Médias: Le Moyen-Orient est à feu et à sang et devinez qui on accuse ? (Palestinian blood lust: It’s time to give hatred its due)

14 octobre, 2015

Nous ne pouvons accepter ni un monde politiquement unipolaire, ni un monde culturellement uniforme, ni l’unilatéralisme de la seule hyperpuissance. Hubert Védrine (1999)
C’est ma dernière élection. Après mon élection, j’aurai plus de flexibilité. Obama (à Medvedev, 27.03.12)
We’re not going to make Syria into a proxy war between the United States and Russia. This is not some superpower chessboard contest. Barack Hussein Obama
It’s the lowest ebb since World War II for U.S. influence and engagement in the region. If you look at the heart of the Middle East, where the U.S. once was, we are now gone—and in our place, we have Iran, Iran’s Shiite proxies, Islamic State and the Russians. What had been a time and place of U.S. ascendancy we have ceded to our adversaries. Ryan Crocker (former ambassador to Afghanistan)
It’s not American military muscle that’s the main thing—there is a hell of a lot of American military muscle in the Middle East. It’s people’s belief—by our friends and by our opponents—that we will use that muscle to protect our friends, no ifs, ands or buts. Nobody is willing to take any risks if the U.S. is not taking any risks and if people are afraid that we’ll turn around and walk away tomorrow. James Jeffrey (former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Turkey)
Being associated with America today carries great costs and great risks. Whoever you are in the region, you have a deep grudge against the United States. If you are in liberal circles, you see Obama placating autocratic leaders even more. And if you are an autocratic leader, you go back to the issue of Mubarak and how unreliable the U.S. is as an ally. There is not one constituency you will find in the region that is supportive of the U.S. at this point—it is quite stunning, really. (…) Whoever comes after Obama will not have many cards left to play. I don’t see a strategy even for the next president. We’ve gone too far.  Emile Hokayem (International Institute for Strategic Studies in Bahrain)
It’s obvious that what’s happening in Afghanistan is pushing our countries closer to Russia. Who knows what America may come up with tomorrow—nobody trusts it anymore, not the elites and not the ordinary people. Tokon Mamytov (former deputy prime minister of Kyrgyzstan)
But U.S. disengagement still has long-term costs—even if one ignores the humanitarian catastrophe in Syria, where more than 250,000 people have died and more than half the population has fled their homes. With the shale revolution, the U.S. may no longer be as dependent on Middle Eastern oil, but its allies and main trading partners still are. Islamic State’s haven in Iraq and Syria may let it plot major terrorist attacks in Europe and the U.S. And the American pullback is affecting other countries’ calculations about how to deal with China and Russia. On the eve of the Arab Spring in 2011, Russia had almost no weight in the region, and Iran was boxed in by Security Council sanctions over its nuclear program. The costly U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan had hardly brought stability, but neither country faced internal collapse, and the Taliban had been chased into the remote corners of the Afghan countryside. Many people in the Middle East chafed at America’s dominance—but they agreed that it was the only game in town. Dramatic developments in recent weeks—from Russia’s Syrian gambit to startling Taliban advances in Afghanistan—highlight just how much the region has changed since then. The Syrian deployment, in particular, has given Mr. Putin the kind of Middle Eastern power projection that, in some ways, exceeds the influence that the Soviet Union enjoyed in the 1970s and 1980s. Already, he has rendered all but impossible plans to create no-fly zones or safe areas outside the writ of the Assad regime—and has moved to position Russia as a viable military alternative that can check U.S. might in the region. (…) Iraqi officials and Kurdish fighters have long complained about the pace of the U.S. bombing campaign against Islamic State and Washington’s unwillingness to provide forward spotters to guide these airstrikes or to embed U.S. advisers with combat units. These constraints have made the U.S. military, in effect, a junior partner of Iran in the campaign against Islamic State, providing air cover to Iranian-guided Shiite militias that go into battle with portraits of the Ayatollahs Khomeini and Khamenei plastered on their tanks. Iraq has already lost a huge chunk of its territory to Islamic State, and another calamity may be looming further east in Afghanistan. The Taliban’s recent seizure of the strategic city of Kunduz, which remains a battleground, suggests how close the U.S.-backed government of President Ashraf Ghani has come to strategic defeat. Its chances of survival could dwindle further if the Obama administration goes ahead with plans to pull out the remaining 9,800 U.S. troops next year. (…) Further afield, U.S. disengagement from Afghanistan has already driven Central Asian states that once tried to pursue relatively independent policies and allowed Western bases onto their soil back into Moscow’s orbit. Among America’s regional allies, puzzlement over why the U.S. is so eager to abandon the region has now given way to alarm and even panic—and, in some cases, attempts at accommodation with Russia. The bloody, messy intervention in Yemen by Saudi Arabia and its Gulf allies stemmed, in part, from a fear that the U.S. is no longer watching their backs against Shiite Iran. These Sunni Arab states could respond even more rashly in the future to the perceived Iranian threat, further inflaming the sectarian passions that have fueled the rise of Islamic State and other extremist groups. (…) Even Israel is hedging its bets. Last year, it broke ranks with Washington and declined to vote for a U.S.-sponsored U.N. General Assembly resolution condemning the Russian annexation of Crimea. In recent days, Israel didn’t criticize the Russian bombardment in Syria. Yaroslav Trofimov
The hard truth is that [the Palestinians] are not a priority for Arab leaders. . . . The priorities of Arab leaders revolve around survival and security”—not Israeli-Palestinian relations or U.S. policy toward Israel.  Dennis Ross
Obama can’t simply shrug this off as an unfortunate consequence of a bad policy decision by his predecessor, as he did with the rise of ISIS in Iraq. Not only did Obama support the war in Afghanistan, he campaigned in 2007-8 on the need to amplify resources for the fight there. The biggest problem with the Iraq war, Obama repeatedly argued, was that its destabilizing impact distracted from the fight for victory in Afghanistan. Obama promised to ramp up the effort in this theater, but became curiously reluctant when pressed for his war strategy, only grudgingly agreeing to provide a troop “surge” — and then only in tandem with a timetable for withdrawal. That has turned out to be as big a “joke” as Obama’s Syria strategy, if not more so. The Taliban used their control of Afghanistan to give al-Qaeda a haven from which to plot attacks against the United States, and that was before they spent 14 years fighting our military. The need to marginalize the Taliban and ensure stability without them was even greater for our national security than in Iraq, and look how that turned out after Obama took control of our policy there. After almost seven years of Obama’s “leadership,” we are on the verge of losing control of both theaters of war while Obama pretends that war doesn’t even exist in either. This is a foreign-policy disaster of nearly unprecedented proportions. Its ill effects will last long after Obama has left office, especially on those in Afghanistan who trusted us to stick to the mission and who will now be left at the meager mercy of Taliban extremists. Ed Morrissey
Dans un article d’opinion publié le 25 août 2015 dans le quotidien saoudien paraissant à Londres Al-Sharq Al-Awsat, Amir Taheri, analyste, auteur et éditorialiste iranien bien connu, a comparé la politique d’Obama envers l’Iran et la politique de Kennedy, Nixon et Reagan dans leurs négociations avec les principaux adversaires des Etats-Unis à leur époque – l’URSS et la Chine. Taheri écrit que, pour conclure l’accord avec l’Iran, Obama veut se poser en héritier d’une tradition établie par ces présidents, consistant à régler les conflits par la diplomatie et les négociations. Toutefois, observe-t-il, ces dirigeants ont négocié en position de force et poursuivi la détente avec les ennemis de l’Amérique seulement après que ces derniers eurent obéi à des exidences américaines essentielles, en modifiant des éléments clés de leur politique. Ainsi, Kennedy a négocié avec l’URSS seulement après l’avoir contrainte à retirer ses installations nucléaires de Cuba ; la normalisation des relations avec la Chine sous Nixon est venue seulement après que cette dernière eut renoncé à la Révolution culturelle et abandonné son projet d’exporter le communisme, et l’engagement par Reagan de négociations avec les Soviétiques a eu lieu seulement après avoir pris des mesures militaires pour contrer la menace qu’ils posaient en Europe. En outre, affirme Taheri, les Etats-Unis ont permis le réchauffement des relations avec la Chine et l’URSS une fois que celles-ci eurent renoncé à leur antagonisme absolu envers eux en acceptant de les considérer comme un rival ou un concurrent plutôt que comme un ennemi mortel devant être détruit. A l’inverse, affirme Taheri, Obama n’a rien demandé aux Iraniens avant d’entamer des négociations, pas même la libération des otages américains. En outre, il a cherché un rapprochement avec l’Iran en dépit de l’absence de tout changement positif de la politique et de l’idéologie radicale de ce pays. L’ouverture américaine n’a fait qu’encourager les pires tendances en Iran, comme le montrent la multiplication des violations des droits de l’homme en Iran et son soutien continu aux groupes terroristes et au régime d’Assad en Syrie. La détente avec l’Amérique n’a pas même amené l’Iran à abandonner ses appels de « Mort à l’Amérique », observe Taheri. Il conclut que « Kennedy, Nixon et Reagan ont répondu positivement aux changements positifs de la part de l’adversaire”, alors qu’Obama “répond positivement à ses propres illusions”. MEMRI
Promoting the ‘deal’ he claims he has made with Iran, President Barack Obama is trying to cast himself as heir to a tradition of ‘peace through negotiations’ followed by US presidents for decades. In that context he has named Presidents John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan as shining examples, with the subtext that he hopes to join their rank in history. (…) Obama quotes JFK as saying one should not negotiate out of fear but should not be afraid of negotiating either. To start with, those who oppose the supposed ‘deal’ with Iran never opposed negotiations; they oppose the result it has produced… In one form or another, Iran and the major powers have been engaged in negotiations on the topic since 2003. What prompted Obama to press the accelerator was his desire to score a diplomatic victory before he leaves office. It did not matter if the ‘deal’ he concocted was more of a dog’s dinner than a serious document. He wanted something, anything , and to achieve that he was prepared to settle for one big diplomatic fudge. (…) Is Obama the new JFK? Hardly. Kennedy did negotiate with the USSR but only after he had blockaded Cuba and forced Nikita Khrushchev to blink and disband the nuclear sites he had set up on the Caribbean island. In contrast, Obama obtained nothing tangible and verifiable. Iran’s Atomic Energy chief Ali-Akbar Salehi put it nicely when he said that the only thing that Iran gave Obama was a promise ‘not to do things we were not doing anyway, or did not wish to do or could not even do at present.’ (…) JFK also had the courage to fly to West Berlin to face the Soviet tanks and warn Moscow against attempts at overrunning the enclave of freedom that Germany’s former capital had become. With his ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’ (I am a citizen of Berlin), he sided with the people of the besieged city in a long and ultimately victorious struggle against Soviet rule. In contrast Obama does not even dare call on the mullahs to release the Americans they hold hostage. Instead, he has engaged in an epistolary courting of the Supreme Guide and instructed his administration in Washington to do and say nothing that might ruffle the mullahs’ feathers. (…) No, Obama is no JFK.  But is he heir to Nixon? Though he hates Nixon ideologically, Obama has tried to compare his Iran ‘deal’ with Nixon’s rapprochement with China. Again, the comparison is misplaced. Normalization with Beijing came after the Chinese leaders had sorted out their internal power struggle and decided to work their way out of the ideological impasse created by their moment of madness known as The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. The big bad wolf of the tale, Lin Biao, was eliminated in an arranged air crash and the Gang of Four defanged before the new leadership set-up in Beijing could approach Washington with talk of normalization. (…) At the time the Chinese elite, having suffered defeat in border clashes with the USSR, saw itself surrounded by enemies, especially after China’s only ally Pakistan had been cut into two halves in an Indo-Soviet scheme that led to the creation of Bangladesh. Hated by all its neighbors, China needed the US to break out of isolation. Even then, the Americans drove a hard bargain. They set a list of 22 measures that Beijing had to take to prove its goodwill, chief among them was abandoning the project of ‘exporting revolution’. (…) Those of us who, as reporters, kept an eye on China and visited the People’s Republic in those days were astonished at the dramatic changes the Communist leaders introduced in domestic and foreign policies to please the Americans. In just two years, China ceased to act as a ’cause’ and started behaving like a nation-state. It was only then that Nixon went to Beijing to highlight a long process of normalization. In the case of Iran, Obama has obtained none of those things. In fact, his ‘deal’ has encouraged the worst tendencies of the Khomeinist regime as symbolized by dramatic rise in executions, the number of prisoners of conscience and support for terror groups not to mention helping Bashar Al-Assad in Syria. (…) No, Obama is no Nixon. But is he a new Reagan as he pretends? Hardly. Reagan was prepared to engage the Soviets at the highest level only after he had convinced them that they could not blackmail Europe with their SS20s while seeking to expand their empire through so-called revolutionary movements they sponsored across the globe. The SS20s were countered with Pershing missiles and ‘revolutionary’ armies with Washington-sponsored ‘freedom fighters.’ (…) Unlike Obama who is scared of offending the mullahs, Reagan had no qualms about calling the USSR ‘The Evil Empire’ and castigating its leaders on issues of freedom and human rights. The famous phrase ‘Mr. Gorbachev, tear down that wall!’ indicated that though he was ready to negotiate, Reagan was not prepared to jettison allies to clinch a deal. (…) Obama has made no mention of Jimmy Carter, the US president he most resembles. However, even Carter was not as bad as Obama if only because he was prepared to boycott the Moscow Olympics to show his displeasure at the invasion of Afghanistan. Carter also tried to do something to liberate US hostages in Tehran by organizing an invasion of the Islamic Republic with seven helicopters. The result was tragicomic; but he did the best his meagre talents allowed. (NB: No one is suggesting Obama should invade Iran if only because if he did the results would be even more tragicomic than Carter’s adventure.) (…) On a more serious note, it is important to remember that dealing with the Khomeinist regime in Tehran is quite different from dealing with the USSR and China was in the context of detente and normalization. Neither the USSR nor the People’s Republic regarded the United States as ‘enemy’ in any religious context as the Khomeinist regime does. Moscow branded the US, its ‘Imperialist’ rival, as an ‘adversary’ (protivnik) who must be fought and, if possible, defeated, but not as a ‘foe’ (vrag) who must be destroyed. In China, too, the US was attacked as ‘arch-Imperialist’ or ‘The Paper Tiger’ but not as a mortal foe. The slogan was ‘Yankee! Go Home!’ (…) In the Khomeinist regime, however, the US is routinely designated as ‘foe’ (doshman) in a religious context and the slogan is ‘Death to America!’ Supreme Guide Ali Khamenei has no qualms about calling for the ‘destruction’ of America, as final step towards a new global system under the banner of his twisted version of Islam. Tehran is the only place where international ‘End of America’ conferences are held by the government every year. The USSR and China first cured themselves of their version of the anti-American disease before seeking detente and normalization. That did not mean they fell in love with the US. What it meant was that they learned to see the US as adversary, rival, or competitor not as a mortal foe engaged in a combat-to-death contest. The Islamic Republic has not yet cured itself of that disease and Obama’s weakness may make it even more difficult for that cure to be applied. (..) Détente with the USSR and normalization with China came after they modified important aspects of their behavior for the better. Kennedy, Nixon and Reagan responded positively to positive changes on the part of the adversary. In the case of the USSR positive change started with the 20th congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in which Khrushchev denounced Joseph Stalin’s crimes, purged the party of its nastiest elements, notably Lavrentiy Beria, and rehabilitated millions of Stalin’s victims. (…) In foreign policy, Khrushchev, his swashbuckling style notwithstanding, accepted the new architecture of stability in Cold War Europe based on NATO and the Warsaw Pact. Kennedy, Johnson and, later, Nixon and President Gerald Ford had to respond positively. In the late1980s, the USSR offered other positive evolutions through Glasnost and Perestroika and final withdrawal from Afghanistan under Mikhail Gorbachev. Again, Reagan and President George Bush (the father) had to respond positively. (…) In the case of China we have already noted the end of the Cultural Revolution. But China also agreed to help the US find a way to end the Vietnam War. Beijing stopped its almost daily provocations against Taiwan and agreed that the issue of the island-nation issue be kicked into the long grass. Within a decade, under Deng Xiaoping, China went even further by adopting capitalism as its economic system. (…) There is one other difference between the cases of the USSR and China in the 1960s to 1990s and that of the Khomeinist regime in Tehran today. The USSR had been an ally of the United States during the Second World War and its partner in setting up the United Nations in 1945. Although rivals and adversaries, the two nations also knew when to work together when their mutual interests warranted it. The same was true of the Chinese Communist Party which had been an ally of the US and its Chinese client the Kuomintang during the war against Japanese occupation when Edgar Snow was able to describe Mao Zedong as ‘America’s staunchest ally against the Japanese Empire.’ In the 1970s, Washington and Beijing did not find it strange to cooperate in containing the USSR, their common rival-cum-adversary as they had done when countering Japan. (…) In the case of the Islamic Republic there is no sign of any positive change and certainly no history of even tactical alliance with the US. (…) Unless he knows something that we do not, Obama is responding positively to his own illusions. » Amir Taheri
Certain that Obama is paralyzed by his fear of undermining the non-existent “deal” the mullahs have intensified their backing for Houthi rebels in Yemen. Last week a delegation was in Tehran with a long shopping list for arms. In Lebanon, the mullahs have toughened their stance on choosing the country’s next president. And in Bahrain, Tehran is working on a plan to “ensure an early victory” of the Shiite revolution in the archipelago. Confident that Obama is determined to abandon traditional allies of the United States, Tehran has also heightened propaganda war against Saudi Arabia, now openly calling for the overthrow of the monarchy there. The mullahs are also heightening contacts with Palestinian groups in the hope of unleashing a new “Intifada.” “Palestine is thirsty for a third Intifada,” Supreme Guide Khamenei’s mouthpiece Kayhan said in an editorial last Thursday. “It is the duty of every Muslim to help start it as soon as possible.” Amir Taheri
Le Président américain qui a abandonné la Syrie et le Yémen sans le moindre combat est maintenant en train de mener à contre-coeur une contre-offensive en Afghanistan. Les talibans semblent avoir correctement évalué le manque de résolution du leadership actuel aux Etats-Unis et ont à l’évidence décidé de reprendre tout l’Afghanistan. Dans sa première campagne présidentielle de 2008, alors qu’il était sénateur, Obama avait qualifié l’engagement des Etats-Unis en Irak de « mauvaise guerre, » et à la place voulait que son pays se concentre sur l’Afghanistan — sa « bonne guerre. » Mais après le retrait des troupes américaines d’Irak en 2011, des pans entiers d’Irak sont tombés sous contrôle de l’Etat Islamique (ISIS), tandis que les autres régions sont passées sous influence de l’Iran. Alors comment se porte la « bonne guerre » du Président Obama en Afghanistan? Le 29 septembre 2015, les combattants talibans se sont emparés de Kunduz, une capitale provinciale. Cette prise représente la plus importante victoire des talibans depuis 2001, date à laquelle une coalition menée par les américains avait renversé le régime des talibans, à la suite des attaques du 11 septembre à New York. Depuis ce revers, les talibans s’étaient cachés dans des régions tribales tout en lançant des attaques terroristes sporadiques dans les villes, sans jamais réussir à reprendre un centre urbain. Avec la chute de Kunduz, les talibans contrôlent la 5ème plus grande ville d’Afghanistan. (…) En outre, Obama semble avoir établi un modèle de sous estimation des adversaires de l’Amérique. Il est connu qu’il a qualifié ISIS « de bande de joyeux fêtards, » et a récemment déclaré que le Président russe Vladimir Poutine s’est engagé dans la guerre en Syrie « par faiblesse. » Mais ce qui est visible à chacun sauf à Obama est que le « faible » Poutine supplante les Etats-Unis en Ukraine, Crimée et maintenant en Syrie. C’est Obama qui semble faible. Dans son approche sur d’autres terrains, Obama s’est aliéné ses alliés et a renforcé ses ennemis. Dans une apparente tentative de persuader le Pakistan de cesser d’appuyer Al-Qaeda et ses filiales, le Président Obama s’est proposé de faire pression sur l’Inde pour qu’elle fasse des concessions au Cachemire. Selon l’ancien ambassadeur du Pakistan aux Etats-Unis, Husain Haqqani, le Président Obama a secrètement écrit  au Président du Pakistan, Asif Ali Zardari in 2009, l’assurant de sa sympathie pour la position du Pakistan au Cachemire, et se proposant apparemment de dire à l’Inde que « les anciennes manières de faire ne sont plus acceptables. » Selon le récit de Haqqani, rendu public en 2013, le Pakistan, qui bénéficie d’une aide financière de plusieurs milliards de dollars des Etats-Unis chaque année, a rejeté l’offre du Président Obama. Au lieu de cela, le Pakistan a continue d’entraîner, d’armer et d’abriter des terroristes internationaux – dont Osama bin Laden. Beaucoup de ces terroristes ont planifié et mené des opérations qui ont tué près de 2000 américains en service et en ont blessé 20,000 autres. Le Président Obama s’est ainsi aliéné l’Inde sans rien obtenir du Pakistan en retour. L’Inde était toute prête à soutenir la stratégie des Etats-Unis en Afghanistan. New Delhi partageait l’inquiétude de Kaboul sur la montée de l’islam militant dans la région. L’Inde est aussi confrontée à une menace existentielle par les milices islamistes dans la province à majorité musulmane du Cachemire et au-delà. Depuis le milieu des années 1990 plus de 30 000 civils indiens appartenant à du personnel de sécurité ont été tués dans des attaques terroristes. Le Président Obama, lors d’une visite en Inde, apparemment a préféré jouer le « commis voyageur » de la religion musulmane, et à plusieurs reprises a interpellé les hindous pour leur intolérance envers la minorité musulmane, niant la réalité de ce qui se révèle être une tentative de génocide et un nettoyage ethnique des Hindous, commencé il y a 70 ans avec la création de la République Islamique du Pakistan et se poursuivant aujourd’hui. Non seulement des millions d’Hindous ont été forcés de quitter le Pakistan quand les deux pays ont été créés en 1947, mais presque tous les hindous restés au Pakistan et au Bangladesh (anciennement Pakistan de l’Est) ont été expulsés ou assassinés au cours des décennies qui suivirent. Le nettoyage ethnique a culminé lors du génocide du Bangladesh en 1971, perpétré par l’Armée pakistanaise. Il a fait trois millions de victimes hindous et bangladeshis, et a forcé plus de 10 millions de refugiés à s’enfuir en Inde. En contrepartie la population musulmane en Inde est passée de 35 millions au début des années 1950 à environ 180 millions in 2015, faisant de l’Inde le foyer de la deuxième plus importante population musulmane au monde, après l’Indonésie. L’offensive des talibans en Afghanistan est le résultat direct de la politique constante de l’administration Obama de s’aliéner ses amis et de renforcer ses ennemis. Que ce soit Israël, l’Iran, l’Egypte ou l’Afghanistan, le Président Obama a de toute évidence préféré traiter avec des acteurs islamistes ou djihadistes plutôt qu’avec des forces libérales, laïques et démocratiques. Les conséquences d’une reconquête par les talibans de l’Afghanistan seraient encore plus désastreuses que leur précédent règne de terreur. Les talibans non seulement recommenceraient à envoyer des djihadistes bien entraînés à travers le Pakistan et au-delà de ses frontières, pour faire la guerre aux « infidèles » en Inde; Il porterait aussi son objectif déclaré de djihad mondial contre l’Occident. Avec les frontières de l’Europe grandes ouvertes, l’occident est plus vulnérable que jamais. Vijeta Uniyal
Si vous pouvez tuer un incroyant américain ou européen – en particulier les méchants et sales Français – ou un Australien ou un Canadien, ou tout […] citoyen des pays qui sont entrés dans une coalition contre l’État islamique, alors comptez sur Allah et tuez-le de n’importe quelle manière. (…) Tuez le mécréant qu’il soit civil ou militaire. (…) Frappez sa tête avec une pierre, égorgez-le avec un couteau, écrasez-le avec votre voiture, jetez-le d’un lieu en hauteur, étranglez-le ou empoisonnez-le. Abou Mohammed al-Adnani (porte-parole de l’EI)
Nous vous bénissons, nous bénissons les Mourabitoun (hommes) et les Mourabitat (femmes). Nous saluons toutes gouttes de sang versées à Jérusalem. C’est du sang pur, du sang propre, du sang qui mène à Dieu. Avec l’aide de Dieu, chaque djihadiste (shaheed) sera au paradis, et chaque blessé sera récompensé. Nous ne leur permettrons aucune avancée. Dans toutes ses divisions, Al-Aqsa est à nous et l’église du Saint Sépulcre est notre, tout est à nous. Ils n’ont pas le droit de les profaner avec leurs pieds sales, et on ne leur permettra pas non plus. Mahmoud Abbas
La présence des « colons Juifs » est « illégale » et par conséquent, toute mesure prise contre eux est légitime et légale. (…) Il est important que le soulèvement populaire s’intensifie. Jamal Muhaisen (Conseil Central du Fatah, 7 oct. , 2015]
 Il n’est pas nécessaire de revenir aux polémiques pour savoir qui a commis cette opération… Il n’est pas utile de l’annoncer ouvertement ni de se vanter de l’avoir fait. On doit remplir son devoir national volontairement et du mieux qu’on le peut. Mahmoud Ismail (officiel de l’OLP, Official PA TV, Oct. 6, 2015]
 Nos vies et notre sang seront sacrifiés pour la mosquée Al-Aqsa. Chaque violation du côté israélien contre Al-Aqsa est une violation de l’occupation, qu’elle soit accomplie dans des uniformes militaires ou religieux ou sous une couverture politique. Nous devons lutter contre toutes ces violations jusqu’à ce que l’occupation soit levée. Raed Salah
Raed Salah, chef du Mouvement islamique radical en Israël, appelle à utiliser la violence pour couper les Juifs de leur site le plus sacré, et affirme qu’Israël a déclaré la guerre en disant qu’il ne peut y avoir de Jérusalem sans le Mont du Temple. Le Sheikh Raed Salah, , a appelé à la violence terroriste sur le Mont du Temple – le site le plus saint du judaïsme – de manière à empêcher l’accès des Juifs au site sacré. Se référant à des visites juives pacifiques sur le site – qui sont souvent l’objet de harcèlement, tel que récemment pendant les prières de Ticha Be Av, une commémoration de la destruction du Premier et du Second Temple sur le site, Salah a parlé d’attaques israéliennes contre la Mosquée Al-Aqsa. (…) Le problème, avoue la journaliste Halevy, c’est que le Mont a été laissé entre les mains du Waqf jordanien depuis qu’il a été libéré pendant la guerre des Six Jours en 1967, et par conséquent, il est devenu le site d’émeutes musulmanes destinées à bloquer l’entrée des Juifs. De même, le Waqf a interdit aux Juifs de prier sur le site, malgré la loi israélienne stipulant la liberté de culte. (…) Lors d’un discours durant une manifestation musulmane en 2007, il a accusé les Juifs d’utiliser le sang des enfants pour cuire les matsot, invoquant les infâmes diffamations médiévales de meurtres de sang utilisés pour déclencher des pogroms meurtriers en Europe et au Moyen-Orient. Salah a également passé une brève période en prison pour avoir transféré de l’argent au Hamas, et s’est ému comme un enfant, des dessins des croix gammées dans une interview en 2009, sur une station de télévision de langue arabe basée à Londres. Coolamnews
Des centaines de milliers de fidèles musulmans doivent aller à Al-Aqsa et s’opposer au complot israélien de verser le sang des habitants arabes de Jérusalem-Est. Aujourd’hui, c’est seulement le travail de quelques individus, mais nous avons besoin d’un soutien national. Si les attaques individuelles continuent sans soutien national, ces actions seront éteintes dans les prochains jours, et donc des centaines de milliers de personnes doivent se mobiliser pour commencer une véritable Intifada. Hanin Zoabi (députée arabe au Parlement israélien)
Mon frère de Cisjordanie : Poignarde ! Mon frère de Cisjordanie : Poignarde les mythes du Talmud dans leurs esprits ! Mon frère de Cisjordanie : Poignarde les mythes sur le Temple dans leurs cœurs ! (…) Ô peuple de la mosquée d’Al-Abrar et peuple de Rafah, depuis votre mosquée, vous avez l’honneur de délivrer ces messages aux hommes de Cisjordanie : formez des escouades d’attaques au couteau. Nous ne voulons pas d’un seul assaillant. Ô jeunes hommes de Cisjordanie : Attaquez-les par trois et quatre. Les uns doivent tenir la victime, pendant que les autres l’attaquent avec des haches et des couteaux de boucher. (…) Ne craignez pas ce que l’on dira de vous. Ô hommes de Cisjordanie, la prochaine fois, attaquez par groupe de trois, quatre ou cinq. Attaquez-les en groupe. Découpez-les en morceaux. Mohammed Salah (« Abou Rajab », imam de Rafah, Gaza)
There’s been a massive increase in settlements over the course of the last years, and there’s an increase in the violence because there’s this frustration that’s growing. John Kerry
The same issue is being fought today and has been fought since 1948, and historians are carried back to the 19th century … when the original people, the Palestinians — and please remember, Jesus was a Palestinian — the Palestinian people had the Europeans come and take their country. (…) The youth in Ferguson and the youth in Palestine have united together to remind us that the dots need to be connected. And what Dr. King said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere, has implications for us as we stand beside our Palestinian brothers and sisters, who have been done one of the most egregious injustices in the 20th and 21st centuries. (…) As we sit here, there is an apartheid wall being built twice the size of the Berlin Wall in height, keeping Palestinians off of illegally occupied territories, where the Europeans have claimed that land as their own. (…) Palestinians are saying ‘Palestinian lives matter.’ We stand with you, we support you, we say God bless you. Jeremiah Wright
C’est contre la colonisation continue des territoires conquis en 1967 que se révoltent une fois de plus en ce moment les Palestiniens. Ils comprennent que la colonisation vise à perpétuer l’infériorité palestinienne et rendre irréversible la situation qui dénie à leur peuple ses droits fondamentaux. Ici se trouve la raison des violences actuelles et on n’y mettra fin que le jour où les Israéliens accepteront de regarder les Palestiniens comme leurs égaux et où les deux peuples accepteront de se faire face sur la « ligne verte » de 1949, issue des accords d’armistice israélo-arabes de Rhodes. (…) Tant que la société juive ne reconnaît pas l’égalité des droits de l’autre peuple résidant sur la terre d’Israël, elle continuera de sombrer dans une réalité ouvertement coloniale et ségrégationniste, comme celle qui existe déjà dans les territoires occupés. Le conflit qui sévit aujourd’hui à Jérusalem comme les tragédies, les attentats et les meurtres qui frappent l’existence quotidienne des Juifs et des Arabes sont un bon exemple de ce que l’avenir nous réserve dans un Etat binational. Naturellement, cette approche exige symétrie et réciprocité du côté palestinien : la « ligne verte » est la frontière définitive, donc aucune colonie juive ne s’établira plus en Cisjordanie, mais aucun Palestinien ne devra retourner à l’intérieur des frontières de l’Etat d’Israël. Le sionisme classique s’est fixé pour tâche d’offrir un foyer au peuple juif. Le temps qui a séparé la guerre d’indépendance de la guerre des Six-Jours a montré que tous les objectifs du sionisme pouvaient être réalisés à l’intérieur du tracé de la « ligne verte ». La seule question sensée que l’on puisse poser aujourd’hui est donc de savoir si la société israélienne a encore la capacité de se réinventer, de sortir de l’emprise de la religion et de l’histoire et d’accepter de scinder le pays en deux Etats libres et indépendants. Zeev Sternhell (Historien)
Dans la bande de Gaza, étroite enclave côtière déjà ravagée par trois guerres et qui étouffe depuis neuf ans sous le blocus israélien, le désespoir est à son comble: la moitié des jeunes cherchent à s’exiler, les suicides sont en hausse, le chômage –l’un des plus forts taux au monde à 45%– n’a jamais été si haut et les perspectives d’avenir si lointaines. L’Obs
Le couteau est érigé en symbole du désespoir de « la génération Oslo ». Francetvinfo
L’usage d’une arme blanche est devenu typique d’une génération moins politisée et religieuse que ses aînés, et marquée par le désespoir.  C’est ce qui effraie les autorités israéliennes, car elles sont incapables de repérer ces individus, puisqu’ils ne sont pas fichés dans leurs services. C’est la génération née après les accord d’Oslo de 1993, accords de paix qui ont échoué. Ces jeunes n’ont jamais rien connu d’autre que les affrontements, la guerre et les humiliations.  Désillusionnés, ils se sont autoradicalisés et sont prêts à tout pour que la Palestine devienne un pays indépendant. Frédéric Encel
Un rapport d’un observateur de l’ONU indique que l’UNRWA gère 12 comptes Facebook antisémites et que les noms des responsables ont été livrés au Secrétaire général de l’ONU, Ban Ki Moon, qui est invité à punir les coupables. L’organisation non gouvernementale UN Watch rapporte que les fonctionnaires de l’UNRWA gèrent pas moins de 12 comptes Facebook différents qui incitent ouvertement à la violence et à la haine contre les Juifs. Le groupe a présenté un rapport jeudi au Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, Ban Ki-moon, pour lui demander encore une fois de punir les coupables, conformément à ses promesses. UN Watch a également signalé que la réponse du porte-parole de l’UNRWA Chris Gunness a été vulgaire et il s’est déchaîné contre l’ONG. Gunness a également tweeté que les allégations d‘antisémitisme contre l’UNRWA sont une légende sans fondement, et que UN Watch manque de crédibilité et « se rend ridicule. » Un porte-parole a répondu que les preuves existaient et avaient été présentées à Ban Ki Moon. Centre Simon Wisenthal
M. Nétanyahou, le «nationaliste», a bien mauvaise presse. Mahmoud Abbas quant à lui fait figure médiatique de gentil «modéré». Sans remonter une nouvelle fois aux origines du conflit, chacun s’accorde à reconnaître que dans sa dernière séquence celui-ci a pour cause la querelle à propos de l’esplanade des mosquées-mont du temple. Il ne se sera pas trouvé un seul journaliste hexagonal pour dire que l’intention prêtée aux responsables israéliens d’empêcher les musulmans d’exercer paisiblement leur culte à l’intérieur de leurs mosquées relevait du fantasme incantatoire islamiste. Il ne s’en est pas trouvé non plus un seul- au rebours de la presse étrangère-pour révéler la teneur du discours du «modéré» président palestinien à la télévision officielle daté du 16 septembre à propos des émeutes qui commençaient à Jérusalem, organisées par les extrémistes qui agressaient ces juifs venus pour prier pendant leur fêtes religieuses: «Nous bénissons les Mourabitoun, nous saluons chaque goutte de leur sang versé à cause de Jérusalem. Ce sang est pur, ce sang est propre, versé au nom d’Allah, chaque martyr aura sa place au paradis. La mosquée Al Aqsa, l’église du Saint-Sépulcre, tout est à nous, entièrement à nous ; ils n’ont pas le droit (les juifs) de les souiller de leurs pieds sales.» Depuis, et compte tenu de l’aggravation de la situation, Mahmoud Abbas a tenté de mettre de l’eau sur le feu. Mais comme le disait déjà le clairvoyant Bourguiba: «les chefs arabes sont toujours étonnés d’être pris au pied de la lettre et de ne plus savoir éteindre les incendies qu’ils ont allumés.» Je ne veux pas prétendre ici que la partie israélienne soit exempte de reproches, a fortiori son premier ministre, plus pragmatique qu’on ne le dit, mais affaibli au sein d’une coalition gouvernementale trop à droite, pour cause de système électoral littéralement criminel. Je persiste néanmoins à penser que dans un cadre intellectuel libéré de tout surmoi xénophile, la première question qui vaudrait d’être posée sans crainte de blasphémer serait de savoir pour quelle miraculeuse raison le monde palestinien échapperait à une radicalité islamiste qui met le feu à toute la région. La question ne sera pas posée. Gilles-William Goldnadel
UNRWA is deeply alarmed by the escalating violence and widespread loss of civilian life in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and in Israel. Only robust political action can prevent the further escalation of a situation that is affecting Palestinian and Israeli civilians. In Gaza a total of 11 Palestinians, among them refugees, have reportedly been killed and at least 186 injured. Nine people, including three children were reportedly killed during demonstrations in Gaza and two people – a pregnant woman and a child – were killed when a house collapsed due to the impact of a nearby Israeli strike. Four people were reportedly injured in the latter incident. In the West Bank, between 1 October and 9 October, UNRWA has recorded 45 incursions by Israeli forces into refugee camps resulting in several refugees being shot dead, including one child.  According to preliminary figures, 180 people have reportedly been injured in West Bank refugee camps, including some 20 children. About 50 of  them were reportedly injured by live-fire. (…)  Further to the recent statement of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the high number of casualties, in particular those resulting from the use of live ammunition by Israeli forces raise serious concerns about the excessive use of force that may be contrary to international law enforcement standards. Under international law there are strict limits to the use of lethal force whether in the context of law enforcement operations or during conflict. These limitations are especially pertinent where a military occupying power operates in civilian areas. According to the UN Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials: “Law enforcement officials shall not use firearms against persons except in self-defense or defense of others against the imminent threat of death or serious injury, to prevent the perpetration of a particularly serious crime involving grave threat to life, to arrest a person presenting such a danger and resisting their authority, or to prevent his or her escape; and only when less extreme means are insufficient to achieve these objectives. In any event, intentional lethal use of firearms may only be made when strictly unavoidable in order to protect life.” Where alleged violations of international law occur, there must be a prompt, impartial, effective and thorough investigation of the events and full accountability in accordance with international standards. (…) The root causes of the conflict, among them the Israeli occupation, must be addressed. Across the occupied Palestinian territory there is a pervasive sense of hopelessness and despair resulting from the denial of rights and dignity. In the West Bank communities living under occupation feel profoundly marginalized. While in Gaza the latest demonstrations are evidence of a generation that has lost hope in the future; not least because of the lack of economic prospects — youth unemployment is one of the highest in the world – but also because of the lack of reconstruction more than a year after the conflict. An entire generation of Palestinians is at risk. All political actors must act decisively to restore their hope in a dignified, secure and stable future. Christopher Gunness (porte-parole de l’Unrwa et ancien journaliste de la BBC, October 12, 2015)
Which Nation Funding UNRWA Would React Differently if its Citizens Were Stabbed, Shot, Bombed and Rammed by Terrorists? The Simon Wiesenthal Center slammed the United Nation Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) for criticizing Israel’s efforts to quell barbaric terrorist attacks by Palestinians against Israelis in Jerusalem and across the Jewish State. UNRWA expressed its concern over the use of live ammunition by Israeli forces – a policy the agency described as, “Excessive use of force,” which, it said, “May be contrary to international law enforcement standards. What an outrage! Instead of unequivocally denouncing the ongoing carnage of murderous stabbings, shootings, bombings and car rammings unleashed by Palestinians against their Jewish neighbors, UNRWA denounces Israel for trying to quell the terrorism and protect its citizens. UNRWA is the international agency that interacts with hundreds of thousands of Palestinians on a daily basis, providing over the decades, billions of dollars of aid. Instead of using its unique position to admonish the Palestinians to stop the terror and violence, targeting babies and a 12 year-old boy, 5 months before his Bar Mitzvah, it instead denounces the Jewish state for trying to stop the terror. As UNRWA receives its funding from the international community it is appropriate to ask, which nation funding UNRWA would react differently than Israel if its citizens were subject to a campaign of stabbings, shootings and bombings: The answer is that every nation in the world would respond powerfully to such a wave of terror, but only Israel is subject to criticism for the sin of defending her civilians. UNRWA’s outrageous criticism of Israel will only serve to inspire more violence against innocent Jews. Wiesenthal Center
What do you do when the people who are trying to kill you live in the neighborhood down the street? Or when they live in the same village as that lovely man your son’s been working with? Or when they work for the phone company? When they try to kill anybody — uniformed soldiers and police, ultra-Orthodox Jews, all the passengers on a city bus? When they target men, and women, and children. When they are men, and women, and children? When their leaders — politicians, spiritual leaders, teachers — lie to them about us, lie about our history, lie about our ambitions? When some of their leaders tell them they will go to paradise if they die in the act of killing us? When they (sometimes) lie to themselves about the killings they carry out — claiming that it is we who are rising up to kill them, that their bombers and stabbers are being attacked in cold blood by us — and thereby widen the circle of embittered potential killers? When they (sometimes) lie to themselves about who it is they are killing, falsely claiming in widely circulated social media exchanges, for instance, that Na’ama Henkin, gunned down with her husband in the West Bank two weeks ago, was deliberately targeted because it was she who had insulted the prophet, calling Muhammad a pig, on a visit to the Temple Mount this summer? When all they need in order to kill is a knife or a screwdriver and a mind that’s been filled with poison? And when that poison pours into them from most every media channel they consume, and from the horrendous Facebook postings of their peers and their role models? (…) After decades relentlessly demonizing and delegitimizing the revived Jewish state, the Palestinian leadership has produced a generation many of whom are so filled with hatred, and so convinced of the imperative to kill, that no other consideration — including the likelihood that they will die in the act — prevents them from seeking to murder Jews. The false claim pumped by Hamas, and the Northern Branch of the Islamic Movement in Israel, and Fatah, and many more besides, that the Jews intend to pray on the Temple Mount — a place of unique sanctity for Jews, but one whose Jewish connection has been erased from the Palestinian narrative — has all too evidently pushed a new wave of young Palestinians, urged to “protect al-Aqsa,” into murderous action against any and all Jewish targets, using any and all weapons. The suicide bombings of the Second Intifada were carried out by West Bank Palestinians; the onslaught was drastically reduced when Israel built the security barrier. Today’s terrorism is largely being carried out by Palestinian Arabs from East Jerusalem, some of whom have blue Israeli identity cards. The relative neglect of East Jerusalem since 1967, by an Israel that expanded the city’s municipal boundaries but signally failed to ensure anything remotely close to equality between Jewish and Arab neighborhoods, only made the lies and the incitement spread more easily. In an Israel where Jews and Arabs live utterly intertwined lives, this new level of potential danger in every seemingly banal encounter is rendering daily life nightmarish. In the short term: Arrest the preachers who spout hatred. Ask Facebook to close down the pages that disseminate it, and find the people behind those pages. Monitor hateful sentiment on social media more effectively; several of this month’s terrorists made no secret of their murderous intentions. (…) But in some neighborhoods, addressing such inequalities is impossible. Physically impossible. As in, Jewish city officials would be taking their lives into their hands to set foot in Shuafat refugee camp. By contrast, handing control of such areas to the PA, whose leader Mahmoud Abbas insists that all Jerusalem territory captured by Israel in 1967 be part of a Palestinian state, becomes ever less palatable and viable, as he becomes ever more extreme in his pronouncements and as the Palestinian-Arab population becomes ever more of a threat. (..) Yasser Arafat rejected Ehud Barak’s peace terms in 2000, and opted instead to foment the Second Intifada. And Mahmoud Abbas, eight years later, failed to seize Ehud Olmert’s offer to withdraw from the entire West Bank (with one-for-one land swaps), divide Jerusalem, and relinquish sovereignty in the Old City. (…) in fact, it is “resistance” that keeps the Palestinians from statehood. Most Israelis want to separate from the Palestinians — want to stop running their lives, want to keep a Jewish-democratic Israel. “Resistance” in each new iteration tells Israelis that they dare not do so. Had Gaza been calm and unthreatening after Israel’s 2005 withdrawal, the late Ariel Sharon would likely have withdrawn unilaterally from most of the West Bank. The Hamas takeover in Gaza, the incessant rocket fire and the frequent rounds of conflict told Israel that it could not risk another such withdrawal — that it could not risk another Hamas takeover in the West Bank. The international community peers shortsightedly at a strong Israel — very strong indeed compared to the Palestinians — and concludes that the onus is upon us to take the calculated risk and grant them full independence. But step back a little — to a perspective that includes Hamas, the rise of Islamic extremism in the Middle East, the threat posed directly by an emboldened Iran and via its terrorist proxies, the anti-Semitism and hostility to Israel rampant across this region — and it should be obvious that a miscalculation by “strong” Israel would quickly render it untenably weak and vulnerable. We might get better international media coverage, but we also might face destruction; Israelis aren’t about to vote for that. (…) What do you do when some of your neighbors are trying to kill you? Protect yourself. Stop them. Do what you sensibly can to help create a different, better climate — to moderate your enemies. Meanwhile, hang tough. Refuse to be terrorized. David Horowitz
Regarding the causes of this Palestinian blood fetish, Western news organizations have resorted to familiar tropes. Palestinians have despaired at the results of the peace process—never mind that Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas just declared the Oslo Accords null and void. Israeli politicians want to allow Jews to pray atop the Temple Mount—never mind that Benjamin Netanyahu denies it and has barred Israeli politicians from visiting the site. There’s always the hoary “cycle of violence” formula that holds nobody and everybody accountable at one and the same time. Left out of most of these stories is some sense of what Palestinian leaders have to say. As in these nuggets from a speech Mr. Abbas gave last month: “Al Aqsa Mosque is ours. They [Jews] have no right to defile it with their filthy feet.” And: “We bless every drop of blood spilled for Jerusalem, which is clean and pure blood, blood spilled for Allah.” Then there is the goading of the Muslim clergy. “Brothers, this is why we recall today what Allah did to the Jews,” one Gaza imam said Friday in a recorded address, translated by the invaluable Middle East Media Research Institute, or Memri. “Today, we realize why the Jews build walls. They do not do this to stop missiles but to prevent the slitting of their throats.” Then, brandishing a six-inch knife, he added: “My brother in the West Bank: Stab!” Imagine if a white minister in, say, South Carolina preached this way about African-Americans, knife and all: Would the news media be supine in reporting it? Would we get “both sides” journalism of the kind that is pro forma when it comes to Israelis and Palestinians, with lengthy pieces explaining—and implicitly justifying—the minister’s sundry grievances, his sense that his country has been stolen from him? And would this be supplemented by the usual fake math of moral opprobrium, which is the stock-in-trade of reporters covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? In the Middle East version, a higher Palestinian death toll suggests greater Israeli culpability. (Perhaps Israeli paramedics should stop treating stabbing victims to help even the score.) (…) The significant question is why so many Palestinians have been seized by their present blood lust—by a communal psychosis in which plunging knives into the necks of Jewish women, children, soldiers and civilians is seen as a religious and patriotic duty, a moral fulfillment. Despair at the state of the peace process, or the economy? Please. It’s time to stop furnishing Palestinians with the excuses they barely bother making for themselves. Above all, it’s time to give hatred its due. We understand its explanatory power when it comes to American slavery, or the Holocaust. We understand it especially when it is the hatred of the powerful against the weak. Yet we fail to see it when the hatred disturbs comforting fictions about all people being basically good, or wanting the same things for their children, or being capable of empathy. Today in Israel, Palestinians are in the midst of a campaign to knife Jews to death, one at a time. This is psychotic. It is evil. To call it anything less is to serve as an apologist, and an accomplice. Bret Stephens

« Couteau arme du désespoir« , « jeunes « désespérés » qui assassinent ou tentent d’assassiner des familles entière enfants et bébés compris, « jeune sans histoire » qui écrase des gens à un arrêt de bus avec une voiture puis s’acharne sur eux pour les achever au couteau, président qui « salue toutes gouttes de sang versées à Jérusalem » et rappelle les récompenses célestes destinées aux « martyrs » qui empêcheront les juifs de  profaner Al Aqsa avec leurs pieds sales », imam qui  appelle en plein prêche du vendredi à « poignarder « les juifs, médias occidentaux qui n’ont que les mots « désespoir » et « contestation » à la bouche, porte-parole d’une agence de l’ONU qui dénonce le seul « usage excessif de la force » des forces de sécurité israéliennes, secrétaire d’Etat américain qui met tout sur le dos des constructions israéliennes …

Vous avez dit « usage excessif de la force » ?

A l’heure où notre vieux rêve de monde unipolaire nous est enfin exaucé …

Et où chacun peut mesurer – pas moins de cinq guerres en cours entre la Syrie et l’Afghanistan ! – les effets chaque jour un peu plus catastrophiques …

D’un désengagement américain que le monde n’a pas connu depuis peut-être la fin de la 2e guerre mondiale  …

Pendant que de l’Iran à l’Etat islamique et à la Turquie et de la Russie à la Chine et à la Corée du nord, les dictatures ou Etats voyous multiplient les menaces dans les 15 mois qui leur restent …

Et qu’au Proche-Orient, dirigeants comme religieux, appellent ouvertement le premier venu à égorger tout juif qu’il ou elle peut trouver sur son chemin …

Devinez quel petit Etat, seule véritable démocratie de toute la région, est actuellement la cible de toutes les accusations ?

Palestine: The Psychotic Stage
The truth about why Palestinians have been seized by their present blood lust.
Bret Stephens
The Wall Street Journal
Oct. 12, 2015

If you’ve been following the news from Israel, you might have the impression that “violence” is killing a lot of people. As in this headline: “Palestinian Killed As Violence Continues.” Or this first paragraph: “Violence and bloodshed radiating outward from flash points in Jerusalem and the West Bank appear to be shifting gears and expanding, with Gaza increasingly drawn in.”

Read further, and you might also get a sense of who, according to Western media, is perpetrating “violence.” As in: “Two Palestinian Teenagers Shot by Israeli Police,” according to one headline. Or: “Israeli Retaliatory Strike in Gaza Kills Woman and Child, Palestinians Say,” according to another.

Such was the media’s way of describing two weeks of Palestinian assaults that began when Hamas killed a Jewish couple as they were driving with their four children in the northern West Bank. Two days later, a Palestinian teenager stabbed two Israelis to death in Jerusalem’s Old City, and also slashed a woman and a 2-year-old boy. Hours later, another knife-wielding Palestinian was shot and killed by Israeli police after he slashed a 15-year-old Israeli boy in the chest and back.

Other Palestinian attacks include the stabbing of two elderly Israeli men and an assault with a vegetable peeler on a 14-year-old. On Sunday, an Arab-Israeli man ran over a 19-year-old female soldier at a bus stop, then got out of his car, stabbed her, and attacked two men and a 14-year-old girl. Several attacks have been carried out by women, including a failed suicide bombing.

Regarding the causes of this Palestinian blood fetish, Western news organizations have resorted to familiar tropes. Palestinians have despaired at the results of the peace process—never mind that Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas just declared the Oslo Accords null and void. Israeli politicians want to allow Jews to pray atop the Temple Mount—never mind that Benjamin Netanyahu denies it and has barred Israeli politicians from visiting the site. There’s always the hoary “cycle of violence” formula that holds nobody and everybody accountable at one and the same time.

Left out of most of these stories is some sense of what Palestinian leaders have to say. As in these nuggets from a speech Mr. Abbas gave last month: “Al Aqsa Mosque is ours. They [Jews] have no right to defile it with their filthy feet.” And: “We bless every drop of blood spilled for Jerusalem, which is clean and pure blood, blood spilled for Allah.”

Then there is the goading of the Muslim clergy. “Brothers, this is why we recall today what Allah did to the Jews,” one Gaza imam said Friday in a recorded address, translated by the invaluable Middle East Media Research Institute, or Memri. “Today, we realize why the Jews build walls. They do not do this to stop missiles but to prevent the slitting of their throats.”

Then, brandishing a six-inch knife, he added: “My brother in the West Bank: Stab!”

Imagine if a white minister in, say, South Carolina preached this way about African-Americans, knife and all: Would the news media be supine in reporting it? Would we get “both sides” journalism of the kind that is pro forma when it comes to Israelis and Palestinians, with lengthy pieces explaining—and implicitly justifying—the minister’s sundry grievances, his sense that his country has been stolen from him?

And would this be supplemented by the usual fake math of moral opprobrium, which is the stock-in-trade of reporters covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? In the Middle East version, a higher Palestinian death toll suggests greater Israeli culpability. (Perhaps Israeli paramedics should stop treating stabbing victims to help even the score.) In a U.S. version, should the higher incidence of black-on-white crime be cited to “balance” stories about white supremacists?

Didn’t think so.

Treatises have been written about the media’s mind-set when it comes to telling the story of Israel. We’ll leave that aside for now. The significant question is why so many Palestinians have been seized by their present blood lust—by a communal psychosis in which plunging knives into the necks of Jewish women, children, soldiers and civilians is seen as a religious and patriotic duty, a moral fulfillment. Despair at the state of the peace process, or the economy? Please. It’s time to stop furnishing Palestinians with the excuses they barely bother making for themselves.

Above all, it’s time to give hatred its due. We understand its explanatory power when it comes to American slavery, or the Holocaust. We understand it especially when it is the hatred of the powerful against the weak. Yet we fail to see it when the hatred disturbs comforting fictions about all people being basically good, or wanting the same things for their children, or being capable of empathy.

Today in Israel, Palestinians are in the midst of a campaign to knife Jews to death, one at a time. This is psychotic. It is evil. To call it anything less is to serve as an apologist, and an accomplice.

Voir aussi:

OLP : Tuer les Juifs est un devoir national légal
Israel
11 octobre 2015

« La présence des « colons Juifs » [à Jérusalem, Tel Aviv, Afula?] est « illégale » et par conséquent, toute mesure prise contre eux est légitime et légale », selon Jamal Muhaisen, membre du Conseil Central du Fatah [ [Al-Hayat Al-Jadida, 7 oct. , 2015]. Cette propension au meurtre des Juifs, souvent exprimée par des responsables du plus haut rang de l’Autorité Palestinienne et du Fatah, explique le vaste soutien accordé par les responsables palestiniens aux récents meurtres de civils israéliens.

Un autre officiel palestinien, Mahmoud Ismail, membre du Comité Excécutif [c’est le moment de le dire!] de l’OLP, a ouvertement déclaré que le meurtre de sang-froid de Naama et Eitam Henkin dans leur voiture et devant leurs quatre enfants était, non seulement « légal », mais qu’il « remplissait pleinement un devoir national » palestinien [TV officielle de l’AP, 6 Oct. 2015].

Alors qu’Israël continue de subir une terreur quotidienne à travers tout le pays, dont quatre tentatives de meurtre au couteau hier et trois de plus, au moins, à cette heure, aujourd’hui, contre des citoyens Juifs, l’Autorité Palestinienne et le Fatah continuent d’exprimer leur total soutien à ce qu’ils sont prompts à qualifier de « soulèvement populaire ». Tout en disant au monde qu’ils ne veulent pas une nouvelle Intifada et qu’ils sont contre le terrorisme, les officiels de l’AP exhortent leur peuple à poursuivre les attentats contre tous les Juifs Israéliens, ce qu’ils appellent un « soulèvement populaire ».

Jamal Muhaisen: “Il est important que le soulèvement populaire s’intensifie.”
[Al-Hayat Al-Jadida, 7 octobre 2015]

Les citations suivantes sont extraites des déclarations de Jamal Muhaisen, membre du Comité Central du Fatah et de Mahmoud Ismaïl, membre du comité exécutif de l’OLP, légitimant le meurtre des civils israéliens.

Jamal Muhaisen, membre du Conseil Central du Fatah :

Jamal Muhaisen, membre du Comité centela du Fatah a déclaré que le peuple palestinien prouve que sa vie et son sang ont peu de valeur, devant leur soutien à la Mosquée Al Aqsa et le devoir d’accomplir la libération et l’indépendance… Muhaisen a insisté sur le fait qu’il est important que le soulèvement populaire (soit les attentats individuels terroristes contre des Juifs) s’accroisse, de façon à punir les crimes de l’occupation des des « Colons ». Il a clairement dit que la présence des « colons » est illégale et que, par conséquent toute mesure prise contre eux est à la fois légale et légitime ».
[Al-Hayat Al-Jadida, Oct. 7, 2015]
Mahmoud Ismail, membre du conseil exécutif de l’OLP :

Animateur de la TV officielle de l’AP :  « Est ce qu’ils [ les tueurs du couple Henkin] sont des Brigades des Martyrs d’Al Aqsa ou du Hamas?

Mahmoud Ismail (officiel de l’OLP) : « Il n’est pas nécessaire de revenir aux polémiques pour savoir qui a commis cette opération… Il n’est pas utile de l’annoncer ouvertement ni de se vanter de l’avoir fait. On doit remplir son devoir national volontairement et du mieux qu’on le peut ».
[Official PA TV, Oct. 6, 2015]

Les meurtriers des Henkin – Israelis Naama et Eitam Henkin (qui est aussi citoyen américain) ont été assassinés de sang-froid dans une attaque à l’arme feu depuis un autre véhicule le 1er octobre 2015, sur la route entre Itamar et Elon Moreh près de Naplouse. Leurs quatre enfants âgés de 9, 7, 4 ans, et le dernier, de 4 mois, présents dans la voiture, ont été témoins de ces meurtres, mais n’ont pas été physiquement blessés, parce que les assassins se sont tirés dessus par erreur.

Bien que les brigades de l’OLP, les Martyrs d’Al Aqsa se sont empressés de revendiquer ces meurtres, cinq terroristes du Hamas ont été arrêtés par le Shin Bet …

palwatch.org

Adaptation : Marc Brzustowski.

Un prédicateur de Rafah brandit un couteau dans un sermon et appelle les Palestiniens à poignarder des juifs

Voir les extraits vidéo sur MEMRI TV

Dans un sermon du vendredi 9 octobre 2015 prononcé à la mosquée Al-Abrar à Rafah, dans la bande de Gaza, le cheikh Mohammed Sallah « Abou Rajab » brandit un couteau, lançant un appel à ses frères de Cisjordanie : « Poignardez-les ». Il ajoute : « Ô jeunes hommes de Cisjordanie : Attaquez-les par trois ou quatre », et « découpez-les en morceaux ». Extraits :

Mohammed Salah « Abou Rajab » : Mes frères, nous devons sans arrêt rappeler au monde, et à tous ceux qui l’ont oublié… Le monde doit entendre, via ces caméras et via Internet : C’est Gaza ! C’est le lieu des tranchées et des canons ! C’est la Cisjordanie ! C’est le lieu des bombes et des poignards ! C’est Jérusalem… Jérusalem est le nom de code… C’est Jérusalem… On peut dire beaucoup de choses sur Jérusalem. C’est là que se trouvent les soldats du prophète Mahomet. Telle est la grâce d’Allah. Les soldats du prophète Mahomet sont ici. Mes frères, voilà pourquoi nous rappelons aujourd’hui ce qu’Allah a fait aux juifs. Nous rappelons ce qu’Il leur a fait à Khaybar.

[…]

Aujourd’hui, nous comprenons pourquoi les [juifs] construisent des murs. Ils ne le font pas pour arrêter les missiles, mais pour empêcher qu’on leur tranche la gorge.

[…]

« Abou Rajab », poignard à la main, fait le geste d’attaquer.

Mon frère de Cisjordanie : Poignarde ! Mon frère de Cisjordanie : Poignarde les mythes du Talmud dans leurs esprits ! Mon frère de Cisjordanie : Poignarde les mythes sur le Temple dans leurs cœurs !

[…]

Aujourd’hui, nous avons déclaré un couvre-feu [en Israël]. Écoutez ce que les juifs se disent entre eux : Restez à la maison, ou bien sortez rencontrer votre mort. Ils n’ont pas d’autre choix. Ô hommes de Cisjordanie, la première phase de l’opération nécessite de poignarder pour parvenir à un couvre-feu.

[…]

Maintenant, nous imposons un couvre-feu avec des poignards, et dans la phase suivante, qui est, avec l’aide d’Allah, sur le point de se réaliser… Nous ne vous renverrons pas en Russie, en Bulgarie, en Ukraine ou en Pologne. Nous ne vous renverrons pas là-bas. Vous êtes venus ici… Le tribunal militaire islamique a décrété… Ce tribunal, présidé par le compagnon du Prophète Sad Ibn Mu’adh, a décrété… Saad Ibn Mu’adh est réapparu, en Cisjordanie. Saad Ibn Mu’adh est aujourd’hui dans les rues de Jérusalem, d’Afula, de Tel-Aviv et du Néguev. Le tribunal militaire islamique a statué le jugement divin : Vous n’aurez rien d’autre sur notre terre que le massacre et le poignard. Pourquoi ? Le monde dira que nous sommes des terroristes, que nous incitons à la haine. Oui ! « Ô Prophète, le Seul qui compte pour toi et pour quiconque te suit parmi les croyants est Allah. Ô Prophète d’Allah, exhorte les croyants à combattre. » Pourquoi ? Ô Amérique, ô agresseurs croisés, ô sionistes arabes, ô sionistes parmi les juifs criminels : sommes-nous des agresseurs ? Vous êtes venus de votre propre volonté pour être massacrés sur notre terre.

[…]

« Lorsque viendra la promesse de l’Au-delà, Nous vous ferons venir en foule. » Allah a fait venir les juifs, Ses ennemis et les ennemis de l’humanité, qui détruisent nos maisons en Syrie, en Irak, en Egypte et partout.

[…]

Ô peuple de la mosquée d’Al-Abrar et peuple de Rafah, depuis votre mosquée, vous avez l’honneur de délivrer ces messages aux hommes de Cisjordanie : formez des escouades d’attaques au couteau. Nous ne voulons pas d’un seul assaillant. Ô jeunes hommes de Cisjordanie : Attaquez-les par trois et quatre. Les uns doivent tenir la victime, pendant que les autres l’attaquent avec des haches et des couteaux de boucher.

[…]

Ne craignez pas ce que l’on dira de vous. Ô hommes de Cisjordanie, la prochaine fois, attaquez par groupe de trois, quatre ou cinq. Attaquez-les en groupe. Découpez-les en morceaux.

[…]

Wiesenthal Center to UNRWA: When will you Repudiate Palestinian Terrorists’ Crimes Against Humanity?

Which Nation Funding UNRWA Would React Differently if its Citizens Were Stabbed, Shot, Bombed and Rammed by Terrorists?
October 13, 2015

The Simon Wiesenthal Center slammed the United Nation Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) for criticizing Israel’s efforts to quell barbaric terrorist attacks by Palestinians against Israelis in Jerusalem and across the Jewish State. UNRWA expressed its concern over the use of live ammunition by Israeli forces – a policy the agency described as, “Excessive use of force,” which, it said, “May be contrary to international law enforcement standards.”

“What an outrage! Instead of unequivocally denouncing the ongoing carnage of murderous stabbings, shootings, bombings and car rammings unleashed by Palestinians against their Jewish neighbors, UNRWA denounces Israel for trying to quell the terrorism and protect its citizens,” charged Rabbis Marvin Hier and Abraham Cooper, Founder and Dean and Associate Dean of the leading Jewish human rights group.

“UNRWA is the international agency that interacts with hundreds of thousands of Palestinians on a daily basis, providing over the decades, billions of dollars of aid. Instead of using its unique position to admonish the Palestinians to stop the terror and violence, targeting babies and a 12 year-old boy, 5 months before his Bar Mitzvah, it instead denounces the Jewish state for trying to stop the terror.”

One of hundreds of images on social media showing how to attack Israelis. This posting and numerous others like it, was removed following protest from the SWC, who has been urging social networking platforms, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook to stop enabling the terror campaign against Israelis through social media.

“As UNRWA receives its funding from the international community it is appropriate to ask, which nation funding UNRWA would react differently than Israel if its citizens were subject to a campaign of stabbings, shootings and bombings: The answer is that every nation in the world would respond powerfully to such a wave of terror, but only Israel is subject to criticism for the sin of defending her civilians. UNRWA’s outrageous criticism of Israel will only serve to inspire more violence against innocent Jews,” Wiesenthal Center officials concluded.

UNRWA calls for political action and accountability to stem the current spiral of violence and fear
12 October 2015

Statement by UNRWA Spokesperson Chris Gunness

UNRWA is deeply alarmed by the escalating violence and widespread loss of civilian life in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and in Israel. Only robust political action can prevent the further escalation of a situation that is affecting Palestinian and Israeli civilians.

In Gaza a total of 11 Palestinians, among them refugees, have reportedly been killed and at least 186 injured. Nine people, including three children were reportedly killed during demonstrations in Gaza and two people – a pregnant woman and a child – were killed when a house collapsed due to the impact of a nearby Israeli strike. Four people were reportedly injured in the latter incident. In the West Bank, between 1 October and 9 October, UNRWA has recorded 45 incursions by Israeli forces into refugee camps resulting in several refugees being shot dead, including one child.  According to preliminary figures, 180 people have reportedly been injured in West Bank refugee camps, including some 20 children. About 50 of  them were reportedly injured by live-fire.

We condemn killings and injuries of Palestine refugees such as the tragic case on 5 October, of Abd El Rahman, a 13-year-old ninth grade student at an UNRWA school who was shot dead by Israeli Forces in Bethlehem’s Aida refugee camp. The initial UNRWA investigation indicates that the child was with a group of friends, next to the UNRWA office after the school day was over and was not  posing any threat.

Further to the recent statement of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the high number of casualties, in particular those resulting from the use of live ammunition by Israeli forces raise serious concerns about the excessive use of force that may be contrary to international law enforcement standards. Under international law there are strict limits to the use of lethal force whether in the context of law enforcement operations or during conflict. These limitations are especially pertinent where a military occupying power operates in civilian areas.

According to the UN Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials: “Law enforcement officials shall not use firearms against persons except in self-defense or defense of others against the imminent threat of death or serious injury, to prevent the perpetration of a particularly serious crime involving grave threat to life, to arrest a person presenting such a danger and resisting their authority, or to prevent his or her escape; and only when less extreme means are insufficient to achieve these objectives. In any event, intentional lethal use of firearms may only be made when strictly unavoidable in order to protect life.”

Where alleged violations of international law occur, there must be a prompt, impartial, effective and thorough investigation of the events and full accountability in accordance with international standards.

UNRWA reiterates the call of the United Nations Secretary-General on all sides to respect and protect the rights of children, in particular their inherent right to life.  We call for maximum restraint to ensure the protection of civilians, in accordance with international law.

The root causes of the conflict, among them the Israeli occupation, must be addressed. Across the occupied Palestinian territory there is a pervasive sense of hopelessness and despair resulting from the denial of rights and dignity. In the West Bank communities living under occupation feel profoundly marginalized. While in Gaza the latest demonstrations are evidence of a generation that has lost hope in the future; not least because of the lack of economic prospects — youth unemployment is one of the highest in the world – but also because of the lack of reconstruction more than a year after the conflict. An entire generation of Palestinians is at risk. All political actors must act decisively to restore their hope in a dignified, secure and stable future.

Conflit israélo-palestinien

Le couteau, arme du désespoir palestinien
Daphné Rousseau

Agence France-Presse à Jérusalem

Le Devoir

13 octobre 2015

Le couteau sorti d’un sac ou d’une chemise est devenu l’arme et le symbole de la confrontation des Palestiniens contre les Israéliens, avec un impact psychologique fort même si ces attaques n’ont fait que deux morts jusque-là.

 « Le terrorisme au couteau ne nous vaincra pas », a lancé le premier ministre Benjamin Nétanyahou à l’ouverture d’une nouvelle session du Parlement placée sous le signe des violences qui secouent Israël et les Territoires palestiniens occupés depuis 12 jours.

 Les images des couteaux, qu’ils soient de simples couteaux de cuisine ou de véritables surins de combat à lame crantée — en passant par un tournevis et même un épluche-légumes —, font depuis dix jours le tour des réseaux sociaux et des médias israéliens et palestiniens.

 Policiers et témoins présents lors des attaques ont pris l’habitude de dégainer leur téléphone portable en quelques secondes pour filmer la scène de l’agression et parfois l’arme utilisée, encore ensanglantée.

 « Il s’agit d’un objet du quotidien que tout le monde a chez soi ou qui est disponible partout, qui ne demande aucun entraînement et qui est facilement dissimulable », résume le Professeur Shaul Kimhi, psychologue et spécialiste des situations de stress et de résilience liée au « terrorisme ». « Une attaque au couteau n’a pas pour fonction première de tuer, mais d’abord de faire peur et le but est atteint. Les Israéliens sentent le danger même s’il n’est pas proportionnel à la menace », ajoute-il.

 Depuis le 3 octobre, 19 attaques ou tentatives d’attaques à l’arme blanche ont été perpétrées, dans la quasi-totalité par des Palestiniens hommes ou femmes. Loin des bains de sang causés par les attentats à la bombe de la deuxième Intifada, elles ont tué deux Israéliens. Dix agresseurs présumés ont été abattus. L’un des agresseurs blessés lundi à Jérusalem-Est avait seulement 13 ans.

 Des attaques à un rythme soutenu

 Les Israéliens sont habitués à développer des solutions techniques pour faire face aux menaces, comme le bouclier anti-missiles Dôme de fer contre les roquettes. Ils sont pris de court par ce mode opératoire qui n’est pas nouveau, mais s’emploie à un rythme inédit. « Nous avons à faire à des individus qui utilisent la plus basique des armes de terrorisme qui existe, et on ne peut pas faire la chasse aux couteaux. Il n’existe donc aucune réponse sécuritaire à cette crise », dit à l’AFP Miri Eisin, ancienne colonelle du renseignement militaire israélien.

 À la télévision israélienne, des spécialistes de l’autodéfense sont invités en plateau pour montrer des parades spécifiques.

 « Le plus important, c’est de créer une « zone stérile », d’éloigner le couteau le plus loin possible de votre corps, par exemple avec cette clé de bras », explique en direct un intervenant en tordant le poignet de celui qui simule son agresseur.

 Les services de secours du Magen David Adom ont, eux, diffusé un tutoriel (une vidéo pédagogique) pour apprendre au public les gestes qui sauvent. Ils rappellent qu’il ne faut pas toucher à la lame enfoncée dans la victime pour ne pas aggraver l’hémorragie.

 Sur les réseaux sociaux palestiniens, certains parlent d’une « Intifada des couteaux » et le chef du Hamas à Gaza, Ismaïl Haniyeh, a salué « les héros au couteau » dans un prêche.

 L’arme du désespoir

 L’usage du couteau est à l’image d’un mouvement spontané de jeunes qui ont répudié leurs dirigeants. Le désespoir apparent de ceux qui manipulent l’arme blanche et doivent bien imaginer qu’ils vont au-devant de la mort reflète celui d’une grande part de cette génération.

 Mohammad Halabi, 19 ans, se disait prêt à mourir sur sa page Facebook au nom d’une « troisième intifada » avant de tuer deux Israéliens à coups de couteau dans la Vieille ville de Jérusalem et d’être ensuite abattu.

 « Hé les occupants ! Avec un couteau, pas de sirène d’alarme pour vous prévenir », écrit un internaute palestinien.

 En réponse, c’est aussi sur les réseaux sociaux que les Israéliens exorcisent la peur en maniant l’humour noir. Comme sur la photo de cet homme affublé d’une armure artisanale, le visage crispé sur le pas de sa porte avec pour légende : « Chérie, je sors juste les poubelles et je reviens ».

 En revanche, les Israéliens ont été choqués de voir passer à Tel-Aviv la semaine dernière un couteau de 3 mètres de long enfoncé dans une réplique géante de tomate rougeoyante, le tout juché sur la plateforme d’un camion.

 Il s’agissait d’une campagne publicitaire du coutelier Arcos. Aux premières plaintes du public, il a remisé son camion et présenté ses excuses en assurant qu’il s’agissait d’un timing malencontreux et qu’il n’avait en aucun cas « songé à faire une exploitation cynique de cette situation si triste ».

What do you do when the people trying to kill you live around the block?

Ultimately, the only way to thwart people bent on murder, with their minds poisoned by racism and religious extremism, is to curb the flow of toxicity
David Horovitz
The Times Of Israel

October 14, 2015

What do you do when the people who are trying to kill you live in the neighborhood down the street?

Or when they live in the same village as that lovely man your son’s been working with?

Or when they work for the phone company?

When they try to kill anybody — uniformed soldiers and police, ultra-Orthodox Jews, all the passengers on a city bus?

When they target men, and women, and children.

When they are men, and women, and children?

When their leaders — politicians, spiritual leaders, teachers — lie to them about us, lie about our history, lie about our ambitions?

When some of their leaders tell them they will go to paradise if they die in the act of killing us?

When they (sometimes) lie to themselves about the killings they carry out — claiming that it is we who are rising up to kill them, that their bombers and stabbers are being attacked in cold blood by us — and thereby widen the circle of embittered potential killers?

When they (sometimes) lie to themselves about who it is they are killing, falsely claiming in widely circulated social media exchanges, for instance, that Na’ama Henkin, gunned down with her husband in the West Bank two weeks ago, was deliberately targeted because it was she who had insulted the prophet, calling Muhammad a pig, on a visit to the Temple Mount this summer?

When all they need in order to kill is a knife or a screwdriver and a mind that’s been filled with poison?

And when that poison pours into them from most every media channel they consume, and from the horrendous Facebook postings of their peers and their role models?

What do you do?

First, acknowledge the scale of the problem.

After decades relentlessly demonizing and delegitimizing the revived Jewish state, the Palestinian leadership has produced a generation many of whom are so filled with hatred, and so convinced of the imperative to kill, that no other consideration — including the likelihood that they will die in the act — prevents them from seeking to murder Jews.

The false claim pumped by Hamas, and the Northern Branch of the Islamic Movement in Israel, and Fatah, and many more besides, that the Jews intend to pray on the Temple Mount — a place of unique sanctity for Jews, but one whose Jewish connection has been erased from the Palestinian narrative — has all too evidently pushed a new wave of young Palestinians, urged to “protect al-Aqsa,” into murderous action against any and all Jewish targets, using any and all weapons.

The suicide bombings of the Second Intifada were carried out by West Bank Palestinians; the onslaught was drastically reduced when Israel built the security barrier. Today’s terrorism is largely being carried out by Palestinian Arabs from East Jerusalem, some of whom have blue Israeli identity cards. The relative neglect of East Jerusalem since 1967, by an Israel that expanded the city’s municipal boundaries but signally failed to ensure anything remotely close to equality between Jewish and Arab neighborhoods, only made the lies and the incitement spread more easily. In an Israel where Jews and Arabs live utterly intertwined lives, this new level of potential danger in every seemingly banal encounter is rendering daily life nightmarish.

Second, tackle the problem in all the spheres where it is exacerbated.

In the short term: Arrest the preachers who spout hatred. Ask Facebook to close down the pages that disseminate it, and find the people behind those pages. Monitor hateful sentiment on social media more effectively; several of this month’s terrorists made no secret of their murderous intentions.

Make plain, via every mainstream and social media avenue, in Arabic, that Israel has no plans to change the status quo at the Temple Mount. Involve King Abdullah of Jordan. Involve anybody else who can credibly address that incendiary lie about Al-Aqsa.

Boost security, of course, as Israel is doing, but know that there can be no hermetic prevention of these kinds of attacks.

Efforts at more strategic change, inevitably, run into the 48-year dilemma of what Israel wants and needs to do about East Jerusalem in particular, and the Palestinians in general. It is unforgivable that Arab neighborhoods of the city lie decades behind the Jewish neighborhoods in everything from city services to education to job opportunity. But in some neighborhoods, addressing such inequalities is impossible. Physically impossible. As in, Jewish city officials would be taking their lives into their hands to set foot in Shuafat refugee camp.

By contrast, handing control of such areas to the PA, whose leader Mahmoud Abbas insists that all Jerusalem territory captured by Israel in 1967 be part of a Palestinian state, becomes ever less palatable and viable, as he becomes ever more extreme in his pronouncements and as the Palestinian-Arab population becomes ever more of a threat.

Only “resistance” will liberate Palestine, Hamas has always argued. In fact, it is “resistance” that keeps the Palestinians from statehood

Ultimately, the only way to thwart people bent on murder, with their minds poisoned by racism and religious extremism, is to curb the flow of toxicity. Different lessons at school; different priorities and values from spiritual leaders; different messages from political leaders; different approaches on mainstream and social media.

But all that, of course, is far easier said than done. A different tone, a different approach, from the Israeli government, might have helped until recently. Then again, we’ve tried different tones and different approaches. As former prime minister Ehud Barak once said, it’s doubtful, when the Jews in their exile through the millennia prayed for a return to Jerusalem, that they were thinking of Shuafat refugee camp. But Yasser Arafat rejected Ehud Barak’s peace terms in 2000, and opted instead to foment the Second Intifada. And Mahmoud Abbas, eight years later, failed to seize Ehud Olmert’s offer to withdraw from the entire West Bank (with one-for-one land swaps), divide Jerusalem, and relinquish sovereignty in the Old City.

And so we still run the lives of millions of Palestinians, hundreds of thousands of whom are on the “safe” side of the barrier we built to protect ourselves from what has now evidently morphed into yet another phase of vicious, futile bloodshed.

Only “resistance” will liberate Palestine, Hamas has always argued, proudly citing the prisoner releases it extorted when kidnapping Gilad Shalit, and the control of Gaza it achieved when expediting Israel’s withdrawal via terror attacks and rocket fire. But in fact, it is “resistance” that keeps the Palestinians from statehood. Most Israelis want to separate from the Palestinians — want to stop running their lives, want to keep a Jewish-democratic Israel. “Resistance” in each new iteration tells Israelis that they dare not do so. Had Gaza been calm and unthreatening after Israel’s 2005 withdrawal, the late Ariel Sharon would likely have withdrawn unilaterally from most of the West Bank. The Hamas takeover in Gaza, the incessant rocket fire and the frequent rounds of conflict told Israel that it could not risk another such withdrawal — that it could not risk another Hamas takeover in the West Bank.

The international community peers shortsightedly at a strong Israel — very strong indeed compared to the Palestinians — and concludes that the onus is upon us to take the calculated risk and grant them full independence. But step back a little — to a perspective that includes Hamas, the rise of Islamic extremism in the Middle East, the threat posed directly by an emboldened Iran and via its terrorist proxies, the anti-Semitism and hostility to Israel rampant across this region — and it should be obvious that a miscalculation by “strong” Israel would quickly render it untenably weak and vulnerable. We might get better international media coverage, but we also might face destruction; Israelis aren’t about to vote for that.

There are two peoples with claims to this bloodied land. Neither is going anywhere. Only conciliation, however reluctantly achieved, is going to enable either and both of these two peoples to live normal lives. And that’s what anybody truly interested in addressing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict should be working for.

What do you do when some of your neighbors are trying to kill you? Protect yourself. Stop them. Do what you sensibly can to help create a different, better climate — to moderate your enemies. Meanwhile, hang tough. Refuse to be terrorized. Get on with living. That, not killing, is what people were born to do.

Obama will be the only person sticking to Iran deal
Amir Taheri
New York Post

October 11, 2015
Sometime this week, President Obama is scheduled to sign an executive order to meet the Oct. 15 “adoption day” he has set for the nuclear deal he says he has made with Iran. According to the president’s timetable the next step would be “the start day of implementation,” fixed for Dec. 15.

But as things now stand, Obama may end up being the only person in the world to sign his much-wanted deal, in effect making a treaty with himself.

The Iranians have signed nothing and have no plans for doing so. The so-called Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) has not even been discussed at the Islamic Republic’s Council of Ministers. Nor has the Tehran government bothered to even provide an official Persian translation of the 159-page text.

The Islamic Majlis, the ersatz parliament, is examining an unofficial text and is due to express its views at an unspecified date in a document “running into more than 1,000 pages,” according to Mohsen Zakani, who heads the “examining committee.”

“The changes we seek would require substantial rewriting of the text,” he adds enigmatically.

Nor have Britain, China, Germany, France and Russia, who were involved in the so-called P5+1 talks that produced the JCPOA, deemed it necessary to provide the Obama “deal” with any legal basis of their own. Obama’s partners have simply decided that the deal he is promoting is really about lifting sanctions against Iran and nothing else.

So they have started doing just that without bothering about JCPOA’s other provisions. Britain has lifted the ban on 22 Iranian banks and companies blacklisted because of alleged involvement in deals linked to the nuclear issue.

German trade with Iran has risen by 33 percent, making it the Islamic Republic’s third-largest partner after China.

China has signed preliminary accords to help Iran build five more nuclear reactors. Russia has started delivering S300 anti-aircraft missile systems and is engaged in talks to sell Sukhoi planes to the Islamic Republic.

France has sent its foreign minister and a 100-man delegation to negotiate big business deals, including projects to double Iran’s crude oil exports.

Other nations have also interpreted JCPOA as a green light for dropping sanctions. Indian trade with Iran has risen by 17 percent, and New Delhi is negotiating massive investment in a rail-and-sea hub in the Iranian port of Chah-Bahar on the Gulf of Oman. With help from Austrian, Turkish and United Arab Emirates banks, the many banking restrictions imposed on Iran because of its nuclear program have been pushed aside.

“The structures of sanctions built over decades is crumbling,” boasts Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

Meanwhile, the nuclear project is and shall remain “fully intact,” says the head of Iran’s Atomic Energy Agency, Ali Akbar Salehi.

“We have started working on a process of nuclear fusion that will be cutting-edge technology for the next 50 years,” he adds.

Even before Obama’s “implementation day,” the mullahs are receiving an average of $400 million a month, no big sum, but enough to ease the regime’s cash-flow problems and increase pay for its repressive forces by around 21 percent.

Last month, Iran and the P5+1 created a joint commission to establish the modalities of implementation of an accord, a process they wish to complete by December 2017 when the first two-year review of JCPOA is scheduled to take place and when Obama will no longer be in the White House. (If things go awry Obama could always blame his successor or even George W Bush.)

Both Obama and his Secretary of State John Kerry have often claimed that, its obvious shortcomings notwithstanding, their nuke deal with the “moderate faction” in Tehran might encourage positive changes in Iran’s behavior.

That hasn’t happened.

The mullahs see the “deal” as a means with which Obama would oppose any suggestion of trying to curb Iran.

“Obama won’t do anything that might jeopardize the deal,” says Ziba Kalam, a Rouhani adviser. “This is his biggest, if not the only, foreign policy success.”

If there have been changes in Tehran’s behavior they have been for the worst. Iran has teamed up with Russia to keep Bashar al-Assad in power in Syria, mocking Obama’s “Assad must go” rhetoric. More importantly, Iran has built its direct military presence in Syria to 7,000 men. (One of Iran’s most senior generals was killed in Aleppo on Wednesday.)

Tehran has also pressured Iraqi Premier Haidar al-Abadi’s weak government to distance itself from Washington and join a dubious coalition with Iran, Russia and Syria.

Certain that Obama is paralyzed by his fear of undermining the non-existent “deal” the mullahs have intensified their backing for Houthi rebels in Yemen. Last week a delegation was in Tehran with a long shopping list for arms.

In Lebanon, the mullahs have toughened their stance on choosing the country’s next president. And in Bahrain, Tehran is working on a plan to “ensure an early victory” of the Shiite revolution in the archipelago.

Confident that Obama is determined to abandon traditional allies of the United States, Tehran has also heightened propaganda war against Saudi Arabia, now openly calling for the overthrow of the monarchy there.

The mullahs are also heightening contacts with Palestinian groups in the hope of unleashing a new “Intifada.”

“Palestine is thirsty for a third Intifada,” Supreme Guide Khamenei’s mouthpiece Kayhan said in an editorial last Thursday. “It is the duty of every Muslim to help start it as soon as possible.”

Obama’s hopes of engaging Iran on other issues were dashed last week when Khamenei declared “any dialogue with the American Great Satan” to be” forbidden.”

“We have no need of America” his adviser Ali-Akbar Velayati added later. “Iran is the region’s big power in its own right.”

Obama had hoped that by sucking up to the mullahs he would at least persuade them to moderate their “hate-America campaign.” Not a bit of that.

“Death to America” slogans, adoring official buildings in Tehran have been painted afresh along with US flags, painted at the entrance of offices so that they could be trampled underfoot. None of the US citizens still held hostages in Iran has been released, and one, Washington Post stringer Jason Rezai, is branded as “head of a spy ring “in Tehran. Paralyzed by his fear of undermining the non-existent deal, Obama doesn’t even call for their release.

Government-sponsored anti-American nationwide events are announced for November, anniversary of the seizure of the US Embassy in Tehran. The annual “End of America” week-long conference is planned for February and is to focus on “African-American victims of US police” and the possibility of “self-determination for blacks.”

According to official sources “families of Black American victims” and a number of “black American revolutionaries” have been invited.

Inside Iran, Obama’s “moderate partners” have doubled the number of executions and political prisoners. Last week they crushed marches by teachers calling for release of their leaders. Hundreds of trade unionists have been arrested and a new “anti-insurrection” brigade paraded in Tehran to terrorize possible protestors.

The Obama deal may end up as the biggest diplomatic scam in recent history.

Voir également:

America’s Fading Footprint in the Middle East
As Russia bombs and Iran plots, the U.S. role is shrinking—and the region’s major players are looking for new ways to advance their own interests
Yaroslav Trofimov
The Wall Street Journal
Oct. 9, 2015

Despised by some, admired by others, the U.S. has been the Middle East’s principal power for decades, providing its allies with guidance and protection.

Now, however, with Russia and Iran thrusting themselves boldly into the region’s affairs, that special role seems to be melting away. As seasoned politicians and diplomats survey the mayhem, they struggle to recall a moment when America counted for so little in the Middle East—and when it was held in such contempt, by friend and foe alike.

“It’s the lowest ebb since World War II for U.S. influence and engagement in the region,” said Ryan Crocker, a career diplomat who served as the Obama administration’s ambassador to Afghanistan and before that as U.S. ambassador to Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Pakistan.

From shepherding Israel toward peace with its Arab neighbors to rolling back Iraq’s 1990 invasion of Kuwait and halting the contagion of Iran’s Islamic Revolution, the U.S. has long been at the core of the Middle East’s security system. Its military might secured critical trade routes and the bulk of the world’s oil supply. Today, the void created by U.S. withdrawal is being filled by the very powers that American policy has long sought to contain.

“If you look at the heart of the Middle East, where the U.S. once was, we are now gone—and in our place, we have Iran, Iran’s Shiite proxies, Islamic State and the Russians,” added Mr. Crocker, now dean of the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. “What had been a time and place of U.S. ascendancy we have ceded to our adversaries.”

Of course, the U.S. retains a formidable presence across the greater Middle East, with some 45,000 troops in the region and deep ties with friendly intelligence services and partners in power from Pakistan to Morocco. Even after U.S. pullbacks in Iraq and Afghanistan, America’s military might in the region dwarfs Russia’s recent deployment to Syria of a few dozen warplanes and a few thousand troops. And as the Obama administration has argued, it isn’t these disengagements but the regional overstretch under President George W. Bush that undermined America’s international standing.

Still, ever since the Arab Spring upended the Middle East’s established order in 2011, America’s ability to influence the region has been sapped by a growing conviction that a risk-averse Washington, focused on a foreign-policy pivot to Asia, just doesn’t want to exercise its traditional Middle Eastern leadership role anymore.

“It’s not American military muscle that’s the main thing—there is a hell of a lot of American military muscle in the Middle East. It’s people’s belief—by our friends and by our opponents—that we will use that muscle to protect our friends, no ifs, ands or buts,” said James Jeffrey, a former U.S. ambassador to Iraq and Turkey. “Nobody is willing to take any risks if the U.S. is not taking any risks and if people are afraid that we’ll turn around and walk away tomorrow.”

This perception seems to be gaining traction in the region, where traditional allies—notably Israel and the Gulf monarchies—feel abandoned after the Obama administration’s nuclear deal with Iran. Many regional leaders and commentators compare Russian President Vladimir Putin’s unflinching support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s ruthless regime with Washington’s willingness to let go of its own allies, notably Egypt’s longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak. The phrase “red line” now often elicits knowing smirks, a result of the president’s U-turn away from striking Syria after the Assad regime’s horrifying sarin-gas attack in 2013.

By focusing Moscow’s latest bombing raids on moderate Syrian rebels trained by the Central Intelligence Agency, with nary an American effort to protect them, Mr. Putin has showcased the hazards of picking the U.S. side in this part of the world.

“Being associated with America today carries great costs and great risks,” said Emile Hokayem, a senior fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in Bahrain. “Whoever you are in the region, you have a deep grudge against the United States. If you are in liberal circles, you see Obama placating autocratic leaders even more. And if you are an autocratic leader, you go back to the issue of Mubarak and how unreliable the U.S. is as an ally. There is not one constituency you will find in the region that is supportive of the U.S. at this point—it is quite stunning, really.”

The Obama administration’s pivot away from the Middle East is rooted, of course, in deep fatigue with the massive military and financial commitments made by the U.S. since 9/11, above all after the 2003 invasion of Iraq: Since 2001, at least $1.6 trillion has been spent, according to the Congressional Research Service, and 6,900 U.S. troops have been killed in the region.

“We couldn’t have gone in more flat-out than we did in Iraq, and not only didn’t it work, it made things even worse. That’s something to keep in mind when talking about Syria,” said Jeremy Shapiro, a fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington and a former State Department official.

By scaling down its Middle East commitments, he added, the Obama administration has rightly recognized the limitations of U.S. power in a perennially turbulent region: “The difference is not whether you have peace, it’s whether Americans are involved in the lack of peace.”

Such reluctance to get involved also reflects the overall mood of the American public, argued Brian Katulis, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, a Washington think tank close to the administration.

“It’s not really about ‘exhaustion’ from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. I see it a bit more as pragmatism—many Americans look back on the past 15 years of U.S. engagement in the Middle East, and they see a meager return on investment when it comes to stability. So there’s a natural skepticism,” he said.

For now, the American public isn’t paying much of a price for the erosion of the country’s standing in the Middle East. The U.S. hasn’t suffered a major terrorist attack on its homeland since 2001. Oil prices remain low. The millions of refugees fleeing Syria and Iraq are flooding into neighboring countries and, increasingly, Europe, not into distant America. And while the region is aflame, with five wars now raging between Libya and Afghanistan, U.S. soldiers no longer die daily on its remote battlefields.

But U.S. disengagement still has long-term costs—even if one ignores the humanitarian catastrophe in Syria, where more than 250,000 people have died and more than half the population has fled their homes. With the shale revolution, the U.S. may no longer be as dependent on Middle Eastern oil, but its allies and main trading partners still are. Islamic State’s haven in Iraq and Syria may let it plot major terrorist attacks in Europe and the U.S. And the American pullback is affecting other countries’ calculations about how to deal with China and Russia.

The White House disputes the notion that the U.S. is losing ground in the Middle East. Earlier this month, President Barack Obama said that Russia’s attacks on anti-Assad forces were made “not out of strength but out of weakness” and warned that Moscow would get “stuck in a quagmire.”

“We’re not going to make Syria into a proxy war between the United States and Russia,” Mr. Obama added. “This is not some superpower chessboard contest.”

But for the past several decades, the Middle East has indeed been a geopolitical chessboard on which the U.S. carefully strengthened its positions—nurturing ties with such disparate friends as Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan, Israel, Pakistan and Turkey to thwart the ambitions of Moscow and Tehran, Washington’s main regional rivals.

On the eve of the Arab Spring in 2011, Russia had almost no weight in the region, and Iran was boxed in by Security Council sanctions over its nuclear program. The costly U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan had hardly brought stability, but neither country faced internal collapse, and the Taliban had been chased into the remote corners of the Afghan countryside. Many people in the Middle East chafed at America’s dominance—but they agreed that it was the only game in town.

Dramatic developments in recent weeks—from Russia’s Syrian gambit to startling Taliban advances in Afghanistan—highlight just how much the region has changed since then.

The Syrian deployment, in particular, has given Mr. Putin the kind of Middle Eastern power projection that, in some ways, exceeds the influence that the Soviet Union enjoyed in the 1970s and 1980s. Already, he has rendered all but impossible plans to create no-fly zones or safe areas outside the writ of the Assad regime—and has moved to position Russia as a viable military alternative that can check U.S. might in the region.

“What Putin wants is to establish a sort of co-dominion with the U.S. to oversee the Middle East—and, so far, he has almost succeeded,” said Camille Grand, director of the Fondation pour la recherché stratégique, a French think tank.

Russia’s entry has been welcomed by many in the region—particularly in Iraq, a mostly Shiite country where the U.S. has invested so much blood and treasure—because of mounting frustration with the U.S. failure to roll back Islamic State.

More than a year after President Obama promised to “degrade and ultimate destroy” Islamic State, the Sunni militant group remains firmly in control of Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city. In May, it seized Ramadi, another crucial Iraqi city. Islamic State—also known as ISIS—is spreading across the region, rattling countries from Afghanistan to Libya to Yemen.

“What’s been the result of this American coalition? Just the expansion of ISIS,” scoffed retired Lebanese Maj. Gen. Hisham Jaber, who now runs a Beirut think tank.

Iraqi officials and Kurdish fighters have long complained about the pace of the U.S. bombing campaign against Islamic State and Washington’s unwillingness to provide forward spotters to guide these airstrikes or to embed U.S. advisers with combat units. These constraints have made the U.S. military, in effect, a junior partner of Iran in the campaign against Islamic State, providing air cover to Iranian-guided Shiite militias that go into battle with portraits of the Ayatollahs Khomeini and Khamenei plastered on their tanks.

Iraq has already lost a huge chunk of its territory to Islamic State, and another calamity may be looming further east in Afghanistan. The Taliban’s recent seizure of the strategic city of Kunduz, which remains a battleground, suggests how close the U.S.-backed government of President Ashraf Ghani has come to strategic defeat. Its chances of survival could dwindle further if the Obama administration goes ahead with plans to pull out the remaining 9,800 U.S. troops next year.

“If the Americans decide to withdraw all forces from Afghanistan, what has happened in Kunduz will happen to many other places,” warned Afghan lawmaker Shinkai Karokhail.

Further afield, U.S. disengagement from Afghanistan has already driven Central Asian states that once tried to pursue relatively independent policies and allowed Western bases onto their soil back into Moscow’s orbit.

“It’s obvious that what’s happening in Afghanistan is pushing our countries closer to Russia. Who knows what America may come up with tomorrow—nobody trusts it anymore, not the elites and not the ordinary people,” said Tokon Mamytov, a former deputy prime minister of Kyrgyzstan who now teaches at the Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University in Bishkek.

Among America’s regional allies, puzzlement over why the U.S. is so eager to abandon the region has now given way to alarm and even panic—and, in some cases, attempts at accommodation with Russia.

The bloody, messy intervention in Yemen by Saudi Arabia and its Gulf allies stemmed, in part, from a fear that the U.S. is no longer watching their backs against Shiite Iran. These Sunni Arab states could respond even more rashly in the future to the perceived Iranian threat, further inflaming the sectarian passions that have fueled the rise of Islamic State and other extremist groups.

The Gulf states “are acting more independently than we have seen in the last 40 years,” said Abdulhaleq Abdulla, a political scientist in the United Arab Emirates.

Even Israel is hedging its bets. Last year, it broke ranks with Washington and declined to vote for a U.S.-sponsored U.N. General Assembly resolution condemning the Russian annexation of Crimea. In recent days, Israel didn’t criticize the Russian bombardment in Syria.

So how deep—and how permanent—is this deterioration of the U.S. ability to shape events in the Middle East?

“The decline is not irreversible at all,” said retired U.S. Navy Adm. James Stavridis, who served in 2009-13 as NATO’s supreme allied commander and is now dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He argues that a boost in aid, exercises and engagement with the Gulf states and Israel, as well as a larger commitment to fighting Islamic State and helping the moderate Syrian opposition, could undo the recent damage.

But others have concluded that the Middle East’s Pax Americana is truly over. “Whoever comes after Obama will not have many cards left to play,” said Mr. Hokayem. “I don’t see a strategy even for the next president. We’ve gone too far.”

Voir également:

Best of Frenemies
Though the Washington hand credits Obama with deep sympathy for the Jewish state, the incidents he recounts contradict that assertion.
Elliott Abrams
The Wall Street Journal
Oct. 11, 2015

Dennis Ross and “Middle East Peace Process” are nearly synonymous, and Mr. Ross wrote an 800-page book on the subject, “The Missing Peace,” after serving as a Mideast envoy to President Bill Clinton. So why another volume now? In “Doomed to Succeed,” the Washington hand brings his account up to date by covering the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations and looking at U.S.-Israel relations from Truman on.

The chapters that cover administrations in which Mr. Ross served—especially at a high level, as he did under Messrs. Bush, Clinton and Obama—are predictably the most lively. There is always the danger that familiarity breeds forgiveness, and the author is indeed less critical of mistakes under Messrs. Clinton or Bush than others might be. But that grant of clemency is withdrawn toward Mr. Obama, as Mr. Ross’s familiarity breeds page after page of criticism.

Mr. Ross’s portrait reinforces the recent account by Israel’s former ambassador, Michael Oren, in his book “Ally.” Six years of Mr. Obama get more pages here than eight years of Messrs. Clinton or Bush, and the author writes that “the president’s distancing from Israel was deliberate.” Though he credits Mr. Obama with deep sympathy for the Jewish state, the incidents he recounts contradict him.

For example, in 2009 the administration pressed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to undertake a 10-month moratorium on settlement construction in the hope of getting negotiations started, at considerable political cost to the Israeli leader. The moratorium brought the Israelis nothing from the Palestinians, so they refused to extend it. As Mr. Ross writes, “though [Palestinian leader] Abu Mazen had shown little flexibility and squandered the moratorium, President Obama . . . put the onus on Israel.”

Doomed to Succeed
By Dennis Ross
Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 474 pages, $30

Mr. Obama kept calling on Israel to take risks for peace. “But,” Mr. Ross adds, “he said nothing about what Abu Mazen had to do; the responsibility for acting was exclusively Netanyahu’s.” Even when Mr. Netanyahu accepted difficult American terms for a new negotiation in 2014 and then Abu Mazen rejected them, the administration “gave him a pass,” instead blaming the continuing construction of Israeli settlements. Mr. Obama believed that as the stronger party Israel could and should do more for peace. “But what if the Palestinians were not prepared to move? . . . He never seemed to ask that question,” Mr. Ross writes.

In Mr. Ross’s view, Mr. Obama fell for the oldest preconceptions about the Middle East, views that the State Department had been putting forward since 1948. There were principally three: “the need to distance from Israel to gain Arab responsiveness, concern about the high costs of cooperating with the Israelis, and the belief that resolving the Palestinian problem is the key to improving the U.S. position in the region.”

In chapter after chapter, Mr. Ross documents how these arguments affected policy over decades and failed to predict Arab behavior—yet were very rarely challenged. The reason they failed is simple, he says: “the hard truth is that [the Palestinians] are not a priority for Arab leaders. . . . The priorities of Arab leaders revolve around survival and security”—not Israeli-Palestinian relations or U.S. policy toward Israel.

What’s striking in this account, and in the history of U.S. Mideast policy, is why these three canards keep reappearing and gaining such wide support. When we move away from Israel, Mr. Ross observes, “our influence does not increase; our ties to the conservative Arab monarchies do not materially improve.”

When Truman recognized Israel immediately in 1948 over the deep opposition of George Marshall and the State Department, relations with all the Arabs remained intact. Eisenhower’s opposition to Israel, England and France over the Suez crisis of 1956, when those three nations invaded Sinai to seize the east bank of the Suez Canal and Ike forced them out, led to no gains with the Arab states—because “what damaged the United States was the perception that it would not stand by its friends.” When LBJ became the first president to provide tanks and Phantom jets to Israel, Averell Harriman at State predicted “an explosion.” It never came. The pattern is repeated every time because, as Mr. Ross rightly argues, the Arab states care about their own interests: “they were not going to make what mattered to them dependent on what we did with Israel.”

Mr. Ross’s treatment of each administration is necessarily brief but useful for that very reason: It’s hard to think of a college course on this subject that would not assign this book as a text. The scope of Mr. Ross’s book also allows him to highlight pointed historical ironies. He notes, for example, that Mr. Clinton intervened directly in Israeli politics to try to defeat Mr. Netanyahu in his 1996 and 1999 elections. Yet the current administration grew outraged about Mr. Netanyahu’s speech to Congress in March 2015.

Mr. Ross draws a harsh portrait of Mr. Obama’s National Security Advisor Susan Rice, who opposes Israel at every turn and refuses to engage in serious conversations with Israeli officials that would improve relations. When the administration considered its first U.N. Security Council veto, of a resolution condemning some construction in Israeli settlements, Ms. Rice was “adamant” in opposing the veto, arguing it would do “grave damage” to our relations with the Arabs. The veto was cast; she was proved wrong. She never admitted her mistake. Neither did George Marshall; neither did the State Department after Suez or after Johnson provided large quantities of arms to Israel for the first time.

Mr. Ross concludes that “those in the early years of the Truman and Eisenhower administrations who saw in the emergence of Israel only doom and gloom for the United States were wrong.” True enough. So readers may have one gripe: Why is this reassuring work entitled “Doomed to Succeed” rather than “A Blessing in Disguise?”

Mr. Abrams, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, handled Middle East affairs at the National Security Council from 2001 to 2009.

Voir encore:

October 5, 2015 Special Dispatch No.6174
Prominent Iranian Analyst Amir Taheri: Unlike Kennedy, Nixon And Reagan, Who Drove A Hard Bargain In Negotiations With Enemies, Obama Is Capitulating And Chasing Illusions In Deal With Iran

In an opinion piece published August 25, 2015 in the London-based Saudi daily Al-Sharq Al-Awsat, Amir Taheri, a prominent Iranian analyst, author and columnist, compared Obama’s policy towards Iran to the policies of Kennedy, Nixon and Reagan in their dealings with the U.S.’s main rivals in their day – the USSR and China. Taheri wrote that, in making the deal with Iran, Obama wishes to portray himself as an heir to the tradition established by these presidents of defusing conflict through diplomacy and negotiations. He noted, however, that these leaders negotiated from a position of strength, and pursued a detente with America’s enemies only after the latter had fulfilled important American demands and changed key elements of their policies. For example, Kennedy negotiated with the USSR only after forcing it to remove the nuclear sites from Cuba; Nixon’s normalization with China came only after the latter had turned its back on the Cultural Revolution and abandoned its project of exporting communism, and Reagan engaged with the Soviets only after taking military measures to counter the threat they posed to Europe. Moreover, says Taheri, the U.S. warmed its relations with China and the USSR only after they abandoned their absolute enmity towards it and began regarding it as a rival and competitor rather than a mortal enemy that must be destroyed.

Conversely, says Taheri, Obama demanded nothing of the Iranians before commencing negotiations, not even the release of U.S. hostages. Moreover, he pursued rapprochement with Iran despite the absence of any positive change in this country’s hardline policies and ideologies. On the contrary, America’s overtures only encouraged Iran’s worst tendencies, as reflected in a sharp rise in human rights violations within Iran and in its continued support for terror groups and for Assad’s regime in Syria. The detente with America did not even cause Iran to abandon its calls of death to America, Taheri notes. He concludes « Kennedy, Nixon and Reagan responded positively to positive changes on the part of the adversary, » whereas « Obama is responding positively to his own illusions. »

The following are excerpts from his article:

JFK Forced Russia To Remove Its Missiles From Cuba; Obama Obtained Nothing Tangible And Verifiable

« Promoting the ‘deal’ he claims he has made with Iran, President Barack Obama is trying to cast himself as heir to a tradition of ‘peace through negotiations’ followed by US presidents for decades. In that context he has named Presidents John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan as shining examples, with the subtext that he hopes to join their rank in history.

« Obama quotes JFK as saying one should not negotiate out of fear but should not be afraid of negotiating either. To start with, those who oppose the supposed ‘deal’ with Iran never opposed negotiations; they oppose the result it has produced… In one form or another, Iran and the major powers have been engaged in negotiations on the topic since 2003. What prompted Obama to press the accelerator was his desire to score a diplomatic victory before he leaves office. It did not matter if the ‘deal’ he concocted was more of a dog’s dinner than a serious document. He wanted something, anything , and to achieve that he was prepared to settle for one big diplomatic fudge.

« Is Obama the new JFK? Hardly. Kennedy did negotiate with the USSR but only after he had blockaded Cuba and forced Nikita Khrushchev to blink and disband the nuclear sites he had set up on the Caribbean island. In contrast, Obama obtained nothing tangible and verifiable. Iran’s Atomic Energy chief Ali-Akbar Salehi put it nicely when he said that the only thing that Iran gave Obama was a promise ‘not to do things we were not doing anyway, or did not wish to do or could not even do at present.’

« JFK also had the courage to fly to West Berlin to face the Soviet tanks and warn Moscow against attempts at overrunning the enclave of freedom that Germany’s former capital had become. With his ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’ (I am a citizen of Berlin), he sided with the people of the besieged city in a long and ultimately victorious struggle against Soviet rule. In contrast Obama does not even dare call on the mullahs to release the Americans they hold hostage. Instead, he has engaged in an epistolary courting of the Supreme Guide and instructed his administration in Washington to do and say nothing that might ruffle the mullahs’ feathers.

Nixon Extracted Far-Reaching Concessions From China; Obama Has Only Encouraged The Worst Tendencies Of The Khomeinist Regime

« No, Obama is no JFK.  But is he heir to Nixon? Though he hates Nixon ideologically, Obama has tried to compare his Iran ‘deal’ with Nixon’s rapprochement with China. Again, the comparison is misplaced. Normalization with Beijing came after the Chinese leaders had sorted out their internal power struggle and decided to work their way out of the ideological impasse created by their moment of madness known as The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. The big bad wolf of the tale, Lin Biao, was eliminated in an arranged air crash and the Gang of Four defanged before the new leadership set-up in Beijing could approach Washington with talk of normalization.

« At the time the Chinese elite, having suffered defeat in border clashes with the USSR, saw itself surrounded by enemies, especially after China’s only ally Pakistan had been cut into two halves in an Indo-Soviet scheme that led to the creation of Bangladesh. Hated by all its neighbors, China needed the US to break out of isolation. Even then, the Americans drove a hard bargain. They set a list of 22 measures that Beijing had to take to prove its goodwill, chief among them was abandoning the project of ‘exporting revolution’.

« Those of us who, as reporters, kept an eye on China and visited the People’s Republic in those days were astonished at the dramatic changes the Communist leaders introduced in domestic and foreign policies to please the Americans. In just two years, China ceased to act as a ’cause’ and started behaving like a nation-state. It was only then that Nixon went to Beijing to highlight a long process of normalization. In the case of Iran, Obama has obtained none of those things. In fact, his ‘deal’ has encouraged the worst tendencies of the Khomeinist regime as symbolized by dramatic rise in executions, the number of prisoners of conscience and support for terror groups not to mention helping Bashar Al-Assad in Syria.

Reagan Had No Qualms About Calling The USSR ‘The Evil Empire’;  Obama Is Scared Of Offending The Mullahs

« No, Obama is no Nixon. But is he a new Reagan as he pretends? Hardly. Reagan was prepared to engage the Soviets at the highest level only after he had convinced them that they could not blackmail Europe with their SS20s while seeking to expand their empire through so-called revolutionary movements they sponsored across the globe. The SS20s were countered with Pershing missiles and ‘revolutionary’ armies with Washington-sponsored ‘freedom fighters.’

« Unlike Obama who is scared of offending the mullahs, Reagan had no qualms about calling the USSR ‘The Evil Empire’ and castigating its leaders on issues of freedom and human rights. The famous phrase ‘Mr. Gorbachev, tear down that wall!’ indicated that though he was ready to negotiate, Reagan was not prepared to jettison allies to clinch a deal.

« Obama has made no mention of Jimmy Carter, the US president he most resembles. However, even Carter was not as bad as Obama if only because he was prepared to boycott the Moscow Olympics to show his displeasure at the invasion of Afghanistan. Carter also tried to do something to liberate US hostages in Tehran by organizing an invasion of the Islamic Republic with seven helicopters. The result was tragicomic; but he did the best his meagre talents allowed. (NB: No one is suggesting Obama should invade Iran if only because if he did the results would be even more tragicomic than Carter’s adventure.)

« On a more serious note, it is important to remember that dealing with the Khomeinist regime in Tehran is quite different from dealing with the USSR and China was in the context of detente and normalization. Neither the USSR nor the People’s Republic regarded the United States as ‘enemy’ in any religious context as the Khomeinist regime does. Moscow branded the US, its ‘Imperialist’ rival, as an ‘adversary’ (protivnik) who must be fought and, if possible, defeated, but not as a ‘foe’ (vrag) who must be destroyed. In China, too, the US was attacked as ‘arch-Imperialist’ or ‘The Paper Tiger’ but not as a mortal foe. The slogan was ‘Yankee! Go Home!' »

China And USSR Moderated Their Virulent Hate For U.S,; In Iran The Slogan Is Still ‘Death To America’

« In the Khomeinist regime, however, the US is routinely designated as ‘foe’ (doshman) in a religious context and the slogan is ‘Death to America!’ Supreme Guide Ali Khamenei has no qualms about calling for the ‘destruction’ of America, as final step towards a new global system under the banner of his twisted version of Islam. Tehran is the only place where international ‘End of America’ conferences are held by the government every year. The USSR and China first cured themselves of their version of the anti-American disease before seeking detente and normalization. That did not mean they fell in love with the US. What it meant was that they learned to see the US as adversary, rival, or competitor not as a mortal foe engaged in a combat-to-death contest. The Islamic Republic has not yet cured itself of that disease and Obama’s weakness may make it even more difficult for that cure to be applied.

« Détente with the USSR and normalization with China came after they modified important aspects of their behavior for the better. Kennedy, Nixon and Reagan responded positively to positive changes on the part of the adversary. In the case of the USSR positive change started with the 20th congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in which Khrushchev denounced Joseph Stalin’s crimes, purged the party of its nastiest elements, notably Lavrentiy Beria, and rehabilitated millions of Stalin’s victims.

« In foreign policy, Khrushchev, his swashbuckling style notwithstanding, accepted the new architecture of stability in Cold War Europe based on NATO and the Warsaw Pact. Kennedy, Johnson and, later, Nixon and President Gerald Ford had to respond positively. In the late1980s, the USSR offered other positive evolutions through Glasnost and Perestroika and final withdrawal from Afghanistan under Mikhail Gorbachev. Again, Reagan and President George Bush (the father) had to respond positively.

« In the case of China we have already noted the end of the Cultural Revolution. But China also agreed to help the US find a way to end the Vietnam War. Beijing stopped its almost daily provocations against Taiwan and agreed that the issue of the island-nation issue be kicked into the long grass. Within a decade, under Deng Xiaoping, China went even further by adopting capitalism as its economic system.

« There is one other difference between the cases of the USSR and China in the 1960s to 1990s and that of the Khomeinist regime in Tehran today. The USSR had been an ally of the United States during the Second World War and its partner in setting up the United Nations in 1945. Although rivals and adversaries, the two nations also knew when to work together when their mutual interests warranted it. The same was true of the Chinese Communist Party which had been an ally of the US and its Chinese client the Kuomintang during the war against Japanese occupation when Edgar Snow was able to describe Mao Zedong as ‘America’s staunchest ally against the Japanese Empire.’ In the 1970s, Washington and Beijing did not find it strange to cooperate in containing the USSR, their common rival-cum-adversary as they had done when countering Japan.

« In the case of the Islamic Republic there is no sign of any positive change and certainly no history of even tactical alliance with the US.

« Unless he knows something that we do not, Obama is responding positively to his own illusions. »

Voir enfin:

Comment Obama a perdu l’Afghanistan
Vijeta Uniyal

Gatestone institute

oct 11, 2015

Les talibans semblent avoir correctement évalué le manque de résolution du leader américain actuel et ont à l’évidence décidé de reprendre tout l’Afghanistan.
Ce qui est visible pour tous excepté pour Obama est que le « faible » Poutine continue de supplanter les américains en Ukraine, en Crimée et maintenant en Syrie. Le Commandant en chef américain n’a pas été en mesure de faire la démonstration des solides qualités requises pour être le leader du monde libre.
Le Président Obama a semble-t-il fait pression sur l’Inde pour qu’elle fasse des concessions au Cachemire. Selon l’ancien ambassadeur du Pakistan aux Etats-Unis, Obama a secrètement écrit au président du Pakistan en 2009, qu’il sympathisait avec la position du Pakistan sur le Cachemire, et apparemment se serait proposé de dire à l’Inde « que les vieilles façons de faire ne sont plus du tout acceptables. »
Les conséquences d’une reconquête de l’Afghanistan par les talibans seraient encore plus désastreuses que leur précédent règne de terreur. Les talibans non seulement recommenceraient à envoyer des djihadistes entraînés au-delà des frontières du Pakistan pour faire la guerre aux « infidèles » en Inde, mais ils mettraient aussi en œuvre leur objectif déclaré de djihad universel contre l’Occident.
Avec les frontières ouvertes de l’Europe, l’Occident est plus que jamais vulnérable.
Le Président américain qui a abandonné la Syrie et le Yémen sans le moindre combat est maintenant en train de mener à contre-coeur une contre-offensive en Afghanistan. Les talibans semblent avoir correctement évalué le manque de résolution du leadership actuel aux Etats-Unis et ont à l’évidence décidé de reprendre tout l’Afghanistan.

Dans sa première campagne présidentielle de 2008, alors qu’il était sénateur, Obama avait qualifié l’engagement des Etats-Unis en Irak de « mauvaise guerre, » et à la place voulait que son pays se concentre sur l’Afghanistan — sa « bonne guerre. »

Mais après le retrait des troupes américaines d’Irak en 2011, des pans entiers d’Irak sont tombés sous contrôle de l’Etat Islamique (ISIS), tandis que les autres régions sont passées sous influence de l’Iran.

Alors comment se porte la « bonne guerre » du Président Obama en Afghanistan?
Le 29 septembre 2015, les combattants talibans se sont emparés de Kunduz, une capitale provinciale. Cette prise représente la plus importante victoire des talibans depuis 2001, date à laquelle une coalition menée par les américains avait renversé le régime des talibans, à la suite des attaques du 11 septembre à New York.

Depuis ce revers, les talibans s’étaient cachés dans des régions tribales tout en lançant des attaques terroristes sporadiques dans les villes, sans jamais réussir à reprendre un centre urbain. Avec la chute de Kunduz, les talibans contrôlent la 5ème plus grande ville d’Afghanistan.

Le 29 septembre les forces talibanes ont lancé une attaque coordonnée sur Kunduz dans trois directions. L’armée afghane n’a pas réussi à opposer une résistance suffisante et s’est défaite précipitamment pour courir se réfugier à l’aéroport de la ville. Apparemment, les soldats afghans espéraient en renfort le soutien des forces aériennes de la coalition conduite par les Etats-Unis. Le porte-parole du ministre de l’intérieur d’Afghanistan, Sediq Sediqqi, a confirmé que la ville de Kunduz était tombée « aux mains des ennemis. »

Malgré des frappes aériennes américaines sévères, les talibans sont de toute évidence bien ancrés ce qui indique que les milices terroristes ont l’intention de se maintenir sur leur territoire nouvellement conquis et n’ont aucune intention de se retirer. Clairement ce groupe taliban ne ressemble pas à celui qui opérait naguère, qui frappait puis disparaissait. Il semble s’être revigoré de la force islamiste, être axé sur la conquête et prêt à défier les Etats-Unis et les forces de la coalition.

Bien que l’armée Afghane, sous l’autorité du gouvernement de Kaboul et de son Président Ashraf Ghani ait échoué dans sa contre-offensive contre la progression des forces talibanes, la responsabilité de cet énorme désastre militaire et géopolitique est à mettre au compte d’Obama.

Le Président Obama n’a jamais manqué de rappeler au monde que les dirigeants « de la plus grande puissance militaire que le monde ait jamais connu, » , c’est-à-dire, la force militaire américaine et le courage de ses braves hommes et femmes ne peuvent être mis en question. Mais le Commandant -en – Chef a échoué à faire preuve de la force de caractère requise pour être le dirigeant du monde libre.

En outre, Obama semble avoir établi un modèle de sous estimation des adversaires de l’Amérique. Il est connu qu’il a qualifié ISIS « de bande de joyeux fêtards, » et a récemment déclaré que le Président russe Vladimir Poutine s’est engagé dans la guerre en Syrie « par faiblesse. »

Mais ce qui est visible à chacun sauf à Obama est que le « faible » Poutine supplante les Etats-Unis en Ukraine, Crimée et maintenant en Syrie. C’est Obama qui semble faible.
Dans son approche sur d’autres terrains, Obama s’est aliéné ses alliés et a renforcé ses ennemis.
Dans une apparente tentative de persuader le Pakistan de cesser d’appuyer Al-Qaeda et ses filiales, le Président Obama s’est proposé de faire pression sur l’Inde pour qu’elle fasse des concessions au Cachemire. Selon l’ancien ambassadeur du Pakistan aux Etats-Unis, Husain Haqqani, le Président Obama a secrètement écrit  au Président du Pakistan, Asif Ali Zardari in 2009, l’assurant de sa sympathie pour la position du Pakistan au Cachemire, et se proposant apparemment de dire à l’Inde que « les anciennes manières de faire ne sont plus acceptables. »

Selon le récit de Haqqani, rendu public en 2013, le Pakistan, qui bénéficie d’une aide financière de plusieurs milliards de dollars des Etats-Unis chaque année, a rejeté l’offre du Président Obama. Au lieu de cela, le Pakistan a continue d’entraîner, d’armer et d’abriter des terroristes internationaux – dont Osama bin Laden. Beaucoup de ces terroristes ont planifié et mené des opérations qui ont tué près de 2000 américains en service et en ont blessé 20,000 autres.

Le Président Obama s’est ainsi aliéné l’Inde sans rien obtenir du Pakistan en retour.
L’Inde était toute prête à soutenir la stratégie des Etats-Unis en Afghanistan. New Delhi partageait l’inquiétude de Kaboul sur la montée de l’islam militant dans la région. L’Inde est aussi confrontée à une menace existentielle par les milices islamistes dans la province à majorité musulmane du Cachemire et au-delà. Depuis le milieu des années 1990 plus de 30 000 civils indiens appartenant à du personnel de sécurité ont été tués dans des attaques terroristes.

Le Président Obama, lors d’une visite en Inde, apparemment a préféré jouer le « commis voyageur » de la religion musulmane, et à plusieurs reprises a interpellé les hindous pour leur intolérance envers la minorité musulmane, niant la réalité de ce qui se révèle être une tentative de génocide et un nettoyage ethnique des Hindous, commencé il y a 70 ans avec la création de la République Islamique du Pakistan et se poursuivant aujourd’hui. Non seulement des millions d’Hindous ont été forcés de quitter le Pakistan quand les deux pays ont été créés en 1947, mais presque tous les hindous restés au Pakistan et au Bangladesh (anciennement Pakistan de l’Est) ont été expulsés ou assassinés au cours des décennies qui suivirent. Le nettoyage ethnique a culminé lors du génocide du Bangladesh en 1971, perpétré par l’Armée pakistanaise. Il a fait trois millions de victimes hindous et bangladeshis, et a forcé plus de 10 millions de refugiés à s’enfuir en Inde. En contrepartie la population musulmane en Inde est passée de 35 millions au début des années 1950 à environ 180 millions in 2015, faisant de l’Inde le foyer de la deuxième plus importante population musulmane au monde, après l’Indonésie.

L’offensive des talibans en Afghanistan est le résultat direct de la politique constante de l’administration Obama de s’aliéner ses amis et de renforcer ses ennemis. Que ce soit Israël, l’Iran, l’Egypte ou l’Afghanistan, le Président Obama a de toute évidence préféré traiter avec des acteurs islamistes ou djihadistes plutôt qu’avec des forces libérales, laïques et démocratiques.

Les conséquences d’une reconquête par les talibans de l’Afghanistan seraient encore plus désastreuses que leur précédent règne de terreur. Les talibans non seulement recommenceraient à envoyer des djihadistes bien entraînés à travers le Pakistan et au-delà de ses frontières, pour faire la guerre aux « infidèles » en Inde; Il porterait aussi son objectif déclaré de djihad mondial contre l’Occident. Avec les frontières de l’Europe grandes ouvertes, l’occident est plus vulnérable que jamais.

Traduction Europe Israël

Vijeta Uniyal – SOURCE

Vijeta Uniyal est analyste politique indien basé en Europe.

Israël : la solution à deux Etats est la seule raisonnable
Zeev Sternhell (Historien)

Le Monde

13.10.2015

C’est contre la colonisation continue des territoires conquis en 1967 que se révoltent une fois de plus en ce moment les Palestiniens. Ils comprennent que la colonisation vise à perpétuer l’infériorité palestinienne et rendre irréversible la situation qui dénie à leur peuple ses droits fondamentaux. Ici se trouve la raison des violences actuelles et on n’y mettra fin que le jour où les Israéliens accepteront de regarder les Palestiniens comme leurs égaux et où les deux peuples accepteront de se faire face sur la « ligne verte » de 1949, issue des accords d’armistice israélo-arabes de Rhodes.

Tandis que nous approchions du canal de Suez vers la fin de la campagne du Sinaï en juin 1967, je demandai à un officier supérieur réserviste de l’armée israélienne – qui devint plus tard l’un des principaux leaders de la gauche sioniste radicale – ce qui se passait en Cisjordanie. « On achève la guerre d’indépendance », me répondit-­il. Tel était alors le discours dominant en Israël, et il l’est encore aujourd’hui, au même titre que celui des droits historiques du peuple juif sur la terre de la Bible, qui sert fondamentalement à légitimer l’occupation et le projet de colonisation.

Deux concepts distincts de nation
L’ambition du sionisme était, par définition, de conquérir et coloniser la Palestine. C’était la nécessité du moment. Le sionisme était une nécessité, la conséquence inévitable de la crise du libéralisme et de la montée du nationalisme radical en Europe. Les dernières décennies du XIXe siècle ont été marquées par l’aboutissement d’un processus global d’assaut contre l’héritage des Lumières, la définition politique et légale de ce qui faisait une nation, et contre le statut et les droits autonomes de l’individu en tant qu’être humain.

Le destin des juifs dépendant depuis la Révolution française du destin des valeurs libérales, les fondateurs du sionisme ont compris que si une crise mettant en cause la démocratie et les droits de l’homme devait se produire en France – la société libérale la plus avancée du Vieux Continent –, cela n’augurait rien de bon pour l’avenir des juifs d’Europe centrale et orientale.

Depuis le milieu du XVIIIe siècle, existaient deux concepts distincts de nation. Le premier, qui correspond au point de vue des Lumières tel qu’il a été présenté dans le Dictionnaire raisonné de Diderot, définit la nation comme un agrégat d’individus soumis au même gouvernement et vivant à l’intérieur des frontières d’un même pays. Le second présente la nation comme un corps organique, un produit de l’histoire, où le rapport aux individus formant le peuple est pareil à celui d’un arbre avec ses branches et ses feuilles : la feuille existe grâce à l’arbre, c’est pourquoi l’arbre a préséance sur la feuille.

Mythe contre raison
Depuis sa création, le mouvement national juif affiche les mêmes caractéristiques que celles de ses pays d’origine en Europe centrale et orientale : une identité nationale tribale, façonnée par l’histoire, la culture, la religion et la langue – une identité en vertu de laquelle l’individu ne se définit pas lui-même mais se trouve défini par l’histoire. La notion de « citoyenneté », à laquelle est raccroché en Occident le concept de nation, n’avait aucun sens en Galicie, en Ukraine ou dans la Russie blanche. Et cela valait également pour les juifs : les sionistes pouvaient bien cesser d’observer les préceptes religieux et rompre avec leur religion au sens de foi métaphysique, mais il leur était impossible de rompre l’attache historique et l’identité historique qui se fondaient sur la religion.

Même si chacun sait d’expérience que la conquête et la colonisation de la Palestine ont été déterminées par la situation catastrophique qui commençait à s’installer en Europe de l’Est à la fin du XIXe siècle, le besoin existentiel réclamait une « couverture » idéologique afin que la conquête de la terre soit investie d’une légitimité historique. L’idéologie du retour sur « la terre de nos pères » n’a pas été élaborée par des religieux pratiquants mais par des nationalistes laïcs pour qui – comme cela avait été le cas pour le « nationalisme intégral » français – la religion, dépourvue de son contenu métaphysique, offrait un ciment social et ne servait essentiellement qu’à réaliser une fusion nationale. L’histoire précéda une décision rationnelle, et c’est l’histoire qui a façonné l’identité collective.

La plupart des dirigeants politiques savent qu’il est bien plus efficace de convaincre les gens par la force d’un mythe que par la force de la raison. La vérité, c’est qu’au XXe siècle, les juifs avaient plus besoin d’un Etat qu’aucun autre peuple au monde. Par conséquent, les dirigeants politiques du mouvement sioniste et du Yichouv (la communauté juive présente en Palestine avant 1948) se sont focalisés sur ce but suprême que représentait la création d’un Etat juif. La Shoah a transformé l’entreprise sioniste en un projet mondial, une dette due au peuple juif. Tel était le contexte sur fond duquel a eu lieu la guerre d’indépendance de 1948.

Le sionisme, victime de son succès
Au lendemain de la guerre, il devint clair que le Yichouv avait été victime de son succès. La direction prise par l’Etat nouvellement établi s’inscrivait dans le prolongement direct de la période précédente : aucun tournant, aucun nouveau commencement pour inaugurer une ère nouvelle. Ce fut la grande faiblesse d’Israël et c’est encore aujourd’hui l’une des sources de notre malaise.

Aussi la communauté de tous les « citoyens », qui incluait nécessairement les Arabes restés sur le territoire, était-elle perçue comme infiniment inférieure à la communauté nationale et religieuse du peuple juif. La déclaration d’indépendance n’était pénétrée d’aucune puissance légale ou morale. C’était un document de relations publiques, destiné à l’opinion publique occidentale.

Jusqu’en 1966, le système démocratique israélien n’empêchait pas les pères fondateurs de placer les Arabes sous autorité militaire ni de les priver de leurs droits de l’homme et de citoyen. Aucun besoin de sécurité ne le justifiait, seulement une nécessité psychologique : il fallait enseigner aux Arabes qui étaient les maîtres et maintenir l’état d’urgence qui prévalait avant la création de l’Etat d’Israël.

La plupart des Israéliens n’ont pas compris, et certains ont refusé de comprendre, qu’il fallait mettre fin à cette situation transitoire, que ce qui était légitime et juste avant 1949, parce que la conquête territoriale était nécessaire, avait cessé de l’être après la guerre. L’idée selon laquelle moins il y avait d’Arabes demeurant dans l’Etat juif mieux cela valait était compréhensible étant donné la guerre pour la survie qui se jouait alors.

Israël n’a pas de frontières permanentes ni de constitution, parce que les pères fondateurs l’ont voulu ainsi : toutes les options devaient demeurer ouvertes, y compris celles qui s’ouvrirent en juin 1967
Cependant, après la victoire et l’ouverture du pays à une immigration massive, une nouvelle ère devait commencer. Son symbole le plus saillant aurait du être une constitution, ainsi que le promettait la déclaration d’indépendance : une constitution démocratique, fondée sur les droits de l’homme et plaçant en son cœur la vie politique et sociale du corps des citoyens, et non pas d’une communauté religieuse ou ethnique particulière.

Une telle constitution aurait montré que les juifs devenant citoyens de leur propre Etat aux côtés des non-juifs, un chapitre entièrement nouveau de leur histoire s’écrivait. En même temps, une constitution aurait délimité les frontières territoriales telles qu’elles furent fixées à l’issue de la guerre. Israël n’a pas de frontières permanentes ni de constitution, parce que les pères fondateurs l’ont voulu ainsi : toutes les options devaient demeurer ouvertes, y compris celles qui s’ouvrirent en juin 1967.

Durant la guerre des Six-Jours de 1967, des territoires qui étaient encore hors de portée vingt ans auparavant tombèrent dans les mains israéliennes comme un fruit mûr. Puisque rien n’était définitif, les élites dirigeantes du mouvement travailliste n’avaient aucune raison de ne pas persévérer dans la voie qui fut jusque-là si victorieuse. Quelle importance pouvait avoir la « ligne verte » aux yeux de ce leadership ? N’était-ce pas simplement un instantané de la situation qui suivit la fin des hostilités en 1949 ?

Sortir de l’impasse
Près d’un demi-siècle s’est écoulé depuis lors et le mouvement national juif est entré dans une impasse. Encore aujourd’hui, l’opposition de centre gauche est incapable de proposer une alternative idéologique au projet de colonisation, alternative fondée sur le principe que ce qui était légitime avant la guerre d’indépendance de 1948-­1949, parce que cela était nécessaire, a cessé de l’être par la suite et donc que les colonies ne sont pas simplement illégales mais illégitimes et immorales et qu’elles ne rencontrent aucun critère de principe, parce qu’elles ne sont pas nécessaires et certainement pas utiles pour l’avenir du peuple juif.

Quels sont les hommes politiques de l’opposition qui seraient prêts à œuvrer concrètement pour désamorcer cette funeste bombe à retardement ? Qui parmi eux accepterait d’assumer l’idée que les droits historiques du peuple juif sur la terre d’Israël n’ont pas priorité sur les droits des Palestiniens à être maîtres de leur destin et donc qu’il faudrait scinder équitablement le pays.

Le temps est venu de reconnaître que l’opération de conquête territoriale qui s’est achevée en 1949 et la partition du pays réalisée à la fin de la guerre d’indépendance doivent constituer l’ultime séparation. Ce n’est que sur cette base que nous pourrons construire l’avenir. Quiconque refuse de comprendre que le sionisme fut une opération destinée à libérer un peuple et non pas des pierres sacrées, un acte politique rationnel et non pas une irruption messianique, condamne Israël à s’enfoncer dangereusement soit dans une situation coloniale soit dans un Etat binational, autrement dit dans une guerre civile permanente.

La « ligne verte » est la frontière définitive
Tant que la société juive ne reconnaît pas l’égalité des droits de l’autre peuple résidant sur la terre d’Israël, elle continuera de sombrer dans une réalité ouvertement coloniale et ségrégationniste, comme celle qui existe déjà dans les territoires occupés. Le conflit qui sévit aujourd’hui à Jérusalem comme les tragédies, les attentats et les meurtres qui frappent l’existence quotidienne des Juifs et des Arabes sont un bon exemple de ce que l’avenir nous réserve dans un Etat binational.

Naturellement, cette approche exige symétrie et réciprocité du côté palestinien : la « ligne verte » est la frontière définitive, donc aucune colonie juive ne s’établira plus en Cisjordanie, mais aucun Palestinien ne devra retourner à l’intérieur des frontières de l’Etat d’Israël.

Le sionisme classique s’est fixé pour tâche d’offrir un foyer au peuple juif. Le temps qui a séparé la guerre d’indépendance de la guerre des Six-Jours a montré que tous les objectifs du sionisme pouvaient être réalisés à l’intérieur du tracé de la « ligne verte ». La seule question sensée que l’on puisse poser aujourd’hui est donc de savoir si la société israélienne a encore la capacité de se réinventer, de sortir de l’emprise de la religion et de l’histoire et d’accepter de scinder le pays en deux Etats libres et indépendants. (Traduit de l’anglais par Pauline Colonna d’Istria © « Haaretz »)

Zeev Sternhell est membre de l’Académie israélienne des sciences et lettres, professeur à l’université hébraïque de Jérusalem. Spécialiste de l’histoire du fascisme son dernier ouvrage est Histoire et Lumières : changer le monde par la raison – entretiens avec Nicolas Weill (Albin Michel, 2014). Il est également l’auteur de Aux origines d’Israël : entre nationalisme et socialisme, Fayard, 1996.

Voir enfin:

http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.678483

With No Solution in Sight: Between Two National Movements

There is more than one reason for the failure of the Oslo Accords, but at the basis lies a fundamental difference in how each side views the conflict.

Shlomo Avineri

Haaretz

Oct 02, 2015

Twenty years after the Oslo Accords, the time has come to ask why they did not bring about the historic compromise envisaged by their initiators and supporters. This is a question to be asked especially by those who supported them and viewed them, justifiably, as the opening toward an epochal reconciliation between the Jewish and Palestinian peoples.

There is more than one reason for the failure to achieve an end to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians: mutual distrust between the two populations, internal pressures from the rejectionists on both sides, Yasser Arafat’s repeated deceptions, the murder of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, the electoral victories of Likud in Israeli elections, Palestinian terrorism, continuing Israeli settlement activities in the territories, the bloody rift between Fatah and Hamas, American presidents who did too little (George W. Bush) or too much and in a wrong way (Barack Obama), the political weakness of Mahmoud Abbas, governments headed by Netanyahu that did everything possible to undermine effective negotiations. All this is true, and everyone picks and chooses what fits their views and interests – but beyond all these lies a fundamental difference in the terms in which each side views the conflict, a difference many tend or choose to overlook.

Most Israelis view the conflict as a struggle between two national movements: the Jewish national movement – Zionism – and the Palestinian national movement as part of the wider Arab national movement. The internal logic of such a view leads in principle to what is called the two-state solution. Even if the Israeli right wing preferred for years to avoid such a view, eventually it has been adopted by Netanyahu, albeit reluctantly, and is now the official policy of his government.
The point is that those Israelis who see the conflict in the framework of a struggle between two national movements assume that this is also the position of the other side; hence when negotiations fail, the recipe advocated is to tinker with some of the details, hoping that further concessions, on one or the other side, will bring about an agreement.

Unfortunately, this is an illusion.
The basic Palestinian position, which usually isn’t always explicitly stated, is totally different and can be easily detected in numerous Palestinian statements. According to the Palestinians’ view, this is not a conflict between two national movements but a conflict between one national movement (the Palestinian) and a colonial and imperialistic entity (Israel). According to this view, Israel will end like all colonial phenomena – it will perish and disappear. Moreover, according to the Palestinian view, the Jews are not a nation but a religious community, and as such not entitled to national self-determination which is, after all, a universal imperative.

According to this view, the Palestinians see all of Israel – and not just the West Bank and Gaza – as analogous to Algeria: an Arab country out of which the foreign colonialists were ultimately expelled. Because of this, Israel – even in its pre-1967 borders – never appears in Palestinian school textbooks; because of this the Palestinians insist never to give up their claim to the right of return of 1948 refugees and their descendants to Israel.

Not a people
This is also the reason for the Palestinians’ obstinate refusal – from Abbas to Saeb Erekat – to accept Israel as the Jewish nation-state in any way whatsoever. At the end of the day, the Palestinian position views Israel as an illegitimate entity, sooner or later doomed to disappear. The Crusader analogy only adds force to this claim.
One expression of the gap between the Israeli and the Palestinian perception is evident in the diplomatic language of both sides when they refer to the two-state solution. The Israeli version talks about “two states for two peoples,” sometime adding “a Palestinian nation-state living next to the Jewish nation-state.” The Palestinian version refers only to a “two-state solution,” never to “two states for two peoples.” It is obvious: If the Jews are not a people, they are not entitled to a state.

This is also the reason why there is no regret among the Palestinians for their rejection of the 1947 United Nations Partition Plan. As far as I know – and I would be happy if proven wrong – there has until now not been any serious Palestinian debate around their rejection of partition: There have been innumerable discussions and publications about their military defeat in 1948 in their attempt to prevent the establishment of Israel, but no Palestinian leader or thinker has openly admitted that the decision to reject the UN Partition Plan and to go to war against it had been politically or morally wrong.

To this very day, no Palestinian intellectual or politician has dared to admit that had the Palestinians accepted partition then, on May 15, 1948 a Palestinian Arab state would have been established in a part of Mandatory Palestine, and there would have been no refugees and no Nakba (“catastrophe”). It is much easier to deny moral responsibility for the terrible catastrophe the Palestinian leadership has brought upon its own people.

This is not just a matter of historical narrative: It has political implications for the here and now. If Israel is not a legitimate state based on the right to national self-determination but an imperialist entity, there is no ground for an end-of-conflict agreement based on compromise.

Most Israelis who maintain that the conflict is a territorial conflict between two national movements tend to believe that a territorial arrangement, linked in one way or another to the pre-1967 Green Line, is the way to reach an eventual resolution of the conflict. Yet the Palestinian behavior under Arafat at Camp David 2000, as well as during the negotiations between Abbas and former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, suggests that something much deeper is at stake.

When Abbas insists repeatedly that his movement cannot give up the claim to the Right of Return because this is “an individual right” reserved to every Palestinian refugee and his descendants, the implication is that even if there will be an agreement on the territorial issues, and even if all West Bank settlers will be evacuated, the conflict will continue to exist and fester. This is also the reason why Abbas refuses to follow Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and address the Knesset as a symbol of reconciliation – this would imply accepting Israel’s sovereignty and legitimacy.

I am well aware that the moderate public in Israel – which acknowledges the Palestinian right to self-determination, opposes Jewish settlement in the territories and supports the two-state solution – finds it difficult to internalize the fact that the Palestinians basically do not accept Israel’s right to exist. But there is no way to deny this uncomfortable truth. Yet this should not lead to despair or the acceptance of the status quo because “there is nothing we can do.”

Multidimensional conflict
One can learn from similar current national conflicts, but unfortunately most Israelis are so immersed in internal debates that they are not aware of some of the similarities. The national conflicts in Cyprus, Kosovo, Bosnia and even faraway Kashmir have certain similarities to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. In all of them a territorial dimension is evident: the Turkish occupation of northern Cyprus, the territorial aspect of the multinational conflicts in Bosnia, the Serbian perception of Kosovo as part of their historical homeland, the Indian occupation of parts of Kashmir.

But all these conflicts are multidimensional, not just territorial – they are conflicts between national movements on which usually one side does not accept the very legitimacy of the other group. All these conflicts relate to contrasting narratives and historical memories as well as to claims to sovereignty; they imply occupation, ethnic cleansing, settlers, resistance to occupation, terrorism, reprisals and guerilla warfare. They are not religious conflicts as such, but every one of them has a religious dimension, linked to holy sites and religious memories which usually exacerbate the conflict and make pragmatic compromises even more difficult.
The multidimensionality of all these conflicts is the reason why no resolution has yet been found to any of them, even after decades of sincere, though sometimes naïve, international efforts: the Annan Plan for Cyprus, the Dayton Accords in Bosnia, etc. All these plans usually focused on the territorial aspect, mainly because of its obvious visibility, but overlooked the much deeper roots of the conflicts which are far more difficult to solve. Yet this did not prevent some practical ways of finding partial agreements of different sorts, aimed at attenuating the conflict and preventing violence and open warfare.

The Israeli right wing is interested in maintaining the status quo, and Netanyahu’s aim is clear: to increase the number of Jewish settlers, prevent handing over control over the territories to the Palestinians and prevent – or delay as much as possible – the establishment of a Palestinian state.

Those who think that the sole aim of Netanyahu is to survive in power are wrong (after all, this is the aim of every political leader). He views his staying in power as a national mission to maintain Israeli control over as much territory of the Land of Israel as possible. His focusing on the Iranian threat is, among other things, a ploy to divert attention from the Palestinian issue, even when it is clear that he is not ever going to attack Iran.

Thinking out of the box
The opposition under Isaac Herzog of the Zionist Union does not propose an alternative to this policy. Herzog is right in repeating his insistence that Israel should return to the negotiating table. But this does not suffice, as this is not a political plan. Does Herzog believe that if the Netanyahu government returns to negotiations, the result would be an agreement based on the two-state solution? Moreover, even if he himself would become – as I hope he would – prime minister, can he offer to the Palestinians more than Ehud Barak offered at Camp David and Olmert offered to Abbas – offers that have in both cases been rejected by the other side?
Similarly, the understandably enticing idea of embracing the Arab League Peace Initiative is a chimera: At a time when the Arab world is rent by internal strife and violent civil wars, and at least four Arab countries are in various stages of radical disintegration, the Arab League is not a real player, though Israel should address the challenge posed by the initiative, despite the fact that it is basically a dead end.

Herzog should go beyond the mantra of “returning to negotiations” and initiate an alternative calling for creativity and political courage. He should declare that, yes, one should return to negotiations, but being aware of the difficulties of reaching a formal agreement, a government headed by him would initiate the following policies:
* A total and unconditional cessation of all construction in the settlements.
* Dismantle the illegal outposts, as promised by previous Israeli governments.
* Encourage a generous program of financial support for settlers who would agree to voluntary resettle in Israel proper (“pinui-pitzui”).
* Prevent Jewish takeover of Arab houses in East Jerusalem, which provokes riots and violence.
* Declare activities linked to organizations like “price tag” illegal, in accordance with existing laws and regulations.
* Encourage and facilitate foreign investments in the West Bank.
* Abolish the remnants of the blockade of the Gaza Strip and try to establish, with the European Union and Egypt, a sustainable mechanism of entry and exit of people and goods to and from the Strip.

These steps are not “concessions” to the Palestinians. Since there are not going to be meaningful negotiations with the Palestinians in the foreseeable future, they are aimed at not accepting the Palestinian veto on an agreement as a cause for a continuing Israeli control over millions of Palestinians. Such steps will also clearly indicate that Israel is not interested in extending or perpetuating its rule over areas populated by Palestinians.
I am aware that these are not easy steps and will not be welcome by many Israelis – nor are they a “solution” of the conflict, but they constitute an alternative to the existing status quo that is undermining the fabric of Israeli society as a Jewish and democratic country.

Confederation not a solution
A last word about an idea recently floated, among others by President Reuven Rivlin – confederation. I greatly appreciate Rivlin’s humane and Zionist campaign to ensure the equal rights of Israel’s Arab citizens – in that he is a true follower of the liberal aspects of Jabotinsky’s legacy. But Rivlin is also an adherent of continuing rule over all the Land of Israel and opposes the establishment of a Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza. When asked how he squares the obvious contradiction between these two positions, he occasionally mentions the idea of a confederation.

On a verbal level this appears a plausible, even pleasant, way out. But it’s a mirage. First of all, there exists no confederacy anywhere in the world (for historical reasons, Switzerland refers to itself as a confederacy, but it is a federation). Confederative ideas have been raised during the disintegration of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, but they all failed. The main reason was that setting up a confederation implies establishing mutually accepted frontiers among the various members of the confederation, and this, after all, is one of the main sticking points in national conflicts.

Does anyone imagine that the Palestinians will agree to a Palestinian entity within the confederation that would not include the Jewish settlements? On the other hand, will Israel agree that the settlements will be under the jurisdiction of the Palestinian entity of the confederation? It is equally obvious that a confederal scheme will not be able to address the issue of Jerusalem. Furthermore, in a confederation – as distinct from a federation – each confederal entity is considered an internationally recognized state, including possible UN membership. Will Israel agree to this? Such a confederation, if it ever comes about, will occasionally have a Palestinian president (probably on a rotating basis): Is this something most Israelis would find acceptable?

A further and unpleasant element would be the different political structures of the two entities of such a confederation. How can one imagine setting up the common institutions of an Israel-Palestine confederation when one entity (Israel) is a pluralist democracy, while the other would be something else, in all probability run as a Mukhabarat-type regime like most Arab countries? I cannot imagine many Israelis being willing to be linked as citizens in any way to such a despotic structure. In short, with all due respect for President Rivlin, such an idea cannot come about due to its overall intrinsic and built-in contradictions.

There is no choice but to admit there is no chance for any mutually accepted agreement in the foreseeable future. Such a pessimistic prognosis calls for the opposition, and its leader, to acknowledge that they have to think outside the box and offer alternatives not in order to “solve” the conflict, but to mitigate its severity and perhaps move both sides eventually to an agreed solution.

But there should be no illusion: So long as the Palestinians maintain that they are fighting – militarily or diplomatically – against a Zionist colonial and imperialistic entity, an historical compromise is unfortunately not on the agenda. Hence a call for creative and bold alternatives is necessary in order to get beyond the status quo and insure Israel’s future as a Jewish and democratic state.

Voir enfin:

Le Sheikh Raed Salah appelle à la conquête du Mont du Temple
Coolamnews

27 juillet 2015

Raed Salah, chef du Mouvement islamique radicale en Israël, appelle à utiliser la violence pour couper les Juifs de leur site le plus sacré, et affirme qu’Israël a déclaré la guerre en disant qu’il ne peut y avoir de Jérusalem sans le Mont du Temple.

Le Sheikh Raed Salah, , a appelé à la violence terroriste sur le Mont du Temple – le site le plus saint du judaïsme – de manière à empêcher l’accès des Juifs au site sacré. Se référant à des visites juives pacifiques sur le site – qui sont souvent l’objet de harcèlement, tel que récemment pendant les prières de Ticha Be Av, une commémoration de la destruction du Premier et du Second Temple sur le site, Salah a parlé d’attaques israéliennes contre la Mosquée Al-Aqsa.

Salah a juré que son mouvement, qui a été très actif pour attiser les émeutes sur le Mont du Temple, s’en tient à son objectif : « Nos vies et notre sang seront sacrifiés pour la mosquée Al-Aqsa. Chaque violation du côté israélien contre Al-Aqsa est une violation de l’occupation, qu’elle soit accomplie dans des uniformes militaires ou religieux ou sous une couverture politique, » a déclaré le cheikh radical, indiquant que les Juifs religieux sont aussi des cibles.

« Nous devons lutter contre toutes ces violations jusqu’à ce que l’occupation soit levée. » C’est en partie à cause de telles déclarations que Salah a été interdit de visite à Jérusalem, du 25 juin jusqu’en décembre, craignant qu’il favorise l’incitation à la violence.

Le problème, avoue la journaliste Halevy, c’est que le Mont a été laissé entre les mains du Waqf jordanien depuis qu’il a été libéré pendant la guerre des Six Jours en 1967, et par conséquent, il est devenu le site d’émeutes musulmanes destinées à bloquer l’entrée des Juifs. De même, le Waqf a interdit aux Juifs de prier sur le site, malgré la loi israélienne stipulant la liberté de culte.

Salah a déclaré que l’occupation vise à faire respecter sa souveraineté sur le Mont du Temple, en commentant, « c’est une illusion, un vide, car Israël n’a pas le pouvoir et la légitimité, et son existence certainement disparaîtra, et la volonté d’Allah se produira bientôt. »

« Les Arabes ont longtemps essayé de nier le caractère juif du site à travers diverses campagnes, entre autres en détruisant des objets juifs anciens et en construisant illégalement sous la mosquée. « Israël a déclaré la guerre, l’occupation a déclaré la guerre contre Al-Qods depuis le début de l’entreprise sioniste au 18ème siècle, et maintenant il conduit une agression terroriste fondée sur la déclaration du mal : il n’y a pas de valeur en Israël sans Jérusalem, et Jérusalem n’a aucune valeur sans le Mont du Temple, » a déclaré Salah.

Lors d’un discours durant une manifestation musulmane en 2007, il a accusé les Juifs d’utiliser le sang des enfants pour cuire les matsot, invoquant les infâmes diffamations médiévales de meurtres de sang utilisés pour déclencher des pogroms meurtriers en Europe et au Moyen-Orient. Salah a également passé une brève période en prison pour avoir transféré de l’argent au Hamas, et s’est ému comme un enfant, des dessins des croix gammées dans une interview en 2009, sur une station de télévision de langue arabe basée à Londres.


Armes à feu: Attention, un massacre peut en cacher un autre ! (As guns could soon overtake cars as America’s number one killer, Harvard econonomist confirms that in developed countries it’s the number of handguns and not assault rifles that kill the most people and children)

11 octobre, 2015
homocidemapGuns
USGuns
Guns_cars

ViolentUSprevention
gun-crime
homicidesbyrace
Guns_race
toll
a-5-ans-un-petit-garcon-tue-sa-soeur-de-2-ans-10908865lzdfg
baby-killed-drive-by-shooting
TennesseeGirl
Il faut toujours dire ce que l’on voit. Surtout, il faut toujours, ce qui est plus difficile, voir ce que l’on voit. Charles Péguy
Nous ne pouvons accepter ni un monde politiquement unipolaire, ni un monde culturellement uniforme, ni l’unilatéralisme de la seule hyperpuissance. Hubert Védrine (1999)
La situation est riche en ironies. Le rejet par l’Europe de la Machtpolitik, son hostilité à l’usage des armes en politique internationale, dépendent de la présence de troupes américaines sur son sol. Le nouvel ordre kantien dont elle jouit ne pouvait fleurir que sous le parapluie protecteur de la puissance américaine exercée selon les règles du vieil ordre hobbésien. (…) Les dirigeants américains sont convaincus que la sécurité mondiale et l’ordre libéral, tout comme le paradis « postmoderne » qu’est l’Europe, ne sauraient survivre longtemps si l’Amérique n’utilisait pas sa puissance dans ce monde dangereux, hobbésien, qui est toujours la règle hors d’Europe. (…) Ainsi, bien que les Etats-Unis aient eu naguère le rôle décisif dans l’accès de l’Europe au paradis kantien, et le jouent toujours pour en assurer la survie, ils ne sauraient eux-mêmes entrer dans cet éden. Ils en gardent la muraille, mais ne peuvent en franchir la porte. Les Etats-Unis, en dépit de leur puissance considérable, demeurent englués dans l’histoire, contraints d’affronter les Saddam Hussein, les ayatollahs, les Kim Jong-iI et les Jiang Zemin, laissant à d’autres la chance d’en toucher les dividendes. Robert Kagan (2002)
N’importe qui peut jouer les gentils quand les mauvais garçons ont été abattus et le train a sifflé trois fois. Alors les habitants de la ville qui jusque là tremblaient comme une feuille peuvent ressortir dans la grand’ rue et féliciter le shérif à coups de grandes claques dans le dos, se réjouissant que son pistolet soit à nouveau tranquillement rangé dans son étui – et que tous ces cadavres de méchants hors-la-loi soient commodément hors de vue chez le croque-morts. Victor Davis Hanson
Les Européens disent maintenant au revoir à M. Bush, et espèrent l’élection d’un président américain qui partage, le croient-ils, leurs attitudes sophistiquées de postnationalisme, post-modernisme et multiculturalisme. Mais ne soyez pas étonné si, afin de protéger la liberté et la démocratie chez eux dans les années à venir, les dirigeants européens commencent à ressembler de plus en plus au cowboy à la gâchette facile de l’étranger qu’ils se délectent aujourd’hui à fustiger. Natan Sharansky
Si vous pouvez tuer un incroyant américain ou européen – en particulier les méchants et sales Français – ou un Australien ou un Canadien, ou tout […] citoyen des pays qui sont entrés dans une coalition contre l’État islamique, alors comptez sur Allah et tuez-le de n’importe quelle manière. (…) Tuez le mécréant qu’il soit civil ou militaire. (…) Frappez sa tête avec une pierre, égorgez-le avec un couteau, écrasez-le avec votre voiture, jetez-le d’un lieu en hauteur, étranglez-le ou empoisonnez-le. Abou Mohammed al-Adnani (porte-parole de l’EI)
Nous vous bénissons, nous bénissons les Mourabitoun (hommes) et les Mourabitat (femmes). Nous saluons toutes gouttes de sang versées à Jérusalem. C’est du sang pur, du sang propre, du sang qui mène à Dieu. Avec l’aide de Dieu, chaque djihadiste (shaheed) sera au paradis, et chaque blessé sera récompensé. Nous ne leur permettrons aucune avancée. Dans toutes ses divisions, Al-Aqsa est à nous et l’église du Saint Sépulcre est notre, tout est à nous. Ils n’ont pas le droit de les profaner avec leurs pieds sales, et on ne leur permettra pas non plus. Mahmoud Abbas
Je ne peux qu’imaginer ce qu’endurent ses parents. Et quand je pense à ce garçon, je pense à mes propres enfants. Si j’avais un fils, il ressemblerait à Trayvon. Obama
Et, bien sûr, ce qui est également la routine est que quelqu’un, quelque part, va commenter et dire, Obama a politisé cette question. Eh bien, cela est quelque chose que nous devrions politiser. Il est pertinent de notre vie commune ensemble, le corps politique. Obama
There is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery. Then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved. . . . After all we have been through. Just to think we can’t walk down our own streets, how humiliating. Jesse Jackson
How do we turn pain into power? How do we go from a moment to a movement that curries favor? (…) The blood of the innocent has power.  Jesse Jackson
Ce que je voulais dire, c’est que lorsque des tyrannies s’instaurent, elles essaient de désarmer le peuple d’abord, et c’est exactement ce qui s’est passé en Allemagne dans les années 1930. C’est pourquoi cela n’arrivera jamais aux Etats-Unis : parce que les (Américains) sont armés. Ben Carson
Savez-vous que les Noirs sont 10 pour cent de la population de Saint-Louis et sont responsables de 58% de ses crimes? Nous avons à faire face à cela. Et nous devons faire quelque chose au sujet de nos normes morales. Nous savons qu’il y a beaucoup de mauvaises choses dans le monde blanc, mais il y a aussi beaucoup de mauvaises choses dans le monde noir. Nous ne pouvons pas continuer à blâmer l’homme blanc. Il y a des choses que nous devons faire pour nous-mêmes. Martin Luther King (St Louis, 1961)
But what about all the other young black murder victims? Nationally, nearly half of all murder victims are black. And the overwhelming majority of those black people are killed by other black people. Where is the march for them? Where is the march against the drug dealers who prey on young black people? Where is the march against bad schools, with their 50% dropout rate for black teenaged boys? Those failed schools are certainly guilty of creating the shameful 40% unemployment rate for black teens? How about marching against the cable television shows constantly offering minstrel-show images of black youth as rappers and comedians who don’t value education, dismiss the importance of marriage, and celebrate killing people, drug money and jailhouse fashion—the pants falling down because the jail guard has taken away the belt, the shoes untied because the warden removed the shoe laces, and accessories such as the drug dealer’s pit bull. (…) There is no fashion, no thug attitude that should be an invitation to murder. But these are the real murderous forces surrounding the Martin death—and yet they never stir protests. The race-baiters argue this case deserves special attention because it fits the mold of white-on-black violence that fills the history books. Some have drawn a comparison to the murder of Emmett Till, a black boy who was killed in 1955 by white racists for whistling at a white woman. (…) While civil rights leaders have raised their voices to speak out against this one tragedy, few if any will do the same about the larger tragedy of daily carnage that is black-on-black crime in America. (…) Almost one half of the nation’s murder victims that year were black and a majority of them were between the ages of 17 and 29. Black people accounted for 13% of the total U.S. population in 2005. Yet they were the victims of 49% of all the nation’s murders. And 93% of black murder victims were killed by other black people, according to the same report. (…) The killing of any child is a tragedy. But where are the protests regarding the larger problems facing black America? Juan Williams
« More whites are killed by the police than blacks primarily because whites outnumber blacks in the general population by more than five to one, » Forst said. The country is about 63 percent white and 12 percent black. (…) A 2002 study in the American Journal of Public Health found that the death rate due to legal intervention was more than three times higher for blacks than for whites in the period from 1988 to 1997. (…) Candace McCoy is a criminologist at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York. McCoy said blacks might be more likely to have a violent encounter with police because they are convicted of felonies at a higher rate than whites. Felonies include everything from violent crimes like murder and rape, to property crimes like burglary and embezzlement, to drug trafficking and gun offenses. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that in 2004, state courts had over 1 million felony convictions. Of those, 59 percent were committed by whites and 38 percent by blacks. But when you factor in the population of whites and blacks, the felony rates stand at 330 per 100,000 for whites and 1,178 per 100,000 for blacks. That’s more than a three-fold difference. McCoy noted that this has more to do with income than race. The felony rates for poor whites are similar to those of poor blacks. « Felony crime is highly correlated with poverty, and race continues to be highly correlated with poverty in the USA, » McCoy said. « It is the most difficult and searing problem in this whole mess. » PunditFact
The absurdity of Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton is that they want to make a movement out of an anomaly. Black teenagers today are afraid of other black teenagers, not whites. … Trayvon’s sad fate clearly sent a quiver of perverse happiness all across America’s civil rights establishment, and throughout the mainstream media as well. His death was vindication of the ‘poetic truth’ that these establishments live by. Shelby Steele
Before the 1960s the black American identity (though no one ever used the word) was based on our common humanity, on the idea that race was always an artificial and exploitive division between people. After the ’60s—in a society guilty for its long abuse of us—we took our historical victimization as the central theme of our group identity. We could not have made a worse mistake. It has given us a generation of ambulance-chasing leaders, and the illusion that our greatest power lies in the manipulation of white guilt. Shelby Steele
Ms. Harper, who divorced her husband a decade ago, appears to have been by far the most significant figure in her son’s troubled life; neighbors say he rarely left their apartment. Unlike his father, who said on television that he had no idea Mr. Harper-Mercer cared so deeply about guns, his mother was well aware of his fascination. In fact, she shared it: In a series of online postings over a decade, Ms. Harper, a nurse, said she kept numerous firearms in her home and expressed pride in her knowledge about them, as well as in her son’s expertise on the subject. She also opened up about her difficulties raising a son who used to bang his head against the wall, and said that both she and her son struggled with Asperger’s syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder. (…) In an online forum, answering a question about state gun laws several years ago, Ms. Harper took a jab at “lame states” that impose limits on keeping loaded firearms in the home, and noted that she had AR-15 and AK-47 semiautomatic rifles, along with a Glock handgun. She also indicated that her son, who lived with her, was well versed in guns, citing him as her source of information on gun laws, saying he “has much knowledge in this field.” “I keep two full mags in my Glock case. And the ARs & AKs all have loaded mags,” Ms. Harper wrote. “No one will be ‘dropping’ by my house uninvited without acknowledgement.” Law enforcement officials have said they recovered 14 firearms and spare ammunition magazines that were purchased legally either by Mr. Harper-Mercer, 26, or an unnamed relative. Mr. Harper-Mercer had six guns with him when he entered a classroom building on Thursday and started firing on a writing class in which he was enrolled; the rest were found in the second-floor apartment he shared with his mother. (…) Neighbors in Southern California have said that Ms. Harper and her son would go to shooting ranges together, something Ms. Harper seemed to confirm in one of her online posts. She talked about the importance of firearms safety and said she learned a lot through target shooting, expressing little patience with unprepared gun owners: “When I’m at the range, I cringe every time the ‘wannabes’ show up.” NYT
According to data gathered by the Centres for Disease Control (CDC), deaths caused by cars in America are in long-term decline. Improved technology, tougher laws and less driving by young people have all led to safer streets and highways. Deaths by guns, though—the great majority suicides, accidents or domestic violence—have been trending slightly upwards. This year, if the trend continues, they will overtake deaths on the roads. The Centre for American Progress first spotted last February that the lines would intersect. Now, on its reading, new data to the end of 2012 support the view that guns will surpass cars this year as the leading killer of under 25s. Bloomberg Government has gone further. Its compilation of the CDC data in December concluded that guns would be deadlier for all age groups. (…) There are about 320m people in the United States, and nearly as many civilian firearms. And although the actual rate of gun ownership is declining, enthusiasts are keeping up the number in circulation. Black Friday on November 28th kicked off such a shopping spree that the FBI had to carry out 175,000 instant background checks (three checks a second), a record for that day, just for sales covered by the extended Brady Act of 1998, the only serious bit of gun-curbing legislation passed in recent history. Many sales escape that oversight, however. Everytown for Gun Safety, a movement backed by Mike Bloomberg, a former mayor of New York, has investigated loopholes in online gun sales and found that one in 30 users of Armslist classifieds has a criminal record that forbids them to own firearms. Private reselling of guns draws no attention, unless it crosses state lines. William Vizzard, a professor of criminal justice at California State University at Sacramento, points out that guns also don’t wear out as fast as cars. “I compare a gun to a hammer or a crowbar,” he says. “Even if you stopped making guns today, you might not see a real change in the number of guns for decades.”Motor vehicles, because they are operated on government-built roads, have been subject to licensing and registration, in the interests of public safety, for more than a century. But guns are typically kept at home. That private space is shielded by the Fourth Amendment just as “the right to bear arms” is protected by the Second, making government control difficult. Car technologies and road laws are ever-evolving: in 2014, for example, the National Highways Traffic Safety Administration announced its plan to phase in mandatory rear-view cameras on new light vehicles, while New York City lowered its speed limit for local roads. By contrast, safety features on firearms—such as smartguns unlocked by an owner’s thumbprint or a radio-frequency encryption—are opposed by the National Rifle Association, whose allies in Congress also block funding for the sort of public-health research that might show, in even clearer detail, the cost of America’s love affair with guns. The Economist
For the better part of a century, the machine most likely to kill an American has been the automobile. Car crashes killed 33,561 people in 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Firearms killed 32,251 people in the United States in 2011, the most recent year for which the Centers for Disease Control has data. But this year gun deaths are expected to surpass car deaths. That’s according to a Center for American Progress report, which cites CDC data that shows guns will kill more Americans under 25 than cars in 2015. Already more than a quarter of the teenagers—15 years old and up—who die of injuries in the United States are killed in gun-related incidents, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. A similar analysis by Bloomberg three years ago found shooting deaths in 2015 « will probably rise to almost 33,000, and those related to autos will decline to about 32,000, based on the 10-year average trend. »  The Atlantic
The law that barred the sale of assault weapons from 1994 to 2004 made little difference. It turns out that big, scary military rifles don’t kill the vast majority of the 11,000 Americans murdered with guns each year. Little handguns do. In 2012, only 322 people were murdered with any kind of rifle, F.B.I. data shows. The continuing focus on assault weapons stems from the media’s obsessive focus on mass shootings, which disproportionately involve weapons like the AR-15, a civilian version of the military M16 rifle. (…) This politically defined category of guns — a selection of rifles, shotguns and handguns with “military-style” features — only figured in about 2 percent of gun crimes nationwide before the ban. Handguns were used in more than 80 percent of gun murders each year, but gun control advocates had failed to interest enough of the public in a handgun ban. Handguns were the weapons most likely to kill you, but they were associated by the public with self-defense. (In 2008, the Supreme Court said there was a constitutional right to keep a loaded handgun at home for self-defense.) (…) Still, the majority of Americans continued to support a ban on assault weapons. One reason: The use of these weapons may be rare over all, but they’re used frequently in the gun violence that gets the most media coverage, mass shootings. The criminologist James Alan Fox at Northeastern University estimates that there have been an average of 100 victims killed each year in mass shootings over the past three decades. That’s less than 1 percent of gun homicide victims. But these acts of violence in schools and movie theaters have come to define the problem of gun violence in America. Most Americans do not know that gun homicides have decreased by 49 percent since 1993 as violent crime also fell, though rates of gun homicide in the United States are still much higher than those in other developed nations. A Pew survey conducted after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., found that 56 percent of Americans believed wrongly that the rate of gun crime was higher than it was 20 years ago. NYT
A 2-year-old Kentucky girl was accidentally killed by her 5-year-old brother who fired a rifle he had been given as a gift, officials said Wednesday. Cumberland County Coroner Gary L. White said (…) “Most everybody in town is pretty devastated by this,” White said. “Nobody wants to take anyone’s guns away, but you’ve got to keep them out of harm’s way for the kids. It’s a safety issue.”(…)  The mother had just stepped outside the house for a moment, White said. (…) The rifle used in the accident is a Crickett designed for children and sold under the slogan “My First Rifle,” according to the company’s website. It is a smaller weapon designed for children and comes with a shoulder stock in child-like colors including pink and swirls. “The little Crickett rifle is a single-shot rifle and it has a child safety,” White said. “This was just a tragic accident.” The child safety lock was in place and operational, White said. Officials believe a shell had been left in the weapon from the last use and no one realized it. “In my fifteen years as coroner, this is the first such case,” he said. “It is very, very rare.” It is legal in Kentucky to give a child a rifle as a gift, White said. Nor is it unusual for children to have rifles, often passed down from their parents, he said. Earlier this month, Brandon Holt, 6, was accidentally shot to death by a 4-year-old playmate in New Jersey. LA Times
Un petit Américain de 5 ans qui jouait avec un fusil qu’on lui avait offert a tué mardi sa petite sœur de 2 ans dans leur maison du Kentucky (centre-est). Selon le médecin légiste du comté rural de Cumberland, il s’agit d’un accident. «Ça fait partie de ces accidents insensés», a affirmé Gary White, interrogé par le journal local, The Lexington Herald-Leader. (…) Selon le médecin, la maman des enfants qui faisait le ménage, était momentanément sortie sur le porche de la maison. «Elle a dit que pas plus de 3 minutes s’étaient écoulées puis elle a entendu la détonation. Elle a couru dans la maison et a trouvé la petite fille», a expliqué Gary White à la télévision locale WKYT. Le fusil, un .22 long rifle spécialement conçu pour les enfants, était un cadeau que le petit garçon avait reçu l’année dernière. Il était stocké dans le coin d’une pièce et les parents ne savaient pas qu’il restait une munition à l’intérieur, a affirmé le médecin légiste. «C’est un petit fusil pour enfant, de marque Crickett. Le petit garçon avait l’habitude de tirer avec», a-t-il confié au Lexington Herald-Leader. Libération (01.05.13)
Après la récente fusillade dans une université américaine qui a coûté la vie à 9 étudiants, c’est un nouveau drame qui a endeuillé les Etats-Unis, d’autant plus terrible que l’assassin et sa victime sont des enfants : un jeune garçon âgé de 11 ans, originaire du Tennessee, a été formellement accusé d’avoir tué samedi par balle une fillette de 8 ans avec un fusil de calibre 12 après une dispute au sujet de chiots. Une voisine a dit à la chaine WBIR, affiliée à CBS, que la jeune fille, Makayla Dyer, jouait avec les voisins samedi soir à White Pine, à l’extérieur de Knoxville. Elle a ensuite commencé à discuter avec le garçon, qui n’avait alors pas été identifié, par une fenêtre ouverte de son domicile. « Il a demandé à la petite fille de voir ses chiots », a rapporté la voisine, Chasity Atwood, à WBID. « Elle a dit non et a ri et puis s’est retournée, a regardé son amie et dit ‘Allons chercher les…’. Mais elle n’a pas eu le temps de dire le mot ‘chiots’ ». Le garçon lui avait déjà tiré une balle dans la poitrine. French people daily
Un garçon américain de 11 ans abat une fillette de 8 ans après une dispute. (…) Il s’est servi du fusil calibre 12 de son père. Un garçon de 11 ans a tué par balle sa voisine, une fillette de 8 ans. La ville de White Pine (Tennessee, Etats-Unis), où le drame s’est déroulé, est sous le choc, rapporte la chaîne locale américaine WATE, lundi 5 octobre. Samedi, la petite fille prénommée McKayla jouait dehors. Son jeune voisin lui aurait demandé de voir son chiot. Elle lui aurait répondu « non ». Vers 19h30, il l’a abattue. (…) « Cette arme aurait dû être mise sous clé ou au moins hors de portée », a dénoncé une voisine, interrogée par la chaîne locale WBIR. Le débat sur le contrôle des armes à feu a été relancé aux Etats-Unis après la fusillade du 1er octobre sur un campus universitaire de l’Oregon. Francetvinfo
Un garçon de 11 ans a été inculpé d’assassinat dans l’Etat américain du Tennessee après avoir tué par balle McKayla Dyer, sa voisine, âgée de 8 ans, lors d’une dispute concernant un chiot. (…) Le débat sur le contrôle des armes à feu a été relancé aux Etats-Unis après la fusillade du 2 octobre sur un campus universitaire de l’Oregon, au cours de laquelle un jeune homme de 26 ans a abattu 9 personnes. (…) Selon le site Gun Violence Archive, 559 enfants de moins de 11 ans ont été tués ou blessés depuis le début de l’année aux Etats-Unis. Le Monde
Since 2002, St. Louis Children’s Hospital has cared for 771 children injured or killed by gunfire; 35 percent were younger than 15. These include the recent 12-year-old boy accidentally killed by his friend when playing with his grandfather’s pistol kept under his pillow, the 2-year-old boy paralyzed when his father accidentally discharged his gun during loading, the 5-year-old girl caught in a cross-fire as she sat on her front porch, the 10-year-old boy killed by his mother overwhelmed with mental illness, and the 4-year-old boy who found a handgun in a closet at home, placed the barrel into his mouth and pulled the trigger as he had often done to get a drink from his water-pistol. Many of these children died despite the heroic efforts of our highly trained pre-hospital, emergency, surgical and critical care staff. In 2010, seven American children age 19 and younger were killed every day. This is twice the number of children who die from cancer, five times the number from heart disease, and 15 times the number from infections. This is also the equivalent of 128 Newtown shootings. It has been estimated at least 38 percent of American households have a gun. In homes with children younger than 18, 22 percent store the gun loaded, 32 percent unlocked, and 8 percent unlocked and loaded. The children in these homes know the gun is present, and many handle the gun in the absence of their parents. Children who have received gun safety training are just as likely to play with and fire a real gun as children not trained. In one study, 8-to-12-year-old boys were observed via one-way mirror as they played for 15 minutes in a waiting room with a disabled .38 caliber handgun concealed in a desk drawer. Seventy two percent discovered the gun, and 48 percent pulled the trigger; 90 percent of those who handled the gun and/or pulled the trigger had prior gun safety instruction. Rather than confer protection, careful studies find guns stored in the home are more likely to be involved in an accidental death, homicide by a family member, or suicide than against an intruder. In 2009, suicide was the third leading cause of death for American youth, with firearms the most common method used. The American Academy of Pediatrics has concluded, “The most effective measure to prevent suicide, homicide, and unintentional firearm-related injuries to children and adolescents is the absence of guns from homes and communities.” (…)  It has been done in many other economically advanced countries, and we can do it in the United States. St Louis-Post dispatch
Drs. Kennedy, Jaffe & Keller (…) quote statistics that would lead the reader to believe that child gun deaths are a national public health crisis. They suggest that there is an epidemic of gun violence that threatens the safety, health and well-being of our children and devote considerable print to listing the number of children killed or treated for gunshot injuries at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. However, most of the individual cases they report suggest that accidental shootings are the main culprit for these injuries, and that inadequate gun storage at home is to blame. In reality, as is obvious from the daily reporting by the Post-Dispatch of area gun violence, most of the victims of these gun-related deaths and injuries are inner-city residents and their injuries are not accidental. According to reliable statistical data reported in 2009 covering the years 1904-2006, from the National Center for Health Statistics (1981 on) and the National Safety Council (prior to 1981), while the number of privately owned guns in the U.S. is at an all-time high, and rises by about 4.5 million per year, the firearm accident death rate is at an all-time annual low, 0.2 per 100,000 population, down 94 percent since the all-time high in 1904. Since 1930, the annual number of such deaths has decreased 80 percent, to an all-time low, while the U.S. population has more than doubled and the number of firearms has quintupled. Among children, such deaths have decreased 90 percent since 1975. Today, the odds are more than a million to one against a child in the U.S. dying in a firearm accident. According to the 2009 data, in reality among all child accidental deaths nationally, firearms were involved in 1.1 percent, compared to motor vehicles (41 percent), suffocation (21 percent), drowning (15 percent), fires (8 percent), pedal cycles (2 percent), poisoning (2 percent), falls (1.9 percent), environmental factors (1.5 percent), and medical mistakes (1 percent). Since the difference between accidental deaths due to medical mistakes (1 percent) and accidental deaths due to firearms (1.1 percent) is only 0.1 percentage points, perhaps we should consider a ban on pediatricians along with the ban they propose on firearms and large-capacity magazines. F.A. Ruecker
411 children (age 14 and under) died from gunfire in all of 2012 or slightly more than one per day. This includes homicides, accidents, and suicides combined. Gun facts
Il est en effet essentiel de mettre les choses en perspective : les tueries de masse, bien que tragiques, restent statistiquement extrêmement rares. Moins de 0,2% des homicides sont liés à des tueries de masse. De manière plus large et malgré la perception générale du contraire, le taux de crime aux États-Unis est en baisse constante depuis plus de 20 ans. Même le taux d’homicides par armes à feu est en baisse, de 49% depuis 1993. Ainsi, depuis plus de 20 ans aux États-Unis, le taux de crime diminue, et ce malgré un nombre record d’armes à feu détenus par des Américains. Dans le même temps, le nombre de permis de port d’arme en public (« concealed carry permit ») a lui aussi augmenté. « Plus d’armes = plus de crimes », vraiment ? Mais au-delà des crimes demeure un fait peu rappelé dans les débats qui suivent les tueries aux États-Unis : avec plus de 300 millions d’armes à feu en circulation, les citoyens américains utilisent massivement leurs armes pour des motifs légitimes. Parmi ceux-ci, on retrouve la collection, la chasse, le tir sportif ou encore la défense de soi et de son prochain. Ainsi, plus de 99,9% des Américains propriétaires légaux d’armes n’ont jamais utilisé celles-ci pour causer du tort à autrui. De quel droit viendrait-on restreindre leurs libertés parce qu’un dément a utilisé ses propres armes à feu pour nuire à autrui ? Non seulement l’immense majorité de ces détenteurs légaux d’armes à feu ne cause pas de tort à autrui, mais elle empêche des crimes et sauvent des vies. Combien de crimes n’ont jamais eu lieu parce que des criminels violents, de peur de se faire abattre, ont été dissuadés d’agresser autrui ? (…)  Par définition, un criminel ne respecte pas la loi. Un fou souhaitant commettre une tuerie trouvera toujours les outils nécessaires. Les seules personnes concernées par les lois sur les armes à feu sont les citoyens honnêtes et pacifiques. Toutefois malgré ces efforts, il paraît vain de souhaiter en finir avec la violence. Certaines personnes seront toujours promptes à agresser autrui. Et face à ces personnes-là, les citoyens honnêtes doivent pouvoir s’armer pour leur défense. Cela n’a pas été le cas sur le campus de l’université dans l’Oregon qui était une « gun free zone », une zone où les citoyens honnêtes en possession de permis de port d’arme ne peuvent la porter. Le tueur avait ainsi le champ libre, sachant que ses victimes seraient incapables de se défendre avant l’arrivée de la police.L’État américain doit en finir avec cette politique de « gun free zones » qui n’empêchent pas les tueurs de commettre leurs crimes, mais empêche une réponse rapide de citoyens qui pourraient stopper l’attaque. Edouard H.
Now, quick: Name the mass shooters at the Chattanooga military recruitment center; the Washington Navy Yard; the high school in Washington state; Fort Hood (the second time) and the Christian college in California. All those shootings also occurred during the last three years. The answers are: Mohammad Youssuf Abdulazeez, Kuwaiti; Aaron Alexis, black, possibly Barbadian-American; Jaylen Ray Fryberg, Indian; Ivan Antonio Lopez, Hispanic; and One L. Goh, Korean immigrant. Ann Coulter
Our review of the academic literature found that a broad array of evidence indicates that gun availability is a risk factor for homicide, both in the United States and across high-income countries. Case-control studies, ecological time-series and cross-sectional studies indicate that in homes, cities, states and regions in the US, where there are more guns, both men and women are at higher risk for homicide, particularly firearm homicide. (…) Using survey data on rates of household gun ownership, we examined the association between gun availability and homicide across states, 2001-2003. We found that states with higher levels of household gun ownership had higher rates of firearm homicide and overall homicide. This relationship held for both genders and all age groups, after accounting for rates of aggravated assault, robbery, unemployment, urbanization, alcohol consumption, and resource deprivation (e.g., poverty). There was no association between gun prevalence and non-firearm homicide. Harvard Injury Control Research Center
We analyzed data for 50 states over 19 years to investigate the relationship between gun prevalence and accidental gun deaths across different age groups. For every age group, where there are more guns there are more accidental deaths. The mortality rate was 7 times higher in the four states with the most guns compared to the four states with the fewest guns. (…) Across states, both firearm prevalence AND questionable storage practices (i.e. storing firearms loaded and unlocked) were associated with higher rates of unintentional firearm deaths. (…) The majority of people killed in firearm accidents are under age 24, and most of these young people are being shot by someone else, usually someone their own age. The shooter is typically a friend or family member, often an older brother. By contrast, older adults are at far lower risk of accidental firearm death, and most often are shooting themselves. (…)  Harvard Injury Control Research Center
The central insight of the modern study of criminal violence is that all crime—even the horrific violent crimes of assault and rape—is at some level opportunistic. Building a low annoying wall against them is almost as effective as building a high impenetrable one. This is the key concept of Franklin Zimring’s amazing work on crime in New York; everyone said that, given the social pressures, the slum pathologies, the profits to be made in drug dealing, the ascending levels of despair, that there was no hope of changing the ever-growing cycle of violence. The right wing insisted that this generation of predators would give way to a new generation of super-predators. What the New York Police Department found out, through empirical experience and better organization, was that making crime even a little bit harder made it much, much rarer. This is undeniably true of property crime, and common sense and evidence tells you that this is also true even of crimes committed by crazy people (to use the plain English the subject deserves). Those who hold themselves together enough to be capable of killing anyone are subject to the same rules of opportunity as sane people. Even madmen need opportunities to display their madness, and behave in different ways depending on the possibilities at hand. Demand an extraordinary degree of determination and organization from someone intent on committing a violent act, and the odds that the violent act will take place are radically reduced, in many cases to zero. Look at the Harvard social scientist David Hemenway’s work on gun violence to see how simple it is; the phrase “more guns = more homicide” tolls through it like a grim bell. The more guns there are in a country, the more gun murders and massacres of children there will be. Even within this gun-crazy country, states with strong gun laws have fewer gun murders (and suicides and accidental killings) than states without them. (…) Summoning the political will to make it happen may be hard. But there’s no doubt or ambiguity about what needs to be done, nor that, if it is done, it will work. One would have to believe that Americans are somehow uniquely evil or depraved to think that the same forces that work on the rest of the planet won’t work here. It’s always hard to summon up political will for change, no matter how beneficial the change may obviously be. Summoning the political will to make automobiles safe was difficult; so was summoning the political will to limit and then effectively ban cigarettes from public places. At some point, we will become a gun-safe, and then a gun-sane, and finally a gun-free society. It’s closer than you think. (…) Gun control is not a panacea, any more than penicillin was. Some violence will always go on. What gun control is good at is controlling guns. Gun control will eliminate gun massacres in America as surely as antibiotics eliminate bacterial infections. As I wrote last week, those who oppose it have made a moral choice: that they would rather have gun massacres of children continue rather than surrender whatever idea of freedom or pleasure they find wrapped up in owning guns or seeing guns owned (…) On gun violence and how to end it, the facts are all in, the evidence is clear, the truth there for all who care to know it—indeed, a global consensus is in place, which, in disbelief and now in disgust, the planet waits for us to join. Those who fight against gun control, actively or passively, with a shrug of helplessness, are dooming more kids to horrible deaths and more parents to unspeakable grief just as surely as are those who fight against pediatric medicine or childhood vaccination. It’s really, and inarguably, just as simple as that. Adam Gopnik
Statistically, the United States is not a particularly violent society. Although gun proponents like to compare this country with hot spots like Colombia, Mexico, and Estonia (making America appear a truly peaceable kingdom), a more relevant comparison is against other high-income, industrialized nations. The percentage of the U.S. population victimized in 2000 by crimes like assault, car theft, burglary, robbery, and sexual incidents is about average for 17 industrialized countries, and lower on many indices than Canada, Australia, or New Zealand. « The only thing that jumps out is lethal violence, » Hemenway says. Violence, pace H. Rap Brown, is not « as American as cherry pie, » but American violence does tend to end in death. The reason, plain and simple, is guns. We own more guns per capita than any other high-income country— maybe even more than one gun for every man, woman, and child in the country. A 1994 survey numbered the U.S. gun supply at more than 200 million in a population then numbered at 262 million, and currently about 35 percent of American households have guns. (These figures count only civilian guns; Switzerland, for example, has plenty of military weapons per capita.) Craig Lambert
Why manufacture guns that go off when you drop them?. Kids play with guns. We put childproof safety caps on aspirin bottles because if kids take too many aspirin, they get sick. You could blame the parents for gun accidents but, as with aspirin, manufacturers could help. It’s very easy to make childproof guns. »The gun-control debate often makes it look like there are only two options: either take away people’s guns, or not. That’s not it at all. This is more like a harm-reduction strategy. Recognize that there are a lot of guns out there, and that reasonable gun policies can minimize the harm that comes from them. (…) It’s not as if a 19-year-old in the United States is more evil than a 19-year-old in Australia— there’s no evidence for that. But a 19-year-old in America can very easily get a pistol. That’s very hard to do in Australia. So when there’s a bar fight in Australia, somebody gets punched out or hit with a beer bottle. Here, they get shot. (…) What guns do is make crimes lethal. They also make suicide attempts lethal: about 60 percent of suicides in America involve guns. If you try to kill yourself with drugs, there’s a 2 to 3 percent chance of dying. With guns, the chance is 90 percent. (…) In Wyoming it’s hard to have big gang fights. Do you call up the other gang and drive 30 miles to meet up? (…) Handguns are the crime guns. They are the ones you can conceal, the guns you take to go rob somebody. You don’t mug people at rifle-point. (…) We have done four surveys on self-defense gun use. And one thing we know for sure is that there’s a lot more criminal gun use than self-defense gun use. And even when people say they pulled their gun in ‘self-defense,’ it usually turns out that there was just an escalating argument —at some point, people feel afraid and draw guns. (…) How often might you appropriately use a gun in self-defense?.  Answer: zero to once in a lifetime. How about inappropriately —because you were tired, afraid, or drunk in a confrontational situation? There are lots and lots of chances. When your anger takes over, it’s nice not to have guns lying around. (…)  « A determined criminal will always get a gun » (…) Yes, but a lot of people aren’t that determined. I’m sure there are some determined yacht buyers out there, but when you raise the price high enough, a lot of them stop buying yachts. (…)  « You can go to a gun show, flea market, the Internet, or classified ads and buy a gun— no questions asked. (…) For decades, there were no plaintiff victories beyond the appellate level » in the tobacco litigation. Reasonable suits might allege things that the manufacturers could do to make guns safer. (…) People say, ‘Teach kids not to pull the trigger,’ but kids will do it. (…)  You could make it hard to remove a serial number. You won’t eliminate the problem, but you can decrease it. (…) You can arrest speeders, but you can also put speed bumps or chicanes [curved, alternating-side curb extensions] into residential areas where children play….Just as…you can revoke the license of bad doctors, but also build [a medical] environment in which it’s harder to make an error, and the mistakes made are not serious or fatal. (…) We know what works. We know that speed kills, so if you raise speed limits, expect to see more highway deaths. Motorcycle helmets work; seat belts work. Car inspections and driver education have no effect. Right-on-red laws mean more pedestrians hit by cars. (…) The goal at home and abroad is to make sure the guns we have are safe, and that people use them properly. We’d like to create a world where it’s hard to make mistakes with guns— and when you do make a mistake, it’s not a terrible thing.  David Hemenway (Harvard)
Qui arrêtera ce nouveau massacre des innocents ?
En ces temps étranges où, brutalisation djihadiste ou victimisation médiatique oblige, le premier imbécile ou damné de la terre venu peut ou se sent obligé d’entrainer dans sa mort, y compris au couteau de boucher, à la voiture-bélier ou à l’avion-missile, des dizaines voire des centaines ou des milliers d’anonymes dans sa mort …
Et où après l’avoir si longtemps dénoncé, l’on se plaint, aujourd’hui que notre rêve de monde multipolaire est enfin exaucé, de l’absence sur la scène mondiale de plus en plus catastrophique du seul pays capable d’en jouer les gendarmes …
Pendant qu’au nom de normes écologiques toujours plus draconiennes, l’on pousse nos constructeurs automobiles à trafiquer nos moteurs …
Et qu’au lendemain, alors que malgré la baisse des dix dernières années les armes à feu pourraient dès cette année dépasser l’automobile comme première cause de décès, d’un énième massacre dans une école américaine (dans une zone interdite aux armes) suivi comme il se doit de deux autres presque simultanés mais heureusement beaucoup moins meurtriers), partisans et opposants se jettent les éternels mêmes arguments à la figure …
Entre un président et ses amis chasseurs d’ambulances incapables de résister à une occasion de récupération politique et un candidat républicain et brillant ex-neurochirurgien qui se sent obligé pour flatter le lobby des armes à feu d’invoquer le génocide juif …
 
Qui rappelle avec l’économiste de la santé américain et ancien nadérite David Hemenway

Qu’aussi tragiques et médiatiques qu’elles soient, ces tueries de masse ne constituent en fait qu’une infime partie du total des homicides (moins de 1% ) et que les armes de guerre qui  leur sont souvent associées n’entrent en jeu que dans 2% des cas ?

 Qui a l’honnêteté de signaler que l’évidence apparemment mathématique (plus d’armes entrainent plus de victimes) ne tient en fait que pour les pays développés (y compris à  l’intérieur même des Etats-Unis – Wyoming: 17,5 décès pour 60% de  possession vs. Massachussets: 3,18 pour 10,6), le cas des pays en développement démontrant largement qu’on peut faire (beaucoup) plus avec (très) peu (Honduras: about 64,8 décès /100 000 pour seulement 6, 2% de possession,  soit presque six fois plus de décès avec 18 fois moins d’armes que les EU), Venezuela: 50,9 pour 10,7%,  Jamaïque: 39,74 pour 8,1% contre 10,6 pour 112,6% pour les EU mais 3,1 pour  31,2% pour la France) ?
Qui osera alors en tirer l’évidente conclusion – éléphant dans la pièce qu’il devient de plus en plus difficile de voir, Hemenway compris – que l’on a en fait affaire à deux Amérique emboitées l’une dans l’autre,  les ghettos noirs, qui pour une population noire totale de 12% de la population totale concentre 41% des auteurs et près de 50% des victimes d’homicides, fonctionnant en fait comme des îlots de sous-développement à l’intérieur d’un pays par ailleurs à la pointe du développement ?
Mais en même temps qui prend la peine d’expliquer que c’est par ailleurs aussi  par effet d’opportunité et d’incitation que ce trop-plein d’armes principalement de poing (près de 113 armes à feu pour 100 habitants !) peut rendre catastrophiques et irréversibles, sans parler des rixes ou des simples vols, les moindres accidents, suicides ou disputes au sein même des familles ?
Qui aura enfin le courage d’exiger face au puissant lobby des fabricants mais aussi des fondamentalistes de la liberté à tout prix …

Un minimum, comme cela a été fait pour l’industrie de l’automobile ou du tabac notamment avec les fameuses « class actions », de sécurités et de contrôles pour les produits …

D’une industrie qui continue à tuer …
Entre homicides, accidents et suicides et certes aussi l’imprudence voire l’inconscience de nombreux parents mais aussi la brutalité de certains policiers
Et à l’instar, sans compter le bébé de 5 mois de Cleveland le même jour que la tuerie de l’Oregon, de ce petit garçon de 11 ans du Tennessee qui a tué sa petite voisine de 8 ans quatre jours après pour avoir refusé de lui montrer son petit chien …
Plus de 400 enfants par an et déjà 563 pour les 10 premiers mois de cette année ?
Ce qui ne fait certes, diront les critiques, que 40 fois moins que le bilan des accidents automobiles  pour lesdits enfants et qu’à peine 20 fois celui du massacre de Newtown …

Death by the Barrel
David Hemenway applies scientific method to the gun problem
Craig Lambert
Harvard magazine
September-October 2004
This particular gun story took place, ironically enough, at the 1997 convention of the American Public Health Association in Indianapolis. There, among a group of white-collar professionals and academics, a seemingly minor incident quickly led to mayhem. While eating dinner at the Planet Hollywood restaurant, a patron bent to pick something up from the floor. A small pistol fell from his pocket, hit the floor, and went off. The bullet struck and injured two convention delegates waiting to be seated; both women went to the hospital. »Why manufacture guns that go off when you drop them? » asks professor of health policy David Hemenway ’66, Ph.D. ’74. « Kids play with guns. We put childproof safety caps on aspirin bottles because if kids take too many aspirin, they get sick. You could blame the parents for gun accidents but, as with aspirin, manufacturers could help. It’s very easy to make childproof guns. »

Logic like this pervades Hemenway’s new book, Private Guns, Public Health (University of Michigan Press), which takes an original approach to an old problem by applying a scientific perspective to firearms. Hemenway, who directs the Harvard Injury Control Research Center at the School of Public Health (www.hsph.harvard.edu/hicrc), summarizes and interprets findings from hundreds of surveys and from epidemiological and field studies to deliver on the book’s subtitle: A Dramatic New Plan for Ending America’s Epidemic of Gun Violence. The empirical groundwork enables Hemenway, whose doctorate is in economics, to sidestep decades of political arm-wrestling over gun control. « The gun-control debate often makes it look like there are only two options: either take away people’s guns, or not, » he says. « That’s not it at all. This is more like a harm-reduction strategy. Recognize that there are a lot of guns out there, and that reasonable gun policies can minimize the harm that comes from them. »

Hemenway’s work on guns and violence is a natural evolution of his research on injuries of various kinds, which he has pursued for decades. (In fact, it could be traced as far back as the 1960s, when, working for Ralph Nader, LL.B. ’58, he investigated product safety as one of « Nader’s Raiders. ») Hemenway says he doesn’t have a personal issue with guns; he has shot firearms, but found the experience « loud and dirty—and there’s no exercise »—as opposed to the « paintball » survival games he enjoys, which involve not only shooting but « a lot of running. » He also happens to live in a state with strong gun laws. « It’s nice, » he says, « to have raised my son in Massachusetts, where he is so much safer. »

Statistically, the United States is not a particularly violent society. Although gun proponents like to compare this country with hot spots like Colombia, Mexico, and Estonia (making America appear a truly peaceable kingdom), a more relevant comparison is against other high-income, industrialized nations. The percentage of the U.S. population victimized in 2000 by crimes like assault, car theft, burglary, robbery, and sexual incidents is about average for 17 industrialized countries, and lower on many indices than Canada, Australia, or New Zealand.

« The only thing that jumps out is lethal violence, » Hemenway says. Violence, pace H. Rap Brown, is not « as American as cherry pie, » but American violence does tend to end in death. The reason, plain and simple, is guns. We own more guns per capita than any other high-income country—maybe even more than one gun for every man, woman, and child in the country. A 1994 survey numbered the U.S. gun supply at more than 200 million in a population then numbered at 262 million, and currently about 35 percent of American households have guns. (These figures count only civilian guns; Switzerland, for example, has plenty of military weapons per capita.)

« It’s not as if a 19-year-old in the United States is more evil than a 19-year-old in Australia—there’s no evidence for that, » Hemenway explains. « But a 19-year-old in America can very easily get a pistol. That’s very hard to do in Australia. So when there’s a bar fight in Australia, somebody gets punched out or hit with a beer bottle. Here, they get shot. »

In general, guns don’t induce people to commit crimes. « What guns do is make crimes lethal, » says Hemenway. They also make suicide attempts lethal: about 60 percent of suicides in America involve guns. « If you try to kill yourself with drugs, there’s a 2 to 3 percent chance of dying, » he explains. « With guns, the chance is 90 percent. »

Gun deaths fall into three categories: homicides, suicides, and accidental killings. In 2001, about 30,000 people died from gunfire in the United States. Set this against the 43,000 annual deaths from motor-vehicle accidents to recognize what startling carnage comes out of a barrel. The comparison is especially telling because cars « are a way of life, » as Hemenway explains. « People use cars all day, every day—and ‘motor vehicles’ include trucks. How many of us use guns? »

Suicides accounted for about 58 percent of gun fatalities, or 17,000 to 18,000 deaths, in 2001; another 11,000 deaths, or 37 percent, were homicides, and the remaining 800 to 900 gun deaths were accidental. For rural areas, the big problem is suicide; in cities, it’s homicide. (« In Wyoming it’s hard to have big gang fights, » Hemenway observes dryly. « Do you call up the other gang and drive 30 miles to meet up? ») Homicides follow a curve similar to that of motor-vehicle fatalities: rising steeply between ages 15 and 21, staying fairly level from there until age 65, then rising again with advanced age. Men between 25 and 55 commit the bulk of suicides, and younger males account for an inflated share of both homicides and unintentional shootings. (Males suffer all injuries, including gunshots, at much higher rates than females.)

Though assault weapons have attracted lots of publicity from Hollywood and Washington, and NRA stands for National Rifle Association, these facts mask the reality of the gun problem, which centers on pistols. « Handguns are the crime guns, » Hemenway says. « They are the ones you can conceal, the guns you take to go rob somebody. You don’t mug people at rifle-point. »

And America is awash in handguns. Canada, for example, has almost as many guns per capita as the United States, but Americans own far more pistols. « Where do Canadian criminals, and Mexican criminals, get their handguns? » asks Hemenway. « From the United States. » Gang members in Boston and New York get their handguns from other states with permissive gun laws; the firearms flow freely across state borders. Interstate 95, which runs from Florida to New England, even has a nickname among gun-runners: « the Iron Pipeline. »

The ways in which people die by guns would not make a good television cop show. Rarely does a suburban homeowner beat a burglar to the draw in his living room at 3 a.m. Few urban pedestrians thwart a mugger by brandishing a pistol. « We have done four surveys on self-defense gun use, » Hemenway says. « And one thing we know for sure is that there’s a lot more criminal gun use than self-defense gun use. And even when people say they pulled their gun in ‘self-defense,’ it usually turns out that there was just an escalating argument—at some point, people feel afraid and draw guns. »

Hemenway has collected stories of self-defense gun use by simply asking those who pulled guns what happened. A typical story might be: « We were in the park drinking. Drinking led to arguing. We ran to our cars and got our guns. » Or: « I was sitting on my porch. A neighbor came up and we got into a fight. He threw a beer at me. I went inside and got my gun. » Hemenway has sent verbatim accounts of such incidents to criminal-court judges, asking if the « self-defense » gun use described was legal. « Most of the time, » he says, « the answer was no. »

Ask criminals why they carried a gun while robbing the convenience store and frequently the answer is, « So I could get the money and not have to hurt anyone. » But as Hemenway explains, « Then something happens. Maybe somebody unexpectedly walks in, or the storeowner draws a gun. Your heart is racing. Next thing you know, somebody is dead. »

Researchers have interviewed adolescents in major urban centers, where many inner-city kids carry guns. When asked why, the reason they most often give is « self-defense, » adding that getting a gun is easy, something one can often do in less than an hour. Yet when researchers asked a group of teenagers, more than half of whom had already carried guns, what kind of world they would like to live in, Hemenway says that almost all of them replied, « One where it’s difficult or impossible to get a gun. »

Most murderers are not hired killers. Instead, killings happen during fights between rival gangs or angry spouses, or even from road rage, and leave deep regret in their wake. « How often might you appropriately use a gun in self-defense? » Hemenway asks rhetorically. « Answer: zero to once in a lifetime. How about inappropriately—because you were tired, afraid, or drunk in a confrontational situation? There are lots and lots of chances. When your anger takes over, it’s nice not to have guns lying around. »

Many suicides, similarly, are impulsive acts. Follow-up interviews with people who survived jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge reveal that few of them tried suicide again. One survivor volunteered this epiphany after jumping: « I realized that all the problems I had in life were solvable—except one: I’m in midair. » In the United States, suicide rates are high in states with an abundance of guns—southern and western mountain states, for example—and lower in places like New Jersey, New England, or Hawaii, where guns are relatively scarce. Nine case-control studies have shown that guns in the house are a risk factor for suicide. Firearms turn the agonizing into the irreversible.

Virtually all industrialized nations have stronger firearms laws than the United States. We have no national law, for example, requiring a license to own a gun (though some states require one). Almost all other countries have licensure laws, and many demand that gun owners undergo training, also not required here. Hemenway scoffs at the rote objection, « A determined criminal will always get a gun, » responding, « Yes, but a lot of people aren’t that determined. I’m sure there are some determined yacht buyers out there, but when you raise the price high enough, a lot of them stop buying yachts. »

In most of these United States, many types of gun sale trigger neither a background check nor a paper trail. « You can go to a gun show, flea market, the Internet, or classified ads and buy a gun—no questions asked, » Hemenway says. It is illegal to sell a firearm to a convicted felon or for criminal purposes, although sting operations have proved that some licensed vendors flout even this proscription. « In 1998, police officers from Chicago (where possessing a new handgun is illegal) posed as local gang members and went firearms shopping in the suburbs, » Hemenway writes. « In store after store, clerks willingly sold powerful handguns to these agents, who made it clear that they intended to use these guns to ‘take care of business’ on the streets of Chicago. »

Some civil lawsuits have targeted gun manufacturers, seeking damages for the death and disability resulting from the use of firearms. In one sense, such plaintiffs are in the bizarre position of suing manufacturers for making products that perform as advertised. Yet there may be parallels to the legal assault on tobacco, another product that can be lethal when used as directed. « For decades, there were no plaintiff victories beyond the appellate level » in the tobacco litigation, Hemenway notes. « Reasonable suits might allege things that the manufacturers could do to make guns safer. »

Many such changes are possible. Fairly small tweaks in design and engineering could save countless human lives—in much the same way that the 1985 law requiring a third brake light (the upper back light) on cars reduced rear-end collisions. For starters, making childproof guns is, well, child’s play. Even a century ago, gunsmiths made pistols that would not fire unless the shooter put extra pressure on the handle while pulling the trigger; this required strength beyond that of a child’s hand.

Many times a teenaged boy will find a gun such as a semi-automatic pistol in his home and, after taking out the ammunition clip, assume that the gun is unloaded. He then points the pistol at his best friend and playfully pulls the trigger, killing the other lad with the bullet that was already in the chamber. « People say, ‘Teach kids not to pull the trigger,’ but kids will do it, » Hemenway says. In a 2001 study, for example, small groups of boys from 8 to 12 years old spent 15 minutes in a room where a handgun was hidden in a drawer. More than two-thirds discovered the gun, more than half the groups handled it, and in more than a third of the groups someone pulled the trigger—despite the fact that more than 90 percent of the boys in the latter groups had received gun-safety instruction.

Hence product redesign may do more good than safety education. Hemenway suggests such changes as adding « a magazine safety, so that when you remove the clip, the gun does not work. Or make guns that visually indicate if they are loaded—just like you can tell if there is film in a camera. » A different design solution could help police, who often find that guns recovered from crime scenes are untraceable because it’s « pretty easy to obliterate the serial number, » Hemenway notes. « Often you can just file it off. You could make it hard to remove a serial number. You won’t eliminate the problem, but you can decrease it. »

One of Hemenway’s main goals is to help create a society in which it is harder to make fatal blunders. He compares it to cutting down on speeding autos. « You can arrest speeders, but you can also put speed bumps or chicanes [curved, alternating-side curb extensions] into residential areas where children play….Just as…you can revoke the license of bad doctors, but also build [a medical] environment in which it’s harder to make an error, and the mistakes made are not serious or fatal. »

Yet even if such interventions became public policy, there would be no way to evaluate their impact without meaningful data. Consider the 1994 law that bans assault weapons, which is due to expire this year. « We don’t know if homicides have gone up, down, or stayed the same as a result of this law, » Hemenway says. « Or take unintentional gun deaths, of which there are about two a day. We don’t know if they tend to occur indoors or outdoors, whether the victim is the shooter or another person, whether they involve long guns or handguns, if they occur in the city or country, or if patterns have changed over time. »

This ignorance about gun deaths stands in sharp contrast to the wealth of useful data available on motor-vehicle fatalities, for which more than 100 pieces of information per death are collected consistently in every state. Shortly after its creation in 1966, the predecessor of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began to record information like the make, model, and year of the car, speed limit and speed of car, where people were sitting, use of seatbelts and more recently airbags, weather conditions—these data and many more are available to researchers on the Web. Consequently, Hemenway says, « We know what works. We know that speed kills, so if you raise speed limits, expect to see more highway deaths. Motorcycle helmets work; seat belts work. Car inspections and driver education have no effect. Right-on-red laws mean more pedestrians hit by cars. »

This kind of detailed information allows researchers to statistically evaluate the effects of laws. Regarding those right-on-red laws, for example, Hemenway explains, « If you only [tracked] traffic deaths, you wouldn’t see this pattern. You need data on pedestrian deaths, and pedestrian deaths at intersections! »

In 1998, Hemenway and the Harvard Injury Control Research Center launched the pilot for what has become the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) in an attempt to assemble a similar database documenting violent deaths, including those by firearms. They funded 10 sites to organize a consistent, comparable set of data, using information that already existed. Vital statistics like age and sex were commonly available. The police have a good system for homicide data. Medical examiners’ (coroners’) reports are a rich source of information but are not part of any system and aren’t linked to anything else; the same is true of crime lab reports. The new system will also provide important suicide data. (Currently, once a death is defined as a suicide, the police investigation ends, so « all we have are death certificates, » says Hemenway. « They tell you nothing about the circumstances. »)

Two years ago, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) took over administration of NVDRS; Hemenway estimates that funding the whole system for all 50 states would cost about $20 million. He will continue this work, but he is also getting involved with international firearms problems. Although high-income countries (other than the United States) generally don’t have severe gun problems, the developing world faces major issues with guns in places like Jamaica, Colombia, and South Africa. The goal at home and abroad, he says, is « to make sure the guns we have are safe, and that people use them properly. We’d like to create a world where it’s hard to make mistakes with guns—and when you do make a mistake, it’s not a terrible thing. »
Craig A. Lambert ’69, Ph.D. ’78, is deputy editor of this magazine.December 19, 2012

Voir aussi:

The Simple Truth About Gun Control
Adam Gopnik
The New Yorker
December 19, 2012

We live, let’s imagine, in a city where children are dying of a ravaging infection. The good news is that its cause is well understood and its cure, an antibiotic, easily at hand. The bad news is that our city council has been taken over by a faith-healing cult that will go to any lengths to keep the antibiotic from the kids. Some citizens would doubtless point out meekly that faith healing has an ancient history in our city, and we must regard the faith healers with respect—to do otherwise would show a lack of respect for their freedom to faith-heal. (The faith healers’ proposition is that if there were a faith healer praying in every kindergarten the kids wouldn’t get infections in the first place.) A few Tartuffes would see the children writhe and heave in pain and then wring their hands in self-congratulatory piety and wonder why a good God would send such a terrible affliction on the innocent—surely he must have a plan! Most of us—every sane person in the city, actually—would tell the faith healers to go to hell, put off worrying about the Problem of Evil till Friday or Saturday or Sunday, and do everything we could to get as much penicillin to the kids as quickly we could.

We do live in such a city. Five thousand seven hundred and forty children and teens died from gunfire in the United States, just in 2008 and 2009. Twenty more, including Olivia Engel, who was seven, and Jesse Lewis, who was six, were killed just last week. Some reports say their bodies weren’t shown to their grief-stricken parents to identify them; just their pictures. The overwhelming majority of those children would have been saved with effective gun control. We know that this is so, because, in societies that have effective gun control, children rarely, rarely, rarely die of gunshots. Let’s worry tomorrow about the problem of Evil. Let’s worry more about making sure that when the Problem of Evil appears in a first-grade classroom, it is armed with a penknife.

There are complex, hand-wringing-worthy problems in our social life: deficits and debts and climate change. Gun violence, and the work of eliminating gun massacres in schools and movie houses and the like, is not one of them. Gun control works on gun violence as surely as antibiotics do on bacterial infections. In Scotland, after Dunblane, in Australia, after Tasmania, in Canada, after the Montreal massacre—in each case the necessary laws were passed to make gun-owning hard, and in each case… well, you will note the absence of massacre-condolence speeches made by the Prime Ministers of Canada and Australia, in comparison with our own President.

The laws differ from place to place. In some jurisdictions, like Scotland, it is essentially impossible to own a gun; in others, like Canada, it is merely very, very difficult. The precise legislation that makes gun-owning hard in a certain sense doesn’t really matter—and that should give hope to all of those who feel that, with several hundred million guns in private hands, there’s no point in trying to make America a gun-sane country.

As I wrote last January, the central insight of the modern study of criminal violence is that all crime—even the horrific violent crimes of assault and rape—is at some level opportunistic. Building a low annoying wall against them is almost as effective as building a high impenetrable one. This is the key concept of Franklin Zimring’s amazing work on crime in New York; everyone said that, given the social pressures, the slum pathologies, the profits to be made in drug dealing, the ascending levels of despair, that there was no hope of changing the ever-growing cycle of violence. The right wing insisted that this generation of predators would give way to a new generation of super-predators.

What the New York Police Department found out, through empirical experience and better organization, was that making crime even a little bit harder made it much, much rarer. This is undeniably true of property crime, and common sense and evidence tells you that this is also true even of crimes committed by crazy people (to use the plain English the subject deserves). Those who hold themselves together enough to be capable of killing anyone are subject to the same rules of opportunity as sane people. Even madmen need opportunities to display their madness, and behave in different ways depending on the possibilities at hand. Demand an extraordinary degree of determination and organization from someone intent on committing a violent act, and the odds that the violent act will take place are radically reduced, in many cases to zero.

Look at the Harvard social scientist David Hemenway’s work on gun violence to see how simple it is; the phrase “more guns = more homicide” tolls through it like a grim bell. The more guns there are in a country, the more gun murders and massacres of children there will be. Even within this gun-crazy country, states with strong gun laws have fewer gun murders (and suicides and accidental killings) than states without them. (Hemenway is also the scientist who has shown that the inflated figure of guns used in self-defense every year, running even to a million or two million, is a pure fantasy, even though it’s still cited by pro-gun enthusiasts. Those hundreds of thousands intruders shot by gun owners left no records in emergency wards or morgues; indeed, left no evidentiary trace behind. This is because they did not exist.) Hemenway has discovered, as he explained in this interview with Harvard Magazine, that what is usually presented as a case of self-defense with guns is, in the real world, almost invariably a story about an escalating quarrel. “How often might you appropriately use a gun in self-defense?” Hemenway asks rhetorically. “Answer: zero to once in a lifetime. How about inappropriately—because you were tired, afraid, or drunk in a confrontational situation? There are lots and lots of chances.”

So don’t listen to those who, seeing twenty dead six- and seven-year-olds in ten minutes, their bodies riddled with bullets designed to rip apart bone and organ, say that this is impossibly hard, or even particularly complex, problem. It’s a very easy one. Summoning the political will to make it happen may be hard. But there’s no doubt or ambiguity about what needs to be done, nor that, if it is done, it will work. One would have to believe that Americans are somehow uniquely evil or depraved to think that the same forces that work on the rest of the planet won’t work here. It’s always hard to summon up political will for change, no matter how beneficial the change may obviously be. Summoning the political will to make automobiles safe was difficult; so was summoning the political will to limit and then effectively ban cigarettes from public places. At some point, we will become a gun-safe, and then a gun-sane, and finally a gun-free society. It’s closer than you think. (I’m grateful to my colleague Jeffrey Toobin for showing so well that the idea that the Second Amendment assures individual possession of guns, so far from being deeply rooted in American law, is in truth a new and bizarre reading, one that would have shocked even Warren Burger.)

Gun control is not a panacea, any more than penicillin was. Some violence will always go on. What gun control is good at is controlling guns. Gun control will eliminate gun massacres in America as surely as antibiotics eliminate bacterial infections. As I wrote last week, those who oppose it have made a moral choice: that they would rather have gun massacres of children continue rather than surrender whatever idea of freedom or pleasure they find wrapped up in owning guns or seeing guns owned—just as the faith healers would rather watch the children die than accept the reality of scientific medicine. This is a moral choice; many faith healers make it to this day, and not just in thought experiments. But it is absurd to shake our heads sapiently and say we can’t possibly know what would have saved the lives of Olivia and Jesse.

On gun violence and how to end it, the facts are all in, the evidence is clear, the truth there for all who care to know it—indeed, a global consensus is in place, which, in disbelief and now in disgust, the planet waits for us to join. Those who fight against gun control, actively or passively, with a shrug of helplessness, are dooming more kids to horrible deaths and more parents to unspeakable grief just as surely as are those who fight against pediatric medicine or childhood vaccination. It’s really, and inarguably, just as simple as that.


Newtown and the Madness of Guns
Adam Gopnik

After the mass gun murders at Virginia Tech, I wrote about the unfathomable image of cell phones ringing in the pockets of the dead kids, and of the parents trying desperately to reach them. And I said (as did many others), This will go on, if no one stops it, in this manner and to this degree in this country alone—alone among all the industrialized, wealthy, and so-called civilized countries in the world. There would be another, for certain.

Then there were—many more, in fact—and when the latest and worst one happened, in Aurora, I (and many others) said, this time in a tone of despair, that nothing had changed. And I (and many others) predicted that it would happen again, soon. And that once again, the same twisted voices would say, Oh, this had nothing to do with gun laws or the misuse of the Second Amendment or anything except some singular madman, of whom America for some reason seems to have a particularly dense sample.

And now it has happened again, bang, like clockwork, one might say: Twenty dead children—babies, really—in a kindergarten in a prosperous town in Connecticut. And a mother screaming. And twenty families told that their grade-schooler had died. After the Aurora killings, I did a few debates with advocates for the child-killing lobby—sorry, the gun lobby—and, without exception and with a mad vehemence, they told the same old lies: it doesn’t happen here more often than elsewhere (yes, it does); more people are protected by guns than killed by them (no, they aren’t—that’s a flat-out fabrication); guns don’t kill people, people do; and all the other perverted lies that people who can only be called knowing accessories to murder continue to repeat, people who are in their own way every bit as twisted and crazy as the killers whom they defend. (That they are often the same people who pretend outrage at the loss of a single embryo only makes the craziness still crazier.)

So let’s state the plain facts one more time, so that they can’t be mistaken: Gun massacres have happened many times in many countries, and in every other country, gun laws have been tightened to reflect the tragedy and the tragic knowledge of its citizens afterward. In every other country, gun massacres have subsequently become rare. In America alone, gun massacres, most often of children, happen with hideous regularity, and they happen with hideous regularity because guns are hideously and regularly available.

The people who fight and lobby and legislate to make guns regularly available are complicit in the murder of those children. They have made a clear moral choice: that the comfort and emotional reassurance they take from the possession of guns, placed in the balance even against the routine murder of innocent children, is of supreme value. Whatever satisfaction gun owners take from their guns—we know for certain that there is no prudential value in them—is more important than children’s lives. Give them credit: life is making moral choices, and that’s a moral choice, clearly made.

All of that is a truth, plain and simple, and recognized throughout the world. At some point, this truth may become so bloody obvious that we will know it, too. Meanwhile, congratulate yourself on living in the child-gun-massacre capital of the known universe.

Voir encore:

St Louis Post dispatch

February 19, 2013

We are writing today as pediatric emergency and trauma physicians to share our concern about the epidemic of gun violence that threatens the safety, health, and well-being of our children in St. Louis and in the United States.

Since 2002, St. Louis Children’s Hospital has cared for 771 children injured or killed by gunfire; 35 percent were younger than 15. These include the recent 12-year-old boy accidentally killed by his friend when playing with his grandfather’s pistol kept under his pillow, the 2-year-old boy paralyzed when his father accidentally discharged his gun during loading, the 5-year-old girl caught in a cross-fire as she sat on her front porch, the 10-year-old boy killed by his mother overwhelmed with mental illness, and the 4-year-old boy who found a handgun in a closet at home, placed the barrel into his mouth and pulled the trigger as he had often done to get a drink from his water-pistol. Many of these children died despite the heroic efforts of our highly trained pre-hospital, emergency, surgical and critical care staff.

In 2010, seven American children age 19 and younger were killed every day. This is twice the number of children who die from cancer, five times the number from heart disease, and 15 times the number from infections. This is also the equivalent of 128 Newtown shootings.

It has been estimated at least 38 percent of American households have a gun. In homes with children younger than 18, 22 percent store the gun loaded, 32 percent unlocked, and 8 percent unlocked and loaded. The children in these homes know the gun is present, and many handle the gun in the absence of their parents.

Children who have received gun safety training are just as likely to play with and fire a real gun as children not trained. In one study, 8-to-12-year-old boys were observed via one-way mirror as they played for 15 minutes in a waiting room with a disabled .38 caliber handgun concealed in a desk drawer. Seventy two percent discovered the gun, and 48 percent pulled the trigger; 90 percent of those who handled the gun and/or pulled the trigger had prior gun safety instruction.

Rather than confer protection, careful studies find guns stored in the home are more likely to be involved in an accidental death, homicide by a family member, or suicide than against an intruder. In 2009, suicide was the third leading cause of death for American youth, with firearms the most common method used. The American Academy of Pediatrics has concluded, “The most effective measure to prevent suicide, homicide, and unintentional firearm-related injuries to children and adolescents is the absence of guns from homes and communities.”

We concur with recent recommendations from more than a dozen national pediatric professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, Academic Pediatric Association, and the American College of Surgeons in response to the Newtown school shooting. We called for action in three areas: reinstating and revising the ban on assault weapons and large ammunition magazines; improving quality and availability of mental health services; and reducing the exposure our children have to media violence. In addition, we called for increasing research on the relationship of these factors on the epidemic of death and injury to children caused by firearm violence and for ending restrictions to this research imposed by Congress.

We are gratified the plan President Obama recently announced addresses all of these issues. The president called for public support of these initiatives, and we strongly agree. As physicians who care for children and families devastated by gun violence, we know first-hand the importance of taking action that will begin to make the environment in St. Louis safer for our children. It has been done in many other economically advanced countries, and we can do it in the United States.

As Gabrielle Giffords said to Congress: “Too many children are dying. Too many children. We must do something. It will be hard, but the time is now. You must act. Be bold, be courageous. Americans are counting on you.” Our children are counting on us!

Voir de même:

Accidental gun deaths of children are far down on the list

St Louis Post dispatch

February 23, 2013

Regarding Drs. Kennedy, Jaffe & Keller’s editorial on child gun deaths, “Gun violence is a pediatric public health crisis” (Feb. 19):

They quote statistics that would lead the reader to believe that child gun deaths are a national public health crisis. They suggest that there is an epidemic of gun violence that threatens the safety, health and well-being of our children and devote considerable print to listing the number of children killed or treated for gunshot injuries at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. However, most of the individual cases they report suggest that accidental shootings are the main culprit for these injuries, and that inadequate gun storage at home is to blame. In reality, as is obvious from the daily reporting by the Post-Dispatch of area gun violence, most of the victims of these gun-related deaths and injuries are inner-city residents and their injuries are not accidental.

According to reliable statistical data reported in 2009 covering the years 1904-2006, from the National Center for Health Statistics (1981 on) and the National Safety Council (prior to 1981), while the number of privately owned guns in the U.S. is at an all-time high, and rises by about 4.5 million per year, the firearm accident death rate is at an all-time annual low, 0.2 per 100,000 population, down 94 percent since the all-time high in 1904. Since 1930, the annual number of such deaths has decreased 80 percent, to an all-time low, while the U.S. population has more than doubled and the number of firearms has quintupled. Among children, such deaths have decreased 90 percent since 1975.

Today, the odds are more than a million to one against a child in the U.S. dying in a firearm accident. According to the 2009 data, in reality among all child accidental deaths nationally, firearms were involved in 1.1 percent, compared to motor vehicles (41 percent), suffocation (21 percent), drowning (15 percent), fires (8 percent), pedal cycles (2 percent), poisoning (2 percent), falls (1.9 percent), environmental factors (1.5 percent), and medical mistakes (1 percent). Since the difference between accidental deaths due to medical mistakes (1 percent) and accidental deaths due to firearms (1.1 percent) is only 0.1 percentage points, perhaps we should consider a ban on pediatricians along with the ban they propose on firearms and large-capacity magazines.

F.A. Ruecker  •  Manchester

Homicide

1. Where there are more guns there is more homicide (literature review).

Our review of the academic literature found that a broad array of evidence indicates that gun availability is a risk factor for homicide, both in the United States and across high-income countries.  Case-control studies, ecological time-series and cross-sectional studies indicate that in homes, cities, states and regions in the US, where there are more guns, both men and women are at higher risk for homicide, particularly firearm homicide.

Hepburn, Lisa; Hemenway, David. Firearm availability and homicide: A review of the literature. Aggression and Violent Behavior: A Review Journal. 2004; 9:417-40.

2. Across high-income nations, more guns = more homicide.

We analyzed the relationship between homicide and gun availability using data from 26 developed countries from the early 1990s.  We found that across developed countries, where guns are more available, there are more homicides. These results often hold even when the United States is excluded.

Hemenway, David; Miller, Matthew. Firearm availability and homicide rates across 26 high income countries. Journal of Trauma. 2000; 49:985-88.

3. Across states, more guns = more homicide

Using a validated proxy for firearm ownership, we analyzed the relationship between firearm availability and homicide across 50 states over a ten year period (1988-1997).

After controlling for poverty and urbanization, for every age group, people in states with many guns have elevated rates of homicide, particularly firearm homicide.

Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah; Hemenway, David. Household firearm ownership levels and homicide rates across U.S. regions and states, 1988-1997. American Journal of Public Health. 2002: 92:1988-1993.

4. Across states, more guns = more homicide (2)

Using survey data on rates of household gun ownership, we examined the association between gun availability and homicide across states, 2001-2003. We found that states with higher levels of household gun ownership had higher rates of firearm homicide and overall homicide.  This relationship held for both genders and all age groups, after accounting for rates of aggravated assault, robbery, unemployment, urbanization, alcohol consumption, and resource deprivation (e.g., poverty). There was no association between gun prevalence and non-firearm homicide.

Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah; Hemenway, David. State-level homicide victimization rates in the U.S. in relation to survey measures of household firearm ownership, 2001-2003. Social Science and Medicine. 2007; 64:656-64.

Voir encore:

Tuerie dans l’Oregon et port d’arme : sachons raison garder

Edouard H.

Contrepoints

4 octobre 2015

Jeudi 1er octobre a lieu une nouvelle tuerie à l’Université Umpqua dans l’Oregon, faisant 10 morts. Comme à chaque nouvelle tuerie à l’aide d’une arme à feu, de nombreuses voix s’élèvent pour mettre en place des politiques restreignant le droit de détenir et de porter des armes. Portées par l’émotion, elles réclament toujours plus de politiques répressives et liberticides. Bien que compréhensibles, ces demandes n’en sont pas moins illégitimes, et il s’agit de défendre cette liberté fondamentale qu’est le droit de détenir et de porter des armes.

Jeudi dernier, le matin, Chris Harper Mercer amène 6 armes à feu sur le campus de l’Université Umpqua et ouvre le feu sur des étudiants, faisant 9 morts. Il meurt ensuite lors d’un échange de tirs avec la police. Face à cette nouvelle tragédie, nous ne pouvons qu’avoir dans notre cœur les familles des victimes, et leur assurer de nos condoléances les plus sincères.

Mais l’émotion générée par cette tuerie, bien que légitime, doit-elle servir de base à des restrictions sur des libertés fondamentales ? L’État américain devrait-il restreindre encore le droit de détention et de port d’armes des honnêtes citoyens américains, comme Barack Obama l’a suggéré ?

Comme dans tous les débats enflammés qui font suite à des événements tragiques, il s’agit de raison garder. La proposition simple consistant à dire « le tueur était armé, restreignons donc l’accès légal aux armes à feu » peut sembler logique au premier abord, mais en réalité, elle ignore complètement le contexte bien plus complexe de la question du port d’arme aux États-Unis. Car en matière d’armes à feu comme dans d’autres, il y a ce qu’on voit et ce qu’on ne voit pas.

Il est en effet essentiel de mettre les choses en perspective : les tueries de masse, bien que tragiques, restent statistiquement extrêmement rares. Moins de 0,2% des homicides sont liés à des tueries de masse.

De manière plus large et malgré la perception générale du contraire, le taux de crime aux États-Unis est en baisse constante depuis plus de 20 ans.

Même le taux d’homicides par armes à feu est en baisse, de 49% depuis 1993.

Ainsi, depuis plus de 20 ans aux États-Unis, le taux de crime diminue, et ce malgré un nombre record d’armes à feu détenus par des Américains. Dans le même temps, le nombre de permis de port d’arme en public (« concealed carry permit ») a lui aussi augmenté. « Plus d’armes = plus de crimes », vraiment ?

Mais au-delà des crimes demeure un fait peu rappelé dans les débats qui suivent les tueries aux États-Unis : avec plus de 300 millions d’armes à feu en circulation, les citoyens américains utilisent massivement leurs armes pour des motifs légitimes. Parmi ceux-ci, on retrouve la collection, la chasse, le tir sportif ou encore la défense de soi et de son prochain.

Ainsi, plus de 99,9% des Américains propriétaires légaux d’armes n’ont jamais utilisé celles-ci pour causer du tort à autrui. De quel droit viendrait-on restreindre leurs libertés parce qu’un dément a utilisé ses propres armes à feu pour nuire à autrui ?

Non seulement l’immense majorité de ces détenteurs légaux d’armes à feu ne cause pas de tort à autrui, mais elle empêche des crimes et sauvent des vies. Combien de crimes n’ont jamais eu lieu parce que des criminels violents, de peur de se faire abattre, ont été dissuadés d’agresser autrui ? Nous ne connaîtrons malheureusement jamais ce chiffre. À défaut, nous avons cependant des estimations du nombre de citoyens américains ayant en effet utilisé leurs armes pour se défendre d’un crime, et le chiffre est conséquent : d’après un rapport du National Research Council, les armes sont utilisées aux États-Unis pour se protéger d’un crime de 500.000 à 3.000.000 fois chaque année.

Ainsi, ce qu’on voit ce sont les crimes commis avec des armes à feu, qui font toujours grand bruit. Ce qu’on ne voit pas, ce sont les utilisations massivement plus nombreuses de ces mêmes armes pour des motifs légitimes, y compris la protection de la vie humaine. Jamais vous n’entendrez évoquer dans des médias traditionnels ces centaines de milliers de citoyens américains qui empêchent des crimes chaque année.

Mais si des mesures restrictives sur les armes à feu empêchaient effectivement leurs utilisations légitimes, elles permettraient au moins d’empêcher les dérangés de faire des tueries de masse, n’est-ce-pas ? On peut en douter. En France la détention d’armes à feu est strictement limitée, le port d’arme est interdit, et cela n’empêche aucunement les fusillades. Par définition, un criminel ne respecte pas la loi. Un fou souhaitant commettre une tuerie trouvera toujours les outils nécessaires. Les seules personnes concernées par les lois sur les armes à feu sont les citoyens honnêtes et pacifiques.

Le droit de détenir et de porter des armes est une liberté fondamentale. La vive émotion suscitée par une telle tragédie ne doit pas nous faire oublier que l’immense majorité des armes à feu aux États-Unis sont possédées par d’honnêtes citoyens ne voulant causer de tort à personne. De tels événements ne doivent pas être instrumentalisés pour restreindre des libertés, qu’il s’agisse de celle de la détention et du port d’armes ou celle du respect de notre vie privée face à la surveillance étatique.

Que faire alors pour empêcher ces tragédies ? Il paraît essentiel de se pencher sur l’origine réelle de ces tragédies : les tireurs et leurs motivations, et non l’outil qu’ils utilisent. Qu’est-ce qui les amène à commettre de telles atrocités, et que pouvons-nous changer à cela ?

Toutefois malgré ces efforts, il paraît vain de souhaiter en finir avec la violence. Certaines personnes seront toujours promptes à agresser autrui. Et face à ces personnes-là, les citoyens honnêtes doivent pouvoir s’armer pour leur défense. Cela n’a pas été le cas sur le campus de l’université dans l’Oregon qui était une « gun free zone », une zone où les citoyens honnêtes en possession de permis de port d’arme ne peuvent la porter. Le tueur avait ainsi le champ libre, sachant que ses victimes seraient incapables de se défendre avant l’arrivée de la police.

L’État américain doit en finir avec cette politique de « gun free zones » qui n’empêchent pas les tueurs de commettre leurs crimes, mais empêche une réponse rapide de citoyens qui pourraient stopper l’attaque.

Voir également:

Americans and their cars
Bangers v bullets
A gun is now more likely to kill you than a car is
The Economist
Jan 10th 2015
New York
ACCORDING to data gathered by the Centres for Disease Control (CDC), deaths caused by cars in America are in long-term decline. Improved technology, tougher laws and less driving by young people have all led to safer streets and highways. Deaths by guns, though—the great majority suicides, accidents or domestic violence—have been trending slightly upwards. This year, if the trend continues, they will overtake deaths on the roads.
The Centre for American Progress first spotted last February that the lines would intersect. Now, on its reading, new data to the end of 2012 support the view that guns will surpass cars this year as the leading killer of under 25s. Bloomberg Government has gone further. Its compilation of the CDC data in December concluded that guns would be deadlier for all age groups.
Comparing the two national icons, cars and guns, yields “a statistic that really resonates with people”, says Chelsea Parsons, co-author of the report for the Centre for American Progress. Resonance is certainly needed. There are about 320m people in the United States, and nearly as many civilian firearms. And although the actual rate of gun ownership is declining, enthusiasts are keeping up the number in circulation. Black Friday on November 28th kicked off such a shopping spree that the FBI had to carry out 175,000 instant background checks (three checks a second), a record for that day, just for sales covered by the extended Brady Act of 1998, the only serious bit of gun-curbing legislation passed in recent history.
Many sales escape that oversight, however. Everytown for Gun Safety, a movement backed by Mike Bloomberg, a former mayor of New York, has investigated loopholes in online gun sales and found that one in 30 users of Armslist classifieds has a criminal record that forbids them to own firearms. Private reselling of guns draws no attention, unless it crosses state lines.
William Vizzard, a professor of criminal justice at California State University at Sacramento, points out that guns also don’t wear out as fast as cars. “I compare a gun to a hammer or a crowbar,” he says. “Even if you stopped making guns today, you might not see a real change in the number of guns for decades.”
Motor vehicles, because they are operated on government-built roads, have been subject to licensing and registration, in the interests of public safety, for more than a century. But guns are typically kept at home. That private space is shielded by the Fourth Amendment just as “the right to bear arms” is protected by the Second, making government control difficult.
Car technologies and road laws are ever-evolving: in 2014, for example, the National Highways Traffic Safety Administration announced its plan to phase in mandatory rear-view cameras on new light vehicles, while New York City lowered its speed limit for local roads. By contrast, safety features on firearms—such as smartguns unlocked by an owner’s thumbprint or a radio-frequency encryption—are opposed by the National Rifle Association, whose allies in Congress also block funding for the sort of public-health research that might show, in even clearer detail, the cost of America’s love affair with guns.
Voir de même:
Technology
America’s Top Killing Machine
Gun deaths are poised to surpass automobile deaths in the United States this year.
Adrienne LaFrance
The Atlantic
Jan 12, 2015
For the better part of a century, the machine most likely to kill an American has been the automobile.

Car crashes killed 33,561 people in 2012, the most recent year for which data is available, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Firearms killed 32,251 people in the United States in 2011, the most recent year for which the Centers for Disease Control has data.

But this year gun deaths are expected to surpass car deaths. That’s according to a Center for American Progress report, which cites CDC data that shows guns will kill more Americans under 25 than cars in 2015. Already more than a quarter of the teenagers—15 years old and up—who die of injuries in the United States are killed in gun-related incidents, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

A similar analysis by Bloomberg three years ago found shooting deaths in 2015 « will probably rise to almost 33,000, and those related to autos will decline to about 32,000, based on the 10-year average trend. » And from The Economist, which wrote about the projection over the weekend:

Comparing the two national icons, cars and guns, yields “a statistic that really resonates with people, » says Chelsea Parsons, co-author of the report for the Centre for American Progress. Resonance is certainly needed. There are about 320 [million] people in the United States, and nearly as many civilian firearms. And although the actual rate of gun ownership is declining, enthusiasts are keeping up the number in circulation.

The figures may say more about a nation’s changing relationship with the automobile than they reveal about America’s ongoing obsession with guns.

The number of fatalities on the roads in the United States has been going down for years as fewer young people drive, car safety technology improves, and even as gas prices climb. (Lower gas prices are correlated with more deaths. A $2 drop in gasoline is linked to some 9,000 additional road fatalities per year in the United States, NPR recently reported.) Though even as fatal transportation incidents dropped in 2013, they accounted for two in five fatalities in the workplace in the United States that year, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

CDC data on firearms offers a more complicated picture, in part because of how the agency categorizes causes of death. Gun deaths can include suicides, homicides, accidental firearms discharges, and even legal killings—but the overall data picture is incomplete. Since 2008, some county-level deaths have been left out to avoid inadvertent privacy breaches. And the number of police shootings—including arrest-related deaths, which are recorded but not made public, according to The Washington Post—are notoriously evasive.

The record of firearm deaths in the United States is murkier still because of how much is at stake politically. Firearm safety remains one of the most divisive issues in the country, with advocates on both sides cherry-picking data to support arguments about the extent to which gun regulation is necessary. It’s not even clear how many guns are out there in the first place, as the Pew Research Center pointed out in a 2013 study: « Respondent error or misstatement in surveys about gun ownership is a widely acknowledged concern of researchers. People may be reluctant to disclose ownership, especially if they are concerned that there may be future restrictions on gun possession or if they acquired their firearms illegally. »

We do know American gun ownership far outstrips gun ownership in other countries. “With less than 5 percent of the world’s population, the United States is home to 35-50 percent of the world’s civilian-owned guns,” according to the Small Arms Survey.

And while the number of firearm homicides dropped dramatically over a 20-year period ending in 2011, the percentage of violent crimes involving firearms has stayed fairly constant, according to the 2013 survey. In other words, even when fewer people die from gun violence, violent crimes involving guns are still happening at the same rate. It’s also true that as the gun homicide rate has declined in the United States, suicides now account for the majority of gun deaths, according to Pew.

Data complexities aside, there is much to learn about a culture from the technologies that kill its people. In the 19th century, before modern labor laws were established, thousands of American workers died in textile mills and other factories. Heavy machinery was hazardous—and violent deaths often made headlines—but chemicals and asbestos killed many workers, too. Workers who made baked enamelware died after inhaling powdered glaze, and textile workers warned of the « kiss of death » from a loom that required its operator to suck a thread through the shuttle’s needle—which meant breathing toxic lint and dust, too.

Americans have been drawing connections between guns and cars for more than a century, since the dawn of the automobile age.

In 1911, The New York Times cited new traffic laws and gun regulations—including imprisonment rather than a monetary fine for people caught carrying pistols—as responsible for driving down the firearm and automobile death rates compared to the year before. But the larger public health risk in those days was infectious disease, which were responsible for almost half of the deaths among Americans in large cities at the turn of the century. It was around that time that officials began collecting reliable annual mortality statistics, according to a 2004 National Bureau of Economic Research paper about public health improvements.

Today, overall accidents are the fifth leading cause of death, according to CDC data. Americans are most likely to die from heart disease—followed by cancer, chronic respiratory disease, and stroke.

 Voir encore:

NBC news

The gun debate in the United States has changed a lot over the last 20 years. Support for gun control has declined sharply as support for gun rights has risen, as we noted earlier this week. Those trends are evident in data from a range of sources including Gallup and the Pew Research Center.

A complicated mix of emotions, attitudes and perceptions go into how people feel about guns, but when you look at the data, two points help explain the drop in support for gun control. Over the same period of time the violent crime rate has also dropped sharply. And the partisan divides that have come to define U.S. politics have pushed into the gun control debate.

The decline in violent crime over the past 25 years has been remarkable. In 1990, there were 729 violent crimes reported for every 100,000 people in the United States, according to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Statistics. The number got as high as 757 in 1992 – and then it began to fall steadily over the next 20 years.

By 2012, the figure was down to 386 violent crimes per 100,000 people.

Gun Homicide Rate Down 49% Since 1993 Peak; Public Unaware
Pace of Decline Slows in Past DecadeD’Vera Cohn, Paul Taylor, Mark Hugo Lopez, Catherine A. Gallagher, Kim Parker and Kevin T. Maass
Pew
May 7, 2013
Chapter 1: Overview
National rates of gun homicide and other violent gun crimes are strikingly lower now than during their peak in the mid-1990s, paralleling a general decline in violent crime, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of government data. Beneath the long-term trend, though, are big differences by decade: Violence plunged through the 1990s, but has declined less dramatically since 2000.Compared with 1993, the peak of U.S. gun homicides, the firearm homicide rate was 49% lower in 2010, and there were fewer deaths, even though the nation’s population grew. The victimization rate for other violent crimes with a firearm—assaults, robberies and sex crimes—was 75% lower in 2011 than in 1993. Violent non-fatal crime victimization overall (with or without a firearm) also is down markedly (72%) over two decades.Nearly all the decline in the firearm homicide rate took place in the 1990s; the downward trend stopped in 2001 and resumed slowly in 2007. The victimization rate for other gun crimes plunged in the 1990s, then declined more slowly from 2000 to 2008. The rate appears to be higher in 2011 compared with 2008, but the increase is not statistically significant. Violent non-fatal crime victimization overall also dropped in the 1990s before declining more slowly from 2000 to 2010, then ticked up in 2011.Despite national attention to the issue of firearm violence, most Americans are unaware that gun crime is lower today than it was two decades ago. According to a new Pew Research Center survey, today 56% of Americans believe gun crime is higher than 20 years ago and only 12% think it is lower.Looking back 50 years, the U.S. gun homicide rate began rising in the 1960s, surged in the 1970s, and hit peaks in 1980 and the early 1990s. (The number of homicides peaked in the early 1990s.) The plunge in homicides after that meant that firearm homicide rates in the late 2000s were equal to those not seen since the early 1960s.1 The sharp decline in the U.S. gun homicide rate, combined with a slower decrease in the gun suicide
rate, means that gun suicides now account for six-in-ten firearms deaths, the highest share since at least 1981.Trends for robberies followed a similar long-term trajectory as homicides (National Research Council, 2004), hitting a peak in the early 1990s before declining.This report examines trends in firearm homicide, non-fatal violent gun crime victimization and non-fatal violent crime victimization overall since 1993. Its findings on firearm crime are based mainly on analysis of data from two federal agencies. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, using information from death certificates, are the source of rates, counts and trends for all firearm deaths, homicide and suicide, unless otherwise specified. The Department of Justice’s National Crime Victimization Survey, a household survey conducted by the Census Bureau, supplies annual estimates of non-fatal crime victimization, including those where firearms are used, regardless of whether the crimes were reported to police. Where relevant, this report also quotes from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports (see text box at the end of this chapter and the Methodology appendix for more discussion about data sources).Researchers have studied the decline in firearm crime and violent crime for many years, and though there are theories to explain the decline, there is no consensus among those who study the issue as to why it happened.There also is debate about the extent of gun ownership in the U.S., although no disagreement that the U.S. has more civilian firearms, both total and per capita, than other nations. Compared with other developed nations, the U.S. has a higher homicide rate and higher rates of gun ownership, but not higher rates for all other crimes. (See Chapter 5 for more details.)In the months since the mass shooting at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school in December, the public is paying close attention to the topic of firearms; according to a recent Pew Research Center survey (Pew Research Center, April 2013) no story received more public attention from mid-March to early April than the debate over gun control. Reducing crime has moved up as a priority for the public in polling this year.Mass shootings are a matter of great public interest and concern. They also are a relatively small share of shootings overall. According to a Bureau of Justice Statistics review, homicides that claimed at least three lives accounted for less than 1% of all homicide deaths from 1980 to 2008. These homicides, most of which are shootings, increased as a share of all homicides from 0.5% in 1980 to 0.8% in 2008, according to the bureau’s data. A Congressional Research Service report, using a definition of four deaths or more, counted 547 deaths from mass shootings in the U.S. from 1983 to 2012.2Looking at the larger topic of firearm deaths, there were 31,672 deaths from guns in the U.S. in 2010. Most (19,392) were suicides; the gun suicide rate has been higher than the gun homicide rate since at least 1981, and the gap is wider than it was in 1981.Knowledge About Crime
Despite the attention to gun violence in recent months, most Americans are unaware that gun crime is markedly lower than it was two decades ago. A new Pew Research Center survey (March 14-17) found that 56% of Americans believe the number of crimes involving a gun is higher than it was 20 years ago; only 12% say it is lower and 26% say it stayed the same. (An additional 6% did not know or did not answer.)Men (46%) are less likely than women (65%) to say long-term gun crime is up. Young adults, ages 18 to 29, are markedly less likely than other adults to say long-term crime is up—44% do, compared with more than half of other adults. Minority adults are more likely than non-Hispanic whites to say that long-term gun crime is up, 62% compared with 53%.Asked about trends in the number of gun crimes “in recent years,” a plurality of 45% believe the number has gone up, 39% say it is about the same and 10% say it has gone down. (An additional 5% did not know or did not answer.) As with long-term crime, women (57%) are more likely than men (32%) to say that gun crime has increased in recent years. So are non-white adults (54%) compared with whites (41%). Adults ages 50 and older (51%) are more likely than those ages 18-49 (42%) to believe gun crime is up.

What is Behind the Crime Decline?
Researchers continue to debate the key factors behind changing crime rates, which is part of a larger discussion about the predictors of crime.3 There is consensus that demographics played some role: The outsized post-World War II baby boom, which produced a large number of people in the high-crime ages of 15 to 20 in the 1960s and 1970s, helped drive crime up in those years.

A review by the National Academy of Sciences of factors driving recent crime trends (Blumstein and Rosenfeld, 2008) cited a decline in rates in the early 1980s as the young boomers got older, then a flare-up by mid-decade in conjunction with a rising street market for crack cocaine, especially in big cities. It noted recruitment of a younger cohort of drug seller with greater willingness to use guns. By the early 1990s, crack markets withered in part because of lessened demand, and the vibrant national economy made it easier for even low-skilled young people to find jobs rather than get involved in crime.

At the same time, a rising number of people ages 30 and older were incarcerated, due in part to stricter laws, which helped restrain violence among this age group. It is less clear, researchers say, that innovative policing strategies and police crackdowns on use of guns by younger adults played a significant role in reducing crime.

Some researchers have proposed additional explanations as to why crime levels plunged so suddenly, including increased access to abortion and lessened exposure to lead. According to one hypothesis, legalization of abortion after the 1973 Supreme Court Roe v. Wade decision resulted in fewer unwanted births, and unwanted children have an increased risk of growing up to become criminals. Another theory links reduced crime to 1970s-era reductions in lead in gasoline; children’s exposure to lead causes brain damage that could be associated with violent behavior. The National Academy of Sciences review said it was unlikely that either played a major role, but researchers continue to explore both factors.

The plateau in national violent crime rates has raised interest in the topic of how local differences might influence crime levels and trends. Crime reductions took place across the country in the 1990s, but since 2000, patterns have varied more by metropolitan area or city.4

One focus of interest is that gun ownership varies widely by region and locality. The National Academy of Sciences review of possible influences on crime trends said there is good evidence of a link between firearm ownership and firearm homicide at the local level; “the causal direction of this relationship remains in dispute, however, with some researchers maintaining that firearm violence elevates rates of gun ownership, but not the reverse.”

There is substantial variation within and across regions and localities in a number of other realms, which complicates any attempt to find a single cause for national trends. Among the variations of interest to researchers are policing techniques, punishment policies, culture, economics and residential segregation.

Internationally, a decline in crime, especially property crime, has been documented in many countries since the mid-1990s. According to the authors of a 30-country study on criminal victimization (Van Dijk et al., 2007), there is no general agreement on all the reasons for this decline. They say there is a general consensus that demographic change—specifically, the shrinking proportion of adolescents across Europe—is a common factor causing decreases across Western countries. They also cite wider use of security measures in homes and businesses as a factor in reducing property crime.

But other potential explanations—such as better policing or increased imprisonment—do not apply in Europe, where policies vary widely, the report noted

Among the major findings of this Pew Research Center report:

U.S. Firearm Deaths
In 2010, there were 3.6 gun homicides per 100,000 people, compared with 7.0 in 1993, according to CDC data.
In 2010, CDC data counted 11,078 gun homicide deaths, compared with 18,253 in 1993.5
Men and boys make up the vast majority (84% in 2010) of gun homicide victims. The firearm homicide rate also is more than five times as high for males of all ages (6.2 deaths per 100,000 people) as it is for females (1.1 deaths per 100,000 people).
By age group, 69% of gun homicide victims in 2010 were ages 18 to 40, an age range that was 31% of the population that year. Gun homicide rates also are highest for adults ages 18 to 24 and 25 to 40.
A disproportionate share of gun homicide victims are black (55% in 2010, compared with the 13% black share of the population). Whites were 25% of victims but 65% of the population in 2010. Hispanics were 17% of victims and 16% of the population in 2010.
The firearm suicide rate (6.3 per 100,000 people) is higher than the firearm homicide rate and has come down less sharply. The number of gun suicide deaths (19,392 in 2010) outnumbered gun homicides, as has been true since at least 1981.
U.S. Firearm Crime Victimization
In 2011, the NCVS estimated there were 181.5 gun crime victimizations for non-fatal violent crime (aggravated assault, robbery and sex crimes) per 100,000 Americans ages 12 and older, compared with 725.3 in 1993.
In terms of numbers, the NCVS estimated there were about 1.5 million non-fatal gun crime victimizations in 1993 among U.S. residents ages 12 and older, compared with 467,000 in 2011.
U.S. Other Non-fatal Crime
The victimization rate for all non-fatal violent crime among those ages 12 and older—simple and aggravated assaults, robberies and sex crimes, with or without firearms—dropped 53% from 1993 to 2000, and 49% from 2000 to 2010. It rose 17% from 2010 to 2011.
Although not the topic of this report, the rate of property crimes—burglary, motor vehicle theft and theft—also declined from 1993 to 2011, by 61%. The rate for these types of crimes was 351.8 per 100,000 people ages 12 and older in 1993, 190.4 in 2000 and 138.7 in 2011.
Context
The number of firearms available for sale to or possessed by U.S. civilians (about 310 million in 2009, according to the Congressional Research Service) has grown in recent years, and the 2009 per capita rate of one person per gun had roughly doubled since 1968. It is not clear, though, how many U.S. households own guns or whether that share has changed over time.
Crime stories accounted for 17% of the total time devoted to news on local television broadcasts in 2012, compared with 29% in 2005, according to Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. Crime trails only traffic and weather as the most common type of story on these newscasts.
About the Data
Findings in this report are based on two main data sources:

Data on homicides and other deaths are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, based on information from death certificates filed in state vital statistics offices, which includes causes of death reported by attending physicians, medical examiners and coroners. Data also include demographic information about decedents reported by funeral directors, who obtain that information from family members and other informants. Population data, used in constructing rates, come from the Census Bureau. Most statistics were obtained via the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS), available from URL: http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/wisqars. Data are available beginning in 1981; suitable population data do not exist for prior years. For more details, see Appendix 4.

Estimates of crime victimization are from the National Crime Victimization Survey, a sample survey conducted for the Bureau of Justice Statistics by the Census Bureau. Although the survey began in 1973, this report uses data since 1993, the first year employing an intensive methodological redesign. The survey collects information about crimes against people and households, but not businesses. It provides estimates of victimization for the population ages 12 and older living in households and non-institutional group quarters; therefore it does not include populations such as homeless people, visiting foreign tourists and business travelers, or those living in institutions such as military barracks or mental hospitals. The survey collects information about the crimes of rape, sexual assault, personal robbery, aggravated and simple assault, household burglary, theft, and motor vehicle theft. For more details, see Appendix 4.

 Roadmap to the Report
The remainder of this report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 explores trends in firearm homicide and all firearm deaths, as well as patterns by gender, race and age. Chapter 3 analyzes trends in non-fatal violent gun crime victimizations, as well as patterns by gender, race and age. Chapter 4 looks at trends and subgroup patterns for non-fatal violent crime victimizations overall. Chapter 5 examines issues related to the topic of firearms: crime news, crime as a public priority, U.S. gun ownership data, and comparison of ownership and crime rates with those in other nations. Appendices 1-3 consist of detailed tables with annual data for firearm deaths, homicides and suicides, as well as non-fatal firearm and overall non-fatal violent crime victimization, for all groups and by subgroup. Appendix 4 explains the report’s methodology.Notes on Terminology
All references to whites, blacks and others are to the non-Hispanic components of those populations. Hispanics can be of any race.“Aggravated assault,” as defined by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, is an attack or attempted attack with a weapon, regardless of whether an injury occurred, and an attack without a weapon when serious injury results.The terms “firearm” and “gun” are used interchangeably.“Homicides,” which come from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, are fatal injuries inflicted by another person with intent to injure or kill. Deaths due to legal intervention or operations of war are excluded. Justifiable homicide is not identified.“Robbery,” as defined by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, is a completed or attempted theft, directly from a person, of property or cash by force or threat of force, with or without a weapon, and with or without injury.“Sex crime,” as defined by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, includes attempted rape, rape and sexual assault.“Simple assault,” as defined by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, is an attack (or attempted assault) without a weapon resulting either in no injury, minor injury (for example, bruises, black eyes, cuts, scratches or swelling) or in undetermined injury requiring less than two days of hospitalization.“Victimization” is based on self-reporting in the National Crime Victimization Survey, which includes Americans ages 12 and older. For personal crimes (which in this report include assault, robbery and sex crime), it is expressed as a rate based on the number of victimizations per 100,000 U.S. residents ages 12 and older. See the Methodology appendix for more details.Acknowledgments
Many researchers and scholars contributed to this report. Senior writer D’Vera Cohn wrote the body of the report. Paul Taylor, senior vice president of the Pew Research Center, provided editorial guidance. Mark Hugo Lopez, senior researcher and associate director of the Pew Hispanic Center, managed the report’s data analysis and wrote the report’s methodology appendix. Catherine A. Gallagher, director of the Cochrane Collaboration of the College for Policy at George Mason University, provided guidance on the report’s data analysis and comments on earlier drafts of the report. Lopez and Kim Parker, associate director of the Center’s Social & Demographic Trends project, managed the report’s development and production. Kevin T. Maass, research associate at the Cochrane Collaboration at George Mason University’s College for Policy, provided analysis of the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports. Research Assistants Eileen Patten and Anna Brown number-checked the report and prepared charts and tables. Patten also conducted background research on trends in crime internationally. The report was copy-edited by Marcia Kramer of Kramer Editing Services.The report also benefited from a review by Professor Richard Felson of Pennsylvania State University. The authors also thank Andrew Kohut and Scott Keeter for their comments on an earlier draft of the report. In addition, the authors thank Kohut, Michael Dimock, Keeter and Alec Tyson, our colleagues at the Pew Research Center, for guidance on the crime knowledge public opinion survey questionnaire. Jeffrey Passel, senior demographer at the Pew Research Center, provided computational assistance for the report’s analysis of homicide rates by race and ethnicity.Finally, Michael Planty and Jennifer Truman of the Bureau of Justice Statistics at the U.S. Department of Justice provided data, invaluable guidance and advice on the report’s analysis of the National Crime Victimization Survey.See Cooper and Smith, 2011. The rate declined through at least 2010. ↩
A USA Today analysis in 2013 found that 934 people died since 2006 in mass shootings, defined as claiming at least four victims, and that most were killed by people they knew: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/02/21/mass-shootings-domestic-violence-nra/1937041/
Much of this section draws from Blumstein and Rosenfeld, 2008. ↩
The diversity of homicide trend by city was the topic of a recent forum, “Putting Homicide Rates in Their Place,” sponsored by the Urban Institute. ↩
There were 11,101 gun homicide deaths in 2011 and the gun homicide rate remained 3.6 per 100,000 people, according to preliminary CDC data. ↩

The Problem Isn’t Guns or White Men
The ticking time bombs that the Left lets loose among us
Ann Coulter
Front Page magazine
October 8, 2015

The media act as if they’re performing a public service by refusing to release details about the perpetrator of the recent mass shooting at a community college in Oregon. But we were given plenty of information about Dylan Roof, Adam Lanza, James Holmes and Jared Loughner.

Now, quick: Name the mass shooters at the Chattanooga military recruitment center; the Washington Navy Yard; the high school in Washington state; Fort Hood (the second time) and the Christian college in California. All those shootings also occurred during the last three years.

The answers are: Mohammad Youssuf Abdulazeez, Kuwaiti; Aaron Alexis, black, possibly Barbadian-American; Jaylen Ray Fryberg, Indian; Ivan Antonio Lopez, Hispanic; and One L. Goh, Korean immigrant. (While I’m here: Why are we bringing in immigrants who are mentally unstable?)

There’s a rigid formula in media accounts of mass shootings: If possible, blame it on angry white men; when that won’t work, blame it on guns.

The perpetrator of the latest massacre, Chris Harper-Mercer, was a half-black immigrant, so the media are refusing to get too specific about him. They don’t want to reward the fiend with publicity!

But as people hear details the media are not anxious to provide, they realize that, once again: It’s a crazy person. How long is this going to go on?

When will the public rise up and demand that the therapeutic community stop loosing these nuts on the public? After the fact, scores of psychiatrists are always lining up to testify that the defendant was legally insane, unable to control his actions. That information would be a lot more helpful before the wanton slaughter.

Product manufacturers are required by law to anticipate that some idiot might try to dry his cat in the microwave. But a person whose job it is to evaluate mental illness can’t be required to ascertain whether the person sitting in his office might be unstable enough to kill?

Maybe at their next convention, psychiatrists could take up a resolution demanding an end to our absurd patient privacy and involuntary commitment laws.

True, America has more privately owned guns than most other countries, and mass shootings are, by definition, committed with guns. But we also make it a lot more difficult than any other country to involuntarily commit crazy people.

Since the deinstitutionalization movement of the 1960s, civil commitment in the United States almost always requires a finding of dangerousness — both imminent and physical — as determined by a judge. Most of the rest of the world has more reasonable standards — you might almost call them « common sense » — allowing family, friends and even acquaintances to petition for involuntarily commitment, with the final decision made by doctors.

The result of our laissez-faire approach to dangerous psychotics is visible in the swarms of homeless people on our streets, crazy people in our prison populations and the prevalence of mass shootings.

According to a 2002 report by Central Institute of Mental Health for the European Union, the number of involuntarily detained mental patients, per 100,000 people, in other countries looks like this:

— Austria, 175

— Finland, 218

— Germany, 175

— Sweden, 114

— England, 93

The absolute maximum number of mental patients per 100,000 people who could possibly be institutionalized by the state in the U.S. — voluntarily or involuntarily — is: 17. Yes, according to the Treatment Advocacy Center, there are a grand total of 17 psychiatric beds even available, not necessarily being used. In 1955, there were 340.

After every mass shooting, the left has a lot of fun forcing Republicans to defend guns. Here’s an idea: Why not force Democrats to defend the right of the dangerous mentally ill not to take their medicine?

Liberals will howl about « stigmatizing » the mentally ill, but they sure don’t mind stigmatizing white men or gun owners. About a third of the population consists of white men. Between a third and half of all Americans have guns in the home. If either white men or guns were the main cause of mass murder, no one would be left in the country.

But I notice that every mass murder is committed by someone who is mentally ill. When the common denominator is a characteristic found in about 0.1 percent of the population — I think we’ve found the crucial ingredient!

Democrats won’t be able to help themselves, but to instantly close ranks and defend dangerous psychotics, hauling out the usual meaningless statistics:

— Most mentally ill are not violent!

Undoubtedly true. BUT WE’RE NOT TALKING ABOUT ANOREXICS, AGORAPHOBICS OR OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVES. We were thinking of paranoid schizophrenics.

— The mentally ill are more likely to be victims than perpetrators of violence!

I’ll wager that the percentage of the nation’s 310 million guns that are ever used in a crime is quite a bit lower than the percentage of mentally ill to ever engage in violence.

As with the « most Muslims are peaceful » canard, while a tiny percentage of mentally ill are violent, a gigantic percentage of mass shooters are mentally ill.

How can these heartless Democrats look the parents of dead children in the eye and defend the right of the mentally deranged to store their feces in a shoebox, menace library patrons — and, every now and then, commit mass murder?

Voir de plus:

The Reasons for the Decline in Support for Gun Control

The gun debate in the United States has changed a lot over the last 20 years. Support for gun control has declined sharply as support for gun rights has risen, as we noted earlier this week. Those trends are evident in data from a range of sources including Gallup and the Pew Research Center.
A complicated mix of emotions, attitudes and perceptions go into how people feel about guns, but when you look at the data, two points help explain the drop in support for gun control. Over the same period of time the violent crime rate has also dropped sharply. And the partisan divides that have come to define U.S. politics have pushed into the gun control debate.
The decline in violent crime over the past 25 years has been remarkable. In 1990, there were 729 violent crimes reported for every 100,000 people in the United States, according to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Statistics. The number got as high as 757 in 1992 – and then it began to fall steadily over the next 20 years.
By 2012, the figure was down to 386 violent crimes per 100,000 people.

Caldwell, Leigh (206448258) / NBC News

(This trend is also true for the U.S. murder rate. In 1990, there were 9.4 murders for every 100,000 people, according to the Uniform Crime Statistics. In 2012, there were only 4.7 for every 100,000.)
These numbers aren’t meant to suggest that people’s attitudes about guns affected the violent crime rate, but it could be the other way around.
Despite the headlines about mass shootings, like last week’s in Oregon, in terms of people’s day-to-day lives and the stories in local media, violent crime is less of an issue today than it was in the United States in 1994. The numbers are still high when compared to other developed countries, but low compared to where the country used to be.
That may have played a role in peoples’ attitudes about gun control. The epidemic of violence that dominated news coverage in the late-1980s and early-1990s gave way to news stories about dropping crime rates and safer cities. That’s become the dominant crime story over the past two decades. It’s one thing see coverage of a senseless horrific shooting somewhere far away from you. It’s another thing to see crime scene tape a few blocks away and personally know victims.
The latest data suggest those declines may be starting to reverse themselves, particularly in big cities and if that rising trend continues, attitudes on gun control may shift.
But there is also a political factor in the gun debate that could be harder to change. As the nation has become more politically polarized and voters have retreated into their red and blue camps, the partisan differences on gun control have become much more pronounced.
Overall, support for gun control has indeed dropped, but Democrats and Republicans have moved in different directions.
In 1993, 47% of Republicans and 65% of Democrats supported gun control, according to Pew Research data. That’s an 18-point gap between members of the two parties, with Republicans sitting near 50%.
In 2015, only 26% of Republicans support gun control, in the Pew Research data. But the Democrats have moved in the other direction – 73% now favor gun control. That’s an enormous 47-point gap with the parties at opposite ends of the spectrum on the question.
In other words, the gun control issue has become deeply intertwined with political identity and as we see on other issues – from abortion to gay marriage – overcoming factors tied to political identity to find consensus can be extremely difficult.
Even if Democratic support for gun control grows and even if independents, who tend to hover around the middle, move back above 50% supporting, it’s unlikely the numbers will show support for it climbing in a significant way.

Voir de même:

Voir aussi:

U.S. Gun Policy: Global Comparisons

Jonathan Masters, Deputy Editor

Council on Foreign Relations
June 24, 2015

Introduction
The debate over gun control in the United States has waxed and waned over the years, stirred by a series of mass killings by gunmen in civilian settings. In particular, the killing of twenty schoolchildren in Newtown, Connecticut, in December 2012 fueled a national discussion over gun laws and calls by the Obama administration to limit the availability of military-style weapons. However, compromise legislation that would have banned semiautomatic assault weapons and expanded background checks was defeated in the Senate in 2013, despite extensive public support.

Gun control advocates sought to rekindle the debate following the shooting deaths of nine people at a South Carolina church in June 2015. These advocates highlight the stricter gun laws and lower incidents of gun violence in several other democracies, like Japan and Australia, but many others say this correlation proves little and note that rates of gun crime in the United States have plunged over the last two decades.

United States
The Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states: « A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. » Supreme Court rulings, citing this amendment, have upheld the right of states to regulate firearms. However, in a 2008 decision (District of Columbia v. Heller [PDF]) confirming an individual right to keep and bear arms, the court struck down Washington, DC, laws that banned handguns and required those in the home to be locked or disassembled.

A number of gun advocates consider ownership a birthright and an essential part of the nation’s heritage. The United States, with less than 5 percent of the world’s population, has about 35–50 percent of the world’s civilian-owned guns, according to a 2007 report by the Switzerland-based Small Arms Survey. It ranks number one in firearms per capita. The United States also has the highest homicide-by-firearm rate among the world’s most developed nations.

But many gun rights proponents say these statistics do not indicate a cause-and-effect relationship and note that the rates of gun homicide and other gun crimes in the United States have dropped since highs in the early 1990s.

Federal law sets the minimum standards for firearm regulation in the United States, but individual states have their own laws, some of which provide further restrictions, others which are more lenient. Some states, including Idaho, Alaska, and Kansas, have passed laws designed to circumvent federal policies, but the Constitution (Article VI, Paragraph 2) establishes the supremacy of federal law.

The Gun Control Act of 1968 prohibited the sale of firearms to several categories of individuals, including persons under eighteen years of age, those with criminal records, the mentally disabled, unlawful aliens, dishonorably discharged military personnel, and others. In 1993, the law was amended by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, which mandated background checks for all unlicensed persons purchasing a firearm from a federally licensed dealer.

However, critics maintain that a so-called « gun show loophole, » codified in the Firearm Owners Protection Act of 1986, effectively allows anyone, including convicted felons, to purchase firearms without a background check.

As of 2015, there were no federal laws banning semiautomatic assault weapons, military-style .50 caliber rifles, handguns, or large-capacity ammunition magazines, which can increase the potential lethality of a given firearm. There was a federal prohibition on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines between 1994 and 2004, but Congress allowed these restrictions to expire.

The United States, with less than 5 percent of the world’s population, has about 35–50 percent of the world’s civilian-owned guns, according to a 2007 report by the Switzerland-based Small Arms Survey.

Canada
Many analysts characterize Canada’s gun laws as strict in comparison to the United States, while others say recent developments have eroded safeguards. Ottawa, like Washington, sets federal gun restrictions that the provinces, territories, and municipalities can supplement. Federal regulations require all gun owners, who must be at least eighteen years of age, to obtain a license that includes a background check and a public safety course.

There are three classes of weapons: nonrestricted (e.g., ordinary rifles and shotguns), restricted (e.g., handguns, semiautomatic rifles/shotguns, and sawed-offs), and prohibited (e.g., automatics). A person wishing to acquire a restricted firearm must obtain a federal registration certificate, according to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Modern Canadian gun laws have been driven by prior gun violence. In December 1989, a disgruntled student walked into a Montreal engineering school with a semiautomatic rifle and killed fourteen students and injured over a dozen others. The incident is widely credited with driving subsequent gun legislation, including the 1995 Firearms Act, which required owner licensing and the registration of all long guns (i.e., rifles and shotguns) while banning more than half of all registered guns. However, in 2012, the government abandoned the long-gun registry, citing cost concerns.

Australia
The inflection point for modern gun control in Australia was the Port Arthur massacre of April 1996, when a young man killed thirty-five people and wounded twenty-three others. The rampage, perpetrated with a semiautomatic rifle, was the worst mass shooting in the nation’s history. Less than two weeks later, the conservative-led national government pushed through fundamental changes to the country’s gun laws in cooperation with the various states, which regulate firearms.

The National Agreement on Firearms all but prohibited automatic and semiautomatic assault rifles, stiffened licensing and ownership rules, and instituted a temporary gun buyback program that took some 650,000 assault weapons (about one-sixth of the national stock) out of public circulation. Among other things, the law also required licensees to demonstrate a « genuine need » for a particular type of gun and take a firearm safety course. After another high-profile shooting in Melbourne in 2002, Australia’s handgun laws were tightened as well.

Many analysts say these measures have been highly effective, citing declining gun-death rates, and the fact that there have been no gun-related mass killings in Australia since 1996. Many also suggest the policy response in the wake of Port Arthur could serve as a model for the United States.
Israel
Military service is compulsory in Israel and guns are very much a part of everyday life. By law, most eighteen-year-olds are drafted, psychologically screened, and receive at least some weapons training after high school. After serving typically two or three years in the armed forces, however, most Israelis are discharged and must abide by civilian gun laws.

The country has relatively strict gun regulations, including an assault-weapons ban and a requirement to register ownership with the government. To become licensed, an applicant must be an Israeli citizen or a permanent resident, be at least twenty-one-years-old, and speak at least some Hebrew, among other qualifications. Notably, a person must also show genuine cause to carry a firearm, such as self-defense or hunting.

However, some critics question the efficacy of these measures. « It doesn’t take much of an expert to realize that these restrictions, in and of themselves, do not constitute much by the way of gun control, » writes Liel Leibovitz for the Jewish magazine Tablet. He notes the relative ease with which someone can justify owning a gun, including residing in an Israeli settlement, employment as a security guard, or working with valuables or large sums of money. Furthermore, he explains that almost the entire population has indirect access to an assault weapon by either being a soldier or a reservist or a relative of one. Israel’s relatively low gun-related homicide rate is a product of the country’s unique « gun culture, » he says.
United Kingdom

Modern gun control efforts in the United Kingdom have been precipitated by extraordinary acts of violence that sparked public outrage and, eventually, political action. In August 1987, a lone gunman armed with two legally owned semiautomatic rifles and a handgun went on a six-hour shooting spree roughly seventy miles west of London, killing sixteen people and then himself. In the wake of the incident, known as the Hungerford massacre, Britain introduced the Firearms (Amendment) Act, which expanded the list of banned weapons, including certain semiautomatic rifles, and increased registration requirements for other weapons.

A gun-related tragedy in the Scottish town of Dunblane, in 1996, prompted Britain’s strictest gun laws yet. In March of that year, a middle-aged man armed with four legally purchased handguns shot and killed sixteen young schoolchildren and one adult before committing suicide in the country’s worst mass shooting to date. The incident sparked a public campaign known as the Snowdrop Petition, which helped drive legislation banning handguns, with few exceptions. The government also instituted a temporary gun buyback program, which many credit with taking tens of thousands of illegal or unwanted guns out of supply.

However, the effectiveness of Britain’s gun laws in gun-crime reduction over the last twenty-five years has stirred ongoing debate. Analysts note that the number of such crimes grew heavily in the late 1990s and peaked in 2004 before falling with each subsequent year. « While tighter gun control removes risk on an incremental basis, » said Peter Squires, a Brighton University criminologist, in an interview with CNN, « significant numbers of weapons remain in Britain. »
Norway
Gun control had rarely been much of a political issue in Norway—where gun laws are viewed as tough, but ownership rates are high—until right-wing extremist Anders Behring Breivik killed seventy-seven people in an attack on an island summer camp in July 2011. Though Norway ranked tenth worldwide in gun ownership, according to the Small Arms Survey, it placed near the bottom in gun-homicide rates. (The U.S. rate is roughly sixty-four times higher.) Most Norwegian police, much like the British, do not carry firearms.

In the wake of the tragedy, some analysts in the United States cited Breivik’s rampage as proof that strict gun laws—which in Norway include requiring applicants to be at least eighteen years of age, specify a « valid reason » for gun ownership, and obtain a government license—are ineffective. « Those who are willing to break the laws against murder do not care about the regulation of firearms, and will get a hold of weapons whether doing so is legal or not, » wrote Charles C. W. Cooke in National Review. Other gun-control critics have argued that had other Norwegians, including the police, been armed, Breivik might have been stopped earlier and killed fewer victims. An independent commission after the massacre recommended tightening Norway’s gun restrictions in a number of ways, including prohibiting pistols and semiautomatic weapons.

Japan
Gun-control advocates regularly cite Japan’s highly restrictive firearm regulations in tandem with its extraordinarily low gun-homicide rate, which is the lowest in the world at one in ten million, according to the latest data available. Most guns are illegal in the country and ownership rates, which are quite small, reflect this.

Under Japan’s firearm and sword law [PDF], the only guns permitted are shotguns, air guns, guns that have research or industrial purposes, or those used for competitions. However, before access to these specialty weapons is granted, one must obtain formal instruction and pass a battery of written, mental, and drug tests and a rigorous background check. Furthermore, owners must inform the authorities of how the weapon and ammunition is stored and provide the firearm for annual inspection.

Some analysts link Japan’s aversion to firearms with its demilitarization in the aftermath of World War II. Others say that because the overall crime rate in the country is so low, most Japanese see no need for firearms.

Voir par ailleurs:

Volkswagen, ce coupable qui en cache un autre
Contrepoints

25 septembre 2015

C’est à un tsunami de surprise feinte que nous avons eu droit la semaine passée : oh, vertuchou, Volkswagen a bricolé les logiciels embarqués dans ses voitures pour obtenir des résultats brillants aux tests anti-pollution aux États-Unis ! Le constructeur a menti, et il a même reconnu l’avoir fait ! Oh ! La pseudo-consternation a atteint rapidement la bourse, où l’action du constructeur a dévissé, et s’étend maintenant sur le marché européen, en touchant rapidement tous les autres constructeurs. Quel monde, mes amis, quel monde !

Ceci posé, revenons un peu sur Terre. Et si je parle de surprise feinte, c’est bien parce que les petites bidouilles des constructeurs pour faire passer leurs engins pour plus propres qu’ils ne le sont étaient connues de pas mal de monde. L’État, déjà, qui a savamment construit les normes, main dans la main avec les fabricants eux-mêmes, et qui devait bien se douter qu’il y aurait le cas des tests bâtis pour permettre aux modèles de remporter de bonnes notes, et les conditions réelles, franchement éloignées. Les automobilistes ensuite, dont l’écrasante majorité a pu constater l’écart entre la consommation affichée publicitairement, et qu’on ne peut obtenir que dans des conditions de roulage qui frôle la crédibilité par le mauvais côté de la tangente. Les associations écolo enfin, qui, toutes largement subventionnées par l’État, ont su tourner les yeux ailleurs le temps qu’il fallait pour ne pas voir les petits soucis de certaines motorisations.

Avant d’aller plus loin, cela ne retire, évidemment, absolument rien à la faute initiale de Volkswagen dans le cas qui nous occupe. Comme le précise avec raison Vincent Bénard dans son dernier article à ce sujet, le constructeur allemand a bel et bien fraudé, en masquant (de façon logicielle, donc) une production de gaz polluants (des oxydes d’azote, dans ce cas-là) bien au-dessus des normes admises en condition de conduite normale. Il mérite donc ce qui lui arrive actuellement.

Maintenant, ce constat ne permet pas d’éviter de rappeler quelques évidences bien trop vite oubliées tant par la plupart des journalistes que, surtout, par ces politiciens qui commentent l’actualité du haut de leur morale irréprochable et de leur parcours dans leur domaine généralement exempt de toute fraude.

On pourra ainsi pouffer en lisant la demande péremptoire et assez gonflée de « totale transparence » de la part de la ministre de l’Écologie, par exemple. C’est bien joli de réclamer la transparence, mais il faudrait aussi pousser les explications techniques un tantinet pour bien faire comprendre exactement l’enjeu, du côté des constructeurs, de respecter des normes anti-CO2 toujours plus drastiques.

En effet, et n’importe quel chimiste pourra le confirmer, l’apparition des oxydes d’azote (NOx) en combustion signifie que le carburant a été brûlé à des températures et des pressions élevées, qui certes contribuent à une diminution de la production de CO2, mais favorisent aussi l’augmentation de la production des NOx. Pour les constructeurs, chaque effort fait pour baisser la quantité de dioxyde de carbone aura donc tendance à augmenter la production des NOx. Cette augmentation est en partie absorbée par des systèmes de catalyse en sortie (notamment à base d’urée), mais on comprend qu’il est très complexe, chimiquement parlant, d’avoir à la fois une baisse constante des émissions d’un gaz qui, rappelons-le, n’est absolument pas nocif comme le CO2, et dans le même temps, une diminution des NOx (qui eux, sont effectivement nocifs pour la santé).

À ce point, on comprend que la course à l’homologation étatique des moteurs provoque le renchérissement des mécaniques vendues (avec l’introduction de systèmes progressivement de plus en plus complexes), ou, moins honnêtement, l’apparition de trucs et astuces pour réussir les conditions, bien calibrées, de tests connus à l’avance. Si la dernière option est clairement punissable, la première laisse songeur quant au bilan de l’action de l’État dans le domaine automobile.

On pourrait évoquer, par exemple, l’apparition de voitures électriques badigeonnées de massives subventions qui, si elles permettent à certains de frimer dans des Tesla agréables à regarder, n’ont toujours pas permis de régler les problèmes d’autonomie (et loin s’en faut), de recharges (longues et épuisantes pour le réseau électrique) ou de recyclage en fin de vie. D’autant que l’État qui subventionne les lubies électriques, c’est d’autant moins pour d’autres technologies, parfois prometteuses mais enterrées.

On pourrait rappeler que le développement en fanfare du diesel sur le sol européen ne doit à peu près rien au hasard et tout à la patte de l’État qui a sciemment encouragé son ascension par des taxations de plus en plus vexatoires sur l’essence. Ici, l’État stratège a bien frappé, et frappe encore : croyant soutenir une industrie automobile en concurrence avec le reste du monde en tabassant l’essence, l’État a introduit un biais énorme en faveur du diesel qui s’est effectivement révélé lucratif pour les constructeurs français… Jusqu’au moment où l’écart fiscal est devenu palpable (la Cour des Comptes évalue le – fameux – manque à gagner à 8 milliard d’euros) et où l’on s’est rendu compte que le diesel était particulièrement médiocre pour l’atmosphère.

On pourrait se rappeler qu’ensuite, l’écologie entrant dans les mœurs et la politique, les normes antipollution se sont mises à pulluler. L’État, toujours aussi stratège, s’est retrouvé avec d’un côté un diesel favorisé et de l’autre une atmosphère à dépolluer, à coup de normes de plus en plus drastiques, et des tests d’homologation idoines (et négociés avec les constructeurs). Là encore, on a du mal à oublier complètement la part de responsabilité de l’État. On pourrait en effet se rappeler qu’il n’y a pas de lobbying sans des individus, des administrations, des élus à « lobbyiser » surtout lorsqu’ils ont un grand pouvoir sur l’avenir d’une filière.

On pourrait enfin se rappeler que c’est encore l’État, au travers de la loi DMCA (protection des droits d’auteurs) qui a directement empêché que la tricherie soit révélée plus tôt : eh oui, selon cette loi, les constructeurs automobiles affirment qu’il est illégal pour des chercheurs indépendants de vérifier le code du logiciel contrôlant les véhicules, et ceci sans l’autorisation du fabricant, et cette interdiction a permis à Volkswagen de conserver ses manipulations à l’abri pendant des années.

L’État qui édicte des normes, l’État qui édicte des interdits, l’État qui pousse certaines motorisations au détriment d’autres … Volkswagen est évidemment coupable (et il l’a reconnu), mais oublier l’État n’est pas oublier un détail de la pièce qui s’est jouée, c’est oublier le décor, la musique et le metteur en scène.

Alors, quand, sur tout ce bazar déjà bien glauque, on apprend que l’État envisagerait de redresser les torts causés avec … une bonne grosse interdiction des diesels d’ici 2025 (parce que ça marche, ces trucs là, qu’on vous dit : c’est efficace et ça n’apporte jamais d’intéressants effets de bords), on sait que là, on tient la solution, c’est évident ! Bingo !

Toute cette affaire pue. Elle pue le capitalisme de connivence. Elle pue le lobbyisme débridé. Elle pue les petits arrangements, les compromis douteux, les arrangements entre copains et coquins. Elle pue de l’odeur âcre d’un diesel mal brûlé, elle pue d’une écologie politisée à mort et utilisée à des fins protectionnistes (ici, des USA contre l’Europe, jusqu’au prochain retour de bâton), elle pue l’interventionnisme de l’État à tous les niveaux.

Volkswagen paiera, cher, sa fraude, et c’est tant mieux. Mais cette affaire montre de façon éclatante l’incohérence des pouvoirs publics, tiraillés entre leurs lubies, leurs compromissions et les petits intérêts bien compris de ceux qui les dirigent. Tout ceci démontre encore une fois que la régulation étatique ne marche pas. Ceci montre à quel point on est éloigné d’un marché libre où les fraudeurs n’auraient jamais eu la possibilité de faire durer leurs manigances aussi longtemps, où l’État n’aurait jamais pu imposer des normes débiles et des tests ridicules, où le consommateur aurait pu se faire flouer sans rien pouvoir dire.

L’État stratège, quelle bouffonnerie !

Voir enfin:

UN Report 2014

Some 437,000 people murdered worldwide in 2012, according to new UNODC study.
Men made up almost 8 out of every 10 homicide victims, women accounted for vast majority of domestic violence fatalities
10 April 2014 – (London/Vienna)
– Almost half a million people (437,000) across the world lost their lives in 2012 as a result of intentional homicide, according to a new study by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).
Launching the Global Study on Homicide 2013 in London today, Jean-Luc Lemahieu, Director for Policy Analysis and Public Affairs, said: “Too many lives are being tragically cut short, too many families and communities left shattered. There is an urgent need to understand how violent crime is plaguing countries around the world, particularly affecting young men but also taking a heavy toll on women.”
Globally, some 80 per cent of homicide victims and 95 per cent of perpetrators are men. Almost 15 per cent of all homicides stem from domestic violence (63,600). However, the overwhelming majority – almost 70 per cent – of domestic violence fatalities are women (43,600). “Home can be the most dangerous place for a woman,” said Mr. Lemahieu. “It is particularly heart-breaking when those who should be protecting their loved ones are the very people responsible for their murder.”Over half of all homicide victims are under 30 years of age, with children under the age of 15 accounting for just over 8 per cent of all homicides (36,000), the Study highlighted.
The regional picture
Almost 750 million people live in countries with the highest homicide rates in the world – namely the Americas and Africa –
meaning that almost half of a
ll homicide occurs in countries
that are home to just 11
per cent of the earth’s
population. At the opposite end of the spectrum, 3
billion people – mainly in Europe, Asia and Oceania- live in countries where homicide rates are
relatively low.
The global average murder rate stands at
6.2 per 100,000 population, but Southern Africa and
Central America recorded more than four
times that number (30 and 26 victims per 100,000
population respectively), the highest in the world. Meanwhile, with rates some five times lower
than the global average, East Asia, Southern
Europe and Western Europe recorded the lowest
homicide levels in 2012. Worryingl
y, homicide levels in North Af
rica, East Africa and parts of
South Asia are rising amid social
and political instability. In an
encouraging trend,
South Africa,
which has consistently high rates of homicide
, saw the homicide rate
halve from 64.5 per 100,000
in 1995 to 31.0 per 100,000 in 2012.
Homicides linked to gangs and organized crim
inal groups accounted for 30 per cent of all
homicides in the Americas compared to below
1 per cent in Asia, Europe and Oceania. While
surges in homicide are often linked to this type
of violence, the Americas saw homicide levels
five to eight times higher than Eu
rope and Asia since the 1950s.
2
The gender bias
Globally, the male homicide rate
is almost four times higher than for females (9.7 versus 2.7 per
100,000) and is highest in the Americas (29.3 pe
r 100,000 males), where it is almost seven times
higher than in Asia, Europe and Oceania (a
ll under 4.5 per 100,000 males). In particular, the
homicide rate for male victims aged 15-29 in S
outh and Central America is over four times the
global average rate for that age
group. More than 1 in 7 of a
ll homicide victims globally is a
young male aged 15-29 in the Americas.
While men are mostly killed by someone they ma
y not even know, almost half of all female
victims are killed by those closest to them. In As
ia, Europe and Oceania the share of victims from
domestic violence is particularly important. In a
ll these regions, the majority of female homicide
victims are killed at the hands of their intimat
e partners/family members (in Asia and Europe, 55
per cent, and in Oceania, 73 per cent). For example, in Asia, 19,700 women were killed by their
intimate partners or family members in 2012. When
only looking at intimat
e partner violence, the
overwhelming majority of homicide victim
s are women (79 per cent in Europe).
The causes of homicide
The consumption of alcohol and/or
illicit drugs increases the risk
of perpetrating homicide. In
some countries, over half of homicide offenders
acted under the influence of alcohol. Although
the effects of illicit drugs are less well docum
ented, cocaine and amphetamine-type stimulants
have been associated with vi
olent behaviour and homicide.
Firearms are the most widely used murder w
eapons, causing 4 in 10 homicides globally, whereas
about a quarter of victims are ki
lled with blades and sharp object
s and just over a third die though
other means (such as strangulation, poisoning etc.).
The use of firearms is particularly prevalent
in the Americas, where two thirds of homicide
s are committed with guns, while sharp objects are
used more frequently in Oceania and Europe.
Post-conflict societies awash in arms and gra
ppling with weak rule of law and impunity are
conducive to organized crime and interpersonal vi
olence. Haiti, for example, saw homicide rates
double from 5.1 in 2007 to 10.2 per 100,000 in 2012.
In South Sudan, the homicide rate in 2013
was, at over 60 per 100,000 people, among the highest
in the world. In contrast, in Sierra Leone
and Liberia, where reconciliation processes and anti
-crime strategies are taking root, security is
gradually improving.
Conviction rates
The global conviction rate for intentional hom
icide is of 43 convictions per 100 homicides.
However, disparities exist across regions, with a
conviction rate of 24 per cent in the Americas,
48 per cent in Asia and 81 per cent in Europe.
For more information please contact:
In Vienna: Preeta Bannerjee, Public
Information Officer, Phone: +43 699 1459 5764
Email:
preeta.bannerjee [at] unodc.org
For media interviews in London: Karen Davies
, Communications Officer for the UK and Ireland
United Nations Regional Information Centre (UNRIC),
Mobile: +32 473 26 22 55
Email:
davies [at] unric.org

Corée du nord: Pourquoi vous ne connaissez pas la Division 39 (As China-supported North Korean butcher and starver of his own people puts on his yearly show for the West’s complicit media, who bothers to investigate the world’s largest state criminal organization ?)

10 octobre, 2015
office38KimLe jour où la Corée du nord s’effondrera, on découvrira un des univers concentrationnaires les plus impitoyables de l’histoire, avec des survivants dont les récits feront honte au monde libre. Et l’on s’interrogera alors sur les raisons pour lesquelles les informations n’ont pas conduit à rompre les relations diplomatiques et à demander des comptes à Pyong Yang. Thérèse Delpech
En dépit de l’impitoyable dictature qui y règne, la Corée du Nord est souvent traitée dans les pages buzz des sites web, et non dans les pages International. Le pays rentre dans ce champ indifférenciant qu’est l’info buzz, où des lamas dans le tramway de Bordeaux ou dans les rues de Phoenix et des controverses sur des robes bleues ou blanches côtoient des exécutions sommaires d’opposants politiques, le tout dans un grand rire général. Le spécialiste de la Corée du Nord, c’est Buzzfeed et pas Le Monde Diplomatique. L’exemple le plus frappant se trouve sur le très respectable Monde.fr. Big Browser, le blog consacré aux contenus viraux, et seul lieu du site pouvant héberger une polémique sur la couleur d’une robe, s’est fait une spécialité des sujets sur la Corée du Nord. Big Browser a publié pas moins d’une cinquantaine d’articles sur la Corée du Nord, traité le plus souvent avec une légèreté inhabituelle pour le quotidien du soir: «Kim Jong-un vous manque, et tout est dépeuplé», «La guerre du sapin de Noël aura-t-elle lieu?», «Comment Björn Borg a fait bombarder Pyongyang de caleçons roses». Même les sujets sur la famine y sont traités sous un angle «insolite». Contacté par mail, Vincent Fagot, rédacteur en chef du Monde.fr, tient à rappeler que la Corée du Nord est davantage traitée par Le Monde en rubrique International. La particularité de l’info buzz — qui explique le traitement réservé à la Corée du Nord — est qu’elle circule le plus souvent sur le mode du bouche-à-oreille, avec des critères de vérification très limités et un contenu altéré au fil des reprises et des traductions. Ce type de format journalistique ne cherche pas à dire le vrai. La vérité de l’info buzz est celle qu’on veut bien entendre. C’est une info qui se conforme à nos attentes, qui confirme nos fantasmes et nos bonnes blagues. Les articles sur la Corée du Nord ne nous disent pas «Le monde est dangereux» comme souvent les articles des pages International, mais plutôt «Le monde est fou». La Corée du Nord est une dictature acidulée, où s’épanouissent un dictateur à la coupe de hipster et de charmantes licornes. Chaque nouvel article doit nous renforcer dans cette vision du «royaume de l’absurde». (…) L’info buzz jubile de ce moment où la réalité dépasse la fiction, où une news sur Kim Jong-un devient plus drôle que The Interview, le film de Seth Rogen sur la Corée du Nord, où LeMonde.fr peut rivaliser avec le Gorafi. La Corée du Nord est reléguée au rayon buzz car les images qui nous arrivent du pays, via la propagande nord-coréenne, sont celle d’un grand Disneyland, un décor de carton-pâte dans lequel évolue le poupin Kim Jong-un. C’est une leçon pour les communicants de toute la planète: pour que les médias reprennent un message, il suffit de les penser comme une scène de mauvais téléfilm, organisé autour d’une figure reconnue de la culture pop, comme l’est Kim-Jong-un. Il faut être le moins crédible, le plus proche de la fiction, pour que l’info buzz s’en empare. Vincent Glad
Located in a heavily guarded concrete building in downtown Pyongyang, Bureau No. 39 is the nerve center of North Korea’s state-run network of international crime. Its official name is Central Committee Bureau 39 of the Korean Workers’ Party. The authors refer to it by what Bechtol says is the more accurately nuanced translation of “Office No. 39.” The mission of Office No. 39 is to generate torrents of cash for North Korean ruler Kim Jong Il, by way of illicit activities abroad. Favorite rackets include international trafficking of drugs produced under state supervision in North Korea, and state production and laundering into world markets of counterfeit U.S. currency, and cigarettes. Such activities are tied directly to the survival of Kim’s regime. The authors report “the crimes organized by Office No. 39 are committed beyond the borders of North Korea by the regime itself, not solely for the personal enrichment of the leadership, but to prop up its armed forces and to fund its military programs.” What sets Office No. 39 apart from more pedestrian political corruption or organized crime is that this operation is not some wayward private gang or unauthorized appendage of government. It is an integral and institutionalized part of the North Korean regime. As such, it enjoys the perquisites and protective trappings of the modern nation-state, including the use of North Korean embassies and state-run businesses abroad, and the reluctance of other nations to intervene in the sovereign affairs of North Korea. Office No. 39 is directly tied to Kim himself, who set it up way back in 1974, when his father, Kim Il Sung, was still in power. The authors explain: “This office was established for the explicit purpose of running illegal activities to generate currency for the North Korean government.” Since the 1991 Soviet collapse, which ended subsidies from Moscow, Office No. 39 has become ever more important, and especially over the past 10 years, its activities have become more prolific. Office No. 39 continues to report directly to Kim, who took charge of the regime when his father died in 1994. According to a North Korean defector interviewed by the authors, Kim Kwang-Jin, who has firsthand knowledge of North Korean financial practices, Office No. 39 is also known to North Korean insiders as “the keeper of Kim’s cashbox.” Organized into 10 departments, specializing in various illicit activities, Office No. 39 serves as a slush fund through which billions of dollars have flowed over the years. In a bizarre personal touch, these funds are collected and presented periodically to Kim in aggregate amounts, labeled “revolutionary funds,” on such special occasions as his official birthday, Feb. 12, or the birthday of his late father, Kim Il Sung, April 15th. This money is not spent on easing the miseries of millions of repressed and famished North Koreans. That effort–from which Kim also has a record of appropriating resources to sustain his regime–is left to the likes of international donors, contributing via outfits such as the United Nations. The authors explain that the profits of Bureau 39 help swell the offshore bank accounts of Kim’s regime, used not only to pay for his luxurious lifestyle, but to buy the loyalties and materials that underpin his totalitarian, nuclear-entwined military state … Claudia Rosett
En dépit de leur rhétorique sur le besoin pressant de développer un arsenal nucléaire, la plus grande priorité des dirigeants nord-coréens est de faire entrer des devises étrangères. Sans elles, estiment les experts, le régime risquerait de s’effondrer sous le poids des sanctions internationales. Les courses de taxis ne peuvent bien entendu à elles seules combler cette lacune. Mais les taxis KKG ne sont que l’arbre qui cache la forêt. La flotte de taxis de KKG est l’un des produits issus d’un partenariat entre un groupe d’investisseurs basés à Hong Kong et une antenne occulte de l’Etat nord-coréen qui, comme le montre notre enquête, a pour vocation première de négocier des contrats à l’international. L’alliance de Pyongyang avec le groupe Queensway [basé à Hong Kong], un groupement d’hommes d’affaires connus pour avoir des liens avec des régimes parias, est opaque. Mais il semble évident que cette alliance permet au régime le plus isolé du monde de garder la tête hors de l’eau. (…) “La plupart des sociétés nord-coréennes sont sous le coup des sanctions des Etats-Unis, de l’UE ou des Nations unies. Elles changent régulièrement de raison sociale, tout comme leurs navires changent de pavillons. Mais la plupart appartiennent à des officiers supérieurs de l’armée ou au Parti du travail de Corée, au pouvoir. Comme elles sont inscrites sur la liste des sanctions, elles ont besoin d’une société étrangère susceptible de les aider à commercer avec des pays étrangers.” (…) Selon plusieurs hauts responsables asiatiques et américains, la branche nord-coréenne du réseau KKG conduit à une organisation clandestine nommée la Division 39 du Parti du travail. Les Etats-Unis qualifient la Division 39 de “branche clandestine du gouvernement (…) qui assure un soutien essentiel au pouvoir nord-coréen, en partie en menant des activités économiques illicites et en gérant des caisses noires, et en générant des revenus pour les instances dirigeantes.” Les dirigeants nord-coréens ont dû recourir à cette stratégie après des années de sanctions internationales. Imposées en réaction aux essais nucléaires de 2006, 2009 et 2013 ces dernières prévoient notamment un embargo sur les armes visant à empêcher la Corée du Nord de se livrer au commerce de matériel militaire et de se procurer des pièces pour son programme atomique ; un gel des avoirs destiné à exercer une pression financière sur le pouvoir ; et un embargo sur l’exportation de produits de luxe, conçu pour priver les hauts dirigeants des attributs du pouvoir – des homards jusqu’aux cigarillos, en passant par les fourrures et les yachts. Les Nations unies ont fixé le cadre général des sanctions, les Etats décidant par eux-mêmes ce qu’ils interdisent. Les rapports annuels d’une commission onusienne qui surveille les sanctions parlent cependant d’un jeu du chat et de la souris, car les dirigeants nord-coréens usent d’une panoplie de subterfuges en constante évolution pour déguiser leurs activités commerciales à l’étranger. Le dernier rapport en date de l’ONU, remis au Conseil de sécurité en février, fait ainsi état de ventes d’armes en Afrique et de l’utilisation de “pavillons de complaisance” pour échapper aux contrôles sur le transport maritime nord-coréen. Il indique également que “des structures commerciales légales ont été utilisées pour des activités illégales”. (…) Au cours des dix dernières années, le groupe Queensway a bâti un empire commercial contrôlant un portefeuille de plusieurs milliards de dollars, dont les tentacules s’étirent du Zimbabwe jusqu’à Manhattan. La nature précise de l’association avec KKG n’est pas très claire – on ignore s’il s’agit d’une joint-venture officielle ou d’un arrangement plus informel. Les liens entre les financiers de KKG se sont noués vers 2006. Selon le récit du haut fonctionnaire asiatique – dont des détails ont été corroborés par d’autres témoignage –, la percée de Queensway en Corée du Nord a été initiée par le représentant du groupe qui a promu ses intérêts en Afrique et ailleurs. Il utilise au moins sept identités différentes, la plus connue étant Sam Pa. L’année dernière, une enquête du Financial Times a établi que M. Pa et les autres fondateurs du groupe Queensway entretenaient des liens étroits avec de puissants intérêts à Pékin, y compris le service de renseignements chinois et plusieurs entreprises d’Etat. Ils ont également des relations avec de grands groupes occidentaux : des sociétés du groupe Queensway sont en affaires avec BP [compagnie pétrolière britannique] en Angola, Gl encore [entreprise anglo-suisse de négoce et d’extraction de matières premières] en Guinée, et d’autres. (…) “Les taxis KKG peuvent rapporter au régime quelques devises, grâce aux touristes de passage à Pyongyang, mais tout indique que les véritables cibles du groupe Queensway sont les secteurs minier et pétrolier”, souligne le chercheur américain J. R. Mailey, l’un des auteurs d’un rapport de 2009 du Congrès américain qui a récemment publié une deuxième étude détaillée sur le groupe. Le think tank britannique Chatham House signalait dans un rapport datant de 2009 qu’une filiale chinoise de Queensway, avait proposé en 2007 une entreprise publique chinoise pour réaliser des explorations sismiques sur deux sites de prospection pétrolière en Corée du Nord. Financial Times

Attention: une désinformation peu en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où « l’un des univers concentrationnaires les plus impitoyables de l’histoire » dont l’effondrement, comme le rappelait Thérèse Delpech, fera un jour la honte d’un monde libre indifférent qui, via ses satellites et les abondants témoignages des transfuges, en connait pourtant tous les détails …

Fête ignomineusement, avec la Chine sans laquelle il  ne tiendrait pas une semaine,  70 ans d’oppression et de famine systématique de sa population …

Pendant qu’avec les 16 mois restants, à la tête du monde libre, de l’incroyable vacance du pouvoir introduite par l’Administration Obama …

Toutes sortes d’Etats voyous ou faillis, et leurs affidés, de l’Iran à la Russie et l’Etat islamique aux Palestiniens, mettent le Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang et menacent d’invasion l’Europe et le reste du monde …

Combien, parmi nos journalistes qui, tout en diffusant sans la moindre vérification « buzz » oblige les rumeurs les plus folles, accourent régulièrement dans ses hôtels cinq étoiles pour l’occasion …

Prennent la peine de rappeler la vérité d’un régime proprement criminel …

Et notamment de la tristement célèbre Division 39 ..

Cette véritable organisation criminelle qui entre vente d’armes, contrefaçon monétaire et trafic de drogue …

Permet au régime le plus isolé au monde, dans la plus grande opacité et avec le soutien de tout ce que la planète compte de pays et d’individus peu recommandables comme le rapportait cet été le Financial Times, de se raccorder à l’économie mondiale pour ses besoins en devises et marchandises ?

Mais aussi fournit à l’ensemble des autres régimes-voyous de la planète comme l’Iran non seulement les moyens de construire leurs armes de destruction massive …

Mais sert d’inspiration et de modèle pour tous dans l’art, pour se maintenir au pouvoir, de déjouer tant les sanctions que les aides d’un système international bien peu regardant ?

Enquête. Division 39 : la botte secrète de la Corée du Nord pour déjouer les sanctions
Tom Burgis (avec Tan-jun Kang à Séoul)

Financial Times
traduit par Courrier international
06/08/2015

A l’été dernier, les habitants de Pyongyang ont commencé à remarquer une nouvelle flotte de taxis dans la capitale nord-coréenne. Avec leur carrosserie brun et or, les rutilantes berlines ne passaient pas inaperçues dans les rues pratiquement désertes de la ville. Les voitures étaient estampillées du logo de la compagnie de taxi : KKG. La compagnie KKG a si rapidement évincé ses concurrents que l’on ne pouvait manquer de se demander qui se cachait derrière cette nouvelle entreprise. Le même logo a été repéré sur des 4×4, sur un panneau publicitaire vantant un projet résidentiel en bordure du fleuve et des autobus à l’aéroport de Pyongyang. Comme d’autres chauffeurs de taxi nord-coréens, ceux de KKG faisaient payer leurs courses en devises – essentiellement en renminbis chinois, mais aussi en euros ou en dollars. De quoi mettre la puce à l’oreille.

En dépit de leur rhétorique sur le besoin pressant de développer un arsenal nucléaire, la plus grande priorité des dirigeants nord-coréens est de faire entrer des devises étrangères. Sans elles, estiment les experts, le régime risquerait de s’effondrer sous le poids des sanctions internationales. Les courses de taxis ne peuvent bien entendu à elles seules combler cette lacune. Mais les taxis KKG ne sont que l’arbre qui cache la forêt. La flotte de taxis de KKG est l’un des produits issus d’un partenariat entre un groupe d’investisseurs basés à Hong Kong et une antenne occulte de l’Etat nord-coréen qui, comme le montre notre enquête, a pour vocation première de négocier des contrats à l’international.

Un royaume plus isolé que jamais

L’alliance de Pyongyang avec le groupe Queensway [basé à Hong Kong], un groupement d’hommes d’affaires connus pour avoir des liens avec des régimes parias, est opaque. Mais il semble évident que cette alliance permet au régime le plus isolé du monde de garder la tête hors de l’eau. “KKG est l’une des plus grandes joint-ventures établies en Corée du Nord”, confie un haut fonctionnaire asiatique qui, pour commenter cette affaire sensible, a souhaité conserver l’anonymat [ancienne colonie britannique, Hong Kong a conservé un système économique particulier : les sociétés étrangères qui y sont enregistrées ne versent pas de taxes, l’identité des actionnaires peut rester cachée, et les transferts de fonds avec l’étranger ne sont soumis à aucune restriction].

“La plupart des sociétés nord-coréennes sont sous le coup des sanctions des Etats-Unis, de l’UE ou des Nations unies. Elles changent régulièrement de raison sociale, tout comme leurs navires changent de pavillons. Mais la plupart appartiennent à des officiers supérieurs de l’armée ou au Parti du travail de Corée, au pouvoir. Comme elles sont inscrites sur la liste des sanctions, elles ont besoin d’une société étrangère susceptible de les aider à commercer avec des pays étrangers.”

A l’heure où les relations des puissances occidentales avec l’Iran et Cuba semblent se réchauffer, le royaume est politiquement plus isolé que jamais. Même la Chine, qui a longtemps été une alliée, prend depuis quelques années ses distances avec Pyongyang. L’année dernière, un rapport des Nations unies décrivait“d’innommables atrocités” perpétrées à l’encontre des détenus des camps de prisonniers nord-coréens. Les démonstrations de force orchestrées par le régime de Kim Jong-un – dont une cyber-attaque contre Sony que Washington a attribuée à Pyongyang, et le tir d’essai d’un missile balistique depuis un sous-marin [en mai dernier] – ont relancé les efforts visant à comprendre comment le régime parvient à se raccorder à l’économie internationale.

Selon des estimations du gouvernement de Séoul fondées sur des données limitées, ces dernières années, l’économie intérieure nord-coréenne aurait soit ralenti, soit enregistré une croissance de 1 %. Toujours est-il que le volume annuel d’exportations, d’environ 3 milliards de dollars, est loin de compenser la facture des importations. Avec la baisse du cours du charbon et d’autres matières premières que la République populaire démocratique de Corée (RPDC) exporte vers la Chine, les réseaux d’entreprises comme celui qui est derrière KKG risquent de devenir de plus en plus vitaux pour apporter au régime des devises indispensables au fonctionnement de l’économie.

Selon plusieurs hauts responsables asiatiques et américains, la branche nord-coréenne du réseau KKG conduit à une organisation clandestine nommée la Division 39 du Parti du travail. Les Etats-Unis qualifient la Division 39 de “branche clandestine du gouvernement (…) qui assure un soutien essentiel au pouvoir nord-coréen, en partie en menant des activités économiques illicites et en gérant des caisses noires, et en générant des revenus pour les instances dirigeantes.” Les dirigeants nord-coréens ont dû recourir à cette stratégie après des années de sanctions internationales. Imposées en réaction aux essais nucléaires de 2006, 2009 et 2013 ces dernières prévoient notamment un embargo sur les armes visant à empêcher la Corée du Nord de se livrer au commerce de matériel militaire et de se procurer des pièces pour son programme atomique ; un gel des avoirs destiné à exercer une pression financière sur le pouvoir ; et un embargo sur l’exportation de produits de luxe, conçu pour priver les hauts dirigeants des attributs du pouvoir – des homards jusqu’aux cigarillos, en passant par les fourrures et les yachts. Les Nations unies ont fixé le cadre général des sanctions, les Etats décidant par eux-mêmes ce qu’ils interdisent.

La “caisse noire” du régime

Les rapports annuels d’une commission onusienne qui surveille les sanctions parlent cependant d’un jeu du chat et de la souris, car les dirigeants nord-coréens usent d’une panoplie de subterfuges en constante évolution pour déguiser leurs activités commerciales à l’étranger. Le dernier rapport en date de l’ONU, remis au Conseil de sécurité en février, fait ainsi état de ventes d’armes en Afrique et de l’utilisation de “pavillons de complaisance” pour échapper aux contrôles sur le transport maritime nord-coréen. Il indique également que “des structures commerciales légales ont été utilisées pour des activités illégales”.

En 2010, les Etats-Unis ont ajouté la Division 39 à leur liste d’entités soumises aux sanctions. L’Union européenne a suivi. Entre temps, la Corée du Nord a engrangé des devises étrangères en exportant des armes, des méthamphétamines, de champignons et de la main-d’œuvre à bas coût. Ses ventes de textiles, de charbon et de minéraux à la Chine lui rapportent peut-être davantage.

Le Conseil de l’Union européenne affirme que la Division 39 était placée sous l’autorité directe de Kim Jong-il, président de Corée du Nord de 1994 à sa mort en 2011, date à laquelle son fils Kim Jong-un lui a succédé. La Division 39 “figure parmi les plus importantes organisations chargées de l’achat de devises et de marchandises”, précise-t-il. Les Etats-Unis et l’UE ont également imposé des sanctions à ce qu’ils considèrent comme des sociétés écrans agissant en faveur de la Division 39. L’une de ces entités, la Korea Daesong General Trading Corporation, également connue sous plusieurs autres noms comparables, “est utilisée pour faciliter les transactions étrangères pour le compte de la Division 39”, a déclaré le Trésor américain. L’entreprise n’a pas souhaité commenter cette information. L’UE la décrit comme une filiale du groupe Daesong, “le plus grand groupe d’entreprises du pays”.

Le rôle du groupe Queensway

Au cours des dix dernières années, le groupe Queensway a bâti un empire commercial contrôlant un portefeuille de plusieurs milliards de dollars, dont les tentacules s’étirent du Zimbabwe jusqu’à Manhattan. La nature précise de l’association avec KKG n’est pas très claire – on ignore s’il s’agit d’une joint-venture officielle ou d’un arrangement plus informel. Les liens entre les financiers de KKG se sont noués vers 2006. Selon le récit du haut fonctionnaire asiatique – dont des détails ont été corroborés par d’autres témoignage –, la percée de Queensway en Corée du Nord a été initiée par le représentant du groupe qui a promu ses intérêts en Afrique et ailleurs. Il utilise au moins sept identités différentes, la plus connue étant Sam Pa.

L’année dernière, une enquête du Financial Times a établi que M. Pa et les autres fondateurs du groupe Queensway entretenaient des liens étroits avec de puissants intérêts à Pékin, y compris le service de renseignements chinois et plusieurs entreprises d’Etat. Ils ont également des relations avec de grands groupes occidentaux : des sociétés du groupe Queensway sont en affaires avec BP [compagnie pétrolière britannique] en Angola, Gl encore [entreprise anglo-suisse de négoce et d’extraction de matières premières] en Guinée, et d’autres.

M. Pa s’est refusé à tout commentaire. De tous les dirigeants des diverses sociétés du groupe Queensway, un seul a accepté de répondre à nos questions. Jee Kin-wee, directeur du service juridique du groupe à la succursale singapourienne de China Sonagol, assure que son entreprise et KKG “sont des entités distinctes qui n’ont aucun rapport entre elles”. Il n’a toutefois pas précisé la nature des relations unissant son entreprise de Singapour et sa société-sœur, China Sonangol International Holding, enregistrée à l’adresse de Queensway à Hong Kong. Cette entité est détenue conjointement par les associés de M. Pa et le groupe pétrolier national d’Angola. Elle est citée dans des procès-verbaux des tribunaux de Hong Kong pour avoir effectué des versements destinés à des projets de KKG.

Jee Kin-wee n’a pas voulu s’exprimer au sujet des activités commerciales du groupe Queensway en Corée du Nord, se bornant à rappeler que “la Chine entretient des relations diplomatiques et économiques normales avec la Corée du Nord et que […] des dizaines de pays dans le monde, dont plusieurs pays de l’UE, ont des relations diplomatiques bilatérales avec la RPDC”. M. Pa a conclu un contrat avec Daesong pour toute une série de projets en Corée du Nord, concernant aussi bien des centrales électriques que l’extraction minière et la pêche, affirme toutefois le haut fonctionnaire asiatique.
L’argent a commencé à affluer – mais on ne sait pas exactement quelles sommes ont atterri directement dans les caisses de Corée du Nord. Un livret de comptes publié dans une décision de 2013 de la Cour suprême de Hong Kong dans le cadre d’un différend opposant des associés de M. Pa comporte plusieurs références à des versements du groupe Queensway : “réseau d’autobus urbains de Pyongyang”, “Aéroport de Pyongyang”, “Corée : 5 000 tonnes d’huile de soja” et “exposition sponsorisée par le consul coréen”, lit-on dans ce document, sans plus de détails. Mais la liste des paiements comporte également des références à KKG.

Les habitants de Pyongyang ont commencé à entendre parler de KKG, dès 2008. Cette année-là, des photographies en ligne montraient un immense panneau publicitaire représentant la maquette d’un projet spectaculaire de constructions résidentielles à Pyongyang. Dans une présentation PowerPoint de 2014, le groupe Hawtai Motor, constructeur automobile privé chinois basé à Tianjin, décrivait KKG comme l’une “des plus grandes entreprises publiques de Corée du Nord”. Les dirigeants de Hawtai ont refusé de commenter cette déclaration. Certains observateurs qui ont assisté à la percée de Queensway en Corée du Nord estiment que le groupe cherche à reproduire un modèle qu’il a déjà expérimenté en Afrique : le groupe y a conclu des contrats “infrastructures contre ressources naturelles” avec des régimes répressifs comme ceux de l’Angola, du Zimbabwe et une junte militaire qui a brièvement dirigé la Guinée. Pour la Corée du Nord, le groupe semble avoir jeté son dévolu sur le potentiel pétrolier inexploité du pays.
“Les taxis KKG peuvent rapporter au régime quelques devises, grâce aux touristes de passage à Pyongyang, mais tout indique que les véritables cibles du groupe Queensway sont les secteurs minier et pétrolier”, souligne le chercheur américain J. R. Mailey, l’un des auteurs d’un rapport de 2009 du Congrès américain qui a récemment publié une deuxième étude détaillée sur le groupe. Le think tank britannique Chatham House signalait dans un rapport datant de 2009 qu’une filiale chinoise de Queensway, avait proposé en 2007 une entreprise publique chinoise pour réaliser des explorations sismiques sur deux sites de prospection pétrolière en Corée du Nord. Comme l’entreprise de taxis et le projet immobilier de Pyongyang, il semblerait que la prospection pétrolière se fasse au moins en partie par l’intermédiaire de KKG, qui fait office de maillon entre Queensway et la Division 39. Selon le haut fonctionnaire asiatique et un intervenant du secteur pétrolier connaissant bien la Corée du Nord, KKG a recherché du pétrole dans plusieurs régions du pays, sans succès pour l’instant.

Le désir de faire des affaires

En novembre 2013, la télévision d’Etat nord-coréenne a diffusé un reportage surune cérémonie organisée dans la ville de Kaesong, non loin de la zone démilitarisée séparant les deux Corées depuis 1953 (DMZ). Des dignitaires saluaient l’inauguration du chantier d’un “parc industriel high-tech”. Selon les médias officiels, le parc devait accueillir un centre de technologies de l’information, un hôtel, des résidences, une école et une centrale électrique. L’un des orateurs était un homme en costume sombre et aux cheveux coupés court, identifié par les médias locaux sous le nom de Jang Su-nam. Il est présenté comme le représentant du “Groupe pour la paix et le développement économique.” Or, d’après M. Mailey, M. Jang a autrefois travaillé pour Daesong. M. Jang n’a pu être contacté pour répondre à nos questions.

La caméra du reportage balayait les autres personnalités invitées : des ambassadeurs de pays africains dans lesquels le groupe Queensway a des intérêts. A côté d’eux, se tenait Nik Zuks, le fondateur australien de la société minière Bellzone, cotée sur le marché alternatif de Londres et opérant en Afrique orientale, et qui a cédé une part majoritaire de son capital à la Chine. M. Zuks n’a pas voulu répondre à nos demandes de commentaires. Selon un haut fonctionnaire asiatique, M. Pa se trouvait à Pyongyang en décembre dernier et a envoyé une carte d’anniversaire personnelle à Kim Jong-un en janvier. Les deux hommes ont en commun autre chose que leur désir de faire des affaires : M. Pa est tombé sous le coup des sanctions américaines l’année dernière pour ses transactions au Zimbabwe, où il a été accusé de financer la police secrète de Robert Mugabe en échange de concessions dans les mines de diamants. Des allégations “infondées” selon M. Pa. “Le rôle de Sam Pa est d’être une vitrine pour le régime de Pyongyang sur les marchés capitalistes, résume un haut fonctionnaire asiatique. Je pense qu’à ce titre, il a un bel avenir devant lui.”

North Korea: The secrets of Office 39

Shadowy organisation’s alliance with Queensway Group helps Pyongyang bring in cash
Tom Burgis
The Financial Times

June 24, 2015

The businessman Sam Pa in front of the Pyongyang skyline. His Queensway Group is linked with KKG, a North Korean enterprise

in the middle of last year, the residents of Pyongyang began to notice a new fleet of taxis operating in the North Korean capital. With their maroon and gold bodywork, the gleaming sedans were easy to spot as they cruised the city’s orderly streets. The cars bore the taxi company’s logo: KKG.

FirstFT is our new essential daily email briefing of the best stories from across the web

The swiftness with which KKG edged out rival taxi operators — one of which was rumoured to be linked to the security services — piqued curiosity about who was behind the new outfit. The same logo has been spotted on 4x4s, on a billboard displaying a planned riverside property development and on buses at Pyongyang airport. Like other North Korean cabbies, the drivers of the KKG taxis asked their fares to pay in foreign currency: mainly Chinese renminbi, but also euros or dollars. And therein lay a clue.

For all their rhetoric about the paramount need to develop a nuclear arsenal, North Korea’s rulers have no more pressing task than bringing in foreign exchange. Without it, experts say, the regime would be at risk of crumbling under international sanctions. Taxi fares alone could hardly fill the gap. But the KKG cabs are just a small part of a much larger endeavour.

The KKG taxi fleet is one product of a partnership between a group of Hong Kong-based investors and a secretive arm of the North Korean state that seeks to cut international business deals, a Financial Times investigation has found.

The North Korean government’s alliance with the so-called Queensway Group, a syndicate of businesspeople with a record of forging ties with pariah states, is opaque. But it seems clear that it is one of a handful of crucial business ventures that allow the world’s most isolated regime to sustain itself.

“KKG is one of several joint ventures in North Korea and it’s one of the biggest ones,” says an Asian official who asked not to be named because of the sensitivity of the matter. “Most North Korean companies are under US or EU or UN sanctions. They always change names, like their ships change flags. But most of the companies belong to military leaders or the ruling Workers’ party of Korea. And they are on the sanctions list. So they need any foreign company that could give them an opportunity to trade with foreign countries.”

While western powers’ relations with Iran and Cuba appear to be thawing, the hermit kingdom’s political isolation is as deep as ever. Even China, long an ally, has grown frostier with Pyongyang in recent years. A UN investigation last year described “unspeakable atrocities” perpetrated against the inmates of its prison camps. The sabre-rattling under Kim Jong Un — including a cyber attack against Sony that Washington blamed on Pyongyang and last month’s test-firing of a ballistic missile from a submarine — has added fresh impetus to efforts to understand how the regime plugs itself into the world economy.

The domestic economy has either contracted or grown at 1 per cent in recent years, according to South Korean government estimates based on limited data, with annual exports of about $3bn falling well short of the import bill. As prices for the coal and other commodities that North Korea exports to China fall, business networks such as the one behind KKG are likely to become increasingly vital in garnering crucial foreign exchange for the regime.

The North Korean end of the KKG network leads to a shadowy organisation called Office 39 of the Workers’ party, according to Asian and US officials. The US has described Office 39 as “a secretive branch of the government . . . that provides critical support to [the] North Korean leadership in part through engaging in illicit economic activities and managing slush funds, and generating revenues for the leadership”.

North Korea’s rulers have had to resort to such tactics after years of international sanctions. Imposed in response to nuclear tests in 2006, 2009 and 2013, the sanctions comprise an arms embargo designed to stop North Korea trading weapons and sourcing parts for its atomic programme; an asset freeze to apply financial pressure to the leadership; and a ban on luxury goods that is meant to deprive senior figures of the trappings of power, from lobster and cigarillos to furs and yachts. The UN sets the overall structure of sanctions; states decide what to prohibit.

But annual reports by a UN panel that monitors the sanctions describe a game of cat-and-mouse, as North Korea’s rulers use an ever-shifting web of subterfuge to disguise commercial activities abroad. The most recent UN report, sent to the Security Council in February, documents arms sales in Africa and the use of “flags of convenience” to conceal North Korean control of shipping. The UN report also suggests that “legitimate business structures have been used for illegitimate activities”. In 2010, the US added Office 39 to its sanctions list. The EU followed suit.

North Korea has brought in foreign exchange by exporting guns, methamphetamines, mushrooms and indentured labourers. Perhaps most lucratively, it also sends textiles, coal and minerals across its border with China. Andrea Berger, a North Korea expert at the UK’s Royal United Services Institute, a think-tank, says: “Office 39 is extremely important. It’s generally regarded as the regime slush fund.”

The EU says Office 39 reported directly to Kim Jong Il, North Korea’s ruler from 1994 until his death in 2011, when his son, Kim Jong Un, took over. Office 39 is “among the most important organisations assigned with currency and merchandise acquisition”, the EU says. The US and the EU also imposed sanctions on what they said were Office 39 front companies. One, which is known as Korea Daesong General Trading Corporation and several similar names, “is used to facilitate foreign transactions on behalf of Office 39”, the US Treasury said. The company did not respond to a request for comment. The EU describes it as part of the broader Daesong group, “the largest company group of the country”.

According to the Asian official and JR Mailey, a researcher at the Pentagon’s Africa Center for Strategic Studies, Daesong is one of the backers behind KKG. Another, according to these people and court documents from Hong Kong, is the business network known informally to those who have studied it as Queensway Group, after the address of its headquarters at 88 Queensway in Hong Kong’s financial district.

Global footprint

Over the past decade, the Queensway Group has built a multi-billion-dollar corporate empire that stretches from Zimbabwe to Manhattan.

Tom Burgis looks at North Korea’s alliance with the Queensway Group, a syndicate of Hong Kong based investors. Such ventures as a taxi fleet with the KKG brand are part of a much larger endeavour by Pyongyang to cut international business deals.

The precise nature of the KKG partnership is unclear — whether it is an incorporated joint venture or a more informal arrangement. Searches by the FT yielded no records for a company called KKG that matched the profile of the one active in North Korea. Nor did searches in English and Korean for Kumgang Economic Development Corporation, KKG’s name when written in Korean characters. That suggests that KKG is either simply a brand, or, if it is a company, it is registered within North Korea, which does not keep company records online. The FT was unable to find contact details for KKG.

The relationship between KKG’s backers was formed around the end of 2006. According to the Asian official, details of whose account were corroborated by others, the Queensway Group’s foray into North Korea was spearheaded by the frontman who has advanced its interests in Africa and elsewhere. He goes by at least seven names — but is best known as Sam Pa.

An FT investigation last year found that Mr Pa and his fellow founders of the Queensway Group have connections to powerful interests in Beijing, including Chinese intelligence and state-owned companies. They also have ties to big western groups: Queensway Group companies are in business with BP in Angola, Glencore in Guinea and others.

Mr Pa did not respond to requests for comment. Only one of the Queensway Group figures and companies contacted for comment replied. Jee Kin Wee, group head of legal at China Sonangol’s arm in Singapore, says his company and KKG “are separate and unrelated companies”. He did not clarify the link between his company in Singapore and its sister company, China Sonangol International Holding, registered at the Queensway address in Hong Kong. That company is jointly owned by Mr Pa’s business associates and Angola’s state oil group. It is named in Hong Kong court documents as having made payments related to KKG projects.

Mr Wee did not answer specific questions about the Queensway Group’s dealings in North Korea. But he stressed that “China enjoys full diplomatic and economic relations with North Korea and . . . scores of countries around the world, including EU countries, have bilateral diplomatic relations with North Korea”.

Mr Pa is said to have met senior North Korean officials as he began his courtship of the regime in 2006. At the time, Pyongyang needed new partners. It had found itself increasingly locked out of the global financial system. A year earlier, the US had accused Macau-based Banco Delta Asia of laundering money for the regime, causing the near-collapse of that bank and prompting others to avoid North Korea.

Mr Pa struck a deal with Daesong for an eclectic range of North Korean projects, the Asian official says, ranging from power plants to mining to fisheries. Money started to flow — although it is unclear how much flowed directly into North Korea. A ledger published in a 2013 Hong Kong high court ruling in a dispute between some of Mr Pa’s business associates refers to Queensway Group payments including “Pyongyang city bus system”, “Korea airport”, “Korea: 5,000 tons of soyabean oil” and “exhibition sponsored by the Korean consul”. There are no further details. But the list of payments also contains references to KKG.

Corporate presence

KKG first came to the attention of Pyongyang’s residents around 2008. That year, photographs posted online showed a billboard displaying a spectacular image of a planned property development close to the Pyongyang Mullet Soup Restaurant. Located by a bend in the Taedong River, the planned properties included a pair of shimmering skyscrapers that would not have looked out of place in London’s riverside Canary Wharf business district. The new development was to be called KKG Avenue and bore the same KKG logo that would appear on Pyongyang taxis.

KKG Avenue made little headway beyond some rickety hoardings and preliminary work on foundations, according to foreign officials, visitors to Pyongyang, photos and satellite images.

Despite such setbacks, KKG has been described at least once as a major North Korean company. A 2014 presentation by Hawtai Motor Group, a privately owned Chinese carmaker based in Tianjin, indicates that the company supplied the vehicles for the KKG taxi fleet. The presentation describes KKG as one of “North Korea’s largest state-owned enterprises”. Hawtai declined to comment.

Some who have observed Queensway’s thrust into North Korea say it is seeking to replicate a model it pioneered in Africa: striking infrastructure-for-natural resources deals with oppressive governments such as Angola’s, Zimbabwe’s and a military junta that briefly ruled Guinea. The group appears to have set its sights on North Korea’s untapped potential for oil.

Mr Mailey, who was one of the authors of a 2009 US congressional report who recently published a second detailed study of the group, says: “The KKG taxis might earn the regime some foreign currency from tourists visiting Pyongyang, but most signs point to the oil and mining sectors as the Queensway Group’s true target.”

Voir aussi:

Pourquoi les informations sur la Corée du Nord sont-elles traitées avec tant de légèreté ?
Vincent Glad

L’an 2000

20 mai 2015

L’actualité du pays est souvent couverte en page « info buzz » plutôt que dans la rubrique International.
Le 13 mai tombait sur les smartphones cette alerte info du Point.fr :

Twitter s’est indigné, Twitter a ironisé, mais Twitter s’est peut-être un peu emballé: le «stagiaire» du Point (nom usuel de celui qui doit assumer seul une erreur collective) n’a fait qu’appliquer avec un peu trop de zèle les préceptes du traitement de l’information sur la Corée du Nord. (le titre de l’article a depuis été changé)

Ce pays est une no-go zone de la déontologie journalistique. Les infos sur la Corée du Nord sont reprises dans la presse mondiale le plus souvent sans aucune vérification. C’est pourtant le pays dont les nouvelles sont le plus sujet à caution, les sources les plus partiales: avec la propagande nord-coréenne d’un côté, les services secrets sud-coréens et les réfugiés au Sud de l’autre.

Le ministre exécuté au canon antiaérien

Le 13 mai, donc, on apprenait que Hyon Yong-chol, le ministre de la Défense nord-coréen, avait été exécuté au canon antiaérien, notamment parce qu’il s’était endormi pendant des célébrations militaires. L’info donnée par les services secrets sud-coréens a fait le tour du monde et occasionné ce superbe push du Point.fr. Avant de passer rapidement au conditionnel, les services secrets sud-coréens n’étant plus si sûrs de leur renseignement.

Evidemment, personne n’avait vérifié l’info, et il sera bien difficile d’avoir le fin mot de l’histoire. La Corée du Nord est un pays totalement fermé, comme le notait le correspondant de l’AFP à Séoul: «Différencier les faits de la fiction est quasi-impossible à propos de la Corée du Nord, dont le régime verrouille tous les canaux d’information et de communication, rendant difficile la vérification des rumeurs. Parallèlement, l’intérêt de la presse internationale est énorme. Surtout lorsqu’il s’agit d’histoires à sensations qui confortent le public dans sa perception de la Corée du Nord comme un pays étrange, brutal et arriéré.»

«Une règle journalistique tacite»

Il y a comme un malaise : derrière l’insolite, le lol et le pittoresque, il y a un régime totalement fermé sur l’extérieur, qui torture ses opposants, détient l’arme nucléaire et reste en guerre latente avec la Corée du Sud. Le démenti des services secrets sud-coréens, obligeant à corriger l’info sur l’exécution du ministre de la Défense, semble avoir été un petit électrochoc dans la presse. France24 a publié un mea cupla sur son site: «C’est une sorte une règle journalistique tacite qui ne s’applique qu’à la Corée du Nord. Presque tous les médias occidentaux – et France24 ne fait pas exception – la respectent scrupuleusement : ignorer l’un des fondamentaux de la profession, la vérification de l’information. Ainsi se retrouvent-ils à relayer les rumeurs (exotiques, cruelles ou insolites) concernant la dictature du leader nord-coréen Kim Jong-un.»

Mais d’où vient cette «règle journalistique tacite», comme l’écrit France 24 ? Sans doute de la rubrique dans laquelle est reléguée l’information sur la Corée du Nord : l’info buzz.

Le spécialiste de la Corée du Nord, c’est Buzzfeed

En dépit de l’impitoyable dictature qui y règne, la Corée du Nord est souvent traitée dans les pages buzz des sites web, et non dans les pages International. Le pays rentre dans ce champ indifférenciant qu’est l’info buzz, où des lamas dans le tramway de Bordeaux ou dans les rues de Phoenix et des controverses sur des robes bleues ou blanches côtoient des exécutions sommaires d’opposants politiques, le tout dans un grand rire général. Le spécialiste de la Corée du Nord, c’est Buzzfeed et pas Le Monde Diplomatique.

L’exemple le plus frappant se trouve sur le très respectable Monde.fr. Big Browser, le blog consacré aux contenus viraux, et seul lieu du site pouvant héberger une polémique sur la couleur d’une robe, s’est fait une spécialité des sujets sur la Corée du Nord.

Big Browser a publié pas moins d’une cinquantaine d’articles sur la Corée du Nord, traité le plus souvent avec une légèreté inhabituelle pour le quotidien du soir: «Kim Jong-un vous manque, et tout est dépeuplé», «La guerre du sapin de Noël aura-t-elle lieu?», «Comment Björn Borg a fait bombarder Pyongyang de caleçons roses». Même les sujets sur la famine y sont traités sous un angle «insolite». Contacté par mail, Vincent Fagot, rédacteur en chef du Monde.fr, tient à rappeler que la Corée du Nord est davantage traitée par Le Monde en rubrique International.

Une info qui confirme nos fantasmes

La particularité de l’info buzz — qui explique le traitement réservé à la Corée du Nord — est qu’elle circule le plus souvent sur le mode du bouche-à-oreille, avec des critères de vérification très limités et un contenu altéré au fil des reprises et des traductions. Ce type de format journalistique ne cherche pas à dire le vrai. La vérité de l’info buzz est celle qu’on veut bien entendre. C’est une info qui se conforme à nos attentes, qui confirme nos fantasmes et nos bonnes blagues.

Les articles sur la Corée du Nord ne nous disent pas «Le monde est dangereux» comme souvent les articles des pages International, mais plutôt «Le monde est fou». La Corée du Nord est une dictature acidulée, où s’épanouissent un dictateur à la coupe de hipster et de charmantes licornes. Chaque nouvel article doit nous renforcer dans cette vision du «royaume de l’absurde».

Ce moment où la réalité dépasse la fiction

Dans L’Esprit du Temps en 1962, Edgar Morin donnait une définition parfaite de l’info buzz. Il parlait alors des faits divers dans la presse: «Tout ce qui dans la vie réelle ressemble au roman ou au rêve est privilégié.» C’est exactement ce qui se passe dans le champ de l’info buzz, dans lequel les médias cherchent dans l’actualité, la vie réelle, des récits qui ont des apparences de fiction.

L’info buzz jubile de ce moment où la réalité dépasse la fiction, où une news sur Kim Jong-un devient plus drôle que The Interview, le film de Seth Rogen sur la Corée du Nord, où LeMonde.fr peut rivaliser avec le Gorafi. La Corée du Nord est reléguée au rayon buzz car les images qui nous arrivent du pays, via la propagande nord-coréenne, sont celle d’un grand Disneyland, un décor de carton-pâte dans lequel évolue le poupin Kim Jong-un.

Kim Jong-un au milieu des tortues

C’est une leçon pour les communicants de toute la planète: pour que les médias reprennent un message, il suffit de les penser comme une scène de mauvais téléfilm, organisé autour d’une figure reconnue de la culture pop, comme l’est Kim-Jong-un. Il faut être le moins crédible, le plus proche de la fiction, pour que l’info buzz s’en empare.

Ainsi, pour faire passer l’austère information que le dirigeant nord-coréen s’active pour améliorer l’élevage dans son pays, le Parti du travail a diffusé dans son journal une photo de Kim Jong-un hurlant sur des dignitaires du régime, au milieu d’un élevage de tortues. Mission accomplie.

Voir également:

Kim Jong Il’s ‘Cashbox’

Claudia Rosett

Forbes

4/15/2010

Despite all the pomp and nuclear summitry, North Korea keeps sliding down President Barack Obama’s to-do list. Yet something must be done. The threat here is not solely North Korea’s own arsenal, or its role, despite U.S. and United Nations sanctions, as a 24/7 convenience store for rogue regimes interested in weapons of mass destruction plus delivery systems. The further problem is that North Korea provides perverse inspiration for other despotisms.

While Obama talks about a world without nuclear weapons, Kim Jong Il sets tyrants everywhere a swaggering example of how to build the bomb and get away with it. Indeed, if recluse weirdo Kim can have the bomb, how on earth could Iran’s ayatollahs face themselves in the mirror every morning if they don’t have one too?

In the new millennium, Pyongyang has been blazing a proliferation trail that includes illicit nuclear tests in 2006 and 2009; illicit tests of ballistic missiles; and such extravagant stuff as help for Syria in building a secret nuclear reactor (which might even now be cranking out plutonium for bombs, had the Israelis not destroyed it with an air strike in 2007). Coupled with such North Korean habits as vending missiles and munitions to the likes of Syria, Iran and Iran’s Lebanon-based terrorist clients, Hezbollah, all this is a wildly dangerous mix.

So what to do about North Korea? Over the past 16 years, nuclear talks and freeze deals have repeatedly failed, under both presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton. Asked about North Korea in a press conference at the close of this week’s nuclear summit in Washington, Obama gave the vague reply that he hoped economic pressure would lead to a resumption of the six-party talks. But he ducked the question of why sanctions have failed to halt North Korea’s nuclear program, saying “I’m not going to give you a full dissertation on North Korean behavior.”

OK, it’s not Obama’s job to deliver dissertations on North Korea. But he missed a fat opportunity to say something genuinely informed and useful. The president–and his entire foreign policy team–ought to be reading and talking (loudly) about the material contained in a highly readable 36-page monograph published just last month by the Strategic Studies Institute of the Army War College: “Criminal Sovereignty: Understanding North Korea’s Illicit International Activities.”

This study is co-authored by three men who share an unusually clear-eyed interest in exploring the nitty-gritty of North Korea’s inner workings, Paul Rexton Kan, Bruce E. Bechtol Jr. and Robert Collins. Among them, going back more than three decades, they have more experience observing North Korea than some of the high-profile diplomats who have parleyed with Pyongyang in recent years from the five-star hotels of Beijing and Berlin. For this publication the three analysts draw on congressional testimony, press reports from around Asia and interviews with North Korean defectors (a resource too often ignored or underutilized by Washington officialdom).

“Criminal Sovereignty” focuses not on proliferation per se, but on a curious institution within North Korea’s government, usually referred to as Bureau No, 39. And what, exactly, is Bureau No. 39?

Located in a heavily guarded concrete building in downtown Pyongyang, Bureau No. 39 is the nerve center of North Korea’s state-run network of international crime. Its official name is Central Committee Bureau 39 of the Korean Workers’ Party. The authors refer to it by what Bechtol says is the more accurately nuanced translation of “Office No. 39.”

The mission of Office No. 39 is to generate torrents of cash for North Korean ruler Kim Jong Il, by way of illicit activities abroad. Favorite rackets include international trafficking of drugs produced under state supervision in North Korea, and state production and laundering into world markets of counterfeit U.S. currency, and cigarettes. Such activities are tied directly to the survival of Kim’s regime. The authors report “the crimes organized by Office No. 39 are committed beyond the borders of North Korea by the regime itself, not solely for the personal enrichment of the leadership, but to prop up its armed forces and to fund its military programs.”

What sets Office No. 39 apart from more pedestrian political corruption or organized crime is that this operation is not some wayward private gang or unauthorized appendage of government. It is an integral and institutionalized part of the North Korean regime. As such, it enjoys the perquisites and protective trappings of the modern nation-state, including the use of North Korean embassies and state-run businesses abroad, and the reluctance of other nations to intervene in the sovereign affairs of North Korea.

Office No. 39 is directly tied to Kim himself, who set it up way back in 1974, when his father, Kim Il Sung, was still in power. The authors explain: “This office was established for the explicit purpose of running illegal activities to generate currency for the North Korean government.” Since the 1991 Soviet collapse, which ended subsidies from Moscow, Office No. 39 has become ever more important, and especially over the past 10 years, its activities have become more prolific.

Office No. 39 continues to report directly to Kim, who took charge of the regime when his father died in 1994. According to a North Korean defector interviewed by the authors, Kim Kwang-Jin, who has firsthand knowledge of North Korean financial practices, Office No. 39 is also known to North Korean insiders as “the keeper of Kim’s cashbox.” Organized into 10 departments, specializing in various illicit activities, Office No. 39 serves as a slush fund through which billions of dollars have flowed over the years. In a bizarre personal touch, these funds are collected and presented periodically to Kim in aggregate amounts, labeled “revolutionary funds,” on such special occasions as his official birthday, Feb. 12, or the birthday of his late father, Kim Il Sung, April 15th.

This money is not spent on easing the miseries of millions of repressed and famished North Koreans. That effort–from which Kim also has a record of appropriating resources to sustain his regime–is left to the likes of international donors, contributing via outfits such as the United Nations. The authors explain that the profits of Bureau 39 help swell the offshore bank accounts of Kim’s regime, used not only to pay for his luxurious lifestyle, but to buy the loyalties and materials that underpin his totalitarian, nuclear-entwined military state.

If Office No. 39 enjoys the amenities of operating as part of the North Korean state, it is by the same token an avenue of vulnerability leading straight to Kim Jong Il. That was evident back in 2005, when the U.S. Treasury caused clear pain for Kim by targeting a major hub of Office No. 39 financial activities in Macau–only to be yanked off the case by a State Department desperate to coddle Kim into a nuclear freeze deal, which then flopped.

These days U.S. and U.N. efforts to corral North Korea seem focused narrowly on activities tied directly to nuclear proliferation. It’s been a while since Washington complained loudly about the rest of Kim’s rackets. Obama needs to think bigger, speak up and solicit the world’s help in cracking down much harder on the all the networks of Office No. 39. Emptying Kim’s cashbox could go farther toward ending the North Korean nuclear threat than any amount of six-party talks or summits.

Claudia Rosett, a journalist in residence with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, writes a weekly column on foreign affairs for Forbes.

Voir encore:

Report: NKorea fires director of Kim’s finances
South Korean Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan, right, escorts Kurt Campbell, U.S. assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, during a photo call before their meeting at Yu’s office in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010. (AP Photo/Lee Jae-won, Pool)
Kwang-Tae Kim
Associated Press

February 4, 2010

SEOUL, South Korea—The director of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il’s secret moneymaking « Room 39 » bureau has been fired, a news report said Thursday. Analysts said the move may be a way to get around international sanctions.

Kim Dong Un, head of the infamous « Room 39 » department said to control Kim’s family enterprises, was replaced by his deputy, Jon Il Chun, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported, citing an unidentified source familiar with North Korean affairs.
The National Intelligence Service, Seoul’s top spy agency, said it could not confirm the report. North Korean state media did not mention the personnel change.

Room 39 is described as the lynchpin of the North’s so-called « court economy » centered on the dynastic Kim family. The department is believed to finance his family and top party officials with business ventures — some legitimate and some not — that include counterfeiting and drug-smuggling.
The bureau oversees some 120 trading companies and mines, accounting for some 25 percent of North Korea’s total trade and employing up to 50,000 North Koreans, said Lim Soo-ho, a research fellow at the Samsung Economic Research Institute think tank.
He said the reported move to fire the Room 39 chief may be part of attempts to get around stringent international sanctions imposed on North Korea.
It was unclear which Room 39 companies or officials might be under U.N. sanctions, but North Korean firms frequently change names to evade scrutiny. And Kim, the Room 39 chief who was reportedly fired, had been blacklisted by the European Union in December, making his movements in Europe difficult and prompting the change in personnel, Yonhap said.

U.N. Security Council sanctions were tightened against North Korea after a May 2009 nuclear test. The order bans North Korea from exporting arms, calls for freezing assets, and forbids travel abroad for certain companies and individuals involved in the country’s nuclear and weapons programs.
The report came as the United States renewed its call for North Korea to return to talks aimed at ending the country’s nuclear weapons programs.
Assistant U.S. Secretary of State Kurt Campbell made the comments Thursday during a meeting with South Korean Unification Minister Hyun In-taek in Seoul, according to Hyun’s office.

The North wants a peace treaty with the U.S. formally ending the 1950-53 Korean War as well as the lifting of sanctions before returning to the disarmament negotiations it abandoned last year. Campbell said no discussion about easing sanctions, a peace treaty or diplomatic relations can take place before the disarmament talks are back on track, according to Yonhap.
A military fracas off the west coast last week emphasized the precarious security situation in the region.
The North fired rounds of artillery toward its disputed western sea border with South Korea, prompting the South to fire warning shots. No injuries or damage were reported.

North Korea has designated five new « naval firing zones » — four off the west coast and one off the east coast — effective from Feb. 6-8, Yonhap reported later Thursday citing an unidentified intelligence source.

Seoul’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said it could not confirm the report. It said Wednesday that the North had issued two separate « naval firing zones » off the west coast, effective from Feb. 5-8. Two other no-sail zones, also off the west coast, remain in place through March 29.

Voir enfin:

Trois idées reçues sur la Corée du nord
Claude Fouquet

Les Echos

10/10/15

 Pays peu ouvert en dépit de l’avalanche d’images diffusées depuis quelques jours par les télévisions invitées à venir couvrir l’anniversaire du parti unique, la Corée du nord est l’objet de nombreuses idées reçues.
Pays fermé à toute influence extérieure. Régime particulièrement violent qui exécute à tour de bras. Classe dirigeante qui vit à l’occidentale … les idées toutes faîtes circulent régulièrement sur la Corée du nord qui fête ce weekend les 70 ans de sa création. S’ils ne sont pas infondés, les clichés sur ce pays singulier cachent une réalité souvent plus complexe.

1) La Corée du nord est le pays le plus fermé du monde

C’est sans doute l’une des expressions qui, avec celle de « dictature communiste », revient le plus souvent. Pourtant s’il est de fait toujours difficile de s’y rendre et d’y voyager à son aise, force est de constater la multiplication depuis plusieurs années des sites et blogs photographiques consacrés à la Corée du nord. Et ces derniers ne publient pas que des photos volées et passées sous le manteau.

Afin de paraître moins hostile à l’extérieur, Pyongyang ouvre régulièrement la porte à certains médias. Mi-septembre par exemple, la chaîne américaine CNN a été autorisée à filmer l’un des centres spatiaux du pays. Bien sûr pas question de laisser les caméras pénétrer à l’intérieur. Les officiels, sagement assis sur des chaises à l’extérieur d’un bâtiment dont l’architecture rappelle le vaisseau spatial « Enterprise » dans la série de science-fiction Startrek, y regrettent même de ne pouvoir y guider les journalistes.

Plus anecdotique mais révélateur, le traditionnel marathon de Pyongyang qui était réservé aux coureurs professionnels (nord-coréens et étrangers) jusqu’en 2013 est désormais ouvert à tous. Et, comme ce qui se passe en Corée du nord n’est pas à un paradoxe près, sur les deux principales agences qui font la promotion de cet événement, l’une est anglaise et a ses bureaux à Pékin, et l’autre est américaine et située dans l’Etat du New Jersey.

2) Les exécutions sont plus nombreuses que par le passé

Début juillet, le chiffre a commencé à circuler sur Internet. Kim Jong-un aurait, depuis la fin 2011 et son arrivée au pouvoir, exécuté environ 70 personnes. Bien plus que son père, Kim Jong Il qui n’aurait exécuté par exemple « que 10 personnes » lors de sa première année au pouvoir. Mais cette affirmation, qui ne concerne que les personnalités importantes et les dirigeants, est difficile à vérifier.

Tout d’abord, Pyongyang reconnaît rarement les condamnations et, de ce fait, les exécutions : celle de l’oncle de Kim Jong-un, le vice-président de la Commission de défense nationale, est en effet l’une des rares a avoir été officiellement reconnue. Ensuite, même les sources extérieures réputées les mieux informées reconnaissent parfois des imprécisions. Ainsi, les renseignements sud-coréens (NIS), qui affirmaient le 13 mai dernier que le ministre nord-coréen de la Défense avait été exécuté (au canon anti-aérien ou au missile selon les interprétations qui ont circulé), expliquaient le lendemain ne pas pouvoir vérifier s’il avait bien été passé par les armes.

De même, Ma Won-chun, le directeur du bureau de planification de la Commission de défense nationale, que l’on croyait avoir été purgé, est réapparu en public cette semaine. Presque 11 mois après sa dernière apparition publique.

3) Seule la classe dirigeante profite d’un certain confort économique

Pyongyang n’est pas avare en images montrant ses avancées et son développement (comme par exemple le nouvel aéroport international de Pyongyang) et le sentiment général, y compris en Corée du sud, est que les choses semblent bouger un peu, principalement dans la capitale où la population paraît pouvoir goûter aux délices d’une certaine forme de société de consommation.

En témoignent les images ramenées de la 11ème Foire commerciale de Pyongyang par un photographe de Singapour qui anime le site « DPKR 360 ». L’occasion de constater que certains prix sont libellés en dollars américains (2 dollars pour une paire de lunettes de soleil), qu’un stand d’équipement de cuisine est tenu par une co-entreprise germano-nord coréenne tandis qu’un autre propose des ordinateurs de marque sud-coréenne Asus. Et bien sûr de nombreuses marques locales.

Et plus récemment, une délégation nord-coréenne s’est rendue à Singapour pour comprendre notamment comment aider le développement de start-up.

Mais la photo publiée le 26 septembre dernier sur Twitter par l’astronaute Scott Kelly parle d’elle-même et relativise ces avancées. On y voit en effet la péninsule coréenne de nuit et vue de l’espace. Et la zone sombre de la Corée du nord où le seul point lumineux correspond à la capitale contraste avec la situation des voisins chinois et sud-coréens largement illuminés.

Un signe que la politique d’autosuffisance et d’indépendance nationale, maîtres-mots jusqu’à ces dernières années du développement du pays, ne porte sans doute pas ses fruits.

 


Pape François: Qu’ils mangent de la pauvreté ! (Why is the Pope so ignorant about capitalism: It’s his Argentine origins, stupid !)

8 octobre, 2015
CubanRefugees
https://i2.wp.com/i.imgur.com/rYpY8D4.gif
argentina-us
 

chart (24)

table (3)

table (6)

Le vrai miracle aujourd’hui, c‘est pas la croissance économique, c’est la pauvreté. Leon Louw (Free Market Foundation of Southern Africa)
Aimez la pauvreté comme une mère. Pape François
L’Église qui vit à Cuba est une Église pauvre, et le témoignage de pauvreté de nos prêtres diocésains et religieux, des diacres et des personnes consacrées, est admirable. Peut-être que c’est justement la pauvreté qui contribue de façon singulière à la solidarité et la fraternité entre tous. Nous espérons que votre témoignage personnel nous stimulera tous à aimer cette pauvreté belle et fructueuse de l’Eglise dans notre terre (…)  La pauvreté est le mur et la mère de la vie consacrée, car elle la protège de toute vie mondaine. Combien de vie qui commencent bien, d’âmes généreuses, se perdent dans l’amour pour cette vie mondaine, riche, et qui se terminent mal, sans amour. (…) La richesse appauvrit. (…) Quand une communauté religieuse commence à compter l’argent à épargner, Dieu est bon de lui donner un économe désastreux pour la mener à la ruine, pour la rendre pauvre ! Dieu veut notre Église pauvre ! Comment est mon esprit de pauvreté ? Pape François
I recognize that globalization has helped many people to lift themselves out of poverty, but it has condemned many other people to starve. It is true that in absolute terms the world’s wealth has grown, but inequality and poverty have arisen.  Pape François
Mais à quoi joue le pape François ? L’annonce dans la presse américaine, mercredi 30 septembre, de sa rencontre secrète avec l’égérie des opposants les plus radicaux au mariage homosexuel aux Etats-Unis a brouillé le message qu’il semblait avoir délivré tout au long de son séjour sur place. Les quelques minutes qu’il a passées jeudi 24 septembre à Washington, avec Kim Davis, une greffière du Kentucky, brièvement emprisonnée au début du mois pour avoir obstinément refusé de délivrer des certificats de mariage aux couples homosexuels, n’ont été ni démenties ni commentées par le Vatican. Mais ce soutien de poids à la frange la plus ultra des chrétiens conservateurs américains, donne en tout cas une dimension politique à un séjour aux Etats-Unis que le pape avait qualifié de purement « pastoral ».Si l’opposition du pape au mariage gay ne fait aucun doute, son choix de conforter une fonctionnaire controversée et désavouée même par une partie du camp conservateur, ne semble pas cadrer avec ses propos d’ouverture, appelant à une Eglise catholique plus inclusive, engagée « dans la construction d’une société tolérante », ainsi qu’il l’a déclaré à la Maison Blanche. Une position qu’il a réitérée tout au long de son voyage aux Etats-Unis, où il a paru éviter avec soin de prendre partie dans « la guerre culturelle » que la hiérarchie catholique sur place, et plus largement les mouvements chrétiens évangéliques – Mme Davis est elle-même chrétienne apostolique –, alimentent au nom de la liberté religieuse. Particulièrement attendu à ce propos, François s’était appliqué à une défense large et globale de ce principe, sans citer d’exemples précis. Il avait notamment dénoncé « un monde où diverses formes de tyrannie moderne cherchent à supprimer la liberté religieuse, ou bien cherchent à la réduire à une sous-culture sans droit d’expression dans la sphère publique, ou encore cherchent à utiliser la religion comme prétexte à la haine et à la brutalité ». Il avait certes rendu une visite surprise à des religieuses, au centre d’une bataille juridique contre le système de santé américain, dit Obamacare, qui oblige les employeurs – y compris leur congrégation – à participer au financement des moyens de contraception de leurs salariés. Mais, parallèlement, il avait aussi loué le travail d’autres congrégations religieuses américaines, réputées elles bien plus libérales sur ces sujets. C’est dans l’avion qui le ramenait à Rome qu’il a été le plus explicite sur le fond, tout en restant ambigu sur la réalité de sa rencontre avec Kim Davis. « L’objection de conscience est un droit », a-t-il répondu à un journaliste qui lui demandait de réagir expressément au cas d’un(e) fonctionnaire qui refuserait de délivrer des certificats de mariage à des couples homosexuels. « Je n’ai pas en mémoire tous les cas d’objection de conscience », a étonnamment éludé le pape, qui a tout de même insisté sur le fait que « dans chaque institution judiciaire, doit exister un droit de conscience ». Le Monde
La brève entrevue entre Madame Kim Davis et le pape François à la nonciature apostolique de Washington D.C., continue à susciter des commentaires et des débats. Afin de contribuer à une compréhension objective de ce qui a été révélé, je suis en mesure d’éclaircir les points suivants : Le pape François a rencontré plusieurs dizaines de personnes qui avaient été invitées à la nonciature afin de le saluer alors qu’il s’apprêtait à quitter Washington pour la ville de New York. De telles salutations brèves se passent lors de chaque visite du pape et sont dues à la gentillesse et la disponibilité caractéristiques du pape. La seule véritable audience que le pape a accordé à la nonciature, le fut pour un des ses anciens étudiants et sa famille. Le Pape n’est pas entré dans les détails de la situation de Madame Davis et sa rencontre avec elle ne doit pas être considérée comme un appui à sa position dans tous ses aspects particuliers et complexes. Père Federico Lombardi (service de presse du Vatican)
L’extrême pauvreté devrait reculer cette année à un niveau sans précédent et frapper moins de 10% de la population mondiale en dépit d’une situation encore « très inquiétante » en Afrique, selon un rapport de la Banque mondiale (BM) publié dimanche. « Nous pourrions être la première génération dans l’histoire qui pourrait mettre un terme à l’extrême pauvreté », s’est félicité Jim Yong Kim, le président de l’institution qui tient la semaine prochaine son assemblée générale à Lima, au Pérou, avec le FMI. Selon les projections de la BM, quelque 702 millions de personnes, soit 9,6% de la population mondiale, vivent sous le seuil de pauvreté, que l’institution a d’ailleurs relevé de 1,25 à 1,90 dollar par jour pour tenir notamment compte de l’inflation. En 2012, date des données disponibles les plus récentes, les plus défavorisés de la planète étaient 902 millions, soit près de 13% de la population mondiale, une proportion qui atteignait encore 29% en 1999. (…) Si la tendance est à une nette baisse en Asie orientale — et spécialement en Inde — ou en Amérique du Sud, l’extrême pauvreté s’enracine en Afrique subsaharienne où elle frappe encore cette année 35,2% de la population. Selon la Banque, la région abrite ainsi, à elle seule, la moitié des plus défavorisés du globe. (…) La situation est particulièrement préoccupante dans les deux pays les plus touchés sur le globe, Madagascar et la République démocratique du Congo, dont quelque 80% de la population vit sous le seuil de pauvreté, d’après le rapport. L’institution reconnaît par ailleurs qu’elle ne dispose pas de données fiables sur la pauvreté au Moyen-Orient et au Maghreb en raison des « conflits » et de « la fragilité » dans les principaux pays de la région. AFP
Les derniers chiffres de la Banque mondiale communiqués à la presse ce 4 octobre sont explicites et encourageants : le nombre de personnes qui vivent dans l’extrême pauvreté a été largement diminué, passant de 37 % de la population mondiale en 1990 à moins de 10 % aujourd’hui, alors que, dans le même temps, cette dernière a augmenté de 2 milliards d’habitants. Le phénomène s’est accéléré pendant ces quatre dernières années : ces personnes totalement démunies, sujettes aux famines ou aux épidémies, qui étaient encore 902 millions en 2012 (12,8 % de la population), ne sont plus que 702 millions en 2015, soit 9,6 % de la population mondiale. On apprend également que ce seuil de l’extrême pauvreté a été relevé par la Banque mondiale de 1,25 dollar à 1,90 dollar par jour dès 2011, en raison, selon le président de la Banque, Jim Yong Kim, « de l’évolution de l’inflation, du prix des matières premières et des taux de change » constatée entre 2005 et 2011 dans les quinze pays les plus pauvres de la planète. Ce seuil n’est donc plus de 1 dollar par jour comme on nous le serine parfois, mais de près du double. Le Point
The thing that always strikes me when we get into these discussions is the United States takes in more people every year legally than the rest of the world combined. You start from that premise — it was 1.7 million last year, you want to add another 400,000 to 600,000 that came in without the benefit of doing it the right way. What is the right number? If over 2 million is not enough, would someone please tell me what that right number is, and would other countries act accordingly. Rep. Michael Burgess (Texas)
The Vatican, for its part, welcomes millions of visitors a year — but allows only a very select few, who meet strict criteria, to be admitted as residents or citizens. Only about 450 of its 800 or so residents actually hold citizenship, according to a 2012 study by the Library of Congress. That study said citizens are either church cardinals who reside in the Vatican, the Holy See’s diplomats around the world, and those who have to reside in the city because of their jobs, such as the Swiss Guard. Spouses and children who live in the city because of their relationship with citizens — including the Swiss Guard and workers such as the gardener — have also been granted citizenship. But that means few of the Vatican’s citizens are women. The Washington Times
A fair-minded person might infer from his advice that capitalism is more prone to impoverish than to create enough wealth to bring the underclass out of poverty. Yet the poor in the free-market United States are mostly better off than the middle classes in Pope Francis’ homeland. Argentina’s statism has transformed one of the most resource-rich countries in the world into an impoverished nation. Are the wages of socialism therefore less than Christian? Authoritarian regimes such as the Castro dynasty in Cuba or Iran’s theocracy do not receive much criticism from the pope for their administration of state justice. Yet Francis blasted capital punishment, which in America is mostly reserved for first-degree murderers, not the perpetrators of thought crimes as in Cuba and Iran. (…) Hundreds of thousands of migrants are now swarming illegally into the West, whether into Europe mostly from the Middle East, or into America from Latin America. They arrive in numbers that make them difficult to assimilate and integrate, with radical repercussions on the host country’s ability to serve the social needs of its own poorer citizens. Yet Francis reserves most of his advice for host countries to ensure that they treat the often-impoverished and mostly young male newcomers with Christian humanity. That advice is admirable. But the pope might have likewise lectured the leaders of countries such as Syria and Mexico to stop whatever they are doing to heartlessly drive out millions of their own citizens from their homes. Or he might have suggested that migrants seek lawful immigration and thereby more charitably not harm the interests of immigrants who wait patiently until they can resettle lawfully. Or he might have praised the West for uniquely creating conditions that draw in, rather than repel, the world’s migrants. (…) If a Christian truly believes that capitalism is the world’s only hope, that illegal immigration is detrimental to all involved, or that the Iranian nuke deal is a prelude to either war or nuclear proliferation, is he thereby somewhat less Christian or Catholic? (…) Would an American president dare to visit the Vatican to lecture the leaders of the Roman Catholic Church about their blatant sex and age discrimination, and to advise Francis that his successor should be female or under 50? (…) In this new freewheeling climate of frank exchange, should Protestant friends now advise Catholic dioceses to open their aggregate 200 million acres of global church lands to help house current migrants? Or should Francis first deplore the capitalist business practices in the administration of the so-called Vatican Bank? Should the Church turn over to prosecuting attorneys all the names of past and present clergy accused of criminal sexual abuse, and cede all investigation and punishment entirely to the state? (…) But do we really want a priest in the role of Bernie Sanders or Ted Cruz, dressed in ancient Roman miter and vestments, addressing hot-button issues with divine sanction? Victor Davis Hanson
Pope Francis has created political controversy…by blaming capitalism for many of the problems of the poor. …putting aside religious or philosophical questions, we have more than two centuries of historical evidence… Any serious look at the history of human beings over the millennia shows that the species began in poverty. It is not poverty, but prosperity, that needs explaining. …which has a better track record of helping the less fortunate — fighting for a bigger slice of the economic pie, or producing a bigger pie? …the official poverty level in the U.S. is the upper middle class in Mexico. The much criticized market economy of the U.S. has done far more for the poor than the ideology of the left. Pope Francis’ own native Argentina was once among the leading economies of the world, before it was ruined by the kind of ideological notions he is now promoting around the world. Thomas Sowell
He has been called the « slum pope » and « a pope for the poor. » And indeed, it’s true that Pope Francis, leader to 1.3 billion Roman Catholics, speaks often of those in need. He’s described the amount of poverty and inequality in the world as « a scandal » and implored the Church to fight what he sees as a « culture of exclusion. » Yet even as he calls for greater concern for the marginalized, he broadly and cavalierly condemns the market-driven economic development that has lifted a billion people out of extreme poverty within the lifetime of the typical millennial. A lack of understanding of even basic economic concepts has led one of the most influential and beloved human beings on the planet to decry free enterprise, opine that private property rights must not be treated as « inviolable, » hold up as the ideal « cooperatives of small producers » over « economies of scale, » accuse the Western world of « scandalous level[s] of consumption, » and assert that we need « to think of containing growth by setting some reasonable limits. » Given his vast influence, which extends far beyond practicing Catholics, this type of rhetoric is deeply troubling. It’s impossible to know how much of an impact his words are having on concrete policy decisions—but it’s implausible to deny that when he calls for regulating and constraining the free markets and economic growth that alleviate truly crushing poverty, the world is listening. A man Politico described as insisting « reality comes before theory » could not be more mistaken about the empirical truth of capitalism’s role in our world. While income inequality within developed countries may be growing, the income gap between the First World and the rest of the world is decreasing fast. As the World Bank’s Branko Milanovic has documented, we are in the midst of « the first decline in global inequality between world citizens since the Industrial Revolution. » In 1960, notes the Cato Institute’s Marian Tupy, the average America earned 11 times more than the average resident of Asia. Today, Americans make 4.8 times as much. « The narrowing of the income gap, » Tupy found, « is a result of growing incomes in the rest of the world, » not a decline in incomes in developed nations. (…) In just two decades, extreme poverty has been reduced by more than 50 percent. « In 1990, almost half of the population in developing regions lived on less than $1.25 a day, » reads a 2014 report from the United Nations. « This rate dropped to 22 per cent by 2010, reducing the number of people living in extreme poverty by 700 million. » How was this secular miracle achieved? The bulk of the answer is through economic development, as nascent markets began to take hold in large swaths of the world that were until recently desperately poor. (…) There are moments when Pope Francis seems to comprehend all this. In his encyclical, he quotes the now-sainted Pope John Paul II that « science and technology are wonderful products of a God-given human creativity, » and asks, « How can we not feel gratitude and appreciation for this progress? » But a few short pages later he suggests that « a decrease in the pace of production and consumption » would yet be for the best. The lasting impression is not of a staunch anti-capitalist tirelessly advocating for a well-thought-out alternative to the present system, but of a man confused about how to achieve the things he wants. Nowhere is that confusion clearer than when Pope Francis discusses the environment, the overarching topic of Laudato Si. To preserve the earth he wants us to live simpler lives, as by the example he’s set by eschewing the lavish trappings of the papacy. But he goes further than that, not just calling for individual restraint but also for government enforcement of what amounts to a reduction in overall economic activity. It does not seem to occur to him that this prescription might have adverse effects for the people still struggling to pull themselves out of desperate conditions and into the type of comfortable life he’s asking the rest of us to forgo. For the poor, the problem isn’t too much consumption, but too little wealth to afford the basic things the First World takes for granted. (…) Over and over throughout Laudato Si, he writes about the importance of protecting « God’s handiwork, » of providing access to green spaces, of « learning to see and appreciate beauty, » and of living in « harmony with creation. » But over and over we’ve seen that the type of concern for the environment he’s describing is a luxury good—that is, a thing people consume more of as they become richer. This should be surprising to no one. It’s been more than 70 years since Abraham Maslow introduced the idea that human needs can be organized into a hierarchy—and that until a person has satisfied her basic requirements for food, shelter, safety, and the like, she won’t be motivated to pursue higher-level needs, like friendship and « self-actualization. » While Pope Francis is not wrong to suggest that clean air and beautiful vistas matter, he seems to overlook how much less they matter to the mother in Burundi who cannot feed her children than they do to the white-collar professional in the U.S. or his native Argentina. (…) The World Health Organization (WHO) released data last year showing that the most air-polluted cities on the planet are all in India, Pakistan, and Iran. The lowest concentrations of particulate matter are meanwhile found in Iceland, Australia, and Canada. Both the economics and the history are clear: The more prosperous the developing world becomes, the more it too will be able to demand and achieve livable conditions. If your goal is to move the world to concern for the preservation of biodiversity, the answer is economic growth. If you want to increase access to clean water, the solution is to increase global wealth, and the consumer power that comes with it. Stephanie Slade
Il y a un siècle, l’Argentine et les États-Unis étaient à peu près aussi riches (ce qui veut dire, à bien des égards, qu’ils étaient tout aussi pauvres). Au cours des 115 dernières années, l’écart est frappant. Et il est pas accidentel. Comme Ronald Bailey l’a expliqué dans sa critique du livre de 2002 d’Hernando de Soto, Mystères de la capitale, Dans les années 1920, l’Argentine était l’une des plus grandes économies du monde, avec un revenu moyen à peu près équivalent à celui de la France. Riche comme un Argentin était un slogan souvent utilisé dans les cafés parisiens pour qualifier une personne particulièrement riche. (…) Depuis les années 1940, l’Argentine s’est engagée dans une série de politiques – nationalisation des industries, expansion des services de l’Etat et emprunts massifs à l’étranger – qui l’a fait rétrograder dans le monde. Au cours des dernières années, le revenu par habitant argentin s’est effondré, passant de 8 909 dollars – le double de celui du Mexique et trois fois celui de la Pologne – en 1999 à 2500 dollars aujourd’hui, à peu près à égalité avec la Jamaïque et la Biélorussie … Nick Gillespie
Argentina actually was slightly richer than the U.S. back in 1896. But that nation’s shift to statism, particularly after World War II, hindered Argentina’s growth rates. And seemingly modest differences in growth, compounded over decades, have a huge impact on living standards for ordinary people (i.e., inflation-adjusted GDP per person climbing nearly $27,000 in the U.S. vs an increase of less than $6,700 in Argentina). (…) To help make the bigger point about the importance of economic liberty, let’s now compare the United States with a jurisdiction that consistently has been ranked as the world’s freest economy. Look at changes in economic output in America and Hong Kong from 1950 to the present. As you can see, Hong Kong started the period as a very poor jurisdiction, with per-capita output only about one-fourth of American levels. But thanks to better policy, which led to faster growth compounding over several decades, Hong Kong has now caught up to the United States. What’s most remarkable, if you look at the table, is that per-capita output over the past 65 years has soared by more than 1,275 percent in Hong Kong. (…) In 1900, only 3% of American homes had electric lights but more than 99% had them before the end of the century. Infant mortality rates were 165 per thousand in 1900 and 7 per thousand by 1997. By 2001, most Americans living below the official poverty line had central air conditioning, a motor vehicle, cable television with multiple TV sets, and other amenities. A scholar specializing in the study of Latin America said that the official poverty level in the U.S. is the upper middle class in Mexico. The much criticized market economy of the U.S. has done far more for the poor than the ideology of the left. Pope Francis’ own native Argentina was once among the leading economies of the world, before it was ruined by the kind of ideological notions he is now promoting around the world. Ronald Bailey

Attention: un miracle peut en cacher un autre !

Au lendemain de la tournée « Danse avec les tyrans » d »un prétendu chef de la chrétienté …

Qui avait non seulement refusé de rencontrer les dissidents cubains mais nie à présent tout soutien à une greffière anti-« mariage pour tous » rencontrée secrètement juste avant son départ des Etats-Unis …

Et qui oubliant, à la tête d’une église possédant l’un des plus riches patrimoines de la planète (combien de divisions de réfugiés accueillis ?), les persécutions ou même le véritable génocide que subissent actuellement les chrétiens à travers le monde du Moyen-Orient à la Chine

N’avait pas de mots assez durs pour fustiger la richesse et le seul capitalisme qui semblent attirer tant de ses chers réfugiés y compris cubains …

Et de mots assez doux pour louer le miracle de la pauvreté dont les même réfugiés semblent si pressés de séparer …

Comment ne pas voir, avec la revue américaine Reason, le miracle encore plus extraordinaire …

De la pauvreté continuée ou même retrouvée, en ces temps qui ont vu l’extrême pauvreté diminuer de moité en à peine deux décennies, de tout un ensemble de pays…

Dont, suite au même malencontreux choix de l’étatisme que propose aujourd’hui la gauche britannique,… l’Argentine natale dudit pape ?

Poor Planning
How to achieve the miracle of poverty
Ronald Bailey
Reason
September 18, 2002

In his wonderful bookThe Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else, the Peruvian economist Hernando De Soto notes: « The cities of the Third World and the former communist countries are teeming with entrepreneurs. You cannot walk through a Middle Eastern market, hike up to a Latin American village, or climb into a taxicab in Moscow without someone trying to make a deal with you. The inhabitants of these countries possess talent, enthusiasm, and an astonishing ability to wring profit out of practically nothing. » It’s possible to keep such people down only if governments dedicate themselves to the pursuit of really bad policies for decades at a time.

Most notorious, of course, was the grinding poverty sustained for seven decades in the communist bloc. The phrase rich communist country has always been an oxymoron. We still have illustrations of communism’s brilliance at sustaining poverty in Cuba and North Korea. Today, even though Cuba has opened a bunch of swank hard currency beach resorts, its GDP per capita is still only $1,700 at purchasing power parity. Per capita GDP in North Korea, which is asking again this year for food aid, is only $1,000.

But policies don’t have to be as bad as totalitarian communism to make people poor. Consider the case of Argentina. In the 1920s Argentina’s was one of the largest economies in the world, with an average income about the same as France’s. Rich as an Argentine was a catch phrase often used in Paris cafés to describe an especially wealthy person.

Since the 1940s Argentina has embarked on a series of policies—nationalization of industries, expansion of state services, and vast overseas borrowing—that has eroded its rank in the world. In recent years, Argentina’s per capita income has collapsed, falling from $8,909—double Mexico’s and three times Poland’s—in 1999 to $2,500 today, roughly on par with Jamaica and Belarus.

Or take Sweden. Long gone are the arguments about the success of that kingdom’s alleged « middle way » between capitalism and communism. In 1970 Sweden was ranked third in per capita income among industrialized nations; today it ranks 17th. The country’s welfare state is strangling its economy. Taxes consume 55 percent of Sweden’s GDP, while public spending equals 65 percent of GDP.

 Just as bad policies can ensure poverty, good policies spark wealth creation. As De Soto points out, in the late 19th century tens of thousands of Japanese emigrated from their impoverished country to Peru in search of a better life. In the 1950s South Korean politicians said they hoped their country’s citizens would some day be as rich as Jamaicans. Clearly Japan (per capita GDP: $24,900) and South Korea (per capita GDP: $16,100) have done something right, while Peru (per capita GDP: $4,550) and Jamaica (per capita GDP: $3,700) have not. Just for comparison, U.S. GDP per capita is $36,200.

Finally, there is the heartbreak of Africa, where average per capita incomes have been falling for three decades. African politicians have embraced at one time or another all of the policy prescriptions for poverty listed below. In between, they have fought numerous civil wars and engaged in various bloody tribal pogroms.

Some recipes guaranteed to get lean results

Here, then, is a short guide for kleptocrats and egalitarians who want to keep their countries poor. All of these policies have stood the test of time as techniques for creating and maintaining poverty. The list is by no means exhaustive, but it will give would-be political leaders a good idea of how to start their countries on the road to ruin.

First, make sure that your country’s money is no good. Print money like there’s no tomorrow. Hyperinflation is one of the easiest and most popular ways to dismantle an economy. Another popular monetary gambit is to make sure your currency is not convertible. This guarantees that no one will ever want to invest in your country.

To further discourage investment, be sure to nationalize all major Industries. Nationalization has additional poverty-enhancing benefits. For example, it will ensure that the nationalized industries never improve technologically or become more efficient, and it makes workers pathetically dependent on their political masters, namely you.

Of course, you may find it too tiresome to nationalize everything, in which case it is very important that you establish high tariffs that insulate your country’s remaining private industries (usually owned by your cronies anyway) from competition.

In addition, your legal system should make it nearly impossible for anyone to license a new business, however small. This will offer opportunities for your bureaucrats to make a living through corruption and will protect your cronies from domestic competition. An added advantage is that most commerce will be made illegal and subject to arbitrary enforcement.

This leads to the point that property is critical. Once people start to own something, they invest in it and improve it, leading inexorably to the creation of wealth. Again, the legal system can help to make it impossible to issue clear titles so that your citizens can’t buy, sell, or borrow against their « property. » Also, force your farmers to sell their crops to government commodity boards at below-market rates. This will discourage them from investing in anything more advanced than subsistence agriculture, and you will be able to sell whatever crops you do seize at low prices to keep the urban populations quiet.

Some Last Advice

Another popular policy is confiscatory taxes. This strategy, which allows you to claim that you are soaking the rich in the name of equity, has long been fashionable among the genteelly stagnating economies of Europe.

Finally, you may have missed the golden age of international graft, when the World Bank and even commercial banks showered the governments of poor countries with loans. But if the opportunity arises, you should follow in the footsteps of two deceased leaders whose fortunes are now being divvied up in « Please Help » spams: Zairean dictator Mobutu Sese Seko and Nigerian General Sani Abacha. Take a page from their book by redirecting international loans directly to your Swiss bank accounts, sticking your citizens with the bill.

Unlike Mobutu, however, make sure to give up the pleasures of arbitrary power before you’re old (or overthrown in a coup), and move to Provence to enjoy your ill-gotten gains. Of course, be sure to invest your purloined riches only in countries with stable money, strong property rights, and honest bureaucracies.

Keeping people poor is hard work, but following the above policies will achieve that goal. Modern poverty is a miracle that only you can make happen.

Voir aussi:

If Pope Francis Wants to Help the Poor, He Should Embrace Capitalism

Markets and globalization have lifted billions out of poverty and lessened global inequality. So what’s behind the pope’s agenda?

Yet even as he calls for greater concern for the marginalized, he broadly and cavalierly condemns the market-driven economic development that has lifted a billion people out of extreme poverty within the lifetime of the typical millennial. A lack of understanding of even basic economic concepts has led one of the most influential and beloved human beings on the planet to decry free enterprise, opine that private property rights must not be treated as « inviolable, » hold up as the ideal « cooperatives of small producers » over « economies of scale, » accuse the Western world of « scandalous level[s] of consumption, » and assert that we need « to think of containing growth by setting some reasonable limits. »

Given his vast influence, which extends far beyond practicing Catholics, this type of rhetoric is deeply troubling. It’s impossible to know how much of an impact his words are having on concrete policy decisions—but it’s implausible to deny that when he calls for regulating and constraining the free markets and economic growth that alleviate truly crushing poverty, the world is listening. As a libertarian who is also a devout Roman Catholic, I’m afraid as well that statements like these from Pope Francis reinforce the mistaken notion that libertarianism and religion are fundamentally incompatible.

There’s no question that the pope at times seems downright hostile to much of what market-loving Catholics believe. In this summer’s lauded-by-the-press environmental encyclical Laudato Si (from which the quotes in the second paragraph were drawn), Pope Francis wrote that people who trust the invisible hand suffer from the same mindset that leads to slavery and « the sexual exploitation of children. » In Evangelii Gaudium, his 2013 apostolic exhortation, he chastised those who « continue to defend trickle-down theories which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice and inclusiveness in the world. »

Even more frustratingly, he asserted that such a belief in free markets « has never been confirmed by the facts. » Worse still, this year he stated in an interview: « I recognize that globalization has helped many people to lift themselves out of poverty, but it has condemned many other people to starve. It is true that in absolute terms the world’s wealth has grown, but inequality and poverty have arisen. » Globalization has caused poverty to « arise » and « condemned…many people to starve »?

A man Politico described as insisting « reality comes before theory » could not be more mistaken about the empirical truth of capitalism’s role in our world. While income inequality within developed countries may be growing, the income gap between the First World and the rest of the world is decreasing fast. As the World Bank’s Branko Milanovic has documented, we are in the midst of « the first decline in global inequality between world citizens since the Industrial Revolution. » In 1960, notes the Cato Institute’s Marian Tupy, the average America earned 11 times more than the average resident of Asia. Today, Americans make 4.8 times as much. « The narrowing of the income gap, » Tupy found, « is a result of growing incomes in the rest of the world, » not a decline in incomes in developed nations.

Markets: The Greatest Anti-Poverty Tool

« Entrepreneurial capitalism takes more people out of poverty than aid. » With those 10 words, spoken to an audience at Georgetown University in 2013, philanthropist rock star Bono demonstrated a keener understanding of economic reality than the leader of global Catholicism.

The U2 frontman clearly has it right—and Pope Francis is wrong to suggest that poverty is growing, or that capitalism, free markets, and globalization are fueling the (non-existent) problem. In just two decades, extreme poverty has been reduced by more than 50 percent. « In 1990, almost half of the population in developing regions lived on less than $1.25 a day, » reads a 2014 report from the United Nations. « This rate dropped to 22 per cent by 2010, reducing the number of people living in extreme poverty by 700 million. »

How was this secular miracle achieved? The bulk of the answer is through economic development, as nascent markets began to take hold in large swaths of the world that were until recently desperately poor. A 2013 editorial from The Economist noted that the Millennium Development Goals « may have helped marginally, by creating a yardstick for measuring progress, and by focusing minds on the evil of poverty. Most of the credit, however, must go to capitalism and free trade, for they enable economies to grow—and it was growth, principally, that has eased destitution. »

The image of economic growth as an « engine » that drives progress and lifts people up is nothing novel, of course. In his book The Road to Freedom, American Enterprise Institute president Arthur Brooks discussed the transformation the U.S. underwent in the 1800s as a result of the Industrial Revolution:

Average prosperity in the 19th century began to rocket upwards…In 1850, life expectancy at birth in the United States was 38.3. By 2010, it was 78. The literacy rate in the United States rose from 80 percent in 1870 to 99 percent today. And real per capita GDP increased twenty-two-fold from 1820 to 1998.

Poverty may never be fully a thing of the past. But if you’re looking to increase global prosperity and decrease global hardship—something Christians as a rule are pretty concerned with and Pope Francis has expressed a particular interest in—history has shown us the way to do it: through industrialization and mass production, trade liberalization that lets goods and people flow across borders to serve each other better, and property rights that give everyone the ability to put their wealth to work for them.

Ultimately, hindering the free market system is the surest way we know of to slow the pace of growth. And it’s growth that leads to quality-of-life improvements not just here in America but also—especially—in the developing world. Pope Francis thinks free marketeers have been deluded by a « myth of unlimited material progress. » If we have, it’s because we’ve seen for ourselves the wonders that economic development and technological advancement can bring—from modern medicine stopping diseases that were the scourge of civilizations for centuries, to buildings more able to withstand natural disasters than at any time before, to ever-widening access to the air conditioning he wishes us to use less of.

The pope is enamored of the idea of « small-scale food production systems … using a modest amount of land and producing less waste, be it in small agricultural parcels, in orchards and gardens, hunting and wild harvesting or local fishing. » He does not seem to understand that it is mass-market production—including often-vilfiied biotech crops—that has freed millions of people from hunger by allowing us to reap far more food from far fewer resources.

Productivity gains have been so great that humanity is on the brink of being able to release enormous tracts of farmland back to nature while feeding more people than ever before, according to researchers at the Program for the Human Environment at Rockefeller University. But resisting such advances out of skepticism or nostalgia can have devastating consequences. Take for example the story of Golden Rice, a genetically modified crop fortified with Vitamin A, whose introduction has been delayed since 2000 by government regulations. The grain has the potential to save up to 3 million poor people a year from going blind, and to alleviate Vitamin A deficiency—which compromises the immune system—in a quarter of a billion people a year. But unwarranted fears of « frankenfoods » have kept Golden Rice from widespread use in the developing world. In a study published last year in the journal Environment and Development Economics, scholars at Technische Universität München and the University of California, Berkeley estimated those delays resulted in the loss of 1.4 million life years over the past decade—and that was just in India.

There are moments when Pope Francis seems to comprehend all this. In his encyclical, he quotes the now-sainted Pope John Paul II that « science and technology are wonderful products of a God-given human creativity, » and asks, « How can we not feel gratitude and appreciation for this progress? » But a few short pages later he suggests that « a decrease in the pace of production and consumption » would yet be for the best. The lasting impression is not of a staunch anti-capitalist tirelessly advocating for a well-thought-out alternative to the present system, but of a man confused about how to achieve the things he wants.

Nowhere is that confusion clearer than when Pope Francis discusses the environment, the overarching topic of Laudato Si. To preserve the earth he wants us to live simpler lives, as by the example he’s set by eschewing the lavish trappings of the papacy. But he goes further than that, not just calling for individual restraint but also for government enforcement of what amounts to a reduction in overall economic activity. It does not seem to occur to him that this prescription might have adverse effects for the people still struggling to pull themselves out of desperate conditions and into the type of comfortable life he’s asking the rest of us to forgo. For the poor, the problem isn’t too much consumption, but too little wealth to afford the basic things the First World takes for granted.

To Save the Planet, Empower More Consumers

But perhaps, as the pope suggests, slower economic growth really is required if we are to save the planet?

Here, too, Pope Francis suffers from a blindness to empirical reality. Over and over throughout Laudato Si, he writes about the importance of protecting « God’s handiwork, » of providing access to green spaces, of « learning to see and appreciate beauty, » and of living in « harmony with creation. » But over and over we’ve seen that the type of concern for the environment he’s describing is a luxury good—that is, a thing people consume more of as they become richer.

This should be surprising to no one. It’s been more than 70 years since Abraham Maslow introduced the idea that human needs can be organized into a hierarchy—and that until a person has satisfied her basic requirements for food, shelter, safety, and the like, she won’t be motivated to pursue higher-level needs, like friendship and « self-actualization. » While Pope Francis is not wrong to suggest that clean air and beautiful vistas matter, he seems to overlook how much less they matter to the mother in Burundi who cannot feed her children than they do to the white-collar professional in the U.S. or his native Argentina.

Again, Pope Francis comes maddeningly close to acknowledging this in his encyclical. « In some countries, » he writes, « there are positive examples of environmental improvement: rivers, polluted for decades, have been cleaned up; native woodlands have been restored; landscapes have been beautified thanks to environmental renewal projects; beautiful buildings have been erected; advances have been made in the production of non-polluting energy… » But he ignores that it’s in the most developed parts of the world where the push for sustainability and green energy, for living slow and eating local, for highway beautification and Earth Day and nearly every other conservation effort originate.

The pope decries « the unruly growth of many cities, which have become unhealthy to live in. » He does not seem to recognize that the cities that are true horrors to live in are the very places that would benefit most from robust economic activity. He condemns « the pollution produced by the companies which operate in less developed countries in ways they never could do at home. » He does not consider that rich Americans and Europeans can afford to care about such things because we’re not malnourished or dying of malaria.

The World Health Organization (WHO) released data last year showing that the most air-polluted cities on the planet are all in India, Pakistan, and Iran. The lowest concentrations of particulate matter are meanwhile found in Iceland, Australia, and Canada.

Both the economics and the history are clear: The more prosperous the developing world becomes, the more it too will be able to demand and achieve livable conditions. If your goal is to move the world to concern for the preservation of biodiversity, the answer is economic growth. If you want to increase access to clean water, the solution is to increase global wealth, and the consumer power that comes with it. Studies have shown that deforestation reverses when a country’s annual GDP reaches about $3,000 per capita. While some environmental indicators do get worse during the early stages of industrialization, the widely accepted Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis convincingly argues that they quickly reverse themselves when national income grows beyond a certain threshold. If the pope wants a cleaner world, the best way to get there is by creating a richer world—something Pope Francis’ own policy recommendations will make more difficult.

Why This Matters to Me

Watching someone a billion people look to for moral guidance—and who’s been known to broker political agreements between world leaders—assume a critical posture toward capitalism is troubling to me as a believer in free markets. But it’s not just that I fear the pope is weakening public support for the economic freedom that increases standards of living while minimizing poverty. It’s also that when Pope Francis slanders the « magical » thinking of people who trust markets more than government, he’s reinforcing the already widespread idea that libertarianism and religion aren’t compatible.

As a churchgoing, Christ-loving Catholic, I feel duty-bound to push back against that notion. It’s not the case that Rome demands fidelity on matters of economic policy—or that everything a pope teaches must be accepted by the faithful as correct. Actually, the ability to make unerring declarations is narrowly circumscribed according to Church teachings. To quote directly from the Second Vatican Council’s Lumen Gentium (emphasis mine), « The Roman Pontiff, head of the college of bishops, enjoys this infallibility in virtue of his office, when, as supreme pastor and teacher of all the faithful…he proclaims by a definitive act a doctrine pertaining to faith or morals. »

In practice, such « definitive acts, » in which a pope makes clear he’s teaching « from the chair » of Jesus, are almost vanishingly rare.

« Catholic social teaching is not a detailed policy platform that all Catholics are obliged to sign on to, » says Catholic University’s Jay W. Richards. « It’s an articulation of what I’d refer to as ‘perennial principles.’…The encyclicals themselves frequently recognize that it falls to Catholic laymen and laywomen, in their respective roles, to take the principles and apply them in concrete situations. »

Even Pope Francis himself has noted that « neither the Pope nor the Church have a monopoly on the interpretation of social realities or the proposal of solutions to contemporary problems. » The passage, from Evangelii Gaudium, continues:

Here I can repeat the insightful observation of Pope Paul VI: « In the face of such widely varying situations, it is difficult for us to utter a unified message and to put forward a solution which has universal validity. This is not our ambition, nor is it our mission. It is up to the Christian communities to analyze with objectivity the situation which is proper to their own country.

In other words, a faithful Catholic need not always agree with a sitting pope. The New York Times columnist Ross Douthat has repeatedly encouraged the faithful to consider that we might actually have a responsibility to resist the pope so as to help preserve the Church from error. The Catechism of the Catholic Church says that « in all he says and does, man is obliged to follow faithfully what he knows to be just and right »—that is, to listen to his « moral conscience. » And so, although I respect Pope Francis’ office, I feel no compunction in saying I think he needs to reassess his beliefs about the power of free markets to make the world a better place. 

The Freedom to Be Better Christians

Responding to the pope’s statements and writings on these topics is made harder by the fact that, like many non-libertarians, he often blurs the line between private vs. public action. Is he simply encouraging people to resist avarice and demonstrate more Christian charity at an individual level? Or is he condemning the capitalist system and suggesting it be replaced at a government level? We know the pope distrusts « the unregulated market. » But does he think extensive laws are needed to constrict people’s choices and redistribute their property? Or can moral actors, making ethical consumption decisions and voluntarily sharing what they have with the less fortunate, provide regulation enough?

Much of what the pope writes seems to be concerned with micro-level, personal behavior. Consider this passage from Laudato Si: « We are speaking of an attitude of the heart…which accepts each moment as a gift from God to be lived to the full. Jesus taught us this attitude when he invited us to contemplate the lilies of the field and the birds of the air…and in this way he showed us the way to overcome that unhealthy anxiety which makes us superficial, aggressive and compulsive consumers. »

To the extent he’s simply urging his followers to better live out our Christian vocations, I find little on which to disagree. A pastor’s job is to be concerned with the eternal souls of his flock. It’s true that « an appreciation of the immense dignity of the poor » is « one of our deepest convictions as believers, » and the Church has always encouraged its members to be good stewards of natural creation. Moreover, the Holy Father is right to warn that « the mere amassing of things and pleasures are not enough to give meaning and joy to the human heart. » Economists describe people as utility, not profit, maximizers. Even the most rigid libertarian knows the pursuit of happiness is more than the pursuit of material wealth.

But Pope Francis often goes beyond just reminding Christians of our « call to sainthood. » In a speech at the World Meeting of Popular Movements this summer in Bolivia he said: « Let us say no to an economy of exclusion and inequality, where money rules, rather than service. That economy kills. That economy excludes. That economy destroys Mother Earth. » Note that here it isn’t just « compulsive consumerism » and « unfettered greed » in his crosshairs—it’s the economy itself. This gives credence to the idea that he thinks the very structures of the market system need to be upended.

« The problem is [Pope Francis] doesn’t clearly make distinctions between capitalism and trade and greed and corporatism, » like the kind he would have seen in Argentina, Catholic University’s Richards says. « My sense is he’s skeptical of what he thinks capitalism is, but also that he hasn’t made a careful study of these things. »

Evidence that the pope is working with an inaccurate picture of what capitalists really believe comes from Evangelii Gaudium, wherein he wrote that we exhibit « a crude and naïve trust in the goodness of those wielding economic power. » Richards thinks Pope Francis fundamentally misunderstands Adam Smith’s key insight: that even if the people who « wield economic power » are narrowly self-interested, the market will orient their behavior in a way that benefits others.

« Now as a matter of fact we live in a fallen world, and so the question is: What is the best economic arrangement to either mitigate human selfishness or even to channel it into something socially beneficial? » Richards asks. « Precisely the reason I believe in limited government and a free economy is because it’s the best of the live alternatives at channeling both people’s creativity and ingenuity, but also their greed. »

The pope doesn’t see it that way. From his perspective, either you support unfettered capitalism or you care about poverty. Among free marketeers, he says dismissively, the problems of the poor « are brought up as an afterthought, a question which gets added almost out of duty or in a tangential way, if not treated merely as collateral damage. » But that is a deeply uncharitable characterization of those who see things differently than he does. The people I know who invest their time and talent into defending economic freedom do so not in spite of the effect we think a capitalist system has on the least among us, but because of it. As John Mackey, the co-founder of Whole Foods (a company that’s a leader in philanthropic giving), argues in a recent interview with Reason, one of the strongest moral arguments for capitalism is that it alleviates poverty.

That’s not to say we shouldn’t still be working to transcend our fallen nature. Within a free society there’s plenty of space, for those who are so inclined, to heed Pope Francis’ appeal—to be less materialistic, more selfless, truer disciples of Christ. In fact, I’ve argued that only a liberalized economic order grants people the autonomy to choose for themselves to be generous. If you don’t have the freedom to accumulate treasure, how can you possibly share it with the world?

Stephanie Slade is deputy managing editor at Reason magazine.

Voir également:

Maybe Pope Francis Doesn’t Understand Capitalism Because He Confuses It with Argentine Corporatism
100 years ago, « rich as an Argentine » was a catchphrase. That hasn’t been true for a long time.
Nick Gillespie
Reason
Sep. 24, 2015

As my colleague—and devout Roman Catholic—Stephanie Slade has argued, Pope Francis doesn’t really understand capitalism, especially its role in lifting up the poor from poverty and deprivation.

The folks at Human Progress, a site operated by the Cato Institute’s Marian Tupy, suggest that the pope’s Argentine origins might be one source of confusion. Argentina is not a capitalist state but a corporatist one. If you mistake corporatism for capitalism, you would surely have a bad view of the latter. A century ago, Argentina and the United States were about equally wealthy (which is to say, in many ways, that they were equally poor).

Over the past 115 years, the divergence is striking. And it’s not accidental. As Ronald Bailey explained in a review of Hernando de Soto’s 2002 book, Mysteries of Capital,

In the 1920s Argentina’s was one of the largest economies in the world, with an average income about the same as France’s. Rich as an Argentine was a catch phrase often used in Paris cafés to describe an especially wealthy person.

Since the 1940s Argentina has embarked on a series of policies—nationalization of industries, expansion of state services, and vast overseas borrowing—that has eroded its rank in the world. In recent years, Argentina’s per capita income has collapsed, falling from $8,909—double Mexico’s and three times Poland’s—in 1999 to $2,500 today, roughly on par with Jamaica and Belarus.

No one is using « rich as an Argentine » these days, that’s for sure. The country’s economy lurches from one crisis to another, so much so that residents now are turning to Bitcoin as a way to escape Argentina’s constantly inflating and deflating currency.

Voir encore:

Pope Wrongly Blames Capitalism For Ills Of Poor

Thomas Sowell

Investor’s Business daily

09/21/2015

Pope Francis has created political controversy, both inside and outside the Catholic Church, by blaming capitalism for many of the problems of the poor. We can no doubt expect more of the same during his visit to the United States.

Pope Francis is part of a larger trend of the rise of the political left among Catholic intellectuals. He is, in a sense, the culmination of that trend.

There has long been a political left among Catholics, as among other Americans. Often they were part of the pragmatic left, as in the many old Irish-run, big-city political machines that dispensed benefits to the poor in exchange for their votes, as somewhat romantically depicted in the movie classic, « The Last Hurrah. »

But there also has been a more ideological left. Where the Communists had their official newspaper, « The Daily Worker, » there was also « The Catholic Worker » published by Dorothy Day.

A landmark in the evolution of the ideological left among Catholics was a publication in the 1980s, by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, titled « Pastoral Letter on Catholic Social Teaching and the U.S. Economy. »

Although this publication was said to be based on Catholic teachings, one of its principal contributors, Archbishop Rembert Weakland, said: « I think we should be upfront and say that really we took this from the Enlightenment era. »

The specifics of the bishops’ « Pastoral Letter » reflect far more of the secular Enlightenment of the 18th century than of Catholic traditions. Archbishop Weakland admitted that such an Enlightenment figure as Thomas Paine « is now coming back through a strange channel. »

Strange indeed. Paine rejected the teachings of « any church that I know of, » including « the Roman church. » He said: « My own mind is my own church. » Nor was Paine unusual among the leading figures of the 18th-century Enlightenment.

To base social or moral principles on the philosophy of the 18th-century Enlightenment and then call the result « Catholic teachings » suggests something like bait-and-switch advertising.

But, putting aside religious or philosophical questions, we have more than two centuries of historical evidence of what has actually happened as the ideas of people like those Enlightenment figures were put into practice in the real world — beginning with the French Revolution and its disastrous aftermath.

The authors of the « Pastoral Letter » in the 1980s and Pope Francis today blithely throw around the phrase « the poor, » blaming poverty on what other people are doing to or for the poor.

Any serious look at the history of human beings over the millennia shows that the species began in poverty. It is not poverty, but prosperity, that needs explaining. Poverty is automatic, but prosperity requires many things — none of which is equally distributed around the world or even within a given society.

Geographic settings are radically different, both among nations and within nations. So are demographic differences, with some nations and groups having a median age over 40 and others having a median age under 20. This means that some groups have several times as much adult work experience as others. Cultures are also radically different in many ways.

As distinguished economic historian David S. Landes put it, « The world has never been a level playing field. » But which has a better track record of helping the less fortunate — fighting for a bigger slice of the economic pie, or producing a bigger pie?

In 1900, only 3% of American homes had electric lights but more than 99% had them before the end of the century. Infant mortality rates were 165 per thousand in 1900 and 7 per thousand by 1997. By 2001, most Americans living below the official poverty line had central air conditioning, a motor vehicle, cable television with multiple TV sets, and other amenities.

A scholar specializing in the study of Latin America said that the official poverty level in the U.S. is the upper middle class in Mexico. The much criticized market economy of the U.S. has done far more for the poor than the ideology of the left.

Pope Francis’ own native Argentina was once among the leading economies of the world, before it was ruined by the kind of ideological notions he is now promoting around the world.

Voir de plus:

Pope Francis’s Hypocritical Politicking
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review Online
October 2, 2015

Unpopular though it may be to say so, I, for one, grew exhausted by the non-stop pronouncements /commentaries of Pope Francis. The spiritual leader of 1 billion Catholics — roughly half of the world’s Christians — Francis just completed a high-profile, endlessly publicized visit to the United States.

But unlike past visiting pontiffs, the Argentine-born Francis weighed in on a number of hot-button U.S. social, domestic, and foreign-policy issues during a heated presidential-election cycle.

Francis, in characteristic cryptic language, pontificated about climate change. He lectured on illegal immigration. He harped on the harshness of capitalism, as well as abortion and capital punishment.

A fair-minded person might infer from his advice that capitalism is more prone to impoverish than to create enough wealth to bring the underclass out of poverty. Yet the poor in the free-market United States are mostly better off than the middle classes in Pope Francis’ homeland. Argentina’s statism has transformed one of the most resource-rich countries in the world into an impoverished nation. Are the wages of socialism therefore less than Christian?

Authoritarian regimes such as the Castro dynasty in Cuba or Iran’s theocracy do not receive much criticism from the pope for their administration of state justice. Yet Francis blasted capital punishment, which in America is mostly reserved for first-degree murderers, not the perpetrators of thought crimes as in Cuba and Iran.

Francis believes — and ipso facto puts the church behind the creed — that global warming is man-caused. It is supposedly ongoing and can be addressed only though radical state intervention.

Francis, who arrived in the U.S. in a carbon-spewing jet, seems to leave no room for other views. If the climate really is becoming warmer, it cannot be because of naturally occurring cycles of long duration.

Hundreds of thousands of migrants are now swarming illegally into the West, whether into Europe mostly from the Middle East, or into America from Latin America. They arrive in numbers that make them difficult to assimilate and integrate, with radical repercussions on the host country’s ability to serve the social needs of its own poorer citizens.

Yet Francis reserves most of his advice for host countries to ensure that they treat the often-impoverished and mostly young male newcomers with Christian humanity. That advice is admirable. But the pope might have likewise lectured the leaders of countries such as Syria and Mexico to stop whatever they are doing to heartlessly drive out millions of their own citizens from their homes.

Or he might have suggested that migrants seek lawful immigration and thereby more charitably not harm the interests of immigrants who wait patiently until they can resettle lawfully.

Or he might have praised the West for uniquely creating conditions that draw in, rather than repel, the world’s migrants.

In sum, Francis did not fully understand a country founded on the principle of separation of church and state. And he has tragically harmed that delicate American equilibrium.

If a Christian truly believes that capitalism is the world’s only hope, that illegal immigration is detrimental to all involved, or that the Iranian nuke deal is a prelude to either war or nuclear proliferation, is he thereby somewhat less Christian or Catholic?

Is Francis aware of age-old hospitality adages about guests and hosts, or warnings about those who live in glass houses?

Would an American president dare to visit the Vatican to lecture the leaders of the Roman Catholic Church about their blatant sex and age discrimination, and to advise Francis that his successor should be female or under 50?

Should Americans urge the pope to adopt the supposedly enlightened Western doctrine of disparate impact, which might fault senior Vatican clergymen for failing to promote diversity in matters of sex, race, or age?

In this new freewheeling climate of frank exchange, should Protestant friends now advise Catholic dioceses to open their aggregate 200 million acres of global church lands to help house current migrants? Or should Francis first deplore the capitalist business practices in the administration of the so-called Vatican Bank?

Should the Church turn over to prosecuting attorneys all the names of past and present clergy accused of criminal sexual abuse, and cede all investigation and punishment entirely to the state?

Lots of hypocrisy inevitably follows when churches and their leaders politick.

Conservatives who object to Francis’s sermonizing often enjoy it when the moral majority and born-again Evangelicals stamp their own social agendas with Protestant piety.

Liberals might applaud the pope when he weighs in on global warming and cutthroat capitalism but perhaps want him to stick to religion when he frowns on abortions or female priests.

Because Pope Francis has shed the Catholic Church’s historic immunity from American politics, for good or bad, he and the church are fair game for political pushback.

But do we really want a priest in the role of Bernie Sanders or Ted Cruz, dressed in ancient Roman miter and vestments, addressing hot-button issues with divine sanction?

Voir de même:

Pope Francis is just another liberal political pundit
John Podhoretz
The New York Post
September 25, 2015

Pope Francis is unquestionably a man of ­uncommon personal grace, the possessor of a genuinely beautiful soul. “On Heaven and Earth,” his book-length exchange with Rabbi Abraham Skorka first published in 2010, is a remarkable testament to the breadth of his perspective.

But that’s not exactly the guy who showed up Friday at the United Nations. That pope endorsed the Iran deal, the UN’s environmentalist goals and what amounts to a worldwide open-borders policy on refugees — and ­offered a very specific view of how to promote development in the Third World that’s straight out of a left-wing textbook.

“The International Financial Agencies,” the pope said, “should care for the sustainable development of countries and should ensure that they are not subjected to oppressive lending systems which, far from promoting progress, subject people to mechanisms which generate greater poverty, exclusion and dependence.”

We’re told we must not view the pope’s expression of views on contemporary subjects through the lens of day-to-day issues — that we belittle him and ourselves by examining his words through an ideological filter.

Because of the awesome position he holds, and by dint of his own teachings and his life and teachings before he rose to service as the Vicar of Christ, Francis is said to be deeper and loftier than mere politics.

Sorry: When the pontiff sounds less like a theological leader and more like the 8 p.m. host on MSNBC or the editor of Mother Jones, what’s a guy to do?

Pope Francis is entirely within his rights to become the world’s foremost liberal. But, since that’s what he is, it can’t be wrong to say so.

It is undoubtedly the role of theological leaders to speak to our highest selves, to remind us of eternal moral teachings, to remove us from the everyday and put us in touch with the divine. We look to leaders to tell us what our faith traditions expect of us — what we should do and what we must do.

And, of course, it is impossible to do so without touching on the behavior of people and nations in the present. A leader whose role it is to save the souls of his flock must take account of the particular temptations that beset them and the particular challenges they face.

But that’s wildly different from specifically embracing a UN document, or endorsing a specific agreement ­between nations. And this is what Francis told us:

“The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable ­Development at the World Summit, which opens today, is an important sign of hope. I am similarly confident that the Paris Conference on Climatic Change will secure fundamental and effective agreements.”

When a leader speaks in these sorts of bureaucratic specifics, he is descending from the highest heavens into ordinary, even trivial,  reality. He’s using his ­authority in the realm of the spiritual to influence the ­political behavior of others.

He becomes just another pundit. And who needs another one of those?

Voir aussi:
Recul historique de la pauvreté dans le monde malgré l’Afrique
AFP

04 Oct 2015
L’extrême pauvreté devrait reculer cette année à un niveau sans précédent et frapper moins de 10% de la population mondiale en dépit d’une situation encore « très inquiétante » en Afrique, selon un rapport de la Banque mondiale (BM) publié dimanche.

« Nous pourrions être la première génération dans l’histoire qui pourrait mettre un terme à l’extrême pauvreté », s’est félicité Jim Yong Kim, le président de l’institution qui tient la semaine prochaine son assemblée générale à Lima, au Pérou, avec le FMI.

Selon les projections de la BM, quelque 702 millions de personnes, soit 9,6% de la population mondiale, vivent sous le seuil de pauvreté, que l’institution a d’ailleurs relevé de 1,25 à 1,90 dollar par jour pour tenir notamment compte de l’inflation.

En 2012, date des données disponibles les plus récentes, les plus défavorisés de la planète étaient 902 millions, soit près de 13% de la population mondiale, une proportion qui atteignait encore 29% en 1999.

Un jeune mineur sort de la galerie d’une mine d’or clandestine au Burkina-Faso, le 20 février 2014, dans le village de Nobsin
Selon M. Kim, ce recul est le fruit d’une croissance économique dynamique, d’investissements dans la santé, l’éducation et dans les mécanismes de protection sociale qui ont permis d’éviter à des millions de personnes « de retomber dans la pauvreté ».

Cette embellie, espère le dirigeant, pourrait donner un « nouvel élan » à la communauté internationale après la récente adoption par les Nations unies de nouveaux objectifs de développement durable, dont l’éradication de l’extrême pauvreté.

– Obstacles –

La Banque mondiale note toutefois que « de nombreux obstacles » demeurent, notamment en raison de fortes disparités géographiques.

Si la tendance est à une nette baisse en Asie orientale — et spécialement en Inde — ou en Amérique du Sud, l’extrême pauvreté s’enracine en Afrique subsaharienne où elle frappe encore cette année 35,2% de la population.

Selon la Banque, la région abrite ainsi, à elle seule, la moitié des plus défavorisés du globe.

« La concentration croissante de la pauvreté dans le monde en Afrique subsaharienne est extrêmement inquiétante (…). La région dans son ensemble n’arrive pas à suivre le rythme de réduction de la pauvreté du reste du monde », souligne la Banque mondiale.

La situation est particulièrement préoccupante dans les deux pays les plus touchés sur le globe, Madagascar et la République démocratique du Congo, dont quelque 80% de la population vit sous le seuil de pauvreté, d’après le rapport.

L’institution reconnaît par ailleurs qu’elle ne dispose pas de données fiables sur la pauvreté au Moyen-Orient et au Maghreb en raison des « conflits » et de « la fragilité » dans les principaux pays de la région.

La Banque mondiale met surtout en garde contre tout retournement de la croissance dans les pays émergents, qui montre des signes d’essoufflement après avoir porté l’économie mondiale pendant la crise financière de 2008-2009.

« Le développement a été robuste au cours des deux dernières années mais le long ralentissement mondial depuis la crise financière de 2008 commence à produire ses effets sur les pays émergents », a estimé l’économiste en chef de la BM, Kaushik Basu.

La Banque s’inquiète spécifiquement de l’impact du prochain resserrement de la politique monétaire américaine, qui pourrait conduire les investisseurs à quitter en masse les pays à faible revenu au risque de les priver de ressources vitales.

« Il y a des turbulences à venir (…) qui créeront de nouveaux défis dans le combat pour mettre fin à la pauvreté », a estimé l’économiste en chef de la BM.

Tout en saluant la tendance à un recul de la pauvreté, l’organisation Oxfam a estimé que le chiffre global « restait intolérablement élevé ». « Beaucoup reste à faire », a déclaré Nicolas Mombrial, le directeur de l’organisation à Washington.

« La mobilisation de nouvelles ressources et un changement politique radical sont nécessaires », a-t-il ajouté.

Voir également:

Le Point
08/10/2015
Les derniers chiffres de la Banque mondiale communiqués à la presse ce 4 octobre sont explicites et encourageants : le nombre de personnes qui vivent dans l’extrême pauvreté a été largement diminué, passant de 37 % de la population mondiale en 1990 à moins de 10 % aujourd’hui, alors que, dans le même temps, cette dernière a augmenté de 2 milliards d’habitants. Le phénomène s’est accéléré pendant ces quatre dernières années : ces personnes totalement démunies, sujettes aux famines ou aux épidémies, qui étaient encore 902 millions en 2012 (12,8 % de la population), ne sont plus que 702 millions en 2015, soit 9,6 % de la population mondiale.On apprend également que ce seuil de l’extrême pauvreté a été relevé par la Banque mondiale de 1,25 dollar à 1,90 dollar par jour dès 2011, en raison, selon le président de la Banque, Jim Yong Kim, « de l’évolution de l’inflation, du prix des matières premières et des taux de change » constatée entre 2005 et 2011 dans les quinze pays les plus pauvres de la planète. Ce seuil n’est donc plus de 1 dollar par jour comme on nous le serine parfois, mais de près du double.Toujours trop !Si l’on s’éloigne un peu de la froideur des chiffres pour avoir un autre regard sur ce problème tragique, on ne peut en aucun cas se contenter de ces nouvelles positives, alors que des centaines de millions d’êtres humains risquent encore à tout moment de mourir de faim. Ce sera toujours trop et on ne se satisfera jamais de ces statistiques, même si elles sont en amélioration constante. En revanche, on peut observer et particulièrement en France un étrange phénomène : au lieu de se réjouir de ces avancées, de se féliciter de ces progrès significatifs, nos bobos professionnels et nos donneurs de leçons habituels ne sont plus disponibles pour en parler et préfèrent garder le silence.Ceux qui défilaient contre la faim dans le monde il n’y a pas si longtemps, derrière des drapeaux rouges et des pancartes agressives, ont disparu de la circulation. Quant à ceux d’entre eux qui travaillent dans les médias, en particulier audiovisuels, apparemment ils n’ont plus aucune envie d’en faire état et d’ouvrir de nouveaux débats sur la question : cela les obligerait à admettre que c’est grâce à l’économie de marché que la pauvreté diminue dans le monde, grâce à la baisse des prix des produits de première nécessité et des médicaments, obtenue par la liberté du commerce dans un système concurrentiel, et enfin grâce aux dizaines de milliards de dollars déversés chaque année sur les pays les plus pauvres par les pays capitalistes les plus riches.

Sans compter les milliards des immenses fondations de donateurs follement généreux tels que Bill Gates ou Warren Buffett. Chez les anticapitalistes et les antilibéraux qui peuplent nos ministères, nos administrations, nos partis politiques et nos médias, étatisés ou non, ce serait se trahir que d’admettre simplement cette évidence : depuis l’effondrement du communisme à l’est de l’Europe et l’adoption de l’économie de marché par la Chine, la planète se porte beaucoup mieux grâce au capitalisme.

Voir de même:

Royaume-Uni. Jeremy Corbyn, un perturbateur qui doit faire ses preuves
Europe
Judith Sinnige

Courrier international – Paris
14/09/2015

Jeremy Corbyn après son élection à la tête du parti travailliste, le 12 septembre 2015. PHOTO AFP / BEN STANSALL
Avec l’élection de M. Corbyn, le Parti travailliste a amorcé un virage à gauche qui répond aux demandes de l’électorat – las de l’austérité et des inégalités. Mais, face aux problèmes du pays, le nouveau leader ne propose pas forcément des solutions viables, s’inquiète la presse britannique.

“Un glissement de terrain” (The Independent), “une catastrophe” (Financial Times) plongeant le Parti travailliste dans “une guerre civile” ( The Sunday Times)… La presse britannique fait surenchère de métaphores pour décrire la victoire de Jeremy Corbyn, le radical de gauche qui a été élu président des travaillistes le 12 septembre avec près de 60 % des voix.

Avec l’élection de Jeremy Corbyn, nous avons “un non-conformiste d’extrême gauche à la tête d’un grand parti politique. C’est quelque chose de grave, non seulement pour le Parti travailliste mais pour la politique britannique tout entière”, estime le Financial Times. Le quotidien financier comprend “la colère populaire concernant l’austérité et les inégalités sociales” et “l’image d’authenticité [de M. Corbyn]” qui ont contribué à sa victoire, mais regrette que Corbyn soit “vigoureusement antiaméricain”, qu’il se dise “ami” du Hamas et du Hezbollah, et qu’il “envisagerait de retirer le Royaume-Uni de l’Otan et d’abandonner l’arsenal nucléaire britannique”.

“Hommage à Trotski”
Quant à sa politique économique, elle risque de devenir “un hommage à Trotski digne des années 1980”, poursuit le journal. Il rappelle que M. Corbyn propose de nationaliser les chemins de fer et qu’il “flirte avec l’idée de forcer la Banque d’Angleterre à financer le déficit [en ayant recours à la planche à billets], sans prendre en considération le risque d’inflation”. Comme ces idées sont “à contre-courant et très éloignées de celles de son groupe parlementaire” – en effet six ministres du cabinet travailliste fantôme ont quitté leur poste après l’élection de M. Corbyn –, elles ne permettent pas “une opposition crédible”. C’est donc “mauvais pour le Parti travailliste et encore pire pour notre pays”.

“Ses idées sont simplement dangereuses”
Son élection est “un bond en arrière”, surenchérit The Daily Telegraph. Le journal conservateur estime que le nouveau dirigeant a tort sur toute la ligne et que “sa forme de socialisme est tellement extrême qu’il représente même une rupture avec les courants plus radicaux au sein de son propre parti”. En l’élisant, le parti a “propulsé au milieu de la scène publique un homme dont les idées sont tout simplement dangereuses”.

The Observer est plus indulgent et rappelle que

Corbyn a réussi à faire quelque chose d’extraordinaire : il a mobilisé des centaines de milliers de personnes, y compris des jeunes, à devenir membres d’un parti. Aucun dirigeant politique ni de gauche ni de droite ne l’a fait.”
Néanmoins, le journal de gauche note que “les idées [de Corbyn] ne sont guère nouvelles” et apportent “peu de solutions concrètes aux problèmes auxquels le pays est confronté”. De plus, il appelle Corbyn à faire en sorte que le Parti travailliste cesse d’être “un parti obsédé par les très riches et les très pauvres, qui ne propose rien à ceux au milieu”.

“Adversaire redoutable pour David Cameron”
“Jeremy Corbyn pourrait faire beaucoup mieux qu’on ne croit”, prévoit le journaliste Ian Dunt. Dans Politics, il conseille aux Britanniques de ne pas croire les prévisions apocalyptiques au sujet de Corbyn : “Si vous lisez la presse, vous allez croire que [l’élection de Corbyn] est le début de l’annihilation du Parti travailliste, que l’opposition à Corbyn de la part de ses députés va déchirer le parti. Ou qu’il sera détruit dans les urnes si jamais il arrive à tenir bon jusqu’aux élections [en 2019] malgré son programme d’extrême gauche. Or, les choses ne sont pas si simples.” Car Corbyn a de nombreux atouts, le premier étant son “langage normal”:

Le public déteste les politiciens, il est avide de voir des personnes normales pour s’opposer à l’élite de Westminster. Or Corbyn est l’homme qu’il faut pour s’en prendre à l’establishment.
Deuxièmement, le gouvernement conservateur trouvera dans Corbyn “un adversaire beaucoup plus redoutable que l’on ne pense. Son style dépouillé et son franc-parler pourraient être très appréciés face à David Cameron”, prévoit le journaliste.

Voir par ailleurs:
Le Monde|
01.10.2015
Mais à quoi joue le pape François ? L’annonce dans la presse américaine, mercredi 30 septembre, de sa rencontre secrète avec l’égérie des opposants les plus radicaux au mariage homosexuel aux Etats-Unis a brouillé le message qu’il semblait avoir délivré tout au long de son séjour sur place. Les quelques minutes qu’il a passées jeudi 24 septembre à Washington, avec Kim Davis, une greffière du Kentucky, brièvement emprisonnée au début du mois pour avoir obstinément refusé de délivrer des certificats de mariage aux couples homosexuels, n’ont été ni démenties ni commentées par le Vatican. Mais ce soutien de poids à la frange la plus ultra des chrétiens conservateurs américains, donne en tout cas une dimension politique à un séjour aux Etats-Unis que le pape avait qualifié de purement « pastoral ».Si l’opposition du pape au mariage gay ne fait aucun doute, son choix de conforter une fonctionnaire controversée et désavouée même par une partie du camp conservateur, ne semble pas cadrer avec ses propos d’ouverture, appelant à une Eglise catholique plus inclusive, engagée « dans la construction d’une société tolérante », ainsi qu’il l’a déclaré à la Maison Blanche. Une position qu’il a réitérée tout au long de son voyage aux Etats-Unis, où il a paru éviter avec soin de prendre partie dans « la guerre culturelle » que la hiérarchie catholique sur place, et plus largement les mouvements chrétiens évangéliques – Mme Davis est elle-même chrétienne apostolique –, alimentent au nom de la liberté religieuse.
Position ambiguë
Particulièrement attendu à ce propos, François s’était appliqué à une défense large et globale de ce principe, sans citer d’exemples précis. Il avait notamment dénoncé « un monde où diverses formes de tyrannie moderne cherchent à supprimer la liberté religieuse, ou bien cherchent à la réduire à une sous-culture sans droit d’expression dans la sphère publique, ou encore cherchent à utiliser la religion comme prétexte à la haine et à la brutalité ». Il avait certes rendu une visite surprise à des religieuses, au centre d’une bataille juridique contre le système de santé américain, dit Obamacare, qui oblige les employeurs – y compris leur congrégation – à participer au financement des moyens de contraception de leurs salariés. Mais, parallèlement, il avait aussi loué le travail d’autres congrégations religieuses américaines, réputées elles bien plus libérales sur ces sujets.C’est dans l’avion qui le ramenait à Rome qu’il a été le plus explicite sur le fond, tout en restant ambigu sur la réalité de sa rencontre avec Kim Davis. « L’objection de conscience est un droit », a-t-il répondu à un journaliste qui lui demandait de réagir expressément au cas d’un(e) fonctionnaire qui refuserait de délivrer des certificats de mariage à des couples homosexuels. « Je n’ai pas en mémoire tous les cas d’objection de conscience », a étonnamment éludé le pape, qui a tout de même insisté sur le fait que « dans chaque institution judiciaire, doit exister un droit de conscience ».Prisée par les conservateurs, cette initiative du pape a déstabilisé le camp progressiste. Et il n’est pas sûr que ce genre de non-dits contribue à pacifier les débats lors du synode sur la famille, qui s’ouvre lundi 5 octobre à Rome et qui s’annonce tendu.
Voir encore:
3 octobre 2015
Le site officiel News.va du Saint-Siège a publié un article reprenant des précisions données par le Père Federico Lombardi, directeur de la salle de presse du Vatican, hier matin 2 octobre, au sujet de la rencontre de Kim Davis avec le pape François à la nonciature de Washington D.C. En voici la traduction intégrale faite depuis la version anglaise (la version française de cette déclaration, qu’on pourra lire ici, est beaucoup plus brève et “arrangée”…) :« Le brève entrevue entre Madame Kim Davis et le pape François à la nonciature apostolique de Washington D.C., continue à susciter des commentaires et des débats. Afin de contribuer à une compréhension objective de ce qui a été révélé, je suis en mesure d’éclaircir les points suivants :Le pape François a rencontré plusieurs dizaines de personnes qui avaient été invitées à la nonciature afin de le saluer alors qu’il s’apprêtait à quitter Washington pour la ville de New York. De telles salutations brèves se passent lors de chaque visite du pape et sont dues à la gentillesse et la disponibilité caractéristiques du pape. La seule véritable audience que le pape a accordé à la nonciature, le fut pour un des ses anciens étudiants et sa famille. Le Pape n’est pas entré dans les détails de la situation de Madame Davis et sa rencontre avec elle ne doit pas être considérée comme un appui à sa position dans tous ses aspects particuliers et complexes ».
C’est un de ces rétropédalages auxquels le Père Lombardi nous a habitué depuis longtemps. Toutefois, du côté de l’intéressée, le son de cloche est assez différent (voir, notamment ici).Liberty Counsel, organisme fondé et dirigé dans le Kentucky par Mat Staver, et qui est le conseil juridique de Kim Davis, a publié également hier un communiqué intitulé « Les faits sur la rencontre de Kim Davis et du pape ». En voici la traduction.

« Les faits concernant la rencontre avec Kim Davis ont été déjà racontés, mais nous allons de nouveau énoncer les détails de cette rencontre en y ajoutant un nouvel élément.

La rencontre avec Kim Davis a été initiée le 14 septembre. Bien que nous ne connaissons pas toutes les personnes qui ont pris part à cette invitation, nous savons tout à fait que le nonce apostolique du Saint-Siège, l’archevêque Carlo Maria Vigano, s’est personnellement entretenu avec Kim Davis sur cette invitation. Cette invitation portait sur une rencontre privée avec le pape François à l’ambassade du Vatican à Washington D.C. le jeudi 24 septembre dans l’après-midi. Il s’agissait une rencontre privée. Aucun autre membre du public [invité] n’y était présent.

Dans la soirée du 23 septembre, Kim Davis a reçu un nouvel appel téléphonique au sujet de la rencontre du lendemain. On lui demanda de se coiffer en ramenant ses cheveux sur le haut de la tête car elle était trop reconnaissable. Vers 8 h du matin, samedi 24, Kim a reçu un autre appel téléphonique lui confirmant qu’on viendrait la chercher à 13 h 15.

À 13 h 15, Staver a accompagné Kim et Joe Davis pour leur faire rencontrer deux hommes du service de sécurité vêtus de costumes et dotés d’oreillettes. Staver a confirmé qu’ils venaient chercher Kim Davis. Ils s’exprimaient avec un très fort accent italien. Staver a accompagné Kim et Joe vers une fourgonnette qui les attendait et est resté à l’hôtel tout en se tenant en contact permanent avec Kim.

Kim et Joe ont été introduits dans une pièce [un salon de la nonciature] dans laquelle il n’y avait aucune autre personne présente. Plus tard, le pape y est entré : il n’était accompagné que d’une seule personne de la sécurité du Vatican ou de l’ambassade. [Le pape] lui a tendu les mains. Kim les lui a saisies et il lui a demandé de prier pour lui. Elle lui a répondu qu’elle le ferait puis a demandé au Pontife de prier pour elle ce à quoi le pape a répondu qu’il le ferait. Le pape François a alors remercié Kim pour “son courage”. Ils se sont étreints. Le pape a déclaré : “Restez forte”. Puis il a offert à Kim et à Joe deux chapelets.

Il n’y avait pas de gens faisant la queue ou d’autres personnes du public visibles quelque part. Kim étant si reconnaissable, il aurait été impossible de garder secrète cette rencontre si d’autres personnes invitées s’étaient trouvées quelque part à proximité du pape ou de Kim Davis.

L’encouragement donné par le pape à Kim et son avertissement à “rester forte” souligne le fait que le pape et d’autres responsables du Vatican connaissaient sa défense de la liberté religieuse. La réponse du pape faite à la question d’un journaliste [à bord de l’avion qui le ramenait à Rome] pour savoir si un fonctionnaire gouvernemental avait le droit à l’objection de conscience pour la délivrance de certificats de mariage, correspond bien à la connaissance [qu’en avait le pape] ».

Liberty Council a maintenu le silence sur cette rencontre jusqu’à ce qu’on lui en autorise la divulgation le mardi 29 septembre. D’où le communiqué du même jour de Liberty Council que nous avons signalé ici le lendemain, mais, avec le décalage horaire, Robert Moynihan, directeur à Rome de Inside the Vatican, en avait largement parlé dans sa Lettre n° 29 sur Internet, dès le 29 au soir…

À chacun désormais de juger au vu des pièces que nous mettons à votre disposition…

Voir enfin:

Chine : la chasse aux chrétiens
En ligne le 7 octobre 2015

Le Parti communiste chinois a pratiquement toujours combattu toutes les religions, dénoncées toutes comme opium du peuple. S’agissant du christianisme, il déclare le suspecter de surcroît de fonctionner comme « agent de l’étranger » entreprenant de saper sa mainmise idéologique.Dans Le Figaro du 5 octobre Sébastien Falletti publie un reportage sur la ville de Wenzhou, 9 millions d’habitants dont 11 % de chrétiens, épicentre de la persécution.Depuis 2013, souligne-t-il, les autorités ont abattu 1 200 croix et détruit plusieurs églises :La cathédrale de Fuyin Jang est une citadelle assiégée, agrippée à la campagne moite du Zhejiang. « Nous ne savons pas combien de temps nous pourrons résister. La croix est le symbole de Jésus-Christ. Sans elle, nous ne pouvons vivre notre foi », explique M. Lin, à l’intérieur de l’église transformée en camp retranché. Sous les ventilateurs, un paroissien en pantalon de flanelle et chemise de ville ronfle sur un matelas de fortune, avec en fond de la musique évangélique. « À l’arrière, nous sommes protégés par la rivière. Ils ont installé des caméras de surveillance pour attendre le moment propice. Chaque nuit, nous nous relayons pour dormir ici et empêcher toute intrusion », explique ce fidèle de cette communauté protestante de 500 âmes, installée depuis plus d’un siècle dans ce bastion chinois de la foi chrétienne. Un bras de fer lancinant de vingt mois, déclenché en mai 2014, lorsque les autorités ont tenté de décapiter l’église de son immense croix, à l’aide d’une grue. La communauté est entrée en résistance, comme la plupart des églises du comté de Pingyang, à 40 minutes à l’ouest de Wenzhou. Ce port surnommé la « Jérusalem chinoise », est la cible d’une campagne antichrétienne sans précédent depuis la Révolution culturelle, lorsque les églises furent saccagées par les gardes rouges maoïstes.Depuis 2013, les autorités ont arraché 1 200 croix et détruit plusieurs églises, dont la plus grande de la ville, selon l’Association des chrétiens du Zhejiang. Cette province côtière du sud-est de la Chine compte plus de 300 000 catholiques et 1 million de protestants, enracinés depuis l’arrivée de missionnaires anglais dès 1860 dans ce port commerçant ouvert aux vents du large. Depuis l’accession au pouvoir du président Xi Jinping, l’un de ses fidèles lieutenants, Xia Baolong, devenu le secrétaire du Parti de la province, fait la chasse aux « constructions illégales », interdisant les croix sur les toits des églises, exigeant qu’elles ne dépassent pas un dixième de la taille de l’édifice sur les murs, selon de nouvelles règles édictées en mai. Ces croix ostentatoires suscitent « l’inconfort » des non-croyants, affirme le quotidien Global Times, contrôlé par le Parti communiste.Mais le pouvoir fait face à une résistance pugnace de nombreuses communautés, formant des boucliers humains autour de leur paroisse. Comme au village crotté de Wuxi, en bout de piste de l’aéroport, où les paysans protestants ont réinstallé leur croix rouge en fer, ce 20 août, dix jours après sa « décapitation » et veillent chaque nuit contre les descentes de sécurité. Depuis l’été, le régime a changé de tactique en procédant à des arrestations aussi brutales que discrètes des leaders de la cause. Au moins dix-neuf chrétiens ont « disparu » sans laisser de trace depuis juillet, selon les témoignages recueillis sur place par Le Figaro.. Comme le pasteur Huang Yizi, cueilli chez lui dans sa petite ville de Shitau, début septembre. « Des hommes ont frappé à sa porte, se faisant passer pour des réparateurs, et ils l’ont embarqué. Depuis, sa famille n’a aucune nouvelle », confie un paroissien sous le choc. Un autre prêtre de la ville de Mapou, Zhang Chongzhu, a lui disparu au volant de sa voiture alors qu’il rentrait de Shanghaï, suivi par un mystérieux véhicule.À Xian Quiao, à quelques kilomètres de là, le silence règne sur la maison ocre de quatre étages posée au bord des rizières, accolée à l’église élancée. À ses pieds, une imposante croix rouge en béton, comme tombée piteusement du clocher. Elle est la cause des malheurs de Zhang Zhi, père d’un bambin de 2 mois et missionnaire ardent. Le 4 septembre, ce trentenaire avait défié le pouvoir en remontant le symbole de sa foi sur le toit de l’église, déposé l’an dernier. Trois jours plus tard, à l’aube, cinq hommes en civil débarquent chez lui pendant qu’il fait sa toilette et l’emportent de force sans explication. « Ses pieds ne touchaient même pas terre, ils ont dû le porter car il refusait de bouger », raconte un voisin témoin de la scène, sous le couvert de l’anonymat. Une descente orchestrée par les services de sécurité publique du comté, qui interdisent à sa femme tout contact avec des médias étrangers. Depuis, la jeune maman se claquemure avec son nourrisson et n’a aucune nouvelle de son mari, incarcéré dans un lieu secret à Wenzhou.L’arrestation la plus spectaculaire a eu lieu, au cœur de la ville, dans la nuit du 26 août. Peu avant minuit, une dizaine d’hommes en civil enjambent le mur protégeant l’arrière de l’église Xia Ling et s’infiltrent dans la pénombre jusqu’au quatrième étage. Quelques minutes plus tard, ils ressortent en encadrant l’avocat Zhang Kai, sous les ordres d’un homme coiffé d’une casquette de police, montrent les images de caméra de surveillance. « Je n’ai rien entendu », se désole le veilleur de la communauté de 400 fidèles, abasourdi. Zhang était le champion de la cause chrétienne défiant devant la justice les ordres de destruction. « Le tribunal nous a dit que nous n’avions pas droit à un avocat », explique un fidèle de la communauté qui s’est opposée par la force à la démolition de « sa » croix. L’escalier défoncé menant au parvis témoigne de l’affrontement. Le juriste chrétien, basé à Pékin, venait régulièrement à Wenzhou mener la bataille, jusqu’à cette nuit fatale. Depuis, même son père n’a pu obtenir de nouvelles. Zhang est accusé d’avoir « perturbé l’ordre public » et « livré des secrets d’État », selon les services de sécurité. Des accusations graves qui autorisent les autorités à le garder au secret pendant six mois. »Le gouvernement a peur, car la population chrétienne est énorme à Wenzhou et risque d’échapper à son emprise. Mais nous ne sommes pas contre le Parti. Le royaume de Jésus est au Ciel, il n’est pas de ce monde » Ces méthodes rappellent celles infligées à un autre avocat chrétien, nommé pour le prix Nobel de la paix. Gao Zhisheng vient de raconter ses tortures à coups de décharges électriques au visage subies pendant une incarcération de trois ans dans une prison du Xinjiang. Il avait lui aussi « disparu » en 2009, embarqué par les services de sécurité à la suite de ses activités de défense des églises chrétiennes et de la secte Falun Gong.Cette vague de « kidnappings » sème l’inquiétude car elle signale une détermination nouvelle du régime à contrôler les religions, depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir de Xi. « Nous avons déjà fait face à des arrestations de quelques jours par le passé, mais c’est la première fois que nous voyons des disparitions ici », explique le dirigeant d’une communauté du district de Pingyang. Pour certains, la campagne est le fruit des ambitions politiques du secrétaire Xia et de sa femme, dévote bouddhiste, visant à plaire au président Xi, pour lequel il a travaillé lorsque ce dernier était gouverneur de la province voisine du Fujian. Pour beaucoup d’autres, il s’agit d’une campagne orchestrée par Xi lui-même, dont l’éventuel succès risque d’être appliqué ensuite dans le reste du pays. « Officiellement, le secrétaire du Parti mène cette campagne, mais il a l’appui du pouvoir central et cela s’inscrit dans une campagne de grande ampleur. Leur objectif réel n’est pas de détruire des croix, mais de siniser le christianisme, à la sauce maoïste », explique M. Lin.Depuis son arrivée à la tête de « l’empire rouge », Xi impose une reprise en main idéologique, bâillonnant toutes les voix discordantes qui menacent la mainmise du Parti, de la presse à l’université en passant par l’art. « Nous devons activement incorporer les religions dans le cadre de la société socialiste », a déclaré le président en mai, devant les représentants des religions, toutes étroitement surveillées par le Parti, athée.Une campagne qui n’ose dire son nom dans le Zhejiang, où les autorités ont recours à des hommes de main et des flics en civil. « Ils n’ont aucun ordre officiel écrit!», s’insurge M. Lin. Une ambiguïté d’ordre tactique. « Ils savent que s’il y a des ordres du pouvoir central, cela entraînera des réactions internationales », analyse un leader de communauté à Pingyang.

Car le Parti a toujours suspecté le christianisme d’être « agent de l’étranger », visant à saper sa mainmise. Une menace agitée par Xi Jinping, dont le « rêve chinois » orchestre un retour au confucianisme et sonne l’alarme contre « les forces occidentales hostiles qui infiltrent constamment la sphère idéologique », selon un document interne distribué aux hauts cadres en 2013.

La popularité du christianisme à Wenzhou, où de nombreux fonctionnaires et cadres sont membres d’Églises richement dotées par leurs prospères fidèles, semble donner corps au spectre de l’infiltration. Mais ces soupçons sont de l’ordre de la paranoïa aux yeux des fidèles de la plupart des Églises « officielles », pourtant sous la coupe du Parti. « Le gouvernement a peur, car la population chrétienne est énorme à Wenzhou et risque d’échapper à son emprise. Mais nous ne sommes pas contre le Parti. Le royaume de Jésus est au Ciel, il n’est pas de ce monde », explique un paroissien, se préparant à une nouvelle nuit de veille incertaine.


Héritage Obama: La meilleure arme de Poutine et de Khamenei (While the rest of the world has to live with the consequences, Obama votes present again and turns out to be Putin and the mullahs’s best weapon)

1 octobre, 2015
Putin-vs-ObamaFlexible Odummy Leader
La démocratie incline à méconnaître, voire à nier les menaces dont elle est l’objet, tant elle répugne à prendre les mesures propres à y répliquer. Elle ne se réveille que lorsque le danger devient mortel, imminent, évident. Mais alors soit le temps lui manque pour qu’elle puisse le conjurer, soit le prix à payer pour survivre devient accablant. (…) La civilisation démocratique est la première dans l’histoire qui se donne tort, face à la puissance qui travaille à la détruire. Jean-François Revel,  Comment les démocraties finissent, 1983)
I don’t think people want a lot of talk about change; I think they want someone with a real record, a doer not a talker. For legislators who don’t want to take a stand, there’s a third way to vote. Not yes, not no, but present, which is kind of like voting maybe. (…) A president can’t vote present; a president can’t pick or choose which challenges he or she will face. Hillary Clinton (Dec. 2007)
C’est ma dernière élection. Après mon élection, j’aurai plus de flexibilité. Obama (à Medvedev, 27.03.12)
Mr. Obama’s aides and some allies dispute the characterization that a present vote is tantamount to ducking an issue. They said Mr. Obama cast 4,000 votes in the Illinois Senate and used the present vote to protest bills that he believed had been drafted unconstitutionally or as part of a broader legislative strategy. (…) An examination of Illinois records shows at least 36 times when Mr. Obama was either the only state senator to vote present or was part of a group of six or fewer to vote that way. In more than 50 votes, he seemed to be acting in concert with other Democrats as part of a strategy. (…) In other present votes, Mr. Obama, who also taught law at the University of Chicago while in the State Senate, said he had concerns about the constitutionality or effectiveness of some provisions. Among those, Mr. Obama did not vote yes or no on a bill that would allow certain victims of sexual crimes to petition judges to seal court records relating to their cases. He also voted present on a bill to impose stricter standards for evidence a judge is permitted to consider in imposing a criminal sentence. On the sex crime bill, Mr. Obama cast the lone present vote in a 58-to-0 vote. Mr. Obama’s campaign said he believed that the bill violated the First Amendment. The bill passed 112-0-0 in the House and 58-0-1 in the Senate. In 2000, Mr. Obama was one of two senators who voted present on a bill on whether facts not presented to a jury could later be the basis for increasing an offender’s sentence beyond the ordinary maximum. State Representative Jim Durkin, a Republican who was a co-sponsor of the bill, said it was intended to bring state law in line with a United States Supreme Court decision that nullified a practice of introducing new evidence to a judge in the sentencing phase of the trial, after a jury conviction on other charges. The bill sailed through both chambers. Out of 174 votes cast in the House and Senate, two were against and two were present, including Mr. Obama’s. “I don’t understand why you would oppose it,” Mr. Durkin said. “But I am more confused by a present vote.” Mr. Obama’s campaign said he voted present to register his dissatisfaction with how the bill was put together. He believed, the campaign said, that the bill was rushed to the floor and that lawmakers were deprived of time to consider it. Mr. Obama was also the sole present vote on a bill that easily passed the Senate that would require teaching respect for others in schools. NYT
C’est très bien qu’il y ait des Français jaunes, des Français noirs, des Français bruns. Ils montrent que la France est ouverte à toutes les races et qu’elle a une vocation universelle. Mais à condition qu’ils restent une petite minorité. Sinon, la France ne serait plus la France. Nous sommes quand même avant tout un peuple européen de race blanche, de culture grecque et latine et de religion chrétienne. Qu’on ne se raconte pas d’histoires ! Les musulmans, vous êtes allés les voir ? Vous les avez regardés avec leurs turbans et leurs djellabas ? Vous voyez bien que ce ne sont pas des Français ! Ceux qui prônent l’intégration ont une cervelle de colibri, même s’ils sont très savants. Essayez d’intégrer de l’huile et du vinaigre. Agitez la bouteille. Au bout d’un moment, ils se sépareront de nouveau. Les Arabes sont des Arabes, les Français sont des Français. Vous croyez que le corps français peut absorber dix millions de musulmans, qui demain seront vingt millions et après-demain quarante ? Si nous faisions l’intégration, si tous les Arabes et Berbères d’Algérie étaient considérés comme Français, comment les empêcherait-on de venir s’installer en métropole, alors que le niveau de vie y est tellement plus élevé ? Mon village ne s’appellerait plus Colombey-les-Deux-Églises, mais Colombey-les-Deux-Mosquées ! Charles De Gaulle (5 mars 1959, en pleine guerre d’Algérie, conversation avec Alain Peyrrefitte)
Pour qu’il y ait une cohésion nationale, il faut garder un équilibre dans le pays, c’est-à-dire sa majorité culturelle. Nous sommes un pays judéo-chrétien – le général de Gaulle le disait –, de race blanche, qui accueille des personnes étrangères. J’ai envie que la France reste la France. Je n’ai pas envie que la France devienne musulmane. Nadine Morano
Belle image de la ville d’Evry… Tu me mets quelques Blancs, quelques Whites, quelques Blancos… Manuel Valls (Evry, 06.06.09)
On a une télévision d’hommes blancs de plus de 50 ans, et ça, il va falloir que cela change. Delphine Ernotte (nouvelle présidente de France Télévisions)
Si le mot « race » figure évidemment dans le dictionnaire, le Larousse met en garde ses lecteurs. David Perrotin
La France est une République indivisible, laïque, démocratique et sociale. Elle assure l’égalité devant la loi de tous les citoyens sans distinction d’origine, de race ou de religion. Elle respecte toutes les croyances. Son organisation est décentralisée. Constitution de la république française (Article 1, 1958)
L’inscription du terme « race », dans l’article même qui dispose des valeurs fondamentales de la République, est inadmissible même dans une « phrase qui a pour objet de lui dénier toute portée ». Proposition de loi du groupe socialiste (Assemblée nationale, nov. 2004)
Regardez la pauvre Morano, pour un mot! On voit bien ce qu’elle a voulu dire. (…) La France, à l’origine, est un pays de race blanche. Aujourd’hui, la France n’est pas un pays de race blanche, elle est multi-ethnique, mais elle est uni-culturelle. (…) Si on lui tombe dessus aujourd’hui, c’est parce qu’il y a une préférence musulmane. Regardez ce qu’il se passe: l’accueil des migrants. On est en train de fabriquer un Kosovo islamique. (…) Je sais ce qu’elle a voulu dire, Morano. Elle n’a pas voulu dire qu’elle était raciste! Qu’est-ce qu’il faut dire? La France est un pays de race noire? (…) En fait , c’est la christianophobie! La christianophobie est une opinion, on a le droit de profaner la croix du christ, mais l’islamophobie est un délit. Si moi je dis quelque chose sur l’islam, là dans un instant, je risque la prison. (…) Pour aller chercher les électeurs, il sont allés chercher les immigrés. (…) Le seul recours aujourd’hui de Hollande et des bobos pour pouvoir gagner, c’est de pouvoir utiliser le vote des banlieues, et ça c’est un scandale parce que ça se fait sur le dos de la France (…) L’ennemi numéro un pour tous les Occidentaux, c’est l’Etat islamique. Pour la France, l’ennemi numéro un, c’est Assad. (…) la classe politique française est en grande partie achetée par le Qatar et par l’Arabie Saoudite. Philippe De Villiers
L’analyse que Luttwak a livrée au journal italien « il Giornale » est sans appel: “L’Europe risque l’islamisation. Ce sera l’Europe chrétienne qui devra s’adapter aux Musulmans et non le contraire”. Luttwak s’en prend surtout au pape François qui a fait un pèlerinage à Lampedusa: “il ne se rend pas compte qu’il collabore au suicide de l’Europe chrétienne … Et ce Pape croit qu’on doit accueillir tous les migrants. Pour le politologue, l’Italie n’est pas en reste, elle devrait bombarder les navires vides des passeurs (…) et sans attendre l’autorisation de l’Onu. Elle en a la force mais pas la volonté”. Edward Luttwak accuse aussi le président turc Erdogan d’œuvrer à l’islamisation progressive de l’Europe, car il tolère ou encourage l’invasion, essentiellement musulmane, à travers les Balkans. Luttwak rappelle en conclusion la fin de la civilisation romaine : “Les barbares arrivèrent du Nord, maintenant ils viennent du Sud …Dans l’Europe actuelle  je ne vois aucune volonté de survie. Les murs ne suffiront pas. Il faut des interventions directes et la première à le faire, devrait être l’Italie”. Europe-Israël
Nous avons en face de nous un groupe ­terroriste plus puissant que jamais. Bien plus puissant qu’Al-Qaïda à sa grande époque. L’EI, fort d’environ 30 000 “soldats” sur le terrain, a recruté plus de membres que l’organisation fondée par Ben Laden en quinze ans ! Et ce n’est pas fini. La France est, de fait, confrontée à une double menace. Celle du déferlement de ce que j’appelle les “scuds” humains du djihad individuel, ces hommes qui passent à l’action sans grande formation ni préparation, agissant seuls, avec plus ou moins de réussite, comme on a pu le voir ces derniers temps. Et celle, sans commune mesure, que je redoute : des actions d’envergure que prépare sans aucun doute l’EI, comme celles menées par Al-Qaïda, qui se sont soldées parfois par des carnages effroyables. (…) Ceux que l’on arrête et qui acceptent de parler nous disent que l’EI a l’intention de nous frapper systématiquement et durement. Comprenez-moi bien, il ressort de nos enquêtes que nous sommes indubitablement l’ennemi absolu. Les hommes de Daech ont les moyens, l’argent et la faculté d’acquérir facilement autant d’armes qu’ils veulent et d’organiser des attaques de masse. Le terrorisme est une surenchère ; il faut toujours aller plus loin, frapper plus fort. Et puis, il reste “le prix ­Goncourt du terrorisme” à atteindre, et je fais là référence aux attentats du 11 septembre 2001 contre les tours du World Trade Center. Je n’imagine pas un instant qu’un homme tel qu’Abou Bakr ­al-Baghdadi et son armée vont se satisfaire longtemps d’opérations extérieures de peu d’envergure. Ils sont en train de penser à quelque chose de bien plus large, visant en tout premier lieu l’Hexagone. (…) Traditionnellement, l’adversaire numéro un du terrorisme djihadiste a longtemps été les Etats-Unis, mais les paramètres ont changé. Les Américains sont plus difficiles à atteindre. La France, elle, est facile à toucher. Il y a la proximité géographique, il y a des relais partout en Europe, il y a la facilité opérationnelle de renvoyer de Syrie en France des volontaires aguerris, des Européens, membres de ­l’organisation, qui peuvent revenir légalement dans l’espace Schengen­ et s’y fondre avant de passer à l’action. (…) La France est devenue l’allié numéro un des Etats-Unis dans la guerre contre Daech et les filières djihadistes. Nous combattons par les armes aux côtés des Etats-Unis. Nous avons mené des raids aériens contre l’EI en Irak. Maintenant, nous intervenons en Syrie. (…) Longtemps notre dispositif antiterroriste nous a permis de porter des coups sévères aux terroristes et aux ­djihadistes de toute obédience. (…)  la donne a changé. L’évidence est là : nous ne sommes plus en mesure de prévenir les attentats comme par le passé. On ne peut plus les empêcher. Il y a là quelque chose d’inéluctable. Bien sûr, on arrête des gens, on démantèle des cellules, on a de la chance aussi, comme on a pu le voir avec certaines affaires récentes, mais la chance ou le fait que les terroristes se plantent dans leur mode opérationnel, ou encore que des citoyens fassent preuve de grande bravoure, ça ne peut pas durer éternellement. Quant aux moyens affectés à la lutte antiterroriste, ils sont clairement devenus très insuffisants, et je pèse mes mots. On frise l’indigence à l’heure où la menace n’a jamais été aussi forte. Ces deux dernières années, j’ai constaté par moi-même qu’il n’y avait parfois plus d’enquêteurs pour mener les investigations dont nous avions besoin ! On fait donc le strict minimum, sans pouvoir pousser les enquêtes, sans “SAV”, au risque de passer à côté de graves menaces. Les politiques prennent des postures martiales, mais ils n’ont pas de vision à long terme. Nous, les juges, les policiers de la DGSI, les hommes de terrain, nous sommes complètement débordés. Nous risquons d’“aller dans le mur”. (…) Sentinelle, Vigipirate, on ne peut pas se permettre de s’en priver, la population ne le comprendrait pas, mais fondamentalement cela ne résout rien. Cela ne freinera pas les hommes de l’EI le jour où ils décideront de passer à la vitesse supérieure et de commettre des attentats d’ampleur. D’autant que nous sommes incapables d’enrayer leur montée en puissance constante. Nul doute que le groupe soit actuellement en train de bâtir les structures, les réseaux, de former les hommes pour concevoir des plans d’attentats de masse. Ils préparent le terrain pour pouvoir frapper fort. (…) Procéder à des frappes “extra-judiciaires” revient à se calquer sur le modèle américain. Cela fait des années que les Etats-Unis éliminent des chefs, des stratèges, des recruteurs au Yémen, en Afghanistan, en Somalie, mais sans affaiblir les groupes visés. Cela n’a jamais marché ! (…) Si l’on prend l’exemple des frères Kouachi, les auteurs de la fusillade de “Charlie Hebdo”, ils étaient, au vu de ce que l’on sait, “en route” pour une campagne d’attentats. On y a échappé parce que, dans un accident de voiture, l’un des frères a perdu sa carte d’identité. C’est cela qui a permis de les identifier et de lancer la chasse à l’homme qui s’est soldée par la mort des deux terroristes, tués par le GIGN. Les Kouachi n’étaient pas partis pour une opération suicide ! S’ils avaient pu, ils auraient continué à frapper. Comme Nemmouche, le tueur du Musée juif de Bruxelles, comme Merah… L’an dernier, j’ai fait neutraliser un réseau de djihadistes très dangereux qui voulait créer un commando de dix “Merah” autonomes, opérant simultanément sur l’ensemble du territoire. L’idée que nous soyons un jour confrontés à une ou plusieurs campagnes d’attentats majeurs ne peut être écartée. Ceux qui nous attaquent veulent nous faire le plus de mal possible. Et le faire dans la durée. Ils s’y préparent. Les Français vont devoir ­s’habituer non à la menace des attentats, mais à la réalité des attentats, qui vont à mes yeux immanquablement survenir. Il ne faut pas se voiler la face. Nous sommes désormais dans l’œil du cyclone. Le pire est devant nous. Marc Trévidic
The president (…) has an overarching moral theory about American power, expressed in his 2009 contention in Prague that “moral leadership is more powerful than any weapon.” At the time, Mr. Obama was speaking about the end of the Cold War—which, he claimed, came about as a result of “peaceful protest”—and of his desire to see a world without nuclear weapons. It didn’t seem to occur to him that the possession of such weapons by the U.S. also had a hand in winning the Cold War. Nor did he seem to contemplate the idea that moral leadership can never safely be a substitute for weapons unless those leaders are willing to throw themselves at the mercy of their enemies’ capacity for shame. In late-era South Africa and the Soviet Union, where men like F.W. de Klerk and Mikhail Gorbachev had a sense of shame, the Obama theory had a chance to work. In Iran in 2009, or in Syria today, it doesn’t. (…)9Mr. Obama believes history is going his way. “What? Me worry?” says the immortal Alfred E. Neuman, and that seems to be the president’s attitude toward Mr. Putin’s interventions in Syria (“doomed to fail”) and Ukraine (“not so smart”), to say nothing of his sang-froid when it comes to the rest of his foreign-policy debacles. In this cheapened Hegelian world view, the U.S. can relax because History is on our side, and the arc of history bends toward justice. Why waste your energies to fulfill a destiny that is already inevitable? And why get in the way of your adversary’s certain doom? It’s easy to accept this view of life if you owe your accelerated good fortune to a superficial charm and understanding of the way the world works. It’s also easier to lecture than to learn, to preach than to act. History will remember Barack Obama as the president who conducted foreign policy less as a principled exercise in the application of American power than as an extended attempt to justify the evasion of it. From Aleppo to Donetsk to Kunduz, people are living with the consequences of that evasion. Bret Stephens
Si le retrait des troupes américaines d’Irak a été à la fois bien intentionné et populaire, et si la Maison Blanche a su présenter à son avantage les concessions octroyées à M. Assad en 2013, les résultats n’en ont pas moins été désastreux. Un simple regard sur la carte de l’Irak et de la Syrie montre que l’essor de l’Etat islamique était une réponse logique à l’abandon américain des Sunnites de la région. Un groupe comme l’Etat islamique ne peut se développer sans le soutien des populations locales, dans ce cas précis les Sunnites qui ne voient d’autre façon de se défendre contre les forces chiites de l’Iran et de la Syrie qui les massacrent par centaines de milliers. En géopolitique comme aux échecs, il faut jouer à partir de la position qui est la vôtre sur l’échiquier au moment où vous commencez à jouer. Reprocher à George W. Bush d’avoir lancé la guerre d’Irak en 2003 ne change rien au fait qu’en 2008 il n’y avait ni crise massive de réfugiés ni armée de l’Etat islamique en ordre de bataille. Les négociations avec les groupes sunnites de la province d’Anbar avaient sapé le soutien à Al Qaeda, une politique qui avait complètement changé la donne et autant contribué à la réduction de la violence que le renforcement des forces américaines. Le départ des troupes américaines et le refus de M. Obama de dissuader M. Assad ont mis fin à toute possibilité de sécurité. La population n’avait d’autre choix que de lutter, fuir ou mourir,  alors elle l’a fait, massivement, comme le confirment des chiffres horribles. (…) Aucun accord ne va changer cela. L’Iran et la Russie ont leurs propres ordres du jour dans la région et ceux-ci n’ont rien de pacifique ni pour l’un ni pour l’autre. L’Iran est le principal soutien mondial du terrorisme. La méthode Poutine pour mener la guerre contre le terrorisme en Tchétchénie était le tapis de bombes. Quand cela n’a pas réussi, il a « acheté » le seigneur de la guerre le plus brutal de la région, Ramzan Kadyrov. La poursuite du massacre de Sunnites dans la région y attirera un afflux sans cesse accru d’aides des Saoudiens et de combattants étrangers du Pakistan, d’Afghanistan et de Russie. La situation va se métastaser, ce qui convient parfaitement à M. Poutine. La guerre et le chaos lui fournissent toujours plus d’ennemis et ainsi plus d’occasions de jouer au dur à la télévison publique russe. Le régime iranien a besoin du conflit pour des raisons semblables et ne peut donc jamais renoncer à ses “Mort à l’Amérique ». Une aggravation du conflit fera aussi monter le prix du pétrole, un avantage qui n’échappe ni à Téhéran ni à Moscou. Ces conséquences peuvent être acceptables pour M. Obama, mais il ne peut faire semblant d’en ignorer sa part de responsabilité. Moi aussi, je voudrais vivre dans le monde de diplomatie et de droit où M. Obama pense vivre. Mais hélas ce n’est pas le cas. Le pouvoir et l’action comptent toujours et dans des endroits comme la Syrie et l’Irak, vous ne pouvez pas avoir le pouvoir sans l’action. M. Poutine n’a rien dit de nouveau à l’ONU, parce qu’il n’en avait pas besoin. Il sait qu’il a des atouts concrets autrement plus efficaces que de simples paroles. Il a des chars en Ukraine, des avions de chasse en Syrie et Barack Obama à la Maison Blanche. Garry Kasparov

Attention: une menace peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où, avec la bénédiction du pays auto-proclamé des droits de l’homme et du prétendu chef de la chrétienté, le drapeau d’un Etat fantôme et d’un mouvement qui appelle toujours à la Solution finale et revendique la propriété exclusive des lieux saints juifs comme chrétiens de Jérusalem flotte ignominieusement sur l’esplanade des Nations unies …

Et où, avec la bénédiction des mêmes plus celle du Contorsioniste-en-chef de la Maison Blanche et prétendu chef du Monde dit libre, un régime qui appelle lui aussi à la même Solution finale et finance ou commandite l’essentiel des activités terroristes de la planète se voit non seulement attribué, pour ses faux frais, quelque 100 milliards de dollars mais pleinement reconnu le droit à l’arme ultime pour réaliser ses projets …

Pendant que sur fond d’invasion, une Europe et une France qui n’ont rien de mieux à faire que de dénoncer (jusqu’aux dictionnaires et à la Constitution !) ceux qui tentent  de garder leur esprit critique et de sonner l’alarme,  sont plus que jamais menacées d’attentats majeurs de la part de l’Etat islamique …

Quel meilleur analyste, pour décrire la partie particulièrement compliquée d’échecs qu’est en train de jouer sur fond de Bérezina économique mais à l’échelle de la planète entière Monsieur Poutine et ses amis iraniens et peut-être même chinois que l’ancien champion du monde, russe lui aussi et enfin dessillé lui aussi, Garry Kasparov ?

Et comment ne pas voir, dans sa dernière et magistrale tribune du Wall Street journal (merci Roger) …

La contribution toute particulière qu’y fait le Professeur Diafoirus de la Maison Blanche …

Qui après avoir abandonné l’Irak alors largement pacifié et s’être fameusement couché en Syrie comme ailleurs …

Se révèle être, par sa seule ineptitude, la meilleure pièce de l’ancien kégébiste et de ses afffidés iraniens ou chinois ?

Poutine en met plein la vue à Obama
Le chaos syrien fait très bien l’affaire du président russe et la hausse du prix du pétrole fera le bonheur de Moscou comme de Téhéran.
Garry Kasparov
WSJ
29 septembre 2015

Avec l’actuel chaos au Moyen-Orient et un régime russe belliciste qui attise les flammes, le véritable duel, par discours interposés, entre les présidents Barack Obama et Vladimir Poutine à l’ONU lundi s’annonçait prometteur. Ce à quoi le monde a alors assisté était en fait écrit d’avance.

M. Obama avait depuis longtemps décidé de poursuivre sa politique de désengagement du Moyen-Orient et ses platitudes sur la coopération et la primauté du droit international ont sonné bien creux dans la salle de l’Assemblée générale de l’ONU. Du conflit en Syrie, a-t-il dit, « nous devons reconnaître qu’il ne peut y avoir,  après tant de sang versé et de carnages, un retour au statu quo d’avant la guerre. » Mais chaque auditeur savait que M. Obama n’avait aucune intention d’appuyer ses mots par la moindre action.

Prenant à son tour la parole une heure plus tard dans la même salle, M. Poutine a ressorti ses diatribes habituelles contre l’ONU ainsi que d’évidentes contre-vérités. “Nous estimons que refuser de coopérer avec les autorités syriennes, avec l’armée gouvernementale, qui affrontent courageusement le terrorisme, est une grave erreur. » Il a parlé de souveraineté nationale — toujours très importante pour M. Poutine, à moins que ce ne soit la souveraineté de la Géorgie, de l’Ukraine ou de quelque autre endroit où il souhaite intervenir.

Autrement dit, le discours de M. Obama n’avait rien de nouveau parce qu’il sait qu’il n’agira pas. Le discours de M. Poutine n’avait rien de nouveau parce qu’il sait qu’il agira de toute façon. Le contenu des discours n’avait donc aucune importance pour M. Poutine avant même qu’il ouvre la bouche. Il a fait son premier discours à l’ONU en dix ans parce que faire le grand homme sur la scène internationale est la seule chose qui lui reste pour justifier son pouvoir en Russie. Le pacte avec le diable conclu avec le peuple russe il y a une dizaine d’années était de leur offrir la prospérité en échange de leurs droits et de la démocratie. Aujourd’hui, nous n’avons ni l’un ni l’autre. La seule manoeuvre qui reste à M. Poutine est de prétendre qu’il défend la grandeur russe contre un nombre toujours plus grand d’ennemis (qu’il excelle à créer). Avec son offensive en Ukraine qui piétine, de nouveaux fronts étaient nécessaires. Et c’est en Syrie et à l’ONU qu’il les a trouvés.

De ce point de vue, l’entretien privé dont on attendait tant entre MM. Obama et Poutine représentait la plus grande récompense possible. La seule déclaration qui en est sortie est que les Etats-Unis et la Russie pourraient envisager de travailler ensemble contre l’État islamique. Non que M. Poutine se soucie de coopération, aussi longtemps que cela ne nuit pas à son objectif de préserver la dictature meurtrière de Bachar al-Assad en Syrie.

Pourtant, les images des deux dirigeants réunis sont présentées dans l’ensemble des médias russes comme un énorme triomphe pour M. Poutine. L’interprétation qui en a été faite et qui a commencé à circuler dès l’annonce de la réunion, est que non seulement le vaillant M. Poutine a confronté et condamné le pusillanime M. Obama et les méchants États-Unis mais qu’il l’a fait à New York, dans le ventre de la bête elle-même. Dès les premières photos, la réunion est devenue un grand succès pour M. Poutine et une nouvelle défaite auto-infligée pour la politique étrangère américaine – et la stabilité et  la démocratie au Moyen-Orient.

Si le retrait des troupes américaines d’Irak a été à la fois bien intentionné et populaire, et si la Maison Blanche a su présenter à son avantage les concessions octroyées à M. Assad en 2013, les résultats n’en ont pas moins été désastreux.

Un simple regard sur la carte de l’Irak et de la Syrie montre que l’essor de l’Etat islamique était une réponse logique à l’abandon américain des Sunnites de la région. Un groupe comme l’Etat islamique ne peut se développer sans le soutien des populations locales, dans ce cas précis les Sunnites qui ne voient d’autre façon de se défendre contre les forces chiites de l’Iran et de la Syrie qui les massacrent par centaines de milliers.

En géopolitique comme aux échecs, il faut jouer à partir de la position qui est la vôtre sur l’échiquier au moment où vous commencez à jouer. Reprocher à George W. Bush d’avoir lancé la guerre d’Irak en 2003 ne change rien au fait qu’en 2008 il n’y avait ni crise massive de réfugiés ni armée de l’Etat islamique en ordre de bataille. Les négociations avec les groupes sunnites de la province d’Anbar avaient sapé le soutien à Al Qaeda, une politique qui avait complètement changé la donne et autant contribué à la réduction de la violence que le renforcement des forces américaines.

Le départ des troupes américaines et le refus de M. Obama de dissuader M. Assad ont mis fin à toute possibilité de sécurité. La population n’avait d’autre choix que de lutter, fuir ou mourir, alors elle l’a fait, massivement, comme le confirment des chiffres horribles. Il est important de se souvenir que les vagues de réfugiés qui atteignent aujourd’hui l’Europe ne fuient pas l’Etat islamique. Ils fuient M. Assad — qui lui-même compte sur le soutien actif de l’Iran et maintenant de la Russie.

Aucun accord ne va changer cela. L’Iran et la Russie ont leurs propres ordres du jour dans la région et ceux-ci n’ont rien de pacifique ni pour l’un ni pour l’autre. L’Iran est le principal soutien mondial du terrorisme. La méthode Poutine pour mener la guerre contre le terrorisme en Tchétchénie était le tapis de bombes. Quand cela n’a pas réussi, il a « acheté » le seigneur de la guerre le plus brutal de la région, Ramzan Kadyrov.

La poursuite du massacre de Sunnites dans la région y attirera un afflux sans cesse accru d’aides des Saoudiens et de combattants étrangers du Pakistan, d’Afghanistan et de Russie. La situation va se métastaser, ce qui convient parfaitement à M. Poutine. La guerre et le chaos lui fournissent toujours plus d’ennemis et ainsi plus d’occasions de jouer au dur à la télévison publique russe. Le régime iranien a besoin du conflit pour des raisons semblables et ne peut donc jamais renoncer à ses “Mort à l’Amérique ». Une aggravation du conflit fera aussi monter le prix du pétrole, un avantage qui n’échappe ni à Téhéran ni à Moscou.

Ces conséquences peuvent être acceptables pour M. Obama, mais il ne peut faire semblant d’en ignorer sa part de responsabilité. Moi aussi, je voudrais vivre dans le monde de diplomatie et de droit où M. Obama pense vivre. Mais hélas ce n’est pas le cas. Le pouvoir et l’action comptent toujours et dans des endroits comme la Syrie et l’Irak, vous ne pouvez pas avoir le pouvoir sans l’action.

M. Poutine n’a rien dit de nouveau à l’ONU, parce qu’il n’en avait pas besoin. Il sait qu’il a des atouts concrets autrement plus efficaces que de simples paroles. Il a des chars en Ukraine, des avions de chasse en Syrie et Barack Obama à la Maison Blanche.

Putin Takes a Victory Lap While Obama Watches
More chaos in Syria suits the Russian president just fine. Higher oil prices will please Moscow and Tehran.
Garry Kasparov
WSJ
Sept. 29, 2015

With the Middle East in chaos and a belligerent Russian regime stoking the turmoil, the dueling speeches at the United Nations on Monday by presidents Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin might have offered new insight. What the world saw instead was entirely predictable.

Mr. Obama has already decided to continue his policy of disengagement from the Middle East, and his platitudes about cooperation and the rule of law rang hollow in the U.N.’s General Assembly hall. Of the conflict in Syria, he said, “we must recognize that there cannot be, after so much bloodshed, so much carnage, a return to the prewar status quo.” But every listener was aware that Mr. Obama had no intention of backing his words with action.

Mr. Putin, speaking about an hour later in the same room, included his usual NATO-bashing and obvious lies. “We think it is an enormous mistake,” Mr. Putin said, “to refuse to cooperate with the Syrian government and its armed forces, who are valiantly fighting terrorism face to face.” He spoke of national sovereignty—which is very important to Mr. Putin, unless it’s the sovereignty of Georgia, Ukraine or another place where he wishes to meddle.

In other words, Mr. Obama’s speech was routine because he knows he will not act. Mr. Putin’s speech was routine because he knows he will act anyway.
The content of the speeches was irrelevant to Mr. Putin before he even opened his mouth. He made his first U.N. address in 10 years because looking like a big man on the international stage is the only ploy he has left to justify his rule in Russia. His devil’s bargain with the Russian people a decade ago was to provide prosperity in exchange for their giving up their rights and democracy. Now we have none of the above. Mr. Putin’s only remaining gambit is to claim that he is defending Russian greatness while surrounded by enemies (whom that he is an expert at creating). With his offensive in Ukraine sputtering along, new fronts were needed. He has found them in Syria and at the U.N.

In this light, the much-hyped private meeting between Messrs. Obama and Putin was the biggest possible prize. The only statement to come out of the meeting was that the U.S. and Russia would consider working together against Islamic State, also known as ISIS. Not that Mr. Putin cares about cooperation, as long as his goal of preserving Bashar Assad’s murderous dictatorship in Syria isn’t interfered with.

Yet the images of the two leaders together are being splashed across the Russian media as a huge triumph for Mr. Putin. The narrative, which began circulating as soon as the meeting was announced, is that not only did the valiant Mr. Putin confront and condemn the weak Mr. Obama and the evil United States, he did so in New York City, the belly of the beast itself. As soon as the first pictures were taken, the meeting became a great success for Mr. Putin, and another self-inflicted defeat for American foreign policy—and for stability and democracy in the Middle East.

No matter how well-intentioned and popular the U.S. exit from Iraq was, or how well the White House spun its concessions to Mr. Assad in 2013, the results clearly have been disastrous. A look at a map of Iraq and Syria shows that the rise of ISIS was a logical response to American abandonment of the region’s Sunnis. A group like ISIS cannot thrive without support from locals, in this case Sunnis who see no other way to defend against the Shiite forces of Iran and Syria that are slaughtering them by the hundreds of thousands.

In world affairs, as in chess, you have to play the position that’s on the board when you sit down. Criticizing George W. Bush for starting the Iraq war in 2003 does not change the fact that in 2008 there was no mass refugee crisis or massive ISIS army on the march. Support for al Qaeda had been undercut by negotiations with Sunni groups in Anbar province, a game-changing policy that was as responsible for reduced violence as the surge of new American forces.

The American exit and Mr. Obama’s refusal to deter Mr. Assad ended any possibility of security. The people had to fight, flee or die, and they are doing all three in horrific numbers. It’s important to remember that the waves of refugees reaching Europe are not running from ISIS. They are fleeing Mr. Assad—who counts on active support from Iran and now Russia.

No deal is going to change that. Iran and Russia have their own agendas in the region, and peace is not on either of them. Iran is the world’s leading state supporter of terrorism. Mr. Putin’s method of fighting the war on terror in Chechnya was carpet bombing. When that didn’t succeed, he bought off the region’s most brutal warlord, Ramzan Kadyrov.

The continued slaughter of Sunnis in the region will draw in more support from the Saudis and more foreign fighters from Pakistan, Afghanistan and Russia. The situation will metastasize like a cancer, which suits Mr. Putin fine. War and chaos create more enemies and more opportunities for him to look like a tough guy on Russian state TV. Iran’s regime needs conflict for similar reasons, which is why it can never give up “Death to America.” A growing war will also drive up the price of oil, a benefit that isn’t lost on Tehran or Moscow.

These consequences may be acceptable to Mr. Obama, but he cannot pretend to be ignorant of his role in creating them. I, too, would like to live in the world of diplomacy and law that Mr. Obama seems to believe we inhabit. But unfortunately we do not. Power and action still matter, and in places like Syria and Iraq you cannot have power without action.

Mr. Putin didn’t say anything new at the U.N., because he didn’t need to. He knows that he has concrete assets that are more effective than mere words. He has tanks in Ukraine, jet fighters in Syria, and Barack Obama in the White House.

Mr. Kasparov, chairman of the New York-based Human Rights Foundation, is the author of “Winter Is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must Be Stopped,” out next month from Public Affairs.

Voir aussi:

An Unteachable President
For Obama, it isn’t the man in the arena who counts. It’s the speaker on the stage.
Bret Stephens
Wall Street Journal
Sept. 28, 2015

Barack Obama told the U.N.’s General Assembly on Monday he’s concerned that “dangerous currents risk pulling us back into a darker, more disordered world.” It’s nice of the president to notice, just don’t expect him to do much about it.

Recall that it wasn’t long ago that Mr. Obama took a sunnier view of world affairs. The tide of war was receding. Al Qaeda was on a path to defeat. ISIS was “a jayvee team” in “Lakers uniforms.” Iraq was an Obama administration success story. Bashar Assad’s days were numbered. The Arab Spring was a rejoinder to, rather than an opportunity for, Islamist violence. The intervention in Libya was vindication for the “lead from behind” approach to intervention. The reset with Russia was a success, a position he maintained as late as September 2013. In Latin America, the “trend lines are good.”

“Overall,” as he told Tom Friedman in August 2014—shortly after ISIS had seized control of Mosul and as Vladimir Putin was muscling his way into eastern Ukraine—“I think there’s still cause for optimism.”

It’s a remarkable record of prediction. One hundred percent wrong. The professor president who loves to talk about teachable moments is himself unteachable. Why is that?

Some of the explanations are ordinary and almost forgivable. All politicians like to boast. The predictions seemed reasonably well-founded at the time they were made. Mr. Obama wasn’t really making predictions: He was choosing optimism, placing a bet on hope. His successes were of his own making; the failures owed to forces beyond his control. And so on.

But there’s a deeper logic to the president’s thinking, starting with ideological necessity. The president had to declare our foreign policy dilemmas solved so he could focus on his favorite task of “nation-building at home.” A strategy of retreat and accommodation, a bias against intervention, a preference for minimal responses—all this was about getting America off the hook, doing away with the distraction of other people’s tragedies.

When you’ve defined your political task as “fundamentally transforming the United States of America”—as Mr. Obama did on the eve of his election in 2008—then your hands are full. Let other people sort out their own problems.

But that isn’t all. The president also has an overarching moral theory about American power, expressed in his 2009 contention in Prague that “moral leadership is more powerful than any weapon.”

At the time, Mr. Obama was speaking about the end of the Cold War—which, he claimed, came about as a result of “peaceful protest”—and of his desire to see a world without nuclear weapons. It didn’t seem to occur to him that the possession of such weapons by the U.S. also had a hand in winning the Cold War. Nor did he seem to contemplate the idea that moral leadership can never safely be a substitute for weapons unless those leaders are willing to throw themselves at the mercy of their enemies’ capacity for shame.

In late-era South Africa and the Soviet Union, where men like F.W. de Klerk and Mikhail Gorbachev had a sense of shame, the Obama theory had a chance to work. In Iran in 2009, or in Syria today, it doesn’t.

Then again, that distinction doesn’t much matter to this president, since he seems to think that seizing the moral high ground is victory enough. Under Mr. Obama, the U.S. is on “the right side of history” when it comes to the territorial sovereignty of Ukraine, or the killing fields in Syria, or the importance of keeping Afghan girls in school.

Having declared our good intentions, why muck it up with the raw and compromising exercise of power? In Mr. Obama’s view, it isn’t the man in the arena who counts. It’s the speaker on the stage.

Finally, Mr. Obama believes history is going his way. “What? Me worry?” says the immortal Alfred E. Neuman, and that seems to be the president’s attitude toward Mr. Putin’s interventions in Syria (“doomed to fail”) and Ukraine (“not so smart”), to say nothing of his sang-froid when it comes to the rest of his foreign-policy debacles.

In this cheapened Hegelian world view, the U.S. can relax because History is on our side, and the arc of history bends toward justice. Why waste your energies to fulfill a destiny that is already inevitable? And why get in the way of your adversary’s certain doom?

It’s easy to accept this view of life if you owe your accelerated good fortune to a superficial charm and understanding of the way the world works. It’s also easier to lecture than to learn, to preach than to act. History will remember Barack Obama as the president who conducted foreign policy less as a principled exercise in the application of American power than as an extended attempt to justify the evasion of it.

From Aleppo to Donetsk to Kunduz, people are living with the consequences of that evasion.

Voir également:

Exclusif. Le cri d’alarme du juge Trévidic
« La France est l’ennemi numéro un de l’Etat islamique »
30 septembre 2015
Interview Frédéric Helbert
Pendant dix ans, il a animé le Pôle judiciaire antiterroriste. Forcé de quitter ses fonctions en pleine tempête pour devenir vice-Président du tribunal de grande instance de Lille, Marc Trévidic nous parle sans tabous.

Paris Match. Pouvez-vous estimer aujourd’hui le niveau de risque que courent les Français ?

Marc Trévidic. La menace est à un niveau maximal, jamais atteint jusqu’alors. D’abord, nous sommes devenus pour l’Etat islamique [EI] l’ennemi numéro un. La France est la cible principale d’une armée de terroristes aux moyens illimités. Ensuite, il est clair que nous sommes particulièrement vulnérables du fait de notre position géographique, de la facilité d’entrer sur notre territoire pour tous les djihadistes d’origine européenne, ­Français ou non, et du fait de la volonté clairement et sans cesse exprimée par les hommes de l’EI de nous frapper. Et puis, il faut le dire : devant l’ampleur de la menace et la diversité des formes qu’elle peut prendre, notre dispositif de lutte antiterroriste est devenu perméable, faillible, et n’a plus l’efficacité qu’il avait auparavant. Enfin, j’ai acquis la conviction que les hommes de Daech [acronyme de l’Etat islamique] ont l’ambition et les moyens de nous atteindre beaucoup plus durement en organisant des actions d’ampleur, incomparables à celles menées jusqu’ici. Je le dis en tant que technicien : les jours les plus sombres sont devant nous. La vraie guerre que l’EI entend porter sur notre sol n’a pas encore commencé.

Pourquoi un constat si alarmant ?

Nous avons en face de nous un groupe ­terroriste plus puissant que jamais. Bien plus puissant qu’Al-Qaïda à sa grande époque. L’EI, fort d’environ 30 000 “soldats” sur le terrain, a recruté plus de membres que l’organisation fondée par Ben Laden en quinze ans ! Et ce n’est pas fini. La France est, de fait, confrontée à une double menace. Celle du déferlement de ce que j’appelle les “scuds” humains du djihad individuel, ces hommes qui passent à l’action sans grande formation ni préparation, agissant seuls, avec plus ou moins de réussite, comme on a pu le voir ces derniers temps. Et celle, sans commune mesure, que je redoute : des actions d’envergure que prépare sans aucun doute l’EI, comme celles menées par Al-Qaïda, qui se sont soldées parfois par des carnages effroyables.

Disposez-vous d’éléments indiquant qu’on se dirige vers ce type d’actions d’envergure ?

Ceux que l’on arrête et qui acceptent de parler nous disent que l’EI a l’intention de nous frapper systématiquement et durement. Comprenez-moi bien, il ressort de nos enquêtes que nous sommes indubitablement l’ennemi absolu. Les hommes de Daech ont les moyens, l’argent et la faculté d’acquérir facilement autant d’armes qu’ils veulent et d’organiser des attaques de masse. Le terrorisme est une surenchère ; il faut toujours aller plus loin, frapper plus fort. Et puis, il reste “le prix ­Goncourt du terrorisme” à atteindre, et je fais là référence aux attentats du 11 septembre 2001 contre les tours du World Trade Center. Je n’imagine pas un instant qu’un homme tel qu’Abou Bakr ­al-Baghdadi et son armée vont se satisfaire longtemps d’opérations extérieures de peu d’envergure. Ils sont en train de penser à quelque chose de bien plus large, visant en tout premier lieu l’Hexagone.

« L’EI a recruté plus de membres qu’Al Qaïda en quinze ans »
Comment en est-on arrivé là ? Pourquoi la France ?

Parce qu’on revient à cette idée qu’on est la cible idéale ! Traditionnellement, l’adversaire numéro un du terrorisme djihadiste a longtemps été les Etats-Unis, mais les paramètres ont changé. Les Américains sont plus difficiles à atteindre. La France, elle, est facile à toucher. Il y a la proximité géographique, il y a des relais partout en Europe, il y a la facilité opérationnelle de renvoyer de Syrie en France des volontaires aguerris, des Européens, membres de ­l’organisation, qui peuvent revenir légalement dans l’espace Schengen­ et s’y fondre avant de passer à l’action.

Il y a aussi des raisons politiques, idéologiques ?

Evidemment ! La France est devenue l’allié numéro un des Etats-Unis dans la guerre contre Daech et les filières djihadistes. Nous combattons par les armes aux côtés des Etats-Unis. Nous avons mené des raids aériens contre l’EI en Irak. Maintenant, nous intervenons en Syrie. De plus, la France a un lourd “passif” aux yeux des islamistes. Pour eux, c’est toujours une nation coloniale, revendiquant parfois ses racines chrétiennes, soutenant ouvertement Israël, vendant des armes aux pays dits “mécréants et corrompus” du Golfe ou du Moyen-Orient. Et une nation qui opprimerait délibérément son importante communauté musulmane. Ce dernier argument est un axe de propagande essentiel pour l’EI. Nos forces armées sont aussi intervenues au Mali pour arrêter les islamistes, même si ce ne sont pas les mêmes réseaux. Ajoutons enfin que, en France, nous sommes depuis des années en première ligne pour combattre le “djihad global”. Longtemps notre dispositif antiterroriste nous a permis de porter des coups sévères aux terroristes et aux ­djihadistes de toute obédience.

Ce n’est plus le cas aujourd’hui ?

Non, la donne a changé. L’évidence est là : nous ne sommes plus en mesure de prévenir les attentats comme par le passé. On ne peut plus les empêcher. Il y a là quelque chose d’inéluctable. Bien sûr, on arrête des gens, on démantèle des cellules, on a de la chance aussi, comme on a pu le voir avec certaines affaires récentes, mais la chance ou le fait que les terroristes se plantent dans leur mode opérationnel, ou encore que des citoyens fassent preuve de grande bravoure, ça ne peut pas durer éternellement. Quant aux moyens affectés à la lutte antiterroriste, ils sont clairement devenus très insuffisants, et je pèse mes mots. On frise l’indigence à l’heure où la menace n’a jamais été aussi forte. Ces deux dernières années, j’ai constaté par moi-même qu’il n’y avait parfois plus d’enquêteurs pour mener les investigations dont nous avions besoin ! On fait donc le strict minimum, sans pouvoir pousser les enquêtes, sans “SAV”, au risque de passer à côté de graves menaces. Les politiques prennent des postures martiales, mais ils n’ont pas de vision à long terme. Nous, les juges, les policiers de la DGSI, les hommes de terrain, nous sommes complètement débordés. Nous risquons d’“aller dans le mur”.

Et le dispositif Sentinelle, qui mobilise des milliers d’hommes pour protéger des lieux symboliques, des sites sensibles, il n’est pas efficace ?

Ce dispositif protège certains endroits, rassure la population. Mais, en fait, il déplace la menace. Cela n’évitera jamais que des hommes déterminés passent à l’action ici ou ailleurs. Si cela leur paraît trop compliqué de s’en prendre à un objectif sous surveillance, ils en trouveront un autre. Un cinéma, un centre commercial, un rassemblement populaire… Sentinelle, Vigipirate, on ne peut pas se permettre de s’en priver, la population ne le comprendrait pas, mais fondamentalement cela ne résout rien. Cela ne freinera pas les hommes de l’EI le jour où ils décideront de passer à la vitesse supérieure et de commettre des attentats d’ampleur. D’autant que nous sommes incapables d’enrayer leur montée en puissance constante. Nul doute que le groupe soit actuellement en train de bâtir les structures, les réseaux, de former les hommes pour concevoir des plans d’attentats de masse. Ils préparent le terrain pour pouvoir frapper fort.

Que penser, alors, de la nouvelle stratégie française ? Des ­premières frappes aériennes ont visé Daech sur le sol syrien. La France invoque un “droit de légitime défense” et dit vouloir cibler les terroristes à la base…

Procéder à des frappes “extra-judiciaires” revient à se calquer sur le modèle américain. Cela fait des années que les Etats-Unis éliminent des chefs, des stratèges, des recruteurs au Yémen, en Afghanistan, en Somalie, mais sans affaiblir les groupes visés. Cela n’a jamais marché ! Je ne crois pas au bien-fondé de la stratégie française. Peut-on penser déstabiliser Daech et nuire à ses objectifs en éliminant des leaders, des “opérationnels” qui auraient été repérés ? Y a-t-il des chefs d’une telle importance qu’ils ne puissent être remplacés dans l’heure par d’autres hommes ? Rien n’est moins sûr. De toute façon, ils nous ont “dans le collimateur” et, de ce point de vue-là, ça ne changera rien ! Cela peut même avoir l’effet inverse que celui recherché en créant des “vocations”. Si, d’aventure, il y avait quelques ciblages réellement pointus, le bras de la justice n’étant pas très long, j’aurais tendance à me dire qu’une petite roquette fera l’affaire ; mais, clairement, il n’est rien dans cette stratégie qui permette de renverser le cours d’une guerre contre une armée de terroristes et de la gagner.

Est-on à l’abri d’une campagne d’attentats sur notre sol ?

Non. Si l’on prend l’exemple des frères Kouachi, les auteurs de la fusillade de “Charlie Hebdo”, ils étaient, au vu de ce que l’on sait, “en route” pour une campagne d’attentats. On y a échappé parce que, dans un accident de voiture, l’un des frères a perdu sa carte d’identité. C’est cela qui a permis de les identifier et de lancer la chasse à l’homme qui s’est soldée par la mort des deux terroristes, tués par le GIGN. Les Kouachi n’étaient pas partis pour une opération suicide ! S’ils avaient pu, ils auraient continué à frapper. Comme Nemmouche, le tueur du Musée juif de Bruxelles, comme Merah… L’an dernier, j’ai fait neutraliser un réseau de djihadistes très dangereux qui voulait créer un commando de dix “Merah” autonomes, opérant simultanément sur l’ensemble du territoire. L’idée que nous soyons un jour confrontés à une ou plusieurs campagnes d’attentats majeurs ne peut être écartée. Ceux qui nous attaquent veulent nous faire le plus de mal possible. Et le faire dans la durée. Ils s’y préparent. Les Français vont devoir ­s’habituer non à la menace des attentats, mais à la réalité des attentats, qui vont à mes yeux immanquablement survenir. Il ne faut pas se voiler la face. Nous sommes désormais dans l’œil du cyclone. Le pire est devant nous.

Voir enfin:

Pour l’un des plus grands stratèges au monde, l’Europe chrétienne est en train de se suicider
Europe-Israël

sept 19, 2015

Quand un économiste et historien prolifique et reconnu comme Edward Luttwak s’exprime à propos de l’arrivée massive de migrants moyen-orientaux en Europe, les spécialistes de stratégie et de sciences politiques tendent l’oreille. Ce géopoliticien très influent, n’y va pas par quatre chemins. Le Pape, le président turc, l’Italie et l’Europe en général en prennent pour leur grade.

L’analyse que Luttwak a livrée au journal italien « il Giornale » est sans appel: “L’Europe risque l’islamisation. Ce sera l’Europe chrétienne qui devra s’adapter aux Musulmans et non le contraire”. Luttwak s’en prend surtout au pape François qui a fait un pèlerinage à Lampedusa: “il ne se rend pas compte qu’il collabore au suicide de l’Europe chrétienne … Et ce Pape croit qu’on doit accueillir tous les migrants.

Edward Luttwak
Pour le politologue, l’Italie n’est pas en reste, elle devrait bombarder les navires vides des passeurs (…) et sans attendre l’autorisation de l’Onu. Elle en a la force mais pas la volonté”. Edward Luttwak accuse aussi le président turc Erdogan d’œuvrer à l’islamisation progressive de l’Europe, car il tolère ou encourage l’invasion, essentiellement musulmane, à travers les Balkans.

Luttwak rappelle en conclusion la fin de la civilisation romaine : “Les barbares arrivèrent du Nord, maintenant ils viennent du Sud …Dans l’Europe actuelle  je ne vois aucune volonté de survie. Les murs ne suffiront pas. Il faut des interventions directes et la première à le faire, devrait être l’Italie”.

Source (Traduction Coolamnews)

Russie : la Bérézina économique
La prospérité économique ne semble pas être l’objectif majeur du Kremlin, ce qui devrait inquiéter.
Jacques Garello

Contrepoints

30 septembre 2015

Tous les indicateurs conjoncturels sont au rouge. Une communication de la Banque Centrale de Russie ne cache pas les difficultés actuelles, mais prévoit une amélioration pour la deuxième partie de l’année 2016. Cet optimisme est de pure façade, car tout le monde sait bien que ce sont les structures qui sont inadaptées. L’économie russe n’a jamais bénéficié de l’élan de sa libération. Mais la prospérité économique n’est pas l’objectif majeur du Kremlin.

Voilà de quoi s’inquiéter peut-être.

La Bérézina

Pour se faire une idée, même atténuée, de la conjoncture en Russie, il suffit de se référer au rapport de la Banque Centrale de Russie publié la semaine dernière. Certes le taux de croissance semble enviable (comparé à celui du reste de l’Europe) : il pourrait même passer de 3,9 % actuellement à 4,4 % l’an prochain : ce sont les données et les prévisions de la Banque, qu’il faut évidemment traiter avec prudence. Mais d’autres chiffres ne peuvent être masqués : une inflation à 15,8 %, une dévaluation de 45 % du rouble par rapport au dollar en moins de six mois, l’effondrement du cours mondial du baril de pétrole, principale recette à l’exportation, et le poids du blocus européen, qui prive les Russes de plusieurs produits de première nécessité, notamment pour l’alimentation. Évidemment, ce sont ces derniers éléments que la Banque met en avant, pour suggérer que le malaise est accidentel, et ne doit rien à la politique économique menée par le Kremlin. D’ailleurs, en conclusion, la Banque se refuse à réviser son taux d’intérêt : la politique monétaire « expansionniste » ne changera pas.

Une économie politisée et désarticulée

En fait, les espoirs nourris pendant l’ère Eltsine n’ont jamais eu de suite. Certaines causes remontent à loin. Lorsque l’ossature des grands kombinats (groupes industriels géants) a été démantelée, la propriété des nouvelles entreprises a été confisquée par des directeurs et des équipes qui les ont rachetées à vil prix. Ainsi les nouveaux millionnaires et la mafia ont-ils colonisé l’industrie. Ils sont toujours en place, dans la mesure où ils n’ont pas contrarié le pouvoir en place, qui n’a cessé de se renforcer avec l’ère Poutine. L’exemple le plus significatif est celui de Gazprom. Monopole du gaz naturel et du pétrole russes, l’une des cinq plus fortes capitalisations boursières du monde, cette entreprise est en fait sous contrôle de l’État russe, qui détient la majorité des actions. Gazprom a deux mérites aux yeux du Kremlin : elle alimente 20 % du budget de l’État et elle exerce un chantage sur les pays européens clients.

Parallèlement, le reste de l’économie n’a pas eu le développement attendu, si l’on excepte l’implantation d’usines européennes en quête de main d’œuvre russe à bon marché. En particulier, l’agriculture est toujours désorganisée, ce qui place la population russe sous dépendance des importations alimentaires. La structure du commerce russe est donc exactement celle d’un pays sous-développé : exportation de ressources naturelles et importation de produits manufacturés.

L’arroseur arrosé

Après avoir cru mettre les Européens, voire les Américains, à sa merci, le Kremlin subit actuellement des revers. D’une part le marché mondial des produits pétroliers et des matières premières s’est inversé. Le chantage aux oléoducs et aux prix a moins de prise, et les recettes ont diminué en quelques mois – à ce jour on estime la perte à quelque 10 milliards de dollars.

D’autre part le chantage sur l’Ukraine a mal tourné, et les Européens ont mis en place un embargo qui renchérit les importations vitales pour la population russe. Les prix de détail ont bondi, et la Banque Centrale n’a pas l’intention de lutter contre l’inflation. Enfin, la Commission Européenne a réagi contre le dumping (sic) des prix du gaz pratiqué par Gazprom, qui vend à l’étranger entre quatre et six fois plus cher qu’aux nationaux. La politique économique, naguère agressive, tourne à l’avantage de l’étranger.

Politique d’abord

Les mécomptes économiques de son pays perturbent-ils Vladimir Poutine ? Il ne semble pas. Il dispose d’un filet de sécurité avec sa place dans le marché mondial de l’énergie, même si elle n’est plus dominante comme naguère. Les réserves de l’Arctique sont une promesse de recettes futures, dont les Russes revendiquent la propriété. Les placements dans plusieurs branches de l’économie mondiale (assurances, finances, sport) demeurent rentables.

Mais, par-dessus tout, c’est l’impérialisme qui guide la politique du Kremlin. La reconquête de la grande Russie a été bien avancée jusqu’à présent en dépit de la résistance de l’Ukraine et de la Géorgie. La présence de troupes russes au Moyen Orient et le soutien à Damas rendent difficile toute solution pacifique dans la région. La solidarité avec les pays du BRIC, en particulier le Brésil et la Chine est un axe diplomatique confirmé et efficace dans les négociations mondiales.

Ces relations internationales s’organisent au nom de la souveraineté de la Grande Russie, ce qui vaut à Poutine toute sa popularité. Le pouvoir intérieur du Kremlin vient d’être confirmé par les élections régionales : plus de 90 % des votants pour l’Union Russe, et aucun siège pour la maigre opposition, sinon celle du Parti Communiste ; les libéraux ont disparu de la vie politique russe. La liberté aussi. Ne pas oublier que la Bérézina a été une victoire du tsar.

Voir par ailleurs:

40 ans d’attentats par des musulmans sur le sol français

Dreuz

29 septembre 2015

Dans un article sur les crimes de l’islam depuis les origines, je pensais que la liste vous ferait tourner la tête.

Voici la liste des crimes de l’islam – sur le sol français cette fois.

Vous allez vous demander quelle mouche les a piqué, ceux qui parlent d’une religion de paix et d’amour. Ils doivent confondre avec les boudhistes.

9 janvier 1973: bombe à l’Agence juive à Paris.

5 septembre 1973: prise d’otages à l’ambassade d’Arabie saoudite par un commando palestinien.

15 septembre 1974: Attentat à la grenade au drugstore Saint-Germain-des-Prés à Paris, 2 morts et 34 blessés.

13 janvier 1975: A l’aéroport d’Orly, des Palestiniens du FPLP (dont un des membres sera décoré de la médaille des droits de l’homme par Christiane Taubira) avec Carlos à leur tête, tirent au lance-roquettes et manquent un Boeing 707 de El Al, atteignent un DC-9 yougoslave. Trois blessés. L’attentat est revendiqué à Beyrouth par l’organisation palestinienne « Septembre noir ».

19 janvier 1975: Carlos réattaque l’aéroport d’Orly et obtient un avion pour s’enfuir à Bagdad. Il y aura 21 blessés.

10 mars 1975: Attentat de la gare de l’Est à Paris, 1 mort et 7 blessés.

20 mai 1975: des Palestiniens tirent contre le comptoir d’El Al d’Orly, et tuent une personne.

22 février 1976: attentat à l’Office de tourisme algérien (revendiqué par le Front de libération unifié de la nouvelle Algérie).

2 novembre 1976: tentative d’assassinat contre Homayoun Keykavoussi, attaché culturel de l’ambassade iranienne (revendiqué par les Brigades internationales Reza Rezayi, groupe maoïste issu de la Gauche prolétarienne.)

7 juillet 1977: tentative d’assassinat contre l’ambassadeur de Mauritanie (revendiqué par les Brigades internationales Mustapha El Wali Sayed).

20 mai 1978: A l’aéroport d’Orly, un commando de trois hommes ouvre le feu dans la salle d’embarquement d’El Al, faisant 4 morts et 5 blessés. L’attentat est revendiqué par une organisation libanaise inconnue, « les Fils du Liban ».

31 juillet 1978: Prise d’otages à l’ambassade d’Irak à Paris exécuté par un militant de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine et commandité par Yasser Arafat, son président (qui recevra des obsèques nationales en France). 1 policier trouve la mort.

3 août 1978: Assassinat à Paris du représentant de l’OLP Izz al-Din al-Kalak et un de ses assistants, par l’organisation Abu Nidal.

2 décembre 1978: Attentat du BHV. Huit blessés dont un grave, revendiqué par

31 août 1978: attentat au domicile d’Yves Mourousi, revendiqué par la section franco-arabe du front du Refus (10 blessés).

27 mars 1979: Une explosion fait 33 blessés dans un foyer israélite, rue Médicis, à Paris VIe, au lendemain de la signature du traité de paix israélo-égyptien, revendiqué par une organisation antisioniste, le Collectif autonome d’intervention contre la présence sioniste en France et la paix israëlo-égyptienne.

17 janvier 1980: Assassinat du directeur de la librairie palestinienne à Paris, Yusef Mubarak, par l’organisation Abu Nidal.

18 Juillet 1980: L’ancien Premier ministre iranien Chapour Bakthiar échappe à une tentative d’assassinat menée par un commando iranien. 2 personnes sont tuées et 6 sont blessées durant l’attaque.

3 octobre 1980: Une bombe dissimulée dans la sacoche d’une moto explose devant la synagogue de la rue Copernic, à Paris XVIe. 4 morts et une vingtaine de blessés. Trente-quatre ans après, en novembre 2014, un suspect libano-canadien, Hassan Diab, est extradé du Canada et écroué en France. Considéré comme proche du Front populaire de libération de la Palestine (FPLP), il est accusé d’avoir confectionné et posé la bombe.

29 août 1981: attentat par un groupe terroriste palestinien à l’hôtel Intercontinental à Paris. 15 blessés.

18 janvier 1982: assassinat de Charles Robert Ray, attaché militaire américain, à Paris. Revendiqué par les FARL, fractions armées révolutionnaires libanaises.

3 avril 1982: Le diplomate israélien Yacov Barsimantov est assassiné à Boulogne-Billancourt. Le Libanais Georges Ibrahim Abdallah, chef des Fractions armées révolutionnaires libanaises (FARL), condamné à perpétuité à Paris en 1987, notamment pour complicité de ce crime, est détenu depuis octobre 1984.

22 avril 1982: une voiture piégée explose au siège du magazine Al Watan Al Arabi rue Marbeuf à Paris. Un mort, 63 blessés (attentat revendiqué par Carlos et semblant être commandité par la Syrie)

9 août 1982: Un commando de 5 arabes appartenant au Fatah et au Conseil révolutionnaire d’Abou Nidal – un groupe palestinien dissident de l’OLP, ouvre le feu rue des Rosiers, à Paris, et jette des grenades à l’intérieur du restaurant juif Goldenberg, faisant 6 morts et 22 blessés.

17 septembre 1982: Le diplomate israélien Amos Manel est gravement blessé à Paris par l’explosion de sa voiture piégée, rue Cardinet. Une cinquantaine de personnes sont blessées, en majorité des élèves du lycée Carnot. L’attentat est revendiqué par les FARL libanaises.

30 septembre 1983: Une bombe explose au Palais des congrès de Marseille, près des pavillons américain, soviétique et algérien lors d’une foire internationale. 1 mort, 26 blessés. Revendiqué par les FARL.

7 février 1984: Assassinat de Gholam Ali Oveisi, ex gouverneur militaire de Téhéran, et de son frère, en exil à Paris. L’attentat est revendiqué par le Jihad islamique.

8 février 1984: Assassinat de l’ambassadeur des Etats arabes unis en France, Khalifa Abdel Aziz al-Mubarak dans une rue de Paris, attribué à l’organisation Abu Nidal.

23 février 1985: Explosion d’une bombe au magasin Marks & Spencer du boulevard Haussmann, revendiquée par l’Organisation Arabe du 15-Mai faisant partie du Hezbollah, fait un mort et 14 blessés.

29 mars 1985: A Paris, une explosion fait 18 blessés au cinéma « Le Rivoli Beaubourg », lors du 4e festival international du cinéma juif. L’attentat est attribué au Hezbollah.

7 décembre 1985: Double attentat au Printemps Haussmann et aux Galeries Lafayette, 43 blessés. Revendiqués par le CSPPA, Comité de Solidarité avec les prisonniers politiques arabes et du Proche-Orient, organisation marxiste liée au Hezbollah et au Djihad islamique animé par des Musulmans chiites inspirés et financés par Téhéran.

3 février 1986: Une explosion au rez-de-chaussée de la galerie du Claridge, avenue des Champs-Elysées, également attribuée au Hezbollah, fait un mort et huit blessés.

3 février 1986: Le même jour, un engin explosif est désamorcé au troisième étage de la Tour Eiffel.

4 février 1986: Une explosion suivie d’un incendie au sous-sol de la librairie Gibert-Jeune, place Saint-Michel, fait cinq blessés. L’acte s’inscrit également dans la liste des attentats commis par le Hezbollah.

5 février 1986: Explosion à la FNAC-Sports au Forum des Halles. 22 blessés, dont un très grave. Revendiqué par le CSPPA à Paris.

17 mars 1986: Explosion dans le TGV Paris-Lyon à la hauteur de Brunoy. Neuf blessés légers. Revendiqué par le CSPPA à Paris.

20 mars 1986: Attentat Galerie «Point Show», avenue des Champs-Elysées. Deux morts et 29 blessés, dont neuf graves. Revendiqué par le CSPPA à Beyrouth.

8 septembre 1986: Attentat au bureau de poste de l’Hôtel de Ville de Paris. Un mort et 21 blessés. Revendiqué par le CSPPA à Beyrouth et à Paris et le PDL affilié au Hezbollah à Beyrouth.

12 septembre 1986: Explosion à la cafétéria de l’hypermarché Casino du centre commercial des «Quatre-Temps» à la Défense. 54 blessés. Revendiquée par le CSPPA à Paris et le PDL à Beyrouth.

14 septembre 1986: Attentat au sous-sol du «Pub-Renault» sur les Champs-Elysées. Deux policiers morts, un blessé grave. Revendiqué par le CSPPA et le PDL à Beyrouth.

15 septembre 1986: Attentat dans la salle de délivrance des permis de conduire de la préfecture de police de Paris. Un mort, 56 blessés. L’attentat est revendiqué par le Hezbollah (CSPPA et PDL à Beyrouth).

16 septembre 1986: Une bombe explose dans un restaurant au nord de Paris.

17 septembre 1986: A Paris, attentat rue de Rennes, dans le magasin Tati, sept personnes trouvent la mort et 55 autres sont blessées lors de l’explosion revendiquée par le CSPPA, Comité de Solidarité avec les prisonniers politiques arabes et du Proche-Orient.

7 avril 1987 : Assassinat d’Ali André Mécili, avocat et politique algérien, à Paris. Le principal suspect, Mohamed Ziane Hasseni, bénéficie d’un non lieu dans des conditions floues qui ressemblent à une collusion entre l’Etat français et algérien.

24 décembre 1994 – 26 décembre 1994: détournement du vol AF 8969 par le GIA, Groupe islamique armé. Après deux jours de prise d’otage du vol Alger-Paris par des membres du GIA algérien, l’assaut du GIGN à l’aéroport de Marignane fait 3 morts (plus les 4 preneurs d’otages).

11 juillet 1995: assassinat de l’imam Abdelbaki Sahraoui, cofondateur du Front islamique du salut (organisation concurrente du GIA), et son secrétaire, abattus dans la mosquée de la rue Myrha à Paris par deux musulmans armés d’un fusil à pompe et d’un pistolet.

15 juillet 1995: Fusillade à Bron entre les policiers et Khaled Kelkal, du GIA qui tente de forcer un barrage de police. Kelkal sera abattu le 29 septembre 1995.

25 juillet 1995: Gare Saint-Michel une bombe explose dans un train du RER B. Revendiqué par le Groupe islamique armé algérien. L’attentat a coûté la vie à 8 personnes et a fait 117 blessés.

17 août 1995: Une bonbonne de gaz avec des clous, signature du GIA, explose à Paris près de la place Charles-de-Gaulle. 16 blessés.

26 août 1995: une bombe est découverte sur la ligne TGV Sud-Est près de Lyon avant d’exploser au passage du TGV. Les empreintes de Khaled Kelkal et de Boualem Bensaïd sont retrouvées sur la bombe.

3 septembre 1995: une cocotte-minute remplie de clous et d’écrous explose sur le marché du boulevard Richard-Lenoir dans le 11e. Quatre blessés légers. C’est toujours la signature du GIA.

7 septembre 1995: L’explosion d’une voiture piégée devant l’Ecole juive de Lyon à Villeurbanne (Rhône) fait 14 blessés. Elle est attribuée aux extrémistes islamistes dirigés par Khaled Kelkal, directement lié à l’attaque.

27-29 septembre 1995: Fusillade dans les monts du Lyonnais. Karim Koussa, Abdelkader Bouhadjar et Abdelkader Mameri sont interpelés. Khaled Kelkal est abattu.

6 octobre 1995: Le jour de l’enterrement de Khaled Kelkal, une bombe du GIA (bouteille de gaz avec des clous et boulons) explose près de la station de métro Maison-Blanche. 12 blessés légers. On retrouve sur la bombe les empreintes de Boualem Bensaïd.

7 octobre 1995: Le leader du GIA, Djamel Zitouni annonce qu’il lance le « jihad », des « frappes militaires au cœur même de la France » pour la punir de son soutien au régime d’Alger. Il exige que le président Jacques Chirac se convertisse à l’islam.

17 octobre 1995: Attentat du RER C, une rame est perforée par l’explosion d’une bombe à la station Musée d’Orsay. Smaïn Aït Ali Belkacem, du GIA, est responsable de l’attentat.

(En 2010, Amedy Coulibaly (auteur de l’attentat de la supérette casher en 2015), Djamel Beghal (maître à penser des frères Kouachi qui ont commis l’attentat contre Charlie Hebdo) et une quinzaine de musulmans projettent de faire évader Smaïn Aït Ali Belkacem. Ils sont arrêtés, font un peu de prison, et sont relâchés)

27 mai 1996: Reza Mazlouman, ancien vice-ministre iranien de l’éducation à l’époque du Chah d’Iran est assassiné à Créteil.

3 décembre 1996: Paris, attentat du RER B à Port-Royal. Une bonbonne de gaz remplie d’explosif éclate dans une rame de train. Une lettre du groupe islamique armé (GIA) envoyée à Jacques Chirac signe implicitement la revendication qui fera 4 morts et 91 blessés.

3 décembre 1996: attentat contre le journal Tribune juive. L’attentat est revendiqué dans une lettre anonyme, qui explique que les terroristes «font partie de la grande nation arabe comme certains font partie de la grande nation juive». Le texte poursuit: «A ce titre nous nous sentons solidaire du sort qui est fait à nos frères palestiniens, en particulier à Hébron ».

31 décembre 2001: Une classe de l’école Ozar-Hatorah de Créteil est détruite par un incendie criminel.

1er avril 2002: La synagogue Or Aviv, à Marseille, est détruite par un incendie criminel et terroriste, alors qu’une vague d’attentats aux cocktails Molotov vise des synagogues.

10 avril 2002: Un autocar scolaire est la cible de jets de pierre, rue Piat, à Paris. Une élève est légèrement blessée.

22 mars 2003: En marge du défilé contre la guerre en Irak, deux membres du mouvement juif Hachomer Hatzaïr sont agressés près de leurs locaux.

8 juillet 2003: Des élèves de l’école Jeunesse Beth Loubavitch à Paris sont attaqués à coups de barres de fer.

17 octobre 2003: Le rabbin Michel Serfaty, reconnu par ses vêtements, est frappé au visage à Ris-Orangis (Essonne). Son agresseur, Abdelrahim criait « Palestine, Palestine, on vous casse la gueule, Youd! » pendant l’agression.

17 octobre 2003: L’agression du rabbin Michel Serfaty à Ris-Orangis (Essonne) provoque un intense émoi. L’agresseur est condamné en décembre 2004 à 6 mois de prison dont 2 mois avec sursis.

15 novembre 2003: Un établissement scolaire juif fréquentée par 200 élèves est dévasté par un incendie criminel à Gagny (Seine-Saint-Denis). Le président Jacques Chirac préside le lendemain une réunion interministérielle sur l’antisémitisme qu’il déclare « intolérable » – et offrira des obsèques nationales au terroriste et tueur de juifs Yasser Arafat.

20 novembre 2003: Dans le garage du 5 rue Louis Blanc, à Paris Xe, Adel Amastaibou prend un long couteau et poignarde Sébastien Salem de plusieurs coups de couteau à la poitrine, jusqu’à la mort. Puis il rejoint l’appartement de sa mère et déclare : « J’ai tué un Juif. J’irai au paradis. Allah m’a guidé ! »

8 octobre 2004: attentat contre l’ambassade d’Indonésie à Paris, revendiqué par le Front islamique français armé. 10 blessés.

25 mai 2005: deux jeunes musulmans lancent trois bouteilles d’acide chlorhydrique sur une école juive du XVIIIe, à Paris.

20 janvier 2006: Un jeune juif, Ilan Halimi, 23 ans, est enlevé par le gang des barbares, un gang musulman dirigé par Youssouf Fofana, qui espère faire payer les juifs. Il est torturé pendant trois semaines dans une cité HLM de Bagneux et retrouvé agonisant au bord d’une voie ferrée le 13 février 2006, et meurt lors de son transfert à l’hôpital.

19 avril 2007: le rabbin de la communauté du Nord-Pas-de-Calais, Elie Dahan, reconnaissable par ses vêtements, est violemment frappé par un jeune musulman, gare du Nord à Paris.

6 décembre 2007: À 12h50, l’explosion d’un colis piégé au un cabinet d’avocats du 52 boulevard de Malesherbes à Paris où est domiciliée la Fondation pour la mémoire de la Shoah fait 1 mort et 5 blessés. Le coursier, une jeune femme « brune, d’un mètre cinquante-cinq, la vingtaine et portant un casque », et de type « nord-africain » est activement recherchée.

16 décembre 2008: Le Front révolutionnaire afghan informe les autorités après avoir déposé des bâtons de dynamite (sans détonateurs) au Printemps à Paris.

20 décembre 2008: Arrestation à Paris de Rany Arnaud, 29 ans, un islamiste isolé soupçonné d’avoir voulu faire sauter le bâtiment de la DCRI.

5 janvier 2009: Une voiture bélier est lancée contre la grille d’une synagogue à Toulouse, qui est incendiée.

8 septembre 2009: Des engins explosifs sont lancés depuis l’extérieur et explosent dans une école juive du Xe arrondissement de Marseille dans le but de la faire brûler avec tous les élèves. «Un riverain aurait aperçu quelqu’un de jeune» au moment du drame.

11 et 15 mars 2012: Mohamed Merah assassine trois militaires à Toulouse et Montauban.

19 mars 2012: Trois enfants et l’un de leurs parents sont sauvagement assassinés dans une école juive de Toulouse par Mohamed Merah, un musulman français.

25 mai 2013: La Défense. Un islamiste arrive par derrière et poignarde Cédric Cordier, un militaire français au cou, dans l’intention de le décapiter. L’agresseur portait une barbe et une djellaba de couleur claire.

20 décembre 2014: Joué-lès-Tours. Un homme armé d’un couteau hurle « Allahu Akbar » en entrant dans un commissariat, et se jette sur un officier de police pour le tuer. 3 policiers sont blessés, dont deux gravement. Le musulman est tué.

21 décembre 2014: Dijon. Un homme hurlant « Allahu Akbar » écrase 13 piétons avec sa voiture.

22 décembre 2014: Nantes. Un homme que les témoins entendent crier « Allahu Akbar » écrase des piétons avec sa voiture sur un marché de Noël. 1 mort et 9 blessés dont 3 graves.

7 janvier 2015: Les frères Kouachi commettent un attentat contre le siège de Charlie Hebdo qui fait 12 morts et 11 blessés.

8 janvier 2015 : Amedy Coulibaly abat une jeune policière de 25 ans, Clarissa Jean-Philippe, à Montrouge (Hauts-de-Seine), et blesse un policier.

9 janvier 2015: Yoav Hattab, Yohan Cohen, Philippe Braham et Michel Saada, des clients de la supérette casher HyperCasher de Vincennes sont tués, et cinq autres sont pris en otages par Amedy Coulibaly, membre de l’Etat islamique.

9 janvier 2015 : prise d’otages à Dammartin-en-Goële par les frères Kouachi. Les 2 terroristes sont abattus. Un membre du GIGN est blessé, l’otage est sain et sauf.

3 février 2015: 3 militaires qui protègent un centre communautaire de Nice, sont attaqués par Moussa Coulibaly (sans relation avec Amédy Coulibaly).

19 avril 2015: Un djihadiste algérien tue une jeune femme accidentellement en voulant voler sa voiture, se tire une balle dans la jambe, ce qui l’obligera à renoncer à son attentat terroriste contre deux églises de Villejuif pendant la messe du dimanche.

26 juin 2015: Attentat terroriste dans l’Isère à Saint-Quentin-Fallavier contre une usine de gaz de la société Air Products dans l’intention de la faire exploser. Un cadavre sera retrouvé, décapité, avec des inscriptions en arabe et un drapeau de l’Etat islamique.

21 août 2015: Attentat du Thalys. Un islamiste qui venait de déclencher un attentat terroriste est terrassé par des héros américains. Les employés à la sécurité du train s’étaient enfuis. Quatre blessés, y compris le terroriste.

Eric Denécé évalue à 102 le nombre de victimes françaises du terrorisme islamiste entre 2001 et 2015.

J’ai compté 91 attentats terroristes commis par des musulmans. Imaginez le tableau, si l’islam n’était pas une religion de paix et d’amour !

Voir enfin:

Etats-unis. Obama peut faire tourner le monde plus rond
Die Welt – Berlin
14/11/2008

Garry Kasparov, célèbre joueur d’échec et opposant au régime moscovite, voudrait bien que le nouveau président américain dénonce le système autoritaire, mais qu’il ne confonde pas le peuple russe avec ses dirigeants.

Il ne fait aucun doute que l’élection de Barack Obama va exercer une influence sur la position de bien des habitants de ce monde vis-à-vis de la seule puissance mondiale. Obama est l’incarnation d’un nouveau genre de dirigeant, il ne ressemble à aucun de ses prédécesseurs. Ici, en Russie, l’homme suscite chez tous un intérêt brûlant. Sa victoire annonce la fin d’une image des Etats-Unis qui remonte à l’époque soviétique et que l’on évoquait quand on était interrogé sur l’oppression dont on était l’objet : “Oui, mais aux Etats-Unis, on lynche encore des Nègres !” C’était devenu un lieu commun de dire qu’évidemment aux États-Unis les riches exploitaient les Noirs et les Latinos. Il en va de la victoire d’Obama comme de la Terre : soudain, tout le monde peut constater qu’elle est incontestablement ronde. Malheureusement, beaucoup dans notre pays préfèrent parler du racisme aux Etats-Unis plutôt que de prendre conscience du racisme et de la xénophobie qui règnent en Russie.

Pourtant, la seule chose qui va véritablement compter, c’est de savoir si Obama se comportera différemment. Il aura peu de temps, sa “fenêtre d’opportunité” ne restera pas longtemps ouverte. Car nous sommes environnés de toutes parts par des crises si graves que le nouveau président américain ne pourra bénéficier d’un long état de grâce. Obama est en grande partie devenu président simplement parce qu’il n’est pas George W. Bush. Ce dernier est devenu – pas toujours à tort, mais souvent injustement – le symbole de tous les problèmes que le monde entier pensait avoir avec les Etats-Unis et les Américains. En incarnant toutes sortes de stéréotypes et de préjugés, le président Bush est devenu le point de mire de la détestation du monde entier. Riche, primaire, indifférent au reste du monde, profondément religieux et impétueux. Barack Obama contredit tous ses stéréotypes. Et nous ne tarderons pas à déverser la misère du monde devant sa porte, attendant désormais plus de lui que sa force de persuasion et ses beaux discours.

Un bon début consisterait à faire clairement comprendre qu’il ne considère pas les Russes comme les ennemis des États-Unis. Comme bien souvent dans les régimes autoritaires, Vladimir Poutine ne représente pas la majorité du peuple. La propagande du Kremlin s’efforce par tous les moyens de présenter les États-Unis comme une nation rivale. Le nouveau président américain pourrait d’un seul geste bousculer cet ordre des choses en s’élevant contre les dictatures en Russie et dans le reste du monde avec un peu plus de force que dans son discours postélectoral.


Intellectuels français: Attention, un déclinisme peut en cacher un autre ! (Victims ot their own success: What’s a French intellectual to do when Obama and the Pope already sound like Mother Jones ?)

28 septembre, 2015
pantheonobamablackboardhttps://i1.wp.com/i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03448/pope-cuba-fidel-ca_3448075k.jpgC’est ainsi que finit le monde. Pas sur un Boum, sur un murmure. TS Eliot
If by « intellectual » you mean people who are a special class who are in the business of imposing thoughts, and framing ideas for people in power, and telling everyone what they should believe, and so on, well, yeah, that’s different. Those people are called « intellectuals » — but they’re really more a kind of secular priesthood, whose task is to uphold the doctrinal truths of the society. And the population should be anti-intellectual in that respect, I think that’s a healthy reaction. In fact, if you compare the United States with France, or with most of Europe for that matter, I think one of the healthy things about the United States is precisely this: there’s very little respect for intellectuals as such. And there shouldn’t be. What’s there to respect? I mean, in France if you’re part of the intellectual elite and you cough, there’s a front-page story in Le Monde. That’s one of the reasons why French intellectual culture is so farcical – it’s like Hollywood. You’re in front of the television cameras all the time, and you’ve got to keep doing something new so they’ll keep focusing on you and not the guy at the next table, and people don’t have ideas that are that good, so they have to come up with crazy stuff, and the intellectuals get all pompous and self-important. So I remember during the Vietnam War, there’d be these big international campaigns to protest the war, and a number of times I was asked to co-sign letters with, say, Jean-Paul Sartre [French philosopher]. Well, we’d co-sign some statement, and in France it was front-page news; here, nobody even mentioned it. And the French thought was scandalous; I thought it was terrific – why the hell should anybody mention it? What difference does it make if two guys who happen to have some name recognition got together and signed a statement? Why should that be of any particular interest to anybody? So I think the American reaction is much healthier in this respect. Noam Chomsky (Rowe, Massachusetts; April 1989)
Ces gens-là sont appelés « intellectuels », mais il s’agit en réalité plutôt d’une sorte de prêtrise séculière, dont la tâche est de soutenir les vérités doctrinales de la société. Et sous cet angle-là, la population doit être contre les intellectuels, je pense que c’est une réaction saine. (…) En France, si vous faites partie de l’élite intellectuelle et que vous toussez, on publie un article en première page du Monde. C’est une des raisons pour lesquelles la culture intellectuelle française est tellement burlesque : c’est comme Hollywood. Noam Chomsky
Le boulot des intellectuels du courant dominant, c’est de servir en quelque sorte de « clergé laïque », de s’assurer du maintien de la foi doctrinale. Si vous remontez à une époque où l’Église dominait, c’est ce que faisait le clergé : c’étaient eux qui guettaient et traquaient l’hérésie. Et lorsque les sociétés sont devenues plus laïques […], les mêmes contrôles sont restés nécessaires : les institutions devaient continuer à se défendre, après tout, et si elles ne le pouvaient pas le faire en brûlant les gens sur le bûcher […], il leur fallait trouver d’autres moyens. Petit à petit, cette responsabilité a été transférée vers la classe intellectuelle – être les gardiens de la vérité politique sacrée, des hommes de main en quelque sorte. Noam Chomsky
[La vie intellectuelle française] a quelque chose d’étrange. Au Collège de France, j’ai participé à un colloque savant sur  » Rationalité, vérité et démocratie « . Discuter ces concepts me semble parfaitement incongru. A la Mutualité, on m’a posé la question suivante :  » Bertrand Russell nous dit qu’il faut se concentrer sur les faits, mais les philosophes nous disent que les faits n’existent pas. Comment faire ?  » Une question de ce type laisse peu de place à un débat sérieux car, à un tel niveau d’abstraction, il n’y a rien à ajouter. (…) Comme observateur lointain, je formulerai une hypothèse. Après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la France est passée de l’avant-garde à l’arrière-cour et elle est devenue une île. Dans les années 30, un artiste ou un écrivain américain se devait d’aller à Paris, de même qu’un scientifique ou un philosophe avait les yeux tournés vers l’Angleterre ou l’Allemagne. Après 1945, tous ces courants se sont inversés, mais la France a eu plus de mal à s’adapter à cette nouvelle hiérarchie du prestige. Cela tient en grande partie à l’histoire de la collaboration. Alors, bien sûr, il y a eu la Résistance et beaucoup de gens courageux, mais rien de comparable avec ce qui s’est passé en Grèce ou en Italie, où la résistance a donné du fil à retordre à six divisions allemandes. Et il a fallu un chercheur américain [Robert Paxton, NDLR] pour que la France soit capable d’affronter ce passé. (…) beaucoup d’intellectuels français sont restés staliniens même quand ils sont passés à l’extrême droite. Comment peut-on accepter que l’Etat définisse la vérité historique et punisse la dissidence de la pensée ? (…) Au Timor-Oriental, entre un quart et un tiers de la population a été décimée avec l’accord des Etats-Unis et de la France, et peu de gens le savent alors que tout le monde connaît les crimes de Pol Pot. Noam Chomsky
Si les révolutions symboliques sont particulièrement difficiles à comprendre, surtout lorsqu’elles sont réussies, c’est parce que le plus difficile est de comprendre ce qui semble aller de soi, dans la mesure où la révolution symbolique produit les structures à travers lesquelles nous la percevons. Autrement dit, à la façon des grandes révolutions religieuses, une révolution symbolique bouleverse des structures cognitives et parfois, dans une certaine mesure, des structures sociales. Elle impose, dès lors que ‘elle réussit, de nouvelles structures cognitives qui, du fait qu’elles se généralisent, qu’elles se diffusent, qu’elles habitent l’ensemble des sujets percevants d’un univers social, deviennent imperceptibles. Pierre Bourdieu
C’est une chose que Weber dit en passant dans son livre sur le judaïsme antique : on oublie toujours que le prophète sort du rang des prêtres ; le Grand Hérésiarque est un prophète qui va dire dans la rue ce qui se dit normalement dans l’univers des docteurs. Bourdieu
La bourgeoisie s’est toujours méfiée – à raison – des intellectuels. Mais elle s’en méfie comme d’êtres étranges qui sont issus de son sein. La plupart des intellectuels, en effet, sont nés de bourgeois qui leur ont inculqué la culture bourgeoise. Ils apparaissent comme gardiens et transmetteurs de cette culture. De fait, un certain nombre de techniciens du savoir pratique se sont, tôt ou tard, faits leurs chiens de garde, comme a dit Nizan. Les autres, ayant été sélectionnés, demeurent élitistes même quand ils professent des idées révolutionnaires. Ceux-là, on les laisse contester : ils parlent le langage bourgeois. Mais doucement on les tourne et, le moment venu, il suffira d’un fauteuil à l’Académie française ou d’un prix Nobel ou de quelque autre manœuvre pour les récupérer. C’est ainsi qu’un écrivain communiste peut exposer actuellement les souvenirs de sa femme à la Bibliothèque nationale et que l’inauguration de l’exposition est faite par le ministre de l’éducation nationale. (…) Cependant il est des intellectuels – j’en suis un – qui, depuis 1968, ne veulent plus dialoguer avec la bourgeoisie. En vérité, la chose n’est pas si simple : tout intellectuel a ce qu’on appelle des intérêts idéologiques. Par quoi on entend l’ensemble de ses œuvres, s’il écrit, jusqu’à ce jour. Bien que j’aie toujours contesté la bourgeoisie, mes œuvres s’adressent à elle, dans son langage, et – au moins dans les plus anciennes – on y trouverait des éléments élitistes. Je me suis attaché, depuis dix-sept ans, à un ouvrage sur Flaubert qui ne saurait intéresser les ouvriers car il est écrit dans un style compliqué et certainement bourgeois. Aussi les deux premiers tomes de cet ouvrage ont été achetés et lus par des bourgeois réformistes, professeurs, étudiants, etc. Ce livre qui n’est pas écrit par le peuple ni pour lui résulte des réflexions faites par un philosophe bourgeois pendant une grande partie de sa vie. J’y suis lié. Deux tomes ont paru, le troisième est sous presse, je prépare le quatrième. J’y suis lié, cela veut dire : j’ai 67 ans, j’y travaille depuis l’âge de 50 ans et j’y rêvais auparavant. Or, justement, cet ouvrage (en admettant qu’il apporte quelque chose) représente, dans sa nature même, une frustration du peuple. C’est lui qui me rattache aux lecteurs bourgeois. Par lui, je suis encore bourgeois et le demeurerai tant que je ne l’aurai pas achevé. Il existe donc une contradiction très particulière en moi : j’écris encore des livres pour la bourgeoisie et je me sens solidaire des travailleurs qui veulent la renverser. Jean-Paul Sartre (1976)
Les intellectuels ont pris l’habitude de travailler non pas dans l’universel, l’exemplaire, le juste-et-le-vrai-pour-tous, mais dans des secteurs déterminés, en des points précis où les situaient soit leurs conditions de travail, soit leurs conditions de vie (le logement, l’hôpital, l’asile, le laboratoire, l’université, les rapports familiaux ou sexuels). (…) Ils y ont gagné à coup sûr une conscience beaucoup plus concrète et immédiate des luttes. Et ils ont rencontré là des problèmes qui étaient spécifiques, non universels, différents souvent de ceux du prolétariat ou des masses. (…) Et cependant, ils s’en sont rapprochés, je crois pour deux raisons : parce qu’il s’agissait de luttes réelles, matérielles, quotidiennes, et parce qu’ils rencontraient souvent, mais dans une autre forme, le même adversaire que le prolétariat, la paysannerie ou les masses (les multinationales, l’appareil judiciaire et policier, la spéculation immobilière) ; c’est ce que j’appellerais l’intellectuel spécifique par opposition à l’intellectuel universel. Michel Foucault
Tout ce qui pouvait nuire à Obama serait donc omis et caché; tout ce qui pouvait nuire à McCain serait monté en épingle et martelé à la tambourinade. On censurerait ce qui gênerait l´un, on amplifierait ce qui affaiblirait l´autre. Le bombardement serait intense, les haut-parleurs répandraient sans répit le faux, le biaisé, le trompeur et l´insidieux. Qu´importe! Nulle enquête, nulle révélation, nulle curiosité. «Je ne l´ai jamais entendu parler ainsi » -, mentait Obama, parlant de son pasteur de vingt ans, Jeremiah Wright, fasciste noir, raciste à rebours, mégalomane délirant des théories conspirationnistes – en vingt ans de prêches et de sermons. Circulez, vous dis-je, y´a rien à voir – et les media, pieusement, de n´aller rien chercher. ACORN, organisation d´activistes d´extrême-gauche, aujourd´hui accusée d´une énorme fraude électorale, dont Obama fut l´avocat – et qui se mobilise pour lui, et avec laquelle il travaillait à Chicago? Oh, ils ne font pas partie de la campagne Obama, expliquent benoîtement les media. Et, ajoute-t-on, sans crainte du ridicule, «la fraude aux inscriptions électorales ne se traduit pas forcément en votes frauduleux». Si, si, c´est ce que dit la presse. La démocratie part du postulat que : «la puissance de bien juger, et distinguer le vrai d’avec le faux» est possession de chaque citoyen, et non d´une élite basée sur la naissance, la fortune, la puissance, ni même le savoir. Bisque, bisque, le déchaînement d´aigreur de la gauche face à Sarah Palin et son adhésion passionnée à l´image vide, charismatique et caméléonesque d´Obama, le Rédempteur qui sauvera le parti intellectuel de la vulgarité du monde et de l´électorat; celui qui «s´accroche à sa foi et à ses armes à feu», comme Obama l´avait dit avec d´autant plus de candeur qu´il ne croyait pas être entendu par eux. (…) Je suggère que cette rage écumante est fondée sur un sentiment exacerbé de lèse-majesté. En l´occurrence, la majesté lésée est celle du monopole d´opinion, que la classe intellectuelle et assimilée (la classe médiatique, l´universitaire, celle du spectacle, etc.) estime lui revenir de droit, et exclusivement. (…) L´intellectuel manie des objets symboliques, ou objets mentaux, d´une grande variété. Leur maniement tend souvent à persuader l´intellectuel qu´il est mieux à même de saisir le monde que quiconque. Or, son pouvoir sur ce monde n´est pas du tout commensurable à la compréhension qu´il estime en avoir. Son ressentiment en est d´autant plus vif. Il ne peut se résoudre à n´être «que» professeur, écrivain, journaliste, lui qui en sait tant et plus que les autres, ceux qui ont du pouvoir. (…) C´est à lui qu´il faudrait s´adresser, vers lui qu´il faudrait se tourner. En l´absence d´une telle demande, l´intellectuel professionnel devient un homme révolté. L´intellectuel moderne tend donc souvent à se dresser contre cette réalité, qui lui refuse ce qu´il estime de droit être sa place en majesté. (…) Ce réel qui minimise et minore son importance personnelle est donc mauvais et devrait être refait. L´homme du commun, qui vote, est ignare. Les politiciens (qui n´écoutent pas notre intellectuel) sont nuls et ignorants. La dextérité dans le maniement des objets intellectuels (la dialectique, comme on disait jadis) devient mandat du Ciel. Laurent Murawiec
There’s little doubt that law student Obama was a political radical by any conventional, society-wide measure of the term. But that’s not the end of the story. At Harvard at least, radical was mainstream and conservative was radical. In fact, the radical view was so mainstream that one couldn’t help but think that even the loudest students would graduate, go to law firms, and fit in just as seamlessly to the new mainstream of their legal professions. And, in fact, most did. They weren’t intellectual leaders; they were followers. My reading of Barack Obama’s political biography is pretty simple: He’s not so much a liberal radical as a member of the liberal mainstream of whatever community he inhabits. In that video, he was doing no more and no less than what most politically engaged leftist law students were doing — supporting the radical race and gender politics that dominated campus. When he went to Chicago and met Bill Ayers, he was fitting within a second, and slightly different, liberal culture. He shifted again in Washington and then again in the White House. But radical, “conviction” politicians don’t decry Gitmo then keep it open, promise to end the wars then reinforce the troops, express outrage at Bush war tactics then maintain rendition and triple the number of drone strikes. Obama’s biography is essentially the same as many of the liberal mainstream-media journalists who cover him. They’ve made the same migration — from leading campus protests, to building families in urban liberal communities, to participating in a national political culture. At the risk of engaging in dime-store pop psychology, they like Obama in part because they identify with him so thoroughly and see much of themselves in him. David French
That pope endorsed the Iran deal, the UN’s environmentalist goals and what amounts to a worldwide open-borders policy on refugees — and ­offered a very specific view of how to promote development in the Third World that’s straight out of a left-wing textbook. (…) Sorry: When the pontiff sounds less like a theological leader and more like the 8 p.m. host on MSNBC or the editor of Mother Jones, what’s a guy to do? Pope Francis is entirely within his rights to become the world’s foremost liberal. But, since that’s what he is, it can’t be wrong to say so. (…) When a leader speaks in these sorts of bureaucratic specifics, he is descending from the highest heavens into ordinary, even trivial, reality. He’s using his ­authority in the realm of the spiritual to influence the ­political behavior of others. He becomes just another pundit. And who needs another one of those? John Podhoretz
Au lendemain des attentats contre Charlie Hebdo et le magasin Hyper Cacher de Vincennes, et après le refus cinglant des jeunes des « quartiers populaires » de participer à la grande manifestation unitaire du 11 janvier, il était difficile pour les Français, même les plus angéliques, de continuer à faire l’impasse sur les dangers et sur la séduction de l’islamisme radical. Mais la propension à noyer le poisson dans ses causes supposées n’a pas disparu. Et le gouvernement a donné l’exemple en dénonçant l’apartheid culturel, ethnique et territorial qui sévirait dans nos banlieues. Ainsi la République a-t-elle plaidé coupable pour les attaques mêmes dont elle faisait l’objet. (…)  Je ne vois chez nos intellectuels ni naïveté, ni lâcheté, mais, si j’ose dire, une vigilance anachronique. En Sarkozy, conseillé par Patrick Buisson, son « génie noir », ils combattaient la réincarnation du maréchal Pétain. Les musulmans leur apparaissaient comme les juifs du XXIe siècle. L’antifascisme façonnait leur vision du monde. Ils ne voulaient pas et ne veulent toujours pas voir dans la crise actuelle des banlieues autre chose qu’une résurgence de la xénophobie et du racisme français. (…) Les élites dont vous parlez ne sont pas francophobes ; face au nationalisme fermé de « l’idéologie française », elles se réclament de la patrie des droits de l’homme. Leur France est la « nation ouverte » célébrée par Victor Hugo, « qui appelle chez elle quiconque est frère ou veut l’être ». Le problème, c’est que, toutes à cette opposition gratifiante entre l’ouvert et le fermé, ces élites légitiment la haine qui se développe dans certains quartiers de nos villes pour les « faces de craie ». C’est l’exclusion, disent ces élites, qui engendre la francophobie. (…) « L’Amérique victime de son hyperpuissance », titrait Télérama après le 11 septembre 2001. Ce qu’on a du mal à penser aujourd’hui comme alors, c’est que l’Occident puisse être haï non pour l’oppression qu’il exerce, mais pour les libertés qu’il propose. Sayyid Qotb est devenu le principal doctrinaire des Frères musulmans, après un séjour aux Etats-Unis, en 1948, où il a été confronté à cette « liberté bestiale qu’on nomme la mixité », à « ce marché d’esclaves qu’on nomme « émancipation de la femme » », à « ces ruses et anxiétés d’un système de mariage et de divorce si contraire à la vie naturelle. En comparaison, quelle raison, quelle hauteur de vue, quelle joie en islam, et quel désir d’atteindre celui qui ne peut être atteint ». (…) L’esprit du temps réussit l’exploit paradoxal de nous faire vivre hors de notre temps, à côté de nos pompes. Alors que la France change de visage, il affirme, imperturbable, que l’histoire se répète, et il cherche des racistes et des fascistes pour donner corps à cette affirmation. J’ai beau être juif et défendre l’école républicaine, me voici lepéniste, et même – il faut ce qu’il faut – maurrassien. (…) La menace était très clairement énoncée en 2004 par le rapport Obin sur les signes et manifestations d’appartenance religieuse dans les établissements scolaires : « Tout laisse à penser que, dans certains quartiers, les élèves sont incités à se méfier de tout ce que les professeurs leur proposent, qui doit d’abord être un objet de suspicion, comme ce qu’ils trouvent à la cantine dans leur assiette ; et qu’ils sont engagés à trier les textes étudiés selon les mêmes catégories religieuses du halal (autorisé) et du haram (interdit). » La question du voile et celle de la nourriture sont deux composantes d’un phénomène beaucoup plus large de sécession culturelle. Et ce phénomène est en expansion. (…) Ce que je sais, grâce à Gilles Kepel, c’est que les Beurs, qui avaient fait la grande marche pour l’égalité en 1983, rejettent maintenant avec horreur ce vocable « tenu au mieux pour méprisant à leur endroit, au pire, pour un complot sioniste destiné à faire fondre comme du beurre leur identité arabo-islamique dans le chaudron des potes de SOS Racisme touillé par l’Union des étudiants juifs de France ». (…) Je pense que Michel Onfray préfère aussi – et il l’a dit – une analyse juste de Bernard-Henri Lévy à une analyse fausse d’Alain de Benoist. Pour ma part, je citerai Camus dans sa lettre adressée aux Temps modernes après la critique au vitriol de l’Homme révolté, parue dans cette revue : « On ne décide pas de la vérité d’une pensée selon qu’elle est à droite ou à gauche, et moins encore selon ce que la droite et la gauche décident d’en faire. A ce compte, Descartes serait stalinien et Péguy bénirait M. Pinay. Si, enfin, la vérité me paraissait à droite, j’y serais. » Je ne suis donc pas plus impressionné par la sortie de Manuel Valls que par la campagne de 1982 contre le « silence des intellectuels ». Le gouvernement est légitimement affolé par la montée du Front national, mais ce ne sont pas les incantations antifascistes qui inverseront la tendance et changeront la donne ; c’est la prise en compte par la gauche comme par la droite traditionnelle de l’inquiétude de toujours plus de Français devant la mutation culturelle qui nous tombe dessus, qui n’a été décidée par personne. (…) Fontenelle a écrit un jour : « On s’accoutume trop quand on est seul à ne penser que comme soi. » J’essaie donc de ne pas rester seul trop longtemps et je fais même l’émission « Répliques » pour être confronté à des points de vue très différents des miens. Mais ce n’est pas ma faute si l’actualité radote et me renvoie sans cesse à la réalité insupportable de l’éclatement de mon pays. Je suis attaqué et même insulté par ceux qui ne veulent surtout pas regarder cette réalité en face. Devant les mauvaises nouvelles, ou, pis encore, devant les nouvelles qui contredisent l’idée reçue du mal et du méchant, le plus simple est encore de s’en prendre au messager et de lui faire la peau. Alain Finkielkraut
Du XVIIIe au XXe siècle, les intellectuels étaient des guides spirituels. Une substitution au clergé – on parle d’ailleurs parfois de «clercs» pour les désigner ou d’«hérésie» de certaines conviction … Le débat d’idées y structure la société beaucoup plus qu’ailleurs. J’irai même jusqu’à dire que la pensée est une composante essentielle de ce que veut dire «être français». Et cela pour une raison historique simple : quand il fallu inventer une nation après la Révolution française, on a dû le faire à travers des principes abstraits. Procédez de cette manière, et vous serez constamment dans un débat d’idées. Etre français, c’est réfléchir sans fin aux valeurs sur lesquelles repose la citoyenneté, savoir ce qu’elles veulent dire, s’il faut les mettre à jour…  Sudhir Hazareesingh
Son essai L’Identité malheureuse a été l’un des plus grands succès de librairie de l’automne 2013, tandis que son auteur devenait l’incarnation ultime du repli de l’esprit français. Toute l’oeuvre d’Alain Finkielkraut est parcourue d’images de décadence, de maladie et de mort. Il a l’habitude des hypothèses paradoxales, par exemple que l’antiracisme serait plus pernicieux que le racisme. Il a des idées fixes, sur l’islamisme ou la prétendue omniprésence de l’antisémitisme.  De plus en plus nationaliste, il est de moins en moins républicain. Il défend une conception hiérarchique de l’ordre culturel et social et, tout comme le Front national, il dénonce le détournement de l’identité française par des minorités immigrées – encore une fantaisie. Son parcours illustre à quel point le pessimisme ambiant a corrompu l’héritage rousseauiste et républicain. (…) On confond trop souvent l’islam, qui est la religion paisible de l’écrasante majorité des musulmans de France, et l’islamisme radical, qui est le fait d’une petite minorité d’agités (nous les avons aussi en Angleterre, et il faut évidemment les combattre). Quant à l’antisémitisme, il faut situer ce phénomène aujourd’hui dans le cadre plus général d’une lepénisation (ou, pour être plus précis, une « marinisation ») des esprits, qui répand la peur de l’autre, qu’il soit musulman, juif, immigré ou homosexuel. Le repli identitaire, surtout lorsqu’il est relayé par des intellectuels complaisants, ne fait qu’alimenter tous les fantasmes. (…) J’y vois la résurgence d’un courant classique de l’individualisme français, à la fois frivole et cérébral, orienté vers ce que Benjamin Constant a appelé la « jouissance paisible de l’indépendance privée ». Dans Le Mystère français, Hervé Le Bras et Emmanuel Todd soulignent l’écart entre le pessimisme conscient des Français et leur optimisme inconscient au cours des trente dernières années: d’où la bonne tenue du taux de natalité, la baisse du nombre de suicides et d’homicides, les progrès de la réussite scolaire, l’émancipation des femmes et l’intégration des immigrés. (…) J’ai choisi ce discours [du ministre des Affaires étrangères Dominique de Villepin contre l’intervention armée en Irak, devant le Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU, le 14 février 2003] parce que c’est un condensé de l’esprit français, un mélange de virilité et de verve enracinées dans ce que la rhétorique française a de meilleur. Un appel à la raison et à la logique cartésienne, construit sous le signe d’oppositions binaires: conflit-harmonie, intérêt personnel- bien commun, politique de puissance-moralité… L’auteur se fait le porte-parole d’une sagesse ancestrale: « Nous sommes les gardiens d’un idéal, nous sommes les gardiens d’une conscience… » Avec le recul, cet exercice apparaît comme un ultime morceau de bravoure, le dernier acte d’une magnifique tradition universaliste. (…)  la France a la particularité de mettre en avant ses prouesses morales et intellectuelles, et la conviction de devoir penser pour le reste du monde. Au XIXe siècle, Auguste Comte affirme que Paris est le centre de l’humanité, parce que l' »esprit philosophique » y règne. L’historien Ernest Lavisse écrit en 1890 que la mission de la France est de « représenter la cause de l’humanité ». La Révolution française a été la source des idéaux messianiques français: liberté, égalité, fraternité, droits de l’homme… (…)  Ce culte se reflète dans la consécration de l’écrivain, véritable guide spirituel de la société, et dans l’importance accordée au style, à la syntaxe, au mot juste, au monde des idées. En 1944, un petit manuel avertissait les soldats britanniques du débarquement: « Vous aurez souvent l’impression [que les Français] se disputent violemment, alors qu’ils ne font que débattre d’une idée abstraite. » (…) Du début des années 1950 à la fin des années 1970, j’ai répertorié le « nouveau roman », la « nouvelle vague », la « nouvelle histoire », la « nouvelle philosophie », la « nouvelle société », la « nouvelle gauche », la « nouvelle droite » – sans oublier la « nouvelle cuisine »…  Il suffit d’examiner comment les uns et les autres se présentent ou sont présentés, sous la forme d’oxymores: « rationaliste passionné », « missionnaire laïque », « spectateur engagé », « défaite glorieuse »… Vous ne vous en rendez pas forcément compte, mais ce genre d’expression paradoxale est déroutante pour un étranger. Julien Green l’a vécu à ses dépens à Oxford lors d’une conférence qu’il donnait sur « les trois Barrès », c’est-à-dire les trois aspects contradictoires de la pensée de l’écrivain nationaliste. Mais l’assistance n’a pas forcément saisi cette subtilité. La preuve, à l’issue de son intervention, un auditeur a levé la main et demandé: « Quels sont les prénoms des deux autres frères Barrès? » (…) L’intellectuel est un « clerc »; son engagement, une « foi »; sa rupture avec une idéologie, une « hérésie » ou une « délivrance »… Rappelez-vous Edgar Morin racontant son adhésion au communisme comme « l’espérance du salut dans la rédemption collective ». Et depuis la Révolution, les héros nationaux entrent au Panthéon, une ancienne église, et de Gaulle est devenu le Saint-Père national. (…) J’avais été surpris par les Mémoires d’Elizabeth Teissier, l’astrologue de François Mitterrand, dénichées à l’étal d’un bouquiniste, avant de découvrir que le président français n’était que le dernier d’une longue série d’hommes célèbres à croire aux « forces de l’esprit »: Robespierre, Victor Hugo, Jaurès, Poincaré, Clemenceau… Entre les deux pôles de la théologie et du matérialisme s’étend un territoire où coexistent l’attachement au rationalisme et la foi dans le surnaturel. Même si cela peut paraître paradoxal s’agissant d’un XVIIIe siècle rejetant les croyances en tout genre, certains principes de l’occultisme à la française sont enracinés dans les idées des Lumières, voire dans celles de la gauche: croyance en la bonté de l’homme, ouverture sur les valeurs et cultures différentes… (…) Cette prédisposition utopiste puise sa source chez Rousseau, qui considère que la faculté première de l’homme est l’imagination. Les oeuvres de Louis-Sébastien Mercier, Saint-Simon, Charles Fourier, Etienne Cabet sont toutes marquées par la révolte contre l’injustice et par l’ambition d’épanouir la nature humaine. Par ailleurs, le raisonnement utopique est marqué par son caractère systématique et radical.  Ces idéaux progressistes ont contribué à l’adhésion de très nombreux Français au communisme. Car, au fond, les promesses du Parti communiste français ne renvoyaient-elles pas à l’ambition des Lumières de former des citoyens instruits partageant une morale laïque commune, à l’aspiration rousseauiste à régénérer l’homme, au désir de Fourier de promouvoir une plus grande harmonie sociale, au culte de la perfection et de l’industrie de Saint-Simon, à la « dictature bienveillante » de Cabet… ?  Sudhir Hazareesingh
Today’s Left Bank is but a pale shadow of this eminent past. Fashion outlets have replaced high theoretical endeavor in Saint-Germain-des-Près (…) Indeed, as Europe fumbles shamefully in its collective response to its current refugee crisis, it is sobering that the reaction which has been most in tune with the Enlightenment’s Rousseauist heritage of humanity and cosmopolitan fraternity has come not from socialist France, but from Christian-democratic German. Sudhir Hazareesingh
French thought is in the doldrums. French philosophy, which taught the world to reason with sweeping and bold systems such as rationalism, republicanism, feminism, positivism, existentialism and structuralism, has had conspicuously little to offer in recent decades. Saint-Germain-des-Prés, once the engine room of the Parisian Left Bank’s intellectual creativity, has become a haven of high-fashion boutiques, with fading memories of its past artistic and literary glory. As a disillusioned writer from the neighbourhood noted grimly: “The time will soon come when we will be reduced to selling little statues of Sartre made in China.” French literature, with its once glittering cast of authors, from Balzac and George Sand to Jules Verne, Albert Camus and Marguerite Yourcenar, has likewise lost much of its global appeal – a loss barely concealed by recent awards of the Nobel prize for literature to JMG Le Clézio and Patrick Modiano.  Yet little of this ideological fertility is now in evidence, and French thinking is no longer a central point of reference for progressives across the world.  (…) Since the late 20th century French thought has lost many of the qualities that made for its universal appeal: its abundant sense of imagination, its buoyant sense of purpose, and above all its capacity (even when engaging in the most byzantine of philosophical issues) to give everyone tuning in, from Buenos Aires to Beirut, the sense that they were participating in a conversation of transcendental significance. In contrast, contemporary French thinking has become increasingly inward-looking – a crisis that manifests itself in the sense of disillusionment among the nation’s intellectual elites, and in the rise of the xenophobic Front National, which has become one of the most dynamic political forces in contemporary France. (…) This pessimistic sensibility has been exacerbated by a widespread belief that French culture is itself in crisis. The representation of France as an exhausted and alienated country, corrupted by the egalitarian heritage of May 68, overrun by Muslim immigrants and incapable of standing up for its own core values is a common theme in French conservative writings. Among the bestselling works in this genre are Alain Finkielkraut’s L’identité malheureuse (2013) and Éric Zemmour’s Suicide Français (2014). This morbid sensibility (which has no real equivalent in Britain, despite its recent economic troubles) is also widespread in contemporary French literature, as best exemplified in Michel Houellebecq’s recent oeuvre: La carte et le territoire (2010) presents France as a haven for global tourism, “with nothing to sell except charming hotels, perfumes, and potted meat”; his latest novel Soumission (2015) is a dystopian parable about the election of an Islamist president in France, set against a backdrop of a general collapse of Enlightenment values. (…) This ascendency of technocratic values among French progressive elites is itself reflective of a wider intellectual crisis on the left. The singular idea of the world (a mixture of Cartesian rationalism, republicanism and Marxism) that dominated the mindset of the nation’s progressive elites for much of the modern era has disintegrated. The problem has been compounded by the self-defeating success of French postmodernism: at a time when European progressives have come up with innovative frameworks for confronting the challenges to democratic power and civil liberties in western societies (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s notion of empire, and Giorgio Agamben’s concept of the state of exception), their Gallic counterparts have been indulging in abstract word games, in the style of Derrida and Baudrillard. French progressive thinkers no longer produce the kind of sweeping grand theories that typified the constructs of the Left Bank in its heyday. They advocate an antiquated form of Marxism (Alain Badiou), a nostalgic and reactionary republicanism (Régis Debray), or else offer a permanent spectacle of frivolity and self-delusion (Bernard-Henri Lévy). Sudhir Hazareesingh
Sur les migrants, au lieu de mener son peuple, Hollande a parlé comme un fonctionnaire : toujours cette peur du Front national qui empoisonne la vie politique française. Sudhir Hazareesingh

Et si la French theory avait été victime de son succès ?

A l’heure où, entre l’Iran, Cuba et les Palestiniens, les chefs prétendus à la fois du Monde libre et de la chrétienté ne sont plus que les petits perroquets des slogans les plus éculés du gauchisme primaire …

Et où – accès de folie (ou retour du refoulé ?) et avec les conséquences catastrophiques que l’on sait, la jusqu’ici plutôt pragmatique chef du gouvernement allemand  s’est transformée sous nos yeux en passionaria du multiculturalisme …

Comment ne pas être surpris après l’étonnante inimitié (réciproque) d’un des plus grands intellectuels américains vivants, déclaré persona non grata au Pays des intellectuels depuis sa défense de la liberté de parole d’un Faurisson …

Du néo-déclinisme de ce Mauriço-britannique d’Oxford et groupie déclarée de nos Napoléon et autre Villepin …

Se lamentant, dans son dernier livre, du déclin et du déclinisme de l’actuelle pensée française ?

A l’instar justement, comme il le rappelle lui-même, d’un pays qui, entre culte de la culture, clercs nouveaux directeurs de conscience et rites panthéoniques …

Semble ne s’être toujours pas remis de la laïcisation forcée de sa Révolution ?

A moins qu’après la débâcle communiste que l’on sait et l’américanisation honnie qu’appelait de ses voeux Chomsky pour l’Europe et la France, il ait enfin perdu son « respect » pour les membres de cette « sorte de prêtrise séculière » ou de « clergé laïc » qui n’étaient en fait que les « gardiens de la vérité politique sacrée » ?

« La France croit devoir penser pour le reste du monde »
Propos recueillis par Emmanuel Hecht
L’Express
28/08/2015

Francophile invétéré et grand spécialiste de Napoléon et du général de Gaulle, Sudhir Hazareesingh porte un regard d’entomologiste sur les moeurs, us et coutumes de nos intellectuels et penseurs. Interview.
Sudhir Hazareesingh, professeur au Balliol College, à Oxford, fait paraître Ce pays qui aime les idées (éd. Flammarion). En version originale: « Comment les Français pensent. Portrait affectueux d’un peuple intellectuel ». Plutôt que d’un essai à charge, il s’agit en effet d’une enquête sur les moeurs, us et coutumes de nos intellectuels et penseurs. Il a enseigné à l’EHESS, à l’Ecole pratique des hautes études et à Sciences po, et n’ignore pas que « sans la liberté de blâmer… »

Comment, en étant originaire de l’océan Indien, peut-on se passionner pour la vie culturelle et politique française?

C’est une vieille histoire. Au Collège royal de Curepipe, à l’île Maurice, j’ai été nourri de littérature française: Molière, Racine, Saint-Exupéry, Gide, Sartre et Camus. Mon père, Kissoonsingh, historien formé à Cambridge et à la Sorbonne, chef de cabinet du Premier ministre sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, avait des liens étroits avec Malraux et Senghor. Je baignais dans un climat de francophilie. Et je n’oublierai jamais le rôle de l’attaché culturel français Antoine Colonna, qui me permettait de suivre l’actualité dans les hebdomadaires, dont L’Express!

Ma francophilie a également été aiguisée par Apostrophes, l’émission télévisée de Bernard Pivot. Je me souviens en particulier d’une intervention de Marguerite Yourcenar, en 1979, sur les notions du bien et du mal. Vous ne pouvez pas imaginer comment, de l’océan Indien, cette émission avait quelque chose de léger et subtil. Etudiant à Oxford pendant les années 1980, j’ai conservé cette passion pour la France, pour son dynamisme culturel, pour son mépris du matérialisme et pour l’éventail de ses opinions politiques et leur complexité historique. C’était un bonheur que de se plonger dans les arcanes du catholicisme, du communisme, de l’extrême droite, de la république, de la monarchie… dans un Royaume-Uni à l’apogée du bipartisme et en pleine déprime thatchérienne!

Votre dernier livre traduit en français, Ce pays qui aime les idées, est la synthèse d’une trentaine d’années consacrées à l’histoire des idées en France, mais aussi une tentative de réponse à la question: pourquoi les Français sont-ils si pessimistes? Quelle est votre réponse, à vous, qui êtes familier des rives de la Seine et qui enseignez de l’autre côté du Channel, dans la prestigieuse université d’Oxford?

Le « malaise français » est au coeur des débats intellectuels depuis une vingtaine d’années: perte de repères idéologiques, crise du modèle républicain, euroscepticisme et rejet de la mondialisation, obsession du « déclinisme » devenue l’idée fixe de la classe politique. En 1995, Jean-Marie Domenach dressait un bilan accablant de la littérature contemporaine française et de l’absence de véritable critique littéraire à la mode anglo-saxonne, celles du Times Literary Supplement et de la New York Review of Books.

En ce début de rentrée littéraire – un rendez-vous très français -, il faut souligner que, pour le monde anglophone, la littérature française s’est égarée entre nombrilisme et abstraction. Lorsqu’un livre attire l’attention à l’étranger, c’est rarement un roman ou un essai philosophique. Le dernier best-seller hors des frontières est Le Capital au XXIe siècle, de l’économiste Thomas Piketty.

A vos yeux, les intellectuels, Alain Finkielkraut en tête, sont les porte-drapeaux d’un « nationalisme fermé ». Notre philosophe n’est-il pas un « coupable » parfait?

Je ne crois pas. Tenons-nous-en aux faits. Son essai L’Identité malheureuse a été l’un des plus grands succès de librairie de l’automne 2013, tandis que son auteur devenait l’incarnation ultime du repli de l’esprit français. Toute l’oeuvre d’Alain Finkielkraut est parcourue d’images de décadence, de maladie et de mort. Il a l’habitude des hypothèses paradoxales, par exemple que l’antiracisme serait plus pernicieux que le racisme. Il a des idées fixes, sur l’islamisme ou la prétendue omniprésence de l’antisémitisme.

De plus en plus nationaliste, il est de moins en moins républicain. Il défend une conception hiérarchique de l’ordre culturel et social et, tout comme le Front national, il dénonce le détournement de l’identité française par des minorités immigrées – encore une fantaisie. Son parcours illustre à quel point le pessimisme ambiant a corrompu l’héritage rousseauiste et républicain.

Vous ne croyez pas au danger de l’islamisme en France? Et vous ne constatez pas la montée d’un antisémitisme de banlieue?

On confond trop souvent l’islam, qui est la religion paisible de l’écrasante majorité des musulmans de France, et l’islamisme radical, qui est le fait d’une petite minorité d’agités (nous les avons aussi en Angleterre, et il faut évidemment les combattre). Quant à l’antisémitisme, il faut situer ce phénomène aujourd’hui dans le cadre plus général d’une lepénisation (ou, pour être plus précis, une « marinisation ») des esprits, qui répand la peur de l’autre, qu’il soit musulman, juif, immigré ou homosexuel. Le repli identitaire, surtout lorsqu’il est relayé par des intellectuels complaisants, ne fait qu’alimenter tous les fantasmes.

En France, l’intellectuel est un « clerc », son engagement une « foi » et de Gaulle « le Saint-Père national ». Ici, la cérémonie des panthéonisés du 27 mai.
Comment expliquez-vous le contraste entre le pessimisme collectif des Français et, à en croire les sondages, leur relatif optimisme individuel?

J’y vois la résurgence d’un courant classique de l’individualisme français, à la fois frivole et cérébral, orienté vers ce que Benjamin Constant a appelé la « jouissance paisible de l’indépendance privée ». Dans Le Mystère français, Hervé Le Bras et Emmanuel Todd soulignent l’écart entre le pessimisme conscient des Français et leur optimisme inconscient au cours des trente dernières années: d’où la bonne tenue du taux de natalité, la baisse du nombre de suicides et d’homicides, les progrès de la réussite scolaire, l’émancipation des femmes et l’intégration des immigrés.

Cet état d’esprit n’est pas si nouveau. Il est ancré chez les élites depuis l’ère postrévolutionnaire, dites-vous. Y compris à gauche, où vous avez même repéré un « désespoir progressiste »? On ne sait plus à qui se fier…

Eh oui, la gauche n’a pas toujours baigné dans un optimisme béat, fondé sur la croyance au progrès. En 1863, au faîte de la gloire de Napoléon III, Proudhon écrit: « Je crois que nous sommes en pleine décadence, et plus je reconnais que j’ai été dupe de mon excessive générosité, moins il me reste de confiance dans la vitalité de ma nation. »

Les premières pages de votre essai sont consacrées au discours du ministre des Affaires étrangères Dominique de Villepin contre l’intervention armée en Irak, devant le Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU, le 14 février 2003. C’est plutôt inattendu, comme entrée en matière?

J’ai choisi ce discours parce que c’est un condensé de l’esprit français, un mélange de virilité et de verve enracinées dans ce que la rhétorique française a de meilleur. Un appel à la raison et à la logique cartésienne, construit sous le signe d’oppositions binaires: conflit-harmonie, intérêt personnel- bien commun, politique de puissance-moralité… L’auteur se fait le porte-parole d’une sagesse ancestrale: « Nous sommes les gardiens d’un idéal, nous sommes les gardiens d’une conscience… » Avec le recul, cet exercice apparaît comme un ultime morceau de bravoure, le dernier acte d’une magnifique tradition universaliste.

N’est-ce pas le cas de nombreuses nations que de se considérer comme investies d’une mission, les Etats-Unis, la Russie, Israël…?

Certes, mais la France a la particularité de mettre en avant ses prouesses morales et intellectuelles, et la conviction de devoir penser pour le reste du monde. Au XIXe siècle, Auguste Comte affirme que Paris est le centre de l’humanité, parce que l' »esprit philosophique » y règne. L’historien Ernest Lavisse écrit en 1890 que la mission de la France est de « représenter la cause de l’humanité ». La Révolution française a été la source des idéaux messianiques français: liber té, égalité, fraternité, droits de l’homme…

Vous avez été frappé par l’étrange culte à la culture célébré par les Français. Il s’agit vraiment d’une spécificité nationale?

J’en suis convaincu. Ce culte se reflète dans la consécration de l’écrivain, véritable guide spirituel de la société, et dans l’importance accordée au style, à la syntaxe, au mot juste, au monde des idées. En 1944, un petit manuel avertis sait les soldats britanniques du débarquement: « Vous aurez souvent l’impression [que les Français] se disputent violemment, alors qu’ils ne font que débattre d’une idée abstraite. »

Pour les Français, dites-vous, la meilleure façon de vendre des idées, c’est d’affirmer qu’elles sont nouvelles. N’y aurait-il pas un peu de marketing dans l’air?

La question se pose. Du début des années 1950 à la fin des années 1970, j’ai répertorié le « nouveau roman », la « nouvelle vague », la « nouvelle histoire », la « nouvelle philosophie », la « nouvelle société », la « nouvelle gauche », la « nouvelle droite » – sans oublier la « nouvelle cuisine »…

Autre trouvaille de vos recherches: le paradoxe serait l’une des clefs d’entrée de la pensée française?

Il suffit d’examiner comment les uns et les autres se présentent ou sont présentés, sous la forme d’oxymores: « rationaliste passionné », « missionnaire laïque », « spectateur engagé », « défaite glorieuse »… Vous ne vous en rendez pas forcément compte, mais ce genre d’expression paradoxale est déroutante pour un étranger. Julien Green l’a vécu à ses dépens à Oxford lors d’une conférence qu’il donnait sur « les trois Barrès », c’est-à-dire les trois aspects contradictoires de la pensée de l’écrivain nationaliste. Mais l’assistance n’a pas forcément saisi cette subtilité. La preuve, à l’issue de son intervention, un auditeur a levé la main et demandé: « Quels sont les prénoms des deux autres frères Barrès? »

Au vocabulaire. L’intellectuel est un « clerc »; son engagement, une « foi »; sa rupture avec une idéologie, une « hérésie » ou une « délivrance »… Rappelez-vous Edgar Morin racontant son adhésion au communisme comme « l’espérance du salut dans la rédemption collective ». Et depuis la Révolution, les héros nationaux entrent au Panthéon, une ancienne église, et de Gaulle est devenu le Saint-Père national.

Autre surprise: au pays de Descartes et du rationalisme philosophique, les Français se passionneraient pour l’occultisme?

J’avais été surpris par les Mémoires d’Elizabeth Teissier, l’astrologue de François Mitterrand, dénichées à l’étal d’un bouquiniste, avant de découvrir que le président français n’était que le dernier d’une longue série d’hommes célèbres à croire aux « forces de l’esprit »: Robespierre, Victor Hugo, Jaurès, Poincaré, Clemenceau… Entre les deux pôles de la théologie et du matérialisme s’étend un territoire où coexistent l’attachement au rationalisme et la foi dans le surnaturel. Même si cela peut paraître paradoxal s’agissant d’un XVIIIe siècle rejetant les croyances en tout genre, certains principes de l’occultisme à la française sont enracinés dans les idées des Lumières, voire dans celles de la gauche: croyance en la bonté de l’homme, ouverture sur les valeurs et cultures différentes…

Dernière caractéristique des Français cartésiens, selon vous, l’inclination pour l’utopie…

Cette prédisposition utopiste puise sa source chez Rousseau, qui considère que la faculté première de l’homme est l’imagination. Les oeuvres de Louis-Sébastien Mercier, Saint-Simon, Charles Fourier, Etienne Cabet sont toutes marquées par la révolte contre l’injustice et par l’ambition d’épanouir la nature humaine. Par ailleurs, le raisonnement utopique est marqué par son caractère systématique et radical.

Ces idéaux progressistes ont contribué à l’adhésion de très nombreux Français au communisme. Car, au fond, les promesses du Parti communiste français ne renvoyaient-elles pas à l’ambition des Lumières de former des citoyens instruits partageant une morale laïque commune, à l’aspiration rousseauiste à régénérer l’homme, au désir de Fourier de promouvoir une plus grande harmonie sociale, au culte de la perfection et de l’industrie de Saint-Simon, à la « dictature bienveillante » de Cabet… ?

Sudhir Hazareesingh en 6 dates

1961 Naissance à l’île Maurice dans une famille de lettrés et de hauts fonctionnaires d’origine indienne.

1981 Etudiant au Balliol College, à Oxford, où il enseigne aujourd’hui les sciences politiques et les relations internationales.

1990 Soutenance d’une thèse sur les rapports entre les intellectuels français et le communisme.

2006 Prix d’histoire de la Fondation Napoléon pour La Légende de Napoléon.

2010 Le Mythe gaullien (Gallimard).

2015 Ce pays qui aime les idées. Histoire d’une passion française (Flammarion).

Interview
Sudhir Hazareesingh : «Chez les intellectuels français émerge un néoconservatisme républicain, frileux et nombriliste»
Sonya Faure
Libération
28 août 2015

Professeur à Oxford, le Britannique né sur l’île Maurice publie «Ce pays qui aime les idées», un essai consacré à la passion typiquement française pour le débat, de plus en plus schématisant et pessimiste.

Face au succès des thèses déclinistes d’Eric Zemmour, d’Alain Finkielkraut ou de Michel Houellebecq, on les cherche anxieusement du regard : mais où sont les intellectuels de gauche ? Pourquoi un tel silence du camp «progressiste» quand ne cesse de se répandre une vision anxieuse et anxiogène du monde ? Dans Ce pays qui aime les idées, un essai paru cette semaine chez Flammarion, un Britannique, professeur à Oxford, se penche sur cette inclination si française pour le débat. Sudhir Hazareesingh a connu son premier émoi intellectuel sur l’île Maurice, où il a grandi, quand il a vu, sur le petit écran, Marguerite Yourcenar débattre des notions de bien et de mal à Apostrophes, l’émission culte de Bernard Pivot. «Même si tant de subtilité avait quelque chose de légèrement cocasse (tout particulièrement lorsqu’on l’observait d’une île tropicale de l’océan Indien), personne ne pouvait à l’époque rivaliser avec l’énergie intellectuelle et le panache des Français», écrit-il. Que reste-t-il de ce panache ? L’universitaire britannique dresse un tableau assez alarmant. Qu’est-il donc arrivé à la France et à ses intellectuels pour qu’ils s’enlisent dans un tel pessimisme teinté d’ethnocentrisme ?
Vous faites le constat très sévère d’une crise de la pensée française. Quels en sont les symptômes ?

La neurasthénie s’est emparée de la France. La vie intellectuelle a versé dans une très forte tendance au déclinisme. En témoigne l’élection d’Alain Finkielkraut à l’Académie française ou les deux derniers romans de Houellebecq, qui a certes toujours donné dans le morbide, mais qui touche désormais à l’extrême névrose… Ce qui me frappe, c’est que ces intellectuels, polémistes ou écrivains ont une vision psychologisante du déclin français. On parle de la France comme d’un patient, on évoque la pourriture – voyez Bernard-Henri Lévy qui compare la gauche française à un «grand cadavre à la renverse», reprenant un mot de Sartre. Dans la culture anglo-saxonne, ce genre de constat s’accompagnerait d’une analyse empirique. On irait voir ce qu’il en est réellement, sur le terrain. Ainsi, l’école française républicaine tant brocardée est-elle vraiment en déclin ? Sur quelles notations s’appuie ce constat ? Où est la chute du taux d’alphabétisation ? C’est une particularité bien française : le débat – et particulièrement le débat décadentiste – s’en tient à un discours très abstrait et à des schémas globalisants.

Ce pessimisme français est-il nouveau ?

Il me semble au contraire être le propre de la pensée française : la certitude que la France est un grand pays, qui doit penser non seulement pour lui-même mais aussi pour le reste du monde, est associée à une grande angoisse de déclin. On retrouve cette dialectique depuis la Révolution jusqu’aux écrits du général de Gaulle. Lorsqu’on a des ambitions extraordinaires, on craint toujours de ne pas être à la hauteur. La France est chargée de représenter la cause de l’humanité, selon Lavisse. Et quand la France n’arrive pas à concrétiser cet universalisme, elle se dit : «Tout est foutu».
Ce qui est plus grave aujourd’hui, c’est qu’une partie du monde intellectuel diffuserait, dites-vous, «une forme étriquée de nationalisme ethnique»…
Pour le dire vite, jusqu’à la fin du XXe siècle, le nationalisme qui dominait en France était républicain : un patriotisme plutôt. On était français tant qu’on adhérait à des valeurs abstraites – le fameux «plébiscite de tous les jours» de Renan. L’identité collective était une construction sociale réinventée à chaque génération. Mais ce schéma-là a commencé à s’effriter à la fin du XXe siècle – à droite surtout, mais aussi à gauche. Le «non» au référendum sur la Constitution européenne de 2005 est un tournant majeur : il représente, entre autres choses, la victoire de la gauche fermée, repliée sur elle-même (le silence des intellectuels, lors de cette campagne, est d’ailleurs éloquent). A partir de 2011, le «marinisme» a commencé à émerger, avec l’ambition de banaliser les idées et les valeurs du Front national, et à droite, Alain Finkielkraut a entamé son évolution vers un nationalisme xénophobe et larmoyant. Une espèce de néoconservatisme républicain, frileux, nombriliste et nostalgique émerge en France.

Cette pensée, on la retrouve aussi chez l’acteur royaliste Lorànt Deutsch, qui vend ses livres sur Paris et la France à plusieurs dizaines milliers de d’exemplaires…

Pour comprendre les grands mouvements de pensée et leur diffusion, il ne faut pas se contenter d’étudier les grands intellectuels. On assiste aujourd’hui à la résurgence d’une histoire conservatrice (dans la tradition royaliste et nationaliste). Y participent aussi bien Deutsch que Jean Sévillia, du Figaro magazine. C’est important car l’histoire a une place de premier plan dans la constitution de l’identité collective française. Pour Sévillia, depuis plus d’un siècle, un complot entre historiens républicains aurait servi à occulter la vraie histoire de la France en minimisant le poids du royalisme et de la chrétienté, et en inventant le mythe d’une terre d’accueil et d’assimilation. Ces polémiques – on pourrait aussi mentionner les débats houleux sur les lois mémorielles – soulignent à quel point l’historien est toujours considéré en France à la fois comme un guérisseur et un oracle chargé de révéler la continuité de la nation et son destin.

Pourquoi le débat français ne parvient-il pas à se saisir plus sereinement de la question des minorités ?

La source du problème vient là encore de l’approche très schématisée des problèmes sociaux en France. On ne pense pas au sort concret des musulmans ou des minorités postcoloniales, on réfléchit à leur place par rapport au principe abstrait qu’est la laïcité. La tournure qu’a pris le débat sur le voile en France est frappante. Dès les années 80, à partir de l’histoire de deux jeunes filles qui arrivent voilées dans un collège de banlieue, un texte signé par des intellectuels de gauche, comme Régis Debray ou Elisabeth Badinter, parle du «Munich de l’école républicaine» ! Les traits caractéristiques du débat d’idées français sont en place : explosion de concepts tonitruants, schématisation extrême. On ne parle jamais des immigrés eux-mêmes, de ce qu’ils sont ou de la manière dont ils se voient. On touche ici à un autre problème : l’interdiction de faire des statistiques ethniques en France. Elles sont pourtant devenues indispensables si on ne veut pas laisser le champ libre aux «fantasmagoristes» qui occupent le terrain aujourd’hui.

Ce refus du multiculturalisme en France, vous le faites remonter à Descartes.

Descartes pose que la pensée est l’essence fondamentale de l’être humain. Et la pensée est indivisible. C’est pour cette raison que toute la tradition républicaine a vu en Descartes son fondateur. Les républicains disaient en effet exactement la même chose au niveau politique : c’est la rationalité qui fonde l’identité politique, et celle-ci ne se divise pas – des schémas très holistiques déjà. Cette grande tradition totalisante a certes été très créative, mais elle a aussi empêché les Français de réfléchir à l’identité de manière souple. Le contraste est évident avec l’Angleterre, où l’on peut être British-Asian, à la fois britannique et asiatique. En France, les mots n’existent pas pour dire cette possible hybridation. On en revient toujours à l’expression «Français d’origine» algérienne ou malienne. Mais l’origine est un faux problème. Elle ne dit que la trace de ce qu’était la personne – ou ses parents – il y a vingt ou cinquante ans. Pas ce qu’elle est aujourd’hui et qui peut tenir d’un brassage des identités.

La figure de l’intellectuel français existe-t-elle encore ?

Elle a connu un repli indéniable. Du XVIIIe au XXe siècle, les intellectuels étaient des guides spirituels. Une substitution au clergé – on parle d’ailleurs parfois de «clercs» pour les désigner ou d’«hérésie» de certaines convictions. La grande tradition intellectuelle française, de Voltaire et Rousseau à Sartre et Foucault, reposait sur un socle littéraire et philosophique, et sur la puissance de l’Ecole normale supérieure. On est désormais passé du lettré philosophe au technocrate. Sans doute parce qu’une société très moderne n’a plus besoin de maître à penser. Sans doute aussi parce que les intellectuels français ont abusé de concepts abstraits – Derrida et les structuralistes notamment. Les fonctions intellectuelles sont toujours là – elles n’évoluent d’ailleurs pas beaucoup quand on voit que Saint-Germain-des-Près concentre toujours autant de maisons d’édition -, des pamphlets s’écrivent tous les six mois… Mais les intellectuels ne s’investissent plus autant dans le débat politique et les politiques n’en sont d’ailleurs plus demandeurs.

Les intellectuels de gauche sont-ils responsables de leur perte de crédit, en France ou à l’étranger ?

Ils ont toujours de nobles sentiments : la défense des plus démunis, le rejet de la fatalité sociale, le mépris pour le mercantilisme anglo-saxon. Mais ils n’ont pas su développer une alternative européenne, une authentique troisième voie entre le mirage du social-libéralisme et les vieilles chimères jacobino-marxistes. Nous l’attendions justement de la France, pays des intellectuels. Mais ils se sont repliés et ont fermé les volets, tournant ainsi le dos au grand principe francais de fraternité. Dès le XVIIIe siècle pourtant, les républicains avaient une culture totalement européenne : ils lisaient Kant et, plus tard, les utilitaristes anglais… Rousseau n’était même pas français ! Mais la production intellectuelle est aujourd’hui devenue très franco-française. A double titre : elle ne parle que de la France et s’exporte peu… à de rares exceptions près, comme le travail sur les lieux de mémoire de l’historien Pierre Nora.

Vous oubliez l’économiste Thomas Piketty ?

Pour le dire de manière provocante, Piketty n’est pas aussi français que les Français le pensent. Sa formation intellectuelle est en partie anglo-américaine et son mode de raisonnement – sa grande utilisation de statistiques – ne s’inscrit pas précisément dans la tradition française. Je suis surtout frappé par une chose : à quel point il est célébré en France, mais à quel point aussi il n’est pas du tout écouté par le gouvernement socialiste. Nul n’est prophète en son pays…

L’autre grand échec des intellectuels français selon vous, c’est de ne pas avoir su endiguer la montée du Front national.

C’est navrant pour le pays de la tradition dreyfusarde. C’est une constante depuis les années 80 : on a systématiquement sous-estimé le Front national. Sans doute est-ce encore une fois dû à une forme de pensée holistique et essentialiste typiquement française : on part de l’idée que la France est le pays de la Révolution et des droits de l’homme. Donc, dans ce pays-là, le Front national ne peut être qu’un phénomène éphémère. Donc on n’a pas besoin d’y réfléchir.

La France est-elle vraiment si intello ?

Le débat d’idées y structure la société beaucoup plus qu’ailleurs. J’irai même jusqu’à dire que la pensée est une composante essentielle de ce que veut dire «être français». Et cela pour une raison historique simple : quand il fallu inventer une nation après la Révolution française, on a dû le faire à travers des principes abstraits. Procédez de cette manière, et vous serez constamment dans un débat d’idées. Etre français, c’est réfléchir sans fin aux valeurs sur lesquelles repose la citoyenneté, savoir ce qu’elles veulent dire, s’il faut les mettre à jour… En France, le moindre village célèbre l’écrivain inconnu qui est né sur ses terres. Il y a encore une épreuve de philo au bac et, chaque année, en juin, la France se met à en discuter… Hier, j’assistais à une altercation entre deux automobilistes parisiens au sujet d’une place de parking. En tout dernier recours, la femme a lancé à l’homme : «C’est une question de principe, monsieur !» Je me suis dit : «Voilà, je suis en France.»

Ce qui est d’abord nouveau aujourd’hui, c’est cela : une forme de fusion des pensées antimodernes dans un éloge commun d’un « républicanisme » nostalgique et passéiste qui réunit les ennemis d’hier, ceux qui sont effectivement les héritiers d’une culture républicaine comme ceux qui s’inscrivent dans une tradition profondément antirépublicaine. La deuxième chose qui me frappe, c’est la dimension très franco-française de cette pensée du repli. (…) Troisième élément qui caractérise notre époque : l’absence de véritable débat. (…) . On n’entend plus de contre-discours. Les antimodernes ont cannibalisé l’espace public. Enfin, quatrième point frappant : la tendance très actuelle à diaboliser tout ce qui est « autre ». (…) Tout ce qui est « autre » est représenté comme une menace pour « l’identité française », cet autre étant à la fois l’étranger (l’Allemagne, les Etats-Unis, le monde arabo-musulman) et le minoritaire (les féministes, les homosexuels, les immigrés, etc.). (…) ces auteurs définissent l’identité française comme un archipel d’îlots menacés. Le premier de ces îlots, c’est la laïcité, dont l’ennemi est à leurs yeux le multiculturalisme. Le deuxième, c’est la souveraineté : ici, l’adversaire s’appelle la mondialisation (ou l’Europe). Le troisième de ces îlots, c’est la civilisation française au sens large : dès lors que tout ce qui est français est par définition supérieur à ce qui ne l’est pas, tout doit être fait pour éviter l’invasion d’une culture étrangère, par essence barbare et immorale. D’où, chez ces auteurs, l’éloge fréquent de la notion de frontière et, à l’inverse, le rejet de toute forme de cosmopolitisme.(…) Dans d’autres pays européens, le réflexe souverainiste et pessimiste peut exister : il est le socle des populismes qui se manifestent un peu partout. Mais (…) En France (…) le pessimisme repose fondamentalement sur le déclinisme, et s’appuie sur certains traits caractéristiques de la tradition intellectuelle nationale : le penchant pour le schématisme, l’abstraction et le refus des faits, le goût du paradoxe, le recours systématique à la diabolisation et aux arguments extrêmes, et une vision apocalyptique de l’avenir. Sudhir Hazareesingh

Voir aussi:

Sudhir Hazareesingh : « En France, le déclinisme a gagné beaucoup de terrain »
LE MONDE DES LIVRES

20.08.2015

Propos recueillis par Julie Clarini

Professeur à Oxford, spécialiste de Napoléon, Sudhir Hazareesingh s’intéresse à l’histoire et à la ­culture politique françaises (La Saint-Napoléon, ­Tallandier, 2007 ; Le Mythe gaullien, Gallimard, 2010). Son nouveau livre, à paraître le 27 août, brosse un portrait intellectuel des Français.

Comment dégager un « esprit français » ?

Il s’agit d’éviter toute forme d’essentialisme. J’essaie de montrer que la pensée française est une construction sociale : à partir des Lumières, un certain mode et style de pensée s’impose et devient hégémonique. J’en décris les caractéristiques et je montre comment cette pensée a été soutenue par les institutions françaises, par l’Etat, par les grandes écoles, par les producteurs de savoirs… Par exemple, le moment que nous vivons aujourd’hui, la rentrée littéraire, est une des manifestations de cet esprit français. Tout est très codifié, très ritualisé. Après une période de vide absolu pendant l’été, les livres arrivent en masse. Et on commence à ­parler des prix, à chuchoter des noms. Surtout, très vite, s’opère la distinction implicite entre la masse des livres et la petite élite qui va vraiment compter.

Votre essai dégage ce qui ­soutient cet esprit français. On reconnaît certains traits (un rapport à la raison, à l’abstraction, une certaine propension à l’utopie, etc.) ; d’autres sont plus étonnants, comme cette tendance à l’occultisme…

Par hasard, en flânant sur les quais de la Seine, j’ai acheté les Mémoires de l’astrologue Elizabeth Teissier (Sous le signe de Mitterrand, Editions n° 1, 1997). C’est étonnant de voir à quel point Mitterrand était proche d’elle. Vous vous souvenez sans doute de cette scène où le président déclare, en 1995, face à la caméra : « Je crois aux forces de l’esprit. » Or, en travaillant sur le mythe de Napoléon, j’avais déjà repéré ­l’importance d’un certain mysticisme au XIXe siècle. J’ai voulu creuser un peu plus. Et il s’avère que l’ésotérisme est une composante fondamentale de la pensée républicaine et socialiste, jusqu’au milieu du XXe siècle. Ce qui est surtout très particulier à la France, c’est que ce sont les hommes et les femmes de gauche, qui croient au progrès, aux Lumières, qui sont fascinés par l’ésotérisme. L’occultisme est la partie submergée à la fois de la tradition républicaine et de la tradition progressiste. Je me permets donc d’avancer la thèse d’une continuité depuis la Révolution jusqu’à Mitterrand.

Vous analysez, dans votre dernier chapitre, l’évolution du monde intellectuel depuis dix ans. Que voyez-vous ?
Un esprit décliniste a gagné beaucoup de terrain, y compris à gauche, elle qui représentait pourtant la tradition philosophique de l’optimisme et du volontarisme. Je crois qu’il s’agit d’un conservatisme nationaliste qui auparavant était aux marges de la République. Barrès, par exemple, se disait républicain mais au sens très minimal. Ses écrits portent la trace de son refus des valeurs républicaines comme l’égalité ou la fraternité. Il me semble que c’est cette tradition-là qui renaît, mais elle renaît cette fois à l’intérieur de la tradition républicaine.

Car le repli que j’essaie d’analyser se manifeste à la fois dans l’espace et dans le temps : un repli nombriliste, qui tourne le dos à l’internationalisme et à la fraternité ; et un repli sur la IIIe République, qui devient un âge d’or. C’est par exemple étrange que François Hollande soit allé s’agenouiller devant la statue de Jules Ferry. Comment Ferry peut-il incarner un modèle pour l’homme d’Etat du XXIe siècle, lui qui justifiait l’empire colonial au nom de la ­supériorité de la race française ? Voilà qui reflète bien l’incapacité française à regarder en face son héritage colonial.

Qu’avez-vous pensé de la ­manifestation du 11 janvier ?

J’ai regardé cela avec intérêt et fascination. D’abord il y a cette chose très française, et tout à fait admirable, que chaque fois qu’on s’en prend vraiment à la Répu­blique, le peuple descend dans la rue. Mais la question, c’est : au nom de quelles valeurs ces Français et ces Françaises ont-ils ­manifesté ?
Je ne suis pas complètement d’accord avec la thèse d’Emmanuel Todd (dans Qui est Charlie ?, Seuil), mais je pense qu’il saisit quelque chose de profond : dans tout grand mouvement de défense de valeurs républicaines, il y a aussi parfois la tentation d’une certaine forme d’exclusion. D’ailleurs, historiquement, cette ambiguïté fait aussi partie de la grande tradition républicaine : le dissident est mis au ban de la communauté politique. Le grand slogan révolutionnaire, c’était : « Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité ou la mort ! »
Il est grand temps d’avoir en France des statistiques ethniques pour savoir ce que pensent vraiment les minorités. Et dédramatiser. En Grande-Bretagne ou aux Etats-Unis, on aurait déjà eu vingt-cinq sondages ! Mais encore une fois, en France, on préfère les schémas, et la grande ­opposition laïcité-religions. C’est une opposition très peu subtile, trop binaire, pour permettre de comprendre ce que veut dire être musulman en France.
Les données essentielles de l’esprit français

Sans doute faut-il être un spécialiste de Napoléon, et qui plus est un Britannique, pour se découvrir non seulement l’envie mais aussi le talent de cerner « l’esprit français ». Sudhir Hazareesingh est dans ce cas. En signant Ce pays qui aime les idées (titre anglais : « Comment pensent les Français », moins flatteur), il fait montre de tout le sérieux et de toute la bienveillante ironie qui sied à l’entreprise. Bref, on le lit avec plaisir, et profit. Les premiers chapitres sont de parfaites synthèses des grandes tendances de la culture française telle qu’elle s’est construite depuis le XVIIIe siècle : l’auteur y tente d’identifier les schémas de pensée, les croyances, et la rhétorique qui forment l’enveloppe dans laquelle se déploie la réflexion.
Il dégage, par exemple, cet attachement français aux grandes oppositions binaires (ouverture et isolement, immobilisme et réforme, liberté et déterminisme, progrès et décadence), dû à l’influence du rationalisme et à son corollaire, le goût de l’abstraction. Les pages sur la réception et l’utilisation, au fil des siècles, de la référence à Descartes sont d’ailleurs instructives. Mais il convient, insiste l’auteur, de ne pas négliger le pouvoir de l’imagination qui est une donnée essentielle de l’esprit français (elle expliquerait en partie la propension nationale à l’utopie). Sudhir Hazareesingh pointe avec soin les paradoxes : en France, la fascination pour l’ordre et la prédictibilité coexiste avec le rejet du conformisme. C’est aussi un pays où l’on peut rencontrer des rationalistes mystiques (lire l’entretien ci-contre) et subir de « glorieuses défaites » (utile invention, au demeurant, comme le souligne l’auteur).

« Tentation du repli »

La fin de l’essai se consacre à des analyses plus thématiques sur la place de l’intellectuel depuis l’après-guerre (décrit subtilement comme une histoire en trois parties : l’influence de Sartre, de Tocqueville puis de Camus) ou sur le rôle de l’histoire dans la construction du sentiment national. Enfin, l’ouvrage aborde le climat intellectuel depuis une dizaine d’années : l’anxiété et le déclinisme paraissent avoir nettement emporté la partie. Cette « tentation du repli », qui semble toucher la gauche autant que la droite, « a corrompu l’héritage rousseauiste et républicain de la pensée française ». Il en résulte en effet un affaiblissement de l’influence française sur la scène ­politique et culturelle à l’échelle mondiale.
Ce pays qui aime les idées. Histoire d’une passion française (How the French Think. An Affectionate Portrait of an Intellectual People), de Sudhir Hazareesingh, traduit de l’anglais par Marie-Anne de Béru, Flammarion, « Au fil de l’histoire », 464 p., 26 € (en librairie le 27 août).

Voir également:

« Les antimodernes ont cannibalisé l’espace public »
Propos recueillis par Thomas Wieder
Le Monde
26.09.2015

Sudhir Hazareesingh est professeur à l’université d’Oxford. Spécialiste de la France des XIXe et XXe siècles, il vient de publier Ce pays qui aime les idées. Histoire d’une passion française (Flammarion, 464 pages, 23,90 euros).

Quel regard portez-vous sur la pensée française d’aujourd’hui ? Dans votre livre, vous parlez d’une « tentation du repli » pour caractériser la période actuelle. Quelles en sont les caractéristiques ?

Sudhir Hazareesingh : Selon moi, quatre phénomènes définissent la situation actuelle. Le premier, c’est le fait que le déclinisme et le pessimisme ne sont plus l’apanage de la droite antimoderne et réactionnaire. Aujourd’hui, l’idée que « rien ne va plus » ou que « tout fout le camp » dépasse de loin cette famille de pensée, au point que certains de ses porte-parole les plus éloquents viennent de la gauche, comme Michel Onfray ou Régis Debray. Ce qui est d’abord nouveau aujourd’hui, c’est cela : une forme de fusion des pensées antimodernes dans un éloge commun d’un « républicanisme » nostalgique et passéiste qui réunit les ennemis d’hier, ceux qui sont effectivement les héritiers d’une culture républicaine comme ceux qui s’inscrivent dans une tradition profondément antirépublicaine.
La deuxième chose qui me frappe, c’est la dimension très franco-française de cette pensée du repli. Il y a deux siècles, les auteurs français réactionnaires avaient un rayonnement international. Joseph de Maistre, par exemple, appartenait au patrimoine mondial de la pensée. Il était lu et discuté à l’étranger. Aujourd’hui, les pamphlétaires français antimodernes n’écrivent que pour un public hexagonal. A l’étranger, personne ne lit Eric Zemmour, Michel Onfray ou Alain Finkielkraut. Il y a quelques années, l’historien Pierre Nora avait dénoncé le « provincialisme » croissant de la vie intellectuelle française. J’adhère totalement à son analyse.
Troisième élément qui caractérise notre époque : l’absence de véritable débat. Autrefois, l’antimodernisme n’était qu’une composante de la scène intellectuelle française. Face aux déclinistes et aux pessimistes, il y avait des progressistes et des optimistes qui pouvaient leur porter la contradiction. De nos jours, il n’y a quasiment plus personne dans le camp d’en face. On n’entend plus de contre-discours. Les antimodernes ont cannibalisé l’espace public.

Enfin, quatrième point frappant : la tendance très actuelle à diaboliser tout ce qui est « autre ». Dans un livre merveilleux, traduit en français sous le titre Deux siècles de rhétorique réactionnaire (Fayard, 1991), le sociologue américain Albert O. Hirschman expliquait qu’un élément central de cette rhétorique était la notion de « mise en péril ». C’est exactement ce qu’on observe aujourd’hui. Tout ce qui est « autre » est représenté comme une menace pour « l’identité française », cet autre étant à la fois l’étranger (l’Allemagne, les Etats-Unis, le monde arabo-musulman) et le minoritaire (les féministes, les homosexuels, les immigrés, etc.).
Quelle est cette identité française qui serait mise en péril ?

Je dirais volontiers que ces auteurs définissent l’identité française comme un archipel d’îlots menacés. Le premier de ces îlots, c’est la laïcité, dont l’ennemi est à leurs yeux le multiculturalisme. Le deuxième, c’est la souveraineté : ici, l’adversaire s’appelle la mondialisation (ou l’Europe). Le troisième de ces îlots, c’est la civilisation française au sens large : dès lors que tout ce qui est français est par définition supérieur à ce qui ne l’est pas, tout doit être fait pour éviter l’invasion d’une culture étrangère, par essence barbare et immorale. D’où, chez ces auteurs, l’éloge fréquent de la notion de frontière et, à l’inverse, le rejet de toute forme de cosmopolitisme.
Face à l’intérêt que suscitent ces intellectuels, les responsables politiques semblent peu audibles. Pourquoi ?

Il y a un élément très important, a fortiori dans un pays comme la France, où l’on aime les idées : c’est la langue. Que l’on partage ou non leurs analyses, force est de constater que les auteurs dont nous parlons savent manier la langue française. Certes, tous ne brillent pas dans le même registre : Finkielkraut, par exemple, est assez mauvais à la télévision mais il écrit remarquablement bien ; Zemmour, même si sa prose n’est pas exceptionnelle, a un talent oratoire hors pair ; Onfray, lui, est bon à peu près partout, que ce soit dans ses livres, dans ses cours ou sur un plateau télévisé, comme celui d’« On n’est pas couché ».

De l’autre côté, le problème est que l’on a une génération d’hommes politiques qui utilisent tous, peu ou prou, une langue technocratique. Ce sont des gestionnaires, incapables de varier de registre en citant un écrivain ou un poète. Or, quand vous mettez des gestionnaires face à des intellectuels qui savent manier la rhétorique, il est logique que l’on écoute davantage les seconds.
Ce que vous observez en France, l’observez-vous ailleurs en Europe ?

Non, pas vraiment. Dans d’autres pays européens, le réflexe souverainiste et pessimiste peut exister : il est le socle des populismes qui se manifestent un peu partout. Mais la manière dont cette pensée se présente en France est particulière, autant dans sa substance que dans son style. En Grande-Bretagne, par exemple, vous avez actuellement, autour de UKIP (United Kingdom Independence Party), un état d’esprit un peu analogue. Mais c’est un mouvement très anti-intellectuel et antipolitique, qui ne repose sur aucun système de valeurs cohérent. Surtout, il n’est pas obsédé par l’idée de déclin.
En France, par contre, le pessimisme repose fondamentalement sur le déclinisme, et s’appuie sur certains traits caractéristiques de la tradition intellectuelle nationale : le penchant pour le schématisme, l’abstraction et le refus des faits, le goût du paradoxe, le recours systématique à la diabolisation et aux arguments extrêmes, et une vision apocalyptique de l’avenir.

Voir encore:

Ce pays qui aime les idées

Aux yeux du monde, les Français seraient arrogants, présomptueux, ingouvernables… Ne seraient-ils pas d’abord et avant tout de grands amoureux des idées ? C’est, en tout cas, dans cette passion spécifiquement française qu’il faut, selon l’historien britannique Sudhir Hazareesingh, chercher les racines de notre identité, et en particulier celles de notre fameuse exception culturelle. Au fond, à quoi reconnaît-on la pensée française ? Peut-être à cette façon d’être un art de vivre partagé par tous.
Sans doute aussi à son inextinguible vitalité : si les Français donnent l’impression de ne jamais débattre sans se disputer, c’est qu’ils ont l’exercice de la controverse trop à coeur ; s’ils passent facilement pour des donneurs de leçons, c’est qu’ils aspirent toujours vivement à l’universel, au point de s’en estimer seuls garants ; s’ils sont râleurs, anarchiques et prompts à la révolte, c’est qu’ils ont une âme frondeuse et l’esprit critique chevillé au corps ; s’ils se croient supérieurs, c’est qu’ils ont le goût de l’abstraction, l’art d’inventer des concepts qui séduisent au-delà des frontières – le socialisme, le structuralisme, l’existentialisme, la déconstruction, le mot même d’intellectuel.
Enfin, s’ils sont enclins aujourd’hui à broyer du noir, c’est qu’ils sont nostalgiques de leur grandeur passée et qu’ils refusent d’abdiquer. Catalogue passionné des spécificités de la pensée française, ce livre nous décrit mieux que nous ne saurions le faire, en même temps qu’il nous pousse à interroger l’inquiétude que nous inspire l’idée de notre déclin

http://www.franceculture.fr/emission-la-grande-table-2eme-partie-histoire-des-idees-la-france-pense-t-elle-encore-2015-08-31

Biographie et informations
Nationalité : Royaume-Uni
Né(e) à : Île Maurice , 1961

Biographie :

Sudhir Hazareesingh est né dans une famille de hauts fonctionnaires indiens.

Il est chargé de recherches et directeur d’études en Sciences Politiques à Balliol College, à l’Université d’Oxford, et Fellow de la British Academy.

Il a été professeur invité à l’EHESS, à l’École Pratique des Hautes Études, et à Sciences-Po.

Il est membre du Comité Scientifique de la revue French Politics, de l’European Journal of Political Theory, ainsi que la revue Napoleonica.

Il contribue régulièrement au Times Literary Supplement, et a publié de nombreux ouvrages sur l’histoire et la culture politique française, dont La Saint-Napoleon. Quand le 14 Juillet se fêtait le 15 Août (Paris, Éditions Tallandier, 2007.

Son ouvrage La Légende de Napoléon (2005) a remporté le Prix du Mémorial d’Ajaccio, le Prix d’Histoire de la Fondation Napoléon, et le Prix de la Ville de Meaux.

http://www.babelio.com/auteur/Sudhir-Hazareesingh/93932

Contre ces intellectuels apôtres d’une France moisise

http://www.babelio.com/auteur/Sudhir-Hazareesingh/93932

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jun/13/from-left-bank-to-left-behind-where-have-the-great-french-thinkers-gone

« I was struck that on the night of the attacks people gathered spontaneously at the Place de la République, and then marched in their millions on 11 January. When confronted by a crisis, the French band together to reaffirm what they call the lien social, the social bond. It’s very much part of their democratic, Rousseauian tradition, reclaiming public space in order to illustrate that the Republic is made up not only of individual citizens but of people with shared values. That said, there were many different sensibilities represented in the march, and it is not easy to ascribe an unequivocal meaning to it. »

http://www.politics.ox.ac.uk/news/sudhir-hazareesingh-discusses-french-secularism-on-the-bbc-in-the-aftermath-of-charlie-hebdo.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b051cpx8

Philosophy
From Left Bank to left behind: where have the great French thinkers gone?
From Voltaire and Rousseau to Sartre and De Beauvoir, France has long produced world-leading thinkers. It even invented the word ‘intellectual’. But progressives around the globe no longer look to Paris for their ideas. What went wrong?
Sudhir Hazareesingh
The Guardian
13 June 2015

Writing shortly after the end of the second world war, the French historian André Siegfried claimed (with a characteristic touch of Gallic aplomb) that French thought had been the driving force behind all the major advances of human civilisation, before concluding that “wherever she goes, France introduces clarity, intellectual ease, curiosity, and … a subtle and necessary form of wisdom”. This ideal of a global French rayonnement (a combination of expansive impact and benevolent radiance) is now a distant and nostalgic memory.

French thought is in the doldrums. French philosophy, which taught the world to reason with sweeping and bold systems such as rationalism, republicanism, feminism, positivism, existentialism and structuralism, has had conspicuously little to offer in recent decades. Saint-Germain-des-Prés, once the engine room of the Parisian Left Bank’s intellectual creativity, has become a haven of high-fashion boutiques, with fading memories of its past artistic and literary glory. As a disillusioned writer from the neighbourhood noted grimly: “The time will soon come when we will be reduced to selling little statues of Sartre made in China.” French literature, with its once glittering cast of authors, from Balzac and George Sand to Jules Verne, Albert Camus and Marguerite Yourcenar, has likewise lost much of its global appeal – a loss barely concealed by recent awards of the Nobel prize for literature to JMG Le Clézio and Patrick Modiano. In 2012, the Magazine Littéraire sounded the alarm with an apocalyptic headline: “La France pense-t-elle encore?” (“Does France still think?”)

Nowhere is this retrenchment more poignantly apparent than in France’s diminishing cultural imprint on the wider world. An enduring source of the French pride is that their ideas and historical experiences have decisively shaped the values of other nations. Versailles in the age of the Sun King was the unrivalled aesthetic and political exemplar for European courts. Caraccioli, the 18th-century author of L’Europe Française, expressed a common view when he enthused about the “sparkling manners and lively vivacity” of the French, before concluding: “Every European is now a Frenchman.” Through the revolutionary epics of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, French civilian and military heroes inspired national liberators throughout the world, from Wolfe Tone in Ireland and Toussaint L’Ouverture in Haiti to Simón Bolívar in Latin America. The Napoleonic Civil Code was widely adopted by newly independent states during the 19th century, and the emperor’s art of war was celebrated by progressive writers and poets across Europe, from William Hazlitt to Adam Mickiewicz, but also by Japanese samurai warriors and Tartar tribesmen (a Central Asian folk song celebrated “Genghis Khan and his nephew Napoleon”), and by the Vietnamese revolutionary hero Võ Nguyên Giáp. In the late 1930s, when he was a history tutor at the Than Long school in Hanoi, Giáp taught French revolutionary history; one of his students later recalled the “mesmerising” quality of his lectures on Napoleon.

Jean Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir take tea together in 1946. Photograph: David E Scherman/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image
Progressive men and women across Europe celebrated the heritage of the 1789 revolution throughout the 19th century, and the first generation of Russian Bolsheviks was obsessed by the analogies between their own revolution in 1917 and the overthrow of the French ancien régime. Lenin drew on the Jacobin heritage as an inspiration for his own revolutionary organisation in Russia, and dismissed those who opposed him as “Girondists”. Stalin’s francophilia extended to obsessively reading the novels of Victor Hugo. French ideas and symbols were universally equated with self-determination and emancipation from servitude: the Statue of Liberty, the iconic emblem of American-ness, was designed by the French sculptor Frédéric Bartholdi; Poland’s national anthem celebrated Napoleon Bonaparte, while Brazil’s flag bore the motto “order and progress”, after Auguste Comte’s motto of positivism. French inspiration was most evident in stimulating traditions of critical and dissenting inquiry about modern society: Olympe de Gouges’s Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen (1791) was embraced by champions of feminine emancipation across the world, while social inequality and political oppression were eloquently denounced by Rousseau and the radical republican tradition of Babeuf, Buonarroti and Blanqui all the way through to the works of Sartre, Fanon, Foucault and Bourdieu. Yet little of this ideological fertility is now in evidence, and French thinking is no longer a central point of reference for progressives across the world. It is noteworthy that none of the recent social revolutions, whether the fall of Soviet-style communism in eastern Europe or the challenge to authoritarian regimes in the Arab world, took their cue from the French tradition.

A yearning towards universality

This intellectual retreat is of course not unique to France. Notwithstanding the recent electoral successes of populist radical movements such as Syriza and Podemos, the horizons of reformist, progressive and internationalist politics have dimmed across Europe since the late 20th century. But the phenomenon is felt much more acutely in France because (in notable contrast with Britain) the nation’s self-image is existentially bound up with its sense of cultural excellence, and with the assumption that their ideas have universal appeal: “France,” claimed the historian Ernest Lavisse without any irony, “is charged with representing the cause of humanity.” From the Enlightenment onwards, France was renowned for her génie scientifique. Paris was celebrated as a principal centre of the European “republic of sciences”, and indeed the discoveries of French scientists revolutionised modern life – from the Cassinis’ new principles of cartography to Louis Pasteur’s seminal findings on disease prevention, and Marie Curie’s ground-breaking research on radioactivity. France also played a pioneering role in devising original forms of intellectual sociability, such as masonic lodges, salons and cafes (the daily Libération celebrated the bistro as a provider of “key social links” among French people). Likewise, the primary impetus for the nation’s ways of thinking has traditionally come from Paris. Indeed, to an extent which is unique in western culture, France’s major cultural bodies – from the state to the great educational and research institutions, academies, publishing houses and press organs – are concentrated in its capital, hence Victor Hugo’s exorbitant claim that Paris was the “centre of the earth”.

This centralisation is one of the main reasons why French ways of thinking exhibit such a striking degree of stylistic consistency – a phenomenon further accentuated by the nation’s profoundly ambivalent intellectual relationship with religion. On the one hand, there has been an ardent tradition of anticlericalism in France, assertively upheld in recent decades by publications such as Charlie Hebdo, and in a colourful lexicon of derogatory designations of priests, with terms such as bouc, calotin, corbeau and ratichon; the place of Islam in contemporary French society continues to generate confusion and acrimonious debate. Yet, in stark contrast with Britain, French thought is also haunted by a pervasive neo-religious rhetoric. One of the modern French words for an intellectual is clerc (a member of the clergy), and the positions held by intellectuals have been consistently defined through concepts such as faith, commitment, heresy and deliverance. Like many men and women of his generation, the philosopher Edgar Morin defined his experiences in the French communist movement as a form of “religious mysticism”. France’s endemic incapacity to reform its state institutions is often represented as a mal, a term which carries connotations of physical disorder as well as sinfulness. One of the classic pamphlets denouncing France’s passion for authority and state centralisation was Alain Peyrefitte’s Le Mal Français; when in 2014 former socialist leader Lionel Jospin challenged what he perceives as France’s unhealthy fascination with Bonapartism, he entitled his polemical essay Le Mal Napoléonien.

This intellectual unity of French thought is crystallised in a number of lasting tropes about Frenchness. The most celebrated, as Siegfried said, is the sense of an exceptional Gallic aptitude for lucidity. The writer Rivarol put it even more imperiously: “What is not clear is not French.” Typically French, too, is an insouciance of manner, “doing frivolous things seriously, and serious things frivolously”, as the philosopher Montesquieu wrote. But it also bears a contrarian and disputatious tendency, as the historian Jules Michelet observed: “We gossip, we quarrel, we expend our energy in words; we use strong language, and fly into great rages over the smallest of subjects.” Above all, French thinking is famous for its love of general notions, such as the French Revolution’s classic triad of liberty, equality and fraternity. As the essayist Emile de Montégut said, “There is no people among whom abstract ideas have played such a great role, whose history is rife with such formidable philosophical tendencies, and where individuals are so oblivious to facts and possessed to such a high degree with a rage for abstractions.”

This passion for generality strongly contrasts with the practical, empirical reasoning of the British. It shows up in many dimensions of the esprit français, especially the tendency for arguments about the good life to revolve around first principles. Burke railed against the “clumsy metaphysics” of the French Revolution’s concept of the rights of man – but the ideal of monarchy celebrated in France by royalist thinkers such as Joseph de Maistre, Louis de Bonald and later Charles Maurras was just as abstract (if not more so). Equally widespread is the passion for considering questions in their totality as opposed to their particular manifestations. In his classic work Les origines de la France contemporaine (1875), Hippolyte Taine described this holism as entrenched since the Enlightenment, a method which sought “to extract, circumscribe and isolate a few very simple and general notions, then, without any reference to experience, to compare and combine them, and from the artificial compound thus obtained, to deduce by pure reasoning all the consequences which it contains”. The resistance leader Charles de Gaulle thus opened his War Memoirs by sketching his “certaine idée de la France” – a country with a vocation for an “eminent and exceptional destiny”. Such lofty aspirations remain an integral feature of French thinking, according to the academician Jean d’Ormesson: “More than any nation, France is haunted by a yearning towards universality.”
Yet paradoxically – the French love paradoxes – this holism comes with the equally cherished Gallic intellectual habit of dividing things into two. This explains why French public debate is invariably structured around a small number of recurring binaries. La France coupée en deux is a familiar representation of the political realm, referring to historical divisions between conservative and progressive blocs, but also dichotomous ways of seeing the world such as opening and closure, stasis and transformation, reason and sentiment, unity and diversity, civilisation and barbarity, masculine and feminine, and good and evil.

The progressive imagination

One of most distinctive features of modern French thought since the Enlightenment, which long provided the basis for its global appeal, is the richness of its progressive tradition. This ingeniousness shines through in the sheer number of mainstream concepts and discursive practices that have their origins in France: a (cursory) list would include the notions of ideology and socialism, the invention of the figure of the “intellectual”, and of the discipline of sociology; the spatial representation of politics as between left and right; the ideas of popular sovereignty and altruism, and the belief that culture should not only be democratically accessible, but should be assigned its own specific department in government (an innovation introduced in 1959 by De Gaulle on his return to power, the first incumbent of the new ministry being the writer André Malraux). This emphasis on creativity bears witness to the consecration of the writer as a spiritual guide for society, and to the central role assigned to imagination in French political and literary culture – hence one of the most celebrated slogans of May ’68: “L’imagination au pouvoir”.
Such has been the centrality of the ideal of creativity that the concepts of revolution and rupture have become familiar tropes across the French humanities and social sciences, whether in politics, history, literature, philosophy, sociology, linguistics, psychology or anthropology. The period between the early 1950s and the late 1970s alone gave us the nouveau roman, the nouvelle vague (in cinema), the nouvelle histoire, the nouvelle philosophie, the nouvelle gauche (and even, in echo, the nouvelle droite), without forgetting nouvelle cuisine – although that concept dates back at least as far as Menon’s Nouveau traité in 1742. For the ethnologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, whose notion of structuralism arguably represented the single most inventive French contribution to western thought in the second half of the 20th century, this thirst for innovation is inherent in the very idea of knowledge: “The great speculative structures are made to be broken. There is not one of them that can hope to last more than a few decades, or at most a century or two.”

This creativity also manifests itself in the French predilection for grand theorising, and in the often breathtaking ambition of progressive thinkers in their quest to uncover original truths about the human condition. Descartes’ cogito ergo sum broke new philosophical ground by locating the source of all certain knowledge in the thinking self, and providing an account of human understanding that was independent of God. Much of Rousseau’s political philosophy was driven by the goal of regenerating humankind through the achievement of republican virtue. Comte wrote extensively about astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics, and he devoted his life to elaborating an original scientific synthesis that would herald “the definitive stage of human intelligence”. Indeed, the most remarkable feature of French grand theorising is its aspiration to find comprehensive and universal explanations for all social phenomena: hence the Annales historians’ ambition to provide an account of the entire range of human activities (histoire totale). Likewise, Sartre’s Critique of Dialectical Reason (1960) aimed to establish “whether there is any such thing as a Truth of humanity as a whole”. Simone de Beauvoir’s Second Sex offered a sweeping alternative to the classic view that gender difference was grounded in human nature: “One is not born, but one becomes a woman.” His scattered observations of Brazilian-Amerindian tribes led Claude Lévi-Strauss to conclude that all social thought was based on certain shared symbolic patterns or myths, while Michel Foucault’s sprawling oeuvre claimed to uncover the forms of control and domination that were inherent in all ideologies and ways of thinking. The most recent product of this distinguished line of grand theorising is the republican historian Pierre Nora’s concept of lieux de mémoire, which offers an overarching framework for reconsidering France’s relationship with its own past.

These intellectual constructs have enjoyed such wide appeal not only because of their seductive literary qualities, but also because of their critical functions in shaping the French collective self-understanding (the contrast with British self-perception is again noteworthy: in Keir Hardie’s memorable expression, the British are “not given to chasing bubbles”). Rousseau’s political philosophy, to take the most obvious example, has consistently provided the bedrock for French republican patterns of thinking over the past two centuries – notably the belief in the possibility of a more rational organisation of society; and the thought that not just society but human nature itself could be regenerated through collective endeavour. Comte’s celebration of the dead (who in his view represented “the better part of humankind”) tapped into a deep fascination among French progressives for the occult. His Religion of Humanity, a secular system of belief complete with its institutions, cults and festivals, exemplified the consistent French quest for a more buoyant and less reactionary alternative to Catholicism. Sartre’s existentialism and his excursions across the philosophical terrain of Marxism in the postwar era underwrote the orthodox idea of a proletarian revolution, and justified the intellectual hegemony of the French Communist party (in his pithy expression: “un anticommuniste est un chien”). The works of De Beauvoir and Foucault are littered with intuitions about the pervasive manifestations (and corrupting effects) of power that have deep roots in French social thought from Rousseau onwards. Nora’s conception of memory has transformed the way the French see themselves, and has also provided the bedrock for a conservative form of neo-republicanism, which has become intellectually and culturally dominant in France since the late 20th century.

The darker sides of abstraction

Over the longue durée, these French progressive ways of thinking have been formidably productive, helping to generate powerful and engaging systems of thought. French thinkers have been especially influential in shaping modern conceptions of citizenship – notably the revolution’s concept of civic patriotism (based on adhesion to common values rather than ethnicity), the notion of the general interest, and the vision of the state’s enabling and enlightening power, embodied in the holistic philosophy of Jacobinism. But this penchant for abstract generality also has its darker sides: an insensitivity to the potentially intrusive and coercive role of the state; a suspicion of social groups that do not conform to shared universalistic norms (in the past, these included Catholics, women and colonial subjects); a disposition to fall back on stereotypes, negative fantasies and conspiracy theories; and a fondness for dividing the political sphere into antagonistic camps of good v evil.
Indeed, the “other” has been an enduringly problematic concept in French culture: hence the long tradition of antisemitism in French nationalist thought. But progressives have also faltered here, notably in their entrenched hostility to female emancipation (women were long viewed by republicans as reactionary agents of Catholicism, and were only granted the vote in 1944). Progressives also struggled to reconcile their universalist ideals of the good life with notions of cultural pluralism and ethnic diversity. Part of the reason why multiculturalism is regarded so negatively by the French is that it is perceived as an alien Anglo-Saxon practice. A contemporary example of these shortcomings is the discussion of the integration of postcolonial minorities from the Maghreb. The roots of this issue lie in the deeply held assumption of the beneficial quality of French civilisation for humankind. This vision underpinned the expansion of French power in Europe during the revolutionary and Napoleonic eras. A belief in the emancipatory quality of their culture explain why leading French progressives consistently advocated a policy of assimilation in the colonies, and – with the honourable exception of the communists – largely turned a blind eye to the racism and social inequalities produced by their own empire. This uncritical belief in the supremacy of the French mission civilisatrice was epitomised during the Algerian war of national liberation in the 1950s and early 1960s by François Mitterrand’s endorsement of the precept of “L’Algérie, c’est la France”. The same way of thinking led the socialist Guy Mollet to reject all manifestations of Algerian nationalism as reactionary and “obscurantist”.

This colonialist legacy still casts a long shadow over the ways in which France treats and perceives its ethnic minority citizens, especially those originating from the Maghreb. These minorities are demonised in the French conservative press and by the extreme right, in a way that would be found shocking in Britain. This vilification has been made easier by the typically abstract way French progressives have framed the debate about minority integration. Thus the principle of laïcité (secularism) has been deployed not to protect the religious freedom of the Maghrebi minorities, as would follow from a strict interpretation of the 1905 law of separation of churches from the state, but to question their Frenchness. Those who have opposed the ban on the veil in schools have been spuriously accused of communitarianism and Islamism – terms all the more terrifying in that they are never precisely defined. Since the January 2015 attack on Charlie Hebdo there have been widespread calls for French citizens of Maghrebi origin to “prove” their attachment to the nation. Presenting the issue of civic integration in such terms has proved counterproductive, not least because it has detracted from the real problems confronting these populations: unemployment, racial discrimination and educational underachievement.

This French penchant for abstraction appears in most paradoxical (and perverse) form in the absence of precise statistical information about their Maghrebi minorities, as it is illegal to collect data about ethnicity and religion in France. And so, instead of drawing on specific social facts and trends, the debate about minority integration has become mired in crude ideological oversimplifications: the equation of secularism with Frenchness; the suggestion that the (white, secular) French are the bearers of “reason”, while those who practise the Islamic faith are “reactionary” (the very same argument deployed earlier against any natives who dared question French colonial rule); and the essentialist assumption of an immutable, and yet paradoxically fragile, French national identity. This unitary and implicitly masculine sense of the French collective self, one of the less salubrious legacies of Descartes’ conception of philosophical reason, remains widespread among progressives today. As the editor of Libération, Laurent Joffrin, put it in an article in February: “Only an abstract conception of Man can confer unity upon France.”

The pessimistic turn

Since the late 20th century French thought has lost many of the qualities that made for its universal appeal: its abundant sense of imagination, its buoyant sense of purpose, and above all its capacity (even when engaging in the most byzantine of philosophical issues) to give everyone tuning in, from Buenos Aires to Beirut, the sense that they were participating in a conversation of transcendental significance. In contrast, contemporary French thinking has become increasingly inward-looking – a crisis that manifests itself in the sense of disillusionment among the nation’s intellectual elites, and in the rise of the xenophobic Front National, which has become one of the most dynamic political forces in contemporary France. Nora, writing in 2010, concluded despondently that France had become the land of “shrinking horizons, the atomisation of the life of the mind, and national provincialism”. Time magazine proved him right in 2015 when it included Marine Le Pen in its list of the world’s 100 most influential figures (the only other French person on the list was the economist Thomas Piketty, the author of the best-selling Capital in the Twenty-First Century).
How is this transformation to be explained? Among the most important factors is a collective recognition that France is no longer a major power. The complicated condition of the European project, which was decisively shaped in the past by a string of French figures (from Jean Monnet to Jacques Delors), bears witness to this decline. This change in the nation’s collective psychology also stems from a delayed recognition of the devastating character of France’s military defeat in 1940, and the impact of two further catastrophes that were not fully internalised: the loss of Indochina and the withdrawal from Algeria. For most of the post-liberation decades, these events were cushioned by the reassuring fiction that the French had behaved heroically during the war, and that France still represented an alternative force in world politics, thanks to its seat at the UN security council, its messianic Gaullist leadership and its distinct political and cultural values (as De Gaulle once observed: “I prefer uplifting lies to demeaning truths”). This myth was largely intended as a replacement of the (equally fabulous) ideal of the French mission civilisatrice in the colonies. Yet this collective confidence has been seriously damaged by the unravelling of the myth of the resistance and the emergence of a “Vichy syndrome”, which in the last two decades of the 20th century detailed the extent of French collaboration during the years of occupation.

This pessimistic sensibility has been exacerbated by a widespread belief that French culture is itself in crisis. The representation of France as an exhausted and alienated country, corrupted by the egalitarian heritage of May 68, overrun by Muslim immigrants and incapable of standing up for its own core values is a common theme in French conservative writings. Among the bestselling works in this genre are Alain Finkielkraut’s L’identité malheureuse (2013) and Éric Zemmour’s Suicide Français (2014). This morbid sensibility (which has no real equivalent in Britain, despite its recent economic troubles) is also widespread in contemporary French literature, as best exemplified in Michel Houellebecq’s recent oeuvre: La carte et le territoire (2010) presents France as a haven for global tourism, “with nothing to sell except charming hotels, perfumes, and potted meat”; his latest novel Soumission (2015) is a dystopian parable about the election of an Islamist president in France, set against a backdrop of a general collapse of Enlightenment values. A major underlying consideration here is the perception of the decline of French as a global language, and its (much-resented) replacement by English. A variety of groups and associations have long been campaigning vigorously against the importation of English words into French. The linguist Claude Hagège referred to the invasion of the English language as a “war”, claiming that its promotion “served the interests of neoliberalism”. Since 2011, the website of the Académie Française has a section dedicated to weeding out anglicisms from the French language. Among the expressions recently singled out for censure were conf call, off record, donner son go (authorise), chambre single, news and faire du running (notwithstanding this crusade, the word “selfie” is set to be included in the 2016 edition of the Larousse dictionary).

A more profound cause of the current malaise relates to the ways in which French elites are recruited and trained. For much of the modern era, the nation’s republican and socialist leaders were grounded in a meritocratic and humanist culture typically provided by institutions such as the École Normale Supérieure: among its most famous graduates were the likes of Jean Jaurès and Léon Blum. However, since the 1960s French elites have increasingly come from technocratic grandes écoles such as the École Nationale d’Administration (ENA). Most of the recent leaders of the Socialist party, including prime ministers Fabius, Rocard and Jospin; and president Hollande, are énarques. Their intellectual outlook reflects the strengths of this type of technocratic education, such as a capacity for hard work and for mastering complex briefs. But it also illustrates its endemic weaknesses: an inability to think creatively, a tendency towards formalism and rule-following, a socially exclusive and complacent metropolitan outlook, a corporatist, bunker mentality (as the joke goes, “Spain has the ETA, Ireland the IRA, and France the ENA”). Above all, it shows an overwhelmingly masculine style and ethos. Women in France struggle even more than in other advanced industrial societies to assume leading positions in politics (the law on parité, for example, is openly flouted by all parties) – and when they do break through the glass ceiling, female politicians face an exceptional barrage of hostility: Édith Cresson is the only woman to have served as prime minister, and she lasted less than a year.

This ascendency of technocratic values among French progressive elites is itself reflective of a wider intellectual crisis on the left. The singular idea of the world (a mixture of Cartesian rationalism, republicanism and Marxism) that dominated the mindset of the nation’s progressive elites for much of the modern era has disintegrated. The problem has been compounded by the self-defeating success of French postmodernism: at a time when European progressives have come up with innovative frameworks for confronting the challenges to democratic power and civil liberties in western societies (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s notion of empire, and Giorgio Agamben’s concept of the state of exception), their Gallic counterparts have been indulging in abstract word games, in the style of Derrida and Baudrillard. French progressive thinkers no longer produce the kind of sweeping grand theories that typified the constructs of the Left Bank in its heyday. They advocate an antiquated form of Marxism (Alain Badiou), a nostalgic and reactionary republicanism (Régis Debray), or else offer a permanent spectacle of frivolity and self-delusion (Bernard-Henri Lévy). The sociologist Bruno Latour clearly had this syndrome in mind when he observed: “It has been a long time since intellectuals were in the vanguard. Indeed it has been a long time since the very notion of the avant-garde …passed away.” But we should remember that in France especially, there is always the potential for a sudden reversal: regeneration is one of the essential myths of French culture.

• Sudhir Hazareesingh’s How the French Think: An Affectionate Portrait of an Intellectual People is published by Allen Lane this month. To order a copy for £16 (RRP £20), go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846. Free UK p&p over £10, online orders only. Phone orders min. p&p of £1.99.,

Voir de plus:

LEFT BANK
The decline of the French intellectual
Paris has ceased to be a major center of innovation in the humanities and social sciences.
Sudhir Hazareesingh
Politico
9/19/15

One of the most characteristic inventions of modern French culture is the “intellectual.”

Intellectuals in France are not just experts in their particular fields, such as literature, art, philosophy and history. They also speak in universal terms, and are expected to provide moral guidance about general social and political issues. Indeed, the most eminent French intellectuals are almost sacred figures, who became global symbols of the causes they championed — thus Voltaire’s powerful denunciation of religious intolerance, Rousseau’s rousing defense of republican freedom, Victor Hugo’s eloquent tirade against Napoleonic despotism, Émile Zola’s passionate plea for justice during the Dreyfus Affair, and Simone de Beauvoir’s bold advocacy of women’s emancipation.

Above all, intellectuals have provided the French with a comforting sense of national pride. As the progressive thinker Edgar Quinet put it, with a big dollop of Gallic self-satisfaction: “France’s vocation is to consume herself for the glory of the world, for others as much as for herself, for an ideal which is yet to be attained of humanity and world civilization.”

* * *

This French intellectualism has also manifested itself in a dazzling array of theories about knowledge, liberty, and the human condition. Successive generations of modern intellectuals — most of them schooled at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris — have hotly debated the meaning of life in books, newspaper articles, petitions, reviews and journals, in the process coining abstruse philosophical systems such as rationalism, eclecticism, spiritualism, republicanism, socialism, positivism, and existentialism.

This feverish theoretical activity came to a head in the decades after World War Two in the emergence of structuralism, a grand philosophy which underscored the importance of myths and the unconscious in human understanding. Its leading exponents were the philosopher of power and knowledge Michel Foucault and the ethnologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, both professors at the Collège de France. Because he shared the name of the famous brand of American garments, Lévi-Strauss received letters throughout his life asking for supplies of blue jeans.

The ultimate symbol of the Left Bank intellectual was the philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, who took the role of the public intellectual to its highest prominence. The intellectuel engagé had a duty to dedicate himself to revolutionary activity, to question established orthodoxies, and to champion the interests of all oppressed groups. Integral to Sartre’s appeal was the sheer glamor he gave to French intellectualism — with his utopian promise of a radiant future; his sweeping, polemical tone, and his celebration of the purifying effects of conflict; his bohemian and insouciant lifestyle, which deliberately spurned the conventions of bourgeois life; and his undisguised contempt for the established institutions of his time — be they the republican State, the Communist party, the French colonial regime in Algeria, or the university system.

As he put it, he was always a “traitor” — and this contrarian spirit was central to the aura which surrounded modern French intellectuals. And even though he detested nationalism, Sartre unwittingly contributed to the French sense of greatness through his embodiment of cultural and intellectual eminence, and his effortless superiority. Indeed, Sartre was undoubtedly one of the most famous French figures of the 20th century, and his writings and polemics were ardently followed by cultural elites across the globe, from Buenos Aires to Beirut.

* * *

Today’s Left Bank is but a pale shadow of this eminent past. Fashion outlets have replaced high theoretical endeavor in Saint-Germain-des-Près. In fact, with very rare exceptions, such as Thomas Piketty’s book on capitalism, Paris has ceased to be a major center of innovation in the humanities and social sciences.

The dominant characteristics of contemporary French intellectual production are its superficial, derivative qualities (typified by figures such as Bernard-Henri Lévy) and its starkly pessimistic state of mind. The pamphlets which top the best-selling non-fiction charts in France nowadays are not works offering the promise of a new dawn, but nostalgic appeals to lost traditions of heroism, such as Stéphane Hessel’s “Indignez Vous!” (2010), and Islamophobic and self-pitying tirades echoing the message of Marine Le Pen’s Front National about the destruction of French identity.

Two recent examples are Alain Finkielkraut’s “L’Identité Malheureuse” (2013) and Eric Zemmour’s “Le Suicide Français” (2014), both suffused with images of degeneration and death. The most recent work in this morbid vein is Michel Houellebecq’s “Soumission” (2015), a dystopic novel which features the election of an Islamist to the French presidency, against the backdrop of a general disintegration of Enlightenment values in French society.

* * *

How is France’s loss of its bearings to be explained? Changes in the wider cultural landscape have had a major impact on Gallic self-confidence. The disintegration of Marxism in the late 20th century left a void which was filled only by postmodernism.

But the writings of the likes of Foucault, Derrida and Baudrillard if anything compounded the problem with their deliberate opaqueness, their fetish for trivial word-play and their denial of the possibility of objective meaning (the hollowness of postmodernism is brilliantly satirized in Laurent Binet’s latest novel, “La septième fonction du langage,” a murder mystery framed around the death of the philosopher Roland Barthes in 1980).

But French reality is itself far from comforting. The overcrowded and underfunded French higher education system is fraying, as shown by the relatively low global rankings of French universities in the Shanghai league table. The system has become both less meritocratic and more technocratic, producing an elite which is markedly less sophisticated and intellectually creative than its 19th and 20th century forebears: The contrast in this respect between Sarkozy and Hollande, who can barely speak grammatical French, and their eloquent and cerebral presidential predecessors is striking.

Arguably the most important reason for the French loss of intellectual dynamism is the growing sense that there has been a major retreat of French power on the global stage, both in its material, “hard” terms and in its cultural “soft” dimensions. In a world dominated politically by the United States, culturally by the dastardly ‘Anglo-Saxons,” and in Europe by the economic might of Germany, the French are struggling to reinvent themselves.

Few of France’s contemporary writers — with the notable exception of Houellebecq — are well known internationally, not even recent Nobel-prize winners such as Le Clézio and Patrick Modiano. The ideal of Francophonia is nothing but an empty shell, and behind its lofty rhetoric the organization has little real resonance among French-speaking communities across the world.

This explains why French intellectuals appear so gloomy about their nation’s future, and have become both more inward-looking, and increasingly turned to their national past: As the French historian Pierre Nora put it even more bluntly, France is suffering from “national provincialism.” It is worth noting, in this context, that neither the collapse of communism in the former Soviet bloc nor the Arab spring were inspired by French thought — in stark contrast with the philosophy of national liberation which underpinned the struggle against European colonialism, which was decisively shaped by the writings of Sartre and Fanon.

Indeed, as Europe fumbles shamefully in its collective response to its current refugee crisis, it is sobering that the reaction which has been most in tune with the Enlightenment’s Rousseauist heritage of humanity and cosmopolitan fraternity has come not from socialist France, but from Christian-democratic Germany.

Sudhir Hazareesingh is a fellow in politics at Balliol College, Oxford. His new book, “How the French think: an affectionate portrait of an intellectual people,” is published by Allen Lane in London and Basic Books in New York. The French version is published by Flammarion as “Ce pays qui aime les idées.”

Voir de même:

Obama, Critical Race Theory, and Harvard Law School

David French

National Review

March 8, 2012

Watching Breitbart.com’s footage of law student Barack Obama praising radical law professor Derrick Bell gave me a strong sense of déjà vu. I arrived at Harvard Law School in August 1991, just a couple months after Barack Obama graduated. It would be hard to overstate the level of poison and vitriol that pervaded the school throughout the early 1990s. In 1993, GQ dubbed the law school “Beirut on the Charles” as HLS campus politics made national news.

This was the era of proud political correctness — including booing, hissing, and shouting down dissenting voices in class — combined with the vocal ascendance of the “crits.” Critical legal theorists rejected American legal systems root and branch, decrying them as the products of an irretrievably broken racist patriarchy. Their “scholarship” was unorthodox (and that’s being charitable), their voices were strident, and their student followers tended to be vicious. Many of the “crits” also had magnetic, preacher-like personalities, and it was more than a little disturbing to see the psychological hold they had over their student constituency.

Conservatives navigating this environment had to watch themselves. I can remember seeing cut-and-paste pictures of gay porn on the walls of the Harkness Commons, with the faces of Federalist Society leaders superimposed on the nude figures of the gay “actors.” If you truly angered the activist Left, they would call your future employers demanding that job offers be revoked, and I can recall receiving more than one note with some variation of “die, you f***ing fascist” for my pro-life advocacy. I was shouted down in class and verbally attacked by teachers. If it weren’t for the courageous free-speech advocacy of professors like Alan Dershowitz, the atmosphere would undoubtedly have been even worse. (I don’t mean to imply that Barack Obama ever participated in acts of political intimidation — I never heard that he did — but these stories do provide some sense of the background political intensity.)

Two events truly caused the campus to explode in the early 1990s. The first was the denial of tenure to Regina Austin (Jake Tapper tells the story here), and the second was the granting of tenure to four white male professors. The first event occurred during Barack Obama’s time at the law school, and the second almost two years later. In both instances there was enormous pressure on all left-leaning students to unite in outrage — and unite they did. But what does all this mean now? In 2012? There’s little doubt that law student Obama was a political radical by any conventional, society-wide measure of the term.

But that’s not the end of the story. At Harvard at least, radical was mainstream and conservative was radical. In fact, the radical view was so mainstream that one couldn’t help but think that even the loudest students would graduate, go to law firms, and fit in just as seamlessly to the new mainstream of their legal professions. And, in fact, most did. They weren’t intellectual leaders; they were followers.

My reading of Barack Obama’s political biography is pretty simple: He’s not so much a liberal radical as a member of the liberal mainstream of whatever community he inhabits. In that video, he was doing no more and no less than what most politically engaged leftist law students were doing — supporting the radical race and gender politics that dominated campus. When he went to Chicago and met Bill Ayers, he was fitting within a second, and slightly different, liberal culture. He shifted again in Washington and then again in the White House. But radical, “conviction” politicians don’t decry Gitmo then keep it open, promise to end the wars then reinforce the troops, express outrage at Bush war tactics then maintain rendition and triple the number of drone strikes.

Obama’s biography is essentially the same as many of the liberal mainstream-media journalists who cover him. They’ve made the same migration — from leading campus protests, to building families in urban liberal communities, to participating in a national political culture. At the risk of engaging in dime-store pop psychology, they like Obama in part because they identify with him so thoroughly and see much of themselves in him. They call him “pragmatic” or “moderate” or “technocratic” because they’re fully aware of legions of leftists who never made the transition from the purer form of activist politics. The pure activist is still leading campus protests or camped out in various parks across the country or writing radical tracts for minuscule readerships. The more moderate Left is running the country.

I would imagine that law school Barack Obama would never imagine ordering drone strikes on American citizens on foreign soil or Navy SEAL raids deep into Pakistan. Law school Barack Obama would likely think Obamacare was a thoroughly unsatisfactory half-measure and oppose it bitterly. Law school Obama is not our president, and I’m not sure that the videos tell us much at all about the man who sits in the oval office.

Voir aussi:

Pope Francis is just another liberal political pundit
John Podhoretz
New York Post

September 25, 2015

Pope Francis is unquestionably a man of ­uncommon personal grace, the possessor of a genuinely beautiful soul. “On Heaven and Earth,” his book-length exchange with Rabbi Abraham Skorka first published in 2010, is a remarkable testament to the breadth of his perspective.

But that’s not exactly the guy who showed up Friday at the United Nations. That pope endorsed the Iran deal, the UN’s environmentalist goals and what amounts to a worldwide open-borders policy on refugees — and ­offered a very specific view of how to promote development in the Third World that’s straight out of a left-wing textbook.

“The International Financial Agencies,” the pope said, “should care for the sustainable development of countries and should ensure that they are not subjected to oppressive lending systems which, far from promoting progress, subject people to mechanisms which generate greater poverty, exclusion and dependence.”

We’re told we must not view the pope’s expression of views on contemporary subjects through the lens of day-to-day issues — that we belittle him and ourselves by examining his words through an ideological filter.

Because of the awesome position he holds, and by dint of his own teachings and his life and teachings before he rose to service as the Vicar of Christ, Francis is said to be deeper and loftier than mere politics.

Sorry: When the pontiff sounds less like a theological leader and more like the
8 p.m. host on MSNBC or the editor of Mother Jones, what’s a guy to do?

Pope Francis is entirely within his rights to become the world’s foremost liberal. But, since that’s what he is, it can’t be wrong to say so.

It is undoubtedly the role of theological leaders to speak to our highest selves, to remind us of eternal moral teachings, to remove us from the everyday and put us in touch with the divine. We look to leaders to tell us what our faith traditions expect of us — what we should do and what we must do.

And, of course, it is impossible to do so without touching on the behavior of people and nations in the present. A leader whose role it is to save the souls of his flock must take account of the particular temptations that beset them and the particular challenges they face.

But that’s wildly different from specifically embracing a UN document, or endorsing a specific agreement ­between nations. And this is what Francis told us:

“The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable ­Development at the World Summit, which opens today, is an important sign of hope. I am similarly confident that the Paris Conference on Climatic Change will secure fundamental and effective agreements.”

When a leader speaks in these sorts of bureaucratic specifics, he is descending from the highest heavens into ordinary, even trivial, reality. He’s using his ­authority in the realm of the spiritual to influence the ­political behavior of others.

He becomes just another pundit. And who needs another one of those?

Voir également:

De Thomas Merton à Dorothy Day, les quatre modèles américains du pape François
Dans son discours au Congrès américain, jeudi 24 septembre, le pape François a donné en exemple quatre figures historiques aux États-Unis, aussi spirituelles qu’engagées : Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day et Thomas Merton.
La Croix
24/9/15

Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), « gardien de la liberté »
C’est l’un des présidents favoris des Américains. Né en 1809 dans le Kentucky, fils d’un fermier descendant d’une famille émigrée d’Angleterre au XVIIe  siècle, cet autodidacte devient avocat, député de l’Illinois, avant d’être élu à la Chambre des représentants à Washington sous les couleurs républicaines (le parti progressiste à l’époque). L’élection de cet abolitionniste convaincu – et profondément religieux – à la présidence des États-Unis, en 1860, a pour conséquence la sécession des États du sud et la guerre du même nom. Lincoln abolit l’esclavage en 1865 et est assassiné la même année, par un sudiste nommé John Wilkes Booth, avant d’avoir vu la réunification du pays. Le pape François a salué en Lincoln un homme qui « a travaillé sans relâche en sorte que” cette nation, sous Dieu (puisse) avoir une nouvelle naissance de liberté” ».

Dr. Martin Luther King
Martin Luther King (1929-1968), « la liberté dans la pluralité et la non-exclusion »
Militant non-violent pour les droits civiques des noirs américains, ce pasteur baptiste d’Atlanta a joué un rôle majeur pour leur émancipation et la prise de conscience de l’injustice de la ségrégation aux États-Unis. En 1963, devant 250 000 personnes rassemblées à Washington, il dit son rêve, « I have a dream… », devenu un hymne à la solidarité et à la réconciliation entre les communautés. Deux ans plus tard, les noirs américains obtiennent le droit de vote. Entre-temps, lui a reçu le prix Nobel de la Paix. Son combat se radicalise : il dénonce la grande pauvreté, la guerre du Vietnam, prêche la désobéissance à l’égard des lois injustes, donnant l’exemple du Christ. Ce « Gandhi noir » est assassiné à Memphis, en 1968, d’une main jamais identifiée. « Son rêve continue de nous inspirer tous », a souligné le pape François, rêve qui conduit « à l’action, à la participation, à l’engagement ».

Dorothy Day (1897-1980), « la justice sociale et les droits des personnes »
C’est l’une des figures catholiques américaines les plus célèbres. Née dans une famille épiscopalienne peu pratiquante qui fuit le séisme de 1906 de San Francisco et connaît des années difficiles à Chicago, elle conçoit très tôt un sentiment aigu de l’injustice sociale. Devenue journaliste, proche des milieux anarchistes et d’ultra-gauche, elle s’engage dans des campagnes publiques en faveur de la justice sociale, des pauvres, des marginaux, des affamés et des sans-abri. Après une vie de bohème et un avortement, elle donne naissance à une fille, et se convertit au catholicisme en 1927. Cette révoltée n’aura de cesse de concilier sa volonté d’un changement radical de la société et sa foi. En 1933, au cœur de la crise économique, elle fonde, avec le Français Pierre Maurin, le Catholic Worker, l’un des plus grands journaux catholiques des États-Unis, puis le « Mouvement catholique ouvrier », qui défend la non-violence et l’hospitalité envers les exclus de la société. « Son activisme social, sa passion pour la justice et pour la cause des opprimés étaient inspirés par l’Évangile, par sa foi, par l’exemple des saints », a souligné le pape François. Pendant la guerre froide, son pacifisme lui vaudra maints séjours en prison. Elle reçoit le prix Pacem in Terris en 1972. Sa cause en canonisation a été ouverte en 2000.

Thomas Merton (1915-1968), « la capacité au dialogue et l’ouverture à Dieu »
Du fond de son monastère de Gethsemani, dans le Kentucky, ce moine cistercien non-conformiste a milité pour l’égalité raciale et contre la guerre froide, correspondu avec des dizaines de personnalités… Né à Prades (Pyrénées-Orientales) en 1915, il gardera toujours un grand attachement à la culture française. Mais ses études le conduisent en Angleterre, où il passe plus de temps dans les cabarets que dans les bibliothèques. Aux États-Unis, grâce à des amis influents et à la lecture de Gilson et Maritain, il se convertit et est reçu dans l’Église catholique en 1938. Après un contact avec les franciscains, il entre chez les cisterciens en 1941. À la demande de son abbé, cet écrivain talentueux rédige une autobiographie qui va faire le tour du monde : La Nuit privée d’étoiles, en 1948. Il mourra accidentellement en Asie à l’âge de 53 ans. Cet homme de prière, de dialogue, « promoteur de paix entre les peuples et les religions », a commenté le pape François, « demeure la source d’une inspiration spirituelle et un guide pour beaucoup de personnes ».

Voir par ailleurs:

 » La France est devenue une île « 
Propos recueillis par Elisabeth Lévy

Le Point

24/06/2010

Noam Chomsky Le Point : Comment jugez-vous la vie intellectuelle française ?

Noam Chomsky : Elle a quelque chose d’étrange. Au Collège de France, j’ai participé à un colloque savant sur  » Rationalité, vérité et démocratie « . Discuter ces concepts me semble parfaitement incongru. A la Mutualité, on m’a posé la question suivante :  » Bertrand Russell nous dit qu’il faut se concentrer sur les faits, mais les philosophes nous disent que les faits n’existent pas. Comment faire ?  » Une question de ce type laisse peu de place à un débat sérieux car, à un tel niveau d’abstraction, il n’y a rien à ajouter.

Avez-vous une explication ?

Comme observateur lointain, je formulerai une hypothèse. Après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la France est passée de l’avant-garde à l’arrière-cour et elle est devenue une île. Dans les années 30, un artiste ou un écrivain américain se devait d’aller à Paris, de même qu’un scientifique ou un philosophe avait les yeux tournés vers l’Angleterre ou l’Allemagne. Après 1945, tous ces courants se sont inversés, mais la France a eu plus de mal à s’adapter à cette nouvelle hiérarchie du prestige. Cela tient en grande partie à l’histoire de la collaboration. Alors, bien sûr, il y a eu la Résistance et beaucoup de gens courageux, mais rien de comparable avec ce qui s’est passé en Grèce ou en Italie, où la résistance a donné du fil à retordre à six divisions allemandes. Et il a fallu un chercheur américain [Robert Paxton, NDLR] pour que la France soit capable d’affronter ce passé.

Depuis, nous nous rattrapons : la repentance est devenue une de nos spécialités, même si elle s’est déplacée du terrain de Vichy à celui de la colonisation.

Il est tout de même surprenant que les guerres coloniales n’aient pas suscité de protestations.

Vous exagérez ! La lutte contre la guerre d’Algérie a été l’acte de naissance de la deuxième gauche.

Il y a eu une mobilisation, limitée d’ailleurs, sur l’Algérie. Mais j’ai suivi la guerre d’Indochine et j’ai été frappé par l’absence de réaction sur la scène intellectuelle. Certes, on peut dire la même chose des intellectuels américains pendant la guerre du Vietnam. Mais, de la France, on attendait autre chose !

Nous sommes au XXIe siècle et vous êtes américain. Vous critiquez durement votre pays. Les Etats-Unis peuvent-ils être responsables de tous les maux du monde ?

Ils sont responsables d’un très grand nombre d’atrocités, parce que, depuis 1945, ils dominent la politique et l’économie mondiales. Et cette domination a été voulue par les décideurs qui, pendant la guerre, imaginaient une zone d’influence américaine comprenant l’hémisphère occidental, l’ancien Empire britannique et l’Extrême-Orient – les  » deux rives des deux océans « . Dans cette zone qu’ils appelaient The Grand Area, aucune souveraineté ne devait s’opposer à celle de l’Amérique. Et ils ont réussi. En commettant de nombreux crimes.

Mais le monde est désormais multipolaire, la Chine est une puissance mondiale.

Combien de bases militaires la Chine possède-t-elle dans le monde ? Aucune. Les Etats-Unis en ont environ 800. Combien de soldats chinois sont-ils déployés à l’étranger ? Presque aucun. Le gouvernement chinois est horrible sur le plan interne, mais il n’est pas agressif à l’extérieur. De plus, la croissance chinoise est en partie fallacieuse : la Chine est un atelier d’assemblage, mais la technologie et les composants viennent du Japon, de Corée, de Taïwan et des Etats-Unis. Aussi le déficit du commerce américano-chinois est-il une illusion. Il en va de même pour la dette. Les premiers créanciers des Etats-Unis sont les Japonais, mais le Premier ministre a dû renoncer à sa promesse d’évacuer Okinawa. Alors, bien sûr, le système international est plus complexe, le nouvel ordre mondial s’est adapté, mais il reste à l’ordre du jour.

Qui est responsable ? Les Etats-Unis seraient-ils dirigés par une bande de sadiques ?

Il ne s’agit pas de culpabilité mais de la nature du système. Or, aux Etats-Unis, le pouvoir est depuis longtemps aux mains du grand capital et, depuis une trentaine d’années, du secteur financier. Obama a gagné parce qu’il était soutenu par les banques. Tous ses conseillers économiques viennent de ce secteur, de sorte que les gens qui ont créé la crise sont ceux qui ont élaboré le plan de sauvetage des banques. Lesquelles sont aujourd’hui plus puissantes qu’avant.

Donc, rien n’a changé avec l’élection d’Obama ?

Les démocrates sont bien obligés de faire quelques pas en direction des plus pauvres, qui constituent leur base électorale, mais cela, même les Etats totalitaires le font. Sur le fond, Obama ne se distingue pas radicalement du second mandat de Bush. La rhétorique a changé, pas la politique.

Vous diriez-vous toujours anarchiste ? Croyez-vous que les sociétés humaines peuvent se passer de pouvoir ?

Je crois à un principe fondamental de la morale humaine qui consiste à s’opposer à toute forme de domination ou de hiérarchie, à moins que celle-ci ne puisse faire la preuve de sa légitimité. Or, la plupart du temps, c’est impossible. Il faut donc détruire ces dominations.

Sauf que, dans les pays démocratiques comme le vôtre, les dirigeants peuvent se prévaloir de la légitimité des urnes.

Il est préférable d’avoir des élections que de ne pas en avoir, mais tout dépend des conditions dans lesquelles elles ont lieu. On critique l’Iran et à juste titre parce que les candidats sont sélectionnés par le clergé mais, en Amérique, ils sont de fait choisis par le grand capital : le vainqueur est celui qui lève le plus de fonds. J’ajouterai que l’un des Etats les plus démocratiques du monde est la Bolivie, où la population indigène, la plus pauvre et la plus opprimée, a su s’organiser politiquement pour porter l’un des siens à la tête du pays. Tous les Etats commettent des crimes, mais ne sont-ils pas pour leurs populations des instances de protection ? Plus les Etats sont puissants, plus ils sont criminels, mais je ne crois nullement que la protection des peuples soit leur priorité. En envahissant l’Irak, les responsables américains savaient qu’ils allaient provoquer une intensification du terrorisme et, donc, mettre en danger les Américains. L’Europe n’a jamais été aussi sauvage qu’au moment où elle inventait l’Etat-nation, qui est à mon sens une véritable calamité imposée au monde, responsable jusqu’à aujourd’hui de nombreux conflits.

Mais le monde sans frontières dont vous rêvez n’est-il pas celui que souhaitent les partisans les plus acharnés de la globalisation capitaliste que vous honnissez ?

Absolument pas. Le  » libre-échange  » ne fait que protéger les droits des investisseurs et du grand capital. On pourrait définir comme  » service  » tout ce qui intéresse l’être humain : éducation, électricité… Mais les accords sur  » le commerce et les services  » ne visent qu’à privatiser ces derniers, donc à réserver leur accès à une minorité privilégiée.

En attendant, personne n’a prouvé qu’il existe une alternative au capitalisme.

C’est un peu comme si vous m’aviez dit en 1943 qu’il n’y avait pas d’alternative au nazisme parce que l’Allemagne gagnait.

Vous charriez, professeur ! Il y en a eu une, d’alternative, et elle n’a pas donné les meilleurs résultats.

L’Union soviétique n’a pas instauré le socialisme mais un capitalisme d’Etat. Seulement, comme la propagande de l’Est et celle de l’Ouest convergeaient, le monde a avalé le bobard selon lequel ce qui se réalisait là-bas était le socialisme. Je continue donc à croire au socialisme véritable, fondé sur le contrôle de la production par les producteurs et sur celui des communautés par elles-mêmes.

Difficile de prononcer votre nom à Paris sans qu’un autre nom surgisse. Comprenez-vous que votre défense de Robert Faurisson ait choqué ?

Cela prouve que beaucoup d’intellectuels français sont restés staliniens même quand ils sont passés à l’extrême droite. Comment peut-on accepter que l’Etat définisse la vérité historique et punisse la dissidence de la pensée ?

L’extermination des juifs d’Europe est une vérité historique, peut-être pas unique mais singulière, non ?

Ce fut un crime horrible et unique, mais il y a beaucoup d’autres crimes uniques. Pourquoi aurait-on le droit de nier le génocide des Mayas au Guatemala ou celui de nombreuses populations indigènes de l’hémisphère occidental – ce que d’excellents journaux américains ne se privent pas de faire – et pas celui-là ?

Le génocide des Indiens n’a peut-être pas, ne serait-ce que parce qu’il est plus ancien, le même poids dans la conscience européenne et occidentale.

C’est bien le problème ! Mais cela n’a rien à voir avec le temps écoulé : le génocide des juifs s’est arrêté en 1945, le massacre des populations indigènes se poursuit. Au Timor-Oriental, entre un quart et un tiers de la population a été décimée avec l’accord des Etats-Unis et de la France, et peu de gens le savent alors que tout le monde connaît les crimes de Pol Pot. La vérité, c’est qu’on a le droit de nier les crimes des puissants – les nôtres. Seuls les crimes des autres ou des perdants sont protégés du négationnisme. Cette hypocrisie est insupportable.

Repères
1928 Naissance à Philadelphie. 1955 Doctorat de linguistique de l’université de Pennsylvanie. 1957  » Structures syntaxiques « . 1964 Milite activement contre la guerre du Vietnam 1968  » L’Amérique et ses nouveaux mandarins  » (Seuil). 1966/1976 Titulaire de la chaire de linguistique au MIT. Depuis 1976  Institute Professor au MIT. 1980 Prend la défense de Faurisson au nom de la liberté d’expression. 2001  » 11-9. Autopsie des terrorismes  » (Le Serpent à plumes). 2007  » Les Etats manqués. Abus de puissance et déficit démocratique  » (Fayard). 2010  » Pour une éducation humaniste  » (Editions de L’Herne).

Haro sur un imprécateur

La mauvaise réputation de Noam Chomsky

Telle qu’elle est relayée par les grands médias, la vie intellectuelle française suscite parfois la consternation à l’étranger : phrases extraites de leur contexte, indignations prévisibles, « polémiques » de pacotille, intellectuels de télévision qui prennent la pose à l’affût du mot trop rapide qui servira de pâture à leurs éditoriaux indignés. En France, Noam Chomsky a été l’objet de campagnes de disqualification d’autant plus vives et régulières qu’il a su détailler, calmement, l’imposture d’un discours à géométrie variable sur les « droits de l’homme », lequel, souvent, couvrait les forfaits de l’Occident.

Jean Bricmont
Le Monde diplomatique
avril 2001

Le New York Times, qui n’aime guère Noam Chomsky (c’est réciproque), admet néanmoins qu’il compte au nombre des plus grands intellectuels vivants. En dehors des départements de linguistique, et des colonnes du Monde diplomatique, il reste néanmoins ignoré en France.

Quand son nom est évoqué, c’est trop souvent pour y associer ceux de Robert Faurisson ou de Pol Pot. Chomsky serait l’archétype de l’intellectuel passant son temps à minimiser ou à nier divers génocides dont l’évocation risquerait de servir l’impérialisme occidental. Il n’a d’ailleurs trouvé qu’un éditeur marginal, Spartacus, pour publier en 1984 ses Réponses inédites à mes détracteurs parisiens, compilation de lettres et d’un entretien, non publiés ou de façon tronquée et adressés à des journaux comme Le Monde, Le Matin de Paris, Les Nouvelles littéraires, pour répondre, entre autres, à des attaques de Jacques Attali et de Bernard-Henri Lévy. D’où l’importance de la publication récente de certains de ses textes (1).

Pendant la guerre du Vietnam, les écrits de Chomsky jouissaient d’une certaine audience en France. Mais, déjà à l’époque, un malentendu implicite commençait à poindre. Dans les mouvements anti-impérialistes dominait une mentalité de « prise de parti ». Il fallait choisir son camp : pour l’Occident ou pour les révolutions du tiers-monde. Une telle attitude est étrangère à Chomsky, rationaliste au sens classique du terme. Non pas qu’il se place « au-dessus de la mêlée » – rares sont les intellectuels plus engagés que lui -, mais son engagement est fondé sur des principes comme la vérité et la justice, et non sur le soutien à un camp historique et social, quel qu’il soit.

Son opposition à la guerre ne découlait pas du pronostic que la révolution vietnamienne offrirait un avenir radieux aux peuples d’Indochine, mais de l’observation que l’agression américaine serait catastrophique parce que, loin d’être motivée par la défense de la démocratie, elle visait à empêcher toute forme de développement indépendant en Indochine et dans le tiers-monde.

Dénoncer l’idéologie de l’Occident

Rigoureux, les écrits de Chomsky offraient aux opposants à la guerre du Vietnam des outils intellectuels précieux ; la différence d’optique entre lui et ses partisans en France pouvait alors passer pour secondaire. La contre-offensive politique et idéologique se déclencha quand, à partir de 1975, des boat people se mirent à fuir le Vietnam et, plus encore, lorsque les Khmers rouges commirent leurs massacres. Un mécanisme de culpabilisation de ceux qui s’étaient opposés à la guerre occidentale, et plus généralement à l’impérialisme, permit de leur imputer la responsabilité de ces événements. Mais, comme le fait remarquer Chomsky, reprocher à des adversaires de l’invasion de l’Afghanistan par l’URSS en 1979 les atrocités commises par les rebelles afghans depuis le retrait des troupes soviétiques ne serait pas moins absurde : s’opposant à l’invasion, ils avaient voulu empêcher une catastrophe dont portent la responsabilité ceux qui l’ont décidée, pas leurs adversaires. Presque banal, un argument de ce type est quasiment inaudible dans le camp occidental.

En France, la mentalité de camp avait conduit nombre d’opposants aux guerres coloniales à se bercer d’illusions sur la possibilité de « lendemains qui chantent » dans les sociétés décolonisées. Cela a rendu la culpabilisation d’autant plus efficace que la fin de la guerre du Vietnam coïncida avec le grand tournant de l’intelligentsia française, qui allait amener celle-ci à s’écarter du marxisme et des révolutions du tiers-monde et, peu à peu, avec le mouvement des « nouveaux philosophes », à adopter des positions favorables à la politique occidentale au Tchad et au Nicaragua. Une bonne partie des intellectuels français, surtout ceux de la « génération 68 », d’abord passive dans la lutte contre les euro-missiles (1982-1983), devint franchement belliciste au moment de la guerre du Golfe puis lors de l’intervention de l’OTAN au Kosovo.

N’ayant jamais eu d’illusions à perdre, Noam Chomsky n’avait aucun combat à renier. Il demeura donc à la pointe de la lutte contre les interventions militaires et les embargos qui, de l’Amérique centrale à l’Irak, ont provoqué des centaines de milliers de victimes. Mais pour ceux qui avaient opéré le grand tournant, Chomsky devenait un anachronisme bizarre et dangereux. Comment pouvait-il ne pas avoir compris que le bon camp était devenu celui de l’Occident, des « droits de l’homme » ? Et le mauvais, celui de la « barbarie à visage humain », pays socialistes et dictatures post-coloniales mêlées ?

L’étude de sa démarche intellectuelle permet de répondre. Une bonne partie de l’œuvre de Chomsky est consacrée à l’analyse des mécanismes idéologiques des sociétés occidentales. Quand un historien étudie l’Empire romain, il essaie de relier les actions des dirigeants de l’époque à leurs intérêts économiques et politiques, ou du moins à la perception que ceux-ci en ont. Au lieu de s’en tenir aux seules intentions avouées des dirigeants, l’historien met au jour la structure « cachée » de la société (relations de pouvoir, contraintes institutionnelles) pour décrypter le discours officiel. Cette démarche est tellement naturelle qu’il ne faut même pas la justifier. On l’applique à des sociétés comme l’Union soviétique hier, la Chine et l’Iran aujourd’hui. Nul expert sérieux n’expliquerait le comportement des dirigeants de ces pays en privilégiant les motivations que ceux-ci mettent en avant pour justifier leurs actions.

Cette attitude méthodologique générale change du tout au tout quand il s’agit des sociétés occidentales. Il devient alors quasi obligatoire d’accepter que les intentions proclamées de leurs gouvernants constituent les ressorts de leurs actions. On peut douter de leur capacité à atteindre leurs objectifs, de leur intelligence. Mais mettre en cause la pureté de leurs motivations, chercher à expliquer leurs actions par les contraintes que des acteurs plus puissants feraient peser sur eux revient souvent à s’exclure du discours « respectable ».

Ainsi, lors de la guerre du Kosovo, on a pu discuter des moyens et de la stratégie mis en œuvre par l’OTAN, mais pas l’idée qu’il s’agissait d’une guerre humanitaire. On a critiqué les moyens utilisés par les Etats-Unis en Amérique centrale dans les années 1980, mais rarement douté qu’ils voulaient protéger ces pays de la menace soviétique ou cubaine. L’argument qui motive ce curieux dualisme dans l’approche des phénomènes politiques est que nos sociétés sont « réellement différentes », à la fois des sociétés passées et des pays comme l’URSS ou la Chine, parce que nos gouvernements seraient « réellement » soucieux des droits de la personne ou de la démocratie.

Mais le fait que les principes démocratiques soient souvent mieux respectés « chez nous » qu’ailleurs n’empêche nullement d’évaluer empiriquement la thèse de la singularité occidentale. On peut y parvenir en comparant deux tragédies (guerre, famine, attentat, etc.) plus ou moins semblables et en observant la réaction de nos gouvernements et de nos médias. Or, quand la responsabilité de ces situations est imputable à nos ennemis, l’indignation est générale et la présentation dépourvue de la moindre indulgence. En revanche, si la responsabilité des gouvernements occidentaux ou de leurs alliés est engagée, les horreurs sont souvent minimisées. Pourtant, si les actions de nos gouvernements étaient réellement motivées par les intentions altruistes qu’ils proclament, ils devraient d’abord agir sur les tragédies dont ils sont responsables, au lieu de donner la priorité à celles qu’ils peuvent attribuer à leurs ennemis. Constater que c’est presque toujours l’inverse qui se produit oblige à retenir l’accusation d’hypocrisie. Une bonne partie de l’œuvre de Chomsky est consacrée à des comparaisons de ce genre (2).

Dans le cas de l’Indochine et du Cambodge en particulier, les écrits de Chomsky, souvent présentés comme une « défense de Pol Pot », ont cherché à comparer les réactions des gouvernements et des médias occidentaux face à deux atrocités presque simultanées : les massacres commis par les Khmers rouges au Cambodge et ceux des Indonésiens au moment de l’invasion du Timor-Oriental.

Concernant le Cambodge, l’indignation fut vive – autant qu’hypocrite (3). En revanche, au moment de l’action militaire indonésienne, les médias et les intellectuels « médiatiques » observèrent un silence presque complet alors même que les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés, dont la France, livraient à l’Indonésie des armes en sachant qu’elles seraient utilisées au Timor (4). Dresser la longue liste des non-indignations de ce type obligerait à revenir sur la Turquie et les Kurdes, Israël et les Palestiniens, sans oublier l’Irak, où, au nom du droit international, on laisse des centaines de milliers de personnes mourir à petit feu.

En se livrant à ce genre de comparaisons, Chomsky a pris le contre-pied de la mentalité de parti particulièrement accusée depuis le grand tournant : puisque le Bien (l’Occident et ses alliés) affrontait le Mal (les nationalismes du tiers-monde et les pays dits socialistes), l’analogie fut interdite. Or Chomsky fit pire. Refusant la duplicité qu’il reproche à nos gouvernants et à nos médias, il a toujours estimé qu’il devait d’abord dénoncer les crimes des gouvernements sur lesquels il pouvait espérer agir, c’est-à-dire les nôtres.

Même s’il n’entrait dans sa démarche nulle illusion sur les régimes « révolutionnaires » ou absolution des crimes commis par les « autres », il était presque inévitable que ceux-là mêmes qui avaient entretenu de telles illusions et accepté de telles absolutions l’accuseraient de tomber dans leurs travers. On peut comprendre la réaction d’une partie de l’intelligentsia française, soucieuse de brûler ce qu’elle a adoré et d’adorer ce qu’elle a brûlé et naturellement désireuse de se venger sur le dos des autres des erreurs qu’elle a autrefois commises. Parfois, Chomsky en a été plus agacé qu’amusé.

Il faut à présent aborder l’« affaire Faurisson », qui alimente les attaques françaises les plus virulentes contre Chomsky. Professeur de littérature à l’université de Lyon, Robert Faurisson fut suspendu de ses fonctions à la fin des années 1970 et poursuivi parce qu’il avait, entre autres, nié l’existence des chambres à gaz pendant la seconde guerre mondiale. Une pétition pour défendre sa liberté d’expression fut signée par plus de cinq cents personnes, dont Chomsky. Pour répondre aux réactions violentes que suscita son geste, Chomsky rédigea alors un petit texte dans lequel il expliquait que reconnaître à une personne le droit d’exprimer ses opinions ne revenait nullement à les partager. Elémentaire aux Etats-Unis, cette distinction parut difficilement compréhensible en France.

Mais Chomsky commit une erreur, la seule dans cette affaire. Il donna son texte à un ami d’alors, Serge Thion, en lui permettant de l’utiliser à sa guise. Or Thion le fit paraître, comme « avis », au début du mémoire publié pour défendre Faurisson. Chomsky n’a cessé de rappeler qu’il n’avait jamais eu l’intention de voir publier son texte à cet endroit et qu’il chercha, mais trop tard, à l’empêcher (5).

Condamner Chomsky dans cette affaire impose, au minimum, de dire ce que l’on réprouve exactement : une erreur tactique ou le principe même de la défense inconditionnelle de la liberté d’expression ? Dans le second cas, il faut alors indiquer que la France ne possède pas, en matière d’expression d’opinions, la tradition libertaire des Etats-Unis. Là-bas, la position de Chomsky ne choque presque personne. Parfois comparée à la Ligue des droits de l’homme, l’American Civil Liberties Union, dans laquelle militent de nombreux antifascistes, porte ainsi plainte devant les tribunaux si on interdit au Ku Klux Klan ou à des groupuscules nazis de manifester, fût-ce en uniforme, dans des quartiers à majorité noire ou juive (6). Le débat à ce propos oppose donc deux traditions politiques différentes, l’une dominante en France, l’autre aux Etats-Unis, et pas un Noam Chomsky, représentant d’une ultra-gauche dévoyée, face à une France républicaine.

Dans un monde où des cohortes d’intellectuels disciplinés et de médias asservis servent de prêtrise séculière aux puissants, lire Chomsky représente un acte d’autodéfense. Il peut permettre d’éviter les fausses évidences et les indignations sélectives du discours dominant. Mais il enseigne aussi que, pour changer le monde, on doit le comprendre de façon objective et qu’il y a une grande différence entre romantisme révolutionnaire – lequel fait parfois plus de tort que de bien – et critique sociale simultanément radicale et rationnelle. Après des années de désespoir et de résignation, une contestation globale du système capitaliste semble renaître. Elle ne peut que tirer avantage de la combinaison de lucidité, de courage et d’optimisme qui marque l’œuvre et la vie de Noam Chomsky.

Jean Bricmont

Professeur de physique à l’université de Louvain (Belgique).
Voir également:

Noam Chomsky et les médias français

Arnaud Rindel, jeudi 27 mai 2010

À l’occasion de la venue de Noam Chomsky en France en cette fin mai 2010, nous rééditons sans changement un article paru en 2003.

* * *La pensée de Noam Chomsky est interdite de débat – du débat qu’elle mérite – dans les médias français. Comme si nous n’avions le choix qu’entre l’idolâtrie et la calomnie. Petit mémento de la bêtise ordinaire de certains seigneurs des médias (Acrimed).

Noam Chomsky, linguiste américain professeur au MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), et, selon les propres mots d’Alain Finkielkraut, « l’intellectuel planétaire le plus populaire » [1], n’est pas exactement la coqueluche des journalistes ou des intellectuels français, c’est le moins que l’on puisse dire.

Depuis une vingtaine d’années, ils ne parlent jamais de son œuvre, qui occupe pourtant (ou peut-être précisément parce qu’elle occupe) une place fondamentale dans la pensée critique moderne. Et les rares fois où son nom est évoqué, c’est pour ressasser encore et toujours les mêmes calomnies effarantes de bêtise et de malhonnêteté [2]. Tout en lui refusant, bien entendu, le droit de répondre librement à ces accusations [3].

Le Figaro , Libération, Le Monde, Bernard-Henri Lévy, Alain Finkielkraut, Alain-Gérard Slama, Jacques Attali, André Glucksmann, Philippe Val et bien d’autres, se sont ainsi époumonés à de nombreuses reprises [4], pour condamner les idées répugnantes qu’ils lui prêtent avec une mauvaise foi consternante.

Tout cela est pourtant connu et limpide pour toute personne qui s’est donné la peine de lire ses écrits, et qui est portée dans son travail de journaliste, ou d’intellectuel, par un minimum de rigueur et d’honnêteté.

Cambodge et Timor

Pour aller vite, car il est pénible d’être forcé de rappeler constamment ce qui ne devrait plus avoir à être discuté depuis une bonne vingtaine d’années, Chomsky n’a jamais nié ou minimisé le génocide perpétré au Cambodge par les Khmers rouges entre 1975 et 1978.

Une partie importante de son travail est consacrée à établir les preuves objectives de l’existence d’une propagande médiatique. Pour ce faire, il cherche à démontrer que toutes choses étant égales par ailleurs, les intérêts politiques et économiques en jeux influencent de manière importante la façon dont les médias rendent compte de conflits internationaux pourtant similaires.

Il a ainsi observé que pour un niveau de violence et un nombre de victimes à peu près équivalents, les atrocités commises par Pol Pot (ennemi des États-Unis), étaient traitées de manière emphatique, avec une exagération systématique des faits et des commentaires, tandis que le génocide perpétré à peu près à la même époque par l’armée indonésienne (alliée des États-Unis), au Timor oriental, était, à l’inverse, complètement occulté par les médias [5].

S’il a étudié les estimations officielles des victimes du Cambodge, c’est uniquement pour montrer que le niveau était comparable à celui du Timor, préalable indispensable à sa démonstration, non pour nier l’horreur des massacres commis, qu’il a par ailleurs, condamnés de manière parfaitement claire à plusieurs reprises, affirmant qu’il serait « difficile de trouver un exemple aussi horrible d’un tel déferlement de fureur » [6]. Tous ceux qui ont pris la peine de lire ses écrits le savent parfaitement.


La théorie du complot

Il n’a pas plus défendu ou propagé une « vulgate conspirationniste », contrairement à ce que laissent entendre là aussi, Philippe Corcuff, ou Daniel Schneidermann [7], sans doute soucieux, comme Alain Finkielkraut, que les citoyens s’en tiennent à « ce qui apparaît » [8].

Il n’a cessé, bien au contraire, de rabâcher que « rien n’est plus éloigné de ce [qu’il dit] que l’idée de conspiration » [9]. « L’idée qu’il y aurait une cabale organisée au plus haut niveau dans un pays comme les États-Unis est complètement idiote. Cela voudrait dire que cela se passe comme en Union Soviétique. C’est totalement différent, et c’est précisément pourquoi je dis exactement l’inverse » [10].

L’inverse étant, en l’occurrence, un « système de « marché dirigé » » [11], où l’information est un produit, que les médias, fonctionnant sur le même modèle que n’importe quelle société commerciale, cherchent à écouler sur un marché.

Les exigences de profit et de rentabilité communes à toute entreprise commerciale entraînent, en plus des pressions politiques, un ensemble de contraintes structurelles, et notamment, une triple dépendance des médias, à l’égard de leurs propriétaires, de leurs annonceurs, et de leurs sources d’information, la rentabilité limitant la possibilité d’investigations personnelles.

De toutes ces contraintes, découle logiquement une certaine orientation de l’information, dans sa forme et dans son contenu, et la sélection préférentielle d’un personnel en phase avec ces principes.

« Ce n’est pas une conspiration mais une analyse institutionnelle », conclut le plus naturellement du monde, Noam Chomsky. Et on se demande comment une évidence si limpide peut échapper à tous ces « grands esprits »…

Quant à la méfiance envers « ce qui apparaît », qui irrite tant Alain Finkielkraut, chez moi, cela s’appelle tout simplement garder un esprit critique.


L’affaire Faurisson

Enfin, les accusations de négationnisme trouvent leur source dans une pétition lancée en 1979 aux États-Unis, qui rassembla plus de 500 signatures, dont celle de Noam Chomsky, pour « assurer la sécurité et le libre exercice de ses droits légaux » à Robert Faurisson, un professeur de la faculté de Lyon, dont les « recherches » ont pour objet de nier la réalité du génocide juif sous le régime de l’Allemagne nazie [12].

Chomsky, devenu malgré lui, en raison de sa popularité, l’emblème de cette pétition, reçut une avalanche de protestations, ce qui l’amena à écrire un texte exposant sa position : Quelques commentaires élémentaires sur le droit à la liberté d’expression. Il y explique entre autre que la liberté d’expression, pour être réellement le reflet d’une vertu démocratique, ne peut se limiter aux opinions que l’on approuve, car même les pires dictateurs sont favorables à la libre diffusion des opinions qui leur conviennent. En conséquence de quoi la liberté d’expression se doit d’être défendue, y compris, et même avant tout, pour les idées qui nous répugnent [13].

Bien entendu, la position libertaire de Chomsky, qui s’explique en partie par l’importance capitale accordée dans la culture américaine à la liberté d’expression, peut et doit être discutée. Mais jamais les critiques n’abordent la question sous cet angle. Elles ont pour seul but de discréditer Chomsky, auteur peu connu du grand public en France, en laissant croire que c’est précisément Faurisson, et ses thèses qu’il aurait défendues et non la seule liberté d’expression.

Du reste, soupçonner Chomsky d’une quelconque sympathie ou complaisance envers les thèses négationnistes est tout simplement ridicule. Dès les débuts de son engagement politique, il affirmait en introduction à son premier ouvrage (American Power and the New Mandarins, 1969, cité dans Le Monde du 24 juillet 1994), et répétait à de nombreuses reprises (voir Chomsky, Les médias et les illusions nécessaires, K films éditions, Paris, 1993), que le simple fait de discuter avec des négationnistes de l’existence des crimes nazis, revenait à perdre notre humanité. Il a eu par la suite de multiples occasions de réitérer très clairement cette condamnation. Dans un autre de ses livres, il décrivait, par exemple, l’Holocauste comme « la plus fantastique flambée de violence collective dans l’histoire de l’humanité » [14]. Dans l’article publié dans The Nation sur l’affaire Faurisson, il indiquait encore « Les conclusions de Faurisson sont diamétralement opposées aux opinions qui sont les miennes et que j’ai fréquemment exprimées par écrit » [15], et dans l’interview publiée dans Le Monde en 1998, il décrivait le négationnisme comme « la pire atrocité de l’histoire humaine », ajoutant à nouveau que « le fait même d’en discuter est ridicule ».

Arnaud Rindel
(01.12.2003)

Ce texte est la version abrégée de la préface d’un recueil de textes de Noam Chomsky, De la guerre comme politique étrangère des Etats-Unis, Agone, Marseille, 2001.

(1) Outre De la guerre comme politique étrangère des Etats-Unis (Agone, Marseille), lire, pour les écrits les plus récents, Les Dessous de la politique de l’Oncle Sam (Ecosociété-EPO-Le Temps des cerises, Montréal-Bruxelles-Paris, 1996), Responsabilité des intellectuels (Agone, Marseille, 1998), Le Nouvel Humanisme militaire (Page Deux, Lausanne, 2000), La Conférence d’Albuquerque (Allia, Paris, 2001).

(2) Lire Edward S. Herman et Noam Chomsky, Manufacturing Consent. The Political Economy of the Mass Media, Pantheon Books, New York, 1988, et Noam Chomsky, Necessary Illusions. Thought Control in Democratic Societies, Pluto Press, Londres, 1989.

(3) Quand, en 1979, les Vietnamiens mirent fin au régime de Pol Pot, les Occidentaux décidèrent de soutenir les Khmers rouges, diplomatiquement à l’ONU, mais aussi, indirectement, sur le plan militaire. A contrario, dans le cas de l’Indonésie, de simples pressions occidentales auraient sans doute suffi pour arrêter les massacres.

(4) Ministre français des affaires étrangères, Louis de Guiringaud se rendit à Djakarta pour y signer un accord militaire. Puis il déclara que la France ne placerait pas l’Indonésie dans une situation embarrassante aux Nations unies à propos du Timor. In Le Monde, 14 septembre 1978.

(5) La version anglaise de ce texte, « Some elementary comments on the rights of freedom of expression », est disponible sur www.zmag.org.

(6) C’est ce qui s’est produit à Skokie (Illinois) en 1978.

Voir enfin:

Florilège de Dorothy Day:

« We are on the side of the revolution. We believe there must be new concepts of property, which is proper to man, and that the new concept is not so new. There is a Christian communism and a Christian capitalism…. We believe in farming communes and cooperatives and will be happy to see how they work out in Cuba…. God bless Castro and all those who are seeing Christ in the poor. God bless all those who are seeking the brotherhood of man because in loving their brothers they love God even though they deny Him. »

Dorothy Day (1961)

In these times when social concerns are so important, I cannot fail to mention the Servant of God Dorothy Day, who founded the Catholic Worker Movement. Her social activism, her passion for justice and for the cause of the oppressed, were inspired by the Gospel, her faith, and the example of the saints.

Pope Francis (US Congress, 2015)

Far better to revolt violently than to do nothing about the poor destitute.

Dorothy Day (1960)

« I am most of all interested in the religious life of the people and so must not be on the side of a regime that favors the extirpation of religion. On the other hand, when that regime is bending all its efforts to make a good life for the people, a naturally good life (on which grace can build) one cannot help but be in favor of the measures taken.

Dorothy Day (Cuba, 1960)

http://dorothyday.catholicworker.org/articles/793.html

http://dorothyday.catholicworker.org/articles/248.html

As a young man Ho Chi Minh had traveled from Indo-China to Paris and on one of his first voyages he had stopped in the ports of New York and Boston. One story is that he had worked in Harlem briefly, and perhaps–who knows–he had stopped in the Chinese and Italian area on Mott Street where the Catholic Worker had its house for fifteen years, from 1936 to 1950. Perhaps he came in for a meal with us just as Chu did or Wong, who is with us now. London, Montreal and New York have seen many exiles and political fugitives. If we had had the privilege of giving hospitality to a Ho Chi Minh, with what respect and interest we would have served him, as a man of vision, as a patriot, a rebel against foreign invaders.

Dorothy Day (1970)

http://dorothyday.catholicworker.org/articles/498.html

the two words [anarchist-pacifist] should go together, especially at this time when more and more people, even priests, are turning to violence, and are finding their heroes in Camillo Torres among the priests, and Che Guevara among laymen. The attraction is strong, because both men literally laid down their lives for their brothers. « Greater love hath no man than this. »

« Let me say, at the risk of seeming ridiculous, that the true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love. » Che Guevara wrote this, and he is quoted by Chicano youth in El Grito Del Norte.

Dorothy Day (1970)

http://www.catholicworker.org/dorothyday/articles/500.pdf

« I in turn, can see Christ in them even though they deny Him, because they are giving themselves to working for a better social order for the wretched of the earth. »

Dorothy Day (on anarchists)

We believe in widespread private property, the de-proletarianizing of our American people. We believe in the individual owning the means of production, the land and his tools. We are opposed to the « finance capitalism » so justly criticized and condemned by Karl Marx but we believe there can be a Christian capitalism as there can be a Christian Communism.

Dorothy Day

http://dorothyday.catholicworker.org/articles/300.html

« To labor is to pray — that is the central point of the Christian doctrine of work. Hence, it is that while both Communism and Christianity are moved by ‘compassion for the multitude,’ the object of communism is to make the poor richer but the object of Christianity is to make the rich poor and the poor holy. »

http://dorothyday.catholicworker.org/articles/166.html

« [L]et it be remembered that I speak as an ex-Communist and one who has not testified before Congressional Committees, nor written works on the Communist conspiracy. I can say with warmth that I loved the [communist] people I worked with and learned much from them. They helped me to find God in His poor, in His abandoned ones, as I had not found Him in Christian churches. »

The Communists point to it as forced upon them, and say that when it comes they will take part in it, and in their plans they want to prepare the ground, and win as many as possible to their point of view and for their side. And where will we be on that day? …

[W]e will inevitably be forced to be on their side, physically speaking. But when it comes to activity, we will be pacifists, I hope and pray, non-violent resisters of aggression, from whomever it comes, resisters to repression, coercion, from whatever side it comes, and our activity will be the works of mercy. Our arms will be the love of God and our brother.

Dorothy Day (1949)

http://dorothyday.catholicworker.org/articles/246.html

« We must make a start. We must renounce war as an instrument of policy. . . . Even as I speak to you I may be guilty of what some men call treason. But we must reject war. . . . You young men should refuse to take up arms. Young women tear down the patriotic posters. And all of you–young and old–put away your flags.

Dorothy Day (1941)

We are still pacifists. Our manifesto is the Sermon on the Mount, which means that we will try to be peacemakers. Speaking for many of our conscientious objectors, we will not participate in armed warfare or in making munitions, or by buying government bonds to prosecute the war, or in urging others to these efforts.
But neither will we be carping in our criticism. We love our country and we love our President. We have been the only country in the world where men of all nations have taken refuge from oppression. We recognize that while in the order of intention we have tried to stand for peace, for love of our brother, in the order of execution we have failed as Americans in living up to our principles.

Dorothy Day (1942)

[O]urs was a long-range program, looking for ownership by the workers of the means of production, the abolition of the assembly line, decentralized factories, the restoration of crafts and ownership of property,” she wrote. “This meant, of course, an accent on the agrarian and rural aspects of our economy and a changing emphasis from the city to the land.”

http://cjd.org/2001/10/01/g-k-chesterton-and-dorothy-day-on-economicsneither-socialism-nor-capitalism-distributism/

We need to change the system. We need to overthrow, not the government, as the authorities are always accusing the Communists ‘of conspiring to teach [us] to do,’ but this rotten, decadent, putrid industrial capitalist system which breeds such suffering in the whited sepulcher of New York. »

Dorothy Day (1956)

http://www.catholicworker.org/dorothyday/articles/710.pdf

We stand at the present time with the Communists, who are also opposing war…. The Sermon on the Mount is our Christian manifesto.

Dorothy Day ( « Our Stand, » Catholic Worker, June 1940)

Marx… Lenin… Mao Tse-Tung… These men were animated by the love of brother and this we must believe though their ends meant the seizure of power, and the building of mighty armies, the compulsion of concentration camps, the forced labor and torture and killing of tens of thousands, even millions.

Dorothy Day (« The Incompatibility of Love and Violence, » Catholic Worker, May 1951)

I am appalled that a woman of such loathsome character would be considered for sainthood. Vatican archives are filled with reports of Christians martyred under the regimes that Dorothy Day supported. I am revolted by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ support for the canonization of a woman whose views supported the violent extermination of Christians throughout the world. I ask that these matters be carefully weighed so that the Holy See will not be inadvertently misled when considering the canonization of Dorothy Day. I am particularly concerned about her support for Ho Chi Minh » …

Virginia State Senator Richard H. “Dick” Black

http://religiousleftexposed.com/home/2013/01/senator-richard-h-black-of-virginia-objects-to-sainthood-for-marxist-dorothy-day.html

The name Dorothy Day has not been used in the United States Congress terribly often. She was a valiant fighter for workers, was very strong in her belief for social justice, and I think it was extraordinary that he cited her as one of the most important people in recent American history. This would be one of the very, very few times that somebody as radical as Dorothy Day was mentioned. He is willing to identify with an extraordinarily courageous woman whose life was about standing with the poorest people in America, and having the courage to stand up to the very powerful. You know, her newspaper was the Catholic Worker, and she stood with the workers of America and fought for justice. His calling out for social justice, his talking about income and wealth inequality, his talking about creating an economy and a culture that works for everybody, not just a few, is a very, very powerful message.

Bernie Sanders

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2015/09/24/the-pope-name-dropped-a-radical-catholic-activist-and-bernie-sanders-couldnt-be-happier/

Voir de plus:

« La République ne doit pas plaider coupable »
Le philosophe et académicien s’interroge sur la difficulté de nos élites à penser ce qui nous arrive, sans céder aux anachronismes.
Alain Finkielkraut
Marianne
03/04/2015

– Marianne : Récemment, l’écrivain algérien Boualem Sansal livrait cette réflexion désabusée : « Les Européens ont toujours sous-estimé l’islamisme. » Cette minoration a-t-elle pris fin ?

Alain Finkielkraut : Au lendemain des attentats contre Charlie Hebdo et le magasin Hyper Cacher de Vincennes, et après le refus cinglant des jeunes des « quartiers populaires » de participer à la grande manifestation unitaire du 11 janvier, il était difficile pour les Français, même les plus angéliques, de continuer à faire l’impasse sur les dangers et sur la séduction de l’islamisme radical. Mais la propension à noyer le poisson dans ses causes supposées n’a pas disparu. Et le gouvernement a donné l’exemple en dénonçant l’apartheid culturel, ethnique et territorial qui sévirait dans nos banlieues. Ainsi la République a-t-elle plaidé coupable pour les attaques mêmes dont elle faisait l’objet.

– Pendant trente ans, un mélange de naïveté et de lâcheté a-t-il empêché de nombreux intellectuels de prendre la mesure du phénomène ?

Je ne vois chez nos intellectuels ni naïveté, ni lâcheté, mais, si j’ose dire, une vigilance anachronique. En Sarkozy, conseillé par Patrick Buisson, son « génie noir », ils combattaient la réincarnation du maréchal Pétain. Les musulmans leur apparaissaient comme les juifs du XXIe siècle. L’antifascisme façonnait leur vision du monde. Ils ne voulaient pas et ne veulent toujours pas voir dans la crise actuelle des banlieues autre chose qu’une résurgence de la xénophobie et du racisme français.

– En France, quelle place a tenu – et tient – la francophobie d’une part des élites dans cette minoration ?

Les élites dont vous parlez ne sont pas francophobes ; face au nationalisme fermé de « l’idéologie française », elles se réclament de la patrie des droits de l’homme. Leur France est la « nation ouverte » célébrée par Victor Hugo, « qui appelle chez elle quiconque est frère ou veut l’être ». Le problème, c’est que, toutes à cette opposition gratifiante entre l’ouvert et le fermé, ces élites légitiment la haine qui se développe dans certains quartiers de nos villes pour les « faces de craie ». C’est l’exclusion, disent ces élites, qui engendre la francophobie.

– Après le 11 septembre 2001, un vaste débat s’est levé. Vous avez pointé dans l’Imparfait du présent les disculpateurs de l’islamisme qui faisaient remonter tout le mal à « l’axe Washington – Tel-Aviv ». Ces personnes-là ont-elles empêché la prise de conscience de la menace globale ?

« L’Amérique victime de son hyperpuissance », titrait Télérama après le 11 septembre 2001. Ce qu’on a du mal à penser aujourd’hui comme alors, c’est que l’Occident puisse être haï non pour l’oppression qu’il exerce, mais pour les libertés qu’il propose. Sayyid Qotb est devenu le principal doctrinaire des Frères musulmans, après un séjour aux Etats-Unis, en 1948, où il a été confronté à cette « liberté bestiale qu’on nomme la mixité », à « ce marché d’esclaves qu’on nomme « émancipation de la femme » », à « ces ruses et anxiétés d’un système de mariage et de divorce si contraire à la vie naturelle. En comparaison, quelle raison, quelle hauteur de vue, quelle joie en islam, et quel désir d’atteindre celui qui ne peut être atteint ».

– L’année dernière, vous avez publié l’Identité malheureuse (1). Cet essai mélancolique a été étrillé par une partie de la critique, et le Monde des livres a cru pouvoir discerner des similitudes entre vos inquiétudes et celles de Marine Le Pen. Quelles réflexions vous inspire ce type de rapprochement ?

L’esprit du temps réussit l’exploit paradoxal de nous faire vivre hors de notre temps, à côté de nos pompes. Alors que la France change de visage, il affirme, imperturbable, que l’histoire se répète, et il cherche des racistes et des fascistes pour donner corps à cette affirmation. J’ai beau être juif et défendre l’école républicaine, me voici lepéniste, et même – il faut ce qu’il faut – maurrassien.

– Avec Régis Debray, Elisabeth Badinter, Catherine Kintzler et Elisabeth de Fontenay, vous avez signé un texte intitulé « Le Munich de l’école républicaine », au moment de l’affaire dite de Creil (sur le port du voile à l’école), en septembre 1989. Plus de vingt-cinq ans après, quelles menaces pèsent, d’après vous, dans l’enceinte scolaire sur la conception exigeante de la laïcité dont vous vous réclamez ?

La menace était très clairement énoncée en 2004 par le rapport Obin sur les signes et manifestations d’appartenance religieuse dans les établissements scolaires : « Tout laisse à penser que, dans certains quartiers, les élèves sont incités à se méfier de tout ce que les professeurs leur proposent, qui doit d’abord être un objet de suspicion, comme ce qu’ils trouvent à la cantine dans leur assiette ; et qu’ils sont engagés à trier les textes étudiés selon les mêmes catégories religieuses du halal (autorisé) et du haram (interdit). » La question du voile et celle de la nourriture sont deux composantes d’un phénomène beaucoup plus large de sécession culturelle. Et ce phénomène est en expansion.

– La géopolitique n’est pas votre registre d’intervention privilégié, mais vous suivez ce que l’islamologue Mohammed Arkoun a appelé « l’extension de la pandémie djihadiste ». Est-ce l’idée califale (c’est-à-dire le projet de rétablissement du califat) qui est devenue le moteur des revendications islamistes ?

Je ne sais pas. Ce que je sais, grâce à Gilles Kepel, c’est que les Beurs, qui avaient fait la grande marche pour l’égalité en 1983, rejettent maintenant avec horreur ce vocable « tenu au mieux pour méprisant à leur endroit, au pire, pour un complot sioniste destiné à faire fondre comme du beurre leur identité arabo-islamique dans le chaudron des potes de SOS Racisme touillé par l’Union des étudiants juifs de France ».

– Etes-vous de ceux qui préférez, avec Michel Onfray, une analyse juste d’Alain de Benoist à une analyse fausse de Bernard-Henri Lévy ? Qu’avez-vous pensé de la réaction de Manuel Valls, accusant le fondateur de l’Université populaire de Caen de « brouiller les cartes » avec le Front national, et regrettant, plus généralement, le silence des intellectuels face à l’extrême droite et à sa menace ?

Je pense que Michel Onfray préfère aussi – et il l’a dit – une analyse juste de Bernard-Henri Lévy à une analyse fausse d’Alain de Benoist. Pour ma part, je citerai Camus dans sa lettre adressée aux Temps modernes après la critique au vitriol de l’Homme révolté, parue dans cette revue : « On ne décide pas de la vérité d’une pensée selon qu’elle est à droite ou à gauche, et moins encore selon ce que la droite et la gauche décident d’en faire. A ce compte, Descartes serait stalinien et Péguy bénirait M. Pinay. Si, enfin, la vérité me paraissait à droite, j’y serais. » Je ne suis donc pas plus impressionné par la sortie de Manuel Valls que par la campagne de 1982 contre le « silence des intellectuels ». Le gouvernement est légitimement affolé par la montée du Front national, mais ce ne sont pas les incantations antifascistes qui inverseront la tendance et changeront la donne ; c’est la prise en compte par la gauche comme par la droite traditionnelle de l’inquiétude de toujours plus de Français devant la mutation culturelle qui nous tombe dessus, qui n’a été décidée par personne.

– Est-ce qu’il vous arrive de douter de la justesse de vos angoisses ? Vous arrive-t-il de vous demander si, comme certains vous le reprochent, vous êtes devenu obsédé par vos combats ?

Fontenelle a écrit un jour : « On s’accoutume trop quand on est seul à ne penser que comme soi. » J’essaie donc de ne pas rester seul trop longtemps et je fais même l’émission « Répliques » pour être confronté à des points de vue très différents des miens. Mais ce n’est pas ma faute si l’actualité radote et me renvoie sans cesse à la réalité insupportable de l’éclatement de mon pays. Je suis attaqué et même insulté par ceux qui ne veulent surtout pas regarder cette réalité en face. Devant les mauvaises nouvelles, ou, pis encore, devant les nouvelles qui contredisent l’idée reçue du mal et du méchant, le plus simple est encore de s’en prendre au messager et de lui faire la peau.

(1) L’Identité malheureuse, réédition, Gallimard, « Folio essais ».

Voir enfin:

Réné Girard et les joies du bashing
Nicolas journet
Sciences humaines
juin 2010
Mis à jour le 15/06/2011

Le père du désir mimétique est la dernière victime expiatoire du critique René Pommier. Le bashing est-il si nuisible qu’il se l’imagine ?
Commencer par choisir un « père fondateur », « un gourou international » ou un « maître à penser » sur lequel plus de vingt thèses ont été soutenues, couvert de récompenses et de doctorats honoris causa, bardé d’une œuvre traduite en plus de cinq langues. Autopsier cette dernière jusqu’à l’écœurement, puis en livrer les morceaux les plus obscurs et les plus navrants nappés de sauce piquante : c’est la recette de René Pommier, agrégé de lettres, professeur émérite à la Sorbonne, esprit rationaliste et autoproclamé « fervent mécréant ». À trente ans d’intervalle, il s’est offert un tableau de chasse honorable : Roland Barthes (servi en deux fois : 1978 et 1987) et Sigmund Freud (croqué en 2008). Et voici qu’il récidive : René Girard, un allumé qui se prend pour un phare (Kimé, 2010) n’est pas un quatrain de potache, mais le titre d’une jubilante entreprise de déboulonnage du maître de la pensée mimétique.

R. Girard, rappelons-le, est un spécialiste de la littérature devenu, au fil d’une œuvre abondante, l’auteur d’une ambitieuse thèse sur l’origine de la violence, des religions, de la culture et du christianisme. Académicien célébré en France, il est depuis des années tout autant enseigné, lu et commenté en Californie et à Sydney. C’est une figure internationale. En réalité, annonce d’entrée R. Pommier, son cas est simple : c’est un mégalomane, son œuvre n’est que « divagation » et sa pensée « ne vaut pas tripette ». On fait difficilement plus concis, mais on n’écrit pas cela sans quelques munitions.

Le désir mimétique, postulat séduisant mais absurde
Malgré la brièveté de son pamphlet, R. Pommier parvient à s’attaquer dans le détail à quelques thèses centrales de la pensée de R. Girard en se livrant à un épluchage en règle de ses sources et de sa logique.

Exemple  : la théorie du désir mimétique, fondamentale, est un postulat séduisant, mais absurde. Si nous ne désirons que ce qu’autrui a désiré avant nous, comment cela a-t-il bien pu commencer un jour ? Les archétypes littéraires que R. Girard avance pour preuve (Don Juan, Don Quichotte) sont contrefaits : Don Juan est un adepte du coup de foudre spontané, Sancho Pança un vrai glouton, qui ne partage nullement les désirs de son maître.

Autre exemple : R. Girard affirme que la violence naît toujours et partout de cette contagion du désir. Mais sa démonstration n’est, selon R. Pommier, qu’une épatante fiction. Dans la plupart des cas qu’il analyse, la peur ou la haine sont des facteurs autrement plus probables. R. Girard, de plus, a mal lu les anthropologues : aucune étude classique n’a montré que le rite du sacrifice eût pour fonction d’apaiser les rivalités entre les hommes ni d’enrayer la violence mimétique. Les bons auteurs ont tous compris qu’il est destiné à apaiser les dieux, non les hommes. Le modèle sacrificiel, à la moulinette duquel R. Girard passe la mythologie grecque et l’Ancien Testament, n’est donc qu’un « délire interprétatif », de même que la « vérité mimétique » dont il fait la clé de la révélation chrétienne. Au mépris de la diversité des textes nouveau testamentaires et de la tradition théologique, R. Girard prétend que, deux mille ans avant lui, le Christ ne dit pas autre chose que ce que lui-même a compris : le sacrifice n’est qu’un mensonge, car la victime est innocente. C’est ainsi que le christianisme, soutenait R. Girard il y a quelques années, a anticipé sur une vérité dont lui-même serait le génial et l’unique découvreur. On fait difficilement plus fort. Il conviendrait donc, persifle R. Pommier, « que tous les chrétiens fêtassent la naissance de René Girard en même temps que celle du Christ ».

En fin de partie, le verdict tombe, et on se doute qu’il n’est pas tendre : d’élucubrations en lectures abusives, R. Girard, selon R. Pommier, ne parvient certes pas à « battre les records d’imbécillité » d’un R. Barthes, mais n’est pas loin de s’en approcher. Il l’écrase en tout cas sur un autre terrain : celui de l’outrecuidance et de l’autocélébration.

Pulsions tauromachiques et iconoclasme radical
Que dire de plus ? L’écriture de R. Pommier peut, selon le cas, réjouir ou indigner le lecteur pétrifié par tant de sarcasmes. La question de savoir si une telle critique est utile ou nuisible au débat s’efface d’abord devant la joie communicative de l’auteur. Il ne s’en cache pas : depuis qu’à l’âge de 15 ans, une vache a succombé sous la roue de sa bicyclette, il adore bousculer ces animaux sacrés. Mais pourquoi ceux-ci plutôt que ceux-là ? Il s’avère que R. Pommier déteste en particulier deux ou trois choses : la prétention intellectuelle, les idées « extravagantes » et le snobisme mêlé de crainte qui fait qu’on les écoute. Entré en lice à la fin des années 1970, il s’est donc heurté au goût immodéré de l’époque pour les théories ambitieuses, les éclats déconstructionnistes et les idées soupçonneuses des maîtres : Jacques Lacan, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida et d’autres, autant de figures de premier plan dont le culte et les idées trop neuves ont éveillé en lui des pulsions tauromachiques. De là vient son penchant pour l’iconoclasme radical, celui qui se soucie peu de quoi mettre à la place. À ce jeu-là, que gagne-t-on ?

Rappelons que R. Pommier n’est ni le premier, ni le dernier à pratiquer ce sport de plume que les Américains appellent « bashing », et qu’en français on traduira par « éreintement ». Souvenons-nous. D’abord, il y eut en 1980 le goguenard Effet ’yau de poêle de François Georges sur les pitreries de J. Lacan. Plus modéré, La Pratique de l’esprit humain, de Marcel Gauchet et Gladys Swain (1980), ne laissa pourtant pas intacte la réputation de M. Foucault. Puis vint le galop d’essai – sérieux mais accusateur – de La Pensée 68 (Luc Ferry et Alain Renaut, 1985) dénonçant les abus du quatuor Foucault-Lacan-Bourdieu-Derrida. Il inaugurait l’ère des « nouveaux philosophes », aujourd’hui à leur tour placés dans le collimateur. Huit ans plus tard, James Miller cible, lui, la vie sexuelle de Michel Foucault.

Puis Alan Sokal et Jean Bricmont épinglent, tout à la fois, J. Lacan, Julia Kristeva, J. Derrida et la nouvelle génération des postmodernes (Impostures intellectuelles, 1997). Ensuite, c’est au tour de P. Bourdieu, relativement épargné jusque-là : en 1998, Jeannine Verdès-Leroux le peint en charlatan et en terroriste (Le Savant et la Politique), Louis Gruel en illusionniste (2005). La même année, Le Livre noir de la psychanalyse importe en France une spécialité déjà florissante aux États-Unis : le « Freud bashing  », qui fera souche à Paris et vient de gagner Michel Onfray. Bien des têtes célèbres ont été dévissées avant celle de R. Girard. Ce qui signifie que, contrairement à une idée répandue, la vindicte n’est pas morte et que le politiquement correct ne règne pas vraiment. Ensuite, qu’elle ne tue personne : le bashing est aussi un hommage rendu au rayonnement des auteurs et des œuvres qu’il vise. La plupart y survivent très bien. Enfin, que sa fonction est aussi de faire de la place pour de nouvelles idées. Mais pas toujours : R. Pommier, quant à lui, se contenterait bien d’un retour au bon sens et au respect de l’antérieur. C’est sans doute là ce qu’il y a de moins passionnant chez lui.

René Pommier, René Girard, un allumé qui se prend pour un phare, Kimé, 2010.