Roumanie: Attention, un refus de sourire peut en cacher un autre ! (Looking back at a time when child abuse was legal, even celebrated)

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTeyEYIHHnQ71iZF7QCYolP8318m2w_jf_s0RmJJKMQSlQaw3UnJQhttps://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1/p526x296/1505677_4011098172898_26535197_n.jpghttps://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1/p280x280/1662283_4011066892116_2146793531_n.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/img.timeinc.net/time/magazine/archive/covers/1984/1101840521_400.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/cdn.thedailybeast.com/content/dailybeast/articles/2013/12/09/ukraine-protesters-smash-lenin-s-statue-in-kiev/jcr:content/image.crop.800.500.jpg/1386585933380.cached.jpghttps://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/t1/s526x296/1959218_4008407105623_2113883908_n.jpgUn des grands problèmes de la Russie – et plus encore de la Chine – est que, contrairement aux camps de concentration hitlériens, les leurs n’ont jamais été libérés et qu’il n’y a eu aucun tribunal de Nuremberg pour juger les crimes commis. Thérèse Delpech
Ne donne-t-on pas des médailles aussi bien aux dieux du stade qu’aux soldats tombés au front? L’Express
Je crois que c’est deux nouvelles qu’on peut appeler bonnes et mauvaises. La bonne nouvelle, c’est que je serai à Times Square. La mauvaise, c’est que je n’ai aucun vêtement sur moi. Je pense qu’elle va mourir. Nadia Comaneci (sur la réaction probable de sa mère encore au pays à l’annonce de son contrat publicitaire avec un fabricant de sous-vêtements américain, 1992)
Je viens d’un pays où il est très difficile de trouver des sous-vêtements et maintenant je viens ici et vous choisissez quel genre de sous-vêtements vous voulez porter : c’est pas bon, c’est du coton, c’est du lycra. Et je pense que je vais faire venir ma mère pour Noël. Et la première fois qu’elle va venir ici à New York, je vais la mettre dans une limousine – elle n’a jamais vu une limousine de sa vie – et je vais arrêter la voiture ici à Times Square : je pense qu’elle va mourir complètement. Nadia Comaneci
Il y a une chose qui intriguait le public: Comaneci ne souriait jamais, ne flirtait jamais avec la foule comme Korbut le faisait toujours. Il y avait des applaudissements fervents pour son brio, mais aucune histoire d’amour. « C’est pas sa nature de sourire », avait dit un juge roumaine, et Karolyi avait ajouté, « C’est son caractère grave ». Sports Illustrated
Comaneci’s large brown eyes, hidden under long bangs, are solemn, perhaps too solemn for a 14-year-old. She answered questions crisply, without elaboration. Has she ever been afraid? « Never. » Has she ever cried? « Never. » What was the happiest moment in her life? « When I won the European Championship. » What is the secret of her success? « I am so good because I work very hard for it. » What is her favorite event? « The uneven bars. I can put in more difficulties. It is more challenging. » How did she rate her performance in the American Cup? « It was a preparatory step toward the Olympics. » Does she enjoy being famous? « It is all right, but I don’t want to get too excited about it. » After a crash course in English, she was interviewed for ABC’s Wide World of Sports. How are you, Nadia? « Yes, I’m fine. » Are you looking forward to the Olympics? « I want for myself gold medal. » How many? « Five. » Does it bother you to be constantly compared to Olga Korbut? « I’m not Olga Korbut. I’m Nadia Comaneci. » Some say that Comaneci is not human enough, that she is a machine, that she has no emotions. But when she is not the center of attention and feels unwatched, she looks human, all right. She can grin like a child. She can get excited. Her favorite place in the U.S. is Disneyland. And she collects dolls. She has 60 of them, all in national costumes, lined up neatly on a shelf in her room at home. Four years ago, when Korbut started the little girls on this path, the Secretary General of the International Gymnastics Federation, Max Bangerter, branded her style « dangerous acrobatics which could lead to pelvic fractures. » The IGF at one point even considered having Korbut’s routine banned in an effort to halt the revolution she had so clearly begun. Obviously, it was less than successful. But how much danger does Karolyi feel Comaneci is in, really? « Ah, » he says, « but Comaneci never falls. » Sports Illustrated
What I found was a story about legal, even celebrated, child abuse. In the dark troughs along the road to the Olympics lay the bodies of the girls who stumbled on the way, broken by the work, pressure and humiliation. I found a girl who felt such shame at not making the Olympic team that she slit her wrists. A father who handed custody of his daughter over to her coach so she could keep skating. A coach who fed his gymnasts so little that federation officials had to smuggle food into their hotel rooms. A mother who hid her child’s chicken pox with makeup so she could compete. Coaches who motivated their athletes by calling them imbeciles, idiots, pigs and cows. (…) Whether we see any changes instituted to protect these young athletes hinges on our willingness to sacrifice a few medals for the sake of their health and well-being. (…) « I’m not suggesting that all elite gymnasts and figure skaters emerge from their sports unhealthy and poorly adjusted. Joan Ryan
The book’s strongest moments come from the sport of gymnastics, where judges reward the work of sleek, supple girls able to perform the hardest maneuvers and give poorer marks to those who have slipped toward womanhood and must rely on grace and form. Countless hours of intensive training, combined with dangerous eating patterns, lower the percentage of body fat to such extreme levels that natural maturation cannot take place. The risks include stunted growth, broken bones and premature osteoporosis, according to Ryan. The physiological effects are only one part of this problem. The psychological effects of growing up as a gymnast can lead to eating disorders, such as the anorexia that eventually killed former gymnast Christy Heinrich. Amy Jackson, pushed by a parent, was training heavily at 6. By the time she was a high school senior, she had tried to commit suicide. The sections on figure skating pale in comparison to the reporting on gymnastics, but Ryan makes it clear that the impact on girls is similarly grim: Once the skaters mature, gaining the hips and breasts that make them aerodynamically inferior to the younger skaters, their careers are effectively shot. Ryan has suggestions for cleaning up the mess in gymnastics and figure skating: The minimum-age requirements should be raised. There should be mandatory licensing of coaches and careful scrutiny by the usually feckless national governing bodies. And athletes should be required to remain in regular schools at least until they are 16. The Chicago Tribune
In January, Romanian gymnastics coach Florin Gheorghe was sentenced to eight years in prison by a Bucharest court for having beaten an 11-year-old athlete so severely during a 1993 practice session she died two days later of a broken neck. Gheorghe’s attorney admitted his client slapped the young woman but said such physical abuse was common practice in Romanian gymnastics. « This kind of punishment is a heritage from Bela Karolyi, » the attorney said, referring to the martinet coach who drove Nadia Comaneci and Mary Lou Retton to Olympic gold medals. Karolyi has denied the charge. – Aurelia Okino, a native Romanian whose daughter, Betty, trained with Karolyi a decade after his defection to the U.S., said in a 1992 interview she had become scared to answer the phone in her Elmhurst home. Aurelia Okino worried it would be Betty, then 17, calling from Karolyi’s gym in Houston with news of another injury, There had been serious elbow, back and knee injuries before Okino made the 1992 Olympic team and helped the U.S. women win a bronze medal in the team event. « Gymnastics is a brutal sport, » Betty Okino said matter-of-factly. Asked why she had let her daughter go that far, Okino said, « How do you deny a child her dream? »- In 1985, a few days before her enormously talented daughter, Tiffany, would win her only U.S. figure skating title, Marjorie Chin accepted the offer of a ride back to her Kansas City hotel from a reporter she had first met 20 minutes before. Tiffany, then 17, took a back seat to Marjorie in the reporter’s car. For 30 minutes, Mrs. Chin delivered relentless criticism of her daughter’s performance in practice that day. « If you keep it up, you’re not going to be the star of the ice show, you’re going to be just part of the supporting cast, » Mrs. Chin said, over and over. – Several times in the last few years, officials of the U.S. Figure Skating Association have spoken to a prominent ice dancer about her eating habits. The ice dancer, 32 years old, still looks like a wraith. One of those stories came from a wire service. The other three are personal recollections–mine, not Ryan’s. Her book, subtitled « the making and breaking of elite gymnasts and figure skaters » (Doubleday, 243 pp., $22.95), has much more frightening tales to tell. Ryan recounts in compelling detail the stories of Julissa Gomez and Christy Henrich, gymnasts whose pursuit of glory proved fatal; of figure skater Amy Grossman, whose mother said, « Skating was God »; of coaches like Karolyi and one of his disciples, Rick Newman, whose ideas of motivating adolescent girls include demeaning them at a time when their egos are most fragile; and of parents who hide their irresponsibility behind the notion of « trying to get the best for my child. » Such is the sordid underbelly of the Olympics’ two most glamorous sports. Only in the last three years has the nation begun to have a vague awareness of this life under the sequins and leotards. Ryan began to get a clear view of these problems while doing research for a newspaper story before the 1992 Olympics. That led her to write this book, in which the villains are both coaches and parents. She lets Karolyi skewer himself with his own words. She shows how parents lose sight of the fundamental notion of protecting their children from harm, so blinded are they by possible fame and fortune. The cause of such intemperate adult behavior is partly the peculiar competitive demands to jump higher and twirl faster, particularly in gymnastics, that favor girls with tiny bodies over young women developing hips and breasts. That puts them in a race against puberty, creating a window of opportunity so narrow it leads to foolhardiness. Neither figure skating nor gymnastics is without athletes whose experiences are positive, a point that needed more attention in Ryan’s book than the disclaimer, « I’m not suggesting that all elite gymnasts and figure skaters emerge from their sports unhealthy and poorly adjusted. » A better balance might have been struck if the author had given voice to the likes of Olympic champions Retton and Kristi Yamaguchi. Ryan’s basic premise about child abuse still is thoroughly supported by interviews, anecdotes and factual evidence. « Little Girls in Pretty Boxes » should be a manifesto for change in the rules of these two sports, so that women with adult bodies still can compete. It should be a wakeup call to parents who have abdicated their responsibility for their childrens’ well-being. Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up hooked on sports that don’t let them grow up . Philip Hersch
La réalité de sa Russie … est à l’opposé des idéaux olympiques et des droits de l’Homme les plus élémentaires. Il n’est pas possible d’ignorer le côté obscur de son régime – la répression qui broie les âmes, les nouvelles lois cruelles contre le blasphème et l’homosexualité, ou encore le système juridique corrompu qui permet de condamner des dissidents politiques à de longues peines sur la foi de fausses accusations. The New York Times
Les Jeux Olympiques, créés dans le but de rapprocher les pays autour du sport, semble avoir eu l’effet inverse sur les relations américano-russes. L’animosité grandissante entre les deux anciens protagonistes de la Guerre froide était visible lors de l’ouverture des Jeux, lors de laquelle une ex-patineuse artistique qui avait tweeté une photo à connotation raciste du président Obama a été choisie pour l’allumage symbolique de la vasque olympique. Cela s’est produit au lendemain de la fuite via YouTube de l’enregistrement d’un appel téléphonique entre l’ambassadeur américain à Kiev et Victoria Nuland, une responsable du Département d’État, dans lequel on entend cette dernière prononcer les mots « Fuck the European Union ». L’administration Obama avait immédiatement accusé Moscou d’avoir intercepté et fuité l’appel, ce que les Russes n’ont qu’à peine démenti. [ … ] Alors qu’il entame sa 15ème année au pouvoir, le président Vladimir Poutine avait espéré que ces Jeux, les premiers sur le sol russe depuis les Jeux olympiques de Moscou en 1980 que les Etats-Unis avaient boycotté, mettrait en valeur la « nouvelle Russie » émergeant des cendres de l’Union soviétique. Au lieu de cela, les États-Unis et leurs alliés occidentaux ont systématiquement dépeint la Russie sous les traits d’une autocratie corrompue. [ … ] Membre Démocrate de la commission du renseignement de la Chambre des Représentants, Dutch Ruppersberger a déclaré à CNN jeudi qu’il craignait que « l’ego » de Poutine mettrait en danger les athlètes et les visiteurs. Pour sa part, le Département d’Etat a conseillé aux membres de l’équipe olympique des États-Unis de ne pas porter leurs tenues officielles aux couleurs de « Team USA » en dehors des sites olympiques officiels, pour leur propre sécurité. Les tensions entre les deux pays ont été les plus fortes sur la question des droits des homosexuels. [ … ] Mais ce n’est pas tout ce qui les divise. Le donneur d’alerte de la NSA Edward Snowden se trouve encore en Russie, qui lui a accordé l’asile temporaire l’an dernier. Sa présence à Moscou est une source d’embarras persistant pour l’administration Obama, et les responsables du renseignement américain ont ouvertement exprimé leurs inquiétudes quant à la possibilité qu’il soit désormais sous l’influence de leurs homologues russes. [ … ] Les deux pays s’affrontent également sur comment gérer le programme nucléaire de l’Iran et sur ce qu’il faut faire par rapport à la Syrie, cette dernière étant un proche allié de la Russie. La crise en Ukraine, où les manifestants cherchent à évincer le président pro-russe Viktor Ianoukovitch, ne fait qu’ajouter aux tensions. The Hill
How does a nation become self-governing when so much of « self » is so rotten? Run-of-the-mill analyses that Ukraine is a « young democracy » with corrupt elites, an ethnic divide and a bullying neighbor don’t suffice. Ukraine is what it is because Ukrainians are what they are. The former doesn’t change until the latter does. (…) that’s what people said about Ukraine during the so-called Orange Revolution in 2004, or about Lebanon’s Cedar Revolution in 2005, or about the Arab Spring in 2011. The revolution will be televised—and then it will be squandered. (…) The homo Sovieticus Ukrainians should fear the most may not be Vladimir Putin after all. Bret Stephens
Avec la même vigueur que ses compatriotes, cependant, le cinéaste filme un pays où les passe-droits pèsent aussi lourd que la terreur politique, jadis. Nul, en effet, ne résiste aux prébendes de Cornelia, pas même le flic présenté comme un modèle incorruptible : il résiste, il résiste, mais il cède comme tous les autres… Télérama
Quand tu prends le train en Roumanie, personne n’achète son ticket au guichet. Tu montes, tu t’assois et tu donnes la moitié de ce que tu aurais dû payer au contrôleur. Rasvan (28 ans)
A la fin des années 1970, le corps enfantin fait fantasmer. Brooke Shields, 13 ans prostituée dans La Petite de Louis Malle et en une de magazine, nue et outrageusement maquillée; Jodie Foster elle aussi pute sous la caméra de Martin Scorsese dans Taxi Driver nous rappellent qu’une certaine forme de pédophilie artistique était alors acceptable. Le traitement médiatique de Nadia Comaneci à cette époque fait écho à cette «mode». Cette fascination pour les corps androgynes et pourtant dénudés est-elle un signe du passé ou cette marchandisation de l’enfance est-elle encore de mise? C’est très troublant le passage que j’ai écrit sur les petites filles de l’Ouest et celles de l’Est. Ces petites filles chargées de maquillage un peu comme des petites esclaves et elle, Nadia, qui arrive le visage pâle, un peu comme une guerrière. J’adore cette image, j’adore le fait qu’elle était entre fille et garçon, elle échappe à son genre pendant un moment. Le titre par exemple, c’est la première phrase que j’ai écrite. Les journalistes occidentaux à Montréal lui demandaient de sourire mais elle ne souriait pas parce que c’est difficile et qu’elle n’avait pas que cela à faire. Sa réponse était «je sais sourire mais une fois que j’ai accompli ma mission». Il y a eu beaucoup de commentaires sur son visage triste, sobre. Pour moi, elle leur a fait un pied de nez, du genre je ne suis pas une petite poupée. (…) Ça a longtemps fait partie de mon adolescence. Quand je suis arrivée en France, ayant été élevée dans un autre système, j’ai été très brutalisée par la consommation. Ce n’est pas une pose, ça m’a pris de front. J’avais 13 ans et je n’avais jamais vu quelqu’un dormir dehors. Ça m’a bouleversée. Pendant des années, quand je disais aux gens qu’il y avait des trucs bien en Roumanie, c’était un discours impossible à entendre. Soit je passais pour une débile, soit on me disait que je ne savais pas de quoi je parlais. Evidemment le système était dévoyé, et la Roumanie n’était pas un système communiste, le communisme n’y a jamais été réellement appliqué. C’est comme quand on parle de la surveillance. Ça me fait mourir de rire. Les gens me disent, il y avait la Securitate en Roumanie. Oui c’est vrai. Mais c’était des baltringues. Des gens qui en suivaient d’autres. Ici votre pass navigo vous localise partout. On a votre nom, votre date de naissance, c’est une atteinte à votre liberté. Pareil pour les caméras vidéo, mais c’est accepté. On pense que ça va être plus pratique! Le succès du capitalisme, c’est d’arriver à faire accepter des choses qui dans le communisme étaient considérées comme horribles. Le capitalisme est nettement mieux marketé. (…) J’étais en France à ce moment-là et comme tous les Roumains, bouche bée. Plus que ça: j’étais sidérée. Parce que pour moi ça ne pouvait pas changer, c’était éternel. J’ai été élevée sous le portrait de Ceausescu. Mais cette sensation de malaise incroyable parce qu’on ne voit pas ses juges. Ça ne commence pas bien un procès où on ne voit pas les juges. Le truc que les gens qui l’arrêtent ratent, c’est qu’ils ont l’air d’un couple de petits vieux. Ils sont pathétiques. Ils ne font pas peur. On a pitié. Lui tremblote, elle a l’air usé, avec son fichu. Ils sont fatigués. Force de l’image mais qui est ratée selon moi. A cette période, il y a eu beaucoup de morts en Roumanie, le contraire de la révolution de velours. Les gens ne savaient plus qui était qui et se tirait dessus. Il n’y a eu aucun procès des sécuristes. Inclure des passages sur la Roumanie dans le roman, ça ne s’est pas décidé tout de suite, ça a pris plusieurs mois. J’étais en Roumanie à ce moment-là. Quand je voyais mes amis là-bas, ce qu’ils me racontaient me semblait tellement contredire ma documentation que je l’ai mis en scène. Moi j’étais armée avec tous mes bouquins et je rencontre des gens de moins de 30 ans qui n’ont pas vraiment vécu cette époque et qui en ont une nostalgie incroyable. On a toujours la nostalgie de son enfance, mais surtout ils en bavent tellement aujourd’hui. Ils me disent «moi mes parents ils partaient en vacances, ils allaient au resto, nous on doit payer nos études et on n’a pas les moyens, on peut pas sortir de toutes façons parce qu’on n’a pas d’argent». Il y a un énorme H&M au centre de Bucarest, j’ai l’impression qu’il est tout le temps vide. Lola Lafon

Attention: un refus de sourire peut en cacher un autre  !

Au lendemain de la chute, payée au prix fort mais pas gagnée d’avance étant donné la corruption généralisée, de la maison Ianoukovitch et de la découverte populaire de son Neverland qui 25 ans après les époux Ceausescu avait un étrange air de déjà vu …

Et de Jeux olympiques dignes des plus beaux jours de la Guerre froide …

Comme avec le roman que vient de sortir Lola Lafon sur la gymnaste prodige roumaine Nadia Comaneci, passée d’un seul coup de Héros du Travail Socialiste à femme-sandwich d’une marque de sous-vêtements américaine  …

Et un excellent dossier du site Slate.fr sur l’ancienne terre des ogres Ceausescu …

Comment ne pas repenser à toute une époque aujourd’hui largement oubliée où, a l’instar des Brooke Shields et autres Jodie Foster dans le cinéma, le corps de nos enfants était non seulement légal mais célébré ?

Mais aussi ne pas voir au-delà de l’image d’épinal que nous pouvons en avoir de travailleurs bon marché et de voleurs de poules voire de châteaux de buveurs de sang  …

La frustration d’une population écartelée entre d’un côté les nécessaires perfusions du FMI et une corruption, comme le rappelle un film roumain sorti en France le mois dernier, effectivement aussi endémique que phénoménale d’où une perte démographique de 13% depuis la fin du communisme (soit quelque 3 millions pour une population à l’origine de 23 millions à destination principalement de l’Italie, de l’Allemagne et de l’Espagne) …

Et de l’autre les craintes de voir leur sol et sous-sol pollués et bradés à des intérêts étrangers par des dirigeants tous aussi véreux les uns que les autres suite à la découverte du plus grand gisement d’or et d’argent d’Europe (300 tonnes et 1.600 tonnes respectivement pour une dizaine de milliards d’euros en jeu) et du troisième gisement européen de gaz de schiste après la Pologne et la France (quelque 1.444 milliards de mètres cubes) ?

Autrement dit, le dépit tout particulier mais probablement pas si rare en ces contrées autrefois martyrisées par le communisme (dont d’ailleurs comme en Chine on attend toujours les procès de Nuremberg) et pas vraiment gâtées par leurs successeurs …

De se retrouver avec ce que les Roumains appellent eux-mêmes un « pauvre pays riche » ?

Lola Lafon sur Nadia Comaneci, la Roumanie, le capitalisme et les corps: l’entretien tablette

Dans «La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais», la romancière raconte l’histoire de la gymnaste Nadia Comaneci, mais surtout à travers elle aborde les questions du genre, du corps féminin, de l’Europe de la guerre froide .

Ursula Michel

Slate.fr

04/02/2014

A l’occasion de la sortie de son nouveau roman, Lola Lafon s’est prêtée à l’exercice de l’entretien tablette de Slate.fr, où les questions sont remplacées par des vidéos, des images, des photos ou encore des dessins. Une autre manière d’aborder l’univers de l’artiste.

A vec ce quatrième roman, La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais, Lola Lafon exhume de nos mémoires Nadia Comaneci, la jeune gymnaste roumaine qui a affolé les compteurs, les journalistes et le public aux Jeux olympiques de Montréal en 1976. Ce «perfect 10», note que personne n’avait jusque-là acquise, la gamine s’en empare et fait découvrir par la même à l’Occident ce petit pays inconnu derrière le rideau de fer. Produit d’un système totalitaire, Comaneci fascine mais l’histoire la rattrape et la chute du mur de Berlin scellera son destin de star déchue.

De Bucarest à Miami, des années 1970 à cet hiver 1989, Lola Lafon revisite le mythe, sonde les fantasmes que ce corps androgyne a provoqués et interroge le manichéisme est/ouest qui a façonné la conception du monde du siècle dernier.

Pendant une poignée de secondes, le monde a retenu son souffle en cet été 1976. La minuscule Roumaine a fait vaciller les championnes russes, elle a transfiguré les possibles de la gymnastique et a donné à la Roumanie une notoriété internationale. Mais comment décide-t-on d’en faire un personnage de roman?

Je ne sais pas quand est arrivée l’idée du personnage de Nadia mais ça faisait un moment que ça traînait dans ma tête. Au bout de quelques mois de documentation, j’ai réalisé que ce n’était pas un roman sur le sport mais que ça réunissait toutes mes thématique: le genre et le mouvement, le corps féminin dans l’espace au sens large, l’espace qu’on s’autorise et celui qui est autorisé, le bloc de l’est et de l’ouest.

Dans le roman précédent [Nous sommes les oiseaux de la tempête qui s’annonce], il y avait déjà beaucoup de choses sur la danse, le corps et le mouvement. Après, des difficultés et d’obstacles sont apparus: six mois de documentation en trois langues qui ont fini par m’ensevelir. Il a fallu arrêter d’ingurgiter.

J’ai alors commencé à écrire une première moitié, mais ça n’allait pas. Il fallait épouser le corps de Nadia, être avec elle, acérée. Pas développer des millions de phrases, avec des adjectifs. Je cherchais la langue, cette fluidité, le passage d’un geste à l’autre comme d’une phrase à l’autre. J’ai coupé dans le texte comme jamais avant.

Et puis j’ai vécu en Roumanie, donc il y avait ma subjectivité assumée. Je voulais faire revivre l’Europe. C’est une métaphore énorme, mais les dix centimètres de la poutre, je les ai ressentis tout du long en évoquant le thème politique. Je me suis dit qu’il fallait rendre compte de Ceausescu et de ses décrets (j’en ai d’ailleurs découverts beaucoup après, j’étais trop jeune à l’époque). Sur le corps des femmes et l’avortement, c’était terrible. On voit aujourd’hui que Ceausescu n’a pas l’apanage de ce genre de décisions… Je voulais rendre compte sans nostalgie ni apologie de cette époque, et ne pas oublier qu’on a idolâtré cette gamine et elle était le pur produit d’un système communiste.

J’ai écrit plusieurs mois sans la voix de la narratrice. C’est mon premier roman à la 3e personne. Et à un moment donné, cet échange épistolaire entre elle et Nadia s’est imposé. Je me suis demandé si c’était juste un retour vers une habitude d’écriture mais en fait non, c’était nécessaire pour lui redonner la parole, pour qu’elle ne reste pas qu’un corps, un corps extraordinaire soit, mais sinon j’étais du côté de ceux qui la regardaient et je voulais lui redonner le pouvoir sur le texte, même fictivement.

A aucun moment, je n’ai envisagé de contacter Nadia. Ce roman est une rêverie, pas une biographie. Je me suis arrêtée en 1990 dans le roman parce qu’après, c’est le réel, c’est sa vie qui lui appartient. J’essaie de rendre compte de la fin d’une époque, d’un parcours qui s’arrête avec le mur qui s’écroule.

A la fin des années 1970, le corps enfantin fait fantasmer. Brooke Shields, 13 ans prostituée dans La Petite de Louis Malle et en une de magazine, nue et outrageusement maquillée; Jodie Foster elle aussi pute sous la caméra de Martin Scorsese dans Taxi Driver nous rappellent qu’une certaine forme de pédophilie artistique était alors acceptable. Le traitement médiatique de Nadia Comaneci à cette époque fait écho à cette «mode». Cette fascination pour les corps androgynes et pourtant dénudés est-elle un signe du passé ou cette marchandisation de l’enfance est-elle encore de mise?

C’est très troublant le passage que j’ai écrit sur les petites filles de l’Ouest et celles de l’Est. Ces petites filles chargées de maquillage un peu comme des petites esclaves et elle, Nadia, qui arrive le visage pâle, un peu comme une guerrière. J’adore cette image, j’adore le fait qu’elle était entre fille et garçon, elle échappe à son genre pendant un moment.

Le titre par exemple, c’est la première phrase que j’ai écrite. Les journalistes occidentaux à Montréal lui demandaient de sourire mais elle ne souriait pas parce que c’est difficile et qu’elle n’avait pas que cela à faire. Sa réponse était «je sais sourire mais une fois que j’ai accompli ma mission». Il y a eu beaucoup de commentaires sur son visage triste, sobre. Pour moi, elle leur a fait un pied de nez, du genre je ne suis pas une petite poupée. Aujourd’hui, avec les mini-miss, les mannequins de 15 ans, la représentation est plus subtile, mais d’une telle agressivité envers les femmes. Les filles de 15 ans sont photoshopées et celles de 30 ans s’en veulent de ne pas leur ressembler. C’est presque un complot contre les femmes.

Si les questions de genre sont au cœur de l’écriture de Lola Lafon, la dimension féministe tient une place tout aussi importante. Comment celle qui attaque les représentations machistes et le commerce du corps dans son travail romanesque se situe-t-elle face au nouveau féminisme incarné par les Femen?

Je n’aime pas l’idée des féministes qui s’entre-déchirent. Mais je trouve bizarre d’adopter un langage qui plaise tant aux hommes pour dénoncer les injustices faites aux femmes. Et puis adopter un langage de pub… je me demande ce qu’il en reste. Finalement, ces interventions ne sont pas si dérangeantes. Les religieux sont choqués, mais on s’en fout. Je crois que la leader, Inna Shevchenko avait dit «les anciennes féministes ce sont des femmes qui lisaient des livres». Mais un livre, c’est parfois beaucoup plus dérangeant qu’une photo. Les Femen, c’est du pop féminisme. C’est digérable. Si grâce à elles d’autres femmes ailleurs se sont libérées, s’il y a eu des prises de conscience, tant mieux. Tous les moyens sont bons finalement.

Son premier roman Une fièvre impossible à négocier arborait le symbole anarchiste. Au-delà d’une pose, cette implication politique irrigue ses autres romans, comme c’est encore le cas dans La petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais où la narratrice, capitaliste de culture (comme on peut l’être pour une religion), dialogue avec Nadia Comaneci, symbole d’un certain communisme. Un discours comparatif entre Est et Ouest, capitalisme et communisme qui fait voler en éclat les idées reçues et la bien-pensance occidentale. Un roman anarchiste peut-être, iconoclaste sans aucun doute.

Ça a longtemps fait partie de mon adolescence. Quand je suis arrivée en France, ayant été élevée dans un autre système, j’ai été très brutalisée par la consommation. Ce n’est pas une pose, ça m’a pris de front. J’avais 13 ans et je n’avais jamais vu quelqu’un dormir dehors. Ça m’a bouleversée.

Pendant des années, quand je disais aux gens qu’il y avait des trucs bien en Roumanie, c’était un discours impossible à entendre. Soit je passais pour une débile, soit on me disait que je ne savais pas de quoi je parlais. Evidemment le système était dévoyé, et la Roumanie n’était pas un système communiste, le communisme n’y a jamais été réellement appliqué. C’est comme quand on parle de la surveillance. Ça me fait mourir de rire. Les gens me disent, il y avait la Securitate en Roumanie. Oui c’est vrai. Mais c’était des baltringues. Des gens qui en suivaient d’autres.

Ici votre pass navigo vous localise partout. On a votre nom, votre date de naissance, c’est une atteinte à votre liberté. Pareil pour les caméras vidéo, mais c’est accepté. On pense que ça va être plus pratique! Le succès du capitalisme, c’est d’arriver à faire accepter des choses qui dans le communisme étaient considérées comme horribles. Le capitalisme est nettement mieux marketé.

Ayant passé une grande partie de son enfance en Roumanie sous le régime Ceausescu, Lola Lafon est fortement critique à l’égard de ce système mort en 1989. Quelques jours avant Noël, une révolution balaie le pouvoir en place, un simulacre de procès est organisé et le couple dirigeant est exécuté. Ces images, d’une violence inouïe, ont tourné en boucle sur les écrans du monde entier à l’époque. L’occasion de les commenter avec la romancière était trop belle.

J’étais en France à ce moment-là et comme tous les Roumains, bouche bée. Plus que ça: j’étais sidérée. Parce que pour moi ça ne pouvait pas changer, c’était éternel. J’ai été élevée sous le portrait de Ceausescu. Mais cette sensation de malaise incroyable parce qu’on ne voit pas ses juges. Ça ne commence pas bien un procès où on ne voit pas les juges. Le truc que les gens qui l’arrêtent ratent, c’est qu’ils ont l’air d’un couple de petits vieux. Ils sont pathétiques. Ils ne font pas peur. On a pitié. Lui tremblote, elle a l’air usé, avec son fichu. Ils sont fatigués. Force de l’image mais qui est ratée selon moi. A cette période, il y a eu beaucoup de morts en Roumanie, le contraire de la révolution de velours. Les gens ne savaient plus qui était qui et se tirait dessus. Il n’y a eu aucun procès des sécuristes.

Inclure des passages sur la Roumanie dans le roman, ça ne s’est pas décidé tout de suite, ça a pris plusieurs mois. J’étais en Roumanie à ce moment-là. Quand je voyais mes amis là-bas, ce qu’ils me racontaient me semblait tellement contredire ma documentation que je l’ai mis en scène. Moi j’étais armée avec tous mes bouquins et je rencontre des gens de moins de 30 ans qui n’ont pas vraiment vécu cette époque et qui en ont une nostalgie incroyable. On a toujours la nostalgie de son enfance, mais surtout ils en bavent tellement aujourd’hui. Ils me disent «moi mes parents ils partaient en vacances, ils allaient au resto, nous on doit payer nos études et on n’a pas les moyens, on peut pas sortir de toutes façons parce qu’on n’a pas d’argent». Il y a un énorme H&M au centre de Bucarest, j’ai l’impression qu’il est tout le temps vide. Ces propos venaient contredire la narratrice, c’est vraiment la mise en scène du processus d’écriture. La confrontation entre la documentation et le réel. Et la voix de Nadia, c’est un peu la mienne. Je lui prends la main.

En plus de son activité romanesque, Lola Lafon s’adonne aussi à la chanson, avec deux albums à son actif. Loin de la culture rock qu’on pouvait imaginer, son admiration se porte sur une chanteuse à texte dont elle a eu l’occasion de reprendre un titre marquant: Göttingen de Barbara.

Je reviens toujours à elle. C’est une rebelle, une iconoclaste. J’ai découvert son œuvre très tard. Ma grande sœur l’écoutait, mais c’est un journaliste qui a titillé ma curiosité bien après. Je m’y suis alors plongée. Elle incarne le genre de femme qui me subjugue. Elle est intemporelle et d’une indépendance incroyable. Jean Corti m’a invité sur scène à interpréter ce titre, Göttingen. Je le chantais à un moment où des enfants sans papiers étaient arrêtés dans des écoles. J’étais totalement bouleversée.

A l’heure où les romans finissent souvent sur grand écran, Lola Lafon ne fait pas exception à la règle. La réalisatrice de Sur la planche, Leïla Kilani, travaillerait à l’adaptation de son précédent ouvrage Nous sommes les oiseaux de la tempête qui s’annonce. Info ou intox?

J’adore ce film, extraordinaire de poésie de brutalité et de rigueur. On s’est rencontrées avec Leïla Kilani et on a travaillé sur un découpage de Nous sommes les oiseaux de la tempête qui s’annonce. Puis, je me suis lancée dans l’écriture de La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais, elle dans son nouveau film donc le projet en suspens pour l’instant. Mais je pense que ça se fera. Mais c’est mieux que je reste à distance. Le roman ne m’appartient plus. Quand on vit deux ans avec un livre, il faut savoir s’en détacher à un moment. Et je suis tellement une control freak que sur un tournage, les gens craqueraient.

Propos recueillis par Ursula Michel

• La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais de Lola Lafon, Actes Sud.

Voir aussi:

Savez-vous pourquoi la Roumanie n’entrera pas dans Schengen? A cause de la corruption

Malgré des condamnations médiatisées et des progrès indéniables en matière d’indépendance de la justice, la corruption reste solidement ancrée en Roumanie. Et les rapports de Bruxelles n’y changent rien.

Marianne Rigaux

25/02/2014

D’après le rapport publié le 3 février par la Commission européenne, un Roumain sur 4 a été confronté à un pot-de-vin dans l’année écoulée. Une économie parallèle qui représenterait 31% du PIB national. Alarmant, mais pas nouveau.

En Roumanie, il y a la haute corruption, celle qui implique des représentants politiques et des magistrats, parfois condamnés. Et puis, celle, tenace, quotidienne, qui relève presque du mode de vie.

Pour Valentin, 30 ans, pas besoin de lui suggérer deux fois.

«Un policier qui te trouve saoul au volant commence par annoncer le prix de l’amende, 700 lei par exemple (155 euros). Tu protestes pour la forme. Tu es sûr qu’il va proposer de ”payer la moitié maintenant”. C’est le signe qu’il faut lui glisser un billet de 100 lei (22 euros).»

Un billet contre des draps propres

Idem pour obtenir une autorisation ou pour éviter un contrôle des normes. «Le pot-de-vin est la règle partout, on a laissé les Roumains aller top loin», déplore Valentin. Lui qui a travaillé pendant deux ans dans les marchés publics l’affirme:

«Ils sont tous biaisés.»

Quel que soit le sujet abordé avec un interlocuteur roumain, la conclusion sera toujours la même:

«Le problème de ce pays, c’est la corruption.»

Elle touche tous les secteurs: justice, politique, économie, médias, santé.

Un expatrié relativise.

«Les pots-de-vin pour accélérer un dossier administratif reculent à Bucarest, mais c’est vrai qu’ils restent de rigueur en milieu hospitalier.»

Lui-même n’a pas hésité lors d’une hospitalisation. Pour être bien traité, passer avant les autres ou avoir des draps propres, glissez votre bakchich dans la blouse.

L’habitude est si tenace que les personnes donnent parfois avant même qu’on ne leur demande. Rasvan, 28 ans, explique.

«Quand tu prends le train en Roumanie, personne n’achète son ticket au guichet. Tu montes, tu t’assois et tu donnes la moitié de ce que tu aurais dû payer au contrôleur.»

Le contrôle annuel de Bruxelles

Toute l’économie marche ainsi. C’est là l’héritage d’un demi-siècle de communisme bouleversé depuis les années 1990 par un capitalisme débridé, dans un Etat permissif, dont la tête est elle-même touchée. En Roumanie, la corruption part d’en haut et infuse toute la société.

«En 2007, les Roumains pensaient que la haute corruption allait baisser, mais le gouvernement n’écoute pas Bruxelles», constate Valentin. Lorsque la Roumanie a rejoint l’UE il y a 7 ans, Bruxelles a imposé un Mécanisme de coopération et de vérification (MCV) pour contrôler les efforts du pays en matière de réformes judiciaires et de lutte contre la corruption. Une première dans l’histoire de l’Union.

A chaque contrôle annuel, la Roumanie reçoit généralement un «peut mieux faire». Le dernier rapport MCV rendu en janvier attribuait à Bucarest un bon point pour les récentes condamnations de dirigeants hauts placés, mais pointait aussi une tentative inquiétante.

Tranquille, le Parlement se vote une «super-immunité»

Ainsi, en décembre le Parlement roumain a voté une «super-immunité» afin que les députés, les sénateurs, le président de la République, mais aussi des professions libérales ne puissent plus être poursuivis pour des crimes comme la corruption ou les abus de pouvoir commis dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions.

Autrement dit, une amnistie, sans que Bruxelles ne puisse intervenir. Pratique, mais aussi ironique, quand 28 membres du Parlement –dont certains qui ont voté cette immunité– sont actuellement jugés ou en train de purger des peines de prison pour corruption. Cristina Guseth, présidente de l’ONG de défense de l’Etat de droit Freedom House Roumanie parle de «mardi noir de la démocratie roumaine».

Un mois plus tard, l’amendement a été retoqué par la Cour constitutionnelle roumaine, mais la tentative a été consignée dans l’évaluation de la Commission européenne. L’avertissement n’a pourtant pas empêché début février l’entrée en vigueur d’un nouveau code pénal très controversé, plutôt conciliant avec les auteurs de corruption. Là encore, la Commission européenne ne peut contraindre Bucarest à revoir ses ajustements.

La seule vraie punition, c’est Schengen. Faute de véritables progrès dans la lutte contre la corruption, l’adhésion de la Roumanie à l’espace de libre circulation est sans cesse reportée depuis plusieurs années. Avec la tendance des douaniers à se faire graisser la patte, impossible de confier la gestion des frontières extérieures à la Roumanie.

Un «M. anti-corruption» détesté

Présentée ainsi, la Roumanie ne semble guère avoir évolué depuis 1989. Malgré tout, Horia Georgescu reste optimiste. Ce juriste de 36 ans dirige l’Agence nationale pour l’intégrité (ANI) qui a la lourde tâche de faire respecter l’intégrité des élus et des hauts fonctionnaires publics roumains.

«Les hommes politiques me détestent, me menacent parfois, mais je ne me laisse pas intimider. La société civile fait confiance à l’agence.»

Son équipe de 35 «inspecteurs de l’intégrité» vérifie actuellement la situation de plus de 2.700 élus et fonctionnaires publics.

Créée en 2008 à la demande de Bruxelles, l’ANI est régulièrement citée en exemple d’efficacité. Ses investigations ont permis de faire tomber 10 ministres, 65 parlementaires et 700 élus locaux pour conflits d’intérêts, incompatibilités ou avoirs non justifiés. Ce qui est à la fois rassurant et inquiétant. La justice roumaine fonctionne, mais la tâche semble immense.

«On fait ce qu’on peut. On espère que la Roumanie va devenir un modèle pour d’autres pays qui s’inspireraient de nos méthodes. Parce que c’est facile de dire ”chez nous, il n’y a pas de corruption” si on n’a pas les outils pour enquêter sur cette corruption.»

Alors, quand la Commission européenne a révélé que la corruption touchait l’ensemble des pays européens, Horia Georgescu s’est senti tout de même un peu rassuré.

«Maintenant, on attend que Bruxelles mette en place des outils pour les membres de l’UE, mais la lutte contre la corruption est d’abord une question de confiance dans les institutions nationales.»

4 ans ferme pour l’ancien Premier ministre

Une autre institution affiche de beaux tableaux de chasse en la matière: la Direction nationale anticorruption (DNA). Depuis 2002, ce parquet financier a fait traduire en justice plus de 5.000 personnes pour corruption moyenne et haute, dont 2.000 condamnées définitivement. Ses experts sont régulièrement invités dans les pays voisins pour présenter l’efficacité du «modèle roumain».

Parmi les personnalités condamnées à de la prison ferme figurent un ancien Premier ministre (4 ans), un patron du club de foot (3 ans), deux anciens ministres de l’Agriculture (3 ans), une ancienne ministre des Sports (5 ans) et de nombreux parlementaires.

La condamnation à quatre ans ferme d’Adrian Nastase est celle qui a le plus intéressé les médias. Premier ministre de 2000 à 2004, négociateur de l’adhésion de la Roumanie à l’Otan et à l’UE, il a plongé pour avoir détourné plus de 1,5 million d’euros pour sa campagne électorale.

D’après Livia Sapaclan, porte parole de la DNA, «le nombre de condamnés définitifs pour corruption de haut niveau (soit plus de 10.000 euros reçus en pots-de-vin) est passé de 155 en 2006 à plus de 1.000 en 2013». Des chiffres encore une fois aussi satisfaisants qu’alarmants sur l’état de corruption du pays.

Réveiller le citoyen

Les jeunes Roumains rencontrés restent mitigés devant ces chiffres. «Les résultats de la DNA, c’est juste des exemples sur-médiatisés. Pour un ancien ministre attrapé, combien font des trucs plus graves sans être condamnés?», s’interroge Valentin.

Andrei et Romana, deux jeunes journalistes d’investigation pour Rise Project, préfèrent en rire.

«Au moins, on ne manque pas de travail! La plupart des médias roumains enquêtent, mais aucun ne le fait avec notre sérieux.»

Rise project a vu le jour en 2011. Il compte aujourd’hui 10 journalistes bénévoles et quelques jolies révélations à son actif, mais Romana veut rester modeste.

«Tu ne sais jamais si untel est condamné parce que tu as écrit un article sur ses conflits d’intérêt ou s’il l’aurait été quoi qu’il en soit.»

Le rapport de la Commission européenne sur la corruption? «Du blabla lointain», juge Andrei. Pour eux, la lutte contre la corruption ne part pas de Bruxelles, mais du citoyen, celui qu’il faut réveiller. Dommage que peu de médias roumains aient cette même envie. Peut-être sont-ils corrompus eux aussi…

Voir également:

Les Roumains en ont assez de se faire voler

Contrairement aux idées reçues, la Roumanie est riche. Mais elle se fait piller. Et si les Roumains ont remporté une victoire contre un projet de mine d’or potentiellement nocif pour l’environnement, la mobilisation continue contre l’exploration des gaz de schiste.

Marianne Rigaux

Slate

01/10/2013

Dimanche 6 octobre, des milliers de Roumains sont descendus dans les rues de Bucarest pour protester contre le gouvernement de centre gauche accusé de favoriser un projet canadien de mine d’or contesté par les scientifiques.

Contrairement aux idées reçues, la Roumanie n’est pas dépourvue de richesses. Mais ce n’est pas elle qui en profite le plus. A l’ouest, il y a l’or convoité par des Canadiens. A l’est, les gaz de schiste promis aux Américains. Et au milieu, les manifestations des Roumains.

En autorisant des compagnies étrangères à exploiter son sous-sol dans l’espoir d’en tirer des bénéfices, le gouvernement a fait exploser la colère des citoyens. Il doit aujourd’hui faire machine à arrière.

Prenons les habitants de Rosia Montana par exemple. S’ils creusaient sous leurs maisons, ils seraient les plus riches de Roumanie. Sous ce village de Transylvanie se trouve le plus grand gisement d’or (300 tonnes) et d’argent (1.600 tonnes) d’Europe. Que tente d’extraire et d’exploiter depuis 1995 une société canadienne, Gabriel Resources.

Le projet prévoit désormais une exploitation intensive à ciel ouvert pendant seize ans, le recours à de grandes quantités de cyanure pour séparer l’or de la boue. Une pratique controversée, interdite dans certains pays d’Europe. Pendant des années, le dossier a connu peu d’avancées concrètes. Sollicité en 2011 pour donner son feu vert, le ministère roumain de l’Environnement n’a même jamais donné de réponse, tandis que la mobilisation contre le projet restait assez locale.

Qui n’en profiterait pas?

Mais voilà: Bucarest a besoin d’argent pour remplir ses caisses vidées par la crise. Car la Roumanie vit depuis trois ans sous perfusion du FMI. Les retombées économiques attendues pour ce pays en crise ont poussé le Premier ministre Victor Ponta –contre ce projet il y a encore quelques mois lorsqu’il était dans l’opposition– à mettre cet été le dossier sur le haut de la pile. Le gouvernement a déposé un projet de loi déclarant la mine «d’utilité publique et d’intérêt exceptionnel». Ce statut autoriserait la compagnie minière à exproprier les villageois qui refusent de quitter le site, au nom de l’Etat roumain.

Des mesures exceptionnelles à la hauteur de l’enjeu? La valeur de Rosia Montana a augmenté au même rythme que le cours de l’or: 10.000 euros le kilo en 2005, plus de 31.000 euros aujourd’hui. Le gisement est aujourd’hui estimé à 10 milliards d’euros.

«Quel pays disposant d’une telle richesse ne chercherait pas de solutions pour en profiter?», avait lancé le président roumain Traian Basescu en 2011, alors que le cours de l’or atteignait un pic historique. Victor Ponta devenu Premier ministre tient à peu près le même discours:

«En tant que député, je ne peux être que contre, mais en tant que Premier ministre, je ne peux être que pour, car je me dois d’attirer de nouveaux investissements en Roumanie.»

Problème: l’Etat roumain est minoritaire au sein de Rosia Montana Gold Corporation (RMGC), la compagnie chargée de l’exploitation du filon. Les profits iront surtout à la société canadienne Gabriel Resources, actionnaire à hauteur de 75%.

Le site d’investigation roumain Rise Project a publié le 31 août le contrat liant l’Etat roumain à RMGC. Il était resté secret pendant toutes ces années, malgré la promesse récurrente du Premier ministre de le publier. Selon ce document, RMGC, qui possède les droits d’exploitation, versera une redevance de 6% sur la production à l’Etat roumain. Pour les manifestants, le gouvernement a tout simplement vendu le pays.

Dans le village de Rosia Montana, les réactions sont mitigées. Il y a ceux qui résistent encore, comme Ani et Andrei, jeune couple d’altermondialistes, qui refusent toujours de vendre leur auberge aux Canadiens.

Et ceux qui se sont résignés: avec 75% de chômage dans la région, «toutes les personnes sensées sont pour la mine», confie Catalin, accoudé au bar. Il faut dire que le lobbying de RMGC ne leur laisse guère le choix.

Dans la cantine du village, financée par RMGC, le porte-parole des Canadiens Catalin Hosu promet que «la mine créera 3.600 emplois directs et indirects durant les 16 années d’exploitation». La compagnie emploie déjà 500 habitants, dont 22 qui se sont enfermés dans une galerie minière à l’annonce du coup de frein au projet.

En décembre, la population locale avait approuvé par référendum la réouverture de la mine à 78%. La consultation, boycottée par les opposants, avait été annulée, faute de participation suffisante. Au fil des années, la majorité des 2.000 habitants a vendu sa maison et fuit.

12.000 tonnes de cyanure par an

«Le prix à payer pour créer quelques emplois est trop élevé», juge Sorin Jurca, l’un des irréductibles opposants. Employé par la mine d’Etat jusqu’à sa fermeture en 2006, il a créé la fondation culturelle Rosia Montana pour défendre le patrimoine menacé.

«Le prix à payer», c’est 900 familles expropriées, 4 montagnes décapitées, 7 églises rasées, 7 cimetières déplacés, des galeries romaines classées au patrimoine national endommagées et surtout 250 millions de tonnes de déchets cyanurés stockés dans un bassin retenu par un barrage, en amont de Rosia Montana.

C’est ce danger environnemental qui a lancé la mobilisation à Bucarest. «Nous ne voulons pas de cyanure, nous ne voulons pas de dictature», ont scandé quotidiennement, pendant les 10 premiers jours de septembre, les manifestants, à Bucarest et dans les grandes villes du pays, mais aussi à Paris, Londres et Bruxelles. Les anti ne sont pas inquiets sans raison: en 2000, à Baia Mare (nord-ouest de la Roumanie), la rupture d’un barrage similaire a déversé 100.000 tonnes de cyanure dans le Danube, tuant 100 tonnes de poissons et empoisonnant l’eau de 2,5 millions de Hongrois.

Depuis, l’Union européenne a durci sa législation sur le cyanure. Environ 1.000 tonnes de cyanure sont utilisées chaque année dans les mines d’or d’Europe, notamment en Suède. En Roumanie, Gold corporation prévoit d’en utiliser 12 fois plus.

Devant la pression populaire, le Premier ministre fait machine arrière à la mi-septembre, retire son soutien au projet de loi et assure qu’il sera rejeté par le Parlement. Bien que le projet ne soit pas définitivement enterré, c’est une victoire pour les opposants.

Et une double défaite pour Victor Ponta qui, à force de changer d’avis, a perdu la confiance de la population. Et sa crédibilité auprès de Gabriel Resources. L’investisseur canadien menace de poursuivre l’Etat roumain «pour violations multiples des traités internationaux d’investissement» si le projet est définitivement abandonné. La presse parle de 4 milliards de dollars (3 milliards d’euros) de dommages et intérêts.

Le soir du 9 septembre, jour du recul du gouvernement roumain, l’action de Gabriel Resources a perdu la moitié de sa valeur à la Bourse de Toronto. Une dépréciation peu du goût des actionnaires, parmi lesquels des fonds spéculatifs, comme celui de John Paulson, qui s’est enrichi en spéculant sur la faillite de la Grèce.

Si les opposants au projet ont accueilli favorablement le recul du gouvernement roumain, ils ont bien l’intention de poursuivre leur mobilisation jusqu’au rejet du projet de loi par le Parlement et promis de revenir touts les jours, jusqu’à ce que le cyanure soit interdit dans l’industrie minière en Roumanie et le site de Rosia Montana classé au patrimoine de l’Unesco.

Les manifestants anti-mine d’or font aussi le lien avec les anti-gaz de schiste. A Bârlad, nord-est du pays, les protestations se multiplient depuis que le Premier ministre a autorisé cet été la compagnie américaine Chevron à explorer les gaz de schiste de la région.

D’après l’Agence américaine d’information sur l’énergie (EIA), le sous-sol roumain renfermerait quelque 1.444 milliards de mètres cubes de gaz de schiste, le troisième gisement européen après la Pologne et la France.

Si le gisement se confirme, Chevron prévoit une extraction par fracturation hydraulique à l’horizon 2017-2018. Une technique controversée, placée par la France sous moratoire, car elle polluerait les nappes phréatiques, fragiliserait les sols, voire favoriserait les tremblements de terre.

Mais en contrepartie de la fracturation de son sol, la région de Bârlad se voit promettre des dizaines de millions de dollars d’investissement dans les infrastructures locales, ainsi que dans le développement de la zone.

Rosia Montana, Bârlad: même combat

Pendant sa campagne électorale, le Premier ministre disait pourtant refuser qu’une entreprise étrangère explore le gaz de schiste roumain. C’était là encore avant d’être nommé et de faire volte-face en ouvrant la porte aux investissements étrangers en ces termes:

«Je veux que nous soyons un pays qui comprenne où sont ses intérêts.»

Comme à Rosia Montana, le profit que pourraient tirer les habitants de Bârlad, une ville désindustrialisée et appauvrie de 60.000 habitants, reste inconnu, car le contrat entre l’Etat et Chevron demeure secret. Et comme à Rosia Montana, le mécontentement dépasse largement les milieux écologistes.

Les Roumains se dressent aussi contre la manière de gouverner, la corruption, les entorses à la démocratie. Ils veulent défendre l’environnement, mais surtout empêcher leur pays de brader son sous-sol. Un réveil démocratique inédit en Roumanie depuis 1989.

Voir également:

L’invasion de Roms n’aura pas lieu

Pas plus de Roumains et de Bulgares, d’ailleurs, au 1er janvier 2014 comme le font craindre certains. Pourquoi? Ceux qui auraient pu venir sont déjà là et ils ne sont pas très nombreux.

Marianne Rigaux

Slate

26/09/2013

Deux échéances font revenir en force les Roms dans les médias: l’accès libre au marché du travail à partir du 1er janvier 2014 et les élections municipales de mars, avec leur lot de surenchère verbale. Au 1er janvier prochain, Roumains et Bulgares pourront librement travailler en France. Depuis leur entrée dans l’UE en 2007, ils sont libres de circuler et de s’installer où ils le veulent, mais ne peuvent pas exercer n’importe quel métier.

Pour l’instant, ils doivent obtenir une autorisation de travail délivrée par une préfecture française, ce qui peut prendre plusieurs mois, même avec une solide promesse d’embauche. L’employeur doit aussi prouver qu’il n’a pas trouvé de candidat français pour le poste, sauf pour une liste de 291 métiers pour lesquels le pays manque de main d’œuvre. Jusqu’en octobre 2012, cette liste ne contenait encore que 150 métiers dits «sous tension».

Avant même la fin de ces mesures transitoires, certains pays comme les Pays-Bas, l’Allemagne, la France et le Royaume-Uni pointent le risque d’une «invasion» de ressortissants roumains et bulgares. Et parmi eux, de nombreux Roms.

Spéculations et fantasmes

Au Royaume-Uni, le leader de l’United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) Nigel Farage l’affirme: «Nous allons ouvrir nos portes à 29 millions de Bulgares et Roumains pauvres. Il est temps de reprendre le contrôle de nos frontières». «Ils ont peur que les travailleurs roumains dérèglent leur marché du travail avec nos salaires plus faibles», constate Ilie Serbanescu, économiste et ancien ministre roumain.

Une étude de l’Observatoire des migrations de l’université d’Oxford relativise pourtant ces fantasmes. Après avoir analysé le «raz-de-marée» migratoire suscité par l’élargissement de l’UE en 2004, les auteurs concluent que les ressortissants des nouveaux pays membres ne représentent qu’un tiers de l’immigration totale au Royaume-Uni.

En France, c’est le Front National qui agite le chiffon rouge. «Je vous annonce que dans le courant de l’année 2014, il viendra à Nice 50.000 Roms au moins puisqu’à partir du 1er janvier, les 12 millions de Roms qui sont situés en Roumanie, en Bulgarie et en Hongrie auront la possibilité de s’établir dans tous les pays d’Europe», a lancé Jean-Marie Le Pen cet été.

Il y a entre 15.000 et 20.000 Roms en France, originaires de Roumanie et de Bulgarie pour la plupart, mais aussi de Macédoine, du Kosovo, de Slovaquie… Un chiffre stable depuis des années. De tous ses voisins, la France est le pays qui compte le moins de Roms: ils sont 750.000 en Espagne et 150.000 en Italie.

L’immigration a déjà eu lieu

Pour la politologue roumaine Irène Costelian, il n’y aura pas de raz-de-marée à l’horizon. «Les Roumains [Roms ou non] sont déjà partis depuis longtemps», affirme-t-elle. Il n’y aura pas de nouveau rush comme il y en a eu en 2004 à la suppression des visas ou en 2007 à l’entrée dans l’Union européenne». Ni comme en 1990, après la chute du dictateur Ceausescu.

D’après le recensement réalisé en 2011, la Roumanie a perdu 13% de sa population depuis la fin du communisme, passant de 23,21 millions en 1990 à 20,12 millions d’habitants en 2011. En cause, une forte émigration, principalement vers l’Italie, l’Allemagne et l’Espagne, et dans une moindre mesure vers la France, où le nombre de ressortissants roumains est estimé à 200.000 personnes.

Et puis partir n’a plus la cote, selon Edith Lhomel, analyste à la documentation française. «En 2011 et 2012, les revenus envoyés au pays par les Roumains expatriés ont baissé. On commence à se rendre compte qu’immigrer dans un pays d’Europe occidentale en crise n’est pas si rentable».

«Le pauvre fait peur»

Reste que les spéculations font douter, à quelques mois des élections municipales en France. Le trio Rom/immigration/insécurité refait surface dans les discours politiques et les médias. «Il ne faut vraiment pas craindre la Roumanie», écrivait le Premier ministre roumain Victor Ponta dans une tribune publiée dans le Times en février.

Oui mais voilà, «le pauvre fait peur», reconnaît Irène Costelian, elle-même née en Roumanie. «Le Roumain traîne l’image du travailleur pauvre qui va casser les prix». Un thème de campagne idéal pour le Front National, mais aussi pour la droite.

Depuis quelques semaines, les Roms et les amalgames sont partout: articles, petites phrases, carte pour localiser les camps, Une racoleuse. Ils ne sont que 20.000, soit la population du Puy-en-Velay, mais ils arrivent à éclipser les 3,2 millions de chômeurs.

Voir de même:

 Mère et Fils

Pierre Murat

Télérama

15/01/2014

Drame réalisé en 2013 par Calin Peter Netzer

Avec Luminita Gheorghiu , Bogdan Dumitrache , Natasa Raab …

Mère et Fils – Bande Annonce – VOST

SYNOPSIS

A 60 ans, Cornelia fait partie de la haute bourgeoisie de Bucarest. Son argent lui permet de connaître tous les puissants et la bonne société de la capitale roumaine. Tout irait pour le mieux si seulement ses relations avec son fils étaient moins tendues. Alors que médecins, musiciens, avocats se pressent à son anniversaire, il a refusé de venir. Lorsque celui-ci tue un enfant dans un accident de voiture, elle utilise son carnet d’adresse et consacre sa fortune pour lui éviter la prison. Un bon moyen, pense-t-elle, pour regagner l’amour de son fils. Or, elle a beau se démener, son fils refuse de se laisser amadouer…

LA CRITIQUE LORS DE LA SORTIE EN SALLE DU 15/01/2014

Plus il la repousse, plus Cornelia intervient dans la vie de son fils quadragénaire. Lorsqu’il tue un gamin au volant de sa voiture, elle fait jouer toutes ses relations pour lui éviter le pire… Depuis quelque temps, le cinéma roumain est au top : sujets brûlants, mises en scène jouant avec brio sur la durée. On se souvient de La Mort de Dante Lazarescu (Cristi Puiu), il y a quelques années, d’Un mois en Thaïlande (Paul Negoescu), l’an dernier, et, bien sûr, de 4 Mois, 3 semaines, 2 jours (Cristian Mungiu), Palme d’or à Cannes en 2007. Couronné à Berlin l’année dernière, Mère et fils n’a pas la même intensité. Durant la première heure, le réalisateur semble se gargariser de la virtuosité de sa caméra. Et le personnage du fils est beaucoup trop faible : brutal, borné, sans envergure ni démesure. On ne comprend pas sa rancoeur. Sa (fausse ?) rédemption indiffère.

Avec la même vigueur que ses compatriotes, cependant, le cinéaste filme un pays où les passe-droits pèsent aussi lourd que la terreur politique, jadis. Nul, en effet, ne résiste aux prébendes de Cornelia, pas même le flic présenté comme un modèle incorruptible : il résiste, il résiste, mais il cède comme tous les autres… Et Luminita Gheorghiu (déjà remarquable dans La Mort de Dante Lazarescu) fait de son personnage une sorte de monstre shakespearien, ne pouvant s’empêcher de distiller le poison dont son fils se sert pour la détruire.

Voir par ailleurs:

Book review.

Spotlight Casts Cruel Shadows For Girls

Reviewed by Bob Ford, Knight-Ridder Newspapers.

The Chicago tribune

August 28, 1995

Little Girls in Pretty Boxes:

The Making and Breaking of Elite Gymnasts and Figure Skaters

By Joan Ryan

Doubleday, 243 pages, $22.95

The lights come on, the audience is hushed and the athletes spin, flip and pirouette before us, china dolls performing their routines with grace and joy.

The little girls who form the core of our national gymnastics and figure-skating teams are the stuff of gossamer dreams as they compete against the world for Olympic medals and patriotic glory.

But for every girl who makes it into the brightest spotlight, there are hundreds left in the shadows of the sport, used and discarded. It is the other side of the American dream and one that has long needed a closer look.

As part of a series of newspaper articles on female athletes, Joan Ryan, a San Francisco journalist, began this investigation of the price exacted in the quest for youthful success. The series grew into « Little Girls in Pretty Boxes, » which is as vital and troubling a work as the sports world has seen in a long time.

« What I found, » writes Ryan, « was a story about legal, even celebrated, child abuse. In the dark troughs along the road to the Olympics lay the bodies of the girls who stumbled on the way, broken by the work, pressure and humiliation.

« I found a girl who felt such shame at not making the Olympic team that she slit her wrists. A skater who underwent plastic surgery when a judge said her nose was distracting. A father who handed custody of his daughter over to her coach so she could keep skating. A coach who fed his gymnasts so little that federation officials had to smuggle food into their hotel rooms. A mother who hid her child’s chicken pox with makeup so she could compete. Coaches who motivated their athletes by calling them imbeciles, idiots, pigs and cows. »

Ryan lets the facts clearly indicate the damage that can be done to young girls by overbearing parents, obsessive coaches and the elusive dream of stardom.

The book’s strongest moments come from the sport of gymnastics, where judges reward the work of sleek, supple girls able to perform the hardest maneuvers and give poorer marks to those who have slipped toward womanhood and must rely on grace and form. Countless hours of intensive training, combined with dangerous eating patterns, lowers the percentage of body fat to such extreme levels that natural maturation cannot take place.

The psychological effects of growing up as a gymnast can lead to eating disorders, such as the anorexia that eventually killed former gymnast Christy Heinrich, and mental illness.

Ryan goes hard after Bela Karolyi, the former Romanian national team coach whose star rose in 1976 with the success of his student, Nadia Comaneci. The methods of Karolyi, now a coach in this country, include verbal abuse, Ryan asserts, and she also alleges that the gymnasts starve themselves to stay in his good graces. Karolyi does his job of producing winners well, however, and Ryan points out that until society changes its priorities for athletes, the situation will not change.

The sections on figure skating are cobbled in artfully by Ryan, but the material pales in comparison to the reporting on gymnastics. She carefully documents the pressure and the politics involved in skating and observes, once again, that judges are usually unwilling to grade a graceful woman as highly as a triple-jumper. Once the skaters mature, gaining the hips and breasts that make them aerodynamically inferior to the younger skaters, their careers are effectively shot. Getting to the top of the pack is a race against time, and the corners cut to get there can scar the athletes forever.

Ryan suggests changes involving gymnastics and figure skating: The minimum-age requirements should be raised. There should be mandatory licensing of coaches and careful scrutiny by the national governing bodies. And athletes should be required to remain in regular schools at least until they are 16.

Few sports books can truly be called important. This book, beautifully written and painstakingly researched, is one of those few.

Voir enfin:

Abuse Amid Glamor In Name Of Sports

 Philip Hersh, Tribune Olympic Sports Writer

The Chicago tribune

June 01, 1995

120

Joan Ryan comes right to the point in the introductory chapter of her book, « Little Girls in Pretty Boxes, » which hits this stores this month.

Ryan, a San Francisco Chronicle columnist, undertook the book to learn about the effects of subjecting young girls to the training demands of figure skating and gymnastics, especially the latter.

« What I found, » Ryan writes, « was a story about legal, even celebrated, child abuse. »

The following anecdotes should illustrate why Ryan came to such a conclusion:

– In January, Romanian gymnastics coach Florin Gheorghe was sentenced to eight years in prison by a Bucharest court for having beaten an 11-year-old athlete so severely during a 1993 practice session she died two days later of a broken neck.

Gheorghe’s attorney admitted his client slapped the young woman but said such physical abuse was common practice in Romanian gymnastics.

« This kind of punishment is a heritage from Bela Karolyi, » the attorney said, referring to the martinet coach who drove Nadia Comaneci and Mary Lou Retton to Olympic gold medals. Karolyi has denied the charge.

– Aurelia Okino, a native Romanian whose daughter, Betty, trained with Karolyi a decade after his defection to the U.S., said in a 1992 interview she had become scared to answer the phone in her Elmhurst home.

Aurelia Okino worried it would be Betty, then 17, calling from Karolyi’s gym in Houston with news of another injury, There had been serious elbow, back and knee injuries before Okino made the 1992 Olympic team and helped the U.S. women win a bronze medal in the team event.

« Gymnastics is a brutal sport, » Betty Okino said matter-of-factly.

Asked why she had let her daughter go that far, Okino said, « How do you deny a child her dream? »

– In 1985, a few days before her enormously talented daughter, Tiffany, would win her only U.S. figure skating title, Marjorie Chin accepted the offer of a ride back to her Kansas City hotel from a reporter she had first met 20 minutes before. Tiffany, then 17, took a back seat to Marjorie in the reporter’s car.

For 30 minutes, Mrs. Chin delivered relentless criticism of her daughter’s performance in practice that day. « If you keep it up, you’re not going to be the star of the ice show, you’re going to be just part of the supporting cast, » Mrs. Chin said, over and over.

– Several times in the last few years, officials of the U.S. Figure Skating Association have spoken to a prominent ice dancer about her eating habits. The ice dancer, 32 years old, still looks like a wraith. One of those stories came from a wire service. The other three are personal recollections–mine, not Ryan’s.

Her book, subtitled « the making and breaking of elite gymnasts and figure skaters » (Doubleday, 243 pp., $22.95), has much more frightening tales to tell.

Ryan recounts in compelling detail the stories of Julissa Gomez and Christy Henrich, gymnasts whose pursuit of glory proved fatal; of figure skater Amy Grossman, whose mother said, « Skating was God »; of coaches like Karolyi and one of his disciples, Rick Newman, whose ideas of motivating adolescent girls include demeaning them at a time when their egos are most fragile; and of parents who hide their irresponsibility behind the notion of « trying to get the best for my child. »

Such is the sordid underbelly of the Olympics’ two most glamorous sports.

Only in the last three years has the nation begun to have a vague awareness of this life under the sequins and leotards. Ryan began to get a clear view of these problems while doing research for a newspaper story before the 1992 Olympics.

That led her to write this book, in which the villains are both coaches and parents. She lets Karolyi skewer himself with his own words. She shows how parents lose sight of the fundamental notion of protecting their children from harm, so blinded are they by possible fame and fortune.

The cause of such intemperate adult behavior is partly the peculiar competitive demands to jump higher and twirl faster, particularly in gymnastics, that favor girls with tiny bodies over young women developing hips and breasts. That puts them in a race against puberty, creating a window of opportunity so narrow it leads to foolhardiness.

Neither figure skating nor gymnastics is without athletes whose experiences are positive, a point that needed more attention in Ryan’s book than the disclaimer, « I’m not suggesting that all elite gymnasts and figure skaters emerge from their sports unhealthy and poorly adjusted. » A better balance might have been struck if the author had given voice to the likes of Olympic champions Retton and Kristi Yamaguchi.

Ryan’s basic premise about child abuse still is thoroughly supported by interviews, anecdotes and factual evidence.

« Little Girls in Pretty Boxes » should be a manifesto for change in the rules of these two sports, so that women with adult bodies still can compete. It should be a wakeup call to parents who have abdicated their responsibility for their childrens’ well-being. Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up hooked on sports that don’t let them grow up.

4 commentaires pour Roumanie: Attention, un refus de sourire peut en cacher un autre ! (Looking back at a time when child abuse was legal, even celebrated)

  1. […] avec Tocqueville et the Economist, ne pas se poser la question, en Europe comme au Moyen-Orient, des Révolutions de couleur en général […]

    J'aime

  2. J’ai beaucoup aimé votre article.

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :