Memorial Day/Irak: C’est une réussite extraordinaire qui a pris presque neuf ans (And today, we remember everything that you did to make it possible)

25 mai, 2015
Pour beaucoup d’entre nous, ce Memorial Day est particulièrement significatif; c’est le premier depuis la fin de la guerre d’Afghanistan. Aujourd’hui, c’est le premier Memorial Day depuis 14 ans où les États-Unis ne sont pas engagés dans une guerre majeure au sol. Barack Hussein Obama
If we fail to respond today, Saddam and all those who would follow in his footsteps will be emboldened tomorrow. Some day, some way, I guarantee you, he’ll use the arsenal. President Clinton (February 1998)
[La mission des forces armées américaines et britanniques est d’]attaquer les programmes d’armement nucléaires, chimiques et biologiques de l’Irak et sa capacité militaire à menacer ses voisins (…) On ne peut laisser Saddam Hussein menacer ses voisins ou le monde avec des armements nucléaires, des gaz toxiques, ou des armes biologiques. » (…) Il y a six semaines, Saddam Hussein avait annoncé qu’il ne coopérerait plus avec l’Unscom [la commission chargée du désarmement en Irak (…). D’autres pays [que l’Irak possèdent des armements de destruction massive et des missiles balistiques. Avec Saddam, il y a une différence majeure : il les a utilisés. Pas une fois, mais de manière répétée (…). Confronté au dernier acte de défiance de Saddam, fin octobre, nous avons mené une intense campagne diplomatique contre l’Irak, appuyée par une imposante force militaire dans la région (…). J’avais alors décidé d’annuler l’attaque de nos avions (…) parce que Saddam avait accepté nos exigences. J’avais conclu que la meilleure chose à faire était de donner à Saddam une dernière chance (…).  Les inspecteurs en désarmement de l’ONU ont testé la volonté de coopération irakienne (…). Hier soir, le chef de l’Unscom, Richard Butler, a rendu son rapport au secrétaire général de l’ONU [Kofi Annan. Les conclusions sont brutales, claires et profondément inquiétantes. Dans quatre domaines sur cinq, l’Irak n’a pas coopéré. En fait, il a même imposé de nouvelles restrictions au travail des inspecteurs (…). Nous devions agir et agir immédiatement (…).  J’espère que Saddam va maintenant finalement coopérer avec les inspecteurs et respecter les résolutions du Conseil de sécurité. Mais nous devons nous préparer à ce qu’il ne le fasse pas et nous devons faire face au danger très réel qu’il représente. Nous allons donc poursuivre une stratégie à long terme pour contenir l’Irak et ses armes de destruction massive et travailler jusqu’au jour où l’Irak aura un gouvernement digne de sa population (…). La dure réalité est qu’aussi longtemps que Saddam reste au pouvoir il menace le bien-être de sa population, la paix de la région et la sécurité du monde. La meilleure façon de mettre un terme définitif à cette menace est la constitution d’un nouveau gouvernement, un gouvernement prêt à vivre en paix avec ses voisins, un gouvernement qui respecte les droits de sa population. Bill Clinton (16.12.98)
Dans l’immédiat, notre attention doit se porter en priorité sur les domaines biologique et chimique. C’est là que nos présomptions vis-à-vis de l’Iraq sont les plus significatives : sur le chimique, nous avons des indices d’une capacité de production de VX et d’ypérite ; sur le biologique, nos indices portent sur la détention possible de stocks significatifs de bacille du charbon et de toxine botulique, et une éventuelle capacité de production.  Dominique De Villepin
 Iraq would serve as the base of a new Islamic caliphate to extend throughout the Middle East, and which would threaten legitimate governments in Europe, Africa and Asia. Don Rumsfeld (2005)
They will try to re-establish a caliphate throughout the entire Muslim world. Just as we had the opportunity to learn what the Nazis were going to do, from Hitler’s world in ‘Mein Kampf,’, we need to learn what these people intend to do from their own words. General Abizaid (2005)
The word getting the workout from the nation’s top guns these days is « caliphate » – the term for the seventh-century Islamic empire that spanned the Middle East, spread to Southwest Asia, North Africa and Spain, then ended with the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258. The term can also refer to other caliphates, including the one declared by the Ottoman Turks that ended in 1924. (…) A number of scholars and former government officials take strong issue with the administration’s warning about a new caliphate, and compare it to the fear of communism spread during the Cold War. They say that although Al Qaeda’s statements do indeed describe a caliphate as a goal, the administration is exaggerating the magnitude of the threat as it seeks to gain support for its policies in Iraq. In the view of John L. Esposito, an Islamic studies professor at Georgetown University, there is a difference between the ability of small bands of terrorists to commit attacks across the world and achieving global conquest. « It is certainly correct to say that these people have a global design, but the administration ought to frame it realistically, » said Mr. Esposito, the founding director of the Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown. « Otherwise they can actually be playing into the hands of the Osama bin Ladens of the world because they raise this to a threat that is exponentially beyond anything that Osama bin Laden can deliver. » Shibley Telhami, the Anwar Sadat professor for peace and development at the University of Maryland, said Al Qaeda was not leading a movement that threatened to mobilize the vast majority of Muslims. A recent poll Mr. Telhami conducted with Zogby International of 3,900 people in six countries – Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Jordan, the United Arab Emirates and Lebanon – found that only 6 percent sympathized with Al Qaeda’s goal of seeking an Islamic state. The notion that Al Qaeda could create a new caliphate, he said, is simply wrong. « There’s no chance in the world that they’ll succeed, » he said. « It’s a silly threat. » (On the other hand, more than 30 percent in Mr. Telhami’s poll said they sympathized with Al Qaeda, because the group stood up to America.) The term « caliphate » has been used internally by policy hawks in the Pentagon since the planning stages for the war in Iraq, but the administration’s public use of the word has increased this summer and fall, around the time that American forces obtained a letter from Ayman al-Zawahiri, the No. 2 leader in Al Qaeda, to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the leader of Al Qaeda in Mesopotamia. The 6,000-word letter, dated early in July, called for the establishment of a militant Islamic caliphate across Iraq before Al Qaeda’s moving on to Syria, Lebanon and Egypt and then a battle against Israel. In recent weeks, the administration’s use of « caliphate » has only intensified, as Mr. Bush has begun a campaign of speeches to try to regain support for the war. He himself has never publicly used the term, although he has repeatedly described the caliphate, as he did in a speech last week when he said that the terrorists want to try to establish « a totalitarian Islamic empire that reaches from Indonesia to Spain. » Six days earlier, Mr. Edelman, the under secretary of defense, made it clear. « Iraq’s future will either embolden terrorists and expand their reach and ability to re-establish a caliphate, or it will deal them a crippling blow, » he said. « For us, failure in Iraq is just not an option. » NYT (2005)
They demand the elimination of Israel; the withdrawal of all Westerners from Muslim countries, irrespective of the wishes of people and government; the establishment of effectively Taleban states and Sharia law in the Arab world en route to one caliphate of all Muslim nations. Tony Blair (2005)
I remember having a conversation with one of the colonels out in the field, and although he did not believe that a rapid unilateral withdrawal would actually be helpful, there was no doubt that the US occupation in Iraq was becoming an increasing source of irritation. And that one of the things that we’re going to need to do – and to do sooner rather than later – is to transition our troops out of the day-to-day operations in Iraq and to have a much lower profile and a smaller footprint in the country over the coming year. On the other hand, I did also ask some people who were not particularly sympathetic to the initial war, but were now trying to make things work in Iraq – what they thought would be the result of a total withdrawal and I think the general view was that we were in such a delicate situation right now and that there was so little institutional capacity on the part of the Iraqi government, that a full military withdrawal at this point would probably result in significant civil war and potentially hundreds of thousands of deaths. This by the way was a message that was delivered also by the Foreign Minister of Jordan, who I’ve been meeting with while here in Amman, Jordan. The sense, I think, throughout the entire region among those who opposed the US invasion, that now that we’re there it’s important that we don’t act equally precipitously in our approach to withdrawal, but that we actually stabilize the situation and allow time for the new Iraqi government to develop some sort of capacity. Barack Obama (January 9, 2006)
Having visited Iraq, I’m also acutely aware that a precipitous withdrawal of our troops, driven by Congressional edict rather than the realities on the ground, will not undo the mistakes made by this Administration. It could compound them. It could compound them by plunging Iraq into an even deeper and, perhaps, irreparable crisis. We must exit Iraq, but not in a way that leaves behind a security vacuum filled with terrorism, chaos, ethnic cleansing and genocide that could engulf large swaths of the Middle East and endanger America. We have both moral and national security reasons to manage our exit in a responsible way. Barack Obama (June 21, 2006)
To begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we are ready … would mean surrendering the future of Iraq to al Qaeda. It would mean that we’d be risking mass killings on a horrific scale. It would mean we’d allow the terrorists to establish a safe haven in Iraq to replace the one they lost in Afghanistan. It would mean increasing the probability that American troops would have to return at some later date to confront an enemy that is even more dangerous. George Bush (2007)
L’Irak a besoin d’une présence américaine et d’instructeurs américains, parce que nous ne sommes pas capables de défendre notre ciel et nos eaux, ainsi que d’utiliser les armes que nous avons achetées ou que nous avons obtenus auprès des Etats-Unis. Jalal Talabani (président irakien, novembre 2011)
L’Irak (…) pourrait être l’un des grands succès de cette administration. Joe Biden (10.02.10)
We think a successful, democratic Iraq can be a model for the entire region. Obama
Nous laissons derrière nous un Etat souverain, stable, autosuffisant, avec une gouvernement représentatif qui a été élu par son peuple. Nous bâtissons un nouveau partenariat entre nos pays. Et nous terminons une guerre non avec une bataille filnale, mais avec une dernière marche du retour. C’est une réussite extraordinaire, qui a pris presque neuf ans Obama Irak C’est une réussite extraordinaire, qui a pris presque neuf ans. Et aujourd’hui nous nous souvenons de tout ce que vous avez fait pour le rendre possible. (…) Dur travail et sacrifice. Ces mots décrivent à peine le prix de cette guerre, et le courage des hommes et des femmes qui l’ont menée. Nous ne connaissons que trop bien le prix élevé de cette guerre. Plus d’1,5 million d’Américains ont servi en Irak. Plus de 30.000 Américains ont été blessés, et ce sont seulement les blessés dont les blessures sont visibles. Près de 4.500 Américains ont perdu la vie, dont 202 héros tombés au champ d’honneur venus d’ici, Fort Bragg. (…) Les dirigeants et les historiens continueront à analyser les leçons stratégiques de l’Irak. Et nos commandants prendront en compte des leçons durement apprises lors de campagnes militaires à l’avenir. Mais la leçon la plus importante que vous nous apprenez n’est pas une leçon en stratégie militaire, c’est une leçon sur le caractère de notre pays, car malgré toutes les difficultés auxquelles notre pays fait face, vous nous rappelez que rien n’est impossible pour les Américains lorsqu’ils sont solidaires. Obama (14.12.11)
Ce n’est pas parce qu’une équipe de juniors porte le maillot des Lakers que cela en fait des Kobe Bryant. Je pense qu’il y a une différence entre les moyens et la portée d’un Ben Laden, d’un réseau qui planifie activement des attaques terroristes de grande envergure contre notre territoire, et ceux de jihadistes impliqués dans des luttes de pouvoir locales, souvent de nature ethnique. Barack Obama (janvier 2014)
Non, je ne pense pas que nous perdons. (…) Il y a eu un revers tactique, c’est incontestable, même si Ramadi était vulnérable depuis très longtemps (…) L’EI a été considérablement affaibli à travers le pays  et il ya eu des progrès significatifs dans le nord et dans les régions où les Peshmergas (forces kurdes) participent. Dans les zones à dominante chiite, « il n’y pas d’avancée de l’EI (…) il ne fait aucun doute que, dans les secteurs sunnites, nous allons devoir renforcer non seulement l’entraînement mais aussi la détermination, et qu’il faut mobiliser les tribus sunnites plus qu’elles ne le sont actuellement (…) L’entraînement des forces de sécurité irakiennes (…) ne va pas assez vite à Al-Anbar (…) il y a une leçon qu’il est important de tirer de ce qui est arrivé, c’est que si les Irakiens eux-mêmes ne sont pas disposés ou capables d’arriver à des compromis politiques nécessaires pour gouverner, si elles ne sont pas prêts à se battre pour la sécurité de leur pays, nous ne pouvons pas le faire pour eux. Obama (2015)
Now, Iraq is not a perfect place. It has many challenges ahead. But we’re leaving behind a sovereign, stable and self-reliant Iraq, with a representative government that was elected by its people. We’re building a new partnership between our nations. And we are ending a war not with a final battle, but with a final march toward home. This is an extraordinary achievement, nearly nine years in the making.  And today, we remember everything that you did to make it possible. (…) Hard work and sacrifice.  Those words only begin to describe the costs of this war and the courage of the men and women who fought it. We know too well the heavy cost of this war.  More than 1.5 million Americans have served in Iraq — 1.5 million.  Over 30,000 Americans have been wounded, and those are only the wounds that show.  Nearly 4,500 Americans made the ultimate sacrifice — including 202 fallen heroes from here at Fort Bragg — 202.  (…) Policymakers and historians will continue to analyze the strategic lessons of Iraq — that’s important to do.  Our commanders will incorporate the hard-won lessons into future military campaigns — that’s important to do.  But the most important lesson that we can take from you is not about military strategy –- it’s a lesson about our national character. For all of the challenges that our nation faces, you remind us that there’s nothing we Americans can’t do when we stick together. (…) Because of you — because you sacrificed so much for a people that you had never met, Iraqis have a chance to forge their own destiny.  That’s part of what makes us special as Americans.  Unlike the old empires, we don’t make these sacrifices for territory or for resources.  We do it because it’s right.  There can be no fuller expression of America’s support for self-determination than our leaving Iraq to its people.  That says something about who we are. Because of you, in Afghanistan we’ve broken the momentum of the Taliban.  Because of you, we’ve begun a transition to the Afghans that will allow us to bring our troops home from there.  And around the globe, as we draw down in Iraq, we have gone after al Qaeda so that terrorists who threaten America will have no safe haven, and Osama bin Laden will never again walk the face of this Earth.  (…) So here’s what I want you to know, and here’s what I want all our men and women in uniform to know:  Because of you, we are ending these wars in a way that will make America stronger and the world more secure. The war in Iraq will soon belong to history.  Your service belongs to the ages.  Never forget that you are part of an unbroken line of heroes spanning two centuries –- from the colonists who overthrew an empire, to your grandparents and parents who faced down fascism and communism, to you –- men and women who fought for the same principles in Fallujah and Kandahar, and delivered justice to those who attacked us on 9/11. (…) And years from now, your legacy will endure in the names of your fallen comrades etched on headstones at Arlington, and the quiet memorials across our country; in the whispered words of admiration as you march in parades, and in the freedom of our children and our grandchildren.  And in the quiet of night, you will recall that your heart was once touched by fire.  You will know that you answered when your country called; you served a cause greater than yourselves; you helped forge a just and lasting peace with Iraq, and among all nations. I could not be prouder of you, and America could not be prouder of you. Obama
Internationally, I’m proud of the fact that we’ve responsibly ended two wars. Now, people will say, well, you’re back in Iraq, but we’re not back in Iraq with an occupying army, we’re back with a coalition of 60 countries helping to stabilize the situation. Obama
No, I don’t think we’re losing, and I just talked to our CENTCOM commanders and the folks on the ground. There’s no doubt there was a tactical setback, although Ramadi had been vulnerable for a very long time, primarily because these are not Iraqi security forces that we have trained or reinforced. They have been there essentially for a year without sufficient reinforcements, and the number of ISIL that have come into the city now are relatively small compared to what happened in [the Iraqi city of] Mosul. But it is indicative that the training of Iraqi security forces, the fortifications, the command-and-control systems are not happening fast enough in Anbar, in the Sunni parts of the country. You’ve seen actually significant progress in the north, and those areas where the Peshmerga [Kurdish forces] are participating. Baghdad is consolidated. Those predominantly Shia areas, you’re not seeing any forward momentum by ISIL, and ISIL has been significantly degraded across the country. (…) there’s no doubt that in the Sunni areas, we’re going to have to ramp up not just training, but also commitment, and we better get Sunni tribes more activated than they currently have been. So it is a source of concern. We’re eight months into what we’ve always anticipated to be a multi-year campaign, and I think [Iraqi] Prime Minister Abadi recognizes many of these problems, but they’re going to have to be addressed. (…) As you said, I’m very clear on the lessons of Iraq. I think it was a mistake for us to go in in the first place, despite the incredible efforts that were made by our men and women in uniform. Despite that error, those sacrifices allowed the Iraqis to take back their country. That opportunity was squandered by Prime Minister Maliki and the unwillingness to reach out effectively to the Sunni and Kurdish populations. (…) I know that there are some in Republican quarters who have suggested that I’ve overlearned the mistake of Iraq, and that, in fact, just because the 2003 invasion did not go well doesn’t argue that we shouldn’t go back in. And one lesson that I think is important to draw from what happened is that if the Iraqis themselves are not willing or capable to arrive at the political accommodations necessary to govern, if they are not willing to fight for the security of their country, we cannot do that for them. (…) But we can’t do it for them, and one of the central flaws I think of the decision back in 2003 was the sense that if we simply went in and deposed a dictator, or simply went in and cleared out the bad guys, that somehow peace and prosperity would automatically emerge, and that lesson we should have learned a long time ago. And so the really important question moving forward is: How do we find effective partners—not just in Iraq, but in Syria, and in Yemen, and in Libya—that we can work with, and how do we create the international coalition and atmosphere in which people across sectarian lines are willing to compromise and are willing to work together in order to provide the next generation a fighting chance for a better future? Obama (2015)
The fact that you are anti-Semitic, or racist, doesn’t preclude you from being interested in survival. It doesn’t preclude you from being rational about the need to keep your economy afloat; it doesn’t preclude you from making strategic decisions about how you stay in power; and so the fact that the supreme leader is anti-Semitic doesn’t mean that this overrides all of his other considerations. You know, if you look at the history of anti-Semitism, Jeff, there were a whole lot of European leaders—and there were deep strains of anti-Semitism in this country (…) They may make irrational decisions with respect to discrimination, with respect to trying to use anti-Semitic rhetoric as an organizing tool. At the margins, where the costs are low, they may pursue policies based on hatred as opposed to self-interest. But the costs here are not low, and what we’ve been very clear [about] to the Iranian regime over the past six years is that we will continue to ratchet up the costs, not simply for their anti-Semitism, but also for whatever expansionist ambitions they may have. That’s what the sanctions represent. That’s what the military option I’ve made clear I preserve represents. And so I think it is not at all contradictory to say that there are deep strains of anti-Semitism in the core regime, but that they also are interested in maintaining power, having some semblance of legitimacy inside their own country, which requires that they get themselves out of what is a deep economic rut that we’ve put them in, and on that basis they are then willing and prepared potentially to strike an agreement on their nuclear program. Obama (2015)
There is no question that the United States was divided going into that war. But I think the United States is united coming out of that war. We all recognize the tremendous price that has been paid in lives, in blood. And yet I think we also recognize that those lives were not lost in vain. (…) As difficult as [the Iraq war] was, and the cost in both American and Iraqi lives, I think the price has been worth it, to establish a stable government in a very important region of the world. Leon Panetta  (secrétaire américain à la Défense)
You don’t get to live life in reverse. What a leader has to do is make a decision, at the moment of decision, based on the best information he has. George Bush did that in 2002 and 2003 and he was supported by Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden and John Kerry and every western country’s intelligence agency. (…) The indictment of President Obama’s policy is much worse than the purported indictment of President Bush’s policy because everyone questions if we had known then what we know now. « It’s hard to analyze hypotheticals in history; I’m confident that the world is a better place and the world is a safer place with Saddam Hussein removed from power. (…) President Obama knew then what was going to happen, because his military commanders were advising him that they needed a small stay-behind force of 10,000 to 15,000 troops. « President Obama, for political reasons, knowing what he knew then, still made the decision to withdraw all our troops from Iraq. Tom Cotton (2015)
Even when viewed through a post-war lens, documentary evidence of messages are consistent with the Iraqi Survey Group’s conclusion that Saddam was at least keeping a WMD program primed for a quick re-start the moment the UN Security Council lifted sanctions. Iraqi Perpectives Project (March 2006)
Captured Iraqi documents have uncovered evidence that links the regime of Saddam Hussein to regional and global terrorism, including a variety of revolutionary, liberation, nationalist, and Islamic terrorist organizations. While these documents do not reveal direct coordination and assistance between the Saddam regime and the al Qaeda network, they do indicate that Saddam was willing to use, albeit cautiously, operatives affiliated with al Qaeda as long as Saddam could have these terrorist operatives monitored closely. Because Saddam’s security organizations and Osama bin Laden’s terrorist network operated with similar aims (at least in the short term), considerable overlap was inevitable when monitoring, contacting, financing, and training the same outside groups. This created both the appearance of and, in some ways, a de facto link between the organizations. At times, these organizations would work together in pursuit of shared goals but still maintain their autonomy and independence because of innate caution and mutual distrust. Though the execution of Iraqi terror plots was not always successful, evidence shows that Saddam’s use of terrorist tactics and his support for terrorist groups remained strong up until the collapse of the regime.  Iraqi Perspectives Project (Saddam and Terrorism, Nov. 2007, released Mar. 2008)
Beginning in 1994, the Fedayeen Saddam opened its own paramilitary training camps for volunteers, graduating more than 7,200 « good men racing full with courage and enthusiasm » in the first year. Beginning in 1998, these camps began hosting « Arab volunteers from Egypt, Palestine, Jordan, ‘the Gulf,’ and Syria. » It is not clear from available evidence where all of these non-Iraqi volunteers who were « sacrificing for the cause » went to ply their newfound skills. Before the summer of 2002, most volunteers went home upon the completion of training. But these camps were humming with frenzied activity in the months immediately prior to the war. As late as January 2003, the volunteers participated in a special training event called the « Heroes Attack. » This training event was designed in part to prepare regional Fedayeen Saddam commands to « obstruct the enemy from achieving his goal and to support keeping peace and stability in the province.  » Study (Joint Forces Command in Norfolk, Virginia)
The prospect of Iraq’s disintegration is already being spun by the Administration and its media friends as the fault of George W. Bush and Mr. Maliki. So it’s worth understanding how we got here. Iraq was largely at peace when Mr. Obama came to office in 2009. Reporters who had known Baghdad during the worst days of the insurgency in 2006 marveled at how peaceful the city had become thanks to the U.S. military surge and counterinsurgency. In 2012 Anthony Blinken, then Mr. Biden’s top security adviser, boasted that, « What’s beyond debate » is that « Iraq today is less violent, more democratic, and more prosperous. And the United States is more deeply engaged there than at any time in recent history. » Mr. Obama employed the same breezy confidence in a speech last year at the National Defense University, saying that « the core of al Qaeda » was on a « path to defeat, » and that the « future of terrorism » came from « less capable » terrorist groups that mainly threatened « diplomatic facilities and businesses abroad. » Mr. Obama concluded his remarks by calling on Congress to repeal its 2001 Authorization to Use Military Force against al Qaeda. If the war on terror was over, ISIS didn’t get the message. The group, known as Tawhid al-Jihad when it was led a decade ago by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, was all but defeated by 2009 but revived as U.S. troops withdrew and especially after the uprising in Syria spiraled into chaos. It now controls territory from the outskirts of Aleppo in northwestern Syria to Fallujah in central Iraq. The possibility that a long civil war in Syria would become an incubator for terrorism and destabilize the region was predictable, and we predicted it. « Now the jihadists have descended by the thousands on Syria, » we noted last May. « They are also moving men and weapons to and from Iraq, which is increasingly sinking back into Sunni-Shiite civil war. . . . If Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki feels threatened by al Qaeda and a Sunni rebellion, he will increasingly look to Iran to help him stay in power. » We don’t quote ourselves to boast of prescience but to wonder why the Administration did nothing to avert the clearly looming disaster. Contrary to what Mr. Blinken claimed in 2012, the « diplomatic surge » the Administration promised for Iraq never arrived, nor did U.S. weapons. « The Americans have really deeply disappointed us by not supplying the Iraqi army with the weapons and support it needs to fight terrorism, » the Journal quoted one Iraqi general based in Kirkuk. That might strike some readers as rich coming from the commander of a collapsing army, but it’s a reminder of the price Iraqis and Americans are now paying for Mr. Obama’s failure to successfully negotiate a Status of Forces Agreement with Baghdad that would have maintained a meaningful U.S. military presence. A squadron of Apache attack helicopters, Predator drones and A-10 attack planes based in Iraq might be able to turn back ISIS’s march on Baghdad. WSJ
Mosul’s fall matters for what it reveals about a terrorism whose threat Mr. Obama claims he has minimized. For starters, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) isn’t a bunch of bug-eyed « Mad Max » guys running around firing Kalashnikovs. ISIS is now a trained and organized army. The seizures of Mosul and Tikrit this week revealed high-level operational skills. ISIS is using vehicles and equipment seized from Iraqi military bases. Normally an army on the move would slow down to establish protective garrisons in towns it takes, but ISIS is doing the opposite, by replenishing itself with fighters from liberated prisons. An astonishing read about this group is on the website of the Washington-based Institute for the Study of War. It is an analysis of a 400-page report, « al-Naba, » published by ISIS in March. This is literally a terrorist organization’s annual report for 2013. It even includes « metrics, » detailed graphs of its operations in Iraq as well as in Syria. One might ask: Didn’t U.S. intelligence know something like Mosul could happen? They did. The February 2014 « Threat Assessment » by the Pentagon’s Defense Intelligence Agency virtually predicted it: « AQI/ISIL [aka ISIS] probably will attempt to take territory in Iraq and Syria . . . as demonstrated recently in Ramadi and Fallujah. » AQI (al Qaeda in Iraq), the report says, is exploiting the weak security environment « since the departure of U.S. forces at the end of 2011. » But to have suggested any mitigating steps to this White House would have been pointless. It won’t listen. In March, Gen. James Mattis, then head of the U.S. Central Command, told Congress he recommended the U.S. keep 13,600 support troops in Afghanistan; he was known not to want an announced final withdrawal date. On May 27, President Obama said it would be 9,800 troops—for just one year. Which guarantees that the taking of Mosul will be replayed in Afghanistan. Let us repeat the most quoted passage in former Defense Secretary Robert Gates’s memoir, « Duty. » It describes the March 2011 meeting with Mr. Obama about Afghanistan in the situation room. « As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his, » Mr. Gates wrote. « For him, it’s all about getting out. » Daniel Henninger
Nothing that happened in Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003 was pre-ordained; different futures than the one unfolding today were possible. Recall that violence declined drastically during the 2007 U.S. troop surge, and that for the next couple of years both Iraq and the West felt that the country was going in the right direction. But the seeds of Iraq’s unravelling were sown in 2010, when the United States did not uphold the election results and failed to broker the formation of a new Iraqi government. As an adviser to the top U.S. general in Iraq, I was a witness. (…)The national elections took place on March 7, 2010, and went more smoothly than we had dared hope. After a month of competitive campaigning across the country and wide media coverage of the different candidates and parties, 62 percent of eligible Iraqis turned out to vote. (…) We had not expected Iraqiya—a coalition headed by the secular Shia Ayad Allawi and leaders of the Sunni community, and running on a non-sectarian platform—to do so well. The coalition had won 91 seats—two more than the incumbent Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s State of Law Coalition. (…) Even though there was no evidence of fraud to justify a recount, the Iraqi electoral commission and the international community agreed to one, fearful of a repeat of the election fiasco in 2009 in Afghanistan, which had tarnished the credibility of elections there. In the meantime, Maliki’s advisers told us he needed two extra seats, either from the recount or through arbitrary de-Ba’athification that could disqualify Iraqiya candidates. Otherwise, he would be blamed for losing Iraq for the Shia, who make up some two-thirds of the population. (…)  General O and I did not think that the Iraqiya candidate, Allawi, would be able to put a government together with himself as prime minister. But we thought he had the right as the winner of the election to have first go—and that this could lead to a political compromise among the leaders, with either Allawi and Maliki agreeing to share power between them or a third person chosen to be prime minister. But … Hill, General O strode down the embassy corridor looking visibly upset. “He told me that Iraq is not ready for democracy, that Iraq needs a Shia strongman,” the general said, “and Maliki is our man.” Odierno had objected that that was not what the Iraqis wanted. They were rid of one dictator, Hussein, and did not want to create another. (…) Sami al-Askari, a Shia politician close to Maliki who believed that an agreement between State of Law and Iraqiya was the best way forward (…) also told me that everyone except the Americans realized that the formation of the government was perceived as a battle between Iran and the United States for influence in Iraq. The Iranians were active, while the U.S. embassy did nothing. Qasim Suleimani, the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard’s al-Quds Force, continued to summon Iraqis to Iran in order to put together a pan-Shia coalition. The Iranians, al-Askari said, intended to drag out government formation until after August 31, when all U.S. combat forces were due to leave, in order to score a “victory” over the United States. (…) In the Arabic media, there was confusion as to why the United States and Iran should both choose Maliki as prime minister, and this fuelled conspiracy theories about a secret deal between those two countries. (…) The Obama administration wanted to see an Iraqi government in place before the U.S. mid-term elections in November. Biden believed the quickest way to form a government was to keep Maliki as prime minister, and to cajole other Iraqis into accepting this. (…) I tried to explain the struggle between secularists and Islamists, and how many Iraqis wanted to move beyond sectarianism. But Biden could not fathom this. For him, Iraq was simply about Sunnis, Shia and Kurds.(…) If only President Obama had paid attention to Iraq. He, more than anyone, would understand the complexity of identities, I thought—and that people can change. But his only interest in Iraq, it appeared, was in ending the war. (…) In July 2014, I visited Erbil, Iraq, shortly after the Islamic State had taken control of a third of the country and the Iraqi Army had disintegrated. I met up with Rafi Issawi. (…) Rafi listed for me the Sunni grievances that had steadily simmered since I’d left—until they had finally boiled over. Maliki had detained thousands of Sunnis without trial, pushed leading Sunnis, including Rafi, out of the political process by accusing them of terrorism and reneged on payments and pledges to the Iraqi tribes who had bravely fought Al Qaeda in Iraq. Year-long Sunni protests demanding an end to discrimination were met by violence, with dozens of unarmed protesters killed by Iraqi security forces. Maliki had completely subverted the judiciary to his will, so that Sunnis felt unable to achieve justice. The Islamic State, Rafi explained to me, was able to take advantage of this situation, publicly claiming to be the defenders of the Sunnis against the Iranian-backed Maliki government. The downward spiral, Rafi told me not surprisingly, had begun in 2010—when Iraqiya was not given the first chance to try to form the government. “We might not have succeeded,” he admitted, “but the process itself would have been important in building trust in Iraq’s young institutions.” Emma Sky
La Maison Blanche maintient que la mission était une affaire 100% américaine, et que les généraux de l’armée pakistanaise et ses services secrets n’ont pas été mis au courant de l’assaut à l’avance. C’est faux. (…) En août 2010, un ancien officier des services secrets pakistanais a approché Jonathan Bank, alors chef du bureau de la CIA à l’ambassade américaine d’Islamabad. Il a proposé de dire à la CIA où trouver Ben Laden en échange de la récompense que Washington avait offerte en 2001. Seymour Hersh
Pour moi, l’échec de la guerre est surtout lié à la manière dont nous nous sommes précipitemment retirés d’Irak en 2011 selon un calendrier arbitraire, au lieu de sécuriser nos gains et de garder un levier d’influence. Si nous avions maintenu une force substantielle capable d’influencer le gouvernement irakien, nous aurions pu empêcher les dérives sectaires qui ont mené à l’émergence de l’Etat islamique. Général Barbero
Through the fall of 2011, the main question facing the American military in Iraq was what our role would be now that combat operations were over. When President Obama announced the end of our combat mission in August 2010, he acknowledged that we would maintain troops for a while. Now that the deadline was upon us, however, it was clear to me–and many others–that withdrawing all our forces would endanger the fragile stability then barely holding Iraq together. Privately, the various leadership factions in Iraq all confided that they wanted some U.S. forces to remain as a bulwark against sectarian violence. But none was willing to take that position publicly, and Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki concluded that any Status of Forces Agreement, which would give legal protection to those forces, would have to be submitted to the Iraqi parliament for approval. That made reaching agreement very difficult given the internal politics of Iraq, but representatives of the Defense and State departments, with scrutiny from the White House, tried to reach a deal. We had leverage. We could, for instance, have threatened to withdraw reconstruction aid to Iraq if al-Maliki would not support some sort of continued U.S. military presence. My fear, as I voiced to the President and others, was that if the country split apart or slid back into the violence that we’d seen in the years immediately following the U.S. invasion, it could become a new haven for terrorists to plot attacks against the U.S. Iraq’s stability was not only in Iraq’s interest but also in ours. I privately and publicly advocated for a residual force that could provide training and security for Iraq’s military. To my frustration, the White House coordinated the negotiations but never really led them. Officials there seemed content to endorse an agreement if State and Defense could reach one, but without the President’s active advocacy, al-Maliki was allowed to slip away. The deal never materialized. To this day, I believe that a small U.S. troop presence in Iraq could have effectively advised the Iraqi military on how to deal with al-Qaeda’s resurgence and the sectarian violence that has engulfed the country. Leon Panetta
As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his. For him, it’s all about getting out. Robert Gates
Toppling Saddam Hussein through military force was a subject discussed at the highest levels of the Clinton administration. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs Staff, Genral Hugh Shelton, noted in his 2010 memoir that a member of Clinton’s Cabinet, apparently Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, suggested provoking an incident with Iraq that would allow the United States to « take out Saddam ». Shelton recalled : Early on in my days as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, we had small, weekly White House breakfasts in National Security Advisor Sandy Berger’s office that included me, Sandy, Bill Cohen (Secretary of Defense), Madeleine Albright (Secretary of State), George Tenet (head of the CIA), Leon Firth (VP chief of staff for security), Bill Richardson (ambassador to the U.N.), and a few other senior administration officials. These were informal sessions where we would gather around Berger’s table and talk about concerns over coffee and breakfast served by the White House dining facility. It was a comfortable setting that encouraged brainstorming of potential options on a variety of issues of the day. During that time we had U-2 aircraft on reconnaissance sorties over Iraq. These planes were designed to fly at extremely high speeds and altitudes (over seventy thousand feet) both for pilot safety and to avoid detection. At one of my very first breakfasts, while Berger and Cohen were engaged in a sidebar discussion down at one end of the table and Tenet and Richardson were preoccupied in another, one of the Cabinet members present leaned over to me and said, “Hugh, I know I shouldn’t even be asking you this, but what we really need in order to go in and take out Saddam is a precipitous event — something that would make us look good in the eyes of the world. Could you have one of our U-2s fly low enough — and slow enough — so as to guarantee that Saddam could shoot it down?”  The hair on the back of my neck bristled, my teeth clenched, and my fists tightened. I was so mad I was about to explode. I looked across the table, thinking about the pilot in the U-2 and responded, “Of course we can …” which prompted a big smile on the official’s face. “You can?” was the excited reply. “Why, of course we can,” I countered. “Just as soon as we get your ass qualified to fly it, I will have it flown just as low and slow as you want to go.” One can only imagine the congressional and media reaction if such a proposal had been aired openly at a meeting of George W. Bush’s Cabinet, either by Vice President Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, or Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz, and this had become public. Stephen F. Knott (Rush to Judgment: George W. Bush, the War on Terror, and His Critics, pp. 136-137)
The overthrow of Saddam Hussein’s regime became official U.S. policy in 1998, when President Clinton signed the Iraq Liberation Act—a bill passed 360-38 by the House of Representatives and by unanimous consent in the Senate. The law called for training and equipping Iraqi dissidents to overthrow Saddam and suggested that the United Nations establish a war-crimes tribunal for the dictator and his lieutenants. The legislation was partly the result of frustration over the undeclared and relatively unheralded « No-Fly Zone War » that had been waged since 1991. Saddam’s military repeatedly fired on U.S. and allied aircraft that were attempting to prevent his regime from destroying Iraqi opposition forces in northern and southern Iraq. According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Hugh Shelton, in 1997 a key member of President Bill Clinton’s cabinet (thought by most observers to have been Secretary of State Madeleine Albright) asked Gen. Shelton whether he could arrange for a U.S. aircraft to fly slowly and low enough that it would be shot down, thereby paving the way for an American effort to topple Saddam. Kenneth Pollack, a member of Mr. Clinton’s National Security Council staff, would later write in 2002 that it was a question of « not whether but when » the U.S. would invade Iraq. He wrote that the threat presented by Saddam was « no less pressing than those we faced in 1941. » Radicalized by the events of 9/11, George W. Bush gradually concluded that a regime that had used chemical weapons against its own people and poison gas against Iran, invaded Iran and Kuwait, harbored some of the world’s most notorious terrorists, made lucrative payments to the families of suicide bombers, fired on American aircraft almost daily, and defied years of U.N. resolutions regarding weapons of mass destruction was a problem. The former chief U.N. weapons inspector, an Australian named Richard Butler, testified in July 2002 that « it is essential to recognize that the claim made by Saddam’s representatives, that Iraq has no WMD, is false. » In the U.S., there was a bipartisan consensus that Saddam possessed and continued to develop WMD. Former Vice President Al Gore noted in September 2002 that Saddam had « stored secret supplies of biological and chemical weapons throughout his country. » Then-Sen. Hillary Clinton observed that Saddam hoped to increase his supply of chemical and biological weapons and to « develop nuclear weapons. » Then-Sen. John Kerry claimed that « a deadly arsenal of weapons of mass destruction in his [Saddam’s] hands is a real and grave threat to our security. » Even those opposed to using force against Iraq acknowledged that, as then-Sen. Edward Kennedy put it, « we have known for many years that Saddam Hussein is seeking and developing » WMD. When it came time to vote on the authorization for the use of force against Iraq, 81 Democrats in the House voted yes, joined by 29 Democrats in the Senate, including the party’s 2004 standard bearers, John Kerry and John Edwards, plus Majority Leader Tom Daschle, Sen. Joe Biden, Mrs. Clinton, and Sens. Harry Reid, Tom Harkin, Chris Dodd and Jay Rockefeller. The latter, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, claimed that Saddam would « likely have nuclear weapons within the next five years. » Support for the war extended far beyond Capitol Hill. In March 2003, a Pew Research Center poll indicated that 72% of the American public supported President Bush’s decision to use force. If Mr. Bush « lied, » as the common accusation has it, then so did many prominent Democrats—and so did the French, whose foreign minister, Dominique de Villepin, claimed in February 2003 that « regarding the chemical domain, we have evidence of [Iraq’s] capacity to produce VX and yperite [mustard gas]; in the biological domain, the evidence suggests the possible possession of significant stocks of anthrax and botulism toxin. » Germany’s intelligence chief August Hanning noted in March 2002 that « it is our estimate that Iraq will have an atomic bomb in three years. » According to interrogations conducted after the invasion, Saddam’s own generals believed that he had WMD and expected him to use these weapons as the invasion force neared Baghdad. The war in Iraq was authorized by a bipartisan congressional coalition, supported by prominent media voices and backed by the public. Yet on its 10th anniversary Americans will be told of the Bush administration’s duplicity in leading us into the conflict. Many members of the bipartisan coalition that committed the U.S. to invade Iraq 10 years ago have long since washed their hands of their share of responsibility. We owe it to history—and, more important, to all those who died—to recognize that this wasn’t Bush’s war, it was America’s war. Stephen F. Knott
Iraq is a symbol. You certainly can make a persuasive argument it was a mistake. But there is a time that line going along that Bush and the other people lied about this. I spent 18 months looking at how Bush decided to invade Iraq. And lots of mistakes, but it was Bush telling George Tenet, the CIA director, don’t let anyone stretch the case on WMD. And he was the one who was skeptical. And if you try to summarize why we went into Iraq, it was momentum. The war plan kept getting better and easier, and finally at the end, people were saying, hey, look, it will only take a week or two. And early on it looked like it was going to take a year or 18 months. And so Bush pulled the trigger. A mistake certainly can be argued, and there is an abundance of evidence. But there was no lying in this that I could find. [about 2011] Well, he didn’t [want to keep any troops there]. Look, Obama does not like war. But as you look back on this, the argument from the military was, let’s keep 10,000, 15,000 troops there as an insurance policy. And we all know insurance policies make sense. We have 30,000 troops or more in South Korea still 65 years or so after the war. When you are a superpower, you have to buy these insurance policies. And he didn’t in this case. I don’t think you can say everything is because of that decision, but clearly a factor. Bob Woodward
The military recommended nearly 20,000 troops, considerably fewer than our 28,500 in Korea, 40,000 in Japan, and 54,000 in Germany. The president rejected those proposals, choosing instead a level of 3,000 to 5,000 troops. A deployment so risibly small would have to expend all its energies simply protecting itself — the fate of our tragic, missionless 1982 Lebanon deployment — with no real capability to train the Iraqis, build their U.S.-equipped air force, mediate ethnic disputes (as we have successfully done, for example, between local Arabs and Kurds), operate surveillance and special-ops bases, and establish the kind of close military-to-military relations that undergird our strongest alliances. The Obama proposal was an unmistakable signal of unseriousness. It became clear that he simply wanted out, leaving any Iraqi foolish enough to maintain a pro-American orientation exposed to Iranian influence, now unopposed and potentially lethal. (…) The excuse is Iraqi refusal to grant legal immunity to U.S. forces. But the Bush administration encountered the same problem, and overcame it. Obama had little desire to. Indeed, he portrays the evacuation as a success, the fulfillment of a campaign promise. Charles Krauthammer
The fact is that by the end of Bush’s tenure the war had been won. You can argue that the price of that victory was too high. Fine. We can debate that until the end of time. But what is not debatable is that it was a victory. Bush bequeathed to Obama a success. By whose measure? By Obama’s. As he told the troops at Fort Bragg on Dec. 14, 2011, “We are leaving behind a sovereign, stable and self-reliant Iraq, with a representative government that was elected by its people.” This was, said the president, a “moment of success.” Which Obama proceeded to fully squander. With the 2012 election approaching, he chose to liquidate our military presence in Iraq. We didn’t just withdraw our forces. We abandoned, destroyed or turned over our equipment, stores, installations and bases. We surrendered our most valuable strategic assets, such as control of Iraqi airspace, soon to become the indispensable conduit for Iran to supply and sustain the Assad regime in Syria and cement its influence all the way to the Mediterranean. And, most relevant to the fall of Ramadi, we abandoned the vast intelligence network we had so painstakingly constructed in Anbar province, without which our current patchwork operations there are largely blind and correspondingly feeble. The current collapse was not predetermined in 2003 but in 2011. Isn’t that what should be asked of Hillary Clinton? We know you think the invasion of 2003 was a mistake. But what about the abandonment of 2011? Was that not a mistake? Charles Krauthammer

Attention: une erreur peut en cacher une autre !

En ce Memorial Day où nos amis américains honorent leurs morts au combat …

Et où, après les pertes (pardon: le « revers tactique ») de Mossoul et Ramadi, leur président annonce triomphalement que la guerre est finie

Pendant qu’aux Etats-Unis mêmes les candidats sont passés à la question de ce qu’ils auraient fait en Irak

A la place d’un George Bush dont même Bob Woodward confirme l’inanité des accusations de mensonges …

Comment ne pas repenser …

A cette glorieuse journée de décembre 2011 …

Où au moment d’un retrait d’Irak qui avec l’élimination elle aussi controversée de Ben Laden allait lui valoir sa brillante réélection un an plus tard …

Et tout en rappelant l’énorme coût en morts et en blessés …

Un président américain presque extatique saluait une « réussite extraordinaire » ?

Mais comment, avec Charles Krauthammer après une telle et aussi coûteuse victoire, ne pas se poser aussi la question …

Non pas tant de l’erreur de l’invasion de 2003 …

Mais de celle de l’abandon de 2011 ?

Obama salue la « réussite » en Irak mais appelle à tirer les leçons du conflit
Le Point
14/12/2011

« Nous ne connaissons que trop bien le prix élevé de cette guerre. Plus d’1,5 million d’Américains ont servi en Irak. Plus de 30.000 Américains ont été blessés, et ce sont seulement les blessés dont les blessures sont visibles », a ajouté le président des USA, en allusion aux séquelles psychologiques dont souffrent certains anciens combattants.
Le président Barack Obama a salué mercredi la « réussite extraordinaire » des Etats-Unis en Irak, en rendant hommage aux soldats quelques jours avant la fin du retrait de l’armée américaine de ce pays.

M. Obama a également évoqué le « prix élevé » de cette guerre de près de neuf ans à laquelle il s’était opposé quand il n’était pas encore à la tête des Etats-Unis, et affirmé que son pays devrait retenir les « leçons » de ce conflit, lors d’un discours devant des soldats à Fort Bragg (Caroline du Nord, sud-est).
« Nous laissons derrière nous un Etat souverain, stable, autosuffisant, avec un gouvernement représentatif qui a été élu par son peuple. Nous bâtissons un nouveau partenariat entre nos pays », a lancé le président devant plusieurs milliers de militaires en uniforme rassemblés dans un hangar de cet énorme complexe, siège des forces spéciales américaines.

« C’est une réussite extraordinaire, qui a pris neuf ans », a-t-il dit, en reconnaissant « le dur travail et le sacrifice » qui ont été nécessaires. « Ces mots décrivent à peine le prix de cette guerre, et le courage des hommes et des femmes qui l’ont menée », a-t-il souligné.

« Nous ne connaissons que trop bien le prix élevé de cette guerre. Plus d’1,5 million d’Américains ont servi en Irak. Plus de 30.000 Américains ont été blessés, et ce sont seulement les blessés dont les blessures sont visibles », a-t-il ajouté, en allusion aux séquelles psychologiques dont souffrent certains anciens combattants.

« Près de 4.500 Américains » ont perdu la vie, a rappelé le président, « dont 202 héros tombés au champ d’honneur venus d’ici, Fort Bragg », a-t-il encore dit. « Et aujourd’hui, nous nous recueillons en prière pour toutes ces familles qui ont perdu ceux qu’ils aimaient, car ils font tous partie de notre grande famille américaine ».

M. Obama, qui avait beaucoup évoqué lors de sa campagne présidentielle victorieuse de 2008 son opposition initiale à la guerre en Irak, en 2002 et 2003 lorsqu’il n’était encore qu’un élu local, a souligné que « les dirigeants et les historiens continueront à analyser les leçons stratégiques de l’Irak ».

« Et nos commandants prendront en compte des leçons durement apprises lors de campagnes militaires à l’avenir », a indiqué le dirigeant.

« Mais la leçon la plus importante que vous nous apprenez n’est pas une leçon en stratégie militaire, c’est une leçon sur le caractère de notre pays », car « malgré toutes les difficultés auxquelles notre pays fait face, vous nous rappelez que rien n’est impossible pour les Américains lorsqu’ils sont solidaires ».

Voir aussi:

L’armée américaine a marqué officiellement son retrait d’Irak
Laurent Lagneau
16-12-2011

Le drapeau des Forces armées américaines en Irak (USF-I) a officiellement été replié lors d’une cérémonie organisée à l’aéroport de Bagdad, lieu symbolique, s’il en est, de l’opération Iraqi Freedom, lancée en mars 2003, puisqu’il s’agit du premier secteur de la capitale irakienne à être occupé par la coalition emmenée par les Etats-Unis pour renverser Saddam Hussein.

« C’est un évènement historique car il y a huit ans, huit mois et 26 jours, j’ai donné l’ordre aux éléments avancés de la troisième division de traverser la frontière » a déclaré le général américain et chef d’état-major adjoint Lloyd Austin.

Conformément l’accord de sécurité conclu entre Bagdad et Washington en 2008, soit avant l’arrivée de Barack Obama à la Maison Blanche, les troupes américaines auront ainsi quitté l’Irak avant la fin de l’année 2011. Après cette date, seulement 160 militaires resteront dans le pays pour être affectés à l’ambassade des Etats-Unis, qui, avec 16.000 employés, sera la plus importante au monde. Ces soldats, aidé par 700 conctractuels, auront pour tâche de former leurs homologues irakiens.

Au cours de ce conflit, qui aurait pu connaître une autre trajectoire si l’erreur de purger l’ancienne armée irakienne de ses cadres n’avait pas été commise, les Etats-Unis ont engagé jusqu’à 170.000 hommes, déployés sur 500 bases. Et plus de 4.500 soldats américains ont perdu la vie au cours de ces 9 ans d’opération.

Prétexte à l’intervention des Etats-Unis, les armes de destruction massive dont Saddam Hussein était soupçonné détenir, n’ont pas été retrouvées. Et l’on se souvient de l’activisme des militants de groupes jihadistes, opérant sous l’étiquette d’al-Qaïda ou non, qui faillit faire basculer l’Irak dans une guerre confessionnelle. Il aura fallu la prise en main des opérations par le général David Petraeus, devenu depuis directeur de la CIA, pour rétablir une situation qui était, au moins jusqu’en 2007, très délicate, grâce à des principes de guerre contre-insurrectionnelle, inspirés par le théoricien français David Galula.

« Nous laissons derrière nous un Etat souverain, stable, autosuffisant, avec une gouvernement représentatif qui a été élu par son peuple. Nous bâtissons un nouveau partenariat entre nos pays. Et nous terminons une guerre non avec une bataille filnale, mais avec une dernière marche du retour » a déclaré le président Barack Obama, le 14 décembre, à l’occasion d’un discours prononcé à Fort Bragg pour rendre hommage aux soldats américains engagés en Irak, au moment de la fin de leur retrait d’Irak.

« C’est une réussite extraordinaire, qui a pris neuf ans », a-t-il encore lancé, en soulignant « le dur travail et le sacrifice » qui « décrivent à peine le prix de cette guerre, et le courage des hommes et des femmes qui l’ont menée ».

« Après le sang versé par les Irakiens et les Américains, la mission visant à faire de l’Irak un pays capable de gouverner et d’assurer seul sa sécurité est devenue réalité », a déclaré Leon Panetta, le patron du Pentagone, lors de la cérémonie marquant le retrait officiel des troupes américains.

« L’Irak va devoir faire face à la menace du terrorisme, à ceux qui sèmeront la division, aux problèmes économiques et sociaux », a-t-il tempéré, soulignant que des « défis continuent d’exister » mais que « les Etats-Unis resteront aux côtés du peuple irakien. » Aussi, avant de parler de réussite, encore faudrait-il attendre encore un peu pour voir comment ce pays va évoluer au cours des prochains mois.

En effet, des attentats sont commis régulièrement et les derniers en date ont surtout visé la communauté chiite à l’occasion de la fête de l’Achoura. Aussi, les tensions confessionnelles sont l’un des écueils que l’Irak aura à éviter. Les désaccords entre Bagdad et la minorité kurde, notamment au sujet de l’exploitation prétrolière, devront être réglés. Enfin, la nouvelle armée irakienne n’est pas encore prête à assurer la sécurité du territoire, en raison de ces lacunes capacitaires. Ce qui inquiète d’ailleurs, le président irakien, Jalal Talabani.

« L’Irak a besoin d’une présence américaine et d’instructeurs américains, parce que nous ne sommes pas capables de défendre notre ciel et nos eaux, ainsi que d’utiliser les armes que nous avons achetées ou que nous avons obtenus auprès des Etats-Unis » a-t-il déclaré en novembre dernier.

Ce qui pose la question de l’influence iranienne dans le pays. En effet, Téhéran ne manque pas de relais en Irak, grâce notamment au chiisme. Le régime des mollahs sera-t-il le principal bénéficiaire de l’opération conduite par les Etats-Unis? L’avenir le dira.

En attendant, Washington a adressé une mise en garde aux Iraniens, sans les nommer. « La souveraineté de l’Irak doit être respectée », a ainsi prévenu Barack Obama, le 12 décembre dernier, à l’occasion d’une rencontre avec Nouri al-Maliki, le Premier ministre irakien.

Pour terminer sur une note provocatrice, s’il devait y avoir un vainqueur de cette guerre en Irak, ce serait sans doute la Chine, qui a profité de l’engagement américain pour monter en puissance. Cette intervention aura coûté près de 800 milliards de dollars au contribuable américain (reconstruction, réparation et remplacement des matériels, pensions et soins des blessés, etc…). L’économiste Joseph Stiglitz, prix Nobel d’économie, a même estimé que ce coût pourrait dépasser finalement les 3.000 milliards de dollars à long terme. Et quand l’on sait que Pékin est l’un des principaux créanciers de Washington…

Voir également:

Obama au pied du mur face aux avancées de l’EI
Jean Michel Gradt
Les Echos
22/05 /15

Dans un entretien publié jeudi, le président américain estime que les Etats-Unis ne sont pas en train de perdre le combat contre le groupe djihadiste en Irak et qu’il se refuse à envoyer des troupes au sol en Irak comme en Syrie.

Malgré une campagne aérienne lancée depuis l’été 2014 par la coalition internationale dirigée par les Etats-Unis pour aider le pouvoir en Irak, et les rebelles en Syrie, à stopper la progression de l’EI, le groupe jihadiste a réussi deux coups de force en huit jours : la prise de Ramadi en Irak et celle de Palmyre en Syrie.

« Je ne crois pas que nous soyons en train de perdre » le combat contre les djihadistes de l’organisation Etat islamique, malgré le «  revers stratégique » subi à Ramadi, chef lieu de la province irakienne d’Anbar tombé dimanche dernier aux mains des jihadistes sunnites ultraradicaux, déclare Barack Obama dans un entretien publié jeudi par le magazine The Atlantic . « Il y a eu un revers tactique, c’est incontestable, même si Ramadi était vulnérable depuis très longtemps« , a-t-il ajouté.

« L’EI a été considérablement affaibli à travers le pays« , a encore expliqué le président américain,qui évoque « des progrès significatifs dans le nord et dans les régions où les Peshmergas (forces kurdes) participent ». Dans les zones à dominante chiite, « il n’y pas d’avancée de l’EI« , a-t-il ajouté. Mais «   il ne fait aucun doute que, dans les secteurs sunnites, nous allons devoir renforcer non seulement l’entraînement mais aussi la détermination, et qu’il faut mobiliser les tribus sunnites plus qu’elles ne le sont actuellement  »

Pas de troupes au sol en Irak

Les Etats-Unis sont-ils prêts à envoyer des troupes au sol ? «  Aujourd’hui la question n’est pas si oui ou non nous envoyons des contingents de troupes américaines au sol. Aujourd’hui, la question est de savoir comment nous trouvons des partenaires efficaces pour gouverner dans ces régions de l’Irak qui sont en ce moment ingouvernables et vaincre efficacement l’EI, pas seulement en Irak, mais en Syrie? « 

Puis, évoquant les « erreurs » commises lors de l’invasion américaine de 2003, il ajoute :  » il y a une leçon qu’il est important de tirer de ce qui est arrivé, c’est que si les Irakiens eux-mêmes ne sont pas disposés ou capables d’arriver à des compromis politiques nécessaires pour gouverner, si elles ne sont pas prêts à se battre pour la sécurité de leur pays, nous ne pouvons pas le faire pour eux », poursuit le président, dont les propos ont été recueillis mardi… c’est-à-dire avant la prise de Palmyre par l’EI en Syrie.

Interrogations après la chute de Palmyre

Or depuis jeudi, la situation a empiré. En s’emparant de Palmyre, cité antique vieille de plus de 2.000 ans et véritable carrefour routier qui ouvre sur le grand désert syrien frontalier de l’Irak , l’EI contrôle « désormais plus de 95.000 km2 en Syrie, soit 50% du territoire« , d’après l’Observatoire syrien des droits de l’Homem (OSDH). Le groupe terroriste s’est emparé de la majeure partie des provinces de Deir Ezzor et Raqa (nord), et a une forte présence à Hassaké (nord-est), Alep (nord), Homs la troisième ville du pays et Hama (centre). Il est aussi maître de la quasi-totalité des champs pétroliers et gaziers de Syrie.

Ce deuxième revers en une semaine face à l’EI sera-t-il de nature à modifier la position adoptée par le président américain dans son entretien à « The Atlantic », notamment sur l’envoi de troupes au sol  ? La réponse est : non.Tout en demandant des moyens supplémentaires au Congrès pour lutter contre l’EI, Barack Obama a réaffirmé hier (voir la vidéo ci-dessous) qu’il n’était pas question pour les Etats-Unis d’envoyer des troupes au sol « en Irak ou en Syrie ».

Dans la presse française, les éditorialistes (voir encadré) s’interrogent. « La froide vérité géopolitique est que les États-Unis s’intéressent avant tout à l’Irak, dont ils espèrent encore sauver l’intégrité, et que nul ne sait plus qui soutenir en Syrie, maintenant que les rebelles +modérés+ ont jeté le masque en s’acoquinant avec al-Qaida« , lit-on sous la plume de Philippe Gélie dans le Figaro.

 » La conquête de Palmyre témoigne de la force de Daech. Créée il y a seulement deux ans, cette organisation a effacé la frontière entre l’Irak et la Syrie, contrôlant de vastes territoires et d’importantes ressources pétrolières et gazières », écrit Jean-Christophe Ploquin dans La Croix. Selon lui, « les seuls qui pourraient développer une stratégie globale contre lui aujourd’hui sont les États-Unis. Mais Barack Obama (…) ne veut plus engager de troupes dans un long conflit moyen-oriental. Il n’a pas la capacité de peser sur ses alliés -européens ou arabes- pour les entraîner dans une coalition internationale puissante. C’est dans ce vide stratégique que s’engouffre Daech. »

Interrogations sur la stratégie des Etats-Unis après la chute de Palmyre

Dans Sud Ouest, Bruno Dive, estime que la prise de Palmyre « signe la première défaite directe de l’armée de Bachar el Assad face à Daech. Mais surtout, elle pose avec une acuité grandissante la question du bien-fondé de la stratégie adoptée par les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés (…) Daech s’enracine, et chaque jour qui passe montre qu’elle sera très difficile à déloger, du moins sans l’appui massif de troupes au sol (…) Le temps des choix clairs et fermes est donc venu. Si l’on ne veut pas que tout le Proche-Orient se transforme en champ de ruines. »

Pour Alexandra Schwartzbrod de Libération, la prise de Palmyre appelle au moins un constat et une interrogation. « Le constat, c’est que l’armée syrienne a perdu de sa toute puissance. On ne peut exclure l’hypothèse que le boucher de Damas ait poussé le machiavélisme jusqu’à demander à ses troupes de déserter les lieux, histoire de laisser les jihadistes prendre le contrôle de ce trésor de l’archéologie mondiale afin de pousser le monde à le soutenir, lui, face à eux. Mais ce jeu-là apparaît dangereux (…) La grande interrogation, ce sont les Etats-Unis (…) Que les forces américaines (…) n’aient pas réussi à bloquer la progression des jihadistes paraît incompréhensible. Tétanisé à l’idée d’enliser les boys dans ce nouveau bourbier, Barack Obama semble bien peu sûr de sa stratégie. Seul espoir, que Palmyre serve d’électrochoc. »

Voir encore:

Obama: « Non, nous ne perdons pas » face au groupe Etat islamique
Le président Barack Obama estime que les Etats-Unis ne sont pas en train de perdre le combat engagé contre le groupe Etat islamique en Irak et Syrie, rappelant avoir toujours indiqué que la campagne contre les jihadistes prendrait « plusieurs années ».

AFP
21-05-2015

« Non, je ne pense pas que nous perdons », a-t-il souligné dans un entretien publié jeudi par le magazine en ligne The Atlantic.

« Il y a eu un revers tactique, c’est incontestable, même si Ramadi était vulnérable depuis très longtemps », a-t-il ajouté, évoquant la chute dimanche dernier de la capitale de la province irakienne d’Al-Anbar aux mains des jihadistes sunnites ultraradicaux.

L’entretien réalisé mardi paraît le jour où l’Etat islamique s’est emparé de la ville de Palmyre en Syrie, autre victoire significative qui lui permet d’élargir sa zone d’influence de part et d’autre de la frontière syro-irakienne.

« L’EI a été considérablement affaibli à travers le pays », a encore expliqué le président Obama, évoquant « des progrès significatifs dans le nord et dans les régions où les Peshmergas (forces kurdes) participent ».

Dans les zones à dominante chiite, « il n’y pas d’avancée de l’EI », a-t-il ajouté.

« L’entraînement des forces de sécurité irakiennes (…) ne va pas assez vite à Al-Anbar », a toutefois concédé M. Obama, confirmant qu’il souhaitait renforcer les efforts américains sur ce point.

En s’emparant de Palmyre, cité antique vieille de plus de 2.000 ans et véritable carrefour routier qui ouvre sur le grand désert syrien frontalier de l’Irak, l’EI se rend désormais maître de la moitié du territoire de Syrie et menace Homs, la troisième ville du pays en guerre.

Malgré une campagne aérienne lancée depuis l’été 2014 par la coalition internationale dirigée par les Etats-Unis pour aider en Irak le pouvoir et en Syrie les rebelles, à stopper la progression de l’EI, le groupe jihadiste a réussi ces deux coups de force (prise de Palmyre et Ramadi) en huit jours.

Voir par ailleurs:

You want hypotheticals? Here’s one.
Charles Krauthammer
The Washington Post
May 21

Ramadi falls. The Iraqi army flees. The great 60-nation anti-Islamic State coalition so grandly proclaimed by the Obama administration is nowhere to be seen. Instead, it’s the defense minister of Iran who flies into Baghdad, an unsubtle demonstration of who’s in charge — while the U.S. air campaign proves futile and America’s alleged strategy for combating the Islamic State is in freefall.

It gets worse. The Gulf states’ top leaders, betrayed and bitter, ostentatiously boycott President Obama’s failed Camp David summit. “We were America’s best friend in the Arab world for 50 years,” laments Saudi Arabia’s former intelligence chief.

Note: “were,” not “are.”

We are scraping bottom. Following six years of President Obama’s steady and determined withdrawal from the Middle East, America’s standing in the region has collapsed. And yet the question incessantly asked of the various presidential candidates is not about that. It’s a retrospective hypothetical: Would you have invaded Iraq in 2003 if you had known then what we know now?

First, the question is not just a hypothetical but an inherently impossible hypothetical. It contradicts itself. Had we known there were no weapons of mass destruction, the very question would not have arisen. The premise of the war — the basis for going to the U.N., to the Congress and, indeed, to the nation — was Iraq’s possession of WMD in violation of the central condition for the cease-fire that ended the 1991 Gulf War. No WMD, no hypothetical to answer in the first place.

Second, the “if you knew then” question implicitly locates the origin and cause of the current disasters in 2003 . As if the fall of Ramadi was predetermined then, as if the author of the current regional collapse is George W. Bush.

This is nonsense. The fact is that by the end of Bush’s tenure the war had been won. You can argue that the price of that victory was too high. Fine. We can debate that until the end of time. But what is not debatable is that it was a victory. Bush bequeathed to Obama a success. By whose measure? By Obama’s. As he told the troops at Fort Bragg on Dec. 14, 2011, “We are leaving behind a sovereign, stable and self-reliant Iraq, with a representative government that was elected by its people.” This was, said the president, a “moment of success.”

Which Obama proceeded to fully squander. With the 2012 election approaching, he chose to liquidate our military presence in Iraq. We didn’t just withdraw our forces. We abandoned, destroyed or turned over our equipment, stores, installations and bases. We surrendered our most valuable strategic assets, such as control of Iraqi airspace, soon to become the indispensable conduit for Iran to supply and sustain the Assad regime in Syria and cement its influence all the way to the Mediterranean. And, most relevant to the fall of Ramadi, we abandoned the vast intelligence network we had so painstakingly constructed in Anbar province, without which our current patchwork operations there are largely blind and correspondingly feeble.

The current collapse was not predetermined in 2003 but in 2011. Isn’t that what should be asked of Hillary Clinton? We know you think the invasion of 2003 was a mistake. But what about the abandonment of 2011? Was that not a mistake?

Voir par ailleurs:

When Everyone Agreed About Iraq
For years before the war, a bipartisan consensus thought Saddam possessed WMD.
Stephen F. Knott
The WSJ
March 15, 2013

At 5:34 a.m. on March 20, 2003, American, British and other allied forces invaded Iraq. One of the most divisive conflicts in the nation’s history would soon be labeled  » Bush’s War. »

The overthrow of Saddam Hussein’s regime became official U.S. policy in 1998, when President Clinton signed the Iraq Liberation Act—a bill passed 360-38 by the House of Representatives and by unanimous consent in the Senate. The law called for training and equipping Iraqi dissidents to overthrow Saddam and suggested that the United Nations establish a war-crimes tribunal for the dictator and his lieutenants.

The legislation was partly the result of frustration over the undeclared and relatively unheralded « No-Fly Zone War » that had been waged since 1991. Saddam’s military repeatedly fired on U.S. and allied aircraft that were attempting to prevent his regime from destroying Iraqi opposition forces in northern and southern Iraq.

According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Hugh Shelton, in 1997 a key member of President Bill Clinton’s cabinet (thought by most observers to have been Secretary of State Madeleine Albright) asked Gen. Shelton whether he could arrange for a U.S. aircraft to fly slowly and low enough that it would be shot down, thereby paving the way for an American effort to topple Saddam. Kenneth Pollack, a member of Mr. Clinton’s National Security Council staff, would later write in 2002 that it was a question of « not whether but when » the U.S. would invade Iraq. He wrote that the threat presented by Saddam was « no less pressing than those we faced in 1941. »

Radicalized by the events of 9/11, George W. Bush gradually concluded that a regime that had used chemical weapons against its own people and poison gas against Iran, invaded Iran and Kuwait, harbored some of the world’s most notorious terrorists, made lucrative payments to the families of suicide bombers, fired on American aircraft almost daily, and defied years of U.N. resolutions regarding weapons of mass destruction was a problem. The former chief U.N. weapons inspector, an Australian named Richard Butler, testified in July 2002 that « it is essential to recognize that the claim made by Saddam’s representatives, that Iraq has no WMD, is false. »

In the U.S., there was a bipartisan consensus that Saddam possessed and continued to develop WMD. Former Vice President Al Gore noted in September 2002 that Saddam had « stored secret supplies of biological and chemical weapons throughout his country. » Then-Sen. Hillary Clinton observed that Saddam hoped to increase his supply of chemical and biological weapons and to « develop nuclear weapons. » Then-Sen. John Kerry claimed that « a deadly arsenal of weapons of mass destruction in his [Saddam’s] hands is a real and grave threat to our security. »

Even those opposed to using force against Iraq acknowledged that, as then-Sen. Edward Kennedy put it, « we have known for many years that Saddam Hussein is seeking and developing » WMD. When it came time to vote on the authorization for the use of force against Iraq, 81 Democrats in the House voted yes, joined by 29 Democrats in the Senate, including the party’s 2004 standard bearers, John Kerry and John Edwards, plus Majority Leader Tom Daschle, Sen. Joe Biden, Mrs. Clinton, and Sens. Harry Reid, Tom Harkin, Chris Dodd and Jay Rockefeller. The latter, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, claimed that Saddam would « likely have nuclear weapons within the next five years. »

Support for the war extended far beyond Capitol Hill. In March 2003, a Pew Research Center poll indicated that 72% of the American public supported President Bush’s decision to use force.

If Mr. Bush « lied, » as the common accusation has it, then so did many prominent Democrats—and so did the French, whose foreign minister, Dominique de Villepin, claimed in February 2003 that « regarding the chemical domain, we have evidence of [Iraq’s] capacity to produce VX and yperite [mustard gas]; in the biological domain, the evidence suggests the possible possession of significant stocks of anthrax and botulism toxin. » Germany’s intelligence chief August Hanning noted in March 2002 that « it is our estimate that Iraq will have an atomic bomb in three years. »

According to interrogations conducted after the invasion, Saddam’s own generals believed that he had WMD and expected him to use these weapons as the invasion force neared Baghdad.

The war in Iraq was authorized by a bipartisan congressional coalition, supported by prominent media voices and backed by the public. Yet on its 10th anniversary Americans will be told of the Bush administration’s duplicity in leading us into the conflict. Many members of the bipartisan coalition that committed the U.S. to invade Iraq 10 years ago have long since washed their hands of their share of responsibility.

We owe it to history—and, more important, to all those who died—to recognize that this wasn’t Bush’s war, it was America’s war.

Mr. Knott, a professor of national security affairs at the United States Naval War College, is the author of « Rush to Judgment: George W. Bush, the War on Terror, and His Critics » (University Press of Kansas, 2012).

Voir enfin:

Global
‘Look … It’s My Name on This’: Obama Defends the Iran Nuclear Deal

In an interview, the U.S. president ties his legacy to a pact with Tehran, argues ISIS is not winning, warns Saudi Arabia not to pursue a nuclear-weapons program, and anguishes about Israel.

Jeffrey Goldberg
The Atlantic
May 21, 2015

On Tuesday afternoon, as President Obama was bringing an occasionally contentious but often illuminating hour-long conversation about the Middle East to an end, I brought up a persistent worry. “A majority of American Jews want to support the Iran deal,” I said, “but a lot of people are anxiety-ridden about this, as am I.” Like many Jews—and also, by the way, many non-Jews—I believe that it is prudent to keep nuclear weapons out of the hands of anti-Semitic regimes. Obama, who earlier in the discussion had explicitly labeled the supreme leader of Iran, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, an anti-Semite, responded with an argument I had not heard him make before.

“Look, 20 years from now, I’m still going to be around, God willing. If Iran has a nuclear weapon, it’s my name on this,” he said, referring to the apparently almost-finished nuclear agreement between Iran and a group of world powers led by the United States. “I think it’s fair to say that in addition to our profound national-security interests, I have a personal interest in locking this down.”

The president—the self-confident, self-contained, coolly rational president—appears to have his own anxieties about the nuclear talks. Which isn’t a bad thing.

Jimmy Carter’s name did not come up in our Oval Office conversation, but it didn’t have to. Carter’s tragic encounter with Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the leader of the Islamic Revolution, is an object lesson in the mysterious power of Iran to undermine, even unravel, American presidencies. Ronald Reagan, of course, also knew something of the Iranian curse. As Obama moves to conclude this historic agreement, one that will—if he is correct in his assessment—keep Iran south of the nuclear threshold not only for the 10- or 15-year period of the deal, but well beyond it, he and his administration have deployed a raft of national security-related arguments to buttress their cause. But Obama’s parting comment to me suggests he knows perfectly well that his personal legacy, and not just the future of global nuclear non-proliferation efforts (among other things), is riding on the proposition that he is not being played by America’s Iranian adversaries, and that his reputation will be forever tarnished if Iran goes sideways, even after he leaves office. Obama’s critics have argued that he is “kicking the can down the road” by striking this agreement with Iran. Obama, though, seems to understand that the can will be his for a very long time.

When we spoke on Tuesday, he mentioned, as he often has, his feelings of personal responsibility to Israel. In the period leading up to the June 30 Iran-negotiation deadline, Obama has been focused on convincing Arab and Jewish leaders—people he has helped to unite over their shared fear of Iran’s hegemonic ambitions—that the nuclear deal will enhance their security. Last week, he gathered leaders of the Gulf Arab states at Camp David in an attempt to provide such reassurance. On Friday, he will be visiting Washington’s Adas Israel Congregation, a flagship synagogue of Conservative Judaism (also, coincidentally, the synagogue I attend) ostensibly in order to give a speech in honor of Jewish American Heritage Month (whatever that is), but actually to reassure American Jews, particularly in the wake of his titanic battles with Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, that he still, to quote from my 2012 interview with him, “has Israel’s back.” (There are no plans, as best as I can tell, for Obama to meet with Netanyahu in the coming weeks; this appears to be a bridge too far for the White House, at least at the moment.)

A good part of our conversation on Tuesday concerned possible flaws in the assumptions undergirding the nuclear deal, at least as the deal’s provisional parameters and potential consequences are currently understood. (A full transcript of the conversation appears below.)

Obama also spoke about ISIS’s latest surge in Iraq, and we discussed the worries of Arab states, which remain concerned not only about Iran’s nuclear ambitions, but about its regional meddling and its patronage of, among other reprehensible players, Lebanon’s Hezbollah and Syria’s Assad regime. Tensions between the U.S. and the Gulf states, I came to see, have not entirely dissipated. Obama was adamant on Tuesday that America’s Arab allies must do more to defend their own interests, but he has also spent much of the past month trying to reassure Saudi Arabia, the linchpin state of the Arab Gulf and one of America’s closest Arab allies, that the U.S. will protect it from Iran. One thing he does not want Saudi Arabia to do is to build a nuclear infrastructure to match the infrastructure Iran will be allowed to keep in place as part of its agreement with the great powers. “Their covert—presumably—pursuit of a nuclear program would greatly strain the relationship they’ve got with the United States,” Obama said of the Saudis.

As in previous conversations I’ve had with Obama (you can find transcripts of these discussions here, here, and here), we spent the bulk of our time talking about a country whose future preoccupies him almost as much as it preoccupies me. In the wake of what seemed to have been a near-meltdown in the relationship between the United States and Israel, Obama talked about what he called his love for the Jewish state; his frustrations with it when it fails to live up to both Jewish and universal values; and his hope that, one day soon, its leaders, including and especially its prime minister, will come to understand Israel’s stark choices as he understands Israel’s stark choices. And, just as he did with Saudi Arabia, Obama issued a warning to Israel: If it proves unwilling to live up to its values—in this case, he made specific mention of Netanyahu’s seemingly flawed understanding of the role Israel’s Arab citizens play in its democratic order—the consequences could be profound.

Obama told me that when Netanyahu asserted, late in his recent reelection campaign, that “a Palestinian state would not happen under his watch, or [when] there [was] discussion in which it appeared that Arab-Israeli citizens were somehow portrayed as an invading force that might vote, and that this should be guarded against—this is contrary to the very language of the Israeli Declaration of Independence, which explicitly states that all people regardless of race or religion are full participants in the democracy. When something like that happens, that has foreign-policy consequences, and precisely because we’re so close to Israel, for us to simply stand there and say nothing would have meant that this office, the Oval Office, lost credibility when it came to speaking out on these issues.”

Though Obama’s goal in giving speeches like the one he is scheduled to give at Adas Israel is to reassure Jews of his love for Israel, he was adamant that he would not allow the Jewish right, and the Republican Party, to automatically define criticism of the Netanyahu government’s policies as anti-Israel or anti-Semitic. Referring to the most powerful Jewish figure in conservative America, Obama said that an “argument that I very much have been concerned about, and it has gotten stronger over the last 10 years … it’s less overt than the arguments that a Sheldon Adelson makes, but in some ways can be just as pernicious, is this argument that there should not be disagreements in public” between the U.S. and Israel. (Obama raised Adelson’s name in part because I had mentioned his view of the president—Adelson’s non-subtle criticism is that Obama is going to destroy the Jewish state—earlier in the interview.)

I started the interview by asking Obama if—despite his previous assertion that ISIS was on the defensive—the United States was, in fact, losing the fight against the Islamic State terror group. When we spoke, the Iraqi city of Ramadi, in Anbar Province, had just fallen to ISIS; Palmyra, in Syria, would fall the day after the interview.

“No, I don’t think we’re losing,” he said. He went on to explain, “There’s no doubt there was a tactical setback, although Ramadi had been vulnerable for a very long time, primarily because these are not Iraqi security forces that we have trained or reinforced. … [T]he training of Iraqi security forces, the fortifications, the command-and-control systems are not happening fast enough in Anbar, in the Sunni parts of the country.” When I asked about the continuing role Iraq plays in American politics—I was making a reference to Jeb Bush’s recent Iraq-related conniptions—Obama pivoted from the question to make the argument that Republicans still don’t grasp key lessons about the Iraq invasion ordered 12 years ago by Jeb’s brother.

“I know that there are some in Republican quarters who have suggested that I’ve overlearned the mistake of Iraq, and that, in fact, just because the 2003 invasion did not go well doesn’t argue that we shouldn’t go back in,” he said. “And one lesson that I think is important to draw from what happened is that if the Iraqis themselves are not willing or capable to arrive at the political accommodations necessary to govern, if they are not willing to fight for the security of their country, we cannot do that for them.”
“In addition to our profound national-security interests, I have a personal interest in locking [the nuclear deal] down.”

I turned the conversation to Iran by quoting to him something he said in that 2012 interview (the same interview in which he publicly ruled out, for the first time, the idea of containing a nuclear Iran, rather than stopping it from crossing the nuclear threshold).

This is what he told me three years ago: “It is almost certain that other players in the region would feel it necessary to get their own nuclear weapons” if Iran got them. I then noted various reports suggesting that, in reaction to a final deal that allows Iran to keep much of its nuclear infrastructure in place, Saudi Arabia, and possibly Turkey and Egypt as well, would consider starting their own nuclear programs. This, of course, would run completely counter to Obama’s nuclear non-proliferation goals.

I asked Obama if the Saudis had promised him not to go down the nuclear path: “What are the consequences if other countries in the region say, ‘Well you know what, they have 5,000 centrifuges? We’re going to have 5,000 centrifuges.’”

Obama responded by downplaying these media reports, and then said, “There has been no indication from the Saudis or any other [Gulf Cooperation Council] countries that they have an intention to pursue their own nuclear program. Part of the reason why they would not pursue their own nuclear program—assuming that we have been successful in preventing Iran from continuing down the path of obtaining a nuclear weapon—is that the protection that we provide as their partner is a far greater deterrent than they could ever hope to achieve by developing their own nuclear stockpile or trying to achieve breakout capacity when it comes to nuclear weapons.”

He went on to say that the Gulf countries, including Saudi Arabia, appear satisfied that if the agreement works as advertised, it will serve to keep Iran from becoming a nuclear threat. “They understand that ultimately their own security and defense is much better served by working with us,” Obama said.

One of the reasons I worry about the Iran deal is that the Obama administration seems, on occasion, to be overly optimistic about the ways in which Iran will deploy the money it will receive when sanctions are relieved. This is a very common fear among Arabs and, of course, among Israelis. I quoted Jack Lew, the treasury secretary, who said in a recent speech to the Washington Institute for Near East Policy that “most of the money Iran receives from sanctions relief will not be used to support” its terrorist-aiding activities. I argued to Obama that this seemed like wishful thinking.

Obama responded at length (please read his full answer below), but he began this way: “I don’t think Jack or anybody in this administration said that no money will go to the military as a consequence of sanctions relief. The question is, if Iran has $150 billion parked outside the country, does the IRGC automatically get $150 billion? Does that $150 billion then translate by orders of magnitude into their capacity to project power throughout the region? And that is what we contest, because when you look at the math, first of all they’re going to have to deliver on their obligations under any agreement, which would take a certain period of time. Then there are the mechanics of unwinding the existing restraints they have on getting that money, which takes a certain amount of time. Then [Iranian President] Rouhani and, by extension, the supreme leader have made a series of commitments to improve the Iranian economy, and the expectations are outsized. You saw the reaction of people in the streets of Tehran after the signing of the agreement. Their expectations are that [the economy is] going to improve significantly.” Obama also argued that most of Iran’s nefarious activities—in Syria, Yemen, and Lebanon—are comparatively low-cost, and that they’ve been pursuing these policies regardless of sanctions.

“The protection that we provide as [the Gulf countries’] partner is a far greater deterrent than they could ever hope to achieve by developing their own nuclear stockpile.”

I also raised another concern—one that the president didn’t seem to fully share. It’s been my belief that it is difficult to negotiate with parties that are captive to a conspiratorial anti-Semitic worldview not because they hold offensive views, but because they hold ridiculous views. As Walter Russell Mead and others have explained, anti-Semites have difficulty understanding the world as it actually works, and don’t comprehend cause-and-effect in politics and economics. Though I would like to see a solid nuclear deal (it is preferable to the alternatives) I don’t believe that the regime with which Obama is negotiating can be counted on to be entirely rational.

Obama responded to this theory by saying the following: “Well the fact that you are anti-Semitic, or racist, doesn’t preclude you from being interested in survival. It doesn’t preclude you from being rational about the need to keep your economy afloat; it doesn’t preclude you from making strategic decisions about how you stay in power; and so the fact that the supreme leader is anti-Semitic doesn’t mean that this overrides all of his other considerations. You know, if you look at the history of anti-Semitism, Jeff, there were a whole lot of European leaders—and there were deep strains of anti-Semitism in this country—”

I interjected by suggesting that anti-Semitic European leaders made irrational decisions, to which Obama responded, “They may make irrational decisions with respect to discrimination, with respect to trying to use anti-Semitic rhetoric as an organizing tool. At the margins, where the costs are low, they may pursue policies based on hatred as opposed to self-interest. But the costs here are not low, and what we’ve been very clear [about] to the Iranian regime over the past six years is that we will continue to ratchet up the costs, not simply for their anti-Semitism, but also for whatever expansionist ambitions they may have. That’s what the sanctions represent. That’s what the military option I’ve made clear I preserve represents. And so I think it is not at all contradictory to say that there are deep strains of anti-Semitism in the core regime, but that they also are interested in maintaining power, having some semblance of legitimacy inside their own country, which requires that they get themselves out of what is a deep economic rut that we’ve put them in, and on that basis they are then willing and prepared potentially to strike an agreement on their nuclear program.”

On Israel, Obama endorsed, in moving terms, the underlying rationale for the existence of a Jewish state, making a direct connection between the battle for African American equality and the fight for Jewish national equality. “There’s a direct line between supporting the right of the Jewish people to have a homeland and to feel safe and free of discrimination and persecution, and the right of African Americans to vote and have equal protection under the law,” he said. “These things are indivisible in my mind.”

In discussing the resurgence of anti-Semitism in Europe, he was quite clear in his condemnation of what has become a common trope—that anti-Zionism, the belief that the Jews should not have a state of their own in at least part of their ancestral homeland, is unrelated to anti-Jewish hostility. He gave me his own parameters for judging whether a person is simply critical of certain Israeli policies or harboring more prejudicial feelings.

“Do you think that Israel has a right to exist as a homeland for the Jewish people, and are you aware of the particular circumstances of Jewish history that might prompt that need and desire?” he said, in defining the questions that he believes should be asked. “And if your answer is no, if your notion is somehow that that history doesn’t matter, then that’s a problem, in my mind. If, on the other hand, you acknowledge the justness of the Jewish homeland, you acknowledge the active presence of anti-Semitism—that it’s not just something in the past, but it is current—if you acknowledge that there are people and nations that, if convenient, would do the Jewish people harm because of a warped ideology. If you acknowledge those things, then you should be able to align yourself with Israel where its security is at stake, you should be able to align yourself with Israel when it comes to making sure that it is not held to a double standard in international fora, you should align yourself with Israel when it comes to making sure that it is not isolated.”

Though he tried to frame his conflict with Netanyahu in impersonal terms, he made two things clear. One is that he will not stop criticizing Israel when he believes it is not living up to its own founding values. And two—and this is my interpretation of his worldview—he holds Israel to a higher standard than he does other countries because of the respect he has for Jewish values and Jewish teachings, and for the role Jewish mentors and teachers have played in his life. After equating the creation of Israel with the American civil-rights movement, he went on to say this: “What is also true, by extension, is that I have to show that same kind of regard to other peoples. And I think it is true to Israel’s traditions and its values—its founding principles—that it has to care about … Palestinian kids. And when I was in Jerusalem and I spoke, the biggest applause that I got was when I spoke about those kids I had visited in Ramallah, and I said to a Israeli audience that it is profoundly Jewish, it is profoundly consistent with Israel’s traditions to care about them. And they agreed. So if that’s not translated into policy—if we’re not willing to take risks on behalf of those values—then those principles become empty words, and in fact, in my mind, it makes it more difficult for us to continue to promote those values when it comes to protecting Israel internationally.”
Obama, when he talks about Israel, sounds like a rabbi in the progressive Zionist tradition.

As I was listening to him speak about Israel and its values (we did not discuss the recent controversy over a now-shelved Israeli Defense Ministry plan to segregate certain West Bank bus lines, but issues like this informed the conversation), I felt as if I had participated in discussions like this dozens of times, but mainly with rabbis. I have probably had 50 different conversations with 50 different rabbis over the past couple of years—including the rabbi of my synagogue, Gil Steinlauf, who is hosting Obama on Friday—about the challenges they face in talking about current Israeli reality.

Many Reform and Conservative rabbis (and some Orthodox rabbis as well) find themselves anguishing—usually before the High Holidays—about how to present Israel’s complex and sometimes unpalatable reality to their congregants. (I refer to this sermon generically as the “How to Love a Difficult Israel” sermon.) Obama, when he talks about Israel, often sounds to me like one of these rabbis:

“My hope is that over time [the] debate gets back on a path where there’s some semblance of hope and not simply fear, because it feels to me as if … all we are talking about is based from fear,” he said. “Over the short term that may seem wise—cynicism always seems a little wise—but it may lead Israel down a path in which it’s very hard to protect itself [as] a Jewish-majority democracy. And I care deeply about preserving that Jewish democracy, because when I think about how I came to know Israel, it was based on images of … kibbutzim, and Moshe Dayan, and Golda Meir, and the sense that not only are we creating a safe Jewish homeland, but also we are remaking the world. We’re repairing it. We are going to do it the right way. We are going to make sure that the lessons we’ve learned from our hardships and our persecutions are applied to how we govern and how we treat others. And it goes back to the values questions that we talked about earlier—those are the values that helped to nurture me and my political beliefs.”

I sent these comments on Wednesday to Rabbi Steinlauf to see if he disagreed with my belief that Obama, when he talks about Israel, sounds like a rabbi in the progressive Zionist tradition. Steinlauf wrote back: “President Obama shares the same yearning for a secure peace in Israel that I and so many of my rabbinic colleagues have. While he doesn’t speak as a Jew, his progressive values flow directly out of the core messages of Torah, and so he is deeply in touch with the heart and spirit of the Jewish people.”

I have to imagine that comments like Steinlauf’s may be understood by people such as Sheldon Adelson and Benjamin Netanyahu as hopelessly naive. But this is where much of the Jewish community is today: nervous about Iran, nervous about Obama’s response to Iran, nervous about Netanyahu’s response to reality, nervous about the toxic marriage between Obama and Netanyahu, and nervous that, once again, there is no margin in the world for Jewish error.

The transcript of my conversation with President Obama, including the contentious bits, is below. I’ve edited some of my baggier questions for clarity and concision. The president’s answers are reproduced in full.

Jeffrey Goldberg: You’ve argued that ISIS has been on the defensive. But Ramadi just fell. Are we actually losing this war, or would you not go that far?

President Barack Obama: No, I don’t think we’re losing, and I just talked to our CENTCOM commanders and the folks on the ground. There’s no doubt there was a tactical setback, although Ramadi had been vulnerable for a very long time, primarily because these are not Iraqi security forces that we have trained or reinforced. They have been there essentially for a year without sufficient reinforcements, and the number of ISIL that have come into the city now are relatively small compared to what happened in [the Iraqi city of] Mosul. But it is indicative that the training of Iraqi security forces, the fortifications, the command-and-control systems are not happening fast enough in Anbar, in the Sunni parts of the country. You’ve seen actually significant progress in the north, and those areas where the Peshmerga [Kurdish forces] are participating. Baghdad is consolidated. Those predominantly Shia areas, you’re not seeing any forward momentum by ISIL, and ISIL has been significantly degraded across the country. But—

Goldberg: You’ve got to worry about the Iraqi forces—

Obama: I’m getting to that, Jeff. You asked me a question, and there’s no doubt that in the Sunni areas, we’re going to have to ramp up not just training, but also commitment, and we better get Sunni tribes more activated than they currently have been. So it is a source of concern. We’re eight months into what we’ve always anticipated to be a multi-year campaign, and I think [Iraqi] Prime Minister Abadi recognizes many of these problems, but they’re going to have to be addressed.

Goldberg: Stay on Iraq. There’s this interesting conversation going on in Republican circles right now, debating a question that you answered for yourself 13 years ago, about whether it was right or wrong to go into Iraq. What is this conversation actually about? I’m also wondering if you think this is the wrong conversation to have in the following sense: You’re under virtually no pressure—correct me if I’m wrong—but you’re under virtually no pressure domestically to get more deeply involved in the Middle East. That seems to be one of the downstream consequences of the Iraq invasion 12 years ago.

Obama: As you said, I’m very clear on the lessons of Iraq. I think it was a mistake for us to go in in the first place, despite the incredible efforts that were made by our men and women in uniform. Despite that error, those sacrifices allowed the Iraqis to take back their country. That opportunity was squandered by Prime Minister Maliki and the unwillingness to reach out effectively to the Sunni and Kurdish populations.
Reuters / The Atlantic

But today the question is not whether or not we are sending in contingents of U.S. ground troops. Today the question is: How do we find effective partners to govern in those parts of Iraq that right now are ungovernable and effectively defeat ISIL, not just in Iraq but in Syria?

It is important to have a clear idea of the past because we don’t want to repeat mistakes. I know that there are some in Republican quarters who have suggested that I’ve overlearned the mistake of Iraq, and that, in fact, just because the 2003 invasion did not go well doesn’t argue that we shouldn’t go back in. And one lesson that I think is important to draw from what happened is that if the Iraqis themselves are not willing or capable to arrive at the political accommodations necessary to govern, if they are not willing to fight for the security of their country, we cannot do that for them. We can be effective allies. I think Prime Minister Abadi is sincere and committed to an inclusive Iraqi state, and I will continue to order our military to provide the Iraqi security forces all assistance that they need in order to secure their country, and I’ll provide diplomatic and economic assistance that’s necessary for them to stabilize.

But we can’t do it for them, and one of the central flaws I think of the decision back in 2003 was the sense that if we simply went in and deposed a dictator, or simply went in and cleared out the bad guys, that somehow peace and prosperity would automatically emerge, and that lesson we should have learned a long time ago. And so the really important question moving forward is: How do we find effective partners—not just in Iraq, but in Syria, and in Yemen, and in Libya—that we can work with, and how do we create the international coalition and atmosphere in which people across sectarian lines are willing to compromise and are willing to work together in order to provide the next generation a fighting chance for a better future?
Reuters / The Atlantic
The Nuclear Deal With Iran

Goldberg: Let me do two or three on Iran, and then we’ll move to Israel and Jews. All of the fun subjects. By the way, you’re coming to my synagogue to speak on Friday.

Obama: I’m very much looking forward to it.

Goldberg: This is the biggest thing that’s happened there since the last Goldberg bar mitzvah.

Obama: [Laughs]

Goldberg: So in 2012 you told me, when we were talking about Iran, “It is almost certain that other players in the region would feel it necessary to get their own nuclear weapons if Iran got them.” Now we’re in this kind of weird situation in which there’s talk that Saudi Arabia, maybe Turkey, maybe Egypt would go build nuclear infrastructures come the finalization of this deal to match the infrastructure that your deal is going to leave in place in Iran. So my question to you is: Have you asked the Saudis not to go down any kind of nuclear path? What have they told you about this? And what are the consequences if other countries in the region say, “Well you know what, they have 5,000 centrifuges? We’re going to have 5,000 centrifuges.”

Obama: There’s been talk in the media, unsourced—

Goldberg: Well, [Saudi Arabia’s] Prince Turki said it publicly—

Obama: Well, he’s not in the government. There has been no indication from the Saudis or any other [Gulf Cooperation Council] countries that they have an intention to pursue their own nuclear program. Part of the reason why they would not pursue their own nuclear program—assuming that we have been successful in preventing Iran from continuing down the path of obtaining a nuclear weapon—is that the protection that we provide as their partner is a far greater deterrent than they could ever hope to achieve by developing their own nuclear stockpile or trying to achieve breakout capacity when it comes to nuclear weapons, and they understand that.

What we saw at the GCC summit was, I think, legitimate skepticism and concern, not simply about the Iranian nuclear program itself but also the consequences of sanctions coming down. We walked through the four pathways that would be shut off in any agreement that I would be signing off on. Technically, we showed them how it would be accomplished—what the verification mechanisms will be, how the UN snapback provisions [for sanctions] might work. They were satisfied that if in fact the agreement meant the benchmarks that we’ve set forth, that it would prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon, and given that, they understand that ultimately their own security and defense is much better served by working with us. Their covert—presumably—pursuit of a nuclear program would greatly strain the relationship they’ve got with the United States.

Goldberg: Stay with Iran for one more moment. I just want you to help me square something. So you’ve argued, quite eloquently in fact, that the Iranian regime has at its highest levels been infected by a kind of anti-Semitic worldview. You talked about that with Tom [Friedman]. “Venomous anti-Semitism” I think is the term that you used. You have argued—not that it even needs arguing—but you’ve argued that people who subscribe to an anti-Semitic worldview, who explain the world through the prism of anti-Semitic ideology, are not rational, are not built for success, are not grounded in a reality that you and I might understand. And yet, you’ve also argued that the regime in Tehran—a regime you’ve described as anti-Semitic, among other problems that they have—is practical, and is responsive to incentive, and shows signs of rationality. So I don’t understand how these things fit together in your mind.

Obama: Well the fact that you are anti-Semitic, or racist, doesn’t preclude you from being interested in survival. It doesn’t preclude you from being rational about the need to keep your economy afloat; it doesn’t preclude you from making strategic decisions about how you stay in power; and so the fact that the supreme leader is anti-Semitic doesn’t mean that this overrides all of his other considerations. You know, if you look at the history of anti-Semitism, Jeff, there were a whole lot of European leaders—and there were deep strains of anti-Semitism in this country—

Goldberg: And they make irrational decisions—

Obama: They may make irrational decisions with respect to discrimination, with respect to trying to use anti-Semitic rhetoric as an organizing tool. At the margins, where the costs are low, they may pursue policies based on hatred as opposed to self-interest. But the costs here are not low, and what we’ve been very clear [about] to the Iranian regime over the past six years is that we will continue to ratchet up the costs, not simply for their anti-Semitism, but also for whatever expansionist ambitions they may have. That’s what the sanctions represent. That’s what the military option I’ve made clear I preserve represents. And so I think it is not at all contradictory to say that there are deep strains of anti-Semitism in the core regime, but that they also are interested in maintaining power, having some semblance of legitimacy inside their own country, which requires that they get themselves out of what is a deep economic rut that we’ve put them in, and on that basis they are then willing and prepared potentially to strike an agreement on their nuclear program.
Reuters / The Atlantic

Goldberg: One of the other issues that’s troubling about this is—and I’m quoting [Treasury Secretary] Jack Lew here, who said a couple of weeks ago at the Washington Institute when talking about Iran’s various nefarious activities, he said, “Most of the money Iran receives from sanctions relief will not be used to support those activities.” To me that sounds like a little bit of wishful thinking—that [Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps] is going to want to get paid, Hezbollah is going to see, among other groups, might see a little bit of a windfall from these billions of dollars that might pour in. I’m not assuming something completely in the other direction either, but I just don’t know where your confidence comes from.

Obama: Well I don’t think Jack or anybody in this administration said that no money will go to the military as a consequence of sanctions relief. The question is, if Iran has $150 billion parked outside the country, does the IRGC automatically get $150 billion? Does that $150 billion then translate by orders of magnitude into their capacity to project power throughout the region? And that is what we contest, because when you look at the math, first of all they’re going to have to deliver on their obligations under any agreement, which would take a certain period of time. Then there are the mechanics of unwinding the existing restraints they have on getting that money, which takes a certain amount of time. Then [Iranian President] Rouhani and, by extension, the supreme leader have made a series of commitments to improve the Iranian economy, and the expectations are outsized. You saw the reaction of people in the streets of Tehran after the signing of the agreement. Their expectations are that [the economy is] going to improve significantly. You have Iranian elites who are champing at the bit to start moving business and getting out from under the restraints that they’ve been under.

And what is also true is that the IRGC right now, precisely because of sanctions, in some ways are able to exploit existing restrictions to have a monopoly on what comes in and out of the country, and they’ve got their own revenue sources that they’ve been able to develop, some of which may actually lessen as a consequence of sanctions relief. So I don’t think this is a science, and this is an issue that came up with the GCC countries during the summit. The point we simply make to them is: It is not a mathematical formula whereby [Iranian leaders] get a certain amount of sanctions relief and automatically they’re causing more problems in the neighborhood. What makes that particularly important is, in the discussion with the GCC countries, we pointed out that the biggest vulnerabilities that they have to Iran, and the most effective destabilizing activities of the IRGC and [Iran’s] Quds Force are actually low-cost. They are not a threat to the region because of their hardware. Ballistic missiles are a concern. They have a missile program. We have to think about missile-defense systems and how those are integrated and coordinated. But the big problems we have are weapons going in to Hezbollah, or them sending agents into Yemen, or other low-tech asymmetric threats that they’re very effective at exploiting, which they’re already doing—they’ve been doing despite sanctions. They will continue to do [this] unless we are developing greater capacity to prevent them from doing those things, which is part of what our discussion was in terms of the security assurances with the GCC countries.

You know, if you look at a situation like Yemen, part of the problem is the chronic, endemic weakness in a state like that, and the instability that Iran then seeks to exploit. If you had GCC countries who were more capable of maritime interdiction, effective intelligence, cutting off financing sources, and are more effective in terms of working and training with allied forces in a place like Yemen, so that Houthis can’t just march into Sana’a, well, if all those things are being done, Iran having some additional dollars from sanctions relief is not going to override those improvements and capabilities, and that’s really where we have to focus. Likewise with respect to Hezbollah. Hezbollah has a certain number of fighters who are hardened and effective. If Iran has some additional resources, then perhaps they’re less strained in trying to make payroll when it comes to Hezbollah, but it’s not as if they can suddenly train up and successfully deploy 10 times the number of Hezbollah fighters that are currently in Syria. That’s not something that they have automatic capacity to do. The reason that Hezbollah is effective is because they’ve got a core group of hardened folks that they’ve developed over the last 20-30 years, and—

Goldberg: You could buy more rockets and put them in south Lebanon.

Obama: Well, and the issue though with respect to rockets in south Lebanon is not whether [Iran has] enough money to do so. They’ve shown a commitment to doing that even when their economy is in the tank. The issue there is: Are we able to interdict those shipments more effectively than we do right now? And that’s the kind of thing that we have to continue to partner with Israel and other countries to stop.

Goldberg: Let me go to these questions related to Israel and your relationship to the American Jewish community. So a number of years ago, I made the case that you’re America’s first Jewish president. And I made that assessment based on the depth of your encounters with Jews: the number of Jewish mentors you’ve had—Abner Mikva, Newton Minow, and so on—teachers, law professors, fellow community organizers, Jewish literature, Jewish thought, and of course your early political base in Chicago. There are obviously Jews in America who are immune to the charms of this argument, led by Sheldon Adelson but not only him.

Here’s a quote from Adelson which always struck me as central to the way your Jewish opponents understand you: “All the steps he’s taken”—“he” meaning you—“against the State of Israel are liable to bring about the destruction of the state.”

I have my own theories about why there’s this bifurcation in the American Jewish community, and we’ve discussed this in past interviews, but what is going on? Is this the byproduct of well-intentioned anxiety about Iran, about the explosive growth of anti-Semitism in Europe? Something else?

Obama: Let me depersonalize it a little bit. First of all, there’s not really a bifurcation with respect to the attitudes of the Jewish American community about me. I consistently received overwhelming majority support from the Jewish community, and even after all the publicity around the recent differences that I’ve had with Prime Minister Netanyahu, the majority of the Jewish American community still supports me, and supports me strongly.

Goldberg: It was 70 percent in the last election.

Obama: 70 percent is pretty good. I think that there are a lot of crosscurrents that are going on right now. There is no doubt that the environment worldwide is scary for a lot of Jewish families. You’ve mentioned some of those trends. You have a Middle East that is turbulent and chaotic, and where extremists seem to be full of enthusiasm and momentum. You have Europe, where, as you’ve very effectively chronicled, there is an emergence of a more overt and dangerous anti-Semitism. And so part of the concern in the Jewish community is that, only a generation removed from the Holocaust, it seems that anti-Semitic rhetoric and anti-Israeli rhetoric is on the rise. And that will make people fearful.

What I also think is that there has been a very concerted effort on the part of some political forces to equate being pro-Israel, and hence being supportive of the Jewish people, with a rubber stamp on a particular set of policies coming out of the Israeli government. So if you are questioning settlement policy, that indicates you’re anti-Israeli, or that indicates you’re anti-Jewish. If you express compassion or empathy towards Palestinian youth, who are dealing with checkpoints or restrictions on their ability to travel, then you are suspect in terms of your support of Israel. If you are willing to get into public disagreements with the Israeli government, then the notion is that you are being anti-Israel, and by extension, anti-Jewish. I completely reject that.

Goldberg: Is that a cynical ploy by somebody?

Obama: Well I won’t ascribe motives to them. I think that some of those folks may sincerely believe that the Jewish state is consistently embattled, that it is in a very bad neighborhood and either you’re with them or against them, and end of story. And they may sincerely believe it. My response to them is that, precisely because I care so deeply about the State of Israel, precisely because I care so much about the Jewish people, I feel obliged to speak honestly and truthfully about what I think will be most likely to lead to long-term security, and will best position us to continue to combat anti-Semitism, and I make no apologies for that precisely because I am secure and confident about how deeply I care about Israel and the Jewish people.

I said in a previous interview and I meant it: I think it would be a moral failing for me as president of the United States, and a moral failing for America, and a moral failing for the world, if we did not protect Israel and stand up for its right to exist, because that would negate not just the history of the 20th century, it would negate the history of the past millennium. And it would violate what we have learned, what humanity should have learned, over that past millennium, which is that when you show intolerance and when you are persecuting minorities and when you are objectifying them and making them the Other, you are destroying something in yourself, and the world goes into a tailspin.

And so, to me, being pro-Israel and pro-Jewish is part and parcel with the values that I’ve been fighting for since I was politically conscious and started getting involved in politics. There’s a direct line between supporting the right of the Jewish people to have a homeland and to feel safe and free of discrimination and persecution, and the right of African Americans to vote and have equal protection under the law. These things are indivisible in my mind. But what is also true, by extension, is that I have to show that same kind of regard to other peoples. And I think it is true to Israel’s traditions and its values—its founding principles—that it has to care about those Palestinian kids. And when I was in Jerusalem and I spoke, the biggest applause that I got was when I spoke about those kids I had visited in Ramallah, and I said to a Israeli audience that it is profoundly Jewish, it is profoundly consistent with Israel’s traditions to care about them. And they agreed. So if that’s not translated into policy—if we’re not willing to take risks on behalf of those values—then those principles become empty words, and in fact, in my mind, it makes it more difficult for us to continue to promote those values when it comes to protecting Israel internationally.

Goldberg: You’re not known as an overly emotive politician, but there was a period in which the relationship between you and the prime minister, and therefore the U.S. government and the Israeli government, seemed very fraught and very emotional. There was more public criticism coming out of this administration directed at Israel than any other ally, and maybe at some adversaries—

Obama: Yeah, and I have to say, Jeff, I completely disagree with that assessment, and I know you wrote that. And I objected to it. I mean, the fact of the matter is that there was a very particular circumstance in which we had a policy difference that shouldn’t be papered over because it goes to the nature of the friendship between the United States and Israel, and how we deal government to government, and how we sort through those issues.

Now, a couple of things that I’d say at the outset. In every public pronouncement I’ve made, I said that the bedrock security relationships between our two countries—these are sacrosanct. Military cooperation, intelligence cooperation—none of that has been affected. I have maintained, and I think I can show that no U.S. president has been more forceful in making sure that we help Israel protect itself, and even some of my critics in Israel have acknowledged as much. I said that none of this should impact the core strategic relationship that exists between the United States and Israel, or the people-to-people relations that are so deep that they transcend any particular president or prime minister and will continue until the end of time.

But what I did say is that when, going into an election, Prime Minister Netanyahu said a Palestinian state would not happen under his watch, or there [was] discussion in which it appeared that Arab-Israeli citizens were somehow portrayed as an invading force that might vote, and that this should be guarded against—this is contrary to the very language of the Israeli Declaration of Independence, which explicitly states that all people regardless of race or religion are full participants in the democracy. When something like that happens, that has foreign-policy consequences, and precisely because we’re so close to Israel, for us to simply stand there and say nothing would have meant that this office, the Oval Office, lost credibility when it came to speaking out on these issues.

And when I am then required to come to Israel’s defense internationally, when there is anti-Semitism out there, when there is anti-Israeli policy that is based not on the particulars of the Palestinian cause but [is] based simply on hostility, I have to make sure that I am entirely credible in speaking out against those things, and that requires me then to also be honest with friends about how I view these issues. Now that makes, understandably, folks both in Israel and here in the United States uncomfortable.

But the one argument that I very much have been concerned about, and it has gotten stronger over the last 10 years … it’s less overt than the arguments that a Sheldon Adelson makes, but in some ways can be just as pernicious, is this argument that there should not be disagreements in public. So a lot of times the criticism that was leveled during this period—including from you, Jeff—was not that you disagreed with me on the assessment, but rather that it’s dangerous or unseemly for us to air these disagreements—

Goldberg: I don’t think I ever—

Obama: You didn’t make that argument—

Goldberg: I didn’t make that argument. I spend half my life airing those arguments.

Obama: Fair enough. But you understand what I’m saying, Jeff. I understand why the Jewish American community, people would get uncomfortable. I would get letters from people saying, “Listen, Mr. President, I completely support you. I agree with you on this issue, but you shouldn’t say these things publicly.” Now the truth of the matter is that what we said publicly was fairly spare and mild, and then would be built up—it seemed like an article a day, partly because when you get in arguments with friends it’s a lot more newsworthy than arguments with enemies. Well, and it’s the same problem that I’m having right now with the trade deals up on Capitol Hill. The fact that I agree with Elizabeth Warren on 90 percent of issues is not news. That we disagree on one thing is news. But my point, Jeff, is that we are at enough of an inflection point in terms of the region that trying to pretend like these important, difficult policy questions are not controversial, and that they don’t have to be sorted out, I think is a problem. And one of the great things about Israel is, these are arguments that take place in Israel every day.

Goldberg: It’s a 61/59 country right now.

Obama: If you sit down in some cafe in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem, you’re hearing far more contentious arguments, and that’s healthy. That’s part of why Americans love Israel, it’s part of the reason why I love Israel—because it is a genuine democracy and you can express your opinions. But the most important thing, I think, that we can do right now in strengthening Israel’s position is to describe very clearly why I have believed that a two-state solution is the best security plan for Israel over the long term; for me to take very seriously Israel’s security concerns about what a two-state solution might look like; to try to work through systematically those issues; but also, at the end of the day, to say to any Israeli prime minister that it will require some risks in order to achieve peace. And the question you have to ask yourself then is: How do you weigh those risks against the risks of doing nothing and just perpetuating the status quo? My argument is that the risks of doing nothing are far greater, and I ultimately—it is important for the Israeli people and the Israeli government to make its own decisions about what it needs to secure the people of that nation.

But my hope is that over time that debate gets back on a path where there’s some semblance of hope and not simply fear, because it feels to me as if … all we are talking about is based from fear. Over the short term that may seem wise—cynicism always seems a little wise—but it may lead Israel down a path in which it’s very hard to protect itself—

Goldberg: As a Jewish-majority democracy.

Obama: —as a Jewish-majority democracy. And I care deeply about preserving that Jewish democracy, because when I think about how I came to know Israel, it was based on images of, you know—

Goldberg: We talked about this once. Kibbutzim, and—

Obama: Kibbutzim, and Moshe Dayan, and Golda Meir, and the sense that not only are we creating a safe Jewish homeland, but also we are remaking the world. We’re repairing it. We are going to do it the right way. We are going to make sure that the lessons we’ve learned from our hardships and our persecutions are applied to how we govern and how we treat others. And it goes back to the values questions that we talked about earlier—those are the values that helped to nurture me and my political beliefs. It’s interesting, when I spoke to some leaders of Jewish organizations a few months back, I said to them, it’s true, I have high expectations for Israel, and they’re not unrealistic expectations, they’re not stupid expectations, they’re not the expectations that Israel would risk its own security blindly in pursuit of some idealistic pie-in-the-sky notions.

Goldberg: But you want Israel to embody Jewish values.

Obama: I want Israel, in the same way that I want the United States, to embody the Judeo-Christian and, ultimately then, what I believe are human or universal values that have led to progress over a millennium. The same values that led to the end of Jim Crow and slavery. The same values that led to Nelson Mandela being freed and a multiracial democracy emerging in South Africa. The same values that led to the Berlin Wall coming down. The same values that animate our discussion on human rights and our concern that people on the other side of the world who may be tortured or jailed for speaking their mind or worshipping—the same values that lead us to speak out against anti-Semitism. I want Israel to embody these values because Israel is aligned with us in that fight for what I believe to be true. And that doesn’t mean there aren’t tough choices and there aren’t compromises. It doesn’t mean that we don’t have to ask ourselves very tough questions about, in the short term, do we have to protect ourselves, which means we may have some choices that—

Goldberg: Hard decisions.

Obama: —And hard decisions that in peace we will not make. Those are decisions that I have to make every time I deploy U.S. forces. Those are choices that we make with respect to drones, and with respect to our intelligence agencies. And so when I spoke to Prime Minister Netanyahu, for example, about can we come up with a peace plan, I sent out our top military folks to go through systematically every contingency, every possible concern that Israel might have on its own terms about maintaining security in a two-state agreement, and what would it mean for the Jordan Valley, and what would it mean with respect to the West Bank, and I was the first one to acknowledge that you can’t have the risk of terrorists coming up right to the edge of Jerusalem and exposing populations. So this isn’t an issue of being naive or unrealistic, but ultimately yes, I think there are certain values that the United States, at its best, exemplifies. I think there are certain values that Israel, and the Jewish tradition, at its best exemplifies. And I am willing to fight for those values.

Goldberg: On this question, which is an American campus question, and which is a European question as well: Hollande’s government [in France]—Manuel Valls, the prime minister—David Cameron [in the U.K.] … we were talking about the line between anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism. And I know that you’ve talked about this with Jewish organizations, with some of your Jewish friends—how you define the differences and the similarities between these two concepts.

Obama: You know, I think a good baseline is: Do you think that Israel has a right to exist as a homeland for the Jewish people, and are you aware of the particular circumstances of Jewish history that might prompt that need and desire? And if your answer is no, if your notion is somehow that that history doesn’t matter, then that’s a problem, in my mind. If, on the other hand, you acknowledge the justness of the Jewish homeland, you acknowledge the active presence of anti-Semitism—that it’s not just something in the past, but it is current—if you acknowledge that there are people and nations that, if convenient, would do the Jewish people harm because of a warped ideology. If you acknowledge those things, then you should be able to align yourself with Israel where its security is at stake, you should be able to align yourself with Israel when it comes to making sure that it is not held to a double standard in international fora, you should align yourself with Israel when it comes to making sure that it is not isolated.

But you should be able to say to Israel, we disagree with you on this particular policy. We disagree with you on settlements. We think that checkpoints are a genuine problem. We disagree with you on a Jewish-nationalist law that would potentially undermine the rights of Arab citizens. And to me, that is entirely consistent with being supportive of the State of Israel and the Jewish people. Now for someone in Israel, including the prime minister, to disagree with those policy positions—that’s OK too. And we can have a debate, and we can have an argument. But you can’t equate people of good will who are concerned about those issues with somebody who is hostile towards Israel. And you know, I actually believe that most American Jews, most Jews around the world, and most Jews in Israel recognize as much. And that’s part of the reason why I do still have broad-based support among American Jews. It’s not because they dislike Israel, it’s not because they aren’t worried about Iran having a nuclear weapon or what Hezbollah is doing in Lebanon. It’s because I think they recognize, having looked at my history and having seen the actions of my administration, that I’ve got Israel’s back, but there are values that I share with them that may be at stake if we’re not able to find a better path forward than what feels like a potential dead-end right now.
U.S.
Barack Obama Is Such a Traditional Jew Sometimes

Jeffrey Goldberg
The Atlantic
Mar 11, 2012

Two weeks ago, after I finished interviewing President Obama on the subject of Iran and Israel, I handed him a copy of the New American Haggadah, the Passover user’s guide edited by Jonathan Safran Foer, which includes commentary by Goldblog. It is an all-around excellent Haggadah (except for my bits, he says fetchingly). Jonathan did a masterful job, first by recruiting Nathan Englander (whose new short story collection, What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, I just read on the flight over to Tel Aviv — by the way, I’m in Tel Aviv — is the equal, at least, of his first collection) to re-translate the Hebrew, in order to de-stultify it. Jonathan also recruited, in addition to yours truly, Nathaniel Deutsch, Rebecca Goldstein and Lemony Snicket to write commentaries, and found a genius named Oded Ezer to design the Haggadah.

It is not, as The New York Times points out, a Brooklyn-hipster Haggadah (as the Foer-Englander combination might suggest, particularly when you realize — just go click on that Times link — that they go shirt-shopping together), but an intelligent and beautiful Haggadah, very modern but also deeply respectful of everything that came before.

When I handed him the Haggadah, President Obama, who famously stages his own seders at the White House, (which is a very nice philo-Semitic thing to do, IMHO) spent a moment leafing through it and making approving noises. Then he said (as I told the Times): « Does this mean we can’t use the Maxwell House Haggadah anymore? »

George W. Bush was, in his own way, a philo-Semite, but he never would have made such an M.O.T. kind of joke (see the end of this post if you’re not sure what M.O.T. means). Once again, Barack Obama was riffing off the cosmic joke that he is somehow anti-Semitic, when in fact, as many people understand, he is the most Jewish president we’ve ever had (except for Rutherford B. Hayes). No president, not even Bill Clinton, has traveled so widely in Jewish circles, been taught by so many Jewish law professors, and had so many Jewish mentors, colleagues, and friends, and advisers as Barack Obama (though it is true that every so often he appoints a gentile to serve as White House chief of staff). And so no President, I’m guessing, would know that the Maxwell House Haggadah — the flimsy, wine-stained, rote, anti-intellectual Haggadah you get when you buy a can of coffee at Shoprite) — is the target, alternatively, of great derision and veneration among American Jews (at least, I’m told there are people who venerate it). I’ll grapple with the meaning of Obama’s Jewishness later, but the dispute between the Jewish right and the Jewish left over Obama is actually not about whether he is anti-Jewish or pro-Jewish, but over what sort of Jew he actually is.

After he cracked wise about Maxwell House, I told the president — this is the part the Times left out — that, as commander-in-chief, he could use whatever Haggadah he liked, though it seemed to me that our Haggadah might add some depth and meaning and aesthetic charm to his seder, as it would to any seder. I knew, of course, that he would stick with the Maxwell House Haggadah — tradition! — but it didn’t strike me until later exactly why he would stick with it. The reason he’s sticking with Maxwell House is the same reason he spoke at the AIPAC convention, and is once again not speaking at the upcoming convention of J Street, the left-leaning pro-Israel group.

Before I go on, here are all the usual Goldblog caveats: AIPAC is too unthinkingly rightist to me, J Street is too naively leftist, etc. etc., but both groups represent legitimate streams of Jewish pro-Israel thought in America, and both are worthy of the President’s attention. But the President only pays attention to one — and it’s the one where he’s not very popular. I wandered around the AIPAC convention last week, and it wasn’t too easy to hear a kind word about Obama. The 13,000 or so delegates to the AIPAC convention are drawn disproportionately from the 22 percent of Jewish voters who did not support Obama in 2008. J Street, on the other hand, is made up overwhelmingly of people who support Obama.

And how does this relate to Obama’s choice of Haggadahs? When it comes to Jews, Obama does the safe thing. The Jews in Glencoe and Syosset and Boca read the Maxwell House Haggadah, and that’s good enough for him. They like AIPAC in Glencoe and Syosset and Boca, and that’s good enough for him, as well. And by the way, just so I’m crystal-clear on the subject, the New American Haggadah is not the J Street equivalent of the haggadah. It is, like Judaism, larger than mere politics. And I’m also expressly not making the point that Obama necessarily shares J Street’s outlook on Middle East politics. He is well to the left of the AIPAC mainstream, of course, but I think he’s too hardheaded to buy much of J Street’s line. But J Street is a natural constituency for Obama, but one he avoids, because someone told him it would be politically unwise to be seen with too many J Streeters. An Obama address at J Street would do great things: It would signal to the American Jewish establishment that a left-Zionist viewpoint is a legitimate viewpoint; and it would allow the President to tell J Street just exactly where he thinks its members are right, and where he thinks they are wrong.

My prediction is that not until we have an actual Jewish president will the president address J Street (obviously, this isn’t true if the first Jewish president is Eric Cantor). Only a Jewish president — a Rahm Emanuel-type, if not Rahm himself — would feel secure enough to make the argument that AIPAC doesn’t speak for everyone. Also, the first Jewish president will undoubtedly use The New American Haggadah. Of that I’m sure.

Oh, and M.O.T = member of the tribe.

Voir encore:

Remarks by the President and First Lady on the End of the War in Iraq

Fort Bragg, North Carolina

11:52 A.M. EST

MRS. OBAMA:  Hello, everyone!  I get to start you all off.  I want to begin by thanking General Anderson for that introduction, but more importantly for his leadership here at Fort Bragg.  I can’t tell you what a pleasure and an honor it is to be back here.  I have so many wonderful memories of this place.

A couple of years ago, I came here on my very first official trip as First Lady.  And I spent some — a great time with some of the amazing military spouses, and I visited again this summer to help to put on the finishing touches on an amazing new home for a veteran and her family.  So when I heard that I had the opportunity to come back and to be a part of welcoming you all home, to say I was excited was an understatement.

And I have to tell you that when I look out at this crowd, I am simply overwhelmed.  I am overwhelmed and proud, because I know the level of strength and commitment that you all display every single day.  Whenever this country calls, you all are the ones who answer, no matter the circumstance, no matter the danger, no matter the sacrifice.

And I know that you do this not just as soldiers, not just as patriots, but as fathers and mothers, as brothers and sisters, as sons and daughters.  And I know that while your children and your spouses and your parents and siblings might not wear uniforms, they serve right alongside you.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!  (Applause.)

MRS. OBAMA:  I know that your sacrifice is their sacrifice, too.  So when I think of all that you do and all that your families do, I am so proud and so grateful.  But more importantly, I’m inspired.  But like so many Americans, I never feel like I can fully convey just how thankful I am, because words just don’t seem to be enough.

And that’s why I have been working so hard, along with Jill Biden, on a campaign that we call Joining Forces.  It’s a campaign that we hope goes beyond words.  It’s a campaign that is about action.  It’s about rallying all Americans to give you the honor, the appreciation and the support that you have all earned.  And I don’t have to tell you that this hasn’t been a difficult campaign.  We haven’t had to do much convincing because American have been lining up to show their appreciation for you and your families in very concrete and meaningful ways.

Businesses are hiring tens of thousands of veterans and military spouses.  Schools all across the country and PTAs are reaching out to our military children.  And individuals are serving their neighbors and their communities all over this country in your honor.

So I want you to know that this nation’s support doesn’t end as this war ends.  Not by a long shot.  We’re going to keep on doing this.  We have so much more work to do.  We’re going to keep finding new ways to serve all of you as well as you have served us.  And the man leading the way is standing right here.  (Applause.)  He is fighting for you and your families every single day.  He’s helped more than half a million veterans and military family members go to college through the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill.  (Applause.)

He’s taken unprecedented steps to improve mental health care.  He’s cut taxes for businesses that hire a veteran or a wounded warrior.  And he has kept his promise to responsibly bring you home from Iraq.

So please join me in welcoming someone who’s your strongest advocate, someone who shows his support for our military not only in words, but in deeds, my husband, our President, and your Commander-in-Chief, Barack Obama.  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, everybody!  (Applause.)  Hello, Fort Bragg!  All the way!

AUDIENCE:  Airborne!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, I’m sure you realize why I don’t like following Michelle Obama.  (Laughter.)  She’s pretty good.  And it is true, I am a little biased, but let me just say it:  Michelle, you are a remarkable First Lady.  You are a great advocate for military families.  (Applause.)  And you’re cute.  (Applause.)  I’m just saying — gentlemen, that’s your goal:  to marry up.  (Laughter.)  Punch above your weight.

Fort Bragg, we’re here to mark a historic moment in the life of our country and our military.  For nearly nine years, our nation has been at war in Iraq.  And you — the incredible men and women of Fort Bragg — have been there every step of the way, serving with honor, sacrificing greatly, from the first waves of the invasion to some of the last troops to come home.  So, as your Commander-in-Chief, and on behalf of a grateful nation, I’m proud to finally say these two words, and I know your families agree:  Welcome home!  (Applause.)  Welcome home.  Welcome home.  (Applause.)  Welcome home.

It is great to be here at Fort Bragg — home of the Airborne and Special Operations Forces.  I want to thank General Anderson and all your outstanding leaders for welcoming us here today, including General Dave Rodriguez, General John Mulholland.  And I want to give a shout-out to your outstanding senior enlisted leaders, including Command Sergeant Major Roger Howard, Darrin Bohn, Parry Baer.  And give a big round of applause to the Ground Forces Band.  (Applause.)

We’ve got a lot of folks in the house today.  We’ve got the 18th Airborne Corps — the Sky Dragons.  (Applause.)  We’ve got the legendary, All-American 82nd Airborne Division.  (Applause.)  We’ve got America’s quiet professionals — our Special Operations Forces.  (Applause.)  From Pope Field, we’ve got Air Force.  (Applause.)  And I do believe we’ve got some Navy and Marine Corps here, too.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Yes!  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  And though they’re not here with us today, we send our thoughts and prayers to General Helmick, Sergeant Major Rice and all the folks from the 18th Airborne and Bragg who are bringing our troops back from Iraq.  (Applause.)  We honor everyone from the 82nd Airborne and Bragg serving and succeeding in Afghanistan, and General Votel and those serving around the world.

And let me just say, one of the most humbling moments I’ve had as President was when I presented our nation’s highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, to the parents of one of those patriots from Fort Bragg who gave his life in Afghanistan — Staff Sergeant Robert Miller.

I want to salute Ginny Rodriguez, Miriam Mulholland, Linda Anderson, Melissa Helmick, Michelle Votel and all the inspiring military families here today.  We honor your service as well.  (Applause.)

And finally, I want to acknowledge your neighbors and friends who help keep your — this outstanding operation going, all who help to keep you Army Strong, and that includes Representatives Mike McIntyre, and Dave Price, and Heath Shuler, and Governor Bev Perdue.  I know Bev is so proud to have done so much for our military families.  So give them a big round of applause.  (Applause.)

Today, I’ve come to speak to you about the end of the war in Iraq.  Over the last few months, the final work of leaving Iraq has been done.  Dozens of bases with American names that housed thousands of American troops have been closed down or turned over to the Iraqis.  Thousands of tons of equipment have been packed up and shipped out.  Tomorrow, the colors of United States Forces-Iraq — the colors you fought under — will be formally cased in a ceremony in Baghdad.  Then they’ll begin their journey across an ocean, back home.

Over the last three years, nearly 150,000 U.S. troops have left Iraq.  And over the next few days, a small group of American soldiers will begin the final march out of that country.  Some of them are on their way back to Fort Bragg.  As General Helmick said, “They know that the last tactical road march out of Iraq will be a symbol, and they’re going to be a part of history.”

As your Commander-in-Chief, I can tell you that it will indeed be a part of history.  Those last American troops will move south on desert sands, and then they will cross the border out of Iraq with their heads held high.  One of the most extraordinary chapters in the history of the American military will come to an end.  Iraq’s future will be in the hands of its people.  America’s war in Iraq will be over.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, we knew this day would come.  We’ve known it for some time.  But still, there is something profound about the end of a war that has lasted so long.

Now, nine years ago, American troops were preparing to deploy to the Persian Gulf and the possibility that they would be sent to war.  Many of you were in grade school.  I was a state senator.  Many of the leaders now governing Iraq — including the Prime Minister — were living in exile.  And since then, our efforts in Iraq have taken many twists and turns.  It was a source of great controversy here at home, with patriots on both sides of the debate.  But there was one constant — there was one constant:  your patriotism, your commitment to fulfill your mission, your abiding commitment to one another.  That was constant.  That did not change.  That did not waiver.

It’s harder to end a war than begin one.  Indeed, everything that American troops have done in Iraq -– all the fighting and all the dying, the bleeding and the building, and the training and the partnering -– all of it has led to this moment of success.  Now, Iraq is not a perfect place.  It has many challenges ahead.  But we’re leaving behind a sovereign, stable and self-reliant Iraq, with a representative government that was elected by its people.  We’re building a new partnership between our nations.  And we are ending a war not with a final battle, but with a final march toward home.

This is an extraordinary achievement, nearly nine years in the making.  And today, we remember everything that you did to make it possible.

We remember the early days -– the American units that streaked across the sands and skies of Iraq; the battles from Karbala to Baghdad, American troops breaking the back of a brutal dictator in less than a month.

We remember the grind of the insurgency -– the roadside bombs, the sniper fire, the suicide attacks.  From the “triangle of death” to the fight for Ramadi; from Mosul in the north to Basra in the south -– your will proved stronger than the terror of those who tried to break it.

We remember the specter of sectarian violence -– al Qaeda’s attacks on mosques and pilgrims, militias that carried out campaigns of intimidation and campaigns of assassination.  And in the face of ancient divisions, you stood firm to help those Iraqis who put their faith in the future.

We remember the surge and we remember the Awakening -– when the abyss of chaos turned toward the promise of reconciliation.  By battling and building block by block in Baghdad, by bringing tribes into the fold and partnering with the Iraqi army and police, you helped turn the tide toward peace.

And we remember the end of our combat mission and the emergence of a new dawn -– the precision of our efforts against al Qaeda in Iraq, the professionalism of the training of Iraqi security forces, and the steady drawdown of our forces.  In handing over responsibility to the Iraqis, you preserved the gains of the last four years and made this day possible.

Just last month, some of you — members of the Falcon Brigade —

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!

THE PRESIDENT:  — turned over the Anbar Operations Center to the Iraqis in the type of ceremony that has become commonplace over these last several months.  In an area that was once the heart of the insurgency, a combination of fighting and training, politics and partnership brought the promise of peace.  And here’s what the local Iraqi deputy governor said:  “This is all because of the U.S. forces’ hard work and sacrifice.”

That’s in the words of an Iraqi.  Hard work and sacrifice.  Those words only begin to describe the costs of this war and the courage of the men and women who fought it.

We know too well the heavy cost of this war.  More than 1.5 million Americans have served in Iraq — 1.5 million.  Over 30,000 Americans have been wounded, and those are only the wounds that show.  Nearly 4,500 Americans made the ultimate sacrifice — including 202 fallen heroes from here at Fort Bragg — 202.  So today, we pause to say a prayer for all those families who have lost their loved ones, for they are part of our broader American family.  We grieve with them.

We also know that these numbers don’t tell the full story of the Iraq war -– not even close.  Our civilians have represented our country with skill and bravery.  Our troops have served tour after tour of duty, with precious little dwell time in between.  Our Guard and Reserve units stepped up with unprecedented service.  You’ve endured dangerous foot patrols and you’ve endured the pain of seeing your friends and comrades fall.  You’ve had to be more than soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen –- you’ve also had to be diplomats and development workers and trainers and peacemakers.  Through all this, you have shown why the United States military is the finest fighting force in the history of the world.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  As Michelle mentioned, we also know that the burden of war is borne by your families.  In countless base communities like Bragg, folks have come together in the absence of a loved one.  As the Mayor of Fayetteville put it, “War is not a political word here.  War is where our friends and neighbors go.”  So there have been missed birthday parties and graduations.  There are bills to pay and jobs that have to be juggled while picking up the kids.  For every soldier that goes on patrol, there are the husbands and the wives, the mothers, the fathers, the sons, the daughters praying that they come back.

So today, as we mark the end of the war, let us acknowledge, let us give a heartfelt round of applause for every military family that has carried that load over the last nine years.  You too have the thanks of a grateful nation.  (Applause.)

Part of ending a war responsibly is standing by those who fought it.  It’s not enough to honor you with words.  Words are cheap.  We must do it with deeds.  You stood up for America; America needs to stand up for you.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!

THE PRESIDENT:  That’s why, as your Commander-in Chief, I am committed to making sure that you get the care and the benefits and the opportunities that you’ve earned. For those of you who remain in uniform, we will do whatever it takes to ensure the health of our force –- including your families.  We will keep faith with you.

We will help our wounded warriors heal, and we will stand by those who’ve suffered the unseen wounds of war.  And make no mistake — as we go forward as a nation, we are going to keep America’s armed forces the strongest fighting force the world has ever seen.  That will not stop.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  That will not stop.  But our commitment doesn’t end when you take off the uniform.  You’re the finest that our nation has to offer.  And after years of rebuilding Iraq, we want to enlist our veterans in the work of rebuilding America.  That’s why we’re committed to doing everything we can to extend more opportunities to those who have served.

That includes the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, so that you and your families can get the education that allows you to live out your dreams.  That includes a national effort to put our veterans to work.  We’ve worked with Congress to pass a tax credit so that companies have the incentive to hire vets.  And Michelle has worked with the private sector to get commitments to create 100,000 jobs for those who’ve served.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!

THE PRESIDENT:  And by the way, we’re doing this not just because it’s the right thing to do by you –- we’re doing it because it’s the right thing to do for America.  Folks like my grandfather came back from World War II to form the backbone of this country’s middle class.  For our post-9/11 veterans -– with your skill, with your discipline, with your leadership, I am confident that the story of your service to America is just beginning.

But there’s something else that we owe you.  As Americans, we have a responsibility to learn from your service.  I’m thinking of an example — Lieutenant Alvin Shell, who was based here at Fort Bragg.  A few years ago, on a supply route outside Baghdad, he and his team were engulfed by flames from an RPG attack.  Covered with gasoline, he ran into the fire to help his fellow soldiers, and then led them two miles back to Camp Victory where he finally collapsed, covered with burns.  When they told him he was a hero, Alvin disagreed.  “I’m not a hero,” he said.  “A hero is a sandwich. “  (Laughter.)  “I’m a paratrooper.”

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!

THE PRESIDENT:  We could do well to learn from Alvin.  This country needs to learn from you.  Folks in Washington need to learn from you.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!

THE PRESIDENT:  Policymakers and historians will continue to analyze the strategic lessons of Iraq — that’s important to do.  Our commanders will incorporate the hard-won lessons into future military campaigns — that’s important to do.  But the most important lesson that we can take from you is not about military strategy –- it’s a lesson about our national character.

For all of the challenges that our nation faces, you remind us that there’s nothing we Americans can’t do when we stick together.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!

THE PRESIDENT:  For all the disagreements that we face, you remind us there’s something bigger than our differences, something that makes us one nation and one people regardless of color, regardless of creed, regardless of what part of the country we come from, regardless of what backgrounds we come out of.  You remind us we’re one nation.

And that’s why the United States military is the most respected institution in our land because you never forget that.  You can’t afford to forget it.  If you forget it, somebody dies.  If you forget it, a mission fails.  So you don’t forget it.  You have each other’s backs.  That’s why you, the 9/11 Generation, has earned your place in history.

Because of you — because you sacrificed so much for a people that you had never met, Iraqis have a chance to forge their own destiny.  That’s part of what makes us special as Americans.  Unlike the old empires, we don’t make these sacrifices for territory or for resources.  We do it because it’s right.  There can be no fuller expression of America’s support for self-determination than our leaving Iraq to its people.  That says something about who we are.

Because of you, in Afghanistan we’ve broken the momentum of the Taliban.  Because of you, we’ve begun a transition to the Afghans that will allow us to bring our troops home from there.  And around the globe, as we draw down in Iraq, we have gone after al Qaeda so that terrorists who threaten America will have no safe haven, and Osama bin Laden will never again walk the face of this Earth.

AUDIENCE:  Hooah!  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  So here’s what I want you to know, and here’s what I want all our men and women in uniform to know:  Because of you, we are ending these wars in a way that will make America stronger and the world more secure.  Because of you.

That success was never guaranteed.  And let us never forget the source of American leadership:  our commitment to the values that are written into our founding documents, and a unique willingness among nations to pay a great price for the progress of human freedom and dignity.  This is who we are.  That’s what we do as Americans, together.

The war in Iraq will soon belong to history.  Your service belongs to the ages.  Never forget that you are part of an unbroken line of heroes spanning two centuries –- from the colonists who overthrew an empire, to your grandparents and parents who faced down fascism and communism, to you –- men and women who fought for the same principles in Fallujah and Kandahar, and delivered justice to those who attacked us on 9/11.

Looking back on the war that saved our union, a great American, Oliver Wendell Holmes, once paid tribute to those who served.  “In our youth,” he said, “our hearts were touched with fire.  It was given to us to learn at the outset that life is a profound and passionate thing.”

All of you here today have lived through the fires of war.  You will be remembered for it.  You will be honored for it — always.  You have done something profound with your lives.  When this nation went to war, you signed up to serve.  When times were tough, you kept fighting.  When there was no end in sight, you found light in the darkness.

And years from now, your legacy will endure in the names of your fallen comrades etched on headstones at Arlington, and the quiet memorials across our country; in the whispered words of admiration as you march in parades, and in the freedom of our children and our grandchildren.  And in the quiet of night, you will recall that your heart was once touched by fire.  You will know that you answered when your country called; you served a cause greater than yourselves; you helped forge a just and lasting peace with Iraq, and among all nations.

I could not be prouder of you, and America could not be prouder of you.

God bless you all, God bless your families, and God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)

Voir par ailleurs:

National Security
Robert Gates, former defense secretary, offers harsh critique of Obama’s leadership in ‘Duty’
Bob Woodward

The Washington Post

January 7, 2014

In a new memoir, former defense secretary Robert Gates unleashes harsh judgments about President Obama’s leadership and his commitment to the Afghanistan war, writing that by early 2010 he had concluded the president “doesn’t believe in his own strategy, and doesn’t consider the war to be his. For him, it’s all about getting out.”

Leveling one of the more serious charges that a defense secretary could make against a commander in chief sending forces into combat, Gates asserts that Obama had more than doubts about the course he had charted in Afghanistan. The president was “skeptical if not outright convinced it would fail,” Gates writes in “Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War.”

Obama, after months of contentious discussion with Gates and other top advisers, deployed 30,000 more troops in a final push to stabilize Afghanistan before a phased withdrawal beginning in mid-2011. “I never doubted Obama’s support for the troops, only his support for their mission,” Gates writes.

As a candidate, Obama had made plain his opposition to the 2003 Iraq invasion while embracing the Afghanistan war as a necessary response to the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, requiring even more military resources to succeed. In Gates’s highly emotional account, Obama remains uncomfortable with the inherited wars and distrustful of the military that is providing him options. Their different worldviews produced a rift that, at least for Gates, became personally wounding and impossible to repair.

In a statement Tuesday evening, National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said Obama “deeply appreciates Bob Gates’ service as Secretary of Defense, and his lifetime of service to our country.”

“As has always been the case, the President welcomes differences of view among his national security team, which broaden his options and enhance our policies,” Hayden said in the statement. “The President wishes Secretary Gates well as he recovers from his recent injury, and discusses his book.” Gates fractured his first vertebra last week in a fall at his home in Washington state.

It is rare for a former Cabinet member, let alone a defense secretary occupying a central position in the chain of command, to publish such an antagonistic portrait of a sitting president.

Gates’s severe criticism is even more surprising — some might say contradictory — because toward the end of “Duty,” he says of Obama’s chief Afghanistan policies, “I believe Obama was right in each of these decisions.” That particular view is not a universal one; like much of the debate about the best path to take in Afghanistan, there is disagreement on how well the surge strategy worked, including among military officials.

The sometimes bitter tone in Gates’s 594-page account contrasts sharply with the even-tempered image that he cultivated during his many years of government service, including stints at the CIA and National Security Council. That image endured through his nearly five years in the Pentagon’s top job, beginning in President George W. Bush’s second term and continuing after Obama asked him to remain in the post. In “Duty,” Gates describes his outwardly calm demeanor as a facade. Underneath, he writes, he was frequently “seething” and “running out of patience on multiple fronts.”

The book, published by Knopf, is scheduled for release Jan. 14.

[PHOTOS: A look at Robert Gates’s career in government]

Gates, a Republican, writes about Obama with an ambivalence that he does not resolve, praising him as “a man of personal integrity” even as he faults his leadership. Though the book simmers with disappointment in Obama, it reflects outright contempt for Vice President Biden and many of Obama’s top aides.

Biden is accused of “poisoning the well” against the military leadership. Thomas Donilon, initially Obama’s deputy national security adviser, and then-Lt. Gen. Douglas E. Lute, the White House coordinator for the wars, are described as regularly engaged in “aggressive, suspicious, and sometimes condescending and insulting questioning of our military leaders.”

In her statement, Hayden said Obama “disagrees with Secretary Gates’ assessment” of the vice president.

“From his leadership on the Balkans in the Senate, to his efforts to end the war in Iraq, Joe Biden has been one of the leading statesmen of his time, and has helped advance America’s leadership in the world,” Hayden said. “President Obama relies on his good counsel every day.”

Gates is 70, nearly 20 years older than Obama. He has worked for every president going back to Richard Nixon, with the exception of Bill Clinton. Throughout his government career, he was known for his bipartisan detachment, the consummate team player. “Duty” is likely to provide ammunition for those who believe it is risky for a president to fill such a key Cabinet post with a holdover from the opposition party.

He writes, “I have tried to be fair in describing actions and motivations of others.” He seems well aware that Obama and his aides will not see it that way.

While serving as defense secretary, Gates gave Obama high marks, saying privately in the summer of 2010 that the president is “very thoughtful and analytical, but he is also quite decisive.” He added, “I think we have a similar approach to dealing with national security issues.”

Obama echoed Gates’s comments in a July 10, 2010, interview for my book “Obama’s Wars.” The president said: “Bob Gates has, I think, served me extraordinarily well. And part of the reason is, you know, I’m not sure if he considers this an insult or a compliment, but he and I actually think a lot alike, in broad terms.”

During that interview, Obama said he believed he “had garnered confidence and trust in Gates.” In “Duty,” Gates complains repeatedly that confidence and trust were what he felt was lacking in his dealings with Obama and his team. “Why did I feel I was constantly at war with everybody, as I have detailed in these pages?” he writes. “Why was I so often angry? Why did I so dislike being back in government and in Washington?”

His answer is that “the broad dysfunction in Washington wore me down, especially as I tried to maintain a public posture of nonpartisan calm, reason and conciliation.”

His lament about Washington was not the only factor contributing to his unhappiness. Gates also writes of the toll taken by the difficulty of overseeing wars against terrorism and insurgencies in countries such as Iraq and Afghanistan. Such wars do not end with a clear surrender; Gates acknowledges having ambiguous feelings about both conflicts. For example, he writes that he does not know what he would have recommended if he had been asked his opinion on Bush’s 2003 decision to invade Iraq.

Three years later, Bush recruited Gates — who had served his father for 15 months as CIA director in the early 1990s — to take on the defense job. The first half of “Duty” covers those final two years in the Bush administration. Gates reveals some disagreements from that period, but none as fundamental or as personal as those he describes with Obama and his aides in the book’s second half.

“All too early in the [Obama] administration,” he writes, “suspicion and distrust of senior military officers by senior White House officials — including the president and vice president — became a big problem for me as I tried to manage the relationship between the commander in chief and his military leaders.”

Gates offers a catalogue of various meetings, based in part on notes that he and his aides made at the time, including an exchange between Obama and then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton that he calls “remarkable.”

He writes: “Hillary told the president that her opposition to the [2007] surge in Iraq had been political because she was facing him in the Iowa primary. . . . The president conceded vaguely that opposition to the Iraq surge had been political. To hear the two of them making these admissions, and in front of me, was as surprising as it was dismaying.”

Earlier in the book, he describes Hillary Clinton in the sort of glowing terms that might be used in a political endorsement. “I found her smart, idealistic but pragmatic, tough-minded, indefatigable, funny, a very valuable colleague, and a superb representative of the United States all over the world,” he wrote.

[READ: The Fix on what Gates’s memoir could mean for a Clinton campaign]
March 3, 2011

“Duty” reflects the memoir genre, declaring that this is how the writer saw it, warts and all, including his own. That focus tends to give short shrift to the fuller, established record. For example, in recounting the difficult discussions that led to the Afghan surge strategy in 2009, Gates makes no reference to the six-page “terms sheet” that Obama drafted at the end, laying out the rationale for the surge and withdrawal timetable. Obama asked everyone involved to sign on, signaling agreement.

According to the meeting notes of another participant, Gates is quoted as telling Obama, “You sound the bugle . . . Mr. President, and Mike [Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff] and I will be the first to charge the hill.”

Gates does not include such a moment in “Duty.” He picks up the story a bit later, after Gen. David H. Petraeus, then the central commander in charge of both the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, made remarks to the press suggesting he was not comfortable with setting a fixed date to start withdrawal.

At a March 3, 2011, National Security Council meeting, Gates writes, the president opened with a “blast.” Obama criticized the military for “popping off in the press” and said he would push back hard against any delay in beginning the withdrawal.

According to Gates, Obama concluded, “ ‘If I believe I am being gamed . . .’ and left the sentence hanging there with the clear implication the consequences would be dire.”

Gates continues: “I was pretty upset myself. I thought implicitly accusing” Petraeus, and perhaps Mullen and Gates himself, “of gaming him in front of thirty people in the Situation Room was inappropriate, not to mention highly disrespectful of Petraeus. As I sat there, I thought: the president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand [Afghanistan President Hamid] Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy, and doesn’t consider the war to be his. For him, it’s all about getting out.”

[READ: World Views: Gates was wrong on the most important issue he ever faced]
‘Breaches of faith’

Lack of trust is a major thread in Gates’s account, along with his unsparing criticism of Obama’s aides. At times, the two threads intertwine. For example, after the devastating 2010 Haitian earthquake that had left tens of thousands dead, Gates met with Obama and Donilon, the deputy national security adviser, about disaster relief.

Donilon was “complaining about how long we were taking,” Gates writes. “Then he went too far, questioning in front of the president and a roomful of people whether General [Douglas] Fraser [head of the U.S. Southern Command] was competent to lead this effort. I’ve rarely been angrier in the Oval Office than I was at that moment. . . . My initial instinct was to storm out, telling the president on the way that he didn’t need two secretaries of defense. It took every bit of my self-discipline to stay seated on the sofa.”

Gates confirms a previously reported statement in which he told Obama’s first national security adviser, retired Marine Gen. James Jones, that he thought Donilon would be a “disaster” if he succeeded Jones (as Donilon did in late 2010). Gates writes that Obama quizzed him about this characterization; a one-on-one meeting with Donilon followed, and that “cleared the air,” according to Gates.

His second year with Obama proved as tough as the first. “For me, 2010 was a year of continued conflict and a couple of important White House breaches of faith,” he writes.

The first, he says, was Obama’s decision to seek the repeal of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy toward gays serving in the military. Though Gates says he supported the decision, there had been months and months of debate, with details still to work out. On one day’s notice, Obama informed Gates and Mullen that he would announce his request for a repeal of the law. Obama had “blindsided Admiral Mullen and me,” Gates writes.

Similarly, in a battle over defense spending, “I was extremely angry with President Obama,” Gates writes. “I felt he had breached faith with me . . . on the budget numbers.” As with “don’t ask, don’t tell,” “I felt that agreements with the Obama White House were good for only as long as they were politically convenient.”

Gates acknowledges forthrightly in “Duty” that he did not reveal his dismay. “I never confronted Obama directly over what I (as well as [Hillary] Clinton, [then-CIA Director Leon] Panetta, and others) saw as the president’s determination that the White House tightly control every aspect of national security policy and even operations. His White House was by far the most centralized and controlling in national security of any I had seen since Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger ruled the roost.”

It got so bad during internal debates over whether to intervene in Libya in 2011 that Gates says he felt compelled to deliver a “rant” because the White House staff was “talking about military options with the president without Defense being involved.”

Gates says his instructions to the Pentagon were: “Don’t give the White House staff and [national security staff] too much information on the military options. They don’t understand it, and ‘experts’ like Samantha Power will decide when we should move militarily.” Power, then on the national security staff and now U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, has been a strong advocate for humanitarian intervention.

Another time, after Donilon and Biden tried to pass orders to Gates, he told the two, “The last time I checked, neither of you are in the chain of command,” and said he expected to get orders directly from Obama.

Life at the top was no picnic, Gates writes. He did little or no socializing. “Every evening I could not wait to get home, get my office homework out of the way, write condolence letters to the families of the fallen, pour a stiff drink, wolf down a frozen dinner or carry out,” since his wife, Becky, often remained at their home in Washington state.

“I got up at five every morning to run two miles around the Mall in Washington, past the World War II, Korean, and Vietnam memorials, and in front of the Lincoln Memorial. And every morning before dawn, I would ritually look up at that stunning white statue of Lincoln, say good morning, and sadly ask him, How did you do it?”

The memoir’s title comes from a quote, “God help me to do my duty,” that Gates says he kept on his desk. The quote has been attributed to Abraham Lincoln’s war secretary, Edwin Stanton.

At his confirmation hearings to be Bush’s defense secretary in late 2006, Gates told the senators that he had not “come back to Washington to be a bump on a log and not say exactly what I think, and to speak candidly and, frankly, boldly to people at both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue about what I believe and what I think needs to be done.”

But Gates says he did not speak his mind when the committee chairman listed the problems he would face as secretary. “I remember sitting at the witness table listening to this litany of woe and thinking, “What the hell am I doing here? I have walked right into the middle of a category-five shitstorm. It was the first of many, many times I would sit at the witness table thinking something very different from what I was saying.”

“Duty” offers the familiar criticism of Congress and its culture, describing it as “truly ugly.” Gates’s cold feelings toward the legislative branch stand in stark contrast to his warmth for the military. He repeatedly describes his affection for the troops, especially those in combat.

Gates wanted to quit at the end of 2010 but agreed to stay at Obama’s urging, finally leaving in mid-2011. He later joined a consulting firm with two of Bush’s closest foreign policy advisers — former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice and Stephen Hadley, the national security adviser during Bush’s second term. The firm is called RiceHadleyGates. In October, he became president-elect of the Boy Scouts of America.

Gates writes, “I did not enjoy being secretary of defense,” or as he e-mailed one friend while still serving, “People have no idea how much I detest this job.”

Evelyn Duffy contributed to this report.

Voir enfin:

Asia Pacific
Bipartisan Critic Turns His Gaze Toward Obama
In His New Memoir, Robert M. Gates, the Former Defense Secretary, Offers a Critique of the President
Thom Shanker

Jan. 7, 2014

WASHINGTON — After ordering a troop increase in Afghanistan, President Obama eventually lost faith in the strategy, his doubts fed by White House advisers who continually brought him negative news reports suggesting it was failing, according to his former defense secretary Robert M. Gates.

In a new memoir, Mr. Gates, a Republican holdover from the Bush administration who served for two years under Mr. Obama, praises the president as a rigorous thinker who frequently made decisions “opposed by his political advisers or that would be unpopular with his fellow Democrats.” But Mr. Gates says that by 2011, Mr. Obama began criticizing — sometimes emotionally — the way his policy in Afghanistan was playing out.

At a pivotal meeting in the situation room in March 2011, called to discuss the withdrawal timetable, Mr. Obama opened with a blast of frustration — expressing doubts about Gen. David H. Petraeus, the commander he had chosen, and questioning whether he could do business with the Afghan president, Hamid Karzai.

“As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his,” Mr. Gates wrote. “For him, it’s all about getting out.”

“Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War” is the first book describing the Obama administration’s policy deliberations written from inside the cabinet. Mr. Gates offers 600 pages of detailed history of his personal wars with Congress, the Pentagon bureaucracy and, in particular, Mr. Obama’s White House staff. He wrote that the “controlling nature” of the staff “took micromanagement and operational meddling to a new level.”

Mr. Obama’s decision to retain Mr. Gates at the Pentagon gave his national security team a respected professional and veteran of decades at the center of American foreign policy — and offered a bipartisan aura. But it was not long before Mr. Obama’s inner circle tired of the defense secretary they initially praised as “Yoda” — a reference to the wise, aged Jedi master in the “Star Wars” films — and he of them.

Mr. Gates describes his running policy battles within Mr. Obama’s inner circle, among them Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.; Tom Donilon, who served as national security adviser; and Douglas E. Lute, the Army lieutenant general who managed Afghan policy issues at the time.

Mr. Gates calls Mr. Biden “a man of integrity,” but questions his judgment. “I think he has been wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades,” Mr. Gates writes. He has high praise for Hillary Rodham Clinton, who served as secretary of state when he was at the Pentagon and was a frequent ally on national security issues.

But Mr. Gates does say that, in defending her support for the Afghan surge, she confided that her opposition to Mr. Bush’s Iraq surge when she was in the Senate and a presidential candidate “had been political,” since she was facing Mr. Obama, then an antiwar senator, in the Iowa primary. In the same conversation, Mr. Obama “conceded vaguely that opposition to the Iraq surge had been political,” Mr. Gates recalls. “To hear the two of them making these admissions, and in front of me, was as surprising as it was dismaying.”

Mr. Gates discloses that he almost quit in September 2009 after a dispute-filled meeting to assess the way ahead in Afghanistan, including the number of troops that were needed. “I was deeply uneasy with the Obama White House’s lack of appreciation — from the top down — of the uncertainties and unpredictability of war,” he recalls. “I came closer to resigning that day than at any other time in my tenure.”

Caitlin Hayden, the National Security Council spokeswoman, released a statement late Tuesday saying that “deliberations over our policy on Afghanistan have been widely reported on over the years, and it is well known that the president has been committed to achieving the mission of disrupting, dismantling and defeating Al Qaeda, while also ensuring that we have a clear plan for winding down the war, which will end this year.”

In response to Mr. Gates’s comments on Mr. Biden, she said, “President Obama relies on his good counsel every day.”

Mr. Gates is a bipartisan critic of the two presidents he served as defense secretary. He holds the George W. Bush administration responsible for misguided policy that squandered the early victories in Afghanistan and Iraq, although he credits Mr. Bush with ordering a troop surge in Iraq that averted collapse of the mission.

And he says that only he and Mr. Bush’s second secretary of state, Condoleezza Rice, pressed forcefully to close the detention center at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, with little result.

Mr. Gates does not spare himself from criticism. He describes how he came to feel “an overwhelming sense of personal responsibility” for the troops he ordered into combat, which left him misty-eyed when discussing their sacrifices — and perhaps clouded his judgment when coldhearted national security interests were at stake.

Mr. Gates acknowledges that he initially opposed sending Special Operations forces to attack a housing compound in Pakistan where Osama bin Laden was believed to be hiding. Mr. Gates writes that Mr. Obama’s approval for the Navy SEAL mission, despite strong doubts that Bin Laden was even there, was “one of the most courageous decisions I had ever witnessed in the White House.”

In his final chapter, Mr. Gates makes clear his verdict on the president’s overall Afghan strategy: “I believe Obama was right in each of these decisions.”

Mr. Gates reveals the depth of Mr. Obama’s concerns over leaks of classified information to news outlets, writing that within his first month in office, the new president said he wanted a criminal investigation into disclosures by The New York Times on covert action intended to sabotage Iran’s suspected effort to develop nuclear weapons.

Mr. Gates, too, ordered a campaign to stamp out unauthorized disclosures, but grew rankled when White House officials always blamed the Pentagon for leaks. “Only the president would acknowledge to me he had problems with leaks in his own shop,” Mr. Gates writes.

Mr. Gates, who began public service as an Air Force intelligence officer, tells of emotional meetings with troops in combat, with those who suffered horrific wounds and with their families.

He writes that he is to be buried in Arlington Cemetery’s Section 60, the final home for many killed in Afghanistan and Iraq. “The greatest honor possible would be to rest among my heroes for all eternity,” Mr. Gates writes in closing his memoir.

Voir encore:

Panetta: Obama, White House Responsible For Chaos In Iraq
Former Secretary of Defense breaks down history in upcoming memoir
Washington Free Beacon Staff
October 2, 2014

 Obama’s former Secretary of Defense and Director of the CIA, Leon Panetta, has blamed the president for the chaos unfolding in Iraq.

Time previewed Panetta’s upcoming memoir, Worthy Fights: A Memoir of Leadership in War and Peace. In the book, Panetta said he and others in the Obama administration pushed for a residual force of U.S. troops to remain in Iraq but their efforts were stymied by White House.

“The White House was so eager to rid itself of Iraq that it was willing to withdraw rather than lock in arrangements that would preserve our influence and interests,” Panetta wrote.
Through the fall of 2011, the main question facing the American military in Iraq was what our role would be now that combat operations were over. When President Obama announced the end of our combat mission in August 2010, he acknowledged that we would maintain troops for a while. Now that the deadline was upon us, however, it was clear to me–and many others–that withdrawing all our forces would endanger the fragile stability then barely holding Iraq together.

Privately, the various leadership factions in Iraq all confided that they wanted some U.S. forces to remain as a bulwark against sectarian violence. But none was willing to take that position publicly, and Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki concluded that any Status of Forces Agreement, which would give legal protection to those forces, would have to be submitted to the Iraqi parliament for approval.

That made reaching agreement very difficult given the internal politics of Iraq, but representatives of the Defense and State departments, with scrutiny from the White House, tried to reach a deal.We had leverage. We could, for instance, have threatened to withdraw reconstruction aid to Iraq if al-Maliki would not support some sort of continued U.S. military presence. My fear, as I voiced to the President and others, was that if the country split apart or slid back into the violence that we’d seen in the years immediately following the U.S. invasion, it could become a new haven for terrorists to plot attacks against the U.S. Iraq’s stability was not only in Iraq’s interest but also in ours. I privately and publicly advocated for a residual force that could provide training and security for Iraq’s military.

To my frustration, the White House coordinated the negotiations but never really led them. Officials there seemed content to endorse an agreement if State and Defense could reach one, but without the President’s active advocacy, al-Maliki was allowed to slip away. The deal never materialized. To this day, I believe that a small U.S. troop presence in Iraq could have effectively advised the Iraqi military on how to deal with al-Qaeda’s resurgence and the sectarian violence that has engulfed the country.
Panetta is a close ally of the Clintons, and his memoir may be seen as an effort to distance Hillary Clinton from the Obama administration’s foreign policy failures. The memoir comes out on October 7.

Voir enfin:

Politics
A Closer Look at Hillary Clinton’s Emails on Benghazi
Michael S. Schmidt

May 21, 2015

Hillary Rodham Clinton last year provided the State Department with 55,000 pages of emails that she said were related to her work as secretary of state, all from the personal account she exclusively used while leading the department.

Roughly 850 pages of those emails that relate to Libya and the 2012 attacks on the United States outposts in Benghazi were handed over to a special committee appointed to investigate the attacks. In response to a request from Mrs. Clinton, the State Department plans to release those emails in the coming days. The New York Times obtained more than a third of those documents and has provided a guide to some of the key findings related to the Benghazi attacks below.

Blumenthal Memos Were Often Circulated Without Identifying Their Source

What Sidney Blumenthal’s Memos to Hillary Clinton Said, and How They Were HandledMAY 18, 2015
From 2011 to 2012, Sidney Blumenthal, a longtime friend and confidant who was a senior adviser to Mrs. Clinton during her 2008 presidential campaign, sent her at least 25 memos about Libya, including several about the Benghazi attacks. Mrs. Clinton forwarded most of them to Jake Sullivan, her trusted foreign policy adviser. Mr. Sullivan would then send the memos along to other senior State Department officials, asking for their feedback. There is no evidence those officials were told that the memos were from Mr. Blumenthal. In April 2012, J. Christopher Stevens, the ambassador who died in the Benghazi attacks, was asked by Mr. Sullivan to provide his thoughts on the latest information “from HRC friend.” (Pages 127-128) Brian Fallon, a spokesman for Mrs. Clinton, said that Mr. Blumenthal had not been working for the government in any official capacity at the time and that his emails to Mrs. Clinton had not been solicited.

In Memo, Blumenthal Initially Blames Demonstrators for Attacks
The day after the Sept. 11, 2012, attacks on American outposts in Benghazi that killed Mr. Stevens and three other Americans, Mr. Blumenthal sent Mrs. Clinton a memo with his intelligence about what had occurred. The memo said the attacks were by “demonstrators” who “were inspired by what many devout Libyan viewed as a sacrilegious internet video on the prophet Mohammed originating in America.” Mrs. Clinton forwarded the memo to Mr. Sullivan, saying “More info.” (Pages 193-195)

Second Memo Provides Detailed Account of Benghazi
The next day, Mr. Blumenthal sent Mrs. Clinton a more thorough account of what had occurred. Citing “sensitive sources” in Libya, the memo provided extensive detail about the episode, saying that the siege had been set off by members of Ansar al-Shariah, the Libyan terrorist group. Those militants had ties to Al Qaeda, had planned the attacks for a month and had used a nearby protest as cover for the siege, the memo said. “We should get this around asap” Mrs. Clinton said in an email to Mr. Sullivan. “Will do,” he responded. That information contradicted the Obama administration’s narrative at the time about what had spawned the attacks. Republicans have said the administration misled the country about the attacks because it did not want to undermine the notion that President Obama, who was up for re-election, was winning the war on terrorism. (Pages 200-203)

Blumenthal Warns of Political Attacks
In early October 2012, a month before Mr. Obama was re-elected, Mr. Blumenthal forwarded Mrs. Clinton an article on a left-leaning website. The article cautioned that the Republicans could exploit the attacks in a “Jimmy Carter Strategy” and use them to paint Mr. Obama as weak on terrorism. Mrs. Clinton forwarded the email to Mr. Sullivan. “Be sure Ben knows they need to be ready for this line of attack,” Mrs. Clinton wrote. She did not say to which Ben she was referring, but one of Mr. Obama’s senior national security advisers is Benjamin J. Rhodes, who handles communications and speechwriting. Mrs. Clinton then told Mr. Blumenthal that she was “pushing to WH” the story. “According to Politico yesterday, there was an internal argument within the Romney campaign over Libya,” Mr. Blumenthal said in response. “Obviously, the neocons and the Rove oriented faction (Ed Gillespie, Rove’s surrogate is now a Romney campaign adviser) beat Stuart Stevens.” (Pages 215-225)

Clinton’s Personal Email Account Contained Sensitive Information
Mrs. Clinton’s emails show that she had a special type of government information known as “sensitive but unclassified,” or “SBU,” in her account. That information included the whereabouts and travel plans of American officials in Libya as security there deteriorated during the uprising against the leadership of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi in 2011. Nearly a year and a half before the attacks in Benghazi, Mr. Stevens, then an American envoy to the rebels, considered leaving Benghazi citing deteriorating security, according to an email to Mrs. Clinton marked “SBU.”

Voir de plus:

Nouvelle polémique autour de la mort de Ben Laden
Emmanuelle.Rivière
Le Figaro

11/05/2015

L’enquête d’une figure du journalisme d’investigation américain remet en cause la thèse officielle sur la mort de Ben Laden. Des affirmations «sans fondement», a aussitôt rétorqué lundi la Maison-Blanche.

Publiée dans la London Review of Books, l’enquête de Seymour M. Hersh, emblème du journalisme d’investigation américain, tend à discréditer la thèse officielle de l’administration Obama sur la mort d’Oussama Ben Laden. Après avoir décrypté le déroulement des opérations qui ont conduit à l’élimination du chef d’al-Qaida, le journaliste ironise: «L’histoire de la Maison-Blanche aurait pu être écrite par Lewis Caroll».

Seymour M. Hersh affirme d’abord que la traque de Ben Laden en mai 2011 n’a pas seulement été menée par les États-Unis. D’après lui, l’opération était connue d’une poignée d’officiels pakistanais, qui pourraient même y avoir contribué. Citant une «source anonyme», il va même jusqu’à évoquer un chantage de l’administration américaine sur le Pakistan. «Nous étions très réticents, mais cela devait être fait parce que tous les programmes d’aides américains auraient été coupés», aurait déclaré la fameuse source d’Hersh. Cette même source ajoutant: «Ils ont dit qu’ils allaient nous affamer si nous ne l’autorisions pas [le raid] et l’accord a été donné alors que Ahmed Shuja Pasha [le directeur général des services secrets pakistanais] était à Washington».

Ben Laden était-il emprisonné par le Pakistan?
D’après le journaliste, le cerveau des attentats de 2001 ne se cachait pas à Abottabad (le lieu où il a été tué) mais y était, en réalité, emprisonné par le Pakistan. Toujours selon le journaliste, c’est une source pakistanaise, rémunérée 25 millions de dollars, qui aurait ensuite rapporté la localisation précise ainsi que des échantillons ADN du terroriste afin de prouver ses affirmations.

Mais Seymour Hersh ne s’arrête pas là. Il soutient que la mise à mort du chef terroriste n’a pu être actionnée qu’après de longues négociations avec le Pakistan: «En août 2010, un ancien officier des services secrets pakistanais a approché Jonathan Bank, alors chef du bureau de la CIA à l’ambassade américaine d’Islamabad», raconte le journaliste, et «il a proposé de dire à la CIA où trouver Ben Laden en échange de la récompense que Washington avait offerte en 2001». Les dires selon lesquels le corps de la dépouille aurait été jeté en mer seraient également erronés. Réduite en morceaux par les balles, elle aurait été éparpillée dans l’ Hindou Koush, entre le Pakistan et l’Afghanistan, avance le journaliste.

Les démentis de la Maison-Blanche
Spécialiste de la politique et des services secrets américains, Seymour Hersh n’en est pas à son premier coup d’éclat. On lui doit notamment les révélations sur le massacre de My Lai en avril 1968 (pour lequel il obtint le Pullitzer en 1970), au cours duquel 400 Vietnamiens ont été exterminés par une unité de l’armée américaine. Il est également à l’origine du rapport sur les tortures des prisonniers d’Abou Ghraib en 2004. C’est peu dire, donc, que le personnage hante les présidents américains depuis plus de 50 ans…

La Maison-Blanche a rejeté en bloc le travail de ce «vieux brisquard» du journalisme. «Il y a trop d’inexactitudes et d’affirmations sans fondement dans cet article pour y répondre point par point», a affirmé Ned Price, porte-parole du Conseil de sécurité nationale (NSC).

La thèse de Seymour Hersh pâtit de reposer en grande partie sur les déclarations d’une source unique, anonyme qui plus est. Au lendemain de l’assaut de mai 2011, Islamabad avait fortement critiqué l’opération américaine, estimant que de telles «actions unilatérales non autorisées» ne devraient pas se reproduire. Quant à la CIA, elle avait affirmé que les États-Unis n’avaient en aucun cas informé le Pakistan, de crainte que le pays n’«alerte» Oussama Ben Laden.

Voir de même:

Mort de Ben Laden : « C’est un énorme mensonge »

Thomas Liabot

le JDD

11 mai 2015

Selon le journaliste Seymour Hersh, la mort d’Oussama Ben Laden n’est pas intervenue selon le scénario révélé par Washington. Un agent pakistanais aurait renseigné la CIA, contre une forte récompense.
Et si Washington avait menti sur la version officielle de la mort d’Oussama Ben Laden? Selon le journaliste Seymour Hersh (prix Pulitzer en 1970), cela ne fait aucun doute. Dans un rapport publié dans la London Review of Books, il affirme en effet que l' »histoire de la Maison-Blanche aurait pu être écrite par Lewis Caroll », le père des Aventures d’Alice au pays des merveilles. « C’est un énorme mensonge, il n’y a pas un seul mot de vrai », poursuit l’ancien journaliste du New York Times.

« La Maison Blanche maintient que la mission était une affaire 100% américaine, et que les généraux de l’armée pakistanaise et ses services secrets n’ont pas été mis au courant de l’assaut à l’avance. C’est faux. » Selon lui, les Pakistanais avaient établi depuis 2006 que le chef d’al-Qaïda était à Abbottabad, et étaient en relation avec la CIA pour planifier son élimination.

Aidé par un agent pakistanais
Seymour Hersh s’explique : « En août 2010, un ancien officier des services secrets pakistanais a approché Jonathan Bank, alors chef du bureau de la CIA à l’ambassade américaine d’Islamabad. Il a proposé de dire à la CIA où trouver Ben Laden en échange de la récompense que Washington avait offerte en 2001″, soit 25 millions de dollars. Récompensé, l’homme serait aujourd’hui consultant à Washington pour la CIA.

Dans son article, Seymour Hersh écrit qu’il n’y pas eu d’affrontements dans la villa d’Abbotabad, mais que les forces spéciales américaines ont abattu « un homme faible et sans armes ». Le journaliste ajoute que le corps d’Oussama Ben Laden n’aurait pas été jeté en mer, mais enterré au Pakistan.

Voir enfin:

The Killing of Osama bin Laden
Seymour M. Hersh
London Review of Books
21 May 2015

Seymour M. Hersh is writing an alternative history of the war on terror.

It’s been four years since a group of US Navy Seals assassinated Osama bin Laden in a night raid on a high-walled compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The killing was the high point of Obama’s first term, and a major factor in his re-election. The White House still maintains that the mission was an all-American affair, and that the senior generals of Pakistan’s army and Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) were not told of the raid in advance. This is false, as are many other elements of the Obama administration’s account. The White House’s story might have been written by Lewis Carroll: would bin Laden, target of a massive international manhunt, really decide that a resort town forty miles from Islamabad would be the safest place to live and command al-Qaida’s operations? He was hiding in the open. So America said.

The most blatant lie was that Pakistan’s two most senior military leaders – General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, chief of the army staff, and General Ahmed Shuja Pasha, director general of the ISI – were never informed of the US mission. This remains the White House position despite an array of reports that have raised questions, including one by Carlotta Gall in the New York Times Magazine of 19 March 2014. Gall, who spent 12 years as the Times correspondent in Afghanistan, wrote that she’d been told by a ‘Pakistani official’ that Pasha had known before the raid that bin Laden was in Abbottabad. The story was denied by US and Pakistani officials, and went no further. In his book Pakistan: Before and after Osama (2012), Imtiaz Gul, executive director of the Centre for Research and Security Studies, a think tank in Islamabad, wrote that he’d spoken to four undercover intelligence officers who – reflecting a widely held local view – asserted that the Pakistani military must have had knowledge of the operation. The issue was raised again in February, when a retired general, Asad Durrani, who was head of the ISI in the early 1990s, told an al-Jazeera interviewer that it was ‘quite possible’ that the senior officers of the ISI did not know where bin Laden had been hiding, ‘but it was more probable that they did [know]. And the idea was that, at the right time, his location would be revealed. And the right time would have been when you can get the necessary quid pro quo – if you have someone like Osama bin Laden, you are not going to simply hand him over to the United States.’

This spring I contacted Durrani and told him in detail what I had learned about the bin Laden assault from American sources: that bin Laden had been a prisoner of the ISI at the Abbottabad compound since 2006; that Kayani and Pasha knew of the raid in advance and had made sure that the two helicopters delivering the Seals to Abbottabad could cross Pakistani airspace without triggering any alarms; that the CIA did not learn of bin Laden’s whereabouts by tracking his couriers, as the White House has claimed since May 2011, but from a former senior Pakistani intelligence officer who betrayed the secret in return for much of the $25 million reward offered by the US, and that, while Obama did order the raid and the Seal team did carry it out, many other aspects of the administration’s account were false.

‘When your version comes out – if you do it – people in Pakistan will be tremendously grateful,’ Durrani told me. ‘For a long time people have stopped trusting what comes out about bin Laden from the official mouths. There will be some negative political comment and some anger, but people like to be told the truth, and what you’ve told me is essentially what I have heard from former colleagues who have been on a fact-finding mission since this episode.’ As a former ISI head, he said, he had been told shortly after the raid by ‘people in the “strategic community” who would know’ that there had been an informant who had alerted the US to bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad, and that after his killing the US’s betrayed promises left Kayani and Pasha exposed.

The major US source for the account that follows is a retired senior intelligence official who was knowledgeable about the initial intelligence about bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad. He also was privy to many aspects of the Seals’ training for the raid, and to the various after-action reports. Two other US sources, who had access to corroborating information, have been longtime consultants to the Special Operations Command. I also received information from inside Pakistan about widespread dismay among the senior ISI and military leadership – echoed later by Durrani – over Obama’s decision to go public immediately with news of bin Laden’s death. The White House did not respond to requests for comment.

*

It began with a walk-in. In August 2010 a former senior Pakistani intelligence officer approached Jonathan Bank, then the CIA’s station chief at the US embassy in Islamabad. He offered to tell the CIA where to find bin Laden in return for the reward that Washington had offered in 2001. Walk-ins are assumed by the CIA to be unreliable, and the response from the agency’s headquarters was to fly in a polygraph team. The walk-in passed the test. ‘So now we’ve got a lead on bin Laden living in a compound in Abbottabad, but how do we really know who it is?’ was the CIA’s worry at the time, the retired senior US intelligence official told me.

The US initially kept what it knew from the Pakistanis. ‘The fear was that if the existence of the source was made known, the Pakistanis themselves would move bin Laden to another location. So only a very small number of people were read into the source and his story,’ the retired official said. ‘The CIA’s first goal was to check out the quality of the informant’s information.’ The compound was put under satellite surveillance. The CIA rented a house in Abbottabad to use as a forward observation base and staffed it with Pakistani employees and foreign nationals. Later on, the base would serve as a contact point with the ISI; it attracted little attention because Abbottabad is a holiday spot full of houses rented on short leases. A psychological profile of the informant was prepared. (The informant and his family were smuggled out of Pakistan and relocated in the Washington area. He is now a consultant for the CIA.)

‘By October the military and intelligence community were discussing the possible military options. Do we drop a bunker buster on the compound or take him out with a drone strike? Perhaps send someone to kill him, single assassin style? But then we’d have no proof of who he was,’ the retired official said. ‘We could see some guy is walking around at night, but we have no intercepts because there’s no commo coming from the compound.’

In October, Obama was briefed on the intelligence. His response was cautious, the retired official said. ‘It just made no sense that bin Laden was living in Abbottabad. It was just too crazy. The president’s position was emphatic: “Don’t talk to me about this any more unless you have proof that it really is bin Laden.”’ The immediate goal of the CIA leadership and the Joint Special Operations Command was to get Obama’s support. They believed they would get this if they got DNA evidence, and if they could assure him that a night assault of the compound would carry no risk. The only way to accomplish both things, the retired official said, ‘was to get the Pakistanis on board’.

During the late autumn of 2010, the US continued to keep quiet about the walk-in, and Kayani and Pasha continued to insist to their American counterparts that they had no information about bin Laden’s whereabouts. ‘The next step was to figure out how to ease Kayani and Pasha into it – to tell them that we’ve got intelligence showing that there is a high-value target in the compound, and to ask them what they know about the target,’ the retired official said. ‘The compound was not an armed enclave – no machine guns around, because it was under ISI control.’ The walk-in had told the US that bin Laden had lived undetected from 2001 to 2006 with some of his wives and children in the Hindu Kush mountains, and that ‘the ISI got to him by paying some of the local tribal people to betray him.’ (Reports after the raid placed him elsewhere in Pakistan during this period.) Bank was also told by the walk-in that bin Laden was very ill, and that early on in his confinement at Abbottabad, the ISI had ordered Amir Aziz, a doctor and a major in the Pakistani army, to move nearby to provide treatment. ‘The truth is that bin Laden was an invalid, but we cannot say that,’ the retired official said. ‘“You mean you guys shot a cripple? Who was about to grab his AK-47?”’
British Academy – Screen Translation film screening

‘It didn’t take long to get the co-operation we needed, because the Pakistanis wanted to ensure the continued release of American military aid, a good percentage of which was anti-terrorism funding that finances personal security, such as bullet-proof limousines and security guards and housing for the ISI leadership,’ the retired official said. He added that there were also under-the-table personal ‘incentives’ that were financed by off-the-books Pentagon contingency funds. ‘The intelligence community knew what the Pakistanis needed to agree – there was the carrot. And they chose the carrot. It was a win-win. We also did a little blackmail. We told them we would leak the fact that you’ve got bin Laden in your backyard. We knew their friends and enemies’ – the Taliban and jihadist groups in Pakistan and Afghanistan – ‘would not like it.’

A worrying factor at this early point, according to the retired official, was Saudi Arabia, which had been financing bin Laden’s upkeep since his seizure by the Pakistanis. ‘The Saudis didn’t want bin Laden’s presence revealed to us because he was a Saudi, and so they told the Pakistanis to keep him out of the picture. The Saudis feared if we knew we would pressure the Pakistanis to let bin Laden start talking to us about what the Saudis had been doing with al-Qaida. And they were dropping money – lots of it. The Pakistanis, in turn, were concerned that the Saudis might spill the beans about their control of bin Laden. The fear was that if the US found out about bin Laden from Riyadh, all hell would break out. The Americans learning about bin Laden’s imprisonment from a walk-in was not the worst thing.’

Despite their constant public feuding, American and Pakistani military and intelligence services have worked together closely for decades on counterterrorism in South Asia. Both services often find it useful to engage in public feuds ‘to cover their asses’, as the retired official put it, but they continually share intelligence used for drone attacks, and co-operate on covert operations. At the same time, it’s understood in Washington that elements of the ISI believe that maintaining a relationship with the Taliban leadership inside Afghanistan is essential to national security. The ISI’s strategic aim is to balance Indian influence in Kabul; the Taliban is also seen in Pakistan as a source of jihadist shock troops who would back Pakistan against India in a confrontation over Kashmir.

Adding to the tension was the Pakistani nuclear arsenal, often depicted in the Western press as an ‘Islamic bomb’ that might be transferred by Pakistan to an embattled nation in the Middle East in the event of a crisis with Israel. The US looked the other way when Pakistan began building its weapons system in the 1970s and it’s widely believed it now has more than a hundred nuclear warheads. It’s understood in Washington that US security depends on the maintenance of strong military and intelligence ties to Pakistan. The belief is mirrored in Pakistan.

‘The Pakistani army sees itself as family,’ the retired official said. ‘Officers call soldiers their sons and all officers are “brothers”. The attitude is different in the American military. The senior Pakistani officers believe they are the elite and have got to look out for all of the people, as keepers of the flame against Muslim fundamentalism. The Pakistanis also know that their trump card against aggression from India is a strong relationship with the United States. They will never cut their person-to-person ties with us.’

Like all CIA station chiefs, Bank was working undercover, but that ended in early December 2010 when he was publicly accused of murder in a criminal complaint filed in Islamabad by Karim Khan, a Pakistani journalist whose son and brother, according to local news reports, had been killed by a US drone strike. Allowing Bank to be named was a violation of diplomatic protocol on the part of the Pakistani authorities, and it brought a wave of unwanted publicity. Bank was ordered to leave Pakistan by the CIA, whose officials subsequently told the Associated Press he was transferred because of concerns for his safety. The New York Times reported that there was ‘strong suspicion’ the ISI had played a role in leaking Bank’s name to Khan. There was speculation that he was outed as payback for the publication in a New York lawsuit a month earlier of the names of ISI chiefs in connection with the Mumbai terrorist attacks of 2008. But there was a collateral reason, the retired official said, for the CIA’s willingness to send Bank back to America. The Pakistanis needed cover in case their co-operation with the Americans in getting rid of bin Laden became known. The Pakistanis could say: “You’re talking about me? We just kicked out your station chief.”’

*

The bin Laden compound was less than two miles from the Pakistan Military Academy, and a Pakistani army combat battalion headquarters was another mile or so away. Abbottabad is less than 15 minutes by helicopter from Tarbela Ghazi, an important base for ISI covert operations and the facility where those who guard Pakistan’s nuclear weapons arsenal are trained. ‘Ghazi is why the ISI put bin Laden in Abbottabad in the first place,’ the retired official said, ‘to keep him under constant supervision.’

The risks for Obama were high at this early stage, especially because there was a troubling precedent: the failed 1980 attempt to rescue the American hostages in Tehran. That failure was a factor in Jimmy Carter’s loss to Ronald Reagan. Obama’s worries were realistic, the retired official said. ‘Was bin Laden ever there? Was the whole story a product of Pakistani deception? What about political blowback in case of failure?’ After all, as the retired official said, ‘If the mission fails, Obama’s just a black Jimmy Carter and it’s all over for re-election.’

Obama was anxious for reassurance that the US was going to get the right man. The proof was to come in the form of bin Laden’s DNA. The planners turned for help to Kayani and Pasha, who asked Aziz to obtain the specimens. Soon after the raid the press found out that Aziz had been living in a house near the bin Laden compound: local reporters discovered his name in Urdu on a plate on the door. Pakistani officials denied that Aziz had any connection to bin Laden, but the retired official told me that Aziz had been rewarded with a share of the $25 million reward the US had put up because the DNA sample had showed conclusively that it was bin Laden in Abbottabad. (In his subsequent testimony to a Pakistani commission investigating the bin Laden raid, Aziz said that he had witnessed the attack on Abbottabad, but had no knowledge of who was living in the compound and had been ordered by a superior officer to stay away from the scene.)

Bargaining continued over the way the mission would be executed. ‘Kayani eventually tells us yes, but he says you can’t have a big strike force. You have to come in lean and mean. And you have to kill him, or there is no deal,’ the retired official said. The agreement was struck by the end of January 2011, and Joint Special Operations Command prepared a list of questions to be answered by the Pakistanis: ‘How can we be assured of no outside intervention? What are the defences inside the compound and its exact dimensions? Where are bin Laden’s rooms and exactly how big are they? How many steps in the stairway? Where are the doors to his rooms, and are they reinforced with steel? How thick?’ The Pakistanis agreed to permit a four-man American cell – a Navy Seal, a CIA case officer and two communications specialists – to set up a liaison office at Tarbela Ghazi for the coming assault. By then, the military had constructed a mock-up of the compound in Abbottabad at a secret former nuclear test site in Utah, and an elite Seal team had begun rehearsing for the attack.

The US had begun to cut back on aid to Pakistan – to ‘turn off the spigot’, in the retired official’s words. The provision of 18 new F-16 fighter aircraft was delayed, and under-the-table cash payments to the senior leaders were suspended. In April 2011 Pasha met the CIA director, Leon Panetta, at agency headquarters. ‘Pasha got a commitment that the United States would turn the money back on, and we got a guarantee that there would be no Pakistani opposition during the mission,’ the retired official said. ‘Pasha also insisted that Washington stop complaining about Pakistan’s lack of co-operation with the American war on terrorism.’ At one point that spring, Pasha offered the Americans a blunt explanation of the reason Pakistan kept bin Laden’s capture a secret, and why it was imperative for the ISI role to remain secret: ‘We needed a hostage to keep tabs on al-Qaida and the Taliban,’ Pasha said, according to the retired official. ‘The ISI was using bin Laden as leverage against Taliban and al-Qaida activities inside Afghanistan and Pakistan. They let the Taliban and al-Qaida leadership know that if they ran operations that clashed with the interests of the ISI, they would turn bin Laden over to us. So if it became known that the Pakistanis had worked with us to get bin Laden at Abbottabad, there would be hell to pay.’

At one of his meetings with Panetta, according to the retired official and a source within the CIA, Pasha was asked by a senior CIA official whether he saw himself as acting in essence as an agent for al-Qaida and the Taliban. ‘He answered no, but said the ISI needed to have some control.’ The message, as the CIA saw it, according to the retired official, was that Kayani and Pasha viewed bin Laden ‘as a resource, and they were more interested in their [own] survival than they were in the United States’.

A Pakistani with close ties to the senior leadership of the ISI told me that ‘there was a deal with your top guys. We were very reluctant, but it had to be done – not because of personal enrichment, but because all of the American aid programmes would be cut off. Your guys said we will starve you out if you don’t do it, and the okay was given while Pasha was in Washington. The deal was not only to keep the taps open, but Pasha was told there would be more goodies for us.’ The Pakistani said that Pasha’s visit also resulted in a commitment from the US to give Pakistan ‘a freer hand’ in Afghanistan as it began its military draw-down there. ‘And so our top dogs justified the deal by saying this is for our country.’

*

Pasha and Kayani were responsible for ensuring that Pakistan’s army and air defence command would not track or engage with the US helicopters used on the mission. The American cell at Tarbela Ghazi was charged with co-ordinating communications between the ISI, the senior US officers at their command post in Afghanistan, and the two Black Hawk helicopters; the goal was to ensure that no stray Pakistani fighter plane on border patrol spotted the intruders and took action to stop them. The initial plan said that news of the raid shouldn’t be announced straightaway. All units in the Joint Special Operations Command operate under stringent secrecy and the JSOC leadership believed, as did Kayani and Pasha, that the killing of bin Laden would not be made public for as long as seven days, maybe longer. Then a carefully constructed cover story would be issued: Obama would announce that DNA analysis confirmed that bin Laden had been killed in a drone raid in the Hindu Kush, on Afghanistan’s side of the border. The Americans who planned the mission assured Kayani and Pasha that their co-operation would never be made public. It was understood by all that if the Pakistani role became known, there would be violent protests – bin Laden was considered a hero by many Pakistanis – and Pasha and Kayani and their families would be in danger, and the Pakistani army publicly disgraced.
SCIENCE MUSEUM – CHURCHILL’S SCIENTISTS

It was clear to all by this point, the retired official said, that bin Laden would not survive: ‘Pasha told us at a meeting in April that he could not risk leaving bin Laden in the compound now that we know he’s there. Too many people in the Pakistani chain of command know about the mission. He and Kayani had to tell the whole story to the directors of the air defence command and to a few local commanders.

‘Of course the guys knew the target was bin Laden and he was there under Pakistani control,’ the retired official said. ‘Otherwise, they would not have done the mission without air cover. It was clearly and absolutely a premeditated murder.’ A former Seal commander, who has led and participated in dozens of similar missions over the past decade, assured me that ‘we were not going to keep bin Laden alive – to allow the terrorist to live. By law, we know what we’re doing inside Pakistan is a homicide. We’ve come to grips with that. Each one of us, when we do these missions, say to ourselves, “Let’s face it. We’re going to commit a murder.”’ The White House’s initial account claimed that bin Laden had been brandishing a weapon; the story was aimed at deflecting those who questioned the legality of the US administration’s targeted assassination programme. The US has consistently maintained, despite widely reported remarks by people involved with the mission, that bin Laden would have been taken alive if he had immediately surrendered.

*

At the Abbottabad compound ISI guards were posted around the clock to keep watch over bin Laden and his wives and children. They were under orders to leave as soon as they heard the rotors of the US helicopters. The town was dark: the electricity supply had been cut off on the orders of the ISI hours before the raid began. One of the Black Hawks crashed inside the walls of the compound, injuring many on board. ‘The guys knew the TOT [time on target] had to be tight because they would wake up the whole town going in,’ the retired official said. The cockpit of the crashed Black Hawk, with its communication and navigational gear, had to be destroyed by concussion grenades, and this would create a series of explosions and a fire visible for miles. Two Chinook helicopters had flown from Afghanistan to a nearby Pakistani intelligence base to provide logistical support, and one of them was immediately dispatched to Abbottabad. But because the helicopter had been equipped with a bladder loaded with extra fuel for the two Black Hawks, it first had to be reconfigured as a troop carrier. The crash of the Black Hawk and the need to fly in a replacement were nerve-wracking and time-consuming setbacks, but the Seals continued with their mission. There was no firefight as they moved into the compound; the ISI guards had gone. ‘Everyone in Pakistan has a gun and high-profile, wealthy folks like those who live in Abbottabad have armed bodyguards, and yet there were no weapons in the compound,’ the retired official pointed out. Had there been any opposition, the team would have been highly vulnerable. Instead, the retired official said, an ISI liaison officer flying with the Seals guided them into the darkened house and up a staircase to bin Laden’s quarters. The Seals had been warned by the Pakistanis that heavy steel doors blocked the stairwell on the first and second-floor landings; bin Laden’s rooms were on the third floor. The Seal squad used explosives to blow the doors open, without injuring anyone. One of bin Laden’s wives was screaming hysterically and a bullet – perhaps a stray round – struck her knee. Aside from those that hit bin Laden, no other shots were fired. (The Obama administration’s account would hold otherwise.)

‘They knew where the target was – third floor, second door on the right,’ the retired official said. ‘Go straight there. Osama was cowering and retreated into the bedroom. Two shooters followed him and opened up. Very simple, very straightforward, very professional hit.’ Some of the Seals were appalled later at the White House’s initial insistence that they had shot bin Laden in self-defence, the retired official said. ‘Six of the Seals’ finest, most experienced NCOs, faced with an unarmed elderly civilian, had to kill him in self-defence? The house was shabby and bin Laden was living in a cell with bars on the window and barbed wire on the roof. The rules of engagement were that if bin Laden put up any opposition they were authorised to take lethal action. But if they suspected he might have some means of opposition, like an explosive vest under his robe, they could also kill him. So here’s this guy in a mystery robe and they shot him. It’s not because he was reaching for a weapon. The rules gave them absolute authority to kill the guy.’ The later White House claim that only one or two bullets were fired into his head was ‘bullshit’, the retired official said. ‘The squad came through the door and obliterated him. As the Seals say, “We kicked his ass and took his gas.”’

After they killed bin Laden, ‘the Seals were just there, some with physical injuries from the crash, waiting for the relief chopper,’ the retired official said. ‘Twenty tense minutes. The Black Hawk is still burning. There are no city lights. No electricity. No police. No fire trucks. They have no prisoners.’ Bin Laden’s wives and children were left for the ISI to interrogate and relocate. ‘Despite all the talk,’ the retired official continued, there were ‘no garbage bags full of computers and storage devices. The guys just stuffed some books and papers they found in his room in their backpacks. The Seals weren’t there because they thought bin Laden was running a command centre for al-Qaida operations, as the White House would later tell the media. And they were not intelligence experts gathering information inside that house.’

On a normal assault mission, the retired official said, there would be no waiting around if a chopper went down. ‘The Seals would have finished the mission, thrown off their guns and gear, and jammed into the remaining Black Hawk and di-di-maued’ – Vietnamese slang for leaving in a rush – ‘out of there, with guys hanging out of the doors. They would not have blown the chopper – no commo gear is worth a dozen lives – unless they knew they were safe. Instead they stood around outside the compound, waiting for the bus to arrive.’ Pasha and Kayani had delivered on all their promises.

*

The backroom argument inside the White House began as soon as it was clear that the mission had succeeded. Bin Laden’s body was presumed to be on its way to Afghanistan. Should Obama stand by the agreement with Kayani and Pasha and pretend a week or so later that bin Laden had been killed in a drone attack in the mountains, or should he go public immediately? The downed helicopter made it easy for Obama’s political advisers to urge the latter plan. The explosion and fireball would be impossible to hide, and word of what had happened was bound to leak. Obama had to ‘get out in front of the story’ before someone in the Pentagon did: waiting would diminish the political impact.

Not everyone agreed. Robert Gates, the secretary of defence, was the most outspoken of those who insisted that the agreements with Pakistan had to be honoured. In his memoir, Duty, Gates did not mask his anger:

Before we broke up and the president headed upstairs to tell the American people what had just happened, I reminded everyone that the techniques, tactics and procedures the Seals had used in the bin Laden operation were used every night in Afghanistan … it was therefore essential that we agree not to release any operational details of the raid. That we killed him, I said, is all we needed to say. Everybody in that room agreed to keep mum on details. That commitment lasted about five hours. The initial leaks came from the White House and CIA. They just couldn’t wait to brag and to claim credit. The facts were often wrong … Nonetheless the information just kept pouring out. I was outraged and at one point, told [the national security adviser, Tom] Donilon, ‘Why doesn’t everybody just shut the fuck up?’ To no avail.

Obama’s speech was put together in a rush, the retired official said, and was viewed by his advisers as a political document, not a message that needed to be submitted for clearance to the national security bureaucracy. This series of self-serving and inaccurate statements would create chaos in the weeks following. Obama said that his administration had discovered that bin Laden was in Pakistan through ‘a possible lead’ the previous August; to many in the CIA the statement suggested a specific event, such as a walk-in. The remark led to a new cover story claiming that the CIA’s brilliant analysts had unmasked a courier network handling bin Laden’s continuing flow of operational orders to al-Qaida. Obama also praised ‘a small team of Americans’ for their care in avoiding civilian deaths and said: ‘After a firefight, they killed Osama bin Laden and took custody of his body.’ Two more details now had to be supplied for the cover story: a description of the firefight that never happened, and a story about what happened to the corpse. Obama went on to praise the Pakistanis: ‘It’s important to note that our counterterrorism co-operation with Pakistan helped lead us to bin Laden and the compound where he was hiding.’ That statement risked exposing Kayani and Pasha. The White House’s solution was to ignore what Obama had said and order anyone talking to the press to insist that the Pakistanis had played no role in killing bin Laden. Obama left the clear impression that he and his advisers hadn’t known for sure that bin Laden was in Abbottabad, but only had information ‘about the possibility’. This led first to the story that the Seals had determined they’d killed the right man by having a six-foot-tall Seal lie next to the corpse for comparison (bin Laden was known to be six foot four); and then to the claim that a DNA test had been performed on the corpse and demonstrated conclusively that the Seals had killed bin Laden. But, according to the retired official, it wasn’t clear from the Seals’ early reports whether all of bin Laden’s body, or any of it, made it back to Afghanistan.

Gates wasn’t the only official who was distressed by Obama’s decision to speak without clearing his remarks in advance, the retired official said, ‘but he was the only one protesting. Obama didn’t just double-cross Gates, he double-crossed everyone. This was not the fog of war. The fact that there was an agreement with the Pakistanis and no contingency analysis of what was to be disclosed if something went wrong – that wasn’t even discussed. And once it went wrong, they had to make up a new cover story on the fly.’ There was a legitimate reason for some deception: the role of the Pakistani walk-in had to be protected.

The White House press corps was told in a briefing shortly after Obama’s announcement that the death of bin Laden was ‘the culmination of years of careful and highly advanced intelligence work’ that focused on tracking a group of couriers, including one who was known to be close to bin Laden. Reporters were told that a team of specially assembled CIA and National Security Agency analysts had traced the courier to a highly secure million-dollar compound in Abbottabad. After months of observation, the American intelligence community had ‘high confidence’ that a high-value target was living in the compound, and it was ‘assessed that there was a strong probability that [it] was Osama bin Laden’. The US assault team ran into a firefight on entering the compound and three adult males – two of them believed to be the couriers – were slain, along with bin Laden. Asked if bin Laden had defended himself, one of the briefers said yes: ‘He did resist the assault force. And he was killed in a firefight.’

The next day John Brennan, then Obama’s senior adviser for counterterrorism, had the task of talking up Obama’s valour while trying to smooth over the misstatements in his speech. He provided a more detailed but equally misleading account of the raid and its planning. Speaking on the record, which he rarely does, Brennan said that the mission was carried out by a group of Navy Seals who had been instructed to take bin Laden alive, if possible. He said the US had no information suggesting that anyone in the Pakistani government or military knew bin Laden’s whereabouts: ‘We didn’t contact the Pakistanis until after all of our people, all of our aircraft were out of Pakistani airspace.’ He emphasised the courage of Obama’s decision to order the strike, and said that the White House had no information ‘that confirmed that bin Laden was at the compound’ before the raid began. Obama, he said, ‘made what I believe was one of the gutsiest calls of any president in recent memory’. Brennan increased the number killed by the Seals inside the compound to five: bin Laden, a courier, his brother, a bin Laden son, and one of the women said to be shielding bin Laden.

Asked whether bin Laden had fired on the Seals, as some reporters had been told, Brennan repeated what would become a White House mantra: ‘He was engaged in a firefight with those that entered the area of the house he was in. And whether or not he got off any rounds, I quite frankly don’t know … Here is bin Laden, who has been calling for these attacks … living in an area that is far removed from the front, hiding behind women who were put in front of him as a shield … [It] just speaks to I think the nature of the individual he was.’

Gates also objected to the idea, pushed by Brennan and Leon Panetta, that US intelligence had learned of bin Laden’s whereabouts from information acquired by waterboarding and other forms of torture. ‘All of this is going on as the Seals are flying home from their mission. The agency guys know the whole story,’ the retired official said. ‘It was a group of annuitants who did it.’ (Annuitants are retired CIA officers who remain active on contract.) ‘They had been called in by some of the mission planners in the agency to help with the cover story. So the old-timers come in and say why not admit that we got some of the information about bin Laden from enhanced interrogation?’ At the time, there was still talk in Washington about the possible prosecution of CIA agents who had conducted torture.

‘Gates told them this was not going to work,’ the retired official said. ‘He was never on the team. He knew at the eleventh hour of his career not to be a party to this nonsense. But State, the agency and the Pentagon had bought in on the cover story. None of the Seals thought that Obama was going to get on national TV and announce the raid. The Special Forces command was apoplectic. They prided themselves on keeping operational security.’ There was fear in Special Operations, the retired official said, that ‘if the true story of the missions leaked out, the White House bureaucracy was going to blame it on the Seals.’

The White House’s solution was to silence the Seals. On 5 May, every member of the Seal hit team – they had returned to their base in southern Virginia – and some members of the Joint Special Operations Command leadership were presented with a nondisclosure form drafted by the White House’s legal office; it promised civil penalties and a lawsuit for anyone who discussed the mission, in public or private. ‘The Seals were not happy,’ the retired official said. But most of them kept quiet, as did Admiral William McRaven, who was then in charge of JSOC. ‘McRaven was apoplectic. He knew he was fucked by the White House, but he’s a dyed-in-the-wool Seal, and not then a political operator, and he knew there’s no glory in blowing the whistle on the president. When Obama went public with bin Laden’s death, everyone had to scramble around for a new story that made sense, and the planners were stuck holding the bag.’

Within days, some of the early exaggerations and distortions had become obvious and the Pentagon issued a series of clarifying statements. No, bin Laden was not armed when he was shot and killed. And no, bin Laden did not use one of his wives as a shield. The press by and large accepted the explanation that the errors were the inevitable by-product of the White House’s desire to accommodate reporters frantic for details of the mission.

One lie that has endured is that the Seals had to fight their way to their target. Only two Seals have made any public statement: No Easy Day, a first-hand account of the raid by Matt Bissonnette, was published in September 2012; and two years later Rob O’Neill was interviewed by Fox News. Both men had resigned from the navy; both had fired at bin Laden. Their accounts contradicted each other on many details, but their stories generally supported the White House version, especially when it came to the need to kill or be killed as the Seals fought their way to bin Laden. O’Neill even told Fox News that he and his fellow Seals thought ‘We were going to die.’ ‘The more we trained on it, the more we realised … this is going to be a one-way mission.’

But the retired official told me that in their initial debriefings the Seals made no mention of a firefight, or indeed of any opposition. The drama and danger portrayed by Bissonnette and O’Neill met a deep-seated need, the retired official said: ‘Seals cannot live with the fact that they killed bin Laden totally unopposed, and so there has to be an account of their courage in the face of danger. The guys are going to sit around the bar and say it was an easy day? That’s not going to happen.’

There was another reason to claim there had been a firefight inside the compound, the retired official said: to avoid the inevitable question that would arise from an uncontested assault. Where were bin Laden’s guards? Surely, the most sought-after terrorist in the world would have around-the-clock protection. ‘And one of those killed had to be the courier, because he didn’t exist and we couldn’t produce him. The Pakistanis had no choice but to play along with it.’ (Two days after the raid, Reuters published photographs of three dead men that it said it had purchased from an ISI official. Two of the men were later identified by an ISI spokesman as being the alleged courier and his brother.)

*

Five days after the raid the Pentagon press corps was provided with a series of videotapes that were said by US officials to have been taken from a large collection the Seals had removed from the compound, along with as many as 15 computers. Snippets from one of the videos showed a solitary bin Laden looking wan and wrapped in a blanket, watching what appeared to be a video of himself on television. An unnamed official told reporters that the raid produced a ‘treasure trove … the single largest collection of senior terrorist materials ever’, which would provide vital insights into al-Qaida’s plans. The official said the material showed that bin Laden ‘remained an active leader in al-Qaida, providing strategic, operational and tactical instructions to the group … He was far from a figurehead [and] continued to direct even tactical details of the group’s management and to encourage plotting’ from what was described as a command-and-control centre in Abbottabad. ‘He was an active player, making the recent operation even more essential for our nation’s security,’ the official said. The information was so vital, he added, that the administration was setting up an inter-agency task force to process it: ‘He was not simply someone who was penning al-Qaida strategy. He was throwing operational ideas out there and he was also specifically directing other al-Qaida members.’

These claims were fabrications: there wasn’t much activity for bin Laden to exercise command and control over. The retired intelligence official said that the CIA’s internal reporting shows that since bin Laden moved to Abbottabad in 2006 only a handful of terrorist attacks could be linked to the remnants of bin Laden’s al-Qaida. ‘We were told at first,’ the retired official said, ‘that the Seals produced garbage bags of stuff and that the community is generating daily intelligence reports out of this stuff. And then we were told that the community is gathering everything together and needs to translate it. But nothing has come of it. Every single thing they have created turns out not to be true. It’s a great hoax – like the Piltdown man.’ The retired official said that most of the materials from Abbottabad were turned over to the US by the Pakistanis, who later razed the building. The ISI took responsibility for the wives and children of bin Laden, none of whom was made available to the US for questioning.

‘Why create the treasure trove story?’ the retired official said. ‘The White House had to give the impression that bin Laden was still operationally important. Otherwise, why kill him? A cover story was created – that there was a network of couriers coming and going with memory sticks and instructions. All to show that bin Laden remained important.’

In July 2011, the Washington Post published what purported to be a summary of some of these materials. The story’s contradictions were glaring. It said the documents had resulted in more than four hundred intelligence reports within six weeks; it warned of unspecified al-Qaida plots; and it mentioned arrests of suspects ‘who are named or described in emails that bin Laden received’. The Post didn’t identify the suspects or reconcile that detail with the administration’s previous assertions that the Abbottabad compound had no internet connection. Despite their claims that the documents had produced hundreds of reports, the Post also quoted officials saying that their main value wasn’t the actionable intelligence they contained, but that they enabled ‘analysts to construct a more comprehensive portrait of al-Qaida’.

In May 2012, the Combating Terrrorism Centre at West Point, a private research group, released translations it had made under a federal government contract of 175 pages of bin Laden documents. Reporters found none of the drama that had been touted in the days after the raid. Patrick Cockburn wrote about the contrast between the administration’s initial claims that bin Laden was the ‘spider at the centre of a conspiratorial web’ and what the translations actually showed: that bin Laden was ‘delusional’ and had ‘limited contact with the outside world outside his compound’.

The retired official disputed the authencity of the West Point materials: ‘There is no linkage between these documents and the counterterrorism centre at the agency. No intelligence community analysis. When was the last time the CIA: 1) announced it had a significant intelligence find; 2) revealed the source; 3) described the method for processing the materials; 4) revealed the time-line for production; 5) described by whom and where the analysis was taking place, and 6) published the sensitive results before the information had been acted on? No agency professional would support this fairy tale.’

*

In June 2011, it was reported in the New York Times, the Washington Post and all over the Pakistani press that Amir Aziz had been held for questioning in Pakistan; he was, it was said, a CIA informant who had been spying on the comings and goings at the bin Laden compound. Aziz was released, but the retired official said that US intelligence was unable to learn who leaked the highly classified information about his involvement with the mission. Officials in Washington decided they ‘could not take a chance that Aziz’s role in obtaining bin Laden’s DNA also would become known’. A sacrificial lamb was needed, and the one chosen was Shakil Afridi, a 48-year-old Pakistani doctor and sometime CIA asset, who had been arrested by the Pakistanis in late May and accused of assisting the agency. ‘We went to the Pakistanis and said go after Afridi,’ the retired official said. ‘We had to cover the whole issue of how we got the DNA.’ It was soon reported that the CIA had organised a fake vaccination programme in Abbottabad with Afridi’s help in a failed attempt to obtain bin Laden’s DNA. Afridi’s legitimate medical operation was run independently of local health authorities, was well financed and offered free vaccinations against hepatitis B. Posters advertising the programme were displayed throughout the area. Afridi was later accused of treason and sentenced to 33 years in prison because of his ties to an extremist. News of the CIA-sponsored programme created widespread anger in Pakistan, and led to the cancellation of other international vaccination programmes that were now seen as cover for American spying.

The retired official said that Afridi had been recruited long before the bin Laden mission as part of a separate intelligence effort to get information about suspected terrorists in Abbottabad and the surrounding area. ‘The plan was to use vaccinations as a way to get the blood of terrorism suspects in the villages.’ Afridi made no attempt to obtain DNA from the residents of the bin Laden compound. The report that he did so was a hurriedly put together ‘CIA cover story creating “facts”’ in a clumsy attempt to protect Aziz and his real mission. ‘Now we have the consequences,’ the retired official said. ‘A great humanitarian project to do something meaningful for the peasants has been compromised as a cynical hoax.’ Afridi’s conviction was overturned, but he remains in prison on a murder charge.

*

In his address announcing the raid, Obama said that after killing bin Laden the Seals ‘took custody of his body’. The statement created a problem. In the initial plan it was to be announced a week or so after the fact that bin Laden was killed in a drone strike somewhere in the mountains on the Pakistan/Afghanistan border and that his remains had been identified by DNA testing. But with Obama’s announcement of his killing by the Seals everyone now expected a body to be produced. Instead, reporters were told that bin Laden’s body had been flown by the Seals to an American military airfield in Jalalabad, Afghanistan, and then straight to the USS Carl Vinson, a supercarrier on routine patrol in the North Arabian Sea. Bin Laden had then been buried at sea, just hours after his death. The press corps’s only sceptical moments at John Brennan’s briefing on 2 May were to do with the burial. The questions were short, to the point, and rarely answered. ‘When was the decision made that he would be buried at sea if killed?’ ‘Was this part of the plan all along?’ ‘Can you just tell us why that was a good idea?’ ‘John, did you consult a Muslim expert on that?’ ‘Is there a visual recording of this burial?’ When this last question was asked, Jay Carney, Obama’s press secretary, came to Brennan’s rescue: ‘We’ve got to give other people a chance here.’

‘We thought the best way to ensure that his body was given an appropriate Islamic burial,’ Brennan said, ‘was to take those actions that would allow us to do that burial at sea.’ He said ‘appropriate specialists and experts’ were consulted, and that the US military was fully capable of carrying out the burial ‘consistent with Islamic law’. Brennan didn’t mention that Muslim law calls for the burial service to be conducted in the presence of an imam, and there was no suggestion that one happened to be on board the Carl Vinson.

In a reconstruction of the bin Laden operation for Vanity Fair, Mark Bowden, who spoke to many senior administration officials, wrote that bin Laden’s body was cleaned and photographed at Jalalabad. Further procedures necessary for a Muslim burial were performed on the carrier, he wrote, ‘with bin Laden’s body being washed again and wrapped in a white shroud. A navy photographer recorded the burial in full sunlight, Monday morning, May 2.’ Bowden described the photos:

One frame shows the body wrapped in a weighted shroud. The next shows it lying diagonally on a chute, feet overboard. In the next frame the body is hitting the water. In the next it is visible just below the surface, ripples spreading outward. In the last frame there are only circular ripples on the surface. The mortal remains of Osama bin Laden were gone for good.

Bowden was careful not to claim that he had actually seen the photographs he described, and he recently told me he hadn’t seen them: ‘I’m always disappointed when I can’t look at something myself, but I spoke with someone I trusted who said he had seen them himself and described them in detail.’ Bowden’s statement adds to the questions about the alleged burial at sea, which has provoked a flood of Freedom of Information Act requests, most of which produced no information. One of them sought access to the photographs. The Pentagon responded that a search of all available records had found no evidence that any photographs had been taken of the burial. Requests on other issues related to the raid were equally unproductive. The reason for the lack of response became clear after the Pentagon held an inquiry into allegations that the Obama administration had provided access to classified materials to the makers of the film Zero Dark Thirty. The Pentagon report, which was put online in June 2013, noted that Admiral McRaven had ordered the files on the raid to be deleted from all military computers and moved to the CIA, where they would be shielded from FOIA requests by the agency’s ‘operational exemption’.

McRaven’s action meant that outsiders could not get access to the Carl Vinson’s unclassified logs. Logs are sacrosanct in the navy, and separate ones are kept for air operations, the deck, the engineering department, the medical office, and for command information and control. They show the sequence of events day by day aboard the ship; if there has been a burial at sea aboard the Carl Vinson, it would have been recorded.

There wasn’t any gossip about a burial among the Carl Vinson’s sailors. The carrier concluded its six-month deployment in June 2011. When the ship docked at its home base in Coronado, California, Rear Admiral Samuel Perez, commander of the Carl Vinson carrier strike group, told reporters that the crew had been ordered not to talk about the burial. Captain Bruce Lindsey, skipper of the Carl Vinson, told reporters he was unable to discuss it. Cameron Short, one of the crew of the Carl Vinson, told the Commercial-News of Danville, Illinois, that the crew had not been told anything about the burial. ‘All he knows is what he’s seen on the news,’ the newspaper reported.

The Pentagon did release a series of emails to the Associated Press. In one of them, Rear Admiral Charles Gaouette reported that the service followed ‘traditional procedures for Islamic burial’, and said none of the sailors on board had been permitted to observe the proceedings. But there was no indication of who washed and wrapped the body, or of which Arabic speaker conducted the service.

Within weeks of the raid, I had been told by two longtime consultants to Special Operations Command, who have access to current intelligence, that the funeral aboard the Carl Vinson didn’t take place. One consultant told me that bin Laden’s remains were photographed and identified after being flown back to Afghanistan. The consultant added: ‘At that point, the CIA took control of the body. The cover story was that it had been flown to the Carl Vinson.’ The second consultant agreed that there had been ‘no burial at sea’. He added that ‘the killing of bin Laden was political theatre designed to burnish Obama’s military credentials … The Seals should have expected the political grandstanding. It’s irresistible to a politician. Bin Laden became a working asset.’ Early this year, speaking again to the second consultant, I returned to the burial at sea. The consultant laughed and said: ‘You mean, he didn’t make it to the water?’

The retired official said there had been another complication: some members of the Seal team had bragged to colleagues and others that they had torn bin Laden’s body to pieces with rifle fire. The remains, including his head, which had only a few bullet holes in it, were thrown into a body bag and, during the helicopter flight back to Jalalabad, some body parts were tossed out over the Hindu Kush mountains – or so the Seals claimed. At the time, the retired official said, the Seals did not think their mission would be made public by Obama within a few hours: ‘If the president had gone ahead with the cover story, there would have been no need to have a funeral within hours of the killing. Once the cover story was blown, and the death was made public, the White House had a serious “Where’s the body?” problem. The world knew US forces had killed bin Laden in Abbottabad. Panic city. What to do? We need a “functional body” because we have to be able to say we identified bin Laden via a DNA analysis. It would be navy officers who came up with the “burial at sea” idea. Perfect. No body. Honourable burial following sharia law. Burial is made public in great detail, but Freedom of Information documents confirming the burial are denied for reasons of “national security”. It’s the classic unravelling of a poorly constructed cover story – it solves an immediate problem but, given the slighest inspection, there is no back-up support. There never was a plan, initially, to take the body to sea, and no burial of bin Laden at sea took place.’ The retired official said that if the Seals’ first accounts are to be believed, there wouldn’t have been much left of bin Laden to put into the sea in any case.

*

It was inevitable that the Obama administration’s lies, misstatements and betrayals would create a backlash. ‘We’ve had a four-year lapse in co-operation,’ the retired official said. ‘It’s taken that long for the Pakistanis to trust us again in the military-to-military counterterrorism relationship – while terrorism was rising all over the world … They felt Obama sold them down the river. They’re just now coming back because the threat from Isis, which is now showing up there, is a lot greater and the bin Laden event is far enough away to enable someone like General Durrani to come out and talk about it.’ Generals Pasha and Kayani have retired and both are reported to be under investigation for corruption during their time in office.

The Senate Intelligence Committee’s long-delayed report on CIA torture, released last December, documented repeated instances of official lying, and suggested that the CIA’s knowledge of bin Laden’s courier was sketchy at best and predated its use of waterboarding and other forms of torture. The report led to international headlines about brutality and waterboarding, along with gruesome details about rectal feeding tubes, ice baths and threats to rape or murder family members of detainees who were believed to be withholding information. Despite the bad publicity, the report was a victory for the CIA. Its major finding – that the use of torture didn’t lead to discovering the truth – had already been the subject of public debate for more than a decade. Another key finding – that the torture conducted was more brutal than Congress had been told – was risible, given the extent of public reporting and published exposés by former interrogators and retired CIA officers. The report depicted tortures that were obviously contrary to international law as violations of rules or ‘inappropriate activities’ or, in some cases, ‘management failures’. Whether the actions described constitute war crimes was not discussed, and the report did not suggest that any of the CIA interrogators or their superiors should be investigated for criminal activity. The agency faced no meaningful consequences as a result of the report.

The retired official told me that the CIA leadership had become experts in derailing serious threats from Congress: ‘They create something that is horrible but not that bad. Give them something that sounds terrible. “Oh my God, we were shoving food up a prisoner’s ass!” Meanwhile, they’re not telling the committee about murders, other war crimes, and secret prisons like we still have in Diego Garcia. The goal also was to stall it as long as possible, which they did.’

The main theme of the committee’s 499-page executive summary is that the CIA lied systematically about the effectiveness of its torture programme in gaining intelligence that would stop future terrorist attacks in the US. The lies included some vital details about the uncovering of an al-Qaida operative called Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti, who was said to be the key al-Qaida courier, and the subsequent tracking of him to Abbottabad in early 2011. The agency’s alleged intelligence, patience and skill in finding al-Kuwaiti became legend after it was dramatised in Zero Dark Thirty.

The Senate report repeatedly raised questions about the quality and reliability of the CIA’s intelligence about al-Kuwaiti. In 2005 an internal CIA report on the hunt for bin Laden noted that ‘detainees provide few actionable leads, and we have to consider the possibility that they are creating fictitious characters to distract us or to absolve themselves of direct knowledge about bin Ladin [sic].’ A CIA cable a year later stated that ‘we have had no success in eliciting actionable intelligence on bin Laden’s location from any detainees.’ The report also highlighted several instances of CIA officers, including Panetta, making false statements to Congress and the public about the value of ‘enhanced interrogation techniques’ in the search for bin Laden’s couriers.

Obama today is not facing re-election as he was in the spring of 2011. His principled stand on behalf of the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran says much, as does his decision to operate without the support of the conservative Republicans in Congress. High-level lying nevertheless remains the modus operandi of US policy, along with secret prisons, drone attacks, Special Forces night raids, bypassing the chain of command, and cutting out those who might say no.


Shabouot/Pentecôte: A quand un référendum sur les dix commandements ? (Robespierre’s one-day religion: Looking back at the ceremony that was to abolish 2, 000 years of “perverted” christianism)

24 mai, 2015
https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Decalogue_parchment_by_Jekuthiel_Sofer_1768.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/judaisme.sdv.fr/perso/rneher-b/tabloi/decl1789.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/i-cms.linternaute.com/image_cms/750/1729145-monument-de-joseph-sec.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/judaisme.sdv.fr/perso/rneher-b/tabloi/mallet.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/www.histoire-image.org/photo/fullscreen/arc40_vue_002z.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/www.carnavalet.paris.fr/sites/default/files/styles/oeuvre_zoom/public/24213-2bd.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/cdn.timesofisrael.com/uploads/2015/05/Ireland-Gay-Marriage_Horo-2.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CFUHobyUsAAhT9b.jpg:large
https://i1.wp.com/www.je-suis-stupide-j-ai-vote-hollande.fr/blog/wp-content/uploads/gpa.pngHomme et femme, il les créa. Genèse 1: 27
Je suis le chemin, la vérité, et la vie. Nul ne vient au Père que par moi. Jésus (Jean 14: 6)
Dans le calendrier juif, Chavouot se déroule « sept semaines entières » ou cinquante jours jusqu’au lendemain du septième sabbat » après la fête de Pessa’h. De là son nom de Fête des Semaines (Chavouot, en hébreu) et celui de Pentecôte (cinquantième [jour], en grec ancien) dans le judaïsme hellénistique. (…) Ce n’est qu’à partir du IIe siècle que le pharisianisme liera la fête de la moisson à la commémoration du don de la Loi au Sinaï. Les Actes des Apôtres situent explicitement lors de cette fête juive le récit où les premiers disciples de Jésus de Nazareth reçoivent l’Esprit Saint et une inspiration divine dans le Cénacle de Jérusalem : des langues de feu se posent sur chacun d’eux, formalisant la venue de l’Esprit (…) L’image du feu — conforme à la tradition juive de l’époque sur l’épisode de la révélation sinaïtique que l’épisode entend renouveler — matérialise la Voix divine. La tradition chrétienne perçoit et présente la Pentecôte comme la réception du don des langues qui permet de porter la promesse du salut universel aux confins de la terre ainsi que semble en attester l’origine des témoins de l’évènement, issus de toute la Diaspora juive. Wikipedia
Dans l’ancien Orient, lors d’une alliance entre deux puissances, on disposait, dans le temple des partenaires, un document écrit devant être lu périodiquement12, il n’est donc pas surprenant que les Tables de la Loi soit le témoignage concret de l’Alliance entre Dieu et son peuple. C’est la raison pour laquelle, les images des tables sont souvent présentes sur le fronton des synagogues. (…) Dans les temples protestants, une représentation des Tables de la Loi remplaçait, jusqu’au XVIIe siècle, la croix des églises catholiques. Wikipedia
Tous les préceptes du Décalogue se peuvent déduire de la justice et de la bienveillance universelle que la loi naturelle ordonne. (…) Le Décalogue ne contient donc que les principaux chefs ou les fondements politiques des Juifs ; mais néanmoins ces fondements (mettant à part ce qui regardait en particulier la nation judaïque) renferment des lois qui sont naturellement imposées à tous les hommes et à l’observance desquelles ils sont tenus dans l’indépendance de l’état de la nature comme dans toute société civile. Louis  de Jancourt (article Décalogue, Encyclopédie dirigée par D’Alembert et Diderot, 1 octobre 1754)
L’Assemblée Nationale reconnaît et déclare, en présence et sous les auspices de l’Être suprême, les droits suivants de l’Homme et du Citoyen… Préambule de la Déclaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen
Le texte s’inscrit sur deux registres, dont la forme évoque celles des Tables de la Loi rapportées par Moïse du mont Sinaï. Il est accompagné de figures allégoriques personnifiant la France et la Renommée, et de symboles comme le faisceau (unité), le bonnet « phrygien » (liberté), le serpent se mordant la queue (éternité), la guirlande de laurier (gloire), les chaînes brisées (victoire sur le despotisme) ; l’ensemble étant placé sous l’œil du Dieu créateur, rayonnant d’un triangle à la fois biblique et maçonnique. Philippe de Carbonnières
Le Judaïsme a abandonné la lecture quotidienne des proclamations des ‘sectaires’ (Chrétiens) (Berachot 12a). Les partisans de Paul croyaient que seuls les Dix Commandements et non le reste de la loi mosaïque étaient divins, éternels et obligatoires. Dans ce contexte, pour les Juifs, donner la priorité au Décalogue aurait pu signifier un accord avec les sectaires, aussi la lecture quotidienne a été abandonnée de façon à montrer que toutes les autres 613 mitzvot étaient des commandements divins. Raymond Apple
Les Tables ne sont pas un symbole laïc ou païen. A la différence du bonnet phrygien, du serpent qui se mord la queue, des faisceaux de licteurs, etc., leur référent n’est pas l’antiquité païenne, mais la Bible, au message religieux évident. Pourtant, dans la France chrétienne du 18e siècle, le message religieux normalement reçu est lié à une symbolique chrétienne, que justement la Révolution repousse. La mentalité révolutionnaire est donc à la recherche d’une symbolique qui ne soit pas chrétienne (puisque l’Eglise est désormais perçue comme synonyme de fanatisme et d’absolutisme despotique), mais qui soit cependant suffisamment religieuse pour satisfaire le sentiment religieux profond qui réside au coeur de chaque révolutionnaire (…) Mais par-delà la croyance sentimentale difficilement déracinable existe aussi un pragmatisme politique. Il peut être dangereux de déraciner tout symbole religieux dans l’imagerie populaire et donc dans les mentalités qu’on veut forger. Représenter des symboles chrétiens est exclu, puisque contraire aux principes jacobins. Les Tables de la Loi s’offrent donc d’une manière idéale pour répondre à un certain besoin religieux sans pour autant laisser croire à une affiliation cléricale. Les Tables de la Loi fournissent ainsi « les vêtements du sacré » à la religion de la Patrie. Nous les voyons figurer sur des allégories patriotiques, sur le soleil qui doit faire sortir le monde vers l’âge des lumières, sur des médailles en fer de grande diffusion, représentant l’Egalité et la Justice, sur des gravures évoquant des fêtes populaires, et jusque sur les uniformes militaires, au milieu des canons. On les trouve sur les médailles d’identification des membres des diverses assemblées révolutionnaires comme celle du Conseil des Cinq-Cents. (…) La laïcisation des Tables de la Loi peut aller jusqu’au cas limite où un contenu nouveau est donné au Décalogue. C’est ainsi qu’une gravure populaire présente « les Dix Commandements républicains » dans le cadre graphique des Tables de la Loi. Les Tables de la Loi remplissent donc un rôle important dans l’iconographie de la Révolution. Elles permettent à la Révolution de déconnecter ses emblèmes de tout ce qui est chrétien sans se prévaloir uniquement de symboles d’origine antique et païenne. Elles permettent de donner une coloration religieuse mais dans un ton pour ainsi dire « neutre » aux idéaux de justice, d’égalité, de soumission à une loi égale pour tous, que prône la Révolution. La défaite de l’arbitraire royal et l’apparition d’une Constitution garantissant les Droits de l’homme sont très clairement symbolisés par les Tables de la Loi, ce qui explique leur place récurrente dans l’iconographie de la Révolution. Renée Neher-Bernheim
On a supposé qu’en accueillant des offrandes civiques, la Convention avait proscrit le culte catholique. Non, la Convention n’a point fait cette démarche téméraire: la Convention ne la fera jamais. Son intention est de maintenir la liberté des cultes, qu’elle a proclamée, et de réprimer en même temps tous ceux qui en abuseraient pour troubler l’ordre public; elle ne permettra pas qu’on persécute les ministres paisibles du culte, et elle les punira avec sévérité toutes les fois qu’ils oseront se prévaloir de leurs fonctions pour tromper les citoyens et pour armer les préjugés ou le royalisme contre la république. (…) Il est des hommes qui veulent aller plus loin; qui, sous le prétexte de détruire la superstition, veulent faire une sorte de religion de l’athéisme lui-même. (…) La Convention n’est point un faiseur de livres, un auteur de systèmes métaphysiques, c’est un corps politique et populaire, chargé de faire respecter, non seulement les droits, mais le caractère du peuple français. Ce n’est point en vain qu’elle a proclamé la déclaration des droits de l’homme en présence de l’Etre suprême!” (…) L’athéisme est aristocratique; l’idée d’un grand être, qui veille sur l’innocence opprimée, et qui punit le crime triomphant, est toute populaire. Le peuple, les malheureux m’applaudissent; si je trouvais des censeurs, ce serait parmi les riches et parmi les coupables. J’ai été, dès le collège, un assez mauvais catholique; je n’ai jamais été ni un ami froid, ni un défenseur infidèle de l’humanité. Je n’en suis que plus attaché aux idées morales et politiques que je viens de vous exposer: “Si Dieu n’existait pas, il faudrait |’inventer.” (…) Ce sentiment est celui de l’Europe et de l’univers, c’est celui du peuple français. Ce peuple n’est attaché ni aux prêtres, ni à la superstition, ni aux cérémonies religieuses; il ne l’est qu’au culte en lui-même, c’est-à-dire à l’idée d’une puissance incompréhensible, l’effroi du crime et le soutien de la vertu, à qui il se plaît à rendre des hommages qui sont autant d’anathèmes contre l’injustice et contre le crime triomphant. Si le philosophe peut attacher sa moralité à d’autres bases, gardons-nous néanmoins de blesser cet instinct sacré et ce sentiment universel des peuples. Quel est le génie qui puisse en un instant remplacer, par ses inventions, cette grande idée protectrice de l’ordre social et de toutes les vertus privées? Maximilien Robespierre (club des Jacobins, 21 novembre 1793)
Si quelqu’un me prouvait que le Christ est en dehors de la vérité, et qu’il serait réel que la vérité fût en dehors du Christ, j’aimerais mieux alors rester avec le Christ qu’avec la vérité. Dostoeivski
Si vous admettez qu’un homme revêtu de la toute-puissance peut en abuser contre ses adversaires, pourquoi n’admettez-vous pas la même chose pour une majorité?  (…) Le pouvoir de tout faire, que je refuse à un seul de mes semblables, je ne l’accorderai jamais à plusieurs. Tocqueville
Toute idée fausse finit dans le sang, mais il s’agit toujours du sang des autres. C’est ce qui explique que certains de nos philosophes se sentent à l’aise pour dire n’importe quoi. Camus
Dans ces temps de tromperie universelle, dire la vérité devient un acte révolutionnaire.  George Orwell (?)
Si les faits ne coïncident pas avec la théorie, il faut changer les faits ! Albert Einstein (?)
La vérité ne se décide pas au vote majoritaire. Doug Gwyn
Dans l’histoire de l’Europe moderne, c’est la Révolution française qui la première fit passer dans la réalité l’idée d’exterminer une classe ou un groupe. Ernst Nolte
Si j’étais législateur, je proposerais tout simplement la disparition du mot et du concept de “mariage” dans un code civil et laïque. Le “mariage”, valeur religieuse, sacrale, hétérosexuelle – avec voeu de procréation, de fidélité éternelle, etc. -, c’est une concession de l’Etat laïque à l’Eglise chrétienne – en particulier dans son monogamisme qui n’est ni juif (il ne fut imposé aux juifs par les Européens qu’au siècle dernier et ne constituait pas une obligation il y a quelques générations au Maghreb juif) ni, cela on le sait bien, musulman. En supprimant le mot et le concept de “mariage”, cette équivoque ou cette hypocrisie religieuse et sacrale, qui n’a aucune place dans une constitution laïque, on les remplacerait par une “union civile” contractuelle, une sorte de pacs généralisé, amélioré, raffiné, souple et ajusté entre des partenaires de sexe ou de nombre non imposé.(…) C’est une utopie mais je prends date. Jacques Derrida
C’est le sens de l’histoire (…) Pour la première fois en Occident, des hommes et des femmes homosexuels prétendent se passer de l’acte sexuel pour fonder une famille. Ils transgressent un ordre procréatif qui a reposé, depuis 2000 ans, sur le principe de la différence sexuelle. Evelyne Roudinesco
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
On a commencé avec la déconstruction du langage et on finit avec la déconstruction de l’être humain dans le laboratoire. (…) Elle est proposée par les mêmes qui d’un côté veulent prolonger la vie indéfiniment et nous disent de l’autre que le monde est surpeuplé. René Girard
Si les forêts tropicales méritent notre protection, l’homme (…) ne la mérite pas moins (…) Parler de la nature de l’être humain comme homme et femme et demander que cet ordre de la création soit respecté ne relève pas d’une métaphysique dépassée. Benoit XVI
La lisibilité de la filiation, qui est dans l’intérêt de l’enfant, est sacrifiée au profit du bon vouloir des adultes et la loi finit par mentir sur l’origine de la vieConférence des évêques
Israël existe et continuera à exister jusqu’à ce que l’islam l’abroge comme il a abrogé ce qui l’a précédé. Hasan al-Bannâ (préambule de la charte du Hamas, 1988)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique est un mouvement palestinien spécifique qui fait allégeance à Allah et à sa voie, l’islam. Il lutte pour hisser la bannière de l’islam sur chaque pouce de la Palestine. Charte du Hamas (Article six)
Les enfants de la nation du Hezbollah au Liban sont en confrontation avec [leurs ennemis] afin d’atteindre les objectifs suivants : un retrait israélien définitif du Liban comme premier pas vers la destruction totale d’Israël et la libération de la Sainte Jérusalem de la souillure de l’occupation … Charte du Hezbollah (1985)
La libération de la Palestine a pour but de “purifier” le pays de toute présence sioniste. (…) Le partage de la Palestine en 1947 et la création de l’État d’Israël sont des événements nuls et non avenus. (…) La Charte ne peut être amendée que par une majorité des deux tiers de tous les membres du Conseil national de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine réunis en session extraordinaire convoquée à cet effet. Charte de l’OLP (articles 15, 19 et 33)
Je mentirais si je vous disais que je vais l’abroger. Personne ne peut le faire. Yasser Arafat (Harvard, octobre 1995)
Abraham n’était pas juif, pas plus que c’était un Hébreu, mais il était tout simplement irakien. Les Juifs n’ont aucun droit de prétendre disposer d’une synagogue dans la tombe des patriarches à Hébron, lieu où est inhumé Abraham. Le bâtiment tout entier devrait être une mosquée. Yasser Arafat, cité dans le Jerusalem Report, 26 décembre 1996)
Mariage homosexuel : l’Irlande plus démocratique que les socialistes français, fait un référendum. Les votes sont clos, en République d’Irlande, où plus de 3.2 millions d’habitants étaient appelés à prendre part à un référendum sur la légalisation du mariage homosexuel. 3,2 millions d’Irlandais chanceux qu’on leur demande s’il veulent que la constitution du pays soit modifiée pour autorisé le mariage des couples de gays et lesbiennes. 3,2 millions d’Irlandais plus chanceux que les Français, méprisé par les élites et les dirigeants politiques socialistes, qui ont fait passer leur réforme malgré l’hostilité de millions de Français dans les rues. 3,2 millions d’Irlandais respectés par leur gouvernement, qui, pour un sujet de société aussi important, les a consultés. Jean-Patrick Grumberg
Le Luxembourg donne l’image d’un pays en avance sur les questions de société. C’est un message envoyé à un moment où l’homophobie est en train de monter en Europe. (…) J’aurais pu le cacher, ou le refouler et être malheureux toute ma vie. J’aurais pu avoir une relation avec quelqu’un de l’autre sexe et avoir des relations homosexuelles en cachette. Mais je me suis dit : si tu veux faire de la politique et être honnête en politique, tu dois être honnête avec toi-même et donc t’accepter toi-même. Charles Michel (Premier ministre belge)
Le Luxembourg a célébré une grande première. Le Premier ministre libéral du Luxembourg Xavier Bettel a épousé vendredi son compagnon belge Gauthier Destenay. Il est ainsi devenu le premier dirigeant uni par les liens d’un mariage homosexuel dans l’Union européenne. Europe 1
Pour fêter les deux ans du mariage homo­sexuel léga­lisé en avril 2013. Et puis, je suis très heureux, alors ça donne envie de faire bouger les menta­li­tés. Mon mari et moi sommes venus vivre à Las Vegas pour être libres d’avoir l’en­fant que nous n’au­rions pas pu avoir en France. À Paris, on a parfois l’im­pres­sion qu’il ne faut être ni juif ni noir, ni arabe ni homo­sexuel. Je ne supporte plus le refus de l’autre. J’en ai assez qu’on dise à Romain de féli­ci­ter sa femme pour la nais­sance. Moi-même je devrais me taire. Eh bien non. Je le reven­dique : nous sommes deux hommes, nous avons fait un enfant et ça se passe bien. Alex Goude (animateur M6)
L’Irlande devient ainsi le premier pays au monde à autoriser le mariage gay par voie référendaire. (…) Plus de 3,2 millions d’Irlandais ont été appelés à se prononcer sur une modification de la Constitution proposant d’autoriser « le mariage entre deux personnes, sans distinction de sexe ». L’Irlande devient ainsi le 19e pays, le 14e en Europe, à légaliser le mariage gay. Il est par contre le seul pays à l’avoir fait par référendum, les autres ayant opté pour la voie parlementaire. « C’est historique », a souligné le ministre de la Santé, Leo Varadkar. Ce référendum, a-t-il estimé, constitue « une révolution culturelle » dans un pays longtemps conservateur et où l’homosexualité n’a été dépénalisée qu’en 1993. « Je suis tellement fier d’être Irlandais aujourd’hui », avait tweeté en début de journée, Aodhan O Riordain, secrétaire d’Etat pour l’Egalité, tandis que, dans les rues de Dublin, des Irlandais, hommes et femmes de tous âges, exultaient et se prenaient dans les bras. Avant même la publication des résultats, un des principaux responsables de la campagne du non, David Quinn, avait concédé la défaite de son camp. « C’est une claire victoire pour le camp du oui », a-t-il déclaré, adressant ses « félicitations » aux partisans du mariage homosexuel. Francetvinfo
Une Allemande de 65 ans, mère de 13 enfants et grand-mère de 7 petits-enfants, a accouché de quadruplés « pas complètement développés » à Berlin, un cas controversé mêlant médecine et téléréalité qui relance le débat sur les grossesses tardives. Annegret Raunigk, qui a procédé à des fécondations in vitro en Ukraine, est désormais la mère de quadruplés la plus âgée au monde, selon la chaîne de télévision RTL, détentrice des droits exclusifs sur cette grossesse hors normes. Les bébés prématurés, trois garçons et une fille, sont nés mardi par césarienne, après seulement 26 semaines de grossesse. Ils ont été placés en couveuse mais ont « de bonnes chances de survivre », selon un communiqué de RTL. « Toutefois, les bébés, par comparaison avec une naissance normale dans la 40e semaine de grossesse, ne sont pas encore développés complètement. D’éventuelles complications ne peuvent donc pas être complètement exclues », poursuit la chaîne. (…) Cette femme élégante, les cheveux roux et une fine paire de lunettes sur les yeux, n’en est pas à sa première grossesse tardive. En 2005, alors âgée de « seulement » 55 ans, elle avait mis au monde une petite fille. C’est d’ailleurs pour répondre au souhait de sa dernière fille d’avoir un petit frère ou une petite sœur qu’elle a décidé de retenter une insémination artificielle, a-t-elle expliqué. Nés de 5 pères différents, les autres enfants d’Annegret Raunigk ont déjà tous quitté le domicile maternel. RTL
L’homme et la femme utilisent tous les deux ces poupées pour remplacer un compagnon humain, que ce soit par choix ou par nécessité. Je pense qu’il n’y a aucun inconvénient à cela, surtout si les journées en deviennent plus supportables » (…) Mes photos concernent la vie, les relations amoureuses et la sexualité. Les poupées repoussent certaines personnes, tandis que d’autres sont empathiques envers elle. Au fur et à mesure que le monde devient plus numérique et moins personnel, il sera de plus en plus banal que des poupées et des robots soient utilisés en tant que substituts pour les relations amoureuses. Je peux uniquement espérer que mes photos déclenchent une émotion ou une connexion chez le spectateur. Stacy Leigh
Une reconnaissance de l’Etat de Palestine par le Saint-Siège est un signe fort envoyé aux pays musulmans. C’est un appel à l’apaisement. (…) En règle générale, le Saint-Siège reconnaît des pays qui l’ont déjà été par la communauté internationale et les grandes puissances. C’est bien le style du pape François de bousculer ainsi les habitudes. François Mabille
Israël-Palestine : la France veut renverser la table Paris propose un projet de résolution poussant les deux parties à s’entendre en 18 mois. Sous peine de reconnaître l’État palestinien. Le Point
Banking on Netanyahu’s assertion while campaigning for re-election that there would be no Palestinian state during his term in office, Obama is reported exclusively by our sources to have given the hitherto withheld green light to European governments to file a UN Security Council motion proclaiming an independent Palestinian state. Although Netanyahu left the foreign affairs portfolio in his charge and available to be filled by a suitably moderate figure as per the White House’s expectations did not satisfy the US President. The White House is confident that, with the US voting in favor, the motion will be passed by an overwhelming majority and therefore be binding on the Israeli government. To show the administration was in earnest, senior US officials sat down with their French counterparts in Paris last week to sketch out the general outline of this motion. According to our sources, they began addressing such questions as the area of the Palestinian state, its borders, security arrangements between Israel and the Palestinians and whether or not to set a hard-and-fast timeline for implementation, or phrase the resolution as  a general declaration of intent. Incorporating a target date in the language would expose Israel to Security Council sanctions for non-compliance. (…) At the same time, both American and French diplomats are already using the club they propose to hang over the Netanyahu government’s head for gains in other spheres. French President Francois Hollande, for instance, the first foreign leader ever to attend a Gulf Council of Cooperation summit, which opened in Riyadh Tuesday to discuss Iran and the Yemen war, used the opportunity to brief Gulf Arab rulers on Washington’s turnaround on the Israeli-Palestinian issue. And US Secretary of State John Kerry plans to present the Obama administration’s new plans for Palestinian statehood to Saudi leaders during his visit to Riyadh Wednesday and Thursday, May 6-7. Kerry will use Washington’s willingness to meet Palestinian aspirations as currency for procuring Saudi and Gulf support for a Yemen ceasefire and their acceptance of the nuclear deal shaping up with Iran. Debka file
Once again, Barack Obama was riffing off the cosmic joke that he is somehow anti-Semitic, when in fact, as many people understand, he is the most Jewish president we’ve ever had (except for Rutherford B. Hayes). No president, not even Bill Clinton, has traveled so widely in Jewish circles, been taught by so many Jewish law professors, and had so many Jewish mentors, colleagues, and friends, and advisers as Barack Obama (though it is true that every so often he appoints a gentile to serve as White House chief of staff). (…) I’ll grapple with the meaning of Obama’s Jewishness later, but the dispute between the Jewish right and the Jewish left over Obama is actually not about whether he is anti-Jewish or pro-Jewish, but over what sort of Jew he actually is. Jeffrey Goldberg
I’ve been called the first Jewish president, you know. Barack Hussein Obama
Maximilien Robespierre, known as l’Incorruptible, is at the summit of his glory.  Rivers of blood, flowing from the guillotines of France, have washed away the Girondins and anyone who had pactised with them; the Jacobins, even though they were close to him;  certain Montagnards and, curiously, some of his friends who had too openly supported the theses of the atheists… (…) So great is his power now, that to have any opinion at all is a crime of lese-Revolution.  Since obtaining the head of Louis XVI, he seems to be invested with a sort of absolute power, a divine right. (…) When, after having voted for death, the Convention came to its senses, terrified at what it had just decided, he demanded an immediate execution.  (…)  Everyone is waiting to see how the High Priest is going to organize the next part of the sacrifice.  For a whole month, a great silence settles on Paris, troubled only by the cries of the executed.  The Convention, the clubs, the army, the Commune and even the revolutionary tribunal, remain quiet… At last, on 6 May, l’Incorruptible climbs up to the tribunal.  He is wearing his sacerdotal clothes, a sky blue riding-coat and white stockings.  (…)  By degrees, he asks the Deputies to recognize the existence of a “Supreme Being and immortality as the directing power of the Universe”. Then to the stupefaction of some, and the enthusiasm of others, he wants to give his vibrant profession of faith the form of a decree, with immediate effect. His speech, which at the end rises in a passionate plea for a regenerated Humanity, is welcomed by unending applause. Couthon spurs his gendarme mount and proclaims that this great piece of literature must be displayed throughout the whole country.  That it should be translated into all languages, too, and diffused throughout the whole universe. The fabulous decree which institutes in France a new religion and proposes a festival in the style of the celebrations of Antiquity, is voted with enthusiasm and without any discussion.  In the corridors, when the euphoria has died down, the least terrorised start to murmur that, when they had voted the King’s death, they thought that they had also voted that of God. The French people welcome back a divinity.  For months, the churches had been profaned.  Mountain decors peopled with mythological characters symbolising Reason had been built in them.  In a lot of places, prostitutes, “living marbles of public flesh” had draped themselves, completely naked, on the altars. God was now being re-installed under the name of Supreme Being. In Paris, it is not yet known that this Being will soon take on the profile of l’Incorruptible.  But perhaps this will eclipse in a brilliant manner the red reflects of the guillotine, of which everybody is secretly very tired. (…) To bring God back to Earth, Robespierre engages the most gifted director, the painter David, who will soon plant the scene of other festivities, this time imperial… (…) On the terrace of the Tuileries Palace, a colossal amphitheatre, whose floor completely covers the ornamental lake, begins to grow.  Cyclopean statues rise above the formal French gardens, which have become the Jardin national.  They symbolise Atheism, Ambition, Discord, Egoism, and will explode on the day of the ceremony…  It is on 20 prairial, year II (8 June, 1794) that it will take place.  Robespierre has chosen the Sunday which, according to the former Roman Catholic rites, was Pentecost. On the Champs-de-Mars, the Holy Mountain is nearly finished.  The People’s representatives will take place on it, along with the choirs, the orchestras and the banner-bearers.  On its summit, a column fifty feet high overlooks the entrance to a deep cave, lit by giant candelabra.  A river seeps from it, snaking between Etruscan tombs in the shade of an oak tree, and an antique altar, a pyramid, a sarcophage and a temple with twenty columns, complete this mythology.  It takes only a month for a swarm of ditch-diggers, masons, carpenters and artists of all kinds, to finish this unusual church. And here, at last, is the astonishing day of 8 June 1794.  Starting at five o’clock in the morning, the sound of pikes striking the pavement, the rattling of sabres, and the noise of a great troop marching, out-of-step and almost in silence, for a lot of these men do not have shoes, is to be heard.  Robespierre sees, parading under his windows, in columns of twelve, some of the forty-eight Sections of the People who are hurrying towards the meeting places, followed by the Parisians who, already the day before, had discovered the altars of the Supreme Being. (…) Occupied by the armies of Europe outside, chopped down by the butchers of the revolutionary tribunal on the inside, the capital escapes for the first time in months from the baseness of this time of proscriptions…  A lot of people cry and embrace each other in the fading light. (…) From 8 June, the day of the Festival of the Supreme Being, Robespierre will have fifty more days to live.  (…) For Robespierre, the sense and the aim of this festival were to replace the pagan, dry and materialistic cult of Reason by a religion which restored transcendance, a God, without Whom, no man worthy of the name, could live… Right from the beginning of the Revolution, Robespierre had tried to stop the dechristianisation of France.  As a faithful disciple of Rousseau, whom he qualified as a “divine man”, he was sure that Man is a “religious animal”, incapable of durably banishing his spiritual needs.  He shared the feeling of the curate of Boissis-la-Bertrand who was willing to renounce his “mummeries”, that is to say, all formal aspects of the cult, but not his religion. (…) The 8 June festival gives a fairly precise idea of the religion that Robespierre wanted, but did not have the time to develop. (…) What originally caused Robespierre’s downfall was the Deputies’ certainty that he wanted to install a new religion of which he would be the High Priest, and this enormous misunderstanding would be fatal to him.  It was not the god of the christian religion that he wanted to install, of course.  He most certainly wanted to radically end the christian institutions and abolish two thousand years of “perverted” christianism, to return to the spirit and the liturgy of the Roman Republic, the religion of Antiquity.  His ideal not only had the sense of political revolution, but also that of a fundamental cultural revolution. This was his great dream.  He succeeded in giving it body for a few hours by getting five hundred thousand French people to live a day in the fashion of Antiquity. Louis Pauwels

Attention: une solution finale peut en cacher une autre !

En ce jour où avec le don du Décalogue et de l’Esprit Saint pour l’universaliser, la Synagogue et l’Eglise ne fêtent rien de moins que leur fondation et acte de naissance

Et où après l’église protestante des Européens les plus mécréants et avant la Cour suprême du peuple jusqu’ici le plus croyant du monde, c’est à présent aux Européens les plus christianisés mais aussi à l’église la plus décrébilisée par les scandales de pédophilie …

Que se décide au vote majoritaire (A quand un référendum sur la pédophilie ?) la vérité sur l’origine de la vie elle-même …

Alors qu’avec une science désormais capable de s’affranchir du temps, on peut à présent  changer  les faits qui ne coïncident plus avec la théorie …

Pendant qu’après l’Amérique d’Obama et la France de Hollande, c’est au tour du Vatican du petit père des peuples François d’imposer au seul Israël …

La prétendue nouvelle vérité d’un Etat qui n’existe même pas sur le papier

Mais qui à l’instar de la purification de toute trace du judéo-christianisme qui se poursuit dans le berceau de celui-ci et pendant que les mollahs eux préparent tranquillement leur Arme fatale, prétend à rien de moins que l’annihilation de son voisin …

Comment ne pas repenser …

A cette même journée de Pentecôte-Shabouot de 1794

Où redescendant de son Horeb en papier-maché du champ de Mars …

Après le sacrifice par régions et tombereaux entiers des réfractaires comme du roi et de son grand rival Danton …

Et avec son nouveau culte de la Raison et ses autels couverts de marbres vivants de chair publique …

L’Incorruptible et nouveau Moïse entendait apporter sous les vivats de la foule …

L’ultime solution finale à la question chrétienne en France  ?

8 juin 1794
La fête de l’Être suprême
À Paris, le 8 juin 1794 (20 prairial An II), le tout-puissant Maximilien de Robespierre conduit la première fête en l’honneur de l’Être suprême. Par cette cérémonie qui se veut grandiose, civique et religieuse à la fois, l’« Incorruptible » tente de concilier la déchristianisation menée par le Comité de Salut public avec les aspirations religieuses de la grande masse des Français.

Fabienne Manière

Hérodote

L’Être suprême plutôt que Dieu
Depuis l’exécution de son principal rival, Danton, le 5 avril 1794, Robespierre écrase de son autorité le Comité de Salut public (le gouvernement révolutionnaire) ainsi que l’assemblée de la Convention. Celle-ci est dominée par les députés de la Montagne (ainsi nommés parce qu’ils siègent sur les bancs les plus élevés). Alliés aux sans-culottes des sections et des clubs parisiens, ils sont disposés à suivre Robespierre sur le chemin sans fin de la Révolution.

Robespierre a recours à la Terreur contre les citoyens suspects de tiédeur révolutionnaire. Il est décidé d’autre part à mener la déchristianisation de la France à son terme.

Mais l’« Incorruptible » ne veut pas priver le peuple de références religieuses et morales car il caresse l’idéal rousseauiste d’une société vertueuse, démocratique et égalitaire. Lui-même se veut déiste, à l’encontre de nombre de ses anciens adversaires, athées déclarés tels Anacharsis Cloots, « pape des athées » ou encore Danton et Desmoulins. Au Club des Jacobins, il lance : « Si Dieu n’existait pas, il faudrait l’inventer ! »

À son instigation, la Convention décrète le 18 floréal An II (7 mai 1794) : « le peuple français reconnaît l’existence de l’Être suprême et de l’Immortalité de l’âme ». Par la même occasion, elle annonce une grande fête destinée à inaugurer ce nouveau culte fondé sur la raison.

Vive la fête
Arrive le jour fixé pour la fête de la nouvelle divinité sans nom et sans visage. Il coïncide avec le dimanche de la Pentecôte (commémoration par les chrétiens de la révélation de l’Esprit-Saint aux apôtres du Christ). À l’initiative du peintre et conventionnel Louis David, grand ordonnateur des festivités, les maisons de Paris ont été fleuries et enguirlandées pour l’occasion.

Robespierre, en habit bleu à revers rouge, met d’abord le feu à une effigie de l’Athéisme, installée au milieu du bassin des Tuileries. En s’effondrant, elle révèle la statue de la Sagesse !

Puis le dictateur prend la tête d’un cortège magnifique, un bouquet de fleurs et d’épis à la main. Il se rend au Champ-de-Mars où a été dressée une montagne surmontée d’un obélisque et de la statue du Peuple français.

La foule des sans-culottes semble apprécier les effets de scène mais le ridicule de la cérémonie suscite des ricanements dans l’entourage de l’« Incorruptible ». Celui-ci, qui s’en aperçoit, dissimule mal son ressentiment.

Retour à la tradition

Quelques semaines plus tard, la victoire de Fleurus rassure les conventionnels sur le sort du pays. Elle les convainc de se défaire d’un chef devenu encombrant et décidément imprévisible. La chute de Robespierre, le 27 juillet 1794 (9 thermidor An II), entraîne la disparition de l’Être suprême.

Les conventionnels n’en ont pas fini pour autant avec les fêtes civiques. Le 11 octobre 1794, ils organisent l’entrée solennelle au Panthéon de la dépouille de leur maître à penser Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Ils créent aussi sept fêtes nationales : fête de la République (1er vendémiaire), fête de la Jeunesse (10 germinal), fête des Époux (10 floréal), fête de la Reconnaissance (10 prairial), fête de l’Agriculture (10 messidor), fête de la Liberté (9 et 10 thermidor – chute de Robespierre ! -), fête de la Vieillesse (10 fructidor).

Dans un ultime effort pour déchristianiser la société, la loi du 9 septembre 1798 instaure la fête du décadi en remplacement du dimanche ; ce jour-là, le président de chaque municipalité, en uniforme d’apparat, doit rassembler les habitants sur la place du village, les informer des lois et des nouvelles, prononcer un sermon civique et célébrer les mariages civils !

Avec le Concordat de 1802, enfin, la religion catholique va retrouver les faveurs des autorités publiques.

Voir aussi:

Mariage homosexuel : l’Irlande plus démocratique que les socialistes français, fait un référendum

Les votes sont clos, en République d’Irlande, où plus de 3.2 millions d’habitants étaient appelés à prendre part à un référendum sur la légalisation du mariage homosexuel.

3,2 millions d’Irlandais chanceux qu’on leur demande s’il veulent que la constitution du pays soit modifiée pour autorisé le mariage des couples de gays et lesbiennes.

3,2 millions d’Irlandais plus chanceux que les Français, méprisé par les élites et les dirigeants politiques socialistes, qui ont fait passer leur réforme malgré l’hostilité de millions de Français dans les rues.

3,2 millions d’Irlandais respectés par leur gouvernement, qui, pour un sujet de société aussi important, les a consultés.

Le résultat du référendum irlandais sur le mariage homosexuel semble se diriger vers deux fois plus de oui que de non.

Il semble même que dans les régions rurales les plus conservatives, le vote se situe aux alentours de 50/50.

A Dublin, le vote est massivement pour le Oui.

Voir également:

L’Irlande a voté en faveur du mariage homosexuel à 62,1% selon les résultats définitifs
L’Irlande devient ainsi le premier pays au monde à autoriser le mariage gay par voie référendaire.

Francetvinfo avec AFP et Reuters

23/05/2015

Les Irlandais se sont prononcés massivement en faveur de la légalisation du mariage homosexuel, selon des résultats définitifs de ce référendum historique, organisé vendredi, et publiés samedi 23 mai. Le oui l’emporte largement avec 62,1% des voix, selon des résultats publiés par la chaîne nationale RTE.

Plus de 3,2 millions d’Irlandais ont été appelés à se prononcer sur une modification de la Constitution proposant d’autoriser « le mariage entre deux personnes, sans distinction de sexe ».

Le 19e pays dans le monde à légaliser le mariage gay
L’Irlande devient ainsi le 19e pays, le 14e en Europe, à légaliser le mariage gay. Il est par contre le seul pays à l’avoir fait par référendum, les autres ayant opté pour la voie parlementaire.

« C’est historique », a souligné le ministre de la Santé, Leo Varadkar. Ce référendum, a-t-il estimé, constitue « une révolution culturelle » dans un pays longtemps conservateur et où l’homosexualité n’a été dépénalisée qu’en 1993. « Je suis tellement fier d’être Irlandais aujourd’hui », avait tweeté en début de journée, Aodhan O Riordain, secrétaire d’Etat pour l’Egalité, tandis que, dans les rues de Dublin, des Irlandais, hommes et femmes de tous âges, exultaient et se prenaient dans les bras.

Avant même la publication des résultats, un des principaux responsables de la campagne du non, David Quinn, avait concédé la défaite de son camp. « C’est une claire victoire pour le camp du oui », a-t-il déclaré, adressant ses « félicitations » aux partisans du mariage homosexuel.

Voir également:

Pédophilie: excuses du primat d’Irlande
Le Figaro/AFP
17/03/2010

Le primat d’Irlande, au coeur d’une polémique pour n’avoir pas dénoncé des abus sexuels dont il avait eu connaissance, a présenté aujourd’hui ses excuses et exprimé sa « honte » de n’avoir pas défendu les valeurs qu’il professe.

Des familles de victimes ont réclamé la démission du cardinal Sean Brady depuis que l’église catholique d’Irlande a reconnu qu’il avait participé à deux réunions en 1975 au cours desquelles deux victimes présumées d’abus sexuels avaient signé des promesses de silence.

« Je voudrais dire à tous ceux qui ont été blessés par des manquements de ma part, que je leur présente des excuses du fond du coeur », a déclaré le cardinal Brady dans son homélie en la cathédrale d’Armagh (Irlande du nord), selon un communiqué de l’église publié à Dublin. « Je voudrais également présenter mes excuses à tous ceux qui ont l’impression que je les ai laissés tomber », a-t-il ajouté. « Avec le recul, j’ai honte de n’avoir pas toujours soutenu les valeurs que je défendais et en lesquelles je crois ».

Une culture de « silence » et de « secret

Le primat d’Irlande avait affirmé lundi qu’il ne présenterait sa démission qu’à la demande du pape Benoît XVI. Selon l’Eglise catholique, le cardinal Sean Brady a participé à deux réunions en 1975, alors qu’il était prêtre. Au cours de ces réunions, deux victimes présumées « ont signé des engagements promettant de respecter la confidentialité de la récolte d’informations », a confirmé l’Eglise.

Les autorités ecclésiastiques enquêtaient alors sur le père Brendan Smyth, considéré comme responsable d’abus sexuels sur des centaines d’enfants sur une période de 40 ans et mort en prison après son arrestation dans les années 1990.
Sur la radio BBC Ulster, le cardinal Brady avait expliqué lundi qu’il régnait il y a 35 ans une culture de « silence » et de « secret » concernant les abus sexuels à la fois dans le clergé et dans la société civile, et qu’il n’avait pas jugé de sa responsabilité de dénoncer le pédophile.

Mariage gay : L’Eglise protestante unie de France autorise la bénédiction des couples de même sexe
Rédaction du HuffPost avec AFP
17/05/2015

MARIAGE POUR TOUS – L’Eglise protestante unie de France (EPUdF) a adopté dimanche la possibilité de bénir les couples homosexuels à l’issue d’un vote très largement positif, une quasi-première en France, a indiqué le porte-parole de la principale Église protestante du pays.

Sur la centaine de délégués de l’EPUdF réunis à Sète (Hérault) et ayant pris part au vote, 94 ont voté pour la possibilité d’offrir une bénédiction religieuse aux couples homosexuels, et trois contre, a-t-il précisé.

Ce vote donne la possibilité aux 500 pasteurs de l’EPUdF de bénir des couples homosexuels, sans pour autant y obliger ceux des pasteurs qui sont opposés à un tel geste.

Le protestantisme est actuellement la 3e religion en France. Selon des données de l’INED de 2008, 45% des Français se déclarent sans religion, 43% se disent catholiques, 8% musulmans, 2% protestants et 0,5% juifs. En 2012, le CSA estimait de son coté que les catholiques représentaient 56% de la population adulte, les musulmans 6%, les protestants 2% et les juifs 1%.

Même bénédiction que celle accordée aux couples hétérosexuels

Le mariage n’est pas un sacrement pour les protestants, mais les couples hétérosexuels unis en mairie peuvent être bénis au temple. En France, seule la Mission populaire évangélique (MPEF), une Eglise beaucoup plus petite que l’EPUdF, autorise un « geste liturgique d’accueil et de prière » pour les homosexuels.

Cette décision intervient deux ans après l’adoption de la loi Taubira sur le mariage gay. Les délégués de la principale Eglise protestante française sont réunis depuis jeudi autour du thème « Bénir, témoins de l’Evangile dans l’accompagnement des personnes et des couples ».

L’EPUdF, qui incarne le courant historique du protestantisme français, revendique 110.000 membres actifs parmi 400.000 personnes faisant appel à ses services.

Tout en se défendant d’être en concurrence avec une mouvance évangélique en forte croissance, elle parie désormais sur une démarche missionnaire pour « passer d’une Eglise de membres à une Eglise de témoins ».

Voir encore:

Etats-Unis : la Cour suprême s’apprête à légaliser le mariage gay
La Cour suprême des Etats-Unis examine mardi la constitutionnalité du mariage homosexuel pour dire si les couples de même sexe peuvent se marier partout dans le pays. Deux ans après le premier round, la plus haute juridiction des Etats-Unis arbitre le second lors d’une audience exceptionnelle de deux heures et demie.
Le Parisien

28 Avril 2015

La Cour suprême des Etats-Unis examine ce mardi, lors d’une audience exceptionnelle de deux heures et demie, la constitutionnalité du mariage homosexuel. Il s’agit de dire si les couples de même sexe peuvent se marier partout dans le pays. Des centaines de militants des deux camps étaient attendus dans la journée devant le temple de la justice.

Une première dans l’UE : le Premier ministre du Luxembourg épouse son compagnon
Plusieurs milliers d’Américains ont déjà manifesté ce week-end à Washington, dont certains ont campé au pied des marches de la haute Cour pour s’assurer une place dans la salle d’audience.

Quatre Etats réfractaires

Légal dans 37 Etats sur 50 (dont certains en appel) ainsi que dans la capitale fédérale Washington, le mariage homosexuel doit encore être reconnu dans tout le pays. C’est ce que réclament des gays et lesbiennes de quatre Etats interdisant le mariage homosexuel, le Tennessee, le Kentucky, le Michigan et l’Ohio. Soutenus par l’administration Obama, les 16 plaignants veulent pouvoir se marier légalement ou voir leur mariage reconnu dans l’Etat où ils vivent. Les quatre Etats incriminés, soutenus par nombre d’organisations religieuses et conservatrices, définissent le mariage comme l’union entre un homme et une femme, refusent de marier des hommes entre eux ou des femmes entre elles, et ne reconnaissent pas le mariage homosexuel lorsqu’il a été légalement célébré ailleurs.

Les quatre Etats visés arguent de leur droit à protéger la définition traditionnelle du mariage, pour «respecter la complémentarité biologique des deux sexes» dans l’éducation des enfants et dans la société. De leur côté, les plaignants ne voient rien d’autre qu’une discrimination fondée sur l’orientation sexuelle. «Quelles que soient les limites imposées au droit à se marier, le genre des conjoints ne peut pas être l’une d’elles», arguent les couples du Michigan. Ils jugent aussi que les quatre Etats violent leur liberté de voyager en refusant de reconnaître leur mariage lorsqu’il a été légalement célébré.

Trois questions pour les neuf Sages

Pour savoir si elle légalise le mariage gay sur tout le territoire américain, la haute Cour se demandera d’abord si le 14e Amendement de la Constitution exige d’un Etat qu’il unisse par les liens du mariage les couples de même sexe. Dans un deuxième temps, elle déterminera si le même Amendement requiert qu’un Etat reconnaisse un mariage homosexuel légalement célébré dans un autre Etat. Dans les deux cas, elle s’appuiera sur le principe d’égalité de tous devant la loi et sur le droit fondamental au mariage. Sur la base du principe de «rationnalité», les neuf sages se demanderont également si un Etat a un intérêt légitime à interdire le mariage des couples de même sexe ou si c’est purement arbitraire.

Fin juin 2013, la Cour suprême a abrogé une partie d’une loi fédérale qui définissait le mariage comme l’union entre un homme et une femme, ouvrant de facto les droits fédéraux à la retraite, à la succession ou aux abattements fiscaux à tous les couples légalement mariés, qu’ils soient hétérosexuels ou homosexuels. Mais le mariage restait du ressort des Etats. Or la haute Cour protège traditionnellement les principes de fédéralisme.

Une marche arrière difficile

D’avis d’experts, la reconnaissance du mariage pour tous à l’échelle du pays semble désormais «inévitable». Traditionnel défenseur des droits homosexuels, le juge conservateur Anthony Kennedy devrait rejoindre les quatre juges progressistes de la haute Cour pour valider le mariage homosexuel au niveau national.

Ces dernières années, la haute Cour américaine, pourtant à majorité conservatrice, a confirmé toutes les décisions judiciaires en faveur des unions des couples de même sexe, «ce qui rend une marche arrière vraiment difficile», estime Steven Schwinn, professeur de la John Marshall Law School.

Cette controverse sur la mariage gay présente un caractère historique. Plus de 150 argumentaires ont été déposés – un record – dont une vingtaine par les deux parties. Sur ces argumentaires, 78 soutiennent les plaignants homosexuels, dont l’administration Obama ; 67 prennent position pour les Etats, dont la Conférence des évêques des Etats-Unis.

Voir de même:

Luxembourg : le Premier ministre épouse son compagnon
B.W avec AFP

Europe 1

15 mai 2015

INÉDIT – Le Premier ministre luxembourgeois s’est marié avec son compagnon, une première pour un chef de gouvernement de l’Union européenne.
Le Luxembourg a célébré une grande première. Le Premier ministre libéral du Luxembourg Xavier Bettel a épousé vendredi son compagnon belge Gauthier Destenay. Il est ainsi devenu le premier dirigeant uni par les liens d’un mariage homosexuel dans l’Union européenne. « Le Luxembourg donne l’image d’un pays en avance sur les questions de société. C’est un message envoyé à un moment où l’homophobie est en train de monter en Europe » », a insisté Charles Michel, le Premier ministre belge.

Le mariage homosexuel légalisé en 2014. Xavier Bettel et Gauthier Destenay, tous deux en costumes sombres, sont arrivés en marchant, la main dans la main. Deux cent personnes étaient présentes devant l’hôtel de ville de Luxembourg et ont applaudi le couple à son arrivée. Les mariés sont revenus sur le perron pour les saluer après la cérémonie et ont eu droit à un lancer de riz. Le jeune Premier ministre, 42 ans, avait fait savoir en août 2014 son intention de se marier avec Gauthier Destenay, un architecte belge. L’annonce était intervenue deux mois après l’adoption à une très large majorité de la législation autorisant le mariage et l’adoption pour les couples du même sexe au Luxembourg.

« Tu dois être honnête avec toi-même ». Xavier Bettel a été nommé chef du gouvernement fin 2013. Il n’a jamais caché son homosexualité à ses compatriotes. « J’aurais pu le cacher, ou le refouler et être malheureux toute ma vie. J’aurais pu avoir une relation avec quelqu’un de l’autre sexe et avoir des relations homosexuelles en cachette. Mais je me suis dit : si tu veux faire de la politique et être honnête en politique, tu dois être honnête avec toi-même et donc t’accepter toi-même », a-t-il expliqué sur la chaîne de télévision belge RTBF. Le Luxembourgeois n’est cependant pas le Premier chef de gouvernement homosexuel à se marier en Europe. La Première ministre islandaise Johanna Sigurdardottir, au pouvoir depuis 2009, a épousé sa compagne en 2010, mais l’Islande n’est pas membre de l’UE.

Voir de plus:

Exclu Gala – Alex Goude: « Avec Romain, on aime­rait un second enfant »
L’anima­teur raconte son homo­pa­ren­ta­lité
Séverine Servat

Gala

22 mai 2015

Alex Goude, anima­teur de La France a un incroyable talent, dévoile sa vie privée. Comme un acte mili­tant. Avec Romain, son mari et amou­reux depuis cinq ans, ils ont eu un fils, Elliot, né par mère porteuse aux États-unis. Rencontre dans leur home sweet home, à Las Vegas.

Du centre-ville truffé de casi­nos, il faut quinze minutes pour arri­ver devant la maison du trublion de M6 située dans un coquet lotis­se­ment de Las Vegas. Deux voitures, dont une imma­tri­cu­lée au nom de son chien, une piscine entou­rée de palmiers fichés sous le soleil de plomb de la ville, deux chambres d’amis et un écran de télé­vi­sion géant exté­rieur signent l’abou­tis­se­ment du rêve améri­cain d’Alex Goude. Voici deux ans qu’il s’est installé à Las Vegas et prend l’avion pour tour­ner ses émis­sions en France. Dans un tran­sat, son fils Elliot, trois mois. Un tableau ordi­naire, sauf qu’El­liot a la parti­cu­la­rité d’avoir deux papas. Alex est marié à Romain, trente ans, et l’en­fant du couple est né par gesta­tion pour autrui. Cette démarche, inter­dite en France, pousse plus loin le débat autour des droits des homo­sexuels. Que penser de ce tableau de famille 2.0, homo­pa­ren­tal, qui oscille entre conte de fées contem­po­rain et étran­geté assu­mée ? Lorsque la nais­sance s’af­fran­chit des lois de la nature, que reste-t-il de nos repères ? L’ani­ma­teur livre ses convic­tions.

Gala : Pourquoi choi­sir, aujourd’­hui, de parler de votre vie privée ?

Alex Goude : Pour fêter les deux ans du mariage homo­sexuel léga­lisé en avril 2013. Et puis, je suis très heureux, alors ça donne envie de faire bouger les menta­li­tés. Mon mari et moi sommes venus vivre à Las Vegas pour être libres d’avoir l’en­fant que nous n’au­rions pas pu avoir en France. À Paris, on a parfois l’im­pres­sion qu’il ne faut être ni juif ni noir, ni arabe ni homo­sexuel. Je ne supporte plus le refus de l’autre. J’en ai assez qu’on dise à Romain de féli­ci­ter sa femme pour la nais­sance. Moi-même je devrais me taire. Eh bien non. Je le reven­dique : nous sommes deux hommes, nous avons fait un enfant et ça se passe bien.

Gala : S’as­su­mer et s’y tenir, c’est un long chemi­ne­ment ?

A. G. : On n’ima­gine pas à quel point. Jusqu’à vingt-cinq ans, je pensais que j’étais hété­ro­sexuel,  j’avais du succès avec les filles, je devais me fian­cer, avoir des enfants comme tout le monde. Puis tout a basculé.

Gala : Vous avez réalisé que ce ne serait pas votre destin ?

A. G. : Oui, j’ai pris des cours de théâtre et à force d’en­dos­ser des person­na­li­tés diffé­rentes, je me suis libéré. Un jour, j’ai embrassé un homme. Le lende­main, j’ai pleuré toute la jour­née, sous le choc. L’his­toire d’amour a duré six mois. J’ai à nouveau aimé des femmes et puis fina­le­ment mon choix s’est à nouveau porté sur un homme.

Gala : Vous l’avez annoncé à vos parents ?

A. G. : Mon père était tombé dans l’al­cool. On ne se parlait plus (le père d’Alex est décédé des suites de son alcoo­lisme). Pour ma mère, qui m’avait connu hétéro, c’était dur à imagi­ner. J’étais son fils unique, elle a pensé qu’elle ne serait jamais grand-mère. Aujourd’­hui elle est heureuse, la vraie ‘Lady Gaga’, c’est elle.

Gala : Le grand public, lui, n’en a jamais rien su…

A. G. : Ma chaine, M6, en tout cas, est au courant et assume. Je n’au­rais jamais parlé de ma vie privée si je ne rece­vais pas sans arrêt, via les réseaux sociaux, des témoi­gnages de jeunes gays déses­pé­rés.

Gala : Vous les écou­tez?

A. G. : Mieux: je leur réponds. L’ho­mo­sexua­lité est encore lour­de­ment stig­ma­ti­sée. En Espagne en 2005 ou au Portu­gal en 2010, la léga­li­sa­tion du mariage est passée en douceur. En France, le débat a été instru­men­ta­lisé. Les gens sont sortis défi­ler en assu­mant leur homo­pho­bie. A ce moment, des adoles­cents me disaient « mes parents me forcent à mili­ter avec eux, ils ne savent pas que je suis homo ». C’était choquant. Qu’est-ce que les parents d’un enfant de six ans qu’on emmène défi­ler savent de la voie qu’il emprun­tera plus tard? Si je peux montrer qu’on réus­sit à fonder une famille malgré tout, alors je le fais.

Gala : Votre enfant est né d’une mère porteuse. Vous auriez pour­tant pu recou­rir à l’adop­tion…

A.G. : En tant que céli­ba­taire oui, mais pas en tant que couple. Pour être en mesure d’adop­ter, en France, aujourd’­hui, on doit taire son homo­sexua­lité. Je n’avais pas envie de mentir. Et puis c’est vrai que Romain et moi, rêvions d’un lien du sang.

Gala : Vous aviez des exemples autour de vous ?

A.G. : Bien sûr. Au sein du show­biz français, nous ne sommes pas les seuls à avoir eu recours à la gesta­tion pour autrui, mais le sujet est tabou. D’au­tant qu’on doit partir à l’étran­ger pour le faire. Aux États-Unis, où la gesta­tion pour autrui (GPA) est légale, les profes­sion­nels ont plus de vingt-cinq ans de recul sur le sujet. Et les enfants, une fois adultes, vont bien. Nous avons fait appel à une agence sérieuse.

Gala : Pour bien comprendre, quel est le proto­cole à suivre ?

A.G. : On l’a débuté avant même de se marier, en mars 2013. D’abord, il faut répondre à des ques­tions sur son couple avec un psy, une démarche que jamais aucun parent biolo­gique n’a évidem­ment à subir pour mettre au monde un enfant. Puis s’in­for­mer des impli­ca­tions psycho­lo­giques qui sont assez complexes, c’est vrai. Il faut être très clair : deux hommes ne peuvent pas faire un enfant. Le tiers, c’est la mère, et on doit respec­ter son rôle. On choi­sit alors une donneuse d’ovule, et une mère porteuse, qui est une personne diffé­rente de la donneuse d’ovule.

Gala : A ce moment, quels ont été vos critères de choix?

A. G. : Romain et moi avons choisi la donneuse qui parais­sait le mieux dans sa peau. Ensuite, nous avons aussi choisi, par goût, une personne aux yeux bleus (ndlr : Elliot a les yeux clairs) comme plusieurs personnes de nos familles respec­tives. C’est une jeune femme qui travaille dans la mode, une yuppie, qui a déjà donné ses ovules à deux autres couples. Elle est dans une démarche altruiste.

Gala : Mais la mère porteuse, elle fait ça pour l’argent, non?

A. G. : Le recours à la GPA pour un couple coûte très cher, mais dans tout le proces­sus, celle qui touche le moins d’argent, c’est la mère porteuse. Elle gagne moins que l’avo­cat, le méde­cin ou l’agence. La nôtre est noire – déjà maman parce que c’est la condi­tion pour porter le bébé d’un autre – et suit des études de psy. Elle avait déjà porté un enfant pour un autre couple. Nous sommes deve­nus amis après avoir commu­niqué avec elle par Skype tout le temps de la gros­sesse. D’après les psys, l’enfant, plus tard, est moins atta­ché à la donneuse d’ovule qu’à la mère porteuse. Cette dernière nous a déjà dit qu’elle voudrait porter notre deuxième enfant. Je comprends le débat autour de la marchan­di­sa­tion des corps, mais dans les faits, ça ne se passe pas comme ça.

Gala : Comment vos voisins prennent-ils votre famille atypique?

A. G. : Sans préju­gés. On se reçoit les uns les autres pour des barbe­cues. Et nous veillons à garder des réfé­rents fémi­nins avec ma mère, celle de Romain, ma tante et sa fille, qui habitent près de chez nous à Las Vegas.

Gala : Comment envi­sa­gez-vous la suite ?

A.G. : On n’a pas voulu savoir si Elliot est mon fils ou celui de Romain. Mais on aime­rait avoir un second enfant et qu’il soit de l’autre papa, c’est ce qu’on a demandé au méde­cin.

Gala : Vous n’avez pas l’im­pres­sion de propo­ser une sorte de monde virtuel, de labo­ra­toire expé­ri­men­tal ?

A.G. : Ecou­tez, pour être clair, quand on est là en train de se tripo­ter devant une éprou­vette pour avoir un bébé alors que c’est tout simple pour les hété­ros, bien sûr, on voit bien que ce n’est pas natu­rel. Mais dans 99% des cas, les psys disent que ce que l’en­fant retient, in fine, c’est la volonté farouche qu’ont eue ses parents de l’avoir.

Voir aussi:

En Allemagne, une femme de 65 ans, mère de 13 enfants, donne naissance à des quadruplés
AFP/ RTL

23 mai 2015

Une Allemande de 65 ans, mère de 13 enfants et grand-mère de 7 petits-enfants, a accouché de quadruplés « pas complètement développés » à Berlin, un cas controversé mêlant médecine et téléréalité qui relance le débat sur les grossesses tardives.

Annegret Raunigk, qui a procédé à des fécondations in vitro en Ukraine, est désormais la mère de quadruplés la plus âgée au monde, selon la chaîne de télévision RTL, détentrice des droits exclusifs sur cette grossesse hors normes.

Les bébés prématurés, trois garçons et une fille, sont nés mardi par césarienne, après seulement 26 semaines de grossesse. Ils ont été placés en couveuse mais ont « de bonnes chances de survivre », selon un communiqué de RTL.

« Toutefois, les bébés, par comparaison avec une naissance normale dans la 40e semaine de grossesse, ne sont pas encore développés complètement. D’éventuelles complications ne peuvent donc pas être complètement exclues », poursuit la chaîne.

Annegret Raunigk, enseignante d’anglais et de russe qui doit prendre sa retraite à l’automne, avait effectué de multiples tentatives en Ukraine avec un donneur et une donneuse anonymes. La dernière tentative s’est avéré un succès puisque les quatre ovules implantés avaient été fécondés.

Malgré des conditions exceptionnelles, « la grossesse s’est déroulée étonnement sans problèmes », assure RTL, sur la foi des témoignages de médecins qui l’ont prise en charge.

Cette femme élégante, les cheveux roux et une fine paire de lunettes sur les yeux, n’en est pas à sa première grossesse tardive. En 2005, alors âgée de « seulement » 55 ans, elle avait mis au monde une petite fille.

C’est d’ailleurs pour répondre au souhait de sa dernière fille d’avoir un petit frère ou une petite sœur qu’elle a décidé de retenter une insémination artificielle, a-t-elle expliqué. Nés de 5 pères différents, les autres enfants d’Annegret Raunigk ont déjà tous quitté le domicile maternel.

Avant même de naître, Neeta (655 g, 30 cm), Dries (960 g, 35 cm), Bence (680 g, 32 cm) et Fjonn (745 g, 32,5 cm) ont suscité un vif intérêt médiatique en Allemagne. Il faut dire que la chaîne de télévision privée, qui diffuse nombre d’émissions de téléréalité et de télécrochet, s’est assuré les droits exclusifs sur cette histoire rocambolesque.

C’est la chaîne qui avait d’ailleurs révélé cette grossesse en avril.

Après avoir suivi Annegret Raunigk ces derniers mois sous la forme d’un « journal de grossesse », RTL a promis de poursuivre l’histoire, même si elle assure qu’aucun tournage n’a eu lieu dans l’hôpital où sont nés les bébés.

La chaîne a également précisé que la mère ne répondrait à aucune demande d’interview d’autres médias.

Lors de la révélation de cette grossesse extraordinaire, la Berlinoise n’avait accordé d’entretien qu’à la chaîne RTL et au quotidien à grand tirage Bild qui l’avait fait poser en Une sous le titre: « J’ai 65 ans et j’attends des quadruplés ».

Annegret Raunigk n’en est pas à sa première coopération avec le groupe RTL. Il y a dix ans, elle avait déjà négocié un contrat d’exclusivité avec la chaîne et le journal Bild pour la naissance de sa fille.

Interviewée en avril, la Berlinoise avait balayé les critiques sur son manque de responsabilité, notamment sur le fait qu’elle aura plus de 70 ans quand les enfants entreront à l’école. « On ne peut jamais savoir ce qui va se passer. Il peut aussi se passer des choses à 20 ans », avait-elle argumenté, affirmant que c’était à chacun de décider pour soi-même de devenir parent.

« Les enfants me permettent de rester jeune », avait-elle lancé.

Ces dernières années, plusieurs cas de grossesse tardive ont attiré l’attention, notamment en Italie. En Allemagne, la chanteuse italienne très populaire Gianna Nannini avait aussi retenu l’attention en 2010 en mettant au monde une petite fille à l’âge de 56 ans.

Voir également:

Mère de quadruplés à 65 ans  : l’indignation du professeur Nisand
Une femme de 65 ans, ayant recours à une fécondation in-vitro en Ukraine, a donné naissance à quatre enfants prématurés en Allemagne. «  Il ne faut surtout pas y voir un exploit. On est juste dans la médecine du fric et de l’irresponsabilité » , dénonce  le professeur Israël Nisand , chef du pôle de gynécologie-obstétrique du CHRU de Strasbourg,

La Croix

23/5/15

Le professeur Israël Nisand dénonce avec force le recours à une fécondation in vitro chez cette femme de 65 ans, mère de quadruplés.

« Science sans conscience n’est que ruine de l’âme ». Chef du pôle de gynécologie-obstétrique du CHRU de Strasbourg, le professeur Israël Nisand cite spontanément Rabelais pour exprimer sa consternation après l’annonce, samedi 23 mai, de l’accouchement d’une Allemande de 65 ans, qui a mis au monde quatre enfants très prématurés. Le cas de cette sexagénaire, Annegret Raunigk, déjà mère de 13 enfants et grand-mère de 7 petits-enfants, avait défrayé la chronique en avril lors de l’annonce de sa grossesse. Après cet accouchement, elle est désormais la mère de quadruplés la plus âgée au monde. «  Il ne faut surtout pas y voir un exploit, ni un record à célébrer. Et les médecins, qui l’ont aidé dans cette démarche, n’ont pas de quoi être fiers. On est juste dans le champ de la médecine du fric et de l’irresponsabilité  », s’agace le professeur Nisand.

«  Ils iront à l’école avec une mère qui aura plus de 70 ans »
Les bébés prématurés, trois garçons et une fille, sont nés mardi par césarienne, après seulement 26 semaines de grossesse. Ils sont dans en situation de grande prématurité et ont été placés en couveuse. « Une naissance à 26 semaines de grossesse expose les enfants à des handicaps qui peuvent être lourds. Et même si tout se passe bien pour eux, il faut songer à leur vie plus tard », explique le professeur Nisand. «  Ils iront à l’école avec une mère qui aura plus de 70 ans », ajoute-il. Interviewée en avril sur ce thème, Annegret Raunigk, avait rejeté les critiques sur son manque de responsabilité « On ne peut jamais savoir ce qui va se passer. Il peut aussi se passer des choses à 20 ans », avait-elle estimé affirmant que c’était à chacun de décider pour soi-même de devenir parent. « Les enfants me permettent de rester jeune », avait-elle ajouté.

Un enfant après 40 ans
Une fécondation in-vitro en Ukraine
Cette enseignante d’anglais et de russe, qui doit prendre sa retraite à l’automne, s’est rendue en Ukraine pour de multiples tentatives de fécondation in-vitro avec un donneur et une donneuse anonymes. La dernière tentative s’est avérée être un succès puisque les quatre ovules implantés ont été fécondés. « Il n’existe malheureusement aucune réglementation internationale permettant d’éviter ce type de bavures médicales, indique le professeur Nisand. On arrive forcément à des dérives quand la médecine emprunte des chemins dévoyés et que des praticiens se comportent comme des prestataires de service avec pour seul principe que celui ou celle qui paie peut tout avoir  ».

Des pays connus pour accepter ces pratiques
Selon le professeur Nisand, plusieurs pays sont connus pour abriter certains médecins qui acceptent de favoriser ces grossesses tardives via les techniques d’assistance médicale à la procréation. «  C’est le cas de l’Ukraine, de la Grèce et surtout de la Turquie. Sinon, il y a aussi l’Inde où quelques médecins peuvent accepter de faire des choses très déraisonnables », indique le médecin, en se félicitant de l’existence en France des lois de bioéthiques qui s’opposent à ces pratiques.

En France, des techniques réservées aux couples « en âge de procréer »
En France, les techniques d’assistances médicales à la procréation (AMP) sont réservées aux couples confrontées à une infertilité médicalement constatée ou pour éviter la transmission d’une maladie grave. La loi ne fixe pas un âge limite précis au delà duquel il n’est plus possible de bénéficier de ces techniques. Elle stipule simplement que le couple (un homme et une femme) doit être en « âge de procréer ». Ce sont donc les médecins qui décident à partir de ce critère. Une autre limite est le fait que l’assurance-maladie ne prend pas en charge une fécondation in-vitro pour une femme au delà de l’âge de 43 ans. Les médecins, en pratique, ne prennent pas non plus en charge les couples dans lesquels l’homme à dépassé 60 ans.

En 2009, une mère de triplés à 59 ans à Paris
En France, ce débat sur les grossesses tardives, favorisées par la médecine, s’était posé en septembre 2008. Une femme de 59 ans avait alors donné naissance à Paris à trois enfants, conçus via une FIV au Vietnam. L’implantation de ces trois embryons avait été, à l’époque, qualifiée de « faute médicale », par le professeur René Frydman, interrogé par la Croix, « Néanmoins, nos services accueillent de plus en plus souvent des femmes enceintes de 45 ans ou plus Elles se rendent principalement en Espagne ou en Belgique, là où le don d’ovocyte est plus répandu puisqu’il est rémunéré 900 €, ou encore en Grèce, à Chypre ou en Ukraine », expliquait alors le célèbre gynécologue-obstétricien, alors chef de service à la maternité de l’hôpital Antoine-Béclère à Clamart.

Voir encore:

L’autoconservation des ovocytes ou la tentation de s’affranchir du temps
Aux États-Unis, les entreprises Apple et Facebook ont annoncé qu’elles couvriraient les frais engagés par leurs salariées qui souhaitent reporter leur projet de grossesse au-delà de 40 ans en ayant recours à la congélation de leurs ovocytes. Une possibilité interdite en France, mais réclamée par certains.

Flore Thomasset

La Croix

27/10/14

Aux États-Unis, certains n’hésitent pas à parler d’une «révolution» comparable à celle que fut, dans les années 1970, l’arrivée de la pilule. L’autoconservation des ovocytes permet à une jeune femme de faire prélever ses ovocytes, notamment quand sa fertilité est maximum, vers 20 ou 30ans, puis de les congeler. Plus tard, vers 40 ou 50ans, elle pourra les faire décongeler, féconder in vitro puis se les voir réimplanter pour commencer sa grossesse.

La technique est pratiquée depuis plusieurs années outre-Atlantique, où elle est en vogue. Mais deux grandes entreprises, Facebook et Apple, viennent d’y apporter un nouvel élan, en annonçant, comme d’autres avant elles, qu’elles prendraient en charge à hauteur de 20000 dollars (16 000€) les traitements contre l’infertilité de leurs salarié(e)s, y compris l’autoconservation des ovocytes  (lire La Croix du 20 octobre)  .

À l’heure où l’âge du premier enfant ne cesse de reculer, où les relations amoureuses sont de plus en plus chaotiques et les ruptures tardives, les femmes y ayant recours se disent libérées de la pression de «l’horloge biologique» et de l’obligation, à 30 ou 35ans, de trouver «absolument» un père pour leur enfant. Surtout, les trentenaires entendent ainsi s’investir pleinement dans leur vie professionnelle, sans être freinées dans leur ascension par la maternité : plutôt que de choisir entre l’une et l’autre, elle diffère la seconde. Les entreprises, évidemment, y trouvent aussi leur compte.

Combien de femmes ont déjà eu recours à cette technique, autorisée aux États-Unis, mais aussi en Espagne, en Belgique, en Italie ? Dans la presse américaine, médecins et laboratoires parlent de 2 000 à 5 000 bébés nés. Dans un article publié dans BusinessWeek en avril, le New York University Fertility Center assurait procéder à 5 à 10ponctions par semaine.

En 2013, l’autoconservation représentait le tiers de leur «business». Car c’est bien de cela qu’il s’agit : aux États-Unis, l’ensemble de la procédure (stimulation hormonale, suivi médical, ponction des ovocytes, vitrification) coûte entre 10 000 et 15 000 dollars (entre 7 900 € et 11 800€), auxquels il faut ajouter 500 à 1000 dollars (393€ à 786€) par an pour la conservation. Sur une dizaine d’années (prélèvement avant 35ans, grossesse avant 45ans), le procédé revient donc très cher.

Et en France, qu’en est-il ? L’autoconservation «sociétale» ou «pour convenance» est interdite. En revanche, elle est autorisée pour raisons médicales, depuis la loi de bioéthique de 2011. Ainsi, elle est régulièrement pratiquée quand une femme est soumise à des traitements qui peuvent rendre infertiles, comme une chimiothérapie. La loi autorise aussi l’autoconservation pour les femmes donnant leurs ovocytes : une partie du prélèvement est donnée, l’autre est conservée pour son propre et éventuel futur usage. Cette mesure, qui n’est cependant pas appliquée faute de décret, a été décidée pour favoriser le don d’ovocytes, qui connaît une pénurie en France.

Pour le Collège national des gynécologues et obstétriciens français (CNGOF), l’autoconservation ne peut être un élément de marchandage en échange du don, elle doit être ouverte à toutes les femmes.

En décembre 2012, le CNGOF a officiellement pris position en ce sens, estimant que cette technique est, «avec le don d’ovocytes, la seule méthode de traitement de l’infertilité réellement efficace à 40 ans et plus». «Il y a un fait de société majeur et largement sous-estimé qui est le retard de la procréation, explique son président, Bernard Hédon. Nous ne cessons de recevoir dans nos cabinets des femmes de 40 ans passés qui, bien qu’elles aient su qu’il ne fallait pas trop attendre pour concevoir, n’ont pas pu le faire avant. On les engage alors dans des processus de FIV (fécondation in vitro) complexes, coûteux et qui sont loin de donner toujours des résultats.»

Plus qu’une affaire de relations ou de carrière, c’est selon lui, plus globalement, une question de mentalité : «Aujourd’hui, quand une femme de 25 ans devient enceinte, on lui dit qu’elle est bien jeune pour cela, remarque-t-il. Or, c’est pourtant le bon âge, d’un point de vue biologique. Le message essentiel doit d’ailleurs rester : “Faites des enfants jeunes.” Car la congélation n’offre aucune garantie de grossesse : ce n’est qu’une aide, limitée, quand on n’a pas pu faire autrement.»

Sauf que pour beaucoup de médecins, l’ouverture de cette technique pour convenance envoie justement un message contradictoire. Elle risque de favoriser les grossesses tardives, au-delà de 43ans, à haut risque pour la mère et l’enfant : fausse couche, diabète gestationnel, hypertension… Une des questions posées par cette technique est d’ailleurs : jusqu’à quel âge réimplanterait-on l’ovocyte fécondé ? Des exemples extrêmes de mères accouchant à 60 ans font régulièrement la une des journaux. Le CNGOF, lui, fixe une limite à 45ans, voire 50ans pour une femme qui ne cumule aucun autre facteur de risque.

«On crée l’illusion que la science peut tout, que l’on peut avoir un enfant à n’importe quel âge, alors que la procréation est quand même un processus naturel, déplore Louis Bujan, président de la fédération des Centres d’études et de conservation des œufs et du sperme (Cecos). On crée des besoins qui n’existent pas : certes, l’âge de la maternité recule, mais il y a encore de la marge avant d’en arriver à ces âges-là. Plutôt que d’abonder dans ce sens, il faudrait se poser la question de savoir pourquoi les femmes reculent leurs projets de maternité.»

En janvier 2013, la fédération a pris position contre l’autoconservation pour convenance, insistant notamment sur la question du coût et de la prise en charge : «Cela pose un vrai problème éthique, poursuit Louis Bujan. Étant donné le coût, que l’on pourrait estimer à 3000€ en France, hors fécondation in vitro et réimplantation, toutes les femmes n’y auront pas accès. Faut-il que la Sécurité sociale le prenne en charge ? Et si oui, au détriment de quel autre remboursement ?»

C’est ainsi un véritable choix de société qui est en jeu. L’Observatoire de la parentalité en entreprise ne s’y est pas trompé, son président, Jérôme Ballarin, se disant «choqué» par l’annonce de Facebook et Apple : «C’est en réorganisant la vie professionnelle autour de la vie privée et non en faisant l’inverse que nous construirons une société équitable et épanouie», a-t-il jugé dans un communiqué. Quant à la ministre de la santé, Marisol Touraine, elle a estimé que «le débat est un débat médical, éthique, ça n’est certainement pas un débat pour directeurs de ressources humaines».

————————————

CE QUE DIT LA LOI BIOÉTHIQUE
En juillet 2011, la révision de loi de bioéthique autorise, en France, «la technique de congélation ultra-rapide des ovocytes». En France, le premier bébé conçu après cette technique naît le 4 mars 2012.
Quand une femme donne ses ovocytes, une partie de la ponction peut être conservée pour usage propre : «Lorsqu’il est majeur, le donneur peut ne pas avoir procréé. Il se voit alors proposer le recueil et la conservation d’une partie de ses gamètes (…) en vue d’une éventuelle réalisation ultérieure, à son bénéfice, d’une assistance médicale à la procréation».
En France, le don d’ovocytes souffre d’une pénurie: en 2012, 422 femmes ont fait un don pour près de 800 fécondations in vitro réalisées ; 2 110 couples étaient en attente d’un don d’ovocytes; 164 enfants sont nés suite à une PMA avec un don.

Voir de même:

Sci/Tech/Health Journalism Ethics News :
Daily Media Pick
Same Sex Marriage Study: At least 12 News Outlets retract or add Editor’s Note
Sydney Smith
iMediaethics

May 20, 2015

Since the news broke that a study on same-sex marriage published last year in Science may be based on fabricated information, most of the news outlets that reported on the study have warned readers about the problems with the study they covered.

As iMediaEthics previously reported, one of the study’s co-authors Donald Green issued a retraction request after saying he learned there were problems with his co-author Michael LaCour’s work. While LaCour hasn’t spoken out yet and said he is still working on a response, Green said at first LaCour « confessed to falsely describing at least some of the details of data collection, » Retraction Watch reported. LaCour later said he didn’t fabricate and that instead he can’t find research evidence to support his study.

The discovery was made when two graduate students tried to further the research and encountered problems. For example, when they went to Qualtrics, the company who LaCour said he got the survey data from, Qualtrics said it couldn’t find that data.

A spokesperson for UCLA, where LaCour is a Ph.D. candidate, told iMediaEthics: « UCLA expects its students to demonstrate integrity in all academic endeavors.  UCLA is reviewing allegations regarding data published by UCLA graduate student Michael LaCour.  UCLA will assess these allegations pursuant to UCLA policy and in a manner that provides due process to Mr. LaCour. »

Below, see a collection of editor’s notes added to news reports because of the questions raised by the study.

1. The Washington Post has added an editor’s note to its story: « Editor’s Note: Since the publication of this post on a study examining how easily people’s minds can be changed concerning same-sex marriage, a co-author has disavowed its findings. Donald P. Green is seeking a retraction of the study from the journal Science, which originally published the research. » Science told iMediaEthics it is reviewing the case.

2. US News added this editor’s note to its Dec. 22, 2014 story that reads: « Editor’s Note: The data used in the study recently were found to have been falsified, » linking to its report on the debunking

3. This American Life retracted its report on the Science study. « Our original story was based on what was known at the time, » This American Life‘s Ira Glass wrote in part. « Obviously the facts have changed. We’ll update today as we learn more. The apparent fakery was discovered by researchers at UC Berkeley and Stanford who tried to replicate the findings in the original study. How they figured it out is a great story in itself. »

4. New York Magazine‘s Dec. 11, 2014 story, « A 20-Minute Chat with a Gay Person Made People Much More Supportive of Gay Marriage » now has this note: « (UPDATE: This study has been retracted by Science. Science of Us has posted an explanation here.) »

5. Bloomberg tacked on an editor’s note to its Oct. 6 story, « How do you Change Someone’s Mind About Abortion? Tell Them You Had One. » That reads:

« EDITOR’S NOTE, May 20, 2015: The findings from the field experiment on attitudes toward gay marriage conducted by UCLA graduate student Michael LaCour described below—which were published in the journal Science two months after Bloomberg Politics reported on the research—have been called into question by co-author Don Green, who yesterday requested that the journal retract the article. ‘Michael LaCour’s failure to produce the raw data,’ Green wrote to the journal’s editors, ‘undermines the credibility of the findings.' »

6. BuzzFeed added an editor’s note to its Dec. 11, 2014 story, « Scientists Report Gay People are the Best at Changing Minds on Marriage Equality. » It states: [Update: The study described in the article below was retracted in May 2015 after the lead author said his co-author faked data. BuzzFeed News reports here.]

7. Business Insider‘s May 12, 2015 story, « How to convince anyone to change their mind on a divisive issue in just 22 minutes — with science, » has this update.  « *Update 5/20: While trying to follow up on the study cited in the story below, researchers have found that some of the data in the original study was falsified. The authors say they’ve requested that the paper be retracted from the journal Science. »

8. Vox retracted its story on the study earlier today, warning readers « don’t believe » it.

9. The New York Times added an editor’s note to its two stories on the study, a spokesperson for the newspaper told iMediaEthics. The editor’s note on The New York Times‘ Dec. 12, 2014 story, « Gay Advocates Can Shift Same-Sex Marriage Views, »  and the New York Times’ Dec. 18 story, « How Same Sex Marriage Effort Found a Way Around Polarization » reads:

« An article on Dec. 12, 2014, reported on a study published by the journal Science that said gay political canvassers could change conservative voters’ views on gay marriage by having a brief face-to-face discussion about the issue. The editor in chief of the journal said on Wednesday that the senior author of the study had now asked that the report be retracted because of the failure of his fellow author to produce data supporting the findings. »

New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan told iMediaEthics she doesn’t plan to address this issue in her blogs or columns and pointed us to the Times‘ PR.

10. The Los Angeles Times added a note to its Dec. 12, 2014 article « Doorstep visits change attitudes on gay marriage. » That update, at the bottom of the article, states: « May 20, 2015: Science published an ‘Expression of Concern’ about the study reported on here. ‘Serious questions have been raised about the validity’ of the report, which claimed that skeptics of same-sex marriage could be persuaded to accept it after talking with a gay lobbyist for 20 minutes. One of the study’s co-authors, Donald Green, said he no longer has confidence in the data and has requested that the study be retracted. Read our full story here. »

The Los Angeles Times also posted a follow-up story on the news, a spokesperson for the newspaper told iMediaEthics.

11. Mother Jones added an update to its Dec. 18, 2014 story, « How a 20-Minute Conversation Can Convince People with Anti-Gay Views to Change Their Mind, a spokesperson for the magazine told iMediaEthics. The update reads: « The following study was retracted following allegations the data had been faked by a co-author. « I am deeply embarrassed by this turn of events and apologize to the editors, reviewers, and readers of Science, » author Columbia University political science professor Donald Green said. The original article follows but be forewarned that its contents are no longer credible given this revelation. »

12. The Wall Street Journal posted this « note to readers » on its Feb. 25, 2015 story, « Gay Marriage: How to Change Minds. »

« NOTE TO READERS: According to an Associated Press report, data in the Science magazine study to which the article below alludes have come under question, as one of the authors of the study has asked the magazine to retract it. Read the article. »

UCLA and Columbia issued a press release last year touting the study.  iMediaEthics has written to Columbia for comment.

Other outlets that reported on the study without adding a flag to readers about the study’s retraction request as of 3 PM EST are:

UPDATED: 5/20/2015 5:57 PM EST Added responses from UCLA, additional info from the New York Times

UPDATED: 5/20/2015 8:32 PM EST Added response from the Los Angeles Times

UPDATED: 5/21/2015 12:42 PM EST Updated with notes from Mother Jones and Wall Street Journal

Voir de plus:

Des poupées sexuelles touchantes

  21/05/2015

ART – Voilà une artiste dont les muses sont assez surprenantes. À travers une série de clichés, la photographe new-yorkaise Stacy Leigh a souhaité montrer que des poupées sexuelles en caoutchouc pouvaient être touchantes.

Si à première vue, les images peuvent paraître glamour et sexy, il suffit de les observer de plus près pour que cette dimension charmante s’amenuise. Le maquillage, les vêtements et la position des poupées… Tout est mis en scène pour qu’elles ressemblent le plus possible à de véritables femmes.

À l’origine, ces poupées pour adulte grandeur nature sont conçues pour donner du plaisir, mais elles servent aussi à apporter de la compagnie. Stacy Leigh l’explique elle-même au site du Mirror: « L’homme et la femme utilisent tous les deux ces poupées pour remplacer un compagnon humain, que ce soit par choix ou par nécessité. Je pense qu’il n’y a aucun inconvénient à cela, surtout si les journées en deviennent plus supportables ». Au total, Stacy Leigh en possède 12, qui valent chacune 4000 livres sterling (5630.80 euros).

Si la série de photos s’intitule « Américains moyens« , c’est parce que l’artiste de 43 ans tient à interpréter une certaine réalité selon laquelle les humains artificiels finiront par faire partie de notre quotidien.

« Mes photos concernent la vie, les relations amoureuses et la sexualité. Les poupées repoussent certaines personnes, tandis que d’autres sont empathiques envers elle. Au fur et à mesure que le monde devient plus numérique et moins personnel, il sera de plus en plus banal que des poupées et des robots soient utilisés en tant que substituts pour les relations amoureuses. Je peux uniquement espérer que mes photos déclenchent une émotion ou une connexion chez le spectateur« .

Celle qui s’auto-décrit comme une « peintre frustrée » raconte comment elle en est arrivée à utiliser des poupées gonflables comme modèles il y a 10 ans, après avoir regardé une série documentaire télévisée sur HBO, « Real Sex« . Au départ, elle reconnaît que c’était plutôt effrayant.

« Elles avaient un effet étrange sur moi. J’étais empathique à leur égard parce qu’elles avaient l’air si réelles, mais je me suis aussi sentie très mal à l’aide, je sentais qu’elles étaient en train de m’observer », confie-t-elle à nos confrères du Huffington Post américain. Avant d’ajouter: « J’ai ressenti le besoin de montrer à quoi elles ressembleraient si elles étaient intégrées dans notre société ».

Jusqu’ici, les poupées gonflables sexuelles n’avaient rien d’humain. Mais plus elles deviennent réalistes, plus leur popularité augmente. « Les clients peuvent choisir de personnaliser absolument tout, qu’il s’agisse de la couleur des cheveux, des yeux et de la peau, de la taille des seins, et même de la forme et du style du vagin », peut-on ainsi lire sur le DailyMail. Inquiétant, vous avez dit?

Voir par ailleurs:

Dans un accord bilatéral, le Saint-Siège reconnaît « l’Etat de Palestine »
Sixtine Dechancé
La Vie

13/05/2015

Dans un accord bilatéral conclu ce 13 mai avec la Palestine, le Saint-Siège reconnaît clairement « l’État de Palestine ». La signature définitive du texte, qui établit une reconnaissance juridique de l’Eglise catholique dans les territoires palestiniens, devrait avoir lieu dans les jours à venir.

Le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas sera en effet présent au Vatican les 16 et 17 mai, où il assistera à la canonisation de deux palestiniennes, la carmélite Mariam Bawardi et Soeur Marie-Alphonsine Ghattas, co-fondatrice de la congrégation des Soeurs du Rosaire. Toutes deux nées au XIXe siècle, elles deviendront les premières saintes palestiniennes de l’époque contemporaine. Le patriarche latin de Jérusalem, Mgr Fouad Twal, a souligné l’importance de cet événement, « signe d’espoir » pour la Terre Sainte et le Moyen-Orient « déchirés par la guerre ».

Le texte, qui attend encore d’être signé, est le fruit d’un long travail entre le Saint-Siège et l’autorité palestinienne, depuis l’accord initial qui les a liés en février 2000. Il s’agissait alors de garantir sur le territoire palestinien la liberté de religion et l’égalité devant la loi des institutions et des fidèles de toutes confessions, ainsi que le libre accès aux lieux saints. Ces dispositions sont renforcées dans le nouvel accord, qui permettra à l’Église, selon Mgr Antoine Camilleri, sous-secrétaire pour les relations avec les États, « d’assurer un service plus efficace à la société ».

La référence explicite à « l’État de Palestine » n’est pas une nouveauté pour le Saint-Siège, qui employait déjà cette expression dans ses communiqués diplomatiques depuis 2012 et plaide depuis longtemps pour la « solution des deux Etats ». Néanmoins, le texte de cet accord bilatéral est appelé à faire jurisprudence.

« Il peut être suivi par d’autres pays, même ceux à majorité musulmane, et il montre qu’une telle reconnaissance [de l’Église] n’est pas incompatible avec le fait que la majorité de la population du pays appartient à une autre religion », a assuré Mgr Camilleri dans une interview à L’Osservatore Romano, le quotidien du Vatican.

Pour François Mabille, spécialiste de la géopolitique vaticane, l’accord est à replacer dans le contexte de crise que subissent les chrétiens au Moyen-Orient : « Une reconnaissance de l’Etat de Palestine par le Saint-Siège est un signe fort envoyé aux pays musulmans. C’est un appel à l’apaisement », interprète-t-il. Bien que la démarche s’inscrive dans la continuité de la politique internationale vaticane, le chercheur y voit une nouveauté : « En règle générale, le Saint-Siège reconnaît des pays qui l’ont déjà été par la communauté internationale et les grandes puissances. C’est bien le style du pape François de bousculer ainsi les habitudes. »

Soulignant dans L’Osservatore Romano « le souhait d’une résolution de la question palestinienne et du conflit israélo-palestinien dans le cadre de la solution des deux Etats », Mgr Antoine Camilleri rappelle également qu’un seul de ces deux Etats existe pour le moment  (Israël). Il réaffirme le souhait du Saint-Siège de voir « l’établissement et la reconnaissance d’un Etat palestinien indépendant, souverain et démocratique ».

Dans le quotidien israélien Haaretz, un membre du ministère des Affaires étrangères critique ce geste du Vatican : « Israël est déçu d’apprendre la décision du Saint-Siège de valider un texte d’accord qui mentionne le terme d' »Etat de Palestine » ». « Ce geste ne fait pas avancer le processus de paix, et éloigne même les autorités palestiniennes d’un retour à des négociations directes et bilatérales. Israël va examiner cet accord et étudier une réaction proportionnée », ajoute-t-il.

Voir aussi:

Exclusive: Obama to back Palestinian state at Security Council – payback for Israel’s right-wing cabinet
DEBKA file

May 6, 2015

US President Barack Obama did not wait for Binyamin Netanyahu to finish building his new government coalition by its deadline at midnight Wednesday, May 6, before going into action to pay him back for forming a right-wing cabinet minus any moderate figure for resuming negotiations with the Palestinians.

Banking on Netanyahu’s assertion while campaigning for re-election that there would be no Palestinian state during his term in office, Obama is reported exclusively by our sources to have given the hitherto withheld green light to European governments to file a UN Security Council motion proclaiming an independent Palestinian state. Although Netanyahu left the foreign affairs portfolio in his charge and available to be filled by a suitably moderate figure as per the White House’s expectations did not satisfy the US President.

The White House is confident that, with the US voting in favor, the motion will be passed by an overwhelming majority and therefore be binding on the Israeli government.

To show the administration was in earnest, senior US officials sat down with their French counterparts in Paris last week to sketch out the general outline of this motion. According to our sources, they began addressing such questions as the area of the Palestinian state, its borders, security arrangements between Israel and the Palestinians and whether or not to set a hard-and-fast timeline for implementation, or phrase the resolution as  a general declaration of intent.

Incorporating a target date in the language would expose Israel to Security Council sanctions for non-compliance.
It was indicated by the American side in Paris that the Obama administration would prefer to give Netanyahu a lengthy though predetermined time scale to reconsider his Palestinian policy or even possibly to broaden and diversify his coalition by introducing non-aligned factions or figures into such key posts as foreign affairs.
At the same time, both American and French diplomats are already using the club they propose to hang over the Netanyahu government’s head for gains in other spheres.

French President Francois Hollande, for instance, the first foreign leader ever to attend a Gulf Council of Cooperation summit, which opened in Riyadh Tuesday to discuss Iran and the Yemen war, used the opportunity to brief Gulf Arab rulers on Washington’s turnaround on the Israeli-Palestinian issue.

And US Secretary of State John Kerry plans to present the Obama administration’s new plans for Palestinian statehood to Saudi leaders during his visit to Riyadh Wednesday and Thursday, May 6-7. Kerry will use Washington’s willingness to meet Palestinian aspirations as currency for procuring Saudi and Gulf support for a Yemen ceasefire and their acceptance of the nuclear deal shaping up with Iran.

Voir également:

Le règne de la vertu – La dictature de Robespierre
Louis Madelin
Revue des Deux Mondes tome 1, 1911

Le 16 germinal an II, Jacques Danton montait à l’échafaud avec ses « complices ; » le 4 du même mois, Jacques Hébert et sa « bande » avaient péri. Seuls, depuis le lamentable effondrement des Girondins, Hébert et Danton gênaient, à des degrés divers, l’omnipotence de Robespierre. Leur sang semblait donc pour longtemps cimenter le pouvoir de Maximilien et je peux dire son sacerdoce ; ce sang impur n’était-il pas offert en holocauste à l’Etre Suprême, trop longtemps offensé par l’athéisme et l’immoralité de ces scélérats ? Les « victoires » du 4 au 16 germinal, ne nous y trompons point, ne sont pas seulement celles d’un homme, ni même d’une politique : voyons-y le passager triomphe d’une secte religieuse. Désormais la « Vertu » l’emporte et, avec elle, Dieu ressuscita. Jusqu’au 9 thermidor, quatre mois durant, la France va connaître le gouvernement le plus singulier et d’ailleurs le plus effroyable, celui qui fera rouler des têtes au nom d’une mission divine.

I
Certes, depuis plus de huit mois, Robespierre semblait l’homme le plus puissant du pays. Après avoir, avec l’appui de Danton, précipité les Girondins du pouvoir, il avait, le 10 juillet 1793, fait éliminer Danton du Comité de Salut public où un instant celui-ci avait paru régner ; Maximilien y avait prudemment, — c’était sa façon, — fait entrer ses amis, puis le 27 juillet, la majorité lui étant assurée, s’y était fait élire. Et depuis lors, il semblait, de cette célèbre salle verte du Pavillon de Flore, où besognait le terrible Comité, dominer la Convention et le pays.

Il s’en fallait cependant qu’avant le printemps de 1794, il pût tout diriger. Il avait dû assister presque impuissant aux « intrigues des factions » et presque à leur triomphe. Plusieurs fois, la Convention avait failli faire rentrer Danton au Comité et sa faction d’indulgens ; par ailleurs, Maximilien avait dû, la rage au cœur, accepter cet opprobre : le triomphe momentané de la faction des exagérés, ces Hébertistes transgressant les dogmes qui lui étaient chers et froissant ses sentimens les plus intimes. Enfin, des provinces où ils desservaient sa politique, les proconsuls l’avaient presque bravé, des « pourris » par surcroît, que son incorruptibilité vomissait et que soutenaient les « factions » de Paris.

Le « règne de la Vertu » ne s’établit donc pas en un jour et il importe de voir de quelle réaction la redoutable dictature parut le fruit : l’Eglise robespierriste avait été militante et même souffrante, avant d’être, pour une heure, triomphante.

Eglise ! Le mot s’impose à nous, mais il avait déjà cours. Son chef et ses apôtres suffisent à marquer d’un caractère vraiment sacerdotal cette singulière confrérie.

Interrogeait-on sur Robespierre un des séides qui l’entouraient, il répondait : Maximilien est l’homme de la vertu.

Il était l’homme de la vertu : probe, chaste, moral, il avait, de l’aveu de Danton, étonné, « peur de l’argent ; » il avait plus peur encore de la femme, et, en ayant la peur, il en avait la haine. Cette phobie était avérée : si, en décembre 1793, une « patriote » pourtant pure, Emilie Laroche, plaide près de lui la cause de Hérault de Séchelles, on écrit : « Il n’y fera pas attention : c’est d’une femme. » Bien au contraire, telle intervention suffirait à perdre le bel Hérault, spécialement haï parce que lui, au contraire, pratique la femme. On dira de Maximilien qu’il est « un prêtre : » par certains côtés il semble plus : quelque moine fanatique persuadé que la femme est « la bête de perdition » destinée à dégrader l’homme et à le faire tomber : il n’a ni épouse ni maîtresse ; il méprise qui se laisse conduire par la maîtresse ou l’épouse : Danton, Hébert, Desmoulins, Tallien, Barras, Fréron encourent à bien des titres sa rancune, mais il déteste spécialement en eux des hommes « avilis » que conduisent des femmes. Mme Roland l’a littéralement exaspéré : nul n’a plus contribué que lui à mener à l’échafaud l’héroïque Manon. C’est lui qui, d’ailleurs, y jettera Lucile Desmoulins qui l’a longtemps cru son ami, et la « veuve Hébert, » après la « veuve Capet. » Et c’est lui encore qui, à la veille de Thermidor, y acheminera, avec une sorte de joie cruelle, cette belle fille de Thérézia Cabarrus, la maîtresse de Tallien. Si, de sa prison, elle réclame moins de gêne : « Qu’on lui donne un miroir, » ricanera-t-il. Et on sent passer, dans cette raillerie, la haine de cette beauté féminine qui a stupidement ensorcelé Tallien, hier « pur. » Il n’est pas jusqu’à sa sœur Charlotte qu’il n’ait, d’une main froide, écartée de sa vie. Pour la première fois, ce pays de France, sentimental et rieur, est gouverné par un ennemi de la femme et du rire.

Il n’est pas laid cependant, ce Maximilien : les demoiselles Duplay, dont il est l’hôte, le trouvent charmant et le lui font bien voir ; la citoyenne Jullien dont, à la vérité, les lettres sont celles d’une fanatique du prophète, lui trouve « les traits doux ; » et, de fait, aucun portrait ne révèle « la figure de chat » dont parle aigrement Buzot. Son portrait par Danloux nous présente un jouvenceau élégant, à la taille mince, aux traits à la vérité un peu forts, le nez et les lèvres trop larges, mais, en dernière analyse, de physionomie fort peu antipathique. Les yeux, sans doute, clignotaient derrière des besicles bleues ; c’était, disait-on, pour ne se point laisser pénétrer : au demeurant, d’une correction parfaite, les cheveux frisés, poudrés, les joues toujours soigneusement rasées, le petit corps maigre bien pris dans une redingote bleue ou marron qu’il porte sur la veste de casimir, chemise brodée à jabots, manchettes toujours blanches, ce sans-culotte se culotte de soie, trop fier pour sacrifier au débraillement républicain. Jusqu’au bout, les effets resteront sans taches, jusqu’au bout, c’est-à-dire jusqu’à cette horrible matinée du 10 thermidor où il viendra s’échouer, éclaboussé de sang et d’ordure, en lambeaux, sur la table du Comité de Salut public, en attendant l’échafaud : « habit de drap de Silésie taché de sang, » lit-on dans l’inventaire du greffe. Sa chambre aux rideaux bleus, son cabinet, où il peine cependant (car sa littérature sent l’huile), sont toujours bien rangés, — remplis d’ailleurs (plusieurs témoins signalent ce trait) de ses portraits et de ses bustes : on y voit Maximilien « sous toutes les formes. »

Le trait est à retenir. Maximilien est avant tout personnel. Nul n’a porté plus haut l’orgueil d’être soi. « Vertueux, » il a reçu du Très-Haut mission de faire régner la vertu. Infortune affreuse, voici la France aux mains d’un de ces terribles missionnaires qui sévissent de temps à autre pour écraser « les impies » et les « corrompus, » les « Amalécites, » disait Cromwell, bref les « non-conformistes. » Ce sont les pires tyrans. A une mission surnaturelle la nature même doit être sacrifiée : Robespierre lui sacrifiera tout, et d’abord l’amitié, la reconnaissance, la tendresse. De Camille Desmoulins, son vieux camarade de Louis-le-Grand, à la petite Lucile au mariage de laquelle il a servi de témoin ; de Brissot, avec lequel il a probablement grossoyé chez le procureur, à Danton dont il sait fort bien qu’il fut un loyal compagnon de luttes, il n’hésitera jamais à jeter un ami sous le couperet. Sa sœur put penser qu’il l’y voulait envoyer. Au fond, il n’aimait personne, parce qu’il se vénérait.

« Etre atroce qui ment à sa conscience, » a écrit de lui la vindicative Manon Roland. Non ! Il obéit, au contraire, à sa conscience ; pénétrée de sa mission, cette conscience lui commandera la calomnie (contre les Girondins notamment) et jusqu’au faux (s’il s’agit de perdre un Hérault de Séchelles contre lequel il forge une pièce) : c’est qu’il ne s’agit point aux yeux de Maximilien de frapper un ennemi personnel : son ennemi est « l’ennemi de la vertu. »

D’ailleurs, aucun doute : s’il incarne la vertu, il tient la vérité. D’où une sorte de sérénité : celle d’un prêtre infaillible : le caractère frappe, dès 1792, qui l’approche. « Robespierre est un prêtre, » a-t-on écrit alors (probablement le mot est-il de Condorcet) : un prêtre et presque un prophète du nouveau Millénaire. « Il y avait en cet homme-là du Mahomet et du Cromwell, » dit un conventionnel. Du pontife il a l’impassibilité. Certes, il n’est pas immuable, étant, ainsi que l’écrivait récemment un excellent historien, M. Sagnac, « grand opportuniste ; » il n’est pas immuable dans ses attitudes, mais il l’est, au fond, dans l’idée maîtresse de sa vie. Il y croit sincèrement, et sa force est dans sa sincérité. Il n’est pas l’ « hypocrite raffiné » que Bossuet a flétri en Olivier Cromwell. Se tenant pour l’homme de la Liberté, de la République, de la Révolution, il estime en toute candeur que quiconque lui fait obstacle est l’ennemi de la Révolution, de la République et de la Liberté. Or lui fait obstacle quiconque excite sa « bilieuse jalousie : » qui a plus de talent et de succès, plus d’audace et plus d’entregent, lui porte nécessairement ombrage. Sa jalousie inquiète multiplie ses ennemis : ce sont ceux de la Patrie. Celui qui n’est pas avec lui est contre elle.

Le prophète proclame des dogmes. Tout d’abord, la Terreur soutenant la Vertu et la Vertu justifiant la Terreur. Le 25 décembre, le dogme fondamental a été proclamé par le pontife infaillible. « Le ressort du gouvernement populaire dans la paix est la Vertu ; en révolution, il est à la fois la Vertu et la Terreur. » Certes, il n’a inventé ni le système ni le mot. Dès le 5 septembre, « les sections de Paris » sont venues demander qu’on « plaçât la Terreur à l’ordre du jour » et, depuis l’été de 1793, Fouquier-Tinville expédie à Sanson « gros et petit gibier. » Ce n’est cependant que du jour où la doctrine a été proclamée par l’Incorruptible sainte, pure et indiscutable, que « l’activité du tribunal » a redoublé. Alors commencent les belles fournées de l’hiver de l’an II qui deviendront « magnifiques » une fois les Indulgens supprimés en germinal (155 victimes en germinal, 354 en floréal), et formidables, quand la loi de Prairial, qu’on peut appeler la loi Couthon-Robespierre, permettra à l’accusateur public d’envoyer, en quarante-sept jours, 1 366 « cliens » au « rasoir national. »

Il serait injuste de faire de cet homme le bouc émissaire de la Terreur. Des proconsuls qu’il n’aimait pas, Carrier, Lequinio, Tallien, Barras, Fréron, Fouché, Collot d’Herbois, Javogue, Le Bon, Schneider, faisaient à Nantes, Lorient, Bordeaux, Toulon, Marseille, Lyon, Amis, Strasbourg, tomber des têtes avant que Paris connût « les belles fournées d’aristocrates. » Mais s’il parut un jour les blâmer, c’est moins d’avoir terrorisé, que d’avoir terrorisé « sans vertu. » De toutes parts, le monde infâme que la Terreur exaltait jusqu’à la démence avait les yeux fixés sur lui avec une sorte de gratitude. Tyranneaux subalternes et délateurs immondes l’adoraient parce qu’il leur avait appris que, forgeant des fers et répandant le sang, ils servaient « la Loi, » « la Patrie, » la Vertu » surtout. « Quelles délices tu aurais goûtées, a écrit un de ces misérables, Achard (de Lyon où l’on mitraille) : quelles délices tu aurais goûtées, si tu eusses vu, avant-hier, cette justice nationale de 209 scélérats ! » et la lettre adressée à un ami du « grand patriote » se termine par : « Le bonjour à Robespierre. » Ils l’adorent tous.

C’est que Robespierre a proclamé ces mouchards, ces geôliers et ces bourreaux, les « hommes de la Vertu. »

Deux autres dogmes cependant seront proclamés ex cathedra : la croyance à l’Etre Suprême, sanction de la vertu, satisfaction donnée aux « âmes pures » et aux élans vers le ciel du Vicaire savoyard, et, par ailleurs, le respect de la propriété sacro-sainte, fondement de l’Etat et de la République ; car, s’il a pu, à certaines heures, paraître mériter, par des concessions purement verbales, les félicitations de la Société des indigens, Maximilien restera, de 1789 à 1794, socialement parlant, un conservateur.

Déiste et conservateur, il l’est avec le même dogmatisme que moraliste et terroriste, c’est-à-dire qu’il se sent une sorte de haine contre les non-conformistes en matière sociale et religieuse comme en matière politique. « Mauvais citoyen, » certes, celui qui prêche « l’indulgence » ou qui, sans vertu, pratique la terreur, mais « mauvais citoyen » aussi qui nie l’existence de l’Etre Suprême et « mauvais citoyen » qui ose prêcher le partage des terres. Telles dispositions lui font apercevoir un monde de « scélérats. » Dans ce pays où, s’est-il écrié en janvier 1793, « la vertu est en minorité ; » mais plus précisément dans cette Convention où Danton et Hébert ont tant d’amis, que peu d’élus au regard de tant de réprouvés ! Sa sombreur s’en augmente. Son maître Rousseau dont il commente le soir, aux enfans du menuisier Duplay, l’œuvre immortelle, « comme un curé de village, dit Barras, explique l’Evangile à ses paroissiens, » entend que les non-conformistes soient chassés de la Cité. Le prophète appliquera la doctrine du Dieu, mais de terrible manière ; ce n’est point seulement hors de la Cité que seront jetés ces scélérats, mais sous le couteau. Au fond ces « scélérats ». soiit des hérétiques, car Robespierre, comme Torquemada, est, suivant le mot ironique de M. Aulard, « le maître de la vérité. »

« La vertu a toujours été en minorité ! » Robespierre ne compte que sur quelques amis, surtout à la Convention : Couthon, Saint-Just, Le Bas. Ce sont les séides de ce Mahomet, les émirs du Prophète.

Couthon plaît à Maximilien par son spiritualisme : lui a non seulement lu le Vicaire savoyard, mais il l’a paraphrasé. Ce n’est pas sans quelque regret que le représentant du Puy-de-Dôme a vu disparaître « messieurs les curés » dont, à la fin de 1791, il louait encore « le zèle et la délicatesse ; » il a toujours protesté que, loin de travailler contre « la religion de nos pères, » les députés travaillaient pour elle « par le rétablissement des mœurs. » Car s’il est religieux, il l’est avec ce puritanisme qui est vraiment la marque du groupe : ce malheureux Couthon, à dire vrai, a peut-être moins de mérite qu’un autre à être de mœurs pures, infortuné qui s’avoue cousu de maux, geint en toutes ses lettres sur son sang avarié et ses jambes recroquevillées, et ne quitte sa voiturette de cul-de-jatte que pour se faire porter à la tribune. A la veille de Thermidor, c’est lui qui, fort de ses bonnes mœurs, dénoncera avec âpreté « les hommes impurs qui cherchent à corrompre la morale publique sur le tombeau des mœurs et de la vertu. » Mais dès 1793, il a admis que « la religion était l’appui des bonnes mœurs, » et si, à l’automne de cette année-là, il a supprimé le culte catholique, c’est avec les considérans d’un puritain d’Ecosse abolissant le presbytérianisme après le papisme : car louant « l’architecte » qui « maintient l’harmonie dans la nature » et dont nous sommes « les enfans, » il affirme n’avoir « détruit la religion des prêtres » que pour instaurer « la religion de Dieu. » Ce « Dieu de vérité » qu’il salue du haut de la tribune, il trouve sa main partout. Nul orateur « clérical » n’a aussi souvent fait appel au Très-Haut et discerné sa dextre : c’est le Très-Haut qui « servant mieux la Révolution que les hommes » a « rappelé » Léopold d’Autriche, ennemi de la France ; et c’est Lui qui, inondant de soleil la fête de la Victoire en 1794, a marqué sa prédilection aux républicains, en « ouvrant pour la première fois depuis longtemps son œil bienfaisant. »

Personne n’a, plus que ce singulier Jacobin, entretenu Robespierre dans cette sorte de mysticisme déiste que le groupe imposera, nous le verrons, aux agens subalternes à l’heure des passagers triomphes. Personne aussi ne contribue plus à donner à cette religion un caractère sombre et terrifiant. L’infirme qu’aigrit son malheur et auquel ses maux font pousser parfois en pleine assemblée des cris de douleur, ne saurait être un souriant apôtre. Dans ses lettres nous le trouvons hanté jusqu’au délire par la crainte des éternels conspirateurs : « Le nombre des complices est immense… Patience, ajoute-t-il, nous saurons délivrer la République de tous ses ennemis. »

Le vrai séide n’est cependant point Couthon, c’est Saint-Just, qu’on appellerait l’enfant de chœur de cette église (il a vingt-cinq ans en 1794), s’il n’était fort supérieur à Robespierre en intelligence et en talent. « Esprit de feu, cœur de glace, » le mot est de Barère et paraît exact. Ce joli garçon, dont Greuze a laissé un charmant portrait, est « un terrible adolescent. » Les Robespierristes eux-mêmes en gardaient un souvenir terrifiant. « Son enthousiasme résultait d’une certitude mathématique, écrit l’un d’eux, Levasseur de la Sarthe… Pour fonder la République qu’il avait rêvée, il aurait donné sa tête, mais aussi cent mille têtes d’hommes avec la sienne. » L’ex-conventionnel Baudot nous le peint, vibrant et coupant, « ne parlant que par sentences. » Orgueilleux jusqu’au miracle, il « portait sa tête comme un Saint-Sacrement : » ne riant qu’ironiquement, il rebutait et alarmait. Audacieux et inflexible, il dépassait Robespierre, — s’il était possible, — en dogmatisme. Nouveau venu à la « vertu » (il avait, dans sa prime jeunesse, composé un poème érotique et commis plus d’une peccadille), il savait parler de la morale mieux qu’homme du monde. « Voyant des criminels dans tous les dissidens, » dit un conventionnel, il flattait l’idée favorite de Robespierre. Il avait épaulé celui-ci, mais le poussait : moins « légaliste » que Maximilien, il était l’agent des exécutions, « le chevalier porte-glaive, » dit M. Claretie. Il eût renié le Maître, si celui-ci avait faibli.

Quant à Le Bas, son fanatisme a quelque chose d’émouvant. Aveugle lorsqu’il s’agissait de Robespierre, ce jeune Le Bas livre, dans ses lettres à Elisabeth Duplay, sa fiancée, puis sa femme, une âme ingénue : pour servir le Maître, il sacrifie tout, s’arrache en soupirant de son idylle, mais sans hésiter, et, après lui avoir voué sa vie, se vouera pour lui à la mort, sachant que tous, là-bas chez les Duplay, l’approuveront, la jeune femme, la belle-sœur, le papa et la maman Duplay. Vraiment les seuls prophètes trouvent de tels serviteurs et les grands égoïstes de tels amis.

II
Le reste du monde politique, Robespierre l’avait en méfiance, surtout en cet hiver de 1793-1794 où la Convention semblait encore subir l’influence de Danton tantôt, et tantôt de l’Hôtel de Ville hébertiste. En somme, tout ce monde lui paraissait tenir en échec la Vertu.

Grand réaliste en face de cet idéaliste presque mystique, brutal, violent, mais parfois généreux, impulsif, autant que l’autre était calculateur, Danton est l’antithèse de Robespierre. Capable de folles colères suivies de prompts retours, d’actes de prodigieuse énergie et d’inexplicables nonchalances, c’était pour Maximilien un adversaire redoutable, mais dont la cuirasse de bronze présentait vingt défauts. Robespierre le tenait pour improbe. Avait-il tort ou raison ? Danton peut-être ne tripota pas, mais couvrit plus d’un tripotage. En cette âme tumultueuse et trouble on découvre, pêle-mêle, dans une lave incandescente des métaux précieux et d’horribles scories. Assurément, on volait autour de lui et l’on jouissait. Lui, truculent, ardent, aimant la femme, — plus particulièrement la sienne, les siennes, car il en eut deux qu’il adora follement, — se plaisant à la ripaille, vrai personnage de Shakspeare, fanfaron de vices et parfois de crimes, paraissait assurément s’éloigner fort de « l’homme de la Vertu. » Il plaisantait d’ailleurs ceux que son ami Chabot (celui-là un vrai voleur) appelait « les catonistes, » et toute cette famille Duplay où prêchait Robespierre, un sot qui fanatisait ces belles filles au lieu de les aimer et transformait en Spartiates et en Romaines ces petites Parisiennes : « Cornélie Copeau, » disait-il en riant de la fille du menuisier, platonique et grave amoureuse.

Au fond, c’étaient ces railleries que Robespierre ne pardonnait pas, et moins encore le génie de ce Danton qui vraiment, à nos yeux, domine de cent coudées l’étroit politicien. Mais il affectait d’être avant tout scandalisé des « mœurs » de son adversaire : un « scélérat, » dira Couthon, qui pratiquait un « système d’immoralité, d’athéisme et de corruption, » et particulièrement avait affirmé — abominable chose, — qu’après la mort, l’homme rentrait dans « le néant. »

En fait Danton paraît bien avoir été athée, sans d’ailleurs avoir jamais voulu ériger en doctrine un sentiment tout personnel. Libre penseur, il n’était pas fanatique. Les prêtres ne l’occupaient pas : il en avait laissé massacrer une centaine aux Carmes sans remords, mais quand, en pleine Terreur, sa fiancée (bonne catholique), avait entendu faire bénir leur union par un « réfractaire, » il y avait consenti. Il n’était point pour une Eglise d’Etat, pas plus la constitutionnelle que la catholique, et pas plus le culte de la Raison que celui de l’Être Suprême. Il pensait que chacun devait vivre à sa guise et, Robespierre étant partisan de l’école obligatoire (pour ne citer qu’un trait), Danton la voulait libre. Mais cette facilité de doctrine même, Robespierre la tenait pour immorale. En toute sincérité, il tenait pour un médiocre républicain ce Danton, dix fois plus « libre penseur » que lui.

D’autre part, depuis quelques mois, en cet hiver de l’an II, — ce terrible Danton encourait à d’autres titres l’excommunication majeure. Ne voulait-il point qu’on mît fin à la Terreur, lui l’homme qui avait presque assumé la responsabilité des massacres de Septembre ? Ce dessein était connu. Au scandale des purs, Danton prônait « l’indulgence. » Lorsque, après la condamnation des Girondins, Camille Desmoulins était venu, en pleurs, se jeter dans ses bras, criant : « C’est moi qui les tue ! » Danton avait pleuré avec lui, et, un soir, passant sur le Pont-Neuf, il avait, dans une sorte d’hallucination, montré à Camille la Seine qu’éclairait le soleil couchant : « Regarde : la Seine coule du sang. Ah ! c’est trop de sang versé. Allons, reprends ta plume et demande qu’on soit clément. » Desmoulins l’avait entendu. Lui aussi avait autrefois allumé les incendies ; mais, depuis des mois, il restait consterné du désastre : « Ce pauvre Camille, » avait écrit de lui le puissant Mirabeau. Il restait « ce pauvre Camille, » enfant terrible, journaliste d’élan, ne calculant rien, âpre folliculaire en 1789, dont un charmant mariage avait adouci l’âme ulcérée, en le dotant d’ailleurs de quelques rentes. Danton ayant parlé, Camille avait lancé son terrible Vieux Cordelier qui prenait à la gorge le Père Duchesne, organe ignoble de l’Extrême Terreur, en attendant qu’il flétrît, avec la basse délation et la terreur sanglante, toute la clientèle de Robespierre.

Robespierre avait cependant, lors de l’apparition du Vieux Cordelier, détourné pour un instant de la tête de Desmoulins les foudres des Jacobins. C’est qu’il lui plaisait que les amis de Danton éventrassent ceux d’Hébert. Il les voulait tous détruire : le Père Duchesne jeté par terre, on tordrait le cou au Vieux Cordelier. Le Père Duchesne, en effet, c’était Hébert, c’était Chaumette, c’était leur Commune « exagérée, » c’était le communisme et l’athéisme affichés et un instant triomphans.

La Commune de Paris, sous l’inspiration d’Hébert et de Chaumette, semblait en effet, — sur le terrain social et religieux, — résolue à consommer ce que leur ami, le citoyen Fouché de Nantes appelait dans ses proclamations de proconsul, à Moulins et Nevers, puis à Lyon, « la Révolution intégrale. »

C’est en effet Fouché, futur millionnaire, qui, en Nivernais et en Bourbonnais, avait, dès l’été de 1793, pris une attitude si démagogique qu’elle avait déconcerté l’Eglise orthodoxe que présidait Maximilien, mais fort exalté l’Hôtel de Ville de Paris. Le futur duc d’Otrante avait, en ces riches provinces du Centre, prêché « la révision des fortunes, » « la guerre au négotiantisme, » « le partage des fruits de la terre, » « l’obligation pour la République d’occuper le travailleur, » tout cela pour faire triompher la formule maratiste : « La richesse et la pauvreté doivent également disparaître du régime de l’égalité. »

Chaumette, fort lié avec Fouché, l’avait poussé, puis suivi. La Commune avait félicité le proconsul et était entrée dans- ses voies : il fallait « inviter la nation à s’emparer de tout le commerce, de toutes les manufactures et à l’aire travailler pour son compte. » Hébert soutenait fort cette doctrine : si Chaumette était le théoricien de l’Hôtel de Ville, lui était le maître, puissant surtout par son terrible Père Duchesne, la feuille la plus répandue de Paris. On entendait convertir Robespierre à l’idée de « faire disparaître, lui écrivait-on, l’aristocratie mercantile. » Mais derrière le mot de révolution intégrale, Maximilien lisait le mot de révolution sociale. Rien ne pouvait plus froisser ses persistans principes de bourgeois conservateur que ces théories extrêmes : elles ne venaient pas de lui et cela eût suffi à les lui faire détester. Il regardait avec une irritation croissante les Hébert, les Chaumette, les Fouché favoriser la révolution communiste et y conquérir, chose grave, une partie de sa clientèle à lui.

Par surcroît, un autre mouvement, parti des mêmes milieux, l’offusquait jusqu’au scandale. On entreprenait la déchristianisation par le triomphe de la Raison. Et tel fait doit nous retenir un instant, car ce mouvement suivi d’une réaction violente permet de saisir le caractère exact de la lutte qui va s’engager, presque exclusivement religieuse.

Dès l’abord, — et c’est ce qui explique ces essais de culte, — la Révolution avait été marquée d’une indéniable tendance à s’ériger en religion ; 1789 est, somme toute, le point de départ d’une crise de mysticisme civique. MM. Tiersot et Mathiez, l’un étudiant plus spécialement les rites et l’autre la doctrine, ont parfaitement démontré à quel point, dès les premières heures, le Verbe s’était fait religieux, et rien ne serait plus intéressant que de résumer ici leurs édifiantes études : évolution des cultes et des dogmes, extension et transformation des fêtes où les Mehul et les Gossec mêlent une sorte de musique sacrée au son du canon et aux hymnes patriotiques.

L’organisation de l’Église constitutionnelle, « l’Eglise tricolore, » avait été un autre essai pour créer un culte révolutionnaire sans se détacher de ce que Couthon appelait encore en 1791 « la religion de nos pères. » Cet essai, on le sait, échouait lamentablement en 1791. L’Eglise artificielle, imposée par la Constitution civile, se dissolvait ; des prêtres jureurs avaient rallié le « papisme, » et d’autres avaient achevé leur évolution en se défroquant ; Grégoire soutenait avec peine les ruines branlantes du sanctuaire « tricolore. »

L’entreprenante Commune de Paris hâtait cette dissolution. De l’Hôtel de Ville, on méditait d’organiser, sur les débris de toutes les religions déistes, le culte païen de la Raison ou de la Liberté.

A cette entreprise Hébert prêtait son nom : le vrai instigateur fut pourtant bien Chaumette. C’était un aventurier que ses mœurs, — si j’en crois les gens bien informés, — eussent de nos jours conduit en cour d’assises (à huis clos). Lui aussi parlait de « la vertu, » mais il pratiquait le vice rare. Anaxagoras Chaumette se fût ici sans doute recommandé des philosophes grecs : comme eux, par ailleurs, il entendait déloger les dieux. Il fallait entre autres évincer le Christ. On commença à Paris par décrocher des clochers « les breloques du Père Éternel » dont on entendit faire des canons et des sous ; puis on parla d’abattre les clochers eux-mêmes, qui, « par leur domination sur les autres édifices, semblaient, écrivait-on à l’Hôtel de Ville, contrarier les principes de l’Egalité. » Le théâtre se mit à ridiculiser l’ancienne religion dans le Tombeau des Imposteurs et l’Inauguration du temple de la Vérité où une grand’messe était, sur la scène, chantée en parodie.

La Convention ne sembla pas tout d’abord portée à favoriser cette campagne. C’étaient cependant certains de ses membres qui avaient, les premiers, en province, tenté de substituer, dès l’automne de 1793, au culte chrétien le culte civique : Dumont à Abbeville, Fouché à Nevers, Laignelot à Rochefort, et bien d’autres. Sous l’inspiration de Chaumette, venu à Nevers, Fouché avait, par un célèbre arrêté, aboli le ciel, le purgatoire et l’enfer, en proclamant la mort « sommeil éternel. »

Le mouvement se généralisa : on se mit à brûler un peu partout « les vierges à miracles » et à rafler « l’argenterie des églises. » Entre les mains de Fouché l’évêque de l’Allier abjura- ; Gobel, évêque de Paris, allait l’imiter. Il y eut des détails grotesques : tel converti se lava la tête en plein club pour « se débaptiser » et, solennellement, Bechonnet, ci-devant prêtre, divorça publiquement d’avec son bréviaire.

Encouragée, la Commune pesait sur la Convention où, appuyé par Robespierre et même par Danton, l’évêque Grégoire résistait très courageusement à la poussée. Mais les « héberistes » de l’Assemblée faisait rage, gens dont Grégoire affirme qu’ils lui amenaient leurs femmes à confesse et leurs enfans à baptiser, mais publiquement « blasphémaient contre la révélation. »

Fouché envoyait des caisses de calices et de crucifix qu’on déballait devant la tribune. Cette opération grisait d’iconoclastie l’Assemblée. Lorsque, après un de ces « inventaires, » Gobel, traîné par Chaumette à la barre de l’Assemblée, s’y fût venu défroquer, la Convention, un instant conquise, céda. Le président, félicitant l’ex-évêque de Paris, déclara que l’Être suprême « né voulait pas de culte que celui de la Raison… et que ce serait désormais la religion nationale. »

Chaumette incontinent fit décider par la Commune que, « pour célébrer le triomphe que la Raison avait, dans cette séance, remporté sur les préjugés de dix-huit siècles, » on célébrerait, le 20 brumaire, une cérémonie civique « devant l’image de cette divinité, dans l’édifice ci-devant église métropolitaine. »

On a maintes fois décrit cette célèbre fête et comment une Liberté, empruntée à l’Opéra, siégea sur l’autel de la Raison. La Convention s’étant, sous prétexte de travail, refusée à assister à la fête, un cortège (extrêmement mêlé) amena la déesse aux Tuileries, et, en sa gracieuse présence, força l’Assemblée à décréter que Notre-Dame deviendrait à jamais Temple de la Raison. Bientôt Libertés et Raisons pullulèrent à Paris et dans les départemens, vierges folles trop souvent (à côté de quelques « déesses » dont le nom étonne) : si l’une de ces Libertés portait sur son front une banderole ornée de ces mots : « Ne me tournez pas en licence, » le conseil n’eût été presque nulle part superflu, car partout s’organisaient de répugnantes saturnales.

Tout cela froissait Robespierre. Lorsque, dès frimaire an II, un de ses hommes, Payan, dénonçait « ces déesses plus avilies que celles de la Fable, » il applaudissait au propos. Collot d’Herbois lui-même, sermonné au Comité, flétrissait « cette Raison postiche qui courait les rues avec les conspirateurs (les Hébertistes déjà menacés) et terminait avec eux leurs prétendues fêtes dans de licencieuses orgies. » Couthon, à la fête de la Victoire, tint des propos fort déistes. Enfin Maximilien lui-même prononçait le 1er frimaire au club ce discours célèbre où il proclamait « toute populaire… l’idée d’un grand Être qui veille sur l’innocence opprimée et qui punit le crime triomphant ; » le 16, il faisait condamner par la Convention « les extravagances du philosophisme. » « Si Dieu n’existait pas, il faudrait l’inventer, » avait-il, entre autres propos, affirmé péremptoirement.

Brusquement, le culte de la Raison oscilla sur ses autels. A Paris, Chaumette et Hébert étaient menacés et dans les départemens où quelques Raisons, fort prudemment, regagnaient, qui les coulisses du théâtre, qui te foyer familial, les proconsuls « athéistes » se sentirent en détresse. Robespierre avait résolu de les faire rappeler, ces misérables et indignes satrapes qui, non contens de pratiquer des « mœurs » contraires à la vertu, expulsaient de son presbytère jusqu’au vicaire savoyard.

Pour les abattre plus sûrement, il fallait abattre leurs protecteurs de Paris, ces « conspirateurs, » ces « scélérats » qui, écrira Couthon, « adoptaient le système absurde et désespérant du néant : » Danton et ses hommes, Hébert et ses complices.

Comment Robespierre les abattit dans les journées de Germinal, nous n’avons pas à le raconter ici. Remarquons seulement que le double procès eut un caractère nettement « moral. » Contre les Hébertistes, il fut vraiment impossible d’articuler un grief sérieux, sauf celui d’avoir eu de mauvaises mœurs ou d’avoir ébranlé celles d’autrui « par la religion de l’athéisme ; » Gobel, qui les suivra à l’échafaud, n’y sera conduit, somme toute, que pour avoir foulé aux pieds sa crosse ; et quant à Chaumette, il est assez caractéristique qu’il se vit reprocher en plein tribunal par le président, Robespierriste fervent, d’avoir démoralisé l’esprit public en supprimant les messes de minuit, le 25 décembre 1793.

Contre les Dantonistes, tels reproches n’étaient pas de mise : Danton lui-même avait, à la Convention, montré quelque dégoût pour « les mascarades » de la Raison. Contre eux, on ne vengea pas l’Être Suprême, mais « la Vertu. » N’ayant à formuler aucun reproche précis contre Danton, on l’accusa de conspiration réactrice, ce qui lui arracha ces magnifiques réponses où l’ironie se mêlait à l’indignation et qui font de son procès une des scènes les plus prodigieusement intéressantes de ce drame révolutionnaire ; mais on avait eu soin de l’entourer d’amis compromettans : Fabre, Chabot, Hérault et autres, dont « l’improbité » ou « l’immoralité » paraissaient établies. Ces « scélérats » salissaient le puissant tribun de leurs « vols » et de leurs « débauches. »

Et c’est pourquoi, lorsque, le 16 germinal, la tête de Danton roulait, douze jours après celle d’Hébert, dans le panier de Sanson, la Vertu était tenue pour triomphante et le Vice pour terrassé.

La veille de cette bataille décisive, Couthon avait écrit (il était certainement l’écho de son milieu) : « Si l’Enfer est contre nous, le Ciel est pour nous et le Ciel est maître de l’Enfer. » La maison des Duplay devenait un Vatican contre lequel les portes de l’enfer ne pouvaient prévaloir.

III
« Le ciel » étant resté « maître, » Robespierre paraissait désormais le chef incontesté. Les dogmes triomphaient avec le pontife. L’Europe (Sorel l’a admirablement montré), l’Europe, mal instruite de sa personnalité, crut qu’un Cromwell était né : de Vienne à Londres, de Pétersbourg à Naples, on affirmait qu’il allait mettre fin à la Révolution.

Il n’y songeait point. De cerveau médiocre et d’âme rétrécie, il n’était pas fait pour concevoir une grande tâche. Il ne pensait toujours qu’à s’assurer contre « ses ennemis, » — ceux de la République s’entend. Qui étaient-ils ? Son vicaire l’a proclamé à la Convention. Il faudrait reproduire ici le discours de Saint-Just où tient tout un programme, non de restauration, mais d’extermination : « Ce qui constitue la République, c’est la destruction de tout ce qui lui est opposé. On est coupable contre la République parce qu’on s’apitoie sur les détenus ; on est coupable parce qu’on ne veut pas de la vertu ; on est coupable parce qu’on ne veut pas de la terreur… » Chaque phrase livrait des centaines de têtes à Fouquier-Tinville. Ce jeune sectaire semblait, devant l’Assemblée terrifiée, faire manœuvrer le déclic d’une gigantesque guillotine.

La Terreur allait donc continuer, frappant pêle-mêle royalistes et républicains, anciens amis de la Reine et d’Hébert, de Mme Roland et de Danton. C’est que Robespierre entendait étouffer dans le sang toute opposition.

Tout — une heure — lui sembla soumis. La Convention, en livrant Danton, s’était faite esclave. On y votait sans discussion et « avec un air de contentement, » sinon, dit Baudot, on était « l’objet de l’attention de Saint-Just comme du temps de Néron. » Il ne fallait point paraître triste ; on devait même se garder de sembler songeur. Barras cite ce député qui, s’étant vu regardé par Robespierre au moment où il paraissait rêver, s’écriait, terrifié : « Il va supposer que je pense quelque chose ! » Billaud qui, au printemps de 1794, ne s’est pas encore séparé de Robespierre au Comité, participe à sa mentalité absolutiste ; prononçant un discours à la Convention, il s’interrompt brusquement et, impérieusement : « Je crois, s’écrie-t-il, qu’on murmure ; » un grand silence plana. Ce Comité, c’est un César à dix têtes qui, pour trois mois, est soumis à Maximilien.

Celui-ci en profitait pour faire rappeler les proconsuls détestés. Déjà Robespierre leur a substitué en province des missi dominici à lui, des agens nationaux qui, partout, entravent, puis démolissent l’œuvre des représentans en mission, envoient à Robespierre des rapports sur les « crimes » commis par ces « despotes » et grossissent les dossiers sous lesquels, avant peu, le maître compte bien écraser cette queue d’Hébert et de Danton. Le type de ces envoyés spéciaux est le petit Jullien ; cet adolescent fait, de Nantes à Toulouse par Bordeaux, une tournée qui pourrait bien coûter cher à ceux qui ont terrorisé « sans vertu. » A Lyon, à Marseille, à Toulon, Robespierre ne se fiera qu’à son frère Augustin, qui, déjà, dénonce l’improbité de Fouché, de Barras et de Fréron. Quand ceux-ci ont regagné Paris, fort inquiets, ils tentent de désarmer le César. Ils courent tous chez Duplay, prêts à toutes les soumissions, à toutes les capitulations : ils trouvent figure de marbre, suivant l’expression de l’un d’eux. Fixés sur leur sort, ils vont saper l’idole et feront Thermidor, mais pas un n’osera, avant le 8 thermidor, élever la voix à la Convention contre ce « tyran » qu’ils démolissent dans l’ombre.

La force du « tyran » est que, maintenant, il tient l’Hôtel de Ville : au « papa Pache, » maire de Paris, suspect d’Hébertisme, on a substitué une des créatures de Robespierre, Fleuriot-Lescot, et, à Chaumette, un homme de la maison Duplay, Payan ; la nouvelle Commune est toute « robespierriste. »

Tenant l’Hôtel de Ville, il tient également le tribunal révolutionnaire ; le président Dumas est à lui, à lui l’accusateur public Fouquier-Tinville. Et le jury ne paraissant pas assez pur, on l’épure : le menuisier Duplay y va exercer une grande influence ; les jurés sont la garde prétorienne du maître et le vont chercher chez Duplay pour l’escorter à la Convention. Il croit tenir l’armée, faisant trembler les généraux : tout à l’heure Hoche et Kellermann seront jetés en prison ; on ne choisit les commissaires aux armées que parmi les amis de Robespierre (mauvaise manœuvre au surplus qui laissera dégarnie, en Thermidor, la gauche robespierriste). Maximilien, par ailleurs, a sous la main la pépinière du futur état-major, cette École de Mars, fondée depuis peu et où vingt-cinq jeunes gens, vêtus à la romaine, reçoivent la visite du Maître avec un enthousiasme que nous a dit l’un d’eux : Le Bas dirige de haut ces jeunes prétoriens. Au surplus, le « général » Henriot livre l’armée de Paris, ce misérable Henriot qu’on appelle couramment dans le peuple « la bourrique à Robespierre. » La propriété rassurée et la religion vengée ont foi en celui-ci : les députés de la Plaine, un Boissy d’Anglas, un Durand de Maillane ont peine à ne lui être pas reconnaissans d’avoir abattu les énergumènes de la Révolution intégrale, et l’évêque Grégoire d’avoir ressuscité Dieu.

Et puis, — et cela maintenant se dit et se redit, — il est « l’homme de la vertu. »

Jamais la vertu ne fut plus magnifiée. Certes, Robespierre n’a fait qu’emprunter le vocable à la phraséologie sentimentale de Rousseau et de vingt autres ; tous les tribuns des assemblées, tous les orateurs des clubs, tous les commissaires dans les départemens l’ont employé à satiété ; Mirabeau, l’homme le plus immoral de son époque, a tonné au nom de la vertu, et c’est pour « le triomphe de la vertu » que Carrier a noyé, Barras et Fréron fusillé, Fouché et Collot mitraillé, Le Bon guillotiné. Tallien, oui Tallien, a parlé au nom de la vertu, et n’est-ce point la citoyenne Therezia Cabarrus, future citoyenne Tallien (on ne s’attendait guère à la trouver en cette affaire), qui, dans une adresse à la Convention du 5 floréal, dit par quels exercices « on exercera les jeunes filles à la vertu ? »

Mais voici l’apothéose de la vraie vertu après l’écrasement du vice hypocrite. Et soudain le pays devenu « Spartiate » est tenu à la vertu. Dès le 16 germinal, la Convention vote un décret exigeant que chacun de ses membres rende un compte moral de sa conduite pour s’assurer « qu’il n’est devenu plus riche qu’en vertus. » Grand exemple. Cou thon a écrit : « Qui dit démocratie dit gouvernement vertueux par essence. » L’heure est venue, dira-t-il encore (cette fois à la tribune), de vouer « au mépris public… tous les êtres improbes et immoraux ; » et voici des précisions : il va falloir particulièrement proscrire « le concubinage honteux qui relâche les liens sacrés du mariage. » Qu’on ne croie pas à de simples formules. Voici telle Société populaire, celle de Provins, qui entend être chaudement félicitée, ayant fait conduire en prison « l’instituteur coupable d’avoir trop tardivement régularisé sa liaison. » Rien ne vaut un petit fait de cette espèce.

Maximilien qui nettoie le Palais-Royal, faisant rentrer les filles et sortir les joueurs, Maximilien lui-même continue à pratiquer la vertu au sein d’une vertueuse famille. Sa chambre bleue — vraie Mecque de la nouvelle religion, — est l’asile des vertus austères. Un jour, il dit à Robert Lindet : « Nous voulons fonder Salente. »

Salente sanglante ! Depuis que Robespierre a écrasé les indulgens, Fouquier-Tinville ne se possède plus : il crie, peste, plaisante, s’affaire, presse tout son monde. Il a exhorté le prudent Dumas « à serrer la botte aux bavards, » grâce à quoi les audiences vont vite. On condamne, tel jour, vingt-trois prévenus sur l’audition d’un seul témoin. » L’accusateur qui a toujours barboté dans le sang avec agrément, s’exalte, tout joyeux : « Les têtes tombent comme des ardoises. » Mais il espère mieux : « La semaine prochaine, j’en déculotterai trois ou quatre cents. » « Il faut, a déclaré Robespierre, que le tribunal soit actif comme le crime et finisse tout procès en vingt-quatre heures. » On les finit en vingt-quatre minutes.

Contre les prévenus les plus disparates, ci-devant grands seigneurs et domestiques, petits boutiquiers et religieuses, anciens membres de la Commune et marquises de Versailles, prêtres et magistrats, artisans et courtisanes et dans ce pêle-mêle Gobel, Chaumette, Lucile Desmoulins, Malesherbes, Lavoisier, le général Dillon, la duchesse du Châtelet, la veuve Hébert, Madame Elisabeth, griefs sommaires : complot liberticide, mais plus souvent l’accusation vague et commode : « a dépravé les mœurs, » — ce qui cadre bien avec le règne de la vertu ; et l’on voit bien, comment la Sainte-Amaranthe, raflée, dit Beugnot, avec tout son cercle, a dépravé les mœurs, mais Madame Elisabeth et Malesherbes ?

En tout cas, des « scélérats, » « déprava leurs des mœurs » emplissent sans cesse les prisons, que sans cesse on vide. A la veille de Thermidor, André Chénier et Antoine Roucher, Garat et Beauharnais, Hoche et Kellermann, les peintres Suvée et Robert, les comédiens du Théâtre-Français sont en prison pêle-mêle avec Therezia Cabarrus, Aimée de Coigny, Joséphine de Beauharnais, des représentans des trois Assemblées révolutionnaires et tout le d’Hozier français. Et tout ce monde a plus ou moins contribué à « dépraver les mœurs, » tout en menaçant la liberté.

En province, sous les commissaires robespierristes comme naguère sous les représentans hébertistes, les massacres continuent et les arrestations. Au 9 thermidor, il y aura 1 000 personnes dans les prisons d’Arras, 3 000 dans celles de Strasbourg, 1 500 dans celles de Toulouse, — à Paris environ 7 000, — victimes vouées à la mort pour que triomphe la vertu.

Il faut cependant « une sanction » à cette vertu, — c’est la théorie de Couthon. Il faut un ciel : il faut un Dieu. Tallien ricanera, le 11 thermidor, que « ce petit Robespierre » eût « déplacé l’Eternel pour se mettre à sa place. » En attendant, il achève de le restaurer.

Le 17 germinal, Couthon vient annoncer à la Convention que le Comité prépare une fête de l’Être Suprême. Commentant son propre discours, il écrit, le 21 : « C’est un besoin pour les âmes pures de reconnaître et d’adorer une intelligence supérieure. » Evidemment, qui n’éprouve pas ce besoin est « impur. » Du reste, on doit à Dieu ces hommages : n’est-ce pas « grâce à la Providence qui veille sans cesse sur nos destinées » que « ces monstres, » Hébert, Danton, ont été abattus ? Oui, le Très-Haut veille sur Robespierre : Dieu est robespierriste, — tout comme Fleuriot-Lescot, Fouquier-Tinville et le général Henriot. « Dieu nous bénit, » écrit Couthon le 12 floréal.

Le 18 floréal, le grand prêtre lui-même lance une encyclique : il vient lire son fameux discours sur les rapports des idées religieuses et morales avec les principes républicains où tient toute la pensée du règne : il faut replonger « le vice dans le néant » et comme il est impossible à Maximilien d’oublier ses ennemis, même lorsqu’il les a fait guillotiner, il entend vouer à l’exécration ces athées : Vergniaud, Hébert, Danton, étrange triumvirat auquel il oppose (facilement, puisqu’ils ne sont plus là pour répondre) ce déisme qui fut la religion de Socrate et celle de Léonidas, — imprévu rapprochement. Quoi qu’il en soit, Robespierre obtint sans peine le vote du décret qui, sanction de son discours, établissait en France comme culte officiel celui de l’Être Suprême et de toutes tes vertus.

Discours et décret mirent le comble à l’exaltation mystique du monde robespierriste. De sa voix « cristalline » qui toujours semblait mouillée de larmes, Couthon en fit, aux Jacobins, telle apologie que le club acclama « avec transports » Dieu et son prophète : la société avait compris que l’athéisme « desséchant le cœur » eût fait de la France « un peuple d’esclaves. » Il est vrai que l’adresse de félicitations adressée par la Société à la Convention parut évidemment d’un style trop religieux au président, Lazare Carnot, l’homme le moins mystique du monde, qui l’accueillit assez sèchement le 27 floréal, — ce qui le rendit incontinent suspect de libertinage.

Mais les subalternes, au contraire, exagéraient les formules. A lire les proclamations et lettres des amis de Robespierre, on reste stupéfait. Vit-on sous une théocratie mystique où sous une république philosophique ? Les soldats qui sont en train de défendre la République et se font tuer pour elle n’ont été, — qui le croirait ? — inspirés que par le désir de « s’élancer dans le sein de la divinité : » C’est le jeune Jullien qui vient l’affirmer au club. Le Dieu des armées ressuscite donc, et voici que le Dieu de la Nature à son tour vient à la rescousse : le maire robespierriste prévoit de riches moissons. Fleuriot-Lescot n’a consulté ni les savans, ni les agronomes ; mais « l’Être Suprême, assure-t-il aux Parisiens… a commandé à la nature de vous préparer d’abondantes récoltes. Il vous observe, crie-t-il encore à ses administrés, soyez dignes de lui ! »

Les Parisiens se rendaient dignes de lui en préparant la Fête de l’Être Suprême.

Elle devait être l’apothéose du nouveau vicaire des Croyans.

Il ne lui manquait qu’un attentat pour corser l’apothéose : l’attentat vint à point. Une enfant fut saisie dans la cour des Duplay, porteuse de deux petits couteaux. On voulut que ce fût une Charlotte Corday : l’Incorruptible allait être égorgé. La petite Cécile Renault fut conduite à l’échafaud avec 53 « complices » qui jamais ne l’avaient vue, revêtus du voile noir du parricide. Maximilien n’était-il pas le père de la Patrie ?

Le 16 prairial, pour qu’il pût présider officiellement la fête du 20, il fut porté à la présidence de la Convention. Quelques ennemis, perfidement, l’y poussèrent, espérant rendre tangible cette dictature pour l’en mieux incriminer le lendemain. Car, cauteleux à son ordinaire, il régnait jusque-là sans se mettre tout à fait en avant, lançant Couthon, Saint-Just et les autres, faisant agir ses ressorts à l’Etat-major, à l’Hôtel de Ville, à la Convention, au Comité, sans prendre visiblement la tête. On voulait le faire monter au Capitole une bonne fois, pour qu’il y trouvât la Roche Tarpéienne.

David préparait la fête : il était le décorateur officiel, le ministre des Beaux-Arts de Maximilien. Marie-Joseph Chénier avait reçu commande de l’hymne que Gossec devait orchestrer. Mais Marie-Joseph avait blessé le maître en fournissant des hymnes à Chaumette. Il fut jugé indigne : le Pontife en était déjà aux excommunications majeures. Méhul et Gossec, pourvus d’une cantate orthodoxe, s’en allèrent, chaque soir, faire exécuter dans les sections le chant sacré, si bien que Paris, — le Paris sceptique et narquois que nous savons, — fut, une semaine durant, occupé à répéter, sur un mandement suivi d’un dispositif, un cantique au bon Dieu. On croit rêver.

M. Tiersot, après M. Aulard, a tracé un tableau fort pittoresque et des plus détaillés de la fête. Je n’en retiendrai que quelques traits.

Sous le ciel de juin, éclatant et propice (toujours « l’œil bienfaisant » que Couthon voit fixé sur lui et ses amis), le sol jonché de roses et les maisons tapissées de feuillage, les cloches échappées aux exécutions de Chaumette sonnent l’Alléluia, tandis que, les tambours battant, le canon tonne ; le peuple « enrégimenté » en un chœur gigantesque s’achemine vers les Tuileries, parterre immense et fleuri, car les hommes portant des branches vertes, les femmes élèvent des corbeilles aux mille nuances, « coup d’œil ravissant, de femmes en blanc couronnées de roses, » dit une spectatrice, Mlle Fusil. (Notons qu’à deux pas de là, place de la Révolution, de l’autre côté de la grille, le pavé restait rouge du sang de la veille et prêt à recevoir celui du lendemain.)

Devant le Château, la Convention est massée, elle aussi fleurie, car chaque représentant porte à la main un bouquet d’épis, de fleurs et de fruits. Au centre du bassin des Tuileries, le monument allégorique, la Sagesse terrassant l’Athéisme.

Chacun prenant place, Robespierre déjeunait au Château où, deux ans après l’éviction des Bourbons et cinq ans avant l’installation de Bonaparte, il représente seul, pour une heure, une manière de souverain. Il en avait conscience. Etait-ce joie ou inquiétude, sa voix tremblait, ses propos étaient entrecoupés. Vêtu de son habit bleu barbeau, — déjà célèbre, — la culotte de nankin bien tirée sur le bas de soie blanc, il portait avec une sorte de solennité l’écharpe et le panache aux trois couleurs. L’orgueil, vraiment, pour la première fois, lui fit perdre la tête et s’évanouir un instant son heureuse cautèle. Lorsqu’il saisit l’énorme bouquet qu’Eléonore Duplay lui avait préparé, il ressentit évidemment l’exaltation d’un pontife, maître des âmes.

Il était midi. Il parut au balcon, gagna l’estrade, se mit à la tête de la Convention qui, elle, avait attendu (c’était cependant le Souverain). De cette estrade, chaire ou trône, il prononça un long discours, rapsodie dont, pour être tout à fait dans la note (le fait a été récemment révélé), il avait prié un brave prêtre, vieux courtisan au demeurant, l’abbé Porquet, de lui composer le texte. Le sermon fini, cent mille voix entonnèrent l’Hymne au Très-Haut, « Père de l’Univers. »

Une heure après, l’énorme procession s’épanchait au Champ-de-Mars, au son des fanfares. Là encore, au milieu de groupes sentimentaux, mères tendres, pures jeunes filles, vieillards vénérables, soldats héroïques, tous pourvus d’attributs et décorés de fleurs, Maximilien pontifia. A la tête de l’Assemblée, il escalada la Montagne artificielle où, grottes, arbres, galeries, temple s’étageaient. L’immense chœur, derechef, s’était reformé que dirigeait le vieux Gossec. Maximilien était maintenant au sommet comme Moïse au Sinaï : l’Hymne montait vers lui et des nuages d’encens l’entouraient. Alors lui qui, à travers les déceptions, les querelles, les injures, les tendresses, les émeutes, les succès, les révolutions, était toujours resté impassible où sombre, lui qui ne semblait pas savoir sourire, s’épanouit à cette heure brève. Un rêve se réalisait : le pontife, — une minute, — dut se croire Dieu. IV
Une minute, il avait perdu de vue son plan de conquête sans tapage ; il était perdu. Il n’entendit pas que, derrière lui, des imprécations grondaient, partant des rangs de la Convention oubliée. Les ennemis soulignaient de murmures l’imprudence de l’homme.

Le soir même, la Décade osa plaisanter en termes acerbes la nouvelle religion d’Etat, et lorsque Maximilien, encore grisé, se rendit aux Jacobins pour y triompher, il s’y heurta à la morne figure de Joseph Fouché.

Par un hasard, ce « déchristianisateur » était président du club, où, déjà avisé, il avait cru trouver une place de sûreté. Il affecta, à la vérité, de s’associer à la joie générale, mais, après quelques phrases banales, il ajouta : « Brutus rendit un hommage digne de l’Etre Suprême en enfonçant un poignard dans le cœur d’un tyran. Sachez l’imiter. » Robespierre comprit : il le montrera bien lorsque, quelques jours après, il désignera Fouché comme le chef d’une conspiration tramée contre lui. Mais on avait applaudi la phrase audacieuse du président. Robespierre avait commis sa première faute.

Il ne lui en fallait plus commettre. On le guettait. Tout un groupe se tenait pour condamné par le règne de la vertu C’étaient ceux qu’autour de Robespierre, on appelait « les pourris, » proconsuls qui avaient fait de l’or dans le sang. C’étaient aussi les athées, la queue d’Hébert, particulièrement ce « misérable Fouché. » Il en fallait (le mot revient dans les discours di groupe) « purger » la Convention.

C’est le surlendemain de l’algarade de Fouché, le 22 prairial que surgit inopinément la proposition Couthon, destinée à livre : à Robespierre ses derniers ennemis. « Toute lenteur est un crime toute formalité un danger public ; le délai pour punir les ennemis de la patrie ne doit être que le temps de les reconnaître. » Le prévenus n’auront plus d’avocats et le jury par ailleurs juger en masse les accusés. Plus d’ « espèces ; » une seule inculpation seront déclarés ennemis du peuple « tous ceux qui cherchent anéantir la liberté soit par la force, soit par la ruse. »

C’est la dictature de l’accusateur public et du juge ; mais on sait bien qui tient juge et accusateur. Ce n’est pas tout, et voici où se trahit le vrai dessein : jusqu’à cette heure, les représentans, — de Vergniaud à Danton, — n’ont pu être traduits devant le tribunal que sur l’autorisation de l’Assemblée ; désormais ils le pourront être sur l’ordre seul des comités. L’article est pour Legendre, Fréron, Tallien, Barras, Fouché et cinquante autres. Les « ennemis » comprirent. « Si cette loi passe, s’écrie Ruamps, il ne me reste plus qu’à me brûler la cervelle. Je demande l’ajournement. » Des voix nombreuses le soutinrent.

Alors Robespierre, blême de colère, se leva. Il voulait sa loi, ses têtes : « Depuis longtemps, la Convention discute et décrète, parce que, depuis longtemps, elle n’est plus asservie qu’à l’empire des factions. » Il demande que, sans s’arrêter à la proposition d’ajournement, la Convention discute jusqu’à huit heures du soir, s’il le faut, le projet de loi qui lui est soumis.

Quel pouvoir d’hypnose exerçait cet homme ? Les opposans tremblans se turent. Une demi-heure après, la loi de mort était votée.

Maximilien partit, croyant tenir ses vengeances. Mais, dès le lendemain, l’Assemblée, soulevée, derechef s’insurgeait. Bourdon de l’Oise et Merlin obtenaient que, d’un trait de plume, on rayât l’article relatif aux représentans. Ces malheureux voulaient bien livrer la France, mais ils ne voulaient pas se livrer.

Robespierre tenait à l’article plus qu’à toute la loi. Il osa venir réclamer ces têtes qui se disputaient à lui. « Des intrigans, dit-il, s’efforçaient d’entraîner la Montagne, de s’y faire les chefs d’un parti. » — « Nommez-les ! » criaient les malheureux au comble de l’angoisse.

Il eût dû les nommer : dans l’état de terreur folle où se débattait la Convention, elle eût encore livré les têtes nommément désignées. Maximilien commit la faute de laisser planer les craintes sans rassurer la masse. « Je les nommerai quand il le faudra. » Mais il avait parlé, son œil vert fixé sur la Montagne. On s’inclina : l’article mortel fut rétabli.

Le soir même, Robespierre, qui tenait sa loi, entrait en campagne. La présence de Fouché au fauteuil des Jacobins était un scandale qui avait trop duré. Robespierre l’en fit chasser, ce soir du 23 prairial. L’autre s’éclipsa, restant désormais dans l’ombre où il tendit ses rets. Ces six semaines, — du 23 prairial au 8 thermidor, — sont affreuses. Le pays connut l’extrême Terreur : à Paris 40, 50, 60 têtes parfois par jour. « Boucherie, » dit M. Aulard. Le mot est juste.

Paris, rempli des « officieux » de Robespierre, était sous la surveillance d’une effroyable police. On craignait tout, le bruit d’une porte qui s’ouvrait, un cri, un souffle. Les salons étaient déserts, les cabarets vides : les filles ne descendaient plus au Palais-Royal où, — chose inouïe, — la vertu régna. Sous le soleil de Messidor, la ville morne attendait : Quoi ? Tous redoutaient tout, des sacristies aux lupanars.

Les députés ne venaient plus aux Tuileries, craignant d’y trouver une souricière : Prieur fut élu président par 94 voix. Les députés ne couchaient plus chez eux. Parmi ceux qui venaient, dit Thibaudeau, « des timides erraient déplace en place, d’autres n’osaient en occuper aucune, s’esquivant au moment du vote. » C’était la Convention-géante, l’Assemblée qui avait vaincu l’Europe, la Représentation nationale. Déjà Cromwell pouvait, du pavillon de Flore, apercevoir son Parlement croupion.

Il semblait vraiment régner sur un monde aplati : Barras, lors d’une suprême démarche, avait trouvé chez Duplay le général Brune, — le futur maréchal, — épluchant les légumes avec la femme du menuisier. On voit aussi chez le menuisier favori le conventionnel Curée, le futur tribun sur la proposition duquel l’Empire sera un jour proclamé et qui, à plat chez Robespierre, s’exerce à la servitude.

Mais, dans l’ombre, les « pourris » agissaient. Puisqu’ils ne pouvaient entraîner la Convention contre les comités, ils avaient entrepris de disloquer les comités. Au Comité de Salut public, Collot d’Herbois, Barère, Billaud-Varenne, Carnot, Prieur, Lindet, — à des titres divers, — se croyaient menacés, à voir l’exclusive faveur de Couthon et Saint-Just ; et le Comité de Sûreté générale presque tout entier se laissait entraîner contre Robespierre. Beaucoup, après tout, parmi les membres des comités n’avaient serré les coudes que devant l’absolue nécessité de préparer d’accord la résistance aux ennemis de la Patrie. A certains d’entre eux le salut public avait paru justifier leur dicta ture collective et leur imposer l’union. Mais les frontières étaient définitivement reconquises : la victoire de Fleurus, dont la nouvelle éclate à Paris en messidor, est le couronnement d’éclatans succès, et chaque succès, en diminuant le péril extérieur, dispose à trouver plus abusive la dictature intérieure et moins nécessaire l’union du comité. Ce « salut public » n’apparaît plus que comme un audacieux prétexte à la dictature, non plus d’un comité, mais d’une coterie et bientôt d’un homme. « Les victoires s’acharnaient contre Robespierre, » écrira Barère. Aussi Saint-Just recommandait-il à celui-ci de « les faire moins mousser à la tribune. »

Parmi les membres des comités d’autre part, certains se sentaient froissés ou menacés, les uns par l’éclatante réaction spiritualiste, les autres par l’insupportable puritanisme de la vertu. Si Carnot et Lindet goûtaient peu la nouvelle religion d’Etat, un Collot d’Herbois n’était point une rosière, et le vieux Vadier, qui parlait de ses « soixante ans de vertu, » les couronnait par d’étranges débauches. Si on faisait décidément passer la vertu des phrases de tribune aux réquisitoires de l’accusateur, la vie devenait instable.

La morgue pédante de tout l’état-major robespierriste exaspérait : le larmoyant Couthon était insupportable, moins cependant que l’arrogant Saint-Just. Le caractère pontifical de Robespierre faisait sourire ce vieux pitre de Vadier : à la Sûreté générale, il avait saisi les fils d’une affaire dont il entendait faire une machine de guerre. Une folle, Catherine Théot, se disait mère de Dieu : elle prédisait la venue d’un nouveau messie ; ce nouveau messie, ne serait-ce pas Robespierre ? Vadier croyait le démêler dans les propos extravagans de la prophétesse. Il compromit Robespierre en en faisant partout des gorges chaudes. On ricana. La force de Robespierre était d’avoir imposé à tous la gravité tragique. Mais, vraiment, on en avait assez en France. Du jour où le ridicule retrouvait ses droits, Robespierre était perdu.

Les ennemis à l’affût, Tallien, Fouché, comprirent qu’ils n’avaient qu’un parti à prendre pour se sauver : agrandir les fissures qui couraient le long du bloc jusque-là si ferme des comités. Ils s’y appliquèrent. Ils y devaient réussir. Les 8 et 9 thermidor, le bloc tombera en pièces et écrasera sous ses morceaux les missionnaires de la Vertu, les apôtres de l’Être Suprême, Maximilien en tête. En réalité, la dictature de la Vertu avait lassé. Notre joyeux pays se laisse impressionner, une beure, par les professeurs de moralité. Encore faut-il que ces professeurs ne coiffent point trop ostensiblement la tiare et ne transforment pas la tribune en chaire pontificale.

La chute de Robespierre sera très nettement marquée par une réaction de débauches. Lui le prévit et le prédit. « Les brigands triomphent ! » s’écriera-t-il le 9 thermidor. Quelques momens après, hagard, accablé, près d’être arrêté, il essaiera de faire front, il se tournera vers le Centre et tendant les bras aux gens du Marais, il criera : « Hommes purs ! hommes vertueux ! c’est à vous que j’ai recours ! » L’un de ces hommes, Durand de Maillane, lui répondra : « Scélérat, la vertu dont tu profanes le nom doit te traîner à l’échafaud. »

Que la réponse ait été le lendemain imaginée par le bon Durand ou qu’il l’ait prononcée, elle s’imposait. L’avant-veille même, 36 personnes avaient péri, dont André Chénier, le pur poète et, la veille, 55, parmi lesquelles 19 femmes ; et demain Hoche allait périr à son tour, — toujours au nom de « la vertu. » Vraiment cette « vertu » coûtait trop cher.

N’importe : soyons persuadés que Robespierre se croira sincèrement, le 9, victime de « brigands, » ainsi qu’il le dit. Jusqu’au bout, l’homme gardera une sincérité qui fait frémir. Au service d’un cœur de marbre et d’un esprit étroit, telle sincérité équivaut à la pire férocité. En tous cas, elle avait abouti au plus effroyable des régimes. Au plus étonnant aussi : des mois durant, la France aura connu et subi le système qu’elle détestera toujours comme le pire des despotismes : une théocratie fondée sur la morale. Le verbe de Rousseau aura donné naissance à la dictature de Calvin doublée de celle de Torquemada. « C’est ainsi, écrivait Saint-Just à Robespierre, que se gouverne un État libre. »

Voir de plus:

Fête de l’Être suprême au Champ de Mars le 20 prairial an II (8 juin 1794)
Thomas Charles Naudet
(1778 – 1810)
Musée Carnavalet – Histoire de Paris
1793
Aquarelle, gouache et pastel sur traits de plume et mine de plomb
Hauteur: 46,8 cm Longueur: 73 cm

En avril 1794, après l’élimination des Hébertistes, après les mesures prises à l’encontre des sans-culottes (épuration de la Commune de Paris, démantèlement des sections, etc.), le comité de Salut Public se trouvait privé d’un soutien populaire dont il avait craint les excès. La Révolution était « glacée », selon l’expression de Saint-Just. Quelques gages donnés à la bourgeoisie dans le domaine économique ne pouvaient suffire à élargir les bases sociales du régime. C’est pour dépasser les divergences idéologiques et les oppositions de classes par le recours à un consensus d’ordre moral et même métaphysique, que, dans le discours du 18 floréal an II, au cours d’une véritable profession de foi déiste, très imprégnée des idées de Rousseau, Robespierre réclama l’instauration d’une religion de l’Être Suprême. La célébration du nouveau culte fut admise par la Convention au nombre des fêtes nationales et décadaires. Cette religion de substitution devait théoriquement pallier les effets de la déchristianisation croissante, ceux qu’entraînait la disparition du principe d’ordre sous-tendu par le catholicisme. Fondée en nouvelle théologie, la Vertu devient alors garante de la pratique politique puisque, selon Robespierre, « le fondement unique de la société civile, c’est la morale » et que « l’idée de l’Être suprême et de l’immortalité de l’âme est un rappel continu à la justice : elle est donc sociale et républicaine » (Rapport du 18 floréal).

C’est David, grand ordonnateur des fêtes révolutionnaires depuis 1791, qui fut chargé de l’organisation de la cérémonie. Commencée aux Tuileries, où Robespierre mit le feu à un groupe de l’Athéisme, père de tous les vices, pour mettre au jour l’effigie de la Sagesse, la fête atteignit son terme au Champ de la Réunion (Champ de Mars). Elle devait sanctionner la fin de la Révolution dans l’espace même où avaient eu lieu les fêtes de la Fédération (14 juillet 1790) et de l’Unité (10 août 1793) ainsi que la destruction solennelle des emblèmes féodaux, le 14 juillet 1792.

Le but de la procession était un rocher artificiel au sommet duquel était planté un arbre de la Liberté. Cette montagne, métaphore politique, était amplement symbolique puisqu’elle relevait d’une conception moralisée de la nature, connotant l’idée de puissance et celle d’une religion naturelle fondée sur la théologie « panthéiste » de l’Émile. Le thème de la montagne avait déjà été exploité au cours des fêtes révolutionnaires : au camp fédératif de Lyon (30 mai 1790), aux Invalides, lors de la fête de l’Unité (10 août 1793) et durant les cérémonies accompagnant la fête de la Liberté et de la Raison à Notre-Dame de Paris (20 brumaire an II) et à Saint-André de Bordeaux (20 frimaire an II). Au Champ de Mars, la montagne était accompagnée d’une colonne dont seul le sommet apparaît dans l’aquarelle de Naudet ; elle supportait une statue du peuple français sous les traits d’Hercule. La montagne était suffisamment élevée pour accueillir les membres de la Convention, les musiciens et une foule de participants qui interprétèrent un hymne à l’Etre suprême sur une musique de Gossec et des paroles de Marie-Joseph Chénier, et jurèrent de ne déposer les armes qu’après avoir triomphé des ennemis de la République. À droite, le char de Cérès, tiré par des bœufs, est, avec l’Hercule et le trépied fumant, la référence obligée à une Antiquité mythique dont les vertus supposées étaient érigées en modèles. À la fin de la cérémonie, cependant, apparurent les premières marques déclarées d’hostilité envers Robespierre, dont le 9 thermidor allait voir la chute, moins de deux mois plus tard.

Sous un ciel dont le bleu est nuancé de nuages légers, dans un registre réduit de couleurs pâles, Naudet a rendu, plus que la gravité d’une liturgie solennelle, l’enthousiasme d’une foule, rivalisant de verve avec Swebach (vr no 147). Il a isolé le motif de la montagne, en l’utilisant comme une sorte de dispositif scénographique et en a fait le centre de sa composition, à l’encontre, par exemple, d’un De Machy qui, dans son tableau du musée Carnavalet, déploie une vision panoramique du Champ de Mars, avec la colonnade circulaire du temple de l’Immortalité (vestige, il est vrai, d’une fête antérieure, celle de l’Unité).

La Fête de l’Etre suprême, 20 prairial an II (8 juin 1794)
Mémoire de l’artificier Ruggieri relatif à la Fête de l’Etre suprême, 20 prairial an II.

Voir encore:

Vue du jardin national et des décorations, le jour de la fête célébrée en l’honneur de l’être suprême
Fête de l’Etre suprême au Champ de Mars (20 prairial an II – 8 juin 1794)

Auteur : Pierre-Antoine DEMACHY (1723-1807)
Date de création : 1794
Date représentée : 8 juin 1794
Dimensions : Hauteur 53.5 cm – Largeur 88.5 cm
Technique et autres indications : Huile sur toile
Lieu de Conservation : Musée Carnavalet (Paris) ; site web

Contexte historique
L’alliance de la Vertu et de la Terreur

A l’été 1793, la Révolution française traverse une période sombre : le pays est durement touché par une crise économique et des troubles sociaux auxquels s’ajoutent une guerre civile (insurrection vendéenne et révolte fédéraliste) et une série de défaites militaires aux frontières. Or l’entrée de Robespierre, fervent jacobin, au Comité de salut public le 27 juillet 1793 marque un tournant : elle permet au gouvernement révolutionnaire d’opérer un redressement de la situation sur tous les fronts, tandis qu’elle entraîne simultanément une radicalisation de la Révolution. Robespierre, qui aspire à l’unité et à la régénération du peuple, s’efforce d’éliminer physiquement tous les ennemis de la Révolution. A ce renforcement de la Terreur, il ajoute l’instauration d’une religion d’Etat en mai 1794 : le culte de l’Etre suprême, en l’honneur duquel il organise des cérémonies fastueuses le 8 juin suivant.

Analyse de l’image
La fête de l’Etre suprême

Cette huile sur toile de Pierre-Antoine Demachy (1723-1807), peintre d’histoire et excellent dessinateur, livre un témoignage particulièrement intéressant sur le déroulement de la fête de l’Etre suprême au Champ-de-Mars, à Paris. Une vue panoramique du Champ-de-Mars lui a permis de restituer l’ampleur et la somptuosité de la célébration : au premier plan figure le peuple, dont les gestes, minutieusement dépeints, laissent transparaître l’allégresse que suscite la vue, au deuxième plan, d’une gigantesque procession formée par les représentants du peuple suivis des soldats révolutionnaires et de la garde républicaine. Au centre, sur un char que tirent quatre taureaux, trône l’allégorie des instruments des arts et des métiers et des productions du territoire français. Ce cortège s’achemine vers une sorte de rocher artificiel – la « montagne sacrée » par excellence – au sommet duquel s’élèvent l’arbre de la Liberté, symbole de l’unité et de l’adhésion collective à la Révolution, et une colonne antique surmontée d’une statue qui brandit un flambeau. En arrière-plan, à gauche, l’architecture massive de l’Ecole militaire évoque le cadre urbain dans lequel s’insère cette fête aux allures champêtres et mythologiques. Ainsi, de cette composition minutieuse et savamment élaborée se dégage une impression de grandeur, mais aussi de froideur qui correspond bien à l’esprit de la cérémonie, dont le faste hautain et le rituel à l’antique, strictement pensé dans ses moindres détails, étaient surtout destinés à inspirer la stupeur et à frapper l’imagination du peuple, plus spectateur qu’acteur.
Interprétation
Les cultes révolutionnaires de l’an II

Fervent catholique, Robespierre s’opposait fermement à l’accélération du processus de déchristianisation entamé en septembre 1792. Pour lui, le vide laissé par la disparition du catholicisme risquait de plus de désorienter le peuple, accoutumé à ses dogmes et à ses rites. C’est pourquoi il s’efforça de créer une religion officielle, conforme aux idéaux des Lumières et, en particulier, aux théories rousseauistes, qui postulaient l’existence d’une morale naturelle et universelle et d’une divinité impersonnelle, l’Etre suprême, créateur de l’Univers. Dépourvue de prêtres et de sanctuaires, cette nouvelle religion déiste et patriotique n’en revêtait pas moins toutes les apparences d’un culte. La fête du 8 juin 1794 rencontra ainsi un certain succès en France. Elle ne fut que le couronnement d’une série de tentatives menées par les dirigeants de l’an II pour instaurer un culte révolutionnaire. Pour la plupart avortées, ces tentatives témoignent de la complexité des liens qui unissaient la sphère politique et la sphère religieuse, ainsi que de l’impossibilité d’éradiquer tout sentiment religieux. Elles constituèrent également le point de départ d’une religion civique dont les développements ont marqué l’histoire de la République.
Auteur : Charlotte DENOËL
– See more at: http://www.histoire-image.org/site/oeuvre/analyse.php?i=379#sthash.oDNzVfcC.dpuf
Titre : Mémoire de l’artificier Ruggieri relatif à la Fête de l’Etre suprême, 20 prairial an II.

Date de création : 1794
Date représentée : 8 juin 1794
Dimensions : Hauteur 32.5 cm – Largeur 21.5 cm
Technique et autres indications : manuscrit ; encre brune ; encre de couleur
Lieu de Conservation : Centre historique des Archives nationales (Paris) ; site web
Contact copyright : CARAN – service de reprographie, 60 rue des Francs-Bourgeois, 75141 Paris cedex 03 ; site web
Référence de l’image : F/4/2090

Contexte historique
Pourfendre l’athéisme à l’aide d’un simulacre pyrotechnique

La fête de l’Etre suprême du 20 prairial an II (8 juin 1794), voulue par Robespierre et orchestrée par J.-L. David, est composée de deux parties. Aux Tuileries, le peuple doit d’abord rejeter l’athéisme puis, au Champ-de-Mars, reconnaître l’Etre suprême et célébrer son adhésion à la Révolution (Voir « La Fête de l’Etre suprême au Champ-de-Mars » de P. A. Demachy ).

Dans l’esprit de Robespierre, la « déchristianisation » entreprise à partir de brumaire an II (novembre 1793) ne doit conduire ni à l’athéisme ni à la laïcité. La reconnaissance du « Grand Etre », auteur de l’Univers, est commune à Voltaire et à Rousseau, elle cimentera la société nouvelle. Le 18 floréal (7 mai), Robespierre fait prendre par la Convention le décret par lequel « le peuple français reconnaît l’Etre suprême et l’immortalité de l’âme » et lui fait approuver le projet de déroulement de la fête de l’Etre suprême mis au point par David pour le 20 prairial. Aux Tuileries, l’Incorruptible prononce deux discours pour stigmatiser l’athéisme, rendre grâce à l’Etre suprême et élever la conscience publique.

On fait appel à l’artificier Ruggieri[1], dont l’activité s’est prolongée jusqu’à notre époque, pour mettre en scène la défaite de l’athéisme. Lorsque débute la Révolution, Petrone Ruggieri exploite un Jardin Ruggieri au faubourg Montmartre, où sont mises en scène des pantomimes pyrotechniques, tous les dimanches et jours de fête à partir du mois de mai. La République, pauvre et guerrière, n’est guère portée sur cet art de substitution dont la monarchie a usé de façon dispendieuse. Elle compose de façon exceptionnelle avec les goûts du temps pour dénoncer le risque de l’athéisme, et non pour organiser un spectacle d’art pyrotechnique.

Analyse des images
Frapper les esprits

David a prévu un effet bref mais spectaculaire : « Le président s’approche tenant entre ses mains un flambeau, le groupe s’embrase, il rentre dans le néant avec la même rapidité que les conspirateurs qu’a frappés le glaive de la loi. »

Daté du 20 fructidor an II (6 septembre 1794), le mémoire de l’artificier Ruggieri, qui s’intitule, à cette occasion, « artificier de la République française une et indivisible », révèle que la statue de l’Athéisme à laquelle Robespierre, habillé en bleu céleste, met le feu a reçu un traitement spécial afin de brûler de façon fulgurante. Il détaille la composition de la pâte inflammable et mentionne aussi la main-d’œuvre « pour avoir aidé au sculpteur à poser la draperie ». L’Athéisme doit aussi consumer les figures qui lui servent de socle : l’Ambition, l’Egoïsme, la Discorde et la Fausse Simplicité. David a prévu qu’elles portent toutes sur le front la mention « seul espoir de l’étranger ». Ces maux fragilisent la patrie en guerre contre les souverains d’Europe coalisés, et le peuple doit en prendre conscience.

L’estampe, éditée par Jacques-Simon Chéreau[2], montre la Sagesse surgissant alors du brasier. Selon David, elle présentera « un front calme et serein », – mais peut-être un peu noirci par la fumée ! – aux députés de la Convention massés sur la tribune. Derrière la Sagesse, on aperçoit les restes de la statue de l’Athéisme et le char de l’allégorie des instruments des arts et des métiers et des productions du territoire français qui sera tiré par quatre taureaux jusqu’au Champ-de-Mars, « emblèmes des jouissances simples de la nature » que « le peuple laborieux et sensible » doit préférer aux « vils trésors de ses lâches ennemis ». Les drapeaux déploient les trois couleurs dans leur disposition originelle[3], qui était encore horizontale et non verticale comme de nos jours.

Interprétation
Promouvoir la vertu civique

Il est surprenant de voir ici l’Incorruptible se prêter à une substitution pyrotechnique organisée avec le concours d’un artificier professionnel pour frapper les esprits ! Le but de Robespierre est d’opérer une pédagogie de masse, fondée sur les conceptions de Rousseau selon lesquelles une émotion bouleversante peut élever les consciences.

L’image, le projet et les documents de cette fête montrent que Robespierre a tenté de propager la morale « naturelle », tout aussi chère à Rousseau que la Raison. Mais cette morale qui serait fondée sur la bonté de l’homme dans l’état de nature nécessite de susciter des élans vers les valeurs simples et naturelles. Robespierre espère voir se répandre la vertu civique grâce à des cérémonies de ce type, qui cherchent à toucher collectivement la sensibilité des participants. David prévoit que le programme suscitera de nombreux moments d’émotion et des larmes populaires, mais aux participants qui viennent de traverser la Terreur, cette fête paraît sans doute grandiose mais étrangement abstraite.

Quelques jours plus tard, la victoire de Fleurus le 8 messidor (26 juin 1794) contre les Autrichiens desserrera l’étau de la coalition et provoquera, sur le plan intérieur, le rejet de la Terreur le mois suivant. Mais, bien après le 9 Thermidor, le Directoire maintiendra longtemps ces cultes civiques à l’Etre suprême.

Auteur : Luce-Marie ALBIGÈS
Notes
1. retour
L’ancêtre de la maison Ruggieri,  » artificier de Bologne « , s’installe à Paris en 1743 pour contribuer par ses  » ingénieuses inventions  » aux spectacles de la Comédie-Italienne. Ses descendants, artificiers du roi, organisent de nombreux spectacles sous l’Ancien Régime.

2. retour
Jacques-Simon Chéreau édite des estampes Aux Deux Colonnes, au 257 de la rue Saint-Jacques – devenue sur cette gravure Rue Jacques, du fait de la déchristianisation –, jusque sous l’Empire. Il est le petit-fils de Jacques Chéreau et le fils de Jacques-Simon Chéreau.

3. retour
Les trois couleurs seront disposées verticalement pour éviter la confusion avec les Pays-Bas.
Bibliographie
Patrick BRACCO,, Ruggieri, 250 ans de feux d’artifice, Paris, Denoël, 1988.
Jules DAVID, Le Peintre Louis David,1748-1825, tome I « Souvenirs et documents inédits », Paris, 1880.
Maxime Préaud, Pierre Casselle, Marianne Grivel et Corinne Le Bitouzé, Dictionnaire des éditeurs d’estampes à Paris sous l’Ancien Régime, Paris, Promodis, 1987.

Voir encore:

Robespierre’s one-day religion
Louis Pauwels

Marilyn Kay Dennis

September 15, 2010

Maximilien Robespierre, known as l’Incorruptible, is at the summit of his glory.  Rivers of blood, flowing from the guillotines of France, have washed away the Girondins and anyone who had pactised with them; the Jacobins, even though they were close to him;  certain Montagnards and, curiously, some of his friends who had too openly supported the theses of the atheists…

In this 1794 Spring, all the great names which had embodied, one after the other, the revolutionary ideals have disappeared in the torment:  Verniaud, Brissot and twenty-one of their friends;  Petion whom he called his brother and Roland, known as le Vertueux;  his wife, the fascinating Madame Roland, Condorcet, the great scholar, President of the Convention, whom he had obliged to commit suicide.

The Corrompus, the Indulgents and, for good measure, the Exageres;  Hebert and his band of lynchers;  the superb Danton and all his companions;  Camille Desmoulins, his former fellow-disciple at Louis-le-Grand, whose best man he had been at his wedding, had all been cut in two.

So great is his power now, that to have any opinion at all is a crime of lese-Revolution.  Since obtaining the head of Louis XVI, he seems to be invested with a sort of absolute power, a divine right.

Without a debate, with no interrogation, no discussion and without anyone to defend him, he had wanted to throw the King into the common grave.  When, after having voted for death, the Convention came to its senses, terrified at what it had just decided, he demanded an immediate execution.  To succeed in this, he had the public tribunals of the Assembly invaded by his friends the sans-culottes.  The redoubtable Commune de Paris lays seige to the King’s prison, the armed sections, the clubs who are devoted to him, get ready for a fight…

Of course, no-one likes him.  There are those who hate him because he has made them vile through the fear that he inspires.  There are those who admire him fearfully, like the Ancients who bowed down before the omnipotent demiurge.  There is the People whom he loves more than he understands, and who idolises him for the absolute rigour of his life.  But without really liking him.  When he, himself, will follow the tragic path of the King, in a cart, an immense cry of joy will rise from the little people of Paris.

He has always been alone, since childhood, and the sceptre of death that he brandishes always higher, isolates him more every day.  Two men only can still enter as they like the door of the living god.  Two exterminating angels.  The handsome Saint-Just, whose principles sharpen every day the blade of the guillotine, and the frightful Couthon, the paraplegic, the blue shadow of the machine, when a gendarme carries him to the tribunal to designate the next victims…

It is April 1794 and, in Paris, it is more oppressing than in the heart of Summer.  Everyone is waiting to see how the High Priest is going to organize the next part of the sacrifice.  For a whole month, a great silence settles on Paris, troubled only by the cries of the executed.  The Convention, the clubs, the army, the Commune and even the revolutionary tribunal, remain quiet…

At last, on 6 May, l’Incorruptible climbs up to the tribunal.  He is wearing his sacerdotal clothes, a sky blue riding-coat and white stockings.  In the deathly silence which greets all of his appearances now, he straightens up and stares for a long time without speaking at the faces of several Deputies.  In particular, that of Fouche, who feels his stony heart starting to liquefy…

Then, he begins in a strange voice, both exalted and monochord…  He starts by establishing that the people of France are at the height of happiness.

“It is in prosperity that the people must meditate to listen to the voice of wisdom…”
Prosperity:  that must be the explosive inflation, with its cortege of misery.  As for wisdom:  that must be the definitive one via the guillotine, with twenty-four heads the day before, and twenty-six today.

Robespierre is more nervous than usual.  His pale, graceless face is agitated with tics.  His eyes with their moist gaze blink frequently while his fingers drum on the edge of the tribunal.

Now, his voice swells, and he climbs over the cadavers, toward the high metaphysical regions, where the Assembly has trouble following him, at first.  By degrees, he asks the Deputies to recognize the existence of a

“Supreme Being and immortality as the directing power of the Universe”.
Then to the stupefaction of some, and the enthusiasm of others, he wants to give his vibrant profession of faith the form of a decree, with immediate effect.

His speech, which at the end rises in a passionate plea for a regenerated Humanity, is welcomed by unending applause.  Couthon spurs his gendarme mount and proclaims that this great piece of literature must be displayed throughout the whole country.  That it should be translated into all languages, too, and diffused throughout the whole universe.

The fabulous decree which institutes in France a new religion and proposes a festival in the style of the celebrations of Antiquity, is voted with enthusiasm and without any discussion.  In the corridors, when the euphoria has died down, the least terrorised start to murmur that, when they had voted the King’s death, they thought that they had also voted that of God.

The French people welcome back a divinity.  For months, the churches had been profaned.  Mountain decors peopled with mythological characters symbolising Reason had been built in them.  In a lot of places, prostitutes, “living marbles of public flesh” had draped themselves, completely naked, on the altars.  God was now being re-installed under the name of Supreme Being.

In Paris, it is not yet known that this Being will soon take on the profile of l’Incorruptible.  But perhaps this will eclipse in a brilliant manner the red reflects of the guillotine, of which everybody is secretly very tired.

Robespierre’s one-day religion – part 2
Louis Pauwels

Marilyn Kay Dennis
September 16, 2010

To bring God back to Earth, Robespierre engages the most gifted director, the painter David, who will soon plant the scene of other festivities, this time imperial…

Robespierre, himself, organizes the music for the ceremonies, and closely oversees the elaboration of the texts, given into the care of Marie-Joseph de Chenier, brother of the great poet, who had only two more months to live.

The gigantic works are hastily started.  On the terrace of the Tuileries Palace, a colossal amphitheatre, whose floor completely covers the ornamental lake, begins to grow.  Cyclopean statues rise above the formal French gardens, which have become the Jardin national.  They symbolise Atheism, Ambition, Discord, Egoism, and will explode on the day of the ceremony…  It is on 20 prairial, year II (8 June, 1794) that it will take place.  Robespierre has chosen the Sunday which, according to the former Roman Catholic rites, was Pentecost.

On the Champs-de-Mars, the Holy Mountain is nearly finished.  The People’s representatives will take place on it, along with the choirs, the orchestras and the banner-bearers.  On its summit, a column fifty feet high overlooks the entrance to a deep cave, lit by giant candelabra.  A river seeps from it, snaking between Etruscan tombs in the shade of an oak tree, and an antique altar, a pyramid, a sarcophage and a temple with twenty columns, complete this mythology.  It takes only a month for a swarm of ditch-diggers, masons, carpenters and artists of all kinds, to finish this unusual church.

A map with all the details of the organization, which had to be strictly respected, was printed and distributed to the people of Paris.  At the crossroads, the musicians who had composed the hymns, Gossec, Mehul and Cherubini, rehearsed and taught their chants to the assembled crowds.

Experts in solemn occasions, the Italians have come to help, and the great firework master of ceremonies, Ruggieri, has installed the mines which are to reduce to ashes the statues which symbolise the major vices of the old times, atheism in particular.  Hardly any notice is taken, amongst all the hammering and sawing, of the rumbling of the carts which, on the other side of the Seine, are carrying hundreds of people to the guillotine.

And here, at last, is the astonishing day of 8 June 1794.  Starting at five o’clock in the morning, the sound of pikes striking the pavement, the rattling of sabres, and the noise of a great troop marching, out-of-step and almost in silence, for a lot of these men do not have shoes, is to be heard.  Robespierre sees, parading under his windows, in columns of twelve, some of the forty-eight Sections of the People who are hurrying towards the meeting places, followed by the Parisians who, already the day before, had discovered the altars of the Supreme Being.

For once, l’Incorruptible allows himself a bit of coquetry.  In this early morning, he adjusts with care the uniform, whose view turns suspects icy cold:  the sky blue jacket, the immaculate stockings, in the pre-Revolution fashion.

At nine o’clock, Paris is in place right down to the last man.  It is not a good idea to be absent from the Grand-Mass in the parish of the terrifying curate who walks in front of his parishioners, carrying a sheaf of wheat ears.

On the Tuileries terrace, the Conventionnels, dressed in dark blue, are already assembled in the amphitheatre.  On their hats, they wear tricoloured feathers, and they, too, brandish wheat ears, mixed with artificial cornflowers and poppies.  The young men arrange themselves in a square around their Section flag, and mothers, who carry bouquets of roses, hold the hand of their daughters dressed in white tunics.

When l’Incorruptible appears, the orchestras start playing their symphonies accompanied by the rolling of drums.  When he arrives at the highest part of the theatre, a salvo of artillery explodes.  Pale, extatic, his body stiff, Robespierre takes a deep breath.

“At last it has arrived, the day forever fortunate that the People consecrate to the Supreme Being…”
His speech, which goes unheard by many, for his voice doesn’t carry well, is magnificent with lyricism and poetic elevation.  The whole time that he takes to descend to the wooden floor over the lake, five hundred thousand Parisians give him an ovation.  Then they see the statue of Atheism go up in flames, replaced by that of Wisdom.  Unfortunately, this papier-mache allegory also has a singed forehead, and its head is crooked.  When Robespierre regains his place, the Conventionnels, sure of making people laugh, cry out:

“Citizen, your wisdom has been obscured!”
Around him, people roar with laughter.  And suddenly, for the High Priest of the new cult, the day darkens, heavy with fateful signs.  Now, an immense procession forms which moves towards the Champ-de-Mars, preceded by cavalry and music squadrons

The Convention surrounds the Liberty float which disappears under an enormous tricoloured banner carried by Childhood decorated with violets.  Virility follows, decorated with oak leaves, beside Adolescence, distinguished by myrtle.  Old Age, decorated with grape-bearing vines, closes the procession.  Behind them, comes the float of the blind, singing hymns to the divinity.

Within the procession, the Deputies look at their little bouquet and find themselves ridiculous.  Luckily, Robespierre walks far up front, which allows the Conventionnels to relax.  In spite of the music, the salvos, the cheering and the singing, he hears behind him cries of “dictator” and “charlatan”.  A woman screams:

“You are a god, Robespierre!”
A Deputy yells to her:

“Cry “Vive la Republique” rather, madwoman!”
In spite of the heat, the face of the Incorruptible is deadly pale.  He thought that today he would feel the spirit of the Supreme Being, but he feels hate around him instead.  He can hear the Deputies openly insulting himself and his God…

Robespierre’s one-day religion – part 3
Louis Pauwels

Marilyn Kay Dennis
September 17, 2010

Very, very slowly, the procession arrives at the foot of the Holy Mountain.  The Conventionnels climb it, and each finds his place on its flanks.  They all have to play their part in front of this long, immense, double column, with men on one side and women on the other.  The crucial moment has arrived.  When the Symphonie au pere de l’Univers erupts, the young girls throw their flowers, the mothers hold their babies up toward Robespierre, the sons unsheath their swords, which they put into their fathers’ hands, swearing only to use them for victory.

Occupied by the armies of Europe outside, chopped down by the butchers of the revolutionary tribunal on the inside, the capital escapes for the first time in months from the baseness of this time of proscriptions…  A lot of people cry and embrace each other in the fading light.

Spread out over the square, whose black soil has not yet finished absorbing the blood of its victims, the crowd feasts and sings.  It will take the whole night to break up…  In the pompous decor delivered up to relic and souvenir hunters, the Deputies can be heard to grumble:

“It’s not enough for him to be the master…  This fellow wants to be a god, as well!”
At nightfall, l’Incorruptible returns alone to the home of the Duplays who shelter him, from where he had left that morning, so full of happy exaltation.  His hosts are very simple people.  When he arrives in the little lodgement, they welcome him with cries of joy and congratulate him on this immense, this indescribable triumph.  Calm, impenetrable, Robespierre tells them in a low voice:

“You will not be seeing me for much longer, my friends…”
***

From 8 June, the day of the Festival of the Supreme Being, Robespierre will have fifty more days to live.  As well as a premonition, it was an act of lucidity that he made with this prediction.  He knew, that day, that he was totally misunderstood by the Conventionnels.

For Robespierre, the sense and the aim of this festival were to replace the pagan, dry and materialistic cult of Reason by a religion which restored transcendance, a God, without Whom, no man worthy of the name, could live…

***

Right from the beginning of the Revolution, Robespierre had tried to stop the dechristianisation of France.  As a faithful disciple of Rousseau, whom he qualified as a “divine man”, he was sure that Man is a “religious animal”, incapable of durably banishing his spiritual needs.  He shared the feeling of the curate of Boissis-la-Bertrand who was willing to renounce his “mummeries”, that is to say, all formal aspects of the cult, but not his religion.  It is in this sense that Michelet was able to say of Robespierre:

“He had a priest’s temperament”.
***

The 8 June festival gives a fairly precise idea of the religion that Robespierre wanted, but did not have the time to develop.  Four days after the festival, perhaps disappointed by the attitude of the Conventionnels, he disappeared, only reappearing at the Convention one month later.  This was enough time for Fouche, Barras and his friends, to dig the hole into which he would fall on 9 Thermidor.  Stefan Zweig writes of Robespierre:

“You can’t pardon a man who has caused you so much fear.”
The 10 Thermidor, he is guillotined with his brother, Saint-Just, Couthon and seventeen of his friends…

***

What originally caused Robespierre’s downfall was the Deputies’ certainty that he wanted to install a new religion of which he would be the High Priest, and this enormous misunderstanding would be fatal to him.  It was not the god of the christian religion that he wanted to install, of course.  He most certainly wanted to radically end the christian institutions and abolish two thousand years of “perverted” christianism, to return to the spirit and the liturgy of the Roman Republic, the religion of Antiquity.  His ideal not only had the sense of political revolution, but also that of a fundamental cultural revolution.

This was his great dream.  He succeeded in giving it body for a few hours by getting five hundred thousand French people to live a day in the fashion of Antiquity.

It is for this reason that he was accused on 9 Thermidor of taking himself for a divinity, and was made to look ridiculous.  He would not have the time to correct this.  And everyone knows that, in France, you can die from being ridiculous…

***

Voir enfin:

La messe rouge

… David, cependant, ne revint pas le lendemain ni les jours suivants, absorbé qu’il était par les préparatifs de la fête gigantesque ordonnée par Robespierre désormais au faîte de la puissance. Celui-ci, considérant que ses ennemis étaient abattus, hormis un seul [xl], a décidé d’en remercier quelqu’un de plus crédible que la déesse Raison : un Etre suprême qui ne peut pas ne pas exister mais auquel cependant il refuse le nom de Dieu. Et depuis que le 7 mai, à la Convention stupéfaite, il a déclaré vouloir rendre hommage à cette entité suprême qui a fait de lui son élu, Louis David dessine, prépare, trace des plans pour l’immense manifestation qui aura lieu, comme par hasard, le 20 prairial, autrement dit le dimanche de la Pentecôte. Dans l’espoir peut-être que le Saint-Esprit s’en mêlerait…

 Ces deux affaires simultanées firent un bruit énorme : on conclut à ce que, par deux fois le même jour, on avait voulu assassiner l’Incorruptible! La fameuse conspiration prenait corps, visages, et Robespierre n’en attacha que plus de soin à la préparation de la cérémonie dont il serait l’unique héros, lui, le grand prêtre de l’Être suprême. Ensuite, on offrirait au peuple le spectacle de la punition exemplaire des membres de cette infâme conspiration : les amis de Batz. D’ici là, on réussirait peut-être à mettre la main sur le baron fantôme.

      Quatre jours avant la fête, le 16 prairial (4 juin) Robespierre fut élu président de la Convention à l’unanimité mais – et ce mais pèserait d’un certain poids dans la suite des événements – quarante-huit heures plus tard, le citoyen Fouché devenait président des Jacobins. Et Fouché haïssait Robespierre…

      En dépit des objurgations de Julie, de Talma et de David qui voudrait qu’elle vienne contempler son ouvre, Laura a refusé farouchement de se rendre à la fête. Ses amis américains n’y vont pas et, de toute façon, elle a horreur de la foule en général et celle qui va se rassembler lui ferait plutôt peur : elle sait trop de quoi elle est capable.

      – Allez-y sans moi, leur dit-elle. Vous me raconterez.

      En revanche, elle a volontiers accordé à Jaouen la permission de s’y rendre : avec lui, elle est sûre d’avoir une relation fidèle, dépourvue de toute autosatisfaction comme de louange obligatoire. Mais, en vérité, Robespierre, David, et les milliers d’ouvriers qui, durant un mois, ont travaillé comme des esclaves construisant des pyramides ont bien fait les choses : un immense cortège doit conduire le char de la Liberté des Tuileries, où se fait le rassemblement, au Champ-de-Mars choisi pour le plus important de la cérémonie. David a donné libre cours à son goût du gigantesque. Sur la terrasse des Tuileries, il a bâti un amphithéâtre dont le plancher recouvre jusqu’au grand bassin. Autour sont plantées d’immenses statues de l’Athéisme (?), de l’Ambition, de la Discorde et de l’Égoïsme que la magie des frères Ruggieri, les maîtres artificiers, fera sauter plus tard.

      A neuf heures du matin, l’amphithéâtre est plein et la foule s’écrase autour. Il est garni de tous les députés de la Convention vêtus de bleu sombre avec chapeaux empanachés de tricolore et portant un petit bouquet d’épis de blé mêlés de bleuets et de coquelicots artificiels. Les jeunes gens forment des carrés autour du drapeau de leur section, cependant que les mères nanties de bouquets de rosés, tiennent par la main leurs filles en tuniques blanches. Et puis voici Robespierre !

      Précédé de roulements de tambour et salué par les éclats des orchestres, il apparaît soudain tout en haut de l’amphithéâtre, silhouette grêle sanglée dans un frac de soie bleu azur avec culotte et bas blancs, coiffé de son habituelle perruque à catogan : presque un élégant de l’Ancien Régime. Il tient dans les bras une gerbe de blé, et c’est dans cet appareil qu’il entame un discours :  » II est enfin arrivé le jour fortuné que le peuple consacre à l’Être suprême…  » Un discours que tous n’entendront pas, car il a toujours eu la voix un peu faible. Puis il se met en marche vers le Champ-de-Mars tandis que flambent les statues que remplace aussitôt celle de la Sagesse. Un peu trop tôt, d’ailleurs, car elle sent le brûlé et manque de perdre la tête. Ce qui fait rire franchement les conventionnels visiblement agacés par une cérémonie qu’ils jugent ridicule.

      Sur le chemin de celui qui se veut le grand prêtre d’un culte nouveau, éclatent les acclamations, les vivats, les chants mais, de temps en temps tout de même son oreille – qu’il a fine s’il ne voit pas très clair -perçoit des cris moins aimables :  » Dictateur!  » ou  » Charlatan! « . Et, sous l’impact de la colère, il devient encore plus pâle que d’habitude. Enfin, voici le Champ-de-Mars, et là, David s’est surpassé. S’il n’a pas encore réussi à construire une montagne sur le Pont-Neuf avec les pierres de Notre-Dame, il en a élevé une ici : la  » Sainte-Montagne  » où prendront place les représentants du peuple, les choeurs, les orchestres et les porte-drapeaux

      Lorsque la Convention eut pris place au sommet de la montagne, un choeur de deux mille cinq cents voix entonna un hymne au Père de l’Univers composé par Marie-Joseph Chénier tandis que les jeunes filles jetaient des fleurs sur la foule répandue tout autour, que les mères élevaient leurs enfants au-dessus de leurs têtes et que les jeunes hommes brandissaient des sabres en jurant de s’en servir jusqu’à la victoire. Après quoi, bien sûr, les assistants se livrèrent à une sorte d’énorme pique-nique copieusement arrosé : il faisait si chaud !

      Parmi les députés, deux hommes avaient suivi le délirant événement avec des yeux froids, un sourire glacé. L’un d’eux dit :

      – Ce n’est pas assez d’être le maître, ce bougre-là voudrait aussi être un dieu?

      – Il faudrait peut-être songer à y mettre un frein?

      L’un s’appelait Barras et l’autre Fouché…

      Robespierre lui-même était-il satisfait? Plein d’exaltation le matin en quittant la maison Duplay, il y revint le soir, toujours calme, toujours impénétrable mais à cette seconde famille qu’il s’était donnée et qui le félicitait en pleurant de joie, il déclara :

      – Vous ne me verrez plus longtemps…

      Ils pensèrent qu’il était fatigué, mais lui songeait déjà à compléter la cérémonie de ce jour en offrant à sa nouvelle divinité un sacrifice propitiatoire susceptible de frapper de terreur ceux qui devaient comploter sa ruine. D’abord, il fallait accorder une grâce aux habitants de sa rue dont certains ne cachaient pas leur écoeurement de voir passer jour après jour, sous leurs fenêtres, les sinistres charrettes de la mort dans lesquelles, parfois, ils reconnaissaient des amis. Une semaine plus tard, le bourreau Sanson démontait la guillotine pour la transporter au bout du faubourg Saint-Antoine, sur la vaste place du Trône-renversé [xlii]. On avait d’abord pensé à la Bastille, mais les habitants s’y opposèrent fermement.

 …

xl

C’est à cette époque qu’il note :  » Les jours qui viennent de luire sont gros des destinées de l’Univers : les deux génies qui s’en disputaient l’empire sont en présence… A la tête de la faction criminelle qui croit toucher au moment de se baigner dans le sang des fidèles représentants du peuple est le baron de Batz… « 

[xli]. Sur son faîte, une colonne de cinquante pieds surveille l’entrée d’une grotte profonde éclairée par des candélabres géants. Une rivière en sourd qui serpente entre des tombeaux étrusques ombragés d’un chêne. Un autel antique, une pyramide, un sarcophage et un temple soutenu de vingt colonnes, complètent cette mythologie.

xli

Louis Pauwels,  » Robespierre ou la religion qui dura un jour  » dans Histoires magiques de l’histoire de France, t. II.
xlii


Erotisme: Ce qui reste quand la religion a disparu (Sex sells: From barihunks to Salomes, opera fights declining sales and rising costs with cheesecake, beefcake and a pinch of course of sacrilege)

17 mai, 2015
https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Privat-Livemont-Absinthe_Robette-1896.jpg
https://blacklightcandelabra.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/ad-schraderap1921.jpg?w=450&h=673
J'enlève le bas (Myriam, 1981)
https://i0.wp.com/www.francetvinfo.fr/image/7550nsx4f-cb38/1000/562/6165259.jpg
https://scontent-cdg.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xat1/v/t1.0-9/10610488_10200582303597104_4379319021987895828_n.jpg?oh=146b64a2fd2b4d65c04341d64b2d0d35&oe=55C7223E
https://scontent-cdg.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/v/t1.0-9/11255494_10200582304597129_2091787067801680713_n.jpg?oh=1f96a36683454db7b55065a8000dcfc3&oe=55D17A52
https://i1.wp.com/statics.lecourrierderussie.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/10403256_932620870095024_7856132859200211053_n_opt.jpgDieu est mort! (…) Et c’est nous qui l’avons tué ! (…) Ce que le monde avait possédé jusqu’alors de plus sacré et de plus puissant a perdu son sang sous nos couteaux (…) Quelles solennités expiatoires, quels jeux sacrés nous faudra-t-il inventer? Nietzsche
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude. Chesterton
De nombreux commentateurs veulent aujourd’hui montrer que, loin d’être non violente, la Bible est vraiment pleine de violence. En un sens, ils ont raison. La représentation de la violence dans la Bible est énorme et plus vive, plus évocatrice, que dans la mythologie même grecque. (…) Il est une chose que j’apprécie dans le refus contemporain de cautionner la violence biblique, quelque chose de rafraîchissant et de stimulant, une capacité d’indignation qui, à quelques exceptions près, manque dans la recherche et l’exégèse religieuse classiques. (…) Une fois que nous nous rendons compte que nous avons à faire au même phénomène social dans la Bible que la mythologie, à savoir la foule hystérique qui ne se calmera pas tant qu’elle n’aura pas lynché une victime, nous ne pouvons manquer de prendre conscience du fait de la grande singularité biblique, même de son caractère unique. (…) Dans la mythologie, la violence collective est toujours représentée à partir du point de vue de l’agresseur et donc on n’entend jamais les victimes elles-mêmes. On ne les entend jamais se lamenter sur leur triste sort et maudire leurs persécuteurs comme ils le font dans les Psaumes. Tout est raconté du point de vue des bourreaux. (…) Pas étonnant que les mythes grecs, les épopées grecques et les tragédies grecques sont toutes sereines, harmonieuses et non perturbées. (…) Pour moi, les Psaumes racontent la même histoire de base que les mythes mais retournée, pour ainsi dire. (…) Les Psaumes d’exécration ou de malédiction sont les premiers textes dans l’histoire qui permettent aux victimes, à jamais réduites au silence dans la mythologie, d’avoir une voix qui leur soit propre. (…) Ces victimes ressentent exactement la même chose que Job. Il faut décrire le livre de Job, je crois, comme un psaume considérablement élargi de malédiction. Si Job était un mythe, nous aurions seulement le point de vue des amis. (…) La critique actuelle de la violence dans la Bible ne soupçonne pas que la violence représentée dans la Bible peut être aussi dans les évènements derrière la mythologie, bien qu’invisible parce qu’elle est non représentée. La Bible est le premier texte à représenter la victimisation du point de vue de la victime, et c’est cette représentation qui est responsable, en fin de compte, de notre propre sensibilité supérieure à la violence. Ce n’est pas le fait de notre intelligence supérieure ou de notre sensibilité. Le fait qu’aujourd’hui nous pouvons passer jugement sur ces textes pour leur violence est un mystère. Personne d’autre n’a jamais fait cela dans le passé. C’est pour des raisons bibliques, paradoxalement, que nous critiquons la Bible. (…) Alors que dans le mythe, nous apprenons le lynchage de la bouche des persécuteurs qui soutiennent qu’ils ont bien fait de lyncher leurs victimes, dans la Bible nous entendons la voix des victimes elles-mêmes qui ne voient nullement le lynchage comme une chose agréable et nous disent en des mots extrêmement violents, des mots qui reflètent une réalité violente qui est aussi à l’origine de la mythologie, mais qui restant invisible, déforme notre compréhension générale de la littérature païenne et de la mythologie. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste , en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. (…) Le mouvement antichrétien le plus puissant est celui qui réassume et « radicalise » le souci des victimes pour le paganiser. (…) Comme les Eglises chrétiennes ont pris conscience tardivement de leurs manquements à la charité, de leur connivence avec l’ordre établi, dans le monde d’hier et d’aujourd’hui, elles sont particulièrement vulnérables au chantage permanent auquel le néopaganisme contemporain les soumet. René Girard
L’art, semble-t-il, est de l’art si on le considère comme tel. New York American (22 octobre 1927)
La société du spectacle, [selon] Roger Caillois qui analyse la dimension ludique dans la culture (…), c’est la dimension inoffensive de la cérémonie primitive. Autrement dit lorsqu’on est privé du mythe, les paroles sacrées qui donnent aux œuvres pouvoir sur la réalité, le rite se réduit à un ensemble réglés d’actes désormais inefficaces qui aboutissent finalement à un pur jeu, loedos. Il donne un exemple qui est extraordinaire, il dit qu’au fond les gens qui jouent au football aujourd’hui, qui lancent un ballon en l’air ne font que répéter sur un mode ludique, jocus, ou loedos, société du spectacle, les grands mythes anciens de la naissance du soleil dans les sociétés où le sacré avait encore une valeur. (…) Nous vivons sur l’idée de Malraux – l’art, c’est ce qui reste quand la religion a disparu. Jean Clair
Pourquoi l’avant-garde a-t-elle été fascinée par le meurtre et a fait des criminels ses héros , de Sade aux sœurs Papin, et de l’horreur ses délices, du supplice des Cent morceaux en Chine à l’apologie du crime rituel chez Bataille, alors que dans l’Ancien Monde, ces choses là étaient tenues en horreur? (…) Il en résulte que la fascination des surréalistes ne s’est jamais éteinte dans le petit milieu de l’ intelligentsia parisienne de mai 1968 au maoïsme des années 1970. De l’admiration de Michel Foucault pour ‘l’ermite de Neauphle-le-Château’ et pour la ‘révolution’ iranienne à… Jean Baudrillard et à son trouble devant les talibans, trois générations d’intellectuels ont été élevées au lait surréaliste. De là notre silence et notre embarras. Jean Clair
Christs, Vierges, Pietàs, Crucifixions, enfers, paradis, offrandes, chutes, dons, échanges: la vision chrétienne du monde semble revenir en force. Où? Dans le domaine de l’art le plus contemporain. (…) L’homme y est réinterprété comme corps incarné, faible, en échec. Cette religion insiste sur l’ordinaire et l’accessible, elle est hantée par la dérision, la mort et le deuil. Après une modernité désincarnée proposant ses icônes majestueuses, on en revient à une image incarnée, une image d’après la chute. En profondeur, il se dit là un renversement des modèles de l’art lui-même: A Prométhée succède Sisyphe ou mieux le Christ souffrant, un homme sans modèle, sans lien, inscrit dans une condition humaine à laquelle il ne peut échapper. Yves Michaud (4e de couverture, L’art contemporain est-il chrétien, Catherine Grenier)
Ce spectacle est une réflexion sur la déchéance de la beauté, sur le mystère de la fin. Les excréments dont le vieux père incontinent se souille ne sont que la métaphore du martyre humain comme condition ultime et réelle. Le visage du Christ illumine tout ceci par la puissance de son regard et interroge chaque spectateur en profondeur. C’est ce regard qui dérange et met à nu ; certainement pas la couleur marron dont l’artifice évident représente les matières fécales. En même temps – et je dois le dire avec clarté – il est complètement faux qu’on salisse le visage du Christ avec les excréments dans le spectacle. Ceux qui ont assisté à la représentation ont pu voir la coulée finale d’un voile d’encre noir, descendant sur le tableau tel un suaire nocturne. Cette image du Christ de la douleur n’appartient pas à l’illustration anesthésiée de la doctrine dogmatique de la foi. Ce Christ interroge en tant qu’image vivante, et certainement il divise et continuera à diviser. Romeo Castellucci
Notre époque, surtout depuis quelques décennies, est passée championne dans l’art de défigurer les icônes majeures du christianisme. (…) L’art contemporain est l’une des manifestations de la christianophobie. Pas la seule… Encore faut-il préciser que ce n’est évidemment pas systématique. L’art sacré d’inspiration et de destination chrétienne poursuit sa route et continue de susciter des œuvres. Le septième art, à ma connaissance, est beaucoup moins souvent christianophobe que ne le sont les arts plastiques. Voyez au cinéma le film Des hommes et des dieux, ou Habemus papam, au théâtre les pièces d’Olivier Py, en littérature, en BD… (…)  Il a droit, pour ainsi dire, à un traitement de faveur. Imaginez qu’à la place du visage du Christ, comme décor d’une pièce de théâtre, figure celui de Moïse, de Mohammed ou de Bouddha. Ce serait un tollé immédiat. De toutes les religions, le christianisme est, sans conteste, la plus agressée. Et selon moi c’est normal. Cela tient au fait que le christianisme aime autant l’image, qui s’expose, que la personne, qui oblige. François Bœspflug
Je crois que la culture dans nos sociétés est un des lieux du sacré : la religion culturelle est devenue pour certaines catégories sociales – dont les intellectuels – le lieu des convictions les plus profondes, des engagements les plus profonds. Par exemple, la honte de la gaffe culturelle est devenue l’équivalent du péché. Je pense que l’analogie avec la religion peut-être poussée très loin. Alors qu’aujourd’hui, une analyse de sociologie religieuse peut être poussée très loin, comme celle sur les évêques ; elle ne touche personne même pas les évêques. … La sociologie de la culture se heurte à des résistances fantastiques. Et le travail d’objectivation qui a été fait sur la religion : personne ne peut contester qu’il y a une certaine corrélation entre la religion que l’on a acquise dans sa famille et la religion que l’on professe ; on ne peut pas nier qu’il y ait une transmission de père en fils des convictions religieuses, que quand cette transmission disparaît, la religion disparaît. Bon, quand on le dit sur la culture, on enlève à l’homme cultivé un des fondements du charme de la culture, à savoir l’illusion de l’innéité, l’illusion charismatique : c’est à dire j’ai acquis ça par moi-même, à la naissance comme une espèce de miracle. Pierre Bourdieu
Le goût « pur » et l’esthétique qui en fait la théorie trouvent leur principe dans le refus du goût « impur » et de l’aïs­thèsis [« sensation » en grec, ce qui a donné « esthétique »] forme simple et primitive du plaisir sensible réduit à un plaisir des sens, comme dans ce que Kant appelle « le goût de la langue, du palais et du gosier », abandon à la sensation immédiate […]. On pourrait montrer que tout le langage de l’esthé­tique est enfermé dans un refus principiel du facile, entendu dans tous les sens que l’éthique et l’esthé­tique bourgeoises donnent à ce mot. (… Comme le disent les mots employés pour les dénoncer, « facile » ou « léger » bien sûr, mais aussi « frivole », « futile », « tape-à-l’oeil », « superficiel », « racoleur » … ou dans, dans le registre des satisfactions orales, « sirupeux », « douceâtre », « à l’eau de rose », « écoeurant », les oeuvres vulgaires ne sont pas seulement une une sorte d’insulte au raffinement des raffinés, une manière d’offense au public « difficile » qui n’entend pas qu’on lui offre des choses « faciles » (on aime à dire des artistes, et en particulier des chefs d’orchestre, qu’ils se respectent et qu’ils respectent leur public); elles suscitent le malaise et le dégoût par les méthodes de séduction, ordinairement dénoncées comme « basses », « dégradantes », « avilissantes » qu’elles mettent en oeuvre, donnant au spectateur le sentiment d’être traité comme le premier venu, qu’on peut séduire avec des charmes de pacotille, l’invitant à régressser vers les formes les plus primitives et les plus élémentaires du plaisir. Pierre Bourdieu
Personne n’aspirerait à la culture si l’on savait à quel point le nombre des hommes cultivés est finalement et ne peut être qu’incroyablement petit; et cependant ce petit nombre vraiment cultivé n’est possible que si une grande masse, déterminée au fond contre sa nature et uniquement par des illusions séduisantes, s’adonne à la culture; on ne devrait rien trahir publiquement de cette ridicule disproportion entre le nombre d’hommes vraiment cultivés et l’énorme appareil de la culture; le vrai secret de la culture est là: des hommes innombrables luttent pour acquérir la culture, travaillent pour la culture, apparemment dans leur propre intérêt, mais au fond seulement pour permettre l’existence du petit nombre. Nietzsche
La musique la plus légitime fait l’objet, avec le disque et la radio, d’usages non moins passifs et intermittents que les musiques « populaires » sans être pour autant discréditée et sans qu’on lui impute les effets aliénants qu’on attribue à la musique populaire. Quant au caractère répétitif de la forme, il atteint un maximum dans le chant grégorien (pourtant hautement valorisé) ou dans nombre de musiques médiévales aujourd’hui cultivées et dans tant de musiques de divertissement du 17e et du 18e siècles, d’ailleurs conçues à l’origine pour être ainsi consommées « en fond sonore ». Pierre Bourdieu
Côté féminin, l’imaginaire est centré sur la pudeur : une jeune fille de bonne famille ne se regarde pas dans le miroir, ni même dans l’eau de sa baignoire ; on prescrit des poudres qui troublent l’eau pour éviter les reflets (en revanche, les miroirs tapissent les murs des bordels). Les femmes connaissent mal leur propre corps, on leur interdit même d’entrer dans les musées d’anatomie. Le corps est caché, corseté, protégé par des nœuds, agrafes, boutons (d’où un érotisme diffus, qui se fixe sur la taille, la poitrine, le cuir des bottines). Côté masculin, ce sont des rituels vénaux et une double morale permanente : le même jeune homme qui identifie la jeune fille à la pureté et fait sa cour selon le rituel classique connaît des expériences sexuelles multiples avec des prostituées, des cousettes (les ouvrières à l’aiguille dans les grandes villes) ou une grisette, jeune fille facile et fraîche qu’on abandonnera pour épouser l’héritière de bonne famille. Alain Corbin
En pleine semaine sainte, la polémique ne pouvait passer inaperçue. Mgr Di Falco a révélé que la RATP avait exigé que soient retirées des affiches annonçant le prochain concert du groupe «Les Prêtres» la mention «au profit des Chrétiens d’Orient» (…) Si la RATP a exigé que soit supprimée la mention des Chrétiens d’Orient, c’est parce que «la RATP et sa régie publicitaire ne peuvent prendre parti dans un conflit de quelque nature qu’il soit» selon leur communiqué commun. «Toute atteinte à ce principe ouvrirait la brèche à des prises de positions antagonistes sur notre territoire». Annoncer que ce concert était offert au profit de ces chrétiens d’Orient est «une information se situant dans le contexte d’un conflit armé à l’étranger et (…) le principe de neutralité du service public qui régit les règles de fonctionnement de l’affichage par Métrobus, trouve en effet dans ce cas à s’appliquer.» Vous avez bien lu. Pour la RATP, les Chrétiens d’Orient sont juste un camp face à l’autre, un camp pour lequel on ne peut pas prendre parti. Alors que la France, par la voix de Laurent Fabius, se démène à l’ONU pour que cesse le génocide dont sont victimes ces minorités d’Irak et d’ailleurs, alors que le Président de la République a reçu des Chrétiens obligés de fuir leur pays pour ne pas être massacrés par Daesh, la RATP -elle- refuse de choisir. Entre Daesh et ses victimes, elle veut rester «neutre».. Cette neutralité-là est impossible. Cette neutralité est une complicité avec celui qui massacre, contre l’innocent qui est massacré. Cette neutralité rappelle celle de Pilate et de tous ceux qui l’ont suivi depuis 2000 ans, se lavant les mains des massacres commis, et fermant les yeux sur le sort des victimes, pour ne pas faire de vagues ni perdre leur poste. Abbé Pierre-Hervé Grosjean (curé de Saint Cyr l’Ecole)
J’ai pensé à vous car vous êtes un ange de paix. Pape François (à Mahmoud Abbas)
Quand une personne va se présenter dans une paroisse pour devenir son pasteur, le seul critère de recrutement risque d’être : “êtes-vous pour ou contre la bénédiction des couples homosexuels ?” Réduire toute la foi chrétienne à cette question est effroyable. Gilles Boucomont (temple du Marais, Paris)
Mommy took a bus trip and now she got her bust out, everybody ride her just like a bus route. (Maman fait un voyage en bus et maintenant elle a son buste à l’air, tout le monde la monte, une vraie ligne de bus) Jay-Z
Montez-moi toute la journée pour 3£. New Adventure travel
I got stuck behind one of these buses in Canton at 8.45 this morning. With our following of 30,000 people, we try not to use We Are Cardiff to express opinions, but I felt like we had an obligation to the women and men of Cardiff to call this company out on the commodification of a woman’s body, and the trivialisation of prostitution. “I guess you could use the ‘it’s just a laugh’ argument, but in 2015 does a bus journey really need to be sexualised to market itself ? Hana Johnson (We Are Cardiff blog)
Firstly we have stated that our objectives have been to make catching the bus attractive to the younger generation. We therefore developed an internal advertising campaign featuring males and females to hold boards to promote the cost of our daily tickets. The slogan of ‘ride me all day for £3’ whilst being a little tongue in cheek was in no way intended to cause offence to either men or women and, if the advert has done so then we apologise unreservedly. There has certainly been no intention to objectify either men or women. Given the volume of negativity received we have decided to remove the pictures from the back of the buses within the next 24 hours. New Adventure travel (Cardiff bus company)
Le procès de deux responsables d’un théâtre de Novossibirsk accusés d’avoir « offensé les sentiments religieux des croyants » en proposant une version très moderne de l’opéra Tannhäuser de Wagner s’est soldé mardi 10 mars par un non-lieu dans cette ville de Sibérie. (…) Le procès a été ouvert la semaine dernière après la plainte d’un évêque orthodoxe, appuyée par le parquet local selon lequel cette adaptation, jouée pour la première fois en décembre à l’opéra de Novossibirsk, « désacralise » l’image de Jésus Christ. La version originale de l’oeuvre, une des plus controversées du compositeur Richard Wagner, a été jouée pour la première fois en 1845. Le héros, Tannhäuser, est le captif volontaire de la déesse de l’amour Vénus avant de chercher la rédemption auprès du pape pour ses excès sexuels. Timofeï Kouliabine a déplacé l’action au XXIe siècle, Tannhäuser devenant un réalisateur qui tourne un film sur la visite de Jésus Christ dans le repaire de la déesse Vénus. Fait religieux.com
Best stalls seats for the Royal Opera House’s latest Salome revival are chopped down to £65 (previously up to £120) with this Evening Standard offer, valid for performances on 8, 14 and 16 June only. Intermezzo
Ah, but Bacchus refuses to rock (did I mention the score was by Philip Glass?), preferring instead to cackle at his own jokes, supervillain-style. His devotees, the mad, enchanted Bacchants, are similarly unfun, anti-sensual, and non-ecstatic. They sport weird Kahlo unibrows and, in their lumpen orange jumpers, evoke the Balinese cast of Mamma Mia! These huffing, puffing, occasionally power-walking Maenads work tirelessly to infuse the show with a dread it assiduously resists, and they occasionally succeed, against all odds. But boy, can you feel them working. They’re reputed to tear animals limb from limb, but their « Bacchic dances » feel no more ominous than a lengthy jazzercise class—everyone seems to be counting beats or calories. Mackie sweats almost as hard, but he’s on a treadmill: Manly Pentheus sees the power of Dionysus demonstrated time and again, but can’t bring himself to acknowledge this androgynous god. Yet Mackie and Akalaitis never quite connect that stubbornness with a gripping interior psychology—the king’s all-too-obvious repression is played for easy laughs—and we hurtle toward tragedy without much at stake. Horror arrives on schedule, Dionysus collects his blood debt, and a mother, after murdering her son, holds his severed head aloft and wails, « I was mad, and now he is dead. » This should crush the audience, but it comes off as a summing-up. I received the information matter-of-factly, like a Google alert. After an hour and a half of strenuously literal choreography and two-dimensional line readings, can you blame me? This Bacchae has a way of staring the incomprehensible in the face … and falling gently asleep, as if nodding off watching the news or in the middle of halfhearted midweek sex. It’s proof that sometimes, when you look long into the abyss, the abyss yawns. Scott Brown
Practically the only thing people get anymore that’s live is sports and opera. (…) In movies, most of the women who get naked are pretty young, and it’s hard to be an opera singer and be that young. It takes a lot of training, and you get better, I think — or louder — as you get older. (…) When [nudity] becomes vulgar, it gets boring. But in opera, what’s interesting is that if it’s done well, if it’s within the context of the story, there’s a subtlety to it that becomes very erotic, especially when it’s coupled with singing. (…) There’s a shift in opera where physicality is very important — not only how you act but how you look, and you can’t shoot yourself in the foot, » he says. « You have to move well, you have to act well, you have to look good, you have to sing well. The competition is much stiffer. Nathan Gunn
Vous voulez savoir ce qu’il y a entre moi et mes Calvin? Rien. Brooke Shields
L’érotisme est aussi utilisé pour promouvoir des produits courants qui ne lui sont traditionnellement pas associés. Par exemple, des spécialistes avancent que le déclin du nombre de billets vendus par l’opéra de Dallas a été renversé à la suite d’une campagne publicitaire montrant des instruments de musique sous un angle plus « osé ». Wikipedia
The creative team came up with an effective formula – fill the Venusberg with beautiful people of both sexes, all nude except for the briefest of thongs, engaged in constant, unrelenting, explicit (or at least convincingly simulated) sex – twosomes of men and women, men and men, etc., threesomes, foursomes, fivesomes splitting off to form new threesomes and twosomes. Most of these performances were taking place on revolving stages, so that the audience would not miss too much. The opera program lists 18 “dancers”, although “dancing” is a curious euphemism for the particular onstage performances of these 18 persons during the extended ballet of the Paris version. The simulations were so vivid, that one would not be astonished if, after all of the rehearsals and actual performances, that some longer term relationships might be developing among these dancers. Los Angeles opera audiences might indeed be hip (or, at least, include many of the hip). But the community is an entertainment capital, where nightmares occur about film ratings so restrictive they eliminate the teenage market, or about the FCC fining big corporations for transgressions occurring on network television. So there is irony in the fact that things not permitted in films and television shows being created a few miles away, were occurring — not in some tiny, out of the way West Hollywood theatre — but, during, of all things, the performance of a Wagnerian opera in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The “Tannhauser” reviews probably knocked some of the reports of post-Oscar parties to the later pages. “Wagner pornucopia” was the inch high headline for the Los Angeles Times’ Calendar section. “‘Tannhauser': the Adult Version” was the three-fourths of an inch headline for the Arts Entertainment section of the Orange County Register. The bottom line is that, just like the citizens of the Wartburg, it is possible to astonish people, even in the hip and sophisticated opera and theatre-going crowd of Los Angeles. But opera performed for purposes of shock and sacrilege is what many opera-goers use to define that ultimate pejorative, “Eurotrash”. To save the new L. A. production of “Tannhauser” from that pigeon hole, can one find in the Ian Judge conceptualization of the stage action elements that redeem his approach, and bring new appreciation and understanding of the opera? Opera horses
They’re known for their great bods and for breathless blogs written by devoted admirers. Bearers of great pecs and pipes, barihunks like Matthew Worth and Tom Forde are bringing high art to the masses in a universally appealing form. And the dark-haired Gunn, all 6 broadly muscled feet of him, is king of that particular hill — as well as the « Barber of Seville. » In his third appearance with LA Opera, he sings the role of Figaro in the Rossini classic opening today. In this production, which originated at Teatro Real Madrid, Gunn, 39, is fully dressed, sporting a white suit with a black polka-dot vest in the visually stark first act, which later bleeds into color. But in Lyric Opera of Chicago’s production last year, the first act opened with a bit of gratuitous beefcake — Gunn awoke wearing only boxer shorts in the sleeping loft above his barbershop before he rose, dressed and flew down a pole to begin another hard day of singing. The lure of flaunting such unabashed virility is catnip to opera companies trying to overcome the graying of their audiences. Inspired in part by Hollywood’s beauty bar, the casting of opera singers for their looks as well as their world-class voices has been viewed as imperative as ever, now that opera has taken to the big screen —  » The Met: Live in HD » is in its fourth season transmitting opera to movie theaters around the world. « I have some colleagues who really feel like opera was never meant to be able to have a camera looking down your throat while you’re screaming your head off and spit’s flying out, » says « the irresistible » Gunn, as the Metropolitan Opera described him in touting his high-def performance as Mercutio in Gounod’s « Romeo et Juliette » two years ago. « And I thought, yeah, that’s true, but at the same time it’s kind of cool. Practically the only thing people get anymore that’s live is sports and opera. » Irene Lacher

Ce qui reste quand la religion a disparu ?

A l’heure où, pour avoir voulu jouer avec les paroles d’une chanson de rap, une compagnie d’autocars de Cardiff se voit contrainte de retirer du dos de ses bus des affiches de jeunes modèles torse nus …

Et où la toile la plus chère jamais vendue aux enchères se voit floutée à la télévision américaine pour cause de seins dénudés …

Alors qu’en Russie un metteur en scène d’un opéra se voit assigné en justice pour cause de désacralisation de la religion …

Et qu’en France une affiche de concert pour les victimes chrétiennes des djihadistes semblent plus choquante que sur Youtube leurs découpages à présent presque quotidiens au couteau de boucher …

Pendant qu’avec l’omniprésence de l’image et du numérique et du travail de sape bimillénaire du judéo-christianisme, nos archaïques et antiques besoins de sang n’ont guère plus pour s’exprimer que les derniers spectacles vivants du sport, du cirque ou des scènes d’opéra …

Et qu’emporté par la démagogie et le politiquement correct ambiants, ce qui reste de l’Eglise se voit sommer de voir des anges partout ou de faire des « mariages pour tous » …

Comment ne pas voir …

Dans la place toujours plus grande de l’érotisme dans nos publicités

Comme, désaffection du public et explosion des coûts aidant, les expositions de nos musées ou de nos places publiques

Ou entre salomés et baritons dépoitraillés sur fond si possible de sang et de sacrilège …

Les scènes de nos opéras …

Ce que disait naguère Malraux de l’art

A savoir ce qui reste quand la religion a disparu ?

Opera barihunks hit a muscular note
Toned physiques like Nathan Gunn’s are getting a standing ovation in the genre’s usually buttoned-up world.
Irene Lacher

LA Times

November 29, 2009

« I’d like to take a little bit of responsibility for this nightmare. »

The source of that generous offer is far from evil. If anything, Nathan Gunn is the dimpled picture of Midwestern nice guy-ness — think a younger, darker Russell Crowe without the edge. That’s why he’s volunteering to take the fall for men like himself — opera’s tantalizing new breed of baritone known as « barihunks. »

They’re known for their great bods and for breathless blogs written by devoted admirers. Bearers of great pecs and pipes, barihunks like Matthew Worth and Tom Forde are bringing high art to the masses in a universally appealing form. And the dark-haired Gunn, all 6 broadly muscled feet of him, is king of that particular hill — as well as the « Barber of Seville. » In his third appearance with LA Opera, he sings the role of Figaro in the Rossini classic opening today.

In this production, which originated at Teatro Real Madrid, Gunn, 39, is fully dressed, sporting a white suit with a black polka-dot vest in the visually stark first act, which later bleeds into color. But in Lyric Opera of Chicago’s production last year, the first act opened with a bit of gratuitous beefcake — Gunn awoke wearing only boxer shorts in the sleeping loft above his barbershop before he rose, dressed and flew down a pole to begin another hard day of singing.

The lure of flaunting such unabashed virility is catnip to opera companies trying to overcome the graying of their audiences. Inspired in part by Hollywood’s beauty bar, the casting of opera singers for their looks as well as their world-class voices has been viewed as imperative as ever, now that opera has taken to the big screen —  » The Met: Live in HD » is in its fourth season transmitting opera to movie theaters around the world.

« I have some colleagues who really feel like opera was never meant to be able to have a camera looking down your throat while you’re screaming your head off and spit’s flying out, » says « the irresistible » Gunn, as the Metropolitan Opera described him in touting his high-def performance as Mercutio in Gounod’s « Romeo et Juliette » two years ago. « And I thought, yeah, that’s true, but at the same time it’s kind of cool. Practically the only thing people get anymore that’s live is sports and opera. »

Gunn wasn’t always this cool about this millennium’s focus on baring it all, or at least, a noticeable chunk of the hunk, for opera audiences. He was initially taken aback when Francesca Zambello first opened the floodgates when she directed him and tenor William Burden in a 1997 production of Gluck’s « Iphigénie en Tauride » at Glimmerglass Opera near Cooperstown, N.Y.

« She’s like, ‘Guys, in the beginning of the show, what’s going to happen is you’re going to be dragged in soaking wet and they’re going to rip your clothes off and you’re going to be bound together on this log. So if you’re nervous, go to the gym,' » recalls the (fortunately) former college athlete during a recent interview in LA Opera’s offices. « I went to the gym. Heck, yeah! »

The response from the usually buttoned-up opera world was enthusiastic. Even the University of Kansas’ erudite Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism weighed in, with Robert F. Gross declaring: « Nathan Gunn’s fine physique is the most eroticized presence on stage. »

(In September, barihunks.blogspot.com reported that another bare-chested duet by Gunn and Burden in the Opera Company of Philadelphia’s production of « Pearl Fishers » was the most popular video on its YouTube site. « It looks like the Philadelphia Phillies aren’t the only thing that’s hot in the City of Brotherly Love, » the site observed.)

Indeed, while sex sells just about everything everywhere, in the rarefied world of opera, male singers like Gunn are generally better salesmen. Women only rarely appear bare-breasted on stage, and when they do, it is likely to serve an avant-garde production, such as in LA Opera’s 1997 production of Wagner’s « Tannhauser, » directed by the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Ian Judge.

In part, says Gunn, men in opera do what women can’t. « In movies, most of the women who get naked are pretty young, and it’s hard to be an opera singer and be that young. It takes a lot of training, and you get better, I think — or louder — as you get older. »

Voir aussi:

Powerful, Edgy “Tannhauser” at Los Angeles Opera – February 28, 2007
Opera horses

March 9th, 2007

Richard Wagner’s “Tannhauser”, although firmly in the standard repertoire, has tended to be performed a little less often in recent years than the work that preceded it (“The Flying Dutchman”) and the eight operas he wrote afterwards. That appears, at least for the near future, to be changing.

California’s three most important opera companies – those of Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego – each have scheduled “Tannhauser” within a twelve month period. Although there is a duplication in two lead performers between two of the companies, each is mounting a completely different production.

Nor is it only California that is being immersed in Wagner’s melodic tale of a young man’s explorations of and angst regarding the charms of women, but opera companies throughout the United States and the World have signed onto revivals or new productions of the work.

Los Angeles Opera brought together a creative team, led by Conductor James Conlon, its new musical director. The team, launching “Tannhauser” as the first production of a multi-year Wagner project, has taken a new look at this work. Wagner’s “Paris version” of the opera, with its extended Venusberg Ballet, was chosen. The Set and Costume Designer was Gottfried Pilz and Lighting Designer was Mark Doubleday (his company debut), both of whose contributions in this extraordinary production were invaluable.

The Director was Royal Shakespeare Company veteran Ian Judge, who has now has a half-dozen memorable Los Angeles Opera productions to his credit. These include a conceptualization of Gounod’s “Romeo et Juliette” in 2005 for Rolando Villazon and Anna Netrebko that I found brilliant.

Before one creates a new production of “Tannhauser” one must decide what, ultimately, the opera is about. The literal story – with its arc of transgression, confrontation, penance and redemption – is interesting enough, and the opera’s rousing music and lush melody, in the hands of an orchestra and of singers of the first rank – makes for a pleasant evening at the opera, especially if you find the other Wagnerian operas to your taste.

Wagner, in his preceding opera, “Die Fliegende Hollaender”, set up a premise for the damnation of its title character that makes little sense to those of us that are part of 21st Century Western civilization. With a violent storm hitting his ship, the Dutchman lost control of himself and started cursing. For this he was damned forever, unless an improbable series of things happened to redeem him. So much for the punishment fitting the crime.

There are many elements of that opera that make it interesting to 21st century audiences, but the story line – the incidents (the cursing) that led to the spell on the Dutchman and the rules that had to be followed to break the spell, is not in itself something that would interest most of us these days.

Were it not that its stirring overture, its treasure chest of melody, and its abundant opportunities for spectacular theatre, “Hollaender” would be an only occasionally performed relic of Romantic era operatic history, like Weber’s “Die Freischuetz”. Is “Tannhauser” another quaint fairy tale like “Hollaender” in which we should immerse ourselves in the music, applaud the use of spectacle to display its exotic settings, but not think too deeply about the plot? I think otherwise.

“Tannhauser” is an opera (and this will be a surprise to some people) in which one can find deeper meaning. My own take on the opera’s story is as follows:

(1) Tannhauser, a creative but difficult artist, who has had problems fitting into a very structured society, decides to shuck it all and pursue a lifestyle that offends the established order, (2) having surfeited his senses, he wishes he could return to his old life to be forgiven, just as was the Prodigal Son, (3) although most everyone is suspicious of his reappearance, Elisabeth, the woman who had always seen something redeeming in his character, is ready to welcome him back, (4) he has renewed difficulty relating to the social order, and flaunts his past behaviors he knows will destroy his chances of reconciliation with his former colleagues, (5) the resulting turmoil results in Elisabeth’s emotional breakdown and ultimate death, (6) Tannhauser, shocked by the impact of his behavior on Elisabeth, squares himself away.

You will note my interpretation of the meaning of the opera is stated in secular language. One can integrate into this explanation meanings for the opera’s religious symbols, or, if preferred, even regard the religious elements literally. However, the basic story remains the same.

The creative team obviously spent time thinking about what they considered the essence of “Tannhauser”, to see if it indeed could be made relevant to our times. Their resulting product appears to concentrate on the question: what is it that happens in the Venusberg that so disrupts the social structure in the Wartburg? Is there a way for the audience to share the shock that the denizens of the Wartburg experienced?

They knew that most of this 21st century audience would be from the Los Angeles area. The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion is itself just seven miles from the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, where, the night after the “Tannhauser” premiere, and three nights before its second performance – the one I attended – the Academy Awards would be distributed.

What could happen in the Venusberg that could cause this audience, that certainly regards itself among the hip and sophisticated, to understand vicariously the social horror that the men and women of the Wartburg experienced?

The creative team came up with an effective formula – fill the Venusberg with beautiful people of both sexes, all nude except for the briefest of thongs, engaged in constant, unrelenting, explicit (or at least convincingly simulated) sex – twosomes of men and women, men and men, etc., threesomes, foursomes, fivesomes splitting off to form new threesomes and twosomes. Most of these performances were taking place on revolving stages, so that the audience would not miss too much.

The opera program lists 18 “dancers”, although “dancing” is a curious euphemism for the particular onstage performances of these 18 persons during the extended ballet of the Paris version. The simulations were so vivid, that one would not be astonished if, after all of the rehearsals and actual performances, that some longer term relationships might be developing among these dancers.

Los Angeles opera audiences might indeed be hip (or, at least, include many of the hip). But the community is an entertainment capital, where nightmares occur about film ratings so restrictive they eliminate the teenage market, or about the FCC fining big corporations for transgressions occurring on network television. So there is irony in the fact that things not permitted in films and television shows being created a few miles away, were occurring — not in some tiny, out of the way West Hollywood theatre — but, during, of all things, the performance of a Wagnerian opera in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.

The “Tannhauser” reviews probably knocked some of the reports of post-Oscar parties to the later pages. “Wagner pornucopia” was the inch high headline for the Los Angeles Times’ Calendar section. “‘Tannhauser': the Adult Version” was the three-fourths of an inch headline for the Arts Entertainment section of the Orange County Register. The bottom line is that, just like the citizens of the Wartburg, it is possible to astonish people, even in the hip and sophisticated opera and theatre-going crowd of Los Angeles.

But opera performed for purposes of shock and sacrilege is what many opera-goers use to define that ultimate pejorative, “Eurotrash”. To save the new L. A. production of “Tannhauser” from that pigeon hole, can one find in the Ian Judge conceptualization of the stage action elements that redeem his approach, and bring new appreciation and understanding of the opera?

First, I will set down my impressions of the performance. There is no curtain for the opera. Each act begins with a facade in place which stretches across the entire front of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion stage. The facade consists of nine dark plue pillars. Connecting each pillar are eight sets of very tall double doors, that often open as windows.

Conductor Conlon leads the Los Angeles Opera Orchestra in the famous prologue. At the point where the Prologue changes tempo to the exotic Venusberg music, we begin to see young men and women, partially clothed in evening dress through the windows of the tall doors. Then, as the opera begins, the pillars and doors are seen to be on curved tracks that snake around the sides and back of center stage.

A grand piano sits at stage right, to do duty as Tannhauser’s lyre in the Venusberg and to return to the Hall in which the singing contest will be held in a later scene. Tannhauser, German tenor Peter Seiffert, dressed in black pajamas and a red dressing gown crosses the stage to sit at the piano. The Venus, Lioba Braun, looking rather like a young Sally Field with an Annette Bening hairstyle, is in her bower in center stage in a red dress. Everyone is barefoot. There are vertical neon lights nearby, now glowing red. (The vertical neon pole will change color for different scenes throughout the performance.)

The youth in evening dress begin to shed their clothes, and each finds a nearby person to engage in first kissing and then (simulated) sex acts of demonstrable versatility. Seiffert, the Tannhauser, is burly and looks 50ish. According to some of the press, he was made to look up like an aging rock star visiting the Venusberg. (My suspicion is that if the production had a younger looking Tannhauser, not bound by on-stage inhibitions and with the physique of, say, a Nathan Gunn or Charles Castronovo – neither of whom would ever be expected to sing this role – Director Judge would have staged the scene quite differently.)

Braun’s Venus was a smaller voice than I am used to in this part, and Seiffert, who is unquestionably on the short list of world’s most prominent Tannhausers, exhibited, at several times during the first two acts, the vibrato spread and beat that often signals vocal difficulties. (He had his voice securely in control in time for an effective third act that should convince a person who has not seen him before that his reputation is warranted.)

Now a blue-violet vertical neon pole is seen. Tannhauser reveals to Venus that his appetites are surfeited and that he wishes to return to his German homeland. The orgy participants, ready to do something else, help take down the Venusberg set to move it into the next scene with the Wartburg hunting party. Tannhauser finds himself out in the cold – literally, it is snowing lightly. A large white leafless tree hangs askew from the top of the stage.

We hear the song of the shepherd boy (sung by Karen Vuong) from offstage, but there is a boy dressed as a cherub with small wings on-stage, who among other stage business (throwing snowballs and standing on the grand piano in his ski boots) arranges for the piano to be pulled out of the snow offstage. (I thought to myself, I wonder whether he is going to do a “snow angel” and he did. I also wondered if the boy, who obviously had to be in the wings waiting for the orgy to end so he could be onstage for the next scene, had parental guidance shielding him from too close an observation of the “dancing”.)

The vertical neon pole was glowing white when the pilgrims appear, costumed in white robes, each holding white staffs. Tannhauser, however, is dressed in black with a black scarf. Still barefoot, he kneels at a cross at mid-stage. The hunters arrive, also dressed in white. Although some have white hunting caps, some of the principals are wearing white Fedoras. Wolfram (German baritone Martin Gantner) is dressed in a white suit, looking rather like Truman Capote, or even more closely, Philip Seymour Hoffman playing Truman Capote, with spectacles resembling a stylish contemporary offering from Lenscrafters. The Landgrave (German bass Franz-Josef Selig) wore a white Fedora with a black band.

As Act II begins, we are introduced to Elisabeth. Since she is to be the princess of the singing contest, she has the hairstyle and general appearance of Princess Diana, and wears a white gown similarly styled to the red gown worn by Venus in Act I. The male dancers from the Venusberg reappear as waiters for the Landgrave’s festivities, each carrying trays filled with glasses of champagne, most of which are taken by the choristers, who prance in with great formality in elegant black and white evening dress, for the melodic toasts.

In the first examples of truly memorable singing in this performance, Petra Maria Schnitzer, the Elisabeth, engages in an affecting duet with Selig’s Landgrave. The Paris version of “Tannhauser”, besides a longer Venusberg scene, has a more extensive song tournament, with more music for Gantner’s Wolfram and for Walther von der Vogelweide (Rodrick Dixon). The other Minnesingers are Jason Stearns (Biterolf), Robert MacNeil (Heinrich der Schreiber) and Christopher Feigum (Reinmar von Zweter).

The act ends with a beautifully sung octet, although Seiffert’s Tannhauser was again showing some vocal stress. As Seiffert sang his “Nach Rom!” he ran out of the back door to join the pilgrims seeking the Pope’s blessing, as the chandeliers of the Wartburg minstrels’ hall are raised.

For the final scene, the cross is back at center stage, and there is a green glow, not just on the vertical neon pole, but throughout the stage, as green light shines through the windows. Elisabeth is dressed in a white gown with green overcoat, and looks for Tannhauser in the ranks of the returning pilgrims. Disheartened and disheveled, she goes to the cross.

After Schnitzer’s extraordinarily effective and expressive prayer, she leaves her overcoat on the ground and disappears through the same portal that Seiffert’s Tannhauser left for Rome.

Gantner’s Wolfram, dressed in modern topcoat, sweater and cravat, and carrying an umbrella, sings to the evening star the most famous aria from “Tannhauser”, his realization that Elisabeth has left this life forever. Wolfram picks up the overcoat and puts it at the base of the cross.

Then Seiffert reappears, summoning the vocal control needed for the great monologue in which Tannhauser describes his depressing interaction with the Pope. With Tannhauser in despair, Venus reappears with two of her dancer boys who approach the cross to try to coax Tannhauser back to the Venusberg.

When Wolfram makes Tannhauser aware that Elisabeth has won him his salvation, Tannhauser clutches Elisabeth’s discarded cloak. Venus having been repulsed, the two boys go back to caressing each other. The body of Elisabeth is brought onstage, as is the Pope’s staff, signalling Tannhauser’s redemption. The appearance of a boy angel, with more fully developed wings, is one of our final impressions of this remarkable production.

The Los Angeles production was unrelentingly theatrical, but did it pass muster as an appropriate presentation of “Tannhauser”? I think it did. Nowhere did it create a different storyline that Wagner did not intend (a criticism I made of Los Angeles Opera’s presentation of “Robert Wilson’s ‘Parsifal’” last December). Everything that is supposed to happen in a traditional performance of “Tannhauser” happened here.

Upon reflection, the wildness of Ian Judge’s Venusberg brought new insights into the relationships between these mythic characters. As the countervailing force to that wildness, the production was fortunate in having Schnitzer, a revelatory Elisabeth, who combined a beautiful voice, good acting abilities, and an attractive appearance. One could imagine a soul torn between Venus and Elisabeth, who comes to realize too late that it is the latter with whom he really wants to be.

I suspect that one way to determine whether the incorporation of non-traditional features into a standard repertoire work is whether you can exchange the traditional and non-traditional elements without doing violence to either the standard or non-traditional presentation. Here, clearly one could do so, without any harm whatsoever.

It would not matter whether Wolfram was wearing a white suit or the classic medieval tunic we associate with this opera, nor whether there was a shepherd boy or an angel, nor a grand piano or a lyre. (In my review of the Los Angeles Opera “Manon” in October, 2006 with Netrebko and Villazon, I made a similar argument in support of Vince Paterson’s updating of that opera.)

But this production, I believe, illuminated some aspects of what Wagner intended when he wrote his own libretto for this work. His Wartburg characters’ degree of shock in learning of Tannhauser’s time in the Venusberg seemed out of proportion to the situation, unless Wagner intended that Tannhauser’s activities in the Venusberg were something the Wartburgers would truly find unsettling.

I think the Los Angeles Opera production helps us sort through the sometimes recondite meanings in this work. It will be interesting to see the other two productions promised for California within the next year.

Voir également:

Opera director charged by Russian authorities with offending Christians

Timofei Kulyabin attacks ‘absurd’ charge over his production of Richard Wagner’s Tannhauser which is alleged to have ‘desecrated’ the image of Jesus Christ

The Guardian

25 February 2015

Russia on Tuesday accused the director of a production of a Richard Wagner opera of publicly offending the feelings of religious believers following a complaint from a senior Russian Orthodox cleric.

Thirty-year-old director Timofei Kulyabin told AFP he has been charged over his production of Wagner’s Tannhauser at Novosibirsk’s State Opera and Ballet Theatre in Siberia, which premiered in December.

“It’s absurd and I don’t want to take part in something absurd, to be honest,” he said.

“I just have a sense of deep incomprehension.”

Prosecutors said the director, who last year won Russia’s prestigious Golden Mask award, “publicly desecrated the object of religious worship in Christianity – the image of Jesus Christ in the Gospels”.

The administrative offence carries a maximum fine of 200,000 rubles ($3,165) for an official.

The case comes three years after a probe against the Pussy Riot punks who were sentenced to two years for “hooliganism”, specifically offending believers, after a performance in a Moscow church.

The case against the opera was opened after a senior Orthodox cleric, the Metropolitan of Novosibirsk, Tikhon, told the prosecutors that he had received complaints from offended believers.

“I wrote (to prosecutors) that Tannhauser breaches the rights of believers … Believers are offended, so to say,” Tikhon said at a news conference this month.

“I don’t want to and I cannot understand the system of values of Orthodox activists,” Kulyabin said. “They have nothing to do with theatre.”

He said that he and the theatre’s director, Boris Mezdrich, had been summoned by prosecutors several days ago to give statements.

Kulyabin said he feared a court could order that the offending scenes be cut or the production could be removed from the theatre’s repertoire.

“It just depends on the level of their imagination,” he said.

After the Pussy Riot case, Russia in 2013 introduced a new criminal offence – carrying out public acts that offend believers – which carries a jail sentence of up to three years. It is unclear how this differs from the “administrative” misdemeanour.

Wagner’s opera, first performed in 1845, is about a hero who falls for the charms of Venus but eventually returns to the Catholic church.

Kulyabin’s production shifts the action to the present day, making Tannhauser a film director, which the director said is “fairly radical”.

Voir encore:

Brèves
Non-lieu en Russie dans le procès d’un opéra de Wagner « offensant » les croyants
Fait religieux

11.03.2015

Le procès de deux responsables d’un théâtre de Novossibirsk accusés d’avoir « offensé les sentiments religieux des croyants » en proposant une version très moderne de l’opéra Tannhäuser de Wagner s’est soldé mardi 10 mars par un non-lieu dans cette ville de Sibérie. Un tribunal local a « prononcé un non-lieu », mettant fin aux poursuites contre le directeur du Théâtre d’opéra et de ballet de Novossibirsk, Boris Mezdritch, et le metteur en scène Timofeï Kouliabine, qui risquaient tous les deux une amende de 200.000 roubles (environ 2.900 euros), ont rapporté les agences de presse russes. Cette décision a été accueillie dans la salle d’audience par des applaudissements, selon la même source.

Le procès a été ouvert la semaine dernière après la plainte d’un évêque orthodoxe, appuyée par le parquet local selon lequel cette adaptation, jouée pour la première fois en décembre à l’opéra de Novossibirsk, « désacralise » l’image de Jésus Christ.

La version originale de l’oeuvre, une des plus controversées du compositeur Richard Wagner, a été jouée pour la première fois en 1845. Le héros, Tannhäuser, est le captif volontaire de la déesse de l’amour Vénus avant de chercher la rédemption auprès du pape pour ses excès sexuels. Timofeï Kouliabine a déplacé l’action au XXIe siècle, Tannhäuser devenant un réalisateur qui tourne un film sur la visite de Jésus Christ dans le repaire de la déesse Vénus.

Avec AFP

Voir aussi:

Romeo Castellucci : la pièce qui fait scandale

Armelle Heliot
Le Figaro

30/10/2011 à 07:45

Considéré comme «blasphématoire» par des mouvements intégristes, le spectacle de l’Italien suscite de violentes manifestations. Mais de quoi parle la pièce ?Il contemple le public. Il nous regarde. Monumental, le portrait du Christ est l’élément central que l’on découvre en pénétrant dans la salle du Théâtre de la Ville, comme on l’a fait en juillet dernier, à l’Opéra-Théâtre d’Avignon, pour les représentations de Sul concetto di volto nel figlio di Dio («Sur le concept du visage du fils de Dieu») de Romeo Castellucci. Le tableau original s’intitule Salvator Mundi («Le sauveur du monde»). Antonello di Messina (1430-1479) découvre les mains du Christ, en un geste de bénédiction paisible. Romeo Castellucci, lui, cadre plus serré ce visage et l’on ne voit ni le cou, ni les mains, ni les épaules. Haut front bombé, paupières délicates, prunelle foncée, visage ovale ombré d’une barbe et d’une fine moustache, ce Christ est rassurant. Très humain.

Sur le plateau, des éléments de décor blancs. Côté jardin, à gauche, un coin salon avec un divan, une télévision. Un coin chambre à cour avec un lit à allure d’hôpital. Au milieu, une table couverte de médicaments. Un père, très vieil homme, en peignoir. Son fils s’apprête à partir au travail. Le vieil homme est incontinent. Trois fois, le fils, avec une patience infinie, va le changer tandis que ce père, à la fin, sanglote, déchirant et, dans un mouvement de désespoir et d’abandon, souille complètement le lit. Le fils se réfugie au pied de l’image… Moment très éprouvant, très dur, nous rappelant que comme «inter faeces et urinam nacimur» (nous naissons entre fèces et urine), on meurt aussi ainsi…

Jets d’huile de vidange, œufs, injures
Des intégristes de l’église Saint-Nicolas-du-Chardonnet protestaient, dimanche à Paris, devant le Théâtre de la Ville, place du Châtelet.
À Avignon, un deuxième mouvement suivait cette scène : des enfants surgissaient, sortant de leurs cartables des grenades de plastique qu’ils envoyaient sur le tableau sans que cela fasse le moindre bruit, sans que l’image soit le moins du monde abîmée. Castellucci disait avoir été inspiré par une photographie de Diane Arbus que l’on peut justement voir actuellement à Paris, au Jeu de paume, l’enfant à la grenade de Central Park en 1962… Ce moment a disparu : père et fils passent derrière la haute toile et l’on entend des grondements, et l’on voit des pressions à l’arrière. De longues traînées sombres – de l’encre de Chine selon Castellucci – coulent sur le visage impassible tandis que se déchire la toile et qu’apparaissent les mots «You are my sheperd», tu es mon berger, et qu’une négation «you ar not my sheperd» surgit.

C’est tout. Dans le document remis à Avignon, on parlait non pas de spectacle, mais de «performance», mais il faut l’entendre au sens de «représentation». Le premier soir, un homme s’écria «C’est nul !» et les jours qui suivirent on vit quelques personnes s’agenouiller devant le théâtre. Dans la ville où quelques mois plutôt certains chrétiens radicaux s’en étaient pris à l’œuvre de l’artiste américain Andres Serrano exposée à la Fondation Lambert, Immersion Pisschrist (nos éditions des 18, 19, 20 avril 2011), on pouvait craindre de vives réactions. Elles ne vinrent pas et, au contraire, de grandes personnalités catholiques organisèrent des rencontres publiques avec Romeo Castellucci. Ainsi Monseigneur Robert Chave et «Foi et Culture», ainsi des communautés religieuses.

Mais déjà certains sites de chrétiens radicaux appelaient à la mobilisation, certaines voix s’élevaient. Notamment celle des représentants de l’Institut Civitas, prenant dès fin juillet pour cible aussi Golgota Picnic de l’Argentin travaillant en Espagne Rodrigo Garcia, spectacle à l’affiche du Théâtre du Rond-Point du 8 au 17 décembre prochain, dans le cadre du Festival d’automne.

Depuis le 20 octobre dernier, date de la première représentation à Paris, des manifestants qui avaient, pour certains, depuis longtemps acheté des places, expriment avec violence leur refus : interrompant les représentations, s’en prenant aux spectateurs – jets d’huile de vidange, œufs, injures – ou priant et chantant des cantiques. Pour eux, on souille l’image du Christ. Or, les coulées et le délitement de l’image renvoient plus au chagrin du fils de Dieu fait homme, à son sentiment d’abandon sur la croix, qu’elles ne sont blasphématoires. Bien sûr, c’est difficile à comprendre. Ce spectacle a été présenté dans toute l’Europe sans incident. À Rome, la saison dernière, il s’est donné dans le calme.

À Paris, on devine qu’il y a, par-delà les déraisons des réactions, les froides raisons de la politique. Dans la manifestation qui a eu lieu samedi avec rendez-vous à la statue de Jeanne d’Arc, à Pyramide, lieu prisé de l’extrême droite, les banderoles disaient : «La France est chrétienne et doit le rester.» Par la voix de son porte-parole, Bernard Podvin, la Conférence des évêques de France a condamné les manifestations. Ce qui n’a pas empêché la dernière représentation du Théâtre de la Ville, cimanche après-midi, d’être donnée sous haute protection policière…

Au Centquatre, du 2 au 6 novembre, Paris IXe. Tél. : 01 53 35 50 00.

Parmi les manifestants, des radicaux de toutes confessions
Christophe Cornevin

Lancés dans une virulente croisade contre les «provocations blasphématoires» écornant l’image du Christ, les catholiques qui protestent depuis une dizaine de jours contre le spectacle de Romeo Castellucci font l’objet d’une attention policière toute particulière. Loin d’être considérés comme de «dangereux révolutionnaires», comme l’observait hier un haut fonctionnaire, ces traditionalistes se regroupent sous les bannières de l’Institut Civitas et de l’église de Saint-Nicolas-du-Chardonnet, où s’exprime la ­pensée intégriste de la fraternité ­Saint-Pie X.

«Cent contrôles par jour»

Dans leur sillage, les services de renseignements ont récemment vu apparaître des royalistes de l’Action française, de nationalistes du Renouveau français ainsi qu’un noyau de militants du Groupe Union Défense (GUD). «Au plus fort des manifestations, qui ont regroupé jusqu’à 1500 personnes, nous avons procédé à cent contrôles par jour, confie un responsable policier. En fin de semaine, nous avons interpellé plusieurs individus porteurs de bombes lacrymogènes ou de boules puantes qu’ils comptaient jeter sur les spectateurs à l’intérieur ou à la sortie du Théâtre de la Ville. » À plusieurs reprises, la représentation de Sur le concept du visage du fils de Dieu a déjà été interrompue en raison d’incidents.

«Deux manifestants ont même été interceptés sur un balcon du théâtre alors qu’ils s’apprêtaient à asperger le site à l’aide de deux bidons d’huile de vidange», grimace un fonctionnaire. Plus inquiétant, une poignée d’islamistes radicaux ont rejoint le mouvement qui se retrouvait jusqu’à hier place du Châtelet à Paris, brocardant notamment sur Internet une «pièce ordurière» pour «défendre l’honneur du prophète Issa (Jésus)».

La reprise du spectacle, le 2 novembre au Centquatre, dans le XIXe arrondissement, risque d’être émaillée de nouveaux incidents. Mais les forces de l’ordre redoutent déjà que les esprits s’enflamment plus encore avec la programmation de Golgota Picnic à partir du 8 décembre prochain au Théâtre du Rond-Point. On y verra Jésus, rebaptisé ici «El Puta Diablo», sa plaie de crucifié emplie de billets de banque. Selon nos informations, la préfecture de police de Paris est saisie depuis vendredi dernier d’une demande d’interdiction du spectacle.

Voir également:

Romeo Castellucci : adresse aux agresseurs
Armelle Héliot

Le Figaro

le 24 octobre 2011

« Je veux pardonner à ceux qui ont essayé par la violence d’empêcher le public d’avoir accès au Théâtre de la Ville à Paris.

Je leur pardonne car ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils font.

Ils n’ont jamais vu le spectacle ; ils ne savent pas qu’il est spirituel et christique ; c’est-à-dire porteur de l’image du Christ. Je ne cherche pas de raccourcis et je déteste la provocation. Pour cette raison, je ne peux accepter la caricature et l’effrayante simplification effectuées par ces personnes. Mais je leur pardonne car ils sont ignorants, et leur ignorance est d’autant plus arrogante et néfaste qu’elle fait appel à la foi. Ces personnes sont  dépourvues de la foi catholique même sur le plan doctrinal et dogmatique ; ils croient à tort défendre les symboles d’une identité perdue, en brandissant menace et violence. Elle est très forte la mobilisation irrationnelle qui s’organise et s’impose par la violence.

Désolé, mais l’art n’est champion que de la liberté d’expression.

Ce spectacle est une réflexion sur la déchéance de la beauté, sur le mystère de la fin. Les excréments dont le vieux père incontinent se souille ne sont que la métaphore du martyre humain comme condition ultime et réelle. Le visage du Christ illumine tout ceci par la puissance de son regard et interroge chaque spectateur en profondeur. C’est ce regard qui dérange et met à nu ; certainement pas la couleur marron dont l’artifice évident représente les matières fécales. En même temps – et je dois le dire avec clarté – il est complètement faux qu’on salisse le visage du Christ avec les excréments dans le spectacle.

Ceux qui ont assisté à la représentation ont pu voir la coulée finale d’un voile d’encre noir, descendant sur le tableau tel un suaire nocturne.

Cette image du Christ de la douleur n’appartient pas à l’illustration anesthésiée de la doctrine dogmatique de la foi. Ce Christ interroge en tant qu’image vivante, et certainement il divise et continuera à diviser. De plus, je tiens à remercier le Théâtre de la Ville en la personne d’Emmanuel Demarcy-Mota, pour tous les efforts qui sont faits afin de garantir l’intégrité des spectateurs et des acteurs. »

Romeo Castellucci

Sociètas Raffaello Sanzio

Paris, le 22 octobre 2011

«Le christianisme, religion la plus agressée» dans l’art

Olivier Delcroix
Le Figaro

30/10/2011 à 07:21

INTERVIEW – «Notre époque est passée championne dans l’art de défigurer les icônes du christianisme. Mais c’est dans sa vocation d’endurer cela intelligemment», estime le dominicain François Bœspflug.

Professeur d’histoire des religions à la faculté de théologie catholique de l’université de Strasbourg, le dominicain François Bœspflug est l’auteur d’une monumentale histoire de l’Éternel dans l’art, Dieu et ses images. Il analyse les scandales et les controverses qui entourent l’art d’aujourd’hui, de plus en plus souvent qualifié de «christianophobe».

LE FIGARO. – Selon vous, la pièce de Romeo Castellucci est-elle «christianophobe» ?

François BŒSPFLUG. – Apparemment, oui. Dans la mesure où elle s’en prend, explicitement, lourdement, péniblement, à l’une des figures majeures en lesquelles se synthétise le message chrétien, le visage du Christ. Selon tous ceux qui ont vu la pièce, c’est à ce point pénible que l’on peut comprendre les réactions de croyants. Néanmoins, je crois qu’il convient de dépasser le grief de «blasphème» adressé à la pièce. Selon moi, elle illustre à merveille un des caractères structurels de l’art contemporain, qui est beaucoup plus ambivalent que platement christianophobe. L’idée que la pièce se déroule devant le Salvator mundi d’Antonello da Messina dit plus qu’une banale agression. Elle dit une obsession, une fascination, une prise à témoin du Christ, du Sauveur. Notre époque, surtout depuis quelques décennies, est passée championne dans l’art de défigurer les icônes majeures du christianisme. Mais c’est dans la vocation du christianisme d’endurer cela intelligemment. Le malheur, actuellement, est que les chrétiens sont profondément désarmés, moralement et intellectuellement. Il faut dire que l’on a congédié ceux qui pourraient les aider à réagir en connaissance de cause, je veux dire les spécialistes de la longue histoire de la défiguration des symboles chrétiens.

Le christianisme est-il devenu la cible privilégiée des artistes ?

Oui, sans doute. L’art contemporain est l’une des manifestations de la christianophobie. Pas la seule… Encore faut-il préciser que ce n’est évidemment pas systématique. L’art sacré d’inspiration et de destination chrétienne poursuit sa route et continue de susciter des œuvres. Le septième art, à ma connaissance, est beaucoup moins souvent christianophobe que ne le sont les arts plastiques. Voyez au cinéma le film Des hommes et des dieux, ou Habemus papam, au théâtre les pièces d’Olivier Py, en littérature, en BD…

Est-ce qu’il est mieux ou moins bien traité que les autres monothéismes ?

Moins bien, c’est incontestable. Il a droit, pour ainsi dire, à un traitement de faveur. Imaginez qu’à la place du visage du Christ, comme décor d’une pièce de théâtre, figure celui de Moïse, de Mohammed ou de Bouddha. Ce serait un tollé immédiat. De toutes les religions, le christianisme est, sans conteste, la plus agressée. Et selon moi c’est normal. Cela tient au fait que le christianisme aime autant l’image, qui s’expose, que la personne, qui oblige.

«Dieu et ses images. Une histoire de l’Éternel dans l’art», de François Bœspflug. 526 pages, Bayard, 39 €.

Voir de même:

Religion L’Eglise protestante unie ouvre la bénédiction aux couples homosexuels mariés
Agnès Chareton
17/05/2015

Réunis en synode national à Sète du 14 au 17 mai, 105 délégués de l’Eglise protestante unie de France se sont prononcés en faveur de l’ouverture de la bénédiction aux couples de même sexe mariés, par 94 voix pour, et 3 contre.

C’est un grand oui. Dimanche 17 mai, une très large majorité de délégués de l’Eglise protestante unie de France (EPUdF), réunis en synode national à Sète (Hérault), ont voté l’ouverture de la bénédiction aux couples mariés de même sexe. A l’issue de trois jours de débats intense et de réflexion, les 105 délégués du synode, rassemblés dans le temple de Sète, ont adopté par 94 voix pour, et 3 voix contre, « la possibilité, pour celles et ceux qui y voient une juste façon de témoigner de l’Evangile, de pratiquer une bénédiction liturgique des couples mariés de même sexe qui veulent placer leur alliance devant Dieu. »

La bénédiction des couples homosexuels n’est « ni un droit, ni une obligation », mais une « possibilité », et « ne s’impose à aucune paroisse, à aucun pasteur », précise l’EPUdF dans un communiqué. Les pasteurs qui souhaitent célébrer de telles bénédictions pourront donc le faire, en accord avec leur conseil presbytéral, et les pasteurs réfractaires n’y seront pas obligés. Cette décision est l’aboutissement d’un processus de consultation de 18 mois, mené à partir de janvier 2014 dans les paroisses et les Eglises locales, et dans les neuf synodes régionaux en novembre 2014. L’EPUDdf a choisi d’aborder la question des couples homosexuels sous l’angle plus large de la bénédiction.

L’EPUdF, forte de 250 000 fidèles, est la troisième Eglise de la Fédération protestante de France (FPF) à s’être prononcée sur ce sujet sensible, qui divise l’Eglise luthéro-réformée depuis plusieurs années. Il y a un an, l’Union des Eglises protestantes d’Alsace et de Lorraine (UEPAL) a décidé de se donner plus de temps avant de trancher, et depuis 2011, la petite Mission populaire évangélique de France autorise la bénédiction des couples homosexuels. A la différence des catholiques, pour les protestants, le mariage n’est pas un sacrement, mais le mariage civil peut être béni lors d’une célébration religieuse au temple.

Malgré le très fort consensus qui se dégage de la décision synodale, en faveur de la bénédiction des couples de même sexe, la question est loin de faire l’unanimité au sein de l’Eglise luthéro-réformée. Au cours du synode, quelques voix ont rappelé que le débat avait été « difficile », même « douloureux » dans certaines paroisses, tandis que d’autres ont pointé le risque de fragiliser, par cette décision, la communion avec les Eglises sœurs protestantes –notamment évangéliques- et le dialogue œcuménique avec l’Eglise catholique. Plusieurs délégués du synode ont insisté sur la nécessité de faire preuve de « pédagogie » concernant la réception de la décision par les paroisses et les Eglises locales.

Voir par ailleurs:

«Ride me all day for 3£» : la campagne d’une compagnie de bus galloise déplaît
Libération

12 mai 2015

Histoire.Les entreprises devraient pourtant le savoir, depuis le temps qu’on le dit : il n’est pas utile de mettre une femme seins à l’air sur une affiche pour vendre un produit qui n’a aucun rapport avec des seins, à l’air ou non. Ni de mettre un homme torse nu pour les mêmes raisons. Vous pouvez trouver ça drôle, glamour ou attirant, mais vous obtiendrez surtout de la mauvaise publicité. Une compagnie de bus de Cardiff (Pays de Galles) a pourtant décidé d’afficher au dos de ses bus la photo en noir et blanc d’une femme topless, dont les seins sont recouverts par un panneau : «Ride me all day for 3£», soit, en gros, «Montez-moi toute la journée pour 3£», «ride» évoquant à la fois une course (en taxi, en bus, de chevaux, etc.) et une relation sexuelle. D’autres bus montrent un homme torse nu avec le même panneau. Du coup, l’entreprise s’est pris un tollé et a décidé de retirer les affiches.

Voir de plus:

Les seins d’un Picasso floutés à la télévision américaine
La chaîne Fox 5 a censuré la poitrine des « Femmes d’Alger », un tableau peint par Picasso devenu la toile la plus chère du monde.
Francetv info

14/05/2015

« Couvrez ce sein que je ne saurais voir. » Le Tartuffe de Molière a semble-t-il fait des émules outre-Atlantique. La chaîne américaine Fox 5 a flouté les seins peints par Picasso sur l’un des tableaux de sa série Les Femmes d’Alger peinte en 1955. Le blog du Monde Big Browser se fait l’écho, jeudi 14 mai, de la censure de cette œuvre d’art.

Fox 5, la chaîne locale new-yorkaise de la très conservatrice Fox, évoquait le prix record de ce tableau, la version O des Femmes d’Alger, la quinzième de la série. L’œuvre a été adjugée 179,36 millions de dollars, soit 157,57 millions d’euros, lors de sa vente aux enchères par la maison Christie’s à New York, lundi 11 mai. Elle est ainsi devenue en onze minutes seulement la toile la plus chère du monde.

Des « esprits sexuellement malades »

Sur Twitter, le critique d’art du célèbre New York Magazine, Jerry Saltz, a dénoncé  le zèle d' »esprits malades », « sexuellement malades ».

« Libérez les tétons »
Le mot-dièse « #freethenipple » – « libérez les tétons » en français – qui avait été utilisé lors de la campagne contre la censure de la nudité féminine sur Facebook a refait surface pour dénoncer « les dangeureux pervers » de « l’Amérique puritaine ».

Les censeurs de Fox 5 ont toutefois fait un oubli : si les seins ont été floutés, la paire de fesses au centre de la toile a, elle, été épargnée.

Voir par ailleurs:

Empire State Of Mind Lyrics
Jay-Z, Alicia Keys

[Jay-Z:]
Yeah,
Yeah, I’m ma up at Brooklyn,
Now I’m down in Tribe ca,
Right next to DeNiro,
But I’ll be hood forever,
I’m the new Sinatra,
And since I made it here,
I can make it anywhere,
Yeah they love me everywhere,
I used to cop in Harlem,
All of my Dominicans
Right there up on Broadway,
Brought me back to that McDonald’s,

Took it to my stash spot,
5-60 State street,
Catch me in the kitchen like a Simmons whipping Pastry,
Cruising down 8th street,
Off white Lexus,
Driving so slow but BK is from Texas,
Me I’m up at Bed Study,
Home of that boy Biggie,
Now I live on billboard,
And I brought my boys with me,
Say what up to Ty Ty, still sipping Mai-tai
Sitting court side Knicks and Nets give me high fives,
N-gga I be Spiked out, I can trip a referee,
Tell by my attitude that I most definitely from

[Alicia Keys:]
In New York,
Concrete jungle where dreams are made of,
There’s nothing you can’t do,
Now you’re in New York,
These streets will make you feel brand new,
The lights will inspire you,
Let’s hear it for New York, New York, New York

[Jay-Z:]
I made you hot nigga,
Catch me at the X with OG at a Yankee game,
Shit I made the Yankee hat more famous than a yankee can,
You should know I bleed Blue, but I ain’t a crip tho,
But I got a gang of niggas walking with my clique though,
Welcome to the melting pot,
Corners where we selling rocks,
Afrika bambaataa shit,
Home of the hip hop,
Yellow cap, gypsy cap, dollar cab, holla back,
For foreigners it aint fitted they forgot how to act,
8 million stories out there and their naked,

Cities is a pity half of y’all won’t make it,
Me I gotta plug Special Ed and I got it made,
If Jeezy’s paying LeBron, I’m paying Dwayne Wade,
3 dice cee-lo
3 card Monte,
Labor day parade, rest in peace Bob Marley,
Statue of Liberty, long live the World trade,
Long live the king yo,
I’m from the empire state that’s

[Repeat Chorus:]

[Jay-Z:]
Lights is blinding,
Girls need blinders
So they can step out of bounds quick,
The side lines is blind with casualties,
Who sipping life casually, then gradually become worse,
Don’t bite the apple Eve,
Caught up in the in crowd,
Now your in-style,
And in the winter gets cold en vogue with your skin out,
The city of sin is a pity on a whim,
Good girls gone bad, the cities filled with them,
Mami took a bus trip and now she got her bust out,
Everybody ride her, just like a bus route,
Hail Mary to the city your a Virgin,
And Jesus CAN save you! life starts when church starts,

Came here for school, graduated to the high life,
Ball players, rap stars, addicted to the limelight,
MDMA got you feeling like a champion,
The city never sleeps better slip you a Ambient

[Repeat Chorus:]

[Alicia Keys:]
One hand in the air for the big city,
Street lights, big dreams all looking pretty,
No place in the World that can compare,
Put your lighters in the air, everybody say yeah
Come on, come,
Yeah,

https://jcdurbant.wordpress.com/…/transport-aerien-quand-l…/

https://jcdurbant.wordpress.com/…/expositions-apres-le-sex…/

Voir encore:

The Erotic History of Advertising
Aromatic Aphrodisiacs: Fragrance
« Hello? »
« You snore. »
« And you steal all the covers. What time did you leave? »
« Six-thirty. You looked like a toppled Greek statue lying there. Only some tourist had swiped your fig leaf. I was tempted to wake you up. »
« I miss you already. »
« You’re going to miss something else. Have you looked in the bathroom yet? »
« Why? »
« I took your bottle of Paco Rabanne cologne. »
« What on earth are you going to do with it…give it to a secret lover you’ve got stashed away in San Francisco? »
« I’m going to take some and rub it on my body when I go to bed tonight. And then I’m going to remember every little thing about you…and last night. »
« Do you know what your voice is doing to me?
« You aren’t the only one with imagination. I’ve got to go; they’re calling my flight. I’ll be back Tuesday. Can I bring you anything? »
« My Paco Rabanne. And a fig leaf. »

Paco Rabanne – A cologne for men. What is remembered is up to you.

Not convinced about the power of product placement? Paco Rabanne had no hesitations. The company discovered a way to inventively insert its own product-Paco Rabanne cologne-into a series of sexually laden tête-à-têtes. The dialogue belonged to a two-page spread revealing the inside of an artist’s flat (see fig. 9.1). Against the far wall a man sits up in bed, sheets to his hips, talking on the phone; an empty bottle of wine sits near the foot of his bed. The dialogue flows down the page on the other side of the ad.
Additional vignettes include a lonely writer in Pawgansett, a musician with a towel wrapped around his waist promising the caller another bedtime story, and a man on his boat making arrangements for a rendezvous. All flirted with their lovers over the telephone, and all plots revolved around a missing (or empty) bottle of Paco Rabanne.
The ads created a mini-sensation when they first appeared in the early-1980s. Readers had fun guessing what the other person looked like. Some even speculated about the caller’s gender-notice that the text is ambiguous, and there is that reference about « a secret lover…stashed away in San Francisco. » An academic study even investigated another Paco Rabanne ad to see how readers interpreted the motive of a female caller-was she a slut, in control, out of control, rich?
Sexual content in fragrance advertising is manifest in the usual ways: as models showing skin-chests and breasts, open shirts, tight-fitting clothing-and as dalliances involving touching, kissing, embracing, and voyeurism. These outward forms of sexual content are often woven into the explicit and implicit sexual promises discussed in Chapter 1: promises to make the wearer more sexually attractive, more likely to engage in sexual behavior, or simply « feel » more sexy for one’s own enjoyment.
The Paco Rabanne campaign didn’t contain nudity (much anyway), and it didn’t come right out and say, « This is what attracts her to you…or you to him. » But, like most fragrance advertising, the campaign did create a sensual mood, and moods are essential in fragrance advertising. « A fragrance doesn’t do anything. It doesn’t stop wetness. It doesn’t unclog your drain. To create a fantasy for the consumer is what fragrance is all about. And sex and romance are a big part of where people’s fantasies tend to run, » confessed Robert Green, vice president of advertising for Calvin Klein Cosmetics, to the New York Times.
One thing is certain: fragrance marketers play to people’s fantasies. A study in 1970 conducted by marketing analyst Suzanne Grayson revealed that sex was the central positioning strategy for 49 percent of the fragrances on the market. The second highest positioning strategy was outdoor/sports at 14 percent. In Grayson’s analysis, sexual themes ranged from raw sex to romance with the fragrance positioned as an aphrodisiac-an aromatic potion that evoked intimate feelings or provoked behavioral expression of those feelings. According to Richard Roth, an account executive for Prince Matchabelli, « Fragrance will always be sold with a desirability motif. » Roth’s prediction, made in 1980, proved accurate as desirability, attraction, and passion remained central themes in fragrance positioning through today. What did change, however, was the content and expression of the desire motif over time. For one, as the Paco Rabanne repartee demonstrates, women became equal partners in « the chase. »
Fragrance Advertising in the 1970s
The 1970s were viewed by some in the industry as a cooling off period, when blatant sexual come-ons-at least those targeted to women-came to be considered passé and in bad taste. Some industry experts predicted that as sex roles evolved, with women entering the workforce and pushing for equality, sexual appeals casting the woman as a sex object would decrease. Grayson’s study seemed to confirm these observations. While sex was the largest positioning strategy in 1970, by 1979 only 28 percent of fragrances used a sex-only strategy. Sex was still present in many ads, but it was combined with other strategies such as youth, status, sports, and fantasy, which of course could have a sexual underlying theme. The tenor of women’s fragrances changed from the theme of turning on men to turning on the self-of being in control and self-sufficient.
Two women’s fragrances, described in more detail in the following sections, exemplify this transition. Introduced in 1975, Aviance used the « desirable quarry » approach. The perfume’s message was: use this to turn on your men. Effective then, this type of approach was soon deemed as « not what women respond to. » By the end of the 1970s, appeals could still contain sex but those with women in control would prove most effective. Fantasy was deemed a exemplary approach: « In fantasy, a lover may be part of the picture, but he is not needed, isn’t integral. Most importantly, sexual fantasy represents the woman in control. » Chanel’s 1979 ad featured fantasy as well as a subtle sexual reference.
Targeting men? That’s a different story. Use whatever strategy works, and Jovan chose one that was brazenly sexual. Its ads made outright promises, or pledges, rather, about the sexual outcomes of using its colognes. The campaign proved very successful, leaving one to wonder if men will ever learn.
Aviance’s « Night » Campaign
Despite having a scent described by its own marketing director as « not that appealing, » Aviance perfume proved to be a smash for Prince Matchabelli. Mark Larcy, now the president of Parfums de Coeur, was the marketing director who put together a successful campaign designed to play to the insecurities and desires of stay-at-home wives in the mid-1970s. The « I’m going to have an Aviance night » campaign sought to « …reassure the traditional housewife that she was still alluring, still exciting, and still able to be wild and carefree with the man she loved, » wrote brand historian Anita Louise Coryell.
Debuting in September 1975, the campaign’s original commercial was built around the proverbial « lingerie-clad wife meets husband at the door » motif. The spot features a woman transforming herself from housewife to lover-with Aviance as the latchkey. The housewife « throws off her unsightly cleaning clothes, including her bandana wrapped around her hair, dons an alluring negligee, coifs her hair, puts on makeup, and sprays herself with Aviance. She greets her husband at the door with a fetching look, and he gives her the once-over. His eyes light up with approval, » wrote Coryell. Anticipation may have been on his mind. The spot’s jingle was especially catchy: « I’ve been sweet and I’ve been good, I’ve had a whole full day of motherhood, but I’m gonna have an Aviance night. »
Short-lived, the spots ran intermittently for four months in 1975. The print campaign consisted of a four-color, full-page shot of the husband leaning against the doorway, as seen through the bare legs of what is assumed to be his horizontally positioned wife (see fig. 9.2). She raises the knee of one of her legs to create a triangle that frames the scene.
The ads were designed to appeal to an emergent segment of the population-women who were staying home in an era when more feminist-minded women were entering the workforce. In-depth research commissioned by Larcy found what he described as, « The stay-at-homes visualized their husbands at work with voluptuous, liberated women. » In addition, research revealed that women used fragrance to assist with role transformation-it helped them move from mother and wife to a sexual partner, or what Larcy described as « their better sexy shelf. » Aviance was positioned as the fragrance that would assist in that transformation.
Despite subsequent criticism about the way the woman in the ad is objectified-whose only worth to her man is as a sexual plaything-women played an integral role in the campaign’s development. The research effort was led by a female sociologist who was able to tap not only the insecurities, but the predilections and aspirations of women in the focus groups. In addition, the ad was produced by the female-agency Advertising to Women, the only agency to understand the product’s positioning, said Larcy. Even the jingle was created by the agency’s president, Lois Geraci Ernst.
In spite of its unappealing « strong, slightly musky scent, » the spot resonated with women. Aviance sold over $7 million its first year and the ad was selected by Advertising Age as one of the best commercials in 1975. In the 1980s, sexualized women would continue to be a mainstay in fragrance advertising, but women were just as apt to objectify as to be objectified.
Chanel « Share[s] the Fantasy »
Chanel first aired its « Share the Fantasy » or « Pool » commercial in 1979. The sensual spot was conspicuous for its lack of sexual explicitness and bold propositions. Showcasing a woman’s fantasy, the commercial was praised for requiring viewers to fill in the « missing images. »
Selling for over $250 an ounce, Chanel No. 5 has been one of the world’s top-selling perfumes since its introduction on May 5, 1921. An enduring symbol of French designer Coco Chanel’s influence, the package has remained virtually unchanged since she first tested the fragrance in the vial labeled « Chanel No. 5. » According to brand researcher William Baue, the 1979 commercial for Chanel No. 5 « became a defining moment for the French fragrance and company’s fashion advertising. » The campaign was part of an overall effort to boost the House of Chanel image, which had diminished after Coco Chanel’s death in 1971. The campaign was an important step for the company to help it reposition itself for the future.
The commercial began with dramatic yet sensuous retro music, and a shot of the enticing blue water in a swimming pool. A woman, facing away from the camera, lies on her back at the edge of the pool. The shadow of an airplane passes over her, followed by a woman’s European-accented voice-over, « I am made of blue sky and golden light, and I will feel this way forever. » A tall, dark man in a black Euro-style swimsuit dives in the water from the other side of the pool. Swimming underwater, he rises up in front of her-then disappears. « Share the Fantasy » was the tagline for the commercial, but only in the American version. It wasn’t needed in France where Chanel’s brand identity is at icon status.
Directed by Ridley Scott, a British film director whose later credits include Alien, Blade Runner, and Thelma & Louise, the spot was produced in-house under the guidance of Chanel’s longtime artistic director Jacques Helleu. A beautiful spot with rich colors, it was truly an indulgent yet tranquil fantasy-sure to lower heart rates in its brief 30 seconds.
The spot’s lack of carnality and blatant sexual referents diverged from other fragrance advertising at the time. « Focusing on fantasy allowed Chanel to harness the power of sexuality without crossing the border into distaste, » observed brand researcher William Baue. The subtle approach was a wise strategy considering that the target audience was older women: « Our advertising is sexy, but never sleazy. If anything, we tend to pull back, rather than go too far, which is opposite of the rest of the business, » remarked Lyle Saunders, a Chanel executive, to Adweek. « Pool » was one of five spots produced for the long-running campaign; the spot ran from 1979 until at least 1985, perhaps longer. Although the company doesn’t release its sales figures, Chanel ratcheted up its prestigious image, and Chanel No. 5 never lost its position as one of the top best-selling perfumes in the world.
Jovan’s Advice: « Get Your Share »…of?
Jovan, Inc., a small fragrance marketer, spiced up consumer advertising and the fragrance industry in the mid-1970s. Executives at the company used blatant sex appeals to boldly introduce a line of musk-oil-based colognes and perfumes. Headlines proclaimed, « Sex Appeal. Now you don’t have to be born with it, » and « Drop for drop, Jovan Musk Oil has brought more men and women together than any other fragrance in history. » The approach earned the company and its three executives accolades, and sales soared from $1.5 million in 1971 to $77 million by 1978. Eleven years after it was founded, a British conglomerate bought Jovan for $85 million. With no previous experience in the fragrance industry, Jovan’s founding executives implemented a sexual marketing strategy that proved to be a very smart venture.
Bernard Mitchell and Berry Shipp were looking to get into a new line of business in 1968 when they founded Jovan with a mink bath oil product. The company’s name was chosen for two reasons: Jovan sounded French, and the name was similar to the company’s two primary competitors, Revlon and Avon. Richard Meyer, a Chicago ad executive, soon joined Jovan to write the ads and creatively manage the fragrance campaigns. Meyer eventually became president of the company.
The company’s success was linked to its Jovan Musk Oil, introduced in 1972. Musk, a synthetic version of an animal pheromone, was marketed for its ability to enhance sexual attraction-though musk’s magnetism is debatable. The product’s genesis was happenstance. Shipp was passing through Greenwich Village when he saw lines of young people buying small bottles of full-strength musk from street venders. Shipp carried the idea back to Jovan, and soon the company was producing a fragrance based largely on musk. Until then, musk had been used only in small amounts as a fragrance additive.
The company’s success was tied to several factors, one of which was its sexual marketing strategy. All promotional activities appeared to position the fragrance as a sexual entrée. For example, consumers were told that Jovan products would help them attract members of the opposite sex, and increase their odds for steamy liaisons. Many Jovan ads contained the subtle argument that people were having sex, and if the reader wasn’t satisfied with his or her « share, » Jovan could be of service. Sex and intimacy were the prizes, and Jovan was positioned as the purchase that helped consumers achieve those ends. Consider a Jovan Musk Oil headline in 1977: « In a world filled with blatant propositions, brash overtures, bold invitations, and brazen proposals…Get your share. »
A 1975 retail ad for Jovan Sex Appeal aftershave/cologne for men, contained the headline, « Sex Appeal for Sale. Come in and get yours. » The tagline read, « Jovan Sex Appeal. Now you don’t have to be born with it. » The only image in the ad, besides the headline, was an illustration of boxed Jovan bottles. The packaging was unique because it was the ad’s copy. The anti-packaging, this brown bag approach, fit the spirit of the ’70s. What did Sex Appeal smell like? Just read the box: « [a] provocative blend of exotic spices and smoldering woods interwoven with animal musk tones. » The description begs the question, what exactly is an animal musk tone? And what species were they referring to-dog or wild jungle beast? It didn’t matter, consumers were buying Jovan by the truckload.
The Fragrance Foundation also liked the ads. In 1975 it voted Jovan’s Musk Oil promotion the « most exciting and creative national advertisement campaign. » Jovan’s CEO, Bernie Mitchell, also earned an industry award. He was voted « the year’s most outstanding person. »
Often, the packaged fragrance was the only illustration. These ads contained attention getting headlines relying on double entendre, references to sex, and explicit promises. Copy in the ads served to elaborate on the suggestive reference in the headline. Consider a 1977 ad appearing in Jet magazine. It contained the headline, « And, it’s legal. » The copy went on to read: The provocative scent that instinctively calms and yet arouses your basic animal desires. And hers. …A no nonsense scent all your own. With lingering powers that will last as long as you do. And then some. …It may not put more women into your life. But it will probably put more life into your women. Because it’s the message lotion. Get it on!
Other ads contained images of nudity and sexually suggestive behavior. For example, another full-page ad appearing in Jet contained a small image of an apparently naked Black couple in a passionate embrace. He’s kissing her neck. Her head is tilted back and her eyes are closed, seemingly in rapture. The headline read, « Drop for drop, Jovan Musk Oil has brought more men and women together than any other fragrance in history. »
A seductive ad targeted to women ran in issues of magazines in 1976 (see fig. 9.3). The headline read, « Jovan Musk Oil Perfume. The only Musk oil dedicated to the proposition. » The image was an extreme close-up shot of a man’s hand lightly resting on a woman’s knee. The man is wearing a wedding ring, but who knows for sure if it’s his wife’s leg he’s touching-it was the ’70s after all. The packaging on the box reads: « It releases the animal instinct. Musk oil is the exciting scent that has stimulated passion since time began. Cleopatra, Helen of Troy, Pompadour knew the spell it could create. So can you. » Similarly styled ads promoted men’s cologne. For example, an ad scheduled to run in Jet contained Black models in a similarly posed shot.
The headline in a 1976 ad, targeted toward women, contained a blatant double entendre typical of Jovan ads, « Someone you know wants it » (see fig. 9.4). Another ad for a different fragrance targeted toward women, Belle de Jovan perfume, contained an image reminiscent of a 1930s romantic appeal. In the hazy image, a man is kissing a woman’s neck. The headline reads, « Introducing Belle de Jovan Perfume. Open. Apply. Experience. Savor. Whisper. Touch. Caress. Stroke. Kiss. . . » There is little doubt about the lustful allusion in this ad. As a call to action, the ad’s tagline reads, « Wear it for him. Before someone else does. »

A 1977 Jovan ad designed to appeal to men read: « 11 great Jovan aftershave/colognes. If one doesn’t get her, another will. » The scene evokes thoughts of a singles’ bar. The man is sitting at a bar with a drink, looking at the viewer. A smiling woman closes her eyes as she whiffs his cologne. The obvious meaning is that men will attract women if they wear one (the correct one, mind you) of Jovan’s colognes.

Jovan carried its sexual expression one step further when it sponsored a limerick contest in 1979. The company invested $500,000 in television and magazine advertising to promote the contest. Readers submitted new last lines for limericks published in the ads. Winners were eligible for cash prizes and trips to Club Med. In the ad, the limerick was scrawled on a wall in the men’s room. Other scrawl in the ad attempted to make the scene believable. For instance, there were hearts with initials in them, a Kilroy-esque symbol, and a phone number for « Arlene. » The limerick read as follows:
There was a young man named McNair, Whose cologne did defile the air. Women with him were brusk, Until he tried Jovan Musk, And now he gets more than his share.
« More » was bold and underlined. A limerick aimed at women told of a boring young maiden who « pleasantly found of the action around, She now gets her share and much more. » These limericks helped to reinforce Jovan’s « get some » strategy.
Until Jovan’s brazen advertising approach, fragrance ads had been mysterious and subtle about the seductive powers of their perfumes. According to an Advertising Age writer, « Perhaps it is because the company’s blatant claims about enhancing the sensual characteristics of a woman’s basic animal instincts exploit what the more decorous fragrance marketers have only been hinting at for years. » Another writer observed that Jovan had ignored the « mystic marketing approach beloved by established fragrance houses »-much to its own success.
Jovan’s success was also tied to is distribution strategy. Unlike most advertised fragrances, Jovan mass marketed its products like packaged goods instead of upscale, image-conscious products. Compared to most colognes and perfumes, Jovan was very competitively priced. For example, smaller bottles were priced at $1.50 and displayed near the checkout at mass merchandisers, drugstores, and department stores. In 1976 for example, Jovan was available in over 22,000 outlets. Using a convenience goods marketing technique (extensive distribution and low price point), Jovan ramped up sales. One ad headline unabashedly proclaimed, « Sex Appeal by Jovan. Now at Walgreens. »
Jovan also created demand for a « wardrobe » of fragrances. Instead of purchasing one Jovan fragrance, consumers were encouraged to use different fragrances throughout the day. Depending on your activities (or goals), there were lighter scents for work and play. In 1977, for example, there were eleven product lines-scents, as Jovan preferred to refer to them-for men. A line of « light colognes » for women was promoted in an interesting ad. A woman is shown sitting between two men who are obviously interested in her. All of them are wearing sports attire (e.g. tennis shorts, tank tops) and she’s signaling « time out » with her hands. « Sometimes you’d rather keep it light, » read the headline. What was the message? If you want to smell nice but keep the boys at bay, wear a lighter musk. In 1981 Jovan introduced Andron (for men and women), a pheromone-based, fragrance. True to form, Andron’s pheromone mixture was touted as a signal for sex.
As previously mentioned, an innovative technique used by Jovan was to print sales copy directly on the box. This approach was referred to as the « talking package » because copy on the box described the contents. For example, a magazine ad for Jovan’s Sex Appeal in 1975 featured images of a teal box with silver and white lettering. Aside from the headline, « Now you don’t have to be born with it, » the ad’s copy was what was printed on the packaging. « This provocative, stimulating blend of rare spices and herbs was created by man for the sole purpose of attracting woman. At will. » The copy also proclaims that men can never have enough « sex appeal. » This particular ad ran in Viva, Cosmopolitan, and Oui. Ads for Sex Appeal for Women fragrance appeared in Harper’s Bazaar, Mademoiselle, Glamour, Essence, and People.
Jovan is the story of a sexual positioning strategy that paid off handsomely. In Jovan’s advertising, packaging, and promotions, sex was always at the core. True, perceptions did exist at the time that musk, Jovan’s primary ingredient, was a sexual attractant, but Meyer and Jovan’s agencies exploited the belief for all it was worth. Unlike other fragrance ads up to that time, Jovan’s advertising contained unabashed sexual claims that Jovan users would become sexual magnets.
More important, Jovan’s appeals resonated with consumers. In 1976, Jovan was third in market share for men’s fragrances and tenth for women’s lines. Although market share for men’s fragrances was a fifth of the market for women’s fragrances, Jovan exploited a male market that was just beginning to take interest in personal care. As a result of its success, Jovan was bought for $85 million by British conglomerate Beecham. With over 97 percent of the purchase price going to Jovan’s three top executives, it’s fair to say that they « got their share. »
Fragrance Advertising in the 1980s
If there was a theme in 1980s fragrance advertising, it was that women and men were equals in the sexual pursuit. Forbes writer Joshua Levine commented in 1990, « Advertisements today frequently picture women as sexual aggressors or at least equal sparring partners, rather than available sex objects. » He could have been describing any number of fragrance ads targeted to both women and men. Perhaps it was the Paco Rabanne ads described earlier, in which the women are just as deft as the men at trading playful one-liners.
Revlon’s Charlie created a stir with a subtle gender-bending pat on the backside in 1987. Successful since its introduction in 1973, writer Robert Crooke described the Charlie campaign as « geared to a theme of energy and female self-sufficiency that borders on brazenness. » Shelley Hack, soon to join Charlie’s Angels, was the original model. The brazenness was put into action when a Charlie model reached down and gave her male colleague a pat that lives in infamy. Was the gesture sexual or merely playful? According to Mal MacDougall, the man who wrote the ad, « It was meant as an asexual gesture, the same kind of thing a quarterback does to a lineman. » Not everyone was convinced; the New York Times refused to run the ads, saying they were sexist and in poor taste.
Women’s newfound sexual assertiveness was evident in many ads at the time. A 1985 ad for Anne Klein perfume shows a couple disrobing in a sequence of 12 snapshots. The woman begins the action by pulling off the man’s tie-no headline for the ad was necessary. A woman pins a man against the side of a giant fragrance bottle in a Coty Musk cologne ad. Pulling his shirt off, she presses up against him, a leg thrust between his: « It must be the Musk. » In « The Joy of Sax » ad for Saxon aftershave, a woman is shown stroking a man’s face: « Your partner will respond to the difference. »
Another trend influenced the look of fragrance advertising in the 1980s. Referring to the influence of AIDS, Adweek’s Dottie Enrico made the following observation in 1987: « Today we’re seeing plenty of sex in ads, but much of it is being couched in the more cautious context of obviously monogamous relationships. » Enrico was referring to a dampening of unabashed sexual interaction in advertising. Reflecting the country’s mood, the headline for a Coty Emeraude perfume ad read: « I love only one man. I wear only one fragrance. »
Revlon struck the right balance with Charlie, but hit resistance with its Intimate perfume television spot in 1987. Hot (and cold) and steamy, the spot contained what some referred to as a 9 1/2 Weeks-inspired ice cube scene. In the ad, a man sensually runs an ice cube down a woman’s cheek and neck. The ad had to be reworked before it was allowed to run on network television. « It’s chilling-both literally and figuratively, » remarked market researcher Judith Langer, of Langer and Associates. « I think it went too far for a lot of people. » Although the couple was « partnered, » the ad was deemed too risqué at a time when, as Levine noted, « fear of AIDS has given overt sexual imagery menacing overtones. » The print version of the campaign contained the headline, « An Intimate Party, » and tagline, « The Uninhibited Fragrance. » Revlon’s Intimate wasn’t the only fragrance spot that had to be reworked. Networks refused to clear a broadcast version of the Paco Rabanne dialogue ad until the male model donned a wedding ring. « I think we’re seeing less of the swinging single in advertising because of the current health situation, » advertising executive Lynne Seid told Adweek.
Despite the dampening of erotic imagery, nudity-especially in Calvin Klein fragrance ads-set new boundaries. Although Obsession was not introduced until 1985, Calvin Klein campaigns dominated fragrance advertising in the 1980s; not in sheer number, but in tone.
We are grateful to Tom Reichert and Prometheus Books for granting aef.com permission to post this excerpt.

Voir enfin:

Alain Corbin: «C’est le temps des oies blanches et des bordels»

Simonnet Dominique

L’Express

01/08/2002

Tant de désirs retenus, tant de frustrations cachées, tant de médiocres conduites… Voilà un siècle bien mal dans sa peau! Le XIXe s’ouvre dans un soupir romantique («Hâtons-nous, jouissons!» déclame Lamartine) et se dévoie dans l’hygiénisme froid des confesseurs et des médecins. Siècle hypocrite qui réprime le sexe mais en est obsédé. Traque la nudité mais regarde par les trous de serrure. Corsète le couple conjugal mais promeut les bordels. Comme si, à ce moment-là, toutes les contradictions du jeu amoureux se bousculaient. Bien sûr, ce sont encore les femmes qui en font les frais. Mais ne jugeons pas trop vite! s’écrie l’historien Alain Corbin. Vers sa fin, ce curieux XIXe tire sur le devant de la scène une composante de l’amour jusqu’alors inavouée: le plaisir. Il est là pour rester.
Il est devenu ce qu’il est convenu d’appeler un «historien des mentalités». Plus que les grands événements, c’est l’intérieur des êtres qui le passionne, leur intimité, leurs émotions. Comment pensaient-ils? Comment se représentaient-ils le monde? Comment vivaient-ils leur propre histoire? Au fil des années, Alain Corbin, qui s’est fixé sur le XIXe un peu par hasard (cela lui épargnait de faire du latin), est devenu le spécialiste des sentiments et des sensations: il a étudié l’odorat (Le Miasme et la jonquille, Flammarion), le désir de rivage (Le Territoire du vide, Flammarion) et, bien sûr, le sentiment amoureux (Les Filles de noce, Champs Flammarion). Toujours se rapprocher des êtres, essayer de se mettre dans leur tête, voilà son défi. Cette fois, il s’est glissé dans les lits.

Voici venu le temps des langueurs, des états d’âme, des rêveries inspirées. Après la froide parenthèse révolutionnaire racontée par Mona Ozouf la semaine dernière, le début du XIXe siècle se love dans le romantisme. Comme si, soudain, le sentiment amoureux,
si longtemps réprimé, devenait une priorité. Du moins, dans la littérature.
Un nouveau code amoureux, en effet, s’élabore après la Révolution, et renoue avec la nostalgie d’un monde idéal, de la complétude rousseauiste. Le thème de l’amour romantique est omniprésent dans les romans, il se glisse dans les manuels de savoir-vivre, et même dans la littérature pieuse. C’est le grand siècle de la confession, de l’introspection, du journal intime que l’on fait tenir aux jeunes filles de bonne famille et qu’elles arrêtent en général avec le mariage. Soudain s’exprime un intense besoin d’épanchement. On évoque la météorologie de soi, on identifie les variations de son être à celles du ciel: «J’établirai un baromètre à mon âme» (Rousseau). On en appelle aux élans du coeur, on fuit loin du corps vers un angélisme diaphane, et on s’abandonne à des rêves d’amours éthérées.

Des rêves de pureté, où l’influence des idées religieuses est forte.
Le discours romantique, qui s’enracine dans le XVIIIe siècle – songez à la Charlotte de Werther – et ne concerne qu’une petite élite culturelle, est en effet truffé de métaphores religieuses: l’amant est une créature céleste; la jeune fille, un ange de pureté et de virginité; l’amour, une expérience mystique. On parle d’aveu, de souffrance rédemptrice, on est «éperdu d’amour», les coeurs «saignent» … A la parole, qui serait trop scandaleuse, on substitue un frôlement, une rougeur, un silence, un regard… Tout se joue sur le choc de la rencontre, la silhouette fugitive aperçue au détour du bosquet, la douceur du parfum, ou un serrement de main comme entre Adèle et Victor Hugo. Dans l’évocation et la distance.

Et donc la frustration…
Mme de Rênal (Le Rouge et le Noir) ou Mme de Mortsauf (Le Lys dans la vallée), substituts de l’amour maternel, portent en elles la question de l’éducation sentimentale et la frustration de la sexualité romantique. Mais attention: l’amour ne se dit que lorsqu’il y a manque, obstacle, éloignement, souffrance; l’historien trouve peu de traces du bonheur. Par ailleurs, le sentiment amoureux a été contenu pendant des siècles et on ne sort pas facilement d’une telle prison: l’idéologie courtoise, la virginité de la Renaissance, la condamnation du «fol amour» par la Réforme, le péché de la chair, tout cela continue à influencer les conduites amoureuses. On peut donc se demander si ce romantisme angélique exprime le reflet de la réalité ou, au contraire, une forme d’exorcisme, la compensation par l’imaginaire d’un manque éprouvé dans la vie quotidienne…

Question qui court tout au long de notre histoire de l’amour. On a toujours conclu à un grand décalage entre l’imaginaire et la réalité des conduites privées, souvent même à une franche opposition. Il y a loin du discours à l’alcôve.
C’est encore le cas au XIXe. Ainsi du mariage. En dépit du discours romantique, il reste organisé par la contrainte sociale: il existe un véritable marché matrimonial. Quant à la sexualité, la correspondance de Flaubert le montre: il y a une coexistence étonnante entre les postures angéliques du romantisme et les pratiques masculines qui se caractérisent par les exploits de bordel. C’est le temps des oies blanches et des maisons closes! On ne vit pas, et on ne dit pas, la sexualité de la même manière selon que l’on est homme ou femme.

Qu’est-ce qui fait la différence?
Côté féminin, l’imaginaire est centré sur la pudeur: une jeune fille de bonne famille ne se regarde pas dans le miroir, ni même dans l’eau de sa baignoire; on prescrit des poudres qui troublent l’eau pour éviter les reflets (en revanche, les miroirs tapissent les murs des bordels). Les femmes connaissent mal leur propre corps, on leur interdit même d’entrer dans les musées d’anatomie. Le corps est caché, corseté, protégé par des noeuds, agrafes, boutons (d’où un érotisme diffus, qui se fixe sur la taille, la poitrine, le cuir des bottines). Côté masculin, ce sont des rituels vénaux et une double morale permanente: le même jeune homme qui identifie la jeune fille à la pureté et fait sa cour selon le rituel classique connaît des expériences sexuelles multiples avec des prostituées, des cousettes (les ouvrières à l’aiguille dans les grandes villes) ou une grisette, jeune fille facile et fraîche qu’on abandonnera pour épouser l’héritière de bonne famille. Comme le raconte Balzac dans Une double famille, il n’est pas rare de conserver, après le mariage, une «fille» entretenue.

Mona Ozouf le remarquait déjà: il y a donc, pour les hommes, deux types de femmes: l’ange et la garce.
Une vraie dualité, aussi, dans la représentation du corps féminin: il est à la fois idéalisé et dégradé. «Hier vous étiez une divinité, aujourd’hui vous êtes une femme», écrit en substance Baudelaire après sa première nuit avec Mme Sabatier. La femme est supposée simuler la proie et taire un éventuel plaisir. Louise Colet, qui assaille Flaubert dans un fiacre et fait l’amour avec lui dans un hôtel de fortune, lève ensuite les yeux au ciel et joint les mains comme à la prière. Jean-Paul Sartre aura ce commentaire: «En 1846, une femme de la société bourgeoise, quand elle vient de faire la bête, doit faire l’ange.» Les hommes de ce temps-là sont obsédés par le sexe, qui les angoisse. Ils se rassurent en tenant les comptes de leurs prouesses, tels Hugo, Flaubert, Vigny.

On est loin du romantisme, en effet.
Chez les bourgeois, la nuit de noces est une épreuve. C’est le rude moment de l’initiation féminine par un mari qui a connu une sexualité vénale. D’où la pratique du voyage de noces, pour épargner à l’entourage familial un moment si gênant… La chambre des époux est un sanctuaire; le lit, un autel où on célèbre l’acte sacré de la reproduction. Il est d’ailleurs souvent surmonté d’un crucifix. Le corps est toujours couvert de linge. La nudité complète entre époux sera proscrite jusque vers 1900 (la nudité, c’est pour le bordel!). On fait l’amour dans l’ombre, rapidement, dans la position du missionnaire, comme le recommandent les médecins, sans trop se soucier du plaisir de sa partenaire. Les femmes avouent-elles leur plaisir, surmontent-elles le mépris ou le dégoût que peut leur inspirer leur partenaire? Elles n’en parlent jamais dans leurs journaux intimes ou leurs correspondances avant les années 1860.

Chez les hommes, en revanche, le discours sur la sexualité n’est plus tabou.
Il est intarissable! Dans les romans, les obscénités sont codées, et la littérature chansonnière est obsédée par l’organe viril. L’imaginaire masculin se nourrit des stéréotypes de l’amour vénal de l’Antiquité. Post coitum animal triste: déception, dégradation de l’image de soi et de l’autre… Le vieux fond libertin travaille les hommes du XIXe: ils ont lu Sade. Une fois mariés, ils ont la nostalgie de leurs aventures avec les cousettes. Les maisons closes de quartier sont là pour soulager tous ces maris frustrés, qui rentrent ensuite sagement à la maison. C’est la sexualité utilitaire. Les maisons contrôlées n’empêchent pas la prostitution clandestine: de pauvres filles se donnent dans les fossés des faubourgs.

Dans les campagnes, on vit ses amours avec un peu plus de liberté.
La campagne, c’est un autre monde. Comme Jacques Solé l’a montré pour le XVIIIe siècle, on pratique une sexualité d’attente, on se déniaise dans les foins, on ferme parfois les yeux quand un cadet viole les petites bergères. On se touche, on «fait l’amour», c’est-à-dire on se courtise. La fille abandonne au garçon le «haut du sac» ou elle se laisse «bouchonner». Dans certaines régions, on pratique le «mignotage» ou, en Vendée, le «maraîchinage», forme de masturbation réciproque. Dans les bals, les filles se laissent caresser sans que cela porte à conséquence. Curieusement, le baiser profond reste un tabou. De leur côté, les bourgeois rêvent de ces amours simples et libres. Mais ils en ont peur.

D’autant que les médecins ne sont pas plus tolérants que les confesseurs. C’est la grande nouveauté: la science se mêle de sexualité.
Oui. Pour les médecins, la sexualité est un «instinct génésique», une force violente nécessaire à la reproduction, théorie qui justifie la double morale des hommes: il faut bien qu’ils satisfassent leur instinct dévorant. Les médecins dénoncent les conduites déviantes, la femme hystérique, l’homosexualité, la sexualité juvénile, toutes ces aberrations de l’ «instinct génésique». La masturbation suscite leur effroi. Elle conduit, disent-ils, à un lent dépérissement. Le plaisir solitaire de la femme, c’est du vice à l’état pur. Jusqu’alors, on pensait que le plaisir féminin était lié aux nécessités de la reproduction. Soudain, en découvrant les mécanismes de l’ovulation, on réalise que ce n’est pas le cas. Il semble donc superflu, inutile, comme le clitoris. Là encore, les médecins justifient l’égoïsme masculin. Le mot «sexualité» (qui marque la naissance de la scientia sexualis) apparaît en 1838 pour désigner les caractères de ce qui est sexué, puis est utilisé vers 1880 au sens de «vie sexuelle».

A partir de ce moment-là, les choses vont changer.
Oui. Dans le domaine de la vie privée, un autre XIXe siècle commence vers 1860. Tout bascule. L’époque est à l’enrichissement, à l’urbanisation. Les bourgeois souffrent de cette morale qui les enferme. Le code romantique commence à se dégrader. On n’y croit plus. Il suffit de lire la correspondance de Flaubert. Finis l’angélisme et les femmes diaphanes! Le sentiment amoureux se dévalorise.

Avec Madame Bovary meurt le romantisme. L’illusion tombe.
Exactement. Madame Bovary, c’est une dérision de l’adultère, une remise en question de l’imaginaire romantique. La femme n’est plus un ange. Elle fait peur. Après la Commune, on craint que l’animalité du peuple ne prenne le dessus. C’est le vice que décrit Zola dans Nana. Pensez aux Rougon-Macquart, mais aussi à l’oeuvre des frères Goncourt, ouvrages dans lesquels la femme est un être désaxé dont le portrait traduit l’anxiété biologique. On a peur aussi des grands fléaux vénériens. L’amour comporte des risques. Il devient tragique. Comme l’a montré Michel Foucault, ces nouveaux sexologues voient des perversions partout. Le bon Dr Bergeret, à Arbois, dont j’ai étudié le cas, estime que ses clientes sont malades parce que leur mari se livre trop à la masturbation réciproque. Pour lui, il n’y a qu’une prescription: une bonne grossesse, ça les apaisera! Le clergé fond, lui aussi, sur la sexualité conjugale et s’en prend à l’ «onanisme des époux». Mais on se met de plus en plus à critiquer ces confesseurs trop curieux, souvent ambigus, qui s’interposent entre les époux.

Le divorce, adopté en 1792 par les révolutionnaires puis supprimé en 1816, est rétabli en 1884. Les femmes le réclament par milliers. Mais l’adultère est le grand thème du moment.
L’adultère du mari ne peut guère être poursuivi; celui de l’épouse est toujours un délit, punissable en théorie jusqu’à deux ans de prison. Mais est-il aussi répandu? Sa mise en scène dans les romans et le théâtre n’est-elle pas encore une forme d’exorcisme? En même temps, les femmes ont une mobilité plus grande. La concentration urbaine, l’éclairage au gaz modifient les comportements; la vie nocturne s’intensifie, dans les bals, les spectacles, l’opérette. Se développe alors une pratique inédite entre jeunes gens: le flirt, qui emprunte à l’ancien code romantique et concilie la virginité, la pudeur et le désir… Une nouvelle ère commence.

C’est l’éclosion d’un nouvel érotisme…
On s’autorise désormais des attouchements, des baisers, des caresses… Celles qui flirtent se situent à mi-chemin entre l’oie blanche et la jeune fille libérée. La sexualité conjugale en est changée, et le plaisir féminin commence à se dire. Quelques médecins audacieux conseillent aux maris d’user de plus de tendresse. Le couple conjugal s’érotise. L’influence des prostituées est indirecte: le jeune homme introduit dans le lit conjugal des raffinements appris auprès d’elles. C’est l’une des grandes craintes des moralistes: que l’alcôve ne se transforme en lupanar. A la fin du XIXe siècle se dessine un nouveau type de couple, plus uni: une femme plus avertie, un homme plus soucieux de sa partenaire. La contraception se développe (avec le coït interrompu, notamment). L’égoïsme masculin perd de sa superbe. Une sexualité plus sensuelle se dessine à la place de l’ancienne sexualité génitale et rapide vouée à la procréation. Entre époux, on s’appelle «chéri(e)». Certains romans pour jeunes femmes n’hésitent plus à esquisser un érotisme voilé. C’est en somme la première révolution sexuelle des années 60, un siècle avant la nôtre. La question de la sexualité est maintenant posée.


Gaza: Attention, un silence peut en cacher un autre ! (Breaking the silence over why Israel’s view of the enemy is becoming more extreme)

9 mai, 2015
https://i2.wp.com/www.thebureauinvestigates.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/All-Totals-Dash54.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CBc3Ks4UUAAtpYu.jpg:large
https://i2.wp.com/www.europe-israel.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/BH6.jpgLes frères Jonas sont ici ; ils sont là quelque part. Sasha et Malia sont de grandes fans. Mais les gars, allez pas vous faire des idées. J’ai deux mots pour vous: « predator drones ». Vous les verrez même pas venir. Vous croyez que je plaisante, hein ? Barack Obama (2010)
L’ennemi n’est pas identifiable en tant que tel dans le sens où ce sont des gens qui se mêlent à la population. Donc ils sont habillés comme n’importe qui. Il n’y a pas d’uniforme donc comment savoir si c’est l’ennemi ou juste des personnes normales ? C’est juste d’après le comportement qu’on peut le voir. Bernard Davin (pilote belge au retour d’Afghanistan, RTBF, 13.01.09)
La majorité du temps, ce n’est pas une décision qui est difficile puisque en fait, c’est l’ennemi qui nous met dans une situation difficile au sol. Didier Polomé (commandant belge)
On n’en saura pas plus. Les détails des opérations OTAN sont couvertes par le secret militaire pour éviter les représailles contre les pays impliqués et contre les familles des pilotes en mission en Afghanistan. Journaliste belge (RTBF, 13.01.09)
Afghanistan: l’armée française tue par erreur quatre jeunes garçons Jean-Dominique Merchet (blog de journaliste, 24.04.10)
Les drones américains ont liquidé plus de monde que le nombre total des détenus de Guantanamo. Pouvons nous être certains qu’il n’y avait parmi eux aucun cas d’erreurs sur la personne ou de morts innocentes ? Les prisonniers de Guantanamo avaient au moins une chance d’établir leur identité, d’être examinés par un Comité de surveillance et, dans la plupart des cas, d’être relâchés. Ceux qui restent à Guantanamo ont été contrôlés et, finalement, devront faire face à une forme quelconque de procédure judiciaire. Ceux qui ont été tués par des frappes de drones, quels qu’ils aient été, ont disparu. Un point c’est tout. Kurt Volker
The drone operation now operates out of two main bases in the US, dozens of smaller installations and at least six foreign countries. There are « terror Tuesday » meetings to discuss targets which Obama’s campaign manager, David Axelrod, sometimes attends, lending credence to those who see naked political calculation involved. The New York Times
Foreign Policy a consacré la une de son numéro daté de mars-avril aux “guerres secrètes d’Obama”. Qui aurait pu croire il y a quatre ans que le nom de Barack Obama allait être associé aux drones et à la guerre secrète technologique ? s’étonne le magazine, qui souligne qu’Obama “est le président américain qui a approuvé le plus de frappes ciblées de toute l’histoire des Etats-Unis”. Voilà donc à quoi ressemblait l’ennemi : quinze membres présumés d’Al-Qaida au Yémen entretenant des liens avec l’Occident. Leurs photographies et la biographie succincte qui les accompagnait les faisaient ressembler à des étudiants dans un trombinoscope universitaire. Plusieurs d’entre eux étaient américains. Deux étaient des adolescents, dont une jeune fille qui ne faisait même pas ses 17 ans. Supervisant la réunion dédiée à la lutte contre le terrorisme, qui réunit tous les mardis une vingtaine de hauts responsables à la Maison-Blanche, Barack Obama a pris un moment pour étudier leurs visages. C’était le 19 janvier 2010, au terme d’une première année de mandat émaillée de complots terroristes dont le point culminant a été la tentative d’attentat évitée de justesse dans le ciel de Detroit le soir de Noël 2009. “Quel âge ont-ils ? s’est enquis Obama ce jour-là. Si Al-Qaida se met à utiliser des enfants, c’est que l’on entre dans une toute nouvelle phase.” La question n’avait rien de théorique : le président a volontairement pris la tête d’un processus de “désignation” hautement confidentiel visant à identifier les terroristes à éliminer ou à capturer. Obama a beau avoir fait campagne en 2008 contre la guerre en Irak et contre l’usage de la torture, il a insisté pour que soit soumise à son aval la liquidation de chacun des individus figurant sur une kill list [liste de cibles à abattre] qui ne cesse de s’allonger, étudiant méticuleusement les biographies des terroristes présumés apparaissant sur ce qu’un haut fonctionnaire surnomme macabrement les “cartes de base-ball”. A chaque fois que l’occasion d’utiliser un drone pour supprimer un terroriste se présente, mais que ce dernier est en famille, le président se réserve le droit de prendre la décision finale. (…) Une série d’interviews accordées au New York Times par une trentaine de ses conseillers permettent de retracer l’évolution d’Obama depuis qu’il a été appelé à superviser personnellement cette “drôle de guerre” contre Al-Qaida et à endosser un rôle sans précédent dans l’histoire de la présidence américaine. Ils évoquent un chef paradoxal qui approuve des opérations de liquidation sans ciller, tout en étant inflexible sur la nécessité de circonscrire la lutte antiterroriste et d’améliorer les relations des Etats-Unis avec le monde arabe. (…) C’est le plus curieux des rituels bureaucratiques : chaque semaine ou presque, une bonne centaine de membres du tentaculaire appareil sécuritaire des Etats-Unis se réunissent lors d’une visioconférence sécurisée pour éplucher les biographies des terroristes présumés et suggérer au président la prochaine cible à abattre. Ce processus de “désignation” confidentiel est une création du gouvernement Obama, un macabre “club de discussion” qui étudie soigneusement des diapositives PowerPoint sur lesquelles figurent les noms, les pseudonymes et le parcours de membres présumés de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida ou de ses alliés de la milice somalienne Al-Chabab. The New York Times (07.06.12)
Rarement moment politique et innovation technologique auront si parfaitement correspondu : lorsque le président démocrate est élu en 2008 par des Américains las des conflits, il dispose d’un moyen tout neuf pour poursuivre, dans la plus grande discrétion, la lutte contre les « ennemis de l’Amérique » sans risquer la vie de citoyens de son pays : les drones. (…) George W. Bush, artisan d’un large déploiement sur le terrain, utilisera modérément ces nouveaux engins létaux. Barack Obama y recourra six fois plus souvent pendant son seul premier mandat que son prédécesseur pendant les deux siens. M. Obama, qui, en recevant le prix Nobel de la paix en décembre 2009, revendiquait une Amérique au « comportement exemplaire dans la conduite de la guerre », banalisera la pratique des « assassinats ciblés », parfois fondés sur de simples présomptions et décidés par lui-même dans un secret absolu. Tandis que les militaires guident les drones dans l’Afghanistan en guerre, c’est jusqu’à présent la très opaque CIA qui opère partout ailleurs (au Yémen, au Pakistan, en Somalie, en Libye). C’est au Yémen en 2002 que la campagne d’ »assassinats ciblés » a débuté. Le Pakistan suit dès 2004. Barack Obama y multiplie les frappes. Certaines missions, menées à l’insu des autorités pakistanaises, soulèvent de lourdes questions de souveraineté. D’autres, les goodwill kills (« homicides de bonne volonté »), le sont avec l’accord du gouvernement local. Tandis que les frappes de drones militaires sont simplement « secrètes », celles opérées par la CIA sont « covert », ce qui signifie que les Etats-Unis n’en reconnaissent même pas l’existence. Dans ce contexte, établir des statistiques est difficile. Selon le Bureau of Investigative Journalism, une ONG britannique, les attaques au Pakistan ont fait entre 2 548 et 3 549 victimes, dont 411 à 884 sont des civils, et 168 à 197 des enfants. En termes statistiques, la campagne de drones est un succès : les Etats-Unis revendiquent l’élimination de plus d’une cinquantaine de hauts responsables d’Al-Qaida et de talibans. D’où la nette diminution du nombre de cibles potentielles et du rythme des frappes, passées de 128 en 2010 (une tous les trois jours) à 48 en 2012 au Pakistan. Car le secret total et son cortège de dénégations ne pouvaient durer éternellement. En mai 2012, le New York Times a révélé l’implication personnelle de M. Obama dans la confection des kill lists. Après une décennie de silence et de mensonges officiels, la réalité a dû être admise. En particulier au début de l’année, lorsque le débat public s’est focalisé sur l’autorisation, donnée par le ministre de la justice, Eric Holder, d’éliminer un citoyen américain responsable de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida. L’imam Anouar Al-Aulaqi avait été abattu le 30 septembre 2011 au Yémen par un drone de la CIA lancé depuis l’Arabie saoudite. Le droit de tuer un concitoyen a nourri une intense controverse. D’autant que la même opération avait causé des « dégâts collatéraux » : Samir Khan, responsable du magazine jihadiste Inspire, et Abdulrahman, 16 ans, fils d’Al-Aulaqui, tous deux américains et ne figurant ni l’un ni l’autre sur la kill list, ont trouvé la mort. Aux yeux des opposants, l’adolescent personnifie désormais l’arbitraire de la guerre des drones. La révélation par la presse des contorsions juridiques imaginées par les conseillers du président pour justifier a posteriori l’assassinat d’un Américain n’a fait qu’alimenter les revendications de transparence. La fronde s’est concrétisée par le blocage au Sénat, plusieurs semaines durant, de la nomination à la tête de la CIA de John Brennan, auparavant grand ordonnateur à la Maison Blanche de la politique d’assassinats ciblés. (…) Très attendu, le grand exercice de clarification a eu lieu le 23 mai devant la National Defense University de Washington. Barack Obama y a prononcé un important discours sur la « guerre juste », affichant enfin une doctrine en matière d’usage des drones. Il était temps : plusieurs organisations de défense des libertés publiques avaient réclamé en justice la communication des documents justifiant les assassinats ciblés. Une directive présidentielle, signée la veille, précise les critères de recours aux frappes à visée mortelle : une « menace continue et imminente contre la population des Etats-Unis », le fait qu’ »aucun autre gouvernement ne soit en mesure d'[y] répondre ou ne la prenne en compte effectivement » et une « quasi-certitude » qu’il n’y aura pas de victimes civiles. Pour la première fois, Barack Obama a reconnu l’existence des assassinats ciblés, y compris ceux ayant visé des Américains, assurant que ces morts le « hanteraient » toute sa vie. (…) Six jours après ce discours, l’assassinat par un drone de Wali ur-Rehman, le numéro deux des talibans pakistanais, en a montré les limites. Ce leader visait plutôt le Pakistan que « la population des Etats-Unis ». Tout porte donc à croire que les critères limitatifs énoncés par Barack Obama ne s’appliquent pas au Pakistan, du moins aussi longtemps qu’il restera des troupes américaines dans l’Afghanistan voisin. Et que les « Signature strikes », ces frappes visant des groupes d’hommes armés non identifiés mais présumés extrémistes, seront poursuivies. Les drones n’ont donc pas fini de mettre en lumière les contradictions de Barack Obama : président antiguerre, champion de la transparence, de la légalité et de la main tendue à l’islam, il a multiplié dans l’ombre les assassinats ciblés, provoquant la colère de musulmans. Le Monde (18.06.13)
Ce qui est arrivé au quartier Dahiya de Beyrouth en 2006 arrivera à tous les villages qui servent de base à des tirs contre Israël. […] Nous ferons un usage de la force disproportionné et y causerons de grands dommages et destructions. De notre point de vue, il ne s’agit pas de villages civils, mais de bases militaires. […] Il ne s’agit pas d’une recommandation, mais d’un plan, et il a été approuvé.  Gadi Eisenkot (commandant israélien de la division nord)
Frapper un grand coup n’est pas nécessairement immoral. Parfois cela peut même sauver des vies à plus long terme, parce que si vous frappez un grand coup, vous réduisez les possibilités que la guerre dure longtemps ou d’un deuxième round. Avi Kober (expert israélien en affaires militaires)
Je ne crois pas qu’une armée ait jamais fait plus d’efforts dans l’histoire militaire pour réduire le nombre des civils blessés et des décès des personnes innocentes que ne le font actuellement les forces armées d’Israël à Gaza. Colonel Richard Kemp (ancien commandant des forces britanniques en Afghanistan)
Je crois qu’en raison de l’énorme destruction, les habitants de Gaza ont compris que cela ne mène nulle part. Quand la construction commencera – avec des fonds de l’Europe, de l’Arabie Saoudite et d’autres endroits – et que les gens auront reconstruit leurs maisons, je ne crois pas qu’ils accepteront d’y remettre des lance-roquettes le jour suivant. Regardez ce qui s’est passé au lendemain de la deuxième guerre du Liban. Le Hezbollah a multiplié les menaces mais n’a pas envoyé la moindre roquette cette fois. Pourquoi? Parce que les habitants du Sud-Liban dont les maisons avaient été détruites ont dit: ‘Pour quoi faire ? Pourquoi recommencer tout ça?’. (…) Après les erreurs de la deuxième guerre du Liban, les soldats avaient peur, la population israélienne avait peur, les médias ont averti que ce serait une guerre dure et sans précédent. Hamas avait averti: ‘Si vous entrez dans Gaza, nous en ferons votre cimetière; il y aura des mines et des guet-apens partout’. Donc il y avait une vraie peur. Cette crainte nous a fait frapper trop fort. Il n’y a aucun doute que des choses dures se sont produites là-bas. Mais d’un autre côté, quand vous comparez aux batailles récentes de par le monde, cela n’a pas été si extraordinaire. A Fallujah, par exemple, environ 6 000 personnes ou 2,3 % de la population de cette ville irakienne ont été tuées par les forces américaines; et les Irakiens n’avaient jamais tiré sur Washington ou New York. En comparaison, le nombre de victimes à Gaza a été très bas. A.B. Yehoshua (écrivain israélien pacifiste)
With an outbreak of hostilities, the IDF will need to act immediately, decisively, and with force that is disproportionate to the enemy’s actions and the threat it poses. Such a response aims at inflicting damage and meting out punishment to an extent that will demand long and expensive reconstruction processes. The strike must be carried out as quickly as possible, and must prioritize damaging assets over seeking out each and every launcher. Punishment must be aimed at decision makers and the power elite. In Syria, punishment should clearly be aimed at the Syrian military, the Syrian regime, and the Syrian state structure. In Lebanon, attacks should both aim at Hizbollah’s military capabilities and should target economic interests and the centers of civilian power that support the organization. Moreover, the closer the relationship between Hizbollah and the Lebanese government, the more the elements of the Lebanese state infrastructure should be targeted. Such a response will create a lasting memory among Syrian and Lebanese decision makers, thereby increasing Israeli deterrence and reducing the likelihood of hostilities against Israel for a an extended period. At the same time, it will force Syria, Hizbollah, and Lebanon to commit to lengthy and resource-intensive reconstruction programs. Recent discussion of “victory” and “defeat” in a future war against Hizbollah has presented an overly simplistic approach. The Israeli public must understand that overall success cannot be measured by the level of high trajectory fire against Israel at the end of the confrontation. The IDF will make an effort to decrease rocket and missile attacks as much as possible, but the main effort will be geared to shorten the period of fighting by striking a serious blow at the assets of the enemy. Israel does not have to be dragged into a war of attrition with Hizbollah. Israel’s test will be the intensity and quality of its response to incidents on the Lebanese border or terrorist attacks involving Hizbollah in the north or Hamas in the south. In such cases, Israel again will not be able to limit its response to actions whose severity is seemingly proportionate to an isolated incident. Rather, it will have to respond disproportionately in order to make it abundantly clear that the State of Israel will accept no attempt to disrupt the calm currently prevailing along its borders. Israel must be prepared for deterioration and escalation, as well as for a full scale confrontation. Such preparedness is obligatory in order to prevent long term attrition. The Israeli home front must be prepared to be fired upon, possibly with even heavy fire for an extended period, based on the understanding that the IDF is working to reduce the period of fighting to a minimum and to create an effective balance of deterrence. This approach is applicable to the Gaza Strip as well. There, the IDF will be required to strike hard at Hamas and to refrain from the cat and mouse games of searching for Qassam rocket launchers. The IDF should not be expected to stop the rocket and missile fire against the Israeli home front through attacks on the launchers themselves, but by means of imposing a ceasefire on the enemy. Gabi Siboni
Il y n’y a que deux moyens d’aborder la question d’une manière efficace: occuper le territoire sur la durée et affaiblir systématiquement l’ennemi, ou entrer en force et porter un coup rapide mais fulgurant. A Gaza, l’armée israélienne a choisi la deuxième option, et donc, elle a eu tout-à-fait raison en termes militaires d’employer une puissance de feu massive. Vous devez frapper dur, entrer et sortir vite et prendre l’ennemi par surprise. Et surtout, vous ne devez jamais vous excuser. Parce que si vous le faites, vous démoralisez votre propre camp avant même de commencer. En dépit de toute les critiques, la guerre du Liban de 2006 a été un succès, parce que le Hezbollah n’a pas réattaqué depuis. En d’autres termes, nous sommes parvenus à casser la volonté de combattre du Hezbollah et je pense qu’il y a une possibilité raisonnable d’arriver au même résultat avec le Hamas à Gaza, où la performance de Tsahal était meilleure et les pertes inférieures. Martin van Creveld (historien militaire)

Nous  avons  réussi,  notre  récit  a  pris  le dessus !
Ismaël  Haniyeh (ancien premier  ministre  du  Hamas, Al-Jazeera, 29 août 2014)
Les groupes armés palestiniens doivent mettre fin à l’ensemble des attaques directes visant les civils et des attaques menées sans discrimination. Ils doivent aussi prendre toutes les précautions possibles afin de protéger les civils de la bande de Gaza des conséquences de ces attaques. Cela suppose d’adopter toutes les mesures qui s’imposent pour éviter de placer combattants et armes dans des zones densément peuplées ou à proximité. (…) Les éléments selon lesquels il est possible qu’une roquette tirée par un groupe armé palestinien ait causé 13 morts civiles dans la bande de Gaza soulignent à quel point ces armes sont non discriminantes et les terribles conséquences de leur utilisation. (…) L’impact dévastateur des attaques israéliennes sur les civils palestiniens durant ce conflit est indéniable, mais les violations commises par un camp dans un conflit ne peuvent jamais justifier les violations perpétrées par leurs adversaires. (…) La communauté internationale doit aider à prévenir de nouvelles violations en luttant contre la banalisation de l’impunité, et en cessant de livrer aux groupes armés palestiniens et à Israël les armes et équipements militaires susceptibles d’être utilisés pour commettre de graves violations du droit international humanitaire. Philip Luther
Amnesty International demande à tous les États de soutenir la Commission d’enquête des Nations unies et la compétence de la Cour pénale internationale concernant les crimes commis par toutes les parties au conflit. Amnesty international
Des groupes armés palestiniens ont fait preuve d’un mépris flagrant pour la vie de civils, en lançant de nombreuses attaques aveugles à l’aide de roquettes et de mortiers en direction de zones civiles en Israël durant le conflit de juillet-août 2014, écrit Amnesty International dans un nouveau rapport rendu public jeudi 26 mars. Ce document, intitulé Unlawful and deadly: Rocket and mortar attacks by Palestinian armed groups during the 2014 Gaza/Israel conflict (…), fournit des éléments tendant à prouver que plusieurs attaques lancées depuis la bande de Gaza constituaient des crimes de guerre. Six civils, dont un petit garçon de quatre ans, ont été tués en Israël dans le cadre d’attaques de ce type, au cours de ce conflit ayant duré 50 jours. Lors de l’attaque la plus mortelle attribuée à un groupe armé palestinien, 13 civils palestiniens, dont 11 mineurs, ont été tués lorsqu’un projectile tiré depuis la bande de Gaza s’est écrasé dans le camp de réfugiés d’al Shati. (…) Toutes les roquettes utilisées par les groupes armés palestiniens sont des projectiles non guidés, avec lesquels on ne peut pas viser avec précision de cible spécifique et qui sont non discriminantes par nature ; recourir à ces armes est interdit par le droit international et leur utilisation constitue un crime de guerre. Les mortiers sont eux aussi des munitions imprécises et ne doivent jamais être utilisés pour attaquer des cibles militaires situées dans des zones civiles ou à proximité. (…) Selon les données des Nations unies, plus de 4 800 roquettes et 1 700 mortiers ont été tirés depuis Gaza vers Israël au cours de ce conflit. Sur ces milliers de roquettes et mortiers, environ 224 auraient atteint des zones résidentielles israéliennes, tandis que le Dôme de fer, le système de défense anti-missile israélien, en a intercepté de nombreux autres. (…) Lors de l’attaque la plus mortelle attribuée à un groupe armé palestinien durant ce conflit, 13 civils palestiniens, dont 11 mineurs, ont été tués lorsqu’un projectile a explosé à côté d’un supermarché, dans le camp – surpeuplé – de réfugiés d’al Shati (bande de Gaza) le 28 juillet 2014, premier jour de l’Aïd al Fitr. Les enfants jouaient dans la rue et achetaient des chips et des boissons sucrées au supermarché au moment de l’attaque. Si les Palestiniens ont affirmé que l’armée israélienne était responsable de cette attaque, un expert indépendant, spécialiste des munitions, ayant examiné les éléments de preuve disponibles pour le compte d’Amnesty International, a conclu que le projectile utilisé dans le cadre de cette attaque était une roquette palestinienne. (…) Mahmoud Abu Shaqfa et son fils Khaled, âgé de cinq ans, ont été gravement blessés lors de cette attaque. Muhammad, son fils de huit ans, a été tué. (…) Il n’y pas d’abri contre les bombes ni de système d’alerte en place pour protéger les civils dans la bande de Gaza. Le rapport décrit en détail d’autres atteintes au droit international humanitaire commises par des groupes armés palestiniens durant le conflit, comme le fait de stocker des roquettes et d’autres munitions dans des immeubles civils, y compris des écoles administrées par les Nations unies, ainsi que des cas dans lesquels des groupes armés palestiniens ont lancé des attaques ou stocké des munitions très près de zones où se réfugiaient des centaines de civils déplacés. Amnesty international
Le bien et le mal se mélangent un peu (…) et ça devient un peu comme un jeu vidéo. Soldat israélien
While the testimonies include pointed descriptions of inappropriate behavior by soldiers in the field, the more disturbing picture that arises from these testimonies reflects systematic policies that were dictated to IDF forces of all ranks and in all zones. The guiding military principle of “minimum risk to our forces, even at the cost of harming innocent civilians,” alongside efforts to deter and intimidate the Palestinians, led to massive and unprecedented harm to the population and the civilian infrastructure in the Gaza Strip. This policy was evident first and foremost during the briefings provided to the forces before entering Gaza. Many soldiers spoke of a working assumption that Palestinian residents had abandoned the neighborhoods they entered due to the IDF’s warnings, thus making anyone located in the area a legitimate target – in some cases even by direct order. This approach was evident before the ground incursion, when the neighborhoods IDF forces entered suffered heavy shelling, as part of the “softening” stage. This included, among other things, massive use of statistical weapons, like cannons and mortars, which are incapable of precise fire. They are intended for broad area offensives, through the random distribution of shells over a range that can reach up to hundreds of meters from the original target (see testimonies 1, 88, and 96). In practice, during the preliminary shelling, the army pounded populated areas throughout the Strip with artillery shells in order to scare off enemy combatants who were in the area, and at times also to urge the civilian population to flee. (…) This policy changed for various reasons, including the dwindling of the target lists, the desire to prevent Hamas from, attaining a “display of victory” ahead of the ceasefires, and the desire to attack as many targets as possible before the ceasefires went into effect. The top echelons of the IDF command determined these changes in the open-fire policy. At least in some cases, the deliberations and circumstances that led to changes in this policy were not directly related to the combat itself or to defending the troops in the field – but rather served political and diplomatic interests. Breaking the silence
This is combat in an urban area, we’re in a war zone. The saying was: ‘There’s no such thing there as a person who is uninvolved.’ In that situation, anyone there is involved. Everything is dangerous; there were no special intelligence warnings such as some person, or some white vehicle arriving… No vehicle is supposed to be there – if there is one, we shoot at it. Anything that’s not ‘sterile’ is suspect. There was an intelligence warning about animals. If a suspicious animal comes near, shoot it. In practice, we didn’t do that. We had arguments about whether or not to do it. But that was just a general instruction; in practice you learn to recognize the animals because they are the only ones wandering around. Israeli soldier
There isn’t a soul around, the streets are empty, no civilians. At no point did I see a single person who wasn’t a soldier. (…) To try and trigger a response, to deter. Our objective at that time was not to eliminate anyone we saw – our objective was to blow up the two tunnels we were sitting right on top of. We kept this line for five days and made sure no one came near. Why would anyone come near? To die? During the talk the unit commander explained that it wasn’t an act of revenge. That the houses situated on a high axis on this side of the ridge dominated the entire area between [the separation fence with] Israel and the neighborhood, and that is why they couldn’t be left standing. They also overlook the Israeli towns and allow for them to be shelled with mortars. At a certain point we understood it was a pattern: you leave a house and the house is gone – after two or three houses you figure out that there’s a pattern. The D9 (armored bulldozer)comes and flattens it. (…) Often there were reports that the tunnels (dug by Palestinian militants) were being dug inside greenhouses to camouflage them. Israeli soldier
We were staying in abandoned houses. The people’s stuff was left inside, but not things like electrical appliances. They must have taken everything – they fled. I did not see any casualties that were not clearly enemies there, because everyone was told to flee north from the very start. That’s what we knew. They left their houses closed up tight. It was clear that people had been preparing for our entry. [When we went in] we turned the houses upside down, because there was no other choice, you had to. We found weapons. Israeli soldier
They went over most of the things viewed as accomplishments. They spoke about numbers: 2,000 dead and 11,000 wounded, half a million refugees, decades worth of destruction. Harm to lots of senior Hamas members and to their homes, to their families. These were stated as accomplishments so that no one would doubt that what we did during this period was meaningful. Israeli soldier
There was this mentally handicapped girl in the neighborhood, apparently, and the fact that shots were fired near her feet only made her laugh (earlier in his testimony the soldier described a practice of shooting near
people’s feet in order to get them to distance themselves from the forces). She would keep getting closer and it was clear to everyone that she was mentally handicapped, so no one shot at her. No one knew how to deal with this situation. She wandered around the areas of the advance guard company and some other company – I assume she just wanted to return home, I assume she ran away from her parents, I don’t think they would have sent her there. It is possible that she was being taken advantage of – perhaps it was a show, I don’t know. I thought to myself that it was a show, and I admit that I really, really wanted to shoot her in the knees because I was convinced it was one. I was sure she was being sent by Hamas to test our alertness, to test our limits, to figure out how we respond to civilians. Later they also let loose a flock of sheep on us, seven or ten of whom had bombs tied to their bellies from below. I don’t know if I was right or wrong, but I was convinced that this girl was a test. Eventually, enough people fired shots near her feet for her to apparently get the message that ‘OK, maybe I shouldn’t be here,’ and she turned and walked away. The reason this happened is that earlier that day I was t know if׳I don right or wrong, but I was convinced that this girl was a test. Eventually, enough people fired shots near her feet for her to apparently get,OK׳ the message thatt be׳I shouldn maybe and she turned ׳,here and walked away. The reason this happened is that earlier that day we heard about an old man who went in the direction of a house held by a different force; [the soldiers] didn’t really know what to do so they went up to him. This guy, 70 or 80 years old, turned out to be booby-trapped from head to toe. From that moment on the protocol was very, very clear: shoot toward the feet. And if they don’t go away, shoot to kill. Israeli soldier
There was a mosque identified [as a hostile target] that we were watching over. This mosque was known to have a tunnel [opening] in it, and they thought that there were Hamas militants or something inside. We didn’t spot any in there – we didn’t detect anything, we didn’t get shot at. Nothing. They told us: “There aren’t supposed to be any civilians there. If you spot someone, shoot.” Israeli soldier
If the family had no phone and a ‘roof knocking’ was conducted, and after a few minutes no one came out, then the assumption was that there was no one there. You were working under the assumption that once a ‘roof knocking’ was conducted everyone leaves the building immediately, and if nobody leaves it means there was no one inside? People who are willing to sacrifice themselves, there’s nothing you can do. We have no way of knowing if there were people in there who decided not to get out. Israeli soldier
It’s like “Call of Duty” (a first-person shooter video game). Ninety-nine percent of the time I was inside a house, not moving around – but during the few times we passed from place to place I remember that the level of destruction looked insane to me. It looked like a movie set, it didn’t look real. Israeli soldier
We entered a neighborhood with orchards, which is the scariest. There were lots of stories going around about being surprised by tunnels or explosive devices in these orchards. When you go in you fire at lots of suspicious places. You shoot at bushes, at trees, at all sorts of houses you suddenly run into, at more trees. You fire a blast and don’t think twice about it. When we first entered [the Gaza Strip] there was this ethos about Hamas – we were certain that the moment we went in our tanks would all be up in flames. But after 48 hours during which no one shoots at you and they’re like ghosts, unseen, their presence unfelt – except once in a while the sound of one shot fired over the course of an entire day – you come to realize the situation is under control. And that’s when my difficulty there started, because the formal rules … they warned us, they told us that after a ceasefire the population might return, and then they repeated the story about the old man who asked for water (earlier in his testimony the testifier described a briefing in which an incident was described where an elderly Palestinian man asked soldiers for water and then threw grenades at the forces). Israeli soldier
We’re blowing up this house, but we can’t eat this bag of Bamba (peanut butter snacks)? Israeli soldier
I never saw anything like it, not even in Lebanon. There was destruction there, too – but never in my life did I see anything like this. When we got there, there were white flags on all the rooftops. We had been prepared for something very… For some very glorious combat, and in the end it was quiet. After three weeks in Gaza, during which you’re shooting at anything that moves – and also at what isn’t moving, crazy amounts – you aren’t anymore really … Israeli soldier
 « The rules of engagement are pretty identical: Anything inside [the Gaza Strip] is a threat, the area has to be ‘sterilized,’ empty of people – and if we don’t see someone waving a white flag, screaming ‘I give up’ or something, then he’s a threat and there’s authorization to open fire.” Haaretz
Israeli soldiers assaulted a pair of photojournalists near the West Bank town of Nabi Saleh on Friday, video footage of the incident shows. The video shows a group of soldiers accosting two photojournalists clearly marked as members of the press, shouting at them « Get out of here. » Then one of the soldiers is seen pushing one of the photographers to the ground with his helmet. After this, another soldier knocks the other photographer to the ground. The same soldier then picks up a stone and hurls it at the photographer. According to the army, the area was a closed military zone and some 70 Palestinians had assembled there and hurled stones at passing vehicles and the force itself. This demonstration is not seen in the video. (…) An Israel Defense Forces spokesman told Haaretz that « the behavior seen in the video is reprehensible and isn’t in line with the guidelines issued by the commanders in the region. The IDF guidelines allow for free press coverage in the territory under control of the Central Command in general, and specifically during demonstrations. The matter will be investigated. » In 2012, an IDF officer was filmed throwing stones and firing at Palestinians in Nabi Saleh – contrary to regulations. He was relieved of his duties and was later charged with illegal use of a fire arm. Haaretz
During Operation Cast Lead, Israeli forces killed Palestinian civilians under permissive rules of engagement and intentionally destroyed their property, say soldiers who fought in the offensive. (…) The testimonies include a description by an infantry squad leader of an incident where an IDF sharpshooter mistakenly shot a Palestinian mother and her two children. (…) Another squad leader from the same brigade told of an incident where the company commander ordered that an elderly Palestinian woman be shot and killed; she was walking on a road about 100 meters from a house the company had commandeered. Haaretz
To write ‘death to the Arabs’ on the walls, to take family pictures and spit on them, just because you can. I think this is the main thing: To understand how much the IDF has fallen in the realm of ethics, really. It’s what I’ll remember the most. IDF soldier
The IDF’s ethical problems did not start in 2009. Such discussions also followed the Six-Day War. But a reserve officer who looked at the transcript Wednesday said: « This is not the IDF we knew. »The descriptions show that Israel’s view of the enemy is becoming more extreme. The deterioration has been continuous – from the first Lebanon war to the second, from the first intifada to the second, from Operation Defensive Shield to Operation Cast Lead. Haaretz
Il n’existe plus de conflit conventionnel dont le cadre légal peut être à postériori analysé. Israël ne fait que s’adapter à une nouvelle forme de guerre totale mêlant le conflit conventionnel à la guerre au nom de l’islam : les Palestiniens entrainent des enfants soldats (filles comme garçons) au « martyr », c’est-à-dire à des actions kamikazes de civils contre des unités militaires. Des vidéos sur ces entrainements prolifèrent sur internet et sont un des moyens de propagande des mouvements palestiniens dans une surenchère djihadiste. Ne pas en tenir compte de par son positionnement politique sur le conflit israélo-palestinien serait une grave erreur; et un appui tacite au développement d’idéologie tendant à exposer les populations civiles dans des conflits armés. De ce fait, le respect du Droit est à la base vicié : toute action militaire entrainant la mort de « civil » se verra condamné par un droit n’ayant jamais envisagé l’utilisation de la population comme arme potentielle. Alors oui, brisons le silence ! Brisons le silence sur une fausse guerre au nom d’une revendication de « libération » (Gaza n’est pas occupée) mais bien sur une idéologie islamiste palestinienne basée sur la destruction définitive du peuple juif au Moyen orient : les chrétiens d’orient pourtant massivement anti-israéliens en découvrent aujourd’hui l’autre pendant. Danilette

Frappes aveugles et aléatoires sur l’ensemble des villes; centaines de kilomètres de tunnels offensifs jusqu’aux zones habitées; enlèvements et menaces d’enlèvement de soldats; militaires sans uniformes déguisés en civils; guerre de rues où tous les coups sont permis; population civile et biens de caractère civil utilisés comme boucliers humains; installations de commandements, armements ou munitions dans maisons d’habitation, écoles, lieux de culte; piégeage de maisons, animaux, vieillards, femmes, enfants ou handicapés mentaux …

Attention: un silence peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où nos belles âmes se félicitent de l’élimination ô combien méritée du cerveau des récents attentats de Paris

Par les drones d’un prix Nobel de la paix qui tout en se refusant à prononcer le nom même de l’ennemi en est quand même bientôt …

Dans la plus grande indifférence et femmes et enfants compris à son 2 500e carton …

Et qu’après avoir courageusement abandonné l’Afghanistan à son triste sort, l’Europe a depuis longtemps oublié ce que ses soldats ont bien pu y faire …

Qui s’étonne …

De l’étrange acharnement des mêmes belles âmes sur les prétendus crimes de guerre

D’une armée tentant de défendre ses soldats face aux pires perfidies du Hamas ?

Et qui prend la peine de se demander la raison

De la « vision israélienne » prétendument « extrême »  …

Derrière l’apparente disproportion des destructions …

 De ceux qui en avaient cyniquement transformées les cibles en objectifs militaires ?

Gaza : Brisons le silence ?
Ded Zep
Danilette
6 mai 2015

L’éthique de l’Armée Israélienne, une des plus rigoureuses, car créée et encadrée par des sociologues et des philosophes au sortir de la barbarie nazie ne serait plus ?

Israël aurait-elle surtout pensé à protéger ses propres soldats, au détriment de la population civile palestinienne, lors de la dernière guerre contre l’islamisme intégriste du Hamas ?

« Une ONG israélienne, Breaking The Silence, sur la foi d’entretiens avec une soixantaine d’anciens combattants du conflit, estime que Tsahal a infligé des ‘préjudices massifs et sans précédent’ aux civils palestiniens pendant ce conflit en tirant à l’aveugle et en négligeant ses règles d’engagement ».

Ce qu’il y a de bien en Israël, c’est la transparence politique et éthique des institutions et des corps sociaux : Tsahal n’est pas la « grande muette » française dont la guerre d’Algérie n’a pas encore révélé plus de 50 ans après tous les aspects d’une guerre forcément sale.

Mais revenons sur la guerre contre le Hamas. Il faut bien comprendre, comme nous le découvrons hélas en France, que l’ennemi est invisible et peut frapper à tout moment.

Retour sur l’escalade ayant mené à une nouvelle intervention israélienne.
1. Tout d’abord des frappes aveugles, aléatoires de missiles tirés de gaza vers les villes israéliennes. Les villes, pas des objectifs militaires.
2. Des tirs sporadiques, puis de plus en plus rapprochés, de plus en plus violents.
3. Le gouvernement israélien commence par prendre des contacts dans le monde arabe pour essayer de faire cesser ces tirs. Des réunions secrètes tripartites avec l’Égypte, mais aussi les pays du Golfe sont organisées pour « convaincre » le Hamas de ne pas s’engager dans une spirale ne pouvant déboucher sur un nouveau conflit : aucun État ne peut supporter que l’on tire délibérément sur son armée, encore moins sur sa population civile sans réagir.
4. Les négociations échouent du fait du Hamas enfermé dans une logique islamiste et des conflits d’intérêts internes à la politique palestinienne : qui sera le mouvement palestinien perçu comme le plus « dur » avec Israël.
5. Israël durcit officiellement le ton et parle de plus en plus d’une possible intervention face à ce casus-belli.
6. Le Hamas réplique en indiquant que gaza sera le tombeau des juifs, et que de nouveaux militaires seront enlevés comme Guilad Shalit (gardé comme otage par les palestiniens « pendant plus de cinq années, soustrait au monde et au droit » – Bertrand Delanoë, maire de Paris -).
7. Le Hamas réplique aussi en disant que dans cette guerre des rues, tout vivant sera un piège pour les soldats israéliens : un âne, un chien, un enfant, une femme, un vieillard seront des kamikazes, des martyrs contre les sionistes.

L’exigence du « principe de distinction » entre combattant et civil
La décision de Tsahal de minimiser au maximum les pertes humaines au niveau de ses propres hommes découle directement de ces avertissements explicites des djihadistes palestiniens.
Il y a aussi l’apprentissage des précédents engagements militaires contre les Palestiniens : ce ne sont pas des soldats identifiables par leurs uniformes contre qui les soldats israéliens ont eut à faire mais à des militaires sans uniformes déguisés en civils !
• Militaires déguisés en civils. Ce principe est dénoncé dans l’article 48 du 1er Protocole additionnel des conventions de Genève :

« En vue d’assurer le respect et la protection de la population civile et des biens de caractère civil, les Parties au conflit doivent en tout temps faire la distinction entre la population civile et les combattants ainsi qu’entre les biens de caractère civil et les objectifs militaires et, par conséquent, ne diriger leurs opérations que contre des objectifs militaires. »

• L’utilisation de ses civils comme boucliers humains par l’une des Parties est interdite.

« Aucun principe n’est plus central à la loi humanitaire en tant de guerre que l’obligation de respecter la distinction entre combattants et non-combattants. Ce principe est violé et la responsabilité pénale est donc engagée lorsque des organisations utilisent des civils comme boucliers ou manifestent une indifférence injustifiée pour la protection des non-combattants. »

• Le droit des conflits armés établit clairement qu’il est formellement interdit aux Parties d’un conflit armé d’utiliser la population civile ou des installations civiles pour protéger des infrastructures militaires. L’article 51-7 du 1er Protocole additionnel des Conventions de Genève stipule :

« La présence ou les mouvements de population civile, ou de personnes civiles, ne doivent pas être utilisés pour mettre certains points ou certaines zones à l’abri d’opérations militaires, notamment pour tenter de mettre des objectifs militaires à l’abri d’attaques ou de couvrir, favoriser ou gêner des opérations militaires. Les Parties au conflit ne doivent pas diriger les mouvements de la population civile ou des personnes civiles ».

Les palestiniens postent leurs unités de tir de missile dans les parcs d’habitation entourés d’enfants, devants des bâtiments de l’ONU, dans des hôpitaux mettant ainsi délibérément ces lieux sous le feu de la réplique israélienne avec des dégâts permettant une guerre des images destinée à soulever l’indignation:
• dans un monde occidental peu informé, toujours prompt à condamner Israël,
• dans le monde arabe pour susciter la formation de nouveaux djihadistes contre les juifs du monde entier : Mohamed Merah, Mehdi Nemmouche, Amedy Coulibaly, les frères Kouachi en sont les exemples récents revendiquant leurs actes pour « venger la mort des enfants palestiniens ».

Conflit conventionnel ou guerre au nom de l’islam ?
À ce titre il n’existe plus de conflit conventionnel dont le cadre légal peut être à postériori analysé. Israël ne fait que s’adapter à une nouvelle forme de guerre totale mêlant le conflit conventionnel à la guerre au nom de l’islam : les palestiniens entrainent des enfants soldats (filles comme garçons) au « martyr », c’est-à-dire à des actions kamikazes de civils contre des unités militaires.
Des vidéos sur ces entrainements prolifèrent sur internet et sont un des moyens de propagande des mouvements palestiniens dans une surenchère djihadiste.
Ne pas en tenir compte de par son positionnement politique sur le conflit israélo-palestinien serait une grave erreur; et un appui tacite au développement d’idéologie tendant à exposer les populations civiles dans des conflits armés.
De ce fait, le respect du Droit est à la base vicié : toute action militaire entrainant la mort de « civil » se verra condamné par un droit n’ayant jamais envisagé l’utilisation de la population comme arme potentielle.

Brisons le silence !
Alors oui, brisons le silence ! Brisons le silence sur une fausse guerre au nom d’une revendication de « libération » (Gaza n’est pas occupée) mais bien sur une idéologie islamiste palestinienne basée sur la destruction définitive du peuple juif au moyen orient : les chrétiens d’orient pourtant massivement anti-israéliens en découvrent aujourd’hui l’autre pendant.

Voir aussi:

La dérive morale de l’armée israélienne à Gaza
Piotr Smolar (Jérusalem, correspondant)

Le Monde

04.05.2015

Eté 2014, bande de Gaza. Un vieux Palestinien gît à terre. Il marchait non loin d’un poste de reconnaissance de l’armée israélienne. Un soldat a décidé de le viser. Il est grièvement blessé à la jambe, ne bouge plus. Est-il vivant ? Les soldats se disputent. L’un d’eux décide de mettre fin à la discussion. Il abat le vieillard.

Cette histoire, narrée par plusieurs de ses acteurs, s’inscrit dans la charge la plus dévastatrice contre l’armée israélienne depuis la guerre, lancée par ses propres soldats. L’organisation non gouvernementale Breaking the Silence (« rompre le silence »), qui regroupe des anciens combattants de Tsahal, publie, lundi 4 mai, un recueil d’entretiens accordés sous couvert d’anonymat par une soixantaine de participants à l’opération « Bordure protectrice ».

Une opération conduite entre le 8 juillet et le 26 août 2014, qui a entraîné la mort de près de 2 100 Palestiniens et 66 soldats israéliens. Israël a détruit trente-deux tunnels permettant de pénétrer clandestinement sur son territoire, puis a conclu un cessez-le-feu avec le Hamas qui ne résout rien. L’offensive a provoqué des dégâts matériels et humains sans précédent. Elle jette, selon l’ONG, « de graves doutes sur l’éthique » de Tsahal.

« Si vous repérez quelqu’un, tirez ! »

Breaking the Silence n’utilise jamais l’expression « crimes de guerre ». Mais la matière que l’organisation a collectée, recoupée, puis soumise à la censure militaire comme l’exige toute publication liée à la sécurité nationale, est impressionnante. « Ce travail soulève le soupçon dérangeant de violations des lois humanitaires, explique l’avocat Michael Sfard, qui conseille l’ONG depuis dix ans. J’espère qu’il y aura un débat, mais j’ai peur qu’on parle plus du messager que du message. Les Israéliens sont de plus en plus autocentrés et nationalistes, intolérants contre les critiques. »

Environ un quart des témoins sont des officiers. Tous les corps sont représentés. Certains étaient armes à la main, d’autres dans la chaîne de commandement. Cette diversité permet, selon l’ONG, de dessiner un tableau des « politiques systémiques » décidées par l’état-major, aussi bien lors des bombardements que des incursions au sol. Ce tableau contraste avec la doxa officielle sur la loyauté de l’armée, ses procédures strictes et les avertissements adressés aux civils, pour les inviter à fuir avant l’offensive.

« Ce travail soulève le soupçon dérangeant de violations des lois humanitaires, explique l’avocat Michael Sfard, qui conseille l’ONG Breaking the Silence. J’espère qu’il y aura un débat »
Les témoignages, eux, racontent une histoire de flou. Au nom de l’obsession du risque minimum pour les soldats, les règles d’engagement – la distinction entre ennemis combattants et civils, le principe de proportionnalité – ont été brouillées. « Les soldats ont reçu pour instructions de leurs commandants de tirer sur chaque personne identifiée dans une zone de combat, dès lors que l’hypothèse de travail était que toute personne sur le terrain était un ennemi », précise l’introduction. « On nous a dit, il n’est pas censé y avoir de civils, si vous repérez quelqu’un, tirez ! », se souvient un sergent d’infanterie, posté dans le nord.

Les instructions sont claires : le doute est un risque. Une personne observe les soldats d’une fenêtre ou d’un toit ? Cible. Elle marche dans la rue à 200 mètres de l’armée ? Cible. Elle demeure dans un immeuble dont les habitants ont été avertis ? Cible. Et quand il n’y a pas de cible, on tire des obus ou au mortier, on « stérilise », selon l’expression récurrente. Ou bien on envoie le D-9, un bulldozer blindé, pour détruire les maisons et dégager la vue.

« Le bien et le mal se mélangent »

Un soldat se souvient de deux femmes, parlant au téléphone et marchant un matin à environ 800 mètres des forces israéliennes. Des guetteuses ? Un drone les survole. Pas de certitude. Elles sont abattues, classées comme « terroristes ». Un sergent raconte le « Bonjour Al-Bourej ! », adressé un matin par son unité de tanks à ce quartier situé dans la partie centrale du territoire. Les tanks sont alignés puis, sur instruction, tirent en même temps, au hasard, pour faire sentir la présence israélienne.

Beaucoup de liberté d’appréciation était laissée aux hommes sur le terrain. Au fil des jours, « le bien et le mal se mélangent un peu (…) et ça devient un peu comme un jeu vidéo », témoigne un soldat. Mais cette latitude correspondait à un mode opérationnel. Au niveau de l’état-major, il existait selon l’ONG trois « niveaux d’activation », déterminant notamment les distances de sécurité acceptées par rapport aux civils palestiniens. Au niveau 3, des dommages collatéraux élevés sont prévus. « Plus l’opération avançait, et plus les limitations ont diminué », explique l’ONG. « Nos recherches montrent que pour l’artillerie, les distances à préserver par rapport aux civils étaient très inférieures à celles par rapport à nos soldats », souligne Yehuda Shaul, cofondateur de Breaking the Silence.

Un lieutenant d’infanterie, dans le nord de la bande de Gaza, se souvient : « Même si on n’entre pas [au sol], c’est obus, obus, obus. Une structure suspecte, une zone ouverte, une possible entrée de tunnel : feu, feu, feu. » L’officier évoque le relâchement des restrictions au fil des jours. Lorsque le 3e niveau opératoire est décidé, les forces aériennes ont le droit à un « niveau raisonnable de pertes civiles, dit-il. C’est quelque chose d’indéfinissable, qui dépend du commandant de brigade, en fonction de son humeur du moment ».

Fin 2014, le vice-procureur militaire, Eli Bar-On, recevait Le Monde pour plaider le discernement des forces armées. « On a conduit plus de 5 000 frappes aériennes pendant la campagne. Le nombre de victimes est phénoménalement bas », assurait-il. A l’en croire, chaque frappe aérienne fait l’objet d’une réflexion et d’une enquête poussée. Selon lui, « la plupart des dégâts ont été causés par le Hamas ». Le magistrat mettait en cause le mouvement islamiste pour son utilisation des bâtiments civils. « On dispose d’une carte de coordination de tous les sites sensibles, mosquées, écoles, hôpitaux, réactualisée plusieurs fois par jour. Quand on la superpose avec la carte des tirs de roquettes, on s’aperçoit qu’une partie significative a été déclenchée de ces endroits. »

Treize enquêtes pénales ouvertes

L’armée peut-elle se policer ? Le parquet général militaire (MAG) a ouvert treize enquêtes pénales, dont deux pour pillages, déjà closes car les plaignants ne se sont pas présentés. Les autres cas concernent des épisodes tristement célèbres du conflit, comme la mort de quatre enfants sur la plage de Gaza, le 16 juillet 2014. Six autres dossiers ont été renvoyés au parquet en vue de l’ouverture d’une enquête criminelle, après un processus de vérification initial.

Ces procédures internes n’inspirent guère confiance. En septembre, deux ONG israéliennes, B’Tselem et Yesh Din, ont annoncé qu’elles cessaient toute coopération avec le parquet. Les résultats des investigations antérieures les ont convaincues. Après la guerre de 2008-2009 dans la bande de Gaza (près de 1 400 Palestiniens tués), 52 enquêtes avaient été ouvertes. La sentence la plus sévère – quinze mois de prison dont la moitié avec sursis – concerna un soldat coupable du vol d’une carte de crédit. Après l’opération « Pilier de défense », en novembre 2012 (167 Palestiniens tués), une commission interne a été mise en place, mais aucune enquête ouverte. Le comportement de l’armée fut jugé « professionnel ».

Voir également:

Investigate Israel’s political leadership over civilian deaths in Gaza
Probing specific incidents of civilian fatalities in last summer’s Gaza war won’t alone contribute to uncovering the truth. An external probe must be launched that examines every level of official involved, and especially politicians.
Haaretz Editorial

May 6, 2015

“Anyone located in an IDF area, in areas the IDF took over – is not [considered] a civilian. That is the working assumption.” That statement, which appears in a report by Breaking the Silence that includes testimony from more than 60 soldiers and officers who participated in last summer’s war in the Gaza Strip, does a lot to explain the large number of civilian fatalities during Operation Protective Edge.

This statement and others like it that appear in the report also reveal the policy set by high-level officials, especially the elected politicians. This policy includes a warped interpretation of the Israel Defense Forces’ Code of Ethics – which says the state has an obligation to protect its soldiers’ lives that outweighs its obligation to protect the lives of civilians “on the other side” who aren’t involved in the fighting – and permits indiscriminate harm to civilians.

“The saying was: ‘There’s no such thing there as a person who is uninvolved,’” another testimony said, revealing a prima facie disregard for the most fundamental principle of the laws of war – the distinction between combatants and civilians. The testimony exposes a de facto policy characterized by permission to “shoot anywhere, nearly freely,” which contradicts both international law and Israeli law. The orders given under this policy ought to be considered patently illegal.

The Supreme Court’s ruling on the 1956 Kafr Qasem massacre stated that “a black flag … like a warning sign saying ‘Stop!’” flies over any order to shoot indiscriminately even at the price of killing innocents. “The illegality is glaringly apparent to the eye and infuriating to the heart, if the eye isn’t blind and the heart isn’t stony or corrupt,” the ruling said.

The Breaking the Silence report also reveals that the IDF tried to create the impression that the number of civilians killed was smaller than it really was – for instance, by classifying women who didn’t participate in the fighting but were shot to death as “terrorists.” There is also testimony about prima facie breaches of the obligation to take precautions to avoid harming civilians, as well as breaches of the prohibition on attacking a military target if disproportionate harm to civilians can be anticipated.

What is especially troubling about the report is the impression that these weren’t exceptional incidents, but settled policy. Therefore, investigating these specific incidents alone won’t contribute to uncovering the truth. An external probe must be launched that examines every level of official involved, and especially the elected politicians, because they’re the ones who bear responsibility for the policy that was implemented.

In an interview last week with Haaretz, Fatou Bensouda, prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in The Hague, said that the ICC only gets involved when a country refuses or is unwilling to conduct its own investigations. This is one investigation that Israel can and must conduct by itself.

 Voir encore:

Gaza testimonies / Diverting the debate from the real issue
A new wave of damning testimonies by IDF soldiers who fought in Gaza has unleashed a knee-jerk reaction.
Amos Harel

Jul. 16, 2009

A new wave of damning testimonies by Israel Defense Forces soldiers who took part in the recent fighting in Gaza has unleashed a knee-jerk reaction from the already sensitive Israeli public. (Leading the charge was Defense Minister Ehud Barak, who on Wednesday demanded that all criticism in military matters be directed at him, not the soldiers.)

The testimonies were released by « Breaking the Silence, » an organization of former soldiers who use personal experiences to illustrate what they perceive to be the folly of Israeli policies in the Palestinian territories. Once again, the organization has been singled out for rebuke.

The response to the testimonies was taken – admittedly very skillfully – in one very specific direction: the reliability of the witnesses and their betrayal of IDF and Israeli society as a whole.

The IDF Spokesman’s Office dismissed Breaking the Silence as a private body focused on media manipulation. Kadima MK Otniel Schneller, a resident of the Maaleh Michmas settlement, demanded the anonymous soldier witnesses identify themselves. This demand took center stage in the efforts to discredit the troops who had spoken out.

So, it was asked, why won’t Breaking the Silence give any identifying details in their accounts, tying them to a specific sector, date or unit? Who would know, reporters heard IDF officers wonder aloud, whether the testimonials were delivered by actors reading from a script?

The nay-sayers should simmer down. The men behind the testimonies are soldiers, that is certain. Three of them met with Haaretz, at the paper’s request. While there is no definite way of vouching for the credibility of their reports, it is safe to say that they did fight in Gaza and that they provided enough authentic detail to prove that they are not imposters.

The refusal to disclose their identities, especially for those witnesses still completing their mandatory military service, stems from a fear of possible retribution, both from their commanders and from their peers.

Telling their stories to outside organizations, in particular the media, is seen as tattling. It was enough for these soldiers to hear from graduates of a pre-army prep course about the onslaught they faced after previous Cast Lead testimonies – vehemently denied in the Military Advocate General’s subsequent report – to understand that their fears are not unfounded. It will be interesting to hear the full version of events once these soldiers are discharged.

On the flip side, Breaking the Silence, founded in 2004 by veterans of the second intifada, has a clear political agenda, and can no longer be classed as a « human rights organization. » Any organization whose website includes the claim by members to expose the « corruption which permeates the military system » is not a neutral observer.

The organization has a clear agenda: to expose the consequences of IDF troops serving in the West Bank and Gaza. This seems more of interest to its members than seeking justice for specific injustices. The fact that the material was published just six months after the end of the conflict will diminish its impact in the eyes of a public supportive of their troops.

But this does not mean that the documented evidence, some of which was videotaped, is fabricated. It goes without saying, however, that the vague contextual descriptions hamper the possibility that the IDF could use such testimonies in a criminal investigation.

During the conflict in Gaza earlier this year, Israel did not use even close to the amount of firepower the U.S. military unleashed on Iraq’s civilian population. The IDF, as can be concluded from the reports themselves, did not systematically kill innocent people. It did use intense fire in crowded areas and issued fairly loose rules of engagement in order to meet the unwritten goal of the operation – a minimum of IDF casualties.

Among the lower ranks of some units, this translated to a certain unraveling in the wake of eight years of Qassam rockets (a period in which, despite our celebrated policy of restraint, several thousand Palestinians were killed) and a sentiment among some soldiers that the time had come to settle the score with the Gazans.

So where can Israel draw the line between self-flagellation and introspection? A month ago, Colonel Hertzi Halevy of the IDF Paratroopers Brigade held a conference on battle values, in which all battalion and brigade commanders took part. It was an extensive and thorough discussion, which heard from legal experts, journalists, a philosophy professor and even (good heavens!) a bona fide leftwing activist.

The Paratroopers officers felt they had done nothing for which they should feel ashamed. Instead of curling up in a defensive ball, they listened to the criticism with interest, although they rejected much of it in their own detailed responses.

International criticism, including an upcoming harsh UN report, will continue regardless. We can and must lead a debate on the matter within Israeli society, instead of responding to every claim with a chorus of « The IDF is the most moral army in the world » – as if that issue had already been settled in an Olympic event in which nations’ armies compete in a moral high jump.

One would hope that the IDF as a whole can follow the Paratroopers? lead, not just in the way its soldiers behave during battle, but in how it examines itself once the battle is over.

Voir de plus:

ANALYSIS / Can Israel dismiss its own troops’ stories from Gaza?
Testimonies of IDF soldiers show that Israel’s view of the enemy is becoming more extreme.
Amos Harel

Haaretz

Mar. 19, 2009

The statements of the Israel Defense Forces soldiers from the Yitzhak Rabin preparatory course provide the first, uncensored look at what occurred in some of the combat units in Operation Cast Lead.

It seems that what soldiers have to say is actually the way things happened in the field, most of the time. And as usual, reality is completely different from the gentler version provided by the military commanders to the public and media during the operation and after.

The soldiers are not lying, for the simple reason that they have no reason to. If you read the transcript that will appear in Haaretz Friday, you will not find any judgment or boasting. This is what the soldiers, from their point of view, saw in Gaza. There is a continuity of testimony from different sectors that reflects a disturbing and depressing picture.

The IDF will do everyone, and most of all itself, a big favor if it takes these soldiers and allegations seriously and investigates itself in depth. When statements came only from Palestinian witnesses or « the hostile press, » it was possible to dismiss them as propaganda that served the enemy. But what can be done when the soldiers themselves tell the story?

It’s possible that somewhere in the stories there were a few mistakes or exaggerations, because a squad or platoon leader does not always see the entire picture. But this is evidence, first hand, of what most Israelis would prefer to repress. This is how the army carried out its war against armed terrorists, with a civilian population of a million and a half people stuck in the middle.

In response to a question from Haaretz Wednesday, Danny Zamir, the head of the preparatory course, said he had decided to publish the discussion in the newsletter only after speaking with and writing to senior IDF officers a number of times. Zamir was told by General Staff officers that the operational inquiries into the fighting in Gaza, including the ethical inquiry, were still far from completion. The officers also said they had not encountered evidence of incidents of the type the soldiers described.

If the IDF really never heard about these incidents, the reasonable assumption is that it did not want to know. The soldiers describe the reality in combat units, from the level of company commander down. In the debriefings, the participants usually include company commanders up. It seems that except for isolated incidents, the rule is « you don’t ask, we won’t tell. »

The ones who finally let the dark secrets out were the soldiers in the combat units themselves. Somewhere along the way their moral warning lights went off.

In the coming days, in an effort to rebuff the claims, we will certainly hear about those who « pulled one over » on Zamir. In 1990, as a company commander in the reserves, Zamir was tried and sentenced to prison for refusing to guard a ceremony where right-wingers brought Torah scrolls to Joseph’s Tomb in Nablus. But even though Zamir does not hide his political opinions, a reading of the transcript shows he acts out of a deep concern for the spirit of the IDF.

The IDF’s ethical problems did not start in 2009. Such discussions also followed the Six-Day War. But a reserve officer who looked at the transcript Wednesday said: « This is not the IDF we knew. »

The descriptions show that Israel’s view of the enemy is becoming more extreme. The deterioration has been continuous – from the first Lebanon war to the second, from the first intifada to the second, from Operation Defensive Shield to Operation Cast Lead.

Voir de même:

IDF in Gaza: Killing civilians, vandalism, and lax rules of engagement
Haaretz expose gathers testimony of Gaza op incidents; IDF: We’ll check info, investigate as required.
Amos Harel

Haaretz

Mar. 18, 2009

During Operation Cast Lead, Israeli forces killed Palestinian civilians under permissive rules of engagement and intentionally destroyed their property, say soldiers who fought in the offensive.

The soldiers are graduates of the Yitzhak Rabin pre-military preparatory course at Oranim Academic College in Tivon. Some of their statements made on Feb. 13 will appear Thursday and Friday in Haaretz. Dozens of graduates of the course who took part in the discussion fought in the Gaza operation.

The speakers included combat pilots and infantry soldiers. Their testimony runs counter to the Israel Defense Forces’ claims that Israeli troops observed a high level of moral behavior during the operation. The session’s transcript was published this week in the newsletter for the course’s graduates.

The testimonies include a description by an infantry squad leader of an incident where an IDF sharpshooter mistakenly shot a Palestinian mother and her two children. « There was a house with a family inside …. We put them in a room. Later we left the house and another platoon entered it, and a few days after that there was an order to release the family. They had set up positions upstairs. There was a sniper position on the roof, » the soldier said.

« The platoon commander let the family go and told them to go to the right. One mother and her two children didn’t understand and went to the left, but they forgot to tell the sharpshooter on the roof they had let them go and it was okay, and he should hold his fire and he … he did what he was supposed to, like he was following his orders. »

According to the squad leader: « The sharpshooter saw a woman and children approaching him, closer than the lines he was told no one should pass. He shot them straight away. In any case, what happened is that in the end he killed them.

« I don’t think he felt too bad about it, because after all, as far as he was concerned, he did his job according to the orders he was given. And the atmosphere in general, from what I understood from most of my men who I talked to … I don’t know how to describe it …. The lives of Palestinians, let’s say, is something very, very less important than the lives of our soldiers. So as far as they are concerned they can justify it that way, » he said.

Another squad leader from the same brigade told of an incident where the company commander ordered that an elderly Palestinian woman be shot and killed; she was walking on a road about 100 meters from a house the company had commandeered.

The squad leader said he argued with his commander over the permissive rules of engagement that allowed the clearing out of houses by shooting without warning the residents beforehand. After the orders were changed, the squad leader’s soldiers complained that « we should kill everyone there [in the center of Gaza]. Everyone there is a terrorist. »

The squad leader said: « You do not get the impression from the officers that there is any logic to it, but they won’t say anything. To write ‘death to the Arabs’ on the walls, to take family pictures and spit on them, just because you can. I think this is the main thing: To understand how much the IDF has fallen in the realm of ethics, really. It’s what I’ll remember the most. »

More soldiers’ testimonies will be published in Haaretz over the coming days.

Voir pareillement:

Israeli soldiers admit ‘shoot first’ policy in Gaza offensive

Anonymous testimonies collated by human rights group also contain allegations that Palestinians were used as human shields
Ian Black, Middle East editor
The Guardian
15 July 2009

Israeli soldiers who served in the Gaza Strip during the offensive of December and January have spoken out about being ordered to shoot without hesitation, destroying houses and mosques with a general disregard for Palestinian lives.

In testimony that will fuel international and Arab demands for war crime investigations, 30 combat soldiers report that the army’s priority was to minimise its own casualties to maintain Israeli public support for the three-week Operation Cast Lead.

One specific allegation is that Palestinians were used by the army as « human shields » despite a 2005 Israeli high court ruling outlawing the practice. « Not much was said about the issue of innocent civilians, » a soldier said. « There was no need to use weapons like mortars or phosphorous, » said another. « I have the feeling that the army was looking for the opportunity to show off its strength. »

The 54 anonymous testimonies were collated by Breaking the Silence, a group that collects information on human rights abuses by the Israeli military. Many of the soldiers are still doing their compulsory national service.

Palestinians counted 1,400 dead but Israel put the death toll at 1,166 and estimated 295 fatalities were civilians. Ten soldiers and three Israeli civilians were killed.

Israel launched the attack after the expiry of a ceasefire designed to halt rocket fire from Gaza and crush the Islamist movement Hamas, which controls the coastal strip.
Advertisement

Witnesses described the destruction of hundreds of houses and many mosques without military reason, the firing of phosphorous shells into inhabited areas, the killing of innocents and the indiscriminate destruction of property.

Soldiers describe a « neighbour procedure » in which Palestinian civilians were forced to enter suspect buildings ahead of troops. They cite cases of civilians advancing in front of a soldier resting his rifle on the civilian’s shoulder.

« We did not get instructions to shoot at anything that moved, » said one soldier. « But we were generally instructed: if you feel threatened, shoot. They kept repeating to us that this is war and in war opening fire is not restricted. »

Many testimonies are in line with claims by Amnesty International and other human rights organisations that Israeli actions were indiscriminate and disproportionate.

Another soldier testified: « You feel like a stupid little kid with a magnifying glass looking at ants, burning them. A 20-year-old kid should not have to do these kinds of things to other people. »

The testimonies « expose significant gaps between the official army version of events and what really happened on the ground », Breaking the Silence said.

« This is an urgent call to Israeli society and its leaders to sober up and investigate anew the results of our actions. »

Ehud Barak, Israel’s defence minister, said: « Criticism directed at the IDF (Israel Defence Forces) by one organisation or another is inappropriate and is directed at the wrong place. The IDF is one of the most ethical armies in the world and acts in accordance with the highest moral code. »

An IDF spokesman told the Ha’aretz newspaper: « The IDF regrets the fact that a human rights organisation would again present to the country and the world a report containing anonymous, generalised testimony without checking the details or their reliability, and without giving the IDF, as a matter of minimal fairness, the opportunity to check the matters and respond to them before publication. »

An internal investigation by the Israeli military said troops fought lawfully although errors did take place, such as the deaths of 21 people in a house that had been wrongly targeted.

Voir encore:

Israeli soldiers killed unarmed civilians carrying white flags in Gaza, says report
Human Rights Watch says Israel has failed to properly investigate ‘white flag’ killings during Gaza offensive
A shell fired by the Israeli military explodes in the northern Gaza Strip
A shell fired by the Israeli military explodes in the northern Gaza Strip during the January offensive. Photograph: Bernat Armangue/AP

Peter Beaumont

The Guardian

13 August 2009

 Israeli soldiers shot dead 11 unarmed Palestinian civilians carrying white flags during Israel’s offensive in Gaza earlier this year, according to a report from Human Rights Watch, which said Israel had failed to investigate the killings adequately.

The deaths – including those of five women and four children – took place in seven separate incidents across Gaza in areas controlled by the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF), where there was no fighting and no Palestinian fighters were nearby.

Human Rights Watch, a New-York-based organisation, which published White Flag Deaths: Killings of Palestinian Civilians during Operation Cast Leadsaid it informed the Israeli military of the cases in February. But the cases were not examined in an IDF internal investigation, which concluded that they « operated in accordance with international law. » The group says at least three witnesses confirmed the details in each of the seven shootings.

Included among the cases is one first reported in detail by the Observer in Khuza’a, close to the fence surrounding Gaza. Rawiya al-Najjar, 47, was shot dead, and her relative Jasmin al-Najjar, 23, was wounded while the two women were attempting to escape an attack on the village that included the use of white phosphorus and the bulldozing of houses.

Three other incidents occurred around the northern Gaza village of al-Atatra, which had previously seen fighting between Israeli soldiers and Hamas fighters. By the time of the shootings, however, the fighting had stopped, and in each case the civilians were visible, unarmed, and displaying white flags, the report says.

In one case, the civilians were walking in a group on a street. In another, they were driving slowly on tractors and in cars, trying to leave the area with the wounded, according to the report.

« On the way we saw tanks and soldiers, » said Omar Abu Halima, 18. « When we saw them [the Israeli soldiers] they told us to stop. After we stopped they fired at us. They killed my cousin Mattar. My cousin Muhammad was wounded and later died. »

In another case – also in al-Atatra – two women holding white flags stepped out of a house that the IDF was demolishing to tell the soldiers that civilians were inside. « We opened the door and a sniper fired at us from a house, » said Zakiya al-Qanu, 55. « Ibtisam was hit and I turned to go back inside and another bullet grazed my back. Ibtisam died in the doorway. »

The Israeli military said that in some cases Hamas militants had used civilians with white flags for cover. It said yesterday the reports were based on « unreliable witnesses » whose testimony was « unproven ».

Human Rights Watch said it could find no evidence of misuse of white flags or the use of civilians as human shields in the cases detailed. « These casualties comprise a fraction of the Palestinian civilians wounded and killed, » the report says.

« But they stand out because, in each case, the victims were standing, walking or in slowly moving vehicles with other unarmed civilians, and were trying to convey their non-combatant status by waving a white flag. »

Along with the use of white phosphorus on civilian areas, the shooting of unarmed civilians has become the most controversial issue of January’s war. The report follows the publication last month of anonymous testimonies by more than two dozen soldiers who fought in Gaza, compiled by Breaking the Silence, an organisation of former Israeli servicemen, which accused the IDF of allowing an atmosphere of permissive violence against civilians.

The allegations of white flag deaths, collected by human rights groups and the media, have yet to be adequately responded to. Under the Geneva conventions, combatants are obliged to distinguish between soldiers and civilians (as well as fighters who are hors de combat) and also have a legal obligation to protect civilians. They are also required to investigate any alleged war crimes committed by their own troops.

Last month, the Israeli government released its own report defending its use of force in Gaza.

It said Israel was investigating five alleged cases in which soldiers killed civilians carrying white flags, incidents that it said resulted in 10 deaths. Two of the cases – the incident in Khuza’a and one in eastern Jabaliya – are among them.

War of words

While relations between Human Rights Watch and Israel have never been comfortable, the series of reports that HRW has released since the war in Gaza has brought both Israeli officials’ criticism of the group to a new pitch of intensity. They accuse the organisation of having an anti-Israeli bias, despite the fact that HRW has also forcefully criticised Palestinian rocket fire out of Gaza that targeted civilians. Israeli media commentators have tried to accuse the group of being part of a campaign to present Israel as « a primary perpetrator of war crimes ». More recently the group’s US and Israeli critics have suggested that a series of meetings to encourage human rights campaigning in Saudi Arabia was a fundraising trip underpinned by its record of criticising Israel, claims that the group has vigorously denied. The Israeli government spokesman Mark Regev referred to these allegations in an attempt to rebut the latest report and questioned the group’s « impartiality, professionalism and credibility ».

Voir aussi:

Israeli soldiers caught on camera pushing, throwing stone at photojournalists
‘The behavior seen in the video is reprehensible,’ an army spokesman said, ‘The matter will be investigated.’
Gili Cohen

Haaretz

Apr. 25, 2015

Israeli soldiers assaulted a pair of photojournalists near the West Bank town of Nabi Saleh on Friday, video footage of the incident shows.

The video shows a group of soldiers accosting two photojournalists clearly marked as members of the press, shouting at them « Get out of here. » Then one of the soldiers is seen pushing one of the photographers to the ground with his helmet. After this, another soldier knocks the other photographer to the ground. The same soldier then picks up a stone and hurls it at the photographer.

According to the army, the area was a closed military zone and some 70 Palestinians had assembled there and hurled stones at passing vehicles and the force itself. This demonstration is not seen in the video.

Two Palestinians were lightly wounded in the clashes. According to the demonstrators, one of the Palestinians suffered a head wound from Ruger fire, but the Israeli army said he was not wounded by a Ruger, but could not give any details on the circumstances of the man’s injury. The other wounded was hit by rubber bullets.

An Israeli soldier was also wounded by stones thrown by the demonstrators.

An Israel Defense Forces spokesman told Haaretz that « the behavior seen in the video is reprehensible and isn’t in line with the guidelines issued by the commanders in the region. The IDF guidelines allow for free press coverage in the territory under control of the Central Command in general, and specifically during demonstrations. The matter will be investigated. »

In 2012, an IDF officer was filmed throwing stones and firing at Palestinians in Nabi Saleh – contrary to regulations. He was relieved of his duties and was later charged with illegal use of a fire arm.

Video by Miki Kratsman:

Voir enfin:

Toute la vérité sur la guerre de Gaza (été 2014)
Freddy Eytan

Le CAPE

3/18/15

Le CAPE de Jérusalem – Centre des Affaires Publiques et de l’Etat (JCPA-CAPE) publie un document exclusif sur les crimes de guerre commis par le mouvement Hamas durant l’opération militaire Bordure Protectrice dans la bande de Gaza.

Ce document a été écrit par des diplomates, des experts et chercheurs, spécialistes en matière de Droit international, de Renseignement, et de stratégie concernant le Hamas.

Il présente un dossier complet, précieux et indispensable, au moment où une commission d’enquête de l’ONU s’apprête à publier des conclusions partiales et mensongères, en osant, sans scrupule, accuser Tsahal de « crimes contre l’Humanité ».

La récente démission du président de cette commission onusienne prouve justement l’absence de souci de justice et de vérité, et sa partialité en faveur de la cause palestinienne.

Cette étude offre au spécialiste comme au grand public un nouvel éclairage sur le combat inlassable que mène aujourd’hui l’Etat juif contre les mouvements terroristes palestiniens dans un contexte régional explosif face à une montée en puissance du djihad mondial, encouragé par l’Organisation de l’Etat islamique-Daesh, et avec la menace omniprésente de l’étendard chiite iranien.

Le Hamas est reconnu comme une organisation terroriste et sa charte appelle toujours à la destruction de l’Etat d’Israël.

L’Egypte, qui combat sans merci les groupes terroristes dans la péninsule du Sinaï, accuse le Hamas de participer activement aux activités terroristes sur son propre territoire, et vient de proclamer le mouvement palestinien « hors la loi », à l’instar de la confrérie des Frères musulmans.

Ce document analyse avec acuité les étapes qui ont abouti au déclenchement de la guerre, et le refus catégorique du Hamas d’accepter les différentes trêves proposées par l’Egypte.

Il explique la complexité du combat mené par un Etat démocratique contre une organisation terroriste dont les chefs n’ont aucun souci de leur propre population. D’une indifférence mortelle et capables des pires lâchetés, les dirigeants du Hamas se cachent systématiquement derrière des boucliers humains dans des hôpitaux, des écoles, des mosquées.

Cette étude révèle la politisation des organismes onusiens, notamment la connivence de l’UNRWA avec le mouvement palestinien. Elle dévoile le réseau des tunnels d’attaque et surtout les efforts de l’Etat d’Israël pour respecter les lois internationales et enquêter lui-même sur les bavures et les défaillances.

Au moment où les Palestiniens lancent une campagne de délégitimation de l’Etat juif, tout en désirant créer leur propre Etat unilatéralement, sans négociation préalable, nous devrions focaliser l’attention des chancelleries et de l’opinion internationale sur les réalités du terrain et révéler au grand jour toute la vérité sur la dernière guerre de Gaza.

Voir l’étude du JCPA-CAPE de Jérusalem “Toute la vérité sur la guerre de Gaza” avec ses illustrations.

Voir l’intégralité du document en anglais.


Good kill: Attention, un pilote de drones peut en cacher un autre (No kill lists and Terror Tuesdays, please, we’re Hollywood)

8 mai, 2015
https://i2.wp.com/www.thebureauinvestigates.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/All-Totals-Dash54.jpg
L’ennemi n’est pas identifiable en tant que tel dans le sens où ce sont des gens qui se mêlent à la population. Donc ils sont habillés comme n’importe qui. Il n’y a pas d’uniforme donc comment savoir si c’est l’ennemi ou juste des personnes normales ? C’est juste d’après le comportement qu’on peut le voir. Bernard Davin (pilote belge au retour d’Afghanistan, RTBF, 13.01.09)
La majorité du temps, ce n’est pas une décision qui est difficile puisque en fait, c’est l’ennemi qui nous met dans une situation difficile au sol. Didier Polomé (commandant belge)
On n’en saura pas plus. Les détails des opérations OTAN sont couvertes par le secret militaire pour éviter les représailles contre les pays impliqués et contre les familles des pilotes en mission en Afghanistan. Journaliste belge (RTBF, 13.01.09)
Le bien et le mal se mélangent un peu (…) et ça devient un peu comme un jeu vidéo. Soldat israélien
Les frères Jonas sont ici ; ils sont là quelque part. Sasha et Malia sont de grandes fans. Mais les gars, allez pas vous faire des idées. J’ai deux mots pour vous: « predator drones ». Vous les verrez même pas venir. Vous croyez que je plaisante, hein ? Barack Obama (2010)
Les drones américains ont liquidé plus de monde que le nombre total des détenus de Guantanamo. Pouvons nous être certains qu’il n’y avait parmi eux aucun cas d’erreurs sur la personne ou de morts innocentes ? Les prisonniers de Guantanamo avaient au moins une chance d’établir leur identité, d’être examinés par un Comité de surveillance et, dans la plupart des cas, d’être relâchés. Ceux qui restent à Guantanamo ont été contrôlés et, finalement, devront faire face à une forme quelconque de procédure judiciaire. Ceux qui ont été tués par des frappes de drones, quels qu’ils aient été, ont disparu. Un point c’est tout. Kurt Volker
The drone operation now operates out of two main bases in the US, dozens of smaller installations and at least six foreign countries. There are « terror Tuesday » meetings to discuss targets which Obama’s campaign manager, David Axelrod, sometimes attends, lending credence to those who see naked political calculation involved. The New York Times
Foreign Policy a consacré la une de son numéro daté de mars-avril aux “guerres secrètes d’Obama”. Qui aurait pu croire il y a quatre ans que le nom de Barack Obama allait être associé aux drones et à la guerre secrète technologique ? s’étonne le magazine, qui souligne qu’Obama “est le président américain qui a approuvé le plus de frappes ciblées de toute l’histoire des Etats-Unis”. Voilà donc à quoi ressemblait l’ennemi : quinze membres présumés d’Al-Qaida au Yémen entretenant des liens avec l’Occident. Leurs photographies et la biographie succincte qui les accompagnait les faisaient ressembler à des étudiants dans un trombinoscope universitaire. Plusieurs d’entre eux étaient américains. Deux étaient des adolescents, dont une jeune fille qui ne faisait même pas ses 17 ans. Supervisant la réunion dédiée à la lutte contre le terrorisme, qui réunit tous les mardis une vingtaine de hauts responsables à la Maison-Blanche, Barack Obama a pris un moment pour étudier leurs visages. C’était le 19 janvier 2010, au terme d’une première année de mandat émaillée de complots terroristes dont le point culminant a été la tentative d’attentat évitée de justesse dans le ciel de Detroit le soir de Noël 2009. “Quel âge ont-ils ? s’est enquis Obama ce jour-là. Si Al-Qaida se met à utiliser des enfants, c’est que l’on entre dans une toute nouvelle phase.” La question n’avait rien de théorique : le président a volontairement pris la tête d’un processus de “désignation” hautement confidentiel visant à identifier les terroristes à éliminer ou à capturer. Obama a beau avoir fait campagne en 2008 contre la guerre en Irak et contre l’usage de la torture, il a insisté pour que soit soumise à son aval la liquidation de chacun des individus figurant sur une kill list [liste de cibles à abattre] qui ne cesse de s’allonger, étudiant méticuleusement les biographies des terroristes présumés apparaissant sur ce qu’un haut fonctionnaire surnomme macabrement les “cartes de base-ball”. A chaque fois que l’occasion d’utiliser un drone pour supprimer un terroriste se présente, mais que ce dernier est en famille, le président se réserve le droit de prendre la décision finale. (…) Une série d’interviews accordées au New York Times par une trentaine de ses conseillers permettent de retracer l’évolution d’Obama depuis qu’il a été appelé à superviser personnellement cette “drôle de guerre” contre Al-Qaida et à endosser un rôle sans précédent dans l’histoire de la présidence américaine. Ils évoquent un chef paradoxal qui approuve des opérations de liquidation sans ciller, tout en étant inflexible sur la nécessité de circonscrire la lutte antiterroriste et d’améliorer les relations des Etats-Unis avec le monde arabe. (…) C’est le plus curieux des rituels bureaucratiques : chaque semaine ou presque, une bonne centaine de membres du tentaculaire appareil sécuritaire des Etats-Unis se réunissent lors d’une visioconférence sécurisée pour éplucher les biographies des terroristes présumés et suggérer au président la prochaine cible à abattre. Ce processus de “désignation” confidentiel est une création du gouvernement Obama, un macabre “club de discussion” qui étudie soigneusement des diapositives PowerPoint sur lesquelles figurent les noms, les pseudonymes et le parcours de membres présumés de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida ou de ses alliés de la milice somalienne Al-Chabab. The New York Times (07.06.12)
Rarement moment politique et innovation technologique auront si parfaitement correspondu : lorsque le président démocrate est élu en 2008 par des Américains las des conflits, il dispose d’un moyen tout neuf pour poursuivre, dans la plus grande discrétion, la lutte contre les « ennemis de l’Amérique » sans risquer la vie de citoyens de son pays : les drones. (…) George W. Bush, artisan d’un large déploiement sur le terrain, utilisera modérément ces nouveaux engins létaux. Barack Obama y recourra six fois plus souvent pendant son seul premier mandat que son prédécesseur pendant les deux siens. M. Obama, qui, en recevant le prix Nobel de la paix en décembre 2009, revendiquait une Amérique au « comportement exemplaire dans la conduite de la guerre », banalisera la pratique des « assassinats ciblés », parfois fondés sur de simples présomptions et décidés par lui-même dans un secret absolu. Tandis que les militaires guident les drones dans l’Afghanistan en guerre, c’est jusqu’à présent la très opaque CIA qui opère partout ailleurs (au Yémen, au Pakistan, en Somalie, en Libye). C’est au Yémen en 2002 que la campagne d' »assassinats ciblés » a débuté. Le Pakistan suit dès 2004. Barack Obama y multiplie les frappes. Certaines missions, menées à l’insu des autorités pakistanaises, soulèvent de lourdes questions de souveraineté. D’autres, les goodwill kills (« homicides de bonne volonté »), le sont avec l’accord du gouvernement local. Tandis que les frappes de drones militaires sont simplement « secrètes », celles opérées par la CIA sont « covert », ce qui signifie que les Etats-Unis n’en reconnaissent même pas l’existence. Dans ce contexte, établir des statistiques est difficile. Selon le Bureau of Investigative Journalism, une ONG britannique, les attaques au Pakistan ont fait entre 2 548 et 3 549 victimes, dont 411 à 884 sont des civils, et 168 à 197 des enfants. En termes statistiques, la campagne de drones est un succès : les Etats-Unis revendiquent l’élimination de plus d’une cinquantaine de hauts responsables d’Al-Qaida et de talibans. D’où la nette diminution du nombre de cibles potentielles et du rythme des frappes, passées de 128 en 2010 (une tous les trois jours) à 48 en 2012 au Pakistan. Car le secret total et son cortège de dénégations ne pouvaient durer éternellement. En mai 2012, le New York Times a révélé l’implication personnelle de M. Obama dans la confection des kill lists. Après une décennie de silence et de mensonges officiels, la réalité a dû être admise. En particulier au début de l’année, lorsque le débat public s’est focalisé sur l’autorisation, donnée par le ministre de la justice, Eric Holder, d’éliminer un citoyen américain responsable de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida. L’imam Anouar Al-Aulaqi avait été abattu le 30 septembre 2011 au Yémen par un drone de la CIA lancé depuis l’Arabie saoudite. Le droit de tuer un concitoyen a nourri une intense controverse. D’autant que la même opération avait causé des « dégâts collatéraux » : Samir Khan, responsable du magazine jihadiste Inspire, et Abdulrahman, 16 ans, fils d’Al-Aulaqui, tous deux américains et ne figurant ni l’un ni l’autre sur la kill list, ont trouvé la mort. Aux yeux des opposants, l’adolescent personnifie désormais l’arbitraire de la guerre des drones. La révélation par la presse des contorsions juridiques imaginées par les conseillers du président pour justifier a posteriori l’assassinat d’un Américain n’a fait qu’alimenter les revendications de transparence. La fronde s’est concrétisée par le blocage au Sénat, plusieurs semaines durant, de la nomination à la tête de la CIA de John Brennan, auparavant grand ordonnateur à la Maison Blanche de la politique d’assassinats ciblés. (…) Très attendu, le grand exercice de clarification a eu lieu le 23 mai devant la National Defense University de Washington. Barack Obama y a prononcé un important discours sur la « guerre juste », affichant enfin une doctrine en matière d’usage des drones. Il était temps : plusieurs organisations de défense des libertés publiques avaient réclamé en justice la communication des documents justifiant les assassinats ciblés. Une directive présidentielle, signée la veille, précise les critères de recours aux frappes à visée mortelle : une « menace continue et imminente contre la population des Etats-Unis », le fait qu' »aucun autre gouvernement ne soit en mesure d'[y] répondre ou ne la prenne en compte effectivement » et une « quasi-certitude » qu’il n’y aura pas de victimes civiles. Pour la première fois, Barack Obama a reconnu l’existence des assassinats ciblés, y compris ceux ayant visé des Américains, assurant que ces morts le « hanteraient » toute sa vie. (…) Six jours après ce discours, l’assassinat par un drone de Wali ur-Rehman, le numéro deux des talibans pakistanais, en a montré les limites. Ce leader visait plutôt le Pakistan que « la population des Etats-Unis ». Tout porte donc à croire que les critères limitatifs énoncés par Barack Obama ne s’appliquent pas au Pakistan, du moins aussi longtemps qu’il restera des troupes américaines dans l’Afghanistan voisin. Et que les « Signature strikes », ces frappes visant des groupes d’hommes armés non identifiés mais présumés extrémistes, seront poursuivies. Les drones n’ont donc pas fini de mettre en lumière les contradictions de Barack Obama : président antiguerre, champion de la transparence, de la légalité et de la main tendue à l’islam, il a multiplié dans l’ombre les assassinats ciblés, provoquant la colère de musulmans. Le Monde (18.06.13)
Aucun soldat n’avait vécu cela jusqu’ici. Avant, on se rendait dans le pays avec lequel on était en conflit. Aujourd’hui, plus besoin : la guerre est télécommandée. Avant, le pilote prenait son jet, lâchait une bombe et rentrait. Aujourd’hui, il lâche sa bombe, attend dans son fauteuil et compte le nombre de morts. Il passe douze heures à tuer des talibans avant d’aller chercher ses enfants à l’école. (…) Obama est démocrate. Et l’emploi des drones a augmenté depuis qu’il est au pouvoir. Mon film parle de l’ »American sniper » ultime. J’ai juste tenté d’être honnête vis-à-vis du sujet. De montrer les choses telles qu’elles sont sans imposer une manière de penser. Il serait naïf de dire « je suis anti-drone ». Ce serait comme dire « je suis anti-internet ». Mais avec cette technologie, la guerre peut être infinie. Le jour où l’armée américaine quittera le Moyen-Orient, les drones, eux, y resteront. (…) L’état-major américain était sur le point d’attribuer une médaille à certains pilotes de drones. Cela a soulevé un tel tollé de la part des vrais pilotes qu’ils ont abandonné l’idée. Ces médailles sont censées célébrer les valeurs et le courage. Comment les décerner à des types qui tuent sans courir le moindre danger ? (…) J’ai aussi pas mal filmé les scènes extérieures au conflit, celles de la vie quotidienne du personnage à Las Vegas, d’un point de vue culminant, pour créer une continuité et un sentiment de paranoïa. Comme si un drone le suivait en permanence. Ou le point de vue de Dieu. Andrew Niccol
Tout ce que je montre est vrai: un type près de Las Vegas peut détruire une maison pleine de talibans en Afghanistan. Encore faut-il être sûr que ceux qui y sont réunis sont vraiment des talibans. Et il est arrivé que des missiles américains soient lancés contre des enterrements. Andrew Niccol
J’étais plus intéressé par le personnage, par cette nouvelle manière de faire la guerre. On n’a jamais demandé à un soldat de faire ça. De combattre douze heures et de rentrer chez lui auprès de sa femme et de ses enfants, il n’y a plus de sas de décompression. (…) J’ai engagé d’anciens pilotes de drones comme consultants, puisque l’armée m’avait refusé sa coopération. J’en aurais bien voulu, ç’aurait été plus facile si on m’avait donné ces équipements, ces installations. J’ai dû les construire. (…) je me suis souvenu aujourd’hui d’une conférence de presse du général Schwartzkopf pendant la première guerre d’Irak, il avait montré des vidéos en noir et blanc, avec une très mauvaise définition, de frappes de précision et on voyait un motocycliste échapper de justesse à un missile. Il l’avait appelé « l’homme le plus chanceux d’Irak ». On le voit traverser un pont, passer dans la ligne de mire et sortir du champ au moment où le panache de l’explosion éclot. Aujourd’hui on sait qu’il existe une vidéo pour chaque frappe de drone, c’est la procédure. Mais on ne les montre plus comme au temps du général Schwartzkopf. Expliquez-moi pourquoi. (…) Je vais vous dire pourquoi. Les humains ont tendance à l’empathie – et même si vous êtes mon ennemi, même si vous êtes une mauvaise personne, si je vous regarde mourir, je ressentirai de l’empathie. Ce qui n’est pas bon pour les affaires militaires. (…) Je crois que ça a tendance à insensibiliser. On n’entend jamais une explosion, on ne sent jamais le sol se soulever. On est à 10 000 kilomètres. (…) L’armée l’a mise là pour des raisons de commodité: les montagnes autour de Las Vegas ressemblent à l’Afghanistan, ce qui permet aux pilotes de drones à l’entraînement de se familiariser avec le terrain. Ils s’exercent aussi à suivre des voitures. Andrew Niccol
Je voulais montrer que plus on progresse technologiquement, plus on régresse humainement. Derrière sa télécommande, le pilote n’entend rien, ne sent pas le sol trembler, ne respire pas l’odeur de brûlé… Il fait exploser des pixels sans jamais être dans le concret de la chair et du sang. Andrew Nicool
I get to play a character I’ve never seen on screen before. He’s spending the bulk of the day fighting the Taliban; leaves work, picks up some eggs and orange juice, helps his son with his homework and fights with his wife about what TV show to watch. And then the next day does the same thing again. This is a new situation we’ve never been in: Soldiers who take people’s lives whose own life isn’t in danger. A lot of these people go into the military because they have the mentality of a warrior. They want to put their life on the line for their beliefs to make people safe, but what does it mean when your life isn’t on the line? It seems like the stuff of sci-fi but it’s arrived. (…) We can’t have a serious conversation about a drone strike unless people have more information. Most people don’t know what a drone looks like, or how it’s operated. I learned a lot – I had no idea [the US] would strike a funeral or rescuers. There’s a certain logic to doing it – you could say perhaps it is proportionate. Perhaps we’re stopping more death than we’re creating, but we are killing innocent people. Am I sure I want our soldiers doing that? An interesting example is on Obama’s third day in office he ordered a drone strike – it was surgical, but they had the wrong information and they murdered a family that had nothing to do with anything. When these tools are available accidents happen. It’s ripe for dialogue. I’m not in politics, I don’t have an agenda for the audience, but I think it’s a really interesting conversation. I don’t think we should let our governments run willy-nilly and kill whoever and spy on whoever they want to without asking any questions. Ethan Hawke
Every strike Tom does in the movie there is a precedent for, but his character is fictitious. There were some things I didn’t put in the movie because I thought they were too outrageous. I was told about drone pilots who were younger than Ethan’s character – they would work with a joystick for 12 hours over Afghanistan, take out a target and go home to their apartment and play video games. The military modelled the workstation on computer games because it’s the joystick that’s the easiest to use. They want gamers to join the Air Force because they’re good and can manoeuvre a drone perfectly. But how can they possibly separate playing one joystick game one moment, and then playing real war the next? Andrew Nicool
His control bunker looks a bit like a shipping container from the outside, boxy and portable. ‘The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave’ “The reason is that they used to wheel them into a Hercules and fly them around the world,” says Niccol. “But then realized they didn’t have to go anywhere; they had satellites.” Hawke’s character kills enemies in Afghanistan from half a world away, but struggles with the moral implications of such precise, emotionless combat. The cinematography in Good Kill calls attention to the similarities in geography between the U.S. and Afghan deserts, and the walled residences that exist in both locations. “It’s not my choice; it’s the military’s choice,” says Niccol. They can train drone pilots locally over terrain similar to what they’ll see while on duty. “If you’re going on a weekend trip to Vegas in your car,” he adds, “you may not know it — in fact you won’t know it — but they’ll follow a car with a drone just as practice.” Good Kill airs both sides of the debate over unmanned drone strikes — on the one hand, it risks fewer American lives; on the other, it risks dehumanizing war — but it’s clear on which side Niccol and Hawke stand. “Say what you like about the United States,” says the New Zealand-born Niccol, “but you’re allowed to make that movie. Some people are going to hate it and think it’s unpatriotic, and some people are going to love it, but if it causes some kind of debate — great.” “That’s the point of making a movie like this,” says Hawke, “is to not let all this stuff happen in our name without us having any awareness or knowledge or interest in what’s being done.” He likes the idea of a war film “that isn’t glorifying the past; something that shows us where we are right now. The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave.” National Post
Needless to say, however, this particular world is no product of Niccol’s imagination: The apparent future of warfare is in fact, as Bruce Greenwood’s hardened commander likes to bark at awestruck new arrivals, “the fucking here and now.” Pilots are recruited in shopping malls on the strength of their gaming expertise; joysticks are the new artillery. The film opens on the Afghan desert, as caught through a drone’s viewfinder and transmitted to Egan’s monitor. A terrorist target is identified, the missile order is given and, within 10 seconds of Egan hitting the switch 7,000 miles away, a life ends in a silent explosion of dust and rubble. (The title refers to Egan’s regular, near-involuntary verbal reaction to each successful hit.) Another day’s work done, Egan hops in his sports car and heads home to his military McMansion, where his wife, Molly (January Jones), and two young children await. It’s an existence that theoretically combines the gung-ho ideals of American heroism and the domestic comforts of the American Dream. Niccol forges this connection with one elegantly ironic long shot of Egan’s car leaving the arid middle-of-nowhere surrounds of the control center (which have an aesthetic proximity to the Middle East, if nothing else) and approaching the glistening urban heights of Vegas — hardly the city to anchor this uncanny setup in any greater sense of reality. For all intents and purposes, Egan, who previously risked life and limb flying F-16 planes in Iraq, has lucked out. It doesn’t feel that way to him, however, as he finds it increasingly impossible to reconcile the immense power he wields from his planeless cockpit with the lack of any attendant peril or consequence on his end. Niccol’s script and Hawke’s stern, buttoned-down performance keep in play the question of whether it’s adrenaline or moral accountability that he misses most in his new vocation, but either way, as new, more ruthless orders come in from the CIA, it’s pushing him to the brink of emotional collapse. Egan finds a measure of solidarity in rookie co-pilot Suarez (a fine, flinty Zoe Kravitz), who challenges authority more brazenly than he does, but can’t explain his internal crisis to his increasingly alienated family. It’s the peculiar mechanics of drone warfare that enable “Good Kill” to be at once a combat film and a war-at-home film, two familiar strains of military drama given a bracing degree of tension by their parallel placement in Niccol’s tightly worked script: The pressures of Egan’s activity in the virtual field bounce off the volatile battles he fights in the bedroom and vice versa, as the film’s intellectual deliberations over the rights and wrongs of this new military policy are joined by the more emotive question of just what type of man, if any, is mentally fit for the task. (Or, indeed, woman: One thing to be said for the new technology is that it expands the demographic limits of combat.) Rife as it is with heated political questioning, this essentially human story steers clear of overt rhetorical side-taking: The Obama administration comes in for some implicit criticism here, but the film’s perspective on America’s ongoing Middle East presence isn’t one the right is likely to take to heart. Just as Niccol’s narrative structure is at once fraught and immaculate in its escalation of ideas and character friction, so his arguments remain ever-so-slightly oblique despite the tidiness of their presentation: How much viewers wish to accept the pic as a single, tragic character study or a broader cautionary tale is up to them. He overplays his hand, however, with a needlessly melodramatic subplot that finds Egan growing personally invested in the fate of a female Afghan civilian living on their regular surveillance route, while Greenwood’s character is given one pithy slogan too many (“fly and fry,” “warheads on foreheads”) to underline the detachment of empathy from the act of killing. Happily, such instances of glib overstatement are rare in a film that trusts its audience both to recognize Niccol’s interpretations of current affairs as such, and to arrive at their own without instruction. Variety
Implacable et documenté, Good kill décrit avec précision les pratiques de l’armée américaine : par exemple, le principe de la double frappe. Vous éliminez d’un missile un foyer de présumés terroristes, mais vous frappez dans les minutes qui suivent au même endroit pour éliminer ceux qui viennent les secourir, et tant pis si ce sont clairement des civils. L’un des sommets du film est le récit d’une opération visant l’enterrement d’ennemis tués plus tôt dans la journée, la barbarie à son maximum – et on est sûr que Andrew Niccol, scénariste et réalisateur, n’a rien inventé. Bien sûr, à tuer quasiment à l’aveugle, ou sur la foi de renseignements invérifiables, on crée une situation de guerre permanente, et on fabrique les adversaires que l’on éliminera plus tard. (…) Good Kill est un film important parce qu’il montre pour la première fois le vrai visage des guerres modernes, et à quel point ont disparu les notions de patriotisme et d’héroïsme – que risque ce combattant planqué à part de se détruire lui-même ? C’est aussi un réquisitoire courageux contre l’american way of life, symbolisée ici par Las Vegas, ville sans âme que les personnages traversent sur leur chemin entre base militaire et pavillon sinistre. Ce n’est pas un film d’anticipation. L’horreur que l’on fait subir aux victimes et, en un sens, à leurs bourreaux, c’est ici et maintenant. Une sale guerre, un sale monde. Aurélien Ferenczi
Ce qui pose vraiment problème n’est toutefois pas d’ordre artistique, mais politique. Paré des oripeaux de la fiction de gauche, The Good Kill s’inscrit pleinement (comme le faisait la troisième saison de « Homeland ») dans le paradigme de la guerre contre le terrorisme telle que la conduisent les Etats-Unis depuis le 11 septembre 2001. Les Afghans ne sont jamais représentés autrement que sous la forme des petites silhouettes noires mal définies, évoluant erratiquement sur l’écran des pilotes de drones qui les surveillent. La seule action véritablement lisible se déroule dans la cour d’une maison, où l’on voit, à plusieurs reprises, un barbu frapper sa [?] femme et la violer. C’est l’argument imparable, tranquillement anti-islamiste, de la cause des femmes, que les avocats de la guerre contre le terrorisme ont toujours brandi sans vergogne pour mettre un terme au débat. La critique que fait Andrew Niccol, dans ce contexte, de l’usage des drones ne pouvait qu’être cosmétique. Elle est aussi inepte, confondant les questions d’ordre psychologique (comment se débrouillent des soldats qui rentrent le soir dans leur lit douillet après avoir tué des gens – souvent innocents), et celles qui se posent sur le plan du droit de la guerre (que Grégoire Chamayou a si bien expliqué dans La Théorie du drone, La Fabrique, 2013), dès lors que ces armes autorisent à détruire des vies dans le camp adverse sans plus en mettre aucune en péril dans le sien. Si l’ancien pilote de chasse ne va pas bien, explique-t-il à sa femme, ce n’est pas parce qu’il tue des innocents, ce qu’il a toujours fait, c’est qu’il les tue sans danger. Pour remédier à son état, s’offre une des rédemptions les plus ahurissantes qu’il ait été donné à voir depuis longtemps au cinéma. S’improvisant bras armé d’une justice totalement aveugle, il dégomme en un clic le violeur honni, rendant à sa [?] femme, après un léger petit suspense, ce qu’il imagine être sa liberté. La conscience lavée, le pilote peut repartir le cœur léger, retrouver sa famille et oublier toutes celles, au loin, qu’il a assassinées pour la bonne cause. Le Monde
Semblable à l’œil de Dieu, sa caméra voit tout lorsqu’elle descend du ciel : la femme qui se fait violer par un taliban sans qu’il puisse intervenir, les marines dont il assure la sécurité durant leur sommeil, mais aussi l’enfant qui surgit à vélo là où il vient d’envoyer son missile… (…) Dans cet univers orwellien où toutes sortes d’euphémismes – « neutraliser », « incapaciter », « effacer » – sont utilisés pour éviter de prononcer le mot « tuer », le décalage entre la réalité et le virtuel prend encore plus de sens quand on apprend que les très jeunes pilotes de drone sont repérés dans les arcades de jeux vidéo. D’autres, comme l’ancien pilote de chasse interprété par Ethan Hawke, culpabilisent d’être si loin du danger. Paris Match

 Vous avez dit deux poids deux mesures ?

Au lendemain de l’annonce de l’élimination ô combien méritée, par un drone américain au Yémen, du commanditaire des attentats de Paris de janvier dernier …

Et après le courageux abandon l’Afghanistan à son triste sort, l’Europe a depuis longtemps oublié ce que ses soldats ont bien pu y faire …

Comment ne pas voir …

Alors que, pour défendre ses soldats face aux pires perfidies du Hamas, Israël se voit à nouveau soupçonné des pires crimes de guerre

L’étonnante retenue de nos journalistes comme de nos cinéastes (une seule allusion indirecte et non-nominative dans un film par ailleurs présenté absurdement comme l’anti-American sniper)  …

Qu’on avait naguère connus autrement plus virulants contre une certaine prison cubaine …

Depuis l’inauguration d’un certain prix Nobel 2009 …

Face à l’élimination, dans la plus grande discrétion, de quelque 2 500 cibles …

« Femmes et enfants » compris, comme le veut la formule …

Par quelqu’un qui peut même, cerise sur le gâteau, se permettre de plaisanter devant un parterre de journalistes …

D’une nouvelle arme pouvant abattre n’importe qui à 10 000  km de distance Américains inclus ?  …

Rencontre
Andrew Niccol : “’Good Kill’ dit une vérité inconfortable”

Aurélien Ferenczi
Télérama

22/04/2015
Œil pour œil, le débat des critiques ciné #331 : “Caprice” d’Emmanuel Mouret et “Good Kill” d’Andrew Niccol

“Good-Kill”, avec Ethan Hawke, son film-brûlot basé sur des faits réels, interroge le drone, une nouvelle arme de guerre. Andrew Niccol (“Bienvenue à Gattaca”, “Lord of war”) livre ses secrets de réalisation et revient sur sa carrière.
Il a toute prête une jolie citation de John Lennon, qu’il sort promptement au journaliste ayant tenté d’établir un lien entre son premier film, Bienvenue à Gattaca (1998) et son sixième – seulement –, Good Kill, sur les écrans cette semaine. « Plus vous mettez le doigt sur ce que vous faites, plus vous l’éloignez. Si je réfléchis trop à ce que je fais, j’ai peur de ne plus pouvoir le faire. » Andrew Niccol, 50 ans, costume chic de businessman, regard bleu, a l’air un peu fatigué (le jet lag ?) et la parole prudente. L’inquiétude, sans doute, d’avoir signé un film-brûlot, qui, en décrivant la vie d’un manipulateur de drone (Ethan Hawke), ex-pilote de l’armée de l’air cloué au sol sur une base du Nevada, raconte la guerre d’aujourd’hui : une guerre à distance, à armes inégales, un conflit sans fin où n’importe quel suspect – aux yeux de qui ? c’est tout le problème – peut être cliniquement dézingué d’un tir à la précision chirurgicale par un soldat en poste à l’autre bout du monde.

« Quand j’ai écrit le film, lâche-t-il, un de mes amis m’a tout de suite dit que je devrais réunir le budget en euros plutôt qu’en dollars. » De fait, le projet, qui n’a pas intéressé les majors d’Hollywood, est produit notamment par le Français Nicolas Chartier (qui avait financé Démineurs, de Kathryn Bigelow). Et quand la production est allée demander le soutien logistique de l’armée américaine, on lui a répondu un cinglant « Classifié »… « C’est ce qui nous différencie d’American Sniper, ajoute malicieusement Andrew Niccol, qui a reçu une aide conséquente de l’armée. »  Sur le film d’Eastwood, il refuse de porter un jugement, se contentant de signaler que le pilote de drone est « le sniper ultime, qui tue sans être vu… »

“Good Kill dit une vérité inconfortable”
Les infos, il les a trouvées alors auprès d’ex-pilotes de drone de l’US Air Force, et aussi dans les documents transmis par Bradley/Chelsea Manning à Wikileaks. « Tout ce que je montre est vrai, assure-t-il : un type près de Las Vegas peut détruire une maison pleine de talibans en Afghanistan. Encore faut-il être sûr que ceux qui y sont réunis sont vraiment des talibans. Et il est arrivé que des missiles américains soient lancés contre des enterrements. » Good kill dédouane un peu l’armée américaine, la soumettant aux ordres obscurs d’une mystérieuse agence gouvernementale – de fait, la CIA – pour qui la mort d’innocents ne semble pas un problème majeur. « Good Kill dit une vérité inconfortable. Après la première projection au Festival de Venise, j’ai entendu des échos contradictoires : certains spectateurs accusaient le film d’être anti-américain, d’autres d’être pro-américain. Moi, je ne juge pas. Et on ne peut pas être « anti-drone » : c’est l’usage qu’on en fait qui peut être répréhensible. »

En 2005, déjà, Andrew Niccol avait abordé un sujet sérieusement contemporain dans l’excellent (et souvent sous-estimé) Lord of war : les trafics d’armes internationaux et leur impact sur les guerres civiles africaines. Le personnage principal, joué par Nicholas Cage, était directement inspiré du trafiquant d’origine russe Victor Bout. Lequel, lors de son procès, se plaignit de la mauvaise image que le film donnait de lui… Après la sortie, Niccol reçut même la visite du FBI. « Parce que nous avions dû louer l’avion-cargo de Victor Bout, impossible autrement de trouver un Antonov en Afrique. Alors que nous mettions en soute des armes factices, l’équipage se fichait de nous : « Nous transportions de vraies armes il y a quelques jours, on aurait pu vous les garder »… Depuis, je sais que je suis sous surveillance ! »

Né en Nouvelle-Zélande, Andrew Niccol a débuté dans la publicité à Londres, qui fut, « comme pour Ridley Scott », son école de cinéma. Il part pour les Etats-Unis au début des années 90, écrit un premier script qu’il ne pourra réaliser, mais qui lui vaudra une nomination à l’Oscar : The Truman show. Sa version à lui, qui se situe entièrement à New York est plus noire que le film signé Peter Weir en 1998. Et à la place de Jim Carrey, Niccol aurait bien vu Jeff Bridges… Mais, dans la foulée, on le laisse réaliser son premier film, déjà avec Ethan Hawke, Bienvenue à Gattaca. « Je suppose que Sony a dit oui sur un malentendu. Une fois le film fini, ils ne savaient pas quoi en faire. Ils l’ont enterré. Cette année-là, ils croyaient beaucoup plus à un petit film d’horreur : Souviens-toi l’été dernier… »

“J’ai des idées non conventionnelles et coûteuses”
Bienvenue à Gattaca est (presque) devenu un classique, et la science-fiction a gagné ses lettres de noblesse auprès des studios. Sans que Niccol en profite réellement. « J’ai des idées non conventionnelles et coûteuses. L’un ou l’autre – des idées conventionnelles exigeant un gros budget, ou des idées non conventionnelles bon marché – ça peut passer. Les deux ensemble, c’est plus dur. » Il a refusé de mettre en scène des films de super-héros, et écrit plusieurs scénarios qui n’ont jamais vu le jour. « Peut-être que je vais enfin pouvoir réaliser The Cross, l’histoire de personnages qui veulent échapper à la société dans laquelle ils vivent… » Le thème central de son œuvre ? Le film avait déjà failli se faire en 2009, avec Vincent Cassel. « Cinéaste aux Etats-Unis, c’est épuisant : il faut savoir faire tourner au-dessus de sa tête plusieurs assiettes en même temps », explique-t-il en empruntant une métaphore circassienne. « Si tant est qu’on ne me chasse pas du pays. Dans ce cas, j’irai au Canada, le pays de ma femme… »

Voir aussi:

‘Good Kill’ Review: Ethan Hawke Stars
Andrew Niccol takes on the topical issue of drone strikes in a tense war drama notable for its tact and intelligence.
Guy Lodge
Variety

September 5, 2014

Sci-fi futures characterized by complex moral and political architecture have long been writer-director Andrew Niccol’s stock-in-trade. Yet while there’s not a hint of fantasy in “Good Kill,” a smart, quietly pulsating contempo war drama, it could hardly feel more typical of Niccol’s strongest work. To many, after all, drone strikes — the controversial subject of this tense but appropriately tactful ethics study — still feel like something that should be a practical and legal impossibility. Those who haven’t considered its far-reaching implications, meanwhile, will be drawn into consciousness by Niccol’s film, which sees Ethan Hawke’s former U.S. fighter pilot wrestling with the psychological strain of killing by remote control. At once forward-thinking and exhilaratingly of the moment, this heady conversation piece could yield substantial commercial returns with the right marketing and release strategy.

Niccol has, of course, covered this kind of topical dramatic territory before in 2005’s Amnesty Intl.-approved underperformer “Lord of War,” which starred Nicolas Cage as a faintly disguised incarnation of Soviet arms dealer Viktor Bout. “Good Kill,” however, feels closer in tone and texture to the stately speculative fiction of his 1997 debut, “Gattaca,” and not merely because of Hawke’s presence in the lead. The spartan Las Vegas airbase where Major Thomas Egan (Hawke) wages war against the Taliban from the comfort of an air-conditioned cubicle seems, in terms of its bleak function and lab-like appearance, a faintly dystopian creation — one where distant life-and-death calls are made at the touch of a button. The perils of playing God, of course, were also explored in Niccol’s prescient screenplay for “The Truman Show,” with which “Good Kill” shares profound concerns about a growing culture of extreme surveillance that itself goes unmonitored.

Needless to say, however, this particular world is no product of Niccol’s imagination: The apparent future of warfare is in fact, as Bruce Greenwood’s hardened commander likes to bark at awestruck new arrivals, “the fucking here and now.” Pilots are recruited in shopping malls on the strength of their gaming expertise; joysticks are the new artillery. The film opens on the Afghan desert, as caught through a drone’s viewfinder and transmitted to Egan’s monitor. A terrorist target is identified, the missile order is given and, within 10 seconds of Egan hitting the switch 7,000 miles away, a life ends in a silent explosion of dust and rubble. (The title refers to Egan’s regular, near-involuntary verbal reaction to each successful hit.)

Another day’s work done, Egan hops in his sports car and heads home to his military McMansion, where his wife, Molly (January Jones), and two young children await. It’s an existence that theoretically combines the gung-ho ideals of American heroism and the domestic comforts of the American Dream. Niccol forges this connection with one elegantly ironic long shot of Egan’s car leaving the arid middle-of-nowhere surrounds of the control center (which have an aesthetic proximity to the Middle East, if nothing else) and approaching the glistening urban heights of Vegas — hardly the city to anchor this uncanny setup in any greater sense of reality.

For all intents and purposes, Egan, who previously risked life and limb flying F-16 planes in Iraq, has lucked out. It doesn’t feel that way to him, however, as he finds it increasingly impossible to reconcile the immense power he wields from his planeless cockpit with the lack of any attendant peril or consequence on his end. Niccol’s script and Hawke’s stern, buttoned-down performance keep in play the question of whether it’s adrenaline or moral accountability that he misses most in his new vocation, but either way, as new, more ruthless orders come in from the CIA, it’s pushing him to the brink of emotional collapse. Egan finds a measure of solidarity in rookie co-pilot Suarez (a fine, flinty Zoe Kravitz), who challenges authority more brazenly than he does, but can’t explain his internal crisis to his increasingly alienated family.

It’s the peculiar mechanics of drone warfare that enable “Good Kill” to be at once a combat film and a war-at-home film, two familiar strains of military drama given a bracing degree of tension by their parallel placement in Niccol’s tightly worked script: The pressures of Egan’s activity in the virtual field bounce off the volatile battles he fights in the bedroom and vice versa, as the film’s intellectual deliberations over the rights and wrongs of this new military policy are joined by the more emotive question of just what type of man, if any, is mentally fit for the task. (Or, indeed, woman: One thing to be said for the new technology is that it expands the demographic limits of combat.) Rife as it is with heated political questioning, this essentially human story steers clear of overt rhetorical side-taking: The Obama administration comes in for some implicit criticism here, but the film’s perspective on America’s ongoing Middle East presence isn’t one the right is likely to take to heart.

Just as Niccol’s narrative structure is at once fraught and immaculate in its escalation of ideas and character friction, so his arguments remain ever-so-slightly oblique despite the tidiness of their presentation: How much viewers wish to accept the pic as a single, tragic character study or a broader cautionary tale is up to them. He overplays his hand, however, with a needlessly melodramatic subplot that finds Egan growing personally invested in the fate of a female Afghan civilian living on their regular surveillance route, while Greenwood’s character is given one pithy slogan too many (“fly and fry,” “warheads on foreheads”) to underline the detachment of empathy from the act of killing. Happily, such instances of glib overstatement are rare in a film that trusts its audience both to recognize Niccol’s interpretations of current affairs as such, and to arrive at their own without instruction.

It can’t be a coincidence that Hawke’s styling — aviators, snug leather bomber, Ivy League haircut — gives him the appearance of Tom Cruise’s “Top Gun” hero Maverick Mitchell gone somewhat to seed. His nuanced, hard-bitten performance, too, bristles with cracked machismo and seething self-disappointment; the actor has had a good run of form recently, though his brittle, closed manner here still surprises. Supporting ensemble work is uniformly strong, with Jones, who has form when it comes to playing the repressed wives of inscrutable men, finally landing a film role worthy of her work in “Mad Men.”

The filmmaking here is as efficient and squared-off as the storytelling, with Amir Mokri’s sturdy lensing capturing the hard, unforgiving light of the Nevada desert, and foregrounding every sharp angle of Guy Barnes’ excellent production design — which makes equally alien spaces of a pod-like military boardroom and the beige, under-loved walls of Egan’s home. Sound work throughout is aces, making a virtue of the sound effects that are eerily absent as those present: In drone warfare, at least in Vegas, no one can hear you scream.

Venice Film Review: ‘Good Kill’
Reviewed at Venice Film Festival (competing), Sept. 3, 2014. (Also in Toronto Film Festival — Special Presentations.) Running time: 102 MIN.

Voir également:

Frame of drones: Ethan Hawke is a conflicted fighter pilot in Andrew Niccol’s Good Kill
Chris Knight

National Post

September 11, 2014

Andrew Niccol can remember a time when U.S. involvement in Iraq included televised media briefings in which Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf would show video clips that demonstrated the accuracy of so-called smart bombs. Then, they were launched from piloted aircraft. Now they’re as likely to be fired from unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones.

“Now that picture is a lot better, and there is obviously video for every one of the drone strikes,” he says. “But you haven’t seen one recently, have you?”

Ethan Hawke jumps in at this point. “Nobody has,” he says darkly. “They don’t want you to see this.”

Hawke is starring in Niccol’s Good Kill, which had its North American premiere this week at the Toronto International Film Festival after screening in Venice. The actor plays Maj. Thomas Egan, a former fighter pilot who now flies unmanned drones from a military base outside Las Vegas. His control bunker looks a bit like a shipping container from the outside, boxy and portable.

‘The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave’

“The reason is that they used to wheel them into a Hercules and fly them around the world,” says Niccol. “But then realized they didn’t have to go anywhere; they had satellites.” Hawke’s character kills enemies in Afghanistan from half a world away, but struggles with the moral implications of such precise, emotionless combat.

The cinematography in Good Kill calls attention to the similarities in geography between the U.S. and Afghan deserts, and the walled residences that exist in both locations. “It’s not my choice; it’s the military’s choice,” says Niccol. They can train drone pilots locally over terrain similar to what they’ll see while on duty.

“If you’re going on a weekend trip to Vegas in your car,” he adds, “you may not know it — in fact you won’t know it — but they’ll follow a car with a drone just as practice.”

Good Kill airs both sides of the debate over unmanned drone strikes — on the one hand, it risks fewer American lives; on the other, it risks dehumanizing war — but it’s clear on which side Niccol and Hawke stand.

“Say what you like about the United States,” says the New Zealand-born Niccol, “but you’re allowed to make that movie. Some people are going to hate it and think it’s unpatriotic, and some people are going to love it, but if it causes some kind of debate — great.”

“That’s the point of making a movie like this,” says Hawke, “is to not let all this stuff happen in our name without us having any awareness or knowledge or interest in what’s being done.”

He likes the idea of a war film “that isn’t glorifying the past; something that shows us where we are right now. The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave.”

Niccol and Hawke have worked together, albeit sporadically, on Gattaca (1997) and Lord of War (2005), before this film. They share a favourite movie (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest) and a shorthand that the writer/director says was invaluable given the movie’s tight budget and timeline.

That extended to Hawke’s agreement to star in the film, which took place over the phone. “I was walking my dog and I called you after reading the script,” he recalls. “I think I walked my dog for two hours as we talked. We were already making the movie that night!”

Voir également:

Entertainment & Arts
Good Kill: Tackling the ethics of drone warfare on film
Genevieve Hassan Entertainment reporter
BBC

10 April 2015

Ethan Hawke’s drone pilot begins to question his orders – and his job
Actor Ethan Hawke and director Andrew Niccol discuss their latest film, Good Kill, about an Air Force drone pilot who begins to question the ethics of his job.

The first time Hawke worked with Niccol, they made 1997 sci-fi film Gattaca. The second occasion, they made 2005’s Lord of War, about an arms dealer with a conscience. Now they’ve made it a hat-trick, reuniting once again to tackle the timely issue of using drones in modern warfare.

Set in 2010, Good Kill sees Hawke play Air Force pilot Tom Egan, who spends eight hours a day fighting the Taliban. But instead of being out on the front line, he’s in a Las Vegas bunker remotely dropping bombs in the Middle East as part of the US’s War on Terror.

Distanced from close combat from the safety of his joystick control half a world away, when the civilian casualties start mounting up, Egan begins to question his orders – and his job.

Hawke and Niccol spoke to the BBC News website about the inspiration behind the film and the moral questions it raises.

Why did you decide to make this project now?
Andrew Niccol: Now is almost a few years too late. I could have made this film a few years ago because this war has been going on in Afghanistan for 13 years. It’s stunning to me it’s America’s longest war and still counting – it beats Vietnam, the first Iraq war and World War Two.

It was all in response to 9/11 and I completely understand why we began it because that’s where Bin Laden was. But it gets to a point where it’s overkill. Are we ever going to leave that part of the planet? Are we really going to stay over the top of the Middle East forever?

Ethan Hawke: The troops are going to come out of Afghanistan, but the drones will still be there. It’s not a question of right or wrong, or how I feel about it – it’s the truth. This is the nature of warfare right now.

Do we want drones to be the international police? Is it a good idea? Is it creating more terror than stopping? They’re valuable questions.

For me as an actor and a fan of storytelling, I get to play a character I’ve never seen on screen before. He’s spending the bulk of the day fighting the Taliban; leaves work, picks up some eggs and orange juice, helps his son with his homework and fights with his wife about what TV show to watch. And then the next day does the same thing again.

This is a new situation we’ve never been in: Soldiers who take people’s lives whose own life isn’t in danger. A lot of these people go into the military because they have the mentality of a warrior. They want to put their life on the line for their beliefs to make people safe, but what does it mean when your life isn’t on the line? It seems like the stuff of sci-fi but it’s arrived.

Did you intend to push a specific political agenda with this film?
Ethan Hawke: No, I’m allergic to that. We can’t have a serious conversation about a drones strike unless people have more information. Most people don’t know what a drone looks like, or how it’s operated.

I learned a lot – I had no idea [the US] would strike a funeral or rescuers. There’s a certain logic to doing it – you could say perhaps it is proportionate. Perhaps we’re stopping more death than we’re creating, but we are killing innocent people. Am I sure I want our soldiers doing that?

An interesting example is on Obama’s third day in office he ordered a drone strike – it was surgical, but they had the wrong information and they murdered a family that had nothing to do with anything. When these tools are available accidents happen. It’s ripe for dialogue.

I’m not in politics, I don’t have an agenda for the audience, but I think it’s a really interesting conversation. I don’t think we should let our governments run willy-nilly and kill whoever and spy on whoever they want to without asking any questions.

Andrew Niccol: I’m not anti or pro, I’m just saying this is what is, and now you have that information perhaps it can provoke thought and conversation.

The US military want computer gamers to join the Air Force because they are equipped with the dexterity and speed needed to operate a drone efficiently, like Ethan Hawke’s character in Good Kill
Are all the events depicted in the film real?
Andrew Niccol: Every strike Tom does in the movie there is a precedent for, but his character is fictitious.

There were some things I didn’t put in the movie because I thought they were too outrageous. I was told about drone pilots who were younger than Ethan’s character – they would work with a joystick for 12 hours over Afghanistan, take out a target and go home to their apartment and play video games.

The military modelled the workstation on computer games because it’s the joystick that’s the easiest to use. They want gamers to join the Air Force because they’re good and can manoeuvre a drone perfectly.

But how can they possibly separate playing one joystick game one moment, and then playing real war the next?

Good Kill is released in UK cinemas on 10 April.

Voir encore:

Barack Obama, président des drones
LE MONDE GEO ET POLITIQUE

Philippe Bernard

18.06.2013

De même que George W. Bush restera dans l’histoire comme le  » président des guerres  » de l’après-11-Septembre en Afghanistan et en Irak, Barack Obama pourrait passer à la postérité comme le  » président des drones « , autrement dit le chef d’une guerre secrète, menée avec des armes que les Etats-Unis sont, parmi les grandes puissances, les seuls à posséder.

Rarement moment politique et innovation technologique auront si parfaitement correspondu : lorsque le président démocrate est élu en 2008 par des Américains las des conflits, il dispose d’un moyen tout neuf pour poursuivre, dans la plus grande discrétion, la lutte contre les « ennemis de l’Amérique » sans risquer la vie de citoyens de son pays : les drones.

L’utilisation militaire d’engins volants téléguidés par les Américains n’est pas nouvelle : pendant la guerre du Vietnam, des drones de reconnaissance avaient patrouillé. Mais l’armement de ces avions sans pilote à partir de 2001 en Afghanistan marque un changement d’époque. Au point que le tout premier Predator armé à avoir frappé des cibles après les attaques du 11-Septembre, immatriculé 3034, a aujourd’hui les honneurs du Musée de l’air et de l’espace, à Washington. Leur montée en puissance aura été fulgurante : alors que le Pentagone ne disposait que de 50 drones au début des années 2000, il en possède aujourd’hui près de 7 500. Dans l’US Air Force, un aéronef sur trois est sans pilote.

George W. Bush, artisan d’un large déploiement sur le terrain, utilisera modérément ces nouveaux engins létaux. Barack Obama y recourra six fois plus souvent pendant son seul premier mandat que son prédécesseur pendant les deux siens. M. Obama, qui, en recevant le prix Nobel de la paix en décembre 2009, revendiquait une Amérique au « comportement exemplaire dans la conduite de la guerre », banalisera la pratique des « assassinats ciblés », parfois fondés sur de simples présomptions et décidés par lui-même dans un secret absolu.

LES FRAPPES OPÉRÉES PAR LA CIA SONT « COVERT »

Tandis que les militaires guident les drones dans l’Afghanistan en guerre, c’est jusqu’à présent la très opaque CIA qui opère partout ailleurs (au Yémen, au Pakistan, en Somalie, en Libye). C’est au Yémen en 2002 que la campagne d' »assassinats ciblés » a débuté. Le Pakistan suit dès 2004. Barack Obama y multiplie les frappes. Certaines missions, menées à l’insu des autorités pakistanaises, soulèvent de lourdes questions de souveraineté. D’autres, les goodwill kills (« homicides de bonne volonté »), le sont avec l’accord du gouvernement local. Tandis que les frappes de drones militaires sont simplement « secrètes », celles opérées par la CIA sont « covert », ce qui signifie que les Etats-Unis n’en reconnaissent même pas l’existence.

Dans ce contexte, établir des statistiques est difficile. Selon le Bureau of Investigative Journalism, une ONG britannique, les attaques au Pakistan ont fait entre 2 548 et 3 549 victimes, dont 411 à 884 sont des civils, et 168 à 197 des enfants. En termes statistiques, la campagne de drones est un succès : les Etats-Unis revendiquent l’élimination de plus d’une cinquantaine de hauts responsables d’Al-Qaida et de talibans. D’où la nette diminution du nombre de cibles potentielles et du rythme des frappes, passées de 128 en 2010 (une tous les trois jours) à 48 en 2012 au Pakistan.

Car le secret total et son cortège de dénégations ne pouvaient durer éternellement. En mai 2012, le New York Times a révélé l’implication personnelle de M. Obama dans la confection des kill lists. Après une décennie de silence et de mensonges officiels, la réalité a dû être admise. En particulier au début de l’année, lorsque le débat public s’est focalisé sur l’autorisation, donnée par le ministre de la justice, Eric Holder, d’éliminer un citoyen américain responsable de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida. L’imam Anouar Al-Aulaqi avait été abattu le 30 septembre 2011 au Yémen par un drone de la CIA lancé depuis l’Arabie saoudite. Le droit de tuer un concitoyen a nourri une intense controverse. D’autant que la même opération avait causé des « dégâts collatéraux » : Samir Khan, responsable du magazine jihadiste Inspire, et Abdulrahman, 16 ans, fils d’Al-Aulaqui, tous deux américains et ne figurant ni l’un ni l’autre sur la kill list, ont trouvé la mort. Aux yeux des opposants, l’adolescent personnifie désormais l’arbitraire de la guerre des drones.

La révélation par la presse des contorsions juridiques imaginées par les conseillers du président pour justifier a posteriori l’assassinat d’un Américain n’a fait qu’alimenter les revendications de transparence. La fronde s’est concrétisée par le blocage au Sénat, plusieurs semaines durant, de la nomination à la tête de la CIA de John Brennan, auparavant grand ordonnateur à la Maison Blanche de la politique d’assassinats ciblés. Une orientation pourfendue, presque treize heures durant, le 6 mars, par le spectaculaire discours du sénateur libertarien Rand Paul.

UN IMPORTANT DISCOURS SUR LA « GUERRE JUSTE »

Très attendu, le grand exercice de clarification a eu lieu le 23 mai devant la National Defense University de Washington. Barack Obama y a prononcé un important discours sur la « guerre juste », affichant enfin une doctrine en matière d’usage des drones. Il était temps : plusieurs organisations de défense des libertés publiques avaient réclamé en justice la communication des documents justifiant les assassinats ciblés.

Une directive présidentielle, signée la veille, précise les critères de recours aux frappes à visée mortelle : une « menace continue et imminente contre la population des Etats-Unis », le fait qu' »aucun autre gouvernement ne soit en mesure d'[y] répondre ou ne la prenne en compte effectivement » et une « quasi-certitude » qu’il n’y aura pas de victimes civiles. Pour la première fois, Barack Obama a reconnu l’existence des assassinats ciblés, y compris ceux ayant visé des Américains, assurant que ces morts le « hanteraient » toute sa vie. Le président a annoncé que les militaires, plutôt que la CIA, auraient désormais la main. Il a aussi repris l’idée de créer une instance judiciaire ou administrative de contrôle des frappes. Mais il a renvoyé au Congrès la mission, incertaine, de créer cette institution. Le président, tout en reconnaissant que l’usage des drones pose de « profondes questions » – de « légalité », de « morale », de « responsabilité « , sans compter « le risque de créer de nouveaux ennemis » -, l’a justifié par son efficacité : « Ces frappes ont sauvé des vies. »

Six jours après ce discours, l’assassinat par un drone de Wali ur-Rehman, le numéro deux des talibans pakistanais, en a montré les limites. Ce leader visait plutôt le Pakistan que « la population des Etats-Unis ». Tout porte donc à croire que les critères limitatifs énoncés par Barack Obama ne s’appliquent pas au Pakistan, du moins aussi longtemps qu’il restera des troupes américaines dans l’Afghanistan voisin. Et que les « Signature strikes », ces frappes visant des groupes d’hommes armés non identifiés mais présumés extrémistes, seront poursuivies.

Les drones n’ont donc pas fini de mettre en lumière les contradictions de Barack Obama : président antiguerre, champion de la transparence, de la légalité et de la main tendue à l’islam, il a multiplié dans l’ombre les assassinats ciblés, provoquant la colère de musulmans.

Or les drones armés, s’ils s’avèrent terriblement efficaces pour éliminer de véritables fauteurs de terreur et, parfois, pour tuer des innocents, le sont nettement moins pour traiter les racines des violences antiaméricaines. Leur usage opaque apparaît comme un précédent encourageant pour les Etats (tels la Chine, la Russie, l’Inde, le Pakistan ou l’Iran) qui vont acquérir ces matériels dans l’avenir. En paraissant considérer les aéronefs pilotés à distance comme l’arme fatale indispensable, le « président des drones » aura enclenché l’engrenage de ce futur incertain.

Voir encore:

US national security
Obama’s secret kill list – the disposition matrix
The disposition matrix is a complex grid of suspected terrorists to be traced then targeted in drone strikes or captured and interrogated. And the British government appears to be colluding in it
US President Barack Obama
Barack Obama, chairing the ‘Terror Tuesday’ meetings, agrees the final schedule of names on the disposition matrix. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Ian Cobain

The Guardian

14 July 2013

When Bilal Berjawi spoke to his wife for the last time, he had no way of being certain that he was about to die. But he should have had his suspicions.

A short, dumpy Londoner who was not, in the words of some who knew him, one of the world’s greatest thinkers, Berjawi had been fighting for months in Somalia with al-Shabaab, the Islamist militant group. His wife was 4,400 miles away, at home in west London. In June 2011, Berjawi had almost been killed in a US drone strike on an al-Shabaab camp on the coast. After that he became wary of telephones. But in January last year, when his wife went into labour and was admitted to St Mary’s hospital in Paddington, he decided to risk a quick phone conversation.

A few hours after the call ended Berjawi was targeted in a fresh drone strike. Perhaps the telephone contact triggered alerts all the way from Camp Lemmonier, the US military’s enormous home-from-home at Djibouti, to the National Security Agency’s headquarters in Maryland. Perhaps a few screens also lit up at GCHQ in Cheltenham? This time the drone attack was successful, from the US perspective, and al-Shabaab issued a terse statement: « The martyr received what he wished for and what he went out for. »

The following month, Berjawi’s former next-door neighbour, who was also in Somalia, was similarly « martyred ». Like Berjawi, Mohamed Sakr had just turned 27 when he was killed in an air strike.

Four months later, the FBI in Manhattan announced that a third man from London, a Vietnamese-born convert to Islam, had been charged with a series of terrorism offences, and that if convicted he would face a mandatory 40-year sentence. This man was promptly arrested by Scotland Yard and is now fighting extradition to the US. And a few weeks after that, another of Berjawi’s mates from London was detained after travelling from Somalia to Djibouti, where he was interrogated for months by US intelligence officers before being hooded and put aboard an aircraft. When 23-year-old Mahdi Hashi next saw daylight, he was being led into a courtroom in Brooklyn.

That these four men had something in common is clear enough: they were all Muslims, all accused of terrorism offences, and all British (or they were British: curiously, all of them unexpectedly lost their British citizenship just as they were about to become unstuck). There is, however, a common theme that is less obvious: it appears that all of them had found their way on to the « disposition matrix ».

The euphemisms of counter-terrorism

When contemplating the euphemisms that have slipped into the lexicon since 9/11, the adjective Orwellian is difficult to avoid. But while such terms as extraordinary rendition, targeted killing and enhanced interrogation are universally known, and their true meanings – kidnap, assassination, torture – widely understood, the disposition matrix has not yet gained such traction.

Since the Obama administration largely shut down the CIA’s rendition programme, choosing instead to dispose of its enemies in drone attacks, those individuals who are being nominated for killing have been discussed at a weekly counter-terrorism meeting at the White House situation room that has become known as Terror Tuesday. Barack Obama, in the chair and wishing to be seen as a restraining influence, agrees the final schedule of names. Once details of these meetings began to emerge it was not long before the media began talking of « kill lists ». More double-speak was required, it seemed, and before long the term disposition matrix was born.

In truth, the matrix is more than a mere euphemism for a kill list, or even a capture-or-kill list. It is a sophisticated grid, mounted upon a database that is said to have been more than two years in the development, containing biographies of individuals believed to pose a threat to US interests, and their known or suspected locations, as well as a range of options for their disposal.

It is a grid, however, that both blurs and expands the boundaries that human rights law and the law of war place upon acts of abduction or targeted killing. There have been claims that people’s names have been entered into it with little or no evidence. And it appears that it will be with us for many years to come.

The background to its creation was the growing realisation in Washington that the drone programme could be creating more enemies than it was destroying. In Pakistan, for example, where the government estimates that more than 400 people have been killed in around 330 drone strikes since 9/11, the US has arguably outstripped even India as the most reviled foreign country. At one point, Admiral Mike Mullen, when chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, was repo rted to be having furious rows over the issue with his opposite number in Pakistan, General Ashfaq Kayani.
matrix mike mullen and ashfaq Kayani

The term entered the public domain following a briefing given to the Washington Post before last year’s presidential election. « We had a disposition problem, » one former counter-terrorism official involved in the development of the Matrix told the Post. Expanding on the nature of that problem, a second administration official added that while « we’re not going to end up in 10 years in a world of everybody holding hands and saying ‘we love America' », there needed to be a recognition that « we can’t possibly kill everyone who wants to harm us ».

Drawing upon legal advice that has remained largely secret, senior officials at the US Counter-Terrorism Center designed a grid that incorporated the existing kill lists of the CIA and the US military’s special forces, but which also offered some new rules and restraints.

Some individuals whose names were entered into the matrix, and who were roaming around Somalia or Yemen, would continue to face drone attack when their whereabouts become known. Others could be targeted and killed by special forces. In a speech in May, Obama suggested that a special court could be given oversight of these targeted killings.

An unknown number would end up in the so-called black sites that the US still quietly operates in east Africa, or in prisons run by US allies in the Middle East or Central Asia. But for others, who for political reasons could not be summarily dispatched or secretly imprisoned, there would be a secret grand jury investigation, followed in some cases by formal arrest and extradition, and in others by « rendition to justice »: they would be grabbed, interrogated without being read their rights, then flown to the US and put on trial with a publicly funded defence lawyer.

Orwell once wrote about political language being « designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable ». As far as the White House is concerned, however, the term disposition matrix describes a continually evolving blueprint not for murder, but for a defence against a threat that continues to change shape and seek out new havens.

As the Obama administration’s tactics became more variegated, the British authorities co-operated, of course, but also ensured that the new rules of the game helped to serve their own counter-terrorism objectives.

Paul Pillar, who served in the CIA for 28 years, including a period as the agency’s senior counter-terrorism analyst, says the British, when grappling with what he describes as a sticky case – « someone who is a violence-prone anti-western jihadi », for example – would welcome a chance to pass on that case to the US. It would be a matter, as he puts it, of allowing someone else to have their headache.

« They might think, if it’s going to be a headache for someone, let the Americans have the headache, » says Pillar. « That’s what the United States has done. The US would drop cases if they were going to be sticky, and let someone else take over. We would let the Egyptians or the Jordanians or whoever take over a very sticky one. From the United Kingdom point of view, if it is going to be a headache for anyone: let the Americans have the headache. »

The four young Londoners – Berjawi, Sakr, Hashi and the Vietnamese-born convert – were certainly considered by MI5 and MI6 to be something of a headache. But could they have been seen so problematic – so sticky – that the US would be encouraged to enter their names into the Matrix?
The home secretary’s special power

Berjawi and Sakr were members of a looseknit group of young Muslims who were on nodding terms with each other, having attended the same mosques and schools and having played in the same five-a-side football matches in west London.

A few members of this group came to be closely scrutinised by MI5 when it emerged that they had links with the men who attempted to carry out a wave of bombings on London’s underground train network on 21 July 2005. Others came to the attention of the authorities as a result of their own conduct. Mohammed Ezzouek, for example, who attended North Westminster community school with Berjawi, was abducted in Kenya and interrogated by British intelligence officers after a trip to Somalia in 2006; another schoolmate, Tariq al-Daour, has recently been released from jail after serving a sentence for inciting terrorism.

As well as sharing their faith and, according to the UK authorities, jihadist intent, these young men had something else in common: they were all dual nationals. Berjawi was born in Lebanon and moved to London with his parents as an infant. Sakr was born in London, but was deemed to be a British-Egyptian dual national because his parents were born in Egypt. Ezzouek is British-Moroccan, while al-Daour is British-Palestinian.

This left them vulnerable to a little-known weapon in the government’s counter-terrorism armoury, one that Theresa May has been deploying with increasing frequency since she became home secretary three years ago. Under the terms of a piece of the 2006 Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act, and a previous piece of legislation dating to 1981, May has the power to deprive dual nationals of their British citizenship if she is « satisfied that deprivation is conducive to the public good ».

This power can be applied only to dual nationals, and those who lose their citizenship can appeal. The government appears usually to wait until the individual has left the country before moving to deprive them of their citizenship, however, and appeals are heard at the highly secretive special immigration appeals commission (SIAC), where the government can submit evidence that cannot be seen or challenged by the appellant.

The Home Office is extraordinarily sensitive about the manner in which this power is being used. It has responded to Freedom of Information Act requests about May’s increased use of this power with delays and appeals; some information requested by the Guardian in June 2011 has still not been handed over. What is known is that at least 17 people have been deprived of their British citizenship at a stroke of May’s pen. In most cases, if not all, the home secretary has taken action on the recommendation of MI5. In each case, a warning notice was sent to the British home of the target, and the deprivation order signed a day or two later.

One person who lost their British citizenship in this way was Anna Chapman, a Russian spy, but the remainder are thought to all be Muslims. Several of them – including a British-Pakistani father and his three sons – were born in the UK, while most of the others arrived as children. And some have been deprived of their citizenship not because they were assessed to be involved in terrorism or any other criminal activity, but because of their alleged involvement in Islamist extremism.

Berjawi and Sakr both travelled to Somalia after claiming that they were being harassed by police in the UK, and were then stripped of their British citizenship. Several months later they were killed. The exact nature of any intelligence that the British government may have shared with Washington before their names were apparently entered into the disposition matrix is deeply secret: the UK has consistently refused to either confirm or deny that it shares intelligence in support of drone strikes, arguing that to do so would damage both national security and relations with the US government.

More than 12 months after Sakr’s death, his father, Gamal, a businessman who settled in London 37 years ago, still cannot talk about his loss without breaking down and weeping. He alleges that one of his two surviving sons has since been harassed by police, and suspects that this boy would also have been stripped of his citizenship had he left the country. « It’s madness, » he cries. « They’re driving these boys to Afghanistan. They’re making everything worse. »

Last year Gamal and his wife flew to Cairo, formally renounced their Egyptian citizenship, and on their return asked their lawyer to let it be known that their sons were no longer dual nationals. But while he wants his family to remain in Britain, the manner in which his son met his death has shattered his trust in the British government. « It was clearly directed from the UK, » he says. « He wasn’t just killed: he was assassinated. »
The case of Mahdi Hashi

Mahdi Hashi was five years old when his family moved to London from Somalia. He returned to the country in 2009, and took up arms for al-Shabaab in its civil war with government forces. A few months earlier he had complained to the Independent that he been under pressure to assist MI5, which he was refusing to do. Hashi was one of a few dozen young British men who have followed the same path: in one internet video clip, an al-Shabaab fighter with a cockney accent can be heard urging fellow Muslims « living in the lands of disbelief » to come and join him. It is thought that the identities of all these men are known to MI5.

After the deaths of Berjawi and Sakr, Hashi was detained by al-Shabaab, who suspected that he was a British spy, and that he was responsible for bringing the drones down on the heads of his brothers-in-arms. According to his US lawyer, Harry Batchelder, he was released in early June last year. The militants had identified three other men whom they believed were the culprits, executing them shortly afterwards.

Within a few days of Hashi’s release, May signed an order depriving him of his British citizenship. The warning notice that was sent to his family’s home read: « The reason for this decision is that the Security Service assess that you have been involved in Islamist extremism and present a risk to the national security of the United Kingdom due to your extremist activities. »

Hashi decided to leave Somalia, and travelled to Djibouti with two other fighters, both Somali-Swedish dual nationals. All three were arrested in a raid on a building, where they had been sleeping on the roof, and were taken to the local intelligence agency headquarters. Hashi says he was interrogated for several weeks by US intelligence officers who refused to identify themselves. These men then handed him over to a team of FBI interrogators, who took a lengthy statement. Hashi was then hooded, put aboard an aircraft, and flown to New York. On arrival he was charged with conspiracy to support a terrorist organisation.

Hashi has since been quoted in a news report as saying he was tortured while in custody in Djibouti. There is reason to doubt that this happened, however: a number of sources familiar with his defence case say that the journalist who wrote the report may have been misled. And the line of defence that he relied upon while being interrogated – that Somalia’s civil war is no concern of the US or the UK – evaporated overnight when al-Shabaab threatened to launch attacks in Britain.

When Hashi was led into court in Brooklyn in January, handcuffed and dressed in a grey and orange prison uniform, he was relaxed and smiling. The 23-year-old had been warned that if he failed to co-operate with the US government, he would be likely to spend the rest of his life behind bars. But he appeared unconcerned.

At no point did the UK government intervene. Indeed, it cannot: he is no longer British.

When the Home Office was asked whether it knew Hashi was facing detention and forcible removal to the US at the point at which May revoked his citizenship, a spokesperson replied: « We do not routinely comment on individual deprivation cases, nor do we comment on intelligence issues. »

The Home Office is also refusing to say whether it is aware of other individuals being killed after losing their British citizenship. On one point it is unambiguous, however. « Citizenship, » it said in a statement, « is a privilege, not a right. »

The case of ‘B2′

A glimpse of even closer UK-US counter-terrorism co-operation can be seen in the case of the Vietnamese-born convert, who cannot be named for legal reasons. Born in 1983 in the far north of Vietnam, he was a month old when his family travelled by sea to Hong Kong, six when they moved to the UK and settled in London, and 12 when he became a British citizen.

While studying web design at a college in Greenwich, he converted to Islam. He later came into contact with the banned Islamist group al-Muhajiroun, and was an associate of Richard Dart, a fellow convert who was the subject of a TV documentary entitled My Brother the Islamist, and who was jailed for six years in April after travelling to Pakistan to seek terrorism training. In December 2010, this man told his eight-months-pregnant wife that he was going to Ireland for a few weeks. Instead, he travelled to Yemen and stayed for seven months. MI5 believes he received terrorism training from al-Qaida in the Arabian peninsula and worked on the group’s online magazine, Inspire.

He denies this. Much of the evidence against him comes from a man called Ahmed Abdulkadir Warsame, a Somali who once lived in the English midlands, and who was « rendered to justice » in much the same way as Hashi after being captured in the Gulf of Aden two years ago. Warsame is now co-operating with the US Justice Department.

On arrival back at Heathrow airport, the Vietnamese-born man was searched by police and arrested when a live bullet was found in his rucksack. A few months later, while he was free on bail, May signed an order revoking his British citizenship. Detained by immigration officials and facing deportation to Vietnam, he appealed to SIAC, where he was given the cipher B2. He won his case after the Vietnamese ambassador to London gave evidence in which he denied that he was one of their citizens. Depriving him of British citizenship at that point would have rendered him stateless, which would have been unlawful.

Within minutes of SIAC announcing its decision and granting B2 unconditional bail, he was rearrested while sitting in the cells at the SIAC building. The warrant had been issued by magistrates five weeks earlier, at the request of the US Justice Department. Moments after that, the FBI announced that B2 had been charged with five terrorism offences and faced up to 40 years in jail. He was driven straight from SIAC to Westminster magistrates’ court, where he faced extradition proceedings.

B2 continues to resist his removal to the US, with his lawyers arguing that he could have been charged in the UK. Indeed, the allegations made by the US authorities, if true, would appear to represent multiple breaches of several UK laws: the Terrorism Act 2000, the Terrorism Act 2006 and the Firearms Act 1968. Asked why B2 was not being prosecuted in the English courts – why, in other words, the Americans were having this particular headache, and not the British – a Crown Prosecution Service spokesperson said: « As this is a live case and the issue of forum may be raised by the defence in court, it would be inappropriate for us to discuss this in advance of the extradition hearing. »

The rule of ‘imminent threat’

In the coffee shops of west London, old friends of Berjawi, Sakr, Hashi and B2 are equally reluctant to talk, especially when questioned about the calamities that have befallen the four men. When they do, it is in a slightly furtive way, almost in whispers.

Ezzouek explains that he never leaves the country any more, fearing he too will be stripped of his British citizenship. Al-Daour is watched closely and says he faces recall to prison whenever he places a foot wrong. Failing even to tell his probation officer that he has bought a car, for example, is enough to see him back behind bars. A number of their associates claim to have learned of the deaths of Berjawi and Sakr from MI5 officers who approached them with the news, and suggested they forget about travelling to Somalia.

Last February, a 16-page US justice department memo, leaked to NBC News, disclosed something of the legal basis for the drone programme. Its authors asserted that the killing of US citizens is lawful if they pose an « imminent threat » of violent attack against the US, and capture is impossible. The document adopts a broad definition of imminence, saying no evidence of a specific plot is needed, and remains silent on the fate that faces enemies who are – or were – citizens of an allied nation, such as the UK.
matrix drone in flight

But if the Obama administration is satisfied that the targeted killing of US citizens is lawful, there is little reason to doubt that young men who have been stripped of their British citizenship, and who take up arms in Somalia or Yemen or elsewhere, will continue to find their way on to the disposition matrix, and continue to be killed by missiles fired from drones hovering high overhead, or rendered to courts in the US.

And while Obama says he wants to curtail the drone programme, his officials have been briefing journalists that they believe the operations are likely to continue for another decade, at least. Given al-Qaida’s resilience and ability to spread, they say, no clear end is in sight.

Voir encore:

La dérive morale de l’armée israélienne à Gaza
Piotr Smolar (Jérusalem, correspondant)

Le Monde

04.05.2015

Eté 2014, bande de Gaza. Un vieux Palestinien gît à terre. Il marchait non loin d’un poste de reconnaissance de l’armée israélienne. Un soldat a décidé de le viser. Il est grièvement blessé à la jambe, ne bouge plus. Est-il vivant ? Les soldats se disputent. L’un d’eux décide de mettre fin à la discussion. Il abat le vieillard.

Cette histoire, narrée par plusieurs de ses acteurs, s’inscrit dans la charge la plus dévastatrice contre l’armée israélienne depuis la guerre, lancée par ses propres soldats. L’organisation non gouvernementale Breaking the Silence (« rompre le silence »), qui regroupe des anciens combattants de Tsahal, publie, lundi 4 mai, un recueil d’entretiens accordés sous couvert d’anonymat par une soixantaine de participants à l’opération « Bordure protectrice ».

Une opération conduite entre le 8 juillet et le 26 août 2014, qui a entraîné la mort de près de 2 100 Palestiniens et 66 soldats israéliens. Israël a détruit trente-deux tunnels permettant de pénétrer clandestinement sur son territoire, puis a conclu un cessez-le-feu avec le Hamas qui ne résout rien. L’offensive a provoqué des dégâts matériels et humains sans précédent. Elle jette, selon l’ONG, « de graves doutes sur l’éthique » de Tsahal.

« Si vous repérez quelqu’un, tirez ! »

Breaking the Silence n’utilise jamais l’expression « crimes de guerre ». Mais la matière que l’organisation a collectée, recoupée, puis soumise à la censure militaire comme l’exige toute publication liée à la sécurité nationale, est impressionnante. « Ce travail soulève le soupçon dérangeant de violations des lois humanitaires, explique l’avocat Michael Sfard, qui conseille l’ONG depuis dix ans. J’espère qu’il y aura un débat, mais j’ai peur qu’on parle plus du messager que du message. Les Israéliens sont de plus en plus autocentrés et nationalistes, intolérants contre les critiques. »

Environ un quart des témoins sont des officiers. Tous les corps sont représentés. Certains étaient armes à la main, d’autres dans la chaîne de commandement. Cette diversité permet, selon l’ONG, de dessiner un tableau des « politiques systémiques » décidées par l’état-major, aussi bien lors des bombardements que des incursions au sol. Ce tableau contraste avec la doxa officielle sur la loyauté de l’armée, ses procédures strictes et les avertissements adressés aux civils, pour les inviter à fuir avant l’offensive.

« Ce travail soulève le soupçon dérangeant de violations des lois humanitaires, explique l’avocat Michael Sfard, qui conseille l’ONG Breaking the Silence. J’espère qu’il y aura un débat »
Les témoignages, eux, racontent une histoire de flou. Au nom de l’obsession du risque minimum pour les soldats, les règles d’engagement – la distinction entre ennemis combattants et civils, le principe de proportionnalité – ont été brouillées. « Les soldats ont reçu pour instructions de leurs commandants de tirer sur chaque personne identifiée dans une zone de combat, dès lors que l’hypothèse de travail était que toute personne sur le terrain était un ennemi », précise l’introduction. « On nous a dit, il n’est pas censé y avoir de civils, si vous repérez quelqu’un, tirez ! », se souvient un sergent d’infanterie, posté dans le nord.

Les instructions sont claires : le doute est un risque. Une personne observe les soldats d’une fenêtre ou d’un toit ? Cible. Elle marche dans la rue à 200 mètres de l’armée ? Cible. Elle demeure dans un immeuble dont les habitants ont été avertis ? Cible. Et quand il n’y a pas de cible, on tire des obus ou au mortier, on « stérilise », selon l’expression récurrente. Ou bien on envoie le D-9, un bulldozer blindé, pour détruire les maisons et dégager la vue.

« Le bien et le mal se mélangent »
Un soldat se souvient de deux femmes, parlant au téléphone et marchant un matin à environ 800 mètres des forces israéliennes. Des guetteuses ? Un drone les survole. Pas de certitude. Elles sont abattues, classées comme « terroristes ». Un sergent raconte le « Bonjour Al-Bourej ! », adressé un matin par son unité de tanks à ce quartier situé dans la partie centrale du territoire. Les tanks sont alignés puis, sur instruction, tirent en même temps, au hasard, pour faire sentir la présence israélienne.

Beaucoup de liberté d’appréciation était laissée aux hommes sur le terrain. Au fil des jours, « le bien et le mal se mélangent un peu (…) et ça devient un peu comme un jeu vidéo », témoigne un soldat. Mais cette latitude correspondait à un mode opérationnel. Au niveau de l’état-major, il existait selon l’ONG trois « niveaux d’activation », déterminant notamment les distances de sécurité acceptées par rapport aux civils palestiniens. Au niveau 3, des dommages collatéraux élevés sont prévus. « Plus l’opération avançait, et plus les limitations ont diminué », explique l’ONG. « Nos recherches montrent que pour l’artillerie, les distances à préserver par rapport aux civils étaient très inférieures à celles par rapport à nos soldats », souligne Yehuda Shaul, cofondateur de Breaking the Silence.

Un lieutenant d’infanterie, dans le nord de la bande de Gaza, se souvient : « Même si on n’entre pas [au sol], c’est obus, obus, obus. Une structure suspecte, une zone ouverte, une possible entrée de tunnel : feu, feu, feu. » L’officier évoque le relâchement des restrictions au fil des jours. Lorsque le 3e niveau opératoire est décidé, les forces aériennes ont le droit à un « niveau raisonnable de pertes civiles, dit-il. C’est quelque chose d’indéfinissable, qui dépend du commandant de brigade, en fonction de son humeur du moment ».

Fin 2014, le vice-procureur militaire, Eli Bar-On, recevait Le Monde pour plaider le discernement des forces armées. « On a conduit plus de 5 000 frappes aériennes pendant la campagne. Le nombre de victimes est phénoménalement bas », assurait-il. A l’en croire, chaque frappe aérienne fait l’objet d’une réflexion et d’une enquête poussée. Selon lui, « la plupart des dégâts ont été causés par le Hamas ». Le magistrat mettait en cause le mouvement islamiste pour son utilisation des bâtiments civils. « On dispose d’une carte de coordination de tous les sites sensibles, mosquées, écoles, hôpitaux, réactualisée plusieurs fois par jour. Quand on la superpose avec la carte des tirs de roquettes, on s’aperçoit qu’une partie significative a été déclenchée de ces endroits. »

Treize enquêtes pénales ouvertes
L’armée peut-elle se policer ? Le parquet général militaire (MAG) a ouvert treize enquêtes pénales, dont deux pour pillages, déjà closes car les plaignants ne se sont pas présentés. Les autres cas concernent des épisodes tristement célèbres du conflit, comme la mort de quatre enfants sur la plage de Gaza, le 16 juillet 2014. Six autres dossiers ont été renvoyés au parquet en vue de l’ouverture d’une enquête criminelle, après un processus de vérification initial.

Ces procédures internes n’inspirent guère confiance. En septembre, deux ONG israéliennes, B’Tselem et Yesh Din, ont annoncé qu’elles cessaient toute coopération avec le parquet. Les résultats des investigations antérieures les ont convaincues. Après la guerre de 2008-2009 dans la bande de Gaza (près de 1 400 Palestiniens tués), 52 enquêtes avaient été ouvertes. La sentence la plus sévère – quinze mois de prison dont la moitié avec sursis – concerna un soldat coupable du vol d’une carte de crédit. Après l’opération « Pilier de défense », en novembre 2012 (167 Palestiniens tués), une commission interne a été mise en place, mais aucune enquête ouverte. Le comportement de l’armée fut jugé « professionnel ».

Voir par ailleurs:

“Good Kill”, ce film digne qu’Eastwood n’a pas signé

Aurélien Ferenczi
Cinécure

24/02/2015

L’unique statuette ramassée l’autre nuit par American Sniper, le dernier Clint Eastwood, a valeur de symbole : l’Oscar du meilleur montage son est allé comme une médaille du courage aux deux types qui ont passé de longues semaines à recueillir, puis à caler sur les images du film des bruits de fusils d’assaut, mitraillettes, fusils de chasse, lance-roquettes, grenades, etc. Des techniciens à l’ouïe fine, sans doute capables de différencier le son d’une balle amie à celui d’une balle ennemie…

Mais ce sont aussi les petits malins responsables (sous les ordres de Papy Clint) de la première faute de goût du film, impardonnable péché originel : dès la première seconde de projection, sur le logo de la Warner (pas encore passée sous contrôle qatari pourtant), une voix psalmodie « Allah Akbar ». Une prière qui ouvre clairement les hostilités, dit à qui on aura affaire, jouerait presque à faire peur. Pas très digne, vraiment…

American Sniper cartonne des deux côtés de l’Atlantique (plus d’un million de spectateurs en France au terme de sa première semaine d’exploitation) : les « eastwoodiens » de longue date s’en félicitent (à tous lessens du mot), sans s’apercevoir que c’est l’un des films les plus faibles de leur auteur-fétiche. Outre les libertés bien commodes qu’il prend avec la vraie biographie de Chris Kyle (un type assez malin pour penser que des séances de tir sont le meilleur remède au syndrome post-traumatique des soldats éclopés), le scénario alterne mécaniquement scènes de guerre banales – moins spectaculaires que celles de La Chute du Faucon noir, par exemple – et vie de famille troublée, montrée avec une finesse éléphantesque. Exemple : Intérieur jour. Chris Kyle est assis dans son fauteuil, inerte. La télévision est éteinte, mais il entend des rafales d’armes automatiques (merci les monteurs son). C’est comme s’il était encore à la guerre… Non, vraiment ? Difficile de reconnaître l’auteur de Josey Wales dans ces gros sabots bellicistes.

Eastwood parachute un héros américain dans une époque où le manichéisme n’est plus possible. Chacun sait qu’il n’y a plus de guerre propre et que le défi « à l’ancienne » que s’impose le héros eastwoodien – avoir la peau du sniper adverse, et puis rentrer chez lui – est pure fiction. L’impossibilité de l’héroïsme est au cœur d’un autre film sur les conflits d’aujourd’hui, qui sonne autrement juste. Good Kill, d’Andrew Niccol (le réalisateur de Bienvenue à Gattaca et Lord of War), qui sortira en France le 22 avril, raconte la guerre d’un type qui tue de très loin. Un ancien pilote de chasse de l’US Air force, désormais aux commandes de drones qu’il dirige à des milliers de kilomètres de distance.

Il agit depuis sa base de Las Vegas, au sein de petites cabines frappées d’extra-territorialité, des habitacles immobiles comme ceux des jeux vidéos, et il appuie sur le lance-roquettes quand les cibles se précisent. Quelles cibles ? C’est le problème, a fortiori quand la CIA s’en mêle, réquisitionnant les unités d’élite de l’armée pour éliminer des suspects : les drones survolent par exemple le Waziristan, au nord-ouest du Pakistan, et il faut obéir aux ordres, imaginer que ces villageois réunis sont bien des terroristes en puissance, et les éliminer, tant pis si des femmes ou des enfants sont dans la zone de tir.

Implacable et documenté, Good kill décrit avec précision les pratiques de l’armée américaine : par exemple, le principe de la double frappe. Vous éliminez d’un missile un foyer de présumés terroristes, mais vous frappez dans les minutes qui suivent au même endroit pour éliminer ceux qui viennent les secourir, et tant pis si ce sont clairement des civils. L’un des sommets du film est le récit d’une opération visant l’enterrement d’ennemis tués plus tôt dans la journée, la barbarie à son maximum – et on est sûr que Andrew Niccol, scénariste et réalisateur, n’a rien inventé. Bien sûr, à tuer quasiment à l’aveugle, ou sur la foi de renseignements invérifiables, on crée une situation de guerre permanente, et on fabrique les adversaires que l’on éliminera plus tard.

Le personnage joué par Ethan Hawke, avec autrement d’intensité que la bonhomie irresponsable de Bradley Cooper chez Eastwood, peut difficilement ne pas être traversé d’un trouble terrible – a fortiori en retrouvant sa femme et ses enfants le soir chez lui, juste après avoir détruit des familles dans la journée.

Good Kill est un film important parce qu’il montre pour la première fois le vrai visage des guerres modernes, et à quel point ont disparu les notions de patriotisme et d’héroïsme – que risque ce combattant plaqué à part de se détruire lui-même ? C’est aussi un réquisitoire courageux contre l’american way of life, symbolisée ici par Las Vegas, ville sans âme que les personnages traversent sur leur chemin entre base militaire et pavillon sinistre. Ce n’est pas un film d’anticipation. L’horreur que l’on fait subir aux victimes et, en un sens, à leurs bourreaux, c’est ici et maintenant. Une sale guerre, un sale monde.

Voir aussi:

Good Kill », un film édifiant sur l’utilisation des drones
Nicolas Schaller

L’Obs
26-04-2015
« Good Kill », c’est l’anti-« American Sniper ». Rencontre avec son réalisateur, Andrew Niccol

L’OBS. « Good Kill » suit un pilote de l’U.S. Air Force, interprété par Ethan Hawke, qui pilote des drones et bombarde le Moyen-Orient depuis une base de Las Vegas, à plus de 10.000 km.

Andrew Niccol. Tout ce que vous voyez dans le film est réel. L’utilisation militaire des drones a commencé après le 11-Septembre et n’a jamais cessé depuis. Les Républicains comme les Démocrates y sont favorables. Cela leur évite d’envoyer des soldats dans la zone de conflit. Les stations de contrôle des drones sont à l’intérieur de remorques. Avant, ces remorques étaient emmenées sur place par hélicoptère. Puis ils se sont rendu compte qu’ils n’avaient pas besoin d’y être. « Good Kill » se déroule en 2010, année où les frappes de drones ont atteint des proportions jamais connues.

Une manière de dire aux familles : « nous n’envoyons pas vos enfants là-bas ».

– C’est sans danger. On ne voit pas revenir de cercueils.

En revanche, les morts de l’autre côté sont hasardeuses.

– Les drones sont très précis. Si vous voulez détruire tel immeuble, vous l’aurez sans problème. Reste à savoir si c’est le bon. Trois jours après son accession au pouvoir, Obama a ordonné une frappe sur un repaire taliban. Qui s’est avéré ne pas en être un. Neuf civils sont morts. Au moment où on tournait, l’armée américaine a accidentellement bombardé une cérémonie de mariage au Yémen. On en a à peine parlé aux infos. Ce n’était pas le premier mariage pris pour cible par erreur. Là-bas, la tradition veut que l’on tire des coups de feu durant la fête et il est arrivé à plusieurs reprises que les Américains prennent ça pour des attaques.

Avez-vous bénéficié du concours de l’armée américaine ?

– Non. Le film raconte une vérité trop dérangeante. Mais j’ai pu parler à d’ex-pilotes de drones tels que Brandon Bryant…

… lequel a déclaré dans les médias américains avoir tué plus de 1600 personnes. Cela n’a choqué personne ?

– Pas vraiment. Les Etats-Unis sont le seul pays où la guerre menée par drones est plus populaire que l’inverse. WikiLeaks m’a été très précieux : c’est le seul moyen de voir des images de frappes de drones. Grâce à Chelsea Manning [ex-analyste militaire condamnée en 2013 à 35 ans de prison pour avoir divulguer des documents classés Secret Défense, ndlr].

« Good Kill » se focalise sur les missions confidentielles menées par l’armée sous le commandement de la C.I.A.

– Je n’ai rien inventé. Comme on le voit dans mon film, l’armée américaine a délibérément bombardé un enterrement. La CIA ne fait plus dans l’espionnage mais dans l’assassinat. Depuis le 11 septembre et la guerre contre le terrorisme, tout lui est permis. Mais comme elle n’a pas de pilotes, elle doit faire appel à l’armée. Bien sûr, l’assassinat est illégal aux Etats-Unis. Sauf qu’ils emploient des termes différents. Ils ont mis au point tout un lexique qui ferait bien rire George Orwell. Ils parlent d’ « auto-défense préventive ». Comme dans « Minority Report » : on tue le coupable présumé avant qu’il n’ait agi ! Il y a aussi la « frappe signature » qui consiste à tirer sur tout un groupe de gens dont vous ne connaissez pas forcément l’identité. Ils justifient cela par l’idée de « proportionalité ». Traduction : il est si important d’éliminer la personne ciblée que peu importe si on tue les types d’à côté. Et puis d’ailleurs, que font-ils là ? S’ils ne sont pas loin d’un terroriste, c’est qu’ils ne doivent pas être innocents.

On imagine les répercussions au Moyen Orient.

– Dans le film, j’ai choisi de ne montrer que le point de vue du drone, si j’ose dire, car c’est le seul à la portée du pilote qu’interprète Ethan Hawke. Une chose m’a marqué : aujourd’hui, les habitants des pays du Moyen-Orient où l’Amérique est en guerre détestent le ciel bleu. Ils sont heureux quand la météo se couvre : cela signifie que les drones ne peuvent pas voler. Cette guerre est une usine à terroristes. A chaque innocent qu’elle tue, l’armée américaine crée dix nouveaux terroristes.

Il est dit dans le film que la console de jeu X-Box a servi de modèle pour les drones. Vrai ?

– Oui, l’armée s’en est inspirée pour concevoir les joysticks de téléguidage. Elle ne veut plus de vrais pilotes, elle les embauche dans les salles d’arcades des centres commerciaux. Comme ce sont des civils, ils n’ont pas le droit d’actionner la bombe. Un officier doit être là pour appuyer sur le bouton de tir. Il y a une chose que je n’ai pas mise dans le film car cela n’aurait pas eu l’air crédible et pourtant, c’est vrai : des jeunes pilotes de drones m’ont raconté qu’après leur journée à tuer des talibans de derrière leur joystick, ils rentraient chez eux et jouaient aux jeux vidéo !

On imagine que la guerre menée avec des drones est moins onéreuse ?

– Un tir de drone coûte 68.000 $. C’est bien moins cher qu’un tir de jet. Un drone est très lent mais il peut tenir en l’air 24 heures d’affilée. On en produit davantage aujourd’hui que des jets. Et bientôt, il y aura des drones-jets. Le personnage d’Ethan Hawke souffre de ça. Il a grandi avec l’image de « Top Gun », rêvait d’être Tom Cruise dans le film et voilà à quoi il en est réduit.

Le syndrome de stress post-traumatique dont il souffre est très particulier.

– Parce qu’aucun soldat n’avait vécu cela jusqu’ici. Avant, on se rendait dans le pays avec lequel on était en conflit. Aujourd’hui, plus besoin : la guerre est télécommandée. Avant, le pilote prenait son jet, lâchait une bombe et rentrait. Aujourd’hui, il lâche sa bombe, attend dans son fauteuil et compte le nombre de morts. Il passe douze heures à tuer des talibans avant d’aller chercher ses enfants à l’école.

« J’ai tué six talibans cet après-midi et là, je rentre chez moi préparer un barbecue », dit le personnage d’Ethan Hawke à l’épicier auquel il achète sa bouteille de vodka quotidienne.

– Et le type croit qu’il blague. Le fait que les pilotes soient basés près du clinquant Las Vegas est obscène. Vous savez pourquoi ils ont choisi cette zone ?Parce que le paysage et les montagnes alentour ressemblent à ceux d’Afghanistan. Cela facilite l’entraînement.

L’héroïsme, la famille, le fantasme d’une Amérique gendarme du monde… « Good Kill » traite des mêmes sujets qu’ « American Sniper ». Jusqu’à sa fin ambiguë. Est-ce la version démocrate du film de Clint Eastwood ?

– Même pas : Obama est démocrate. Et l’emploi des drones a augmenté depuis qu’il est au pouvoir. Mon film parle de l’ »American sniper » ultime. J’ai juste tenté d’être honnête vis-à-vis du sujet. De montrer les choses telles qu’elles sont sans imposer une manière de penser. Il serait naïf de dire « je suis anti-drone ». Ce serait comme dire « je suis anti-internet ». Mais avec cette technologie, la guerre peut être infinie. Le jour où l’armée américaine quittera le Moyen-Orient, les drones, eux, y resteront.

Qu’avez-vous pensé d’ « American Sniper » ?

– J’ai pour règle de ne jamais m’exprimer sur les films des autres, mais son succès m’a un peu surpris. En fait, il est tombé pile au bon moment et a permis aux Américains de se sentir mieux vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes. Mon « sniper » est très différent. Ce qui m’intéresse chez lui, c’est sa schizophrénie. L’état-major américain était sur le point d’attribuer une médaille à certains pilotes de drones. Cela a soulevé un tel tollé de la part des vrais pilotes qu’ils ont abandonné l’idée. Ces médailles sont censées célébrer les valeurs et le courage. Comment les décerner à des types qui tuent sans courir le moindre danger ?

Je crains que « Good Kill » ne rencontre pas le même succès qu’ « American Sniper » aux Etats-Unis.

– Je n’en doute pas.

Votre film est moins roublard que celui d’Eastwood.

– Et c’est une petite compagnie indépendante qui le sort, pas la Warner.

Avez-vous utilisé de vrais drones lors du tournage ?

– On peut effectuer des prises de vue aériennes à l’aide de drones mais, étrangement, ils sont trop petits et pas assez stables pour soutenir une caméra de cinéma. J’ai donc utilisé un hélicoptère ainsi qu’une grue de 60 mètres en balançant légèrement la caméra pour donner l’impression qu’elle vole. J’ai aussi pas mal filmé les scènes extérieures au conflit, celles de la vie quotidienne du personnage à Las Vegas, d’un point de vue culminant, pour créer une continuité et un sentiment de paranoïa. Comme si un drone le suivait en permanence. Ou le point de vue de Dieu.

Salle de contrôle (Voltage Pictures / Sobini films)

« Truman Show », « S1m0ne », « Lord of War » : dans tous vos films, les hommes sont prisonniers de la technologie…

– L’interaction entre les humains et la technologie me passionne.

… Et un individu se retrouve doté du pouvoir d’un dieu.

– Dans « Bienvenue à Gattaca » aussi : la manipulation génétique, c’est jouer à être Dieu. J’ai toujours vu le personnage de Nicolas Cage dans « Lord of War » comme quelqu’un d’invincible. Je l’imaginais traversant un champ de bataille sans baisser la tête, inatteignable. C’est sa malédiction.

Vous aimez gratter les sujets qui fâchent ?

– Je suis sur la « watch list » des autorités américaines depuis « Lord of War ».

Comment le savez-vous ?

– Le FBI m’a rendu visite pour savoir pourquoi j’avais fait jouer un vrai trafiquant d’armes dans le film. Parce que le seul moyen d’obtenir un avion-cargo russe en Afrique est de passer par un trafiquant d’armes. Celui que l’on voit dans « Lord of War » transportait de vraies armes au Congo une semaine avant qu’on le filme rempli de fausses armes. L’équipage russe se foutait de moi en me disant : « Pourquoi t’es pas venu la semaine dernière, on t’en aurait filées des vraies ». Vous vous souvenez du plan avec tous les tanks ? Les cinquante ont été vendus à Kadhafi un mois plus tard.

Propos recueillis par Nicolas Schaller

Voir de même:

« Good Kill » : au temps des drones, un nouvel art de la guerre
Thomas Sotinel
Le Monde

21.04.2015

L’American Sniper de Clint Eastwood était capable d’abattre sa cible à plusieurs centaines de mètres de distance. Le major Tom Egan peut le faire à des milliers de kilomètres. Le major est un as de l’US Air Force, le descendant des pilotes de biplan de la première guerre mondiale, qui fascinaient les Howard, Hawks et Hughes, des héros que filmait John Ford pendant la bataille de Midway en 1942. Mais la vie de guerrier de Tom Egan n’a rien à voir avec celle de ses ancêtres chevaleresques, qui ne savaient jamais le matin s’ils reverraient un jour leur patrie. Le soir, quand le service est fini, le major du XXIe siècle pousse la porte de l’espèce de container dans lequel il a passé sa journée, marche jusqu’au parking, monte dans sa voiture et regagne la périphérie de Las Vegas, sa maison entourée d’un carré de pelouse aussi verte que le désert est poussiéreux. Tom Egan ne pilote plus d’avions depuis longtemps mais dirige des drones qui survolent l’Afghanistan, le Waziristan, le Yémen, la Somalie pour surveiller et punir les ennemis des Etats-Unis.

Andrew Niccol, le réalisateur de Good Kill, est fasciné par les mutations de l’humanité : l’intervention de la génétique dans la définition des rapports sociaux (Bienvenue à Gattaca), la mondialisation – vue à travers le commerce des armes (Lord of War). Ici, il se lance dans une entreprise presque impossible : la mise en scène de la guerre contemporaine, dont l’asymétrie repose sur la disparition physique de l’une des parties en présence, remplacée par des machines. Comme cette ambition s’accompagne d’un souci très américain d’offrir un spectacle correspondant au prix du billet, Good Kill n’est pas tout à fait le film analytique, froid et fascinant que l’on entrevoit lors des premières séquences.

Elles montrent Tom Egan (Ethan Hawke) abruti d’ennui, devant un écran qui offre des images d’une netteté et d’une platitude presque insupportables. On y voit des cours orientales dans lesquelles des gens sans intérêt vaquent à des occupations triviales. Une fois que le renseignement a assigné à ces silhouettes la qualité d’ennemi, Egan peut faire tomber la foudre sur elles. Ce processus clinique, à l’opposé de la fureur guerrière que chérit le cinéma, trouve sa contrepartie civile dans le paysage synthétique de Las Vegas que traverse le soldat pour rentrer chez lui.

Une volonté d’analyse froide
Ethan Hawke est parfait pour le rôle, trouvant un nouvel emploi à cette faille constitutive qui fait qu’on sait toujours qu’il ne sera pas le héros qu’on attendait. Ici, sa frustration d’ancien combattant de terrain (on suppose qu’il a mitraillé et bombardé en Irak et en Afghanistan) honteux de son travail de bourreau à distance qu’il ressent comme une espèce d’impuissance martiale.

Cette description clinique, photographiée avec un soin maniaque du détail et un refus admirable de l’esthétique habituelle des films situés à Las Vegas, est assez vigoureuse et singulière pour empêcher Good Kill de succomber à ses nombreux défauts. Telles les figures dramatiques usées – les disputes conjugales en écho aux drames guerriers (Ethan Hawke a pour épouse January Jones, qui incarne Betty Draper dans la série « Mad Men ») –, la galerie sommaire de stéréotypes qui entourent le major Egan à la base de l’US Air Force, répartis équitablement entre militaires soucieux de leur honneur et ruffians qui voient des ennemis partout.

Malgré ces maladresses (et une fin qui menace de saper le travail intellectuel qui a précédé), Good Kill reste un film passionnant, soulevant (parfois avec beaucoup de raideur) une bonne part des questions posées par les mutations de l’art de la guerre.

On voit les contrôleurs de drones se soumettre aux ordres des services secrets, on les voit tentés par la toute-puissance que leur confère ce pouvoir de voir et de tuer sans être vus ni menacés. Dans les moments où la mise en scène s’accorde avec cette volonté d’analyse froide, Good Kill devient comme une version réaliste de ce qui reste à ce jour le meilleur film d’Andrew Niccol, le cauchemar futuriste de Bienvenue à Gattaca : le portrait d’un monde dont l’homme a exclu sa propre humanité.
Film américain d’Andrew Niccol avec Ethan Hawke, January Jones, Zoë Kravitz (1 h 42).

Toronto: le drame de drones d’Andrew Niccol

Thomas Sotinel

10 septembre 2014

« Good Kill », c’est l’interjection qu’éructent les pilotes de drones une fois leur objectif détruit. Coincés à l’intérieur d’une espèce de caravane, dans le désert du Nevada, ils contrôlent à distance de petits avions sans pilotes qui frappent sans relâches les ennemis des Etats-Unis, en Afghanistan, au Waziristan, au Yemen. Good Kill, le film, raconte le voyage dans la folie d’un ces pilotes, incarné par Ethan Hawke, qui n’arrive pas à faire le deuil de la guerre, la vraie, celle qui révèle la vérité d’un homme.

Ethan Hawke dans Good Kill, d’Andrew Niccol
Andrew Niccol a présenté son film à la Mostra, comme vous l’avez peut-être lu sur ce site. Je ne partage pas la répulsion de ma camarade vénitienne, au contraire. De Bienvenue à Gattaca en Lord of War, Niccol a toujours mis en scène avec précision l’interaction entre l’homme et les machines qu’il crée. Il est peut-être moins à l’aise lorsqu’il s’agit de filmer les relations entre humains, mais comme l’essentiel de Good Kill est consacré à ces machines invisibles dont les victimes n’apprennent la présence qu’au moment exact de leur mort, ce n’est pas très grave.

Pour l’instant, le film n’a pas trouvé de distributeur en France. En attendant, voici ce que le réalisateur a à en dire.

Qu’est ce qui vous a intéressé dans les drones?

J’étais plus intéressé par le personnage, par cette nouvelle manière de faire la guerre. On n’a jamais demandé à un soldat de faire ça. De combattre douze heures et de rentrer chez lui auprès de sa femme et de ses enfants, il n’y a plus de sas de décompression.

Vous avez imaginé la psychologie de ces pilotes?

J’ai engagé d’anciens pilotes de drones comme consultants, puisque l’armée m’avait refusé sa coopération. J’en aurais bien voulu, ç’aurait été plus facile si on m’avait donné ces équipements, ces installations. J’ai dû les construire.

Vous pensez que ce souci de discrétion, de secret même, fait partie la stratégie d’emploi des drones?

Oui, je me suis souvenu aujourd’hui d’une conférence de presse du général Schwartzkopf pendant la première guerre d’Irak, il avait montré des vidéos en noir et blanc, avec une très mauvaise définition, de frappes de précision et on voyait un motocycliste échapper de justesse à un missile. Il l’avait appelé « l’homme le plus chanceux d’Irak ». On le voit traverser un pont, passer dans la ligne de mire et sortir du champ au moment où le panache de l’explosion éclot. Aujourd’hui on sait qu’il existe une vidéo pour chaque frappe de drone, c’est la procédure. Mais on ne les montre plus comme au temps du général Schwartzkopf. Expliquez-moi pourquoi.

Je préfèrerais que vous le fassiez.

Je vais vous dire pourquoi. Les humains ont tendance à l’empathie – et même si vous êtes mon ennemi, même si vous êtes une mauvaise personne, si je vous regarde mourir, je ressentirai de l’empathie. Ce qui n’est pas bon pour les affaires militaires.

Vous pensez que l’emploi des drones permet de surmonter cet inconvénient?

Je crois que ça a tendance à insensibiliser. On n’entend jamais une explosion, on ne sent jamais le sol se soulever. On est à 10 000 kilomètres.

Il doit y avoir plusieurs bases de pilotages de drones aux Etats-Unis, pourquoi avez vous situé celle du film près de Las Vegas?

L’armée l’a mise là pour des raisons de commodité: les montagnes autour de Las Vegas ressemblent à l’Afghanistan, ce qui permet aux pilotes de drones à l’entraînement de se familiariser avec le terrain. Ils s’exercent aussi à suivre des voitures.

« Good Kill », par Andrew Niccol, en salles actuellement

« The Good Kill » à la Mostra de Venise : le film américain de trop
Isabelle Regnier (Venise, envoyée spéciale)

Le Monde

06.09.2014

(…)

LA QUESTION DES DRONES

Mais il a fallu attendre vendredi 5 septembre pour découvrir, en compétition, le plus problématique des films américains. Très attendu, The Good Kill d’Andrew Niccol (auteur du très élégant Bienvenue à Gattacca, et du plus englué Master of War) promettait d’interroger la question hautement politique et morale des drones, en suivant un ancien pilote de chasse reconverti en pilote à distance de ces machines meurtrières.

Le film est si mauvais qu’on peine à y croire. À partir d’un scénario qui lorgne du côté de la série Homeland (malaise du pilote de guerre de retour dans la vie civile, cynisme de la CIA, suprématie de la raison d’Etat dans la guerre contre le terrorisme…), Andrew Niccol met en scène des personnages sans épaisseur, sans qualité. Enveloppe vide qui tire la gueule du début à la fin du film, celui d’Ethan Hawke est défini par les rasades de vodka qu’il s’envoie en douce dans la salle de bains ; déambulant en robe cocktail et talons aiguilles dans son pavillon de la banlieue de Las Vegas comme si elle n’était pas tout à fait sortie de la série Mad Men, sa femme, interprétée par l’actrice January Jones, répète en boucle la même réplique : « tu as l’air d’être à des kilomètres… » ; quant à la jeune Zoe Kravitz, qui restera peut-être dans l’histoire comme la femme officier la plus sexy de toute l’histoire de l’armée, elle s’adonne, faute d’avoir plus intéressant à faire, à un festival de moues boudeuses qui pourrait lui valoir un prix dans un festival un peu en pointe. Le reste – monologues didactiques sur l’enjeu militaire et moral des drones, dialogues téléphonés, blagues pas drôles, musique de bourrin – est à l’avenant.

CRITIQUE COSMÉTIQUE

Ce qui pose vraiment problème n’est toutefois pas d’ordre artistique, mais politique. Paré des oripeaux de la fiction de gauche, The Good Kill s’inscrit pleinement (comme le faisait la troisième saison de « Homeland ») dans le paradigme de la guerre contre le terrorisme telle que la conduisent les Etats-Unis depuis le 11 septembre 2001. Les Afghans ne sont jamais représentés autrement que sous la forme des petites silhouettes noires mal définies, évoluant erratiquement sur l’écran des pilotes de drones qui les surveillent. La seule action véritablement lisible se déroule dans la cour d’une maison, où l’on voit, à plusieurs reprises, un barbu frapper sa femme et la violer. C’est l’argument imparable, tranquillement anti-islamiste, de la cause des femmes, que les avocats de la guerre contre le terrorisme ont toujours brandi sans vergogne pour mettre un terme au débat.

La critique que fait Andrew Niccol, dans ce contexte, de l’usage des drones ne pouvait qu’être cosmétique. Elle est aussi inepte, confondant les questions d’ordre psychologique (comment se débrouillent des soldats qui rentrent le soir dans leur lit douillet après avoir tué des gens – souvent innocents), et celles qui se posent sur le plan du droit de la guerre (que Grégoire Chamayou a si bien expliqué dans La Théorie du drone, La Fabrique, 2013), dès lors que ces armes autorisent à détruire des vies dans le camp adverse sans plus en mettre aucune en péril dans le sien. Si l’ancien pilote de chasse ne va pas bien, explique-t-il à sa femme, ce n’est pas parce qu’il tue des innocents, ce qu’il a toujours fait, c’est qu’il les tue sans danger.

RÉDEMPTION AHURISSANTE

Pour remédier à son état, s’offre une des rédemptions les plus ahurissantes qu’il ait été donné à voir depuis longtemps au cinéma. S’improvisant bras armé d’une justice totalement aveugle, il dégomme en un clic le violeur honni, rendant à sa femme, après un léger petit suspense, ce qu’il imagine être sa liberté. La conscience lavée, le pilote peut repartir le cœur léger, retrouver sa famille et oublier toutes celles, au loin, qu’il a assassinées pour la bonne cause.

Good Kill
Thriller réalisé en 2014 par Andrew Niccol
Avec Ethan Hawke , Stafford Douglas , Michael Sheets …
Date de sortie : 22 avril 2015

Good Kill – Bande Annonce VOST
SYNOPSIS
Le commandant Tom Egan est un ancien pilote de chasse de l’US Army qui, après de nombreuses missions sur le terrain, se retrouve en service dans une petite base du Nevada où il s’est reconverti en pilote de drones, des machines meurtrières guidées à distance. Derrière sa télécommande Tom opère ses missions douze heures par jour : surveillance des terrains à risque, protection des troupes et exécution des cibles terroristes. Mais de retour chez lui, ses relations avec sa famille sont exécrables. Progressivement confronté à des problèmes de conscience, Tom remet bientôt sa mission en question…

LA CRITIQUE LORS DE LA SORTIE EN SALLE DU 22/04/2015

Pour

Un héros américain déchu : pilote de chasse, le commandant Tommy Egan ne fait plus voler que des drones. Enfermé dans un conteneur banalisé, sur une base militaire près de Las Vegas, son écran de contrôle lui montre la Terre, quelque part au Moyen-Orient, filmée de si haut qu’elle en devient presque abstraite. Mais pas pour lui. On lui ­désigne des cibles à bombarder, il voit des humains qu’il doit détruire. Et ça le détruit, comme l’alcool dont il abuse… Il est beau, ce personnage, cet oiseau blessé interprété par Ethan Hawke avec un désenchantement fiévreux digne de Montgomery Clift. Pour mener la guerre d’aujourd’hui, technologique et furtive, il faudrait que le commandant Egan devienne lui-même une machine. Au lieu de quoi, il résiste, pense, souffre. Le film trouve là une dimension mentale séduisante et pleine de tension. Car les états d’âme du militaire surgissent dans une réalité qui semble simplifiée, géométrique, comme les maisons du lotissement où il vit avec sa famille.

La superbe mise en scène d’Andrew Niccol donne toute sa complexité au personnage. Filmé à plusieurs reprises avec un crucifix derrière lui, accroché au mur de la chambre à coucher, il est désigné comme un croyant possible. En tout cas, un homme honnête qui veut rester fidèle à sa femme — alors que tout le pousse vers une charmante collègue — et à son idée du bien. Les autres pilotes de drones, après avoir fait feu, s’exclament « Good kill ! » (« en plein dans le mille ! »). Pour lui, cette logique entre le « good » et le « kill » soulève des interrogations morales. Nobles, assurément, mais qui, dans ce monde explosif et martial, passent par la violence. La guerre, c’est ça. — Frédéric Strauss

Contre

La guerre moderne qui transforme les soldats en snipers de jeux vidéo : un sujet en or pour le réalisateur de Bienvenue à Gattaca et Lord of war. Hélas, Andrew Niccol accumule les archétypes : l’ancien pilote, partagé entre le devoir et la cul­pabilité, sa collègue féminine qui verse une larme en gros plan en appuyant sur le bouton de la mort, le ­supérieur galonné qui débite des discours lourdement explicatifs… Dans American Sniper, Clint Eastwood filmait un homme formé à obéir et à tuer sans chercher à définir ce qu’est un « bon » ou un « mauvais » soldat. Andrew Niccol, lui, s’arroge ce droit et plonge dans la complaisance. Pendant tout le film, il prépare le terrain, il montre plusieurs fois, sur l’écran de contrôle, un salaud, un violeur, la pire des ordures. Enfin une cible que le sniper pourra dégommer sans remords — depuis son scénario du Truman Show, il n’a qu’une obsession : l’homme qui se prend pour Dieu. Mais à aucun moment, ici, il ne condamne le geste de ce soldat qui, à force d’exercer le droit de vie et de mort à distance, se change en justicier. Le film réquisitoire contre la sale guerre devient, dès lors, un thriller qui crée le malaise et met en rage. — Guillemette Odicino

Frédéric Strauss;Guillemette Odicino

Ethan Hawke et Andrew Niccol
« Good Kill », une drone de guerre
Ethan et Andrew posent pour Paris Match. © Patrick Fouque
Le 23 avril 2015 | Mise à jour le 23 avril 2015
Christine Haas

Dans «Good Kill», tuer à distance provoque des dégâts qui n’ont rien de virtuel…

«Good Kill ! » est la phrase glaçante que prononce le pilote de drone en atteignant sa cible quelque part en Afghanistan, à 11 000 kilomètres de la base militaire de Las Vegas où il « combat » douze heures par jour, installé dans un compartiment climatisé. Semblable à l’œil de Dieu, sa caméra voit tout lorsqu’elle descend du ciel : la femme qui se fait violer par un taliban sans qu’il puisse intervenir, les marines dont il assure la sécurité durant leur sommeil, mais aussi l’enfant qui surgit à vélo là où il vient d’envoyer son missile…

Face à cette inconfortable vérité, l’armée américaine n’a pas soutenu le projet du subversif Andrew Niccol, qui avait déjà agacé avec sa leçon de géopolitique dans « Lord of War ». Pour son scénario, le cinéaste s’est nourri des conseils d’anciens pilotes de drone. « Je voulais montrer que plus on progresse technologiquement, plus on régresse humainement, explique-t-il. Derrière sa télécommande, le pilote n’entend rien, ne sent pas le sol trembler, ne respire pas l’odeur de brûlé… Il fait exploser des pixels sans jamais être dans le concret de la chair et du sang. »

Dans cet univers orwellien où toutes sortes d’euphémismes – « neutraliser », « incapaciter », « effacer » – sont utilisés pour éviter de prononcer le mot « tuer », le décalage entre la réalité et le virtuel prend encore plus de sens quand on apprend que les très jeunes pilotes de drone sont repérés dans les arcades de jeux vidéo. D’autres, comme l’ancien pilote de chasse interprété par Ethan Hawke, culpabilisent d’être si loin du danger. « Il combat les talibans tout l’après-midi, explique l’acteur, puis il rentre chez lui, passe la soirée en famille et, le lendemain matin, retourne faire la guerre. Sa psychose traumatique s’accentue lorsqu’il se demande si l’Amérique ne suscite pas plus le terrorisme qu’elle ne l’éradique. C’est la triste possibilité d’une guerre sans fin qui semble se dessiner… »

«Good Kill», en salle actuellement.

Voir encore:

« Good Kill », les drones noyés sous le pathos
Andrew Niccol fait mine de s’attaquer aux questions posées par la suprématie technologique de l’armée américaine, mais déçoit avec un film caricatural.
La Croix
21/4/15

GOOD KILL

d’Andrew Niccol Film américain, 1 h 42

Présenté lors de la dernière Mostra de Venise, au mois de septembre 2014, Good Kill avait, sur le papier, de quoi retenir l’attention. D’abord pour son thème – l’utilisation massive de drones par l’armée américaine –, encore très peu exploité par le cinéma hollywoodien.

Ensuite pour la personnalité de son réalisateur, Andrew Niccol, scénariste de The Truman Show à ses débuts, à qui l’on doit un film d’anticipation très réussi, Bienvenue à Gattaca (1998), mais aussi Simone (2002), Lord of War (2005), Les Ames Vagabondes (2013)…

Autant de longs-métrages qui, s’ils ne révèlent pas à toute force la personnalité d’un auteur, proposent de réfléchir par-delà le simple divertissement. Dans le cas présent, il faut hélas déchanter.

Voici donc l’histoire du commandant Tommy Egan (Ethan Hawke), pilote de chasse de l’armée de l’air américaine, affecté au guidage de drones en attendant de retrouver une affectation digne de son rang. Depuis sa base située dans les environs de Las Vegas, avec des horaires de fonctionnaire, il traque les Talibans afghans à l’aide de ces aéronefs sans équipage, concentrés de technologies censés permettre des « frappes chirurgicales ».

Supportant mal de délivrer la mort sans être lui-même engagé physiquement, Tommy Egan vit des heures d’autant plus difficiles que les services secrets américains s’immiscent souvent dans son travail, désignant des cibles sans donner de raisons et faisant peu de cas des éventuels dommages collatéraux.

Le questionnement moral du soldat se trouve décuplé par la toute-puissance et l’omniscience dont il semble jouir derrière ses manettes. Son malaise, son impuissance à agir, l’incitent à se transformer en justicier solitaire, en dépit de sa hiérarchie et des procédures d’encadrement existantes.

Un scénario caricatural

Good Kill ne fait pas longtemps illusion : si le sujet autorisait une réflexion intéressante sur la guerre technologique, ses risques et limites, le scénario se charge de la caricaturer et de l’étouffer sous une épaisse couche de pathos.

Le pilote de drone cache ses bouteilles de vodka et, incapable de s’extraire de ses obsessions, voit son couple et sa famille se déliter sous ses yeux. Sempiternelle rengaine. Hollywood, dont on connaît la capacité à s’emparer du réel, donne ici plutôt l’impression de faire du vieux avec du neuf. La portée critique du film s’en trouve considérablement réduite.

Voir enfin:

«Charlie Hebdo»: un chef d’al-Qaïda tué par un drone au Yémen
RFI
07-05-2015

Nasser bin Ali al-Ansi avait revendiqué l’attentat de «Charlie Hebdo» en janvier 2015. AFP PHOTO / HANDOUT / SITE Intelligence Group
Un haut responsable d’al-Qaïda dans la péninsule arabique (Aqpa) a été tué par un tir de drone américain au Yémen. L’information est donnée par l’organisation elle-même, selon le centre américain de surveillance des sites islamistes. Nasser al-Ansi est connu pour avoir revendiqué l’attaque contre Charlie Hebdo, le 7 janvier dernier en France.

Nasser al-Ansi, stratège militaire du réseau extrémiste, était apparu dans plusieurs vidéos d’Aqpa. C’est lui qui, le 14 janvier, affirmait que son groupe avait mené, par l’intermédiaire des frères Kouachi, la tuerie de Charlie Hebdo une semaine plus tôt, pour « venger » Mahomet, caricaturé par le journal satirique français. L’homme est aussi connu pour ses discours faisant l’apologie des attaques en Europe et aux Etats-Unis. Il avait rendu Barack Obama responsable de la mort de deux otages occidentaux que son groupe détenait, lors d’une tentative de libération.

La mort d’Ansi a été annoncée par un responsable d’Aqpa, Abou al-Miqdad al-Kindi dans une vidéo diffusée sur Twitter, selon SITE. Le centre américain de surveillance des sites islamistes précise que « selon des informations de presse, Ansi a été tué par un raid de drone à Moukalla, une ville du gouvernorat du Hadramout au Yémen, en avril avec son fils et six autres combattants ». Le Pentagone, comme à l’habitude, n’a pas souhaité commenter ces informations.

Selon une biographie fournie en novembre 2014 par Aqpa, Nasser ben Ali al-Ansi est né en octobre 1975 à Taëz, au Yémen. Il a participé au « jihad » en Bosnie en 1995, avant de retourner au Yémen puis de se rendre au Cachemire et en Afghanistan. Il avait rencontré Oussama ben Laden qui l’avait chargé de questions administratives, avant de participer à davantage de camps d’entraînement où il avait excellé. Il a été emprisonné six mois au Yémen puis avait rejoint Aqpa en 2011.

Sa mort, pour laquelle Washington offrait une récompense de cinq millions de dollars, est un coup réel porté à l’organisation, qui a profité de la guerre civile au Yémen pour reprendre des positions. Cela signifie aussi que le Pentagone a continué de recevoir des informations en provenance de ce pays malgré la crise, et le retrait de ses marines.


Polémique Ménard: Il faut relancer le débat sur les statistiques ethniques (No demographics, please, we’re French)

6 mai, 2015
https://i0.wp.com/www.ons.gov.uk/ons/resources/figure5religionbyethnicity_tcm77-310415.pnghttps://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44/Census-2000-Data-Top-US-Ancestries.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Religions_of_the_US.PNGhttps://i2.wp.com/si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/NA-BH463_numbgu_NS_20100813185901.gifhttps://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0c/Religions_of_the_United_States.png https://i1.wp.com/i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/05/06/article-2620957-1D97975900000578-999_634x572.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/05/05/article-2620957-1D97AD2700000578-399_306x348.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/05/05/article-2620957-1D97AE0F00000578-460_306x348.jpg

Il y a plus d’un siècle, Jean Jaurès définissait par ces mots sa vision du vivre-ensemble entre citoyens issus des deux rives de la Méditerranée : « l’action socialiste se produira, en chaque pays, avec d’autant plus de force et d’autorité qu’elle sera universelle et universellement probe, et que nul ne pourra y soupçonner un piège ». A l’heure où les crises économique, écologique et sociale s’abattent de concert sur notre pays et où de trop longues années de mauvaise gouvernance favorisent la montée des haines et du rejet de l’autre, il nous incombe de revenir aux valeurs fondatrices de notre pacte républicain et du projet socialiste pour bâtir cette société enfin véritablement universelle. Ces jours-ci, nous célébrerons la grande fête de solidarité et de partage qu’est l’Aïd-al-Fitr. A l’issue du mois de jeûne du Ramadan, temps fort de joie, d’échange de vœux et de présents, elle illumine la vie et les demeures de millions de nos compatriotes de culture musulmane. Issue d’une longue tradition et porteuse de riches héritages culturels, par les valeurs qu’elle porte et l’idéal social qu’elle vise, elle s’inscrit pleinement dans cette démarche d’universalité. François Hollande (31 août 2011)
En ce début du XXI° siècle, un nouveau péril terrifiant vient assombrir encore davantage l’avenir de ce malheureux continent que l’on pourrait croire décidément voué au malheur. C’est une explosion démographique à venir, inouïe, sans précédent dans l’histoire du monde. Ce phénomène, selon les prévisions des Nations Unies, pourrait porter la population africaine au chiffre véritablement hallucinant de 4,2 milliards de personnes, soit autour de 47 % de la population mondiale prévue pour la fin de ce siècle. En 2100, un homme sur deux sur la planète vivrait en Afrique ! Cela alors que l’Afrique n’est, de toute évidence, nullement préparée à affronter ce prodigieux défi démographique. En conséquence, l’Afrique, naguère sous-peuplée, va-t-elle devenir un continent maudit, surpeuplé et affamé, livré à tous les déchirements que la misère extrême peut engendrer ? Sans compter que son déversoir naturel serait inévitablement une Europe d’abord réticente, puis un jour peut-être, hostile. Yves-Marie Laulan (Institut de Géopolitique des Populations)
Dans sa lettre aux musulmans à l’occasion de l’Aïd-al-Fitr, François Hollande évoque le « projet socialiste pour bâtir cette société enfin véritablement universelle. ». Quel est exactement ce projet ? (…) Il ne s’agit pas d’un projet secret, mais d’une utopie à moyen-long terme, qui est plus ou moins distillée dans les réflexions de Terra Nova, la Nouvelle Civilisation de Martine Aubry, le projet du Parti Socialiste pour 2012, ou bien encore dans cette petite phrase de François Hollande. (…) Mais (…) comment faire pour « bâtir cette société véritablement universelle » ? Eh bien puisque l’exportation n’a pas fonctionné, tentons le pari de l’importation ! (…) Cela fait quelque temps déjà que l’extrême-gauche prône en quelque sorte la création d’une « nouvelle civilisation » sur nos terres. Ceci en faisant venir en masse des immigrés, en important de nouveaux « prolétaires » pour remplacer ceux qui font défaut en France, afin de faire exploser le système capitaliste (si c’est sous le poids des prestations sociales, c’est bien vu !). Mais aussi pour mettre à mal l’ordre établi dans notre société judéo-chrétienne et blanche, donc  « fondamentalement raciste ». Stéphane Buret
La basilique de Saint-Denis, où reposent les rois de France, n’est qu’à quelques stations de RER ou de métro du coeur de Paris. Mais en vingt minutes de trajet, on change radicalement de monde. Je me souviens m’y être rendue il y a dix ans, trois mois après la réélection de Jacques Chirac. À la sortie du métro, les jeunes filles voilées étaient déjà nombreuses devant l’université. À l’entrée de la basilique, alors occupée par des sans-papiers, trois femmes voilées de noir, assises derrière une longue table qui barrait l’accès de la nef, contrôlaient les visiteurs. Ce jour-là, j’ai pensé que si j’avais dû habiter là-bas, j’aurais probablement voté FN. Christine Clerc
Les plus dangereux éléments de l’extrême droite ne sont donc pas ses noyaux durs, mais les pseudopodes qu’elle émet dans des directions éloignées et variées qui permettent aux venins idéologiques du Front national de se répandre dans une large partie de la société (…)  sous l’emprise d’une sorte de fanatisme démographique, telle M. Tribalat, la prophète de l’assimilation et de la population “de souche”. Ce dernier groupe est de loin le plus dangereux car il agit masqué, peut-être à l’insu de ses membres qui sont persuadés, soit de leur mission, soit que la poursuite de leur intérêt personnel par tous les moyens n’a pas de conséquence politique. Hervé Le Bras
Un chiffre étonnamment stable: contrairement à ce que l’on croit souvent, la proportion d’immigrés ne varie guère depuis le début des années 1980. Le Monde (03.12.09)
Cet article du 4 décembre montre que les bons sentiments et la volonté pédagogique de redresser l’opinion publique qui pense mal conduisent à des catastrophes. Ils conduisent à piétiner la déontologie minimale de tout journaliste qui se respecte dont le devoir est d’informer et non de consoler ou de rassurer. Le Monde vient de faire la démonstration que les chiffres peuvent être manipulés et, à l’opposé de ses intentions sans doute, conforte ainsi ceux qui pensent que les médias ne disent pas la vérité sur la question de l’immigration. Michèle Tribalat
On a voulu rester sobre pour ne pas choquer les sensibilités de l’Insee, pour que ce soit publiable par eux mais ils ont pas envie de le traiter. Toute nouvelle avec des infos de type forte concentration au delà de ce qu’on aurait pu imaginer, l’Insee préfère ne pas informer plutôt que de risquer de publier une nouvelle sensible. Par peur de réveiller le racisme en France. Michèle Tribalat
En France, on ne devrait pas pouvoir à la fois se vanter d’avoir réussi à faire barrage aux statistiques ethnoraciales et espérer connaître la situation des Noirs. Pourtant, manifestement, dans ce pays, on sait sans avoir besoin de compter. Michèle Tribalat
Si les bobos vantent la diversité, ce sont les ouvriers français qui ont été au contact des immigrés dans la capitale. Ce sont eux qui ont amorti l’intégration. Michèle Tribalat
Jean-François Revel explique très justement, dans La connaissance inutile, que les scientifiques ne sont pas plus raisonnables que le commun des mortels dès qu’ils s’éloignent de leur domaine d’études : « le travail scientifique , par sa nature particulière, comporte et impose de façon prédominante des critères impossibles à éluder durablement (…) Un grand savant peut se forger ses opinions politiques ou morales de façon aussi arbitraire et sous l’empire de considérations aussi insensées que les hommes dépourvus de toute expérience du raisonnement scientifique. (…) Vivre à une époque modelée par la science ne rend aucun de nous plus apte à se comporter de façon scientifique en dehors des domaines et des conditions où règnent sans équivoque la contrainte des procédures scientifiques. »(..) « le chercheur scientifique n’est pas un homme par nature plus honnête que l’ignorant. C’est quelqu’un qui s’est volontairement enfermé dans des règles telles qu’elles le condamnent, pour ainsi dire, à l’honnêteté. »(…) Yan van Beek, un chercheur néerlandais parle de la lecture morale selon laquelle un savoir n’est pas jugé en fonction de son mérite factuel mais en raison de ses conséquences sociales, politiques ou morales. Des normes existent et sont d’autant plus difficiles à transgresser qu’elles touchent certains sujets. Il ne faut sous-estimer l’ignorance. La méconnaissance des faits et la préférence pour le politiquement correct se conjuguent pour expliquer pourquoi il n’est nul besoin d’être sous le joug d’un pouvoir autoritaire pour voir fleurir des versions officielles sur de nombreux sujets. Les médias ont une arme plus terrible encore que le dénigrement : le silence. Une thèse qui n’est pas connue ne risque pas d’être populaire. Cependant, le pluralisme ne garantit pas la vérité. Vous pouvez mettre la plus grande diversité des incompétences devant une caméra, il est peut probable qu’il en sorte quelque chose d’instructif. Il manque un véritable attachement à la liberté d’expression, un goût de la vérité, une plus grande confiance dans l’aptitude de la société à réagir sainement aux informations. Il faudrait également que les médias cessent de vouloir réformer l’opinion publique pour l’informer. Michèle Tribalat
L’avantage fécond, sans être colossal, appliqué à une structure par âge beaucoup plus jeune, est loin d’être négligeable et favorise les croyants les plus impliqués. Combiné à une immigration dont on ne voit pas bien qu’elle puisse se réduire dans les années qui viennent, à une rétention élevée due à une endogamie religieuse très importante et à une « réislamisation » des jeunes générations, il donne à la confession musulmane un dynamisme tout à fait incongru dans un pays très fortement laïcisé, en voie de déchristianisation avancée et qui a pris l’habitude de penser cette sécularisation galopante comme à la fois progressiste et inexorable. On a, j’ai moi-même, longtemps pensé que l’islam ne ferait pas exception à ce puissant courant. Rien n’est moins sûr. Un contexte très sécularisé peut, au contraire, être le ferment d’un durcissement identitaire et religieux, l’islam n’étant pas perçu comme ringard, à la différence de l’intégrisme catholique, et bénéficiant d’un « climat relativiste », propice à son expansion. Michèle Tribalat
En 1992, on (…) observait une sécularisation importante des jeunes d’origine algérienne, des unions mixtes en nombre non négligeable pour les débuts de vie en couple de ces jeunes, une certaine mobilité sociale, ainsi qu’un recul des pratiques matrimoniales traditionnelles. La sécularisation des jeunes d’origine algérienne paraissait prometteuse. Je n’ai pas, alors, anticipé le mouvement de désécularisation que je décris dans mon dernier livre (Assimilation. La fin du modèle français, Éditions du Toucan, 2013), qui a coïncidé avec la réislamisation des jeunes. Combiné à une forte endogamie religieuse, il ne favorise pas la mixité ethnique des mariages. (…) L’enquête MGIS était rétrospective et recueillait l’histoire des individus sur le temps long, autrement dit, le passé. Elle ne pouvait donc, en aucun cas, répondre aux interrogations sur l’évolution récente et les phénomènes émergents. Il aurait fallu mener des enquêtes de ce type régulièrement. (…) L’observation nationale fait la moyenne de situations locales extrêmement contrastées et ne constitue donc pas un outil suffisant à la description du réel. Différents niveaux de réalité peuvent coexister de manière contradictoire. Il est possible que des situations locales évoluent mal sans que les données nationales n’en rendent compte, au moins pendant un certain temps. (…) Aujourd’hui, la catégorie des immigrés est entrée dans les mœurs statistiques françaises et l’Insee a introduit le pays de naissance et la nationalité de naissance des parents dans la plupart de ses grandes enquêtes. Le dernier pas à franchir est l’introduction de ces données dans les enquêtes annuelles de recensement. (…) j’ai pu montrer que l’importance accordée à la religion était plus grande chez les jeunes adultes musulmans que chez les plus vieux, alors qu’on observait le phénomène inverse chez les catholiques. Classer n’implique aucune fixité de comportement dans le temps. Classer, c’est ce que fait la statistique tout le temps. Je ne vois pas pourquoi les variables culturelles et religieuses seraient écartées d’emblée avant d’avoir été étudiées. L’introduction de la religion dans l’enquête « Trajectoires et origines » de 2008, ce qui n’avait pas été possible en 1992, nous a appris beaucoup de choses. Il a ainsi été possible d’estimer le nombre de musulmans, et pour un démographe, les nombres comptent, d’estimer leur potentiel démographique et d’analyser l’évolution de leur rapport à la religion selon l’âge, notamment à travers une transmission croissante de l’islam. (…) après le cycle migratoire des Trente Glorieuses, la France a connu vingt-cinq ans de « plat » migratoire, avec une proportion d’immigrés n’évoluant pas et une population immigrée qui augmentait au rythme de la population native. (…) Ensuite nous sommes passés à un nouveau cycle. Le cycle migratoire des années 2000, équivalent en intensité de celui des Trente Glorieuses, a offert des opportunités nouvelles au FN. Loin de les contester, Marine Le Pen utilise d’ailleurs volontiers les chiffres donnés par le ministère de l’Intérieur sur l’immigration étrangère. Mais je crois que le diagnostic du FN sur l’impuissance politique est juste. La France n’a pas vraiment la maîtrise de la politique migratoire, qui est une compétence partagée avec l’UE et la Commission européenne est favorable à une politique migratoire très généreuse compte tenu de ses anticipations démographiques. Michèle Tribalat
My name is Jamaal; I’m white. Growing up I never thought twice about my name (of course I was next door to a commune, hanging out with Orly, Oshia, Lark Song, River Rocks, Sky Blue, and more than one Rainbow). (…) Halfway through my first year teaching, the principal who had hired me confided that I was lucky to have gotten the job. (…)  They had not been planning to take another student-teacher when my application showed up.  But, in his words, as they scanned through it and saw a Jamaal who plays basketball and counts Muhammad Ali among his heroes he thought, we could use a little diversity. Jaamal Allan
Nous sommes à un tournant identitaire car nous sommes devenus minoritaires, nous, les Guyanais. En fait, nous payons aujourd’hui les plans de peuplement lancés dans les années 1970 pour noyer les mouvements indépendantistes d’alors et sécuriser le centre spatial. Jacques Chirac, le ministre de l’Agriculture de l’époque, a joué les apprentis sorciers.explique Christiane Taubira (députée PRG de Guyane, 2005)
Nous sommes à un tournant identitaire. Les Guyanais de souche sont devenus minoritaires sur leur propre terre. Christiane Taubira (2007)
Ce qu’il a fait est un crime contre la République ! Il y a une procédure judiciaire qui suivra son cheminement. Le destituer est possible dans la loi, c’est une décision qui peut être prise mais ce n’est pas à moi qu’il appartient de la prendre. Christiane Taubira (sur Robert Ménard, 2015)
Lorsque l’on passe son temps à créer de la haine dans une société, on ne peut pas être républicain ! (…) Ce qu’il faut retenir, c’est que ce sont des gens qui ne sont pas républicains et ne conçoivent pas que l’on fasse société en étant différent ce sont des gens qui passent leur temps à regarder la société en la fragmentant et en cherchant un bouc-émissaire, un ennemi intérieur, quelqu’un sur qui concentrer la haine. (…) Lorsque l’on passe son temps à créer de la haine dans une société, on ne peut pas être républicain ! Christiane Taubira (sur la famille Le  Pen, 2015)
« Il faut relancer le débat sur les statistiques ethniques et je présenterai un projet de loi en ce sens à l’Assemblée nationale en début d’année prochaine  (…) pour certains, les statistiques ethniques mettraient en cause les valeurs de la République, alors qu’au contraire, c’est l’absence de mesures concrètes qui est à craindre… Manuel Valls (2009)
Belle image de la ville d’Evry… Tu me mets quelques Blancs, quelques Whites, quelques Blancos… Manuel Valls (Evry, 06.06.09)
Evidemment avec les stands qu’il y avait là, le sentiment que la ville, tout à coup, ça n’est que cela, (…) ça n’est que cette brocante, alors que j’ai l’idée au fond d’une diversité, d’un mélange, qui ne peut pas être uniquement le ghetto. On peut le dire, ça ? (…) On a besoin d’un mélange. Ce qui a tué une partie de la République, c’est évidemment la ghettoïsation, la ségrégation territoriale, sociale, ethnique, qui sont une réalité. Un véritable apartheid s’est construit, que les gens bien-pensants voient de temps en temps leur éclater à la figure, comme ça a été le cas en 2005, à l’occasion des émeutes de banlieues. Manuel Valls (Direct 8)
Je l’assume totalement. Je veux lutter contre le ghetto. C’est quoi le ghetto? On met les gens les plus pauvres, souvent issus de l’immigration – et pas seulement – dans les mêmes villes, dans les mêmes quartiers, dans les mêmes cages d’escalier, dans les mêmes écoles. (…) Je l’assume parce que je suis républicain et que je lutte contre tous les communautarismes. (…) Ca arrange beaucoup de gens qu’il y ait des ghettos (…) moi, je veux les casser, c’est ça l’émancipation de ces quartiers qui méritent de représenter demain l’avenir de ce pays. Manuel Valls
Honte au Maire de Béziers. La République ne fait AUCUNE distinction parmi ses enfants. Manuel Valls (05.05.15)
Le fichage d’élèves dans les écoles est contraire à toutes les valeurs de la République. Il y a des principes dans la République et quand ils sont gravement atteints, les tribunaux en sont saisis et des sanctions seront prononcées par les juges compétents. François Hollande (Ryad, 05.05.15)
On a besoin de savoir quelle est la réalité pour que les choses puissent changer. Patrick Lozès (Cran)
 Il y a 64,6 % d’enfants de confession musulmane à Béziers. (…) Ce sont les chiffres de ma mairie. Pardon de vous dire que le maire a les noms, classe par classe, des enfants. Je sais que je n’ai pas le droit mais on le fait. » Il précise même : « Les prénoms disent les confessions. Dire l’inverse, c’est nier une évidence. Robert Ménard
Il y a tout un tas de pays où il y a de statistiques ethniques et ils ne sont pas moins démocratiques, pas moins républicains que les autres ! Robert Ménard
Ils sont où les enfants de nos ministres ? Dans quelle écoles ? Robert Ménard
En un mot, la gauche, elle n’a pas de leçons à nous donner et à me donner. Je voudrais juste rappeler. Quand Manuel Valls en 2008 [2009 en fait, ndlr] se plaint qu’il y a trop de noirs et d’arabes sur les marchés de sa ville et qu’il demande à un membre de son cabinet, je le cite : ‘tu me mets quelques blancs, quelques white, quelques blancos’. Qui tient ces propos ? C’est Manuel Valls. Quand Martine Aubry affirme, c’était en 2012, qu’il y a 35% de Maghrébins à Lille et que c’est génial, elle le sait  comment ? Au faciès ? Quand Jack Lang écrit en 2014 l’an dernier au premier ministre  pour liui dire que les deux tiers des prisonniers en France sont des musulmans. Il le sait comment ? Par l’opération du Siant-Esprit ?  Robert Ménard
La mairie de Béziers ne constitue pas et n’a jamais constitué de fichiers des enfants scolarisés dans les écoles publiques de la ville. Le voudrait-elle qu’elle n’en a d’ailleurs pas les moyens. Il ne peut donc exister aucun « fichage » des enfants, musulmans ou non. Le seul fichier existant à notre connaissance recensant les élèves des écoles publiques de la ville est celui de l’Éducation nationale. C’est donc à elle, et elle seule, de rendre publique cette liste. Elle ne le fera certainement pas au prétexte de motifs juridiques. Mairie de Béziers
Une telle initiative n’est pas anodine de la part de Robert Ménard. Elle se rajoute à la longue liste des polémiques qui marquent son mandat à la mairie de Béziers, depuis son élection en 2014. D’abord, c’est l’interdiction d’étendre du linge aux fenêtres donnant sur les rues du centre-ville en journée, puis l’établissement d’un couvre-feu pour les mineurs de moins de 13 ans dans certains quartiers, la suppression de l’accueil matinal des enfants de chômeurs, l’inauguration d’une crèche dans sa mairie, la publicité sur l’armement de ses policiers, la commande d’un livre sur Béziers à l’écrivain Renaud Camus, chantre de la théorie du « grand remplacement » et héraut des identitaires ou le changement d’un nom de rue pour effacer le souvenir de la guerre d’Algérie. Le Monde
La classe politique s’indigne contre Robert Ménard à cause du fichage ethnique des écoliers auquel il aurait procédé – il dément l’avoir fait – à Béziers dont le parquet a naturellement ouvert une enquête. Mais cette classe politique, gauche et droite confondues, si prompte à s’émouvoir, peut-elle se dire si remarquable? Que va-t-elle devenir quand elle n’aura plus sous l’opprobre le FN tel qu’elle l’a toujours obscurément désiré, formellement républicain mais avec des relents racistes et antisémites et des nostalgies historiques nauséabondes comme dirait le Premier ministre qui place cet adjectif partout, croyant qu’il est une argumentation à lui seul? Comme on le sent, son malaise, devant les péripéties mélodramatiques qui se déroulent au FN depuis plusieurs jours et dont elle ne sait si elle doit s’en réjouir ou les déplorer! S’en réjouir, parce que la victoire de la fille sur le père pourrait affaiblir ce parti? Les déplorer, parce que débarrassé des provocations lassantes du père, la fille pourrait enfin changer le nom du parti et conduire celui-ci sur une voie qui contraindrait ses adversaires à faire preuve d’intelligence politique et non plus seulement d’une réprobation morale souvent hypocrite? (…) Il n’y a que des imbéciles – et malheureusement Rama Yade a démontré qu’elle en était une en tournant en dérision les affrontements aussi bien familiaux que stratégiques entre Jean-Marie Le Pen et Marine Le Pen – pour ne pas percevoir l’importance de la «déchirure» qui, risquant de modifier le FN, va sans doute faire bouger les lignes autour de lui. (…) Aujourd’hui, à cause de la pauvreté de la réplique antagoniste – UMP et PS -, un grand nombre de Français, lassés par l’offre politique classique, se sentent l’envie d’essayer le FN sur la palette large qui est mise à leur disposition et qui pour l’essentiel les a déçus. (…) Il faudra considérer cependant, une fois pour toutes, que le père et la fille ont des personnalités différentes, que lui voulait provoquer et qu’elle souhaite conquérir. Que le FN sans lui ne sera pas le même que le FN sous l’emprise enfin totalement libre de sa fille. Que ce ne sera pas seulement la façade qui sera changée mais la substance et qu’avec elle on passera d’un populisme vulgaire à un projet politique, aussi discutable qu’il soit. Contre elle, la bouche en cœur et le cœur à la bouche ne suffiront plus. On ne peut pas, par ailleurs, avoir à juste titre dénoncé les saillies historiquement partiales et extrémistes du père et continuer à tenir pour rien l’adhésion de la fille au corpus honorable de la vérité sur les monstruosités historiques. Si elle a attendu longtemps pour tirer les conséquences qui convenaient, il n’est pas absurde de concevoir que longtemps dans sa tête et sa sensibilité, la fille a plus pesé que la responsable du FN, l’affection que le réalisme. Il me semble toutefois que deux écueils de taille vont devoir être surmontés et des choix clairs opérés. Le fourre-tout idéologique qui mêle, dans un vaste vivier, une vision et un programme de fermeté et d’autorité en matière de sécurité et de justice – c’est sa droite – à une conception économique, financière et européenne atypique, par certains côtés plus «mélenchonienne» que le modèle -c’est sa gauche, voire son extrême gauche – contraindra un jour ou l’autre le FN à déchirer le voile et à sortir de l’ambiguïté. Ce qui est bon pour une conquête, pour une candidate ne le sera évidemment pas si les portes du pouvoir semblent accessibles. Il y aura à arbitrer et à choisir l’ordre prioritaire dans ce désordre et la tonalité dominante dans cet entrelacs qui aujourd’hui attrape tout mais demain fera peur par son incohérence. (…) Il est manifeste qu’une fois les soubresauts, polémiques, aigreurs et désaveux dépassés, le FN se renforcera grâce à Marine Le Pen et si en face on n’a pas compris que l’adversaire ayant changé, il convenait aussi de substituer à l’éthique indignée et vaine un affrontement politique et de permettre au pays de respirer autrement que par le seul recours, pour l’avenir, à l’espoir que le FN représenterait. Toutes les autres espérances ayant été saccagées par le réel, la violation des engagements et l’amateurisme. Philippe Bilger
Le fait, hors les cas prévus par la loi, de mettre ou de conserver en mémoire informatisée, sans le consentement exprès de l’intéressé, des données à caractère personnel qui, directement ou indirectement, font apparaître les origines raciales ou ethniques, les opinions politiques, philosophiques ou religieuses, ou les appartenances syndicales des personnes, ou qui sont relatives à la santé ou à l’orientation ou identité sexuelle de celles-ci, est puni de cinq ans d’emprisonnement et de 300 000 euros d’amende. Est puni des mêmes peines le fait, hors les cas prévus par la loi, de mettre ou de conserver en mémoire informatisée des données à caractère personnel concernant des infractions, des condamnations ou des mesures de sûreté. Code pénal (Article 226-19, modifié par LOI n°2012-954 du 6 août 2012 – art. 4)
Les discriminations sont encore plus dommageables quand elles sont implicites. Esther Dufilo
Il serait ironique que des associations qui ont pour objectif de défendre les droits et les libertés cherchent à imposer une censure préalable de la recherche. Il est toujours dangereux que des acteurs politiques prétendent dire quelle est la «bonne» science ! Remplacer l’enquête, comme le suggère la pétition, par du «testing» à grande échelle n’a pas de sens. Le testing a toute son utilité pour révéler des pratiques discriminatoires ouvertes. Il ne permet pas de reconstruire et comparer des trajectoires socioprofessionnelles, d’aller à la racine des inégalités et de repérer leur imposition, fût-elle involontaire. Du reste, en choisissant de présenter des candidats «noirs», «arabes» ou «maghrébins» et «français blancs», le testing manipule les catégories par lesquelles se construisent les discriminations. Collectif de chercheurs français et étrangers
En France, on ne devrait pas pouvoir à la fois se vanter d’avoir réussi à faire barrage aux statistiques ethnoraciales et espérer connaître la situation des Noirs. Pourtant, manifestement, dans ce pays, on sait sans avoir besoin de compter. Michèle Tribalat
Chaque fois que l’on construit des catégories statistiques, il y a un débat. L’histoire des catégories socioprofessionnelles en France le montre. Quand on a créé la catégorie «cadre», la catégorie «ouvriers», les marxistes ont dit «cela ne reflète pas les vrais rapports d’exploitation entre la bourgeoisie et le prolétariat».Aujourd’hui, on connaît les Français par acquisition, par le lieu de naissance des parents et des grands-parents, mais il y a des catégories de personnes qui sont de longue date en France et qui échappent à cette statistique. Utiliser des catégories plus fines permettrait d’avoir un reflet assez fidèle de la population française.(…) Le prénom ou le patronyme d’un individu …C’est un moyen détourné qui tient plutôt du bricolage et qui ne vaut que dans la mesure où d’autres indicateurs plus directs ne sont pas disponibles.Si vous cherchez à mesurer les discriminations dans une entreprise, vous allez constituer un échantillon sur la base des prénoms. Vous retiendrez des personnes certainement susceptibles d’être discriminées parce qu’elles s’appellent Mohamed ou Fatoumata. Mais vous passerez à côté d’un Patrick pourtant noir car antillais ou d’origine africaine. (…)  L’une des solutions est de passer par l’autodéfinition. Votre père est asiatique, votre mère noire, mais comment vous définissez-vous ? Georges Felouzis (Bordeaux-II)
Selon le rapport confidentiel que s’est procuré le Figaro, quelque 300 000 Africains pénètreraient chaque année clandestinement dans l’Union européenne. 80% d’entre eux utiliseraient les services d’organisations de trafiquants, dont les revenus pour ce type d’activité sont estimés à 300 millions de dollars, soit 237 millions d’euros, par an. (…) «Les groupes criminels d’Afrique de l’Ouest, en majorité nigérians, sont souvent décrits comme des réseaux, précise le rapport, les experts de chaque zone pouvant être associés rapidement à d’autres de manière transversale. [Une telle] flexibilité rend ces groupes extrêmement résistants à l’action des forces de l’ordre : il est virtuellement impossible de décapiter une organisation criminelle en Afrique, parce que sa structure est essentiellement horizontale. Le système du «havalah» est très fréquemment employé : ce mode traditionnel de transfert de fonds dans le monde arabe, qui se pratique par le biais d’intermédiaires et sans aucune trace écrite, permet notamment aux groupes criminels de racketter facilement les familles d’immigrants, en exigeant d’elles des sommes supplémentaires ou des recouvrements d’avances de paiement. Rapport ONUDC (2006)
Un chiffre étonnamment stable: contrairement à ce que l’on croit souvent, la proportion d’immigrés ne varie guère depuis le début des années 1980. Le Monde
Cet article du 4 décembre montre que les bons sentiments et la volonté pédagogique de redresser l’opinion publique qui pense mal conduisent à des catastrophes. Ils conduisent à piétiner la déontologie minimale de tout journaliste qui se respecte dont le devoir est d’informer et non de consoler ou de rassurer. Le Monde vient de faire la démonstration que les chiffres peuvent être manipulés et, à l’opposé de ses intentions sans doute, conforte ainsi ceux qui pensent que les médias ne disent pas la vérité sur la question de l’immigration. Michèle Tribalat
On a voulu rester sobre pour ne pas choquer les sensibilités de l’Insee, pour que ce soit publiable par eux mais ils ont pas envie de le traiter. Toute nouvelle avec des infos de type forte concentration au delà de ce qu’on aurait pu imaginer, l’Insee préfère ne pas informer plutôt que de risquer de publier une nouvelle sensible. Par peur de réveiller le racisme en France. Michèle Tribalat
Just under a year ago, France’s Marine Le Pen told TIME her far-right National Front Party would be in power within a decade. That’s a nightmarish prospect for millions who regard her France-for-the-French message as mere jingoism—and it seemed like a stretch. Her prediction, however, no longer seems preposterous. Le Pen has spun gold from voter exasperation, mixing charm and ambition to rack up wins in European Parliament and local elections with an anti-Europe, anti-immigration campaign. That’s made her Europe’s leading right-winger, giving like-minded politicians across the continent a dose of electability. And this month she finally split from her father, National Front founder Jean-Marie Le Pen, over his noxious anti-Semitism. Le Pen has strong allure for many French, who have hit the wall with asphyxiating political elitism and near zero growth. To stop her race for the Élysée Palace in its tracks, France’s lackluster leaders will need to overhaul their ineffectual, gutless style and mount a more appealing revolution of their own. Vivienne Walt (Marine Le Pen, France’s nationalist force, The 100 most influential people, Time, April 16, 2015)
Lorsqu’il s’agit de fichiers nominatifs, la crainte est de voir se constituer un « fichage ethnique » potentiellement dangereux si, par exemple, arrivait au pouvoir un gouvernement raciste qui