Affaire David Hamilton: It’s no rock ‘n’ roll show (Looking back at the dark side of rock music’s magnetism)

https://ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2013-10/enhanced/webdr05/4/17/anigif_enhanced-buzz-25891-1380922620-10.gifreal-lolitalolitapenguiniggy-popmaddoxpagesable_starrrolling-stone-magazine-february-15-1969-groupies-beatles-fillmore-east_22893650starmagstar-magstarrollsgirls groupiescreemhollywoodgirlstylerpamelatdriver

lolita-1997bilitishttp://top50-blogconnexion.blogspot.com/1985/10/Charlotte-Serge-Gainsbourg-Lemon-Incest.html
prettybaby manhattanfilm cobra-verdethe-lover-film-advert-poster-ephemera-1992
jeunejolie
la_vie_d_adele

Si quelqu’un scandalisait un de ces petits qui croient en moi, il vaudrait mieux pour lui qu’on suspendît à son cou une meule de moulin et qu’on le jetât au fond de la mer. Jésus (Matthieu 18: 6)
Il faut peut-être entendre par démocratie les vices de quelques-uns à la portée du plus grand nombre. Henry Becque
Il nous arriverait, si nous savions mieux analyser nos amours, de voir que souvent les femmes ne nous plaisent qu’à cause du contrepoids d’hommes à qui nous avons à les disputer (…) ce contrepoids supprimé, le charme de la femme tombe. Proust
There’s only three of us in this business. Nabokov penned it, Balthus painted it, and I photographed it. David Hamilton
Had I done to Dolly, perhaps, what Frank Lasalle, a fifty-year-old mechanic, had done to eleven-year-old Sally Horner in 1948? Vladimir Nabokov
I found myself maturing amid a civilization which allows a man of twentyfive to court a girl of sixteen but not a girl of twelve. Humbert Humbert (Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov, 1955)
Ici, on vous met en prison si vous couchez avec une fille de 12 ans alors qu’en Orient, on vous marie avec une gamine de 11 ans. C’est incompréhensible! Klaus Kinski (1977)
Did you hear about the midnight rambler Well, honey, it’s no rock ‘n’ roll show (…) Well you heard about the Boston… It’s not one of those Well, talkin’ ’bout the midnight…sh… The one that closed the bedroom door  I’m called the hit-and-run raper in anger  The knife-sharpened tippie-toe…  Or just the shoot ’em dead, brainbell jangler  You know, the one you never seen before. Mick Jagger
Young teacher, the subject of schoolgirl fantasy She wants him so badly Knows what she wants to be Inside her there’s longing This girl’s an open page Book marking – she’s so close now This girl is half his age (…) Don’t stand so close to me (…) Strong words in the staffroom The accusations fly It’s no use, he sees her He starts to shake and cough Just like the old man in That book by Nabokov. Sting
Sweet Little Sixteen. She’s got the grown-up blues tight dresses and lipstick. She’s sportin’ high-heel shoes. Oh but tomorrow morning, she’ll have to change her trend and be sweet sixteen. And back in class again. Chuck Berry (“Sweet Little Sixteen”)
I slept with Sable when she was 13. Her parents were too rich to do anything, She rocked her way around L.A., ‘Til a New York Doll carried her away. Iggy Pop (Look away)
I can see that you’re fifteen years old No I don’t want your I.D. And I can see that you’re so far from home But it’s no hanging matter It’s no capital crime Oh yeah, you’re a strange stray cat. Mick Jagger-Keith Richards
Long ago, and, oh, so far away I fell in love with you before the second show Your guitar, it sounds so sweet and clear But you’re not really here, it’s just the radio Don’t you remember, you told me you loved me baby? You said you’d be coming back this way again baby Baby, baby, baby, baby, oh baby I love you, I really do Loneliness is such a sad affair And I can hardly wait to be with you again. Leon Russell and Bonnie Bramlet
From the window of your rented limousine, I saw your pretty blue eyes One day soon you’re gonna reach sixteen, Painted lady in the city of lies. (…) Lips like cherries and the brow of a queen, Come on, flash it in my eyes Said you dug me since you were thirteen, then you giggle as you heave and sigh. Robert Plant-Jimmy Page (Sick again, Led Zeppelin)
It’s a shame to see these young chicks bungle their lives away in a flurry and rush to compete with what was in the old days the goodtime relationships we had with the GTOs and people like that. When it came to looning, they could give us as much of a looning as we could give them. It’s a shame, really. If you listen to ‘Sick Again,’ a track from Physical Graffiti, the words show I feel a bit sorry for them. ‘Clutching pages from your teenage dream in the lobby of the Hotel Paradise/Through the circus of the L.A. queen how fast you learn the downhill slide.’ One minute she’s 12 and the next minute she’s 13 and over the top. Such a shame. They haven’t got the style that they had in the old days… way back in ’68. Robert Plant
Tomorrow brings another town, another girl like you. Have you time before you leave to greet another man. Richard Wright
Yeah! You’re a star fucker (…) Yeah, I heard about your Polaroids Now that’s what I call obscene Your tricks with fruit was kind a cute I bet you keep your pussy clean (…) Yeah, Ali McGraw got mad with you For givin’ head to Steve McQueen, Yeah, and me we made a pretty pair Fallin’ through the Silver Screen Yeah, I’m makin’ bets that you gonna get John Wayne before he dies. Mick Jagger
People always give me this bit about us being a macho band, and I always ask them to give me examples. « Under My Thumb »… Yes, but they always say Starf–ker, and that just happened to be about someone I knew. There’s really no reason to have women on tour, unless they’ve got a job to do. The only other reason is to f–k. Otherwise they get bored, they just sit around and moan. It would be different if they did everything for you, like answer the phones, make the breakfast, look after your clothes and your packing, see if the car was ready, and f–k. Sort of a combination of what (road manager) Alan Dunn does and a beautiful chick. Mick Jagger
Some girls take my money Some girls take my clothes Some girls get the shirt off my back And leave me with a lethal dose French girls they want Cartier Italian girls want cars American girls want everything in the world You can possibly imagine English girls they’re so prissy I can’t stand them on the telephone Sometimes I take the receiver off the hook I don’t want them to ever call at all White girls they’re pretty funny Sometimes they drive me mad Black girls just wanna get fucked all night I just don’t have that much jam Chinese girls are so gentle They’re really such a tease You never know quite what they’re cookin’ Inside those silky sleeves  (…) Some girls they’re so pure Some girls so corrupt Some girls give me children I only made love to her once Give me half your money Give me half your car Give me half of everything I’ll make you world’s biggest star So gimme all your money Give me all your gold Let’s go back to Zuma beach I’ll give you half of everything I own. Mick Jagger
Goodbye Ruby Tuesday Who could hang a name on you? When you change with every new day Still I’m gonna miss you. Brian Jones
She’s my little rock ‘n’ roll My tits and ass with soul baby Keith Richards
The plaster’s gettin’ harder and my love is perfection A token of my love for her collection, her collection Plaster caster, grab a hold of me faster And if you wanna see my love, just ask her And my love is the plaster And yeah, she’s the collector. Gene Simmons
Come on, babe on the round about, ride on the merry-go-round We all know what your name is, so you better lay your money down. Led Zeppelin
Like to tell ya about my baby You know she comes around She about five feet four A-from her head to the ground Van Morrison
Well, she was standing by my dressing room after the show Asking for my autograph and asked if she could go Back to my motel room But the rest is just a tragic tale Because five short minutes of lovin’ Done brought me twenty long years in jail Well, like a fool in a hurry I took her to my room She casted me in plaster while I sang her a tune. Jim Croce
This girl is easy meat I seen her on the street See-through blouse an’ a tiny little dress Her manner indiscreet…i knew she was Easy, easy, easy meat (…) She wanna take me home Make me sweat and moan Rub my head and beat me off With a copy of rollin’ stone Frank Zappa
Hey all you girls in these Industrial towns I know you’re prob’ly gettin’ tired Of all the local clowns They never give you no respect They never treat you nice So perhaps you oughta try A little friendly advice And be a CREW SLUT Hey, you ‘ll love it Be a CREW SLUT It’s a way of life Be a CREW SLUT See the world Don’t make a fuss, just get on the bus CREW SLUT Add water, makes its own sauce Be a CREW SLUT So you don’t forget, call before midnite tonite The boys in the crew Are fust waiting for you. Frank Zappa
I was an innocent girl, but the way it happened was so beautiful. I remember him looking like God and having me over a table. Who wouldn’t want to lose their virginity to David Bowie? Lorie Maddox
It’s not about being physically mature. It’s emotional maturity that matters. I don’t think most 16-year-olds are ready. I think the age of consent should be raised to 18 at a minimum, and some girls aren’t even ready then. I know, I know. People will find that odd, coming from me. But I think I do know what I’m talking about here. You are still a child, even at 16. You can never get that part of your life, your childhood, back. I never could. Mandy Smith
Sable Starr (born Sable Hay Shields; August 15, 1957 – April 18, 2009) was a noted American groupie, often described as the « queen of the groupie scene » in Los Angeles during the early 1970s. She admitted during an interview published in the June 1973 edition of Star Magazine that she was closely acquainted with Iggy Pop, Mick Jagger, Rod Stewart, Alice Cooper, David Bowie, and Marc Bolan. Starr first attended concerts around Los Angeles with older friends who had dropped out of school in late 1968. She lost her virginity at age 12 with Spirit guitarist Randy California after a gig at Topanga, California. She had a younger sister, Corel Shields (born 1959), who was involved with Iggy Pop at age 11, although he was also acquainted with Starr. Iggy Pop later immortalized his own involvement with Starr, in the 1996 song « Look Away » (…) Starr became one of the first « baby groupies » who in the early 1970s frequented the Rainbow Bar and Grill, the Whiskey A Go Go, and Rodney Bingenheimer’s English Disco; these were trendy nightclubs on West Hollywood’s Sunset Strip. The girls were named as such because of their young age. She got started after a friend invited her to the Whiskey A Go Go at the age of 14. (…) In 1973 she gave a candid interview for the short-lived Los Angeles-based Star Magazine, and boasted to the journalist that she considered herself to be « the best » of all the local groupies. She also claimed that she was closely acquainted with some of rock music’s leading musicians such as Jeff Beck, David Bowie, Mick Jagger, Rod Stewart, Marc Bolan, and Alice Cooper, adding that her favorite rock star acquaintance was Led Zeppelin’s lead singer, Robert Plant. When asked how she attracted the attention of the musicians, she maintained it was because of the outrageous glam rock clothing she habitually wore. She was often photographed alongside well-known rock musicians; these photos appeared in American rock magazines such as Creem and Rock Scene. (…) She ran away from home when she was 16 after meeting Johnny Thunders, guitarist in the glam rock band the New York Dolls. Wikipedia
Pamela Des Barres, connue comme groupie des groupes rock dans les années 1960 et 1970, est une femme de lettres, née Pamela Ann Miller à Reseda, Californie le 9 septembre 1948. (…) Lorsqu’elle était encore enfant, elle idolâtrait les Beatles et Elvis Presley, et fantasmait à l’idée de rencontrer son Beatle favori, Paul McCartney. Un amie du secondaire a introduit Des Barres auprès de Don Van Vliet, mieux connu sous le pseudonyme de Captain Beefheart, un musicien et ami de Frank Zappa. Vliet l’a, à son tour, introduite auprès de Charlie Watts et Bill Wyman des Rolling Stones, qui l’ont conduite à la scène rock au Sunset Strip de Los Angeles. Pamela a donc ensuite commencé à passer son temps avec The Byrds et quelques autres groupes. Quand elle est diplômée du secondaire, en 1966, elle multiplie les petits boulots qui lui permettent d’habiter près du Sunset Strip et d’entretenir plus de relations avec des musiciens rock : Nick St. Nicholas, Mick Jagger, Keith Moon, Jim Morrison, Jimmy Page, Chris Hillman, Noel Redding, Jimi Hendrix, Ray Davies, Frank Zappa et l’acteur Don Johnson. Membre des GTO’s (Girls Together Outrageously), un groupe uniquement constitué de chanteuses, formé par Frank Zappa. Le groupe a commencé sous le nom de Laurel Canyon Ballet Company, et a commencé par des premières parties des concerts de Zappa et des Mothers of Invention. Le spectacle était principalement constitué par des « performances », mélange de musique et de paroles parlées, puisqu’aucun de ses membres ne savait chanter ou jouer correctement d’un instrument. Elles ont sorti un album, Permanent Damage en 1969, couvertes par Zappa et Jeff Beck. Le groupe a été dissous par Zappa un mois après le lancement de l’album parce que quelques-uns de ses membres avaient été arrêtés pour possession de drogue. Elle se marie avec Michael Des Barres, chanteur principal de Power Station et de Detective, le 29 octobre 1977. Ils ont un enfant, Nicholas Dean Des Barres, né le 30 septembre 1978. Le couple divorce en 1991, en raison des infidélités répétées de Michael Des Barres. Des Barres a écrit deux livres à propos de son expérience de groupie : I’m With The Band (1987) (publié en Allemagne sous le titre anglophone Light my fire) et Take Another Little Piece of My Heart: A Groupie Grows Up (1993), ainsi qu’un autre livre, Rock Bottom: Dark Moments in Music Babylon.Wikipedia
Annie aime les sucettes Les sucett’s à l’anis Les sucett’s à l’anis D’Annie Donn’nt à ses baisers Un goût ani-Sé lorsque le sucre d’orge Parfumé à l’anis Coule dans la gorge d’Annie Elle est au paradis Pour quelques pennies Annie A ses sucettes à L’anis Ell’s ont la couleur de ses grands yeux La couleur des jours heureux … Serge Gainsbourg (Les Sucettes, 1966)
Les Sucettes est une chanson écrite par Serge Gainsbourg pour France Gall en 1966. Cette chanson est principalement connue pour ses deux niveaux de lecture : l’un décrit la scène innocente d’une fillette, Annie, friande de sucettes qu’elle va acheter au drugstore, l’autre décrit implicitement d’une fellation. Wikipedia
Je n’en compre­nais pas le sens et je peux vous certi­fier qu’à l’époque personne ne compre­nait le double sens. (…) Avant chaque disque (…), Serge me deman­dait de lui racon­ter ma vie (…) ce que vous avez fait pendant les vacances. Alors, je lui ai dit que j’avais été à Noir­mou­tier chez mes parents. Là-bas, il n’y a pas grand-chose à faire, sauf que, tous les jours, j’al­lais m’ache­ter une sucette à l’anis…(….) Et quand il a écrit la petite chan­son, je me voyais aller ache­ter ma sucette. C’était l’his­toire d’une petite fille qui allait ache­ter ses sucettes à l’anis, et quand elle n’en avait plus, elle allait retourner en acheter… Mais en même temps, je sentais que ce n’était pas clair… C’était Gainsbourg quand même !  (…) Mais (…) il me l’a jouée au piano, comme ça, et je l’ai tout de suite trou­vée très jolie, je lui ai dit : Serge, j’adore ta chanson !  (…) Et puis, je pars au Japon et là j’apprends qu’il y a tout un truc là-dessus, c’était horrible. (…) Ça a changé mon rapport aux garçons. (…) Ça m’a humiliée, en fait. France Gall
La mort a pour moi le visage d’une enfant Au regard transparent Son corps habile au raffinement de l’amour Me prendra pour toujours Elle m’appelle par mon nom Quand soudain je perds la raison Est-ce un maléfice Ou l’effet subtil du cannabis? (…) La mort ouvrant sous moi ses jambes et ses bras S’est refermée sur moi Son corps m’arrache enfin les râles du plaisir Et mon dernier soupir. Serge Gainsbourg (Cannabis, 1970)
Avoir pour premier grand amour un tel homme fait que le retour à la réalité est terrible. A seize ans je découvrais des sommets et ne pouvais ensuite que tomber de ce piédestal. Constance Meyer
Pendant les cinq dernières années de sa vie, de 1985 à 1991, Serge Gains­bourg a fréquenté une jeune femme alors qu’il vivait avec Bambou. Elle s’ap­pelle Cons­tance Meyer, avait à l’époque 16 ans, soit quarante-et-un de moins que le chan­teur, et raconte tout dans un livre qui paraît demain, La Jeune Fille Et Gains­bourg, aux éditions de L’Ar­chi­pel.En 1985, cette fan de l’homme à la tête de chou se pointe comme de nombreux, et surtout nombreuses, fans au domi­cile du chan­teur pour y dépo­ser une lettre accom­pa­gnée de son numéro de télé­phone. Visi­ble­ment touché, Gains­bourg appelle la jeune fille et l’in­vite à dîner. Suivront cinq années d’une histoire d’amour qui durera presque jusqu’au décès de l’ar­tiste en 1991. Cons­tance Meyer précise que Bambou, qui parta­geait la vie de Gains­bourg à l’époque, était au courant de la situa­tion et s’en accom­mo­dait : à elle les week-ends, à Cons­tance le reste de la semaine. Gala (2010)
The suggestion that I’d slept with Tony Leung on set was a disgusting allegation. Jean-Jacques Annaud had a lot to do with that – he was trying to promote the film. Now, I would handle things very differently, but back then – when I was in the middle of it, and a kid, really – it was very, very hard. I felt exploited by him. He never dispelled the rumours. He would walk into a room and be ambiguous, which ignited the fire. Everywhere I went in the world, the rumour followed me. Jane March
L’Indochine, dans les années 1930. Une Française de 15 ans et demi vit avec sa mère, une institutrice besogneuse, et ses deux frères, pour lesquels elle éprouve un étrange mélange de tendresse et de mépris. Sur le bac qui la conduit vers Saïgon et son pensionnat, elle fait la connaissance d’un élégant Chinois au physique de jeune premier. L’homme a l’air sensible à son charme et le lui fait courtoisement savoir. Elle accepte de le revoir régulièrement. Dans sa garçonnière, elle découvre le vertige des sens. Il est follement épris, elle prétend n’en vouloir qu’à son argent. La mère de la jeune fille tolère tant bien que mal cette liaison… Télérama
She was only 18 when she made the movie, after being spotted by Annaud on the cover of Just Seventeen. He said he was captivated by ‘this little girl with a faintly bored air and the look of revolt in her eyes’. It was a look he set out to exploit. Within days of the film’s release in 1992, rumours abounded that Jane had actually made love on the set with her co-star Tony Leung during steamy scenes. To add fuel to the fire, Annaud suggested that his young star had been a virgin, but had gained experience before filming began. Jane was pursued on a worldwide promotional tour by the question: ‘Did she or didn’t she?’ Annaud did absolutely nothing to put an end to the speculation and Jane was dubbed ‘the Sinner from Pinner’, after the rather dreary London suburb in which she grew up. Meanwhile, those who had known her in Pinner became rich on stories sold to tabloid newspapers and Annaud grew in stature on the back of Jane’s ignominy, which generated huge publicity for the film. Jane says she felt violated, prostituted and abandoned by Annaud. She sobbed herself into a nervous breakdown and couldn’t bring herself to speak to the director for ten years. The Daily Mail
The elements in the story are the basic stuff of common erotic fantasies: Sex between strangers separated by age, race and social convention, and conducted as a physical exercise without much personal communication. (…) Jean-Jacques Annaud’s film treats them in much the same spirit as « Emmanuelle » or the Playboy and Penthouse erotic videos, in which beautiful actors and elegant photography provide a soft-core sensuality. As an entry in that genre, « The Lover » is more than capable, and the movie is likely to have a long life on video as the sort of sexy entertainment that arouses but does not embarrass. (…) Annaud and his collaborators have got all of the physical details just right, but there is a failure of the imagination here; we do not sense the presence of real people behind the attractive facades of the two main actors. (…) Like classic pornography, it can isolate them in a room, in a bed: They are bodies that have come together for our reveries. Roger Ebert
Smooth, hard and satiny-brown, the two bodies mesh with color-coordinated seamlessness, like a pants-shirt combo purchased at the Gap. The camera looks on from a respectful middle distance, lingering with discreet languor over the puddingy smoothness of breasts, buttocks, and bellies, the whole scene bathed in a late-afternoon haze of sunlight and shadow. Sex! Passion! Voluptuous calendar-art photography! It’s time, once again, for the highfalutin cinema tease — for one of those slow-moving European-flavored specials that promise to be not merely sexy but ”erotic,” that keep trying to turn us on (but tastefully, so tastefully), that feature two beautiful and inexpressive actors doing their best to look tortured, romantic, obsessed. (…) The Lover isn’t exactly Emmanuelle — the characters do appear to be awake when they’re coupling — yet it’s one more movie that titillates us with the prospect of taking sex seriously and then dampens our interest by taking it too seriously. Why do so many filmmakers insist on staging erotic encounters as if they were some sort of hushed religious ritual? The answer, of course, is that they’re trying to dignify sex. But sex isn’t dignified — it’s messy and playful and abandoned. In The Lover, director Jean-Jacques Annaud gives us the sweating and writhing without the spontaneity and surprise. (…) In The Lover, these two are meant to be burning their way through a thicket of taboos. Yet as characters, they’re so thinly drawn that it’s hard to see anything forbidden in what they’re doing. We’re just watching two perfect bodies intertwine in solemn, Calvin Klein rapture (which, admittedly, has its charm). Owen Gleiberman
Sur un sujet dérangeant – la prostitution d’une lycéenne des beaux quartiers –, le réalisateur signe un film élégant qui s’appuie sur le talent de Marine Vacth. La Croix (2013)
François Ozon’s new film is a luxurious fantasy of a young girl’s flowering: a very French and very male fantasy, like the pilot episode of the world’s classiest soap opera. There’s some softcore eroticism and an entirely, if enjoyably, absurd final scene with Charlotte Rampling, whose cameo lends a grandmotherly seal of approval to the drama’s sexual adventure. The Guardian
Palme d’Or à Cannes, le cinquième film d’Abdellatif Kechiche, secoué par plusieurs polémiques, évoque le devenir de deux jeunes femmes traversées par une passion amoureuse. (…) Au début du récit, Emma est étudiante aux Beaux-Arts, désireuse de s’inventer un avenir d’artiste-peintre ; Adèle, lycéenne, se rêve institutrice. L’une a les cheveux bleus, de l’assurance, de l’ambition et assume son orientation sexuelle. L’autre, plus jeune, plus terrienne, moins égocentrée, se découvre, reçoit de plein fouet cette passion « hors norme » qui la plonge dans un indicible trouble, au milieu de ses amis comme de sa famille.  La quête de jouissance qui accompagne cette relation donne lieu à deux longues scènes particulièrement explicites qui, elles aussi, ont suscité et susciteront la discussion. On peut les trouver crues, extrêmement appuyées, choquantes (le film, en salles, est interdit aux moins de 12 ans). Il en va ainsi du cinéma – aussi intransigeant que dérangeant – d’Abdellatif Kechiche, expérience émotionnelle, sensorielle, travail d’imprégnation progressive du spectateur, plutôt que de suggestion ou de démonstration. La Croix (2013)
Quand on a vu le film mercredi en public, quand on a découvert les scènes de sexe sur grand écran, on a été… choquées. On les a pourtant tournées. Mais, j’avoue, c’était gênant. (…) [Les conditions de tournage] C’était horrible. Léa Seydoux
C’était… bestial ! Il y a un truc électrique, un abandon… c’est chaud franchement ! (…) Je ne savais pas que la scène de cul allait durer 7 minutes, qu’il n’y aurait pas de musique. Là, il n’y a que nos respirations et le claquement de nos mains sur nos fesses ». (…) Il y avait parfois une sorte de manipulation, qu’il était difficile de gérer. Mais c’était une bonne expérience d’apprentissage, en tant qu’actrice. Adèle Exarchopoulos
Léa: The thing is, in France, it’s not like in the States. The director has all the power. When you’re an actor on a film in France and you sign the contract, you have to give yourself, and in a way you’re trapped.
Adèle: He warned us that we had to trust him—blind trust—and give a lot of ourselves. He was making a movie about passion, so he wanted to have sex scenes, but without choreography—more like special sex scenes. He told us he didn’t want to hide the character’s sexuality because it’s an important part of every relationship. So he asked me if I was ready to make it, and I said, “Yeah, of course!” because I’m young and pretty new to cinema. But once we were on the shoot, I realized that he really wanted us to give him everything. Most people don’t even dare to ask the things that he did, and they’re more respectful—you get reassured during sex scenes, and they’re choreographed, which desexualizes the act.
Léa: For us, it’s very embarrassing.
Adèle: At Cannes, all of our families were there in the theater so during the sex scenes I’d close my eyes. [Kechiche] told me to imagine it’s not me, but it’s me, so I’d close my eyes and imagined I was on an island far away, but I couldn’t help but listen, so I didn’t succeed in escaping. The scene is a little too long.
Léa: No, we had fake pussies that were molds of our real pussies. It was weird to have a fake mold of your pussy and then put it over your real one. We spent 10 days on just that one scene. It wasn’t like, “OK, today we’re going to shoot the sex scene!” It was 10 days.
Adèle: One day you know that you’re going to be naked all day and doing different sexual positions, and it’s hard because I’m not that familiar with lesbian sex.
Léa: The first day we shot together, I had to masturbate you, I think?
Adèle: [Laughs] After the walk-by, it’s the first scene that we really shot together, so it was, “Hello!” But after that, we made lots of different sex scenes. And he wanted the sexuality to evolve over the course of the film as well, so that she’s learning at the beginning, and then becomes more and more comfortable. It’s really a film about sexual passion—about skin, and about flesh, because Kechiche shot very close-up. You get the sense that they want to eat each other, to devour each other.
Adèle: (…) And the shoot was very long in general.
Léa: Five-and-a-half months. What was terrible on this film was that we couldn’t see the ending. It was supposed to only be two months, then three, then four, then it became five-and-a-half. By the end, we were just so tired.
Adèle: For me, I was so exhausted that I think the emotions came out more freely. And there was no makeup artist, stylist, or costume designer. After a while, you can see that their faces are started to get more marked. We shot the film chronologically, so it helped that I grew up with the experiences my character had.
Léa: It was horrible.
Adèle: In every shoot, there are things that you can’t plan for, but every genius has his own complexity. [Kechiche] is a genius, but he’s tortured. We wanted to give everything we have, but sometimes there was a kind of manipulation, which was hard to handle. But it was a good learning experience for me, as an actor.
Marlowe Stern: Would you ever work with Kechiche again?
Léa: Never.
Adèle: I don’t think so.
Adèle: Yeah, because you can see that we were really suffering. With the fight scene, it was horrible. She was hitting me so many times, and [Kechiche] was screaming, “Hit her! Hit her again!”
Léa: In America, we’d all be in jail.Adèle: (…) She was really hitting me. And once she was hitting me, there were people there screaming, “Hit her!” and she didn’t want to hit me, so she’d say sorry with her eyes and then hit me really hard.
Léa: [Kechiche] shot with three cameras, so the fight scene was a one-hour continuous take. And during the shooting, I had to push her out of a glass door and scream, “Now go away!” and [Adèle] slapped the door and cut herself and was bleeding everywhere and crying with her nose running, and then after, [Kechiche] said, “No, we’re not finished. We’re doing it again.”
Adèle: She was trying to calm me, because we shot so many intense scenes and he only kept like 10 percent of the film. It’s nothing compared to what we did. And in that scene, she tried to stop my nose from running and [Kechiche] screamed, “No! Kiss her! Lick her snot!” The Daily Beast
Nous devrions, a priori, nous réjouir (…) Hélas, et indépendamment de la qualité artistique du film, nous ne pourrons pas participer de cet enthousiasme : nos collègues ayant travaillé sur ce film nous ont rapporté des faits révoltants et inacceptables. La majorité d’entre eux, initialement motivés, à la fois par leur métier et le projet du film en sont revenus écœurés, voire déprimés. (…)  Certains ont abandonné « en cours de route », « soit parce qu’ils étaient exténués, soit qu’ils étaient poussés à bout par la production, ou usés moralement par des comportements qui dans d’autres secteurs d’activités relèveraient sans ambiguïté du harcèlement moral ». Le Spiac-CGT
On ne vient pas faire la promo à L.A quand on a un problème avec le réalisateur. Si Léa n’était pas née dans le coton, elle n’aurait jamais dit cela. Léa n’était pas capable d’entrer dans le rôle. J’ai rallongé le tournage pour elle. Léa Seydoux fait partie d’un système qui ne veut pas de moi, car je dérange. Abdellatif Kechiche
Je n’ai pas critiqué Abdel Kechiche, j’ai parlé de son approche. On ne travaillera plus ensemble. Léa Seydoux
Les cinéastes et auteurs français, européens, américains et du monde entier, tiennent à affirmer leur consternation. Il leur semble inadmissible qu’une manifestation culturelle internationale, rendant hommage à l’un des plus grands cinéastes contemporains, puisse être transformée en traquenard policier. Forts de leur extraterritorialité, les festivals de cinéma du monde entier ont toujours permis aux œuvres d’être montrées et de circuler et aux cinéastes de les présenter librement et en toute sécurité, même quand certains États voulaient s’y opposer. L’arrestation de Roman Polanski dans un pays neutre où il circulait et croyait pouvoir circuler librement jusqu’à ce jour, est une atteinte à cette tradition: elle ouvre la porte à des dérives dont nul aujourd’hui ne peut prévoir les effets. Pétition pour Romain Polanski (28.09.09)
Il m’était arrivé plusieurs fois que certains gosses ouvrent ma braguette et commencent à me chatouiller. Je réagissais de manière différente selon les circonstances, mais leur désir me posait un problème. Je leur demandais : « Pourquoi ne jouez-vous pas ensemble, pourquoi m’avez-vous choisi, moi, et pas d’autres gosses? » Mais s’ils insistaient, je les caressais quand même. Daniel Cohn-Bendit (Grand Bazar, 1975)
La profusion de jeunes garçons très attrayants et immédiatement disponibles me met dans un état de désir que je n’ai plus besoin de réfréner ou d’occulter. (…) Je n’ai pas d’autre compte à régler que d’aligner mes bahts, et je suis libre, absolument libre de jouer avec mon désir et de choisir. La morale occidentale, la culpabilité de toujours, la honte que je traîne volent en éclats ; et que le monde aille à sa perte, comme dirait l’autre. Frédéric Mitterrand (”La mauvaise vie”, 2005)
J’étais chaque fois avec des gens de mon âge ou de cinq ans de moins. (…) Que vienne me jeter la première pierre celui qui n’a pas commis ce genre d’erreur. Parmi tous les gens qui nous regardent ce soir, quel est celui qui n’aurait pas commis ce genre d’erreur au moins une seule fois ? (…) Ce n’est ni un roman, ni des Mémoires. J’ai préféré laissé les choses dans le vague. C’est un récit, mais au fond, pour moi, c’est un tract : une manière de raconter une vie qui ressemble à la mienne, mais aussi à celles de beaucoup d’autres gens. Frédéric Mitterrand
C’est pas vrai. Quand les gens disent les garçons, on imagine alors les petits garçons. Ça fait partie de ce puritanisme général qui nous envahit qui fait que l’on veut toujours noircir le tableau, ça n’a aucun rapport. (…) Evidemment, je cours le risque de ce genre d’amalgame. Je le cours d’autant plus facilement ce risque-là puisqu’il ne me concerne pas. (…) Il faudrait que les gens lisent le livre et ils se rendraient compte qu’en vérité c’est très clair. Frédéric Mitterrand (émission « Culture et dépendances », le 6 avril 2005)
J’aurai raconté des histoires avec des filles, personne n’aurait rien remarqué. Frédéric Mitterrand
En tant que ministre de la Culture, il s’illustre en prenant la défense d’un cinéaste accusé de viol sur mineure et il écrit un livre où il dit avoir profité du tourisme sexuel, je trouve ça a minima choquant (…) On ne peut pas prendre la défense d’un cinéaste violeur au motif que c’est de l’histoire ancienne et qu’il est un grand artiste et appartenir à un gouvernement impitoyable avec les Français dès lors qu’ils mordent le trait. (…) Au moment où la France s’est engagée avec la Thaïlande pour lutter contre ce fléau qu’est le tourisme sexuel, voilà un ministre du gouvernement qui explique qu’il est lui-même consommateur. Benoît Hamon (porte-parole du Parti socialiste)
On ne peut pas donner le sentiment qu’on protège les plus forts, les connus, les notables, alors qu’il y a les petits qui subissent la justice tous les jours. Ce sentiment qu’il y a deux justices est insupportable.Manuel Valls (député-maire PS)
Qu’est-ce qu’on peut dire aux délinquants sexuels quand Frédéric Mitterrand est encore ministre de la Culture? Marine Le Pen (vice-présidente du FN)
A ce propos d’ailleurs, nous n’avons rien contre les homosexuels à Rue89 mais nous aimerions savoir comment Frédéric Mitterrand a pu adopter trois enfants, alors qu’il est homosexuel et qu’il le revendique, à l’heure où l’on refuse toujours le droit d’adopter aux couples homosexuels ? Pourquoi cette différence de traitement? Rue 89
C’est une affaire très française, ou en tout cas sud-européenne, parce que dans les cultures politiques protestantes du nord, Mitterrand, âgé de 62 ans, n’aurait jamais décroché son travail. Son autobiographie sulphureuse, publiée en 2005, l’aurait rendu impensable. (…) Si un ministre confessait avoir fréquenté des prostituées par le passé, peu de gens en France s’en offusquerait. C’est la suspicion de pédophilie qui fait toute la différence. (…) Sarkozy, qui a lu livre en juin [et] l’avait trouvé  » courageux et talentueux » (…) s’est conformé à une tradition bien française selon laquelle la vie privée des personnes publiques n’est généralement pas matière à discussion. Il aurait dû se douter, compte tenu de la médiatisation de sa vie sentimentale, que cette vieille règle qui protège les élites avait volé en éclats. Charles Bremmer (The Times)
David Bowie was a musical genius. He was also involved in child sexual exploitation. In the 1970s, David Bowie, along with Iggy Pop, Jimmy Page, Bill Wyman, Mick Jagger and others, were part of the ‘Baby Groupies’ scene in LA. The ‘Baby Groupies’ were 13 to 15 year old girls who were raped by male rock stars. The names of these girls are easily searchable online but I will not share them here as all victims of rape deserve anonymity. The ‘Baby Groupie‘ scene was about young girls being prepared for sexual exploitation (commonly refereed to as grooming) and then sexually assaulted and raped. Even articles which make it clear that the music industry ” ignor(ed), and worse enabl(ed), a culture that still allows powerful men to target young girls” celebrate that culture and minimise the choices of adult men to rape children and those who chose to look away. This is what male entitlement to sexual access to the bodies of female children and adults looks like. It is rape culture. David Bowie is listed publicly as the man that one teenage girl ‘lost her virginity’ too.* We need to be absolutely clear about this, adult men do not ‘have sex’ with 13 to 15 year old girls. It is rape. Children cannot consent to sex with adult men – even famous rock stars. Suggesting this is due to the ‘context’ of 70s LA culture is to wilfully ignore the history of children being sexually exploited by powerful men. The only difference to the context here was that the men were musicians and not politicians, religious leaders, or fathers. David Bowie was an incredible musician who inspired generations. He also participated in a culture where children were sexually exploited and raped. This is as much a part of his legacy as his music. Louise Pennington
When we treat public figures like gods, we enable the dangerous dynamic in which famous men prey on women and girls. Bowie is part of a long line of male stars who have used their fame to take advantage of vulnerable women. Among the many celebrities who have allegedly slept with girls under the age of consent are Elvis Presley (Priscilla Beaulieu, 14), Marvin Gaye (Denise Gordy, 15), Iggy Pop (Sable Starr, 13) and Chuck Berry (Janice Escalanti, 14). R. Kelly, Woody Allen and Roman Polanski, have all been accused or convicted of sexually assaulting minors, which differs from statutory rape in that it involves force. And of course, celebrities’ sexual crimes are not limited to teenagers. The cases of Bill Cosby and Jian Ghomeshi, who both allegedly used their high profiles to sexually abuse women, are currently before the legal system. Obviously, Bowie is not in the same league as Bill Cosby, if only because Mattix, known as one of the famous “baby groupies,” doesn’t seem remotely unhappy about her experiences with Bowie. They were both part of the ‘70s rock star scene on L.A’s Sunset Strip, where blowjobs and quaaludes were given out like handshakes. Mattix looks back fondly on the experience, calling it “beautiful” in a recent interview with Thrillist. She looks back less fondly on her relationship with Jimmy Page, who allegedly kidnapped and locked her up in a hotel room. But it’s still important to acknowledge that what Bowie did was illegal. Consent laws are in place because, unlike Mattix, too many underage girls end up traumatized by the sexual experiences they have with older men. Many of those who “consented” as teens realize later that they were exploited and controlled by their older lovers. It’s incredibly hard for any victim of sexual assault to come forward, but when your perpetrator is a beloved public figure, your story becomes even more unbelievable. We know rapists don’t fit one mould, yet we’re incredulous when a person’s crimes don’t match our image of them. This phenomenon is particularly heightened with celebrities. (…) You can both write a catchy pop song and like underage sex. But too often we mistake a person’s talent for who they are as people. Celebrities know this and take advantage of the protection that comes with being a beloved public figure. As a result, their victims suffer in silence. We should acknowledge that Bowie slept with an underage woman to acknowledge his humanity. Yes, his talent was exceptional. No, he was not a monster. But we should never glorify celebrities to the point that we refuse to acknowledge that they’re capable of ugly acts. Otherwise, we send a message to the alleged victims of Roman Polanski, R. Kelly and Jian Ghomeshi that entertainment is more valuable than justice. Angelina Chapin
Since the death of David Bowie on January 10th, fans and media have dissected much of his musical and cultural legacy. Bowie stands as a towering figure over the last 45 years of music, and as a celebrity famous for an ever-changing, enigmatic approach to his life and art, there is much to be analyzed in the wake of his passing. But not all of it is pleasant or even musical. One uncomfortable facet of the iconic rocker’s past has suddenly been thrust into the center of the dialogue, and it’s raised questions about both Bowie and the world that has enabled him and so many others. The high-profile controversies surrounding contemporary stars like R. Kelly (who was famously accused of statutory rape and taken to court on child pornography charges in the early 2000s) and the backlash against rapper Tyga (following his relationship with a then-underage Kylie Jenner) have led to a broader discussion surrounding legal consent and adult male stars who engage in predatory behavior. And since his death, more fans and commentators have had to question Bowie’s own past with teen girls as well. (…) Rock star escapades from that period have been glamorized for decades with no regard for how disturbing or illegal the behavior was. It became a part of the mythos—a disgusting testament to how little the writers documenting the happenings of the day cared about taking their heroes to task. And it was right there in the music itself: The Rolling Stones sang about underage girls in “Stray Cat Blues” and Chuck Berry glorified the teenage “groupie” in “Sweet Little Sixteen” a decade earlier. But we can’t look at it with those same eyes today—not if we are sincere about protecting victims and holding celebrities accountable. It’s convenient to go after Tyga and R. Kelly when we see hashtags or trending stories, and their behavior warrants every bit of scrutiny and criticism it’s gotten. But we cannot write off the alarming behavior of superstars past just because they’re now older, greyer or in the case of Bowie, newly-departed. Because this behavior didn’t start with contemporary hip-hop and R&B acts. In addition to her time with Bowie, Mattix was also statutory raped by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page. In the book Hammer Of the Gods, former Zeppelin road manager Richard Cole claimed that the rocker tasked him with kidnapping the teen girl. He allegedly escorted her from a nightclub and thrust her into the back of Page’s limo with the warning of stay put or “I’ll have your head.” Page kept Mattix hidden for three years to avoid legal trouble. Mattix still romanticizes her experiences with these very adult men (“It was magnificent. Can you believe it? It was just like right out of a story! Kidnapped, man, at 14!” she stated in Hammer Of the Gods) but there is no doubt that what both Page and Bowie did was unacceptable. That it was glamorized in magazines like Creem and glossed over in films like Almost Famous speaks to cultural irresponsibility. So much of our culture turns a blind eye or gleefully endorses the hypersexualizing of teen girls. And when the stories are anecdotal as opposed to ripped from the headlines, it can be easy to dismiss and minimize the acts of artists like Bowie and Page as something “of the time.” But statutory rape laws existed even in the coke-fueled hedonism of the 1970s—because someone had to be protective of young girls who were susceptible to predators with big hair and loud guitars. But as it turns out, no one cared about protecting these girls; they were too busy mythologizing the rockers who were abusing them. Early rock ‘n’ rollers Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis both saw their careers sullied by headlines involving underage girls: Lewis revealed that he was married to his 13-year-old cousin in 1958 and was subsequently blacklisted from radio, while Berry was arrested and found guilty of transporting an underage girl across state lines for immoral purposes, spending two years in jail in 1960. Eagles drummer and vocalist Don Henley was arrested in 1980 in Los Angeles and charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor after paramedics were called to his home to save a naked 16-year-old girl who was overdosing on cocaine and Quaaludes. He was fined $2,000, given two years’ probation, and ordered into a drug counseling program. Rocker turned right-wing caricature Ted Nugent sought out underage girls, going so far as to become the legal guardian of Pele Massa when she was 17 just to be able to duck kidnapping charges. Prince kept Anna Garcia, aka “Anna Fantastic,” with him at his Paisley Park compound when she was a teenager. She would ultimately become the subject of several of his late ‘80s/early ‘90s works, like “Vicki Waiting” and “Pink Cashmere,” which he wrote for Anna on her 18th birthday. (…) Prince dated Mayte Garcia shortly thereafter, a dancer he met when she was 16. “When we met I was a virgin and had never been with anybody,” she told The Mirror last year. The two would marry in 1996, when Mayte was 22. Unlike Anna, Mayte insists Prince didn’t pursue her seriously until she was 18. (…) There have been varying stories surrounding the relationship between a young Aretha Franklin and the late Sam Cooke. She has indicated in interviews that things between them became romantic, but in his unauthorized biography, David Ritz indicated that their first encounter occurred when she was only 12 years old and visited Cooke in his motel room in Atlanta. In the Sam Cooke Legends television documentary, Aretha recalled an incident involving her being in Cooke’s room, but indicated that her father interrupted what was likely going to be a sexual encounter. (…) Marvin Gaye met Janis Hunter around the time of her 17th birthday, and the still-married Motown star pursued the teenager immediately. According to Hunter’s 2015 memoir After The Dance, Gaye took her to an Italian restaurant in Hollywood and bribed the waiter $20 to bring the underage girl apricot sours. He had sex with her shortly thereafter, and the two began a relationship, despite a 17-year age difference and the fact that Marvin was still legally married to his first wife, Anna Gordy. Gaye would famously write “Let’s Get It On” in tribute to his lust for Jan. Shortly after giving birth to a daughter, Nona, Jan and Marvin were featured in a November 1974 issue of Ebony when she was 18. They would marry in 1977, after Marvin’s divorce from Anna was finalized; but Janis would leave the singer in 1981. We can dismiss all of this as just the “way things were back then.” We can pretend that we haven’t heard countless songs about young “Lolitas” who were “just seventeen—you know what I mean.” We can ignore the racial implications in the mainstream media’s relative silence on rockers’ histories of statutory rape and its glorification. But the next time you watch Almost Famous, take note of how much younger most of the Band Aids seem compared to the world-weary rockers that are repeatedly shown taking them to bed (Kate Hudson’s Penny Lane says she’s 16 in the film). Note how the movie casually nods to Page and Mattix in a scene at the infamous Hyatt “Riot House” on Sunset Strip. And think about how many girls would’ve been better off had someone given a damn way back when, as opposed to just fawning over a guitarist with some hit songs. Former Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman infamously began seeing 13-year-old Mandy Smith in 1983. According to Smith, Wyman had sex with her when she was 14. They married when she turned 18 in 1989; they divorced in 1991. She spoke about her time with the ex-Stone in an interview with The Daily Mail in 2010. “It’s not about being physically mature. It’s emotional maturity that matters,” she stated, after making it clear that she regrets what happened to her. “I don’t think most 16-year-olds are ready. I think the age of consent should be raised to 18 at a minimum, and some girls aren’t even ready then.” The Daily Beast
While the UK in 2015 inexplicably draws a line at girlhood sexuality on screen, it’s San Francisco in the 1970s that provides the film’s own context – with all the temptation for nostalgic glaze that this could offer a contemporary mindset. But elsewhere in California in those years, certain teenage girls went way beyond a cut-out-and-keep relationship to the frenzied rock scene’s most desirable. They hung out on Sunset Boulevard, L.A. There you’d find the self-dubbed foxy ladies, better known in the backstage of our cultural consciousness as baby groupies: the group of teenage high schoolers who ruled over a particular mile of Sunset Boulevard in the early 70s. The queens of the scene were close confidantes Sable Starr and Lori Lightning, who, along with other teen-aged names like Shray Mecham and Queenie Glam, slept with and dated the likes of David Bowie, Jimmy Page, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck, Marc Bolan, Alice Cooper, Robert Plant and Iggy Pop. They were, in news that will destroy your idols, very young: Starr was 14 years old when she started hanging out on the Strip, with a 13 year old Lori Lightning (real name Mattix) joining the now established gang soon afterwards. The hangouts of choice were spots like the Rainbow Bar and Grill, Whiskey a Go Go and the E Club ­– later renamed Rodney Bingenheimer’s English Disco. The latter club was the preferred enclave for the era’s strange new musical breed – where, as Bowie would later enthuse to Details magazine, glam rock stars and their devotees could parade their “sounds of tomorrow” dressed in “clothes of derision.” The scene was documented by the controversial, short-lived publication Star, a tome that took teenage magazine tropes to their extreme: inside, you’ll find all the usual short stories, style guides and “How to approach your crush” articles, except in this case the stories tell of romantic backstage fantasies, how to dress to catch your “superfox”, and even a step-by-step nose-job diary (in the mag’s own words, “no dream is too far-out”). Beloved by adolescent aficionados everywhere, it wasn’t long, of course, before concerned parents were knocking the publisher’s door down – five issues long, in fact. Thanks to dedicated archive digger Ryan Richardson you can gape at every single issue online – including an interview with Starr and Queenie, in the final issue, that records for posterity the startling, angsty conviction of these ultimate mean girls. (…) But even more striking than the magazine’s laugh out loud, irreverent take on the scene – in its own words, “relief from all that moral-spiritual-ethical-medical-advice” – are the clothes. (…) Star was, needless to say, a heavily glamorised chronicle of the teenage groupie girls who frequented its pages – wilfully ignoring, and worse enabling, a culture that still allows powerful men to target young girls. But like any history that plays out in the margins – in the backstage of rock music’s mythmaking – there are conflicting accounts as to how well or badly off the girls were. Lori Lightning, who claims to have fallen in love with Jimmy Page aged 14, has no regrets. As she tells fellow ex-groupie Pamela des Barres in the latter’s book, “It was such a different time – there was no AIDS – and you were free to experiment.” Nobody can ask Starr, now – the ballsy queen of the babies eventually got clean and had kids, but died aged 51 in 2009. Even now, there’s a kind of power to be found somewhere amid the gushing interviews and romanticised editorials of Star. Addressing its teen readers without patronising them, Star cut straight to the heart of the sexual desires of girlhood like no other magazine would dare. Sexually forward in their dress and their attitude, the groupies adopted acceptable male traits to go out and get what they wanted. By channelling the stars of the Sunset Strip, the magazine empowered readers to approach humdrum high school life with the same fearlessness. Though not exactly feminist in its boy-getting tips – “I’d scratch any girl’s eyes out for a guy I want” – the message that boys shouldn’t have all the fun is loud and clear. As one reader writes in of the frustrating sexual double standard, “Guys can take their going steady rings and rules and shove it up their noses!” (…) Iggy Pop (…) slept with Starr when she was just 13, and, horribly, later wrote a song about it. His words are worryingly relevant to our own fetish for history’s visuals without their story – style divorced from context, worth a fleeting Instagram like and then on to the next. Our preference for rose-tinted glasses – especially de rigour heart-shaped ones, fit for a foxy lady – is hugely problematic. But flicking through Star magazine, you begin to see its role as a link between the innocent teenyboppers of the 60s, and the rise of badass female frontwomen in the 70s and beyond. Joan Jett was first spotted on the Boulevard, outside the Rainbow Grill. Later on, Grace Jones and Courtney Love are just two examples of powerful artists who were sexually upfront in their fashion, and did things entirely on their own terms. Dazed (Aug. 10, 2015)
The dregs of the sexual revolution were what remained, and it was really sort of a counterrevolution (guys arguing that since sex was beautiful and everyone should have lots everything goes and they could go at anyone; young women and girls with no way to say no and no one to help them stay out of harmful dudes’ way). The culture was sort of snickeringly approving of the pursuit of underage girls (and the illegal argument doesn’t carry that much weight; smoking pot is also illegal; it’s about the immorality of power imbalance and rape culture). It was completely normalized. Like child marriage in some times and places. Which doesn’t make it okay, but means that, unlike a man engaged in the pursuit of a minor today, there was virtually no discourse about why this might be wrong. It’s also the context for what’s widely regarded as the anti-sex feminism of the 1980s: those women were finally formulating a post-sexual-revolution ideology of sex as another arena of power and power as liable to be abused; we owe them so much. Lori Maddox
For San Francisco in particular and for California generally, 1978 was a notably terrible year, the year in which the fiddler had to be paid for all the tunes to which the counterculture had danced. The sexual revolution had deteriorated into a sort of free-market free-trade ideology in which all should have access to sex and none should deny access. I grew up north of San Francisco in an atmosphere where once you were twelve or so hippie dudes in their thirties wanted to give you drugs and neck rubs that were clearly only the beginning, and it was immensely hard to say no to them. There were no grounds. Sex was good; everyone should have it all the time; anything could be construed as consent; and almost nothing meant no, including “no.” “It was the culture,” she wrote. “Rock stars were open about their liaisons with underage groupies.” It doesn’t excuse these men to note that there was an overwhelming, meaningful, non-dismissible sense in this decade that sex with young female teenagers was if not explicitly desirable then certainly OK. Louis Malle released “Pretty Baby” in 1978, in which an 11-year-old and sometimes unclothed Brooke Shields played a child prostitute; in Manhattan, released the following year, director Woody Allen paired his middle-aged character with a 17-year old; color photographer David Hamilton’s prettily prurient photographs of half-undressed pubescent girls were everywhere…at the end of the decade Playboy attempted to release nude photographs of a painted, vamping Shields at the age of 10 in a book titled Sugar and Spice. […] In 1977, Roman Polanski’s implicit excuse for raping a 13-year-old girl he had plied with champagne and quaaludes was that everyone was doing it. Polanski had sequestered his victim at Jack Nicholson’s Bel Air house on the grounds that he was going to take pictures of her for French Vogue. Polanski’s victim pretended she had asthma to try to get out of his clutches. It didn’t work. Afterward, he delivered the dazed, glassy-eyed child to her home, he upbraided her big sister for being unkind to the family dog. Some defended him on the grounds that the girl looked 14. Reading Solnit on this, you can understand how Lori Maddox could have possibly developed not just a sincere desire to fuck adult men but the channels to do it basically in public; why an entire scene encouraged her, photographed her, gave her drugs that made all of it feel better, loved her for it, celebrated her for it, for years. (…) It is Maddox who interests me, in the end, not Bowie. But if there’s an argument for labeling Bowie a rapist that gets me, it’s how much I owe to the inflexible spirit that calls for it. Look, what a miracle; we are talking about this, when out of all the interviews Bowie gave in his life, he seems to never have been asked on the record about Maddox or any of the other “baby groupies,” or to have said a thing about Wanda Nichols after the case was dismissed. Jezabel

Attention, un scandale peut en cacher bien d’autres  !

En ces temps étranges …

Où l’on dénonce d’un côté comme le plus rétrograde les mutilations sexuelles que l’on prône de l’autre comme summum du progrès

Où l’on fustige chez certains les mariages forcés d’enfants tout en imposant par la loi à d’autres le mensonge et l’aberration de l’imposition de « parents de même sexe »

Où le long silence coupable sur la pédophilie que l’on condamne dans l’Eglise catholique se mue en complaisance douteuse pour les relations proprement incestueuses de certains de nos happy few, responsables politiques compris  …

l’irresponsabilité la plus débridée dans l’habillement comme dans le comportement ou le langage cotoie la pudibonderie la plus rétrograde dans les relations hommes-femmes …

Et à l’heure où la vérité semble enfin sortir sur les pratiques supposées du photographe David Hamilton

Alors que dans la plupart des pays les plus problématiques de ses oeuvres continuent à être publiées …

Qui rappelle …

Dans le climat général qui a permis de tels actes …

Et notamment dans la tant célébrée révolution sexuelle des années 60 …

La part de la musique et du cinéma qui l’ont si fièrement portée …

De ces Rolling Stones ou Bowie (ou notre propre Gainsbourg), Woodie Allen ou Malle, De Niro,  Kinski ou Annaud

Qu’oubliant leurs multiples Lorie Maddox ou Sheryl Brookes on continue de fêter ou d’enterrer royalement …

Et surtout la vérité suggérée dans tant de chansons …

Mais explicitée dans le célèbre « Midnight rambler » des Rolling Stones …

Et d’ailleurs déjà envisagée dans le non moins célèbre « Lolita » de Nabokov …

Derrière le rock ‘n’ roll show …

A savoir, outre l’évidente apologie de la pédophilie, la violence sexuelle, voire le viol ?

Chapin: David Bowie’s magnetism had a dark side

Propos recueillis par Marie-France Chatrier

Il y a vingt-cinq ans, Constance Meyer a vécu une histoire avec le chanteur qu’elle raconte dans un livre paru récemment, « La jeune fille et Gainsbourg » (éd. l’Archipel). Nous avons rencontré cette jeune femme aujourd’hui amoureuse et mère de famille. A peine assise, avant que l’on pose la première question, elle s’inquiète : « Surtout ne faites pas un papier trash sur notre relation qui ne ressemblait en rien à cela »… Extraits.

La rencontre

En 1985, Constance a 16 ans. Ses parents sont professeurs de faculté, elle est bonne élève au lycée Victor Duruy. « Je deviens adulte doucement auprès de ma mère, divorcée, entourée de mes frères. Un jour, sur mon Walkman, j’entends « Love on the Beat ». Le choc. Vacances en Californie l’été qui suit, je ne fais qu’écouter ce titre qui, pour moi, est une révolution. »

A la rentrée des classes, elle découvre que Gainsbourg chante au Casino de Paris. « J’enfourne mon Ciao, une heure avant le concert, il reste quelques places dans le fond de la salle. Je prends. Quand la lumière s’éteint, je rampe jusqu’au premier rang, jusqu’à toucher la scène. » « Pour moi ce type sur scène c’est une évidence, il m’est familier. On est comme cela à l’adolescence, entier. » Elle retourne le voir quatre fois.

Un signe du destin

« Ma prof d’italien nous dit qu’elle habite rue de Lille, à côté de chez Serge… Je suis dubitative, je le lui dis. « Allez donc au 5 bis, rue de Verneuil si vous ne me croyez pas », me répond-t-elle. Je m’y précipite, la maison, les tags, aucun doute. Je sonne. Pas de réponse… Sur le trottoir d’en face, j’ouvre mon sac à dos et je lui écris. Cinq pages pour dire toute ma passion, mon engouement pour sa musique, je donne mon numéro de téléphone et je termine par « Quelle folie !»  »

Il est 14 h 30 à quand elle glisse la lettre sous la porte. Elle rentre chez elle faire ses devoirs.

17 h, le téléphone sonne, elle répond.

– Pourrais-je parler à Constance ?

– C’est moi…

– C’est l’homme qui a reçu la lettre… Elle est bien écrite, elle m’a touché. J’aimerais bien te rencontrer. Tu veux venir dîner avec moi ce soir?

Elle lui propose le lendemain, sa mère doit sortir….

Le RDV

5 décembre, 20 heures: elle sonne trois fois chez lui (c’est le code).

« Si je suis intimidée , il l’est plus que moi encore. Les silences s’enchaînent, il me propose d’écouter le dernier disque de Jane « Quoi ». Il met la musique à fond. Il m’emmène Chez Ravi, un indien délicieux rue de Verneuil. Tout le monde le connaît. En entrant dans le restaurant je repère un garçon qui est dans ma classe : Bertil Scali. Au restaurant, Serge, toujours timide, me raconte une foule d’histoires drôles parce qu’il ne sait trop quoi me dire. Moi je le trouve irrésistible. A la fin du repas, je lui avoue que je ne comprends pas ce que veut dire « Je t’aime moi non plus ». Une Chanson devenue un film. Il me propose de venir le voir chez lui, en cassette.

Je découvre l’étage de son hôtel particulier: moquette noire au sol avec de gros motifs blancs. Je visite sa petite bibliothèque : livres précieux, objets et sa vieille machine à écrire Remington… Il y a aussi sa collection de poupées anciennes, la salle de bain de Jane restée intacte depuis leur séparation… Serge me dit de m’installer sur le lit et je découvre les merveilles d’une technique ultra inconnue de moi : un écran descend du plafond, il lance le film et s’en va téléphoner, vaquer à ses occupations. Quand le film est terminé, il me propose de voir « Equateur », son second long-métrage…

Je suis épuisée quand le film se termine. Serge me propose de rester dormir, nous dormons ensemble. Au matin, Fulbert son homme de ménage a préparé du café… Serge a du travail … on se quitte… Sur le pas de la porte, il me fait un signe de la main quand je démarre mon Ciao .

Ils deviennent amants

Mars 1986 : « Je passe chez lui, sonne trois fois, pas de réponse. J’écris sur son mur un poème pour qu’il le voit… Il me rappelle… Me propose notre second dîner. Après le restaurant créole, cette fois, rue de Verneuil, on rentre, on parle, on se rapproche. Je découvre sa gentillesse, sa douceur, sa faculté à mettre en valeur la personne avec laquelle il se trouve… D’une certaine façon il me rend plus belle, plus importante en me mettant tellement en valeur… Sa chambre, son film préféré « Les sentiers de la gloire » de Kubrick, le lit gigantesque recouvert de vison, les bouteilles de parfum Guerlain. Je me sens bien, déjà familière en ce lieu. Après le film, il me demande si je veux faire « dodo avec lui »… J’en meurs d’envie. C’est tendre… »

« J’ai presque 17 ans, une vraie maturité, Serge ne fait pas son âge, il n’a pas d’âge. »

L’histoire se poursuit cinq ans « régulièrement », dit-elle. Beaucoup de lettres (il n’y a pas de portable à l’époque), beaucoup de télégrammes.

« Je le retrouve en fin d’après-midi, chez lui, en studio, en tournage, à l’hôtel. On reste toute la nuit ensemble, on dort peu, on parle énormément… Il me raconte sa vie, me parle de sa solitude, de ses moments de déprime, de ses doutes. »

«Il dit ne pas connaître le bonheur… Il a un stock d’anecdotes incroyables que j’adore écouter… Quand il parle de sa mère, il pleure. Il parle de sa première femme, de ses enfants, de Jane et de sa rencontre avec Bambou… et aussi de Charlotte et de Lulu. »

Elle assiste à de nombreux épisodes connus, souvent cachée dans les coulisses. Elle est ainsi présente sur le plateau de Michel Drucker quand il dit à Whitney Houston « I want to fuck you ». Malgré, ou peut-être à cause de l’éducation stricte qu’il a reçu, Serge adore la trangression. Sur « Tenue de Soirée » , elle est en studio avec Bertrand Blier, Serge compose sur un clavier électronique. Elle dit l’avoir vu dicter d’une traite le synopsis de « Charlotte Forever » à une dactylo.

Au fur et à mesure que leur histoire avance, Serge la transforme physiquement, lui demande de s’habiller autrement, de ne plus porter de vêtements informes, de se couper les cheveux.

Elle dit n’avoir que très peu connu Gainsbarre… Ce qu’elle a vu elle c’est un homme qui n’a jamais cessé d’être un enfant, timide, doux. Jamais blasé.. Quand un gamin de six ans le reconnaît dans la rue, cela le met en joie, de même lorsqu’il entend ses chansons à la radio.

« De ma vie je n’ai jamais rencontré un homme aussi généreux, attentionné et drôle. Dépourvu de vulgarité, de méchanceté. Un dandy, avec une allure folle et unique. Depuis je n’ai jamais cessé de chercher un tel homme. Si je pense à Serge , je pense à son eau de toilette Van Cleef &Arpels pour homme , bouteille noire. Il a en six exemplaires, la même veste, le même jean, les mêmes Repetto. Et détail important: il relève toujours le col de sa veste ou de sa chemise.

Il a beaucoup souffert de sa laideur; d’elle il dit : « Elle a ceci de supérieur sur la beauté c’est qu’elle dure. » Les deux dernière années, Serge fume de plus en plus, des Gitanes qu’il allume avec un Zippo, boit de l’alcool, beaucoup de pastis.

C’est en tournant « Charlotte For Ever » que la fille de Gainsbourg rencontre Constance. Celle-ci est couchée dans une chambre de l’hôtel Raphaël où elle a dormi avec Serge. « J’ai beaucoup attendu les appels de Serge pendant toutes ces années. Je ne sais jamais quand je vais le revoir. »

Dernier Acte

1989 à 1991: Plusieurs hospitalisations. Serge doit arrêter de fumer, de boire. Il est déprimé, il a peur de perdre la vue. Il se referme sur lui-même.

Dernier appel en décembre 1990… Il fume et boit à nouveau. Parle de la mort en blaguant. Dit qu’il faudrait faire un musée de sa maison, après.

« Il est mort avant de vieillir, tu es encore jeune, tu as 62 ans », lui dit-elle.

« Avoir pour premier grand amour un tel homme fait que le retour à la réalité est terrible. A seize ans je découvrais des sommets et ne pouvais ensuite que tomber de ce piédestal. »

« La jeune fille et Gainsbourg », de Constance Meyer, éd. de l’Archipel, 160 pages. 14,95 euros.

Voir de même:

Masterpiece

The Stars of ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’ On the Riveting Lesbian Love Story
It’s the interview that sparked a huge fight between director Abdellatif Kechiche and actress Léa Seydoux. The 10-minute graphic lesbian sex scene in the masterful French Drama ‘Blue is the Warmest Color,’ winner of the Palme d’Or, stunned Cannes. At Telluride, Marlow Stern spoke to the film’s two onscreen lovers about ‘that scene’ and why they’ll never work with Kechiche again.
Marlow Stern
The Daily Beast
09.01.13

Film festival reviews are, as is their wont, often prone to hyperbole. Even the most weathered of movie critics can get swept up in the wonder of it all.

But make no mistake about it: the French drama Blue is the Warmest Color is filmmaking—and acting—of the highest order.

Directed by Abdellatif Kechiche, and based on a graphic novel by Julie Maroh, Blue tells the story of Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos), an awkward but beautiful 15-year-old girl whose initial sexual forays leave much to be desired. All that changes when she crosses paths with Emma (Léa Seydoux), a blue-haired college student studying art. It’s love—or is it lust?—at first sight, and before long, the two are inseparable. But, like any first love, the pair’s hidden quirks and desires begin to reveal themselves, and they struggle to remain afloat.

In a Cannes Film Festival first, the Palme d’Or was awarded to the entire Blue is the Warmest Color team—Kechiche, Exarchopoulos, and Seydoux—and the three-hour film has received universal praise from critics and audiences alike for its honest and poignant portrayal of first love.

The film’s two stars, who deliver two of the best performances of the year, sat down with Marlow Stern at the Telluride Film Festival to discuss the hellish-sounding making of the film, including why they’re embarrassed by the film’s talked-about 10-minute sex scene, and how they were terrorized on set by Kechiche. 

Do you remember the first time you thought you were in love?

Léa: For me, I was maybe ten years old. I was in love with my cousin, I remember. Every time he came in, I could feel my heart beating so fast. At the time, I was crazy about Barbie but I was kind of a tomboy, so I was hiding my passion for Barbie’s because he said, “I hate girls who like Barbies.” I told him my favorite color was blue, even though it was pink. Once, I remember he came in and saw me playing with my Barbies and I turned red and felt so embarrassed.

Adèle: The first people that I started to feel something for in that way were my cousins, too. You go on vacation with them, spend a lot of time with them, and they’re a little bit older than you. But when I really fell in love and discovered how stupid you can be and everything, I was about 14. But it was a bad story. I regret it.

This is a very immersive role that demanded a lot from both of you. You must have had a lot of trust in Kechiche before signing on to this.

Léa: The thing is, in France, it’s not like in the States. The director has all the power. When you’re an actor on a film in France and you sign the contract, you have to give yourself, and in a way you’re trapped.

Adèle: He warned us that we had to trust him—blind trust—and give a lot of ourselves. He was making a movie about passion, so he wanted to have sex scenes, but without choreography—more like special sex scenes. He told us he didn’t want to hide the character’s sexuality because it’s an important part of every relationship. So he asked me if I was ready to make it, and I said, “Yeah, of course!” because I’m young and pretty new to cinema. But once we were on the shoot, I realized that he really wanted us to give him everything. Most people don’t even dare to ask the things that he did, and they’re more respectful—you get reassured during sex scenes, and they’re choreographed, which desexualizes the act.

Right. They pause the action for new camera angles, etc.

Adèle: Exactly. I didn’t know [Léa] in the beginning, and during the first sex scene, I was a little bit ashamed to touch her where I thought I wanted, because he didn’t tell us what to do. You’re free, but at the same time you’re embarrassed because I didn’t really know her that well.

Wait. You two didn’t meet at all before filming?

Adèle: We met once for a camera test before, since she was already cast, but that was it until the shoot.

And was it difficult to shoot that 10-minute sex scene? I don’t remember the last time I’ve seen a sex scene that long in a movie—gay or hetero.

Léa: For us, it’s very embarrassing.

Adèle: At Cannes, all of our families were there in the theater so during the sex scenes I’d close my eyes. [Kechiche] told me to imagine it’s not me, but it’s me, so I’d close my eyes and imagined I was on an island far away, but I couldn’t help but listen, so I didn’t succeed in escaping. The scene is a little too long.

Were the sex scenes between you two unsimulated? They look so real.

Léa: No, we had fake pussies that were molds of our real pussies. It was weird to have a fake mold of your pussy and then put it over your real one. We spent 10 days on just that one scene. It wasn’t like, “OK, today we’re going to shoot the sex scene!” It was 10 days.

Adèle: One day you know that you’re going to be naked all day and doing different sexual positions, and it’s hard because I’m not that familiar with lesbian sex.

Me either.

Léa: The first day we shot together, I had to masturbate you, I think?

Adèle: [Laughs] After the walk-by, it’s the first scene that we really shot together, so it was, “Hello!” But after that, we made lots of different sex scenes. And he wanted the sexuality to evolve over the course of the film as well, so that she’s learning at the beginning, and then becomes more and more comfortable. It’s really a film about sexual passion—about skin, and about flesh, because Kechiche shot very close-up. You get the sense that they want to eat each other, to devour each other.

So are you two really good friends now? You know each other a lot more intimately than I know most of my friends.

Adèle: Yeah! [Laughs] Thankfully we’re friends.

And the shoot was very long in general.

Léa: Five-and-a-half months. What was terrible on this film was that we couldn’t see the ending. It was supposed to only be two months, then three, then four, then it became five-and-a-half. By the end, we were just so tired.

Adèle: For me, I was so exhausted that I think the emotions came out more freely. And there was no makeup artist, stylist, or costume designer. After a while, you can see that their faces are started to get more marked. We shot the film chronologically, so it helped that I grew up with the experiences my character had.

And same-sex marriage wasn’t legalized in France until May—well before you finished shooting the film. This is an important film. It’s rare to see such an honest depiction of the love between two young women onscreen.

Léa: It is amazing. In France, it’s not out yet but at Cannes it was huge, and I think this is one of the reasons. This film is very modern. It’s a new way to make films. We never saw a film like this before—a love story this realistic. And it says a lot about the youth of today. It’s a film about love. I don’t really think it’s a film about homosexuality—it’s more than that. Homosexuality is not taboo anymore—even if it isn’t considered “moral” by everyone—which is how it should be.

Adèle: Without being a militant, Adèle was already very partial towards this movement because of how she was brought up. So for her, it’s just normal. There are some things that you can’t control, so she thinks it’s very bizarre when people say it’s against nature, and has no idea why anybody would give a fuck. Before gay marriage was legalized in France, there were huge demonstrations in France with even mothers with small children shouting terrible insults.

Right. I grew up around plenty of gay people, so it’s all about experience. People are afraid of what they aren’t familiar with, or don’t understand. But sex scenes aside, what was the toughest scene for you two to film? 

Léa: Any emotional scenes. [Kechiche] was always searching, because he didn’t really know what he wanted. We spent weeks shooting scenes. Even crossing the street was difficult. In the first scene where we cross paths and it’s love at first sight, it’s only about thirty seconds long, but we spent the whole day shooting it—over 100 takes. By the end of it, I remember I was dizzy and couldn’t even sit. And by the end of it, [Kechiche] burst into a rage because after 100 takes I walked by Adele and laughed a little bit, because we had been walking by each other doing this stare-down scene all day. It was so, so funny. And [Kechiche] became so crazy that he picked up the little monitor he was viewing it through and threw it into the street, screaming, “I can’t work under these conditions!”

Adèle: We were like, “Sorry, we’ve shot this 100 times and we just laughed once.” And it was a Friday and we wanted to go to Paris and see our families, but he wouldn’t let us. But me, I always took trains in secret to see my boyfriend.

So… was this filmmaking experience enjoyable for you at all? It doesn’t sound like it.

Léa: It was horrible.

Adèle: In every shoot, there are things that you can’t plan for, but every genius has his own complexity. [Kechiche] is a genius, but he’s tortured. We wanted to give everything we have, but sometimes there was a kind of manipulation, which was hard to handle. But it was a good learning experience for me, as an actor.

Would you ever work with Kechiche again?

Léa: Never.

Adèle: I don’t think so.

But you don’t think that the proof is in the pudding at all? It is such a brilliant film.

Adèle: Yeah, because you can see that we were really suffering. With the fight scene, it was horrible. She was hitting me so many times, and [Kechiche] was screaming, “Hit her! Hit her again!”

Léa: In America, we’d all be in jail.

You were really hitting her?

Adèle: Of course! She was really hitting me. And once she was hitting me, there were people there screaming, “Hit her!” and she didn’t want to hit me, so she’d say sorry with her eyes and then hit me really hard.

Léa: [Kechiche] shot with three cameras, so the fight scene was a one-hour continuous take. And during the shooting, I had to push her out of a glass door and scream, “Now go away!” and [Adèle] slapped the door and cut herself and was bleeding everywhere and crying with her nose running, and then after, [Kechiche] said, “No, we’re not finished. We’re doing it again.”

It’s funny that you mention the runny nose, because watching the scene with you two in the diner, I was really worried that the stream of snot was going to go into your mouth.

Adèle: She was trying to calm me, because we shot so many intense scenes and he only kept like 10 percent of the film. It’s nothing compared to what we did. And in that scene, she tried to stop my nose from running and [Kechiche] screamed, “No! Kiss her! Lick her snot!”

So this was clearly a grueling shoot. What was the first thing you did when shooting wrapped?

Léa: Well, thank god we won the Palme d’Or, because it was so horrible. So now it’s cool that everyone likes the film and it’s a big success. But I took five days off and did like… three films in a row.

Adèle: I went to Thailand with my boy with no cellphone, no one to tell me “do this” and “do that” and “hit her again.” I was like [flips two birds], smoking weed, massages, woo!

Voir enfin:

Des techniciens racontent le tournage difficile de « La Vie d’Adèle »

Sept intermittents du spectacle, embauchés sur le  film d’Abdellatif Kechiche, décrivent un climat lourd et des comportements proches du « harcèlement moral ».

Clarisse Fabre

Le Monde

24.05.2013

Il faut parler, vider son sac, fouiller dans sa mémoire pour que certains détails finissent par revenir, enfin. Le tournage de La Vie d’Adèle, d’Abdellatif Kechiche, sélectionné en compétition officielle à Cannes, est fini depuis neuf mois. Les souvenirs se sont estompés. Mais ils ont été ravivés subitement, jeudi 23 mai, par la publication d’un communiqué musclé du Spiac-CGT. Le Syndicat des professionnels de l’industrie de l’audiovisuel et du cinéma a dénoncé tous les manquements au Code du travail durant les cinq de mois de tournage, de mars à août 2012.

Il a aussi déploré un climat lourd, des comportements proches du « harcèlement moral », au point que certains ouvriers et techniciens auraient abandonné le navire en cours de route. Chose rare, et terriblement frustrante. Le syndicat a choisi de taper fort le jour où l’équipe du film montait les marches du Palais des festivals pour la « première mondiale ».

Hier, sur la Croisette, Abdellatif Kechiche savourait les critiques dithyrambiques, tandis qu’à l’autre bout du pays, dans la région Nord-Pas-de-Calais, certains se repassaient le film du tournage. « Une grosse, grosse galère », témoigne ce salarié. « On n’a même pas été invités à la projection. Il paraît, aussi, qu’il n’y a pas de générique de fin. C’est comme si nos noms avaient été effacés, on n’existe plus ! », s’indigne un autre. Dans un communiqué, l’association regroupant les techniciens et ouvriers du cinéma du Nord-Pas-de-Calais, l’Atocan, fait cette remarque grinçante : « Si ce long-métrage devait devenir une référence artistique, nous espérons qu’il ne devienne jamais un exemple en termes de production. »

Bien sûr, un tournage n’est jamais un fleuve tranquille. Il y a toujours des moments de tension. Mais, bien souvent, il reste le sentiment joyeux d’avoir participé à une belle aventure. C’est le plus important, et ça permet d’oublier le reste. Visiblement, tout le monde n’a pas réussi à sublimer le tournage de La Vie d’Adèle. Des intermittents du spectacle, embauchés sur le tournage, ont accepté de témoigner, sous couvert d’anonymat, car ils tiennent à retrouver du travail. L’un d’eux résume : « Le tournage était prévu pour deux mois et demi. Finalement il a duré le double, à budget constant. Et pour faire du Kechiche, il faut être là à 100 %. Sur cinq mois, c’est pas tenable. »

Commençons par les tarifs au rabais, et autres entorses au droit social. Certes, La Vie d’Adèle ne sera pas le premier tournage à avoir contourné les règles. La future convention collective du cinéma, quelle qu’elle soit, est d’ailleurs censée mettre de l’ordre dans les contrats de travail. Mais, dans La Vie d’Adèle, « les choses sont allées beaucoup trop loin », constate ce technicien, rompu à tous les arrangements sur les films d’auteurs fauchés. Figurants embauchés à l’arrache, au coin d’une rue, devant le magasin d’un disquaire lillois ; planning modifiés avec des cycles de travail sur six jours payés cinq jours, etc.

BEAUCOUP DE STAGIAIRES…

La Vie d’Adèle a pourtant bénéficié d’une enveloppe de 4 millions d’euros, ce qui n’est pas rien. Mais le tournage s’est éternisé. Est arrivé le moment où il n’y avait plus d’argent : du moins, c’est ce que disait la personne chargée de la paie, issue de la société Quat’ Sous du réalisateur. Abdellatif Kechiche est aussi coproducteur du film, ce qui n’a pas arrangé les choses. « Il avait tout pouvoir », comme le dit un technicien. Il ne restait plus qu’à faire le bras de fer pour obtenir son chèque, quand une journée déclarée huit heures avait été « oubliée ». Du travail bénévole a même été proposé à certains sur le thème : travailler auprès de Kechiche est une si belle carte de visite. « C’est vrai qu’il s’entoure de jeunes, leur confie des responsabilités. On apprend énormément. Mais c’est aussi parce qu’il cherche des gens malléables. Pour lui, quelqu’un qui a trop d’expérience est formaté. » Il y avait donc beaucoup de stagiaires…

Certains, en revanche, n’ont eu « aucun problème d’argent » avec la production. Tous leurs frais ont été payés. Mais ils gardent un sentiment mêlé : l’atmosphère sur le tournage n’était « pas humaine ». « Il y a eu un mépris pour les conditions de travail, pour le repos de l’équipe, et sa vie privée, je n’ai jamais vu ça », dit cet ancien collaborateur. C’est ce qui le rend le plus mélancolique. « Kechiche peut être chaleureux avec l’équipe, demander aux uns et aux autres s’ils vont bien. Il travaille au plus près des comédiens, il y passe un temps fou. Il peut filmer un repas de famille pendant une heure et demie, en laissant improviser les acteurs, pour capter des éclats du réel, de l’intime. Le résultat est magnifique. Mais quand on connaît l’envers du décor, on se demande vraiment : ‘Elle est où cette beauté ?’ C’est à désespérer de tout. »

Le style Kechiche est mal passé, et même a fait souffrir. Sa « méthode », si l’on peut dire, consiste souvent à improviser. Le souci de privilégier l’instant est très important pour ce cinéaste qui recherche par-dessus tout l’authenticité. « Le soir, quand on quittait le plateau, parfois tard, vers 23 heures, on ne savait pas ce qui allait se passer le lendemain. » Il est arrivé à l’équipe de recevoir un courriel, dans la foulée, annonçant l’heure de la reprise. Parfois, c’est un SMS qui arrivait pendant la nuit…

Les proches du réalisateur, qui le placent très haut dans leur estime, et qui pour rien au monde ne rateraient l’aventure, se sont accommodés de ce rythme foutraque. Un technicien du Nord raconte : « Dès que Kechiche demande quelque chose, ils rappliquent autour de lui. C’est une véritable cour, ils supportent tout ! » Quitte à reporter le stress sur les autres. « Un jour, Kechiche a renvoyé une de ses fidèles. Tu es trop nerveuse, tu empêches tout le monde de travailler. Rentre chez toi ! » Une image vient à l’esprit de ce témoin : « On ne nous donnait pas les moyens de travailler. C’est comme si on vous demandait de repeindre un immense hangar avec un petit pinceau. »

« C’EST INCROYABLE LE TEMPS QU’ON A GÂCHÉ »

La nécessité de tout faire « à l’arrache » est en cause, une fois de plus. Le décor ne plaît plus à Kechiche, ou l’empêche de faire le plan dont il rêve ? Une heure avant le « prêt à tourner », le PAT, il faut démolir le mur. Autre exemple , un jour de tournage au lycée Pasteur, à Lille. « Il pleuvait, et bizarrement les costumes des comédiennes traînaient par terre. Pourquoi ? Tout simplement parce que quelqu’un a décidé d’emprunter le camion qui transportait les costumes. Et les vêtements ont été posés là, par terre, sans prévenir. Et tant pis pour ceux qui doivent ramasser ! »

Le mépris pour les techniciens revient comme un refrain. « L’histoire de la montre » est restée dans les esprits. Voici la scène : Léa Seydoux et Adèle Exarchopoulos sont habillées, assises sur un banc, prêtes à jouer. Soudain Kechiche dit à l’une d’elles : « Dans la scène, tu dois regarder l’heure, alors il te faut une montre. Allez chercher une montre ! », ordonne-t-il. Dans ces cas-là, il faut courir comme un lapin, partir toute affaire cessante. Quelqu’un fonce, donc. A son retour, il y a comme un malaise : Kechiche ne regarde même pas la montre qui vient d’être achetée. Car entre-temps, il a changé d’avis. Une autre fois, l’équipe a attendu huit heures que le tournage commence. Kechiche n’était pas prêt, ou réfléchissait. Mais personne n’avait été prévenu et tout le monde tournait en rond. « C’est incroyable le temps qu’on a gâché », se remémore un ancien salarié.

Parfois, le témoignage vire à la rigolade, ou au rire nerveux, tellement c’est gros. Cette fois-ci, l’équipe est sur le plateau. Les deux comédiennes principales ont puisé dans le stock de costumes et ont choisi elles-mêmes leurs vêtements. De toute façon, il n’y avait pas de consigne. Mais la tenue ne plaît pas au réalisateur. « Kechiche a dévisagé tous les membres de l’équipe, détaillant la façon dont chacun était habillé. Soudain, il a dit : ‘Le pull rouge, là, je le veux !' » Quelqu’un est allé négocier, demandant à la fille en question de bien vouloir prêter son pull le temps de la scène.

Morale de l’histoire ? « Je pense que Kechiche a un immense respect pour les comédiens. Mais pas pour les techniciens. » La preuve, poursuit-il, « c’était un jour de tournage dans un appartement. On était persuadés qu’on allait filmer. Au lieu de ça, Kechiche s’est assis à table, dans le décor de la cuisine, avec Léa Seydoux et Adèle Exarchopoulos. Il a demandé à l’un de ses proches d’aller chercher des huîtres et du champagne. Et ils se sont mis à manger. Nous autres, on attendait ». Heureusement, l’espace était suffisamment grand pour que chacun vaque à ses occupations, ailleurs que dans la cuisine. « On n’était pas collés devant la table, à les regarder manger ! Mais il régnait un sentiment bizarre. »

L’heure tourne. Ce technicien pourrait passer la nuit au téléphone à raconter « des tonnes d’anecdotes ». Une dernière avant de raccrocher. C’était un jour où Wild Bunch, producteur principal du film, venait assister au tournage, avec d’autres responsables. Il fallait faire bonne figure, donner l’impression que tout était sous contrôle. Il a donc été décidé de filmer quelques scènes bien ciblées, au lycée Pasteur, ou de refaire des prises qui avaient déjà été faites. A la fin de la journée, un des visiteurs a lâché : « Ben, ça se passe plutôt bien en fait… »

Un commentaire pour Affaire David Hamilton: It’s no rock ‘n’ roll show (Looking back at the dark side of rock music’s magnetism)

  1. jcdurbant dit :

    That scene wasn’t in the original script. The truth is it was Marlon who came up with the idea,’ she said. They only told me about it before we had to film the scene and I was so angry. I should have called my agent or had my lawyer come to the set because you can’t force someone to do something that isn’t in the script, but at the time, I didn’t know that. Marlon said to me: « Maria, don’t worry, it’s just a movie, » but during the scene, even though what Marlon was doing wasn’t real, I was crying real tears. I felt humiliated and to be honest, I felt a little raped, both by Marlon and by Bertolucci. After the scene, Marlon didn’t console me or apologize. Thankfully, there was just one take.’

    Maria Schneider

    Bertolucci claimed during the 2013 interview that he and Brando came up with the idea of the scene, which involves butter. ‘The sequence of the butter is an idea that I had with Marlon in the morning before shooting it,’ Bertulocci said in the video, published on YouTube. But, he said, he was ‘horrible’ to Schneider when he didn’t tell her about his plans. ‘I wanted her reaction as a girl, not as an actress,’ he added. ‘And I think that she hated me and also Marlon because we didn’t tell her. Bertulocci said he felt guilty but didn’t regret shooting the scene as he did. ‘I didn’t want Maria to act her humiliation, her rage. I wanted Maria to feel, not to act the rage and humiliation,’ he said. ‘Then she hated me for all her life.’

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3997724/Last-Tango-Paris-director-Bernardo-Bertolucci-admits-butter-rape-scene-non-consensual-wanted-Maria-Schneider-s-feel-rage-humiliation.html

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :