Réseaux sociaux: Quand la vénalité défend la liberté (Shielded review: After allegations of special protection of popular far-right activists for their revenue, Facebook finally pulls the plug on anti-islam activist Tommy Robinson)

28 février, 2019

petition
breitbart04

La vertu même devient vice, étant mal appliquée, et le vice est parfois ennobli par l’action. Frère Laurent (Roméo et Juliette, Shakespeare)
Vous, les Blancs, vous entraînez vos filles à boire et à faire du sexe. Quand elles nous arrivent, elles sont parfaitement entraînées. Ahmed (violeur pakistanais)
By date of conviction, we have evidence of such exploitation taking place in Keighley (2005 and 2013), Blackpool (2006), Oldham (2007 and 2008), Blackburn (2007, 2008 and 2009), Sheffield (2008), Manchester (2008 and 2013) Skipton (2009), Rochdale (two cases in 2010, one in 2012 and another in 2013), Nelson (2010), Preston (2010) Rotherham (2010) Derby (2010), Telford (2012), Bradford (2012), Ipswich (2013), Birmingham (2013), Oxford (2013), Barking (2013) and Peterborough (2013). This is based on a trawl of news sources so is almost certainly incomplete. (…) Ceop data about the ethnicity of offenders and suspects identified by those 31 police forces in 2012 is incomplete. The unit says: “All ethnicities were represented in the sample. However, a disproportionate number of offenders were reported as Asian.” Of 52 groups where ethnicity data was provided, 26 (50 per cent) comprised all Asian offenders, 11 (21 per cent) were all white, 9 (17 per cent) groups had offenders from multiple ethnicities, 4 (8 per cent) were all black offenders and there were 2 (4 per cent) exclusively Arab groups. Of the 306 offenders whose ethnicity was noted, 75 per cent were categorised as Asian, 17 per cent white, and the remaining 8 per cent black (5 per cent) or Arab (3 per cent). By contrast, the seven “Type 2 groups” – paedophile rings rather than grooming gangs – “were reported as exclusively of white ethnicity”. Ceop identified 144 victims of the Type 1 groups. Again, the data was incomplete. Gender was mentioned in 118 cases. All were female. Some 97 per cent of victims were white. Girls aged between 14 and 15 accounted for 57 per cent of victims. Out of 144 girls, 100 had “at least one identifiable vulnerability” like alcohol or drug problems, mental health issues or a history of going missing. More than half of the victims were in local authority care. The 27 court cases that we found led to the convictions of 92 men. Some 79 (87 per cent) were reported as being of South Asian Muslim origin. Three were white Britons, two were Indian, three were Iraqi Kurds, four were eastern European Roma and one was a Congolese refugee, according to reports of the trials. Considerable caution is needed when looking at these numbers, as our sample is very unscientific. There are grooming cases we will have missed, and there will undoubtedly be offences that have not resulted in convictions. (…) Ceop says: “The comparative levels of freedom that white British children enjoy in comparison to some other ethnicities may make them more vulnerable to exploitation. “They may also be more likely to report abuse. This is an area requiring better data and further research.” Channel 4 news
By now surely everyone knows the case of the eight men convicted of picking vulnerable underage girls off the streets, then plying them with drink and drugs before having sex with them. A shocking story. But maybe you haven’t heard. Because these sex assaults did not take place in Rochdale, where a similar story led the news for days in May, but in Derby earlier this month. Fifteen girls aged 13 to 15, many of them in care, were preyed on by the men. And though they were not working as a gang, their methods were similar – often targeting children in care and luring them with, among other things, cuddly toys. But this time, of the eight predators, seven were white, not Asian. And the story made barely a ripple in the national media. Of the daily papers, only the Guardian and the Times reported it. There was no commentary anywhere on how these crimes shine a light on British culture, or how middle-aged white men have to confront the deep flaws in their religious and ethnic identity. Yet that’s exactly what played out following the conviction in May of the « Asian sex gang » in Rochdale, which made the front page of every national newspaper. Though analysis of the case focused on how big a factor was race, religion and culture, the unreported story is of how politicians and the media have created a new racial scapegoat. In fact, if anyone wants to study how racism begins, and creeps into the consciousness of an entire nation, they need look no further. (…) the intense interest in the Rochdale story arose from a January 2011 Times « scoop » that was based on the conviction of at most 50 British Pakistanis out of a total UK population of 1.2 million, just one in 24,000 (…) Even the Child Protection and Online Protection Centre (Ceop), which has also studied potential offenders who have not been convicted, has only identified 41 Asian gangs (of 230 in total) and 240 Asian individuals – and they are spread across the country. But, despite this, a new stereotype has taken hold: that a significant proportion of Asian men are groomers (and the rest of their communities know of it and keep silent). But if it really is an « Asian » thing, how come Indians don’t do it? If it’s a « Pakistani » thing, how come an Afghan was convicted in the Rochdale case? And if it’s a « Muslim » thing, how come it doesn’t seem to involve anyone of African or Middle Eastern origin? The standard response to anyone who questions this is: face the facts, all those convicted in Rochdale were Muslim. Well, if one case is enough to make such a generalisation, how about if all the members of a gang of armed robbers were white; or cybercriminals; or child traffickers? (All three of these have happened.) Would we be so keen to « face the facts » and make it a problem the whole white community has to deal with? Would we have articles examining what it is about Britishness or Christianity or Europeanness, that makes people so capable of such things? (…) Whatever the case, we know that abuse of white girls is not a cultural or religious issue because there is no longstanding history of it taking place in Asia or the Muslim world. How did middle-aged Asian men from tight-knit communities even come into contact with white teenage girls in Rochdale? The main cultural relevance in this story is that vulnerable, often disturbed, young girls, regularly out late at night, often end up in late-closing restaurants and minicab offices, staffed almost exclusively by men. After a while, relationships build up, with the men offering free lifts and/or food. For those with a predatory instinct, sexual exploitation is an easy next step. This is an issue of what men can do when away from their own families and in a position of power over badly damaged young people. It’s a story repeated across Britain, by white and other ethnic groups: where the opportunity arises, some men will take advantage. The precise method, and whether it’s an individual or group crime, depends on the particular setting – be they priests, youth workers or networks on the web. (…) if the tables were turned and the victims were Asian or Muslim, we would have been subjected to equally skewed « expert » commentary asking: what is wrong with how Muslims raise girls? Why are so many of them on the streets at night? Shouldn’t the community face up to its shocking moral breakdown? (…) We have been here before, of course: in the 1950s, West Indian men were labelled pimps, luring innocent young white girls into prostitution. By the 1970s and 80s they were vilified as muggers and looters. And two years ago, Channel 4 ran stories, again based on a tiny set of data, claiming there was an endemic culture of gang rape in black communities. The victims weren’t white, though, so media interest soon faded. It seems that these stories need to strike terror in the heart of white people for them to really take off. What is also at play here is the inability of people, when learning about a different culture or race, to distinguish between the aberrations of a tiny minority within that group, and the normal behaviour of a significant section. Some examples are small in number but can be the tip of a much wider problem: eg, knife crime, which is literally the sharp end of a host of problems affecting black communities ranging from family breakdown, to poverty, to low school achievement and social exclusion. Joseph Harker
There is a small minority of Pakistani men who believe that white girls are fair game. And we have to be prepared to say that. You can only start solving a problem if you acknowledge it first. This small minority who see women as second class citizens, and white women probably as third class citizens, are to be spoken out against. (…) These were grown men, some of them religious teachers or running businesses, with young families of their own. Whether or not these girls were easy prey, they knew it was wrong. (…) In mosque after mosque, this should be raised as an issue so that anybody remotely involved should start to feel that the community is turning on them. Communities have a responsibility to stand up and say, ‘This is wrong, this will not be tolerated’. (…) Cultural sensitivity should never be a bar to applying the law. (…) Failure to be “open and front-footed” would “create a gap for extremists to fill, a gap where hate can be peddled.  (…) Leadership is about moving people with you, not just pissing them off. Baroness Warsi
The terrible story of the Oxford child sex ring has brought shame not only on the city of dreaming spires, but also on the local Muslim community. It is a sense of repulsion and outrage that I feel particularly strongly, working as a Muslim leader and Imam in this neighbourhood and trying  to promote genuine  cultural integration. (…) But apart from its sheer depravity, what also depresses me about this case is the widespread refusal to face up to its hard realities. The fact is that the vicious activities of the Oxford ring are bound up with religion and race: religion, because all the perpetrators, though they had different nationalities, were Muslim; and race, because they deliberately targeted vulnerable white girls, whom they appeared to regard as ‘easy meat’, to use one of their revealing, racist phrases. Indeed, one of the victims who bravely gave evidence in court told a newspaper afterwards that ‘the men exclusively wanted white girls to abuse’. But as so often in fearful, politically correct modern Britain, there is a craven unwillingness to face up to this reality. Commentators and politicians tip-toe around it, hiding behind weasel words. We are told that child sex abuse happens ‘in all communities’, that white men are really far more likely to be abusers, as has been shown by the fall-out from the Jimmy Savile case. One particularly misguided commentary argued that the predators’ religion was an irrelevance, for what really mattered was that most of them worked in the night-time economy as taxi drivers, just as in the Rochdale child sex scandal many of the abusers worked in kebab houses, so they had far more opportunities to target vulnerable girls. But all this is deluded nonsense. While it is, of course, true that abuse happens in all communities, no amount of obfuscation can hide the pattern that has been exposed in a series of recent chilling scandals, from Rochdale to Oxford, and Telford to Derby. In all these incidents, the abusers were Muslim men, and their targets were under-age white girls. Moreover, reputable studies show that around 26 per cent of those involved in grooming and exploitation rings are Muslims, which is around five times higher than the proportion of Muslims in the adult male population. To pretend that this is not an issue for the Islamic community is to fall into a state of ideological denial. But then part of the reason this scandal happened at all is precisely because of such politically correct thinking. All the agencies of the state, including the police, the social services and the care system, seemed eager to ignore the sickening exploitation that was happening before their eyes. Terrified of accusations of racism, desperate not to undermine the official creed of cultural diversity, they took no action against obvious abuse. (…) Amazingly, the predators seem to have been allowed by local authority managers to come and go from care homes, picking their targets to ply them with drink and drugs before abusing them. You can be sure that if the situation had been reversed, with gangs of tough, young white men preying on vulnerable Muslim girls, the state’s agencies would have acted with greater alacrity. Another sign of the cowardly approach to these horrors is the constant reference to the criminals as ‘Asians’ rather than as ‘Muslims’. In this context, Asian is a completely meaningless term.  The men were not from China, or India or Sri Lanka or even Bangladesh. They were all from either Pakistan or Eritrea, which is, in fact, in East Africa rather than Asia. What united them in their outlook was their twisted, corrupt mindset, which bred their misogyny and racism. (…) In the misguided orthodoxy that now prevails in many mosques, including several of those in Oxford, men are unfortunately taught that women are second-class citizens, little more than chattels or possessions over whom they have absolute authority. That is why we see this growing, reprehensible fashion for segregation at Islamic events on university campuses, with female Muslim students pushed to the back of lecture halls. There was a telling incident in the trial when it was revealed that one of the thugs heated up some metal to brand a girl, as if she were a cow. ‘Now, if you have sex with someone else, he’ll know that you belong to me,’ said this criminal, highlighting an attitude where women are seen as nothing more than personal property. The view of some Islamic preachers towards white women can be appalling. They encourage their followers to believe that these women are habitually promiscuous, decadent and sleazy — sins which are made all the worse by the fact that they are kaffurs or non-believers. Their dress code, from mini-skirts to sleeveless tops, is deemed to reflect their impure and immoral outlook. According to this mentality, these white women deserve to be punished for their behaviour by being exploited and degraded. On one level, most imams in the UK are simply using their puritanical sermons to promote the wearing of the hijab and even the burka among their female adherents. But the dire result can be the brutish misogyny we see in the Oxford sex ring. (…) It is telling, though, that they never dared to target Muslim girls from the Oxford area. They knew that they would be sought out by the girls’ families and ostracised by their community. But preying on vulnerable white girls had no such consequences — once again revealing how intimately race and religion are bound up with this case. (…) Horror over this latest scandal should serve as a catalyst for a new approach, but change can take place only if we abandon the dangerous blinkers of political correctness and antiquated multiculturalism. Dr. Taj Hargey (Imam of the Oxford Islamic Congregation)
Je respecte le droit de chacun à la liberté d’expression. C’est l’un des droits les plus importants que nous avons. Avec ces droits viennent des responsabilités –la responsabilité d’exercer sa liberté de parole dans le cadre de la loi. Je ne suis pas sûr que vous mesurez les conséquences potentielles de ce que vous avez fait. Juge
Cela n’a rien à voir avec la liberté de parole, ou de la presse, ni à propos de la légitimité du journalisme ou le politiquement correct. C’est une question de justice, et d’assurer qu’un procès peut avoir lieu de manière juste et impartiale […] Il s’agit de préserver l’intégrité du jury, qu’il continue [à siéger] sans que les gens soient intimidés ou affectés par des «reportages» – si on peut les qualifier de tels – irresponsables et faux. Juge
Il s’agit de justice, de faire en sorte qu’un procès puisse être mené avec justice et équité […], d’être innocent jusqu’à preuve du contraire. Juge
This contempt hearing is not about free speech. This is not about the freedom of the press. This is not about legitimate journalism; this is not about political correctness; this is not about whether one political viewpoint is right or another. It is about justice, and it is about ensuring that a trial can be carried out justly and fairly. It is about ensuring that a jury are not in any way inhibited from carrying out their important function. It is about being innocent until proven guilty. It is not about people prejudging a situation and going round to that court and publishing material, whether in print or online, referring to defendants as ‘Muslim pedophile rapists.’ In short, Mr. Yaxley-Lennon, turn up at another court, refer to people as ‘Muslim pedophiles, Muslim rapists’ and so on and so forth while trials are ongoing and before there has been a finding by a jury that that is what they are, and you will find yourself inside. Do you understand? Judge Norton
No one could possibly conclude that it would be anything other than highly prejudicial to the defendants in the trial. I respect everyone’s right to free speech. That’s one of the most important rights that we have. With those rights come responsibilities. The responsibility to exercise that freedom of speech within the law. I am not sure you appreciate the potential consequence of what you have done. You have to understand we are not preventing publication. We are postponing publication to ensure that the trial is fair. When people are convicted and given long sentences, it is on a proper basis and not a conviction that can be overturned. It is a serious feature that you were encouraging others to share what you were streaming live on social media. Judge
In May, Tommy Robinson was jailed over comments which had the potential to cause a retrial at Leeds Crown Court – and we can now reveal the details of the case he was protesting about. Robinson, whose real name is Stephen Christopher Yaxley-Lennon, streamed an hour-long Facebook Live outside the court in May and within hours it had been watched more than 250,000 times. A judge who locked the far right activist up for 13 months for contempt of court told him his actions could have caused a long-running trial to be retried which would cost taxpayers ‘hundreds and hundreds of thousands of pounds’. A court order was put in place temporarily banning any reporting on Robinson’s arrest and sentencing hearing, but LeedsLive challenged the order and were able to report it a few days later. Now we can reveal the long-running trial he could have put in jeopardy involved a Huddersfield grooming gang who were jailed on October 19 for more than 200 years for the grooming and sexual abuse of young children. The abuse of the vulnerable, isolated and underage girls – the youngest of whom was 11 or 12 – was described by a judge as ‘top of the scale’. A total of 20 men, ranging in age from 27 to 54, were convicted as part of Operation Tendersea during three trials at Leeds Crown Court throughout 2018 making it the worst scandal to ever hit Huddersfield. They were found guilty of child sex offences including rape, inciting child prostitution and abduction of a child. A court order had been in place temporarily banning any reporting of the trials until now. On May 25, 35-year-old Yaxley-Lennon was arrested on suspicion of a breach of the peace and was held in the court cells before being taken up to the courtroom to face the trial judge. In a rare move, he was arrested, charged and sentenced within five hours. (…) Robinson, whose criminal record dates back to 2005, has a previous conviction for contempt of court. He was the subject of a suspended prison sentence, imposed at Canterbury Crown Court, after he filmed in court. He also has convictions for disobeying a court order, possessing identity documents with intent, fraud, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, possessing drugs and threatening behaviour. In May he was found in contempt of court and in breach of a suspended sentence. Matthew Harding, mitigating, said his client felt « deep regret » after realising the potential consequences of his actions. He said Robinson was aware of the reporting restriction in place in the case but thought what he was saying on camera was already in the public domain. Leeds live
I have been completely had, how embarrassing man. I had a woman, and I’ll show you our screenshots, messaging me all morning about what had happened to her son. It turns out some leftie is sitting somewhere absolutely mugging me completely off and laughing about it. Fake news central. It turns out the ‘13-year-old’ boy who had been jumped by five Muslims wasn’t her son. Tommy Robinson
Lawyers representing a Syrian boy who was attacked at school are crowdfunding to sue Tommy Robinson and Facebook. Footage of the 15-year-old victim being pushed to the ground and having water poured on his face sparked outrage in November, and police continue to investigate the incident in Huddersfield. Amid prominent media coverage, Mr Robinson posted a series of videos on his Facebook account accusing the boy of bullying and claiming “lots of Muslim gangs are beating up white English kids” in Britain. Lawyers for the victim, Jamal, allege that the anti-Islam activist’s posts were defamatory and are exploring whether Facebook can be pursued for allowing fundraising via his page. A page asking for public donations to “sue Tommy Robinson, Facebook and others” has raised more than £3,000 since going online on Saturday. Abdulnaser Youssef, of Farooq Bajwa and Co solicitors, wrote that allegations that Jamal was involved in the beating of a young English girl was false. (…) Mr Robinson’s Facebook page has more than 1 million followers and his posts on the Huddersfield incident were viewed up to 900,000 times each. The page had a “donate” button to transfer him money at the time, but it was removed amid concern that a tool the social media giant says is for charities was abused. Facebook deleted several of Mr Robinson’s videos for violating community standards, after Jamal’s family announced their intention to sue in November. Their lawyers (…) said that Mr Robinson’s social media posts caused Jamal to become “the focus of countless messages of hate and threats from the extreme right wing”, and a police safety warning. (…) The suspect, a 16-year-old boy, has been summonsed to court for alleged assault but no date for the hearing has been set. The teenager had shared numerous posts from Mr Robinson’s Facebook account in previous months, as well as from Britain First and other far-right accounts. The Independent
I met Danny. I was working on some film on Newsnight and Danny was in the green room. It was unusual to meet a white working class male in the Newsnight green room. It was so unusual that me and one of my mates, we went down there to have a drink with him in the way that you would do with somebody, from the, you know a cannibal from the Amazonian, erm, from Amazonia or maybe a creature from outer space. John Sweeney (BBC)
The BBC strongly rejects any suggestion that our journalism is ‘faked’ or biased. Any programme we broadcast will adhere to the BBC’s strict editorial guidelines. Some of the footage which has been released was recorded without our knowledge during this investigation and John Sweeney made some offensive and inappropriate remarks, for which he apologises. BBC Panorama’s investigation will continue. BBC spokeswoman
Tommy Robinson (…) a été arrêté le vendredi 25 mai, alors qu’il filmait et transmettait en direct sur Facebook les entrées de personnes devant être jugées au tribunal de Leeds, au nord de l’Angleterre. (…) La faute à ce que l’on appelle outre-Manche une «reporting restriction» – qu’on pourrait traduire par «restriction de reportage». Le ministère de la Justice britannique en a transmis une copie à CheckNews par mail. Il s’agit d’un ordre du juge de Leeds, daté du jour de l’arrestation de Tommy Robinson. Il interdit aux médias de parler de cette arrestation ou des procédures en cours, au motif d’une loi britannique censée empêcher tout «risque ou préjudice à l’administration de la justice». Ce mardi 29 mai, The Independent et le média Leeds Live ont annoncé qu’à la suite de leurs demandes, cet ordre restrictif a été levé par la justice. Autrement dit, il est de nouveau possible, quatre jours après l’arrestation de l’activiste d’extrême droite, d’aborder ce sujet au Royaume-Uni. Confirmant une information qui circulait déjà à l’extrême droite du web et attribuée à la chaîne américaine Fox News, The Independent écrit que Robinson a été condamné à 13 mois de prison pour outrage au tribunal. La vidéo qui a valu à Robinson son emprisonnement est encore en ligne. Pendant une heure, vendredi 25 au matin, il attend, interpelle et filme des personnes qui doivent être jugées au tribunal de Leeds. La vidéo se termine quand l’activiste est emmené par des policiers.(…) le procès dont l’activiste a filmé des suspects avant d’être embarqué fait lui aussi l’objet d’une reporting restriction. Autrement dit, il est interdit aux médias britanniques d’en parler tant que la justice n’a pas rendu sa décision. Celle-ci ne devrait pas être connue avant la fin de l’année, explique à CheckNews Lizzie Dearden, la journaliste de The Independent qui a participé à faire lever la reporting restriction sur le cas Robinson. L’interdiction de parler du procès dont l’activiste a filmé les accusés s’applique potentiellement à des médias étrangers (comme Libération). L’intéressé n’en est pas à son coup d’essai. Il avait déjà été condamné à trois mois avec sursis pour avoir «couvert» un procès de viol en réunion à Canterbury, il y a un an. Pour cerner le personnage, qui a déjà séjourné à deux reprises en prison (dans sa jeunesse pour avoir frappé un policier, et plus tard pour fraude au prêt), on pourrait situer sa genèse au hooliganisme anglais de Luton, la ville dont il est originaire. Tommy Robinson est le nom de scène – en privé il est Stephen Yaxley-Lennon – du fondateur de l’English Defence League, un mouvement (qu’il a depuis quitté) censé éviter l’«islamisation» des Iles britanniques. Libération
L’arrestation et la condamnation à 13 mois de prison de Tommy Robinson, le co-fondateur de l’English Defence League, un mouvement d’extrême droite dont le but affiché est de «combattre l’islamisation de l’Angleterre», ont été largement commentés sur le web cette dernière semaine. L’homme, de son vrai nom Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, a été arrêté vendredi 25 mai, alors qu’il filmait des gens entrant dans le tribunal de Leeds, au Royaume-Uni, où étaient jugés selon lui «des prédateurs sexuels». Tommy Robinson diffuse la vidéo en direct sur Facebook live, où elle est vue plus de 500.000 fois. Pendant qu’il tourne, il se fait embarquer par la police pour «trouble à l’ordre public» –une interpellation elle aussi diffusée en live sur le réseau social. Les médias anglo-saxons sont sommés, via une décision du juge, de ne pas évoquer l’arrestation. Aucun d’entre-eux ne traitera le sujet jusqu’au mardi 29 mai, à l’exception de The Independent. Ce silence médiatique trouve rapidement un écho en France, dans les milieux très à droite, qui reprochent aux médias de taire le scandale anglais. Le hashtag #FreeTommyRobinson apparaît sur Twitter et certains sites de droite et d’extrême droite, comme Dreuz.info, s’emparent de l’affaire. Breizh-infos explique que l’emprisonnement menace de mort Tommy Robinson, car selon son avocat, il aurait été agressé lors d’une incarcération antérieure et sa tête serait mise à prix. Valeurs Actuelles embraye et publie à son tour un article, relayé par la secrétaire générale adjointe du groupe Les Républicains, Valérie Boyer. La veille, le président du groupe Front national-Marseille Bleu Marine au Conseil municipal de Marseille, Stéphane Ravier, y était également allé de son tweet. Selon l’extrême droite, le procès que souhaitait couvrir Tommy Robinson serait celui du scandale de Telford, une importante affaire de viols sur mineures et de pédophilie, dévoilée par le Sunday Mirror et largement reprise par la fachosphère. Si cette affaire fait autant de bruit, c’est parce que les militantes et militants sont persuadés qu’elle a été passée sous silence pour «protéger» les accusés, en majorité d’origine pakistanaise. Tommy Robinson affirme le procès qui se déroulait à Leeds le jour de son interpellation était bel et bien celui de Telford, mais rien ne permet de le confirmer. Cette incertitude alimente les accusations de censure des droites et extrêmes droites françaises et britanniques. Au Royaume-Uni, la loi impose, dans certaines affaires, des «reporting restrictions»; les juges peuvent fixer un embargo limitant le traitement médiatique d’une affaire. Comme le précise Libération, cette mesure est destinée à empêcher tout «risque ou préjudice à l’administration de la justice». Le procès de Leeds nécessitant visiblement cette protection, l’arrestation et l’emprisonnement de Tommy Robinson y ont également été aussi soumis. (…) Rapidement, le Sun, le Mirror, la BBC et le Guardian ont donné les raisons de l’arrestation de l’ancien leader de l’English Defence League. On apprend que l’homme, âgé de 35 ans, a été condamné à treize mois de prison pour outrage au tribunal –et non pour trouble à l’ordre public. L’outrage au tribunal, en droit britannique, est le fait de désobéir à un ordre de la cour ou de manquer de respect envers son autorité –en somme, de manifester sa méfiance quant à sa capacité à rendre la justice. Le choix de Tommy Robinson de couvrir médiatiquement le procès de Leeds, malgré restriction, explique sa condamnation. Même si la BBC explique que Robinson a plaidé coupable, le jugement alimente l’impression –fausse– que l’on voudrait faire taire celui qui est considéré comme un lanceur d’alerte par une partie de la fachosphère. Lors du procès, l’avocat de Robinson a exprimé le «profond regret» de son client, qui assure que ses actions n’avaient pas pour objectif de «causer des difficultés dans le processus judiciaire». Il n’a pas été entendu par le juge, qui a estimé que ses commentaires sur les réseaux sociaux, pendant la vidéo, risquaient de priver les accusés du droit à un procès équitable. (…) La liste des procès du jour, avec le nom des personnes entendues, est en effet disponible sur le site du tribunal. N’y est cependant pas mentionné ce qui est débattu. Tommy Robinson est un habitué des outrages au tribunal. En 2017, il avait tenté de filmer des accusés dans une affaire de viol, alors que leur procès était en cours –un acte qui lui avait valu du sursis. En France, où aucune loi ne peut imposer un tel embargo sur une affaire, la condamnation de Robinson surprend, certains comparant le Royaume-Uni à une dictature. (…) Le verdict rendu contre l’activiste et l’interdiction de couvrir le procès relèvent pourtant davantage d’un certain pragmatisme que d’une censure d’État: le juge a choisi de condamner Robinson car son action est susceptible d’entraîner un nouveau procès dans l’affaire de Leeds –ce qui coûterait aux contribuables «des centaines et des centaines de milliers de livres», selon Le Sun. Slate
La page Facebook de Tommy Robinson a de manière répétée contrevenu à ces règles, avec des publications utilisant un langage déshumanisant et des appels à la violence dirigés contre les musulmans. Ce n’est pas une décision que nous prenons à la légère mais les individus et organisations qui attaquent les autres sur la base de ce qu’ils sont n’ont pas leur place sur Facebook et Instagram. Facebook
If the content is indeed violating it will go. I want to be clear this is not a discussion about money. This is a discussion about political speech. People are debating very sensitive issues on Facebook, including issues like immigration. And that political debate can be entirely legitimate. I do think having extra reviewers on that when the debate is taking place absolutely makes sense and I think people would expect us to be careful and cautious before we take down their political speech. Richard Allan (Facebook’s head of public policy and Liberal Democrat peer)
We remove content from Facebook no matter who posts it, when it breaks our standards. If Tommy Robinson’s page repeatedly violated our community standards, we would remove it, as we did with Britain First. Richard Allan
Leading far-right activists have received special protection from Facebook, preventing their pages from being deleted even after a pattern of behaviour that would typically result in moderator action being taken. The process, called “shielded review”, was uncovered by Channel 4 Dispatches, after the documentary series sent an undercover reporter to work as a content moderator in a Dublin-based Facebook contractor, Cpl. Typically, Facebook pages are deleted if they are found to have five or more pieces of content that violate the site’s rules. But more popular pages, including those of activists like Tommy Robinson, are protected from those rules and are instead elevated to a second tier of moderation where in-house Facebook staff, rather than external contractors, take the decision on whether or not to take action. Most of the pages granted shielded review are for governments and news organisations, but Robinson – whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon – and the defunct political party Britain First were given the same status. In effect, although individual pieces of content are still removed by Facebook, the normal rules do not apply to the page itself for all but the most egregious breaches of the site’s guidelines. The Dispatches programme also alleged that Facebook moderators were trained to ignore visual evidence that a user was below the age of 13, and so should not be on the site, even if they were being investigated for breaking rules such as those governing self-harm. “We have to have an admission that the person is underage,” a trainer told the undercover reporter. “If not, we just, like, pretend that we are blind and we don’t know what underage looks like.” When pushed on whether it even applies in areas such as self-harm, the trainer gave confirmation, saying: “If this person was a kid, like a 10-year-old kid, we don’t care, we still action the ticket as if they were an adult.” The choice to ignore evidence suggesting a user is underage could pose problems for Facebook, which is required in the US and EU to prevent children under 13 from using their site. Speaking to the US Senate earlier this year, Mark Zuckerberg told senators that “we don’t allow people under the age of 13 to use Facebook”, but did not disclose the fact that Facebook trains its moderators to not act on visual evidence to the contrary. Allan told the Guardian that Facebook investigates underage users who have been reported to its moderators as underage. “If a Facebook user is reported to us as being under 13, a reviewer will look at the content on their profile (text and photos) to try to ascertain their age,” he said. “If they believe the person is under 13, the account will be put on a hold. This means they cannot use Facebook until they provide proof of their age. We are investigating why any reviewers or trainers at Cpl would have suggested otherwise” … Over the past two years, Facebook has gradually opened up to the outside world about how it runs its moderation efforts. In 2017, the Guardian obtained and published the company’s internal guidelines, revealing for the first time Facebook’s policies around sex, terrorism and violence. A year later, Facebook published its own versions of the guidelines, offering the first detailed look at its rulebook in more than a decade of operation. Responding to questions about the story, Allan said: “It’s clear that some of what is shown in the programme does not reflect Facebook’s policies or values, and falls short of the high standards we expect. We take these mistakes in some of our training processes and enforcement incredibly seriously and are grateful to the journalists who brought them to our attention. “Where we know we have made mistakes, we have taken action immediately. We are providing additional training and are working to understand exactly what happened so we can rectify it.” The Guardian

Attention: une motivation peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où après Instagram et Paypal, Facebook vient sous les huées des défenseurs de la liberté d’expression …

D’accéder à la demande de groupes antiracistes et anti-fascistes auto-proclamés d’interdire définitivement de réseau …

L’ancien hooligan devenu croisé de la lutte contre l’islamisation sous le pseudonyme emprunté à l’un des héros du hooliganisme anglais, Tommy Robinson

Suite à ses démêlés avec la justice pour avoir failli compromettre, entre une incitation au harcèlement dont celui d’un réfugié syrien de 15 ans et une dénonciation des méthodes et de l’élitisme de la BBC, le déroulement de tristement célèbres procès d’immigrés musulmans pakistanais pour viols de mineures …

Rendus en bonne partie possibles par des services sociaux et de police paralysés par la peur d’être accusés de racisme …

Et où entre appât du gain, liberté d’expression, incitation à la haine et politiquement correct …

La poule aux oeux d’or de Mark Zucker,erg est rattrapée par le véritable et inextricable sac de noeuds juridico-politique dans lequel sont désormais prises …

L’ensemble de nos institutions suite à des décennies d’immigration incontrôlée de ressortisants musulmans ne reconnaissant ni nos lois ni nos coutumes …

Devinez ce qui avait jusqu’ici et si longtemps retenu les services de modération habituellement si impitoyablement sourcilleux de votre réseau social préféré … ?

C4 Dispatches documentary finds moderators left Britain First’s pages alone as ‘they generate a lot of revenue’

Leading far-right activists have received special protection from Facebook, preventing their pages from being deleted even after a pattern of behaviour that would typically result in moderator action being taken.

The process, called “shielded review”, was uncovered by Channel 4 Dispatches, after the documentary series sent an undercover reporter to work as a content moderator in a Dublin-based Facebook contractor, Cpl.

Typically, Facebook pages are deleted if they are found to have five or more pieces of content that violate the site’s rules. But more popular pages, including those of activists like Tommy Robinson, are protected from those rules and are instead elevated to a second tier of moderation where in-house Facebook staff, rather than external contractors, take the decision on whether or not to take action.

Most of the pages granted shielded review are for governments and news organisations, but Robinson – whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon – and the defunct political party Britain First were given the same status. In effect, although individual pieces of content are still removed by Facebook, the normal rules do not apply to the page itself for all but the most egregious breaches of the site’s guidelines.

In the documentary, a moderator tells the Dispatches reporter that Britain First’s pages were left up, even though they repeatedly broke Facebook’s rules, because “they have a lot of followers so they’re generating a lot of revenue for Facebook”.

Britain First’s Facebook page was eventually banned in March 2018, almost six months after it was deregistered as a political party and a week after its leaders were jailed for a series of hate crimes against Muslims. Robinson is also in jail, serving a 13-month sentence for contempt of court.

In the Dispatches documentary, Facebook’s head of public policy, the Liberal Democrat peer Richard Allan, disputes that the rules are based on revenue. “If the content is indeed violating it will go,” Allan said.

“I want to be clear this is not a discussion about money. This is a discussion about political speech. People are debating very sensitive issues on Facebook, including issues like immigration. And that political debate can be entirely legitimate. I do think having extra reviewers on that when the debate is taking place absolutely makes sense and I think people would expect us to be careful and cautious before we take down their political speech.”

On Monday, Allan addressed Robinson’s page directly, and told the Guardian: “We remove content from Facebook no matter who posts it, when it breaks our standards. If Tommy Robinson’s page repeatedly violated our community standards, we would remove it, as we did with Britain First.”

The Dispatches programme also alleged that Facebook moderators were trained to ignore visual evidence that a user was below the age of 13, and so should not be on the site, even if they were being investigated for breaking rules such as those governing self-harm.

“We have to have an admission that the person is underage,” a trainer told the undercover reporter. “If not, we just, like, pretend that we are blind and we don’t know what underage looks like.” When pushed on whether it even applies in areas such as self-harm, the trainer gave confirmation, saying: “If this person was a kid, like a 10-year-old kid, we don’t care, we still action the ticket as if they were an adult.”

The choice to ignore evidence suggesting a user is underage could pose problems for Facebook, which is required in the US and EU to prevent children under 13 from using their site. Speaking to the US Senate earlier this year, Mark Zuckerberg told senators that “we don’t allow people under the age of 13 to use Facebook”, but did not disclose the fact that Facebook trains its moderators to not act on visual evidence to the contrary.

Allan told the Guardian that Facebook investigates underage users who have been reported to its moderators as underage. “If a Facebook user is reported to us as being under 13, a reviewer will look at the content on their profile (text and photos) to try to ascertain their age,” he said. “If they believe the person is under 13, the account will be put on a hold. This means they cannot use Facebook until they provide proof of their age. We are investigating why any reviewers or trainers at Cpl would have suggested otherwise.”

Over the past two years, Facebook has gradually opened up to the outside world about how it runs its moderation efforts. In 2017, the Guardian obtained and published the company’s internal guidelines, revealing for the first time Facebook’s policies around sex, terrorism and violence.

A year later, Facebook published its own versions of the guidelines, offering the first detailed look at its rulebook in more than a decade of operation.

Responding to questions about the story, Allan said: “It’s clear that some of what is shown in the programme does not reflect Facebook’s policies or values, and falls short of the high standards we expect. We take these mistakes in some of our training processes and enforcement incredibly seriously and are grateful to the journalists who brought them to our attention.

“Where we know we have made mistakes, we have taken action immediately. We are providing additional training and are working to understand exactly what happened so we can rectify it.”

Voir aussi:

Syrian refugee attack: Boy’s family crowdfunding to sue Tommy Robinson and Facebook over ‘defamation’
Lawyers say Facebook enabled ‘false comments’ to spread as Robinson raised money
Lizzie Dearden
The Independent
21 January 2019

Lawyers representing a Syrian boy who was attacked at school are crowdfunding to sue Tommy Robinson and Facebook.

Footage of the 15-year-old victim being pushed to the ground and having water poured on his face sparked outrage in November, and police continue to investigate the incident in Huddersfield.

Amid prominent media coverage, Mr Robinson posted a series of videos on his Facebook account accusing the boy of bullying and claiming “lots of Muslim gangs are beating up white English kids” in Britain.

Lawyers for the victim, Jamal, allege that the anti-Islam activist’s posts were defamatory and are exploring whether Facebook can be pursued for allowing fundraising via his page.

A page asking for public donations to “sue Tommy Robinson, Facebook and others” has raised more than £3,000 since going online on Saturday.

Abdulnaser Youssef, of Farooq Bajwa and Co solicitors, wrote that allegations that Jamal was involved in the beating of a young English girl was false.

“Tommy Robinson [whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon] sought to justify the abuse directed towards Jamal, he defamed the young boy,” he added.

“To make matters worse, he even raised money in support of those behind the bullying by galvanising cash from his supporters on social media platforms.”

Mr Youssef said Jamal’s lawyers were raising money for a defamation action over Mr Robinson’s “false comments” and added: “We are also exploring bringing a claim against Facebook and other social media platforms which have been exploited by Lennon [Robinson] to publish his false and damaging comments made in respect of Jamal.”

Mr Robinson’s Facebook page has more than 1 million followers and his posts on the Huddersfield incident were viewed up to 900,000 times each.

The page had a “donate” button to transfer him money at the time, but it was removed amid concern that a tool the social media giant says is for charities was abused.

Facebook deleted several of Mr Robinson’s videos for violating community standards, after Jamal’s family announced their intention to sue in November.

Their lawyers hope to use part of the crowdfunded money to “penetrate the veil surrounding Lennon’s finances” to ensure compensation can be sought if the lawsuit succeeds.

They said that Mr Robinson’s social media posts caused Jamal to become “the focus of countless messages of hate and threats from the extreme right wing”, and a police safety warning.

Mr Youssef said money from another crowdfunding page set up in November had enabled the family to “relocate to a safer environment where Jamal and his sister will be able to live and study in peace”.

West Yorkshire Police said the incident at Almondbury Community School remains under investigation.

The suspect, a 16-year-old boy, has been summonsed to court for alleged assault but no date for the hearing has been set.

The teenager had shared numerous posts from Mr Robinson’s Facebook account in previous months, as well as from Britain First and other far-right accounts.

The Independent has asked Facebook for comment.

Voir également:

Tommy Robinson admits he shared ‘fake news’ about Muslims attacking boy at school where Syrian refugee was filmed being bullied
Katy Clifton
The Evening Standard
30 November 2018

Tommy Robinson has confessed to spreading fake news about five Muslims attacking a boy at the school where a Syrian refugee was filmed being bullied.

The former EDL leader said in a Facebook video post on Friday “he had been completely mugged off” by “some leftie”.

On Thursday, he had made claims that the 15-year-old who was filmed being bullied in Huddersfield had been involved in a separate attack on a girl at the school.

However, just hours after spreading the claims during two Facebook live broadcasts, Mr Robinson admitted to his followers that he had helped spread fake news.

Explaining he had been duped, the far-right activist said: “I have been completely had, how embarrassing man. »

He added: “I had a woman, and I’ll show you our screenshots, messaging me all morning about what had happened to her son.

« It turns out some leftie is sitting somewhere absolutely mugging me completely off and laughing about it. Fake news central.

“It turns out the ‘13-year-old’ boy who had been jumped by five Muslims wasn’t her son.”

The family’s lawyer on Thursday strongly dismissed the claims made by the former EDL leader and said they were “actively considering legal action” against Mr Robinson.

A letter addressed to Mr Robinson from Farooq Bajwa & Co solicitors read: “We have been aware of two videos posted to your Facebook page. These videos contain a number of false and defamatory allegations in respect of our client.”

Asking for the videos to be removed immediately, it continues: “We wish to place you on notice that our client intends to pursue legal action against you in respect of these contents of these publications and you will shortly be receiving formal pre-action correspondence in this respect.”

Although it is uncertain whether he will still face legal action, in a further Facebook live posted on Friday Mr Robinson said: “If you’re solicitor watching this that’s suing me, I don’t give a s***.”

The comments came after footage of the 15-year-old Syrian refugee being « waterboarded » while at school in Huddersfield was widely shared on social media.

The video’s emergence this week was followed by further footage of what was said to be the boy’s sister being physically abused at the same school.

A 16-year-old boy has been interviewed over the attack on the boy and reported for summons for an offence of assault ahead of a youth court appearance.

The boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was questioned by police over the footage in which the 15-year-old victim, with his arm in a cast, is thrown to the ground.

He is dragged to the floor by his neck before his attacker says, « I’ll drown you », while forcing water from a bottle into his mouth.

The Syrian teenager told ITV News on Tuesday: « I woke up at night and just started crying about this problem. They think I’m different, different from them.

« I don’t feel safe at school. Sometimes I say to my dad, ‘I don’t want to go to school any more’. I was just crying and I didn’t do nothing because I respect the school rules. »

Voir par ailleurs:

L’activiste d’extrême droite Tommy Robinson n’a pas été censuré, il a enfreint la loi britannique

Frédéric Scarbonchi
Slate
31 mai 2018
L’arrestation et la condamnation à 13 mois de prison de Tommy Robinson, le co-fondateur de l’English Defence League, un mouvement d’extrême droite dont le but affiché est de «combattre l’islamisation de l’Angleterre», ont été largement commentés sur le web cette dernière semaine.

L’homme, de son vrai nom Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, a été arrêté vendredi 25 mai, alors qu’il filmait des gens entrant dans le tribunal de Leeds, au Royaume-Uni, où étaient jugés selon lui «des prédateurs sexuels».

Tommy Robinson diffuse la vidéo en direct sur Facebook live, où elle est vue plus de 500.000 fois. Pendant qu’il tourne, il se fait embarquer par la police pour «trouble à l’ordre public» –une interpellation elle aussi diffusée en live sur le réseau social.

Accusations de censure

Les médias anglo-saxons sont sommés, via une décision du juge, de ne pas évoquer l’arrestation. Aucun d’entre-eux ne traitera le sujet jusqu’au mardi 29 mai, à l’exception de The Independent.

Ce silence médiatique trouve rapidement un écho en France, dans les milieux très à droite, qui reprochent aux médias de taire le scandale anglais. Le hashtag #FreeTommyRobinson apparaît sur Twitter et certains sites de droite et d’extrême droite, comme Dreuz.info, s’emparent de l’affaire.

Breizh-infos explique que l’emprisonnement menace de mort Tommy Robinson, car selon son avocat, il aurait été agressé lors d’une incarcération antérieure et sa tête serait mise à prix.

Valeurs Actuelles embraye et publie à son tour un article, relayé par la secrétaire générale adjointe du groupe Les Républicains, Valérie Boyer.

La veille, le président du groupe Front national-Marseille Bleu Marine au Conseil municipal de Marseille, Stéphane Ravier, y était également allé de son tweet.

Selon l’extrême droite, le procès que souhaitait couvrir Tommy Robinson serait celui du scandale de Telford, une importante affaire de viols sur mineures et de pédophilie, dévoilée par le Sunday Mirror et largement reprise par la fachosphère.

Si cette affaire fait autant de bruit, c’est parce que les militantes et militants sont persuadés qu’elle a été passée sous silence pour «protéger» les accusés, en majorité d’origine pakistanaise.

Tommy Robinson affirme le procès qui se déroulait à Leeds le jour de son interpellation était bel et bien celui de Telford, mais rien ne permet de le confirmer. Cette incertitude alimente les accusations de censure des droites et extrêmes droites françaises et britanniques.

«Reporting restrictions»

Au Royaume-Uni, la loi impose, dans certaines affaires, des «reporting restrictions»; les juges peuvent fixer un embargo limitant le traitement médiatique d’une affaire. Comme le précise Libération, cette mesure est destinée à empêcher tout «risque ou préjudice à l’administration de la justice».

Le procès de Leeds nécessitant visiblement cette protection, l’arrestation et l’emprisonnement de Tommy Robinson y ont également été aussi soumis.

Si l’on ne connaît toujours pas l’objet du procès qui a attiré Robinson, la restriction empêchant d’évoquer son interpellation a été levée mardi 29 mai, alors que les médias eux-mêmes contestaient l’embargo, que les manifestations de soutien à Tommy Robinson se multipliaient et qu’une pétition en ligne avait déjà recueilli 400.000 signatures.

Outrage au tribunal

Rapidement, le Sun, le Mirror, la BBC et le Guardian ont donné les raisons de l’arrestation de l’ancien leader de l’English Defence League. On apprend que l’homme, âgé de 35 ans, a été condamné à treize mois de prison pour outrage au tribunal –et non pour trouble à l’ordre public.

L’outrage au tribunal, en droit britannique, est le fait de désobéir à un ordre de la cour ou de manquer de respect envers son autorité –en somme, de manifester sa méfiance quant à sa capacité à rendre la justice. Le choix de Tommy Robinson de couvrir médiatiquement le procès de Leeds, malgré restriction, explique sa condamnation.

Même si la BBC explique que Robinson a plaidé coupable, le jugement alimente l’impression –fausse– que l’on voudrait faire taire celui qui est considéré comme un lanceur d’alerte par une partie de la fachosphère.

Lors du procès, l’avocat de Robinson a exprimé le «profond regret» de son client, qui assure que ses actions n’avaient pas pour objectif de «causer des difficultés dans le processus judiciaire». Il n’a pas été entendu par le juge, qui a estimé que ses commentaires sur les réseaux sociaux, pendant la vidéo, risquaient de priver les accusés du droit à un procès équitable.

Lorsqu’il diffusait sa vidéo en live, Tommy Robinson avait d’ailleurs conscience que son acte pouvait être considéré comme un outrage: il le dit expressément et à plusieurs reprises.

Sur la page Facebook de l’activiste, dans la nuit du 29 au 30 mai, un statut a été publié. Si l’homme a reconnu l’outrage devant le tribunal, sa défense publique est tout autre: «Vous devez vous poser la question: pourquoi un reporter lisant un acte d’accusation publique devant un tribunal risque-t-il soudainement de provoquer l’effondrement d’un procès?».

La liste des procès du jour, avec le nom des personnes entendues, est en effet disponible sur le site du tribunal. N’y est cependant pas mentionné ce qui est débattu.

Tommy Robinson est un habitué des outrages au tribunal. En 2017, il avait tenté de filmer des accusés dans une affaire de viol, alors que leur procès était en cours –un acte qui lui avait valu du sursis.

Réactions internationales

En France, où aucune loi ne peut imposer un tel embargo sur une affaire, la condamnation de Robinson surprend, certains comparant le Royaume-Uni à une dictature.

Aux Pays Bas, Geert Wilders, le leader du Parti pour la liberté (PVV), mouvement d’extrême droite, a apporté son soutien à Tommy Robinson. Dans une vidéo publiée sur Twitter, il affirme que la condamnation du Britannique est une «disgrâce absolue», une preuve que «les autorités veulent nous faire taire».

Donald Trump Jr., le fils du président des États-Unis, a également tweeté sa désapprobation.

Décision pragmatique

Le verdict rendu contre l’activiste et l’interdiction de couvrir le procès relèvent pourtant davantage d’un certain pragmatisme que d’une censure d’État: le juge a choisi de condamner Robinson car son action est susceptible d’entraîner un nouveau procès dans l’affaire de Leeds –ce qui coûterait aux contribuables «des centaines et des centaines de milliers de livres», selon Le Sun.

«Je respecte le droit de chacun à la liberté d’expression. C’est l’un des droits les plus importants que nous avons. Avec ces droits viennent des responsabilités –la responsabilité d’exercer sa liberté de parole dans le cadre de la loi. Je ne suis pas sûr que vous mesurez les conséquences potentielles de ce que vous avez fait», aurait justifié le juge lors du procès.

La motivation du juge était similaire lorsque Robinson avait déjà été condamné en 2017: «Il s’agit de justice, de faire en sorte qu’un procès puisse être mené avec justice et équité […], d’être innocent jusqu’à preuve du contraire.»

Voir aussi:

Que se passe-t-il avec Tommy Robinson au Royaume-Uni ?

L’activiste d’extrême droite a écopé de 13 mois de prison pour avoir filmé les suspects d’un procès dont les médias ont, pour l’heure, interdiction de parler. Son arrestation elle-même faisait l’objet, jusqu’à ce jour d’un black-out juridique.
Fabien Leboucq

Militant d’extrême-droite anglais, Tommy Robinson, de son vrai nom Stephen Yaxley Lennon, a été arrêté, jugé et condamné à 13 mois de prison vendredi 25 mai en l’espace de cing heures, à Leeds en Angleterre. Cette arrestation, sous le coup d’une interdiction de couverture par les médias, déchaine les passions sur les réseaux sociaux.

Le C.V de Tommy Robinson est parlant. Fondateur de l’English Defence League (EDL), qu’il quitte pour devenir le correspondant de Rebel Media, un site d’information affilié à l’extrême-droite canadienne. En parallèle, il participe aussi au développement de la branche britannique de Pegida, mouvement anti-islam allemand.

Vendredi dernier alors qu’il couvre l’ouverture du procès d’un supposé gang de proxénètes d’origine anglo-indienne et anglo-pakistanaise dans la ville de Telford (comté de Shropshire), Tommy Robinson est interpellé alors qu’il fait un live sur les marches du tribunal. S’adressant à ses fans sur les réseaux sociaux, il commente le défilé en arrière-plan des suspects entrant au tribunal, les invectivant au passage en leur promettant la prison. Ce procès se tenait dans un contexte tendu. L’extrême-droite s’en étant emparé pour accuser les autorités britanniques de laxisme, au prétexte qu’elles auraient toléré les actes délictueux de ce gang identifié depuis de longues années. Leur procès était du reste censé se tenir à huit-clos et toute publicité avait été interdite par un arrêté du juge.

Alors qu’il est toujours face caméra, une heure plus tard, Tommy Robinson est embarqué en direct par la police. La vidéo de son arrestation cumulera près de 4 millions de vues sur Facebook en moins d’une semaine. Selon le « Daily Mirror », cinq heures seulement se sont écoulées entre l’arrestation de Tommy Robinson et sa condamnation à treize mois de prison ferme, celui-ci étant déjà sous le coup d’une peine de sursis pour des faits similaires.

Malgré qu’elle n’ait pas été commentée par la presse à cause de l’interdiction de publicité, la nouvelle s’est rapidement répandue via les réseaux sociaux et les médias d’extrême-droite, suscitant de vives réactions en Europe et dans le monde. Une pétition demandant sa libération, rédigée en huit langues et adressée à Theresa May, première ministre britannique, cumulait plus de 540 000 signatures le 31 mai.

Donald Trump Jr lui a twitté son soutien

En Angleterre, plus de cent personnes très agitées se sont massées devant le 10, Downing Street, soutenues par certains membres de l’UKIP (parti pour l’indépendance). En Allemagne, l’AFD réclamait que l’asile politique soit accordé à Robinson, tandis que Geert Wilders, chef de l’extrême-droite néerlandaise et alliée de Marine Le Pen, considérait que «le Royaume-Uni se comporte comme l’Arabie saoudite». La droite américaine s’est largement exprimée elle aussi, par la voix de « Breitbart News », à la droite des Républicains, ou encore de Donald Trump Jr., fils du président qui lui twittait son soutien.

La classe politique française n’est pas en reste. De nombreux cadres du Front national, ainsi que Valérie Boyer (LR) ont notamment partagé un article de « Valeurs Actuelles » consacré à l’affaire et des rassemblements sont prévus à Paris, Bordeaux et Montpellier. Les médias traditionnels ne pouvant traiter l’affaire jusque dans l’après-midi du mardi 29 mai, les débats ont majoritairement eu lieu sur les réseaux sociaux. Les supporters de Tommy Robinson considèrent son arrestation comme une atteinte à la liberté d’expression, parlant même pompeusement de “dictature de la bienpensance”. Ses détracteurs, quant à eux, soulignent que dès le départ Tommy Robinson couvrait ce procès avec l’intention de le déstabiliser.

Quoi qu’il en soit, la décision du juge ne semble pas avoir été très efficace, l’information ayant largement circulé malgré le black-out médiatique qui avait été décrété. Cette décision pourrait même avoir été contre-productive, laissant le quasi-monopole de l’information aux militants d’extrême droite.

Voir de plus:

Harcèlement scolaire: un jeune réfugié syrien martyrisé à l’école (vidéo choc)
La vidéo d’un jeune réfugié syrien, martyrisé par ses camarades de lycée, a provoqué une vive polémique

France Soir

La vidéo choc d’un jeune réfugié syrien, scolarisé dans un lycée en Angleterre, et victime de harcèlement scolaire, fait le tour d’Internet depuis mardi. On peut y voir l’adolescent martyrisé par un élève britannique, devant une assemblée visiblement amusée par cette scène de violences.

Les images choquantes d’un jeune réfugié syrien, victime de harcèlement scolaire et d’une agression à caractère raciste, font le tour des réseaux sociaux depuis mardi 27.

Sur la vidéo, partagée des milliers de fois sur Twitter, on aperçoit un adolescent de 16 ans, réfugié syrien dans ce lycée britannique de Huddersfield, se faire martyriser par un élève beaucoup plus grand que lui sur le terrain de sport attenant à l’établissement scolaire.

Le jeune homme harcelé, qui ne peut se défendre car son bras est cassé (il porte un plâtre au bras gauche), se retrouve projeté violemment au sol.

L’agresseur le saisit par le cou et commence à l’étrangler puis lui maintient fermement la tête en lui versant une bouteille d’eau dessus. « Je vais te noyer », lui crie-t-il avant de finalement relâcher sa prise.

Les faits remontent à fin octobre dernier. Ils se sont déroulés devant une assemblée d’adolescents qui ont préféré se moquer de la victime et rire avec son bourreau plutôt que d’aller alerter un enseignant.

Mais la famille de Jamal, l’adolescent violenté, a porté plainte et une enquête a été ouverte par la police britannique pour « agression aggravée à caractère raciste ».

Suite à la diffusion de ces images sur les réseaux sociaux, Jamal a reçu énormément de messages de soutien et une cagnotte GoFundMe a même été créée pour aider sa famille à surmonter cette épreuve et à s’intégrer dans la société britannique.

La personne à l’initiative de la cagnotte a mis un objectif de 50.000 livres (environ 56.600 euros). En 14 heures, plus de 3.300 personnes ont fait un don et à midi ce mercredi 28, il ne manquait de 212 livres pour atteindre la somme fixée.

Voir encore:

Facebook supprime les comptes de Tommy Robinson, figure de l’extrême droite britannique
Le réseau social a emboîté le pas à Twitter, estimant que les messages postés par cet agitateur d’extrême droite avaient violé à de nombreuses reprises les règles de modération sur les contenus haineux.
Le Monde avec AFP
26 février 2019

Facebook a décidé, mardi 26 février, de supprimer la page de Tommy Robinson, de même que son profil Instagram. Cette figure de l’extrême droite britannique a, selon le réseau social, « régulièrement violé » les conditions d’utilisation de Facebook et d’Instagram en proférant des messages haineux, particulièrement contre les musulmans.Tommy Robinson avait fondé, en 2009, l’English Defence League (EDL), un groupe d’extrême droite voulant lutter contre « les dangers de l’islamisme ». Condamné en mai 2018 à treize mois de prison pour avoir filmé et diffusé sur Internet des images d’un procès criminel, alors qu’il n’en avait pas le droit, Tommy Robinson avait été libéré sous caution en août en attente de son procès en appel. Son cas avait attiré l’attention de l’alt-right américaine, et même de Donald Trump Jr., fils du président américain, et de Steve Bannon, ex-conseiller de Donald Trump, qui lui avait apporté son soutien. En novembre, Tommy Robinson est devenu le conseiller spécial du chef du parti europhobe UKIP, Gerard Batten.

« Pas leur place »

Sur les réseaux sociaux, Tommy Robinson, dont le vrai nom est Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, avait déjà connu une interdiction remarquée. En mars 2018, Twitter avait supprimé son compte, qui rassemblait alors des millions d’abonnés et générait des centaines de milliers de visionnages de ces vidéos promouvant des messages incitant à la haîne de l’Islam, expliquait alors The Guardian.

C’est désormais à Facebook d’emboîter le pas, notamment en raison de messages répétés promouvant la haine, selon le quotidien britannique. Dans un communiqué sur le sujet, le réseau social a précisé :

« La page Facebook de Tommy Robinson a de manière répétée contrevenu à ces règles, avec des publications utilisant un langage déshumanisant et des appels à la violence dirigés contre les musulmans. Ce n’est pas une décision que nous prenons à la légère mais les individus et organisations qui attaquent les autres sur la base de ce qu’ils sont n’ont pas leur place sur Facebook et Instagram. »

Interrogé par l’agence de presse britannique PA, Tommy Robinson a affirmé que Facebook avait réagi de la sorte en raison de la diffusion de son dernier documentaire, qui « montre comment l’establishment travaille avec les médias pour me faire tomber et me détruire ». « Il s’agit d’une attaque contre la liberté d’expression à travers le monde », a-t-il déclaré.

Interrogé par l’agence de presse britannique PA, Tommy Robinson a affirmé que Facebook avait réagi à son documentaire Panadrama qui « montre comment l’establishment travaille avec les médias pour me faire tomber et me détruire ». « Il s’agit d’une attaque contre la liberté d’expression à travers le monde », a-t-il estimé. Tommy Robinson est le pseudonyme de Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, tiré du nom d’un célèbre hooligan britannique. Il est le fondateur de l' »English Defence League » (EDL), un groupe marginal affirmant lutter contre la menace islamiste.

Condamné en mai à treize mois de prison pour avoir filmé et diffusé sur internet des images d’un procès criminel qui faisait l’objet de restrictions de couverture, il a été libéré sous caution en août en attente de son procès en appel. Son cas avait attiré l’attention de l' »alt-right » américaine, ou « droite alternative », et même de Donald Trump Jr., fils du président américain, et de Steve Bannon, ex-conseiller de Donald Trump, qui lui avait apporté son soutien. En novembre, il est devenu le conseiller spécial du chef du parti europhobe Ukip Gerard Batten.

Voir enfin:

The full story behind Tommy Robinson’s contempt of court battle after Facebook Live at grooming trial
Before he was jailed for contempt of court in May, a judge told him: ‘Freedom of speech comes with responsibility’

Stephanie Finnegan
leeds live

29 May 2018

In May, Tommy Robinson was jailed over comments which had the potential to cause a retrial at Leeds Crown Court – and we can now reveal the details of the case he was protesting about.

Robinson, whose real name is Stephen Christopher Yaxley-Lennon, streamed an hour-long Facebook Live outside the court in May and within hours it had been watched more than 250,000 times.

A judge who locked the far right activist up for 13 months for contempt of court told him his actions could have caused a long-running trial to be retried which would cost taxpayers ‘hundreds and hundreds of thousands of pounds’.

A court order was put in place temporarily banning any reporting on Robinson’s arrest and sentencing hearing, but LeedsLive challenged the order and were able to report it a few days later.

Now we can reveal the long-running trial he could have put in jeopardy involved a Huddersfield groming gang who were jailed on October 19 for more than 200 years for the grooming and sexual abuse of young children.

The abuse of the vulnerable, isolated and underage girls – the youngest of whom was 11 or 12 – was described by a judge as ‘top of the scale’.

A total of 20 men, ranging in age from 27 to 54, were convicted as part of Operation Tendersea during three trials at Leeds Crown Court throughout 2018 making it the worst scandal to ever hit Huddersfield.

They were found guilty of child sex offences including rape, inciting child prostitution and abduction of a child.

A court order had been in place temporarily banning any reporting of the trials until now.

On May 25, 35-year-old Yaxley-Lennon was arrested on suspicion of a breach of the peace and was held in the court cells before being taken up to the courtroom to face the trial judge.

In a rare move, he was arrested, charged and sentenced within five hours.

The video footage was played to Judge Geoffrey Marson QC as Robinson sat in the dock.

Leeds Crown Court has advised the media that the address given by Stephen Yaxley-Lennon during his hearing on Friday May 25 was an old address.

His current address – which we would publish as part of the court report – was not given to the court.

We have chosen to remove the incorrect address with the current occupants of that property in mind.

To be clear, it is the responsibility of the defendant – in this case Mr Yaxley-Lennon – to ensure information given in a court hearing is accurate.

The media can only report the address given in open court and we have been informed that we were not at fault.
Robinson, whose criminal record dates back to 2005, has a previous conviction for contempt of court.

He was the subject of a suspended prison sentence, imposed at Canterbury Crown Court, after he filmed in court.

He also has convictions for disobeying a court order, possessing identity documents with intent, fraud, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, possessing drugs and threatening behaviour.

In May he was found in contempt of court and in breach of a suspended sentence.

Matthew Harding, mitigating, said his client felt « deep regret » after realising the potential consequences of his actions.

He said Robinson was aware of the reporting restriction in place in the case but thought what he was saying on camera was already in the public domain.

The barrister added: « He was mindful, having spoken to others and taken advice, not to say things that he thought would actually prejudice these proceedings.

« He did not try to cause difficulties for the court process. »

Mr Harding said Robinson had been the victim of assaults while serving time in prison before and there had been « a price on his head » during his last prison term with inmates being offered the reward of drugs and mobile phones to kill him.

But the judge said: “No one could possibly conclude that it would be anything other than highly prejudicial to the defendants in the trial.

“I respect everyone’s right to free speech. That’s one of the most important rights that we have.

“With those rights come responsibilities. The responsibility to exercise that freedom of speech within the law.

“I am not sure you appreciate the potential consequence of what you have done. »

The judge added: “You have to understand we are not preventing publication. We are postponing publication to ensure that the trial is fair.

“When people are convicted and given long sentences, it is on a proper basis and not a conviction that can be overturned.

“It is a serious feature that you were encouraging others to share what you were streaming live on social media.”


Attention: une américanisation peut en cacher une autre ! (Like causes, like effects: while the Trump-loathing left spirals out of control, the Trump-inspired right fights back against the destabilizing effects of globalization on both sides of the Atlantic)

27 février, 2019
No photo description available.
Là où le péché abonde, la grâce surabonde. Paul (Romains 5 : 20)
Où est le péril, croît, le salutaire aussi. Hölderlin
Sur les plans géographique, culturel et social, il existe bien des points communs entre les situations françaises et américaines, à commencer par le déclassement de la classe moyenne. C’est « l’Amérique périphérique » qui a voté Trump, celle des territoires désindustrialisés et ruraux qui est aussi celle des ouvriers, employés, travailleurs indépendants ou paysans. Ceux qui étaient hier au cœur de la machine économique en sont aujourd’hui bannis. Le parallèle avec la situation américaine existe aussi sur le plan culturel, nous avons adopté un modèle économique mondialisé. Fort logiquement, nous devons affronter les conséquences de ce modèle économique mondialisé : l’ouvrier – hier à gauche –, le paysan – hier à droite –, l’employé – à gauche et à droite – ont aujourd’hui une perception commune des effets de la mondialisation et rompent avec ceux qui n’ont pas su les protéger. La France est en train de devenir une société américaine, il n’y a aucune raison pour que l’on échappe aux effets indésirables du modèle. (…) Dans l’ensemble des pays développés, le modèle mondialisé produit la même contestation. Elle émane des mêmes territoires (Amérique périphérique, France périphérique, Angleterre périphérique… ) et de catégories qui constituaient hier la classe moyenne, largement perdue de vue par le monde d’en haut. (…) Faire passer les classes moyennes et populaires pour « réactionnaires », « fascisées », « pétinisées » est très pratique. Cela permet d’éviter de se poser des questions cruciales. Lorsque l’on diagnostique quelqu’un comme fasciste, la priorité devient de le rééduquer, pas de s’interroger sur l’organisation économique du territoire où il vit. L’antifascisme est une arme de classe. Pasolini expliquait déjà dans ses Écrits corsaires que depuis que la gauche a adopté l’économie de marché, il ne lui reste qu’une chose à faire pour garder sa posture de gauche : lutter contre un fascisme qui n’existe pas. C’est exactement ce qui est en train de se passer. Christophe Guilluy
Déclarer que le tombeau des Patriarches est une mosquée, que donc mes ancêtres Abraham, Isaac et Jacob ont été islamisés il y a plus de 3500 ans, que le Mont sur lequel se dressait le Temple de Salomon est un lieu islamique, relèvent du négationnisme le plus antisémite ou le plus analphabète. Le soutien à la fiction « palestinienne », l’apport français au financement des terroristes arabes, le soutien à l’enseignement de la haine dans les livres scolaires financés par l’Union Européenne dépassent le cadre de la simple critique à l’égard la politique israélienne. Les agissements intempestifs du Consulat français de Jérusalem et son soutien permanent au terrorisme anti israélien ne se situent pas dans le cadre d’une diplomatie normale. Les votes permanents de la France automatiques de soutien à toute motion contre l’Etat d’Israël, la politique munichoise de soumission aux Ayatollah iraniens ne sont pas de simples postures politiques. Elles sont le véritable révélateur d’un antisémitisme d’Etat que les définitions et les législations de Mr Macron ne pourront pas masquer… Jacques Kupfer
Je ne voulais pas me mêler à ce qui m’est apparu comme un concours général d’hypocrisie. Je ne voulais pas manifester à côté de tous ces faux culs, champions de l’arrière-pensée, au premier rang desquels figurent les partis de gauche, qui s’accusent d’ailleurs réciproquement de chercher à récupérer le mouvement de protestation. Bien qu’ils se soient mis à part du rassemblement général, je vise notamment et directement Jean-Luc Mélenchon, et ses affidés de «La France insoumise» et leurs proches, les Thomas Guénolé ou Aude Lancelin, et toute la mouvance de l’islamo-gauchisme, qui font des Musulmans, ces «prolétaires» du XXIe siècle», les victimes du «sionisme», lui-même émanation du capitalisme israélo-européen. Car, l’antisionisme est bien, comme l’a dit Emmanuel Macron, la forme réinventée de l’antisémitisme. N’a-t-on pas vu l’autre jour un énergumène en jaune crachant sa haine contre Alain Finkielkraut, et le menaçant de la punition de Dieu, ce qui est la rhétorique et les mots mêmes des islamistes. Mélenchon et les autres se disent grands pourfendeurs de l’antisémitisme, mais…Et ce «mais» fait toute leur imposture. Ils ont une étiquette de gauche. Mais Doriot et Déat l’avaient aussi…. Ceux-là sont à l’extrême de la duplicité. Mais il en est d’autres, plus sournois, dont l’attitude est aussi le symptôme de la gangrène qui se développe dans une partie de la gauche. Je pense naturellement à la déclaration ignominieuse de Jean-Pierre Mignard, l’avocat proche de François Hollande, qui a dit en somme que Finkielkraut avait bien mérité ce qui lui était arrivé. Comment l’ancien président de la République n’a-t-il pas su trouver les mots pour condamner les propos de son ami? J’en viens à préférer le comportement de Marine Le Pen qui, au moins dans ce cas, ne semble pas jouer les hypocrites… Pierre Weill
I give interracial couples a look. Daggers. They get uncomfortable when they see me on the street. Hand in hand and arm in arm. I just hope they’re on in it for the sex mythology. Spike Lee
Now I’m in a space where, being on Pose, I’m invited to red carpets and I have something to say through clothes. My goal is to be a walking piece of political art every time I show up. To challenge expectations. What is masculinity? What does that mean? Women show up every day in pants, but the minute a man wears a dress, the seas part. It happened to me at the Golden Globes [when I wore a pink cape], and I was like, really? Y’all trippin’? I stopped traffic! That Globes outfit changed everything for me. I had the courage to push the status quo. I believe men on the red carpet would love to play more. This industry masquerades itself as inclusive, but actors are afraid to play, because if they show up as something outside of the status quo, they might be received as feminine, and, as a result, they won’t get that masculine job, that superhero job. And that’s the truth. I’ve been confronted with that. I’ve always wanted to wear a ball gown, I just didn’t know when. I was inspired [this past New York Fashion Week] because there’s a conversation happening about inclusion and diversity. There were so many people of different races and voices. At Palomo Spain, genderless boys floated down the runway in gorgeous chiffon dresses and capes. It was lovely. Fashion has the ability to touch people in a different way. I also went to Christian Siriano’s show. I’ve loved him ever since he was on Project Runway. He was the first person who understood that everybody wears clothes—not just size zeros. He’s become the go-to person for all of the Hollywood women who are rejected by the fashion industry. The fashion industry rejects you if you’re above a size four, it’s ridiculous! I’ve always wanted to work with [Siriano]. I got this Oscars gig [hosting a red carpet pre-show], and at his party after the show, I just dropped it in his ear and said, “Do you think you’d have time to make me a gown?” And he said, “AAAAA-BSOLUTELY.” We wanted to play between the masculine and the feminine. This look was interesting because it’s not drag. I’m not a drag queen, I’m a man in a dress. He came up with a tux on the top, and a ballgown that bursts out at the bottom. I wore it with Rick Owens shoes. Rick is very gender-bending and rock’n’roll. It’s a high, 6-inch chunky boot that makes me feel really grounded. And I rocked some Oscar Heyman fine jewelry with it. They’re known for colored jewels and gemstones. I wore their brooches for my Golden Globes look. Billy Porter
The Jussie Smollett case, in which a young black, gay actor has apparently concocted a tale of being attacked by two white men wearing MAGA hats and shouting anti-gay slurs, is just the latest example of how desperately media elites want to confirm their favored narrative about America: that the country is endemically and lethally racist, sexist, and homophobic, and that the election of Donald Trump both proves and reinforces such bigotry. The truth: as instances of actual racism get harder and harder to find, the search to find such bigotry becomes increasingly frenzied and unmoored from reality. Smollett made a not-irrational wager that a patently preposterous narrative about an anti-black, anti-gay hate crime at 2 a.m. in subzero Chicago would be embraced by virtually the entirety of the mainstream media, leading Democratic politicians, Hollywood, and academia, with no one in these cohorts bothering to fact-check his narrative or entertain even armchair skepticism toward it. He also presumed, again with good reason, that to claim victim status would catapult him to the highest echelons of public admiration and accomplishment. And he was right. Kamala Harris and Cory Booker called it a “modern-day lynching.” Joe Biden warned that “we must no longer give this hate safe harbor,” his implication being that we need to stop winking at such racist attacks. If Beale Street Could Talk’s Barry Jenkins lamented, “This what all that hateful mongering has wrought. Are you PROUD???”  Good Morning America interviewed Smollett without asking a single critical question about his story. (…) Even the Chicago Police Department was reluctant to express any skepticism toward the Smollett narrative until it had overwhelming evidence of the hoax, since to question the ubiquity of racism today is to invite accusations of racism. Yet the CPD, along with their law enforcement brethren, are surely aware of what the data say regarding hate crimes. In 2017, the FBI reported an additional 1,000 hate crimes from 2016, for a total of 7,000. But an additional 1,000 police agencies participated in hate-crime reporting in 2017, as Reason’s Robby Soave has pointed out, so it’s not clear that that increase is real or simply a result of more reporting. Even if real, 7,000 “hate crimes” in a country this large is an infinitesimal number. And the definition of a hate crime is highly political: very little black-on-white street crime gets classified as such, though hatred for whites undoubtedly drives a considerable fraction of this activity. (Between 2012 and 2015, blacks committed more than 85 percent of interracial violent victimizations between blacks and whites.) The Smollett case is a rerun of the Covington hoax, which mobilized an identical longing on the part of the media and political elites to confirm the narrative of American racism, now exacerbated in the era of Trump. Native American activist Nathan Phillips concocted an outright lie about his interaction with the Covington Catholic High School students, and he, too, became an instant, revered celebrity. Then as now, public figure after public figure announced that MAGA hats were the very symbol of white supremacy. Alyssa Milano declared that “the MAGA hat is the new white hood.” New York Times columnist Charles Blow called MAGA hats the “new iconography of white supremacy.” Other recent credulously received phony claims of white racism include the Jazmine Barnes case in Houston and racial-profiling charges against a South Carolina cop. Andy Ngo has collected many more. Now that Smollett’s story is falling apart, he is clinging to his victim identity any way he can: his lawyers say that he feels “victimized” by reports that he played a role in the assault. The Smollett and Covington cases, and others, are grounded in the #BelieveSurvivors mantra of the Kavanaugh hearings: the Left demands utter credence toward any claim of racism and sexism, and the merest act of questioning these claims or trying to pin down details is regarded as hateful. Anti-racism—preferably of a performative nature—is now the national religion of white elites, who would rather blame themselves (and the deplorables) for nonexistent racism than speak honestly about the behavioral problems and academic skills gaps that lead to ongoing socioeconomic disparities.  The Senate just passed an anti-lynching bill, backed by Senators Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, and Tim Scott—as if lynchings were a fact of our current reality. Don’t be surprised if Democrats appropriate funding for a new underground railroad. The current anti-racist frenzy is the product of a poisoned academic culture that has declared war on Western Civilization and that teaches students, more than anything else, how to hate—to hate the greatest accomplishments of our civilization, to hate America, and to hate one another. We continue to play with fire. Heather Mac Donald
The Democratic Party is now in the hands of newcomer establishment figures such as Senators Corey Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Mazie Hirono; socialist Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren; newly elected representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, and Rashida Tlaib; and activists like Linda Sasour, Al Sharpton, Maxine Waters, and the usual Hollywood celebrities—all of whom Sen. Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and former Vice President Joe Biden futilely try to appease. The result is that on almost every issue, the answer to Trump is neither liberal nor progressive, but nihilistic. The logical extreme alone ensures revolutionary purity even as it would result in chaos and destruction. (…) Why has the Democratic Party veered so sharply to the hard Left to the point of anarchism? If Donald Trump is the catalyst, the genesis of the new radicalism preceded him. The half-century obsession with identity politics, especially tribal identification and victimhood, taught an entire generation that one’s essence is defined by superficial appearance or lineage, not innate character. For about a half century, universities have eroded inductive and empirical education. Instead, deduction and advocacy took its place—and to such a degree that to question man-made global warming, the dogma of racial separatism and chauvinism, radical abortion, or gay marriage became taboo and proof of near criminality. (…) Most of the nihilistic positions are also funded by wealthy Americans on behalf of poor Americans. Rich leftwing activism reflects a an almost Medieval desire for penance and exemption. Progressive philanthropists virtue-signal their class solidarity without real costs to their own privilege, while assuaging abstract guilt. In other words, never have the representatives of the very rich and the subsidized poor been so eager to make the middle classes pay for their agendas. (…) In sum, the emerging alternative to Trump is not Democratic pragmatism, but an angry nihilism that is as incoherent as it is destructive. Victor Davis Hanson
Trump was greeted by the Washington media and intellectual establishment as if he were the first beast in the Book of Revelation, who arose “out of the sea, having seven heads and ten horns, and upon his horns ten crowns, and upon his heads the name of blasphemy.” Besides the Washington press and pundit corps, Donald Trump faced a third and more formidable opponent: the culture of permanent and senior employees of the federal and state governments, and the political appointees in Washington who revolve in and out from business, think tanks, lobbying firms, universities, and the media. (…) Never before in the history of the presidency had a commander in chief earned the antipathy of the vast majority of the media, much of the career establishments of both political parties, the majority of the holders of the nation’s accumulated personal wealth, and the permanent federal bureaucracy. And lived to tell the tale. Victor Davis Hanson
There have been so far about three general reactions to the concocted Jussie Smollett psychodrama. One, and the most common, has been apprehension that Smollett’s lies will discredit future real incidents of hate crimes against gays and minorities. This could be a legitimate concern, given the tensions within a multiracial society. Yet, in fact, there is no evidence in the past that false reports (some lists of such fake hate crimes put the number at around 400) have had such an effect—either on spiking real hate crimes, suppressing reporting, discouraging police investigations, or preventing even more race-crime hoaxes. As Heather Mac Donald has recently once again noted, the 2017 upswing in reported hate crimes from the prior year may well be largely because an additional 1,000 police agencies were for the first time reporting such crimes. Mac Donald also notes that a “hate crime”—a micro percentage of reported violent crime—is narrowly defined not to include general interracial violent victimization, a category in which African-Americans on average commit 85 percent of such crimes. From Tawana Brawley to the Covington kids, fictive accounts of race-based bias and violence have not stopped purported victims from believing that they, too, could invent such incidents and win credibility—to say nothing of profitable attention. After all, the publicity of the Duke Lacrosse or Covington hoaxes did not suggest to Jussie Smollett that he would not be found credible. In fact, the opposite may be true. The more we hear of fake hate crimes, the more we will likely hear of future fake hate crimes. Nor did the spate of prior fake racist crimes discourage quite influential media and celebrity grandees from rushing to embrace the unlikely narrative. (…) Yet much of the nation believed all that and more. Politicians and celebrities did so within minutes. Many did not give up such credence, even as Smollett refused to hand over his cell phone records, which he had cited as electronic proof of the attack, given he supposedly was on the phone at the time with his manager, thus memorializing the attack. If you had any doubt about Smollett’s fiction, he reminds us again that such unbelief says more about you than him: “It feels like if I had said it was a Muslim, or a Mexican, or someone black, I feel like the doubters would have supported me much more. A lot more. And that says a lot about the place that we are in our country right now.” (…) None of recent concocted racially motivated attacks have had any effect in demolishing public credibility about even the most improbable allegations of such assaults. Indeed, in our Orwellian world of racial melodrama, those who rushed to judgment to condemn Donald Trump and his supporters for Smollett’s suffering, turned 180 degrees on hearing the news of the Smollett fabrication. They now soberly and judiciously warned us not to do what they had just done. Instead America was “to wait for all the facts” and not “rush to judgement” in assuming that Smollett was guilty of fraud. Smollett has shown that the most absurd narratives imaginable will continue to gain credence because they fill a deep psychological, cultural—and, yes, careerist—need for millions in the country to believe that hate crimes are epidemic, that they are the currency of the Right, and that they can only be addressed by more government scrutiny of a particular class of victimizers such as the Duke Lacrosse team, the Covington kids, or Smollett’s mythic red-hatted Trump racists. (…) In 2019 America, the number of those likely victimized far outnumbers the shrinking pool of likely victimizers. The rewards and publicity for being a concocted victim of a frenzied Trump supporter far outweigh the possible downside of fabricating the entire incident. As we saw with the Kavanaugh and Covington fiascoes, if a crime could or should be true, then it more or less is. A second reaction was the far more legitimate worry that thousands of hours of careful police work were squandered, as resources were diverted from real crime investigations. Although so far, the overburdened Chicago police have been careful in downplaying this redirection in limited resources, it was no doubt gargantuan.Yet Smollett’s supporters almost immediately questioned the police department’s ethics when authorities ever so cautiously hinted that the facts and Smollett’s own behavior did not line up with a racist attack. Smollett’s probable preemptive O.J. Simpson-like defense will run contrary to facts, but he has learned that ginning up popular furor against the police can, at worst, lead to leverage in plea bargaining and, at  best, turn potential local jurors into nullifying social justice warriors. (…) Yet the third, most important, and most ignored reaction was that in some sense Smollett himself was a racist and had committed a hate crime. His farce is yet another example that it is now largely permissible to slur and smear millions of purported Trump supporters, as either defined by their stereotyped race and gender or their red hats (with or without a logo). As pundits and talking heads nearly wept on screen in their worries about future potential hate crimes that might now not be taken seriously, they abjectly ignored the real hate crime that had just occurred. In truth, Smollett had done his best to ignite some sort of popular racially driven vendetta against conservative white male voters, previously known as “clingers,” “crazies,” “deplorables,” and “irredeemables” who, our elites warn, smell up Walmart, gross America out with toothless smiles, and should be swapped out for new immigrants. (…) Given that the Smollett myth followed so closely after the Covington kids fiction, we can surmise that Smollett counted on two popular reactions: the left-wing public was still thirsty for more “proof” of MAGA white hatred, even if poorly scripted and logically implausible; and, second, Smollett was not much worried about any serious consequences if he should be caught once again in a made-up hate crime. To paraphrase CNN anchorwoman Brooke Baldwin, who in careerist fashion immediately sought to gin up popular outrage over the Smollett “hate crime” attack: “This is America, 2019.” Baldwin is right in her inference that we really are suffering from a national illness—and her own fact-free, careerist-driven editorializing and others like it are the proof. Victor Davis Hanson
The hate attack on Empire star Jussie Smollett is now alleged to be a hoax. That shouldn’t surprise anyone. Smollett’s story was bizarre, bordering on the absurd. (…) How many Trump supporters even exist in the downtown of a city that went 83% for Hillary Clinton — and how many of them watch « Empire? » How many guys looking for a fight carry rope and bottles of bleach around with them? That this case turned out to be a hoax shouldn’t come as too big of a shock. A great many hate crime stories turn out to be hoaxes. Simply looking at what happened to the most widely reported hate crime stories over the past 4-5 years illustrates this: not only the Smollett case but also the Yasmin Seweid, Air Force Academy, Eastern Michigan, Wisconsin-Parkside, Kean College, Covington Catholic, and “Hopewell Baptist burning” racial scandals all turned out to be fakes. And, these cases are not isolated outliers. Doing research for a book, Hate Crime Hoax, I was able to easily put together a data set of 409 confirmed hate hoaxes. An overlapping but substantially different list of 348 hoaxes exists at fakehatecrimes.org, and researcher Laird Wilcox put together another list of at least 300 in his still-contemporary book Crying Wolf. To put these numbers in context, a little over 7,000 hate crimes were reported by the FBI in 2017 and perhaps 8-10% of these are widely reported enough to catch the eye of a national researcher. Why do hoaxers hoax? In some cases, the motivations are tawdry and financial. Jussie Smollett allegedly wanted to make himself a sympathetic figure to boost his salary. However, the motivations of many hoaxers are honorable if misguided. In college campus hate hoax cases (Kean College, U-Chicago), the individuals responsible almost invariably say that they staged incidents to call attention to real incidents of racist violence on campus. Certainly, the media giants that leap to publicize hate crime stories later revealed to be fakes, and the organizations that line up to defend their “victims” — the Southern Poverty Law Center, Black Lives Matter, CAIR — think that they are providing a public service by fighting bigotry. However, hate crime hoaxers are “calling attention to a problem” that is a very small part of total crimes. There is very little brutally violent racism in the modern USA. There are less than 7,000 real hate crimes reported in a typical year. Inter-racial crime is quite rare; 84% of white murder victims and 93% of Black murder victims are killed by criminals of their own race, and the person most likely to kill you is your ex-wife or husband. When violent inter-racial crimes do occur, whites are at least as likely to be the targets as are minorities. Simply put, Klansmen armed with nooses are not lurking on Chicago street corners. In this context, what hate hoaxers actually do is worsen generally good race relations, and distract attention from real problems. As Chicago’s disgusted top cop, Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson, pointed out yesterday, skilled police officers spent four weeks tracking down Smollett’s imaginary attackers — in a city that has seen 28 murders as of Feb. 9th, according to The Chicago Tribune. We all, media and citizens alike, would be better served to focus on real issues like gun violence and the opiate epidemic than on fairy tales like Jussie’s. Wilfred Reilly (Kentucky State University)
Le patriotisme, c’est de l’amour, un sentiment profond que l’on a ou que l’on n’a pas, le moins que l’on puisse dire, c’est qu’on ne le ressent pas chez Emmanuel Macron, ni à l’égard de la France, ni à l’égard des Français. Marine le Pen
L’Europe des peuples a maintenant son étendard. Marine Le Pen
Réveillons-nous également pour dire que le patriotisme est une valeur cardinale du vivre ensemble. Lors de la coupe du monde 2014, arrivant chez un couple d’amis pour regarder un match des bleus, mon fils de 8 ans avait à la main un drapeau Bleu-Blanc-Rouge. La maîtresse de maison, brillante avocate, me dit « cela fait un peu FN, non? ». Cette réaction d’une femme intelligente illustre la bien-pensance ambiante dans laquelle nous nous étions collectivement conditionnés. Au lendemain des attentats, cette amie me fit remarquer que je n’avais pas mis le drapeau français à ma fenêtre pour répondre à la demande de François Hollande. Je lui répondis qu’il était bien gentil de la part du Président de nous demander de mettre un drapeau au balcon mais c’était faire preuve d’amnésie. C’était bien vite oublier que depuis des décennies la gauche de SOS racisme, à commencer par l’ancien Premier secrétaire du PS, vouait aux gémonies toute référence à la nation. Le PS et ses acolytes ont, ces trente dernières années, volontairement voulu associer les patriotes à des nationalistes. Cela a été le fruit d’une stratégie électorale alliant sectarisme et cynisme. Sectarisme afin de s’autoproclamer comme les seuls détenteurs des valeurs républicaines. Cynisme pour faire monter le FN. Vincent Roger (Conseiller régional (LR) d’Ile-de-France, conseiller du 4e arrondissement de Paris, soutien de François Fillon pour la primaire de la droite)
The Green Book is a black story and for a white man to steal that legacy and name for a film that has little or nothing to do with The Green Book is unacceptable. We have always had our stories and our history stolen from us and told through the lens of whiteness and this film is Hollywood’s latest example. Roger Ross Williams
On a le respect de la patrie sans aller vers le nationalisme. (…) Les écoles sont des écoles, ce ne sont pas des casernes. Michel Larivé (La France insoumise)
Sous l’Amérique d’aujourd’hui perce la France de demain. La « flexibilité » à l’américaine — de l’emploi, des horaires d’ouverture des magasins, du départ à la retraite, de la vie familiale désynchronisée —, on connaît déjà. Voici maintenant la revendication de « lieux sûrs », de l’entre-soi, du « droit » de se promener en pyjama dans la rue, des pronoms aussi fluides que le genre. En attendant l’addiction sur ordonnance, la prescription de pilules pour améliorer les résultats scolaires, l’épuration de la littérature, la prohibition de la danse « sexuellement agressive » et du port du sombrero. En huit histoires, toutes de première main, ce livre raconte l’Amérique comme vous ne l’avez jamais vue, la France telle que vous ne la connaissez pas… encore. Présentation de l’éditeur
Les Démocrates comme les Républicains ont à nouveau tenté d’instrumentaliser à leur profit les revendications identitaires qui dominent et divisent la société américaine depuis des années. Les premiers sont convaincus qu’il y a un stock de votes en leur faveur à récupérer chez les “minorités” (Noirs, Latinos, femmes, musulmans, homosexuels) et au lieu de concentrer leurs efforts et leurs discours sur le contenu de leur programme économique et politique, ils se dispersent dans le clientélisme. Les seconds se posent en défenseurs d’une identité américaine blanche et chrétienne menacée. Des deux côtés, on part du principe que l’électeur voudra voter pour une personne qui lui ressemble, et non pas pour une personne dont les idées le convainquent. Et gare aux traîtres! En 2017, un sénateur noir républicain s’est ainsi fait insulter comme “house negro” – nègre de case – parce qu’il soutenait la candidature d’un membre blanc de son parti au poste de ministre de la Justice. À l’inverse, certains de mes amis ne sont plus les bienvenus chez leurs parents pour avoir soutenu Hillary Clinton à la présidentielle de 2016. (…) Je crois que le pays est divisé depuis longtemps et que l’avènement de Trump n’a fait que mettre en lumière le malaise profond de la société américaine. (…) Plus encore qu’ailleurs, la fracture est béante entre de grands gagnants de la mondialisation et des gens “largués”. (…) Alors parfois, des parents sont même prêts à donner des amphétamines à leurs enfants, dès le CP, pour qu’ils obtiennent de bonnes notes. Dans la communauté noire, les aînés convaincus qu’il suffisait d’être honnête et laborieux, de «filer doux» pour réussir, sont moqués par une jeunesse qui se radicalise. Je vous donne un autre exemple de la panique ambiante: à la fin des années soixante, une large majorité d’Américains se déclarait très optimiste sur l’avenir multiracial du pays. En 2001, 70% des Noirs et 62% des Blancs pensaient encore que les relations avec l’autre communauté étaient bonnes. En 2016, avant l’élection de Donald Trump, ils n’étaient plus que 49% des Noirs et 55% des Blancs. (…) La classe politique mais aussi les réseaux sociaux alimentent une vision catastrophiste et spectrale de la réalité. Chacun vit dans sa cave identitaire, sans vue sur l’extérieur et des faits relativement rares prennent une importance disproportionnée dès qu’ils sont massivement diffusés: quand la vidéo d’un homme noir abattu par la police pour avoir traversé en dehors des clous devient virale, le sentiment d’injustice est décuplé. Quand la nouvelle d’un enfant retrouvé assassiné dans les toilettes d’une station-service est commentée ad nauseam à la sortie de chaque école du pays, la peur du prédateur pédophile gagne les foyers. 60% des Américains sont convaincus que la criminalité augmente alors que, selon le FBI, le taux de crimes violents a chuté de 43% depuis 1993. Le danger réel diminue mais le sentiment être en danger augmente, ce qui incite au repli sur soi et sa communauté. (…) L’abondance de l’information disponible donne l’illusion du contrôle, alors qu’elle est en réalité le combustible d’une anxiété souvent paranoïaque. On croit pouvoir tout savoir, tout comprendre tout seul, on se méfie des experts et des intermédiaires – médecins, journalistes – dont la compétence nous rassurait auparavant. D’autres causes de l’anxiété sont la nécessité de s’adapter à des changements de plus en plus rapides, la désagrégation de la cellule familiale, la baisse de la religiosité, la précarisation de l’emploi ou encore l’obsession du risque zéro. Dans un pays riche, on finit par être beaucoup plus angoissé à l’idée que “quelque chose pourrait nous arriver” que dans un pays pauvre ou, objectivement, les risques encourus – de maladie, d’accident – sont infiniment plus élevés. 18% des Américains souffrent officiellement de troubles anxieux contre seulement 10% en France, où le chiffre est cependant en hausse. Vous verrez que la France va être gagnée par cette maladie (…) L’espérance de vie a diminué pour la seconde année consécutive aux États-Unis à cause d’une épidémie qui touche toutes les classes sociales: depuis 1999, 350 000 Américains sont morts d’une overdose d’opioïdes. Ces médicaments contre la douleur, efficaces et bon marché dans un pays où se soigner coûte très cher, ont été massivement prescrits pendant des années en dépit de leur fort potentiel addictif. En cause, une collusion avérée entre des laboratoires pharmaceutiques et des médecins rémunérés pour promouvoir leurs opioïdes, mais aussi la demande croissante des patients de ne pas avoir mal. Malgré les efforts des pouvoirs publics, l’épidémie n’a pas diminué en 2017: pour les trois millions d’accro aux opioïdes que comptent les États-Unis, il est facile de se procurer les pilules, importées de Chine, sur le Dark Web, l’internet caché. (…) La classe ouvrière et la classe moyenne américaine souffrent des répercussions d’un ultralibéralisme que, Bernie Sanders mis à part, les Démocrates n’ont jamais vraiment dénoncé, quand ils ne l’ont pas eux aussi encouragé. Leur langage de solidarité est sélectif — il cible certaines «communautés» au détriment d’autres – et hypocrite puisque ces élites tirent leur rente de situation d’une mondialisation débridée qui est à l’origine du malheur de leurs concitoyens. Or, quand on vient dire à un type qui se tue à la tâche sur un chantier mais n’a pas de quoi se payer le dentiste qu’il est un “blanc privilégié”, il ne faut pas s’étonner qu’il le prenne mal. Cela explique aussi, bien sûr, le succès de Donald Trump. (…) Sincèrement, je trouve que les relations entre hommes et femmes sont plus agréables en France qu’aux États-Unis. Metoo va sans doute aggraver la défiance qui existe déjà ici entre les deux sexes. D’ailleurs, MeToo n’a pas été initié par les féministes radicales. C’est le prolongement d’un mouvement amorcé depuis longtemps sur les campus américains et connu sous le nom de Title IX, nom d’une mesure adoptée en 1972 pour obliger les universités à financer à parts égales les équipes de sport féminines et masculines. Au fil des ans, son application s’est étendue à la lutte contre le harcèlement sexuel et les discriminations. Title IX a fait beaucoup pour l’égalité entre les sexes mais les meilleures intentions sont souvent perverties. La question du consentement, largement reprise par MeToo, l’illustre: est-il raisonnable, par exemple, qu’une femme puisse retirer son consentement après l’acte sexuel parce que, le lendemain, elle apprend que son partenaire lui a menti sur sa situation matrimoniale? (…) Vous n’imaginez pas (…) à quel point les féministes sont divisées. Les plus radicales ne cherchent pas à en finir avec le patriarcat mais à prendre leur revanche en instaurant le matriarcat. L’homme blanc de plus de 50 ans est la cible préférée (…) ce genre de féminisme, si l’on peut dire, n’est pas une alternative au trumpisme puisqu’il est lui aussi, une manifestation de la «fracturation identitaire» qui mine les États-Unis. Géraldine Smith
Le livre s’intitulait Scènes de la vie future. Georges Duhamel décrivait l’Amérique qu’il avait visitée en 1929 ; une société rongée par le matérialisme, le consumérisme, le puritanisme (en pleine prohibition). Il s’effrayait de l’influence américaine sur une France qui ne demandait qu’à être contaminée par les virus venus d’outre-Atlantique. L’ouvrage publié en 1930 connut un immense succès. Sans le savoir, Duhamel avait inventé un genre éditorial en soi : le vu en Amérique, bientôt en France. (…) Comme dans son précédent ouvrage, qui racontait l’échec du « vivre ensemble » dans le XIe arrondissement de Paris, [Géraldine Smith] s’avère une bobo contrariée par le réel, mais qui a le mérite, contrairement à la plupart de ses pairs, de ne pas refuser de voir ce qu’elle voit. On peut lui reprocher ses illusions, pas son honnêteté intellectuelle. Bien sûr, elle ne décèle dans ce qu’elle dénonce que « des effets pervers » d’idées justes, puisque provenant du fonds idéaliste de gauche, sans comprendre — ou admettre — que c’est son idéalisme de gauche qui est pervers. Géraldine Smith est une des innombrables incarnations contemporaines de la fameuse phrase de Bossuet : « Dieu rit de ceux qui déplorent les effets dont ils chérissent les causes. » Pourtant, à part Dieu, personne n’a envie de rire après avoir lu ce qu’elle raconte. Installée depuis dix ans en Caroline du Nord, elle nous montre une Amérique toujours plus riche avec toujours plus de pauvres ; avec moins de chômeurs que jamais, mais toujours moins de protection sociale aussi. Le travail du dimanche désagrège une vie de famille déjà minée par le divorce de masse ; le règne du « cool » dans les vêtements fait songer à la célèbre phrase d’Einstein sur « l’Amérique passée directement de la barbarie à la décadence ». Un Américain sur quatre va quotidiennement au fast-food ; et les autres se nourrissent de pizzas ou de sushis avalés n’importe comment, n’importe où, à n’importe quelle heure. Bien la peine de dépenser des milliards de dollars dans des campagnes contre l’obésité ! Le chapitre sur les enfants traités par amphétamines pour obtenir de meilleurs résultats scolaires fait froid dans le dos. Un médecin explique : « Notre société a décidé que modifier l’environnement de l’enfant coûterait trop cher. Nous avons donc décidé de modifier l’enfant. » Un professeur de psychiatrie analyse les conséquences du laxisme des parents et des profs : « À l’école, on punissait les enfants qui ne restaient pas assis. Aujourd’hui, on les envoie en thérapie et on les drogue. » Pas étonnant que l’Amérique soit aussi le pays où des millions de malades sont devenus de véritables « drogués » après qu’on les eut soignés avec des dérivés de l’opium pour atténuer les effets de la douleur. Le pays également où des parents conduisent leurs enfants de 10 ans chez des médecins afin que ceux-ci bloquent par des traitements chimiques leur puberté, parce que leur fille ne se sent pas à l’aise dans son identité de genre. Mais c’est à l’université, sur les campus que le monde entier leur envie, que l’Amérique fabrique son avenir. Et le nôtre. Un avenir paradoxal, à la fois hyperprotecteur et hyperconflictuel. La protection de tous ceux qui ne peuvent supporter les « microagressions » concernant leur sexe, leur genre, leur couleur de peau, leurs origines. Ceux-là ont le droit à des « trigger warnings » (déclencheurs d’alerte) et des « lecteurs de sensibilité » pour éviter tout ce qui pourrait les choquer : « Les livres ne sont pas le lieu où un lecteur doit faire face à une représentation nocive ou stéréotypée de ce qu’il est. » En clair, les femmes ne doivent plus lire Madame Bovary, les Juifs ne s’aventureront plus dans la lecture de Rebatet ou de Barrès, ou même de Balzac ou Voltaire ; les homosexuels ne chanteront plus du Brassens ou du Brel et les hétérosexuels ne liront pas Jean Genet. Chacun chez soi et les vaches seront bien gardées, disait le dicton populaire d’antan. C’est exactement ce que nous montre Géraldine Smith, lorsqu’elle nous relate la mésaventure de son fils et d’un de ses amis noirs, à qui la « fraternité noire » (sorte de confrérie étudiante, NDLR) interdit de s’installer ensemble dans le campus. Ou ces femmes noires qui refusent la promiscuité avec les femmes blanches accusées d’être des « privilégiées ». Ou ces filles qui s’écrient : « Stop! You are making me really unconfortable! » [Arrêtez ! Vous me mettez vraiment mal à l’aise ! »] dès qu’elles ont un désaccord avec un garçon. Ou cet étudiant sanctionné par l’université pour une « danse sexuellement agressive ». L’Amérique qui sort de ce tableau édifiant est à rebours des idéaux de ceux qui l’ont forgée : les féministes et les militants noirs organisent leur propre ségrégation. Les existentialistes les plus fanatiques inventent l’essentialisme des races et des genres le plus implacable. Ressuscitent le vieux principe de l’apartheid : « séparé, mais égal ». Comme le reconnaît, effarée, Géraldine Smith : « Les parents noirs cherchaient à se fondre dans l’Amérique blanche ; leurs enfants les accusent de [blanchissement/lavage à blanc] “white washing” ; les premiers luttaient pour le droit de s’asseoir à la même table, les seconds veulent qu’on leur dresse une table de même taille, mais séparée. » Elle voit juste : tout ce qu’elle décrit viendra en France — y est déjà. Nous allons vivre une nouvelle vague d’américanisation : après celle des années 30 (décrite par Georges Duhamel), celle de l’après-guerre (le yé-yé et la société de consommation), celle des années 80 (McDonald’s et antiracisme multiculturel), nous subirons celle qui vient : séparation de plus en plus conflictuelle des races et des sexes. Comme si, contrairement à tous les lieux communs progressistes, c’était le patriarcat blanc, assis sur la civilisation occidentale, qui s’avérait en dépit de ses limites et de ses crimes le plus « inclusif », car porteur d’une raison universaliste, héritée de l’Antiquité grecque, romaine et chrétienne. Georges Duhamel l’aurait volontiers expliqué à Géraldine Smith, qui ne l’aurait sans doute pas cru. Eric Zemmour

Attention: une américanisation peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où entre la dénonciation d’un film multi-oscarisé célébrant l’amitié entre un pianiste noir et son chauffeur blanc

Et la multiplication, sans compter l’effet de la meilleure prise en compte de vraies aggressions qui restent statistiquement marginales, des fausses agressions racistes ou homophobes …

La gauche américaine s’enferme chaque jour un peu plus ouvertement dans la pseudo-politique et le maximalisme du communautarisme racial ou sexuel

Et qu’entre un drapeau national à l’intérieur même des écoles dénoncé par la gauche comme casernisation

Et un drapeau inversé d’étoiles bleues sur fond jaune …

Les idées trop vite enterrées du Front national font, entre deux concours d’hypocrisie de nos pompiers-pyromanes, un retour fracassant

Comment ne pas voir …

Ces « scènes de la vie future » qui, comme le rappelle bien le dernier livre de Géraldine Smith, ne devraient en effet pas manquer d’arriver en France …

Mais aussi, ce qu’elle semble oublier, l’autre côté de ces effets logiques du choix du modèle économique mondialisé …

A savoir leur contestation depuis longtemps décrite par le géographe Christophe Guilluy …

Et bien anticipée par un prétendu idiot du village comme Trump …

Car issue des mêmes territoires géographiques et catégories sociales …

Aujourd’hui marginalisés mais encore numériquement majoritaires … ?

Éric Zemmour : «Scènes de la vie future»
Eric Zemmour
Le Figaro
31/10/2018

CHRONIQUE – Dans un livre très documenté, Géraldine Smith offre une description apocalyptique du progressisme américain qui transforme le pays en enfer. Et qui a déjà contaminé la France.

Le livre s’intitulait Scènes de la vie future. Georges Duhamel décrivait l’Amérique qu’il avait visitée en 1929 ; une société rongée par le matérialisme, le consumérisme, le puritanisme (en pleine prohibition). Il s’effrayait de l’influence américaine sur une France qui ne demandait qu’à être contaminée par les virus venus d’outre-Atlantique. L’ouvrage publié en 1930 connut un immense succès. Sans le savoir, Duhamel avait inventé un genre éditorial en soi : le vu en Amérique, bientôt en France.

Géraldine Smith n’a ni l’élégance littéraire, ni la vaste culture, ni la hauteur de vue de son lointain prédécesseur. Son style journalistique est sans goût ni saveur, mais il a le mérite d’être concret et pédagogique. Ses analyses sont pauvres, mais ses descriptions sont riches. Comme dans son précédent ouvrage, qui racontait l’échec du « vivre ensemble » dans le XIe arrondissement de Paris, notre observatrice s’avère une bobo contrariée par le réel, mais qui a le mérite, contrairement à la plupart de ses pairs, de ne pas refuser de voir ce qu’elle voit. On peut lui reprocher ses illusions, pas son honnêteté intellectuelle. Bien sûr, elle ne décèle dans ce qu’elle dénonce que « des effets pervers » d’idées justes, puisque provenant du fonds idéaliste de gauche, sans comprendre — ou admettre — que c’est son idéalisme de gauche qui est pervers. Géraldine Smith est une des innombrables incarnations contemporaines de la fameuse phrase [approximative, voir [1]] de Bossuet : « Dieu rit de ceux qui déplorent les effets dont ils chérissent les causes. »

Pourtant, à part Dieu, personne n’a envie de rire après avoir lu ce qu’elle raconte. Installée depuis dix ans en Caroline du Nord, elle nous montre une Amérique toujours plus riche avec toujours plus de pauvres ; avec moins de chômeurs que jamais, mais toujours moins de protection sociale aussi. Le travail du dimanche désagrège une vie de famille déjà minée par le divorce de masse ; le règne du « cool » dans les vêtements fait songer à la célèbre phrase d’Einstein sur « l’Amérique passée directement de la barbarie à la décadence ». Un Américain sur quatre va quotidiennement au fast-food ; et les autres se nourrissent de pizzas ou de sushis avalés n’importe comment, n’importe où, à n’importe quelle heure. Bien la peine de dépenser des milliards de dollars dans des campagnes contre l’obésité ! Le chapitre sur les enfants traités par amphétamines pour obtenir de meilleurs résultats scolaires fait froid dans le dos. Un médecin explique : « Notre société a décidé que modifier l’environnement de l’enfant coûterait trop cher. Nous avons donc décidé de modifier l’enfant. » Un professeur de psychiatrie analyse les conséquences du laxisme des parents et des profs : « À l’école, on punissait les enfants qui ne restaient pas assis. Aujourd’hui, on les envoie en thérapie et on les drogue. » Pas étonnant que l’Amérique soit aussi le pays où des millions de malades sont devenus de véritables « drogués » après qu’on les eut soignés avec des dérivés de l’opium pour atténuer les effets de la douleur. Le pays également où des parents conduisent leurs enfants de 10 ans chez des médecins afin que ceux-ci bloquent par des traitements chimiques leur puberté, parce que leur fille ne se sent pas à l’aise dans son identité de genre.

Mais c’est à l’université, sur les campus que le monde entier leur envie, que l’Amérique fabrique son avenir. Et le nôtre. Un avenir paradoxal, à la fois hyperprotecteur et hyperconflictuel. La protection de tous ceux qui ne peuvent supporter les « microagressions » concernant leur sexe, leur genre, leur couleur de peau, leurs origines. Ceux-là ont le droit à des « trigger warnings » (déclencheurs d’alerte) et des « lecteurs de sensibilité » pour éviter tout ce qui pourrait les choquer : « Les livres ne sont pas le lieu où un lecteur doit faire face à une représentation nocive ou stéréotypée de ce qu’il est. » En clair, les femmes ne doivent plus lire Madame Bovary, les Juifs ne s’aventureront plus dans la lecture de Rebatet ou de Barrès, ou même de Balzac ou Voltaire ; les homosexuels ne chanteront plus du Brassens ou du Brel et les hétérosexuels ne liront pas Jean Genet. Chacun chez soi et les vaches seront bien gardées, disait le dicton populaire d’antan. C’est exactement ce que nous montre Géraldine Smith, lorsqu’elle nous relate la mésaventure de son fils et d’un de ses amis noirs, à qui la « fraternité noire » (sorte de confrérie étudiante, NDLR) interdit de s’installer ensemble dans le campus. Ou ces femmes noires qui refusent la promiscuité avec les femmes blanches accusées d’être des « privilégiées ». Ou ces filles qui s’écrient : « Stop! You are making me really unconfortable! » [Arrêtez ! Vous me mettez vraiment mal à l’aise ! »] dès qu’elles ont un désaccord avec un garçon. Ou cet étudiant sanctionné par l’université pour une « danse sexuellement agressive ». L’Amérique qui sort de ce tableau édifiant est à rebours des idéaux de ceux qui l’ont forgée : les féministes et les militants noirs organisent leur propre ségrégation. Les existentialistes les plus fanatiques inventent l’essentialisme des races et des genres le plus implacable. Ressuscitent le vieux principe de l’apartheid : « séparé, mais égal ». Comme le reconnaît, effarée, Géraldine Smith : « Les parents noirs cherchaient à se fondre dans l’Amérique blanche ; leurs enfants les accusent de [blanchissement/lavage à blanc] “white washing” ; les premiers luttaient pour le droit de s’asseoir à la même table, les seconds veulent qu’on leur dresse une table de même taille, mais séparée. »

Elle voit juste : tout ce qu’elle décrit viendra en France — y est déjà. Nous allons vivre une nouvelle vague d’américanisation : après celle des années 30 (décrite par Georges Duhamel), celle de l’après-guerre (le yé-yé et la société de consommation), celle des années 80 (McDonald’s et antiracisme multiculturel), nous subirons celle qui vient : séparation de plus en plus conflictuelle des races et des sexes. Comme si, contrairement à tous les lieux communs progressistes, c’était le patriarcat blanc, assis sur la civilisation occidentale, qui s’avérait en dépit de ses limites et de ses crimes le plus « inclusif », car porteur d’une raison universaliste, héritée de l’Antiquité grecque, romaine et chrétienne. Georges Duhamel l’aurait volontiers expliqué à Géraldine Smith, qui ne l’aurait sans doute pas cru.

VU EN AMÉRIQUE BIENTÔT EN FRANCE.
de Géraldine Smith,
paru chez Stock,
17 octobre 2018,
à Paris
257 pages,
19,50 €.
ISBN-13 : 978-2234083745

Voir également:

The Frenzied Search for Racism

Elites bought Jussie Smollett’s story because it confirmed their cherished narrative about a hateful America.

Heather Mac Donald

City journal

February 18, 2019

The Jussie Smollett case, in which a young black, gay actor has apparently concocted a tale of being attacked by two white men wearing MAGA hats and shouting anti-gay slurs, is just the latest example of how desperately media elites want to confirm their favored narrative about America: that the country is endemically and lethally racist, sexist, and homophobic, and that the election of Donald Trump both proves and reinforces such bigotry.

The truth: as instances of actual racism get harder and harder to find, the search to find such bigotry becomes increasingly frenzied and unmoored from reality.

Smollett made a not-irrational wager that a patently preposterous narrative about an anti-black, anti-gay hate crime at 2 a.m. in subzero Chicago would be embraced by virtually the entirety of the mainstream media, leading Democratic politicians, Hollywood, and academia, with no one in these cohorts bothering to fact-check his narrative or entertain even armchair skepticism toward it. He also presumed, again with good reason, that to claim victim status would catapult him to the highest echelons of public admiration and accomplishment. And he was right. Kamala Harris and Cory Booker called it a “modern-day lynching.” Joe Biden warned that “we must no longer give this hate safe harbor,” his implication being that we need to stop winking at such racist attacks. If Beale Street Could Talk’s Barry Jenkins lamented, “This what all that hateful mongering has wrought. Are you PROUD???”  Good Morning America interviewed Smollett without asking a single critical question about his story.

The examples are as numerous as the retractions will be minimal.

Even the Chicago Police Department was reluctant to express any skepticism toward the Smollett narrative until it had overwhelming evidence of the hoax, since to question the ubiquity of racism today is to invite accusations of racism. Yet the CPD, along with their law enforcement brethren, are surely aware of what the data say regarding hate crimes. In 2017, the FBI reported an additional 1,000 hate crimes from 2016, for a total of 7,000. But an additional 1,000 police agencies participated in hate-crime reporting in 2017, as Reason’s Robby Soave has pointed out, so it’s not clear that that increase is real or simply a result of more reporting. Even if real, 7,000 “hate crimes” in a country this large is an infinitesimal number. And the definition of a hate crime is highly political: very little black-on-white street crime gets classified as such, though hatred for whites undoubtedly drives a considerable fraction of this activity. (Between 2012 and 2015, blacks committed more than 85 percent of interracial violent victimizations between blacks and whites.)

The Smollett case is a rerun of the Covington hoax, which mobilized an identical longing on the part of the media and political elites to confirm the narrative of American racism, now exacerbated in the era of Trump. Native American activist Nathan Phillips concocted an outright lie about his interaction with the Covington Catholic High School students, and he, too, became an instant, revered celebrity. Then as now, public figure after public figure announced that MAGA hats were the very symbol of white supremacy. Alyssa Milano declared that “the MAGA hat is the new white hood.” New York Times columnist Charles Blow called MAGA hats the “new iconography of white supremacy.” Other recent credulously received phony claims of white racism include the Jazmine Barnes case in Houston and racial-profiling charges against a South Carolina cop. Andy Ngo has collected many more. Now that Smollett’s story is falling apart, he is clinging to his victim identity any way he can: his lawyers say that he feels “victimized” by reports that he played a role in the assault.

The Smollett and Covington cases, and others, are grounded in the #BelieveSurvivors mantra of the Kavanaugh hearings: the Left demands utter credence toward any claim of racism and sexism, and the merest act of questioning these claims or trying to pin down details is regarded as hateful. Anti-racism—preferably of a performative nature—is now the national religion of white elites, who would rather blame themselves (and the deplorables) for nonexistent racism than speak honestly about the behavioral problems and academic skills gaps that lead to ongoing socioeconomic disparities.  The Senate just passed an anti-lynching bill, backed by Senators Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, and Tim Scott—as if lynchings were a fact of our current reality. Don’t be surprised if Democrats appropriate funding for a new underground railroad.

The current anti-racist frenzy is the product of a poisoned academic culture that has declared war on Western Civilization and that teaches students, more than anything else, how to hate—to hate the greatest accomplishments of our civilization, to hate America, and to hate one another.

We continue to play with fire.

Voir de même:

Yes, ‘This Is America, 2019’

Victor Davis Hanson
American greatness
February 24th, 2019

There have been so far about three general reactions to the concocted Jussie Smollett psychodrama.

One, and the most common, has been apprehension that Smollett’s lies will discredit future real incidents of hate crimes against gays and minorities. This could be a legitimate concern, given the tensions within a multiracial society.

Yet, in fact, there is no evidence in the past that false reports (some lists of such fake hate crimes put the number at around 400) have had such an effect—either on spiking real hate crimes, suppressing reporting, discouraging police investigations, or preventing even more race-crime hoaxes.

As Heather Mac Donald has recently once again noted, the 2017 upswing in reported hate crimes from the prior year may well be largely because an additional 1,000 police agencies were for the first time reporting such crimes. Mac Donald also notes that a “hate crime”—a micro percentage of reported violent crime—is narrowly defined not to include general interracial violent victimization, a category in which African-Americans on average commit 85 percent of such crimes.

From Tawana Brawley to the Covington kids, fictive accounts of race-based bias and violence have not stopped purported victims from believing that they, too, could invent such incidents and win credibility—to say nothing of profitable attention. After all, the publicity of the Duke Lacrosse or Covington hoaxes did not suggest to Jussie Smollett that he would not be found credible. In fact, the opposite may be true. The more we hear of fake hate crimes, the more we will likely hear of future fake hate crimes.

Nor did the spate of prior fake racist crimes discourage quite influential media and celebrity grandees from rushing to embrace the unlikely narrative. After all, Americans were asked to believe without evidence that two venomous white men, with red MAGA hats, hooded, and deliberately prowling about at 2 a.m.  in subfreezing temperatures, in a liberal neighborhood of liberal Chicago (that went 83 percent for Hillary Clinton), were on the hunt for random minorities and gays, replete with customary ski-masks, lynching rope, and bleach.

And then, once the MAGA devils instinctively recognized a random early-morning passerby as a rather minor actor from a Fox TV series “Empire,” they would grow enraged and shout out racial and homophobic slurs and MAGA rah-rahs (“This is MAGA country!”)—incensed by their sudden recognition that their target was, in fact, the obviously world-famous Smollett (who said his white thuggish assaulters first yelled out “Empire!” then, to add clarity about their white fears of such a hit series, they added “F—ot Empire n—er!”).

Smollett, however, insists he stood defiant (“I don’t answer to Empire. My name ain’t Empire.”), in his role as a supposedly all-too-well known and despised actor in the alt-white world.

Further, we were asked to believe that in between blows from two much larger white demons, the relatively diminutive Smollett did not break off his phone call transmission. Instead, as he later described the fracas, he fought heroically back (“So I punched his ass right back. We started tussling”) and drove off the Trump-fueled monsters (“And I want a little gay boy who might watch this to see that I fought the f— back. I didn’t run off. They did.”), even as he was oblivious to the attempted lynching (“I noticed the rope around my neck and I started screaming”).

In addition, we were asked to believe that Smollett’s prior criminal conviction for providing police with false information during a DUI arrest, and the strange coincidence of receiving a recent death threat in the mail packaged with mysterious white powder (“In the letter, it had a stick figure hanging from a tree with a gun pointing toward it: ‘Smollett Jussie, you will die, black [bleep]. There was no address, but the return address said in big red letters, ‘MAGA.’“), would provide no useful context for these strange events.

Discrediting Hate Crimes?
Instead, Smollett fought off the racists for the greater good of America: “I have fought for love. I’m an advocate. I respect too much the people—who I am now one of those people—who have been attacked in any way. You do such a disservice when you lie about something like this.”

So do not dare question either the courage or the mettle of the crusading Smollett: “For me, the main thing was the idea that I somehow switched up my story, you know? And that somehow maybe I added a little extra trinket, you know, of the MAGA thing. I didn’t need to add anything like that. They called me a f—ot, they called me a n—er. There’s no which way you cut it. I don’t need some MAGA hat as the cherry on top of some racist sundae.”

Amen, Jussie.

Yet much of the nation believed all that and more. Politicians and celebrities did so within minutes. Many did not give up such credence, even as Smollett refused to hand over his cell phone records, which he had cited as electronic proof of the attack, given he supposedly was on the phone at the time with his manager, thus memorializing the attack. If you had any doubt about Smollett’s fiction, he reminds us again that such unbelief says more about you than him: “It feels like if I had said it was a Muslim, or a Mexican, or someone black, I feel like the doubters would have supported me much more. A lot more. And that says a lot about the place that we are in our country right now.”

Again, amen, it does say a lot, Jussie.

None of recent concocted racially motivated attacks have had any effect in demolishing public credibility about even the most improbable allegations of such assaults. Indeed, in our Orwellian world of racial melodrama, those who rushed to judgment to condemn Donald Trump and his supporters for Smollett’s suffering, turned 180 degrees on hearing the news of the Smollett fabrication. They now soberly and judiciously warned us not to do what they had just done. Instead America was “to wait for all the facts” and not “rush to judgement” in assuming that Smollett was guilty of fraud.

Smollett has shown that the most absurd narratives imaginable will continue to gain credence because they fill a deep psychological, cultural—and, yes, careerist—need for millions in the country to believe that hate crimes are epidemic, that they are the currency of the Right, and that they can only be addressed by more government scrutiny of a particular class of victimizers such as the Duke Lacrosse team, the Covington kids, or Smollett’s mythic red-hatted Trump racists.

(A cynic might have advised Smollett to have first checked that the anticipated surveillance cameras under which he staged the attack were pointing in the right direction, and that he should have ensured his “Empire”hirelings did not buy their sundry assault gear—masks, hats, etc.—all at the same store or at least not on film, and that Smollett himself should have not written them a traceable check for their services, and that he should have written into his script antifreeze dousing instead of household bleach that freezes at about 5 degrees.)

In 2019 America, the number of those likely victimized far outnumbers the shrinking pool of likely victimizers. The rewards and publicity for being a concocted victim of a frenzied Trump supporter far outweigh the possible downside of fabricating the entire incident. As we saw with the Kavanaugh and Covington fiascoes, if a crime could or should be true, then it more or less is.

Wasted Time and Money?
A second reaction was the far more legitimate worry that thousands of hours of careful police work were squandered, as resources were diverted from real crime investigations. Although so far, the overburdened Chicago police have been careful in downplaying this redirection in limited resources, it was no doubt gargantuan.Yet Smollett’s supporters almost immediately questioned the police department’s ethics when authorities ever so cautiously hinted that the facts and Smollett’s own behavior did not line up with a racist attack.

Smollett’s probable preemptive O.J. Simpson-like defense will run contrary to facts, but he has learned that ginning up popular furor against the police can, at worst, lead to leverage in plea bargaining and, at  best, turn potential local jurors into nullifying social justice warriors.

In lieu of either defense, he could turn to fallback defenses that he acted in a drug-induced diminished capacity and was not responsible for his actions—or that his jealous “Empire”duo secretly scouted out his nocturnal routines, were all the time covert Trump/MAGA converts, and, as traitors to their race and class, in envy of Smollett’s success, and as ingrates pounced despite receiving such generous financial help from him in the recent past.

Racism Against “Racists” Is Not Racism
Yet the third, most important, and most ignored reaction was that in some sense Smollett himself was a racist and had committed a hate crime.

His farce is yet another example that it is now largely permissible to slur and smear millions of purported Trump supporters, as either defined by their stereotyped race and gender or their red hats (with or without a logo). As pundits and talking heads nearly wept on screen in their worries about future potential hate crimes that might now not be taken seriously, they abjectly ignored the real hate crime that had just occurred. In truth, Smollett had done his best to ignite some sort of popular racially driven vendetta against conservative white male voters, previously known as “clingers,” “crazies,” “deplorables,” and “irredeemables” who, our elites warn, smell up Walmart, gross America out with toothless smiles, and should be swapped out for new immigrants.

Or as courageous Smollett described the motives for the faux-attack of his two Nigerian-American contractors, supposedly dressed up as Donald Trump’s white ogres, “I come really, really hard against 45”—that is, Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States—“I come really hard against his administration, and I don’t hold my tongue. I could only go off of their words. I mean, who says, “f—ot Empire n—er,” “This is MAGA country, n—er,” ties a noose around your neck, and pours [frozen?] bleach on you? And this is just a friendly fight? I will never be the man that this did not happen to. Everything is forever changed.”

In fact, no one says that, Jussie, and no one ever did say that except you who scripted the dialogue.

Given that the Smollett myth followed so closely after the Covington kids fiction, we can surmise that Smollett counted on two popular reactions: the left-wing public was still thirsty for more “proof” of MAGA white hatred, even if poorly scripted and logically implausible; and, second, Smollett was not much worried about any serious consequences if he should be caught once again in a made-up hate crime.

To paraphrase CNN anchorwoman Brooke Baldwin, who in careerist fashion immediately sought to gin up popular outrage over the Smollett “hate crime” attack: “This is America, 2019.”

Baldwin is right in her inference that we really are suffering from a national illness—and her own fact-free, careerist-driven editorializing and others like it are the proof.

Voir de plus:

Survival at the White House

The administrative state took aim at Trump, but it has not been able to destroy himNo one in Washington called Donald J. Trump a “god” (as journalist Evan Thomas in 2009 had suggested of Obama) when he arrived in January 2017. No one felt nerve impulses in his leg when Trump talked, as journalist Chris Matthews once remarked had happened to him after hearing an Obama speech. And no newsman or pundit cared how crisply creased were Trump’s pants, at least in the manner that New York Times columnist David Brooks had once praised Obama’s sartorial preciseness. Instead, Trump was greeted by the Washington media and intellectual establishment as if he were the first beast in the Book of Revelation, who arose “out of the sea, having seven heads and ten horns, and upon his horns ten crowns, and upon his heads the name of blasphemy.”

Besides the Washington press and pundit corps, Donald Trump faced a third and more formidable opponent: the culture of permanent and senior employees of the federal and state governments, and the political appointees in Washington who revolve in and out from business, think tanks, lobbying firms, universities, and the media. Or as the legal scholar of the administrative state Philip Hamburger put it: “Although the United States remains a republic, administrative power creates within it a very different sort of government. The result is a state within the state — an administrative state within the Constitution’s United States.”

Since the U.S. post-war era, the growth of American state and federal government has been enormous. By 2017, there were nearly 3 million civilian federal workers, and another 1.3 million Americans in the uniformed military. Over 22 million local, state, and federal workers had made government the largest employment sector.

The insidious power of the unelected administrative state is easy to understand. After all, it governs the most powerful aspects of modern American life: taxes, surveillance, criminal-justice proceedings, national security, and regulation. The nightmares of any independent trucker or small-business person are being audited by the IRS, having communications surveilled, or being investigated by a government regulator or prosecutor.

The reach of the deep state ultimately is based on two premises. One, improper government-worker behavior is difficult to audit or at least to be held to account, given that it is protected by both union contracts and civil-service law. And, two, a government appointee or bureaucrat has the unlimited resources of the state behind him, while the targeted private citizen in a federal indictment, tax audit, or regulation violation not only does not, but is assumed also not to have the means even to provide an adequate legal defense.

In theory, the deep state should have been a nonpartisan meritocratic cadre of government officials who were custodians of a civil service that had often served Americans well and transcended changes in presidential administrations. The ranks of top government regulators, justices, executive officers, and bureaucrats would take advice, and often be drawn, from hallowed, supposedly apolitical East Coast institutions — the World Bank, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Federal Reserve, Ivy League faculties, Wall Street, and blue-chip Washington and New York law firms.

In fact, the deep state grew increasingly political, progressive, and internationalist. Its members and cultural outlook were shaped by the good life on the two coasts and abroad. And every four or eight years, it usually greeted not so much incoming Republican or Democratic presidents as much as fusion-party representatives with reputable résumés, past memberships in similar organizations, and outlooks identical to its own.

Then the disrupter Trump crashed in.

While the deep state was far too vast to be stereotypically monolithic in the Obama and Trump years, it was a general rule that it had admired Obama, who grew it, and it now loathed Trump, who promised to shrink it. Moreover, Trump did not, like most incoming and outgoing politicians, praise in Pavlovian fashion the institutions of Washington. Nothing to Trump was sacred. During and after the campaign, he blasted the CIA, the FBI, the IRS, and Department of Justice as either incompetent or prejudicial.

When Trump cited the Department of Veterans Affairs, it was to side with its victims, not its administrators or venerable history. In Trump’s mind, the problem with federal agencies was not just that they overreached and were weaponized, but that their folds of bureaucracy led to incompetency.

Trump was not so much critical as ignorant of the deep state’s rules and its supposed sterling record of stable governance. Trump proved willing to fire lifelong public servants. He ignored sober and judicious advice from Washington “wise men.” He appointed “crazy” outsiders skeptical of establishment institutions. He purged high government of its progressive activists. And he embraced deep-state heresies and blasphemies such as considering tariffs, questioning NATO, doubting the efficacy of NAFTA, whining about federal judges, and jawboning interest rates. He also left vacant key offices on the theory that one less deep-state voice was one less critic, and one less obstacle to undoing the Obama record.

In the meantime, establishment institutions provided the seasoned opposition to almost everything Trump did. They were likely the “senior officials” to whom an anonymous New York Times op-ed writer referred when he talked about an ongoing “resistance” inside the government to thwart the Trump agenda. In the conservative old days, a Republican president could call upon New York and Washington pundits and insiders — in the present generation, names such as David Brooks, David Frum, Bill Kristol, Bret Stephens, or George Will — for kitchen-cabinet advice. But now they were among Trump’s fiercest critics. Only in the matter of judicial appointments could Trump find seasoned and experienced conservatives eager to be appointed or advanced, and respected organizations such as the Federalist Society eager to help him ensure conservative justices.

As an initial result, Obama holdovers lingered everywhere in the executive branch and cabinet offices. They had no immediate desire to leave when obstruction, if caught, only won accolades. Almost immediately, Trump’s private phone calls with foreign leaders such as Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto and Australian prime minister Malcolm Turnbull were leaked to the press and appeared as transcripts in the Washington Post.

In the 1970s, the military officer corps and the top ranks of the CIA, DOJ, and FBI were, in the eyes of the Left, synonymous with conspiracies like those in Seven Days in May and The Manchurian Candidate. Yet in 2016, these same institutions had been recalibrated by progressives as protectors of social justice against interlopers and bomb throwers such as Donald Trump. Whether it was scary or needed to have a secretive, unelected cabal inside the White House subverting presidential agendas depended on who was president.

During the Robert Mueller investigations, progressives usually defended the FISA-court-ordered intercepts of private citizens’ communications, despite the machinations taken to deceive FISA-court justices. Indeed, liberal critics suggested that to question how the multitude of conflicts of interest at the Obama DOJ and FBI had warped their presentations of the Steele dossier to the courts was in itself an obstruction of justice or downright unpatriotic.

News of FBI informants planted into the 2016 Trump campaign raised no eyebrows. Nor did the unmasking and leaking of the names of U.S. citizens by members of the Obama National Security Council. Former CIA director John Brennan and former director of national intelligence James Clapper soon became progressive pundits on cable news. While retaining their security clearances, they blasted Trump variously as a Russian mole, a foreign asset, treasonous, and a veritable traitor.

Both became liberal icons, despite their lucrative merry-go-rounds between Washington businesses and government service, and they sometimes lied under oath to Congress about all that and more.

On March 17, John Brennan, in objection to the firing of deputy director of the FBI, Andrew McCabe (who shortly would be found by the nonpartisan inspector general to have lied on four occasions to federal investigators, and was soon reportedly in legal jeopardy from a grand-jury investigation), tweeted about the current president of the United States: “When the full extent of your venality, moral turpitude, and political corruption becomes known, you will take your rightful place as a disgraced demagogue in the dustbin of history . . . America will triumph over you.”

In mid April, Brennan followed up with another attack on Trump: “Your kakistocracy [rule of the “worst people”] is collapsing after its lamentable journey. As the greatest Nation history has known, we have the opportunity to emerge from this nightmare stronger & more committed to ensuring a better life for all Americans, including those you have so tragically deceived.”

If such hysterics from the former head of the world’s premier spy agency and current MSNBC/NBC pundit seemed a near threat to a sitting president, then Samantha Power, former U.N. ambassador and a past ethics professor on the Harvard faculty, sort of confirmed that it really was: “Not a good idea to piss off John Brennan.”

Trump was warned by friends, enemies, and neutrals that his fight against the deep state was suicidal. Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer, just a few days before Trump’s inauguration, cheerfully forecast (in a precursor to Samantha Power’s later admonition) what might happen to Trump once he attacked the intelligence services: “Let me tell you: You take on the intelligence community — they have six ways from Sunday at getting back at you.”

Former administrative-state careerists were not shy about warning Trump of what was ahead. The counterterrorism analyst Phil Mudd, who had worked in the CIA and the FBI under Robert Mueller, warned CNN host Jake Tapper in August 2017 that “the government is going to kill” President Donald Trump. Kill? And what was the reason the melodramatic Mudd adduced for his astounding prediction? “Because he doesn’t support them.” Mudd then elaborated: “Let me give you one bottom line as a former government official. The government is going to kill this guy. The government is going to kill this guy because he doesn’t support them.” Mudd further clarified his assassination metaphor: “What I’m saying is government — people talk about the deep state — when you disrespect government officials who’ve done 30 years, they’re going to say, ‘Really?’”

It was difficult to ascertain to what degree Mudd was serious or exaggerating the depth of deep-state loathing of Trump.

Despite the predictions and expectations of nearly everyone associated with the establishment, in the first two years of his presidency, Trump has not resigned. He has not been impeached. He has not been indicted. He has not died or been declared non compos mentis. Trump did not govern as a liberal, as some of his Never Trump critics predicted. He had not been driven to seclusion by lurid exposés of his womanizing a decade earlier as a Manhattan television celebrity.

An administrative state, swamp, deep state, call it what you wish, was wrong about Trump’s nomination, his election, and his governance. It was right only in its warnings that he could be crude and profane, with a lurid past and an ethical necropolis of skeletons in his closet — a fact long ago factored and baked into his supporters’ votes.

At each stage, the erroneous predictions of the deep state prompted ever greater animus at a target that it could not quite understand, much less derail, and so far has not been able to destroy. By autumn 2018, the repetitive nightly predictions of cable-news pundits that the latest presidential controversy was a “bombshell,” or marked a “turning point,” or offered proof that “the walls were closing in,” or ensured that “impeachment was looming on the horizon,” had amounted to little more than monotonous and scripted groupthink.

Never before in the history of the presidency had a commander in chief earned the antipathy of the vast majority of the media, much of the career establishments of both political parties, the majority of the holders of the nation’s accumulated personal wealth, and the permanent federal bureaucracy.

And lived to tell the tale.

–This essay is adapted from Mr. Hanson’s new book, The Case for Trump, which Basic Books will publish in March.

Voir enfin:

Victor Davis Hanson
Hoover
February 18, 2019

As the 2020 election nears, there is as yet no coherent Democratic response to the Trump agenda. If Trump himself is unpopular and polarizing, his agenda is for the most part in sync with a majority of Americans who like the 3% annualized GDP growth; near-record peacetime unemployment; record natural gas and oil production; young, scholarly and constructionist justices; pro-Israel Mideast politics; and realism about NATO laxity, the flawed Iran Deal, and the Paris Climate Accord, Chinese mercantilism, and the past inability of the U.S. to translate battlefield victories abroad into lasting security and strategic advantages.

Yet hatred of Trump himself, as well as fear of a successful Trump agenda, has unhinged his opposition. From 2017-19, progressives sought to abort the Trump presidency through furor at his person and often pathetic attempts to invoke the Emoluments Clause, the 25th Amendment, the Logan Act, Articles of Impeachment, the Mueller special counsel investigation, former Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe’s counter-intelligence investigation of Trump, and cherry-picking federal justice to stay Trump initiatives. All failed. Now the Left has decided to offer not just invective, but a new array of alternatives—often of a radical sort that we have not seen or heard about since the 1960s.

The Democratic Party is now in the hands of newcomer establishment figures such as Senators Corey Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Mazie Hirono; socialist Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren; newly elected representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, and Rashida Tlaib; and activists like Linda Sasour, Al Sharpton, Maxine Waters, and the usual Hollywood celebrities—all of whom Sen. Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and former Vice President Joe Biden futilely try to appease.

The result is that on almost every issue, the answer to Trump is neither liberal nor progressive, but nihilistic. The logical extreme alone ensures revolutionary purity even as it would result in chaos and destruction.

The new Democratic idea of Medicare for all is tantamount to Medicare for no one. Abolishing private insurance would crash the health-care system. Once everyone is let into the Medicare system–despite never having contributed to it–the entire notion of a generational and legal bond is shattered. If birth is to be rationed by radical abortionists, soon life will be too—and on the same premise that a supposed defective or unwanted infant is as much a burden to the family and society as is a sick or unproductive senior.

The leftwing rebuttal of Trump’s economic agenda is apparently not now a return to Obama tax schedules. Much less is it a point-by-point refutation of Trump’s efforts to reduce regulations and taxes.

Instead, new Democrats are calling for an unconstitutional “wealth tax” on the accumulation of already taxed income. They propose a radically new estate tax to confiscate already taxed income. And they envision new rates of 70% to 90% on the top brackets—on the logic that if the government does not get your savings account, or your estate, it can at least take your income.

The logic is again nihilistic: if lower taxes have created rare 3% per annum growth and near-record unemployment, then far higher taxes would do what exactly? Stall the economy to ensure a recession where everyone might be more equally poorer?

The country has long been divided on abortion, which has been legal by court decision for nearly half a century, with well over 50 million abortions performed since 1973. Half the country would still allow it; half want it ended.

A fourth of Americans would forbid it under all circumstances including rape of the mother; the other quarter of the public would allow it to the point of delivery—or even after.

Yet the new Democratic position, as we see from efforts in New York and Virginia and in other states, is well beyond extreme. As Virginia governor Ralph Northam articulated the new laxity: the mother and doctor after birth could in theory and in mutual consultation agree to kill the delivered infant—a position shared only by a few countries such as North Korea and China where it de facto occurs. Endangered species of snails, worms, and rodents in theory earn more protection from radical progressives than do third-trimester unborn babies and delivered infants, who can be deemed without legal protection.

Vastly expanded natural gas and oil production has ended the Persian Gulf stranglehold on US foreign policy. Cheap fuel has empowered the middle classes and helped to expand the economy as well as created trillions of dollars in national treasure.

Yet “The New Green Deal”, within a decade after its passing, would call for the end of the internal combustion engine, without ensuring that Americans have reasonable ground, air or sea transportation, affordable methods to heat and cool their homes, or the means to replace the sources of 83 percent of our generated electricity. Is the point to make power and fuel so expensive that few can use it—on the theory that the planet in 1840 was preferably cooler than it is now?

Again, these proposals are anarchic. They strain the imagination to find the most radical means necessary to destroy the very fabric of modern life as we know it, as if Venezuela, Cuba, and the old Soviet Union have taught us nothing.

According to a recent Yale-MIT joint study, nearly 20 million foreign nationals are currently residing in the U.S. illegally. In many places, the border is wide open. Local and state agencies are spending hundreds of billions of dollars to provide housing, food, education, legal counsel, and health care subsidies to those who crossed the border unlawfully. They do so often at the cost of shorting care to needy American citizens.

When immigration is illegal, en masse, non-meritocratic, and not diverse, then assimilation and integration lag, social tensions rise, and identity politics and tribalism are the result. Cynicism spreads among Americans who cannot, as illegal aliens do, pick and choose which federal laws they find inconvenient.  Legal would-be immigrants are considered veritable dunces, who wait years in line as lawbreakers cut in ahead of them.

What is new the Democratic solution for open borders? Forbid any border fence or wall, although border barriers were mainstream Democratic tenets during the passage of the Secure Fence Act of 2006? Abolish the bureau of Immigration and Custom Enforcement, currently the only impediment between an additional 40-50 million illegal arrivals, given that international polls suggest as many as half the populations of Central American and Mexico would prefer to emigrate to the United States?

Currently, students and graduates owe collectively about $1.5 trillion in school debt, largely as a result of spiraling college costs. Universities have long jacked up the rates of tuition, and room and board, above the rate of inflation. The assurance of government-backed student loans has proved a narcotic for prodigality, especially given that such ensured obligations were never predicated on the applicants’ ability to repay such indebtedness.

The responsible bipartisan solution might be to work with higher education to reduce costs. More competition is needed in the financial market place. More online education, and on-the-job training and trade schools, can offer alternatives to traditional higher education.

Radical reforms within universities might include truth in advertising about the costs versus the benefits of a bachelor’s degree.  Tenure should be replaced by periodic contracts.  A national exit exam is needed for the granting of a BA—a sort of exit ACT or SAT to ensure the degree means something. Future teachers should be able to substitute an academic MA for the School of Education’s monopoly over the teaching credential.

In contrast, the nihilist approach would be to cancel all student debt, and make college “free” for all. Thereby, we would send a message to those who forewent college and have been working since 18 that they must shoulder the burden of the educational debts of their peers. Universities would feel little need to reform. Students would be even less pressured to finish their studies in a normative four years or to concentrate on curriculum choices that guaranteed literacy and fact-based education.

Why has the Democratic Party veered so sharply to the hard Left to the point of anarchism?

If Donald Trump is the catalyst, the genesis of the new radicalism preceded him. The half-century obsession with identity politics, especially tribal identification and victimhood, taught an entire generation that one’s essence is defined by superficial appearance or lineage, not innate character.

For about a half century, universities have eroded inductive and empirical education. Instead, deduction and advocacy took its place—and to such a degree that to question man-made global warming, the dogma of racial separatism and chauvinism, radical abortion, or gay marriage became taboo and proof of near criminality.

But advocacy for generations of youth also came at a price of not learning history, languages, science, math, and literature, the age-old menu of broad liberal arts education.  And the result is reified by the emergence of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, whose arrogance and ignorance are emblematic of the worth of a costly Boston University degree. Never have self-professed radicals been so class-conscious in self-referencing their degrees from bourgeoisie institutions, and so vehement in espousing agendas about which they can provide no logical arguments or data.

Most of the nihilistic positions are also funded by wealthy Americans on behalf of poor Americans. Rich leftwing activism reflects a an almost Medieval desire for penance and exemption. Progressive philanthropists virtue-signal their class solidarity without real costs to their own privilege, while assuaging abstract guilt. In other words, never have the representatives of the very rich and the subsidized poor been so eager to make the middle classes pay for their agendas.

Finally, the new nihilism is often advanced through social media and the Internet. These are frighteningly intrusive media in which millions can electronically and anonymously bully, pontificate, and slander without consequence, and in the expectation that the more radical, the more instantaneous, and the more polarizing an argument, the more likely it will gain attention from the internet mob. We saw the dangers of the electronic mob in the smearing of the Covington high schoolers and the supposed “hate crime”  against Jussie Smollett.

Force-multipliers of this new thumbs-up/thumbs-down electronic absolutism are the providers themselves, such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Apple. In various ways, Silicon Valley has been caught censoring traditional views, warping searches to promote progressivism, and banning participants in asymmetrical partisan fashion.

In sum, the emerging alternative to Trump is not Democratic pragmatism, but an angry nihilism that is as incoherent as it is destructive.


Montée aux extrêmes: Vous avez dit République de la haine ? (Extreme democracy: from their country’s elites or their common people, Trump and Macron seem to attract more hatred than anyone can remember)

3 février, 2019
Image result for Trump miner hard hat
Emmanuel Macron à l'Elysée le 9 février dernier.

Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Il n’y a plus ni Juif ni Grec, il n’y a plus ni esclave ni libre, il n’y a plus ni homme ni femme; car tous vous êtes un en Jésus Christ. Paul (Galates 3: 28)
L’exigence chrétienne a produit une machine qui va fonctionner en dépit des hommes et de leurs désirs. Si aujourd’hui encore, après deux mille ans de christianisme, on reproche toujours, et à juste titre, à certains chrétiens de ne pas vivre selon les principes dont ils se réclament, c’est que le christianisme s’est universellement imposé, même parmi ceux qui se disent athées. Le système qui s’est enclenché il y a deux millénaires ne va pas s’arrêter, car les hommes s’en chargent eux-mêmes en dehors de toute adhésion au christianisme. Le tiers-monde non chrétien reproche aux pays riches d’être leur victime, car les Occidentaux ne suivent pas leurs propres principes. Chacun de par le vaste monde se réclame du système de valeurs chrétien, et, finalement, il n’y en a plus d’autres. Que signifient les droits de l’homme si ce n’est la défense de la victime innocente? Le christianisme, dans sa forme laïcisée, est devenu tellement dominant qu’on ne le voit plus en tant que tel. La vraie mondialisation, c’est le christianisme! René Girard
Ça n’est pas la République des fusibles, la République de la haine. On ne peut pas être chef par beau temps. S’ils veulent un responsable, il est devant vous. Qu’ils viennent le chercher. Je réponds au peuple français. Emmanuel Macron (24.07.2018)
Parce qu’on veut à tout prix se débarrasser de Trump. Joy Behar
Because we’re desperate to get Trump out of office. That’s why. I think the press jumps the gun a lot because we just — we have so much circumstantial evidence against this guy that we basically are hoping that Cohen has the goods and what have you and so it’s wishful thinking. Joy Behar
Je n’oublie pas d’où je viens. Je ne suis pas l’enfant naturel de temps calme de la vie politique. Je suis le fruit d’une forme de brutalité de l’histoire, d’une effraction parce que la France était malheureuse et inquiète, si j’oublie tout cela, ce sera le début de l’épreuve. Emmanuel Macron
Je n’ai pas souvenir que des gens aient été écartés pour des questions de morale, il n’y a pas eu de jury de moralité pour savoir si quelqu’un pouvait devenir ministre ou pas.  (…) Je n’ai pas demandé au Premier ministre si les ministres avaient fait l’objet de plainte regardée par les juges et classée sans suite parce que les faits étaient non établis et prescrits. (…) Il faut collectivement qu’on se méfie. La question est de savoir où commence le sérieux et où doit s’arrêter la nécessaire transparence et le jeu des contre-pouvoirs. On veut que les dirigeants soient exemplaires. On s’est donné des règles. Mais quand le but des contre-pouvoirs finit par être de détruire ceux qui exercent le pouvoir sans qu’il n’y ait de limite ni de principe, ce n’est plus une version équilibrée de la démocratie. Penser que quelque chose qui a été regardé, jugé, devrait, soit nous conduire à écarter quelqu’un du pouvoir, soit à l’empêcher d’exercer, ça devient une forme de République du soupçon. Emmanuel Macron
La première bataille, c’est de loger tout le monde dignement. Je ne veux plus d’ici la fin de l’année avoir des femmes et des hommes dans les rues, dans les bois. C’est une question de dignité, une question d’humanité et d’efficacité. Emmanuel Macron
Je suis le fils de cette crise. Toutes les colères que vous évoquez aujourd’hui, ce sont elles qui m’ont porté. (…) On écrase tous nos débats en France sur la fiscalité. On pense qu’on règle tout par la fiscalité. On ne règle pas par la fiscalité les vrais inégalités de départ. J’ai supprimé l’ISF pour réindustrialiser le pays, créer de l’emploi. La vraie inégalité, c’est le chômage. Est-ce qu’il y a deux ans, on vivait mieux quand il y avait l’ISF, est-ce qu’il y avait moins de SDF ? Non. Je n’ai pas supprimé l’ISF pour faire des cadeaux à certains, c’est pour qu’ils réinvestissent dans le pays. Je n’ai pas pris l’engagement de campagne qu’il y ait zéro SDF. J’entends beaucoup ça mais je n’ai jamais dit ça. J’ai eu un mot sur les demandeurs d’asile qui dorment dehors. Emmanuel Macron (24.01.2109)
Nous n’avons pas réussi. Il y a des publics fragiles qui sont en dehors des politiques publiques mises en places et (…) la pression migratoire forte en fin de trimestre.  (…) ces dernières années, de nombreuses places en chambres d’hôtel ont été ouvertes (…) ce n’est pas une bonne mesure, car on laisse les gens loin de la socialisation. aujourd’hui, on diminue la part des chambres d’hôtel pour faire de la place aux pensions de famille. Ne plus avoir de personnes qui dorment dans la rue doit rester un objectif, on ne peut pas s’accommoder de cette situation. Emmanuel Macron
Selon les chiffres donnés par certaines associations, le nombre de sans-abri s’élève à 200.000 en France. Ce sont majoritairement des hommes seuls, auxquels s’ajoutent de plus en plus de familles, notamment des familles de migrants, en situation irrégulière ou en situation de demande d’asile. RTL
J’ai été élu par les Français. (…) Il y a des gens qui pensent comme ça, avec d’ailleurs, je dois dire, des relents de choses que j’aime pas beaucoup (…) Parce que derrière, ça s’appellerait la banque Dupont, il y aurait certainement moins d’arguments !  Et ça, ça me plait pas dans votre réflexion. Il y a des gens qui vous mettent comme ça un poinçon (…) Vous savez, je suis pas un héritier. Moi, je suis né à Amiens, il y a personne personne dans ma famille qui était banquier, ni politicien, ni énarque. Ce que je dois, je le dois à une famille qui m’a appris le sens de l’effort. Ceux qui m’ont élevé, qui m’ont éduqué et après, j’ai jamais lâché le morceau ! Donc, si j’étais né banquier d’affaires, vous pourriez me faire la leçon. Si j’étais né avec une petite cuillère dans la bouche ou fils de politicien, vous pourriez me faire la leçon, c’est pas le cas ! Donc je peux vous regarder en face. Vous pouvez ne pas aimer les banquiers, en attendant, vous aurez pas de prêt sans banquier. C’est comme ça !  Emmanuel Macron (24.01.2019)
The news obsesses over the recent government shutdown, the latest Robert Mueller arrest and, of course, fake news—from the BuzzFeed Michael Cohen non-story to the smears of the Covington Catholic High School students. But aside from the weekly hysterias, the world has dramatically changed since 2016 in ways we scarcely have appreciated. The idea that China systematically rigged trade laws and engaged in technological espionage to run up huge deficits is no longer a Trump, or even a partisan, issue. The world did not fall apart after the U.S. pulled out of the flawed Iran nuclear deal. Most yawned when the U.S. left the symbolic but empty Paris Climate Accord. Ditto when the U.S. moved its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. There is also a growing, though little reported, consensus about what created the current economic renaissance: tax cuts, massive deregulation, recalibration of trade policy, tax incentives to bring back offshore capital, and dramatic rises in oil and natural gas production. Although partisan bickering continues over the extent of the upswing, most appreciate that millions of Americans are now back again working—especially minority youth—in a manner not seen in over a decade. For all the acrimony about illegal immigration, the government shutdown over the wall and the question of amnesties, most Americans also finally favor some sort of grand bargain compromise. The public seems to be agreeing that conservatives should get more border fencing or walls in strategic areas, an end to new illegal immigration and deportation for those undocumented immigrants with criminal records. Liberals in turn will likely obtain green cards for those long-time immigrants here illegally who have a work history and have not committed violent crimes. Both sides will be forced to agree that illegal immigration, sanctuary cities and open borders should end and legal immigration should be reformed. Today U.S. foreign policy actually reflects those paradoxes. The public supports a withdrawal from the quagmires in Afghanistan and Syria. But it also approved of bombing ISIS into retreat and muscular efforts to denuclearize North Korea. Two years ago, most Americans accepted that the European Union and NATO were sacrosanct status quo institutions beyond criticism. Today there is growing agreement that our NATO allies will only pay their fair share of mutual defense if they are forced to live up to their promises. Most Americans have now concluded that while the EU may be necessary to prevent another intra-European war, it is increasingly a postmodern, anti-democratic and unstable entity. (…) Trump has not changed his campaign reputation for being mercurial, crass and crude. But what has changed is the media’s own reputation in its hysterical reaction to Trump. Instead of empirical reporting, the networks and press have become unhinged. When reporting of the presidency has proved 90 percent negative, and false news stories are legion, the media are no longer seen as the remedy to Trump but rather an illness themselves. Since 2016, polls show that Americans have assumed that the proverbial mainstream media cannot be counted on for honest reporting but will omit, twist and massage facts and evidence for the higher “truth” of neutralizing the Trump presidency. When asked on “The View” why so often the liberal press keeps making up facts, “jumps the gun” and has to “walk stuff back when it turns out wrong,” Joy Behar honestly answered, “Because we’re desperate to get Trump out of office. That’s why.” Trump’s popularity is about where it was when he was elected—ranging on average from the low to mid-forties. But many of his policies have led to more prosperity and address festering problems abroad. And despite the negative news, they are widely supported, even—or especially—if Trump himself is not given proper credit for enacting most of them. Victor Davis Hanson
Il ne faut pas dissimuler que les institutions démocratiques développent à un très haut niveau le sentiment de l’envie dans le coeur humain. Ce n’est point tant parce qu’elle offrent à chacun les moyens de s’égaler aux autres, mais parce que ces moyens défaillent sans cesse à ceux qui les emploient. Les institutions démocratiques réveillent et flattent la passion de l’égalité sans pouvoir jamais la satisfaire entièrement. Cette égalité complète s’échappe tous les jours des mains du peuples au moment où il croit la saisir, et fuit, comme dit Pascal, d’une fuite éternelle; le peuple s’échauffe à la recherche de ce bien d’autant plus précieux qu’il est assez proche pour être connu et assez loin pour ne pas être goûté. Tout ce qui le dépasse par quelque endroit lui paraît un obstacle à ses désirs, et il n’y a pas de supériorité si légitime dont la vue ne fatigue sas yeux. Tocqueville
Il y a en effet une passion mâle et légitime pour l’égalité qui excite les hommes à vouloir être tous forts et estimés. Cette passion tend à élever les petits au rang des grands ; mais il se rencontre aussi dans le cœur humain un goût dépravé pour l’égalité, qui porte les faibles à vouloir attirer les forts à leur niveau, et qui réduit les hommes à préférer l’égalité dans la servitude à l’inégalité dans la liberté. Tocqueville
Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Parfois, la durée du règne [du nouveau roi] est fixée dès le départ: les rois de Djonkon (…) régnaient sept ans à l’origine. Chez les Bambaras, le nouveau roi déterminait traditionnellement lui-même la longueur de son propre règne. On lui passait au cou une bande de coton, dont deux hommes tiraient les extrémités en sens contraire pendant qu’il extrayait d’une calebasse autant de cailloux qu’il pouvait en tenir. Ces derniers indiquaient le nombre d’années de son règne, à l’expiration desquelles on l’étranglait. (…) Le roi paraissait rarement en public. Son pied nu ne devait jamais toucher le sol, car les les récoltes en eussent été desséchées; il ne devait rien ramasser sur la terre non plus. S’il venait à tomber de cheval, on le mettait autrefois à mort. Personne n’avait le droit de dire qu’il était malade; s’il contractait une maladie grave, on l’étranglait en grand secret. . . . On croyait qu’il contrôlait la pluie et les vents. Une succession de sécheresses et de mauvaises récoltes trahissait une relâchement  de sa force et on l’étranglait en secret la nuit. Elias Canetti
Le roi ne règne qu’en vertu de sa mort future; il n’est rien d’autre qu’une victime en instance de sacrifice, un condamné à mort qui attend son exécution. (…) Prévoyante, la ville d’Athènes entretenait à ses frais un certain nombre de malheureux […]. En cas de besoin, c’est-à-dire quand une calamité s’abattait ou menaçait de s’abattre sur la ville, épidémie, famine, invasion étrangère, dissensions intérieures, il y avait toujours un pharmakos à la disposition de la collectivité. […] On promenait le pharmakos un peu partout, afin de drainer les impuretés et de les rassembler sur sa tête ; après quoi on chassait ou on tuait le pharmakos dans une cérémonie à laquelle toute la populace prenait part. […] D’une part, on […] [voyait] en lui un personnage lamentable, méprisable et même coupable ; il […] [était] en butte à toutes sortes de moqueries, d’insultes et bien sûr de violences ; on […] [l’entourait], d’autre part, d’une vénération quasi-religieuse ; il […] [jouait] le rôle principal dans une espèce de culte.  René Girard
Le roi a une fonction réelle et c’est la fonction de toute victime sacrificielle. Il est une machine à convertir la violence stérile et contagieuse en valeurs culturelles positives. René Girard
Pour qu’il y ait cette unanimité dans les deux sens, un mimétisme de foule doit chaque fois jouer. Les membres de la communauté s’influencent réciproquement, ils s’imitent les uns les autres dans l’adulation fanatique puis dans l’hostilité plus fanatique encore. René Girard
Le règne du roi n’est que l’entracte prolongé d’un rituel sacrificiel violent. Gil Bailie
J’ai suivi cette campagne avec un sentiment de malaise franchement (…) qui s’est peu à peu transformé en honte.  (…) Malaise parce que la deuxième France, dont vous parlez, la France qui est périphérique, qui hésite entre Marine Le Pen et rien,  je me suis rendu compte que je ne la comprenais pas, que je ne la voyais pas, que j’avais perdu le contact. Et ça, quand on veut écrire des romans, je trouve que c’est une faute professionnelle assez lourde.  (….) Parce que je ne la vois plus, je fais partie de l’élite mondialisée, maintenant. (…) Et pourtant, je viens de cette France. (…) Elle habite pas dans les mêmes quartiers que moi. Elle habite pas à Paris. A Paris, Le Pen n’existe pas. Elle habite dans des zones périphériques décrites par Christophe Guilluy. Des zones mal connues. (…) Mais le fait est que j’ai perdu le contact. (…) Non, je la comprends pas suffisamment, je veux dire, je pourrais pas écrire dessus. C’est ça qui me gêne, c’est pour ça que suis mal à l’aise. (…) Non, je suis pas dans la même situation. Moi, je ne crois pas au vote idéologique, je crois au vote de classe. Bien que le mot est démodé. Il y a une classe qui vote Le Pen, une classe qui vote Macron, une classe qui vote Fillon. Facilement identifiables et on le voit tout de suite. Et que je le veuille ou non, je fais partie de la France qui vote Macron. Parce que je suis trop riche pour voter Le Pen ou Mélenchon. Et parce que je suis pas un hériter, donc je suis pas la classe qui vote Fillon. (…) Ce qui est apparu et qui est très surprenant – alors, ça, c’est vraiment un phénomène imprévu – c’est un véritable parti confessionnel, précisément catholique. Dans tout ce que j’ai suivi – et, je vous dis, j’ai tout suivi  – Jean-Frédéric Poisson était quand même le plus étonnant. (…) Une espèce d’impavidité et une défense des valeurs catholiques qui est inhabituelle pour un parti politique. (….) Ca m’a interloqué parce que je croyais le catholicisme mourant. (…) [Macron] L’axe de sa  campagne, j’ai l’impression que c’est une espèce de thérapie de groupe pour convertir les Français à l’optimisme. Michel Houellebecq
La participation médiocre, les conditions de cette victoire dans le contexte du «Fillongate», puis face à un adversaire «repoussoir», dans sa fonction d’épouvantail traditionnel de la politique française, donnent à cette élection un goût d’inachevé. Les Français ont-ils jamais été en situation de «choisir»? Tandis que la France «d’en haut» célèbre son sauveur providentiel sur les plateaux de télévision, une vague de perplexité déferle sur la majorité silencieuse. Que va-t-il en sortir? Par-delà l’euphorie médiatique d’un jour, le personnage de M. Macron porte en lui un potentiel de rejet, de moquerie et de haine insoupçonnable. Son style «jeunesse dorée», son passé d’énarque, d’inspecteur des finances, de banquier, d’ancien conseiller de François Hollande, occultés le temps d’une élection, en font la cible potentielle d’un hallucinant lynchage collectif, une victime expiatoire en puissance des frustrations, souffrances et déceptions du pays. Quant à la «France d’en haut», médiatique, journalistique, chacun sait à quelle vitesse le vent tourne et sa propension à brûler ce qu’elle a adoré. Jamais une présidence n’a vu le jour sous des auspices aussi incertains. Cette élection, produit du chaos, de l’effondrement des partis, d’une vertigineuse crise de confiance, signe-t-elle le début d’une renaissance ou une étape supplémentaire dans la décomposition et la poussée de violence? En vérité, M. Macron n’a aucun intérêt à obtenir, avec «En marche», une majorité absolue à l’Assemblée qui ferait de lui un nouvel «hyperprésident» censé détenir la quintessence du pouvoir. Sa meilleure chance de réussir son mandat est de se garder des sirènes de «l’hyperprésidence» qui mène tout droit au statut de «coupable idéal» des malheurs du pays, à l’image de tous ses prédécesseurs. De la part du président Macron, la vraie nouveauté serait dans la redécouverte d’une présidence modeste, axée sur l’international, centrée sur l’essentiel et le partage des responsabilités avec un puissant gouvernement réformiste et une Assemblée souveraine, conformément à la lettre – jamais respectée – de la Constitution de 1958. Maxime Tandonnet (07.05.2017)
La violente polémique qui secoue la candidature de François Fillon à l’élection présidentielle n’a rien d’une surprise. Il fallait s’y attendre. La vie politique française n’a jamais supporté les têtes qui dépassent, les personnalités qui prennent l’ascendant. Dans l’histoire, les hommes d’État visionnaires, ceux qui ont eu raison avant tout le monde, ont été descendus en flammes et leur image est restée maudite des décennies ou des siècles après leur mort (…) Dans mon livre les Parias de la République(Perrin, 2017), j’ai raconté la descente aux enfers de ces parias qui furent aussi de grands hommes d’État, et une femme Premier ministre, leur diabolisation qui les poursuit jusqu’aux yeux de la postérité. Cet ouvrage annonce aussi la généralisation et la banalisation de la figure du paria dans la vie politique contemporaine. La médiatisation, Internet et la puissance des réseaux sociaux, les exigences de transparence, la défiance face à l’autorité et surtout, la personnalisation du pouvoir à outrance, transforme tout homme ou femme incarnant de pouvoir en bouc émissaire des frustrations et des angoisses d’une époque. Qui ne se souvient à quel point Nicolas Sarkozy fut traîné dans la boue de 2007 à 2012? Dans un tout autre genre, François Hollande a aussi connu, à la tête de l’État, le vertige de l’humiliation. La diabolisation des hommes politiques s’accélère: non seulement Sarkozy, puis Hollande, mais aussi Alain Juppé et Manuel Valls viennent de chuter. L’hécatombe est désormais inarrêtable… Sans aucun doute, le tour viendra d’Emmanuel Macron, et sa chute sera aussi subite et aussi violente que son ascension fondée sur la sublimation d’une image. (…) Oui, il fallait s’attendre, tôt ou tard, à la lapidation de François Fillon. Le prétexte de l’emploi de son épouse à ses côtés est ambigu. Le recrutement de proches par des responsables politiques est une vieille – et mauvaise – habitude française. Alexandre Millerand , Vincent Auriol, François Mitterrand employaient leur fils à l’Elysée et Jacques Chirac sa fille. Combien de ministres ont recruté un proche dans leurs cabinets? Combien de fils et de fille «de» ont hérité de la position politique de leur père? 20% des parlementaires emploient un membre de leur famille. L’un des plus hauts responsables actuels de la République a l’habitude de salarier sa femme auprès de lui. Tout cela est bien connu. À l’évidence, cette pratique n’est pas à l’honneur de notre République. Mais tout le monde s’en est jusqu’à présent accommodé, hypocritement, sans poser de question. Personne ne s’est interrogé sur la nature et l’effectivité des tâches accomplies par le conjoint ou le parent. Et voici que soudain, le dossier est opportunément rouvert, contre François Fillon. (…) L’homme se prête particulièrement à une diabolisation. Son caractère à la fois discret et volontariste a tout pour exaspérer un microcosme politico-médiatique plus enclin à idolâtrer le clinquant stérile et l’impuissance bavarde. La ligne de défense de François Fillon transparaît dans son discours du 29 janvier. Il s’apprête à endosser le rôle de paria, comptant sur un retournement en sa faveur. En témoigne la présence de Pénélope à ses côtés. Sa parole, conservatrice et libérale, semble avoir été façonnée pour exacerber les haines des idéologues de la table rase: «On me décrit comme le représentant d’une France traditionnelle. Mais celui qui n’a pas de racines marche dans le vide. Je ne renie rien de ce qu’on m’a transmis, rien de ce qui m’a fait, pas plus ma foi personnelle que mes engagements politiques». Peut-il réussir? In fine, le résultat des élections de 2017 dépendra du corps électoral: emprise de l’émotionnel ou choix d’un destin collectif? Mais au-delà, une grande leçon de ces événements devrait s’imposer: l’urgence de refonder la vie politique française, sur une base moins personnalisée et plus collective, tournée vers le débat d’idées et non plus l’émotion – entre haine et idolâtrie – autour de personnages publics. Maxime Tandonnet (30.01.2017)
Un homme d’État doit concilier trois qualités: une vision de l’histoire, le sens du bien commun et le courage personnel. Ils sont très peu nombreux à avoir durablement émergé dans l’histoire politique française. En effet, en raison de leur supériorité, ils sont rapidement pris en chasse par le marais et réduits au silence avant d’être lapidés. Le véritable homme d’État est un paria en puissance. Le Général de Gaulle fut un paria tout à fait particulier, un paria qui a réussi. Il faut se souvenir de la manière dont il fut traité dans les années 1950 et 1960. Il était en permanence insulté, qualifié de réactionnaire et de fasciste. Dans Le Coup d’État permanent, François Mitterrand utilise à son propos les mots de «caudillo, duce, führer…». C’est un comble pour le chef de la résistance française au nazisme… S’il fut un paria qui a réussi, c’est en raison de sa place hors norme dans l’histoire, auteur de l’appel du 18 juin 1940 et de la décolonisation. Mais dès lors, il n’est plus vraiment un paria au sens de la définition que j’en donne, son image à la postérité étant largement positive et consensuelle. (…) la lecture des livres de René Girard, notamment La violence et le sacré et Les choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde m’a inspiré l’idée de cet ouvrage sur les parias de la République. Sa grille de lecture peut s’appliquer à l’histoire politique française: la quête d’un bouc émissaire, victime expiatoire de la violence collective, et son lynchage par lequel la société politique retrouve son unité. Le cas d’Édith Cresson est intéressant à cet égard. Quand on lit la presse de l’époque, quand on replonge dans les actualités du début des années 1990, la violence, la férocité de son lynchage nous apparaissent comme sidérantes. On a beaucoup parlé de ses maladresses, provocations et fautes de communication qui furent réelles. Mais l’acharnement contre elle, les insultes, la caricature, la diffamation contre une femme Premier ministre qui prenait une place convoitée par des hommes, a atteint des proportions vertigineuses. On en a oublié des aspects positifs de sa politique: le rejet des 35 heures, la promotion de l’apprentissage, des privatisations et de la politique industrielle, la volonté de maîtriser les frontières. Elle fut vraiment une femme lynchée. Et sur ce sacrifice, les politiques de son camp ont tenté de se refaire une cohésion. Sans succès. Encore aujourd’hui, je constate à quel point elle fut haïe. Des personnalités de droite ou de gauche m’ont vivement reproché de tenter de la «réhabiliter» parmi mes parias! De fait, je ne cherche pas à la réhabiliter et ne cache rien de ses erreurs, mais je mets le doigt sur un épisode qui n’est pas à l’honneur de la classe politique française. La violence est certes inhérente à la république dès lors que la république suppose une concurrence pour les postes, les mandats, les honneurs. Cette violence devrait être tempérée par la morale, le sens de l’honneur, du respect des autres, par les valeurs au sens du duc de Broglie. Elle ne l’a pas été à l’égard d’Édith Cresson. Elle l’est de moins en moins aujourd’hui, comme en témoigne la multiplication des lynchages politico-médiatiques à tout propos. (…) Nicolas Sarkozy a fait l’objet d’un lynchage permanent et violent pendant son quinquennat: insultes au jour le jour, calomnies et les aspects positifs du bilan de son action ont été étrangement passés sous silence. Pourtant, il me semble trop tôt pour lui appliquer le qualificatif de paria au sens où je l’entends dans mon ouvrage, supposant un bannissement qui se poursuit dans l’histoire. Comment sera-t-il jugé dans vingt ans? Qui peut le dire? Souvenons-nous de Mitterrand et de Chirac. Leur fin de règne fut pathétique, pitoyable. Qui s’en souvient encore? La mémoire contemporaine est tellement courte… Aujourd’hui, ils sont plutôt encensés et n’ont rien de parias… (…) [François Fillon] a le profil d’un bouc émissaire, sans aucun doute, faute de pouvoir parler de paria à ce stade. D’ici à l’élection présidentielle et par la suite, s’il l’emporte, il sera inévitablement maltraité et son tempérament à la fois réservé et volontaire ne peut qu’exciter la hargne envers lui. Il faut noter que François Hollande, quoi qu’on en pense, n’a pas été épargné par le monde médiatique et la presse qu’il croyait tout acquise à sa cause… C’est une vraie question que je me pose: le président de la République, qui incarnait du temps du général de Gaulle et de Pompidou, le prestige, l’autorité, la grandeur nationale, est-il en train de devenir le bouc émissaire naturel d’un pays en crise de confiance? Ultramédiatisé, il incarne à lui tout seul le pouvoir politique dans la conscience collective. Mais ne disposant pas d’une baguette magique pour régler les difficultés des Français, apaiser leurs inquiétudes, il devient responsable malgré lui de tous les maux de la création. Je pense qu’il faut refonder notre vision du pouvoir politique, lui donner une connotation moins personnelle et individualiste. Le temps est venu de redécouvrir les vertus d’une politique davantage axée sur l’engagement collectif, le partage de la responsabilité, entre le chef de l’État, le Premier ministre, la majorité, la nation, au service du bien commun. Maxime Tandonnet (13.01.2017)
La suppression de l’ISF symbolise à elle seule la fin de la solidarité des plus riches avec le reste de la société. Macron a aussi procédé à la création d’un prélèvement forfaitaire unique (PFU ou flat-tax) sur les revenus du capital, mesure moins connue du grand public mais tout aussi importante. Non seulement, les riches ne sont plus concernés par la solidarité nationale mais en plus on les dispense de la progressivité de l’impôt sur les revenus du capital, c’est-à-dire de payer leurs impôts à hauteur de leur fortune. Que vous ayez seulement quelques actions, pour peu que vous en ayez, ou que vous soyez Bernard Arnault, vous paierez tous le même impôt forfaitaire. Avec Macron, les impostures se font en cascade. Car en répétant à l’envi que cet impôt forfaitaire était de 30 %, le gouvernement a oublié de préciser que ce chiffre comprend aussi le prélèvement social, la contribution additionnelle de solidarité pour l’autonomie et le prélèvement de solidarité. Au final, l’impôt forfaitaire en tant que tel n’est que de 12,8 %. Cela signifie que le plus mal payé des contribuables paie plus en impôts sur le revenu que le plus riche des actionnaires sur chaque euro de dividendes perçus. (…) Plus encore que chez ses prédécesseurs, le profil d’Emmanuel Macron se prête à la sociologie bourdieusienne, son habitus étant en adéquation parfaite avec les conditions de la pratique de sa position sociale. Autrement dit, sa manière d’être et de gouverner est très liée au milieu dans lequel il évolue : celui du pouvoir et de l’argent. Le storytelling médiatico-politique qui a entouré son élection a voulu nous faire croire à un ovni politique, sans passif. Mais notre enquête, qui croise le contenu de sa politique sociale et économique avec sa trajectoire sociobiographique et les réseaux oligarchiques, démontre qu’il est bien un enfant du sérail, adoubé par les puissants et soutenu par de généreux donateurs. A sa sortie de l’ENA, il intègre l’inspection des finances sous la direction de Jean-Pierre Jouyet, une des figures centrales du maillage oligarchique français. Très vite, Macron participe à la fameuse «commission Attali» («pour la libéralisation de croissance») sous Sarkozy, où il rencontre les plus grands patrons. Il occupe ensuite un poste de directeur à la banque Rothschild et devient en même temps le meneur du volet économique de la campagne de François Hollande pour la présidentielle. Entre la création du CICE et le pacte de responsabilité, il imprègne ensuite le mandat socialiste de la politique de l’offre selon laquelle plus on donne aux entreprises, plus elles investissent dans l’appareil productif. Enfin, il se sert de son poste de ministre l’Economie pour concourir à la mandature suprême. (…) Macron est pieds et poings liés aux ultra-riches qui ont financé sa campagne. Il est leur obligé. Prenons une fois de plus l’exemple de la suppression de l’ISF. Cette mesure devait intervenir au 1er janvier 2018. Or sa suppression est une des premières décisions prises par Macron en octobre 2017. Cette façon de précipiter l’agenda politique néolibéral est symptomatique de la pression exercée par les puissants, les nantis, les actionnaires et les créanciers qui utilisent l’argent comme arme d’asservissement et de division des individus. Pour autant, les gilets jaunes font preuve d’une unité remarquable. En tant que sociologues, nous n’avions jamais imaginé qu’un jour un tel mouvement social surgirait. On s’est beaucoup fait à l’idée que les gens modestes, rivés aux urgences d’une vie quotidienne difficile, trouveraient leur bonheur dans l’achat d’un pavillon individuel installé à proximité d’un centre commercial. Comme si le bonheur était dans le magasin où l’on achète le dernier iPhone. C’était un leurre. Nous nous réjouissons de la colère qu’expriment les gilets jaunes. Elle ne s’arrêtera pas. Le processus est irréversible. Pour la première fois, ils ont permis d’interconnecter toutes les inégalités à partir d’une question à la fois de pouvoir d’achat et d’écologie. Ils ont mis en lumière l’imposture écologique du gouvernement. Nous savons désormais que seuls 19 % des recettes de la taxe intérieure de consommation sur les produits énergétiques (TICPE) seront directement dédiés à l’écologie. (…) En refusant d’être parqués sur le Champ-de-Mars le 24 novembre, ils ont attaqué les hauts lieux du pouvoir. Ils ont dénoncé l’agrégation spatiale des élites sociales dans les quartiers huppés. Cela s’est fait grâce au court-circuitage des corps intermédiaires, ne se laissant pas prendre au piège institutionnel. En se rassemblant aux abords des Champs-Elysées, les gilets jaunes ont fait le choix de ne pas s’attaquer à leurs patrons, puisqu’ils ne sont pas en grève, mais de s’adresser directement à Macron en tant que chef d’entreprise de la France. C’est Macron le capitaliste en chef qui mène la guerre de classes en France. «Le chef, c’est moi !» avait-il dit le 14 juillet 2017. C’est donc lui que les gilets jaunes interpellent. Logique. Maintenant, il faut espérer une convergence des luttes avec les syndicats, les cheminots et autres militants de gauche. Il faut être attentif à ne pas s’opposer les uns aux autres. Les gilets jaunes nous rendent le service du siècle. Monique Pinçon-Charlot
Les tyrans ont plus souvent suscité la passion et la fascination que la haine. (…) La haine personnelle qui s’attache aujourd’hui à la personne du président de la République est inédite. (…) L’explication par la seule politique semble insuffisante même s’il ne faut pas la négliger. Il est vrai que la concentration du pouvoir a pour effet de concentrer aussi les critiques et les indignations. On le sait, la Ve république confie l’essentiel du pouvoir à un monarque républicain élu par le peuple. Les révisions constitutionnelles n’ont cessé de renforcer le pouvoir du président, de l’élection au suffrage universel direct en 1962 à l’introduction du quinquennat et l’élection législative dans la foulée en 2000, sans oublier les effets de la pratique gouvernementale. En sorte que l’affaiblissement progressif des corps intermédiaires n’est pas seulement dû à la personnalité des présidents ou à leur appétit de pouvoir, mais des institutions elles-mêmes. En 1968, on s’inquiétait de ce qu’entre le général de Gaulle et Daniel Cohn-Bendit il n’y eût pas de corps intermédiaires et que la révolte des étudiants, qui souhaitaient entrer dans les dortoirs des filles, débouchât finalement sur une remise en cause de toutes les institutions. Pourtant, à l’époque, le Premier ministre négocia avec les syndicats les accords de Grenelle. Les partis politiques, en particulier le Parti communiste, pouvaient apparaître débordés par les manifestants gauchistes, mais ils organisaient encore les débats et les élections. L’élection continuait à définir la légitimité des gouvernants, seuls quelques gauchistes faisaient écho à la formule inoubliable de Jean-Paul Sartre, « élection piège à cons », quand le président de la République décida de dissoudre l’Assemblée nationale. Le Parti communiste se mit immédiatement en ordre de bataille pour organiser la campagne électorale et personne ne contesta la légitimité de l’Assemblée « introuvable » qui fut élue en juin 1968. Les institutions politiques n’ont pas changé mais aujourd’hui le délitement de la société de la démocratie qu’en empruntant à Montesquieu, j’ai appelée « extrême » est frappant. Toutes les institutions sont contestées. Seule la CFDT s’efforce héroïquement de contribuer aux débats publics, mais les autres syndicats, les partis traditionnels semblent épuisés, les pouvoirs locaux assurent la gestion et s’opposent au gouvernement central, le rôle des assemblées est affaibli et l’on n’est pas sûr qu’une dissolution de l’Assemblée nationale redonnerait une légitimité politique au président légitiment élu en 2017 et dont le mandat s’achève en 2022. Le mouvement des Gilets jaunes qui se veut sans chefs et sans organisation, purement « transversal », qui refuse de se plier aux règles qui organisent les manifestations et remet en cause la légitimité du président est à l’image d’une société qui, en profondeur, refuse les hiérarchies, l’autorité, les distinctions et les compétences. Lorsque le dialogue démocratique, qui fait appel à la raison commune, n’est plus possible, il reste la violence et la haine. La démocratie « extrême » donne à cette haine une forme particulière. Dans le monde de la passion de l’égalité et du refus de la reconnaissance des compétences, le président actuel n’est plus seulement celui qui concentre le pouvoir, et, à ce titre, concentre les critiques, comme les précédents présidents de la République. Il est celui qui tranche radicalement avec la passion égalitaire. Il est scandaleux qu’il soit aussi jeune et talentueux. De plus, il semble n’avoir connu ni les épreuves ni les échecs. Mitterrand n’a été élu qu’après une longue vie publique et deux échecs à l’élection présidentielle, Chirac n’est devenu président de la République qu’après de longues souffrances politiques et deux échecs : ces cicatrices l’ont comme rapproché de ses électeurs. Le terme d’arrogant, qui est en train de devenir une sorte d’adjectif homérique, traduit la haine à l’égard de celui qui n’a pas traversé les épreuves initiatiques. Le seul précédent qu’on puisse évoquer est celui de Valéry Giscard d’Estaing qui, à la fin de son septennat, a cristallisé une haine dont l’origine était comparable : personnalité politique talentueuse, brillant pédagogue, jeune et beau, à la silhouette athlétique. Mais cette haine fut beaucoup moins violente que celle à laquelle nous assistons aujourd’hui. La démocratie était alors moins « extrême ». La haine à l’égard de Nicolas Sarkozy était teintée d’agacement, mais sa vulgarité apparente et son goût affiché de l’argent et de la réussite matérielle n’étaient pas étrangers à ses électeurs ; si les intellectuels le trouvaient odieux, ce n’était pas le cas de la majorité de ses partisans. Quant à François Hollande, le sentiment dominant était le mépris plutôt que la haine. Or, le mépris donne des satisfactions, puisqu’il procure l’agréable impression que les autres ne nous sont pas supérieurs. Se sentir supérieur suscite un sentiment de confiance en soi – ce qui fait dire à certains anthropologues que notre appétence pour le malheur d’autrui serait un héritage des sociétés primitives. Il est difficile de mépriser l’actuel président de la République. Son électorat se recrute d’ailleurs parmi les plus diplômés et les plus assurés dans la vie sociale. En revanche, il est la victime de ce qu’on peut appeler une haine démocratique. La société démocratique, où toutes les fonctions sont formellement ouvertes à tous, suscite les espoirs et les ambitions. Elle multiplie en conséquence, à tous les niveaux le nombre des déçus et des humiliés. En organisant une concurrence générale qui ouvre formellement à tous toutes les possibilités et toutes les positions sociales, elle n’accorde plus d’excuses aux échecs inévitables que les individus n’ont plus la ressource d’expliquer par la volonté de Dieu, la naissance ou le destin. En proclamant l’égalité des chances et la méritocratie républicaine, elle déçoit inévitablement ceux qui ne réussissent pas, en nourrissant leur sentiment de l’injustice sociale et leurs ressentiments. Tous les démocrates sont jugés responsables de leurs propres échecs, alors que ceux-ci ont des causes sociales autant que personnelles. Les démocrates risquent donc de devenir insatisfaits et envieux. Ils font tous l’expérience de l’échec – même les anciens présidents de la République qui ne sont pas réélus – et nourrissent le ressentiment et la haine pour ceux qui sont trop évidemment et trop publiquement dotés par la nature des « talents » et des « vertus » qui, selon la déclaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen, sont les seules distinctions sociales légitimes et qui, ensuite, n’ont connu dans leur vie que les succès. Par leurs échecs avant leur élection, François Mitterrand, Jacques Chirac et Nicolas Sarkozy avaient démontré une forme de proximité avec leurs électeurs. Il faut ajouter le rôle que jouent désormais les réseaux sociaux qui révèlent, sans aucun contrôle, des faits jugés d’autant plus scandaleux qu’on ne vérifie pas leur véracité et donnent une illusion de transparence et de compréhension sur des sujets, par définition complexes. La maîtrise dont a fait preuve le président de la République six heures devant des maires ruraux, démontrant sa connaissance des dossiers et même sa capacité à écouter et ses qualités de pédagogue, risque de renforcer cette image : il est trop jeune et trop intelligent. Arrogant en un mot… On peut craindre que nombre d’électeurs, devant ce spectacle, se sentent aussi humiliés que Mme Le Pen lors du fameux débat d’entre les deux tours de l’élection présidentielle. Lors de ce moment historique, combien d’entre eux, devant la supériorité aveuglante du futur Président de la République, se sont sentis solidaires d’une candidate écrasée par la compétence de son concurrent ? Comment alors répondre autrement que par la haine ? Dominique Schnapper

Quand il ne reste plus que la haine …

A l’heure de cet étrange et formidable chassé croisé …

Qui voit en dépit ou plutôt à cause de ses formidables succès économiques comme diplomatiques …

La tête d’un président américain littéralement mise à prix par les élites, presse comprise, de son propre pays …

Tandis que de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique …

Désormais contraint de jouer les bateleurs de foire dans les sous-préfectures …

Le bénéficiaire du casse du siècle d’il y a à peine deux ans face au véritable assassinat politique de ses concurrents …

Se retrouve, via le mouvement des gilets jaunes, conspué depuis des mois par la base cette fois de sa population …

Comment ne pas voir …

Au-delà du « service du siècle », pour reprendre l’expression de la sociologue Monique Pinçon-Charlot, que nous rendent effectivement les gilets jaunes …

Avec la mise à jour non seulement de l’explosion d’inégalité que produit la mondialisation

Mais également face à ses perdants la profonde solidarité de classe et le mépris de ses gagnants  …

Cette montée aux extrêmes de la démocratie …

Que rappelle la sociologue Dominique Schnappner …

Ou poussé par la passion de l’égalité qu’avait si bien repéré Tocqueville …

Qui en organisant, égalité des chances et méritocratie républicaine obligent, une concurrence générale ouvrant formellement à tous toutes les possibilités et toutes les positions sociales …

Ne peut manquer de produire l’envie et le ressentiment parmi ses inévitables perdants et frustrés …

Et transformer pour les plus dotés comme l’avait rappelé René Girard …

Dans cet « entracte prolongé d’un rituel sacrificiel violent » qu’est (re)devenu, réseaux sociaux aidant, un mandat présidentiel …

La fascination des débuts en la plus grande des haines ?

Emmanuel Macron: pourquoi cette haine?
Dominique Schnapper
Telos
28 janvier 2019

Un souvenir de mars 1953, au début de ma classe d’hypokhâgne au lycée Fénelon : les larmes de l’une de mes camarades venue de Tunisie. Nous venions d’apprendre la mort de Staline. L’émotion était largement répandue, bien au-delà des militants du parti communiste. Les tyrans ont plus souvent suscité la passion et la fascination que la haine.
Un degré inédit de haine

La haine personnelle qui s’attache aujourd’hui à la personne du président de la République est inédite. A l’égard de leurs gouvernants, les Français ont manifesté au cours de l’histoire des sentiments divers et extrêmes, de l’admiration à l’attachement jusqu’à la détestation. On fait volontiers l’hypothèse que la mort de Louis XVI reste un impensé de notre histoire qui continue à marquer notre vie collective. Mais la passion autour de la personne d’Emmanuel Macron nous a pris par surprise. On peut évidemment critiquer sa politique ou son style personnel, pointer ses maladresses ou ses provocations, mais n’est-ce pas le cas de tous ceux qui sont dans l’action ?

L’explication par la seule politique semble insuffisante même s’il ne faut pas la négliger. Il est vrai que la concentration du pouvoir a pour effet de concentrer aussi les critiques et les indignations. On le sait, la Ve république confie l’essentiel du pouvoir à un monarque républicain élu par le peuple. Les révisions constitutionnelles n’ont cessé de renforcer le pouvoir du président, de l’élection au suffrage universel direct en 1962 à l’introduction du quinquennat et l’élection législative dans la foulée en 2000, sans oublier les effets de la pratique gouvernementale. En sorte que l’affaiblissement progressif des corps intermédiaires n’est pas seulement dû à la personnalité des présidents ou à leur appétit de pouvoir, mais des institutions elles-mêmes. En 1968, on s’inquiétait de ce qu’entre le général de Gaulle et Daniel Cohn-Bendit il n’y eût pas de corps intermédiaires et que la révolte des étudiants, qui souhaitaient entrer dans les dortoirs des filles, débouchât finalement sur une remise en cause de toutes les institutions. Pourtant, à l’époque, le Premier ministre négocia avec les syndicats les accords de Grenelle. Les partis politiques, en particulier le Parti communiste, pouvaient apparaître débordés par les manifestants gauchistes, mais ils organisaient encore les débats et les élections. L’élection continuait à définir la légitimité des gouvernants, seuls quelques gauchistes faisaient écho à la formule inoubliable de Jean-Paul Sartre, « élection piège à cons », quand le président de la République décida de dissoudre l’Assemblée nationale. Le Parti communiste se mit immédiatement en ordre de bataille pour organiser la campagne électorale et personne ne contesta la légitimité de l’Assemblée « introuvable » qui fut élue en juin 1968.

Les institutions politiques n’ont pas changé mais aujourd’hui le délitement de la société de la démocratie qu’en empruntant à Montesquieu, j’ai appelée « extrême » est frappant[1]. Toutes les institutions sont contestées. Seule la CFDT s’efforce héroïquement de contribuer aux débats publics, mais les autres syndicats, les partis traditionnels semblent épuisés, les pouvoirs locaux assurent la gestion et s’opposent au gouvernement central, le rôle des assemblées est affaibli et l’on n’est pas sûr qu’une dissolution de l’Assemblée nationale redonnerait une légitimité politique au président légitiment élu en 2017 et dont le mandat s’achève en 2022. Le mouvement des Gilets jaunes qui se veut sans chefs et sans organisation, purement « transversal », qui refuse de se plier aux règles qui organisent les manifestations et remet en cause la légitimité du président est à l’image d’une société qui, en profondeur, refuse les hiérarchies, l’autorité, les distinctions et les compétences.

Lorsque le dialogue démocratique, qui fait appel à la raison commune, n’est plus possible, il reste la violence et la haine. La démocratie « extrême » donne à cette haine une forme particulière. Dans le monde de la passion de l’égalité et du refus de la reconnaissance des compétences, le président actuel n’est plus seulement celui qui concentre le pouvoir, et, à ce titre, concentre les critiques, comme les précédents présidents de la République. Il est celui qui tranche radicalement avec la passion égalitaire. Il est scandaleux qu’il soit aussi jeune et talentueux. De plus, il semble n’avoir connu ni les épreuves ni les échecs. Mitterrand n’a été élu qu’après une longue vie publique et deux échecs à l’élection présidentielle, Chirac n’est devenu président de la République qu’après de longues souffrances politiques et deux échecs : ces cicatrices l’ont comme rapproché de ses électeurs. Le terme d’arrogant, qui est en train de devenir une sorte d’adjectif homérique, traduit la haine à l’égard de celui qui n’a pas traversé les épreuves initiatiques.

Le seul précédent qu’on puisse évoquer est celui de Valéry Giscard d’Estaing qui, à la fin de son septennat, a cristallisé une haine dont l’origine était comparable : personnalité politique talentueuse, brillant pédagogue, jeune et beau, à la silhouette athlétique. Mais cette haine fut beaucoup moins violente que celle à laquelle nous assistons aujourd’hui. La démocratie était alors moins « extrême ».

La haine à l’égard de Nicolas Sarkozy était teintée d’agacement, mais sa vulgarité apparente et son goût affiché de l’argent et de la réussite matérielle n’étaient pas étrangers à ses électeurs ; si les intellectuels le trouvaient odieux, ce n’était pas le cas de la majorité de ses partisans. Quant à François Hollande, le sentiment dominant était le mépris plutôt la haine. Or, le mépris donne des satisfactions, puisqu’il procure l’agréable impression que les autres ne nous sont pas supérieurs. Se sentir supérieur suscite un sentiment de confiance en soi – ce qui fait dire à certains anthropologues que notre appétence pour le malheur d’autrui serait un héritage des sociétés primitives. Il est difficile de mépriser l’actuel président de la République. Son électorat se recrute d’ailleurs parmi les plus diplômés et les plus assurés dans la vie sociale.
La haine démocratique

En revanche, il est la victime de ce qu’on peut appeler une haine démocratique. La société démocratique, où toutes les fonctions sont formellement ouvertes à tous, suscite les espoirs et les ambitions. Elle multiplie en conséquence, à tous les niveaux le nombre des déçus et des humiliés. En organisant une concurrence générale qui ouvre formellement à tous toutes les possibilités et toutes les positions sociales, elle n’accorde plus d’excuses aux échecs inévitables que les individus n’ont plus la ressource d’expliquer par la volonté de Dieu, la naissance ou le destin. En proclamant l’égalité des chances et la méritocratie républicaine, elle déçoit inévitablement ceux qui ne réussissent pas, en nourrissant leur sentiment de l’injustice sociale et leurs ressentiments. Tous les démocrates sont jugés responsables de leurs propres échecs, alors que ceux-ci ont des causes sociales autant que personnelles. Les démocrates risquent donc de devenir insatisfaits et envieux. Ils font tous l’expérience de l’échec – même les anciens présidents de la République qui ne sont pas réélus – et nourrissent le ressentiment et la haine pour ceux qui sont trop évidemment et trop publiquement dotés par la nature des « talents » et des « vertus » qui, selon la déclaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen, sont les seules distinctions sociales légitimes et qui, ensuite, n’ont connu dans leur vie que les succès. Par leurs échecs avant leur élection, François Mitterrand, Jacques Chirac et Nicolas Sarkozy avaient démontré une forme de proximité avec leurs électeurs.

Il faut ajouter le rôle que jouent désormais les réseaux sociaux qui révèlent, sans aucun contrôle, des faits jugés d’autant plus scandaleux qu’on ne vérifie pas leur véracité et donnent une illusion de transparence et de compréhension sur des sujets, par définition complexes.

La maîtrise dont a fait preuve le président de la République six heures devant des maires ruraux, démontrant sa connaissance des dossiers et même sa capacité à écouter et ses qualités de pédagogue, risque de renforcer cette image : il est trop jeune et trop intelligent. Arrogant en un mot… On peut craindre que nombre d’électeurs, devant ce spectacle, se sentent aussi humiliés que Mme Le Pen lors du fameux débat d’entre les deux tours de l’élection présidentielle. Lors de ce moment historique, combien d’entre eux, devant la supériorité aveuglante du futur Président de la République, se sont sentis solidaires d’une candidate écrasée par la compétence de son concurrent ? Comment alors répondre autrement que par la haine ?

Voir aussi:

Interview

Les Pinçon-Charlot «Macron est l’obligé des ultra-riches»

Le storytelling médiatico-politique a voulu en faire un ovni politique, sans passif. Les deux sociologues affirment, au contraire, que la manière d’être et de gouverner du Président est très liée au milieu dans lequel il évolue : celui du pouvoir et de l’argent.

Simon Blin

Pas sûr que le dernier livre du couple de sociologues raccommode le Président avec les gilets jaunes. Huit ans après le Président des riches (2010), une enquête sur l’oligarchie dans la France de Sarkozy, Monique Pinçon-Charlot et Michel Pinçon, ex-directeurs de recherche au CNRS engagés à gauche, poursuivent leur travail d’investigation sur les accointances du pouvoir avec le monde de l’argent dans le Président des ultra-riches (La Découverte). Résultat, le portrait d’un gouvernant toujours plus proche des plus fortunés et encore plus éloigné du reste de la société.

Que doit-on attendre du «grand débat national», lancé le 15 janvier par Emmanuel Macron, étant donné que les principales revendications des gilets jaunes en termes de justice fiscale, dont le rétablissement de l’ISF, ne seront pas discutées ?

Peu de choses. La suppression de l’ISF symbolise à elle seule la fin de la solidarité des plus riches avec le reste de la société. Macron a aussi procédé à la création d’un prélèvement forfaitaire unique (PFU ou flat-tax) sur les revenus du capital, mesure moins connue du grand public mais tout aussi importante. Non seulement, les riches ne sont plus concernés par la solidarité nationale mais en plus on les dispense de la progressivité de l’impôt sur les revenus du capital, c’est-à-dire de payer leurs impôts à hauteur de leur fortune. Que vous ayez seulement quelques actions, pour peu que vous en ayez, ou que vous soyez Bernard Arnault, vous paierez tous le même impôt forfaitaire. Avec Macron, les impostures se font en cascade. Car en répétant à l’envi que cet impôt forfaitaire était de 30 %, le gouvernement a oublié de préciser que ce chiffre comprend aussi le prélèvement social, la contribution additionnelle de solidarité pour l’autonomie et le prélèvement de solidarité. Au final, l’impôt forfaitaire en tant que tel n’est que de 12,8 %. Cela signifie que le plus mal payé des contribuables paie plus en impôts sur le revenu que le plus riche des actionnaires sur chaque euro de dividendes perçus.

A vous lire, ce tour de passe-passe fiscal semble faire partie du code génétique du Président.

Plus encore que chez ses prédécesseurs, le profil d’Emmanuel Macron se prête à la sociologie bourdieusienne, son habitus étant en adéquation parfaite avec les conditions de la pratique de sa position sociale. Autrement dit, sa manière d’être et de gouverner est très liée au milieu dans lequel il évolue : celui du pouvoir et de l’argent. Le storytelling médiatico-politique qui a entouré son élection a voulu nous faire croire à un ovni politique, sans passif. Mais notre enquête, qui croise le contenu de sa politique sociale et économique avec sa trajectoire sociobiographique et les réseaux oligarchiques, démontre qu’il est bien un enfant du sérail, adoubé par les puissants et soutenu par de généreux donateurs.

A sa sortie de l’ENA, il intègre l’inspection des finances sous la direction de Jean-Pierre Jouyet, une des figures centrales du maillage oligarchique français. Très vite, Macron participe à la fameuse «commission Attali» («pour la libéralisation de croissance») sous Sarkozy, où il rencontre les plus grands patrons. Il occupe ensuite un poste de directeur à la banque Rothschild et devient en même temps le meneur du volet économique de la campagne de François Hollande pour la présidentielle. Entre la création du CICE et le pacte de responsabilité, il imprègne ensuite le mandat socialiste de la politique de l’offre selon laquelle plus on donne aux entreprises, plus elles investissent dans l’appareil productif. Enfin, il se sert de son poste de ministre l’Economie pour concourir à la mandature suprême.

Derrière Emmanuel Macron, diriez-vous qu’il existe en pratique une solidarité de riches ?

C’est pire que cela. Macron est pieds et poings liés aux ultra-riches qui ont financé sa campagne. Il est leur obligé. Prenons une fois de plus l’exemple de la suppression de l’ISF. Cette mesure devait intervenir au 1er janvier 2018. Or sa suppression est une des premières décisions prises par Macron en octobre 2017. Cette façon de précipiter l’agenda politique néolibéral est symptomatique de la pression exercée par les puissants, les nantis, les actionnaires et les créanciers qui utilisent l’argent comme arme d’asservissement et de division des individus.

Pour autant, les gilets jaunes font preuve d’une unité remarquable. En tant que sociologues, nous n’avions jamais imaginé qu’un jour un tel mouvement social surgirait. On s’est beaucoup fait à l’idée que les gens modestes, rivés aux urgences d’une vie quotidienne difficile, trouveraient leur bonheur dans l’achat d’un pavillon individuel installé à proximité d’un centre commercial. Comme si le bonheur était dans le magasin où l’on achète le dernier iPhone. C’était un leurre. Nous nous réjouissons de la colère qu’expriment les gilets jaunes. Elle ne s’arrêtera pas. Le processus est irréversible. Pour la première fois, ils ont permis d’interconnecter toutes les inégalités à partir d’une question à la fois de pouvoir d’achat et d’écologie. Ils ont mis en lumière l’imposture écologique du gouvernement. Nous savons désormais que seuls 19 % des recettes de la taxe intérieure de consommation sur les produits énergétiques (TICPE) seront directement dédiés à l’écologie.

Les gilets jaunes s’en sont pris aux beaux quartiers sur lesquels vous enquêtez depuis trente ans. Avez-vous été surpris ?

Pas tant que ça. En refusant d’être parqués sur le Champ-de-Mars le 24 novembre, ils ont attaqué les hauts lieux du pouvoir. Ils ont dénoncé l’agrégation spatiale des élites sociales dans les quartiers huppés. Cela s’est fait grâce au court-circuitage des corps intermédiaires, ne se laissant pas prendre au piège institutionnel. En se rassemblant aux abords des Champs-Elysées, les gilets jaunes ont fait le choix de ne pas s’attaquer à leurs patrons, puisqu’ils ne sont pas en grève, mais de s’adresser directement à Macron en tant que chef d’entreprise de la France. C’est Macron le capitaliste en chef qui mène la guerre de classes en France. «Le chef, c’est moi !» avait-il dit le 14 juillet 2017. C’est donc lui que les gilets jaunes interpellent. Logique. Maintenant, il faut espérer une convergence des luttes avec les syndicats, les cheminots et autres militants de gauche. Il faut être attentif à ne pas s’opposer les uns aux autres. Les gilets jaunes nous rendent le service du siècle.

Voir également:

Affaire Hulot : Emmanuel Macron met en garde contre « la République du soupçon »

Mariana Grépinet

Paris Match

Pouvoir d’achat, Syrie, migrants et SDF, service national universel et exercice du pouvoir, le chef de l’Etat a répondu pendant 2 heures à une centaine de journalistes ce soir.

Pour la première fois depuis son élection en mai dernier, Emmanuel Macron avait accepté l’invitation de l’Association de la presse présidentielle (APP) qui réunit journalistes français et étrangers. Devant une centaine d’entre eux, pendant près de deux heures ce mardi soir, il a répondu à toutes les questions.

Affaire Hulot

« Je n’ai pas souvenir que des gens aient été écartés pour des questions de morale, il n’y a pas eu de jury de moralité pour savoir si quelqu’un pouvait devenir ministre ou pas », a expliqué Emmanuel Macron. Et d’ajouter, soutenant son ministre sans jamais le citer, « je n’ai pas demandé au Premier ministre si les ministres avaient fait l’objet de plainte regardée par les juges et classée sans suite parce que les faits étaient non établis et prescrits ». « Il faut collectivement qu’on se méfie, a exhorté le chef de l’Etat. La question est de savoir où commence le sérieux et où doit s’arrêter la nécessaire transparence et le jeu des contre-pouvoirs. On veut que les dirigeants soient exemplaires. On s’est donné des règles. Mais quand le but des contre-pouvoirs finit par être de détruire ceux qui exercent le pouvoir sans qu’il n’y ait de limite ni de principe, ce n’est plus une version équilibrée de la démocratie. Penser que quelque chose qui a été regardé, jugé, devrait, soit nous conduire à écarter quelqu’un du pouvoir, soit à l’empêcher d’exercer, ça devient une forme de République du soupçon. » Emmanuel Macron a évoqué l’affaire Cahuzac, pour insister « il ne faut pas tout confondre, si tout se vaut, on perdra beaucoup ». Et d’assurer encore à propos de son ministre de la Transition écologique : « Non, je n’étais pas au courant, car ce n’est pas une question que j’ai posée. »

La foi

Interrogé sur son rapport à la foi, Emmanuel Macron a confié « Je crois oui. Si on ne croit pas en sa bonne étoile, en son pays, en son action, on n’a pas le quotidien que j’ai aujourd’hui. Je crois en une forme de transcendance. Je respecte la place que les religions occupent dans notre société. Croire en des religions, en des formes métaphysiques fait partie de la vie en société. On ne doit pas gommer cette part irréductible. »

Loger tous les SDF

Emmanuel Macron a rappelé que son engagement de ne plus avoir d’hommes ou de femmes dans les rues ou dans les bois avant la fin 2017 avait été tenu en juillet dernier lors d’un discours relatif à l’accueil des migrants. Mais il a reconnu, ce qui est rare, son échec :« Nous n’avons pas réussi. » Il a avancé deux explications, l’existence de « publics fragiles qui sont en dehors des politiques publiques mises en places » et « la pression migratoire forte en fin de trimestre ». Le président a expliqué que ces dernières années, de nombreuses places en chambres d’hôtel avaient été ouvertes « ce n’est pas une bonne mesure, car on laisse les gens loin de la socialisation ». Et de poursuivre « aujourd’hui, on diminue la part des chambres d’hôtel pour faire de la place aux pensions de famille ». Et de conclure : « Ne plus avoir de personnes qui dorment dans la rue doit rester un objectif, on ne peut pas s’accommoder de cette situation. »

Service national universel

Dans un de ses rares traits d’humour, Emmanuel Macron a reconnu à demi-mots que la parole gouvernementale n’avait pas été claire à propos du service national universel. Il a donc lui-même confirmé que ce dernier serait bien obligatoire et universel, pour les hommes et les femmes donc. Sa forme pourra être civique mais ne sera pas militaire. Or, « ce qui coûte très cher, c’est un service militaire à l’ancienne où il faut loger pendant un temps donné des gens loin de leur famille », a souligné Macron. Le service national tel qu’il l’envisage, qui a « un intérêt en terme de cohésion nationale », aura un coût « mais ne sera pas prohibitif ». Il devrait durer entre 3 et 6 mois et pourra être plus long si on y intègre une composante service civique.

Rôle de son épouse Brigitte

« Dans la fonction qui est la mienne on ne gomme pas sa vie personnelle. Mon épouse Brigitte a une fonction de représentation indispensable, qu’elle assume et qui est utile sur le pays. Et elle s’engage, comme le prévoit la charte de l’été dernier, sur des causes qui lui tiennent à cœur où sa présence peut apporter quelque chose et qui sont en cohérence avec les priorités que j’ai pu définir », a explique Emmanuel Macron et de citer les deux causes sur lesquelles, selon lui « sa présence, son regard, son action peuvent aider, accélérer, faciliter » : « tous les sujets qui relèvent de l’éducation, et en particulier pour les jeunes enfants en situation de handicap » et « le sujet des violences faites aux personnes et plus particulièrement aux femmes ». « Mettre un coup de projecteur, venir aider une association, parrainer tel événement, faciliter les choses, en appui avec le rôle des ministres, est utile et pertinent », a assuré le chef de l’Etat.

L’épreuve du pouvoir

« Depuis que j’ai été élu, j’ai pris la mesure de la charge, du poids de celle-ci, de la part de solitude qu’elle implique, de la fin de l’innocence qu’elle décrète, mais je ne crois pas que ce soit une épreuve ; c’est faire », a expliqué le président en précisant qu’il ne se sentait pas autorisé « à prendre une forme de loisir ». « Il y a une part d’ascèse », a t il encore insisté. « Je n’oublie pas d’où je viens. Je ne suis pas l’enfant naturel de temps calmes de la vie politique. Je suis le fruit d’une forme de brutalité de l’histoire. Une effraction parce que la France était malheureuse et inquiète. Si j’oublie un seul instant tout cela, ce sera sans doute le début de l’épreuve. » Et de lâcher : « Il n’y a pas d’innocence et pas de répit, mais c’est au fond ce que j’ai souhaité, je ne me plaindrai pas. »

Voir par ailleurs:

Much Has Changed for the Better Since 2016—Not That Trump Will Get Credit

Victor Davis Hanson
American greatness
January 30th, 2019

 

The news obsesses over the recent government shutdown, the latest Robert Mueller arrest and, of course, fake news—from the BuzzFeed Michael Cohen non-story to the smears of the Covington Catholic High School students.

But aside from the weekly hysterias, the world has dramatically changed since 2016 in ways we scarcely have appreciated.

The idea that China systematically rigged trade laws and engaged in technological espionage to run up huge deficits is no longer a Trump, or even a partisan, issue.

In the last two years, a mainstream consensus has grown that China poses a commercial and mercantile threat to world trade, to its neighbors and to the very security of the United States—and requires a strong response, including temporary tariffs.

The world did not fall apart after the U.S. pulled out of the flawed Iran nuclear deal. Most yawned when the U.S. left the symbolic but empty Paris Climate Accord. Ditto when the U.S. moved its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

In retrospect, most Americans accept that such once controversial decisions were not ever all that controversial.

There is also a growing, though little reported, consensus about what created the current economic renaissance: tax cuts, massive deregulation, recalibration of trade policy, tax incentives to bring back offshore capital, and dramatic rises in oil and natural gas production.

Although partisan bickering continues over the extent of the upswing, most appreciate that millions of Americans are now back again working—especially minority youth—in a manner not seen in over a decade.

The Supreme Court and federal judges will be far more conservative for a generation—as Trump’s judicial nominations are uniformly conservative, mostly young and well qualified.

For all the acrimony about illegal immigration, the government shutdown over the wall and the question of amnesties, most Americans also finally favor some sort of grand bargain compromise.

The public seems to be agreeing that conservatives should get more border fencing or walls in strategic areas, an end to new illegal immigration and deportation for those undocumented immigrants with criminal records.

Liberals in turn will likely obtain green cards for those long-time immigrants here illegally who have a work history and have not committed violent crimes.

Both sides will be forced to agree that illegal immigration, sanctuary cities and open borders should end and legal immigration should be reformed.

Americans have paradoxically grown tired both of costly overseas interventions and perceptions of American weakness that led to the Libyan fiasco, the Syrian genocide, the rise of the ISIS caliphate, and Iranian-inspired terrorism.

Today U.S. foreign policy actually reflects those paradoxes. The public supports a withdrawal from the quagmires in Afghanistan and Syria. But it also approved of bombing ISIS into retreat and muscular efforts to denuclearize North Korea.

Two years ago, most Americans accepted that the European Union and NATO were sacrosanct status quo institutions beyond criticism. Today there is growing agreement that our NATO allies will only pay their fair share of mutual defense if they are forced to live up to their promises.

Europe is not stable and steady, but torn by Eastern European anger at open borders, Southern European resentment at the ultimatums of German banks, and acrimonious negotiations over the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU.

Most Americans have now concluded that while the EU may be necessary to prevent another intra-European war, it is increasingly a postmodern, anti-democratic and unstable entity.

Trump has not changed his campaign reputation for being mercurial, crass and crude.

But what has changed is the media’s own reputation in its hysterical reaction to Trump. Instead of empirical reporting, the networks and press have become unhinged.

When reporting of the presidency has proved 90 percent negative, and false news stories are legion, the media are no longer seen as the remedy to Trump but rather an illness themselves.

Since 2016, polls show that Americans have assumed that the proverbial mainstream media cannot be counted on for honest reporting but will omit, twist and massage facts and evidence for the higher “truth” of neutralizing the Trump presidency.

When asked on “The View” why so often the liberal press keeps making up facts, “jumps the gun” and has to “walk stuff back when it turns out wrong,” Joy Behar honestly answered, “Because we’re desperate to get Trump out of office. That’s why.”

Trump’s popularity is about where it was when he was elected—ranging on average from the low to mid-forties. But many of his policies have led to more prosperity and address festering problems abroad.

And despite the negative news, they are widely supported, even—or especially—if Trump himself is not given proper credit for enacting most of them.


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :