Gaza: Pas de deuxième Syrie à Gaza ! (We see what Qatar’s and Turkey’s meddling in Syria has led to: Palestinian human rights activist denounces Hamas and Qatari-Turkish interference in Gaza)

15 août, 2014
Ce que le kamikaze humanitaire guette, ce n’est pas les dégâts qu’il va faire, mais les dégâts qu’on va lui faire. Et ce sont ces dégâts inversés qui sont censés faire des dégâts. Le kamikaze humanitaire est un kamikaze d’un genre mutant, tout à fait neuf, parfaitement inédit : c’est un kamikaze oxymore. C’est l’idée que les dégâts seront extrêmement collatéraux, diffus, les explications très confuses, les analyses rendues très compliquées puisque le mot humanitaire, lâché comme une bombe, est brandi comme l’arme à laquelle on ne peut rien rétorquer : on ne fait pas la guerre à la paix. Le mot humanitaire est un mot qui a tout dit. Son drapeau est intouchable, son pavillon est insouillable. C’est l’idée que, déguisé en pacifiste, le terroriste aura de son côté, tout blotti contre la coque de son navire naïf rempli de gentillesse gentille et d’idéaux grands, d’ambitions fraternelles, la communauté internationale. Car c’est le monde entier qui, tout à coup, forme une communauté. Le mot humanitaire, forcément inoffensif, ne saurait être offensé, attaqué : c’est une paix qui avance sur les flots, on ne bombarde pas une paix, on ne crible pas de flèches, de balles, une colombe qui passe, même si cette colombe est pilotée par Mohammed Atta, je veux dire ses avatars paisibles, ses avatars innocents, ses avatars gentils, ses avatars qui avancent avec des sentiments plein les poches et la rage entre les dents, et la haine dans les yeux au moment même du sourire. Il y avait les kamikazes volants, voici les kamikazes flottants. Les kamikazes de la vitesse du son ? Démodées. Voici les kamikazes, déguisés en bonnes fées, de la langueur des flots, voici les kamikazes de la vitesse de croisière. Les kamikazes comme des poissons sur les flots, dont l’aide qu’ils apportent est un costume, une panoplie, un déguisement. Ils attendent qu’Israël riposte, autrement se donne tort. Kamikazes qui voudraient non seulement nous faire accroire qu’ils sont pacifistes, mais qu’ils sont passifs. Kamikazes déclencheurs de bavures officielles, au fil de l’eau. Non plus descendant des nuages, s’abattant comme autant de foudres, mais des kamikazes bien lents, bien tranquilles, bien plaisanciers. Des kamikazes bercés par la vague, et qui savent ce qu’ils viennent récolter : des coups, et par conséquent de la publicité. Des kamikazes au long cours qui viennent, innocemment, fabriquer de la culpabilité israélienne. Yann Moix
In a post-imperial, post-colonial world, Israel’s behaviour troubled and jarred. The spread of television and then the internet, beamed endless pictures of Israeli infantrymen beating stone-throwers and, later, Israeli tanks and aircraft taking on Kalashnikov-wielding guerrillas. It looked like a brutal and unequal struggle. Liberal hearts went out to the underdog – and anti-Semites and opportunists of various sorts joined in the anti-Israeli chorus. Israelis might argue that the (relatively) lightly armed Hamasniks in Gaza want to drive the Jews into the sea; that the struggle isn’t really between Israel and the Palestinians but between little Israel and the vast Arab and Muslim worlds, which long for Israel’s demise ; even that Israel isn’t the issue, that Islamists seek the demise of the West itself, and that Israel is merely an outpost of the far larger civilisation that they find abhorrent and seek to topple. But television doesn’t show this bigger picture; images can’t elucidate ideas. It shows mighty Israel crushing bedraggled Gaza. Western TV screens never show Hamas – not a gunman, or a rocket launched at Tel Aviv, not a fighter shelling a nearby kibbutz. In these past few weeks, it has seemed as if Israel’s F-16s and Merkava tanks and 155mm artillery have been fighting only wailing mothers, mangled children, run-down concrete slums. Not Hamasniks. Not the 3,000 rockets reaching out for Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Beersheba. Not mortar bombs crashing into kibbutz dining halls. Not rockets fired at Israel from Gaza hospitals and schools, designed to provoke Israeli counterfire that could then be screened as an atrocity. In the shambles of this war, a few basic facts about the contenders have been lost: Israel is a Western liberal democracy, where Arabs have the vote and, like Jews, are not detained in the middle of the night for what they think or say. While there is a violent, Right-wing fringe, Israelis remains basically tolerant, even in wartime, even under terrorist provocation. Their country is a scientific, technological and artistic powerhouse, in large measure because it is an open society. On the other side are a range of fanatical Muslim organisations that are totalitarian. Hamas holds Gaza’s population as a hostage in an iron grip and is intolerant of all “others” – Jews, homosexuals, socialists. How many Christians have remained in Gaza since the violent 2007 Hamas takeover? The Palestinians have been treated badly, there is no doubt about that. Britain, America, fellow Arabs, Zionists – all are to blame. But so are they, having rejected two-state compromises offered in 1937, 1947, 2000 and 2008. They should have a state of their own, in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and Gaza. This is fair, this would constitute a modicum of justice. But this is not what Hamas wants. Like Isis in Iraq and Syria, like al Qaeda, the Shabab in Somalia and Boko Haram in Nigeria, it seeks to destroy Western neighbours. And the Nick Cleggs of this world, who call on Britain to suspend arms sales to Israel, are their accomplices. It’s as if they really don’t understand the world they live in, like those liberals in Britain and France who called for disarmament and pro-German treaty revision in the Thirties. But the message is clear. The barbarians truly are at the gates.  Benny Morris
It is by now no secret that Qatar has emerged as Hamas’ home away from home and ATM. Shaikh Tamim’s father, Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited Gaza in 2012 when he was still the ruler of Qatar, pledging $400 million in economic aid. Most recently, Doha tried to transfer millions of dollars via Jordan’s Arab Bank to help pay the salaries of Hamas civil servants in Gaza, but the transfer was apparently blocked at Washington’s request. Since 2011, Qatar has been the home of the aforementioned Khaled Meshal, who runs Hamas’s leadership. During a recent appearance on Qatar’s media network Al Jazeera Arabic, Meshal blessed the individuals who kidnapped and ultimately murdered three Israeli teenagers. He boasted that Hamas was a unified movement and that its military wing reports to him and his associates in the political bureau. American officials have revealed that Qatar also hosts several other Hamas leaders. Israeli authorities reportedly intercepted an individual in April on his way back from meeting a member of Hamas’s military wing in Qatar who gave him money and directives intended for Hamas cells in the West Bank. Israeli and Egyptian officials report that Qatar is so eager for a political win at Cairo’s expense that it actually urged Hamas to reject the Egyptian cease-fire initiative last week. Doha is also using its vast petroleum wealth to striking diplomatic effect: one UN official source suggests that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon would not have made it to Doha for cease-fire talks on Sunday if the Qataris hadn’t chartered him a plane out of their own pocket.  Turkey, for its part, has emerged as one of the most strident supporters of Hamas on the world stage. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vociferously advocated for Hamas while his government has found ways to donate hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Hamas, mostly through infrastructure projects, but also through materials and reportedly even direct financial support. Turkey is also home to Salah Al-Arouri, founder of the West Bank branch of the Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military wing. He reportedly has been given “sole control” of Hamas’s military operations in the West Bank, and two Palestinians arrested last year for smuggling money for Hamas into the West Bank admitted they were doing so on Al-Arouri’s orders. He is also suspected of being behind a recent surge in kidnapping plots from the West Bank. An Israeli security official recently noted, “I have no doubt that Al-Arouri was connected to the act” of kidnapping that helped set off the latest round of violence between the parties, which has seen hundreds killed and thousands wounded, nearly all of them Palestinians. Al-Arouri, it should be noted, was among the high-level Hamas officials who met with the amir of Kuwait on Monday to discuss cease-fire terms (…). So as Washington considers cutting a deal brokered by Qatar and Turkey for an end to the latest round of hostilities, it bears pointing out why these two countries are so influential with Hamas in the first place: because they empower the terrorist movement and provide it with a free hand for operations. A cease-fire is obviously desirable, but not if the cost is honoring terror sponsors. There must be others who can mediate. Interestingly, both Ankara and Doha count themselves among America’s friends. But their support for terrorist entities—not just Hamas—has become so obvious that U.S. legislators began to send concerned letters to officials from both countries last year. This alone is a sign that America must set the bar higher for the behavior of its allies and not reward them for bad behaviorDavid Andrew Weinberg and Jonathan Schanzer
Lorsque Ban Ki Moon s’est rendu à Jérusalem, le 22 juillet, pour faire pression en vue d’un cessez-le-feu à Gaza et d’en revenir à des discussions sur les causes fondamentales du conflit palestino-israélien, Netanyahu a littéralement « explosé » de colère : « Vous ne pouvez pas parler au Hamas. Ce sont des extrémistes islamistes au même titre qu’Al Qaïda, l’Etat Islamique, les Taliban ou Boko Haram ! Passant inaperçues pour lui, ses paroles ne sont pas tombées dans l’oreille d’un sourd, dans le monde islamiste. Là  les observateurs suivaient à la trace chaque stade du conflit à Gaza, dès qu’on a compris qu’il s’élevait à un niveau comparable à la guerre contre Al Qaïda. Aussi, après avoir freiné l’opération contre le Hamas, Israël pourrait bien se rendre compte qu’il a mis la main dans un nouveau nid de frelons. En ce moment-même, l’Etat Islamique et le Front Al Nosra combattent pour étendre leurs avant-postes syriens et irakiens par une poussée au Liban même. Et ils ne s’arrêtront sans doute pas en si bon chemin. Si les Jihadistes en mouvement ont eu la possibilité d’évaluer que Tsahal est incapable de vaincre le Hamas, ils pourraient bien se retourner contre Israël et lui poser une nouvelle menace extrêmement dangereuse. 4. L’Iran aura bien pris note, de son côté, du fait que, deux fois de suite en deux ans, les dirigeants israéliens ont préféré s’abstenir d’apporter une conclusion victorieuse à une guerre débutée par des forces paramilitaires que Téhéran a préalablement renforcées, entraînées et financées – d’abord le Hezbollah, dans la Guerre du Liban en 2006, qui s’est terminée par un tracé de zone gérée par la FINUL, et actuellement , un conflit avec les Islamistes palestiniens qui semble se terminer de la même façon. Debka
Faisant état de sources fiables, Rafik Chelly a ajouté que « Des avions sont arrivés en Libye à partir du Qatar, et elles étaient pleines de djihadistes, ce qui explique les succès d’Ansar al-charia, notamment leur occupation d’une base militaire à Benghazi… Le nombre de ces éléments terroristes qui viennent de l’EIIL, dont beaucoup de tunisiens, oscille entre 4000 et 5000. Leur objectif, imposer leur domination sur la capitale, ensuite occuper Zentan , auquel cas, le danger sur la Tunisie n’en sera que plus grand avec le franchissement des frontières….. ». Contacté par le correspondant de Tunisie-Secret à Tunis, Rafik Chelly a indiqué que parmi ces 5000 djihadistes, il y a près de 200 éléments de nationalité française. Autrement dit, des binationaux. On rappellera ici que, déjà en janvier 2014, Rafik Chelly a déclaré que au quotidien Attounisia (17 janvier), que « 4500 djihadistes tunisiens appartenant au mouvement d’Ansar al-charia, sont actuellement dans des camps d’entrainement en Libye ». Les 5000 djihadistes en question reviennent donc à leur point de départ, la Libye, où ils ont été entrainés et d’où les services qataris les ont transportés vers la Syrie, dès la fin de l’année 2011. On précisera enfin que, sur la base de rapports de renseignement parvenus au journal algérien « Al-Bilad al-Jazairiya », celui-ci a révélé, dans son édition du 4 juillet dernier que des djihadistes libyens appartenant à Ansar al-charia, ainsi que des éléments de l’EIIL, se sont rencontrés dans une ville en Turquie pour conclure un accord consistant à transférer les djihadistes d’origine maghrébine présents en Irak, à les transférer vers la Libye pour renforcer les rangs d’Ansar al-charia dans ce pays ainsi qu’en Tunisie. Le même rapport de renseignement indique que l’EIIL a décidé d’élargir son djihad au Maghreb arabe et dans le Sahel, loin d’un Moyen-Orient déjà partiellement conquisNebil Ben Yahmed
From Hamas’s point of view, it must be a source of immense delight to witness the strains, and practical fallout, in the relationship between Washington and Jerusalem. It wins an election in which the US insisted it be allowed to take part, even though it has never renounced terrorism. It murders its way to control of Gaza. It diverts Gaza’s resources to turn the Strip into one great big terrorist bunker. It hits Israel, over and over and over again. It intimidates international journalists to not report on and film its attack methods. And the international community condemns Israel, the UN sets up inquiries into Israeli war crimes, and Israel’s allies limit its arms supplies. Times of Israel
Les missiles qui sont aujourd’hui lancés contre Israël sont, pour chacun d’entre eux, un crime contre l’humanité, qu’il frappe ou manque [sa cible], car il vise une cible civile. Les agissements d’Israël contre des civils palestiniens constituent aussi des crimes contre l’humanité. S’agissant des crimes de guerre sous la Quatrième Convention de Genève – colonies, judaïsation, points de contrôle, arrestations et ainsi de suite, ils nous confèrent une assise très solide. Toutefois, les Palestiniens sont en mauvaise posture en ce qui concerne l’autre problème. Car viser des civils, que ce soit un ou mille, est considéré comme un crime contre l’humanité. (…) Faire appel à la CPI [Cour pénale internationale] nécessite un consensus écrit, de toutes les factions palestiniennes. Ainsi, quand un Palestinien est arrêté pour son implication dans le meurtre d’un citoyen israélien, on ne nous reprochera pas de l’extrader. Veuillez noter que parmi les nôtres, plusieurs à Gaza sont apparus à la télévision pour dire que l’armée israélienne les avait avertis d’évacuer leurs maisons avant les explosions. Dans un tel cas de figure, s’il y a des victimes, la loi considère que c’est le fait d’une erreur plutôt qu’un meurtre intentionnel, [les Israéliens] ayant suivi la procédure légale. En ce qui concerne les missiles lancés de notre côté… Nous n’avertissons jamais personne de l’endroit où ces missiles vont tomber, ou des opérations que nous effectuons. Ainsi, il faudrait s’informer avant de parler de faire appel à la CPI, sous le coup de l’émotion. Ibrahim Khreisheh (émissaire palestinien au CDHNU, télévision de l’Autorité palestinienne, 9 juillet 2014)
La Palestine n’est pas un État partie au Statut de Rome. La Cour n’a reçu de la Palestine aucun document officiel faisant état de son acceptation de sa compétence ou demandant au Procureur d’ouvrir une enquête au sujet des crimes allégués, suite à l’adoption de la résolution (67/19) de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies en date du 29 novembre 2012, qui accorde à la Palestine le statut d’État non membre observateur. Par conséquent, la CPI n’est pas compétente pour connaître des crimes qui auraient été commis sur le territoire palestinien. CPI
When the Palestinian Authority (PA) was established 1994, I noticed that most Palestinian and Israeli human rights organizations continued monitoring the Israeli occupation, but that nobody wanted to pay any attention to the PA’s violations. In a meeting held in March 1996, the board members of B’Tselem decided that they would not concern themselves with PA abuses. That’s why I left. I wanted to fill a role that I thought was very important, but that was empty. (…) I think that if the Palestinians want to form a successful civil society, live in a democracy, and respect human rights, we will have to build institutions with our own hands. We should not lay our fate in other people’s hands. We have done so quite enough over the past sixty years. We are still demanding a state from the international community instead of building it ourselves. I think that it is the time for the Palestinians to start building their own democracy right now. I believe that democracy has never been offered by leaders or governments. Democracy is determined by the people themselves. (…) Creating a human rights organization under an Arab regime is like committing suicide. Yasser Arafat was used to doing whatever he wanted without being criticized or monitored. When I started watching, investigating, criticizing, he started to look at me in a very bad light. The Palestinian Authority defamed us and slandered us. Among other accusations, they said that we serve the enemy’s interests. When we started to publish reports on PA human rights violations, the reports became sexy news material for the international community. They were particularly well-reported by the Israeli media. The issue was especially sexy because, as you know, I had spent the past seven and a half years criticizing only Israel. Arafat saw me as a traitor. (…) In my opinion, the establishment of a Palestinian state is not only related to the Israelis. It concerns the Palestinians. We have had a very bad experience with building a state, developing it, and keeping it alive. That brings me to the September 2005 Israeli disengagement from Gaza. Everybody thought that the Israeli disengagement would be a kind of test for the Palestinians. It would test whether we are really able to build our own state and manage our daily lives ourselves. In my opinion, we totally failed to manage Gaza, develop it, and build infrastructure. Today, fewer and fewer Palestinian voices speak up in favor of es-tablishing a state. Everybody has his own horrible troubles. The only people calling for a state right now are the politicians. Politicians around the world are buying and selling blood. This is the only income that they have. And that’s exactly what Arafat practiced with the Palestinians. I remember with great sadness what happened when he started creating an Intifada and threatening the Israelis. Palestinian security workers went to the schools, ordered the schoolmasters to close the schools, and then sent the schoolchildren to throw stones at the Israelis. That was a very horrible thing to do. Politicians sacrifice their people to achieve their political interests. This is unfortunately the Palestinian attitude. (…) Gaza is a big problem for the Palestinians, Israelis, and Egyptians. The international community becomes more and more afraid of the Palestinians because Hamas reflects such a negative side of Palestinian politics. I don’t think that Hamas will ever offer Gaza back to Abbas. The question is: Who is going to control Hamas? Hamas right now oppresses the Gazan people. But who will contain Hamas? I don’t think that dialogue will solve the problem. We will all be watching whether Hamas can manage Gaza and keep it functioning. The Arab countries should put more effort into solving the conflict between Hamas and Fatah. The problem is that the Arab countries are so divided, some supporting Hamas against Fatah and some supporting Fatah against Hamas. This won’t help the situation. (…) I think there is a lack of good will and leadership on both sides. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict also tends to become a commercial conflict. Everybody is making something off this conflict. There are countries that have an interest in perpetuating the fighting. The Iranians, for example, are trying to provoke a regional war using Hezbollah and Hamas. I don’t think the Palestinians will have the same opportunities for peace that we were offered between 1947 and July 2000. Palestinian violence has probably caused some countries to want not to get involved anymore. ‘…) Don’t forget that we are living under a Taliban regime in the Gaza Strip. Our fieldworker hesitates before investigating cases there. The situation for human rights organizations sometimes reminds me of the Saddam Hussein regime. We can’t monitor the Gaza Strip the way we used to monitor it when it was PA territory. We are trying to collect data from newspapers and other organizations that operate in the area. We are in touch with some journalists there. But we face serious opposition and danger. (…) The best opportunity for us to make peace with Israel was probably in 1978 or 1979 when Egyptian president Anwar Sadat visited Israel. He suggested that Yasser Arafat join him, but Arafat refused. The most important thing for us to do now is learn from the mis-takes we made between 1947 and today so that we don’t repeat them. We should put these mistakes on the table and study them well. After studying our mistakes, I think the solution will be very easy to createBassem Eid
There is no doubt there’s an atmosphere of fear and terror in Gaza. Others were executed in various gatherings under the pretext of their being collaborators with Israel. Hamas has a physical presence in almost every house in Gaza and can listen to what’s being said. It’s a Stasi regime par excellence. The population is much more scared of Hamas than it is of the Israeli soldiers,” Eid said. Hamas, for its part, is more worried about the possible return of control of the Gaza Strip to the Palestinian Authority than it is of an Israeli military incursion. In my opinion, Hamas is willing to pay its last drop of blood to prevent Abbas and his PA from setting foot in Gaza. These people (Hamas) are fighting for their existence. Bassem Eid
En tant que Palestinien, je dois avouer : je suis responsable d’une partie de ce qui s’est passé. En tant que Palestinien, je ne peux pas nier ma responsabilité dans la mort de mon propre peuple. La majorité des Palestiniens s’est opposée aux tirs de roquettes contre Israël. Les Palestiniens ont compris que ces missiles ne servaient à rien. Les Palestiniens ont appelé le Hamas à cesser les tirs et à essayer de négocier avec l’occupation israélienne. Mais le Hamas n’a jamais considéré les besoins des Palestiniens. Seulement ses propres intérêts politiques. Et ils ont continué à tirer des roquettes sur Israël, en sachant très bien quel serait le résultat: le Hamas a ouvert la route de la mort sur notre peuple. Nous savions que le Hamas creusait des tunnels qui mèneraient à notre destruction. Nous savons tous que trois personnes vivent sur ​​chaque mètre carré de la bande de Gaza et le Hamas sait que toute attaque par Israël conduirait à une mort massive. Mais les dirigeants du Hamas sont plus intéressés par leurs victoires que par la vie de leurs victimes. En effet, le Hamas a besoin de ces décès afin de prétendre à la victoire. La mort de son propre peuple donne au Hamas ce pouvoir qui lui permet d’accumuler plus d’argent et plus de bras. Le Hamas n’a jamais été intéressé par la libération du peuple palestinien de l’occupation. Et Israël ne pourrait jamais détruire l’infrastructure mise en place par le Hamas. Seulement, nous, le peuple palestinien, pourrions le démanteler. Qu’aurions-nous pu faire? Les habitants de la bande de Gaza avaient la responsabilité de se rebeller contre le pouvoir du Hamas. Oui, le contrôle du Hamas est mortel et les gens ont eu peur d’exprimer leur mécontentement face à son règne et sa mauvaise gestion. Et pourtant, nous avons abdiqué, nous en portons la responsabilité. Nous le savions, et nous avons laissé faire. Ces décès (plus de 1.800 à ce jour, près de 0,1% de la population de la bande de Gaza) pourront-ils nous enseigner une leçon que nous n’oublierons jamais? L’idée que nous devons nous débarrasser du Hamas et complètement démilitariser Gaza. Ensuite, nous allons ouvrir les points de passage frontaliers. Je dis cela en tant que Palestinien fidèle et parce que je m’inquiète pour mon propre peuple. Je n’ai aucune confiance dans les initiatives européennes et américaines. Il n’y a qu’une seule initiative à laquelle je peux croire et en laquelle j’ai confiance: une initiative trilatérale qui comprend l’Egypte, les Palestiniens et Israël. Sinon, il n’y aura pas de calme ou d’apaisement dans la bande de Gaza ou en Israël. Nous ne devons pas permettre à la bande de Gaza de devenir la victime des complots et des intrigues arabes. L’Egypte a toujours été le médiateur légitime, et si on avait écouté un peu plus l’Egypte de nombreuses vies auraient été sauvées. Le Qatar et la Turquie n’ont aucun rapport avec le peuple palestinien, et nous n’avons rien en commun. Ces deux Etats ont tenté de saboter chaque tentative de cessez-le-feu. À mon avis, au moins deux tiers des morts palestiniens sont victimes du complot turco-qatari. Nous voyons ce à quoi a conduit l’ingérence du Qatar et de la Turquie en Syrie. Je ne veux pas les voir établir une « deuxième Syrie » dans la bande de Gaza. Bassem Eid
Personnellement je ne vois pas l’origine des problèmes actuels dans  »l’occupation ». Non pas parce que ce terme est impropre pour caractériser le rapport entre Israël et les Palestiniens, car alors les Palestiniens devraient aussi utiliser ce terme  »occupation » lorsque la Jordanie et l’Egypte occupaient la  »Cisjordanie » (appellation de la Jordanie) et Gaza… Mais surtout parce que la belligérance entre les Juifs et les Arabes n’a pas commencé en 1967. Si l’on veut une vraie paix, une paix définitive, c’est à cet état de belligérance qu’il faut mettre fin. Je n’ai personnellement pas de recette magique, mais il me semble qu’il faut désamorcer la cause de cette belligérance. Depuis 1921, toutes les guerres déclenchées par les Arabes contre les Juifs, puis contre Israël, sont fondées sur le refus arabe de considérer : – que les Juifs ont un droit historique d’appartenance à cette région, au nom d’une histoire de 3000 ans d’attachement à cette région. – que les Juifs tout comme les Arabes ont le droit de se constituer en Etat-Nation et de disposer d’eux mêmes, au moins sur une partie de ce que fut leur patrie. Je suis peut-être naïf, mais il me semble que si le monde arabo-musulman dont font partie les Palestiniens, reconnaissait ce droit, (et non pas seulement Israël comme  »fait accompli »), alors disparaîtrait la cause de la belligérance, et alors toutes les questions soi-disant  »litigieuses », liées au territoire et aux frontières, seraient résolues en un tour de main. Jean-Pierre Lledo
Remember that when President Sadat made peace with Israel in 1979 he got back all of his country’s land from the Israelis, without shedding any blood. This is a real peace. Arafat rejected Sadat’s offer to join him in Israel but imagine if he had accepted. Think how many settlements would never have been created in the occupied territories and think that Palestine could have been established all that time ago. I want to move forward and to look to our children’s future. In my opinion, history should be dismissed and people like us should look ahead. Palestinian leaders continue to demand that Israel remove more than 160 checkpoints in the occupied territories, evacuate so-called « the illegal settlements », allow Palestinian workers to enter Israel to work, and demolish the wall that separates Palestinians from Israelis (and other Palestinians). But to what end? After the last six years of Intifada, we Palestinians have lost so much – not least more than 4,000 of our people killed by the Israelis. Consider also that since Israel left Gaza in September of 2005, the Palestinians have created chaos. So who will make this right of return applicable? In January 2007 there were 17 Palestinians killed by Israelis, but there were 35 Palestinians killed by Palestinians, so, right or return of right to live? (…) Three years ago, I went to visit the Palestinian village of Qariut, located between Ramalla and Nablus. The Israeli occupation confiscated their land and established a settlement called Eli. When I left the people in Qariut I asked them once specific question: if the Israelis were to evacuate Eli settlements tomorrow, would you agree to give the land and the houses for your brothers, the refugees? And nobody agreed… So, if even the Palestinians are not willing to accept this right of return, how can we expect Israelis will do it? All of the peace accords and initiatives since 1993 talk about the return of the Palestinian refugees to the Palestinian state, and all of these peace accords and initiatives got the blessing of the Palestinian leaders, but all of these initiatives have been rejected by the Palestinians refugees themselves. There is no common ground or status between the Palestinian refugees and their leaders. And for the lack of the common ground, we are loosing, land, property and lives.  Bassem Eid

Attention: une Syrie peut en cacher une autre !

Alors qu’après l’assaut terroristo-médiatique contre Israël  …

Et l’annonce turque d’une énième « flottille de la paix » contre le blocus de Gaza …

Le Hamas et ses idiots utiles médiatiques s’apprêtent, pour continuer à « fabriquer de la culpabilité israélienne » mais contre toute évidence, à nous refaire le coup du tribunal international …

Comment ne pas voir avec le bien improbable et solitaire fondateur d’une ONG qui s’intéresse aux violations palestiniennes des droits de l’homme Bassem Eid …

Et à l’instar de ces images recyclées du conflit syrien lui-même …

La véritable menace qui pointe derrière tout cela …

A savoir, avec les appuis des suspects habituels de Doha et d‘Istanbul, la syrianisation du conflit de Gaza en particulier et de la Palestine en général ?

Le Hamas a besoin des morts palestiniens pour crier victoire
Bassem Eid

I24news

10 août 2014

Depuis plus de 26 ans, je consacre ma vie à la défense des droits de l’Homme. J’ai assisté à des guerres, à la terreur et la violence. Pourtant, le mois dernier (de l’enlèvement suivi du meurtre de trois adolescents juifs, à l’assassinat du jeune Mohammed abu Khdeir, puis la guerre à Gaza) a été la période de ma vie la plus difficile politiquement et émotionnellement.

Je vis à Jérusalem-Est et j’ai été témoin de la dévastation de la vie dans ma ville. Une fois de plus, la Route 1 est devenue la ligne de démarcation entre l’Est et l’Ouest. Juifs et Arabes ont peur des ombres de l’un et de l’autre. Des résidents palestiniens de Jérusalem ont attaqué les infrastructures publiques de Beit Hanina et Shuhafat, causant d’énormes dégâts aux feux de circulation, au tramway, et aux sources de courant électrique. Je ne peux pas accepter cela comme signe de protestation civique: il s’agit de pure vengeance. Et la coexistence pour laquelle j’ai lutté toute ma vie a été pendue, exécutée sur la place publique.

J’ai mal.

Il ne fait aucun doute que la mort et la destruction dans la bande de Gaza est un tsunami. Les deux peuples sont en difficulté, mais chaque côté nient la douleur de l’autre… ce qui ne fait que l’empirer.

Et pourtant, en tant que Palestinien, je dois avouer : je suis responsable d’une partie de ce qui s’est passé. En tant que Palestinien, je ne peux pas nier ma responsabilité dans la mort de mon propre peuple.

La majorité des Palestiniens s’est opposée aux tirs de roquettes contre Israël. Les Palestiniens ont compris que ces missiles ne servaient à rien. Les Palestiniens ont appelé le Hamas à cesser les tirs et à essayer de négocier avec l’occupation israélienne. Mais le Hamas n’a jamais considéré les besoins des Palestiniens. Seulement ses propres intérêts politiques. Et ils ont continué à tirer des roquettes sur Israël, en sachant très bien quel serait le résultat: le Hamas a ouvert la route de la mort sur notre peuple.

Nous savions que le Hamas creusait des tunnels qui mèneraient à notre destruction.

Nous savons tous que trois personnes vivent sur ​​chaque mètre carré de la bande de Gaza et le Hamas sait que toute attaque par Israël conduirait à une mort massive. Mais les dirigeants du Hamas sont plus intéressés par leurs victoires que par la vie de leurs victimes.

En effet, le Hamas a besoin de ces décès afin de prétendre à la victoire. La mort de son propre peuple donne au Hamas ce pouvoir qui lui permet d’accumuler plus d’argent et plus de bras.

Le Hamas n’a jamais été intéressé par la libération du peuple palestinien de l’occupation. Et Israël ne pourrait jamais détruire l’infrastructure mise en place par le Hamas. Seulement, nous, le peuple palestinien, pourrions le démanteler.

Qu’aurions-nous pu faire? Les habitants de la bande de Gaza avaient la responsabilité de se rebeller contre le pouvoir du Hamas. Oui, le contrôle du Hamas est mortel et les gens ont eu peur d’exprimer leur mécontentement face à son règne et sa mauvaise gestion. Et pourtant, nous avons abdiqué, nous en portons la responsabilité.

Nous le savions, et nous avons laissé faire.

Ces décès (plus de 1.800 à ce jour, près de 0,1% de la population de la bande de Gaza) pourront-ils nous enseigner une leçon que nous n’oublierons jamais? L’idée que nous devons nous débarrasser du Hamas et complètement démilitariser Gaza. Ensuite, nous allons ouvrir les points de passage frontaliers. Je dis cela en tant que Palestinien fidèle et parce que je m’inquiète pour mon propre peuple.

Je n’ai aucune confiance dans les initiatives européennes et américaines. Il n’y a qu’une seule initiative à laquelle je peux croire et en laquelle j’ai confiance: une initiative trilatérale qui comprend l’Egypte, les Palestiniens et Israël. Sinon, il n’y aura pas de calme ou d’apaisement dans la bande de Gaza ou en Israël.

Nous ne devons pas permettre à la bande de Gaza de devenir la victime des complots et des intrigues arabes. L’Egypte a toujours été le médiateur légitime, et si on avait écouté un peu plus l’Egypte de nombreuses vies auraient été sauvées.

Le Qatar et la Turquie n’ont aucun rapport avec le peuple palestinien, et nous n’avons rien en commun. Ces deux Etats ont tenté de saboter chaque tentative de cessez-le-feu. À mon avis, au moins deux tiers des morts palestiniens sont victimes du complot turco-qatari.

Nous voyons ce à quoi a conduit l’ingérence du Qatar et de la Turquie en Syrie. Je ne veux pas les voir établir une « deuxième Syrie » dans la bande de Gaza.

L’Egypte sait que ces complots sont aussi dirigés contre son régime. Nous ne pouvons qu’espérer que le président égyptien, Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, ne se perdra pas dans l’épaisse confusion entourant la région, et qu’il parviendra à sortir son propre peuple et nous les Palestiniens, de ce bourbier islamique et religieux.

Il est grand temps pour les Israéliens et les Palestiniens de trouver une alternative à la guerre. Et oui, c’est véritablement possible avec l’aide de l’Egypte.

Bassem Eid est un activiste des droits de l’homme et un commentateur politique

Voir également:

Réponse de Jean-Pierre Lledo, cinéaste et essayiste 

Bien cher Bassem,

Avec cette nouvelle guerre, je pensais beaucoup à vous, depuis que nous avions en Juin, de la même tribune à Jérusalem, parlé  »de la culture de la honte et de l’honneur » dans les sociétés arabes, et je dois dire que j’avais été impressionné par votre franchise, osant parler devant un public juif de ce fléau du crimes d’honneur plus fort dans la société palestinienne, que partout ailleurs, dont sont principalement victimes les femmes, .

En lisant cette tribune, je suis tout autant touché par la liberté de pensée qui est la vôtre. C’est pour ma part la première fois que je lis un texte d’un Palestinien qui n’accuse pas l’Autre, mais soi-même.

J’espère que nous aurons l’occasion très bientôt de nous revoir pour approfondir nos pensées.

En attendant, je voudrais quand même vous dire que personnellement je ne vois pas l’origine des problèmes actuels dans  »l’occupation ».

Non pas parce que ce terme est impropre pour caractériser le rapport entre Israël et les Palestiniens, car alors les Palestiniens devraient aussi utiliser ce terme  »occupation » lorsque la Jordanie et l’Egypte occupaient la  »Cisjordanie » (appellation de la Jordanie) et Gaza…

Mais surtout parce que la belligérance entre les Juifs et les Arabes n’a pas commencé en 1967.

Si l’on veut une vraie paix, une paix définitive, c’est à cet état de belligérance qu’il faut mettre fin.

Je n’ai personnellement pas de recette magique, mais il me semble qu’il faut désamorcer la cause de cette belligérance.

Depuis 1921, toutes les guerres déclenchées par les Arabes contre les Juifs, puis contre Israël, sont fondées sur le refus arabe de considérer :

- que les Juifs ont un droit historique d’appartenance à cette région, au nom d’une histoire de 3000 ans d’attachement à cette région.

- que les Juifs tout comme les Arabes ont le droit de se constituer en Etat-Nation et de disposer d’eux mêmes, au moins sur une partie de ce que fut leur patrie.

Je suis peut-être naïf, mais il me semble que si le monde arabo-musulman dont font partie les Palestiniens, reconnaissait ce droit, (et non pas seulement Israël comme  »fait accompli »), alors disparaîtrait la cause de la belligérance, et alors toutes les questions soi-disant  »litigieuses », liées au territoire et aux frontières, seraient résolues en un tour de main.

Voila ce que je tenais à vous dire, tout en vous remerciant pour la franchise de votre point de vue.

(petite remarque encore : 1800 victimes représentent 0,1% – et non  »1% » de la population gazaoui. comme vous l’avez écrit. Parmi lesquels les 3/4 sont sans doute des combattants Hamas déguisés en  »civils »).

Jean-Pierre Lledo

Voir aussi:

Explosif : le Qatar a transporté 5000 terroristes de l’EIIL en Libye

Nebil Ben Yahmed

Tunisie secret

9 Août 2014

C’est Rafik Chelly, ex directeur de la sécurité présidentielle (1984-1987), ancien haut responsable des services de renseignement tunisien et actuel secrétaire général du « Centre Tunisien des Etudes de Sécurité Globale », qui vient de l’affirmer dans une interview au quotidien arabophone Attounissia. Cela signifie qu’après avoir activement contribué à l’embrasement de la Syrie et de l’Irak, le Qatar veut déplacer le feu de la guerre civile et de la barbarie en Libye, c’est-à-dire, inévitablement, en Tunisie et en Algérie.

D’abord une précision : contrairement à ce qui a été dit dans certains médias tunisiens, l’interview de Rafik Chelly n’a pas été publiée dans le quotidien algérien « Al-Khabar », mais dans le journal tunisien Al-Tounissia, le 4 août 2014.

Par son mutisme, la troïka a boosté Abou Iyadh

A la question « Est-il vrai que l’occupation de la Tunisie –comme le pensent certains observateurs pessimistes- par des organisations terroristes n’est qu’une question de temps, et que nous allons vivre le scénario libyen, syrien et irakien ? », l’ancien haut responsable au ministère de l’Intérieur, Rafik Chelly, a répondu : « On doit d’abord revenir à l’historique des événements qui nous ont mené à la situation actuelle. Aussi, depuis l’annonce par Abou Iyadh de la création d’Ansar al-charia, en avril 2011, après avoir bénéficié de l’amnistie générale, il a fait une démonstration de force en mai 2012, en sortant à Kairouan avec 5000 de ses adeptes. Malgré la menace que ces derniers constituaient sur la sécurité nationale, la troïka a observé le mutisme, ce qui a encouragé Abou Iyadh et ses troupes de réapparaitre l’année suivante, en déclarant qu’il est capable de mobiliser 50 000 personnes. Son intention était de profiter de la situation pour déclarer la ville de Kairouan émirat islamiste, ce qui a inquiété Ennahda, qui a interdit cette manifestation pour préserver son image auprès de l’opinion publique tunisienne et internationale… ».

Selon Rafik Chelly, c’est après l’assassinat de Chokri Belaïd et Mohamed Brahmi qu’Ali Larayedh a été contraint de classer Ansar al-charia comme une organisation terroriste, en dépit de l’opposition radicale de certains hauts responsables d’Ennahda. Et c’est à la suite de cette décision tardive que les dirigeants d’Ansar al-charia ont fui la Tunisie vers la Libye, où ils ont rejoint Abou Iyadh pour constituer, des camps d’entrainement à Sebrata et à Derna.

C’est le Qatar qui a rapatrié les djihadistes de l’EIIL

A la seconde question, «Ne pensez vous pas que c’est l’échec des islamistes en Libye qui a mis toute la région en danger imminent ? », Rafik Chelly a répondu que « L’échec cuisant des islamistes après les dernières élections du Conseil National a constitué un tournant périlleux. Il y a eu l’opération de l’aéroport (Libye), ensuite les déplacements d’Abdelhakim Belhadj, de Belkaïd et d’Ali Sallabi en Turquie, au Qatar et en Irak pour rencontrer l’EIIL, et ce pour deux raisons : primo, rapatrier les djihadistes maghrébins en Libye, secundo, conclure des contrats de vente d’armes modernes, avec l’accord de certains pays. L’aéroport de Syrte a été aménagé pour accueillir les cargos d’armes, de même que l’aéroport de Miitika ».

Faisant état de sources fiables, Rafik Chelly a ajouté que « Des avions sont arrivés en Libye à partir du Qatar, et elles étaient pleines de djihadistes, ce qui explique les succès d’Ansar al-charia, notamment leur occupation d’une base militaire à Benghazi… Le nombre de ces éléments terroristes qui viennent de l’EIIL, dont beaucoup de tunisiens, oscille entre 4000 et 5000. Leur objectif, imposer leur domination sur la capitale, ensuite occuper Zentan , auquel cas, le danger sur la Tunisie n’en sera que plus grand avec le franchissement des frontières….. ». Contacté par le correspondant de Tunisie-Secret à Tunis, Rafik Chelly a indiqué que parmi ces 5000 djihadistes, il y a près de 200 éléments de nationalité française. Autrement dit, des binationaux.

Rencontre secrète dans une ville turque

On rappellera ici que, déjà en janvier 2014, Rafik Chelly a déclaré que au quotidien Attounisia (17 janvier), que « 4500 djihadistes tunisiens appartenant au mouvement d’Ansar al-charia, sont actuellement dans des camps d’entrainement en Libye ». Les 5000 djihadistes en question reviennent donc à leur point de départ, la Libye, où ils ont été entrainés et d’où les services qataris les ont transportés vers la Syrie, dès la fin de l’année 2011.

On précisera enfin que, sur la base de rapports de renseignement parvenus au journal algérien « Al-Bilad al-Jazairiya », celui-ci a révélé, dans son édition du 4 juillet dernier que des djihadistes libyens appartenant à Ansar al-charia, ainsi que des éléments de l’EIIL, se sont rencontrés dans une ville en Turquie pour conclure un accord consistant à transférer les djihadistes d’origine maghrébine présents en Irak, à les transférer vers la Libye pour renforcer les rangs d’Ansar al-charia dans ce pays ainsi qu’en Tunisie. Le même rapport de renseignement indique que l’EIIL a décidé d’élargir son djihad au Maghreb arabe et dans le Sahel, loin d’un Moyen-Orient déjà partiellement conquis.

 Voir également:

Tsahal Peut-Elle Se Contenter De Demi-Victoires ?
Debka files

Jerusalem plus

L’Iran et Al Qaïda prennent bonne note de la victoire limitée d’Israël sur le Hamas, noyau dur d’un embryon d’armée palestinienne.

Alors que la délégation israélienne est arrivée au Caire pour des pourparlers indirects avec le Hamas, à la fin des premières 24h d’un cessez-le-feu de 3 jours dans la guerre à Gaza, les porte-parole du gouvernement israélien ont produit d’énormes efforts, mardi soir 5 août, pour convaincre le public que la guerre à Gaza était en voie de se terminer et que l’ennemi avait subi d’énormes dégradations de ses capacités d’agression.

Le chef d’Etat-Major le Lieutenant-Général Benny Gantz a continué, jusqu’à présent, à déclarer : « Nous nous acheminons maintenant, vers une période de reconstruction ». Ce n’est pas exactement le message que les soldats voulaient entendre de la part de leur Commandant en chef, alors qu’ils se retiraient des champs de bataille de Gaza, après 28 jours d’âpres combats et de lourdes pertes (64 tués dans Tsahal). Mais les artistes en relations publiques du gouvernement étaient déjà en train d’exposer toute l’horreur d’un scénario de simulation décrivant une opération théorique devant aboutir à la conquête de la totalité de la Bande de Gaza.

Ce scenario, qu’on dit avoir été présenté au Cabinet de sécurité, la semaine dernière, au cours du débat sur les tactiques à employer lors de la prochaine phase d’opération, aurait coûté des centaines de vies humaines parmi les soldats israéliens et mené à une réoccupation d’une durée de cinq ans, afin de purger le territoire des 20.000 terroristes présents et de démanteler leur machine de guerre.

Ce scénario a été imaginé pour faire taire les mécontents, à commencer par les citoyens vivant à portée étroite de la Bande de Gaza, qui refusaient de retourner dans leurs maisons, à cause du danger qui n’est pas totalement éliminé.

Les alternatives que le Cabinet a examinées n’ont jamais contenu l’occupation totale de la Bande de Gaza. L’option la plus sérieuse envisagée par les Ministres et qui a été rejetée dès la première semaine de guerre, consistait à envoyer des troupes pour une frappe-éclair, afin de détruire les centres de commandement du Hamas et le noyau dur de sa structure militaire et de ressortir rapidement. Si cette option avait été appliquée à un stade précoce du conflit, plutôt que de prolonger dix jours de frappes ininterrompues et sans réels résultats probants, cela aurait permis de sauver des pertes lourdes du côté palestinien et la dévastation de leurs propriétés, d’une étendue qui trouble aussi pas mal d’ Israéliens.

Et cette semaine encore, les hommes politiques dirigeant la guerre, ont décidé de l’écourter, sans prêter le moindre égard aux avis concernant l faisabilité des opérations, pouvant conduire cette mission anti-terroriste vers une conclusion victorieuse, pour la population vivant sous la menace terroriste du Hamas depuis plus d’une décennie.

La décision d’en venir plutôt à un cessez-le-feu et à des discussions indirectes avec le Hamas a été coûteuse pour le Premier Ministre Binyamin Netanyahu, qui lui a valu le plus de critiques à l’intérieur. Au premier jour du cessez-le-feu, mardi, la côte de popularité de Binyamin Netanyahu a subi une perte sèche autour de 60%, ce qui équivaut au niveau des sondages juste avant la guerre, après avoir crever des plafonds frôlant les 80% au pic de l’opération.

La façon dont les dirigeants israéliens ont géré et conclu la guerre à Gaza a quatre conséquences qui dépassent sa sphère immédiate :

1. Le fait qu’après avoir subi un coup sévère, le Hamas tient encore le choc et conserve indemne l’essentiel de son infrastructure militaire, lui apportant le prestige du noyau dur d’une sorte d’armée régulière palestinienne, dont ne disposaient pas les Islamistes avant le lancement de l’Opération Bordure Défensive, le 7 juillet.

Ce noyau dur est déjà une force combattante active, dote d’un bon entraînement au combat et d’une certaine popularité nationale – non seulement à Gaza, mais aussi sur les domaines de l’Autorité Palestinienne dans les territoires cisjordaniens.

Aussi voit-on le Hamas arriver au Caire à la table des négociations, avec cette carte d’une réputation militaire fraîchement refaite.

2. Les perspectives d’un accommodement d’après-guerre qui puisse changer le paysage global du terrorisme dans la Bande de Gaza sont assez faibles. Les tacticiens du gouvernement israélien ont fait allusion au fait que Mahmoud Abbas pourrait convenir en tant que personnalité aux commandes d’un tel accommodement. C’est, proprement, une chimère. La branche armée du Hamas n’envisagerait pas cinq minutes de laisser les mains libres à un tel rival sur leur chasse gardée. Et, quoi qu’il en soit, Abbas ne montre pas d’inclination particulière à se conformer à aucun schéma directeur israélien de nouvelle gouvernance à Gaza.

3. Lorsque Ban Ki Moon s’est rendu à Jérusalem, le 22 juillet, pour faire pression en vue d’un cessez-le-feu à Gaza et d’en revenir à des discussions sur les causes fondamentales du conflit palestino-israélien, Netanyahu a littéralement « explosé » de colère : « Vous ne pouvez pas parler au Hamas. Ce sont des extrémistes islamistes au même titre qu’Al Qaïda, l’Etat Islamique, les Taliban ou Boko Haram !

Passant inaperçues pour lui, ses paroles ne sont pas tombées dans l’oreille d’un sourd, dans le monde islamiste. Là  les observateurs suivaient à la trace chaque stade du conflit à Gaza, dès qu’on a compris qu’il s’élevait à un niveau comparable à la guerre contre Al Qaïda. Aussi, après avoir freiné l’opération contre le Hamas, Israël pourrait bien se rendre compte qu’il a mis la main dans un nouveau nid de frelons. En ce moment-même, l’Etat Islamique et le Front Al Nosra combattent pour étendre leurs avant-postes syriens et irakiens par une poussée au Liban même. Et ils ne s’arrêtront sans doute pas en si bon chemin.

Si les Jihadistes en mouvement ont eu la possibilité d’évaluer que Tsahal est incapable de vaincre le Hamas, ils pourraient bien se retourner contre Israël et lui poser une nouvelle menace extrêmement dangereuse.

4. L’Iran aura bien pris note, de son côté, du fait que, deux fois de suite en deux ans, les dirigeants israéliens ont préféré s’abstenir d’apporter une conclusion victorieuse à une guerre débutée par des forces paramilitaires que Téhéran a préalablement renforcées, entraînées et financées – d’abord le Hezbollah, dans la Guerre du Liban en 2006, qui s’est terminée par un tracé de zone gérée par la FINUL, et actuellement , un conflit avec les Islamistes palestiniens qui semble se terminer de la même façon.

DEBKAfile Analyse Exclusive :debka.com

Adaptation : Marc Brzustowski.

Voir encore:

International media failed professionally and ethically in Gaza
Op-ed: According to civilian death toll measure, Nazi Germany – which had one million dead civilians in World War II – was a victim of the aggressive US, which lost ‘only’ 12,000 civilians.
Eytan Gilboa
Ynet news

08.13.14

The media coverage of wars affects the global public opinion, leaders and decision making. Its trends can determine the results just as much as what it achieved in the battlefield.

The main problem presented in the media during all of Israel’s wars and operations in the past decade is proportionality and the number of civilian casualties. The media is the main source of information on the extent, type and source of losses.

The coverage of Operation Protective Edge and the civilian casualties in the global media, mainly in the West, was characterized by an anti-Israel bias and serious professional and ethical failures. They appeared in all components of the journalistic coverage: Pictures, headlines, reports, editorials and cartoons.

The images from Gaza showed only what Hamas permitted the media to broadcast and describe. Hamas terrorized and censored journalists. It only allowed them to broadcast images of destruction and killing of civilians, particularly women and children, and staged situations on the ground.

There were no images of rockets launched from populated areas and from within UNRWA schools, mosques and hospitals. There were only images of civilians’ bodies and funerals and very few images of Hamas fighters, if any.

Media outlets around the world failed to mention the restricting conditions they had operated under in Gaza, which unavoidably led to false and misleading reports.

Only after they left Gaza, few journalists like the Italian Gabriele Barbati and the French Gallagher Fenwick dared to expose the way Hamas terrorized journalists, its use of civilians as human shields and its failed launches which resulted in the killing of children, like at the Shati refugee camp on July 28. This is an ethical failure.

The media have turned the civilian death toll into the only measure of the justness of the Israeli warfare. The New York Times and Haaretz, for instance, published the Gaza death toll on their front pages every day. The message is clear: The higher the number of civilian casualties, the more « war crimes » Israel is committing.

This measure is groundless. According to its distorted logic, Nazi Germany – which had one million dead civilians in World War II – was the victim of the aggressiveness of the United States, which lost « only » 12,000 civilians, and Britain, which lost « only » 67,000 civilians. This is a logic and ethical failure.

The media knew that the reports published by the Palestinians, the United Nations and the Red Cross about civilian victims in all the conflicts since the first Lebanon War until today were false. In Operation Protective Edge as well, the claims of 75-80% civilian casualties are false.

The New York Times and the BBC, which emphasized the « victim competition, » are now admitting that the reported number of civilian deaths contradicts statistical tests. This is a professional failure.

China and India’s broadcast networks exposed the missing context of Israel’s efforts to avoid harming civilians and Hamas’ counteractions. Who would have thought that communist China’s international broadcast network (CCTV) would cover the Gaza conflict in a much more accurate and balanced way than the British BBC?

This surprising fact points more than anything to the anti-Israel bias and perhaps anti-Semitism of Western media outlets. The biased and misleading coverage contributed to the hasty calls to prosecute Israel for war crimes, to mass protests against Israel and to anti-Semitic incidents in Europe.

The Western media must report to their consumers about their professional and ethical failures in Gaza. I seriously doubt they have the courage to probe their own failures as they often demand from governments and organizations.

Prof. Eytan Gilboa is the director of the School of Communication and a senior research associate at the BESA Center for Strategic Studies at Bar-Ilan University.

Des journalistes d’Al-Jazeera utilisent leurs comptes Facebook et Twitter comme outils de propagande au service du Hamas

hamas

Par Y. Yehoshua, B. Chernitsky et Y. Graff *

La couverture du conflit de Gaza par la chaîne qatarie Al-Jazeera révèle le soutien absolu de l’émir qatari, Cheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, accordé au Hamas. Avec le conflit,  la chaîne est devenue un puissant organe de propagande du Hamas. Elle a transmis les messages du mouvement, sa couverture du conflit était partiale, au point que les intervenants des émissions en direct de la chaîne qui osaient émettre des critiques, même légères, du Hamas, rencontraient censure et opprobre. Le fait est que les partisans du Hamas ont lancé la campagne « Un million de mercis à Al-Jazeera » sur Twitter, pour exprimer leur gratitude envers la chaîne qui « penchait en faveur de la résistance ». [1]

« Un million de mercis à Al-Jazeera »

La position pro-Hamas de la chaîne est également perceptible dans l’activité en ligne de ses journalistes, animateurs et présentateurs sur les médias sociaux. Leurs pages Facebook et Twitter sont inondées d’éloges de la branche militaire du Hamas, des Brigades Izz al-Din al-Qassam, pour leur guerre contre Israël, y compris pour les tirs de roquettes, l’utilisation de tunnels et les prétendus enlèvements de soldats israéliens. Dans la lignée de la politique étrangère qatarie, ils fustigent l’Egypte et son président, Abd Al-Fattah Al-Sissi, pour la couverture médiatique égyptienne du conflit.

Un article paru dans le quotidien qatari Al-Quds Al-Arabi explique le phénomène : « La douleur et l’angoisse des journalistes d’Al-Jazeera devant la tragédie des Palestiniens dans la bande [de Gaza], en Cisjordanie et dans la Jérusalem occupée, a incité un grand nombre d’entre eux à renforcer leur activité sur les médias sociaux, dès la minute où ils quittaient la salle de rédaction… » La présentatrice d’Al-Jazeera Khadija Benguenna a confié au quotidien : « Cette fois, les médias sociaux ont joué un rôle plus important, plus actif et plus fervent que les médias traditionnels. Les images et les articles parvenaient aux internautes en temps réel, au moment du bombardement, [et] chacun pouvait voir les roquettes de la résistance voler dans le ciel des villes israéliennes… » [2]

Extraits de messages des journalistes et présentateurs d’Al-Jazeera sur les médias sociaux :

Soutien aux tirs de roquettes sur Israël

Les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera se sont montrés solidaires de l’action militaire du Hamas contre Israël et ont salué ses succès. Dans une série de tweets en date du 9 juillet, [3] le correspondant Amer Al-Kubaisi a exprimé son soutien aux tirs de roquettes du Hamas sur Israël : « Malgré le siège [du président égyptien] Al-Sissi de Gaza et l’élimination des tunnels, le Hamas améliore ses roquettes à la fois en qualité et en quantité, terrorise et surprend Israël à Tel-Aviv, Haïfa et Jérusalem ».

Plus tard le même jour, il tweete : « Le Hamas ne renoncera à aucun missile de longue portée. Il les a développés lui-même et les a envoyés sur Haïfa et Jérusalem. C’est ce qui terrifie le renseignement israélien. Etre armé signifie être en vie. »

Dans un autre tweet, il ajoute : « Les dispositifs d’armement chimique se trouvent à Haïfa. Un coup asséné sur l’un d’eux revient à rayer un quart des Israéliens de la Palestine historique. Israël lutte pour ne pas être évacué… »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Le 17 juillet, Al-Kubaisi tweetait un poster montrant diverses roquettes du Hamas, avec des détails sur la portée de chacune, et demandait aux followers de retweeter. Il écrit : « Ici, en une image, vous pouvez apprendre à connaître les roquettes d’Al-Qassam, leur portée, et les villes qu’elles peuvent atteindre. Si vous aimez cette image, retweetez-la. »

Poster tweeté par Al-Kubaisi

Ahmed Mansour, présentateur de l’émission Without Borders d’Al-Jazeera, s’est également solidarisé des tirs de roquettes du Hamas. Le 9 juillet, Mansour écrit sur sa page Facebook : « Israël est stupéfait et déconcerté par les roquettes de la résistance palestinienne qui l’ont frappé en profondeur, atteignant Tel Aviv, Jérusalem et Haïfa, malgré le siège de Gaza par Al-Sissi et son gouvernement…  Si la résistance reçoit les armes qui lui permettront de s’occuper du lâche Israël, stupéfait et pétrifié, alors les Israéliens vivront dans des abris ou fuiront le pays. » [4]

Le post d’Ahmed Mansour

Le présentateur Jalal Chahda a tweeté, le 15 juillet : « Le système du Dôme de fer israélien est un tigre de papier, plus faible qu’une toile d’araignée, un échec, inutile contre les roquettes de la noble résistance, qui défend l’honneur de la oumma. » [5]

Tweet de Jalal Chahda

Un autre journaliste d’Al-Jazeera s’est montré solidaire des tirs de roquettes par le Hamas : le présentateur d’In Depth, Ali Al-Zafiri, a tweeté le 12 juillet : « Al-Ja’bari [6] vous bombarde depuis la tombe. » Il a ajouté le hashtag #Praise_Qassam à son tweet. [7]

Tweet d’Ali Al-Zafiri

Dans un tweet du 29 juillet, le correspondant d’Al-Jazeera au Pakistan, Ahmad Mowaffagh Zaidan, a fait l’éloge de la branche militaire du Hamas, les Brigades Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam, et de leur chef Mohammed Deif. Il a tweeté : « Ils ont relevé nos têtes » avec leurs tirs de roquettes sur Israël. Le lendemain, il demandait à Allah de les protéger. [8]

Les tweets d’Ahmad Zaidan

Soutien aux incursions en Israël et aux enlèvements de soldats

Les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera ont exprimé leur soutien aux autres actions du Hamas contre Israël et contre les soldats israéliens. Le 17 juillet, Ahmed Mansour postait un statut Facebook louant l’incursion du Hamas par un tunnel près du kibboutz de Sufa, disant qu’elle
« devrait être enseignée dans les plus grandes académies militaires comme l’une des opérations de résistance les plus remarquables contre de grandes armées. C’est une opération qui surpasse tous les films hollywoodiens, une réalité qui dépasse la fiction ». Il a ajouté : « Les Brigades Al-Qassam et la résistance palestinienne battent le record de la gloire et de l’héroïsme de la oumma. »

Le post d’Ahmed Mansour

Jalal Chahda a soutenu la construction de tunnels par le Hamas, tweetant : « Les tunnels de Gaza sont le cimetière des sionistes. » Il a également salué la résistance armée en général : « Dans le passé, je croyais que la résistance armée en Palestine occupée était l’une des méthodes de libération, et aujourd’hui, je suis convaincu que la résistance armée est la seule méthode. »

Les tweets de Jalal Chahda

Des reporters se sont réjouis lorsque le Hamas a affirmé avoir capturé le soldat israélien « Shaul Aaron » ; Israël a plus tard statué que le Sgt Oron Shaul avait été tué dans l’action, et que son lieu d’inhumation était inconnu. Juste avant l’annonce de la capture par le Hamas, Amer Al-Kubaisi a tweeté : « Dans 10 minutes, le Hamas fera une annonce importante. Personnellement, je hume un [Gilad] Shalit. » Al-Kubaisi s’est plus tard vanté d’être « le premier journaliste au monde à avoir parlé de la capture d’un ‘nouveau Shalit’, avant même l’annonce d’Al-Qassam. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

La présentatrice Salma Al-Jamal s’est également réjouie de l’annonce de l’enlèvement du Hamas sur Facebook. [9] Le 20 juillet, elle a partagé l’annonce du Hamas et écrit : « Allah Akbar, un nouveau Gilad Shalit a été capturé. » La présentatrice Khadija Benguenna a également acclamé l’annonce, tweetant : « Allah Akbar et Allah soit loué pour la capture d’un soldat sioniste » [10]

Le post de Salma Al-Jamal

Tweet de Khadija Benguenna

Diffuser la propagande du Hamas

En plus de glorifier et de soutenir l’aile militaire du Hamas, les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera ont diffusé les messages du mouvement via leurs comptes de médias sociaux, partageant et retweetant des déclarations de responsables du Hamas, des vidéos du Hamas et des URL de sites web et de comptes du Hamas, de ses partisans et affiliés.

Par exemple, le 18 juillet, suite à la fermeture du compte Twitter d’Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam, [11] Ali Al-Zafiri a tweeté sur le nouveau compte d’Al-Qassam, appelant ses partisans à le suivre. Il écrit : « [C’est] le nouveau compte des Brigades Al-Qassam, l’aile de notre oumma – puisque Twitter a fermé leur compte d’origine. Vous êtes priés de le soutenir, le suivre et le partager. C’est le moins [qu’on puisse faire]. »

Tweet d’Ali Al-Zafiri

Khadija Benguenna a également partagé des informations d’un autre organe d’information au service du Hamas, Al-Risala Radio, sur sa page Facebook. Le 28 juillet, elle a posté un lien accompagné du commentaire suivant : « La couverture se poursuit sur la radio Al-Risala. »

Le post de Khadija Benguenna

Jalal Chahda a tweeté une citation de l’ancien dirigeant spirituel du Hamas, le cheikh Ahmed Yassine, éliminé par Israël en 2004 : « Je demeurerai un combattant du jihad jusqu’à ce que mon pays soit libéré, car je ne crains pas la mort. »

Tweet de Jalal Chahda

Critique de l’Egypte, de son président, de ses médias et de son armée

Dans le contexte de l’animosité égyptienne envers le Hamas et son principal bailleur de fonds, le Qatar, les journalistes, invités et présentateurs d’Al-Jazeera ont également utilisé leurs comptes de médias sociaux pour attaquer l’Egypte et le président Abd Al-Fattah Al-Sissi. Ils ont également fustigé la couverture médiatique égyptienne du conflit actuel, et critiqué l’armée égyptienne pour son inaction.

Dans ses tweets du 26 juillet, Amer Al-Kubaisi s’en est plus particulièrement pris à Al-Sissi : « Connaissez-vous Sisinyahu ? » a-t-il tweeté, avec une photo d’un Al-Sissi déguisé en juif. Le lendemain, il a tweeté : « Al-Sissi soutient [Khalifa] Haftar, Al-Sissi soutient Bachar [Al-Assad], Al-Sissi soutient [Nouri] Al-Maliki, Al-Sissi soutient [Benjamin] Netanyahu. Il soutient l’église avant la mosquée, les chiites avant les sunnites, et les juifs avant les musulmans. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Ahmed Mansour a critiqué l’armée égyptienne sur Facebook ; le 19 juillet, il écrit : « L’armée qui ferme le passage de Rafah et empêche les convois humanitaires et médicaux d’arriver jusqu’à la population de Gaza, en proie à une guerre d’extermination, n’est pas l’armée égyptienne ; c’est l’armée d’Al-Sissi, qui tue le peuple égyptien et assiège la population de Gaza – car la [vraie] armée égyptienne est l’armée de soutien à Gaza et de défense du peuple égyptien. Quand l’armée égyptienne reviendra-t-elle ? » Dans un autre post, il qualifie le président Al-Sissi, et l’émir des Émirats arabes unis, le cheikh Al-Nahyan, de « sionistes arabes ».

Le 21 juillet, Mansour écrit : « Chaque jour, les Brigades Al-Qassam soulignent que ce sont elles qui opèrent et mènent la bataille de Gaza, sur le plan militaire et en matière de renseignement, de politique et d’information, tandis que Netanyahou, les dirigeants israéliens et leurs alliés arabes sionistes, dirigés par Al-Sissi et [le président des Emirats arabes unis Khalifa] bin Zayed, s’enfoncent dans le mensonge, le brouillard et la défaite mentale, militaire et politique. »

Les posts d’Ahmed Mansour

Jamal Chahda a tweeté : « L’armée égyptienne a annoncé que 13 nouveaux tunnels dans la bande de Gaza ont été détruits. C’est ainsi qu’[ils] expriment leur solidarité avec Gaza et sa population assiégée. »

Tweet de Jamal Chahda

Le présentateur d’Al-Jazeera Jamal Rayyan a maudit les médias égyptiens, les qualifant d’« ordures ». [12] Il a également tweeté des vidéos de personnalités médiatiques égyptiennes attaquant Al-Jazeera et lui-même personnellement, pour ses déclarations anti-égyptiennes, ajoutant : « Un ami m’a suggéré d’organiser des ateliers avec des personnalités des médias égyptiens. Je lui ai dit : ‘Impossible. Ce sont des ordures. On ne peut les changer. Il serait plus facile de recréer les Egyptiens à partir de zéro’. »

Les tweets de Jamal Rayyan

Le 20 juillet, la présentatrice Ghada Owais a posté une image accompagnée d’une déclaration soulignant que l’Egypte avait empêché les délégations médicales d’entrer dans la bande de Gaza, sous la légende : « Libre à vous d’interpréter. » [13]

Le post de Ghada Owais

Critique de l’Autorité palestinienne et de ses dirigeants

Les journalistes ont également sévèrement critiqué l’Autorité palestinienne et ses dirigeants. Le 23 juillet, Amer Al-Kubaisi a publié un avis moqueur, « Porté disparu », du chef du gouvernement de réconciliation Rami Hamdallah, pour son inaction dans la crise de Gaza. L’avis appelle à le livrer au peuple palestinien pour qu’il puisse présenter sa démission.

Dans un autre tweet, le 21 juillet, Al-Kubaisi écrit : « L’Intifada est la mère des Palestiniens, et la résistance est leur père. Le père oeuvre à Gaza et la mère, en Cisjordanie, va bientôt se manifester. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Khadija Benguenna écrit, le 26 juillet : « Pourquoi Abu Mazen traîne-t-il des pieds face à l’éventualité d’une adhésion au Traité de Rome, qui permettrait à la Palestine de devenir membre de la Cour pénale internationale ? C’est le meilleur moyen d’assiéger Netanyahu et de le piéger en Israël. »

Tweet de Khadija Benguenna

Pour la disparition d’Israël et des régimes arabes

En plus de soutenir le Hamas, certains journalistes ont aussi évoqué en filigrane leur espoir de voir Israël disparaître. Le 20 juillet, Ahmed Mansour a tweeté une vidéo du cheikh Ahmad Yassin prédisant qu’Israël allait disparaître d’ici à 2027.

Le 20 juillet, Salma Al-Jamal a cité l’imam égyptien pro-Frères musulmans Mohammad Al-Ghazali (décédé en 1996), qui a annoncé qu’après la chute des régimes arabes viendrait celle d’Israël. Elle a ajouté : « Bientôt, avec l’aide d’Allah. »

Tweet d’Ahmed Mansour
 

Tweet de Salma Al-Jamal

Post de Khadija Benguenna du 28 juillet montrant un drapeau israélien brûlé dans une récente manifestation en Algérie

* Y. Yehoshua est vice-président des recherches et directrice de MEMRI Israël ; B. Chernitsky et Y. Graff sont chargés de recherche au MEMRI.

Notes :
[1] Palinfo.com, 23 juillet 2014.
[2] Al-Quds Al-Arabi (Londres), le 14 juillet 2014.
[3] Twitter.com/amer_alkubaisi.
[4] Facebook.com/ahmed.mansour.1276487.
[5] Twitter.com/ChahdaJalal.
[6] Le chef de l’aile militaire du Hamas tué par Israël en novembre 2012.
[7] Twitter.com/AliAldafiri.
[8] Twitter.com/Ahmadmuaffaq.
[9] Facebook.com/SalmaAljamal.NewsPresenter
[10] Twitter.com/khadijabenguen.
[11] Voir MEMRI Dépêche spéciale n ° 5813, « Following Twitter Shutdown Of Hamas’ Al-Qassam Brigades Account – One Week Later, A New Account Is Active, »  du 31 juillet 2014.
[12] Twitter.com/jamalrayyan.
[13] Facebook.com/1ghada.owais.

Le « siège israélien de Gaza » : un mythe savamment exploité

Dr Zvi Tenney
Ambassador of Israel (ret)
http://www.zvitenney.info

La bande de Gaza a une frontière commune non seulement avec Israël mais aussi avec l’Egypte. Les 13 kilomètres de cette frontière sont contrôlés par l’Egypte et non par Israël. Le point de passage de Rafah sur cette frontière permet le passage de personnes désirant voyager de par le monde après être passées par Egypte.

Mais plus important encore est le fait que toute marchandise peut passer d’Israël à la bande de Gaza à l’exception d’armes et d’une courte liste de matériaux pouvant être utilisés à des fin de terrorisme .N’oublions pas que Gaza est gouverné depuis 2007 par le Hamas, une organisation terroriste, condamnée par tous les pays occidentaux, qui affiche ouvertement son refus de l’existence d’Israël qu’il a comme objectif de détruire.

Les marchandises qui passent d’Israël à la bande de Gaza sont de toute sorte, produits de consommation courante, équipements et produits médicaux, fuel et courant électrique…..Les super marchés, les centres commerciaux, les hôtels, les restaurants y sont donc abondamment achalandés. Les témoignages sur ce fait ne manquent pas et les photos des lieux étonnent toujours car on croierait
voir les photos d’une ville ocidentale florissante.

Rappelons à ce propos que durant les premiers cinq mois de 2014 ,18 000 camions de marchandises ont passé d’Israël à la bande de Gaza transportant plus de 228 000 tonnes de marchandises, commandés par des commerçants et des hommes d’affaires locaux qui entrent constamment en Israël pour y faire leurs achats. Ceci sans parler de quantités importantes d’eau et de l’approvisionnement de plus de la moitié de la consommation d’électricité de toute la bande de Gaza.

Par ailleurs durant les cinq premiers mois de 2014 plus de 60 000 habitants de la bande de Gaza sont rentrés en Israël dont évidemment ceux qui avaient besoin de soins médicaux et d’hospitalisation.

Il est donc clair qu’il n’y a absolument pas de siège ou de blocus terrestre qu’Israël impose à la bande de Gaza .Le seul blocus qu’Israël surveille de près et qui est le prétexte pour les anti israéliens de parler « de blocus total de Gaza par Israël », est le blocus maritime. Un blocus qui dans les conditions d’hostilité extrême du Hamas contre Israël est tout à fait compréhensible pour éviter l’importation d’armes dangereuses comme par exemple des missiles de longue portée en provenance de l’Iran.

Ce genre de blocus est d’ailleurs permis par les législations internationales et a en effet été accepté comme étant légitime par une Commission spéciale convoquée en 2011 par le Secrétaire général de l’ONU pour examiner ce blocus maritime qu’Israël est obligé d’imposer compte tenu du constant comportement agressif du Hamas contre Israël qui subit depuis de nombreuses années déjà des tirs de roquettes du Hamas ayant pour cible les populations civiles en Israël….Et cela bien qu’Israël ait complètement évacué la bande de Gaza en 2005.
Cette commission avait conclu que l’approvisionnement de Gaza devait être assurée, comme c’est le cas depuis toujours, par les passages frontaliers terrestres.

Les vociférations du Hamas et de ses supporters affirmant que les tirs de roquettes sur Israël sont « un acte de résistance à l’occupation israélienne » de Gaza ou qu’ils ont comme objectif de mettre fin au « siège israélien », ne sont donc que prétexte bancal pour justifier la mise en action de l’idéologie du Hamas de mettre fin, pour raison religieuse, à l’existence d’Israël comme inscrit dans sa convention….Il est navrant que nombreux anti israéliens de par le monde tombent dan ce panneau tendu par le Hamas et ses supporters.

Voir de même:

The international media’s hypocrisy – the Hamas case
Op-ed: Most of the international media have decided for you in advance that Israel is the bad guy in the story. It focuses on every Gaza casualty while ignoring civilian deaths in Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Libya and Kenya.
Yossi Levy
Ynet news

08.09.14

In the summer of 1999 more than 2,000 civilians were killed by NATO air forces which bombed cities and villages in what was the former Yugoslavia. As Ambassador to Belgrade, I still feel the pain and the agony of that horrible summer. It wasn’t only Serbian military bases that were bombed but also, albeit unintentionally, hospitals, schools, libraries, and even a train over a bridge. Serbia, as you all know, had not launched even a single missile towards any NATO capital city.

The media in the countries that were involved in the military operation did not, however, start their daily broadcasting with updates on the number of civilian dead; they didn’t mention the death toll every 30 minutes and, actually, did not even send camera crews to show their shocked viewers in London and Hamburg the horrors and bloodshed of demolished streets and hospitals.

Losing Hasbara
‘Smashing a peanut with a hammer': Foreign journalists on int’l coverage of Gaza fighting / Polina Garaev
Since Gaza op started, IDF released scores of videos of pilots calling off strikes and Israel urging Gazans to evacuate, but foreign reporters tell Ynet that in Europe a photo of dead Palestinians is worth more than a thousand Israeli words.

As far as Western media were concerned, the Serbian civilian victims had no names and no faces. It is the same today with regards to the women and children killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, who have been killed in massive numbers over the past decade or more, who were the tragic victims of Western air forces bombing terrorist targets in both countries.

Does anyone know how many innocents have been victims of Western pilots in the last decade? Nobody bothers to count them because the European media knows full well that war has its own cruel rules – that in war, yes, innocent people do unfortunately die.

With one exception. The war between Israel and Hamas with its Jihadi Islamic terror. When it comes to this war, European media has different standards. The tragic innocent victims who have been killed by the Israeli Defence Forces dominate practically every news outlet and their deaths have been reported in the most dramatic way time and time again. Meanwhile, as we speak, innocents are dying in Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Libya, and Kenya, usually on a vaster scale than in Gaza, but the media is uninterested in people who die in those countries who have had an extra piece of bad luck – Israel didn’t kill them, so the world doesn’t care.

The death of innocent people is always a tragedy. But I do not know any other army in the world that is as careful as one can be in wartime as the IDF is. Very often IDF units even cancel operations because of fears for civilian safety. Only the IDF actually warns in advance where and when it is going to hit, giving civilians time to leave specific areas. Hamas is the party here that forces Palestinian civilians to stay in their homes and thus endanger their lives. In the midst of this, Israeli pilots face a cruel dilemma: if they fire at a rocket launcher near a hospital or a mosque they may kill civilians; if they do not, the rocket, once it is fired, may kill Israelis near a hospital or a synagogue.

It is very easy to judge young men on such desperate missions from the comfort of a couch in a safe city far away. Israel fights for its life against an organization which, all too often merely described in the media as “militants”, is the actual government in Gaza, an organisation that calls not only for the destruction of the State of Israel but for the murder of all Jews wherever they are. The Hamas charter is a barbaric, anti-semitic and medieval document which calls openly to murder Jews. After it accuses the Jews for all the calamities of the humanity, article 7 simply says: if a Jew hides behind a rock or a tree, the rock and the tree will shout to the Moslems, come and kill him. This is a clear anti-Semitic rhetoric you can find on daily basis among Hamas leaders (Osama Hamdan, Fauzi Barhum and many others) preaching to their crowds in Arabic. Did you read about it in the media? I believe you did not.

Has the media in Europe also forgotten that Hamas, which fires rockets at civilians all over Israel, are the same people that a decade ago during the Second Intifada murdered hundreds of Israeli civilians by blowing them up in restaurants, bars and night clubs? Surely not. The media knows the facts, but in too many cases does not report the truth. It knowingly betrays its duty to tell the world what is really happening in the Gaza Strip.

The media knows as well that Hamas opposes all and any political solutions between Israel and the Palestinian people. In fact, a two-state solution, which we still hope to achieve, would be the worst nightmare for Hamas because what it wants is a single Islamic Greater Palestine ruled by Sharia Law in which people will be beheaded, the hands of thieves chopped off, and city squares turned into fairgrounds of public torture and execution, including stoning women for adultery and homosexuals for, well, being homosexual.

Hamas is the dystopian nightmare that Israel is fighting. Europe has known for a long time that Hamas, which is essentially a localized version of Al Qaeda, is a mortal enemy of Israel, but first and foremost it is the enemy of the Palestinian people because of its blindness and fanaticism. Hamas prevents the Palestinian people from attaining the freedom, prosperity and independence they deserve.

Even Egypt, the most important Arab country, accuses Hamas of war crimes against its own people, and puts the responsibility on Hamas for the escalation of the current conflict. Egypt offered a ceasefire two weeks ago; Israel accepted, Hamas did not. Since then Israel has agreed to several truces while Hamas has violated all of them.

In spite of that, anyone who listens to some European media would think Israel somehow wants to conquer Gaza. This is probably the biggest lie of all. Israel left Gaza in 2005, evacuating all its bases and uprooting all Jewish communities. For the first time since the beginning of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Palestinians were given full control over a territory on which they could have built a good economy and thriving society. Instead, they chose an Islamist terrorist organization to control their lives. Gaza became an armed base for escalated, indiscriminate attacks on Israel. In the last nine years, 15,000 missiles have been fired into Israel from Gaza with no provocation or justification. What would you do if a terrorist organization dedicated to your annihilation bombarded you for nearly a decade?

Violence and killing is the raison d’etre of Hamas. Unfortunately, despite the plain facts, many in the media and the international community are not listening. The claim that Israel is always “guilty” is only the latest echo of the old cry that “the Jews” are guilty. This is truly a miserable hour for Europe’s media, which is attacking, often viciously, not the terrorist Islamic Hamas, but its victim – Israel, a fellow democracy which fights for its survival in a region that is becoming more and more chaotic by the day.

One could understand such perverse instincts from the media in the Arab world, perhaps, but one expects better from the European media towards a fellow democracy which is fighting Jihadi madness on its own doorstep.

Most of the international media have decided for you in advance that Israel is the bad guy in the story. This biased approach is not a beautiful chapter in the history of the world media, and perhaps in the loaded history between European nations and the Jewish people.

Yossi Levy is the Israeli ambassador to Serbia and Montenegro

Voir encore:

 

Why Qatar and Turkey Can’t Solve the Crisis in Gaza
A bad idea
David Andrew Weinberg and Jonathan Schanzer
National Interest
July 23, 2014

With Washington desperate for a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas, and with Egypt having flamed out as a broker of calm, two of Hamas’s top patrons are about to be rewarded with a high-profile diplomatic victory. U.S. and Israeli media are now reporting that the White House may be looking to Qatar and Turkey to help negotiate an end to the hostilities. Qatar, in fact, held a high-profile cease-fire summit in Doha on Sunday that included Palestinian Authority president Mahmoud Abbas, UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon, the Norwegian foreign minister, and Hamas leader Khaled Meshal.

No progress was reported on Sunday. But using the good offices of Qatar is a huge mistake. The same goes for Turkey. In exchange for fleeting calm, the United States will have effectively given approval to these allies-cum-frenemies to continue their respective roles as sponsors of Hamas, which is a designated terrorist group in the United States.
Since a visit to Turkey by Qatar’s ruler Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, and amidst reports that Meshal has been shuttling between the two countries, Doha and Ankara have been floating terms of a joint cease-fire proposal that would reportedly grant Hamas significant benefits. Specifically, the deal would grant Hamas an open border in Gaza that would allow the group to continue to smuggle rockets and other advanced weaponry at an ever alarming pace.

The Israelis see this as a nonstarter. But the White House is nevertheless working the phones with Qatar and Turkey to see if a deal can be struck.

Since the war broke out in early July, Secretary of State John Kerry has reached out at least three times by phone to Turkey’s Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and six times to his Qatari counterpart, Khalid Al Attiyah (Kerry’s Mideast chief boasted last month that the secretary of state “is in very constant contact” with FM Al-Attiyah and even “keeps his number on his own cell phone”). Kerry was also expected to visit Qatar before Egypt’s aborted cease-fire proposal.

It is by now no secret that Qatar has emerged as Hamas’ home away from home and ATM. Shaikh Tamim’s father, Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited Gaza in 2012 when he was still the ruler of Qatar, pledging $400 million in economic aid. Most recently, Doha tried to transfer millions of dollars via Jordan’s Arab Bank to help pay the salaries of Hamas civil servants in Gaza, but the transfer was apparently blocked at Washington’s request.

Since 2011, Qatar has been the home of the aforementioned Khaled Meshal, who runs Hamas’s leadership. During a recent appearance on Qatar’s media network Al Jazeera Arabic, Meshal blessed the individuals who kidnapped and ultimately murdered three Israeli teenagers. He boasted that Hamas was a unified movement and that its military wing reports to him and his associates in the political bureau. American officials have revealed that Qatar also hosts several other Hamas leaders. Israeli authorities reportedly intercepted an individual in April on his way back from meeting a member of Hamas’s military wing in Qatar who gave him money and directives intended for Hamas cells in the West Bank.

Israeli and Egyptian officials report that Qatar is so eager for a political win at Cairo’s expense that it actually urged Hamas to reject the Egyptian cease-fire initiative last week. Doha is also using its vast petroleum wealth to striking diplomatic effect: one UN official source suggests that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon would not have made it to Doha for cease-fire talks on Sunday if the Qataris hadn’t chartered him a plane out of their own pocket.

Turkey, for its part, has emerged as one of the most strident supporters of Hamas on the world stage. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vociferously advocated for Hamas while his government has found ways to donate hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Hamas, mostly through infrastructure projects, but also through materials and reportedly even direct financial support.

Turkey is also home to Salah Al-Arouri, founder of the West Bank branch of the Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military wing. He reportedly has been given “sole control” of Hamas’s military operations in the West Bank, and two Palestinians arrested last year for smuggling money for Hamas into the West Bank admitted they were doing so on Al-Arouri’s orders. He is also suspected of being behind a recent surge in kidnapping plots from the West Bank. An Israeli security official recently noted, “I have no doubt that Al-Arouri was connected to the act” of kidnapping that helped set off the latest round of violence between the parties, which has seen hundreds killed and thousands wounded, nearly all of them Palestinians.

Al-Arouri, it should be noted, was among the high-level Hamas officials who met with the amir of Kuwait on Monday to discuss cease-fire terms (he is pictured in the middle of the couch here).

So as Washington considers cutting a deal brokered by Qatar and Turkey for an end to the latest round of hostilities, it bears pointing out why these two countries are so influential with Hamas in the first place: because they empower the terrorist movement and provide it with a free hand for operations. A cease-fire is obviously desirable, but not if the cost is honoring terror sponsors. There must be others who can mediate.

Interestingly, both Ankara and Doha count themselves among America’s friends. But their support for terrorist entities—not just Hamas—has become so obvious that U.S. legislators began to send concerned letters to officials from both countries last year. This alone is a sign that America must set the bar higher for the behavior of its allies and not reward them for bad behavior.

David Andrew Weinberg, a former Democratic Professional Staff Member at the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Jonathan Schanzer is Vice President for Research at the Foundation and a former intelligence analyst at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Voir aussi:

Bientôt une nouvelle flottille contre le blocus de Gaza
Le Point

12/08/2014

Des navires devraient appareiller avant la fin de l’année. La précédente tentative, en 2010, s’était soldée par la mort de 10 activistes turcs.

Une coalition internationale d’activistes a annoncé mardi son intention de faire appareiller, avant la fin de l’année, une nouvelle flottille pour briser le blocus maritime imposé par Israël à la bande de Gaza. « Nous voulons envoyer cette flottille en 2014″, a déclaré à la presse cette coalition, dont fait partie l’ONG islamique turque IHH à l’origine d’une précédente tentative équivalente qui s’était soldée par la mort de dix activistes turcs en mai 2010. Les organisateurs n’ont pas précisé le calendrier de l’opération lors de leur conférence presse, organisée dans les locaux de la Fondation pour l’aide humanitaire (IHH), à Istanbul.

« C’est une réaction à la solidarité croissante avec le peuple palestinien qui se manifeste à travers le monde », a justifié le groupe un mois après le début de la nouvelle offensive lancée par l’armée israélienne sur la bande de Gaza. Les navires qui composeront cette nouvelle flottille partiront de plusieurs ports du monde entier pour transporter de l’aide humanitaire à destination des Palestiniens. « Nous allons former cette flottille avec l’objectif de montrer que la communauté internationale ne peut pas croiser les bras lorsqu’on attaque des civils et que sont commis des crimes contre l’humanité », a expliqué l’activiste canadien Ehab Lotayef.

Une ONG proche des autorités

Le blocus de Gaza a été imposé en 2007 afin, selon l’État hébreu, d’empêcher la livraison d’armes aux Palestiniens des islamistes duHamas qui contrôlent ce territoire. En mai 2010, l’assaut des commandos israéliens contre le navire amiral de la première flottille, le Mavi Marmara, avait provoqué la mort de 10 citoyens turcs et généré une grave crise diplomatique entre les gouvernements israélien et turc. La justice turque a ouvert en 2012 un procès par contumace contre quatre anciens responsables de l’armée israélienne. Des négociations ont débuté entre les deux pays pour l’indemnisation des victimes turques, mais elles n’ont pour l’heure pas abouti.

Élu dimanche président dès le premier tour de scrutin, le Premier ministre islamo-conservateur turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan a multiplié ces dernières semaines les violentes attaques contre la nouvelle intervention militaire de l’État hébreu à Gaza. L’ONG IHH est considérée comme proche des autorités d’Ankara. Le Mavi Marmarafera partie de la nouvelle expédition qui, a indiqué Durmus Aydin, un responsable d’IHH, « n’est d’aucune façon soutenue par le gouvernement turc ».

Voir encore:

Echec du blocus de Gaza ?

Les restrictions imposées à la bande de Gaza, en place depuis la prise de contrôle par le Hamas en 2007, sont au cœur des négociations pour un accord à long terme. Le Hamas déclare vouloir la liberté pour Gaza, mais utilisera très probablement un accès facilité pour faire entrer des armes

Mitch Ginsburg

The Times of Israel

15 août 2014

Mitch Ginsburg est le correspondant des questions militaires du Times of Israel

Les négociations au Caire, apparemment renouvelées pour cinq jours mercredi, avec des tirs de roquettes et les ripostes à minuit, ont été menées à huis clos.

Il y a de nombreux sujets à débattre, le rôle, désormais de l’Autorité palestinienne à Gaza, le retour des dépouilles des deux soldats israéliens, l’avenir des hommes armés palestiniens arrêtés lors de l’opération, la notion, peut-être, de démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza, la durée du cessez-le-feu.

Pourtant, au cœur de la discussion, se trouve très probablement le blocus, le mécanisme qui restreint, à un petit filet, les marchandises entrant dans Gaza, et dans une plus grande mesure, tout ce qui laisse l’enclave de 362 kilomètres carrés coincée entre Israël, l’Egypte et la mer.

Une rapide observation des différents points de passage, pour les personnes et les biens, peut aider à brosser un tableau de la situation actuelle, de son évolution au cours des années passées et où tout cela pourrait conduire à la fin de la campagne actuelle.

Kerem Shalom est ajourd’hui l’unique passage d’entrée et de sortie pour les marchandises à Gaza. En 2005, avant l’arrivée du Hamas au pouvoir, une moyenne mensuelle de 10 400 camions de vivres entrait à Gaza depuis Israël. Après que le Hamas, une organisation terroriste ouvertement engagée à la destruction d’Israël, ait gagné une élection populaire et, avec une efficacité brutale, ait renversé le pouvoir de l’Autorité palestinienne à Gaza en 2007, Israël a imposé un blocus sur la bande de Gaza.

Pour les trois premières années, de juin 2007 à juin 2010, au cours desquelles seules les « vivres vitales » étaient autorisées à entrer dans la bande, une moyenne mensuelle de 2 400 camions passait dans Gaza, selon les statistiques fournies par l’organisation Gisha qui milite pour une circulation plus libre des marchandises vers et depuis Gaza.

Le blocus, empêchant tout de l’essence au bœuf, a été fortement modifié après l’incident du Mavi Marmara en mai 2010 au cours duquel des commandos de marine israéliens, attaqués, ont tué 10 activistes turcs sur un navire cherchant à briser le blocus. En réponse, Israël a facilité le blocus en permettant à presque toutes les marchandises d’entrer dans Gaza.

La question épineuse était, pourtant, et continue à être, les restrictions sur les ravitaillements à double utilisation, ceux qui ont le potentiel d’être utilisés pour des objectifs néfastes.

Le premier d’entre eux est le ciment. La population civile de Gaza a besoin de matériels de construction. Gisha estime que Gaza manque de 75 000 maisons et de 259 écoles.

En outre, 10 000 maisons ont été détruites pendant l’opération Bordure protectrice, à la fois par les tirs israéliens et les bombes palestiniennes. L’industrie de construction à Gaza emploie 70 000 travailleurs, déclare la cofondatrice de Gisha,Sari Bashi, et représentait à une époque jusqu’à 28 % du PIB.

Pourtant, les priorités du Hamas à Gaza sont évidemment différentes et le ciment est utilisé à des fins militaires.

Khaled Meshaal, le chef du bureau politique du Hamas, a admis cela au cours d’une conférence tenue à Damas plusieurs mois après l’opération Plomb durci en 2008-2009, selon des éléments du Centre de Renseignement et d’Information Meir Amit. « En apparence, les images visibles sont des négociations au sujet de la réconciliation et de la construction. Pourtant, les images cachées sont qu’une grande partie de l’argent et de l’effort est investie dans la résistance et dans les préparations militaires », explique Meshaal.

Tout cela était nulle part plus évident que dans les arches uniformes faites en ciment qui ont été trouvées pour soutenir le réseau de tunnels d’attaque du Hamas creusé sous la frontière vers Israël.

Le général de Brigade Michael Edelstein, le commandant de la Division Gaza, a déclaré durant une réunion à proximité de la frontière de Gaza il y a deux semaines, que le Hamas avait créé un « métro de terreur » à Gaza, en utilisant des dizaines de millions de dollars et « des milliers de tonnes de ciment ».

Les sites de lancement de roquettes, les tunnels internes, les bunkers ont tous été fortifiés avec du ciment.

Selon le Centre Meir Amit, une organisation dirigée par d’anciens officiers israéliens des renseignements, le ciment passait vers Gaza par des souterrains très tranquillement avant l’arrivée au pouvoir en Egypte d’Abdel Fatah el-Sissi. Il a réduit le flot des marchandises depuis son territoire à travers les tunnels.

Aujourd’hui, un rapport récent suggère que le ciment est soit produit à Gaza à partir de matériel brut, comme des cendres et du sable de mer, ou pris à des organisations internationales, qui demandent l’importation de ciment ou soumettent des plans et des rapports d’information aux autorités israéliennes afin de recevoir une autorisation pour importer du ciment dans Gaza.

Bashi a également déclaré que le carburant était à une époque considéré comme une substance à double emploi, puisqu’il est utilisé pour les roquettes, et, qu’aujourd’hui, il est autorisé à entrer librement dans Gaza.

Le Coordinateur des activités du gouvernement dans les tTerritoires (COGAT) pour l’armée a envoyé environ 7,6 millions de litres de carburant et de benzène dans Gaza pendant le seul mois mois de guerre. (Un total de 3 324 camions de ravitaillement sont entrés dans Gaza via Israël depuis le début de l’opération Bordure protectrice le 8 juillet, selon les chiffres de COGAT).

Mentionnant un taux de chômage de 45 % dans Gaza, alors qu’il était de 18 % l’an passé, Bashi a déclaré que les restrictions ont échoué à empêcher la construction de tunnels et ont, au lieu de cela, puni les habitants, créant une situation économique qui est totalement néfaste à la stabilité. « C’est une erreur de voir cela comme un jeu sans effets », a-t-elle déclaré.

Pourtant, le prix en sang payé par les Israéliens pour (au moins temporairement) se débarasser de la menace des tunnels, couplé à l’insécurité perturbant la vie des résidents des régions à la frontière, rend très improbable qu’Israël autorisera le transport libre et ouvert du ciment vers Gaza à cette période. Et particulièrement maintenant que les tunnels sous Rafah ont été fermés.

Très probablement, cela sera confié à des acteurs responsables et supervisé au maximum (Israël a perdu 64 soldats pendant le premier mois de combat, onze ont été tués par des hommes armés du Hamas sortis des tunnels vers Israël, et beaucoup plus au cours des recherches et de la démolition des tunnels à l’intérieur de Gaza).

Les marchandises sortant peuvent, elles aussi, passer uniquement à travers Kerem Shalom. Le point de passage vers l’Egypte, à Rafah, est totalement fermé aux marchandises.

Et tandis que les Gazaouis peuvent exporter peu de produits, les entreprises israéliennes profitent des ventes d’import des commodités,comme les mangues ou le bœuf vers Gaza.

Udi Tamir, un des propriétaires de Egli Tal, une des plus importants importateurs de bétail, a déclaré que l’industrie envoie environ 35 000 têtes de bétail à Gaza chaque année par exemple. Il déclaré avec malice au cours d’une conversation, il y a quelques années, que certains éleveurs de bétail israéliens pourraient vouloir offrir au nouveau président élu Recep Tayyip Erdogan une récompense pour l’ensemble de sa carrière.

De janvier à juin 1014, une moyenne mensuelle de 17 camions de produits est sortie de Gaza, 2 % de la moyenne avant 2007, selon les chiffres de Gisha, et tandis qu’à une époque Gaza exportait 85 % de ses marchandises vers la Cisjordanie et Israël, aujourd’hui, sur la base d’une politique israélienne de séparation entre la Cisjordanie contrôlée par l’Autorité palestinienne et la bande de Gaza contrôlée par le Hamas, théoriquement aucune marchandise n’est autorisée à voyager de Gaza, à travers Israël, vers la Cisjordanie.

Selon Gisha, un total de 49 camions pour une organisation internationale, quatre camions de bureaux d’écoles pour l’Autorité palestinienne et deux camions de feuilles de palmiers pour Israël sont tout ce qui a passé vers Israël et la Cisjordanie depuis mars 2012.

Dans ce domaine, très probablement, un progrès pourrait être atteint en prenant relativement peu de risque pour la sécurité et avec un bénéfice palpable.

Les points de passages pour piétons

Le passage d’Erez est la voie pour les personnes entre Israël, Gaza et la Cisjordanie. Le point de passage de Rafah, ouvert et fermé par intermittence au cours des dernières années et très minutieusement surveillé par l’Egypte, est la voie principale depuis la bande de Gaza pour le voyage international.

Ainsi, de janvier à juin de cette année, une moyenne mensuelle de 6 445 personnes ont quitté Gaza par Rafah, un chiffre qui représente environ 16 % de la moyenne durant ces mêmes mois en 2013, lorsque l’Egypte était aux mains du prédécesseur de Sissi, Mohammed Morsi. Depuis le début de la guerre, le passage a été fermé presque complètement.

Sur la même période, les chiffres de Gisha montrent qu’une moyenne mensuelle de
5 920 Palestiniens ont quitté Gaza à travers Erez. La plupart étaient des patients médicaux et leurs compagnons et des hommes d’affaires.

Selon Gisha, des personnes en deuil d’un proche de premier degré sont autorisés à voyager en Cisjordanie, comme le sont les chrétiens qui souhaitent visiter les lieux saints, les proches au premier degré souhaitant participer à un mariage, les étudiants en voyage vers l’étranger, les orphelins sans liens de premier degré à Gaza. Ceux qui souhaitent se marier en Cisjordanie ou les étudiants souhaitant y étudier, par exemple, ne sont pas autorisés à quitter Gaza par Erez.

Bashi a noté que 31 % des personnes dans Gaza ont des proches en Cisjordanie. Elle appelle à une plus grande liberté de mouvement, comme c’est autorisé par les évaluations sécuritaires.

Le Shin Bet a pourtant, au cours des années passées, intercepté à de nombreuses reprises des messages entre Gaza et la Cisjordanie et a averti, même avant l’enlèvement du 12 juin de trois adolescents israéliens puis leur meurtre, apparemment organisé depuis Gaza, que le Hamas a constamment cherché à dynamiser les vieilles cellules terroristes en Cisjordanie.

Des armes

Sans aéroports et sans ports, les voies réelles et employées pour introduire en contrebande des armes professionnelles à Gaza, a déclaré un ancien officer des renseignement au cours de la campagne actuelle, étaient depuis « l’axe de résistance », l’Iran le Hezbollah et la Syrie, vers le Soudan et, de là, vers le nord, via la péninsule du Sinaï en direction des tunnels de Rafah et Gaza.

Peut-être parce que le flot d’idéologie terroriste et de matériel n’est pas seulement allé au nord-ouest vers Gaza, mais aussi au sud-est vers Rafah, la péninsule du Sinaï, et le reste de l’Egypte, en y alimentant la violence, le président egyptien Sissi a largement éradiqué les tunnels de Rafah qui étaient utilisés pour transporter tout, des voitures et du ciment aux roquettes M-302.

Comme le trafic de drogue, la circulation d’armes ne peut pourtant jamais être pleinement arrêtée.

En mars dernier, des commandos de marine israéliens sont montés à bord du navire Klos-C enregistré au Panama et ont trouvé 40 roquettes M-302 et 180 cartouches de mortiers de 120 mm sous des tonnes de ciment. Un rapport des Nations unies a trouvé que les armes étaient en réalité envoyées depuis l’Iran mais a contesté l’affirmation israélienne qu’elles étaient destinées à Gaza.

Ni les officiels israéliens ni ceux des Nations unies n’ont fourni de preuves tangibles quant à la destination finale des armes. Il serait pourtant difficile d’expliquer pourquoi les troupes israéliennes intercepteraient pas un navire à plus de 1 800 kilomètres nautiques de ses eaux territoriales, à moins que le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu et d’autres croient vraiment que les armes auraient pu être tirées sur les citoyens israéliens.

Le Hamas exige la levée du blocus et l’ouverture du port, une réussite tangible qui pourrait être présentée aux habitants de Gaza comme un signe d’autonomie et de liberté.

De telles exigences sont pourtant contrebalancées par ses efforts incessants d’importer le type d’armes qui a fait du Hezbollah une force de combat si terrifiante dans la région.

Mercredi soir, peu avant la fin du cessez-le-feu prolongé, le Hamas a montré des images de roquettes M-75 fabriquées sur place, nettoyées avec amour et exposées comme des planches de surf. Les métaux qui les composent, et les explosives dans l’ogive, doivent être attrapées dans les filets adaptés du blocus israéliens.

A la fin de cette campagne, comme après l’incident du Mavi Marmara, de nombreux éléments du blocus seront mis sur la table des négociations.

Israël, sur une base pragmatique, sera relativement flexible pour des concessions qui renforcent l’économie comme, par exemple, l’export de fraises ou d’autres produits. Mais il sera beaucoup plus strict sur l’importation de marchandises à double utilisation qui permettent notamment la construction de M-75.

La difficulté sera de trouver la formule qui élargit les trous du filet pour soutenir les Gazaouis ordinaires, accorder des réussites à l’Autorité palestinienne plutôt qu’au Hamas, et permette à Israël de s’assurer que le Hamas, avec son allégeance jurée au djihad, sera restreint dans son intention de suivre l’exemple du groupe terroriste libanais, le Hezbollah.

STOP QATAR’S TERROR FUNDING

Qatar is the largest supplier of finance to Hamas in Gaza. The weapons that Qatar financed were used to launch indiscriminate attacks on civilians in the last few weeks and led to Operation Protective Edge.

Qatar and its leader are pouring billions of dollars into an organisation defined as terrorist by the majority of the world and are hosting its leader Khaled Mashal, in prosperous safety in Doha as he plots to wage a religious war against the “infidels”. We citizens of London, Israelis and Jews alike, would like to show the world the significance of Qatar in this conflict. Qatar fuels religious wars all over the world and especially in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon.

We believe that directing the world’s attention to Qatar, especially when their hosting of the World Cup is questionable due to the possibility of bribery and slave labour, will pressure it and its leaders and may cause them to reconsider their stance towards funding terrorism. This is the start of a relentless and continuous campaign that we are intending to initiate against Qatar.

As part of this campaign we will demonstrate and protest in front of the Qatari embassies, Al Jazeera’s centres, Harrods (one of their most recent and prestigious purchases) and all associated parties. Your signature on this petition will give the emphasis and assurance for our struggle and efforts to sever the roots of global terrorism by cutting off its funding. The Israeli and Jewish organisations will be those who will deliver the message to the Emir of Qatar via his embassies and to the media.

This petition is written in English, Hebrew, Arabic and Spanish and we are hoping that it will be translated to as many languages as possible. Thank you for your assistance, please sign and share the petitions with all lovers of peace and stability.

To: Mr. Shaikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar
We write this open letter in protest at the growing support that the Qatari government affords to Hamas. Hamas is designated as a terrorist organisation by the European Union, the United States of America, Canada, Australia, Japan and many countries in the Middle East. Qatar is the only country in the Arab World that supports and funds Hamas, the terrorist organisation that initiated the war in Gaza.

We are aware of Qatar’s claim that it contributes generously toward the people of Gaza but the results prove different. Your Highness’ and Qatar’s financial contribution was not used to set up hospitals, housing and schools, nor was it used to build bomb shelters and install warning systems for the Gazan people. It was used and is being used to acquire and produce missiles, build terror tunnels and to train children as fighters. Hamas also endlessly promotes Shahada meaning death for a religious cause while killing as many “infidels” as possible may it be men, women or children.

It is a shame that Your Highness and Qatar’s government did not use its influence over Hamas to persuade them to accept the Egyptian ceasefires. Hamas has consistently rejected them time after time while Israel has accepted them unconditionally. Your Highness’ real concern for the Gazans’ wellbeing could have saved hundreds if not thousands of lives and prevented the wounding and displacement of tens of thousands if the influence over Hamas has been exercised to force them to stop shooting and accept the truce.

Al Jazeera, the Television Network owned, funded and broadcast from Qatar has become a propaganda tool for a terrorist organisation promoting a deceptive and inaccurate picture of the conflict. Al Jazeera’s journalists failed to report on the launching pads, booby-trapped facilities and housing of rockets in UNRWA and other UN facilities. They also didn’t report on the schools, kindergartens, mosques and other public buildings used by Hamas for attacking the citizens of Israel through the firing of thousands of rockets indiscriminately. But worst of all they failed to report on the thousands used as human shields (men, women and children) as a despicable tool of media manipulation while putting those innocent lives at risk. Al Jazeera, especially the Arabic language channel, has become a news agency promoting Hamas. Its broadcasting incites the Arab world to follow the terrorist path and in the process damages its reputation as a respectable and impartial independent news network. In case Qatar wants to plead ignorance to the above, we will be able to enlighten them with facts.

Your Highness, the Qatari financial wealth is able to buy you assets around the world. Qatar’s opportunity to host the World Cup in 2022 will place it in the centre of world attention. However Qatar’s association with Hamas, other terrorist groups and the support that is offered to them casts doubts on Qatar’s position as a nation committed to peace and counter-terrorism despite being a member of the International Treaty for Counter-Terrorism of 1999. According to the treaty all member states are obligated to refrain from funding terror and to punish any known body or person who does so.

Qatar has clearly abused the Treaty by funding modern terrorism and especially the Hamas. To the dismay of the Arab World and its allies, the fighting in Gaza has exposed Doha as a centre for terrorism and a haven forterrorists. A clear example is the hospitality afforded by Qatar toKhaled Mashal, a notorious arch-terrorist and the leader of the Hamas. Mr Mashal terrorises Israel and ordering his people to die for “a religious cause” while he lives in luxury far from harm.
Note to forward to your friends:

Hi!

I just signed the petition « Emir of Qatar: Stop Qatar’s Terror Funding » on Change.org.

It’s important. Will you sign it too? Here’s the link:

http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/emir-of-qatar-stop-qatar-s-terror-funding?recruiter=140784870&utm_campaign=signature_receipt&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition

Thanks!

A Plea for Realism

Bassem Eid

Common grounds
The time has come for the Palestinian public to acknowledge the reality in which they live. A century of national struggle and 34 years spent resisting the occupation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem has not yet brought us peace, and the right of Palestinian self-determination has yet to be actualized. The largely ineffectual “peace process” has been characterized by the expansion of illegal Israeli settlements in the Occupied territories, numerous closures, and the constant humiliation of a frustrated Palestinian public. The al-Aqsa intifada grew from decades of injustice and discontent and did not erupt in a vacuum.

The reality in which we now live is that of an uneven struggle where Palestinian fighters, despite all their bravery, do not stand a chance against Israel’s military might. It is a reality of fruitless appeals to the international community and the Arab world, whom the Palestinians still rely upon to defend their cause. The international community does show some sympathy for the Palestinian struggle, but in the realm of international politics and diplomacy, sympathy holds little weight in the face of the economic, political and military power of Israel and its allies.

I believe that the violent path chosen by Palestinians in the al-Aqsa intifada has failed. This violence achieved little beyond an overwhelming Israeli military response, and the Palestinians, who have no means to win a military victory, pay a very high price in the confrontation. The use of firearms by Palestinians clouds the issue and provides the Israelis and their foreign sympathizers with a means of justifying the disproportionate “response” of the Israeli military. Moreover, violence diverts the attention of the world from the real issue – the injustice endured by the Palestinian people – and Palestinians are consequently portrayed as a fundamentally violent and irresponsible people, a people with whom it is not possible to make peace.

The violence characterizing the al-Aqsa Intifada prompted the demise of the Israeli liberal left, and a concurrent swing to the right of the Israeli political spectrum, empowering the current government under Ariel Sharon to reject any concessions or compromises.

It is time for the Palestinian people to accept this reality and to direct their struggle into a more pragmatic strategy. This does not mean that the struggle has to end. On the contrary, while a violent struggle seems unlikely to achieve the liberation of the Palestinian territories and the establishment of a Palestinian state, a sudden halt of the intifada would be perceived as a victory for Sharon’s government, thereby seemingly confirming that the brutal suppression of the intifada was well founded.

In my opinion, non-violent resistance is the best possible means of ending the current deadlock. Non-violence does not imply passivity in the face of the occupation. On the contrary, it can be a very powerful means of resistance, one that requires as much bravery and heroism as any armed operation.

Several non-violent actions have been successfully orchestrated recently, most notably those at Birzeit University, demonstrating that the Israeli army is helpless in confronting this kind of resistance. Non-violent resistance can include all segments of the Palestinian people, with a very important role to be played by women and children.

Non-violence will also enable the Palestinian people to communicate their message much more effectively in clearly articulated demands. Take the old city of Hebron, for example, where 40,000 Palestinians have lived under a strict curfew for a large part of the al-Aqsa intifada. What if every day at 4 pm, Palestinians sat outside their doorstep for an hour, drinking tea or smoking narguilah, without the use of stones or slogans. They would be in blatant disregard of the curfew imposed upon them, and there is no guarantee that the response of the Israeli army would be non-violent, but the message would be clear and powerful: it is unacceptable to lock 40,000 people indoors for the security of 400 Israeli settlers.

Non-violence would be a more pragmatic way of resisting the occupation. However, just as the Palestinians have to display pragmatism in how they resist the occupation, they have to be equally realistic in the goals they seek to achieve through resistance. Even though the PLO recognized the existence of Israel in 1988, many Palestinians still cannot bring it upon themselves to openly acknowledge Israel’s right to exist. I believe that a future with Israel is better than no future at all. Palestinians need to state very clearly and unequivocally that they do not question the existence of the State of Israel in its pre-1967 borders, and that the singular goal of the al-Aqsa intifada is the liberation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Future negotiations on questions such as the right to return will have to take Israel’s concerns into consideration. Embracing such an attitude is obviously painful for us Palestinians, who have already conceded so much, but the time has come to face reality.

# # #

Bassem Eid is Director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group in Jerusalem (www.phrmg.org).

Voir de plus:

An Interview with Bassem Eid of Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group
Abram Shanedling

Hasbara fellowships

Jun 24, 2011

The Executive Director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group explains why he sees little progress in Palestinian-Israeli negotiations.
The Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG) was established in 1996 in response to the deteriorating state of human rights under the newly established Palestinian Authority (PA). Today, PHRMG, based in Jerusalem, monitors human rights abuse against Palestinians in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Founder and Executive Director of PHRMG Bassem Eid shared his opinion on the Arab Spring, Israeli-Palestinian relations, and the Obama administration.

What is your view of the current state of the « Arab Spring?”

Bassem Eid (BE): I don’t believe that in the days of Obama we are going to see any peace in the Middle East. It looks like everything is moving backward. Islamism is increasing and it’s not only putting Israel under pressure but also the Arab democrats under pressure. Egypt in my opinion is going to be completely occupied by an Islamist brotherhood, and Syria will likely go down the same path.

How do you see this impacting Israeli-Palestinian relations?

BE: To make peace, I don’t think the Palestinians and Israelis are ready. Palestinians don’t want to be considered Muslim and don’t want to establish an Islamist state. When [Palestinians] want to make peace with Israel, no Arab country will support us. So we have a difficulty on how to present our ideas.

How about Israel?

BE: Israel is in a very difficult situation. Everybody is worried and everybody completely has the feeling that danger surrounds us.

How do you see the issue of Palestinian refugees seriously factoring in on future negotiations?

BE: It’s a very strong card that the PA is holding, but nobody believes that the Palestinians will all be back, especially those descendents. I think it is an issue that is already agreed between the Palestinians and Israelis.

Everybody talks about right of return within the Palestinian state only. The majority of Palestinians in the Diaspora prefer to get financial compensation instead of coming back, especially to a Palestinian state under the PA.

How does Hamas and Gaza fit into everything, especially with the recent reconciliation deal struck between the PA and Hamas?

BE: Today Gaza is not just a problem for Israel, but for the Palestinians in the West Bank as well as the Arab World. In the past few years, [PA President] Mahmoud Abbas has failed to build any strategy for the peace process, so he went and made the reconciliation deal.

Do you think the reconciliation deal will amount to anything?

BE: Past agreements between the PA and Hamas have usually failed. Even though the PA and Hamas signed this deal, to this day, they have not figured out a new prime minister. I am a person who believes that if any election takes place among the Palestinians, Hamas will win. This would be a big disaster for the Palestinians, the Israelis, and the world.

You sound quite pessimistic, but is there anything the the U.S. can do?

BE: With Islamism spreading in the region, I think we have a window this year for peace, but after a year, the gates of peace will unfortunately close.

This article was adapted from an original published June 24, 2011 by Abram Shanedling on PolicyMic.com

Voir de même:

An Israeli and a Palestinian scathed by South Africa apartheid rhetoric
Despite their limited knowledge of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, South Africans have many prejudices that are being fueled by anti-Israel groups
Benjamin Pogrund and Bassem Eid

Haaretz

May 4, 2012

The two of us, an Israeli and a Palestinian, went to South Africa recently to speak about the Middle East. For understandable reasons, South Africa is a major source for the « Israel is apartheid » accusation; it stems from the fact that many South Africans, especially blacks, relate Israel’s treatment of Palestinians to their own history of racial discrimination.

And indeed, in the several dozen meetings we addressed, we repeatedly heard the apartheid accusation. No, we replied: Apartheid does not exist inside Israel; there’s discrimination against Arabs but it’s not South African apartheid. On the West Bank, there is military occupation and repression, but it is not apartheid. The apartheid comparison is false and confuses the real problems.

As we traveled around the country, it became clear to us that South Africans generally have limited knowledge about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. But they hold many prejudices and these are fed and manipulated by organizations that are vehemently anti-Israel – to the extent of calling for destruction of the Jewish state, as the Palestinian Solidarity Campaign, the Muslim Judicial Council and the Russell Tribunal have done. Black trade unions join in the attacks and so do some people of Jewish origin.

Our host was the South African Jewish Board of Deputies. During 10 days we spoke on five university campuses, at several public meetings and to journalists, and were on radio programs, including one aired by a Muslim station.

We were shown an e-mail calling for protests against our visit: It seemed that the anti-Israel hard-liners were upset by an Israeli and a Palestinian speaking on the same platform and promoting peace. But there were no protests: The worst we experienced was a knot of about six people standing quietly outside one meeting. We were also warned to expect « tough questions, » but we didn’t hear any. Instead, the large audiences – people of all colors, and mainly non-Jews – were attentive and wanted information about the current state of play in the conflict.

There were some hostile comments such as the silly sneer that Israel is « terrified of a few suicide bombers » and that it is « hogwash » to call Hamas a terrorist organization. In a more serious vein were repeated references to the Palestinian « right of return. » It cannot be said whether those who spoke were genuinely responding to the plight of the refugees, or were cynically using it as a reasonable-sounding slogan although it in effect calls for elimination of the Jewish state.

Nelson Mandela’s words in support of Palestinian freedom were flung at us (and also appear in propaganda leaflets issued by Palestinian-supporting organizations ). He was quoted as saying: « But we know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians. » Mandela did indeed say that, on December 9, 1997, on the occasion of Palestinian Solidarity Day, and it still resonates strongly among South Africans. But it’s actually half of what he said in the context of a call for freedom for all people. He also explained the greater context and the dishonesty of the propagandists in singling out Israel: « … without the resolution of conflicts in East Timor, the Sudan and other parts of the world. »

Other falsities we heard were that only Jews are allowed to own or rent 93 percent of the land in Israel, and that Israel’s restrictions on marriage (which in actuality derive from Jewish, Muslim and Christian religious authorities ) are the same as apartheid South Africa’s prohibition of marriage – or sex – across color lines.

There was also an earlier statement by the South African Council of Churches in support of Israel Apartheid Week in which it claimed that « Israel remained the single supporter of apartheid when the rest of the world implemented economic sanctions, boycotts and divestment to force change in South Africa. » That, of course, is nonsense: Israel did trade with apartheid South Africa – but so did the entire world, starting with oil sales by Arab states, and including the United States, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Soviet Union and many in Africa.

BDS, the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, is noisily vocal and gets publicity in South African media. While we were there it ran Israel Apartheid Week programs on several university campuses. But the movement did not garner wide support; some scheduled speakers did not even turn up. Its boast that more than 100 universities worldwide took part in the week doesn’t amount to much: Apartheid weeks have been going on for eight years and out of the 100 this year, 60 were held on American campuses (out of 4,000 universities and colleges in that country ). Not much progress there.

We did not pre-plan what we were going to say. But a consensus emerged: First, we both spoke in bleak terms about peace prospects in the near future; second, we each castigated our own leaderships for double-talk and pretense, and for their lack of boldness and vision, and we pointed to the growth of Jewish settlements on the West Bank as undermining the chances for an agreement.

We stressed that we welcomed interest in our part of the world – but warned that some members of Palestinian solidarity movements have never visited the occupied territories, and they damage the Palestinian cause abroad because they act out of ignorance, and foster division and hatred between Arabs and Jews. They do not help to bring peace.

Our strangest meeting was with scores of Congolese who asked us to explain why their conflict – ongoing since 1960 with a toll of perhaps more than 7 million people dead – receives less attention in South African and other media than does the Israeli-Palestinian struggle. It was painful listening to their recital of mass rapes and murders. But it was difficult to empathize with them when one speaker blamed the Jews, whom he said controlled the world and the media, and when a former army officer asked us for money to go and fight the Congolese government.

Bassem Eid is director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group and a former researcher for B’Tselem. Benjamin Pogrund, South African-born, was founder of Yakar’s Center for Social Concern in Jerusalem.

Voir aussi:

LIFE IS BETTER THAN DEATH: INTERVIEW WITH BASSEM EID
Interviewed by Joel B. Pollak

New Society (Harvard college Middle East Journal)

January 29, 2008

Joel B. Pollak ’99 is a graduate of Harvard College and the University of Cape Town. He was a political speechwriter for the Leader of the Opposition in South Africa from 2002 to 2006 and is a second-year student at Harvard Law School.

***

Bassem Eid is the Executive Director and co-founder of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG), which tracks human rights violations against Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, regardless of who commits them. He is a former fieldworker for B’Tselem, the Israeli human rights organization focusing on the occupied territories. Eid’s work at PHRMG has concentrated on documenting violations by the Palestin-ian Authority against its own citizens. In recent years he has also moni-tored abuses committed by the Fatah and Hamas factions in their internec-ine struggles. Eid has received numerous human rights awards and frequently addresses Israeli and foreign audiences about the human rights problems facing Palestinians. Earlier this year, he teamed up with left-wing Israeli politician Yossi Beilin at the Doha Debates, arguing that Palestinians should abandon the right of return for the sake of peace with Israel.
New Society: Tell me about your life—where you are from, and how you came to be where you are today.
Bassem Eid: I am Palestinian and I was born in the Old City in East Jerusalem. I lived there for eight years, but then in 1966, for no reason, the Jorda-nian government established a refugee camp called Shuefat Refugee Camp near the French Hill in Jerusalem. The Jordanian government removed 500 families from the Old City, mainly from the Jewish Quarter. It was exactly one year before the 1967 war. I lived in the refugee camp for 32 years from 1966 until 1999. For the past four years, I have been living in Jericho.

I finished secondary school in one of the municipality schools in East Jerusalem. Then I attended Hebrew University for two years and studied journalism, but I couldn’t continue for financial reasons. After leaving the university, I worked as a freelance journalist for Palestin-ian and Israeli newspapers until 1988 before joining B’Tselem, an Israeli human rights organization that investigates rights violations in the occupied territories. In mid-1996, I resigned from B’Tselem and founded the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG), which is where I still am today.

NS: Why did you leave B’Tselem?

Eid: When the Palestinian Authority (PA) was established 1994, I noticed that most Palestinian and Israeli human rights organizations continued monitoring the Israeli occupation, but that nobody wanted to pay any attention to the PA’s violations. In a meeting held in March 1996, the board members of B’Tselem decided that they would not concern themselves with PA abuses. That’s why I left. I wanted to fill a role that I thought was very important, but that was empty.

NS: So you left that same year?

Eid: Yes. The decision came out in March, and I left at the end of July 1996 to set up the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group. Our main aim is to observe the Palestinian Authority’s violations. Between 1996 and 2000, our publications did not cover Israeli violations at all. All of our reports and press releases responded to Palestinian Authority abuses. We only started collecting data on Israeli violations after the second Intifada broke out in September 2000. Then we started to investigate Israeli killings, assassinations, house demolitions, and the use of the excessive force. In the meantime, we continued to collect information about Palestinian Authority violations.
Today, we are probably the organization with the most extensive data on internal killings among the Palestinians. I believe we are the only organization, for example, that investigates the murder of collaborators by Palestinians. We also investigate long-term imprisonment without charge, torture, the conduct of the state security court, and deaths that occur in Palestinian detention centers. We collect information on these issues and update our reports everyday.

NS: Why do you think B’Tselem chose not to monitor the Palestinian Authority?

Eid: In my opinion, that was a wise decision. At that time, there were still large areas under Israeli occupation and B’Tselem still had a lot of work to do to expose rights violations by the Israeli army in the occupied territories.
On the other side, I think that if the Palestinians want to form a successful civil society, live in a democracy, and respect human rights, we will have to build institutions with our own hands. We should not lay our fate in other people’s hands. We have done so quite enough over the past sixty years. We are still demanding a state from the international community instead of building it ourselves. I think that it is the time for the Palestinians to start building their own democracy right now. I believe that democracy has never been offered by leaders or governments. Democracy is determined by the people themselves.

NS: How did the Palestinian Authority react to your new organization?

Eid: Creating a human rights organization under an Arab regime is like committing suicide. Yasser Arafat was used to doing whatever he wanted without being criticized or monitored. When I started watch-ing, investigating, criticizing, he started to look at me in a very bad light. The Palestinian Authority defamed us and slandered us. Among other accusations, they said that we serve the enemy’s interests.

When we started to publish reports on PA human rights viola-tions, the reports became sexy news material for the international community. They were particularly well-reported by the Israeli media. The issue was especially sexy because, as you know, I had spent the past seven and a half years criticizing only Israel. Arafat saw me as a traitor.
We had a very tough period and had to get through many tough moments. Sometimes, ironically, these fears and difficulties gave us more energy and made us become even more committed to the sub-ject. We decided to continue in spite of all the danger surrounding us. And here we are! We still exist.

NS: Has your work become easier or more difficult since Arafat’s death?

Eid: Well, I think the PA does not really exist anymore. It exists in the pages of newspapers rather than on the ground itself. The PA com-pletely destroyed itself during the past seven years. They got themselves into huge trouble.
As far as my work is concerned, I feel very secure right now. Eve-ryone knows me where I live in Jericho. I’m very satisfied with what I’m doing.

NS: What do you think of the prospects for Palestinians right now? Will there be a Palestinian state? Is the two-state solution still viable?

Eid: It must be possible to create a Palestinian state. The question is how. How will we deal with it? How will we build it? How will we unite to establish good institutions?

In my opinion, the establishment of a Palestinian state is not only related to the Israelis. It concerns the Palestinians. We have had a very bad experience with building a state, developing it, and keeping it alive.

That brings me to the September 2005 Israeli disengagement from Gaza. Everybody thought that the Israeli disengagement would be a kind of test for the Palestinians. It would test whether we are really able to build our own state and manage our daily lives ourselves. In my opinion, we totally failed to manage Gaza, develop it, and build infrastructure.

Today, fewer and fewer Palestinian voices speak up in favor of es-tablishing a state. Everybody has his own horrible troubles. The only people calling for a state right now are the politicians.

Politicians around the world are buying and selling blood. This is the only income that they have. And that’s exactly what Arafat prac-ticed with the Palestinians. I remember with great sadness what happened when he started creating an Intifada and threatening the Israelis. Palestinian security workers went to the schools, ordered the schoolmasters to close the schools, and then sent the schoolchildren to throw stones at the Israelis. That was a very horrible thing to do. Politicians sacrifice their people to achieve their political interests. This is unfortunately the Palestinian attitude.
Look at Prime Minister Salaam Fayyad, who is saying, “No more resistance!” This is a huge change. One can resist, but one must also protect oneself and one’s survival. People were born to live, not to die. When you are alive, you can choose to resist, but you can also choose to build, to achieve things, to reach for what you want. When you die, you just die. This is a good lesson for the Palestinians right now: sacrificing ourselves will not help us achieve anything. We won’t achieve anything with violent resistance.

We are having to face the consequences of our actions over the past seven years. In my opinion, the Palestinians totally lost their way during the past seven years. Things will get worse if we continue in the same way. We will have to change our direction.

NS: What do you think should happen in Gaza?

Eid: Gaza is a big problem for the Palestinians, Israelis, and Egyptians. The international community becomes more and more afraid of the Palestinians because Hamas reflects such a negative side of Palestinian politics. I don’t think that Hamas will ever offer Gaza to back to Abbas.

The question is: Who is going to control Hamas? Hamas right now oppresses the Gazan people. But who will contain Hamas? I don’t think that dialogue will solve the problem.
We will all be watching whether Hamas can manage Gaza and keep it functioning. The Arab countries should put more effort into solving the conflict between Hamas and Fatah. The problem is that the Arab countries are so divided, some supporting Hamas against Fatah and some supporting Fatah against Hamas. This won’t help the situation.

I don’t think the international community can do very much on this issue, besides continuing to provide important humanitarian aid to the people of Gaza. On the whole, though, it’s too early right now to tell what will happen to Gaza and Hamas.

NS: What about Hamas in the West Bank. Are they a factor?

Eid: They do exist in the West Bank, but what’s happening in Gaza could never happen in the West Bank.

This is not only because Fatah is stronger than Hamas, but also be-cause of the Israeli occupation in the West Bank. Israelis will never allow Hamas militants to take over Jenin, facing Afula.

Of course, Hamas will still threaten to occupy the West Bank, to jeopardize any peace agreement, and to harm the Palestinian Presi-dent and government in the West Bank. I don’t think we will see peace in the near future.
Daily life in the West Bank will become a little bit easier, though, according to the promises of Ehud Olmert and Mahmoud Abbas. But I think the peace process will take much longer than anybody expects.

NS: What do you think is the main reason that the conflict continues?

Eid: I think there is a lack of good will and leadership on both sides. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict also tends to become a commercial conflict. Everybody is making something off this conflict. There are countries that have an interest in perpetuating the fighting. The Iranians, for example, are trying to provoke a regional war using Hezbollah and Hamas.

I don’t think the Palestinians will have the same opportunities for peace that we were offered between 1947 and July 2000. Palestinian violence has probably caused some countries to want not to get involved anymore. The foreign policy of the international community is totally biased.

NS: When you say that foreign policy is biased, you mean in which direction?

Eid: Well, the problem is that the international community is not united. Countries are divided. Policies are divided. So many different biased policies are involved in this conflict. In this kind of situation, I don’t think that the Palestinians or the Israelis will be able to reach a kind of final peace or a final agreement between themselves.

NS: Do you think there’s a possibility that Israelis and Palestinians will be able to build something out of the cooperation that still exists between them in some areas? Are these areas of cooperation possible foundations for peace?

Eid: Small-scale cooperation is very important. But I don’t think a permanent solution is possible right now. Let us talk about a tempo-rary one, instead. This is what Abbas and Olmert are doing right now. Let us release few thousand Palestinian prisoners, let us evacuate a couple of checkpoints, let us open the gates of the wall between villages and clinics or schools, let us issue a couple of tens of thou-sands of work permits to Palestinians so that they can work in Israel—this is what we are negotiating with the Israelis now.

When you talk about the state, the settlements, the borders, and the water, the Israelis say, this is so complicated, let’s leave it to the end. In the meanwhile, let’s do things step-by-step. That is how we are today negotiating with the Israelis. Many of these small things will probably continue to be delivered in the future.

NS: How do you feel about the situation? What motivates you?

Eid: I’m very angry and frustrated. I’m hopeless. I know my ideas provoke people, but I’m not a politician. I care much more about people’s lives rather than their lands. Land you can get everywhere in the world, but you can never replace lives. I don’t want to hear about killings, I don’t want to hear about shootings. I hate violence.

I am 48 years old. I had never, ever in my life seen a tank shooting until the past six or seven years. Since then, when I’ve gone to Ramal-lah, Bethlehem, Jericho, I’ve been so afraid. I’ve seen the kinds of things I never want to see again. I don’t like the way we are militariz-ing the conflict. It’s horrible. And I don’t like the way we’re making it religious. That brings great danger.

Looking back through history, one finds several examples of con-flicts that were solved without any kind of bloodshed. So I do believe that we can solve our conflict. We will have to learn from the experi-ences of others.

NS: What did you learn when you went to South Africa this year?

Eid: South Africa is very interesting. But it couldn’t be a model for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. There are some very good things in the South African case that we can learn from. The Truth and Reconcilia-tion Committee, for example.
The most important lesson is that the people in South Africa built their democracy and institutions with their own hands. Nobody offered it to them. I hope Palestinians will learn from that.

But otherwise, the South African case is very different from our situation. It involved people fighting against one apartheid govern-ment. In the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, you are not talking about one government or one nation. It’s totally different. We are not fighting for a one-state solution. Of course we are not.

What I learnt in South Africa is that some Islamists in South Africa are totally disconnected from the realities and still believe that the solution will be one state—an Islamic state. I found that very horrible.

NS: Do people in the West Bank and East Jerusalem want one state or two states, or do they want something else entirely?

Eid: At the moment, I think the Palestinians want a three-state solu-tion for two nations—Gaza, the West Bank, and Israel. Of course, there are still some disconnected Palestinians and Israelis who believe in a one-state solution. But I think that the Palestinians dream of creating our own independent, democratic, anti-Islamist country. And I think the Israelis want their own Jewish, Zionist country. I think both people have a right to their own states.

NS: What do you think the role should be of the Palestinian Diaspora, people in other parts of the region and other parts of the world?

Eid: That’s a really a big problem right now. I don’t believe that all the Palestinian refugees would like to come back. Israel will never open its doors to those refugees. The Palestinians shouldn’t have to continue sacrificing themselves for the right of return, a dream that will never be applicable on the ground. There are refugees around the world. All nations have refugees. This is an international problem. Refugees should be able to move to the West Bank or other countries. They should be more realistic about the situation.

NS: How are your ideas received by other Palestinians?

Eid: I don’t think that most Palestinians agree with me. And politi-cians are completely ignorant of my ideas because they don’t serve their political interests. We are a totally unstable society. Our opinions change ever day. Sometimes we feel powerful and energetic; some-times we feel tired and hopeless. I prefer talking to people when they are tired. Then they are more likely to listen to new ideas.

NS: What are your perceptions of Israeli human rights groups? Are they succeeding in their work?

Eid: I think they are doing a good job. We, the Palestinians, have learnt a lot from the Israeli organizations. There are Palestinians who are critical of the Israeli organizations, but mostly they are people who have no real idea of what is going on. I know what happens inside the Israeli organizations. I think that they are doing the maximum they can do to improve the daily lives of the Palestinians. If you go to the High Court, you will realize that most of the appeals made on behalf of Palestinians have been presented by Israeli groups and Israeli lawyers, not Palestinian ones.

NS: Are you able to monitor what’s going on in Gaza right now?

Eid: That’s very, very difficult. Don’t forget that we are living under a Taliban regime in the Gaza Strip. Our fieldworker hesitates before investigating cases there. The situation for human rights organizations sometimes reminds me of the Saddam Hussein regime. We can’t monitor the Gaza Strip the way we used to monitor it when it was PA territory. We are trying to collect data from newspapers and other organizations that operate in the area. We are in touch with some journalists there. But we face serious opposition and danger.

NS: What advice would you like to give to the Palestinians?

Eid: The best opportunity for us to make peace with Israel was probably in 1978 or 1979 when Egyptian president Anwar Sadat visited Israel. He suggested that Yasser Arafat join him, but Arafat refused.

The most important thing for us to do now is learn from the mis-takes we made between 1947 and today so that we don’t repeat them. We should put these mistakes on the table and study them well. After studying our mistakes, I think the solution will be very easy to create.

Voir enfin:

Christian In Israel
Abandoned by the Israeli Left: The story of Bassem Eid
Palestinian activist reflects on what went wrong in peace process, and what can be done now.
David Parsons
The Jerusalem Post
06/25/2012

Back during the first Palestinian intifada (1987 to 1993), the Israeli human rights organization B’Tselem latched on to a young Palestinian field worker named Bassem Eid and turned him into the darling of the Israeli Left. He reported on many of the incidents of alleged use of force against Palestinian civilians, and was sent on speaking tours to dozens of nations around the world.

But when the Olso peace process was launched, Bassem Eid saw his hopes for a free and democratic Palestinian state dashed by the new regime set up by PLO leader Yasser Arafat. So he set up his own organization to monitor violations of human rights being committed by the Palestinian Authority against his own people. By the time the second intifada broke out in the year 2000, Bassem was watching his dreams of peace and coexistence between Israel and the Palestinians go up in smoke.


Gaza: Obama va-t-il continuer à servir de bouclier aux barbares du Hamas à nos portes ? (After Iraq, Syria, Libya and Afghanistan, will Obama throw Israel to the wolves ?)

13 août, 2014
J’étais optimiste quand Obama a été élu président, parce que je pensais qu’il allait corriger certaines erreurs de Bush. Mais Obama est hypocrite. Il abandonne l’Irak aux loups. Tarek Aziz (05.08. 10)
The  friendships and the bonds of trust that I’ve been able to forge with a whole range of leaders is precisely, or is a big part of, what has allowed us to execute effective diplomacy. I think that if you ask them, Angela Merkel or Prime Minister Singh or President Lee or Prime Minister Erdogan or David Cameron would say, We have a lot of trust and confidence in the President. We believe what he says. We believe that he’ll follow through on his commitments. We think he’s paying attention to our concerns and our interests. And that’s part of the reason we’ve been able to forge these close working relationships and gotten a whole bunch of stuff done. Obama (Time, 19.01.12)
Notre démocratie est uniquement le train dans lequel nous montons jusqu’à ce que nous ayons atteint notre objectif. Les mosquées sont nos casernes, les minarets sont nos baïonnettes, les coupoles nos casques et les croyants nos soldats. Erdogan (1997)
La démocratie et ses fondements jusqu’à aujourd’hui peuvent être perçus à la fois comme une fin en soi ou un moyen. Selon nous la démocratie est seulement un moyen. Si vous voulez entrer dans n’importe quel système, l’élection est un moyen. La démocratie est comme un tramway, il va jusqu’où vous voulez aller, et là vous descendez. Erdogan
Dites-moi, quelle est la différence entre les opérations israéliennes et celles des nazis et d’Hitler. C’est du racisme, du fascisme. Ce qui est fait à Gaza revient à raviver l’esprit du mal et pervers d’Hitler. Erdogan
Ce n’est pas la première fois que nous sommes confrontés à une telle situation. Depuis 1948, tous les jours, tous les mois et surtout pendant le mois sacré du ramadan, nous assistons à une tentative de génocide systématique. Recep Tayyip Erdogan (premier ministre turc)
L’association qui regroupe les journalistes travaillant en Israël et dans les Territoires a accusé, dans un communiqué, le mouvement islamiste palestinien Hamas d’avoir recours à « des méthodes énergiques et peu orthodoxes » à l’encontre des envoyés spéciaux.  « On ne peut pas empêcher les médias internationaux de faire leur travail par la menace ou les pressions et priver leurs lecteurs, auditeurs et téléspectateurs d’une vision objective du terrain », poursuit le texte.  « A plusieurs reprises, des journalistes étrangers travaillant à Gaza ont été harcelés, menacés ou interrogés sur des reportages ou des informations dont ils avaient fait état dans leur média ou sur les réseaux sociaux », a dit l’association. (…) Les journalistes ayant été menacés répugnent à raconter publiquement leur expérience, par crainte des répercussions, a-t-elle dit. (…) L’association accuse aussi le Hamas de chercher à « filtrer » l’entrée des journalistes en réclamant des informations sur leur compte à leur média. Elle craint l’établissement d’une liste noire des journalistes dont le travail aurait déplu au Hamas. Plusieurs médias ont rapporté avoir reçu lundi une demande du Hamas réclamant les noms des journalistes se rendant à Gaza, leur média, leur pays de résidence, leurs coordonnées ainsi que le nom de leur traducteur, pour « faciliter et organiser » leur travail dans l’enclave palestinienne. AFP/L’Express
 Our strategy is also shaped by deeper understanding of al Qaeda’s goals, strategy, and tactics over the past decade. I’m not talking about al Qaeda’s grandiose vision of global domination through a violent Islamic caliphate. That vision is absurd, and we are not going to organize our counter-terrorism policies against a feckless delusion that is never going to happen. We are not going to elevate these thugs and their murderous aspirations into something larger than they are. John Brennen (conseiller pour le contre-terrrorisme, 30.06.11)
In strongly supporting a surge in Afghanistan, Hillary told the president that her opposition in Iraq had been political because she was facing him in the primary. She went on to say, ‘The Iraq surge worked.’ The president conceded vaguely that opposition to the surge had been political. To hear the two of them making these admissions, and in front of me, was as surprising as it was dismaying. Robert Gates
Great nations need organizing principles, and ‘Don’t do stupid stuff’ is not an organizing principle. (…) I think Israel did what it had to do to respond to the rockets,” she told me. “Israel has a right to defend itself. The steps Hamas has taken to embed rockets and command-and-control facilities and tunnel entrances in civilian areas, this makes a response by Israel difficult. (…) [J]ust as we try to do in the United States and be as careful as possible in going after targets to avoid civilians. (…)  mistakes were made (…) We’ve made them. I don’t know a nation, no matter what its values are—and I think that democratic nations have demonstrably better values in a conflict position—that hasn’t made errors, but ultimately the responsibility rests with Hamas. (…)  it’s impossible to know what happens in the fog of war. Some reports say, maybe it wasn’t the exact UN school that was bombed, but it was the annex to the school next door where they were firing the rockets. And I do think oftentimes that the anguish you are privy to because of the coverage, and the women and the children and all the rest of that, makes it very difficult to sort through to get to the truth. There’s no doubt in my mind that Hamas initiated this conflict. … So the ultimate responsibility has to rest on Hamas and the decisions it made.(…) It is striking … that you have more than 170,000 people dead in Syria. … You have Russia massing battalions—Russia, that actually annexed and is occupying part of a UN member-state—and I fear that it will do even more to prevent the incremental success of the Ukrainian government to take back its own territory, other than Crimea. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Ukraine on both sides, not counting the [Malaysia Airlines] plane, and yet we do see this enormous international reaction against Israel, and Israel’s right to defend itself, and the way Israel has to defend itself. This reaction is uncalled for and unfair. You can’t ever discount anti-Semitism, especially with what’s going on in Europe today. There are more demonstrations against Israel by an exponential amount than there are against Russia seizing part of Ukraine and shooting down a civilian airliner. So there’s something else at work here than what you see on TV. (…) What you see is largely what Hamas invites and permits Western journalists to report on from Gaza. It’s the old PR problem that Israel has. Yes, there are substantive, deep levels of antagonism or anti-Semitism towards Israel, because it’s a powerful state, a really effective military. And Hamas paints itself as the defender of the rights of the Palestinians to have their own state. So the PR battle is one that is historically tilted against Israel. (…) If I were the prime minister of Israel, you’re damn right I would expect to have control over security, because even if I’m dealing with [Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud] Abbas, who is 79 years old, and other members of Fatah, who are enjoying a better lifestyle and making money on all kinds of things, that does not protect Israel from the influx of Hamas or cross-border attacks from anywhere else. With Syria and Iraq, it is all one big threat. So Netanyahu could not do this in good conscience. (…) I would not put Hamas in the category of people we could work with. I don’t think that is realistic because its whole reason for being is resistance against Israel, destruction of Israel, and it is married to very nasty tactics and ideologies, including virulent anti-Semitism. I do not think they should be in any way treated as a legitimate interlocutor, especially because if you do that, it redounds to the disadvantage of the Palestinian Authority, which has a lot of problems, but historically has changed its charter, moved away from the kind of guerrilla resistance movement of previous decadesHillary Clinton
Les Qataris m’ont affirmé à maintes reprises que le Hamas est une organisation humanitaire. Nancy Pelosi (chef de file de la minorité au Congrès)
Whatever happened to the Hillary Clinton who was an early advocate of diplomatic engagement with Iran, and who praised Bashar Assad as a « reformer » and pointedly refused to call for his ouster six months into the uprising? Wasn’t she the most vocal and enthusiastic advocate for the reset with Russia? Didn’t she deliver White House messages to Benjamin Netanyahu by yelling at him? Didn’t she also once describe former Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak as a family friend? And didn’t she characterize her relationship with Mr. Obama—in that cloying « 60 Minutes » exit interview the two of them did with Steve Kroft —as « very warm, very close »? Where’s the love now? There are a few possible answers to that one. One is that the views she expressed in the interview are sincere and long-held and she was always a closet neoconservative; Commentary magazine is delivered to her mailbox in an unmarked brown envelope. Another is that Mrs. Clinton can read a poll: Americans now disapprove of the president’s handling of foreign policy by a 57% to 37% margin, and she belatedly needs to disavow the consequences of the policies she once advocated. A third is that she believes in whatever she says, at least at the time she’s saying it. She is a Clinton, after all. There’s something to all of these theories: The political opportunist always lacks the courage of his, or her, convictions. That’s not necessarily because there aren’t any convictions. It’s because the convictions are always subordinated to the needs of ambition and ingratiation. Then again, who cares who Mrs. Clinton really is? When the question needs to be asked, it means we already know, or should know, how to answer it. The truth about Mrs. Clinton isn’t what’s potentially at stake in the next election. It’s the truth about who we are. Are we prepared to believe anything? We tried that with Barack Obama, the man who promised to be whatever we wanted him to be. Mrs. Clinton’s self-reinvention as a hawk invites us to make the mistake twice. Bret Stephens
Il est indiscutable que le Président Obama a, consciemment ou non, servi de bouclier au Hamas. Ce n’est pas un conflit dans lequel les États-Unis doivent jouer le rôle de médiateurs ou même faire allusion à une équivalence morale. Ce conflit nous a été imposé par un groupe terroriste qui promeut la culture de la mort et du martyre, laquelle s’exprime dans le slogan souvent cité: « Les Juifs veulent la vie alors que nous voulons mourir en martyrs ». Nous avons affaire ici à une entité qui veut l’indépendance. C’est un conflit entre le bien et le mal. On se fût attendu à ce que notre allié impute la responsabilité de la mort des victimes aux marchands de mort du Hamas qui prennent pour cibles des citoyens israéliens et causent des victimes à leur propre peuple qu’ils utilisent comme boucliers humains en les exhibant avec joie devant le monde comme des victimes de la tyrannie israélienne. Au lieu de cela, le Président Obama a pris les devants en soutenant hypocritement notre droit à nous défendre, tout en nous reprochant de réagir de manière disproportionnée en ripostant contre la source des tirs de missiles, et les postes de commandement qui sont délibérément imbriqués dans les bâtiments de l’ONU, les écoles, les hôpitaux et les mosquées. Les scènes sanglantes de victimes palestiniennes, mises en relief par les médias mondiaux auraient dû être présentées dans le contexte de la responsabilité du Hamas qui a délibérément orchestré ce cauchemar. Au lieu de cela, le comportement du Président Obama a tout simplement encouragé le Hamas à poursuivre sa stratégie barbare, persuadé qu’il est que les États-Unis le sauveront des machoires de la défaite et le récompenseront de son engagement dans le terrorisme. Dans ce contexte, les éructations clairement synchronisées de la Maison Blanche, du Département d’État, et même du Pentagone, juste avant l’annonce du cessez-le-feu mort-né de 72 heures, condamnant Israël pour les victimes civiles, et ce compris le bombardement d’une école de l’UNRWA à Gaza, comme « indéfendables » et « totalement inacceptables », avaient clairement pour but d’obtenir le soutien du Qatar et de la Turquie. (…) Le choc public causé par la découverte des tunnels terroristes et celle de l’extension de la portée des missiles qui couvrent désormais tout le pays, a réalisé l’union du peuple d’une manière qui rappelle la Guerre des Six-Jours. (…) Bien que ce ne soit pas perceptible en raison de l’extraordinaire tsunami de l’antisémitisme mondial et de l’attitude des deux poids deux mesures, adoptée par les pays occidentaux, il y a un clair consensus sur le fait que cette guerre nous a été imposée, et une plus grande prise de conscience de la nature terroriste du Hamas et de son mépris de la vie humaine. Il y a aussi le revirement radical dans l’approche de l’Égypte, de l’Arabie Saoudite, de la Jordanie, de l’Autorité Palestinienne et de la majeure partie des membres de la Ligue arabe, qui ont avalisé la proposition égyptienne de cessez-le feu, et dont la peur et le mépris des fondamentalistes islamistes extrémistes dépassent de beaucoup leur traditionnelle haine d’Israël. Les Égyptiens et d’autres États arabes modérés affirment, que depuis son discours initial du Caire en 2009, le Président Obama est apparu comme un supporter des Frères musulmans, créateurs du Hamas, qu’ils considèrent à juste titre comme une organisation fondamentaliste terroriste. Ils considèrent l’atteinte causée aux propositions égyptiennes de cessez-le-feu et le recours au Qatar et à la Turquie, qui soutiennent les Frères Musulmans et le Hamas, comme un exemple de plus du fait que les États-Unis trahissent leurs alliés et font cause commune avec leurs ennemis. (…) Le résultat dépend, dans une large mesure, des États-Unis. S’ils récompensent le Hamas pour son agression en s’efforçant de faire « lever le blocus », ou s’ils lui versent des fonds sans démilitarisation, ce sera une trahison à notre égard. Les États-Unis auront détruit le peu de crédibilité mondiale qu’ils ont encore et seront considérés comme abandonnant leurs alliés de longue date pour flatter obséquieusement ceux qui soutiennent le terrorisme islamique fanatique. Les États-Unis soutiendront-ils la juste cause d’Israël contre le terrorisme génocidaire, ou seront-ils un bouclier de protection pour les barbares du Hamas qui sont à nos portes, frayant ainsi la voie à une future guerre beaucoup plus brutale dans un futur proche ? Isi Leibler

Attention: un bouclier humain peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où, victime de l’incroyable succès de sa stratégie de propagande morbide comme nous le rappelions dans notre dernier billet, le Hamas a réussi l’exploit de rallier une communauté internationale – Monde arabe, quoi qu’il en dise officiellement, compris ! -jusque là divisée à la demande israélienne de son propre désarmement …

Et  qu’avec son seul autre allié dans la région et aux côtés des  incontournables financiers du jihadisme mondial, l‘islamisme dit « modéré » prend tranquillement  le tramway de la démocratie  …

Pendant qu’après les abjections que l’on sait et à travers une timide et tardive déclaration, commencent à émerger les conditions dans lesquelles nos médias collaborent au cauchemar délibérément orchestré par le Hamas …

Et qu’en Irak même et avant demain  l’Afghanistan apparait  chaque jour un peu plus clairement la folie de l’Administration américaine actuelle d’abandon systématique des positions chèrement acquises …..

Devinez, comme le rappelle cette excellente tribune de l’éditorialiste du Jerusalem Post Isi Leibler traduite par notre ami Menahem Macina, qui entre deux parties de golf est en train de tout saboter ?

Et qui,  fidèle à lui-même et à son habitude de trahir ses alliés (Israël, Egypte) et soutenir ses ennemis (Qatar, Turquie, Iran), pourrait à nouveau jouer les boucliers humains …

Pour une organisation explicitement auto-revendiquée comme terroriste et génocidaire?

Obama va-t-il continuer à servir de bouclier aux barbares du Hamas qui sont à nos portes?
Isi Leibler
The Jerusalem post
12/08/2014
Texte original anglais “Will Obama keep shielding Hamas barbarians at our gates?”, sur le site du Jerusalem Post, 3 août 2014

[Bien qu’il date un peu et qu’entre temps les choses ont quelque peu changé sur le terrain, puisque un nouveau cessez-le-feu de 72 heures est entré en vigueur depuis 24 heures, j’ai cru intéressant de traduire les réflexions de cet éditorialiste engagé et passionné, qui croit à la réalité de l’incident révélant une brouille profonde entre Israël et l’Administration Obama. On n’est bien entendu pas obligé de partager sa vision pessimiste des choses, mais il faut l’entendre. Merci à Giora Hod de m’avoir signalé ce texte. (Menahem Macina).]
Si les États-Unis récompensent le Hamas en voulant faire cesser le blocus ou en les finançant sans démilitarisation, ce sera une trahison à notre égard.

Les États-Unis sont le plus important allié d’Israël. Ils nous ont fourni des armes, et voici juste une semaine [fin juillet], ils nous ont accordé un financement supplémentaire pour améliorer les performances du système de défense anti-missiles Iron Dome (dôme de fer). Ils ont également usé de leur influence politique pour faire échouer l’adoption de résolutions hostiles et de sanctions au niveau international.

Mais nous ne devons pas nous faire d’illusions. La relation américano-israélienne est sous grande tension. En dépit des déclarations sibyllines des gouvernements israélien et américain, niant la véracité des extraits d’une conversation téléphonique empoisonnée entre le Premier ministre Binyamin Netanyahu et le Président Barak Obama, le rédacteur en chef hautement respecté du département étranger de la chaîne de télévision Channel One, Oren Nahary, défend fermement son reportage ; il maintient que sa source – un haut fonctionnaire américain – est crédible, et que l’information ne provient pas du bureau du Premier ministre [israélien].

Le Président américain aurait réagi en disant que ce n’était pas à Netanyahu de dicter à l’Amérique quels pays devaient agir en tant que médiateurs. Quelques jours plus tard, Nancy Pelosi, chef de file de la minorité au Congrès, a accrédité cet échange en disant sur CNN que les États-Unis devraient coopérer avec les Qataris qui, dit-elle « m’ont affirmé à maintes reprises que le Hamas est une organisation humanitaire ». Il est ahurissant qu’un dirigeant démocratique du Congrès puisse qualifier d’« humanitaire » une organisation génocidaire ayant des objectifs similaires à ceux d’al-Qaïda, et dont la charte appelle explicitement à la destruction d’Israël et au meurtre des juifs.

Il y a eu également des échanges tendus entre le bureau du Premier ministre et le Secrétaire d’État américain John Kerry, désormais tristement célèbre pour ses commentaires inappropriés et ses déclarations contradictoires.

Les deux parties ont fait des efforts pour calmer la tempête. Les hauts fonctionnaires américains ont réaffirmé leur soutien à Israël et soutenu à nouveau son droit à se défendre. Avec quelque retard, le président Obama a emboîté le pas aux Européens et fait de la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza une question qui devrait être négociée en liaison avec la levée du blocus après la cessation des hostilités.

Mais il est indiscutable que le Président Obama a, consciemment ou non, servi de bouclier au Hamas. Ce n’est pas un conflit dans lequel les États-Unis doivent jouer le rôle de médiateurs ou même faire allusion à une équivalence morale. Ce conflit nous a été imposé par un groupe terroriste qui promeut la culture de la mort et du martyre, laquelle s’exprime dans le slogan souvent cité: « Les Juifs veulent la vie alors que nous voulons mourir en martyrs ». Nous avons affaire ici à une entité qui veut l’indépendance. C’est un conflit entre le bien et le mal.

On se fût attendu à ce que notre allié impute la responsabilité de la mort des victimes aux marchands de mort du Hamas qui prennent pour cibles des citoyens israéliens et causent des victimes à leur propre peuple qu’ils utilisent comme boucliers humains en les exhibant avec joie devant le monde comme des victimes de la tyrannie israélienne.

Au lieu de cela, le Président Obama a pris les devants en soutenant hypocritement notre droit à nous défendre, tout en nous reprochant de réagir de manière disproportionnée en ripostant contre la source des tirs de missiles, et les postes de commandement qui sont délibérément imbriqués dans les bâtiments de l’ONU, les écoles, les hôpitaux et les mosquées. Les scènes sanglantes de victimes palestiniennes, mises en relief par les médias mondiaux auraient dû être présentées dans le contexte de la responsabilité du Hamas qui a délibérément orchestré ce cauchemar. Au lieu de cela, le comportement du Président Obama a tout simplement encouragé le Hamas à poursuivre sa stratégie barbare, persuadé qu’il est que les États-Unis le sauveront des machoires de la défaite et le récompenseront de son engagement dans le terrorisme.

Dans ce contexte, les éructations clairement synchronisées de la Maison Blanche, du Département d’État, et même du Pentagone, juste avant l’annonce du cessez-le-feu mort-né de 72 heures, condamnant Israël pour les victimes civiles, et ce compris le bombardement d’une école de l’UNRWA à Gaza, comme « indéfendables » et « totalement inacceptables », avaient clairement pour but d’obtenir le soutien du Qatar et de la Turquie.

Les États-Unis savent parfaitement quelles mesures extraordinaires, sans équivalent dans quelque conflit armé que ce soit, ont été prises par Israël pour réduire au minimum les pertes civiles. Mais des civils innocents meurent au cours d’une guerre – et a fortiori dans des circonstances où des femmes et des enfants sont utilisés comme boucliers humains et délibérément logés dans le voisinage immédiat de lanceurs de missiles et de postes de commandement. Quand les soldats israéliens sont pris sous le feu de terroristes, même si ces tirs proviennent d’écoles, ils doivent riposter, ou être tués. En outre, des accidents sont inévitables. Il sufit de se remémorer les milliers de civils français innocents tués par les Alliés durant l’invasion en 1944.

Pour prendre la mesure du deux poids deux mesures et de l’hypocrisie dont nous sommes victimes, les États-Unis devraient tenir compte des centaines de milliers de civils innocents tués par les forces de la coalition au cours de la guerre d’Irak et en Afghanistan, ainsi que le carnage causé en Serbie par les bombardements indiscriminés de civils par l’OTAN, à Belgrade, pour venir à bout de Milosevic.

La tragédie des victimes palestiniennes innocentes nous attriste tous. Mais il est révoltant de voir le président américain exprimer plus d’indignation pour la mort de 1 500 Palestiniens, dont une grande partie sont des terroristes sanguinaires, que pour les 180 000 Syriens massacrés dans la guerre civile en cours dans ce pays.

Il est absolument inacceptable de condamner un allié de longue date. Comment les États-Unis peuvent-ils justifier leur focalisation sur la perte de vies innocentes sans prendre en considération le contexte et en s’abstenant de jeter le blâme sur le Hamas qui exulte de massacrer tant les Israéliens que son propre peuple, dont il exploite ouvertement les souffrances pour discréditer Israël et détourner l’attention de ses activités terroristes? Cela rappelle l’expression sarcastique – souvent citée – de Golda Meïr, selon laquelle « la paix adviendra quand nos adversaires aimeront leurs enfants plus qu’ils nous haïssent ».

Israël doit rester ferme. Le choc public causé par la découverte des tunnels terroristes et celle de l’extension de la portée des missiles qui couvrent désormais tout le pays, a réalisé l’union du peuple d’une manière qui rappelle la Guerre des Six-Jours. Près de 90% de la population sont inébranlables sur ce point : Israel ne doit pas s’arrêter tant que Gaza ne sera pas démilitarisée et le Hamas complètement écrasé, malgré le terrible coût en vies humaines

Même le Parti d’opposition travailliste “colombe” attend cela de Netanyahu. Bien que ce ne soit pas perceptible en raison de l’extraordinaire tsunami de l’antisémitisme mondial et de l’attitude des deux poids deux mesures, adoptée par les pays occidentaux, il y a un clair consensus sur le fait que cette guerre nous a été imposée, et une plus grande prise de conscience de la nature terroriste du Hamas et de son mépris de la vie humaine.

Il y a aussi le revirement radical dans l’approche de l’Égypte, de l’Arabie Saoudite, de la Jordanie, de l’Autorité Palestinienne et de la majeure partie des membres de la Ligue arabe, qui ont avalisé la proposition égyptienne de cessez-le feu, et dont la peur et le mépris des fondamentalistes islamistes extrémistes dépassent de beaucoup leur traditionnelle haine d’Israël. Les Égyptiens et d’autres États arabes modérés affirment, que depuis son discours initial du Caire en 2009, le Président Obama est apparu comme un supporter des Frères musulmans, créateurs du Hamas, qu’ils considèrent à juste titre comme une organisation fondamentaliste terroriste.

Ils considèrent l’atteinte causée aux propositions égyptiennes de cessez-le-feu et le recours au Qatar et à la Turquie, qui soutiennent les Frères Musulmans et le Hamas, comme un exemple de plus du fait que les États-Unis trahissent leurs alliés et font cause commune avec leurs ennemis. La chose a trouvé son expression dans la proposition initiale de cessez-le-feu de Kerry, parrainée par le Qatar et la Turquie, mais rejetée à l’unanimité par le cabinet israélien, et qui aurait pu être rédigée par le Hamas.

À l’heure actuelle, Israël a largement atteint ses objectifs principaux qui étaient de détruire les tunnels et de neutraliser de manière significative les capacités de tirs de missiles. Mais le Hamas reste intact et, à moins qu’une démilitarisation ne soit imposée, nous devrons faire face à des djihadistes invétérés qui ne renonceront pas à leur objectif ouvertement exprimé de nous détruire ou tout au moins d’user notre moral par des attaques terroristes incessantes.

La responsabilité majeure de tout gouvernement est de protéger ses citoyens. C’est l’occasion pour Israël de rester ferme et de prendre toutes les mesures qui seront nécessaires pour affaiblir le Hamas et démilitariser Gaza. La responsabilité des dommages collatéraux causés aux civils innocents incombe exclusivement au Hamas.

L’insolente violation par le Hamas du cessez-le-feu de 72 heures a mené à une réaction temporaire mondiale à l’encontre du Hamas.

Après avoir neutralisé les tunnels que Tsahal a été en mesure de détecter, les forces terrestres ont été redéployées. Toutefois, Netanyahu a clairement dit que l’opération n’était pas terminée.

Le cabinet doit rapidement décider de l’une des deux options suivantes. Il peut étendre la campagne terrestre et conquérir Gaza, ce à quoi la majorité de la nation souscrira probablement en premier lieu, mais cela impliquerait probablement des pertes massives et donnerait lieu à une pression internationale qui pourrait nous contraindre à nous replier de manière unilatérale ou nous exposer à des sanctions. Il apparaît que sans exclure cette option, le Premier ministre Netanyahu – au moins à court terme – a l’intention de continuer à détruire les lance-missiles et à attaquer le Hamas par voie aérienne, limitant ainsi les pertes israéliennes et exerçant une plus grande influence sur la mise en oeuvre de la démilitarisation.

Le résultat dépend, dans une large mesure, des États-Unis. S’ils récompensent le Hamas pour son agression en s’efforçant de faire « lever le blocus », ou s’ils lui versent des fonds sans démilitarisation, ce sera une trahison à notre égard. Les États-Unis auront détruit le peu de crédibilité mondiale qu’ils ont encore et seront considérés comme abandonnant leurs alliés de longue date pour flatter obséquieusement ceux qui soutiennent le terrorisme islamique fanatique.

Les États-Unis soutiendront-ils la juste cause d’Israël contre le terrorisme génocidaire, ou seront-ils un bouclier de protection pour les barbares du Hamas qui sont à nos portes, frayant ainsi la voie à une future guerre beaucoup plus brutale dans un futur proche ?
© Isi Leibler

Le site Internet de l’auteur peut être consulté at http://www.wordfromjerusalem.com. On peut le contacter à ileibler@leibler.com.

Voir aussi:

JÉRUSALEM
Gaza: une association de médias étrangers dénoncent les pratiques du Hamas
AFP/L’Express

11/08/2014

Jérusalem – L’Association de la presse étrangère en Israël et dans les Territoires palestiniens a accusé lundi le Hamas d’avoir « harcelé » et « menacé » des journalistes étrangers venus couvrir la guerre dans la bande de Gaza.

L’association qui regroupe les journalistes travaillant en Israël et dans les Territoires a accusé, dans un communiqué, le mouvement islamiste palestinien Hamas d’avoir recours à « des méthodes énergiques et peu orthodoxes » à l’encontre des envoyés spéciaux.

« On ne peut pas empêcher les médias internationaux de faire leur travail par la menace ou les pressions et priver leurs lecteurs, auditeurs et téléspectateurs d’une vision objective du terrain », poursuit le texte.

« A plusieurs reprises, des journalistes étrangers travaillant à Gaza ont été harcelés, menacés ou interrogés sur des reportages ou des informations dont ils avaient fait état dans leur média ou sur les réseaux sociaux », a dit l’association.

Des centaines de journalistes venus du monde entier se sont rendus à Gaza pour « couvrir » le conflit entre Israël et le Hamas, qui contrôle le territoire. « Environ 10% » d’entre eux ont dit avoir rencontré des difficultés avec les autorités du Hamas, a dit une responsable de l’association à l’AFP.

Les journalistes ayant été menacés répugnent à raconter publiquement leur expérience, par crainte des répercussions, a-t-elle dit.

Un photographe a rapporté à l’association avoir été frappé et son appareil détruit; l’appareil d’un autre lui a été confisqué pendant trois jours et il a été demandé à plusieurs journalistes de retirer des publications sur Twitter et des vidéos sur YouTube. Un média européen a été menacé alors qu’il filmait une manifestation anti-Hamas, a-t-elle dit.

L’association accuse aussi le Hamas de chercher à « filtrer » l’entrée des journalistes en réclamant des informations sur leur compte à leur média. Elle craint l’établissement d’une liste noire des journalistes dont le travail aurait déplu au Hamas.

Plusieurs médias ont rapporté avoir reçu lundi une demande du Hamas réclamant les noms des journalistes se rendant à Gaza, leur média, leur pays de résidence, leurs coordonnées ainsi que le nom de leur traducteur, pour « faciliter et organiser » leur travail dans l’enclave palestinienne.

Voir encore:

Hillary Clinton: ‘Failure’ to Help Syrian Rebels Led to the Rise of ISIS
The former secretary of state, and probable candidate for president, outlines her foreign-policy doctrine. She says this about President Obama’s: « Great nations need organizing principles, and ‘Don’t do stupid stuff’ is not an organizing principle. »
Jeffrey Goldberg

The Atlantic

AUG 10 2014

President Obama has long ridiculed the idea that the U.S., early in the Syrian civil war, could have shaped the forces fighting the Assad regime, thereby stopping al Qaeda-inspired groups—like the one rampaging across Syria and Iraq today—from seizing control of the rebellion. In an interview in February, the president told me that “when you have a professional army … fighting against a farmer, a carpenter, an engineer who started out as protesters and suddenly now see themselves in the midst of a civil conflict—the notion that we could have, in a clean way that didn’t commit U.S. military forces, changed the equation on the ground there was never true.”

Well, his former secretary of state, Hillary Rodham Clinton, isn’t buying it. In an interview with me earlier this week, she used her sharpest language yet to describe the « failure » that resulted from the decision to keep the U.S. on the sidelines during the first phase of the Syrian uprising.

“The failure to help build up a credible fighting force of the people who were the originators of the protests against Assad—there were Islamists, there were secularists, there was everything in the middle—the failure to do that left a big vacuum, which the jihadists have now filled,” Clinton said.

As she writes in her memoir of her State Department years, Hard Choices, she was an inside-the-administration advocate of doing more to help the Syrian rebellion. Now, her supporters argue, her position has been vindicated by recent events.
Hillary Clinton: Chinese System Is Doomed, Leaders on a ‘Fool’s Errand’
Professional Clinton-watchers (and there are battalions of them) have told me that it is only a matter of time before she makes a more forceful attempt to highlight her differences with the (unpopular) president she ran against, and then went on to serve. On a number of occasions during my interview with her, I got the sense that this effort is already underway. (And for what it’s worth, I also think she may have told me that she’s running for president—see below for her not-entirely-ambiguous nod in that direction.)

Of course, Clinton had many kind words for the “incredibly intelligent” and “thoughtful” Obama, and she expressed sympathy and understanding for the devilishly complicated challenges he faces. But she also suggested that she finds his approach to foreign policy overly cautious, and she made the case that America needs a leader who believes that the country, despite its various missteps, is an indispensable force for good. At one point, I mentioned the slogan President Obama recently coined to describe his foreign-policy doctrine: “Don’t do stupid shit” (an expression often rendered as “Don’t do stupid stuff” in less-than-private encounters).

This is what Clinton said about Obama’s slogan: “Great nations need organizing principles, and ‘Don’t do stupid stuff’ is not an organizing principle.”

She softened the blow by noting that Obama was “trying to communicate to the American people that he’s not going to do something crazy,” but she repeatedly suggested that the U.S. sometimes appears to be withdrawing from the world stage.

During a discussion about the dangers of jihadism (a topic that has her “hepped-up, » she told me moments after she greeted me at her office in New York) and of the sort of resurgent nationalism seen in Russia today, I noted that Americans are quite wary right now of international commitment-making. She responded by arguing that there is a happy medium between bellicose posturing (of the sort she associated with the George W. Bush administration) and its opposite, a focus on withdrawal.

“You know, when you’re down on yourself, and when you are hunkering down and pulling back, you’re not going to make any better decisions than when you were aggressively, belligerently putting yourself forward,” she said. “One issue is that we don’t even tell our own story very well these days.”

I responded by saying that I thought that “defeating fascism and communism is a pretty big deal.” In other words, that the U.S., on balance, has done a good job of advancing the cause of freedom.

Clinton responded to this idea with great enthusiasm: “That’s how I feel! Maybe this is old-fashioned.” And then she seemed to signal that, yes, indeed, she’s planning to run for president. “Okay, I feel that this might be an old-fashioned idea, but I’m about to find out, in more ways than one.”

She said that the resilience, and expansion, of Islamist terrorism means that the U.S. must develop an “overarching” strategy to confront it, and she equated this struggle to the one the U.S. waged against Soviet-led communism.

Clinton-watchers say it’s a matter of time before she highlights her differences with Obama. I got the sense that this effort is well underway.
“One of the reasons why I worry about what’s happening in the Middle East right now is because of the breakout capacity of jihadist groups that can affect Europe, can affect the United States,” she said. “Jihadist groups are governing territory. They will never stay there, though. They are driven to expand. Their raison d’etre is to be against the West, against the Crusaders, against the fill-in-the-blank—and we all fit into one of these categories. How do we try to contain that? I’m thinking a lot about containment, deterrence, and defeat.”

She went on, “You know, we did a good job in containing the Soviet Union but we made a lot of mistakes, we supported really nasty guys, we did some things that we are not particularly proud of, from Latin America to Southeast Asia, but we did have a kind of overarching framework about what we were trying to do that did lead to the defeat of the Soviet Union and the collapse of Communism. That was our objective. We achieved it.” (This was one of those moments, by the way, when I was absolutely sure I wasn’t listening to President Obama, who is loath to discuss the threat of Islamist terrorism in such a sweeping manner.)

Much of my conversation with Clinton focused on the Gaza war. She offered a vociferous defense of Israel, and of its prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, as well. This is noteworthy because, as secretary of state, she spent a lot of time yelling at Netanyahu on the administration’s behalf over Israel’s West Bank settlement policy. Now, she is leaving no daylight at all between the Israelis and herself.

“I think Israel did what it had to do to respond to the rockets,” she told me. “Israel has a right to defend itself. The steps Hamas has taken to embed rockets and command-and-control facilities and tunnel entrances in civilian areas, this makes a response by Israel difficult.”

I asked her if she believed that Israel had done enough to prevent the deaths of children and other innocent people.

“[J]ust as we try to do in the United States and be as careful as possible in going after targets to avoid civilians,” mistakes are made, she said. “We’ve made them. I don’t know a nation, no matter what its values are—and I think that democratic nations have demonstrably better values in a conflict position—that hasn’t made errors, but ultimately the responsibility rests with Hamas.”
She went on to say that “it’s impossible to know what happens in the fog of war. Some reports say, maybe it wasn’t the exact UN school that was bombed, but it was the annex to the school next door where they were firing the rockets. And I do think oftentimes that the anguish you are privy to because of the coverage, and the women and the children and all the rest of that, makes it very difficult to sort through to get to the truth.”

She continued, “There’s no doubt in my mind that Hamas initiated this conflict. … So the ultimate responsibility has to rest on Hamas and the decisions it made.”

When I asked her about the intense international focus on Gaza, she was quick to identify anti-Semitism as an important motivating factor in criticism of Israel. “It is striking … that you have more than 170,000 people dead in Syria. … You have Russia massing battalions—Russia, that actually annexed and is occupying part of a UN member-state—and I fear that it will do even more to prevent the incremental success of the Ukrainian government to take back its own territory, other than Crimea. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Ukraine on both sides, not counting the [Malaysia Airlines] plane, and yet we do see this enormous international reaction against Israel, and Israel’s right to defend itself, and the way Israel has to defend itself. This reaction is uncalled for and unfair.”

She went on, “You can’t ever discount anti-Semitism, especially with what’s going on in Europe today. There are more demonstrations against Israel by an exponential amount than there are against Russia seizing part of Ukraine and shooting down a civilian airliner. So there’s something else at work here than what you see on TV.” Clinton also blamed Hamas for “stage-managing” the conflict. “What you see is largely what Hamas invites and permits Western journalists to report on from Gaza. It’s the old PR problem that Israel has. Yes, there are substantive, deep levels of antagonism or anti-Semitism towards Israel, because it’s a powerful state, a really effective military. And Hamas paints itself as the defender of the rights of the Palestinians to have their own state. So the PR battle is one that is historically tilted against Israel.”

Clinton also seemed to take an indirect shot at administration critics of Netanyahu, who has argued that the rise of Muslim fundamentalism in the Middle East means that Israel cannot, in the foreseeable future, withdraw its forces from much of the West Bank. “If I were the prime minister of Israel, you’re damn right I would expect to have control over security, because even if I’m dealing with [Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud] Abbas, who is 79 years old, and other members of Fatah, who are enjoying a better lifestyle and making money on all kinds of things, that does not protect Israel from the influx of Hamas or cross-border attacks from anywhere else. With Syria and Iraq, it is all one big threat. So Netanyahu could not do this in good conscience.”

She also struck a notably hard line on Iran’s nuclear demands. “I’ve always been in the camp that held that they did not have a right to enrichment,” Clinton said. “Contrary to their claim, there is no such thing as a right to enrich. This is absolutely unfounded. There is no such right. I am well aware that I am not at the negotiating table anymore, but I think it’s important to send a signal to everybody who is there that there cannot be a deal unless there is a clear set of restrictions on Iran. The preference would be no enrichment. The potential fallback position would be such little enrichment that they could not break out.” When I asked her if the demands of Israel, and of America’s Arab allies, that Iran not be allowed any uranium-enrichment capability whatsoever were militant or unrealistic, she said, “I think it’s important that they stake out that position.”

What follows is a transcript of our conversation. It has been edited for clarity but not for length, as you will see. Two other things to look for: First, the masterful way in which Clinton says she has drawn no conclusions about events in Syria and elsewhere, and then draws rigorously reasoned conclusions. Second, her fascinating and complicated analysis of the Muslim Brotherhood’s ill-fated dalliance with democracy.
JEFFREY GOLDBERG: It seems that you’ve shifted your position on Iran’s nuclear ambitions. By [chief U.S. negotiator] Wendy Sherman’s definition of maximalism, you’ve taken a fairly maximalist position—little or no enrichment for Iran. Are you taking a harder line than your former colleagues in the Obama administration are taking on this matter?

HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON: It’s a consistent line. I’ve always been in the camp that held that they did not have a right to enrichment. Contrary to their claim, there is no such thing as a right to enrich. This is absolutely unfounded. There is no such right. I am well aware that I am not at the negotiating table anymore, but I think it’s important to send a signal to everybody who is there that there cannot be a deal unless there is a clear set of restrictions on Iran. The preference would be no enrichment. The potential fallback position would be such little enrichment that they could not break out. So, little or no enrichment has always been my position.

JG: Am I wrong in saying that the Obama administration’s negotiators have a more flexible understanding of this issue at the moment?

HRC: I don’t want to speak for them, but I would argue that Iran, through the voice of the supreme leader, has taken a very maximalist position—he wants 190,000 centrifuges and the right to enrich. And some in our Congress, and some of our best friends, have taken the opposite position—absolutely no enrichment. I think in a negotiation you need to be very clear about what it is going to take to move the other side. I think at the moment there is a big debate going on in Tehran about what they can or should do in order to get relief from the sanctions. It’s my understanding that we still have a united P5+1 position, which is intensive inspections, very clear limits on what they can do in their facilities that they would permitted to operate, and then how they handle this question of enrichment, whether it’s done from the outside, or whether it can truly be constrained to meet what I think our standard should be of little-to-no enrichment. That’s what this negotiation is about.

JG: But there is no sign that the Iranians are willing to pull back—freezing in place is the farthest they seem to be willing to go. Am I wrong?

HRC: We don’t know. I think there’s a political debate. I think you had the position staked out by the supreme leader that they’re going to get to do what they want to do, and that they don’t have any intention of having a nuclear weapon but they nevertheless want 190,000 centrifuges (laughs). I think the political, non-clerical side of the equation is basically saying, “Look, you know, getting relief from these sanctions is economically and politically important to us. We have our hands full in Syria and Iraq, just to name two places, maybe increasingly in Lebanon, and who knows what’s going to happen with us and Hamas. So what harm does it do to have a very strict regime that we can live under until we determine that maybe we won’t have to any longer?” That, I think, is the other side of the argument.
JG: Would you be content with an Iran that is perpetually a year away from being able to reach nuclear-breakout capability?

HRC: I would like it to be more than a year. I think it should be more than a year. No enrichment at all would make everyone breathe easier. If, however, they want a little bit for the Tehran research reactor, or a little bit for this scientific researcher, but they’ll never go above 5 percent enrichment—

JG: So, a few thousand centrifuges?

HRC: We know what “no” means. If we’re talking a little, we’re talking about a discrete, constantly inspected number of centrifuges. “No” is my preference.

JG: Would you define what “a little” means?

HRC: No.

JG: So what the Gulf states want, and what the Israelis want, which is to say no enrichment at all, is not a militant, unrealistic position?

HRC: It’s not an unrealistic position. I think it’s important that they stake out that position.

JG: So, Gaza. As you write in your book, you negotiated the last long-term ceasefire in 2012. Are you surprised at all that it didn’t hold?

HRC: I’m surprised that it held as long as it did. But given the changes in the region, the fall of [former Egyptian President Mohamed] Morsi, his replacement by [Abdel Fattah] al-Sisi, the corner that Hamas felt itself in, I’m not surprised that Hamas provoked another attack.

JG: The Israeli response, was it disproportionate?

HRC: Israel was attacked by rockets from Gaza. Israel has a right to defend itself. The steps Hamas has taken to embed rockets and command-and-control facilities and tunnel entrances in civilian areas, this makes a response by Israel difficult. Of course Israel, just like the United States, or any other democratic country, should do everything they can possibly do to limit civilian casualties.

« We see this enormous international reaction against Israel. This reaction is uncalled for and unfair. »
JG: Do you think Israel did enough to limit civilian casualties?

HRC: It’s unclear. I think Israel did what it had to do to respond to the rockets. And there is the surprising number and complexity of the tunnels, and Hamas has consistently, not just in this conflict, but in the past, been less than protective of their civilians.

JG: Before we continue talking endlessly about Gaza, can I ask you if you think we spend too much time on Gaza and on Israel-Palestine generally? I ask because over the past year or so your successor spent a tremendous amount of time on the Israel-Palestinian file and in the same period of time an al Qaeda-inspired organization took over half of Syria and Iraq.

HRC: Right, right.

JG: I understand that secretaries of state can do more than one thing at a time. But what is the cause of this preoccupation?

HRC: I’ve thought a lot about this, because you do have a number of conflicts going on right now. As the U.S., as a U.S. official, you have to pay attention to anything that threatens Israel directly, or anything in the larger Middle East that arises out of the Palestinian-Israeli situation. That’s just a given.

It is striking, however, that you have more than 170,000 people dead in Syria. You have the vacuum that has been created by the relentless assault by Assad on his own population, an assault that has bred these extremist groups, the most well-known of which, ISIS—or ISIL—is now literally expanding its territory inside Syria and inside Iraq. You have Russia massing battalions—Russia, that actually annexed and is occupying part of a UN member state—and I fear that it will do even more to prevent the incremental success of the Ukrainian government to take back its own territory, other than Crimea. More than 1,000 people have been killed in Ukraine on both sides, not counting the [Malaysia Airlines] plane, and yet we do see this enormous international reaction against Israel, and Israel’s right to defend itself, and the way Israel has to defend itself. This reaction is uncalled for and unfair.

JG: What do you think causes this reaction?

HRC: There are a number of factors going into it. You can’t ever discount anti-Semitism, especially with what’s going on in Europe today. There are more demonstrations against Israel by an exponential amount than there are against Russia seizing part of Ukraine and shooting down a civilian airliner. So there’s something else at work here than what you see on TV.

And what you see on TV is so effectively stage-managed by Hamas, and always has been. What you see is largely what Hamas invites and permits Western journalists to report on from Gaza. It’s the old PR problem that Israel has. Yes, there are substantive, deep levels of antagonism or anti-Semitism towards Israel, because it’s a powerful state, a really effective military. And Hamas paints itself as the defender of the rights of the Palestinians to have their own state. So the PR battle is one that is historically tilted against Israel.

« There’s no doubt in my mind that Hamas initiated this conflict and did so to leverage its position. »
JG: Nevertheless there are hundreds of children—

HRC: Absolutely, and it’s dreadful.

JG: Who do you hold responsible for those deaths? How do you parcel out blame?

HRC: I’m not sure it’s possible to parcel out blame because it’s impossible to know what happens in the fog of war. Some reports say, maybe it wasn’t the exact UN school that was bombed, but it was the annex to the school next door where they were firing the rockets. And I do think oftentimes that the anguish you are privy to because of the coverage, and the women and the children and all the rest of that, makes it very difficult to sort through to get to the truth.

There’s no doubt in my mind that Hamas initiated this conflict and wanted to do so in order to leverage its position, having been shut out by the Egyptians post-Morsi, having been shunned by the Gulf, having been pulled into a technocratic government with Fatah and the Palestinian Authority that might have caused better governance and a greater willingness on the part of the people of Gaza to move away from tolerating Hamas in their midst. So the ultimate responsibility has to rest on Hamas and the decisions it made.

That doesn’t mean that, just as we try to do in the United States and be as careful as possible in going after targets to avoid civilians, that there aren’t mistakes that are made. We’ve made them. I don’t know a nation, no matter what its values are—and I think that democratic nations have demonstrably better values in a conflict position—that hasn’t made errors, but ultimately the responsibility rests with Hamas.

JG: Several years ago, when you were in the Senate, we had a conversation about what would move Israeli leaders to make compromises for peace. You’ve had a lot of arguments with Netanyahu. What is your thinking on Netanyahu now?
HRC: Let’s step back. First of all, [former Israeli Prime Minister] Yitzhak Rabin was prepared to do so much and he was murdered for that belief. And then [former Israeli Prime Minister] Ehud Barak offered everything you could imagine being given under any realistic scenario to the Palestinians for their state, and [former Palestinian leader Yasir] Arafat walked away. I don’t care about the revisionist history. I know that Arafat walked away, okay? Everybody says, “American needs to say something.” Well, we said it, it was the Clinton parameters, we put it out there, and Bill Clinton is adored in Israel, as you know. He got Netanyahu to give up territory, which Netanyahu believes lost him the prime ministership [in his first term], but he moved in that direction, as hard as it was.

Bush pretty much ignored what was going on and they made a terrible error in the Palestinian elections [in which Hamas came to power in Gaza], but he did come with the Roadmap [to Peace] and the Roadmap was credible and it talked about what needed to be done, and this is one area where I give the Palestinians credit. Under [former Palestinian Prime Minister] Salam Fayyad, they made a lot of progress.

I had the last face-to-face negotiations between Abbas and Netanyahu. [Secretary of State John] Kerry never got there. I had them in the room three times with [former Middle East negotiator] George Mitchell and me, and that was it. And I saw Netanyahu move from being against the two-state solution to announcing his support for it, to considering all kinds of Barak-like options, way far from what he is, and what he is comfortable with.

Now I put Jerusalem in a different category. That is the hardest issue, Again, based on my experience—and you know, I got Netanyahu to agree to the unprecedented  settlement freeze, it did not cover East Jerusalem, but it did cover the West Bank and it was actually legitimate and it did stop new housing starts for 10 months. It took me nine months to get Abbas into the negotiations even after we delivered on the settlement freeze, he had a million reasons, some of them legitimate, some of them the same old, same old.

So what I tell people is, yeah, if I were the prime minister of Israel, you’re damn right I would expect to have control over security [on the West Bank], because even if I’m dealing with Abbas, who is 79 years old, and other members of Fatah, who are enjoying a better lifestyle and making money on all kinds of things, that does not protect Israel from the influx of Hamas or cross-border attacks from anywhere else. With Syria and Iraq, it is all one big threat. So Netanyahu could not do this in good conscience. If this were Rabin or Barak in his place—and I’ve talked to Ehud about this—they would have to demand a level of security that would be provided by the [Israel Defense Forces] for a period of time. And in my meetings with them I got Abbas to about six, seven, eight years on continued IDF presence. Now he’s fallen back to three, but he was with me at six, seven, eight. I got Netanyahu to go from forever to 2025. That’s a negotiation, okay? So I know. Dealing with Bibi is not easy, so people get frustrated and they lose sight of what we’re trying to achieve here.

Hillary Clinton meets Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in 2010. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)
JG: You go out of your way in Hard Choices to praise Robert Ford, who recently quit as U.S. ambassador to Syria, as an excellent diplomat. Ford quit in protest and has recently written strongly about what he sees as the inadequacies of Obama administration policy. Do you agree with Ford that we are at fault for not doing enough to build up a credible Syrian opposition when we could have?

HRC: I have the highest regard for Robert. I’m the one who convinced the administration to send an ambassador to Syria. You know, this is why I called the chapter on Syria “A Wicked Problem.” I can’t sit here today and say that if we had done what I recommended, and what Robert Ford recommended, that we’d be in a demonstrably different place.

JG: That’s the president’s argument, that we wouldn’t be in a different place.

HRC: Well, I did believe, which is why I advocated this, that if we were to carefully vet, train, and equip early on a core group of the developing Free Syrian Army, we would, number one, have some better insight into what was going on on the ground. Two, we would have been helped in standing up a credible political opposition, which would prove to be very difficult, because there was this constant struggle between what was largely an exile group outside of Syria trying to claim to be the political opposition, and the people on the ground, primarily those doing the fighting and dying, who rejected that, and we were never able to bridge that, despite a lot of efforts that Robert and others made.

So I did think that eventually, and I said this at the time, in a conflict like this, the hard men with the guns are going to be the more likely actors in any political transition than those on the outside just talking. And therefore we needed to figure out how we could support them on the ground, better equip them, and we didn’t have to go all the way, and I totally understand the cautions that we had to contend with, but we’ll never know. And I don’t think we can claim to know.

JG: You do have a suspicion, though.

HRC: Obviously. I advocated for a position.

JG: Do you think we’d be where we are with ISIS right now if the U.S. had done more three years ago to build up a moderate Syrian opposition?

HRC: Well, I don’t know the answer to that. I know that the failure to help build up a credible fighting force of the people who were the originators of the protests against Assad—there were Islamists, there were secularists, there was everything in the middle—the failure to do that left a big vacuum, which the jihadists have now filled.

They were often armed in an indiscriminate way by other forces and we had no skin in the game that really enabled us to prevent this indiscriminate arming.

JG: Is there a chance that President Obama overlearned the lessons of the previous administration? In other words, if the story of the Bush administration is one of overreach, is the story of the Obama administration one of underreach?

HRC: You know, I don’t think you can draw that conclusion. It’s a very key question. How do you calibrate, that’s the key issue. I think we have learned a lot during this period, but then how to apply it going forward will still take a lot of calibration and balancing. But you know, we helped overthrow [Libyan leader Muammar] Qaddafi.
JG: But we didn’t stick around for the aftermath.

HRC: Well, we did stick around. We stuck around with offers of money and technical assistance, on everything from getting rid of some of the nasty stuff he left behind, to border security, to training. It wasn’t just us, it was the Europeans as well. Some of the Gulf countries had their particular favorites. They certainly stuck around and backed their favorite militias. It is not yet clear how the Libyans themselves will overcome the lack of security, which they inherited from Qaddafi. Remember, they’ve had two good elections. They’ve elected moderates and secularists and a limited number of Islamists, so you talk about democracy in action—the Libyans have done it twice—but they can’t control the ground. But how can you help when you have so many different players who looted the stuffed warehouses of every kind of weapon from the Qaddafi regime, some of which they’re using in Libya, some of which they’re passing out around the region?

So you can go back and argue either, we should we have helped the people of Libya try to overthrow a dictator who, remember, killed Americans and did a lot of other bad stuff, or we should have been on the sidelines. In this case we helped, but that didn’t make the road any easier in Syria, where we said, “It’s messy, it’s complicated, we’re not sure what the outcome will be.” So what I’m hoping for is that we sort out what we have learned, because we’ve tried a bunch of different approaches. Egypt is a perfect example. The revolution in Tahrir Square was not a Muslim Brotherhood revolution. It was not led by Islamists. They came very late to the party. Mubarak falls and I’m in Cairo a short time after, meeting the leaders of this movement, and I’m saying, “Okay, who’s going to run for office? Who’s going to form a political party?” and they’re saying, “We don’t do that, that’s not who we are.”

And I said that there are only two organized groups in this country, the military and the Muslim Brotherhood, and what we have here is an old lesson that you can’t beat somebody with nobody. There was a real opportunity here to, if a group had arisen out of the revolution, to create a democratic Egyptian alternative. Didn’t  happen. What do we have to think about? In order to do that better, I see a lot of questions that we have to be answering. I don’t think we can draw judgments yet. I think we can draw a judgment about the Bush administration in terms of overreach, but I don’t know that we can reach a conclusion about underreach.

Hillary Cliinton poses with Libyan soldiers in the fall of 2011. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)
JG: There is this moment in your book, in which Morsi tells you not to worry about jihadists in the Sinai—he says in essence that now that a Muslim Brotherhood government is in charge, jihadists won’t feel the need to continue their campaign. You write that this was either shockingly sinister or shockingly naïve. Which one do you think it was?

HRC: I think Morsi was naïve. I’m just talking about Morsi, not necessarily anyone else in the Muslim Brotherhood. I think he genuinely believed that with the legitimacy of an elected Islamist government, that the jihadists would see that there was a different route to power and influence and would be part of the political process. He had every hope, in fact, that the credible election of a Muslim Brotherhood government would mean the end of jihadist activities within Egypt, and also exemplify that there’s a different way to power.

The debate is between the bin Ladens of the world and the Muslim Brotherhood. The bin Ladens believe you can’t overthrow the infidels or the impure through politics. It has to be through violent resistance. So when I made the case to Morsi that we were picking up a lot of intelligence about jihadist groups creating safe havens inside Sinai, and that this would be a threat not only to Israel but to Egypt, he just dismissed this out of hand, and then shortly thereafter a large group of Egyptian soldiers were murdered.

JG: In an interview in 2011, I asked you if we should fear the Muslim Brotherhood—this is well before they came into power—and you said, ‘The jury is out.” Is the jury still out for you today?

HRC: I think the jury would come back with a lesser included offense, and that is a failure to govern in a democratic, inclusive manner while holding power in Cairo. The Muslim Brotherhood had the most extraordinary opportunity to demonstrate the potential for an Islamist movement to take responsibility for governance, and they were ill-prepared and unable to make the transition from movement to responsibility. We will see how they respond to the crackdown they’re under in Egypt, but the Muslim Brotherhood itself, although it had close ties with Hamas, for example, had not evidenced, because they were kept under tight control by Mubarak, the willingness to engage in violent conflict to achieve their goals. So the jury is in on their failure to govern in a way that would win the confidence of the entire Egyptian electorate. The jury is out as to whether they morph into a violent jihadist resistance group.

« The jury is out as to whether the Muslim Brotherhood morphs into a violent jihadist resistance group. »
JG: There’s a critique you hear of the Obama administration in the Gulf, in Jordan, in Israel, that it is a sign of naiveté to believe that there are Islamists you can work with, and that Hamas might even be a group that you could work with. Is there a role for political Islam in these countries? Can we ever find a way to work with them?

HRC: I think it’s too soon to tell. I would not put Hamas in the category of people we could work with. I don’t think that is realistic because its whole reason for being is resistance against Israel, destruction of Israel, and it is married to very nasty tactics and ideologies, including virulent anti-Semitism. I do not think they should be in any way treated as a legitimate interlocutor, especially because if you do that, it redounds to the disadvantage of the Palestinian Authority, which has a lot of problems, but historically has changed its charter, moved away from the kind of guerrilla resistance movement of previous decades.

I think you have to ask yourself, could different leaders have made a difference in the Muslim Brotherhood’s governance of Egypt? We won’t know and we can’t know the answer to that question. We know that Morsi was ill-equipped to be president of Egypt. He had no political experience. He was an engineer, he was wedded to the ideology of top-down control.

JG: But you’re open to the idea that there are sophisticated Islamists out there?
HRC: I think you’ve seen a level of sophistication in Tunisia. It’s a very different environment than Egypt, much smaller, but you’ve seen the Ennahda Party evolve from being quite demanding that their position be accepted as the national position but then being willing to step back in the face of very strong political opposition from secularists, from moderate Muslims, etc. So Tunisia might not be the tail that wags the dog, but it’s an interesting tail. If you look at Morocco, where the king had a major role in organizing the electoral change, you have a head of state who is a monarch who is descended from Muhammad, you have a government that is largely but not completely representative of the Muslim party of Morocco. So I think that there are not a lot of analogies, but when you look around the world, there’s a Hindu nationalist party now, back in power in India. The big question for Prime Minister Modi is how inclusive he will be as leader because of questions raised concerning his governance of Gujurat [the state he governed, which was the scene of anti-Muslim riots in 2002]. There were certainly Christian parties in Europe, pre- and post-World War II. They had very strong values that they wanted to see their society follow, but they were steeped in democracy, so they were good political actors.

JG: So, it’s not an impossibility.

HRC: It’s not an impossibility. So far, it doesn’t seem likely. We have to say that. Because for whatever reason, whatever combination of reasons, there hasn’t been the soil necessary to nurture the political side of the experience, for people whose primary self-definition is as Islamists.

« We’ve learned about the limits of our power. But we’ve also learned about the importance of our power appropriately deployed and explained. »
JG: Are we so egocentric, so Washington-centric, that we think that our decisions are dispositive? As secretary, did you learn more about the possibilities of American power or the limitations of American power?

HRC: Both, but it’s not just about American power. It’s American values that also happen to be universal values. If you have no political—small “p”—experience, it is really hard to go from a dictatorship to anything resembling what you and I would call democracy. That’s the lesson of Egypt. We didn’t invade Egypt. They did it themselves, and once they did it they looked around and didn’t know what they were supposed to do next.

I think we’ve learned about the limits of our power to spread freedom and democracy. That’s one of the big lessons out of Iraq. But we’ve also learned about the importance of our power, our influence, and our values appropriately deployed and explained. If you’re looking at what we could have done that would have been more effective, would have been more accepted by the Egyptians on the political front, what could we have done that would have been more effective in Libya, where they did their elections really well under incredibly difficult circumstances but they looked around and they had no levers to pull because they had these militias out there. My passion is, let’s do some after-action reviews, let’s learn these lessons, let’s figure out how we’re going to have different and better responses going forward.

JG: Is the lesson for you, like it is for President Obama, “Don’t do stupid shit”?

HRC: That’s a good lesson but it’s more complicated than that. Because your stupid may not be mine, and vice versa. I don’t think it was stupid for the United States to do everything we could to remove Qaddafi because that came from the bottom up. That was people asking us to help. It was stupid to do what we did in Iraq and to have no plan about what to do after we did it. That was really stupid. I don’t think you can quickly jump to conclusions about what falls into the stupid and non-stupid categories. That’s what I’m arguing.

JG: Do you think the next administration, whoever it is, can find some harmony between muscular intervention—“We must do something”—vs. let’s just not do something stupid, let’s stay away from problems like Syria because it’s a wicked problem and not something we want to tackle?

HRC: I think part of the challenge is that our government too often has a tendency to swing between these extremes. The pendulum swings back and then the pendulum swings the other way. What I’m arguing for is to take a hard look at what tools we have. Are they sufficient for the complex situations we’re going to face, or not? And what can we do to have better tools? I do think that is an important debate.

One of the reasons why I worry about what’s happening in the Middle East right now is because of the breakout capacity of jihadist groups that can affect Europe, can affect the United States. Jihadist groups are governing territory. They will never stay there, though. They are driven to expand. Their raison d’être is to be against the West, against the Crusaders, against the fill-in-the-blank—and we all fit into one of these categories. How do we try to contain that? I’m thinking a lot about containment, deterrence, and defeat. You know, we did a good job in containing the Soviet Union, but we made a lot of mistakes, we supported really nasty guys, we did some things that we are not particularly proud of, from Latin America to Southeast Asia, but we did have a kind of overarching framework about what we were trying to do that did lead to the defeat of the Soviet Union and the collapse of Communism. That was our objective. We achieved it.

Now the big mistake was thinking that, okay, the end of history has come upon us, after the fall of the Soviet Union. That was never true, history never stops and nationalisms were going to assert themselves, and then other variations on ideologies were going to claim  their space. Obviously, jihadi Islam is the prime example, but not the only example—the effort by Putin to restore his vision of Russian greatness is another. In the world in which we are living right now, vacuums get filled by some pretty unsavory players.

Hillary Clinton and Vladimir Putin, in 2012 (Jim Watson/Reuters)
JG: There doesn’t seem to be a domestic constituency for the type of engagement you might symbolize.

HRC: Well, that’s because most Americans think of engagement and go immediately to military engagement. That’s why I use the phrase “smart power.” I did it deliberately because I thought we had to have another way of talking about American engagement, other than unilateralism and the so-called boots on the ground.

You know, when you’re down on yourself, and when you are hunkering down and pulling back, you’re not going to make any better decisions than when you were aggressively, belligerently putting yourself forward. One issue is that we don’t even tell our own story very well these days.
JG: I think that defeating fascism and communism is a pretty big deal.

HRC: That’s how I feel! Maybe this is old-fashioned. Okay, I feel that this might be an old-fashioned idea—but I’m about to find out, in more ways than one.

Great nations need organizing principles, and “Don’t do stupid stuff” is not an organizing principle. It may be a necessary brake on the actions you might take in order to promote a vision.

JG: So why do you think the president went out of his way to suggest recently that that this is his foreign policy in a nutshell?

HRC: I think he was trying to communicate to the American people that he’s not going to do something crazy. I’ve sat in too many rooms with the president. He’s thoughtful, he’s incredibly smart, and able to analyze a lot of different factors that are all moving at the same time. I think he is cautious because he knows what he inherited, both the two wars and the economic front, and he has expended a lot of capital and energy trying to pull us out of the hole we’re in.

So I think that that’s a political message. It’s not his worldview, if that makes sense to you.

Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama on the campaign trail, in 2008 (Jim Young/Reuters)
JG: There is an idea in some quarters that the administration shows signs of believing that we, the U.S., aren’t so great, so we shouldn’t be telling people what to do.

HRC: I know that that is an opinion held by a certain group of Americans, I get all that. It’s not where I’m at.

JG: What is your organizing principle, then?

HRC: Peace, progress, and prosperity. This worked for a very long time. Take prosperity. That’s a huge domestic challenge for us. If we don’t restore the American dream for Americans, then you can forget about any kind of continuing leadership in the world. Americans deserve to feel secure in their own lives, in their own middle-class aspirations, before you go to them and say, “We’re going to have to enforce navigable sea lanes in the South China Sea.” You’ve got to take care of your home first. That’s another part of the political messaging that you have to engage in right now. People are not only turned off about being engaged in the world, they’re pretty discouraged about what’s happening here at home.

I think people want—and this is a generalization I will go ahead and make—people want to make sure our economic situation improves and that our political decision-making improves. Whether they articulate it this way or not, I think people feel like we’re facing really important challenges here at home: The economy is not growing, the middle class is not feeling like they are secure, and we are living in a time of gridlock and dysfunction that is just frustrating and outraging.

People assume that we’re going to have to do what we do so long as it’s not stupid, but what people want us to focus on are problems here at home. If you were to scratch below the surface on that—and I haven’t looked at the research or the polling—but I think people would say, first things first. Let’s make sure we are taking care of our people and we’re doing it in a way that will bring rewards to those of us who work hard, play by the rules, and yeah, we don’t want to see the world go to hell in a handbasket, and they don’t want to see a resurgence of aggression by anybody.

JG: Do you think they understand your idea about expansionist jihadism following us home?

HRC: I don’t know that people are thinking about it. People are thinking about what is wrong with people in Washington that they can’t make decisions, and they want the economy to grow again. People are feeling a little bit that there’s a little bit happening that is making them feel better about the economy, but it’s not nearly enough where it should be.

JG: Have you been able to embed your women’s agenda at the core of what the federal government does?

HRC: Yes, we did. We had the first-ever ambassador for global women’s issues. That’s permanent now, and that’s a big deal because that is the beachhead.

Secretary Kerry to his credit has issued directions to embassies and diplomats about this continuing to be a priority for our government. There is also a much greater basis in research now that proves you cannot have peace and security without the participation of women. You can’t grow your GDP without opening the doors to full participation of women and girls in the formal economy.

JG: There’s a link between misogyny and stagnation in the Middle East, which in many ways is the world’s most dysfunctional region.

HRC: It’s now very provable, when you look at the data from the IMF and the World Bank and what opening the formal economy would mean to a country’s GDP. You have Prime Minister [Shinzo] Abe in Japan who was elected to fix the economy after so many years of dysfunction in Japan, and one of the major elements in his plan is to get women into the workforce. If you do that, if I remember correctly, the GDP for Japan would go up nine percent. Well, it would go up 34 percent in Egypt. So it’s self-evident and provable.

Voir enfin:

The Hillary Metamorphosis
Reasons to be skeptical about Mrs. Clinton’s self-reinvention as a foreign-policy hawk.
Bret Stephens
WSJ
Aug. 11, 2014 7

Robert Gates, who is the Captain Renault of our time, recounts the following White House exchange between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, back when she was serving the president loyally as secretary of state and he was taking notes as secretary of defense.

« In strongly supporting a surge in Afghanistan, » Mr. Gates writes in his memoir, « Duty, » « Hillary told the president that her opposition in Iraq had been political because she was facing him in the primary. She went on to say, ‘The Iraq surge worked.’ The president conceded vaguely that opposition to the surge had been political. To hear the two of them making these admissions, and in front of me, was as surprising as it was dismaying. »

Here’s a fit subject for an undergraduate philosophy seminar: What, or who, is your true self? Are you Kierkegaardian or Aristotelian? Is the real « you » the interior and subjective you; the you of your private whispers and good intentions? Or are you only the sum of your public behavior, statements and actions? Are you the you that you have been, and are? Or are you what you are, perhaps, becoming?

And if Mrs. Clinton supported the surge in private—because she thought it would help America win a war—but opposed it in public—because she needed to win a primary—shall we conclude that she is (a) despicable; (b) clever; (c) both; or (d) « what difference, at this point, does it make? »

***
All this comes to mind after reading Mrs. Clinton’s remarkable interview with Jeffrey Goldberg in the Atlantic. « Great nations need organizing principles, » she said, in the interview’s most quotable line, « and ‘Don’t do stupid stuff’ is not an organizing principle. »

That one is a direct riposte to the White House’s latest brainstorm of a guiding foreign-policy concept. But it wasn’t Mrs. Clinton’s only put-down of her old boss.

She was scathing on the president’s abdication in Syria: « I know that the failure »—failure— »to help build a credible fighting force of the people who were the originators of the protests against Assad . . . the failure to do that left a big vacuum, which the jihadists have now filled. » She was unequivocal in her defense of Israel, in a way that would be unimaginable coming from John Kerry : « If I were prime minister of Israel, you’re damn right I would expect to have control over security [on the West Bank]. » She was dubious about the nuclear diplomacy with Iran, and the administration’s willingness to concede to Tehran a « right » to enrich uranium.

She blasted Israel’s critics in its war against Hamas: « You can’t ever discount anti-Semitism, especially with what’s going on in Europe today. » She hinted at the corruption of Mahmoud Abbas and his inner circle, « who are enjoying a better lifestyle and making money on all kinds of things. » She blamed Moscow for « shooting down a civilian jetliner, » presumably while the president waits for the results of a forensic investigation.

And she made the case for American power: « We’ve learned about the limits of our power to spread freedom and democracy. That’s one big lesson out of Iraq. But we’ve also learned about the importance of our power, our influence, and our values. » With Mr. Obama, the emphasis is always on the limitations, period.

All this sounds a lot like what you might read on this editorial page. Whatever happened to the Hillary Clinton who was an early advocate of diplomatic engagement with Iran, and who praised Bashar Assad as a « reformer » and pointedly refused to call for his ouster six months into the uprising? Wasn’t she the most vocal and enthusiastic advocate for the reset with Russia? Didn’t she deliver White House messages to Benjamin Netanyahu by yelling at him? Didn’t she also once describe former Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak as a family friend?

And didn’t she characterize her relationship with Mr. Obama—in that cloying « 60 Minutes » exit interview the two of them did with Steve Kroft —as « very warm, very close »? Where’s the love now?

***
There are a few possible answers to that one. One is that the views she expressed in the interview are sincere and long-held and she was always a closet neoconservative; Commentary magazine is delivered to her mailbox in an unmarked brown envelope. Another is that Mrs. Clinton can read a poll: Americans now disapprove of the president’s handling of foreign policy by a 57% to 37% margin, and she belatedly needs to disavow the consequences of the policies she once advocated. A third is that she believes in whatever she says, at least at the time she’s saying it. She is a Clinton, after all.

There’s something to all of these theories: The political opportunist always lacks the courage of his, or her, convictions. That’s not necessarily because there aren’t any convictions. It’s because the convictions are always subordinated to the needs of ambition and ingratiation.

Then again, who cares who Mrs. Clinton really is? When the question needs to be asked, it means we already know, or should know, how to answer it. The truth about Mrs. Clinton isn’t what’s potentially at stake in the next election. It’s the truth about who we are. Are we prepared to believe anything?

We tried that with Barack Obama, the man who promised to be whatever we wanted him to be. Mrs. Clinton’s self-reinvention as a hawk invites us to make the mistake twice.


Antisémitisme: Une seule injustice tolérée suffit à remettre en cause l’idée même de la justice (Former foreign affairs minister harks back to France’s long tradition of antisemitism at the very top)

11 août, 2014

Cet antisémitisme est une pathologie, une maladie qu’il faut combattre. Cette vague d’antisémitisme est enracinée dans cette croyance d’un Islam militant qui attaque les Juifs. La charte du Hamas demande l’éradication de tous les Juifs, pas seulement l’État juif. Ils ne veulent pas une solution à deux États. Ils veulent un seul État sans Juif. Donc ce n’est pas étonnant que les amis du Hamas en France, et ailleurs en Europe, partagent cette idéologie antisémite, et il faut la combattre. (…) Ce n’est pas la bataille d’Israël, c’est la bataille de la France, car s’ils réussissent ici et que nous ne sommes pas solidaires, et bien cette peste du terrorisme viendra chez vous. C’est une question de temps mais elle viendra en France. Et c’est déjà le cas.  Benjamin Netanyahou
Notre démocratie est uniquement le train dans lequel nous montons jusqu’à ce que nous ayons atteint notre objectif. Les mosquées sont nos casernes, les minarets sont nos baïonnettes, les coupoles nos casques et les croyants nos soldats. Erdogan (1997)
La démocratie et ses fondements jusqu’à aujourd’hui peuvent être perçus à la fois comme une fin en soi ou un moyen. Selon nous la démocratie est seulement un moyen. Si vous voulez entrer dans n’importe quel système, l’élection est un moyen. La démocratie est comme un tramway, il va jusqu’où vous voulez aller, et là vous descendez. Erdogan
Dites-moi, quelle est la différence entre les opérations israéliennes et celles des nazis et d’Hitler. C’est du racisme, du fascisme. Ce qui est fait à Gaza revient à raviver l’esprit du mal et pervers d’Hitler. Erdogan
Ce n’est pas la première fois que nous sommes confrontés à une telle situation. Depuis 1948, tous les jours, tous les mois et surtout pendant le mois sacré du ramadan, nous assistons à une tentative de génocide systématique. Recep Tayyip Erdogan (premier ministre turc)
Erdogan va instaurer un régime basé sur un seul homme, qui frôle une dictature. Car il a supprimé la séparation des pouvoirs. L’exécutif, c’est lui, le législatif, c’est son parti, la justice est sous sa tutelle, les juges et les procureurs qui ouvrent des enquêtes non désirées sont immédiatement virés. Quant au quatrième pouvoir, les médias sont, en dehors de quelques exceptions, sous son contrôle. Baskin Oran
« L’argent leur sert à nouer des liens avec les élites. Quand ils achètent le PSG ou le Prix de l’Arc de triomphe, ils s’offrent aussi un accès privilégié au Tout-Paris, friand des invitations en loge », observe un habitué de ces rendez-vous mondains. Pour harponner les Français qui comptent, HBJ s’appuie sur l’ambassadeur du Qatar, son homme lige à Paris. Ce dimanche midi, le très urbain Mohamed al-Kuwari, qui a longtemps été directeur de cabinet du Premier ministre, accueille lui-même le millier d’invités qui se presse au palais d’Iéna. Pour fêter ses quarante ans d’indépendance, le Qatar a annexé un palais de la République. Le siège du Conseil économique, social et environnemental, la troisième assemblée de France, a été privatisé pour l’occasion. On y croise, coupe de champagne à la main, plusieurs ministres de Sarkozy comme David Douillet, Jeannette Bougrab, Thierry Mariani, Maurice Leroy, mais aussi Jean Tiberi. La plupart sont des habitués du 1 rue de Tilsitt, la nouvelle ambassade. Le splendide hôtel particulier de la place de l’Étoile voit défiler les people, qui, pour certains, ne repartent pas les mains vides. Prix Richesses dans la diversité ou prix Doha capitale culturelle arabe, toutes les occasions sont bonnes pour « récompenser » les amis du Qatar. Des dizaines de personnalités, à l’instar des anciens ministres Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres et Jack Lang ou de l’ancien président du CSA Dominique Baudis, se sont vu distinguer avec, pour certains, un chèque de 10 000 euros. C’est aussi le cas de Yamina Benguigui, qui vient de faire son entrée au gouvernement. Pour mener à bien sa mission de grand chambellan des relations publiques, l’ambassadeur du Qatar dispose d’une voiture diplomatique équipée d’un gyrophare. On ne compte plus les politiques qui ont fait le déplacement à Doha, devenue sous Sarkozy une destination à la mode. « Beaucoup voyagent gratuitement sur Qatar Airways, la compagnie nationale dont le président n’est autre que HBJ », persifle un parlementaire français. Parmi les habitués du Paris-Doha, Dominique de Villepin. L’ancien Premier ministre fréquente assidûment le Qatar depuis qu’il a dirigé le Quai d’Orsay. Sa particule et son élégance naturelle ont tout de suite séduit l’émir et son épouse, la cheikha Mozah. Une amitié généreuse qui ne s’est jamais démentie. Aujourd’hui avocat d’affaires, Villepin a pour client le Qatar Luxury Group, fonds d’investissement personnel de la femme de l’émir. C’est avec cette cassette que la cheikha a pris le contrôle du célèbre maroquinier Le Tanneur implanté en Corrèze, fief de François Hollande. Un pied de nez à son ennemi HBJ, le favori de la sarkozie. Cette relation particulière avec le couple royal, Villepin la défend jalousement. Témoin, cet incident : en 2008, lors d’un dîner de gala en marge d’une conférence, Dominique de Villepin quitte la table avec fracas lorsqu’il découvre que Ségolène Royal, candidate défaite à la présidentielle, occupe la place d’honneur. L’élue de Poitou-Charentes est assise à côté du Premier ministre qatari alors que lui doit se contenter du vice-Premier ministre chargé du pétrole. Le Point (2012)
Détestés à mort de toutes les classes de la société, tous enrichis par la guerre, dont ils ont profité sur le dos des Russes, des Boches et des Polonais, et assez disposés à une révolution sociale où ils recueilleraient beaucoup d’argent en échange de quelques mauvais coups. De Gaulle (détaché auprès de l’armée polonaise, sur les juifs de Varsovie, lettre à sa mère, 1919)
On pouvait se demander, en effet, et on se demandait même chez beaucoup de Juifs, si l’implantation de cette communauté sur des terres qui avaient été acquises dans des conditions plus ou moins justifiables et au milieu des peuples arabes qui lui étaient foncièrement hostiles, n’allait pas entraîner d’incessants, d’interminables, frictions et conflits. Certains même redoutaient que les Juifs, jusqu’alors dispersés, mais qui étaient restés ce qu’ils avaient été de tous temps, c’est-à-dire un peuple d’élite, sûr de lui-même et dominateur, n’en viennent, une fois rassemblés dans le site de leur ancienne grandeur, à changer en ambition ardente et conquérante les souhaits très émouvants qu’ils formaient depuis dix-neuf siècles. De Gaulle (conférence de presse du 27 novembre 1967)
“un État d’Israël guerrier et résolu à s’agrandir” et “un peuple d’élite, sûr de lui-même et dominateur” qui “en dépit du flot tantôt montant, tantôt descendant, des malveillances qu’ils provoquaient, qu’ils suscitaient plus exactement dans certains pays et à certaines époques” …
Charles De Gaulle (conférence de presse de nov. 67)
Est-ce que tenter de remettre les pieds chez soi constitue forcément une agression imprévue ? Michel Jobert
Pourquoi accepterions-nous une troisième guerre mondiale à cause de ces gens là?
Daniel Bernard (ambassadeur de France, après avoir qualifié Israël de « petit pays de merde », Londres, décembre 2001)
Ce n’est pas une politique de tuer des enfants. Chirac (accueillant Barak à Paris, le 4 octobre 2000)
La situation est tragique mais les forces en présence au Moyen-Orient font qu’au long terme, Israël, comme autrefois les Royaumes francs, finira par disparaître. Cette région a toujours rejeté les corps étrangers. Villepin (2001)
Il y a à Gaza l’aboutissement d’un engrenage dont Israël est prisonnier, l’éternel engrenage de la force. (…) Cette logique mène à la surenchère, toujours plus d’usage de la force, toujours plus de transgression du droit, toujours plus d’acceptation de l’inacceptable. (…) Après le 11-Septembre, l’Amérique a été livrée, elle aussi, à la peur. Son aspiration à la sécurité était justifiée. Mais, en s’engageant dans l’aventure irakienne, les Etats-Unis ont fait primer la force sur le droit, s’enfermant dans un conflit qu’ils ne peuvent gagner. (…) On le voit en Cisjordanie, un autre avenir est possible. (…) Ce chemin passe par la création d’un Etat palestinien, car seule la reconnaissance d’un Etat palestinien souverain peut être le point de départ d’un nouvel élan pour la région. Dans ce processus, tout le monde le sait bien, il faudra impliquer le Hamas dans la dynamique de paix. Comme pour tout mouvement radical, chaque défaite devant la force est une victoire dans les esprits, par un effet de levier imparable. L’enjeu, c’est bien aujourd’hui d’avancer vers une unité palestinienne qui offre un interlocuteur crédible pour la paix. (…) C’est un enjeu pour la stabilité du Moyen-Orient. Car ceux qui veulent œuvrer à la stabilité du Moyen-Orient sont affaiblis par la logique de force. La spirale sert de justification à d’autres spirales, comme celle de la prolifération nucléaire en Iran. Villepin (2010)
Les Israéliens se sont surarmés et en faisant cela, ils font la même faute que les Américains, celle de ne pas avoir compris les leçons de la deuxième guerre mondiale, car il n’y a jamais rien de bon à attendre d’une guerre. Et la force peut détruire, elle ne peut jamais rien construire, surtout pas la paix. Le fait d’être ivre de puissance et d’être seul à l’avoir, si vous n’êtes pas très cultivé, enfant d’une longue histoire et grande pratique, vous allez toujours croire que vous pouvez imposer votre vision. Israël vit encore cette illusion, les Israéliens sont probablement dans la période où ils sont en train de comprendre leurs limites. C’était Sharon le premier général qui s’est retiré de la bande de Gaza car il ne pouvait plus la tenir. Nous défendons absolument le droit à l’existence d’Israël et à sa sécurité, mais nous ne défendons pas son droit à se conduire en puissance occupante, cynique et brutale … Michel Rocard (Al Ahram, 2006)
Il n’y a pas de dialogue possible avec ces organisations dont le crime n’est pas seulement un moyen, mais une fin. Ils sont, en effet, prêts au pire, parce que c’est là leur pouvoir disproportionné sur le monde entier. Ils font image. Ils sont avant tout image. L’urgence pour la communauté internationale c’est devenir en aide aux civils qui souffrent, notamment en créant des corridors humanitaires pour évacuer les chrétiens d’Irak. Et en même temps il s’agit d’entendre et de traiter avec des interlocuteurs crédibles, à côté et en marge de ces mouvements, les revendications qu’ils fédèrent, par exemple le sentiment d’humiliation des sunnites d’Irak. (…) l’islam n’est pas la cause, mais le prétexte et en définitive la victime de cette hystérie collective. Les musulmans regardent aujourd’hui avec effroi ce au nom de quoi des crimes abominables sont perpétrés. (…) la solution est politique. C’est sur ce point qu’il faut aujourd’hui insister pour apporter des réponses. C’est sur ce terrain que les djihadistes de l’Etat islamique sont faibles. Le premier enjeu politique, ici comme toujours, c’est l’unité et le droit que doit incarner la communauté internationale. La force n’est qu’un pis aller pourempêcher le pire. Elle doit être ponctuelle. Et soyons conscients que c’est ce que souhaitent les djihadistes pour ennoblir leur combat et radicaliser les esprits contre l’Occident, toujours suspect soit de croisade, soit de colonialisme. C’est pourquoi aujourd’hui recourir à des frappes unilatérales n’est pas une solution. L’action ne peut se passer d’une résolution à l’ONU. Ne renouvelons pas sans cesse les mêmes erreurs. Souvenons-nous même que sans l’intervention unilatérale américaine en 2003, il n’y aurait pas eu un tel boulevard en Irak pour les forces totalitaires. Les frappes doivent être encadrées par une résolution du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies et s’appuyer sur les principaux pays de la région. Il s’agit aussi de penser plus loin et de préparer d’ores et déjà la consolidation des pays les plus menacés par la tache d’huile djihadiste, laJordanie, verrou de la péninsule Arabique, et la Turquie, déjà vacillante politiquement et aujourd’hui soumise à un afflux de réfugiés de Syrie et d’Irak. (…)  L’enjeu, plus encore, il faut avoir le courage de le dire haut et fort, ce sont les financements qui nourrissent l’Etat islamique. Il dispose désormais de ressources propres de plus en plus conséquentes, en rançonnant les populations, en accaparant des réserves d’or ou en s’appropriant des champs pétroliers. C’est cela qu’il faut assécher. Mais il faut aussi couper le robinet des bailleurs de fonds sans lesquels l’Etat islamique n’est rien. Dans un Moyen-Orient profondément tourmenté, il y a aujourd’hui des forces conservatrices, des individus ou des circuits, parfois ancrés dans la société, parfois en marge de l’action de l’Etat, qui agissent pour le pire, mues par la peur de perdre le pouvoir, mues aussi par la crainte d’idées novatrices et démocratiques. Il faut dire à l’Arabie saoudite et aux monarchies conservatrices qu’elles doivent sortir de ce jeu destructeur, car leurs dynasties seront les premières victimes d’un djihadistan qui s’étendrait à la péninsule Arabique, car il n’y a là-bas aucune alternative hormis les pouvoirs traditionnels actuels. Que ce soit par rivalité géopolitique ou que ce soit par conviction politique, il faut que ces pays cessent de souffler sur les braises du Moyen-Orient. La France peut agir sur ses points d’appui dans la région, notamment le Qatar, et faire pression en ce sens. Villepin (Le Monde, 09.08.14)
Lever la voix face au massacre qui est perpétré à Gaza, c’est aujourd’hui, je l’écris en conscience, un devoir pour la France, une France qui est attachée indéfectiblement à l’existence et à la sécurité d’Israël mais qui ne saurait oublier les droits et devoirs qui sont conférés à Israël en sa qualité d’État constitué. (…) Comment comprendre aujourd’hui que la France appelle à la «retenue» quand on tue des enfants en connaissance de cause? Comment comprendre que la France s’abstienne lorsqu’il s’agit d’une enquête internationale sur les crimes de guerre commis des deux côtés? Comment comprendre que la première réaction de la France, par la voix de son président, soit celle du soutien sans réserve à la politique de sécurité d’Israël? (…) L’État israélien se condamne à des opérations régulières à Gaza ou en Cisjordanie, cette stratégie terrifiante parce qu’elle condamne les Palestiniens au sous-développement et à la souffrance, terrifiante parce qu’elle condamne Israël peu à peu à devenir un État ségrégationniste, militariste et autoritaire. Ayons le courage de dire une première vérité: il n’y a pas en droit international de droit à la sécurité qui implique en retour un droit à l’occupation et encore moins un droit au massacre. Il y a un droit à la paix qui est le même pour tous les peuples. La sécurité telle que la recherche aujourd’hui Israël se fait contre la paix et contre le peuple palestinien. En lieu et place de la recherche de la paix, il n’y a plus que l’engrenage de la force qui conduit à la guerre perpétuelle à plus ou moins basse intensité. L’État israélien se condamne à des opérations régulières à Gaza ou en Cisjordanie, cette stratégie terrifiante parce qu’elle condamne les Palestiniens au sous-développement et à la souffrance, terrifiante parce qu’elle condamne Israël peu à peu à devenir un État ségrégationniste, militariste et autoritaire. C’est la spirale de l’Afrique du Sud de l’apartheid avant Frederik De Klerk et Nelson Mandela, faite de répression violente, d’iniquité et de bantoustans humiliants. C’est la spirale de l’Algérie française entre putsch des généraux et OAS face au camp de la paix incarné par de Gaulle. Il y a une deuxième vérité à dire haut et fort: il ne saurait y avoir de responsabilité collective d’un peuple pour les agissements de certains. Comment oublier le profond déséquilibre de la situation, qui oppose non deux États, mais un peuple sans terre et sans espoir à un État poussé par la peur? On ne peut se prévaloir du fait que le Hamas instrumentalise les civils pour faire oublier qu’on assassine ces derniers, d’autant moins qu’on a refusé de croire et reconnaître en 2007 que ces civils aient voté pour le Hamas, du moins pour sa branche politique. (…) Troisième vérité qui brûle les lèvres et que je veux exprimer ici: oui il y a une terreur en Palestine et en Cisjordanie, une terreur organisée et méthodique appliquée par les forces armées israéliennes, comme en ont témoigné de nombreux officiers et soldats israéliens écœurés par le rôle qu’on leur a fait jouer. Je ne peux accepter d’entendre que ce qui se passe en Palestine n’est pas si grave puisque ce serait pire ailleurs. Je ne peux accepter qu’on condamne un peuple entier à la peur des bombardements, à la puanteur des aspersions d’«eau sale» et à la misère du blocus. Car je ne peux accepter qu’on nie qu’il y a quelque chose qui dépasse nos différences et qui est notre humanité commune.(…) Je ne peux accepter qu’on condamne un peuple entier à la peur des bombardements, à la puanteur des aspersions d’«eau sale» et à la misère du blocus. Car je ne peux accepter qu’on nie qu’il y a quelque chose qui dépasse nos différences et qui est notre humanité commune. Il n’y a aujourd’hui ni plan de paix, ni interlocuteur capable d’en proposer un. Il faut tout reprendre depuis le début. Le problème de la paix, comme en Algérie entre 1958 et 1962, ce n’est pas «comment?», c’est «qui?». Il n’y a pas de partenaire en Palestine car les partisans de la paix ont été méthodiquement marginalisés par la stratégie du gouvernement d’Israël. La logique de force a légitimisé hier le Hamas contre le Fatah. Elle légitime aujourd’hui les fanatiques les plus radicaux du Hamas voire le Djihad islamique. Se passer de partenaire pour la paix, cela veut dire s’engager dans une logique où il n’y aurait plus que la soumission ou l’élimination. Il n’y a plus de partenaire pour la paix en Israël car le camp de la paix a été réduit au silence et marginalisé. Le peuple israélien est un peuple de mémoire, de fierté et de courage. Mais aujourd’hui c’est une logique folle qui s’est emparée de son État, une logique qui conduit à détruire la possibilité d’une solution à deux États, seule envisageable. (…) On désespère de la diplomatie du carnet de chèques de l’Europe qui se borne à payer pour reconstruire les bâtiments palestiniens qui ont été bombardés hier et le seront à nouveau demain, quand les États-Unis dépensent deux milliards de dollars par an pour financer les bombes qui détruisent ces bâtiments. (…) L’urgence aujourd’hui, c’est d’empêcher que des crimes de guerre soient commis. Pour cela, il est temps de donner droit aux demandes palestiniennes d’adhérer à la Cour pénale internationale, qui demeure aujourd’hui le meilleur garant de la loi internationale. Le premier outil pour réveiller la société israélienne, ce sont les sanctions. Il faut la placer devant ses responsabilités historiques avant qu’il ne soit trop tard, tout particulièrement à l’heure où il est question d’une opération terrestre de grande envergure à Gaza. Cela passe par un vote par le Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU d’une résolution condamnant l’action d’Israël, son non-respect des résolutions antérieures et son non-respect du droit humanitaire et du droit de la guerre. Cela signifie concrètement d’assumer des sanctions économiques ciblées et graduées, notamment pour des activités directement liées aux opérations à Gaza ou aux activités économiques dans les colonies. (…) L’urgence aujourd’hui, c’est d’empêcher que des crimes de guerre soient commis. Pour cela, il est temps de donner droit aux demandes palestiniennes d’adhérer à la Cour pénale internationale, qui demeure aujourd’hui le meilleur garant de la loi internationale. C’est une manière de mettre les Territoires palestiniens sous protection internationale. (…) À défaut de pouvoir négocier une solution, il faut l’imposer par la mise sous mandat de l’ONU de Gaza, de la Cisjordanie et de Jérusalem Est, avec une administration et une force de paix internationales. Cette administration serait soumise à de grands périls, du côté de tous les extrémistes, nous le savons, mais la paix exige des sacrifices. Elle aurait vocation à redresser l’économie et la société sur ces territoires par un plan d’aide significatif et par la protection des civils. Elle aurait également pour but de renouer le dialogue interpalestinien et de garantir des élections libres sur l’ensemble de ces territoires. Forte de ces résultats, elle appuierait des pourparlers de paix avec Israël en en traçant les grandes lignes. Nous n’avons pas le droit de nous résigner à la guerre perpétuelle. Parce qu’elle continuera de contaminer toute la région. Parce que son poison ne cessera de briser l’espoir même d’un ordre mondial. Une seule injustice tolérée suffit à remettre en cause l’idée même de la justice. Villepin (31.07.14)

Avec Villepin, l’antisémitisme renoue avec une longue tradition française

« Massacre » d’enfants « en connaissance de cause »,  » crimes de guerre », « stratégie terrifiante », État ségrégationniste, militariste et autoritaire »,  » droit à l’occupation », « droit au massacre »,  « condamne les Palestiniens au sous-développement et à la souffrance »,  « spirale de l’Afrique du Sud de l’apartheid », « bantoustans humiliants », « spirale de l’Algérie française entre putsch des généraux et OAS »,  » assassine »,  » terreur organisée et méthodique appliquée par les forces armées israéliennes », « condamne un peuple entier à la peur des bombardements, à la puanteur des aspersions d’«eau sale» et à la misère du blocus », « logique folle », « guerre perpétuelle », « continuera de contaminer toute la région »,  » briser l’espoir même d’un ordre mondial », « une seule injustice tolérée suffit à remettre en cause l’idée même de la justice » …

A l’heure où, victime de l’incroyable succès de sa stratégie de propagande morbide, le Hamas a  réussi l’exploit de rallier une communauté internationale jusque là divisée à la demande israélienne de son propre désarmement …

Et  qu’avec son seul autre allié dans la région et aux côtés des  incontournables financiers du jihadisme mondial, l‘islamisme dit « modéré » prend tranquillement  le tramway de la démocratie  …

Pendant que plus au sud en Irak, le Monde supposé libre découvre, quand il est déjà trop tard, le djihadisme réel qui, sous prétexte qu’ils sont chrétiens, crucifie, enterre vivant et découpe en morceaux les enfants …

Quelle meilleure illustration d’une autre prophétie du premier ministre israélien sur l’arrivée et la présence même des maux complémentaires de l’antisémitisme et du terrorisme en France …

Que cette tribune, en une du Figaro il y a une dizaine de jours (avant une deuxième du Monde sur les chrétiens d’Irak  il y a trois jours poussant l’impertinence jusqu’à dénoncer la seule Arabie saoudite pour financement du terrorisme et prôner  – surpise ! – la médiation du Qatar), de l’ancien ministre des affaires étrangères de Jacques Chirac et actuelle pompom girl de luxe de nos amis qataris  …

Où, du terrorisme de l’Algérie française à  l’apartheid sud-africain, tous les poncifs de l’antisémitisme (pardon: de l’antisionisme) actuel sont évoqués contre la « seule injustice tolérée » qui « suffit à remettre en cause l’idée même de la justice » ?

Renouant d’ailleurs avec une longue tradition française qu’il avait incarnée lui-même lors de son propre passage au Quai d’Orsay …

Lorsqu’il  avait, on s’en souvient, fameusement évoqué la disparition d’ Israël de la région …

Rejeté comme un « corps étranger »  « comme autrefois les Royaumes francs » …

« Lever la voix face au massacre perpétré à Gaza »
Dominique de Villepin
Le Figaro
31/07/2014
FIGAROVOX/EXCLUSIF- Dans une tribune publiée dans Le Figaro, l’ancien premier ministre s’inquiète du silence de la France face à l’escalade de la violence entre Israéliens et Palestiniens. Il appelle de ses vœux une interposition de l’ONU.

Dominique de Villepin est avocat. Il a été ministre des Affaires étrangères et premier ministre de Jacques Chirac.

Lever la voix face au massacre qui est perpétré à Gaza, c’est aujourd’hui, je l’écris en conscience, un devoir pour la France, une France qui est attachée indéfectiblement à l’existence et à la sécurité d’Israël mais qui ne saurait oublier les droits et devoirs qui sont conférés à Israël en sa qualité d’État constitué. Je veux dire à tous ceux qui sont tentés par la résignation face à l’éternel retour de la guerre qu’il est temps de parler et d’agir. Il est temps de mesurer l’impasse d’une France alignée et si sûre du recours à la force. Pour lever le voile des mensonges, des omissions et des demi-vérités. Pour porter un espoir de changement. Par mauvaise conscience, par intérêt mal compris, par soumission à la voix du plus fort, la voix de la France s’est tue, celle qui faisait parler le général de Gaulle au lendemain de la guerre des Six-Jours, celle qui faisait parler Jacques Chirac après la deuxième intifada. Comment comprendre aujourd’hui que la France appelle à la «retenue» quand on tue des enfants en connaissance de cause? Comment comprendre que la France s’abstienne lorsqu’il s’agit d’une enquête internationale sur les crimes de guerre commis des deux côtés? Comment comprendre que la première réaction de la France, par la voix de son président, soit celle du soutien sans réserve à la politique de sécurité d’Israël? Quelle impasse pour la France que cet esprit d’alignement et de soutien au recours à la force.

Je crois que seule la vérité permet l’action. Nous ne construirons pas la paix sur des mensonges. C’est pour cela que nous avons un devoir de vérité face à un conflit où chaque mot est piégé, où les pires accusations sont instrumentalisées. Ayons le courage de dire une première vérité: il n’y a pas en droit international de droit à la sécurité qui implique en retour un droit à l’occupation et encore moins un droit au massacre. Il y a un droit à la paix qui est le même pour tous les peuples. La sécurité telle que la recherche aujourd’hui Israël se fait contre la paix et contre le peuple palestinien. En lieu et place de la recherche de la paix, il n’y a plus que l’engrenage de la force qui conduit à la guerre perpétuelle à plus ou moins basse intensité. L’État israélien se condamne à des opérations régulières à Gaza ou en Cisjordanie, cette stratégie terrifiante parce qu’elle condamne les Palestiniens au sous-développement et à la souffrance, terrifiante parce qu’elle condamne Israël peu à peu à devenir un État ségrégationniste, militariste et autoritaire. C’est la spirale de l’Afrique du Sud de l’apartheid avant Frederik De Klerk et Nelson Mandela, faite de répression violente, d’iniquité et de bantoustans humiliants. C’est la spirale de l’Algérie française entre putsch des généraux et OAS face au camp de la paix incarné par de Gaulle.

Il y a une deuxième vérité à dire haut et fort: il ne saurait y avoir de responsabilité collective d’un peuple pour les agissements de certains. Comment oublier le profond déséquilibre de la situation, qui oppose non deux États, mais un peuple sans terre et sans espoir à un État poussé par la peur? On ne peut se prévaloir du fait que le Hamas instrumentalise les civils pour faire oublier qu’on assassine ces derniers, d’autant moins qu’on a refusé de croire et reconnaître en 2007 que ces civils aient voté pour le Hamas, du moins pour sa branche politique. Qu’on cite, outre les États-Unis, un seul pays au monde qui agirait de cette façon. Même si les situations sont, bien sûr, différentes, la France est-elle partie en guerre en Algérie en 1995-1996 après les attentats financés par le GIA? Londres a-t-elle bombardé l’Irlande dans les années 1970?

Troisième vérité qui brûle les lèvres et que je veux exprimer ici: oui il y a une terreur en Palestine et en Cisjordanie, une terreur organisée et méthodique appliquée par les forces armées israéliennes, comme en ont témoigné de nombreux officiers et soldats israéliens écœurés par le rôle qu’on leur a fait jouer. Je ne peux accepter d’entendre que ce qui se passe en Palestine n’est pas si grave puisque ce serait pire ailleurs. Je ne peux accepter qu’on condamne un peuple entier à la peur des bombardements, à la puanteur des aspersions d’«eau sale» et à la misère du blocus. Car je ne peux accepter qu’on nie qu’il y a quelque chose qui dépasse nos différences et qui est notre humanité commune.
Il n’y a aujourd’hui ni plan de paix, ni interlocuteur capable d’en proposer un. Il faut tout reprendre depuis le début. Le problème de la paix, comme en Algérie entre 1958 et 1962, ce n’est pas «comment?», c’est «qui?».
Il n’y a pas de partenaire en Palestine car les partisans de la paix ont été méthodiquement marginalisés par la stratégie du gouvernement d’Israël. La logique de force a légitimisé hier le Hamas contre le Fatah. Elle légitime aujourd’hui les fanatiques les plus radicaux du Hamas voire le Djihad islamique. Se passer de partenaire pour la paix, cela veut dire s’engager dans une logique où il n’y aurait plus que la soumission ou l’élimination.
Il n’y a plus de partenaire pour la paix en Israël car le camp de la paix a été réduit au silence et marginalisé. Le peuple israélien est un peuple de mémoire, de fierté et de courage. Mais aujourd’hui c’est une logique folle qui s’est emparée de son État, une logique qui conduit à détruire la possibilité d’une solution à deux États, seule envisageable. La résignation d’une partie du peuple israélien est aujourd’hui le principal danger. Amos Oz, Zeev Sternhell ou Elie Barnavi sont de plus en plus seuls à crier dans le désert, la voix couverte par le vacarme des hélicoptères.
Il n’y a plus non plus de partenaire sur la scène internationale, à force de lassitude et de résignation, à force de plans de paix enterrés. On s’interroge sur l’utilité du Quartette. On désespère de la diplomatie du carnet de chèques de l’Europe qui se borne à payer pour reconstruire les bâtiments palestiniens qui ont été bombardés hier et le seront à nouveau demain, quand les États-Unis dépensent deux milliards de dollars par an pour financer les bombes qui détruisent ces bâtiments.

Face à l’absence de plan de paix, seules des mesures imposées et capables de changer la donne sont susceptibles de réveiller les partenaires de leur torpeur. C’est au premier chef la responsabilité de la France.
Le deuxième outil, c’est la justice internationale. L’urgence aujourd’hui, c’est d’empêcher que des crimes de guerre soient commis. Pour cela, il est temps de donner droit aux demandes palestiniennes d’adhérer à la Cour pénale internationale, qui demeure aujourd’hui le meilleur garant de la loi internationale.
Le premier outil pour réveiller la société israélienne, ce sont les sanctions. Il faut la placer devant ses responsabilités historiques avant qu’il ne soit trop tard, tout particulièrement à l’heure où il est question d’une opération terrestre de grande envergure à Gaza. Cela passe par un vote par le Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU d’une résolution condamnant l’action d’Israël, son non-respect des résolutions antérieures et son non-respect du droit humanitaire et du droit de la guerre. Cela signifie concrètement d’assumer des sanctions économiques ciblées et graduées, notamment pour des activités directement liées aux opérations à Gaza ou aux activités économiques dans les colonies. Je ne crois guère aux sanctions face à des États autoritaires qu’elles renforcent. Elles peuvent être utiles dans une société démocratique qui doit être mise face aux réalités.
Le deuxième outil, c’est la justice internationale. L’urgence aujourd’hui, c’est d’empêcher que des crimes de guerre soient commis. Pour cela, il est temps de donner droit aux demandes palestiniennes d’adhérer à la Cour pénale internationale, qui demeure aujourd’hui le meilleur garant de la loi internationale. C’est une manière de mettre les Territoires palestiniens sous protection internationale.
Le troisième outil à la disposition de la communauté internationale, c’est l’interposition. À défaut de pouvoir négocier une solution, il faut l’imposer par la mise sous mandat de l’ONU de Gaza, de la Cisjordanie et de Jérusalem Est, avec une administration et une force de paix internationales. Cette administration serait soumise à de grands périls, du côté de tous les extrémistes, nous le savons, mais la paix exige des sacrifices. Elle aurait vocation à redresser l’économie et la société sur ces territoires par un plan d’aide significatif et par la protection des civils. Elle aurait également pour but de renouer le dialogue interpalestinien et de garantir des élections libres sur l’ensemble de ces territoires. Forte de ces résultats, elle appuierait des pourparlers de paix avec Israël en en traçant les grandes lignes.
Nous n’avons pas le droit de nous résigner à la guerre perpétuelle. Parce qu’elle continuera de contaminer toute la région. Parce que son poison ne cessera de briser l’espoir même d’un ordre mondial. Une seule injustice tolérée suffit à remettre en cause l’idée même de la justice.

 Voir aussi:

To Raise the Voice in View of the Massacre in Gaza
Dominique de Villepin Prime Minister of France from 2005-2007
The Huffington post
08/03/2014

Today, to raise one’s voice, in view of the massacre perpetrated in Gaza is, and I write this with conscience, France’s duty. France, whose commitment to the existence and the security of Israel is unwavering, but who, at the same time, cannot neglect the rights and duties of Israel in its quality as a nation state. I appeal to all those who are tempted to recoil in the face of the perennial return to war: now is time to speak and to act. It is time to measure the dead end in which France finds itself, aligned and so certain of the merits of force as recourse. It is time to pull off the veil of lies, of omissions and of half-truths, to support the hope for change.

Whether because of guilt, ill-conceived interest or submission in face of the toughest, France’s own voice has perished; the voice which impelled General de Gaulle to speak out in the wake of the Six Day War; the voice which drove Jacques Chirac to cry out the morrow of the second intifada. Today, how are we to understand France’s call for « restraint » when children are knowingly being killed? How are we to understand when France abstains as an international investigation is weighed on the crimes of war committed by both sides? How are we to understand when, from the mouth of its president, France’s initial reaction is one which unreservedly supports the security policy of Israel? France is in a blind alley with its adapting spirit and the support of the use of force.

I believe that truth alone can justify action. We will not build peace on lies. This is why we are duty-bound to truth in the face of a conflict in which each word is loaded and the most contemptible accusations are exploited.

Let us have the courage to declare a first truth: International law does not give a right to security which engages, in return, a right to occupy and even less so, a right to massacre. There is a right to peace, and that right is the same for all peoples. The security which Israel seeks today, is done so against peace and against the Palestinian people. Instead of a search for peace, there is but a spiral of force which heads toward perpetual war with varying intensity. Israel condemns itself to repeated confrontations in Gaza or in the West Bank because it condemns the Palestinians to backwardness and suffering. Terrifying strategy because, little by little, it condemns Israel to becoming a segregationist, militaristic and authoritarian State. It is the spiral of South Africa under apartheid — before Frederik De Klerk and Nelson Mandela — wrought by violent repression, fear and the debasing Bantustans. It is the spiral of French Algeria between the putsch of the generals and of the bombings of the Secret Armed Organisation (OAS) as opposed to the side of peace embodied by de Gaulle.

There is a second truth to declare forcefully: There can be no collective responsibility of a people for the acts of certain groups or individuals. How can we forget the depth of the imbalance of the situation; one which does not oppose two states, but, rather, a people, landless and hopeless, against a state which is driven by fear? One can not take pretext of the fact that the civilians are exploited by Hamas in order to obliterate the fact that they are the ones that are killed, even less so it has been denied to acknowledge that those very civilians voted for Hamas in 2007, or at least for one of its political branches. Other than the United States, could there be one single country in the world to act thus? Though the situations are, of course, vastly different, did France go to war in Algeria in 1995-1996 after the attacks financed by the Armed Islamic Group (GIA)? Did London bomb Ireland in the 1970s?

One cannot fail to note a third, tongue-burning truth which I want to state: Yes, there is terror in Palestine and in the West Bank. An organized, methodical terror, systematically applied by the Israeli armed forces as has been testified by numerous Israeli officers and soldiers disgusted by the role which they had been given. I cannot accept hearing that what is happening in Palestine is not that serious and that it would be worse elsewhere. I cannot accept that an entire people has been condemned to fear and bombing, to the stench of « dirty water » and the misery of the blockade. I cannot accept the denial that something transcends our differences – our common humanity.

Today, we have no peace plan or an interlocutor capable of proposing one. We have to start from scratch. The problem of peace, as was the case in Algeria between 1958 and 1962, is not « how? » but « who? »

There is no interlocutor in Palestine because the fighters for peace have been systematically marginalized by the strategy of the Israeli government. Yesterday’s logic of force legitimized Hamas against the Fatah. Today’s legitimizes the most radical forces of Hamas, or even, the Islamic Jihad. To do without a partner for peace is accepting a logic leading towards submission or elimination.

There are no more partners for peace in Israel, because the peace militants have been marginalized and reduced to silence. The people of Israel are a people of memory, pride and courage. But today a crazy logic has overtaken their state, a logic which leads to the loss of the possibility of a two-state solution, the only conceivable one. A resigned segment of the Israeli population is today’s primary threat. Amos Oz, Zeev Sternhell or Elie Barnavi are increasingly alone, crying in the desert, their voices drowned by the roar of the helicopters.

Nor are their partners on the international scene because of the many buried peace plans and the resulting weariness and resignation. We question the usefulness of the Quartet. We despair at the Europe checkbook diplomacy which limits itself to paying for the reconstruction of Palestinian buildings which were bombed yesterday and which will be bombed again tomorrow, while the United States spends two billion dollars annually to finance the bombs that destroy those very buildings.

Given the absence of a peace plan, only imposed measures capable of changing the general trend are susceptible to reawaken the partners out of their torpor. This is absolutely the responsibility of France.

Tool number one: Sanctions, to wake up the Israeli society. It needs to face its historical responsibilities before it is too late, particularly at this time, when a large scale military ground operation is being considered in Gaza. This is done by a vote of the UN Security Council with a resolution condemning Israel’s actions, its non-compliance with prior resolutions, its non-compliance with human rights and the laws of war. Concretely, applying targeted and calibrated economic sanctions, particularly to activities directly linked to the operations in Gaza or to those activities in the colonies. I don’t believe in sanctions against authoritarian states, which they reenforce, but I believe that they can be effective in a democratic society which needs to be confronted with reality.

Tool number two: International justice. The urgency today is to prevent war crimes. To achieve this, it is high time the right to be affiliated to the International Court of Justice, the best guarantor of international law today, be given to the Palestinians. By doing this, the Palestinian Territories come under international protection.

Tool number three available to the international community: an interposition force. In the absence of a possible negotiated solution, one must be imposed by a UN mandate in Gaza, the West Bank and East Jerusalem with an administration and an international peacekeeping force. We know that this administration would be in great danger from all across the extremist spectrum, but peace demands sacrifices. Its goals would be to restructure the economy and society in these territories with a substantial aid plan, as well as to protect civilians. Also, to resume the inter-Palestinian dialogue and guarantee free elections on the whole of its territories. With strength gained in these areas, it would promote peace negotiations with Israel and draft the outlines for these.

We do not have the right to resign in the face of perpetual war because it will continue to contaminate the whole region; its poison will not cease to shatter hopes for world order. One single injustice tolerated is sufficient to challenge the idea of justice itself.

This post was first published in Le Figaro newspaper on Friday, August 1.

Voir encore:

« Ne laissons pas le Moyen-Orient à la barbarie ! »
Dominique de Villepin (Ancien premier ministre)
Le Monde
09.08.2014

Il semble que chaque jour annonce des massacres plus épouvantables que la veille. Des centaines de milliers de chrétiens d’Orient, à qui une longue histoire lie la France, sont menacées de massacres et fuient sur les routes dans les pires conditions. Aujourd’hui des femmes, des enfants, des vieillards meurent de soif dans le désert irakien pour la seule raison qu’ils sont chrétiens ou yézidis. L’Irak se vide depuis onze ans de la diversité religieuse qui a fait sa richesse pendant des millénaires. La France a un devoir de parole et d’action, parce qu’elle porte encore et toujours le message des droits de l’homme, parce qu’elle est obligée par sa propre histoire de douleurs et d’épreuves.
Je l’ai dit le mois dernier, lors des fulgurantes victoires de l’Etat islamique d’Irak et du Levant (EIIL), le poison identitaire, comme les pires venins, attaque en moins de temps qu’il ne faut pour le dire l’ensemble de l’organisme. Si nous voulons lutter contre cette menace, nous devons tâcher de la comprendre et la combattre en commun, méthodiquement.

LA VIE OU LA MORT ?

Ce n’est en rien un choc immémorial entre les civilisations, entre l’Islam et la chrétienté, ce n’est pas la dixième croisade. Ce n’est pas davantage la lutte sans âge de la civilisation contre la barbarie, car c’est trop facile de se croire toujours ainsi justifié d’avance. Non il s’agit d’un événement historique majeur et complexe, lié aux indépendances nationales, à la mondialisation et au « Printemps arabe ». Le Moyen-Orient traverse une crise de modernisation qui a un caractère existentiel et qui altère si bien les rapports de force sociaux et politiques que tous les vieux clivages sont réveillés. Les frontières de l’âge Sykes-Picot sont balayées. Les modèles politiques post-coloniaux et de guerre froide sont obsolètes. Les chiites et les sunnites sont face à face et les minorités sont en butte à toutes les purifications identitaires. En un mot l’islamisme est à l’islam ce que le fascisme fut en Europe à l’idée nationale, un double monstrueux et hors de contrôle, à cheval sur l’archaïsme et sur la modernité. Imaginaires archaïques et médiévaux, communications et propagande aux technologies ultramodernes. Il faudra une génération au Moyen-Orient pour entrer dans sa propre modernité apaisée, mais d’ici là il est guetté par la tentation nihiliste, par le suicide civilisationnel. Nous sommes à la veille du moment décisif où la région basculera de l’un ou de l’autre côté. Notre rôle, c’est de l’aider du mieux que nous pouvons à choisir la vie contre la mort.

L’appel à l’histoire n’a de sens que si elle nous ouvre des chemins. Quels enseignements pouvons-nous alors tirer d’une telle analyse ? Le premier, il n’est pas inutile, c’est qu’il n’y a pas de dialogue possible avec ces organisations dont le crime n’est pas seulement un moyen, mais une fin. Ils sont, en effet, prêts au pire, parce que c’est là leur pouvoir disproportionné sur le monde entier. Ils font image. Ils sont avant tout image. L’urgence pour la communauté internationale c’est devenir en aide aux civils qui souffrent, notamment en créant des corridors humanitaires pour évacuer les chrétiens d’Irak. Et en même temps il s’agit d’entendre et de traiter avec des interlocuteurs crédibles, à côté et en marge de ces mouvements, les revendications qu’ils fédèrent, par exemple le sentiment d’humiliation des sunnites d’Irak.

Le deuxième enseignement, c’est que l’islam n’est pas la cause, mais le prétexte et en définitive la victime de cette hystérie collective. Les musulmans regardent aujourd’hui avec effroi ce au nom de quoi des crimes abominables sont perpétrés.

Le troisième enseignement c’est que la solution est politique. C’est sur ce point qu’il faut aujourd’hui insister pour apporter des réponses. C’est sur ce terrain que les djihadistes de l’Etat islamique sont faibles.

Le premier enjeu politique, ici comme toujours, c’est l’unité et le droit que doit incarner la communauté internationale. La force n’est qu’un pis aller pourempêcher le pire. Elle doit être ponctuelle. Et soyons conscients que c’est ce que souhaitent les djihadistes pour ennoblir leur combat et radicaliser les esprits contre l’Occident, toujours suspect soit de croisade, soit de colonialisme. C’est pourquoi aujourd’hui recourir à des frappes unilatérales n’est pas une solution. L’action ne peut se passer d’une résolution à l’ONU. Ne renouvelons pas sans cesse les mêmes erreurs. Souvenons-nous même que sans l’intervention unilatérale américaine en 2003, il n’y aurait pas eu un tel boulevard en Irak pour les forces totalitaires. Les frappes doivent être encadrées par une résolution du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies et s’appuyer sur les principaux pays de la région. Il s’agit aussi de penser plus loin et de préparer d’ores et déjà la consolidation des pays les plus menacés par la tache d’huile djihadiste, laJordanie, verrou de la péninsule Arabique, et la Turquie, déjà vacillante politiquement et aujourd’hui soumise à un afflux de réfugiés de Syrie et d’Irak.

Deuxièmement, l’enjeu, ce ne sont pas tant les groupuscules fanatiques que les masses qu’ils peuvent parvenir à fédérer et à mobiliser, soit par la peur d’un danger plus grand, comme c’est le cas pour certains chefs de tribu et pouvoirs locaux sunnites, soit par la haine. Il s’agit de mener une politique méthodique pourdissocier les composantes hétéroclites qui constituent l’engrenage actuel en territoire sunnite. Qu’est-ce qui a été obtenu depuis un mois du gouvernement Al-Maliki ? Rien. Il demeure un pouvoir sectaire et borné qui attend patiemment que Téhéran et Washington soient contraints d’endosser ses actions faute d’autre solution. C’est encore et toujours sur le gouvernement d’Al-Maliki qu’il faut fairepression pour que les frappes ne soient pas des coups d’épée dans le sable. Il faut dès aujourd’hui un gouvernement inclusif faisant place à toutes les composantes pacifiques de la société irakienne. Il faut un programme d’inclusion communautaire dans l’armée et l’administration pour empêcher le cercle vicieux des frustrations et des haines.

L’ARABIE SAOUDITE DOIT SORTIR DE CE JEU DESTRUCTEUR

L’enjeu, plus encore, il faut avoir le courage de le dire haut et fort, ce sont les financements qui nourrissent l’Etat islamique. Il dispose désormais de ressources propres de plus en plus conséquentes, en rançonnant les populations, en accaparant des réserves d’or ou en s’appropriant des champs pétroliers. C’est cela qu’il faut assécher. Mais il faut aussi couper le robinet des bailleurs de fonds sans lesquels l’Etat islamique n’est rien. Dans un Moyen-Orient profondément tourmenté, il y a aujourd’hui des forces conservatrices, des individus ou des circuits, parfois ancrés dans la société, parfois en marge de l’action de l’Etat, qui agissent pour le pire, mues par la peur de perdre le pouvoir, mues aussi par la crainte d’idées novatrices et démocratiques. Il faut dire à l’Arabie saoudite et aux monarchies conservatrices qu’elles doivent sortir de ce jeu destructeur, car leurs dynasties seront les premières victimes d’un djihadistan qui s’étendrait à la péninsule Arabique, car il n’y a là-bas aucune alternative hormis les pouvoirs traditionnels actuels. Que ce soit par rivalité géopolitique ou que ce soit par conviction politique, il faut que ces pays cessent de souffler sur les braises du Moyen-Orient. La France peut agir sur ses points d’appui dans la région, notamment le Qatar, et faire pression en ce sens.

Le troisième enjeu politique, c’est d’empêcher le double jeu des Etats qui, dans la politique du pire, imaginent toujours un moyen de consolider tel ou tel avantage. La Turquie doit clarifier ses positions dans la région et soutenir un Irak équilibré avec une composante kurde stable, en luttant avec toutes ses forces contre les réseaux de l’Etat islamique qui utilisent notamment son territoire comme terrain de parcours. Aucun des Etats-nations de la région ne mène aujourd’hui la politique de simplicité, de clarté et d’urgence qui s’impose, ni l’Iran, ni l’Egypte. Il est temps, face au péril qui pourrait tous les effacer, de cesser toutes les arrière-pensées mesquines.
Le temps d’un effort de construction régionale est venu. Ne nous y trompons pas, c’est le Moyen-Orient des prochaines décennies qui se dessine. C’est une stratégie et une action de long terme qui s’imposent, en impliquant tous les acteurs de la région. Le processus de négociation sur la prolifération nucléaireiranienne est décisif pour la place d’un Iran apaisé dans la région. La seule réponse aujourd’hui c’est une conférence régionale permettant d’avancer sur des grands dossiers stratégiques, économiques et politiques, des questions pétrolières jusqu’au partage des eaux.

La France a raison de se mobiliser par la voix de François Hollande. Elle a raison d’avoir choisi la voie des Nations unies. Mais il lui faut aujourd’hui donnerclairement le cap, les moyens  et les bornes de son action.

Dominique de Villepin (Ancien premier ministre)

Voir enfin:

Elections présidentielles 2012
Patrimoine: Demeure de maître pour Villepin
Anne Vidalie

L’Express

22/02/2012

L’ex-Premier ministre – qui n’a pas répondu au questionnaire de L’Express – a acquis un hôtel particulier à Paris. Il y a installé son cabinet d’avocat dont il tire de substantiels revenus.

Retour du refoulé ou clin d’oeil du hasard? C’est dans la très chic rue Fortuny, où Nicolas Sarkozy a grandi, au coeur du XVIIe arrondissement de Paris, que Dominique de Villepin s’est offert un hôtel particulier, en janvier 2010, pour 3 millions d’euros.

Officiellement, cette bâtisse de 400 mètres carrés à la façade en brique et pierre blanche, édifiée en 1876 pour la comédienne Sarah Bernhardt, appartient à la société civile immobilière (SCI) Fortuny 35, créée en décembre 2009 pour abriter le patrimoine de la famille Villepin – laquelle a fait l’objet d’une donation-partage aux trois enfants du couple, en octobre 2010.

Désormais, la demeure de la rue Fortuny abrite le cabinet d’avocat fondé par l’ex-Premier ministre en 2008. Une reconversion réussie: au cours des deux derniers exercices, Villepin International a engrangé 4,2 millions d’euros de chiffre d’affaires et dégagé un résultat net cumulé de 1,8 million. Son président s’octroierait, selon ses déclarations, une rémunération mensuelle de 20 000 euros.

Officiellement séparés depuis le printemps 2011, Dominique de Villepin et son épouse, Marie-Laure, ont revendu le mois dernier le vaste appartement familial de la rue Georges-Berger, dans le XVIIe. Le couple l’avait acheté 1,87 million d’euros en septembre 2005.

Une SCI baptisée Villepin Immobilier
Quatre ans plus tard, les Villepin et leurs trois enfants ont constitué une SCI, baptisée Villepin Immobilier, pour acquérir un appartement d’une valeur de 860 000 euros rue Cambacérès, dans le VIIIe, derrière le ministère de l’Intérieur. Le héraut de République solidaire est également nu-propriétaire, aux côtés de sa soeur et de son frère, de l’appartement qu’occupe leur père, l’ancien sénateur Xavier de Villepin, dans le XVIe, à deux pas de la Seine.

A la tête d’un patrimoine évalué, hors biens professionnels, à environ 4 millions d’euros, Dominique de Villepin a versé 26 808 euros au fisc en 2011 au titre de l’impôt sur la fortune. Cette année-là, il avait cédé aux enchères, à l’hôtel Drouot, sa collection de livres consacrés à Napoléon pour 1,2 million d’euros.


Gaza: Attention, une victoire peut en cacher une autre (One dead baby too many ? – Will Hamas be the victim of its own morbid propaganda “success” ?)

9 août, 2014
Devant l’école gérée par l’Agence des Nations unies pour les réfugiés palestiniens que l’armée israélienne a bombardée dimanche 3 août, faisant au moins dix morts.

Il faut commencer par se souvenir que le nazisme s’est lui-même présenté comme une lutte contre la violence: c’est en se posant en victime du traité de Versailles que Hitler a gagné son pouvoir. Et le communisme lui aussi s’est présenté comme une défense des victimes. Désormais, c’est donc seulement au nom de la lutte contre la violence qu’on peut commettre la violence. René Girard
C’est vrai qu’il y a un carnage à Gaza, mais c’est la conséquence des agissements du Hamas. Nous visons délibérément des cibles militaires et par accident des civils. Eux, ils visent délibérément des civils en envoyant des roquettes sur les villes israéliennes. (…) Nous regrettons qu’il y ait des victimes civiles à Gaza, mais il faut savoir à qui incombe la responsabilité de tout cela, en l’occurrence, le Hamas. Le Hamas se cache derrière des civils, les utilise comme boucliers humains, construit des tunnels dans des lieux civils et s’attend à ce qu’on condamne Israël pour son opération. (…) A l’heure actuelle l’antisémitisme est enraciné dans l’idéologie de certains groupes terroristes. La charte du Hamas demande d’ailleurs l’éradication de tous les juifs. Ils ne veulent pas d’une solution à deux Etats. (…) Cet antisémitisme est une pathologie, une maladie qu’il faut combattre. Cette vague d’antisémitisme est enracinée dans cette croyance d’un Islam militant qui attaque les Juifs. La charte du Hamas demande l’éradication de tous les Juifs, pas seulement l’État juif. Ils ne veulent pas une solution à deux États. Ils veulent un seul État sans Juif. Donc ce n’est pas étonnant que les amis du Hamas en France, et ailleurs en Europe, partagent cette idéologie antisémite, et il faut la combattre. (…) Ce n’est pas la bataille d’Israël, c’est la bataille de la France, car s’ils réussissent ici et que nous ne sommes pas solidaires, et bien cette peste du terrorisme viendra chez vous. C’est une question de temps mais elle viendra en France. Et c’est déjà le cas (…)  Les gens ne connaissent pas la réalité. Israël est une démocratie à qui on impose la guerre, qui se bat pour sa sécurité contre un ennemi particulièrement cruel qui n’obéit à aucune norme, à aucune loi, qui n’a aucune inhibition, qui attaque nos civils et qui utilise ses propres civils comme boucliers humains.  Benjamin Netanyahou
L’UE condamne vivement les tirs aveugles de roquettes lancées vers Israël par le Hamas et des groupes radicaux de la bande de Gaza et qui touchent directement des civils. Ce sont  des actes criminels injustifiables. L’UE demande au Hamas de mettre immédiatement un  terme à ces actions et de renoncer à la violence. Tous les groupes terroristes présents à  Gaza doivent désarmer. Conseil de l’Union européenne
Le Président a rappelé la position américaine à savoir qu’au final, toute solution de long terme au conflit israélo-palestinien doit assurer le désarmement de groupes terroristes et la démilitarisation de Gaza. Barack Obama
Le premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Nétanyahou, l’a répété, lundi 28 juillet au soir à la télévision : « une longue campagne » se profile pour « achever l’objectif de l’opération : détruire les tunnels ». Mais cet objectif n’est plus, désormais, que « la première étape et la plus cruciale pour la démilitarisation de Gaza ». (…)  L’idée a été entérinée par les vingt-huit ministres des affaires étrangères de l’Union européenne ainsi que par le président américain, Barack Obama, et son chef de la diplomatie, John Kerry. Le Monde
The Qataris have invested hundreds of millions in both defensive and offensive cyber capabilities,” said Dadon. “We have sourced 70% of the cyber-attacks on Israeli government sites in recent weeks to IP addresses associated with Qatar.” (…) Not only is Qatar footing the bill, it also trained Hamas terrorists how to use sophisticated equipment and systems to manage its extensive terror tunnel system, as well, systems to fire rockets at Israel using automatic, timed launching systems. (…) According to Dadon, Hamas has embedded sophisticated network systems inside its terror tunnels, giving operatives in command and control centers the ability to monitor events in any of the tunnels. Using sensors and other networked equipment, terrorists can quickly be notified if an IDF unit is advancing in a tunnel, allowing them to disperse quickly — and allowing the command and control staff to set off explosives when soldiers approach a booby trap. In addition, he said, Hamas has automated its rocket firing system using networked, cloud-based launching software provided by Qatar. “They can set off a rocket from any distance, and set them to go off at a specific time, using timers,” Dadon said. “Anyone who thinks they have dozens of people sitting next to launchers firing rockets each time there is a barrage is mistaken.” Besides the assistance Qatar gives Hamas, hackers hired by the Gulf kingdom have been busy hitting Israeli government and infrastructure sites, trying to disrupt the operations of electricity, water, and other critical systems, said Dadon. The Times of Israel
C’est un mystère pourquoi tant de médias acceptent comme parole d’évangile les chiffres du Hamas sur le nombre de civils tués dans la récente guerre. Le Hamas proclame que 90% des 1800 Palestiniens tués sont des civils. Israël dit que la moitié des tués sont des combattants. Les faits objectifs sont plus proches de ce que dit Israël que du Hamas. Même des organisations de droits de l’homme anti-israéliennes reconnaissent, selon le New York Times, que le Hamas compte probablement parmi ces « civils tués par Israël », les groupes suivants : les Palestiniens tués comme collaborateurs, ceux tués de violences domestiques (crimes d’honneur), les Palestiniens tués par des roquettes ou obus de mortier du Hamas et les Palestiniens qui sont morts de mort naturelle durant le conflit. Je me demande si le Hamas compte aussi les 162 enfants qui sont morts en travaillant comme esclaves pour construire les tunnels. Le Hamas ne comptabilise pas comme combattants, ceux qui construisent les tunnels, ni ceux qui permettent à leurs maisons d’être utilisées comme cache d’armes et lancement de roquettes, ni les policiers du Hamas, ni les membres de la branche politique et ni les autres qui travaillent main dans la main avec les terroristes armés. Il y a plusieurs années, j’ai forgé un concept pour essayer de montrer que la distance entre un civil et un combattant n’est souvent qu’une question de degré, je l’ai appelé « continuum of civilianality ». Il est clair qu’un enfant dont l’âge ne lui permet pas encore d’aider les combattants du Hamas est un civil et qu’un combattant du Hamas qui tire des roquettes, porte des armes ou opère dans les tunnels est un combattant. Entre ces deux extrêmes, se trouve une grande variété de gens, dont certains sont plus proches des civils et certains sont plus proches des combattants. La loi de la guerre n’a pas établi de distinction claire entre combattants et civils, en particulier dans un contexte de guerre urbaine où des gens peuvent transporter des armes la nuit et être boulangers durant la journée, ou tirer des roquettes durant la journée et aller dormir avec leurs familles la nuit. (…) Les données publiées par le New York Times suggèrent fortement qu’un très grand nombre, peut-être la majorité des gens tués sont plus proches du combattant de l’extrêmité de l’échelle que du civil de l’extrémité de l’échelle. Premièrement, la vaste majorité des tués sont plutôt des hommes que des femmes, deuxièmement la majorité ont entre 15 et 40 ans, le nombre de personnes âgés de plus de 60 ans sont rarissimes, le nombre d’enfants en dessous de 15 ans est aussi relativement petit, bien que leurs images aient été prépondérantes ! En d’autres termes, les genres et âges des tués ne sont pas représentatifs de la population générale de Gaza mais plus représentatifs du genre et de l’âge des combattants. Ces données suggèrent qu’un très grand pourcentage de Palestiniens tués sont du coté des combattants de l’échelle (continuum). Elles prouvent également, comme si des preuves étaient nécessaires à des yeux impartiaux, qu’Israël n’a pas ciblé des civils au hasard. Si cela était le cas, les tués seraient représentatifs de la population générale de Gaza plutôt que de sous-groupes étroitement associées à des combattants. Les médias devraient cesser immédiatement d’utiliser les statistiques approuvées par le Hamas qui déjà dans le passé se sont révélés être très peu fiables (…) Les médias font preuve de paresse en s’appuyant sur les chiffres de la propagande du Hamas et mettent en danger la profession. Lorsque l’infâme rapport Goldstone a faussement affirmé que la grande majorité des personnes tuées dans l’Opération Plomb Durci étaient des civils et non des combattants du Hamas, beaucoup d’habitants de Gaza se sont plaints, ils ont accusé le Hamas de lâcheté puisque tant de civils avaient été tués alors que les combattants avaient été épargnés. À la suite de ces plaintes, le Hamas a été forcé de dire la vérité : il a reconnu le nombre de combattants et policiers armés tués. Il est probable que le Hamas fera une « correction » similaire à l’égard de ce conflit. Mais cette correction ne sera pas diffusée dans les médias, comme la correction précédente ne l’avait pas été. Les gros titres du genre « La plupart des personnes tuées par Israël sont des enfants, des femmes et des personnes âgées » vont continuer à être diffusés malgré la fausseté des faits. Tant que les médias ne démentiront pas, le Hamas poursuivra sa « stratégie de bébés morts » et plus de gens des deux côtés vont mourir. Alan Dershowitz
C’est la troisième fois depuis le début du conflit qu’une telle scène de chaos se produit dans un centre de l’UNRWA, l’organisme de l’ONU chargé des réfugiés palestiniens, après l’attaque des écoles de Beit Hanoun et Jabaliya, au nord de la bande de Gaza. « Cette folie doit cesser », a déclaré le secrétaire général de l’ONU, Ban Ki-moon, dénonçant un « scandale du point de vue moral et un acte criminel ». Les Etats-Unis se sont dits « consternés » par ce « bombardement honteux », tandis que François Hollande jugeait l’attaque « inadmissible », appelant à ce que les responsables du carnage « répondent de leurs actes ». (…) Après trois semaines de conflit, l’étroite bande de terre est au bord d’un désastre humanitaire sans précédent : un quart des habitants de Gaza ont fui leur maison ; 280 000 réfugiés s’entassent dans les 84 écoles de l’ONU complètement saturées. Une dizaine d’hôpitaux ont été endommagés par des bombardements, aggravant le bilan des victimes, qui dépasse les 1 800 morts et 9 000 blessés. Des rues entières ont été rayées de la carte, comme à Beit Hanoun dans le nord, ou près de Khan Younès, dans le sud-est. Le 29 juillet, le bombardement de l’unique centrale électrique de Gaza a ajouté une nouvelle plaie aux calamités du territoire palestinien. La distribution d’eau dans les maisons a été quasiment coupée, faute d’énergie électrique pour faire fonctionner les systèmes de pompage. Les Gazaouis errent des journées entières, jerrican à la main, à la recherche des quelques camions-citernes distribuant de l’eau saine. A Rafah, l’école de l’ONU, qui accueille plus de 3 000 réfugiés, est privée d’eau depuis quatre jours. Les conditions sanitaires sont désastreuses. Les salles et les allées crasseuses des écoles surpeuplées affichent le douloureux spectacle du dénuement et de la promiscuité. Des familles entières s’entassent derrière des tapis déployés en rideaux de fortune. (…) Selon les Nations unies, plus de 50 000 Gazaouis ont perdu la totalité de leur maison, auxquels il faut ajouter 30 000 autres personnes dont le logement est considéré comme inhabitable. Le Monde
Tsahal a les coordonnées GPS de toutes les écoles. Pourtant, à pas moins de cinq reprises, ces écoles ont essuyé le feu direct de l’armée israélienne. Quelque 40 personnes ont été fauchées par des obus, dans ces établissements, alors que l’ONU avait prévenu de la présence de réfugiés. Au total, selon l’ONU, 133 écoles ont été endommagées par l’armée israélienne. A l’entrée de la ville de Gaza, un marché qui venait de rouvrir après le jeûne du ramadan a pris une volée d’obus. Des hôpitaux ont été touchés. (…) Les bombardements ont détruit l’unique centrale électrique et démoli une partie du système d’épuration des eaux. Hôpitaux et centres de réfugiés fonctionnent dans des conditions de plus en plus précaires. Pas un mètre carré de Gaza n’est hors de portée de Tsahal. Près de 80 % des 1 600 Palestiniens tués à ce jour sont des civils. On connaît la position d’Israël. Le Hamas installe ses roquettes au milieu d’une population dont il sait qu’elle n’a guère le loisir de s’enfuir ; chacun de ses tirs visant les villes israéliennes est parfaitement indiscriminé ; il lui arrive de stocker ses missiles dans la proximité immédiate des centres de l’ONU et de tirer depuis ces lieux. C’est ainsi, et de façon avérée. Tout autant que la virulence de la punition collective infligée par Israël aux gens de Gaza. Comme s’ils étaient collectivement responsables. Le Monde
On ne sait pas si le président russe, Vladimir Poutine, où l’un de ses subordonnés, a donné l’ordre de faire sauter en vol le Boeing 777 de la Malaysia Airlines. Mais il y a déjà cinq fois plus de civils innocents massacrés à Gaza, ceux-là soigneusement ciblés et sur l’ordre direct d’un gouvernement. Les sanctions de l’Union européenne contre Israël restent au niveau zéro. L’annexion de la Crimée russophone déclenche indignation et sanctions. Celle de la Jérusalem arabophone nous laisserait impavides ? Peut-on à la fois condamner M. Poutine et absoudre M. Nétanyahou ? Encore deux poids deux mesures ? Nous avons condamné les conflits interarabes et intermusulmans qui ensanglantent et décomposent le Moyen-Orient. Ils font plus de victimes locales que la répression israélienne. Mais la particularité de l’affaire israélo-palestinienne est qu’elle concerne et touche à l’identité des millions d’Arabes et musulmans, des millions de chrétiens et Occidentaux, des millions de juifs dispersés dans le monde. Ce conflit apparemment local est de portée mondiale et de ce fait a déjà suscité ses métastases dans le monde musulman, le monde juif, le monde occidental. Il a réveillé et amplifié anti-judaïsme, anti-arabisme, anti-christianisme (les croisés) et répandu des incendies de haine dans tous les continents. (…) N’ayant guère d’accointances avec les actuels présidents du Conseil et de la Commission européens, ce n’est pas vers ces éminentes et sagaces personnalités que nous nous tournons mais vers vous, François Hollande, pour qui nous avons voté et qui ne nous êtes pas inconnu. C’est de vous que nous sommes en droit d’attendre une réponse urgente et déterminée face à ce carnage, comme à la systématisation des punitions collectives en Cisjordanie même. Les appels pieux ne suffisent pas plus que les renvois dos à dos qui masquent la terrible disproportion de forces entre colonisateurs et colonisés depuis quarante-sept ans. L’écrivain et dissident russe Alexandre Soljenitsyne (1918-2008) demandait aux dirigeants soviétiques une seule chose : « Ne mentez pas. » Quand on ne peut résister à la force, on doit au moins résister au mensonge. Ne vous et ne nous mentez pas, monsieur le Président. On doit toujours regretter la mort de militaires en opération, mais quand les victimes sont des civils, femmes et enfants sans défense qui n’ont plus d’eau à boire, non pas des occupants mais des occupés, et non des envahisseurs mais des envahis, il ne s’agit plus d’implorer mais de sommer au respect du droit international. (…) Nous n’oublions pas les chrétiens expulsés d’Irak et les civils assiégés d’Alep. Mais à notre connaissance, vous n’avez jamais chanté La Vie en rose en trinquant avec l’autocrate de Damas ou avec le calife de Mossoul comme on vous l’a vu faire sur nos écrans avec le premier ministre israélien au cours d’un repas familial. (…) Israël se veut défenseur d’un Occident ex-persécuteur de juifs, dont il est un héritier pour le meilleur et pour le pire. Il se dit défenseur de la démocratie, qu’il réserve pleinement aux seuls juifs, et se prétend ennemi du racisme tout en se rapprochant d’un apartheid pour les Arabes. L’école stoïcienne recommandait de distinguer, parmi les événements du monde, entre les choses qui dépendent de nous et celles qui ne dépendent pas de nous. On ne peut guère agir sur les accidents d’avion et les séismes – et pourtant vous avez personnellement pris en main le sort et le deuil des familles des victimes d’une catastrophe aérienne au Mali. C’est tout à votre honneur. A fortiori, un homme politique se doit de monter en première ligne quand les catastrophes humanitaires sont le fait de décisions politiques sur lesquelles il peut intervenir, surtout quand les responsables sont de ses amis ou alliés et qu’ils font partie des Nations unies, sujets aux mêmes devoirs et obligations que les autres Etats. La France n’est-elle pas un membre permanent du Conseil de sécurité ? Ce ne sont certes pas des Français qui sont directement en cause ici, c’est une certaine idée de la France dont vous êtes comptable, aux yeux de vos compatriotes comme du reste du monde. Rony Brauman, Régis Debray, Edgar Morin et Christiane Hessel
Il n’existe que deux moyens d’utiliser le monopole de la violence légitime : la guerre ou la police. Les vraies difficultés d’Israël ont commencé lorsque les ennemis ont été remplacés par des délinquants et que la guerre a été remplacée par de la police à grande échelle, action perpétuelle, car la lutte contre les délinquants ne s’arrête jamais, et s’avère coûteuse sur la durée, au moins sur le plan humain. Près de 1 000 soldats et policiers israéliens ont ainsi perdu la vie pendant l’occupation du Liban sud et les deux Intifada palestiniennes. Dans les années 2000, avec le développement des armes de précision à longue portée et l’édification de la barrière de sécurité, les Israéliens ont cru pouvoir résoudre ce dernier problème en évacuant certaines zones occupées tout en les gardant à portée des frappes. Cette stratégie a laissé le champ libre à des organisations hostiles comme le Hamas, qui, refusant de « jouer le jeu », ont pris soin de ne pas laisser apparaître de cibles susceptibles de constituer des objectifs militaires. Face à des miliciens fantassins ou des lanceurs de lance-roquettes, tous aisément dissimulables dans la population, les Israéliens ne pouvaient dès lors que frapper l’ensemble de celle-ci pour avoir une chance d’atteindre les premiers. (…) L’opération « Bordure protectrice » est ainsi, depuis 2006, la quatrième opération de même type contre le Hamas. Comme à chaque fois, le Hamas a répondu par une campagne de frappes qui s’avère toujours aussi peu létale pour les civils israéliens, qui, à ce jour, déplorent « seulement » trois victimes – neuf au total pendant les trois opérations précédentes. De leur côté, malgré les précautions et la précision des armes, les raids aériens ou les tirs d’artillerie israéliens finissent toujours, dans un espace où la densité de population dépasse 4 700 habitants par km2, par toucher massivement les civils. Ces pertes sont présentées comme inévitables et attribuées à la lâcheté du Hamas, comme si les soldats français avaient tué des milliers de civils afghans, dont des centaines d’enfants, en renvoyant la responsabilité sur les talibans qui se cachaient au milieu d’eux. (…) La nouveauté de cette opération est le niveau de pertes de Tsahal qui, avec 64 soldats tués, représente presque quatre fois le total des trois précédentes opérations. Lors de « Plomb durci », en 2008-2009, le rapport de pertes avait été de 60-70 combattants du Hamas tués pour un soldat israélien. Il est actuellement environ dix fois inférieur. Cette anomalie s’explique par les adaptations du Hamas qui, face à un adversaire ne variant pas ses modes d’action, a su contourner la barrière de sécurité par un réseau de tunnels d’attaque et par l’emploi de missiles antichars ou de fusils de tireurs d’élite capables d’envoyer des projectiles directs très précis jusqu’à plusieurs kilomètres. Cette double menace a imposé de renforcer la barrière d’une présence militaire, ce qui offrait déjà des cibles aux Palestiniens, et, pour tenter d’y mettre fin, de combattre dans les zones urbanisées de Gaza. Pour Israël, le bilan de « Bordure protectrice » est donc pour l’instant très inférieur à celui de « Plomb durci » et de « Pilier de défense ». Il ne reste alors que deux voies possibles, celle de l’acceptation d’une trêve en se contentant de l’arrêt des tirs du Hamas pour proclamer la victoire ou celle d’une fuite en avant à l’issue incertaine afin d’obtenir des résultats plus en proportion avec les pertes subies. A plus long terme, il reste à savoir combien de temps cette guerre sisyphéenne sera tenable. En 2002, une étude avait conclu que 50 % des Palestiniens entre 6 et 11 ans ne rêvaient pas de devenir médecin ou ingénieur mais de tuer des Israéliens en étant kamikaze. Douze ans plus tard, ces dizaines de milliers d’enfants sont adultes et rien n’a été fait pour les faire changer d’avis. Michel Goya
Benjamin Netanyahu a raison dans la mesure où le Hamas porte la responsabilité principale de la logique de terreur actuelle. Aujourd’hui encore, le Hamas a pris la responsabilité de briser la trève et de reprendre des tirs inefficaces qui se retournent fatalement contre la population palestinienne. Provocation supplémentaire, il a invité un journaliste d’Al Jazeera pour montrer que tous les tunnels n’ont pas pas été détruits. Benjamin Netanyahu n’a pas tort non plus lorsqu’il parle de terrorisme. Le Hamas, qui s’est maintenu au pouvoir de manière non démocratique, impose une dictature islamiste à Gaza et se sert de sa population civile comme de la chair à canon. Néanmoins, il faut aussi se demander qui est responsable du fait qu’on en soit arrivé là. Qui a démoralisé, humilié , piétiné les populations de Gaza et de Cisjordanie? Qui a continué la colonisation au mépris du droit international? Qui a saboté le processus de paix et les efforts fournis par l’administration américaine pour trouver une issue au conflit? Est-ce vraiment l’intérêt d’Israël de marginaliser le président de l’autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas? Tout se passse comme si certains voulaient que le Hamas l’emporte sur les modérés car c’est un adversaire idéal, facile à diaboliser. On en arrive à soupçonner Benjamin Netanyahu de jouer les apprentis sorciers. Jean-François Kahn
Parmi tous les critères que proposent  les commentateurs pour déterminer « qui a gagné » l’Opération Bordure de protection, une chose saute aux yeux de tout le monde: l’attitude de la communauté internationale à l’égard d’un après-guerre de Gaza (pour peu qu’elle s’achève et quand elle s’achèvera). Et sur ce chapitre, Israël semble avoir remporté une victoire convaincante. La guerre de Gaza a changé la manière dont le monde parle du Hamas et de la bande de Gaza – et malgré toutes leurs niaiseries à Jérusalem, ce qui se passe est plus ou moins à l’unisson de ce que dit Benjamin Netanyahu. La semaine dernière, je parlais de la proposition informelle du gouvernement Netanyahu d’une « paix économique » pour Gaza, en échange de sa démilitarisation. Malgré les succès enregistrés, la paix économique n’a jamais été réellement adoptée par la communauté internationale, et quand Netanyahu la proposait, elle était généralement accueillie avec colère et dérision. Mais pas cette fois. Cette fois, le Hamas semble avoir surestimé sa force. Il est possible qu’il ait été victime de son « succès » macabre en matière de guerre de propagande. Mais le fait est que la communauté internationale est si déchirée par la violence à Gaza, qu’elle veut, plus que jamais, en empêcher la récurrence. Et peu importe ses nombreuses tentatives d’accuser Israël, il semble qu’elle comprenne qu’il n’y a qu’une manière d’empêcher un futur bain de sang : démilitariser, au moins de manière significative, la bande de Gaza. Seth Mandel

Quand le mieux devient l’ennemi du bien (le Hamas et ses propagandistes en auraient-ils cette fois trop fait ?) …

A l’heure où rompant une énième trêve et après un mois de « calvaire  largement auto-infligé

Le Hamas et ses pompom girls célèbrent dans le sang à nouveau leur incroyable victoire dans la guerre de pure propagande que semblent être désormais devenus les conflits actuels …

Pendant que juste à côté nos belles âmes se décident enfin à se tourner vers la véritable épuration ethnique à laquelle sont soumis les derniers restes de chrétiens de la région …

Comment pourtant ne pas voir avec la revue Commentary …

Derrière les sommets de diabolisation dont Israël a été l’objet …

Mais aussi, peut-être pour la première fois d’une manière aussi éclatante,  la révélation de l’incroyable arsenal (merci Téhéran et Doha !) de roquettes et de tunnels offensifs dont disposaient les dirigeants d’une entité censée être parmi les plus pauvres du monde …

Comme de l’inimaginable degré d’atrocité et du nombre de victimes, certes très probablement exagéré par le Hamas lui-même, que ceux-ci pouvaient provoquer …

La véritable victime qu’ont fini par produire la machine  de propagande si terriblement efficace des  dirigeants gazaouites et de leurs relais médiatiques occidentaux  …

Et pour laquelle, pour ne plus jamais  avoir à revoir de telles horreurs,  tout le monde n’a plus désormais que le mot jusqu’ici exclusivement israélien de « démilitarisation » à la bouche …

A savoir, victime de son propre succès, le Hamas lui-même ?

The Gaza War Has Changed the Way the World Talks About Hamas
Seth Mandel
Commentary
08.08.2014

Amid all the metrics commentators propose to determine “who won” Operation Protective Edge, one is staring everyone in the face: the international community’s attitude toward a postwar (if and when the war is over) Gaza. And on that score, Israel seems to have won a convincing victory. The Gaza war has changed the way the world is talking about Hamas and the Gaza Strip–and, despite all their tut-tutting at Jerusalem, they sound quite a bit like Benjamin Netanyahu.

I wrote last week of the Netanyahu government’s informal proposal for a sort of “economic peace” for Gaza in return for its demilitarization. Despite its record of success, economic peace has never really been embraced by the international community–and when Netanyahu proposes it, it’s usually met with anger and derision. But not this time. This time Hamas seems to have overplayed its hand.

It’s possible that this is Hamas being a victim of its own morbid “success” with regard to the propaganda war. That is, maybe the international community is so torn up by the violence in Gaza that they want more than ever to prevent its recurrence. And no matter how often they try to blame Israel, they seem to understand that there’s only one way to prevent future bloodshed: demilitarize, at least to a significant degree, the Gaza Strip.

Take, for example, the Obama administration. While President Obama, Secretary of State John Kerry, and their staffers and advisors have been intent on criticizing Israel in public and in harsh terms, the president’s loyal defense secretary, Chuck Hagel, reportedly spoke as though he took the need to disarm Hamas for granted last week. And it’s even more significant to hear of European leaders joining that bandwagon. As Foreign Policy reported last night:
Major European powers have outlined a detailed plan for a European-backed U.N. mission to monitor the lifting of an Israeli and Egyptian blockade of the Gaza Strip and the dismantling of Hamas’s military tunnel network and rocket arsenals, according to a copy of the plan obtained by Foreign Policy.

The European initiative aims to reinforce wide-ranging cease-fire talks underway in Cairo. The Europeans are hoping to take advantage of this week’s 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire to cobble a more durable plan addressing underlying issues that could reignite violence between Israel and the Palestinians.

It remains unclear whether the European plan has the support of Hamas, Israel, or the United States. It does, however, include several elements the Obama administration believes are essential, including the need to ease Gazans’ plight, strengthen the role of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, and ensure the demilitarization of the Gaza Strip.

The plan — described in a so-called non-paper titled “Gaza: Supporting a Sustainable Ceasefire” — envisions the creation of a U.N.-mandated “monitoring and verification” mission, possibly drawing peacekeepers from the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO), which has monitored a series of Israeli-Arab truces in the region since the late 1940s. The mission “should cover military and security aspects, such as the dismantling of tunnels between Gaza and Israel, and the lifting of restrictions on movement and access,” according to the document. “It could have a role in monitoring imports of construction and dual use materials allowed in the Gaza Strip, and the re-introduction of the Palestinian Authority.”

The plan’s existence is in many ways more important than its details, for it shows Europe to be embracing Netanyahu’s idea for an economic peace for Gaza. Removing the import and export restrictions (or most of them) in return for real demilitarization would be an obvious win for everyone–except Hamas. In fact, it would give a major boost to the peace process overall, because it would discredit armed “resistance” as an effective method to win Palestinians their autonomy.

It would be quite a turnaround if Gaza somehow became the prime example of peaceful state building with the international community’s help. It’s also not an easy task, to say the least. But the fact that even Europe is on board, and expects to get the UN to agree to such a plan, shows that the principle of disarming Hamas and demilitarizing the Gaza Strip has gone mainstream.

Whether it happens is another question, of course, and no one should get their hopes up, especially while Hamas is breaking even temporary ceasefires. Additionally, the UN’s record in policing such zones of conflict, especially in the Middle East, is not cause for optimism. But talk of Hamas “winning” this war is made all the more ridiculous when the topic of conversation in the capitals of the Middle East and throughout the West is how to permanently disarm Hamas and dismantle any infrastructure they can use against Israel.

La guerre de Gaza a changé la manière dont le monde parle du Hamas
Seth Mandel
13/08/2014

La guerre de Gaza a changé la manière dont le monde parle du Hamas, Seth Mandel

Traduction française, par M. Macina de l’article intitulé « The Gaza War Has Changed the Way the World Talks About Hamas », mis en ligne le 8 août 2014 sur le site de Commentary Magazine.

Parmi tous les critères que proposent les commentateurs pour déterminer « qui a gagné » l’Opération Bordure de protection, une chose saute aux yeux de tout le monde: l’attitude de la communauté internationale à l’égard d’un après-guerre de Gaza (pour peu qu’elle s’achève et quand elle s’achèvera). Et sur ce chapitre, Israël semble avoir remporté une victoire convaincante. La guerre de Gaza a changé la manière dont le monde parle du Hamas et de la bande de Gaza – et malgré toutes leurs niaiseries à Jérusalem, ce qui se passe est plus ou moins à l’unisson de ce que dit Benjamin Netanyahu.

La semaine dernière, je parlais de la proposition informelle du gouvernement Netanyahu d’une « paix économique » pour Gaza, en échange de sa démilitarisation. Malgré les succès enregistrés, la paix économique n’a jamais été réellement adoptée par la communauté internationale, et quand Netanyahu la proposait, elle était généralement accueillie avec colère et dérision. Mais pas cette fois. Cette fois, le Hamas semble avoir surestimé sa force.

Il est possible qu’il ait été victime de son « succès » macabre en matière de guerre de propagande. Mais le fait est que la communauté internationale est si déchirée par la violence à Gaza, qu’elle veut, plus que jamais, en empêcher la récurrence. Et peu importe ses nombreuses tentatives d’accuser Israël, il semble qu’elle comprenne qu’il n’y a qu’une manière d’empêcher un futur bain de sang : démilitariser, au moins de manière significative, la bande de Gaza.

Arrêtons-nous, par exemple, sur l’administration Obama. Alors que le Président Obama, le Secrétaire d’Etat John Kerry, leur personnel et leurs conseillers avaient l’intention de critiquer publiquement Israël dans les termes les plus durs, on entend dire que le loyal ministre de la Défense du Président, Chuck Hagel, aurait parlé, la semaine passée, en des termes impliquant qu’il considère le désarmement du Hamas comme allant de soi. Et il est encore plus significatif d’apprendre que des dirigeants européens ont pris ce train en marche. Foreign Policy relatait hier soir :

« Selon une copie du plan obtenue par Foreign Policy, des grandes puissances européennes ont esquissé les grandes lignes d’un plan détaillé pour une mission des Nations unies, soutenue par l’Europe, chargée d’observer la levée des blocus israélien et égyptien de la Bande de Gaza et le démantèlement militaire du réseau de tunnels et des arsenaux de missiles du Hamas. »

L’initiative européenne vise à renforcer de larges pourparlers de cessez-le-feu qui sont en cours au Caire. Les Européens espèrent tirer avantage du présent cessez-le-feu humanitaire de 72 heures pour échafauder un plan plus durable destiné à régler des problèmes sous-jacents qui pourraient rallumer la violence entre Israël et les Palestiniens.

A ce stade, on ignore si ce plan européen a le soutien du Hamas, d’Israël et des Etats-Unis. Cependant, il comporte quelques éléments que l’administration Obama juge essentiels, dont la nécessité d’améliorer la situation critique des Gazans, de renforcer le rôle du Président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas, et de garantir la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza.

Le plan exposé dans un document dit officieux, intitulé « Gaza : prise en charge d’un cessez-le-feu durable », envisage la création d’une mission d’« observation et de vérification », mandatée par les Nations unies, et éventuellement accompagnée de soldats de maintien de la paix de l’Organisation onusienne de Supervision de Trêves (UNTSO), qui a surveillé une série de trêves israélo-arabes dans la région depuis la fin des années 40. Selon ce document, la mission « devrait couvrir les aspects militaires et sécuritaires, tels que le démantèlement des tunnels entre Gaza et Israël, et la levée des restrictions de mouvement et d’accès ». « Il pourrait jouer un rôle dans la supervision des importations de matériaux de construction et de matériel à double usage dont l’entrée dans la bande de Gaza serait autorisée, et dans la réintroduction de l’Autorité Palestinienne. »

L’existence de ce plan est à bien des égards plus importante que ses détails, car il montre que l’Europe est en train d’adopter l’idée de Netanyahu d’une paix économique pour Gaza. Supprimer les restrictions d’importation et d’exportation (ou la majeure partie d’entre elles), en échange d’une véritable démilitarisation, serait un gain évident pour tout le monde, sauf pour le Hamas. En fait, il stimulerait considérablement l’ensemble du processus de paix, car il discréditerait la « résistance » armée, au bénéfice d’une méthode efficace permettant aux Palestiniens de gagner leur autonomie.

Ce serait un véritable revirement si Gaza devenait, en quelque sorte, le principal exemple de l’édification d’un Etat pacifique avec l’aide de la communauté internationale. Toutefois il ne s’agit pas d’une tâche facile, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire. Mais le fait que même l’Europe y soit attelée, et espère obtenir de l’ONU qu’elle entérine un tel plan, montre que le principe de désarmer le Hamas et de démilitariser la Bande de Gaza est largement admis.

Que cela se réalise est une autre question, bien sûr, et nul ne doit fonder tous ses espoirs là-dessus, en particulier quand on sait que le Hamas brise même des cessez-le-feu temporaires. De plus, les expériences onusiennes de gestion de telles zones de combat, n’inclinent guère à l’optimisme. Mais parler du Hamas comme étant le « vainqueur » de cette guerre est devenu d’autant plus ridicule que le principal sujet de conversation dans les capitales du Moyen-Orient et dans tout le monde occidental tourne autour de la manière de désarmer le Hamas de façon permanente et de démanteler toutes infrastructures qu’il pourrait utiliser contre Israël.

Voir aussi:

Les statistiques bidons du Hamas

Alan Dershowitz, professeur de droit à Harvard

Gatesone institute

7 août 2014

adaptation française Danilette

C’est un mystère pourquoi tant de media acceptent comme parole d’évangile les chiffres du Hamas sur le nombre de civils tués dans la récente guerre. Le Hamas proclame que 90% des 1800 Palestiniens tués sont des civils [NDT : 1800, chiffres du Hamas]. Israël dit que la moitié des tués sont des combattants. Les faits objectifs sont plus proches de ce que dit Israël que du Hamas.

Même des organisations de droits de l’homme anti-israéliennes reconnaissent, selon le New York Times, que le Hamas compte probablement parmi ces « civils tués par Israël », les groupes suivants : Les Palestiniens tués comme collaborateurs, ceux tués de violences domestiques (crimes d’honneur), les Palestiniens tués par des roquettes ou obus de mortier du Hamas et les Palestiniens qui sont morts de mort naturelle durant le conflit.

Je me demande si le Hamas compte aussi les 162 enfants [NDT : chiffre officiel du Hamas, il y en a eu beaucoup plus…] qui sont morts en travaillant comme esclaves pour construire les tunnels. Le Hamas ne comptabilise pas comme combattants, ceux qui construisent les tunnels, ni ceux qui permettent à leurs maisons d’être utilisées comme cache d’armes et lancement de roquettes, ni les policiers du Hamas, ni les membres de la branche politique et ni les autres qui travaillent main dans la main avec les terroristes armés.

Il y a plusieurs années, j’ai forgé un concept pour essayer de montrer que la distance entre un civil et un combattant n’est souvent qu’une question de degré, je l’ai appelé « continuum of civilianality ». Il est clair qu’un enfant dont l’âge ne lui permet pas encore d’aider les combattants du Hamas est un civil et qu’un combattant du Hamas qui tire des roquettes, porte des armes ou opère dans les tunnels est un combattant. Entre ces deux extrêmes, se trouve une grande variété de gens, dont certains sont plus proches des civils et certains sont plus proches des combattants. La loi de la guerre n’a pas établi de distinction claire entre combattants et civils, en particulier dans un contexte de guerre urbaine où des gens peuvent transporter des armes la nuit et être boulangers durant la journée, ou tirer des roquettes durant la journée et aller dormir avec leurs familles la nuit. (Il est intéressant de noter que la Cour suprême israélienne a essayé d’élaborer une définition fonctionnelle du terme combattant en plein contexte trouble de guerrilla urbaine).

Les données publiées par le New York Times suggèrent fortement qu’un très grand nombre, peut-être la majorité des gens tués sont plus proches du combattant de l’extrêmité de l’échelle que du civil de l’extrémité de l’échelle. Premièrement, la vaste majorité des tués sont plutôt des hommes que des femmes, deuxièmement la majorité ont entre 15 et 40 ans, le nombre de personnes âgés de plus de 60 ans sont rarissimes, le nombre d’enfants en dessous de 15 ans est aussi relativement petit, bien que leurs images aient été prépondérantes ! En d’autres termes, les genres et âges des tués ne sont pas représentatifs de la population générale de Gaza mais plus représentatifs du genre et de l’âge des combattants. Ces données suggèrent qu’un très grand pourcentage de Palestiniens tués sont du coté des combattants de l’échelle (continuum).

Elles prouvent également, comme si des preuves étaient nécessaires à des yeux impartiaux, qu’Israël n’a pas ciblé des civils au hasard. Si cela était le cas, les tués seraient représentatifs de la population générale de Gaza plutôt que de sous-groupes étroitement associées à des combattants.

Les médias devraient cesser immédiatement d’utiliser les statistiques approuvées par le Hamas qui déjà dans le passé se sont révélés être très peu fiables. Ils devraient plutôt essayer de documenter, de façon indépendante, les données de chaque personne tuée : âge, sexe, profession, affiliation au Hamas et autres facteurs objectifs pertinents à la définition de son statut de combattant, non-combattant ou mixte. Les media font preuve de paresse en s’apuyant sur les chiffres de la propagande du Hamas et mettent en danger la profession. Lorsque l’infâme rapport Goldstone a faussement affirmé que la grande majorité des personnes tuées dans l’Opération Plomb Durci étaient des civils et non des combattants du Hamas, beaucoup d’habitants de Gaza se sont plaints, ils ont accusé le Hamas de lâcheté puisque tant de civils avaient été tués alors que les combattants avaient été épargnés. À la suite de ces plaintes, le Hamas a été forcé de dire la vérité : il a reconnu le nombre de combattants et policiers armés tués. Il est probable que le Hamas fera une « correction » similaire à l’égard de ce conflit. Mais cette correction ne sera pas diffusée dans les médias, comme la correction précédente ne l’avait pas été.

Les gros titres du genre « La plupart des personnes tuées par Israël sont des enfants, des femmes et des personnes âgées » vont continuer à être diffusés malgré la fausseté des faits. Tant que les media ne démentiront pas, le Hamas poursuivra sa « stratégie de bébés morts » et plus de gens des deux côtés vont mourir.

Voir également:

Désastre humanitaire dans les ruines de Gaza
Hélène Jaffiol (Gaza, envoyée spéciale)
Le Monde
04.08.2014

Malgré une nouvelle trêve humanitaire de sept heures annoncée par Israël à partirde 9 heures, lundi 4 août, le cauchemar des habitants de Gaza n’en finit pas. Chaque arrêt provisoire des hostilités, chaque cessez-le-feu, s’achève en nouveau bain de sang.

Amal Jababra, jeune et frêle Palestinienne de Rafah, avait rejoint vendredi, à bout de force, l’enceinte d’une école de l’ONU, alors qu’un déluge de feu s’abattait sur les quartiers est de la ville-frontière. Dimanche, en milieu de matinée, elle a de nouveau vécu l’horreur lorsque les éclats d’un obus israélien ont déchiqueté la jambe de son mari, devant l’entrée du bâtiment. L’attaque qui, selon l’arméeisraélienne, visait trois membres du Jihad islamique circulant sur une moto, a fait plus de 10 morts et 30 blessés parmi les civils.

« CETTE FOLIE DOIT CESSER »

C’est la troisième fois depuis le début du conflit qu’une telle scène de chaos se produit dans un centre de l’UNRWA, l’organisme de l’ONU chargé des réfugiés palestiniens, après l’attaque des écoles de Beit Hanoun et Jabaliya, au nord de la bande de Gaza. « Cette folie doit cesser », a déclaré le secrétaire général de l’ONU, Ban Ki-moon, dénonçant un « scandale du point de vue moral et un acte criminel ». Les Etats-Unis se sont dits « consternés » par ce « bombardement honteux », tandis que François Hollande jugeait l’attaque « inadmissible », appelant à ce que les responsables du carnage « répondent de leurs actes ».

Alors qu’Israël se positionne déjà dans l’après-conflit, réfléchissant à un retrait unilatéral de ses troupes, le deuil et la terreur écrasent toujours le quotidien des habitants de l’enclave palestinienne, en particulier dans les zones frontalières qui restent soumises à de rudes bombardements. Dans la nuit de lundi, dix Palestiniens ont été tués dans des raids.

DES RUES ENTIÈRES ONT ÉTÉ RAYÉES DE LA CARTE

Après trois semaines de conflit, l’étroite bande de terre est au bord d’un désastre humanitaire sans précédent : un quart des habitants de Gaza ont fui leur maison ; 280 000 réfugiés s’entassent dans les 84 écoles de l’ONU complètement saturées. Une dizaine d’hôpitaux ont été endommagés par des bombardements, aggravant le bilan des victimes, qui dépasse les 1 800 morts et 9 000 blessés.

Des rues entières ont été rayées de la carte, comme à Beit Hanoun dans le nord, ou près de Khan Younès, dans le sud-est. Le 29 juillet, le bombardement de l’unique centrale électrique de Gaza a ajouté une nouvelle plaie aux calamités du territoire palestinien. La distribution d’eau dans les maisons a été quasiment coupée, faute d’énergie électrique pour faire fonctionner les systèmes de pompage. Les Gazaouis errent des journées entières, jerrican à la main, à la recherche des quelques camions-citernes distribuant de l’eau saine.

Lire l’édito : Le calvaire des habitants de Gaza

A Rafah, l’école de l’ONU, qui accueille plus de 3 000 réfugiés, est privée d’eau depuis quatre jours. Les conditions sanitaires sont désastreuses. Les salles et les allées crasseuses des écoles surpeuplées affichent le douloureux spectacle du dénuement et de la promiscuité. Des familles entières s’entassent derrière des tapis déployés en rideaux de fortune.

 « NOUS N’AVONS QU’UN REPAS PAR JOUR »

Sabha Walred reste en retrait, épuisée. La nuit dernière, elle a dû partager une salle de classe avec près de 100 autres réfugiés : « J’ai dû dormir assise, recroquevillée sur ma chaise. » Mais le moment le plus difficile pour cette jeune mère de 25 ans reste le partage de la ration journalière :

« Nous n’avons qu’un repas par jour. Trois pains, un peu de fromage et un petit morceau de viande. Je dois le diviser entre mes quatre enfants et mon mari. »
Elle avoue en être réduite au chapardage :

« J’ai des jumeaux âgés d’un an et ils ont besoin de lait. Dès que je le peux, je vais voler des briques de lait dans les bureaux de l’administration. Je n’ai pas le choix. »
L’annonce d’un retrait progressif israélien, en particulier à Beit Lahiya, dans le nord de la bande de Gaza, n’a pas déclenché de retours massifs de réfugiés, retenus par la terreur légitime de se retrouver une nouvelle fois piégés sous les bombes.

De source palestinienne, cinq Gazaouis ont été tués dimanche par une frappe israélienne alors qu’ils revenaient dans leur maison à Jabaliya.

PLUS DE 50 000 GAZAOUIS ONT PERDU LEUR MAISON

Selon les Nations unies, plus de 50 000 Gazaouis ont perdu la totalité de leur maison, auxquels il faut ajouter 30 000 autres personnes dont le logement est considéré comme inhabitable. Dans un environnement comme frappé par la foudre, la famille Aghra a choisi de revenir habiter dans les quelques pièces encore utilisables de sa maison, éventrée par un missile qui a réduit à l’état de ruines l’habitation voisine.

« Je devais revenir. La maison, pour un Palestinien, c’est sa dignité. J’ai la chance qu’elle tienne encore debout, c’est l’essentiel », relativise Nahla Warsh, 37 ans. Sans eau, sans électricité, la survie est une lutte quotidienne.

A côté d’elle, son beau-frère Abdullah, un jeune professeur de 22 ans, les traits tirés, craint le pire quant au dénouement de ce conflit : « Si l’armée israélienne se retire et nous laisse dans notre misère, sans nous accorder la levée du blocus, nous ne pourrons jamais nous relever. Autant nous achever maintenant ! »

Voir de plus:

Le calvaire des habitants de Gaza
Le Monde

02.08.2014

Edito du « Monde ». Partout dans le monde, les bombardements en zone urbaine font des victimes civiles. C’est particulièrement vrai de toutes les guerres dites asymétriques, où des combattants noyés dans la population affrontent une armée traditionnelle. Au cours du seul week-end des samedi 19 et dimanche 20 juillet, quelque 700 personnes ont été tuées, en Syrie, dans la ville d’Alep, que les forces du régime de Bachar Al-Assad pilonnent à l’artillerie lourde – sans provoquer la moindre indignation.

Le plus souvent, les populations civiles fuient. Elles viennent gonfler les camps de réfugiés dans les pays alentour. Pas à Gaza. Dans ce territoire palestinien de 360 kilomètres carrés, la population ne peut s’échapper. Les habitants de la bande de Gaza – 1,8 million de personnes – sont prisonniers de la guerre.

Près d’un mois après le début de l’opération israélienne, ils vivent un véritable enfer, une tragédie humanitaire de grande ampleur. Pour combien de temps encore ?

250 000 GAZAOUIS DÉPLACÉS

La seule frontière vers laquelle ils ont essayé de fuir, celle de l’Egypte, au sud du territoire, est restée hermétiquement fermée. Le Hamas, le mouvement islamiste palestinien qui contrôle Gaza depuis 2007, est l’ennemi de l’Egypte du maréchal Abdel Fattah Al-Sissi. Farouche adversaire de l’islamisme politique, le nouveau pouvoir égyptien n’est pas fâché de voir Israël attaquer le Hamas.

Quelque 250 000 Gazaouis sont aujourd’hui des personnes déplacées. Ils ont fui leur domicile ou celui-ci a été détruit. Ils s’entassent dans les écoles et autres centres de l’UNRWA, l’organisme de l’ONU chargé des réfugiés palestiniens. Souvent, ils s’y rendent parce que l’armée israélienne leur a enjoint de le faire, avant de tirer sur leur quartier.

ECOLES, MARCHÉS ET HÔPITAUX ATTAQUÉS

Tsahal a les coordonnées GPS de toutes les écoles. Pourtant, à pas moins de cinq reprises, ces écoles ont essuyé le feu direct de l’armée israélienne. Quelque 40 personnes ont été fauchées par des obus, dans ces établissements, alors que l’ONU avait prévenu de la présence de réfugiés. Au total, selon l’ONU, 133 écoles ont été endommagées par l’armée israélienne. A l’entrée de la ville de Gaza, un marché qui venait de rouvrir après le jeûne du ramadan a pris une volée d’obus. Des hôpitaux ont été touchés.

La découverte d’un réseau de tunnels – par lequel le Hamas entend mener des attaques et des enlèvements en Israël – a changé la nature de l’opération israélienne. L’armée entre chaque jour plus profondément dans la densité urbaine de Gaza.

PUNITION COLLECTIVE

Les bombardements ont détruit l’unique centrale électrique et démoli une partie du système d’épuration des eaux. Hôpitaux et centres de réfugiés fonctionnent dans des conditions de plus en plus précaires. Pas un mètre carré de Gaza n’est hors de portée de Tsahal. Près de 80 % des 1 600 Palestiniens tués à ce jour sont des civils.

On connaît la position d’Israël. Le Hamas installe ses roquettes au milieu d’une population dont il sait qu’elle n’a guère le loisir de s’enfuir ; chacun de ses tirs visant les villes israéliennes est parfaitement indiscriminé ; il lui arrive de stocker ses missiles dans la proximité immédiate des centres de l’ONU et de tirer depuis ces lieux.

C’est ainsi, et de façon avérée. Tout autant que la virulence de la punition collective infligée par Israël aux gens de Gaza. Comme s’ils étaient collectivement responsables.

Voir encore:

« M. Hollande, vous êtes comptable d’une certaine idée de la France qui se joue à Gaza « 
Rony Brauman (Ex-président de MSF, professeur à Sciences Po), Régis Debray (Ecrivain et philosophe), Edgar Morin (Sociologue et philosophe) (Directeur de recherches émérite au CNRS) et Christiane Hessel (Veuve de Stéphane Hessel)

Le Monde

04.08.2014

« Quand la violence crée une spirale incontrôlée et la mort de 300 civils innocents, la situation exige une réponse urgente et déterminée »,viennent d’indiquer à bon escient le président du Conseil européen, Herman Van Rompuy, et le président de la Commission européenne, José Manuel Barroso, au moment d’élever au niveau 3 les sanctions économiques contre la Russie.

On ne sait pas si le président russe, Vladimir Poutine, où l’un de ses subordonnés, a donné l’ordre de faire sauter en vol le Boeing 777 de la Malaysia Airlines. Mais il y a déjà cinq fois plus de civils innocents massacrés à Gaza, ceux-là soigneusement ciblés et sur l’ordre direct d’un gouvernement. Les sanctions de l’Union européenne contre Israël restent au niveau zéro. L’annexion de la Crimée russophone déclenche indignation et sanctions. Celle de la Jérusalem arabophone nous laisserait impavides ? Peut-on à la fois condamner M. Poutine et absoudre M. Nétanyahou ? Encore deux poids deux mesures ?

Nous avons condamné les conflits interarabes et intermusulmans qui ensanglantent et décomposent le Moyen-Orient. Ils font plus de victimes locales que la répression israélienne. Mais la particularité de l’affaire israélo-palestinienne est qu’elle concerne et touche à l’identité des millions d’Arabes et musulmans, des millions de chrétiens et Occidentaux, des millions de juifs dispersés dans le monde.

RÉSISTER AU MENSONGE

Ce conflit apparemment local est de portée mondiale et de ce fait a déjà suscité ses métastases dans le monde musulman, le monde juif, le monde occidental. Il a réveillé et amplifié anti-judaïsme, anti-arabisme, anti-christianisme (les croisés) et répandu des incendies de haine dans tous les continents.

Nous avons eu l’occasion de nous rendre à Gaza, où il existe un Institut culturel français ; et les SOS que nous recevons de nos amis sur place, qui voient les leurs mourir dans une terrible solitude, nous bouleversent. N’ayant guère d’accointances avec les actuels présidents du Conseil et de la Commission européens, ce n’est pas vers ces éminentes et sagaces personnalités que nous nous tournons mais vers vous, François Hollande, pour qui nous avons voté et qui ne nous êtes pas inconnu. C’est de vous que nous sommes en droit d’attendre une réponse urgente et déterminée face à ce carnage, comme à la systématisation des punitions collectives en Cisjordanie même.

Les appels pieux ne suffisent pas plus que les renvois dos à dos qui masquent la terrible disproportion de forces entre colonisateurs et colonisés depuis quarante-sept ans. L’écrivain et dissident russe Alexandre Soljenitsyne (1918-2008) demandait aux dirigeants soviétiques une seule chose : « Ne mentez pas. » Quand on ne peut résister à la force, on doit au moins résister au mensonge. Ne vous et ne nous mentez pas, monsieur le Président.

L’ENFERMEMENT COMPLET N’EST NI VIABLE NI HUMAIN

On doit toujours regretter la mort de militaires en opération, mais quand les victimes sont des civils, femmes et enfants sans défense qui n’ont plus d’eau à boire, non pas des occupants mais des occupés, et non des envahisseurs mais des envahis, il ne s’agit plus d’implorer mais de sommer au respect du droit international.

La France est bien placée pour initier un mouvement des grands pays européens pour la suspension de l’accord d’association entre Israël et l’UE, accord conditionné au respect de nos valeurs communes et des accords de paix souscrits par le passé. De même pourrait-elle faire valoir qu’un cessez-le-feu qui déboucherait sur un retour au statu quo ante, lui-même déjà intolérable, ne ferait que contribuer au pourrissement de la situation et donc au retour de l’insécurité pour les uns comme pour les autres.

L’enfermement complet n’est ni viable ni humain. Pourquoi la police européenne ne pourrait-elle revenir sur tous les points de passage entre Gaza et l’extérieur, comme c’était le cas avant 2007 ?

APARTHEID

Nous n’oublions pas les chrétiens expulsés d’Irak et les civils assiégés d’Alep. Mais à notre connaissance, vous n’avez jamais chanté La Vie en roseen trinquant avec l’autocrate de Damas ou avec le calife de Mossoul comme on vous l’a vu faire sur nos écrans avec le premier ministre israélien au cours d’un repas familial.

Lire les témoignages : Les chrétiens de Mossoul racontent leur expulsion, froide et implacable

L’extrême droite israélienne vous semblant moins répréhensible que l’extrême droite française, à quelque chose cette inconséquence pourrait être bonne : faciliter les échanges et les pressions au nom de valeurs communes.

Israël se veut défenseur d’un Occident ex-persécuteur de juifs, dont il est un héritier pour le meilleur et pour le pire. Il se dit défenseur de la démocratie, qu’il réserve pleinement aux seuls juifs, et se prétend ennemi du racisme tout en se rapprochant d’un apartheid pour les Arabes.

UN HOMME POLITIQUE SE DOIT DE MONTER EN PREMIÈRE LIGNE

L’école stoïcienne recommandait de distinguer, parmi les événements du monde, entre les choses qui dépendent de nous et celles qui ne dépendent pas de nous. On ne peut guère agir sur les accidents d’avion et les séismes – et pourtant vous avez personnellement pris en main le sort et le deuil des familles des victimes d’une catastrophe aérienne au Mali. C’est tout à votre honneur. A fortiori, un homme politique se doit de monter en première ligne quand les catastrophes humanitaires sont le fait de décisions politiques sur lesquelles il peut intervenir, surtout quand les responsables sont de ses amis ou alliés et qu’ils font partie des Nations unies, sujets aux mêmes devoirs et obligations que les autres Etats. La France n’est-elle pas un membre permanent du Conseil de sécurité ?

Ce ne sont certes pas des Français qui sont directement en cause ici, c’est une certaine idée de la France dont vous êtes comptable, aux yeux de vos compatriotes comme du reste du monde. Et il ne vous échappe pas que faux-fuyants et faux-semblants ont une crédibilité et une durée de vie de plus en plus limitées.

Rony Brauman (Ex-président de MSF, professeur à Sciences Po)

Régis Debray (Ecrivain et philosophe)

Edgar Morin (Sociologue et philosophe) (Directeur de recherches émérite au CNRS)

Christiane Hessel (Veuve de Stéphane Hessel)

Voir encore:

Le conflit israélo-palestinien n’est pas un conflit mondial
Maurice Goldring (Universitaire Paris VIII, auteur du livre Les ex-communistes, éditions Le Bord De L’eau)
Le Monde
07.08.2014

Dans leur tribune du Monde, pubiée le 4 août, Rony Brauman, Régis Debray, Christiane Hessel et Edgar Morin sont convaincus « qu’une certaine idée de laFrance se joue à Gaza ». Rony Brauman et Christiane Hessel sont connus pouravoir choisi leur camp dans le conflit israélo-palestinien. Régis Debray et Edgar Morin apportent la caution d’esprits plus modérés.
Les signataires acceptent que d’autres conflits sont plus meurtriers dans le monde arabe. Mais la particularité du conflit israélo-palestinien est « qu’il concerne et touche à l’identité des millions d’Arabes et de Musulmans, des millions de Chrétiens et d’Occidentaux, des millions de Juifs dispersés dans le monde ». Ce conflit n’est pas local, il est de portée mondiale et de ce fait a « déjà suscité sesmétastases dans le monde musulman, le monde juif, le monde occidental ». Il a réveillé les xénophobies et les racismes, a répandu la haine dans tous les continents.

Il ne suffit plus « d’appels pieux », ni de « renvois dos à dos ». Parce qu’il y a des colonisés et des colonisateurs avec une « terrible disproportion de forces ». Il fautsévir, suspendre l’accord d’association entre Israël et l’Union Européenne.

EXPORTER CE CONFLIT, C’EST RENFORCER LES EXTRÊMES

Les choses sont ainsi dites clairement. Le monde est parcouru de conflits beaucoup plus meurtriers, mais sur lesquels les signataires ne peuvent pas grand-chose. Alors que devant ce conflit, ils retrouvent les vieux réflexes, les vieux clivages qui nous manquent tant depuis la chute du mur de Berlin. Afrique du Sud,Vietnam, Chili, Cuba, étaient tous des conflits de « portée mondiale », ils suscitaient tous des « métastases » dans le monde entier. Les conflits inter-arabes, internes à l’Afrique ne sont pas des « conflits mondiaux ». On n’y peut rien. Alors que là, on retrouve le colonialisme, l’impérialisme, l’internationalisme prolétarien, les dénonciations des complicités entre puissances coloniales.

L’inscription du conflit israélo-palestinien comme conflit de « portée mondiale » lui assure une prolongation indéfinie. Il faut au contraire refuser les métastases,refuser l’exportation de ce conflit comme on refuse les haines mondiales. Voici qui serait une contribution utile de nos faiseurs d’opinion. Le conflit israélo-palestinien n’est pas mondial, c’est un conflit local. Dans un petit territoire, des populations face à face depuis 70 ans portent au pouvoir leurs représentants les plus réactionnaires, les plus bellicistes. Ceux qui refusent les négociations, les compromis, parce que la paix les rejeterait dans les limbes. En contribuant àdonner à ce conflit une dimension mondiale, on conforte ces extrêmes. Les Palestiniens deviennent le symbole de tous les colonisés du monde, les Israéliens sont à l’avant-garde de la défense du monde occidental menacé par l’islamisme radical. Dans ce face à face, seuls les chefs de guerre ont droit à la parole. Leurs alliés soufflent sur les braises.

Voir enfin:

Guerre sisyphéenne à Gaza
Michel Goya (Directeur du bureau recherche du centre de doctrine d’emploi des forces)
Le Monde
05.08.2014

Il n’existe que deux moyens d’utiliser le monopole de la violence légitime : la guerre ou la police. Les vraies difficultés d’Israël ont commencé lorsque les ennemis ont été remplacés par des délinquants et que la guerre a été remplacée par de la police à grande échelle, action perpétuelle, car la lutte contre les délinquants ne s’arrête jamais, et s’avère coûteuse sur la durée, au moins sur le plan humain. Près de 1 000 soldats et policiers israéliens ont ainsi perdu la vie pendant l’occupation du Liban sud et les deux Intifada palestiniennes.

Dans les années 2000, avec le développement des armes de précision à longue portée et l’édification de la barrière de sécurité, les Israéliens ont cru pouvoir résoudre ce dernier problème en évacuant certaines zones occupées tout en les gardant à portée des frappes. Cette stratégie a laissé le champ libre à des organisations hostiles comme le Hamas, qui, refusant de « jouer le jeu », ont pris soin de ne pas laisser apparaître de cibles susceptibles de constituer des objectifs militaires. Face à des miliciens fantassins ou des lanceurs de lance-roquettes, tous aisément dissimulables dans la population, les Israéliens ne pouvaient dès lors que frapper l’ensemble de celle-ci pour avoir une chance d’atteindre les premiers.

LE GOUVERNEMENT ISRAÉLIEN PIÉGÉ PAR L’ARMÉE

Cette évolution stratégique israélienne a coïncidé aussi avec la disparition des grands leaders historiques, seuls capables d’imposer des choix politiques forts, dans un système parlementaire très instable. Faute d’une volonté capable d’imposer une solution politique à long terme, le gouvernement est désormais piégé par cette armée à qui il doit sa survie et qui ne peut que lui proposer des solutions sécuritaires à court terme.

L’opération « Bordure protectrice » est ainsi, depuis 2006, la quatrième opération de même type contre le Hamas. Comme à chaque fois, le Hamas a répondu par une campagne de frappes qui s’avère toujours aussi peu létale pour les civils israéliens, qui, à ce jour, déplorent « seulement » trois victimes – neuf au totalpendant les trois opérations précédentes. De leur côté, malgré les précautions et la précision des armes, les raids aériens ou les tirs d’artillerie israéliens finissent toujours, dans un espace où la densité de population dépasse 4 700 habitants par km2, par toucher massivement les civils. Ces pertes sont présentées comme inévitables et attribuées à la lâcheté du Hamas, comme si les soldats français avaient tué des milliers de civils afghans, dont des centaines d’enfants, en renvoyant la responsabilité sur les talibans qui se cachaient au milieu d’eux. Malgré ces arguments, la position d’Israël se trouve toujours affectée par ces massacres.

DEUX VOIES POSSIBLES

La nouveauté de cette opération est le niveau de pertes de Tsahal qui, avec 64 soldats tués, représente presque quatre fois le total des trois précédentes opérations. Lors de « Plomb durci », en 2008-2009, le rapport de pertes avait été de 60-70 combattants du Hamas tués pour un soldat israélien. Il est actuellement environ dix fois inférieur. Cette anomalie s’explique par les adaptations du Hamas qui, face à un adversaire ne variant pas ses modes d’action, a su contourner la barrière de sécurité par un réseau de tunnels d’attaque et par l’emploi de missiles antichars ou de fusils de tireurs d’élite capables d’envoyer des projectiles directs très précis jusqu’à plusieurs kilomètres. Cette double menace a imposé de renforcer la barrière d’une présence militaire, ce qui offrait déjà des cibles aux Palestiniens, et, pour tenter d’y mettre fin, de combattre dans les zones urbanisées de Gaza.

Pour Israël, le bilan de « Bordure protectrice » est donc pour l’instant très inférieur à celui de « Plomb durci » et de « Pilier de défense ». Il ne reste alors que deux voies possibles, celle de l’acceptation d’une trêve en se contentant de l’arrêt des tirs du Hamas pour proclamer la victoire ou celle d’une fuite en avant à l’issue incertaine afin d’obtenir des résultats plus en proportion avec les pertes subies.

A plus long terme, il reste à savoir combien de temps cette guerre sisyphéenne sera tenable. En 2002, une étude avait conclu que 50 % des Palestiniens entre 6 et 11 ans ne rêvaient pas de devenir médecin ou ingénieur mais de tuer des Israéliens en étant kamikaze. Douze ans plus tard, ces dizaines de milliers d’enfants sont adultes et rien n’a été fait pour les faire changer d’avis. Israël contre le Hezbollah : chronique d’une défaite annoncée 12 juillet- 14 août 2006 (Editions du Rocher, 177 p., 16,90 euros).

Michel Goya est l’auteur avec Marc-Antoine Brillant d’Israël contre le Hezbollah : chronique d’une défaite annoncée 12 juillet- 14 août 2006(Editions du Rocher, 177 p., 16,90 euros) et de Sous le feu : la mort comme hypothèse de travail (éditions Tallandier, 266 p., 20,90 euros)

Michel Goya (Directeur du bureau recherche du centre de doctrine d’emploi des forces)


Désinformation: Paris Match a trouvé son Charles Enderlin (Israel-bashing in French media: Who needs Charles Enderlin when you’ve got Frédéric Helbert ?)

8 août, 2014
 Si le gouvernement des États-Unis a un droit légitime de bombarder et de tuer des civils en Irak, les opprimés ont de même un droit moral d’attaquer les États-Unis avec leurs armes à eux. Les morts civils sont les mêmes qu’ils soient américains, palestiniens ou irakiens. Dr. Mads Gilbert (sur les attentats du 11/9, le 30 septembre 2001)
In an interview with the Norwegian news agency NTB in 2009, Gilbert described his own statements in the aftermath of 9/11 as « unwise and ill-considered », stressing that he is completely against terror against civilians. Wikipedia
C’est une attaque massive, d’Israel contre tout le peuple palestinien. Des crimes de guerre sont commis tous les jours. (…)  La réalité c’est un massacre sans précédent ici. Des tueries de masse, des atrocités visant le peuple palestinien.  C’est plus d’un millier de morts! C’est 50% des victimes qui sont des femmes ou des enfants. Je voudrais monter à Obama ces gens ordinaires, ces civils, amputés, les corps criblés de fragments de bombes, tailladés à mort par ces fléchettes normalement destinées à percer le blindage d’un char, où horriblement  brulés. Je voudrais qu’il voit de ces yeux l’infinie souffrance de ces gens ordinaires et innocents. Causée par une armée si puissante, bâtie et alimentée grâce à l’argent américain, au soutien américain, aux armes US. Quand j’ai écrit, je me posais la question à moi-même en fait. Comment tout cela est-possible? (…) Pour les victimes c’est l’enfer, pour nous c’est dur aussi, mais on doit rester fort dans la tempête et on le reste. En sachant que chaque fois qu’une bombe tombe, des civils palestiniens sont inévitablement tués où blessés. (…) Cela va beaucoup plus loin! Toutes les conventions internationales, toutes les « lois de la guerre » sont bafouées. La première arme de destruction terrible, c’est le siège de la Bande de Gaza. Une punition collective aux conséquences  inimaginables!  Ce siège est contraire l’article 33 je crois  de la Convention de Genève. Le siège de Gaza devenue une prison à ciel ouvert, ce châtiment collectif est totalement illégal.  Second point:  L’usage totalement disproportionné de la force. Comparez les bilans! Ceux des civils touchés: des centaines et des centaines de mort d’un coté, moins de 4 où 5 de l’autre. Le troisième point illégal c’est qu’il est interdit de bombarder sans discriminations zones civiles et militaires, en prétextant que le Hamas utilise la population comme « bouclier humain ». Ce territoire est si petit que tout est forcément imbriqué. Les Israéliens utilisent toujours le même argument pour commettre le pire. Je suis désolé de devoir le rappeler, mais si l’on regarde l’histoire des mouvements de résistance, comme celui qui lutta contre l’occupant allemand en France, on s’aperçoit qu’ils ils cachaient leurs armes partout, y compris dans des zones civiles. Je ne cautionne pas cela, pas plus que je n’ai une quelconque sympathie pour le Hamas, mais il y a une vraie hypocrisie à clamer que la résistance combattante, composée désormais de plusieurs groupes, d’ordinaires opposés, faisant pour l’heure front commun, utilise systématiquement la population pour se protéger. C’est une propagande que l’on martele coté israélien pour tout justifier. Que voulriez-vous qu’elle fasse la résistance? Qu’elle se mette à découvert sur une colline déserte et qu’elle attende les F-16? (…) Déjà le gouvernement israélien et les égyptiens pourraient ouvrir leurs frontières! Et permettre à la population civile de fuir. Les combattants eux veulent rester et affronter l’armée israélienne. OK. Mais qu’on ouvre les frontières pour permettre aux civils de fuir, et aux blessés d’être soignés correctement. Si vous êtes brave et courageux  Monsieur Netanyahu, ouvrez-donc les frontières! Mais Israel boucle plus que jamais Gaza, et use de ses F-16, ses hélicoptères d’attaque « Apache », pour viser délibérément des femmes et des enfants et à c’est vraiment dégueulasse. Je ne dis pas cela en l’air. Je me base sur ce que je vois tous les jours à l’hôpital. Les israéliens dans leur rhétorique sont pris à leur propre piège! Ils affirment que les bombardements sont ciblés, qu’ils ont un taux de réussite de 90%. Alors que nous médecins, nous avons affaire à des milliers de victimes civiles palestiniennes! Vous ne pouvez dire que les opérations ciblées sont une réussite, alors que des centaines de femmes, d’enfants, de vieillards, sont tués! Où alors on en revient à l’idée que les populations civiles sont délibérément visées! L’armée israélienne sait pertinemment qu’elle tue des civils en masse. Il n’y a aucun doute possible. C’est un massacre, un crime monstrueux. Cela ne relève pas du crime de guerre uniquement. C’est un crime contre l’humanité! Je suis satisfait  qu’une enquête internationale ait été ordonnée. Car cela ne concerne pas uniquement ce conflit. Si on laisse Israel faire en toute impunité, qui seront les prochaines victimes? Si on laisse Monsieur Obama et monsieur Netanyahu agir ainsi avec les armes les plus sophistiqués du monde contre des femmes et des enfants où va t-on? Sommes-nous, nous les occidentaux légitimes à condamner fermement des mouvements comme Boko-Aram, par exemple où les  états dits « voyous » quand nous laissons tuer des femmes et des enfants sans rien faire. Pour moi, et encore une fois je le dis comme toubib rompu à la médecine d’urgence, ce que fait Israel n’est rien moins que du « terrorisme d’état »… (…) Je ne me l ‘explique pas. Ils sont devenus fous à mes yeux.  Je constate mais je n’ai aucune explication rationnelle. J’imagine ce qu’ils diraient – à juste titre- si la situation était inversée. Et si elle l’était je serai comme mon devoir de médecin me l’impose aux cotés de leurs victimes. Je ne comprends pas non plus. l’inertie internationale, pire, le soutien aveugle de grandes nations comme la France derrière Israel. J’aime la France. Ce pays porte des valeurs universelles, et a longtemps été un soutien exceptionnel pour les palestiniens. La France, qui siège au Conseil de Sécurité, faisait entendre sa voix en faveur du peuple de Palestine. Aujourd’hui elle les abandonne, elle tourne le dos à des populations qui vivent l’un des pire moments de leur histoire.  Elle soutient Israel. Je crois que votre gouvernement, votre président, votre premier ministre surtout, celui des Affaires étrangères, mélangent tout. Leur référence c’est l’holocauste, mais les palestiniens n’ont rien à voir avec l’holocauste! Ils se battent pour leurs droits, pour récupérer leur terre, avoir un pays, vivre normalement, et sont épuisés par le siège, les guerres qui se succèdent, 3 en 6 ans,  le déni permanent de leurs droits. Que la France les ait abandonné dans les circonstances actuelles est pour eux un coup terrible… Mads Gilbert
Grand-reporter de guerre et journaliste d’investigation, spécialiste du Terrorisme, je couvre depuis 25 ans les unes de l’actualité. Très souvent sur le terrain, je souhaite partager avec tous la face parfois moins visible des enquêtes et reportages diffusés sur tous les médias. J’aime explorer le dessous des cartes de dossiers sensibles. Frédéric Helbert
Nous rencontrons Ahmed, qui nous emmène dans une maison, en lisière du village, face à la frontière. Dans la salle de bains une odeur pestilentielle se dégage encore. Le sol est d’un noir de sang séché mélangé à de la poussière. Sur les carreaux blancs des murs, des éclaboussures de sang et des dizaines d’impacts de balles. À l’extérieur, le mur ne présente aucune trace. C’est là qu’Ahmed a retrouvé son fils Bilal, 22 ans, couché sous un amoncellement de corps. Ils étaient six. Selon les renseignements obtenus par le père, Bilal et ses camarades ont été arrêtés dans les rues et ont été emmenés dans la maison par des forces spéciales. « C’étaient des civils. Un de mes fils a reconnu son frère à cause de ses chaussures parce que les cadavres étaient en état de décomposition », affirme-t-il. Quand bien même ce seraient des combattants, leur mort, une exécution sommaire, s’apparente, là encore, à un crime de guerre. Les identités des cinq autres ne sont pas connues. « Nous les avons enterrés tous ensemble avec des numéros pour pouvoir l’indiquer à leurs familles après la guerre », dit Ahmed. Autre témoignage, quelques rues plus loin. Celui de Mohammed Al Najjar, 62 ans, qui a retrouvé son beau-fils, Wasfi, 27 ans, mort à même le sol, près de la mosquée Ibed el Rahman. « Il avait les pieds liés par une corde et un trou au milieu du front », décrit-il avec émotion. « Depuis 1967, j’ai vécu plus d’une guerre menée par les Israéliens. Mais ça n’a jamais été comme ça. Ils veulent nous effacer de l’humanité. » Pierre Barbancey (L’Humanité)
«Des crimes de guerres ont été commis contre une population sans défense», ajoute un chauffeur de taxi assis devant sa maison détruite. Son taxi jaune est enseveli sous les décombres. «Vous en voulez la preuve? Il y en a partout mais allez au bout du village. Vous y trouverez une des rares maisons intactes. On l’appelle « la maison de l’horreur »». Après quelques minutes de marche, je m’enfonce dans une petite ruelle. Elle mène vers le domicile d’un médecin proche du Fatah -l’organisation rivale du Hamas- qui a fui.  En apparence, vu de l’extérieur, rien ne trahit ce que je vais découvrir. Moaz, 24 ans monte la garde devant une bâtisse aux murs en béton gris, entourée de verdure. Le propriétaire lui a confié les clés. Lorsque la porte en fer forgé s’ouvre, immédiatement une odeur terrible de mort me prend à la gorge. Les chambres sont en désordre mais intactes. C’est au bout d’un couloir que l’on découvre ce qui devait être une salle d’eau. Cinq mètres carrés à peine. La pièce de l’horreur à l’état brut. Des murs truffés d’impacts, maculés de sang. A terre, les restes noirâtres en état de décomposition avancée des corps de sept jeunes Palestiniens retenus prisonniers pendant deux jours, alors que l’offensive battait son plein, avant d’être froidement exécutés. Tous les témoignages que je vais recueillir pendant plusieurs heures concordent. Et confirment l’insoutenable vision.  Moaz, qui était l’ami des victimes livre un récit aussi méticuleux que possible : «Au début, mes amis, dont 6 appartenaient à la famille Al Najjar, la plus importante du village, ont tenté de se cacher au mieux alors que les bombardements étaient intenses et que 3000 personnes environ n’avaient pas réussi à fuir avant que le village soit totalement bouclé. Ils voulaient rester ensemble, solidaires. Un jour, je ne me souviens plus lequel, ils ont décidé de tenter de fuir à travers les ruelles du village, évitant la route principale où les chars israéliens avaient pris position. Mais ils sont tombés sur une patrouille israélienne. De sa fenêtre, un vieil homme a vu le premier châtiment. Une balle dans le genou pour chacun d’entre eux». Les sept Palestiniens capturés sont alors ramenés dans la maison dont ils ne sortiront pas vivants. Un autre voisin raconte qu’il entendait des cris affreux. «Comme ceux de gens que l’on torture.» Mais personne ne pouvait rien faire. Deux jours plus tard, soudain, le même voisin entend des rafales claquer. «J’ai compris tout de suite que c’était la fin, une fin atroce pour des jeunes qui n’avaient rien à se reprocher, et j’ai pleuré», bredouille-t-il, hanté par le souvenir. Retour dans la maison de l’horreur. Tout concorde. L’image des traces de sang, les murs déchirés par les balles… Des douilles de fusil d’assaut au sol. Et le magma de chair décomposée… Hier, raconte Moaz, «un des parents de mes amis assassinés est venu brièvement voir. Il a fondu en larmes et s’en est allé précipitamment».  Il faudra attendre la première trêve humanitaire pour que les cadavres soient extraits de la maison et enterrés à la hâte tous ensemble. Les familles veulent alors se rendre dans le cimetière le plus proche, mais il a été ravagé par les chars israéliens. «Un sacrilège, murmure sur place un homme en train de creuser une nouvelle tombe. Regardez par vous même». De fait, le cimetière a été bombardé, avant que des chars ne le traversent pour prendre position dans le village. La terre est complètement retournée. En se penchant sur un caveau défoncé, on distingue des squelettes, des crânes, des ossements. «Ce n’est pas un crime infâme, ça?», hurle le gardien du cimetière. Les sept jeunes Palestiniens assassinés reposent désormais ensemble sous une tombe encore fraiche, dans un autre cimetière situé à l’écart du village. «Il a fallu faire vite, dit un employé. Car cette trêve là a été très vite rompue». Je pars à la recherche des familles, mais elles demeurent invisibles, murées dans leur chagrin. «Ils ne veulent pas parler aujourd’hui», m’explique un de leurs proches. «Mais moi je peux. Et je vous jure devant Dieu que ce qui a été accompli dans la maison de l’horreur n’est pas le seul crime de guerre à Khouza’a. Il y en a eu d’autres, beaucoup d’autres». L’armée israélienne s’est vengée sauvagement selon lui d’un fait de guerre survenu en 2008. Un commando israélien avait fait une incursion par delà la frontière. Ils sont rentrés dans un ferme déserte qui avait été minée. Près de 10 soldats sont morts. Pour les rescapés de la destruction de Khouza’a, village où il faisait bon vivre disent tous ceux qui l’ont connu avant l’offensive, c’est là qu’il faut trouver l’explication d’un tel acharnement et de telles exactions. Frédéric Helbert (Paris Match)
Pour résumer : Paris-Match explique que son envoyé spécial à Gaza a découvert la scène d’un massacre, alors que d’autres médias (…) avaient publié des images plusieurs jours auparavant. Cet envoyé spécial n’a jamais vu les corps dans la maison (contrairement à Al Jazeera). Il n’a jamais vu les corps au cimetière (car ils étaient déjà enterrés et dans un autre cimetière). Il n’a pas réussi à rencontrer les familles des victimes et il fait confiance à un voisin qui lui a dit que les victimes sont « des jeunes qui n’avaient rien à se reprocher », alors qu’Al Jazeera montre des hommes en treillis. Cool Israël

Après TFI, Paris Match  a trouvé son Enderlin !

Alors qu’après l’éclatante démonstration de sa perfidie et de son échec militaire …

Le Hamas a, comme prévu, repris dès la fin de la trêve ses bombardements sur Israël …

Et qu’à l’instar du Figaro, nos médias en mal de copie titrent sur des « Israël reprend ses frappes sur Gaza: un enfant palestinien tué » (bandeau du flash actu) …

Autrement plus porteurs que le titre d’origine: « Le Hamas refuse de prolonger la trêve » (http://www.lefigaro.fr/international/2014/08/08/01003-20140808ARTFIG00030-le-hamas-refuse-de-prolonger-la-treve-a-gaza.php) …

Retour, avec le site israélien Cool Israël, sur ce qui devait probablement être le scoop du siècle …

Mais cette fois non de notre Charles Enderlin national et indéboulonnable maitre-faussaire de  France 2 …

Ni de son homologue Patrick Fandio à TFI …

Mais du vieux briscard Frédéric Helbert – à ajouter illico à notre « scorecard » – pour le magazine lui-même du choc des photos et du poids des mots !

Qui, après Al Jazeera et d’autres pages Facebook et à peu près au même moment que son confrère, un peu plus prudent, de l’Humanité Pierre Barbancey …

Et entre deux interviews de pompom girls du Hamas à la Mads Gilbert

Nous fait la visite de la « petite boutique des horreurs » (à inscrire bientôt au Guide du routard ?)…

Où, crime de guerre ou pas, ses fameux jeunes civils qui y auraient été torturés et assassinés et dont il n’a donc jamais vu les corps puisqu’ils étaient déjà enterrés …

Ne semblent pas avoir eu le temps, si l’on en croit les images de la chaine des financiers du jihad mondial Hamas compris, d’enlever leur treillis militaires …

Khouza’a (Gaza) : Le Scoop bidon de Paris Match !!!

Cool Israel
7 Aug 2014
Par La rédaction

Paris Match Khouzaa CI

Khouza'a Paris Match

Un article du reporter free-lance Fréderic Helbert publié dans Paris-Match le 7 août 2014, intitulé « A GAZA, LA MAISON DE L’HORREUR » prétend expliquer l’assassinat de 7 palestiniens dans une maison de Khouza’a dans la bande de Gaza durant l’opération Bordure protectrice. Cet article comporte des lacunes considérables.

Premièrement, Paris-Match s’est fait rouler dans la farine par son reporter Fréderic Helbert. Car naïvement, Paris Match annonce le 7 août en introduction de l’article « Notre envoyé spécial à Gaza raconte comment il a découvert la scène d’un massacre dans une maison du petit village de Khouza’a. » Le premier gros problème c’est que ce monsieur n’a rien découvert du tout et qu’il est même arrivé après la guerre car Al Jazeera avait publié l’information 1 semaine plus tôt.

Video Al-Jazeera

Frédéric Helbert est présenté comme le découvreur de ce charnier mais comme il arrive 1 semaine après Al Jazeera il ne reste plus de cadavres mais seulement des « restes noirâtres en état de décomposition avancée ». Al Jazeera, quand à lui montre de vraies images sur lesquelles on peut voir des corps d’hommes entassés dans ce qui ressemble à la même maison, nous y reviendrons.

Au moment où le reporter de Paris Match est arrivé dans la maison, les morts avaient déjà été enterrés, il s’est donc rendu au cimetière le plus proche, a pu parler avec le gardien du lieu mais n’a donc pas vu les corps, enterrés dans « un autre cimetière situé à l’écart du village. »

Fréderic Helbert continue sa découverte : « Je pars à la recherche des familles, mais elles demeurent invisibles, murées dans leur chagrin. «Ils ne veulent pas parler aujourd’hui», m’explique un de leurs proches. «Mais moi je peux. Et je vous jure devant Dieu que…»». Le reporter reconnait qu’il n’a pu rencontrer aucun membre de la famille mais seulement un de leurs proches pour ce scoop annoncé comme tel par Paris Match.

Kouza'a Paris Match 4X4Ensuite Helbert écrit que selon un voisin : les 7 cadavres (qu’Helbert n’a pas vu) sont ceux de jeunes gens qui « n’avaient rien à se reprocher »). Bravo pour la rigueur journalistique. Contrairement à la version du reporter de Paris-Match, les images d’Al Jazeera (que l’on ne peut pas accuser d’être pro israélien) montrent des corps entassés d’hommes en treillis militaires qui ressemblent à tout, sauf à des civils. Les photos postées sur plusieurs comptes Facebook palestiniens montrent la même réalité que les images d’Al Jazeera.

Pour résumer :

  • Paris-Match explique que son envoyé spécial à Gaza a découvert la scène d’un massacre, alors que d’autres médias (source 1, source 2,source 3, source 4) avaient publié des images plusieurs jours auparavant.
  • Cet envoyé spécial n’a jamais vu les corps dans la maison (contrairement à Al Jazeera).
  • Il n’a jamais vu les corps au cimetière (car ils étaient déjà enterrés et dans un autre cimetière).
  • Il n’a pas réussi à rencontrer les familles des victimes et il fait confiance à un voisin qui lui a dit que les victimes sont « des jeunes qui n’avaient rien à se reprocher », alors qu’Al Jazeera montre des hommes en treillis.

Enfin, Fréderic Helbert, fier de son chef d’œuvre, n’a rien trouvé de mieux que de claironner sur son compte Twitter :

Le ridicule de ce « Comming…2 mn », comme le « coming soon » d’un film hollywoodien, (sans compter la faute d’orthographe qui va avec), semble être un détail mais il en dit beaucoup sur la qualité de ce reportage.

 Voir aussi:

Gaza : Crimes de guerre à Khouza’a
Pierre Barbancey
L’Humanité
6 Août, 2014

Corps amoncelés dans une maison, cadavres avec les pieds liés… Les témoignages révèlent les horreurs commises par l’armée israélienne.

Gaza (Palestine), envoyé spécial. Les habitants du village de Khouza’a, qui jouxte la frontière avec Israël, à l’est de Khan Younès, n’ont pu regagner leurs habitations, ou ce qu’il en reste, que le vendredi 1er août. Malgré de multiples tentatives les jours précédents, ils ont dû attendre une trêve et le retrait des chars israéliens qui barraient l’accès. Ce qu’ils ont découvert a dépassé toutes les horreurs. Cette localité de 13 000 habitants, connue pour être un havre de paix dans cette rude bande de Gaza, a été quasiment rasée par le flot de bombes et de missiles qui s’est abattu dès l’offensive terrestre israélienne. « Lorsque je suis revenu, je n’arrivai même pas à me repérer. On ne nous traite pas comme des êtres humains », certifie Jamal Al Najjar. L’Humanité a rendu compte du calvaire vécu par ces Palestiniens, dont certains ont été arrêtés, frappés, détenus pendant trois jours pour interrogatoire sans que quiconque ne parle d’« acte barbare ». Les récits qui suivent se sont déroulés durant les deux dernières semaines.

L’armée israélienne empêchait les secours d’accéder à la zone

La vérité sur ce qui s’est passé à Khouza’a commence à éclater, terrible. Sous les décombres, de nombreux corps ont été retrouvés : des habitants coincés, incapables de fuir, pris au piège sous le déluge de bombes. Un cas de crime de guerre caractérisé. D’autant que même les secours n’ont pu accéder à la zone, empêchés par l’armée israélienne. Un des quartiers de ce gros village est essentiellement occupé par une famille étendue, les Al Najjar. Nous rencontrons Ahmed, qui nous emmène dans une maison, en lisière du village, face à la frontière. Dans la salle de bains une odeur pestilentielle se dégage encore. Le sol est d’un noir de sang séché mélangé à de la poussière. Sur les carreaux blancs des murs, des éclaboussures de sang et des dizaines d’impacts de balles. À l’extérieur, le mur ne présente aucune trace. C’est là qu’Ahmed a retrouvé son fils Bilal, 22 ans, couché sous un amoncellement de corps. Ils étaient six. Selon les renseignements obtenus par le père, Bilal et ses camarades ont été arrêtés dans les rues et ont été emmenés dans la maison par des forces spéciales. « C’étaient des civils. Un de mes fils a reconnu son frère à cause de ses chaussures parce que les cadavres étaient en état de décomposition », affirme-t-il. Quand bien même ce seraient des combattants, leur mort, une exécution sommaire, s’apparente, là encore, à un crime de guerre. Les identités des cinq autres ne sont pas connues. « Nous les avons enterrés tous ensemble avec des numéros pour pouvoir l’indiquer à leurs familles après la guerre », dit Ahmed. Autre témoignage, quelques rues plus loin. Celui de Mohammed Al Najjar, 62 ans, qui a retrouvé son beau-fils, Wasfi, 27 ans, mort à même le sol, près de la mosquée Ibed el Rahman. « Il avait les pieds liés par une corde et un trou au milieu du front », décrit-il avec émotion. « Depuis 1967, j’ai vécu plus d’une guerre menée par les Israéliens. Mais ça n’a jamais été comme ça. Ils veulent nous effacer de l’humanité. » La femme de Wasfi, enceinte, doit maintenant élever ses deux enfants toute seule. L’histoire de Bassam Al Najjar, 31 ans, est tout aussi éloquente au sujet des exactions commises par l’armée israélienne à Khouza’a. « Le jour de l’invasion terrestre, beaucoup de gens du quartier se sont regroupés. Nous étions environ 170, hommes, femmes, enfants, dans une maison où nous pensions être à l’abri des bombardements. Mais le patio a été touché et nous nous sommes réfugiés dans la maison mitoyenne où nous pouvions entrer sans sortir dans la rue. Mais au milieu de la nuit, les obus sont tombés de façon encore plus intense. Nous avons tenté de joindre la Croix-Rouge et des leaders palestiniens, qui nous ont dit que les Israéliens n’acceptaient pas notre évacuation. Vers 6 h 30, le matin du 25 juillet, nous avons pris le risque de sortir. Nous avons brandi un drapeau blanc et avons commencé à marcher vers Abassane. Nous sentions des balles siffler au-dessus de nos têtes. Des éclats ont blessé légèrement un homme du groupe. C’est alors que nous avons aperçu un char. On s’est tous mis à genoux, les mains en l’air. On est resté environ une heure comme ça. Le char tirait au-dessus de nous et lançait des bombes qui faisaient du bruit, sans éclats. Mais un homme de 55 ans, Mohammed, a été touché au côté droit de la poitrine. Il était juste à côté de moi. Je n’ai rien pu faire. Il a agonisé pendant dix minutes puis est mort. Par la suite, le char a avancé vers nous. On pensait qu’on allait mourir. Un soldat est sorti de sa tourelle, nous a filmés puis a demandé, en arabe, que l’un d’entre nous vienne discuter. Nous avons envoyé Haytham Al Najjar avec un drapeau blanc. On nous a ensuite autorisés à partir après que les hommes et les adolescents ont soulevé leurs chemises pour montrer qu’ils n’avaient pas d’armes ni d’explosifs. Nous avons emmené le corps de Mohammed mais même à ce moment-là ils tiraient au-dessus de nos têtes. » Tous aujourd’hui pleurent leurs morts et la destruction de leur village. Ils sont encore logés dans des écoles de l’ONU, dans le dénuement le plus total. Tous se demandent si on leur rendra justice. « Je n’aurais jamais pensé qu’en 2014 une armée puisse agresser un peuple de cette manière », dit Bassam, le visage dur.

Voir également:

SEPT PALESTINIENS MASSACRÉS

A GAZA, LA MAISON DE L’HORREUR

A Gaza, la maison de l'horreur

Dans la maison de l’horreur, à Khouza’a. Des murs truffés d’impacts, maculés de sang. A terre, les restes noirâtres en état de décomposition avancée des corps de sept jeunes Palestiniens.© Frédéric Helbert
Le 06 août 2014 | Mise à jour le 07 août 2014
FRÉDÉRIC HELBERT, ENVOYÉ SPÉCIAL À GAZA

 

 

Notre envoyé spécial à Gaza raconte comment il a découvert la scène d’un massacre dans une maison du petit village de Khouza’a.

A l’heure d’une trêve respectée par toutes les parties, nombre de réfugiés tentent de regagner leurs villages. Le plus souvent pour y découvrir des théâtres de dévastation totale. A une demi-heure de route de la ville de Gaza, le village-martyr de Khouza’a, qui fut un point stratégique pour les Israéliens. Leurs forces, dès les premiers jours de la guerre, ont franchi la frontière, pour occuper le village et en faire une place forte. «Nous avons d’abord subi d’intenses bombardements raconte un vieux Palestinien rescapé d’une offensive d’une violence inouïe. Puis les les chars israéliens sont arrivés. Le village a été entièrement encerclé, puis occupé. Et le calvaire effroyable a commencé pour nous. Une punition barbare».

«Des crimes de guerres ont été commis contre une population sans défense», ajoute un chauffeur de taxi assis devant sa maison détruite. Son taxi jaune est enseveli sous les décombres. «Vous en voulez la preuve? Il y en a partout mais allez au bout du village. Vous y trouverez une des rares maisons intactes. On l’appelle « la maison de l’horreur »». Après quelques minutes de marche, je m’enfonce dans une petite ruelle. Elle mène vers le domicile d’un médecin proche du Fatah -l’organisation rivale du Hamas- qui a fui.

En apparence, vu de l’extérieur, rien ne trahit ce que je vais découvrir. Moaz, 24 ans monte la garde devant une bâtisse aux murs en béton gris, entourée de verdure. Le propriétaire lui a confié les clés. Lorsque la porte en fer forgé s’ouvre, immédiatement une odeur terrible de mort me prend à la gorge. Les chambres sont en désordre mais intactes. C’est au bout d’un couloir que l’on découvre ce qui devait être une salle d’eau. Cinq mètres carrés à peine. La pièce de l’horreur à l’état brut. Des murs truffés d’impacts, maculés de sang. A terre, les restes noirâtres en état de décomposition avancée des corps de sept jeunes Palestiniens retenus prisonniers pendant deux jours, alors que l’offensive battait son plein, avant d’être froidement exécutés. Tous les témoignages que je vais recueillir pendant plusieurs heures concordent. Et confirment l’insoutenable vision.

DES CRIS AFFREUX, « COMME DES GENS QUE L’ON TORTURE »

Moaz, qui était l’ami des victimes livre un récit aussi méticuleux que possible : «Au début, mes amis, dont 6 appartenaient à la famille Al Najjar, la plus importante du village, ont tenté de se cacher au mieux alors que les bombardements étaient intenses et que 3000 personnes environ n’avaient pas réussi à fuir avant que le village soit totalement bouclé. Ils voulaient rester ensemble, solidaires. Un jour, je ne me souviens plus lequel, ils ont décidé de tenter de fuir à travers les ruelles du village, évitant la route principale où les chars israéliens avaient pris position. Mais ils sont tombés sur une patrouille israélienne. De sa fenêtre, un vieil homme a vu le premier châtiment. Une balle dans le genou pour chacun d’entre eux». Les sept Palestiniens capturés sont alors ramenés dans la maison dont ils ne sortiront pas vivants. Un autre voisin raconte qu’il entendait des cris affreux. «Comme ceux de gens que l’on torture.» Mais personne ne pouvait rien faire. Deux jours plus tard, soudain, le même voisin entend des rafales claquer. «J’ai compris tout de suite que c’était la fin, une fin atroce pour des jeunes qui n’avaient rien à se reprocher, et j’ai pleuré», bredouille-t-il, hanté par le souvenir. Retour dans la maison de l’horreur. Tout concorde. L’image des traces de sang, les murs déchirés par les balles… Des douilles de fusil d’assaut au sol. Et le magma de chair décomposée… Hier, raconte Moaz, «un des parents de mes amis assassinés est venu brièvement voir. Il a fondu en larmes et s’en est allé précipitamment».

DSC_9576
DSC_9585

A l’intérieur de la « maison de l’horreur ». Les murs témoignent de la violence qui s’y est déroulée.© Frédéric Helbert

 

 

Il faudra attendre la première trêve humanitaire pour que les cadavres soient extraits de la maison et enterrés à la hâte tous ensemble. Les familles veulent alors se rendre dans le cimetière le plus proche, mais il a été ravagé par les chars israéliens. «Un sacrilège, murmure sur place un homme en train de creuser une nouvelle tombe. Regardez par vous même». De fait, le cimetière a été bombardé, avant que des chars ne le traversent pour prendre position dans le village. La terre est complètement retournée. En se penchant sur un caveau défoncé, on distingue des squelettes, des crânes, des ossements. «Ce n’est pas un crime infâme, ça?», hurle le gardien du cimetière.

Les sept jeunes Palestiniens assassinés reposent désormais ensemble sous une tombe encore fraiche, dans un autre cimetière situé à l’écart du village. «Il a fallu faire vite, dit un employé. Car cette trêve là a été très vite rompue». Je pars à la recherche des familles, mais elles demeurent invisibles, murées dans leur chagrin. «Ils ne veulent pas parler aujourd’hui», m’explique un de leurs proches. «Mais moi je peux. Et je vous jure devant Dieu que ce qui a été accompli dans la maison de l’horreur n’est pas le seul crime de guerre à Khouza’a. Il y en a eu d’autres, beaucoup d’autres». L’armée israélienne s’est vengée sauvagement selon lui d’un fait de guerre survenu en 2008. Un commando israélien avait fait une incursion par delà la frontière. Ils sont rentrés dans un ferme déserte qui avait été minée. Près de 10 soldats sont morts. Pour les rescapés de la destruction de Khouza’a, village où il faisait bon vivre disent tous ceux qui l’ont connu avant l’offensive, c’est là qu’il faut trouver l’explication d’un tel acharnement et de telles exactions.

« ILS NOUS ONT TIRÉ DANS LE DOS »

D’autres habitants racontent comment un groupe de 400 personnes, parmi lesquelles de nombreux vieillards, des femmes, des enfants, ont tenté de sortir pour échapper à la furie des bombardements en avançant sur la route principale, mains levées, drapeau blanc hissé. «Ils ont d’abord été contraints à faire marche arrière parce qu’un char a tiré à la mitrailleuse lourde. Et ce n’étaient pas que des tirs d’avertissements. Certains ont été touchés et sont morts sur le coup. D’autres ont agonisé dans leur sang». Le jour suivant, nouvelle tentative. A hauteur de la station-service de Khouza’a, réduite en miettes, l’armée israélienne les a contraint à nouveau à stopper leur marche, et à ne pas bouger pendant 24 heures. Un père a vu son fils déjà blessé agoniser devant lui. Un frère a, des heures durant, tenu dans ses bras sa soeur handicapée, mortellement touchée par un tir de sniper alors qu’il la poussait sur une chaise roulante. Un jeune Palestinien a réussi à appeler la Croix-Rouge, qui a envoyé des ambulances. Mais interdiction leur a été faite de passer à coups de «warning shots» tirés par les chars. «Puis les Israéliens ont fini par nous laisser partir», raconte un blessé retrouvé à l’hôpital Al Najjar, dans une commune voisine. «Mais ils nous ont tiré dans le dos. C’est là que j’ai été touché, derrière l’épaule. Je peux m’estimer « heureux »». Au moins quatre personnes dont un vieillard de 92 ans sont morts à ce moment là.

Retour à Khouza’a, dans la maison de l’horreur, une dernière fois. Là où a été récupéré, parmi les douilles, le couteau d’un soldat israélien taché de sang. Sinistre signature. Moaz veille toujours. «A ce jour, je n’ai vu aucun enquêteur indépendant, aucun responsable de l’ONU ou d’une quelconque ONG n’est venu enquêter dit-il. Maintenant, nous le savons. Israël peut nous tuer comme il l’entend. En toute impunité. Le sang du peuple palestinien ne vaut rien».

Voir encore:

Mads Gilbert: « Cette guerre est un crime contre l’humanité »

Frederic Helbert blog

28/07/2014

-EXCLUSIF-  MADS GILBERT, LE MEDECIN URGENTISTE  NORVEGIEN QUI INVITE BARACK OBAMA A VENIR VOIR LA REALITE D’UNE SITUATION TRAGIQUE SE LIVRE A « COEUR OUVERT ».

Mads Gilbert le médecin urgentiste qui a écrit une lettre ouverte à Obama @Frédéric Helbert

Gaza, Hôpital Shifa. Entretien sans détour avec Mads GILBERT.

Mads Gilbert – Ma lettre ouverte à Obama, je ne pensais pas qu’elle aurait un tel écho. Non vraiment pas. En fait nous avions vécu une journée et une nuit très dure. Nous avions reçu plus d’une centaine de blessés. C’était l’enfer! J’ai fini vers 5h du matin. Je me suis retrouvé épuisé, dans ma chambre, et j’avais besoin d’évacuer la pression. Alors je me suis mis à écrire comme je le fais souvent. C’est venu spontanément comme un cri du coeur. J’ai envoyé ce que j’avais écrit à quatre ou cinq amis, et puis cela a échappé à mon contrôle. La lettre a parcouru Internet, ça a fait un effet boule de neige. Et au bout du compte le tour du monde!

Frédéric Helbert: Avez-vous reçu une réponse?

- Non! Rien, mais je ne suis malheureusement pas étonné. Les leaders et chefs d’état de la communauté internationale, comme ceux des Etats-Unis, ou le gouvernement israélien, sont totalement déconnectés du terrain. Des réalités humaines. Ils sont devenus distants, insensibles, « vaccinés » ignorant la souffrance des populations. Obama dit qu’Israel a le droit de se défendre? Personne ne peut s’élever contre le principe, mais ce n’est pas de la défense! C’est une attaque massive, d’Israel contre tout le peuple palestinien. Des crimes de guerre sont commis tous les jours. Moi, j’ai voulu humblement partager mes sentiments avec le Président des Etats-Unis. Nous sommes deux êtres humains. Nous avons tous les deux un coeur. Je voulais qu’il voit ce que je vois. Je voulais lui montrer la réalité palestinienne.  La réalité c’est un massacre sans précédent ici. Des tueries de masse, des atrocités visant le peuple palestinien.  C’est plus d’un millier de morts! C’est 50% des victimes qui sont des femmes ou des enfants. Je voudrais monter à Obama ces gens ordinaires, ces civils, amputés, les corps criblés de fragments de bombes, tailladés à mort par ces fléchettes normalement destinées à percer le blindage d’un char, où horriblement  brulés. Je voudrais qu’il voit de ces yeux l’infinie souffrance de ces gens ordinaires et innocents. Causée par une armée si puissante, bâtie et alimentée grâce à l’argent américain, au soutien américain, aux armes US. Quand j’ai écrit, je me posais la question à moi-même en fait. Comment tout cela est-possible? Je couchais mes sentiments sur le papier. Des sentiments contenus pendant les si dures heures de notre travail de médecins urgentistes. Pour les victimes c’est l’enfer, pour nous c’est dur aussi, mais on doit rester fort dans la tempête et on le reste. En sachant que chaque fois qu’une bombe tombe, des civils palestiniens sont inévitablement tués où blessés. 

FH- Mais rien n’a changé. Obama et les autres sont impuissants ou laissent faire. Des armes terrifiantes sont utilisées comme ces bombes à fléchettes d’acier ou autres…

- Cela va beaucoup plus loin! Toutes les conventions internationales, toutes les « lois de la guerre » sont bafouées. La première arme de destruction terrible, c’est le siège de la Bande de Gaza. Une punition collective aux conséquences  inimaginables!  Ce siège est contraire l’article 33 je crois  de la Convention de Genève. Le siège de Gaza devenue une prison à ciel ouvert, ce châtiment collectif est totalement illégal.  Second point:  L’usage totalement disproportionné de la force. Comparez les bilans! Ceux des civils touchés: des centaines et des centaines de mort d’un coté, moins de 4 où 5 de l’autre. Le troisième point illégal c’est qu’il est interdit de bombarder sans discriminations zones civiles et militaires, en prétextant que le Hamas utilise la population comme « bouclier humain ». Ce territoire est si petit que tout est forcément imbriqué. Les israéliens utilisent toujours le même argument pour commettre le pire. Je suis désolé de devoir le rappeler, mais si l’on regarde l’histoire des mouvements de résistance, comme celui qui lutta contre l’occupant allemand en France, on s »aperçoit qu’ils ils cachaient leurs armes partout, y compris dans des zones civiles. Je ne cautionne pas cela, pas plus que je n’ai une quelconque sympathie pour le Hamas, mais il y a une vraie hypocrisie à clamer que la résistance combattante, composée désormais de plusieurs groupes, d’ordinaires opposés, faisant pour l’heure front commun, utilise systématiquement la population pour se protéger. C’est une propagande que l’on martele coté israélien pour tout justifier. Que voulriez-vous qu’elle fasse la résistance? Qu’elle se mette à découvert sur une colline déserte et qu’elle attende les F-16?

FH- On vous a vu montrer beaucoup de compassion à l’égard des victimes que vous soignez. Vous avez-meme embrassé le front d’un enfant mourant…

- Mais c’est la moindre des choses. Je suis tellement impressionné par la retenue admirable des blessés, par le courage de ces enfants parfois atrocement touchés, par leur regards… La détresse des parents aussi me bouleverse. Cela fait partie de ma conception du métier. Je fais ce que j’ai à faire sur le plan médical. Je donne le maximum, mais c’est mon devoir aussi d’essayer d’apporter du réconfort, en parlant doucement aux victimes, à leurs pères, leurs mères, leurs frères, leurs soeurs. Un regard, un geste tendre peuvent beaucoup pour ces gens simples confrontés à la tragédie, pour les enfants, les nourrissons,  qui souffrent sans rien dire, et sans comprendre pourquoi on leur a fait cela. J’essaie d’apporter un peu d’humanité dans cet océan de douleurs. Mais je ne sais plus parfois où est l’humanité, quand j’entends les cris terribles de désespoir de ceux qui viennent de perdre un proche. Ce sont des moments insoutenables. Je ne m’y habituerai jamais!

FH: Voyez-vous une solution pour enrayer la spirale guerrière?

Déjà le gouvernement israélien et les égyptiens pourraient ouvrir leurs frontières! Et permettre à la population civile de fuir. Les combattants eux veulent rester et affronter l’armée israélienne. OK. Mais qu’on ouvre les frontières pour permettre aux civils de fuir, et aux blessés d’être soignés correctement. Si vous êtes brave et courageux  Monsieur Netanyahu, ouvrez-donc les frontières! Mais Israel boucle plus que jamais Gaza, et use de ses F-16, ses hélicoptères d’attaque « Apache », pour viser délibérément des femmes et des enfants et à c’est vraiment dégueulasse. Je ne dis pas cela en l’air. Je me base sur ce que je vois tous les jours à l’hôpital. Les israéliens dans leur rhétorique sont pris à leur propre piège! Ils affirment que les bombardements sont ciblés, qu’ils ont un taux de réussite de 90%. Alors que nous médecins, nous avons affaire à des milliers de victimes civiles palestiniennes! Vous ne pouvez dire que les opérations ciblées sont une réussite, alors que des centaines de femmes, d’enfants, de vieillards, sont tués! Où alors on en revient à l’idée que les populations civiles sont délibérément visées! L’armée israélienne sait pertinemment qu’elle tue des civils en masse. Il n’y a aucun doute possible. C’est un massacre, un crime monstrueux. Cela ne relève pas du crime de guerre uniquement. C’est un crime contre l’humanité! Je suis satisfait  qu’une enquête internationale ait été ordonnée. Car Cela ne concerne pas uniquement ce conflit. Si on laisse Israel faire en toute impunité, qui seront les prochaines victimes? Si on laisse Monsieur Obama et monsieur Netanyahu agir ainsi avec les armes les plus sophistiqués du monde contre des femmes et des enfants où va t-on? Sommes-nous, nous les occidentaux légitimes à condamner fermement des mouvements comme Boko-Aram, par exemple où les  états dits « voyous » quand nous laissons tuer des femmes et des enfants sans rien faire. Pour moi, et encore une fois je le dis comme toubib rompu à la médecine d’urgence, ce que fait Israel n’est rien moins que du « terrorisme d’état »…

FH: Comment pouvez vous expliquer que la société Israélienne puisse dans sa grande majorité approuver une telle opération, et soutenir une armée qui frappe si durement des civils?

- Je ne me l ‘explique pas. Ils sont devenus fous à mes yeux.  Je constate mais je n’ai aucune explication rationnelle. J’imagine ce qu’ils diraient – à juste titre- si la situation était inversée. Et si elle l’était je serai comme mon devoir de médecin me l’impose aux cotés de leurs victimes. Je ne comprends pas non plus. l’inertie internationale, pire, le soutien aveugle de grandes nations comme la France derrière Israel. J’aime la France. Ce pays porte des valeurs universelles, et a longtemps été un soutien exceptionnel pour les palestiniens. La France, qui siège au Conseil de Sécurité, faisait entendre sa voix en faveur du peuple de Palestine. Aujourd’hui elle les abandonne, elle tourne le dos à des populations qui vivent l’un des pire moments de leur histoire.  Elle soutient Israel. Je crois que votre gouvernement, votre président, votre premier ministre surtout, celui des Affaires étrangères, mélangent tout. Leur référence c’est l’holocauste, mais les palestiniens n’ont rien à voir avec l’holocauste! Ils se battent pour leurs droits, pour récupérer leur terre, avoir un pays, vivre normalement, et sont épuisés par le siège, les guerres qui se succèdent, 3 en 6 ans,  le déni permanent de leurs droits. Que la France les ait abandonné dans les circonstances actuelles est pour eux un coup terrible… 

L’entretien s’arrête brutalement. On vient chercher Mads Gilbert, que tout le monde appelle à l’hôpital « DoctorMads » pour tenter de sauver un palestinien entre la vie et la mort…

Mads Gilbert face à l'urgence absolue @Frédéric Helbert

Le chirurgien "aux manettes" face à un cas quasi-déséspéré @Frédéric Helbert

Le combat contre la mort en salle de réanimation d'urgence @ Frédéric Helbert DR

Interview et photos: Frédéric Helbert.


Gaza: Attention, une défaite peut en cacher une autre (A change of mentality that has no historical precedent: never since the birth of the Jewish state have the traditional enemies surrounding Israel been in such military and political disarray)

7 août, 2014

Le roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, (…) prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Cela prouve le caractère de notre noble peuple, combattant du djihad, qui défend ses droits et ses demeures le torse nu, avec son sang. La politique d’un peuple qui affronte les avions israéliens la poitrine nue, pour protéger ses habitations, s’est révélée efficace contre l’occupation. Cette politique reflète la nature de notre peuple brave et courageux. Nous, au Hamas, appelons notre peuple à adopter cette politique, pour protéger les maisons palestiniennes. Sami Abu Zuhri (porte-parole du Hamas, juillet 2014)
Le département de l’information du ministère de l’Intérieur et de la Sécurité nationale exhorte les militants sur les sites de médias sociaux, en particulier Facebook, à corriger certains des termes couramment employés en rapport avec l’agression dans la bande de Gaza. La vidéo suivante, du département de l’information, appelle tous les militants à utiliser la terminologie appropriée, pour jouer leur rôle dans le renforcement du front intérieur et transmettre correctement les informations au monde entier. (…) Toute personne tuée ou tombée en martyr doit être appelée « civil de Gaza ou de Palestine », avant de préciser son rôle dans le djihad ou son grade militaire. N’oubliez pas de toujours ajouter l’expression « civil innocent » ou « citoyen innocent » en évoquant les victimes des attaques israéliennes sur Gaza. Commencez [vos rapports sur] les actions de résistance par l’expression « en réponse à la cruelle attaque israélienne », et concluez avec la phrase : « Ces nombreuses personnes sont des martyrs depuis qu’Israël a lancé son agression contre Gaza ». Assurez-vous toujours de maintenir le principe : « Le rôle de l’occupation est d’attaquer, et nous en Palestine sommes toujours en mode réaction ».Attention à ne pas répandre les rumeurs de porte-parole israéliens, en particulier celles qui portent atteinte au front intérieur. Méfiez-vous d’adopter la version de l’occupation [des événements]. Vous devez toujours émettre des doutes [sur leur version], la réfuter et la considérer comme fausse. Évitez de publier des photos de tirs de roquettes sur Israël depuis les centres-villes de Gaza. Cela [servirait de] prétexte pour attaquer des zones résidentielles de la bande de Gaza. Ne publiez pas ou ne partagez pas de photos ou de clips vidéo montrant des sites de lancement de roquettes ou [les forces] du mouvement de résistance à Gaza. (…) ne publiez pas de photos d’hommes masqués avec des armes lourdes en gros plan, afin que votre page ne soit pas fermée [par Facebook] sous prétexte d’incitation à la violence. Dans vos informations, assurez-vous de préciser : « Les obus fabriqués localement tirés par la résistance sont une réponse naturelle à l’occupation israélienne qui tire délibérément des roquettes contre des civils en Cisjordanie et à Gaza »… (…) • Lorsque vous vous adressez à l’Occident, vous devez utiliser un discours politique, rationnel et convaincant, et éviter les propos émotifs mendiant de l’empathie. Certains à travers le monde sont dotés d’une conscience ; vous devez maintenir le contact avec eux et les utiliser au profit de la Palestine. Leur rôle est de faire honte de l’occupation et d’exposer ses violations. • Évitez d’entrer dans une discussion politique avec un Occidental pour le convaincre que l’Holocauste est un mensonge et une tromperie ; en revanche, assimilez-le aux crimes d’Israël contre les civils palestiniens. • Le narratif de la vie comparé au narratif du sang : [en parlant] à un ami arabe, commencez par le nombre de martyrs. [Mais en parlant] à un ami occidental, commencez par le nombre de blessés et de morts. Veillez à humaniser la souffrance palestinienne. Essayez de dépeindre la souffrance des civils à Gaza et en Cisjordanie pendant les opérations de l’occupation et ses bombardements de villes et villages. • Ne publiez pas de photos de commandants militaires. Ne mentionnez pas leurs noms en public, ne faites pas l’éloge de leurs succès dans des conversations avec des amis étrangers ! Directives du ministère de l’Intérieur du Hamas aux activistes en ligne
Depuis le début de l’opération, au moins 35 bâtiments résidentiels auraient été visés et détruits, entraînant dans la majorité des pertes civiles enregistrées jusqu’à présent, y compris une attaque le 8 Juillet à Khan Younis qui a tué sept civils, dont trois enfants, et blessé 25 autres. Dans la plupart des cas, avant les attaques, les habitants ont été avertis de quitter, que ce soit via des appels téléphoniques de l’armée d’Israël ou par des tirs de missiles d’avertissement. Rapport ONU (09.07.14)
Le Secrétaire général est alarmé d’apprendre que des roquettes ont été entreposées dans une école de l’Office de secours et de travaux des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés de Palestine dans le Proche-Orient (UNRWA), à Gaza, et que ces armes ont par la suite disparu.  Il fait part de son indignation et de son regret concernant le fait que des armes ont été placées dans une école administrée par l’ONU.  En agissant de la sorte, les personnes responsables transforment les écoles en de potentielles cibles militaires et mettent en danger les vies d’enfants innocents, des employés de l’ONU qui travaillent dans de tels locaux, et de tout autres personnes qui ont recours aux écoles de l’ONU comme abris. Le Secrétaire général note que cet acte contrevient aux termes de la résolution 1860 (2009) du Conseil de sécurité qui appelle à la prévention du trafic d’armes.  Il exige que les groupes militants responsables cessent immédiatement de conduire ce genre d’actions et soient tenus responsables d’avoir ainsi mis en danger la vie de personnes civiles. (…) Le Secrétaire général appelle toutes les parties exerçant une influence sur les groupes militants à envoyer un message indiquant sans aucune équivoque qu’une telle situation est inacceptable. Porte-parole du Secrétaire général de l’ONU, M. Ban Ki-moon (23/7/2014)
Les missiles qui sont aujourd’hui lancés contre Israël sont, pour chacun d’entre eux, un crime contre l’humanité, qu’il frappe ou manque [sa cible], car il vise une cible civile. Les agissements d’Israël contre des civils palestiniens constituent aussi des crimes contre l’humanité. S’agissant des crimes de guerre sous la Quatrième Convention de Genève – colonies, judaïsation, points de contrôle, arrestations et ainsi de suite, ils nous confèrent une assise très solide. Toutefois, les Palestiniens sont en mauvaise posture en ce qui concerne l’autre problème. Car viser des civils, que ce soit un ou mille, est considéré comme un crime contre l’humanité. (…) Faire appel à la CPI [Cour pénale internationale] nécessite un consensus écrit, de toutes les factions palestiniennes. Ainsi, quand un Palestinien est arrêté pour son implication dans le meurtre d’un citoyen israélien, on ne nous reprochera pas de l’extrader. Veuillez noter que parmi les nôtres, plusieurs à Gaza sont apparus à la télévision pour dire que l’armée israélienne les avait avertis d’évacuer leurs maisons avant les explosions. Dans un tel cas de figure, s’il y a des victimes, la loi considère que c’est le fait d’une erreur plutôt qu’un meurtre intentionnel, [les Israéliens] ayant suivi la procédure légale. En ce qui concerne les missiles lancés de notre côté… Nous n’avertissons jamais personne de l’endroit où ces missiles vont tomber, ou des opérations que nous effectuons. Ainsi, il faudrait s’informer avant de parler de faire appel à la CPI, sous le coup de l’émotion. Ibrahim Khreisheh (émissaire palestinien au CDHNU, télévision de l’Autorité palestinienne, 9 juillet 2014)
Tout comme Hitler, qui cherchait à établir une race sans défaut, Israël poursuit le même but (…) Ils ont tué des femmes pour qu’elles ne donnent pas la vie à des Palestiniens. Ils tuent des bébés pour qu’ils ne  grandissent pas. Ils tuent des hommes pour qu’ils ne puissent défendre leur pays (…) Ils se noieront dans le bain de sang qu’ils répandent. Recep Tayyip Erdogan
Les signataires de ce communiqué, qui appartiennent au monde de la culture, déclarent leur indignation contre le génocide qui est en train d’être perpétué contre la population palestinienne par les troupes d’occupation israélienne dans la bande de Gaza. Collectif de célébrités espagnoles
C’est vrai, des civils, des enfants, des femmes tombent à Gaza. C’est parce qu’Israël bombarde les Palestiniens. Mais aussi il faut revenir sur la cause. Pourquoi Israël a bombardé les Palestiniens, ou pourquoi ça se passe de cette façon-là. Moi je tiens, en étant palestinienne, moi je tiens responsable le Hamas. Parce que c’est le Hamas qui a refusé la trêve après le 19 décembre. C’est le Hamas qui utilise les civils comme boucliers humains. Ils utilisent les régions les plus peuplées pour lancer leurs roquettes. Ils font ce qu’ils veulent ! Ils lancent des roquettes et les civils meurent à leur place. L’explosion qui s’est passée à l’école à Jabaliya: les hommes étaient là et les gens sont sortis pour demander aux militants de Hamas de foutre le camp. Dans la cité où j’habitais, ils sont venus devant le bâtiment. Ils ont lancé deux roquettes et j’ai perdu deux voisins et j’en ai une centaine qui semblent blessés jusqu’à maintenant. (…) Les gens n’ont pas le droit de dire non à Hamas, parce que Hamas va les faire payer très cher après l’incursion israélienne. Hamas ne représente pas toute la Palestine. Moi j’étais très touchée de voir qu’il y a une solidarité internationale pour manifester en ce qui concerne ce qui se passe actuellement à Gaza. Mais j’étais aussi désolée parce qu’il y avait un ou deux drapeaux palestiniens et le reste c’était des drapeaux du Hamas. Et les gens doivent comprendre que vous êtes en train de soutenir le Hamas. Il faut soutenir les Palestiniens parce que le Hamas ce n’est pas la Palestine. Ça c’est premièrement. Et deuxièmement, c’est tout ce que vous êtes en train de voir comme aide humanitaire. Les sympathisants et les membres du Hamas bénéficient de cette aide humanitaire et jusqu’à maintenant, je connais des gens qui n’ont même pas de farine, même pas du pain. Ça fait deux jours ou trois jours qu’ils n’ont rien mangé. Parce qu’ils ne sont pas du Hamas, tout simplement. Vous n’êtes pas partie du Hamas, vous n’avez pas le droit à l’aide humanitaire… Amina (réfugiée palestinienne)
My memories of the civilian casualties from two years ago are still fresh, but that experience could not prepare me for the civilian casualties in this current crisis. (…) One of the reasons for that is because the Hamas fighters are living among the civilian population. Where you have a separate army that is fighting from a front line, it is easy to differentiate between soldiers and civilians. This is a situation where the fighters fire rockets from all over the Gaza Strip, from neighborhoods to cemeteries, from parking lots, from any number of places. They move quickly and then retaliation often comes quickly from Israel. That retaliation can be very severe, hitting residential neighborhoods, homes, killing and injuring scores of women and children. (…)  This is a war fought largely behind the scenes. Hamas fighters are not able to expose themselves. If they were to even step a foot on the street they would be spotted by an Israeli drone and immediately blown up. We don’t see those fighters. They are operating out of buildings and homes and at night. (…) If we had access to them, we would be photographing them. I never saw a single device for launching the rockets to Israel. It’s as if they don’t exist. Sometimes people assume that you can have access to everything, that you can see everything. But the fighters are virtually invisible to us. What we do as photographers is document what we can to show that side of the war. There are funerals, there are people being rushed to the hospital, but you can’t differentiate the fighters from the civilians. They are not wearing uniforms. If there is someone coming into the hospital injured, you can’t tell if that’s just a shopkeeper or if this is someone who just fired a rocket towards Israel. It’s impossible to know who’s who. We tried to cover this as objectively as possible. Tylor Hicks (photographe, New York Times)
This war in Gaza is not the first war I have covered, it isn’t even the first war I’ve covered in Gaza. I’ve been to places like Syria and Libya, and seen some of the horrible things that are normal in armed conflict, and I’ve seen dead children before, but never like during this war in Gaza. Never so many, never so often. Sara Hussein (AFP)
Moi ce qui me frappe le plus c’est la manipulation journalistique dans les médias occidentaux sur cette guerre. Dans ce que je lis, ce que j’entends à la radio, c’est chaque fois autant de morts civils, des femmes et des enfants victimes des soldats israéliens. C’est rare que l’on nous dise déjà combien de civils morts en Israël. Celui qui entend cela, déduit que les militaires israéliens ne se battent qu’avec les civils, ou passent et massacrent les civils sur leur passage, tel un tourbillon. Je me demande comment les gens ne voient pas cette manipulation contre Israël. C’est comme si tout le monde voulait qu’Israël soit effacé de la carte du monde comme a dit un jour un certain chef d’État. Yolande Mukagasana (Écrivain, rescapée du génocide perpétré contre les Tutsis du Rwanda)
La dernière image de la guerre de Gaza qui restera dans les mémoires, sera celle de la mort des civils palestiniens, des quatre garçons, par exemple, qui jouaient au football sur une plage lorsque les bombardements des Israéliens les ont tués. Aucun Dôme de fer n’a la force de protéger le régime israélien contre ces images et ces mémoires, écrit l’auteur de l’article de Foreign Policy. Le système du Dôme de fer pourra peut-être protéger le régime israélien contre les dégâts matériels, mais il sera incapable de protéger les israéliens du mal dont ils sont auteurs eux-mêmes. Mais que disent les dirigeants du régime israéliens pour justifier leurs crimes ? Ils disent que les attaques aux missiles et roquettes du Hamas étaient insupportable et que trois adolescents israéliens avaient été enlevés et assassinés en Cisjordanie. Ils concluront que le Hamas est un groupe terroriste qui se sert de la population civile comme un bouclier humain pour protéger ses dépôts d’armes et de munitions. C’est donc le Hamas qui oblige l’armée d’Israël à massacrer les civils dans une logique de légitime défense. Mais la vérité ne pourra pas se cacher longtemps derrière ces justifications. David Rothkopf (Foreign Policy)
In postmodern wars, we are told, there is no victory, no defeat, no aggressors, no defenders, just a tragedy of conflicting agendas. But in such a mindless and amoral landscape, Israel in fact is on its way to emerging in a far better position after the Gaza war than before. Analysts of the current fighting in Gaza have assured us that even if Israel weakens Hamas, such a short-term victory will hardly lead to long-term strategic success — but they don’t define “long-term.” In this line of thinking, supposedly in a few weeks Israel will only find itself more isolated than ever. It will grow even more unpopular in Europe and will perhaps, for the first time, lose its patron, America — while gaining an enraged host of Arab and Islamic enemies. Meanwhile, Hamas will gain stature, rebuild, and slowly wear Israel down. But if we compare the Gaza war with Israel’s past wars, that pessimistic scenario hardly rings true. Unlike in the existential wars of 1948, 1956, 1967, and 1973, Israel faces no coalition of powerful conventional enemies. Syria’s military is wrecked. Iraq is devouring itself. Egypt is bankrupt and in no mood for war. Its military government is more worried about Hamas than about Israel. Jordan has no wish to attack Israel. The Gulf States are likewise more afraid of the axis of Iran, Hezbollah, Hamas, and the Muslim Brotherhood than of Israel — a change of mentality that has no historical precedent. In short, never since the birth of the Jewish state have the traditional enemies surrounding Israel been in such military and political disarray. Never have powerful Arab states quietly hoped that Israel would destroy an Islamist terrorist organization that they fear more than they fear the Jewish state. (…) In the current asymmetrical war, Israel has found a method of inflicting as much damage on Hamas as it finds politically and strategically useful without suffering intolerable losses. And because the war is seen as existential — aiming rockets at a civilian population will do that — Israeli public opinion will largely support the effort to retaliate. After all the acrimony dies down, Gazans will understand that there was a correlation between blown-up houses, on the one hand, and, on the other, tunnel entrances, weapon depots, and the habitat of the Hamas leadership. Even the Hamas totalitarians will not be able to keep that fact hidden. As the rubble is cleared away, too many Gazans will ask of their Hamas leaders whether the supposedly brilliant strategy of asymmetrical warfare was worth it. Hamas’s intended war — blanketing Israel with thousands of rockets that would send video clips around the world of hundreds of thousands of Jews trembling in fear in shelters — failed in its first hours. The air campaign was about as successful as the tunnel war, which was supposed to allow hit teams to enter Israel to kidnap and kill, with gruesome videos posted all over the Internet. Both strategies largely failed almost upon implementation. As long as Israel does not seek to reoccupy Gaza, it can inflict enough damage on the Hamas leadership, and on both the tunnels and the missile stockpiles, to win four or five years of quiet. In the Middle East, that sort of calm qualifies as victory. And the more the world sees of the elaborate tunnels and vast missile arsenals that an impoverished Hamas had built with other people’s money, and the more these military assets proved entirely futile in actual war, the more Hamas appears not just foolish but incompetent, if not ridiculous, as well.  Victor Davis Hanson

Attention: une défaite peut en cacher une autre !

Voisins arabes entre Syrie Irak Egypte et Jordanie déchirés par la pire des guerres civiles, en quasi-faillite ou fragilisés; pays du Golfe plus inquiets que jamais face à l’Iran et ses affidés des Frères musulmans Hezbollah et Hamas; milices surarmées du Hezbollah tenues en respect au nord après leur écrasante défaite il y a huit ans; Hamas ayant perdu en un mois et sans compter des centaines de combattants la plupart de ses tunnels offensifs, postes de commandement et peut-être les deux tiers de son armement; révélation à  la planète entière de l’étendue de l’armement, des tunnels offensifs et de la perversion et perfidie d’un pays théoriquement parmi les plus pauvres du monde utilisant non seulement sa population comme boucliers humains mais multipliant les intimidations sur les journalistes; pusallinimité des Etats-Unis à l’ONU (prêtant elle-même ses écoles au dépot d’armes) de la réponse occidentale …

A l’heure où, contre toute évidence, nos médias et nos belles âmes – jusqu’en Israël même ! – vont repartir pour un tour avec les discours habituels sur la défaite supposée d’un Etat israélien plus diabolisé que jamais …

Alors qu’après une nouvelle et magistrale défaite, des combattants qui passent leur temps à parader en uniformes rutilants mais se battent en vêtements civils, viennent en fait de démontrer à la planète entière – jusqu’au sacrifice délibéré et cynique d’enfants ! – le degré de leur imaginable  perfidie et perversion

Pendant que, de Washington à l’ONU, l’Occident a lui fait mesurer toute l’étendue de sa pusallinimité …

Et qu’à coup d‘images sanguinolantes,  nos valeureux correspondants de guerre et belles âmes de service ont rivalisé à qui serait la meilleure attachée de presse du Hamas

Comment ne pas voir avec l’historien militaire américain Victor Davis Hanson …

L’incroyable et historique, pour qui a des yeux pour voir et des oreilles pour entendre et mis à part le Qatar et la Turquie, changement de donne notamment au niveau des alliances régionales qui vient de se faire sous nos yeux ?

A Stronger Israel?
Elite opinion believes Israel will lose “long-term” whatever happens in the next weeks. Not necessarily.
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review Online
August 5, 2014

In postmodern wars, we are told, there is no victory, no defeat, no aggressors, no defenders, just a tragedy of conflicting agendas. But in such a mindless and amoral landscape, Israel in fact is on its way to emerging in a far better position after the Gaza war than before.

Analysts of the current fighting in Gaza have assured us that even if Israel weakens Hamas, such a short-term victory will hardly lead to long-term strategic success — but they don’t define “long-term.” In this line of thinking, supposedly in a few weeks Israel will only find itself more isolated than ever. It will grow even more unpopular in Europe and will perhaps, for the first time, lose its patron, America — while gaining an enraged host of Arab and Islamic enemies. Meanwhile, Hamas will gain stature, rebuild, and slowly wear Israel down.

But if we compare the Gaza war with Israel’s past wars, that pessimistic scenario hardly rings true. Unlike in the existential wars of 1948, 1956, 1967, and 1973, Israel faces no coalition of powerful conventional enemies. Syria’s military is wrecked. Iraq is devouring itself. Egypt is bankrupt and in no mood for war. Its military government is more worried about Hamas than about Israel. Jordan has no wish to attack Israel. The Gulf States are likewise more afraid of the axis of Iran, Hezbollah, Hamas, and the Muslim Brotherhood than of Israel — a change of mentality that has no historical precedent. In short, never since the birth of the Jewish state have the traditional enemies surrounding Israel been in such military and political disarray. Never have powerful Arab states quietly hoped that Israel would destroy an Islamist terrorist organization that they fear more than they fear the Jewish state.

But is not asymmetrical warfare the true threat to Israel? The West, after all, has had little success in achieving long-term victories over terrorist groups and insurgents — remember Afghanistan and Iraq. How can tiny Israel find security against enemies who seem to gain political clout and legitimacy as they incur ever greater losses, especially when there is only a set number of casualties that an affluent, Western Israel can afford, before public support for the war collapses? How can the Israelis fight a war that the world media portray as genocide against the innocents?

In fact, most of these suppositions are simplistic. The U.S., for example, defeated assorted Islamic insurgents in what was largely an optional war in Iraq; a small token peacekeeping force might have kept Nouri al-Maliki from hounding Sunni politicians, and otherwise kept the peace. Israel’s recent counterinsurgency wars have rendered both the Palestinians on the West Bank and pro-Iranian Hezbollah militants in Lebanon less, not more, dangerous. Hamas, not Israel, would not wish to repeat the last three weeks.

Oddly, Hezbollah, an erstwhile ally of Hamas, has been largely quiet during the Gaza war. Why, when the use of its vast missile arsenal, in conjunction with Hamas’s rocketry, might in theory have overwhelmed Israel’s missile defenses? The answer is probably the huge amount of damage suffered by Hezbollah in the 2006 war in Lebanon, and its inability to protect its remaining assets from yet another overwhelming Israeli air response. Had Hamas’s rockets hit their targets, perhaps Hezbollah would have joined in. But for now, 2014 looks to them a lot like 2006.

In the current asymmetrical war, Israel has found a method of inflicting as much damage on Hamas as it finds politically and strategically useful without suffering intolerable losses. And because the war is seen as existential — aiming rockets at a civilian population will do that — Israeli public opinion will largely support the effort to retaliate.

As long as Israel does not seek to reoccupy Gaza, it can inflict enough damage on the Hamas leadership, and on both the tunnels and the missile stockpiles, to win four or five years of quiet. In the Middle East, that sort of calm qualifies as victory. And the more the world sees of the elaborate tunnels and vast missile arsenals that an impoverished Hamas had built with other people’s money, and the more these military assets proved entirely futile in actual war, the more Hamas appears not just foolish but incompetent, if not ridiculous, as well.

After all the acrimony dies down, Gazans will understand that there was a correlation between blown-up houses, on the one hand, and, on the other, tunnel entrances, weapon depots, and the habitat of the Hamas leadership. Even the Hamas totalitarians will not be able to keep that fact hidden. As the rubble is cleared away, too many Gazans will ask of their Hamas leaders whether the supposedly brilliant strategy of asymmetrical warfare was worth it. Hamas’s intended war — blanketing Israel with thousands of rockets that would send video clips around the world of hundreds of thousands of Jews trembling in fear in shelters — failed in its first hours. The air campaign was about as successful as the tunnel war, which was supposed to allow hit teams to enter Israel to kidnap and kill, with gruesome videos posted all over the Internet. Both strategies largely failed almost upon implementation.

In terms of domestic politics, Israel has rarely been more united — akin to the United States right after 9/11. The Israeli Left and Right agree that no modern Western state can exist under periodic clouds of rockets and missiles. Similarly, the attrition of Hamas only plays into the hands of the Palestinian Authority, which understandably stayed out of the war and did not incite the West Bank to stage simultaneous attacks. Like it or not, after the Gaza war, Israel will be dealing in the near future with Palestinians who do not always think preemptive rocket and tunnel attacks work to their own strategic advantage.

In terms of economics, Israel is no longer subject to carbon-fuel blackmail. It will soon become a major exporter of natural gas, and political realities will reflect that commercial importance. If one cynically believes that much of the global tilt to the Palestinians began as an aftershock from the 1973 oil embargoes, then Israeli exports may soon be reflected in more favorable politics.

Is Israel politically isolated? It certainly seems that way, if one looks at the response to the Gaza war among Western journalists, academics, politicians, and popular culture. But public opinion in the United States remains staunchly pro-Israel in spite of the American elite culture’s romance with Hamas and the Palestinians. Moreover, the Democratic party is facing its own increasing existential crisis, as its establishment pro-Israel donors and politicians are appalled by the increasingly anti-Israel tones of its ever more radical base. After the Gaza war, some major Democratic supporters of Israel will quietly make the necessary adjustments, in recognition that both their party and the Obama administration seem to prefer Hamas to democratic Israel. The upcoming 2014 midterm election does not favor candidates who are anti-Israel, but rather pro-Israeli conservatives. After 2016 there is unlikely to be a president who shares the incoherent views of Barack Obama on the Middle East. Fairly or not, it appears that the administration is trying to hide its pro-Hamas sympathies and is doing so unprofessionally and ineptly.

Europe, of course, remains mostly hostile to Israel, a hatred that predates the Gaza war. But the current demonstrations of virulent anti-Semitic hatred do not reflect well on the European Union. At present, it appears that European nations either cannot or will not confront their own fascistic Islamic radicals, which leaves open the question of whether the Islamist message of the streets resonates with Europeans.The European hostility to Israel does not stem just from events on the ground in Gaza, but is more a reflection of Europe’s inability to deal with its 20th-century past. Demonization, the more virulent the better, of Israelis seems to ease guilt over the Holocaust — as if to imply that, while the genocide was regrettable, there was something innately savage in Jewish culture, now manifested in Gaza, that might understandably have incited past generations of more radical Europeans. Otherwise, Europeans simply mask with trendy ideology the more materialistic assessment that demography, oil, and the fear of terrorism weigh in favor of allying with the Palestinians. Either way, European anti-Semitism is a bankrupt ideology, one that manifests itself in sympathy for an undemocratic, misogynistic, homophobic, and religiously intolerant Hamas, along with selective unconcern with the many occupations, refugees, divided cities, and walled borders that exist in the wide world outside the Middle East.

The U.N. will emerge after the war in an even sorrier state. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has offered mostly platitudes and buffooneries. Certainly, he would never take his own advice if North Korea were to move in the manner of Hamas. Hamas’s use of U.N. facilities to hide arsenals could not have occurred without U.N. complicity. What little credibility the U.N. had in the Middle East before the war is mostly shredded.

Iran is watching the war, and its surrogate is not doing well. There is no particular reason why an Israeli anti-missile system could not knock down an Iranian missile. Nor is Hezbollah as fiery in deed as in word these days. The message to Iran is that Israel will fight back in whatever way it finds appropriate against its enemy of the moment.

Gaza is a military and political minefield. But if Israel continues on its present course, it will emerge far better off than Hamas and better off than it was before Hamas began its missile barrage. And in the Middle East, that is about as close to victory as one gets. The future for Israel is not bleak, just as it is not bleak for any nation that chooses to defend itself from savage enemies that seek its destruction.

 Voir aussi:

How Hamas Deliberately Created a Humanitarian Crisis in Gaza
Evelyn Gordon
Commentary
08.06.2014

There has been a lot of talk lately about the humanitarian crisis in Gaza. What has gone curiously unmentioned by all the great humanitarians from the UN and “human rights” groups, however, is the degree to which this crisis was deliberately fomented by Hamas: Aside from starting the war to begin with, Hamas has done its level best to deprive Gazans of everything from food to medical care to housing, despite Israel’s best efforts to provide them.

Take, for instance, the widely reported shortages of medicines and various other essentials. Many of these products are imported, and since Egypt has largely closed its border, Gaza has only one conduit for these vital imports: the Kerem Shalom crossing into Israel. Thus if Gaza’s Hamas government had any concern whatsoever for its citizens, ensuring that this crossing was kept open and could function at maximum efficiency would be a top priority.

Instead, Hamas and other terrorist groups subjected Kerem Shalom to relentless rocket and mortar fire throughout the 29-day conflict, thereby ensuring that the job of getting cargo through was constantly interrupted as crossing workers raced for cover. Hamas also launched at least three tunnel attacks near Kerem Shalom, each of which shut the crossing down for hours.

Despite this, Israeli staffers risked their lives to keep the crossing open and managed to send through 1,491 truckloads of food, 220 truckloads of other humanitarian supplies, and 106 truckloads of medical supplies. But the numbers would certainly have been higher had the nonstop attacks not kept disrupting operations. On August 1, for instance, a shipment comprising 91 truckloads of aid had to be aborted on when Hamas violated a humanitarian cease-fire by launching a massive attack near Kerem Shalom.

Then there’s the shortage of medical care, as Gaza’s hospitals were reportedly overwhelmed by the influx of Palestinian casualties. To relieve this pressure, Israel allowed some Palestinians into Israel for treatment and also set up a field hospital on the Gaza border. But throughout the war, the field hospital stood almost empty–which Israel says is because Hamas deliberately kept Palestinians from using it.

Many pundits dismiss this claim, insisting there were simply no Palestinians who wanted to go there. That, however, is highly implausible. Gazans routinely seek treatment in Israel because it offers better medical care than Gaza does; as one Gazan said in 2012, “It is obvious that people come to Israel for medical treatment, regardless of the political conflict.” Even Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh sends his family to Israel for treatment; over the past two years, Israel has treated both his granddaughter and his sister’s husband. So while some Palestinians undoubtedly objected to accepting help from the enemy, it’s hard to believe there weren’t also Palestinians who simply wanted the best possible care for their loved ones, and would gladly have accepted it from Israel had they not feared retaliation from a group with no qualms about shooting dissenters.

It’s also worth noting that “humanitarian” organizations in Gaza actively contributed to this particular problem. UNRWA and the Red Cross did refer a few patients to the Israeli field hospital. But you have to wonder why they opted to refer most patients to Gaza’s Shifa Hospital and then make videos about how difficult conditions there were instead of easing the burden on Shifa by referring more patients to the Israeli hospital.

Then, of course, there’s the dire electricity shortage–also courtesy in part of Hamas, which destroyed two power lines carrying electricity from Israel to Gaza and subsequently prevented their repair by shelling the area nonstop.

Finally, there’s the massive destruction of houses in Gaza, which has left thousands of families homeless. That, too, was largely courtesy of Hamas: It booby-trapped houses and other civilian buildings, like a UNRWA clinic, on a massive scale and also used such buildings to store rockets and explosives.

Sometimes, it blew up these buildings itself in an effort to kill Israeli soldiers. Other times, the buildings blew up when relatively light Israeli ammunition like mortar shells–which aren’t powerful enough to destroy a building on their own–caused the booby traps or stored rockets to detonate. As Prof. Gregory Rose aptly noted, Hamas effectively turned all of Gaza into one big suicide bomb. In one neighborhood, for instance, 19 out of 28 houses were either booby-trapped, storing rockets, or concealing a tunnel entrance, thereby ensuring their destruction.

Now, the organization is gleefully watching the world blame Israel for the humanitarian crisis Hamas itself created. And that gives it every incentive to repeat these tactics in the future.

Voir également:

Vidéo: Gaza, des Palestiniens témoignent et dénoncent le Hamas
Europe Israël
août 06, 2014

Anina, réfugiée palestinienne interviewée sur France Info, dénonce le Hamas et indique que les manifestants pro-gaza se trompent car ils ne soutiennent pas le peuple palestinien mais le Hamas qui martyrise le peuple. Ramad et Mahomoud se cachent car ils sont recherchés par le Hamas. Nonie Darwish, femme palestinienne de Gaza, parle des djihadistes du Hamas, de l’Islam radical…
Ces témoignages sont accablants sur la terreur que fait régner le Hamas sur les palestiniens: boucliers humains, sévices, meurtres, l’organisation terroriste détourne l’aide humanitaire et affame le peuple.

Pour manger et survivre il faut appartenir au Hamas…

Une vidéo a écouter jusqu’au bout et à diffuser massivement…

Anina : C’est vrai, des civils, des enfants, des femmes tombent à Gaza. C’est parce qu’Israël bombarde les Palestiniens. Mais aussi il faut revenir sur la cause. Pourquoi Israël a bombardé les Palestiniens, ou pourquoi ça se passe de cette façon-là.

Moi je tiens, en étant palestinienne, moi je tiens responsable le Hamas. Parce que c’est le Hamas qui a refusé la trêve après le 19 décembre. C’est le Hamas qui utilise les civils comme boucliers humains. Ils utilisent les régions les plus peuplées pour lancer leurs roquettes. Ils font ce qu’ils veulent ! Ils lancent des roquettes et les civils meurent à leur place.

L’explosion qui s’est passée à l’école à Jabaliya: les hommes étaient là et les gens sont sortis pour demander aux militants de Hamas de foutre le camp. Dans la cité où j’habitais, ils sont venus devant le bâtiment. Ils ont lancé deux roquettes et j’ai perdu deux voisins et j’en ai une centaine qui semblent blessés jusqu’à maintenant.

France info : Vous voulez dire que la Hamas lance des roquettes d’endroits où il y a des civils et des enfants?

Anina : Oui.

France Info : …en sachant que les bombardements israéliens vont faire des victimes parmi cette population ?

Anina : Oui. Les gens n’ont pas le droit de dire non à Hamas, parce que Hamas va les faire payer très cher après l’incursion israélienne. Hamas ne représente pas toute la Palestine. Moi j’étais très touchée de voir qu’il y a une solidarité internationale pour manifester en ce qui concerne ce qui se passe actuellement à Gaza. Mais j’étais aussi désolée parce qu’il y avait un ou deux drapeaux palestiniens et le reste c’était des drapeaux du Hamas.

Et les gens doivent comprendre que vous êtes en train de soutenir le Hamas. Il faut soutenir les Palestiniens parce que le Hamas ce n’est pas la Palestine. Ça c’est premièrement. Et deuxièmement, c’est tout ce que vous êtes en train de voir comme aide humanitaire. Les sympathisants et les membres du Hamas bénéficient de cette aide humanitaire et jusqu’à maintenant, je connais des gens qui n’ont même pas de farine, même pas du pain. Ça fait deux jours ou trois jours qu’ils n’ont rien mangé. Parce qu’ils ne sont pas du Hamas, tout simplement. Vous n’êtes pas partie du Hamas, vous n’avez pas le droit à l’aide humanitaire…

Voir encore:

Hamas Concealing Their Role In Innocent Gaza Deaths By Threatening, Expelling Reporters

Brendan Bordelon
The Daily caller
07/31/2014

Increasing reports from Gaza suggest Hamas is actively threatening or deporting any international journalist who reports on casualties caused by the terror group or its use of human shields — with one Italian journalist claiming he was unable to report the deadly misfire of a Hamas rocket until he’d left the battered coastal enclave.

On Monday, American media outlets reported that a strike on al-Shati refugee camp killed ten civilians — nine of them children. The Daily Beast called the attack an Israeli “air strike,” ignoring an Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) protest to the contrary. The Nation noted the IDF’s denial but added that “several eyewitnesses blamed the explosion on an airstrike.”

On Tuesday, Italian journalist Gabriele Barbati tweeted the following:

Unlike the initial news of the attack, Hamas’ complicity in the childrens’ death was not widely reported in international media outlets. And almost no one reported on Barbati’s inference that Hamas seeks to “retaliate” against inconvenient journalists.

Reporters still in Gaza who reveal Hamas’ endangerment of its own people have mysteriously deleted those reports soon after their filing. On July 22, Wall Street Journal reporter Nick Casey tweeted a photo allegedly taken from within al-Shifa hospital, the main reception point for women and children wounded in the Gaza fighting:

Al-Shifa hospital tweet

That tweet was quickly removed from Casey’s feed after a Hamas media account tweeted the following:

Other reports indicate what has long been suspected — that Hamas uses al-Shifa hospital not just as a multimedia hub to meet reporters and conduct TV interviews — but as a shield for a base through which its top leadership plans operations and hides from Israeli forces.

On July 15, the Washington Posts’s William Booth reported that the hospital “has become a de facto headquarters for Hamas leaders, who can be seen in the hallways and offices.” But the first independent confirmation of a Hamas headquarter at the hospital isn’t mentioned until the eight paragraph of the story — something TabletMag calls “burying the lede.” And other journalists who routinely visit the hospital to interview Hamas officials fail to mention the significance of their pervasive presence.

On July 29, al-Shifa hospital was hit by an unidentified aerial bomb. Wall Street Journal reporter Tamer El-Ghobashy quickly tweeted the following:

Tamer El-GhobashyThat post was soon taken down, with El-Ghobashy replacing the tweet with the same picture captioned “Unclear what the origin of the projectile is.” El-Ghobashy later claimed he deleted the tweet because it was “speculative” and that there was “no conspiracy.”

But the experiences of others reporters less accommodating to Hamas suggest there may have been an element of self-preservation in El-Ghobashy’s decision to remove the tweet.

The Times of Israel reports that earlier this month, an unidentified French journalist for local newspaper Ouest France was interviewed for an article in France’s Liberation newspaper.

The journalist reported how he was held against his will, threatened and interrogated by Hamas officials in a back room of al-Shifa hospital. “Are you a corespondent for Israel?” he was consistently asked. The officials eventually decided to expel the reporter from Gaza altogether.

Liberation later took down the article over concerns for the reporter’s safety, which the story named.

And on Wednesday, pro-Hamas journalists in Gaza tweeted that RT reporter Harry Fear was expelled from Gaza after tweeting that rockets were being fired from a location near his hotel:

Harry Fear

Over one day later, Fear’s deportation from Gaza has not been confirmed or denied by RT.

Voir de plus:

On Israel’s Defeat in Gaza
Hamas will dig out from under the rubble and the world will remember the image of four boys killed on a beach.
David Rothkopf
Foreign policy
August 6, 2014

There is no doubt that Israeli leaders feel justified in their actions in Gaza. Polls show that over nine out of 10 Israelis supported the recent war. Hamas is a very bad actor. Israel has every right to defend itself.

Yet, whenever this most recent conflict is seen to be over, it will not be remembered for the security logic behind it or the speeches justifying it. Nor will it be remembered for the tactical gains that Israel may have achieved. No, the lasting image this war will leave the world is of four boys on a beach, playing soccer and then running for their lives, hurtled from a carefree moment of childhood to oblivion in the blink of an eye.

There is no Iron Dome that can protect Israel from images like that. There is no Iron Dome that can undo the images of suffering and destruction burned into our memories or justify away the damage to Israel’s legitimacy that comes from such wanton slaughter. Most importantly, the Iron Dome protects Israel only from the damage others try to inflict upon it; it cannot save the country from the damage it does to itself.

Let’s accept for a moment every single argument made by the Israeli leadership for their actions in Gaza: Missile attacks are intolerable. Kidnapping and killing Israeli boys is a horror. Hamas is a terrorist group. It uses human shields to protect its munitions and its fighters. It actively invites Israeli attacks that inevitably wreak havoc upon innocent Palestinians. Every country has a right to defend itself. Other countries have done worse to protect the security of their citizens. It is easy to accept all these things. They are all true.

Also, let’s set aside the counterarguments. Set aside the reality that this war was started as much as response to Israeli government anger over the Palestinian unity government as it was to address the security concerns above. Set aside that it was in part an emotional response to the kidnapping and murder of three Israeli teens as it was to missile attacks. Set aside that these missile attacks launched from Hamas-controlled Gaza have inflicted relatively limited damage since they started over a decade ago and that Israel’s response to these attacks has been — by any measure — disproportionate. These things may also be true, but there are counterarguments to the counterarguments.

If you were an Israeli and you had lost one relative, or watched your child huddle in a shelter through even just one missile attack, your concern would be the safety of your family. Further, it would be impossible to look at the threat posed by any individual attack or any series of attacks as being isolated or limited; greater risks still loomed. As Jeffrey Goldberg points out in his well-argued and thoughtful piece, « What Would Hamas Do If It Could Do Whatever It Wanted? » it is a fact that Hamas lists among its stated goals the destruction not only of Israel but of all Jews.

And of course these counterarguments to the counterarguments are no less compelling than those of Gazans who feel that blockading 1.8 million people in a bleak urban environment is oppressive, and who have every right to demand the freedom, dignity, and personal security they are not receiving — people who rightly feel that no matter what Hamas’s tactics, there is nothing that justifies the killing of their children, not to mention their innocent sisters, brothers, mothers, and fathers.

That is the horrible reality of this situation. With an open mind, it is easy to see the perspectives of both sides. With an open heart, it is easy to understand the fear and the heartbreak and the impulse for survival that have pushed both groups to the desperate acts they have committed.

But if, in committing this show of egregious force, Israel’s primary goal was to enhance its security, it likely achieved only near-term gains on that front. Hamas remains. The populace from which it recruits is inflamed. Its global funders in faraway places like Qatar remain safe and intact and no less inclined to write checks. Indeed, they have gained standing through this conflict and been invited to join the table in diplomatic exchanges where, had they not been funders of terrorism, they would have had no place.

If Israel’s goal was to delegitimize Hamas, whatever it achieved during these last three weeks came at the expense of its own reputation. No matter how many articulate, pommy-accented spokespeople Israel rolls out to discuss human shields, they are trumped by the images of dead and wounded women and children, the stories of displaced families, the ground truth of an advanced, technologically sophisticated, militarily powerful nation laying waste to a land it occupies in order to root out a small cadre of fighters who pose little strategic threat to it. In short, Israel was waging a military action against an adversary that was waging a political campaign and thus adopted the wrong tactics and measured their progress by the wrong metrics. In fact, there is no denying that the Israeli tactics (it seems very unlikely there was any real strategizing going on) in this war do not pass the most basic tests available by which to assess them, those of morality, proportionality, and effectiveness.

Strategically, this is about neither missiles nor tunnels. It is, at its heart, like most aspects of Israel’s long struggle with the Palestinians, about the terms by which the people of Palestine will get the state that is theirs by every right and precept of international law and decency. Therefore, Israel’s action has to be assessed in terms of whether or not it will help or hurt its own standing in that negotiation, in which both sides participate by virtue of their daily actions whether there’s a formal negotiating table in place or not. And for all the reasons cited above, it can only hurt. Further, it must be asked whether the bloodshed in Gaza will make it more or less likely that the world will embrace Palestinian efforts to claim independence with or without Israeli cooperation. What is more, even if Hamas is weakened by the actions of the past few weeks, and the world (including perhaps Hamas) realizes the benefits of allowing the Palestinian Authority’s current leaders to take the lead on behalf of the Palestinian people, that transfer to a more legitimate leadership takes away one of Israel’s favorite excuses for not making progress toward an agreement. Absent Hamas and absent the divisions it brought, you have a more unified and internationally acceptable Palestinian regime.

The situation on the ground in Gaza in the wake of the violence of this past month does not help much to identify a winner or a loser from this knot of absolutes and moral ambiguities, rights and violations, human needs and political agendas. Israel can rightly claim to have inflicted great damage on Hamas, destroying rockets and tunnel complexes and exposing their cowardly and reckless tactics for what they are. Hamas can claim to have won simply because they survived and will live to fight another day, in that instance with a new army of recruits inflamed into action by this last war.

Such claims aside, the reality is that it is almost certainly more true that both sides lost than it is that either won. Israel’s standing internationally is further damaged, as is whatever slight credibility Hamas may have had as an advocate for the Palestinian people. It will cost billions to rebuild Gaza. The economic crater created by the conflict will harm both sides.

In the end, Israel lost in large part because despite its massive military and resource and advantages and Palestinian poverty and the comparative weakness of Hamas’s fighters, the Palestinians have one secret weapon that, like the images and narrative of the past conflict, trumps the Iron Dome. They have the clock on their side. With each day their population grows as does the injustice under which they suffer. With each day Israel’s arguments for delaying the establishment of that state grow weaker.

But for all the care we may and should give to looking at such a crisis in a balanced way, at the end of the day, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that one side actually did come out of this the loser. That is because when the final results and long-term implications of those results are tallied up, they are likely to suggest Israel both won less and lost more than did the Palestinian people.

Gaza avant le Congo ? La Palestine avant la Syrie ?
Alain Gresh
Nouvelles d’Orient
31 juillet 2014

A chaque nouvelle offensive israélienne contre les Palestiniens, ressurgit le même argument : pourquoi vous focalisez-vous sur ce conflit qui fait bien moins de morts que les guerres ravageant d’autres pays, comme le Congo, la Syrie, l’Irak ? En quoi le conflit israélo-palestinien est-il à part ? C’est pour tenter de répondre à cette question que j’ai écrit De quoi la Palestine est-elle le nom ?(le livre a été traduit en arabe (ألان غريش : علامَ يُطلق اسم فلسطين؟).

Le texte ci-dessous est un extrait de la conclusion de l’ouvrage. Il répond notamment au journaliste Hugues Serraf à propos de l’offensive israélienne sur Gaza de décembre 2008 – janvier 2009.
« Si un mort israélien vaut plusieurs morts palestiniens, combien faut-il de cadavres congolais pour un linceul gazaoui ? C’est un bête entrefilet de quelques lignes, une dépêche AFP que personne ne s’est donné la peine de réécrire ou de compléter. […] 271 personnes auraient été tuées depuis le 25 décembre 2008 en République démocratique du Congo par les hommes de l’Armée de résistance du Seigneur (LRA en anglais), un groupe venu d’Ouganda et en route pour la République centrafricaine. »

Lire « Gaza l’insoumise, creuset du nationalisme palestinien », et « Une question d’“équilibre” » dansLe Monde diplomatiqued’août 2014, en kiosques.Voilà ce qu’écrivait le journaliste Hugues Serraf durant l’attaque israélienne contre Gaza. L’interrogation est légitime, même si la conclusion est problématique :

« Comprendre comment Israël est devenu le méchant idéal ; celui que vous adorerez haïr sans retenue puisque sans risque d’être contredit autrement que par un « sioniste » ; celui dont vous comparerez systématiquement les crapuleries à celles des nazis […]Cette spécificité des réactions à ce qui touche Israël a peut-être des ressorts raisonnables que je suis honnêtement incapable de saisir. Peut-être est-il réellement possible de décréter que le conflit avec les Palestiniens est plus grave, plus intense, plus tragique — bref, plus tout et n’importe quoi que tout et n’importe quoi. Il faudra me le démontrer. »

Essayons de le « démontrer », même si, sous sa feinte naïveté, l’opinion de Serraf semble arrêtée : c’est l’antisémitisme qui expliquerait cette « fixation » sur la Palestine, laquelle permettrait d’exprimer, sans honte et sans remords, cette « haine éternelle » à l’égard des juifs. La Palestine serait-elle le nouveau nom de l’antisémitisme ?

La place de la Palestine au coeur de la Terre sainte et d’un Proche-Orient riche en pétrole explique, en partie, le fait qu’elle ait souvent occupé, au moins depuis 1967, la Une de l’actualité. Pourtant, cette cause n’a longtemps suscité que peu d’indignation. Ni les millions de réfugiés parqués dans des camps, ni le naufrage de tout un peuple en 1948-1949 n’ont ému l’Europe, traumatisée par la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Après 1967, si la mobilisation de quelques groupes d’extrême gauche européens en faveur des fedayins s’inscrivit dans la solidarité mondiale antiimpérialiste, dans l’exaltation de la « lutte armée » et dans le grand rêve de révolution, elle se limita à des cercles peu influents. Il fallut l’invasion israélienne du Liban en 1982 et le déclenchement de « la révolte des pierres » — la première Intifada — en 1987 pour que la solidarité avec la Palestine déborde les groupes militants.

Le numéro des Temps modernes publié au moment de la guerre de juin 1967 illustrait le malaise de la gauche française, y compris de ceux qui s’étaient engagés ardemment dans le combat pour l’indépendance algérienne et, plus largement, pour la décolonisation. Dans sa préface à la revue, Jean-Paul Sartre ne dissimulait pas son embarras :

« Je voulais seulement rappeler qu’il y a, chez beaucoup d’entre nous, cette détermination affective qui n’est pas, pour autant, un trait sans importance de notre subjectivité mais un effet général de circonstances historiques et parfaitement objectives que nous ne sommes pas près d’oublier. Ainsi sommes-nous allergiques à tout ce qui pourrait, de près ou de loin, ressembler à de l’antisémitisme. À quoi nombre d’Arabes répondront : « Nous ne sommes pas antisémites, mais anti-israéliens. » Sans doute ont-ils raison : mais peuvent-ils empêcher que ces Israéliens pour nous ne soient aussi des Juifs ? »

On ne peut mieux résumer les réticences de la gauche européenne vis-à-vis de la cause palestinienne.

Réticences qui confinent à l’aveuglement : les Palestiniens en tant que tels ne sont même pas évoqués en 1967, alors que la menace sur Israël, peinte dans les termes les plus alarmistes dans les années 1960, perdait toute consistance réelle : le pays, appuyé par les Etats-Unis, pouvait vaincre toutes les armées arabes réunies. En Europe, comme l’expliquait Sartre, on percevait ce conflit à travers les persécutions antisémites et « la légitime aspiration à une patrie du peuple juif », chassé de ses terres deux mille ans plus tôt.

On peut alors, avant de revenir sur la question de l’antisémitisme, reformuler l’interrogation de Serraf et se demander plutôt pourquoi, après une si longue période de discrétion, la Palestine est devenue, comme l’énonçait le philosophe Etienne Balibar, une « cause universelle » ; pourquoi, en janvier 2009, des paysans latino-américains, mais aussi de jeunes Français et des vétérans de la lutte anti-apartheid sud-africains, sont descendus dans la rue pour dénoncer l’agression israélienne contre Gaza. Pour quelle raison une cause mobilise-t-elle, à un moment donné, les opinions de tous les continents ?

A partir des années 1960, le Vietnam (plus largement l’Indochine) puis l’Afrique du Sud ont occupé une place privilégiée dans l’actualité internationale. Etait-ce justifié ? Les Etats-Unis expliquaient alors que le communisme portait la responsabilité de crimes bien plus graves que leur intervention au Vietnam. Le régime de l’apartheid, pour sa part, prétendait que l’on comptait moins de morts en Afrique du Sud que sous telle ou telle dictature du continent africain. L’assassinat du militant étudiant Steve Biko par les policiers de l’apartheid en septembre 1977, un an après les émeutes de Soweto, a suscité plus d’indignation que l’élimination à la même époque de milliers d’opposants par le dictateur éthiopien Haile Mariam Mengistu. C’est le même argument que reprend Serraf quand il explique que le conflit israélo-palestinien est bien moins meurtrier que les « petites guerre » aux confins de l’Ouganda et de la République démocratique du Congo.

Il n’empêche. Qu’on s’en désole ou pas, l’opinion publique internationale ne mesure pas ses réactions à la seule aune d’une comptabilité macabre. Car elle est sensible aussi à la portée symbolique des situations. A un moment donné, un conflit peut en effet exprimer la « vérité » d’une époque, dépasser le cadre étroit de sa localisation géographique pour gagner une signification universelle. Malgré leurs dissemblances, le Vietnam, l’Afrique du Sud et la Palestine se situent tous trois sur la ligne de faille entre Nord et Sud. L’histoire du siècle passé a certes été marquée par les deux guerres mondiales, par l’émergence, l’apogée et la chute du communisme et par l’affirmation de la puissance des Etats-Unis. Mais, comme nous l’avons montré au fil des chapitres précédents, elle a aussi vu s’émanciper du joug colonial la grande majorité de la population mondiale, qui a cherché à conquérir le droit de décider elle-même de son destin. Le Vietnam a symbolisé la lutte d’un petit peuple du Tiers Monde contre la principale puissance du Nord ; l’Afrique du Sud a illustré la révolte contre un système ségrégationniste dominé par les Blancs ; ultime survivance du « colonialisme de peuplement » européen, la Palestine cristallise les aspirations à un monde qui aura tourné la page de deux siècles de domination de l’Occident…

De quoi la Palestine est-elle devenue le nom ?

D’abord, de la domination coloniale de l’Occident. Ensuite, d’une injustice persistante, marquée par une violation permanente du droit international. Enfin, d’une logique de « deux poids, deux mesures », appliquée par les gouvernements, relayée par les Nations unies et théorisée par bon nombre d’intellectuels occidentaux. Au croisement de l’Orient et de l’Occident, du Sud et du Nord, la Palestine symbolise à la fois le monde ancien, marqué par l’hégémonie du Nord, et la gestation d’un monde nouveau fondé sur le principe de l’égalité entre les peuples.

Serraf a raison. La couverture de l’affrontement israélo-palestinien obéit à des règles différentes de celles qui prévalent pour les autres conflits, et Israël est jugé selon des principes spéciaux. En effet, quel autre exemple connaît-on d’une occupation condamnée depuis plus de quarante ans par les Nations unies sans résultats ni sanctions ? Quel autre cas existe-t-il de puissance conquérante pouvant installer plus de 500 000 colons dans les territoires qu’elle occupe (politique qui, en droit international, constitue un « crime de guerre ») sans que la communauté internationale émette autre chose que des condamnations verbales, sans effet ni suite ?

Voir encore:

Israël peut-il sortir du piège de Gaza ?
Pierre Rousselin
Géopolitique
1 août 2014

Israël ne règlera pas le problème que lui pose le Hamas en bombardant sans relâche la bande de Gaza. L’artillerie, l’aviation, les incursions terrestres et la création d’une zone tampon peuvent amoindrir la capacité qu’ont les islamistes de lancer des roquettes sur Israël. Mais le Hamas pourra toujours crier victoire : il lui suffit de résister à une force militaire dont la supériorité est écrasante. L’accumulation désolante de victimes civiles des raids israéliens ne détourne pas les Palestiniens des militants intégristes. Elle ne fait, au contraire, que les radicaliser.

Ce même scénario s’est déjà produit deux fois au cours des dernières années, lors des conflits similaires de 2008-2009 et de 2012. Au fil des ans, la violence ne fait qu’augmenter, les bilans sont de plus en plus sanglants, mais le problème de fond reste le même. Le Hamas s’est adapté en augmentant la portée de ses roquettes, en ayant recours à des drones et en étendant le maillage de tunnels qui est au coeur de sa stratégie. Le réseau sous-terrain lui sert à s’approvisionner en armements depuis l’Egypte voisine, à échapper à la surveillance israélienne, à s’abriter des bombardements et à effectuer des incursions en Israël.

Intervenir tous les deux ou trois ans à Gaza pour détruire l’arsenal des islamistes constitue la seule riposte qu’Israël ait trouvée. A court terme, elle vise un objectif militaire précis : réduire la capacité offensive des islamistes. Mais à long terme, elle sert les intérêts du Hamas. Le mouvement islamiste sort à chaque fois grandi d’une bataille dont le coût en vies humaines met Israël sur le banc des accusés. Une fois le calme revenu, l’ennemi n’a aucun mal à se réarmer et à reconstruire son réseau de tunnels. Cette année, le Hamas était affaibli au point de devoir soutenir un gouvernement d’unité nationale avec les modérés de l’Autorité palestinienne. Avec l’offensive israélienne, les plus extrémistes ont retourné la situation à leur profit.

Comme en 2008 et en 2012, Israël est pris dans le piège de Gaza. La logique de guerre radicalise l’opinion publique israélienne qui s’étonne de la poursuite des tirs de roquettes et exige encore davantage de son armée. Même s’il le souhaitait, l’Etat hébreu ne peut pas réoccuper durablement le territoire comme avant les accords d’Oslo, en 1993. La branche armée du Hamas a eu tout le temps de s’organiser et causerait des pertes insupportables à des troupes d’occupation.  Espérer éradiquer les militants islamistes par la force n’a pas de sens. D’autres, plus extrémistes encore, prendront la place du Hamas. Ils existent déjà dans la mouvance salafiste, bien implantée à Gaza.

Comment échapper à ce cercle infernal ? L’accumulation de victimes depuis le 8 juillet rend urgent un cessez le feu. L’échec des efforts entrepris jusqu’ici montre qu’une trêve ne pourra être obtenue que si elle ouvre la voie à une solution durable. Pour cela, une feuille de route doit être établie et imposée aux belligérants par un effort diplomatique coordonné et soutenu le plus largement possible.

L’évolution de la configuration internationale dans laquelle s’inscrit le sanglant huis clos de Gaza peut fournir une lueur d’espoir. Pour en finir avec les lancers de roquettes, Benjamin Netanyahou peut compter cette fois sur un allié objectif de taille : l’Egypte.

Jusqu’au renversement de Mohamed Morsi, le Hamas était soutenu par les Frères musulmans au pouvoir au Caire. Depuis juillet 2013, le mouvement palestinien est devenu une cible prioritaire de la lutte anti-islamiste menée par le régime égyptien. Le général Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, élu à la présidence en mai dernier, a étendu la « guerre contre le terrorisme » qu’il mène contre les Frères musulmans égyptien au Hamas.  L’Egypte n’a pas attendu le déclenchement de l’opération israélienne en cours pour restreindre les transferts de fonds et s’attaquer aux tunnels de ravitaillement en armes qui passent sous la frontière entre Gaza et le Sinaï, obligeant le mouvement de la résistance islamique à engager une « réconciliation » avec l’Autorité palestinienne.

Du point de vue Israélien, la poursuite du statu quo est intenable. Le Hamas a réussi à renverser en sa faveur les paramètres du conflit. La supériorité militaire écrasante sur laquelle l’Etat hébreu fonde sa défense depuis sa création devait porter le combat loin des arrières pour mener des offensives-éclairs destinées à remporter des victoires rapides avant de subir la pression pour un cessez le feu. Dans un conflit asymétrique comme celui de Gaza, la supériorité militaire israélienne ne parvient pas à imposer sa loi. Elle devient même contreproductive lorsqu’il lui faut faire des centaines de morts dans la population civile, femmes et enfants compris, pour détruire quelques tunnels et éliminer quelques roquettes. A long terme, la sécurité d’Israël ne dépend pas seulement de sa puissance de feu mais aussi de l’image projetée dans le monde. Chaque offensive à Gaza dure de plus en plus longtemps et produit un effet désastreux sur le soutien que l’Etat hébreu peut espérer avoir dans la communauté internationale.

Un arrêt durable des hostilités ne peut être accepté par Israël que s’il met en route une démilitarisation effective de la branche armée du Hamas.  C’est un objectif auquel devrait souscrire l’Egypte, en coordination avec l’Autorité palestinienne de Mahmoud Abbas. En échange de mesures concrètes dans ce sens, sous supervision internationale, Israël devra autoriser une levée progressive  et contrôlée du blocus de Gaza et faciliter un financement de la reconstruction du territoire par l’intermédiaire de l’Autorité palestinienne.

Le cessez-le feu de 2012, négocié par l’entremise des Etats-Unis, n’avait  rien réglé, faute d’une réelle volonté de l’imposer de la part de l’Egypte alors sous l’emprise des Frères musulmans de Mohamed Morsi. Cette fois, la nouvelle donne internationale peut permettre de contrer le Hamas tout en remettant en selle les modérés de l’Autorité palestinienne. Encore faudrait-il que les diplomaties occidentales assument ce choix, l’imposent à Israël et cessent de faire le jeu des islamistes et de leurs alliés dans le monde arabe.


Hamas: De même que pour toutes les terres conquises par l’islam (For the Hamas, Palestine is an Islamic Waqf throughout all generations and to the Day of Resurrection as long as Heaven and earth last)

3 août, 2014
Le roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, prit avec lui sept cents hommes tirant l’épée pour se frayer un passage jusqu’au roi d’Édom; mais ils ne purent pas. Il prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique aspire à l’accomplissement de la promesse de Dieu, quel que soit le temps nécessaire. L’Apôtre de Dieu -que Dieu lui donne bénédiction et paix- a dit : « L’Heure ne viendra pas avant que les musulmans n’aient combattu les Juifs (c’est à dire que les musulmans ne les aient tués), avant que les Juifs ne se fussent cachés derrière les pierres et les arbres et que les pierres et les arbres eussent dit : ‘Musulman, serviteur de Dieu ! Un Juif se cache derrière moi, viens et tue-le. Charte du Hamas (article 7)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique croit que la Palestine est un Waqf islamique consacré aux générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jugement Dernier. Pas une seule parcelle ne peut en être dilapidée ou abandonnée à d’autres. Aucun pays arabe, président arabe ou roi arabe, ni tous les rois et présidents arabes réunis, ni une organisation même palestinienne n’a le droit de le faire. La Palestine est un Waqf musulman consacré aux générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier. Qui peut prétendre avoir le droit de représenter les générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier ? Tel est le statut de la terre de Palestine dans la Charia, et il en va de même pour toutes les terres conquises par l’islam et devenues terres de Waqf dès leur conquête, pour être consacrées à toutes les générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier. Il en est ainsi depuis que les chefs des armées islamiques ont conquis les terres de Syrie et d’Irak et ont demandé au Calife des musulmans, Omar Ibn-al Khattab, s’ils devaient partager ces terres entre les soldats ou les laisser à leurs propriétaires. Suite à des consultations et des discussions entre le Calife des musulmans, Omar Ibn-al Khattab, et les compagnons du Prophète, Allah le bénisse, il fut décidé que la terre soit laissée à ses propriétaires pour qu’ils profitent de ses fruits. Cependant, la propriété véritable et la terre même doit être consacrée aux seuls musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier. Ceux qui se trouvent sur ces terres peuvent uniquement profiter de ses fruits. Ce waqf persiste tant que le Ciel et la Terre existent. Toute procédure en contradiction avec la Charia islamique en ce qui concerne la Palestine est nulle et non avenue.« C’est la vérité infaillible. Célèbre le nom d’Allah le Très-Haut » (Coran, LVI, 95-96). Charte du Hamas (article 11)
The Jews are the most despicable and contemptible nation to crawl upon the face of the Earth, because they have displayed hostility to Allah. Allah will kill the Jews in the hell of the world to come, just like they killed the believers in the hell of this world. Atallah Abu al-Subh (former Hamas minister of culture, 2011)
Right now, Israel is much more powerful than Hezbollah and Hamas. Let’s say tomorrow this was reversed. Let’s say Hamas had the firepower of Israel and Israel had the firepower of Hamas. What do you think would happen to Israel were the balance of power reversed? David Wolpe (rabbi of Los Angeles Sinai Temple)
The truth is that there is an obvious, undeniable, and hugely consequential moral difference between Israel and her enemies. The Israelis are surrounded by people who have explicitly genocidal intentions towards them. The charter of Hamas is explicitly genocidal. It looks forward to a time, based on Koranic prophesy, when the earth itself will cry out for Jewish blood, where the trees and the stones will say “O Muslim, there’s a Jew hiding behind me. Come and kill him.” This is a political document. We are talking about a government that was voted into power by a majority of Palestinians. (…) The discourse in the Muslim world about Jews is utterly shocking. Not only is there Holocaust denial—there’s Holocaust denial that then asserts that we will do it for real if given the chance. The only thing more obnoxious than denying the Holocaust is to say that itshould have happened; it didn’t happen, but if we get the chance, we will accomplish it. There are children’s shows in the Palestinian territories and elsewhere that teach five-year-olds about the glories of martyrdom and about the necessity of killing Jews. And this gets to the heart of the moral difference between Israel and her enemies. And this is something I discussed in The End of Faith. To see this moral difference, you have to ask what each side would do if they had the power to do it. What would the Jews do to the Palestinians if they could do anything they wanted? Well, we know the answer to that question, because they can do more or less anything they want. The Israeli army could kill everyone in Gaza tomorrow. So what does that mean? Well, it means that, when they drop a bomb on a beach and kill four Palestinian children, as happened last week, this is almost certainly an accident. They’re not targeting children. They could target as many children as they want. Every time a Palestinian child dies, Israel edges ever closer to becoming an international pariah. So the Israelis take great pains not to kill children and other noncombatants. (…)What do we know of the Palestinians? What would the Palestinians do to the Jews in Israel if the power imbalance were reversed? Well, they have told us what they would do. For some reason, Israel’s critics just don’t want to believe the worst about a group like Hamas, even when it declares the worst of itself. We’ve already had a Holocaust and several other genocides in the 20th century. People are capable of committing genocide. When they tell us they intend to commit genocide, we should listen. There is every reason to believe that the Palestinians would kill all the Jews in Israel if they could. Would every Palestinian support genocide? Of course not. But vast numbers of them—and of Muslims throughout the world—would. Needless to say, the Palestinians in general, not just Hamas, have a history of targeting innocent noncombatants in the most shocking ways possible. They’ve blown themselves up on buses and in restaurants. They’ve massacred teenagers. They’ve murdered Olympic athletes. They now shoot rockets indiscriminately into civilian areas. And again, the charter of their government in Gaza explicitly tells us that they want to annihilate the Jews—not just in Israel but everywhere.(…) The truth is that everything you need to know about the moral imbalance between Israel and her enemies can be understood on the topic of human shields. Who uses human shields? Well, Hamas certainly does. They shoot their rockets from residential neighborhoods, from beside schools, and hospitals, and mosques. Muslims in other recent conflicts, in Iraq and elsewhere, have also used human shields. They have laid their rifles on the shoulders of their own children and shot from behind their bodies. Consider the moral difference between using human shields and being deterred by them. That is the difference we’re talking about. The Israelis and other Western powers are deterred, however imperfectly, by the Muslim use of human shields in these conflicts, as we should be. It is morally abhorrent to kill noncombatants if you can avoid it. It’s certainly abhorrent to shoot through the bodies of children to get at your adversary. But take a moment to reflect on how contemptible this behavior is. And understand how cynical it is. The Muslims are acting on the assumption—the knowledge, in fact—that the infidels with whom they fight, the very people whom their religion does nothing but vilify, will be deterred by their use of Muslim human shields. They consider the Jews the spawn of apes and pigs—and yet they rely on the fact that they don’t want to kill Muslim noncombatants.(…) Now imagine reversing the roles here. Imagine how fatuous—indeed comical it would be—for the Israelis to attempt to use human shields to deter the Palestinians. (…) But Imagine the Israelis holding up their own women and children as human shields. Of course, that would be ridiculous. The Palestinians are trying to kill everyone. Killing women and children is part of the plan. Reversing the roles here produces a grotesque Monty Python skit. If you’re going to talk about the conflict in the Middle East, you have to acknowledge this difference. I don’t think there’s any ethical disparity to be found anywhere that is more shocking or consequential than this. And the truth is, this isn’t even the worst that jihadists do. Hamas is practically a moderate organization, compared to other jihadist groups. There are Muslims who have blown themselves up in crowds of children—again, Muslim children—just to get at the American soldiers who were handing out candy to them. They have committed suicide bombings, only to send another bomber to the hospital to await the casualities—where they then blow up all the injured along with the doctors and nurses trying to save their lives. Every day that you could read about an Israeli rocket gone astray or Israeli soldiers beating up an innocent teenager, you could have read about ISIS in Iraq crucifying people on the side of the road, Christians and Muslims. Where is the outrage in the Muslim world and on the Left over these crimes? Where are the demonstrations, 10,000 or 100,000 deep, in the capitals of Europe against ISIS?  If Israel kills a dozen Palestinians by accident, the entire Muslim world is inflamed. God forbid you burn a Koran, or write a novel vaguely critical of the faith. And yet Muslims can destroy their own societies—and seek to destroy the West—and you don’t hear a peep. (…) These incompatible religious attachments to this land have made it impossible for Muslims and Jews to negotiate like rational human beings, and they have made it impossible for them to live in peace. But the onus is still more on the side of the Muslims here. Even on their worst day, the Israelis act with greater care and compassion and self-criticism than Muslim combatants have anywhere, ever. And again, you have to ask yourself, what do these groups want? What would they accomplish if they could accomplish anything? What would the Israelis do if they could do what they want? They would live in peace with their neighbors, if they had neighbors who would live in peace with them. They would simply continue to build out their high tech sector and thrive. (…) What do groups like ISIS and al-Qaeda and even Hamas want? They want to impose their religious views on the rest of humanity. They want stifle every freedom that decent, educated, secular people care about. This is not a trivial difference. And yet judging from the level of condemnation that Israel now receives, you would think the difference ran the other way. This kind of confusion puts all of us in danger. This is the great story of our time. For the rest of our lives, and the lives of our children, we are going to be confronted by people who don’t want to live peacefully in a secular, pluralistic world, because they are desperate to get to Paradise, and they are willing to destroy the very possibility of human happiness along the way. The truth is, we are all living in Israel. It’s just that some of us haven’t realized it yet. Sam Harris
On ne manque pas d’images du conflit de Gaza. Nous avons vu les décombres, les enfants palestiniens morts, les Israéliens courir aux abris pendant les attaques de roquettes, les manœuvres israéliennes et les images fournies par l’armée israélienne des militants du Hamas sortant de tunnels pour attaquer les soldats israéliens. Nous n’avons pratiquement pas vu aucune image d’hommes armés du Hamas à Gaza. Nous savons qu’ils sont là : il y a bien quelqu’un qui doit se charger de lancer les roquettes sur Israël (plus de 2 800) et de les tirer sur les troupes israéliennes dans Gaza. Pourtant, jusqu’à maintenant, les seules images que nous avons vues (ou dont nous avons même entendu parler) sont les vidéos fournies par l’armée israélienne de terroristes du Hamas utilisant les hôpitaux, les ambulances, les mosquées, les écoles (et les tunnels) pour lancer des attaques contre des cibles israéliennes ou transporter des armes autour de Gaza. Pourquoi n’avons nous pas vu des photographies prises par des journalistes d’hommes du Hamas dans Gaza ? Nous savons que le Hamas ne veut pas que le monde voit les hommes armés palestiniens en train de lancer de roquettes ou utilisant des lieux peuplés de civils comme des bases d’opération. Mais si l’on peut voir des images des deux côtés pratiquement dans toutes les guerres, en Syrie, en Ukraine, en Irak, pourquoi Gaza fait-elle figure d’exception ? Si des journalistes sont menacés et intimidés lorsqu’ils essaient de documenter les activités du Hamas dans Gaza, leurs agences de presse devraient le dire publiquement. (…) Pour de nombreux spectateurs, le récit de cette guerre doit apparaître très clair : le puissant Israël bombarde des Palestiniens sans défense. C’est compréhensible lorsque l’on ne voit presque aucune photographie des agresseurs palestiniens. (…) Ce n’est pas un détail. L’opinion publique est un élément crucial dans ce conflit. Elle va jouer un rôle pour déterminer quand les combats cesseront, à quoi ressemblera le cessez-le-feu et qui portera en priorité la responsabilité pour la mort d’innocents. Si les grands médias suppriment les images des terroristes du Hamas utilisant des civils comme des boucliers et utilisant des écoles et des hôpitaux comme des bases d’opérations, alors les gens autour du monde auront naturellement du mal à voir les Israéliens comme autre chose que des agresseurs et les Palestiniens comme autre chose que des victimes. Times of Israel
Les menaces du Hamas ne sont pas responsables de l’ignorance et de la stupidité de la couverture des hostilités à Gaza, mais elles sont en partie responsables. Les journalistes et les médias employeurs coopèrent avec le Hamas non seulement en passant sous silence des histoires qui ne servent pas la cause du Hamas, mais aussi en ne parlant pas des conditions restrictives dans lesquelles ils travaillent. Scott Johnson
Pourtant, le sionisme, sans doute plus que toute autre idéologie contemporaine, est diabolisé. « Tous les sionistes sont des cibles légitimes partout dans le monde! » énonce une bannière récemment brandie par des manifestants anti-Israël au Danemark. « Les chiens sont admis dans cet établissement, mais pas les sionistes, en aucune circonstance », prévient une pancarte à la fenêtre d’un café belge. On a dit à un manifestant juif en Islande : « Toi porc sioniste, je vais te couper la tête. »Dans certains milieux universitaires et médiatiques, le sionisme est synonyme de colonialisme et d’impérialisme. Les critiques d’extrême droite et gauche le comparent au racisme ou, pire, au nazisme. Et cela en Occident. Au Moyen-Orient, le sionisme est l’abomination ultime – le produit d’un Holocauste que beaucoup dans la région nient avoir jamais existé, ce qui ne les empêche pas de maintenir que les sionistes l’ont bien mérité. Qu’est-ce qui, dans ​​le sionisme, suscite un tel dégoût ? Après tout, le désir d’un peuple dispersé d’avoir son propre Etat ne peut être si révulsif, surtout sachant que ce même peuple a enduré des siècles de massacres et d’expulsions, qui ont atteint leur paroxysme dans le plus grand assassinat de masse de l’histoire. Peut-être la révulsion envers le sionisme découle-t-elle de sa mixture inhabituelle d’identité nationale, de religion et de fidélité à une terre. Le Japon s’en rapproche le plus, mais malgré son passé rapace, le nationalisme japonais ne suscite pas la révulsion provoquée par le sionisme. Il est clair que l’antisémitisme, dans ses versions européenne et musulmane, joue un rôle. Fauteurs de cabales, faucheurs d’argent, conquérants du monde et assassins de bébés – toutes ces diffamations autrefois jetées à la tête des Juifs le sont aujourd’hui à celle des sionistes. Et à l’image des capitalistes antisémites qui voyaient tous les Juifs comme des communistes et des communistes pour qui le capitalisme était intrinsèquement juif, les adversaires du sionisme le décrivent comme l’Autre abominable. Mais tous ces détracteurs sont des fanatiques, et certains parmi eux sont des Juifs. Pour un nombre croissant de Juifs progressistes, le sionisme est un nationalisme militant, tandis que pour de nombreux Juifs ultra-orthodoxes, ce mouvement n’est pas suffisamment pieux – voire même hérétique. Comment un idéal si universellement vilipendé peut-il conserver sa légitimité, ou même prétendre être un succès ? Michael Oren
To remember the historical milieu compels every sincere observer to admit that there is no necessary connection between al-Miraj and sovereign rights over Jerusalem since, in the time when the Prophet… consecrated the place with his footprints on the Stone, the City was not a part of the Islamic State – whose borders were then limited to the Arabian Peninsula – but under Byzantine administration. Moreover, although radical preachers try to remove this from exegesis, the Glorious Quran expressly recognizes that Jerusalem plays for the Jewish people the same role that Mecca has for Muslims. We read in Surah al-Baqarah: “…They would not follow thy direction of prayer (qiblah), nor art thou to follow their direction of prayer; nor indeed will they follow each other’s direction of prayer….” All Quranic annotators explain that « thy qiblah » is obviously the Kaabah of Mecca, while « their qiblah  » refers to the Temple Site in Jerusalem. To quote just one of the most important of them, we read in Qadi Baydawi’s Commentary : “Verily, in their prayers Jews orientate themselves toward the Rock (al-Sakhrah), while Christians orientate themselves eastwards….” As opposed to what sectarian radicals continuously claim, the Book that is a guide for those who abide by Islam—as we have just now shown—recognizes Jerusalem as Jewish direction of prayer…. After…deep reflection about the implications of this approach, it is not difficult to understand that separation in directions of prayer is a mean[s] to decrease possible rivalries in [the] management of [the] Holy Places. For those who receive from Allah the gift of equilibrium and the attitude to reconciliation, it should not be difficult to conclude that, as no one is willing to deny Muslims… complete sovereignty over Mecca, from an Islamic point of view… there is not any sound theological reason to deny an equal right of Jews over Jerusalem. Abdul-Hadi Palazzi (“Antizionism and Antisemitism in the Contemporary Islamic Milieu)
Affirming Israel’s « right to exist » is as unacceptable as denying that right, because even posing the question of whether or not the Children of Israel (Jews) — individually, collectively or nationally — have a « right to exist » is unacceptable. Israel exists by Divine Right, confirmed in both the Bible and Qur’an. I find in the Qur’an that God granted the Land of Israel to the Children of Israel and ordered them to settle therein (Qur’an, Sura 5:21) and that before the Last Day He will bring the Children of Israel to retake possession of their Land, gathering them from different countries and nations (Qu’ran, Sura 17:104). Consequently, as a Muslim who abides by the Qur’an, I believe that opposing the existence of the State of Israel means opposing a Divine decree. Every time Arabs fought against Israel they suffered humiliating defeats. In opposing the will of God by making war on Israel, Arabs were in effect making war on God Himself. They ignored the Qur’an, and God punished them. Now, having learned nothing from defeat after defeat, Arabs want to obtain through terror what they were unable to obtain through war: the destruction of the State of Israel. The result is quite predictable: as they have been defeated in the past, the Arabs will be defeated again. In 1919, Emir Feisal (leader of the Hashemite family, i.e., the leader of the family of the Prophet Muhammad) reached an Agreement with Chaim Weizmann for the creation of a Jewish State and an Arab Kingdom having the Jordan river as a border between them. Emir Feisal wrote, « We feel that the Arabs and Jews are cousins in race, having suffered similar oppressions at the hands of powers stronger than themselves, and by a happy coincidence have been able to take the first step towards the attainment of their national ideals together. The Arabs, especially the educated among us, look with the deepest sympathy on the Zionist movement. » In Feisal’s time, none claimed that accepting the creation of the State of Israel and befriending Zionism was against Islam. Even the Arab leaders who opposed the Feisal-Weizmann Agreement never resorted to an Islamic argument to condemn it. Unfortunately that Agreement was never implemented, since the British opposed the creation of the Arab Kingdom and chose to give sovereignty over Arabia to Ibn Sa’ud’s marauders, i.e., to the forefathers of the House of Sa’ud. When the Saudis started ruling an oil rich Kingdom, they also started investing a regular part of their wealth in spreading Wahhabism worldwide. Wahhabism is a totalitarian cult which stands for terror, massacre of civilians and for permanent war against Jews, Christians and non-Wahhabi Muslims. The influence of Wahhabism in the contemporary Arab world is such that many Arab Muslims are wrongly convinced that, in order to be a good Muslim, one must hate Israel and hope for its destruction. (…) The Bible says that God gave the Land of Israel as a heritage to the descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and gave the rest of the world as a heritage to other peoples. As confirmed by the Qur’an and Islamic tradition, Abraham himself bequeathed to his descendants from Isaac the Land of Israel, and bequeathed to his descendants from Ishmael other lands, such as the Arabian peninsula. Now descendants of Ishmael, the Arabs, have a gigantic territory extending from Morocco to Iraq. The descendants of Isaac, the Jews, on the contrary, only have a tiny, narrow strip of land. However, Arab dictators are not satisfied with their huge territory. They want more. They also want the little heritage of the Children of Israel, and resort to terror in order to get it. Sheikh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi (Director of the Cultural Institute of the Italian Islamic Community)
To win a war, one must identify who the enemy is and neutralize the enemy’s chain of command. World War Two was won when the German army was destroyed, Berlin was captured and Hitler removed from power. To win the War on Terror, it is necessary to understand that al-Qa’ida is a Saudi organization, created by the House of Sa’ud, funded with petro-dollar profits by the House of Sa’ud and used by the House of Sa’ud for acts of mass terror primarily against the West, and the rest of the world, as well. Consequently, to really win the War on Terror it is necessary for the U.S. to invade Saudi Arabia, capture King Abdallah and the other 1,500 princes who constitute the House of Sa’ud, to freeze their assets, to remove them from power, and to send them to Guantanamo for life imprisonment. Then it is necessary to replace the Saudi-Wahhabi terror-funding regime with a moderate, non-Wahhabi and pro-West regime, such as a Hashemite Sunni Muslim constitutional monarchy. Unless all this is done, the War on Terror will never be won. It is possible to destroy al-Qa’ida, to capture or execute Bin Laden, al-Zarqawi, al-Zawahiri, etc., but this will not end the War. After some years, Saudi princes will again start funding many similar terror organizations. The Saudi regime can only survive by increasing its support for terror. Saddam’s regime was one of the worst criminal dictatorships which existed in this world, and destroying it was surely a praiseworthy task for which, as a Muslim, I am thankful to President Bush, to the governments who joined the Coalition and to soldiers who fought in the field. Destroying the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and the regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq were surely praiseworthy tasks, but I regret that focusing on these secondary enemies was — for the White House — a way to obscure the role of the world’s main enemy: the Saudis. (…)  I am extremely disappointed with him. I hoped that — after Saudi terrorists attacked the U.S. on 9/11 — this would necessarily cause a radical revision in U.S.-Saudi relations. The first action a U.S. President had to do after such a criminal attack as 9/11 was to immediately outlaw Saudi-controlled institutions inside the U.S. and acknowledge that viewing Saudis as « friends » was a mortal sin representing sixty years of failed U.S. foreign and economic policy. U.S. governmental agencies have plenty of evidence about the role of the House of Sa’ud in funding the worldwide terror network. U.S. citizens can even read in newspapers that some days before the 9/11 attack Muhammad Atta received a check from the wife of the former Saudi Ambassador to Washington, Prince Bandar, but unbelievably this caused no consequences. Let us consider plain facts: the wife of a foreign ambassador pays terrorists for attacks which murder thousands of U.S. citizens, and the U.S. government not only does not declare war on that foreign country, in this case Saudi Arabia, but does not even terminate diplomatic relations with that country. On the contrary, then-Crown Prince Abdallah, the creator (together with the new Saudi ambassador to the United States, former Saudi ambassador to the United Kingdom, and Father of 9/11, Prince Turki al-Feisal) of al-Qa’ida, is immediately invited to Bush’s ranch as a honored guest, and Bush tells him, « You are our ally in the War on Terror »! Can one image FDR inviting Hitler to the United States and telling him, « You are our ally in the war against Fascism in Europe »? Something very similar happened after 9/11. As a matter of fact, the Saudis supported Bush’s electoral campaign for his first term in office, and asked him in exchange to be the first U.S. President to promote the creation of a Palestinian State. Once he was elected, Bush refused to abide by the agreement, and the consequence was 9/11. « We paid for your election, and now you must do want we want from you », this was the message behind the 9/11 attack. Bush immediately started doing what the Saudis wanted from him: compelling Israel to withdraw from Judea, Samaria and Gaza, in order to permit the creation of a PLO state. Western media speak of a « Road Map, » while Arab media call it by its real name: « Abdallah’s Plan. » One hears about a U.S. President who allegedly leads a « War on Terror » and promotes the spread of « democracy » and « freedom » in the Islamic world, but the reality shows a U.S. president who — after a Saudi terror attack against the U.S. — abides by a Saudi diktat, hides the role of the Saudi regime behind al-Qa’ida and wants Israel, the only democratic state in the Middle East, cut to pieces to facilitate the creation of another dictatorial regime, lead by Arafat deputy Abu Mazen, the terrorist who organized the mass murder of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. Theoretically, Bush proclaims his intention to punish terror and to spread democracy, but the Road Map is the exact opposite of all this: it means punishing the victims of terror and rewarding terrorists, compelling democracy to withdraw in order to create a new dictatorial Arab regime. For the U.S. there is only one single trustworthy ally in the entire Middle East: Israel. Now Bush is punishing America’s ally Israel to reward those who heartily supported « our brother Saddam », those who demonstrate by burning Stars and Strips flags and those who call America « the imperialist power controlled by Zionism ». In doing so, Bush seriously risks becoming the most anti-Israeli and anti-Jewish President in the history of the U.S. Sheikh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi (Director of the Cultural Institute of the Italian Islamic Community)
The failure of the Ottoman Empire to maintain and reform its financial and political policies in the face of changes in the international order in the nineteenth century led to the British occupation of Egypt in 1882 and was capped by its calamitous decision to ally itself with Germany in the First World War, when the Empire was ultimately consigned to oblivion. Some Muslims confronted modern challenges to traditional Islam by focusing on the distant past, the Golden Age of the Rightly Guided Caliphs (Rashidun), or the Salafs, (ancestors). Those who seek to emulate these ancestors are called Salafis, and their movement is often referred to in Arabic as the Salafiyyah, and its first major ideologue was the Egyptian Rashid Rida. Despite the lack of a political consensus among Palestinian Arabs about what form of government ought to be constituted following the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, officials administering the major Palestinian Islamic institutions in Jerusalem under the British Mandate to the present day have adhered to the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood inspired by Rida and articulated by the Hajj Amin al-Husseini and Hassan al-Banna in the 1930s. This continuity was masked throughout the periods of Hashemite and Israeli rule as the world’s focus was on the emergence of the secular nationalist Palestinian Liberation Organization and its associated rivals. From a minority position that emerged following the First World War in the Middle East, the claim that Palestine is waqf has been widely accepted in the Muslim discourse following the failures of the secularists to win the battle against Israel by the mid-1990s.
However, taking the larger view, which includes not only the municipality of Jerusalem, but the issue of settlements and Israeli “heritage sites” in East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza, and the entire course of the conflict, it is not only the Jerusalem municipality or Israel’s policies regarding the Palestinians which is to blame for the current impasse. The Palestinians’ continued willingness to support violent action against Israel, and their continued hope for a one state solution, has resulted, contrary to all reason, to support for HAMAS. Emboldened by its defeat of FATAH in Gaza in 2007, and backed by an extraordinarily aggressive Iran, the maximalists again are threatening to lead the Palestinian remnant to their complete destruction. All attempts to convince the Palestinians to abandon jihadist ideology have failed, despite the fact that the Arab world is ready to accommodate Israel in the current Middle Eastern state system. Recent calls for a bi-national, secular state instead of a two-state solution are distractions from the real issues at hand. Improving the living conditions of the Palestinian people, fostering the development of municipal and national government in Gaza and the West Bank, and fighting against Islamist opportunism are goals that can be achieved under the shadow of the Iranian threat. Only on the micro-level can political progress be made. The conflict has to become localized. Only by rejecting the regionalization of the political issues facing the Palestinian and Israeli conflict can the international threats on the macro-level be challenged. A paradigm shift is needed to thwart the Islamist threat to Israel. Below are concrete steps towards localizing the conflict and to reinvigorate the peace process that could break the cycle of despair now characterizing the region within the parameters of the Beillin-Abu Mazen plan of 1995. Immediate Steps Within the Realm of Realpolitik and Reason: Localize Conflict Management and Resolution 1. Establish embassies in West and East Jerusalem All states having diplomatic relations with Israel should immediately establish embassies in Israel and Palestine. Arab League states establish embassies in East and West Jerusalem. Use these embassies to kick start economic development and housing in various neighborhoods. 2. Latin Patriarchate, Greek Orthodox Patriarchate, and other Christian landowners in Palestine/Israel to cooperate by developing local community development boards. 3) UNESCO overseas restoration and preservation of Islamic monuments and archeological sites. Turkey to cooperate with Israel and Palestine with historical preservation projects. 4) Educational programs for Palestinian and Israeli students focusing on holy sites throughout the land. Educational institutions currently training tour guides to spearhead these efforts, emphasizing change and continuity over time. 5) Truth and Reconciliation commissions to document and memorialize history. Institutions of higher learning to cooperate with education ministries. 6) UNRWA to close refugee camps throughout the Middle East. Repatriate and reimburse Arab and Jewish refugees according to their wishes—return, compensation, or memorials—on a case-by-case basis. Judith Mendelsohn Rood

Attention: une abomination peut en cacher une autre !

Attaques d’écoles, attaques d’hôpitaux, massacres de femmes, massacres d’handicapés, massacres d’enfants …

Alors que ce qui devrait être la révélation ultime d’une perfidie et d’un détournement systématique (jusqu’au recours quasi-archaïque au sacrifice d’enfants !) des valeurs civilisées que l’opinion occidentale n’arrive même pas à imaginer …

Est en train de transformer sur la base d’une information tout aussi systématiquement tronquée par l’intimidation et les menaces constantes sur les journalistes

La seule véritable démocratie du Moyen-Orient en l’abomination des abominations …

Retour, avec une intéressante analyse de  Judith Mendelsohn Rood, sur le véritable programme d’une organisation …

Qui funeste et monstrueux fruit comme on le sait d’un pacte faustien entre Israël et les Saoudiens …

Se révèle être à la fois explicitement guerrière et terroriste …

Et maximaliste et totalitariste …

Ne réclamant rien de moins, au-delà de quelques trêves purement tactiques, que la suppression pure et simple de toute présence juive en Palestine …

HAMAS in the Context of the Historic Islamicization of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict
Judith Mendelsohn Rood

Academia

Judith Mendelsohn Rood, Ph.D. Department of History, Government, and Social Science Biola University

Abstract: Secular Palestinian nationalists and scholars have studied the emergence of the Islamic Resistance Movement, HAMAS, but few have paid attention to its characterization of Palestine as an Islamic waqf. Following Hamas’ successful ousting of Fatah from Gaza in 2006, Hamas has been gaining the upper hand in the West Bank and Jerusalem as well because of its continuation of armed resistance against Israel. Hamas’ political success must be understood as a success of the Muslim Brotherhood to repudiate the secular nationalist Palestinian movement. Should HAMAS’s position on land tenure in the Palestinian Authority, defined by the unfounded claim that all land in Palestine is waqf, new problems arise for the development of the secular Palestinian state and is already posing problems for individual municipalities on the West Bank. The ideologically driven Israeli policy in Jerusalem is again matched by ideological Islamist agenda. Introduction Palestinian scholar Nur Masalha has characterized HAMAS’s claim that Palestine is an Islamic waqf as “the main innovative idea” that the Islamic Resistance Movement has contributed to the Arab-Israel Conflict. However, to the contrary, the claim that all Palestine is waqf  has been the official position of the Muslim Palestinian political establishment since before the days of the British Mandate. This claim, however, does not fit with the theory or practice of Islamic land tenure during any other period in Muslim history.

I first presented a version of this paper on July 31, 2008 at William Carey International University. In July 2009 and March 2010 I interviewed a number of Bethlehem area residents about land tenure issues facing their municipalities. I wish to thank them for their insights and their help, but, because of the sensitivity of these situations, I will have to let them remain anonymous. Any mistakes are my own and no one else is responsible for them. I welcome comments and corrections: judith.rood@biola.edu.

The HAMAS charter refers to the land of Palestine as “waqf ” that is, set aside as an eternal charitable endowment for the Muslim community. This is exactly the concept that the infamous mufti of Jerusalem, al-Hajj Amin al-Husseini, used to oppose the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine at the time of the British Mandate, a policy that directly led to the Palestinian catastrophe of 1948. Thus, the HAMAS position that the land of Palestine is an irrevocable waqf is the same position held by the mufti  during the Mandate Period to outlaw Palestinian land sales to Jews, by the Jordanians from 1947-1967, by Palestinian secular nationalist groups, and by the Palestinian Authority today. Land sales to Jews are still defined as treason, and accused collaborators are punishable by death, a penalty often imposed extrajudicially. Moreover, this was the position of the Muslim effendiyat  (elite) of Jerusalem in the 19th century (they actually recognized that all of Palestine was not waqf, but consisted mostly of military land grants). The Ottoman authorities explicitly rejected their claim before the rise of political Zionism in order to encourage the growth of commerce in the region of Jerusalem. However, now that HAMAS has become the Islamic Republic of Iran’s newest proxy, the claim is more dangerous than ever before. In this article, we will dissect the issue by defining the geographical, legal, and economic meanings of the terms used by HAMAS in order to disprove them strictly on the grounds of Islamic law and government during the Ottoman period. The 1988 Hamas Charter asserts in Article 11: The Islamic Resistance Movement believes that the land of Palestine is an Islamic Waqf consecrated for future Moslem generations until Judgment Day. It, or any part of it, should not be squandered: it, or any part of it, should not be given up. Neither a single Arab country nor all Arab countries, neither any king or president, nor all the kings and presidents, neither any organization nor all of them, be they Palestinian or Arab, possess the right to do that. Palestine is an Islamic Waqf land consecrated for Moslem generations until Judgment Day. This being so, who could claim to have the right to represent Moslem generations till Judgment Day?

The failure of the Ottoman Empire to maintain and reform its financial and political policies in the face of changes in the international order in the nineteenth century led to the British occupation of Egypt in 1882 and was capped by its calamitous decision to ally itself with Germany in the First World War, when the Empire was ultimately consigned to oblivion. Some Muslims confronted modern challenges to traditional Islam by focusing on the distant past, the Golden Age of the Rightly Guided Caliphs (Rashidun), or the Salafs, (ancestors). Those who seek to emulate these ancestors are called Salafis, and their movement is often referred to in Arabic as the Salafiyyah, and its first major ideologue was the Egyptian Rashid Rida. Despite the lack of a political consensus among Palestinian Arabs about what form of government ought to be constituted following the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, officials administering the major Palestinian Islamic institutions in Jerusalem under the British Mandate to the present day have adhered to the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood inspired by Rida and articulated by the Hajj Amin al-Husseini and Hassan al-Banna in the 1930s. This continuity was masked throughout the periods of Hashemite and Israeli rule as the world’s focus was on the emergence of the secular nationalist Palestinian Liberation Organization and its associated rivals. From a minority position that emerged following the First World War in the Middle East, the claim that Palestine is waqf  has been widely accepted  in the Muslim discourse following the failures of the secularists to win the battle against Israel by the mid-1990s.

The Muslim link to Palestine is through Jerusalem, based upon the identity of the Dome of the Rock with the Night Journey and Ascension to Heaven of Muhammad, described in the Quran as happening only at the indeterminate “Furthest Mosque,” which traditionally has been identified with Jerusalem. The reason for the journey to the “Furthest Mosque” was for Muhammad to ascend to heaven to meet with Moses and the biblical prophets on the site of the Temple, where the
Sakinah (Arabic) or Shechina (Hebrew), (the Glory of God) had once rested. To the consternation of well-educated Muslims worldwide, officials in charge of the Islamic institutions in Jerusalem serving the Palestinian National Authority, established May 4, 1994, took the position of HAMAS even further, stating that the Temple of Solomon itself was not located in Jerusalem. Ikramah Sabri, the then mufti  of Jerusalem, said that “There is no evidence that Solomon’s Temple was in Jerusalem; probably it was in Bethlehem or in some other place.”

He was also quoted as saying: « There is not [even] the smallest indication of the existence of a Jewish temple on this place in the past. In the whole city, there is not even a single stone indicating Jewish history. » This  assertion was made despite the existence of a well-known pamphlet for tourists published in 1935 by the Islamic authorities themselves, pointing out that it is “beyond dispute” that the Dome of the Rock sits on the site of Solomon’s Temple. The issue was so provocative that the Shaykh of Al-Azhar, the head of Islam’s most venerable and greatest religious university, in an article entitled “Does Solomon’s Temple Exist Under the Current Al-Aksa Mosque in Jerusalem?” published in Al-Ahram, November 2, 2000, felt compelled to explain its importance to his people. Yasser Arafat echoed this claim repeatedly until his death, and FATAH officials have continued to do so to this day, in total agreement with HAMAS, in order to deny any Jewish claims to the holy site. In July, 2009 Avi Diskin, head of the Shin Bet (Israel Security Agency), told the Israeli cabinet that “Egyptian cleric Sheikh Youssef al-Qaradawi of the Muslim Brotherhood « had allocated some $25 million for the purchase of property and to build Hamas charitable institutions that would expand the group’s reach in Jerusalem. » This activity points to the importance of properly understanding the evidence in the Islamic law records relating to the historic role of the Islamic institutions in administering Islamic awaqf in practical and political terms in order to prove that such claims cannot be substantiated according to Islamic law.

I. The Conquest of the Arab Provinces and Ottoman Empire Land Tenure

According to Hamas’ charter, the Islamic claim to eternal sovereignty over “Palestine” resides in the very fact of the Islamic conquest. This is the law governing the land of Palestine in the Islamic Sharia (law) and the same goes for any land the Moslems have conquered by force, because during the times of (Islamic) conquests, the Moslems consecrated these lands to Moslem generations till the Day of Judgment. It happened like this: When the leaders of the Islamic armies conquered Syria and Iraq, they sent to the Caliph of the Moslems, Umar bin-el-Khatab, asking for his advice concerning the conquered land – whether they should divide it among the soldiers, or leave it for its owners, or what? After consultations and discussions between the Caliph of the Moslems, Omar bin-el-Khatab and companions of the Prophet, Allah bless him and grant him salvation, it was decided that the land should be left with its owners who could benefit by its fruit. As for the real ownership of the land and the land itself, it should be consecrated for Moslem generations till Judgment Day. Those who are on the land, are there only to benefit from its fruit. This Waqf remains as long as earth and heaven remain. Any procedure in contradiction to Islamic Sharia, where Palestine is concerned, is null and void. This understanding, however, is incorrect and cannot be justified according to Islamic law as it was practiced “in Palestine” under the Ottomans, and before them the Mamluks and the Ayyubids, stretching back to the conquests of Salah al-Din in 1187 and even to the peaceful submission to the third Caliph, Umar, of Jerusalem in 636 by the Patriarch Sophronious. One of the hallmarks of Salafi teaching, which is at the heart of the Muslim Brotherhood, is that since the previous regimes which have ruled the Muslim world were not truly Islamic, the history of their governance and laws cannot be held to have correctly followed the Shariah, and therefore cannot be used to determine proper Islamic policies. This willful amnesia was repudiated by the Ottomans during the Wahhabist rebellions in Arabia in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, but since the end of the First World War there has been no Muslim authority powerful enough to challenge the Salafists today, as we have learned since 9/11.

The Ottomans followed a well-articulated Sunni system of imperial land tenure based on the Levitical concept that asserts that God is the owner of the land, and the state and its subjects are but its possessors, who are to use of it justly for the benefit of its subjects. As such, the sovereign had the right to dispose of the land—to utilize it for its peoples’ benefit—as he saw fit within the administrative laws of the empire. The right of usufruct, as the scholars name it, is earned by properly using the property—keeping it productive—and ensuring that the state can tax its produce so that it will be able to sustain the safety and prosperity of its subjects. The root of Ottoman identification of Jerusalem with Mecca and Medina lay both in their status as the three holy cities of Islam and in their juridical status following the original Muslim conquest of Syria. At an assembly in the Syrian military camp at Jabiya in 637, the Caliph ‘Umar declared the lands which surrendered unconditionally to his armies as fay, (lands that would pay tribute to the central government, and which were to be held as a perpetual trust for all Muslims). Thus, Syria and Iraq were regarded as lands subject to the kharaj  (land tax assessed upon non-Muslim landholders). According to the Jabiya agreement, revenue from the conquered territories was to be collected and given to the central government, and those who had participated in the campaigns of expansion would be enrolled in the diwan  (imperial) registers. Those so enrolled would be entitled to fixed stipends and land grants. The lands were thus not divided and parceled out among the military, but instead were controlled directly by the central government. Muslims would not settle these lands and pay the ushr (land tax assessed on Muslim proprietors, i.e., the tithe): rather, the original inhabitants would remain on their property, but would pay the kharaj. Under Islamic law, fay lands were thus held by the state, but its use was left in the possession of their inhabitants, who paid tribute from the revenues of the land to the central treasury of the state. Over the course of time the population increasingly became Muslim. The distinction between Hijazi and Syrian Muslims blurred, and the Muslims of Syria began, in effect, to pay the kharaj  along with the non-Muslims because they lived on conquered lands worked by non-Muslims. When the Mamluk territories, encompassing the later Ottoman provinces of Sidon, Damascus, Aleppo, Baghdad, Basra, Mosul, Tripoli (Libyan), Bengazi, the Hijaz, and Yemen, were conquered by the Ottomans, they were exempted from paying the normal miri  (imperial land) taxes because of their status as kharaj  land, unlike the Hijaz and Basra, which were categorizied as provinces paying the ushr  tax.

The Ottomans, after their conquest of the Arab provinces and the creation of the Eyalet (Province) of Damascus during the years 1517-1520, recognized existing practices regarding the taxation of arable land in the Province of Damascus. In keeping with the Hanafi school of jurisprudence, upon their conquest of the Arab provinces, the Ottomans declared these conquered territories as belonging to the bayt mal al-muslimin  (the common treasury of the state), to be used for the benefit of all Muslims, and by extension, the dhimmis, or protected minorities living among them. As such, under the Ottomans, the conquered lands of Syria continued to be considered kharaj  lands whose usufruct could be granted or leased out in the name of the bayt al-mal  by the Sultan as imam (leader), of the Muslim community. The Ottomans organized the systems administering awqaf, timars  (military land grants), and iltizams/malikanes (tax farms) on the varying types of land that they conquered. The Ottomans also had a well-articulated system for administering trade, and all other forms of production and property, based upon the sixteenth century Siyasetname  (Administrative Law Code) of Sulayman the Magnificent. Devised by the brilliant Ebu Su’ud Effendi, the Shaykh al-Islam  (Chief Jurisconsult of the Empire) based upon the Shari’ah and the Qanun (administrative law), this code stipulated that land could be disposed of (in the legal sense of disposition or use) in three ways: it could be assigned as a grant in return for military service, it could be leased directly to cultivators, or it could be held in perpetual trust for the Muslim subjects of the empire as waqf. Many parcels of land throughout the Ottoman Empire’s Arab provinces were divided and subdivided into fractions, some of which were assigned as military estates and some of which were assigned as waqf, while other portions may have been private property or shared pasture land. The land tenure system was designed to prevent the permanent alienation of land from the state, with one single exception: the assignment of land by the Sultan to an individual as milk (private property). This property always would revert ultimately to the state upon the death of the owner and his descendants. During much of the Ottoman period, the city of Jerusalem was administered as a part of the Province of Damascus following the pattern of the classical timar  system—some land in Jerusalem’s hinterlands was granted to military officers in return for their service to the Sultan. Other lands, recognized as property held as waqf  by the Greek Orthodox Church (and a few others as well) under previous Muslim dynasties (the Ayyubids and the Mamluks), were integrated into the Ottoman administration. The city was the capital of the sanjaq  of Jabal al-Quds  (the administrative district of the mountains of Jerusalem). Other sanjaqs  of the southern part of the Provinces of Sidon and Damascus—Jabal Nablus, Gaza, Jaffa, Ramla, Lydda, Acre, Hebron, Sidon, Jenin, Tulkarem, Karak—were all tied to Jerusalem through the legal system, evidenced by documents regarding cases from these towns scattered throughout the Ottoman Islamic court registers. The sanjaq  of Jerusalem and the mountainous lands of the sanjaq of Nablus (Jabal Nablus) were distinguished geographically from what is called in the court registers « the land of Palestine » (ard filastin) encompassing the towns of Gaza, Ramla, and Lydda (Lod).

This distinction tallies with the description of Palestine given by Volney in the late eighteenth century, who described it as a geographical unit including all of the land « between theMediterranean to the West and the chain of mountains to the East, and two lines, one drawnto the South, by Khan Younes, and the other to the North, between Kaisaria [Caesarea] andthe rivulet of Yafa [Jaffa]. » He noted that Palestine was « almost entirely a level plain, without either river or rivulet in summer, but watered by several torrents in winter » and thatit was « a district independent of every pashalic [sanjaq ], » which occasionally had « governorsof its own, who reside at Gaza under the title of Pashas; but it is usually, as at present,divided into three appanages, or melkana, viz. Yafa, Loudd [Lydda/Lod] and Gaza.” Thus, the term ard filastin, « the land of Palestine, » was used during the Ottoman period to refer specifically to a geographical area in agricultural use and divided into taxfarms, whether administered as independent sanjaqs or attached to adjacent sanjaqsHistorically this land was controlled directly by the central government in Istanbul by leasing it to Ottoman officers. In the period before the invasion, ‘Abdullah Pasha, governor of Sidon, obtained the lease. The important point here is that a significant portion of the richagricultural lands identified in the Islamic court records dating from the Ottoman period as“Palestine” were not attached to the imperial awqaf of Jerusalem, and thus were not administered by the notables of the city representing the Ottoman government, but directlyby the Ottoman government in Istanbul. To the south lay Hebron, sometimes nominally apart of the sanjaq of Jerusalem, but in fact a rebellious and nearly autonomous town with apowerful and militant leadership of its own.In Jerusalem, the Ottomans administered Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of theRock together with the Waqf of the Two Noble Sanctuaries of Mecca and Medina (al- Haramayn al-Sharifayn ). This admininstrative feature explains the relative unimportance of Jerusalem in the Ottoman Empire. Since the three cities were organized for purposes ofrevenue as one institution, and since the Ottomans placed a higher degree of importance on Mecca and Medina, Jerusalem was overshadowed in an institutional sense. Nevertheless, its rank as the third holiest city did confer status and important privileges to the ulama (learned authorities) who served as administrators of the imperial awqaf  there. One of the most important posts in the city was the shaykh al-haram, (the superintendent of the Dome of theRock and Al-Aqsa). Moreover, al-Aqsa had its own waqf, as did other mosques, tombs,schools, hospices, etc., which received revenues from many shops, agricultural lands, andother income-producing urban and rural properties throughout Bilad al-Sham which were dedicated and assigned to them. In the sixteenth century, the wife of Sulayman the Magnificent, originally a Christian from somewhere in the Russian Empire, endowed the Khasseki Sultan imaret (foundation, waqf ) with Greek Orthodox church properties in the vicinity of Bethlehem, Lydda andRamla. The Palestinian National Authority still recognizes this fact, and the Christian tenantsand sharecroppers who have resided on these lands still are not the legal landowners. Thefinancial support of the Holy Cities, and the annual hajj pilgrimage, obviously were not solelya Palestinian responsibility. Financial obligations were imposed not only on towns and villages in the administrative districts of Jerusalem, Nablus, and Hebron, but also on othercities throughout the empire, including Damascus, Aleppo and cities in Anatolia and theBalkans. The Waqf of Sayyidna Ibrahim al-Khalil (Abraham, the Beloved Friend of God, as heis known to Muslims) located in Hebron, and known in the West as the Tomb of thePatriarchs, held claim to the revenues of many southern Palestinian villages and agriculturallands and was administered as a part of the other important imperial awqaf. Peasants livingon lands dedicated to the support of these awqaf were among those exempted from paying the miri (imperial land tax, or kharaj )—instead, they paid to support the Hajj and theHaramayn awqaf. For example, taxes (payable in kind) were assessed on land held as awqaf by the Greek Orthodox church in Bethlehem and its neighboring villages throughout thedistrict of Jerusalem. Such lands—and this means most of the arable lands in Bethlehem, for example— are still categorized in this manner to this day. This fact has the Christians livingin these regions are literally caught between a rock and a hard place today—their village lands are still categorized as waqf with double ownership: the Greek Orthodox Church, which is the owner of the use of the property and the property itself, and the KhassekiSultan Waqf, which claims a share of the produce of the land. This complicated situation hasallowed the Israelis to confiscate what they call abandoned state lands in the West Bank, which in the past were administered by the Porte, and by Hamas, which now claims allproperty is waqf, belonging to the Muslim community.

The sharecroppers and tenants who worked these lands never received the “tapu” registration required for private land under the Ottoman Land Law of 1858 because these lands were waqf. Moreover, unworked land lapsed after three years into the category of mawat, (waste lands), which the Israelis also claim to have the right to confiscate, as againstthe HAMAS claim that all land in Palestine belongs to the Muslim community as waqf, no matter its condition. Under Ottoman law, to the contrary, a tenant who brought dead landsinto cultivation could claim it as mulk, or freehold land. And if there was a time of politicalinstability, peasants could leave the region until calm was restored within three years withoutlosing their claim to land that they had improved. None of these laws is still in effect today.Some two-thirds of the actual sum of the jizya (per capital poll tax on non-Muslim dhimmis ) revenues collected in the district of Jerusalem in the first half of the nineteenth century ended up in the hands of the provincial governor of Damascus, who at the time also served as the amir al ! hajj, the commander of the hajj caravan from that city. It followed thatthe Porte would entrust this official with the collection and disbursement of the  jizya. Inother words, under the Ottomans, taxes paid by Jews and Christians in Jerusalem and itsenvirons actually were sent outside of their territories to support the pilgrimage caravan tothe Muslim Holy Cities in the Hijaz and the Haramayn Waqf  Jerusalem, governed within the framework of Ottoman provincial administration,derived its status, then, from Muslim land law, but was not identified with Palestine underOttoman rule. During the period of Sultan Mahmud II’s reforms in the 1820s, theOttomans explicitly identified the Muslim sanctuary in the city of Jerusalem, and itsimportant imperial awqaf, with the exempted Sharifate (the Office of the Descendants of theProphet) of Mecca and Medina (known to the Ottomans and other Muslims as the Haramayn (the Two Sanctuaries). Unlike current Palestinian usage of the term, during the Ottoman period « haramayn  » did not refer to the al-Aqsa Mosque and Dome of the Rock, or to thebuildings of the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem and the Tomb of Ibrahim al-Khalil (Cave ofMachpelah) in Hebron, each of which had their own awqaf in addition to becoming attached to the Haramayn waqf during the centralization of religious institutions under a new ministryby the Ottomans in the nineteenth century. The term traditionally had a specific meaning to Muslims, including the Ottomans: itreferred only to the Holy Cities of the Hijaz. Jerusalem was called « thalith al-haramayn, » (the third after the Two Holy Places). When, near the end of his life in 1566, Sulayman theMagnificent dedicated additional revenues and produce from throughout Bilad al-Sham (theSyrian Provinces of the Ottoman Empire) in support of the Khasseki Sultan Waqf (The Endowment of His Beloved Wife), for example, one of the titles he used to describe himself was « khadim al-Haramayn  » “Servant of the Two Holy Cities,” referring to the Holy Cities of  Mecca and Medina.

Indeed, this relationship was manifested in the special fiscal relationship of Jerusalem with the Haramayn that was central to Ottoman administration of the city, particularly during the reform period of Mahmud II, all the way up to the Turkish defeat in the First World War in 1917 and the abolition of the Ottoman Caliphate on March 3, 1924. Therefore, what was actually “waqf” were some lands scattered, throughout the empire: some of which belonged to the Greek Orthodox Church, which had to pay the jizya and kharaj taxes on lands it leased to peasants to work. These individuals had to pay taxes, including a land tax as a portion of the produce to support the waqf which funded the Hajj Pilgrimage and the four Muslim sanctuaries of Mecca, Medina, Jerusalem, and Hebron. “Palestine” therefore was most definitely NOT a waqf under Islamic or Ottoman law. It was governed completely separately under the military land grant system and its lands were leased as iltizam/malikane (tax-farms).

II. Awqaf Under Ottoman Control

Under Islamic law, a waqf is a legal entity, comprising land or property whose revenues are set aside to benefit the entire Muslim community and its non-Muslim inhabitants who were considered as having joined the ummah by agreeing to accept Islamic rule. It has long been thought that this stipulation meant that such trusts were endowed for charitable purposes, and that it was the charitable purpose of such awqaf which made them valid and sound under Islamic and Ottoman law. However, that is not the case. A valid Islamic waqf, the waqf sahih, came to mean an endowment that is made from lands that pay the ushr or kharaj tax. The meaning of the waqf in the Ottoman context is that such lands can never be permanently alienated from the central treasury of the Islamic state— bayt mal al- muslimin. Property and land so endowed thus became in essence inalienable, removed from legal transfer, as church property is in the West. Since the ownership of such property ultimately belongs to God, only the use of the property, and the produce and revenues that it yields can be allotted to the beneficiaries of the waqf. The logic of this arrangement is based on the Islamic notion of the common good of the people residing in a just state, whose resources are exploited and protected for the benefit of all Muslims. In the mid-1820s, Sultan Mahmud II began to implement reforms in waqf administration throughout the empire. He sought to reassert direct state control over all awqaf in the empire, based upon the formal recognition of the previously uncodified, but inherent distinction between canonically valid and invalid awqaf. This distinction was always inherent in the Ottoman system: Mahmud formalized it in order to reassert control of all miri—state lands in the empire. From this period onward, under Ottoman law, there were two officially recognized forms of awqaf: waqf sahih (the valid waqf) and the waqf ghayr sahih (invalid waqf). Valid awqaf were made from lands paying the kharaj and the ushr, and thus were located in Syria, Iraq, and the Hijaz. Invalid endowments, however, reassigned revenues due to the treasury ostensibly for some religious or charitable purpose or a specific purpose by which awqaf could legitimately be established. There were three types of the « invalid » awqaf accepted by the Ottomans until 1825. The first type allowed the revenues of land to be made waqf, while the substance of the land, and its right of use and possession, were kept by the treasury; the second, the right of use is given as waqf, while the substance and revenues remain with the treasury; and the third type assigned both possession and revenue to the waqf, while the substance remains with the treasury. Under Ottoman administrative law after 1826, all awqaf not falling under the category of sahih were deemed invalid, since they were established upon land that had been alienated at some point from imperial lands. It is often thought that charitable and religious trusts were valid because they were established for ostensibly religious or charitable purposes. However, this is a misplaced assumption that has caused great confusion in the interpretation of the institution of the waqf in the Ottoman period. What is important is not the purpose of the waqf, nor the type of possession, but the nature of the land in the Ottoman system of land tenure. These reforms reiterated that the lands of Syria, including the sanjaq of Jerusalem, Nablus, and Sidon were not waqf.

That this was the clear situation is the Ottoman response to a request made on 28 May 28, 1837 recorded in the registers of the Islamic court in Jerusalem. The governing council (majlis) of Jerusalem asserted in a petition asking the Sultan to bar a group of Ashkenazi Jews from conducting trade in the city because “the lands of this region are miri and waqf.” The Muslim authorities of the city clearly understood that the land in the region was state land, and that some of it had been set aside as waqf. This request the Porte denied. Indeed, in other cases, the Porte ruled that foreigners could purchase waqf property in order to restore it to productivity and usefulness. When the Ottoman Empire disintegrated and the Turks surrendered and withdrew from its Arab provinces, the Muslim community no longer had a Muslim sovereign whose legitimacy they accepted as the ultimate authority to decide political questions. When the Ottoman Caliphate was abolished, the problem of sovereignty thus became the basic political issue facing Muslims: should Islamic control be restored over the former Arab provinces, and if so, how should it be constituted? The Turkish defeat led to the de facto separation of the Palestinian, Syrian and Hijazi elements of the Haramayn Waqf. Thereafter, the term in Palestinian usage came to mean first, Jerusalem and Hebron, referring to the two sanctuaries—Al-Aqsa and Sayyidna Khalil. After 1948, when Hebron went under Hashemite sovereignty, the term “Haramayn” came to refer to the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock.

III. Enter The Muslim Brotherhood 
The Muslim Brotherhood is a modern ideological movement that was founded inEgypt in 1928. Ideologically it was shaped by the anti-colonialism and anti-imperialism inEgypt and the Middle East generally, and by the Arab-Jewish conflict in mandatory Palestine specifically. The Muslim Brotherhood has long been the most important of the Sunniopposition groups in the Arab world. Its aim is to reestablish the Caliphate and to governaccording to the Shariah. While legal in Transjordan and then Jordan, it has been banned inEgypt and Syria, where it threatens to overthrow the current regimes. Violent splintergroups of the Brotherhood have arisen worldwide. Rashid Rida, Hassan al-Banna, andSayyid Qutb are the chief ideologues of the movement. They sought to create a vanguard tooppose the secularization of Islamic society, which they thought was accelerated through theintroduction of imperialism, capitalism, Zionism, socialism, and communism in the periodleading up to the First World War. The Salafi Movement, and therefore the Muslim Brotherhood rejects all Muslimregimes since the death of ‘Ali as illegitimate and un-Islamic, and of all of these, considersthe Ottoman Empire the most illegitimate. The Wahhabi doctrine has been at the heart ofSaudi Arabian identity since its first irruption in 1740 when they rejected the legitimacy ofthe Ottoman Empire. The Arabs remember Turkish rule as a time of oppression andsubjugation. Arab nationalist animosity regarding the historic legacy of the Ottomans burnshot to this day: from this perspective, the Ottoman defeat was at once a judgment on the Turks and a challenge to the Arabs, who struggled between the various ideological options available to them in the period between the world wars and thereafter. The entire twentiethcentury framed the failures of all of their ideological movements to solve the politicaldilemmas posed to the Arabs by the fall of the Ottoman Empire. The Saudis and the Hashemite Jordanians competed for most of the last centuryover which dynasty could legitimately claim to be the rightful guardian of the Islamic HolyCities: Mecca, Medina, and Jerusalem. The impact of this competition was to furtherfragment the Arab Muslim political consensus over the fate of the lands entrusted by theLeague of Nations to the British in the form of a mandate to govern the region until itsinhabitants were ready for self-governance. When King Hussein ultimately relinquished hisclaims to the West Bank and Jerusalem in 1988, leaving the PLO to administer their Islamicinstitutions, Yasser Arafat actually had to make dual appointments of key Islamic positions.Both Jordanian- and Saudi-approved officials initially served the Palestinian National Authority, since the PLO needed to assuage both powers in order to continue to receivetheir financial—and political support. Only when it became clear that Arafat had thrown inhis lot with the Iranians during the Karina incident in the midst of the Al-Aqsa Intifada didboth Saudi Arabia and Jordan abandon the PA. Since Arafat’s death, both Saudi Arabia and Jordan have been cooperating with the PA in order to attempt to rein in HAMAS and keep Iran out. They have not succeeded.
IV. The Islamicization of the Palestinian Resistance 
The British, who invented a status quo in Palestine by creating de novo an Islamic administration in Palestine by placing in the office of the “mufti” Hajj Amin al-Hussayni, who engineered the policies that generated the dominant, and most radical, Arab response toZionism. His fingerprints are all over the Islamic administration in Jerusalem even today. The fact that the mufti’s religious polemic led to the Nakba, the catastrophic Arab defeat in 1948, was precisely the reason that the Palestinian liberation movement reframed its opposition to Israel in terms of secular Arab nationalism. The Islamicization of the Palestinian resistance to Zionism began with the British creation of the office of “Grand Mufti” in 1918 and the appointment of Hajj Amin as muftiin 1922. Traditionally, a mufti is a religious authority, or jurisconsult, who issues decisionsrelating to Islamic law. Under the British Mandate, for the first time the mufti became thehighest Muslim official in Palestine. He was also named president of the newly createdSupreme Muslim Council, becoming the officially recognized religious and political leader ofthe Palestinian Arabs. The fact that the mufti and his policies were opposed by the majorityof the Palestinian Arabs for many different reasons, including those who took exception to his interpretation of Islam and Zionism, has emerged in Palestinian and Zionist historiography only recently. Hajj Amin, whose influence on Palestinian political culture remains profound to thisday, was deeply influenced by Rashid Rida, the leading Islamist teacher when he was a youngman. As a soldier in the Ottoman army he was stationed in Smyrna where he witnessed the Turkish extermination of the Armenians, an event that left him deeply impressed by Turkishracial nationalism. He traveled to Damascus to support Faisal, who had declared an Arabstate in Syria only to be expelled by France. On Amin’s return to Palestine in 1921 he soonbecame involved in riots against the Balfour Declaration and Jewish immigration. Hebecame a fugitive from British justice for his radical politics, but then was neverthelesspardoned, and placed in control of all former Ottoman awqaf properties and the Islamiccourt bureaucracy in Jerusalem and throughout Palestine by Herbert Samuel, the High Commissioner of the British Mandate. The mufti, however, had had no Islamic religioustraining or certification as a member of the ulama, the Muslim officials trained and authorized to make religious decisions in the Islamic world. At first, the mufti may have been hopeful that the British would treat the Arabs in Palestine fairly. While he was working on building an Arab Islamic university in the Mamilla district in West Jerusalem adjacent to the site of a Muslim cemetery in the late ‘20s, he worked with Jewish architects and construction crews to build the Palace Hotel, which he envisioned as a business whose profits would fund the university. The cemetery actually extended further than was then known, as the builders discovered when they began excavating to lay the foundation of the new hotel. The mufti sought to change the purpose of the waqf, endowed by Salah al-Din after his siege of the city in 1187 in order to build the campus, including the hotel. Thus, despite the fact that he worked closely with Jews while he was leading the Arab Higher Committee’s building program, early on his attitude towards them changed. He also rejected and dissolved the secular-nationalist Moslem-Christian Associations and began emphasizing the idea that the Palestine was waqf   —the possession of the Muslim ummah in perpetuity. In the absence of Muslim sovereignty during the Mandate, he merged the idea of waqf, the kind of property that the Muslim authorities had administered before 1917, with the idea of state land (timar), a factor in 1837 but no longer.

Amin began collaborating with Hassan al-Banna, considered the father of the MuslimBrotherhood, in 1935. The mufti thus articulated the idea that Palestine itself is a “waqf” sometime between 1929, when the Palace Hotel opened, and 1935, when they founded theMuslim Brotherhood in support of the Arab Higher Committee’s opposition to Zionism. Hajj Amin was able to rally a force of about two thousand Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood volunteers who fought in the Negev against the nascent Israeli state, and to field a Palestinian militia under the leadership of Qassam al-Ahmad, who was killed at Qastel and who has become the eponymous inspiration for the armed brigade of Hamas today. Following the Mandate Period, the administration of Muslim institutions in Palestine shifted to the Transjordanian Ministry of Religious Foundations. Transjordan had de facto sovereignty over al-Haram al-Sharif  (aka the Temple Mount) and paid the salaries of the Muslim officials employed in the Islamic court. The Muslim Brotherhood became the channel for Salafi ideas during this time. Outlawed for decades in Egypt and Syria, after1948 clandestine cells operated in Muslim towns and villages in the West Bank and Gaza under Jordanian rule, even when the cells in Egypt and Syria were practically wiped out. However, as a result of the 1948 war, Transjordan took possession of the Temple Mount and the administration of waqf properties and the Islamic courts in the West Bank as protector and guardian of the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem and Haram al-Khalil in Hebron in 1950. Thus the Hashemite dynasty administered the Islamic institutions in Jerusalem until1988, when King Hussein relinquished his sovereign claim to the Palestinian National Authority. In 1964, President Gamal abd al-Nasser, Egypt, created the Palestinian Liberation Organization to fight a guerilla war against Israel. The PLO’s Muslim leadership included 

members of the Muslim Brotherhood, but the majority were secular nationalists, many of whom were nominal Christians. For the next thirty years, the PLO waged battle ostensibly with the support of the majority of all Palestinians, and, although the corruption and authoritarian nature of Arafat’s rule became well-known, they were willing to overlook his flaws in order to present a unified front against Israel, to share in his increasing power and international status, and to hold onto some sense of dignity. Egypt took over the Gaza Stripin 1948 using what Nasser claimed was the “State of Palestine” to infiltrate groups of Palestinian fighters into Israel until his ignominious defeat in 1967. In the 1970s and early 80s, Israel permitted Saudi Arabia to fund an alternative group of Muslim administrators and officials, which eventually led to the establishment of the Islamic Resistance Movement, HAMAS, as the Gazan branch of the Muslim Brotherhood.

 HAMAS emerged as an alternative to the failed policies of the Palestinian LiberationOrganization, FATAH in the late 1980s. For the employees of the court, like manyPalestinian Muslims, many of whom were sympathetic to, if not members of the MuslimBrotherhood, this was an exciting development, an opportunity for those who had remainedunder Israeli occupation to regain some of the power that the “outsiders” –the PLO—hadasserted over them, the “insiders” who had steadfastly endured under the Israeli“occupation.” Discussions surrounding the disposition of Saudi Arabian charity from the PLO via SAMED—the “Steadfastness Fund” which provided social services to the Palestinian poor, widows, and orphans, and the sick—to the nascent HAMAS organization were intense. SAMED: Palestinian Martyrs Works Society – established in 1970 to provide vocational training to the children of Palestinian martyrs; played an important role – in the1970s and 1980s, and especially during the First Intifada – in the economic and social welfare infrastructure of the Palestinian communities. The emergence of HAMAS in the mid-1980s resulted from a Faustian bargain the Israelis made with the Saudis, allowing them to build mosques and provide social servicesthrough funds and personnel as a counterbalance to the PLO. Some people even suspectthat an Israeli agent helped to name the movement—pronounced in Hebrew as “

KHamas,” which means “terror” –to make the message clear. Dividing the Palestinians along ideological lines certainly has been advantageous to those Israelis and Palestinians who oppose negotiating a settlement. The homicide bombings and their inevitable reprisals have made Palestinians and Israelis pay a heavy price for this political decision. The resulting polarization has hastened the re-Islamicization of Palestinian society. It has also prevented the PLO from achieving any tangible political goals and reignited virulent anti-Semitism.Popular Palestinian frustration with the corrupt and ineffective PLO, exiled into seeming oblivion in Tunis in 1982, particularly in the years before the First Intifada of the Stones (1987-2002), enabled HAMAS to emerge in 1986 as the most robust political rival to the PLO.

On July 28, 1988 King Hussein of Jordan relinquished the Hashemite claim to Jerusalem, as well as the right to govern the West Bank or the Palestinians. The Islamic court employees were now to be paid by the PLO, preparing the way for the Palestinian National Authority, led by the PLO, to take over the administration of Islamic institutions in Jerusalem. Weakened by the war in Lebanon, its Tunisian exile, and the fall of the SovietUnion in 1989 the PLO committed itself to the peace process just as HAMAS began to emerge as a political force. Meanwhile, during the Iraq War of 1990, Arafat had thrown his support behind Saddam Hussein, thereby incurring the wrath of Saudi Arabia. After a short period of time, during which there were two parallel groups of Muslim officials in the PNA, one Jordanian-trained and one Saudi-trained, the Palestinians chose the Saudis in order to placate them. These developments solidified the position of HAMAS in Palestinian Islamic institutions, and explain the intricate connections between FATAH/PNA and HAMAS during the al- Aqsa Intifada in the early 2000s. What the Israelis did not expect was the cooptation of the Islamists by the PLO, which lasted until the death of Arafat. The Al-Aqsa Intifada of 2000 was characterized by a vicious cycle of suicide bombings and Israeli reprisals, which, along with the corruption and tyranny of Arafat, destroyed law and order in the territories. With his passing, the time had come for HAMAS to challenge its “brother” resistance movement by leveraging Iranian support via Syria. The resulting complete breakdown of civil society in Palestine was the tragic legacy of the Oslo Peace Process. Eventually, to the horror of Palestinian moderates who supported a two-state agreement with Israel, including many members of the PLO, an overwhelming majority democratically elected HAMAS to power in Gaza January 6, 2006. Under the shadow of an increasingly belligerent Iran, a belated, and failed, Saudi attempt to forge a moderate coalition of the PLO and HAMAS was followed by the brutal expulsion of the PLO from Gaza on June 15, 2007. HAMAS is now completely under the control of Tehran, according to former Palestinian Foreign Minister Ziyad Abu Amr, the Palestinian scholar-diplomat who failed to convince HAMAS to recognize Israel and engage in diplomacy under the aegis of Saudi Arabia.

 The ideology that has driven Israeli policy in Jerusalem and the West Bank for more than four decades, especially the suppression of the emergence of municipal self-government in the Arab villages of East Jerusalem and the neglect of the Arab inhabitants in the Occupied Territories, has undermined moderate Palestinians who sought a negotiated peace. The Second Intifada resulted in the breakdown of Palestinian society, including its legal,political, and social institutions. The violence of the Israeli response has radicalized the Palestinians even more, because the deaths of many innocent victims—family members, friends, and neighbors—who now include everyone in Gaza— are indelibly imprinted inPalestinian minds. The re-Islamicization of the conflict, enabled by the belief that their only alternative is armed struggle is almost universal among both Muslim and Christian Palestinians that I spoke with during my most recent trip to Bethlehem. The first, theIntifada of the Stones, began as a non-violent tax revolt in Bethlehem soon turned violent when Islamists took control of the narrative. The catastrophic Islamist Al-Aqsa Intifada,characterized by the collaboration of the PLO with HAMAS, has just barely been quelled on the West Bank, where the PNA is achieving a semblance of law and order. However, the foreboding calls for “Days of Rage” called for by members of the Palestinian cabinet illustrate how easily the current campaign of non-violence could easily dissolve into another armed uprising. However, there is another dimension to this situation.
Since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 and the “Nakba” (“Catastrophe”) in which 600,000 Christian and Muslim Arabs lost their homes, the Palestinian national movement was basically secular. It is still politically incorrect to focus on sectarian identities in discussing Palestinian politics, primarily because Palestinian Christians desire to be understood as in fraternal solidarity with Muslim Palestinians against Zionism. The ahistorical claim that Palestine is waqf  however, now represents a very real threat to the historically Christian communities on the West Bank and in Jerusalem. In March 2010, Palestinian activists are resurrecting the 1970s/80s concept of “sumud” (“solidarity”) to frame the third, ostensibly non-violent, “Al-Quds” (“Jerusalem”) Intifada, which has been called in the wake of Israeli settlement projects in East Jerusalem. As Asma Afsarrudin, Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the University of Notre Dame has rightly asserted, …although the system of dhimma (literally, protection) extended to Jews and Christians was considered sufficiently humane in pre-Modern Muslim societies, today it would rightly be considered as plainly discriminatory and unjust within the modern state system, which defines citizenship not by faith but on the basis of birthplace and residence. This view, however, is under direct attack by HAMAS, which seeks to establish an Islamic state governed by Islamic law. Following the April 2, 2002 takeover of the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem by the al-Aqsa Martyr’s Brigade/Tanzim and the punitive Israeli attacks on that town during the duration of the Al-Aqsa Intifada, the position of moderates in the West Bank became extremely tenuous. With the takeover of HAMAS in Gaza, the situation deteriorated completely. And, as Benny Morris argues, the maximalist Muslim position, that all Palestine is waqf, is at its heart the same jihadist position that has characterized Arab opposition to Israel all along.

V. Alternative Interpretations

War between Muslims and Jews is not inevitable. Muslim moderates are challenging the ideologically-driven Islamist apologetic against Israel. The most important one is Imam Abdul-Hadi Palazzi, Secretary-General of the Italian Muslim Association and Director of the Institute of the Italian Islamic Community, who has been calling for a revitalization of traditional Sunni Islam. He has taken aim at the historical amnesia of the Islamist movement.

In his response to the 2001 statement made by the mufti of Jerusalem denying Jewish ties to the Haram al-Sharif, Palazzi wrote that Sabri “is representative of those [Muslims] who repudiate “… the Jewish heritage [of Islam] as a whole, with the clear attempt even to remove it from historical memory.” Muslims are so ignorant of their own history that they are “really inclined to take these words for granted, notwithstanding the fact that they contradict both historical evidence and Islamic sources.” He argues against the Salafi claim that Palestine is an Islamic waqf by revisiting the issues surrounding the Night Journey. To remember the historical milieu compels every sincere observer to admit that there is no necessary connection between al-Miraj and sovereign rights over Jerusalem since, in the time when the Prophet… consecrated the place with his footprints on the Stone, the City was not a part of the Islamic State – whose borders were then limited to the Arabian Peninsula – but under Byzantine administration. Moreover, although radical preachers try to remove this from exegesis, the Glorious Quran expressly recognizes that Jerusalem plays for the Jewish people the same role that Mecca has for Muslims. We read in Surah al-Baqarah: “…They would not follow thy direction of prayer (qiblah), nor art thou to follow their direction of prayer; nor indeed will they follow each other’s direction of prayer….” All Quranic annotators explain that « thy qiblah » is obviously the Kaabah of Mecca, while « their qiblah » refers to the Temple Site in Jerusalem. To quote just one of the most important of them, we read in Qadi Baydawi’s Commentary: “Verily, in their prayers Jews orientate themselves toward the Rock (al-Sakhrah), while Christians orientate themselves eastwards….” Palazzi concludes that the Quran reveals the Jewish connection with Jerusalem. As opposed to what sectarian radicals continuously claim, the Book that is a guide for those who abide by Islam—as we have just now shown—recognizes Jerusalem as Jewish direction of prayer…. After…deep reflection about the implications of this approach, it is not difficult to understand that separation in directions of prayer is a mean[s] to decrease possible rivalries in [the] management of [the] Holy Places. For those who receive from Allah the gift of equilibrium and the attitude to reconciliation, it should not be difficult to conclude that, as no one is willing to deny Muslims…complete sovereignty over Mecca, from an Islamic point of view… there is not any sound theological reason to deny an equal right of Jews over Jerusalem. Other Muslims are challenging the HAMAS/Muslim Brotherhood’s doctrines on Israel to show that the Qur’an recognizes that God has given the Jews Jerusalem as an eternal bequest.

There is an alternative Muslim narrative regarding the Jews and the Muslims of these small settler enclaves is to proclaim Jewish superiority everywhere, while disrupting the tissue of co-existence that depends on leaving Palestinians spaces of their own. Israelis often protest Palestinian complaints that Israel really doesn’t want peace. Wahrman helps us to see why the Palestinians believe this. In every case the government and the municipality – currently run by a right-wing mayor, Nir Barkat, who seems all too eager to stoke any fire that comes his way – put forth arguments that supposedly justify the invasion. Some are legal arguments about ownership, sometimes going back eighty years (as in the case of Sheikh Jarrah) and sometimes based on a recent purchase (as in the case of the Shepherd Hotel). Some are historical arguments, mobilizing traditional Jewish associations of those particular spots – partly true, partly invented or stretched – to buttress a claim from times immemorial. But the goal, the methods, and the consequences are always the same: an intrusive encroachment into Palestinian space, eyesore houses emblazoned with Israeli flags, aggressive settlers that often seek confrontation with the neighboring Palestinians, and a permanent disruptive presence of Israeli military and police that inevitably follow the settlers. That the legal argument is but a veneer is demonstrated by the fact that ever since the incongruous high-rise intrusion into the Palestinian village of Silwan, named by the settlers “Yehonatan House,” was declared by Israeli courts illegal and due for immediate demolition, Jerusalem’s mayor has openly defied this ruling. Wahrman writes, “In terms of sheer damage to co-existence in a complicated city, therefore, twenty units in Sheikh Jarrah sow more immediate hatred than 1600 units in Ramat Shlomo.” And he is right. The propoganda value of such policies is great. Last fall, the Holy Land Christian Ecumenical Foundation invited a 16-year old Muslim girl whose entire family had been evicted from their home and was now living in the street to speak at a conference on Arab-Jewish relations. They young girl described in great detail how she and her family lived their lives day-to-day, trying to go to school and work while living on the street. Anecdote upon anecdote builds up the dossier against Israel’s infringements upon the human rights of the Palestinian people.

Wahrman argues against the assertions of Ambassador Harrop and authors Chesin, Hutman and Melamed, writing, To present such aggressive acts as a continuation of the policies of Israeli governments over 43 years is simply untrue. Until recently, Israeli governments carefully avoided such conflicts, and thus allowed Jewish-Arab coexistence in the Holy City to remain surprisingly resilient in the face of many challenges during the first generation after 1967. Efforts to disrupt this pattern began by individuals and small groups, often with private American funding. Their intensification over the last decade and a half has largely flown under the radar, despite being a development with momentous consequences (much greater, say, than those of the settlement ‘outposts’ that have received so much attention). Their protestations of innocence notwithstanding, the support for this game-changing policy from Netanyahu’s government together with the zealous mayor of Jerusalem is unprecedented. Wahrman finds the current Israeli government to blame for the deterioration of Israeli-Palestinian relations in Jerusalem. Netanyahu’s government is deliberately undermining this balance and rapidly changing the urban circumstances, thus rendering a compromise less and less likely. As it turns out, counter to Netanyahu’s claims, these actions are not in the Israeli vaunted “Consensus.” Even at this juncture when the left in Israel is unprecedently [sic] weak, many Israelis (42% according to a recent poll) oppose these new Israeli policies and support a complete freeze of Israeli construction in East Jerusalem. The U.S. should not let manipulative rhetoric about the eternal city and 3000 years of history obfuscate the actual intersection of historical and geographic facts, nor stand in the way of the policy conclusions that must be drawn from them. However, taking the larger view, which includes not only the municipality of Jerusalem, but the issue of settlements and Israeli “heritage sites” in East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza, and the entire course of the conflict, it is not only the Jerusalem municipality or Israel’s policies regarding the Palestinians which is to blame for the current impasse. The Palestinians’ continued willingness to support violent action against Israel, and their continued hope for a one state solution, has resulted, contrary to all reason, to support for HAMAS. Emboldened by its defeat of FATAH in Gaza in 2007, and backed by an extraordinarily aggressive Iran, the maximalists again are threatening to lead the Palestinian remnant to their complete destruction. All attempts to convince the Palestinians to abandon jihadist ideology have failed, despite the fact that the Arab world is ready to accommodate Israel in the current Middle Eastern state system.

Recent calls for a bi-national, secular state instead of a two-state solution are distractions from the real issues at hand. Improving the living conditions of the Palestinian people, fostering the development of municipal and national government in Gaza and the West Bank, and fighting against Islamist opportunism are goals that can be achieved under the shadow of the Iranian threat. Only on the micro-level can political progress be made. The conflict has to become localized. Only by rejecting the regionalization of the political issues facing the Palestinian and Israeli conflict can the international threats on the macro-level be challenged. The general squalor of the Muslim and Christian Quarters (including the Armenian Quarter) stands in contrast to the beautifully restored Jewish Quarter. The municipality should work with organizations seeking to preserve these monuments as a show of good faith before the radicals turn the city into a battleground. Perhaps Turkey, Egypt, Syria, and Jordan, as part of a reconceptualized peace process, could work to restore the neglected Muslim neighborhoods and monuments of Jerusalem in a bid to fend off Hamas and Islamic Jihad as they seek to cash in on Muslim anger over this neglect. Israel and her international allies could urge UNESCO to move on Jordan’s nomination of the Old City of Jerusalem as a World Heritage site, and invite international investment in the restoration of neglected treasures. Building a few playgrounds might prevent the march to making Jerusalem a battlefield once again. In 2009, the Palestinian academic, intellectual, and cultural communities attempted to celebrate Jerusalem’s Arab identity, but Israel frustrated these of these small settler enclaves is to proclaim Jewish superiority everywhere, while disrupting the tissue of co-existence that depends on leaving Palestinians spaces of their own. Israelis often protest Palestinian complaints that Israel really doesn’t want peace. Wahrman helps us to see why the Palestinians believe this. In every case the government and the municipality – currently run by a right-wing mayor, Nir Barkat, who seems all too eager to stoke any fire that comes his way – put forth arguments that supposedly justify the invasion. Some are legal arguments about ownership, sometimes going back eighty years (as in the case of Sheikh Jarrah) and sometimes based on a recent purchase (as in the case of the Shepherd Hotel). Some are historical arguments, mobilizing traditional Jewish associations of those particular spots – partly true, partly invented or stretched – to buttress a claim from times immemorial. But the goal, the methods, and the consequences are always the same: an intrusive encroachment into Palestinian space, eyesore houses emblazoned with Israeli flags, aggressive settlers that often seek confrontation with the neighboring Palestinians, and a permanent disruptive presence of Israeli military and police that inevitably follow the settlers. That the legal argument is but a veneer is demonstrated by the fact that ever since the incongruous high-rise intrusion into the Palestinian village of Silwan, named by the settlers “Yehonatan House,” was declared by Israeli courts illegal and due for immediate demolition, Jerusalem’s mayor has openly defied this ruling. Wahrman writes, “In terms of sheer damage to co-existence in a complicated city, therefore, twenty units in Sheikh Jarrah sow more immediate hatred than 1600 units in Ramat Shlomo.” And he is right. The propoganda value of such policies is great. Last fall, the Holy Land Christian Ecumenical Foundation invited a 16-year old Muslim girl whose entire family had been evicted from their home and was now living in the street to speak at a conference on Arab-Jewish relations. They young girl described in great detail how she and her family lived their lives day-to-day, trying to go to school and work while living on the street. Anecdote upon anecdote builds up the dossier against Israel’s infringements upon the human rights of the Palestinian people.

A paradigm shift is needed to thwart the Islamist threat to Israel. Below are concrete steps towards localizing the conflict and to reinvigorate the peace process that could break the cycle of despair now characterizing the region within the parameters of the Beillin-Abu Mazen plan of 1995.

Immediate Steps Within the Realm of Realpolitik and Reason: Localize Conflict Management and Resolution 1. Establish embassies in West and East Jerusalem All states having diplomatic relations with Israel should immediately establish embassies in Israel and Palestine. Arab League states establish embassies in East and West Jerusalem. Use these embassies to kick start economic development and housing in various neighborhoods. 2. Latin Patriarchate, Greek Orthodox Patriarchate, and other Christian landowners in Palestine/Israel to cooperate by developing local community development boards. 3) UNESCO overseas restoration and preservation of Islamic monuments and archeological sites. Turkey to cooperate with Israel and Palestine with historical preservation projects. 4) Educational programs for Palestinian and Israeli students focusing on holy sites throughout the land. Educational institutions currently training tour guides to spearhead these efforts, emphasizing change and continuity over time. 5) Truth and Reconciliation commissions to document and memorialize history. Institutions of higher learning to cooperate with education ministries. 6) UNRWA to close refugee camps throughout the Middle East. Repatriate and reimburse Arab and Jewish refugees according to their wishes—return, compensation, or memorials—on a case-by-case basis

Voir aussi:

The Anti-Terror, Pro-Israel Sheikh
FrontPageMagazine.com
Jamie Glazov

September 12, 2005

Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Sheikh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi, Director of the Cultural Institute of the Italian Islamic Community and a vocal critic of militant Islam.

FP: Hello Sheikh Palazzi, welcome to Frontpage Interview. It is an honor to speak with you.

Palazzi: The honor is mine.

FP: One doesn’t find many prominent Muslim clerics today who openly denounce suicide bombings, let alone suicide bombings against Israelis. Yet you are quite vocal about supporting Israel’s right to exist. Tell us why, as a Muslim, you have come to this disposition and why you have received so much criticism from certain elements of the Muslim community for it.

Palazzi: As a scholar of Islamic Law, I believe that Islam permits wars under certain conditions (i.e., it permits some soldiers to fight against other soldiers when ordered to do so by the State), but strictly forbids taking military initiatives by individuals, groups or factions (which is referred as « fitnah », i.e., sedition), strictly forbids targeting civilians and strictly forbids committing suicide. Consequently, as a Muslim scholar, I must necessarily condemn suicide bombing as a matter of principle, irrespective of who the victims are. I am obliged to say that a suicide bomber is by no means a martyr of Islam, but a criminal who dies while committing acts which Islam views as capital crimes.

Regarding Israel, I beg your pardon but may I ask you to please consider refraining from speaking of Israel’s « right to exist. » Affirming Israel’s « right to exist » is as unacceptable as denying that right, because even posing the question of whether or not the Children of Israel (Jews) — individually, collectively or nationally — have a « right to exist » is unacceptable. Israel exists by Divine Right, confirmed in both the Bible and Qur’an.

I find in the Qur’an that God granted the Land of Israel to the Children of Israel and ordered them to settle therein (Qur’an, Sura 5:21) and that before the Last Day He will bring the Children of Israel to retake possession of their Land, gathering them from different countries and nations (Qu’ran, Sura 17:104). Consequently, as a Muslim who abides by the Qur’an, I believe that opposing the existence of the State of Israel means opposing a Divine decree.

Every time Arabs fought against Israel they suffered humiliating defeats. In opposing the will of God by making war on Israel, Arabs were in effect making war on God Himself. They ignored the Qur’an, and God punished them. Now, having learned nothing from defeat after defeat, Arabs want to obtain through terror what they were unable to obtain through war: the destruction of the State of Israel. The result is quite predictable: as they have been defeated in the past, the Arabs will be defeated again.

In 1919, Emir Feisal (leader of the Hashemite family, i.e., the leader of the family of the Prophet Muhammad) reached an Agreement with Chaim Weizmann for the creation of a Jewish State and an Arab Kingdom having the Jordan river as a border between them. Emir Feisal wrote, « We feel that the Arabs and Jews are cousins in race, having suffered similar oppressions at the hands of powers stronger than themselves, and by a happy coincidence have been able to take the first step towards the attainment of their national ideals together. The Arabs, especially the educated among us, look with the deepest sympathy on the Zionist movement. »

In Feisal’s time, none claimed that accepting the creation of the State of Israel and befriending Zionism was against Islam. Even the Arab leaders who opposed the Feisal-Weizmann Agreement never resorted to an Islamic argument to condemn it. Unfortunately that Agreement was never implemented, since the British opposed the creation of the Arab Kingdom and chose to give sovereignty over Arabia to Ibn Sa’ud’s marauders, i.e., to the forefathers of the House of Sa’ud.

When the Saudis started ruling an oil rich kingdom, they also started investing a regular part of their wealth in spreading Wahhabism worldwide. Wahhabism is a totalitarian cult which stands for terror, massacre of civilians and for permanent war against Jews, Christians and non-Wahhabi Muslims. The influence of Wahhabism in the contemporary Arab world is such that many Arab Muslims are wrongly convinced that, in order to be a good Muslim, one must hate Israel and hope for its destruction.

Incidentally, in countries where Wahhabism did not spread, this idea is not rooted. Most Muslims in Turkey, India, Indonesia, or the former Soviet Union do not believe at all that a good Muslim must necessarily be anti-Israel. To give some relevant examples, the leading Muslim scholar and former President of Indonesia, Shaykh Abdurrahman Wahid, is on friendly terms with Israel and also visited leaders of Jewish organizations in the United States. The Mufti of Sierra Leone, Sheikh Ahmed Sillah, is also a friend of Israel, as is the Mufti of European Russia, Sheikh Salman Farid.

An organization called « Muslims for Israel » was recently founded in Canada. Voicing pro-Israeli points of view obviously causes negative reactions from Wahhabi groups and Muslims influenced by Wahhabism. However, while those people verbally attack and circulate the most astonishing fabrications about me, I also receive encouragement and support from pro-Israel Muslims living in different parts of the world.

While visiting Israel, I was welcomed by a delegation of heads of Arab villages in the Jerusalem area. They were telling me how much they like living in Israel, and how much they fear being transferred to PLO rule. Many of the Arab inhabitants of Gush Katif today share the same feeling. They say, « Israelis give us jobs and an opportunity to live in peace. What kind of future awaits us under PLO? » I am sure that, were they free to speak and able to see the reality beyond propaganda, many more Arab Muslims would support my positions.

Irshad Manji, a pro-Israeli Muslim journalist from Canada, tells that some Muslims support her openly, yet many more Muslims tell her, « We are with you, but are afraid to tell it. » The same happens to me in Italy, or when I visit Israel. As one knows, being anti-Israeli has become « politically correct » among Arabs. People are afraid to oppose what is « politically correct » even when they live in a democracy. What can one expect from those who live under totalitarian regimes and who have no access to a free press, but to governmental propaganda only? The world should give pro-Israeli Muslims a chance. We owe this to the memory of Anwar Sadat, martyred by those same Wahhabi terrorists who today spread terror everywhere.

In 1996, the Islam-Israel Fellowship of the Root & Branch Association was co-founded by myself and Dr. Asher Eder to promote cooperation between the State of Israel and Muslim nations, and between Jews and Muslims in Israel and abroad, to build a better world based upon a proper Jewish understanding of the Tanakh (Bible) and Jewish Tradition, and upon a proper Muslim understanding of the Qur’an (Koran) and Islamic Tradition. I recommend to FrontPage readers « Peace is Possible between Ishmael and Israel according to the Qur’an and the Tanach (Bible) » by Dr. Eder, with a Foreward by myself, which may be found at [www.rb.org.il ]. I also welcome your readers to visit my website at [ http://www.amislam.com ].

FP: Thank you Sheikh Palazzi. Tell us, if you believe in the life of the soul after death, where does the soul of the suicide bomber go?

Palazzi: Everyone who dies while committing capital sins such as suicide and murder will enter hellfire, except for the one who repents before death catches him. As for the one who dies without repenting for a capital sin — while having a correct doctrinal belief and believing that his sin was a sin — he will dwell in hellfire until his sin is expiated, or even less because of the eventual intercession of Prophets and pious people. However, those who die without repenting for a capital sin and without even believing it is a capital sin, will be denied entrance to heaven, and will dwell in hellfire as long as God wishes. However, God’s mercy is such that it completely prevails over his wrath, to the point where hellfire ultimately becomes an abode of relief.

In Islam, both murder and suicide are capital sins about whose nature no Muslim can either doubt or claim ignorance. Every Muslim must know that committing suicide and murder are forbidden in Islam, exactly as every Muslim knows that daily prayers are five, that the month of fasting is Ramadan, that the destination of pilgrimage is Mecca, etc.

Consequently, the one who dies as a suicide bomber and who does so while wrongly believing that his action is in accordance with Islam, actually dies without having correct doctrinal faith and without any opportunity of repentance, and consequently will permanently dwell in hellfire and will never be admitted to heaven. Denying that suicide and murder are capital sins in Islam represents a lack of correct doctrinal faith according to the Shari’a.

FP: Kindly relate to us your experience at the University of California in Santa Barbara on March 4, 2004, when you came on campus and denounced terrorism. Many Muslim students from the Muslim Students Association at UCSB tried to shout you down. What happened and what do you make of it?

Palazzi: In reality, those who opposed my visit at UCSB were a small group of students, mostly related to the local Muslim Student Association (MSA; i.e., to the student branch of the Wahhabi Muslim Brotherhood). I invited them to be involved in the debate, to explain the reasons why they opposed my visit and/or the contents of my speech.

However, they were not in the least interested in real debate and discussion. They only shouted some slogans and left the hall. Other Muslim students, not related to the MSA, on the contrary appreciated my visit, and together with non-Muslim students went on asking me questions privately even after the public debate was over. Apart from that small group of vociferous opponents, both Muslim and non-Muslim students at UCSB were friendly and interested in thoughtful discussion of issues.

FP: Can you illuminate for us the humane and tolerant side of Islam?

Palazzi: In contrast to Wahhabism, which is a religion of terror, coercion and violence, Sunni Islam is a religion of peace and tolerance. A Muslim is called to be a loyal citizen of the country in which he lives, on the condition that the State does not deny his basic religious freedom and does not compel him to accept another religion by force. If the government is in other respects tyrannical, corrupt, oppressive, etc., a Muslim may seek redress through established legal channels, without resort to sedition or violence. If he thinks government oppression is unbearable, he must migrate elsewhere. This is the case regardless of whether or not Muslims are a majority or a minority, or the ruler is a Muslim or a non-Muslim.

Sunni Islam recognized different forms of efforts to support Islam (jihad), and acknowledges a military form of jihad. In the Sunni understanding, military jihad can only be undertaken by an Islamic State. Muslims may not initiate armed conflicts on their own initiative, but only after the head of an Islamic State has formally declared war against another state which oppresses Muslims or denies their religion freedom. Islamic sources foresaw that the Islamic State (Caliphate) would cease to exist, and that Muslims and non-Muslims alike would be ruled for a period of history by secular states alone.

According to Sunni belief, the Caliphate will be restored in messianic times, by Imam al-Mahdi, and not by politicians or military leaders. As long as Imam al-Mahdi is not present, no restoration of the Caliphate is possible, and without a Caliphate military jihad is impossible. The only legitimate jihad in our time is not-military jihad, i.e., competing with non-Muslims in good deeds, such as creating a better world and establishing enduring peace.

Wahhabis simply take words used in Islamic Law and apply them against Islamic Law itself. In Islamic Law, terrorism is a sin, and suicide another sin. Wahhabis call « jihad » acts of suicide terrorism and « martyrs » those who die while committing them. With regard to murder and suicide, the conflicting positions of Sunni Islam and Wahhabism are fundamental and irreconcilable.

FP: Tell us a bit about your upbringing and your own intellectual and spiritual journey? Who were some mentors/figures who influenced you? Has your philosophy and outlook always been the same or has it changed over the years? Tell us about a matter about which you have changed your mind or have had second thoughts over the years.

Palazzi: I was born in Rome into a non-observant Muslim family, having no special interest in religion. At that time, there existed in Italy no Muslim organization and no religious facilities. Apart from some Arabic words and some knowledge of major Islamic holidays, I received no formal religious education. Even so, since my youth I was interested in spirituality and metaphysics, and this led me to study philosophy at the State University of Rome.

During that period, I felt a need to rediscover my Islamic roots. After completing my secular education I moved to Cairo, wherein I studied at al-Azhar Islamic University. In Cairo, I had the opportunity to study under the best teachers. At that time, al-Azhar was not, as it is today, a nest of Wahhabi and neo-Salafi fanatics and extremists, but was still a center of traditional Islamic learning.

While living in Cairo, I also had the opportunity to study Sufism, the mystical tradition of Islam, under my main teachers, Sheikh Ismail al-Azhari and Sheikh Hussein al-Khalwati. I also benefited from the opportunity to study under the then Mufti of Egypt, the late Sheikh Muhammad al-Mutawali as-Sha’rawi, the one who convinced Sadat to make peace with Israel and who went with him to Jerusalem to pray in the al-Aqsa mosque.

When I came back to Rome, I met other Muslims sharing my attitude, and together we established the organization which today is called the Italian Muslim Assembly. While a teenager, I studied different ideologies and philosophies, and was to a certain extent influenced by them. However, after my stay in Cairo, I considered my basic period of intellectual and spiritual formation completed. My spiritual philosophy has remained more or less the same until today.

FP: What did you think about Pope John Paul II? What do you think of the new Pope?

Palazzi: I think the late Pope John Paul II was a contradictory personality. He made some decisions which were extremely progressive (interfaith meetings, visits to mosques and synagogues, etc.), but his individual theology was nevertheless extremely conservative and from a certain point of view naive. He publicly asked forgiveness for crimes committed by the Church against Jews, but afterwards canonized some very controversial personalities, such as his predecessor Pius IX (one of the most implacable enemies of democracy in the history of humanity), and even pro-Nazi Croatian Cardinal Stepinac.

John Paul II took no steps to censor priests and bishops who scandalously cooperated with mass-murderers such as Saddam Hussein or Yasser Arafat, and refused to take a clear position about bishops involved in covering up the scandal of pedophile priests. He approved the war in Kosovo to free the oppressed population from Milosevic, but had no courage to support the war for the liberation of Iraq from Saddam Hussein. The refusal of John Paul II to « bless » the international Coalition fighting for the liberation of Iraq is something I as a Muslim can hardly forgive, as I cannot forget Catholic organizations marching together with Communists and neo-Nazis « against Bush’s war » and objectively in support of Saddam’s regime.

On themes such as birth control and embryology John Paul II’s mentality was totally obscurantist and medieval. He compared abortion to massacres committed by Nazis and Communists. He promoted dialogue between the Church and non-Catholic religions, but permitted Cardinal Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) to silence theological debate and dissent within the Catholic Church itself.

From a political point of view, John Paul II supported a direct and constant interference of the Church in the affairs of European States, especially Italy. Many Italians, even practicing Catholic Italians, were disappointed by the idea of a foreign (in this case Polish) pope who interfered with the dialectic of majority rule and minority opposition in our country, and considered it a gross infringement of our national sovereignty.

To conclude, I must say that the pontificate of John Paul II was characterized by light and darkness. Positive elements were counter-balanced by many negative ones.

As for Benedict XVI, taking into consideration the documents he signed when he was President of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (formerly known as the « Sacred Congregation of the Universal Inquisition »), he seems to be even more conservative than was John Paul II, and even less inclined to tolerate theological pluralism inside the Catholic Church. In one these documents, the « Dominus Jesus » Declaration, the then Cardinal Ratzinger explained that « interfaith dialogue must be understood as a part of the missionary activity of the Catholic Church. » The same document openly says that non-Catholic religions are « seriously defective » from a theological and ethical point of view.

All this is not encouraging at all. We have a Pope, Benedict XVI, who simply rejects the notion of pluralism. He does not see the Catholic Church as an element of society which must co-exist with other elements on a basis of equality and dignity, but sees the Catholic Church as the master which must educate society.

According to the approach of Benedict XVI, religions do not represent different spiritual perspectives, each of which can make its unique contribution to help us partially understand the mystery of God. Benedict thinks the truth about God is already known, and the Pope (i.e., himself) is the only authorized interpreter of that truth. Catholics and non-Catholics alike must simply be educated by the one (i.e., himself) who represents that truth on earth.

Dialogue is not seen as an end in itself, but only as a tool to bring non-Catholic religions more in line with Catholicism. With regard to the attitudes of past Popes such as John XXIII and Paul VI, Benedict XVI seriously risks nullifying the results of the Second Vatican Council and returning Catholic theology to what it was at the time of the Counter Reformation.

Ratzinger, therefore, is a Pope who preaches a totalitarian understanding of religion, and incidentally is also the first Pope to have participated in a Nazi German youth movement. Perhaps this past will not affect relations with Jews, but Benedict recently chose not to mention Israel by name in a public statement of solidarity with nations that recently suffered terrorist attacks. When the Israeli government protested this omission, the reaction of the Press Office of the Holy See was arrogant, condescending, and dismissive, adding insult (a sin of commission) to the original injury (a sin of omission), especially when one considers that the omission was committed by a Bavarian Pope who was both a member of a Nazi German youth movement and a soldier in the Nazi German Wehrmacht.

FP: You are, of course, right about some of these things. I guess I will just say that Pope John Paul II was an incredible human being who provided crucial and meaningful spiritual leadership during a tumultuous time. His job was not to run a popularity contest. I think in some ways he was a very holy man and brought much light to a dark world. He was firm in several areas where it was necessary to be firm. And, of course, he played a tremendous role in the crumbling of an evil empire.

The hype that the media went on about Benedict XVI being in the Nazi German youth movement is also a vicious and dirty cheap shot. Pope XVI was never a Nazi and everyone knows it. All German boys at that time were forced to become members of the Hitler Youth – and so was he. This Pope has made it clear years ago how his faith showed him the evil of Nazism and anti-Semitism.

Palazzi: Although « all German boys at that time were forced to become members of the hitler youth, » the young Joseph Ratzinger nevertheless volunteered for a combat unit of the Hitler Youth. This circumstance is confirmed by the Vatican press office. Of course, we are dealing with a teenager living in a period when Nazi indoctrination was systematic, but at least during that period Joseph Ratzinger was a convinced Nazi who chose to join a military unit fighting against the Allies. I do not doubt that his faith showed him the evil of Nazism and anti-Semitism, but this happened after World War Two was over, not before.

FP: Well, Sheikh Palazzi, the evidence suggests that the Pope volunteering for a combat unit is simply untrue and that is why the Pope evaded people who were trying to force him to « volunteer » for a combat unit by declaring his intent to become a priest. There is no trace to the assertion that the Vatican Press Office confirmed the opposite. Ratzinger received a dispensation from the Hitler Youth because of his religious studies and he deserted the German army. He never attended any Hitler Youth meetings and his seminary professor secured the paper « proving » his attendance on his behalf.

And it is this upon this falsehood that you frame your further assertion that Ratzinger was at that time a « convinced Nazi » — which is, with all due respect, simply a historical falsehood and a personal slander. His own word, and those of all who knew him and his family, says otherwise: that he and his whole family were anti-Nazis. There is no trace of Nazism in anything Ratzinger has ever done since the war, and it seems that many people are just trying to smear him and his theological conservatism – quite an unworthy thing to do.

In any case, let’s get back to the terror war. What is the best way for the West to fight it? What do you think of the American liberation of Iraq?

Palazzi: To win a war, one must identify who the enemy is and neutralize the enemy’s chain of command. World War Two was won when the German army was destroyed, Berlin was captured and Hitler removed from power. To win the War on Terror, it is necessary to understand that al-Qa’ida is a Saudi organization, created by the House of Sa’ud, funded with petro-dollar profits by the House of Sa’ud and used by the House of Sa’ud for acts of mass terror primarily against the West, and the rest of the world, as well.

Consequently, to really win the War on Terror it is necessary for the U.S. to invade Saudi Arabia, capture King Abdallah and the other 1,500 princes who constitute the House of Sa’ud, to freeze their assets, to remove them from power, and to send them to Guantanamo for life imprisonment.

Then it is necessary to replace the Saudi-Wahhabi terror-funding regime with a moderate, non-Wahhabi and pro-West regime, such as a Hashemite Sunni Muslim constitutional monarchy.

Unless all this is done, the War on Terror will never be won. It is possible to destroy al-Qa’ida, to capture or execute Bin Laden, al-Zarqawi, al-Zawahiri, etc., but this will not end the War. After some years, Saudi princes will again start funding many similar terror organizations. The Saudi regime can only survive by increasing its support for terror.

Saddam’s regime was one of the worst criminal dictatorships which existed in this world, and destroying it was surely a praiseworthy task for which, as a Muslim, I am thankful to President Bush, to the governments who joined the Coalition and to soldiers who fought in the field. Destroying the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and the regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq were surely praiseworthy tasks, but I regret that focusing on these secondary enemies was — for the White House — a way to obscure the role of the world’s main enemy: the Saudis.

FP: What do you think of President Bush?

Palazzi: I am extremely disappointed with him. I hoped that — after Saudi terrorists attacked the U.S. on 9/11 — this would necessarily cause a radical revision in U.S.-Saudi relations. The first action a U.S. President had to do after such a criminal attack as 9/11 was to immediately outlaw Saudi-controlled institutions inside the U.S. and acknowledge that viewing Saudis as « friends » was a mortal sin representing sixty years of failed U.S. foreign and economic policy.

U.S. governmental agencies have plenty of evidence about the role of the House of Sa’ud in funding the worldwide terror network. U.S. citizens can even read in newspapers that some days before the 9/11 attack Muhammad Atta received a check from the wife of the former Saudi Ambassador to Washington, Prince Bandar, but unbelievably this caused no consequences. Let us consider plain facts: the wife of a foreign ambassador pays terrorists for attacks which murder thousands of U.S. citizens, and the U.S. government not only does not declare war on that foreign country, in this case Saudi Arabia, but does not even terminate diplomatic relations with that country.

On the contrary, then-Crown Prince Abdallah, the creator (together with the new Saudi ambassador to the United States, former Saudi ambassador to the United Kingdom, and Father of 9/11, Prince Turki al-Feisal) of al-Qa’ida, is immediately invited to Bush’s ranch as a honored guest, and Bush tells him, « You are our ally in the War on Terror »! Can one image FDR inviting Hitler to the United States and telling him, « You are our ally in the war against Fascism in Europe »?

Something very similar happened after 9/11. As a matter of fact, the Saudis supported Bush’s electoral campaign for his first term in office, and asked him in exchange to be the first U.S. President to promote the creation of a Palestinian State. Once he was elected, Bush refused to abide by the agreement, and the consequence was 9/11.

« We paid for your election, and now you must do want we want from you », this was the message behind the 9/11 attack. Bush immediately started doing what the Saudis wanted from him: compelling Israel to withdraw from Judea, Samaria and Gaza, in order to permit the creation of a PLO state. Western media speak of a « Road Map, » while Arab media call it by its real name: « Abdallah’s Plan. »

One hears about a U.S. President who allegedly leads a « War on Terror » and promotes the spread of « democracy » and « freedom » in the Islamic world, but the reality shows a U.S. president who — after a Saudi terror attack against the U.S. — abides by a Saudi diktat, hides the role of the Saudi regime behind al-Qa’ida and wants Israel, the only democratic state in the Middle East, cut to pieces to facilitate the creation of another dictatorial regime, lead by Arafat deputy Abu Mazen, the terrorist who organized the mass murder of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics.

Theoretically, Bush proclaims his intention to punish terror and to spread democracy, but the Road Map is the exact opposite of all this: it means punishing the victims of terror and rewarding terrorists, compelling democracy to withdraw in order to create a new dictatorial Arab regime. For the U.S. there is only one single trustworthy ally in the entire Middle East: Israel.

Now Bush is punishing America’s ally Israel to reward those who heartily supported « our brother Saddam », those who demonstrate by burning Stars and Strips flags and those who call America « the imperialist power controlled by Zionism ». In doing so, Bush seriously risks becoming the most anti-Israeli and anti-Jewish President in the history of the U.S.

Let us look at the impending victims of Bush’s foreign policy, at the inhabitants of Gush Katif. What is their crime? What did they do to merit deportation from their homes and the theft of their farms and businesses? They live in peace, work hard and provide jobs for thousands of Gaza Arabs. To please the Saudis, Bush wants a Judenrein Gaza, with the Jews of Gush Katif deported from their homes, their houses destroyed and even the remains of their relatives exhumed and buried elsewhere.

Were one to proclaim « Jews, for the only reason of their being Jews, must be deported from New York and forcibly resettled in New Jersey », the whole world would shout and say this is racist deportation, ethnic cleansing, violation of basic human rights, etc. Now, by supporting the infamous anti-Israeli Saudi Plan, Bush is applying the same identical principle: he accepts the idea that Jews, for the only fault of being Jews, must be deported from their homes in Judea, Samaria and Gaza, and resettled elsewhere.

Throughout history, Jews were frequently deported from country to country by Romans, Popes, Czars, Nazis, etc. Now, thanks to Bush’s policy, Jews will also be deported from Israel, and deported not by anti-Semitic regimes, but by Jews and others wearing Israeli uniforms. It is the norm for Arab dictators to conceive a political project based on ethnic cleansing and deportation of Jews, but it is simply unbelievable that a U.S. President approves such a project and compels Israel to accept it.

I am shocked to realize that a U.S. President supports ethnic cleansing of Jews from parts of the Land of Israel, and that most American Jewish organizational leaders either keep silent or even approve of this deportation plan. With the few praiseworthy exceptions of the Zionist Organization of America (Morton Klein), Americans for a Safe Israel (Herb Zweibon and Helen Freedman), National Council of Young Israel (Pesach Lerner) and a few other groups, most Jewish organizations in the U.S. collaborate with Bush’s plans against their own brothers and sisters in Israel.

The implications of the Road Map are staggering: A Jew is not like other human beings, he can be deported from place to place, according to the cynical oil drenched dictates of political opportunism. Deporting Jews and cutting Israel into pieces was the original goal of Arab dictators supported by the Soviet Union.

The U.S. has consistently opposed this racist policy and supported Israel against terrorists who wanted to destroy it. Now Bush is granting those same terrorists a victory: what was not accomplished by terror will be accomplished by the Israeli Defence Forces with the support of the United States. Saudis are able to compel a U.S. President to betray U.S. allies and to force the creation of an entity (« Palestine ») controlled by terrorists.

President Bush claims to be a Born Again Christian and also claims to read the Bible every day. The Bible says that God gave the Land of Israel as a heritage to the descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and gave the rest of the world as a heritage to other peoples. As confirmed by the Qur’an and Islamic tradition, Abraham himself bequeathed to his descendants from Isaac the Land of Israel, and bequeathed to his descendants from Ishmael other lands, such as the Arabian peninsula.

Now descendants of Ishmael, the Arabs, have a gigantic territory extending from Morocco to Iraq. The descendants of Isaac, the Jews, on the contrary, only have a tiny, narrow strip of land. However, Arab dictators are not satisfied with their huge territory. They want more. They also want the little heritage of the Children of Israel, and resort to terror in order to get it.

U.S. Presidents have always opposed this attempt to steal from the Jewish People what God granted them. Now we have a U.S. President who claims to honor the Bible, and yet wants to give Arab dictators what belongs to the Jewish People. By doing so, Bush is not only rewarding terror, encouraging further terror and showing the world that terror works, but he is also opposing God’s will. I pray that the citizens of the U.S. will be spared the full consequences of this anti-Israel, anti-Jewish and anti-God foreign policy.

FP: There is indeed a tragedy inherent in the Israelis not being defended the way they should be. And the disengagement from Gaza truly comes with many dangerous risks. But there are several very shrewd strategic reasons involved in this move and they are in Israel’s interests. We shouldn’t forget that. Bush and Sharon are making wise and calculated steps in their own context. It is more complicated than simply seeing this as a great malicious betrayal. But we’ll have to debate this another time.

Let us turn to your personal interests for a moment. What are some of your favorite books?

Palazzi: Books I prefer reading are those dealing with spirituality. I am especially interested in the study of similarities between Sufism and Kabbalah, and consequently I consider « al-Futuhat al-Makkiyyah » by Ibn ‘Arabi and the « Zohar » as my basic sources. I am also interested in the study of non-monotheistic mysticism, and consequently appreciate the Upanishad, the Vedantasutra and the Purana of the Hindu tradition, the Buddhist Canon and the Greek Philokalia. I am also interested in the history of Middle East. Books such as « Battle Ground » by Shmuel Katz and « The Secret War Against the Jews » by John Loftus are among my favorites.

FP: Do you listen to music? If so, tell us what music you like.

Palazzi: Because of my academic interests in ethnomusicology and ritual dance, I frequently listen to Medieval music, be it Arabic-Andalusi, Maghrebi, Persian, European or Byzantine. Then I am also fond of symphonic music, and my favorite composers are Bruckner, Mahler and Stravinsky. I also like jazz, especially from New Orleans.

FP: Why do you think Islamic extremists demonize music? For instance, the Taliban illegalized all music, Khomeini illegalized many forms of “Western music” etc. What is it about music that they see so threatening? Isn’t music a divine gift? Also, do you think dancing is anti-Islamic?

Palazzi: Khomeini was not so extreme about music as are the Taliban (who follow an Indian version of Saudi Wahhabism known as Deobandism) or the Saudis. Khomeini never demonized music in principle. He rather imposed his personal preferences regarding which music was acceptable and which was not. Khomeini deemed traditional Islamic music and Western classical music to be acceptable, and modern Western popular music to be unacceptable. The Taliban, on the contrary, even banned Sufi music and traditional Islamic chants, and the Saudis go on doing the same until today.

Some Muslim scholars of the past restricted the range of acceptable music to a minimum, but Imam al-Ghazali, a leading authority in the Shafi’i school of jurisprudence to which I belong, preferred to emphasize the positive value of music. A chapter of al-Ghazali’s book in Persian, « The Alchemy of Happiness », is entitled « Concerning Music and Dancing as Aids to the Religious Life ».

al-Ghazali writes: « The heart of man has been so constituted by the Almighty that, like a flint, it contains a hidden fire which is evoked by music and harmony, and renders man beside himself with ecstasy. These harmonies are echoes of that higher world of beauty which we call the world of spirits; they remind man of his relationship to that world, and produce in him an emotion so deep and strange that he himself is powerless to explain it. The effect of music and dancing is deeper in proportion as the natures on which they act are simple and prone to motion; they fan into a flame whatever love is already dormant in the heart, whether it be earthly and sensual, or divine and spiritual ».

While other scholars tried to classify musical instruments and musical styles as permissible or forbidden on the basis of their personal preferences, Imam al-Ghazali on the contrary classified music according to the effects it produces on the soul: music which promotes illicit and immoral desires must be avoided, while music which echoes spiritual harmony and awakens contemplation should be encouraged. The latter kind of music is surely a divine gift. Till today Sufi musicians play traditional songs and mystical melodies in order to increase love for God and to cause listeners to join in ecstatic dancing.

FP: So do you ever dance to your favorite music?

Palazzi: I not only regularly dance according to the teachings of the Mevlevi school as they were received by the Naqshbandi and Qadiri Sufi Orders, but I also teach my students, with the authorization of my Sheikhs, what in the West is known as the ritual dance of the Whirling Dervishes. In Arabic, this same dance is called Sama’, meaning « listening ». The ritualized techniques of Sufi dance are necessary since an ordinary person lacks spontaneity. For those who reach a certain spiritual level, technique itself is not necessary anymore: listening to traditional Mevlevi music, especially to the sound of flute and drum, is enough to lead to spontaneous dance out of love for God.

During the last years, I have led seminars and arranged performances of the ritual dance of the Whirling Dervishes in cultural centers, universities and dancing schools. Students at dancing schools have some technical advantages over participants who never attended such schools, but in many cases the dance students were less spontaneous and more concerned with external appearances. These dance students were educated to perform for the public in performances which must please audiences. In Dergas, Sufi dancing halls, students dance exclusively for the Beloved One, and to be united with Him. That is the basic difference.

FP: Do you think that veiling of women in Islam should me mandatory or voluntary?

Palazzi: Wearing or not wearing a veil should be the choice of a Muslim woman alone. No one has the right to compel her to wear or not wear a veil. As with prayer, fasting and all the other religious practices, veiling has meaning when it is spontaneous and reflects one’s will to please God by choosing to observe a religious precept. Forcing people to observe religious precepts does not result in an increase in faith, but rather an increase in hypocrisy. One does not pray, fast or wear a veil as an expression of freely chosen faith to submit to what one believes to be commanded by God, but only due to human coercion.

Consequently, I strongly condemn those regimes, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, which force women who do not want to wear the veil to do so; and regimes, such as Turkey and France, which prevent women who do want to wear the veil from doing so. My ideal of religious freedom is that, if a woman wants to veil, she must be free to do so, and the State must defend her right to veil; while if a woman does not want to veil, she must be free to do so, and the State must defend her right not to do so.

Voir encore:

What Would Hamas Do If It Could Do Whatever It Wanted?
Understanding what the Muslim Brotherhood’s Gaza branch wants by studying its theology, strategy, and history
Jeffrey Goldberg

The Atlantic

AUG 4 2014

In the spring of 2009, Roger Cohen, the New York Times columnist, surprised some of his readers by claiming that Iran’s remaining Jews were “living, working and worshiping in relative tranquility.”

Cohen wrote: “Perhaps I have a bias toward facts over words, but I say the reality of Iranian civility toward Jews tells us more about Iran—its sophistication and culture—than all the inflammatory rhetoric.”

Perhaps.

In this, and other, columns, Cohen appeared to be trying to convince his fellow Jews that they had less to fear from the Iran of Khamenei and (at the time) Ahmadinejad than they thought. To me, the column was a whitewash. It seemed (and seems) reasonable to worry about the intentions of those Iranian leaders who deny or minimize the Holocaust while hoping to annihilate the Jewish state, and who have funded and trained groups—Hezbollah and Hamas—that have as their goal the killing of Jews.

It is a dereliction of responsibility not to try to understand the goals and beliefs of Islamist totalitarian movements.
Cohen’s most acid critics came from within the Persian Jewish exile community. The vast majority of Iran’s Jews fled the country after the Khomeini revolution; many found refuge in Los Angeles. David Wolpe, the rabbi of Sinai Temple there, invited Cohen to speak to his congregants, about half of whom are Persian exiles, shortly after the column appeared. Cohen, to his credit, accepted the invitation. The encounter between Cohen and an audience of several hundred (mainly Jews, but also Bahais, members of a faith persecuted with great intensity by the Iranian regime) was tense but mainly civil (you can watch it here). For me, the most interesting moment came not in a discussion about the dubious health of Iran’s remnant Jewish population, but after Wolpe asked Cohen about the intentions of Iran and its allies toward Jews living outside Iran.

“Right now,” Wolpe said, “Israel is much more powerful than Hezbollah and Hamas. Let’s say tomorrow this was reversed. Let’s say Hamas had the firepower of Israel and Israel had the firepower of Hamas. What do you think would happen to Israel were the balance of power reversed?”

“I don’t know what would happen tomorrow,” Cohen answered. This response brought a measure of derisive laughter from the incredulous audience. “And it doesn’t matter that I don’t know because it’s not going to happen tomorrow or in one or two years.” Wolpe quickly told Cohen that he himself knows exactly what would happen if the power balance between Hamas and Israel were to be reversed. (Later, Wolpe told me that he thought Cohen could not have been so naïve as to misunderstand the nature of Hamas and Hezbollah, but instead was simply caught short by the question.)

At the time, Cohen suggested that he was uninterested in grappling with the nature of Hamas and its goals. “I reject the thinking behind your question,” he said. “It’s not useful to go there.”

“Going there,” however, is necessary, not only to understand why Israelis fear Hamas, but also to understand that the narrative advanced by Hamas apologists concerning the group’s beliefs and goals is false. “Going there” also does not require enormous imagination, or a well-developed predisposition toward paranoia. It is, in my opinion, a dereliction of responsibility on the part of progressives not to try to understand the goals and beliefs of Islamist totalitarian movements.

(This post, you should know, is not a commentary on the particulars of the war between Israel and Hamas, a war in which Hamas baited Israel and Israel took the bait. Each time Israel kills an innocent Palestinian in its attempt to neutralize Hamas’s rockets, it represents a victory for Hamas, which has made plain its goal of getting Israel to kill innocent Gazans. Suffice it to say that Israel cannot afford many more “victories” of the sort it is seeking in Gaza right now. I supported a ceasefire early in this war precisely because I believed that the Israeli government had not thought through its strategic goals, or the methods for achieving those goals.)

While it is true that Hamas is expert at getting innocent Palestinians killed, it has made it very plain, in word and deed, that it would rather kill Jews. The following blood-freezing statement is from the group’s charter: “The Islamic Resistance Movement aspires to the realization of Allah’s promise, no matter how long that should take. The Prophet, Allah bless him and grant him salvation, has said: ‘The day of judgment will not come until Muslims fight the Jews (killing the Jews), when the Jews will hide behind stones and trees. The stones and trees will say ‘O Muslims, O Abdulla, there is a Jew behind me, come and kill him.”

This is a frank and open call for genocide, embedded in one of the most thoroughly anti-Semitic documents you’ll read this side of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Not many people seem to know that Hamas’s founding document is genocidal. Sometimes, the reasons for this lack of knowledge are benign; other times, as the New Yorker’s Philip Gourevitch argues in his recent dismantling of Rashid Khalidi’s apologia for Hamas, this ignorance is a direct byproduct of a decision to mask evidence of Hamas’s innate theocratic fascism.

The historian of totalitarianism Jeffrey Herf, in an article on the American Interest website, places the Hamas charter in context:

[T]he Hamas Covenant of 1988 notably replaced the Marxist-Leninist conspiracy theory of world politics with the classic anti-Semitic tropes of Nazism and European fascism, which the Islamists had absorbed when they collaborated with the Nazis during World War II. That influence is apparent in Article 22, which asserts that “supportive forces behind the enemy” have amassed great wealth: « With their money, they took control of the world media, news agencies, the press, publishing houses, broadcasting stations, and others. With their money they stirred revolutions in various parts of the world with the purpose of achieving their interests and reaping the fruit therein. With their money, they took control of the world media. They were behind the French Revolution, the Communist revolution and most of the revolutions we heard and hear about here and there. With their money, they formed secret societies, such as Freemason, Rotary Clubs, the Lions and others in different parts of the world for the purpose of sabotaging societies and achieving Zionist interests. With their money they were able to control imperialistic countries and instigate them to colonize many countries in order to enable them to exploit their resources and spread corruption there. »

The above paragraph of Article 22 could have been taken, almost word for word, from Nazi Germany’s anti-Jewish propaganda texts and broadcasts.
The question Roger Cohen refused to answer at Sinai Temple was addressed in a recent post by Sam Harris, the atheist intellectual, who is opposed, as a matter of ideology, to the existence of Israel as a Jewish state (or to any country organized around a religion), but who for practical reasons supports its continued existence as a haven for an especially persecuted people, and also as a not-particularly religious redoubt in a region of the world deeply affected by religious fundamentalism. Referring not only to the Hamas charter, Harris writes that, “The discourse in the Muslim world about Jews is utterly shocking.”

Not only is there Holocaust denial—there’s Holocaust denial that then asserts that we will do it for real if given the chance. The only thing more obnoxious than denying the Holocaust is to say that it should have happened; it didn’t happen, but if we get the chance, we will accomplish it. There are children’s shows in the Palestinian territories and elsewhere that teach five-year-olds about the glories of martyrdom and about the necessity of killing Jews.

And this gets to the heart of the moral difference between Israel and her enemies. …

What do we know of the Palestinians? What would the Palestinians do to the Jews in Israel if the power imbalance were reversed? Well, they have told us what they would do. For some reason, Israel’s critics just don’t want to believe the worst about a group like Hamas, even when it declares the worst of itself. We’ve already had a Holocaust and several other genocides in the 20th century. People are capable of committing genocide. When they tell us they intend to commit genocide, we should listen. There is every reason to believe that the Palestinians would kill all the Jews in Israel if they could. Would every Palestinian support genocide? Of course not. But vast numbers of them—and of Muslims throughout the world—would. Needless to say, the Palestinians in general, not just Hamas, have a history of targeting innocent noncombatants in the most shocking ways possible. They’ve blown themselves up on buses and in restaurants. They’ve massacred teenagers. They’ve murdered Olympic athletes. They now shoot rockets indiscriminately into civilian areas.
The first time I witnessed Hamas’s hatred of Jews manifest itself in large-scale, fatal violence was in late July of 1997, when two of the group’s suicide bombers detonated themselves in an open-air market in West Jerusalem. The attack took 16 lives, and injured 178. I happened to be only a few blocks from the market at the time of the attack, and arrived shortly after the paramedics and firefighters. Over the next hours, a scene unfolded that I would see again and again: screaming relatives; members of the Orthodox burial society scraping flesh off walls; the ground covered in blood and viscera. I remember another Hamas attack, on a bus in downtown Jerusalem, in which body parts of children were blown into the street by the force of the blast. At yet another bombing, I was with rescue workers as they recovered a human arm stuck high up in a tree.

After each of these attacks, Hamas leaders issued blood-curdling statements claiming credit, and promising more death. “The Jews will lose because they crave life but a true Muslim loves death,” a former Hamas leader, Abdel-Aziz Rantisi, told me in an interview in 2002. In the same interview he made the following imperishable statement: “People always talk about what the Germans did to the Jews, but the true question is, ‘What did the Jews do to the Germans?’”

I will always remember this interview not only because Rantisi’s Judeophobia was breathtaking, but because just as I was leaving his apartment in Gaza City, a friend from Jerusalem called to tell me that she had just heard a massive explosion outside her office at the Hebrew University (not far, by the way, of an attack earlier today). A cafeteria had just been bombed, my friend told me. This was another Hamas operation, one which killed nine people, including a young woman of exceptional promise named Marla Bennett, a 24-year-old American student who wrote shortly before her death, “My friends and family in San Diego ask me to come home, it is dangerous here. I appreciate their concern. But there is nowhere else in the world I would rather be right now. I have a front-row seat for the history of the Jewish people.”

Hamas is an organization devoted to ending Jewish history. This is what so many Jews understand, and what so many non-Jews don’t. The novelist Amos Oz, who has led Israel’s left-wing peace camp for decades, said in an interview last week that he doesn’t see a prospect for compromise between Israel and Hamas. « I have been a man of compromise all my life, » Oz said. « But even a man of compromise cannot approach Hamas and say: ‘Maybe we meet halfway and Israel only exists on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.' »

In the years since it adopted its charter, Hamas leaders and spokesmen have reinforced its message again and again. Mahmoud Zahar said in 2006 that the group « will not change a single word in its covenant. » To underscore the point, in 2010 Zahhar said, « Our ultimate plan is [to have] Palestine in its entirety. I say this loud and clear so that nobody will accuse me of employing political tactics. We will not recognize the Israeli enemy. »

In 2011, the former Hamas minister of culture, Atallah Abu al-Subh, said that « the Jews are the most despicable and contemptible nation to crawl upon the face of the Earth, because they have displayed hostility to Allah. Allah will kill the Jews in the hell of the world to come, just like they killed the believers in the hell of this world. » Just last week, a top Hamas official, Osama Hamdan, accused Jews of using Christian blood to make matzo. This is not a group, in other words, that is seeking the sort of peace that Amos Oz—or, for that matter, the Palestinian Authority president, Mahmoud Abbas—is seeking. People wonder why Israelis have such a visceral reaction to Hamas. The answer is easy. Israel is a small country, and most of its citizens know someone who was murdered by Hamas in its extended suicide-bombing campaigns; and most people also understand that if Hamas had its way, it would kill them as well.

Voir par ailleurs:

In Defense of Zionism
The often reviled ideology that gave rise to Israel has been an astonishing historical success.
Michael B. Oren
WSJ
Aug. 1, 2014

They come from every corner of the country—investment bankers, farmers, computer geeks, jazz drummers, botany professors, car mechanics—leaving their jobs and their families. They put on uniforms that are invariably too tight or too baggy, sign out their gear and guns. Then, scrambling onto military vehicles, 70,000 reservists—women and men—join the young conscripts of what is proportionally the world’s largest citizen army. They all know that some of them will return maimed or not at all. And yet, without hesitation or (for the most part) complaint, proudly responding to the call-up, Israelis stand ready to defend their nation. They risk their lives for an idea.

The idea is Zionism. It is the belief that the Jewish people should have their own sovereign state in the Land of Israel. Though founded less than 150 years ago, the Zionist movement sprung from a 4,000-year-long bond between the Jewish people and its historic homeland, an attachment sustained throughout 20 centuries of exile. This is why Zionism achieved its goals and remains relevant and rigorous today. It is why citizens of Israel—the state that Zionism created—willingly take up arms. They believe their idea is worth fighting for.

Yet Zionism, arguably more than any other contemporary ideology, is demonized. « All Zionists are legitimate targets everywhere in the world! » declared a banner recently paraded by anti-Israel protesters in Denmark. « Dogs are allowed in this establishment but Zionists are not under any circumstances, » warned a sign in the window of a Belgian cafe. A Jewish demonstrator in Iceland was accosted and told, « You Zionist pig, I’m going to behead you. »

In certain academic and media circles, Zionism is synonymous with colonialism and imperialism. Critics on the radical right and left have likened it to racism or, worse, Nazism. And that is in the West. In the Middle East, Zionism is the ultimate abomination—the product of a Holocaust that many in the region deny ever happened while maintaining nevertheless that the Zionists deserved it.

What is it about Zionism that elicits such loathing? After all, the longing of a dispersed people for a state of their own cannot possibly be so repugnant, especially after that people endured centuries of massacres and expulsions, culminating in history’s largest mass murder. Perhaps revulsion toward Zionism stems from its unusual blend of national identity, religion and loyalty to a land. Japan offers the closest parallel, but despite its rapacious past, Japanese nationalism doesn’t evoke the abhorrence aroused by Zionism.

Clearly anti-Semitism, of both the European and Muslim varieties, plays a role. Cabals, money grubbing, plots to take over the world and murder babies—all the libels historically leveled at Jews are regularly hurled at Zionists. And like the anti-Semitic capitalists who saw all Jews as communists and the communists who painted capitalism as inherently Jewish, the opponents of Zionism portray it as the abominable Other.

But not all of Zionism’s critics are bigoted, and not a few of them are Jewish. For a growing number of progressive Jews, Zionism is too militantly nationalist, while for many ultra-Orthodox Jews, the movement is insufficiently pious—even heretical. How can an idea so universally reviled retain its legitimacy, much less lay claim to success?

The answer is simple: Zionism worked. The chances were infinitesimal that a scattered national group could be assembled from some 70 countries into a sliver-sized territory shorn of resources and rich in adversaries and somehow survive, much less prosper. The odds that those immigrants would forge a national identity capable of producing a vibrant literature, pace-setting arts and six of the world’s leading universities approximated zero.

Elsewhere in the world, indigenous languages are dying out, forests are being decimated, and the populations of industrialized nations are plummeting. Yet Zionism revived the Hebrew language, which is now more widely spoken than Danish and Finnish and will soon surpass Swedish. Zionist organizations planted hundreds of forests, enabling the land of Israel to enter the 21st century with more trees than it had at the end of the 19th. And the family values that Zionism fostered have produced the fastest natural growth rate in the modernized world and history’s largest Jewish community. The average secular couple in Israel has at least three children, each a reaffirmation of confidence in Zionism’s future.

Indeed, by just about any international criteria, Israel is not only successful but flourishing. The population is annually rated among the happiest, healthiest and most educated in the world. Life expectancy in Israel, reflecting its superb universal health-care system, significantly exceeds America’s and that of most European countries. Unemployment is low, the economy robust. A global leader in innovation, Israel is home to R&D centers of some 300 high-tech companies, including Apple, Intel and Motorola. The beaches are teeming, the rock music is awesome, and the food is off the Zagat charts.

The democratic ideals integral to Zionist thought have withstood pressures that have precipitated coups and revolutions in numerous other nations. Today, Israel is one of the few states—along with Great Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the U.S.—that has never known a second of nondemocratic governance.

These accomplishments would be sufficiently astonishing if attained in North America or Northern Europe. But Zionism has prospered in the supremely inhospitable—indeed, lethal—environment of the Middle East. Two hours’ drive east of the bustling nightclubs of Tel Aviv—less than the distance between New York and Philadelphia—is Jordan, home to more than a half million refugees from Syria’s civil war. Traveling north from Tel Aviv for four hours would bring that driver to war-ravaged Damascus or, heading east, to the carnage in western Iraq. Turning south, in the time it takes to reach San Francisco from Los Angeles, the traveler would find himself in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

In a region reeling with ethnic strife and religious bloodshed, Zionism has engendered a multiethnic, multiracial and religiously diverse society. Arabs serve in the Israel Defense Forces, in the Knesset and on the Supreme Court. While Christian communities of the Middle East are steadily eradicated, Israel’s continues to grow. Israeli Arab Christians are, in fact, on average better educated and more affluent than Israeli Jews.

In view of these monumental achievements, one might think that Zionism would be admired rather than deplored. But Zionism stands accused of thwarting the national aspirations of Palestine’s indigenous inhabitants, of oppressing and dispossessing them.

Never mind that the Jews were natives of the land—its Arabic place names reveal Hebrew palimpsests—millennia before the Palestinians or the rise of Palestinian nationalism. Never mind that in 1937, 1947, 2000 and 2008, the Palestinians received offers to divide the land and rejected them, usually with violence. And never mind that the majority of Zionism’s adherents today still stand ready to share their patrimony in return for recognition of Jewish statehood and peace.

The response to date has been, at best, a refusal to remain at the negotiating table or, at worst, war. But Israelis refuse to relinquish the hope of resuming negotiations with President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority. To live in peace and security with our Palestinian neighbors remains the Zionist dream.

Still, for all of its triumphs, its resilience and openness to peace, Zionism fell short of some of its original goals. The agrarian, egalitarian society created by Zionist pioneers has been replaced by a dynamic, largely capitalist economy with yawning gaps between rich and poor. Mostly secular at its inception, Zionism has also spawned a rapidly expanding religious sector, some elements of which eschew the Jewish state.

About a fifth of Israel’s population is non-Jewish, and though some communities (such as the Druse) are intensely patriotic and often serve in the army, others are much less so, and some even call for Israel’s dissolution. And there is the issue of Judea and Samaria—what most of the world calls the West Bank—an area twice used to launch wars of national destruction against Israel but which, since its capture in 1967, has proved painfully divisive.

Many Zionists insist that these territories represent the cradle of Jewish civilization and must, by right, be settled. But others warn that continued rule over the West Bank’s Palestinian population erodes Israel’s moral foundation and will eventually force it to choose between being Jewish and remaining democratic.

Yet the most searing of Zionism’s unfulfilled visions was that of a state in which Jews could be free from the fear of annihilation. The army imagined by Theodor Herzl, Zionism’s founding father, marched in parades and saluted flag-waving crowds. The Israel Defense Forces, by contrast, with no time for marching, much less saluting, has remained in active combat mode since its founding in 1948. With the exception of Vladimir Jabotinsky, the ideological forbear of today’s Likud Party, none of Zionism’s early thinkers anticipated circumstances in which Jews would be permanently at arms. Few envisaged a state that would face multiple existential threats on a daily basis just because it is Jewish.

Confronted with such monumental threats, Israelis might be expected to flee abroad and prospective immigrants discouraged. But Israel has one of the lower emigration rates among developed countries while Jews continue to make aliyah—literally, in Hebrew, « to ascend »—to Israel. Surveys show that Israelis remain stubbornly optimistic about their country’s future. And Jews keep on arriving, especially from Europe, where their security is swiftly eroding. Last week, thousands of Parisians went on an anti-Semitic rant, looting Jewish shops and attempting to ransack synagogues.

American Jews face no comparable threat, and yet numbers of them continue to make aliyah. They come not in search of refuge but to take up the Zionist challenge—to be, as the Israeli national anthem pledges, « a free people in our land, the Land of Zion and Jerusalem. » American Jews have held every high office, from prime minister to Supreme Court chief justice to head of Israel’s equivalent of the Fed, and are disproportionately prominent in Israel’s civil society.

Hundreds of young Americans serve as « Lone Soldiers, » without families in the country, and volunteer for front-line combat units. One of them, Max Steinberg from Los Angeles, fell in the first days of the current Gaza fighting. His funeral, on Mount Herzl in Jerusalem, was attended by 30,000 people, most of them strangers, who came out of respect for this intrepid and selfless Zionist.

I also paid my respects to Max, whose Zionist journey was much like mine. After working on a kibbutz—a communal farm—I made aliyah and trained as a paratrooper. I participated in several wars, and my children have served as well, sometimes in battle. Our family has taken shelter from Iraqi Scuds and Hamas M-75s, and a suicide bomber killed one of our closest relatives.

Despite these trials, my Zionist life has been immensely fulfilling. And the reason wasn’t Zionism’s successes—not the Nobel Prizes gleaned by Israeli scholars, not the Israeli cures for chronic diseases or the breakthroughs in alternative energy. The reason—paradoxically, perhaps—was Zionism’s failures.

Failure is the price of sovereignty. Statehood means making hard and often agonizing choices—whether to attack Hamas in Palestinian neighborhoods, for example, or to suffer rocket strikes on our own territory. It requires reconciling our desire to be enlightened with our longing to remain alive. Most onerously, sovereignty involves assuming responsibility. Zionism, in my definition, means Jewish responsibility. It means taking responsibility for our infrastructure, our defense, our society and the soul of our state. It is easy to claim responsibility for victories; setbacks are far harder to embrace.

But that is precisely the lure of Zionism. Growing up in America, I felt grateful to be born in a time when Jews could assume sovereign responsibilities. Statehood is messy, but I regarded that mess as a blessing denied to my forefathers for 2,000 years. I still feel privileged today, even as Israel grapples with circumstances that are at once perilous, painful and unjust. Fighting terrorists who shoot at us from behind their own children, our children in uniform continue to be killed and wounded while much of the world brands them as war criminals.

Zionism, nevertheless, will prevail. Deriving its energy from a people that refuses to disappear and its ethos from historically tested ideas, the Zionist project will thrive. We will be vilified, we will find ourselves increasingly alone, but we will defend the homes that Zionism inspired us to build.

The Israeli media have just reported the call-up of an additional 16,000 reservists. Even as I write, they too are mobilizing for active duty—aware of the dangers, grateful for the honor and ready to bear responsibility.

Mr. Oren was Israel’s ambassador to the U.S. from 2009 to 2013. He holds the chair in international diplomacy at IDC Herzliya in Israel and is a fellow at the Atlantic Council. His books include « Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East » and « Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East, 1776 to the Present. »

Pour la défense du sionisme
L’idéologie souvent honnie qui a donné naissance à Israël est un succès historique étonnant.
Michael B. Oren

Wall Street Journal

Traduction française JSSNews

Ils sont venus de tous les coins du pays – banquiers, agriculteurs, informaticiens, batteurs de jazz, professeurs de botanique, mécaniciens – ils ont quitté leurs emplois et de leurs familles. Ils ont endossé leurs uniformes, toujours trop serrés ou trop amples, ont signé pour leur équipement et leur fusil. Ensuite, entassés dans des véhicules militaires, 70 000 réservistes – femmes et hommes – ont rejoint les jeunes conscrits de la plus grande armée de citoyens du monde. Ils savent tous que certains d’entre eux reviendront estropiés ou ne reviendront pas du tout. Et pourtant, sans hésitation ni plainte, répondant fièrement à l’appel, les Israéliens se dressent, prêts à défendre leur nation. A risquer leur vie pour un idéal.

Cet idéal est le sionisme. C’est la conviction que le peuple juif est en droit d’avoir son propre État souverain sur la terre d’Israël. Bien que fondé il y a moins de 150 ans, le mouvement sioniste est né de 4 000 longues années de lien entre le peuple juif et sa patrie historique, un attachement qui a perduré pendant 20 siècles d’exil. C’est pourquoi le sionisme a atteint ses objectifs et qu’il demeure plus que jamais actuel et fort. C’est pourquoi les citoyens d’Israël – l’Etat créé par le sionisme – prennent volontiers les armes. Car ils sont convaincus que leur idéal vaut la peine de se battre.

Pourtant, le sionisme, sans doute plus que toute autre idéologie contemporaine, est diabolisé. « Tous les sionistes sont des cibles légitimes partout dans le monde! » énonce une bannière récemment brandie par des manifestants anti-Israël au Danemark. « Les chiens sont admis dans cet établissement, mais pas les sionistes, en aucune circonstance », prévient une pancarte à la fenêtre d’un café belge. On a dit à un manifestant juif en Islande : « Toi porc sioniste, je vais te couper la tête. »

Dans certains milieux universitaires et médiatiques, le sionisme est synonyme de colonialisme et d’impérialisme. Les critiques d’extrême droite et gauche le comparent au racisme ou, pire, au nazisme. Et cela en Occident. Au Moyen-Orient, le sionisme est l’abomination ultime – le produit d’un Holocauste que beaucoup dans la région nient avoir jamais existé, ce qui ne les empêche pas de maintenir que les sionistes l’ont bien mérité.

Qu’est-ce qui, dans ​​le sionisme, suscite un tel dégoût ? Après tout, le désir d’un peuple dispersé d’avoir son propre Etat ne peut être si révulsif, surtout sachant que ce même peuple a enduré des siècles de massacres et d’expulsions, qui ont atteint leur paroxysme dans le plus grand assassinat de masse de l’histoire. Peut-être la révulsion envers le sionisme découle-t-elle de sa mixture inhabituelle d’identité nationale, de religion et de fidélité à une terre. Le Japon s’en rapproche le plus, mais malgré son passé rapace, le nationalisme japonais ne suscite pas la révulsion provoquée par le sionisme.

Il est clair que l’antisémitisme, dans ses versions européenne et musulmane, joue un rôle. Fauteurs de cabales, faucheurs d’argent, conquérants du monde et assassins de bébés – toutes ces diffamations autrefois jetées à la tête des Juifs le sont aujourd’hui à celle des sionistes. Et à l’image des capitalistes antisémites qui voyaient tous les Juifs comme des communistes et des communistes pour qui le capitalisme était intrinsèquement juif, les adversaires du sionisme le décrivent comme l’Autre abominable.

Mais tous ces détracteurs sont des fanatiques, et certains parmi eux sont des Juifs. Pour un nombre croissant de Juifs progressistes, le sionisme est un nationalisme militant, tandis que pour de nombreux Juifs ultra-orthodoxes, ce mouvement n’est pas suffisamment pieux – voire même hérétique. Comment un idéal si universellement vilipendé peut-il conserver sa légitimité, ou même prétendre être un succès ?

La réponse est simple : le sionisme a fonctionné. Les chances étaient infimes qu’un groupe dispersé à travers le monde puisse rassembler des membres de quelque 70 pays dans un territoire de la taille d’un ruban, dénué de ressources et riche en adversaires, survivre, et même prospérer. Les chances que ces immigrants se forgent une identité nationale, soient capables de produire une littérature palpitante, des arts de référence et six des plus grandes universités mondiales, étaient proches de zéro.

Ailleurs dans le monde, les langues autochtones sont en voie de disparition, les forêts sont décimées, et les populations des pays industrialisés vieillissent. Pourtant, le sionisme a fait revivre la langue hébraïque, qui est aujourd’hui plus largement parlée que le danois et le finnois et dépassera bientôt le suédois. Les organisations sionistes ont planté des centaines de forêts, faisant entrer la terre d’Israël dans le 21ème siècle avec plus d’arbres qu’à la fin du 19ème. Et les valeurs familiales que le sionisme défend produisent le taux d’accroissement naturel le plus rapide du monde moderne et la plus grande communauté juive de l’histoire. Le couple laïc moyen en Israël a au moins trois enfants, chacun étant une preuve vivante que le sionisme est confiant en l’avenir.

En effet, dans presque tous les critères internationaux, Israël n’est pas seulement victorieux, mais florissant. Sa population est chaque année classée parmi les plus heureuses, les plus saines et les plus éduquées du monde. L’espérance de vie en Israël, qui reflète son excellent système de santé universel, dépasse largement celle des Etats-Unis et de la plupart des pays européens. Le chômage est faible, l’économie robuste. Chef de file mondial en matière d’innovation, Israël est le foyer de centres R & D de 300 entreprises de haute technologie, y compris Apple, Intel et Motorola. Les plages sont prises d’assaut, la musique rock géniale et la nourriture exquise.

Les idéaux démocratiques inhérents à la pensée sioniste ont résisté aux pressions qui ont déclenché coups d’Etat et révolutions dans de nombreux autres pays. Aujourd’hui, Israël est l’un des rares Etats – avec la Grande-Bretagne, le Canada, la Nouvelle-Zélande et les Etats-Unis – n’ayant pas connu une seconde de gouvernance non démocratique.

Ces réalisations seraient suffisamment étonnantes si elles avaient eu lieu en Amérique du Nord ou en Europe du Nord. Mais le sionisme a prospéré dans l’environnement extrêmement inhospitalier –même meurtrier – du Moyen-Orient. A deux heures de route à l’est des boîtes de nuit animées de Tel Aviv – à une distance inférieure de celle entre New York et Philadelphie – se trouve la Jordanie, qui a accueilli plus d’un demi-million de réfugiés de la guerre civile syrienne. A quatre heures de route depuis le nord de Tel-Aviv, vous êtes à Damas, ravagé par la guerre, et vers l’est, dans le carnage de l’ouest de l’Irak. Vers le sud, dans la distance de San Francisco à Los Angeles, vous vous trouvez à la place Tahrir du Caire.

Dans une région envahie de conflits ethniques et de massacres religieux, le sionisme a engendré une société multiethnique, multiraciale et pluriconfessionnelle. Les Arabes servent dans les Forces de défense israéliennes, à la Knesset et à la Cour suprême. Alors que les communautés chrétiennes du Moyen-Orient sont régulièrement éradiquées, celles d’Israël continuent de croître. Les Arabes chrétiens sont, en fait, en moyenne plus instruits et plus riches que les Juifs israéliens.

Compte tenu de ces réalisations monumentales, on pourrait penser que le sionisme serait admiré plutôt que critiqué. Mais le sionisme accusés d’obstruer les aspirations nationales des habitants autochtones de la Palestine, de les opprimer et de les déposséder.

Peu importe que les Juifs peuplaient cette terre – ses noms de lieux arabes révèlent des origines hébraïques – des millénaires avant les Palestiniens ou la montée du nationalisme palestinien. Peu importe que, en 1937, 1947, 2000 et 2008, les Palestiniens aient reçu des propositions de diviser la terre et les ont rejetées, généralement avec violence. Et peu importe que la majorité des partisans du sionisme soient aujourd’hui encore prêts à partager leur patrimoine en contrepartie de la reconnaissance d’un Etat juif et de la paix.

La réponse à ce jour a été, au mieux, un refus de rester à la table de négociation ou, au pire, la guerre. Mais les Israéliens refusent de renoncer à l’espoir d’une reprise des négociations avec le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas. Vivre en paix et en sécurité avec nos voisins palestiniens reste le rêve sioniste.

Pourtant, malgré ses triomphes, sa capacité de résistance et son ouverture à la paix, le sionisme n’a pas réalisé certains de ses objectifs initiaux. La société égalitaire agraire créée par les pionniers sionistes a été remplacée par une économie dynamique, en grande partie capitaliste, creusant le fossé entre les riches et les pauvres. Partiellement laïc à ses débuts, le sionisme a également donné naissance à un secteur religieux en pleine expansion, dont certains éléments rejettent l’Etat juif.

Environ un cinquième de la population d’Israël est non-juive, et même si certaines communautés (comme les Druzes) sont intensément patriotiques et servent souvent dans l’armée, d’autres le sont beaucoup moins, et certaines appellent même à la dissolution d’Israël. Et il y a la question de la Judée-Samarie – généralement appelée la Cisjordanie – autrefois lieu de déclenchement de guerres de destruction nationale contre Israël, mais qui, depuis son annexion en 1967, divise le peuple.

Nombre de sionistes maintiennent que ces territoires représentent le berceau de la civilisation juive et doivent, de droit, être peuplés. Mais d’autres avertissent que ce contrôle de la population palestinienne de Cisjordanie érode le fondement moral d’Israël et finira par forcer à faire un choix entre être juif et rester démocratique.

Pourtant, la vision du sionisme qui ne s’est douloureusement pas réalisée est celle que les Juifs puissent être libérés de la peur d’être anéantis. L’armée imaginée par Théodore Herzl, fondateur du sionisme, devait parader dans les défilés et saluer la foule agitant des drapeaux. Les Forces de défense israéliennes, en revanche, n’ont pas le temps de défiler, encore moins de saluer, consacrées depuis leur fondation en 1948 à défendre leur pays sans relâche. A l’exception de Vladimir Jabotinsky, le père du Likoud, aucun des pionniers du sionisme n’avait prévu que les nouveaux Juifs devraient toujours être prêts à prendre les armes. Ils n’avaient pas envisagé que cet Etat serait constamment en butte à de multiples menaces existentielles, pour la simple raison qu’il est juif.

Face à de telles menaces monumentales, on devait voir les Israéliens fuir à l’étranger et les immigrants potentiels baisser les bras. Israël connaît un des taux d’émigration les plus faibles parmi les pays développés et les Juifs continuent à faire leur aliya, littéralement, en hébreu, « monter » à Israël. Les enquêtes montrent que les Israéliens restent obstinément optimistes quant à l’avenir de leur pays. Et les Juifs continuent d’affluer, en particulier d’Europe, où leur sécurité s’est rapidement détériorée. La semaine dernière, des milliers de Parisiens ont manifesté aux sons d’une diatribe antisémite, pillé des magasins juifs et tenté de saccager des synagogues.

Les Juifs américains ne connaissent pas de menace comparable, et pourtant nombre d’entre eux continuent à faire leur aliya. Ils ne viennent pas à la recherche d’un refuge, mais pour relever le défi sioniste, évoqué dans l’hymne national israélien, « être un peuple libre sur notre terre, la terre de Sion et de Jérusalem. »

Des centaines de jeunes Américains sont des « soldats seuls », sans aucune famille dans le pays, et se portent volontaires aux premières lignes des unités combattantes. L’un d’eux, Max Steinberg de Los Angeles, est tombé aux premiers jours des combats à Gaza. Ses funérailles, au Mont Herzl à Jérusalem, ont réuni 30 000 personnes, la plupart d’entre eux des étrangers, venus par respect pour ce sioniste intrépide et altruiste.

J’ai aussi rendu hommage à Max, dont l’épopée sioniste ressemble beaucoup à la mienne. Après avoir travaillé dans un kibboutz, j’ai fait mon aliya, et suivi une formation de parachutiste. J’ai participé à plusieurs guerres, et mes enfants ont servi dans les rangs de l’armée, et parfois combattu. Notre famille s’est abritée des Scuds irakiens et des M-75 du Hamas, et un terroriste suicide a assassiné l’un de nos proches parents.

Malgré ces épreuves, ma vie sioniste est extrêmement enrichissante. Et non grâce aux succès de cette idéologie – les prix Nobel remportés par des chercheurs israéliens, les remèdes israéliens aux maladies chroniques ou les percées dans les énergies alternatives. Mais, paradoxalement, grâce à ses échecs.

L’échec est le prix de la souveraineté. Gouverner signifie faire des choix difficiles et souvent angoissants – attaquer le Hamas dans les zones peuplées, par exemple, ou de subir des tirs de roquettes sur notre propre territoire. Il faut concilier entre notre désir d’être éclairé et celui de rester en vie. Souvent en payant le prix, la souveraineté implique d’assumer ses responsabilités. Le sionisme, pour moi, est une responsabilité juive. Il signifie endosser la responsabilité de notre infrastructure, de notre défense, de notre société et de l’âme de notre Etat​​. Il est facile de s’attribuer les victoires ; beaucoup plus difficile d’assumer les échecs.

Mais c’est précisément l’attrait du sionisme. En grandissant en Amérique, j’étais reconnaissant d’être né à une époque où les Juifs peuvent assumer des responsabilités souveraines. Gouverner est chaotique, mais ce chaos est une bénédiction refusée à mes ancêtres depuis 2 000 ans. Et je ressens toujours ce privilège aujourd’hui, même si Israël est face à une situation à la fois périlleuse, douloureuse et injuste. Même s’il lutte contre des terroristes qui tirent en se cachant derrière leurs propres enfants, même si nos enfants en uniformes sont tués et blessés, tandis que le monde les traite de criminels de guerre.

Le sionisme, néanmoins, vaincra. Tirant son énergie d’un peuple qui refuse de disparaître et sa philosophie d’idéaux qui ont fait leurs preuves historiquement, le projet sioniste prospérera. Nous serons honnis, nous nous retrouverons de plus en plus seuls, mais nous défendrons les maisons que ce sionisme nous a poussés à construire.

Par M. Oren – Wall Street Journal – Traduction JSSNews

M. Oren était l’ambassadeur d’Israël aux États-Unis de 2009 à 2013. Il est titulaire de la chaire de diplomatie internationale au IDC Herzliya en Israël et est membre du Conseil de l’Atlantique. Parmi ses livres, “Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East”, et “Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East, 1776 to the Present.”

Voir enfin:

Les images manquantes de la guerre contre le Hamas

En coopérant à la censure médiatique du Hamas sur ses combattants, la presse internationale ne relate qu’une partie de l’histoire

Uriel Heilman

Times of Israel

1 août 2014

On ne manque pas d’images du conflit de Gaza.

Nous avons vu les décombres, les enfants palestiniens morts, les Israéliens courir aux abris pendant les attaques de roquettes, les manœuvres israéliennes et les images fournies par l’armée israélienne des militants du Hamas sortant de tunnels pour attaquer les soldats israéliens.

Nous n’avons pratiquement pas vu aucune image d’hommes armés du Hamas à Gaza.

Nous savons qu’ils sont là : il y a bien quelqu’un qui doit se charger de lancer les roquettes sur Israël (plus de 2 800) et de les tirer sur les troupes israéliennes dans Gaza. Pourtant, jusqu’à maintenant, les seules images que nous avons vues (ou dont nous avons même entendu parler) sont les vidéos fournies par l’armée israélienne de terroristes du Hamas utilisant les hôpitaux, les ambulances, les mosquées, les écoles (et les tunnels) pour lancer des attaques contre des cibles israéliennes ou transporter des armes autour de Gaza.

Pourquoi n’avons nous pas vu des photographies prises par des journalistes d’hommes du Hamas dans Gaza ?

Nous savons que le Hamas ne veut pas que le monde voit les hommes armés palestiniens en train de lancer de roquettes ou utilisant des lieux peuplés de civils comme des bases d’opération. Mais si l’on peut voir des images des deux côtés pratiquement dans toutes les guerres, en Syrie, en Ukraine, en Irak, pourquoi Gaza fait-elle figure d’exception ?

Si des journalistes sont menacés et intimidés lorsqu’ils essaient de documenter les activités du Hamas dans Gaza, leurs agences de presse devraient le dire publiquement. Elles ne le font pas.

Mardi, le New York Times a publié un article du photographe Sergeï Ponomarev sur ses journées à Gaza. Voici ce que Ponomarev écrit :

C’était une guerre de routine. On part tôt le matin pour voir des maisons détruites la veille. Ensuite on va aux funérailles, ensuite aux hôpitaux parce que plus de personnes blessées arrivent et dans la soirée on retourne voir plus de maisons détruites.

C’était la même chose chaque jour, en passant simplement de Rafah à Khan Younis.

Y-a-t-il des tentatives de documenter les activités du Hamas ?

Si, comme moi, vous vous demandez si le New York Times a envoyé un autre photographe pour couvrir cet aspect de l’histoire : le New York Times n’a pas publié de photos de combattants du Hamas à Gaza, point final. En regardant les trois dernières séries de reportages photographiques du journal sur le conflit, sur un total de 37 images, il n’y en a pas une seule sur un combattant du Hamas.

Dans la série de reportage photo du L.A Times, sur plus de 75 photographies du conflit, il n’y a pas non plus une seule image de combattants du Hamas, selon le Comité américain pour la Précision du reportage au Moyen Orient.

Pour de nombreux spectateurs, le récit de cette guerre doit apparaître très clair : le puissant Israël bombarde des Palestiniens sans défense. C’est compréhensible lorsque l’on ne voit presque aucune photographie des agresseurs palestiniens.

Dans un article du Washington Post de William Booth datant du 15 juillet, l’utilisation du Hamas de l’hôpital Al-Shifa dans la ville de Gaza comme une base opératoire est mentionnée, mais on consacre seulement une demi-phrase dans le huitième paragraphe de l’article.

Le ministre a été refoulé avant qu’il ne puisse atteindre l’hôpital qui est devenu de facto un quartier général pour les dirigeants du Hamas, comme on peut le voir dans les couloirs et les bureaux.

Comme l’a noté Tablet, c’est ce que l’on appelle noyer le poisson.

Dans la même logique, une agence de presse palestinienne a annoncé cette semaine que le Hamas a exécuté des dizaines de Palestiniens suspectés d’avoir collaboré avec Israël la semaine dernière. Le JTA a repris cette information, mais elle n’a pas été mentionnée par les grandes agences de presse.

Soit les journalistes et les rédacteurs de chef ne sont pas intéressés à raconter cette partie de l’histoire qui montre ce que le Hamas fait dans Gaza soit ils n’en sont pas capables. Arrêtons-nous sur cette dernière possibilité.

On a beaucoup parlé du côté des soutiens d’Israël d’une décision de Nick Casy du Wall Street Journal d’effacer un tweet au sujet du mode d’utilisation du Hamas de l’hôpital Shifa comme une base d’opérations. On peut supposer que Casy a effacé le tweet à cause des menaces du Hamas soit sur sa personne ou sur sa capacité à continuer à couvrir le conflit.

Un article du Times of Israel suggérait déjà cela plus tôt dans la
semaine :

Plusieurs journalistes occidentaux travaillant actuellement à Gaza ont été harcelés et menacés par le Hamas pour avoir documenté des cas de l’implication par le groupe terroriste de civils dans sa guerre contre Israël, ont déclaré des officiels israéliens en exprimant leur indignation que certains média internationaux se laissent apparemment intimider sans même évoquer ce type d’incidents.

Le Times of Israel a confirmé plusieurs incidents au cours desquels des journalistes ont été interrogés et menacés. Cela incluait des cas où des photographes qui avaient pris des photos de terroristes du Hamas dans des circonstances compromettantes, des hommes armés préparant des tirs de roquettes dans des structures civiles, et/ou des combattants en habits civils, et qui avaient été approchés par des hommes du Hamas, menacés physiquement et on leur avait pris leurs équipements. Un autre cas impliquant un journaliste français avait tout d’abord été annoncé par le journaliste impliqué, mais le récit avait ensuite été retiré d’Internet.

Après avoir quitté Gaza, la journaliste indépendante Gabriele Barbati, dans une série de tweets condamnant le Hamas pour un incident récent avec des victimes civiles, avait soutenu les déclarations que le Hamas menaçait des journalistes :

Sorti de #Gaza loin des représailles du #Hamas : tir de roquette manqué a tué des enfants hier à Shati. Témoin : des militants se sont précipités pour enlever les débris (29 juillet).

Pourquoi peut-on seulement lire des articles sur l’intimidation dans des médias juifs ou israéliens, ou sur des blogs, mais pas dans les grands médias occidentaux ?

Sur son blog Powerline, l’avocat Scott Johnson demande aux agences de presse de remédier à cela :

Les menaces du Hamas ne sont pas responsables de l’ignorance et de la stupidité de la couverture des hostilités à Gaza, mais elles sont en partie responsables. Les journalistes et les médias employeurs coopèrent avec le Hamas non seulement en passant sous silence des histoires qui ne servent pas la cause du Hamas, mais aussi en ne parlant pas des conditions restrictives dans lesquelles ils travaillent.

Ce n’est pas un détail. L’opinion publique est un élément crucial dans ce conflit. Elle va jouer un rôle pour déterminer quand les combats cesseront, à quoi ressemblera le cessez-le-feu et qui portera en priorité la responsabilité pour la mort d’innocents.

Si les grands médias suppriment les images des terroristes du Hamas utilisant des civils comme des boucliers et utilisant des écoles et des hôpitaux comme des bases d’opérations, alors les gens autour du monde auront naturellement du mal à voir les Israéliens comme autre chose que des agresseurs et les Palestiniens comme autre chose que des victimes.

Ils n’ont pourtant qu’une partie de l’histoire. Et d’où je viens, une demi-vérité est considérée comme un mensonge.


Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 343 autres abonnés

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :