Environnement: Comme les Aztèques qui tuaient toujours plus de victimes (While climate change turns into cargo cult science, what of our quasi-religious addiction to growth as the rest of the world demands its own American dream and our finite planet eventually runs out of resources ?)

2 mai, 2021

Cargo Cult Agile. Fred: Are you in a Cargo Cult? | by Tomas Kejzlar | Skeptical Agile

PageCommuniqués de Presse Archives - Page 4 sur 16 - Alternatiba

Socialter N°34 Fin du monde, fin du mois, même combat ? - avril/mai 2019 - POLLEN DIFPOP
Students at the International School of Beijing playing in one of two domes with air-filtration systems for when smog is severeChinese millionaire and philanthropist Chen Guangbiao hands out cans of air during a publicity stunt on a day of heavy air pollution last week at a financial district in Beijing.DIEU EST AMERICAIN
Unsettled - BenBella Books
Une nation s’élèvera contre une nation, et un royaume contre un royaume; il y aura de grands tremblements de terre, et, en divers lieux, des pestes et des famines; il y aura des phénomènes terribles, et de grands signes dans le ciel. (…) Il y aura des signes dans le soleil, dans la lune et dans les étoiles. Et sur la terre, il y aura de l’angoisse chez les nations qui ne sauront que faire, au bruit de la mer et des flots. Jésus (Luc 21: 10-25)
Où est Dieu? cria-t-il, je vais vous le dire! Nous l’avons tué – vous et moi! Nous tous sommes ses meurtriers! Mais comment avons-nous fait cela? Comment avons-nous pu vider la mer? Qui nous a donné l’éponge pour effacer l’horizon tout entier? Dieu est mort! (…) Et c’est nous qui l’avons tué ! (…) Ce que le monde avait possédé jusqu’alors de plus sacré et de plus puissant a perdu son sang sous nos couteaux (…) Quelles solennités expiatoires, quels jeux sacrés nous faudra-t-il inventer? Nietzsche
Ce sont les enjeux ! Pour faire un monde où chaque enfant de Dieu puisse vivre, ou entrer dans l’obscurité, nous devons soit nous aimer l’un l’autre, soit mourir. Lyndon Johnson (1964)
Interdire le DDT a tué plus de personnes qu’Hitler. Personnage d’un roman de  Michael Crichton (State of Fear, 2004)
Parents have scrambled to buy air purifiers. IQAir, a Swiss company, makes purifiers that cost up to $3,000 here and are displayed in shiny showrooms. Mike Murphy, the chief executive of IQAir China, said sales had tripled in the first three months of 2013 over the same period last year. Face masks are now part of the urban dress code. Ms. Zhang laid out half a dozen masks on her dining room table and held up one with a picture of a teddy bear that fits Xiaotian. Schools are adopting emergency measures. Xiaotian’s private kindergarten used to take the children on a field trip once a week, but it has canceled most of those this year. At the prestigious Beijing No. 4 High School, which has long trained Chinese leaders and their children, outdoor physical education classes are now canceled when the pollution index is high. (…) Elite schools are investing in infrastructure to keep children active. Among them are Dulwich College Beijing and the International School of Beijing, which in January completed two large white sports domes of synthetic fabric that cover athletic fields and tennis courts. The construction of the domes and an accompanying building began a year ago, to give the 1,900 students a place to exercise in both bad weather and high pollution, said Jeff Johanson, director of student activities. The project cost $5.7 million and includes hospital-grade air-filtration systems. Teachers check the hourly air ratings from the United States Embassy to determine whether children should play outside or beneath the domes. NYT
From gigantic domes that keep out pollution to face masks with fancy fiber filters, purifiers and even canned air, Chinese businesses are trying to find a way to market that most elusive commodity: clean air. An unprecedented wave of pollution throughout China (dubbed the “airpocalypse” or “airmageddon” by headline writers) has spawned an almost entirely new industry. The biggest ticket item is a huge dome that looks like a cross between the Biosphere and an overgrown wedding tent. Two of them recently went up at the International School of Beijing, one with six tennis courts, another large enough to harbor kids playing soccer and badminton and shooting hoops simultaneously Friday afternoon. The contraptions are held up with pressure from the system pumping in fresh air. Your ears pop when you go in through one of three revolving doors that maintain a tight air lock. The anti-pollution dome is the joint creation of a Shenzhen-based manufacturer of outdoor enclosures and a California company, Valencia-based UVDI, that makes air filtration and disinfection systems for hospitals, schools, museums and airports, including the new international terminal at Los Angeles International Airport. Although the technologies aren’t new, this is the first time they’ve been put together specifically to keep out pollution, the manufacturers say. (…) Since air pollution skyrocketed in mid-January, Xiao said, orders for domes were pouring in from schools, government sports facilities and wealthy individuals who want them in their backyards. He said domes measuring more than 54,000 square feet each cost more than $1 million. (…) Because it’s not possible to put a dome over all of Beijing, where air quality is the worst, people are taking matters into their own hands. Not since the 2003 epidemic of SARS have face masks been such hot sellers. Many manufacturers are reporting record sales of devices varying from high-tech neoprene masks with exhalation valves, designed for urban bicyclists, that cost up to $50 each, to cheap cloth masks (some in stripes, polka dots, paisley and some emulating animal faces). (…) In mid-January, measurements of particulate matter reached more than 1,000 micrograms per cubic meter in some parts of northeast China. Anything above 300 is considered “hazardous” and the index stops at 500. By comparison, the U.S. has seen readings of 1,000 only in areas downwind of forest fires. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last year that the average particulate matter reading from 16 airport smokers’ lounges was 166.6. The Chinese government has been experimenting with various emergency measures, curtailing the use of official cars and ordering factories and construction sites to shut down. Some cities are even considering curbs on fireworks during the upcoming Chinese New Year holiday, interfering with an almost sacred tradition. In the meantime, home air filters have joined the new must-have appliances for middle class Chinese. (…) Many distributors report panic buying of air purifiers. In China, home air purifiers range from $15 gizmos that look like night lights to handsome $6,000 wood-finished models that are supplied to Zhongnanhai, the headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party and to other leadership facilities. One model is advertised as emitting vitamin C to build immunity and to prevent skin aging. In a more tongue in cheek approach to the problem, a self-promoting Chinese millionaire has been selling soda-sized cans of, you guessed it, air. (…) “I want to tell mayors, county chiefs and heads of big companies,” Chen told reporters Wednesday, while giving out free cans of air on a Beijing sidewalk as a publicity stunt. “Don’t just chase GDP growth, don’t chase the biggest profits at the expense of our children and grandchildren. » LA Times
Plus la guerre froide s’éloigne, plus le nombre de conflits diminue. (…) il n’y a eu ainsi en 2010 que 15 conflits d’ampleur significative, tous internes. (…)  Grosso modo, le nombre de conflits d’importance a diminué de 60% depuis la fin de la guerre froide (…) outre le fait que les guerres sont plutôt moins meurtrières, en moyenne, qu’elles ne l’étaient jusque dans les années 1960, cette réduction trouve sa source essentiellement dans la diminution spectaculaire du nombre de guerres civiles. La fin des conflits indirects entre l’Est et l’Ouest, l’intervention croissante des organisations internationales et des médiateurs externes, et dans une certaine mesure le développement économique et social des États, sont les causes principales de cette tendance. S’y ajoutent sans doute (…) des évolutions démographiques favorables. Bruno Tertrais
Imaginez que [Fukushima] se soit produit dans un pays non-développé: le nombre de morts aurait été de 200 000. Le développement et la croissance nous protègent des catastrophes naturelles. Bruno Tertrais
Longtemps, les divinités représentèrent le lieu de cette extériorité. Les sociétés modernes ont voulu s’en affranchir: mais cette désacralisation peut nous laisser sans protection aucune face à notre violence et nous mener à la catastrophe finale. Jean-Pierre Dupuy
Nous vivons à la fois dans le meilleur et le pire des mondes. Les progrès de l’humanité sont réels. Nos lois sont meilleures et nous nous tuons moins les uns les autres. En même temps, nous ne voulons pas voir notre responsabilité dans les menaces et les possibilités de destruction qui pèsent sur nous. René Girard
Les événements qui se déroulent sous nos yeux sont à la fois naturels et culturels, c’est-à-dire qu’ils sont apocalyptiques. Jusqu’à présent, les textes de l’Apocalypse faisaient rire. Tout l’effort de la pensée moderne a été de séparer le culturel du naturel. La science consiste à montrer que les phénomènes culturels ne sont pas naturels et qu’on se trompe forcément si on mélange les tremblements de terre et les rumeurs de guerre, comme le fait le texte de l’Apocalypse. Mais, tout à coup, la science prend conscience que les activités de l’homme sont en train de détruire la nature. C’est la science qui revient à l’Apocalypse. René Girard
L’interprétation que Dupuy et Dumouchel donnent de notre société me paraît juste, seulement un peu trop optimiste. D’après eux, la société de consommation constitue une façon de désamorcer la rivalité mimétique, de réduire sa puissance conflictuelle. C’est vrai. S’arranger pour que les mêmes objets, les mêmes marchandises soient accessibles à tout le monde, c’est réduire les occasions de conflit et de rivalité entre les individus. Lorsque ce système devient permanent, toutefois, les individus finissent par se désintéresser de ces objets trop accessibles et identiques. Il faut du temps pour que cette « usure » se produise, mais elle se produit toujours. Parce qu’elle rend les objets trop faciles à acquérir, la société de consommation travaille à sa propre destruction. Comme tout mécanisme sacrificiel, cette société a besoin de se réinventer de temps à autre. Pour survivre, elle doit inventer des gadgets toujours nouveaux. Et la société de marché engloutit les ressources de la terre, un peu comme les Aztèques qui tuaient toujours plus de victimes. Tout remède sacrificiel perd son efficacité avec le temps. René Girard
Certains spécialistes avancent le chiffre de vingt mille victimes par an au moment de la conquête de Cortès. Même s’il y avait beaucoup d’exagération, le sacrifice humain n’en jouerait pas moins chez les Aztèques un rôle proprement monstrueux. Ce peuple était constamment occupé à guerroyer, non pour étendre son territoire, mais pour se procurer les victimes nécessaires aux innombrables sacrifices recensés par Bernardino de Sahagun. Les ethnologues possèdent toutes ces données depuis des siècles, depuis l’époque, en vérité, qui effectua les premiers déchiffrements de la représentation persécutrice dans le monde occidental. Mais ils ne tirent pas les mêmes conclusions dans les deux cas. Aujourd’hui moins que jamais. Ils passent le plus clair de leur temps à minimiser, sinon à justifier entièrement, chez les Aztèques, ce qu’ils condamnent à juste titre dans leur propre univers. Une fois de plus nous retrouvons les deux poids et les deux mesures qui caractérisent les sciences de l’homme dans leur traitement des sociétés historiques et des sociétés ethnologiques. Notre impuissance à repérer dans les mythes une représentation persécutrice plus mystifiée encore que la nôtre ne tient pas seulement à la difficulté plus grande de l’entreprise, à la transfiguration plus extrême des données, elle relève “modernes sont surtout obsédés par le mépris et ils s’efforcent de présenter ces univers disparus sous les couleurs les plus favorables. (…) Les ethnologues décrivent avec gourmandise le sort enviable de ces victimes. Pendant la période qui précède leur sacrifice, elles jouissent de privilèges extraordinaires et c’est sereinement, peut-être même joyeusement, qu’elles s’avancent vers la mort. Jacques Soustelle, entre autres, recommande à ses lecteurs de ne pas interpréter ces boucheries religieuses à la lumière de nos concepts. L’affreux péché d’ethnocentrisme nous guette et, quoi que fassent les sociétés exotiques, il faut se garder du moindre jugement négatif. Si louable que soit le souci de « réhabiliter » des mondes méconnus, il faut y mettre du discernement. Les excès actuels rivalisent de ridicule avec l’enflure orgueilleuse de naguère, mais en sens contraire. Au fond, c’est toujours la même condescendance : nous n’appliquons pas à ces sociétés les critères que nous appliquons à nous-mêmes, mais à la suite, cette fois, d’une inversion démagogique bien caractéristique de notre fin de siècle. Ou bien nos sources ne valent rien et nous n’avons plus qu’à nous taire : nous ne saurons jamais rien de certain sur les Aztèques, ou bien nos sources valent quelque chose, et l’honnêteté oblige à conclure que la religion de ce peuple n’a pas usurpé sa place au musée planétaire de l’horreur humaine. Le zèle antiethnocentrique s’égare quand il justifie les orgies sanglantes de l’image visiblement trompeuse qu’elles donnent d’elles-mêmes. Bien que pénétré d’idéologie sacrificielle, le mythe atroce et magnifique de Teotihuacan porte sourdement témoignage contre cette vision mystificatrice. Si quelque chose humanise ce texte, ce n’est pas la fausse idylle des victimes et des bourreaux qu’épousent fâcheusement le néo-rousseauisme et le néo-nietzschéisme de nos deux après-guerres, c’est ce qui s’oppose à cette hypocrite vision, sans aller jusqu’à la contredire ouvertement, ce sont les hésitations que j’ai notées face aux fausses évidences qui les entourent. René Girard
Cargo cult: any of the religious movements chiefly, but not solely, in Melanesia that exhibit belief in the imminence of a new age of blessing, to be initiated by the arrival of a special “cargo” of goods from supernatural sources—based on the observation by local residents of the delivery of supplies to colonial officials. Tribal divinities, culture heroes, or ancestors may be expected to return with the cargo, or the goods may be expected to come through foreigners, who are sometimes accused of having intercepted material goods intended for the native peoples. If the cargo is expected by ship or plane, symbolic wharves or landing strips and warehouses are sometimes built in preparation, and traditional material resources are abandoned—gardening ceases, and pigs and foodstocks are destroyed. Former customs may be revived or current practices drastically changed, and new social organizations, sometimes imitative of the colonial police or armed forces, initiated. Encyclopaedia Britannica
Pur produit des sociétés dans lesquelles les élites ignorent que les processus culturels précèdent le succès, le Culte du Cargo, qui consiste à investir dans une infrastructure dont est dotée une société prospère en espérant que cette acquisition produise les mêmes effets pour soi, fut l’un des moteurs des emprunts toxiques des collectivités locales. L’expression a été popularisée lors de la seconde guerre mondiale, quand elle s’est exprimée par de fausses infrastructures créées par les insulaires et destinées à attirer les cargos.(…) Les collectivités ont développé une addiction à la dépense et, comme les ménages victimes plus ou moins conscientes des subprimes, elles ont facilement trouvé un dealer pour leur répondre. Les causes en sont assez évidentes : multiplication des élus locaux n’ayant pas toujours de compétences techniques et encore moins financières, peu ou pas formés, tenus parfois par leur administration devenue maîtresse des lieux, et engagés dans une concurrence à la visibilité entre la ville, l’agglomération, le département à qui voudra montrer qu’il construit ou qu’il anime plus et mieux que l’autre, dans une relation finalement assez féodale. (…) Il serait sans doute erroné de porter l’opprobre sur les élus locaux ou même sur les banques, car il s’agit là de la manifestation d’une tendance de fond très profonde et très simple qui a à faire avec le désir mimétique et le Culte du Cargo. Ce dernier fut particulièrement évident en Océanie pendant la seconde guerre mondiale, où des habitants des îles observant une corrélation entre l’appel du radio et l’arrivée d’un cargo de vivres, ou bien entre l’existence d’une piste et l’arrivée d’avions, se mirent à construire un culte fait de simulacre de radio et de fausses pistes d’atterrissage, espérant ainsi que l’existence de moyens ferait venir l’objet désiré. Il s’agit d’un phénomène général, comme par exemple en informatique lorsque l’on recopie une procédure que l’on ne comprend pas dans son propre programme, en espérant qu’elle y produise le même effet que dans son programme d’origine. (…) Bien que paradoxale, l’addiction à la dette est synchrone avec les difficultés financières et correspond peut-être inconsciemment à l’instinct du joueur à se “refaire”. Ce qui est toutefois plus grave est, d’une part, l’hallucination collective qui permet le phénomène de Culte du Cargo, mais aussi l’absence totale de contre-pouvoir à cette pensée devenue unique, voire magique. Le Culte du Cargo aggrave toujours la situation. La raison est aussi simple que diabolique : les prêtres du Culte du Cargo dépensent pour acheter des infrastructures similaires à ce qu’ils ont vu ailleurs dans l’espoir d’attirer la fortune sur leur tribu. Malheureusement, dans le même temps, les “esprits” qui restaient dans la tribu se sont enfuis ou se taisent devant la pression de la foule en attente de miracle. Alors, les élites, qui ignorent totalement que derrière l’apparent résultat se cachent des processus culturels complexes qu’ils ne comprennent pas, se dotent d’un faux aéroport ou d’une fausse radio et dilapident ainsi, en pure perte, leurs dernières ressources. Il serait injuste de penser que ce phénomène ne concerne que des populations peu avancées. En 1974, Richard Feynman dénonça la “Cargo Cult Science” lors d’un discours à Caltech. Les collectivités confrontées à une concurrence pour la population organisent agendas et ateliers (en fait des brainstormings) pour évoquer les raisons de leurs handicaps par rapport à d’autres. Il suit généralement une liste de solutions précédées de “Il faut” : de la Recherche, des Jeunes, des Cadres, une communauté homosexuelle, une patinoire, une piscine, le TGV, un festival, une équipe sportive onéreuse, son gymnase…Tout cela est peut-être vrai, mais cela revient à confondre les effets avec les processus requis pour les obtenir. Comme nul ne comprend les processus culturels qui ont conduit à ce qu’une collectivité réussisse, il est plus facile de croire que boire le café de George Clooney vous apportera le même succès. Rien de nouveau ici : la publicité et ses 700 milliards de dollars de budget mondial annuel manipule cela depuis le début de la société de consommation. Routes menant à des plateformes logistiques ou des zones industrielles jamais construites, bureaux vides, duplication des infrastructures (piscines, technopoles, pépinières…) à quelques mètres les unes des autres, le Culte du Cargo nous coûte cher : il faut que cela se voit, même si cela ne sert à rien. Malheureusement, les vraies actions de création des processus culturels et sociaux ne se voient généralement pas aussi bien qu’un beau bâtiment tout neuf. (…) Ainsi, les pôles de compétitivité marchent d’autant mieux qu’ils viennent seulement labelliser un système culturel déjà préexistant. Lorsqu’ils sont des créations dans l’urgence, en hydroponique, par la volonté rituelle de reproduire, leurs effets relèvent de l’espoir, non d’une stratégie. (…) Ainsi, la tentation française de copier les mesures allemandes qui ont conduit au succès, sans que les dirigeants français aient vraiment compris pourquoi, mais en espérant les mêmes bénéfices, peut être considérée comme une expression du Culte du Cargo. C’est en effet faire fi des processus culturels engagés depuis des décennies en Allemagne et qui ont conduit à une culture de la négociation sociale et à des syndicats représentatifs. (…) Contrairement à ce que veulent faire croire les prêtres du Culte du Cargo, les danses de la pluie ne marchent pas, il faut réfléchir. Luc Brunet
Je crois qu’il y a  quelque chose qui se passe. Il y a quelque chose qui est en train de changer et cela va changer à nouveau. Je ne pense pas que ce soit un canular, je pense qu’il y a probablement une différence. Mais je ne sais pas si c’est à cause de l’homme. (…) Je ne veux pas donner des trillions et des trillions de dollars. Je ne veux pas perdre des millions et des millions d’emplois. Je ne veux pas qu’on y perde au change. (…) Et on ne sait pas si ça se serait passé avec ou sans l’homme. On ne sait pas. (…) Il y a des scientifiques qui ne sont pas d’accord avec ça. (…) Je ne nie pas le changement climatique. Mais cela pourrait très bien repartir dans l’autre sens. Vous savez, on parle de plus de millions d’années. Il y en a qui disent que nous avons eu des ouragans qui étaient bien pires que ce que nous venons d’avoir avec Michael. (…) Vous savez, les scientifiques aussi ont leurs visées politiques. Président Trump (15.10.2018)
La « fin du monde » contre la « fin du mois ». L’expression, supposée avoir été employée initialement par un gilet jaune, a fait florès : comment concilier les impératifs de pouvoir d’achat à court terme, et les exigences écologiques vitales pour la survie de la planète ? La formule a même été reprise ce mardi par Emmanuel Macron, dans son discours sur la transition énergétique. « On l’entend, le président, le gouvernement, a-t-il expliqué, en paraphrasant les requêtes supposées des contestataires. Ils évoquent la fin du monde, nous on parle de la fin du mois. Nous allons traiter les deux, et nous devons traiter les deux. » (…) C’est dire que l’expression – si elle a pu être reprise ponctuellement par tel ou tel manifestant – émane en fait de nos élites boboïsantes. Elle correspond bien à la vision méprisante qu’elles ont d’une France périphérique aux idées étriquées, obsédée par le « pognon » indifférente au bien commun, là où nos dirigeants auraient la capacité à embrasser plus large, et à voir plus loin. Or, la réalité est toute autre : quand on prend le temps de parler à ces gilets jaunes, on constate qu’ils sont parfaitement conscients de la problématique écologique. Parmi leurs revendications, dévoilées ces derniers jours, il y a ainsi l’interdiction immédiate du glyphosate, cancérogène probable que le gouvernement a en revanche autorisé pour encore au moins trois ans. Mais, s’ils se sentent concernés par l’avenir de la planète, les représentants de cette France rurale et périurbaine refusent de payer pour les turpitudes d’un système économique qui détruit l’environnement. D’autant que c’est ce même système qui est à l’origine de la désindustrialisation et de la dévitalisation des territoires, dont ils subissent depuis trente ans les conséquences en première ligne. A l’inverse, nos grandes consciences donneuses de leçon sont bien souvent les principaux bénéficiaires de cette économie mondialisée. Qui est égoïste, et qui est altruiste ? Parmi les doléances des gilets jaunes, on trouve d’ailleurs aussi nombre de revendications politiques : comptabilisation du vote blanc, présence obligatoire des députés à l’Assemblée nationale, promulgation des lois par les citoyens eux-mêmes. Des revendications qu’on peut bien moquer, ou balayer d’un revers de manche en estimant qu’elles ne sont pas de leur ressort. Elles n’en témoignent pas moins d’un souci du politique, au sens le plus noble du terme, celui du devenir de la Cité. A l’inverse, en se repaissant d’une figure rhétorique caricaturale, reprise comme un « gimmick » de communication, nos élites démontrent leur goût pour le paraître et la superficialité, ainsi que la facilité avec laquelle elles s’entichent de clichés qui ne font que conforter leurs préjugés. Alors, qui est ouvert, et qui est étriqué ? Qui voit loin, et qui est replié sur lui-même ? Qui pense à ses fins de mois, et qui, à la fin du monde ? Benjamin Masse-Stamberger
In the South Seas there is a Cargo Cult of people. During the war they saw airplanes land with lots of good materials, and they want the same thing to happen now. So they’ve arranged to make things like runways, to put fires along the sides of the runways, to make a wooden hut for a man to sit in, with two wooden pieces on his head like headphones and bars of bamboo sticking out like antennas—he’s the controller—and they wait for the airplanes to land. They’re doing everything right. The form is perfect. It looks exactly the way it looked before. But it doesn’t work. No airplanes land. So I call these things Cargo Cult Science, because they follow all the apparent precepts and forms of scientific investigation, but they’re missing something essential, because the planes don’t land. Now it behooves me, of course, to tell you what they’re missing. But it would he just about as difficult to explain to the South Sea Islanders how they have to arrange things so that they get some wealth in their system. It is not something simple like telling them how to improve the shapes of the earphones. But there is one feature I notice that is generally missing in Cargo Cult Science. That is the idea that we all hope you have learned in studying science in school (…) It’s a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty—a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you’re doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid—not only what you think is right about it: other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you’ve eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked—to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated. Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. You must do the best you can—if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong—to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. There is also a more subtle problem. When you have put a lot of ideas together to make an elaborate theory, you want to make sure, when explaining what it fits, that those things it fits are not just the things that gave you the idea for the theory; but that the finished theory makes something else come out right, in addition. In summary, the idea is to try to give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another. The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists… You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that. Richard Feynman (1974)
If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period. Michael Crichton (2013)
Humans exert a growing, but physically small, warming influence on the climate. The results from many different climate models disagree with, or even contradict, each other and many kinds of observations. In short, the science is insufficient to make useful predictions about how the climate will change over the coming decades, much less what effect our actions will have on it. Dr. Steven E. Koonin
‘The Science,” we’re told, is settled. How many times have you heard it? Humans have broken the earth’s climate. Temperatures are rising, sea level is surging, ice is disappearing, and heat waves, storms, droughts, floods, and wildfires are an ever-worsening scourge on the world. Greenhouse gas emissions are causing all of this. And unless they’re eliminated promptly by radical changes to society and its energy systems, “The Science” says Earth is doomed.  Yes, it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it. But beyond that — to paraphrase the classic movie “The Princess Bride” — “I do not think ‘The Science’ says what you think it says.”  For example, both research literature and government reports state clearly that heat waves in the US are now no more common than they were in 1900, and that the warmest temperatures in the US have not risen in the past fifty years. When I tell people this, most are incredulous. Some gasp. And some get downright hostile.  These are almost certainly not the only climate facts you haven’t heard. Here are three more that might surprise you, drawn from recent published research or assessments of climate science published by the US government and the UN:   Humans have had no detectable impact on hurricanes over the past century. Greenland’s ice sheet isn’t shrinking any more rapidly today than it was 80 years ago. The global area burned by wildfires has declined more than 25 percent since 2003 and 2020 was one of the lowest years on record.  Why haven’t you heard these facts before?  Most of the disconnect comes from the long game of telephone that starts with the research literature and runs through the assessment reports to the summaries of the assessment reports and on to the media coverage. There are abundant opportunities to get things wrong — both accidentally and on purpose — as the information goes through filter after filter to be packaged for various audiences. The public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries, let alone the reports and research papers themselves. That’s perfectly understandable — the data and analyses are nearly impenetrable for non-experts, and the writing is not exactly gripping. As a result, most people don’t get the whole story. Policymakers, too, have to rely on information that’s been put through several different wringers by the time it gets to them. Because most government officials are not themselves scientists, it’s up to scientists to make sure that those who make key policy decisions get an accurate, complete and transparent picture of what’s known (and unknown) about the changing climate, one undistorted by “agenda” or “narrative.” Unfortunately, getting that story straight isn’t as easy as it sounds. (…) the public discussions of climate and energy [have become] increasingly distant from the science. Phrases like “climate emergency,” “climate crisis” and “climate disaster” are now routinely bandied about to support sweeping policy proposals to “fight climate change” with government interventions and subsidies. Not surprisingly, the Biden administration has made climate and energy a major priority infused throughout the government, with the appointment of John Kerry as climate envoy and proposed spending of almost $2 trillion dollars to fight this “existential threat to humanity.” Trillion-dollar decisions about reducing human influences on the climate should be informed by an accurate understanding of scientific certainties and uncertainties. My late Nobel-prizewinning Caltech colleague Richard Feynman was one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century. At the 1974 Caltech commencement, he gave a now famous address titled “Cargo Cult Science” about the rigor scientists must adopt to avoid fooling not only themselves. “Give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another,” he implored.  Much of the public portrayal of climate science ignores the great late physicist’s advice. It is an effort to persuade rather than inform, and the information presented withholds either essential context or what doesn’t “fit.” Scientists write and too-casually review the reports, reporters uncritically repeat them, editors allow that to happen, activists and their organizations fan the fires of alarm, and experts endorse the deception by keeping silent.  As a result, the constant repetition of these and many other climate fallacies are turned into accepted truths known as “The Science.” Dr. Steven E. Koonin
Physicist Steven Koonin kicks the hornet’s nest right out of the gate in “Unsettled.” In the book’s first sentences he asserts that “the Science” about our planet’s climate is anything but “settled.” Mr. Koonin knows well that it is nonetheless a settled subject in the minds of most pundits and politicians and most of the population. Further proof of the public’s sentiment: Earlier this year the United Nations Development Programme published the mother of all climate surveys, titled “The Peoples’ Climate Vote.” With more than a million respondents from 50 countries, the survey, unsurprisingly, found “64% of people said that climate change was an emergency.” But science itself is not conducted by polls, regardless of how often we are urged to heed a “scientific consensus” on climate. As the science-trained novelist Michael Crichton summarized in a famous 2003 lecture at Caltech: “If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period.” Mr. Koonin says much the same in “Unsettled.” The book is no polemic. It’s a plea for understanding how scientists extract clarity from complexity. And, as Mr. Koonin makes clear, few areas of science are as complex and multidisciplinary as the planet’s climate. (…) But Mr. Koonin is no “climate denier,” to use the concocted phrase used to shut down debate. The word “denier” is of course meant to associate skeptics of climate alarmism with Holocaust deniers. (…) Mr. Koonin makes it clear, on the book’s first page, that “it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it.” The heart of the science debate, however, isn’t about whether the globe is warmer or whether humanity contributed. The important questions are about the magnitude of civilization’s contribution and the speed of changes; and, derivatively, about the urgency and scale of governmental response. (…) As Mr Koonin illustrates, tornado frequency and severity are also not trending up; nor are the number and severity of droughts. The extent of global fires has been trending significantly downward. The rate of sea-level rise has not accelerated. Global crop yields are rising, not falling. And while global atmospheric CO2 levels are obviously higher now than two centuries ago, they’re not at any record planetary high—they’re at a low that has only been seen once before in the past 500 million years. Mr. Koonin laments the sloppiness of those using local weather “events” to make claims about long-cycle planetary phenomena. He chastises not so much local news media as journalists with prestigious national media who should know better. (…) When it comes to the vaunted computer models, Mr. Koonin is persuasively skeptical. It’s a big problem, he says, when models can’t retroactively “predict” events that have already happened. And he notes that some of the “tuning” done to models so that they work better amounts to “cooking the books.” (…) Since all the data that Mr. Koonin uses are available to others, he poses the obvious question: “Why haven’t you heard these facts before?” (…) He points to such things as incentives to invoke alarm for fundraising purposes and official reports that “mislead by omission.” Many of the primary scientific reports, he observes repeatedly, are factual. Still, “the public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries.” (…) But even if one remains unconvinced by his arguments, the right response is to debate the science. We’ll see if that happens in a world in which politicians assert the science is settled and plan astronomical levels of spending to replace the nation’s massive infrastructures with “green” alternatives. Never have so many spent so much public money on the basis of claims that are so unsettled. The prospects for a reasoned debate are not good. Mark P. Mills
La prophétie de malheur est faite pour éviter qu’elle ne se réalise; et se gausser ultérieurement d’éventuels sonneurs d’alarme en leur rappelant que le pire ne s’est pas réalisé serait le comble de l’injustice: il se peut que leur impair soit leur mérite. Hans Jonas
(Noah was tired of playing the prophet of doom and of always foretelling a catastrophe that would not occur and that no one would take seriously. One day,) he clothed himself in sackcloth and put ashes on his head. This act was only permitted to someone lamenting the loss of his dear child or his wife. Clothed in the habit of truth, acting sorrowful, he went back to the city, intent on using to his advantage the curiosity, malignity and superstition of its people. Within a short time, he had gathered around him a small crowd, and the questions began to surface. He was asked if someone was dead and who the dead person was. Noah answered them that many were dead and, much to the amusement of those who were listening, that they themselves were dead. Asked when this catastrophe had taken place, he answered: tomorrow. Seizing this moment of attention and disarray, Noah stood up to his full height and began to speak: the day after tomorrow, the flood will be something that will have been. And when the flood will have been, all that is will never have existed. When the flood will have carried away all that is, all that will have been, it will be too late to remember, for there will be no one left. So there will no longer be any difference between the dead and those who weep for them. If I have come before you, it is to reverse time, it is to weep today for tomorrow’s dead. The day after tomorrow, it will be too late. Upon this, he went back home, took his clothes off, removed the ashes covering his face, and went to his workshop. In the evening, a carpenter knocked on his door and said to him: let me help you build an ark, so that this may become false. Later, a roofer joined with them and said: it is raining over the mountains, let me help you, so that this may become false. Günther Anders
Si nous nous distinguons des apocalypticiens judéo-chrétiens classiques, ce n’est pas seulement parce que nous craignons la fin (qu’ils ont, eux, espérée), mais surtout parce que notre passion apocalyptique n’a pas d’autre objectif que celui d’empêcher l’apocalypse. Nous ne sommes apocalypticiens que pour avoir tort. Que pour jouir chaque jour à nouveau de la chance d’être là, ridicules mais toujours debout. Günther Anders
Quiconque tient une guerre imminente pour certaine contribue à son déclenchement, précisément par la certitude qu’il en a. Quiconque tient la paix pour certaine se conduit avec insouciance et nous mène sans le vouloir à la guerre. Seul celui qui voit le péril et ne l’oublie pas un seul instant se montre capable de se comporter rationnellement et de faire tout le possible pour l’exorciser. Karl Jaspers
To make the prospect of a catastrophe credible, one must increase the ontological force of its inscription in the future. But to do this with too much success would be to lose sight of the goal, which is precisely to raise awareness and spur action so that the catastrophe does not take place. Jean-Pierre Dupuy (The Paradox of Enlightened Doomsaying/The Jonah Paradox]
Annoncer que la catastrophe est certaine, c’est contribuer à la rendre telle. La passer sous silence ou en minimiser l’importance, à la façon des optimistes béats, conduit au même résultat. Ce qu’il faudrait, c’est combiner les deux démarches : annoncer un avenir destinal qui superposerait l’occurrence de la catastrophe, pour qu’elle puisse faire office de dissuasion, et sa non-occurrence, pour préserver l’espoir. C’est parce que la catastrophe constitue un destin détestable dont nous devons dire que nous n’en voulons pas qu’il faut garder les yeux fixés sur elle, sans jamais la perdre de vue. Jean-Pierre Dupuy
La modernité (…) repose sur la conviction que la croissance économique n’est pas seulement possible mais absolument essentielle. Prières, bonnes actions et méditation pourraient bien être une source de consolation et d’inspiration, mais des problèmes tels que la famine, les épidémies et la guerre ne sauraient être résolus que par la croissance. Ce dogme fondamental se laisse résumer par une idée simple : « Si tu as un problème, tu as probablement besoin de plus, et pour avoir plus, il faut produire plus ! » Les responsables politiques et les économistes modernes insistent : la croissance est vitale pour trois grandes raisons. Premièrement, quand nous produisons plus, nous pouvons consommer plus, accroître notre niveau de vie et, prétendument, jouir d’une vie plus heureuse. Deuxièmement, tant que l’espèce humaine se multiplie, la croissance économique est nécessaire à seule fin de rester où nous en sommes. (…) La modernité a fait du « toujours plus » une panacée applicable à la quasi-totalité des problèmes publics et privés – du fondamentalisme religieux au mariage raté, en passant par l’autoritarisme dans le tiers-monde. (…) La croissance économique est ainsi devenue le carrefour où se rejoignent la quasi-totalité des religions, idéologies et mouvements modernes. L’Union soviétique, avec ses plans quinquennaux mégalomaniaques, n’était pas moins obsédée par la croissance que l’impitoyable requin de la finance américain. De même que chrétiens et musulmans croient tous au ciel et ne divergent que sur le moyen d’y parvenir, au cours de la guerre froide, capitalistes et communistes imaginaient créer le paradis sur terre par la croissance économique et ne se disputaient que sur la méthode exacte. (…) De fait, on n’a sans doute pas tort de parler de religion lorsqu’il s’agit de la croyance dans la croissance économique : elle prétend aujourd’hui résoudre nombre de nos problèmes éthiques, sinon la plupart. La croissance économique étant prétendument la source de toutes les bonnes choses, elle encourage les gens à enterrer leurs désaccords éthiques pour adopter la ligne d’action qui maximise la croissance à long terme. Le credo du « toujours plus » presse en conséquence les individus, les entreprises et les gouvernements de mépriser tout ce qui pourrait entraver la croissance économique : par exemple, préserver l’égalité sociale, assurer l’harmonie écologique ou honorer ses parents. En Union soviétique, les dirigeants pensaient que le communisme étatique était la voie de la croissance la plus rapide : tout ce qui se mettait en travers de la collectivisation fut donc passé au bulldozer, y compris des millions de koulaks, la liberté d’expression et la mer d’Aral. De nos jours, il est généralement admis qu’une forme de capitalisme de marché est une manière beaucoup plus efficace d’assurer la croissance à long terme : on protège donc les magnats cupides, les paysans riches et la liberté d’expression, tout en démantelant et détruisant les habitats écologiques, les structures sociales et les valeurs traditionnelles qui gênent le capitalisme de marché. (….) Le capitalisme de marché a une réponse sans appel. Si la croissance économique exige que nous relâchions les liens familiaux, encouragions les gens à vivre loin de leurs parents, et importions des aides de l’autre bout du monde, ainsi soit-il. Cette réponse implique cependant un jugement éthique, plutôt qu’un énoncé factuel. Lorsque certains se spécialisent dans les logiciels quand d’autres consacrent leur temps à soigner les aînés, on peut sans nul doute produire plus de logiciels et assurer aux personnes âgées des soins plus professionnels. Mais la croissance économique est-elle plus importante que les liens familiaux ? En se permettant de porter des jugements éthiques de ce type, le capitalisme de marché a franchi la frontière qui séparait le champ de la science de celui de la religion. L’étiquette de « religion » déplairait probablement à la plupart des capitalistes, mais, pour ce qui est des religions, le capitalisme peut au moins tenir la tête haute. À la différence des autres religions qui nous promettent un gâteau au ciel, le capitalisme promet des miracles ici, sur terre… et parfois même en accomplit. Le capitalisme mérite même des lauriers pour avoir réduit la violence humaine et accru la tolérance et la coopération. (…) La croissance économique peut-elle cependant se poursuivre éternellement ? L’économie ne finira-t-elle pas par être à court de ressources et par s’arrêter ? Pour assurer une croissance perpétuelle, il nous faut découvrir un stock de ressources inépuisable. Une solution consiste à explorer et à conquérir de nouvelles terres. Des siècles durant, la croissance de l’économie européenne et l’expansion du système capitaliste se sont largement nourries de conquêtes impériales outre-mer. Or le nombre d’îles et de continents est limité. Certains entrepreneurs espèrent finalement explorer et conquérir de nouvelles planètes, voire de nouvelles galaxies, mais, en attendant, l’économie moderne doit trouver une meilleure méthode pour poursuivre son expansion. (…) La véritable némésis de l’économie moderne est l’effondrement écologique. Le progrès scientifique et la croissance économique prennent place dans une biosphère fragile et, à mesure qu’ils prennent de l’ampleur, les ondes de choc déstabilisent l’écologie. Pour assurer à chaque personne dans le monde le même niveau de vie que dans la société d’abondance américaine, il faudrait quelques planètes de plus ; or nous n’avons que celle-ci. (…) Une débâcle écologique provoquera une ruine économique, des troubles politiques et une chute du niveau de vie. Elle pourrait bien menacer l’existence même de la civilisation humaine. (…) Nous pourrions amoindrir le danger en ralentissant le rythme du progrès et de la croissance. Si cette année les investisseurs attendent un retour de 6 % sur leurs portefeuilles, dans dix ans ils pourraient apprendre à se satisfaire de 3 %, puis de 1 % dans vingt ans ; dans trente ans, l’économie cessera de croître et nous nous contenterons de ce que nous avons déjà. Le credo de la croissance s’oppose pourtant fermement à cette idée hérétique et il suggère plutôt d’aller encore plus vite. Si nos découvertes déstabilisent l’écosystème et menacent l’humanité, il nous faut découvrir quelque chose qui nous protège. Si la couche d’ozone s’amenuise et nous expose au cancer de la peau, à nous d’inventer un meilleur écran solaire et de meilleurs traitements contre le cancer, favorisant ainsi l’essor de nouvelles usines de crèmes solaires et de centres anticancéreux. Si les nouvelles industries polluent l’atmosphère et les océans, provoquant un réchauffement général et des extinctions massives, il nous appartient de construire des mondes virtuels et des sanctuaires high-tech qui nous offriront toutes les bonnes choses de la vie, même si la planète devient aussi chaude, morne et polluée que l’enfer. (…) L’humanité se trouve coincée dans une course double. D’un côté, nous nous sentons obligés d’accélérer le rythme du progrès scientifique et de la croissance économique. Un milliard de Chinois et un milliard d’Indiens aspirent au niveau de vie de la classe moyenne américaine, et ils ne voient aucune raison de brider leurs rêves quand les Américains ne sont pas disposés à renoncer à leurs 4×4 et à leurs centres commerciaux. D’un autre côté, nous devons garder au moins une longueur d’avance sur l’Armageddon écologique. Mener de front cette double course devient chaque année plus difficile, parce que chaque pas qui rapproche l’habitant des bidonvilles de Delhi du rêve américain rapproche aussi la planète du gouffre. (…) Qui sait si la science sera toujours capable de sauver simultanément l’économie du gel et l’écologie du point d’ébullition. Et puisque le rythme continue de s’accélérer, les marges d’erreur ne cessent de se rétrécir. Si, précédemment, il suffisait d’une invention stupéfiante une fois par siècle, nous avons aujourd’hui besoin d’un miracle tous les deux ans. (…) Paradoxalement, le pouvoir même de la science peut accroître ledanger, en rendant les plus riches complaisants. (…) Trop de politiciens et d’électeurs pensent que, tant que l’économie poursuit sa croissance, les ingénieurs et les hommes de science pourront toujours la sauver du jugement dernier. S’agissant du changement climatique, beaucoup de défenseurs de la croissance ne se contentent pas d’espérer des miracles : ils tiennent pour acquis que les miracles se produiront. (…) Même si les choses tournent au pire, et que la science ne peut empêcher le déluge, les ingénieurs pourraient encore construire une arche de Noé high-tech pour la caste supérieure, et laisser les milliards d’autres hommes se noyer. La croyance en cette arche high-tech est actuellement une des plus grosses menaces sur l’avenir de l’humanité et de tout l’écosystème. (…) Et les plus pauvres ? Pourquoi ne protestent-ils pas ? Si le déluge survient un jour, ils en supporteront le coût, mais ils seront aussi les premiers à faire les frais de la stagnation économique. Dans un monde capitaliste, leur vie s’améliore uniquement quand l’économie croît. Aussi est-il peu probable qu’ils soutiennent des mesures pour réduire les menaces écologiques futures fondées sur le ralentissement de la croissance économique actuelle. Protéger l’environnement est une très belle idée, mais ceux qui n’arrivent pas à payer leur loyer s’inquiètent bien davantage de leur découvert bancaire que de la fonte de la calotte glaciaire. (…) Même si nous continuons de courir assez vite et parvenons à parer à la foi l’effondrement économique et la débâcle écologique, la course elle-même crée d’immenses problèmes. (…) Sur un plan collectif, les gouvernements, les entreprises et les organismes sont encouragés à mesurer leur succès en termes de croissance et à craindre l’équilibre comme le diable. Sur le plan individuel, nous sommes constamment poussés à accroître nos revenus et notre niveau de vie. Même si vous êtes satisfait de votre situation actuelle, vous devez rechercher toujours plus. Le luxe d’hier devient nécessité d’aujourd’hui. (…) Le deal moderne nous promettait un pouvoir sans précédent. La promesse a été tenue. Mais à quel prix ? Yuval Harari
Les outils dont l’homme dispose aujourd’hui sont infiniment plus puissants que tous ceux qu’il a connus auparavant. Ces outils, l’homme est parfaitement capable de les utiliser de façon égoïste et rivalitaire. Ce qui m’intéresse, c’est cet accroissement de la puissance de l’homme sur le réel. Les statistiques de production et de consommation d’énergie sont en progrès constant, et la rapidité d’augmentation de ce progrès augmente elle aussi constamment, dessinant une courbe parfaite, presque verticale. C’est pour moi une immense source d’effroi tant les hommes, essentiellement, restent des rivaux, rivalisant pour le même objet ou la même gloire – ce qui est la même chose. Nous sommes arrivés à un stade où le milieu humain est menacé par la puissance même de l’homme. Il s’agit avant tout de la menace écologique, des armes et des manipulations biologiques. (…) Loin d’être absurdes ou impensables, les grands textes eschatologiques – ceux des Évangiles synoptiques, en particulier Matthieu, chapitre 24, et Marc, chapitre 13 –, sont d’une actualité saisissante. La science moderne a séparé la nature et la culture, alors qu’on avait défini la religion comme le tonnerre de Zeus, etc. Dans les textes apocalyptiques, ce qui frappe, c’est ce mélange de nature et de culture ; les guerres et rumeurs de guerre, le fracas de la mer et des flots ne forment qu’un. Or si nous regardons ce qui se passe autour de nous, si nous nous interrogeons sur l’action des hommes sur le réel, le réchauffement global, la montée du niveau la mer, nous nous retrouvons face à un univers où les choses naturelles et culturelles sont confondues. La science elle-même le reconnaît. J’ai voulu radicaliser cet aspect apocalyptique. Je pense que les gens sont trop rassurés. Ils se rassurent eux-mêmes. L’homme est comme un insecte qui fait son nid ; il fait confiance à l’environnement. La créature fait toujours confiance à l’environnement… Le rationalisme issu des Lumières continue aussi à rassurer. (…) La Chine a favorisé le développement de l’automobile. Cette priorité dénote une rivalité avec les Américains sur un terrain très redoutable ; la pollution dans la région de Shanghai est effrayante. Mais avoir autant d’automobiles que l’Amérique est un but dont il est, semble-t-il, impossible de priver les hommes. L’Occident conseille aux pays en voie de développement et aux pays les plus peuplés du globe, comme la Chine et l’Inde, de ne pas faire la même chose que lui ! Il y a là quelque chose de paradoxal et de scandaleux pour ceux auxquels ces conseils s’adressent. Aux États-Unis, les politiciens vous diront tous qu’ils sont d’accord pour prendre des mesures écologiques si elles ne touchent pas les accroissements de production. Or, s’il y a une partie du monde qui n’a pas besoin d’accroissement de production, c’est bien les États-Unis ; le profit individuel et les rivalités, qui ne sont pas immédiatement guerrières et destructrices mais qui le seront peut-être indirectement, et de façon plus massive encore, sont sacrées ; pas question de les toucher. Que faut-il pour qu’elles cessent d’être sacrées ? Il n’est pas certain que la situation actuelle, notamment la disparition croissante des espèces, soit menaçante pour la vie sur la planète, mais il y a une possibilité très forte qu’elle le soit. Ne pas prendre de précaution, alors qu’on est dans le doute, est dément. Des mesures écologiques sérieuses impliqueraient des diminutions de production. Mais ce raisonnement ne joue pas dans l’écologie, l’humanité étant follement attachée à ce type de concurrence qui structure en particulier la réalité occidentale, les habitudes de vie, de goût de l’humanité dite « développée ». René Girard

Attention: un culte du cargo peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où au nom d’une prétendue science hautement selective et de plus en plus douteuse

Et où après avoir ruiné, à coup de délocalisations et d’immigration sauvages,  leurs emplois et leurs vies …

Entre deux petites virées à l’autre bout du monde et des annonces de centaines de milliards de dépenses pour reverdir nos économies …

Nos ayatollahs du climat et intermittents du jetset « de la fin  du monde » font feu de tout bois contre la France ou l’Amérique « de la fin du mois » qui « fume des clopes et roule en diesel » …

Pendant que pour rattraper tant d’injustices face à l’inextricable dilemme entre environnement et emplois, nos populistes tentent de relancer encore plus fort la folle machine de la croissance à tout prix …

Ou nos nouveaux prêtres du transhumanisme multiplient littéralement les promesses en l’air sur l’éventuelle colonisation de l’une ou l’autre des autres planètes de notre système solaire …

Comment ne pas repenser …

Après le feu prix Nobel de physique américain Richard Feynman

Qui dès les années 70 nous en avait averti …

A la pseudoscience ou nouvelle pensée magique qu’est en train de devenir la science dont nos sociétés ont fait rien de moins qu’une nouvelle religion …

Qu’il avait en son temps qualifiée de « science du culte cargo » (improprement dit « culte du cargo » en français, en référence aux bateaux du même nom, alors que le mot anglais, proche du français « cargaison », fait en réalité référence aux marchandises ou aux biens matériels) …

Car ayant quitté, dans une approche non réfléchie et ritualiste, son enracinement dans l’expérience et de plus en plus tentée, sous la pression politique et médiatique, de ne garder que le nom et l’apparence de la méthode scientifique …

A la manière de ces sortes de versions modernisées des antiques danses de la pluie des habitants de certaines petites iles mélanésiennes de la seconde guerre mondiale…

Où observant une corrélation entre l’appel du radio et l’arrivée d’une cargaison de vivres et d’objets manufacturés ou entre l’existence d’une piste et l’arrivée d’avions …

Ces derniers s’étaient mis, on le sait, à construire un culte fait de simulacre de radio et de fausses pistes d’atterrissage, espérant ainsi que l’existence de moyens ferait venir les biens matériels occidentaux désirés tout en dilapidant, en pure perte, leurs propres maigres ressources ?

Mais comment ne pas voir aussi …

Avec de Jonas, Anders, Jaspers à Dupuy, nos penseurs du dilemme du prophète de malheur dont « l’impair pourrait être le mérite » …

Et notre regretté anthropologue français René Girard

Ou plus récemment l’historien israélien Yuval Harari

A la fois fascinés par la formidable capacité de notre monde moderne à désamorcer la puissance conflictuelle de la rivalité mimétique en rendant les mêmes marchandises accessibles à tous …

Et effrayés par la tout aussi formidable puissance des outils dont nous disposons …

Qui entre menace écologique, armes et manipulations biologiques proprement apocalyptiques

Menacent notre propre milieu naturel avec l’entrée dans la danse, mimétisme planétaire oblige, des milliards de Chinois, Indiens ou autres jusque là laissés pour compte  …

Dans une fuite en avant que suppose notre système même puisqu’il ne vit que par l’innovation et la croissance perpétuelles …

Et qui à terme, au nom de la désormais sacro-sainte croissance mais aussi du fait de la simple accoutumance poussant comme pour les drogues à toujours plus de consommation pour conserver les mêmes effets, ne peut qu’engloutir les ressources de la terre …

A la manière de ces Aztèques qui à la veille de leur inévitable défaite devant Cortès…

Multipliaient, jusqu’à des dizaines de milliers par an, le nombre des victimes de leurs sacrifices humains ?

Obama administration scientist says climate ‘emergency’ is based on fallacy

‘The Science,” we’re told, is settled. How many times have you heard it?

Humans have broken the earth’s climate. Temperatures are rising, sea level is surging, ice is disappearing, and heat waves, storms, droughts, floods, and wildfires are an ever-worsening scourge on the world. Greenhouse gas emissions are causing all of this. And unless they’re eliminated promptly by radical changes to society and its energy systems, “The Science” says Earth is doomed. 

Yes, it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it. But beyond that — to paraphrase the classic movie “The Princess Bride” — “I do not think ‘The Science’ says what you think it says.”

For example, both research literature and government reports state clearly that heat waves in the US are now no more common than they were in 1900, and that the warmest temperatures in the US have not risen in the past fifty years. When I tell people this, most are incredulous. Some gasp. And some get downright hostile.

These are almost certainly not the only climate facts you haven’t heard. Here are three more that might surprise you, drawn from recent published research or assessments of climate science published by the US government and the UN:

  •  Humans have had no detectable impact on hurricanes over the past century.
  • Greenland’s ice sheet isn’t shrinking any more rapidly today than it was 80 years ago.
  • The global area burned by wildfires has declined more than 25 percent since 2003 and 2020 was one of the lowest years on record.

Why haven’t you heard these facts before?

Most of the disconnect comes from the long game of telephone that starts with the research literature and runs through the assessment reports to the summaries of the assessment reports and on to the media coverage. There are abundant opportunities to get things wrong — both accidentally and on purpose — as the information goes through filter after filter to be packaged for various audiences. The public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries, let alone the reports and research papers themselves. That’s perfectly understandable — the data and analyses are nearly impenetrable for non-experts, and the writing is not exactly gripping. As a result, most people don’t get the whole story.

Policymakers, too, have to rely on information that’s been put through several different wringers by the time it gets to them. Because most government officials are not themselves scientists, it’s up to scientists to make sure that those who make key policy decisions get an accurate, complete and transparent picture of what’s known (and unknown) about the changing climate, one undistorted by “agenda” or “narrative.” Unfortunately, getting that story straight isn’t as easy as it sounds.

I should know. That used to be my job.

I’m a scientist — I work to understand the world through measurements and observations, and then to communicate clearly both the excitement and the implications of that understanding. Early in my career, I had great fun doing this for esoteric phenomena in the realm of atoms and nuclei using high-performance computer modeling (which is also an important tool for much of climate science). But beginning in 2004, I spent about a decade turning those same methods to the subject of climate and its implications for energy technologies. I did this first as chief scientist for the oil company BP, where I focused on advancing renewable energy, and then as undersecretary for science in the Obama administration’s Department of Energy, where I helped guide the government’s investments in energy technologies and climate science. I found great satisfaction in these roles, helping to define and catalyze actions that would reduce carbon dioxide emissions, the agreed-upon imperative that would “save the planet.”

But doubts began in late 2013 when I was asked by the American Physical Society to lead an update of its public statement on climate. As part of that effort, in January 2014 I convened a workshop with a specific objective: to “stress test” the state of climate science.

I came away from the APS workshop not only surprised, but shaken by the realization that climate science was far less mature than I had supposed. Here’s what I discovered:

Humans exert a growing, but physically small, warming influence on the climate. The results from many different climate models disagree with, or even contradict, each other and many kinds of observations. In short, the science is insufficient to make useful predictions about how the climate will change over the coming decades, much less what effect our actions will have on it. 

In the seven years since that workshop, I watched with dismay as the public discussions of climate and energy became increasingly distant from the science. Phrases like “climate emergency,” “climate crisis” and “climate disaster” are now routinely bandied about to support sweeping policy proposals to “fight climate change” with government interventions and subsidies. Not surprisingly, the Biden administration has made climate and energy a major priority infused throughout the government, with the appointment of John Kerry as climate envoy and proposed spending of almost $2 trillion dollars to fight this “existential threat to humanity.”

Trillion-dollar decisions about reducing human influences on the climate should be informed by an accurate understanding of scientific certainties and uncertainties. My late Nobel-prizewinning Caltech colleague Richard Feynman was one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century. At the 1974 Caltech commencement, he gave a now famous address titled “Cargo Cult Science” about the rigor scientists must adopt to avoid fooling not only themselves. “Give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another,” he implored.

Much of the public portrayal of climate science ignores the great late physicist’s advice. It is an effort to persuade rather than inform, and the information presented withholds either essential context or what doesn’t “fit.” Scientists write and too-casually review the reports, reporters uncritically repeat them, editors allow that to happen, activists and their organizations fan the fires of alarm, and experts endorse the deception by keeping silent.

As a result, the constant repetition of these and many other climate fallacies are turned into accepted truths known as “The Science.”

This article is an adapted excerpt from Dr. Koonin’s book, “Unsettled: What Climate Science Tells Us, What It Doesn’t, and Why It Matters” (BenBella Books), out May 4.

Voir aussi:

‘Unsettled’ Review: The ‘Consensus’ On Climate
A top Obama scientist looks at the evidence on warming and CO2 emissions and rebuts much of the dominant political narrative.
Mark P. Mills
The Wall Street Journal
April 25, 2021

Physicist Steven Koonin kicks the hornet’s nest right out of the gate in “Unsettled.” In the book’s first sentences he asserts that “the Science” about our planet’s climate is anything but “settled.” Mr. Koonin knows well that it is nonetheless a settled subject in the minds of most pundits and politicians and most of the population.

Further proof of the public’s sentiment: Earlier this year the United Nations Development Programme published the mother of all climate surveys, titled “The Peoples’ Climate Vote.” With more than a million respondents from 50 countries, the survey, unsurprisingly, found “64% of people said that climate change was an emergency.”

But science itself is not conducted by polls, regardless of how often we are urged to heed a “scientific consensus” on climate. As the science-trained novelist Michael Crichton summarized in a famous 2003 lecture at Caltech: “If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period.” Mr. Koonin says much the same in “Unsettled.”

The book is no polemic. It’s a plea for understanding how scientists extract clarity from complexity. And, as Mr. Koonin makes clear, few areas of science are as complex and multidisciplinary as the planet’s climate.

But Mr. Koonin is no “climate denier,” to use the concocted phrase used to shut down debate. The word “denier” is of course meant to associate skeptics of climate alarmism with Holocaust deniers. Mr. Koonin finds this label particularly abhorrent, since “the Nazis killed more than two hundred of my relatives in Eastern Europe.” As for “denying,” Mr. Koonin makes it clear, on the book’s first page, that “it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it.”

The heart of the science debate, however, isn’t about whether the globe is warmer or whether humanity contributed. The important questions are about the magnitude of civilization’s contribution and the speed of changes; and, derivatively, about the urgency and scale of governmental response. Mr. Koonin thinks most readers will be surprised at what the data show. I dare say they will.

As Mr Koonin illustrates, tornado frequency and severity are also not trending up; nor are the number and severity of droughts. The extent of global fires has been trending significantly downward. The rate of sea-level rise has not accelerated. Global crop yields are rising, not falling. And while global atmospheric CO2 levels are obviously higher now than two centuries ago, they’re not at any record planetary high—they’re at a low that has only been seen once before in the past 500 million years.

Mr. Koonin laments the sloppiness of those using local weather “events” to make claims about long-cycle planetary phenomena. He chastises not so much local news media as journalists with prestigious national media who should know better. This attribution error evokes one of Mr. Koonin’s rare rebukes: “Pointing to hurricanes as an example of the ravages of human-caused climate change is at best unconvincing, and at worst plainly dishonest.”

When it comes to the vaunted computer models, Mr. Koonin is persuasively skeptical. It’s a big problem, he says, when models can’t retroactively “predict” events that have already happened. And he notes that some of the “tuning” done to models so that they work better amounts to “cooking the books.” He should know, having written one of the first textbooks on using computers to model physics phenomena.

Mr. Koonin’s science credentials are impeccable—unlike, say, those of one well-known Swedish teenager to whom the media affords great attention on climate matters. He has been a professor of physics at Caltech and served as the top scientist in Barack Obama’s Energy Department. The book is copiously referenced and relies on widely accepted government documents.

Since all the data that Mr. Koonin uses are available to others, he poses the obvious question: “Why haven’t you heard these facts before?” He is cautious, perhaps overly so, in proposing the causes for so much misinformation. He points to such things as incentives to invoke alarm for fundraising purposes and official reports that “mislead by omission.” Many of the primary scientific reports, he observes repeatedly, are factual. Still, “the public gets their climate information almost exclusively from the media; very few people actually read the assessment summaries.”

Mr. Koonin says that he knows he’ll be criticized, even “attacked.” You can’t blame him for taking a few pages to shadow box with his critics. But even if one remains unconvinced by his arguments, the right response is to debate the science. We’ll see if that happens in a world in which politicians assert the science is settled and plan astronomical levels of spending to replace the nation’s massive infrastructures with “green” alternatives. Never have so many spent so much public money on the basis of claims that are so unsettled. The prospects for a reasoned debate are not good. Good luck, Mr. Koonin.

Mr. Mills, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the author of “Digital Cathedrals” and a forthcoming book on how the cloud and new technologies will create an economic boom.

Voir également:

ANTICIPATION

Culte du Cargo : contagion des collectivités aux Etats

Luc Brunet

MAP

Mars 2012

Pur produit des sociétés dans lesquelles les élites ignorent que les processus culturels précèdent le succès, le Culte du Cargo, qui consiste à investir dans une infrastructure dont est dotée une société prospère en espérant que cette acquisition produise les mêmes effets pour soi, fut l’un des moteurs des emprunts toxiques des collectivités locales. L’expression a été popularisée lors de la seconde guerre mondiale, quand elle s’est exprimée par de fausses infrastructures créées par les insulaires et destinées à attirer les cargos. En 2012, le Culte du Cargo tendra à se généraliser au niveau des Etats.

En septembre 2011, dans l’orbite des difficultés de DEXIA, les personnes qui ne lisent pas le GEAB découvraient avec stupéfaction que des milliers de collectivités locales étaient exposées à des emprunts toxiques1. En décembre, un rapport parlementaire français2 évalue le désastre à 19 Milliards d’euros, près du double de ce qu’estimait la Cours des Comptes six mois plus tôt. Les collectivités représentent, en France par exemple, 70% de l’investissement public3, soit 51,7 milliards d’euros en 2010 (-2,1% par rapport à 2009).

Les collectivités ont développé une addiction à la dépense4 et, comme les ménages victimes plus ou moins conscientes des subprimes, elles ont facilement trouvé un dealer pour leur répondre5. Les causes en sont assez évidentes : multiplication des élus locaux n’ayant pas toujours de compétences techniques et encore moins financières, peu ou pas formés, tenus parfois par leur administration devenue maîtresse des lieux, et engagés dans une concurrence à la visibilité entre la ville, l’agglomération, le département à qui voudra montrer qu’il construit ou qu’il anime plus et mieux que l’autre, dans une relation finalement assez féodale. L’Italie a prévu une baisse de 3 milliards d’euros des subventions aux collectivités, la Suède et le Royaume-Uni6(dont les collectivités avaient par ailleurs été exposées aux faillites des institutions financières islandaises7) s’engagent aussi dans un douloureux sevrage, dans l’optique de gagner en stabilité financière ce qui risque fort d’être perdu en autonomie.

Il serait sans doute erroné de porter l’opprobre sur les élus locaux ou même sur les banques, car il s’agit là de la manifestation d’une tendance de fond très profonde et très simple qui a à faire avec le désir mimétique et le Culte du Cargo. Ce dernier fut particulièrement évident en Océanie pendant la seconde guerre mondiale, où des habitants des îles observant une corrélation entre l’appel du radio et l’arrivée d’un cargo de vivres, ou bien entre l’existence d’une piste et l’arrivée d’avions, se mirent à construire un culte fait de simulacre de radio et de fausses pistes d’atterrissage, espérant ainsi que l’existence de moyens ferait venir l’objet désiré.

Il s’agit d’un phénomène général, comme par exemple en informatique lorsque l’on recopie une procédure que l’on ne comprend pas dans son propre programme, en espérant qu’elle y produise le même effet que dans son programme d’origine.

Un exemple emblématique est celui de Flint, Michigan. La fermeture brutale des usines General Motors a vu la patrie de Michael Moore perdre 25.000 habitants et se paupériser, la population étant pratiquement divisée par deux entre 1960 et 2010. Il s’agit évidemment là d’une distillation : la crise provoque l’évaporation de l’esprit (c’est-à-dire des talents) qui s’envole vers d’autres lieux plus prospères tandis que se concentrent les problèmes et la pauvreté dans la cité autrefois bénie par son parrain industriel. C’est alors que la bénédiction devient un baiser de la mort puisque, dans leur prospérité, ses élus n’ont pas réfléchi ni vu les tendances de fond pourtant évidentes de la mondialisation. C’est alors qu’arrive l’idée de Six Flags Autoworld. Ce parc d’attraction automobile, supposé être “La renaissance de la Grande Cité de Flint” selon le gouverneur du Michigan J. Blanchard, ouvre en 1984. Un an et 80 millions de dollars plus loin, le parc ferme et il sera finalement détruit en 1997.8

Bien que paradoxale, l’addiction à la dette est synchrone avec les difficultés financières et correspond peut-être inconsciemment à l’instinct du joueur à se “refaire”9. Ce qui est toutefois plus grave est, d’une part, l’hallucination collective qui permet le phénomène de Culte du Cargo, mais aussi l’absence totale de contre-pouvoir à cette pensée devenue unique, voire magique. Le Culte du Cargo aggrave toujours la situation.
La raison est aussi simple que diabolique : les prêtres du Culte du Cargo dépensent pour acheter des infrastructures similaires à ce qu’ils ont vu ailleurs dans l’espoir d’attirer la fortune sur leur tribu. Malheureusement, dans le même temps, les “esprits” qui restaient dans la tribu se sont enfuis ou se taisent devant la pression de la foule en attente de miracle. Alors, les élites, qui ignorent totalement que derrière l’apparent résultat se cachent des processus culturels complexes qu’ils ne comprennent pas, se dotent d’un faux aéroport ou d’une fausse radio et dilapident ainsi, en pure perte, leurs dernières ressources.
Il serait injuste de penser que ce phénomène ne concerne que des populations peu avancées. En 1974, Richard Feynman dénonça la “Cargo Cult Science” lors d’un discours à Caltech10.
Les collectivités confrontées à une concurrence pour la population organisent agendas et ateliers (en fait des brainstormings) pour évoquer les raisons de leurs handicaps par rapport à d’autres. Il suit généralement une liste de solutions précédées de “Il faut” : de la Recherche, des Jeunes, des Cadres, une communauté homosexuelle, une patinoire, une piscine, le TGV, un festival, une équipe sportive onéreuse, son gymnase…Tout cela est peut-être vrai, mais cela revient à confondre les effets avec les processus requis pour les obtenir.
Comme nul ne comprend les processus culturels qui ont conduit à ce qu’une collectivité réussisse, il est plus facile de croire que boire le café de Georges Clooney vous apportera le même succès. Rien de nouveau ici : la publicité et ses 700 milliards de dollars de budget mondial annuel manipule cela depuis le début de la société de consommation.
Routes menant à des plateformes logistiques ou des zones industrielles jamais construites, bureaux vides, duplication des infrastructures (piscines, technopoles, pépinières…) à quelques mètres les unes des autres, le Culte du Cargo nous coûte cher : il faut que cela se voit, même si cela ne sert à rien. Malheureusement, les vraies actions de création des processus culturels et sociaux ne se voient généralement pas aussi bien qu’un beau bâtiment tout neuf.
Le processus suit trois étapes et retour : crise, fuite ou éviction des rationnels, rituel de brainstorming puis Culte du Cargo et investissement, qui conduisent enfin à une aggravation de la crise.
Ainsi, les pôles de compétitivité marchent d’autant mieux qu’ils viennent seulement labelliser un système culturel déjà préexistant. Lorsqu’ils sont des créations dans l’urgence, en hydroponique, par la volonté rituelle de reproduire, leurs effets relèvent de l’espoir, non d’une stratégie. Le culte du Cargo est une façon pour les collectivités prises au sens large de ne pas se poser la question véritable : Est-ce que chacune d’entre elles peut de manière identique accéder au même destin dans la société de la connaissance ?
2012 : les Indiens fuient-ils les Amériques ?
Le monde occidental est, contrairement à l’idée reçue, une société dont le moteur est l’inégalité. La compétition pour l’attractivité de la “meilleure” population fait rage et elle a été, tout le XXème siècle, à l’avantage des Etats-Unis. Une des raisons profondes à l’étrange résilience du dollar et à la curieuse faiblesse de l’Euro est l’irrationnel pari de la plus grande attractivité des Etats-Unis pour les compétences.
Depuis la création du G20, il y a au moins quatre “New kids in Town”, les BRICs. Si l’un des révélateurs d’un engrenage de type cargo est la fuite des cerveaux, alors, même si elle ne bat pas encore son plein, l’Occident, et particulièrement les Etats-Unis, risque fort de perdre une part de ses élites asiatiques. La multiplication des études, notamment de la part des institutions académiques indiennes, est révélatrice quant à elle d’une actualité
Si beaucoup des informaticiens des Etats-Unis sont Indiens, parfois mal dans leur peau aux USA11, et qu’une part croissante est maintenant attirée par un retour121314 dans une Inde démocratique et en train de gérer son problème de corruption, les deux premières phases du processus sont déjà bien engagées.
Il reste l’étape du rituel de brainstorming visant à étudier les conditions du succès Suisse, Chinois ou autre, pour que les idées de dépenses les plus incohérentes soient lancées
2012 : Contagion du Culte du Cargo aux Etats
Les campagnes électorales de 2012 seront un révélateur. S’il reste encore quelques esprits pour dire que la mise en place, coûteuse et dérangeante, des actions visant à rétablir les processus culturels conduisant à la création de richesse concrète, c’est-à-dire vendables à d’autres, alors l’Occident aura vécu un de ses énièmes rebonds civilisationnels. Si nous observons des investissements déraisonnables d’un point de vue thermodynamique, dans des infrastructures énergétiques décoratives mais inefficaces, ou bien dans de faux projets d’apparat visant à renforcer l’attractivité perdue, il faudra boire jusqu’à la lie le jus amer de la crise.
Ainsi, la tentation française de copier les mesures allemandes qui ont conduit au succès, sans que les dirigeants français aient vraiment compris pourquoi, mais en espérant les mêmes bénéfices, peut être considérée comme une expression du Culte du Cargo. C’est en effet faire fi des processus culturels engagés depuis des décennies en Allemagne et qui ont conduit à une culture de la négociation sociale et à des syndicats représentatifs.
En période de crise, il faudrait toujours prouver l’utilité des actions, pas le caractère publicitaire qu’elles pourraient avoir. En 2012, il faudra sans doute, dans les pays où des élections vont avoir lieu, poser la question du pourquoi des investissements. Les candidats proposant de séduisants mais coûteux gadgets devront être questionnés par les journalistes sur leur analyse.15
Dernières nouvelles de Flint, en novembre 2011, le gouverneur confirme l’état d’urgence financière de la ville15. Contrairement à ce que veulent faire croire les prêtres du Culte du Cargo, les danses de la pluie ne marchent pas, il faut réfléchir.13
Voir de même:

Cargo Cult Science

Richard P. Feynman

Caltech

1974

Some remarks on science, pseudoscience, and learning how to not fool yourself. Caltech’s 1974 commencement address.

During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of rhinoceros horn would increase potency. (Another crazy idea of the Middle Ages is these hats we have on today—which is too loose in my case.) Then a method was discovered for separating the ideas—which was to try one to see if it worked, and if it didn’t work, to eliminate it. This method became organized, of course, into science. And it developed very well, so that we are now in the scientific age. It is such a scientific age, in fact, that we have difficulty in understanding how­ witch doctors could ever have existed, when nothing that they proposed ever really worked—or very little of it did.

But even today I meet lots of people who sooner or later get me into a conversation about UFO’s, or astrology, or some form of mysticism, expanded consciousness, new types of awareness, ESP, and so forth. And I’ve concluded that it’s not a scientific world.

Most people believe so many wonderful things that I decided to investigate why they did. And what has been referred to as my curiosity for investigation has landed me in a difficulty where I found so much junk to talk about that I can’t do it in this talk. I’m overwhelmed. First I started out by investigating various ideas of mysticism, and mystic experiences. I went into isolation tanks (they’re dark and quiet and you float in Epsom salts) and got many hours of hallucinations, so I know something about that. Then I went to Esalen, which is a hotbed of this kind of thought (it’s a wonderful place; you should go visit there). Then I became overwhelmed. I didn’t realize how much there was.

I was sitting, for example, in a hot bath and there’s another guy and a girl in the bath. He says to the girl, “I’m learning massage and I wonder if I could practice on you?” She says OK, so she gets up on a table and he starts off on her foot—working on her big toe and pushing it around. Then he turns to what is apparently his instructor, and says, “I feel a kind of dent. Is that the pituitary?” And she says, “No, that’s not the way it feels.” I say, “You’re a hell of a long way from the pituitary, man.” And they both looked at me—I had blown my cover, you see—and she said, “It’s reflexology.” So I closed my eyes and appeared to be meditating.

That’s just an example of the kind of things that overwhelm me. I also looked into extrasensory perception and PSI phenomena, and the latest craze there was Uri Geller, a man who is supposed to be able to bend keys by rubbing them with his finger. So I went to his hotel room, on his invitation, to see a demonstration of both mind reading and bending keys. He didn’t do any mind reading that succeeded; nobody can read my mind, I guess. And my boy held a key and Geller rubbed it, and nothing happened. Then he told us it works better under water, and so you can picture all of us standing in the bathroom with the water turned on and the key under it, and him rubbing the key with his finger. Nothing happened. So I was unable to investigate that phenomenon.

But then I began to think, what else is there that we believe? (And I thought then about the witch doctors, and how easy it would have been to check on them by noticing that nothing really worked.) So I found things that even more people believe, such as that we have some knowledge of how to educate. There are big schools of reading methods and mathematics methods, and so forth, but if you notice, you’ll see the reading scores keep going down—or hardly going up—in spite of the fact that we continually use these same people to improve the methods. There’s a witch doctor remedy that doesn’t work. It ought to be looked into: how do they know that their method should work? Another example is how to treat criminals. We obviously have made no progress—lots of theory, but no progress—in decreasing the amount of crime by the method that we use to handle criminals.

Yet these things are said to be scientific. We study them. And I think ordinary people with commonsense ideas are intimidated by this pseudoscience. A teacher who has some good idea of how to teach her children to read is forced by the school system to do it some other way—or is even fooled by the school system into thinking that her method is not necessarily a good one. Or a parent of bad boys, after disciplining them in one way or another, feels guilty for the rest of her life because she didn’t do “the right thing,” according to the experts.

So we really ought to look into theories that don’t work, and science that isn’t science.

I tried to find a principle for discovering more of these kinds of things, and came up with the following system. Any time you find yourself in a conversation at a cocktail party—in which you do not feel uncomfortable that the hostess might come around and say, “Why are you fellows talking shop?’’ or that your wife will come around and say, “Why are you flirting again?”—then you can be sure you are talking about something about which nobody knows anything.

Using this method, I discovered a few more topics that I had forgotten—among them the efficacy of various forms of psychotherapy. So I began to investigate through the library, and so on, and I have so much to tell you that I can’t do it at all. I will have to limit myself to just a few little things. I’ll concentrate on the things more people believe in. Maybe I will give a series of speeches next year on all these subjects. It will take a long time.

I think the educational and psychological studies I mentioned are examples of what I would like to call Cargo Cult Science. In the South Seas there is a Cargo Cult of people. During the war they saw airplanes land with lots of good materials, and they want the same thing to happen now. So they’ve arranged to make things like runways, to put fires along the sides of the runways, to make a wooden hut for a man to sit in, with two wooden pieces on his head like headphones and bars of bamboo sticking out like antennas—he’s the controller—and they wait for the airplanes to land. They’re doing everything right. The form is perfect. It looks exactly the way it looked before. But it doesn’t work. No airplanes land. So I call these things Cargo Cult Science, because they follow all the apparent precepts and forms of scientific investigation, but they’re missing something essential, because the planes don’t land.

Now it behooves me, of course, to tell you what they’re missing. But it would he just about as difficult to explain to the South Sea Islanders how they have to arrange things so that they get some wealth in their system. It is not something simple like telling them how to improve the shapes of the earphones. But there is one feature I notice that is generally missing in Cargo Cult Science. That is the idea that we all hope you have learned in studying science in school—we never explicitly say what this is, but just hope that you catch on by all the examples of scientific investigation. It is interesting, therefore, to bring it out now and speak of it explicitly. It’s a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty—a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you’re doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid—not only what you think is right about it: other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you’ve eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked—to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated.

Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. You must do the best you can—if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong—to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. There is also a more subtle problem. When you have put a lot of ideas together to make an elaborate theory, you want to make sure, when explaining what it fits, that those things it fits are not just the things that gave you the idea for the theory; but that the finished theory makes something else come out right, in addition.

In summary, the idea is to try to give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another.

The easiest way to explain this idea is to contrast it, for example, with advertising. Last night I heard that Wesson Oil doesn’t soak through food. Well, that’s true. It’s not dishonest; but the thing I’m talking about is not just a matter of not being dishonest, it’s a matter of scientific integrity, which is another level. The fact that should be added to that advertising statement is that no oils soak through food, if operated at a certain temperature. If operated at another temperature, they all will—including Wesson Oil. So it’s the implication which has been conveyed, not the fact, which is true, and the difference is what we have to deal with.

We’ve learned from experience that the truth will out. Other experimenters will repeat your experiment and find out whether you were wrong or right. Nature’s phenomena will agree or they’ll disagree with your theory. And, although you may gain some temporary fame and excitement, you will not gain a good reputation as a scientist if you haven’t tried to be very careful in this kind of work. And it’s this type of integrity, this kind of care not to fool yourself, that is missing to a large extent in much of the research in Cargo Cult Science.

A great deal of their difficulty is, of course, the difficulty of the subject and the inapplicability of the scientific method to the subject. Nevertheless, it should be remarked that this is not the only difficulty. That’s why the planes don’t land—but they don’t land.

We have learned a lot from experience about how to handle some of the ways we fool ourselves. One example: Millikan measured the charge on an electron by an experiment with falling oil drops and got an answer which we now know not to be quite right. It’s a little bit off, because he had the incorrect value for the viscosity of air. It’s interesting to look at the history of measurements of the charge of the electron, after Millikan. If you plot them as a function of time, you find that one is a little bigger than Millikan’s, and the next one’s a little bit bigger than that, and the next one’s a little bit bigger than that, until finally they settle down to a number which is higher.

Why didn’t they discover that the new number was higher right away? It’s a thing that scientists are ashamed of—this history—because it’s apparent that people did things like this: When they got a number that was too high above Millikan’s, they thought something must be wrong—and they would look for and find a reason why something might be wrong. When they got a number closer to Millikan’s value they didn’t look so hard. And so they eliminated the numbers that were too far off, and did other things like that. We’ve learned those tricks nowadays, and now we don’t have that kind of a disease.

But this long history of learning how to not fool ourselves—of having utter scientific integrity—is, I’m sorry to say, something that we haven’t specifically included in any particular course that I know of. We just hope you’ve caught on by osmosis.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists. You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that.

I would like to add something that’s not essential to the science, but something I kind of believe, which is that you should not fool the layman when you’re talking as a scientist. I’m not trying to tell you what to do about cheating on your wife, or fooling your girlfriend, or something like that, when you’re not trying to be a scientist, but just trying to be an ordinary human being. We’ll leave those problems up to you and your rabbi. I’m talking about a specific, extra type of integrity that is not lying, but bending over backwards to show how you’re maybe wrong, that you ought to do when acting as a scientist. And this is our responsibility as scientists, certainly to other scientists, and I think to laymen.

For example, I was a little surprised when I was talking to a friend who was going to go on the radio. He does work on cosmology and astronomy, and he wondered how he would explain what the applications of this work were. “Well,” I said, “there aren’t any.” He said, “Yes, but then we won’t get support for more research of this kind.” I think that’s kind of dishonest. If you’re representing yourself as a scientist, then you should explain to the layman what you’re doing—and if they don’t want to support you under those circumstances, then that’s their decision.

One example of the principle is this: If you’ve made up your mind to test a theory, or you want to explain some idea, you should always decide to publish it whichever way it comes out. If we only publish results of a certain kind, we can make the argument look good. We must publish both kinds of result. For example—let’s take advertising again—suppose some particular cigarette has some particular property, like low nicotine. It’s published widely by the company that this means it is good for you—they don’t say, for instance, that the tars are a different proportion, or that something else is the matter with the cigarette. In other words, publication probability depends upon the answer. That should not be done.

I say that’s also important in giving certain types of government advice. Supposing a senator asked you for advice about whether drilling a hole should be done in his state; and you decide it would he better in some other state. If you don’t publish such a result, it seems to me you’re not giving scientific advice. You’re being used. If your answer happens to come out in the direction the government or the politicians like, they can use it as an argument in their favor; if it comes out the other way, they don’t publish it at all. That’s not giving scientific advice.

Other kinds of errors are more characteristic of poor science. When I was at Cornell. I often talked to the people in the psychology department. One of the students told me she wanted to do an experiment that went something like this—I don’t remember it in detail, but it had been found by others that under certain circumstances, X, rats did something, A. She was curious as to whether, if she changed the circumstances to Y, they would still do, A. So her proposal was to do the experiment under circumstances Y and see if they still did A.

I explained to her that it was necessary first to repeat in her laboratory the experiment of the other person—to do it under condition X to see if she could also get result A—and then change to Y and see if A changed. Then she would know that the real difference was the thing she thought she had under control.

She was very delighted with this new idea, and went to her professor. And his reply was, no, you cannot do that, because the experiment has already been done and you would be wasting time. This was in about 1935 or so, and it seems to have been the general policy then to not try to repeat psychological experiments, but only to change the conditions and see what happens.

Nowadays there’s a certain danger of the same thing happening, even in the famous field of physics. I was shocked to hear of an experiment done at the big accelerator at the National Accelerator Laboratory, where a person used deuterium. In order to compare his heavy hydrogen results to what might happen to light hydrogen he had to use data from someone else’s experiment on light hydrogen, which was done on different apparatus. When asked he said it was because he couldn’t get time on the program (because there’s so little time and it’s such expensive apparatus) to do the experiment with light hydrogen on this apparatus because there wouldn’t be any new result. And so the men in charge of programs at NAL are so anxious for new results, in order to get more money to keep the thing going for public relations purposes, they are destroying—possibly—the value of the experiments themselves, which is the whole purpose of the thing. It is often hard for the experimenters there to complete their work as their scientific integrity demands.

All experiments in psychology are not of this type, however. For example, there have been many experiments running rats through all kinds of mazes, and so on—with little clear result. But in 1937 a man named Young did a very interesting one. He had a long corridor with doors all along one side where the rats came in, and doors along the other side where the food was. He wanted to see if he could train the rats to go in at the third door down from wherever he started them off. No. The rats went immediately to the door where the food had been the time before.

The question was, how did the rats know, because the corridor was so beautifully built and so uniform, that this was the same door as before? Obviously there was something about the door that was different from the other doors. So he painted the doors very carefully, arranging the textures on the faces of the doors exactly the same. Still the rats could tell. Then he thought maybe the rats were smelling the food, so he used chemicals to change the smell after each run. Still the rats could tell. Then he realized the rats might be able to tell by seeing the lights and the arrangement in the laboratory like any commonsense person. So he covered the corridor, and, still the rats could tell.

He finally found that they could tell by the way the floor sounded when they ran over it. And he could only fix that by putting his corridor in sand. So he covered one after another of all possible clues and finally was able to fool the rats so that they had to learn to go in the third door. If he relaxed any of his conditions, the rats could tell.

Now, from a scientific standpoint, that is an A‑Number‑l experiment. That is the experiment that makes rat‑running experiments sensible, because it uncovers the clues that the rat is really using—not what you think it’s using. And that is the experiment that tells exactly what conditions you have to use in order to be careful and control everything in an experiment with rat‑running.

I looked into the subsequent history of this research. The subsequent experiment, and the one after that, never referred to Mr. Young. They never used any of his criteria of putting the corridor on sand, or being very careful. They just went right on running rats in the same old way, and paid no attention to the great discoveries of Mr. Young, and his papers are not referred to, because he didn’t discover anything about the rats. In fact, he discovered all the things you have to do to discover something about rats. But not paying attention to experiments like that is a characteristic of Cargo Cult Science.

Another example is the ESP experiments of Mr. Rhine, and other people. As various people have made criticisms—and they themselves have made criticisms of their own experiments—they improve the techniques so that the effects are smaller, and smaller, and smaller until they gradually disappear. All the parapsychologists are looking for some experiment that can be repeated—that you can do again and get the same effect—statistically, even. They run a million rats—no, it’s people this time—they do a lot of things and get a certain statistical effect. Next time they try it they don’t get it any more. And now you find a man saying that it is an irrelevant demand to expect a repeatable experiment. This is science?

This man also speaks about a new institution, in a talk in which he was resigning as Director of the Institute of Parapsychology. And, in telling people what to do next, he says that one of the things they have to do is be sure they only train students who have shown their ability to get PSI results to an acceptable extent—not to waste their time on those ambitious and interested students who get only chance results. It is very dangerous to have such a policy in teaching—to teach students only how to get certain results, rather than how to do an experiment with scientific integrity.

So I wish to you—I have no more time, so I have just one wish for you—the good luck to be somewhere where you are free to maintain the kind of integrity I have described, and where you do not feel forced by a need to maintain your position in the organization, or financial support, or so on, to lose your integrity. May you have that freedom. May I also give you one last bit of advice: Never say that you’ll give a talk unless you know clearly what you’re going to talk about and more or less what you’re going to say.

Voir de plus:

René Girard. « L’accroissement de la puissance de l’homme sur le réel m’effraie »

René Girard, propos recueillis par Juliette Cerf publié le 11 min

[Actualisation: René Girard est mort mercredi 4 novembre 2015, à l’âge de 91 ans] Auteur d’une théorie fertile et discutée, René Girard est un penseur inclassable qui vit aux Etats-Unis depuis 1947. Entre critique littéraire, théologie et anthropologie, il révèle les liens unissant la violence et le religieux, et construit une « science des rapports humains ».

Transdisciplinaire, la théorie du désir mimétique de René Girard repose sur l’idée que l’homme ne désire jamais par lui-même sinon en imitant les désirs d’un tiers pris pour modèle, le médiateur. Aux concepts abstraits et à la fixité, il a toujours préféré la matière des œuvres et le dynamisme des mécanismes, comme celui du bouc émissaire et du sacrifice. Né le 25 décembre 1923 à Avignon, ancien élève de l’École des chartes, venu « de nulle part » comme il aime à le dire, René Girard s’est d’abord intéressé au désir mimétique à travers la littérature (Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque) avant de prendre pour objet les religions archaïques (La Violence et le Sacré) puis la Bible et le christianisme (Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde). Anthropologue autodidacte élu à l’Académie française en 2005, penseur chrétien converti par sa théorie – « Ce n’est pas parce je suis chrétien que je pense comme je le fais ; c’est parce que mes recherches m’ont amené à penser ce que je pense, que je suis devenu chrétien », a-t-il écrit –, René Girard a bâti une anthropologie du phénomène religieux. En insistant sur le passage des religions mythiques au christianisme, il invente une genèse de la culture.

Philosophie magazine : Votre parcours est atypique. Votre position  extérieure à l’université vous a-t-elle permis d’élaborer votre théorie transversale ?

René Girard : Oui, sans conteste, et cela remonte très tôt dans mon enfance. Je n’ai jamais rien appris dans les établissements d’enseignement. J’ai des souvenirs de mon entrée en classe de dixième à Avignon. Je vois encore la maîtresse, aussi peu terrifiante que possible. Elle m’a pourtant causé une véritable panique… Ma mère m’a retiré du lycée et j’ai passé mes premières années d’enseignement dans ce que mon père appelait une école de gâtés. Je suis retourné au lycée en sixième et je suis devenu terriblement chahuteur, si bien que je me suis fait renvoyer de l’année de philo. J’avais passé mon premier bac très médiocrement et j’ai fait ma classe de philo seul. J’ai obtenu une mention bien. À partir de là, mon père a considéré que j’étais le meilleur professeur de moi-même… En 1941, je suis parti pour la khâgne de Lyon. La situation était difficile, il y avait déjà des restrictions alimentaires, et je suis rentré chez mes parents. Mon père, qui était conservateur de la bibliothèque et du musée d’Avignon, m’a suggéré de préparer seul l’École des chartes. J’ai été reçu en 1943. Mais j’ai trouvé cela ennuyeux et suis parti pour les États-Unis en 1947, répondant à une offre d’assistant de français.

C’est la littérature qui est à la source de votre théorie.

«Le christianisme est, selon moi, à la source du scepticisme moderne, il est démystification»

Aux États-Unis, j’ai commencé à enseigner la littérature française. Mon idée première a été de me demander comment enseigner ces romans que, pour beaucoup, je n’avais pas lus. La critique littéraire était déjà très différentialiste ; il fallait découvrir dans les œuvres ce qui les rendait exceptionnelles, différentes les unes des autres. En lisant ces romans, ce qui m’a frappé au contraire, c’est la substance très analogue qui en émanait, de Stendhal à Proust par exemple. La même problématique sociale reparaissait sous un jour différent, mais avec des différences liées à la période plutôt qu’à la personnalité du romancier. Je suis arrivé à l’idée que s’il y a des modes et de l’Histoire, c’est parce que les hommes ont tendance à désirer la même chose. Ils imitent le désir les uns des autres. L’imitation, pour cette raison, est source de conflits. Désirer la même chose, c’est s’opposer à son modèle, c’est essayer de lui enlever l’objet qu’il désire. Le modèle se change en rival. Ces allers-retours accélèrent les échanges hostiles et la puissance du désir ; il y a donc chez l’homme une espèce de spirale ascendante de rivalité, de concurrence et de violence. Si la littérature a été un point de départ pour moi, c’est que le roman ne parle que des rapports concrets, des vraies relations humaines ; il ne monologue pas. C’est à partir de trois personnages que l’on peut parler correctement des rapports humains et jamais à partir d’un sujet seul. C’est la rivalité mimétique qui est première pour moi, non l’individu.

Vous reprochez à la philosophie de ne pas penser assez la relation. Que faire de l’intersubjectivité ?

L’intersubjectivité est la bonne direction mais elle est récente. Lévinas a bien compris le mimétisme ; il cite toujours cette parole talmudique formidable : si tout le monde est d’accord pour condamner un individu, libérez-le, il doit être innocent. L’accord contre lui est un accord mimétique. Dans le Talmud, il y a une conscience du mimétisme, de l’influence réciproque des hommes les uns sur les autres qui tranche complètement sur les religions antiques et en particulier sur la religion grecque. Cette dernière voit les individus comme des boules de billard, isolées les unes des autres. Nous avons vécu une longue période où la philosophie ne voyait que des différences ; la déconstruction et le structuralisme ont alors joué un rôle important. Pour moi, au fond, il n’y a que des identités méconnues. La méconnaissance que l’Amérique a de l’Europe est à cet égard frappante ; les Américains imaginent qu’il y a quelque chose de spécifiquement européen qu’ils n’ont pas et ne comprennent pas. En réalité, ils ne comprennent pas l’identité des réactions de part et d’autre ; les différences ne sont que des différences de situation, de pouvoir relatif. L’Europe fait la même chose vis-à-vis de l’Amérique : elle ne voit pas à quel point l’Amérique est la même chose que l’Europe. Chez les Américains, il y a quand même cette idée qu’on a immigré parce qu’on est des Européens ratés ; par conséquent, l’Amérique est en rivalité permanente, toujours en train de prouver à l’Europe qu’elle peut faire mieux qu’elle.

La violence est au cœur de votre anthropologie mimétique. Cet aspect conflictuel de l’imitation, la philosophie ne l’avait-elle pas déjà mis en lumière ?

Platon est le premier à avoir parlé de l’imitation. Il lui a accordé un rôle prodigieux : l’imitation, pour lui, est essentielle et dangereuse. Il la redoute. L’imitation, c’est le passage de l’essence à l’existence. Dans La République, il y a des textes extraordinaires sur les dangers des gardiens de la cité idéale s’imitant les uns les autres. L’hostilité de Platon envers la foule, qui est dans une imitation déréglée, déchaînée, est impressionnante. Platon est l’un des précurseurs de cette vision conflictuelle de l’imitation, mais il n’en révèle pas vraiment le mécanisme. Tout ceci disparaît avec Aristote qui rend l’imitation anodine et docile ; pour lui, l’imitation, c’est le peintre du dimanche voulant être aussi réaliste que possible ! Depuis Aristote, l’imitation est considérée comme une faculté, une technique assez stupide et dérisoire, qui joue un rôle dans l’éducation élémentaire.

Selon vous, la philosophie est idéaliste, essentialiste. Est-ce votre réalisme qui vous en éloigne ?

Oui, je pense que l’accent mis sur l’observation du réel dans le monde moderne a été quelque chose de très efficace, autant dans le danger que dans le bénéfice. Les outils dont l’homme dispose aujourd’hui sont infiniment plus puissants que tous ceux qu’il a connus auparavant. Ces outils, l’homme est parfaitement capable de les utiliser de façon égoïste et rivalitaire. Ce qui m’intéresse, c’est cet accroissement de la puissance de l’homme sur le réel. Les statistiques de production et de consommation d’énergie sont en progrès constant, et la rapidité d’augmentation de ce progrès augmente elle aussi constamment, dessinant une courbe parfaite, presque verticale. C’est pour moi une immense source d’effroi tant les hommes, essentiellement, restent des rivaux, rivalisant pour le même objet ou la même gloire – ce qui est la même chose. Nous sommes arrivés à un stade où le milieu humain est menacé par la puissance même de l’homme. Il s’agit avant tout de la menace écologique, des armes et des manipulations biologiques.

Dans Achever Clausewitz, vous ne cachez pas votre inquiétude face à ce climat « apocalyptique ».

«L’humanisme occidental ne voit pas que la violence se développe spontanément quand les hommes rivalisent pour un objet»

Loin d’être absurdes ou impensables, les grands textes eschatologiques – ceux des Évangiles synoptiques, en particulier Matthieu, chapitre 24, et Marc, chapitre 13 –, sont d’une actualité saisissante. La science moderne a séparé la nature et la culture, alors qu’on avait défini la religion comme le tonnerre de Zeus, etc. Dans les textes apocalyptiques, ce qui frappe, c’est ce mélange de nature et de culture ; les guerres et rumeurs de guerre, le fracas de la mer et des flots ne forment qu’un. Or si nous regardons ce qui se passe autour de nous, si nous nous interrogeons sur l’action des hommes sur le réel, le réchauffement global, la montée du niveau la mer, nous nous retrouvons face à un univers où les choses naturelles et culturelles sont confondues. La science elle-même le reconnaît. J’ai voulu radicaliser cet aspect apocalyptique. Je pense que les gens sont trop rassurés. Ils se rassurent eux-mêmes. L’homme est comme un insecte qui fait son nid ; il fait confiance à l’environnement. La créature fait toujours confiance à l’environnement… Le rationalisme issu des Lumières continue aussi à rassurer. Les rapports humains, l’humanisme des Lumières les juge stables ; il considère que les rapports hostiles entre individus sont exactement comme ces boules de billard qui s’entrechoquent : c’est la plus grosse ou la plus rapide qui l’emporte sur les autres. L’humanisme occidental ne voit pas que la violence est ce qui se développe spontanément entre les hommes lorsqu’ils rivalisent pour un objet. Clausewitz était un homme des Lumières, et ce n’est, à mon avis, que parce qu’il parle de la guerre qu’il saisit les rapports humains véritables ; libéré, il peut parler de la violence. Quand Clausewitz définit la guerre comme une montée aux extrêmes, il décrit un mécanisme très simple : lorsque nous nous bagarrons avec quelqu’un, nous allons toujours vers le pire, nos injures seront toujours plus violentes. Il se produit ce que nous appelons aujourd’hui une « escalade », escalation en anglais, une montée par échelle d’intensité.

Certains phénomènes contemporains relèvent-ils, pour vous, du mécanisme mimétique ?

La Chine a favorisé le développement de l’automobile. Cette priorité dénote une rivalité avec les Américains sur un terrain très redoutable ; la pollution dans la région de Shanghai est effrayante. Mais avoir autant d’automobiles que l’Amérique est un but dont il est, semble-t-il, impossible de priver les hommes. L’Occident conseille aux pays en voie de développement et aux pays les plus peuplés du globe, comme la Chine et l’Inde, de ne pas faire la même chose que lui ! Il y a là quelque chose de paradoxal et de scandaleux pour ceux auxquels ces conseils s’adressent. Aux États-Unis, les politiciens vous diront tous qu’ils sont d’accord pour prendre des mesures écologiques si elles ne touchent pas les accroissements de production. Or, s’il y a une partie du monde qui n’a pas besoin d’accroissement de production, c’est bien les États-Unis ; le profit individuel et les rivalités, qui ne sont pas immédiatement guerrières et destructrices mais qui le seront peut-être indirectement, et de façon plus massive encore, sont sacrées ; pas question de les toucher. Que faut-il pour qu’elles cessent d’être sacrées ? Il n’est pas certain que la situation actuelle, notamment la disparition croissante des espèces, soit menaçante pour la vie sur la planète, mais il y a une possibilité très forte qu’elle le soit. Ne pas prendre de précaution, alors qu’on est dans le doute, est dément. Des mesures écologiques sérieuses impliqueraient des diminutions de production. Mais ce raisonnement ne joue pas dans l’écologie, l’humanité étant follement attachée à ce type de concurrence qui structure en particulier la réalité occidentale, les habitudes de vie, de goût de l’humanité dite « développée ».

Vivons-nous dans une société de victimes ? Ce processus actuel de victimisation ressemble-t-il à celui que vous avez analysé dans Le Bouc émissaire ?

Notre société s’intéresse aux victimes et dénonce la victimisation collective d’individus innocents. Le besoin de bouc émissaire est si puissant que nous accusons toujours les gens de faire des boucs émissaires. Aujourd’hui, nous victimisons les victimisateurs ou ceux que nous jugeons comme tels. Dès que nous sommes hostiles à quelqu’un, nous l’accusons de faire des victimes, ce qui est très différent de l’hostilité qui structure les sociétés archaïques. Dans mon système, il y a deux types de religions. D’abord, les religions archaïques, qui sont fondées sur des crises de violence se résolvant par des phénomènes de bouc émissaire, c’est-à-dire par le choix d’une victime insignifiante mais dont on comprend, au regard des mythes, qu’elle n’est pas choisie au hasard : Œdipe est boiteux, il a attiré l’attention pour des raisons qui n’ont rien à voir avec le parricide et l’inceste. Le fait religieux, c’est un bouc émissaire qui rassemble contre lui une communauté troublée et qui fait cesser ce trouble. Ce bouc émissaire apparaît très méchant, dangereux, mais aussi très bon et secourable puisqu’il ressoude la communauté et purge la violence. Il faut l’apaiser. Pour cela, on recommence prudemment sur des victimes désignées à l’avance qui n’appartiennent pas à la communauté, qui lui sont un peu extérieures ; c’est-à-dire qu’on fait des sacrifices, des moments de violence contrôlés, ritualisés. La religion protège ainsi les sociétés de la violence mimétique. Ensuite, le judaïque et le chrétien révèlent la vérité du système. Dans les sociétés archaïques, le système fonctionne parce qu’on ne le comprend pas. C’est ce que j’appelle la méconnaissance : avoir un bouc émissaire, c’est ne pas savoir qu’on l’a ; apprendre qu’on en a un, c’est le perdre. L’anthropologie moderne a compris que, d’une certaine manière, le drame dans le judaïque et le chrétien, et en particulier la crucifixion du Christ, a la même structure que les mythes. Mais ce que les antropologues n’ont pas vu, c’est que dans les mythes, la victime apparaît comme coupable, tandis que les Évangiles reconnaissent l’innocence de la victime sacrificielle. On peut les considérer comme une explication de la religion archaïque : mieux on comprend les Évangiles, plus on comprend qu’ils suppriment les religions. J’exalte le christianisme d’une façon paradoxale. Selon moi, il est à la source du scepticisme moderne. Il est révélation des boucs émissaires. Il est démystification.

Voir encore:

« Fin du monde » contre « fin du mois », la rhétorique méprisante de nos élites

En reprenant à son compte cette expression, Emmanuel Macron a illustré la vision caricaturale qu’ont nos dirigeants de la France périphérique.

Benjamin Masse-Stamberger

Marianne

La « fin du monde » contre la « fin du mois ». L’expression, supposée avoir été employée initialement par un gilet jaune, a fait florès : comment concilier les impératifs de pouvoir d’achat à court terme, et les exigences écologiques vitales pour la survie de la planète ? La formule a même été reprise ce mardi par Emmanuel Macron, dans son discours sur la transition énergétique. « On l’entend, le président, le gouvernement, a-t-il expliqué, en paraphrasant les requêtes supposées des contestataires. Ils évoquent la fin du monde, nous on parle de la fin du mois. Nous allons traiter les deux, et nous devons traiter les deux. »

L’expression a-t-elle effectivement été employée par des gilets jaunes ? Peut-être. Mais le moins qu’on puisse dire, c’est que nos élites se sont saisies avec gourmandise de cette dialectique rassurante, reprise comme une antienne sur tous les plateaux de télévision pour résumer la problématique soulevée par ce mouvement sans précédent. Les politiques eux-mêmes en ont fait leurs choux gras : l’expression avait déjà été employée par Nicolas Hulot le 22 novembre, lors de l’Emission politique sur France 2, puis par Emmanuelle Wargon, la secrétaire d’Etat à l’Ecologie, le 24 novembre sur LCI enfin par Ségolène Royal le 25 novembre dernier, sur France 3. A vrai dire, elle avait même été utilisée par David Cormand, le secrétaire national d’Europe-Ecologie-Les Verts, sur France Info… dès le 4 septembre !

Quand on prend le temps de parler à ces gilets jaunes, on constate qu’ils sont parfaitement conscients de la problématique écologique

C’est dire que l’expression – si elle a pu être reprise ponctuellement par tel ou tel manifestant – émane en fait de nos élites boboïsantes. Elle correspond bien à la vision méprisante qu’elles ont d’une France périphérique aux idées étriquées, obsédée par le « pognon » indifférente au bien commun, là où nos dirigeants auraient la capacité à embrasser plus large, et à voir plus loin.

Or, la réalité est toute autre : quand on prend le temps de parler à ces gilets jaunes, on constate qu’ils sont parfaitement conscients de la problématique écologique. Parmi leurs revendications, dévoilées ces derniers jours, il y a ainsi l’interdiction immédiate du glyphosate, cancérogène probable que le gouvernement a en revanche autorisé pour encore au moins trois ans. Mais, s’ils se sentent concernés par l’avenir de la planète, les représentants de cette France rurale et périurbaine refusent de payer pour les turpitudes d’un système économique qui détruit l’environnement. D’autant que c’est ce même système qui est à l’origine de la désindustrialisation et de la dévitalisation des territoires, dont ils subissent depuis trente ans les conséquences en première ligne. A l’inverse, nos grandes consciences donneuses de leçon sont bien souvent les principaux bénéficiaires de cette économie mondialisée. Qui est égoïste, et qui est altruiste ?

Parmi les doléances des gilets jaunes, on trouve d’ailleurs aussi nombre de revendications politiques : comptabilisation du vote blanc, présence obligatoire des députés à l’Assemblée nationale, promulgation des lois par les citoyens eux-mêmes. Des revendications qu’on peut bien moquer, ou balayer d’un revers de manche en estimant qu’elles ne sont pas de leur ressort. Elles n’en témoignent pas moins d’un souci du politique, au sens le plus noble du terme, celui du devenir de la Cité. A l’inverse, en se repaissant d’une figure rhétorique caricaturale, reprise comme un « gimmick » de communication, nos élites démontrent leur goût pour le paraître et la superficialité, ainsi que la facilité avec laquelle elles s’entichent de clichés qui ne font que conforter leurs préjugés. Alors, qui est ouvert, et qui est étriqué ? Qui voit loin, et qui est replié sur lui-même ? Qui pense à ses fins de mois, et qui, à la fin du monde ?

Voir enfin:

LE GATEAU MIRACLE

Homo deus

Yuval Noah Harari

2015

/…/ La modernité (…) repose sur la conviction que la croissance économique n’est pas seulement possible mais absolument essentielle. Prières, bonnes actions et méditation pourraient bien être une source de consolation et d’inspiration, mais des problèmes tels que la famine, les épidémies et la guerre ne sauraient être résolus que par la croissance. Ce dogme fondamental se laisse résumer par une idée simple : « Si tu as un problème, tu as probablement besoin de plus, et pour avoir plus, il faut produire plus ! »

Les responsables politiques et les économistes modernes insistent : la croissance est vitale pour trois grandes raisons. Premièrement, quand nous produisons plus, nous pouvons consommer plus, accroître notre niveau de vie et, prétendument, jouir d’une vie plus heureuse. Deuxièmement, tant que l’espèce humaine se multiplie, la croissance économique est nécessaire à seule fin de rester où nous en sommes. En Inde, par exemple, la croissance démographique est de 1,2 % par an. Cela signifie que, si l’économie indienne n’enregistre pas une croissance annuelle d’au moins 1,2 %, le chômage augmentera, les salaires diminueront et le niveau de vie moyen déclinera. Troisièmement, même si les Indiens cessent de se multiplier, et si la classe moyenne indienne peut secontenter de son niveau de vie actuel, que devrait faire l’Inde de ses centaines demillions de citoyens frappés par la pauvreté ? Sans croissance, le gâteau reste dela même taille ; on ne saurait par conséquent donner plus aux pauvres qu’en prenant aux riches. Cela obligera à des choix très difficiles, et causera probablement beaucoup de rancœur, voire de violence. Si vous souhaitez éviter des choix douloureux, le ressentiment et les violences, il vous faut un gâteau plus gros.

La modernité a fait du « toujours plus » une panacée applicable à la quasi-totalité des problèmes publics et privés – du fondamentalisme religieux au mariage raté, en passant par l’autoritarisme dans le tiers-monde. Si seulement des pays comme le Pakistan et l’Égypte pouvaient soutenir une croissance régulière, leurs citoyens profiteraient des avantages que constituent voitures individuelles et réfrigérateurs pleins à craquer ; dès lors, ils suivraient la voie dela prospérité ici-bas au lieu d’emboîter le pas au joueur de pipeau fondamentaliste. De même, dans des pays comme le Congo et la Birmanie, lacroissance économique produirait une classe moyenne prospère, qui est le socle de la démocratie libérale. Quant au couple qui traverse une mauvaise passe, il serait sauvé si seulement il pouvait acquérir une maison plus grande (que mari et femme n’aient pas à partager un bureau encombré), acheter un lave-vaisselle (qu’ils cessent de se disputer pour savoir à qui le tour de faire la vaisselle) et suivre de coûteuses séances de thérapie deux fois par semaine.

La croissance économique est ainsi devenue le carrefour où se rejoignent la quasi-totalité des religions, idéologies et mouvements modernes. L’Union soviétique, avec ses plans quinquennaux mégalomaniaques, n’était pas moins obsédée par la croissance que l’impitoyable requin de la finance américain. De même que chrétiens et musulmans croient tous au ciel et ne divergent que sur le moyen d’y parvenir, au cours de la guerre froide, capitalistes et communistes imaginaient créer le paradis sur terre par la croissance économique et ne sedisputaient que sur la méthode exacte.

Aujourd’hui, les revivalistes hindous, les musulmans pieux, les nationalistes japonais et les communistes chinois peuvent bien proclamer leur adhésion à de valeurs et objectifs très différents : tous ont cependant fini par croire que la croissance économique est la clé pour atteindre leurs buts disparates. En 2014, Narendra Modi, hindou fervent, a ainsi été élu Premier ministre de l’Inde ; sonélection a largement été due au fait qu’il a su stimuler la croissance économiquedans son État du Gujarât et à l’idée largement partagée que lui seul pourrait ranimer une économie nationale léthargique. En Turquie, des vues analogues ontpermis à l’islamiste Recep Tayyip Erdoğan de conserver le pouvoir depuis 2003. Le nom de son parti – Parti de la justice et du développement – souligne sonattachement au développement économique ; de fait, le gouvernement Erdoğan aréussi à obtenir des taux de croissance impressionnants depuis plus de dix ans.

En 2012, le Premier ministre japonais, le nationaliste Shinzō Abe, est arrivé au pouvoir en promettant d’arracher l’économie japonaise à deux décennies de stagnation. À cette fin, il a recouru à des mesures si agressives et inhabituellesqu’on a parlé d’ « abenomie ». Dans le même temps, en Chine, le particommuniste a rendu hommage du bout des lèvres aux idéaux marxistes-léninistes traditionnels ; dans les faits, cependant, il s’en tient aux célèbresmaximes de Deng Xiaoping : « le développement est la seule vérité tangible » et « qu’importe que le chat soit noir ou blanc, pourvu qu’il attrape les souris ». Ce qui veut dire en clair : faites tout ce qui sert la croissance économique, même sicela aurait déplu à Marx et à Lénine.

À Singapour, comme il sied à cet État-cité qui va droit au but, cet axe de réflexion est poussé encore plus loin, au point que les salaires des ministres sontindexés sur le PIB. Quand l’économie croît, le salaire des ministres estaugmenté, comme si leur mission se réduisait à cela. Cette obsession de la croissance pourrait sembler aller de soi, mais c’est uniquement parce que nous vivons dans le monde moderne. Les maharajas indiens, les sultans ottomans, les shoguns de Kamakura et les empereurs Han fondaient rarement leur destin politique sur la croissance économique. Que Modi, Erdoğan, Abe et le président chinois Xi Jinping aient tous misé leur carrière sur la croissance atteste le statut quasi religieux que la croissance a fini par acquérir à travers le monde. De fait, on n’a sans doute pas tort de parler de religion lorsqu’il s’agit de la croyance dans la croissance économique : elle prétend aujourd’hui résoudre nombre de nos problèmes éthiques, sinon la plupart. La croissance économique étant prétendument la source de toutes les bonnes choses, elle encourage les gens à enterrer leurs désaccords éthiques pour adopter la ligne d’action qui maximise la croissance à long terme. L’Inde de Modi abrite des milliers de sectes, de partis, de mouvements et de gourous : bien que leurs objectifs ultimes puissent diverger, tous doivent passer par le même goulet d’étranglement de la croissance économique. Alors, en attendant, pourquoi ne pas tous se serrer les coudes ?

Le credo du « toujours plus » presse en conséquence les individus, les entreprises et les gouvernements de mépriser tout ce qui pourrait entraver la croissance économique : par exemple, préserver l’égalité sociale, assurer l’harmonie écologique ou honorer ses parents. En Union soviétique, lesdirigeants pensaient que le communisme étatique était la voie de la croissance laplus rapide : tout ce qui se mettait en travers de la collectivisation fut donc passé au bulldozer, y compris des millions de koulaks, la liberté d’expression et la mer d’Aral. De nos jours, il est généralement admis qu’une forme de capitalisme de marché est une manière beaucoup plus efficace d’assurer la croissance à long terme : on protège donc les magnats cupides, les paysans riches et la liberté d’expression, tout en démantelant et détruisant les habitats écologiques, les structures sociales et les valeurs traditionnelles qui gênent le capitalisme de marché.

Prenez, par exemple, une ingénieure logiciel qui touche 100 dollars par heure de travail dans une start-up de high-tech. Un jour, son vieux père fait un AVC. Il a besoin d’aide pour faire ses courses, la cuisine et même sa toilette. Elle pourrait installer son père chez elle, partir plus tard au travail le matin, rentrer plus tôt le soir et prendre soin personnellement de son père. Ses revenus et la productivité de la start-up en souffriraient, mais son père profiterait des soins d’une fille dévouée et aimante. Inversement, elle pourrait faire appel à une aide mexicaine qui, pour 12 dollars de l’heure, vivrait avec son père et pourvoirait à tous ses besoins. Cela ne changerait rien à sa vie d’ingénieure et à la start-up, et cela profiterait à l’aide et l’économie mexicaines. Que doit faire notre ingénieure ?

Le capitalisme de marché a une réponse sans appel. Si la croissance économique exige que nous relâchions les liens familiaux, encouragions les gens à vivre loin de leurs parents, et importions des aides de l’autre bout du monde, ainsi soit-il. Cette réponse implique cependant un jugement éthique, plutôt qu’unénoncé factuel. Lorsque certains se spécialisent dans les logiciels quand d’autresconsacrent leur temps à soigner les aînés, on peut sans nul doute produire plus de logiciels et assurer aux personnes âgées des soins plus professionnels. Mais la croissance économique est-elle plus importante que les liens familiaux ? En sepermettant de porter des jugements éthiques de ce type, le capitalisme de marchéa franchi la frontière qui séparait le champ de la science de celui de la religion.

L’étiquette de « religion » déplairait probablement à la plupart des capitalistes, mais, pour ce qui est des religions, le capitalisme peut au moins tenir la tête haute. À la différence des autres religions qui nous promettent un gâteau au ciel, le capitalisme promet des miracles ici, sur terre… et parfois même en accomplit. Le capitalisme mérite même des lauriers pour avoir réduit la violence humaine etaccru la tolérance et la coopération. Ainsi que l’explique le chapitre suivant, d’autres facteurs entrent ici en jeu, mais le capitalisme a amplement contribué à l’harmonie mondiale en encourageant les hommes à cesser de voir l’économie comme un jeu à somme nulle, où votre profit est ma perte, pour y voir plutôt une situation gagnant-gagnant, où votre profit est aussi le mien. Cette approche dubénéfice mutuel a probablement bien plus contribué à l’harmonie générale quedes siècles de prédication chrétienne sur le thème du « aime ton prochain » et « tends l’autre joue ».

De sa croyance en la valeur suprême de la croissance, le capitalisme déduit son commandement numéro un : tu investiras tes profits pour augmenter la croissance. Pendant le plus clair de l’histoire, les princes et les prêtres ont dilapidé leurs profits en carnavals flamboyants, somptueux palais et guerres inutiles. Inversement, ils ont placé leurs pièces d’or dans des coffres de fer, scellés et enfermés dans un donjon. Aujourd’hui, les fervents capitalistes se servent de leurs profits pour embaucher, développer leur usine ou mettre au point un nouveau produit.

S’ils ne savent comment faire, ils confient leur argent à quelqu’un qui saura : un banquier ou un spécialiste du capital-risque. Ce dernier prête de l’argent à divers entrepreneurs. Des paysans empruntent pour planter de nouveaux champs de blé ; des sous-traitants, pour construire de nouvelles maisons, des compagniesénergétiques, pour explorer de nouveaux champs de pétrole et les usinesd’armement, pour mettre au point de nouvelles armes. Les profits de toutes cesactivités permettent aux entrepreneurs de rembourser avec intérêts. Non seulement nous avons maintenant plus de blé, de maisons, de pétrole et d’armes, mais nous avons aussi plus d’argent, que les banques et les fonds peuvent denouveau prêter. Cette roue ne cessera jamais de tourner, du moins pas selon le capitalisme. Jamais n’arrivera un moment où le capitalisme dira : « Ça suffit. Il y a assez de croissance ! On peut se la couler douce. » Si vous voulez savoir pourquoi la roue capitaliste a peu de chance de s’arrêter un jour de tourner, discutez donc une heure avec un ami qui a accumulé 100 000 dollars et se demande qu’en faire.

« Les banques offrent des taux d’intérêt si bas, déplore-t-il. Je ne veux pasmettre mon argent sur un compte d’épargne qui rapporte à peine 0,5 % par an. Peut-être puis-je obtenir 2 % en bons du Trésor. L’an dernier, mon cousin Richie a acheté un appartement à Seattle, et son investissement lui a déjà rapporté 20 % ! Peut-être devrais-je me lancer dans l’immobilier, mais tout le monde parle d’une nouvelle bulle spéculative. Alors que penses-tu de la Bourse ? Un ami m’a dit que le bon plan, ces derniers temps, c’est d’acheter un fonds négocié en Bourse qui suit les économies émergentes comme le Brésil ou la Chine. » Il s’arrête un moment pour reprendre son souffle, et vous lui posez la questionsuivante : « Eh bien, pourquoi ne pas te contenter de tes 100 000 dollars ? » Il vous expliquera mieux que je ne saurais le faire pourquoi le capitalisme nes’arrêtera jamais.

On apprend même cette leçon aux enfants et aux adolescents à travers des jeux capitalistes omniprésents. Les jeux prémodernes, comme les échecs, supposaient une économie stagnante. Vous commencez une partie d’échecs avec seize pièces et, à la fin, vous n’en avez plus. Dans de rares cas, un pion peut être transformé en reine, mais vous ne pouvez produire de nouveaux pions ni métamorphoser vos cavaliers en chars. Les joueurs d’échecs n’ont donc jamais à  penser investissement. À l’opposé, beaucoup de jeux de société modernes et de jeux vidéo se focalisent sur l’investissement et la croissance.

Particulièrement révélateurs sont les jeux de stratégie du genre de Minecraft,Les Colons de Catane ou Civilizationde Sid Meier. Le jeu peut avoir pour cadre le Moyen Âge, l’âge de pierre ou quelque pays imaginaire, mais les principes restent les mêmes – et sont toujours capitalistes. Votre but est d’établir une ville,un royaume, voire toute une civilisation. Vous partez d’une base très modeste : juste un village, peut-être, avec les champs voisins. Vos actifs vous assurent un revenu initial sous forme de blé, de bois, de fer ou d’or. À vous d’investir ce revenu à bon escient. Il vous faut choisir entre des outils improductifs mais encore nécessaires, comme les soldats, et des actifs productifs, tels que des villages, des mines et des champs supplémentaires. La stratégie gagnante consiste habituellement à investir le strict minimum dans des produits de première nécessité improductifs, tout en maximisant vos actifs productifs. Aménager des villages supplémentaires signifie qu’au prochain tour vous disposerez d’un revenu plus important qui pourrait vous permettre non seulement d’acheter d’autres soldats, si besoin, mais aussi d’augmenter vos investissements productifs. Bientôt vous pourrez ainsi transformer vos villages en villes, bâtir des universités, des ports et des usines, explorer les mers et les océans, créer votre civilisation et gagner la partie.

LE SYNDROME DE L’ARCHE

La croissance économique peut-elle cependant se poursuivre éternellement ? L’économie ne finira-t-elle pas par être à court de ressources et par s’arrêter ? Pour assurer une croissance perpétuelle, il nous faut découvrir un stock de ressources inépuisable. Une solution consiste à explorer et à conquérir de nouvelles terres. Des siècles durant, la croissance de l’économie européenne et l’expansion du système capitaliste se sont largement nourries de conquêtes impériales outre-mer. Or le nombre d’îles et de continents est limité. Certains entrepreneurs espèrent finalement explorer et conquérir de nouvelles planètes, voire de nouvelles galaxies, mais, en attendant, l’économie moderne doit trouver une meilleure méthode pour poursuivre son expansion.

C’est la science qui a fourni la solution à la modernité. L’économie des renards ne saurait croître, parce qu’ils ne savent pas produire plus de lapins. L’économie des lapins stagne, parce qu’ils ne peuvent faire pousser l’herbe plus vite. Mais l’économie humaine peut croître, parce que les hommes peuvent découvrir des sources d’énergie et des matériaux nouveaux.

La vision traditionnelle du monde comme un gâteau de taille fixe présuppose qu’il n’y a que deux types de ressources : les matières premières et l’énergie. En vérité, cependant, il y en a trois : les matières premières, l’énergie et la connaissance. Les matières premières et l’énergie sont épuisables : plus vous les utilisez, moins vous en avez. Le savoir, en revanche, est une ressource en perpétuelle croissance : plus vous l’utilisez, plus vous en possédez. En fait,quand vous augmentez votre stock de connaissances, il peut vous faire accéder aussi à plus de matières premières et d’énergie. Si j’investis 100 millions de dollars dans la recherche de pétrole en Alaska et si j’en trouve, j’ai plus de pétrole, mais mes petits-enfants en auront moins. En revanche, si j’investis la même somme dans la recherche sur l’énergie solaire et que je découvre une nouvelle façon plus efficace de la domestiquer, mes petits-enfants et moi aurons davantage d’énergie.

Pendant des millénaires, la route scientifique de la croissance est restée bloquée parce que les gens croyaient que les Saintes Écritures et les anciennes traditions contenaient tout ce que le monde avait à offrir en connaissances importantes. Une société convaincue que tous les gisements de pétrole ont déjà été découverts ne perdrait pas de temps ni d’argent à chercher du pétrole. De même, une culture humaine persuadée de savoir déjà tout ce qui vaut la peine d’être su ne ferait pas l’effort de se mettre en quête de nouvelles connaissances. Telle était la position de la plupart des civilisations humaines prémodernes. La révolution scientifique a cependant libéré l’humanité de cette conviction naïve. La plus grande découverte scientifique a été la découverte de l’ignorance. Du jour où les hommes ont compris à quel point ils en savaient peu sur le monde, ils ont eu soudain une excellente raison de rechercher des connaissances nouvelles, ce qui a ouvert la voie scientifique du progrès.

À chaque génération, la science a contribué à découvrir de nouvelles sources d’énergie, de nouvelles matières premières, des machines plus performantes et des méthodes de production inédites. En 2017, l’humanité dispose donc de bien plus d’énergie et de matières premières que jamais, et la production s’envole. Des inventions comme la machine à vapeur, le moteur à combustion interne et l’ordinateur ont créé de toutes pièces des industries nouvelles. Si nous nous projetons dans vingt ans, en 2037, nous produirons et consommerons beaucoup plus qu’en 2017. Nous faisons confiance aux nanotechnologies, au géniegénétique et à l’intelligence artificielle pour révolutionner encore la production et ouvrir de nouveaux rayons dans nos supermarchés en perpétuelle expansion.

Nous avons donc de bonnes chances de triompher du problème de la rareté des ressources. La véritable némésis de l’économie moderne est l’effondrement écologique. Le progrès scientifique et la croissance économique prennent place dans une biosphère fragile et, à mesure qu’ils prennent de l’ampleur, les ondes de choc déstabilisent l’écologie. Pour assurer à chaque personne dans le mondele même niveau de vie que dans la société d’abondance américaine, il faudrait quelques planètes de plus ; or nous n’avons que celle-ci. Si le progrès et la croissance finissent par détruire l’écosystème, cela n’en coûtera pas seulement aux chauves-souris vampires, aux renards et aux lapins. Mais aussi à Sapiens. Une débâcle écologique provoquera une ruine économique, des troubles politiques et une chute du niveau de vie. Elle pourrait bien menacer l’existence même de la civilisation humaine.

Nous pourrions amoindrir le danger en ralentissant le rythme du progrès et de la croissance. Si cette année les investisseurs attendent un retour de 6 % sur leursportefeuilles, dans dix ans ils pourraient apprendre à se satisfaire de 3 %, puis de 1 % dans vingt ans ; dans trente ans, l’économie cessera de croître et nous nous contenterons de ce que nous avons déjà. Le credo de la croissance s’oppose pourtant fermement à cette idée hérétique et il suggère plutôt d’aller encore plus vite. Si nos découvertes déstabilisent l’écosystème et menacent l’humanité, il nous faut découvrir quelque chose qui nous protège. Si la couche d’ozone s’amenuise et nous expose au cancer de la peau, à nous d’inventer un meilleur écran solaire et de meilleurs traitements contre le cancer, favorisant ainsi l’essor de nouvelles usines de crèmes solaires et de centres anticancéreux. Si les nouvelles industries polluent l’atmosphère et les océans, provoquant un réchauffement général et des extinctions massives, il nous appartient de construire des mondes virtuels et des sanctuaires high-tech qui nous offriront toutes les bonnes choses de la vie, même si la planète devient aussi chaude, morne et polluée que l’enfer.

Pékin est déjà tellement polluée que la population évite de sortir, et que les riches Chinois dépensent des milliers de dollars en purificateurs d’air intérieur. Les super-riches construisent même des protections au-dessus de leur cour. En 2013, l’École internationale de Pékin, destinée aux enfants de diplomatesétrangers et de la haute société chinoise, est allée encore plus loin et a construitune immense coupole de 5 millions de dollars au-dessus de ses six courts detennis et de ses terrains de jeux. D’autres écoles suivent le mouvement, et le marché chinois des purificateurs d’air explose. Bien entendu, la plupart des Pékinois ne peuvent s’offrir pareil luxe, ni envoyer leurs enfants à l’École internationale.

L’humanité se trouve coincée dans une course double. D’un côté, nous nous sentons obligés d’accélérer le rythme du progrès scientifique et de la croissance économique. Un milliard de Chinois et un milliard d’Indiens aspirent au niveau de vie de la classe moyenne américaine, et ils ne voient aucune raison de brider leurs rêves quand les Américains ne sont pas disposés à renoncer à leurs 4×4 et à leurs centres commerciaux. D’un autre côté, nous devons garder au moins une longueur d’avance sur l’Armageddon écologique. Mener de front cette double course devient chaque année plus difficile, parce que chaque pas qui rapproche l’habitant des bidonvilles de Delhi du rêve américain rapproche aussi la planète du gouffre.

La bonne nouvelle, c’est que l’humanité jouit depuis des siècles de la croissance économique sans pour autant être victime de la débâcle écologique. Bien d’autres espèces ont péri en cours de route, et les hommes se sont aussi retrouvés face à un certain nombre de crises économiques et de désastres écologiques, mais jusqu’ici nous avons toujours réussi à nous en tirer. Reste qu’aucune loi de la nature ne garantit le succès futur. Qui sait si la science sera toujours capable de sauver simultanément l’économie du gel et l’écologie du point d’ébullition. Et puisque le rythme continue de s’accélérer, les marges d’erreur ne cessent de se rétrécir. Si, précédemment, il suffisait d’une invention stupéfiante une fois par siècle, nous avons aujourd’hui besoin d’un miracle tous les deux ans.

Nous devrions aussi nous inquiéter qu’une apocalypse écologique puisse avoirdes conséquences différentes en fonction des différentes castes humaines. Il n’ya pas de justice dans l’histoire. Quand une catastrophe s’abat, les pauvressouffrent toujours bien plus que les riches, même si ce sont ces derniers qui sontresponsables de la tragédie. Le réchauffement climatique affecte déjà la vie desplus pauvres dans les pays arides d’Afrique bien plus que la vie des Occidentauxplus aisés. Paradoxalement, le pouvoir même de la science peut accroître ledanger, en rendant les plus riches complaisants.

Prenez les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. La plupart des savants et un nombre croissant de responsables politiques reconnaissent la réalité du réchauffement climatique et l’ampleur du danger. Jusqu’ici, pourtant, cette reconnaissance n’a pas suffi à changer sensiblement notre comportement. Nous parlons beaucoup du réchauffement, mais, en pratique, l’humanité n’est pas prête aux sérieux sacrifices économiques, sociaux ou politiques nécessaires pour arrêter la catastrophe. Les émissions n’ont pas du tout diminué entre 2000 et 2010. Elles ont au contraire augmenté de 2,2 % par an, contre un taux annuel de 1,3 % entre 1970 et 2000(4). Signé en 1997, le protocole de Kyoto sur la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre visait à ralentir le réchauffement plutôt qu’à l’arrêter, mais le pollueur numéro un du monde, les États-Unis, a refusé de le ratifier et n’a fait aucun effort pour essayer de réduire de manière notable ses émissions, de peur de gêner sa croissance économique.

En décembre 2015, l’accord de Paris a fixé des objectifs plus ambitieux, appelant à limiter l’augmentation de la température moyenne à 1,5 degré au-dessus des niveaux préindustriels. Toutefois, nombre des douloureuses mesures nécessaires pour atteindre ce but ont été comme par hasard différées après 2030, ce qui revient de fait à passer la patate chaude à la génération suivante. Les administrations actuelles peuvent ainsi récolter les avantages politiques immédiats de leur apparent engagement vert, tandis que le lourd prix politique de la réduction des émissions (et du ralentissement de la croissance) est légué aux administrations futures. Malgré tout, au moment où j’écris (janvier 2016), il est loin d’être certain que les États-Unis et d’autres grands pollueurs ratifieront et mettront en œuvre l’accord de Paris. Trop de politiciens et d’électeurs pensent que, tant que l’économie poursuit sa croissance, les ingénieurs et les hommes de science pourront toujours la sauver du jugement dernier. S’agissant du changement climatique, beaucoup de défenseurs de la croissance ne se contentent pas d’espérer des miracles : ils tiennent pour acquis que les miracles se produiront.

À quel point est-il rationnel de risquer l’avenir de l’humanité en supposant que les futurs chercheurs feront des découvertes insoupçonnées qui sauveront la planète ? La plupart des présidents, ministres et PDG qui dirigent le monde sont des gens très rationnels. Pourquoi sont-ils disposés à faire un tel pari ? Peut-être parce qu’ils ne pensent pas parier sur leur avenir personnel. Même si les choses tournent au pire, et que la science ne peut empêcher le déluge, les ingénieurs pourraient encore construire une arche de Noé high-tech pour la caste supérieure, et laisser les milliards d’autres hommes se noyer. La croyance en cette arche high-tech est actuellement une des plus grosses menaces sur l’avenir de l’humanité et de tout l’écosystème. Les gens qui croient à l’arche high-tech ne devraient pas être en charge de l’écologie mondiale, pour la même raison qu’ilne faut pas confier les armes nucléaires à ceux qui croient à un au-delà céleste.

Et les plus pauvres ? Pourquoi ne protestent-ils pas ? Si le déluge survient un jour, ils en supporteront le coût, mais ils seront aussi les premiers à faire les frais de la stagnation économique. Dans un monde capitaliste, leur vie s’améliore uniquement quand l’économie croît. Aussi est-il peu probable qu’ils soutiennent des mesures pour réduire les menaces écologiques futures fondées sur le ralentissement de la croissance économique actuelle. Protéger l’environnement est une très belle idée, mais ceux qui n’arrivent pas à payer leur loyer s’inquiètent bien davantage de leur découvert bancaire que de la fonte de la calotte glaciaire.

FOIRE D’EMPOIGNE

Même si nous continuons de courir assez vite et parvenons à parer à la foi ’effondrement économique et la débâcle écologique, la course elle-même créed’immenses problèmes. Pour l’individu, elle se traduit par de hauts niveaux destress et de tension. Après des siècles de croissance économique et de progrèsscientifique, la vie aurait dû devenir calme et paisible, tout au moins dans lespays les plus avancés. Si nos ancêtres avaient eu un aperçu des outils et desressources dont nous disposons, ils auraient conjecturé que nous jouissons d’unetranquillité céleste, débarrassés de tout tracas et de tout souci. La vérité est trèsdifférente. Malgré toutes nos réalisations, nous sommes constamment pressés defaire et produire toujours plus.

Nous nous en prenons à nous-mêmes, au patron, à l’hypothèque, au gouvernement, au système scolaire. Mais ce n’est pas vraiment leur faute. C’est le deal moderne, que nous avons tous souscrit le jour de notre naissance. Dans le monde prémoderne, les gens étaient proches des modestes employés d’une bureaucratie socialiste. Ils pointaient et attendaient qu’un autre fasse quelque chose. Dans le monde moderne, c’est nous, les hommes, qui avons les choses en main, et nous sommes soumis jour et nuit à une pression constante.

Sur le plan collectif, la course se manifeste par des chambardements incessants. Alors que les systèmes politiques et sociaux duraient autrefois des siècles, aujourd’hui chaque génération détruit le vieux monde pour en construire un nouveau à la place. Comme le Manifeste communiste le montre brillamment,le monde moderne a absolument besoin d’incertitude et de perturbation. Toutes les relations fixes, tous les vieux préjugés sont balayés, les nouvelles structures deviennent archaïques avant même de pouvoir faire de vieux os. Tout ce qui est solide se dissipe dans l’air. Il n’est pas facile de vivre dans un monde aussi chaotique, et encore moins de le gouverner.

La modernité doit donc travailler dur pour s’assurer que ni les individus ni le collectif n’essaient de se retirer de la course, malgré la tension et le chaos qu’elle crée. À cette fin, elle brandit la croissance comme la valeur suprême au nom de laquelle on devrait tout sacrifier et braver tous les dangers. Sur un plan collectif, les gouvernements, les entreprises et les organismes sont encouragés à mesurer leur succès en termes de croissance et à craindre l’équilibre comme le diable. Sur le plan individuel, nous sommes constamment poussés à accroître nos revenus et notre niveau de vie. Même si vous êtes satisfait de votre situation actuelle, vous devez rechercher toujours plus. Le luxe d’hier devient nécessité d’aujourd’hui. Si autrefois vous viviez bien dans un appartement avec trois chambres, une voiture et un ordinateur fixe, aujourd’hui il vous faut une maison de cinq chambres, avec deux voitures et une nuée d’iPods, de tablettes et de smartphones.

Il n’était pas très difficile de convaincre les individus de vouloir plus. La cupidité vient facilement aux êtres humains. Le gros problème a été de convaincre les institutions collectives comme les États et les Églises d’accompagner le nouvel idéal. Des millénaires durant, les sociétés se sont efforcées de freiner les désirs individuels et de promouvoir une sorte d’équilibre. Il était notoire que les gens voulaient toujours plus pour eux-mêmes, mais le gâteau étant d’une taille fixe, l’harmonie sociale dépendait de la retenue. L’avarice était mauvaise. La modernité a mis le monde sens dessus dessous. Elle a convaincu les instances collectives que l’équilibre est bien plus effrayant que le chaos, et que comme l’avarice nourrit la croissance, c’est une force du bien. Dès lors, la modernité a incité les gens à vouloir plus, et a démantelé les disciplines séculaires qui tempéraient la cupidité.

Les angoisses qui en résultèrent furent largement apaisées par le capitalisme de marché : c’est une des raisons de la popularité de cette idéologie. Les penseurs capitalistes ne cessent de nous calmer : « Ne vous inquiétez pas, tout ira bien. Du moment que l’économie croît, la main invisible du marché pourvoira à tout. » Le capitalisme a donc sanctifié un système vorace et chaotique qui croît à pas de géant, sans que personne comprenne ce qui se passe et où nous courons. (Le communisme, qui croyait aussi à la croissance, pensait pouvoir empêcher le chaos et orchestrer la croissance par la planification. Après ses premiers succès, cependant, il s’est laissé largement distancer par la cavalcade désordonnée du marché.)

Il est de bon ton aujourd’hui, chez les intellectuels, de dénigrer le capitalisme. Puisqu’il domine le monde, nous ne devons rien négliger pour en saisir les insuffisances avant qu’elles ne produisent des catastrophes apocalyptiques. La critique du capitalisme ne doit pourtant pas nous aveugler sur ses avantages et ses réalisations. Il a été jusqu’ici un succès stupéfiant, du moins si nous ignorons les risques de débâcle écologique future, et si nous mesurons la réussite à l’aune de la production et de la croissance. Sans doute vivons-nous en 2017 dans un monde de stress et de chaos, mais les sombres prophéties d’effondrement et de violence ne se sont pas matérialisées, tandis que les scandaleuses promesses de croissance perpétuelle et de coopération mondiale s’accomplissent. Nous connaissons certes des crises économiques épisodiques et des guerres internationales, mais, à long terme, le capitalisme ne s’est pas seulement imposé, il a aussi réussi à surmonter la famine, les épidémies et la guerre. Des millénaires durant, prêtres, rabbins et muftis nous avaient expliqué que les hommes n’y parviendraient pas par leurs propres efforts. Puis sont venus les banquiers, les investisseurs et les industriels : en deux siècles, ils y sont arrivés !

Le deal moderne nous promettait un pouvoir sans précédent. La promesse a été tenue. Mais à quel prix ? En échange du pouvoir, le deal moderne attend de nous que nous renoncions au sens. Comment les hommes ont-ils accueilli cette exigence glaçante ? Obtempérer aurait pu aisément se traduire par un monde sinistre, dénué d’éthique, d’esthétique et de compassion. Il n’en reste pas moins vrai que l’humanité est aujourd’hui non seulement bien plus puissante que jamais, mais aussi beaucoup plus paisible et coopérative. Comment y sommes-nous parvenus ? Comment la morale, la beauté et même la compassion ont-elles survécu et fleuri dans un monde sans dieux, ni ciel, ni enfer ?

Une fois encore, les capitalistes sont prompts à en créditer la main invisible du marché. Pourtant, celle-ci n’est pas seulement invisible, elle est aussi aveugle : toute seule, jamais elle n’aurait pu sauver la société humaine. En vérité, même une foire d’empoigne générale ne saurait se passer de la main secourable d’un dieu, d’un roi ou d’une Église. Si tout est à vendre, y compris les tribunaux et la police, la confiance s’évapore, le crédit se dissipe et les affaires périclitent. Qu’est-ce qui a sauvé la société moderne de l’effondrement ? L’espèce humaine n’a pas été sauvée par la loi de l’offre et de la demande, mais par l’essor d’une nouvelle religion révolutionnaire : l’humanisme.

Voir par ailleurs:

In China, Breathing Becomes a Childhood Risk
Edward Wong
The New York Times
April 22, 2013

BEIJING — The boy’s chronic cough and stuffy nose began last year at the age of 3. His symptoms worsened this winter, when smog across northern China surged to record levels. Now he needs his sinuses cleared every night with saltwater piped through a machine’s tubes.

The boy’s mother, Zhang Zixuan, said she almost never lets him go outside, and when she does she usually makes him wear a face mask. The difference between Britain, where she once studied, and China is “heaven and hell,” she said.

Levels of deadly pollutants up to 40 times the recommended exposure limit in Beijing and other cities have struck fear into parents and led them to take steps that are radically altering the nature of urban life for their children.

Parents are confining sons and daughters to their homes, even if it means keeping them away from friends. Schools are canceling outdoor activities and field trips. Parents with means are choosing schools based on air-filtration systems, and some international schools have built gigantic, futuristic-looking domes over sports fields to ensure healthy breathing.

“I hope in the future we’ll move to a foreign country,” Ms. Zhang, a lawyer, said as her ailing son, Wu Xiaotian, played on a mat in their apartment, near a new air purifier. “Otherwise we’ll choke to death.”

She is not alone in looking to leave. Some middle- and upper-class Chinese parents and expatriates have already begun leaving China, a trend that executives say could result in a huge loss of talent and experience. Foreign parents are also turning down prestigious jobs or negotiating for hardship pay from their employers, citing the pollution.

There are no statistics for the flight, and many people are still eager to come work in Beijing, but talk of leaving is gaining urgency around the capital and on Chinese microblogs and parenting forums. Chinese are also discussing holidays to what they call the “clean-air destinations” of Tibet, Hainan and Fujian.

“I’ve been here for six years and I’ve never seen anxiety levels the way they are now,” said Dr. Richard Saint Cyr, a new father and a family health doctor at Beijing United Family Hospital, whose patients are half Chinese and half foreigners. “Even for me, I’ve never been as anxious as I am now. It has been extraordinarily bad.”

He added: “Many mothers, especially, have been second-guessing their living in Beijing. I think many mothers are fed up with keeping their children inside.”

Few developments have eroded trust in the Communist Party as quickly as the realization that the leaders have failed to rein in threats to children’s health and safety. There was national outrage in 2008 after more than 5,000 children were killed when their schools collapsed in an earthquake, and hundreds of thousands were sickened and six infants died in a tainted-formula scandal. Officials tried to suppress angry parents, sometimes by force or with payoffs.

But the fury over air pollution is much more widespread and is just beginning to gain momentum.

“I don’t trust the pollution measurements of the Beijing government,” said Ms. Zhang’s father, Zhang Xiaochuan, a retired newspaper administrator.

Scientific studies justify fears of long-term damage to children and fetuses. A study published by The New England Journal of Medicine showed that children exposed to high levels of air pollution can suffer permanent lung damage. The research was done in the 1990s in Los Angeles, where levels of pollution were much lower than those in Chinese cities today.

A study by California researchers published last month suggested a link between autism in children and the exposure of pregnant women to traffic-related air pollution. Columbia University researchers, in a study done in New York, found that prenatal exposure to air pollutants could result in children with anxiety, depression and attention-span problems. Some of the same researchers found in an earlier study that children in Chongqing, China, who had prenatal exposure to high levels of air pollutants from a coal-fired plant were born with smaller head circumferences, showed slower growth and performed less well on cognitive development tests at age 2. The shutdown of the plant resulted in children born with fewer difficulties.

Analyses show little relief ahead if China does not change growth policies and strengthen environmental regulation. A Deutsche Bank report released in February said the current trends of coal use and automobile emissions meant air pollution was expected to worsen by an additional 70 percent by 2025.

Some children’s hospitals in northern China reported a large number of patients with respiratory illnesses this winter, when the air pollution soared. During one bad week in January, Beijing Children’s Hospital admitted up to 9,000 patients a day for emergency visits, half of them for respiratory problems, according to a report by Xinhua, the state news agency.

Parents have scrambled to buy air purifiers. IQAir, a Swiss company, makes purifiers that cost up to $3,000 here and are displayed in shiny showrooms. Mike Murphy, the chief executive of IQAir China, said sales had tripled in the first three months of 2013 over the same period last year.

Face masks are now part of the urban dress code. Ms. Zhang laid out half a dozen masks on her dining room table and held up one with a picture of a teddy bear that fits Xiaotian. Schools are adopting emergency measures. Xiaotian’s private kindergarten used to take the children on a field trip once a week, but it has canceled most of those this year.

At the prestigious Beijing No. 4 High School, which has long trained Chinese leaders and their children, outdoor physical education classes are now canceled when the pollution index is high.

“The days with blue sky and seemingly clean air are treasured, and I usually go out and do exercise,” said Dong Yifu, a senior there who was just accepted to Yale University.

Elite schools are investing in infrastructure to keep children active. Among them are Dulwich College Beijing and the International School of Beijing, which in January completed two large white sports domes of synthetic fabric that cover athletic fields and tennis courts.

The construction of the domes and an accompanying building began a year ago, to give the 1,900 students a place to exercise in both bad weather and high pollution, said Jeff Johanson, director of student activities. The project cost $5.7 million and includes hospital-grade air-filtration systems.

Teachers check the hourly air ratings from the United States Embassy to determine whether children should play outside or beneath the domes. “The elementary schoolchildren don’t miss recess anymore,” Mr. Johanson said.

One American mother, Tara Duffy, said she had chosen a prekindergarten school for her daughter in part because the school had air filters in the classrooms. The school, called the 3e International School, also brings in doctors to talk about pollution and bars the children from playing outdoors during increases in smog levels. “In the past six months, there have been a lot more ‘red flag’ days, and they keep the kids inside,” said Ms. Duffy, a writer and former foundation consultant.

Ms. Duffy said she also checked the daily air quality index to decide whether to take her daughter to an outdoor picnic or an indoor play space.

Now, after nine years here, Ms. Duffy is leaving China, and she cites the pollution and traffic as major factors.

That calculus is playing out with expatriates across Beijing, and even with foreigners outside China. One American couple with a young child discussed the pollution when considering a prestigious foundation job in Beijing, and it was among the reasons they turned down the offer.

James McGregor, a senior counselor in the Beijing office of APCO Worldwide, a consulting company, said he had heard of an American diplomat with young children who had turned down a posting here. That was despite the fact that the State Department provides a 15 percent salary bonus for Beijing that exists partly because of the pollution. The hardship bonus for other Chinese cities, which also suffer from awful air, ranges from 20 percent to 30 percent, except for Shanghai, where it is 10 percent.

“I’ve lived in Beijing 23 years, and my children were brought up here, but if I had young children I’d have to leave,” Mr. McGregor said. “A lot of people have started exit plans.”

Voir aussi:

China entrepreneurs cash in on air pollution

 

BEIJING — Bad air is good news for many Chinese entrepreneurs.

From gigantic domes that keep out pollution to face masks with fancy fiber filters, purifiers and even canned air, Chinese businesses are trying to find a way to market that most elusive commodity: clean air.

An unprecedented wave of pollution throughout China (dubbed the “airpocalypse” or “airmageddon” by headline writers) has spawned an almost entirely new industry.

The biggest ticket item is a huge dome that looks like a cross between the Biosphere and an overgrown wedding tent. Two of them recently went up at the International School of Beijing, one with six tennis courts, another large enough to harbor kids playing soccer and badminton and shooting hoops simultaneously Friday afternoon.

The contraptions are held up with pressure from the system pumping in fresh air. Your ears pop when you go in through one of three revolving doors that maintain a tight air lock.

The anti-pollution dome is the joint creation of a Shenzhen-based manufacturer of outdoor enclosures and a California company, Valencia-based UVDI, that makes air filtration and disinfection systems for hospitals, schools, museums and airports, including the new international terminal at Los Angeles International Airport.

Although the technologies aren’t new, this is the first time they’ve been put together specifically to keep out pollution, the manufacturers say.

“So far there is no better way to solve the pollution problem,” said Xiao Long, the head of the Shenzhen company, Broadwell Technologies.

On a recent day when the fine particulate matter in the air reached 650 micrograms per cubic meter, well into the hazardous range, the measurement inside was 25. Before the dome, the international school, like many others, had to suspend outdoor activities on high pollution days. By U.S. standards, readings below 50 are considered “good” and those below 100 are considered “moderate.”

Since air pollution skyrocketed in mid-January, Xiao said, orders for domes were pouring in from schools, government sports facilities and wealthy individuals who want them in their backyards. He said domes measuring more than 54,000 square feet each cost more than $1 million.

“This is a product only for China. You don’t have pollution this bad in California,” Xiao said.

Because it’s not possible to put a dome over all of Beijing, where air quality is the worst, people are taking matters into their own hands.

Not since the 2003 epidemic of SARS have face masks been such hot sellers. Many manufacturers are reporting record sales of devices varying from high-tech neoprene masks with exhalation valves, designed for urban bicyclists, that cost up to $50 each, to cheap cloth masks (some in stripes, polka dots, paisley and some emulating animal faces).

“Practically speaking, people have no other options,” said Zhao Danqing, head of a Shanghai-based mask manufacturer that registered its name as PM 2.5, referring to particulate matter smaller than 2.5 micrograms.

The term, virtually unknown in China a few years ago, is now as much a feature of daily weather chitchat as temperature and humidity, and Zhao’s company has sold 1 million masks at $5 each since the summer.

Having China clean up the air would be preferable to making a profit from the crisis, Zhao said.

“When people ask me what is the future of our product, I tell them I hope it will be retired soon,” Zhao said.

A combination of windless weather, rising temperatures and emissions from coal heating has created some of the worst air pollution on record in the country.

In mid-January, measurements of particulate matter reached more than 1,000 micrograms per cubic meter in some parts of northeast China. Anything above 300 is considered “hazardous” and the index stops at 500. By comparison, the U.S. has seen readings of 1,000 only in areas downwind of forest fires. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last year that the average particulate matter reading from 16 airport smokers’ lounges was 166.6.

The Chinese government has been experimenting with various emergency measures, curtailing the use of official cars and ordering factories and construction sites to shut down. Some cities are even considering curbs on fireworks during the upcoming Chinese New Year holiday, interfering with an almost sacred tradition.

In the meantime, home air filters have joined the new must-have appliances for middle class Chinese.

“Our customers used to be all foreigners. Now they are mostly Chinese,” said Cathy Liu, a sales manager at a branch of Villa Lifestyles, a distributor of Swiss IQAir purifiers, which start at $1,600 here for a machine large enough for a bedroom. The weekend of Jan. 12, when the poor air quality hit unprecedented levels, the stock sold out, she said.

Many distributors report panic buying of air purifiers. In China, home air purifiers range from $15 gizmos that look like night lights to handsome $6,000 wood-finished models that are supplied to Zhongnanhai, the headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party and to other leadership facilities. One model is advertised as emitting vitamin C to build immunity and to prevent skin aging.

In a more tongue in cheek approach to the problem, a self-promoting Chinese millionaire has been selling soda-sized cans of, you guessed it, air.

Chen Guangbiao, a relentless self-promoter who made his fortune in the recycling business, claims to have collected the air from remote parts of western China and Taiwan. The cans, which are emblazoned with Chen’s name and labeled “fresh air,” sell for 80 cents each, with proceeds going to charity, he said.

“I want to tell mayors, county chiefs and heads of big companies,” Chen told reporters Wednesday, while giving out free cans of air on a Beijing sidewalk as a publicity stunt. “Don’t just chase GDP growth, don’t chase the biggest profits at the expense of our children and grandchild. »

 


Verdict Chauvin: Merci, George Floyd, d’avoir sacrifié votre vie pour la justice (Homo sapiens is the only species capable of co-operating flexibly in large numbers, but revolutions are rare and can be easily hijacked because it’s not only numbers but flexible organization that counts)

23 avril, 2021

Iran's Leader Future -Nicolae Elena Ceausescu Execution - YouTube

Hold The Front Page: Romania's Ceausescu and Wife Executed (1989)

Il est dans votre intérêt qu’un seul homme meure pour le peuple, et que la nation entière ne périsse pas. Caïphe (Jean 11: 50)
Lorsqu’un Sanhédrin s’est déclaré unanime pour condamner, l’accusé sera acquitté. Le Talmud
Il arrive que les victimes d’une foule soient tout à fait aléatoires; il arrive aussi qu’elles ne le soient pas. Il arrive même que les crimes dont on les accuse soient réels, mais ce ne sont pas eux, même dans ce cas-là, qui joue le premier rôle dans le choix des persécuteurs, c’est l’appartenance des victimes à certaines catégories particulièrement exposées à la persécution. (…) il existe donc des traits universels de sélection victimaire (…) à côté des critères culturels et religieux, il y en a de purement physiques. La maladie, la folie, les difformités génétiques, les mutilations accidentelles et même les infirmités en général tendent à polariser les persécuteurs. (…) l’infirmité s’inscrit dans un ensemble indissociable du signe victimaire et dans certains groupes — à l’internat scolaire par exemple — tout individu qui éprouve des difficultés d’adaptation, l’étranger, le provincial, l’orphelin, le fils de famille, le fauché, ou, tout simplement, le dernier arrivé, est plus ou moins interchangeables avec l’infirme.(…) lorsqu’un groupe humain l’habitude de choisir ses victimes dans une certaine catégorie sociale, ethnique, religieuse, il tend à lui attribuer les infirmités ou les difformités qui renforceraient la polarisation victimaire si elles étaient réelles. (…) à la marginalité des miséreux, ou marginalité  du dehors, il faut en ajouter une seconde, la marginalité du dedans, celle des riches et du dedans. Le monarque et sa cour font parfois songer à l’oeil d’un ouragan. Cette double marginalité suggère une organisation tourbillonnante. En temps normal, certes, les riches et les puissants jouissent de toutes sortes de protections et de privilèges qui font défaut aux déshérités. Mais ce ne sont pas les circonstances normales qui nous concernent ici, ce sont les périodes de crise. Le moindre regard sur l’histoire universelle révèle que les risques de mort violente aux mains d’une foule déchaînée sont statistiquement plus élevés pour les que pour toute autre catégorie. A la limite ce sont toutes les qualités extrêmes qui attirent, de temps en temps, les foudres collectives, pas seulement les extrêmes de la richesse et de la pauvreté, mais également ceux du succès et de l’échec, de la beauté et de la laideur, du vice de la vertu, du pouvoir de séduire et du pouvoir de déplaire ; c’est la faiblesse des femmes, des enfants et des vieillards, mais c’est aussi la force des plus forts qui devient faiblesse devant le nombre. (…) On retrouve dans la révolution tous les traits caractéristiques des grandes crises qui favorisent les persécutions collectives.René Girard
Louis doit mourir, parce qu’il faut que la patrie vive. Robespierre (3 décembre 1792)
Une nation ne se régénère que sur un monceau de cadavres. Saint-Just
L’arbre de la liberté doit être revivifié de temps en temps par le sang des patriotes et des tyrans. Jefferson
Qu’un sang impur abreuve nos sillons! Rouget de Lisle
Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Prévoyante, la ville d’Athènes entretenait à ses frais un certain nombre de malheureux […]. En cas de besoin, c’est-à-dire quand une calamité s’abattait ou menaçait de s’abattre sur la ville, épidémie, famine, invasion étrangère, dissensions intérieures, il y avait toujours un pharmakos à la disposition de la collectivité. […] On promenait le pharmakos un peu partout, afin de drainer les impuretés et de les rassembler sur sa tête ; après quoi on chassait ou on tuait le pharmakos dans une cérémonie à laquelle toute la populace prenait part. […] D’une part, on […] [voyait] en lui un personnage lamentable, méprisable et même coupable ; il […] [était] en butte à toutes sortes de moqueries, d’insultes et bien sûr de violences ; on […] [l’entourait], d’autre part, d’une vénération quasi-religieuse ; il […] [jouait] le rôle principal dans une espèce de culte.  René Girard
Pour qu’il y ait cette unanimité dans les deux sens, un mimétisme de foule doit chaque fois jouer. Les membres de la communauté s’influencent réciproquement, ils s’imitent les uns les autres dans l’adulation fanatique puis dans l’hostilité plus fanatique encore. René Girard
Merci, George Floyd, d’avoir sacrifié votre vie pour la justice. Nancy Pelosi (présidente de la Chambre des Représentants)
Nous devons rester dans la rue et nous devons être plus actifs, nous devons devenir plus conflictuels. Nous devons nous assurer qu’ils savent que nous sommes sérieux. Maxine Waters représentante démocrate de Californie)
Je prie pour que le verdict soit le bon. À mon avis, c’est accablant. Je ne dirais pas cela si le jury ne s’était pas retiré pour délibérer. J’ai appris à connaître la famille de George (…). C’est une famille bien. Joe Biden
Le président Biden a parlé hier (lundi) avec la famille de George Floyd pour prendre de ses nouvelles et lui assurer qu’il priait pour elle. Jen Psaki (porte-parole de l’exécutif américain)
L’heure est venue pour ce pays de se rassembler.  Le verdict de culpabilité ne fera pas revenir George» mais cette décision peut être le moment d’un changement significatif. Joe Biden
Nous sommes tous tellement soulagés – pas seulement pour le verdict, mais parce qu’il a été reconnu coupable des trois chefs d’accusation, pas d’un seul. C’est très important. Nous allons faire beaucoup plus. Nous allons faire beaucoup de choses.C’est peut-être une première étape dans la lutte contre ce qui relève véritablement du racisme systémique. Joe Biden
Nous sommes tous tellement soulagés. J’aurais aimé être là pour vous prendre dans mes bras. Joe Biden
Aujourd’hui, nous poussons un soupir de soulagement. Cela n’enlève toutefois pas la douleur. Une mesure de justice n’est pas la même chose qu’une justice équitable. Ce verdict est un pas dans la bonne direction. Et, le fait est que nous avons encore du travail à faire. Nous devons encore réformer le système. Kamala Harris
Justice est faite. Adam Silver (patron de la NBA)
Je vais vous dire que la membre du Congrès Waters vous a peut-être donné quelque chose en appel qui pourrait entraîner l’annulation de tout ce procès. Juge Peter Cahill
L’avocat de Derek Chauvin a pour sa part demandé l’acquittement de son client. L’accusation «a échoué à apporter la preuve au-delà du doute raisonnable et Derek Chauvin doit par conséquent être déclaré non-coupable», a affirmé l’avocat du policier, Eric Nelson, après près de trois heures de plaidoirie. Le procès se tient dans un climat de fortes tensions, après la mort récente d’un jeune homme noir lors d’un contrôle routier près de Minneapolis. (…) Selon Eric Nelson, George Floyd est mort d’une crise cardiaque due à des problèmes de cœur, aggravés par la consommation de fentanyl, un opiacé, et de méthamphétamine, un stimulant, et par l’inhalation de gaz d’échappement pendant qu’il était allongé au sol. D’après la défense, le policier a utilisé une procédure autorisée pour maîtriser un individu qui se débattait et le maintenir au sol. Elle évoque aussi une «foule hostile» qui représentait une «menace» et aurait détourné l’attention du policier du sort de George Floyd. Le jury, qui s’est retiré lundi pour délibérer, doit rendre un verdict unanime sur chacune des trois charges. «Vous devez être absolument impartiaux», leur a dit le juge Peter Cahill, qui les a invités à «examiner les preuves, de les soupeser et d’appliquer la loi». Cela pourrait prendre des heures, des jours, voire des semaines. Les condamnations de policiers pour meurtre sont très rares, les jurés ayant tendance à leur octroyer le bénéfice du doute. Si le jury ne parvient pas à se mettre d’accord sur l’ensemble des charges, le procès sera déclaré «nul». Tout autre scénario qu’une condamnation inquiète les autorités locales. La tension est très forte à Minneapolis, qui s’était déjà embrasée après la mort de George Floyd. Plus de 400 personnes ont défilé lundi dans les rues de la ville pour demander la condamnation de Derek Chauvin, chantant «le monde observe, nous observons, faites ce qui est juste». Marchant derrière une banderole réclamant «justice pour George Floyd», ils ont croisé sur leur chemin des soldats de la Garde nationale, les observant près de véhicules blindés. Tenue de camouflage, et fusil mitrailleur en bandoulière, ces militaires patrouillent depuis plusieurs semaines dans les rues de la ville. La mort récente de Daunte Wright, un jeune Afro-Américain d’une vingtaine d’années tué par une policière blanche lors d’un banal contrôle routier dans la banlieue de Minneapolis, n’a fait qu’ajouter à la tension qui règne depuis le début du procès. Le Figaro
Cops are forming a conga line down at the pension section and I don’t blame them. NYPD cops are looking for better jobs with other departments or even embarking on new careers. Joseph Giacalone (retired NYPD sergeant and adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice)
More than 5,300 NYPD uniformed officers retired or put in their papers to leave in 2020 — a 75 percent spike from the year before, department data show. The exodus — amid the pandemic, anti-cop hostility, riots and a skyrocketing number of NYC shootings — saw 2,600 officers say goodbye to the job and another 2,746 file for retirement, a combined 5,346. In 2019, the NYPD had 1,509 uniformed officers leave and 1,544 file for retirement, for a total of 3,053. The departures and planned departures of 5,300 officers represents about 15 percent of the force. Already, as of April 5, the NYPD headcount of uniformed officers has dropped to 34,974 from 36,900 in 2019. Through April 21 of this year, 831 cops have retired or filed to leave — and many more are expected to follow suit in the current anti-cop climate, according to Joseph Giacalone, a retired NYPD sergeant and adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. NYPost
Nous ne tolérons pas l’usage d’un langage raciste, qu’il soit intentionnel ou non. Le NYT
Qui d’entre nous veut vivre dans un monde, ou travailler dans un domaine, où l’intention est catégoriquement exclue comme circonstance atténuante ? Bret Stephens
I have never taken a salary from the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation and that’s important because what the right-wing media is trying to say is the donations that people have made to Black Lives Matter went toward my spending and that is categorically untrue and incredibly dangerous. I’m a college professor first of all, I’m a TV producer and I have had two book deals…. and also have had a YouTube deal. So all of my income comes directly from the work that I do. Organizers should get paid for the work that they do. They should get paid a living wage. And the fact that the right-wing media is trying to create hysteria around my spending is, frankly, racist and sexist and I also want to say that many of us that end up investing in homes in the black community often invest in homes to take care of their family. You can talk to so many black people and black women particularly that take care of their families, take care of their loved ones especially when they’re in a position to. The homes I have bought ‘directly support the people that I love and care about and I’m not ‘renting them out in some Airbnb operation. The way that I live my life is a direct support to black people, including my black family members, first and foremost. For so many black folks who are able to invest in themselves and their communities they choose to invest in their family and that is what I have chosen to do. I have a child, I have a brother who has a severe mental illness that I take care of, I support my mother, I support many other family members of mine and so I see my money as not my own. I see it as my family’s money, as well. The whole point of these articles and these attacks against me are to discredit me, but also to discredit the movement.We have to stay focused on white supremacy and see through the right-wing lies. I have not just been a target of white supremacists and the right in this moment but obviously since the beginning of when I started Black Lives Matter I have been a target and these folks have created a much more dangerous situation for me and my family. It is very serious. The minute we started to receive funding I looked at my team and said we have to get these dollars out the door now. Now that Black Lives Matter has money, we have to be a grantmaking body as well as a think tank, act tank. And so much of the work that BLM specifically has done has been reinvesting into the black community. (…) a quarter of our budget [is] going back into the community and also we have to build an organization,’. It’s the first time we’ve ever had real dollars and we have to build a black institution that can challenge policing, that can take care of the black community. [But] the organization is not a ‘charity'(….) I do understand why people expect that from us. But I think it’s important that people recognize there are other places they can also get grants. There are other places they can also get resources. And, most importantly, our target should be the United States government. Our target should be calling on Congress to pass reparations.’ Patrisse Cullors (BLM cofounder)
Les dirigeants noirs actuels en sont réduits à vivre des dernières bribes d’autorité morale qui leur restent de leurs jours de gloire des années 50 et 60. (…) Ce ne serait pas la première fois qu’un mouvement initié dans une profonde clarté morale, et qui avait atteint la grandeur, finirait par se perdre en une parodie de lui-même – terrassé non par l’échec mais par son succès même. Les dirigeants des droits civiques d’aujourd’hui refusent de voir l’évidence: la réussite de leurs ancêtres dans la réalisation de la transformation de la société américaine leur interdit aujourd’hui l’héroïsme alors inévitable d’un Martin Luther King, d’un James Farmer ou d’un Nelson Mandela. Jesse Jackson et Al Sharpton ne peuvent nous réécrire la lettre mémorable de la prison de Birmingham ou traverser à nouveau, comme John Lewis en 1965, le pont Edmund Pettus à Selma, en Alabama, dans un maelström de chiens policiers et de matraques. Cette Amérique n’est plus (ce qui ne veut pas dire que toute trace d’elle a disparu). Les Revs. Jackson et Sharpton sont voués à un destin difficile: ils ne peuvent plus jamais être que d’inutiles redondances, des échos des grands hommes qu’ils imitent parce que l’Amérique a changé. Difficile d’être un King ou un Mandela aujourd’hui alors que votre monstrueux ennemi n’a plus que le visage poupin d’un George Zimmerman. Le but de l’establishment des droits civiques d’aujourd’hui n’est pas de rechercher la justice, mais de rechercher le pouvoir des Noirs dans la vie américaine sur la base de la présomption qu’ils sont toujours, de mille manières subtiles, victimes du racisme blanc. Shelby Steele
Avant les années 1960, l’identité des noirs-américains (bien que personne n’ait jamais utilisé le mot) était basée sur notre humanité commune, sur l’idée que la race était toujours une division artificielle et abusive entre les gens. Après les années 60, dans une société coupable d’avoir abusé de nous depuis longtemps, nous avons pris notre victimisation historique comme le thème central de notre identité de groupe. Nous n’aurions pu faire de pire erreur. Cela nous a donné une génération de chasseurs d’ambulances et l’illusion que notre plus grand pouvoir réside dans la manipulation de la culpabilité blanche. Shelby Steele
Il faut se rappeler que les chefs militaires allemands jouaient un jeu désespéré. Néanmoins, ce fut avec un sentiment d’effroi qu’ils tournèrent contre la Russie la plus affreuse de toutes les armes. Ils firent transporter Lénine, de Suisse en Russie, comme un bacille de la peste, dans un wagon plombé. Winston Churchill
Quand Freud est arrivé aux États-Unis, en voyant New York il a dit: « Je leur apporte la peste. » Il avait tort. Les Américains n’ont eu aucun mal à digérer une psychanalyse vite américanisée. Mais en 1966, nous avons vraiment apporté la peste avec Lacan et la déconstruction… du moins dans les universités! Au point que je me suis senti soudain aussi étranger à Johns Hopkins qu’à Avignon au milieu de mes amis post-surréalistes. Un an plus tard, la déconstruction était déjà à la mode. Cela me mettait mal à l’aise. C’est la raison pour laquelle je suis parti pour Buffalo en 1968. René Girard
Ce racisme  antiraciste est le  seul chemin qui puisse  mener à l’abolition  des  différences de race. Jean-Paul Sartre (Orphée noir, 1948)
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège: la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
La Wokeité est la nouvelle religion, qui grandit plus vite et plus fort que le christianisme lui-même. Son sacerdoce dépasse le clergé et exerce beaucoup plus de pouvoir. La Silicon Valley est le nouveau Vatican et Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google et Twitter les nouveaux évangiles. Victor Davis Hanson
Quand j’ai écrit mon livre, je suis retourné à Max Weber et à Alexis de Tocqueville, car tous deux avaient identifié l’importance fondamentale de l’anxiété spirituelle que nous éprouvons tous. Il me semble qu’à la fin du XXe siècle et au début du XXIe siècle, nous avons oublié la centralité de cette anxiété, de ces démons ou anges spirituels qui nous habitent. Ils nous gouvernent de manière profondément dangereuse. (…) Tocqueville avait saisi l’importance du fait religieux et de la panoplie des Églises protestantes qui ont défini la nation américaine. Il a montré que malgré leur nombre innombrable et leurs querelles, elles étaient parvenues à s’unir pour être ce qu’il appelait joliment «le courant central des manières et de la morale». Quelles que soient les empoignades entre anglicans épiscopaliens et congrégationalistes, entre congrégationalistes et presbytériens, entre presbytériens et baptistes, les protestants se sont combinés pour donner une forme à nos vies: celle des mariages, des baptêmes et des funérailles ; des familles, et même de la politique, en cela même que le protestantisme ne cesse d’affirmer qu’il y a quelque chose de plus important que la politique. Ce modèle a perduré jusqu’au milieu des années 1960. (…) Pour moi, c’est avant tout le mouvement de l’Évangile social qui a gagné les Églises protestantes, qui est à la racine de l’effondrement. (…) Mais ils n’ont pas été remplacés. Le résultat de tout cela, c’est que l’Église protestante américaine a connu un déclin catastrophique. En 1965, 50 % des Américains appartenaient à l’une des 8 Églises protestantes dominantes. Aujourd’hui, ce chiffre s’établit à 4 %!  (…) Une partie de ces protestants ont migré vers les Églises chrétiennes évangéliques, qui dans les années 1970, sous Jimmy Carter, ont émergé comme force politique. On a vu également un nombre surprenant de conversions au catholicisme, surtout chez les intellectuels. Mais la majorité sont devenus ce que j’appelle dans mon livre des «post-protestants», ce qui nous amène au décryptage des événements d’aujourd’hui. Ces post-protestants se sont approprié une série de thèmes empruntés à l’Évangile social de Walter Rauschenbusch. Quand vous reprenez les péchés sociaux qu’il faut selon lui rejeter pour accéder à une forme de rédemption – l’intolérance, le pouvoir, le militarisme, l’oppression de classe… vous retrouvez exactement les thèmes que brandissent les gens qui mettent aujourd’hui le feu à Portland et d’autres villes. Ce sont les post-protestants. Ils se sont juste débarrassés de Dieu! Quand je dis à mes étudiants qu’ils sont les héritiers de leurs grands-parents protestants, ils sont offensés. Mais ils ont exactement la même approche moralisatrice et le même sens exacerbé de leur importance, la même condescendance et le même sentiment de supériorité exaspérante et ridicule, que les protestants exprimaient notamment vis-à-vis des catholiques. (…) Mais ils ne le savent pas. En fait, l’état de l’Amérique a été toujours lié à l’état de la religion protestante. Les catholiques se sont fait une place mais le protestantisme a été le Mississippi qui a arrosé le pays. Et c’est toujours le cas! C’est juste que nous avons maintenant une Église du Christ sans le Christ. Cela veut dire qu’il n’y a pas de pardon possible. Dans la religion chrétienne, le péché originel est l’idée que vous êtes né coupable, que l’humanité hérite d’une tache qui corrompt nos désirs et nos actions. Mais le Christ paie les dettes du péché originel, nous en libérant. Si vous enlevez le Christ du tableau en revanche, vous obtenez… la culpabilité blanche et le racisme systémique. Bien sûr, les jeunes radicaux n’utilisent pas le mot «péché originel». Mais ils utilisent exactement les termes qui s’y appliquent. (…) Ils parlent d’«une tache reçue en héritage» qui «infecte votre esprit». C’est une idée très dangereuse, que les Églises canalisaient autrefois. Mais aujourd’hui que cette idée s’est échappée de l’Église, elle a gagné la rue et vous avez des meutes de post-protestants qui parcourent Washington DC, en s’en prenant à des gens dans des restaurants pour exiger d’eux qu’ils lèvent le poing. Leur conviction que l’Amérique est intrinsèquement corrompue par l’esclavage et n’a réalisé que le Mal, n’est pas enracinée dans des faits que l’on pourrait discuter, elle relève de la croyance religieuse. On exclut ceux qui ne se soumettent pas. On dérive vers une vision apocalyptique du monde qui n’est plus équilibrée par rien d’autre. Cela peut donner la pire forme d’environnementalisme, par exemple, parce que toutes les autres dimensions sont disqualifiées au nom de «la fin du monde». C’est l’idée chrétienne de l’apocalypse, mais dégagée du christianisme. Il y a des douzaines d’exemples de religiosité visibles dans le comportement des protestataires: ils s’allongent par terre face au sol et gémissent, comme des prêtres que l’on consacre dans l’Église catholique. Ils ont organisé une cérémonie à Portland durant laquelle ils ont lavé les pieds de personnes noires pour montrer leur repentir pour la culpabilité blanche. Ils s’agenouillent. Tout cela sans savoir que c’est religieux! C’est religieux parce que l’humanité est religieuse. Il y a une faim spirituelle à l’intérieur de nous, qui se manifeste de différentes manières, y compris la violence! Ces gens veulent un monde qui ait un sens, et ils ne l’ont pas. (…) Le marxisme est une religion par analogie. Certes, il porte cette idée d’une nouvelle naissance. Certaines personnes voulaient des certitudes et ne les trouvant plus dans leurs Églises, ils sont allés vers le marxisme. Mais en Amérique, c’est différent, car tout est centré sur le protestantisme. Dans L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Max Weber, avec génie et insolence, prend Marx et le met cul par-dessus tête. Marx avait dit que le protestantisme avait émergé à la faveur de changements économiques. Weber dit l’inverse. Ce n’est pas l’économie qui a transformé la religion, c’est la religion qui a transformé l’économie. Le protestantisme nous a donné le capitalisme, pas l’inverse! Parce que les puritains devaient épargner de l’argent pour assurer leur salut. Le ressort principal n’était pas l’économie mais la faim spirituelle, ce sentiment beaucoup plus profond, selon Weber. Une faim spirituelle a mené les gens vers le marxisme, et c’est la même faim spirituelle qui fait qu’ils sont dans les rues d’Amérique aujourd’hui. (…) Ces gens-là veulent être sûrs d’être de «bonnes personnes». Ils savent qu’ils sont de bonnes personnes s’ils sont opposés au racisme. Ils pensent être de bonnes personnes parce qu’ils sont opposés à la destruction de l’environnement. Ils veulent avoir la bonne «attitude», c’est la raison pour laquelle ceux qui n’ont pas la bonne attitude sont expulsés de leurs universités ou de leur travail pour des raisons dérisoires. Avant, on était exclu de l’Église, aujourd’hui, on est exclu de la vie publique… C’est pour cela que les gens qui soutiennent Trump, sont vus comme des «déplorables», comme disait Hillary Clinton, c’est-à-dire des gens qui ne peuvent être rachetés. Ils ont leur bible et leur fusil et ne suivent pas les commandements de la justice sociale. (…) Il faut comprendre que l’idéologie «woke» de la justice sociale a pénétré les institutions américaines à un point incroyable. Je n’imagine pas qu’un professeur ayant une chaire à la Sorbonne soit forcé d’assister à des classes obligatoires organisées pour le corps professoral sur leur «culpabilité blanche», et enseignées par des gens qui viennent à peine de finir le collège. Mais c’est la réalité des universités américaines. Un sondage récent a montré que la majorité des professeurs d’université ne disent rien. Ils abandonnent plutôt toute mention de tout sujet controversé. Pourtant, des études ont montré que la foule des vigies de Twitter qui obtient la tête des professeurs excommuniés, remplirait à peine la moitié d’un terrain de football universitaire! Il y a un manque de courage. (…)  mes étudiants, et tous ces post-protestants dont je vous parle, sont absolument convaincus que tous les gens qui ont précédé, étaient stupides et sans doute maléfiques. Ils ne croient plus au projet historique américain. Ils sont contre les «affinités électives» qui, selon Weber, nous ont donné la modernité: la science, le capitalisme, l’État-nation. Si la théorie de la physique de Newton, Principia, est un manuel de viol, comme l’a dit une universitaire féministe, si sa physique est l’invention d’un moyen de violer le monde, cela veut dire que la science est mauvaise. Si vous êtes soupçonneux de la science, du capitalisme, du protestantisme, si vous rejetez tous les moteurs de la modernité la seule chose qui reste, ce sont les péchés qui nous ont menés là où nous sommes. Pour sûr, nous en avons commis. Mais si on ne voit pas que ça, il n’y a plus d’échappatoire, plus de projet. Ce qui passe aujourd’hui est différent de 1968 en France, quand la remise en cause a finalement été absorbée dans quelque chose de plus large. Le mouvement actuel ne peut être absorbé car il vise à défaire les États-Unis dans ses fondements: l’État-nation, le capitalisme et la religion protestante. Mais comme les États-Unis n’ont pas d’histoire prémoderne, nous ne pouvons absorber un mouvement vraiment antimoderne. (…) Il y a une phrase de Heidegger qui dit que «seulement un Dieu pourrait nous sauver»! On a le sentiment qu’on est aux prémices d’une apocalypse, d’une guerre civile, d’une grande destruction de la modernité. Est-ce à cause de la trahison des clercs? Pour moi, l’incapacité des vieux libéraux à faire rempart contre les jeunes radicaux, est aujourd’hui le grand danger. Quand j’ai vu que de jeunes journalistes du New York Times avaient menacé de partir, parce qu’un responsable éditorial avait publié une tribune d’un sénateur américain qui leur déplaisait, j’ai été stupéfait. Je suis assez vieux pour savoir que dans le passé, la direction aurait immédiatement dit à ces jeunes journalistes de prendre la porte s’ils n’étaient pas contents. Mais ce qui s’est passé, c’est que le rédacteur en chef a été limogé. Joseph Bottum
Le facteur crucial de notre conquête du monde a plutôt été notre capacité de relier de nombreux humains les uns aux autres. Si, de nos jours, les humains dominent sans concurrence la planète, ce n’est pas que l’individu humain soit plus malin et agile de ses dix doigts que le chimpanzé ou le loup, mais parce qu’Homo sapiens est la seule espèce sur terre capable de coopérer en masse et en souplesse. L’intelligence et la fabrication d’outils ont été aussi manifestement très importants. (…) Si la coopération est la clé, pourquoi les fourmis et les abeilles n’ont-elles pas inventé la bombe atomique avant nous, alors même qu’elles ont appris à coopérer toutes ensemble des millions d’années plus tôt ? Parce que leur coopération manque de souplesse. Les abeilles coopèrent avec une grande sophistication, mais sont incapables de réinventer leur système social du jour au lendemain. Si une ruche faisait face à une nouvelle menace ou à une nouvelle opportunité, les abeilles seraient par exemple incapables de guillotiner la reine ou d’instaurer une République. Des mammifères sociaux comme les éléphants et les chimpanzés coopèrent bien plus souplement que les abeilles, mais ils ne le font qu’avec un petit nombre de camarades et de membres de leur famille. Leur coopération repose sur ce lien personnel. (…) Pour autant qu’on le sache, seul Sapiens est en mesure de coopérer très souplement avec d’innombrables inconnus. Yuval Noah Harari
La Roumanie communiste s’effondra quand 80 000 personnes, sur la place centrale de Bucarest, comprirent qu’elles étaient beaucoup plus fortes que le vieil homme à la toque de fourrure sur le balcon. Ce qui est vraiment stupéfiant, cependant, ce n’est pas cet instant où le système s’est effondré, mais qu’il ait réussi à survivre des décennies durant. Pourquoi les révolutions sont-elles si rares ? Pourquoi les masses passent-elles des siècles à applaudir et acclamer, à faire tout ce que leur ordonne l’homme au balcon, alors même qu’elles pourraient en théorie charger à tout moment et le tailler en pièces ? Ceauşescu et les siens dominèrent trois décennies durant vingt millions de Roumains en remplissant trois conditions incontournables. Premièrement, ils placèrent de fidèles apparatchiks communistes à la tête de tous les réseaux de coopération, comme l’armée, les syndicats et même les associations sportives. Deuxièmement, ils empêchèrent la création d’organisations rivales – politiques, économiques et sociales – susceptibles de servir de base à une coopération anticommuniste. Troisièmement, ils comptèrent sur le soutien des partis frères d’Union soviétique et d’Europe de l’Est. (…) Ceauşescu ne perdit le pouvoir que le jour où ces trois conditions cessèrent d’être réunies. À la fin des années 1980, l’Union soviétique retira sa protection, et les régimes communistes commencèrent à tomber comme des dominos. En décembre 1989, Ceauşescu ne pouvait espérer aucune aide extérieure. Bien au contraire, les révolutions des paysans voisins donnèrent du cœur à l’opposition locale. Deuxièmement, le parti communiste lui-même commença à se scinder en camps rivaux, les modérés souhaitant se débarrasser de Ceauşescu et initier des réformes avant qu’il ne fût trop tard. Troisièmement, en organisant la réunion de soutien de Bucarest et en la diffusant à la télévision, Ceauşescu fournit aux révolutionnaires l’occasion idéale de découvrir leur pouvoir et de manifester contre lui. Quel moyen plus rapide de propager la révolution que de la montrer à la télévision ? Pourtant, quand le pouvoir échappa aux mains de l’organisateur maladroit sur son balcon, ce ne sont pas les masses populaires de la place qui le récupérèrent. (…) de même que dans la Russie de 1917, le pouvoir échut à un petit groupe d’acteurs politiques qui avaient pour seul atout d’être organisés. La révolution roumaine fut piratée par le Front de salut national (FSN) autoproclamé, qui n’était en réalité qu’un écran de fumée dissimulant l’aile modérée du parti communiste. (…) formé de cadres moyens du parti et dirigé par Ion Iliescu, ancien membre du Comité central du PC et un temps responsable de la propagande. Iliescu et ses camarades du FSN se métamorphosèrent en démocrates, proclamèrent devant tous les micros qu’ils étaient les chefs de la révolution, puis usèrent de leur longue expérience et de leurs réseaux de copains pour prendre le contrôle du pays et se mettre ses ressources dans la poche. (…) Ion Iliescu fut élu président ; ses collègues devinrent ministres, parlementaires, directeurs de banque et multimillionnaires. La nouvelle élite roumaine qui contrôle aujourd’hui encore le pays se compose essentiellement des anciens communistes et de leurs familles. Yuval Harari

Merci, George Floyd, d’avoir sacrifié votre vie pour la justice !

Au lendemain d’un verdict qui par son unanimité, sa rapidité, sa prédictiblité, son effet cathartique

Comme, sur fond de crise sanitaire en ces temps où la blancheur de peau et la profession de policier sont devenues les pires tares, les traits distinctifs de sa victime …

Au terme de mois d’émeutes et de pillage et d’une campagne médiatico-politique proprement orchestrée jusqu’au plus haut niveau de l’appareil d’Etat

Pour comme souvent, couleur de l’impétrant comprise, un banal refus d’optempérer tournant à la tragédie, suite à la malheureuse combinaison de certaines fragilités latentes et de la suringestion de drogues de celui-ci …

Avec les conséquences, que l’on sait, sur les forces de police et les résidents des quartiers les plus vulnérables

Aura jusqu’au dernier jour, au point même d’en inquiéter le juge et selon les mots mêmes de la présidente de la Chambre des représentants

Pris toutes les caractéristiques d’une expulsion de bouc émissaire réussie …

Comment ne pas voir …

Quelques mois après son accession aux pleins pouvoirs politiques …

Via l’instrumentalisation du virus chinois et de la mort accidentelle de George Floyd …

Et, entre deux mascarades de procédures de destitution, l’élection volée de Joe Biden

L’apothéose de cette  idéologie « woke » du racisme antiraciste et de la censure politiquement correcte …

Qui fonds de commerce d’une véritable « génération de chasseurs d’ambulances » condamnée à rejouer éternellement les luttes du passé

Avait patiemment pendant des décennies conquis l’université et les grands médias, puis ces dernières années les réseaux sociaux ?

Et comment ne pas repenser …

Avec le dernier best-seller de l’historien israélien Yuval Harari (« Homo deus »)…

Même si en bon postmoderne il en évacue totalement la dimension pourtant évidemment sacrificielle et quasi-religieuse …

A cette singulière capacité humaine de coopérer en masse et en souplesse …

Qui permet en certes de rares occasions et via une simple poignée d’hommes …

De produire le meilleur comme avec le processus civilisateur introduit par la révélation judéo-chrétienne …

Mais aussi pour peu que l’organisation soit suffisamment efficace et flexible ….

Comme avec leurs lots d’exécutions et de purges l’a tant de fois montré l’histoire …

De la France de 1789 et la Russie de 1917 …

A la Roumanie de 1989 ou l’Egypte de 2011 …

Etre si facilement détournée ?

VIVE LA REVOLUTION !

Yuval Noah Harari

Homo deus

2015

Pour monter une révolution, le nombre ne suffit jamais. Les révolutions sont généralement l’œuvre de petits réseaux d’agitateurs, non des masses. Si vous voulez lancer une révolution, ne vous demandez pas : « Combien de gens soutiennent mes idées ? », mais plutôt : « Parmi mes partisans, combien sont capables de coopérer efficacement ? » La révolution russe a fini par éclater non pas le jour où 180 millions de paysans se sont soulevés contre le tsar, mais quand une poignée de communistes se sont trouvés au bon endroit au bon moment. Début 1917, alors que l’aristocratie et la bourgeoisie russes comptaient au moins trois millions de personnes, la fraction bolchévique de Lénine (qui deviendrait le parti communiste) ne dépassait pas les 23 000 militants. Les communistes n’en prirent pas moins le contrôle de l’immense Empire russe, parce qu’ils surent s’organiser. Quand l’autorité échappa aux mains décrépites du tsar et à celles tout aussi tremblantes du gouvernement provisoire de Kerenski, les communistes s’en saisirent sans attendre, s’emparant des rênes du pouvoir tel un bulldog qui referme ses crocs sur un os.

Les communistes ne devaient relâcher leur emprise qu’à la fin des années 1980. L’efficacité de leur organisation leur permit de conserver le pouvoir plus de sept longues décennies, et s’ils finirent par tomber, ce fut en raison de leur organisation défaillante. Le 21 décembre 1989, Nicolae Ceauşescu, le dictateur roumain, organisa une grande manifestation de soutien au centre de Bucarest. Au cours des mois précédents, l’Union soviétique avait retiré son soutien aux régimes communistes d’Europe de l’Est, le mur de Berlin était tombé, et des révolutions avaient balayé la Pologne, l’Allemagne de l’Est, la Hongrie, la Bulgarie et la Tchécoslovaquie. Ceauşescu, qui dirigeait son pays depuis 1965, pensait pouvoir résister au tsunami, alors même que des émeutes contre son régime avaient éclaté dans la ville de Timişoara le 17 décembre. Voulant contre-attaquer, Ceauşescu organisa un vaste rassemblement à Bucarest afin de prouver aux Roumains et au reste du monde que la majorité de la population continuait de l’aimer, ou tout au moins de le craindre. L’appareil du parti qui se fissurait mobilisa 80 000 personnes sur la place centrale de la ville ; les citoyens roumains reçurent pour consigne de cesser toute activité et d’allumer leur poste de radio ou de télévision.

Sous les vivats d’une foule apparemment enthousiaste, Ceauşescu se présenta au balcon dominant la place, comme il l’avait fait à maintes reprises au cours des précédentes décennies. Flanqué de son épouse Elena, de dirigeants du parti et d’une bande de gardes du corps, il se mit à prononcer un de ces discours monotones qui étaient sa marque de fabrique, regardant d’un air très satisfait la foule qui applaudissait mécaniquement. Puis quelque chose dérapa. Vous pouvez le voir sur YouTube. Il vous suffit de taper « Ceauşescu, dernier discours », et de regarder l’histoire en action.

La vidéo YouTube montre Ceauşescu qui commence une énième longue phrase : « Je tiens à remercier les initiateurs et organisateurs de ce grand événement à Bucarest, y voyant un… » Puis il se tait, les yeux grands ouverts, et se fige, incrédule. Dans cette fraction de seconde, on assiste à l’effondrement de tout un monde. Dans le public, quelqu’un a hué. On débat encore aujourd’hui de l’identité de celui qui, le premier, a osé huer. Puis une autre personne a fait de même, puis une autre, et encore une autre ; quelques secondes plus tard, la masse se mit à siffler, crier des injures et scander « Ti-mi-şoa-ra ! Ti-mi-şoa-ra ! »

Tout cela se produisit en direct à la télévision roumaine sous les yeux des trois quarts de la population, scotchée au petit écran, le cœur battant la chamade. La Securitate, la sinistre police secrète, ordonna aussitôt l’arrêt de la retransmission, mais les équipes de télévision refusèrent d’obtempérer et l’interruption fut très brève. Le cameraman pointa la caméra vers le ciel, en sorte que les téléspectateurs ne puissent pas voir la panique gagnant les dirigeants du parti sur le balcon, mais le preneur de son continua d’enregistrer, et les techniciens de retransmettre la scène après un arrêt d’à peine plus d’une minute. La foule continuait à huer et Ceauşescu à crier « Hello ! Hello ! Hello ! », comme si le problème venait du micro. Sa femme Elena se mit à réprimander le public :« Taisez-vous ! Taisez-vous ! », jusqu’à ce que Ceauşescu se tourne vers elle et lui crie au vu et au su de tous : « Tais-toi ! » Après quoi il en appela à la foule déchaînée de la place en l’implorant : « Camarades ! Camarades ! Du calme, camarades ! »

Mais les camarades ne voulaient pas se calmer. La Roumanie communiste s’effondra quand 80 000 personnes, sur la place centrale de Bucarest, comprirent qu’elles étaient beaucoup plus fortes que le vieil homme à la toque de fourrure sur le balcon. Ce qui est vraiment stupéfiant, cependant, ce n’est pas cet instant où le système s’est effondré, mais qu’il ait réussi à survivre des décennies durant. Pourquoi les révolutions sont-elles si rares ? Pourquoi les masses passent-elles des siècles à applaudir et acclamer, à faire tout ce que leur ordonne l’homme au balcon, alors même qu’elles pourraient en théorie charger à tout moment et le tailler en pièces ?

Ceauşescu et les siens dominèrent trois décennies durant vingt millions de Roumains en remplissant trois conditions incontournables. Premièrement, ils placèrent de fidèles apparatchiks communistes à la tête de tous les réseaux de coopération, comme l’armée, les syndicats et même les associations sportives. Deuxièmement, ils empêchèrent la création d’organisations rivales – politiques, économiques et sociales – susceptibles de servir de base à une coopération anticommuniste. Troisièmement, ils comptèrent sur le soutien des partis frères d’Union soviétique et d’Europe de l’Est. Malgré des tensions occasionnelles, ces partis s’entraidèrent en cas de besoin ou, tout au moins, veillèrent à ce qu’aucun intrus ne vienne perturber le paradis socialiste. Dans ces conditions, malgré les épreuves et les souffrances que leur infligea l’élite dirigeante, les vingt millions de Roumains ne réussirent à organiser aucune opposition efficace.

Ceauşescu ne perdit le pouvoir que le jour où ces trois conditions cessèrent d’être réunies. À la fin des années 1980, l’Union soviétique retira sa protection, et les régimes communistes commencèrent à tomber comme des dominos. En décembre 1989, Ceauşescu ne pouvait espérer aucune aide extérieure. Bien au contraire, les révolutions des paysans voisins donnèrent du cœur à l’opposition locale. Deuxièmement, le parti communiste lui-même commença à se scinder en camps rivaux, les modérés souhaitant se débarrasser de Ceauşescu et initier des réformes avant qu’il ne fût trop tard. Troisièmement, en organisant la réunion de soutien de Bucarest et en la diffusant à la télévision, Ceauşescu fournit aux révolutionnaires l’occasion idéale de découvrir leur pouvoir et de manifester contre lui. Quel moyen plus rapide de propager la révolution que de la montrer à la télévision ?

Pourtant, quand le pouvoir échappa aux mains de l’organisateur maladroit sur son balcon, ce ne sont pas les masses populaires de la place qui le récupérèrent. Bien que nombreuse et enthousiaste, la foule ne savait pas s’organiser. Dès lors, de même que dans la Russie de 1917, le pouvoir échut à un petit groupe d’acteurs politiques qui avaient pour seul atout d’être organisés. La révolution roumaine fut piratée par le Front de salut national (FSN) autoproclamé, qui n’était en réalité qu’un écran de fumée dissimulant l’aile modérée du parti communiste. Le Front n’avait pas de lien véritable avec la foule des manifestants. Il était formé de cadres moyens du parti et dirigé par Ion Iliescu, ancien membre du Comité central du PC et un temps responsable de la propagande. Iliescu et ses camarades du FSN se métamorphosèrent en démocrates, proclamèrent devant tous les micros qu’ils étaient les chefs de la révolution, puis usèrent de leur longue expérience et de leurs réseaux de copains pour prendre le contrôle du pays et se mettre ses ressources dans la poche.

Dans la Roumanie communiste, l’État possédait presque tout. La Roumanie démocratique s’empressa de privatiser tous ses actifs, les vendant à des prix sacrifiés aux anciens communistes qui furent les seuls à comprendre ce qui se passait et s’aidèrent mutuellement à constituer leur magot. Les entreprises d’État qui contrôlaient l’infrastructure et les ressources naturelles furent bradées à d’anciens cadres communistes, tandis que les fantassins du parti achetaient maisons et appartements pour quelques sous.

Ion Iliescu fut élu président ; ses collègues devinrent ministres, parlementaires, directeurs de banque et multimillionnaires. La nouvelle élite roumaine qui contrôle aujourd’hui encore le pays se compose essentiellement des anciens communistes et de leurs familles. Les masses qui ont risqué leur peau à Timişoara et Bucarest ont dû se contenter des restes parce qu’elles n’ont pas su coopérer ni créer une organisation efficace pour prendre en main leurs intérêts.

La révolution égyptienne de 2011 a connu le même destin. Ce que la télévision avait fait en 1989, Facebook et Twitter l’ont fait en 2011. Les nouveaux médias ont aidé les masses à coordonner leurs activités : des milliers de gens ont inondé les rues et les places au bon moment et renversé le régime de Moubarak. Toutefois, faire descendre 100 000 personnes sur la place Tahrir est une chose ; c’en est une autre de s’emparer de la machine politique, de serrer les bonnes mains dans les bonnes arrière-salles et de diriger efficacement un pays. Dès lors, quand Moubarak est tombé, les manifestants n’ont pas pu combler le vide. L’Égypte n’avait que deux institutions assez organisées pour diriger le pays : l’armée et les Frères musulmans. La révolution a donc été récupérée d’abord par les Frères musulmans, puis par l’armée.

Les ex-communistes roumains et les généraux égyptiens n’étaient pas plus intelligents ou habiles que les anciens dictateurs ou les manifestants de Bucarest ou du Caire. Leur avantage résidait dans une coopération tout en souplesse. Ils coopéraient mieux que les foules et étaient disposés à se montrer bien plus souples que des hommes rigides comme Ceauşescu et Moubarak.

Voir aussi:

Mort de George Floyd : l’avocat de Derek Chauvin demande l’acquittement

Après l’ultime journée du procès, les jurés se sont retirés pour délibérer. Ils devront rendre un verdict unanime pour chacun des trois chefs d’inculpation. Tout autre scénario qu’une condamnation inquiète les autorités locales.

George Floyd «a appelé à l’aide dans son dernier souffle» avant de mourir sous le genou de Derek Chauvin, a affirmé lundi 19 avril le procureur dans son réquisitoire contre le policier accusé d’avoir tué le quadragénaire afro-américain le 25 mai 2020 à Minneapolis. «George Floyd a supplié jusqu’à ce qu’il ne puisse plus parler», a dit Steve Schleicher au jury. «Il fallait juste un peu de compassion, et personne n’en a montré ce jour-là», a ajouté le procureur.

Le policier blanc de 45 ans est jugé pour meurtre, homicide involontaire et violences volontaires ayant entraîné la mort de George Floyd, qui avait été interpellé pour une infraction mineure. Pendant plus de neuf minutes, il avait maintenu un genou sur le cou du quadragénaire qui était allongé sur le ventre, les mains menottées dans le dos. Sa mort a suscité des manifestations antiracistes d’une ampleur historique et une vague d’indignation mondiale contre les brutalités policières.

«Il a appelé à l’aide dans son dernier souffle mais l’agent n’a pas aidé, l’accusé est resté sur lui», a rappelé le procureur, affirmant que le policier avait enfreint le code de la police de Minneapolis en matière d’usage de la force. «George Floyd n’était une menace pour personne, il ne tentait de faire de mal à personne», a-t-il dit. Il a aussi fustigé l’inaction du policier, qui n’a rien fait pour ranimer George Floyd. «En tant que premier secours, vous devez faire un massage cardiaque, il ne l’a pas fait alors qu’il était formé à cela», a lancé le procureur. «L’accusé n’est pas jugé parce qu’il est policier» mais «il est jugé pour ce qu’il a fait», a souligné Steve Schleicher, estimant que Derek Chauvin avait «trahi son insigne».

L’avocat de Derek Chauvin a pour sa part demandé l’acquittement de son client. L’accusation «a échoué à apporter la preuve au-delà du doute raisonnable et Derek Chauvin doit par conséquent être déclaré non-coupable», a affirmé l’avocat du policier, Eric Nelson, après près de trois heures de plaidoirie. Le procès se tient dans un climat de fortes tensions, après la mort récente d’un jeune homme noir lors d’un contrôle routier près de Minneapolis. «C’était un meurtre, l’accusé est coupable des trois chefs d’accusation et il n’y a aucune excuse», a asséné le procureur en conclusion de son réquisitoire, qui a duré plus d’une heure et demie.

Le risque d’un verdict «nul»

Pour l’accusation, qui a appelé à la barre près de 40 témoins, c’est bien le policier qui a tué George Floyd, qui ne «pouvait pas respirer». Il est mort d’un «manque d’oxygène» provoqué par la pression de Derek Chauvin sur son cou et son dos, ont expliqué plusieurs médecins. L’Afro-Américain avait des problèmes cardiaques mais même une personne en bonne santé «serait morte de ce que George Floyd a subi», a affirmé le pneumologue Martin Tobin. Pour David Schultz, professeur de droit à l’université du Minnesota, les procureurs «ont fait du très bon travail» pour démontrer que le policier n’avait pas agi «de manière raisonnable».

Selon Eric Nelson, George Floyd est mort d’une crise cardiaque due à des problèmes de cœur, aggravés par la consommation de fentanyl, un opiacé, et de méthamphétamine, un stimulant, et par l’inhalation de gaz d’échappement pendant qu’il était allongé au sol. D’après la défense, le policier a utilisé une procédure autorisée pour maîtriser un individu qui se débattait et le maintenir au sol. Elle évoque aussi une «foule hostile» qui représentait une «menace» et aurait détourné l’attention du policier du sort de George Floyd. Derek Chauvin, lui, a refusé de s’expliquer, usant du droit de tout accusé aux États-Unis à ne pas apporter de témoignage susceptible de l’incriminer.

Le jury, qui s’est retiré lundi pour délibérer, doit rendre un verdict unanime sur chacune des trois charges. «Vous devez être absolument impartiaux», leur a dit le juge Peter Cahill, qui les a invités à «examiner les preuves, de les soupeser et d’appliquer la loi». Cela pourrait prendre des heures, des jours, voire des semaines. Les condamnations de policiers pour meurtre sont très rares, les jurés ayant tendance à leur octroyer le bénéfice du doute. Si le jury ne parvient pas à se mettre d’accord sur l’ensemble des charges, le procès sera déclaré «nul». Tout autre scénario qu’une condamnation inquiète les autorités locales.

La tension est très forte à Minneapolis, qui s’était déjà embrasée après la mort de George Floyd. Plus de 400 personnes ont défilé lundi dans les rues de la ville pour demander la condamnation de Derek Chauvin, chantant «le monde observe, nous observons, faites ce qui est juste». Marchant derrière une banderole réclamant «justice pour George Floyd», ils ont croisé sur leur chemin des soldats de la Garde nationale, les observant près de véhicules blindés. Tenue de camouflage, et fusil mitrailleur en bandoulière, ces militaires patrouillent depuis plusieurs semaines dans les rues de la ville. La mort récente de Daunte Wright, un jeune Afro-Américain d’une vingtaine d’années tué par une policière blanche lors d’un banal contrôle routier dans la banlieue de Minneapolis, n’a fait qu’ajouter à la tension qui règne depuis le début du procès.

Rodney Floyd, l’un des frères de George, a fait part plus tôt dans la journée, de sa gratitude pour les messages de soutien «venus du monde entier» à sa famille, dont plusieurs membres ont suivi les débats depuis le 29 mars. «J’espère que les jurés vont rendre le bon verdict», déclare Courtenay Carver, un travailleur social afro-américain de 56 ans. «Nous nous préparons au pire», confiait Janay Clanton, une habitante de Minneapolis. «Tout va exploser», a même prédit la sexagénaire, si Derek Chauvin n’est pas reconnu coupable. L’issue du procès aura aussi un impact sur celui de trois autres agents qui doivent être jugés en août pour «complicité de meurtre».


Livres: Cachez ce péché originel que je ne saurai voir ! (We’re all children and forever indebted to evil empires born in blood and maintained through oppression and war that no academic or political surgery can ever purge because we’d be defending nothing but the legacy of an older and no less brutal empire)

6 mars, 2021

Victoria Station Bombay, Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus. India 2011 - YouTubeTaj Mahal built by traitors, says BJP 'hate speaker' - The Frontier Post

The invader (Léon-Maxime Faivre, 1884)

Caïn se jeta sur son frère Abel et le tua. (…) Il bâtit ensuite une ville et il donna à cette ville le nom de son fils Hénoc. Genèse 4: 8-17
Voici, je suis né dans l’iniquité, et ma mère m’a conçu dans le péché. David (Psaume 51: 5)
Vous dites: Si nous avions vécu du temps de nos pères, nous ne nous serions pas joints à eux pour répandre le sang des prophètes. Vous témoignez ainsi contre vous-mêmes que vous êtes les fils de ceux qui ont tué les prophètes. Jésus (Matthieu 23: 30-31)
C’est un ennemi qui a fait cela. (…) Non, [ne l’arrachez pas] de peur qu’en arrachant l’ivraie, vous ne déraciniez en même temps le blé. Laissez croître ensemble l’un et l’autre jusqu’à la moisson. Jésus (Matthieu 13: 27-30)
Vous avez appris qu’il a été dit: Tu aimeras ton prochain, et tu haïras ton ennemi. Mais moi, je vous dis: Aimez vos ennemis (…) afin que vous soyez fils de votre Père qui est dans les cieux; car il fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons et il fait pleuvoir sur les justes et sur les injustes. Jésus (Matthieu 5: 43-45)
Bon, mais à part les égouts, l’éducation, le vin, l’ordre public, l’irrigation, les routes, le système d’eau courante et la santé publique, qu’est-ce que les Romains ont fait pour nous ? Life of Brian
Enlever, égorger, piller, c’est, dans leur faux langage, gouverner ; et, où ils ont fait un désert, ils disent qu’ils ont donné la paix. Calgacos (d’après Tacite, 83 après JC)
Nous sommes une société qui, tous les cinquante ans ou presque, est prise d’une sorte de paroxysme de vertu – une orgie d’auto-purification à travers laquelle le mal d’une forme ou d’une autre doit être chassé. De la chasse aux sorcières de Salem aux chasses aux communistes de l’ère McCarthy à la violente fixation actuelle sur la maltraitance des enfants, on retrouve le même fil conducteur d’hystérie morale. Après la période du maccarthisme, les gens demandaient : mais comment cela a-t-il pu arriver ? Comment la présomption d’innocence a-t-elle pu être abandonnée aussi systématiquement ? Comment de grandes et puissantes institutions ont-elles pu accepté que des enquêteurs du Congrès aient fait si peu de cas des libertés civiles – tout cela au nom d’une guerre contre les communistes ? Comment était-il possible de croire que des subversifs se cachaient derrière chaque porte de bibliothèque, dans chaque station de radio, que chaque acteur de troisième zone qui avait appartenu à la mauvaise organisation politique constituait une menace pour la sécurité de la nation ? Dans quelques décennies peut-être les gens ne manqueront pas de se poser les mêmes questions sur notre époque actuelle; une époque où les accusations de sévices les plus improbables trouvent des oreilles bienveillantes; une époque où il suffit d’être accusé par des sources anonymes pour être jeté en pâture à la justice; une époque où la chasse à ceux qui maltraitent les enfants est devenu une pathologie nationale. Dorothy Rabinowitz
La révolution iranienne fut en quelque sorte la version islamique et tiers-mondiste de la contre-culture occidentale. Il serait intéressant de mettre en exergue les analogies et les ressemblances que l’on retrouve dans le discours anti-consommateur, anti-technologique et anti-moderne des dirigeants islamiques de celui que l’on découvre chez les protagonistes les plus exaltés de la contre-culture occidentale. Daryiush Shayegan (Les Illusions de l’identité, 1992)
Malgré eux, les islamistes sont des Occidentaux. Même en rejetant l’Occident, ils l’acceptent. Aussi réactionnaires que soient ses intentions, l’islamisme intègre non seulement les idées de l’Occident mais aussi ses institutions. Le rêve islamiste d’effacer le mode de vie occidental de la vie musulmane est, dans ces conditions, incapable de réussir. Le système hybride qui en résulte est plus solide qu’il n’y paraît. Les adversaires de l’islam militant souvent le rejettent en le qualifiant d’effort de repli pour éviter la vie moderne et ils se consolent avec la prédiction selon laquelle il est dès lors condamné à se trouver à la traîne des avancées de la modernisation qui a eu lieu. Mais cette attente est erronée. Car l’islamisme attire précisément les musulmans qui, aux prises avec les défis de la modernité, sont confrontés à des difficultés, et sa puissance et le nombre de ses adeptes ne cessent de croître. Les tendances actuelles donnent à penser que l’islam radical restera une force pendant un certain temps encore. Daniel Pipes
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux …Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
De nombreux commentateurs veulent aujourd’hui montrer que, loin d’être non violente, la Bible est vraiment pleine de violence. En un sens, ils ont raison. La représentation de la violence dans la Bible est énorme et plus vive, plus évocatrice, que dans la mythologie même grecque. (…) Il est une chose que j’apprécie dans le refus contemporain de cautionner la violence biblique, quelque chose de rafraîchissant et de stimulant, une capacité d’indignation qui, à quelques exceptions près, manque dans la recherche et l’exégèse religieuse classiques. (…) Une fois que nous nous rendons compte que nous avons à faire au même phénomène social dans la Bible que la mythologie, à savoir la foule hystérique qui ne se calmera pas tant qu’elle n’aura pas lynché une victime, nous ne pouvons manquer de prendre conscience du fait de la grande singularité biblique, même de son caractère unique. (…) Dans la mythologie, la violence collective est toujours représentée à partir du point de vue de l’agresseur et donc on n’entend jamais les victimes elles-mêmes. On ne les entend jamais se lamenter sur leur triste sort et maudire leurs persécuteurs comme ils le font dans les Psaumes. Tout est raconté du point de vue des bourreaux. (…) Pas étonnant que les mythes grecs, les épopées grecques et les tragédies grecques sont toutes sereines, harmonieuses et non perturbées. (…) Pour moi, les Psaumes racontent la même histoire de base que les mythes mais retournée, pour ainsi dire. (…) Les Psaumes d’exécration ou de malédiction sont les premiers textes dans l’histoire qui permettent aux victimes, à jamais réduites au silence dans la mythologie, d’avoir une voix qui leur soit propre. (…) Ces victimes ressentent exactement la même chose que Job. Il faut décrire le livre de Job, je crois, comme un psaume considérablement élargi de malédiction. Si Job était un mythe, nous aurions seulement le point de vue des amis. (…) La critique actuelle de la violence dans la Bible ne soupçonne pas que la violence représentée dans la Bible peut être aussi dans les évènements derrière la mythologie, bien qu’invisible parce qu’elle est non représentée. La Bible est le premier texte à représenter la victimisation du point de vue de la victime, et c’est cette représentation qui est responsable, en fin de compte, de notre propre sensibilité supérieure à la violence. Ce n’est pas le fait de notre intelligence supérieure ou de notre sensibilité. Le fait qu’aujourd’hui nous pouvons passer jugement sur ces textes pour leur violence est un mystère. Personne d’autre n’a jamais fait cela dans le passé. C’est pour des raisons bibliques, paradoxalement, que nous critiquons la Bible. (…) Alors que dans le mythe, nous apprenons le lynchage de la bouche des persécuteurs qui soutiennent qu’ils ont bien fait de lyncher leurs victimes, dans la Bible nous entendons la voix des victimes elles-mêmes qui ne voient nullement le lynchage comme une chose agréable et nous disent en des mots extrêmement violents, des mots qui reflètent une réalité violente qui est aussi à l’origine de la mythologie, mais qui restant invisible, déforme notre compréhension générale de la littérature païenne et de la mythologie. René Girard
Aujourd’hui nous pourrions vraiment faire la synthèse de l’anthropologie de la fin du XIXe et du début du XXe. Prenez James George Frazer, l’auteur du célèbre Rameau d’or: qu’est-ce qu’il n’a pas vu sur le bouc émissaire! Lorsqu’il a choisi l’expression « bouc émissaire » pour désigner toute une catégorie de victimes, il a créé ses propres catégories, qui sont un peu hésitantes parfois, mais il est toujours allé dans la bonne direction. S’il s’est vite arrêté, c’est qu’il ne voulait pas reconnaître dans son monde et en lui-même, le bouc émissaire. Aujourd’hui on repère les boucs émissaires dans l’Angleterre victorienne et on ne les repère plus dans les sociétés archaïques. C’est défendu. Frazer a vu ce que les déconstructionnistes ne voient pas. Il a vu le bouc émissaire chez les autres, il ne l’a pas vu dans l’Angleterre victorienne. On peut dire que la pensée moderne opère toujours un jeu de cache-cache pour ne pas voir la violence. Tantôt on la voit chez les autres, et pas chez soi, tantôt on la voit seulement chez soi, et pas chez les autres. Or, c’est du pareil au même. Mais le fait que nous la voyons maintenant chez nous est le signe d’une aggravation de la crise sacrificielle et donc on peut espérer qu’on va vers la vérité. La meilleure manière de démontrer la théorie du bouc émissaire, revient à mettre en rapport les hommes du XIXe siècle qui ne voyaient la présence de boucs émissaires qu’ailleurs et nous qui ne la voyons que chez nous et non ailleurs. Rassemblez les deux et vous aurez la vérité. (…) La théorie mimétique le fait parce qu’elle introduit la notion d’évolution, d’évolution historique ou de cassure. Elle est obligée d’introduire le temps pour éviter précisément le jugement moral anachronique. Si vous introduisez la notion de temps pleinement, vous n’allez pas condamner les cultures archaïques. Notre époque a raison de réhabiliter les boucs émissaires du passé! Mais nous nous croyons supérieurs à nos pères, dont nous faisons à notre tour des boucs émissaires. Nous sommes comme ces pharisiens dont parle Jésus, qui élevaient benoîtement des tombeaux à tous les prophètes que leurs pères avaient tués, pour se glorifier eux-mêmes. (…) Le Christ dénonce la répétition mimétique du passé, ce mécanisme mimétique selon lequel les fils pensent faire mieux que les pères, être indemnes de violence. Comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui. René Girard
La gare ferroviaire Chhatrapati Shivaji de Mumbai, anciennement Victoria Station, quand la ville s’appelait Bombay. Les Britanniques la construisirent dans le style néogothique alors en vogue à la fin du XIXe siècle en Grande-Bretagne. Un gouvernement nationaliste hindou changea le nom de la ville et de la gare, sans être pour autant tenté de raser un bâtiment aussi magnifique alors même qu’il était l’œuvre d’oppresseurs étrangers. Yuval Noah Harari
Le Taj Mahal. Exemple de culture indienne « authentique » ou création étrangère de l’impérialisme islamique ? Yuval Noah Harari
Combien d’Indiens, de nos jours, appelleraient de leurs vœux un référendum pour se défaire de la démocratie, de l’anglais, du réseau ferroviaire, du système juridique, du cricket et du thé sous prétexte qu’ils font partie de l’héritage impérial ? Même s’ils le faisaient, le fait même d’appeler à un vote pour trancher n’illustrerait-il pas leur dette envers leurs anciens suzerains ? Même si nous devions entièrement désavouer l’héritage d’un empire brutal dans l’espoir de reconstruire ou de sauvegarder les cultures  « authentiques » d’avant, nous ne défendrions très probablement que l’héritage d’un empire plus ancien et non moins brutal. Ceux qui s’offusquent de la mutilation de la culture indienne par le Raj britannique sanctifient à leur insu l’héritage de l’Empire moghol et du sultanat conquérant de Delhi. Et qui s’efforce de sauver l’« authentique culture indienne » des influences étrangères de ces empires musulmans sanctifie l’héritage des empires gupta, kushan et maurya. Si un ultranationaliste hindou devait détruire tous les bâtiments laissés par les conquérants britanniques comme la gare centrale de Bombay, que ferait-il des constructions des conquérants musulmans comme le Taj Mahal ? Nul ne sait réellement résoudre cette épineuse question de l’héritage culturel. Quelle que soit la voie suivie, la première étape consiste à prendre acte de la complexité du dilemme et à accepter que la division simpliste du passé en braves types et en sales types ne mène à rien. À moins, bien entendu, que nous soyons prêts à admettre que nous marchons habituellement sur les brisées des sales types. Yuval Noah Harari

Cachez ce péché originel que je ne saurai voir !

Et si …

A l’heure où nous traversons à nouveau …

A l’instar de nos pogroms, chasses aux sorcières, révolutions ou génocides …

Cette fois entre déboulonnages de statues, débaptêmes de rues et mise au pilori de professeurs ou d’intellectuels …

L’une de ces périodes, dont est faite notre histoire, de folie furieuse de purification

Comment ne pas repenser …

A cet excellent texte issu de Sapiens, le best-seller mondial de l’historien israélien Yuval Noah Harari …

Où reprenant pour l’histoire humaine, l’entreprise vulguratrice de bref survol historique de Hawking pour l’univers …

Mais oubliant en passager clandestin typique de notre siècle …

La source de cette singulière lucidité de notre époque

Mais hélas aussi de son double non moins singulier de cécité

A savoir l’idée, proprement biblique mais aujourd’hui si décriée, de péché originel …

Comme avec la parabole évangélique de l’ivraie à ne pas arracher par peur d’arracher le bon grain avec …

Celle de la tolérance dont nous sommes aujourd’hui si fiers …

Il montre à quel point nous sommes tous les enfants à jamais redevables des méchants empires qui nous ont précédés …

Nés dans le sang et maintenus par l’oppression et la guerre …

Mais qu’aucune chirurgie académique ou politique ne pourra jamais purger …

Parce que nous ne défendrions rien d’autre que l’héritage d’un empire plus ancien et non moins brutal … ?

BRAVES TYPES ET SALES TYPES DANS L’HISTOIRE

Yuval Noah Harari

Sapiens – Une brève histoire de l’humanité

2012

Il est tentant de diviser le monde en braves types et en sales types pour classer les empires parmi les salauds de l’histoire. Après tout, la quasi-totalité de ces empires sont nés dans le sang et ont conservé le pouvoir par l’oppression et la guerre. Pourtant, la plupart des cultures actuelles reposent sur des héritages impériaux. Si les empires sont mauvais par définition, qu’est-ce que cela dit de nous ? Il est des écoles de pensée et des mouvements politiques qui voudraient purger la culture humaine de l’impérialisme, pour ne laisser qu’une civilisation qu’ils croient pure, authentique, sans la souillure du péché. Ces idéologies sont au mieux naïves ; au pire, elles servent de façade hypocrite au nationalisme et au fanatisme sommaires. Peut-être pourriez-vous plaider que, dans la myriade de cultures apparues à l’aube de l’histoire, il en était quelques-unes de pures, soustraites au péché et aux influences délétères des autres sociétés. Depuis cette aube, cependant, aucune culture ne saurait raisonnablement y prétendre ; il n’existe assurément aucune culture de ce genre sur terre. Toutes les cultures humaines sont au moins en partie héritières d’empires et de civilisations impériales, et aucune opération de chirurgie universitaire ou politique ne saurait retrancher l’héritage impérial sans tuer le patient.Songez, par exemple, à la relation ambivalente qui existe entre l’actuelle République indienne indépendante et le Raj britannique. La conquête et l’occupation britanniques coûtèrent la vie à des millions d’Indiens et se soldèrent par l’humiliation et l’exploitation de centaines de millions d’autres. Beaucoup d’Indiens adoptèrent néanmoins, avec l’ardeur de néophytes, des idées occidentales comme l’autodétermination et les droits de l’homme. Ils furent consternés de voir les Britanniques refuser d’appliquer leurs valeurs proclamées et d’accorder aux indigènes des droits égaux en tant que sujets britanniques ou l’indépendance. L’État indien moderne n’en est pas moins fils de l’Empire britannique. Certes les Britanniques tuèrent, blessèrent et persécutèrent les habitants du sous-continent, mais ils unirent également une ahurissante mosaïque de royaumes,principautés et tribus rivales, créant une conscience nationale partagée et un pays formant plus ou moins une unité politique. Ils jetèrent les bases du système judiciaire indien, créèrent une administration et construisirent un réseau ferroviaire critique pour l’intégration économique. L’Inde indépendante fit de la démocratie occidentale, dans son incarnation britannique, sa forme de gouvernement. L’anglais reste la lingua franca du sous-continent : une langue neutre qui permet de communiquer entre citoyens de langue hindi, tamoul ou malayalam. Les Indiens sont des joueurs de cricket passionnés et de grands buveurs de chai (thé) : le jeu et la boisson sont tous deux des héritages britanniques. La culture commerciale du thé n’existait pas en Inde avant que la British East India Company ne l’introduise au milieu du XIXe siècle. Ce sont les snobs de sahibs britanniques qui lancèrent la consommation de thé dans tout le sous-continent.

Combien d’Indiens, de nos jours, appelleraient de leurs vœux un référendum pour se défaire de la démocratie, de l’anglais, du réseau ferroviaire, du système juridique, du cricket et du thé sous prétexte qu’ils font partie de l’héritage impérial ? Même s’ils le faisaient, le fait même d’appeler à un vote pour trancher n’illustrerait-il pas leur dette envers leurs anciens suzerains ? Même si nous devions entièrement désavouer l’héritage d’un empire brutal dans l’espoir de reconstruire ou de sauvegarder les cultures « authentiques »d’avant, nous ne défendrions très probablement que l’héritage d’un empire plus ancien et non moins brutal. Ceux qui s’offusquent de la mutilation de la culture indienne par le Raj britannique sanctifient à leur insu l’héritage de l’Empire moghol et du sultanat conquérant de Delhi. Et qui s’efforce de sauver l’« authentique culture indienne » des influences étrangères de ces empires musulmans sanctifie l’héritage des empires gupta, kushan et maurya. Si un ultranationaliste hindou devait détruire tous les bâtiments laissés par les conquérants britanniques comme la gare centrale de Bombay, que ferait-il des constructions des conquérants musulmans comme le Taj Mahal ?

Nul ne sait réellement résoudre cette épineuse question de l’héritage culturel. Quelle que soit la voie suivie, la première étape consiste à prendre acte de la complexité du dilemme et à accepter que la division simpliste du passé en braves types et en sales types ne mène à rien. À moins, bien entendu, que nous soyons prêts à admettre que nous marchons habituellement sur les brisées des sales types.

Voir aussi:

Good Guys and Bad Guys in History

It is tempting to divide history neatly into good guys and bad guys, with all empires among the bad guys. For the vast majority of empires were founded on blood, and maintained their power through oppression and war. Yet most of today’s cultures are based on imperial legacies. If empires are by definition bad, what does that say about us?

There are schools of thought and political movements that seek to purge human culture of imperialism, leaving behind what they claim is a pure, authentic civilisation, untainted by sin. These ideologies are at best naïve; at worst they serve as disingenuous window-dressing for crude nationalism and bigotry. Perhaps you could make a case that some of the myriad cultures that emerged at the dawn of recorded history were pure, untouched by sin and unadulterated by other societies. But no culture since that dawn can reasonably make that claim, certainly no culture that exists now on earth. All human cultures are at least in part the legacy of empires and imperial civilisations, and no academic or political surgery can cut out the imperial legacies without killing the patient.

Think, for example, about the love-hate relationship between the independent Indian republic of today and the British Raj. The British conquest and occupation of India cost the lives of millions of Indians, and was responsible for the continuous humiliation and exploitation of hundreds of millions more. Yet many Indians adopted, with the zest of converts, Western ideas such as self-determination and human rights, and were dismayed when the British refused to live up to their own declared values by granting native Indians either equal rights as British subjects or independence.

Nevertheless, the modern Indian state is a child of the British Empire. The British killed, injured and persecuted the inhabitants of the subcontinent, but they also united a bewildering mosaic of warring kingdoms, principalities and tribes, creating a shared national consciousness and a country that functioned more or less as a single political unit. They laid the foundations of the Indian judicial system, created its administrative structure, and built the railroad network that was critical for economic integration. Independent India adopted Western democracy, in its British incarnation, as its form of government. English is still the subcontinent’s lingua franca, a neutral tongue that native speakers of Hindi, Tamil and Malayalam can use to communicate. Indians are passionate cricket players and chai (tea) drinkers, and both game and beverage are British legacies. Commercial tea farming did not exist in India until the mid-nineteenth century, when it was introduced by the British East India Company. It was the snobbish British sahibs who spread the custom of tea drinking throughout the subcontinent.

28. The Chhatrapati Shivaji train station in Mumbai. It began its life as Victoria Station, Bombay. The British built it in the Neo-Gothic style that was popular in late nineteenth-century Britain. A Hindu nationalist government changed the names of both city and station, but showed no appetite for razing such a magnificent building, even if it was built by foreign oppressors.

How many Indians today would want to call a vote to divest themselves of democracy, English, the railway network, the legal system, cricket and tea on the grounds that they are imperial legacies? And if they did, wouldn’t the very act of calling a vote to decide the issue demonstrate their debt to their former overlords?

29. The Taj Mahal. An example of ‘authentic’ Indian culture, or the alien creation of Muslim imperialism?

Even if we were to completely disavow the legacy of a brutal empire in the hope of reconstructing and safeguarding the ‘authentic’ cultures that preceded it, in all probability what we will be defending is nothing but the legacy of an older and no less brutal empire. Those who resent the mutilation of Indian culture by the British Raj inadvertently sanctify the legacies of the Mughal Empire and the conquering sultanate of Delhi. And whoever attempts to rescue ‘authentic Indian culture’ from the alien influences of these Muslim empires sanctifies the legacies of the Gupta Empire, the Kushan Empire and the Maurya Empire. If an extreme Hindu nationalist were to destroy all the buildings left by the British conquerors, such as Mumbai’s main train station, what about the structures left by India’s Muslim conquerors, such as the Taj Mahal?

Nobody really knows how to solve this thorny question of cultural inheritance. Whatever path we take, the first step is to acknowledge the complexity of the dilemma and to accept that simplistically dividing the past into good guys and bad guys leads nowhere. Unless, of course, we are willing to admit that we usually follow the lead of the bad guys.

Voir également:

Were we happier in the stone age?
Does modern life make us happy? We have gained much but we have lost a great deal too. Are humans better suited to a hunter-gatherer lifestyle?
Yuval Noah Harari
The Guardian
5 Sep 2014

We are far more powerful than our ancestors, but are we much happier? Historians seldom stop to ponder this question, yet ultimately, isn’t it what history is all about? Our understanding and our judgment of, say, the worldwide spread of monotheistic religion surely depends on whether we conclude that it raised or lowered global happiness levels. And if the spread of monotheism had no noticeable impact on global happiness, what difference did it make?

With the rise of individualism and the decline of collectivist ideologies, happiness is arguably becoming our supreme value. With the stupendous growth in human production, happiness is also acquiring unprecedented economic importance. Consumerist economies are increasingly geared to supply happiness rather than subsistence or even affluence, and a chorus of voices is now calling for a replacement of GDP measurements with happiness statistics as the basic economic yardstick. Politics seems to be following suit. The traditional right to « the pursuit of happiness » is imperceptibly morphing into a right to happiness, which means that it is becoming the duty of government to ensure the happiness of its citizens. In 2007 the European commission launched « Beyond GDP » to consider the feasibility of using a wellbeing index to replace or complement GDP. Similar initiatives have recently been developed in numerous other countries – from Thailand to Canada, from Israel to Brazil.

Most governments still focus on achieving economic growth, but when asked what is so good about growth, even diehard capitalists almost invariably turn to happiness. Suppose we caught David Cameron in a corner, and demanded to know why he cared so much about economic growth. « Well, » he might answer, « growth is essential to provide people with higher standards of living, better medical care, bigger houses, faster cars, tastier ice-cream. » And, we could press further, what is so good about higher standards of living? « Isn’t it obvious? » Cameron might reply, « It makes people happier. »

Ice-cream
A reason to be happy … tastier ice-cream? Photograph: Envision/Corbis

Suppose, for the sake of argument, that we could somehow scientifically prove that higher standards of living did not translate into greater happiness. « But David, » we could say, « look at these historical, psychological and biological studies. They prove beyond any reasonable doubt that having bigger houses, tastier ice-cream and even better medicines does not increase human happiness. » « Really? » he would gasp, « Why did nobody tell me! Well, if that’s the case, forget about my plans to boost economic growth. I am leaving everything and joining a hippie commune. »

This is a highly unlikely scenario, and not only because so far we have almost no scientific studies of the long-term history of happiness. Scholars have researched the history of just about everything – politics, economics, diseases, sexuality, food – yet they have seldom asked how they all influence human happiness. Over the last decade, I have been writing a history of humankind, tracking down the transformation of our species from an insignificant African ape into the master of the planet. It was not easy to understand what turned Homo sapiens into an ecological serial killer; why men dominated women in most human societies; or why capitalism became the most successful religion ever. It wasn’t easy to address such questions because scholars have offered so many different and conflicting answers. In contrast, when it came to assessing the bottom line – whether thousands of years of inventions and discoveries have made us happier – it was surprising to realise that scholars have neglected even to ask the question. This is the largest lacuna in our understanding of history.

The Whig view of history

Though few scholars have studied the long-term history of happiness, almost everybody has some idea about it. One common preconception – often termed « the Whig view of history » – sees history as the triumphal march of progress. Each passing millennium witnessed new discoveries: agriculture, the wheel, writing, print, steam engines, antibiotics. Humans generally use newly found powers to alleviate miseries and fulfil aspirations. It follows that the exponential growth in human power must have resulted in an exponential growth in happiness. Modern people are happier than medieval people, and medieval people were happier than stone age people.

Antibiotics
The discovery of antibiotics … a marker in the triumphal march of progess. Photograph: Doug Steley C/Alamy

But this progressive view is highly controversial. Though few would dispute the fact that human power has been growing since the dawn of history, it is far less clear that power correlates with happiness. The advent of agriculture, for example, increased the collective power of humankind by several orders of magnitude. Yet it did not necessarily improve the lot of the individual. For millions of years, human bodies and minds were adapted to running after gazelles, climbing trees to pick apples, and sniffing here and there in search of mushrooms. Peasant life, in contrast, included long hours of agricultural drudgery: ploughing, weeding, harvesting and carrying water buckets from the river. Such a lifestyle was harmful to human backs, knees and joints, and numbing to the human mind.

In return for all this hard work, peasants usually had a worse diet than hunter-gatherers, and suffered more from malnutrition and starvation. Their crowded settlements became hotbeds for new infectious diseases, most of which originated in domesticated farm animals. Agriculture also opened the way for social stratification, exploitation and possibly patriarchy. From the viewpoint of individual happiness, the « agricultural revolution » was, in the words of the scientist Jared Diamond, « the worst mistake in the history of the human race ».

The case of the agricultural revolution is not a single aberration, however. Themarch of progress from the first Sumerian city-states to the empires of Assyria and Babylonia was accompanied by a steady deterioration in the social status and economic freedom of women. The European Renaissance, for all its marvellous discoveries and inventions, benefited few people outside the circle of male elites. The spread of European empires fostered the exchange of technologies, ideas and products, yet this was hardly good news for millions of Native Americans, Africans and Aboriginal Australians.

The point need not be elaborated further. Scholars have thrashed the Whig view of history so thoroughly, that the only question left is: why do so many people still believe in it?

Paradise lost

There is an equally common but completely opposite preconception, which might be dubbed the « romantic view of history ». This argues that there is a reverse correlation between power and happiness. As humankind gained more power, it created a cold mechanistic world, which is ill-suited to our real needs.

'Computers have turned us into zombies'
‘Computers have turned us into zombies.’ Photograph: Christopher Thomond for the Guardian

Romantics never tire of finding the dark side of every discovery. Writing gave rise to extortionate taxation. Printing begot mass propaganda and brainwashing. Computers turn us into zombies. The harshest criticism of all is reserved for the unholy trinity of industrialism, capitalism and consumerism. These three bugbears have alienated people from their natural surroundings, from their human communities, and even from their daily activities. The factory worker is nothing but a mechanical cog, a slave to the requirements of machines and the interests of money. The middle class may enjoy better working conditions and many material comforts, but it pays for them dearly with social disintegration and spiritual emptiness. From a romantic perspective, the lives of medieval peasants were preferable to those of modern factory-hands and office clerks, and the lives of stone-age foragers were the best of all.

Yet the romantic insistence on seeing the dark side of every novelty is as dogmatic as the Whig belief in progress. For instance, over the last two centuries modern medicine has beaten back the army of diseases that prey on humankind, from tuberculosis and measles to cholera and diphtheria. Average life expectancy has soared, and global child mortality has dropped from roughly 33% to less than 5%. Can anyone doubt that this made a huge contribution to the happiness not only of those children who might otherwise be dead, but also of their parents, siblings and friends?

Paradise now

A more nuanced stance agrees with the romantics that, up until the modern age, there was no clear correlation between power and happiness. Medieval peasants may indeed have been more miserable than their hunter-gatherer ancestors. But the romantics are wrong in their harsh judgment of modernity. In the last few centuries we have not only gained immense powers, but more importantly, new humanist ideologies have finally harnessed our collective power in the service of individual happiness. Despite some catastrophes such as the Holocaust and the Atlantic slave trade (so the story goes), we have at long last turned the corner and begun increasing global happiness systematically. The triumphs of modern medicine are just one example. Other unprecedented achievements include the decline of international wars; the dramatic drop in domestic violence; and the elimination of mass-scale famines. (See Steven Pinker’s book The Better Angels of Our Nature.)

Yet this, too, is an oversimplification. We can congratulate ourselves on the accomplishments of modern Homo sapiens only if we completely ignore the fate of all other animals. Much of the wealth that shields humans from disease and famine was accumulated at the expense of laboratory monkeys, dairy cows and conveyor-belt chickens. Tens of billions of them have been subjected over the last two centuries to a regime of industrial exploitation, whose cruelty has no precedent in the annals of planet Earth.

Dairy cows
‘Much of the wealth that shields humans from disease and famine was accumulated at the expense of laboratory monkeys, dairy cows and conveyor-belt chickens.’ Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian

Secondly, the time frame we are talking about is extremely short. Even if we focus only on the fate of humans, it is hard to argue that the life of the ordinary Welsh coalminer or Chinese peasant in 1800 was better than that of the ordinary forager 20,000 years ago. Most humans began to enjoy the fruits of modern medicine no earlier than 1850. Mass famines and major wars continued to blight much of humanity up to the middle of the 20th century. Even though the last few decades have proven to be a relative golden age for humanity in the developed world, it is too early to know whether this represents a fundamental shift in the currents of history, or an ephemeral wave of good fortune: 50 years is simply not enough time on which to base sweeping generalisations.

Indeed, the contemporary golden age may turn out to have sown the seeds of future catastrophe. Over the last few decades we have been disturbing the ecologic equilibrium of our planet in myriad ways, and nobody knows what the consequences will be. We may be destroying the groundwork of human prosperity in an orgy of reckless consumption.

Lonely and grey?

Even if we take into account solely the citizens of today’s affluent societies, Romantics may point out that our comfort and security have their price. Homo sapiens evolved as a social animal, and our wellbeing is usually influenced by the quality of our relationships more than by our household amenities, the size of our bank accounts or even our health. Unfortunately, the immense improvement in material conditions that affluent westerners have enjoyed over the last century was coupled with the collapse of most intimate communities.

People in the developed world rely on the state and the market for almost everything they need: food, shelter, education, health, security. Therefore it has become possible to survive without having extended families or any real friends. A person living in a London high rise is surrounded by thousands of people wherever she goes, but she might never have visited the flat next door, and might know very little about her colleagues at work. Even her friends might be just pub buddies. Many present-day friendships involve little more than talking and having fun together. We meet a friend at a pub, call him on the phone, or send an email, so that we can unload our anger at what happened today in the office, or share our thoughts on the latest royal scandal. Yet how well can you really know a person only from conversations?

In contrast to such pub buddies, friends in the stone age depended on one another for their very survival. Humans lived in close-knit communities, and friends were people with whom you went hunting mammoths. You survived long journeys and difficult winters together. You took care of one another when one of you fell sick, and shared your last morsels of food in times of want. Such friends knew each other more intimately than many present-day couples. Replacing such precarious tribal networks with the security of modern economies and states obviously has enormous advantages. But the quality and depth of intimate relationships are likely to have suffered.

Mammoth
In the stone age, friends went mammoth-hunting together. Photograph: Andrew Nelmerm/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

In addition to shallower relationships, contemporary people also suffer from a much poorer sensory world. Ancient foragers lived in the present moment, acutely aware of every sound, taste and smell. Their survival depended on it. They listened to the slightest movement in the grass to learn whether a snake might be lurking there. They carefully observed the foliage of trees in order to discover fruits and birds’ nests. They sniffed the wind for approaching danger. They moved with a minimum of effort and noise, and knew how to sit, walk and run in the most agile and efficient manner. Varied and constant use of their bodies gave them physical dexterity that people today are unable to achieve even after years of practising yoga or tai chi.

Today we can go to the supermarket and choose to eat a thousand different dishes. But whatever we choose, we might eat it in haste in front of the TV, not really paying attention to the taste. We can go on vacation to a thousand amazing locations. But wherever we go, we might play with our smartphone instead of really seeing the place. We have more choice than ever before, but what good is this choice, when we have lost the ability really to pay attention?

Well, what did you expect?

Even if you don’t buy into this picture of Pleistocene richness replaced by modern poverty, it is clear that the immense rise in human power has not been matched by an equal rise in human happiness. We are a thousand times more powerful than our hunter-gatherer ancestors, but not even the most optimistic Whig can believe that we are a thousand times happier. If we told our great-great-grandmother how we live, with vaccinations and painkillers and running water and stuffed refrigerators, she would likely have clasped her hands in astonishment and said: « You are living in paradise! You probably wake up every morning with a song in your heart, and pass your days walking on sunshine, full of gratitude and loving-kindness for all. » Well, we don’t. Compared to what most people in history dreamed about, we may be living in paradise. But for some reason, we don’t feel that we are.

One explanation has been provided by social scientists, who have recently rediscovered an ancient wisdom: our happiness depends less on objective conditions and more on our own expectations. Expectations, however, tend to adapt to conditions. When things improve, expectations rise, and consequently even dramatic improvements in conditions might leave us as dissatisfied as before. In their pursuit of happiness, people are stuck on the proverbial « hedonic treadmill », running faster and faster but getting nowhere.

If you don’t believe that, just ask Hosni Mubarak. The average Egyptian was far less likely to die from starvation, plague or violence under Mubarak than under any previous regime in Egyptian history. In all likelihood, Mubarak’s regime was also less corrupt. Nevertheless, in 2011 Egyptians took to the streets in anger to overthrow Mubarak. For they had much higher expectations than their ancestors.

Indeed, if happiness is strongly influenced by expectations then one of the central pillars of the modern world, mass media, seems almost tailored to prevent significant increases in global happiness levels. A man living in a small village 5,000 years ago measured himself against the other 50 men in the village. Compared to them, he looked pretty hot. Today, a man living in a small village compares himself to film stars and models, whom he sees every day on screens and giant billboards. Our modern villager is likely to be less happy with the way he looks.

The biological glass ceiling

Evolutionary biologists offer a complementary explanation for the hedonic treadmill. They contend that both our expectations and our happiness are not really determined by political, social or cultural factors, but rather by our biochemical system. Nobody is ever made happy, they argue, by getting a promotion, winning the lottery, or even finding true love. People are made happy by one thing and one thing only – pleasant sensations in their bodies. A person who just got a promotion and jumps from joy is not really reacting to the good news. She is reacting to various hormones coursing through her bloodstream, and to the storm of electric signals flashing between different parts of her brain.

Evolution illustration
‘Evolution has no interest in happiness per se: it is interested only in survival and repro­duction, and it uses happiness and misery as mere goads.’ Photograph: Philipp Kammerer/Alamy

The bad news is that pleasant sensations quickly subside. If last year I got a promotion, I might still be filling the new position, but the very pleasant sensations that I felt back then subsided long ago. If I want to continue feeling such sensations, I must get another promotion. And another. This is all the fault of evolution. Evolution has no interest in happiness per se: it is interested only in survival and reproduction, and it uses happiness and misery as mere goads. Evolution makes sure that no matter what we achieve, we remain dissatisfied, forever grasping for more. Happiness is thus a homeostatic system. Just as our biochemical system maintains our body temperature and sugar levels within narrow boundaries, it also prevents our happiness levels from rising beyond certain thresholds.

If happiness really is determined by our biochemical system, then further economic growth, social reforms and political revolutions will not make our world a much happier place. The only way dramatically to raise global happiness levels is by psychiatric drugs, genetic engineering and other direct manipulations of our biochemical infrastructure. In Brave New World, Aldous Huxley envisaged a world in which happiness is the supreme value, and in which everybody constantly takes the drug soma, which makes people happy without harming their productivity and efficiency. The drug forms one of the foundations of the World State, which is never threatened by wars, revolutions or strikes, because all people are supremely content with their current conditions. Huxley presented this world as a frightening dystopia. Today, more and more scientists, policymakers and ordinary people are adopting it as their goal.

Second thoughts

There are people who think that happiness is really not that important, and that it is a mistake to define individual satisfaction as the aim of human society. Others agree that happiness is the supreme good, but think that happiness isn’t just a matter of pleasant sensations. Thousands of years ago Buddhist monks reached the surprising conclusion that pursuing pleasant sensations is in fact the root of suffering, and that happiness lies in the opposite direction. Pleasant sensations are just ephemeral and meaningless vibrations. If five minutes ago I felt joyful or peaceful, that feeling is now gone, and I may well feel angry or bored. If I identify happiness with pleasant sensations, and crave to experience more and more of them, I have no choice but constantly to pursue them, and even if I get them, they immediately disappear, and I have to start all over again. This pursuit brings no lasting achievement. On the contrary: the more I crave these pleasant sensations, the more stressed and dissatisfied I become. However, if I learn to see my sensations for what they really are – ephemeral and meaningless vibrations – I lose interest in pursuing them, and can be content with whatever I experience. For what is the point of running after something that disappears as fast as it arises? For Buddhism, then, happiness isn’t pleasant sensations, but rather the wisdom, serenity and freedom that come from understanding our true nature.

True or false, the practical impact of such alternative views is minimal. For the capitalist juggernaut, happiness is pleasure. Full stop. With each passing year, our tolerance for unpleasant sensations decreases, whereas our craving for pleasant sensations increases. Both scientific research and economic activity are geared to that end, producing each year better painkillers, new ice-cream flavours, more comfortable mattresses, and more addictive games for our smartphones, so that we will not suffer a single boring moment while waiting for the bus.

All this is hardly enough, of course. Humans are not adapted by evolution to experience constant pleasure, so ice‑cream and smartphone games will not do. If that is what humankind nevertheless wants, it will be necessary to re-engineer our bodies and minds. We are working on it.

Yuval Noah Harari’s Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind is published by Harvill Secker. He will be speaking at the Natural History Museum, Oxford, on 10 September.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Taj Mahal and 4 other monuments earned Rs 146.05 crore, more than half the total revenue generated by centrally-protected monuments, in 2017-18.

New Delhi: Fringe Hindu groups and even some BJP leaders may have sought to belittle their significance but official data shows that India’s top five revenue generating monuments were all built by Muslim rulers – the Taj Mahal, Agra Fort, Qutub Minar, Fatehpur Sikri and Red Fort.

While Qutub Minar was built by rulers of the Delhi Sultanate, the rest were constructed by the Mughals.

These five monuments together earned the government Rs 146.05 crore in 2017-18, according Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) data. This is more than half the total revenue of Rs 271.8 crore generated by all centrally-protected monuments.

While some politicians sparked a controversy last year by arguing that the Mughal-era monument did not represent Indian culture, the number of visitors to it, both Indian and foreign, only increased since 2016-17.

A total of 64.58 lakh people visited the Taj Mahal in 2017-18 compared to 50.66 lakh in 2016-17.

Last year, the UP tourism department had even omitted the Taj Mahal, a UNESCO world heritage site, from a brochure listing the state’s principal attractions.

With total earnings of Rs 30.55 crore, Agra Fort built by Mughal emperor Akbar, another UNESCO world heritage site, was the second highest revenue generator in the last financial year.

While the Konark Sun Temple in Odisha came second after the Taj Mahal in terms of number of visitors (32.3 lakh), it generated only Rs 10.06 crore as revenue. This, officials said, is because the temple is mostly popular only with Indian tourists, with 32.21 lakh domestic visitors making the trip last year.

While Indian tourists are charged Rs 30 per head as entry fee to world heritage monuments across the country, foreign tourists have to pay Rs 500 each.

“It is impossible to communalise the entire Indian population through the meaningless political venom spewed by politicians,” said historian S. Irfan Habib, explaining the increase in visitors to the Taj.

“No matter what they say about the Taj Mahal and Red Fort, Indians will continue going there,” he added.


Nostalgie: Quand la pierre qui roule n’amassait pas mousse (But that’s not how it used to be: looking back at Don McLean’s classic song about America’s loss of innocence)

3 octobre, 2020


Rebel Without a Cause R2005 U.S. One Sheet Poster | Posteritati Movie Poster Gallery | New YorkThe Rolling Stones - Altamont Raceway - Livermore, - Catawiki10+ Best Funny Ads images | funny ads, copywriting ads, ads

Mais, quand le Fils de l’homme viendra, trouvera-t-il la foi sur la terre? Jésus (Luc 18: 8)
Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue about that; I’m right and I’ll be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now; I don’t know which will go first – rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me. John Lennon (1966)
Who wrote the book of love? Tell me, tell me… I wonder, wonder who … Was it someone from above? The Monotones (1958)
Well, that’ll be the day, when you say goodbye Yes, that’ll be the day, when you make me cry You say you’re gonna leave, you know it’s a lie ‘Cause that’ll be the day when I die. Buddy Holly (1957)
Well, ya know a rolling stone don’t gather no moss. Buddy Holly (1958)
Now, for ten years we’ve been on our own And moss grows fat on a rolling stone But, that’s not how it used to be. (…) The Father, Son, and the Holy Ghost, they caught the last train for the coast, the day the music died. Don McLean
C’était une sorte de Woodstock, le genre de truc qui marchait à l’époque, mais cette mode allait sur sa fin. Si Woodstock a lancé la mode, elle a pris fin ce jour-là. Charlie Watts
Ça a été horrible, vraiment horrible. Tu te sens responsable. Comment cela a-t-il pu déraper de la sorte ? Mais je n’ai pas pensé à tous ces trucs auxquels les journalistes ont pensé : la grande perte de l’innocence, la fin d’une ère… C’était davantage le côté effroyable de la situation, le fait horrible que quelqu’un soit tué pendant un concert, combien c’était triste pour sa famille, mais aussi le comportement flippant des Hell’s Angels. Mick Jagger
J’y suis pas allé pour faire la police. J’suis pas flic. Je ne prétendrai jamais être flic. Ce Mick Jagger, il met tout sur le dos des Angels. Il nous prend pour des nazes. En ce qui me concerne, on s’est vraiment fait entuber par cet abruti. On m’a dit que si je m’asseyais sur le bord de la scène, pour bloquer les gens, je pourrais boire de la bière jusqu’à la fin du concert. C’est pour ça que j’y suis allé. Et tu sais quoi ? Quand ils ont commencé à toucher nos motos, tout a dérapé. Je sais pas si vous pensez qu’on les paie 50 $ ou qu’on les vole, ou que ça coûte cher ou quoi. Personne ne touche à ma moto. Juste parce qu’il y a une foule de 300 000 personnes ils pensent pouvoir s’en sortir. Mais quand je vois quelque chose qui est toute ma vie, avec tout ce que j’y ai investi, la chose que j’aime le plus au monde, et qu’un type lui donne des coups de pied, on va le choper. Et tu sais quoi ? On les a eus. Je ne suis pas un pacifiste minable, en aucun cas. Et c’est peut-être des hippies à fleurs et tout ça. Certains étaient bourrés de drogue, et c’est dommage qu’on ne l’ait pas été, ils descendaient la colline en courant et en hurlant et en sautant sur les gens. Et pas toujours sur des Angels, mais quand ils ont sauté sur un Angel, ils se sont fait mal.  Sonny Barger
SOS Racisme. SOS Baleines. Ambiguïté : dans un cas, c’est pour dénoncer le racisme ; dans l’autre, c’est pour sauver les baleines. Et si dans le premier cas, c’était aussi un appel subliminal à sauver le racisme, et donc l’enjeu de la lutte antiraciste comme dernier vestige des passions politiques, et donc une espèce virtuellement condamnée. Jean Baudrillard (1987)
I had an idea for a big song about America, and I didn’t want to write that this land is your land or some song like that. And I came up with this notion that politics and music flow parallel together forward through history. So the music you get is related somehow to the political environment that’s going on. And in the song, « American Pie, » the verses get somewhat more dire each time until you get to the end, but the good old boys are always there singing and singing, « Bye-bye Miss American Pie » almost like fiddling while Rome is burning. This was all in my head, and it sort of turned out to be true because, you now have a kind of music in America that’s really more spectacle, it owes more to Liberace than it does to Elvis Presley. And it’s somewhat meaningless and loud and bloviating and, and yet — and then we have this sort of spectacle in Washington, this kind of politics, which has gotten so out of control. And so the theory seems to hold up, but again, it was only my theory, and that’s how I wrote the song. That was the principle behind it. Don McLean
For some reason I wanted to write a big song about America and about politics, but I wanted to do it in a different way. As I was fiddling around, I started singing this thing about the Buddy Holly crash, the thing that came out (singing), ‘Long, long time ago, I can still remember how that music used to make me smile.’ I thought, Whoa, what’s that? And then the day the music died, it just came out. And I said, Oh, that is such a great idea. And so that’s all I had. And then I thought, I can’t have another slow song on this record. I’ve got to speed this up. I came up with this chorus, crazy chorus. And then one time about a month later I just woke up and wrote the other five verses. Because I realized what it was, I knew what I had. And basically, all I had to do was speed up the slow verse with the chorus and then slow down the last verse so it was like the first verse, and then tell the story, which was a dream. It is from all these fantasies, all these memories that I made personal. Buddy Holly’s death to me was a personal tragedy. As a child, a 15-year-old, I had no idea that nobody else felt that way much. I mean, I went to school and mentioned it and they said, ‘So what?’ So I carried this yearning and longing, if you will, this weird sadness that would overtake me when I would look at this album, The Buddy Holly Story, because that was my last Buddy record before he passed away. Don McLean
I was headed on a certain course, and the success I got with ‘American Pie’ really threw me off. It just shattered my lifestyle and made me quite neurotic and extremely petulant. I was really prickly for a long time. If the things you’re doing aren’t increasing your energy and awareness and clarity and enjoyment, then you feel as though you’re moving blindly. That’s what happened to me. I seemed to be in a place where nothing felt like anything, and nothing meant anything. Literally nothing mattered. It was very hard for me to wake up in the morning and decide why it was I wanted to get up. Don McLean
I’m very proud of the song. It is biographical in nature and I don’t think anyone has ever picked up on that. The song starts off with my memories of the death of Buddy Holly. But it moves on to describe America as I was seeing it and how I was fantasizing it might become, so it’s part reality and part fantasy but I’m always in the song as a witness or as even the subject sometimes in some of the verses. You know how when you dream something you can see something change into something else and it’s illogical when you examine it in the morning but when you’re dreaming it seems perfectly logical. So it’s perfectly okay for me to talk about being in the gym and seeing this girl dancing with someone else and suddenly have this become this other thing that this verse becomes and moving on just like that. That’s why I’ve never analyzed the lyrics to the song. They’re beyond analysis. They’re poetry. Don McLean
By 1964, you didn’t hear anything about Buddy Holly. He was completely forgotten. But I didn’t forget him, and I think this song helped make people aware that Buddy’s legitimate musical contribution had been overlooked. When I first heard ‘American Pie’ on the radio, I was playing a gig somewhere, and it was immediately followed by ‘Peggy Sue.’ They caught right on to the Holly connection, and that made me very happy. I realized that it was actually gonna perform some good works. Don McLean
It means never having to work again for the rest of my life. Don McLean (1991)
A month or so later I was in Philadelphia and I wrote the rest of the song. I was trying to figure out what this song was trying to tell me and where it was supposed to go. That’s when I realized it had to go forward from 1957 and it had to take in everything that has happened. I had to be a witness to the things going on, kind of like Mickey Mouse in Fantasia. I didn’t know anything about hit records. I was just trying to make the most interesting and exciting record that I could. Once the song was written, there was no doubt that it was the whole enchilada. It was clearly a very interesting, wonderful thing and everybody knew it. Don McLean (2003)
Basically in ‘American Pie’ things are heading in the wrong direction… It is becoming less idyllic. I don’t know whether you consider that wrong or right but it is a morality song in a sense. I was around in 1970 and now I am around in 2015… there is no poetry and very little romance in anything anymore, so it is really like the last phase of ‘American Pie’. Don McLean (2015)
The song has nostalgic themes, stretching from the late 1950s until the late 1960s. Except to acknowledge that he first learned about Buddy Holly’s death on February 3, 1959—McLean was age 13—when he was folding newspapers for his paper route on the morning of February 4, 1959 (hence the line « February made me shiver/with every paper I’d deliver »), McLean has generally avoided responding to direct questions about the song’s lyrics; he has said: « They’re beyond analysis. They’re poetry. » He also stated in an editorial published in 2009, on the 50th anniversary of the crash that killed Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. « The Big Bopper » Richardson (who are alluded to in the final verse in a comparison with the Christian Holy Trinity), that writing the first verse of the song exorcised his long-running grief over Holly’s death and that he considers the song to be « a big song … that summed up the world known as America ». McLean dedicated the American Pie album to Holly. It was also speculated that the song contains numerous references to post-World War II American events (such as the murders of civil rights workers Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner), and elements of culture, including 1960s culture (e.g. sock hops, cruising, Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Charles Manson, and much more). When asked what « American Pie » meant, McLean jokingly replied, « It means I don’t ever have to work again if I don’t want to. » Later, he stated, « You will find many interpretations of my lyrics but none of them by me … Sorry to leave you all on your own like this but long ago I realized that songwriters should make their statements and move on, maintaining a dignified silence. » He also commented on the popularity of his music, « I didn’t write songs that were just catchy, but with a point of view, or songs about the environment. In February 2015, McLean announced he would reveal the meaning of the lyrics to the song when the original manuscript went for auction in New York City, in April 2015. The lyrics and notes were auctioned on April 7, and sold for $1.2 million. In the sale catalogue notes, McLean revealed the meaning in the song’s lyrics: « Basically in American Pie things are heading in the wrong direction. … It [life] is becoming less idyllic. I don’t know whether you consider that wrong or right but it is a morality song in a sense. » The catalogue confirmed some of the better known references in the song’s lyrics, including mentions of Elvis Presley (« the king ») and Bob Dylan (« the jester »), and confirmed that the song culminates with a near-verbatim description of the death of Meredith Hunter at the Altamont Free Concert, ten years after the plane crash that killed Holly, Valens, and Richardson. Wikipedia
« The Jester » is probably Bob Dylan. It refers to him wearing « A coat he borrowed from James Dean, » and being « On the sidelines in a cast. » Dylan wore a red jacket similar to James Dean’s on the cover of The Freewheeling Bob Dylan, and got in a motorcycle accident in 1966 which put him out of service for most of that year. Dylan also made frequent use of jokers, jesters or clowns in his lyrics. The line, « And a voice that came from you and me » could refer to the folk style he sings, and the line, « And while the king was looking down the jester stole his thorny crown » could be about how Dylan took Elvis Presley’s place as the number one performer. The line, « Eight miles high and falling fast » is likely a reference to The Byrds’ hit « Eight Miles High. » Regarding the line, « The birds (Byrds) flew off from a fallout shelter, » a fallout shelter is a ’60s term for a drug rehabilitation facility, which one of the band members of The Byrds checked into after being caught with drugs. The section with the line, « The flames climbed high into the night, » is probably about the Altamont Speedway concert in 1969. While the Rolling Stones were playing, a fan was stabbed to death by a member of The Hells Angels who was hired for security. The line, « Sergeants played a marching tune, » is likely a reference to The Beatles’ album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The line, « I met a girl who sang the blues and I asked her for some happy news, but she just smiled and turned away, » is probably about Janis Joplin. She died of a drug overdose in 1970. The lyric, « And while Lenin/Lennon read a book on Marx, » has been interpreted different ways. Some view it as a reference to Vladimir Lenin, the communist dictator who led the Russian Revolution in 1917 and who built the USSR, which was later ruled by Josef Stalin. The « Marx » referred to here would be the socialist philosopher Karl Marx. Others believe it is about John Lennon, whose songs often reflected a very communistic theology (particularly « Imagine »). Some have even suggested that in the latter case, « Marx » is actually Groucho Marx, another cynical entertainer who was suspected of being a socialist, and whose wordplay was often similar to Lennon’s lyrics. « Did you write the book of love » is probably a reference to the 1958 hit « Book Of Love » by the Monotones. The chorus for that song is « Who wrote the book of love? Tell me, tell me… I wonder, wonder who » etc. One of the lines asks, « Was it someone from above? » Don McLean was a practicing Catholic, and believed in the depravity of ’60s music, hence the closing lyric: « The Father, Son, and the Holy Ghost, they caught the last train for the coast, the day the music died. » Some, have postulated that in this line, the Trinity represents Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper. « And moss grows fat on our rolling stone » – Mick Jagger’s appearance at a concert in skin-tight outfits, displaying a roll of fat, unusual for the skinny Stones frontman. Also, the words, « You know a rolling stone don’t gather no moss » appear in the Buddy Holly song « Early in the Morning, » which is about his ex missing him early in the morning when he’s gone. « The quartet practiced in the park » – The Beatles performing at Shea Stadium. « And we sang dirges in the dark, the day the music died » – The ’60s peace marches. « Helter Skelter in a summer swelter » – The Manson Family’s attack on Sharon Tate and others in California. « We all got up to dance, Oh, but we never got the chance, ’cause the players tried to take the field, the marching band refused to yield » – The huge numbers of young people who went to Chicago for the 1968 Democratic Party National Convention, and who thought they would be part of the process (« the players tried to take the field »), only to receive a violently rude awakening by the Chicago Police Department nightsticks (the commissions who studied the violence after-the-fact would later term the Chicago PD as « conducting a full-scale police riot ») or as McLean calls the police « the marching band. » (…)The line « Jack be nimble, Jack be quick, Jack Flash sat on a candle stick » is taken from a nursery rhyme that goes « Jack be nimble, Jack be quick, Jack jump over the candlestick. » Jumping over the candlestick comes from a game where people would jump over fires. « Jumpin’ Jack Flash » is a Rolling Stones song. Another possible reference to The Stones can be found in the line, « Fire is the devils only friend, » which could be The Rolling Stones « Sympathy For The Devil, » which is on the same Rolling Stones album. (…) McLean wrote the opening verse first, then came up with the chorus, including the famous title. The phrase « as American as apple pie » was part of the lexicon, but « American Pie » was not. When McLean came up with those two words, he says « a light went off in my head. » (…) Regarding the lyrics, « Jack Flash sat on a candlestick, ’cause fire is the devil’s only friend, » this could be a reference to the space program, and to the role it played in the Cold War between America and Russia throughout the ’60s. It is central to McLean’s theme of the blending of the political turmoil and musical protest as they intertwined through our lives during this remarkable point in history. Thus, the reference incorporates Jack Flash (the Rolling Stones), with our first astronaut to orbit the earth, John (common nickname for John is Jack) Glenn, paired with « Flash » (an allusion to fire), with another image for a rocket launch, « candlestick, » then pulls the whole theme together with « ’cause fire is the Devil’s (Russia’s) only friend, » as Russia had beaten America to manned orbital flight. At 8 minutes 32 seconds, this is the longest song in length to hit #1 on the Hot 100. The single was split in two parts because the 45 did not have enough room for the whole song on one side. The A-side ran 4:11 and the B-side was 4:31 – you had to flip the record in the middle to hear all of it. Disc jockeys usually played the album version at full length, which was to their benefit because it gave them time for a snack, a cigarette or a bathroom break. (…) When the original was released at a whopping 8:32, some radio stations in the United States refused to play it because of a policy limiting airplay to 3:30. Some interpret the song as a protest against this policy. When Madonna covered the song many years later, she cut huge swathes of the song, ironically to make it more radio friendly, to 4:34 on the album and under 4 minutes for the radio edit. In 1971, a singer named Lori Lieberman saw McLean perform this at the Troubadour theater in Los Angeles. She claimed that she was so moved by the concert that her experience became the basis for her song « Killing Me Softly With His Song, » which was a huge hit for Roberta Flack in 1973. When we spoke with Charles Fox, who wrote « Killing Me Softly » with Norman Gimbel, he explained that when Lieberman heard their song, it reminded her of the show, and she had nothing to do with writing the song. This song did a great deal to revive interest in Buddy Holly. Says McLean: « By 1964, you didn’t hear anything about Buddy Holly. He was completely forgotten. But I didn’t forget him, and I think this song helped make people aware that Buddy’s legitimate musical contribution had been overlooked. When I first heard ‘American Pie’ on the radio, I was playing a gig somewhere, and it was immediately followed by ‘Peggy Sue.’ They caught right on to the Holly connection, and that made me very happy. I realized that it was actually gonna perform some good works. » In 2002, this was featured in a Chevrolet ad. It showed a guy in his Chevy singing along to the end of this song. At the end, he gets out and it is clear that he was not going to leave the car until the song was over. The ad played up the heritage of Chevrolet, which has a history of being mentioned in famous songs (the line in this one is « Drove my Chevy to the levee »). Chevy used the same idea a year earlier when it ran billboards of a red Corvette that said, « They don’t write songs about Volvos. » Weird Al Yankovic did a parody of this song for his 1999 album Running With Scissors. It was called « The Saga Begins » and was about Star Wars: The Phantom Menace written from the point of view of Obi-Wan Kenobi. Sample lyric: « Bye, bye this here Anakin guy, maybe Vader someday later but now just a small fry. » It was the second Star Wars themed parody for Weird Al – his first being « Yoda, » which is a takeoff on « Lola » by The Kinks. Al admitted that he wrote « The Saga Begins » before the movie came out, entirely based on Internet rumors. (…) This song was enshrined in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2002, 29 years after it was snubbed for the four categories it was nominated in. At the 1973 ceremony, « American Pie » lost both Song of the Year and Record of the year to « First Time Ever I Saw Your Face. » (…) Fans still make the occasional pilgrimage to the spot of the plane crash that inspired this song. It’s in a location so remote that tourists are few. The song starts in mono, and gradually goes to stereo over its eight-and-a-half minutes. This was done to represent going from the monaural era into the age of stereo. This song was a forebear to the ’50s nostalgia the became popular later in the decade. A year after it was released, Elton John scored a ’50s-themed hit with « Crocodile Rock; in 1973 the George Lucas movie American Graffiti harkened back to that decade, and in 1978 the movie The Buddy Holly Story hit theaters. One of the more bizarre covers of this song came in 1972, when it appeared on the album Meet The Brady Bunch, performed by the cast of the TV show. This version runs just 3:39. This song appears in the films Born on the Fourth of July (1989), Celebrity (1998) and Josie and the Pussycats (2001). Don McLean’s original manuscript of « American Pie » was sold for $1.2 million at a Christie’s New York auction on April 7, 2015. Songfacts

Nostalgie quand tu nous tiens !

En ces jours étranges ….

Où, à l’instar d’une espèce condamnée comme l’avait bien vu Baudrillard …

Le racisme devient « l’enjeu de la lutte antiraciste comme dernier vestige des passions politiques » …

Et SOS racisme attaque à nouveau Eric Zemmour en justice …

Pendant qu’au Sénat ou dans les beaux quartiers parisiens, ses notables de créateurs coulent des jours paisibles …

Comment ne pas repenser …

A la fameuse phrase de la célébrissime chanson de Don McLean …

Qui  entre la mort de Buddy Holly et celle, quatre mois après Woodstock, d’un fan au festival d’Altamont pendant le passage des Rolling Stones ….

Revenait, il y a 50 ans sur la perte d’innocence du rock et de l’Amérique de son adolescence …

Regrettant le temps proverbial …

Où « la pierre qui roule n’amassait pas mousse » ?

What is Don McLean’s song “American Pie” all about?

Dear Cecil:

I’ve been listening to Don McLean sing « American Pie » for twenty years now and I still don’t know what the hell he’s talking about. I know, I know, the « day the music died » is a reference to the Buddy Holly/Ritchie Valens/Big Bopper plane crash, but the rest of the song seems to be chock full of musical symbolism that I’ve never been able to decipher. There are clear references to the Byrds ( » … eight miles high and fallin’ fast … ») and the Rolling Stones (« … Jack Flash sat on a candlestick … »), but the song also mentions the « King and Queen, » the « Jester » (I’ve heard this is either Mick Jagger or Bob Dylan), a « girl who sang the blues » (Janis Joplin?), and the Devil himself. I’ve heard there is an answer key that explains all the symbols. Is there? Even if there isn’t, can you give me a line on who’s who and what’s what in this mediocre but firmly-entrenched-in-my-mind piece of music?

Scott McGough, Baltimore

Cecil replies:

Now, now, Scott. If you can’t clarify the confused, certainly the pinnacle of literary achievement in my mind, history (e.g., the towering rep of James Joyce) instructs us that your next best bet is to obfuscate the obvious. Don McLean has never issued an “answer key” for “American Pie,” undoubtedly on the theory that as long as you can keep ’em guessing, your legend will never die.

He’s probably right. Still, he’s dropped a few hints. Straight Dope musicologist Stefan Daystrom taped the following intro from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40 radio show circa January 1972: “A few days ago we phoned Don McLean for a little help in interpreting his great hit ‘American Pie.’ He was pretty reluctant to give us a straight interpretation of his work; he’d rather let it speak for itself. But he explained some of the specific references that he makes. The most important one is the death of rockabilly singer Buddy Holly in 1959; for McLean, that’s when the music died. The court jester he refers to is Bob Dylan. The Stones and the flames in the sky refer to the concert at Altamont, California. And McLean goes on, painting his picture,” blah blah, segue to record.

Not much to go on, but at least it rules out the Christ imagery. For the rest we turn to the song’s legion of freelance interpreters, whose thoughts were most recently compiled by Rich Kulawiec into a file that I plucked from the Internet. (I love the Internet.) No room to reprint all the lyrics, which you probably haven’t been able to forget anyway, but herewith the high points:

February made me shiver: Holly’s plane crashed February 3, 1959.

Them good ole boys were singing “This’ll be the day that I die”: Holly’s hit “That’ll Be the Day” had a similar line.

The Jester sang for the King and Queen in a coat he borrowed from James Dean: ID of K and Q obscure. Elvis and Connie Francis (or Little Richard)? John and Jackie Kennedy? Or Queen Elizabeth and consort, for whom Dylan apparently did play once? Dean’s coat is the famous red windbreaker he wore in Rebel Without a Cause; Dylan wore a similar one on “The Freewheeling Bob Dylan” album cover.

With the Jester on the sidelines in a cast: On July 29, 1966 Dylan had a motorcycle accident that kept him laid up for nine months.

While sergeants played a marching tune: The Beatles’ “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.”

And as I watched him on the stage/ my hands were clenched in fists of rage/ No angel born in hell/ Could break that Satan’s spell/ And as the flames climbed high into the night: Mick Jagger, Altamont.

I met a girl who sang the blues/ And I asked her for some happy news/ But she just smiled and turned away: Janis Joplin OD’d October 4, 1970.

The three men I admire most/ The Father, Son, and Holy Ghost/ They caught the last train for the coast: Major mystery. Holly, Bopper, Valens? Hank Williams, Elvis, Holly? JFK, RFK, ML King? The literal tripartite deity? As for the coast, could be the departure of the music biz for California. Or it simply rhymes, a big determinant of plot direction in pop music lyrics (which may also explain “drove my Chevy to the levee”). Best I can do for now. Just don’t ask me to explain “Stairway to Heaven.”

The last word (probably) on “American Pie”

Dear Cecil:

As you can imagine, over the years I have been asked many times to discuss and explain my song “American Pie.” I have never discussed the lyrics, but have admitted to the Holly reference in the opening stanzas. I dedicated the album American Pie to Buddy Holly as well in order to connect the entire statement to Holly in hopes of bringing about an interest in him, which subsequently did occur.

This brings me to my point. Casey Kasem never spoke to me and none of the references he confirms my making were made by me. You will find many “interpretations” of my lyrics but none of them by me. Isn’t this fun?

Sorry to leave you all on your own like this but long ago I realized that songwriters should make their statements and move on, maintaining a dignified silence.

— Don McLean, Castine, Maine

Cecil Adams

Voir aussi:

It had been a while since I’d seen “Gimme Shelter,” one of the early classics of the Maysles brothers, Albert and David, and I watched it again on the occasion of the passing of Albert Maysles last Thursday. To my surprise, I found that a big part of the story of “Gimme Shelter” is in the end credits, which say that the movie was filmed by “the Maysles Brothers and (in alphabetical order)” the names of twenty-two more camera operators. By way of contrast, the brothers’ previous feature, “Salesman,” credited “photography” solely to Albert Maysles, and “Grey Gardens,” from 1976, was “filmed by” Albert Maysles and David Maysles. The difference is drastic: it’s the distinction between newsgathering and relationships, and relationships are what the Maysleses built their films on.

The Maysleses virtually lived with the Bible peddlers on the road, they virtually inhabited Grey Gardens with Big Edie and Little Edie, but—as Michael Sragow reports in this superb study, from 2000, on the making of “Gimme Shelter”—the Maysleses didn’t and couldn’t move in with the Rolling Stones. Stan Goldstein, a Maysles associate, told Sragow, “In the film there are virtually no personal moments with the Stones—the Maysles were not involved with the Stones’ lives. They did not have unlimited access. It was an outside view.”

It’s a commonplace to consider the documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman’s films to be centered on the lives of institutions and those of the Maysleses to be centered on the lives of people, but “Gimme Shelter” does both. Though it’s replete with some exhilarating concert footage—notably, of the Stones performing on the concert tour that led up to the Altamont disaster—its central subject is how the Altamont concert came into being. “Gimme Shelter” is a film about a concert that is only incidentally a concert film. Yet the Maysleses’ vision of the unfolding events is distinctive—and, for that matter, historic—by virtue of their distinctive directorial procedure.

Early on, Charlie Watts, the Stones drummer, is seen in the editing room, watching footage with David Maysles, who tells him that it will take eight weeks to edit the film. Watts asks whether Maysles thinks he can do it in that time, and Maysles answers, waving his arm to indicate the editing room, “This gives us the freedom, you guys watching it.”

Filming in the editing room (which, Sragow reports, was the idea of Charlotte Zwerin, one of the film’s editors and directors, who had joined the project after the rest of the shoot) gave them the freedom to break from the strict chronology of the concert season that went from New York to Altamont while staying within the participatory logic of their direct-cinema program. It’s easy to imagine another filmmaker using a voice-over and a montage to introduce, at the start, the fatal outcome of the Altamont concert and portentously declare the intention to follow the band on their American tour to see how they reached that calamitous result. The Maysleses, repudiating such ex-cathedra interventions, instead create a new, and newly personal, sphere of action for the Stones and themselves that the filmmakers can use to frame the concert footage.

The editing-room sequences render the concert footage archival, making it look like what it is—in effect, found footage of a historical event. The result is to turn the impersonal archive personal and to give the Maysles brothers, as well as the Rolling Stones, a personal implication in even the documentary images that they themselves didn’t film.

Among those images are those of a press conference where Mick Jagger announced his plans for a free concert and his intentions in holding it, which are of a worthy and progressive cast: “It’s creating a microcosmic society which sets examples for the rest of America as to how one can behave at large gatherings.” (Later, though, he frames it in more demotic terms: “The concert is an excuse for everyone to talk to each other, get together, sleep with each other, hold each other, and get very stoned.”)

A strange convergence of interests appears in negotiations filmed by the Maysleses between the attorney Melvin Belli, acting on the Stones’ behalf; Dick Carter, the owner of the Altamont Speedway; and other local authorities. The intense pressure to make the concert happen is suggested in a radio broadcast from the day before the concert, during which the announcer Frank Terry snarks that “apparently it’s one of the most difficult things in the world to give a free concert.” The Stones want to perform; their fans want to see them perform a free concert; the local government wants to deliver that show and not to stand in its way; Belli wants to facilitate it; and the Stones don’t exactly renounce their authority in the process but do, in revealing moments, lay bare to the Maysleses’ cameras their readiness to engage with a mighty system of which they themselves aren’t quite the masters.

Within this convergence of rational interests, one element is overlooked: madness. Jagger approaches the concert with constructive purpose and festive enthusiasm, but he performs like a man possessed, singing with fury of a crossfire hurricane and warning his listeners that to play with him is to play with fire. No, what happened at Altamont is not the music’s fault. Celebrity was already a scene of madness in Frank Sinatra’s first flush of fame and when the Beatles were chased through the train station in “A Hard Day’s Night.” But the Beatles’ celebrity was, almost from the start, their subject as well as their object, and they approached it and managed it with a Warholian consciousness, as in their movies; they managed their music in the same way and became, like Glenn Gould, concert dropouts. By contrast, the Stones were primal and natural performers, whose music seemed to thrive, even to exist, in contact with the audience. That contact becomes the movie’s subject—a subject that surpasses the Rolling Stones and enters into history at large.

The Maysleses and Zwerin intercut the discussions between Belli, Carter, and the authorities with concert footage from the Stones’ other venues along the way. The effect—the music running as the nighttime preparations for the Altamont concert occur, with fires and headlights, a swirling tumult—suggests the forces about to be unleashed on the world at large. A cut from a moment in concert to a helicopter shot of an apocalyptic line of cars winding through the hills toward Altamont and of the crowd already gathered there suggests that something wild has escaped from the closed confines of the Garden and other halls. The Maysleses’ enduring theme of the absent boundary between theatre and life, between show and reality, is stood on its head: art as great as that of the Stones is destined to have a mighty real-world effect. There’s a reason why the crucial adjective for art is “powerful”; it’s ultimately forced to engage with power as such.

What died at Altamont was the notion of spontaneity, of the sense that things could happen on their own and that benevolent spirits would prevail. What ended was the idea of the unproduced. What was born there was infrastructure—the physical infrastructure of facilities, the abstract one of authority. From that point on, concerts were the tip of the iceberg, the superstructure, the mere public face and shining aftermath of elaborate planning. The lawyers and the insurers, the politicians and the police, security consultants and fire-safety experts—the masters and mistresses of management—would be running the show.

The movie ends with concertgoers the morning after, walking away, their backs to the viewer, leaving a blank natural realm of earth and sky; they’re leaving the state of nature and heading back to the city, from which they’ll never be able to leave innocently again. What emerges accursed is the very idea of nature, of the idea that, left to their own inclinations and stripped of the trappings of the wider social order, the young people of the new generation will somehow spontaneously create a higher, gentler, more loving grassroots order. What died at Altamont is the Rousseauian dream itself. What was envisioned in “Lord of the Flies” and subsequently dramatized in such films as “Straw Dogs” and “Deliverance” was presented in reality in “Gimme Shelter.” The haunting freeze-frame on Jagger staring into the camera, at the end of the film, after his forensic examination of the footage of the killing of Meredith Hunter at the concert, reveals not the filmmakers’ accusation or his own sense of guilt but lost illusions.


Antifas: Attention, un extrémisme peut en cacher un autre ! (It is time to confront the violent extremism on the left by treating black-clad Antifa protesters as a gang, says Berkeley mayor Jesse Arreguin)

1 octobre, 2020

Antifa face off against white supremacists in Charlottesville, VA

GettyImages-839981910

Image

Les fascistes de demain s’appelleront eux-mêmes antifascistes. Winston Churchill (?)
Police: A toujours tort. Flaubert (Dictionnaire des idées reçues ou catalogue des opinions chics, 1913)
Vous avez des gueules de fils à papa. Je vous haïs, comme je hais vos papas. Bon sang ne saurait mentir. (…) Lorsque hier, à Valle Giulia, vous vous êtes battus avec les policiers, moi, je sympathisais avec les policiers. Car les policiers sont fils de pauvres. Ils viennent de sub-utopies, paysannes ou urbaines. (…) Ils ont vingt ans, le même âge que vous, chers et chères. Evidemment, nous sommes d’accord contre l’institution de la police. Mais prenez-vous-en à la Magistrature, et vous verrez ! Les garçons policiers que vous, par pur vandalisme (attitude dignement héritée du Risorgimento), de fils à papa, avez tabassés, appartiennent à l’autre classe sociale. À Valle Giulia, hier, il y a eu ainsi un fragment de lutte de classe : et vous, très chers (bien que du côté de la raison) vous étiez les riches, tandis que les policiers (qui étaient du côté du tort) étaient les pauvres. Belle victoire, donc, que la vôtre ! Dans ces cas-là, c’est aux policiers qu’on donne des fleurs, très chers. La Stampa et Il Corriere della Sera, NewsWeek et Le Monde vous lèchent le cul. Vous êtes leurs fils, leur espérance, leur futur : s’il vous font des reproches il ne se prépareront pas, c’est sûr, à une lutte de classe contre vous ! Au contraire, il s’agit plutôt d’une lutte intestine. Pour celui qui, intellectuel ou ouvrier, est extérieur à votre lutte, l’idée est très divertissante qu’un jeune bourgeois cogne un vieux bourgeois, et qu’un vieux bourgeois condamne un jeune bourgeois. (…) Allez occuper les universités, chers fils, mais donnez la moitié de vos revenus paternels, aussi maigres soient-ils, à de jeunes ouvriers afin qu’ils puissent occuper, avec vous, leurs usines. Pier Palo Pasolini (1968)
Frapper vite, frapper fort, un bon flic est un flic mort. Pekatralatak (Flics porcs assassins, Pour un Djihad de Classe, 2008)
A riot is the language of the unheard. ​I hope we can avoid riots because riots are self-defeating and socially destructive. Martin Luther King
On se demande souvent quelle idéologie va remplacer le socialisme. Mais elle est déjà là, sous nos yeux : c’est l’antiracisme (…) Comme toutes les idéologies, celle de l’antiracisme se propose non de servir ceux qu’elle prétend délivrer, mais d’asservir ceux qu’elle vise à enrôler (…) Agissant par la terreur et non par la raison, cet antiracisme fabrique plus de racistes qu’il n’en guérit […] L’antiracisme idéologique, qu’il faut soigneusement distinguer de l’antiracisme effectif et sincère, attise les divisions entre les humains au nom de leur fraternité proclamée.  Jean-François Revel (1999)
C’est une sphère très difficile à cerner, qui a parfois des réactions surréalistes et des actions très violentes. On les reconnait à leur «dress code»: «des vêtements noirs, des bottes hautes… Comme les militants de l’extrême droite, à la différence que les gauchistes ont des lacets rouges et les autres, des lacets blancs. Ce sont des militants chevronnés, proches des milieux libertaires et anarchistes, qui viennent des ZAD (Zones à défendre, ndlr) de Sivens, Notre-Dame-des-Landes, Turin… et que l’on voit aujourd’hui aux avant-postes des manifestations sauvages. (…) Cette ultragauche est à l’affût de toutes les luttes: il y a trente ans, les redskins tapaient contre les fascistes, au début des années 2000 on retrouvait ces groupes sur les manifestations contre les sommets gouvernementaux et aujourd’hui, ils se rassemblent contre la loi travail. Même si ce ne sont pas les mêmes générations militantes qui agissent, il y a eu comme un passage de témoin. (…) beaucoup de slogans, d’affiches de [Mai 8] sont repris aujourd’hui dans les cortèges avec des appels pour les «grèves, blocages et manifestations sauvages. (…) Globalement, les antifascistes d’aujourd’hui sont moins violents, plus politisés et plus composites que dans les années 80. Ils sont souvent surdiplômés, viennent de milieux plus bourgeois mais ne trouvent pas de raison d’être à travers le travail. La société plonge avec eux dans un cycle offensif: une action violente, suivie d’une répression forte. L’ultragauche cherche ainsi à créer plus de solidarité entre groupes, et recruter de nouveaux militants dans les rangs des défenseurs de liberté. Jacques Leclercq (2016)
L’insécurité sociale et culturelle dans laquelle ont été plongées les classes populaires, leur relégation spatiale, débouchent sur une crise politique majeure. L’émergence d’une « France périphérique », la montée des radicalités politiques et sociales sont autant de signes d’une remise en cause du modèle économique et sociétal dominant. Face à ces contestations, la classe dominante n’a plus d’autre choix que de dégainer sa dernière arme, celle de l’antifascisme. Contrairement à l’antifascisme du siècle dernier, il ne s’agit pas de combattre un régime autoritaire ou un parti unique. Comme l’annonçait déjà Pier Paolo Pasolini en 1974, analysant la nouvelle stratégie d’une gauche qui abandonnait la question sociale, il s’agit de mettre en scène « un antifascisme facile qui a pour objet un fascisme archaïque qui n’existe plus et n’existera plus jamais ». C’est d’ailleurs en 1983, au moment où la gauche française initie son virage libéral, abandonne les classes populaires et la question sociale, qu’elle lance son grand mouvement de résistance au fascisme qui vient. Lionel Jospin reconnaîtra plus tard que cette « lutte antifasciste en France n’a été que du théâtre » et même que « le Front national n’a jamais été un parti fasciste ». Ce n’est pas un hasard si les instigateurs et financeurs de l’antiracisme et de l’antifascisme sont aussi des représentants du modèle mondialisé. De Bernard-Henri Lévy à Pierre Bergé, des médias (contrôlés par des multinationales), du Medef aux entreprises du CAC 40, de Hollywood à Canal Plus, l’ensemble de la classe dominante se lance dans la résistance de salon. « No pasaràn » devient le cri de ralliement des classes dominantes, économiques ou intellectuelles, de gauche comme de droite. Il n’est d’ailleurs pas inintéressant de constater, comme le fait le chercheur Jacques Leclerq, que les groupes « antifa » (qui s’étaient notamment fait remarquer pendant les manifestations contre la loi Travail par des violences contre des policiers), recrutent essentiellement des jeunes diplômés de la bourgeoisie. Véritable arme de classe, l’antifascisme présente en effet un intérêt majeur. Il confère une supériorité morale à des élites délégitimées en réduisant toute critique des effets de la mondialisation à une dérive fasciste ou raciste. Mais, pour être durable, cette stratégie nécessite la promotion de l’« ennemi fasciste » et donc la surmédiatisation du Front national… Aujourd’hui, on lutte donc contre le fascisme en faisant sa promotion. Un « combat à mort » où on ne cherche pas à détruire l’adversaire, mais à assurer sa longévité. Il est en effet très étrange que les républicains, qui sauf erreur détiennent le pouvoir, n’interdisent pas un parti identifié comme « fasciste ». À moins que ces nouveaux partisans n’aient pas véritablement en ligne de mire ce petit parti, cette « PME familiale », mais les classes populaires dans leur ensemble. Car le problème est que ce n’est pas le Front national qui influence les classes populaires, mais l’inverse. Le FN n’est qu’un symptôme d’un refus radical des classes populaires du modèle mondialisé. L’antifascisme de salon ne vise pas le FN, mais l’ensemble des classes populaires qu’il convient de fasciser afin de délégitimer leur diagnostic, un « diagnostic d’en bas » qu’on appelle « populisme ». Cette désignation laisse entendre que les plus modestes n’ont pas les capacités d’analyser les effets de la mondialisation sur le quotidien et qu’elles sont aisément manipulables. Expert en « antifascisme », Bernard-Henri Lévy a ainsi ruiné l’argumentaire souverainiste, celui de Chevènement, en l’assimilant à une dérive nationaliste – lire : fasciste. Du refus du référendum européen à la critique des effets de la dérégulation, du dogme du libre-échange, toute critique directe ou indirecte de la mondialisation est désormais fascisée. Le souverainisme, une « saloperie », nous dit Bernard-Henri Lévy. Décrire l’insécurité sociale et culturelle en milieu populaire, c’est « faire le jeu de ». Dessiner les contours d’une France fragilisée, celle de la France périphérique, « c’est aussi faire le jeu de ». Illustration parfaite du « fascisme de l’antifascisme », l’argument selon lequel il ne faudrait pas dire certaines vérités, car cela « ferait le jeu de », est régulièrement utilisé. Il faut dire que les enjeux sont considérables. Si elle perd la guerre des représentations, la classe dominante est nue. Elle devra alors faire face à la question sociale et assumer des choix économiques et sociétaux qui ont précarisé les classes populaires. C’est dans ce contexte qu’il faut comprendre la multiplication des procès en sorcellerie et le nouveau maccarthysme des « libéraux-godwiniens ». L’expression du philosophe Jean-Claude Michéa vise à dénoncer l’utilisation systématique par les libéraux de la théorie du juriste Mike Godwin selon laquelle « plus une discussion en ligne dure longtemps (sur Internet), plus la probabilité d’y trouver une comparaison impliquant les nazis ou Hitler s’approche de 1 ». Pour la classe dominante, la défense même de gens ordinaires devient suspecte. (…) On pourrait multiplier les exemples, mais la méthode est toujours la même : fasciser ceux qui donnent à voir la réalité populaire. Face à une guerre des représentations qu’elle est en train de perdre, la classe dominante en arrive même à fasciser les territoires ! La « France périphérique » est ainsi présentée comme une représentation d’une France blanche xénophobe opposée aux quartiers ethnicisés de banlieue. Peu importe que la distinction entre les territoires ruraux, les petites villes et les villes moyennes et les métropoles n’ait jamais reposé sur un clivage ethnique, peu importe que la France périphérique, qui comprend les DOM-TOM, ne soit pas homogène ethniquement et culturellement, l’objectif est avant tout d’ostraciser et de délégitimer les territoires populaires. Et, inversement, de présenter la France des métropoles comme ouverte et cosmopolite. La France du repli d’un côté, des ploucs et des ruraux, la France de l’ouverture et de la tolérance de l’autre. Mais qu’on ne s’y trompe pas, cet « antiracisme de salon » ne vise absolument pas à protéger l’« immigré », le « musulman », les « minorités » face au fascisme qui vient, il s’agit d’abord de défendre des intérêts de classe, ceux de la bourgeoisie. Si l’arme de l’antifascisme permet à moyen terme de décrédibiliser toute proposition économique alternative et de contenir la contestation populaire, elle révèle aussi l’isolement des classes dominantes et supérieures. Cette stratégie de la peur n’a en effet plus aucune influence sur les catégories modestes, ni dans la France périphérique, ni en banlieue. C’est terminé. Les classes populaires ne parlent plus avec les « mots » de l’intelligentsia. Le « théâtre de la lutte antifasciste » se joue devant des salles vides. En ostracisant, et en falsifiant, l’idéologie antifasciste vise à isoler, atomiser les classes populaires et les opposants au modèle dominant en créant un climat de peur. Le problème est que cette stratégie de défense de classe devient inopérante et, pire, est en train de se retourner contre ses promoteurs. La volonté de polariser encore plus le débat public entre « racistes et antiracistes », entre « fascistes et antifascistes » semble aussi indiquer la fuite en avant d’une classe dominante qui n’est pas prête à remettre en question un modèle qui ne fait plus société. Réunie sous la bannière de l’antifascisme, partageant une représentation unique (de la société et des territoires), les bourgeoisies de gauche et de droite sont tentées par le parti unique. Si les « intellectuels sont portés au totalitarisme bien plus que les gens ordinaires », une tentation totalitaire semble aussi imprégner de plus en plus une classe dominante délégitimée, et ce d’autant plus qu’elle est en train de perdre la bataille des représentations. Ainsi, quand la fascisation ne suffit plus, la classe dominante n’hésite plus à délégitimer les résultats électoraux lorsqu’ils ne lui sont pas favorables. La tentation d’exclure les catégories modestes du champ de la démocratie devient plus précisé. L’argument utilisé, un argument de classe et d’autorité, est celui du niveau d’éducation des classes populaires. Il permet de justifier une reprise en main idéologique. En juin 2016, le vote des classes populaires britanniques pour le Brexit a non seulement révélé un mépris de classe, mais aussi une volonté de restreindre la démocratie. Quand Alain Mine déclare que le Brexit, « c’est la victoire des gens peu formés sur les gens éduqués » ou lorsque Bernard-Henri Lévy insiste sur la « victoire du petit sur le grand, et de la crétinerie sur l’esprit », la volonté totalitaire des classes dominantes se fait jour. Les mots de l’antifascisme sont ceux de la classe dominante, les catégories modestes l’ont parfaitement compris et refusent désormais les conditions d’un débat tronqué. Christophe Guilluy
Ce qui s’appelle tour à tour Antifa et Black Blocks est une unique nébuleuse d’anarchistes ; d’usage, des gosses de riches en révolte pubertaire. Gauchistes à 20 ans, ils combattent fictivement un fascisme onirique – et à 40 ans, dirigent les boîtes de com’ ou médias du système. Ces casseurs sont connus. A Paris et autour (92, 93, 94) opère la DRPP, Direction du renseignement de la préfecture de police, très affutée sur son territoire. L’auteur est formel : la DRPP connaît un par un les deux ou trois cents pires Black blocks et peut les cueillir au nid avant toute émeute (dans les beaux quartiers ou des squats…) puis les isoler quelques heures ; les codes en vigueur le permettent. En prime, ces milieux anarchistes grouillent d’indicateurs. En Ile-de-France, la PP connaît ainsi les préparatifs d’une émeute. Enfin, l’Europe du renseignement existe : quand trente émeutiers allemands, belges ou italiens, vont à Paris se joindre à la « fête », un signalement est fourni. Ces alertes donnent des itinéraires, l’immatriculation des véhicules, etc. (les « indics », toujours…). Là, un barrage filtrant règle le problème. Ainsi, L’Intérieur peut, sinon neutraliser une émeute – du moins, en limiter à 90% les dégâts. Exemple : avant l’élection présidentielle, les Black blocks veulent attaquer une réunion du Front national au Zénith le 17 avril 2017. Comme d’usage prévenue, la police agit et l’affaire avorte. Cela, elle le peut toujours – même en mars 2019. (…) Ce qui est advenu samedi 16 mars sur les Champs-Elysées n’a rien à voir avec la population française, et fort marginalement, avec les Gilets jaunes eux-mêmes. Bien plutôt, la Mairie de Paris et les gouvernements Hollande-Macron doivent s’en prendre à eux-mêmes. Depuis dix ans, ils considèrent les Antifa comme de preux hérauts de la démocratie – certes un tantinet excités mais n’est-ce pas, il faut que jeunesse se passe. Ici règne la connivence : ces anarchistes sont leurs fils ou les copains de ceux-ci. Certes moins gravement, c’est le cas de figure Maison-Blanche – Moudjahidine afghans. Utiles pour combattre l’Union soviétique en Afghanistan – mais l’URSS disparue, ils ne rentrent pas docilement à la niche – ils suscitent Oussama ben Laden. Ici pareil, les Antifa chouchous-Bobos sont en même temps des Black Block. Là, catastrophe ! On ne sait que dire, on se borne à gémir sur la violence qui doit cesser et à édicter des lois futiles. Car bien sûr, chacun sait qu’au rayon répression ferme, le chien Hollande-Macron n’a pas de crocs. Et comment se montrer féroce envers ses propres enfants ? Il y a des exemples récents de cela ; des noms, des faits. Si un Antifa est par hasard arrêté, il est peu après relâché en douce. (…) L’impéritie de ce gouvernement, son ignorance des élémentaires normes du maintien de l’ordre éclatent au grand jour. Et l’isolement de M. Macron, tout autant. M. Castaner d’abord. Dans le petit milieu politiciens-médias, là où se recrutent confidents, amants et associés, on sait que le ministre de l’Intérieur est un farceur, occupant ce poste car M. Macron n’avait nul candidat fiable à y mettre. Alors que la France vit sa pire crise de violence sociale en un siècle, M. Castaner fait la noce en boîte de nuit, où – je cite la presse people, il « embrasse une inconnue sur la bouche « . Ebahis, toutes les racailles, narcos et Antifa soupirent d’aise. On connaît le proverbe « Quand le chat n’est pas là, les souris dansent ». On a vu le bal samedi 16 mars sur les Champs-Elysées. M. Macron, lui, skie. A mesure où la situation s’aggrave ; à mesure où, certains jours, la France frôle la guerre civile ; M. Macron renforce son contrôle – chaque jour plus tatillon – sur les médias, notamment l’information des radios-télévisions, tenues à la laisse courte. Le président croit ainsi visiblement que l’actuel chaos est affaire de communication. Or bien sûr, c’est tout sauf ça. Une telle erreur de diagnostic n’augure rien de bon pour la suite de son quinquennat. Xavier Raufer
Vous savez, le respect de la loi n’est pas une catégorie pertinente pour moi, ce qui compte c’est la justice et la pureté, ce n’est pas la loi. (…) La personne la plus condamnée de France, c’est le préfet de police de Paris, qui a 135 condamnations au tribunal administratif pour des manœuvres dilatoires sur la question de la demande d’asile, donc je ne crois pas que les gouvernants obéissent beaucoup à la loi. Je ne vois pas pourquoi nous on devrait le faire. (…)  C’est l’analyse sociologique. C’est-à-dire que vous pouvez établir dans le monde social qu’il y a un certain nombre de mécanismes qui produisent de la persécution ou la mise à mort prématurée d’un certain nombre de populations. Si jamais vous produisez une action qui lève ces systèmes de persécution, qui soulagent les corps de la souffrance, vous produisez une action qui est juste et qui est pure. Et si à l’inverse vous prenez des mesures qui renforcent l’exposition des corps à la persécution, alors vous êtes impur et vous êtes injuste. (…) C’est objectif, tout le monde le sait. Tout le monde sait très bien ce que c’est qu’un corps qui souffre, tout le monde sait très bien qu’il y a des clochards dans la rue. Quand Macron dit qu’il n’y a pas de pénibilité du travail, il le sait qu’il y a de la pénibilité. (…) Quand il dit qu’il n’y a pas de violences policières et qu’on voit les vidéos du Burger King pendant les gilets jaunes (…). Il voit très bien qu’en niant ces réalités, il active des systèmes de pouvoir de dénégation qui permettent de perpétuer des systèmes de persécution. (…) Moi je pense que le but de la gauche, c’est de produire des fractures, des gens intolérables et des débats intolérables dans le monde social. Il faut savoir qu’il y a des paradigmes irréconciliables. Moi, je suis contre le paradigme du débat, contre le paradigme de la discussion. Je pense que nous perdons notre temps lorsque nous allons sur des chaînes d’info débattre avec des gens qui sont de toute façon pas convaincables. En fait, nous ratifions la possibilité qu’il fasse partie de l’espace du débat. Je pense que la politique est de l’ordre de l’antagonisme et de la lutte et j’assume totalement le fait qu’il faille reproduire un certain nombre de censures dans l’espace public, pour rétablir un espace où les opinions justes prennent le pouvoir sur les opinions injustes. (…) Plus que la censure – parce que je ne suis pas favorable à l’appareil d’Etat -, je suis favorable à une forme de mépris que la gauche doit avoir pour les opinions de droite. Quand vous avez sur une chaîne d’info en continu des débats d’extrême droite ou semi racistes, tout le monde sait que c’est fait pour ça, et tout le monde va se mettre à réagir ça. (…) On se met à être contaminé dans nos espaces de gauche par ces prises de parole complètement délirantes plutôt que les laisser tranquilles dans leur coin à faire le silence, les renvoyer à leur insignifiance. Geoffroy de Lagasnerie
Beaucoup de gens ici font profil bas. Je connais au moins 25 personnes dans la rue qui sont des partisans de Trump, mais qui sortent pas leurs pancartes. C’est une bataille constante et lorsque vous avez des pancartes, il y a un facteur d’intimidation. Ma femme et ma fille de 3 ans sont sorties et des gars sont passés en voiture et ont baissé leur vitre et leur ont crié des obscénités. C’est dégoûtant mais c’est juste le genre de trucs merdiques qui se passent. Ma fille a été isolée des enfants des voisins. L’été dernier, ils jouaient tous ensemble. Cet été, ils ne vont pas jouer avec elle. C’est méchant. Je ne peux pas l’expliquer mais c’est le comportement que nous constatons. Tom Moran (Scranton, Pennsylvania)
Dans un monde turbulent sous la menace de prédateurs comme le président chinois Xi Jinping, sur qui comptez-vous pour défendre l’Amérique ? Un pitbull agressif prêt à faire n’importe quoi pour gagner, ou un faiblard souriant qui lance des insultes de cour de récréation ? Ce point de vue est probablement derrière le fait que 66% des téléspectateurs hispanophones de Telemundo ont jugé Trump vainqueur du débat, le résultat inverse de sondages similaires sur CNN et CBS News. Après tout, si vous avez vécu sous une dictature socialiste ou la tyrannie de gangs tueurs, vous appréciez un leader costaud pour vous protéger. Les Américains ont voté pour Trump en 2016 précisément parce que c’est un pitbull, un barbare, un franc-tireur qu’ils ont engagé pour combattre la gauche corrompue, drainer le marécage, ramener leurs emplois de Chine et défendre le drapeau, la famille et le bon sens. (…) Ils n’ont que faire de sa « présidentialité » tant qu’il se bat pour eux. Miranda Devine
We’re a drinking club with a patriot problem. As Proud Boys, I think our main objective is to defend the West. Enrique Tarrio
I am not taking this as a direct endorsement from the President. He did an excellent job and was asked a VERY pointed question. The question was in reference to WHITE SUPREMACY…which we are not. Enrique Tarrio
Gotta say: the Proud Boys aren’t white supremacists. Enrique Tarrio, their overall leader, is a Black Cuban dude. The Proud Boys explicitly say they’re not racist. They are an openly right-leaning group and they’ll openly fight you — they don’t deny any of this — but saying they’re white supremacist: If you’re talking about a group of people more than 10% people of color and headed by an Afro-Latino guy, that doesn’t make sense. Wilfred Reilly (Kentucky State University)
Unbelievable. Every person in America knows these riots are being orchestrated by black lives matter and Antifa. Chris Wallace asks the President to condemn white supremacists but did not think to ask Joe Biden to condemn Antifa or BLM. Candice Owens
Good people can go to Charlottesville. Michelle Piercy
We came to Charlottesville, Virginia, to tell both sides, the far right and the far left, listen, whether we agree with what you have to say or not, we agree with your right to say it, without being in fear of being assaulted by the other group. But what happened when we came here? We were the one who were assaulted. Joshua Shoaff (American Warrior Revolution)
You had some very bad people in that group, but you also had people that were very fine people, on both sides. You had people in that group … There were people in that rally — and I looked the night before — if you look, there were people protesting very quietly the taking down of the statue of Robert E. Lee. I’m sure in that group there were some bad ones. The following day it looked like they had some rough, bad people — neo-Nazis, white nationalists, whatever you want to call them. But you had a lot of people in that group that were there to innocently protest, and very legally protest. President Trump, Aug. 15, 2017
I was talking about people that went because they felt very strongly about the monument to Robert E. Lee, a great general. Trump, April 26, 2019
By and large, in my experience militia groups are not any more racist than any other group of middle-aged white men. Militias are not about whiteness, not about racism, but their anti-Islam feelings spring from fear and ignorance of Muslims. Amy Cooter (Vanderbilt University)
Militias started showing up at events where left-wing elements would be, and that includes white-supremacist events. They aren’t white supremacists. They are there opposing the people opposing the white supremacists. Mark Pitcavage (Anti-Defamation League)
Militia leaders … emphasize their defense of free speech and depict themselves as peacekeepers. But they never go out and protect the free speech rights of antifa and left-wing groups. Sam Jackson (University at Albany)
Militia groups purported to be there to protect the First Amendment rights of the protesters. The real goal, the evidence showed, was to provoke violent confrontations with counterprotesters and make a strong physical showing of white supremacy and white nationalism. I certainly think that AWR knew which side it was ‘protecting,’ and made that choice willingly. Mary McCord (Georgetown’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection)
The Charlottesville City Council in February 2017 had voted to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that had stood in the city since 1924, but opponents quickly sued in court to block the decision. In June 2017, the City Council voted to give Lee Park, where the statue stood, a new name — Emancipation Park. (In 2018, the park was renamed yet again to Market Street Park.) The city’s actions inspired a group of neo-Nazis, white supremacists and related groups to schedule the “Unite the Right” rally for the weekend of Aug. 12, 2017, in Charlottesville. There is little dispute over the makeup of the groups associated with the rally. A well-known white nationalist, Richard Spencer, was involved; former Ku Klux Klan head David Duke was a scheduled speaker. “Charlottesville prepares for a white nationalist rally on Saturday,” a Washington Post headline read. Counterdemonstrations were planned by people opposed to the alt-right, such as church groups, civil rights leaders and anti-fascist activists known as “antifa,” many of whom arrived with sticks and shields. Suddenly, a militia group associated with the Patriot movement announced it was also going to hold an event called 1Team1Fight Unity in Charlottesville on Saturday, Aug. 12, rescheduling an event that has been planned for Greenville, S.C., 370 miles away. Other militia groups also made plans to attend. On the night of Aug. 11, the neo-Nazi and white-supremacist groups marched on the campus of the University of Virginia, carrying flaming torches and chanting anti-Semitic slogans. This is where Trump got into trouble. While he condemned right-wing hate groups — “those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans” — he appeared to believe there were peaceful protesters there as well. (…) But there were only neo-Nazis and white supremacists in the Friday night rally. Virtually anyone watching cable news coverage or looking at the pictures of the event would know that. It’s possible Trump became confused and was really referring to the Saturday rallies. But he asserted there were people who were not alt-right who were “very quietly” protesting the removal of Lee’s statue. But that’s wrong. There were white supremacists. There were counterprotesters. And there were heavily armed anti-government militias who showed up on Saturday. “Although Virginia is an open-carry state, the presence of the militia was unnerving to law enforcement officials on the scene,” The Post reported. The day after Trump’s Aug. 15 news conference, the New York Times quoted a woman named Michelle Piercy and described her as “a night shift worker at a Wichita, Kan., retirement home, who drove all night with a conservative group that opposed the planned removal of a statue of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee.” She told the Times: “Good people can go to Charlottesville.” Some Trump defenders, such as in a video titled “The Charlottesville Lie,” have prominently featured Piercy’s quote as evidence that Trump was right — there were protesters opposed to the removal of the statue. (…) As far as we can tell, Piercy gave one other interview about Charlottesville, with the pro-Trump website Media Equalizer, which described AWR as “a group that stands up for individual free speech rights and acts as a buffer between competing voices.” Piercy told Media Equalizer: “We were made aware that the situation could be dangerous, and we were prepared.” That is confirmed by Facebook videos, streamed by AWR, that show roughly three dozen militia members marching through the streets of Charlottesville, armed and dressed in military-style clothing, supposedly seeking people whose rights were being infringed. Police encouraged them to leave, according to an independent review of the day’s events commissioned by Charlottesville, but they attracted attention from counterprotesters. One militia member then was hit in the head by a rock, halting their retreat. “The militia members apparently did not realize that they had stopped directly across the street from Friendship Court, a predominantly African-American public housing complex,” the review said. A video posted on YouTube shows Heyer briefly crossing paths with AWR after the militia group was challenged by residents and counterprotesters to leave the area. Two revealing Facebook videos posted by the group have been deleted but were obtained by The Fact Checker. One, titled “The Truth about Charlottesville,” was posted on Aug. 12, immediately after law enforcement shut down the rally. It lasts about 25 minutes, and it is mostly narrated by Joshua Shoaff, also known as Ace Baker, the leader of AWR. Members of other militia groups also speak in the video. There’s no suggestion the militias traveled to Charlottesville because of the Lee statue, though late in the video a couple of militia members make brief references to the Confederate flag and Confederate monuments. (The 207-page independent review commissioned by Charlottesville also makes no mention of peaceful pro-statue demonstrators.) “We came to Charlottesville, Virginia, to tell both sides, the far right and the far left, listen, whether we agree with what you have to say or not, we agree with your right to say it, without being in fear of being assaulted by the other group,” Shoaff says. But he complains, “What happened when we came here? We were the one who were assaulted.” During the video, a militia member who is black appears on screen, and Shoaff sarcastically says, “Hey, look, hey, there’s black guy in here, oh, my God.” At another point, an unidentified militia member says: “We are civil nationalists. We love America. We love the Constitution. We respect any race, any color. We are all about respecting constitutional values.” After the city of Charlottesville sued AWR and other militia groups, Baker on Oct. 12 posted another video obtained by The Fact Checker. “We had long guns. We had pistols. We were pelted with bricks, and could have f—ing used deadly force. But we didn’t,” he declares. “We had the justification to use deadly force that day and mow people f—ing down. But we didn’t.” So what’s going on here? Anti-government militia groups are not racist but tend to be wary of Muslims and immigrants, according to experts who study the Patriot movement. (…) Militias are strongly pro-Trump, but his election posed a conundrum: They had always been deeply suspicious of the federal government, but now it was headed by someone they supported. So they started to build up antifa as an enemy, falsely believing the activists are bankrolled by billionaire investor George Soros, according to Mark Pitcavage, senior research fellow at the Center on Extremism of the Anti-Defamation League. Antifa, short for anti-fascist, sprung up to challenge neo-Nazis. “Militias started showing up at events where left-wing elements would be, and that includes white-supremacist events,” Pitcavage said. “They aren’t white supremacists. They are there opposing the people opposing the white supremacists.” Sam Jackson, a University at Albany professor who studies anti-government extremism, said that militia leaders have “strategic motivations to frame things in certain ways and it may not match real motivations.” That’s why they emphasize their defense of free speech and depict themselves as peacekeepers. But, he noted, “they never go out and protect the free speech rights of antifa and left-wing groups.” Militia groups “purported to be there to protect the First Amendment rights of the protesters,” said Mary McCord, legal director at Georgetown’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection and counsel for Charlottesville in a lawsuit. The “real goal, the evidence showed, was to provoke violent confrontations with counterprotesters and make a strong physical showing of white supremacy and white nationalism. I certainly think that AWR knew which side it was ‘protecting,’ and made that choice willingly.” In recent weeks, Trump has echoed the language he used regarding the Charlottesville attendees to encourage protests against social distancing orders. “These are very good people, but they are angry,” Trump tweeted on May 1. In other tweets, he urged governors to “liberate” states. That’s the language of militias, McCord said — code for liberation from a tyrannical government. And who has been showing up at the rallies opposing shutdown orders? Armed militias associated with the Patriot movement. (…) The evidence shows there were no quiet protesters against removing the statue that weekend. That’s just a figment of the president’s imagination. The militia groups were not spurred on by the Confederate statue controversy. They arrived in Charlottesville heavily armed and, by their own account, were prepared to use deadly force (?) — because of a desire to insert themselves in a dangerous situation that, in effect, pitted them against the foes of white supremacists. Trump earns Four Pinocchios. The Washinton Post
Our domestic violent extremists include everything from racially motivated violent extremists, which we’ve talked about here in this Committee before, I think when I testified last year, for example, all the way to antigovernment, anti-authority violent extremists, and that includes people ranging from anarchist violent extremists, people who subscribe to Antifa or other ideologies, as well as militia types, and those kinds. (…) We look at Antifa as more of an ideology or a movement than an organization. To be clear, we do have quite a number of properly predicated domestic terrorism investigations into violent anarchist extremists, any number of whom self identify with the Antifa movement. And that’s part of this broader group of domestic violent extremists that I’m talking about, but it’s just one part of it. We also have the racially motivated violence extremists, the militia types, and others. (…) I think one of the things a lot of people don’t understand about people who subscribe to this Boogaloo thinking is that their main focus is just dismantling, tearing down government. They’re less clear on what it is they think they’re going to replace government with. I’m not even sure they would all agree with each other (…) Antifa is a real thing. It’s not a group or an organization, it’s a movement or an ideology, may be one way of thinking of it. (…) as I think I said in response to an earlier question, Antifa is a real thing. It’s not a fiction, but it’s not an organization, or a structure. We understand it to be more of a movement, or maybe you could call it an ideology. (…) And we have seen individuals, I think I’ve mentioned this in response to one of the earlier questions, identified with the Antifa movement, coalescing regionally into what you might describe as small groups, or nodes. And we are actively investigating the potential violence from those regional nodes, if you will. (…) I think what I would say is that we have seen folks who subscribe to or self identify with the Antifa movement who coalesce regionally into what we refer to or think of as more as small groups or nodes. And they’re certainly organized at that level, those individuals. Chris Wray (FBI, 17.09.2020)
When you look across the country, you have got three broad categories. You have the peaceful protesters, which is maybe the biggest number of people. Then, you have the criminal opportunists who engage in looting, low-level vandalism, etc. Then, you have a third group. While it numerically might be the smallest, it is the most serious and the one we have to go after most aggressively, the ones who are violating federal law. Ied’s, molotov cocktails, arsons of government facilities. Who those people are, that is our priority. That is our focus. However, we have certainly seen a number of violent and anarchist extremists participating in that mix. I have gotten questions about antifa, for example, so let me try to be as clear as I can. Antifa is a real thing, it is not a fiction. We have seen organized, tactical activity at both the local and regional level. We have seen antifa adherents coalescing and working together in what I would describe as small groups. All of this I said last week, but some of it got more clearly conveyed than others. We had a number of predicated investigations into some anarchists, some of whom operate through these nodes and to subscribe to our self identify with anarchists extremism, including antifa, and we will not hesitate, will not hesitate to aggressively investigate that kind of activity. So we are going to be looking at, and will look at, their funding, their tactics, their logistics, their supply chains. We are going to pursue all available charges. There are also what i would describe as the militia types, and we have had plenty of those and we have a number of investigations into those as well. But I have been trying to put a lot of these things into nice, neat, clean buckets. It is a challenge because one of the things we see more and more in the counterterrorism space is people who assemble together in some kind of mishmash, a whole bunch of different ideologies. We sometimes refer to it as a salad bar of ideologies, a little bit of this, a little bit of that, and what they are really about is the violence. Chris Wray (FBI, 24.09.2020)
C’est une idée, pas une organisation. Joe Biden
Presque tout ce que je vois vient de l’aile gauche, pas de l’aile droite. (…) Proud Boys, restez en retrait et à l’écart de tout ça. Mais je vais vous dire (…) quelqu’un doit faire quelque chose contre les antifas et la gauche parce que ce n’est pas un problème de droite. Président Trump
I don’t know who the Proud Boys are. I mean, you’ll have to give me a definition, because I really don’t know who they are. I can only say they have to stand down, let law enforcement do their work. (…) I’ve always denounced any form of that (…) Any form of any of that, you have to denounce. But I also — and Joe Biden has to say something about Antifa. It’s not a philosophy. These are people that hit people over the head with baseball bats. He’s got to come out and he’s got to be strong, and he’s got to condemn Antifa. And it’s very important that he does that. Président Trump
We look at Antifa as more of an ideology or a movement than an organization. To be clear, we do have quite a number of properly predicated domestic terrorism investigations into violent anarchist extremists, any number of whom self-identify with the Antifa movement. And that’s part of this broader group of domestic violent extremists that I’m talking about, but it’s just one part of it. We also have the racially motivated violence extremists, the militia types, and others. (…) Antifa is a real thing. It’s not a group or an organization, it’s a movement or an ideology, maybe one way of thinking of it, and we have quite a number and I’ve said this consistently since my first time appearing before this committee, we have any number of properly predicated investigations into what we would describe as violent anarchist extremists. Some of those individuals self-identify with Antifa (…) we have seen individuals, I think I’ve mentioned this in response to one of the earlier questions, identified with the Antifa movement, coalescing regionally into what you might describe as small groups, or nodes. And we are actively investigating the potential violence from those regional nodes, if you will. (…) I want to be clear that by describing it as an ideology or movement, I by no means mean to minimize the seriousness of the violence and criminality that is going on across the country. Some of which is attributable to that people inspired by, or who self-identify with that ideology and movement. We’re focused on that violence on that criminality. And some of it is extremely serious. Christopher Wray (FBI Director)
The FBI tried to characterize the potential threat from individuals within that group. The bureau doesn’t designate groups but does investigate violent conspiracies. We do not intend and did not intend to designate the group as extremist. I can see where Clark County representatives came to that conclusion. That was not our intention. That’s not what we do. We will not open a case if someone belongs to antifa or even the Proud Boys. There has to be a credible allegation or a threat of violence before someone opens a case. Renn Cannon (Oregon FBI)
As I said on Saturday, we condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence. It has no place in America. And as I have said many times before: No matter the color of our skin, we all live under the same laws, we all salute the same great flag, and we are all made by the same almighty God. We must love each other, show affection for each other, and unite together in condemnation of hatred, bigotry, and violence. We must rediscover the bonds of love and loyalty that bring us together as Americans. Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans. We are a nation founded on the truth that all of us are created equal. We are equal in the eyes of our Creator. We are equal under the law. And we are equal under our Constitution. Those who spread violence in the name of bigotry strike at the very core of America.  (…) Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans. President Trump (Aug. 14, 2017)
Yes, I think there’s blame on both sides. You look at, you look at both sides. I think there’s blame on both sides, and I have no doubt about it, and you don’t have any doubt about it either. And, and, and, and if you reported it accurately, you would say. (…) Excuse me, ([the neonazis] didn’t put themselves down as neo — and you had some very bad people in that group. But you also had people that were very fine people on both sides. You had people in that group – excuse me, excuse me. I saw the same pictures as you did. You had people in that group that were there to protest the taking down, of to them, a very, very important statue and the renaming of a park from Robert E. Lee to another name. … It’s fine, you’re changing history, you’re changing culture, and you had people – and I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally – but you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists, okay? And the press has treated them absolutely unfairly. Now, in the other group also, you had some fine people, but you also had troublemakers and you see them come with the black outfits and with the helmets and with the baseball bats – you had a lot of bad people in the other group too. (…) There were people in that rally, and I looked the night before. If you look, they were people protesting very quietly, the taking down of the statue of Robert E. Lee. I’m sure in that group there were some bad ones. The following day, it looked like they had some rough, bad people, neo-Nazis, white nationalists, whatever you want to call them. But you had a lot of people in that group that were there to innocently protest and very legally protest, because you know, I don’t know if you know, they had a permit. The other group didn’t have a permit. So I only tell you this: There are two sides to a story. President Trump (Aug. 15, 2017)
The shooter in El Paso posted a manifesto online consumed by racist hate. In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry, and white supremacy. These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America. Hatred warps the mind, ravages the heart, and devours the soul. We have asked the FBI to identify all further resources they need to investigate and disrupt hate crimes and domestic terrorism — whatever they need.  President Trump (Aug. 5, 2019)
Only three things happened, for me, tonight: Number one, Donald Trump refused to condemn white supremacy. Number two, the president of the United States refused to condemn white supremacy. Number three, the commander-in-chief refused to condemn white supremacy on the global stage, in front of my children, in front of everybody’s families. And he was given the opportunity multiple times to condemn white supremacy, and he gave a wink and a nod to a racist, Nazi, murderous organization that is now celebrating online, that is now saying “We have a go-ahead.” Look at what they’re saying, look at what the Proud Boys are doing right now online, because the president of the United States refused to condemn white supremacy. Van Jones (CNN)
We are not sure if the socialist, communist, democratic or even anarchist utopia is possible. Rather, some insurrectionary anarchists believe that the meaning of being an anarchist lies in the struggle itself and what that struggle reveals. The Ex-Worker
Black people get shot for doing ordinary law-abiding things. They don’t have the luxury of anarchy. Andrè Taylor
Establishment media still continues to overlook trending Anarchist black bloc tactics especially in DC, Portland & Seattle with satellite activity in Denver, Sacramento and San Diego. (…) But (…) They’re real – but localized without a major event to capitalize on. Insurrectionary Anarchist ideology & rhetoric however has permeated into the social justice movement with blazing efficiency. Jeremy Lee Quinn (Sep 17, 2020)
As for Anarchism, there are several schools of thought in Anarchism. Consider these 3 in the US. Mainstream Anarchism​ (left wing) intersects with music, film, art & comics in pop culture and holds intellectual reverence to its historic ideals aligning on the left with Antifascism. Insurrectionary Anarchism​​ (fringe left)​ maintains a strong presence in the Northwest and via ​ CrimethInc​ holds itself to instigating revolutionary absolutes ie. abolish all police & prisons. Employs black bloc tactics to disrupt the system. National Anarchism​​(fringe right)​ is a racist iteration of the political philosophy that was a minor presence over the last decade in Idaho & the San Francisco Bay Area where “entryism” was espoused, the technique of infiltrating another group to convert its followers. (…) The comfort narrative from the mainstream has been that a right wing iteration has been responsible for provoking chaos. We have found no evidence of this on the ground. The Proud Boys are referenced most often. They are anti – Anarchist (commonly labeled Antifa) but not white supremacists, nor is there evidence that they have worked under the cover of protests. Rather, it is the Anarchist – Antifascists consistently showing up at rightwing rallies which results in confrontations with the Proud Boys. Thus, our current situation appears to involve the first two categories. Media outlets since the end of May have gravitated towards a benign pop culture interpretation of anarchism. Meanwhile in the streets, the more extreme version has been developing with strident fanaticism, especially in the Pacific Northwest. (…) Anarchists at their core seek ultimately to abolish hierarchy and in these last months we have seen them welcome synonymous Antifascist minded groups and autonomous rioters under their umbrella. The most dogmatic Anarchism opposes reform of any kind. It’s the entire system the Anarchist wishes to bring down, whether it is Capitalist or Communist. (…) All of this is irrelevant to the Anarchist. “We don’t care who is fucking shit up, as long as they’re fucking shit up,” a self identifying Anarchist wrote online after following an inquiry about possible right wing infiltrators at BLM protests in Minnesota. Anarchy it would seem is the point, as is the anonymity of all. (…) That fanaticism takes a different form in Portland where kids ages 15-25 have been recruited by the Youth Liberation Front and maintained a pattern of harassment and aggression against both Law enforcement and Nationalist or Patriot identifying citizens. At their most coherent, they are acting in the name of Antifascism against those they believe to be white supremacists. The Northwest YLF brought “Direct Action” to a fever pitch in Portland at the Federal Courthouse. The government responded with an iron first. As in Minneapolis, activists were eager to expose the nation’s militaristic itch. (…) Shellshocked confusion from the DHS is understandable. To those who have not followed the rise of modern Anarchism in street art, films, graphic novels, activism & counter culture – including its online integration with protest culture internationally- these mostly young men dressed in cartoonish masks & ninja outfits must seem alien. It started in Germany during a recession in the late 80s. The black bloc was born, an Anarchic method of anonymizing oneself at protests so acts of dissent might be committed free from criminality. The practice migrated to Seattle at the WTO riots of 1999. By the late 2000s black bloc tactics would be permeating sub culturally across the nation. The Anarchist movement is preached worldwide via ​“Crimethinc. The Ex-Worker”​, a collective formed by 1996. They published a modern Anarchist Cookbook “Recipe for Disasters” and other works by 2003. They joined twitter in 2008. At Occupy Wall Street in 2011, the masks came out. Alan Moore, the English Anarchist and comic book auteur (Watchmen, V for Vendetta) ​was involved with the publication of “Occupy Comics” romanticizing the Anarchist struggle in the wake of the New York action. Then came Ferguson. At the 2014 Ferguson riots, Anarchists took to the streets within the Community. CrimethInc will always have plausible deniability of direct involvement. They are the messengers of an idea they insist, which can never be defeated now that it is out in the ether. In their view they are mere scribes of the struggle which dates back to the 1800s. In agile doublespeak, CrimethInc dispels “outside agitator” myths at riots under the rationale that Anarchists are a part of any community movement fighting oppression rather than outsiders looking in. (…) New alliances were made May 26th 2020, the first day of the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis. What we still see on Twitter is only a snapshot. Direct messaging and private online Discord, Signal or Telegram app chats make it easy these days for like-minded collectives to share techniques, ideas and intentions privately. Purists to the portrayal of a 100% street revolution will argue techniques are applied organically with parallel thinking, rather than widespread coordination. Crimethinc would later post observations in a post mortem Minneapolis including a breakdown of the most effective “ballistics” and use of “peaceful protesters as shields.” CrimethInc often also extols tactics of looting and burning down businesses to divert police resources in ​“The Siege of the Third Precinct in Minneapolis, an Account & Analysis.”​ In this excerpt CrimethInc gives a rare direct address to rebels about using end to end encryption apps like Telegram. (…) It is significant to note that Anarchist methods could not be employed without a population of active participants reaching critical mass. On May 26th, that mass began to form. (…) May 27th Second day of Minneapolis protests: Anarchist website  ​CrimethInc ​begins tweeting blackbloc dress code tips for protesters. Several that day participate in riot actions breaking windows at the 3rd precinct dressed in all black. Several men carry umbrellas, a suggested accessory to shield rioters from overhead cameras. (…) In weeks to come more advanced tactics such as “ballistics” and using “peaceful protesters” as shields are shared via CrimethInc with its following. (…) A riot is the language of the unheard” ​begins to be passed around on social media omitting King’s conclusion in the clip ​“I hope we can avoid riots because riots are self-defeating and socially destructive. Jeremy Lee Quinn
The ability to continue to spread and to eventually bring more violence, including a violent insurgency, relies on the ability to hide in plain sight — to be confused with legitimate protests, and for media and the public to minimize the threat. Pamela Paresky (Rutgers university)
On the last Sunday in May, Jeremy Lee Quinn, a furloughed photographer in Santa Monica, Calif., was snapping photos of suburban moms kneeling at a Black Lives Matter protest when a friend alerted him to a more dramatic subject: looting at a shoe store about a mile away. He arrived to find young people pouring out of the store, shoeboxes under their arms. But there was something odd about the scene. A group of men, dressed entirely in black, milled around nearby, like supervisors. One wore a creepy rubber Halloween mask. The next day, Mr. Quinn took pictures of another store being looted. Again, he noticed something strange. A white man, clad in black, had broken the window with a crowbar, but walked away without taking a thing. Mr. Quinn began studying footage of looting from around the country and saw the same black outfits and, in some cases, the same masks. He decided to go to a protest dressed like that himself, to figure out what was really going on. He expected to find white supremacists who wanted to help re-elect President Trump by stoking fear of Black (sic) people. What he discovered instead were true believers in “insurrectionary anarchism.” (…) Mr. Quinn (…) has spent the past four months marching with “black bloc” anarchists in half a dozen cities across the country, chronicling the experience on his website, Public Report. He says he respects the idealistic goal of a hierarchy-free society that anarchists embrace, but grew increasingly uncomfortable with the tactics used by some anarchists, which he feared would set off a backlash that could help get President Trump re-elected. In Portland, Ore., he marched with people who shot fireworks at the federal court building. In Washington, he marched with protesters who harassed diners. (…) While talking heads on television routinely described it as a spontaneous eruption of anger at racial injustice, it was strategically planned, facilitated and advertised on social media by anarchists who believed that their actions advanced the cause of racial justice. In some cities, they were a fringe element, quickly expelled by peaceful organizers. But in Washington, Portland and Seattle they have attracted a “cultlike energy,” Mr. Quinn told me. Don’t take just Mr. Quinn’s word for it. Take the word of the anarchists themselves, who lay out the strategy in Crimethinc, an anarchist publication: Black-clad figures break windows, set fires, vandalize police cars, then melt back into the crowd of peaceful protesters. When the police respond by brutalizing innocent demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and rough arrests, the public’s disdain for law enforcement grows. It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101. An anarchist podcast called “The Ex-Worker” explains that while some anarchists believe in pacifist civil disobedience inspired by Mohandas Gandhi, others advocate using crimes like arson and shoplifting to wear down the capitalist system. (…) If that is not enough to convince you that there’s a method to the madness, check out the new report by Rutgers researchers that documents the “systematic, online mobilization of violence that was planned, coordinated (in real time) and celebrated by explicitly violent anarcho-socialist networks that rode on the coattails of peaceful protest,” according to its co-author Pamela Paresky. She said some anarchist social media accounts had grown 300-fold since May, to hundreds of thousands of followers. (…) the scale of destruction caught the media’s attention in a way that peaceful protests hadn’t. How many articles would I have written about a peaceful march? How many months would Mr. Quinn have spent investigating suburban moms kneeling? That’s on us. While I feared that the looting and arson would derail the urgent demands for racial justice and bring condemnation, I was wrong, at least in the short term. Support for Black Lives Matter soared. Corporations opened their wallets. (…) But as the protests continue, support has flagged. The percentage of people who say they support the Black Lives Matter movement has dropped from 67 percent in June to 55 percent, according to a recent Pew poll. “Insurrectionary anarchy” brings diminishing returns, especially as anarchists complicate life for those working within the system to halt police violence. (…)That’s the thing about “insurrectionary anarchists.” They make fickle allies. If they help you get into power, they will try to oust you the following day, since power is what they are against. Many of them don’t even vote. They are experts at unraveling an old order but considerably less skilled at building a new one. That’s why, even after more than 100 days of protest in Portland, activists do not agree on a set of common policy goals. Even some anarchists admit as much. “We are not sure if the socialist, communist, democratic or even anarchist utopia is possible,” a voice on “The Ex-Worker” podcast intones. “Rather, some insurrectionary anarchists believe that the meaning of being an anarchist lies in the struggle itself and what that struggle reveals.” In other words, it’s not really about George Floyd or Black lives, but insurrection for insurrection’s sake. Farah Stockman
Pendant toutes les années du mitterrandisme, nous n’avons jamais été face à une menace fasciste, donc tout antifascisme n’était que du théâtre. Nous avons été face à un parti, le Front National, qui était un parti d’extrême droite, un parti populiste aussi, à sa façon, mais nous n’avons jamais été dans une situation de menace fasciste, et même pas face à un parti fasciste.D’abord le procès en fascisme à l’égard de Nicolas Sarkozy est à la fois absurde et scandaleux. Je suis profondément attaché à l’identité nationale et je crois même ressentir et savoir ce qu’elle est, en tout cas pour moi. L’identité nationale, c’est notre bien commun, c’est une langue, c’est une histoire, c’est une mémoire, ce qui n’est pas exactement la même chose, c’est une culture, c’est-à-dire une littérature, des arts, une, la philo, les philosophies. Et puis c’est une organisation politique avec ses principes et ses lois. Quand on vit en France, j’ajouterai : l’identité nationale, c’est aussi un art de vivre, peut-être, que cette identité nationale. Je crois profondément que les nations existent, existent encore, et en France, ce qui est frappant, c’est que nous sommes à la fois attachés à la multiplicité des expressions qui font notre nation, et à la singularité de notre propre nation. Et donc ce que je me dis, c’est que s’il y a aujourd’hui une crise de l’identité, crise de l’identité à travers notamment des institutions qui l’exprimaient, la représentaient, c’est peut-être parce qu’il y a une crise de la tradition, une crise de la transmission. Il faut que nous rappelions les éléments essentiels de notre identité nationale parce que si nous doutons de notre identité nationale, nous aurons évidemment beaucoup plus de mal à intégrer. Lionel Jospin (France Culture, 29.09.07)
Car la consigne (« Qu’ils s’en aillent tous ») ne visera pas seulement ce président, roi des accointances, et ses ministres, ce conseil d’administration gouvernemental de la clique du Fouquet’s ! Elle concernera toute l’oligarchie bénéficiaire du gâchis actuel. « Qu’ils s’en aillent tous ! » : les patrons hors de prix, les sorciers du fric qui transforment tout ce qui est humain en marchandise, les émigrés fiscaux, les financiers dont les exigences cancérisent les entreprises. Qu’ils s’en aillent aussi, les griots du prétendu « déclin de la France » avec leurs salles refrains qui injectent le poison de la résignation. Et pendant que j’y suis, « Qu’ils s’en aillent tous » aussi ces antihéros du sport, gorgés d’argent, planqués du fisc, blindés d’ingratitude. Du balai ! Ouste ! De l’air ! Jean-Luc Mélenchon (extrait du livre)
Quand Mélenchon titre son livre Chassez-les tous (sic), c’est d’une violence extraordinaire. Mais lui est invité partout.  Jean-Marie Aphatie
C’est une chose complètement acceptée. Certains antifa ne partagent pas ces codes-là, mais dans le noyau dur du mouvement, ils s’habillent de la même façon et avec les mêmes marques que le camp d’en face. Parce que les racines de leurs mouvements sont les mêmes: les skinheads. Les deux ont divergé entre redskins et skins d’extrême-droite, mais l’origine est la même. (…) depuis que les antifa se revendiquent plus ouvertement skinheads, et se rasent même la tête, ce sont les mêmes au niveau du look. Avec les mêmes bombers, les mêmes Dr Martens, les mêmes origines culturelles, et la même fascination pour la baston. Ce sont les frères ouverts contre les frères fermés, en somme. (…) c’est un grand classique. Les boutiques qui vendent des fringues «rock» au sens très large du terme sont peu nombreuses, donc c’est un lieu de croisement. Dans le XVe arrondissement parisien, une boutique qui distribue ces marques est surtout visitée par les skinheads d’extrême droite, mais peut l’être par l’autre bord aussi. Il y a déjà eu plusieurs bastons autour de la boutique, surtout entre 1990 et 1995. (…) pratiquement tous les skins et les antifas qui portent ces marques s’habillent là-bas. Ils ont généralement peu de moyens, et comme les prix de ces marques sont élevés, ils attendent ces réductions pour se fournir. Depuis deux, trois ans, il y a des tensions lors de ces ventes, des individus des deux bords s’y croisent, il y a des regards. On peut presque dire que ce drame était inéluctable. Marc-Aurèle Vecchione
Dans les années 60, les mods anglais, incarnés par les Kinks ou les Who, s’emparent des vêtements bourgeois destinés aux élites (celles qui jouent au tennis, notamment) : le polo Fred Perry, le blouson Harrington ou les chemises Ben Sherman. Avec la fin des mods à l’aube des années 70, l’image de ces maisons se trouble : les skinheads, nés en réaction au mouvement hippie, se les approprient. Parmi eux, certains sont apolitiques, d’autres d’extrême gauche, beaucoup sont fascistes. Si bien que dans les années 70 et 80, le vestiaire en descendance mods est davantage associé aux militants extrémistes qu’à la musique. La succession d’artistes anglo-saxons s’affichant en Fred Perry (les Pogues, époque punk ; les Specials, version ska ; les Blur et Oasis, à l’ère brit-pop, ou les Strokes et Franz Ferdinand, plus rock), n’a pas suffi à dissiper l’image ambiguë de la marque. Aujourd’hui, Fred Perry ne communique pas sur sa stratégie marketing, mais les activités de ces dix dernières années montrent sa volonté de se distinguer en tant que maison de mode versée dans la créativité, et la musique. (…) Autre signe d’une volonté d’assainissement de son image : Fred Perry inaugure en 2008 sa première boutique française à Paris, dans le quartier du Marais. Une enseigne proprette, à côté de Zadig & Voltaire, Maje et Sandro, où règne une ambiance bien différente des petites boutiques multimarques à l’ambiance un peu tendue, spécialisées dans les griffes qu’aiment certains militants d’extrême droite, comme Ben Sherman ou Lonsdale. Si Fred Perry et Ben Sherman ont pu compenser de troubles associations politiques par une cool attitude, la marque anglaise Lonsdale a été clairement associée aux groupuscules d’extrême droite. Les néonazis l’auraient «récupérée» à cause des lettres «NSDA» au cœur du mot «Lonsdale» (NSDA pour Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, le parti nazi). Au milieu des années 2000, la griffe a ainsi été bannie dans plusieurs établissements scolaires en Allemagne, et surtout aux Pays-Bas, ou l’expression «jeunesse Lonsdale» était apparue pour évoquer la résurgence néonazie dans le pays. Plusieurs points de vente, trop marqués politiquement, ont dû être fermés, et les campagnes de communication de la marque martèlent désormais le slogan «Lonsdale loves all colours». Libération
La tragique mort de Clément Méric réveille une image que la marque anglaise avait réussi à faire un peu oublier. Il faudra qu’elle redouble d’effort pour éloigner ces clients aussi fidèles que gênants. Un peu comme Lacoste avait tenté de le faire en son temps avec les rappeurs des cités. Huffington post
Antifa (…) est le nom collectif utilisé par différents groupes autonomes et souvent informels se réclamant de l’antifascisme. Les groupes Antifa sont connus pour leur recours à l’action directe pour s’opposer à l’extrême droite, pouvant aller jusqu’à la destruction de biens matériels et la violence physique lorsqu’ils le jugent nécessaire. La plupart de ces groupes sont anti-gouvernement et anti-capitalistes, et appartiennent à des mouvances d’extrême gauche anarchistes, communistes ou socialistes. Ils mettent l’accent notamment sur la lutte directe contre l’extrême droite et les mouvements prônant la suprématie de la race blanche. Le terme Antifa tient son origine de l’Action antifasciste, un nom employé par des mouvements politiques européens des années 1920 et 1930 qui ont lutté contre les fascistes en Allemagne, en Italie et en Espagne. En réponse à l’importance du néonazisme après la chute du Mur de Berlin, des manifestants antifascistes ont réapparu en Allemagne. Peter Beinart, un journaliste américain, écrit que « à la fin des années 1980 aux États-Unis, des fans de punk appartenant à des mouvances de gauche leur ont emboîté le pas mais sous le nom d’Anti-Racist Action (« Action antiraciste »), pensant que les Américains seraient plus familiers avec la lutte contre le racisme qu’avec celle contre le fascisme ». Le militantisme antifasciste remonte aux années 1920, années durant lesquelles les anti-fascistes ont été impliqués dans des batailles de rue contre les Chemises noires de Benito Mussolini ou celles brunes d’Adolf Hitler, l’Union britannique des fascistes d’Oswald Mosley et des organisations américaines pro-nazies telles que les Amis de la Nouvelle-Allemagne. Bien qu’il n’existe pas de réelle connexion entre les organisations antifascistes, on peut remonter la généalogie de l’Antifa américaine jusqu’à l’Allemagne de Weimar, où fut créé en 1932 le premier groupe décrit comme « antifa », Antifaschistische Aktion, avec la participation du Parti communiste d’Allemagne. Le logo aux deux drapeaux d’Antifaschistische Aktion est le symbole le plus couramment utilisé par l’Antifa américaine, avec le cercle antifasciste aux trois flèches du mouvement social-démocrate Front de fer (créé en 1931 puis dirigé par les sociaux-démocrates). L’Anti-Racist Action, née des mouvements punk et d’une partie du mouvement skinhead de la fin des années 1980, est le précurseur direct de beaucoup, sinon de la plupart des mouvements antifa américains actuels. D’autres groupes antifa ont cependant d’autres ascendances, comme les Baldies de Minneapolis, dans le Minnesota, un groupe formé en 1987, avec l’intention de combattre le néonazisme. Le mouvement Antifa est constitué de groupes autonomes, et n’a donc pas d’organisation formelle. Ces groupes forment des réseaux de soutien, comme le NYC Antifa, ou fonctionnent de façon indépendante. L’organisation de manifestations se fait généralement via les médias sociaux, des sites web et des listes de diffusion. Bien que le nombre d’affiliés aux mouvements Antifa ne puisse être estimé avec précision, le mouvement a pris plus d’ampleur depuis l’élection de Donald Trump : environ 200 groupes, de taille et niveau d’engagement variables, existent actuellement aux États-Unis. Dans une interview accordée à la chaîne de télévision CNN en août 2017, un membre de Rose City Antifa (un groupe de Portland, dans l’Oregon), explique que « les membres de notre groupe viennent de toute la gauche : nous avons des anarchistes, nous avons des socialistes, nous avons même des libéraux et des sociaux-démocrates ». Bien que les militants Antifa puissent pratiquer l’entraide, comme ils le firent après l’ouragan Harvey, ils ont surtout été associés aux démonstrations de violence à l’encontre de la police et des personnes dont les opinions politiques sont jugées nauséabondes. Ils sont généralement perçus comme n’hésitant pas à recourir à des démonstrations de force. Un manuel publié sur It’s Going Down, un site anarchiste, met pourtant en garde contre « ceux qui ont seulement envie de se battre ». Il note en outre que « se confronter physiquement aux fascistes est un aspect nécessaire de la lutte anti-fasciste, mais ce n’est pas le seul ni même nécessairement le plus important ». Selon Peter Beinart, les militants Antifa « luttent contre le suprémacisme blanc, non en essayant de changer la politique du gouvernement, mais par l’action directe. Ils essaient d’identifier publiquement les suprémacistes pour les faire licencier ou leur faire perdre leur logement », en plus de « perturber leurs rassemblements, y compris par la force ». Les groupes Antifa ont participé activement aux protestations et manifestations contre l’élection de Donald Trump en 2016. Ils ont également participé aux manifestations de février 2017 à Berkeley contre le porte-parole de l’alt-right Milo Yiannopoulos. Ces manifestations ont attiré l’attention du public, les médias ayant rapporté que les Antifa ont « lancé des cocktails Molotov et brisé des fenêtres » et causé 100 000 $ de dommages. Le 15 juin 2017, des membres d’Antifa se sont joints aux manifestants de l’Evergreen State College, qui s’opposaient à un événement organisé par le Patriot Prayer, un mouvement de droite libérale suspecté de liens avec le suprémacisme blanc. Lors des contre-manifestations au rassemblement « Unir la droite » de Charlottesville en août 2017, les Antifa ont « certainement utilisé des battes et des marqueurs à air comprimé contre les manifestants suprémacistes ». Selon un Antifa interrogé par la journaliste Adele Stan, les battes utilisées par les manifestants antifascistes sont justifiées par la présence de « goon squads » (sortes de groupes mercenaires) dans l’autre camp. Lors de cet événement, des Antifa ont protégé Cornel West et divers membres du clergé de l’attaque de suprémacistes. Cornel West a plus tard déclaré qu’il estimait que les Antifa lui avaient « sauvé la vie ». Selon un militant d’extrême droite, les manifestants Antifa n’étaient pas cantonnés au périmètre qui leur avait été alloué par la ville, mais arpentaient les rues et ont bloqué le passage aux manifestants d’extrême-droite avant de lancer une attaque sur eux avec des masses, des sprays au poivre, des briques, des bâtons et du liquide sale. À Berkeley, le 27 août 2017, une centaine de manifestants Antifa auraient rejoint les 2 000 à 4 000 contre-manifestants présents pour s’opposer à ce qui a été décrit comme une « poignée » de manifestants de l’alt-right et de supporters du président Trump, réunis pour un rally « Say No to Marxism » (« Non au marxisme ») qui avait été annulé pour des raisons de sécurité. Il est décrit que certains militants Antifa ont donné des coups de pied à des manifestants non armés et ont menacé de casser les caméras des journalistes. Le maire de Berkeley Jesse Arreguin a suggéré de classer les Antifa de la ville comme « gang ». Lors de nouvelles contre-manifestations en opposition au rassemblement « Unir la droite » à Charlottesville en août 2018, des Antifas ont invectivé et attaqué des journalistes et des policiers, leur lançant notamment des œufs et des bouteilles d’eau, et en tirant des feux d’artifice dans leur direction. Des journalistes rapportent aussi que des Antifa les ont harcelés pour les empêcher de filmer. Selon la National Public Radio, « ceux qui parlent au nom du mouvement Antifa reconnaissent qu’ils ont parfois des battes et des massues » et leur « méthode repose sur la confrontation ». CNN affirme que les Antifa sont « connus pour causer des dégradations matérielles lors des manifestations ». Scott Crow, un membre de longue date d’un groupe Antifa et impliqué dans l’organisation du mouvement selon CNN, fait valoir que la destruction de la propriété n’est pas une forme de violence. Selon Brian Levin, directeur du Centre pour l’Étude de la Haine et de l’Extrémisme à l’Université d’État de Californie de San Bernardino, les Antifa ont recours à la violence car « ils croient que les élites contrôlent le gouvernement et les médias. Ils ont donc besoin de s’opposer frontalement à ceux qu’ils considèrent comme racistes ». Selon Mark Bray, maître de conférences à l’Institut de recherche sur le genre de Dartmouth et auteur d’Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook (Antifa: Le Manuel des antifascistes), les adhérents au mouvement sont pour la plupart socialistes, anarchistes ou communistes et « refusent de faire appel à la police ou à l’État pour freiner l’avancée du suprémacisme blanc. Ils préconisent à la place l’opposition populaire au fascisme telle que nous avons pu le voir à Charlottesville ». En rapport avec cet ouvrage, Carlos Lozada a déclaré que les groupes Antifa ne respectent pas la liberté d’expression. Selon Bray, l’atteinte à la liberté d’expression « est justifiée par son rôle dans la lutte politique contre le fascisme ». Selon Scott Crow, cette justification se fonde sur le principe de l’action directe : « L’incitation à la haine ne relève pas de la liberté d’expression. Si vous mettez en danger des personnes avec ce que vous dites et les actes que vos paroles impliquent, alors vous n’avez pas le droit de le dire. C’est pour cela que nous allons au conflit, pour les faire taire, parce que nous croyons que les nazis et les fascistes de tout poil ne devraient pas avoir droit à la parole ». En juin 2017, la mouvance Antifa a été rattachée à l’anarchisme par le Département de la sécurité intérieure du New Jersey, qui avec le FBI a classé leurs activités comme terrorisme domestique. Le FBI et le DSI ont également reconnu être incapables d’infiltrer « l’organisation diffuse et décentralisée » de ces groupes. À la suite des violences de Berkeley le 27 août 2017, les actions des Antifa ont fait l’objet de critiques de la part de Républicains, de Démocrates et des commentateurs politiques des médias américains: la chef de l’opposition Nancy Pelosi condamne la violence des militants Antifa à Berkeley dans un communiqué de presse, l’animatrice de talk-show conservatrice et contributrice à Fox News Laura Ingraham a proposé de déclarer le mouvement Antifa comme organisation terroriste, Trevor Noah, humoriste et animateur de The Daily Show, a qualifié l’Antifa de « vegan ISIS » (« Daesh végétalien »). En août 2017, une pétition appelant à ce que les Antifa soient classés par le Pentagone comme une organisation terroriste a été lancée via la plate-forme de la Maison-Blanche We The People. Elle a recueilli plus de 100 000 signatures en trois jours, et par conséquent – en vertu de la politique définie par l’administration Obama – aurait dû recevoir un examen officiel et une réponse par la Maison-Blanche. Avec plus de 300 000 signatures à la fin du mois d’août, c’était la troisième pétition la plus signée de la plate-forme. Toutefois, cette politique n’a pas été poursuivie par l’administration Trump, qui n’a répondu à aucune des pétitions de la plate-forme. L’auteur de la pétition, connu sous le pseudonyme de Microchip, a expliqué à Politico que le but de celle-ci n’était pas nécessairement de provoquer une quelconque action concrète de la part du gouvernement, mais simplement de pousser les conservateurs à la partager et à en débattre. En mai 2020, en réaction aux manifestations faisant suite à la mort de George Floyd, Donald Trump annonce sur Twitter que les États-Unis « désigneront Antifa comme une organisation terroriste ». (…) Les anti-antifas sont les opposants à l’Action Antifasciste. Il ne s’agit pas du nom d’une quelconque organisation. Les anti-antifas sont souvent composés de militants d’extrême droite radicaux tels des néofascistes, néonazis, skinhead d’extrême droite, ainsi que de suprémacistes blancs et noirs. Wikipedia
This whole event should be seen through the context of what it is…an information war. A number of people who go to these protests are looking for fights or to document them. they’re all livestreaming. When tensions boil over, it’s meant to be ammunition for a culture war. Charlie Warzel (Jun 30, 2019)
It’s not ‘both sides-ing’ to note that both parties…& many of the ppl who cover them (journalists, provacateurs, activists) know what’s going on. They know the risks & they know how it can be weaponized. Which is why talking about this like it’s a 20th century protest is stupid. Charlie Warzel
But we know, as filmmakers long have, that footage doesn’t convey the objective reality of a situation; it reveals certain things and obscures others. Moreover, the meaning of filmed events is entirely open to contestation. The mere fact that Ngo was assaulted doesn’t say what the meaning of that assault is, or what the broader context is that’s necessary to understand it. The result is a never-ending stream of Rorschach test controversies pushed on social media, in which either the meaning of events on film or even the very facts of what’s being depicted are litigated endlessly and tied to our right-versus-left culture war. All forms of antifa violence are problematic,” the Anti-Defamation League, a Jewish anti-hate group, writes in its primer on the group. “That said, it is important to reject attempts to claim equivalence between the antifa and the white supremacist groups they oppose.” The guide continues: Antifa reject racism but use unacceptable tactics. White supremacists use even more extreme violence to spread their ideologies of hate, to intimidate ethnic minorities, and undermine democratic norms. Right-wing extremists have been one of the largest and most consistent sources of domestic terror incidents in the United States for many years; they have murdered hundreds of people in this country over the last ten years alone. To date, there have not been any known antifa-related murders. Anti-fascism originated in response to early European fascism, and when Mussolini’s Blackshirts and Hitler’s Brownshirts were ascendant in Europe, various socialist, communist, and anarchist parties and groups emerged to confront them. When I talk about anti-fascism in the book and when we talk about it today, it’s really a matter of tracing the sort of historical lineage of revolutionary anti-fascist movements that came from below, from the people, and not from the state. The sort of militant anti-fascism that antifa represents reemerged in postwar Europe in Britain, where fascists had broad rights to organize and demonstrate. You started to see these groups spring up in the 1940s and ’50s and ’60s and ’70s. You saw similar movements in Germany in the ’80s around the time the Berlin Wall falls, when a wave of neo-Nazism rolled across the country targeting immigrants. There, as elsewhere, leftist groups emerged as tools of self-defense. The whole point was to stare down these fascist groups in the street and stop them by force if necessary. These groups in the ’80s adopted the name antifa, and it eventually spread to the United States in the late ’80s and into the ’90s. Originally, it was known as the Anti-Racist Action Network. That kind of faded in the mid-2000s; the recent wave we’re seeing in the US developed out of it, but has taken on more of the name and the kind of aesthetics of the European movement. (…) The basic principle of antifa is “no platform for fascism.” If you ask them, they’ll tell you that they believe you have to deny any and all platforms to fascism, no matter how big or small the threat. The original fascist groups that later seized power in Europe started out very small. You cannot, they argue, treat these groups lightly. You need to take them with the utmost seriousness, and the way to prevent them from growing is to prevent them from having even the first step toward becoming normalized in society. (…) Much of what they do does not involve physical confrontation. They also focus on using public opinion to expose white supremacists and raise the social and professional costs of their participation in these groups. They want to see these people fired from their jobs, denounced by their families, marginalized by their communities. But yes, part of what they do is physical confrontation. They view self-defense as necessary in terms of defending communities against white supremacists. They also see this as a preventative action. They look at the history of fascism in Europe and say, “we have to eradicate this problem before it gets any bigger, before it’s too late.” Sometimes that involves physical confrontation or blocking their marches or whatever the case may be. It’s also important to remember that these are self-described revolutionaries. They’re anarchists and communists who are way outside the traditional conservative-liberal spectrum. They’re not interested in and don’t feel constrained by conventional norms. (…) The other thing that’s worth clarifying is that anti-fascist groups don’t only organize against textbook fascists. There is, first of all, a lot of debate about what constitutes fascism. And it’s a legitimate question to ask — where does one draw the line, and how does one see this kind of organizing? Of course, there is no central command for a group like antifa. There is no antifa board of directors telling people where that line is, and so of course different groups will assess different threats as they see fit. But I suppose the question you’re raising has to do with the slippery-slope argument, which is that if you start calling everyone a fascist and depriving them of a platform, where does it end? One of the arguments I make in the book is that while analytically that’s a conversation worth having, I don’t know of any empirical examples of anti-fascists successfully stopping a neo-Nazi group and then moving on to other groups that are not racist but merely to the right. What tends to happen is they disband once they’ve successfully marginalized or eliminated the local right-wing extremist threat, and then return to what they normally do — organizing unions, doing environmental activism, etc. (…) Whenever we look at the question of causation in history, you can never isolate one variable and make grand or definitive conclusions. So I don’t want to overstate any of the causal claims being made here. But Norway is an interesting example. In the ’90s, they had a pretty violent neo-Nazi skinhead movement, and the street-level anti-fascist groups there seemed to play a significant role in marginalizing the threat. By the end of ’90s it was pretty much defunct, and subsequently there hasn’t been a serious fascist [movement] in Norway. Another example you can look at is popular responses to the National Front [a far-right political party formed in Britain in 1967] in the late ’70s in Britain. The National Front was pretty huge, and the Anti-Nazi League, through both a combination of militant anti-fascist tactics and also some more popular organizing and electoral strategies, managed to successfully deflate the National Front momentum. One of the most famous moments of that era was the Battle of Lewisham in 1977 where the members of this largely immigrant community physically blocked a big National Front march and that sort of stopped their aggressive efforts to target that community. (…) First, they argue that in Europe you can see that parliamentary democracy did not always stop the advance of fascism and Nazism — and in the cases of both Germany and Italy, Hitler and Mussolini were appointed and gained their power largely through democratic means. When Hitler took his final control through the [1933] Enabling Act, it was approved by parliament. They also say that rational discourse is insufficient on its own because a lot of good arguments were made and a lot of debates were had but ultimately that was insufficient during that period, and so the view that good ideas always prevail over bad ideas isn’t very convincing. Their other key point, which probably isn’t made enough, is that these are revolutionary leftists. They’re not concerned about the fact that fascism targets liberalism. These are self-described revolutionaries. They have no allegiance to liberal democracy, which they believe has failed the marginalized communities they’re defending. They’re anarchists and communists who are way outside the traditional conservative-liberal spectrum. (…) anti-fascists will concede that most of the time nonviolence is certainly the way to go. Most antifa members believe it’s far easier to use nonviolent methods than it is to show up and use direct action methods. But they argue that history shows that it’s dangerous to take violence and self-defense off the table. (…) I think the people who showed up in Charlottesville to square off against self-identified neo-Nazis did the world a service, and I applaud them. But when I see antifa showing up at places like UC Berkeley and setting fire to cars and throwing rocks through windows in order to prevent someone like Milo Yiannopoulos from speaking, I think they’ve gone way too far. Milo isn’t a Nazi, and he isn’t an actual threat. He’s a traveling clown looking to offend social justice warriors. I think that reasonable people can disagree about this. I can’t speak for the individuals who committed these political actions, but the general defense is that the rationale for shutting down someone like Milo has to do with the fact that his kind of commentary emboldens actual fascists. The Berkeley administrators issued a statement in advance that they feared he was going to out undocumented students on campus, and previously he had targeted a transgender student at the University of Milwaukee Wisconsin. Antifa regards this as an instigation to violence, and so they feel justified in shutting it down. Again, though, this is much easier to understand when you remember that antifa isn’t concerned with free speech or other liberal democratic values. (…) For the most part, these are pan-leftist groups composed of leftists of different stripes. They all seem to have different views of what they think the ideal social order looks like. Some of them are Marxists, some are Leninists, some are social democrats or anarchists. But they cohere around a response to what they perceive as a common threat. (…) As I said before, anti-fascists don’t have any allegiance to liberalism, so that’s not the question that they are focused on. The question is also how much of a threat do we think white supremacists or neo-Nazis pose, both in a literal or immediate sense but also in terms of their ability to influence broader discourses or even the Trump administration. I believe that for people who are feeling the worst repercussions of this, they are already experiencing a kind of illiberalism in terms of their lack of access to the kinds of freedoms that liberalism promotes and tries to aspire to; and so for me, that’s more of a focus, in terms of trying to mitigate those kinds of problems, than the fears of people who, prior to Trump, thought that everything was fine in the US. (…) The first thing to point out is that being part of one of these groups is a huge time commitment, and the vetting process that these groups have for bringing in new people is very strenuous. You have to really commit — it’s basically like a second job. This limits the number of people that are going to be willing to put their time into it. I don’t think the antifa movement is going to explode as much as some do. But I do think that antifa can influence where leftist politics in America is going. They are aggressive, loud, and fiercely committed. They’re having a wider influence on the radical left in this country, particularly on campuses and with other groups like Black Lives Matter. But I don’t want to overstate antifa’s role in these shifts. (…) they don’t care about the Democratic Party. (…) Will a lot of people see antifa and their methods as a poor reflection of the left? Absolutely. But I also think that these are not people who were going to vote Democrat anyway. If you read the news or pay attention to what’s happening, you know that Nancy Pelosi has nothing to do with antifa. This group loathes the Democratic Party, and they don’t hide that. So anyone who blames the Democrats for antifa is likely already disposed to vote Republican anyway. Mark Bray
The lack of formal structure and leadership doesn’t mean antifa is unorganized. Individual activists often issue “calls for action” on social media, urging like-minded people to join them in the streets. The rallying cry is boosted by anarchists, socialists, social-justice activists, far-left nonprofits, clergy and others—some of whom call themselves antifa and some not. Turnout at protests or rallies is spontaneous, and to the extent that there are antifa groups, they’re small and intimate. “The phrase that leftists use is ‘affinity groups,’ ” says Mark Bray, author of “Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook” a sympathetic history. “They are basically people who know each other well and can plan to attend actions together and sometimes will have a division of tasks.” It’s no coincidence that many antifa demonstrations occur at police stations and courthouses. Antifa generally “refuses to put faith in the courts or the police to stop the far right,” Mr. Bray says. “Part of the reason for that is a kind of radical critique of the system as being a fertile ground for fascism to grow.” Instead of seeking legal redress, antifa activists embrace what they euphemistically describe as a “diversity of tactics.” (…) Not all antifa adherents engage in violence, but they universally refuse to disavow it. Other antifa tactics include the heckler’s veto and doxxing—publicizing information about opponents’ identity in the hope that they will lose their jobs or suffer other social consequences. Who’s funding antifa? “The question, honestly, is silly, because it’s based on the assumption that there’s a whole lot of expensive things that require funding,” says George Ciccariello-Maher, a self-professed supporter of antifa and author of the forthcoming “A World Without Police.” Instead, “it’s just people showing up” and participating in “a shoestring operation.” It doesn’t cost much to print posters, and activists can rent a U-Haul and drop off a load of protest supplies for a couple of hundred dollars. The little fund-raising that is done is usually crowd-sourced, both Messrs. Bray and Ciccariello-Maher say. Supporters of far-left protests make contributions through GoFundMe to bail-out funds or legal-defense funds for those arrested, and more-established progressive groups sometimes help promote these efforts. In June, Kamala Harris tweeted in support of the Minnesota Freedom Fund, and Reuters reported that at least 13 Biden staffers gave to it. (…) Antifa’s complexity was part of what Federal Bureau of Investigation Director Chris Wray tried to explain during the congressional testimony Mr. Biden cited in the debate. “Antifa is a real thing. It is not a fiction,” Mr. Wray said. “Trying to put a lot of these things into nice, neat, clean buckets” is “a bit of a challenge, because one of the things that we see more and more in the counterterrorism spaces [is] people who assemble together in some kind of mishmash, a bunch of different ideologies. All—we sometimes refer to it as almost like a salad bar of ideologies, a little bit of this, a little bit of that, and what they’re really about is the violence.” Mr. Wray vowed that “we are not going to stand for the violence” and said the FBI is investigating “anarchist violent extremists” and “their funding, their tactics, the logistics, their supply chains.” Antifa’s lack of a central structure is what makes it effective at imposing disorder on American cities. Without leadership, no one can moderate the movement or prevent a protest from becoming a riot. If antifa were a conventional organization, the government could cripple it by bringing criminal charges against its leaders and financial backers. Instead, it can only prosecute low-level activists who commit street crimes. Even that often proves difficult, since antifa has adopted a “black bloc” uniform that makes it difficult to tell rioters apart. Instead of a hierarchy, law enforcement is now contending with a hydra. Jillian Kay Melchior
I think we should classify them as a gang. They come dressed in uniforms. They have weapons, almost like a militia, and I think we need to think about that in terms of our law enforcement approach. I think we are going to have to think ‘big picture’ about what is the strategy for how we are going to deal with these violent elements on the left as well. We also need to hold accountable and encourage people not to associate with these extremists because it empowers them and gives them cover. Berkeley Mayor Jesse Arreguin
Under California law, a gang is defined as an organization of at least three persons, with a common name, or identifying mark or symbol, which engages in criminal activity. Criminals who commit offenses for gangs can face tougher sentences in the state. Newsweek

Attention, un extrémisme peut en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’au lendemain d’un premier débat présidentiel américain …

Nos médias nous bassinent d’articles à charge sur un groupuscule nationaliste américain …

Fondé il y a quatre ans à New York par un hipster canado-britannique et cofondateur du magazine « Vice », un certain Gavin McInnes, mais dirigé aujourd’hui par un Afro-cubain

Auquel aurait prétendument apporté son soutien un président américain …

Qui a par ailleurs maintes fois dénoncé le racisme des néonazis et suprémacistes blancs …

Auxquels nos médias assimilent tous les groupes nationalistes

Tout en célébrant comme « antiracisme » le racisme inversé des Black Lives Matter

Et qu’après des semaines de confinement, de casse et d’émeutes – et de refus de l’aide fédérale dont elle se plaint aujourd’hui de ne pas avoir reçu – la plus grande ville américaine se retrouve au bord du gouffre financier

Pendant que chez nous sur une radio publique, un sociologue appelle ouvertement à la censure des pensées « injustes et impures »

Comment ne pas voir ….

Sans compter l’extrême corruption d’une presse qui depuis quatre ans non seulement instruit et conduit à charge uniquement un véritable procès de Moscou permanent pour délégitimer par tous les moyens, faux dossiers du FBI compris, l’élu des « deplorables …

Mais se prépare avec une élection par correspondance (avec le vote-harvesting) – où certains états ont déjà prévu de comptabiliser les envois jusqu’à deux semaines après le vote officiel ! – à torpiller la prochaine élection et, si le président sortant arrive à passer toutes ces embûches, la totalité de son prochain mandat …

L’incroyable hypocrisie de la gauche et des médias en général là-bas comme ici

Qui font totalement l’impasse sur les violences, nettement plus coûteuses en termes de dégâts matériels, générées par l’extrême gauche des antifas et BLM …

Quand à l’instar d’un Biden, bien loin de la condamnation que le modérateur du débat s’est bien gardé de lui demander, ils ne les réduisent pas à une « idée » …

De la part de groupuscules qui comme le suggérait il y a trois ans le maire de Berkeley …

Ont toutes les caractéristiques de gangs …

D’où aussi le risque comme semblent l’indiquer sa remontée dans les sondages des minorités noires et hispaniques

De renforcer « l‘éléphant nécessaire dans le magasin de porcelaine poussiéreux de la politique » qu’a depuis le début été Trump ?

BERKELEY (CBS SF) — Mayor of Berkeley Jesse Arreguin on Monday said it is time to confront the violent extremism on the left by treating black-clad Antifa protesters as a gang.

A large number of masked Antifa activists were seen jumping the barriers at a largely peaceful demonstration in Berkeley’s Martin Luther King Civic Center Park on Sunday.

Some began attacking Trump supporters at the rally.

“I think we should classify them as a gang,” said Arreguin. “They come dressed in uniforms. They have weapons, almost like a militia and I think we need to think about that in terms of our law enforcement approach.”

Arreguin said that while he does not support the far right, it was time to draw the line on the left as well, especially on the black-clad activists who showed up in force and took over both the protests and the park, and played a part in Sunday’s violent clashes.

“I think we are going to have to think ‘big picture’ about what is the strategy for how we are going to deal with these violent elements on the left as well,” said the mayor.

The mayor said it was also time for the non-violent protesters to take a stand.

“We also need to hold accountable and encourage people not to associate with these extremists because it empowers them and gives them cover,” said Arreguin.

On Monday, protest organizers defended Antifa’s presence.

“White supremacists and fascists are not welcome. And if the state is not going to protect us — and if they do not — then we are going to protect ourselves and welcome those who stand with us,” said Sara Kershner with the National Lawyers Guild.

KPIX 5 news crews observed that most of the conservative demonstrators in the park were Trump supporters who repeatedly denounced Nazis and racists.

And while it didn’t look good, the mayor also praised Berkeley police for holding back and ceding the park to the anarchists when the group jumped the barriers.

“Black Bloc was trying to provoke the police,” said Arreguin. “I think some of the more conservative protesters had already left or had been escorted out.”

When asked what he would say to a Trump supporter who was chased down the street, the mayor replied, “It’s unacceptable. Anyone who was injured… it’s completely unacceptable and we are going to be looking at video and identifying people.”

In the wake of Charlottesville and Sunday’s troubles in Berkeley, the mayor also called on UC Berkeley to call off next month’s Free Speech Week featuring Milo Yiannopoulos.

It was an appearance by Yiannopoulos in February that triggered a riot in Sproul Plaza on campus.

“I believe that is the right thing to do,” said Arreguin. “And if they don’t do that, then they need to work with the city and potentially assist the city through resources to be able to adequately police what we know is going to be a large protest that will spill out onto the city streets.”

Voir aussi:

Biden and Trump Are Both Right on Antifa

It’s an idea, not a group, and its radical leftist adherents refuse to disavow violence.

What is antifa? “An idea, not an organization,” Joe Biden said during Tuesday’s debate. “When a bat hits you over the head, that’s not an idea,” President Trump countered. “Antifa is a dangerous, radical group.” Both men are right—Mr. Biden that antifa is foremost an ideology, and Mr. Trump about its propensity for violence.

Some adherents I’ve interviewed describe antifa as a radical leftist political affiliation or movement. They pride themselves on being leaderless and not hierarchical, and “membership” is more a matter of self-profession than enlistment. The core belief is a duty to oppose “fascists,” “bigots” and the “alt-right,” though these terms are seldom defined. Some adherents fall back on a definist fallacy: Antifa is short for “antifascist,” so anyone who doesn’t support it must be pro-fascist.

The lack of formal structure and leadership doesn’t mean antifa is unorganized. Individual activists often issue “calls for action” on social media, urging like-minded people to join them in the streets. The rallying cry is boosted by anarchists, socialists, social-justice activists, far-left nonprofits, clergy and others—some of whom call themselves antifa and some not. Turnout at protests or rallies is spontaneous, and to the extent that there are antifa groups, they’re small and intimate. “The phrase that leftists use is ‘affinity groups,’ ” says Mark Bray, author of “Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook” a sympathetic history. “They are basically people who know each other well and can plan to attend actions together and sometimes will have a division of tasks.”

It’s no coincidence that many antifa demonstrations occur at police stations and courthouses. Antifa generally “refuses to put faith in the courts or the police to stop the far right,” Mr. Bray says. “Part of the reason for that is a kind of radical critique of the system as being a fertile ground for fascism to grow.” Instead of seeking legal redress, antifa activists embrace what they euphemistically describe as a “diversity of tactics.”

Who’s funding antifa? “The question, honestly, is silly, because it’s based on the assumption that there’s a whole lot of expensive things that require funding,” says George Ciccariello-Maher, a self-professed supporter of antifa and author of the forthcoming “A World Without Police.” Instead, “it’s just people showing up” and participating in “a shoestring operation.” It doesn’t cost much to print posters, and activists can rent a U-Haul and drop off a load of protest supplies for a couple of hundred dollars.

The little fund-raising that is done is usually crowd-sourced, both Messrs. Bray and Ciccariello-Maher say. Supporters of far-left protests make contributions through GoFundMe to bail-out funds or legal-defense funds for those arrested, and more-established progressive groups sometimes help promote these efforts. In June, Kamala Harris tweeted in support of the Minnesota Freedom Fund, and Reuters reported that at least 13 Biden staffers gave to it.

Some conservatives have claimed George Soros funds antifa, a suggestion Mr. Bray finds laughable: “First of all, these are radical anticapitalists who would not accept an offer of funds from a billionaire. And I don’t know of any billionaires who want to fund revolutionary anticapitalists anyway.” Laura Silber, chief communications officer of the Open Society Foundations, says that while Mr. Soros and his group supports the right to peaceful protest, “we abhor violence of any kind” and “we do not now nor have we ever funded ‘antifa.’ ”

Antifa’s complexity was part of what Federal Bureau of Investigation Director Chris Wray tried to explain during the congressional testimony Mr. Biden cited in the debate. “Antifa is a real thing. It is not a fiction,” Mr. Wray said. “Trying to put a lot of these things into nice, neat, clean buckets” is “a bit of a challenge, because one of the things that we see more and more in the counterterrorism spaces [is] people who assemble together in some kind of mishmash, a bunch of different ideologies. All—we sometimes refer to it as almost like a salad bar of ideologies, a little bit of this, a little bit of that, and what they’re really about is the violence.” Mr. Wray vowed that “we are not going to stand for the violence” and said the FBI is investigating “anarchist violent extremists” and “their funding, their tactics, the logistics, their supply chains.”

Antifa’s lack of a central structure is what makes it effective at imposing disorder on American cities. Without leadership, no one can moderate the movement or prevent a protest from becoming a riot. If antifa were a conventional organization, the government could cripple it by bringing criminal charges against its leaders and financial backers. Instead, it can only prosecute low-level activists who commit street crimes. Even that often proves difficult, since antifa has adopted a “black bloc” uniform that makes it difficult to tell rioters apart. Instead of a hierarchy, law enforcement is now contending with a hydra.

Ms. Melchior is an editorial page writer for the Journal.

Voir également:

“Insurrectionary anarchists” have been protesting for racial justice all summer. Some Black leaders wish they would go home.

Ms. Stockman is a member of the editorial board.

The New York Times

On the last Sunday in May, Jeremy Lee Quinn, a furloughed photographer in Santa Monica, Calif., was snapping photos of suburban moms kneeling at a Black Lives Matter protest when a friend alerted him to a more dramatic subject: looting at a shoe store about a mile away.

He arrived to find young people pouring out of the store, shoeboxes under their arms. But there was something odd about the scene. A group of men, dressed entirely in black, milled around nearby, like supervisors. One wore a creepy rubber Halloween mask.

The next day, Mr. Quinn took pictures of another store being looted. Again, he noticed something strange. A white man, clad in black, had broken the window with a crowbar, but walked away without taking a thing.

Mr. Quinn began studying footage of looting from around the country and saw the same black outfits and, in some cases, the same masks. He decided to go to a protest dressed like that himself, to figure out what was really going on. He expected to find white supremacists who wanted to help re-elect President Trump by stoking fear of Black people. What he discovered instead were true believers in “insurrectionary anarchism.”

To better understand them, Mr. Quinn, a 40-something theater student who worked at Univision until the pandemic, has spent the past four months marching with “black bloc” anarchists in half a dozen cities across the country, chronicling the experience on his website, Public Report.

He says he respects the idealistic goal of a hierarchy-free society that anarchists embrace, but grew increasingly uncomfortable with the tactics used by some anarchists, which he feared would set off a backlash that could help get President Trump re-elected. In Portland, Ore., he marched with people who shot fireworks at the federal court building. In Washington, he marched with protesters who harassed diners.

Mr. Quinn discovered a thorny truth about the mayhem that unfolded in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man in Minneapolis. It wasn’t mayhem at all.

While talking heads on television routinely described it as a spontaneous eruption of anger at racial injustice, it was strategically planned, facilitated and advertised on social media by anarchists who believed that their actions advanced the cause of racial justice. In some cities, they were a fringe element, quickly expelled by peaceful organizers. But in Washington, Portland and Seattle they have attracted a “cultlike energy,” Mr. Quinn told me.

Don’t take just Mr. Quinn’s word for it. Take the word of the anarchists themselves, who lay out the strategy in Crimethinc, an anarchist publication: Black-clad figures break windows, set fires, vandalize police cars, then melt back into the crowd of peaceful protesters. When the police respond by brutalizing innocent demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and rough arrests, the public’s disdain for law enforcement grows. It’s Asymmetric Warfare 101.

An anarchist podcast called “The Ex-Worker” explains that while some anarchists believe in pacifist civil disobedience inspired by Mohandas Gandhi, others advocate using crimes like arson and shoplifting to wear down the capitalist system. According to “The Ex-Worker,” the term “insurrectionary anarchist” dates back at least to the Spanish Civil War and its aftermath, when opponents of the fascist leader Francisco Franco took “direct action” against his regime, including assassinating policemen and robbing banks.

If that is not enough to convince you that there’s a method to the madness, check out the new report by Rutgers researchers that documents the “systematic, online mobilization of violence that was planned, coordinated (in real time) and celebrated by explicitly violent anarcho-socialist networks that rode on the coattails of peaceful protest,” according to its co-author Pamela Paresky. She said some anarchist social media accounts had grown 300-fold since May, to hundreds of thousands of followers.

“The ability to continue to spread and to eventually bring more violence, including a violent insurgency, relies on the ability to hide in plain sight — to be confused with legitimate protests, and for media and the public to minimize the threat,” Dr. Paresky told me.

Her report will almost certainly catch the attention of conservative media and William Barr’s Department of Justice, which recently declared New York, Portland and Seattle “anarchist jurisdictions,” a widely mocked designation accompanied by the threat of withholding federal funds.

There’s an even thornier truth that few people seem to want to talk about: Anarchy got results.

Don’t get me wrong. My heart broke for the people in Minneapolis who lost buildings to arson and looting. Migizi, a Native American nonprofit in Minneapolis, raised more than $1 million to buy and renovate a place where Native American teenagers could learn about their culture — only to watch it go up in flames, alongside dozens of others, including a police station. It can take years to build a building — and only one night to burn it down.

And yet, I had to admit that the scale of destruction caught the media’s attention in a way that peaceful protests hadn’t. How many articles would I have written about a peaceful march? How many months would Mr. Quinn have spent investigating suburban moms kneeling? That’s on us.

While I feared that the looting and arson would derail the urgent demands for racial justice and bring condemnation, I was wrong, at least in the short term. Support for Black Lives Matter soared. Corporations opened their wallets. It was as if the nation rallied behind peaceful Black organizers after it saw the alternative, like whites who flocked to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. after they got a glimpse of Malcolm X.

But as the protests continue, support has flagged. The percentage of people who say they support the Black Lives Matter movement has dropped from 67 percent in June to 55 percent, according to a recent Pew poll.

“Insurrectionary anarchy” brings diminishing returns, especially as anarchists complicate life for those working within the system to halt police violence.

In Louisville, Ky., Attica Scott, a Black state representative who sponsored a police reform bill, was arrested last week and charged with felony rioting after someone threw a road flare inside a library.

In Portland, Jo Ann Hardesty, an activist turned city councilor, has pushed for the creation of a pilot program of unarmed street responders to handle mental illness and homelessness, a practical step to help protect populations that experience violence at the hands of police. Yet Ms. Hardesty is shouted down at protests by anarchists who want to abolish the police, not merely reform or defund them.

“As a Black woman who has been working on this for 30 years, to have young white activists who have just discovered that Black lives matter yelling at me that I’m not doing enough for Black people — it’s kind of ironic, is what it is,” Ms. Hardesty told me.

In Seattle, Andrè Taylor, a Black man who lost his brother to police violence in 2016, helped change state law that made it nearly impossible to prosecute officers for killing civilians. But he has been branded a “pig cop” by young anarchists because his nonprofit organization receives funds from the city, and because he cooperates with the police.

“When they say, ‘You are working with the police,’ I say, ‘I have worked with police and I will continue to work for reform,’” Mr. Taylor told me. “Remember, I lost a brother.”

Black people get shot for doing ordinary law-abiding things. They don’t have the luxury of anarchy, he told me.

That’s the thing about “insurrectionary anarchists.” They make fickle allies. If they help you get into power, they will try to oust you the following day, since power is what they are against. Many of them don’t even vote. They are experts at unraveling an old order but considerably less skilled at building a new one. That’s why, even after more than 100 days of protest in Portland, activists do not agree on a set of common policy goals.

Even some anarchists admit as much.

“We are not sure if the socialist, communist, democratic or even anarchist utopia is possible,” a voice on “The Ex-Worker” podcast intones. “Rather, some insurrectionary anarchists believe that the meaning of being an anarchist lies in the struggle itself and what that struggle reveals.”

In other words, it’s not really about George Floyd or Black lives, but insurrection for insurrection’s sake.

Voir de même:

Since 1907, Portland, Oregon, has hosted an annual Rose Festival. Since 2007, the festival had included a parade down 82nd Avenue. Since 2013, the Republican Party of Multnomah County, which includes Portland, had taken part. This April, all of that changed.

In the days leading up to the planned parade, a group called the Direct Action Alliance declared, “Fascists plan to march through the streets,” and warned, “Nazis will not march through Portland unopposed.” The alliance said it didn’t object to the Multnomah GOP itself, but to “fascists” who planned to infiltrate its ranks. Yet it also denounced marchers with “Trump flags” and “red maga hats” who could “normalize support for an orange man who bragged about sexually harassing women and who is waging a war of hate, racism and prejudice.” A second group, Oregon Students Empowered, created a Facebook page called “Shut down fascism! No nazis in Portland!”

Next, the parade’s organizers received an anonymous email warning that if “Trump supporters” and others who promote “hateful rhetoric” marched, “we will have two hundred or more people rush into the parade … and drag and push those people out.” When Portland police said they lacked the resources to provide adequate security, the organizers canceled the parade. It was a sign of things to come.

For progressives, Donald Trump is not just another Republican president. Seventy-six percent of Democrats, according to a Suffolk poll from last September, consider him a racist. Last March, according to a YouGov survey, 71 percent of Democrats agreed that his campaign contained “fascist undertones.” All of which raises a question that is likely to bedevil progressives for years to come: If you believe the president of the United States is leading a racist, fascist movement that threatens the rights, if not the lives, of vulnerable minorities, how far are you willing to go to stop it?In Washington, D.C., the response to that question centers on how members of Congress can oppose Trump’s agenda, on how Democrats can retake the House of Representatives, and on how and when to push for impeachment. But in the country at large, some militant leftists are offering a very different answer. On Inauguration Day, a masked activist punched the white-supremacist leader Richard Spencer. In February, protesters violently disrupted UC Berkeley’s plans to host a speech by Milo Yiannopoulos, a former Breitbart.com editor. In March, protesters pushed and shoved the controversial conservative political scientist Charles Murray when he spoke at Middlebury College, in Vermont.As far-flung as these incidents were, they have something crucial in common. Like the organizations that opposed the Multnomah County Republican Party’s participation in the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade, these activists appear to be linked to a movement called “antifa,” which is short for antifascist or Anti-Fascist Action. The movement’s secrecy makes definitively cataloging its activities difficult, but this much is certain: Antifa’s power is growing. And how the rest of the activist left responds will help define its moral character in the Trump age.

Antifa traces its roots to the 1920s and ’30s, when militant leftists battled fascists in the streets of Germany, Italy, and Spain. When fascism withered after World War II, antifa did too. But in the ’70s and ’80s, neo-Nazi skinheads began to infiltrate Britain’s punk scene. After the Berlin Wall fell, neo-Nazism also gained prominence in Germany. In response, a cadre of young leftists, including many anarchists and punk fans, revived the tradition of street-level antifascism.

In the late ’80s, left-wing punk fans in the United States began following suit, though they initially called their groups Anti-Racist Action, on the theory that Americans would be more familiar with fighting racism than fascism. According to Mark Bray, the author of the forthcoming Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook, these activists toured with popular alternative bands in the ’90s, trying to ensure that neo-Nazis did not recruit their fans. In 2002, they disrupted a speech by the head of the World Church of the Creator, a white-supremacist group in Pennsylvania; 25 people were arrested in the resulting brawl.

By the 2000s, as the internet facilitated more transatlantic dialogue, some American activists had adopted the name antifa. But even on the militant left, the movement didn’t occupy the spotlight. To most left-wing activists during the Clinton, Bush, and Obama years, deregulated global capitalism seemed like a greater threat than fascism.Trump has changed that. For antifa, the result has been explosive growth. According to NYC Antifa, the group’s Twitter following nearly quadrupled in the first three weeks of January alone. (By summer, it exceeded 15,000.) Trump’s rise has also bred a new sympathy for antifa among some on the mainstream left. “Suddenly,” noted the antifa-aligned journal It’s Going Down, “anarchists and antifa, who have been demonized and sidelined by the wider Left have been hearing from liberals and Leftists, ‘you’ve been right all along.’ ” An article in The Nation argued that “to call Trumpism fascist” is to realize that it is “not well combated or contained by standard liberal appeals to reason.” The radical left, it said, offers “practical and serious responses in this political moment.”Those responses sometimes spill blood. Since antifa is heavily composed of anarchists, its activists place little faith in the state, which they consider complicit in fascism and racism. They prefer direct action: They pressure venues to deny white supremacists space to meet. They pressure employers to fire them and landlords to evict them. And when people they deem racists and fascists manage to assemble, antifa’s partisans try to break up their gatherings, including by force.Such tactics have elicited substantial support from the mainstream left. When the masked antifa activist was filmed assaulting Spencer on Inauguration Day, another piece in The Nation described his punch as an act of “kinetic beauty.” Slate ran an approving article about a humorous piano ballad that glorified the assault. Twitter was inundated with viral versions of the video set to different songs, prompting the former Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau to tweet, “I don’t care how many different songs you set Richard Spencer being punched to, I’ll laugh at every one.”The violence is not directed only at avowed racists like Spencer: In June of last year, demonstrators—at least some of whom were associated with antifa—punched and threw eggs at people exiting a Trump rally in San Jose, California. An article in It’s Going Down celebrated the “righteous beatings.”Antifascists call such actions defensive. Hate speech against vulnerable minorities, they argue, leads to violence against vulnerable minorities. But Trump supporters and white nationalists see antifa’s attacks as an assault on their right to freely assemble, which they in turn seek to reassert. The result is a level of sustained political street warfare not seen in the U.S. since the 1960s. A few weeks after the attacks in San Jose, for instance, a white-supremacist leader announced that he would host a march in Sacramento to protest the attacks at Trump rallies. Anti-Fascist Action Sacramento called for a counterdemonstration; in the end, at least 10 people were stabbed.
A similar cycle has played out at UC Berkeley. In February, masked antifascists broke store windows and hurled Molotov cocktails and rocks at police during a rally against the planned speech by Yiannopoulos. After the university canceled the speech out of what it called “concern for public safety,” white nationalists announced a “March on Berkeley” in support of “free speech.” At that rally, a 41-year-old man named Kyle Chapman, who was wearing a baseball helmet, ski goggles, shin guards, and a mask, smashed an antifa activist over the head with a wooden post. Suddenly, Trump supporters had a viral video of their own. A far-right crowdfunding site soon raised more than $80,000 for Chapman’s legal defense. (In January, the same site had offered a substantial reward for the identity of the antifascist who had punched Spencer.) A politicized fight culture is emerging, fueled by cheerleaders on both sides. As James Anderson, an editor at It’s Going Down, told Vice, “This shit is fun.”

Portland offers perhaps the clearest glimpse of where all of this can lead. The Pacific Northwest has long attracted white supremacists, who have seen it as a haven from America’s multiracial East and South. In 1857, Oregon (then a federal territory) banned African Americans from living there. By the 1920s, it boasted the highest Ku Klux Klan membership rate of any state.

In 1988, neo-Nazis in Portland killed an Ethiopian immigrant with a baseball bat. Shortly thereafter, notes Alex Reid Ross, a lecturer at Portland State University and the author of Against the Fascist Creep, anti-Nazi skinheads formed a chapter of Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice. Before long, the city also had an Anti-Racist Action group.

Now, in the Trump era, Portland has become a bastion of antifascist militancy. Masked protesters smashed store windows during multiday demonstrations following Trump’s election. In early April, antifa activists threw smoke bombs into a “Rally for Trump and Freedom” in the Portland suburb of Vancouver, Washington. A local paper said the ensuing melee resembled a mosh pit.

When antifascists forced the cancellation of the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade, Trump supporters responded with a “March for Free Speech.” Among those who attended was Jeremy Christian, a burly ex-con draped in an American flag, who uttered racial slurs and made Nazi salutes. A few weeks later, on May 25, a man believed to be Christian was filmed calling antifa “a bunch of punk bitches.”

The next day, Christian boarded a light-rail train and began yelling that “colored people” were ruining the city. He fixed his attention on two teenage girls, one African American and the other wearing a hijab, and told them “to go back to Saudi Arabia” or “kill themselves.” As the girls retreated to the back of the train, three men interposed themselves between Christian and his targets. “Please,” one said, “get off this train.” Christian stabbed all three. One bled to death on the train. One was declared dead at a local hospital. One survived.

The cycle continued. Nine days after the attack, on June 4, Trump supporters hosted another Portland rally, this one featuring Chapman, who had gained fame with his assault on the antifascist in Berkeley. Antifa activists threw bricks until the police dispersed them with stun grenades and tear gas.What’s eroding in Portland is the quality Max Weber considered essential to a functioning state: a monopoly on legitimate violence. As members of a largely anarchist movement, antifascists don’t want the government to stop white supremacists from gathering. They want to do so themselves, rendering the government impotent. With help from other left-wing activists, they’re already having some success at disrupting government. Demonstrators have interrupted so many city-council meetings that in February, the council met behind locked doors. In February and March, activists protesting police violence and the city’s investments in the Dakota Access Pipeline hounded Mayor Ted Wheeler so persistently at his home that he took refuge in a hotel. The fateful email to parade organizers warned, “The police cannot stop us from shutting down roads.”All of this fuels the fears of Trump supporters, who suspect that liberal bastions are refusing to protect their right to free speech. Joey Gibson, a Trump supporter who organized the June 4 Portland rally, told me that his “biggest pet peeve is when mayors have police stand down … They don’t want conservatives to be coming together and speaking.” To provide security at the rally, Gibson brought in a far-right militia called the Oath Keepers. In late June, James Buchal, the chair of the Multnomah County Republican Party, announced that it too would use militia members for security, because “volunteers don’t feel safe on the streets of Portland.”Antifa believes it is pursuing the opposite of authoritarianism. Many of its activists oppose the very notion of a centralized state. But in the name of protecting the vulnerable, antifascists have granted themselves the authority to decide which Americans may publicly assemble and which may not. That authority rests on no democratic foundation. Unlike the politicians they revile, the men and women of antifa cannot be voted out of office. Generally, they don’t even disclose their names.Antifa’s perceived legitimacy is inversely correlated with the government’s. Which is why, in the Trump era, the movement is growing like never before. As the president derides and subverts liberal-democratic norms, progressives face a choice. They can recommit to the rules of fair play, and try to limit the president’s corrosive effect, though they will often fail. Or they can, in revulsion or fear or righteous rage, try to deny racists and Trump supporters their political rights. From Middlebury to Berkeley to Portland, the latter approach is on the rise, especially among young people.Revulsion, fear, and rage are understandable. But one thing is clear. The people preventing Republicans from safely assembling on the streets of Portland may consider themselves fierce opponents of the authoritarianism growing on the American right. In truth, however, they are its unlikeliest allies.
Peter Beinart is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York.

Voir de plus:

Black professor insists ‘Proud Boys aren’t white supremacists’ as Trump takes flak
Valerie Richardson
The Washington Times
September 30, 2020

It turns out not everybody believes the Proud Boys are white supremacists, including a prominent Black professor at a historically Black university.

Wilfred Reilly, associate professor of political science at Kentucky State University, said Wednesday that “the Proud Boys aren’t white supremacists,” describing the right-wing group’s beliefs as “Western chauvinist” and noting that their international chairman, Enrique Tarrio, is Black.

“Gotta say: the Proud Boys aren’t white supremacists,” tweeted Mr. Reilly, author of “Hate Crime Hoax.”

Mr. Reilly said that about 10% to 20% of Proud Boys activists are people of color, a diverse racial composition that is “extremely well-known in law enforcement,” based on his research.

Enrique Tarrio, their overall leader, is a Black Cuban dude. The Proud Boys explicitly say they’re not racist,” Mr. Reilly told The Washington Times. “They are an openly right-leaning group and they’ll openly fight you — they don’t deny any of this — but saying they’re White supremacist: If you’re talking about a group of people more than 10% people of color and headed by an Afro-Latino guy, that doesn’t make sense.
Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer accused Mr. Trump of refusing to condemn white supremacy, tweeting, “He told white supremacists to ‘stand back and stand by.’ President Trump is a national disgrace, and Americans will not stand for it.”

Democratic presidential nominee Joseph R. Biden told reporters Wednesday: “My message to the Proud Boys and every other White supremacist group is: cease and desist. That’s not who we are.”

White House spokeswoman Alysa Farah pushed back on the criticism, saying, “I don’t think there’s anything to clarify. He’s told them to stand back.”

Black Trump supporter Melissa Tate also challenged the “white supremacist” label, posting a video in which she and Beverly Beatty said that the Proud Boys helped provide security for them at a Christian prayer event.

“STOP THE LIES,” tweeted Ms. Tate, who has 440,700 followers. “Proud Boys are NOT White Supremacist. They are Christian men many of them hispanic & some black.”

Voir encore:
In his Tuesday press conference, Donald Trump talked at length about what he called “the alt left.” White supremacists, he claimed, weren’t the only people in Charlottesville last weekend that deserved condemnation. “You had a group on the other side that was also very violent,” he declared. “Nobody wants to say that.”I can say with great confidence that Trump’s final sentence is untrue. I can do so because the September issue of The Atlantic contains an essay of mine entitled “The Rise of the Violent Left,” which discusses the very phenomenon that Trump claims “nobody wants” to discuss. Trump is right that, in Charlottesville and beyond, the violence of some leftist activists constitutes a real problem. Where he’s wrong is in suggesting that it’s a problem in any way comparable to white supremacism.What Trump calls “the alt left” (I’ll explain why that’s a bad term later) is actually antifa, which is short for anti-fascist. The movement traces its roots to the militant leftists who in the 1920s and 1930s brawled with fascists on the streets of Germany, Italy, and Spain. It revived in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, when anti-racist punks in Britain and Germany mobilized to defeat neo-Nazi skinheads who were infiltrating the music scene. Via punk, groups calling themselves anti-racist action—and later, anti-fascist action or antifa—sprung up in the United States. They have seen explosive growth in the Trump era for an obvious reason: There’s more open white supremacism to mobilize against.
As members of a largely anarchist movement, antifa activists generally combat white supremacism not by trying to change government policy but through direct action. They try to publicly identify white supremacists and get them fired from their jobs and evicted from their apartments. And they disrupt white-supremacist rallies, including by force.As I argued in my essay, some of their tactics are genuinely troubling. They’re troubling tactically because conservatives use antifa’s violence to justify—or at least distract from—the violence of white supremacists, as Trump did in his press conference. They’re troubling strategically because they allow white supremacists to depict themselves as victims being denied the right to freely assemble. And they’re troubling morally because antifa activists really do infringe upon that right. By using violence, they reject the moral legacy of the civil-rights movement’s fight against white supremacy. And by seeking to deny racists the ability to assemble, they reject the moral legacy of the ACLU, which in 1977 went to the Supreme Court to defend the right of neo-Nazis to march through Skokie, Illinois.Antifa activists are sincere. They genuinely believe that their actions protect vulnerable people from harm. Cornel West claims they did so in Charlottesville. But for all of antifa’s supposed anti-authoritarianism, there’s something fundamentally authoritarian about its claim that its activists—who no one elected—can decide whose views are too odious to be publicly expressed. That kind of undemocratic, illegitimate power corrupts. It leads to what happened this April in Portland, Oregon, where antifa activists threatened to disrupt the city’s Rose Festival parade if people wearing “red maga hats” marched alongside the local Republican Party. Because of antifa, Republican officials in Portland claim they can’t even conduct voter registration in the city without being physically threatened or harassed.So, yes, antifa is not a figment of the conservative imagination. It’s a moral problem that liberals need to confront.But saying it’s a problem is vastly different than implying, as Trump did, that it’s a problem equal to white supremacism. Using the phrase “alt-left” suggests a moral equivalence that simply doesn’t exist.For starters, while antifa perpetrates violence, it doesn’t perpetrate it on anything like the scale that white nationalists do. It’s no coincidence that it was a Nazi sympathizer—and not an antifa activist—who committed murder in Charlottesville. According to the Anti-Defamation League, right-wing extremists committed 74 percent of the 372 politically motivated murders recorded in the United States between 2007 and 2016. Left-wing extremists committed less than 2 percent.Second, antifa activists don’t wield anything like the alt-right’s power. White, Christian supremacy has been government policy in the United States for much of American history. Anarchism has not. That’s why there are no statues of Mikhail Bakunin in America’s parks and government buildings. Antifa boasts no equivalent to Steve Bannon, who called his old publication, Breitbart, “the platform for the alt-right,” and now works in the White House. It boasts no equivalent to Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III, who bears the middle name of a Confederate general and the first name of the Confederacy’s president, and who allegedly called the NAACP “un-American.” It boasts no equivalent to Alex Jones, who Donald Trump praised as “amazing.” Even if antifa’s vision of society were as noxious as the “alt-right’s,” it has vastly less power to make that vision a reality.
And antifa’s vision is not as noxious. Antifa activists do not celebrate regimes that committed genocide and enforced slavery. They’re mostly anarchists. Anarchism may not be a particularly practical ideology. But it’s not an ideology that depicts the members of a particular race or religion as subhuman.If Donald Trump really wants to undermine antifa, he should do his best to stamp out the bigotry that antifa—counterproductively—mobilizes against. Taking down Confederate statues in places like Charlottesville would be a good start.

Peter Beinart is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a professor of journalism and political science at the City University of New York.

“They have no allegiance to liberal democracy”: An expert on antifa explains the group

The left-wing group is back in the news. An expert explains where they come from and what they want.

As protests against the killing of George Floyd rage across the country, the left-wing group “antifa” (short for anti-fascist) is back in the news. Although antifa’s role remains unclear, President Trump (and others) are blaming them for helping to incite violence. Antifa became a national story back in 2017 when it collided with neo-Nazis in Charlottesville. Shortly after that incident, I reached out to Mark Bray, a historian at Dartmouth College and author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook. We discussed the group’s origins, aims, and tactics. You can read our full exchange, which feels newly relevant, below.


When Donald Trump used the phrase “alt-left” to describe the anti-neo-Nazi protesters in Charlottesville last year, most people had no idea what he meant. I’m actually not sure he knew what he meant.

“What about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the ‘alt-right’? Do they have any assemblage of guilt?” Trump said during a rambling press conference.

If the alt-left exists, it’s probably best represented by “antifa” (short for “anti-fascist”) — a loose network of left-wing activists who physically resist people they consider fascists. These are often the scruffy, bandana-clad people who show up at alt-right rallies or speaking events in order to shut them down before they happen, and they openly embrace violence as a justifiable means to that end.

Antifa is not a monolithic organization, nor does it have anything like a hierarchical leadership structure. It’s an umbrella group that shares a number of causes, the most important of which is resisting white nationalist movements. Adherents are mostly socialists, anarchists, and communists who, according to Mark Bray, a historian at Dartmouth College and author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook, “reject turning to the police or the state to halt the advance of white supremacy. Instead they advocate popular opposition to fascism as we witnessed in Charlottesville.”

I reached out to Bray to discuss the group and its burgeoning impact on American politics. He’s sympathetic to antifa’s cause and makes no effort to hide that. He describes the book as “an unabashedly partisan call to arms that aims to equip a new generation of anti-fascists with the history and theory necessary to defeat the resurgent far right.”

In this interview, we talk about the ethics of “militant anti-fascism,” why groups like antifa don’t care if they hurt the Democratic Party, and why resisting fascism in a liberal democracy poses a unique challenge to conventional political norms.

Our conversation, lightly edited for clarity, follows.

The roots of antifa

Sean Illing

What is “antifa”? Where did it come from?

Mark Bray

Anti-fascism originated in response to early European fascism, and when Mussolini’s Blackshirts and Hitler’s Brownshirts were ascendant in Europe, various socialist, communist, and anarchist parties and groups emerged to confront them. When I talk about anti-fascism in the book and when we talk about it today, it’s really a matter of tracing the sort of historical lineage of revolutionary anti-fascist movements that came from below, from the people, and not from the state.

The sort of militant anti-fascism that antifa represents reemerged in postwar Europe in Britain, where fascists had broad rights to organize and demonstrate. You started to see these groups spring up in the 1940s and ’50s and ’60s and ’70s. You saw similar movements in Germany in the ’80s around the time the Berlin Wall falls, when a wave of neo-Nazism rolled across the country targeting immigrants. There, as elsewhere, leftist groups emerged as tools of self-defense. The whole point was to stare down these fascist groups in the street and stop them by force if necessary.

These groups in the ’80s adopted the name antifa, and it eventually spread to the United States in the late ’80s and into the ’90s. Originally, it was known as the Anti-Racist Action Network. That kind of faded in the mid-2000s; the recent wave we’re seeing in the US developed out of it, but has taken on more of the name and the kind of aesthetics of the European movement.

Sean Illing

And this is largely a response to Trump?

Mark Bray

I think so. The basic principle of antifa is “no platform for fascism.” If you ask them, they’ll tell you that they believe you have to deny any and all platforms to fascism, no matter how big or small the threat. The original fascist groups that later seized power in Europe started out very small. You cannot, they argue, treat these groups lightly. You need to take them with the utmost seriousness, and the way to prevent them from growing is to prevent them from having even the first step toward becoming normalized in society.

Why they embrace violence

Sean Illing

What’s their strategic logic? Why do they think physical violence, as opposed to nonviolent resistance, is both justifiable and effective?

Mark Bray

That’s a very good question. Much of what they do does not involve physical confrontation. They also focus on using public opinion to expose white supremacists and raise the social and professional costs of their participation in these groups. They want to see these people fired from their jobs, denounced by their families, marginalized by their communities.

But yes, part of what they do is physical confrontation. They view self-defense as necessary in terms of defending communities against white supremacists. They also see this as a preventative action. They look at the history of fascism in Europe and say, “we have to eradicate this problem before it gets any bigger, before it’s too late.” Sometimes that involves physical confrontation or blocking their marches or whatever the case may be.

It’s also important to remember that these are self-described revolutionaries. They’re anarchists and communists who are way outside the traditional conservative-liberal spectrum. They’re not interested in and don’t feel constrained by conventional norms.

Sean Illing

You say one of the principles of antifa is “no platform for fascism.” How do they define fascism? Where’s the threshold?

Mark Bray

Good question. The other thing that’s worth clarifying is that anti-fascist groups don’t only organize against textbook fascists. There is, first of all, a lot of debate about what constitutes fascism. And it’s a legitimate question to ask — where does one draw the line, and how does one see this kind of organizing?

Of course, there is no central command for a group like antifa. There is no antifa board of directors telling people where that line is, and so of course different groups will assess different threats as they see fit. But I suppose the question you’re raising has to do with the slippery-slope argument, which is that if you start calling everyone a fascist and depriving them of a platform, where does it end?

One of the arguments I make in the book is that while analytically that’s a conversation worth having, I don’t know of any empirical examples of anti-fascists successfully stopping a neo-Nazi group and then moving on to other groups that are not racist but merely to the right. What tends to happen is they disband once they’ve successfully marginalized or eliminated the local right-wing extremist threat, and then return to what they normally do — organizing unions, doing environmental activism, etc.

Do antifa’s tactics actually work?

Sean Illing

You’re a historian. You’ve looked at the data. Is there evidence that the tactics adopted by antifa work? Are there cases of these sorts of groups successfully undercutting fascist movements?

Mark Bray

Another good question. Whenever we look at the question of causation in history, you can never isolate one variable and make grand or definitive conclusions. So I don’t want to overstate any of the causal claims being made here. But Norway is an interesting example. In the ’90s, they had a pretty violent neo-Nazi skinhead movement, and the street-level anti-fascist groups there seemed to play a significant role in marginalizing the threat. By the end of ’90s it was pretty much defunct, and subsequently there hasn’t been a serious fascist [movement] in Norway.

Another example you can look at is popular responses to the National Front [a far-right political party formed in Britain in 1967] in the late ’70s in Britain. The National Front was pretty huge, and the Anti-Nazi League, through both a combination of militant anti-fascist tactics and also some more popular organizing and electoral strategies, managed to successfully deflate the National Front momentum.

One of the most famous moments of that era was the Battle of Lewisham in 1977 where the members of this largely immigrant community physically blocked a big National Front march and that sort of stopped their aggressive efforts to target that community.

They don’t care about liberal democracy

Sean Illing

So antifa’s logic is that fascism is a rejection of liberal democratic norms, and therefore it can’t be defeated with what we’d consider conventional liberal democratic tactics?

Mark Bray

Well, certainly the latter is correct. They argue a couple of things. First, they argue that in Europe you can see that parliamentary democracy did not always stop the advance of fascism and Nazism — and in the cases of both Germany and Italy, Hitler and Mussolini were appointed and gained their power largely through democratic means. When Hitler took his final control through the [1933] Enabling Act, it was approved by parliament.

They also say that rational discourse is insufficient on its own because a lot of good arguments were made and a lot of debates were had but ultimately that was insufficient during that period, and so the view that good ideas always prevail over bad ideas isn’t very convincing.

They other key point, which probably isn’t made enough, is that these are revolutionary leftists. They’re not concerned about the fact that fascism targets liberalism. These are self-described revolutionaries. They have no allegiance to liberal democracy, which they believe has failed the marginalized communities they’re defending. They’re anarchists and communists who are way outside the traditional conservative-liberal spectrum.

Sean Illing

Scholars of nonviolence will say the worldwide abolition of slavery was achieved almost entirely with nonviolent means (our Civil War being an obvious exception), that great strides in women’s rights were made, that nonviolent revolutions in Eastern Europe, South Africa, Chile, Egypt, the Philippines, and elsewhere were all accomplished without the use of force. What’s different about antifa’s mission? Why do they believe violence is more effective in this context?

Mark Bray

As I said earlier, no single factor in history can explain an outcome. It’s always more complicated than that. Certainly that’s true in terms of the abolition of slavery. In Latin America, for example, a lot of the abolition of slavery happened through gradual emancipation laws, and a lot of those laws were enacted in explicit response to the Haitian Revolution and out of fear that if they didn’t start to adjust, they’d have an uprising on their hands.

This is also true of the civil rights movement, where the threat of race riots and Black Panthers and so forth made a lot of white America more sympathetic to the kinds of things that Martin Luther King and his allies were saying than they might have otherwise been.

The case of Nazism is obviously one of those intractable historical problems for advocates of pacifism. Even the school of strategic nonviolence that puts aside the ethical questions in favor of the strategic questions still fails, in my view, to show how nonviolence might have worked in that situation.

But look, anti-fascists will concede that most of the time nonviolence is certainly the way to go. Most antifa members believe it’s far easier to use nonviolent methods than it is to show up and use direct action methods. But they argue that history shows that it’s dangerous to take violence and self-defense off the table.

Why shut down speech?

Sean Illing

Here’s my problem. I think the people who showed up in Charlottesville to square off against self-identified neo-Nazis did the world a service, and I applaud them. But when I see antifa showing up at places like UC Berkeley and setting fire to cars and throwing rocks through windows in order to prevent someone like Milo Yiannopoulos from speaking, I think they’ve gone way too far. Milo isn’t a Nazi, and he isn’t an actual threat. He’s a traveling clown looking to offend social justice warriors.

Mark Bray

I think that reasonable people can disagree about this. I can’t speak for the individuals who committed these political actions, but the general defense is that the rationale for shutting down someone like Milo has to do with the fact that his kind of commentary emboldens actual fascists. The Berkeley administrators issued a statement in advance that they feared he was going to out undocumented students on campus, and previously he had targeted a transgender student at the University of Milwaukee Wisconsin. Antifa regards this as an instigation to violence, and so they feel justified in shutting it down.

Again, though, this is much easier to understand when you remember that antifa isn’t concerned with free speech or other liberal democratic values.

What does antifa actually want?

Sean Illing

Antifa defines itself in purely negative terms, in terms of what they’re against. But what do they want? Do they have any concrete political goals?

Mark Bray

That’s a great question, and one that often gets overlooked. For the most part, these are pan-leftist groups composed of leftists of different stripes. They all seem to have different views of what they think the ideal social order looks like. Some of them are Marxists, some are Leninists, some are social democrats or anarchists. But they cohere around a response to what they perceive as a common threat.

Sean Illing

Do you think people are right to be concerned that this type of illiberalism will only occasion more illiberalism in response to it, and that the result will be a spiral of competing illiberalisms?

Mark Bray

As I said before, anti-fascists don’t have any allegiance to liberalism, so that’s not the question that they are focused on. The question is also how much of a threat do we think white supremacists or neo-Nazis pose, both in a literal or immediate sense but also in terms of their ability to influence broader discourses or even the Trump administration.

I believe that for people who are feeling the worst repercussions of this, they are already experiencing a kind of illiberalism in terms of their lack of access to the kinds of freedoms that liberalism promotes and tries to aspire to; and so for me, that’s more of a focus, in terms of trying to mitigate those kinds of problems, than the fears of people who, prior to Trump, thought that everything was fine in the US.

Sean Illing

Do you anticipate antifa becoming larger and more active? And if so, what does that mean for American politics moving forward?

Mark Bray

The first thing to point out is that being part of one of these groups is a huge time commitment, and the vetting process that these groups have for bringing in new people is very strenuous. You have to really commit — it’s basically like a second job. This limits the number of people that are going to be willing to put their time into it. I don’t think the antifa movement is going to explode as much as some do.

But I do think that antifa can influence where leftist politics in America is going. They are aggressive, loud, and fiercely committed. They’re having a wider influence on the radical left in this country, particularly on campuses and with other groups like Black Lives Matter. But I don’t want to overstate antifa’s role in these shifts.

Sean Illing

Well, that dovetails with my final question, which is: Do you think the influence antifa is having on the American left will ultimately hurt the Democratic Party — and by extension help the Republicans?

Mark Bray

Not to be repetitive here, but they don’t care about the Democratic Party. But it’s still an interesting question to consider. Given the disaster that is the Trump presidency, I just think it would be a colossal failure of the Democratic Party not to win the next presidential election and gain a majority in Congress. If they can’t do that given this craziness, then they need to really rethink what they’re doing.

Will a lot of people see antifa and their methods as a poor reflection of the left? Absolutely. But I also think that these are not people who were going to vote Democrat anyway. If you read the news or pay attention to what’s happening, you know that Nancy Pelosi has nothing to do with antifa. This group loathes the Democratic Party, and they don’t hide that.

So anyone who blames the Democrats for antifa is likely already disposed to vote Republican anyway.

Voir encore:

Who are Antifa?

ADL

Antifa: Definition and History:

The anti-fascist protest movement known as antifa gained new prominence in the United States after the white supremacist Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, VA, in August 2017. In Charlottesville and at many subsequent events held by white supremacists or right-wing extremists, antifa activists have aggressively confronted what they believe to be authoritarian movements and groups. While most counter-protestors tend to be peaceful, there have been several instances where encounters between antifa and the far-right have turned violent.

These violent counter-protesters are often part of “antifa” (short for “antifascist”), a loose collection of groups, networks and individuals who believe in active, aggressive opposition to far right-wing movements. Their ideology is rooted in the assumption that the Nazi party would never have been able to come to power in Germany if people had more aggressively fought them in the streets in the 1920s and 30s. Most antifa come from the anarchist movement or from the far left, though since the 2016 presidential election, some people with more mainstream political backgrounds have also joined their ranks.

These antifa sometimes use a logo with a double flag, usually in black and red. The antifa movement began in the 1960s in Europe, and had reached the US by the end of the 1970s.  Most people who show up to counter or oppose white supremacist public events are peaceful demonstrators, but when antifa show up, as they frequently do, they can increase the chances that an event may turn violent.

Today, antifa activists focus on harassing right wing extremists both online and in real life.  Antifa is not a unified group; it is loose collection of local/regional groups and individuals. Their presence at a protest is intended to intimidate and dissuade racists, but the use of violent measures by some antifa against their adversaries can create a vicious, self-defeating cycle of attacks, counter-attacks and blame. This is why most established civil rights organizations criticize antifa tactics as dangerous and counterproductive.

The current political climate increases the chances of violent confrontations at protests and rallies. Antifa have expanded their definition of fascist/fascism to include not just white supremacists and other extremists, but also many conservatives and supporters of President Trump.  In Berkeley, for example, some antifa were captured on video harassing Trump supporters with no known extremist connections.  Antifa have also falsely characterized some recent right wing rallies as “Nazi” events, even though they were not actually white supremacist in nature.

Another concern is the misapplication of the label “antifa” to include all counter-protesters, rather than limiting it to those who proactively seek physical confrontations with their perceived fascist adversaries.  It is critical to understand how antifa fit within the larger counter-protest efforts. Doing so allows law enforcement to focus their resources on the minority who engage in violence without curtailing the civil rights of the majority of peaceful individuals who just want their voices to be heard.

All forms of antifa violence are problematic. Additionally, violence plays into the “victimhood” narrative of white supremacists and other right-wing extremists and can even be used for recruiting purposes.  Images of these “free speech” protesters being beaten by black-clad and bandana-masked antifa provide right wing extremists with a powerful propaganda tool.

That said, it is important to reject attempts to claim equivalence between the antifa and the white supremacist groups they oppose. Antifa reject racism but use unacceptable tactics. White supremacists use even more extreme violence to spread their ideologies of hate, to intimidate ethnic minorities, and undermine democratic norms. Right-wing extremists have been one of the largest and most consistent sources of domestic terror incidents in the United States for many years; they have murdered hundreds of people in this country over the last ten years alone.  To date, there have not been any known antifa-related murders.

Antifa: Scope and Tactics:

Today’s antifa argue they are the on-the-ground defense against individuals they believe are promoting fascism in the United States.  However, antifa, who have many anti-police anarchists in their ranks, can also target law enforcement with both verbal and physical assaults because they believe the police are providing cover for white supremacists.  They will sometimes chant against fascism and against law enforcement in the same breath.

While some antifa use their fists, other violent tactics include throwing projectiles, including bricks, crowbars, homemade slingshots, metal chains, water bottles, and balloons filled with urine and feces.  They have deployed noxious gases, pushed through police barricades, and attempted to exploit any perceived weakness in law enforcement presence.

Away from rallies, they also engage in “doxxing,” exposing their adversaries’ identities, addresses, jobs and other private information. This can lead to their opponents being harassed or losing their jobs, among other consequences. Members of the alt right and other right wing extremists have responded with their own doxxing campaigns, and by perpetuating hateful and violent narratives using fake “antifa” social media accounts.

Because there is no unifying body for antifa, it is impossible to know how many “members” are currently active.  Different localities have antifa populations of different strengths, but antifa are also sometimes willing to travel hundreds of miles to oppose a white supremacist event.

Voir enfin:

The assault on conservative journalist Andy Ngo, explained

An unjustifiable attack — and a subsequent controversy spotlighting the militant left-wing group antifa.

Last Saturday, the far-right Proud Boys group held a rally in Portland, Oregon. Left-wing groups, including the Portland branch of the militant antifa group, put together a counterprotest — whose attendees clashed with the Proud Boys. But the most notable instance of violence had nothing to do with the Proud Boys: It was an attack by counterprotesters on the conservative journalist Andy Ngo that reportedly sent him to the hospital.

In footage captured by Portland-based reporter Jim Ryan, demonstrators douse Ngo in milkshake, punch him, and yell at him. In short, it looks a lot like an unprovoked, unjustified, reprehensible assault on an observer — a journalist — merely because the protesters don’t like him.

But the aftermath of the attack — the narratives both sides have spun out of the basic facts established by the footage — is much trickier to assess.

In the dominant narrative, pushed by the conservative and mainstream media alike, the attack on Ngo is evidence of a serious left-wing violence problem in America. Antifa, they argue, is a group of street thugs that has repeatedly attacked journalists and poses a genuine threat to public safety. The fact that the left tolerates antifa, or even celebrates them, is proof of a serious rot; Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) has called for an investigation into the events in Portland.

“I pray for full and speedy recovery for journalist Andy Ngo,” writes Kevin McCarthy, the House minority leader. “The hate and violence perpetrated by Antifa must be condemned in the strongest possible way by all Americans.”

But according to a second narrative, offered primarily by less well-known left-liberal writers and social media accounts, the mainstream media is getting it all wrong. Ngo is not an innocent victim but a far-right sympathizer who has doxxed antifa members in the past, potentially facilitating their harassment, and provokes them so that he can broadcast the result. The outpouring of sympathy for Ngo, in this account, is actually evidence that the mainstream media is falling for Ngo’s grift — funneling money to his Patreon and legitimizing a right-wing smear campaign against a group that’s working to protect people from the threat of violence from groups like the Proud Boys.

The two main figures in these events are Ngo and antifa.

The publication where Ngo is an editor, Quillette, is widely seen as a major hub of the “intellectual dark web” — a loose collection of anti-political correctness, anti-identity politics, anti-left media figures and reporters. Ngo is the closest thing the intellectual dark web has to a gonzo journalist, someone who goes into allegedly hostile places and documents them for his more than 200,000 Twitter followers to illustrate that the IDW is right about the threat from multiculturalism and the left.

Last year, for example, Ngo went to the UK to chronicle the supposed threat the rising Muslim population posed to British society. The resulting article, “A Visit to Islamic England,” claimed England was being quietly conquered by fundamentalist Islam.

The piece was shredded by actual Brits. Most amusingly, Ngo presented a London sign reading “alcohol restricted zone” as evidence of Islamic dominance in the Whitechapel neighborhood; it was actually a public safety ordinance designed to discourage public acts of drunkenness from patrons of nearby pubs, bars, and strip clubs.

Ngo’s coverage of left-wing protesters is similarly ideological. He views left-wing activists, like Muslim immigrants to the West, as a threat to free and open societies. His reporting plays up acts of vandalism, violence, and hostility to free speech without a comparable focus on the much more frequent and deadly actions of right-wing extremists.

Antifa is a perfect foil for Ngo. The group of typically black-clad activists are radicals who believe the best way to deal with the rise of white supremacy and hate groups in the Trump era is by confronting them on the street. Sometimes, this means organizing demonstrations against them; other times, it means brawling in the streets.

“They view self-defense as necessary in terms of defending communities against white supremacists,” Mark Bray, a Dartmouth historian who studies antifa, told my colleague Sean Illing in a 2017 interview. “They have no allegiance to liberal democracy, which they believe has failed the marginalized communities they’re defending. They’re anarchists and communists who are way outside the traditional conservative-liberal spectrum.”

Antifa does not have a central command structure, and its members are typically anonymous. While not all antifa activities involve physical confrontation, some do have a nasty habit of assaulting people — including journalists, as some reporter friends of mine like Taylor Lorenz, who were attacked while live-streaming in Charlottesville, Virginia, can speak to.

Portland, where Ngo lives, has seen a particularly notable number of brawls between antifa and far-right groups in recent years. Ngo has not only documented antifa activities but published at least one member’s full name alongside a picture — “doxxing” her, in internet parlance, and exposing her to retaliation. Ngo’s work on this front had made him well-known to antifa, and profoundly despised — he claims, for example, that an antifa member assaulted and robbed him at his gym.

In mid-June, he reported advance news of an event on June 29 in Portland by the “Proud Boys” — a far-right group who describe themselves as “Western chauvinists” and are a major antifa nemesis. Portland antifa, who organized a counterprotest, issued a statement warning about the event that criticized Ngo by name.

The stage was set for a major confrontation between Ngo and antifa. And when he showed up at their event over the weekend, that’s exactly what happened.

What the right and left narratives of the attack reveal

The attack on Ngo appeared to be taking place at a left-wing counter-rally to the Proud Boys event. It was a march, and while there was at least one scuffle between left-wingers and Proud Boys at one point, the situation where Ngo was filming with his GoPro did not appear violent prior to the attack on him.

The footage is only 30 seconds long, so it doesn’t show whether Ngo was antagonizing the demonstrators in some other way. But if you watch it, Ngo clearly comes across as the victim of an attack:

Ngo was recognized by the crowd, as people yell things like, “Fuck you, Andy Ngo!” He was punched without any attempt to retaliate, covering his face with his hands in a defensive posture. You can see him being hit with a milkshake (a common tactic used against right-wing figures in the UK), egged, and sprayed with silly string.

Footage from the aftermath, taken by Ngo himself, shows his face battered and bloody. According to a statement by Quillette’s editors, the attack produced “a brain hemorrhage that required Ngo’s overnight hospitalization.”

It’s important to reiterate: Beating people up is reprehensible. Whoever punched Ngo, antifa or otherwise, committed a crime.

The right/center and left narratives go beyond that central point to claim Saturday’s events for their team. In the process, they tend to distort the facts, trying to make it fit their worldview when it doesn’t quite conform.

CNN’s Jake Tapper, for example, argued that this was part of a broader pattern of antifa violence — retweeting an interview with Ngo in which he compares antifa to the neo-Nazi who killed Heather Heyer in Charlottesville in 2017.

But antifa has not committed a single murder, at least that we’re aware of. We don’t yet have proof that the people who assaulted Ngo were antifa members (though it seems likely given their history). And the attack on Ngo seems less like a part of a broader pattern of attacks on journalists than it does part of a specific feud between Portland antifa and Ngo; they didn’t appear to target other journalists at the rally in the same fashion (which doesn’t excuse the attack on Ngo).

The problem with this narrative is not that antifa is blameless. Some of its members clearly have crossed the line. It’s that hyping the threat they pose paints a decentralized group with a broad and simple brush, and contributes to a disproportionate right-wing panic in the process.

Portland police, based on a theory developed by one officer, tweeted that the milkshakes being thrown by protesters may have been mixed with quick-dry cement. There is at best flimsy evidence for this claim, which is hard to believe as a matter of sheer physics (sugar slows the process of concrete setting). There’s also footage of people drinking the milkshakes, which you wouldn’t do if it were a hidden cement vector. But that didn’t stop the quick-dry cement claim from being reported as fact in right-wing outlets, including Fox News.

This is part of a broader narrative, largely sold on the right, designed to paint antifa as an equal-and-opposite number to neo-Nazi groups — Fox’s Laura Ingraham has even proposed labeling antifa as terrorists. The idea is to paint a picture of symmetrical radicalization, one in which both sides have extremist flanks that pose a major threat to civil peace.

But that’s simply inaccurate. As bad as antifa’s transgressions have been, the far right has been worse. There is no antifa equivalent to Heyer’s murder, or the Charleston church shooting, or the attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue. Antifa has no relationship with the Democratic Party nor do its members really support the party; alt-right activists are Trump fans, and at times seem to get tacit support from the White House (again, see Charlottesville). A national focus on antifa can distract from the much greater problem of far-right extremism — as watchdog groups have argued.

“All forms of antifa violence are problematic,” the Anti-Defamation League, a Jewish anti-hate group, writes in its primer on the group. “That said, it is important to reject attempts to claim equivalence between the antifa and the white supremacist groups they oppose.” The guide continues:

Antifa reject racism but use unacceptable tactics. White supremacists use even more extreme violence to spread their ideologies of hate, to intimidate ethnic minorities, and undermine democratic norms. Right-wing extremists have been one of the largest and most consistent sources of domestic terror incidents in the United States for many years; they have murdered hundreds of people in this country over the last ten years alone. To date, there have not been any known antifa-related murders.

But the left-wing narrative of events where Ngo is the real villain has serious problems too. It’s indicative of a hunger on the left, amid administration horrors like child detention camps and the scary rise in far-right non-state violence, to create a “with us or against us” mentality.

It’s fine to dislike Ngo’s journalism (I do), and to argue that he has intentionally antagonized antifa in order to provoke them. But just because Ngo has filmed Portland leftists, or even doxxed them, doesn’t mean they are justified in using physical force against him.

Antifa members aren’t morally inert forces of nature. They have agency, and they don’t need to respond to Ngo’s antagonism with violence. The fact that some in the group seem to have done so exposes that some who identify as antifa aren’t nearly as purely anti-fascist as they want observers to think. Antifa may oppose the alt-right first and foremost, but members direct their clashes at a broader set of targets than anyone who can fairly be called a “fascist.”

There’s also a strange meme emerging in some antifa-sympathetic quarters that Ngo is somehow “not a journalist.”

This is clearly incorrect. Ngo is a writer and photographer who contributes to journalistic outlets. That’s journalism, even if you don’t like the content.

Street confrontations and the culture war

The divergent interpretations of the Ngo situation, based on limited evidence, reminds me of the Covington Catholic controversy in January.

In that incident, a short viral video showed a group of white teens in “Make America Great Again” hats surrounding a small group of Native American demonstrators, including an elder from the Omaha tribe named Nathan Phillips. One of the kids, identified as Covington Catholic High School student Nick Sandmann, stands in Phillips’s face and smirks, unaffected by the drumming. It looks like a straightforward story of privileged racist white kids harassing a peaceful Native protester.

But shortly after the clip went viral, to universal and at times vitriolic condemnation, a pushback began in right-of-center media. Some argued that mainstream media and left-wing activists alike were being unfair to the kids, who were actually defending themselves from insults and harassment from a separate group of protesters, members of the fringe Black Israelite movement.

There was far more footage of this incident than the Ngo one, yet it was difficult to be certain which side had a more accurate read of the situation. It’s clear some of the kids were confused by Phillips; it’s equally clear some of the kids were making racist gestures. We don’t know what was in Sandmann’s head when he was standing in front of Phillips.

But the Covington incident dominated American politics for days because both sides saw what they wanted to in the footage. The left, which sees white supremacy as one of its fundamental enemies, was quick — in some cases, too quick — to identify Sandmann and his classmates as villains.

The right’s reaction, in turn, revealed several of its core assumptions that white Christians are persecuted minorities, that overzealous social justice warriors represent an existential threat to a free society, and that the media is on their enemies’ side.

A related dynamic seems to be shaping up in the Ngo case: The right sees proof that the left is radicalizing, a threat to them and their safety, and hypes up the risk they pose. The left sees a hostile journalist trying to gin up sympathy and dollars via his Patreon account, and warns that he’s trying to trick the public into excusing his anti-left propaganda work.

It’s never been easier to capture footage of a confrontation at a rally or other public event. Social media, particularly Twitter, can amplify an ideologically particular interpretation of events before all the evidence is in — allowing a contradictory narrative to form on the other side in response, highlighting its own selective interpretation of what happened.

This is particularly likely to happen at heated events like protests. As the New York Times’s Charlie Warzel points out, Ngo is not the only person who goes to such events with the intent of filming something notable:

But we know, as filmmakers long have, that footage doesn’t convey the objective reality of a situation; it reveals certain things and obscures others. Moreover, the meaning of filmed events is entirely open to contestation. The mere fact that Ngo was assaulted doesn’t say what the meaning of that assault is, or what the broader context is that’s necessary to understand it.

The result is a never-ending stream of Rorschach test controversies pushed on social media, in which either the meaning of events on film or even the very facts of what’s being depicted are litigated endlessly and tied to our right-versus-left culture war.

The attack on Andy Ngo is not the first situation where political factions have used a high-profile video to claim that the other side is the real threat to the public — nor will it be the last.

Voir par ailleurs:

Trump is a pit bull fighting for America: Devine

The New York Post

Quick! Get out the smelling salts for all the faint hearts hyperventilating about President Trump’s “lack of decorum” at Tuesday night’s debate.

Did they really expect him to play by Marquess of Queensberry rules?

Jake Tapper on CNN lamented that a friend’s sixth-grade daughter “burst into tears, had to run to bed” because she was “so appalled” by Trump’s behavior.

Debate reviews by media bien pensants were summarized in a Joe Biden campaign email Wednesday morning, titled, “Trump Blew it, Bigly.”

It quoted columnists at the Washington Post and the New York Times excoriating Trump’s “nihilism,” “norm-busting” and “nasty, unsettling meanness.”

Never-Trumper Max Boot was typical: “Trump showed no respect for time limits, human decency or the truth.”

Frank Bruni’s take at the Times was: “After that fiasco, Biden should refuse to debate Trump again.”

Entertainer Bette Midler took to Twitter to call Trump “a pig” and demand “a kill switch on the microphone or there’s no reason to do this again.”

Bob Woodward told MSNBC that Trump “is assassinating the presidency.”

Mika Brzezinski was apoplectic: “Why in the hell should [Biden] get back on stage with that fool.”

Sure enough, the Commission on Presidential Debates announced Wednesday that future moderators will be given a kill switch to cut candidates’ microphones.

But if Democrats are so certain their man won, why are they so anxious for him not to participate in more debates, and why do they want a kill switch to control the ­debaters?

As for all the sad sacks in the ­media lamenting Trump’s trampling of “norms,” what have they been doing the past four years but trashing norms by promoting rancid lies about the president, lies pursued by the FBI and CIA to strangle his presidency at birth.

In any case, the Democratic candidate supposedly running a “decorum” ticket let loose a string of Tourette’s-style schoolyard insults, calling the president a “liar,” “fool,” “clown,” “racist” and “stupid.”

“Shut up, man,” said Biden.

Trump’s goading succeeded in ripping off Biden’s “nice guy” mask and forcing him to fight in the ­gutter.

Instinctively, or deliberately, the president engaged in a winning fighting strategy deployed by the best national rugby team in the world, New Zealand’s All Blacks. They come out hard in the first phase of the game, using sheer brute violence to probe their opponents’ weaknesses. It’s not pretty but it’s effective if your goal is to win.

So if Biden gives it his best effort in the next two debates rather than using Trump’s lack of decorum as an excuse not to engage, then you’ll see the president calibrating his ­attacks to zero in on Biden’s vulnerabilities.

Sure, the debate was a chaotic mess. But the emotional takeaway was this: In a turbulent world with circling predators like Chinese President Xi Jinping, whom do you want defending America? An aggressive pit bull who will do anything to win, or a smirking milquetoast hurling schoolyard insults.

This view probably is behind the fact that 66 percent of Spanish-speaking viewers of Telemundo judged Trump the winner of the debate, the opposite result of similar insta-polls on CNN and CBS News.

After all, if you’ve lived through a socialist dictatorship or MS-13 tyranny, you appreciate a tough leader to protect you.

Americans voted for Trump in 2016 precisely because he is a pit bull, a barbarian, a gun-slinger they hired to fight the dirty left, drain the swamp, bring back their jobs from China and stand up for the flag, family and common sense.

They don’t care that he doesn’t act “presidential” as long as he fights for them.

Of course, it would have been better for the president to tone down the interruptions and give Biden enough slack to lose his train of thought and say something ridiculous, as he usually does when talking without a teleprompter.

But we should not be surprised by the rancor of the debate.

It reflects the rancor tearing apart this country, pitting neighbor against neighbor, children against parents, friend against friend.

You can see it in the street in Scranton, Pa., where Biden spent his first 10 years.

At first sight, tree-lined North Washington Avenue is an all-Democrat enclave, with a “Biden 2020” or “Scranton Loves Joe” yard sign in front of about every third house.

But that’s not because Trump supporters don’t live on the street. It’s because their signs get stolen.

“A lot of people here are under the radar,” says financial planner Tom Moran, 61, whose Dutch Tudor home down the road from Biden’s childhood home is adorned with a giant Trump flag.

“I know at least 25 people on the street who are Trump supporters, but they don’t have signs up.”

He has lost three signs and neighbors down the road have lost two. The only other Trump sign on the street is tucked safely behind a window.

“It’s been a constant battle and when you have the signs out, there’s an intimidation factor.”

The animosity between Trump’s and Biden’s supporters is like nothing he’s seen before.

“My wife and my 3-year-old daughter have been outside, and guys have driven by and rolled their window down and yelled obscenities. It’s disgusting but it’s just the kind of crappy stuff that’s happening.

“My daughter’s been isolated from the neighbors’ kids. Last summer they were all playing together. This summer they won’t play with her.

“It is mean. I can’t explain it but this is the behavior we’re seeing.”

As we speak, a neighbor walks by with his dog, raises his fist and yells, “Trump all the way. Biden is a loser.”

It’s not the fault of the president or Biden or moderator Chris Wallace that Tuesday’s debate was an acrimonious shambles.

It’s the way the country is right now.

Voir aussi:

‘Will You Shut Up, Man?’

Amazing that just five words from the debate may tip voters who are undecided between Joe Biden and Donald Trump.

The Wall Street Journal

A reader emailed me before dawn Wednesday to say that in more than 60 years of presidential debates, he had never seen anything like what happened hours earlier. Yes, it’s true, we’re still in Trump Land, Toto.

One can imagine analysis will arrive from Trump Land that blowing up the debate was Mr. Trump’s plan going in. What other than a thought-out strategy, perhaps to capture the so-called secret Trump voters, could explain the president dynamiting it from start to finish?

Conventional wisdom is that because it was a debacle, the debate didn’t change any minds. But the high percentage of committed party-line voters has been a reality for months. Other than driving turnout from a polarized electorate, these presidential debates are about winning at the margin by pulling over undecided or leaning voters.

This especially includes women, with whom Mr. Trump lately has been underwater and sinking in battleground-state polls. Here’s guessing few women migrated to the Trump column Tuesday evening.

The second, policy-based prong is to drive the perception of Mr. Trump that is freshest in the public’s mind—that he mishandled the coronavirus, the biggest public-health threat of our lifetimes. Set aside how little the reality comports with this charge. Reality is irrelevant to an opposition election strategy.

Polls have put public disapproval of Mr. Trump on the virus at nearly 57%, a high number given that most governors have strong approval ratings on the virus. This is almost entirely a function of the early, ill-run coronavirus news conferences, which consisted mainly of Mr. Trump promoting himself and picking fights with reporters, when the country was tuning in daily for straight information about the emerging crisis. If Mr. Trump loses, those press conferences will be the straw that did it.

Central to the Biden team’s strategy is their recognition that Mr. Trump’s Achilles’ heel is personal criticism. He can’t take it. Ever. His instinct to crack back is hair-trigger.

This worked for him in the 2016 GOP primary debates against Low Energy Jeb, Lyin’ Ted, Little Marco and the rest. It sort of worked because the jammed stage minimized his time on target. Though not to everyone’s taste, his primary debate performances established Mr. Trump in many voters’ minds as the Anti-Politician.

The crack-back compulsion continued with the White House press corps, and in time became less amusing. Instead of opportunities to explain his policies, the exchanges turned into tiresome, predictable cat fights. Goading Mr. Trump became a press routine, like working out at the gym.

Mr. Trump has been called, not without justification, a necessary bull in the dusty china shop of politics. But Tuesday night he looked like a bull on the floor of an arena, tiring and turning first to face picador Chris Wallace and then lurching back at Mr. Biden’s toreador. It got hard to watch.

Mr. Biden proved he isn’t Mel Brooks’s 2,000-year-old man, but he is an aging politician, unable to sustain a normal campaign and struggling to reconcile or explain his party’s abrupt drift to the edge of socialism. But with 47 years in the trenches, Mr. Biden is a political pro, which means being case-hardened against personal criticism.

The debate was 90 minutes of maybe the only thing Joe Biden is still good at—parrying attacks, whether from former presidential candidate Kamala Harris or Mr. Trump. When Mr. Trump finally played the Hunter Biden card and “cocaine use,” Mr. Biden said his son, “like a lot of people at home,” was fixing the problem—and millions of moms nodded in sympathy.

Mr. Biden ran through his talking points, however preposterous, such as suggesting cops take along a psychiatrist on 911 calls. The biggest Biden vulnerability came when he asserted, “You can’t fix the economy until you fix the Covid crisis.” Lockdowns to the horizon.

The president’s response—that people want their schools and restaurants open and that he restarted Big Ten football—was OK but not enough on an issue central to his re-election.

Mr. Trump has a good story to tell. The speakers at the impressive GOP convention created a narrative template for the campaign, but that story wasn’t told Tuesday night.

When asked to address race in the U.S., giving Mr. Trump a chance to talk about his prison releases and minority job creation, he segued into a 25-year-old anecdote about Mr. Biden and “superpredators.” Even sympathetic voters have difficulty absorbing a good political record if it’s conveyed to them in random semi-soundbites.

This first presidential debate will be remembered for five words: “Will you shut up, man?” Amazing to think that may be what turns deciding votes in this election.

Voir également:

Trump Has Condemned White Supremacists

Former Vice President Joe Biden wrongly claimed President Donald Trump has “yet once to condemn white supremacy, the neo-Nazis.”

Trump drew criticism for his condemnation of “hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides” after a rally organized by a white nationalist in Charlottesville in 2017, and for saying there were “very fine people on both sides.” But, contrary to Biden’s claim, the president twice specifically condemned white supremacists and neo-Nazis, and he has repeated that condemnation since.

On ABC’s “This Week,” Biden was asked what the consequences would be of a Trump victory in 2020. Biden responded that Trump would “go on dividing us based on race.”

Biden, Feb. 9: George, I, honest to God believe, they’re going to change the nature of who we are for a long, long time. Our children are listening. The idea — the man who can belittle people, go on dividing us based on race, religion, ethnicity, based on all the things that, in fact, make up America is just incredibly divisive. You see these white supremacists coming out from under the rocks. He’s yet once to condemn white supremacy, the neo-Nazis. He hasn’t condemned a darn thing. He has given them oxygen. And that’s what’s going to continue to happen. That’s who this guy is. He has no basic American values — he doesn’t understand the American code.

Biden has said that Trump’s comments in the aftermath of the Charlottesville rally convinced him to run for president. In a video announcing his candidacy, Biden said Trump’s “very fine people on both sides” comment “assigned a moral equivalence between those spreading hate and those with the courage to stand against it” and “shocked the conscience of the nation.”

Trump has said his “very fine people” comment referred not to white supremacists and neo-Nazis but to “people that went because they felt very strongly about the monument to Robert E. Lee — a great general, whether you like it or not.” Some have argued that explanation doesn’t hold up, because Trump referred in that statement to a protest “the night before” when — it was widely reported white nationalists burned tiki torches and chanted anti-Semitic and white nationalist slogans. We’ll leave it to readers to make up their minds on Trump’s remarks, but Biden’s comment that Trump has “yet once to condemn white supremacy” is not accurate.

Let’s revisit Trump’s comments in the days after the Charlottesville rally. That rally turned violent, and one person, Heather Heyer, was killed and many others injured, when a man with a history of making racist comments plowed his car into a group of counterprotesters.

The day of that incident Trump said, “We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides. On many sides.” Trump said he had spoken to Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, and “we agreed that the hate and the division must stop, and must stop right now. We have to come together as Americans with love for our nation and true affection — really — and I say this so strongly — true affection for each other.”

Two days later, on Aug. 14, 2017, Trump issued a statement from the White House, and referred to “KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.”

Trump, Aug. 14, 2017: As I said on Saturday, we condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence. It has no place in America.

And as I have said many times before: No matter the color of our skin, we all live under the same laws, we all salute the same great flag, and we are all made by the same almighty God. We must love each other, show affection for each other, and unite together in condemnation of hatred, bigotry, and violence. We must rediscover the bonds of love and loyalty that bring us together as Americans.

Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.

We are a nation founded on the truth that all of us are created equal. We are equal in the eyes of our Creator. We are equal under the law. And we are equal under our Constitution. Those who spread violence in the name of bigotry strike at the very core of America.

During a press conference the following day, Aug. 15, 2017, Trump explained his initial “many sides” comment.

“You had a group on one side that was bad,” Trump said. “And you had a group on the other side that was also very violent.” He added, “I’ve condemned neo-Nazis. I’ve condemned many different groups, but not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch.”

Here’s the relevant portion when the president said some in the group protesting the removal of the Lee statue were “very fine people”:

Reporter, Aug. 15, 2017: You said there was hatred, there was violence on both sides …

Trump: Well, I do think there’s blame – yes, I think there’s blame on both sides. You look at, you look at both sides. I think there’s blame on both sides, and I have no doubt about it, and you don’t have any doubt about it either. And, and, and, and if you reported it accurately, you would say.

Reporter: The neo-Nazis started this thing. They showed up in Charlottesville. …

Trump: Excuse me, they didn’t put themselves down as neo — and you had some very bad people in that group. But you also had people that were very fine people on both sides. You had people in that group – excuse me, excuse me. I saw the same pictures as you did. You had people in that group that were there to protest the taking down, of to them, a very, very important statue and the renaming of a park from Robert E. Lee to another name. …

It’s fine, you’re changing history, you’re changing culture, and you had people – and I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally – but you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists, okay? And the press has treated them absolutely unfairly. Now, in the other group also, you had some fine people, but you also had troublemakers and you see them come with the black outfits and with the helmets and with the baseball bats – you had a lot of bad people in the other group too.

Reporter: I just didn’t understand what you were saying. You were saying the press has treated white nationalists unfairly? …

Trump: No, no. There were people in that rally, and I looked the night before. If you look, they were people protesting very quietly, the taking down of the statue of Robert E. Lee. I’m sure in that group there were some bad ones. The following day, it looked like they had some rough, bad people, neo-Nazis, white nationalists, whatever you want to call them. But you had a lot of people in that group that were there to innocently protest and very legally protest, because you know, I don’t know if you know, they had a permit. The other group didn’t have a permit. So I only tell you this: There are two sides to a story.

So, contrary to Biden’s claim that Trump has “yet once to condemn white supremacy, the neo-Nazis,” in the course of two days, Trump did it twice.

Trump, Aug. 14, 2017: Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.

Trump, Aug. 15, 2017: I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally.

Nor was that the last time Trump condemned white supremacy by name.

After nearly two dozen people were killed on Aug. 3, 2019, in a shooting at a Wal-Mart in El Paso, Trump said: “The shooter in El Paso posted a manifesto online consumed by racist hate. In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry, and white supremacy. These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America. Hatred warps the mind, ravages the heart, and devours the soul. We have asked the FBI to identify all further resources they need to investigate and disrupt hate crimes and domestic terrorism — whatever they need.”

Biden said that since Trump took office, “You see these white supremacists coming out from under the rocks.” Last March, we looked into that issue, and experts told us there are a number of indicators that suggest white nationalism and white supremacy — and violence inspired by them — are on the rise, in the U.S. and around the world.

It’s Biden’s opinion that Trump’s comments have “given them oxygen,” as he said. But Biden went too far when he said Trump has “yet once to condemn white supremacy, the neo-Nazis. He hasn’t condemned a darn thing.” He has, although perhaps not as often or as quickly as Biden would like.

Voir de plus:

The original antifa had a pragmatic streak.

Oct. 31, 2020

Ever since Donald Trump became president, public officials, academics and media columnists have debated the similarities between the right-wing authoritarian turn in the United States and other countries and the history of fascism in Europe in the 1930s. The term antifascism has received comparably less public analysis, even though — in its Twitter-friendly short form “antifa” — the term has come to play a key role in this year’s electoral politics.

For Trump and his supporters on Fox News and conservative talk radio, antifa is the symbol and shorthand for urban violence and rioting, anarchist revolution and left-wing terrorism. Trump has continually relativized right-wing violence and white supremacy by shifting attention to the supposedly far greater menace of antifa. At a rally in Tampa on Thursday, Trump reminded attendees that Joe Biden had called antifa an idea, to which the president responded “No, when you get hit over the head behind your back with a baseball bat, that’s not an idea. That’s not an idea.”

At the same time, the usually loosely organized groups of left-wing protesters in Portland, Ore., and other U.S. cities that have adopted the name antifa — which the FBI indicates is nowhere as great a terrorist threat as right-wing groups — position themselves as outside the moderate liberal mainstream.

For both the right and the left, antifa connotes an uncompromising radicalism. However, a look at the historical roots of the antifa movement reveal much more prevalent strands of pragmatism, compromise and coalition-building. In some cases, the movement also reflected a surprising embrace of moderation and reconciliation. This is especially true for German antifascism between the 1930s and the early Cold War. This is noteworthy especially since Germany often provides the reference point for contemporary discussions of fascism.

Who were the original antifa? The term was used during the last months of World War II as a short form for Antifascist Committees, small resistance groups that took over local administrations in Germany in 1944 and 1945, between the collapse of the Third Reich and the establishment of the Allied occupation zones. In most cases, the core of these antifa committees, such as the National Committee Free Germany (NKFD) in Leipzig, were Communist Party cells that had survived underground in Nazi Germany. However, many antifas were local grass-roots groups that incorporated broad coalitions of social democrats, trade union activists and even conservative Hitler opponents.

The emergence of these antifa groups did not correlate to street violence, despite styling themselves as “fighting groups” and sporting revolutionary rhetoric and symbolism that harked back to the workers councils of the early Weimar Republic.

Local antifas organized rudimentary municipal administration, reconstruction and basic police functions. They provided for law and order in the absence of organized government. The most radical and revolutionary act was often the temporary takeover of factories and the establishment of workers councils — an act that led directly to the concept of Mitbestimmung (co-determination) of workers and trade union representatives in factory management in the decidedly capitalist and non-revolutionary postwar West Germany.

Rather than engaging in street fighting, the antifas distributed leaflets appealing to the unity of workers “of all parties and confessions.” The KGF in Bremen — the German acronym stood for Fighting Association against Fascism — organized neighborhood discussion groups, triggering early discussions about Germans’ complicity in the Nazi regime and its crimes — a debate that prefigured postwar Germany’s practice of Vergangenheitsbewältigung, or “coming to terms with the past.”

The local antifa in the Ruhr city of Duisburg made Nazi party members clean up bomb damage, but unlike in other European countries, there was little violence or ad hoc executions of people suspected of Nazi sympathies. This reflected the still substantial support for the regime among the population as well as the fact that non-Jewish Germans suffered much less from the Nazis than the rest of Europe, but it also testifies to a general attitude of constraint, moderation and acceptance of the rule of law. There was no resistance by any of the armed antifa “fighting groups” against their dissolution by the occupation authorities in East and West Germany in the course of 1945 and 1946.

If the original antifas in Germany were overall moderate organizations, it reminds us that antifascism — as a movement and ideology — was based on a compromise.

At the VII Comintern Congress in Moscow in 1935, Joseph Stalin rescinded his previous policy of forced noncooperation between European communist and democratic parties (a policy that bears significant responsibility for Adolf Hitler’s electoral success in 1933). After years of downplaying the threat of fascism, and of denouncing social democracy as “social fascism,” Stalin’s about-face enabled coalitions between communists, social democrats, liberals and conservatives — even former archconservatives such as the writer Thomas Mann counted themselves part of the movement.

These “popular front” coalitions and alliances helped prevent fascism from coming to power in a number of countries in the second half of the 1930s. German antifascism, in particular, flourished in exile groups that focused less on revolutionary violence than on a “cultural renewal” of humanist values, which included a reevaluation of the country’s history.

After 1945, with the beginning of the Cold War, the term “antifascism” was quickly co-opted and instrumentalized by the Soviet-controlled regimes in Eastern Europe, with many former antifascists falling victim to show trials and purges. The inclusive and nonpartisan antifascism of the prewar and World War II period did not fit into a Stalinist system that was based on the power monopoly of communist parties.

In the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), antifascism became a rhetorical device that legitimized the ruling party’s claim to moral superiority over its Western counterpart — the official GDR term for the Berlin Wall constructed in 1961 was “anti-fascist protection wall.” This affected the memory — or lack of it — of the short-lived antifa groups during the Cold War. Largely ignored or forgotten in the West, they were selectively memorialized and glorified as precursors to communist rule in the East, with their history of diversity and inclusion suppressed.

But this should not let us forget that the original antifa were neither the terrorist arsonists of Trump’s propaganda nor uncompromising, dogmatic revolutionaries rejecting any liberal compromises. The authoritarian sympathies of Trump and the Republican Party fall short of the fascism of the 1930s, but it is safe to say that the success of the Biden and Harris campaign will depend on the kinds of compromise and undogmatic coalition-building that characterized the original antifa of 80 years ago. Trump’s desperate attempts to tie Biden to the term “antifa” thus contains an ironic and unintended grain of truth.

Voir aussi:

Qui sont les «Proud Boys», que Donald Trump appelle à se tenir «prêts»?

Interrogé lors du débat avec Joe Biden sur le nationalisme blanc, le président américain a adressé un message à l’organisation d’extrême droite: «Proud Boys, mettez-vous en retrait, tenez-vous prêts».

Stanislas Poyet

30 septembre 2020

Alors que le présentateur lui demandait s’il condamnait les suprémacistes blancs lors de son premier débat face à Joe Biden, Donald Trump s’est fendu d’une réponse énigmatique. «Proud Boys, mettez-vous en retrait, tenez-vous prêts», a déclaré le président des États-Unis, avant d’accuser les milices antifa d’extrême gauche de l’essentiel des violences observées en manifestation. Il a finalement fait volte-face mercredi appelant les milices d’extrême droite à «laisser la police faire son travail». «Je ne sais pas qui sont les Proud Boys», a-t-il également affirmé.

Alors, qui sont ces «Proud boys» («fiers garçons», en anglais) dont Donald Trump a fait mention? Il s’agit d’une organisation d’extrême droite américaine, qui se décrit comme une fraternité, un «club d’homme», qui assume ses positions pro-Trump. L’organisation a été décrite comme «un groupe de haine» par le Southern Poverty Law Center, une association qui observe les groupes d’extrême droite.

Fin novembre 2018, il a été rapporté, sur la base d’une note interne de la police du comté de Clark, que le FBI avait classé les «Proud Boys» comme «un groupe extrémiste lié au nationalisme blanc». L’information a été plus tard démentie par un responsable du FBI, précisant que la police fédérale américaine surveillait simplement ce groupe.

Violence, misogynie et arme à feu

Les «Proud Boys» cultivent un idéal de force, largement emprunt de misogynie, et de racisme – ce dont ils se défendent. Le groupe s’adresse aux hommes qui «refusent de s’excuser d’avoir créé le monde moderne». Il défend le port d’armes à feu, «l’entreprenariat» et la «femme au foyer», tout en s’opposant au «politiquement correct» et à l’immigration.

Pour défendre les «valeurs occidentales», les «Proud Boys» revendiquent le recours à la violence. «Je veux de la violence, je veux des coups de poing au visage. Je suis déçu que les partisans de Trump n’aient pas suffisamment frappé», déclarait ainsi Gavin McInnes, le fondateur du groupe. Pour Heidi Beirich, directrice du projet de renseignement pour le Southern Poverty Law Center, assumer la violence à ce point n’est pas commun chez les groupes d’extrême droite.

Je veux de la violence, je veux des coups de poing au visage. Je suis déçu que les partisans de Trump n’aient pas suffisamment frappé

Gavin McInnes, fondateur des «Proud Boys»

Selon le rapport interne de la police du comté de Clark se référant au FBI, le groupe «a contribué à l’escalade récente de la violence lors de rassemblements politiques organisés sur les campus universitaires et dans des villes comme Charlottesville, Virginie, Portland, Oregon et Seattle, Washington».

«Hipster raciste»

Le média américain Vox a affublé les «Proud boys» du sobriquet de «hipster racistes». Le mouvement tient en effet fortement à la personnalité charismatique et fantasque de son fondateur, Gavin McInnes, un canado-britannique résidant au États-Unis, considéré comme l’un des initiateurs du mouvement hipster, qui cofonda le magazine Vice en 1994. En 2018, il quitte officiellement la présidence du groupe, mais il y reste fortement impliqué.

S’ils ne portent pas à proprement parler d’uniformes, les «Proud Boys» se reconnaissent à leurs polos de la marque Fred Perry noirs et jaunes. La marque, déjà primée par les groupes skinhead, a plusieurs fois jugé nécessaire de se démarquer du groupe, en demandant à ses membres de cesser de porter leurs polos. En septembre 2020, Fred Perry a annoncé qu’il cessait de vendre ses polos noirs et jaunes en Amérique du Nord et au Canada.

Ce mardi, le noir et le jaune se retrouvaient sur les pages Facebook «Proud Boys». L’adresse de Donald Trump lors du débat a été récupérée pour en faire un logo: «Stand Back, Stand By», «Reculez, tenez-vous prêts».

Voir également:

Aux Etats-Unis, les Proud Boys, miliciens d’extrême droite, fiers d’être cités par le président

Donald Trump leur a enjoint, lors du débat télévisé de mardi soir, de se « mettre en retrait » et de « se tenir prêt ».

Corine Lesnes

Le Monde

30 septembre 2020

Les membres de la milice d’extrême droite des Proud Boys n’ont pas été peu fiers de s’entendre donner des consignes par le président des Etats-Unis. Pendant son débat contre Joe Biden, mardi 29 septembre, Donald Trump a été invité par le modérateur Chris Wallace à répudier solennellement la violence d’extrême droite. « Etes-vous prêt ce soir à condamner les suprémacistes blancs et les milices et à dire qu’ils doivent rentrer dans le rang et ne pas ajouter à la violence ? », a invité le journaliste.

« J’y suis tout à fait disposé », a répondu M. Trump, avant d’ajouter que la violence émanait surtout de l’extrême gauche, « et non de l’aile droite ». Le présentateur ayant insisté, le président a fait mine de s’exécuter et, puisque Joe Biden avait mentionné les Proud Boys, c’est à eux qu’il s’est adressé : « Proud Boys, mettez-vous en retrait et tenez-vous prêts », a-t-il lancé. « Mais il faut que quelqu’un fasse quelque chose au sujet de ces antifas et de la gauche. Ce n’est pas un problème de l’aile droite. C’est la gauche. » La mouvance d’extrême gauche, dite antifa, a été rendue responsable de nombre de violences urbaines, notamment à Portland (Oregon) en marge des manifestations antiracistes de Black Lives Matter.

Le débat présidentiel n’était pas encore terminé que les membres du groupe célébraient, sur les réseaux sociaux, cette légitimation qualifiée d’« historique ». Quelques heures plus tard l’expression de M. Trump – « stand back and stand by » – était ajoutée au logo des « Boys ». « Ce que le président a dit, c’est qu’on pouvait se payer » les antifas, a commenté sur Twitter Joe Biggs, l’une des figures du groupe, en se déclarant « ravi » de poursuivre l’affrontement. « Sir, a-t-il ajouté, emphatique. Nous sommes prêts ! »

« Caravanes pour Trump »

Les Proud Boys, groupuscule qui n’accepte pas de femmes, fondé en 2016 par le cofondateur de Vice Media Gavin McInnes, en même temps que l’apparition de la mouvance identitaire, nationaliste et islamophobe de l’alt-right, pour « alternative right », sont considérés comme un « groupe de haine » (« hate group ») par le SPLC (Southern Poverty Law Center), qui fait autorité dans l’analyse des extrémistes. Jusqu’à la victoire de M. Trump, ils se cantonnaient à une présence sur Internet. Cette année, ils font bruyamment campagne pour la réélection du républicain. Pendant l’été, ils ont organisé des « caravanes pour Trump », cortèges de 4 × 4 qu’ils aiment amener, armés de fusils d’assaut ou de paintballs, au cœur des villes progressistes.

Ce n’est pas la première fois que le président manifeste de l’indulgence pour l’extrême droite. Après les affrontements de Charlottesville, en Virginie, en août 2017 lors d’une manifestation à laquelle avaient participé les mêmes Proud Boys, il avait renvoyé suprémacistes blancs et manifestants antiracistes dos à dos, estimant qu’il y avait « des gens bien des deux côtés ». Alors que la société américaine accepte de plus en plus largement l’idée de racisme structurel, le débat de mardi a montré que Donald Trump n’avait pas évolué.

Voir par ailleurs:

Are Anarchists for Real

Or just a sideshow barometer for social breakage?

Jeremy Lee Quinn

Public report

September 17, 2020

Establishment media still continues to overlook trending Anarchist black bloc tactics especially in DC, Portland & Seattle with satellite activity in Denver, Sacramento and San Diego.

AdBusters – Blackspot, the Vancouver collective that organized Occupy Wall Street, announced over the summer big plans for a DC Occupation.

But aligned groups & Northwest elements of Insurrectionary Anarchism have yet to join in. Do Anarchists have the cohesion and apparatus outside of BLM for anything other than constant agitation from within?

NOTE: We’ve been undercover marching with self described Insurrectionary Anarchists in DC, Seattle, Portland & beyond.

So yes. They’re real – but localized without a major event to capitalize on. Insurrectionary Anarchist ideology & rhetoric however has permeated into the social justice movement with blazing efficiency.

Voir aussi:

Loi travail: les groupes antifascistes de l’ultragauche au devant de la scène

  • AFP/La Croix

«Plus politisés» et «plus composites» qu’autrefois, selon le chercheur Jacques Leclercq, les groupes antifascistes de l’ultragauche, peu nombreux mais parfois très violents, sont revenus au devant de la scène avec la mobilisation contre la loi travail.

Depuis la première manifestation contre le projet de loi El Khomri le 9 mars, ces militants de l’ultragauche n’ont cessé de faire parler d’eux. Ils prennent systématiquement la tête des cortèges parisiens, sous l’oeil parfois agacé des traditionnelles organisations syndicales (CGT, FO, Unef…), et scandent des slogans hostiles aux forces de l’ordre comme: «Tout le monde déteste la police».

«C’est une sphère très difficile à cerner, qui a parfois des réactions surréalistes et des actions très violentes», explique Jacques Leclercq, auteur de l’ouvrage «Ultragauche, autonomes, émeutiers et insurrectionnels», dans un entretien avec l’AFP. On les reconnait à leur «dress code»: «des vêtements noirs, des bottes hautes… Comme les militants de l’extrême droite, à la différence que les gauchistes ont des lacets rouges et les autres, des lacets blancs».

Ils semblent peu nombreux, mais leurs actions (vitrines cassées, murs tagués, pavés arrachés, voitures vandalisées) en marge des manifestations et leurs échauffourées avec les forces de l’ordre viennent régulièrement brouiller le message des syndicats.

Sur leur site, les «antifas» de l’AFPB (Antifascistes Paris Banlieue) se disent «dans le viseur du ministère de l’Intérieur».

Un épisode violent a de fait marqué les esprits. Alors que des policiers manifestent à Paris le 18 mai contre «la haine anti-flics» de plus en plus répandue selon eux lors de la mobilisation contre la loi travail, une poignée d’autonomes s’en prennent à une voiture de police, d’où deux agents sortiront légèrement blessés.

Les vidéos montrent plusieurs personnes cagoulées jetant de lourds projectiles sur le véhicule, cherchant à frapper l’un des deux policiers, puis tirant un fumigène dans l’habitacle avant que le voiture s’embrase. Des suspects mis en examen dans cette affaire sont des membres connus de la mouvance des «antifas».

«Ce sont des militants chevronnés, proches des milieux libertaires et anarchistes, qui viennent des ZAD (Zones à défendre, ndlr) de Sivens, Notre-Dame-des-Landes, Turin… et que l’on voit aujourd’hui aux avant-postes des manifestations sauvages», explique Jacques Leclercq.

– «Un cycle offensif» –

Sur leur site, ces militants se présentent avant tout comme «une organisation antifasciste et anticapitaliste». Une définition assez large, qui permet d’attirer vers eux «pour la première fois (…) des militants traditionnels, d’associations de gauche, des syndicalistes ou des écologistes mobilisés contre la COP21».

Une alliance entamée avec l’instauration de l’état d’urgence, lors des attentats du 13 novembre, et qui se poursuit à travers la mobilisation sociale. «Cette ultragauche est à l’affût de toutes les luttes: il y a trente ans, les redskins tapaient contre les fascistes, au début des années 2000 on retrouvait ces groupes sur les manifestations contre les sommets gouvernementaux et aujourd’hui, ils se rassemblent contre la loi travail».

C’est aussi le résultat des rassemblements successifs contre le CPE (2006), pour les retraites (2010) ou, plus récemment, pour les migrants. «Même si ce ne sont pas les mêmes générations militantes qui agissent, il y a eu comme un passage de témoin», observe Jacques Leclercq.

A deux ans du premier cinquantenaire de «Mai 68», le chercheur relève que «beaucoup de slogans, d’affiches de cette époque sont repris aujourd’hui dans les cortèges» avec des appels pour les «grèves, blocages et manifestations sauvages».

Alors qu’on croyait le mouvement antifasciste «atone» depuis le décès d’un de ses membres, Clément Méric, il y a trois ans, le 5 juin 2013 au cours d’une bagarre avec des skins d’extrême droite, l’ultragauche reprend des couleurs.

«Globalement, les antifascistes d’aujourd’hui sont moins violents, plus politisés et plus composites que dans les années 80», relève le chercheur. «Ils sont souvent surdiplômés», viennent de «milieux plus bourgeois» mais «ne trouvent pas de raison d’être à travers le travail».

La société plonge avec eux dans «un cycle offensif»: «une action violente, suivie d’une répression forte». L’ultragauche cherche ainsi «à créer plus de solidarité entre groupes, et recruter de nouveaux militants dans les rangs des défenseurs de liberté».

Voir également:

L’antifascisme, une arme de classe

Christophe Guilluy

Le Crépuscule de la France d’en haut (p. 171-179)

2016

L’insécurité sociale et culturelle dans laquelle ont été plongées les classes populaires, leur relégation spatiale, débouchent sur une crise politique majeure. L’émergence d’une « France périphérique », la montée des radicalités politiques et sociales sont autant de signes d’une remise en cause du modèle économique et sociétal dominant. Face à ces contestations, la classe dominante n’a plus d’autre choix que de dégainer sa dernière arme, celle de l’antifascisme. Contrairement à l’antifascisme du siècle dernier, il ne s’agit pas de combattre un régime autoritaire ou un parti unique. Comme l’annonçait déjà Pier Paolo Pasolini en 1974, analysant la nouvelle stratégie d’une gauche qui abandonnait la question sociale, il s’agit de mettre en scène « un antifascisme facile qui a pour objet un fascisme archaïque qui n’existe plus et n’existera plus jamais » (1). C’est d’ailleurs en 1983, au moment où la gauche française initie son virage libéral, abandonne les classes populaires et la question sociale, qu’elle lance son grand mouvement de résistance au fascisme qui vient. Lionel Jospin reconnaîtra plus tard que cette « lutte antifasciste en France n’a été que du théâtre » et même que « le Front national n’a jamais été un parti fasciste » (2). Ce n’est pas un hasard si les instigateurs et financeurs de l’antiracisme et de l’antifascisme sont aussi des représentants du modèle mondialisé. De Bernard-Henri Lévy à Pierre Bergé, des médias (contrôlés par des multinationales), du Medef aux entreprises du CAC 40, de Hollywood à Canal Plus, l’ensemble de la classe dominante se lance dans la résistance de salon. « No pasaràn » devient le cri de ralliement des classes dominantes, économiques ou intellectuelles, de gauche comme de droite. Il n’est d’ailleurs pas inintéressant de constater, comme le fait le chercheur Jacques Leclerq (3), que les groupes « antifa » (qui s’étaient notamment fait remarquer pendant les manifestations contre la loi Travail par des violences contre des policiers), recrutent essentiellement des jeunes diplômés de la bourgeoisie (4).

Véritable arme de classe, l’antifascisme présente en effet un intérêt majeur. Il confère une supériorité morale à des élites délégitimées en réduisant toute critique des effets de la mondialisation à une dérive fasciste ou raciste. Mais, pour être durable, cette stratégie nécessite la promotion de l’« ennemi fasciste » et donc la surmédiatisation du Front national… Aujourd’hui, on lutte donc contre le fascisme en faisant sa promotion. Un « combat à mort » où on ne cherche pas à détruire l’adversaire, mais à assurer sa longévité. Il est en effet très étrange que les républicains, qui sauf erreur détiennent le pouvoir, n’interdisent pas un parti identifié comme « fasciste ». À moins que ces nouveaux partisans n’aient pas véritablement en ligne de mire ce petit parti, cette « PME familiale », mais les classes populaires dans leur ensemble. Car le problème est que ce n’est pas le Front national qui influence les classes populaires, mais l’inverse. Le FN n’est qu’un symptôme d’un refus radical des classes populaires du modèle mondialisé. L’antifascisme de salon ne vise pas le FN, mais l’ensemble des classes populaires qu’il convient de fasciser afin de délégitimer leur diagnostic, un « diagnostic d’en bas » qu’on appelle « populisme ». Cette désignation laisse entendre que les plus modestes n’ont pas les capacités d’analyser les effets de la mondialisation sur le quotidien et qu’elles sont aisément manipulables.

Expert en « antifascisme », Bernard-Henri Lévy a ainsi ruiné l’argumentaire souverainiste, celui de Chevènement, en l’assimilant à une dérive nationaliste – lire : fasciste. Du refus du référendum européen à la critique des effets de la dérégulation, du dogme du libre-échange, toute critique directe ou indirecte de la mondialisation est désormais fascisée. Le souverainisme, une « saloperie », nous dit Bernard-Henri Lévy. Décrire l’insécurité sociale et culturelle en milieu populaire, c’est « faire le jeu de ». Dessiner les contours d’une France fragilisée, celle de la France périphérique, « c’est aussi faire le jeu de ».

Illustration parfaite du « fascisme de l’antifascisme (5) », l’argument selon lequel il ne faudrait pas dire certaines vérités, car cela « ferait le jeu de », est régulièrement utilisé. Il faut dire que les enjeux sont considérables. Si elle perd la guerre des représentations, la classe dominante est nue. Elle devra alors faire face à la question sociale et assumer des choix économiques et sociétaux qui ont précarisé les classes populaires. C’est dans ce contexte qu’il faut comprendre la multiplication des procès en sorcellerie et le nouveau maccarthysme des « libéraux-godwiniens ». L’expression du philosophe Jean-Claude Michéa vise à dénoncer l’utilisation systématique par les libéraux de la théorie du juriste Mike Godwin selon laquelle « plus une discussion en ligne dure longtemps (sur Internet), plus la probabilité d’y trouver une comparaison impliquant les nazis ou Hitler s’approche de 1 ».

Pour la classe dominante, la défense même de gens ordinaires devient suspecte. Pour avoir évoqué la « décence commune des gens ordinaires », leurs valeurs traditionnelles d’entraide et de solidarité, le philosophe s’est retrouvé sur la liste des dangereux « réactionnaires » (autre synonyme de fasciste), bref, de ceux qui « font le jeu de » (6). La technique est d’ailleurs utilisée pour tous les chercheurs ou intellectuels qui auraient l’audace de proposer une autre représentation du peuple et de ses aspirations. De la démographe Michèle Tribalat au philosophe Michel Onfray, la liste des « fascisés » s’allonge inexorablement au rythme de la délégitimation de la classe dominante. On pourrait multiplier les exemples, mais la méthode est toujours la même : fasciser ceux qui donnent à voir la réalité populaire.

Face à une guerre des représentations qu’elle est en train de perdre, la classe dominante en arrive même à fasciser les territoires ! La « France périphérique » est ainsi présentée comme une représentation d’une France blanche xénophobe opposée aux quartiers ethnicisés de banlieue. Peu importe que la distinction entre les territoires ruraux, les petites villes et les villes moyennes et les métropoles n’ait jamais reposé sur un clivage ethnique, peu importe que la France périphérique, qui comprend les DOM-TOM, ne soit pas homogène ethniquement et culturellement, l’objectif est avant tout d’ostraciser et de délégitimer les territoires populaires. Et, inversement, de présenter la France des métropoles comme ouverte et cosmopolite. La France du repli d’un côté, des ploucs et des ruraux, la France de l’ouverture et de la tolérance de l’autre. Mais qu’on ne s’y trompe pas, cet « antiracisme de salon » ne vise absolument pas à protéger l’« immigré », le « musulman », les « minorités » face au fascisme qui vient, il s’agit d’abord de défendre des intérêts de classe, ceux de la bourgeoisie.

Si l’arme de l’antifascisme permet à moyen terme de décrédibiliser toute proposition économique alternative et de contenir la contestation populaire, elle révèle aussi l’isolement des classes dominantes et supérieures. Cette stratégie de la peur n’a en effet plus aucune influence sur les catégories modestes, ni dans la France périphérique, ni en banlieue. C’est terminé. Les classes populaires ne parlent plus avec les « mots » de l’intelligentsia. Le « théâtre de la lutte antifasciste » (7) se joue devant des salles vides.

En ostracisant, et en falsifiant, l’idéologie antifasciste vise à isoler, atomiser les classes populaires et les opposants au modèle dominant en créant un climat de peur. Le problème est que cette stratégie de défense de classe devient inopérante et, pire, est en train de se retourner contre ses promoteurs. La volonté de polariser encore plus le débat public entre « racistes et antiracistes », entre « fascistes et antifascistes » semble aussi indiquer la fuite en avant d’une classe dominante qui n’est pas prête à remettre en question un modèle qui ne fait plus société. Réunie sous la bannière de l’antifascisme, partageant une représentation unique (de la société et des territoires), les bourgeoisies de gauche et de droite sont tentées par le parti unique. Si les « intellectuels sont portés au totalitarisme bien plus que les gens ordinaires », une tentation totalitaire semble aussi imprégner de plus en plus une classe dominante délégitimée, et ce d’autant plus qu’elle est en train de perdre la bataille des représentations.

Ainsi, quand la fascisation ne suffit plus, la classe dominante n’hésite plus à délégitimer les résultats électoraux lorsqu’ils ne lui sont pas favorables. La tentation d’exclure les catégories modestes du champ de la démocratie devient plus précisé. L’argument utilisé, un argument de classe et d’autorité, est celui du niveau d’éducation des classes populaires. Il permet de justifier une reprise en main idéologique. En juin 2016, le vote des classes populaires britanniques pour le Brexit a non seulement révélé un mépris de classe, mais aussi une volonté de restreindre la démocratie. Quand Alain Mine déclare que le Brexit, « c’est la victoire des gens peu formés sur les gens éduqués » (9) ou lorsque Bernard-Henri Lévy insiste sur la « victoire du petit sur le grand, et de la crétinerie sur l’esprit » (10), la volonté totalitaire des classes dominantes se fait jour. Les mots de l’antifascisme sont ceux de la classe dominante, les catégories modestes l’ont parfaitement compris et refusent désormais les conditions d’un débat tronqué.

Notes

1. L’Europeo, 26 décembre 1974, interview de Pasolini publiée par la suite dans le livre Écrits corsaires, Champs- Flammarion, 2009.
2. « Répliques », France Culture, 29 septembre 2007 et Lionel Jospin, Lionel raconte Jospin, Seuil, 2009.
3. Auteur de « Ultragauche, autonomes, émeutiers et insurrectionnels », AFP, 3 juin 2016.
4. Un constat qui fait écho à l’analyse de Pasolini de 1968 Dans ses Écrits corsaires, l’écrivain disait se sentir plus proche du « CRS fils d’ouvriers ou de paysans » que de « l’étudiant fils de notaire ».
5. Pasolini, Écrits corsaires, op. cit.
6. Frédéric Lordon, « Impasse Michéa », La Revue des livres, septembre 2013.
7. « Répliques », France Culture, 29 septembre 2007 et Lionel Jospin, Lionel raconte Jospin, Seuil, 2009.
8. Simon Leys, Orwell ou l’horreur de la politique, Champs/Flammarion, 1984.
9. Marianne, 29 juin 2016.
10. Le Monde, 26 juin 2016.

Voir encore:

Fact Checker

Analysis

The ‘very fine people’ at Charlottesville: Who were they?

May 8, 2020

“You had some very bad people in that group, but you also had people that were very fine people, on both sides. You had people in that group … There were people in that rally — and I looked the night before — if you look, there were people protesting very quietly the taking down of the statue of Robert E. Lee. I’m sure in that group there were some bad ones. The following day it looked like they had some rough, bad people — neo-Nazis, white nationalists, whatever you want to call them. But you had a lot of people in that group that were there to innocently protest, and very legally protest.”

— President Trump, Aug. 15, 2017

“I was talking about people that went because they felt very strongly about the monument to Robert E. Lee, a great general.”

— Trump, April 26, 2019

The violence in Charlottesville in the summer of President Trump’s first year in office continues to be a flash point in the presidential campaign. After one woman, 32-year-old Heather Heyer, was killed by a white supremacist while she protested a rally of alt-right groups, Trump made a series of statements that politically backfired on him. In his first remarks, he condemned racism but suggested “both sides” were equally at fault. Members of his CEO manufacturing council resigned in protest, and Gary Cohn, a top economic aide at the time who is Jewish, also considered resigning.

Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, has made Trump’s response to Charlottesville a central part of his argument that Trump is unfit to be president. Trump “assigned a moral equivalence between those spreading hate and those with the courage to stand against it,” Biden said in his presidential announcement speech a year ago. “And in that moment, I knew the threat to this nation was unlike any I had ever seen in my lifetime.”

But memories fade and new narratives take hold. Over the course of several days, Trump did not speak with precision and he made a number of contradictory remarks, permitting both his supporters and foes to create their own version of what happened.

This fact check, and the video above, will set the record straight on who was in Charlottesville that weekend. We wanted to put this issue to rest before it emerged again in the presidential campaign.

The Facts

The Charlottesville City Council in February 2017 had voted to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that had stood in the city since 1924, but opponents quickly sued in court to block the decision. In June 2017, the City Council voted to give Lee Park, where the statue stood, a new name — Emancipation Park. (In 2018, the park was renamed yet again to Market Street Park.)

The city’s actions inspired a group of neo-Nazis, white supremacists and related groups to schedule the “Unite the Right” rally for the weekend of Aug. 12, 2017, in Charlottesville. There is little dispute over the makeup of the groups associated with the rally. A well-known white nationalist, Richard Spencer, was involved; former Ku Klux Klan head David Duke was a scheduled speaker. “Charlottesville prepares for a white nationalist rally on Saturday,” a Washington Post headline read.

Counterdemonstrations were planned by people opposed to the alt-right, such as church groups, civil rights leaders and anti-fascist activists known as “antifa,” many of whom arrived with sticks and shields.

Suddenly, a militia group associated with the Patriot movement announced it was also going to hold an event called 1Team1Fight Unity in Charlottesville on Saturday, Aug. 12, rescheduling an event that has been planned for Greenville, S.C., 370 miles away. Other militia groups also made plans to attend.

On the night of Aug. 11, the neo-Nazi and white-supremacist groups marched on the campus of the University of Virginia, carrying flaming torches and chanting anti-Semitic slogans.

This is where Trump got into trouble. While he condemned right-wing hate groups — “those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans” — he appeared to believe there were peaceful protesters there as well.

“You had people — and I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists — because they should be condemned totally,” Trump said on Aug. 15, several days after the rally. “But you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists.”

He added: “There were people in that rally — and I looked the night before — if you look, there were people protesting very quietly the taking down of the statue of Robert E. Lee. I’m sure in that group there were some bad ones.”

But there were only neo-Nazis and white supremacists in the Friday night rally. Virtually anyone watching cable news coverage or looking at the pictures of the event would know that.

It’s possible Trump became confused and was really referring to the Saturday rallies. But he asserted there were people who were not alt-right who were “very quietly” protesting the removal of Lee’s statue.

But that’s wrong. There were white supremacists. There were counterprotesters. And there were heavily armed anti-government militias who showed up on Saturday. “Although Virginia is an open-carry state, the presence of the militia was unnerving to law enforcement officials on the scene,” The Post reported.

The day after Trump’s Aug. 15 news conference, the New York Times quoted a woman named Michelle Piercy and described her as “a night shift worker at a Wichita, Kan., retirement home, who drove all night with a conservative group that opposed the planned removal of a statue of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee.” She told the Times: “Good people can go to Charlottesville.”

Some Trump defenders, such as in a video titled “The Charlottesville Lie,” have prominently featured Piercy’s quote as evidence that Trump was right — there were protesters opposed to the removal of the statue.

Piercy did not respond to requests for an interview. On her Facebook page, Piercy a few days before the rally changed her cover photo to the logo of American Warrior Revolution (AWR), a militia group that attended the rally.

As far as we can tell, Piercy gave one other interview about Charlottesville, with the pro-Trump website Media Equalizer, which described AWR as “a group that stands up for individual free speech rights and acts as a buffer between competing voices.” Piercy told Media Equalizer: “We were made aware that the situation could be dangerous, and we were prepared.”

That is confirmed by Facebook videos, streamed by AWR, that show roughly three dozen militia members marching through the streets of Charlottesville, armed and dressed in military-style clothing, supposedly seeking people whose rights were being infringed. Police encouraged them to leave, according to an independent review of the day’s events commissioned by Charlottesville, but they attracted attention from counterprotesters. One militia member then was hit in the head by a rock, halting their retreat. “The militia members apparently did not realize that they had stopped directly across the street from Friendship Court, a predominantly African-American public housing complex,” the review said.

A video posted on YouTube shows Heyer briefly crossing paths with AWR after the militia group was challenged by residents and counterprotesters to leave the area.

Two revealing Facebook videos posted by the group have been deleted but were obtained by The Fact Checker. One, titled “The Truth about Charlottesville,” was posted on Aug. 12, immediately after law enforcement shut down the rally. It lasts about 25 minutes, and it is mostly narrated by Joshua Shoaff, also known as Ace Baker, the leader of AWR. Members of other militia groups also speak in the video.

There’s no suggestion the militias traveled to Charlottesville because of the Lee statue, though late in the video a couple of militia members make brief references to the Confederate flag and Confederate monuments. (The 207-page independent review commissioned by Charlottesville also makes no mention of peaceful pro-statue demonstrators.)

“We came to Charlottesville, Virginia, to tell both sides, the far right and the far left, listen, whether we agree with what you have to say or not, we agree with your right to say it, without being in fear of being assaulted by the other group,” Shoaff says. But he complains, “What happened when we came here? We were the one who were assaulted.”

During the video, a militia member who is black appears on screen, and Shoaff sarcastically says, “Hey, look, hey, there’s black guy in here, oh, my God.” At another point, an unidentified militia member says: “We are civil nationalists. We love America. We love the Constitution. We respect any race, any color. We are all about respecting constitutional values.”

After the city of Charlottesville sued AWR and other militia groups, Baker on Oct. 12 posted another video obtained by The Fact Checker. “We had long guns. We had pistols. We were pelted with bricks, and could have f—ing used deadly force. But we didn’t,” he declares. “We had the justification to use deadly force that day and mow people f—ing down. But we didn’t.”

Shoaff, on behalf of the group, signed a consent decree in May 2018 promising members would not to come to Charlottesville again “while armed with a firearm, weapon, shield, or any item whose purpose is to inflict bodily harm, at any demonstration, rally, protest, or march.” He did not respond to requests for an interview.

So what’s going on here? Anti-government militia groups are not racist but tend to be wary of Muslims and immigrants, according to experts who study the Patriot movement. “By and large, in my experience militia groups are not any more racist than any other group of middle-aged white men,” said Amy Cooter, a Vanderbilt University scholar who has interviewed many militia members. “Militias are not about whiteness, not about racism,” but their anti-Islam feelings spring from fear and ignorance of Muslims, she said.

Militias are strongly pro-Trump, but his election posed a conundrum: They had always been deeply suspicious of the federal government, but now it was headed by someone they supported. So they started to build up antifa as an enemy, falsely believing the activists are bankrolled by billionaire investor George Soros, according to Mark Pitcavage, senior research fellow at the Center on Extremism of the Anti-Defamation League.

Antifa, short for anti-fascist, sprung up to challenge neo-Nazis.

“Militias started showing up at events where left-wing elements would be, and that includes white-supremacist events,” Pitcavage said. “They aren’t white supremacists. They are there opposing the people opposing the white supremacists.”

Sam Jackson, a University at Albany professor who studies anti-government extremism, said that militia leaders have “strategic motivations to frame things in certain ways and it may not match real motivations.” That’s why they emphasize their defense of free speech and depict themselves as peacekeepers. But, he noted, “they never go out and protect the free speech rights of antifa and left-wing groups.”

Militia groups “purported to be there to protect the First Amendment rights of the protesters,” said Mary McCord, legal director at Georgetown’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection and counsel for Charlottesville in a lawsuit. The “real goal, the evidence showed, was to provoke violent confrontations with counterprotesters and make a strong physical showing of white supremacy and white nationalism. I certainly think that AWR knew which side it was ‘protecting,’ and made that choice willingly.”

In recent weeks, Trump has echoed the language he used regarding the Charlottesville attendees to encourage protests against social distancing orders. “These are very good people, but they are angry,” Trump tweeted on May 1. In other tweets, he urged governors to “liberate” states.

That’s the language of militias, McCord said — code for liberation from a tyrannical government. And who has been showing up at the rallies opposing shutdown orders? Armed militias associated with the Patriot movement.

The White House did not respond to a request for a comment on our findings.

The Pinocchio Test

The evidence shows there were no quiet protesters against removing the statue that weekend. That’s just a figment of the president’s imagination. The militia groups were not spurred on by the Confederate statue controversy. They arrived in Charlottesville heavily armed and, by their own account, were prepared to use deadly force — because of a desire to insert themselves in a dangerous situation that, in effect, pitted them against the foes of white supremacists.

Trump earns Four Pinocchios.

Voir enfin:

« Je vous hais chers étudiants » : quand Pasolini fustigeait Mai-68

Le 16 juin 1968, le cinéaste italien Pier Paolo Pasolini publiait dans l’hebdomadaire « L’Espresso » un poème virulent à l’encontre des étudiants, emblèmes de Mai 68.

« La bourgeoisie aime se punir de ses propres mains. » Ces mots forts proviennent d’un poème retentissant du cinéaste Pier Paolo Pasolini, publié le 16 juin 1968 dans « l’Espresso » sous le titre « Il PCI ai giovani ! » (« le Parti communiste italien aux jeunes ! »). Dans ce texte qui fit scandale à l’époque, celui qui était connu pour adhérer au marxisme et défendre les classes populaires, critique de façon extrêmement virulente les révoltes étudiantes qui secouent l’Italie.

A la fois révolutionnaire, communiste et chrétien, le cinéaste prend le contre-pied de cette mémoire collective qui voit dans Mai-68 la révolte du peuple contre l’autorité en place. Dans les livres d’histoire, la position paradoxale de l’artiste est aujourd’hui encore qualifiée de « singulière ».

« Les policiers étaient les pauvres « 

Surnommé le « mai rampant », en raison de sa durée, le mouvement des étudiants italiens se soulève dès 1967. Le système scolaire, en retard et inadapté aux évolutions de l’époque, nourrit le malaise générationnel. A Rome, début mars 1968, la faculté d’architecture de Valle Giulia lance le premier « sessantotto » (« soixante-huit ») de la capitale.

En juin,  à l’issue d’une révolte qui a fait plusieurs centaines de blessés, Pier Paolo Pasolini, surnommé « P.P.P », lance une invective aux manifestants :

« Lorsque hier, […] vous vous êtes battus avec les policiers, moi je sympathisais avec les policiers. Car les policiers sont fils de pauvres. Ils viennent de sous-utopies, paysannes ou urbaines. »A l’université Valle Giulia, les étudiants se sont élevés contre leurs aînés. Mais P.P.P. est plus sensible à la lutte des classes qu’à la lutte des générations : « Et vous, très chers (bien que du côté de la raison) vous étiez les riches, tandis que les policiers (qui étaient du côté du tort) étaient les pauvres. »

Le poète ne se reconnaît plus dans une gauche qui s’est tournée vers les classes favorisées. Interpellant, plein d’amertume, le Parti communiste officiel, il lance : « Vous abandonnez le langage révolutionnaire ». Davide Luglio, spécialiste de la littérature italienne moderne et contemporaine à l’université Paris-Sorbonne, analyse :

« Pour lui, les appareils politiques qui représentent cette idéologie ne se rangent plus du côté des défavorisés. Et délaissent un idéal révolutionnaire de changement. »

Contre la position dominante

Le poème est à l’image de l’artiste : celle d’homme révolté et écorché. « Oh mon Dieu ! Vais-je devoir prendre en considération l’éventualité de faire à vos côtés la Guerre Civile et mettre de côté ma vieille idée de Révolution ? », questionne l’éternel incompris, figure de l’anti-système. La révolte étudiante n’a rien de la lutte des classes qu’il appelle de ses voeux et ça le désespère :

« Il martèle que ce sont les fils qui se révoltent contre leurs pères. La grogne a lieu à l’intérieur d’une même classe dominante qu’est la bourgeoisie », explique Davide Luglio.Dès lors, il fustige également les médias du monde entier qui encouragent ces révoltes : « Doucement, le temps d’Hitler revient », prévient avec un sens violent de la provocation celui qui, né en 1922, a vécu sous le fascisme. La phrase a beau faire polémique, il l’assume. C’est sa façon d’exprimer son opposition viscérale au système néocapitaliste qu’il juge beaucoup plus puissant que les totalitarismes d’avant-guerre. Davide Luglio explique :

« Pasolini accuse le modèle consumériste de standardiser tous les modes de vie de manière sournoise. Un paysan par exemple poursuit dorénavant le même idéal bourgeois : acheter un frigo, une télévision… »P.P.P. voit dans Mai 68 l’apothéose des années 60, qu’il exècre. Le capitalisme libéral qui émerge n’est pour lui qu’une homologation de la pensée unique qu’il s’attache à combattre, jusqu’à s’opposer à l’avortement. Pour lui,

« La vieille société traditionnelle, avec une diversité linguistique, culturelle, disparaît au profit d’un seul modèle préconçu », pointe le professeur à l’université Paris-Sorbonne.Assassiné dans des conditions mystérieuses en 1975, Pasolini couche sur papier ses indignations : « Vous êtes en retard, mes chers », glisse-t-il avec malice. La lutte, à ses yeux, doit désormais être sociale :

« Donnez la moitié de vos revenus paternels, aussi maigres soient-ils, à de jeunes ouvriers afin qu’ils puissent occuper, avec vous, leurs usines », conseille-t-il.Cinquante ans après, en pleine période de conflit social, l’œil acéré du cinéaste maudit, même s’il est certainement manichéen et excessif, soulève des questions terriblement actuelles.


Cour suprême américaine: Attention, une politisation peut en cacher une autre ! (As our media lament its current conservative shift, guess what political leanings the US Supreme court had for some 50 years while still being more liberal today than public opinion on legal issues like abortion, affirmative action or school prayer)

28 septembre, 2020
https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/napavalleyregister.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/e4/3e47a030-4b1d-57d4-8e2b-7d65cc1a5095/5f6e82fac7949.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C715

Political Cartoons by AF Branco

Vous semblez … considérer les juges comme les arbitres ultimes de toutes les questions constitutionnelles; doctrine très dangereuse en effet, et qui nous placerait sous le despotisme d’une oligarchie. Nos juges sont aussi honnêtes que les autres hommes, et pas plus. Ils ont, avec d’autres, les mêmes passions pour le parti, pour le pouvoir et le privilège de leur corps. Leur maxime est boni judicis est ampliare jurisdictionem [un bon juge élargit sa compétence], et leur pouvoir est d’autant plus dangereux qu’ils détiennent leur fonction à  vie et qu’ils ne sont pas, comme les autres fonctionnaires, responsables devant un corps électoral. La Constitution n’a pas érigé un tribunal unique de ce genre, sachant que, quelles que soient les mains confiées, avec la corruption du temps et du parti, ses membres deviendraient des despotes. Il a plus judicieusement rendu tous les départements co-égaux et co-souverains en eux-mêmes. Thomas Jefferson (lettre à William Charles Jarvis, 28 septembre 1820)
Si le juge avait pu attaquer les lois d’une façon théorique et générale ; s’il avait pu prendre l’initiative et censurer le législateur, il fût entré avec éclat sur la scène politique ; devenu le champion ou l’adversaire d’un parti, il eût appelé toutes les passions qui divisent le pays à prendre part à la lutte. Mais quand le juge attaque une loi dans un débat obscur et sur une application particulière, il dérobe en partie l’importance de l’attaque aux regards du public. Son arrêt n’a pour but que de frapper un intérêt individuel ; la loi ne se trouve blessée que par hasard. Tocqueville
Il n’est presque pas de question politique, aux États-Unis, qui ne se résolve tôt ou tard en question judiciaire. De là, l’obligation où se trouvent les partis, dans leur polémique journalière, d’emprunter à la justice ses idées et son langage. La plupart des hommes publics étant, ou ayant d’ailleurs été des légistes, font passer dans le maniement des affaires les usages et le tour d’idées qui leur sont propres. Le jury achève d’y familiariser toutes les classes. La langue judiciaire devient ainsi, en quelque sorte, la langue vulgaire ; l’esprit légiste, né dans l’intérieur des écoles et des tribunaux, se répand donc peu à peu au-delà de leur enceinte ; il s’infiltre pour ainsi dire dans toute la société, il descend dans les derniers rangs, et le peuple tout entier finit par contracter une partie des habitudes et des goûts du magistrat. Tocqueville
Ce qui est vraiment stupéfiant, c’est l’hubris qui se reflète dans le Putsch judiciaire d’aujourd’hui. Juge Antonin Scalia
Sécuriser les frontières nationales semble assez orthodoxe. À l’ère du terrorisme anti-occidental, placer temporairement les immigrants en provenance de zones déchirées par la guerre jusqu’à ce qu’ils puissent être contrôlés n’est guère radical. S’attendre à ce que les » villes sanctuaires « suivent les lois fédérales plutôt qu’adopter les stratégies d’annulation de l’ancienne confédération sécessionniste est un retour aux lois de la Constitution. Utiliser l’expression «terreur islamique radicale» à la place de «violence sur le lieu de travail» ou de «catastrophes causées par l’homme» est sensé et non subversif. Insister pour que les Etats membres de l’OTAN honorent leurs obligations en matière de dépenses de défense, longtemps ignorées, n’est pas provocateur mais plus que temps. Supposer que l’Union européenne et les Nations Unies implosent est empirique, ce n’est pas débile. Remettre en question les accords parallèles secrets de l’accord avec l’Iran ou l’échec de la réinitialisation russe n’est que le retour à la réalité. Faire en sorte que l’Agence de protection de l’environnement suive plutôt qu’elle impose des lois, c’est comme cela qu’elle a toujours été censée être. Apporter résolument son soutien à Israël, seul pays libre et démocratique du Moyen-Orient, était la politique américaine de base jusqu’à l’élection d’Obama. (…) Il est logique de s’attendre à ce que les médias rapportent les nouvelles plutôt que de les « masser » pour les adapter aux programmes progressistes. Dans le passé, proclamer Obama «une sorte de dieu» ou l’homme le plus intelligent qui ait jamais accédé à la présidence n’était pas une pratique journalistique normale. (…) La moitié du pays a du mal à s’adapter au Trumpisme, confondant le style souvent peu orthodoxe et grinçant de Trump avec son programme par ailleurs pragmatique et surtout centriste. En somme, Trump semble révolutionnaire, mais c’est uniquement parce qu’il annule bruyamment une révolution. Victor Davis Hanson
La Cour n’est pas une législature. Que le mariage homosexuel soit une bonne idée ne devrait pas nous concerner mais est du ressort de la loi. Chief justice John Roberts
J’ai été commis au juge Scalia il y a plus de 20 ans, mais les leçons que j’ai apprises résonnent toujours. Sa philosophie judiciaire est aussi la mienne: un juge doit appliquer la loi telle qu’elle est écrite. Les juges ne sont pas des décideurs politiques, et ils doivent être résolus à mettre de côté toutes les opinions politiques qu’ils pourraient avoir. Amy Coney Barrett
I write separately to call attention to this Court’s threat to American democracy. (…) it is not of special importance to me what the law says about marriage. It is of overwhelming importance, however, who it is that rules me. Today’s decree says that my Ruler, and the Ruler of 320 million Americans coast-to-coast, is a majority of the nine lawyers on the Supreme Court. The opinion in these cases is the furthest extension in fact—and the furthest extension one can even imagine—of the Court’s claimed power to create “liberties” that the Constitution and its Amendments neglect to mention. This practice of constitutional revision by an unelected committee of nine, always accompanied (as it is today) by extravagant praise of liberty, robs the People of the most important liberty they asserted in the Declaration of Independence and won in the Revolution of 1776: the freedom to govern themselves. Until the courts put a stop to it, public debate over same-sex marriage displayed American democracy at its best. (…) The electorates of 11 States, either directly or through their representatives, chose to expand the traditional definition of marriage. Many more decided not to. Win or lose, advocates for both sides continued pressing their cases, secure in the knowledge that an electoral loss can be negated by a later electoral win. That is exactly how our system of government is supposed to work. (…) But the Court ends this debate, in an opinion lacking even a thin veneer of law. Buried beneath the mummeries and straining-to-be-memorable passages of the opinion is a candid and startling assertion: No matter what it was the People ratified, the Fourteenth Amendment protects those rights that the Judiciary, in its “reasoned judgment,” thinks the Fourteenth Amendment ought to protect. That is so because “[t]he generations that wrote and ratified the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment did not presume to know the extent of freedom in all of its dimensions . . . . ” (…) “and so they entrusted to future generations a charter protecting the right of all persons to enjoy liberty as we learn its meaning.” The “we,” needless to say, is the nine of us. “History and tradition guide and discipline [our] inquiry but do not set its outer boundaries.” Thus, rather than focusing on the People’s understanding of “liberty”—at the time of ratification or even today—the majority focuses on four “principles and traditions” that, in the majority’s view, prohibit States from defining marriage as an institution consisting of one man and one woman. This is a naked judicial claim to legislative—indeed, super-legislative—power; a claim fundamentally at odds with our system of government. Except as limited by a constitutional prohibition agreed to by the People, the States are free to adopt whatever laws they like, even those that offend the esteemed Justices’ “reasoned judgment.” A system of government that makes the People subordinate to a committee of nine unelected lawyers does not deserve to be called a democracy. Judges are selected precisely for their skill as lawyers; whether they reflect the policy views of a particular constituency is not (or should not be) relevant. Not surprisingly then, the Federal Judiciary is hardly a cross-section of America. Take, for example, this Court, which consists of only nine men and women, all of them successful lawyers18 who studied at Harvard or Yale Law School. Four of the nine are natives of New York City. Eight of them grew up in east- and west-coast States. Only one hails from the vast expanse in-between. Not a single South-westerner or even, to tell the truth, a genuine Westerner (California does not count). Not a single evangelical Christian (a group that comprises about one quarter of Americans19), or even a Protestant of any denomination. The strikingly unrepresentative character of the body voting on today’s social upheaval would be irrelevant if they were functioning as judges, answering the legal question whether the American people had ever ratified a constitutional provision that was understood to proscribe the traditional definition of marriage. But of course the Justices in today’s majority are not voting on that basis; they say they are not. And to allow the policy question of same-sex marriage to be considered and resolved by a select, patrician, highly unrepresentative panel of nine is to violate a principle even more fundamental than no taxation without representation: no social transformation without representation. But what really astounds is the hubris reflected into day’s judicial Putsch. The five Justices who compose today’s majority are entirely comfortable concluding that every State violated the Constitution for all of the 135 years between the Fourteenth Amendment’s ratification and Massachusetts’ permitting of same-sex marriages in 2003. They have discovered in the Fourteenth Amendment a “fundamental right” overlooked by every person alive at the time of ratification, and almost everyone else in the time since. They see what lesser legal minds—minds like Thomas Cooley, John Marshall Harlan, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Learned Hand, Louis Brandeis, William Howard Taft, Benjamin Cardozo, Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter, Robert Jackson, and Henry Friendly—could not. They are certain that the People ratified the Fourteenth Amendment to bestow on them the power to remove questions from the democratic process when that is called for by their “reasoned judgment.” These Justices know that limiting marriage to one man and one woman is contrary to reason; they know that an institution as old as government itself, and accepted by every nation in history until 15 years ago, cannot possibly be supported by anything other than ignorance or bigotry. And they are willing to say that any citizen who does not agree with that, who adheres to what was, until 15 years ago, the unanimous judgment of all generations and all societies, stands against the Constitution. The opinion is couched in a style that is as pretentiousas its content is egotistic. It is one thing for separate concurring or dissenting opinions to contain extravagances, even silly extravagances, of thought and expression; it is something else for the official opinion of the Court to do so. Of course the opinion’s showy profundities are often profoundly incoherent. “The nature of marriage is that, through its enduring bond, two persons together can find other freedoms, such as expression, intimacy, and spirituality.” (Really? Who ever thought that intimacy and spirituality [whatever that means] were freedoms? And if intimacy is, one would think Freedom of Intimacy is abridged rather than expanded by marriage. Ask the nearest hippie. Expression, sure enough, is a freedom, but anyone in a long-lasting marriage will attest that that happy state constricts, rather than expands, what one can prudently say.) (…) The world does not expect logic and precision in poetry or inspirational pop-philosophy; it demands them in the law. The stuff contained in today’s opinion has to diminish this Court’s reputation for clear thinking and sober analysis. Hubris is sometimes defined as o’erweening pride; and pride, we know, goeth before a fall. The Judiciary is the“least dangerous” of the federal branches because it has“neither Force nor Will, but merely judgment; and must ultimately depend upon the aid of the executive arm” and the States, “even for the efficacy of its judgments.” With each decision of ours that takes from the People a question properly left to them—with each decision that is unabashedly based not on law, but on the “reasoned judgment” of a bare majority of this Court—we move one step closer to being reminded of our impotence. Juge Antonin Scala
Until the federal courts intervened, the American people were engaged in a debate about whether their States should recognize same-sex marriage. The question in these cases, however, is not what States should do about same-sex marriage but whether the Constitution answers that question for them. It does not. The Constitution leaves that question to be decided by the people of each State. The Constitution says nothing about a right to same-sex marriage, but the Court holds that the term “liberty” inthe Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment encompasses this right. Our Nation was founded upon the principle that every person has the unalienable right to liberty, but liberty is a term of many meanings. For classical liberals, it may include economic rights now limited by government regulation. For social democrats, it may include the right to a variety of government benefits. For today’s majority, it has a distinctively postmodern meaning. To prevent five unelected Justices from imposing their personal vision of liberty upon the American people, the Court has held that “liberty” under the Due Process Clause should be understood to protect only those rights that are “‘deeply rooted in this Nation’s history and tradition.’” (…) And it is beyond dispute that the right to same-sex marriage is not among those rights. (…) Indeed: “In this country, no State permitted same-sex marriage until the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Courtheld in 2003 that limiting marriage to opposite-sex couples violated the State Constitution. (…) Nor is the right to same-sex marriage deeply rooted in the traditions of other nations. No country allowed same-sex couples to marry until the Netherlands did so in 2000. “What [those arguing in favor of a constitutional right to same sex marriage] seek, therefore, is not the protection of a deeply rooted right but the recognitionof a very new right, and they seek this innovation not from a legislative body elected by the people, but from unelected judges. Attempting to circumvent the problem presented by the newness of the right found in these cases, the majority claims that the issue is the right to equal treatment. Noting that marriage is a fundamental right, the majority argues that a State has no valid reason for denying that right to same-sex couples. This reasoning is dependent upon a particular understanding of the purpose of civil marriage. Although the Court expresses the point in loftier terms, its argument is that the fundamental purpose of marriage is to promote the well-being of those who choose to marry. Marriage provides emotional fulfillment and the promise of support in times of need. And by benefiting persons who choose to wed, marriage indirectly benefits society because persons who live in stable, fulfilling, and supportive relationships make better citizens. It is for these reasons, the argument goes, that States encourage and formalize marriage, confer special benefits on married persons, and also impose some special obligations. This understanding of the States’ reasons for recognizing marriage enables the majority to argue that same-sex marriage serves the States’ objectives in the same way as opposite-sex marriage. This understanding of marriage, which focuses almost entirely on the happiness of persons who choose to marry, is shared by many people today, but it is not the traditional one. For millennia, marriage was inextricably linked to the one thing that only an opposite-sex couple can do: procreate. Adherents to different schools of philosophy use different terms to explain why society should formalize marriage and attach special benefits and obligations to persons who marry. Here, the States defending their adherence to the traditional understanding of marriage have explained their position using the pragmatic vocabulary that characterizes most American political discourse. Their basic argument is that States formalize and promote marriage, unlike other fulfilling human relationships, in order to encourage potentially procreative conduct to take place within a lasting unit that has long been thought to provide the best atmosphere for raising children. They thus argue that there are reasonable secular grounds for restricting marriage to opposite-sex couples. If this traditional understanding of the purpose of marriage does not ring true to all ears today, that is probably because the tie between marriage and procreation has frayed. Today, for instance, more than 40% of all children in this country are born to unmarried women. This development undoubtedly is both a cause and a result of changes in our society’s understanding of marriage. While, for many, the attributes of marriage in 21st-century America have changed, those States that do not want to recognize same-sex marriage have not yet given up on the traditional understanding. They worry that by officially abandoning the older understanding, they may contribute to marriage’s further decay. It is far beyond the outer reaches of this Court’s authority to say that a State may not adhere to the understanding of marriage that has long prevailed, not just in this country and others with similar cultural roots, but also in a great variety of countries and cultures all around the globe. As I wrote in Windsor: “The family is an ancient and universal human institution. Family structure reflects the characteristics of a civilization, and changes in family structure and in the popular understanding of marriage and the family can have profound effects. Past changes in the understanding of marriage—for example, the gradual ascendance of the idea that romantic love is a prerequisite to marriage—have had far-reaching conse-quences. But the process by which such consequences come about is complex, involving the interaction of numerous factors, and tends to occur over an extended period of time.“ We can expect something similar to take place if same-sex marriage becomes widely accepted. The long-term consequences of this change are not now known and are unlikely to be ascertainable for some time to come. There are those who think that allowing same-sex marriage will seriously undermine the institution of marriage. Others think that recognition of same-sex marriage will fortify a now-shaky institution. “At present, no one—including social scientists, philosophers, and historians—can predict with any certainty what the long-term ramifications of widespread acceptance of same-sex marriage will be. And judges are certainly not equipped to make such an assessment. The Members of this Court have the authority and the responsibility to interpret and apply the Constitution. Thus, if the Constitution contained a provision guaranteeing the right to marry a person of the same sex, it would be our duty to enforce that right. But the Constitution simply does not speak to the issue of same-sex marriage. In our system of government, ultimate sovereignty rests with the people, and the people have the right to control their own destiny. Any change on a question so fundamental should be made by the people through their elected officials.” (…) Today’s decision usurps the constitutional right of the people to decide whether to keep or alter the traditional understanding of marriage. The decision will also have other important consequences.It will be used to vilify Americans who are unwilling to assent to the new orthodoxy. In the course of its opinion, the majority compares traditional marriage laws to laws that denied equal treatment for African-Americans and women. (…) The implications of this analogy will be exploited by those who are determined to stamp out every vestige of dissent. Perhaps recognizing how its reasoning may be used, the majority attempts, toward the end of its opinion, to reassure those who oppose same-sex marriage that their rights of conscience will be protected. (….) We will soon see whether this proves to be true. I assume that those who cling to old beliefs will be able to whisper their thoughts in the recesses of their homes, but if they repeat those views in public, they will risk being labeled as bigots and treated as such by governments, employers, and schools. The system of federalism established by our Constitution provides a way for people with different beliefs to live together in a single nation. If the issue of same-sex marriage had been left to the people of the States, it is likely that some States would recognize same-sex marriage and others would not. It is also possible that some States would tie recognition to protection for conscience rights. The majority today makes that impossible. By imposing its own views on the entire country, the majority facilitates the marginalization of the many Americans who have traditional ideas. Recalling the harsh treatment of gays and lesbians in the past, some may think that turn-about is fair play. But if that sentiment prevails, the Nation will experience bitter and lasting wounds. Today’s decision will also have a fundamental effect on this Court and its ability to uphold the rule of law. If a bare majority of Justices can invent a new right and impose that right on the rest of the country, the only real limit on what future majorities will be able to do is their own sense of what those with political power and cultural influence are willing to tolerate. Even enthusiastic supporters of same-sex marriage should worry about the scope of the power that today’s majority claims. Today’s decision shows that decades of attempts to restrain this Court’s abuse of its authority have failed. A lesson that some will take from today’s decision is that preaching about the proper method of interpreting the Constitution or the virtues of judicial self-restraint and humility cannot compete with the temptation to achieve what is viewed as a noble end by any practicable means. I do not doubt that my colleagues in the majority sincerely see in the Constitution a vision of liberty that happens to coincide with their own. But this sincerity is cause for concern, not comfort. What it evidences is the deep and perhaps irremediable corruption of our legal culture’s conception of constitutional interpretation. Most Americans—understandably—will cheer or lament today’s decision because of their views on the issue of same-sex marriage. But all Americans, whatever their thinking on that issue, should worry about what the majority’s claim of power portends. Juge Joseph Alito
Over the past six years, voters and legislators in eleven States and the District of Columbia have revised their laws to allow marriage between two people of the same sex. But this Court is not a legislature. Whether same-sex marriage is a good idea should be of no concern to us. Under the Constitution, judges have power to say what the law is, not what it should be. The people who ratified the Constitution authorized courts to exercise “neither force nor will but merely judgment.” The Federalist No. 78, p. 465 (C. Rossiter ed. 1961) (A. Hamilton) (…).Although the policy arguments for extending marriageto same-sex couples may be compelling, the legal arguments for requiring such an extension are not. The fundamental right to marry does not include a right to makea State change its definition of marriage. And a State’s decision to maintain the meaning of marriage that has persisted in every culture throughout human history can hardly be called irrational. In short, our Constitution does not enact any one theory of marriage. The people of a State are free to expand marriage to include same-sex couples, or to retain the historic definition. Today, however, the Court takes the extraordinary step of ordering every State to license and recognize same-sex marriage. Many people will rejoice at this decision, and I begrudge none their celebration. But for those who believe in a government of laws, not of men, the majority’s approach is deeply disheartening. Supporters of same-sexmarriage have achieved considerable success persuading their fellow citizens—through the democratic process—to adopt their view. That ends today. Five lawyers have closed the debate and enacted their own vision of marriage as a matter of constitutional law. Stealing this issue from the people will for many cast a cloud over same-sex marriage, making a dramatic social change that much more difficult to accept. The majority’s decision is an act of will, not legal judgment. The right it announces has no basis in the Constitution or this Court’s precedent. The majority expressly disclaims judicial “caution” and omits even a pretense of humility, openly relying on its desire to remake society according to its own “new insight” into the “nature of injustice.” (…) As a result, the Court invalidates the marriage laws of more than half the States and orders the transformation of a social institution that has formed the basis of human society for millennia, for the Kalahari Bushmen and the Han Chinese, the Carthaginians and the Aztecs. Just who do we think we are? It can be tempting for judges to confuse our own preferences with the requirements of the law. But as this Court has been reminded throughout our history, the Constitu-tion “is made for people of fundamentally differing views.” (…) Understand well what this dissent is about: It is not about whether, in my judgment, the institution of marriage should be changed to include same-sex couples. It is instead about whether, in our democratic republic, that decision should rest with the people acting through their elected representatives, or with five lawyers who happen to hold commissions authorizing them to resolve legal disputes according to law. The Constitution leaves no doubt about the answer. (…) As the majority acknowledges, marriage “has existed for millennia and across civilizations.” (…) For all those millennia, across all those civilizations, “marriage”referred to only one relationship: the union of a man and a woman. (…) (petitioners conceding that they are not aware of any society that permitted same-sex marriage before 2001). (…) This universal definition of marriage as the union of a man and a woman is no historical coincidence. Marriage did not come about as a result of a political movement, discovery, disease, war, religious doctrine, or any other moving force of world history—and certainly not as a result of a prehistoric decision to exclude gays and lesbians. It arose in the nature of things to meet a vital need: ensuring that children are conceived by a mother and father committed to raising them in the stable conditions of a lifelong relationship. (…) The premises supporting this concept of marriage are so fundamental that they rarely require articulation. The human race must procreate to survive. Procreation occurs through sexual relations between a man and a woman. When sexual relations result in the conception of a child, that child’s prospects are generally better if the mother and father stay together rather than going their separate ways. Therefore, for the good of children and society, sexual relations that can lead to procreation should occur only between a man and a woman committed to a lasting bond. Society has recognized that bond as marriage. And by bestowing a respected status and material benefits on married couples, society encourages men and women to conduct sexual relations within marriage rather than without. As one prominent scholar put it, “Marriage is asocially arranged solution for the problem of getting people to stay together and care for children that the mere desire for children, and the sex that makes children possible,does not solve.” J. Q. Wilson, The Marriage Problem 41 (2002). (…) Allowing unelected federal judges to select which un-enumerated rights rank as “fundamental”—and to strike down state laws on the basis of that determination—raises obvious concerns about the judicial role. (…) In Loving, the Court held that racial restrictions on the right to marry lacked a compelling justification. In Zablocki, restrictions based on child support debts did not suffice. In Turner, restrictions based on status as a prisoner were deemed impermissible. None of the laws at issue in those cases purported to change the core definition of marriage as the union of a man and a woman. The laws challenged in Zablocki and Turner did not define marriage as “the union of a man and a woman, where neither party owes child support or is in prison.” Nor did the interracial marriage ban at issue in Loving define marriage as “the union of a man and a woman of the same race.” (…) Removing racial barriers to marriage therefore did not change what a marriage was any more than integrating schools changed what a school was. As the majority admits, the institution of “marriage” discussed in every one of these cases “presumed a relationship involving opposite-sex partners.” Ante, at 11. In short, the “right to marry” cases stand for the im-portant but limited proposition that particular restrictionson access to marriage as traditionally defined violate due process. These precedents say nothing at all about a right to make a State change its definition of marriage, which isthe right petitioners actually seek here. (…) The truth is that today’s decision rests on nothing more than the majority’s own conviction that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry because they want to, and that “it would disparage their choices and diminish their personhood to deny them this right.” (…)  If “[t]here is dignity in the bond between two men or two women who seek to marry and in their autonomy to make such profound choices,” (…) why would there be any less dignity in the bond between three people who, in exercising their autonomy, seek to make the profound choice to marry? If a same-sex couple has the constitutional right to marry because their children would otherwise “suffer the stigma of knowing their families are somehow lesser” (…) But this approach is dangerous for the rule of law. The purpose of insisting that implied fundamental rights have roots in the history and tradition of our people is to ensure that when unelected judges strike down democratically enacted laws, they do so based on something more than their own beliefs. The Court today not only overlooks our country’s entire history and tradition but actively repudiates it, preferring to live only in the heady days of the here and now. I agree with the majority that the “nature of injustice is that we may not always see it in our own times.” (…) As petitioners put it, “times can blind.” (…) But to blind yourself to history is both prideful and unwise. “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” W. Faulkner, Requiem for a Nun 92 (1951). (…) Nowhere is the majority’s extravagant conception of judicial supremacy more evident than in its description—and dismissal—of the public debate regarding same-sex marriage. Yes, the majority concedes, on one side are thousands of years of human history in every society known to have populated the planet. But on the other side, there has been “extensive litigation,” “many thoughtful District Court decisions,” “countless studies, papers, books, and other popular and scholarly writings,” and “more than 100” amicus briefs in these cases alone. (…) What would be the point of allowing the democratic process to go on? It is high time for the Court to decide the meaning of marriage, based on five lawyers’ “better informed understanding” of “a liberty that remains urgent in our own era.” (…) The answer is surely there in one of those amicus briefs or studies. Those who founded our country would not recognize the majority’s conception of the judicial role. They after all risked their lives and fortunes for the precious right to govern themselves. They would never have imagined yielding that right on a question of social policy to unaccountable and unelected judges. And they certainly would not have been satisfied by a system empowering judges to override policy judgments so long as they do so after “a quite extensive discussion.” (…) In our democracy, debate about the content of the law is not an exhaustion requirement to be checked off before courts can impose their will. “Surely the Constitution does not put either the legislative branch or the executive branch in the position of a television quiz show contestant so that when a given period of time has elapsed and a problem remains unresolved by them, the federal judiciary may press a buzzer and take its turn at fashioning a solution.” (…) As a plurality of this Court explained just last year, “It is demeaning to the democratic process to presume that voters are not capable of deciding an issue of this sensitivity on decent and rational grounds.” (…) The Court’s accumulation of power does not occur in a vacuum. It comes at the expense of the people. And they know it. Here and abroad, people are in the midst of a serious and thoughtful public debate on the issue of same-sex marriage. They see voters carefully considering same-sex marriage, casting ballots in favor or opposed, and sometimes changing their minds. They see political leaders similarly reexamining their positions, and either reversing course or explaining adherence to old convictions confirmed anew. They see governments and businesses modifying policies and practices with respect to same-sex couples, and participating actively in the civic discourse. They see countries overseas democratically accepting profound social change, or declining to do so. This deliberative process is making people take seriously questions that they may not have even regarded as questions before. When decisions are reached through democratic means, some people will inevitably be disappointed with the results. But those whose views do not prevail at least know that they have had their say, and accordingly are—in the tradition of our political culture—reconciled to the resultof a fair and honest debate. In addition, they can gear up to raise the issue later, hoping to persuade enough on the winning side to think again. (…) But today the Court puts a stop to all that. By deciding his question under the Constitution, the Court removes it from the realm of democratic decision. There will be consequences to shutting down the political process on an issue of such profound public significance. Closing debate tends to close minds. People denied a voice are less likely to accept the ruling of a court on an issue that does not seem to be the sort of thing courts usually decide. Indeed, however heartened the proponents of same-sex marriage might be on this day, it is worth acknowledging what they have lost, and lost forever: the opportunity to win the true acceptance that comes from persuading their fellow citizens of the justice of their cause. And they lose this just when the winds of change were freshening at their backs. Federal courts are blunt instruments when it comes to creating rights. They have constitutional power only to resolve concrete cases or controversies; they do not have the flexibility of legislatures to address concerns of parties not before the court or to anticipate problems that may arise from the exercise of a new right. Today’s decision, for example, creates serious questions about religious liberty. Many good and decent people oppose same-sex marriage as a tenet of faith, and their freedom to exercise religion is—unlike the right imagined by the majority—actually spelled out in the Constitution. (…) Respect for sincere religious conviction has led voters and legislators in every State that has adopted same-sex marriage democratically to include accommodations for religious practice. The majority’s decision imposing same-sex marriage cannot, of course, create any such accommodations. The majority graciously suggests that religiousbelievers may continue to “advocate” and “teach” their views of marriage. (…) The First Amendment guarantees, however, the freedom to “exercise” religion. Ominously, that is not a word the majority uses. Hard questions arise when people of faith exercisereligion in ways that may be seen to conflict with the new right to same-sex marriage—when, for example, a religious college provides married student housing only to opposite-sex married couples, or a religious adoption agency declines to place children with same-sex married couples. Indeed, the Solicitor General candidly acknowledged that the tax exemptions of some religious institutions would be in question if they opposed same-sex mar-riage. (…) There is little doubt that these and similar questions will soon be before this Court. Unfortunately, people of faith can take no comfort in the treatment they receive from the majority today. Perhaps the most discouraging aspect of today’s decisionis the extent to which the majority feels compelled to sully those on the other side of the debate. The majority offers a cursory assurance that it does not intend to disparage people who, as a matter of conscience, cannot accept same-sex marriage. (…) That disclaimer is hard to square with the very next sentence, in which the majority explains that “the necessary consequence” of laws codify-ing the traditional definition of marriage is to “demea[n]or stigmatiz[e]” same-sex couples. (…) The majority reiterates such characterizations over and over. By the majority’s account, Americans who did nothing more than follow the understanding of marriage that has existed for our entire history—in particular, the tens of millions of people who voted to reaffirm their States’ enduring definition of marriage—have acted to “lock . . . out,” “disparage,”“disrespect and subordinate,” and inflict “[d]ignitarywounds” upon their gay and lesbian neighbors. (…) These apparent assaults on the character of fairminded people will have an effect, in society and in court. (…). Moreover, they are entirely gratuitous. It is one thing for the major-ity to conclude that the Constitution protects a right to same-sex marriage; it is something else to portray everyone who does not share the majority’s “better informed understanding” as bigoted. (…) If you are among the many Americans—of whatever sexual orientation—who favor expanding same-sex mar-riage, by all means celebrate today’s decision. Celebrate the achievement of a desired goal. Celebrate the opportunity for a new expression of commitment to a partner. Celebrate the availability of new benefits. But do not celebrate the Constitution. It had nothing to do with it. Chief justice Roberts
Le dogme résonne très fort avec vous et c’est un sujet d’inquiétude pour un certain nombre de sujets pour lesquels beaucoup de gens se sont battus dans ce pays. Sénatrice démocrate
C’est au nom de la liberté, bien entendu, mais aussi au nom de l’« amour, de la fidélité, du dévouement » et de la nécessité de « ne pas condamner des personnes à la solitude » que la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis a finalement validé le mariage entre personnes de même sexe. Tels furent en tout cas les mots employés au terme de cette longue décision rédigée par le Juge Kennedy au nom de la Cour. (…) Le mariage gay est entré dans le droit américain non par la loi, librement débattue et votée au niveau de chaque Etat, mais par la jurisprudence de la plus haute juridiction du pays, laquelle s’impose à tous les Etats américains. Mais c’est une décision politique. Eminemment politique à l’instar de celle qui valida l’Obamacare, sécurité sociale à l’américaine, reforme phare du Président Obama, à une petite voix près. On se souviendra en effet que cette Cour a ceci de particulier qu’elle prétend être totalement transparente. Elle est composée de neuf juges, savants juristes, et rend ses décisions à la suite d’un vote. Point de bulletins secrets dans cette enceinte ; les votants sont connus. A se fier à sa composition, la Cour n’aurait jamais dû valider le mariage homosexuel : cinq juges conservateurs, quatre progressistes. Cinq a priori hostiles, quatre a priori favorables. Mais le sort en a décidé autrement ; le juge Kennedy, le plus modéré des conservateurs, fit bloc avec les progressistes, basculant ainsi la majorité en faveur de ces derniers. C’est un deuxième coup dur pour les conservateurs de la Cour en quelques mois : l’Obamacare bénéficia également de ce même coup du sort ; à l’époque ce fut le président, le Juge John Roberts, qui permit aux progressistes de l’emporter et de valider le système. (…) La spécificité de l’évènement est que ce sont des juges qui, forçant l’interprétation d’une Constitution qui ne dit rien du mariage homosexuel, ont estimé que cette union découlait ou résultait de la notion de « liberté ». C’est un « putsch judiciaire » selon l’emblématique juge Antonin Scalia, le doyen de la Cour. Un pays qui permet à un « comité de neuf juges non-élus » de modifier le droit sur une question qui relève du législateur et non du pouvoir judiciaire, ne mérite pas d’être considéré comme une « démocratie ». Mais l’autre basculement désormais acté, c’est celui d’une argumentation dont le centre de gravité s’est déplacé de la raison vers l’émotion, de la ratio vers l’affectus. La Cour Suprême des Etats-Unis s’est en cela bien inscrite dans une tendance incontestable au sein de la quasi-totalité des juridictions occidentales. L’idée même de raisonnement perd du terrain : énième avatar de la civilisation de l’individu, les juges éprouvent de plus en plus de mal à apprécier les arguments en dehors de la chaleur des émotions. Cette décision fait en effet la part belle à la médiatisation des revendications individualistes, rejouées depuis plusieurs mois sur le modèle de la « lutte pour les droits civiques ». Ainsi la Cour n’hésite pas à comparer les lois traditionnelles du mariage à celles qui, à une autre époque, furent discriminatoires à l’égard des afro-américains et des femmes. (…) La Maison Blanche s’est instantanément baignée des couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel, symbole de la « gaypride ». Les réseaux sociaux ont été inondés de ces mêmes couleurs en soutien à ce qui est maintenant connu sous le nom de la cause gay. (…) Comme le relève un autre juge de la Cour ayant voté contre cette décision, il est fort dommage que cela se fasse au détriment du droit et de la Constitution des Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Yohann Rimokh
La Constitution donne au président le pouvoir de nommer et au Sénat le pouvoir de donner son avis et son consentement sur les candidats à la Cour suprême. En conséquence, j’ai l’intention de (…) considérer le candidat nommé par le président. Si le candidat est présenté au Sénat, j’ai l’intention de voter en fonction de ses qualifications. (…) Je pense qu’à ce stade, il est approprié de regarder la Constitution et de regarder le précédent, qui existe depuis le début de l’histoire de notre pays. Et dans une circonstance où le candidat d’un président vient d’un autre parti que le Sénat, alors puis le plus souvent, le Sénat ne confirme pas. La décision Garland était donc conforme à cela. Par contre, quand il y a un candidat d’un parti qui est du même parti que le Sénat, alors généralement ils confirment. J’ai choisi le côté de la Constitution et du précédent, après l’avoir étudié, et j’ai pris ma décision sur cette base. Je reconnais donc que nous avons peut-être un tribunal, qui a plus de tendance conservatrice que ce qu’il avait au cours des dernières décennies. Mais mes amis progressistes se sont habitués depuis de nombreuses décennies à l’idée d’avoir une cour progressiste, mais ce n’est pas gravé dans le marbre. Et je sais que beaucoup de gens se disent : ‘Mon Dieu, nous ne voulons pas d’un tel changement’. Je comprends leur énergie. Mais il me semble également approprié pour une nation de centre droit d’avoir une cour qui reflète les points de vue du centre droit, qui encore une fois, ne change pas la loi. ce qu’il énonce. Mais au lieu de cela, suive la loi et suive la Constitution. Mitt Romney
Solid majorities want the court to uphold Roe v. Wade and are in favor of abortion rights in the abstract. However, equally substantial majorities favor procedural and other restrictions, including waiting periods, parental consent, spousal notification and bans on ‘partial birth’ abortion. Samantha Luks and Michael Salamon
When Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and his colleagues on the Supreme Court left for their summer break at the end of June, they marked a milestone: the Roberts court had just completed its fifth term. In those five years, the court not only moved to the right but also became the most conservative one in living memory, based on an analysis of four sets of political science data. (…) The recent shift to the right is modest. And the court’s decisions have hardly been uniformly conservative. The justices have, for instance, limited the use of the death penalty and rejected broad claims of executive power in the government’s efforts to combat terrorism. But scholars who look at overall trends rather than individual decisions say that widely accepted political science data tell an unmistakable story about a notably conservative court. (…) The proposition that the Roberts court is to the right of even the quite conservative courts that preceded it thus seems fairly well established. But it is subject to qualifications. First, the rightward shift is modest. Second, the data do not take popular attitudes into account. While the court is quite conservative by historical standards, it is less so by contemporary ones. Public opinion polls suggest that about 30 percent of Americans think the current court is too liberal, and almost half think it is about right. On given legal issues, too, the court’s decisions are often closely aligned with or more liberal than public opinion, according to studies collected in 2008 in “Public Opinion and Constitutional Controversy” (Oxford University Press). The public is largely in sync with the court, for instance, in its attitude toward abortion — in favor of a right to abortion but sympathetic to many restrictions on that right. “Solid majorities want the court to uphold Roe v. Wade and are in favor of abortion rights in the abstract,” one of the studies concluded. “However, equally substantial majorities favor procedural and other restrictions, including waiting periods, parental consent, spousal notification and bans on ‘partial birth’ abortion.” Similarly, the public is roughly aligned with the court in questioning affirmative action plans that use numerical standards or preferences while approving those that allow race to be considered in less definitive ways. The Roberts court has not yet decided a major religion case, but the public has not always approved of earlier rulings in this area. For instance, another study in the 2008 book found that “public opinion has remained solidly against the court’s landmark decisions declaring school prayer unconstitutional.” (…) In some ways, the Roberts court is more cautious than earlier ones. The Rehnquist court struck down about 120 laws, or about six a year, according to an analysis by Professor Epstein. The Roberts court, which on average hears fewer cases than the Rehnquist court did, has struck down fewer laws — 15 in its first five years, or three a year. It is the ideological direction of the decisions that has changed. When the Rehnquist court struck down laws, it reached a liberal result more than 70 percent of the time. The Roberts court has tilted strongly in the opposite direction, reaching a conservative result 60 percent of the time. The Rehnquist court overruled 45 precedents over 19 years. Sixty percent of those decisions reached a conservative result. The Roberts court overruled eight precedents in its first five years, a slightly lower annual rate. All but one reached a conservative result. NYT (2010)
Tout d’abord, il serait erroné de ne voir dans le choix du président des États-Unis qu’une opération politique. Nul ne conteste que ce type de nomination peut constituer un véritable enjeu de campagne à quelques semaines d’un scrutin présidentiel ; et depuis 1790, année au cours de laquelle la Cour suprême a statué pour la première fois, les nominations de ces grands juges figurent traditionnellement au nombre des mesures majeures des présidents lorsqu’il s’agit de dresser un bilan de leur action. Pour autant, ces nominations, réalisées en application de l’article II de la Constitution fédérale, ne présentent pas en elles-mêmes une nature politique. Républicain ou démocrate, le président est entouré de conseils avisés émanant du White House Counsel, du ministère de la Justice, de parlementaires, de cercles de réflexion et d’anciens membres de la Cour, qui s’attachent d’abord aux compétences juridiques et à l’itinéraire professionnel du candidat. Ce sont les qualifications qui font l’essentiel d’un choix mûrement réfléchi ; si des préférences sont exprimées, elles ne relèveront que de la «judicial philosophy» du candidat, et en aucun cas de considérations partisanes. Une fois la confirmation sénatoriale et la prise de fonctions réalisées, l’opposition rituelle faite entre progressistes et conservateurs au sein de la Cour procède d’une vision encore plus réductrice. Les hommes et les femmes qui composent cette juridiction sont des juristes de haut niveau, dotés d’un véritable esprit critique et d’une vaste culture ; tous ont eu une activité d’avocat ou une pratique académique leur conférant une bonne connaissance de la vie économique et sociale et ont été juges fédéraux, sans engagement politique préalable. Ils sont nommés à vie et acceptent cette mission non pas pour être le bras séculier d’un parti ou d’une idéologie mais pour veiller sur la Constitution, l’interpréter et résoudre des problématiques juridiques, y compris en matière électorale. Les membres de la Cour suprême des États-Unis ne sont pas des juges de droite ou de gauche, ni des juges «fiables» ou «imprévisibles» ; ce sont des juges, au plus haut sens du terme. C’est faire insulte à ces esprits rigoureux, indépendants et impartiaux que de vouloir les enfermer dans des catégories ou des étiquettes préétablies. Quelles que soient les conditions de leur nomination et de leur confirmation, ces juges se tiennent toujours prudemment éloignés de ce qu’Antonin Scalia, dont la haute stature intellectuelle a dominé la jurisprudence de la Cour pendant près de trente ans et mentor du juge Barrett, appelait le «cirque politique et médiatique». (…) Il existe bien sûr des lignes de partage, des positions et des inclinations. Mais celles-ci sont souvent liées à la mise en œuvre des méthodes d’interprétation de la Constitution. Un juge «originaliste», qui intègre le sens initial des normes constitutionnelles, pourra ne pas avoir la même lecture qu’un autre juge qui est partisan d’une approche plus «vivante», selon les termes de Stephen Breyer. Ces préférences sont indépendantes des options politiques ou sociétales. Le juge Neil Gorsuch, nommé par le président Donald Trump et réputé dans l’opinion comme étant conservateur, en a récemment donné une illustration éclatante dans l’affaire de la discrimination sexuelle au travail ; son textualisme l’a conduit à prendre une position LGBT que nul n’attendait. Et les exemples foisonnent de membres de la Cour qui, au cours de l’histoire de cette juridiction, ont surpris par leurs prises de position, alors que leur désignation initiale aurait pu laisser penser qu’ils adopteraient un point de vue inverse: Earl Warren et William Brennan, nommés par le président Eisenhower, Sandra Day O’Connor et Anthony Kennedy, désignés parle président Reagan, Harry Blackmun nommé par le président Nixon et rapporteur de la célèbre affaire Roe v. Wade (qui, en 1973, a autorisé l’IVG dans l’ensemble des États-Unis, NDLR), ont étonné plus d’un observateur par leurs votes dans des dossiers parfois majeurs où chacun leur prêtait une position contraire, guidée par les préjugés habituels. Le Chief Justice John G. Roberts, nommé par le président Bush, a déconcerté les ténors du Parti républicain dans plusieurs grands dossiers par ses positions vues comme «libérales» (c’est-à-dire, aux États-Unis, «de gauche», NDLR). Francois-Henri Briard
C’était prévisible: la désignation d’Amy Coney Barrett à la Cour suprême ouvre un épisode de plus dans la guerre culturelle qui déchire la société américaine — après le procès en destitution du président, les polémiques sur la crise sanitaire et l’exacerbation des tensions raciales. La détermination de Donald Trump, moins de six semaines avant l’élection présidentielle, à pressentir cette brillante juriste au pedigree impeccable n’avait rien d’improvisé. Elle renvoie autant à des considérations électorales qu’à des raisons politiques. L’ego surdimensionné du président y joue aussi sa part: si le Sénat confirmait cette nomination, M. Trump aura été le premier président à faire entrer à la Cour suprême, en un seul mandat, trois magistrats de son choix. Et cette fois-ci, ce serait un juge conservateur qui succéderait non pas à un autre juge conservateur mais à une icône de la gauche «libérale», en modifiant au passage l’équilibre «politique» de la Cour (six conservateurs contre trois «libéraux»). Sans doute espère-t-il qu’en cas de contestation du scrutin présidentiel, une Cour ainsi composée saura le ménager… (…) Si l’initiative de M. Trump soulève une telle tempête, c’est qu’elle touche au rôle suréminent qui est dévolu au droit – et aux juges – dans la culture politique américaine. L’esprit légaliste constitue depuis le temps lointain des Pères pèlerins la source de toute légitimité. C’est le droit, plus encore que la souveraineté, qu’invoque la Déclaration d’indépendance. La Constitution de 1787 reconnaîtra aux juristes une place qu’ils n’occupent nulle part ailleurs. Tocqueville, en interrogeant les caractères originaux de la jeune démocratie américaine, fait cette observation qui n’a pas pris une ride: «Il n’est presque pas de question politique qui ne se résolve tôt ou tard en question judiciaire. » C’est à la Cour suprême, non au législateur, qu’il revient d’interpréter l’esprit des lois sur les matières qui lui sont déférées. C’est elle, non le Congrès, qui s’est prononcée sur l’abolition de l’esclavage, le démantèlement de la ségrégation, le droit à l’avortement ou le mariage homosexuel. Or, depuis quelques décennies, l’activisme judiciaire impulsé par des juges «libéraux» («de gauche», NDLR) a amené la Cour, toujours au nom de la Constitution, à créer des droits et à prononcer des arrêts qui réglaient la vie publique et les conduites individuelles sans l’aveu du législateur. C’est cette dérive légaliste que contestaient les conservateurs: le rôle des juges est d’appliquer et de punir les infractions à la loi, non de légiférer ; et les questions que la Constitution laisse incertaines doivent être tranchées par les élus du peuple, argumentent-ils. D’où l’importance capitale que républicains et démocrates accordent à la désignation des magistrats d’une Cour suprême devenue l’enjeu – et l’arbitre – de la guerre civile qui les oppose. Les premiers redoutent une offensive progressiste pour étendre indéfiniment le domaine des droits individuels. Les seconds présagent une atteinte des conservateurs aux lois sur l’avortement, les droits des minorités, les immigrés, la discrimination positive et, dans l’immédiat, à la réforme de santé du président Obama. Le chef de la majorité républicaine au Sénat, Mitch McConnell, entend engager sans tarder la confirmation de Mme Coney Barrett. Le processus pourrait se poursuivre jusqu’à la prise de fonction du prochain président, même si les républicains auront perdu et la Maison-Blanche et la majorité au Sénat. Les démocrates n’y peuvent rien, puisque la Constitution l’autorise. Les deux camps agitent les principes et invoquent des précédents. Les démocrates rappellent qu’en 2016, le même M. McConnell a refusé de mettre à l’ordre du jour la confirmation d’un juge pressenti à la Cour suprême par M. Obama, au motif qu’une telle nomination n’était pas légitime à neuf mois d’une élection présidentielle. (…) Mais les républicains n’ont pas tort de soutenir qu’en pareille situation les démocrates se seraient conduits comme eux, en exploitant à leur avantage leur supériorité numérique. Il suffit de rappeler les manœuvres délétères qu’ils ont employées il y a deux ans pour saboter la nomination du juge Kavanaugh. Ran Halévy
Depuis l’arrêt Marbury v. Madison de 1803, la Cour est chargée du contrôle de constitutionalité des lois fédérales et des lois des États. Elle est aussi le juge de cassation pour les juridictions fédérales et fédérées. Enfin, elle est le juge des élections, ce qui aura sans doute une grande importance cette année. En effet, compte tenu des difficultés liées au vote par correspondance, on peut s’attendre à de nombreux recours au lendemain du scrutin du 3 novembre. Par ailleurs, la jurisprudence joue un rôle sans commune mesure avec ce que nous connaissons en France: les Américains ont un système de common law à la britannique, c’est-à-dire un système juridique qui ne repose pas sur un code de lois (comme notre Code civil), mais sur la jurisprudence élaborée par les tribunaux. C’est donc la Cour qui pose les règles sur de nombreux sujets politiques: respect du droit de vote (Shelby county v. Holder, 2013), financement des campagnes électorales (Citizens united, 2010), répartition des pouvoirs entre États et gouvernement fédéral… Ainsi que sur les questions de société: prière à l’école, avortement (avec l’arrêt Roe v. Wade en 1973), peine de mort, questions d’égalité raciale, droit des homosexuels, application de la loi sur la santé Obamacare… Cette jurisprudence évolue. Par exemple, jusqu’à présent, la Cour a refusé de se saisir d’affaires relatives à la GPA. Les justiciables font donc face à des situations très différentes selon les États. Mais cela pourrait changer avec de prochaines affaires. La Cour a donc un rôle politique, même si les juges s’en défendent. À partir du New Deal dans les années 1930, la Cour a peu à peu adopté une attitude progressiste. Une longue période d’ «activisme judiciaire» s’est déroulée sous les Chief Justice Earl Warren (de 1953 à 1969) puis Warren Burger ( de 1969 à 1986). Mais le mouvement conservateur américain, de retour à partir des années 1960, avait bien compris que les questions de jurisprudence étaient l’un des terrains sur lesquels il devait combattre. En 1982, des étudiants en droit de Yale fondent la Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies pour former des juges idéologiquement conservateurs et promouvoir leur nomination. Le but étant de «droitiser» les décisions de justice, avec comme objectif principal l’interdiction de l’avortement au niveau fédéral. Aujourd’hui, les 5 membres conservateurs de la Cour sont ou ont été membres de la Federalist society: le chief justice John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, et les deux juges nommés par le président Donald Trump, Neil Gorsuch et Brett Kavanaugh. Et le juge Antonin Scalia avant eux. Ils appuient leur positionnement conservateur sur deux théories du droit: la théorie «textualiste» , qui exige une lecture littérale du texte constitutionnel et la théorie «originaliste» qui veut un retour aux intentions originelles des rédacteurs de la Constitution. Face à eux, il ne reste que 3 juges progressistes: Steven Breyer, 82 ans, nommé par Bill Clinton, Antonia Sotomayor et Elena Kagan, nommées par Barack Obama. Il faut noter cependant qu’à plusieurs reprises ces dernières années, le chief justice Roberts a voté avec ses pairs progressistes, souhaitant renforcer l’image impartiale de la Cour. C’est pourquoi la nomination d’un sixième juge conservateur est si importante pour les Républicains. Le processus est bien balisé: les candidats sont nommés par le président, puis auditionnés par la Commission des affaires judiciaires du Sénat. Le Sénat débat et vote enfin la confirmation. Depuis 2017, ce vote n’est plus à la majorité qualifiée, mais à la majorité simple. Plus précisément, la procédure du filibuster, qui exigeait une majorité de 60 sénateurs pour passer au vote a été supprimée. Ce qui tombe bien pour les Républicains, qui ont actuellement une majorité de 53 sénateurs sur 100. Ainsi, rien n’empêche Trump et le Sénat de nommer un nouveau juge rapidement, peut-être même avant les élections du 3 novembre. (…) À défaut, les sénateurs républicains pourraient encore voter pendant la période de transition (entre l’élection et l’investiture du 20 janvier). Une telle rapidité aura sans doute un prix politique. En février 2016, lorsque le juge Antonin Scalia est mort, les sénateurs républicains ont refusé d’examiner la candidature du juge proposée par Obama, Merrick Garland, jugé centriste, car l’élection était trop proche. Aujourd’hui, Mitch McConnell (chef de la majorité au Sénat), Lindsay Graham (sénateur de Caroline du sud et président de la Commission sur les affaires judiciaires) et Ted Cruz (sénateur du Texas) ont retourné leur veste. Furieux, les Démocrates évoquent l’idée d’augmenter le nombre de juges, comme Franklin D. Roosevelt avait menacé de le faire dans les années 1930. Ils comptent aussi sur la défection de trois ou quatre sénateurs républicains, comme Susan Collins (Maine) et Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), qui ont dit ce week-end qu’elles refuseraient de voter avant les élections. En revanche, Mitt Romney (Utah) a finalement dit qu’il prendrait part au vote dès que possible. Laurence Nardon
Bien qu’Amy Coney Barrett soit le choix du président pour remplacer la juge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, elle est plus justement décrite comme l’héritière d’un autre juge de la Cour suprême décédé: le héros conservateur Antonin Scalia. Comme Scalia, pour qui elle a déjà été greffière, elle est une catholique romaine engagée et une adepte de son interprétation privilégiée de la Constitution connue sous le nom d’originalisme. Ces qualifications ravissent beaucoup de droite, mais consternent les libéraux qui craignent que ses votes ne conduisent à l’effritement de certaines lois, en particulier la décision Roe v. Wade légalisant l’avortement. (…) Barrett a également souligné à quel point elle est, dans son approche du droit, un opposé polaire à Ginsburg. Elle a dit de Scalia: « Sa philosophie judiciaire est la mienne aussi. » Sa nomination place Barrett sur la voie pour aider les conservateurs à dominer la cour pendant des décennies. C’est aussi sûr de dynamiser la base du président que de galvaniser ses ennemis à l’approche du jour du scrutin. Les dirigeants républicains du Sénat ont déclaré qu’ils avaient les voix pour la confirmer cette année, probablement avant les élections de novembre. Au-delà des élections, l’élévation de Barrett pourrait amener un jugement national sur l’avortement, une question qui divise amèrement de nombreux Américains depuis près d’un demi-siècle. L’idée de renverser ou de vider Roe v. Wade, la décision historique de 1973, a été une question politique animée exploitée par les deux parties. Ses écrits et discours montrent un engagement envers l’originalisme, un concept qui implique que les juges s’efforcent de déchiffrer les significations originales des textes pour évaluer si les droits d’une personne ont été violés. De nombreux libéraux disent que cette approche est trop rigide et ne permet pas aux conséquences de la Constitution de s’adapter à l’évolution des temps. Concernant l’avortement, des questions se sont posées sur l’implication de Barrett dans des organisations qui s’y opposent vigoureusement. Mais elle n’a pas dit publiquement qu’elle chercherait, si on lui en donnait la chance, à réduire les droits affirmés par la Haute Cour. Barrett est juge fédéral depuis 2017, lorsque Trump l’a nommée à la 7th US Circuit Court of Appeals, basée à Chicago. Mais en tant que professeur de droit de longue date à l’Université de Notre-Dame, elle s’était déjà imposée comme une conservatrice fiable dans le moule de Scalia. Elle a acquis une réputation de commis Scalia à la fin des années 1990 comme brillante et habile à séparer les arguments mal raisonnés. Ara Lovitt, qui travaillait avec elle, a rappelé lors de sa cérémonie d’investiture pour le 7e circuit que Scalia avait fait l’éloge d’elle. (…) Barrett et son mari, Jesse Barrett, ancien procureur fédéral, sont tous deux diplômés de la faculté de droit Notre-Dame. (…)  Barrett serait la seule juge du tribunal actuel à ne pas avoir obtenu son diplôme en droit d’une école de l’Ivy League. Les huit juges actuels ont tous assisté à Harvard ou à Yale. Si elle est confirmée, six des neuf juges seront catholiques. La manière dont ses croyances religieuses pourraient guider ses opinions juridiques est devenue une préoccupation majeure pour certains démocrates lors d’audiences de confirmation meurtrières après la nomination de Barrett au 7ème circuit. Cela a incité les républicains à accuser les démocrates de chercher à imposer un test religieux sur l’aptitude de Barrett à l’emploi. À Notre-Dame, où Barrett a commencé à enseigner à 30 ans, elle invoquait souvent Dieu dans des articles et des discours. Dans une allocution de 2006, elle a encouragé les étudiants diplômés en droit à voir leur carrière comme un moyen de «bâtir le royaume de Dieu». Elle a été considérée comme finaliste en 2018 pour la haute cour avant que Trump ne nomme Brett Kavanaugh pour le siège qui a ouvert ses portes lorsque le juge Anthony Kennedy a pris sa retraite. Même certains conservateurs craignaient que son dossier judiciaire clairsemé ne rende trop difficile de prédire comment elle pourrait gouverner, craignant qu’elle pourrait finir comme d’autres conservateurs apparemment qui se sont retrouvés plus modérés. Trois ans plus tard, son dossier comprend maintenant une centaine d’opinions et de dissensions, dans lesquelles elle a souvent illustré l’influence de Scalia en plongeant profondément dans les détails historiques pour glaner le sens des textes originaux. France 24
Autant, dans sa période new-yorkaise, Trump était bien plus progressiste dans ses positions et n’avait pas grand-chose en commun avec un évangélique de l’Arkansas par exemple… autant, depuis qu’il est élu, il a su habilement changer de convictions sur des sujets jugés fondamentaux par une large composante de son électorat: l’avortement, par exemple. Tout l’enjeu pour lui est de montrer qu’il est le Président qui tient ses promesses, et de fait, la nomination de juges conservateurs à la Cour suprême est un élément-clé pour lui permettre de tenir de nombreux engagements pris durant sa campagne: sur les lois fiscales, les droits de douane et le protectionnisme, le Mexique… Sur Twitter, Trump joue sur cette ligne-là en égrenant à longueur de temps la liste des promesses qu’il a tenues, et c’est en effet un argument très fort à l’approche des élections de mi-mandat, où Trump est loin d’être assuré de conserver une majorité républicaine au sénat. Alors, il cherche à tout prix à montrer qu’il est l’homme qui fait ce qu’il dit et qui dit ce qu’il fait: le transfert de l’ambassade à Jérusalem, par exemple, avait été promis de longue date, notamment par Obama, mais seul Trump a effectivement pris cette décision. (…) on peut (…) s’attendre à une instrumentalisation des sujets sociétaux comme l’avortement ou le droit des minorités sexuelles, qui sont en passe de devenir un véritable enjeu de campagne. Ces sujets ont le mérite d’être eux-aussi des pivots idéologiques, et c’est pour cela que Trump a intérêt à donner des gages à ce propos. La nomination d’un juge à la Cour suprême, dans un tel contexte, sera évidemment surveillée de près, et par tous les côtés de l’échiquier. (…) il peut faire face à une censure par le sénat du candidat qu’il proposera. Les démocrates ont déjà invoqué le fait qu’en période électorale, le moment est mal choisi pour nommer un juge à la Cour suprême: les républicains déjà, en 2016, avaient invoqué le même argument pour retarder le remplacement d’Antonin Scalia, décédé peu avant les élections présidentielles. Mais en réalité, comme les démocrates n’ont pas la majorité au sénat, ils ne pourront faire obstruction qu’à condition d’obtenir le ralliement de certains républicains. Pour ceux qui ne jouent pas leur réélection car ils ont décidé de ne pas briguer un nouveau mandat, il n’est pas exclu qu’un mouvement de «fronde» à Donald Trump puisse se dégager: des sénateurs comme John McCain ou Jeff Flake, par exemple, ne font pas mystère de leur hostilité au Président sur certains sujets. Cependant, Trump a été assez habile lorsqu’il a remplacé le juge Scalia, en nommant à sa place Neil Gorsuch qui n’est pas un ultraconservateur. Au contraire, Gorsuch pouvait apparaître comme un choix raisonnable, c’est-à-dire quelqu’un de modérément conservateur, à la fois ferme sur l’avortement ou les droits des homosexuels mais sans être sectaire non plus. Ainsi, si Trump doit affronter une obstruction de la part des démocrates, il aura beau jeu de la retourner à son avantage: ce seront eux qui passeront pour déraisonnables. De leur côté, les démocrates se distinguent en deux camps: ceux des États généralement acquis aux républicains joueront la conciliation pour ne pas se mettre à dos la frange conservatrice de leur électorat, tandis qu’au contraire les candidats à la primaire de 2020 s’aligneront sur la base démocrate, plutôt maximaliste. Le consensus, en tout cas, sera de bloquer toute nomination d’un juge ouvertement hostile à l’avortement. (…) Kennedy était connu pour des positions progressistes sur l’IVG, mais aussi la peine de mort et le mariage gay. Il était au cœur d’un équilibre au sein de la Cour suprême, qui risque bien de disparaître avec lui. Mais là encore, l’habileté de Trump a été de nommer auparavant Gorsuch, qui bien qu’il soit moins ambivalent que ne l’était Kennedy, n’était pas non plus un idéologue de la droite évangélique la plus dure. Cette adresse politique lui a sans doute permis de mettre le juge Kennedy en confiance. Si Donald Trump, qui joue sa réélection, regarde vers 2020, les conservateurs, eux, ont les yeux tournés jusqu’à au moins 2050 ! (…) La session de juin vient de se terminer. On ne sait pas encore avec précision quelles affaires vont remonter à la Cour suprême dans les prochaines sessions, mais ce qui est sûr c’est que la question des droits des homosexuels est de plus en plus au cœur de l’actualité. Notamment, il y a des affaires autour de la liberté de conscience, lorsque des personnes refusent de fournir certains services à des couples homosexuels qui se marient. Ensuite, la Cour suprême ne prendra pas directement de décision suspendant le mariage homosexuel ou le droit à l’avortement, mais elle peut avoir à se prononcer sur des affaires concernant des États ayant pris des mesures restreignant l’accès à ces droits. Elle pourrait donc être amenée à permettre à ces États de limiter sévèrement ces droits par des mesures réglementaires. C’est en tout cas ce que souhaitent les conservateurs américains: revenir sur les changements de société qu’a connus l’Amérique depuis les années 60. En fait, si Donald Trump, qui joue sa réélection, regarde vers 2020, les conservateurs, eux, ont les yeux tournés jusqu’à au moins 2050! (…) c’est bien l’enjeu de cette nomination, et de celles qui pourraient éventuellement suivre sous Trump (car il y a deux autres juges de 79 et 85 ans actuellement à la Cour suprême). Lorsque l’on est nommé à la Cour, on l’est à vie, c’est-à-dire pour encore au moins vingt ou trente ans en théorie. Neil Gorsuch, le dernier juge en date, n’a que 50 ans: sauf accident, il pourrait encore siéger en 2048! On rentre dans une nouvelle phase du mandat de Donald Trump. Cette phase était en réalité prévisible, et très attendue: à vrai dire, c’était même un des enjeux principaux de l’élection de 2016, de savoir qui de Clinton ou de Trump allait devoir nommer deux, peut-être trois ou quatre juges au cours de son mandat. Ce que les conservateurs attendent à présent, c’est de faire pencher définitivement la balance en leur faveur à la Cour, en instaurant un rapport de force à cinq contre quatre, qui serait l’assurance de garantir des décisions très conservatrices sur les sujets que nous avons précédemment évoqués. Lauric Henneton
Contrairement à ce que l’on pourrait penser, la Cour suprême n’est pas une institution qui flotterait au-dessus de la société américaine pour, de sa hauteur, arbitrer les grands débats qui animent les États-Unis. Elle a toujours été fortement politisée, reflétant les tendances très lourdes au sein du monde du droit. En ce sens, elle est elle-même, et a toujours été, très ancrée dans la société américaine. L’affaire de Floride, en 2000, lors de l’élection opposant Al Gore à George W. Bush, a fortement marqué les esprits et renvoyé l’image d’une cour actrice politique. Un scénario qui, d’ailleurs, pourrait se reproduire cette année. Mais même quand ils ne se mêlent pas d’affaires électorales, les sages sont des acteurs du débat politique, se penchant sur les grandes questions de leur temps. Le décès de Ruth Bader Ginsburg et le choix de la juge appelée, si elle est confirmée par le Sénat, à lui succéder, illustre les deux points de vue qui s’affrontent dans l’univers du droit, à savoir dans les universités américaines, dans les revues de droit, et dans les cours inférieures par lesquelles passent les juges de la Cour suprême. La première tendance, qualifiée souvent de « réaliste », considère que le droit doit accompagner la société dans ses évolutions. Cette tendance a dominé la Cour suprême jusqu’aux années 1970-1980, et Ruth Bader Ginsburg était l’une de ses représentantes. C’est une tendance, par définition, progressiste. La deuxième, au contraire, n’a que faire des statistiques et des données sociologiques. Elle estime que le droit est intangible, immuable, que ce qui compte est la jurisprudence. Or cette école de pensée, très active, a pris beaucoup de place dans les facultés américaines au cours des dernières décennies. Et les juges que nomme Donald Trump depuis qu’il est arrivé à la Maison-Blanche, pour les cours inférieures comme pour la Cour suprême, font partie de cette tendance. Ce clivage, à l’heure où la société américaine, comme les autres, est confrontée à des questions nouvelles et très complexes, qui n’ont pas de réponses simples, qu’il s’agisse de l’euthanasie, de l’avortement ou du mariage homosexuel, s’exprime sur ces questions fondamentales. D’où les débats très vifs qui entourent aujourd’hui tout ce qui touche à la Cour suprême, qu’il s’agisse des nominations des sages comme de leurs décisions. Cette complexité se retrouve d’ailleurs dans les arrêts, qui sont le plus souvent pris à des majorités très faibles parmi les neuf juges. Dans les années 1960, il pouvait y avoir des arrêts importants pris à l’unanimité. Aujourd’hui, ce consensus est impensable sur les grands sujets qui divisent la société américaine tout comme la Cour suprême. Romain Huret

Attention: une politicisation peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où avec la psychose covid

Et entre obligation du port du masque à l’extérieur et fermeture complète des salles de sport ou partielle des restaurants y compris avec terrasses ou même des plages

La restriction, en France et en Europe, est en train de devenir la règle et la liberté l’exception

Et où avec la nouvelle nomination d’une juge conservatrice à la Cour suprême aux Etats-Unis à moins de deux mois de la présidentielle …

L’hystérie et la fureur quasi-religieuse anti-Trump est repartie pour un tour …

Comment ne pas voir …

Alors que nos médias ont repris leurs jérémiades sur la « fin de l’ère progressive »

Ou l’excessive politisation de ladite Cour suprême …

La réalité comme le rappelait récemment l’historien Romain Huret  …

Non seulement historiquement d’une politicisation continue de ladite cour …

Mais comme vient de le rappeler le sénateur Romney pourtant ferme opposant au président américain …

Celle de son positionnement résolument à gauche pendant plus d’un demi-siècle

Et ce encore aujourd’hui par rapport à l’opinion américaine en général …

Sans compter le véritable « putsch judiciaire » d’il y a cinq ans sur le mariage homosexuel …

Comme l’ont démontré nombre de ses récentes décisions sur l’avortement, la discrimination positive ou la prière à l’école

L’actuel repositionnement apparaissant alors …

A l’instar de la si décriée présidence Trump

Moins comme une dangereuse radicalisation …

Qu’un logique recentrement qui n’aurait que trop tardé ?

La Cour suprême américaine est-elle une institution politisée ?
La mort de Ruth Bader Ginsburg, doyenne de la Cour suprême des États-Unis, a chamboulé la campagne électorale américaine. Les débats entourant le choix de la juge conservatrice Amy Coney Barrett, appelée à lui succéder, vont dominer les prochaines semaines, soulignant l’importance politique des neuf juges de cette institution arbitre des grands débats qui divisent l’Amérique.
Recueilli par Agnès Rotivel et Gilles Biassette
La Croix
27/09/2020

► « La Cour suprême aura une coloration conservatrice pour encore longtemps »

Didier Combeau, politologue, auteur d’« Être américain aujourd’hui » (1).

Les juges à la Cour suprême sont nommés par le président, puis confirmés par le Sénat, ils s’expriment sur tous les domaines importants, l’avortement, le droit aux armes, les minorités, etc. Du fait du blocage au Congrès où républicains et démocrates campent de plus en plus sur leurs positions, et où il est difficile d’obtenir un accord bi partisan pour faire adopter un texte de loi, beaucoup d’activistes se tournent vers la justice. Et d’appel en appel vers la Cour suprême. De ce fait, la nomination des juges est devenue de plus en plus politisée.

Lorsqu’un président a la majorité au Sénat, il peut plus facilement faire nommer une personnalité soit progressiste soit conservatrice. Et ce d’autant qu’il n’y a plus le « filibuster », une procédure qui rendait impérative une forme de compromis. Avant 2017, un juge de la Cour suprême devait obtenir 60 voix sur 100 pour être confirmé. Or, il était rare qu’un parti ait une telle majorité, ce qui supposait l’apport de voix issues de l’opposition. La fin du « filibuster » a donc contribué à politiser le processus, puisqu’il est ainsi possible de faire confirmer des personnalités moins consensuelles.

La culpabilité a été partagée. Le « filibuster » a été supprimé à l’initiative des démocrates en 2013 pour la nomination des juges fédéraux. Les républicains ont alors protesté, mais en 2017, c’est à leur initiative que le « filibuster » a été supprimé pour la nomination des juges à la Cour suprême.

À l’heure actuelle sur huit juges, il y a cinq conservateurs dont un juge Roberts, qui se range d’un côté ou de l’autre, c’est selon, et trois progressistes. Comme Trump a nommé une juge conservatrice supplémentaire, Amy Coney Barrett, cela fait six conservateurs sur neuf. Et les juges étant nommés à vie, elle pourrait être là pour plusieurs décennies.

Trump a déjà remplacé deux conservateurs âgés par des conservateurs d’une cinquantaine d’années, la Cour suprême aura une coloration conservatrice pour encore longtemps. Certes, les juges peuvent démissionner. Certains à gauche ont reproché à Ruth Bader Ginsburg de ne pas l’avoir fait sous Obama alors qu’elle était déjà âgée, 82 ans et malade. Elle aurait pu être remplacée par un juge progressiste.

À droite, beaucoup critiquent l’activisme de la cour et pensent qu’elle devrait s’en tenir à la constitution. À gauche, certains souhaiteraient augmenter le nombre des juges. Franklin Delano Roosevelt avait menacé de le faire dans les années 1930 au moment où la Cour suprême s’opposait à la mise en place de la politique du New Deal. Si les démocrates reviennent au pouvoir et sont majoritaires au congrès, ils pourraient augmenter le nombre des juges pour nommer des progressistes.

► « La Cour suprême a toujours été très politisée »

Romain Huret, historien des États-Unis et directeur adjoint du laboratoire Mondes américains.

Contrairement à ce que l’on pourrait penser, la Cour suprême n’est pas une institution qui flotterait au-dessus de la société américaine pour, de sa hauteur, arbitrer les grands débats qui animent les États-Unis. Elle a toujours été fortement politisée, reflétant les tendances très lourdes au sein du monde du droit. En ce sens, elle est elle-même, et a toujours été, très ancrée dans la société américaine.

L’affaire de Floride, en 2000, lors de l’élection opposant Al Gore à George W. Bush, a fortement marqué les esprits et renvoyé l’image d’une cour actrice politique. Un scénario qui, d’ailleurs, pourrait se reproduire cette année. Mais même quand ils ne se mêlent pas d’affaires électorales, les sages sont des acteurs du débat politique, se penchant sur les grandes questions de leur temps.

Le décès de Ruth Bader Ginsburg et le choix de la juge appelée, si elle est confirmée par le Sénat, à lui succéder, illustre les deux points de vue qui s’affrontent dans l’univers du droit, à savoir dans les universités américaines, dans les revues de droit, et dans les cours inférieures par lesquelles passent les juges de la Cour suprême.

La première tendance, qualifiée souvent de « réaliste », considère que le droit doit accompagner la société dans ses évolutions. Cette tendance a dominé la Cour suprême jusqu’aux années 1970-1980, et Ruth Bader Ginsburg était l’une de ses représentantes. C’est une tendance, par définition, progressiste.

La deuxième, au contraire, n’a que faire des statistiques et des données sociologiques. Elle estime que le droit est intangible, immuable, que ce qui compte est la jurisprudence. Or cette école de pensée, très active, a pris beaucoup de place dans les facultés américaines au cours des dernières décennies. Et les juges que nomme Donald Trump depuis qu’il est arrivé à la Maison-Blanche, pour les cours inférieures comme pour la Cour suprême, font partie de cette tendance.

Ce clivage, à l’heure où la société américaine, comme les autres, est confrontée à des questions nouvelles et très complexes, qui n’ont pas de réponses simples, qu’il s’agisse de l’euthanasie, de l’avortement ou du mariage homosexuel, s’exprime sur ces questions fondamentales. D’où les débats très vifs qui entourent aujourd’hui tout ce qui touche à la Cour suprême, qu’il s’agisse des nominations des sages comme de leurs décisions.

Cette complexité se retrouve d’ailleurs dans les arrêts, qui sont le plus souvent pris à des majorités très faibles parmi les neuf juges. Dans les années 1960, il pouvait y avoir des arrêts importants pris à l’unanimité. Aujourd’hui, ce consensus est impensable sur les grands sujets qui divisent la société américaine tout comme la Cour suprême.

(1) Gallimard, 282 p. 20 €.

Lauric Henneton est maître de conférences à l’Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin. Il est l’auteur de La fin du rêve américain? (Odile Jacob, 2017).

FIGAROVOX.- Le juge Anthony Kennedy a annoncé son départ à la retraite, ce qui laisse à Donald Trump le pouvoir de nommer à vie l’un des neuf juges qui détiennent le pouvoir juridique suprême dans le pays. Faut-il s’attendre à ce que la Cour bascule définitivement du côté des conservateurs?

Lauric HENNETON.- Oui, il est probable que Donald Trump désigne un juge plutôt conservateur, car c’est là qu’est son intérêt électoral. Autant, dans sa période new-yorkaise, Trump était bien plus progressiste dans ses positions et n’avait pas grand-chose en commun avec un évangélique de l’Arkansas par exemple… autant, depuis qu’il est élu, il a su habilement changer de convictions sur des sujets jugés fondamentaux par une large composante de son électorat: l’avortement, par exemple.

Tout l’enjeu pour lui est de montrer qu’il est le Président qui tient ses promesses, et de fait, la nomination de juges conservateurs à la Cour suprême est un élément-clé pour lui permettre de tenir de nombreux engagements pris durant sa campagne: sur les lois fiscales, les droits de douane et le protectionnisme, le Mexique… Sur Twitter, Trump joue sur cette ligne-là en égrenant à longueur de temps la liste des promesses qu’il a tenues, et c’est en effet un argument très fort à l’approche des élections de mi-mandat, où Trump est loin d’être assuré de conserver une majorité républicaine au sénat. Alors, il cherche à tout prix à montrer qu’il est l’homme qui fait ce qu’il dit et qui dit ce qu’il fait: le transfert de l’ambassade à Jérusalem, par exemple, avait été promis de longue date, notamment par Obama, mais seul Trump a effectivement pris cette décision.

Justement, sur quels thèmes quoi vont se jouer ces élections de mi-mandat?

C’est difficile à anticiper car la vie politique américaine va très vite, au gré des événements, et certains sujets dont l’on croit un moment qu’ils vont être primordiaux disparaissent rapidement de la scène médiatique. En février par exemple, après la fusillade de Parkland et les manifestations immenses qui ont suivi, on était en droit de penser que la question du contrôle des armes à feu allait dominer la campagne des midterms… En réalité, cette question a quasiment disparu de l’actualité, bien qu’on ne soit pas à l’abri qu’elle ressurgisse à l’occasion d’une nouvelle fusillade dans une école, ou bien qu’un attentat ramène au contraire les enjeux de sécurité voire d’immigration au rang des priorités médiatiques.

En revanche, on peut plus facilement s’attendre à une instrumentalisation des sujets sociétaux comme l’avortement ou le droit des minorités sexuelles, qui sont en passe de devenir un véritable enjeu de campagne. Ces sujets ont le mérite d’être eux-aussi des pivots idéologiques, et c’est pour cela que Trump a intérêt à donner des gages à ce propos. La nomination d’un juge à la Cour suprême, dans un tel contexte, sera évidemment surveillée de près, et par tous les côtés de l’échiquier.

Donald Trump est-il tout-puissant pour cette nomination, ou risque-t-il de rencontrer une opposition au sénat?

Il n’est certainement pas tout-puissant, car il peut faire face à une censure par le sénat du candidat qu’il proposera. Les démocrates ont déjà invoqué le fait qu’en période électorale, le moment est mal choisi pour nommer un juge à la Cour suprême: les républicains déjà, en 2016, avaient invoqué le même argument pour retarder le remplacement d’Antonin Scalia, décédé peu avant les élections présidentielles.

Mais en réalité, comme les démocrates n’ont pas la majorité au sénat, ils ne pourront faire obstruction qu’à condition d’obtenir le ralliement de certains républicains. Pour ceux qui ne jouent pas leur réélection car ils ont décidé de ne pas briguer un nouveau mandat, il n’est pas exclu qu’un mouvement de «fronde» à Donald Trump puisse se dégager: des sénateurs comme John McCain ou Jeff Flake, par exemple, ne font pas mystère de leur hostilité au Président sur certains sujets.

Cependant, Trump a été assez habile lorsqu’il a remplacé le juge Scalia, en nommant à sa place Neil Gorsuch qui n’est pas un ultraconservateur. Au contraire, Gorsuch pouvait apparaître comme un choix raisonnable, c’est-à-dire quelqu’un de modérément conservateur, à la fois ferme sur l’avortement ou les droits des homosexuels mais sans être sectaire non plus. Ainsi, si Trump doit affronter une obstruction de la part des démocrates, il aura beau jeu de la retourner à son avantage: ce seront eux qui passeront pour déraisonnables.

De leur côté, les démocrates se distinguent en deux camps: ceux des États généralement acquis aux républicains joueront la conciliation pour ne pas se mettre à dos la frange conservatrice de leur électorat, tandis qu’au contraire les candidats à la primaire de 2020 s’aligneront sur la base démocrate, plutôt maximaliste. Le consensus, en tout cas, sera de bloquer toute nomination d’un juge ouvertement hostile à l’avortement.

Justement, si le juge Kennedy avait été ambivalent, votant même en faveur de certaines décisions progressistes comme le mariage homosexuel, il savait qu’en démissionnant il ouvrait la voie à un basculement conservateur…

En effet, Kennedy était connu pour des positions progressistes sur l’IVG, mais aussi la peine de mort et le mariage gay. Il était au cœur d’un équilibre au sein de la Cour suprême, qui risque bien de disparaître avec lui. Mais là encore, l’habileté de Trump a été de nommer auparavant Gorsuch, qui bien qu’il soit moins ambivalent que ne l’était Kennedy, n’était pas non plus un idéologue de la droite évangélique la plus dure. Cette adresse politique lui a sans doute permis de mettre le juge Kennedy en confiance.

Si Donald Trump, qui joue sa réélection, regarde vers 2020, les conservateurs, eux, ont les yeux tournés jusqu’à au moins 2050 !

Quelles seront les décisions importantes sur lesquelles la Cour devra se prononcer? Faut-il s’attendre à un basculement sociétal aux États-Unis?

La session de juin vient de se terminer. On ne sait pas encore avec précision quelles affaires vont remonter à la Cour suprême dans les prochaines sessions, mais ce qui est sûr c’est que la question des droits des homosexuels est de plus en plus au cœur de l’actualité. Notamment, il y a des affaires autour de la liberté de conscience, lorsque des personnes refusent de fournir certains services à des couples homosexuels qui se marient.

Ensuite, la Cour suprême ne prendra pas directement de décision suspendant le mariage homosexuel ou le droit à l’avortement, mais elle peut avoir à se prononcer sur des affaires concernant des États ayant pris des mesures restreignant l’accès à ces droits. Elle pourrait donc être amenée à permettre à ces États de limiter sévèrement ces droits par des mesures réglementaires.

C’est en tout cas ce que souhaitent les conservateurs américains: revenir sur les changements de société qu’a connus l’Amérique depuis les années 60.

En fait, si Donald Trump, qui joue sa réélection, regarde vers 2020, les conservateurs, eux, ont les yeux tournés jusqu’à au moins 2050!

N’est-il pas trop tôt pour dire que Donald Trump est en mesure d’insuffler une politique au pays pour les vingt ou trente prochaines années?

En tout cas, c’est bien l’enjeu de cette nomination, et de celles qui pourraient éventuellement suivre sous Trump (car il y a deux autres juges de 79 et 85 ans actuellement à la Cour suprême). Lorsque l’on est nommé à la Cour, on l’est à vie, c’est-à-dire pour encore au moins vingt ou trente ans en théorie. Neil Gorsuch, le dernier juge en date, n’a que 50 ans: sauf accident, il pourrait encore siéger en 2048!

On rentre dans une nouvelle phase du mandat de Donald Trump. Cette phase était en réalité prévisible, et très attendue: à vrai dire, c’était même un des enjeux principaux de l’élection de 2016, de savoir qui de Clinton ou de Trump allait devoir nommer deux, peut-être trois ou quatre juges au cours de son mandat.

Ce que les conservateurs attendent à présent, c’est de faire pencher définitivement la balance en leur faveur à la Cour, en instaurant un rapport de force à cinq contre quatre, qui serait l’assurance de garantir des décisions très conservatrices sur les sujets que nous avons précédemment évoqués.

Voir également:

Court Under Roberts Is Most Conservative in Decades
Adam Liptak
The New York Times
July 24, 2010

WASHINGTON — When Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and his colleagues on the Supreme Court left for their summer break at the end of June, they marked a milestone: the Roberts court had just completed its fifth term.

In those five years, the court not only moved to the right but also became the most conservative one in living memory, based on an analysis of four sets of political science data.

And for all the public debate about the confirmation of Elena Kagan or the addition last year of Justice Sonia Sotomayor, there is no reason to think they will make a difference in the court’s ideological balance. Indeed, the data show that only one recent replacement altered its direction, that of Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in 2006, pulling the court to the right.

There is no similar switch on the horizon. That means that Chief Justice Roberts, 55, is settling in for what is likely to be a very long tenure at the head of a court that seems to be entering a period of stability.

If the Roberts court continues on the course suggested by its first five years, it is likely to allow a greater role for religion in public life, to permit more participation by unions and corporations in elections and to elaborate further on the scope of the Second Amendment’s right to bear arms. Abortion rights are likely to be curtailed, as are affirmative action and protections for people accused of crimes.

The recent shift to the right is modest. And the court’s decisions have hardly been uniformly conservative. The justices have, for instance, limited the use of the death penalty and rejected broad claims of executive power in the government’s efforts to combat terrorism.

But scholars who look at overall trends rather than individual decisions say that widely accepted political science data tell an unmistakable story about a notably conservative court.

Almost all judicial decisions, they say, can be assigned an ideological value. Those favoring, say, prosecutors and employers are said to be conservative, while those favoring criminal defendants and people claiming discrimination are said to be liberal.

Analyses of databases coding Supreme Court decisions and justices’ votes along these lines, one going back to 1953 and another to 1937, show that the Roberts court has staked out territory to the right of the two conservative courts that immediately preceded it by four distinct measures:

¶In its first five years, the Roberts court issued conservative decisions 58 percent of the time. And in the term ending a year ago, the rate rose to 65 percent, the highest number in any year since at least 1953.

The courts led by Chief Justices Warren E. Burger, from 1969 to 1986, and William H. Rehnquist, from 1986 to 2005, issued conservative decisions at an almost indistinguishable rate — 55 percent of the time.

That was a sharp break from the court led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, from 1953 to 1969, in what liberals consider the Supreme Court’s golden age and conservatives portray as the height of inappropriate judicial meddling. That court issued conservative decisions 34 percent of the time.

¶Four of the six most conservative justices of the 44 who have sat on the court since 1937 are serving now: Chief Justice Roberts and Justices Alito, Antonin Scalia and, most conservative of all, Clarence Thomas. (The other two were Chief Justices Burger and Rehnquist.) Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, the swing justice on the current court, is in the top 10.

¶The Roberts court is finding laws unconstitutional and reversing precedent — two measures of activism — no more often than earlier courts. But the ideological direction of the court’s activism has undergone a marked change toward conservative results.

¶Until she retired in 2006, Justice O’Connor was very often the court’s swing vote, and in her later years she had drifted to the center-left. These days, Justice Kennedy has assumed that crucial role at the court’s center, moving the court to the right.

Justice John Paul Stevens, who retired in June, had his own way of tallying the court’s direction. In an interview in his chambers in April, he said that every one of the 11 justices who had joined the court since 1975, including himself, was more conservative than his or her predecessor, with the possible exceptions of Justices Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The numbers largely bear this out, though Chief Justice Roberts is slightly more liberal than his predecessor, Chief Justice Rehnquist, at least if all of Chief Justice Rehnquist’s 33 years on the court, 14 of them as an associate justice, are considered. (In later years, some of his views softened.)

But Justice Stevens did not consider the question difficult. Asked if the replacement of Chief Justice Rehnquist by Chief Justice Roberts had moved the court to the right, he did not hesitate.

“Oh, yes,” Justice Stevens said.

The Most Significant Change

“Gosh,” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor said at a law school forum in January a few days after the Supreme Court undid one of her major achievements by reversing a decision on campaign spending limits. “I step away for a couple of years and there’s no telling what’s going to happen.”

When Justice O’Connor announced her retirement in 2005, the membership of the Rehnquist court had been stable for 11 years, the second-longest stretch without a new justice in American history.

Since then, the pace of change has been dizzying, and several justices have said they found it disorienting. But in an analysis of the court’s direction, some changes matter much more than others. Chief Justice Rehnquist died soon after Justice O’Connor announced that she was stepping down. He was replaced by Chief Justice Roberts, his former law clerk. Justice David H. Souter retired in 2009 and was succeeded by Justice Sotomayor. Justice Stevens followed Justice Souter this year, and he is likely to be succeeded by Elena Kagan.

But not one of those three replacements seems likely to affect the fundamental ideological alignment of the court. Chief Justice Rehnquist, a conservative, was replaced by a conservative. Justices Souter and Stevens, both liberals, have been or are likely to be succeeded by liberals.

Justices’ views can shift over time. Even if they do not, a justice’s place in the court’s ideological spectrum can move as new justices arrive. And chief justices may be able to affect the overall direction of the court, notably by using the power to determine who writes the opinion for the court when they are in the majority. Chief Justice Roberts is certainly widely viewed as a canny tactician.

But only one change — Justice Alito’s replacement of Justice O’Connor — really mattered. That move defines the Roberts court. “That’s a real switch in terms of ideology and a switch in terms of outlook,” said Lee Epstein, who teaches law and political science at Northwestern University and is a leading curator and analyst of empirical data about the Supreme Court.

The point is not that Justice Alito has turned out to be exceptionally conservative, though he has: he is the third-most conservative justice to serve on the court since 1937, behind only Justice Thomas and Chief Justice Rehnquist. It is that he replaced the more liberal justice who was at the ideological center of the court.

Though Chief Justice Roberts gets all the attention, Justice Alito may thus be the lasting triumph of the administration of President George W. Bush. He thrust Justice Kennedy to the court’s center and has reshaped the future of American law.

It is easy to forget that Justice Alito was Mr. Bush’s second choice. Had his first nominee, the apparently less conservative Harriet E. Miers, not withdrawn after a rebellion from Mr. Bush’s conservative base, the nature of the Roberts court might have been entirely different.

By the end of her almost quarter-century on the court, Justice O’Connor was without question the justice who controlled the result in ideologically divided cases.

“On virtually all conceptual and empirical definitions, O’Connor is the court’s center — the median, the key, the critical and the swing justice,” Andrew D. Martin and two colleagues wrote in a study published in 2005 in The North Carolina Law Review shortly before Justice O’Connor’s retirement.

With Justice Alito joining the court’s more conservative wing, Justice Kennedy has now unambiguously taken on the role of the justice at the center of the court, and the ideological daylight between him and Justice O’Connor is a measure of the Roberts court’s shift to the right.

Justice O’Connor, for her part, does not name names but has expressed misgivings about the direction of the court.

“If you think you’ve been helpful, and then it’s dismantled, you think, ‘Oh, dear,’ ” she said at William & Mary Law School in October in her usual crisp and no-nonsense fashion. “But life goes on. It’s not always positive.”

Justice O’Connor was one of the authors of McConnell v. Federal Election Commission, a 2003 decision that, among other things, upheld restrictions on campaign spending by businesses and unions. It was reversed on that point in the Citizens United decision.

Asked at the law school forum in January how she felt about the later decision, she responded obliquely. But there was no mistaking her meaning.

“If you want my legal opinion” about Citizens United, Justice O’Connor said, “you can go read” McConnell.

The Court Without O’Connor

The shift resulting from Justice O’Connor’s departure was more than ideological. She brought with her qualities that are no longer represented on the court. She was raised and educated in the West, and she served in all three branches of Arizona’s government, including as a government lawyer, majority leader of the State Senate, an elected trial judge and an appeals court judge.

Those experiences informed Justice O’Connor’s sensitivity to states’ rights and her frequent deference to political judgments. Her rulings were often pragmatic and narrow, and her critics said she engaged in split-the-difference jurisprudence.

Justice Alito’s background is more limited than Justice O’Connor’s — he worked in the Justice Department and then as a federal appeals court judge — and his rulings are often more muscular.

Since they never sat on the court together, trying to say how Justice O’Connor would have voted in the cases heard by Justice Alito generally involves extrapolation and speculation. In some, though, it seems plain that she would have voted differently from him.

Just weeks before she left the court, for instance, Justice O’Connor heard arguments in Hudson v. Michigan, a case about whether evidence should be suppressed because it was found after Detroit police officers stormed a home without announcing themselves.

“Is there no policy protecting the homeowner a little bit and the sanctity of the home from this immediate entry?” Justice O’Connor asked a government lawyer. David A. Moran, a lawyer for the defendant, Booker T. Hudson, said the questioning left him confident that he had Justice O’Connor’s crucial vote.

Three months later, the court called for reargument, signaling a 4-to-4 deadlock after Justice O’Connor’s departure. When the 5-to-4 decision was announced in June, the court not only ruled that violations of the knock-and-announce rule do not require the suppression of evidence, but also called into question the exclusionary rule itself.

The shift had taken place. Justice Alito was in the majority.

“My 5-4 loss in Hudson v. Michigan,” Mr. Moran wrote in 2006 in Cato Supreme Court Review, “signals the end of the Fourth Amendment” — protecting against unreasonable searches — “as we know it.”

The departure of Justice O’Connor very likely affected the outcomes in two other contentious areas: abortion and race.

In 2000, the court struck down a Nebraska law banning an abortion procedure by a vote of 5 to 4, with Justice O’Connor in the majority. Seven years later, the court upheld a similar federal law, the Partial-Birth Abortion Act, by the same vote.

“The key to the case was not in the difference in wording between the federal law and the Nebraska act,” Erwin Chemerinsky wrote in 2007 in The Green Bag, a law journal. “It was Justice Alito having replaced Justice O’Connor.”

In 2003, Justice O’Connor wrote the majority opinion in a 5-to-4 decision allowing public universities to take account of race in admissions decisions. And a month before her retirement in 2006, the court refused to hear a case challenging the use of race to achieve integration in public schools.

Almost as soon as she left, the court reversed course. A 2007 decision limited the use of race for such a purpose, also on a 5-to-4 vote.

There were, to be sure, issues on which Justice Kennedy was to the left of Justice O’Connor. In a 5-to-4 decision in 2005 overturning the juvenile death penalty, Justice Kennedy was in the majority and Justice O’Connor was not.

But changing swing justices in 2006 had an unmistakable effect across a broad range of cases. “O’Connor at the end was quite a bit more liberal than Kennedy is now,” Professor Epstein said.

The numbers bear this out.

The Rehnquist court had trended left in its later years, issuing conservative rulings less than half the time in its last two years in divided cases, a phenomenon not seen since 1981. The first term of the Roberts court was a sharp jolt to the right. It issued conservative rulings in 71 percent of divided cases, the highest rate in any year since the beginning of the Warren court in 1953.

Judging by the Numbers

Chief Justice Roberts has not served nearly as long as his three most recent predecessors. The court he leads has been in flux. But five years of data are now available, and they point almost uniformly in one direction: to the right.

Scholars quarrel about some of the methodological choices made by political scientists who assign a conservative or liberal label to Supreme Court decisions and the votes of individual justices. But most of those arguments are at the margins, and the measures are generally accepted in the political science literature.

The leading database, created by Harold J. Spaeth with the support of the National Science Foundation about 20 years ago, has served as the basis for a great deal of empirical research on the contemporary Supreme Court and its members. In the database, votes favoring criminal defendants, unions, people claiming discrimination or violation of their civil rights are, for instance, said to be liberal. Decisions striking down economic regulations and favoring prosecutors, employers and the government are said to be conservative.

About 1 percent of cases have no ideological valence, as in a boundary dispute between two states. And some concern multiple issues or contain ideological cross-currents.

But while it is easy to identify the occasional case for which ideological coding makes no sense, the vast majority fit pretty well. They also tend to align with the votes of the justices usually said to be liberal or conservative.

Still, such coding is a blunt instrument. It does not take account of the precedential and other constraints that are in play or how much a decision moves the law in a conservative or liberal direction. The mix of cases has changed over time. And the database treats every decision, monumental or trivial, as a single unit.

“It’s crazy to count each case as one,” said Frank B. Cross, a law and business professor at the University of Texas. “But the problem of counting each case as one is reduced by the fact that the less-important ones tend to be unanimous.”

Some judges find the entire enterprise offensive.

“Supreme Court justices do not acknowledge that any of their decisions are influenced by ideology rather than by neutral legal analysis,” William M. Landes, an economist at the University of Chicago, and Richard A. Posner, a federal appeals court judge, wrote last year in The Journal of Legal Analysis. But if that were true, they continued, knowing the political party of the president who appointed a given justice would tell you nothing about how the justice was likely to vote in ideologically charged cases.

In fact, the correlation between the political party of appointing presidents and the ideological direction of the rulings of the judges they appoint is quite strong.

Here, too, there are exceptions. Justices Stevens and Souter were appointed by Republican presidents and ended up voting with the court’s liberal wing. But they are gone. If Ms. Kagan wins Senate confirmation, all of the justices on the court may be expected to align themselves across the ideological spectrum in sync with the party of the president who appointed them.

The proposition that the Roberts court is to the right of even the quite conservative courts that preceded it thus seems fairly well established. But it is subject to qualifications.

First, the rightward shift is modest.

Second, the data do not take popular attitudes into account. While the court is quite conservative by historical standards, it is less so by contemporary ones. Public opinion polls suggest that about 30 percent of Americans think the current court is too liberal, and almost half think it is about right.

On given legal issues, too, the court’s decisions are often closely aligned with or more liberal than public opinion, according to studies collected in 2008 in “Public Opinion and Constitutional Controversy” (Oxford University Press).

The public is largely in sync with the court, for instance, in its attitude toward abortion — in favor of a right to abortion but sympathetic to many restrictions on that right.

“Solid majorities want the court to uphold Roe v. Wade and are in favor of abortion rights in the abstract,” one of the studies concluded. “However, equally substantial majorities favor procedural and other restrictions, including waiting periods, parental consent, spousal notification and bans on ‘partial birth’ abortion.”

Similarly, the public is roughly aligned with the court in questioning affirmative action plans that use numerical standards or preferences while approving those that allow race to be considered in less definitive ways.

The Roberts court has not yet decided a major religion case, but the public has not always approved of earlier rulings in this area. For instance, another study in the 2008 book found that “public opinion has remained solidly against the court’s landmark decisions declaring school prayer unconstitutional.”

In some ways, the Roberts court is more cautious than earlier ones. The Rehnquist court struck down about 120 laws, or about six a year, according to an analysis by Professor Epstein. The Roberts court, which on average hears fewer cases than the Rehnquist court did, has struck down fewer laws — 15 in its first five years, or three a year.

It is the ideological direction of the decisions that has changed. When the Rehnquist court struck down laws, it reached a liberal result more than 70 percent of the time. The Roberts court has tilted strongly in the opposite direction, reaching a conservative result 60 percent of the time.

The Rehnquist court overruled 45 precedents over 19 years. Sixty percent of those decisions reached a conservative result. The Roberts court overruled eight precedents in its first five years, a slightly lower annual rate. All but one reached a conservative result.

Voir de plus:

Amy Coney Barrett, choix de la haute cour, est l’héritière de Scalia

CHICAGO – Bien qu’Amy Coney Barrett soit le choix du président pour remplacer la juge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, elle est plus justement décrite comme l’héritière d’un autre juge de la Cour suprême décédé: le héros conservateur Antonin Scalia.Comme Scalia, pour qui elle a déjà été greffière, elle est une catholique romaine engagée et une adepte de son interprétation privilégiée de la Constitution connue sous le nom d’originalisme. Ces qualifications ravissent beaucoup de droite, mais consternent les libéraux qui craignent que ses votes ne conduisent à l’effritement de certaines lois, en particulier la décision Roe v. Wade légalisant l’avortement.

Le président américain Donald Trump a nommé le juge d’appel de la Cour fédérale de South Bend, Indiana, âgé de 48 ans, lors d’une conférence de presse à Rose Garden samedi.

Dans des remarques quelques instants après que Trump l’a nommée, avec son mari et leurs sept enfants à la recherche, Barrett a rendu hommage à Ginsburg.

«Je me souviendrai de qui est venu avant moi», a-t-elle déclaré, citant la carrière de Ginsburg en tant que pionnière des droits des femmes. « Elle a non seulement cassé les plafonds de verre, elle les a brisés. »

Mais Barrett a également souligné à quel point elle est, dans son approche du droit, un opposé polaire à Ginsburg.

Elle a dit de Scalia: « Sa philosophie judiciaire est la mienne aussi. »

Sa nomination place Barrett sur la voie pour aider les conservateurs à dominer la cour pendant des décennies. C’est aussi sûr de dynamiser la base du président que de galvaniser ses ennemis à l’approche du jour du scrutin. Les dirigeants républicains du Sénat ont déclaré qu’ils avaient les voix pour la confirmer cette année, probablement avant les élections de novembre.

Au-delà des élections, l’élévation de Barrett pourrait amener un jugement national sur l’avortement, une question qui divise amèrement de nombreux Américains depuis près d’un demi-siècle. L’idée de renverser ou de vider Roe v. Wade, la décision historique de 1973, a été une question politique animée exploitée par les deux parties.

Ses écrits et discours montrent un engagement envers l’originalisme, un concept qui implique que les juges s’efforcent de déchiffrer les significations originales des textes pour évaluer si les droits d’une personne ont été violés. De nombreux libéraux disent que cette approche est trop rigide et ne permet pas aux conséquences de la Constitution de s’adapter à l’évolution des temps.

Concernant l’avortement, des questions se sont posées sur l’implication de Barrett dans des organisations qui s’y opposent vigoureusement. Mais elle n’a pas dit publiquement qu’elle chercherait, si on lui en donnait la chance, à réduire les droits affirmés par la Haute Cour.

Barrett est juge fédéral depuis 2017, lorsque Trump l’a nommée à la 7th US Circuit Court of Appeals, basée à Chicago. Mais en tant que professeur de droit de longue date à l’Université de Notre-Dame, elle s’était déjà imposée comme une conservatrice fiable dans le moule de Scalia.

Elle a acquis une réputation de commis Scalia à la fin des années 1990 comme brillante et habile à séparer les arguments mal raisonnés. Ara Lovitt, qui travaillait avec elle, a rappelé lors de sa cérémonie d’investiture pour le 7e circuit que Scalia avait fait l’éloge d’elle.

«Amy n’est-elle pas géniale», se souvient Lovitt en disant à Scalia.

Samedi, Barrett a également fait référence à l’étroite amitié entre Ginsburg et son compatriote amateur d’opéra Scalia, affirmant que Ginsburg a montré que les juges peuvent être en désaccord sur les principes « sans rancœur en personne ».

Avant de devenir juge, Barrett a expliqué comment les précédents judiciaires apportent une stabilité bienvenue à la loi. Mais elle semblait laisser la porte ouverte à la possibilité d’en renverser celles sur lesquelles il restait un vif désaccord.

«Une fois qu’un précédent est profondément enraciné», selon un article de 2017 du University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitution Law, que Barrett a co-écrit, «la Cour n’est plus tenue de se pencher sur la question de l’exactitude du précédent». Mais il a ajouté: « Rien de tout cela ne veut dire qu’un juge ne peut pas tenter de renverser un précédent établi de longue date. Alors que les caractéristiques institutionnelles peuvent entraver cet effort, un juge est libre d’essayer. »

Barrett et son mari, Jesse Barrett, ancien procureur fédéral, sont tous deux diplômés de la faculté de droit Notre-Dame. Leurs sept enfants comprennent deux adoptés d’Haïti et un ayant des besoins spéciaux.

Trump a déclaré samedi que Barrett serait la première femme juge à servir avec de jeunes enfants. En regardant ses enfants au premier rang, la présidente a dit: « Merci d’avoir partagé ta mère. »

Barrett serait la seule juge du tribunal actuel à ne pas avoir obtenu son diplôme en droit d’une école de l’Ivy League. Les huit juges actuels ont tous assisté à Harvard ou à Yale.

Si elle est confirmée, six des neuf juges seront catholiques.

La manière dont ses croyances religieuses pourraient guider ses opinions juridiques est devenue une préoccupation majeure pour certains démocrates lors d’audiences de confirmation meurtrières après la nomination de Barrett au 7ème circuit. Cela a incité les républicains à accuser les démocrates de chercher à imposer un test religieux sur l’aptitude de Barrett à l’emploi.

À Notre-Dame, où Barrett a commencé à enseigner à 30 ans, elle invoquait souvent Dieu dans des articles et des discours. Dans une allocution de 2006, elle a encouragé les étudiants diplômés en droit à voir leur carrière comme un moyen de «bâtir le royaume de Dieu».

Elle a été considérée comme finaliste en 2018 pour la haute cour avant que Trump ne nomme Brett Kavanaugh pour le siège qui a ouvert ses portes lorsque le juge Anthony Kennedy a pris sa retraite. Même certains conservateurs craignaient que son dossier judiciaire clairsemé ne rende trop difficile de prédire comment elle pourrait gouverner, craignant qu’elle pourrait finir comme d’autres conservateurs apparemment qui se sont retrouvés plus modérés.

Trois ans plus tard, son dossier comprend maintenant une centaine d’opinions et de dissensions, dans lesquelles elle a souvent illustré l’influence de Scalia en plongeant profondément dans les détails historiques pour glaner le sens des textes originaux.

Dans une dissidence de 2019 dans une affaire de droits des armes à feu, Barrett a fait valoir qu’une personne reconnue coupable d’un crime non violent ne devrait pas être automatiquement interdite de posséder une arme à feu. Toutes les pages de sa dissidence de 37 pages, sauf quelques-unes, étaient consacrées à l’histoire des lois sur les armes à feu aux 18e et 19e siècles.

Barrett s’est joint à deux reprises à des opinions dissidentes demandant que les décisions liées à l’avortement soient rejetées et répétées par le tribunal au complet. L’année dernière, après qu’un panel de trois juges a bloqué une loi de l’Indiana qui rendrait plus difficile pour les mineurs d’avoir un avortement sans que ses parents en soient avertis, Barrett a voté pour que l’affaire soit répétée par le tribunal.

Les informations financières de Barrett montrent des liens avec un certain nombre de groupes conservateurs. Elle et son mari ont des investissements d’une valeur comprise entre 845000 et 2,8 millions de dollars, selon son rapport de divulgation financière de 2019. Les juges rapportent la valeur de leurs investissements dans les gammes. Leur argent est principalement investi dans des fonds communs de placement.

Lorsqu’elle a été nommée à la cour d’appel en 2017, Barrett a déclaré des actifs d’un peu plus de 2 millions de dollars, y compris sa maison dans l’Indiana d’une valeur de près de 425000 dollars et une hypothèque avec un solde de 175000 dollars.

Au cours des deux années précédentes, Barrett a reçu 4 200 $ en deux versements égaux d’Alliance Defending Freedom, un cabinet d’avocats chrétien conservateur, selon son rapport financier. En 2018 et 2019, elle a participé à 10 événements parrainés par la Federalist Society, qui a payé son transport, ses repas et son hébergement dans plusieurs villes.

Barrett a grandi à la Nouvelle-Orléans et était l’aîné d’un avocat de Shell Oil Co. Elle a obtenu son diplôme de premier cycle en littérature anglaise en 1994 au Rhodes College de Memphis, Tennessee.

Elle a également été commis pour Laurence Silberman pendant un an à la Cour d’appel des États-Unis pour le circuit du district de Columbia. Entre les stages et l’entrée dans le monde universitaire, elle a travaillé de 1999 à 2001 dans un cabinet d’avocats à Washington, Miller, Cassidy, Larroca & Lewin.

——

Les rédacteurs d’Associated Press Mark Sherman à Washington et Ryan J. Foley à Iowa City, Iowa, ont contribué à ce rapport.

Amy Coney Barrett, une catholique pratiquante à la Cour suprême

PORTRAIT – Nommée par Donald Trump, cette mère de sept enfants est une juriste respectée. Elle est considérée par des groupes de pression démocrates comme partisane et rétrograde.

Adrien Jaulmes

De notre correspondant aux États-Unis

Amy Coney Barrett, 48 ans, deviendra à son entrée en fonction la plus jeune juge de la Cour suprême. Si sa longévité égale celle de Ruth Bader Ginsburg, elle pourra ainsi siéger pendant quatre décennies dans la plus haute juridiction américaine.

Ses qualités humaines et ses compétences professionnelles ont été unanimement saluées, y compris par des magistrats libéraux. Née en Louisiane, diplômée de l’Université Notre-Dame, où elle a aussi enseigné le droit, Barrett avait été l’une des collaboratrices d’Antonin Scalia, décédé en 2016.

Juriste respectée, elle appartient à la même école que son mentor. «Sa philosophie judiciaire est aussi la mienne», a dit Barrett à l’annonce de sa nomination: «un juge doit appliquer la loi telle qu’elle est écrite. Les juges ne sont pas des décideurs politiques, et ils doivent être résolus à mettre de côté toutes les opinions politiques qu’ils pourraient avoir». Barrett est décrite dans les milieux juridiques comme une juriste rigoureuse et cherchant le compromis plus qu’à imposer des décisions extrêmes.

Mais cette catholique pratiquante, mère de sept enfants, dont deux adoptés en Haïti, et un autre trisomique, est déjà dénoncée par des groupes de pression démocrates comme un juge partisan et rétrograde. Les associations militantes homosexuelles l’attaquent aussi pour son appartenance à un groupe religieux chrétien, Gens de Foi, même si Barrett a expliqué à plusieurs reprises que sa foi ne compromettait pas son travail.

Professeur de droit presque inconnue voici quatre ans, Barrett avait été placée par un conseiller juridique de Trump, lui-même enseignant à Notre-Dame, sur une liste de candidats conservateurs potentiels pour pourvoir des postes de juges. En 2017, sa nomination par Trump à la Cour d’appel de Chicago avait donné lieu à une audition difficile par la commission des affaires judiciaires du Sénat. Des élus démocrates avaient questionné Barrett à propos de sa foi catholique. «Le dogme résonne très fort avec vous», lui avait lancé une sénatrice démocrate, «et c’est un sujet d’inquiétude pour un certain nombre de sujets pour lesquels beaucoup de gens se sont battus dans ce pays».

Trump avait été impressionné par le sang-froid et le calme de Barrett devant ces attaques, et l’avait alors placée dans la liste de candidats possibles à la Cour suprême.

« La Cour encore plus à droite »

En pleine campagne présidentielle, les démocrates ont pour l’instant mis en sourdine leurs critiques sur la foi de Barrett. Ils n’ont pas non plus salué la nomination d’une femme, mettant plutôt en garde contre les positions d’une juge qui s’est déjà prononcée en faveur des restrictions à l’immigration du président Trump et de la protection du droit à porter des armes à feu. Ils craignent aussi que Barrett permette à terme d’annuler la décision historique Roe vs Wade de la Cour suprême, qui avait légalisé l’avortement dans tout le pays en 1973.

Au milieu d’une pandémie, Donald Trump essaye d’imposer la nomination d’un juge qui détruira l’Obamacare

Joe Biden

Les conservateurs espèrent qu’elle contribuera à invalider l’Obamacare, le programme d’assurance-maladie introduit par Barack Obama. «Au milieu d’une pandémie, Donald Trump essaye d’imposer la nomination d’un juge qui détruira l’Obamacare», a commenté Joe Biden. «Nous ne pouvons pas le laisser gagner.»

Kamala Harris, candidate à la vice-présidence de Joe Biden, ancienne procureur et membre de la commission des affaires juridiques du Sénat qui devra auditionner Barrett, a dit être «fermement opposée à cette nomination». «Le successeur choisi par Trump pour remplacer le juge Ginsburg rend les choses claires: ils veulent détruire la loi sur la santé pour tous et annuler Roe. Ce choix va placer la Cour encore plus à droite pour une génération et nuire à des millions d’Américains.»

Voir encore:

Cour suprême: « Les Républicains vont consolider leur majorité »

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Le président américain va annoncer dans les jours à venir qui remplacera la juge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, icône de la gauche américaine, à la Cour suprême. Cette nomination devrait renforcer la majorité républicaine, analyse Laurence Nardon.

Laurence Nardon

Laurence Nardon est responsable du programme États-Unis à l’Institut français des relations internationales (Ifri). Elle a publié Les États-Unis de Trump en 100 questions (Tallandier, 2018)et analyse chaque semaine les enjeux de la campagne présidentielle américaine dans ses podcasts audio «Trump 2020» .


La disparition, samedi 18 septembre, de Ruth Bader Ginsburg, ajoute, si c’était encore possible, un degré d’hystérie à la campagne américaine. Nommée à la Cour suprême par Bill Clinton en 1993, RBG était une juriste de tout premier ordre. Elle était aussi devenue une star pour la gauche américaine, du fait de ses convictions progressistes. Elle était même surnommée «Notorious RBG», en référence au rappeur Notorious BIG.

Son remplacement est une question très importante, du fait du rôle primordial de la Cour suprême (dite SCOTUS pour Supreme Court of the United States) dans le système américain. Séparation des pouvoirs oblige, cette dernière est instituée par le 3ème article de la Constitution, après le Congrès (article 1) et le la présidence (article 2). Une loi de 1869 prévoit qu’elle sera composée de 9 juges. L’article 3 de la constitution prévoit que les juges resteront en poste tant qu’ils ont un «bon comportement» («during good behavior»), ce qui a été interprété jusqu’à présent comme autorisant un mandat à vie.

Depuis l’arrêt Marbury v. Madison de 1803, la Cour est chargée du contrôle de constitutionalité des lois fédérales et des lois des États. Elle est aussi le juge de cassation pour les juridictions fédérales et fédérées. Enfin, elle est le juge des élections, ce qui aura sans doute une grande importance cette année. En effet, compte tenu des difficultés liées au vote par correspondance, on peut s’attendre à de nombreux recours au lendemain du scrutin du 3 novembre.

Par ailleurs, la jurisprudence joue un rôle sans commune mesure avec ce que nous connaissons en France: les Américains ont un système de common law à la britannique, c’est-à-dire un système juridique qui ne repose pas sur un code de lois (comme notre Code civil), mais sur la jurisprudence élaborée par les tribunaux.

C’est donc la Cour qui pose les règles sur de nombreux sujets politiques: respect du droit de vote (Shelby county v. Holder, 2013), financement des campagnes électorales (Citizens united, 2010), répartition des pouvoirs entre États et gouvernement fédéral… Ainsi que sur les questions de société: prière à l’école, avortement (avec l’arrêt Roe v. Wade en 1973), peine de mort, questions d’égalité raciale, droit des homosexuels, application de la loi sur la santé Obamacare… Cette jurisprudence évolue. Par exemple, jusqu’à présent, la Cour a refusé de se saisir d’affaires relatives à la GPA. Les justiciables font donc face à des situations très différentes selon les États. Mais cela pourrait changer avec de prochaines affaires.

La Cour a donc un rôle politique, même si les juges s’en défendent. À partir du New Deal dans les années 1930, la Cour a peu à peu adopté une attitude progressiste. Une longue période d’ «activisme judiciaire» s’est déroulée sous les Chief Justice Earl Warren (de 1953 à 1969) puis Warren Burger ( de 1969 à 1986). Mais le mouvement conservateur américain, de retour à partir des années 1960, avait bien compris que les questions de jurisprudence étaient l’un des terrains sur lesquels il devait combattre. En 1982, des étudiants en droit de Yale fondent la Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies pour former des juges idéologiquement conservateurs et promouvoir leur nomination. Le but étant de «droitiser» les décisions de justice, avec comme objectif principal l’interdiction de l’avortement au niveau fédéral.

Aujourd’hui, les 5 membres conservateurs de la Cour sont ou ont été membres de la Federalist society: le chief justice John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, et les deux juges nommés par le président Donald Trump, Neil Gorsuch et Brett Kavanaugh. Et le juge Antonin Scalia avant eux. Ils appuient leur positionnement conservateur sur deux théories du droit: la théorie «textualiste» , qui exige une lecture littérale du texte constitutionnel et la théorie «originaliste» qui veut un retour aux intentions originelles des rédacteurs de la Constitution.

Face à eux, il ne reste que 3 juges progressistes: Steven Breyer, 82 ans, nommé par Bill Clinton, Antonia Sotomayor et Elena Kagan, nommées par Barack Obama. Il faut noter cependant qu’à plusieurs reprises ces dernières années, le chief justice Roberts a voté avec ses pairs progressistes, souhaitant renforcer l’image impartiale de la Cour. C’est pourquoi la nomination d’un sixième juge conservateur est si importante pour les Républicains.

Le processus est bien balisé: les candidats sont nommés par le président, puis auditionnés par la Commission des affaires judiciaires du Sénat. Le Sénat débat et vote enfin la confirmation. Depuis 2017, ce vote n’est plus à la majorité qualifiée, mais à la majorité simple. Plus précisément, la procédure du filibuster, qui exigeait une majorité de 60 sénateurs pour passer au vote a été supprimée. Ce qui tombe bien pour les Républicains, qui ont actuellement une majorité de 53 sénateurs sur 100.

Ainsi, rien n’empêche Trump et le Sénat de nommer un nouveau juge rapidement, peut-être même avant les élections du 3 novembre. Trump devrait annoncer son choix le 25 ou 26 septembre. Les deux noms qui circulent sont ceux d’Amy Barrett, une catholique conservatrice et de Barbara Lagoa, une juge d’origine cubaine. Selon le New York Times, un vote serait possible dès la semaine du 19 octobre. À défaut, les sénateurs républicains pourraient encore voter pendant la période de transition (entre l’élection et l’investiture du 20 janvier).

Une telle rapidité aura sans doute un prix politique. En février 2016, lorsque le juge Antonin Scalia est mort, les sénateurs républicains ont refusé d’examiner la candidature du juge proposée par Obama, Merrick Garland, jugé centriste, car l’élection était trop proche. Aujourd’hui, Mitch McConnell (chef de la majorité au Sénat), Lindsay Graham (sénateur de Caroline du sud et président de la Commission sur les affaires judiciaires) et Ted Cruz (sénateur du Texas) ont retourné leur veste.

Furieux, les Démocrates évoquent l’idée d’augmenter le nombre de juges, comme Franklin D. Roosevelt avait menacé de le faire dans les années 1930. Ils comptent aussi sur la défection de trois ou quatre sénateurs républicains, comme Susan Collins (Maine) et Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), qui ont dit ce week-end qu’elles refuseraient de voter avant les élections. En revanche, Mitt Romney (Utah) a finalement dit qu’il prendrait part au vote dès que possible.

Voir par ailleurs:

Cour suprême: «Des Sages qui défient les pronostics hâtifs»

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – La Cour suprême a un fonctionnement bien plus subtil qu’on ne le croit souvent, argumente Francois-Henri Briard, avocat au Conseil d’État et à la Cour de cassation.

Francois-Henri Briard
27 septembre 2020

Francois-Henri Briard est président de l’Institut Vergennes, fondé en 1993 avec le juge à la Cour suprême Antonin Scalia. Il est membre de la Société historique de la Cour suprême des États-Unis d’Amérique.


Alors que le président Donald Trump vient de désigner un possible successeur du juge Ruth Ginsburg en la personne du juge Amy Coney Barrett, qu’il soit permis à un professionnel du droit qui fréquente assidûment cette juridiction depuis près de trente ans, et qui en connaît bien les membres, de remettre un peu d’ordre dans le tumulte actuel, où l’approximation des commentaires le dispute à l’inexactitude.

Tout d’abord, il serait erroné de ne voir dans le choix du président des États-Unis qu’une opération politique. Nul ne conteste que ce type de nomination peut constituer un véritable enjeu de campagne à quelques semaines d’un scrutin présidentiel ; et depuis 1790, année au cours de laquelle la Cour suprême a statué pour la première fois, les nominations de ces grands juges figurent traditionnellement au nombre des mesures majeures des présidents lorsqu’il s’agit de dresser un bilan de leur action. Pour autant, ces nominations, réalisées en application de l’article II de la Constitution fédérale, ne présentent pas en elles-mêmes une nature politique.

Républicain ou démocrate, le président est entouré de conseils avisés émanant du White House Counsel, du ministère de la Justice, de parlementaires, de cercles de réflexion et d’anciens membres de la Cour, qui s’attachent d’abord aux compétences juridiques et à l’itinéraire professionnel du candidat. Ce sont les qualifications qui font l’essentiel d’un choix mûrement réfléchi ; si des préférences sont exprimées, elles ne relèveront que de la «judicial philosophy» du candidat, et en aucun cas de considérations partisanes.

Une fois la confirmation sénatoriale et la prise de fonctions réalisées, l’opposition rituelle faite entre progressistes et conservateurs au sein de la Cour procède d’une vision encore plus réductrice. Les hommes et les femmes qui composent cette juridiction sont des juristes de haut niveau, dotés d’un véritable esprit critique et d’une vaste culture ; tous ont eu une activité d’avocat ou une pratique académique leur conférant une bonne connaissance de la vie économique et sociale et ont été juges fédéraux, sans engagement politique préalable. Ils sont nommés à vie et acceptent cette mission non pas pour être le bras séculier d’un parti ou d’une idéologie mais pour veiller sur la Constitution, l’interpréter et résoudre des problématiques juridiques, y compris en matière électorale.

Les membres de la Cour suprême des États-Unis ne sont pas des juges de droite ou de gauche, ni des juges «fiables» ou «imprévisibles» ; ce sont des juges, au plus haut sens du terme. C’est faire insulte à ces esprits rigoureux, indépendants et impartiaux que de vouloir les enfermer dans des catégories ou des étiquettes préétablies. Quelles que soient les conditions de leur nomination et de leur confirmation, ces juges se tiennent toujours prudemment éloignés de ce qu’Antonin Scalia, dont la haute stature intellectuelle a dominé la jurisprudence de la Cour pendant près de trente ans et mentor du juge Barrett, appelait le «cirque politique et médiatique».

Il faut avoir vu de près et concrètement, dans le secret de la Cour, le minutieux processus d’instruction contradictoire des 80 affaires jugées chaque année et le soin apporté à l’examen des questions posées pour mesurer combien les considérations politiques sont éloignées du monde de leurs délibérations. Il existe bien sûr des lignes de partage, des positions et des inclinations. Mais celles-ci sont souvent liées à la mise en œuvre des méthodes d’interprétation de la Constitution. Un juge «originaliste», qui intègre le sens initial des normes constitutionnelles, pourra ne pas avoir la même lecture qu’un autre juge qui est partisan d’une approche plus «vivante», selon les termes de Stephen Breyer.

Ces préférences sont indépendantes des options politiques ou sociétales. Le juge Neil Gorsuch, nommé par le président Donald Trump et réputé dans l’opinion comme étant conservateur, en a récemment donné une illustration éclatante dans l’affaire de la discrimination sexuelle au travail ; son textualisme l’a conduit à prendre une position LGBT que nul n’attendait. Et les exemples foisonnent de membres de la Cour qui, au cours de l’histoire de cette juridiction, ont surpris par leurs prises de position, alors que leur désignation initiale aurait pu laisser penser qu’ils adopteraient un point de vue inverse: Earl Warren et William Brennan, nommés par le président Eisenhower, Sandra Day O’Connor et Anthony Kennedy, désignés parle président Reagan, Harry Blackmun nommé par le président Nixon et rapporteur de la célèbre affaire Roe v. Wade (qui, en 1973, a autorisé l’IVG dans l’ensemble des États-Unis, NDLR), ont étonné plus d’un observateur par leurs votes dans des dossiers parfois majeurs où chacun leur prêtait une position contraire, guidée par les préjugés habituels. Le Chief Justice John G. Roberts, nommé par le président Bush, a déconcerté les ténors du Parti républicain dans plusieurs grands dossiers par ses positions vues comme «libérales» (c’est-à-dire, aux États-Unis, «de gauche», NDLR).

Pourquoi un tel décalage entre le mythe et la réalité? Tout simplement parce qu’il existe chez les membres de la Cour suprême des États-Unis une réalité invisible qui est plus forte que toute autre considération: une véritable éthique d’indépendance qui force le respect et le sens de l’appartenance à une communauté professionnelle qui se nourrit d’honnêteté intellectuelle, de liberté d’esprit, de culture juridique, de rigueur d’analyse et de respect pour l’opinion de l’autre.

Cette appartenance à la communauté des juristes était si forte en ce qui concerne Ruth Ginsburg que son meilleur ami à la Cour était son collègue Antonin Scalia, pourtant réputé pour ses opinions regardées comme ultraconservatrices. Tous deux partageaient, outre le même goût pour le chant lyrique, la vie spirituelle et les réveillons de la Saint-Sylvestre, une même passion de l’indépendance, du droit et de la discussion juridique.

Dans son ouvrage De la démocratie en Amérique qu’il ne faut jamais cesser de relire, et qui se trouve dans tous les bureaux des membres de la Cour suprême des États-Unis, notre compatriote Alexis de Tocqueville écrivait qu’«aucune nation au monde n’a constitué le pouvoir judiciaire de la même manière que les Américains». Puissions-nous demeurer des observateurs attentifs, respectueux et éclairés de cette institution unique, pour le plus grand bien du lien transatlantique.

Voir aussi:

Cour suprême: « Pourquoi neuf juges ont le dernier mot sur toutes les questions qui divisent l’Amérique »

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Le respect scrupuleux du droit est au cœur de la culture politique américaine. Et aucun autre pays n’accorde une telle place au contrôle de conformité des lois à la Constitution, explique l’historien Ran Halévi.

Ran Halévi

Ran Halévi est directeur de recherche au CNRS et professeur au Centre d’études sociologiques et politiques Raymond-Aron.


C’était prévisible: la désignation d’Amy Coney Barrett à la Cour suprême ouvre un épisode de plus dans la guerre culturelle qui déchire la société américaine — après le procès en destitution du président, les polémiques sur la crise sanitaire et l’exacerbation des tensions raciales.

La détermination de Donald Trump, moins de six semaines avant l’élection présidentielle, à pressentir cette brillante juriste au pedigree impeccable n’avait rien d’improvisé. Elle renvoie autant à des considérations électorales qu’à des raisons politiques. L’ego surdimensionné du président y joue aussi sa part: si le Sénat confirmait cette nomination, M. Trump aura été le premier président à faire entrer à la Cour suprême, en un seul mandat, trois magistrats de son choix. Et cette fois-ci, ce serait un juge conservateur qui succéderait non pas à un autre juge conservateur mais à une icône de la gauche «libérale», en modifiant au passage l’équilibre «politique» de la Cour (six conservateurs contre trois «libéraux»). Sans doute espère-t-il qu’en cas de contestation du scrutin présidentiel, une Cour ainsi composée saura le ménager…

Dans l’immédiat, M. Trump entend détourner le thème central de cette campagne, que les démocrates exploitent avec méthode: sa gestion calamiteuse de l’épidémie du Covid-19 et ses conséquences catastrophiques pour des millions d’Américains. Les sondages, pourtant, semblent désavouer ses attentes. Quelque 57 % des électeurs contre 38 % souhaitent que la nomination à la Cour suprême revienne au président et au Sénat élus le 3 novembre prochain. Et parmi les enjeux de ces élections, la succession à la Cour suprême figure bonne dernière (11 %), après l’économie (25 %), la crise sanitaire (17 %), le système de santé (15 %) et la sécurité (12 %).

Enfin, le choix de faire passer en force la confirmation de Mme Coney Barrett a beau galvaniser les partisans du président, il risque de mobiliser surtout les électeurs démocrates, d’aliéner le vote des femmes diplômées, mais aussi de mettre en péril la réélection de plusieurs sénateurs républicains en position vulnérable. D’ailleurs, le seul résultat tangible à ce jour de l’initiative présidentielle aura été de faire exploser le montant des dons individuels aux candidats démocrates.

Si l’initiative de M. Trump soulève une telle tempête, c’est qu’elle touche au rôle suréminent qui est dévolu au droit – et aux juges – dans la culture politique américaine. L’esprit légaliste constitue depuis le temps lointain des Pères pèlerins la source de toute légitimité. C’est le droit, plus encore que la souveraineté, qu’invoque la Déclaration d’indépendance. La Constitution de 1787 reconnaîtra aux juristes une place qu’ils n’occupent nulle part ailleurs. Tocqueville, en interrogeant les caractères originaux de la jeune démocratie américaine, fait cette observation qui n’a pas pris une ride: «Il n’est presque pas de question politique qui ne se résolve tôt ou tard en question judiciaire.»

C’est à la Cour suprême, non au législateur, qu’il revient d’interpréter l’esprit des lois sur les matières qui lui sont déférées. C’est elle, non le Congrès, qui s’est prononcée sur l’abolition de l’esclavage, le démantèlement de la ségrégation, le droit à l’avortement ou le mariage homosexuel. Or, depuis quelques décennies, l’activisme judiciaire impulsé par des juges «libéraux» («de gauche», NDLR) a amené la Cour, toujours au nom de la Constitution, à créer des droits et à prononcer des arrêts qui réglaient la vie publique et les conduites individuelles sans l’aveu du législateur. C’est cette dérive légaliste que contestaient les conservateurs: le rôle des juges est d’appliquer et de punir les infractions à la loi, non de légiférer ; et les questions que la Constitution laisse incertaines doivent être tranchées par les élus du peuple, argumentent-ils.

D’où l’importance capitale que républicains et démocrates accordent à la désignation des magistrats d’une Cour suprême devenue l’enjeu – et l’arbitre – de la guerre civile qui les oppose. Les premiers redoutent une offensive progressiste pour étendre indéfiniment le domaine des droits individuels. Les seconds présagent une atteinte des conservateurs aux lois sur l’avortement, les droits des minorités, les immigrés, la discrimination positive et, dans l’immédiat, à la réforme de santé du président Obama.

Le chef de la majorité républicaine au Sénat, Mitch McConnell, entend engager sans tarder la confirmation de Mme Coney Barrett. Le processus pourrait se poursuivre jusqu’à la prise de fonction du prochain président, même si les républicains auront perdu et la Maison-Blanche et la majorité au Sénat. Les démocrates n’y peuvent rien, puisque la Constitution l’autorise. Les deux camps agitent les principes et invoquent des précédents. Les démocrates rappellent qu’en 2016, le même M. McConnell a refusé de mettre à l’ordre du jour la confirmation d’un juge pressenti à la Cour suprême par M. Obama, au motif qu’une telle nomination n’était pas légitime à neuf mois d’une élection présidentielle. Aujourd’hui, à moins de six semaines du scrutin, il trouve la chose parfaitement recommandable, à coups d’arguments passablement spécieux.

Si l’on estime qu’un président en fin de mandat ne saurait nommer à la Cour suprême, M. Trump est encore moins fondé à le faire que son prédécesseur.

Mais les républicains n’ont pas tort de soutenir qu’en pareille situation les démocrates se seraient conduits comme eux, en exploitant à leur avantage leur supériorité numérique. Il suffit de rappeler les manœuvres délétères qu’ils ont employées il y a deux ans pour saboter la nomination du juge Kavanaugh.

La vérité est que démocrates et républicains, depuis longtemps déjà, font primer la loi du nombre sur l’esprit des institutions et le souci du bien commun. Ils usent sans vergogne, toujours habillés d’un riche appareil casuistique, du pouvoir considérable que leur procure en alternance le suffrage universel. L’Amérique est devenue une démocratie purement majoritaire. Tocqueville le voyait déjà venir dans ses réflexions fameuses sur la tyrannie de la majorité. «Je regarde comme impie et détestable cette maxime qu’en matière de gouvernement la majorité d’un peuple a le droit de tout faire.»

Voir enfin:

President Trump announced Saturday afternoon that he would nominate Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, setting off a politically explosive scramble to confirm a deeply conservative jurist before Election Day.

The following are her remarks, as transcribed by The New York Times.

JUDGE AMY CONEY BARRETT: Thank you. Thank you very much, Mr. President. I am deeply honored by the confidence that you have placed in me. And I am so grateful, to you and the first lady, to the vice president and the second lady, and to so many others here for your kindness on this rather overwhelming occasion. I fully understand that this is a momentous decision for a president. And if the Senate does me the honor of confirming me, I pledge to discharge the responsibilities of this job to the very best of my ability. I love the United States, and I love the United States Constitution. I am truly humbled by the prospect of serving on the Supreme Court. Should I be confirmed, I will be mindful of who came before me.

The flag of the United States is still flying at half-staff, in memory of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to mark the end of a great American life. Justice Ginsburg began her career at a time when women were not welcome in the legal profession. But she not only broke glass ceilings, she smashed them. For that, she has won the admiration of women across the country, and indeed, all over the world. She was a woman of enormous talent and consequence, and her life of public service serves as an example to us all.

Particularly poignant to me was her long and deep friendship with Justice Antonin Scalia, my own mentor. Justices Scalia and Ginsburg disagreed fiercely in print without rancor in person. Their ability to maintain a warm and rich friendship despite their differences even inspired an opera. These two great Americans demonstrated that arguments, even about matters of great consequence, need not destroy affection.

In both my personal and professional relationships, I strive to meet that standard. I was lucky enough to clerk for Justice Scalia. And given his incalculable influence on my life, I am very moved to have members of the Scalia family here today, including his dear wife, Maureen. I clerked for Justice Scalia more than 20 years ago, but the lessons I learned still resonate. His judicial philosophy is mine, too. A judge must apply the law as written. Judges are not policymakers, and they must be resolute in setting aside any policy views they might hold.

The president has asked me to become the ninth justice, and as it happens I am used to being in a group of nine — my family. Our family includes me; my husband, Jesse; Emma; Vivian; Tess; John Peter; Liam; Juliet; and Benjamin. Vivian and John Peter, as the president said, were born in Haiti, and they came to us five years apart, when they were very young. And the most revealing fact about Benjamin, our youngest, is that his brothers and sisters unreservedly identity him as their favorite sibling.

Our children obviously make our life very full. While I am a judge, I’m better known back home as a room parent, car pool driver and birthday party planner. When schools went remote last spring, I tried on another hat. Jesse and I became co-principals of the Barrett e-learning academy. And yes, the list of enrolled students was a very long one. Our children are my greatest joy, even though they deprive me of any reasonable amount of sleep.

I could not manage this very full life without the unwavering support of my husband, Jesse. At the start of our marriage, I imagined that we would run our household as partners. As it has turned out, Jesse does far more than his share of the work. To my chagrin, I learned at dinner recently that my children consider him to be the better cook. For 21 years, Jesse has asked me every single morning what he can do for me that day. And though I almost always say, “Nothing,” he still finds ways to take things off my plate. And that’s not because he has a lot of free time. He has a busy law practice. It is because he is a superb and generous husband, and I am very fortunate.

Jesse and I have a life full of relationships, not only with our children, but with siblings, friends and fearless babysitters, one of whom is with us today. I’m particularly grateful to my parents, Mike and Linda Coney. I spent the bulk of — I have spent the bulk of my adulthood as a Midwesterner, but I grew up in their New Orleans home. And as my brother and sisters can also attest, Mom and Dad’s generosity extends not only to us, but to more people than any of us could count. They are an inspiration. It is important, at a moment like this, to acknowledge family and friends.

But this evening, I also want to acknowledge you, my fellow Americans. The president has nominated me to serve on the United States Supreme Court, and that institution belongs to all of us. If confirmed, I would not assume that role for the sake of those in my own circle and certainly not for my own sake. I would assume this role to serve you. I would discharge the judicial oath, which requires me to administer justice without respect to persons, do equal right to the poor and rich, and faithfully and impartially discharge my duties under the United States Constitution.

I have no illusions that the road ahead of me will be easy, either for the short term or the long haul. I never imagined that I would find myself in this position. But now that I am, I assure you that I will meet the challenge with both humility and courage. Members of the United States Senate, I look forward to working with you during the confirmation process. And I will do my very best to demonstrate that I am worthy of your support.

Thank you


Guerres culturelles: La ‘wokeité’ serait-elle le christianisme des imbéciles ? (Purer-than-thou: Behind the fourth Great Awakening we now see taking to our streets once again is nothing but the Girardian escalation of mimetic rivalry, former Weekly Standard literary editor Joseph Bottum says)

26 septembre, 2020
Classic Lincoln & Hamlin Wide Awakes 1860 Campaign Ribbon, white | Lot #25784 | Heritage Auctions
Woke | Know Your MemeDictionary.com Adds Words: 'Woke,' 'Butthurt' and 'Pokemon' | Time
PNG - 393.4 koL’antisémitisme est le socialisme des imbéciles. Ferdinand Kronawetter ? (attribué à August Bebel)
Je les ai foulés dans ma colère, Je les ai écrasés dans ma fureur; Leur sang a jailli sur mes vêtements, Et j’ai souillé tous mes habits. Car un jour de vengeance était dans mon coeur (…) J’ai foulé des peuples dans ma colère, Je les ai rendus ivres dans ma fureur, Et j’ai répandu leur sang sur la terre. Esaïe 63: 3-6
Et l’ange jeta sa faucille sur la terre. Et il vendangea la vigne de la terre, et jeta la vendange dans la grande cuve de la colère de Dieu. Et la cuve fut foulée hors de la ville; et du sang sortit de la cuve, jusqu’aux mors des chevaux, sur une étendue de mille six cents stades. Apocalypse 14: 19-20
Mes yeux ont vu la gloire de la venue du Seigneur; Il piétine le vignoble où sont gardés les raisins de la colère; Il a libéré la foudre fatidique de sa terrible et rapide épée; Sa vérité est en marche. (…) Dans la beauté des lys Christ est né de l’autre côté de l’océan, Avec dans sa poitrine la gloire qui nous transfigure vous et moi; Comme il est mort pour rendre les hommes saints, mourons pour rendre les hommes libres; Tandis que Dieu est en marche. Julia Ward Howe (1861)
La colère commence à luire dans les yeux de ceux qui ont faim. Dans l’âme des gens, les raisins de la colère se gonflent et mûrissent, annonçant les vendanges prochaines. John Steinbeck (1939)
La civilisation atteindra la perfection le jour où la dernière pierre de la dernière église aura assommé le dernier prêtre. Attribué à Zola
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
La nature d’une civilisation, c’est ce qui s’agrège autour d’une religion. Notre civilisation est incapable de construire un temple ou un tombeau. Elle sera contrainte de trouver sa valeur fondamentale, ou elle se décomposera. C’est le grand phénomène de notre époque que la violence de la poussée islamique. Sous-estimée par la plupart de nos contemporains, cette montée de l’islam est analogiquement comparable aux débuts du communisme du temps de Lénine. Les conséquences de ce phénomène sont encore imprévisibles. A l’origine de la révolution marxiste, on croyait pouvoir endiguer le courant par des solutions partielles. Ni le christianisme, ni les organisations patronales ou ouvrières n’ont trouvé la réponse. De même aujourd’hui, le monde occidental ne semble guère préparé à affronter le problème de l’islam. En théorie, la solution paraît d’ailleurs extrêmement difficile. Peut-être serait-elle possible en pratique si, pour nous borner à l’aspect français de la question, celle-ci était pensée et appliquée par un véritable homme d’Etat. Les données actuelles du problème portent à croire que des formes variées de dictature musulmane vont s’établir successivement à travers le monde arabe. Quand je dis «musulmane» je pense moins aux structures religieuses qu’aux structures temporelles découlant de la doctrine de Mahomet. Dès maintenant, le sultan du Maroc est dépassé et Bourguiba ne conservera le pouvoir qu’en devenant une sorte de dictateur. Peut-être des solutions partielles auraient-elles suffi à endiguer le courant de l’islam, si elles avaient été appliquées à temps. Actuellement, il est trop tard ! Les «misérables» ont d’ailleurs peu à perdre. Ils préféreront conserver leur misère à l’intérieur d’une communauté musulmane. Leur sort sans doute restera inchangé. Nous avons d’eux une conception trop occidentale. Aux bienfaits que nous prétendons pouvoir leur apporter, ils préféreront l’avenir de leur race. L’Afrique noire ne restera pas longtemps insensible à ce processus. Tout ce que nous pouvons faire, c’est prendre conscience de la gravité du phénomène et tenter d’en retarder l’évolution. André Malraux (1956)
Nous sommes encore proches de cette période des grandes expositions internationales qui regardait de façon utopique la mondialisation comme l’Exposition de Londres – la « Fameuse » dont parle Dostoievski, les expositions de Paris… Plus on s’approche de la vraie mondialisation plus on s’aperçoit que la non-différence ce n’est pas du tout la paix parmi les hommes mais ce peut être la rivalité mimétique la plus extravagante. On était encore dans cette idée selon laquelle on vivait dans le même monde: on n’est plus séparé par rien de ce qui séparait les hommes auparavant donc c’est forcément le paradis. Ce que voulait la Révolution française. Après la nuit du 4 août, plus de problème ! René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège: la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
Nous sommes une société qui, tous les cinquante ans ou presque, est prise d’une sorte de paroxysme de vertu – une orgie d’auto-purification à travers laquelle le mal d’une forme ou d’une autre doit être chassé. De la chasse aux sorcières de Salem aux chasses aux communistes de l’ère McCarthy à la violente fixation actuelle sur la maltraitance des enfants, on retrouve le même fil conducteur d’hystérie morale. Après la période du maccarthisme, les gens demandaient : mais comment cela a-t-il pu arriver ? Comment la présomption d’innocence a-t-elle pu être abandonnée aussi systématiquement ? Comment de grandes et puissantes institutions ont-elles pu accepté que des enquêteurs du Congrès aient fait si peu de cas des libertés civiles – tout cela au nom d’une guerre contre les communistes ? Comment était-il possible de croire que des subversifs se cachaient derrière chaque porte de bibliothèque, dans chaque station de radio, que chaque acteur de troisième zone qui avait appartenu à la mauvaise organisation politique constituait une menace pour la sécurité de la nation ? Dans quelques décennies peut-être les gens ne manqueront pas de se poser les mêmes questions sur notre époque actuelle; une époque où les accusations de sévices les plus improbables trouvent des oreilles bienveillantes; une époque où il suffit d’être accusé par des sources anonymes pour être jeté en pâture à la justice; une époque où la chasse à ceux qui maltraitent les enfants est devenu une pathologie nationale. Dorothy Rabinowitz
La glorification d’une race et le dénigrement corollaire d’une autre ou d’autres a toujours été et sera une recette de meurtre. Ceci est une loi absolue. Si on laisse quelqu’un subir un traitement particulièrement défavorable à un groupe quelconque d’individus en raison de leur race ou de leur couleur de peau, on ne saurait fixer de limites aux mauvais traitements dont ils seront l’objet et puisque la race entière a été condamnée pour des raisons mystérieuses il n’y a aucune raison pour ne pas essayer de la détruire dans son intégralité. C’est précisément ce que les nazis auraient voulu accomplir (…) J’ai beaucoup à cœur de voir les noirs conquérir leur liberté aux Etats Unis. Mais leur dignité et leur santé spirituelle me tiennent également à cœur et je me dois de m’opposer à toutes tentatives des noirs de faire à d’autres ce qu’on leur a fait. James Baldwin
The recent flurry of marches, demonstrations and even riots, along with the Democratic Party’s spiteful reaction to the Trump presidency, exposes what modern liberalism has become: a politics shrouded in pathos. Unlike the civil-rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s, when protesters wore their Sunday best and carried themselves with heroic dignity, today’s liberal marches are marked by incoherence and downright lunacy—hats designed to evoke sexual organs, poems that scream in anger yet have no point to make, and an hysterical anti-Americanism. All this suggests lostness, the end of something rather than the beginning. (…) America, since the ’60s, has lived through what might be called an age of white guilt. We may still be in this age, but the Trump election suggests an exhaustion with the idea of white guilt, and with the drama of culpability, innocence and correctness in which it mires us. White guilt (…) is the terror of being stigmatized with America’s old bigotries—racism, sexism, homophobia and xenophobia. To be stigmatized as a fellow traveler with any of these bigotries is to be utterly stripped of moral authority and made into a pariah. The terror of this, of having “no name in the street” as the Bible puts it, pressures whites to act guiltily even when they feel no actual guilt. (…) It is also the heart and soul of contemporary liberalism. This liberalism is the politics given to us by white guilt, and it shares white guilt’s central corruption. It is not real liberalism, in the classic sense. It is a mock liberalism. Freedom is not its raison d’être; moral authority is. (…) Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, good liberals both, pursued power by offering their candidacies as opportunities for Americans to document their innocence of the nation’s past. “I had to vote for Obama,” a rock-ribbed Republican said to me. “I couldn’t tell my grandson that I didn’t vote for the first black president.” For this man liberalism was a moral vaccine that immunized him against stigmatization. For Mr. Obama it was raw political power in the real world, enough to lift him—unknown and untested—into the presidency. But for Mrs. Clinton, liberalism was not enough. The white guilt that lifted Mr. Obama did not carry her into office—even though her opponent was soundly stigmatized as an iconic racist and sexist. Perhaps the Obama presidency was the culmination of the age of white guilt, so that this guiltiness has entered its denouement. (…) Our new conservative president rolls his eyes when he is called a racist, and we all—liberal and conservative alike—know that he isn’t one. The jig is up. Bigotry exists, but it is far down on the list of problems that minorities now face. (…) Today’s liberalism is an anachronism. It has no understanding, really, of what poverty is and how it has to be overcome. (…) Four thousand shootings in Chicago last year, and the mayor announces that his will be a sanctuary city. This is moral esteem over reality; the self-congratulation of idealism. Liberalism is exhausted because it has become a corruption. Shelby Steele
For over forty years the left has been successfully reshaping American culture. Social mores and government policies about sexuality, marriage, the sexes, race relations, morality, and ethics have changed radically. The collective wisdom of the human race that we call tradition has been marginalized or discarded completely. The role of religion in public life has been reduced to a private preference. And politics has been increasingly driven by the assumptions of progressivism: internationalism privileged over nationalism, centralization of power over its dispersal in federalism, elitist technocracy over democratic republicanism, “human sciences” over common sense, and dependent clients over autonomous citizens. But the election of Donald Trump, and the overreach of the left’s response to that victory, suggest that we may be seeing the beginning of the end of the left’s cultural, social, and political dominance. The two terms of Barack Obama seemed to be the crowning validation of the left’s victory. Despite Obama’s “no blue state, no red state” campaign rhetoric, he governed as the most leftist––and ineffectual–– president in history. Deficits exploded, taxes were raised, new entitlements created, and government expanded far beyond the dreams of center-left Democrats. Marriage and sex identities were redefined. The narrative of permanent white racism was endorsed and promoted. Tradition-minded Americans were scorned as “bitter clingers to guns and religion.” Hollywood and Silicon Valley became even more powerful cultural arbiters and left-wing publicists. And cosmopolitan internationalism was privileged over patriotic nationalism, while American exceptionalism was reduced to an irrational parochial prejudice. The shocking repudiation of the establishment left’s anointed successor, Hillary Clinton, was the first sign that perhaps the hubristic left had overreached, and summoned nemesis in the form of a vulgar, braggadocios reality television star and casino developer who scorned the hypocritical rules of decorum and political correctness that even many Republicans adopted to avoid censure and calumny. Yet rather than learning the tragic self-knowledge that Aristotle says compensates the victim of nemesis, the left overreached yet again with its outlandish, hysterical tantrums over Trump’s victory. The result has been a stark exposure of the left’s incoherence and hypocrisy so graphic and preposterous that they can no longer be ignored. First, the now decidedly leftist Democrats refused to acknowledge their political miscalculations. Rather than admit that their party has drifted too far left beyond the beliefs of the bulk of the states’ citizens, they shifted blame onto a whole catalogue of miscreants: Russian meddling, a careerist FBI director, their own lap-dog media, endemic sexism, an out-of-date Electoral College, FOX News, and irredeemable “deplorables” were just a few. Still high on the “permanent majority” Kool-Aid they drank during the Obama years, they pitched a fit and called it “resistance,” as though comfortably preaching to the media, university, and entertainment choirs was like fighting Nazis in occupied France. (…) in colleges and universities. Normal people watched as some of the most privileged young people in history turned their subjective slights and bathetic discontents into weapons of tyranny, shouting down or driving away speakers they didn’t like, and calling for “muscle” to enforce their assault on the First Amendment. Relentlessly repeated on FOX News and on the Drudge Report, these antics galvanized large swaths of American voters who used to be amused, but now were disgusted by such displays of rank ingratitude and arrogant dismissal of Constitutional rights. And voters could see that the Democrats encouraged and enabled this nonsense. The prestige of America’s best universities, where most of these rites of passage for the scions of the well-heeled occurred, was even more damaged than it had been in the previous decades. So too with the world of entertainment. Badly educated actors, musicians, and entertainers, those glorified jugglers, jesters, and sword-swallowers who fancy themselves “artists,” have let loose an endless stream of dull leftwing clichés and bromides that were in their dotage fifty years ago. The spectacle of moral preening coming from the entertainment industry––one that trades in vulgarity, misogyny, sexual exploitation, the glorification of violence, and, worst of all, the production of banal, mindless movies and television shows recycling predictable plots, villains, and heroes––has disgusted millions of voters, who are sick of being lectured to by overpaid carnies. So they vote with their feet for the alternatives, while movie grosses and television ratings decline. As for the media, their long-time habit of substituting political activism for journalism, unleashed during the Obama years, has been freed from its last restraints while covering Trump. The contrast between the “slobbering love affair,” as Bernie Goldberg described the media’s coverage of Obama, and the obsessive Javert-like hounding of Trump has stripped the last veil of objectivity from the media. They’ve been exposed as flacks no longer seeking the truth, but manufacturing partisan narratives. The long cover-up of the Weinstein scandal is further confirmation of the media’s amoral principles and selective outrage. With numerous alternatives to the activism of the mainstream media now available, the legacy media that once dominated the reporting of news and political commentary are now shrinking in influence and lashing out in fury at their diminished prestige and profits. Two recent events have focused this turn against the sixties’ hijacking of the culture. The preposterous “protests” by NFL players disrespecting the flag during pregame ceremonies has angered large numbers of Americans and hit the League in the wallet. The race card that always has trumped every political or social conflict has perhaps lost its power. The spectacle of rich one-percenters recycling lies about police encounters with blacks and the endemic racism of American society has discredited the decades-long racial narrative constantly peddled by Democrats, movies, television shows, and school curricula from grade-school to university. The endless scolding of white people by blacks more privileged than the majority of human beings who ever existed has lost its credibility. The racial good will that got a polished mediocrity like Barack Obama twice elected president perhaps has been squandered in this attempt of rich people who play games to pose as perpetual victims. These supposed victims appear more interested in camouflaging their privilege than improving the lives of their so-called “brothers” and “sisters.” The second is the Harvey Weinstein scandal. A lavish donor to Democrats––praised by Hillary Clinton and the Obamas, given standing ovations at awards shows by the politically correct, slavishly courted and feted by progressive actors and entertainers, and long known to be a vicious sexual predator by these same progressive “feminists” supposedly anguished by the plight of women––perhaps will become the straw that breaks the back of progressive ideology. (…) The spectacle of a rich feminist and progressive icon like Jane Fonda whimpering about her own moral cowardice has destroyed the credibility we foolishly gave to Hollywood’s dunces and poltroons. Bruce Thornton
We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise). Black Lives Matter
BLM’s « what we believe » page, calling for the destruction of the nuclear family among many other radical left wing agenda items, has been deleted » pic.twitter.com/qCZxUFMZH4 Matt Walsh
Correction: This article’s headline originally stated that People of Praise inspired ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’. The book’s author, Margaret Atwood, has never specifically mentioned the group as being the inspiration for her work. A New Yorker profile of the author from 2017 mentions a newspaper clipping as part of her research for the book of a different charismatic Catholic group, People of Hope. Newsweek regrets the error. Newsweek
Je conseille à tout le monde d’être un peu prudent quand ils passent par là, rester éveillé, garder les yeux ouverts. Leadbelly (« Scottsboro Boys », 1938)
If You’re Woke You Dig It. William Melvin Kelley (1962)
I been sleeping all my life. And now that Mr. Garvey done woke me up, I’m gon’ stay woke. And I’m gon help him wake up other black folk. Barry Beckham (1972)
I am known to stay awake A beautiful world I’m trying to find I’ve been in search of myself (…) I am in the search of something new (A beautiful world I’m trying to find) Searchin’ me Searching inside of you And that’s fo’ real What if it were no niggas Only master teachers? I stay woke. Erykah Badu (2008)
La vérité ne nécessite aucune croyance. / Restez réveillé. Regardez attentivement. / #FreePussyRiot. Erykah Badu
Wikipédia est-il  assez woke ? Bloomberg Businessweek
L’énigme est intégrée. Lorsque les Blancs aspirent à obtenir des points pour la conscience, ils marchent directement dans la ligne de mire entre l’alliance et l’appropriation. Amanda Hess
WOKE: Adjectif dérivé du verbe anglais awake (« s’éveiller »), il désigne un membre d’un groupe dominant, conscient du système oppressant les minorités et n’hésitant pas à dénoncer les discriminations en utilisant le vocabulaire intersectionnel. Marianne
Le grand réveil (Great Awakening) correspond à une vague de réveils religieux dans le Royaume de Grande-Bretagne et ses colonies américaines au milieu du XVIIIe siècle. Le terme de Great Awakening est apparu vers 1842. On le retrouve dans le titre de l’ouvrage consacré par Joseph Tracy au renouveau religieux qui débuta en Grande-Bretagne et dans ses colonies américaines dans les années 1720, progressa considérablement dans les années 1740 pour s’atténuer dans les années 1760 voire 1770. Il sera suivi de nouvelles vagues de réveil, le second grand réveil (1790-1840) et une troisième vague de réveils entre 1855 et les premières décennies du XXe siècle. Ces réveils religieux dans la tradition protestante et surtout dans le contexte américain sont compris comme une période de redynamisation de la vie religieuse. Le Great Awakening toucha des églises protestantes et des églises chrétiennes évangéliques et contribua à la formation de nouvelles Églises. Wikipedia
Woke est un terme apparu durant les années 2010 aux États-Unis, pour décrire un état d’esprit militant et combatif pour la protection des minorités et contre le racisme. Il dérive du verbe wake (réveiller), pour décrire un état d’éveil face à l’injustice. Il est dans un premier temps utilisé dans le mouvement de Black Lives Matter, avant d’être repris plus largement. Depuis la fin des années 2010, le terme Woke s’est déployé et aujourd’hui une personne « woke » se définit comme étant consciente de toutes les injustices et de toutes les formes d’inégalités, d’oppression qui pèsent sur les minorités, du racisme au sexisme en passant par les préoccupations environnementales et utilisant généralement un vocabulaire intersectionnel. Son usage répandu serait dû au mouvement Black Lives Matter. Le terme Woke est non seulement associé aux militantismes antiraciste, féministe et LGBT mais aussi à une politique de gauche dite progressiste et à certaines réflexions face aux problèmes socioculturels (les termes culture Woke et politique Woke sont également utilisés). (…) Les termes Woke et wide awake (complètement éveillé) sont apparus pour la première fois dans la culture politique et les annonces politiques lors de l’ élection présidentielle américaine de 1860 pour soutenir Abraham Lincoln. Le Parti républicain a cultivé le mouvement pour s’opposer principalement à la propagation de l’esclavage, comme décrit dans le mouvement Wide Awakes. Les dictionnaires d’Oxford enregistrent  une utilisation politiquement consciente précoce en 1962 dans l’article « If You’re Woke You Dig It » de William Melvin Kelley dans le New York Times et dans la pièce de 1971 Garvey Lives! de Barry Beckham (« I been sleeping all my life. And now that Mr. Garvey done woke me up, I’m gon’ stay woke. And I’m gon help him wake up other black folk. »). Garvey avait lui-même exhorté ses auditoires du début du XXe siècle, « Wake up Ethiopia! Wake up Africa! » (« Réveillez-vous Éthiopie! Réveillez-vous Afrique! »en français). Auparavant, Jay Saunders Redding avait enregistré un commentaire d’un employé afro-américain du syndicat United Mine Workers of America en 1940 (« Laissez-moi vous dire, mon ami. Se réveiller est beaucoup plus difficile que de dormir, mais nous resterons éveillés plus longtemps. »). Leadbelly utilise la phrase vers la fin de l’enregistrement de sa chanson de 1938 « Scottsboro Boys », tout en expliquant l’incident du même nom, en disant « Je conseille à tout le monde d’être un peu prudent quand ils passent par là, rester éveillé, garder les yeux ouverts ». La première utilisation moderne du terme « Woke » apparaît dans la chanson « Master Teacher » de l’album New Amerykah Part One (4th World War) (2008) de la chanteuse de soul Erykah Badu. Tout au long de la chanson, Badu chante la phrase: « I stay woke ». Bien que la phrase n’ait pas encore de lien avec les problèmes de justice, la chanson de Badu est créditée du lien ultérieur avec ces problèmes. To « stay woke » (Rester éveillé) dans ce sens exprime l’aspect grammatical continu et habituel intensifié de l’anglais vernaculaire afro-américain : en substance, être toujours éveillé, ou être toujours vigilant. David Stovall a dit: « Erykah l’a amené vivant dans la culture populaire. Elle veut dire ne pas être apaisée, ne pas être anesthésiée. » Le concept d’être Woke (réveillé en anglais) soutient l’idée que ce type de prise de conscience doit être acquise. Le rappeur Earl Sweatshirt se souvient d’avoir chanté « I stay woke » sur la chanson et sa mère a refusé la chanson et a répondu: « Non, tu ne l’es pas. » En 2012, les utilisateurs de Twitter, y compris Erykah Badu, ont commencé à utiliser « Woke » et « stay Woke » en relation avec des questions de justice sociale et raciale et #StayWoke est devenu un mot-dièse largement utilisé. Badu a incité ceci avec la première utilisation politiquement chargée de l’expression sur Twitter. Elle a tweeté pour soutenir le groupe de musique féministe russe Pussy Riot : « La vérité ne nécessite aucune croyance. / Restez réveillé. Regardez attentivement. / #FreePussyRiot. » Le terme Woke s’est répandu dans un usage courant dans le monde anglo-saxon par les médias sociaux et des cercles militants. Par exemple, en 2016, le titre d’un article de Bloomberg Businessweek demandait « Is Wikipedia Woke? » (« Est-ce que Wikipédia est Woke ? »), en faisant référence à la base de contributeurs largement blancs de l’encyclopédie en ligne. Enfin, le terme Woke s’est étendu à d’autres causes et d’autres usages, plus mondains. Car, en effet, tout semble maintenant ainsi « éveillé » : la 75ème cérémonie des Golden Globes, marquée par l’affaire Weinstein et la volonté d’en finir avec le harcèlement sexuel, était en partie Woke, selon le New York Times. Le magazine London Review of Books affirme même que la famille royale britannique est désormais Woke d’après les récentes fiançailles du prince Harry avec l’actrice métisse Meghan Markle, dont les positions anti-Donald Trump sont bien connues. À la fin des années 2010, le terme « Woke » avait pris pour indiquer « une paranoïa saine, en particulier sur les questions de justice raciale et politique » et a été adopté comme un terme d’argot plus générique et a fait l’objet de mèmes. Par exemple, MTV News l’a identifié comme un mot-clé d’argot adolescent pour 2016. Dans le New York Times, Amanda Hess a exprimé des inquiétudes quant au fait que le mot Woke a été culturellement approprié, écrivant: « L’énigme est intégrée. Lorsque les Blancs aspirent à obtenir des points pour la conscience, ils marchent directement dans la ligne de mire entre l’alliance et l’appropriation. Wikipedia
On ne peut comprendre la gauche si on ne comprend pas que le gauchisme est une religion. Dennis Prager
You cannot understand the Left if you do not understand that leftism is a religion. It is not God-based (some left-wing Christians’ and Jews’ claims notwithstanding), but otherwise it has every characteristic of a religion. The most blatant of those characteristics is dogma. People who believe in leftism have as many dogmas as the most fundamentalist Christian. One of them is material equality as the preeminent moral goal. Another is the villainy of corporations. The bigger the corporation, the greater the villainy. Thus, instead of the devil, the Left has Big Pharma, Big Tobacco, Big Oil, the “military-industrial complex,” and the like. Meanwhile, Big Labor, Big Trial Lawyers, and — of course — Big Government are left-wing angels. And why is that? Why, to be specific, does the Left fear big corporations but not big government? The answer is dogma — a belief system that transcends reason. No rational person can deny that big governments have caused almost all the great evils of the last century, arguably the bloodiest in history. Who killed the 20 to 30 million Soviet citizens in the Gulag Archipelago — big government or big business? Hint: There were no private businesses in the Soviet Union. Who deliberately caused 75 million Chinese to starve to death — big government or big business? Hint: See previous hint. Did Coca-Cola kill 5 million Ukrainians? Did Big Oil slaughter a quarter of the Cambodian population? Would there have been a Holocaust without the huge Nazi state? Whatever bad things big corporations have done is dwarfed by the monstrous crimes — the mass enslavement of people, the deprivation of the most basic human rights, not to mention the mass murder and torture and genocide — committed by big governments. (…) Religious Christians and Jews also have some irrational beliefs, but their irrationality is overwhelmingly confined to theological matters; and these theological irrationalities have no deleterious impact on religious Jews’ and Christians’ ability to see the world rationally and morally. Few religious Jews or Christians believe that big corporations are in any way analogous to big government in terms of evil done. And the few who do are leftists. That the Left demonizes Big Pharma, for instance, is an example of this dogmatism. America’s pharmaceutical companies have saved millions of lives, including millions of leftists’ lives. And I do not doubt that in order to increase profits they have not always played by the rules. But to demonize big pharmaceutical companies while lionizing big government, big labor unions, and big tort-law firms is to stand morality on its head. There is yet another reason to fear big government far more than big corporations. ExxonMobil has no police force, no IRS, no ability to arrest you, no ability to shut you up, and certainly no ability to kill you. ExxonMobil can’t knock on your door in the middle of the night and legally take you away. Apple Computer cannot take your money away without your consent, and it runs no prisons. The government does all of these things. Of course, the Left will respond that government also does good and that corporations and capitalists are, by their very nature, “greedy.” To which the rational response is that, of course, government also does good. But so do the vast majority of corporations, private citizens, church groups, and myriad voluntary associations. On the other hand, only big government can do anything approaching the monstrous evils of the last century. As for greed: Between hunger for money and hunger for power, the latter is incomparably more frightening. It is noteworthy that none of the twentieth century’s monsters — Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao — were preoccupied with material gain. They loved power much more than money. And that is why the Left is much more frightening than the Right. It craves power.  Dennis Prager
What I found most interesting and provocative is Bottum’s thesis that although it seems that the moral core of modern American society has been entirely secularized, and religion and religious institutions play little role in shaping those views, in fact the watered-down gruel of moral views served up by elite establishment opinion (recycling, multiculturalism, and the like) is a remnant of the old collection of Protestant mainline views that dominated American society for decades or even centuries. To highlight the important sociological importance of religion in American society, Bottum uses the now-familiar metaphor of a three-legged stool in describing American society (one that I and others have used as well): a balance between constitutional democracy, free market capitalism, and a strong and vibrant web of civil society institutions where moral lessons are taught and social capital is built. In the United States, the most important civil society organizations traditionally have been family and churches. And, among the churches, by far the most important were those that Bottum deems as the “Protestant Mainline” — Episcopalian, Lutheran, Baptist (Northern), Methodist, Presbyterian, Congregationalist/United Church of Christ, etc. The data on changing membership in these churches is jaw-dropping. In 1965, for example, over half of the United States population claimed membership in one of the Protestant mainline churches. Today, by contrast, less than 10 percent of the population belongs to one of these churches. Moreover, those numbers are likely to continue to decline — the Protestant Mainline (“PM”) churches also sport the highest average age of any church group. Why does the suicide of the Protestant Mainline matter? Because for Bottum, these churches are what provided the sturdy third leg to balance politics and markets in making a good society. Indeed, Bottum sees the PM churches as the heart of American Exceptionalism — they provided the moral code of Americanism. Probity, responsibility, honesty, integrity — all the moral virtues that provided the bedrock of American society and also constrained the hydraulic and leveling tendencies of the state and market to devour spheres of private life. The collapse of this religious-moral consensus has been most pronounced among American elites, who have turned largely indifferent to formal religious belief. And in some leftist elite circles it has turned to outright hostility toward religion — Bottum reminds us of Barack Obama’s observation that rural Americans today cling to their “guns and Bibles” out of bitterness about changes in the world. Perhaps most striking is that anti-Catholic bigotry today is almost exclusively found on “the political Left, as it members rage about insidious Roman influence on the nation: the Catholic justices on the Supreme Court plotting to undo the abortion license, and the Catholic racists of the old rust belt states turning their backs on Obama to vote for Hillary Clinton in the 2008 Democratic primaries. Why is it no surprise that one of the last places in American Christianity to find good, old-fashioned anti-Catholicism is among the administrators of the dying Mainline…. They must be anti-Catholics precisely to the extent that they are also political leftists.” As the recent squabbles over compelling practicing Catholics to toe the new cultural line on same-sex marriage at the risk of losing their jobs or businesses, the political Left today is increasingly intolerant of recognizing a private sphere of belief outside of the crushing hand of political orthodoxy. Yet as Bottum notes, the traditional elite consensus has been replaced by a new spiritual orthodoxy of “morality.” The American elite (however defined) today does subscribe to a set of orthodoxies of what constitutes “proper” behavior: proper views on the environment, feminism, gay rights, etc. Thus, Bottum provocatively argues, the PM hasn’t gone away, it has simply evolved into a new form, a religion without God as it were, in which the Sierra club, universities, and Democratic Party have supplanted the Methodists and Presbyterians as the teachers of proper values. (…) Bottum points to the key moment as the emergence of the Social Gospel movement in the early 20th Century. Led by Walter Rauschenbusch, the Social Gospel movement reached beyond the traditional view that Christianity spoke to personal failings such as sin, but instead reached “the social sin of all mankind, to which all who ever lived have contributed, and under which all who ever lived have suffered.” As Bottum summarizes it, Rauschenbusch identified six social sins: “bigotry, the arrogance of power, the corruption of justice for personal ends, the madness [and groupthink] of the mob, militarism, and class contempt.” As religious belief moved from the pulpit and pew to the voting booth and activism, the role of Jesus and any religious belief became increasingly attenuated. And eventually, Bottum suggests, the political agenda itself came to overwhelm the increasingly irrelevant religious beliefs that initially supported it. Indeed, to again consider contemporary debates, what matters most is outward conformity to orthodox opinion, not persuasion and inward acceptance of a set of particular views–as best illustrated by the lynch mobs that attacked Brendan Eich for his political donations (his outward behavior) and to compel conformity of behavior among wedding cake bakers and the like, all of which bears little relation to (and in fact is likely counterproductive) to changing personal belief. (Of course, that too is an unstable equilibrium–in the future it won’t be sufficient to not merely not be politically opposed to same-sex marriage, it will be a litmus test to be affirmatively in favor of it.). Thus, while the modern elite appears to be largely non-religious, Bottum argues that they are the subconscious heirs to the old Protestant Mainline, but are merely Post-Protestant — the same demographic group of people holding more or less the same views and fighting the same battles as the advocates of the social gospel. In the second part of the book, Bottum turns to his second theme — the effort beginning around 2000 of Catholics and Evangelical Christians to form an alliance to create a new moral consensus to replace the void left by the collapse Protestant Mainline churches. Oversimplified, Bottum’s basic point is that this was an effort to marry the zeal and energy of Evangelical churches to the long, well-developed natural law theory of Catholicism, including Catholic social teaching. Again oversimplified, Bottum’s argument is that this effort was doomed on both sides of the equation–first, Catholicism is simply too dense and “foreign” to ever be a majoritarian church in the United States; and second, because evangelical Christianity itself has lost much of its vibrant nature. Bottum notes, which I hadn’t realized, that after years of rapid growth, evangelical Christianity appears to be in some decline in membership. Thus, the religious void remains. The obvious question with which one is left is if Bottum is correct that religious institutions uphold the third leg of the American stool, and if (as he claims) religion is the key to American exceptionalism, can America survive without a continued vibrant religious tradition? (…) Campus protests today, for example, often seem to be sort of a form of performance art, where the gestures of protest and being seen to “care” are ends in themselves, as often the protests themselves have goals that are somewhat incoherent (compared to, say, protests against the Vietnam War). Bottum describes this as a sort of spirtual angst, a vague discomfort with the way things are and an even vaguer desire for change. On this point I wonder whether he is being too generous to their motives. (…) But there is one thesis that he doesn’t consider that I think contributes much of the explanation of the decline of the importance of the Protestant Mainline, which is the thesis developed by Shelby Steele is his great book “White Guilt.” I think Steele’s argument provides the key to unlocking not only the decline of the Protestant Mainline but also the timing, and why the decline of the Protestant Mainline has been so much more precipitous than Evangelicals and Catholics, as well as why anti-Evangelical and anti-Catholic bigotry is so socially acceptable among liberal elites. Steele’s thesis, oversimplified, is that the elite institutions of American society for many years were complicit in a system that perpetrated injustices on many Americans. The government, large corporations, major universities, white-show law firms, fraternal organizations, etc.–the military being somewhat of an exception to this–all conspired explicitly or tacitly in a social system that supported first slavery then racial discrimination, inequality toward women, anti-Semitism, and other real injustices. Moreover, all of this came to a head in the 1960s, when these long-held and legitimate grievances bubbled to the surface and were finally recognized and acknowledged by those who ran these elite institutions and efforts were taken to remediate their harms. This complicity in America’s evils, Steele argues, discredited the moral authority of these institutions, leaving not only a vacuum at the heart of American society but an ongoing effort at their redemption. But, Steele argues, this is where things have become somewhat perverse. It wasn’t enough for, say, Coca-Cola to actually take steps to remediate its past sins, it was crucial for Coca-Cola to show that it was acknowledging its guilty legacy and, in particular, to demonstrate that it was now truly enlightened. But how to do that? Steele argues that this is the pivotal role played by hustlers like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton — they can sell the indulgences to corporations, universities, and the other guilty institutions to allow them to demonstrate that they “understand” and accept their guilt and through bowing to Jackson’s demands, Jackson can give them a clean bill of moral health. Thus, Steele says that what is really going on is an effort by the leaders of these institutions to “dissociate” themselves from their troubled past and peer institutions today that lack the same degree of enlightenment. Moreover, it is crucially important that the Jackson’s of the world set the terms–indeed, the more absurd and ridiculous the penance the better from this perspective, because more ridiculous penances make it easier to demonstrate your acceptance of your guilt. One set of institutions that Steele does not address, but which fits perfectly into his thesis, is the Protestant Mainline churches that Bottum is describing. It is precisely because the Protestant Mainline churches were the moral backbone of American society that they were in need of the same sort of moral redemption that universities, corporations, and the government. Indeed, because of their claim to be the moral exemplar, their complicity in real injustice was especially bad. Much of the goofiness of the Mainline Protestant churches over the past couple of decades can be well-understood, I think, through this lens of efforts to dissociate themselves from their legacy and other less-enlightened churches. In short, it seems that often their religious dogma is reverse-engineered–they start from wanting to make sure that they hold the correct cutting-edge political and social views, then they retrofit a thin veil of religious belief over those social and political opinions. Such that their religious beliefs today, as far as one ever hears about them at all, differ little from the views of The New York Times editorial page. This also explains why Catholics and Evangelicals are so maddening, and threatening, to the modern elites. Unlike the Protestant Mainline churches that were the moral voice of the American establishment, Catholicism and Evangelicals have always been outsiders to the American establishment. Thus they bear none of the guilt of having supported unjust political and social systems and refuse to act like they do. They have no reason to kowtow to elite opinion and, indeed, are often quite populist in their worldview (consider the respect that Justices Scalia or Thomas have for the moral judgments of ordinary Americans on issues like abortion or same-sex marriage vs. the views of elites). Given the sorry record of American elites for decades, there is actually a dividing line between two world views. Modern elites believe that the entire American society was to blame, thus we all share guilt and must all seek forgiveness through affirmative action, compulsory sensitivity training, and recycling mandates. Others, notably Catholics and Evangelicals, refuse to accept blame for a social system that they played no role in creating or maintaining and which, in fact, they were excluded themselves. To some extent, therefore, I think that the often-remarked political fault line in American society along religious lines (which Bottum discusses extensively), is as much cultural and historical (in Steele’s sense) as disagreements over religion per se. At the same time, the decline of its moral authority hit the Protestant Mainline churches harder than well-entrenched universities, corporations, or the government, in part because the embrace of the Social Gospel had laid the foundations for their own obsolescence years before. This also explains why if a religious revival is to occur, it would come from the alliance of Catholics and Evangelicals that he describes in the second half of the book. Mainline Protestantism seems to simply lack the moral authority to revive itself and has essentially made itself obsolete. There appears to be little market for religions without God.
In the end, Bottum leaves us with no answer to his central question–can America, which for so long relied on the Protestant Mainline churches to provide a moral and institutional third leg to the country, survive without it. Can the thin gruel of the post-Protestant New York Times elite consensus provide the moral glue that used to hold the country together? Perhaps, or perhaps not — that is the question we are left with after reading Bottum’s fascinating book. Finally, (…) I wanted to call attention to Jody’s new essay at the Weekly Standard “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas” that touches on many of the themes of the book and develops them in light of ongoing controversies, especially on the parallels between the new moral consensus and traditional religious thinking (and, in fact, his comments on “original sin” strike me as similar to the points about Shelby Steele that I raised above).
Todd Zywicki
I was simply going to take up the fact that America was in essence a Protestant nation from its founding, from the arrival of the Puritans—and well, it’s a little more sophisticated than that, really from William and Mary on this was a Protestant country—and that we needed to sort of describe what Tocqueville called the main current of that. Now mainline is a word from much later, from the 1930s, but there always was a kind of main current of a general Protestantism. And I wanted to look at its political consequences and cultural consequences. However much the rival Protestant denominations feuded with one another, disagreed with one another, I thought they gave a tone to the nation. And one of the things that they did particularly from the Civil War on was constrain social and political demons. They corralled them. They gave a shape to America, which was the marriage culture, the shape of funerals, life and death, birth, the family. They gave a shape to the cultural and sociological condition of America. And it struck me at the time, so I followed up that essay on the death of Protestant America with a whole book. And then subsequently applying it to the political situation that I saw emerging then in a big cover story for The Weekly Standard, called “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas.” And in that kind of threefold push, I thought, “No one that I know is taking seriously the massive sociological change, perhaps the biggest in American history.” From 1965 when the Protestant churches, the mainline churches, by which I mean the founding churches in the National Council of Churches and the God box up on Riverside Drive—those churches, and their affiliated black churches, constituted or had membership that was just over fifty percent of America, as late as 1965. Today that number is well under 10 percent and that’s a huge sociological change that nobody to me seems to be paying sufficient attention to. (…) in (…) mainstream sociological discussions of America that just was not appearing as anything significant, and I thought it was profoundly significant and that the attempt of some of our neoconservative Catholic friends—and I was in the belly of that beast in those days—to substitute Catholicism for the failed American cultural pillar of the mainline Protestant churches—that project, interesting as it was, failed, and that consequently, I predicted, we were going to see ever-larger sociological and cultural and political upset. Because there was no turning these demons of the human condition into an understanding of their personal application. Instead they just became cultural. And I trace this move, perhaps unfairly, but I traced it to Rauschenbusch. And said when you say that it’s not individual sin, it’s social sin. And he lists six of them and they are exactly what the protestors are out in the street against right now. It’s what he called bigotry, which we used the word racism for, its militarism, its authoritarianism, and he names these six social sins and they are exactly the ones that the protesters are out against. But I said the trouble with Rauschenbusch, who was a believer—I think he was a serious Christian and profoundly biblically educated so that his speech was just ripe with biblical quotations—the problem with him is the subsequent generations don’t need the church anymore. They don’t need Jesus anymore. He thinks of Jesus—in the metaphor I use—for the social gospel movement as it developed into just the social movement. Christ is the ladder by which we climb to the new ledge of understanding, but once we’re on that ledge, we don’t need the ladder anymore. The logic of it is quite clear. We’ve reached this new height of moral and ethical understanding. Yes, thank you, Jesus Christ and the revelations taught it to us, but we’re there now. What need have we for a personal relationship with Jesus, what we need have we for a church? Having achieved this sentiment that knows that sin is these social constructs of destructiveness and our anxiety, the spiritual anxiety that human beings always feel, just by being human, is here answered. How do you know that you are saved today? You know that you are saved because you have the right attitude toward social sins. That’s how you know. Now they wouldn’t say saved; they would say, “How do you know you’re a good person?” But that’s just the logic. The logical pattern is the same. And I develop that in the essay, “The Spiritual Shape of Political Ideas” by analyzing as tightly as I could the way in which white guilt is original sin. It’s original sin divorced from the theology that let it make sense. But the pattern of internal logic is exactly the same. It produces the same need to find salvation. It produces the same need to know that you are good by knowing that you are bad. It produces the same logic by which Paul would say, “Before the law there was no sin.” It has all of the same patterns of reason, except as you pointed out in your introduction, there’s no atonement. It’s as though (…) we’re living in St. Augustine’s metaphysics, but with all the Christ stuff stripped out. It’s a dark world; it’s a grim world. We’re inherently guilty and there’s no salvation. There’s no escape from it. Except for the destruction of all. Which is why I then moved in that essay to talk about shunning in its modern forms, again divorced from the structures that once made it make sense, and apocalypse. The sense that we’re living at the end of the world and things are so terrible and so destructive that all the ordinary niceties of manners, of balancing judgment and so on, those are—if someone says, “We are destroying the planet and we’re all going to die unless you do what I want,” if I say, “Well we need to hear other voices,” they say, “That’s complicity with evil.” Right? The end of the world is coming; this is this apocalyptic imagination. Now all of that I think was once upon a time in America—and I’m speaking only politically and sociologically—all of that was corralled, or much of it was corralled in the churches. You were taught a frame to understand your dissatisfactions with the world. You were taught a frame to understand the horror, the metaphysical horror that is the fact (…) that you and I are going to die. You were taught this frame that made it bearable and made it possible to move somewhere with it. With the breaking of that, these demons are let loose and now they’re out there. I’ve often said (…) that the history of America since World War II is a history of a fourth Great Awakening that never quite happened. In a sense what I’ve seen for some years building and is now taking to the streets once again is the fourth Great Awakening except without the Christianity. I see in other words what’s happening out there as spiritual anxiety. But spiritual anxiety occurring in a world in which these people have no answer. They just have outrage. And it’s an escalating outrage. This is where the single most influential thinker in my thought—a modern thinker—is Rene Girard, and Rene Girard’s idea of the escalation of mimetic rivalry. The ways in which we get ever purer and we seek ever more tiny examples of evil that we can scapegoat and we enter into competition, this rivalry, to see who is more pure. This is exactly the motor, the Girardian motor, on which my idea of the spiritual anxiety runs. And so, statues of George Washington are coming down now. And once upon a time, in the generation that I grew up in, and the generation that you grew up in, George Washington was—there were things bad things to say about him—but this was tantamount to saying America was a mistake. And of course these people think America was a mistake, because they think the whole history of the world is a mistake. There’s this outrage. And the outrage I think is spiritual. And that’s why it doesn’t get answered when voices of calm reason say, “Well, let’s consider all sides. Yes, there were mistakes that were made and evils that were done, but let’s try to fix them.” Spiritual anxiety doesn’t get answered by, “Oh well, let’s fix something.” It gets answered by the flame. It gets answered by the looting. It gets answered by the tearing down. (…) But creation appears to us in concrete guises, and the concrete guise right now is America. So, this is why you’ll get praise of ancient civilizations. Or you get the historical insanity of a US senator standing up on the well of the Senate and saying America invented slavery, that there was no slavery before the United States. That’s historically insane, but it’s not unlearned because we’ve passed beyond ignorance here. There’s something willful about it. And that’s what’s extraordinary, I think. And yeah, I’m glad you look back to my 10-year-old book now because I think I did predict some of this, although obviously not in its particulars. But there was a warning there that the collapse of the mainline Protestant churches was going to introduce a demonic element into American life. And lo and behold, it has. (…) there are multiple questions there (…). Why Catholicism failed, why the evangelicals and Catholics together failed. So Catholicism by itself failed. The evangelicals and Catholics together project failed to provide this moral pillar to American discourse. And then there are a variety of reasons for that, beginning with the fact that Catholicism is an alien religion, alien to America. Jews and Catholics were more or less welcome to live here, but we understood that we lived on the banks of a great Mississippi of Protestantism that poured down the center of this country. But the question of why it failed is one thing. The question of why the mainline Protestant churches failed is yet another part of your question. And although I list several examples that people have offered, I don’t make a decision about that in part because I am a Catholic. I have a suspicion that Protestantism with a higher sense of personal salvation, but a less thick metaphysics, was more susceptible to the line of the social gospel movement. But I don’t know that for certain so in the book I’m merely presenting these possibilities. And then evangelicalism, Catholicism, was under attack for wounds, some of which it committed itself. Evangelicalism is in decline in America. The statistics show that this period when it seemed to be going from strength to strength may have been fueled most of all by the death of the mainline churches. They were just picking up those members. Instead of going to the Methodist Church, they were going to the Bible church out on the prairie. But regardless, that Christian discourse, that slightly secularized Christian discourse, that would allow Abraham Lincoln to make his speeches, that would provide the background to political rhetoric and so on, that’s all gone. And as a consequence, it seems to me we don’t have a shared culture and that’s part of what allows these protests. But also I think (…) a culture that no longer believes in itself, that no longer has horizons, and targets, and goals, that no longer has even the vaguest sense of a telos towards which we ought to move, a culture like that, if we look at it, we no longer have a measure of progress. We can’t say what an advance is along the way. All we can do is look at our history and see it as a catalog of crimes that we perpetrated in order to reach this point that we’re at. And we can’t see the good that came out of it. Because we don’t know what the good is, we don’t know what the telos is, the target, so we have no measure for that. So, we can’t celebrate the Civil War victory that ended slavery. All we can do is condemn slavery. We can’t celebrate the victory over the Nazis. We have to end World War II; all we can do is decry militarism and the crimes we committed to win that war, like the firebombing of Dresden, or  Hiroshima. And I think that that reasoning is quite exact because the young people that I hear speak—now I haven’t spent as much time on this as I perhaps should have, following the ins and outs of every protestor alive today—but what I’ve heard suggests that they condemn America to the core—the whole of America, of American history. There is nothing good about this nation. And there it seems to me the reasoning is quite exact. Unable to see a point to America, unable to see a goal. They are quite right that all they can see are the crimes. Whereas you and I are capable of saying, yes slavery was a great sin, and we got over it, and then the post-reconstruction settlement of Jim Crow was a great sin, but we got over it, and we still are committing sins to this day but the optimism of America is that we’ll get over it, we will find solutions to these because we feel that we are a city on a hill. We feel that we are heading somewhere. The telos may be vague, maybe inchoate, but its pull is real for people like you and me, Mark. These young people—who, I think partly because they’ve been systematically miss-educated—don’t have any feeling for that at all. And because they don’t, I think they are actually being quite rational in saying America is just evil, it’s a history of sin. (…) I think it’ll pass. These things pass. There are various rages that take to the streets, but they are to some degree victims of their own energy. They burn out, and I think this one will burn out. The thing that we are not seeing now—in fact we’re seeing the opposite—is someone standing up to them. The New York Times firing of its op-ed page editor over publication of an op-ed from a sitting US senator is really quite extraordinary if we think about it. But I don’t believe institutions can survive if they pander in this way. And I think eventually we’ll get one standing up. I haven’t heard yet from the publisher of J.K. Rowling, the Harry Potter author, who the staff of her publishing house has declared themselves unwilling to work at a publisher that would publish a woman with such reprobate views of transgenderism. If the publisher doesn’t stand up to her, I think we may be in for another year of this. But I have a feeling she sells so well, that I don’t believe the publisher is going to give in. And if we have one person saying “That’s interesting, but if you can’t work here, you can’t work here, goodbye.” The first time we see that and they survived the subsequent Twitter outrage, I think we’ll see an end to the current cancel culture, which is of course the most insidious of the general social—the burning and the breaking of statues is physical, but the most destructive cultural thing right now is the cancel culture that gets people fired and their relatives fired and the rest of it. I think that has to end and I imagine it will, the first time somebody stands up to them and survives. Joseph Bottum
Quand j’ai écrit mon livre, je suis retourné à Max Weber et à Alexis de Tocqueville, car tous deux avaient identifié l’importance fondamentale de l’anxiété spirituelle que nous éprouvons tous. Il me semble qu’à la fin du XXe siècle et au début du XXIe siècle, nous avons oublié la centralité de cette anxiété, de ces démons ou anges spirituels qui nous habitent. Ils nous gouvernent de manière profondément dangereuse. Norman Mailer a dit un jour que toute la sociologie américaine avait été un effort désespéré pour essayer de dire quelque chose sur l’Amérique que Tocqueville n’avait pas dit! C’est vrai! Tocqueville avait saisi l’importance du fait religieux et de la panoplie des Églises protestantes qui ont défini la nation américaine. Il a montré que malgré leur nombre innombrable et leurs querelles, elles étaient parvenues à s’unir pour être ce qu’il appelait joliment «le courant central des manières et de la morale». Quelles que soient les empoignades entre anglicans épiscopaliens et congrégationalistes, entre congrégationalistes et presbytériens, entre presbytériens et baptistes, les protestants se sont combinés pour donner une forme à nos vies: celle des mariages, des baptêmes et des funérailles ; des familles, et même de la politique, en cela même que le protestantisme ne cesse d’affirmer qu’il y a quelque chose de plus important que la politique. Ce modèle a perduré jusqu’au milieu des années 1960. (…) Pour moi, c’est avant tout le mouvement de l’Évangile social qui a gagné les Églises protestantes, qui est à la racine de l’effondrement. Dans mon livre, je consacre deux chapitres à Walter Rauschenbusch, la figure clé. Mais il faut comprendre que le déclin des Églises européennes a aussi joué. L’une des sources d’autorité des Églises américaines venait de l’influence de théologiens européens éminents comme Wolfhart Pannenberg ou l’ancien premier ministre néerlandais Abraham Kuyper, esprit d’une grande profondeur qui venait souvent à Princeton donner des conférences devant des milliers de participants! Mais ils n’ont pas été remplacés. Le résultat de tout cela, c’est que l’Église protestante américaine a connu un déclin catastrophique. En 1965, 50 % des Américains appartenaient à l’une des 8 Églises protestantes dominantes. Aujourd’hui, ce chiffre s’établit à 4 %! Cet effondrement est le changement sociologique le plus fondamental des 50 dernières années, mais personne n’en parle. Une partie de ces protestants ont migré vers les Églises chrétiennes évangéliques, qui dans les années 1970, sous Jimmy Carter, ont émergé comme force politique. On a vu également un nombre surprenant de conversions au catholicisme, surtout chez les intellectuels. Mais la majorité sont devenus ce que j’appelle dans mon livre des «post-protestants», ce qui nous amène au décryptage des événements d’aujourd’hui. Ces post-protestants se sont approprié une série de thèmes empruntés à l’Évangile social de Walter Rauschenbusch. Quand vous reprenez les péchés sociaux qu’il faut selon lui rejeter pour accéder à une forme de rédemption – l’intolérance, le pouvoir, le militarisme, l’oppression de classe… vous retrouvez exactement les thèmes que brandissent les gens qui mettent aujourd’hui le feu à Portland et d’autres villes. Ce sont les post-protestants. Ils se sont juste débarrassés de Dieu! Quand je dis à mes étudiants qu’ils sont les héritiers de leurs grands-parents protestants, ils sont offensés. Mais ils ont exactement la même approche moralisatrice et le même sens exacerbé de leur importance, la même condescendance et le même sentiment de supériorité exaspérante et ridicule, que les protestants exprimaient notamment vis-à-vis des catholiques. (…) Mais ils ne le savent pas. En fait, l’état de l’Amérique a été toujours lié à l’état de la religion protestante. Les catholiques se sont fait une place mais le protestantisme a été le Mississippi qui a arrosé le pays. Et c’est toujours le cas! C’est juste que nous avons maintenant une Église du Christ sans le Christ. Cela veut dire qu’il n’y a pas de pardon possible. Dans la religion chrétienne, le péché originel est l’idée que vous êtes né coupable, que l’humanité hérite d’une tache qui corrompt nos désirs et nos actions. Mais le Christ paie les dettes du péché originel, nous en libérant. Si vous enlevez le Christ du tableau en revanche, vous obtenez… la culpabilité blanche et le racisme systémique. Bien sûr, les jeunes radicaux n’utilisent pas le mot «péché originel». Mais ils utilisent exactement les termes qui s’y appliquent. (…) Ils parlent d’«une tache reçue en héritage» qui «infecte votre esprit». C’est une idée très dangereuse, que les Églises canalisaient autrefois. Mais aujourd’hui que cette idée s’est échappée de l’Église, elle a gagné la rue et vous avez des meutes de post-protestants qui parcourent Washington DC, en s’en prenant à des gens dans des restaurants pour exiger d’eux qu’ils lèvent le poing. Leur conviction que l’Amérique est intrinsèquement corrompue par l’esclavage et n’a réalisé que le Mal, n’est pas enracinée dans des faits que l’on pourrait discuter, elle relève de la croyance religieuse. On exclut ceux qui ne se soumettent pas. On dérive vers une vision apocalyptique du monde qui n’est plus équilibrée par rien d’autre. Cela peut donner la pire forme d’environnementalisme, par exemple, parce que toutes les autres dimensions sont disqualifiées au nom de «la fin du monde». C’est l’idée chrétienne de l’apocalypse, mais dégagée du christianisme. Il y a des douzaines d’exemples de religiosité visibles dans le comportement des protestataires: ils s’allongent par terre face au sol et gémissent, comme des prêtres que l’on consacre dans l’Église catholique. Ils ont organisé une cérémonie à Portland durant laquelle ils ont lavé les pieds de personnes noires pour montrer leur repentir pour la culpabilité blanche. Ils s’agenouillent. Tout cela sans savoir que c’est religieux! C’est religieux parce que l’humanité est religieuse. Il y a une faim spirituelle à l’intérieur de nous, qui se manifeste de différentes manières, y compris la violence! Ces gens veulent un monde qui ait un sens, et ils ne l’ont pas. (…) Le marxisme est une religion par analogie. Certes, il porte cette idée d’une nouvelle naissance. Certaines personnes voulaient des certitudes et ne les trouvant plus dans leurs Églises, ils sont allés vers le marxisme. Mais en Amérique, c’est différent, car tout est centré sur le protestantisme. Dans L’Éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Max Weber, avec génie et insolence, prend Marx et le met cul par-dessus tête. Marx avait dit que le protestantisme avait émergé à la faveur de changements économiques. Weber dit l’inverse. Ce n’est pas l’économie qui a transformé la religion, c’est la religion qui a transformé l’économie. Le protestantisme nous a donné le capitalisme, pas l’inverse! Parce que les puritains devaient épargner de l’argent pour assurer leur salut. Le ressort principal n’était pas l’économie mais la faim spirituelle, ce sentiment beaucoup plus profond, selon Weber. Une faim spirituelle a mené les gens vers le marxisme, et c’est la même faim spirituelle qui fait qu’ils sont dans les rues d’Amérique aujourd’hui. (…) Je n’ai pas voté pour Trump. Bien que conservateur, je fais partie des «Never Trumpers». Mais je vois potentiellement une guerre civile à feu doux éclater si Trump gagne cette élection! Car les parties sont polarisées sur le plan spirituel. Si Trump gagne, pour les gens qui sont dans la rue, ce ne sera pas le triomphe des républicains, mais celui du mal. Rauschenbusch, dans son Évangile, dit que nous devons accomplir la rédemption de notre personnalité. Ces gens-là veulent être sûrs d’être de «bonnes personnes». Ils savent qu’ils sont de bonnes personnes s’ils sont opposés au racisme. Ils pensent être de bonnes personnes parce qu’ils sont opposés à la destruction de l’environnement. Ils veulent avoir la bonne «attitude», c’est la raison pour laquelle ceux qui n’ont pas la bonne attitude sont expulsés de leurs universités ou de leur travail pour des raisons dérisoires. Avant, on était exclu de l’Église, aujourd’hui, on est exclu de la vie publique… C’est pour cela que les gens qui soutiennent Trump, sont vus comme des «déplorables», comme disait Hillary Clinton, c’est-à-dire des gens qui ne peuvent être rachetés. Ils ont leur bible et leur fusil et ne suivent pas les commandements de la justice sociale. (…) Avant même que Trump ne surgisse, avec Sarah Palin, et même sous Reagan, on a vu émerger à droite le sentiment que tout ce que faisaient les républicains pour l’Amérique traditionnelle, c’était ralentir sa disparition. Il y avait une immense exaspération car toute cette Amérique avait le sentiment que son mode de vie était fondamentalement menacé par les démocrates. Reagan est arrivé et a dit: «Je vais m’y opposer». Et voilà que Trump arrive et dit à son tour qu’il va dire non à tout ça. Je déteste le fait que Trump occupe cet espace, parce qu’il est vulgaire et insupportable. Mais il est vrai que tous ceux qui s’étaient sentis marginalisés ont voté pour Trump parce qu’il s’est mis en travers de la route. C’est d’ailleurs ce que leur dit Trump: «Ils n’en ont pas après moi, mais après vous.» Il faut comprendre que l’idéologie «woke» de la justice sociale a pénétré les institutions américaines à un point incroyable. Je n’imagine pas qu’un professeur ayant une chaire à la Sorbonne soit forcé d’assister à des classes obligatoires organisées pour le corps professoral sur leur «culpabilité blanche», et enseignées par des gens qui viennent à peine de finir le collège. Mais c’est la réalité des universités américaines. Un sondage récent a montré que la majorité des professeurs d’université ne disent rien. Ils abandonnent plutôt toute mention de tout sujet controversé. Pourtant, des études ont montré que la foule des vigies de Twitter qui obtient la tête des professeurs excommuniés, remplirait à peine la moitié d’un terrain de football universitaire! Il y a un manque de courage. (…) La France a fait beaucoup de choses bonnes et glorieuses pour faire avancer la civilisation, mais elle a fait du mal. Si on croit au projet historique français, on peut démêler le bien du mal. Mais mes étudiants, et tous ces post-protestants dont je vous parle, sont absolument convaincus que tous les gens qui ont précédé, étaient stupides et sans doute maléfiques. Ils ne croient plus au projet historique américain. Ils sont contre les «affinités électives» qui, selon Weber, nous ont donné la modernité: la science, le capitalisme, l’État-nation. Si la théorie de la physique de Newton, Principia, est un manuel de viol, comme l’a dit une universitaire féministe, si sa physique est l’invention d’un moyen de violer le monde, cela veut dire que la science est mauvaise. Si vous êtes soupçonneux de la science, du capitalisme, du protestantisme, si vous rejetez tous les moteurs de la modernité la seule chose qui reste, ce sont les péchés qui nous ont menés là où nous sommes. Pour sûr, nous en avons commis. Mais si on ne voit pas que ça, il n’y a plus d’échappatoire, plus de projet. Ce qui passe aujourd’hui est différent de 1968 en France, quand la remise en cause a finalement été absorbée dans quelque chose de plus large. Le mouvement actuel ne peut être absorbé car il vise à défaire les États-Unis dans ses fondements: l’État-nation, le capitalisme et la religion protestante. Mais comme les États-Unis n’ont pas d’histoire prémoderne, nous ne pouvons absorber un mouvement vraiment antimoderne. (…) Il y a une phrase de Heidegger qui dit que «seulement un Dieu pourrait nous sauver»! On a le sentiment qu’on est aux prémices d’une apocalypse, d’une guerre civile, d’une grande destruction de la modernité. Est-ce à cause de la trahison des clercs? Pour moi, l’incapacité des vieux libéraux à faire rempart contre les jeunes radicaux, est aujourd’hui le grand danger. Quand j’ai vu que de jeunes journalistes du New York Times avaient menacé de partir, parce qu’un responsable éditorial avait publié une tribune d’un sénateur américain qui leur déplaisait, j’ai été stupéfait. Je suis assez vieux pour savoir que dans le passé, la direction aurait immédiatement dit à ces jeunes journalistes de prendre la porte s’ils n’étaient pas contents. Mais ce qui s’est passé, c’est que le rédacteur en chef a été limogé. Joseph Bottum

C’est ce qui reste du christianisme quand on a tout oublié, imbécile !

Racisme d’état, racisé, cisgenre/cishet, blantriarcat, privilège blanc, appropriation culturelle, larmes blanches, larmes males, biais de confirmation, woke…

A l’heure où après des mois d’émeutes et de casse et l’inévitable retour de bâton et remontée de leur Trump honni dans les sondages …

Les nouveaux protestants de Black lives matter en sont, signe des temps, à effacer leur profession de foi sur leur site …

Mais où leur vocabulaire semble en train d’entrer dans la langue courante …

Tandis que, de la part des médias dits sérieux, tout est bon pour discréditer le catholicisme de la candidate du président Tump pour remplacer une juge de la Cour suprême récemment décédée …

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec le spécialiste du phénomène religieux en politique et girardien Joseph Bottum

Entre iconoclasme, génuflexions, auto-flagellations, lavements des pieds, liturgie, procession, croisades, inquisition, textes sacrés, tabous, catéchisme, dogmatisme, moralisme, excommunications, saints, martyrs…

La dimension proprement religieuse de, pour reprendre le mot attribué à Bebel pour l’antisémitisme en ces temps de décérébration universitaire, cette sorte de « christianisme des imbéciles » …

Suite au fait sociologique central mais sous-estimé des 50 dernières années …

De l’effondrement, à partir du milieu des années 1960, du modèle et socle commun fait de mariages, baptêmes, funérailles, familles et politique, que leur avaient légué les églises protestantes américaines …

Et son remplacement, à partir du mouvement de l’Évangile social d’un Walter Rauschenbusch, par une sorte de version sécularisée que n’ont que compensé partiellement les églises évangéliques et catholique…

Avec ses péchés sociaux à rejeter pour accéder à la rédemption que seraient l’intolérance, le pouvoir, le militarisme, l’oppression de classe…

Sauf que derrière ce « Mississippi protestant qui avait arrosé le pays’, c’est en fait de Dieu qu’ils se sont  débarrassés …

Via la sanctification de l’ultime victime du péché originel de l’esclavage, à savoir les noirs …

D’où leur reprise – ô combien transparente et significative – du terme d’argot noir « woke » …

Pour apporter à l’Amérique et au monde une sorte de quatrième Grand Réveil comme l’Amérique les multiplie depuis le milieu du 19e siècle …

Sauf que derrière cette nouvelle église du Christ sans le Christ, il n’y a plus de pardon possible …

Que l’indécrottable péché originel, derrière l’impardonnable privilège blanc, de la culpabilité blanche et du racisme systémique…

Et in fine, libérée du cadre des églises qui avaient autrefois canalisé cette sainte colère, que l’escalade, proprement mimétique, de la course à la pureté idéologique que l’on voit actuellment dans leurs rues et déjà en partie dans les nôtres …

Autrement dit, jusqu’à ce que pourrait peut-être y mettre fin la réaction de la majorité silencieuse que comme nombre de Never-Trumpers, Bottum se refuse à voir derrière la vulgarité d’un Trump …

La démolition pure et simple, entrevue déjà par Malraux comme Girard, de l’essentiel de la culture et du projet non seulement américain mais occidental …

Et donc l’ouverture, derrière cette remise en cause de toutes valeurs partagées et but commun, à la guerre civile  ?

« La passion religieuse a échappé au protestantisme et met le feu à la politique »

GRAND ENTRETIEN – Professeur à l’université du Dakota du Sud, Joseph Bottum est essayiste et spécialiste du phénomène religieux en politique. Il offre un éclairage saisissant sur les élections américaines, dont il craint qu’elles ne dégénèrent en guerre civile si Trump est réélu.
Laure Mandeville
Le Figaro
24 septembre 2020

Dans son livre An Anxious Rage, the Post-Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of America, écrit il y a six ans, il explique qu’on ne peut comprendre la fureur idéologique qui s’est emparée de l’Amérique, si on ne s’intéresse pas à la centralité du fait religieux et à l’effondrement du protestantisme, «ce Mississippi» qui a arrosé et façonné si longtemps la culture américaine et ses mœurs.

Bottum décrit la marque laissée par le protestantisme à travers l’émergence de ce qu’il appelle les «post-protestants», ces nouveaux puritains sans Dieu qui pratiquent la religion de la culture «woke» et de la justice sociale, et rejettent le projet américain dans son intégralité. Il voit à l’œuvre une entreprise de «destruction de la modernité» sur laquelle sont fondés les États-Unis.

LE FIGARO. – Dans votre livre An Anxious Age, vous revenez sur l’importance fondamentale du protestantisme pour comprendre les États-Unis et vous expliquez que son effondrement a été le fait sociologique central, mais sous-estimé, des 50 dernières années. Vous dites que ce déclin a débouché sur l’émergence d’un post-protestantisme qui est un nouveau puritanisme sans Dieu, qui explique la rage quasi-religieuse qui s’exprime dans les rues du pays. De quoi s’agit-il?

Joseph BOTTUM. –Quand j’ai écrit mon livre, je suis retourné à Max Weber et à Alexis de Tocqueville, car tous deux avaient identifié l’importance fondamentale de l’anxiété spirituelle que nous éprouvons tous. Il me semble qu’à la fin du XXe siècle et au début du XXIe siècle, nous avons oublié la centralité de cette anxiété, de ces démons ou anges spirituels qui nous habitent. Ils nous gouvernent de manière profondément dangereuse. Norman Mailer a dit un jour que toute la sociologie américaine avait été un effort désespéré pour essayer de dire quelque chose sur l’Amérique que Tocqueville n’avait pas dit! C’est vrai! Tocqueville avait saisi l’importance du fait religieux et de la panoplie des Églises protestantes qui ont défini la nation américaine. Il a montré que malgré leur nombre innombrable et leurs querelles, elles étaient parvenues à s’unir pour être ce qu’il appelait joliment «le courant central des manières et de la morale». Quelles que soient les empoignades entre anglicans épiscopaliens et congrégationalistes, entre congrégationalistes et presbytériens, entre presbytériens et baptistes, les protestants se sont combinés pour donner une forme à nos vies: celle des mariages, des baptêmes et des funérailles ; des familles, et même de la politique, en cela même que le protestantisme ne cesse d’affirmer qu’il y a quelque chose de plus important que la politique. Ce modèle a perduré jusqu’au milieu des années 1960.

Qu’est-ce qui a précipité le déclin du protestantisme? La libération des mœurs des années 1960, l’émergence de la théologie de la justice sociale?

Pour moi, c’est avant tout le mouvement de l’Évangile social qui a gagné les Églises protestantes, qui est à la racine de l’effondrement. Dans mon livre, je consacre deux chapitres à Walter Rauschenbusch, la figure clé. Mais il faut comprendre que le déclin des Églises européennes a aussi joué. L’une des sources d’autorité des Églises américaines venait de l’influence de théologiens européens éminents comme Wolfhart Pannenberg ou l’ancien premier ministre néerlandais Abraham Kuyper, esprit d’une grande profondeur qui venait souvent à Princeton donner des conférences devant des milliers de participants! Mais ils n’ont pas été remplacés. Le résultat de tout cela, c’est que l’Église protestante américaine a connu un déclin catastrophique. En 1965, 50 % des Américains appartenaient à l’une des 8 Églises protestantes dominantes. Aujourd’hui, ce chiffre s’établit à 4 %! Cet effondrement est le changement sociologique le plus fondamental des 50 dernières années, mais personne n’en parle.

Une partie de ces protestants ont migré vers les Églises chrétiennes évangéliques, qui dans les années 1970, sous Jimmy Carter, ont émergé comme force politique. On a vu également un nombre surprenant de conversions au catholicisme, surtout chez les intellectuels. Mais la majorité sont devenus ce que j’appelle dans mon livre des «post-protestants», ce qui nous amène au décryptage des événements d’aujourd’hui. Ces post-protestants se sont approprié une série de thèmes empruntés à l’Évangile social de Walter Rauschenbusch. Quand vous reprenez les péchés sociaux qu’il faut selon lui rejeter pour accéder à une forme de rédemption – l’intolérance, le pouvoir, le militarisme, l’oppression de classe… vous retrouvez exactement les thèmes que brandissent les gens qui mettent aujourd’hui le feu à Portland et d’autres villes. Ce sont les post-protestants. Ils se sont juste débarrassés de Dieu! Quand je dis à mes étudiants qu’ils sont les héritiers de leurs grands-parents protestants, ils sont offensés. Mais ils ont exactement la même approche moralisatrice et le même sens exacerbé de leur importance, la même condescendance et le même sentiment de supériorité exaspérante et ridicule, que les protestants exprimaient notamment vis-à-vis des catholiques.

La génération «woke» est une nouvelle version du puritanisme?

Absolument! Mais ils ne le savent pas. En fait, l’état de l’Amérique a été toujours lié à l’état de la religion protestante. Les catholiques se sont fait une place mais le protestantisme a été le Mississippi qui a arrosé le pays. Et c’est toujours le cas! C’est juste que nous avons maintenant une Église du Christ sans le Christ. Cela veut dire qu’il n’y a pas de pardon possible. Dans la religion chrétienne, le péché originel est l’idée que vous êtes né coupable, que l’humanité hérite d’une tache qui corrompt nos désirs et nos actions. Mais le Christ paie les dettes du péché originel, nous en libérant. Si vous enlevez le Christ du tableau en revanche, vous obtenez… la culpabilité blanche et le racisme systémique. Bien sûr, les jeunes radicaux n’utilisent pas le mot «péché originel». Mais ils utilisent exactement les termes qui s’y appliquent.

Ils parlent d’«une tache reçue en héritage» qui «infecte votre esprit». C’est une idée très dangereuse, que les Églises canalisaient autrefois. Mais aujourd’hui que cette idée s’est échappée de l’Église, elle a gagné la rue et vous avez des meutes de post-protestants qui parcourent Washington DC, en s’en prenant à des gens dans des restaurants pour exiger d’eux qu’ils lèvent le poing. Leur conviction que l’Amérique est intrinsèquement corrompue par l’esclavage et n’a réalisé que le Mal, n’est pas enracinée dans des faits que l’on pourrait discuter, elle relève de la croyance religieuse. On exclut ceux qui ne se soumettent pas. On dérive vers une vision apocalyptique du monde qui n’est plus équilibrée par rien d’autre. Cela peut donner la pire forme d’environnementalisme, par exemple, parce que toutes les autres dimensions sont disqualifiées au nom de «la fin du monde».

C’est l’idée chrétienne de l’apocalypse, mais dégagée du christianisme. Il y a des douzaines d’exemples de religiosité visibles dans le comportement des protestataires: ils s’allongent par terre face au sol et gémissent, comme des prêtres que l’on consacre dans l’Église catholique. Ils ont organisé une cérémonie à Portland durant laquelle ils ont lavé les pieds de personnes noires pour montrer leur repentir pour la culpabilité blanche. Ils s’agenouillent. Tout cela sans savoir que c’est religieux! C’est religieux parce que l’humanité est religieuse. Il y a une faim spirituelle à l’intérieur de nous, qui se manifeste de différentes manières, y compris la violence! Ces gens veulent un monde qui ait un sens, et ils ne l’ont pas.

Les post-protestants peuvent-ils être comparés aux nihilistes russes qui cherchaient aussi un sens dans la lutte révolutionnaire et le marxisme?

Oui et non. Le marxisme es