly not the president — who are making Israel a partisan issue. They are doing so by abandoning Israel and embracing antisemitic conceptions of nationalism and of the Jewish and American nations.

Trump’s tweet storm, however controversial, showed that he is personally committed to fighting hatred of Jews and Israel. As he was being targeted as a racist by Democrats, the Department of Justice was holding a conference on combatting antisemitism. The conference, which placed a spotlight on campus antisemitism, did not shy away from discussing and condemning antisemitism on the left as well as on the right, and Islamic antisemitism.

In his remarks before the conference, Attorney General Willian Barr discussed the galloping hostility Jewish students face in U.S. universities today.

In his words, “On college campuses today, Jewish students who support Israel are frequently targeted for harassment, Jewish student organizations are marginalized, and progressive Jewish students are told they must denounce their beliefs and their heritage in order to be part of ‘intersectional’ causes.”

He added: “We must ensure for the future of our country and our society – that college campuses remain open to ideological diversity and respectful of people of all faiths.”

In her remarks at the Justice Department conference, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos championed Israel, and discussed actions her department is taking to combat campus antisemitism and specifically the so-called “boycott, divestment, sanctions” (BDS) movement against Israel and its American supporters.

In DeVos’s words, the BDS campaign is “one of the most pernicious threats” of antisemitism on college campuses.

“These bullies claim they stand for human rights, but we all known that BDS stands for antisemitism,” she said.

She noted that education department intervention forced Williams College to cancel an antisemitic ruling against a Jewish campus group, and that the department is currently investigating the use of federal funds by Duke University and the University of North Carolina to finance a conference featuring antisemitic and pro-terror speakers.

It is a testament to the left’s increasing embrace of anti-Jewish bigotry, and its rejection of America’s right to borders, — and through them, to self-government and self-determination — that Trump is being branded a racist for standing up to these distressing trends.

And it is a testament to Trump’s moral courage that he is willing to speak the truth about antisemitism and anti-Americanism even at the cost of wall-to-wall calumny by Democrats and the media.


Caricature antisémite du New York Times: chronique d’une catastrophe annoncée (Between normalization of deviance and creeping normality, how the NYT ended up joining a long-established European post-WWII tradition of antisemitism)

1 mai, 2019

https://twitter.com/Harry1T6/status/1122140959968350209?ref_src=twsrc^tfw

https://www.cartooningforpeace.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/ANTONIO-021.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D5PgCTHXoAAlivA.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/www.whale.to/b/cartoo-10Dave-Brown_68351d.jpg
Blurred Charlie hebdo cover
https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2018/09/1862/1048/brancopic.jpg?ve=1&tl=1https://i.pinimg.com/originals/52/22/1a/52221a18227659157e3d130da2f552e8.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/editorialcartoonists.com/cartoons/BrancA/2017/BrancA20170124_low.jpg
Related image
Image result for Ilhan Omar Branco cartoons
No photo description available.No photo description available.Image result for Overton window Ilhan Omar Branco cartoon

Image result for Halima Aden Burkini hijab Sports illustrated swimsuit cartoons

L’oppression mentale totalitaire est faite de piqûres de moustiques et non de grands coups sur la tête. (…) Quel fut le moyen de propagande le plus puissant de l’hitlérisme? Etaient-ce les discours isolés de Hitler et de Goebbels, leurs déclarations à tel ou tel sujet, leurs propos haineux sur le judaïsme, sur le bolchevisme? Non, incontestablement, car beaucoup de choses demeuraient incomprises par la masse ou l’ennuyaient, du fait de leur éternelle répétition.[…] Non, l’effet le plus puissant ne fut pas produit par des discours isolés, ni par des articles ou des tracts, ni par des affiches ou des drapeaux, il ne fut obtenu par rien de ce qu’on était forcé d’enregistrer par la pensée ou la perception. Le nazisme s’insinua dans la chair et le sang du grand nombre à travers des expressions isolées, des tournures, des formes syntaxiques qui s’imposaient à des millions d’exemplaires et qui furent adoptées de façon mécanique et inconsciente. Victor Klemperer (LTI, la langue du IIIe Reich)
La décision de célébrer désormais le 1er mai comme un jour de lutte sociale de par le monde installe au centre de la mémoire ouvrière un crime commis par l’Amérique. Philippe Roger
Il sera organisé une grande manifestation à date fixe de manière que dans tous les pays et dans toutes les villes à la fois, le même jour convenu, les travailleurs mettent les pouvoirs publics en demeure de réduire légalement à huit heures la journée de travail et d’appliquer les autres résolutions du congrès. Attendu qu’une semblable manifestation a été déjà décidée pour le 1er mai 1890 par l’AFL, dans son congrès de décembre 1888 tenu à Saint Louis, cette date est adoptée pour la manifestation. Raymond Lavigne (Congrès de la IIe Internationale, Paris, le 20 juin 1889)
La NASA, c’est nous : la même chose se passe chez nous ! Lecteurs de Diane Vaughan
Diane Vaughan est une sociologue américaine à l’Université Columbia. Elle est principalement connue pour son travail sur les problèmes organisationnels ayant conduit au crash de la navette Challenger en 1986. Plus généralement, elle s’intéresse aux « manières dont les choses tournent mal » dans des situations très diverses : les séparations de couple, les échecs industriels etc. (…) Vaughan a travaillé sur des thèmes éclectiques, qui trouvent leur point commun dans l’étude de l’évolution des relations et des situations. Dans Uncoupling, elle montre que les séparations amoureuses ne sont pas des évènements soudains mais un détachement graduel accompagné de signaux. Elle a proposé l’expression « normalisation de la déviance, » faisant le lien entre sociologie des organisations et sociologie de la déviance, pour expliquer comment la tolérance aux dysfonctionnements augmente. De mauvaises pratiques n’ayant pas de résultats négatifs immédiats deviennent de plus en plus acceptés, menant parfois à la catastrophe (comme celle de Challenger). Wikipedia
La normalité rampante est un terme souvent utilisé pour désigner la façon dont un changement important ne peut être accepté comme normal s’il se produit lentement, par incréments inaperçus, quand il serait considéré comme inacceptable s’il a eu lieu en une seule étape ou sur une courte période. Wikipedia
Les hommes politiques parlent de « normalité rampante » pour désigner ce type de tendances lentes œuvrant sous des fluctuations bruyantes. Si l’économie, l’école, les embouteillages ou toute autre chose ne se détériorent que lentement, il est difficile d’admettre que chaque année de plus est en moyenne légèrement pire que la précédente ; les repères fondamentaux quant à ce qui constitue la « normalité » évoluent donc graduellement et imperceptiblement. Il faut parfois plusieurs décennies au cours d’une séquence de ce type de petits changements annuels avant qu’on saisisse, d’un coup, que la situation était meilleure il y a plusieurs décennies et que ce qui est considéré comme normal a de fait atteint un niveau inférieur. Une autre dimension liée à la normalité rampante est l’ « amnésie du paysage » : on oublie à quel point le paysage alentour était différent il y a cinquante ans, parce que les changements d’année en année ont été eux aussi graduels. La fonte des glaciers et des neiges du Montana causée par le réchauffement global en est un exemple (chapitre 1). Adolescent, j’ai passé les étés 1953 et 1956 à Big Hole Basin dans le Montana et je n’y suis retourné que quarante-deux plus tard en 1998, avant de décider d’y revenir chaque année. Parmi mes plus vifs souvenirs du Big Hole, la neige qui recouvrait les sommets à l’horizon même en plein été, mon sentiment qu’une bande blanche bas dans le ciel entourait le bassin. N’ayant pas connu les fluctuations et la disparition graduelle des neiges éternelles pendant l’intervalle de quarante-deux ans, j’ai été choqué et attristé lors de mon retour à Big Hole en 1998 de ne plus retrouver qu’une bande blanche en pointillés, voire plus de bande blanche du tout en 2001 et en 2003. Interrogés sur ce changement, mes amis du Montana s’en montrent moins conscients : sans chercher plus loin, ils comparaient chaque année à son état antérieur de l’année d’avant. La normalité rampante ou l’amnésie du paysage les empêchaient, plus que moi, de se souvenir de la situation dans les années 1950. Un exemple parmi d’autres qui montre qu’on découvre souvent un problème lorsqu’il est déjà trop tard. L’amnésie du paysage répond en partie à la question de mes étudiants : qu’a pensé l’habitant de l’île de Pâques qui a coupé le dernier palmier ? Nous imaginons inconsciemment un changement sou­dain : une année, l’île était encore recouverte d’une forêt de palmiers parce qu’on y produisait du vin, des fruits et du bois d’œuvre pour transporter et ériger les statues ; puis voilà que, l’année suivante, il ne restait plus qu’un arbre, qu’un habitant a abattu, incroyable geste de stupidité autodestructrice. Il est cependant plus probable que les modifications dans la couverture forestière d’année en année ont été presque indétectables : une année quelques arbres ont été coupés ici ou là, mais de jeunes arbres commençaient à repousser sur le site de ce jardin abandonné. Seuls les plus vieux habitants de l’île, s’ils repensaient à leur enfance des décennies plus tôt, pouvaient voir la différence. Leurs enfants ne pouvaient pas plus comprendre les contes de leurs parents, où il était question d’une grande forêt, que mes fils de dix-sept ans ne peuvent comprendre aujourd’hui les contes de mon épouse et de moi-même, décrivant ce qu’était Los Angeles il y a quarante ans. Petit à petit, les arbres de l’île de Pâques sont devenus plus rares, plus petits et moins importants. À l’époque où le dernier palmier portant des fruits a été coupé, cette espèce avait depuis longtemps cessé d’avoir une signification économique. Il ne restait à couper chaque année que de jeunes palmiers de plus en plus petits, ainsi que d’autres buissons et pousses. Personne n’aurait remarqué la chute du dernier petit palmier. Le souvenir de la forêt de palmiers des siècles antérieurs avait succombé à l’amnésie du paysage. À l’opposé, la vitesse avec laquelle la déforestation s’est répandue dans le Japon des débuts de l’ère Tokugawa a aidé les shoguns à identifier les changements dans le paysage et la nécessité d’actions correctives. Jared Diamond
N’oublions pas que les programmes spatiaux impliquent de multiples collaborations. La NASA en particulier sous-traite la majeure partie des composants de ses missions. Que des problèmes surgissent quand un grand nombre d’organisations différentes travaillent ensemble n’a rien d’exceptionnel, surtout quand il s’agit d’innovations techniques. Des erreurs sont faites en permanence dans toute organisation complexe, mais contrairement au cas de la NASA sur qui les projecteurs médiatiques sont braqués, leurs conséquences, souvent moins spectaculaires, restent généralement ignorées du grand public. (…) Je venais à l’époque de finir un livre, je n’avais rien de précis en tête, si ce n’est d’écrire un court article que l’on m’avait commandé sur la notion d’inconduite, c’est-à-dire de comportement individuel fautif. Le cas Challenger avait alors, selon l’explication officielle, toutes les apparences du parfait exemple, avec cependant la particularité de s’être produit dans une organisation gouvernementale à caractère non lucratif plutôt qu’au sein d’une entreprise. (…) Plutôt que de limiter son attention au niveau individuel, il est en effet indispensable d’examiner comment la culture d’une organisation façonne la manière dont les individus prennent des décisions en son sein. Mon analyse a montré que, pendant les années qui ont précédé l’accident, les ingénieurs et managers de la NASA ont progressivement instauré une situation qui les autorisait à considérer que tout allait bien, alors qu’ils disposaient d’éléments montrant au contraire que quelque chose allait mal. C’est ce que j’ai appelé une normalisation de la déviance : il s’agit d’un processus par lequel des individus sont amenés au sein d’une organisation à accomplir certaines choses qu’ils ne feraient pas dans un autre contexte. Mais leurs actions ne sont pas délibérément déviantes. Elles sont au contraire rendues normales et acceptables par la culture de l’organisation. (…) les erreurs sont inévitables, ne serait ce que parce que dans un système complexe, surtout lorsqu’il est innovant, il est impossible de prédire ou contrôler tous les paramètres d’une situation. Mais il est capital qu’une organisation prenne acte de la dimension sociale des erreurs produites en son sein et agisse en conséquence. Un pas dans ce sens a été accompli par exemple par certains hôpitaux américains. Ici à Boston, de nombreuses études ont abordé le problème des erreurs médicales en se penchant sur la complexité du système hospitalier. Ce qui auparavant était perçu comme l’erreur d’un individu devient une erreur dont la cause est aussi à chercher du côté du système lui-même, en particulier dans la division du travail au sein de l’hôpital. Ce n’est plus seulement la responsabilité du chirurgien ou de l’anesthésiste, mais aussi celle du système qui lui impose un planning chargé. (…) Si vous voulez vraiment comprendre comment une erreur est générée au sein d’un système complexe et résoudre le problème, il ne faut pas se contenter d’analyser la situation au niveau individuel, c’est l’organisation dans son ensemble qu’il faut considérer et, au-delà de l’organisation elle-même, son contexte politique et économique. ‘une politique de blâme individuel n’est pas suffisante car elle sort de leur contexte les « mauvaises décisions » en négligeant les facteurs organisationnels qui ont pesé sur ces décisions. Dès lors, les instances de contrôle, tout comme le public, croient à tort que, pour résoudre le problème, il suffit de se débarrasser des « mauvais décideurs ». Or, on a vu avec le cas de Challenger qu’il n’en était rien. Une stratégie punitive doit s’accompagner d’un souci de réforme des structures et de la culture de l’organisation. Diane Vaughan
Durant mes études de master puis de thèse, je me suis d’abord intéressée aux phénomènes de déviance et de contrôle social, puis j’ai découvert la littérature sur les organisations. Combinant l’un et l’autre de ces aspects, j’ai choisi d’étudier la criminalité en col blanc en tant que phénomène organisationnel. (…) Je me suis appuyée sur une étude de cas. Deux organisations sont impliquées : la première, une chaîne de pharmacies discount de l’Ohio, Revco, s’était rendue coupable de fraudes contre l’autre organisation, l’administration publique en charge de l’assurance santé (Medicaid), à qui une double facturation était transmise par voie informatique par les pharmaciens. (…) Mais, et c’est ce qui rend le cas intéressant en soi, les deux employés ont dit avoir mis en place le système des fausses prescriptions parce que les services de Medicaid rejetaient en masse les prescriptions à rembourser. C’était donc une façon détournée de recouvrer les fonds non perçus et de rééquilibrer les comptes de Revco. (…) J’ai compris combien la théorie de l’anomie de Robert K. Merton – une source d’inspiration essentielle pour moi – peut s’appliquer ici. Selon le schéma mertonien, les deux employés ont « innové » en adaptant les moyens et les règlements aux fins légitimes de l’organisation, qui étaient contrariées par le système Medicaid et donc menaçaient sa survie. Le dysfonctionnement dans le système de transaction entre les deux organisations crée une opportunité de comportement illicite ou de viol des règles pour réaliser les objectifs. (…)  Alors que j’étais étudiante, j’ai rédigé un article sur la séparation conjugale, que j’ai appelée « découplage » (uncoupling) (…) J’ai approfondi le sujet lorsque j’étais à Yale, puis à Boston après mon recrutement au Wellesley College Center for Research on Women. (…) J’observais un couple, à la façon d’une organisation minuscule, au moment critique où la relation rompait ou après la séparation.(…) Des références traversent ces recherches, par exemple la théorie du signal de l’économiste « nobélisé » Michael Spence, qui peut s’appliquer autant aux entreprises qu’aux relations intimes dans le couple. Comment les organisations fondent-elles leurs choix lorsqu’elles recrutent et que les candidats sont nombreux ? La réponse est économique : il est trop coûteux de connaître à fond chaque candidat, si bien que les organisations émettent des jugements sur la base de signaux. Ces derniers sont de deux sortes : d’une part, des indicateurs qui ne peuvent pas être changés, comme l’âge ou le sexe (à l’époque, il n’était pas possible de le changer). D’autre part, des signaux d’ordre social : où avez-vous obtenu votre diplôme ? Qui vous recommande ? Quelle est votre expérience professionnelle ? Ces seconds signaux peuvent être manipulés, truqués, ce qui rapproche de la problématique de la fraude. La théorie du signal s’applique aussi dans Uncoupling : malgré l’expérience d’une rupture relationnelle soudaine, souvent vécue comme traumatique ou chaotique dans nos vies, l’hypothèse que j’ai faite était de dire par contraste que la transition est graduelle : le découplage est une suite de transitions. Je n’ai pas tardé à le vérifier durant les interviews, lors desquelles je demandais aux personnes séparées de retracer la chronologie de leur relation. Une même logique était à l’œuvre : une des deux personnes, initiatrice, commence à quitter la relation, socialement et psychologiquement, avant que l’autre ne réalise que quelque chose ne fonctionne plus. Le temps qu’elle le comprenne, qu’elle en perçoive le signal, il est trop tard pour sauver la relation. (…) Il est frappant de voir que dans ces petites organisations les gens peuvent tomber en morceaux sans même le remarquer ni agir contre. Une longue période d’incubation précède la rupture, les initiateurs envoient des signaux, les partenaires les interprètent (ou pas), mais quoi qu’il arrive, selon les buts ordinaires de l’organisation (le couple) la rupture ne fait pas partie du plan initial. Je commençais à y voir plus clair dans ces processus, analogues malgré les échelles d’analyse, mais il me manquait encore des données sur des structures bien plus grandes. J’ai envoyé le manuscrit d’Uncoupling à mon éditeur en décembre 1985. Un mois plus tard, le 28 janvier 1986, Challenger explosa. La presse a ramené l’explosion à un exemple d’inconduite organisationnelle. Cela se rapprochait de mes premiers cas d’étude – à ceci près que cela concernait une organisation à but non lucratif, la Nasa – et j’ai commencé à enquêter. (…) [Avec Columbia] Le même pattern que j’avais identifié sur le cas Challenger se reproduisait. J’étais stupéfaite par les prises de parole du responsable de la navette spatiale à la télévision : en substance, les équipes impliquées dans le programme s’étaient retrouvées dans la même situation de normalisation de la déviance. (…) J’ai pu vérifier auprès de mes collègues que le modèle causal que j’avais défini sur la catastrophe Challenger fonctionnait encore dans ce nouveau cas. Diane Vaughan
While Ken Livingstone was forcing startled historians to explain that Adolf Hitler was not a Zionist, I was in Naz Shah’s Bradford. A politician who wants to win there cannot afford to be reasonable, I discovered. He or she cannot deplore the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and say that the Israelis and Palestinians should have their own states. They have to engage in extremist rhetoric of the “sweep all the Jews out” variety or risk their opponents denouncing them as “Zionists”. George Galloway, who, never forget, was a demagogue from the race-card playing left rather than the far right, made the private prejudices of conservative Muslim voters respectable. Aisha Ali-Khan, who worked as Galloway’s assistant until his behaviour came to disgust her, realised how deep prejudice had sunk when she made a silly quip about David Miliband being more “fanciable” than Ed. Respect members accused her of being a “Jew lover” and, all of a sudden in Bradford politics, that did not seem an outrageous, or even an unusual, insult. Where Galloway led, others followed. David Ward, a now mercifully forgotten Liberal Democrat MP, tried and failed to save his seat by proclaiming his Jew obsession. Nothing, not even the murder of Jews, could restrain him. At one point, he told his constituents that the sight of the Israeli prime minister honouring the Parisian Jews whom Islamists had murdered made him “sick”. (He appeared to find the massacre itself easier to stomach.)Naz Shah’s picture of Israel superimposed on to a map of the US to show her “solution” for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was not a one-off but part of a race to the bottom. But Shah’s wider behaviour as an MP – a “progressive” MP, mark you – gives you a better idea of how deep the rot has sunk. She ignored a Bradford imam who declared that the terrorist who murdered a liberal Pakistani politician was a “great hero of Islam” and concentrated her energies on expressing her “loathing” of liberal and feminist British Muslims instead. (…) Liberal Muslims make many profoundly uncomfortable. Writers in the left-wing press treat them as Uncle Toms, as Shah did, because they are willing to work with the government to stop young men and women joining Islamic State. While they are criticised, politically correct criticism rarely extends to clerics who celebrate religious assassins. As for the antisemitism that allows Labour MPs to fantasise about “transporting” Jews, consider how jeering and dishonest the debate around that has become. When feminists talk about rape, they are not told as a matter of course “but women are always making false rape accusations”. If they were, they would suspect that their opponents wanted to deny the existence of sexual violence. Yet it is standard in polite society to hear that accusations of antisemitism are always made in bad faith to delegitimise justifiable criticism of Israel. I accept that there are Jews who say that all criticism of Israel is antisemitic. For her part, a feminist must accept that there are women who make false accusations of rape. But that does not mean that antisemitism does not exist, any more than it means that rape never happens. Challenging prejudices on the left wing is going to be all the more difficult because, incredibly, the British left in the second decade of the 21st century is led by men steeped in the worst traditions of the 20th. When historians had to explain last week that if Montgomery had not defeated Rommel at El Alamein in Egypt then the German armies would have killed every Jew they could find in Palestine, they were dealing with the conspiracy theory that Hitler was a Zionist, developed by a half-educated American Trotskyist called Lenni Brenner in the 1980s. When Jeremy Corbyn defended the Islamist likes of Raed Salah, who say that Jews dine on the blood of Christian children, he was continuing a tradition of communist accommodation with antisemitism that goes back to Stalin’s purges of Soviet Jews in the late 1940s. It is astonishing that you have to, but you must learn the worst of leftwing history now. For Labour is not just led by dirty men but by dirty old men, with roots in the contaminated soil of Marxist totalitarianism. If it is to change, its leaders will either have to change their minds or be thrown out of office. Put like this, the tasks facing Labour moderates seem impossible. They have to be attempted, however, for moral as much as electoral reasons. (…) Not just in Paris, but in Marseille, Copenhagen and Brussels, fascistic reactionaries are murdering Jews – once again. Go to any British synagogue or Jewish school and you will see police officers and volunteers guarding them. I do not want to tempt fate, but if British Jews were murdered, the leader of the Labour party would not be welcome at their memorial. The mourners would point to the exit and ask him to leave. If it is incredible that we have reached this pass, it is also intolerable. However hard the effort to overthrow it, the status quo cannot stand. Nick Cohen
The UK Labour Party, which dates back to 1900, was long seen as the party of the working classes. Throughout most of its history, Labour has stood for social justice, equality, and anti-racism. Labour’s controversy over anti-Semitism is fairly recent. It’s often traced back to 2015, when Jeremy Corbyn became the party leader. Corbyn, seen as on Labour’s left wing, has long defended the rights of Palestinians and often been more critical than the party mainstream of Israel’s government. But during the Labour leadership contest in 2015, a then-senior Jewish Labour MP said that Corbyn had in the past showed “poor judgment” on the issue of anti-Semitism — after Corbyn unexpectedly became the frontrunner in the contest, a Jewish newspaper reported on his past meetings with individuals and organizations who had expressed anti-Semitic views. Concerns over anti-Semitism only really began to turn into a crisis, however, the year after Corbyn became leader. In April 2016, a well-known right-wing blog revealed that Labour MP Naz Shah had posted anti-Semitic messages to Facebook a couple of years before being elected. One post showed a photo of Israel superimposed onto a map of the US, suggesting the country’s relocation would resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Above the photo, Shah wrote, “Problem solved.” Shah apologized, but former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, a long-time Labour member who was close to party leader Jeremy Corbyn, made things worse by rushing to Shah’s defense — and added an inflammatory claim that Hitler initially supported Zionism, before “he went mad and ended up killing six million Jews.” The party suspended Shah and Livingstone and launched an inquiry into anti-Semitism. But Corbyn was criticized for not acting quickly or decisively enough to deal with the problem. Afterward, claims of anti-Semitism kept resurfacing as individual examples were dug up across Labour’s wide membership. By now a narrative was building that anti-Semitism was rife within the party — and that the election of Corbyn as leader was the cause. Throughout his political career, Corbyn has protested against racism and backed left-wing campaigns such as nuclear disarmament, and was considered the long shot in the party’s leadership contest — bookmakers initially put the chance of him winning at 200 to 1. Corbyn’s victory confirmed that the New Labour project was dead. (…) Corbyn’s campaign drummed up a big grassroots following as his anti-austerity, socialist message gained traction, in a way that would later be echoed by Bernie Sanders’s 2016 campaign in the US. (…) But after Corbyn’s unexpected win, everything changed. Corbyn steered the party to the left on many issues, including proposals to nationalize the railways and possibly the energy companies, end the era of slashing state spending, and tax the rich. He also moved the party leftward on Israel and Palestine. Labour’s previously moribund membership boomed to half a million, making it one of the biggest political parties in Europe. The many newcomers were attracted by the chance to support a truly left-wing Labour Party. Claims of anti-Semitism also increased: Labour’s general secretary revealed that between April 2018 and January 2019, the party received 673 accusations of anti-Semitism among members, which had led to 96 members being suspended and 12 expelled. Part of the reason anti-Semitism claims have grown under Corbyn is that his wing of the party — the socialist left — tends to be passionately pro-Palestine. There is nothing inherently anti-Semitic about defending Palestinians, but such a position can lead to tensions between left-wing anti-Zionists and mainstream Jewish communities. This tension has at times led to a tendency on the left to indulge in anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and tropes — like blaming a Jewish conspiracy for Western governments’ support of Israel or equating Jews who support Israel with Nazi collaborators. (…) At first glance, Corbyn hardly seems like someone who would be an enabler of anti-Semitism. He has a long history of campaigning against racism — for instance, in the 1980s, he participated in anti-apartheid protests against South Africa, at the same time that former Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was calling Nelson Mandela’s African National Congress opposition movement a “typical terrorist organization.” And he has long campaigned for Palestinian rights, while being critical of the government of Israel — including comparing Israel’s treatment of Palestinians to apartheid. But Corbyn’s anti-imperialist, anti-racist stance over the years has also led some to label him a terrorist sympathizer. Corbyn in the past advocated for negotiations with militant Irish republicans. As he did with Irish republicans, Corbyn encouraged talks with the Islamist militant groups Hamas and Hezbollah. He has also been heavily criticized for having previously referred to these groups as “friends,” which caused outrage when publicized during 2015’s Labour leadership contest. Corbyn explained that he had only used “friends” in the context of trying to promote peace talks, but later said he regretted using the word. Last March, Corbyn was also criticized for a 2012 comment on Facebook, in which he had expressed solidarity with an artist who had used anti-Semitic tropes in a London mural that was going to be torn down. After Luciana Berger tweeted about the post and demanded an explanation from the Labour Party leadership, Corbyn said that he “sincerely regretted” having not looked at the “deeply disturbing” image more closely, and condemned anti-Semitism. (…) In August 2018, the right-wing British newspaper the Daily Mail accused Corbyn of having laid a wreath at the graves of the Palestinian terrorists while in Tunisia in 2014. Corbyn acknowledges that he participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at a Tunisian cemetery in 2014, but says he was commemorating the victims of a 1985 Israeli airstrike on the headquarters of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO), who were living in exile in Tunis at the time. The airstrike killed almost 50 people, including civilians, and wounded dozens more. However, the Daily Mail published photos showing Corbyn holding a wreath not far from the graves of four Palestinians believed to be involved with the 1972 Munich massacre, in which members of the Black September terrorist organization killed 11 Israeli athletes and a German police officer at the Munich Olympics. Corbyn denies he was commemorating the latter individuals, but his muddled explanations in the wake of the controversy left some unsatisfied with his response. Today, on social media, it is common to see Corbyn denounced for enabling anti-Semitism — author J.K. Rowling has even criticized him for it — while some brand him outright as an anti-Semite. When US Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) recently tweeted that she’d had “a lovely and wide-reaching conversation” with Corbyn by phone, hundreds of commenters criticized her for speaking to Labour’s “anti-Semitic” leader. (…) Indeed, urgency is needed for Labour’s leadership to effectually tackle the party’s anti-Semitism crisis and convince other MPs not to quit. The nine MPs who’ve left have formed the Independent Group, an informal assemblage that plans to launch as an official political party before the end of the year. Several other Labour MPs are rumored to be thinking of joining them. Unless Labour moves fast, the emerging centrist party could prove an existential threat. Vox.com
Omar didn’t know that the language in which she expressed her malignant delusions was in the lineage of Jew-hatred in its Christian and European forms. Until she entered the national stage, she’d had no need to know. Omar’s malignant delusions are commonplace in the Arab and Muslim world from which she comes. They are commonplace among the leadership of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the Hamas-friendly front organization for the Muslim Brotherhood which supported her Congressional campaign. And they have become commonplace on the left of the Democratic party. Democrats now protest that the whites and the right have their racists too. In other words, they’re saying that two wrongs make a right. This is playground logic, and it ignores the imbalance between the two kinds of anti-Jewish racism. Firstly, no Republican leader ever posed for the cover of any other national outlet with Steve King, or Omar’s new Twitter chum David Duke. Secondly, the Republican leadership, no doubt hypnotized by the Benjamins tucked in Ivanka Trump’s suspender belt, is hostile to the white racist fringe, and the white racist fringe detests the Republican leadership. Thirdly, the white racists are nothing if not candid about their beliefs and their intentions towards the Jewish people. Ilhan Omar isn’t even honest. Omar said she was against BDS when running for the House and then revised her position as soon as she won her set. She denounces Israel and Saudi Arabia, who oppose the Muslim Brotherhood, but not Turkey or Qatar, the Muslim Brotherhood’s sponsors. She may be ignorant, but she knows exactly what she is doing. She is furtive and duplicitous, and she is successfully importing the language and ideas of racism into a susceptible Democratic party. The buffoons who lead the Democrats are allowing Omar to mainstream anti-Jewish racism. The Democratic leadership tried to co-opt the energy of the post-2008 grassroots, to give its exhausted rainbow coalition an infusion of 21st-century identity politics. The failure to issue the promised condemnation of Omar shows that a European-style ‘red-green’ alliance of hard leftists and Islamists is co-opting the party. This, like the pro-Democratic media’s extended PR work for Rashida Tlaib and that other left-Islamist pinup Linda Sarsour, reflects a turning point in American history. The metaphysical, conspiratorial hatred of Jews is a symptom of civilization in decline. So the inability of the Democratic leadership to call Omar a racist reflects more than the moral and ideological decay of a political party. Americans like to believe in their exceptionalism, and American Jews like to say America is different. We’re about see if those ideas are true. Dominic Green
Il est fini le temps de la cathédrale, si ça pouvait signifier, aussi la fin des curés. Frédéric Fromet (France inter)
Sur France Inter, radio du service public, une « chanson » abjecte sur l’incendie de la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris a été diffusée le 19 avril dernier. Et n’a suscité aucune réaction majeure depuis. Les catholiques ont-ils beaucoup d’humour ou sont-ils tout simplement inaudibles ? Toujours est-il qu’une prestation de (très) mauvais goût sur la radio France Inter le 19 avril dernier a totalement échappé aux radars de la polémique. Qu’en aurait-il été avec une pareille satire sur d’autres religions présentes dans l’Hexagone ? Lors de l’émission Par Jupiter !, présentée par Charline Vanhoenacker et Alex Vizorek, « La chanson de Frédéric Fromet » portait sur l’incendie de la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris. Depuis, l’Observatoire de la Christianophobie a notamment relevé la chose, au milieu d’un silence médiatique total. Rappelons que France Inter, appartenant au groupe Radio France, est une radio du service public détenue à 100 % par l’État français et financée en grande partie par la redevance audiovisuelle. (…) À noter que dans cette séquence, la carte de « l’humour » cathophobe est jouée au maximum puisque Frédéric Fromet présente son « œuvre » du jour en ces termes : « L’incendie de Notre-Dame de Paris, c’est quand même du pain bénit. » De quoi susciter les ricanements de l’assistance, une voix féminine ironisant ensuite : « Oh, un Vendredi saint, mon Dieu ! » Délits d’images
This feature is proving that a fully covered hijab wearing model can confidently stand alongside a beautiful woman in a revealing bikini and together they can celebrate one another, cheer each other on, and champion each other’s successes. Young Muslim women need to know that there is a modest swimsuit option available to them so they can join the swim team, participate in swim class at school, and go with their friends to the beach. Muslim girls should feel confident taking that step and doing so comfortably while wearing a burkini. SI Swimsuit has been at the forefront of changing the narrative and conversation on social issues and preconceived notions. I’m hoping this specific feature will open doors up for my Somali community, Muslim community, refugee community, and any other community that can relate to being different. Halima Aden
La mannequin et activiste musulmane entre dans l’histoire avec ses débuts pour le magazine Sports Illustrated Swimsuit. Sports Illustrated Swimsuit continue de prôner la différence dans l’industrie de la mode. Et le nouveau numéro de 2019 est le plus diversifié de tous les temps. La mannequin et activiste américano-somalienne Halima Aden fait ses débuts pour le magazine. Il s’agit de la première fois qu’un mannequin pose avec un hijab et un burkini pour les pages de SI qui sont, habituellement très sexy et où les mannequins sont très dénudés. Halima Aden est née dans un camp de réfugiés au Kenya, où elle a vécu jusqu’à l’âge de sept ans avant de déménager aux États-Unis, elle est retournée dans son pays de naissance pour le shooting de Sport Illustrated pris par le photographe Yu Tsai. « Je n’arrête pas de penser à moi, âgé de six ans, qui vivait dans un camp de réfugiés dans ce même pays », a déclaré Halima Aden, 21 ans, à SI lors de son interview. « Donc, grandir pour vivre le rêve américain et revenir au Kenya pour un magazine de mode dans les plus belles régions du pays, je ne pense pas que ce soit une histoire que quiconque puisse inventer » a-t-elle déclaré émue. Halima a été la première femme à porter un hijab au concours de Miss Minnesota, aux États-Unis, où elle s’est classée demi-finaliste et la première à porter un burkini pour la compétition de maillot de bain… Ce qui lui a valu un contrat avec IMG Models. Peu de temps après, Halima Aden a fait ses débuts sur le podium lors de la Fashion Week de New York à l’automne 2017 en tant que modèle pour le show de la saison 5 de la marque de Kanye West. Public
In a controversial move, Sports Illustrated has unveiled photos of its first ever Baptist swimsuit model, pictured in a floor-length denim skirt, modest collared blouse, and no makeup or jewelry whatsoever, other than her purity ring. The « hot » photoshoot includes pictures of the woman lying on the beach, rolling around in the water, and reading Passion and Purity on the beach in sexy poses, all while completely covered up. Christians quickly praised the decision. « We are glad SI finally sees the value of modesty, » one leading evangelical said. « A woman mostly covered from head to toe is a great precedent to set, and we hope more models going forward will be dressed this modestly. » The woman, Becky Grace-Charity-Faith Benson, said she’s proud to represent her Baptist religious heritage. « It’s important for young Christian girls to see that beauty isn’t just being skinny or wearing b*kinis—it’s wearing a comfy pair of sneaks, a long, denim skirt you made at home, or a modest one-piece bathing suit under a swim shirt and long, flowy swim skirt. » Babylon bee
We are all cartoonists now. Antonio Branco
It’s time for the west to wake up to this kind of thing and stop appeasing radical Islam. Antonio Branco
I’m a fan of Twitter, I’m a fan of a president that talks directly to the people. Antonio Branco
Out of respect to our readers we have avoided those we felt were offensive. Many Muslims consider publishing images of their prophet innately offensive and we have refrained from doing so. Dean Baquet (NYT)
Selon les standards du Times, nous ne publions pas d’images ou d’autres matériaux offensant délibérément les sensibilités religieuses. Après concertation, les journalistes du Times ont décidé que décrire les caricatures en question donnerait suffisamment d’informations pour comprendre l’histoire. NYT
As I grew older, I learned that the fair-skinned, blue-eyed depiction of Jesus has for centuries adorned stained glass windows and altars in churches throughout the United States and Europe. But Jesus, born in Bethlehem, was most likely a Palestinian man with dark skin. Eric Copage
The Times published an appalling political cartoon in the opinion pages of its international print edition late last week. It portrayed Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel as a dog wearing a Star of David on a collar. He was leading President Trump, drawn as a blind man wearing a skullcap. The cartoon was chosen from a syndication service by a production editor who did not recognize its anti-Semitism. Yet however it came to be published, the appearance of such an obviously bigoted cartoon in a mainstream publication is evidence of a profound danger — not only of anti-Semitism but of numbness to its creep, to the insidious way this ancient, enduring prejudice is once again working itself into public view and common conversation. Anti-Semitic imagery is particularly dangerous now. The number of assaults against American Jews more than doubled from 2017 to 2018, rising to 39, according to a report released Tuesday by the Anti-Defamation League. On Saturday, a gunman opened fire during Passover services at a synagogue in San Diego County, killing one person and injuring three, allegedly after he posted in an online manifesto that he wanted to murder Jews. For decades, most American Jews felt safe to practice their religion, but now they pass through metal detectors to enter synagogues and schools. Jews face even greater hostility and danger in Europe, where the cartoon was created. In Britain, one of several members of Parliament who resigned from the Labour Party in February said that the party had become “institutionally anti-Semitic.” In France and Belgium, Jews have been the targets of terrorist attacks by Muslim extremists. Across Europe, right-wing parties with long histories of anti-Semitic rhetoric are gaining political strength. This is also a period of rising criticism of Israel, much of it directed at the rightward drift of its own government and some of it even questioning Israel’s very foundation as a Jewish state. We have been and remain stalwart supporters of Israel, and believe that good-faith criticism should work to strengthen it over the long term by helping it stay true to its democratic values. But anti-Zionism can clearly serve as a cover for anti-Semitism — and some criticism of Israel, as the cartoon demonstrated, is couched openly in anti-Semitic terms. The responsibility for acts of hatred rests on the shoulders of the proponents and perpetrators. But history teaches that the rise of extremism requires the acquiescence of broader society. As anti-Semitism has surged from the internet into the streets, President Trump has done too little to rouse the national conscience against it. Though he condemned the cartoon in The Times, he has failed to speak out against anti-Semitic groups like the white nationalists who marched in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017 chanting, “Jews will not replace us.” He has practiced a politics of intolerance for diversity, and attacks on some minority groups threaten the safety of every minority group. (…) A particularly frightening, and also historically resonant, aspect of the rise of anti-Semitism in recent years is that it has come from both the right and left sides of the political spectrum. Both right-wing and left-wing politicians have traded in incendiary tropes, like the ideas that Jews secretly control the financial system or politicians. (…) In the 1930s and the 1940s, The Times was largely silent as anti-Semitism rose up and bathed the world in blood. That failure still haunts this newspaper. Now, rightly, The Times has declared itself “deeply sorry” for the cartoon and called it “unacceptable.” Apologies are important, but the deeper obligation of The Times is to focus on leading through unblinking journalism and the clear editorial expression of its values. Society in recent years has shown healthy signs of increased sensitivity to other forms of bigotry, yet somehow anti-Semitism can often still be dismissed as a disease gnawing only at the fringes of society. That is a dangerous mistake. As recent events have shown, it is a very mainstream problem. The NYT Editorial Board
During the 2016 campaign, Donald J. Trump’s second campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, had regular communications with his longtime associate — a former Russian military translator in Kiev who has been investigated in Ukraine on suspicion of being a Russian intelligence agent. At the Republican National Convention in July, J. D. Gordon, a former Pentagon official on Mr. Trump’s national security team, met with the Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, at a time when Mr. Gordon was helping keep hawkish language on Russia’s conflict with Ukraine out of the party’s platform. And Jason Greenblatt, a former Trump Organization lawyer and now a special representative for international negotiations at the White House, met last summer with Rabbi Berel Lazar, the chief rabbi of Russia and an ally of Russia’s president, Vladimir V. Putin. In a Washington atmosphere supercharged by the finding of the intelligence agencies that Mr. Putin tried to steer the election to Mr. Trump, as well as continuing F.B.I. and congressional investigations, a growing list of Russian contacts with Mr. Trump’s associates is getting intense and skeptical scrutiny. (…) In fact, vigorous reporting by multiple news media organizations is turning up multiple contacts between Trump associates and Russians who serve in or are close to Mr. Putin’s government. There have been courtesy calls, policy discussions and business contacts, though nothing has emerged publicly indicating anything more sinister. A dossier of allegations on Trump-Russia contacts, compiled by a former British intelligence agent for Mr. Trump’s political opponents, includes unproven claims that his aides collaborated in Russia’s hacking of Democratic targets. Current and former American officials have said that phone records and intercepted calls show that members of Mr. Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and other Trump associates had repeated contacts with senior Russian intelligence officials in the year before the election. (…) Rabbi Lazar, who has condemned critics of Mr. Putin’s actions in Ukraine, is the leader of the Hasidic Chabad-Lubavitch group in Russia, where it is a powerful organization running dozens of schools and offering social services across the country, while maintaining links to a lucrative financial donor network. Mr. Greenblatt, who handled outreach to Jews for the campaign, said that Rabbi Lazar was one of several Chabad leaders he had met during the campaign. He said the two men did not discuss broader United States-Russia relations and called the meeting “probably less than useful.” Rabbi Lazar said they had spoken about anti-Semitism in Russia, Russian Jews in Israel and Russian society in general. While he meets with Mr. Putin once or twice a year, he said, he never discussed his meeting with Mr. Greenblatt with Kremlin officials. The NYT
Starting in 1999, Putin enlisted two of his closest confidants, the oligarchs Lev Leviev and Roman Abramovich, who would go on to become Chabad’s biggest patrons worldwide, to create the Federation of Jewish Communities of Russia under the leadership of Chabad rabbi Berel Lazar, who would come to be known as “Putin’s rabbi.” A few years later, Trump would seek out Russian projects and capital by joining forces with a partnership called Bayrock-Sapir, led by Soviet emigres Tevfik Arif, Felix Sater and Tamir Sapir—who maintain close ties to Chabad. The company’s ventures would lead to multiple lawsuits alleging fraud and a criminal investigation of a condo project in Manhattan. Meanwhile, the links between Trump and Chabad kept piling up. (…) With the help of this trans-Atlantic diaspora and some globetrotting real estate moguls, Trump Tower and Moscow’s Red Square can feel at times like part of the same tight-knit neighborhood. Now, with Trump in the Oval Office having proclaimed his desire to reorient the global order around improved U.S. relations with Putin’s government—and as the FBI probes the possibility of improper coordination between Trump associates and the Kremlin—that small world has suddenly taken on outsize importance. Founded in Lithuania in 1775, the Chabad-Lubavitch movement today has adherents numbering in the five, or perhaps six, figures. What the movement lacks in numbers it makes up for in enthusiasm, as it is known for practicing a particularly joyous form of Judaism. (…) Despite its small size, Chabad has grown to become the most sprawling Jewish institution in the world, with a presence in over 1,000 far-flung cities, including locales like Kathmandu and Hanoi with few full-time Jewish residents. (…) Chabad followers are also, according to Klein, “remarkable” fundraisers.(…) The Putin-Chabad alliance has reaped benefits for both sides. (…) With Washington abuzz about the FBI’s counterintelligence investigation of Trump world’s relationship with Putin’s Kremlin, their overlapping networks remain the object of much scrutiny and fascination. (…) To those unfamiliar with Russian politics, Trump’s world and Hasidic Judaism, all these Chabad links can appear confounding. Others simply greet them with a shrug. “The interconnectedness of the Jewish world through Chabad is not surprising insofar as it’s one of the main Jewish players,” said Boteach. “I would assume that the world of New York real estate isn’t that huge either.”Politico
The past several days have left many Jews in the United States feeling shell-shocked. Attacks against them seem to be coming from all quarters. First, on Thursday, the New York Times’ International Edition published a stunningly antisemitic cartoon on its op-ed page. It portrayed a blind President Donald Trump wearing the garb of an ultra-Orthodox Jew, replete with a black suit and a black yarmulke, with the blackened sunglasses of a blind man being led by a seeing-eye dog with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s face. If the message – that Jewish dogs are leading the blind American by the nose — wasn’t clear enough, the Netanyahu dog was wearing a collar with a Star of David medallion, just to make the point unmistakable. Under a torrent of criticism, after first refusing to apologize for the cartoon, which it removed from its online edition, the Times issued an acknowledment on Sunday, but has taken no action against the editors responsible. Two days after the Times published its hateful cartoon, Jews at the Chabad House synagogue in Poway, outside San Diego, were attacked by a rifle-bearing white supremacist as they prayed. (…) On the face of things, there is no meaningful connection between the Times’ cartoon and the Poway attack. In his online manifesto, Earnest presented himself as a Nazi in the mold of Robert Bowers, the white supremacist who massacred 11 Jews at the Tree of Life Synagogue last October. The New York Times, on the other hand, is outspoken in its hatred of white supremacists whom it associates with President Donald Trump, the paper’s archenemy. On the surface, the two schools of Jew hatred share no common ground. But a serious consideration of the Times’ anti-Jewish propaganda leads to the opposite conclusion. The New York Times — as an institution that propagates anti-Jewish messages, narratives, and demonizations — is deeply tied to the rise in white supremacist violence against Jews. This is the case for several reasons. First, as Seth Franzman of the Jerusalem Post pointed out, Bowers and Earnest share two hatreds – for Jews and for Trump. Both men hate Trump, whom they view as a friend of the Jews. Earnest referred to Trump as “That Zionist, Jew-loving, anti-White, traitorous c**ks****er.” Bowers wrote that he opposed Trump because he is supposedly surrounded by Jews, whom Bowers called an “infestation” in the White House. The New York Times also hates Trump. And like Bowers and Earnest, it promotes the notion in both news stories and editorials that Trump’s support for Israel harms U.S. interests to benefit avaricious Jews. In 2017, just as the Russia collusion narrative was taking hold, Politico spun an antisemitic conspiracy theory that placed Chabad at the center of the nefarious scheme in which Russian President Vladimir Putin connived with Trump to steal the election from Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. (…) The story, titled “The Happy-Go-Lucky Jewish Group that Connects Trump and Putin,” claimed that Russia’s Chief Rabbi Berel Lazar, who is Chabad’s senior representative there, served as an intermediary between Putin and Trum-p. He did this, Politico alleged, through his close ties to Chabad rabbis in the United States who have longstanding ties to Trump. (…) In other words, the antisemitic Chabad conspiracy theory laid out by Politico, which slanderously placed Chabad at the center of a nefarious plot to steal the U.S. presidency for Trump, was first proposed by the New York Times. The Times is well known for its hostility towards Israel. But that hostility is never limited to Israel itself. It also encompasses Jewish Americans who support Israel. For instance, in a 11,000 word “analysis” of the antisemitic “boycott, divestment, sanctions” (BDS) movement published in late March, the Times effectively delegitimized all Jewish support for Israel. (…) Last week the Times erroneously claimed that Jesus was a Palestinian. The falsehood was picked up by antisemitic Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN). The Times waited a week to issue a correction. (…) In an op-ed following the cartoon’s publication, the Times’ in-house NeverTrump pro-Israel columnist Bret Stephens at once condemned the cartoon and the paper’s easy-breezy relationship with antisemitism, and minimized the role that antisemitism plays at the New York Times. Stephens attributed the decision to publish the cartoon in the New York Times international edition to the small staff in the paper’s Paris office and insisted that “the charge that the institution [i.e., the Times] is in any way antisemitic is a calumny.” (…) Stephens tried to minimize the Times’ power to influence the public discourse in the U.S. by placing its antisemitic reporting in the context of a larger phenomenon. But the fact is that while the New York Times has long since ceased serving as the “paper of record” for anyone not on the political left in America, it is still the most powerful news organization in the United States, and arguably in the world. The Times has the power to set the terms of the discourse on every subject it touches. Politico felt it was reasonable to allege a Jewish world conspiracy run by Chabad that linked Putin with Trump because, as Haberman suggested, the Times had invented the preposterous, bigoted theory three weeks earlier. New York University felt comfortable giving a prestigious award to the Hamas-linked antisemitic group Students for Justice in Palestine last week because the Times promotes its harassment campaign against Jewish students. (…) It has co-opted of the discourse on antisemitism in a manner that sanitizes the paper and its followers from allegations of being part of the problem. It has led the charge in reducing the acceptable discourse on antisemitism to a discussion of right wing antisemitism. Led by reporter Jonathan Weisman, with able assists from Weiss and Stephens, the Times has pushed the view that the most dangerous antisemites in America are Trump supporters. The basis of this slander is the false claim that Trump referred to the neo-Nazis who protested in Charlottesville in August 2017 as “very fine people.” As Breitbart’s Joel Pollak noted, Trump specifically singled out the neo-Nazis for condemnation and said merely that the protesters at the scene who simply wanted the statue of Robert E. Lee preserved (and those who peacefully opposed them) were decent people. The Times has used this falsehood as a means to project the view that hatred of Jews begins with Trump – arguably the most pro-Jewish president in U.S. history, goes through the Republican Party, which has actively defended Jews in the face of Democratic bigotry, and ends with his supporters. By attributing an imaginary hostility against Jews to Trump, Republicans, and Trump supporters, the Times has effectively given carte blanche to itself, the Democrats, and its fellow Trump-hating antisemites to promote Jew-hatred. John Earnest and Robert Bowers were not ordered to enter synagogues and massacre Jews by the editors of the New York Times. But their decisions to do so was made in an environment of hatred for Jews that the Times promotes every day. Following the Bowers massacre of Jewish worshippers at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, the New York Times and its Trump-hating columnists blamed Trump for Bowers’s action. Not only was this a slander. It was also pure projection. Caroline Glick
À la suite d’un torrent de protestations, la direction du grand quotidien libéral a reconnu que sa caricature reprenait les clichés antisémites d’usage et a présenté ses regrets. Mais il est difficile pour autant, pour un observateur qui scrute depuis longtemps les relations judéo-américaines, de passer cet incident en pures pertes et profits. Pour différentes raisons qui se conjuguent dangereusement. Mais un mot tout d’abord sur la caricature. En dépit de l’amende honorable versée sans barguigner par le journal lui-même, certains esprits forts discutent l’aspect antisémite du dessin incriminé. J’ai cru remarquer qu’il s’agissait souvent d’antiracistes de gauche vétilleux qui sourcillent dès lors que, par exemple, on ne partage pas avec eux extatiquement le même enthousiasme pour le phénomène migratoire massif et souvent illégal. Au demeurant, le New York Times lui-même n’est pas le dernier à se proposer pour donner à autrui des leçons d’antiracisme qu’il n’a pas réclamées. Nous mettrons bien évidemment leurs contestations sur le compte de leur ignorance de l’histoire de l’antisémitisme plutôt que sur celui d’une improbable mauvaise foi. Tout d’abord, l’animalisation du Juif est un grand classique. Mais au-delà même de cet antisémitisme de facture assez classique, ce méchant dessin s’insère dans un contexte contemporain anglo-saxon de gauche fort dégradé. Il convient de comprendre que parallèlement à un conflit interne au parti travailliste britannique qui reproche, preuves à l’appui, à Jeremy Corbyn un antisémitisme caricatural (lui-même ayant reconnu un problème au sein du Labour), le parti Démocrate américain est déchiré. En cause, de nouvelles représentantes d’origine islamique ou immigrée qui multiplient les dérapages. La plus emblématique étant pour l’heure ilhan Omar, d’origine somalienne, qui enchaînent en spirales les provocations suivies d’excuses. L’un de ses griefs consistant notamment à reprocher aux politiciens juifs une double et déloyale allégeance en faveur de l’état Juif. Les réactions de l’appareil démocrate ordinairement antiraciste, se caractérisant ici par une manière de déploration paternaliste. C’est donc bien dans ce cadre général et particulier qu’il convenait d’analyser pourquoi cette caricature tombait mal, pour le journal libéral comme pour la gauche américaine en proie à ses nouveaux vieux démons, comme pour les juifs américains traditionnellement et majoritairement démocrates. Gilles-William Goldnadel
You thought that Congresswoman Ilhan Omar’s comments about foreign loyalty or “Benjamins” were problematic. The International Edition of the Times just said: “Let me show you what we can do,” with a cartoon of a yarmulke-wearing, blind US President Donald Trump being led by a dog with a Star of David collar and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s face for a head. (…) It used to be that we were told that Trump was fostering “Trump antisemitism” and driving a new wave of antisemitism in the US. But the cartoon depicts him as a Jew. Well, which is it? Is he fostering antisemitism, or is he now a closet Jew being led by Israel, depicted as a Jewish dog? We used to say that images “conjured up memories” of 1930s antisemitism. This didn’t conjure it up; this showed us exactly what it looked like. The Nazis also depicted us as animals. They also put Stars of David on us. Antisemites have compared us to dogs, pigs and monkeys before. It used to be that it was on the far-Right that Jews were depicted as controlling the world, like an octopus or a spider. But now we see how mainstream it has become to blame the Jews and Israel for the world’s problems. There isn’t just one problem with this cartoon. There are numerous problems. Problem one is putting a yarmulke on the US president in a negative way. What is being said there? That he is secretly a Jew. Then making him blind, and having him led by Israel. That implies Israel controls US policy or controls America. Problem two: they put a dog leash with a Star of David, which is antisemitic in multiple ways. Problems three and four. You’d think that after the Holocaust, any use of the Star of David would automatically raise questions in a newsroom. But no. Then they put the Israeli prime minister’s face on a dog. On a dog. Problem number five. So this cartoon wasn’t just mildly antisemitic. It wasn’t like “whoops.” It was deeply antisemitic. The New York Times acknowledged this in a kind of pathetic way. They admitted that the cartoon “included antisemitic tropes.” It then noted, “The image was offensive and it was an error of judgement to publish it.” This should be a defining moment. It is a defining moment because one of America’s most prestigious newspapers did this, not some small town newspaper somewhere. That it was in the International Edition doesn’t make it any less harmful. In fact, it shows America’s face to the world and gives a quiet signal to other antisemites. How can we demand that there be zero tolerance for antisemitism and antisemitic tropes when this happens? Jerusalem Post
A dog with a Jewish star around its neck and the face of a Jewish leader, leading a blind, yarmulke-wearing U.S. President would be standard fare for the notorious Nazi newspaper Der Sturmer, and for its modern descendants. Unfortunately the New York Times must now be counted among those descendants. Just days after the Times published an op-ed falsely claiming Jesus was a Palestinian, the New York Times International Edition placed this cartoon on their op-ed page, depicting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a dog leading a blind U.S. President Donald Trump: The cartoon is by the award-winning (aren’t they all) Portuguese cartoonist Antonio Antunes Moreira, and was distributed by the New York Times News Service and Syndicate. After a wave of criticism – perhaps among the earliest was a tweet from the left wing site Jewish Worker – the Times removed the image and tweeted this statement: A political cartoon in the international print edition of The New York Times on Thursday, included anti-Semitic tropes, depicting the Prime Minister of Israel as a guide dog with a Star of David collar leading the President of the United States, shown wearing a skullcap. The image was offensive, and it was an error of judgement to publish it. It was provided by the New York Times News Service and Syndicate, which has since deleted it. Some have termed this an apology – it is not, it is cold-blooded and at best descriptive. Neither the word apology nor any synonym for apology is employed, and there is nothing about accountability or further steps the Times will take to make sure nothing like this ever happens again. This did not happen in a vacuum, but there is nothing about the responsible editor or editors being fired, or even disciplined. There is nothing about no longer accepting or distributing cartoons from the cartoonist Antonio, who has previously used religious symbols in an offensive way. For example, in the cartoon below the Jewish Star of David is represented as controlling the United States, and a crescent moon often associated with Islam is linked with dynamite. Both the Jewish Star and the crescent are seemingly bloody. Camera
Imagine if the New York Times cartoon that depicted Israel’s Prime Minister as a dog had, instead, depicted the leader of another ethnic or gender group in a similar manner? If you think that is hard to imagine that you are absolutely right. It would be inconceivable for a Times editor to have allowed the portrayal of a Muslim leader as a dog; or the leader of any other ethnic or gender group in so dehumanizing a manner. What is it then about Jews that allowed such a degrading cartoon about one of its leaders? One would think that in light of the history of the Holocaust, which is being commemorated this week, the last group that a main stream newspaper would demonize by employing a caricature right out of the Nazi playbook, would be the Jews. But, no. Only three quarters of a century after Der Stürmer incentivized the mass murder of Jews by dehumanizing them we see a revival of such bigoted caricatures. The New York Times should be especially sensitive to this issue, because they were on the wrong side of history when it came to reporting the Holocaust. They deliberately buried the story because their Jewish owners wanted to distance themselves from Jewish concerns. They were also on the wrong side of history when it came to the establishment of the nation state of the Jewish people, following the holocaust. When it comes to Jews and Israel, the New York Times is still on the wrong side of history. I am a strong believer in freedom of speech and the New York Times has a right to continue its biased reporting and editorializing. But despite my support for freedom of speech, I am attending a protest in front of the New York Times this afternoon to express my freedom of speech against how the New York Times has chosen to exercise its. There is no inconsistency in defending the right to express bigotry and at the same time protesting that bigotry. When I defended the rights of Communists and Nazis to express their venomous philosophies, I also insisted on expressing my contempt for their philosophy. I did the same when I defended the rights of Palestinian students to fly the Palestinian flag in commemoration of the death of Arafat. I went out of my way to defend the right of students to express their support of this mass murder. But I also went out of my way to condemn Arafat and those who support him and praise his memory. I do not believe in free speech for me, but not for thee. But I do believe in condemning those who hide behind the First Amendment to express anti-Semitic, anti-Muslim, homophobic, sexist or racist views. Nor is the publication of this anti-Semitic cartoon a one-off. For years now, the New York Times op-ed pages have been one-sidedly anti-Israel. Its reporting has often been provably false, and all the errors tend to favor Israel’s enemies. Most recently, the New York Times published an op-ed declaring, on Easter Sunday, that the crucified Jesus was probably a Palestinian. How absurd. How preposterous. How predictable. In recent years, it has become more and more difficult to distinguish between the reporting of the New York Times and their editorializing. Sometimes its editors hide behind the euphemism « news analysis, » when allowing personal opinions to be published on the front page. More recently, they haven’t even bothered to offer any cover. The reporting itself, as repeatedly demonstrated by the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America (CAMERA), has been filled with anti-Israel errors. The publishers of the New York Times owe its readers a responsibility to probe deeply into this bias and to assume responsibility for making the Times earn its title as the newspaper of record. Any comparison between the reporting of the New York Times and that of the Wall Street Journal when it comes to the Middle East would give the New York Times a failing grade. Having said this, I do not support a boycott of the New York Times. Let readers decide for themselves whether they want to read its biased reporting. I, for one, will continue to read the New York Times with a critical eye, because it is important to know what disinformation readers are getting and how to challenge that disinformation in the marketplace of ideas. So I am off to stand in protest of the New York Times, while defending its right to be wrong. That is what the First Amendment is all about. Finally, there is some good news. One traditional anti-Semitic trope is that « the Jews control the media. » People who peddle this nonsense, often point to the New York Times, which is, in fact, published by a prominent Jewish family, the Sulzbergers. Anyone who reads the New York Times will immediately see the lie in this bigoted claim: Yes, the New York Times has long been controlled by a Jewish family. But this Jewish family is far from being supportive of Jewish values, the nation state of the Jewish people or Jewish sensibilities. If anything, it has used its Jewishness as an excuse to say about Jews and do to Jews what no mainstream newspaper, not owned by Jews, would ever do. Alan M. Dershowitz
As prejudices go, anti-Semitism can sometimes be hard to pin down, but on Thursday the opinion pages of The New York Times international edition provided a textbook illustration of it. Except that The Times wasn’t explaining anti-Semitism. It was purveying it. It did so in the form of a cartoon, provided to the newspaper by a wire service and published directly above an unrelated column by Tom Friedman, in which a guide dog with a prideful countenance and the face of Benjamin Netanyahu leads a blind, fat Donald Trump wearing dark glasses and a black yarmulke. Lest there be any doubt as to the identity of the dog-man, it wears a collar from which hangs a Star of David. Here was an image that, in another age, might have been published in the pages of Der Stürmer. The Jew in the form of a dog. The small but wily Jew leading the dumb and trusting American. The hated Trump being Judaized with a skullcap. The nominal servant acting as the true master. The cartoon checked so many anti-Semitic boxes that the only thing missing was a dollar sign. (…) The Times has a longstanding Jewish problem, dating back to World War II, when it mostly buried news about the Holocaust, and continuing into the present day in the form of intensely adversarial coverage of Israel. The criticism goes double when it comes to the editorial pages, whose overall approach toward the Jewish state tends to range, with some notable exceptions, from tut-tutting disappointment to thunderous condemnation. (…) The problem with the cartoon isn’t that its publication was a willful act of anti-Semitism. It wasn’t. The problem is that its publication was an astonishing act of ignorance of anti-Semitism — and that, at a publication that is otherwise hyper-alert to nearly every conceivable expression of prejudice, from mansplaining to racial microaggressions to transphobia. Imagine, for instance, if the dog on a leash in the image hadn’t been the Israeli prime minister but instead a prominent woman such as Nancy Pelosi, a person of color such as John Lewis, or a Muslim such as Ilhan Omar. Would that have gone unnoticed by either the wire service that provides the Times with images or the editor who, even if he were working in haste, selected it? The question answers itself. And it raises a follow-on: How have even the most blatant expressions of anti-Semitism become almost undetectable to editors who think it’s part of their job to stand up to bigotry? The reason is the almost torrential criticism of Israel and the mainstreaming of anti-Zionism, including by this paper, which has become so common that people have been desensitized to its inherent bigotry. So long as anti-Semitic arguments or images are framed, however speciously, as commentary about Israel, there will be a tendency to view them as a form of political opinion, not ethnic prejudice. But as I noted in a Sunday Review essay in February, anti-Zionism is all but indistinguishable from anti-Semitism in practice and often in intent, however much progressives try to deny this. Add to the mix the media’s routine demonization of Netanyahu, and it is easy to see how the cartoon came to be drawn and published: Already depicted as a malevolent Jewish leader, it’s just a short step to depict him as a malevolent Jew. The paper (…) owes itself some serious reflection as to how its publication came, to many longtime readers, as a shock but not a surprise. Bret L. Stephens
António Antunes a publié ses premiers dessins animés dans le quotidien de Lisbonne« République » en mars 1974. Plus tard cette année, il a rejoint l’hebdomadaire « Expresso » où il continue de publier ses œuvres. Il a reçu différents prix dont le Grand Prix du 20e Salon of Cartoons (Montréal, Canada, 1983), Le 1er prix pour Cartoon Editorial du 23ème International Salon of Cartoons (Montréal, Canada, 1986), Grand Prix D’honneur 15e Festival du Dessin Humoristique (Anglet, France, 1993), Prix ​​d’excellence – Best Newspaper Design, SND – Stockholm, Suède (1995) Premio Internazionale Satira Politica (ex-aequo, Forte Dei Marmi, Italie, 2002), Grand Prix Stuart Carvalhais (Lisbonne, Portugal, 2005) et le Prix International Presse (Saint-Just-le-Martel, France, 2010). Il a organisé des expositions individuelles au Portugal, en France, en Espagne, au Brésil, en Allemagne et au Luxembourg. Il a été membre du jury à différents Salons de Dessin d’Humour au Portugal, au Brésil, en Grèce, en Italie, en Serbie et en Turquie. António est se dédie aussi au design graphique, à la sculpture, aux médailles et il est l’auteur de l’animation plastique de la station de métro Airport de Lisbonne, ouverte en 2012, mettant en vedette des caricatures de personnalités de premier plan dans la ville, réalisées en pierre inserée. Il est président du jury de World Press Cartoon, le Salon dont il est le directeur depuis sa fondation en 2005. Festival International de la caricature, du dessin de presse et d’humour
When the international version of the NY Times decided to publish an anti-Semitic cartoon by the Portuguese cartoonist Antonio Moreira Antunes, it was just following a long-established European post-WWII tradition. Antunes has been in the anti-Semitic image business for decades, and won an award in 1983 for his appropriation of a Warsaw ghetto photo, changing the victim of Nazis into a Palestinian victim of Israeli Jews. For this, Antunes received the top prize at the 20th International Salon of Cartoons in Montreal. So that’s the identity and history of the cartoonist who drew the more recent cartoon with Trump as a blind Jew being led by the dachshund Jew Netanyahu. So far, though, the Times hasn’t seen fit to name the person or persons who decided to publish the Trump/Netanyahu cartoon in their paper. But my guess is that this person or people who made the call is/are European as well—or, if American, has/have lived a long time abroad. To Europeans, that cartoon would likely be considered ho-hum, just business as usual—or maybe even worthy of a prize or two. They have lost the ability to see what the cartoon looks like to others because they are so used to what’s being expressed here that it’s become mainstream. It’s not as though any of this is new in Europe, although it may be somewhat new for the NY Times (even the international version) to publish this sort of thing. Prior to doing the research for this post, I had never heard of Antunes’ reworking of the Warsaw ghetto image. But for me, that blind-Trump/dachshund-Netanyahu cartoon had already conjured up the memory of another cartoon, one that had appeared in the British newspaper The Independent and was drawn by the British political cartoonist Dave Brown. (…) Ariel Sharon is naked, except for that little Likud rosette instead of a fig leaf. Not a kippah or a Jewish star in sight. So that makes the blood libel perfectly okay, apparently. In fact, the cartoon was so highly thought of that it was awarded the 2003 first prize by the British Political Cartoon Society. (…) If you think about it, it’s a wonder that the international NY Times took so long to get with the program. Legal insurrection

Attention: une normalisation de la déviance peut en cacher une autre !

En cette nouvelle Fête du travail ….

Véritable institutionnalisation, de la première bombe anarchiste de Haymarket square aux actuelles déprédations des black blocs, de la violence politique …

Pendant qu’après l’élection au Congrès de la première députée voilée explicitement antisémite, nos médias nous présentent comme nouvelle avancée historique la burkinisation d’un des modèles du numéro spécial maillots du magazine sportif américain Sports illustrated

Comment ne pas voir …

La publication, dans les pages internationales (et parisiennes) d’un quotidien qui avait refusé la moindre caricature de Mahomet ou de Charlie hebdo …

Et entre une descente en règle de la politique israélienne, la dénonciation de la prétendue collusion de Trump avec la Russie via « son rabbin » et la palestinisation de Jésus lui-même …

D’une caricature antisémite, deux jours avant une nouvelle fusillade dans une synagogue, digne des plus beaux jours de der Sturmer ou de Je suis partout …

Comme un nouveau cas, excuses ou pas, à l’instar de ce qui arrive actuellement tant aux travaillistes britanniques qu’aux démocrates américains …

De la « normalisation de la déviance » ou de la « normalité rampante » si bien décrits par les sociologue et historien des catastrophes spatiales (Diane Vaughan) ou écologiques (Jared Diamond) …

rejoignant entre le détournement de la photo du ghetto de Varsovie ou un Sharon dévoreur d’enfants …

Une désormais longue et dûment primée, sauf très rares exceptions, tradition européenne

La tolérance croissante à toute une série de petites entorses à la déontologie génère imperceptiblement une véritable culture d’entreprise de l’antisionisme

Et derrière la banalisation de l’antisémitisme qui s’ensuit …

Sans parler bien sûr de l’antichristianisme de rigueur

Aboutit presque inévitablement au type de  fiasco actuel ?

The New York Times and the European vogue for anti-Semitic cartoons
For decades European anti-Semitic cartoons have won international prizes
New Neo
Legal insurrection
April 30, 2019

When the international version of the NY Times decided to publish an anti-Semitic cartoon by the Portuguese cartoonist Antonio Moreira Antunes, it was just following a long-established European post-WWII tradition. Antunes has been in the anti-Semitic image business for decades, and won an award in 1983 for his appropriation of a Warsaw ghetto photo, changing the victim of Nazis into a Palestinian victim of Israeli Jews. For this, Antunes received the top prize at the 20th International Salon of Cartoons in Montreal.

So that’s the identity and history of the cartoonist who drew the more recent cartoon with Trump as a blind Jew being led by the dachshund Jew Netanyahu. So far, though, the Times hasn’t seen fit to name the person or persons who decided to publish the Trump/Netanyahu cartoon in their paper. But my guess is that this person or people who made the call is/are European as well—or, if American, has/have lived a long time abroad.

To Europeans, that cartoon would likely be considered ho-hum, just business as usual—or maybe even worthy of a prize or two. They have lost the ability to see what the cartoon looks like to others because they are so used to what’s being expressed here that it’s become mainstream.

It’s not as though any of this is new in Europe, although it may be somewhat new for the NY Times (even the international version) to publish this sort of thing. Prior to doing the research for this post, I had never heard of Antunes’ reworking of the Warsaw ghetto image. But for me, that blind-Trump/dachshund-Netanyahu cartoon had already conjured up the memory of another cartoon, one that had appeared in the British newspaper The Independent and was drawn by the British political cartoonist Dave Brown.

It was early in 2003, during the Second Intifada, when Palestinians had been deliberately targeting and blowing up Israelis civilians (including Israeli children) at a rapid clip for three years. The wall had been started but was far from completion at the time the cartoon was published (January of 2003). One would think that if anyone was going to be depicted as deliberate and ghoulish child killers it would be the Palestinians, who not only supported suicide bombers who murdered children but who purposely used their own children as sacrifices, putting them in harm’s way (see also this) to make it more likely that defensive retaliatory measures by the Israelis would result in the inadvertent death of Palestinian children.

But ghoulish Palestinians wasn’t the image Brown was after (and here the reference is to the famous Goya painting “Saturn Devouring His Son“):

See? Ariel Sharon is naked, except for that little Likud rosette instead of a fig leaf. Not a kippah or a Jewish star in sight. So that makes the blood libel perfectly okay, apparently. In fact, the cartoon was so highly thought of that it was awarded the 2003 first prize by the British Political Cartoon Society. In his acceptance speech, “Brown thanked the Israeli Embassy for its angry reaction to the cartoon, which he said had contributed greatly to its publicity.”

If you think about it, it’s a wonder that the international NY Times took so long to get with the program.

Voir aussi:

A Despicable Cartoon in The Times
The paper of record needs to reflect deeply on how it came to publish anti-Semitic propaganda.
NYT
April 28, 2019

As prejudices go, anti-Semitism can sometimes be hard to pin down, but on Thursday the opinion pages of The New York Times international edition provided a textbook illustration of it.

Except that The Times wasn’t explaining anti-Semitism. It was purveying it.

It did so in the form of a cartoon, provided to the newspaper by a wire service and published directly above an unrelated column by Tom Friedman, in which a guide dog with a prideful countenance and the face of Benjamin Netanyahu leads a blind, fat Donald Trump wearing dark glasses and a black yarmulke. Lest there be any doubt as to the identity of the dog-man, it wears a collar from which hangs a Star of David.

Here was an image that, in another age, might have been published in the pages of Der Stürmer. The Jew in the form of a dog. The small but wily Jew leading the dumb and trusting American. The hated Trump being Judaized with a skullcap. The nominal servant acting as the true master. The cartoon checked so many anti-Semitic boxes that the only thing missing was a dollar sign.

The image also had an obvious political message: Namely, that in the current administration, the United States follows wherever Israel wants to go. This is false — consider Israel’s horrified reaction to Trump’s announcement last year that he intended to withdraw U.S. forces from Syria — but it’s beside the point. There are legitimate ways to criticize Trump’s approach to Israel, in pictures as well as words. But there was nothing legitimate about this cartoon.

So what was it doing in The Times?

For some Times readers — or, as often, former readers — the answer is clear: The Times has a longstanding Jewish problem, dating back to World War II, when it mostly buried news about the Holocaust, and continuing into the present day in the form of intensely adversarial coverage of Israel. The criticism goes double when it comes to the editorial pages, whose overall approach toward the Jewish state tends to range, with some notable exceptions, from tut-tutting disappointment to thunderous condemnation.

For these readers, the cartoon would have come like the slip of the tongue that reveals the deeper institutional prejudice. What was long suspected is, at last, revealed.

The real story is a bit different, though not in ways that acquit The Times. The cartoon appeared in the print version of the international edition, which has a limited overseas circulation, a much smaller staff, and far less oversight than the regular edition. Incredibly, the cartoon itself was selected and seen by just one midlevel editor right before the paper went to press.

An initial editor’s note acknowledged that the cartoon “included anti-Semitic tropes,” “was offensive,” and that “it was an error of judgment to publish it.” On Sunday, The Times issued an additional statement saying it was “deeply sorry” for the cartoon and that “significant changes” would be made in terms of internal processes and training.

In other words, the paper’s position is that it is guilty of a serious screw-up but not a cardinal sin. Not quite.

The problem with the cartoon isn’t that its publication was a willful act of anti-Semitism. It wasn’t. The problem is that its publication was an astonishing act of ignorance of anti-Semitism — and that, at a publication that is otherwise hyper-alert to nearly every conceivable expression of prejudice, from mansplaining to racial microaggressions to transphobia.

Imagine, for instance, if the dog on a leash in the image hadn’t been the Israeli prime minister but instead a prominent woman such as Nancy Pelosi, a person of color such as John Lewis, or a Muslim such as Ilhan Omar. Would that have gone unnoticed by either the wire service that provides the Times with images or the editor who, even if he were working in haste, selected it?

The question answers itself. And it raises a follow-on: How have even the most blatant expressions of anti-Semitism become almost undetectable to editors who think it’s part of their job to stand up to bigotry?

The reason is the almost torrential criticism of Israel and the mainstreaming of anti-Zionism, including by this paper, which has become so common that people have been desensitized to its inherent bigotry. So long as anti-Semitic arguments or images are framed, however speciously, as commentary about Israel, there will be a tendency to view them as a form of political opinion, not ethnic prejudice. But as I noted in a Sunday Review essay in February, anti-Zionism is all but indistinguishable from anti-Semitism in practice and often in intent, however much progressives try to deny this.

Add to the mix the media’s routine demonization of Netanyahu, and it is easy to see how the cartoon came to be drawn and published: Already depicted as a malevolent Jewish leader, it’s just a short step to depict him as a malevolent Jew.

I’m writing this column conscious of the fact that it is unusually critical of the newspaper in which it appears, and it is a credit to the paper that it is publishing it. I have now been with The Times for two years and I’m certain that the charge that the institution is in any way anti-Semitic is a calumny.

But the publication of the cartoon isn’t just an “error of judgment,” either. The paper owes the Israeli prime minister an apology. It owes itself some serious reflection as to how it came to publish that cartoon — and how its publication came, to many longtime readers, as a shock but not a surprise.

Bret L. Stephens has been an Opinion columnist with The Times since April 2017. He won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary at The Wall Street Journal in 2013 and was previously editor in chief of The Jerusalem Post.

 Voir également:

New York Times pathetic excuse for printing antisemitic cartoon – opinion
You thought that Congresswoman Ilhan Omar’s comments about foreign loyalty or “Benjamins” were problematic. The International Edition of the New York Times just said “let me show you what we can do.”
Seth J. Frantzman
Jerusalem Post
April 28, 2019

At a time of rising antisemitism, when we have become increasingly exposed to the notion of dog whistles and tropes that are antisemitic, when there is a lively and active debate about this issue in the US, The New York Times International Edition did the equivalent of saying “hold my beer.”

You thought that Congresswoman Ilhan Omar’s comments about foreign loyalty or “Benjamins” were problematic. The International Edition of the Times just said: “Let me show you what we can do,” with a cartoon of a yarmulke-wearing, blind US President Donald Trump being led by a dog with a Star of David collar and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s face for a head.
I didn’t believe the cartoon was real when I first saw it. Many of my colleagues didn’t believe it either. I spent all day Saturday trying to track down a hard copy. I phoned friends, I got a PDF of the edition, and even then I didn’t believe it.

I had to see for myself. So I drove to a 24-hour supermarket. There on the newsstand was the April 25 edition. I flipped gingerly through, fearing to see Page 16.

And then I found it. It stared back at me: That horrid image of a blind US President Donald Trump with a yarmulke being led by a dog with the face of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Worse, the dog was wearing a Star of David as a collar.

This is what The New York Times thinks of us Israelis. Even if they subsequently said it was an error, they thought it was okay to print a cartoon showing the US president being blindly led by the “Jewish dog”?

And not only that, those who watched as it went to print thought it was fine to put a Jewish skullcap on the US president. Dual loyalty? No need to even wrestle with that question.

It used to be that we were told that Trump was fostering “Trump antisemitism” and driving a new wave of antisemitism in the US. But the cartoon depicts him as a Jew. Well, which is it? Is he fostering antisemitism, or is he now a closet Jew being led by Israel, depicted as a Jewish dog? We used to say that images “conjured up memories” of 1930s antisemitism. This didn’t conjure it up; this showed us exactly what it looked like.

The Nazis also depicted us as animals. They also put Stars of David on us. Antisemites have compared us to dogs, pigs and monkeys before. It used to be that it was on the far-Right that Jews were depicted as controlling the world, like an octopus or a spider.

But now we see how mainstream it has become to blame the Jews and Israel for the world’s problems.

The cartoon comes in the context of numerous similar antisemitic statements and “dog whistles.” In this case it isn’t only “the Jews” but also Israel “leading” the US president. The cartoon is clear as day. It presents the Jews, as symbolized by that Star of David collar, secretly controlling the US president. Trump is being led by Israel, by the Jewish state.

No other country or minority group is subjected to such unrelenting and systematic hatred by mainstream US newspapers. No one would dare to put an Islamic leader’s face on a dog, with Islamic symbols, leading the US president.

Of course not. The editor would stop that.

They’d be sensitive to this issue. They would err on the side of not being offensive. The night editor, the assistant editor or someone would say: “This doesn’t look right.”

Imagine the days when racists tried to depict US president Barack Obama as a closet Muslim. We know the tropes. So why put a yarmulke on Trump’s head? When it comes to Jews and Israel, there is no depth to which they will not sink.

And an apology after the fact isn’t enough.

I know. I’m an Op-ed Editor. When I used to run cartoons in my section, no fewer than four people would see it before it went to print. At the International Edition of The New York Times, it should have been more than four. And they all thought it was fine? What that tells me is that there is a culture of antisemitism somewhere in the newsroom.

THERE ISN’T just one problem with this cartoon. There are numerous problems.

Problem one is putting a yarmulke on the US president in a negative way. What is being said there? That he is secretly a Jew. Then making him blind, and having him led by Israel. That implies Israel controls US policy or controls America.

That is problem two. Then they put a dog leash with a Star of David, which is antisemitic in multiple ways.

Problems three and four. You’d think that after the Holocaust, any use of the Star of David would automatically raise questions in a newsroom.

But no. Then they put the Israeli prime minister’s face on a dog. On a dog. Problem number five.

So this cartoon wasn’t just mildly antisemitic. It wasn’t like “whoops.” It was deeply antisemitic.

The New York Times acknowledged this in a kind of pathetic way. They admitted that the cartoon “included antisemitic tropes.” It then noted, “The image was offensive and it was an error of judgement to publish it.”

That’s not enough. An error of judgment would imply that it was just a kind of mistake. “Tropes” would imply that to some people it is antisemitic, but that it’s not clear as day.

But this is clear as day.

This isn’t like some story of unclear antisemitism. This isn’t a dog whistle. This is a dog. This is antisemitic on numerous levels. It’s time to say no more. It’s time to say “They shall not pass.”

This should be a defining moment. It is a defining moment because one of America’s most prestigious newspapers did this, not some small town newspaper somewhere.

That it was in the International Edition doesn’t make it any less harmful. In fact, it shows America’s face to the world and gives a quiet signal to other antisemites. How can we demand that there be zero tolerance for antisemitism and antisemitic tropes when this happens?

People must speak up against the cartoon fiasco and demand a real accounting. And a real conversation. Not another set of excuses where we all pretend it’s not clearly antisemitism, and it’s not clearly an attack on Jews and “dual loyalty.”

We need to hear contrition and explanations. The public should be included, and The New York Times should listen to how harmful and offensive this was.

Voir encore:

Une caricature antisémite publiée dans le “New York Times” : “un dessin abject”
Le grand quotidien américain s’est excusé pour un dessin représentant Donald Trump et Benyamin Nétanyahou, paru dans son édition internationale. Plus qu’une simple erreur de jugement, dénonce un de ses propres chroniqueurs.
Courrier international
29/04/2019

“Un dessin abject dans le New York Times” : c’est le titre d’une chronique publiée le 28 avril par le New York Times lui-même. Le chroniqueur conservateur Bret Stephens n’hésite pas à critiquer l’institution qui l’emploie pour avoir publié dans son édition internationale une caricature jugée antisémite par de nombreux lecteurs

Ce dessin représente le Premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Nétanyahou, sous l’apparence d’un chien tirant au bout de sa laisse le président américain, Donald Trump. Nétanyahou est affublé d’un collier avec une étoile de David, tandis que Trump porte une kippa et des lunettes noires. “Le Juif sous la forme d’un chien. Le Juif petit mais rusé menant l’Américain naïf et idiot. Trump, cet homme détesté, judaïsé avec une kippa. […] Le dessin était tellement rempli de traits antisémites que tout ce qui manquait, c’était le symbole du dollar”, dénonce le chroniqueur.

La caricature, œuvre du dessinateur portugais António Moreira Antunes, a d’abord été publiée par le journal de Lisbonne Expresso, a précisé le New York Times. D’après le quotidien israélien Jerusalem Post, ce dessinateur aurait déjà été accusé d’antisémitisme dans le passé.

Des excuses sont venues du New York Times à deux reprises. “Nous sommes sincèrement désolés de la publication d’un dessin antisémite jeudi dernier”, a notamment fait savoir, dimanche 28 avril, la rubrique Opinions du journal. En mettant en cause une décision prise dans la précipitation par un seul éditeur.

Pour le chroniqueur Bret Stephens, il ne s’agit pourtant pas d’une simple erreur de jugement. Si la rédaction du New York Times n’est pas coupable d’antisémitisme, elle aurait manqué de vigilance face à une image antisémite. Et cela, selon ce chroniqueur qui prend régulièrement la défense d’Israël, du fait du “flot de critiques à l’encontre d’Israël et [de] la banalisation de l’antisionisme, y compris dans ce journal. Un antisionisme devenu si courant que les gens ne perçoivent plus qu’il est intrinsèquement sectaire.”

Voir aussi:

New York Times, Central Clearinghouse of Antisemitism in America

Caroline Glick

The past several days have left many Jews in the United States feeling shell-shocked. Attacks against them seem to be coming from all quarters.

First, on Thursday, the New York Times’ International Edition published a stunningly antisemitic cartoon on its op-ed page. It portrayed a blind President Donald Trump wearing the garb of an ultra-Orthodox Jew, replete with a black suit and a black yarmulke, with the blackened sunglasses of a blind man being led by a seeing-eye dog with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s face.

If the message – that Jewish dogs are leading the blind American by the nose — wasn’t clear enough, the Netanyahu dog was wearing a collar with a Star of David medallion, just to make the point unmistakable.

Under a torrent of criticism, after first refusing to apologize for the cartoon, which it removed from its online edition, the Times issued an acknowledment on Sunday, but has taken no action against the editors responsible.

Two days after the Times published its hateful cartoon, Jews at the Chabad House synagogue in Poway, outside San Diego, were attacked by a rifle-bearing white supremacist as they prayed.

John Earnest, the gunman, murdered 60-year-old Lori Glibert Kaye and wounded Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein; nine-year-old Noya Dahan; and her uncle, Almog Peretz.

On the face of things, there is no meaningful connection between the Times’ cartoon and the Poway attack. In his online manifesto, Earnest presented himself as a Nazi in the mold of Robert Bowers, the white supremacist who massacred 11 Jews at the Tree of Life Synagogue last October.

The New York Times, on the other hand, is outspoken in its hatred of white supremacists whom it associates with President Donald Trump, the paper’s archenemy.

On the surface, the two schools of Jew hatred share no common ground.

But a serious consideration of the Times’ anti-Jewish propaganda leads to the opposite conclusion.

The New York Times — as an institution that propagates anti-Jewish messages, narratives, and demonizations — is deeply tied to the rise in white supremacist violence against Jews. This is the case for several reasons.

First, as Seth Franzman of the Jerusalem Post pointed out, Bowers and Earnest share two hatreds – for Jews and for Trump.

Both men hate Trump, whom they view as a friend of the Jews. Earnest referred to Trump as “That Zionist, Jew-loving, anti-White, traitorous c**ks****er.” Bowers wrote that he opposed Trump because he is supposedly surrounded by Jews, whom Bowers called an “infestation” in the White House.

The New York Times also hates Trump. And like Bowers and Earnest, it promotes the notion in both news stories and editorials that Trump’s support for Israel harms U.S. interests to benefit avaricious Jews.

In 2017, just as the Russia collusion narrative was taking hold, Politico spun an antisemitic conspiracy theory that placed Chabad at the center of the nefarious scheme in which Russian President Vladimir Putin connived with Trump to steal the election from Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. The obscene story referred to Chabad as “an international Hasidic movement most people have never heard of.” In truth, Chabad is one of the largest Jewish religious movements in the world and the fastest-growing Jewish religious movement in the United States.

The story, titled “The Happy-Go-Lucky Jewish Group that Connects Trump and Putin,” claimed that Russia’s Chief Rabbi Berel Lazar, who is Chabad’s senior representative there, served as an intermediary between Putin and Trum-p. He did this, Politico alleged, through his close ties to Chabad rabbis in the United States who have longstanding ties to Trump.

Following the article’s publication, the New York Times‘ star reporter Maggie Haberman tweeted,  “We wrote a few weeks ago about “Putin’s Rabbi” Berel Lazar reaching out to a Trump aide.”

The Times’ story alleged that there were across-the-board ties between senior Trump campaign aides and Russian officials. Among the many ties discussed was a meeting that Trump’s advisor Jason Greenblatt held with Lazar. In other words, the antisemitic Chabad conspiracy theory laid out by Politico, which slanderously placed Chabad at the center of a nefarious plot to steal the U.S. presidency for Trump, was first proposed by the New York Times.

The Times is well known for its hostility towards Israel. But that hostility is never limited to Israel itself. It also encompasses Jewish Americans who support Israel. For instance, in a 11,000 word “analysis” of the antisemitic “boycott, divestment, sanctions” (BDS) movement published in late March, the Times effectively delegitimized all Jewish support for Israel.

The article, by Nathan Thrush. purported to be an objective analysis of BDS, which calls for Israel to be destroyed and uses forms of social, economic and political warfare against Jews who support Israel to render continued support for Israel beyond the Pale.

Rather than objectively analyzing BDS, Thrall’s article promoted it — and, through it, the rticle delegitimized American Jewish support for Israel.

The article began with a description of the discussions on Israel conducted by the Democratic Party’s platform committee ahead of the 2016 Democratic National Convention. The committee was comprised of representatives of Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and representatives of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Thrall wrote:

The representatives chosen by Sanders…were all minorities, including James Zogby, the head of the Arab American Institute and a former senior official on Jesse Jackson’s 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns; the Native American activist Deborah Parker; and Cornel West, the African-American professor and author then teaching at Union Theological Seminary.

The representatives selected by Clinton and the D.N.C. who spoke on the issue were all Jewish and included the retired congressman Howard Berman, who is now a lobbyist; Wendy Sherman, a former under secretary of state for political affairs; and Bonnie Schaefer, a Florida philanthropist and Democratic donor, who had made contributions to Clinton.

In other words, the anti-Israel representatives were all civil rights activists and members of legitimate victim groups. The pro-Israel representatives were all there because of their money.

And of course, because they are all-powerful, the Jews won.

The New York Times’ promotion of anti-Jewish libels in relation to Israel and more generally is all-encompassing. The Times reacted, for example, to Trump’s designation of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) as a terrorist organization by suggesting that he move could lead the U.S. to designate Israeli intelligence agencies as terrorist organizations.

Why? Well, because they are Israeli. And Israelis are terrorists.

The Times used the recent death of an Israeli spymaster to regurgitate a long discredited accusation that Israel stole enriched uranium from the United States. As is its wont, the Times libeled Israel in bold and then published a correction in fine print.

In addition, as part of its longstanding war against Israel’s Orthodox religious authorities, Times columnist Bari Weiss alleged falsely that Israel’s rabbinate controls circumcision, suggesting that the voluntary practice is compulsory.

Last week the Times erroneously claimed that Jesus was a Palestinian. The falsehood was picked up by antisemitic Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN). The Times waited a week to issue a correction.

As to Ilhan Omar, the Times falsely claimed that the only congressional Democrats who condemned her anti-Semitic tweets were Jews — when in fact the Democratic Congressional leadership, which is not comprised of Jews, condemned her anti-Jewish posts.

The paper’s hostility towards Jews is so intense and pervasive that despite the increased public attention to the paper’s hostility to Jews that its anti-Jewish cartoon of blind Trump and dog Netanyahu generated, on Sunday the Times published a feature on bat mitzvahs that portrayed the religious rite of passage for 12 year old girls as a materialist party geared entirely toward social climbing. That is, the Judaism the Times portrayed was denuded of all intrinsic meaning. Bat mitzvahs were presented as a flashy way that materialistic, vapid Jews promote their equally vapid, materialistic daughters.

All this, then, brings us to the synagogue shooting on Saturday and the larger phenomenon of growing antisemitism in America, which while relegated to the margins of the political right is now becoming a dominant force in the Democratic Party specifically and the political left more generally.

In an op-ed following the cartoon’s publication, the Times’ in-house NeverTrump pro-Israel columnist Bret Stephens at once condemned the cartoon and the paper’s easy-breezy relationship with antisemitism, and minimized the role that antisemitism plays at the New York Times. Stephens attributed the decision to publish the cartoon in the New York Times international edition to the small staff in the paper’s Paris office and insisted that “the charge that the institution [i.e., the Times] is in any way antisemitic is a calumny.”

But of course, it is not a calumny. It is a statement of fact, laid bare by the paper’s decision to publish a cartoon that could easily have been published in a Nazi publication.

And this brings us back to the issue of the Times’ responsibility for rising antisemitism in the United States.

Stephens tried to minimize the Times’ power to influence the public discourse in the U.S. by placing its antisemitic reporting in the context of a larger phenomenon. But the fact is that while the New York Times has long since ceased serving as the “paper of record” for anyone not on the political left in America, it is still the most powerful news organization in the United States, and arguably in the world.

The Times has the power to set the terms of the discourse on every subject it touches. Politico felt it was reasonable to allege a Jewish world conspiracy run by Chabad that linked Putin with Trump because, as Haberman suggested, the Times had invented the preposterous, bigoted theory three weeks earlier. New York University felt comfortable giving a prestigious award to the Hamas-linked antisemitic group Students for Justice in Palestine last week because the Times promotes its harassment campaign against Jewish students.

The Times’ active propagation of anti-Jewish sentiment is not the only way the paper promotes Jew-hatred. It has co-opted of the discourse on antisemitism in a manner that sanitizes the paper and its followers from allegations of being part of the problem. It has led the charge in reducing the acceptable discourse on antisemitism to a discussion of right wing antisemitism. Led by reporter Jonathan Weisman, with able assists from Weiss and Stephens, the Times has pushed the view that the most dangerous antisemites in America are Trump supporters. The basis of this slander is the false claim that Trump referred to the neo-Nazis who protested in Charlottesville in August 2017 as “very fine people.” As Breitbart’s Joel Pollak noted, Trump specifically singled out the neo-Nazis for condemnation and said merely that the protesters at the scene who simply wanted the statue of Robert E. Lee preserved (and those who peacefully opposed them) were decent people.

The Times has used this falsehood as a means to project the view that hatred of Jews begins with Trump – arguably the most pro-Jewish president in U.S. history, goes through the Republican Party, which has actively defended Jews in the face of Democratic bigotry, and ends with his supporters.

By attributing an imaginary hostility against Jews to Trump, Republicans, and Trump supporters, the Times has effectively given carte blanche to itself, the Democrats, and its fellow Trump-hating antisemites to promote Jew-hatred.

John Earnest and Robert Bowers were not ordered to enter synagogues and massacre Jews by the editors of the New York Times. But their decisions to do so was made in an environment of hatred for Jews that the Times promotes every day.

Following the Bowers massacre of Jewish worshippers at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, the New York Times and its Trump-hating columnists blamed Trump for Bowers’s action. Not only was this a slander. It was also pure projection.

Voir aussi:

I saw the darkness of antisemitism, but I never thought it would get this dark

The party faces a huge problem that must be surmounted, if only for moral reasons

Nick Cohen
The Guardian
30 Apr 2016

Racism is not a specific illness but a general sickness. Display one symptom and you display them all. If you show me an anti-Muslim bigot, I will be able to guess his or her views on the European Union, welfare state, crime and “political correctness”. Show me a leftwing or Islamist antisemite and, once again, he will carry a suitcase full of prejudices, which have nothing to do with Jews, but somehow have everything to do with Jews.

The Labour party does not have a “problem with antisemitism” it can isolate and treat, like a patient asking a doctor for a course of antibiotics. The party and much of the wider liberal-left have a chronic condition.

As I have written about the darkness on the left before, I am not going to crow now that it has turned darker than even I predicted. (There is not much to crow about, after all.) I have nothing but respect for the Labour MPs who are trying to stop their party becoming a playpen for fanatics and cranks. It just appears to me that they face interlocking difficulties that are close to insoluble.

They must first pay the political price of confronting supporters from immigrant communities, which Labour MPs from all wings of the party have failed to do for decades. It may be high. While Ken Livingstone was forcing startled historians to explain that Adolf Hitler was not a Zionist, I was in Naz Shah’s Bradford. A politician who wants to win there cannot afford to be reasonable, I discovered. He or she cannot deplore the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and say that the Israelis and Palestinians should have their own states. They have to engage in extremist rhetoric of the “sweep all the Jews out” variety or risk their opponents denouncing them as “Zionists”.

George Galloway, who, never forget, was a demagogue from the race-card playing left rather than the far right, made the private prejudices of conservative Muslim voters respectable. Aisha Ali-Khan, who worked as Galloway’s assistant until his behaviour came to disgust her, realised how deep prejudice had sunk when she made a silly quip about David Miliband being more “fanciable” than Ed. Respect members accused her of being a “Jew lover” and, all of a sudden in Bradford politics, that did not seem an outrageous, or even an unusual, insult. Where Galloway led, others followed. David Ward, a now mercifully forgotten Liberal Democrat MP, tried and failed to save his seat by proclaiming his Jew obsession. Nothing, not even the murder of Jews, could restrain him. At one point, he told his constituents that the sight of the Israeli prime minister honouring the Parisian Jews whom Islamists had murdered made him “sick”. (He appeared to find the massacre itself easier to stomach.)

Naz Shah’s picture of Israel superimposed on to a map of the US to show her “solution” for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was not a one-off but part of a race to the bottom. But Shah’s wider behaviour as an MP – a “progressive” MP, mark you – gives you a better idea of how deep the rot has sunk. She ignored a Bradford imam who declared that the terrorist who murdered a liberal Pakistani politician was a “great hero of Islam” and concentrated her energies on expressing her “loathing” of liberal and feminist British Muslims instead.

Shah is not alone, which is why I talk of a general sickness. Liberal Muslims make many profoundly uncomfortable. Writers in the left-wing press treat them as Uncle Toms, as Shah did, because they are willing to work with the government to stop young men and women joining Islamic State. While they are criticised, politically correct criticism rarely extends to clerics who celebrate religious assassins. As for the antisemitism that allows Labour MPs to fantasise about “transporting” Jews, consider how jeering and dishonest the debate around that has become.

When feminists talk about rape, they are not told as a matter of course “but women are always making false rape accusations”. If they were, they would suspect that their opponents wanted to deny the existence of sexual violence. Yet it is standard in polite society to hear that accusations of antisemitism are always made in bad faith to delegitimise justifiable criticism of Israel. I accept that there are Jews who say that all criticism of Israel is antisemitic. For her part, a feminist must accept that there are women who make false accusations of rape. But that does not mean that antisemitism does not exist, any more than it means that rape never happens.

Challenging prejudices on the left wing is going to be all the more difficult because, incredibly, the British left in the second decade of the 21st century is led by men steeped in the worst traditions of the 20th. When historians had to explain last week that if Montgomery had not defeated Rommel at El Alamein in Egypt then the German armies would have killed every Jew they could find in Palestine, they were dealing with the conspiracy theory that Hitler was a Zionist, developed by a half-educated American Trotskyist called Lenni Brenner in the 1980s.

When Jeremy Corbyn defended the Islamist likes of Raed Salah, who say that Jews dine on the blood of Christian children, he was continuing a tradition of communist accommodation with antisemitism that goes back to Stalin’s purges of Soviet Jews in the late 1940s.

It is astonishing that you have to, but you must learn the worst of leftwing history now. For Labour is not just led by dirty men but by dirty old men, with roots in the contaminated soil of Marxist totalitarianism. If it is to change, its leaders will either have to change their minds or be thrown out of office.

Put like this, the tasks facing Labour moderates seem impossible. They have to be attempted, however, for moral as much as electoral reasons.

Allow me to state the moral argument as baldly as I can. Not just in Paris, but in Marseille, Copenhagen and Brussels, fascistic reactionaries are murdering Jews – once again. Go to any British synagogue or Jewish school and you will see police officers and volunteers guarding them. I do not want to tempt fate, but if British Jews were murdered, the leader of the Labour party would not be welcome at their memorial. The mourners would point to the exit and ask him to leave.

If it is incredible that we have reached this pass, it is also intolerable. However hard the effort to overthrow it, the status quo cannot stand.

Voir également:

A Rising Tide of Anti-Semitism
By publishing a bigoted cartoon, The Times ignored the lessons of history, including its own.
The Editorial Board
The New York Times
April 30, 2019

The Times published an appalling political cartoon in the opinion pages of its international print edition late last week. It portrayed Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel as a dog wearing a Star of David on a collar. He was leading President Trump, drawn as a blind man wearing a skullcap.

The cartoon was chosen from a syndication service by a production editor who did not recognize its anti-Semitism. Yet however it came to be published, the appearance of such an obviously bigoted cartoon in a mainstream publication is evidence of a profound danger — not only of anti-Semitism but of numbness to its creep, to the insidious way this ancient, enduring prejudice is once again working itself into public view and common conversation.

Anti-Semitic imagery is particularly dangerous now. The number of assaults against American Jews more than doubled from 2017 to 2018, rising to 39, according to a report released Tuesday by the Anti-Defamation League. On Saturday, a gunman opened fire during Passover services at a synagogue in San Diego County, killing one person and injuring three, allegedly after he posted in an online manifesto that he wanted to murder Jews. For decades, most American Jews felt safe to practice their religion, but now they pass through metal detectors to enter synagogues and schools.

Jews face even greater hostility and danger in Europe, where the cartoon was created. In Britain, one of several members of Parliament who resigned from the Labour Party in February said that the party had become “institutionally anti-Semitic.” In France and Belgium, Jews have been the targets of terrorist attacks by Muslim extremists. Across Europe, right-wing parties with long histories of anti-Semitic rhetoric are gaining political strength.

This is also a period of rising criticism of Israel, much of it directed at the rightward drift of its own government and some of it even questioning Israel’s very foundation as a Jewish state. We have been and remain stalwart supporters of Israel, and believe that good-faith criticism should work to strengthen it over the long term by helping it stay true to its democratic values. But anti-Zionism can clearly serve as a cover for anti-Semitism — and some criticism of Israel, as the cartoon demonstrated, is couched openly in anti-Semitic terms.

The responsibility for acts of hatred rests on the shoulders of the proponents and perpetrators. But history teaches that the rise of extremism requires the acquiescence of broader society.

As anti-Semitism has surged from the internet into the streets, President Trump has done too little to rouse the national conscience against it. Though he condemned the cartoon in The Times, he has failed to speak out against anti-Semitic groups like the white nationalists who marched in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017 chanting, “Jews will not replace us.” He has practiced a politics of intolerance for diversity, and attacks on some minority groups threaten the safety of every minority group. The gunman who attacked the synagogue in San Diego claimed responsibility for setting a fire at a nearby mosque, and wrote that he was inspired by the deadly attack on mosques in New Zealand last month.

A particularly frightening, and also historically resonant, aspect of the rise of anti-Semitism in recent years is that it has come from both the right and left sides of the political spectrum. Both right-wing and left-wing politicians have traded in incendiary tropes, like the ideas that Jews secretly control the financial system or politicians.

The recent attacks on Jews in the United States have been carried out by men who identify as white supremacists, including the killing of 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue last year. But the A.D.L. reports that most anti-Semitic assaults, and incidents of harassment and the vandalism of Jewish community buildings and cemeteries, are not carried out by the members of extremist groups. Instead, the perpetrators are hate-filled individuals.

In the 1930s and the 1940s, The Times was largely silent as anti-Semitism rose up and bathed the world in blood. That failure still haunts this newspaper. Now, rightly, The Times has declared itself “deeply sorry” for the cartoon and called it “unacceptable.” Apologies are important, but the deeper obligation of The Times is to focus on leading through unblinking journalism and the clear editorial expression of its values. Society in recent years has shown healthy signs of increased sensitivity to other forms of bigotry, yet somehow anti-Semitism can often still be dismissed as a disease gnawing only at the fringes of society. That is a dangerous mistake. As recent events have shown, it is a very mainstream problem.

As the world once again contends with this age-old enemy, it is not enough to refrain from empowering it. It is necessary to stand in opposition.

Voir de :

The anti-Semitism crisis tearing the UK Labour Party apart, explained
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is being accused of mishandling claims of anti-Semitism in the party.
Darren Loucaides
Vox.com
Mar 8, 2019

LONDON — The UK’s Labour Party is in the midst of a full-blown anti-Semitism crisis.

Recently, nine members of Parliament (MPs) quit the center-left party in protest of the current leadership, citing their handling of allegations of anti-Semitism as well as dissatisfaction over the party’s stance on Brexit.

“I cannot remain in a party that I have today come to the sickening conclusion is institutionally anti-Semitic,” Labour MP Luciana Berger said at a February 18 press conference explaining her decision to leave. Berger, who is Jewish, has received a torrent of anti-Semitic abuse online over the past few years.

While rumors have circulated for months about a possible Labour split due to the UK’s upcoming, chaotic divorce from the European Union, the resignations — particularly Berger’s — sent shock waves through the party, and many felt that the party leadership should have done more to protect Berger from the abuse she’d been receiving.

If you’re wondering how the situation has escalated to this point, don’t worry. We’ve got you covered.

The anti-Semitism controversy in the Labour Party is fairly recent

The UK Labour Party, which dates back to 1900, was long seen as the party of the working classes. Throughout most of its history, Labour has stood for social justice, equality, and anti-racism.

Labour’s controversy over anti-Semitism is fairly recent. It’s often traced back to 2015, when Jeremy Corbyn became the party leader. Corbyn, seen as on Labour’s left wing, has long defended the rights of Palestinians and often been more critical than the party mainstream of Israel’s government.

But during the Labour leadership contest in 2015, a then-senior Jewish Labour MP said that Corbyn had in the past showed “poor judgment” on the issue of anti-Semitism — after Corbyn unexpectedly became the frontrunner in the contest, a Jewish newspaper reported on his past meetings with individuals and organizations who had expressed anti-Semitic views.

Concerns over anti-Semitism only really began to turn into a crisis, however, the year after Corbyn became leader. In April 2016, a well-known right-wing blog revealed that Labour MP Naz Shah had posted anti-Semitic messages to Facebook a couple of years before being elected.

One post showed a photo of Israel superimposed onto a map of the US, suggesting the country’s relocation would resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Above the photo, Shah wrote, “Problem solved.”

Shah apologized, but former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, a long-time Labour member who was close to party leader Jeremy Corbyn, made things worse by rushing to Shah’s defense — and added an inflammatory claim that Hitler initially supported Zionism, before “he went mad and ended up killing six million Jews.”

The party suspended Shah and Livingstone and launched an inquiry into anti-Semitism. But Corbyn was criticized for not acting quickly or decisively enough to deal with the problem. Afterward, claims of anti-Semitism kept resurfacing as individual examples were dug up across Labour’s wide membership.

By now a narrative was building that anti-Semitism was rife within the party — and that the election of Corbyn as leader was the cause.

The unlikely rise of Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Corbyn became Labour’s leader in 2015, to pretty much everyone’s surprise.

The 69-year-old became politically active in his 20s and had been a so-called “backbencher” — an MP without an official position in the government or the opposition parties — since 1983.

Throughout his political career, Corbyn has protested against racism and backed left-wing campaigns such as nuclear disarmament, and was considered the long shot in the party’s leadership contest — bookmakers initially put the chance of him winning at 200 to 1.

The three other candidates were considered centrist or center-left. Two had served in government during the New Labour era, when Tony Blair swung the party to the center ground. Corbyn’s victory confirmed that the New Labour project was dead.

Some MPs later admitted they only backed him as one of the leadership candidates so that a representative of the party’s left-wing would be on the ballot; they never thought he would win.

Corbyn’s campaign drummed up a big grassroots following as his anti-austerity, socialist message gained traction, in a way that would later be echoed by Bernie Sanders’s 2016 campaign in the US.

Shocking the establishment and against all odds, Corbyn went on to decisively win the leadership contest. When, the following year, MPs on the right of the party revolted and forced a leadership contest, Corbyn yet again won convincingly.

Ever since Tony Blair helmed the party from 1994 to 2007, Labour had been dominated by more centrist than left-leaning MPs. Under Blair, Labour embraced neoliberal economics alongside more traditionally liberal social policies, such as a minimum wage.

But after Corbyn’s unexpected win, everything changed. Corbyn steered the party to the left on many issues, including proposals to nationalize the railways and possibly the energy companies, end the era of slashing state spending, and tax the rich.

He also moved the party leftward on Israel and Palestine.

Labour’s previously moribund membership boomed to half a million, making it one of the biggest political parties in Europe. The many newcomers were attracted by the chance to support a truly left-wing Labour Party.

Claims of anti-Semitism also increased: Labour’s general secretary revealed that between April 2018 and January 2019, the party received 673 accusations of anti-Semitism among members, which had led to 96 members being suspended and 12 expelled.

Part of the reason anti-Semitism claims have grown under Corbyn is that his wing of the party — the socialist left — tends to be passionately pro-Palestine. There is nothing inherently anti-Semitic about defending Palestinians, but such a position can lead to tensions between left-wing anti-Zionists and mainstream Jewish communities.

This tension has at times led to a tendency on the left to indulge in anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and tropes — like blaming a Jewish conspiracy for Western governments’ support of Israel or equating Jews who support Israel with Nazi collaborators.

Corbyn’s defenders point out that the media has inordinately focused on Labour while giving less attention to cases of racism and Islamophobia among the Conservatives and other parties. But if it wasn’t clear already, recent events have confirmed that anti-Semitism is a crisis for Labour.

Many of the MPs who resigned from Labour two weeks ago had long been threatening to go, and have deeply held political differences with Labour’s more radically progressive leadership. But Luciana Berger resigned because of anti-Semitism, and Labour’s failure to prevent her from leaving on this count is impossible to ignore.

Is Corbyn to blame for Labour’s current crisis?

At first glance, Corbyn hardly seems like someone who would be an enabler of anti-Semitism.

He has a long history of campaigning against racism — for instance, in the 1980s, he participated in anti-apartheid protests against South Africa, at the same time that former Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was calling Nelson Mandela’s African National Congress opposition movement a “typical terrorist organization.”

And he has long campaigned for Palestinian rights, while being critical of the government of Israel — including comparing Israel’s treatment of Palestinians to apartheid.

But Corbyn’s anti-imperialist, anti-racist stance over the years has also led some to label him a terrorist sympathizer. Corbyn in the past advocated for negotiations with militant Irish republicans. As he did with Irish republicans, Corbyn encouraged talks with the Islamist militant groups Hamas and Hezbollah.

He has also been heavily criticized for having previously referred to these groups as “friends,” which caused outrage when publicized during 2015’s Labour leadership contest. Corbyn explained that he had only used “friends” in the context of trying to promote peace talks, but later said he regretted using the word.

Last March, Corbyn was also criticized for a 2012 comment on Facebook, in which he had expressed solidarity with an artist who had used anti-Semitic tropes in a London mural that was going to be torn down.

After Luciana Berger tweeted about the post and demanded an explanation from the Labour Party leadership, Corbyn said that he “sincerely regretted” having not looked at the “deeply disturbing” image more closely, and condemned anti-Semitism.

A few days later, Jewish groups gathered outside the UK Parliament to demonstrate against anti-Semitism. The Jewish Leadership Council, an umbrella organization for several Jewish groups and institutions in the UK, said that there was “no safe space” in the Labour Party for Jewish people.

“Rightly or wrong, Jeremy Corbyn is now the figurehead for an anti-Semitic political culture, based upon an obsessive hatred of Israel, conspiracy theories and fake news,” the chair of the Jewish Leadership Council, Jonathan Goldstein, said at the time.

The crisis didn’t end there. In August 2018, the right-wing British newspaper the Daily Mail accused Corbyn of having laid a wreath at the graves of the Palestinian terrorists while in Tunisia in 2014.

Corbyn acknowledges that he participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at a Tunisian cemetery in 2014, but says he was commemorating the victims of a 1985 Israeli airstrike on the headquarters of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO), who were living in exile in Tunis at the time. The airstrike killed almost 50 people, including civilians, and wounded dozens more.

However, the Daily Mail published photos showing Corbyn holding a wreath not far from the graves of four Palestinians believed to be involved with the 1972 Munich massacre, in which members of the Black September terrorist organization killed 11 Israeli athletes and a German police officer at the Munich Olympics.

Corbyn denies he was commemorating the latter individuals, but his muddled explanations in the wake of the controversy left some unsatisfied with his response.

Today, on social media, it is common to see Corbyn denounced for enabling anti-Semitism — author J.K. Rowling has even criticized him for it — while some brand him outright as an anti-Semite. When US Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) recently tweeted that she’d had “a lovely and wide-reaching conversation” with Corbyn by phone, hundreds of commenters criticized her for speaking to Labour’s “anti-Semitic” leader.

Corbyn’s defenders argue that there is no clear evidence that he — a lifelong campaigner against racism — is anti-Semitic.

“My mother was a refugee on the Kindertransport, and a massive friend of Corbyn — they worked terribly closely together, doing all sorts of political things to support communities in North London,” Annabelle Sreberny, emeritus professor at SOAS University of London and member of Jewish Voice for Labour — a small organization that tends to deny Labour has a problem with anti-Semitism — told me. “So the idea that he himself is an anti-Semite is just a pathetic smear.”

Sreberny told me she largely sees the portrayal of Corbyn’s Labour Party as “institutionally anti-Semitic” — which is how Berger put it when she resigned — as part of a calculated political campaign against Corbyn and his left-wing agenda.

And indeed, this perception may have actually contributed to the current crisis.

Michael Segalov, a journalist who has written and spoken extensively on this issue, told me he thinks that part of the reason Corbyn and the Labour leadership were initially slow to react to anti-Semitism was that the claims were wrongly interpreted as part of a sustained, wider campaign of personal and political attacks against Corbyn.

But like Segalov, there are many in the Labour Party who strongly disagree with the idea that the accusations of anti-Semitism are merely a political smear campaign. A poll carried out by the Jewish Chronicle newspaper in the summer of 2018 found more than 85 percent of British Jews believe Corbyn himself is anti-Semitic, and a similar number believe the level of anti-Semitism in the Labour Party is “high” or “very high.”

Jon Lansman, founder of the pro-Corbyn campaign group Momentum and now a member of Labour’s national executive committee, recently told the BBC’s Radio 4 that there were many more Labour members who held “hardcore, anti-Semitic opinions” than previously thought. Lansman, who is Jewish, also said that he felt “regret, sadness and some shame” about Berger’s resignation from the party.

Where does Labour go from here?

There seems to have been a major shift in the perspectives of party leaders since the resignation of the nine Labour MPs.

Labour’s deputy leader Tom Watson, who is seen as a centrist, recently told the BBC that he thought if Corbyn took “a personal lead” in examining accusations of anti-Semitism, it could make a big difference. Watson said that just last week, he had received a dossier from parliamentary colleagues of 50 complaints on anti-Semitism that he felt had not been dealt with adequately, and had passed them on to Corbyn.

Corbyn, perhaps heeding Watson’s advice, is in talks to appoint former Lord Chancellor Charlie Falconer to be an independent reviewer tasked with ensuring that anti-Semitism claims within the party are handled more effectively. Falconer held high office from 2003 to 2007 under Blair’s government and is respected across the party.

The recent split could prove a turning point for Labour in terms of addressing anti-Semitism as well as wider divisions within the party. “I think [Corbyn] understands now that if he is ever to be prime minister, he needs to rebuild that trust [with the British Jewish community],” said Watson, who urged the quick expulsion of members who’d made anti-Semitic comments. But as Watson added: “Time is against us.”

Indeed, urgency is needed for Labour’s leadership to effectually tackle the party’s anti-Semitism crisis and convince other MPs not to quit. The nine MPs who’ve left have formed the Independent Group, an informal assemblage that plans to launch as an official political party before the end of the year. Several other Labour MPs are rumored to be thinking of joining them.

Unless Labour moves fast, the emerging centrist party could prove an existential threat.

Darren Loucaides is a British writer who covers politics, populism, and identity.

Voir encore:

The Democrats are becoming the party of the Jew-haters

A party and a civilization in moral decline

Dominic Green
The Spectator
March 7, 2019

When Ilhan Omar says that there’s too much money in American politics, she’s stating the obvious. That’s why I support her brave campaign against the US Chamber of Commerce, the National Association of Realtors, the American Medical Association, the American Hospital Association, the Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America, General Electric, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Business Roundtable, the AARP, and Boeing.

These are America’s top 10 lobby groups, ranked by total spending over the last 20 years. In 2018, the US Chamber of Commerce spent $94.8 million on lobbying. Alphabet, Google’s parent company, spent $21.7 million and surged to Number Eight on the charts. The America-Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) ranked Number 157, and spent $3.5 million. Who knew you could buy America so cheaply?

Ilhan, that’s who. In 2012, only Ilhan was wise enough to see that ‘Israel has hypnotized the world’. Now, only Ilhan is bold enough to say that American support for Israel is ‘all about the Benjamins’, rather than a mass of reasons religious, strategic, cultural, and sentimental. And only Ilhan has the integrity to double down, and say, ‘I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is OK to push for allegiance to a foreign country.’

The 19th-century British prime minister Viscount Palmerston said that great powers have interests, not friends. Omar’s notion that the greatest power in history is somehow beholden to a faraway state the size of New Jersey is a delusion. So is her notion that Israel, a state which has taken to best part of seven decades to set up a railroad network, possesses diabolical powers to ‘hypnotize’ the world. So is her idea that Israel’s supporters, Jewish and not, operate by making congressmen and senators ‘pledge allegiance’, like a militia in a failed state. This last might be Omar’s biggest delusion of all. She actually believes that promises mean something in politics.

Omar’s private thoughts are nobody else’s business. It’s not as if the doctors, Jewish ones probably, have ever dissected a brain and noted hypertrophy of the Jew-hating lobe. Words and deeds are what matters, especially in public life. In which case, anyone who claims that Omar isn’t, to use Nancy Pelosi’s formulation, an ‘intentional’ Jew-hater isn’t listening. Omar has herself apologized for what she admitted was the ‘ugly sentiment’ of her ‘hypnotized’ imagery. It took seven years, but shortly after entering Congress, she disavowed that ‘anti-Semitic trope’ as ‘unfortunate and offensive’. She also apologized ‘unequivocally’ in February after the ‘Benjamins’ episode. Her defense was that she was ignorant of the ‘painful history of anti-Semitic tropes’. She intended it; she just didn’t know what it meant.

Omar didn’t know that the language in which she expressed her malignant delusions was in the lineage of Jew-hatred in its Christian and European forms. Until she entered the national stage, she’d had no need to know. Omar’s malignant delusions are commonplace in the Arab and Muslim world from which she comes. They are commonplace among the leadership of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the Hamas-friendly front organization for the Muslim Brotherhood which supported her Congressional campaign. And they have become commonplace on the left of the Democratic party.

Democrats now protest that the whites and the right have their racists too. In other words, they’re saying that two wrongs make a right. This is playground logic, and it ignores the imbalance between the two kinds of anti-Jewish racism. Firstly, no Republican leader ever posed for the cover of any other national outlet with Steve King, or Omar’s new Twitter chum David Duke. Secondly, the Republican leadership, no doubt hypnotized by the Benjamins tucked in Ivanka Trump’s suspender belt, is hostile to the white racist fringe, and the white racist fringe detests the Republican leadership. Thirdly, the white racists are nothing if not candid about their beliefs and their intentions towards the Jewish people. Ilhan Omar isn’t even honest.

Omar said she was against BDS when running for the House and then revised her position as soon as she won her set. She denounces Israel and Saudi Arabia, who oppose the Muslim Brotherhood, but not Turkey or Qatar, the Muslim Brotherhood’s sponsors. She may be ignorant, but she knows exactly what she is doing. She is furtive and duplicitous, and she is successfully importing the language and ideas of racism into a susceptible Democratic party.

The buffoons who lead the Democrats are allowing Omar to mainstream anti-Jewish racism. The Democratic leadership tried to co-opt the energy of the post-2008 grassroots, to give its exhausted rainbow coalition an infusion of 21st-century identity politics. The failure to issue the promised condemnation of Omar shows that a European-style ‘red-green’ alliance of hard leftists and Islamists is co-opting the party. This, like the pro-Democratic media’s extended PR work for Rashida Tlaib and that other left-Islamist pinup Linda Sarsour, reflects a turning point in American history.

The metaphysical, conspiratorial hatred of Jews is a symptom of civilization in decline. So the inability of the Democratic leadership to call Omar a racist reflects more than the moral and ideological decay of a political party. Americans like to believe in their exceptionalism, and American Jews like to say America is different. We’re about see if those ideas are true.

Dominic Green is Life & Arts Editor of Spectator USA.

Voir par ailleurs:

Diane Vaughan : les leçons d’une explosion
Diane Vaughan
La Recherche
mars 2000

Si la NASA enchaîne aujourd’hui les contre-performances sur Mars, elle avait connu en 1986 une catastrophe : l’explosion de la navette « Challenger ». Quels sont les processus qui, au sein de la culture d’une telle organisation, engendrent une déviance progressivement institutionnalisée ?

La Recherche : La NASA vient de perdre coup sur coup deux sondes martiennes. Comment réagissez-vous à ces récents déboires ?

Diane Vaughan : Ils ne me surprennent guère ! N’oublions pas que les programmes spatiaux impliquent de multiples collaborations. La NASA en particulier sous-traite la majeure partie des composants de ses missions. Que des problèmes surgissent quand un grand nombre d’organisations différentes travaillent ensemble n’a rien d’exceptionnel, surtout quand il s’agit d’innovations techniques. Des erreurs sont faites en permanence dans toute organisation complexe, mais contrairement au cas de la NASA sur qui les projecteurs médiatiques sont braqués, leurs conséquences, souvent moins spectaculaires, restent généralement ignorées du grand public.

Quelle était votre motivation pour vous pencher sur les causes de l’explosion de la navette spatiale Challenger en 1986 ?

Je venais à l’époque de finir un livre, je n’avais rien de précis en tête, si ce n’est d’écrire un court article que l’on m’avait commandé sur la notion d’inconduite, c’est-à-dire de comportement individuel fautif. Le cas Challenger avait alors, selon l’explication officielle, toutes les apparences du parfait exemple, avec cependant la particularité de s’être produit dans une organisation gouvernementale à caractère non lucratif plutôt qu’au sein d’une entreprise. Je ne m’attendais alors pas du tout à ce que mon travail remette complètement en question les conclusions obtenues par la Commission présidentielle qui avait été chargée de l’enquête après la catastrophe.

Quelles étaient les conclusions de cette Commission présidentielle ? Des responsables avaient-ils été identifiés ?

L’enquête de la Commission révéla le fait suivant : la veille du lancement de Challenger , lors d’une téléconférence tenue depuis le Marshall Space Flight Center, le centre de tir de la NASA, des ingénieurs de Morton Thiokol, l’entreprise qui fabriquait le joint annulaire d’un des boosters à l’origine de l’accident, avaient fait part aux managers de la NASA de leur opposition au lancement en invoquant les très faibles températures prévues le lendemain. Cependant, ces managers ne transmirent pas l’information à leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques et, soucieux de respecter la date du lancement, décidèrent de maintenir celui-ci au lendemain. Selon l’explication officiellement admise, une telle décision résultait de la forte pression interne qui régnait alors à la NASA : faute d’un financement suffisant du Congrès, le programme de la navette reposait en effet en partie sur les revenus procurés par les lancements de satellites commerciaux privés.

La conclusion suivante s’imposa alors à la Commission : soumis à cette pression de production, les managers du Marshall Space Flight Center ont ignoré les recommandations des ingénieurs et ont enfreint les règles de sécurité et de transmission de l’information au sein de la hiérarchie, dans le but de maintenir la date de lancement. Selon cette interprétation, il ne s’agissait donc pas d’un simple accident technique, mais d’un cas classique d’inconduite au sein d’une organisation : dans le souci de respecter les objectifs de l’organisation, certains de ses membres sont amenés à violer ses règles de fonctionnement.

Pensez-vous que la Commission présidentielle, en plaçant ainsi la responsabilité sur certains individus, ignora délibérément d’autres facteurs ?

La réponse à une telle question est très complexe. Je crois d’abord que la Commission ne s’attendait pas à trouver autre chose à l’origine de l’accident qu’un simple problème technique. Or, soudainement, cette téléconférence révélait l’existence d’un dysfonctionnement d’une tout autre nature. Cette découverte conditionna la manière même dont l’enquête se poursuivit : par exemple, ne furent appelés à témoigner que cinq ingénieurs, qui s’étaient tous opposés au lancement lors de la téléconférence. L’un des techniciens de la NASA, qui était certainement la personne la mieux avertie quant à l’histoire de ce joint annulaire, ne fut même pas interrogé. La Commission ne procéda pas aux interviews d’une manière aussi exhaustive que l’aurait fait un sociologue : elle interrogea seulement les personnes susceptibles de détenir des informations pertinentes au regard de ce qui, d’emblée, avait eu toutes les apparences d’une mauvaise décision de la part de certains managers. Pour autant, je ne crois pas qu’il faille cher- cher derrière cela une volonté délibérée de masquer d’autres facteurs ou de protéger certaines personnes plus haut placées dans la hiérarchie. Il faut plutôt se rappeler que la Commission était soumise à de fortes contraintes d’ordre pratique. Elle ne disposait que de trois mois pour rendre son rapport, alors que la quantité d’informations à analyser était phénoménale : les documents relatifs à l’accident de Challenger remplissent deux étages complets d’un immense entrepôt ! Ajoutez à cela que les membres de la Commission n’ont pas conduit eux-mêmes les interviews, pas plus qu’ils n’ont lu les comptes rendus : ils étaient seulement « briefés » par les équipes d’interviewers à qui l’on avait sous-traité les entretiens. Difficile dans ces conditions de s’imprégner de la culture d’une organisation.

Quel rôle attribuez-vous donc à la culture de la NASA dans l’accident de Challenger ?

Plutôt que de limiter son attention au niveau individuel, il est en effet indispensable d’examiner comment la culture d’une organisation façonne la manière dont les individus prennent des décisions en son sein. Mon analyse a montré que, pendant les années qui ont précédé l’accident, les ingénieurs et managers de la NASA ont progressivement instauré une situation qui les autorisait à considérer que tout allait bien, alors qu’ils disposaient d’éléments montrant au contraire que quelque chose allait mal. C’est ce que j’ai appelé une normalisation de la déviance : il s’agit d’un processus par lequel des individus sont amenés au sein d’une organisation à accomplir certaines choses qu’ils ne feraient pas dans un autre contexte. Mais leurs actions ne sont pas délibérément déviantes. Elles sont au contraire rendues normales et acceptables par la culture de l’organisation.

Quelle déviance s’est normalisée dans l’histoire de la navette, et pourquoi ?

Lorsque pour la première fois une anomalie fut constatée sur l’un des boosters au retour d’une mission, cette anomalie ne constitua pas un signal d’alarme, car la culture du programme spatial était celle d’un programme technologique de nature extrêmement innovante. Et dans ce contexte, le fait que certains des composants des boosters subissent des dommages lors d’un vol n’était pas considéré comme inacceptable, même si cela n’était pas prévu par ses concepteurs. Avoir des problèmes avec un système aussi complexe que la navette était même quelque chose d’attendu !

Pour saisir les causes de l’accident de Challenger, ne faut-il donc pas remonter seulement à la veille du lancement, mais dix ans avant ?

Absolument. Pendant près de dix ans, les boosters ont subi des dommages pratiquement lors de chaque mission. Après chacun de ces incidents, les analyses des ingénieurs conduisaient à considérer le risque comme acceptable et à recommander la poursuite du programme sans que des tests et des études supplémentaires soient nécessaires. En soi, chacune de ces décisions peut sembler logique et rationnelle. Mais leur accumulation a progressivement conduit à ce que le fait de voler avec de sérieuses anomalies devienne quelque chose de routinier, d’officiellement toléré.

Comment est fixé ce seuil d’acceptabilité du risque ?

C’est là un aspect de la culture d’une organisation qui, vu de l’extérieur, peut paraître très étrange. Au début du programme, la NASA produisit un document intitulé « The acceptable risk process », dans lequel était énoncé un ensemble de procédures à suivre. Celles-ci garantissaient que le maximum soit fait pour la sécurité d’un vol, tant au niveau des processus de prise de décision qu’au niveau purement technique. Ce qui bien sûr n’assurait pas pour autant l’élimination de tout risque. Mais, petit à petit, s’est instaurée une sorte de foi dans ces méthodes : les appliquer rigoureusement n’était plus seulement le mieux que l’on puisse faire, cela suffisait aussi à garantir la sûreté du vol. Or, l’opposition au lancement formulée par les ingénieurs de Thiokol était principalement fondée sur des intuitions. Il n’est dès lors pas étonnant qu’une telle opposition ait été jugée irrecevable par les managers de la NASA, étant donné ce contexte de croyance institutionnalisée dans les méthodes employées.

Selon vous, il n’y a donc pas eu à proprement parler inconduite de la part des responsables du Marshall Space Flight Center ?

Non, en effet, puisque aucune des règles habituelles de décision n’a été transgressée lors de cette fameuse téléconférence. Il faudrait en fait plutôt parler d’erreur : les ingénieurs de Thiokol n’ont pas été en mesure de présenter aux managers les arguments techniques nécessaires pour les convaincre du caractère exceptionnel de la température de lancement et des risques supplémentaires qui en découlaient. La décision de procéder au lancement n’a donc rien eu d’anormal dans le contexte culturel de l’époque.

Pourriez-vous décrire ce contexte culturel ? En quoi, par exemple, diffère- t-il du contexte culturel du programme Apollo , le précédent grand programme de vols habités de la NASA ?

L’ère Apollo se caractérisait par une culture d’ingénieurs purement technique. Cette culture est encore bien sûr présente à l’époque de Challenger, mais la multiplication des contrats de sous-traitance a largement transformé le travail des ingénieurs de la NASA qui assurent dorénavant surtout des tâches de coordination. Cette institutionnalisation de la sous-traitance a comme conséquence de fortement accentuer le poids de la bureaucratie, notamment dans les processus de prises de décision que nous venons d’évoquer et derrière lesquels se sont inconsciemment retranchés ingénieurs et managers.

Un autre changement culturel, peut-être encore plus décisif, résulta des difficultés budgétaires du programme : elles se traduisirent à tous les niveaux de l’organisation par une pression de production très forte, dont les conséquences ont été à juste titre soulignées par la Commission présidentielle. Apollo avait bénéficié d’un large consensus dans l’opinion, allant de pair avec un soutien financier sans faille de la part du Congrès. Ce n’était plus du tout le cas à l’époque de la navette spatiale, l’implication des Etats-Unis dans la guerre du Vietnam ayant entre-temps remis en cause les engagements du pays en matière d’exploration spatiale. Il y eut alors cette volonté politique des hauts dirigeants de la NASA de présenter à l’opinion publique le programme de la navette comme un programme opérationnel : ce n’était plus un programme expérimental comme Apollo, mais un programme suffisamment sûr pour que la NASA puisse s’engager auprès d’entreprises commerciales.

Et suffisamment sûr pour qu’on fasse voler des civils ?

Exactement. Et c’est là une troisième altération de la culture de la NASA qui découla de décisions politiques prises à la fois par les hauts dirigeants de l’agence spatiale et par la Maison Blanche. Le désastre de Challenger n’aurait sans doute pas été aussi traumatisant pour le pays s’il ne s’était trouvé à bord de la navette deux civils, dont une enseignante. Souvenez-vous que la NASA avait déjà perdu plusieurs astronautes lors d’un accident survenu sur le pas de tir d’une des missions Apollo. L’enquête qui a suivi avait été réalisée en interne par l’agence spatiale. Etant donné la nouvelle culture de la NASA, ce ne pouvait plus être le cas pour Challenger , dont la disparition prit d’emblée une dimension publique, politique.

Iriez-vous jusqu’à dire que le président de l’époque, Ronald Reagan, le Congrès et les élites dirigeantes de la NASA ont leur part de responsabilité dans l’accident de Challenger ?

Leurs décisions – celle par exemple de réduire le financement fédéral du programme – étaient bien évidemment dénuées de toute intention délibérée de rendre un pareil désastre possible. Elles n’ont de plus enfreint aucune règle, aucun impératif éthique. Mais il est certain que ces mêmes décisions ont contribué à façonner une nouvelle culture de l’organisation qui a rendu possible la normalisation de déviances techniques, et acceptable de faire voler une enseignante. Pour cette raison, les élites politiques du pays ont certainement des comptes à rendre. Et l’on peut s’étonner que ni les médias, ni l’opinion publique, ni bien sûr la Commission présidentielle ne leur en aient demandé !

Pensez-vous que la NASA ait tiré toutes les leçons de l’accident ?

Beaucoup de choses ont été changées au niveau interne après Challenger, notamment les procédures de prise de décision et de conduite de projet. Par exemple, la NASA s’assure désormais que l’avis de ses astronautes soit davantage pris en compte. Mais rien n’a changé fondamentalement en ce qui concerne la culture même du programme. Le problème du financement privé et son corollaire, la pression de production, demeurent et la NASA a même récemment recommencé à faire voler des civils !

La devise de Dan Goldin, l’actuel dirigeant de l’agence spatiale, « Better, faster and cheaper » Mieux, plus vite et moins cher ne vous paraît-elle pas être un oxymoron ?

C’est le mot en effet ! Les contraintes accrues de calendrier et de budget qui se cachent derrière le Faster et le Cheaper me semblent à l’évidence bien peu conciliables avec le Better de la devise. Mais ne m’étant pas penchée sur les nouveaux programmes, je ne peux guère vous en dire plus. A part cette observation : les gens ayant décidé des réductions de personnels et de moyens ne se sont pas davantage préoccupés qu’à l’époque de Challenger d’étudier leurs effets sur la structure et la culture de l’organisation. Or, de telles études me semblent indispensables. Le problème n’est pas tant l’absence de motivations politiques pour les mener que la nécessité de disposer des compétences de sociologues, anthropologues et autres acteurs traditionnellement absents des sphères dirigeantes d’une organisation comme la NASA.

Avez-vous eu des réactions officielles des dirigeants de la NASA après la publication de votre livre ?

Absolument aucune ! J’ai eu par contre beaucoup de réactions – d’ailleurs souvent très favorables – de personnes qui ont travaillé pour la NASA, ou de diverses organisations dont certaines m’ont dit : « La NASA, c’est nous : la même chose se passe chez nous ! »

Le cas Challenger illustre votre thèse plus générale selon laquelle les erreurs sont socialement construites et systématiquement produites par toute structure sociale. Cela implique-t-il que les erreurs soient inévitables et qu’un certain fatalisme soit dès lors de mise ?

Oui, les erreurs sont inévitables, ne serait ce que parce que dans un système complexe, surtout lorsqu’il est innovant, il est impossible de prédire ou contrôler tous les paramètres d’une situation. Mais il est capital qu’une organisation prenne acte de la dimension sociale des erreurs produites en son sein et agisse en conséquence. Un pas dans ce sens a été accompli par exemple par certains hôpitaux américains. Ici à Boston, de nombreuses études ont abordé le problème des erreurs médicales en se penchant sur la complexité du système hospitalier. Ce qui auparavant était perçu comme l’erreur d’un individu devient une erreur dont la cause est aussi à chercher du côté du système lui-même, en particulier dans la division du travail au sein de l’hôpital. Ce n’est plus seulement la responsabilité du chirurgien ou de l’anesthésiste, mais aussi celle du système qui lui impose un planning chargé.

Faut-il donc chaque fois élargir le champ de l’analyse ?

En effet. Si vous voulez vraiment comprendre comment une erreur est générée au sein d’un système complexe et résoudre le problème, il ne faut pas se contenter d’analyser la situation au niveau individuel, c’est l’organisation dans son ensemble qu’il faut considérer et, au-delà de l’organisation elle-même, son contexte politique et économique. On a vu dans le cas de Challenger que les conclusions auxquelles on aboutit alors sont bien différentes de celles délivrées par une analyse des actions individuelles.

Mais les situations ne sont-elles pas parfois trop complexes pour que cette approche soit réalisable en pratique ?

Je ne le crois pas. On peut cependant considérer, comme le fait notamment Charles Perrow dans son livre Normal Accidents1 , qu’étant donné le caractère inévitable des erreurs générées par certains systèmes en raison de leur complexité, mieux vaudrait se passer complètement de ces systèmes « trop complexes ». Les centrales nucléaires seraient un exemple de tels systèmes. Mais bien évidemment, cette position est indéfendable pour d’autres systèmes complexes comme les hôpitaux.

Quelle leçon peut-on tirer de cette approche en matière de contrôle social d’une organisation ?

Elle suggère qu’une politique de blâme individuel n’est pas suffisante car elle sort de leur contexte les « mauvaises décisions » en négligeant les facteurs organisationnels qui ont pesé sur ces décisions. Dès lors, les instances de contrôle, tout comme le public, croient à tort que, pour résoudre le problème, il suffit de se débarrasser des « mauvais décideurs ». Or, on a vu avec le cas de Chal- lenger qu’il n’en était rien. Une stratégie punitive doit s’accom-pagner d’un souci de réforme des structures et de la culture de l’organisation. Ce qui supposerait par exemple de pouvoir légalement mandater des intrusions dans ce qui est traditionnelle-ment considéré comme son domaine privé.

Vous travaillez actuellement sur le contrôle aérien. Qu’attendez-vous de cette étude ?

Les contrôleurs aériens sont connus pour être capables de détecter des anomalies avant que celles-ci ne génèrent des erreurs irrattrapables. L’histoire de Challenger montre qu’il y a eu de nombreux signaux de danger avant l’accident, qui n’ont pas été pris en compte comme tels. Il me semblait donc logique de m’intéresser à une situation où les gens peuvent expliquer comment ils identifient des signaux d’alarme et prennent les « bonnes » décisions. J’espère alors en tirer des leçons utiles aux organisations soucieuses de minimiser la gravité des erreurs qu’elles produisent systématiquement.

Propos recueillis et traduits de l’américain par Stéphanie Ruphy.

1 C. Perrow, Normal Accidents : Living with High-Risk Technologies , Princeton University Press, 1999

Voir aussi:

En théorie, tout est une question de timing
Entretien avec Diane Vaughan
Réalisé et traduit par Arnaud Saint-Martin
Zilsel/Cairn
2017/2 (N° 2), pages 185 à 222

Diane Vaughan est bien connue pour la recherche classique qu’elle a consacrée à l’accident tragique de la navette spatiale Challenger, survenu en 1986. Dans un livre important paru exactement dix ans après le crash, la sociologue étasunienne proposait une analyse très documentée de la banalisation du risque à la Nasa, qui avait conduit les ingénieurs à prendre des décisions mortelles. Cela a été lu comme largement contre-intuitif dans la presse et parmi les professionnels de la gestion des risques et des désastres, car l’interprétation qui dominait jusqu’alors consistait à individualiser la faute dans un registre très moraliste. L’explication par les structures et la culture d’une organisation aussi complexe que la Nasa montre à l’inverse comment une déviance s’est normalisée au gré des missions du programme de la navette, à travers des décisions qui ont précipité une catastrophe que personne n’avait évidemment désirée. Diane Vaughan révèle ici la force explicative d’un modèle théorique sociologique général, qu’elle s’est efforcée d’affiner et d’appliquer à plusieurs objets empiriques tout au long de sa carrière, amorcée dans les années 1970.

Dans cet entretien réalisé à New York au printemps 2014 puis complété durant l’été 2017, on suivra les itinéraires intellectuels de l’auteure, professeur à l’université Columbia depuis 2005. On y découvrira ses premières recherches sur la criminalité en col blanc et la séparation conjugale, puis les tâtonnements et révélations sur le terrain de Challenger. On ne tardera pas à repérer un pattern intellectuel très particulier en même temps qu’il vise la montée en généralité : sans se disperser, Diane Vaughan approfondit des thèmes théoriques qui lui sont chers, tout en se laissant surprendre sur le(s) terrain(s). Ses explications peuvent intéresser des publics en dehors du champ académique. C’est le cas, surtout, de son travail sur Challenger, qui l’a installée dans les médias aux États-Unis comme experte des échecs organisationnels, surtout après l’accident de l’autre navette Columbia en 2003. Cet exercice non prémédité et « par accident » [1][1]Diane Vaughan, « Public Sociologist by Accident », Social… de public sociology aura été aussi formateur qu’engageant pour une chercheuse qui se percevait au départ comme « académique ». C’était l’occasion d’enseigner la sociologie hors les murs et le confort du département universitaire. Outre les précisions apportées sur ses recherches, la conversation qui suit illustre par l’exemple les vertus de la recherche patiente et obstinée, à distance des standards du « publish or perish » ou du « demo or die ». Diane Vaughan est de ces sociologues qui ne transigent pas avec les nécessités de l’enquête et qui publient lorsqu’elles ou ils estiment que la recherche est suffisamment mûre pour l’être, et pas avant. Quitte à passer des années dans l’invisibilité, pour cause de prospection, de vérifications et de « revisites » sur le terrain. L’ouvrage sur l’accident de Challenger est un modèle en la matière, comme le sera sans doute son nouveau livre sur le contrôle du trafic aérien, dont elle avait amorcé la préparation… à la fin des années 1990. Dernier aspect remarquable qui ressort de l’entretien : au fil des enquêtes et des prises de position publiques, Diane Vaughan s’est efforcée de combiner toutes les dimensions d’une activité intellectuelle qui alterne entre les phases de recherche, d’enseignement, de conseil ou l’intervention publique, sans rien renier de l’exigence théorique élevée qui continue d’être la sienne. Chacun de ces pôles enrichit les autres sans se confondre pour autant. C’est une équation toute personnelle mais, à voir ce qu’elle promet de découvertes et d’heureuses surprises dans cette vie de recherche, il est sans doute bon de s’en inspirer.
Une certaine fascination pour le côté obscur des organisations

Zilsel — Vous avez longtemps travaillé sur les dysfonctionnements, les échecs organisationnels et ce que vous avez appelé la « normalisation de la déviance ». Votre enquête sur le crash de Challenger est votre contribution la plus connue dans ce segment des sciences sociales. Une problématique a peu à peu émergé, que vous n’avez pas cessé d’enrichir au moyen d’un modèle théorique général, celle qui concerne la relation entre les facteurs structurels et les comportements déviants ou illicites. Pour commencer, pourriez-vous revenir sur l’itinéraire qui vous a amenée à aborder ces thèmes classiques de la sociologie des organisations et de la déviance ?

Diane Vaughan — Durant mes études de master puis de thèse, je me suis d’abord intéressée aux phénomènes de déviance et de contrôle social, puis j’ai découvert la littérature sur les organisations. Combinant l’un et l’autre de ces aspects, j’ai choisi d’étudier la criminalité en col blanc en tant que phénomène organisationnel. C’est le sujet de ma thèse, que j’ai soutenue à l’université d’État de l’Ohio en 1979. Je me suis appuyée sur une étude de cas. Deux organisations sont impliquées : la première, une chaîne de pharmacies discount de l’Ohio, Revco, s’était rendue coupable de fraudes contre l’autre organisation, l’administration publique en charge de l’assurance santé (Medicaid), à qui une double facturation était transmise par voie informatique par les pharmaciens. 500 000 dollars ont ainsi été collectés de façon illégale, jusqu’à ce que les deux cadres responsables de l’opération soient pincés en 1977 suite à une enquête des autorités judiciaires. L’affaire a été aussitôt réglée : Revco a plaidé coupable, a restitué 50 000 dollars, tandis que les deux fautifs ont payé une amende de 2000 dollars chacun. Mais, et c’est ce qui rend le cas intéressant en soi, les deux employés ont dit avoir mis en place le système des fausses prescriptions parce que les services de Medicaid rejetaient en masse les prescriptions à rembourser. C’était donc une façon détournée de recouvrer les fonds non perçus et de rééquilibrer les comptes de Revco. Au-delà des agissements individuels, les organisations se trouvaient mises en cause et il n’était pas évident de savoir qui était la victime et qui était le coupable. À partir de la chronologie des événements, des données recueillies sur le cas par divers services d’investigation officiels ou de Revco, mais aussi des interviews que j’ai réalisées, je me suis efforcée d’expliquer d’une part comment et pourquoi cette fraude a été rendue possible et, d’autre part, quels moyens réglementaires et de contrôle ont été mis en place pour y faire face. En plus de l’aspect monographique, j’ai développé un modèle théorique causal. J’ai analysé notamment les effets de la pression de l’environnement concurrentiel sur les organisations et la façon dont elles y répondent, au risque d’altérer leur fonctionnement, toujours plus complexifié par la multiplication des règles et des procédures. J’ai aussi intégré le fait qu’elles offrent et reconnaissent les moyens légitimes d’accéder à des objectifs (s’agissant de Revco, tirer des revenus de la vente de médicaments), tout en créant les conditions structurelles des écarts de conduite pour les atteindre. J’ai compris combien la théorie de l’anomie de Robert K. Merton – une source d’inspiration essentielle pour moi – peut s’appliquer ici. Selon le schéma mertonien, les deux employés ont « innové » en adaptant les moyens et les règlements aux fins légitimes de l’organisation, qui étaient contrariées par le système Medicaid et donc menaçaient sa survie. Le dysfonctionnement dans le système de transaction entre les deux organisations crée une opportunité de comportement illicite ou de viol des règles pour réaliser les objectifs. Avec cette première recherche académique qui s’est transformée en un livre [2][2]Diane Vaughan, Controlling Unlawful Organizational Behavior :…, j’ai dégagé un modèle théorique général, qui permet de comprendre comment les organisations répondent aux pressions d’un environnement externe, dans la structure sociale de la société américaine. À terme, je souhaitais appliquer cette idée d’une pression structurelle sur d’autres types d’organisation, à but non lucratif en particulier.

Après la thèse, j’ai bénéficié d’une bourse postdoctorale de trois ans à l’université de Yale. En même temps que je finissais de rédiger mon premier livre, mes recherches m’ont portée vers d’autres réalités que la fraude en entreprise. Alors que j’étais étudiante, j’ai rédigé un article sur la séparation conjugale, que j’ai appelée « découplage » (uncoupling) [3][3]Diane Vaughan, « Uncoupling : The Process of Moving from One…. J’ai approfondi le sujet lorsque j’étais à Yale, puis à Boston après mon recrutement au Wellesley College Center for Research on Women. J’ai réalisé une centaine d’interviews pour cette enquête. Les gens avec qui je me suis entretenue étaient en union libre ou mariés, gays ou hétérosexuels. J’observais un couple, à la façon d’une organisation minuscule, au moment critique où la relation rompait ou après la séparation. J’ai fini par en faire un livre, Uncoupling [4][4]Diane Vaughan, Uncoupling : Turning Points in Intimate…. Des références traversent ces recherches, par exemple la théorie du signal de l’économiste « nobélisé » Michael Spence, qui peut s’appliquer autant aux entreprises qu’aux relations intimes dans le couple. Comment les organisations fondent-elles leurs choix lorsqu’elles recrutent et que les candidats sont nombreux ? La réponse est économique : il est trop coûteux de connaître à fond chaque candidat, si bien que les organisations émettent des jugements sur la base de signaux. Ces derniers sont de deux sortes : d’une part, des indicateurs qui ne peuvent pas être changés, comme l’âge ou le sexe (à l’époque, il n’était pas possible de le changer). D’autre part, des signaux d’ordre social : où avez-vous obtenu votre diplôme ? Qui vous recommande ? Quelle est votre expérience professionnelle ? Ces seconds signaux peuvent être manipulés, truqués, ce qui rapproche de la problématique de la fraude. La théorie du signal s’applique aussi dans Uncoupling : malgré l’expérience d’une rupture relationnelle soudaine, souvent vécue comme traumatique ou chaotique dans nos vies, l’hypothèse que j’ai faite était de dire par contraste que la transition est graduelle : le découplage est une suite de transitions. Je n’ai pas tardé à le vérifier durant les interviews, lors desquelles je demandais aux personnes séparées de retracer la chronologie de leur relation. Une même logique était à l’œuvre : une des deux personnes, initiatrice, commence à quitter la relation, socialement et psychologiquement, avant que l’autre ne réalise que quelque chose ne fonctionne plus. Le temps qu’elle le comprenne, qu’elle en perçoive le signal, il est trop tard pour sauver la relation. Certes pas toujours, puisque quelquefois les personnes parviennent à inverser le processus, parce qu’ils savent comment traiter l’information ; mais en général, c’est cette trame qui organise le découplage. Il est frappant de voir que dans ces petites organisations les gens peuvent tomber en morceaux sans même le remarquer ni agir contre. Une longue période d’incubation précède la rupture, les initiateurs envoient des signaux, les partenaires les interprètent (ou pas), mais quoi qu’il arrive, selon les buts ordinaires de l’organisation (le couple) la rupture ne fait pas partie du plan initial.

Je commençais à y voir plus clair dans ces processus, analogues malgré les échelles d’analyse, mais il me manquait encore des données sur des structures bien plus grandes. J’ai envoyé le manuscrit d’Uncoupling à mon éditeur en décembre 1985. Un mois plus tard, le 28 janvier 1986, Challenger explosa. La presse a ramené l’explosion à un exemple d’inconduite organisationnelle. Cela se rapprochait de mes premiers cas d’étude – à ceci près que cela concernait une organisation à but non lucratif, la Nasa – et j’ai commencé à enquêter.

Zilsel — Au moment où vous constatez les analogies avec vos premiers objets et que vous débutez le travail sur l’accident de Challenger, quel est votre niveau de familiarité avec l’astronautique et ce que pouvaient éventuellement en dire les sciences sociales ?

Diane Vaughan — J’en ignorais tout ! Je ne connaissais pas non plus les Science & Technology Studies (STS) qui m’aideront à analyser les aspects technologiques. J’ai commencé à travailler à partir de mon modèle théorique. Je n’étais pas complètement dépaysée parce que j’avais étudié le crime organisationnel au moyen de l’informatique dans mon premier livre. Lorsque j’ai amorcé le projet en 1986, je bénéficiais d’une résidence d’un an au Center for Socio-Legal Studies, à l’université d’Oxford. Deux choses importantes me sont arrivées sur place. La première : à l’issue d’un de mes exposés au Centre, un auditeur m’a suggéré de lire l’article « Unruly Technology » de Brian Wynne [5][5]Brian Wynne, « Unruly Technology : Practical Rules, Impractical…, que je ne connaissais pas. Je l’ai dévoré aussitôt et cela m’a ouvert des perspectives fantastiques, notamment la découverte des STS.

Une recherche sérendipienne et pleine d’effets inattendus
À propos de Diane Vaughan, The Challenger Launch Decision : Risky Technology, Culture, and Deviance at NASA, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1996.
Ce n’était certes pas prémédité, mais l’accident a bel et bien eu lieu : le 28 janvier 1986, la navette spatiale Challenger se désintégrait en plein ciel 73 secondes après son lancement. Cette tragédie nationale suivie en direct par la Nation tout entière a aussitôt remis en question l’aura d’infaillibilité de la Nasa. Le public s’était peu à peu habitué à l’idée d’une « démocratisation » prochaine de l’accès à l’espace, au moyen d’un véhicule expérimental et high tech, qui embarquait des civils dans cette vingt-cinquième mission STS-51-L, en particulier une institutrice médiatisée pour l’occasion, mais voilà que la confiance dans la sûreté de la technologie s’est aussitôt dégradée. La Commission présidentielle diligentée pour faire la lumière sur les causes de l’accident a rapidement identifié le problème : fragilisé par le froid glacial, un joint d’étanchéité du propulseur d’appoint à poudre s’éroda puis céda dès après le lancement et précipita l’explosion du segment puis la désintégration de la navette. Les directeurs de vol au centre spatial Kennedy de Cap Canaveral en étaient pourtant informés et, durant une téléconférence la veille, ils ont été de nouveau mis en garde par des ingénieurs de la compagnie Thiokol qui fabriquait les fusées d’appoint pour la Nasa. Néanmoins, ils ont finalement décidé de programmer le lancement après sept reports. Pourquoi cette décision a-t-elle été prise malgré les alertes sur la possible rupture des joints dans ces conditions ? Diane Vaughan y répond en dévoilant les mécanismes par lesquels les risques techniques ont été normalisés les années avant le désastre. Elle montre comment la culture organisationnelle des centres techniques de la Nasa, fondée sur l’exploit et l’idéologie de la frontière à dépasser (« Can do ! », p. 209), installe les déviations techniques comme autant de réalités normales.
« Immergée » dans cette culture, Diane Vaughan ne perd jamais le lecteur, ce qui est une prouesse parce que ce gros livre de 575 pages fourmille de détails techniques, de savoirs experts et d’acronymes pour ingénieurs. L’usage d’une trame chronologique s’avère ici précieux pour comprendre comment le risque a été « culturellement » construit, après que des décisions ont été prises de lancer la navette malgré la connaissance des anomalies, en fait très nombreuses et constitutives de la technologie. Les anomalies étaient la norme, notamment celles sur les joints des boosters qui avaient été décelées dans des lancements antérieurs, le risque devenait « acceptable » et n’était plus référé à la hiérarchie. La sociologue navigue entre les échelles micro des conduites et des perceptions individuelles et interindividuelles, méso des organisations (de leur structure sociale et culturelle, de leur accès aux ressources rares, en particulier les budgets), et macro de l’environnement socio-politique et de la culture étasunienne. Les facteurs extérieurs (agenda et contraintes de la politique intérieure, géopolitique, compétition internationale sur le marché de l’industrie spatiale, etc.) pèsent lourd dans la prise de décision et, plus largement, sur l’évolution des activités du secteur aérospatial, tout comme les rapports de force et les conflits « culturels » entre les acteurs, singulièrement entre les ingénieurs de la Nasa et les entreprises sous-traitantes comme Thiokol, chargée de fabriquer les fusées d’appoint. La pression sur les ingénieurs de la Nasa et des entreprises sous-traitantes était immense tout au long du programme, et tout particulièrement la veille du lancement fatal, mais ce n’est pas le seul facteur qui explique la décision malheureuse d’autoriser le lancement ; cette pression faisait partie de l’environnement de travail ordinaire des ingénieurs, qui en réalité ne faisaient que suivre un protocole normal sous contraintes organisationnelles fortes : aucune règle n’a été violée alors qu’on sait maintenant que les ingénieurs ont commis une lourde erreur (p. 68).

Diane Vaughan reconstitue cette histoire contre-intuitive dans un récit « révisionniste » extrêmement précis, qui contredit le récit qui avait cours. Ce récit mettait en scène l’évidence d’un calcul amoral (amoral calculation) de responsables, coupables d’avoir « joué à la roulette russe » pour de grosses poignées de dollars (chaque report de lancement est infiniment coûteux et menace la survie budgétaire du programme). Les chapitres qui suivent sont autant d’explorations des trois grands facteurs qui expliquent la « normalisation de la déviance » dans le processus de décision : (1) la production d’une « culture » propre à un groupe de travail (autour des fusées d’appoint) au filtre de laquelle le risque est normalisé et le processus de décision configuré (patterned), durant les premières missions où les signaux de danger potentiel avaient été distingués (chapitres 3 à 5) ; (2) la « culture de la production » avec ses normes et croyances, caractéristique des mondes de l’aérospatial (qui incluent la Nasa, les industriels, etc.), culture qui engendre une construction « indigène » de l’acceptabilité du risque (chapitre 6) ; (3) le « secret structurel » autour de la circulation contrainte et parfois même empêchée de l’information au sein de l’organisation, qui altère la perception des signaux de danger potentiel (chapitre 7). Informant cette théorie de la normalisation de la déviance, la trame chronologique coupe court avec les explications rétrospectives qui concluent à l’inévitabilité de l’explosion de la navette sans la rapporter au processus par lequel, à force de dérogations, celle-ci a été rendue possible. Abrégée en 50 pages dans le chapitre 9 faute de place ( !), la « description ethnographique dense » de la nuit qui a précédé le lancement achève de restituer l’événement, à la façon d’un scénario de film catastrophe. Le chapitre 10 propose enfin de monter en généralité : la théorie de la normalisation de la déviance est testée sur d’autres organisations, et l’auteure d’esquisser par ces comparaisons structurelles une analyse sociologique de l’organisation sociale de l’erreur (p. 394-399).

The Challenger Launch Decision est une exploration vertigineuse du « côté obscur » de l’organisation Nasa [6], de la « boîte noire » du processus de décision (p. 196). Ce livre est remarquable pour de nombreuses raisons. D’abord, c’est un modèle d’investigation empirique et théorique, la preuve en actes que l’enquête documentaire n’est pas significative sans théorie, et vice versa. Diane Vaughan a recueilli des masses de données durant plusieurs années. Il aura fallu trier dans les 200 000 documents publiés après-coup par la Nasa et les 9 000 pages de retranscription des audiences de la Commission d’enquête. « Tout au long de ce projet, écrit-elle dans l’ouverture du livre, j’avais l’impression d’être une détective, mais ce travail de détective n’avait pas l’infaillible clarté linéaire d’une enquête de Sherlock Holmes » (p. 39). Elle a procédé de façon inductive, par l’ancrage de la théorie sur le terrain, et a invité le lecteur à la suivre dans ses cheminements. Ses interprétations tirent parti de cadres théoriques formulés ailleurs. Elle prône l’usage intensif de la « théorisation analogique », qui consiste à appliquer des concepts et des schèmes théoriques sur des objets qui possèdent des caractéristiques plus ou moins communes. Ainsi l’auteure propose-t-elle un modèle théorique à la fois très indexé à un cas (très) particulier et assez souple et générique pour autoriser des applications sur d’autres objets structurellement comparables. En plus de son apport évident aux disaster studies et à la sociologie des organisations, l’ouvrage est aussi une contribution majeure à la connaissance du fonctionnement, des arcanes et de la structure sociale et culturelle d’une méga-organisation gouvernementale, légendaire par ses accomplissements depuis Apollo mais en fait assez méconnue.

La seconde chose qui m’est arrivée est que je cherchais des précédents historiques de viol des règles au moment des décisions de lancement de la navette, mais je n’en trouvais pas. L’hypothèse initiale qui était la mienne, en phase avec la compréhension traditionnelle des accidents, est que la décision résulte d’un « calcul amoral », de type coûts/bénéfices : sous la pression, les directeurs de vol connaissent les risques mais, escomptant une issue favorable, ils décident malgré tout et sciemment du lancement. Le viol des règles de sûreté est dès lors intégré dans le processus de décision qui précède l’explosion. En fait, cela contredisait mon hypothèse de départ qu’ils se conformaient à toutes les règles. J’ai commencé à examiner les documents d’ingénierie. Brian Wynne souligne que les ingénieurs qui travaillent avec des technologies peu sûres inventent des règles pour « fonctionner » avec ces données, au gré d’une pratique qui se transforme, et cela normalise le processus de façon ad hoc. Mon dieu, ce fut une révélation ! J’ai tout jeté et j’ai recommencé à zéro. Ma question était simple : pourquoi décidèrent-ils de lancer Challenger ?

Zilsel — L’enquête n’est pas facilitée par le fait que, comme vous l’avez souligné dans un article [7][7]Diane Vaughan, « The Dark Side of Organizations : Mistake,…, la Nasa est un exemple parmi d’autres de ces gigantesques bureaucraties techno-scientifiques qui génèrent des quantités littéralement astronomiques de documents. Lorsqu’on lit la monographie sur Challenger, on est frappé par la masse d’archives et de sources de statut divers – rendue accessible par les autorités – que vous avez utilisée pour documenter les processus ayant mené à l’accident. Comment avez-vous procédé pour gérer l’abondance de ces données, dont la maîtrise technique est essentielle pour bien cerner les enjeux ?

Diane Vaughan — Je n’ai pas tout lu ! Il a fallu que je m’organise pour comprendre complètement la logique des événements. Il le fallait avant de réaliser les interviews. J’ai procédé de façon chronologique, à partir des sources historiques publiquement accessibles. J’ai commencé par éplucher les cinq volumes de la commission, les uns après les autres. Le premier rassemble des synthèses, d’autres contiennent des séries de témoignages devant la commission d’enquête. Au fur et à mesure, j’ai repéré les indices d’un pattern régulier, en particulier les problèmes que la commission éprouvait pour comprendre le langage bureaucratique de la Nasa, illustrés par exemple dans le débat ésotérique au sujet des dérogations de lancement (Launch Constraint waivers) : malgré la présence d’anomalies sur les fusées d’appoint à poudre qui a causé l’accident, les ingénieurs de la Nasa et du sous-traitant Thiokol ont jugé le risque « acceptable ». J’ai commencé à saisir le langage technique, ce qui est crucial, mais aussi les différentes positions occupées par les acteurs impliqués dans le programme, le problème lié aux propulseurs d’appoint, en bref comment le système fonctionne. J’ai vite remarqué que les interprétations étaient loin de converger, parce que les gens occupaient des positions différentes dans la structure de l’organisation. Rien d’étonnant : lorsqu’on enquête sur des organisations complexes, on obtient des discours parfois très contradictoires au sujet d’un même phénomène. Cela ne signifie pas que certains mentent tandis que d’autres livrent la vérité la plus absolue ; cela signifie bien plutôt que la position de chacun dans la structure de l’organisation détermine ce qu’il sait et comment il interprète la situation.

En plus des premières lectures, je me suis rendue aux Archives nationales, à Washington DC. J’y ai visionné l’ensemble des vidéos enregistrées aux audiences. J’ai observé les dépositions des témoins, la façon dont ils exprimaient leurs sentiments, le son de leur voix, etc. Ce n’est pas vraiment lisible dans le livre, mais cela m’a été très utile. J’ai appris à les connaître. J’ai passé également trois semaines aux Archives à photocopier des transcriptions réalisées par des avocats chevronnés que la Commission Rogers avait recrutés pour l’investigation. Ils ont interviewé diverses personnes, pour documenter la veille du lancement et l’histoire de la prise de décision sur les fusées d’appoint à poudre. J’ai aussi obtenu la permission de consulter des copies de documents d’ingénierie sur les décisions de lancement. Je disposais d’un immense stock d’informations ! C’est pourquoi j’ai vite compris qu’il était plus simple de traiter ces données de manière chronologique. J’ai commencé par le premier lancement, puis je me suis intéressée aux documents sur les lancements ultérieurs et je n’ai pas cessé de répéter ce processus d’enquête itératif.

Zilsel — Vous définissez votre démarche comme relevant de l’« ethnographie historique ». Cela consiste à suivre les traces, les textes, en les situant dans des environnements pratiques particuliers. Pourriez-vous resituer la façon dont vous est venue cette idée et comment vous l’avez mise en œuvre sur le terrain ?

Diane Vaughan — J’entends par « ethnographie historique » une analyse historique de séquences d’événements basée sur les documents disponibles. Cela s’est imposé à moi parce qu’il m’était indispensable de retourner dans le passé. L’ethnographie renvoie ici à la compréhension de la signification que revêt une situation pour les personnes qui vivent dans un monde différent du vôtre. Le but est de reconstruire les croyances culturelles et une vision du monde, d’interpréter les informations dont les acteurs disposent et auxquels ils ont accès, mais aussi ce qu’ils en font. Cela peut concerner, par exemple, toute la documentation des ingénieurs sur la revue d’aptitude au vol, qui implique un vocabulaire précis, un protocole, une manière de définir la situation. Je disposais des transcriptions des témoignages et les données empiriques sur chaque revue d’aptitude au vol, ce qui me permettait de comprendre comment les acteurs décrivaient la chaîne de décisions, à comparer ensuite avec les protocoles.

J’ai étudié cela des années durant, de 1987 à 1992, et dans l’intervalle j’ai écrit les trois premiers chapitres sur la normalisation de la déviance. Puis, je suis revenue en arrière, j’ai trouvé de nouveaux éléments, j’ai sans cesse révisé mes premières interprétations du processus, qui n’étaient pas complètement correctes. C’est ainsi que j’ai repéré que cela se répétait à chaque décision de lancement, après que les responsables de vol ont décidé d’ignorer les anomalies. J’ai également compris pourquoi à tel moment au contraire, ils avaient tenu compte des anomalies. Des signaux d’alerte précoces et des signaux mêlés leur étaient parvenus. Ils ont identifié une anomalie à l’occasion d’un vol, mais trois lancements furent décidés à la suite sans accrocs. Chaque décision s’accompagne d’un degré élevé d’incertitude.

Après avoir approfondi au maximum la documentation que j’avais rassemblée, je me suis rendue en 1992 au Marshall Space Center de la Nasa, à Huntsville (Alabama), pour réaliser des interviews avec les personnes clés. J’y ai rencontré Roger Boisjoly, j’ai fini par bien le connaître. J’ai interviewé de même Leon Ray, la personne qui en savait le plus, qui n’était pas présent la nuit du lancement ; il était en charge des affaires techniques, il avait travaillé à fond sur le vol. J’ai rencontré aussi Larry Mulloy, Larry Wear – qui était l’ingénieur en chef – d’autres personnes encore, dont j’oublie les noms. J’ai réalisé des interviews téléphoniques en plus, pour compléter l’information. Toutes ces personnes sont restées en contact avec moi. Je pouvais revenir vers eux quand j’avais des questions. Il fallait à chaque instant que je maîtrise l’histoire pour que les échanges soient consistants, parce qu’ils ont compris ce que j’étais en train de faire, et saisi que je n’étais pas d’accord avec les résultats de la commission. Mais suffisamment de temps était passé depuis le crash, si bien qu’ils ont tous accepté de me parler.

Cette expérience de recherche fut incroyablement riche. D’autant plus que, pour les acteurs rencontrés, l’événement a été traumatique. J’aurais dû écrire un appendice méthodologique pour en analyser les enjeux, mais le livre était tellement long déjà… Les récits que les gens font des accidents traumatiques rappellent les ruptures dans les relations intimes, ils sont typiques parce qu’ils commencent par exprimer une confusion vis-à-vis de ce qui est arrivé. Les témoins ont besoin de revenir en arrière et de reconstruire l’histoire d’une façon ordonnée, afin de la comprendre. Mais j’étais convaincue, sur la base de tous ces enregistrements écrits et oraux du passé, que cela coïncidait avec ce qu’il s’était passé. L’histoire que je reconstituais devait être la plus détaillée possible, parce que personne ne savait tout ce que je savais après tant d’années de recherche. Tant de personnes ont publié sur l’accident, le matériau était immense… Donc, il y avait toutes ces sources sur un événement qui était devenu « historique », ce qui justifiait encore l’idée d’« ethnographie historique ».

Zilsel — Et des « descriptions denses » et parfois très techniques de l’ethnographie historique jusqu’à la modélisation sociologique, comment s’est opérée la transition ?

Diane Vaughan — L’analyse s’est peu à peu consolidée. Je combinais le niveau micro de la prise de décision et de la normalisation de la déviance et l’idée d’un pattern régulier dans l’organisation. J’ai mis en lumière l’effet de l’environnement concurrentiel sur la production de la « culture Nasa ». La pression externe sur l’agence provoquait périodiquement des changements dans l’organisation, cela affectait ce que les gens disaient et faisaient. Jusqu’à des situations-limite, où l’on impose des cadences impératives à des ingénieurs qui travaillent H24, semaine après semaine… J’enrichis ensuite par le concept de « secret structurel », à partir de l’intervention des acteurs réglementaires (regulators) externes et l’activité de ceux qui, dans l’organisation, disposent d’un statut réglementaire officiel. L’information sur les anomalies devenait toujours plus mince et réservée aux strates supérieures de la hiérarchie. Ce sont autant de pièces du puzzle. Mon modèle théorique permettait ainsi de comprendre que la décision ne relevait pas de l’inconduite intentionnelle, mais il aura fallu le démontrer, ce dont je n’étais pas sûre à 100 % au départ. C’est en étudiant à fond tous les lancements de la navette que j’y suis parvenue. J’ai compris qu’il y avait un problème lorsque le lancement était prévu un jour de froid. Quand j’ai tout mis bout à bout, je me suis rendue compte que c’était la première fois que l’on disposait d’un récit complet du processus de lancement de Challenger. Mais il me restait encore à expliquer que ce processus ne résultait pas d’une forme d’inconduite, mais plutôt d’une erreur structurellement liée à l’organisation. Des signaux ont été manqués, des pressions ont été exercées dans la production, qui ont affecté l’interprétation des données. Personne ne voulait faire exploser la navette. Personne, absolument personne. Larry Mulloy m’a confié lors d’une interview que le problème des joints sur la fusée à poudre d’appoint était l’un des moins sérieux sur la navette, les problèmes étaient nombreux et normaux parce qu’il s’agissait d’une technologie expérimentale ; ils s’attendaient à avoir des problèmes, celui-là était celui qui préoccupait le moins. Des anneaux en caoutchouc qui scellaient des joints sur les fusées et risquaient de lâcher, cela n’était rien par rapport au système de parachutes utilisé pour récupérer des fusées coûtant des milliards de dollars.

Zilsel — C’est donc une très longue histoire : entre l’accident de Challenger et la publication de votre livre, dix ans se sont écoulés…

Diane Vaughan — L’un des privilèges d’être professeure titulaire (tenure) est que vous pouvez travailler sans hâter les choses. Si j’avais été sous la pression de publier après un an seulement, le résultat aurait été dévastateur puisque je sais maintenant que je me serais trompée complètement dans l’analyse, ce que j’explique dans un des chapitres du livre… Mais comme cela prenait toujours plus de temps et que l’on s’éloignait du crash, je me suis dit que personne ne s’y intéresserait. J’ai écrit les derniers chapitres l’année avant le dixième anniversaire de l’accident de Challenger. Au moment où j’ai envoyé mon manuscrit, en juin 1995, j’ai demandé à mon éditeur s’il pouvait sortir le livre dans les six mois, ce à quoi il m’a répondu qu’en principe cela prenait plutôt une année. Qu’à cela ne tienne, j’ai accéléré la rédaction et j’y suis arrivée ! En novembre 1995, une centaine d’exemplaires a été envoyée aux médias. La publication était envisagée le 28 janvier 1996, date d’anniversaire de l’accident. Tous les journalistes chargés de couvrir l’événement se sont jetés dessus. Ce fut sportif. J’ai été occupée de novembre jusqu’à l’anniversaire, et encore des années après par d’incessantes sollicitations académiques et de conseil. En point d’orgue de cette médiatisation, Malcom Gladwell, journaliste du New Yorker qui s’intéressait au processus de décision sans me connaître, a publié le 22 janvier un long article intitulé « Blowup » [8][8]Malcolm Gladwell, « Blowup », The New Yorker, 22 janvier 1996.. Mon livre y occupait une bonne place. Il a ensuite été chroniqué des dizaines de fois dans les plus grands journaux américains, à la une du New York Times, et jusqu’en Angleterre, dans le Times et l’Independant. C’était impressionnant et inattendu que dix ans après, ce livre épais puisse attirer autant l’attention. Tous les comptes rendus étaient favorables, y compris dans les revues académiques. Quand l’accident de Columbia est survenu en 2003, tout le monde savait que j’étais la personne la plus qualifiée pour livrer mon analyse « à chaud ». Et mon livre a encore été commenté.

Les Science and Technology Studies : une rencontre fortuite

Zilsel — C’est à l’occasion de vos recherches sur Challenger que vous avez découvert les STS, et en particulier le travail de Brian Wynne qui a influé sur votre analyse des pratiques des ingénieurs. Pourriez-vous revenir sur ce moment ? Quel a été l’effet sur la suite de votre carrière ?

Diane Vaughan — Je ne suis pas devenue une « chercheuse STS », j’ai plutôt utilisé la littérature qui relève de ce domaine et j’ai rencontré des chercheurs. C’est la même chose avec les organization studies ou la sociologie de la déviance. Dans ces domaines, surtout dans les STS, c’est l’aspect totalement éclectique qui m’a séduite et qui convenait à la façon dont je travaille. Mais pour autant, ma démarche était très éloignée de ce que faisaient les autres en STS. Je me rappelle la première fois que j’ai rencontré Harry Collins, à Bristol de mémoire. Nous nous sommes installés dans son bureau et il m’a lancé, enthousiaste : « Diane vous tombez du ciel ! Comment en êtes-vous venue à travailler là-dessus ? ! » Alors que le domaine commençait à devenir visible dans le monde académique, j’apparaissais ainsi, sans prévenir ! En fait, je travaillais seule depuis une dizaine d’années, sans lien avec ces domaines. Je tirais les éléments qui m’étaient utiles de diverses littératures, dans le seul objectif de m’aider à structurer mon cadre d’analyse théorique. J’avançais de la sorte, en agrégeant ces sources et en rencontrant de nouveaux collègues, qui m’apportaient en retour de nouveaux éléments. Ce fut le cas avec l’article déclencheur de Brian Wynne.

Zilsel — Vous qualifiez les STS d’éclectiques. Le mot est sans doute bien choisi pour décrire l’état d’effervescence des premières années. Pour autant, nombreux sont les chercheurs dans le domaine qui s’efforcent de le transformer en discipline autonome, donc pas si éclectique et interdisciplinaire que cela. Comment considérez-vous cette tension entre la constitution interdisciplinaire originelle (celle qui était mise en avant au début des années 1970) et l’ambition d’institutionnaliser un segment disciplinaire relativement indépendant des disciplines canoniques (histoire, philosophie et sociologie des sciences), que l’on peut voir à l’œuvre dans les Handbooks et les Readers ?

Diane Vaughan — Je ne pense pas qu’il y ait de tension. Il me semble logique que les STS souhaitent être plus fortes dans le but de se développer. Elles sont déjà en elles-mêmes interdisciplinaires. Et puis, cela se diffuse quoi qu’il advienne, cela fonctionne. Je ne me suis pas rendue à un congrès de STS ou de la Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) depuis bien longtemps. Je suis allée à San Diego en 2013 et j’étais impressionnée par le programme. Il tenait dans un petit livret, comme une petite Bible, et vous pouviez très rapidement constater la diversité des thèmes. Des gens qui travaillent sur tout ce que vous pouvez imaginer y présentaient leurs recherches, par exemple le big data. C’est très actuel, très important. Vous savez, je ne pense pas qu’il y ait encore beaucoup d’études de laboratoire. Ce n’est plus le cœur des STS. Si vous regardez seulement les fondateurs et la façon dont leur travail a évolué à travers le temps, par exemple comment Donald McKenzie est passé des statistiques aux marchés financiers, tout en écrivant pour des publics hors des STS, via le Times Higher Education, vous constatez sans peine une certaine évolution dans les thèmes autant que dans les approches. C’est le cas également de Karin Knorr-Cetina, qui a commencé sa carrière d’ethnométhodologue dans les laboratoires et qui aujourd’hui travaille à démontrer que les marchés sont des choses matérielles ; elle n’intervient pas en dehors du monde académique, mais ses résultats se propagent au-delà de ce qui est connu en STS. On peut encore mentionner la carrière de Harry Collins, depuis les études de laboratoire jusqu’à l’expertise, et maintenant il travaille sur l’expertise profane [9][9]Voir Harry Collins, Martin Weinel et Robert Evans, « The…. Je peux voir chez certains étudiants que j’encadre les effets féconds que peut provoquer la découverte du noyau théorique des STS. Ce noyau d’idées n’a pas été oublié, les études de laboratoire sont prolongées et enrichies par de nouvelles méthodes sur des objets différents ou émergents. En même temps, ce noyau théorique est renouvelé par l’ajout d’idées et d’auteurs qui avaient disparu, comme Ludwik Fleck, ressuscité par Robert K. Merton plus de quarante ans après qu’il a publié son important ouvrage The Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact (1935).

Zilsel — Votre livre sur l’accident de Challenger est une référence classique dans les disaster studies. Que pensez-vous de ce domaine aujourd’hui de plus en plus visible à l’heure des catastrophes et de la banalisation des risques ?

Diane Vaughan — Je n’ai pas contribué de façon explicite à ce domaine, je me suis surtout focalisé sur mes études de cas Challenger et le contrôle du trafic aérien. Au début, les disaster studies n’étaient pas perçues comme mainstream. Le sociologue des organisations Charles Perrow a publié son livre Normal Accidents bien avant le mien [10][10]Charles Perrow, Normal Accidents : Living with High-Risk…, du reste ce n’était pas classé dans les disaster studies pas plus que dans les organization studies. Puis les disaster studies ont émergé. Il aura fallu attendre la crise financière pour se rendre compte de ce que l’étude des technologies à risque pouvait apporter à l’explication. Je pense notamment au travail de Donald McKenzie, bien qu’il ne soit pas un spécialiste des organisations, mais on peut aussi mentionner les recherches de Karin Knorr-Cetina sur les marchés financiers. Les STS ont beaucoup apporté à l’analyse des désastres de l’économie financière. Mais pour revenir à ma contribution, elle a été plutôt d’ordre théorique, à travers des communications programmatiques faites dans des congrès, à la 4S ou à l’American Sociological Association, ou encore via mon enseignement, puisque j’organise un séminaire sur les échecs organisationnels et un autre sur la connaissance scientifique et la technologie, qui aborde aussi ces questions. J’ai aussi publié un article dans Social Studies of Science [11][11]Diane Vaughan, « The Role of Organization in the Production of…, qui proposait précisément d’appliquer une analyse de type organisationnel sur un sujet classique de la sociologie de la connaissance scientifique. Mais en réalité, cela existait au moins de façon latente. Harry Collins a par exemple comparé deux laboratoires travaillant sur les ondes gravitationnelles, l’un situé en Italie, l’autre aux États-Unis. Son interprétation est culturelle – au sens où il essaie de rendre compte de cultures scientifiques in situ – et l’organisation est l’unité d’analyse [12][12]Harry Collins, Gravity’s Shadow : The Search for Gravitational…. Karin Knorr-Cetina ne procède pas autrement dans Epistemic Cultures, cependant qu’elle ne fait pas usage explicitement des théories sur les organisations [13][13]Karin Knorr-Cetina, Epistemic Cultures : How the Sciences Make…. Même Donald McKenzie s’est orienté dans cette direction. Je pense en particulier à un article qu’il a consacré à la crise financière de 2008 [14][14]Donald MacKenzie, « The Credit Crisis as a Problem in the…. Il montre bien comment les marchés financiers sont couplés à des technologies, et réglés par des organisations, et il est significatif qu’il discute au passage mon analyse sur Challenger. Mais cela n’a pas été approfondi plus que cela dans ces écrits. Ce qui ne veut pas dire que ça ne le sera pas plus tard, car ces idées se diffusent, elles circulent. D’autres pourraient emboîter le pas, de la même façon que je me suis appuyée sur les STS pour les adapter à mes centres d’intérêt théoriques. Quand je m’y suis retrouvée, c’était un microcosme, très interdisciplinaire et ouvert. S’y côtoyaient géographes, philosophes, politologues, sociologues, ingénieurs, etc. Il me semble que c’est toujours le cas et c’est ce qu’il y a de plus précieux. Néanmoins, force est de constater que si les STS se diffusent dans la sociologie mainstream, l’inverse n’est pas avéré. L’engouement reste limité. Peu de sociologues travaillant sur les organisations utilisent le noyau dur des méthodes et théories des STS, à quelques rares exceptions près. Me vient en tête le nom de Wanda Orlikowskio, de la Business School de New York University, longtemps directrice de publication de la revue Organization Science. C’est la même chose dans les disaster studies.

Zilsel — J’ai l’impression que dans les STS il y a une tendance à surinvestir les problèmes philosophiques, qui a donné des controverses parfois très intenses, notamment dans le cas de la construction sociale des savoirs au début des années 1990. Comme si « théoriser », ça voulait dire « faire de la philosophie » – et alors du même coup, reléguer au second plan le travail monographique qui était stratégique dans les années 1970.

Diane Vaughan — Il y a sans doute un certain intérêt pour la théorie et la théorisation, mais les efforts restent hélas trop souvent isolés, cela ne communique pas assez. La palette des concepts utiles est certes étendue. Mon concept de « normalisation de la déviance », comme d’autres – les « conséquences inattendues de l’action » de Robert K. Merton, la « flexibilité interprétative » d’Harry Collins et Trevor Pinch –, peuvent être appliqués pour rendre compte de situations et d’objets présentant des similarités de structure, mais l’intégration des concepts est insuffisante. La « flexibilité interprétative » se diffuse entre les frontières disciplinaires alors que dans les STS ce n’est presque plus cité du tout… Tout cela me conforte dans l’impression que la perspective d’une intégration et de mise en relation de ces recherches n’est pas à l’ordre du jour. C’est très individuel, ce n’est pas cumulatif. Quand vous pensez à la formation des chercheurs des STS, leur inclination à l’interdisciplinarité, cela devrait marcher dans ce sens : les géographes s’intéressent à la diffusion des idées et sont outillés conceptuellement pour l’étudier, les sociologues de la connaissance mettent l’accent sur la production de la connaissance, cela devrait communiquer en liant ces bouts. Mais ce n’est pas vraiment le cas. Si bien que les interprétations individuelles continuent de prévaloir.

Zilsel — Pourtant au tout début des années 1970, il y avait des tentatives de développer une sociologie des organisations scientifiques, avec des visées intégratrices. Un peu plus tard, des propositions se sont consolidées, je pense par exemple à l’importante contribution de Richard Whitley, TheIntellectual and Social Organization of the Sciences [15][15]Richard Whitley, The Intellectual and Social Organization of…, qui propose d’utiles définitions, typologies et modélisations des types d’organisations scientifiques, applicables dans différentes disciplines à travers l’histoire des sciences. Cette démarche est tout à fait en phase avec le projet que vous mettez en avant. S’il n’est pas cité suffisamment, le livre n’en reste pas moins une source indispensable…

Diane Vaughan — Je ne connais pas ce livre… (Cherchant)

Zilsel — Ah ! C’est intéressant parce que dans mon esprit, c’est un classique des études organisationnelles appliquées aux STS. Richard Whitley a été actif dès le début des années 1970, puis s’est un peu éloigné du « mouvement STS » en se concentrant sur les transformations du capitalisme. Sans vouloir surinterpréter, que vous n’ayez pas connaissance de son ouvrage – dont la première édition n’était plus vraiment citée au début des années 1990, quand vous faites le lien avec les STS – me semble révélateur des circulations intellectuelles contrariées au sein des STS.

Diane Vaughan — C’est assez inquiétant que je sois passée à côté ! (Rires) J’ai travaillé et construit mon cadre théorique en m’inspirant des idées développées par d’autres, j’ai bricolé, c’est assez caractéristique de mes recherches. Et quand cela fonctionne sur les phénomènes que vous essayez d’expliquer, vous allez jusqu’au bout de l’explication sans nécessairement faire l’inventaire de toute la littérature, à tel point qu’il peut y avoir un angle mort et quelques oublis. Mais le plus important à la fin, c’est que votre explication tienne la route. Cela dit, j’ai passé un temps considérable à lire les revues de STS après que j’ai découvert l’article de Brian Wynne. J’ai beaucoup apprécié les débats dans certains numéros de Social Studies of Science. Ces lectures ont été formatrices.

Voyages et aventures des théorisations sociologiques

Zilsel — Il est frappant de constater combien il est crucial dans vos recherches d’entretenir une forme de continuité, depuis le premier ouvrage jusqu’au dernier à paraître. Au fur et à mesure, votre approche théorique se consolide, les lignes directrices sont toujours plus affirmées, tout en ménageant assez de souplesse dans les applications à de nouveaux objets. Est-ce un biais de présentation induit par le cadre même de notre entretien, qui mêle biographie et enquêtes, qui suppose donc de revenir en arrière avec linéarité et effet de reconstruction a posteriori, ou bien s’agit-il d’une sorte de trame épistémologique présente tout au long de votre carrière ?

Diane Vaughan — Il y a une forme de continuité, c’est indéniable. Elle s’enrichit de différents procédés, dont le plus essentiel est la comparaison analogique. C’est une idée dominante : les études de cas que j’ai réalisées partagent des données et des processus, mais qui varient en taille autant qu’en complexité. Cette question de l’analogie et surtout son usage dans la théorisation dans les sciences sociales m’intéressent beaucoup. Comme je l’ai soutenu dans une contribution à un livre sur la théorisation [16][16]Diane Vaughan, « Analogy, Cases, and Comparative Social…, nous y avons recours très souvent sans pour autant en avoir une pleine conscience. C’est pourquoi il me paraît nécessaire de rendre explicites ces usages, afin d’exploiter au mieux les potentialités du raisonnement analogique [17][17]Voir aussi Diane Vaughan, « Theorizing disaster : Analogy,…. Lorsque l’on achève un article ou un livre et que l’on essaie de généraliser à partir des résultats, on généralise nos résultats à des situations qui sont analogues sous certains aspects et critères.

C’est une partie de la réponse, mais je ne suis pas sûre que cela réponde à toute la question. Il faut également prendre en considération d’autres éléments, par exemple les processus d’induction et de déduction. Ils sont rituellement distingués. Les chercheurs peuvent reconnaître qu’ils usent soit de l’un, soit de l’autre, et de façon exclusive, mais en réalité je pense que dans le mouvement de la recherche les deux interviennent de concert. Dans The Discovery of Grounded Theory, qui est très lu ici à Columbia, Barney Glaser et Anselm Strauss soutenaient que vous devez vous engager dans un cadre de recherche sans rien savoir, en contrôlant rigoureusement l’induction, en « ancrant la théorie », mais on ne procède jamais ainsi lorsque l’on travaille sur les objets [18][18]Barney Glaser et Anselm Strauss, The Discovery of Grounded…. On a toujours une raison de choisir d’étudier tel ou tel objet. C’est pourquoi il importe de reconnaître l’existence d’une sorte de théorie de départ qui est vôtre lorsque vous amorcez une enquête, qui peut s’avérer juste ou erronée, mais qui, une fois ramenée au premier plan, explicitée donc, n’en permet pas moins d’établir des comparaisons analogiques ou de théoriser analogiquement. En d’autres termes, il y a cette théorie initiale, née d’autres expériences de recherche notamment, mais le processus de découverte demeure aussi inductif parce que nous importons des idées en même temps que nous avançons et découvrons de nouvelles choses. Par exemple, dans le cas de Challenger, j’étais en train de travailler sur mes données et je me rendais compte que j’employais toujours l’expression « moyens légitimes » pour les interpréter. Puis j’ai cherché à en trouver l’origine. Je me suis vite rendue compte en allant vérifier que cela venait de Merton, ce qui m’a amenée à renforcer un raisonnement qui n’était qu’intuitif au départ. Importer sciemment ce schème d’analyse lié à la théorie mertonienne de l’anomie a ainsi modifié ma perspective.

Cela arrive en permanence dans les dynamiques de recherche, et pourtant il est rare que l’on accorde à ces aspects l’importance qu’ils méritent. Nous devrions être bien plus attentifs à nos propres processus de théorisation. Cela peut être d’ordre analogique ou bien basé sur des différences par rapport à des choses que nous connaissons, mais je pense que c’est une façon de faire prendre conscience aux chercheurs qu’ils adoptent une démarche, qu’ils sont inspirés par des concepts et des ressources théoriques. C’est une dimension du travail intellectuel que je mets en avant dans mon enseignement, c’est extrêmement important. Cela aiderait à saisir de façon plus immédiate les intérêts théoriques sous-jacents, qui ne sont pas toujours manifestes, comme s’ils allaient de soi. Il arrive souvent de lire l’ultime version d’un article ou d’un projet de recherche sans savoir vraiment comment ni pourquoi son auteur en est venu à développer les idées qu’il défend. C’est en soi un problème de sociologie de la connaissance très intéressant.

Zilsel — Donc il y a des déplacements analogiques dans votre recherche ainsi que des références par moments appuyées sur le travail de divers auteurs, qui sont autant de sources d’inspiration. C’est le cas par exemple de Bourdieu [19][19]Diane Vaughan, « Bourdieu and Organizations : The Empirical…, dont vous montrez qu’il peut aider à l’analyse empirique des organisations comme champs ou dans des champs – ce qui ne manquera pas de surprendre en France, où la référence à Crozier est plus immédiate. On peut aussi trouver des références répétées à Merton, à Bruno Latour, à Harry Collins, etc. À première vue, cela donne l’impression d’un patchwork référentiel, mais l’on comprend que l’objectif prioritaire pour vous est de chercher des outils utiles pour votre recherche. Et peu importe que ces outils puissent paraître incompatibles, si la recherche avance.

Diane Vaughan — Là encore, je dirais que ces usages relèvent de l’analogie. J’ai été très influencée par l’article de Paul DiMaggio et Walter Powell, « La cage d’acier revisitée » [20][20]Paul J. DiMaggio et Walter W. Powell, « The Iron Cage…, et plus largement le développement de la théorie néo-institutionnaliste durant les années 1980. DiMaggio et Powell étaient enseignants à Yale lors de mon séjour postdoctoral là-bas. J’ai assisté à l’élaboration de leur cadre d’analyse. Quand ils ont fini par en tirer un livre collectif fondateur en 1991 [21][21]Walter W. Powell et Paul DiMaggio (eds.), The New…, j’étais absorbée par l’enquête sur Challenger, en particulier par l’analyse du processus de prise de décision. J’ai lu l’introduction du livre. Ils y reconnaissent que l’agency était trop peu intégrée au schéma théorique de « La cage d’acier revisitée ». Pour y pallier, ils suggèrent des pistes pour leur « nouvel » institutionnalisme : outre les références du moment en théorie des organisations, ils s’appuient sur l’approche bourdieusienne du niveau micro de l’action en termes de dispositions et de prédispositions pour consolider leur « théorie de l’action pratique » [22][22]Ibid., p. 25-26.. Cela m’a inspirée alors que j’étais en train de travailler sur le façonnement des comportements individuels par la culture organisationnelle de la Nasa. Je n’en oubliais pas moins d’utiliser cette théorie néo-institutionnaliste à un niveau plus macro pour comprendre les logiques institutionnelles qui influent sur les organisations et, par extension, les individus. J’ai essayé de connecter théoriquement toutes ces dimensions qui, dans le cadre de ma recherche, étaient objectivement liées. Si mon usage des cadres d’analyse dispositionnalistes de Bourdieu n’est pas si visible dans le livre sur Challenger, j’ai approfondi après-coup la discussion dans l’article que vous mentionnez, sans les relier explicitement à mes terrains d’enquête. Le principal problème, comme je l’ai signalé dans cet article, est que la notion d’habitus et la théorisation qui la sous-tend sont très pertinentes pour rendre compte des pratiques à l’échelle micro, mais à mon sens elle n’est pas assez approfondie sur le domaine institutionnel, alors même que c’était une des ambitions de Bourdieu, qui référait à des phénomènes de niveau macro. Une piste consisterait par exemple à mettre en évidence des « habitus organisationnels ».

Zilsel — Vous n’échapperez pas à une question rituelle des entretiens biographiques : pourriez-vous citer quelques auteurs qui vous ont influencée durant votre carrière ?

Diane Vaughan — Je peux sans doute en citer quelques-uns. J’ai déjà évoqué Merton, Spence, Wynne… Arthur Stinchcombe me vient également à l’esprit. De Merton et Stinchcombe, outre leurs contributions majeures aux domaines qui m’ont intéressée, en particulier les organisations et la théorie sociologique, j’ai retenu l’importance du concept et de sa définition la plus claire possible. C’est un souci constant chez Merton, tout comme dans les ouvrages les plus théoriques de Stinchcombe [23][23]Voir notamment Arthur Stinchcombe, Constructing Social…. Pour lier l’un et l’autre, je renverrai à l’article que Stinchcombe a publié dans le livre d’hommages à Merton que Lewis Coser, son ancien étudiant à Columbia, a fait paraître en 1975 [24][24]Lewis Coser, The Functions of Social Conflict, New York, The…. Dès la première page, vous savez où vous allez. Les marqueurs théoriques sont clairs, vous lisez une démonstration rigoureuse. Il écrit des choses comme « par structure sociale, je veux dire… ». Il propose des définitions claires des processus et des mécanismes, qui lui permettent, dans cet article, de reconstruire l’ensemble de la théorie sociale de Merton – ce qui est un tour de force théorique, que son auteur avait d’ailleurs salué. C’est pour moi un modèle que j’essaie de mettre en œuvre dans mes publications.

Zilsel — Définir les concepts, les intégrer théoriquement, se soucier de leur adéquation aux données empiriques, etc. Ce n’est pas une pratique si courante en sociologie !

Diane Vaughan — Non, mais ça le devrait ! Mais revenons de nouveau sur la diffusion des idées. La comparaison analogique en est un aspect essentiel puisqu’elle suppose de définir les concepts qui vous permettent de trouver des correspondances entre différentes choses. Un concept est analogique à la structure d’un problème et, sous certaines conditions, de comparabilité notamment, il peut être « transporté » vers un autre problème structuré de façon similaire. Or pour que ce transport soit réussi un minimum, pour que cela circule, il faut une définition à peu près stable et précise du concept en amont. Cela concerne les terminologies scientifiques amenées à circuler entre les disciplines scientifiques – leur circulation en dehors de cet espace académique est un autre aspect, sur lequel nous pourrons revenir. La normalisation de la déviance, par exemple, est un des concepts pivots du livre sur Challenger. Il a énormément circulé, plus que je ne l’aurais imaginé d’ailleurs. Si vous cherchez via Google, vous pourrez constater qu’il s’est diffusé très largement. Vous pouvez procéder de la même façon avec n’importe quel concept et voir ce qu’il est devenu en première analyse. Et aller plus loin en reconstituant l’histoire fine des circulations. Prenons la théorie de la signalisation, qui présente l’intérêt de décrire des processus à l’œuvre dans une variété de configurations sociales. Il est instructif d’en remonter la source, dans la mesure du possible.

Par exemple, dans le premier chapitre de Market signaling, Michael Spence pose sa théorie. Je l’ai interviewé afin de savoir comment l’idée lui en est venue. Il m’a raconté cette histoire passionnante. Alors qu’il travaillait sur sa thèse de doctorat, à Harvard après avoir bourlingué, il a fait la connaissance de Robert Jervis sur le campus. Sa thèse portait sur la logique des images et des perceptions dans les relations internationales [25][25]Robert Jervis, The Logic of Images in International Relations,…. Il s’intéressait aux négociations entre les États-nations, pour ce qui concerne en particulier la dissuasion nucléaire. Jervis avait suivi les cours d’Erving Goffman à l’université de Berkeley, et l’on retrouve les analyses du sociologue dans son approche des relations internationales. Et ces analyses d’influencer par la suite Michael Spence. J’ai voulu en savoir plus. Je suis allé à la rencontre de Robert Jervis, qui enseignait alors à l’université Columbia. Il m’a confirmé qu’au moment de sa thèse, il était incollable sur les livres de Goffman, comme Strategic Interaction, dans lequel on trouve une analyse des stratégies de signalisation… que Goffman développe en s’appuyant sur la thèse de Jervis [26][26]Erving Goffman, Strategic Interaction, Philadelphia, University…. Donc d’une certaine manière, ce dernier a utilisé Goffman qui l’a utilisé. Après le départ de Jervis pour Columbia, Spence est resté en contact avec lui via l’économiste et spécialiste de politique étrangère Thomas Schelling, une autre personne importante de cette histoire, avec qui Goffman a également collaboré lors d’un séjour à Harvard. Quand j’ai demandé à Michael Spence s’il s’imaginait recevoir un jour un « prix Nobel » pour cette contribution, il m’a répondu aussitôt par la négative. Et j’en suis venue à lui poser l’idée qui me taraudait le plus et qui justifiait l’entretien, à savoir l’explication du succès et de la diffusion large de son idée. Ce à quoi il a répondu qu’à l’époque où il l’a travaillée, les économistes étaient concentrés sur des problèmes structurellement similaires.

Ainsi, les théories voyagent de façon parallèle et plus ou moins en simultané… Tous les auteurs que je viens d’évoquer, Goffman, Jervis, Spence, Schelling, sont des penseurs « analogiques ». Tout comme l’était Robert K. Merton, qui est une autre source d’inspiration de Jervis, comme l’atteste l’application du paradigme mertonien des conséquences inattendues de l’action à son analyse des effets de système dans les relations internationales [27][27]Diane Vaughan, Compte rendu de Robert Jervis, System Effects,….

La sociologie publique « par accident »

Zilsel — Évoquons à présent ce qu’il est convenu d’appeler, notamment à la suite de la campagne persévérante de Michael Burawoy [28][28]Michael Burawoy, « Pour la sociologie publique », Actes de la… aux États-Unis, la « sociologie publique » (public sociology). Votre ouvrage sur Challenger vous a propulsée sur des scènes autres qu’académiques, où les questions relatives au processus de décision et au fonctionnement des organisations aussi bureaucratiques et gigantesques que la Nasa ont été posées de façon aiguë. Il vous aura fallu publiciser votre diagnostic sur la normalisation de la déviance en échangeant avec une multiplicité d’audiences. Pourriez-vous revenir sur les « voyages » de théorisation de l’échec organisationnel de Challenger, dont les conclusions ont été réactualisées lors de l’explosion d’une seconde navette Columbia en 2003 ?

Diane Vaughan — Il m’est arrivé d’intervenir hors du monde académique, en diverses occasions et de différentes manières. Mon travail sur le crash de Challenger a à voir avec la question du pouvoir, qui ne laisse pas indifférent. Il est possible de l’envisager « à froid » sous l’angle d’un système ou d’effets de système au sein d’une organisation. Y interviennent des facteurs externes, le lien avec le champ politique, le financement des programmes, mais aussi la façon dont les leaders y répondent. Les ingénieurs de la Nasa ont lu le livre sur Challenger, cela résonnait avec leur propre environnement de travail. J’ai été en contact avec le milieu des ingénieurs, par courrier électronique ou à d’autres occasions ; ils continuent à m’écrire, pas aussi régulièrement qu’avant, mais tout de même encore. Cela les a frappés parce qu’ils ont perçu comment leur monde est configuré. Surtout, ils ont été confrontés à une analyse qui ne part pas des individus pris isolément, mais les situe dans une position au sein de l’organisation. Le registre de l’analyse organisationnelle les place dans une position d’extériorité et d’explication structurelle. Le cadre théorique et les concepts sont à un niveau de généralité assez élevé pour être appropriés par quiconque est placé dans une configuration similairement structurée. Et cela permet de contredire le réflexe qui consiste à individualiser l’échec ou la faute, de surinvestir les traits de personnalité des coupables ou leur éventuel manque de compétence. L’idée de mettre en œuvre un raisonnement en termes de système et d’effets de système est ma contribution, dont les acteurs peuvent se saisir pour comprendre et transformer leur monde. Même les responsables politiques, parce qu’ils étaient impliqués, ont été forcés de reconnaître cette réalité et de l’affronter.

J’ai été surprise par l’attention très large que le livre a suscitée, bien après les premiers comptes rendus dans la presse. Je ne cessais d’être sollicitée par des grandes organisations pour donner des conférences, par exemple dans une convention IBM devant 5 000 personnes, aux services de l’US Air Force, à l’US Nuclear Operation, aux services de l’US Submarine, etc. Quelles que soient l’organisation et sa façon de considérer le risque, qu’il s’agisse d’IBM ou de l’armée de l’air, à chaque fois il était question d’échec organisationnel et des moyens à mettre en œuvre pour tenter d’y échapper. Certaines organisations ont sauté le pas et ont intégré ce paramètre dans leur fonctionnement. C’est le cas de l’US Submarine, qui a introduit des formations sur l’échec organisationnel et la normalisation de la déviance. Il était possible de tirer des leçons partout où des systèmes techniques complexes et de grande envergure posent des problèmes organisationnels. Cela inclut les hôpitaux. Je me rappelle avoir été invitée à donner une conférence inaugurale à un congrès sur les erreurs médicales à Palm Springs. C’est un secteur d’activité spécifique, mais sur lequel mes analyses peuvent parfaitement s’appliquer. Les personnes que j’y ai rencontrées me décrivaient diverses sortes d’erreurs, en les rapportant à l’organisation hospitalière. J’ai assisté à une intéressante communication, qui portait sur une erreur lourde de conséquences qui s’est produite dans un hôpital en Floride : les chirurgiens procédaient à une intervention mineure sur un enfant de 10 ans, mais ils ont injecté un produit dans ses veines qui n’était pas le bon, ce qui a provoqué sa mort. Après cette tragédie, une enquête a été menée. Elle s’est focalisée sur la division du travail, la manière dont les opérations étaient organisées et catégorisées. On comprend alors mieux pourquoi la personne qui a chargé la seringue a confondu les traitements. C’est l’ensemble du système organisationnel que constitue la salle d’opération qu’il fallait questionner et repenser ; par exemple, modifier la division du travail, les signalisations et les procédures de telle sorte que l’on puisse se rendre attentif aux signaux appropriés. Comme à l’US Submarine, des hôpitaux ont donc intégré ces changements pour faire face au risque.

Zilsel — Tout se passe comme si votre théorie agissait à la façon d’une sorte d’électrochoc ou de révélation existentielle chez les acteurs qui, de façon soudaine, comprennent pourquoi cela dysfonctionne.

Diane Vaughan — Un des effets les plus perceptibles de l’analyse organisationnelle est le décentrement de soi. Au départ, tout le monde pense en termes d’erreur individuelle et de formation défaillante ; mais d’un coup, ils sont invités à changer de perspective et se mettent à penser de façon systémique. C’est une conversion du regard. Je pense que c’est une bonne chose. Cela m’amène à l’autre question que vous souleviez, celle des raisons de l’adhésion des scientifiques, des ingénieurs ou des techniciens à la théorie de la normalisation de la déviance. Cela renvoie de nouveau au processus de diffusion des idées. J’ai cherché récemment des références faites à la normalisation de la déviance sur Google Scholar. C’est utilisé dans la vaste littérature sur les organisations bien sûr, mais ça l’est également dans des domaines aussi divers – et éloignés de la sociologie – que l’éthique du commerce, la santé publique, le travail social, les disaster studies, l’adoption et les familles d’accueil (foster care). Cela se diffuse partout où des gens considèrent qu’il faut changer un système défectueux. C’est un concept générique et transposable, ouvert à une multiplicité de réappropriations en même temps qu’il conserve une définition de base.

Zilsel — Ce processus par lequel un concept est extrait de son contexte initial de découverte et finit par circuler ailleurs rappelle – sans que l’on réfère à la source, à force d’utilisation – l’idée d’« oblitération par incorporation » proposée par Robert K. Merton. C’est une piste pour analyser la « vernacularisation » des terminologies scientifiques, laquelle peut emprunter des chemins inattendus, voire étonnants.

Diane Vaughan — Il faut tenir compte de tous les canaux de diffusion. Par exemple, on trouve des vidéos sur YouTube, dans lesquelles telle ou telle personne présente l’étude de cas sur Challenger ou introduit l’idée de normalisation de la déviance. L’une d’entre elles met en scène Mike Mullane, ancien astronaute. À l’occasion d’une conférence donnée devant l’International Association of Fire Fighters en 2013, il revient sur la façon dont les manageurs de la Nasa ont finalement accepté de prendre des risques connus sans pour autant attendre un désastre, normalisant ainsi une forme de déviance. À aucun instant il ne cite mon ouvrage. Il présente l’explication avec une telle conviction qu’il a l’air de penser que c’est son idée ! (Rires) Cela arrive, ce n’est pas une mauvaise chose si vous partez du principe que les gens doivent utiliser l’idée, et peu importe à la rigueur qu’elle soit remaniée à la marge [29][29]Mike Mullane l’utilise non sans la réviser : dans la conférence…. Dire qu’au moment où je l’ai achevé, je pensais que personne n’allait le lire… Ce fut le contraire. Et l’expérience m’a été très bénéfique. Et d’autres se sont ajoutées. Avec Uncoupling par exemple. En 2014, alors que j’étais passée à autre chose près de trente ans après la parution du livre, la notion-clé qu’il porte réapparaît dans les médias à la faveur d’une rupture retentissante : un jour donc, Gwyneth Paltrow annonce qu’elle est en train de se séparer de son mari Chris Martin, le chanteur de Coldplay. Un communiqué officiel en fait état. Il devient aussitôt viral sur Internet. Le texte précise qu’elle et lui sont entrés dans une phase de « découplage conscient » (conscious uncoupling) [30][30]John Koblin, « A Third Party Names Their Split », The New York…, ce qui a intrigué nombre de fans et de commentateurs qui ont cherché à savoir à quoi cela renvoyait. De même que des « programmes » peuvent être mis en place pour combattre la normalisation de la déviance, on peut trouver des thérapeutes impliqués dans cette explication du « découplage conscient », qui proposent des traitements et des stages en cinq semaines pour accompagner les couples qui prennent la décision de se séparer. Ici encore, un de mes livres a été repéré puis réutilisé. Si cela n’a pas pris les proportions du débat autour de Challenger et des organisations à risque, « uncoupling » est devenu un terme vernaculaire.

Zilsel — Et ainsi l’idiome sociologique en vient à enrichir le vocabulaire ordinaire.

Diane Vaughan — Je suis une grande avocate de la sociologie vernaculaire ! (Rires) Les interprétations que j’ai pu proposer étaient basées sur les données dont je disposais. J’ai discerné un pattern qui n’était pas référé à un mot ni n’était l’objet d’une quelconque théorisation. Je lui ai donné un nom, qui décrit donc une expérience particulière. Mais ce n’est pas comme si j’inventais tout ex nihilo. Ce qui se passe dans telle situation, par exemple quand l’accident ou la déviance deviennent acceptables dans une organisation, la normalisation de la déviance pour résumer, ce processus donc est sorti du travail de conceptualisation, de l’écriture. Et dans des circonstances que l’on ne contrôle pas toujours, ces néologismes sont finalement appropriés. C’est une des voies de la sociologie publique. Difficile, d’ailleurs, d’être plus « public » que Gwyneth Paltrow !

Zilsel — C’est certain ! Évoquons donc de nouveau la sociologie publique. Vous avez été sollicitée par la Nasa après le crash de Columbia, en 2003. Vous l’évoquez longuement dans un article, « Nasa revisited » [31][31]Diane Vaughan, « NASA Revisited : Theory, Analogy, and Public…, qui vous amène à réfléchir sur les « voyages » de la théorie sociologique au-delà des frontières de son contexte d’élaboration académique. Vous soulignez que votre implication dans la recherche des causes de ce nouvel accident fut l’occasion de diffuser un « message sociologique » dans les discours publics et politiques sur l’organisation de la Nasa. Que vos analyses théoriques s’appuient sur une ethnographie rigoureusement documentée a, dites-vous, nettement favorisé l’appropriation et l’influence de ce message. Ainsi êtes-vous devenue une avocate de la sociologie publique [32][32]Diane Vaughan, « How Theory Travels : A Most Public Public…. Cette orientation était-elle implicite jusqu’alors, malgré les conférences données devant les professionnels exposés à la normalisation de la déviance que vous évoquiez plus tôt ? Le crash de Columbia et les « revisites » qu’il a suscitées ont-ils été une sorte de révélateur de votre positionnement disciplinaire ?

Diane Vaughan — C’est après Columbia que j’en ai eu vraiment conscience.. Le même pattern que j’avais identifié sur le cas Challenger se reproduisait. J’étais stupéfaite par les prises de parole du responsable de la navette spatiale à la télévision : en substance, les équipes impliquées dans le programme s’étaient retrouvées dans la même situation de normalisation de la déviance. Cela m’a surprise. Et je me suis de nouveau laissée happer, puisque j’ai accepté de faire partie de la commission d’enquête sur l’accident de Columbia. Cela a différé la réalisation de l’enquête sur le contrôle du trafic aérien, qui entrait dans sa phase d’écriture après deux ans de travail, mais cette expérience a été très intéressante parce que j’ai observé et participé à l’enquête, de l’intérieur – à la différence de l’enquête sur le crash de Challenger, où j’avais accédé aux données de la commission d’enquête après-coup. J’ai eu la chance d’être conviée dans les installations de la Nasa. J’ai par exemple visité l’énorme centre d’entraînement des astronautes à Houston. C’est un endroit extraordinaire. On y trouve la plus grande piscine du monde, une navette grandeur réelle plongée dans l’eau afin d’entraîner les astronautes à des activités extravéhiculaires. J’ai adoré travailler dans cette équipe interdisciplinaire. J’ai pu vérifier auprès de mes collègues que le modèle causal que j’avais défini sur la catastrophe Challenger fonctionnait encore dans ce nouveau cas. Si bien que le livre a eu une deuxième vie. Je dirais donc que dans ce contexte, j’ai été amenée à m’engager une nouvelle fois dans une forme de sociologie publique, sans pour autant utiliser le terme de moi-même. C’est venu après.

Zilsel — Pourriez-vous rappeler les circonstances de cette prise de conscience que vos interventions pouvaient être rangées sous cette rubrique ?

Diane Vaughan — Vous avez mentionné tout à l’heure la définition qu’en donne Michael Burawoy. Eh bien, il s’est appuyé entre autres sur mes interventions après les crashs de Challenger et Columbia pour définir ce qu’il entend par « sociologie publique ». Tout s’est déroulé au sein de l’American Sociological Association (ASA), alors qu’il en était le président. D’une façon très offensive, en bon marxiste qu’il est, il a proposé de réévaluer le potentiel de transformation sociale de la sociologie publique à l’occasion de son allocution de président (presidential address) au congrès de 2004, qui s’est tenu à l’université de Berkeley [33][33]« Michael Burawoy, For Public Sociology, Part 1 :…. Ce fut un grand moment. C’est l’un des meilleurs conférenciers qui soient ! À Berkeley, il enseigne la théorie sociologique en premier cycle (undergraduate) devant un amphithéâtre d’environ 400 étudiants. Ils s’entretueraient pour pouvoir y assister ! Non seulement il dit des choses importantes de manière accessible, mais en plus il est vraiment amusant. Lors de cette fameuse conférence de 2004, il a plaidé pour la sociologie publique. L’ambiance était survoltée, une bonne partie de la profession était présente ainsi qu’une foule d’étudiants (les siens), certains portant des tee-shirts à l’effigie de Marx. Je me souviens du début de son discours. Burawoy a commencé par évoquer sa carrière, ses débuts dans les mines de Zambie, puis son travail dans une usine à Chicago, ensuite la Sibérie et d’autres expériences encore. Il liait ces moments à des événements politiques qui avaient lieu à l’époque, il dramatisait les enjeux en rappelant que partout où il se trouvait, le chaos était toujours au rendez-vous. Pour conclure, pince-sans-rire : « après je suis devenu… le président de l’ASA ». C’était d’un comique ! (Rires) Après cette introduction, il a repris le fil de sa démonstration et, au détour d’une « thèse » sur la sociologie publique telle qu’il l’entend, il a mentionné mon enquête sur Challenger. Ce n’était pas tout à fait un hasard. Il est venu à Boston College juste au moment où l’accident de Columbia était en cours d’investigation. Je m’occupais de l’organisation des conférences de professeurs éminents invités à l’université. Alors que nous préparions la sienne, mon téléphone n’arrêtait pas de sonner. Les médias me sollicitaient sans interruption et je venais tout juste d’être réquisitionnée pour témoigner à Houston. Cela a fait « tilt » lorsqu’il a découvert combien j’étais impliquée dans cette affaire. Il cherchait à illustrer la sociologie publique. Il avait déjà lu mon livre sur Challenger, il l’a relié à cette nouvelle catastrophe et mes activités dans le cadre de la commission d’enquête. Et donc, à un moment de sa conférence, il parle de moi [34][34]« Michael Burawoy For Public Sociology, Part 3 : Thesis 2 &…. Il se rappelle les moments passés ensemble à Boston, fait rire la salle en disant qu’il a fait « une ethnographie de moi » (Rires), cela pour étayer l’idée que non seulement mon livre sur Challenger était une sorte de sociologie publique parce qu’il avait retenu une large attention en dehors du monde académique, mais qu’en plus je suis intervenue dans la foulée de l’accident de Columbia – qui était annoncé dans le livre, faute d’une prise de conscience à la Nasa. Burawoy tenait donc un exemple idéal : le cas d’une sociologie académique qui devient publique et finit par « convertir » les acteurs à la sociologie. Il rappelle que le rapport de la commission est imprégné de mon vocabulaire et en conclut que « c’est du pur Diane Vaughan ». (Sourires)

Après le congrès de l’ASA, il a continué de défendre sa conception de la sociologie publique. Il a donné d’innombrables conférences dans des community colleges américains. Les personnes qui y enseignent ne se retrouvent pas vraiment dans la sociologie académique de l’ASA. Ils travaillent sur des projets spécifiques dans les quartiers en qualité d’« animateurs communautaires » (community organizers). Ces personnes sont souvent engagées dans des causes ou sont des activistes politiques. Néanmoins, ces sociologues sont perçus comme des chercheurs de second plan, à l’ombre des sociologues rattachés à des départements de sociologie académique. Burawoy refuse ces hiérarchies et souligne au contraire que ces figures sont interdépendantes, que l’on peut aussi passer de l’une à l’autre – ce que je fais sans cesse. Quoique les enjeux fussent éloignés au premier abord, Burawoy a toujours mentionné l’explosion de Columbia dans ses interventions auprès des publics de sociologues des community colleges. Il l’a fait de nouveau dans d’autres circonstances, par exemple l’été suivant en Afrique du Sud. Puis il a continué ailleurs son travail de légitimation de la sociologie publique, notamment au sein de l’Association internationale de sociologie qu’il a présidée de 2010 à 2014. Ce travail a payé. La sociologie publique est devenue un peu plus légitime, et mon livre sur Challenger de même que mes aventures de sociologue publique y ont contribué. Ce qu’a reconnu l’ASA, qui m’a décerné en 2006 un prix « public understanding of sociology » [35][35]Voir « Diane Vaughan Award Statement », 2006,…. C’était un honneur immense, d’autant plus que nous étions deux du département de Columbia à recevoir un prix lors de cette cérémonie (Herbert Gans, récipiendaire du prix W.E.B. Du Bois career of distinguished scholarship) [36][36]ASA Awards Ceremony and Presidential Address, 2006,…. L’aspect qu’a le plus combattu Burawoy est le caractère très hiérarchique de la sociologie américaine. Il voulait transformer cet état de fait, notamment en rééquilibrant les diverses manières de la faire progresser – qu’il s’agisse des sociologies académique, critique, experte et publique. Certes, cette conception n’a pas fait consensus et a suscité d’énormes discussions, mais elle a permis de faire avancer la réflexion sur la sociologie publique. Dans mon discours de réception du prix à l’ASA en 2006, j’ai dit en substance que je n’avais pas anticipé que mon livre « universitaire » écrit dix ans plus tôt puisse être converti en exemple de manuel pour sociologue public [37][37]Voir également Diane Vaughan, « Public Sociologist by…. Mais il l’est devenu. Ces choses-là sont imprévisibles et je ne suis pas la seule à qui cela est arrivé. Je pense à l’expérience de Lewis Coser, que j’ai bien connu à Boston College. Un jour il était revenu sur le succès tardif du livre tiré de sa thèse, The Social Functions of Conflict, qu’il avait publié en 1956. « Ce livre, m’avait-il confié, est passé inaperçu jusque dans les années 1970, et soudain c’est devenu une source d’inspiration. Tout est une question de timing ». Voilà : une question de timing. C’est absolument vrai quand je repense à mon livre sur Challenger.

Notes
[1] Diane Vaughan, « Public Sociologist by Accident », Social Problems, vol. 51, n° 1, 2004, p. 103-130.

[2] Diane Vaughan, Controlling Unlawful Organizational Behavior : Social Structure and Corporate Misconduct, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1983.
[3] Diane Vaughan, « Uncoupling : The Process of Moving from One Lifestyle to Another », Alternative Lifestyle : Changing Patterns in Marriage, Family and Intimacy, vol. 2, Sage, 1979, p. 415-442.
[4] Diane Vaughan, Uncoupling : Turning Points in Intimate Relationships, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1986.
[5] Brian Wynne, « Unruly Technology : Practical Rules, Impractical Discourses and Public Understanding », Social Studies of Science, vol. 18, n° 1, 1988, p. 147-167.

[6] Diane Vaughan, « The Role of the Organization in the Production of Techno-Scientific Knowledge », Social Studies of Science, vol. 29, n° 6, 1999, p. 913-943.

[7] Diane Vaughan, « The Dark Side of Organizations : Mistake, Misconduct, and Disaster », Annual Review of Sociology, vol. 25, 1999, p. 271-305.
[8] Malcolm Gladwell, « Blowup », The New Yorker, 22 janvier 1996.
[9] Voir Harry Collins, Martin Weinel et Robert Evans, « The politics and policy of the Third Wave : new technologies and society », Critical Policy Studies, vol. 4, n° 2, 2010, p. 185-201.
[10] Charles Perrow, Normal Accidents : Living with High-Risk Technologies, New York, Basic Books, 1984.
[11] Diane Vaughan, « The Role of Organization in the Production of Techno-Scientific Knowledge », Social Studies of Science, vol. 29, n° 6, 1999, p. 913-943.

[12] Harry Collins, Gravity’s Shadow : The Search for Gravitational Waves, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2004.
[13] Karin Knorr-Cetina, Epistemic Cultures : How the Sciences Make Knowledge, Cambridge (Mass.), Harvard University Press, 1999.
[14] Donald MacKenzie, « The Credit Crisis as a Problem in the Sociology of Knowledge », American Journal of Sociology, vol. 116, n° 6, 2011, p. 1778-1841.

[15] Richard Whitley, The Intellectual and Social Organization of the Sciences, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000 [1984].
[16] Diane Vaughan, « Analogy, Cases, and Comparative Social Organization », in Richard Swedberg (ed.), Theorizing in Social Science, Stanford, Stanford University Press, 2014, p. 61-84.
[17] Voir aussi Diane Vaughan, « Theorizing disaster : Analogy, historical ethnography, and the Challenger accident », Ethnography, vol. 5, n° 3, 2004, p. 315-347.
[18] Barney Glaser et Anselm Strauss, The Discovery of Grounded Theory : Strategies for Qualitative Research, New Brunswick, Transaction Publishers, 1967.
[19] Diane Vaughan, « Bourdieu and Organizations : The Empirical Challenge », Theory and Society, vol. 37, n° 1, 2008, p. 65-81.

[20] Paul J. DiMaggio et Walter W. Powell, « The Iron Cage Revisited : Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields », American Sociological Review, vol. 48, n° 2, 1983, p. 147-160.
[21] Walter W. Powell et Paul DiMaggio (eds.), The New Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1991.
[22] Ibid., p. 25-26.
[23] Voir notamment Arthur Stinchcombe, Constructing Social Theories, Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1968.
[24] Lewis Coser, The Functions of Social Conflict, New York, The Free Press, 1956.
[25] Robert Jervis, The Logic of Images in International Relations, New York, Columbia University Press, 1969.
[26] Erving Goffman, Strategic Interaction, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1969.
[27] Diane Vaughan, Compte rendu de Robert Jervis, System Effects, Princeton University Press, 1998, Contemporary Sociology, vol. 29, n° 2, 2000, 425-427.
[28] Michael Burawoy, « Pour la sociologie publique », Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, n° 176-177, 2009, p. 121-144. Pour une mise en perspective, voir Étienne Ollion, « Que faire de la sociologie publique ? », Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, n° 176-177, 2009, p. 114-120.

[29] Mike Mullane l’utilise non sans la réviser : dans la conférence précédemment citée, il en fait une « tendance humaine naturelle » – « très humaine » – qui survient dans certaines circonstances et qui consiste à « accepter de baisser les standards de performance », des techniques comme des individus qui les exploitent, en ayant recours à des « raccourcis » pouvant compromettre la sûreté. C’est « très naturel », donc n’importe quel domaine d’activité exposé à des risques aigus est susceptible de « rationaliser » cette situation de telle sorte que la catastrophe ne manquera pas de survenir. Sur le site professionnel de Mike Mullane, chacun pourra se procurer le DVD de près d’une heure « Stopping Normalization of Deviance » (sous copyright) pour la somme de 750 dollars (http://mikemullane.com/product/stopping-normalization-of-deviance/, consulté le 23 mai 2017). (Note du traducteur)
[30] John Koblin, « A Third Party Names Their Split », The New York Times, 28 mars 2014. Plus tard, Gwyneth Paltrow niera avoir utilisé d’elle-même l’expression. La référence aurait été faite par des thérapeutes pour qualifier la séparation du couple. Il est piquant de noter que, en Angleterre, l’expression « customisée » de « conscious uncoupling » – qui s’inspire du processus décrit par Diane Vaughan – a suscité la dérision : le néologisme exprimerait la « psychophilie américaine » (Kunal Dutta, « Gwyneth Paltrow denies using phrase “conscious uncoupling” to describe split from Chris Martin », Independant, 3 août 2015). (Note du traducteur)
[31] Diane Vaughan, « NASA Revisited : Theory, Analogy, and Public Sociology », American Journal of Sociology, vol. 112, n° 2, 2006, p. 353-393.

[32] Diane Vaughan, « How Theory Travels : A Most Public Public Sociology », dossier « Public Sociology in Action », Footnotes, novembre-décembre 2003, http://www.asanet.org/sites/default/files/savvy/footnotes/nov03/fn7.html. Voir aussi Diane Vaughan, « How Theory Travels : Analogy, Models, and the Diffusion of Ideas », conférence donnée au congrès annuel de l’American Sociological Association, San Francisco, août 1998.
[33] « Michael Burawoy, For Public Sociology, Part 1 : Introduction », YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NxvPKGtkUQ. Voir également la version publiée de la conférence : Michael Burawoy, « For Public Sociology », American Sociological Review, vol. 70, n° 1, p. 4-28.
[34] « Michael Burawoy For Public Sociology, Part 3 : Thesis 2 & 3 », YouTube, en ligne : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fdbix7b-iyQ, à partir de la huitième minute.
[35] Voir « Diane Vaughan Award Statement », 2006, http://www.asanet.org/news-and-events/member-awards/public-understanding-sociology-asa-award/diane-vaughan-award-statement.
[36] ASA Awards Ceremony and Presidential Address, 2006, https://vimeo.com/203499881.
[37] Voir également Diane Vaughan, « Public Sociologist by Accident », Social Problems, vol. 51, n° 1, 2004, p. 103-130.

Voir enfin:

Pourquoi certaines sociétés prennent-elles des décisions catastrophiques ?
LieuxCommuns

8 juin 2016

Chapitre éponyme (14) du livre de Jared Diamond, « Effondrement. Comment les sociétés décident de leur disparition ou de leur survie » (2005, Gallimard 2006).
L’éducation est un processus qui implique deux groupes de participants supposés jouer des rôles différents : les enseignants, qui transmettent un savoir aux élèves, et les élèves, qui absorbent la connaissance qu’ils leur apportent. En réalité, comme chaque enseignant le découvre, l’éducation consiste aussi pour les élèves à transmettre des connaissances à leurs enseignants, à mettre au défi leurs présuppositions et à poser des questions auxquelles ils n’avaient pas pensé auparavant. J’en fis moi-même l’expérience à mon séminaire à l’université de Californie à Los Angeles (UCLA), où je testais la matière de ce livre auprès de mes étudiants. Lors des échanges, l’un d’entre eux me posa une question qui me laissa sans voix : que se dit à lui-même le Pascuan [habitant de l’île de Pâques] qui abattit le dernier arbre ? Les dommages infligés à l’environnement se font-ils en toute connaissance de cause ? Les étudiants se demandaient si – à supposer qu’il y ait encore des Terriens vivants dans cent ans – les hommes du XXIIe siècle seront aussi stupéfaits de notre aveuglement que nous le sommes de celui des habitants de l’île de Pâques.

Historiens et archéologues professionnels ne laissent pas d’être étonnés par les décisions catastrophiques qu’ont prises nombre de sociétés. Le livre peut-être le plus cité sur les effondrements de sociétés est dû à la plume de l’archéologue Joseph Tainter, The Collapse of Complex Societies ( 1990). Examinant les diverses interprétations possibles des effondrements anciens, Tainter se montre sceptique quant à l’hypothèse selon laquelle la cause en fut la diminution des ressources environnementales : « Cette conception présuppose que ces sociétés contemplent les risques sans mener d’actions correctrices. Les sociétés complexes se caractérisent par une prise de décision centralisée, des flux d’informations importants, une forte coordination de leurs différentes parties, des canaux de commandement formels et la mise en commun de leurs ressources. Cette structure semble avoir la capacité, voire le but délibéré, d’équilibrer les fluctuations et les déficiences de la productivité. Fortes de leur structure administrative et de la capacité à encadrer l’allocation du travail et des ressources, la gestion de l’adversité environnementale est sans doute l’une des choses que les sociétés complexes font le mieux. Il est curieux qu’elles se soient effondrées alors qu’elles étaient confrontées précisément à ces situations qu’elles étaient équipées pour circonvenir [ … ]. Lorsqu’il devient évident pour les membres ou les fonctionnaires d’une société complexe qu’une base de ressources se détériore, il semble plus raisonnable de supposer que des pas rationnels sont franchis pour trouver une solution. L’autre présupposé — l’idiotie en face du désastre — exige un acte de foi devant lequel on peut légitime­ ment hésiter. »

Tainter estimait donc qu’il est peu probable que les sociétés complexes puissent s’effondrer en vertu de l’échec de leur gestion des ressources environnementales. Et pourtant, il est clair, au vu de tous les cas analysés dans ce livre, que c’est précisément un tel échec qui s’est produit de façon répétée. Comment autant de sociétés ont-elles pu commettre d’aussi funestes erreurs ?

La question renvoie à un phénomène déconcertant : à savoir, des échecs dans la prise de décision en groupe de la part de sociétés tout entières ou d’autres groupes. Un problème lié assurément à celui des échecs intervenant dans la prise de décision individuelle, mais qui ne s’y résume pas. Des facteurs supplémentaires entrent en ligne de compte dans les échecs de la prise de décision en groupe – tels les conflits d’intérêts entre membres du groupe ou la dynamique de groupe, par exemple. Sujet complexe pour lequel il n’existe pas une seule et unique réponse adaptée à toutes les situations.

J’entends plutôt proposer, à partir des exemples plus amplement développés dans les chapitres précédents, un guide des facteurs qui contribuent à la prise de décision en groupe. Je regrouperai ces facteurs en quatre catégories souples. En premier, un groupe peut échouer à anticiper un problème avant qu’il ne survienne vraiment. Deuxièmement, lorsque le problème arrive, le groupe peut échouer à le percevoir. Ensuite, une fois qu’il l’a perçu, il peut échouer dans sa tentative pour le résoudre. Enfin, il peut essayer de le résoudre, mais échouer. Les analyses des raisons expliquant les échecs et les effondrements ne sont pas seulement déprimantes, elles ont aussi un revers : les décisions qui réussissent. Comprendre les raisons pour lesquelles les groupes prennent souvent de mauvaises décisions, c’est s’armer de connaissances pour mieux orienter les groupes à prendre de judicieuses décisions.

Premier chapitre de mon guide : les groupes peuvent causer des catastrophes parce qu’ils ne parviennent pas à anticiper un problème avant qu’il sur­ienne, et ce pour plusieurs raisons. L’une est qu’ils peuvent ne pas avoir d’expérience antérieure de problèmes similaires et ne sont donc pas sensibilisés à la possibilité qu’ils adviennent.

Un exemple de choix est le désordre que les colons britanniques ont créé en introduisant les lapins et les renards en Australie dans les années 1800. Aujourd’hui, ce sont deux des exemples les plus désastreux de l’impact d’animaux sur un environnement où ils n’étaient pas présents à l’origine (voir chapitre 13). Ces introductions sont des plus tragiques parce qu’elles ont été menées à bien intentionnellement et moyennant beaucoup d’efforts ; elles ne résultent pas de minuscules semences transportées par inadvertance, comme dans beaucoup de cas de mauvaises herbes nocives. Les renards sont devenus les prédateurs de nombreuses espèces de mammifères primitifs australiens qu’ils ont exterminés parce que ceux-ci ne possédaient pas l’ expérience évolutionniste des renards, tandis que les lapins consomment une grande partie du fourrage destiné aux moutons et au bétail, concurrencent les mammifères herbivores autochtones et minent le terrain avec leurs terriers.

Rétrospectivement, nous considérons comme incroyablement stupide que les colons aient intentionnellement lâché en Australie deux espèces étrangères de mammifères dont la maîtrise, et non pas l’éradication, a exigé des milliards de dollars, après qu’elles ont causé des milliards de dollars de dégâts. Nous admettons aujourd’hui, en nous appuyant sur maints autres exemples de ce type, que ces introductions se révèlent souvent désastreuses pour des raisons inattendues. C’est pourquoi, lorsqu’on entre en Australie ou aux États-Unis comme visiteur ou comme résident rentrant chez lui, l’une des premières questions posées par les agents de l’immigration est de savoir si l’on transporte des plantes, des semences ou des animaux – afin de réduire le risque qu’ils s’échappent et s’établissent dans ces pays. Cette expérience antérieure nous a appris (souvent, mais pas toujours) à anticiper les périls potentiels que représente l’introduction de nouvelles espèces. Mais il est toujours difficile, même pour des écologues professionnels, de prédire quelles introductions réussiront, lesquelles se révéleront désastreuses et pourquoi la même espèce s’introduit en certains sites et pas en d’autres. Par conséquent, nous ne devrions pas être surpris par le fait que les Australiens du XIXe siècle, qui n’avaient pas notre expérience, n’ont pas réussi à anticiper les effets des lapins et des renards.

Dans nos enquêtes, nous avons rencontré d’autres exemples de sociétés n’ayant pas réussi à anticiper un problème faute d’en avoir l’expérience. Lorsqu’ils ont investi massivement dans la chasse au morse afin d’exporter de l’ivoire en Europe, les Norvégiens du Groenland ne pouvaient se douter que les croisades élimineraient à terme l’ivoire de morse en rouvrant aux Européens l’accès à l’ivoire d’éléphant d’Asie et d’Afrique ni que les glaces gêneraient les transports vers l’Europe. Sans scientifiques spécialistes des sols, les Mayas de Copàn ne pouvaient prévoir que la déforestation des pentes des collines déclencherait une érosion au détriment du fond des vallées.

Une expérience antérieure ne garantit pas nécessairement qu’une société anticipera un problème, pour peu que cette expérience ait été faite longtemps auparavant et qu’elle soit oubliée. C’est en particulier un problème pour les sociétés sans écriture, qui ont moins que les sociétés avec écriture la capacité à conserver les annales d’événements lointains : la transmission orale des informations est plus limitée que la transmission écrite. Nous avons vu au chapitre 4 que la société anasazi du Chaco Canyon a survécu à plusieurs sécheresses avant de succomber à la grande sécheresse du XIIe siècle après J.-C. Mais, faute de disposer de l’écriture et d’archives, les Anasazis du XIIe siècle n’avaient pas les acquis des mêmes épisodes climatiques antérieurs de plusieurs siècles. De même, les basses terres mayas de l’époque classique ont succombé à une sécheresse au IXe siècle, alors que cette même région avait été touchée par la sécheresse des siècles plus tôt (chapitre 5). Bien que les Mayas disposassent d’une écriture, celle-ci rapportait les hauts faits des rois et les événements astronomiques plutôt que la météorologie, de sorte que la sécheresse du IIIe siècle n’a été d’aucune aide pour anticiper celle du IXe.

Dans les sociétés modernes et contemporaines dont les écrits abordent d’autres questions que celles des rois et des planètes, cela n’implique pas nécessairement que les sociétés s’appuient sur leur expérience passée. Elles ont une tendance à l’oubli. Pendant les deux années qui suivirent les pénuries d’essence liées à la crise du pétrole du Golfe en 1973, les Américains se sont détournés des automobiles à forte consommation, puis ils ont oublié et font aujourd’hui bon accueil aux 4 x 4, malgré tout ce qui a été et est imprimé sur les événements de 1973. Lorsque la ville de Tucson, en Arizona, a connu une grave sécheresse dans les années 1950, ses citoyens en émoi ont juré leurs grands dieux qu’ils géreraient mieux leur eau, mais ils ont vite repris le gaspillage lié à la construction de parcours de golf et à l’arro­sage des jardins.

Une autre raison expliquant l’échec d’une société à anticiper un problème tient au raisonnement par mauvaise analogie. Le raisonnement par analogie est pertinent si les situations ancienne et nouvelle sont vraiment de même type. Mais les similitudes peuvent n’être que de surface. Les Vikings qui ont émigré en Islande à partir de 870 après J.-C. venaient de Norvège et de Grande-Bretagne, pays dotés de sols lourds déposés par les glaciers et qui, même privés de leur couvert végétal, ne peuvent être emportés par l’érosion. Lorsque les colons vikings ont rencontré en Islande beaucoup d’espèces d’arbres qu’ils connaissaient déjà en Norvège et en Grande-Bretagne, ils ont été trompés par la similitude apparente du paysage (chapitre 6). Malheureusement, les sols islandais ne sont pas nés de l’usure glaciaire, mais de vents apportant des cendres légères soufflées par des éruptions volcaniques. Une fois que les Vikings ont défriché les forêts islandaises pour créer des pâturages pour leur cheptel, les sols légers ont été exposés au vent et une bonne partie des sols islandais de surface a été érodée.

La préparation de l’armée française à la Seconde Guerre mondiale est un célèbre exemple contemporain de raisonnement par mauvaise analogie. Après l’horrible bain de sang de la Première, la France a admis qu’il était vital pour elle de se protéger contre la possibilité d’une autre invasion allemande. Malheureusement, le haut commandement de l’armée a présupposé qu’une nouvelle guerre se livrerait de la même façon que la Première Guerre mondiale, au cours de laquelle le front Est entre la France et l’Allemagne s’est stabilisé par la guerre de tranchées. Les forces défensives d’infanterie avaient bâti des tranchées fortifiées sophistiquées et elles étaient parvenues à repousser les attaques d’infanterie, alors que les forces d’offensive n’avaient déployé les chars tout juste inventés que de façon individuelle et uniquement en soutien aux attaques de fantassins. Dès lors, la France a construit la ligne Maginot, un système encore plus sophistiqué et coûteux de fortifications. Le haut commandement allemand, vaincu lors de la Première Guerre mondiale, avait admis, lui, qu’une nouvelle stratégie s’imposait. Il utilisa des chars regroupés en divisions distinctes pour lancer des attaques éclairs, contourna la ligne Maginot en empruntant des forêts auparavant jugées impénétrables aux chars et occupa Paris en six semaines seulement. Raisonnant faussement par analogie avec la Première Guerre mondiale, l’état-major français commit une erreur très répandue : faire des plans pour la guerre à venir comme si c’était la répétition de la précédente, d’autant que cette dernière avait été remportée.

Deuxième chapitre de mon guide, après l’anticipation, le fait qu’une société peut percevoir ou non qu’un problème se pose vraiment. Il existe au moins trois raisons expliquant de tels échecs, toutes communes au monde des affaires et à l’Université.

Premièrement, les origines de certains problèmes ne peuvent littéralement pas être perçus. Par exemple, les nutriments responsables de la fertilité des sols sont invisibles à l’œil nu et on ne les mesure par des analyses chimiques que depuis l’époque contemporaine. En Australie, à Mangareva, dans certaines parties du Sud-Ouest américain et en bien d’autres lieux, la plus grande partie des nutriments avait déjà été lessivée et détachée des sols par suite des pluies avant que les hommes ne viennent s’établir. Quand les colons ont entrepris de faire pousser des cultures, celles-ci ont rapidement épuisé les nutriments qui restaient, de sorte que l’agriculture a été un échec. Et pourtant, ces sols pauvres en éléments nutritifs portaient souvent une végétation luxuriante en apparence, pour la raison que la plupart des nutriments de l’écosystème sont contenus dans la végétation plutôt que dans les sols. Les premiers colons d’Australie et de Mangareva n’avaient aucun moyen de percevoir ce problème d’ épuisement nutritif des sols par défrichement – non plus que les agriculteurs des régions salées en profondeur (comme l’est du Montana et certaines parties de l’Australie et de la Mésopotamie) ne pouvaient percevoir la salinisation en cours, non plus que certains mineurs·ne pouvaient percevoir que les eaux rejetées par les mines regorgeaient de cuivre et d’acide toxique dissous.

Une autre raison qui explique l’absence de perception d’un problème une fois qu’il se pose, c’est la distance des gestionnaires, le problème est potentiel dans toute société ou entreprise importante. Par exemple, la plus grande firme propriétaire terrienne et d’exploitation forestière au Montana aujourd’hui n’est pas basée dans l’État, mais à quatre cents kilomètres, à Seattle, dans l’État de Washington. Faute de proximité géographique, les cadres de l’entreprise peuvent ignorer un problème à ses commencements sur leurs propriétés forestières. Les entreprises bien gérées évitent de telles surprises en envoyant périodiquement des responsables « sur le terrain » pour observer ce qui s’y passe réellement. De même, si les Tikopiens vivant sur leur île minuscule et les montagnards de Nouvelle-Guinée dans leurs vallées ont réussi à gérer leurs ressources pendant plus de mille ans, c’est grâce à une connaissance exacte du territoire dans son entier dont dépend leur société.

La circonstance la plus répandue d’un échec de perception est celle d’une tendance lourde marquée par des fluctuations. Le réchauffement global en est l’exemple de choix à l’époque contemporaine. Nous comprenons désormais que les températures de par le monde ont monté au cours des décennies récentes, en grande partie du fait des changements atmosphériques causés par les hommes. Cependant, le climat n’a pas exactement augmenté de 0,01 degré par an. Il fluctue de façon erratique d’une année sur l’autre : trois degrés de plus un été que le précédent, deux degrés de plus l’été suivant, quatre degrés de moins le suivant, un degré de moins encore le suivant, puis cinq degrés de plus, etc. Compte tenu de ces fluctuations importantes et imprévisibles, il a fallu longtemps pour discerner la tendance moyenne à la hausse de 0,01 degré. C’est pourquoi la plupart des climatologues professionnels, auparavant sceptiques quant à la réalité du réchauffement global, ne sont convaincus que depuis quelques années. À l’époque où j’écris ces lignes, le président George W. Bush n’était toujours pas convaincu de sa réalité et il estime qu’il faut poursuivre les recherches. À l’époque médiévale, les habitants du Groenland éprouvaient de semblables difficultés à admettre que leur climat se refroidissait progressivement, et les Mayas et les Anasazis à discerner que le leur devenait plus sec.

Les hommes politiques parlent de « normalité rampante » pour désigner ce type de tendances lentes œuvrant sous des fluctuations bruyantes. Si l’économie, l’école, les embouteillages ou toute autre chose ne se détériorent que lentement, il est difficile d’admettre que chaque année de plus est en moyenne légèrement pire que la précédente ; les repères fondamentaux quant à ce qui constitue la « normalité » évoluent donc graduellement et imperceptiblement. Il faut parfois plusieurs décennies au cours d’une séquence de ce type de petits changements annuels avant qu’on saisisse, d’un coup, que la situation était meilleure il y a plusieurs décennies et que ce qui est considéré comme normal a de fait atteint un niveau inférieur.

Une autre dimension liée à la normalité rampante est l’ « amnésie du paysage » : on oublie à quel point le paysage alentour était différent il y a cinquante ans, parce que les changements d’année en année ont été eux aussi graduels. La fonte des glaciers et des neiges du Montana causée par le réchauffement global en est un exemple (chapitre 1). Adolescent, j’ai passé les étés 1953 et 1956 à Big Hole Basin dans le Montana et je n’y suis retourné que quarante-deux plus tard en 1998, avant de décider d’y revenir chaque année. Parmi mes plus vifs souvenirs du Big Hole, la neige qui recouvrait les sommets à l’horizon même en plein été, mon sentiment qu’une bande blanche bas dans le ciel entourait le bassin. N’ayant pas connu les fluctuations et la disparition graduelle des neiges éternelles pendant l’intervalle de quarante-deux ans, j’ai été choqué et attristé lors de mon retour à Big Hole en 1998 de ne plus retrouver qu’une bande blanche en pointillés, voire plus de bande blanche du tout en 2001 et en 2003. Interrogés sur ce changement, mes amis du Montana s’en montrent moins conscients : sans chercher plus loin, ils comparaient chaque année à son état antérieur de l’année d’avant. La normalité rampante ou l’amnésie du paysage les empêchaient, plus que moi, de se souvenir de la situation dans les années 1950. Un exemple parmi d’autres qui montre qu’on découvre souvent un problème lorsqu’il est déjà trop tard.

L’amnésie du paysage répond en partie à la question de mes étudiants : qu’a pensé l’habitant de l’île de Pâques qui a coupé le dernier palmier ? Nous imaginons inconsciemment un changement sou­dain : une année, l’île était encore recouverte d’une forêt de palmiers parce qu’on y produisait du vin, des fruits et du bois d’œuvre pour transporter et ériger les statues ; puis voilà que, l’année suivante, il ne restait plus qu’un arbre, qu’un habitant a abattu, incroyable geste de stupidité autodestructrice. Il est cependant plus probable que les modifications dans la couverture forestière d’année en année ont été presque indétectables : une année quelques arbres ont été coupés ici ou là, mais de jeunes arbres commençaient à repousser sur le site de ce jardin abandonné. Seuls les plus vieux habitants de l’île, s’ils repensaient à leur enfance des décennies plus tôt, pouvaient voir la différence. Leurs enfants ne pouvaient pas plus comprendre les contes de leurs parents, où il était question d’une grande forêt, que mes fils de dix-sept ans ne peuvent comprendre aujourd’hui les contes de mon épouse et de moi-même, décrivant ce qu’était Los Angeles il y a quarante ans. Petit à petit, les arbres de l’île de Pâques sont devenus plus rares, plus petits et moins importants. À l’époque où le dernier palmier portant des fruits a été coupé, cette espèce avait depuis longtemps cessé d’avoir une signification économique. Il ne restait à couper chaque année que de jeunes palmiers de plus en plus petits, ainsi que d’autres buissons et pousses. Personne n’aurait remarqué la chute du dernier petit palmier. Le souvenir de la forêt de palmiers des siècles antérieurs avait succombé à l’amnésie du paysage. À l’opposé, la vitesse avec laquelle la déforestation s’est répandue dans le Japon des débuts de l’ère Tokugawa a aidé les shoguns à identifier les changements dans le paysage et la nécessité d’actions correctives.

Le troisième chapitre de mon guide des échecs est le plus nourri, car traitant d’une situation la plus courante : souvent les sociétés échouent même à résoudre un problème qu’elles ont perçu.

Beaucoup des raisons tiennent à ce que les écono­mistes et d’autres spécialistes de sciences sociales appellent le « comportement rationnel », fruit de conflits d’intérêts. Certains individus, par raisonnement, concluent qu’elles peuvent favoriser leurs intérêts en adoptant un comportement qui est, en réalité, dommageable à d’autres mais que la loi autorise de fait ou par non-application. Ils se sentent en sécurité parce qu’ils sont concentrés (peu nombreux) et très motivés par la perspective de réaliser des profits importants, certains et immédiats, alors que les pertes se distribuent sur un grand nombre d’individus. Cela donne aux perdants peu de motivation pour se défendre, parce que chaque perdant perd peu et n’obtiendrait que des profits réduits, incertains et lointains, quand bien même réussissait-il à défaire ce que la minorité a accompli. C’est le cas, par exemple, des subventions à effets pervers : ces budgets que les gouvernements dépensent pour soutenir des activités qui ne seraient pas rentables sans ces aides, comme la pêche, la production de sucre aux États-Unis et celle du coton en Australie (subventionnées indirectement par le gouvernement qui supporte les coûts liés à l’irrigation). Les pêcheurs et les cultivateurs peu nombreux font pression avec ténacité pour obtenir les subventions qui représentent une bonne part de leurs revenus, tandis que les perdants – tous les contribuables – se font moins entendre parce que la subvention concernée n’est financée que par une petite fraction des impôts acquittée par les contribuables. Les mesures bénéficiant à une petite minorité aux dépens d’une large majorité sont en particulier susceptibles d’être prises dans certains types de démocraties où le pouvoir de faire pencher la balance repose sur certains petits groupes : par exemple, les sénateurs des petits États au Sénat américain ou les petits partis religieux en Israël, à un degré par ailleurs inenvisageable dans le système parlementaire hollandais.

Un type fréquent de comportement rationnel pervers est de l’ordre de l’égoïsme. Prenons un exemple simple. La plupart des pêcheurs du Montana pêchent la truite. Quelques-uns préfèrent pêcher le brochet, gros poisson carnivore qui n’existe pas naturellement dans l’ouest du Montana, mais a été introduit subrepticement et illégalement dans certains lacs et rivières de cette contrée. Il y a ruiné la pêche à la truite, suite à la disparition des truites. Or les pêcheurs de brochets sont moins nombreux que ne l’étaient les pêcheurs de truites.

Nous avons un autre exemple engendrant plus de perdants et des pertes financières plus importantes : jusqu’en 1971, les compagnies minières du Montana, lorsqu’elles fermaient une mine, laissaient son cuivre, son arsenic et son acide s’écouler dans les rivières, faute de législation de l’État pour les contraindre à nettoyer les sites. En 1971, une telle loi a été promulguée. Les entreprises ont·alors découvert qu’elles pouvaient extraire le minerai de valeur, puis se déclarer en faillite avant d’avoir à assumer les coûts d’un nettoyage. Résultat : les citoyens du Montana ont dû acquitter cinq cents millions de dollars de frais de nettoyage, alors que les sociétés minières n’ont eu qu’à engranger leurs profits. D’innombrables autres exemples de comportements de ce type dans le monde des affaires pourraient être cités, mais il n’est pas aussi universel que certains· cyniques le soupçonnent. Au chapitre suivant, nous verrons dans quelle mesure ces comportements résultent de l’impératif, pour les entreprises, de gagner de l’argent dans le cadre autorisé par les règlements de l’État, le droit et la demande du public.

Une forme particulière de conflit d’intérêts est connue sous le nom de « tragédie des communs », laquelle est intimement liée aux conflits appelés « dilemme du prisonnier » et « logique de l’action collective ». Prenez une situation dans laquelle beaucoup de consommateurs récoltent une ressource qu’ils possèdent en commun, tels des pêcheurs qui prennent du poisson dans une zone de l’océan ou des bergers qui font paître leurs moutons sur un pâturage commun. Si chacun surexploite la ressource concernée, elle diminuera par surpêche ou surpâturage et finira par disparaître. Tous les consommateurs en souffriront. Il serait donc dans l’intérêt commun de tous les consommateurs d’exercer une contrainte et de ne pas surexploiter cette ressource. Mais tant qu’il n’existe pas de régulation efficace fixant la quantité de la ressource que chaque consommateur pourra récolter, chaque consommateur a raison de se dire : « Si je n’attrape pas ce poisson ou si je ne laisse pas mes moutons brouter cette herbe, un autre pêcheur ou un autre berger le fera ; je n’ai donc pas de raison de me retenir de surpêcher ou de surrécolter. » Le comporte­ ment rationnel correct consiste ici à récolter avant que l’autre consommateur puisse le faire, même si cela peut avoir pour résultat la destruction des biens communs, et donc nuire à tous les consommateurs.

En réalité, alors que cette logique a conduit nombre de biens communs à être surexploités et détruits, d’autres ont été préservés pendant des centaines, voire des milliers d’années. Parmi les conséquences malheureuses, on trouve la surexploitation et la disparition de la plupart des grandes zones de pêche et l’extermination de la grande faune (gros mammifères, oiseaux et reptiles) sur chaque île océanique ou continent colonisé par les humains pour la première fois au cours des cinquante mille dernières années. Les conséquences heureuses comprennent la préservation de nombreuses zones de pêche locales, de forêts, de sources d’eau, comme les zones de pêche à la truite et les systèmes d’irrigation du Montana que j’ai décrits au chapitre 1. La chose est aisément explicable par trois types différents de dispositions qui ont évolué pour préserver une ressource commune tout en permettant une récolte durable.

Une solution évidente consiste pour le gouvernement ou une autre force extérieure à intervenir, avec ou sans l’invitation des consommateurs, et à imposer des quotas, comme le shoghun et le daimyo dans le Japon des Tokugawas, les empereurs incas dans les Andes et les princes et les propriétaires terriens de l’Allemagne du XVIe siècle l’ont fait pour la coupe de bois. Cependant, la chose n’est pas possible dans certaines situations (par exemple, une île en plein océan) et cela implique des coûts d’administration et de police excessifs dans d’autres situations. Une deuxième solution consiste à privatiser la ressource, c’est-à-dire à la diviser en lots individuels que chaque propriétaire sera motivé à gérer avec prudence dans son propre intérêt. Cette pratique a été appliquée dans certaines forêts possédées par des villages dans le Japon des Tokugawas. Cependant, là encore, certaines ressources (comme les animaux et le poisson migrateur) sont impossibles à subdiviser et les propriétaires individuels peuvent éprouver encore plus de difficultés que les gardes-côtes ou la police publique à refouler les intrus.

Face à la tragédie des communs , la solution qui demeure consiste pour les consommateurs à reconnaître leurs intérêts communs et à imaginer, suivre et imposer eux-mêmes des quotas de récolte prudents. Cela n’est possible que si toute une série de conditions sont satisfaites : les consommateurs forment un groupe homogène ; ils ont appris à se faire confiance et à communiquer entre eux ; ils comptent avoir un avenir commun et transmettre la ressource concernée aux jeunes générations ; ils ont la capacité, ou la permission, de s’organiser et de se surveiller eux-mêmes, et on le leur permet ; les frontières de la ressource et de son ensemble de consommateurs sont bien définies. Le cas des droits s l’eau pour l’irrigation au Montana, analysé au chapitre 1, en est un bon exemple. Alors que l’attribution de ces droits a force de loi écrite, les ranchers obéissent surtout au délégué à l’eau qu’ils ont élu et ils ne tranchent plus leurs litiges devant les tribunaux. Parmi les autres exemples de groupes homogènes gérant avec prudence les ressources qu’ils veulent transmettre à leurs enfants, on trouve les habitants de l’île de Tikopia, les montagnards de Nouvelle-Guinée, les membres de castes indiennes et d’autres groupes analysés au chapitre 9. Ces petits groupes, avec les Islandais (chapitre 6) et les Japonais de l’ère Tokugawa, qui forment des groupes plus importants, ont de plus été motivés à parvenir à un accord par leur isolement de fait : il était évident pour tout le groupe qu’il ne survivrait que grâce à ses ressources dans un avenir proche. De tels groupes savaient qu’ils ne pouvaient invoquer l’excuse classique ( « ce n’est pas mon problème ») pour justifier leur mauvaise gestion.

Des conflits d’intérêts impliquant un comportement rationnel peuvent advenir lorsque, au contraire de la société dans son ensemble, le principal consommateur n’a pas intérêt à long terme à préserver la ressource concernée. Par exemple, une bonne part de l’exploitation commerciale de la forêt tropicale humide est aujourd’hui assurée par des compagnies forestières internationales, lesquelles en général signent des baux à court terme dans un pays, coupent la forêt sur tout le terrain qu’elles ont loué, puis vont dans un autre pays. Les bûcherons ont bien vu qu’une fois qu’ils ont payé le loyer de leur location, il est de leur intérêt de couper les forêts aussi vite que possible, de ne pas tenir leur promesse de reforestation et de s’en aller. C’est ainsi qu’ils ont détruit la plus grande partie des forêts des basses terres de la péninsule de Malaisie, puis de Bornéo, puis des îles Salomon et de Sumatra, maintenant des Philippines, et bientôt de la Nouvelle-Guinée, de l’Amazonie et du bassin du Congo. Ce qui est bon pour les bûcherons est mauvais pour la population locale, qui perd sa source de produits forestiers et doit subir les conséquences de l’érosion des sols et de la sédimentation. C’est mauvais aussi pour le pays d’accueil dans son ensemble, qui perd ainsi une part de sa biodiversité ·et de la possibilité de se doter d’une activité forestière durable. Ce conflit d’intérêts résultant de la location de terres à court terme contraste avec les résultats fréquem­ment obtenus lorsque les sociétés forestières possèdent la terre, car alors elles anticipent des récoltes répétées et -tout comme la population locale et le pays ont intérêt à adopter une perspective à long terme. Dans les années 1920, les paysans chinois ont noté un contraste similaire quand ils ont évalué les avantages comparés de l’exploitation par deux types différents de seigneurs de la guerre. Il était dur d’être exploité par un « bandit à demeure », un seigneur de la guerre implanté localement, mais il laissait au moins aux paysans assez de ressources pour qu’ils lui procurent plus de butin dans les années à venir. Le pire était d’être exploité par un « bandit errant », un seigneur de la guerre qui, telle une compagnie forestière louant des terres à court terme, ne laissait rien aux paysans d’une région et s’en allait seulement piller ceux d’une autre.

Le comportement rationnel peut également dicter à des élites repliées dans leur sphère des décisions nuisibles au reste de la société à l’écart de laquelle elles se maintiennent.

On en a vu, au cours de notre enquête, des exemples divers – la dictature Trujillo en République dominicaine, ou les élites possédantes en Haïti, ou bien encore la politique foncière des zones de résidences huppées sous haute protection sécuritaire aux États-Unis. Il n’y a guère, Barbara Tuchman dressait dans The March of Folly [1] la longue liste des décisions politiques qui, de la guerre de Troie à la guerre du Viêt Nam, furent causes de catastrophes. Il ne faisait, à ses yeux, aucun doute que « la plus importante des forces qui affectent la sottise politique, c’est la soif du pouvoir que Tacite a appelée ’la plus flagrante de toutes les passions’ ». C’est ce même désir que nous avons vu à l’ œuvre chez les chefs de l’île de Pâques ou les rois mayas : elle les poussa, par la rivalité mimétique, à ériger des statues et des monuments toujours plus élevés. Tout chef ou roi qui aurait construit des statues ou des monuments de moindre dimension afin d’épargner les forêts aurait perdu son prestige, donc son rang, et par conséquent sa fonction. La compétition pour le prestige fait rarement bon ménage avec la vision à long terme.

A l’inverse, l’immersion de l’élite dans la société oblige les dirigeants à être conscients des effets de leurs actions. Nous verrons au dernier chapitre que la forte conscience environnementale des Hollandais – y compris celle de leurs hommes politiques – tient au fait qu’une bonne partie de la population, dirigeants et dirigés, vit sur des terres situées en dessous du niveau de la mer, et que tous partagent les mêmes risques en cas de mauvaise gestion des digues. De même, les grands hommes de Nouvelle-Guinée en zone montagnarde vivent dans le même type de huttes que les hommes sans qualité, vont avec ces derniers piocher du bois à brûler et du bois d’œuvre dans les mêmes endroits et sont ainsi très motivés pour élaborer une activité forestière durable (chapitre 9).

D’autres échecs s’expliquent par le « comportement irrationnel », c’est-à-dire le comportement dommageable non plus à certains ni à la majorité, mais. à tous. Un tel comportement irrationnel survient souvent quand chacun, individuellement, est travaillé par un conflit de valeurs : on veut ignorer un mauvais statu quo parce qu’il résulte de l’application des valeurs auxquelles on tient profondément. « La persistance dans l’erreur », « le raidissement », « le refus de tirer les conclusions qui s’imposent à partir de signes négatifs », « l’immobilisme, la stagnation mentale » sont les causes que Barbara Tuch man recense. Les psychologues, eux, parlent d’ « effet de ruine » pour désigner un trait voisin : l’hésitation à abandonner une politique – ou à vendre une action – dans laquelle il a été déjà beaucoup investi.

Certaines motivations irrationnelles courantes tiennent au fait que l’opinion peut ne pas apprécier ceux qui perçoivent un problème les premiers et le dénoncent – comme le parti vert de Tasmanie qui a le premier protesté contre l’introduction de renards en Tasmanie. Ou bien, les avertissements peuvent ou non être entendus du fait de mises en garde antérieures qui se sont révélées de fausses alertes. Ou bien encore, l’opinion peut décider de n’avoir tout simplement pas d’avis sur la question.

Mais il est un facteur clé : les valeurs religieuses. Profondément implantées, elles sont donc de fréquentes causes de comportement désastreux. Par exemple, une bonne partie de la déforestation dans l’île de Pâques résultait d’une motivation religieuse : il fallait disposer de troncs d’arbres pour transporter et ériger les statues géantes de pierre qui étaient des objets de vénération. Au même moment, mais à six mille kilomètres de là et dans l’autre hémisphère, les Norvégiens du Groenland suivaient simplement leurs valeurs chrétiennes. Ces mêmes valeurs qui leur permirent de survivre pendant des siècles les empêchèrent d’opérer des changements drastiques dans leur style de vie et d’adopter certaines technologies inuits qui les auraient aidés à survivre plus long­ temps.

Le monde moderne et contemporain nous offre de nombreux exemples d’admirables valeurs profanes auxquelles nous tenons par-dessus tout alors qu’elles n’ont plus de sens. Les Australiens ont apporté de Grande-Bretagne la tradition d’élever des moutons pour la laine, des valeurs rurales fortes et une identi­ication à la Grande-Bretagne ; ils ont ainsi réalisé l’exploit de bâtir une démocratie digne du Premier Monde loin de toute autre (à l’exception de la Nouvelle-Zélande) ; aujourd’hui, ils commencent cependant à découvrir que ces valeurs ont aussi un revers. Si les habitants du Montana ont tant répugné à résoudre leurs problèmes causés par les mines, l’exploitation forestière et les ranches, c’est parce que ces trois activités, piliers de l’économie du Montana, étaient liées à l’esprit pionnier et à l’identité de cet État. L’attachement des pionniers à la liberté individuelle et à l’autosuffisance les ont empêchés longtemps d’admettre que désormais ils avaient besoin de planification publique et de contrepoids aux droits individuels. La détermination de la Chine communiste à ne pas répéter les erreurs du capitalisme l’a conduite à mépriser le souci de l’environnement : on sait où cela l’a conduite. L’idéal rwandais des grandes familles était adapté à l’époque traditionnelle où la mortalité infantile était élevée, mais il a conduit aujourd’hui à une désastreuse explosion démographique. Il me semble qu’une bonne part de l’opposition rigide que rencontre le souci pour l’environnement dans le Premier Monde s’explique par des valeurs acquises il y a longtemps et jamais réexaminées. Ce qu’en d’autres termes Barbara Tuchman décrit comme la préservation par « des dirigeants ou responsables politiques [des] idées avec lesquelles ils ont commencé leur carrière ».

Concernant ses valeurs fondamentales, jusqu’à quel point un individu préfère-t-il mourir plutôt que de faire des compromis et vivre ? Des millions de gens, à l’époque contemporaine, ont été confrontés à la décision de savoir si, pour sauver leur vie, ils seraient ou non disposés à trahir leurs amis ou leurs proches, à complaire à un dictateur, à vivre en esclavage ou à préférer l’exil. Les nations et les sociétés ont parfois à prendre collectivement des décisions similaires.

Toutes ces décisions impliquent ·des paris sur l’avenir, faute de la certitude que la perpétuation de certaines valeurs conduise à l’échec et leur préservation au succès. En tentant de continuer à être des agriculteurs chrétiens, les Norvégiens du Groenland ont préféré mourir en tant que tels plutôt que de vivre comme des Inuits ; ils ont perdu leur pari. Parmi les cinq petits pays d’Europe de l’Est confrontés à la puissance irrésistible des armées russes, les Estoniens, les Lettons et les Lituaniens ont renoncé à leur indépendance en 1939 sans combattre, alors que les Finlandais se sont battus en 1939-1940 et ont sauvegardé leur indépendance ; les Hongrois, eux, se sont battus en 1956 et ils ont été défaits. Qui d’entre nous peut dire quel pays a été plus sage ? Qui d’entre nous aurait pu prévoir que seuls les Finlandais gagneraient leur pari ?

Peut-être une clé du succès ou de l’échec pour une société est-elle de savoir à quelles valeurs fondamentales se tenir et lesquelles écarter, voire remplacer par de nouvelles. Au cours des soixante dernières années, des pays parmi les plus puissants ont renoncé à certaines valeurs qui paraissaient centrales dans leur image nationale : la Grande-Bretagne et la France ont renoncé à leur rôle centenaire de puissances mondiales agissant de façon indépendante ; le Japon a renoncé à sa tradition militaire et à ses forces armées ; et la Russie a abandonné sa longue expérience du communisme. Les États-Unis ont abandonné en substance – mais pas complètement – leurs anciennes valeurs de discrimination raciale légale, d’homophobie légale, de subordination des femmes et de répression sexuelle. L ’Australie révise aujourd’hui son statut de société. rurale agricole structurée par une identité britannique. Se pourrait-il que les sociétés qui réussissent soient celles qui ont le courage de prendre ces décisions difficiles et ont la chance de gagner leurs paris ?

Beaucoup d’échecs en partie irrationnels s’expliquent par le conflit entre des motivations à court terme et à long terme chez le même individu. Les paysans rwandais et haïtiens, ainsi que des milliards d’autres gens dans le monde aujourd’hui, sont désespérément pauvres et ne pensent qu’à la façon dont ils vont se nourrir le lendemain. Les pêcheurs pauvres des récifs tropicaux se servent de dynamite et de cyanure pour tuer les poissons du récif (et incidemment détruire les récifs eux-mêmes) afin de nourrir leurs enfants aujourd’hui, tout en sachant que, ce faisant, ils ravagent leur cadre de vie futur. Des économistes justifient rationnellement ce souci exclusif des profits à court terme en arguant qu’il peut être de meilleur aloi de récolter une ressource aujourd’hui que demain, dès lors que les profits d’aujourd’hui peuvent être investis et que les intérêts de cet investissement entre aujourd’hui et demain tendent à rendre la récolte d’aujourd’hui plus valable que celle de demain. Quitte à ce que les conséquences néfastes soient supportées par la génération à venir, qui, par définition, n’est pas encore ici pour faire droit à une prospective à long terme.

D’autres facteurs interviennent dans les prises de décision irrationnelles. Irving Janis étudie la « pensée de groupe », forme moins prégnante et à petite échelle de la psychologie des foules, et qui peut apparaître dans un groupe de décideurs. En particulier lorsqu’un petit groupe soudé (comme les conseillers du président Kennedy pendant la crise de la baie des Cochons ou ceux du président Johnson lors de l’escalade de la guerre du Viêt Nam) essaie de parvenir à une décision dans des circonstances de stress où le besoin de soutien et d’approbation mutuels peuvent conduire à annihiler les doutes et la pensée critique, à partager des illusions, à parvenir à un consensus prématuré et finalement à prendre une décision catastrophique. La pensée de groupe – et la psychologie des foules – peut opérer sur des périodes qui ne sont pas seulement de quelques heures, mais parfois de quelques années ; toutefois, on ignore encore quelle est leur part dans des décisions catastrophiques concernant des problèmes d’environnement de longue durée (décennies ou siècles).

La dernière raison spéculative que je mentionne­ rai pour expliquer l’échec irrationnel dans les tentatives menées pour résoudre un problème que l’on perçoit est le déni d’origine psychologique. Si une chose perçue suscite en vous une émotion douloureuse, elle sera inconsciemment supprimée ou niée afin d’éviter cette douleur, angoisse ou peur, quitte à ce que le déni conduise à des décisions désastreuses.

Dans le domaine qui nous concerne, prenons l’exemple d’une étroite vallée sinistrée juste derrière un grand barrage. Que le barrage vienne à se rompre, l’eau emportera les habitants sur une distance considérable en aval. Quand on sonde l’opinion qui vit en aval du barrage sur sa crainte d’une éventuelle rupture, cette peur est moindre en aval, elle augmente au fur et à mesure qu’on s’approche, atteint son paroxysme à quelques kilomètres du barrage, puis décroît brutalement et tend vers zéro parmi les habitants les plus proches du barrage ! Autrement dit, ces derniers, qui sont les plus certains d’être inondés en cas de rupture, disent d’une certaine manière ne pas être concernés. Ce déni d’origine psychologique est leur seule façon de vivre dans une normalité quotidienne. Le déni d’origine psychologique est un phénomène bien attesté dans la psychologie individuelle, mais il semble s’appliquer aussi à la psychologie des groupes.

Enfin, dernier chapitre de mon catalogue, le cas où une société échoue à résoudre un problème perçu, voire anticipé : le problème peut être au-delà de nos capacités présentes de résolution, une solution peut exister, mais être trop coûteuse, ou bien encore nos ·efforts peuvent être trop minimes ou trop tardifs. Certaines solutions tentées ont un effet de retour qui fait empirer le problème, telle l’introduction de crapauds en Australie pour contrôler les insectes nuisibles ou la suppression des feux de forêts dans l’Ouest américain. Maintes sociétés du passé (comme l’Islande médiévale) n’avaient pas les connaissances écologiques détaillées qui nous permettent désormais de mieux faire face aux problèmes auxquels elles étaient confrontées. Mais certains de ces problèmes continuent aujourd’hui à résister à toute solution.

Au chapitre 8, nous avons vu qu’au Groenland, ces cinq derniers mille ans, le climat froid et les ressources limitées et variables ont conduit à l’échec quatre vagues successives de chasseurs-cueilleurs américains puis des Norvégiens. Les Inuits sont parvenus à vivre en autosuffisance au Groenland pendant sept cents ans, mais leur vie était dure et ils mouraient souvent de faim. Les Inuits contemporains ne sont plus prêts à subsister de façon traditionnelle avec des outils de pierre, des traîneaux et la pêche à la baleine au harpon : ils importent des technologies et de la nourriture. Le gouvernement du Groenland n’a pas encore développé une économie qui soit indépendante de l’aide étrangère malgré le choix de l’élevage du bétail et les subventions aux éleveurs de moutons. On comprend mieux dès lors l’échec final des Norvégiens. De même, l’échec final des Anasazis ·dans le sud-ouest des États-Unis doit être considéré à la lumière de beaucoup d’autres tentatives qui ont finalement échoué pour établir des sociétés rurales durables dans un environnement hostile à l’agriculture.

Parmi les problèmes les plus récurrents aujourd’hui, on trouve ceux que posent les espèces nuisibles, qui se révélèrent souvent impossibles à éradiquer ou à contrôler une fois introduites. Par exemple, l’État du Montana continue à dépenser plus de cent millions de dollars par an pour combattre des mauvaises herbes qui ont été introduites. Non pas parce que le Montana n’a rien fait pour les éradiquer, mais tout simplement parce que ces mauvaises herbes sont impossibles à éradiquer à l’heure actuelle. Certaines. ont des racines trop profondes pour qu’on les arrache à la main et les désherbants chimiques spécifiques coûtent cher. L’Australie a tenté les haies, les renards, la chasse, les bulldozers et le virus de la myxomatose ou le virus Calici pour maîtriser les lapins, lesquels ont pour l’instant résisté à toutes ces offensives.

Le problème catastrophique des incendies de forêts dans les parties sèches de l’Ouest montagneux des États-Unis pourrait sans doute être maîtrisé grâce à des techniques de gestion, comme l’élagage mécanique des sous-bois et l’enlèvement du bois mort, visant à réduire ce qui peut brûler. Malheureusement, la mise en œuvre de cette solution sur une grande échelle est considérée comme prohibitive. Le destin du moineau de Floride illustre également l’échec dû aux coûts estimés et à la procrastination qui s’ensuit : trop peu, trop tard. L’habitat de ce moineau se réduisant, toute action a été repoussée le temps que l’on établisse si vraiment il diminuait à un point critique. Lorsque l’Office américain du poisson et de la faune sauvage a décidé à la fin des années 1980 d’acheter l’habitat restant pour le coût élevé de cinq millions de dollars, il était si dégradé que les moineaux moururent. Une polémique fit alors rage pour savoir si l’on devait accoupler les derniers spécimens en captivité avec d’autres, assez proches, puis en obtenir de plus purs en croisant les hybrides ainsi obtenus. Lorsque l’autorisation fut finalement accordée, les derniers moineaux captifs étaient devenus infertiles du fait de leur âge avancé. L’effort pour préserver l’habitat et pour accoupler les oiseaux captifs aurait été moins coûteux et davantage couronné de succès s’il avait été entrepris plus tôt.

En ouverture à ce chapitre, il y avait l’étonnement de mes étudiants et le refus de Joseph Tainter de croire qu’une société pouvait choisir l’échec. Au moment de conclure, il nous apparaît que nous sommes à l’extrême inverse : il y a quantité de raisons qui expliquent l’échec des sociétés. Mais le fait que nous soyons, moi, en train de rédiger et, vous, de lire cet ouvrage prouve que l’échec n’est pas notre destinée inéluctable. Au chapitre 9, nous avons analysé nombre de succès.

Si certaines sociétés réussissent tandis que d’autres échouent, la raison en est évidemment dans les différences entre les environnements plutôt qu’entre les sociétés. Certains environnements posent des problèmes plus difficiles que d’autres. Par exemple, le Groenland froid et isolé posait un plus grand défi que le sud de la Norvège, dont provenaient beaucoup de colons du Groenland. De même, l’île de Pâques, qui est sèche, isolée, de latitude élevée et plate, représentait pour ses colons un plus grand défi que Tahiti, humide, moins isolée, équatoriale et élevée, d’où étaient originaires des ancêtres des habitants de l’île de Pâques. Mais ce n’est que la moitié de l’histoire. Si j’affirmais que ces différences environnementales représentent la seule raison de l’échec ou de la réussite des sociétés, il serait juste de m’accuser de « déterminisme environnemental »,conception peu à l’honneur chez les spécialistes des sciences sociales. En réalité, si les conditions environnementales rendent sans doute plus difficile le maintien des sociétés humaines dans certains milieux plutôt que dans d’autres, les raisons de la réussite ou de l’échec tiennent aussi aux choix qu’opère une société.

Par exemple, pourquoi l’Empire inca a-t-il réussi à reboiser son environnement sec et froid, mais pas les habitants de l’île de Pâques ni les Norvégiens du Groenland ? La réponse dépend en partie des idiosyncrasies des individus et met au défi toute prédiction. Je crois cependant qu’une meilleure intelligence des causes potentielles d’échec recensées dans cette enquête peut aider les décideurs à en prendre conscience et à les éviter.

Un exemple frappant de l’usage d’une bonne compréhension d’une crise antérieure nous est donné par les crises consécutives mais contrastées impliquant Cuba et les États-Unis. Chaque crise donne lieu à des discussions entre le président Kennedy et ses conseillers. Début 1961, ils versent dans la pensée de groupe, et prennent donc la décision catastrophique de lancer l’invasion de la baie des Cochons, qui est un échec humiliant, et conduit à la crise bien plus dangereuse des missiles cubains. Irving Janis, dans Groupthink : Psychological Studies of Policy Decisions and Fiascoes, montre que les délibérations sur l’ expédition dans la baie des Cochons présentent toutes les caractéristiques, ou presque, de la prise de mauvaises décisions : sentiment prématuré d’unanimité, annihilation des doutes personnels et empêchement de l’expression de visions opposées, meneur – Kennedy – dirigeant la discussion de façon à minimiser les désaccords. En 1962, les délibérations sur la crise des missiles impliquent Kennedy et nombre des mêmes conseillers, mais elles suivent un processus inverse et débouchent sur des décisions fructueuses : Kennedy ordonne aux participants de penser avec scepticisme, il autorise la libre discussion, il rencontre séparément les sous-groupes et quitte parfois la salle pour éviter de trop influencer lui-même la discussion.

Au cours de ces deux crises cubaines, la prise de décision est différente en grande partie parce que Kennedy lui-même, après le fiasco de la baie des Cochons, a réfléchi aux dysfonctionnements dans le mode de décision et invité ses conseillers à faire de même.

__ Il faut qu’un dirigeant se fasse parfois visionnaire, ce qui implique du courage politique, puisqu’il doit résoudre un problème environnemental. Nous en avons rencontré quelques cas : les premiers shoguns tokugawas, qui ont réduit la déforestation du Japon longtemps avant que celle-ci n’atteigne le stade de l’île de Pâques ; Joaquin Balaguer, le dictateur qui, quelles que fussent ses motivations, soutint fortement les défenseurs de l’environnement dans la partie dominicaine d’Hispaniola, alors que ses homologues du côté haïtien ne firent rien de tel ; les chefs de Tikopia qui décidèrent d’éliminer les porcs nocifs pour leur île, malgré le statut prestigieux de cet animal en Mélanésie ; les dirigeants de la Chine communiste qui ont promulgué un planning familial longtemps avant que la surpopulation de leur pays atteigne le niveau du Rwanda aujourd’hui. Autant d’exemples qui sont des raisons d’espérer et font de mon enquête un ouvrage optimiste.

[1] Traduction française : La marche folle de l’Histoire, Paris, Robert Laffont, 1985. Citations respectivement aux pages 374 et 376 (N.d.É.)Voir par ailleurs:

Voir par ailleurs:

As a Black Child in Los Angeles, I Couldn’t Understand Why Jesus Had Blue Eyes
As Christians prepare to celebrate Easter, a Times journalist wonders how others first visualized Jesus as a child — and what those images mean now. Share your experience in the comments.
Eric V Copage
The New York Times
April 19, 2019

I must have been no older than 6. I was in church in my hometown, Los Angeles. Parishioners fanned themselves to stay cool in the packed, stuffy room.

On one side of each fan was an illustration of an Ozzie and Harriet-like American family — father, mother, son, daughter. All were black, like the parishioners in the church. On the other side was an illustration of Jesus Christ — fair skinned, fair haired, blue eyed.

Something seemed amiss to me about that depiction of Christ. Why was he white? Why was he not black, like my family, like me?

As I grew older, I learned that the fair-skinned, blue-eyed depiction of Jesus has for centuries adorned stained glass windows and altars in churches throughout the United States and Europe. But Jesus, a Jew born in Bethlehem, presumably had the complexion of a Middle Eastern man.

Many black Americans I met over the years not only embraced that image, but also insisted upon it. In a July 2002 episode of the radio show “This American Life,” an artist, Milton Reed, who made his living painting murals inside people’s apartments in public housing projects in Chicago, said black clients often asked him to paint Jesus — and insisted that Mr. Reed paint him white.

[Use the comments to tell us what you see when you visualize Christ. Your response may be highlighted in this article.]

With the approach of Easter, and these memories at the front of my mind, I decided to dig a little into this topic.

George Yancy, who edited “Christology and Whiteness,” a collection of essays about race and Christianity, told me the desire — sometimes the psychological need — of some black Americans to see Christ as white may “simply be a habit.”

“The first time I saw images of a black Christ it was shocking,” Dr. Yancy, who is black, told me. “It was like, ‘How dare they!’ But when you’ve seen a white Jesus all your life you think that can be the only acceptable image.”

Dr. Yancy, a philosophy professor at Emory University, also said that the social cultural soup all Americans are immersed in equates white with good and pure and black with bad and evil. Consciously or subconsciously some black Americans might have bought into that.

“If you internalized that worldview,” he said, “how could a dark-skinned Christ wash sins away?”

In a few black American churches the image of a white Jesus never took root, and for at least 100 years, those churches have been depicting Christ as black, as reported in a 1994 Washington Post article.

Since the 1960s, with the civil rights and black power movements and black liberation theology, the trend to show Christ as black has steadily grown.

“It would seem to follow that as black people came to rethink and embrace their own beauty, their own self-representation, that the image of a black Christ would naturally follow,” Dr. Yancy said.

Now, even though cultures across the world may at times show a Jesus that reflects their own story, a white Jesus is still deeply embedded in the Western story of Christianity. It has become often impossible to separate Jesus and white from the American psyche.

I remain interested in the depiction of Christ among blacks, Hispanics, East Asians, South Asians and other communities of color, both American born and immigrant.

I am also interested in how white Christians feel about images of Christ. How do you feel about the possibility that Christ may not have looked the way he has been portrayed for centuries in the United States and Europe? If you’ve seen Christ depicted as a man of color, what was your reaction?

In the comments section of this article, I encourage you to share how the age-old debate over the identity of Jesus is playing out in your life and religious community.

Please include where you’re from. We may highlight a selection of responses in this article.

Correction: 

Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article referred imprecisely to Jesus’s background. While he lived in an area that later came to be known as Palestine, Jesus was a Jew who was born in Bethlehem.


Arabie saoudite: Cachez cette croix que je ne saurai voir ! (World’s best-kept secret: Guess why you probably never heard of the recent French archeological find confirming the Judeo-Christian origins of Arabic writing in Saudi Arabia 150 years before the rise of Islam ?)

26 avril, 2019
 spread_of_religions600Jesus Palestinianhttps://scontent-cdg2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/58374239_1676880679125217_3985717405736239104_n.png?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-cdg2-1.xx&oh=a77a3a5c8f7978f65b9a00c0de479d0c&oe=5D2EA585Notre-Dame pendant l'incendie du 15 avril 2019
Veiled New Zealand PMMillionaire Srilankan suicide bomber Inshaf Ibrahim with tycoon fatherjohn_paul_ii_kisses_koranQu’on ne se fie à aucun de ses frères; car tout frère cherche à tromper… Jérémie 9: 4
Les ennemis de Juda et de Benjamin apprirent que les fils de la captivité bâtissaient un temple à l’Éternel, le Dieu d’Israël. Ils vinrent auprès de Zorobabel et des chefs de familles, et leur dirent: Nous bâtirons avec vous; car, comme vous, nous invoquons votre Dieu, et nous lui offrons des sacrifices depuis le temps d’Ésar Haddon, roi d’Assyrie, qui nous a fait monter ici. Mais Zorobabel, Josué, et les autres chefs des familles d’Israël, leur répondirent: Ce n’est pas à vous et à nous de bâtir la maison de notre Dieu; nous la bâtirons nous seuls à l’Éternel, le Dieu d’Israël, comme nous l’a ordonné le roi Cyrus, roi de Perse. Alors les gens du pays découragèrent le peuple de Juda; ils l’intimidèrent pour l’empêcher de bâtir, et ils gagnèrent à prix d’argent des conseillers pour faire échouer son entreprise. Il en fut ainsi pendant toute la vie de Cyrus, roi de Perse, et jusqu’au règne de Darius, roi de Perse. Sous le règne d’Assuérus, au commencement de son règne, ils écrivirent une accusation contre les habitants de Juda et de Jérusalem. Et du temps d’Artaxerxès, Bischlam, Mithredath, Thabeel, et le reste de leurs collègues, écrivirent à Artaxerxès, roi de Perse. Esdras 4: 1-15
Nul ami tel qu’un frère ; nul ennemi comme un frère. Proverbe indien
Nous avons tendance à penser naïvement les rapports fraternels comme une affectueuse complicité. Mais les exemples mythologiques, littéraires et historiques dessinent une autre réalité et donnent d’innombrables exemples de conflits violents. Nous citions Caïn et Abel ou Jacob et Esaü mais il y a aussi Romus et Romulus, Etéocle et Polynice, Richard Cœur de lion et Jean sans terre.…  Même quand ils ne sont pas des jumeaux, les frères ont de nombreux attributs en commun qui les confondent : ils ont le même père, la même mère, le même sexe, la même position relative dans la société. Cette proximité et cette parenté les rendent ennemis, concurrents. René Girard
C’était une cité fortement convoitée par les ennemis de la foi et c’est pourquoi, par une sorte de syndrome mimétique, elle devint chère également au cœur des Musulmans. Emmanuel Sivan
Le point intéressant est l’attitude des Palestiniens. Il me semble que ceux-ci sont attirés par deux attitudes extrêmes: l’une est la négation pure et simple de la Shoah, dont il y a divers exemples dans la littérature palestinienne ; l’autre est l’identification de leur propre destin à celui du peuple juif. Tout le monde a pu remarquer, par exemple, que la Déclaration d’indépendance des Palestiniens en novembre 1988 était calquée sur la Déclaration d’indépendance d’Israël en 1948. C’est dans cet esprit qu’il arrive aux dirigeants palestiniens de dire que la Shoah, ils savent ce que c’est, puisque c’est ce qu’ils subissent au quotidien. J’ai entendu M. Arafat dire cela, en 1989, à un groupe d’intellectuels, dont je faisais partie. Pierre Vidal-Naquet
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme. Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxismeRené Girard
Après ces choses, Dieu mit Abraham à l’épreuve, et lui dit: Abraham! Et il répondit: Me voici! Dieu dit: Prends ton fils, ton unique, celui que tu aimes, Isaac; va-t’en au pays de Morija, et là offre-le en holocauste sur l’une des montagnes que je te dirai. Genèse 22 :1-2
Nous lui fîmes donc la bonne annonce d’un garçon (Ismaïl) longanime. Puis quand celui-ci fut en âge de l’accompagner, [Abraham] dit: ‹Ô mon fils, je me vois en songe en train de t’immoler. Vois donc ce que tu en penses›. (Ismaël) dit: ‹Ô mon cher père, fais ce qui t’es commandé: tu me trouveras, s’il plaît à Allah, du nombre des endurants› (…) Nous lui fîmes la bonne annonce d’Isaac comme prophète d’entre les gens vertueux. Le Coran, 37, 101-102 & 112
Le Coran partage avec les apocryphes chrétiens de nombreuses scènes de vie de Marie et d’enfance de Jésus : la consécration de Marie dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Îmran, 31 et le Proto-évangile de Jacques, la vie de Marie au Temple dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Îmran, 32 et la Sourate XIX, Marie, 16 et le Proto-évangile de Jacques, le tirage au sort pour la prise en charge de Marie dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Imran, 39 et le Proto-évangile de Jacques, la station sous un palmier dans la Sourate XIX, Marie, 23 et l’Évangile du pseudo-Matthieu, Jésus parle au berceau dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Imran, 41 et la Sourate XIX, Marie, 30 et l’Évangile arabe de l’enfance, Jésus anime des oiseaux en argile dans la Sourate III, La famille de ‘Imran, 43 et la Sourate V, La Table, 110 et l’Évangile de l’enfance selon Thomas… Wikipedia
La condition préalable à tout dialogue est que chacun soit honnête avec sa tradition. (…) les chrétiens ont repris tel quel le corpus de la Bible hébraïque. Saint Paul parle de ” greffe” du christianisme sur le judaïsme, ce qui est une façon de ne pas nier celui-ci . (…) Dans l’islam, le corpus biblique est, au contraire, totalement remanié pour lui faire dire tout autre chose que son sens initial (…) La récupération sous forme de torsion ne respecte pas le texte originel sur lequel, malgré tout, le Coran s’appuie. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
Le christianisme (…) nous a fait passer de l’archaïsme à la modernité, en nous aidant à canaliser la violence autrement que par la mort.(…) En faisant d’un supplicié son Dieu, le christianisme va dénoncer le caractère inacceptable du sacrifice. Le Christ, fils de Dieu, innocent par essence, n’a-t-il pas dit – avec les prophètes juifs : « Je veux la miséricorde et non le sacrifice » ? En échange, il a promis le royaume de Dieu qui doit inaugurer l’ère de la réconciliation et la fin de la violence. La Passion inaugure ainsi un ordre inédit qui fonde les droits de l’homme, absolument inaliénables. (…) l’islam (…) ne supporte pas l’idée d’un Dieu crucifié, et donc le sacrifice ultime. Il prône la violence au nom de la guerre sainte et certains de ses fidèles recherchent le martyre en son nom. Archaïque ? Peut-être, mais l’est-il plus que notre société moderne hostile aux rites et de plus en plus soumise à la violence ? Jésus a-t-il échoué ? L’humanité a conservé de nombreux mécanismes sacrificiels. Il lui faut toujours tuer pour fonder, détruire pour créer, ce qui explique pour une part les génocides, les goulags et les holocaustes, le recours à l’arme nucléaire, et aujourd’hui le terrorisme. René Girard
Pour accepter l’islam, l’Europe a forgé le mythe de l’Andalousie tolérante qui aurait constitué un âge d’or pour les trois religions. Tout ce qui concerne les combats, le statut humiliant du non musulman a été soigneusement gommé. Il s’agit d’une véritable falsification de l’histoire réelle. Anne-Marie Delcambre
Je n’aime pas parler de violence islamique : si je parlais de violence islamique, je devrais également parler de violence catholique. Tous les musulmans ne sont pas violents ; tous les catholiques ne sont pas violents. Je crois que dans presque toutes les religions, il y a toujours un petit groupe fondamentaliste. Mais on ne peut pas dire — je crois que cela n’est pas vrai et que ce n’est pas juste — que l’islam est terroriste. Pape François
Je ne crois pas qu’il y ait aujourd’hui une peur de l’islam, en tant que tel, mais de Daech et de sa guerre de conquête, tirée en partie de l’islam. L’idée de conquête est inhérente à l’âme de l’islam, il est vrai. Mais on pourrait interpréter, avec la même idée de conquête, la fin de l’Évangile de Matthieu, où Jésus envoie ses disciples dans toutes les nations. (…) Devant l’actuel terrorisme islamiste, il conviendrait de s’interroger sur la manière dont a été exporté un modèle de démocratie trop occidentale dans des pays où il y avait un pouvoir fort, comme en Irak. Ou en Libye, à la structure tribale. On ne peut avancer sans tenir compte de cette culture.  (…) Sur le fond, la coexistence entre chrétiens et musulmans est possible. Je viens d’un pays où ils cohabitent en bonne familiarité. (…) En Centrafrique, avant la guerre, chrétiens et musulmans vivaient ensemble et doivent le réapprendre aujourd’hui. Le Liban aussi montre que c’est possible. Pape François
Un passage des propos du pape François attire l’œil: «L’idée de conquête est inhérente à l’âme de l’islam, il est vrai. Mais on pourrait interpréter avec la même idée de conquête la fin de l’Évangile de Matthieu, où Jésus envoie ses disciples dans toutes les nations». Voici le passage évoqué: «Allez donc, faites des disciples (“mathèteuein”, en grec) de toutes les nations, baptisant les gens (…), leur enseignant (“didaskein”) à observer tout ce que je vous ai commandé (Matthieu, 28, 19)». On peut appeler «conquête» la tâche de prêcher, d’enseigner et de baptiser. Il s’agit bien d’une mission universelle, proposant la foi à tout homme, à la différence de religions nationales comme le shintô. Le christianisme ressemble par là à l’islam, dont le prophète a été envoyé «aux rouges comme aux noirs». Mais son but est la conversion des cœurs, par enseignement, non la prise du pouvoir. Les tentatives d’imposer la foi par la force, comme Charlemagne avec les Saxons, sont de monstrueuses perversions, moins interprétation que pur et simple contresens. Le Coran ne contient pas d’équivalent de l’envoi en mission des disciples. Il se peut que les exhortations à tuer qu’on y lit n’aient qu’une portée circonstancielle, et l’on ignore les causes de l’expansion arabe du VIIe siècle. Reste que le mot de conquête n’est plus alors une métaphore et prend un sens plus concret, carrément militaire. Les deux recueils les plus autorisés (sahīh) attribuent à Mahomet cette déclaration (hadith), constamment citée depuis: «J’ai reçu l’ordre de combattre (qātala) les gens (nās) jusqu’à ce qu’ils attestent “Il n’y a de dieu qu’Allah et Muhammad est l’envoyé d’Allah”, accomplissent la prière et versent l’aumône (zakāt). S’ils le font, leur sang et leurs biens sont à l’abri de moi, sauf selon le droit de l’islam (bi-haqqi ‘l-islām), et leur compte revient à Allah (hisābu-hum ‘alā ‘Llah) (Bukhari, Foi, 17 (25) ; Muslim, Foi, 8, [124] 32-[129] 36)». J’ai reproduit l’arabe de passages obscurs. Pour le dernier, la récente traduction de Harkat Ahmed explique: «Quant à leur for intérieur, leur compte n’incombera qu’à Dieu (p. 62)» Indication précieuse: il s’agit d’obtenir la confession verbale, les gestes de la prière et le versement de l’impôt. Non pas une conversion des cœurs, mais une soumission, sens du mot «islam» dans bien des récits sur la vie de Mahomet. L’adhésion sincère pourra et devra venir, mais elle n’est pas première. Nul ne peut la forcer, car «il n’y a pas de contrainte en religion (Coran, II, 256)». Elle viendra quand la loi islamique sera en vigueur. Il sera alors dans l’intérêt des conquis de passer à la religion des conquérants. On voit que le mot «conquête» a un tout autre sens que pour le verset de Matthieu. Pourquoi insister sur ces différences? Un vaste examen de conscience est à l’œuvre chez bien des musulmans, en réaction aux horreurs de l’État islamique. Ce n’est pas en entretenant la confusion intellectuelle qu’on les aidera à se mettre au clair sur les sources textuelles et les origines historiques de leur religion. Rémi Brague
Les Chrétiens et les juifs parlent d’un livre «inspiré» par Dieu mais nullement une œuvre de Dieu. Pour les musulmans, le Coran est un «miracle» qui «éblouit le monde», c’est-à-dire une œuvre purement divine, incréée et présente depuis l’éternité. Il est donc par définition infaillible. Il n’a pas à être interprété ou analysé, la Parole de Dieu ne peut l’être, elle ne peut qu’être suivie. (…) Du point de vue coranique, un terroriste musulman n’est pas en contradiction avec les préceptes du Coran et reste donc un bon musulman. D’ailleurs les fatwas touchent des démocrates et tout à fait exceptionnellement des terroristes musulmans, il a fallu attendre jusqu’à mars 2005 pour qu’une fatwa soit lancée contre Oussama Ben Laden, émanant de la commission islamique d’Espagne. Louis Chagnon
C’est une religion aux préceptes assez simples et convaincants. Un seul Dieu, qui ordonne toute chose dans le monde… Pour adhérer à l’islam, il suffit de prononcer une formule : « J’atteste qu’il n’y a de divinité que Dieu et que Mahomet est son prophète. » Avec cela, vous êtes musulman. Il est de coutume de circoncire les nouveaux fidèles. Mais ce n’est pas obligatoire. Si les soldats de Napoléon ne se sont pas convertis à l’islam, c’est que les savants musulmans, en fait très ennuyés par la perspective d’une conversion aussi massive, ont imposé deux conditions : la circoncision et l’interdiction de boire du vin. Cette dernière était inacceptable. Et voilà pourquoi les Français sont chrétiens et pas musulmans.  Maxime Rodinson
D’après les théologiens musulmans, le Coran vient directement d’Allah, il n’a pas changé d’une seule lettre depuis qu’il a été mis par écrit, et sa langue est si somptueusement poétique qu’elle est inimitable par aucun humain. Mohammed l’a récité alors qu’il était analphabète. Avant que le monde ne soit créé, le Coran était déjà présent, ce que la théologie musulmane exprime en disant que le Coran est incréé. Le Coran est en arabe depuis avant la fondation du monde parce qu’Allah parle arabe avec les anges. (…) L’alphabet arabe ne comportait à l’époque de Mohammed que trois voyelles longues : a, i, u, et ne faisait pas la différence entre certaines consonnes. Cette écriture, nommée scriptio defectiva, est indéchiffrable, et ne peut servir que d’aide mémoire à ceux qui connaissent déjà le texte. (…) C’est vers 650, que des collectes ont été faites pour constituer le Coran. Le Coran a donc été primitivement écrit en scriptio defectiva. Vers 850, deux siècles après les collectes, des grammairiens perses qui ignoraient la culture arabe ont fait des conjectures pour passer en scriptio plena, afin de rendre le Coran compréhensible. Cela n’a pas suffi. Il a fallu y ajouter d’autres conjectures sur le sens des passages obscurs, qui concernent environ 30% du Coran. L’édition actuelle du Coran est celle du Caire, faite en 1926. Il a donc fallu 1 300 ans pour la mettre au point. C’est une traduction en arabe classique d’un texte qui est incompréhensible sous sa forme originale. (…) À l’époque de Mohammed, l’arabe n’était pas une langue de culture, ni une langue internationale. Depuis plus de mille ans, dans tout le Proche Orient, la langue de culture était l’araméen. Les lettrés arabes, peu nombreux, parlaient en arabe et écrivaient en araméen. La situation était comparable à celle de l’Europe de la même époque, où les lettrés parlaient dans leur langue locale et écrivaient en latin. Les difficultés du Coran s’éclairent si on cherche le sens à partir de l’araméen. Le Coran n’est pas écrit en arabe pur, mais en un arabe aussi chargé d’araméen que, par exemple, l’allemand est chargé de latin. André Frament
D’après la théologie musulmane, Mohammed, venant à la suite d’une longue suite de prophètes, n’aurait fait qu’un « rappel », rendu nécessaire parce que les hommes oublient. On peut donc penser que des révélations faites aux prophètes prédécesseurs de Mohammed ont du laisser des traces. D’autre part, des historiens pensent que les nouveaux systèmes d’idées se développent à partir d’ébauches antécédentes. Quelle que soit l’hypothèse choisie, il a dû exister une sorte de pré-islam qu’il est intéressant de rechercher. (…) De fait,certaines idées présentes dans l’islam d’aujourd’hui sont également présentes dans les sectes millénaristes et messianiques du Proche Orient, aux premier et deuxième siècles de notre ère. Voir comment ces idées ont cheminé dans cette région du monde a donné un éclairage supplémentaire. Dans le Coran, Myriam, sœur d’Aaron, et Marie, mère du Christ, est une seule et même personne, alors que 1.200 ans les séparent. La Trinité, formée pour les chrétiens du Père, du Christ et du Saint-Esprit, est déclarée dans le Coran formée, du Père, du Christ, et de Marie. Ces éléments, et d’autres de la sorte, font penser que le Coran est formé de plusieurs traditions différentes, comme on peut l’observer pour d’autres livres anciens. (…) Les messianismes juifs se sont formés en trois siècles, de 180 avant notre ère à 150 après. Leur théologie présente cinq idées centrales qui, durent encore de nos jours: · La première est celle d’une guerre menée pour des raisons théologiques. · La seconde est celle d’émigration : les Justes devaient d’abord aller au désert, reproduisant l’Exode de Moïse au Néguev-Sinaï. · La troisième idée était la conquête de Jérusalem. · La quatrième était la libération complète de la Palestine juive. · La cinquième était la conquête du monde entier. Alors que les quatre premières étaient tout à fait générales dans les mouvements messianiques juifs, la dernière n’était acceptée que par une partie des adeptes. Les deux premières idées sont proches de celles de l’islam, et la cinquième reste un rêve que les musulmans ont poursuivi pendant quatorze siècles. (…) Les nazaréens pratiquaient la circoncision, la polygamie limitée à 4 épouses, décrivaient un paradis où les élus trouveraient des aliments délicieux, des boissons agréables et des femmes. Toutes ces idées sont présentes dans l’islam. De plus, un grand nombre de thèses, de conceptions, de dogmes nazaréens se retrouvent à l’identique dans l’islam d’aujourd’hui : ‘Îsâ, le nom de Jésus, le statut du Christ, les récits de l’enfance de Marie, la confusion entre Marie et Myriam, le statut des femmes, la Trinité formée du Père, du Christ et de Marie, la conception du paradis, le vin, interdit sur terre mais présent en fleuves entiers au paradis… (…) Le mot musulman apparaît pour la première fois sur le Dôme du roc, en 691, il entre dans l’usage officiel vers 720, il est utilisé sur une monnaie pour la première fois en 768, et sur papyrus en 775 seulement. La recherche linguistique montre que les mots islam et musulman ne viennent pas de l’arabe, mais de l’araméen, la langue des nazaréens. (…) Le nom de Médine, d’après les documents musulmans, viendrait de madina ar-rasul Allah, la ville du messager d’Allah. Cette étymologie en langue arabe est proposée par l’islam plus de 200 ans après les faits. Or, à l’époque, madina ne signifiait pas ville, mais région. Ville se disait qura. Des textes datant de 30 ans après les faits indiquent une autre étymologie, à partir de l’araméen, impliquant les nazaréens. (…) Il est très douteux que les Arabes du VIIe siècle soient des polythéistes étrangers aux traditions biblique ou chrétienne. Par leur commerce, ils sont, en effet, depuis plus de six siècles en contact avec des juifs et depuis six siècles en contact avec des chrétiens. Ils ne pouvaient pas ignorer la révélation judéo-chrétienne. André Frament
La question de l’Hégire permet d’entrevoir immédiatement ce qui s’est passé. L’Hégire ou Émigration à l’oasis de Yathrib situé en plein désert est un événement très significatif de la vie du Mahomet historique. On sait que, très rapidement, cette année-là – 622 semble-t-il – a été tenue pour l’an 1 du calendrier du groupe formé autour de Mahomet (ou plutôt du groupe dont il était lui-même un membre). Or, la fondation d’un nouveau calendrier absolu ne s’explique jamais que par la conscience de commencer une Ère Nouvelle, et cela dans le cadre d’une vision de l’Histoire. Quelle ère nouvelle ? D’après les explications musulmanes actuelles, cette année 1 se fonderait sur une défaite et une fuite de Mahomet, parti se réfugier loin de La Mecque. Mais comment une fuite peut-elle être sacralisée jusqu’à devenir la base de tout un édifice chronologique et religieux ? Cela n’a pas de sens. Si Mahomet est bien arrivé à Yathrib – qui sera renommé plus tard Médine – en 622, ce ne fut pas seulement avec une partie de la tribu des Qoréchites, mais avec ceux pour qui le repli au désert rappelait justement un glorieux passé et surtout la figure de la promesse divine. Alors, le puzzle des données apparemment incohérentes prend forme, ainsi que Michaël Cook et d’autres l’on entrevu. Le désert est le lieu où Dieu forme le peuple qui doit aller libérer la terre, au sens de ce verset : « Ô mon peuple, entrez dans la terre que Dieu vous a destinée » (Coran V, 21). Nous sommes ici dans la vision de l’histoire dont le modèle de base est constitué par le récit biblique de l’Exode, lorsque le petit reste d’Israël préparé par Dieu au désert est appelé à conquérir la terre, c’est-à-dire la Palestine selon la vision biblique. Telle est la vision qu’avaient ceux qui accompagnaient et en fait qui dirigeaient Mahomet et les autres Arabes vers Yathrib en 622. Et voilà pourquoi une année 1 y est décrétée : le salut est en marche. Dans l’oasis de Yathrib d’ailleurs, la plupart des sédentaires sont des « juifs » aux dires mêmes des traditions islamiques. Et pourtant les traditions rabbiniques ne les ont jamais reconnus comme des leurs : ces « juifs » et ceux qui y conduisirent leurs amis arabes sont en réalité ces “judéochrétiens” hérétiques, qui vous évoquiez à l’instant. Ils appartenaient à la secte de « nazaréens » dont on a déjà parlé à propos de la sourate 5, verset 82. E.-M. Gallez
C’est à la suite de la destruction du Temple de 70 que l’idéologie judéo-nazaréenne se structura en vision cohérente du Monde et de l’Histoire, construite sous l’angle de l’affrontement des « bons » et des « méchants », les premiers devant être les instruments de la libération de la Terre. Le recoupement des données indique que c’est en Syrie, chez les judéo-chrétiens qui refusèrent de rentrer en Judée après 70 et réinterprétèrent leur foi, que cette idéologie de salut – la première de l’Histoire – s’est explicitée. (…) Pour en revenir à l’attente judéonazaréenne du Messie-Jésus, je ne vous apprendrai rien en disant qu’il n’est pas redescendu du Ciel en 638. En 639 non plus. En 640, l’espérance de le voir redescendre du Ciel apparut clairement être une chimère. C’est la crise. (…) Il est invraisemblable que Mahomet ait massacré des juifs rabbanites (orthodoxes ndlr), dont les judéo-nazaréens aussi bien que leurs alliés Arabes avaient besoin de la neutralité, au moins. Mais après 640, on imagine aisément que Umar puis son successeur Uthman aient voulu se défaire d’alliés devenus encombrants. Ironie de l’histoire : les « fils d’Israël » – au moins leurs chefs – sont massacrés par ceux qu’ils avaient eux-mêmes convaincus d’être les « fils d’Ismaël » ! En fait, le problème se posait aux Arabes de justifier d’une manière nouvelle le pouvoir qu’ils avaient pris sur le Proche-Orient. C’est dans ce cadre qu’apparut la nécessité d’avoir un livre propre à eux, opposable à la Bible des juifs et des chrétiens, et qui consacrerait la domination arabe sur le monde… et qui contribuerait à occulter le passé judéo-nazaréen. EM Gellez
Le Calife basé à l’oasis de Médine ne disposait, en fait de « textes » en arabe, que des papiers que les judéo-nazaréens y avaient laissés. Même si l’on y ajoute les textes plus anciens laissés en Syrie, cela ne fait pas encore un choix énorme. Et il fallait choisir, dans la hâte, des textes répondant aux attentes des nouveaux maîtres du Proche-Orient ! Autant dire que, quel qu’il fût, le résultat du choix ne pouvait guère être satisfaisant, même si on choisissait les textes présentant le moins d’allusions au passé judéonazaréen. C’est ainsi que les traditions musulmanes ont gardé le souvenir de « collectes » ou assemblages du Coran divergents entre eux et concurrents – parce qu’ils fournirent évidemment à des ambitieux l’occasion de se pousser au pouvoir. Umar fut assassiné. Son successeur également, et il s’ensuivit une véritable guerre intra-musulmane, aboutissant au schisme entre « chiites » et « sunnites ». Quant aux textes assemblés dans ce qu’on nomma le « Coran », ils continuèrent d’être adaptés à ce qu’on attendait d’eux, dans une suite de fuites en avant : apporter des modifications à un texte, c’est souvent se condamner à introduire de nouvelles pour pallier les difficultés ou les incohérences induites par les premières, etc. Un texte ne se laisse pas si facilement manipuler. Surtout qu’il faut chaque fois rappeler les exemplaires en circulation,les détruire et les remplacer par des nouveaux – ce dont les traditions musulmanes ont gardé le souvenir et situent jusqu’à l’époque du gouverneur Hajjaj, au début du VIIIe siècle encore ! Quand il devint trop tard pour le modifier encore en ses consonnes, sa voyellisation puis son interprétation furent à leur tour l’objet d’élaborations (parfois assez savantes). Ainsi, à force d’être manipulé, le texte coranique devint de plus en plus obscur, ce qu’il est aujourd’hui. Mais il était tout à fait clair en ces divers feuillets primitifs c’est-à-dire avant que ceux-ci aient été choisis pour constituer un recueil de 114 parties – le même nombre que de logia de l’évangile de Thomas, nombre lié aux besoins liturgiques selon Pierre Perrier. EM Gellez
Du fait de l’hyperspécialisation, très peu d’islamologues s’étaient intéressés aux textes de la mer Morte qui, particulièrement dans leur version la plus récente, reflètent une parenté avec le texte coranique ; et, en sens inverse, tout aussi peu de qoumranologues, d’exégètes ou de patrologues avaient porté de l’intérêt au Coran et à l’Islam. Or ces deux côtés de la recherche s’éclairent mutuellement, ils constituent en quelque sorte le terminus a quo et le terminus ad quem de celle-ci, renvoyant à une même mouvance religieuse : celle que des ex-judéo-chrétiens ont structurée vers la fin du Ier siècle. On la connaît surtout sous la qualification de “nazaréenne” ; les membres de cette secte apocalyptico-messianiste avaient en effet gardé l’appellation de nazaréens que les premiers judéo-chrétiens avaient portée (durant très peu d’années) avant de s’appeler précisément chrétiens d’après le terme de Messie (c’est-à-dire christianoï ou Mesihayé). Il s’agit évidemment des naçârâ du texte coranique selon le sens qu’y avait encore ce mot avant le VIIIe siècle et selon le sens qu’indiquent certains traducteurs à propos de passages où l’actuelle signification de chrétiens ne convient visiblement pas ; au reste, à propos de ces nazaréens, même certains sites musulmans libéraux en viennent aujourd’hui à se demander si leur doctrine n’était pas celle de Mahomet. À la suite de Ray A. Pritz, l’auteur préconise l’appellation de judéo-nazaréens pour éviter toute ambiguïté ; l’avantage est également de rappeler l’origine judéenne (ainsi qu’un lien primitif avec la communauté de Jacques de Jérusalem, selon les témoignages patristiques). Signalons en passant que l’auteur établit un parallélisme avec une autre mouvance qui prend sa source dans les mêmes années, le gnosticisme ; ceci offre un certain intérêt car les deux mouvances partent dans des directions qu’il présente comme radicalement opposées. L’apparition de l’islam tel qu’il se présente aujourd’hui s’explique de manière tout à fait cohérente dans le cadre de cette synthèse. À la suite de la rupture bien compréhensible avec les judéonazaréens, les nouveaux maîtres arabes du Proche-Orient ont été obligés d’inventer des références exclusivement arabes pour justifier leur pouvoir, explique l’auteur. Ceci rend compte en particulier d’une difficulté à laquelle tout islamologue est confronté, à savoir la question du polythéisme mecquois. Comment les Mecquois pouvaient-ils être convaincus par une Révélation qui leur aurait été impossible à comprendre ? Le détail du texte coranique ne s’accorde pas avec un tel présupposé. À supposer justement que Mahomet ait vécu à La Mecque avant que l’Hégire le conduise à Yathrib-Médine (en 622) : la convergence de nombreuses études, généralement récentes, oriente dans une autre direction. Le travail de recoupement et de recherche effectué par l’auteur débouche sur un tableau d’ensemble ; celui-ci fait saisir pourquoi la biographie du Prophète de l’Islam, telle qu’elle s’est élaborée et imposée deux siècles après sa mort, présente le contenu que nous lui connaissons. M.-Th. Urvoy
Christoph Luxenberg considère (…) que des pans entiers du Coran mecquois seraient un palimpseste d’hymnes chrétiennes. Avant lui, Günter Lüling avait tenté d’établir qu’une partie du Coran provenait d’hymnes chrétiennes répondant à une christologie angélique. Cela me paraît trop automatique et trop rapide. En revanche, Christoph Luxenberg m’a convaincu sur l’influence syriaque dans plusieurs passages du Coran, notamment dans la sourate 100 dans laquelle il voit une réécriture de la première épître de saint Pierre (5,8-9). On reconnaît dans le Coran des traces évidentes de syriaque. À commencer par le mot Qur’an qui, en syriaque, signifie «recueil» ou «lectionnaire». Cette influence me semble fondamentale. D’autre part, Angelika Neuwirth [NDLR spécialiste du Coran, université de Berlin] a bien souligné la forme liturgique du Coran. Et des chercheurs allemands juifs ont noté une ressemblance forte entre le Coran mecquois et les psaumes bibliques. Serait-il un lectionnaire, ou contiendrait-il les éléments d’un lectionnaire? Je suis enclin à le penser. Sans l’influence syriaque comment comprendre que le Coran ait pu reprendre le thème des sept dormants d’Éphèse qui sont d’origine chrétienne? De plus, la christologie du Coran est influencée par le Diatessaron de Tatien et par certains évangiles apocryphes. On peut penser que le groupe dans lequel le Coran primitif a vu le jour était l’un des rejetons de groupes judéo-chrétiens attachés à une christologie pré-nicéenne, avec aussi quelques accents manichéens. Claude Gilliot
Il est vrai que le mouvement national arabe n’a aucun contenu positif. Les dirigeants du mouvement sont tout à fait indifférents au bien-être de la population et à la fourniture de leurs besoins essentiels. Ils n’aident pas  le fellah ; au contraire, les dirigeants sucent son sang et l’exploitent la prise de conscience populaire pour en tirer un avantage. Mais nous faisons une erreur si nous mesurons les arabes [palestiniens] et leur mouvement à l’aune de nos normes. Chaque peuple est digne de son mouvement national. La caractéristique évidente d’un mouvement politique, c’est qu’il sait mobiliser les masses. Il n’y a aucun doute que nous sommes confrontés à un mouvement politique, et nous ne devrions pas sous-estimer ce potentiel. (…) Un mouvement national mobilise les masses, et c’est la chose principale. Les Arabes [palestiniens] ne sont pas un parti de renouveau et leur valeur morale est douteuse. Mais dans un sens politique, c’est un mouvement national. David Ben Gourion (premier Premier ministre israélien)
La grande majorité des fellahs ne tirent pas leur origine des envahisseurs arabes, mais d’avant cela, des fellahs juifs qui étaient la majorité constitutive du pays. Yitzhak Ben Zvi (second président de l’Etat d’Israël, 1929)
La grande majorité et les principales structures de la Falahin musulmane dans l’Ouest Eretz Israël nous présentent un brin racial et une unité d’ensemble ethnique, et il n’y a aucun doute que beaucoup de sang juif coule dans leurs veines, le sang de ces agriculteurs Juifs, « profanes »,  qui pris dans la folie de l’époque ont choisi d’abandonner leur foi afin de rester sur leurs terres. David Ben Gourion et Ytzhak Ben Zvi
Une très vaste étude anthropologique, diverses études génétiques, une recherche démographique historique et une enquête historique et géographique (…) renforcent une œuvre antérieure de David Ben-Gurion (le premier premier ministre d’Israël) et d’autres, dans leurs conclusions très surprenantes : une vaste majorité de Palestiniens (80-90 %) sont les descendants du peuple d’Israël qui sont restés dans le pays après la destruction du Second Temple juif. Les ancêtres de la plupart des Palestiniens ont été contraints de se convertir à l’Islam. L’Engagement
Oui, ils sont tous d’ascendance juive. Et comme ils n’avaient pas le choix, ils se sont convertis à l’Islam. Vous savez, cela date de plusieurs siècles; ce n’est pas récent, c’est rien de nouveau. Par exemple, nous n’allumions pas de feu le jour du Sabbat. Ma mère et ma grand-mère, je me rappelle, quand j’étais enfant. Elles avaient un bain spécial (mikveh). Bédouin
Cela semble très certainement surréaliste, parce qu’extrêmement révolutionnaire de dire aux gens que leurs pires ennemis sont actuellement leurs frères. Donc, il n’y a pas le choix. Ce travail surréaliste doit être fait tout comme le sionisme qui paraissait à ses débuts surréaliste. Tsvi Misinai
Il devient clair qu’une part significative des Arabes en Israël sont actuellement descendants des juifs qui ont été forcés de se convertir à l’Islam au fil des siècles. Il y a des études qui indiquent que 85% de ce groupe sont d’origine juive. Certains prétendent que ce pourcentage est moins élevé. Rabbin Dov Stein (Secrétaire du nouveau Sanhédrin)
Quand un Empire conquiert un pays, il exile l’élite et laisse les classes populaires et c’est ce qui est arrivé après la destruction du Premier comme du Second Temple. Ben Gurion disait avec le zèle qu’on lui connait: beaucoup de sang juif coule dans les veines de ces fermiers. Ils aimaient tant Israël qu’ils ont abandonné leur religion mais seulement parce qu’il leur fallut choisir entre la religion et la terre et ils firent le choix de la terre. Elon Jarden (bibliste israélien)
Nous avons constaté que bien que les Juifs ont été dispersés partout dans le monde pendant deux mille ans, ils ont maintenu toujours continuité génétique au cours des âges. Et une autre chose qui nous a surpris aussi était la proximité élevée des Arabes vivant dans les terres — les Palestiniens. (…) Le même chromosome peut apparaître dans les Juifs ashkénazes et les Palestiniens. (…) Il est clair que nous sommes tous de la même famille, mais malheureusement, les familles ont aussi leurs conflits; ce n’est pas rare que des frères et soeurs se battent entre eux. Professeur Ariella Oppenheim (Université hébraïque)
Souvenons-nous que les tribus d’Arabie étaient chrétiennes. Les meilleurs poètes et écrivains étaient chrétiens, tout comme nombre de guerriers et de philosophes (…) Ce sont eux qui portaient la bannière du panarabisme. La première université palestinienne a été créée par des chrétiens. Abd Al-Nasser Al-Najjar (Al-Ayyam)
La paix véritable, globale et durable viendra le jour où les voisins d’Israël reconnaîtront que le peuple juif se trouve sur cette terre de droit, et non de facto. (…) Tout lie Israël à cette région: la géographie, l’histoire, la culture mais aussi la religion et la langue. La religion juive est la référence théologique première et le fondement même de l’islam et de la chrétienté orientale. L’hébreu et l’arabe sont aussi proches que le sont en Europe deux langues d’origine latine. L’apport de la civilisation hébraïque sur les peuples de cette région est indéniable. Prétendre que ce pays est occidental équivaut à délégitimer son existence; le salut d’Israël ne peut venir de son déracinement. Le Moyen-Orient est le seul « club » régional auquel l’Etat hébreu est susceptible d’adhérer. Soutenir cette adhésion revient à se rapprocher des éléments les plus modérés parmi son voisinage arabe, et en premier lieu: des minorités. Rejeter cette option, c’est s’isoler et disparaître. Israël n’a pas le choix. Masri Feki
Si l’intervention militaire en Irak et le renversement du régime chauviniste de Saddam Hussein a apporté un quelconque résultat positif, hormis le déclenchement timide d’un processus politique démocratique, c’est sans doute le dévoilement de la grande diversité confessionnelle, ethnique et culturelle du Moyen-Orient qui demeure une réalité résiliente. (…) En réalité, les Egyptiens ne sont pas plus Arabes que ne sont Espagnols les Mexicains et les Péruviens. Ce qui fonde la nation, c’est la référence à une entité géographique, le partage de mêmes valeurs, une communauté de convenances politiques, d’idées, d’intérêts, d’affections, de souvenirs et de rêves communs. A contre-courant de toutes les expériences nationalistes venant couronner des faits nationaux, objectifs et observables, le nationalisme panarabe est plus le créateur que la création de la nation arabe. Sa conception arbitraire de la nation qui veut que l’on soit Arabe malgré soi, pour la simple raison que l’on fait usage de la langue arabe met à l’écart d’importants récits historiques et de légitimes revendications nationales. Masri Feki
Comme le génocide des Arméniens qui l’a précédé et le génocide des Cambodgiens qui lui a succédé, et comme tant d’autres persécutions de tant d’autres peuples, les leçons de l’Holocauste ne doivent jamais être oubliées. Ronald Reagan (22 avril 1981)
Aujourd’hui, je devrais le nommer « génocide arménien » ». « Je crois que nous – le gouvernement des Etats-Unis – devons à nos concitoyens une discussion honnête et sans détours sur ce problème. Je vous le dis en tant que personne qui a étudié le sujet – je n’ai aucun doute sur ce qui est arrivé. » « Je crois qu’il est malvenu pour nous, les Américains, de jouer avec les mots dans ce cas « . « Je crois qu’il nous faut dire les choses telles qu’elles sont. John Evans (Ambassadeur des Etats-Unis en Arménie, Berkeley, 19.02. 2005)
Aujourd’hui, nous commémorons le Meds Yeghern et honorons la mémoire de ceux qui ont souffert de l’une des pires atrocités de masse du 20e siècle. À partir de 1915, un million et demi d’Arméniens ont été déportés, massacrés ou condamnés à mort au cours des dernières années de l’Empire ottoman. En ce jour de commémoration, nous nous associons une nouvelle fois à la communauté arménienne d’Amérique et du monde entier pour porter le deuil des nombreuses vies perdues. En cette journée, nous honorons et reconnaissons également le travail de ceux qui ont essayé de mettre fin à la violence, ainsi que ceux qui ont cherché à garantir que de telles atrocités ne se reproduisent plus, à l’instar du militant des droits de l’homme et avocat, Raphael Lemkin. Nous rappelons les contributions d’Américains généreux qui ont aidé à sauver des vies et à reconstruire les communautés arméniennes. En honorant la mémoire de ceux qui ont souffert, nous nous inspirons également du courage et de la résilience du peuple arménien qui, face à une terrible adversité, a construit des communautés dynamiques dans le monde entier, y compris aux États-Unis. Nous nous engageons à tirer les leçons des tragédies du passé pour ne pas les répéter. Nous nous félicitons des efforts des Arméniens et des Turcs pour reconnaître et tenir compte de leur histoire douloureuse. Et nous nous associons au peuple arménien pour rappeler les vies perdues pendant le Meds Yeghern et réaffirmons notre engagement en faveur d’un monde plus pacifique. Donald Trump (24.04.2019)
Israël a toujours refusé de reconnaître les événements d’Arménie comme un génocide. Cette décision est moins une tentative de revendication du monopole de la souffrance (ou une volonté de présenter la Shoah comme un événement historique sans précédent) qu’une basse manœuvre politique des plus cyniques. Pendant bien des années, Israël a refusé de reconnaître ce génocide de peur de s’attirer les foudres de la Turquie. Depuis la fin des années 1950, Ankara était devenu un allié stratégique particulièrement solide de l’État hébreu –l’un de ses seuls amis dans le monde musulman. Les milieux du renseignement et de la sécurité intérieure des deux pays entretenaient des liens étroits; la Turquie constituait par ailleurs l’un des principaux clients de l’industrie de l’armement israélienne. À chaque fois qu’une personne israélienne (qu’elle soit députée, militante des droits humains ou historienne) plaidait pour une reconnaissance du génocide arménien, le pouvoir tuait l’initiative dans l’œuf. Plusieurs gouvernements successifs (quelle que soit leur idéologie et leur orientation politique) ont tout fait pour préserver cette bonne entente avec la Turquie (et les contrats de vente d’armes), préférant leur intérêt économique aux valeurs universelles. Lorsqu’ils évoquaient les événements, ils ne parlaient donc pas de «génocide», mais de «tragédie». Au fil de la dernière décennie, les relations entre Israël et la Turquie de Recep Tayyip Erdoğan se sont toutefois refroidies. Les contrats d’armement ne sont plus à l’ordre du jour et la coopération clandestine des deux services de renseignement contre l’ennemi commun (la Syrie) a été interrompue. Les relations turco-israéliennes sont aujourd’hui au plus bas: le Premier ministre Benyamin Netanyahou et son fils Yair invectivent Erdoğan sur Twitter et ce dernier le leur rend bien (ils se traitent mutuellement de «tyran» et de «meurtrier», entre autres noms d’oiseaux). Et pourtant, Israël n’en démord pas: il refuse de reconnaître le génocide arménien. Il invoque désormais une nouvelle excuse: l’Azerbaïdjan, qui a perdu une grande partie de son territoire au profit de l’Arménie entre 1991 et 1994. Ce pays musulman à majorité chiite s’est tourné vers Israël pour moderniser ses équipements militaires et l’État hébreu s’est empressé d’accepter de lui vendre son matériel dernier cri: non seulement l’Azerbaïdjan représentait un nouveau marché particulièrement prometteur, mais il se trouvait aux portes de l’Iran –l’ennemi juré d’Israël. Cette relation nouvelle a d’abord été tenue secrète; les censeurs militaires israéliens ont imposé un blackout médiatique total aux journalistes locaux. Le secret a finalement été éventé par le président azerbaïdjanais Ilham Aliyev (qui est la cible de nombreuses critiques; on l’accuse notamment de corruption, d’abus de pouvoir et de violations des droits humains). C’est lors d’une conférence de presse, en décembre 2016, pendant une visite officielle de Netanyahou, qu’il a annoncé que l’Azerbaïdjan achetait pour cinq milliards de dollars d’armements israéliens. Pour Israël, ce pays occupe désormais peu ou prou la place qu’occupait autrefois la Turquie: un marché lucratif, ouvert à leurs équipements. (…) En échange, l’Azerbaïdjan vend du pétrole à Israël et permet aux services de renseignement israéliens de lancer des opérations contre l’Iran depuis son territoire. Netanyahou, qui a été réélu ce mois-ci pour un cinquième mandat de Premier ministre, craint qu’une reconnaissance du génocide arménien ne compromette la manne du marché azerbaïdjanais; Aliyev, qui s’entend à merveille avec Erdogan, pourrait en outre décider de fermer les portes de son pays au renseignement israélien. Yossi Melman
Mon cœur est brisé par la Nouvelle-Zélande et la communauté musulmane mondiale. Nous devons continuer à lutter contre la perpétuation et la normalisation de l’islamophobie et du racisme sous toutes ses formes. Hillary Clinton
En cette semaine sainte pour de nombreuses religions, nous devons rester unis contre la haine et la violence. Je prie pour toutes les personnes touchées par ces terribles attaques contre les fidèles et les voyageurs de Pâques au Sri Lanka. Hillary Clinton
Michelle et moi-même adressons nos condoléances au peuple néo-zélandais. Nous sommes profondément bouleversés par vous et par la communauté islamique dans son ensemble. Nous devons tous rester contre la haine sous toutes ses formes. Barack Hussein Obama
Les attaques contre les touristes et les fidèles de Pâques sont des attaques contre l’humanité. En cette journée consacrée à l’amour, à la rédemption et au renouveau, nous prions pour les victimes et restons avec le peuple du Sri Lanka. Barack Hussein Obama
The acts of violence against churches and hotels in Sri Lanka are truly appalling, and my sympathies go out to all of those affected at this tragic time. Theresa May
It remains unclear who carried out the attacks. The BBC
Sri Lanka church bombings stoke far-Right anger in the West (…) far-Right groups began to describe the attacks in specifically religious terms. To some, it was further proof that Christians in many parts of the world are under attack. The Washington Post
Islamist terrorists, bombs strapped to their backs, had gone into churches on the holiest day in the Christian calendar with the express purpose of murdering as many innocents as possible. There was also carnage at hotels popular with Western tourists. “It remains unclear who carried out the attacks,” the BBC website was still insisting 12 hours after the massacres. We knew. And they knew. But if you stayed tuned to the news all day, you would not hear the word “terrorist” and certainly not the most inflammatory term of all: “Christian”. The contrast with the reporting of the mosque shootings in New Zealand could not have been more striking. Back in March, there was no doubt that the massacres in Christchurch, by a lone gunman during Friday prayers, were motivated by hatred of Muslims. One evil man’s actions were swiftly used to extrapolate an entire theory of racism on the Right. Journalists like me, who had dared to criticise the burka, or the grievous failure of integration (finally admitted by Tony Blair this week, I see), were said by Leftists to be guilty of Islamophobia and therefore “implicated” in the murder of 50 men, women and children. When it’s the other way around, though, the denial is deafening. Theresa May tweeted, “The acts of violence against churches and hotels in Sri Lanka are truly appalling, and my sympathies go out to all of those affected at this tragic time.” But they weren’t acts of violence against buildings, were theyPrime Minister? If you detonate a bomb inside a church on Easter Sunday, the result does tend to be that you kill an awful lot of followers of Jesus Christ. When a vicar’s daughter decides that it’s wiser not to mention the C-word, you know that fear is now greater than faith. Compare and contrast the reaction of Hillary Clinton to the two tragedies. On Sunday, she tweeted, “I’m praying for everyone affected by today’s horrific attacks on Easter worshippers and travellers in Sri Lanka.” Easter worshippers? That’s a clunking new euphemism for Christians. When the mosques in Christchurch were targeted, did Clinton talk of Ramadan worshippers? No, she wrote, “My heart breaks for New Zealand and the global Muslim community.” I’m afraid that politicians like Clinton and May are paralysed by a terrible dilemma. It’s too scary to admit that militant Islamists are at war with Christianity and Western civilization, that vandalism of churches is rife across Europe and that, according to the Pew Report, Christianity is the world’s most persecuted religion. In order to cover up this inconvenient truth, politicians and the police increasingly try to create a false equivalence between terrorism committed by the far-Right and by Islamists. It’s a downright lie. In the UK alone, intelligence officers have identified 23,000 jihadist extremists, at least 3,000 of whom are believed to pose an active threat. Scores of foul fiends must have plotted and carried out the Sri Lankan attacks. This is deeply uncomfortable for the liberal media, which responds with shifty obfuscation. On Monday, The Washington Post ran a bizarre story about the Easter Sunday massacre with the headline, “Sri Lanka church bombings stoke far-Right anger in the West”. That was wildly premature, but it inadvertently revealed their overwhelming concern: not that so many had been slaughtered, but that such horrors would provoke a backlash against Muslims. The Post continued, “far-Right groups began to describe the attacks in specifically religious terms”. Possibly not unrelated to the fact that the Sri Lankan authorities had just blamed a militant Islamist group. “To some”, the paper opined gingerly, “it was further proof that Christians in many parts of the world are under attack.” Well, yes, the cold-blooded murder of more than 290 people, most of them Christians in their place of worship, does tend to give credence to the theory that a certain religion is “under attack”. Sorry. You know, we had been thinking of taking a holiday this Easter in Sri Lanka because so many friends, some of them Sri Lankans, had urged us to go. We could easily have been the Nicholsons. Mum, Anita with her adorable son and daughter, Alex and Annabel, having breakfast in their Colombo hotel while dad, Ben, popped up to the room, or back to the buffet. A beautiful family wiped out in a split second, leaving him to wonder why he was spared. In that same restaurant, Anne Storm Pedersen, the wife of Danish billionaire, Anders Holch Povlsen, cried out for people to pray for three of her four children who had just been murdered. The mind melts at the thought of such intolerable suffering. Allison Pearson
Après les terribles série d’attentats à la bombe dimanche de Pâques (21), au Sri Lanka, qui compte déjà 310 morts et plus de 500 blessés, des représentants de l’aile démocratique des Etats-Unis ont décidé de se prononcer sur le fait, mais sans reconnaître les véritables motivations et la cible du massacre: l’église persécutée. Alors que le terme « islamophobie » a été repris après une attaque contre une mosquée à Christchurch (Nouvelle-Zélande) en mars dernier, les principaux médias et les représentants démocrates refusent également de parler de « cristophobie ». (…) S’agissant du massacre au Sri Lanka, Hillary Clinton et l’ancien président des États-Unis, Barack Obama, ont refusé de reconnaître que parmi les principales victimes de ces attaques, il y avait des chrétiens. Tous deux ont préféré appeler ces gens « des fidèles de Pâques ». Les mêmes personnalités qui avaient omis d’utiliser le terme « chrétiens » dans leurs déclarations pour le remplacer par « adorateurs de Pâques » n’ont pas hésité à déplorer les violences à l’encontre de la « communauté islamique » après l’attaque de la mosquée Christchurch en Nouvelle-Zélande. Selon le chroniqueur Rodrigo Constantino, cette disparité dans les commentaires des démocrates américains est due à une vision dans laquelle les chrétiens ne peuvent être considérés comme victimes de rien. Ichrétien
Israël a hypnotisé le monde. Ilhan Omar (2012)
It’s all about the Benjamins baby. Puff Daddy (billets de cent dollars à l’effigie de Benjamin Franklin, retweeté par Ilhan Omar pour désigner AIPAC, le lobby pro-israélien aux États-Unis)
L’antisémitisme est réel et je suis reconnaissante à mes alliés et collègues juifs qui me donnent une leçon sur cette histoire douloureuse de rhétorique antisémite. Mon intention n’était pas d’offenser mes administrés ou les juifs américains. Il faut toujours être prêt à reculer et à réfléchir aux critiques, comme j’attends des gens qu’ils m’écoutent quand on m’attaque à cause de mon identité. (…) le rôle problématique des lobbyistes dans notre système politique, que ce soit l’AIPAC, la NRA ou l’industrie des énergies fossiles. Ça dure depuis trop longtemps et on doit être prêt à le régler. Ilhan Omar
CAIR a été créé après le 11 septembre 2001, parce qu’ils ont reconnu que certaines personnes avaient fait quelque chose et que nous commencions tous à perdre la jouissance de nos libertés civiles. Ilhan Omar
As I grew older, I learned that the fair-skinned, blue-eyed depiction of Jesus has for centuries adorned stained glass windows and altars in churches throughout the United States and Europe. But Jesus, born in Bethlehem, was most likely a Palestinian man with dark skin. (…) I am also interested in how white Christians feel about images of Christ. How do you feel about the possibility that Christ may not have looked the way he has been portrayed for centuries in the United States and Europe? If you’ve seen Christ depicted as a man of color, what was your reaction? Eric V Copage
Don’t they know we’re Christian too? Do they even consider us human? Don’t they know Jesus was a Palestinian? Omar Suleiman (Southern Methodist University, retweeted by Ihlan Omar)
I am amazed that the author of this article cannot simply state that Jesus was a Jew. He uses the anachronistic term ‘Palestinian.’ During Jesus’ lifetime the Romans called the province which they controlled ‘Judea.’ Later they renamed it ‘Syria Palestina.’ Referring to Jesus as ‘Palestinian’ is simply misleading in the context of his era. Jewish Times reader
The claim that Jesus was a Palestinian is so bizarre that the question becomes what one gains by making that allegation. For people who have no theological or historical rooting, the idea that Jesus was a Palestinian creates a new narrative for Palestinian history, which otherwise does not date back very far. If one can say that Jesus was Palestinian 2,000 years ago, then that means the Jews are occupying Palestinian land. For people who don’t like Jews to begin with, it is a deadly combination of the Jews killed Jesus and now they are doing the same to his progeny. From a political and propaganda point of view, there is something to be gained. The myth that Jesus was a Palestinian dates back to the days of Yasser Arafat, when his trusted Christian-Palestinian adviser Hanan Ashrawi made the claim. Since then, the idea resurfaces now and again. The absurdity of it is breathtaking. Jesus was born in Bethlehem, think about who his parents were – his mother, Mary, was betrothed to Joseph, a carpenter. In the Gospels, there is no mention of Palestine, only Judea, which is where Jews lived. If the Palestinians admit that Jesus was a Jew, then the idea that the Jews only arrived in Israel in 1948 and occupied Palestinian indigenous land becomes an absurdity. Omar knows this narrative is false but also that it has an inherent power to it. The ‘Benjamins,’ the big lie of dual loyalty, Jesus is a Palestinian – it is all rewriting history to plant in people’s minds that the Palestinian people go back thousands of years. She is a very clear person. Ilhan Omar is a clever antisemite, so truth does not play much of a role anyway. When an elected member of the US Congress retweets such a thing, that takes things to the next level. (…) I’m surprised The New York Times allowed Copage to publish an op-ed with such a line, and expected such information only to be shared on platforms like Facebook and Twitter, where users can get away with much more before it is identified – if it is ever identified – as fake news. The solution: education. It is extremely important for world Jewry and Jewish families to teach their own and go over our amazing love affair between the people and her land that stands for more than 3,000 years, it is the responsibility of educated Jews and Christians to counter such falsehoods. Rabbi Abraham Cooper (Simon Wiesenthal Center)
Au début du 20e siècle, les Arabes de la région ne se définissaient pas comme des Palestiniens. « Falastin » en arabe désignait alors la région du mandat britannique sur la Palestine, qui était habitée par des Arabes palestiniens, et des Juifs palestiniens… Le journal juif « Jerusalem Post » s’appelait alors « Palestine Post ». Dans les années 1960, soit dix-huit siècles après la popularisation du terme Palestine par les Romains, tandis que les Juifs de Palestine étaient devenus des Israéliens, les Arabes de Palestine adoptèrent le terme de Palestiniens. L’étymologie fournie par France-Soir est trompeuse puisqu’elle implique que « Palestine » soit un mot arabe, et par extension que la région ait été arabe avant même la présence des Romains. Il n’en est rien et c’est le mot latin « Palaestina » qui a été transcrit en arabe par « Falastin », pas l’inverse. L’arabe ne connaissant pas le son « P », la transcription depuis le latin l’a transformé en « F » – qui est un son proche (en hébreu, une seule lettre est d’ailleurs utilisée pour les deux sons avec une simple ponctuation pour les différencier). L’article raille ceux qui mettent en doute la légitimité historique de la « Palestine » comme entité arabe en se basant sur l’étymologie du mot. Mais une fois démontrée, la falsification de l’histoire nécessaire à l’invalidation de ce point de vue semble bien atteindre l’effet inverse… D’autant que, juste derrière la phrase en question, l’article contient un deuxième passage tout aussi aberrant. Un internaute a fait remarquer, non sans ironie, qu’aucune lettre de l’hébreu ne pouvait retranscrire le son “j”. En conséquence, Jérusalem (qui se prononce “Yerushalayim”) ne se trouve pas en Israël. C’est évidemment le nom original hébreu « Yerushalayim » qui a été transcrit en français par « Jérusalem »; le « J » du français est une adaptation issue de l’hébreu. Le grec « Hierosólyma » avait gardé la trace de la prononciation hébraïque, tout comme l’allemand qui l’écrit « Jerusalem » comme en français mais où le « J » se prononce « I ». Dire que Jérusalem ne se trouve pas en Israël est par ailleurs faux quelle que soit la justification (au minimum, tout le monde hormis les haïsseurs d’Israël reconnaît que la partie occidentale de la ville est israélienne)… Infoequitable
En 2014, des chercheurs, faisant parti d’une expédition franco-saoudienne étudiant des inscriptions sur les roches, du sud de l’Arabie saoudite, ont annoncé avoir découvert ce qui pourraient bien être les textes les plus anciens écrits en alphabet arabe. Or cette découverte est restée très confidentielle. Sans doute parce que ce que révèle le contenu des textes est quelque peu embarrassant pour certains. (…) Quelques médias dont les médias français et arabes en ont parlé, qualifiant le texte de «chaînon manquant» entre l’arabe et les alphabets antérieurs utilisés dans la région, comme le Nabatéen. La plupart des articles étaient accompagnés de photos d’autres sites archéologiques ou inscriptions anciennes. En effet, il est presque impossible de trouver une photo de cette inscription là en ligne. Impossible aussi de trouver une quelconque référence au contenu réel du texte. Ce n’est qu’en explorant le rapport de 100 pages qui rend compte des travaux de cette saison archéologique, publié en décembre par l’Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres – qui d’ailleurs soutient ces recherches, – qu’il est possible de trouver une référence à cette découverte et d’en savoir plus. Selon le rapport, le texte arabe, griffonné sur une grosse pierre rectangulaire, se résume simplement à un nom, “Thawban (fils de) Malik”, suivi d’une date Décevant? Eh bien non. Car l’inscription est aussi précédée d’une grande croix, indubitablement chrétienne. Une autre croix identique apparaît sur l’autre stèle, qui date plus ou moins de la même période. Les sentiments des fonctionnaires saoudiens, confrontés à une découverte importante pour leur patrimoine sont mitigés et traduisent leur embarras. D’où la communication si discrète autour de cette découverte. Que l’origine de l’alphabet utilisé pour écrire leur livre sacré soit liée à un chrétien, quelque 150 ans avant l’Islam, les embarrasse. Plus consternant encore pour eux, est de devoir admettre que ces textes sont non seulement un patrimoine hérité d’une communauté chrétienne autrefois importante, mais qu’ils sont également liés à l’histoire d’une ancienne royauté juive, qui régnait autrefois sur une grande partie de ce qu’est aujourd’hui le Yémen et l’Arabie Saoudite. Le Coran et la tradition musulmane tardive ne nient pas la présence de communautés juives et chrétiennes à travers la péninsule, à l’époque de Mahomet. Mais l’image générale de l’Arabie préislamique qu’ils convoquent, est celle du chaos et de l’anarchie. La région est décrite comme ayant été dominée par jahilliyah – l’ignorance – l’anarchie, l’analphabétisme et des cultes païens barbares. Les décennies précédant le début du calendrier islamique, qui débute à la “hijra” de Mahomet, c’est-à-dire sa migration de La Mecque vers Médine, en 622, ont été marquées par un affaiblissement des sociétés et des Etats centralisés, en Europe et au Moyen-Orient. Et ce, en partie à cause de la peste, les pandémies et la guerre incessante entre les empires byzantin et perse. La sombre représentation que la tradition fait de l’Arabie pré-islamique est moins une description précise, qu’une métaphore littéraire, dont le but est de souligner la puissance unificatrice et éclairante du message de Mahomet. Le réexamen d’œuvres de l’époque, tant par des chercheurs musulmans que chrétiens, au cours de ces dernières années, ainsi que des découvertes comme celle-ci, en Arabie Saoudite, permet de se faire une image beaucoup plus élaborée et nuancée de la région avant la montée de l’Islam, et de redécouvrir son histoire riche et complexe. C’est le cas du royaume de Himyar, souvent oublié, qui est pourtant au cœur de l’une des périodes clés de l’Arabie. Établi vers le 2ème siècle EC, au 4ème siècle il s’était imposé comme une puissance régionale. Etabli là où se trouve aujourd’hui le Yémen, Himyar avait conquis les États voisins, y compris l’ancien royaume de Sheba (dont la légendaire reine est au centre d’une réunion biblique avec Salomon). Dans un récent article intitulé «Quelle sorte de judaïsme en Arabie?», Christian Robin, un historien français qui dirige également l’expédition à Bir Hima, révèlent que la plupart des érudits, s’entendent sur le fait que vers 380, les élites du royaume de Himyar s’était converti à une forme de judaïsme. Les dirigeants himyarites ont pu voir dans le judaïsme une force unificatrice potentielle pour leur nouvel empire, culturellement divers, et y ont trouvé de quoi se forger une identité fédératrice, leur permettant de résister contre le désir rampant d’hégémonie des chrétiens byzantins et éthiopiens, ainsi que de l’empire zoroastrien de Perse. (…) Pour ce qui est des premiers textes arabes découverts à Bir Hima, qui constituaient probablement un genre de monument commémoratif, l’équipe franco-saoudienne note que le nom de Thawban fils de Malik apparaît sur huit inscriptions, avec les noms d’autres chrétiens. Selon les chroniqueurs chrétiens, vers 470 (date de l’inscription Thawban), les chrétiens de la ville voisine de Najran auraient subi une vague de persécutions, perpétrée par des Himyarites. Les experts français soupçonnent Thawban et ses compagnons chrétiens d’avoir été martyrisés à cette occasion.  (…) En dépit de la domination chrétienne et musulmane, les Juifs ont continué à représenter une forte présence dans la péninsule arabique. Cela ressort clairement des relations de Mahomet (souvent conflictuelles) avec eux, mais aussi de l’influence du judaïsme sur les rituels et les interdits de la nouvelle religion (prières quotidiennes, circoncision, pureté rituelle, pèlerinage, charité, interdiction des images et de la consommation du porc). Ariel David
Selon les sources arabes, avant l’islam régnaient en Arabie anarchie, paganisme, obscurantisme et illetrisme, le tout résumé sous le terme de ‘jâhiliyya’(= ère de l’ignorance): cette présentation apologétique tendait à faire contraste avec la brillante civilisation islamique qui a suivi. De leur côté les sources externes faisaient état des principaux évènements militaires survenus dans la péninsule: conquêtes d’un roi de Babylone au nord (550 av JC); projet de conquête par Alexandre le grand (323 av JC); raid romain au Yémen (25 av JC); crise entre les royaumes de Yémen et d’Ethiopie (520 ap JC). Enfin les sources archéologiques, bien que nombreuses, restaient peu exploitées car leur datage imprécis rendait leur interprétation fragile.De très nombreuses découvertes sont venues depuis 1970 remettre en cause l’image traditionnelle de l’Arabie préislamique. Monnaies, monuments, gravures rupestres, archives, et surtout innombrables inscriptions de toutes sortes sont venues fournir du travail aux épigraphistes pour des décennies. Seule une partie de ces découvertes a déjà fait l’objet de publications, car les chercheurs compétents (un peu en Europe, un peu dans le royaume Saoudien, aucun aux USA) sont en nombre très insuffisant. Avant l’ère chrétienne, les écritures propres à la péninsule arabique dérivaient de l’ougaritique. Elles se caractérisaient par des lettres très géométriques et des mots séparés par des barres. (…) Très différente des précédentes, l’écriture araméenne se diffuse dans la péninsule Arabique au début de l’ère chrétienne. C’est une écriture beaucoup moins géométrique, sans voyelles, sans séparation entre les mots. Sa forme cursive est l’ancêtre de l’arabe, lui-même dérivé du nabatéen, une variété de l’araméen. La plus ancienne inscription en langue arabe (encore assez éloignée de sa forme actuelle)a pu être datée de 470 ap JC . C’est seulement depuis 1989, après un siècle de décantation (datation au carbone 14, traduction des inscriptions), qu’on est arrivé à faire une chronologie approximative de l’ensemble des civilisations de la péninsule Arabique. Certaines inscriptions portent des dates. Pour d’autres on se fonde sur le stade atteint dans l’évolution de l’écriture. Par ailleurs certains souverains cités, aux noms caractéristiques, sont aussi mentionnés dans les archives assyriennes, ce qui permet de dater avec sûreté les inscriptions. Enfin des inscriptions se réfèrent à des événements que l’on peut dater. (…) Situé au SO de la péninsule arabique, le Yémen en constitue la partie fertile, en raison de son altitude (moyenne 2000 m) et de son régime de pluies de mousson. Divisé en 3 ou 4 royaumes dans l’Antiquité, il a été totalement unifié vers 300 sous le nom de royaume de Himyar (capitale Zafâr). A la suite des campagnes des princes Yaz’anides (320-360), il s’est soumis durablement toute la péninsule arabique. Sa religion dominante est devenue le judéo-monothéisme vers 380. Contraint de se soumettre au royaume chrétien d’Aksûm (Ethiopie) vers 500, il a connu la révolte du roi juif Joseph en 522 et la persécution des chrétiens qui l’a accompagnée. Cette révolte a été matée par les Ethiopiens, qui ont installé le roi chrétien Abraha (535-565). En 570 le royaume de Himyar s’est soumis aux perses Sassanides et a disparu de l’Histoire. Le paganisme a laissé de nombreuses traces au Yémen (temples, inscriptions). Voici par exemple des images du temple considérable de Ma’arib, dans lequel on a trouvé plus de mille inscriptions très instructives. A noter que ce paganisme s’interdisait toute représentation divine sous forme humaine ou animale: le dieu était figuré par un trône vide, seule la représentation de ses messagers ailés étant admise.L’une des premières inscriptions monothéistes recensées (‘Avec l’aide d’Ilân, maître du Ciel’) date de 330 EC. Si en parallèle on relève les dates des dernières inscriptions trouvées dans les temples païens du Yémen, on arrive à la conclusion que presque tous ces temples ont été abandonnés au 3e siècle, les derniers et les plus grands l’ayant été à la fin du 4e siècle : la dernière inscription païenne date de 380 EC. (…) On a des preuves nombreuses de la présence juive en Arabie. Ainsi dans la nécropole juive de Bet She’arîm (découverte en Galilée à la fin des années 30, mais oubliée par la suite), on a trouvé un caveau réservé aux juifs Himyarites (ou Homérites). Par ailleurs sur le site de Hasî (près de Zafâr, au Yémen), on a trouvé la très belle inscription suivante: ‘Le prince a concédé au Seigneur du Ciel quatre parcelles, à côté de ce rocher, en descendant jusqu’à la clôture de la zone cultivée, pour y enterrer les juifs, avec l’assurance qu’on évitera d’y enterrer avec eux un non-juif ‘(‘rmy=araméen=païen). Voilà donc le témoignage explicite qu’une autorité (juive?) a accordé sa protection aux communautés juives et s’est senti une obligation de leur créer un cimetière réservé. Un grand nombre d’inscriptions sont dues aux rois de Himyar. (…) Les rois de Himyar utilisent toujours des formules monothéistes, sans que l’on puisse dire s’ils sont juifs ou non. En revanche les inscriptions rédigées par des particuliers présentent toute la gamme entre ce monothéisme neutre et un judaïsme affirmé. Comme aucune inscription ne mentionne une orientation religieuse différente, la société apparaît ainsi fortement judaïsée. Le judéomonothéisme de Himyar a une maison qui lui est consacrée en propre: le mikrâb. Elle sert au culte, à l’enseignement, et peut-être à l’hébergement des voyageurs. On trouve un mikrâb dans les cimetières juifs. Le nom de mikrâb n’est attesté dans les inscriptions que pendant la période judéomonothéiste. On a la certitude que le mikrâb est partagé entre les juifs fidèles de la Torah et les judéomonothéistes, considérés par les premiers comme des ‘craignant Dieu’. (…) Par le mikrâb, la communauté juive, sans doute minoritaire, était en relation étroite avec les monothéistes plus nombreux qui adhéraient aux principes de morale de la Torah, mais pas à l’ensemble de ses prescriptions. (…) Le judaïsme dans le nord-ouest de la péninsule arabique, attesté par des sources externes, a laissé lui aussi de nombreuses traces dans les inscriptions. Par exemple sur une stèle trouvée à Tayma, une grande oasis du nord de l’Arabie, l’inscription dit: ‘Ceci est le mémorial d’Isaïe, fils de Joseph, prince de Tayma, qu’ont érigé sur lui Amram et Rashim ses frères’. Le terme traduit par ‘prince’ désigne plus précisément le premier magistrat de la cité; il est utilisé dans ce sens sur une inscription du site voisin de Madâ’in Salih. Tous les noms étant juifs, on est assuré que le premier magistrat d’une grande oasis de l’Arabie du nord était juif en 203 EC. (…) Près de Tayma, on a trouvé une menorah avec les ustensiles caractéristiques du judaïsme qui l’accompagnaient. A Rome l’édit de tolérance de Milan est promulgué en 314, Constantin se fait baptiser en 337, son successeur Constance II devient le premier empereur chrétien, et le paganisme est interdit dans le monde romain vers 380. A Aksûm, le souverain éthiopien devient officiellement chrétien vers 360. Et à Himyar le roi se déclare juif vers 380. Cette suite de conversions montre que les royaumes d’Aksûm et d’Himyar évoluent à un rythme voisin de celui du monde méditerranéen. Circulations de personnes et échanges commerciaux font que les exigences spirituelles du monde romain touchent également les populations de l’Ethiopie et de la péninsule Arabique. Si l’on recense tous les mots religieux présents dans les inscriptions du Yémen, on trouve un grand nombre de fois ceux de ‘prière’ et d’aumône légale’. Deux des cinq piliers de l’islam étaient donc déjà fortement enracinés en Arabie quelque 250 ans avant la prédication de Mahomet. Le paganisme grossier accolé à la période préislamique ne correspond en rien à la réalité. Vers 500 le royaume de Himyar, qui domine toute l’Arabie, devient tributaire du royaume éthiopien d’Aksûm, lequel est chrétien. En 522 le roi himyarite Joseph que les Ethiopiens ont installé sur le trône se révolte et se déclare juif. Au cours de ses campagnes, il massacre les soutiens des Ethiopiens, qui sont le plus souvent chrétiens. La tradition a notamment retenu le martyre de la population chrétienne de Najrân. Mais Joseph est vaincu par les troupes Aksûmites en 525, et leur chef Abraha (531-570) impose la domination chrétienne sur toute l’Arabie. Les archives permettent de situer la plupart des sièges épiscopaux de cette époque, ainsi que la localisation de nombreuses églises. Les vestiges de plusieurs d’entre elles ont été mis au jour par les ar