Irak: Ah, le bon vieux temps de Saddam! (Bagdad worst: Guess who’s got the curse of Google auto-complete this year ?)

23 mars, 2014
https://i0.wp.com/www.iranchamber.com/history/articles/images/saddam_baathist_propaganda.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/planetgroupentertainment.squarespace.com/storage/SaddamHussein.jpgJe pense (qu’il s’agit d’une guerre civile, ndlr), étant donné le niveau de violence, de meurtres, d’amertume, et la façon dont les forces se dressent les unes contres les autres. Il y a quelques années, lorsqu’il y avait une lutte au Liban ou ailleurs, on appelait cela une guerre civile. C’est bien pire. Ils avaient un dictateur brutal, mais ils avaient leurs rues, ils pouvaient sortir, leurs enfants pouvaient aller à l’école et en revenir sans que leurs parents ne se demandent ‘Vais-je revoir mon enfant ?’ (…) Les choses n’ont pas marché comme ils (les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés, ndlr) l’espéraient et il est essentiel d’avoir un regard critique  (…)  le gouvernement irakien n’a pas été capable de mettre la violence sous contrôle. (…) En tant que secrétaire général, j’ai fais tout ce que j’ai pu. Kofi Annan
Si du temps de Saddam Hussein, le chômage sévissait déjà et l’eau et d’électricité manquaient, les problèmes étaient d’une moindre ampleur et mieux gérés. La sécurité, elle, s’est totalement détériorée depuis l’invasion de l’Irak, menée en 2003 par une coalition conduite par les Etats-Unis. Pourtant, Bagdad a une histoire glorieuse. Construite en 762 sur les rives du Tigre par le calife abbasside Abou Jaafar al-Mansour, la ville a depuis joué un rôle central dans le monde arabo-musulman. Au 20e siècle, Bagdad était le brillant exemple d’une ville arabe moderne avec certaines des meilleurs universités et musées de la région, une élite bien formée, un centre culturel dynamique et un système de santé haut de gamme. Son aéroport international était un modèle pour la région et la ville a connu la naissance de l’Opep, le cartel des pays exportateurs de pétrole. La ville abritait en outre une population de différentes confessions: musulmans, chrétiens, juifs et autres. « Bagdad représentait le centre économique de l’Etat abbasside », souligne Issam al-Faili, professeur d’histoire politique à l’université Moustansiriyah, un établissement vieux de huit siècles. Il rappelle qu’elle a « servi de base à la conquête de régions voisines pour élargir l’influence de l’islam ». »Elle était une capitale du monde », dit, avec fierté, l’universitaire, qui admet qu' »aujourd’hui, elle est devenue l’une des villes les plus misérables de la planète ». AFP
Every expat I know here is mystified by that data. I’d be hard-pressed to find an expat (not a lot of them around admittedly) who believes that’s the case, apart from the prisoners of the Green Zone — the embassy people, U.N. staff and others who can’t actually get out into the city. Jane Arraf (freelance journalist)
The Iraqi capital has beaten out 222 other locations to be named the city with the lowest quality of life for expats in the entire world. Baghdad is so bad, according to Mercer, that companies should pay people a considerable amount extra to live there. As Hannibal explained to me, companies would likely have to pay an employee an extra 35-40 percent on top of their base salary as compensation for the poor quality of life in Iraq – that some companies might go as high as 50 percent in cash or other services. Worse still, Baghdad is a persistent worst offender in Mercer’s data, gradually falling down the rankings since 2001 and ranking last since 2004. It’s even acquired the curse of Google Auto-complete: Type « Baghdad Worst » into the search engine, and « Baghdad worst place to live » and « Baghdad worst city » appear. The Washington Post
Political instability, high crime levels, and elevated air pollution are a few factors that can be detrimental to the daily lives of expatriate employees their families and local residents. To ensure that compensation packages reflect the local environment appropriately, employers need a clear picture of the quality of living in the cities where they operate. In a world economy that is becoming more globalised, cities beyond the traditional financial and business centres are working to improve their quality of living so they can attract more foreign companies. This year’s survey recognises so-called ‘second tier’ or ‘emerging’ cites and points to a few examples from around the world These cities have been investing massively in their infrastructure and attracting foreign direct investments by providing incentives such as tax, housing, or entry facilities. Emerging cities will become major players that traditional financial centres and capital cities will have to compete with. European cities enjoy a high overall quality of living compared to those in other regions. Healthcare, infrastructure, and recreational facilities are generally of a very high standard. Political stability and relatively low crime levels enable expatriates to feel safe and secure in most locations. The region has seen few changes in living standards over the last year. Several cities in Central and South America are still attractive to expatriates due to their relatively stable political environments, improving infrastructure, and pleasant climate. But many locations remain challenging due to natural disasters, such as hurricanes often hitting the region, as well as local economic inequality and high crime rates. Companies placing their workers on expatriate assignments in these locations must ensure that hardship allowances reflect the lower levels of quality of living. The Middle East and especially Africa remain one of the most challenging regions for multinational organisations and expatriates. Regional instability and disruptive political events, including civil unrest, lack of infrastructure and natural disasters such as flooding, keep the quality of living from improving in many of its cities. However, some cities that might not have been very attractive to foreign companies are making efforts to attract them. Slagin Parakatil (Senior Researcher at Mercer)
The abysmal Iraq results forecast what could happen in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have so far spent $90 billion in reconstruction projects during a 12-year military campaign that is slated to end, for the most part, in 2014. Shortly after the March 2003 invasion, Congress set up a $2.4 billion fund to help ease the sting of war for Iraqis. It aimed to rebuild Iraq’s water and electricity systems; provide food, health care and governance for its people; and take care of those who were forced from their homes in the fighting. Less than six months later, President George W. Bush asked for $20 billion more to further stabilize Iraq and help turn it into an ally that could gain economic independence and reap global investments. To date, the U.S. has spent more than $60 billion in reconstruction grants to help Iraq get back on its feet after the country was broken by more than two decades of war, sanctions and dictatorship. That works out to about $15 million a day. And yet Iraq’s government is rife with corruption and infighting. Baghdad’s streets are still cowed by near-daily deadly bombings. A quarter of the country’s 31 million population lives in poverty, and few have reliable electricity and clean water. Overall, including all military and diplomatic costs and other aid, the U.S. has spent at least $767 billion since the American-led invasion, according to the Congressional Budget Office. National Priorities Project, a U.S. research group that analyzes federal data, estimated the cost at $811 billion, noting that some funds are still being spent on ongoing projects. Sen. Susan Collins, a member of the Senate committee that oversees U.S. funding, said the Bush administration should have agreed to give the reconstruction money to Iraq as a loan in 2003 instead as an outright gift. « It’s been an extraordinarily disappointing effort and, largely, a failed program, » Collins, R-Maine, said in an interview Tuesday. « I believe, had the money been structured as a loan in the first place, that we would have seen a far more responsible approach to how the money was used, and lower levels of corruption in far fewer ways. » (…) Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno, who was the top U.S. military commander in Iraq from 2008 to 2010, said, « It would have been better to hold off spending large sums of money » until the country stabilized. About a third of the $60 billion was spent to train and equip Iraqi security forces, which had to be rebuilt after the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority disbanded Saddam’s army in 2003. Today, Iraqi forces have varying successes in safekeeping the public and only limited ability to secure their land, air and sea borders. The report also cites Defense Secretary Leon Panetta as saying that the 2011 withdrawal of American troops from Iraq weakened U.S. influence in Baghdad. Panetta has since left office: Former Sen. Chuck Hagel took over the defense job last week. Washington is eyeing a similar military drawdown next year in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have spent $90 billion so far on rebuilding projects. The Afghanistan effort risks falling into the same problems that mired Iraq if oversight isn’t coordinated better. In Iraq, officials were too eager to build in the middle of a civil war, and too often raced ahead without solid plans or back-up plans, the report concluded. CBS news

Oubliez Damas ! Oubliez Grozny ! (sans parler de Tbilisi ou bientôt Kiev ?)

A l’heure où, après les dérives catastrophiques des années Bush, une Russie reconnaissante se réjouit du retour au bercail de sa province perdue de Crimée …

Et où sort le classement mondial des villes pour la qualité de vie par le leader mondial du conseil en ressources humaines Mercer Consulting Group …

(Vienne,  Vancouver, Pointe-à-Pitre, Singapour, Auckland, Port-Louis et Dubai contre Tbilisi, Mexico, Port-au-Prince, Dushanbe, Bangui et Bagdad) …

Comment, avec l’agence de presse nationale française AFP, ne pas être scandalisé de ce que le cowboy Bush a fait de la cité arabe modèle de Saddam

Qui, entre sa guerre et ses milliards (60 milliards de dollars de reconstruction, 800 avec la guerre !), se retrouve onze ans après… pire ville du monde ?

Jadis cité arabe modèle, Bagdad devient la pire ville au monde

Le Nouvel Observateur

AFPPar Salam FARAJ | AFP

21 mars 2014

Cité modèle dans le monde arabe jusqu’aux années 1970, Bagdad est devenue, après des décennies de conflits, la pire ville au monde en matière de qualité de vie.

La capitale irakienne -édifiée sur les rives du Tigre il y a 1.250 ans et jadis un centre intellectuel, économique et politique de renommée mondiale- est arrivée en 223e et dernière position du classement 2014 sur la qualité de vie, établi par le leader mondial du conseil en ressources humaines Mercer Consulting Group.

Ce classement tient compte de l’environnement social, politique et économique de la ville, qui compte 8,5 millions d’habitants, ainsi que des critères relatifs à la santé et l’éducation.

Et à Bagdad, les habitants doivent faire face à une multitude de problèmes: attentats quasi-quotidiens, pénurie d’électricité et d’eau potable, mauvais système d?égouts, embouteillages réguliers et taux de chômage élevé.

Si du temps de Saddam Hussein, le chômage sévissait déjà et l’eau et d’électricité manquaient, les problèmes étaient d’une moindre ampleur et mieux gérés.

La sécurité, elle, s’est totalement détériorée depuis l’invasion de l’Irak, menée en 2003 par une coalition conduite par les Etats-Unis.

« Nous vivons dans des casernes », se plaint Hamid al-Daraji, un vendeur, en évoquant les nombreux points de contrôle, les murs en béton anti-explosion et le déploiement massif des forces de sécurité.

« Riches et pauvres partagent la même souffrance », ajoute-t-il. « Le riche peut être à tout moment la cible d’une attaque à l’explosif, d’un rapt ou d’un assassinat, tout comme le pauvre ».

Pourtant, Bagdad a une histoire glorieuse.

Construite en 762 sur les rives du Tigre par le calife abbasside Abou Jaafar al-Mansour, la ville a depuis joué un rôle central dans le monde arabo-musulman.

Au 20e siècle, Bagdad était le brillant exemple d’une ville arabe moderne avec certaines des meilleurs universités et musées de la région, une élite bien formée, un centre culturel dynamique et un système de santé haut de gamme.

Son aéroport international était un modèle pour la région et la ville a connu la naissance de l’Opep, le cartel des pays exportateurs de pétrole.

La ville abritait en outre une population de différentes confessions: musulmans, chrétiens, juifs et autres.

« Bagdad représentait le centre économique de l’Etat abbasside », souligne Issam al-Faili, professeur d’histoire politique à l’université Moustansiriyah, un établissement vieux de huit siècles.

Il rappelle qu’elle a « servi de base à la conquête de régions voisines pour élargir l’influence de l’islam ».

– ‘Bagdad, la belle, en ruines’ –

« Elle était une capitale du monde », dit, avec fierté, l’universitaire, qui admet qu' »aujourd’hui, elle est devenue l’une des villes les plus misérables de la planète ».

L’Irak connaît depuis un an une recrudescence des violences, alimentées par le ressentiment de la minorité sunnite face au gouvernement dominé par les chiites, et par le conflit en Syrie voisine. Depuis le début 2014, plus de 1.900 personnes ont été tuées.

Face aux violences, les forces de sécurité installent de nouveaux points de contrôle, qui pullulent déjà à Bagdad, et imposent des restrictions au trafic routier. Des murs massifs en béton, conçus pour résister à l’impact des explosions, divisent des quartiers confessionnellement mixtes.

Certains tentent de nettoyer et d’embellir la ville mais reconnaissent la difficulté de la mission.

« Les gouvernements successifs n’ont pas travaillé pour développer Bagdad », regrette Amir al-Chalabi, chef d’une ONG, la Humanitarian Construction Organisation, qui mène campagne pour améliorer les services de base dans la ville.

« La nuit, elle se transforme en une ville fantôme car elle manque d’éclairage », note-t-il.

Des câbles électriques pendent dans les rues où des particuliers gérant de générateurs fournissent, contre rémunération, du courant électrique, compensant ainsi les défaillances du réseau public. Et en raison du réseau limité des égouts, les rues de la capitale sont inondées dès les premières pluies.

Et malgré une économie en forte croissance grâce au pétrole, en pleine reprise, ce secteur n’est pas générateur d’emplois pour enrayer le taux de chômage dans le pays, y compris dans la capitale.

« Les problèmes de Bagdad sont innombrables. Bagdad la belle est aujourd’hui en ruines », se lamente Hamid al-Daraji.

Voir aussi:

Why do people choose to live in the ‘worst city in the world?’

Adam Taylor

The Washington Post

February 26 2014

Human resources consulting firm Mercer recently crunched the numbers on dozens of factors about life for an expatriate. The aim? To calculate exactly how much extra international firms should be willing to pay their employees when asking them to move to undesirable locations.(While Mercer wouldn’t release the precise data, Ed Hannibal, a global mobility leader at the company, said that factors involved included such concerns as security, infrastructure and the availability of international goods).

While the data has its practical uses, it has another, more viral, function too: Ranking the « best » and « worst » cities for quality of life in the entire world.

For example, it turns out that expats asked to move to Austria are pretty lucky: Vienna ranked top of the list for expats, followed by Zurich, Auckland, Munich and Vancouver. For all of these cities, Hannibal told me, quality of life was so good that companies were recommended to not pay employees there any hardship costs at all.

But down at the other end of the scale, it’s a different story. According to Mercer, companies should be willing to pay top dollar for some cities, and none more so than Baghdad.

Yes, the Iraqi capital has beaten out 222 other locations to be named the city with the lowest quality of life for expats in the entire world.

Baghdad is so bad, according to Mercer, that companies should pay people a considerable amount extra to live there. As Hannibal explained to me, companies would likely have to pay an employee an extra 35-40 percent on top of their base salary as compensation for the poor quality of life in Iraq – that some companies might go as high as 50 percent in cash or other services. Worse still, Baghdad is a persistent worst offender in Mercer’s data, gradually falling down the rankings since 2001 and ranking last since 2004. It’s even acquired the curse of Google Auto-complete: Type « Baghdad Worst » into the search engine, and « Baghdad worst place to live » and « Baghdad worst city » appear.

Could a bustling city of 6 million people really be the worst city in the world? To get a better perspective on it, I reached out to a few Baghdad expats, people who, unlike most Iraqis, made a choice to live in Iraq. Surprisingly, most seemed to be aware that they were apparently living in the worst place they could live.

« I know exactly which survey you mean, » said one person who has lived in Baghdad for five years and asked not to be named. « I have often thought of that survey when I take the direct Austrian air flight from Baghdad to Vienna, thereby going from the worst city to the best city in the world in a matter of a few hours. »

Others, however, were quick to argue that the poll didn’t reflect the Baghdad they knew. « Every expat I know here is mystified by that data, » said Jane Arraf, a freelance journalist who has spent many years in the city. « I’d be hard-pressed to find an expat (not a lot of them around admittedly) who believes that’s the case, apart from the prisoners of the Green Zone — the embassy people, U.N. staff and others who can’t actually get out into the city. »

It seems obvious, of course, that Baghdad is a more dangerous place than Vienna: More than 1,000 people were killed in attacks last month, for example. And surely luxury goods would be easier to find in a Western city (when I asked one Baghdad resident about the availability of international goods, they e-mailed back: « hahahahahahahaha »).

« In a sense, almost anything an Iraqi could want can be obtained, » Raoul Henri Alcala, a private businessman who has lived in the city for 10 years explains, « although often at a high price that also often includes payments to facilitators that can best be described as blatant corruption. »

Alcala, who once worked for the Iraqi government and now runs his own consulting firm, lives in the « Green Zone » and says that while his choice of location is safer than the outside city (the « Red Zone »), his location provides its own difficulties. « Shops do exist in the Zone selling food, beverages, pharmaceuticals and minor comfort items, » Alcala says. « Everything else has to be purchased outside, and can be brought into the Zone only after a laborious written authorization is requested and received. » Popular restaurants, markets and liquor stores outside the Green Zone have become targets for terror attacks, according to Alcala.

Alcala says that he has never lived in a city with a comparable « level of uncertainty and difficulty. » There do appear to be rivals, however, for Baghdad’s « worst city » crown. In the Mercer data, it narrowly beats out Bangui in the Central African Republic, Port-Au-Prince in Haiti, N’Djamena in Chad and Sana’a in Yemen. Plus, there are more than 223 cities on Earth. It’s plausible that one of these unlisted locations is « worse » than Baghdad (and, for what it’s worth, rival data from the Economist Intelligence Unit states that Damascus was the worst place in the world to live).

Baghdad’s place at the bottom of the list is a little more depressing when you consider that much of the lack of infrastructure and chaotic security situation can at least partially be blamed on eight years of U.S.-led war (the U.S. government has spent $60 billion in civilian reconstruction to be fair, though much of it is thought to have been wasted). That weight must affect some expats in Baghdad: One told me that she « felt a sense of responsibility to clean up the mess that George Bush made. » On the other hand, others explained that the potential for personal remuneration was likely a serious motive for many expats.

Ultimately, people who choose to live in a place like Baghdad probably do so for a complicated set of reasons. As Arraf puts it, there are two types of people in the world: The « you couldn’t pay me enough to do this » types, and the « I can’t believe I’m getting paid to do this » types. The latter should probably ignore Mercer’s data.

Voir enfin:

Baghdad Now World’s Worst City

AlJazeerah.net

3-3-4

Baghdad has been rated the world’s worst city to live in.

A new study by a UK research company puts the occupied Iraqi capital last of 215 cities it profiled throughout the world.

Mercer Human Resource Consulting based its overall quality of life survey on political, social, economic and environmental factors, as well as personal safety, health, education, transport and other public services.

It was compiled to help governments and major companies to place employees on international assignments.

The study, released on Monday, said Baghdad is now the world’s least attractive city for expatriates.

Top Swiss cities

Placed 213th out of 215 cities last year, Baghdad’s rating has dropped due to ongoing concerns over security and the city’s precarious infrastructure.

The survey revealed that Zurich and Geneva are the world’s top-rated urban centres.

The rating takes into account the cities’ schools, where standards of education are now considered among the best in the world.

Cities in Europe, New Zealand, and Australia continue to dominate the top of the rankings.

Vienna shares third place with Vancouver, while Auckland, Bern, Copenhagen, Frankfurt and Sydney are joint fifth.

US cities slide

However, US cities have slipped in the rankings this year as tighter restrictions have been imposed on entry to the country.

Several US cities now also have to deal with increased security checks as a result of the « war on terror ».

Meanwhile, other poor-scoring cities for overall quality of life include Bangui in the Central African Republic, and Brazzaville and Pointe Noire in Congo.

Mercer senior researcher Slagin Parakatil said: « The threat of terrorism in the Middle East and the political and economic turmoil in African countries has increased the disparity between cities at the top and the bottom end of the rankings. »

Voir encore:

Much of $60B from U.S. to rebuild Iraq wasted, special auditor’s final report to Congress shows

CBS news

APMarch 6, 2013

WASHINGTON Ten years and $60 billion in American taxpayer funds later, Iraq is still so unstable and broken that even its leaders question whether U.S. efforts to rebuild the war-torn nation were worth the cost.

In his final report to Congress, Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction Stuart Bowen’s conclusion was all too clear: Since the invasion a decade ago this month, the U.S. has spent too much money in Iraq for too few results.

The reconstruction effort « grew to a size much larger than was ever anticipated, » Bowen told The Associated Press in a preview of his last audit of U.S. funds spent in Iraq, to be released Wednesday. « Not enough was accomplished for the size of the funds expended. »

In interviews with Bowen, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki said the U.S. funding « could have brought great change in Iraq » but fell short too often. « There was misspending of money, » said al-Maliki, a Shiite Muslim whose sect makes up about 60 percent of Iraq’s population.

Iraqi Parliament Speaker Osama al-Nujaifi, the country’s top Sunni Muslim official, told auditors that the rebuilding efforts « had unfavorable outcomes in general. »

« You think if you throw money at a problem, you can fix it, » Kurdish government official Qubad Talabani, son of Iraqi president Jalal Talabani, told auditors. « It was just not strategic thinking. »

The abysmal Iraq results forecast what could happen in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have so far spent $90 billion in reconstruction projects during a 12-year military campaign that is slated to end, for the most part, in 2014.

Shortly after the March 2003 invasion, Congress set up a $2.4 billion fund to help ease the sting of war for Iraqis. It aimed to rebuild Iraq’s water and electricity systems; provide food, health care and governance for its people; and take care of those who were forced from their homes in the fighting. Less than six months later, President George W. Bush asked for $20 billion more to further stabilize Iraq and help turn it into an ally that could gain economic independence and reap global investments.

To date, the U.S. has spent more than $60 billion in reconstruction grants to help Iraq get back on its feet after the country was broken by more than two decades of war, sanctions and dictatorship. That works out to about $15 million a day.

And yet Iraq’s government is rife with corruption and infighting. Baghdad’s streets are still cowed by near-daily deadly bombings. A quarter of the country’s 31 million population lives in poverty, and few have reliable electricity and clean water.

Overall, including all military and diplomatic costs and other aid, the U.S. has spent at least $767 billion since the American-led invasion, according to the Congressional Budget Office. National Priorities Project, a U.S. research group that analyzes federal data, estimated the cost at $811 billion, noting that some funds are still being spent on ongoing projects.

Sen. Susan Collins, a member of the Senate committee that oversees U.S. funding, said the Bush administration should have agreed to give the reconstruction money to Iraq as a loan in 2003 instead as an outright gift.

« It’s been an extraordinarily disappointing effort and, largely, a failed program, » Collins, R-Maine, said in an interview Tuesday. « I believe, had the money been structured as a loan in the first place, that we would have seen a far more responsible approach to how the money was used, and lower levels of corruption in far fewer ways. »

In numerous interviews with Iraqi and U.S. officials, and though multiple examples of thwarted or defrauded projects, Bowen’s report laid bare a trail of waste, including:

–In Iraq’s eastern Diyala province, a crossroads for Shiite militias, Sunni insurgents and Kurdish squatters, the U.S. began building a 3,600-bed prison in 2004 but abandoned the project after three years to flee a surge in violence. The half-completed Khan Bani Sa’ad Correctional Facility cost American taxpayers $40 million but sits in rubble, and Iraqi Justice Ministry officials say they have no plans to ever finish or use it.

–Subcontractors for Anham LLC, based in Vienna, Va., overcharged the U.S. government thousands of dollars for supplies, including $900 for a control switch valued at $7.05 and $80 for a piece of pipe that costs $1.41. Anham was hired to maintain and operate warehouses and supply centers near Baghdad’s international airport and the Persian Gulf port at Umm Qasr.

–A $108 million wastewater treatment center in the city of Fallujah, a former al Qaeda stronghold in western Iraq, will have taken eight years longer to build than planned when it is completed in 2014 and will only service 9,000 homes. Iraqi officials must provide an additional $87 million to hook up most of the rest of the city, or 25,000 additional homes.

–After blowing up the al-Fatah bridge in north-central Iraq during the invasion and severing a crucial oil and gas pipeline, U.S. officials decided to try to rebuild the pipeline under the Tigris River, at a cost of $75 million. A geological study predicted the project might fail, and it did: Eventually, the bridge and pipelines were repaired at an additional cost of $29 million.

–A widespread ring of fraud led by a former U.S. Army officer resulted in tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and the criminal convictions of 22 people connected to government contracts for bottled water and other supplies at the Iraqi reconstruction program’s headquarters at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait.

In too many cases, Bowen concluded, U.S. officials did not consult with Iraqis closely or deeply enough to determine what reconstruction projects were really needed or, in some cases, wanted. As a result, Iraqis took limited interest in the work, often walking away from half-finished programs, refusing to pay their share, or failing to maintain completed projects once they were handed over.

Deputy Prime Minister Hussain al-Shahristani, a Shiite, described the projects as well intentioned, but poorly prepared and inadequately supervised.

The missed opportunities were not lost on at least 15 senior State and Defense department officials interviewed in the report, including ambassadors and generals, who were directly involved in rebuilding Iraq.

One key lesson learned in Iraq, Deputy Secretary of State William Burns told auditors, is that the U.S. cannot expect to « do it all and do it our way. We must share the burden better multilaterally and engage the host country constantly on what is truly needed. »

Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno, who was the top U.S. military commander in Iraq from 2008 to 2010, said, « It would have been better to hold off spending large sums of money » until the country stabilized.

About a third of the $60 billion was spent to train and equip Iraqi security forces, which had to be rebuilt after the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority disbanded Saddam’s army in 2003. Today, Iraqi forces have varying successes in safekeeping the public and only limited ability to secure their land, air and sea borders.

The report also cites Defense Secretary Leon Panetta as saying that the 2011 withdrawal of American troops from Iraq weakened U.S. influence in Baghdad. Panetta has since left office: Former Sen. Chuck Hagel took over the defense job last week. Washington is eyeing a similar military drawdown next year in Afghanistan, where U.S. taxpayers have spent $90 billion so far on rebuilding projects.

The Afghanistan effort risks falling into the same problems that mired Iraq if oversight isn’t coordinated better. In Iraq, officials were too eager to build in the middle of a civil war, and too often raced ahead without solid plans or back-up plans, the report concluded.

Most of the work was done in piecemeal fashion, as no single government agency had responsibility for all of the money spent. The State Department, for example, was supposed to oversee reconstruction strategy starting in 2004, but controlled only about 10 percent of the money at stake. The Defense Department paid for the vast majority of the projects — 75 percent.

Voir par ailleurs:

2014 Quality of Living worldwide city rankings – Mercer survey

United States , New York

Publication date: 19 February 2014


Vienna is the city with the world’s best quality of living, according to the Mercer 2014 Quality of Living rankings, in which European cities dominate. Zurich and Auckland follow in second and third place, respectively. Munich is in fourth place, followed by Vancouver, which is also the highest-ranking city in North America. Ranking 25 globally, Singapore is the highest-ranking Asian city, whereas Dubai (73) ranks first across Middle East and Africa. The city of Pointe-à-Pitre (69), Guadeloupe, takes the top spot for Central and South America.

Mercer conducts its Quality of Living survey annually to help multinational companies and other employers compensate employees fairly when placing them on international assignments. Two common incentives include a quality-of-living allowance and a mobility premium. A quality-of-living or “hardship” allowance compensates for a decrease in the quality of living between home and host locations, whereas a mobility premium simply compensates for the inconvenience of being uprooted and having to work in another country. Mercer’s Quality of Living reports provide valuable information and hardship premium recommendations for over 460 cities throughout the world, the ranking covers 223 of these cities.

Political instability, high crime levels, and elevated air pollution are a few factors that can be detrimental to the daily lives of expatriate employees their families and local residents. To ensure that compensation packages reflect the local environment appropriately, employers need a clear picture of the quality of living in the cities where they operate,” said Slagin Parakatil, Senior Researcher at Mercer.

Mr Parakatil added: “In a world economy that is becoming more globalised, cities beyond the traditional financial and business centres are working to improve their quality of living so they can attract more foreign companies. This year’s survey recognises so-called ‘second tier’ or ‘emerging’ cites and points to a few examples from around the world These cities have been investing massively in their infrastructure and attracting foreign direct investments by providing incentives such as tax, housing, or entry facilities. Emerging cities will become major players that traditional financial centres and capital cities will have to compete with.”

Europe

Vienna is the highest-ranking city globally. In Europe, it is followed by Zurich (2), Munich (4), Düsseldorf (6), and Frankfurt (7). “European cities enjoy a high overall quality of living compared to those in other regions. Healthcare, infrastructure, and recreational facilities are generally of a very high standard. Political stability and relatively low crime levels enable expatriates to feel safe and secure in most locations. The region has seen few changes in living standards over the last year,” said Mr Parakatil.

Ranking 191 overall, Tbilisi, Georgia, is the lowest-ranking city in Europe. It continues to improve in its quality of living, mainly due to a growing availability of consumer goods, improving internal stability, and developing infrastructure. Other cities on the lower end of Europe’s ranking include: Minsk (189), Belarus; Yerevan (180), Armenia; Tirana (179), Albania; and St Petersburg (168), Russia. Ranking 107, Wroclaw, Poland, is an emerging European city. Since Poland’s accession to the European Union, Wroclaw has witnessed tangible economic growth, partly due to its talent pool, improved infrastructure, and foreign and internal direct investments. The EU named Wroclaw as a European Capital of Culture for 2016.

Americas

Canadian cities dominate North America’s top-five list. Ranking fifth globally, Vancouver tops the regional list, followed by Ottawa (14), Toronto (15), Montreal (23), and San Francisco (27). The region’s lowest-ranking city is Mexico City (122), preceded by four US cities: Detroit (70), St. Louis (67), Houston (66), and Miami (65). Mr Parakatil commented: “On the whole, North American cities offer a high quality of living and are attractive working destinations for companies and their expatriates. A wide range of consumer goods are available, and infrastructures, including recreational provisions, are excellent.

In Central and South America, the quality of living varies substantially. Pointe-à-Pitre (69), Guadeloupe, is the region’s highest-ranked city, followed by San Juan (72), Montevideo (77), Buenos Aires (81), and Santiago (93). Manaus (125), Brazil, has been identified as an example of an emerging city in this region due to its major industrial centre which has seen the creation of the “Free Economic Zone of Manaus,” an area with administrative autonomy giving Manaus a competitive advantage over other cities in the region. This zone has attracted talent from other cities and regions, with several multinational companies already settled in the area and more expected to arrive in the near future.

Several cities in Central and South America are still attractive to expatriates due to their relatively stable political environments, improving infrastructure, and pleasant climate,” said Mr Parakatil. “But many locations remain challenging due to natural disasters, such as hurricanes often hitting the region, as well as local economic inequality and high crime rates. Companies placing their workers on expatriate assignments in these locations must ensure that hardship allowances reflect the lower levels of quality of living.

Asia Pacific

Singapore (25) has the highest quality of living in Asia, followed by four Japanese cities: Tokyo (43), Kobe (47), Yokohama (49), and Osaka (57). Dushanbe (209), Tajikistan, is the lowest-ranking city in the region. Mr Parakatil commented: “Asia has a bigger range of quality-of-living standard amongst its cities than any other region. For many cities, such as those in South Korea, the quality of living is continually improving. But for others, such as some in China, issues like pervasive poor air pollution are eroding their quality of living.

With their considerable growth in the last decade, many second-tier Asian cities are starting to emerge as important places of business for multinational companies. Examples include Cheonan (98), South Korea, which is strategically located in an area where several technology companies have operations. Over the past decades, Pune (139), India has developed into an education hub and home to IT, other high-tech industries, and automobile manufacturing. The city of Xian (141), China has also witnessed some major developments, such as the establishment of an “Economic and Technological Development Zone” to attract foreign investments. The city is also host to various financial services, consulting, and computer services.

Elsewhere, New Zealand and Australian cities rank high on the list for quality of living, with Auckland and Sydney ranking 3 and 10, respectively.

Middle East and Africa

With a global rank of 73, Dubai is the highest-ranked city in the Middle East and Africa region. It is followed by Abu Dhabi (78), UAE; Port Louis (82), Mauritius; and Durban (85) and Cape Town (90), South Africa. Durban has been identified as an example of an emerging city in this region, due to the growth of its manufacturing industries and the increasing importance of the shipping port. Generally, though, this region dominates the lower end of the quality of living ranking, with five out of the bottom six cities; Baghdad (223) has the lowest overall ranking.

The Middle East and especially Africa remain one of the most challenging regions for multinational organisations and expatriates. Regional instability and disruptive political events, including civil unrest, lack of infrastructure and natural disasters such as flooding, keep the quality of living from improving in many of its cities. However, some cities that might not have been very attractive to foreign companies are making efforts to attract them,” said Mr Parakatil.

Notes for Editors

Mercer produces worldwide quality-of-living rankings annually from its most recent Worldwide Quality of Living Surveys. Individual reports are produced for each city surveyed. Comparative quality-of-living indexes between a base city and a host city are available, as are multiple-city comparisons. Details are available from Mercer Client Services in Warsaw, at +48 22 434 5383 or at www.mercer.com/qualityofliving.

The data was largely collected between September and November 2013, and will be updated regularly to take account of changing circumstances. In particular, the assessments will be revised to reflect significant political, economic, and environmental developments.

Expatriates in difficult locations: Determining appropriate allowances and incentives

Companies need to be able to determine their expatriate compensation packages rationally, consistently and systematically. Providing incentives to reward and recognise the efforts that employees and their families make when taking on international assignments remains a typical practice, particularly for difficult locations. Two common incentives include a quality-of-living allowance and a mobility premium:

  • A quality-of-living or “hardship” allowance compensates for a decrease in the quality of living between home and host locations.
  • A mobility premium simply compensates for the inconvenience of being uprooted and having to work in another country.

A quality-of-living allowance is typically location-related, while a mobility premium is usually independent of the host location. Some multinational companies combine these premiums, but the vast majority provides them separately.

Quality of Living: City benchmarking

Mercer also helps municipalities assess factors that can improve their quality of living rankings. In a global environment, employers have many choices as to where to deploy their mobile employees and set up new business. A city’s quality of living standards can be an important variable for employers to consider.

Leaders in many cities want to understand the specific factors that affect their residents’ quality of living and address those issues that lower their city’s overall quality-of-living ranking. Mercer advises municipalities through a holistic approach that addresses their goals of progressing towards excellence, and attracting multinational companies and globally mobile talent by improving the elements that are measured in its Quality of Living survey.

Mercer hardship allowance recommendations

Mercer evaluates local living conditions in more than 460 cities it surveys worldwide. Living conditions are analysed according to 39 factors, grouped in 10 categories:

  • Political and social environment (political stability, crime, law enforcement, etc.)
  • Economic environment (currency exchange regulations, banking services)
  • Socio-cultural environment (media availability and censorship, limitations on personal freedom)
  • Medical and health considerations (medical supplies and services, infectious diseases, sewage, waste disposal, air pollution, etc)
  • Schools and education (standards and availability of international schools)
  • Public services and transportation (electricity, water, public transportation, traffic congestion, etc)
  • Recreation (restaurants, theatres, cinemas, sports and leisure, etc)
  • Consumer goods (availability of food/daily consumption items, cars, etc)
  • Housing (rental housing, household appliances, furniture, maintenance services)
  • Natural environment (climate, record of natural disasters)

The scores attributed to each factor, which are weighted to reflect their importance to expatriates, allow for objective city-to-city comparisons. The result is a quality of living index that compares relative differences between any two locations evaluated. For the indices to be used effectively, Mercer has created a grid that allows users to link the resulting index to a quality of living allowance amount by recommending a percentage value in relation to the index.

Voir enfin:

The 10 worst cities in the world to live in

The Economist

Friday 30 August 2013

Damascus in Syria is the worst city in the world to live in, according to The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Global Liveability Ranking.

Cities across the world are awarded scores depending on lifestyle challenges faced by the people living there. Each city is scored on its stability, healthcare, culture and environment, education and infrastructure.

Since the Arab Spring in 2011, Syria has been plagued with destruction and violence as rebels fight government forces. The country has been left battle-scarred with around 2 million people fleeing from country, while Damascus has been the source of much recent tension.

Other cities that have made it onto worst cities the list include Dhaka in Bangladesh and Lagos in Nigeria. Third worst city to live in was Port Moresby in Papa New Guinea, surprisingly Melbourne and Sydney in neighbouring nation Australia were ranked in the top 10 cities in the world to live in.

Click here to see the top 10 cities in the world

2. Dhaka, Bangladesh: The country has faced controversy recently after a garment factory collapsed killing over 1,000 people

2. Dhaka in Bangladesh: The country has faced controversy recently after a garment factory collapsed killing over 1,000 people

3. Moresby, Papa New Guinea: Despite recent growth, most people live in extreme poverty

3. Moresby, Papa New Guinea: Despite recent growth, most people live in extreme poverty

4. Lagos, Nigeria: The city rated poorly in The Economist Intelligence Unit's report and was awarded the lowest score for stability in the bottom 10 countries to live in

4. Lagos, Nigeria: The city rated poorly in The Economist Intelligence Unit’s report and was awarded the lowest score for stability

5. Harare, Zimbabwe: With the continuing economic and political crises that face the country, Harare is the fifth worst city to live in.

5. Harare, Zimbabwe: With the continuing economic and political crises that face the country, Harare is the fifth worst city to live in.  

6. Algiers, Algeria: While it rates more highly for its stability, there are terrorist groups that are active in the city. While conflict and natural disasters have left the old town in ruins

6. Algiers, Algeria: While it rates more highly for its stability, there are terrorist groups that are active in the city

7. Karachi, Pakistan: Violence linked to terrorism and high homicide rates makes this city one of the worst places in the world to live in

7. Karachi, Pakistan: Violence linked to terrorism and high homicide rates makes this city one of the worst places in the world to live in  

8. Tripoli, Libya: Since the Arab Spring in 2011 there has been violence and protests in the city

8. Tripoli, Libya: Since the Arab Spring in 2011 there has been violence and protests in the city

9. Douala, Cameroon: Despite being the richest city in the whole of Central Africa, Douala has scored the lowest for health care in the bottom 10 cities

9. Douala, Cameroon: Despite being the richest city in the whole of Central Africa, Douala has scored the lowest for health care in the bottom 10 cities

10. Tehran, Iran: While the city rates highly on health care and education, Tehran did not score so well on infrastructure.

10. Tehran, Iran: While the city rates highly on health care and education, Tehran did not score so well on infrastructure.


Papauté: Après l’obamamanie, voici la papomanie ! (Esquire’s best dressed man of 2013 celebrates first year in office)

13 mars, 2014
 https://i1.wp.com/www.courrierinternational.com/files/imagecache/article_ul/2014/hebdos/1215/UNES/1215-RollingStone.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/cdn.spectator.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Pope-Idol-v3_SE_v2-393x413.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t1/1966881_4057303968014_779553176_n.jpg
Nous vivons dans un système international injuste, au centre duquel trône l’argent-roi. (…) C’est une culture du jetable, qui rejette les jeunes comme les vieux. Dans certains pays d’Europe, […] toute une génération de jeunes gens est privée de la dignité que procure le travail. Pape François
Dans ce contexte, certains défendent encore les théories de la “rechute favorable”, qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant. En même temps, les exclus continuent à attendre. Pour pouvoir soutenir un style de vie  qui exclut les autres, ou pour pouvoir s’enthousiasmer avec cet idéal égoïste, on a développé une mondialisation de l’indifférence. Presque sans nous en apercevoir, nous devenons incapables d’éprouver de la compassion devant le cri de douleur des autres, nous ne pleurons plus devant le drame des autres, leur prêter attention ne nous intéresse pas, comme si tout nous était une responsabilité étrangère qui n’est pas de notre ressort. La culture du bien-être nous anesthésie et nous perdons notre calme si le marché offre quelque chose que nous n’avons pas encore acheté, tandis que toutes ces vies brisées par manque de possibilités nous semblent un simple spectacle qui ne nous trouble en aucune façon. Non à la nouvelle idolâtrie de l’argent. Une des causes de cette situation se trouve dans la relation que nous avons établie avec l’argent, puisque nous acceptons paisiblement sa prédominance sur nous et sur nos sociétés. La crise financière que nous traversons nous fait oublier qu’elle a à son origine une crise anthropologique profonde : la négation du primat de l’être humain ! Nous avons créé de nouvelles idoles. L’adoration de l’antique veau d’or (cf. Ex 32, 1-35) a trouvé une nouvelle et impitoyable version dans le fétichisme de l’argent et dans la dictature de l’économie sans visage et sans un but véritablement humain. (…) Alors que les gains d’un petit nombre s’accroissent exponentiellement, ceux de la majorité se situent de façon toujours plus éloignée du bien-être de cette heureuse minorité. Ce déséquilibre procède d’idéologies qui défendent l’autonomie absolue des marchés et la spéculation financière. Par conséquent, ils nient le droit de contrôle des États chargés de veiller à la préservation du bien commun. Une nouvelle tyrannie invisible s’instaure, parfois virtuelle, qui impose ses lois et ses règles, de façon unilatérale et impla­cable. Pape François
Francis continues to talk about his wish for a “poor church”, a “church for the poor”. But lately he has spoken out on “greed” and “inequality”, social maladies due to “neoliberalism” and “unfettered capitalism”. If this is the direction in which he is going, one must worry about his view of the world. How does he understand it? Specifically, has he understood the basic fact: Capitalism has been most successful in producing sustained economic growth. And that it is this growth which has been most effective in greatly reducing poverty? Just where is there “unfettered capitalism” in the world today? It is in China. Since the economic reforms that began in 1979 China has been the clearest example of “unfettered capitalism” (or, if you will, of the “neoliberal Washington Consensus”). It is still “fettered” by the bulky presence of inefficient state-owned enterprises, debris of the socialist past, with privileged access to capital and government favors. Nevertheless the capitalist engine has been roaring on, the private sector of the economy that does not have to worry about the “fetters” imposed on it in Western democratic countries—an expensive welfare state, laws and regulations that inhibit growth, and free labor unions. And it is this capitalist sector of the Chinese economy that has lifted millions of people from degrading poverty to a decent level of material life. The Chinese regime is appalling in many ways, but not because of failure to deal with poverty. Does Francis understand any of this? Greed is a moral flaw that exists in any economic system. And inequality is not of great concern to most people; they are concerned about the quality of their own lives and the prospects for the future of their children, rather than the income or wealth of people across town (that concern is called envy, which, if I recall correctly, is also a sin). Peter Berger
Revenons sur l’analogie avec Obama. Comme Francois, le président américain a été une figure télégénique succédant à un prédécesseur impopulaire avec la promesse d’un changement radical. Comme Francois, il est passé incroyablement vite à la notoriété mondiale, avec une histoire personnelle compliquée pouvant être lue de plusieurs manières. Et comme Francois, il a inspiré un consensus presque étrange parmi les commentateurs. Les médias influents ont décidé qu’il était essentiellement un gars bien qu’ils ont jugé par la suite sur ses intentions et non sur ses réalisations, blamant largement ses échecs sur ses ennemis et l’appuyant à chaque fois qu’il en avait le plus besoin. Francois n’est pas, bien sûr, le nouvel Obama, mais il jouit de la même relation enchantée  avec les journalistes. Oui, la lune de miel se terminera, comme elle l’a fait avec le président, mais cela ressemble au début d’un long mariage heureux. (…) De toute évidence, les journalistes ont aussi un intérêt économique à poursuivre leur idylle avec le François fantasmagorique : les articles sur ce sujet se vendent bien. Après tout, il a été la personnalité la plus débattue sur Internet l’année dernière. Si l’on met en ligne une jolie photo de lui en train d’embrasser un enfant, ou si l’on arrive à se faire un selfie [autoportrait pris au téléphone portable] avec de jeunes admirateurs du pape au Vatican, le nombre de pages vues grimpe en flèche. François est devenu l’un des produits les plus vendeurs en ligne. Aucun blogueur ne voudrait casser le marché. Rush Limbaugh, conservateur américain et présentateur de radio, a accusé le pontife de prôner “un marxisme pur et dur”. De toute évidence, on avait affaire à un nouvel avatar du François fantasmagorique. Sous François, l’Eglise s’engage résolument à mettre en œuvre ce que les théologiens appellent “l’option préférentielle pour les pauvres”. Mais pour choisir cette option, l’Eglise doit courtiser les plus riches. Par exemple, quelques multimillionnaires généreux financent la plupart des initiatives catholiques en Angleterre et au pays de Galles. Il suffirait que l’un d’entre eux soit rebuté par l’image “marxiste” de François pour que l’Eglise soit en difficulté. Cet homme de 77 ans sait qu’il doit faire aboutir rapidement les réformes financières lancées par son prédécesseur Benoît XVI, remanier la curie romaine, imposer des normes mondiales rigoureuses sur la conduite à tenir face aux affaires de sévices sexuels commis par des prêtres, continuer à prôner la paix en Syrie, inviter les Israéliens et les Palestiniens à négocier pendant sa visite en Terre sainte, et superviser un synode marqué par les controverses, qui pourrait revoir la position de l’Eglise en ce qui concerne les catholiques divorcés et remariés. Entre-temps, le François fantasmagorique va supprimer des dogmes, attiser la lutte des classes et influencer les tendances de la mode masculine. Mais ne tombez pas dans le panneau : tout cela est une illusion tout aussi entretenue par les médias que l’idée selon laquelle l’Eglise catholique serait obsédée par le sexe et l’argent. Ce qui compte, ce sont les paroles et les actes du vrai François. Et cela devrait être plus intéressant que les inventions, même les plus captivantes. The Spectator

Après l’obamamanie, voici la papomanie !

Couverture de Rolling Stone, encensement par le Guardian (« nouveau héros évident de la gauche” pour remplacer remplacer les posters défraîchis d’Obama “sur les murs des chambres d’étudiants de par le monde”), personne de l’année à la fois du magazine d’information Time et du magazine homosexuel américain The Advocate, homme le mieux habillé de l’année pour Esquire, personnalité la plus débattue sur Internet …

Alors que, de Rolling Stone au Guardian et de Time à Esquire et à l’Advocate, la nouvelle idole de nos éditorialistes fait les couvertures de la presse de gauche bien-pensante …

Comment ne pas voir, en ce premier anniversaire de son élection et avec l’une des rares voix discordantes, la même image largement fantasmée qui nous avait été faite d’un certain messie noir et plus rapide prix Nobel de la paix de l’histoire?

VATICAN François l’illusionniste

Tolérant, progressiste, voire marxiste, le pape François est la nouvelle idole des éditorialistes de la gauche bien-pensante. Une image qui doit beaucoup à leur imagination, selon l’hebdomadaire conservateur.

The Spectator (extraits)

Luke Coppen

1I février 2014

Le 31 décembre 2013, les médias ont reçu une dépêche stupéfiante. Le Vatican démentait officiellement que le pape François ait l’intention d’abolir le péché. On aurait dit un canular, mais ce n’en était pas un. Qui avait poussé le Vatican à publier un commentaire sur quelque chose d’aussi improbable ? Il s’avère que c’est l’un des plus éminents journalistes d’Italie : Eugenio Scalfari, cofondateur du journal de gauche La Repubblica Son article s’intitulait “La Révolution de François : il a aboli le péché”.

Pourquoi un journaliste, et a fortiori un analyste aussi prestigieux que Scalfari, se serait-il imaginé que le pape avait jeté aux orties l’un des principes fondamentaux de la théologie chrétienne ? Eh bien, depuis son entrée en fonctions, l’année dernière, François a été promu au rang de superstar de la gauche libérale [libérale au sens anglo-saxon, c’est-à-dire réformiste]. Ses origines modestes (il a été videur), son aversion pour la pompe vaticane (il prépare lui-même ses spaghettis) et sa volonté de mettre en avant l’engagement de l’Eglise en faveur des pauvres a amené les gens de gauche, et même des athées comme ce Scalfari, à le croire aussi étranger qu’eux aux dogmes de l’Eglise. Autrement dit, ils pensent que le pape n’est pas catholique. L’année dernière, presque tous les commentateurs orientés à gauche sont tombés sous le charme de ce jésuite laveur de pieds. Article après article, ils projetaient leurs rêves les plus fous sur François.

En novembre, Jonathan Freedland, journaliste au Guardian, annonçait que François était “le nouveau héros évident de la gauche”. Pour lui, les portraits du souverain pontife devaient remplacer les posters défraîchis d’Obama “sur les murs des chambres d’étudiants de par le monde”. Quelques jours plus tard, François prononçait une homélie dénonçant ce qu’il appelait “le progressisme adolescent”. Mais les gens ne voient et n’entendent que ce qu’ils veulent et personne n’a rien remarqué.

Voilà comment on en est venu à faire du pape une idole de la gauche. Dès qu’il se montre fidèle à la doctrine catholique, ses fans de gauche font la sourde oreille. En décembre, le plus vieux magazine gay des Etats-Unis, The Advocate, a salué en François son homme de l’année, du fait de la compassion qu’il a exprimée envers les homosexuels. Ce n’était guère révolutionnaire : l’article 2358 du catéchisme de l’Eglise catholique appelle à traiter les gays “avec respect, compassion et sensibilité”. En se contentant de réaffirmer un enseignement catholique, François est devenu un héros. La palme de la glorification absurde revient aux journalistes d’Esquire, qui sont arrivés à faire passer pour l’homme le mieux habillé de l’année en 2013 une personnalité portant la même tenue tous les jours.

Certains experts ont remarqué le gouffre existant entre le François fantasmagorique, figure née de l’imagination de la gauche, et l’actuel occupant du trône de saint Pierre. James Bloodworth, rédacteur du blog politique Left Foot Forward, a récemment appelé ses pairs à tempérer leurs ardeurs. “Les positions du pape François sur la plupart des sujets ont de quoi faire dresser les cheveux sur la tête de n’importe quelle personne de gauche, écrit-il. Au lieu de cela, article après article, des journalistes dont on pourrait attendre un peu plus de vigilance nous servent la même guimauve.”

La remarque de Bloodworth annonce-t-elle un réveil des laïques ? Pendant un certain temps, il a paru inévitable que les fans du nouveau pape comprennent qu’il n’était pas sur le point de donner sa bénédiction aux femmes prêtres, à l’usage du préservatif, au mariage gay ou à l’avortement, et qu’ils se retournent alors contre lui. Or cela paraît peu probable. Maintenant qu’ils ont inventé le François fantasmagorique, ses sympathisants de gauche ne vont peut-être plus jamais vouloir tuer leur création.

De toute évidence, les journalistes ont aussi un intérêt économique à poursuivre leur idylle avec le François fantasmagorique : les articles sur ce sujet se vendent bien. Après tout, il a été la personnalité la plus débattue sur Internet l’année dernière. Si l’on met en ligne une jolie photo de lui en train d’embrasser un enfant, ou si l’on arrive à se faire un selfie [autoportrait pris au téléphone portable] avec de jeunes admirateurs du pape au Vatican, le nombre de pages vues grimpe en flèche. François est devenu l’un des produits les plus vendeurs en ligne. Aucun blogueur ne voudrait casser le marché.

Rush Limbaugh, conservateur américain et présentateur de radio, a accusé le pontife de prôner “un marxisme pur et dur”. De toute évidence, on avait affaire à un nouvel avatar du François fantasmagorique. Sous François, l’Eglise s’engage résolument à mettre en œuvre ce que les théologiens appellent “l’option préférentielle pour les pauvres”. Mais pour choisir cette option, l’Eglise doit courtiser les plus riches. Par exemple, quelques multimillionnaires généreux financent la plupart des initiatives catholiques en Angleterre et au pays de Galles. Il suffirait que l’un d’entre eux soit rebuté par l’image “marxiste” de François pour que l’Eglise soit en difficulté.

Cet homme de 77 ans sait qu’il doit faire aboutir rapidement les réformes financières lancées par son prédécesseur Benoît XVI, remanier la curie romaine, imposer des normes mondiales rigoureuses sur la conduite à tenir face aux affaires de sévices sexuels commis par des prêtres, continuer à prôner la paix en Syrie, inviter les Israéliens et les Palestiniens à négocier pendant sa visite en Terre sainte, et superviser un synode marqué par les controverses, qui pourrait revoir la position de l’Eglise en ce qui concerne les catholiques divorcés et remariés.

Entre-temps, le François fantasmagorique va supprimer des dogmes, attiser la lutte des classes et influencer les tendances de la mode masculine. Mais ne tombez pas dans le panneau : tout cela est une illusion tout aussi entretenue par les médias que l’idée selon laquelle l’Eglise catholique serait obsédée par le sexe et l’argent. Ce qui compte, ce sont les paroles et les actes du vrai François. Et cela devrait être plus intéressant que les inventions, même les plus captivantes.

Voir aussi:

Sorry — but Pope Francis is no liberal

Trendy commentators have fallen in love with a pope of their own invention

Luke Coppen

11 January 2014

On the last day of 2013, one of the weirdest religious stories for ages appeared on the news wires. The Vatican had officially denied that Pope Francis intended to abolish sin. It sounded like a spoof, but wasn’t. Who had goaded the Vatican into commenting on something so improbable? It turned out to be one of Italy’s most distinguished journalists: Eugenio Scalfari, co-founder of the left-wing newspaper La Repubblica, who had published an article entitled ‘Francis’s Revolution: he has abolished sin’.

Why would anyone, let alone a very highly regarded thinker and writer like Scalfari, believe the Pope had done away with such a basic tenet of Christian theology? Well, since he took charge last year, Francis has been made into a superstar of the liberal left. His humble background (he is a former bouncer), his dislike for the trappings of office (he cooks his own spaghetti) and his emphasis on the church’s concern for the poor has made liberals, even atheists like Scalfari, suppose that he is as hostile to church dogma as they are. They assume, in other words, that the Pope isn’t Catholic. Last year few left-leaning commentators could resist falling for the foot-washing Jesuit from Buenos Aires. In column after column they projected their deepest hopes on to Francis — he is, they think, the man who will finally bring enlightened liberal values to the Catholic church.

In November Guardian writer Jonathan Freedland argued that Francis was ‘the obvious new hero of the left’ and that portraits of the Supreme Pontiff should replace fading Obama posters on ‘the walls of the world’s student bedrooms’. Just days later Francis preached a homily denouncing what he called ‘adolescent progressivism’, but people see and hear what they want to, so no one took any notice of that.

That is how the Pope has come to be spun as a left-liberal idol. Whenever he proves himself loyal to Catholic teaching — denouncing abortion, for instance, or saying that same-sex marriage is an ‘anthropological regression’ — his liberal fan base turns a deaf ear. Last month America’s oldest gay magazine, the Advocate, hailed Francis as its person of the year because of the compassion he had expressed towards homosexuals. It was hardly a revolution: Article 2358 of the Catholic church’s catechism calls for gay people to be treated with ‘respect, compassion and sensitivity’. In simply restating Catholic teaching, however, Francis was hailed as a hero. When a Maltese bishop said the Pope had told him he was ‘shocked’ by the idea of gay adoption, that barely made a splash. Time magazine, too, made Francis person of the year, hailing him for his ‘rejection of Church dogma’ — as if he had declared that from now on there would be two rather than three Persons of the Holy Trinity. But for cockeyed lionisation of Francis it would be hard to beat the editors of Esquire, who somehow managed to convince themselves that a figure who wears the same outfit every day was the best dressed man of 2013.

Some pundits have noticed the gulf between what you might call the Fantasy Francis — the figure conjured up by liberal imagination — and the actual occupant of the Chair of St Peter. James Bloodworth, editor of the political blog Left Foot Forward, recently urged his journalistic allies to show some restraint. ‘Pope Francis’s position on most issues should make the hair of every liberal curl,’ he wrote. ‘Instead we get article after article of saccharine from people who really should know better.’

Is Bloodworth’s remark a sign of a coming secular backlash against the new Pope? For a while, it seemed inevitable that the new Pope’s fans would come to realise he is not about to bless women bishops, condom use, gay marriage and abortion — and then they would turn on him. Now, that seems unlikely. Having invented the Fantasy Francis, his liberal well-wishers may never want to kill off their creation.

Consider the Obama analogy. Like Francis, the US president was a telegenic figure who followed an unpopular predecessor with a promise of radical change. Like Francis, he rose to worldwide prominence with incredible speed, bringing a complicated personal history that could be read in multiple ways. And like Francis, he inspired an almost eerie consensus among the commentariat. The most influential media outlets decided he was essentially a decent guy and judged him thereafter on his intentions rather than his achievements, blamed his failures largely on his enemies and backed him whenever he needed it most. Francis is not, of course, the new Obama, but he enjoys the same charmed relationship with journalists. Yes, the honeymoon will end, as it did with the president, but this looks like the start of a happy, lifelong marriage.

There’s only one case I can think of in which the media would turn on Francis: in the unlikely event that his private character were dramatically at odds with his public persona. He would have to be caught, say, building a death ray in the Vatican Gardens. (Even then some outlets would present it in the best possible light: ‘Pope Francis develops radical cure for human suffering.’)

Journalists also have a clear economic motive for sticking with the Fantasy Francis narrative: people will pay to read about it. After all, he was the most discussed person on the internet last year. Post a cute photo of him hugging a child, or posing for a ‘selfie’ with young admirers in the Vatican, and you’ll see a satisfying spike in page views. Francis has become one of the world’s most reliable online commodities. What sensible hack would want to threaten that?

Actually, Pope Francis has already survived a secular backlash. Barely an hour after he first appeared on the balcony above St Peter’s Square last March, the editor of the Guardian tweeted: ‘Was Pope Francis an accessory to murder and false imprisonment?’ The answer was ‘no’, of course. But allegations about Francis’s behaviour during Argentina’s Dirty War featured in bulletins for the next 24 hours, before fizzling out. The backlash lasted one entire news cycle. The idea of a left-wing pope, who had come to tear down the temple he inherited, turned out to be a far better story.

Perhaps the real challenge for the Pope this year will come from a different quarter. In his first apostolic exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium, Francis criticised ‘trickle-down theories which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice’. In classic Vatican style, that was a mistranslation of the original Spanish, which rejected the theory that ‘economic growth, encouraged by a free market alone’, would ensure more justice.

Such nuances didn’t concern the American conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh, who accused the Pontiff of espousing ‘pure Marxism’. Clearly this was just another version of the Fantasy Francis — a misapprehension of the man and his message that the Catholic hierarchy has done little to correct. But there is a price to be paid in allowing such myths to grow — a price that may have been paid, for example, by the Archdiocese of New York, which may have lost a seven-figure donation. According to Ken Langone, who is trying to raise $180 million to restore the city’s Catholic cathedral, one potential donor said he was so offended by the Pope’s alleged comments that he was reluctant to chip in.

Under Francis, the church is deeply committed to what theologians call ‘the preferential option for the poor’. But in order to opt for the poor, the church has to court the super-rich. A few generous multi-millionaires, for example, fund most of the major Catholic initiatives in England and Wales (including a significant part of Benedict XVI’s state visit in 2010). If just one of them was put off by the distorted ‘Marxist’ image of Francis, the church here would be in trouble.

Of course if those who caricature the church as bigoted and uncaring are forced to take a second look, then Pope Francis can claim he is doing his job. Cardinal Timothy Dolan, archbishop of New York, says that Roman Catholicism had been ‘out-marketed’ by its Hollywood critics — but now Pope Francis is changing the tone, without changing the substance.

But while the Pontiff has succeeded in appealing to those outside the church, his boldness has upset some within it. The Vatican analyst John Allen describes this as the Pope’s ‘older son problem’ — a reference to the parable of the Prodigal Son, in which the faithful brother gripes when his father welcomes back the wayward one. Allen writes that ‘Francis basically has killed the fatted calf for the prodigal sons and daughters of the postmodern world, reaching out to gays, women, non-believers, and virtually every other constituency inside and outside the church that has felt alienated.’ But some Catholics feel Francis is taking their loyalty for granted. ‘In the Gospel parable,’ Allen notes, ‘the father eventually notices his older son’s resentment and pulls him aside to assure him: “Everything I have is yours.” At some stage, Pope Francis may need to have such a moment with his own older sons (and daughters).’

You might think: why bother? The Pope should be focused on reaching out to the alienated, rather than on tending his followers’ wounded egos and stressing that he has not come to tear down Catholic teaching. But Francis needs an eager workforce if he is to realise his beautiful vision of the church as ‘a field hospital after battle’.

Catholics are having just as much trouble as everyone else distinguishing the real Francis. Just last week a devout, well–informed laywoman asked me if it was true that Francis had denied the existence of hell. It turned out that the Pope had overturned 2,000 years of Christian teaching at the end of the ‘Third Vatican Council’ — as reported exclusively by the ‘largely satirical’ blog Diversity Chronicle.

The true Francis will be moving fast throughout this year. The 77-year-old knows he must quickly finish the financial reforms launched by his predecessor Benedict XVI, overhaul the Roman Curia (which liberals and conservatives agree is in desperate need of reform), impose rigorous global norms on the handling of clerical sex abuse cases, continue to press for peace in Syria, nudge Israelis and Palestinians closer to an agreement during his Holy Land visit and oversee a contentious synod of bishops that could shift the Church’s approach to divorced and remarried Catholics.

Meanwhile, the Fantasy Francis will continue to throw out dogmas, agitate for class war and set trends in men’s fashion. But don’t be fooled: this is as much of a media-driven illusion as the idea that the Catholic church is obsessed by sex and money. What matters is what the real Francis says and does. And that should be more interesting than even the most gripping invention.

Luke Coppen is editor of the Catholic Herald.

Le Pape s’attaque à la « tyrannie » des marchés

Giulietta Gamberini

La Tribune

26/11/2013

Le capitalisme débridé est « une nouvelle tyrannie » selon le Pape François qui, dans un texte publié mardi, invite les leaders du monde entier à lutter contre la pauvreté et les inégalités croissantes.

Depuis son élection en mars, le Pape François avait déjà ponctué ses sermons de critiques contre l’économie capitaliste. Dans sa première exhortation apostolique, appelée Evangelii Gaudium (La joie de l’Evangile) et rendue publique ce mardi, il dessine nettement sa vision économique et sociale et appelle à l’action l’Eglise comme les leaders politiques. L’inégalité sociale y figure notamment comme l’une des questions tenant le plus à cœur au nouveau pontife, qui exhorte à une révision radicale du système économique et financier.

Non à une économie de l’exclusion

« Certains défendent encore les théories de la « rechute favorable », qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant ».

Les intérêts du « marché divinisé » sont transformés en règle absolue, condamne le Pape, produisant un système inégalitaire où les exclus, pire que les exploités, deviennent des « déchets ».

« Il n’est pas possible que le fait qu’une personne âgée réduite à vivre dans la rue meure de froid ne soit pas une nouvelle, tandis que la baisse de deux points en bourse en soit une. »

Contre l’économie de l’exclusion et de la disparité sociale, le chef de l’Eglise va jusqu’à invoquer le cinquième commandement du décalogue chrétien « Tu ne tueras point » puisque, souligne-t-il, un tel système finit aussi par tuer.

Non à la nouvelle idolâtrie de l’argent

« La crise financière que nous traversons nous fait oublier qu’elle a à son origine une crise anthropologique profonde : la négation du primat de l’être humain ! »

Le Pape regrette surtout que les objectifs humanistes de l’économie soient perdus de vue et que l’être humain soit réduit à l’un seul de ses besoins : la consommation. La négation du droit de contrôle des Etats, chargés de préserver le bien commun, par la « nouvelle tyrannie invisible », « parfois virtuelle », de l’autonomie absolue des marchés et de la spéculation financière y est pour beaucoup selon le Pape, qui pointe aussi la corruption et l’évasion fiscale.

« Une réforme financière qui n’ignore pas l’éthique demanderait un changement vigoureux d’attitude de la part des dirigeants politiques, que j’exhorte à affronter ce défi avec détermination et avec clairvoyance, sans ignorer, naturellement, la spécificité de chaque contexte. »

Le pontife invite notamment à revenir à une économie et à une finance humanistes ainsi qu’à la solidarité désintéressée.

Non à la disparité sociale qui engendre la violence

« Quand la société – locale, nationale ou mondiale – abandonne dans la périphérie une partie d’elle-même, il n’y a ni programmes politiques, ni forces de l’ordre ou d’intelligence qui puissent assurer sans fin la tranquillité ».

Le Pape François met en garde contre la violence sociale, qui ne pourra jamais être éradiquée, au niveau national comme mondial, tant que l’exclusion et la disparité sociales persistent, empêchant tout développement durable et pacifique.

« Les revendications sociales qui ont un rapport avec la distribution des revenus, l’intégration sociale des pauvres et les droits humains ne peuvent pas être étouffées sous prétexte de construire un consensus de bureau ou une paix éphémère, pour une minorité heureuse ».

Une paix sociale obtenue par l’imposition serait fausse selon le suprême pasteur de l’Eglise, la dignité humaine et le bien commun se situant au-dessus de la tranquillité des catégories privilégiées.

Oui à une redistribution des revenus

« La croissance dans l’équité exige quelque chose de plus que la croissance économique, bien qu’elle la suppose ; elle demande des décisions, des programmes, des mécanismes et des processus spécifiquement orientés vers une meilleure distribution des revenus, la création d’opportunités d’emplois, une promotion intégrale des pauvres qui dépasse le simple assistanat »

Les plans d’assistance ne peuvent plus représenter que des solutions provisoires selon le Pape, qui appelle les gouvernants comme le pouvoir financier à agir pour assurer à tous les citoyens un travail digne, une instruction et une assistance sanitaire.

« L’économie, comme le dit le mot lui-même, devrait être l’art d’atteindre une administration adéquate de la maison commune, qui est le monde entier. »

Les conséquences que toute action économique d’envergure produit sur la totalité de la planète invitent les gouvernements à assumer leur responsabilité commune, rappelle le pontife.

Mais l’Eglise aussi, souligne le Pape, doit profondément se rénover et reprendre contact avec la réalité sociale, notamment la hiérarchie du Vatican.

Evangelii Gaudium

Cette fois, c’est sûr : le pape François est socialiste

Clément Guillou

Rue89

27/11/2013

Le pape François n’est pas encore marxiste, même s’il a déclaré il y a peu que les hommes étaient des esclaves devant « se libérer des structures économiques et sociales qui nous réduisent en esclavage ».

Mais depuis l’exhortation apostolique publiée mardi par le Vatican, on peut affirmer sans crainte que le pape François est farouchement antilibéral et même… socialiste.

Il est des passages encore plus révolutionnaires dans ce premier texte majeur du pontificat de François, à en croire les journalistes accrédités au Vatican, mais celui-ci m’intéresse davantage.

Dès le chapitre 2, il se lance dans une longue diatribe contre le modèle économique « qui tue ». Extraits :

« De même que le commandement de “ne pas tuer” pose une limite claire pour assurer la valeur de la vie humaine, aujourd’hui, nous devons dire “non à une économie de l’exclusion et de la disparité sociale”. Une telle économie tue. »

Notre confiance en la bonté des puissants

Le pape François s’en prend ensuite à la théorie libérale du « trickle down [l’expression employée dans la version anglaise, d’ordinaire traduite par “ruissellement”, ici par “rechute favorable”, ndlr] ».

Cette théorie économique, qui stipule que les revenus des plus riches contribuent indirectement à enrichir les plus pauvres, a justifié l’action de Margaret Thatcher et Ronald Reagan et les libéraux la considèrent encore comme valable :

« Dans ce contexte, certains défendent encore les théories de la “rechute favorable”, qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde.

Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant. En même temps, les exclus continuent à attendre. »

Puisqu’on ne peut pas faire confiance au marché ni à ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique pour enrichir les plus pauvres, il faut revenir à plus d’Etat. L’air de rien, le pape explique que ce sont la régulation économique et la redistribution des richesses qui peuvent diminuer l’exclusion, pas la charité :

« Ce déséquilibre procède d’idéologies qui défendent l’autonomie absolue des marchés et la spéculation financière. Par conséquent, ils nient le droit de contrôle des Etats chargés de veiller à la préservation du bien commun. Une nouvelle tyrannie invisible s’instaure, parfois virtuelle, qui impose ses lois et ses règles, de façon unilatérale et implacable. »

« L’argent doit servir, non pas gouverner ! »

Et puis tant qu’à faire, François recommande aussi d’abandonner l’austérité et le dogme des 3% de déficit :

« De plus, la dette et ses intérêts éloignent les pays des possibilités praticables par leur économie et les citoyens de leur pouvoir d’achat réel. S’ajoutent à tout cela une corruption ramifiée et une évasion fiscale égoïste qui ont atteint des dimensions mondiales. »

Conclusion :

« Une réforme financière qui n’ignore pas l’éthique demanderait un changement vigoureux d’attitude de la part des dirigeants politiques, que j’exhorte à affronter ce défi avec détermination et avec clairvoyance, sans ignorer, naturellement, la spécificité de chaque contexte. L’argent doit servir et non pas gouverner ! »

De l’anticommunisme à l’anticapitalisme

Bien sûr, le Vatican délivre de plus en plus souvent des messages économiques depuis la crise financière de 2008, allant même jusqu’à proposer ses solutions pour la régulation.

Mais François semble leur accorder une importance primordiale, qualifiant le chômage des jeunes et la solitude des personnes âgées de « plus grandes afflictions du monde actuellement ».

Farouchement anticommuniste, Jean-Paul II avait défendu le rôle du marché et la propriété privée, tout en mettant en garde contre les leurres de la société de consommation et en insistant sur l’importance d’apporter un cadre législatif et éthique strict respectueux de la liberté humaine.

Benoît XVI, lui, « semblait critiquer autant l’Etat que le marché ; François oriente considérablement son propos, pour dire que le marché a bien plus de pouvoir que l’Etat », observe un professeur de théologie interrogé par le Wall Street Journal.

La journaliste de The Atlantic Heather Horn, qui maîtrise mieux que moi son histoire de l’économie, y voit beaucoup de rapprochements avec les thèses de l’économiste hongrois Karl Polanyi, adepte d’un socialisme démocratique :

au lieu que ce soit le marché qui aide les gens à vivre mieux, ce sont les gens qui s’adaptent au marché ;

nos problèmes [la Première Guerre mondiale pour Polanyi, la crise actuelle pour François, ndlr] viennent du fait que le marché est au cœur de l’économie, et non l’homme ;

la théorie du marché absolument libre, déconnecté de la société, « détruirait physiquement l’homme et transformerait son environnement en monde sauvage », écrivait Polanyi, tandis que le pape note que « dans ce système, qui tend à tout phagocyter dans le but d’accroître les bénéfices, tout ce qui est fragile, comme l’environnement, reste sans défense ».

Le passage de l’anticommunisme à l’anticapitalisme, raconté par The Atlantic, doit évidemment se lire à l’aune des ravages de l’une et l’autre doctrine. Il n’en reste pas moins que, pour le Vatican, c’est une sacrée évolution.

Is Liberation theology resurgent ?

Two German Cardinals, and a Peruvian Dominican

Peter Berger

The American interest

December 4, 2013

The British Catholic journal The Tablet (which I have found to be a reliable and balanced source for what goes on in the Roman world) carried a story in its November 23, 2013, issue by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt, its correspondent in Germany. Titled “Mueller vs. Marx: Clash of the Titans”, the story reports on a public disagreement between Cardinal Gerhard Mueller, the head of the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF), and Cardinal Reinhard Marx, Archbishop of Munich, president of the European Bishops’ Conference and recent appointee to Pope Francis’ eight-member advisory Council of Cardinals. Whether these two men merit the label “titans” will not be immediately clear to non-Catholics; it will be to those who look to Rome for criteria for what is important: The CDF (which was headed by Benedict XVI before his elevation to the papacy) is the Church’s watchdog for doctrinal orthodoxy; Munich is the largest German diocese.

The disagreement is over the issue of whether divorced Catholics should continue to be barred from receiving communion, as canon law presently mandates. Mueller takes a hardline position on this: Appeals to “mercy” must not override this affirmation of the indissolubility of marriage. Marx, very much in tune with recent remarks by Pope Francis, has said that the issue should not be considered as closed. If there is a list of intra-Catholic issues that outsiders could not care about less, this probably heads the list. I have not thought about it, and I will hardly do so in the future: Catholics should be left alone to decide whom they admit to their sacramental commensality. But something else caught my attention: What Mueller and Marx have in common despite their doctrinal differences: an affinity with the teachings of Gustavo Gutierrez. That is a matter that everyone, Catholic or non-Catholic, with an interest in public policy should care about very much.

Gustavo Gutierrez was born in Lima, Peru, in 1928. A Dominican priest, he ministered to poor people in the slums. He also had higher education in his own country and in Europe, and is still on the faculty of Notre Dame in the US. In 1971 he published his enormously influential book, A Theology of Liberation, which became the founding document for the theological school of that name; Gutierrez is rightly seen as a founder of the school, which became a movement. He also advocated the so-called “preferential option for the poor” (“la opcion preferencial para los pobres”), which proposed that the Church should pay primary attention to the interests of the poor. It became the slogan for the Catholic left in Latin America and beyond, and was solemnly agreed upon at the conference of Latin American bishops (CELAM) in Medellin, Colombia, in 1968. Rome was from the beginning skeptical about the movement, not for its concern for the poor, but for its adoption of a Marxist interpretation of the contemporary world—“unjust social structures” equated with capitalism—and for the advocacy by some of its followers for class struggle and socialist revolution. The CDF, under then Cardinal Ratzinger, criticized Liberation Theology in 1984 and 1986. I don’t know how far Gutierrez himself endorsed the more radical versions of his theology, but he certainly became an idol for those who did.

Strange as this may seem, what the two cardinals in the Tablet story have in common is, precisely, sympathy with the ideas of Gustavo Gutierrez. Mueller met the latter on a visit to Lima, where he was impressed by his encounters with the “poorest of the poor”. He has repeatedly visited Peru and maintained his relationship with Gutierrez. He has not directly embraced Liberation Theology, but he has started the process toward the sanctification of Oscar Romero, the Archbishop of San Salvador who was assassinated by a right-wing death squad in 1980 and has become an object of veneration by the Catholic left. Marx has published a tongue-in-cheek letter to his namesake Karl, saying that the latter’s ideas have been rejected too broadly. He has sharply criticized “neoliberalism” and “turbo-capitalism”. Most interestingly, he has co-authored a book with Gutierrez! [I have not read this book. I spend some time reading things for my blog, but I’m afraid there are limits.] I understand that this book develops the core idea of Liberation Theology—the “solidarity with the poor”. Marx is apparently a folksy character; he enjoys attending the annual Munich Beer Festival, guzzling that beverage to the ear-shattering sound of Bavarian folk music. [Speaking as a Viennese, this doesn’t necessarily endear him to me.]

What emerges here is the possibility of an axis between theological conservatism and political leftism. Is this where the Catholic Church is heading?

A few months ago I wrote a post on this blog, asking whether the pontificate of Francis I heralds a new opening for Liberation Theology. I cautiously suggested that this may not be the case, though the jury is still out. Francis’ identification with the poor is not necessarily linked to leftist ideology. Even the “preferential option”, understood as a general moral rather than specifically political orientation, is hardly surprising in any follower of Jesus of Nazareth.

There is evidence that Francis showed little if any sympathy for Liberation Theology in his native Argentina. Then as now, he showed personal identification with the most marginal people in society—it is not accidental that as pope he chose the name of the saint known as “poverello” (“the little poor one”). So far, so good. So far, I don’t feel compelled to retract my earlier assessment of the present papacy. But I’m getting a bit worried.

Presumably worrisome: In September 2013 Francis received Gustavo Gutierrez in a private audience. A sign of personal favor? Or a move to avoid criticisms by conservatives? Or another attempt to draw back into the Church a constituency on the left with grievances? (After all, there has been a long campaign to reconcile the papacy with the right-wing critics of Vatican II.) Francis continues to talk about his wish for a “poor church”, a “church for the poor”. But lately he has spoken out on “greed” and “inequality”, social maladies due to “neoliberalism” and “unfettered capitalism”. If this is the direction in which he is going, one must worry about his view of the world. How does he understand it? Specifically, has he understood the basic fact: Capitalism has been most successful in producing sustained economic growth. And that it is this growth which has been most effective in greatly reducing poverty? Just where is there “unfettered capitalism” in the world today? It is in China. Since the economic reforms that began in 1979 China has been the clearest example of “unfettered capitalism” (or, if you will, of the “neoliberal Washington Consensus”). It is still “fettered” by the bulky presence of inefficient state-owned enterprises, debris of the socialist past, with privileged access to capital and government favors. Nevertheless the capitalist engine has been roaring on, the private sector of the economy that does not have to worry about the “fetters” imposed on it in Western democratic countries—an expensive welfare state, laws and regulations that inhibit growth, and free labor unions. And it is this capitalist sector of the Chinese economy that has lifted millions of people from degrading poverty to a decent level of material life. The Chinese regime is appalling in many ways, but not because of failure to deal with poverty. Does Francis understand any of this? Greed is a moral flaw that exists in any economic system. And inequality is not of great concern to most people; they are concerned about the quality of their own lives and the prospects for the future of their children, rather than the income or wealth of people across town (that concern is called envy, which, if I recall correctly, is also a sin).

I continue to think that Francis’ view of the world is to the right of the Liberation Theology movement. But the papacy is very much a “bully pulpit”. If the Pope continues to make leftist noises, he will give encouragement to the leftist wave that has (predictably) risen as a result of the economic crises of the last five years. These certainly are cause for reform of the capitalist economy, especially its financial industry, but not for a return to the poverty-enhancing policies of socialist utopianism. As far as I know, the agency called “Iustitia et Pax” (“Justice and Peace”) has been a niche of leftist ideas in the complex bureaucracy of the Vatican. It would be very unfortunate if Francis, wittingly or not, caused this niche to expand.

Voir aussi:

The Denominational Imperative

Peter Berger

The American interest

November 20, 2013

On November 11, 2013, Religion News Service reprinted an Associated Press story by Gillian Flaccus on the development of “atheist mega-churches”. These have the rather revealing name “Sunday Assemblies” (perhaps an allusion to the Pentecostal Assemblies of God—in the hope of emulating the success of the latter?). The story described a recent gathering of this type in Los Angeles: “It looked like a typical Sunday morning at any mega-church. Several hundred people, including families with small children, packed in for more than an hour of rousing music, an inspirational talk and some quiet reflection. The only thing missing was God.” Apparently there now are similar “churches” in other US locations. The movement (if it can be called that) began in Britain earlier this year, founded by Sanderson Jones and Pippa Evans, two prominent comedians (I am not making this up). The pair is currently on a fundraising tour in America and Australia.

The AP story links this development to the growth of the “nones” in the US—that is, people who say “none” when asked for their religious affiliation in a survey. A recent study by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life (a major center for religious demography) found that 20% of Americans fall under that category. But, as the story makes clear, it would be a mistake to understand all these people to be atheists. A majority of them believes in God and says that they are “spiritual but not religious”. All one can say with confidence is that these are individuals who have not found a religious community that they like. Decided atheists are a very small minority in this country, and a shrinking one worldwide. And I would think that most in this group are better described as agnostics (they don’t know whether God exists) rather than atheists (those who claim to know that he doesn’t). I further think that the recent flurry of avowed atheists writing bestselling books or suing government agencies on First Amendment grounds should not be seen as a great cultural wave, in America or anywhere else (let them just dream of competing with the mighty tsunami of Pentecostal Christianity sweeping over much of our planet).

How then is one to understand the phenomenon described in the story? I think there are two ways of understanding it. First, there is the lingering notion of Sunday morning as a festive ceremony of the entire family. This notion has deep cultural roots in Christian-majority countries (even if, especially in Europe, this notion is rooted in nostalgia rather than piety). Many people who would not be comfortable participating in an overtly Christian worship service still feel that something vaguely resembling it would be a good program to attend once a week, preferably en famille. Thus a Unitarian was once described as someone who doesn’t play golf and must find something else to do on Sunday morning. This atheist gathering in Los Angeles is following a classic American pattern originally inspired by Protestant piety—lay people being sociable in a church (or in this case quasi-church) setting. They are on their best behavior, exhibiting the prototypical “Protestant smile”. This smile has long ago migrated from its original religious location to grace the faces of Catholics, Jews and adherents of more exotic faiths. It has become a sacrament of American civility. It would be a grave error to call it “superficial” or “false”. Far be it from me to begrudge atheists their replication of it.

However, there is a more important aspect to the aforementioned phenomenon: Every community of value, religious or otherwise, becomes a denomination in America. Atheists, as they want public recognition, begin to exhibit the characteristics of a religious denomination: They form national organizations, they hold conferences, they establish local branches (“churches”, in common parlance) which hold Sunday morning services—and they want to have atheist chaplains in universities and the military. As good Americans, they litigate to protect their constitutional rights. And they smile while they are doing all these things.

As far as I know, the term “denomination” is an innovation of American English. In classical sociology of religion, in the early 20th-entury writings of Max Weber and Ernst Troeltsch, religious institutions were described as coming in two types: the “church”, a large body open to the society into which an individual is born, and the ”sect”, a smaller group set aside from the society which an individual chooses to join. The historian Richard Niebuhr, in 1929, published a book that has become a classic, The Social Sources of Denominationalism. It is a very rich account of religious history, but among many other contributions, Niebuhr argued that America has produced a third type of religious institutions—the denomination—which has some qualities derived from both the Weber-Troeltsch types: It is a large body not isolated from society, but it is also a voluntary association which individuals chose to join. It can also be described as a church which, in fact if not theologically, accepts the right of other churches to exist. This distinctive institution, I would propose, is the result of a social and a political fact. The denomination is an institutional formation seeking to adapt to pluralism—the largely peaceful coexistence of diverse religious communities in the same society. The denomination is protected in a pluralist situation by the political and legal guarantee of religious freedom. Pluralism is the product of powerful forces of modernity—urbanization, migration, mass literacy and education; it can exist without religious freedom, but the latter clearly enhances it. While Niebuhr was right in seeing the denomination as primarily an American invention, it has now become globalized—because pluralism has become a global fact. The worldwide explosion of Pentecostalism, which I mentioned before, is a prime example of global pluralism—ever splitting off into an exuberant variety of groupings.

The British sociologist David Martin has written about what he called the “Amsterdam-London-Boston axis”—that offspring of the Protestant Reformation that did not eventuate in state churches—the free churches, all voluntary associations, which played an enormous role in the British colonies in North America and came to full fruition in the United States. This form of Protestantism has pluralism in its sociological DNA. One could say that it has a built-in denominational imperative: “Go forth and multiply”. American Protestant history is one of churches splitting apart, merging, splitting apart again. Churches have divided over doctrinal differences, ethnic or regional ones, or because of moral or political differences. Almost all Protestant churches split over the issue of slavery in the 19th century, as they divide now over what I call issues south of the navel. American Lutheranism was for a long time split into ethnically defined synods, though this has now been replaced by basic doctrinal disagreements. Roman Catholicism has been protected from Protestant denominationalism by its centralized hierarchy, but it has become “Protestantized” in a different way: Against its deepest ecclesiological instincts, it has become de facto a voluntary association—with the result that its lay people have become vocally uppity. Even American Jews have organized in at least four denominations. (Joke: An American Jew stranded on a desert island built two synagogues, one in which he goes to pray, the other in which he would not be found dead), Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus in America have all fallen into the denominational pattern. The same pattern appears in secular movements (for example, the various “denominations” of American psychotherapy). Even witches have managed to create a denomination, Wiccan (I understand that they want the right to appoint chaplains for hospitals or in the military). Why should atheists be an exception?

The First Amendment is the icon invoked by all denominations in America. But its basic legal principle is reflected in everyday American mores. When I came to America as a young man, someone told me: “If you don’t want to do something, just say that it’s against your religion”. I had difficulty imagining a situation in which I could plausibly use this recommendation. I asked: “But won’t they ask what my religion is?” The response: “They wouldn’t dare.”

Voir également:

BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics

Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 1999, 135 p.

Sébastien Fath

p. 71-73

Référence(s) :

BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics, Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 1999, 135 p.

Cet ouvrage collectif, au titre provoquant, est le résultat d’une commande. Il répond au souhait de la Greve Foundation (alors présidée par John Kitzer), relayé par le Foreign Policy Institute de la John Hopkins University, d’inventorier (et d’expliquer) les nombreux phénomènes de vitalité religieuse sur la scène politique mondiale. C’est l’Ethic and Public Policy Center (présidé par Elliott Abrams, Washington D.C.) qui fut chargé de répondre à cette demande, ce dont il s’acquitta en confiant la tâche à P.L.B. et à une équipe de conférenciers. Ce livre, qui regroupe les différentes contributions rassemblées à l’initiative de Berger, défend une thèse : celle, non pas de la « désécularisation » du monde (contrairement au titre), mais du maintien vigoureux du religieux « traditionnel » sur la scène publique de très nombreux pays. Cette hypothèse est essentiellement présentée, et théorisée, par P.L.B. lui-même, dans une ample introduction.

D’après P.L.B., le monde d’aujourd’hui est « aussi furieusement religieux que toujours » (p. 2). Ce qui vaut à l’auteur un rapide mea culpa. dans la mesure où il s’est montré, par le passé, l’un des partisans les plus pénétrants de la théorie de la sécularisation, qu’il considère aujourd’hui comme globalement erronée. En effet, l’idée que la modernisation de la société conduise nécessairement au déclin de la religion dans l’espace public et dans la sphère individuelle s’est, d’après lui, avérée « fausse » (p. 3), les faits montrant au contraire une permanence vigoureuse (et parfois même un développement) du rôle des religions dans les sociétés humaines. Cette permanence n’a pas été uniforme : reprenant les hypothèses développées notamment par Roger Fink et Rodney Stark, il souligne que les religions qui ont cherché à s’aligner sur les valeurs de la modernité ont globalement « échoué », tandis que celles qui ont maintenu un « supernaturalisme réactionnaire » ont largement prospéré (p. 4). Partout, l’A. constate la vitalité des mouvements religieux « conservateurs, orthodoxes ou traditionalistes » (p. 6). Le choix d’une ligne catholique conservatrice par Jean-Paul II, la montée en puissance du protestantisme évangélique aux États-Unis, les succès du judaïsme orthodoxe (aussi bien en Israël que dans la diaspora), l’impact impressionnant de l’islamisme relèvent de ce phénomène, observable aussi dans l’hindouisme et le bouddhisme. En dépit de grandes différences, tous ces mouvements auraient pour point commun une posture « religieuse sans ambiguïté », et une démarche, « pour le moins », de « contre-sécularisation » (p. 6). L’essor de l’islam et celui du protestantisme évangélique constituent, pour l’A., les exemples les plus remarquables de cette « contre-sécularisation » (on est tenté de le suivre en partie sur ce point). Tous deux manifestent un dynamisme conversionniste considérable, même si celui de l’islam s’exprime surtout dans des pays déjà musulmans, ou comprenant d’importantes minorités musulmanes (comme en Europe), alors que le protestantisme évangélique connaîtrait un développement mondial, dans des pays où « ce type de religion était auparavant inconnu ou très marginal » (p. 9).

L’A. voit deux exceptions apparentes à la thèse de la « désécularisation » (sic). D’une part, l’Europe, aux taux de pratique religieuse très faibles. D’autre part, l’existence d’une « subculture internationale composée d’individus dotés d’une éducation occidentale supérieure » dont les contenus sont, « en effet sécularisés » (p. 10). Cette subculture, dominante dans les milieux médiatiques, académiques, politiques, constituerait une « élite globalisée », qui tenterait d’imposer ses normes (fondée sur les idéaux des Lumières) par le biais des médias et des institutions universitaires. P.L.B. n’hésite pas à critiquer (non sans humour) le « vase clos » relatif d’universitaires favorables au postulat de la sécularisation, mais incapables de prendre la mesure du décalage entre leur « monde » et celui des populations dont ils sont supposés analyser le rapport à la religion. Opérant un exercice radical de décentrage, il n’hésite pas à affirmer que cette « subculture » des élites occidentales sécularisées (à laquelle les universitaires participent) constitue, tout compte fait, une anomalie beaucoup plus étonnante que tel ou tel phénomène de radicalisme religieux. De ce fait, « l’Université de Chicago est un terrain beaucoup plus intéressant pour la sociologie des religions que les écoles islamiques de Qom » ! (p. 12) Les théories de la « dernière digue », défendues par ceux qui cherchent à sauver l’hypothèse de la sécularisation linéaire (les musulmans et les évangéliques constitueraient d’ultimes « digues » religieuses face à la marée de la sécularisation) ne tiennent pas, selon l’A. Il considère comme aberrante l’hypothèse selon laquelle « des mollah iraniens, des prédicateurs pentecôtistes, et des lamas tibétains penseront tous – et agiront – comme des professeurs de littérature dans les universités américaines » (p. 12). Cependant, il souligne la variété des relations à la modernité, qui peuvent aller d’une attitude « anti-moderne » (qui caractériserait selon lui l’islam) à une valorisation de la démocratie et de l’individu (qui caractériserait, d’après P.L.B., le courant évangélique). Quelles que soient les stratégies d’adaptation, les religions conservent une part essentielle dans les « affaires du monde » (p. 14), que ce soit sur le terrain politique, économique, social, humanitaire, tant il apparaît évident, pour l’A., que le sentiment religieux (et sa traduction intramondaine) constitue « un trait pérenne de l’humanité » (p. 13).

Les chapitres suivants (de moindre portée) proposent ensuite quelques éclairages partiels à partir de terrains spécifiques. La contribution de George Weigel (pp. 19 à 36) s’attache essentiellement à mettre en perspective l’impact de la pensée de Jean-Paul II (minutieusement exposée). Au passage, l’A. montre qu’à l’image de Léon XIII à la fin du XIXe siècle, le pape présente la vérité catholique comme une vérité « publique » (p. 25), bonne pour tous et pas seulement pour les catholiques. Mais il souligne en même temps (et c’est là un apport majeur) que sa posture apparaît désormais comme « post-Constantinienne » (p. 32). En d’autres termes, sans pour autant vouloir revenir au temps des catacombes (une sous-culture de repli), le catholicisme de l’an 2000 et de demain entend tenir une distance critique (qui n’a pas toujours été adoptée par le passé) face aux pouvoirs politiques. En clair, il s’agit de la fin d’un modèle moniste qui, en catholicisme, a longtemps voulu associer le politique et l’Église dans un modèle englobant. Cette analyse en terme de différenciation partielle des sphères, on le voit, ne paraît guère s’accorder avec l’hypothèse d’une « désécularisation » du monde : à la lumière de contributions comme celles de Weigel, on voit bien qu’une approche plus nuancée s’impose, une réelle vigueur religieuse n’étant pas incompatible avec certains phénomènes de sécularisation. C’est au même type de conclusion que parvient David Martin (pp. 37-49) dans son analyse du renouveau évangélique en protestantisme. En dépit d’un essor très significatif des Églises de type évangélique dans le monde, ces dernières lui paraissent surtout défendre « le rôle de commentateurs influents au sein d’une société pluraliste » (p. 48). L’idée d’une « société chrétienne », d’une Jérusalem évangélique terrestre a globalement décliné tout au long de l’époque contemporaine. Opposant lui aussi l’inspiration pluraliste et démocratique du courant évangélique à la perspective plus moniste de l’islam (p. 49), il considère donc, comme George Weigel, qu’une forme de « différenciation des sphères » (qui constitue une des caractéristiques fortes de la modernité sécularisée) joue à plein dans son terrain d’étude. La contribution de Jonathan Sacks (très engagé idéologiquement) développe ensuite la question de l’identité juive en modernité (pp. 51-63). Concluant sur le fait que les juifs survivront non par le nombre, mais « par la qualité et la force de la foi juive » (p. 63), il paraît déplorer, en attendant, le degré de sécularisation trop important qu’il constate en judaïsme, rapportant cette anecdote éclairante de Shlomo Carlebach en visite sur les campus américains : « je demande aux étudiants ce qu’ils sont. Si quelqu’un se lève et dit, « je suis un Catholique », je sais que c’est un Catholique. Si quelqu’un dit. « Je suis un Protestant », je sais que c’est un Protestant. Si quelqu’un se lève et dit, « Je suis seulement un être-humain », je sais que c’est un Juif » (p. 60). Il ne s’agit pas là, à proprement parler, d’un langage religieux identitaire, « désécularisé »… Là encore, le contenu de la contribution paraît apporter de sérieuses réserves à l’hypothèse liminaire défendue par P.L.B.

Grace Davie, quant à elle, semble davantage se situer dans cet axe. Dans son analyse de l’Europe, possible « exception qui confirme la règle » (pp. 65-83), elle s’attache minutieusement à montrer, qu’après tout, les Européens ne sont peut-être pas moins religieux, mais différemment religieux que les citoyens d’autres parties du monde. Appuyée principalement sur une analyse très fine des résultats de l’Enquête Européenne sur les valeurs, elle confirme à la fois le diagnostic d’une « déprise » de la religion sur les populations, et le maintien d’une demande religieuse « hors institution ». Elle précise aussi très opportunément que les données quantitatives disponibles sur la pratique religieuse en Europe ne sont pas assez étoffées, dans leur échantillonnage, pour rendre compte des minorités religieuses (comme le judaïsme, l’islam, l’hindouisme, les « nouveaux mouvements religieux »). Or, il est essentiel, selon elle, de tenir compte de ces minorités, qui font globalement preuve d’un réel dynamisme religieux. La prise en considération, d’autre part, des taux de pratique toujours élevés aux États-Unis l’invite, au contraire de Steve Bruce dont la thèse est présentée entre les pages 74 et 77, à considérer l’Europe comme l’exception occidentale… qui confirme la règle d’un vigoureux maintien du religieux en modernité. Se référant aux travaux de José Casanova, elle attribue ce particularisme européen aux liens séculaires entre l’Eglise et l’État. S’appuyant ensuite sur les analyses de Danièle Hervieu-Léger, elle souligne le « paradoxe de la modernité » européenne (p. 80), qui corrode les mémoires collectives (amnésie) mais ouvre de nouveaux espaces utopiques que seule la religion peut remplir. Sa conclusion laisse ouverte la question d’une poursuite, ou non, du recul du religieux eu Europe. Les dernières contributions (Tu Weiming sur la Chine, pp. 85-101, et Abdullahi A. An-Na’im sur l’islam (pp. 103-121) n’apportent pas d’éléments décisifs, tout en soulignant qu’en Chine comme dans l’espace islamique, le religieux s’avère plutôt plus présent aujourd’hui qu’il y a quelques décennies.

Dépourvu de conclusion, l’ouvrage laisse un goût d’inachevé : la thèse suggérée dans le titre (la « désécularisation ») n’y aura pas été démontrée, et les contributions, à l’orientation parfois plus confessionnelle que scientifique, suggèrent une interprétation nuancée de la réalité : réaffirmations religieuses parfois (Chine, essor de l’islam et du protestantisme évangélique), certes, mais aussi déclin continu du rôle social des Églises (dans le cas européen), sur fond de multiples négociations avec la modernité où une sécularisation interne des religions s’observe parfois (option pour un modèle « post-constantinien » en catholicisme, valorisation accrue du pluralisme chez les évangéliques). Au bout du compte, l’ouvrage dirigé par P.L.B. soulève plus de questions qu’il n’en résoud. Peut-être était-ce, au fond, son objectif ?

Référence papier

Sébastien Fath, « BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics », Archives de sciences sociales des religions, 112 | 2000, 71-73.

Référence électronique

Sébastien Fath, « BERGER (Peter L.), ed., The Desecularization of the World, Resurgent Religion and World Politics », Archives de sciences sociales des religions [En ligne], 112 | octobre-décembre 2000, document 112.6, mis en ligne le 19 août 2009, consulté le 08 décembre 2013. URL : http://assr.revues.org/20264

Stephens: Obama’s Envy Problem

Inequality is a problem when the rich get richer at the expense of the poor.

That’s not happening in America.

Dec. 30, 2013

By BRET STEPHENS

As he came to the end of his awful year Barack Obama gave an awful speech. The president thinks America has inequality issues. What it has—what he has—is an envy problem.

I’ll get to the point in a moment, but first a word about the speech’s awfulness. To illustrate the evils of income inequality, the president said this:

« Ordinary folks can’t write massive campaign checks or hire high-priced lobbyists and lawyers to secure policies that tilt the playing field in their favor at everyone else’s expense. And so people get the bad taste that the system is rigged, and that increases cynicism and polarization, and it decreases the political participation that is a requisite part of our system of self-government. »

This is coming from the man who signs legislation, such as Dodd-Frank, that only high-priced lawyers can understand; who, according to the Guardian newspaper, has spent much of 2013 on a « record-breaking fundraising spree, » making « 30 separate visits to wealthy donors, » at « more than twice the rate of the president’s two-term predecessors. »

In my last column, comparing Jane Fonda with Pope Francis, I wrote that liberalism was haunted by its hypocrisy. Consider Mr. Obama’s campaign-finance pieties as Exhibit B.

Now about inequality. In 1835 Alexis de Tocqueville noticed what might be called the paradox of equality: As social conditions become more equal, the more people resent the inequalities that remain.

« Democratic institutions awaken and foster a passion for equality which they can never entirely satisfy, » Tocqueville wrote. « This complete equality eludes the grasp of the people at the very moment they think they have grasped it . . . the people are excited in the pursuit of an advantage, which is more precious because it is not sufficiently remote to be unknown or sufficiently near to be enjoyed. »

One result: « Democratic institutions strongly tend to promote the feeling of envy. » Another: « A depraved taste for equality, which impels the weak to attempt to lower the powerful to

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304591604579290350851300782 1/3/2014

Bret Stephens: Obama’s Envy Problem – WSJ.com Page 2 of 3

Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-59) saw the dark side of the politics of equality. Corbis

expense of the poor.

their own level and reduces men to prefer equality in slavery to inequality with freedom. »

That is the background by which the current hand-wringing over inequality must be judged. Inequality is not a problem simply because the rich get richer faster than the poor get richer. It’s a problem only when the rich get richer at the

Mr. Obama tried to prove that in his speech, comparing present-day income with that halcyon year of 1979: « The top 10 percent no longer takes in one-third of our income—it now takes half, » he said, suggesting that the rich are eating a larger share of the national pie. « Whereas in the past, the average CEO made about 20 to 30 times the income of the average worker, today’s CEO now makes 273 times more. And meanwhile, a family in the top one percent has a net worth 288 times higher than the typical family, which is a record for this country. »

Here is a factual error, marred by an analytical error, compounded by a moral error. It’s the top 20% that take in just over half of aggregate income, according to the Census Bureau, not the top 10%. That figure is essentially unchanged since the mid-1990s, when Bill Clinton was president. And it isn’t dramatically different from 1979, when the top fifth took in 44% of aggregate income.

Besides which, so what? In 1979 the mean household income of the bottom 20% was $4,006. By 2012, it was $11,490. That’s an increase of 186%. For the middle class, the increase was 211%. For the top fifth it’s 320%. The richer have outpaced the poorer in growing their incomes, just as runners will outpace joggers who will, in turn, outpace walkers. But, as James Taylor might say, the walking man walks.

As it is, to whom except the envious should it matter that the boss now makes a lot more, provided you, too, also make more? Class-consciousness has always been a fact of American life, but rarely is it about how the poor, or even the middle class, feel toward the very rich. It has been about how the professional class—lawyers, journalists, administrators, academics—feel toward the financial class. It’s what Volvo America thinks about S-class America.

That idiot you knew freshman year, always fondling a lacrosse stick, before he became the head of his fraternity—his bonus last year was how much?

The moral greatness of capitalism rests in the fact that it is the only economic system where one person’s gain can be another’s also—where Steve Jobs’s billions are his shareholders’ thousands. Capitalism cultivates a sense of admiration where envy would otherwise rule in a zero-sum economic system. It’s what, for the past 60 years, has blunted the democratic tendency toward envy in the U.S. and distinguished its free-market democracy from the social democracies of Europe. It’s what draws people to this country.

Somewhere in the rubble of Mr. Obama’s musings on inequality there was a better speech on economic mobility. Then again, under Mr. Obama the median income of the poorest Americans has declined in absolute terms, to $11,490 in 2012 from $11,552 in 2009, at the height of the recession. Chalk it up as another instance of Mr. Obama being the cause of the very problems he aspires to address.

Le pape François se défend d’être marxiste

Jean-Marie Guénois

Le Figaro

15/12/2013

«Je le répète, je ne me suis pas exprimé en technicien, mais selon la doctrine sociale de l’Église», a rappelé le pape François.

Après ses diatribes contre le libéralisme, le souverain pontife a précisé ses positions économiques dans une interview à La Stampa.

Le pape François n’est pas «marxiste». Il a dû le préciser explicitement dimanche dans une interview exclusive accordée au quotidien italien La Stampa en réponse à une vague d’accusations venues des États-Unis qui ont suivi l’Exhortation apostolique publiée le 26 novembre où François avait effectivement instruit un procès en règle contre l’économie libérale qui «tue». On apprend également dans cet entretien son opposition aux femmes «cardinal» et sa prudence sur l’évolution de l’Église en faveur des divorcés remariés.

Rush Limbaugh, un animateur de radio américain, avait en effet fustigé l’exhortation apostolique intitulée La Joie de l’Évangile, la qualifiant de… «marxisme pur». Stuart Varney, de la chaîne Fox News, y avait vu du «néo-socialisme». Jonathon Moseley, membre du Tea Party, avait renchéri: «Jésus n’était pas un socialiste!» En France, Clément Guillou titrait sa chronique sur le site Rue 89: «Cette fois, c’est sûr, le pape François est socialiste».

Mais la polémique s’est à ce point enflammée outre-Atlantique, y compris dans les milieux catholiques, étonnés par les positions économiques du Pape, que François a dû préciser sa pensée par cet entretien avec le journaliste Andréa Tornielli, l’un des vaticanistes italiens les plus en vue. «L’idéologie marxiste est erronée, lui confie le pape François, mais dans ma vie j’ai rencontré de nombreux marxistes qui étaient des gens bien.»

«  Une des causes de cette situation se trouve dans la relation que nous avons établie avec l’argent, puisque nous acceptons paisiblement sa prédominance sur nous et sur nos sociétés»

Extrait de l’exhortation apostolique

En fait, le passage de l’exhortation apostolique qui a mis le feu aux poudres a été la critique du Pape contre la théorie de la «rechute favorable» (en anglais «trickle down», expression mieux traduite en français par «théorie du ruissellement»): «Certains défendent encore les théories de la “rechute favorable”, écrivait François, qui supposent que chaque croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire en soi une plus grande équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Cette opinion, qui n’a jamais été confirmée par les faits, exprime une confiance grossière et naïve dans la bonté de ceux qui détiennent le pouvoir économique et dans les mécanismes sacralisés du système économique dominant. Mais, pendant ce temps, les exclus continuent à attendre.»

Le Pape ajoutait, dans ce même chapitre: «Une des causes de cette situation se trouve dans la relation que nous avons établie avec l’argent, puisque nous acceptons paisiblement sa prédominance sur nous et sur nos sociétés. La crise financière que nous traversons nous fait oublier qu’elle a, à son origine, une crise anthropologique profonde: la négation du primat de l’être humain! Nous avons créé de nouvelles idoles. L’adoration de l’antique veau d’or a trouvé une nouvelle et impitoyable version dans le fétichisme de l’argent et dans la dictature de l’économie sans visage et sans un but véritablement humain.»

Prônant un renforcement de l’État dans le contrôle de l’économie, le Pape concluait: «Alors que les gains d’un petit nombre s’accroissent exponentiellement, ceux de la majorité se situent de façon toujours plus éloignée du bien-être de cette heureuse minorité. Ce déséquilibre procède d’idéologies qui défendent l’autonomie absolue des marchés et la spéculation financière. Par conséquent, ils nient le droit de contrôle des États chargés de veiller à la préservation du bien commun. Une nouvelle tyrannie invisible s’instaure, parfois virtuelle, qui impose ses lois et ses règles, de façon unilatérale et impla­cable.»

Des propos d’une fermeté inédite dans la bouche d’un pape – car la doc­trine sociale de l’Église a toujours défendu la responsabilité personnelle et la liberté d’entreprise – qui ont alors suscité une incompréhension certaine, car plusieurs observateurs nord-américains ont reconnu là les thèses de l’écono­miste hongrois d’inspiration socialiste Karl Polanyi (1886-1964).

D’où cette mise au point du Pape dans l’interview de La Stampa: «Il n’y a rien dans l’exhortation apostolique qui ne soit dans la doctrine sociale de l’Église. Je ne me suis pas exprimé d’un point de vue technique, mais j’ai cherché à présenter une photographie de ce qui se passe. L’unique citation spécifique est celle de la théorie de la “rechute favorable”, selon laquelle toute croissance économique, favorisée par le libre marché, réussit à produire, par elle-même, une meilleure équité et inclusion sociale dans le monde. Soit la promesse que quand le verre serait rempli, il déborderait, et les pauvres alors en profiteraient. Mais quand il est plein, le verre, comme par magie, s’agrandit et jamais rien n’en sort pour les pauvres. Ce fut là ma seule référence à une théorie spécifique. Je le répète, je ne me suis pas exprimé en technicien mais selon la doctrine sociale de l’Église. Cela ne signifie pas être marxiste.»

Voir par ailleurs:

Le pape François, un an au Vatican : une révolution en trompe-l’oeil ?

Le Plus-Nouvelobs

14-03-2014

Jean-Marcel Bouguereau

éditorialiste

LE PLUS. Premier pape argentin de l’histoire, le pape François a fêté, jeudi 13 mars, le premier anniversaire de son élection au Vatican. Porteur de nombreuses attentes de réformes et d’ouverture, celui qui a succédé à Benoît XVI est-il à la hauteur ? Notre éditorialiste Jean-Marcel Bouguereau dresse un premier bilan.

Édité par Sébastien Billard

Le pape François pourrait en remontrer à l’autre François (Hollande) : en un an, il a réussi à changer beaucoup de choses dans cette institution par nature conservatrice, l’Église. C’est le magazine « Rolling-Stone » qui titrait à propos de lui : « Les temps changent ».

On a beaucoup parlé de son style de vie, de sa simplicité, jusqu’à son refus de porter les traditionnels escarpins rouges, préférant rappeler son cordonnier argentin pour réparer ses vieilles chaussures. Il a bouleversé par son exemple les habitudes de la Curie romaine, en instaurant au Vatican une humilité qui n’était plus de mise chez ces prélats confits dans leurs ors et leurs brocards.

Transparence financière et gestes d’ouverture

Même si cela a beaucoup contribué à sa popularité, l’essentiel n’est pas là. Premier pape non européen, premier pape jésuite, premier pape de la mondialisation, il a montré sa volonté de réformer la toute-puissante Curie.

Son super ministère des finances va coiffer la fameuse banque du Vatican où il a commencé à faire le ménage : plus aucun laïc ne peut y ouvrir de compte ce qui, jusque-là, permettait à certains mafieux de blanchir au Vatican l’argent de trafics de drogue. Une transparence financière qui ne plait guère aux parrains de la mafia calabraise, qui lui auraient adressé des menaces de mort.

Il a multiplié les gestes de compréhension envers les homosexuels et envers les athées, demandant « l’ouverture et la miséricorde vis-à-vis des personnes divorcées, homosexuelles ou encore des femmes qui ont subi un avortement ».

Mais sa volonté, selon la formule de Kierkegaard, « de remettre un peu de christianisme dans la chrétienté », ne plait pas à tout le monde. Le Tea Party américain n’a-t-il pas dénoncé en lui un « marxiste » et même, horresco referens, un « libéral », c’est à dire une sorte de gauchiste !

Pensez donc ! Un homme qui parle de la différence entre pêcheurs et corrompus, qui dit « qui suis-je pour juger un gay qui cherche Dieu ? », qui critique une société qui fait de l’argent une idole !

Se transformer pour continuer à exister

Mais parce qu’il prépare lui-même ses spaghettis et qu’il s’échappe clandestinement du Vatican les soirs de grand froid pour visiter des SDF romains, faut-il, comme certains, en faire une nouvelle idole de la gauche dont les posters viendraient remplacer ceux de Guevara ?

Ce pape reste pape. Dans ses goûts cinématographiques figurent le néoréalisme italien, Fellini, Rossellini et « Le Guépard » de Visconti où l’on trouve cette phrase tirée du roman de Lampedusa « Il faut que tout change pour que rien ne change ».

Dans cette période du risorgimento (« Renaissance ») où l’aristocratie ne meurt pas mais se transforme, on peut trouver une analogie avec la situation d’une Église qui doit impérativement se transformer pour continuer à exister.

Voir encore:

Eglise : jusqu’où veut aller le pape François sur les dossiers sensibles ?

Marie Lemonnier

Le Nouvel Observateur

13-03-2014

La place des femmes et des laïcs, l’homosexualité, la réforme de la Curie… Le successeur de Benoît XVI amènera-t-il le renouveau ?

Elu il y a un an, le 13 mars 2013, après la renonciation de Benoît XVI, souverain pontife pris dans les tourments du Vatileaks, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, 77 ans, a été désigné par ses pairs pour opérer la réforme nécessaire de l’appareil catholique. Avec ses prises de paroles, parfois tranchées, parfois ambiguës, et les premières décisions de sa première année de gouvernance, le pape argentin a ouvert plusieurs grands chantiers qui laissent entrevoir une forte volonté de renouveau, sans néanmoins toucher aux fondamentaux de la doctrine dont les papes sont les héritiers autant que les garants. Jusqu’où veut-il aller et jusqu’où pourra-t-il mener l’Eglise ?

1 La réforme de la Curie

Après le Vatileaks, les cardinaux électeurs ont clairement demandé au nouveau successeur de Pierre d’opérer un nettoyage et une rationalisation de la Curie romaine. Il s’agit d’une part d’alléger la structure, dans laquelle les dicastères (équivalent de ministères) se sont accumulés ces dernières décennies, mais aussi d’en changer la perspective. Au lieu de la laisser prospérer au-dessus des évêques comme un super-gouvernement tout puissant, François souhaite lui confier le rôle de médiateur entre les épiscopats et le pape. L’objectif ? Qu’elle soit véritablement au service des pasteurs de l’Eglise universelle et des Eglises locales. Une manière de faire vivre la collégialité, maître-mot de Vatican II que souhaite mettre en application Bergoglio, comme on le voit également à travers son usage du synode qui est l’occasion pour les évêques du monde entier de prendre part à la décision mais aussi avec la création de ce conseil permanent de 8 cardinaux venus des cinq continents, surnommé le G8 ou le C8, chargé de l’aider dans sa réforme de la Curie.

François veut ainsi que l’Eglise ne soit plus une monarchie absolue mais un organe de participation autour du pape, qui reste néanmoins seul détenteur de l’autorité. Etranger à l’institution romaine sur laquelle il porte un regard critique voire sévère, le pape argentin n’hésite pas à fustiger les querelles de pouvoir en son sein, les habitudes de cour et tous ceux qui s’y « prennent pour des dieux ». Il semble ainsi très déterminé à remplir sa mission. A cette fin, une nouvelle Constitution apostolique doit être écrite pour remplacer celle de Jean-Paul II appelée Pastor Bonus, en vigueur depuis 1988. Le père Lombardi, porte-parole du Saint-Siège, a déjà tenté de modérer les impatiences en avertissant qu’elle ne verrait pas le jour avant 2015.

2 La gestion et la transparence des finances

« Je veux une Eglise pauvre au service des pauvres », martèle le pape François. En créant fin février un « Secrétariat pour l’économie » (un super ministère aux pouvoirs étendus sur le Saint-Siège et l’Etat du Vatican), dirigé par le cardinal australien Pell, qui fait déjà partie des hommes forts du G8 du pape, ainsi qu’un « Conseil pour l’économie » ayant autorité pour contrôler toutes les instances vaticanes, le pape François donne enfin les premiers signes concrets de la réforme institutionnelle.

C’est comme s’il avait créé la Cour des comptes et l’Inspection des finances en même temps ! », souligne l’historien de la papauté Philippe Levillain.

Des bilans financiers seront rendus publics et les procédures moins bureaucratiques. Autre nouveauté, pour assurer une meilleure transparence, ce Conseil pour l’économie (CE) sera composé de 8 prélats mais aussi de 7 laïcs (dont le Français Jean-Baptiste de Franssu, patron de la société Incipit). C’est la première fois que des laïcs entrent ainsi dans une institution curiale. Enfin, le CE sera coordonné par l’archevêque de Munich et tout nouveau président de la Conférence épiscopale allemande Reinhard Marx, également auteur d’un livre intitulé… « Le Capital ». Ca ne s’invente pas.

Même si aucune décision n’a encore été prise concernant la très critiquée et opaque banque du Vatican, la commission chargée de sa réforme poursuit ses travaux et devrait faire des annonces courant avril. Plus de la moitié des 19.000 comptes de l’IOR (Institut pour les Œuvres de religion) a été contrôlée ; un millier a été fermé et moins d’une centaine de comptes suspects fait l’objet d’investigations plus approfondies. « Tout va changer dans la gestion économico-administrative du Saint-Siège », promet ainsi le site Vatican Insider.

3 La place des femmes et des laïcs

La femme « peut et doit être plus présente dans les lieux de décision de l’Eglise », affirme le Saint-Père dans le « Corriere della Sera » du 5 mars, laissant ainsi espérer que des femmes puissent être à l’avenir nommées à la tête de dicastères. Le pape faisait toutefois observer qu’il s’agit là d’une « promotion de type fonctionnel » qui ne fait guère « avancer les choses ». Il a également plusieurs fois exprimé sa volonté de promouvoir une « théologie de la femme » qui laisse dubitatif sur les réelles avancées à attendre sur le sujet. Surtout, il n’a pas caché qu’il n’ordonnera pas de femmes prêtres. Quant à nommer une femme Cardinal ? « D’où est sortie cette blague ? », a-t-il tout bonnement écarté dans « la Stampa » du 15 décembre.

Le pape ne dit rien, en revanche, sur l’ordination éventuelle d’hommes mariés. Cela peut-il faire partie des non-dits où les lignes peuvent bouger ?

Si le cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga, coordinateur du conseil des huit cardinaux chargé de la réforme, a émis l’idée de mettre un « couple marié » à la tête du Conseil pontifical pour la famille, l’hypothèse paraît là aussi douteuse. D’autant que ce Conseil pontifical pourrait se voir fondu dans un ensemble plus large. En revanche, une véritable Congrégation pour les laïcs pourrait voir le jour.

4 Les homosexuels

Si une personne est gay et cherche le Seigneur et qu’elle est de bonne volonté, mais qui suis-je pour la juger ? »

Lancée dans l’avion qui le ramenait du Brésil en juillet 2013, cette phrase est peut-être la plus connue et la plus commentée du pape François. Du moins dans sa version tronquée : « Qui suis-je pour juger ? ». Et décontextualisée. En effet, le pape répondait à une question précise, qui portait sur Mgr Battista Ricca, le prélat qu’il venait de nommer comme conseiller pour la réforme de la banque du Vatican et dont l’homosexualité venait d’être révélée dans les médias italiens. La phrase lui valut néanmoins les honneurs de la célèbre revue LGBT américaine Advocate et a été accueillie comme une phrase symbolique de la bienveillance papale. En invitant les pasteurs à mieux « accompagner » les homosexuels, François prône ainsi une Église qui « considère la personne » avant de « condamner ».

« La pensée de l’Eglise, nous la connaissons et je suis fils de l’Eglise, mais il n’est pas nécessaire d’en parler en permanence. Les enseignements, tant dogmatiques que moraux, ne sont pas tous équivalents, déclare Bergoglio. Nous devons donc trouver un nouvel équilibre, autrement l’édifice moral de l’Eglise risque lui aussi de s’écrouler comme un château de cartes, de perdre la fraîcheur et le parfum de l’Evangile ».

Même s’il souhaite étudier les raisons pour lesquelles des Etats ont pu adopter des unions civiles, le pape rappelle que le mariage est « l’union d’un homme et d’une femme ».

5 La famille et la question des divorcés-remariés

La question des divorcés remariés, très attendue par l’opinion publique, est une source de crispations actuellement au Vatican. On l’a vu dernièrement au consistoire préparatoire au synode sur la famille qui s’est tenu les 20 et 21 février à Rome et dont le cardinal français Paul Poupard redoutait qu’il se termine en « guerre civile ». « Les confrontations fraternelles et ouvertes font grandir la pensée théologique et pastorale. De ceci je n’ai pas peur, plutôt je le cherche »¸ a cependant assuré le pape François.

« Je crois que ce temps est celui de la miséricorde », avait-il déclaré au retour des JMJ de Rio. Ce qui ne veut pas dire suppression de l’interdiction pour eux de communier. Le « non » a été formulé par le préfet de la congrégation pour la doctrine de la foi, Mgr Gerhard L. Müller. Le pape argentin a néanmoins donné des signes d’espoir et d’ouverture, en choisissant le cardinal théologien Walter Kasper pour ouvrir le consistoire.

Dans son discours inaugural, ce dernier, connu pour ses positions progressistes, a en effet émis l’idée d’un « nouveau développement » concernant l’épineuse question des divorcés remariés, suggérant que la pratique actuelle serait « contre-productive ». Le cardinal propose ainsi des solutions vers un sacrement de pénitence. Cette voie ne serait cependant pas une solution générale mais s’adresserait au petit nombre de ceux qui seraient sincèrement intéressé par les sacrements. Des pistes de réflexion qualifiées de « théologie sereine » par le pape François qui défend par ailleurs la famille traditionnelle si « maltraitée, dépréciée », mais « plan lumineux de Dieu ».

La question n’est pas celle de changer la doctrine mais d’aller en profondeur et faire en sorte que la pastorale tienne compte des situations et de ce qu’il est possible de faire pour les personnes », a-t-il tenu à préciser dans sa dernière interview du 5 mars tout en saluant le « génie prophétique de Paul VI », auteur de l’encyclique Humanae Vitae qui fermait la question de la contraception.

Prudent, le pape François veut donc replacer la morale à sa « juste place » sans rien lâcher sur la doctrine. Ayant choisi le mode de la collégialité sous la forme de deux synodes en 2014 et 2015, aucune conclusion ne devrait voir le jour avant la fin des travaux ecclésiastiques.


De Staline à Poutine: Une longue pratique d’assassinats secrets et un effort mondial de désinformation (From JFK to Litvinenko: Romanian top spy defector Ion Mihai Pacepa looks back on the Kremlin’s killing and disinforming ways)

8 mars, 2014
https://i2.wp.com/i1.sndcdn.com/artworks-000034189888-rl6yse-t500x500.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02582/LITVINENKO_2582317b.jpgI shouted out, Who killed the Kennedys?  When after all  It was you and me. The Rolling Stones (1968)
Il n’aura même pas eu la satisfaction d’être tué pour les droits civiques. Il a fallu que ce soit un imbécile de petit communiste. Cela prive même sa mort de toute signification. Jackie Kennedy
En affirmant que l’Amérique a le droit d’agir parce qu’elle mène une guerre, qui ne s’applique pas à un territoire précis, contre un ennemi multiforme, la Maison-Blanche crée aussi un dangereux précédent, qui pourrait bien être utilisé à l’avenir par la Russie, la Chine ou l’Iran pour aller éliminer leurs propres ennemis. Pourquoi, dès lors, les alliés de l’Amérique restent-ils silencieux, alors qu’ils accablaient Bush? Le Figaro
Depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir de Vladimir Poutine, pas moins de 29 professionnels des médias ont été assassinés en lien direct avec leurs activités professionnelles. Agressions et assassinats se perpétuent à un rythme égal, nourri par l’impunité générale. RSF
Les Russes ont monté de toutes pièces des « séparatistes » ossètes, et abkhazes, pour casser la Géorgie, coupable de lèse-Russie. Moscou préparait depuis des mois l’assaut qui vient de se produire. La 58ème armée, qui s’est ruée sur la Géorgie, avait été préparée de longue main. (…) Poutine a préparé l’action (…) dès le mois d’avril, nous dit le spécialiste russe des affaires militaires Pavel Felgenhauer. On ne lance pas à l’improviste une opération combinée des commandos, des unités de blindés, de la marine et de l’armée de l’air, sans oublier une vaste cyber-attaque commencée une ou deux semaine avant l’assaut. Vu l’état général des forces russes, où les officiers vendent les pneus, les munitions, les carburants et les équipements, il a fallu préparer spécialement l’invasion pendant des mois. Laurent Murawiec
Quel autre pays au monde peut en effet se permettre de raser des villes, de spolier les étrangers, d’assassiner les opposants hors de ses frontières, de harceler les diplomates étrangers, de menacer ses voisins, sans provoquer autre chose que de faibles protestations? Françoise Thom
La politique de « redémarrage » des relations russo-américaines proposée par le président Obama a été interprétée à Moscou comme l’indice de la prise de conscience par les Américains de leur faiblesse, et par conséquent comme une invitation à Moscou de pousser ses pions (…) Le contrat d’achat des Mistrals présente un triple avantage: d’abord, la Russie acquiert des armements de haute technologie sans avoir à faire l’effort de les développer elle-même ; deuxièmement, elle réduit à néant la solidarité atlantique et la solidarité européenne ; troisièmement, elle accélère la vassalisation du deuxième grand pays européen après l’Allemagne. Un expert russe a récemment comparé cette politique à celle de la Chine face aux Etats-Unis : selon lui, à Washington le lobby pro-chinois intéressé aux affaires avec la Chine est devenu si puissant que les Etats-Unis sont désormais incapables de s’opposer à Pékin; la même chose est déjà vraie pour l’Allemagne face à la Russie et elle le sera pour la France après la signature du contrat sur les Mistrals. Françoise Thom
« Dix », me fit remarquer Ceausescu. « C’est dix dirigeants internationaux que le Kremlin a tué ou tenté de tuer »,  m’expliqua-t-il, les comptant sur ses doigts. Laszlo Rajk et Imre Nagy de Hongrie ; Lucretiu Patrascanu et Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej de Roumanie ; Rudolf Slansky, le dirigeant tchèque et Jan Masaryk, le chef de la diplomatie de ce pays ; le shah d’Iran ; Palmiro Togliatti d’Italie ; le Président américain John F. Kennedy ; et Mao Tse Tong. Ion Mihai Pacepa
Quand l’Union soviétique s’est effondrée, les Russes avaient une chance unique de se libérer de leur ancienne forme d’État policier byzantin, qui avait, pendant des siècles, isolé le pays et l’avait laissé complètement démuni devant la complexité de la société moderne. Malheureusement, les Russes n’ont pas été à la hauteur de cette tâche. Depuis la chute du communisme, ils ont été confrontés à une forme indigène de capitalisme dirigé par un ensemble de vieux bureaucrates communistes, spéculateurs et impitoyables mafiosi qui a creusé les inégalités sociales. Par conséquent, après une période de bouleversements, les Russes ont progressivement — et peut-être heureusement — glissé dans leur forme historique du gouvernement, le samoderzhaviye russe traditionnel, une forme d’autocratie remontant à Ivan le Terrible au XIVe siècle, dans laquelle un seigneur féodal dirigeait le pays avec l’aide de sa police politique personnelle. Bonne ou mauvaise, l’ancienne police politique peut apparaître à la plupart des Russes comme leur seul moyen de défense contre la rapacité de leurs nouveaux capitalistes. Il ne sera pas facile de rompre avec une tradition de cinq siècles. Cela ne signifie pas que la Russie ne peut pas changer. Mais pour cela, les Etats-Unis ont leur rôle à jouer. Nous devrions arrêter de faire semblant que le gouvernement russe est démocratique et l’évaluer pour ce qu’il est vraiment : une bande de plus de 6 000 anciens officiers du KGB, une des organisations les plus criminelles de l’histoire — qui a saisi les postes les plus importants dans les gouvernements fédéraux et locaux, et qui perpétuent la pratique de Staline, Khrouchtchev et Brejnev d’assassinats secrets de ceux qui se dressent sur leur chemin. Tuer a toujours un prix, et il faudrait forcer le Kremlin à le payer jusqu’à ce qu’il arrête le massacre. Ion Mihai Pacepa
À partir de ses 15 ans, selon ses propres déclarations, Oswald s’intéresse au marxisme. Peu après, à La Nouvelle-Orléans, il achète le Capital et le Manifeste du Parti communiste7. En octobre 1956, Lee écrit au président du Parti socialiste d’Amérique une lettre où il se déclare marxiste et affirme étudier les principes marxistes depuis quinze mois. Pourtant, alors même qu’il lit toute la littérature marxiste qu’il peut trouver, Oswald prépare son entrée dans les marines en apprenant par cœur le manuel des marines de son frère aîné, Robert, qui est marine. Oswald adore ce frère dont il porte fièrement la bague du Corps et rêve depuis longtemps de l’imiter en le suivant dans la carrière. Alors même qu’il se considère comme un marxiste, Oswald réalise son rêve d’enfance et s’engage dans les marines une semaine après son dix-septième anniversaire. Après les entraînements de base, d’octobre 1956 à mars 1957, Oswald suit un entraînement spécifique destiné à la composante aérienne des marines. Au terme de cet entraînement, le 3 mai 1957, il devient soldat de première classe, reçoit l’accréditation de sécurité minimale, « confidentiel »9, et suit l’entraînement d’opérateur radar. Après un passage à la base d’El Toro (Californie) en juillet 1957, il est assigné à la base d’Atsugi, au Japon, en août 1957. Cette base est utilisée pour les vols de l’avion espion Lockheed U-2 au-dessus de l’URSS, et quoique Oswald ne soit pas impliqué dans ces opérations secrètes, certains auteurs ont spéculé qu’il aurait pu commencer là une carrière d’espion. (…)  En février 1959, il demande à passer un test de connaissance du russe auquel il a des résultats « faibles ».C’est alors qu’Oswald commence à exprimer de manière claire des opinions marxistes qui n’améliorent pas sa popularité auprès de ses camarades. Il lit énormément de revues en russe, écoute des disques en russe et s’adresse aux autres soit en russe soit en contrefaisant un accent russe. Ses camarades le surnomment alors « Oswaldskovich ». Mi-1959, il fait en sorte de rompre prématurément son engagement dans l’armée en prétextant le fait qu’il est le seul soutien pour sa mère souffrante. Lorsqu’il peut quitter l’armée en septembre 1959, il a en fait déjà préparé l’étape suivante de sa vie, sa défection en URSS. Oswald a été un bon soldat, en tout cas au début de sa carrière, et ses résultats aux tests de tir, par exemple, sont très satisfaisants. Ses résultats au tir se dégradent cependant vers la fin de sa carrière militaire, élément qui fut ensuite utilisé pour faire passer Oswald pour un piètre tireur. Ainsi, avec un score de 191 le 5 mai 1959, Oswald atteint encore le niveau « bon tireur », alors qu’il envisage déjà son départ du Corps. Lors de cette séance de tir, Nelson Delgado, la seule personne qui affirma devant la commission Warren qu’Oswald était un mauvais tireur, avait fait 19212. En fait, selon les standards du Corps de Marines, Oswald était un assez bon tireur. Le voyage d’Oswald en URSS est bien préparé : il a économisé la quasi-totalité de sa solde de marine et obtient un passeport en prétendant vouloir étudier en Europe. Il embarque le 20 septembre 1959 sur un bateau en partance de La Nouvelle-Orléans à destination du Havre, où il arrive le 8 octobre pour partir immédiatement vers Southampton, puis prend un avion vers Helsinki (Finlande), où il atterrit le 10 octobre. Dès le lundi 12, Oswald se présente à l’ambassade d’URSS et demande un visa touristique de six jours dans le cadre d’un voyage organisé, visa qu’il obtient le 14 octobre. Oswald quitte Helsinki par train le 15 octobre et arrive à Moscou le 16. Le jour même, il demande la citoyenneté soviétique, que les Soviétiques lui refusent au premier abord, considérant que sa défection est de peu de valeur. Après qu’il a tenté de se suicider, les Soviétiques lui accordent le droit de rester, d’abord temporairement, à la suite de quoi Oswald tente de renoncer à sa citoyenneté américaine, lors d’une visite au consul américain le 31 octobre 1959, puis pour un temps indéterminé. Les Soviétiques envoient Oswald à Minsk en janvier 1960. Il y est surveillé en permanence par le KGB17 pendant les deux ans et demi que dure son séjour. Oswald semble tout d’abord heureux : il a un travail dans une usine métallurgique, un appartement gratuit et une allocation gouvernementale en plus de son salaire, une existence confortable selon les standards de vie soviétiques. Le fait que le U2 de Francis Powers ait été abattu par les Soviétiques après l’arrivée d’Oswald, en mai 1960, a éveillé la curiosité de certains auteurs se demandant quel lien cet évènement pouvait avoir avec le passage d’Oswald sur la base d’Atsugi, une des bases d’où des U2 décollaient. Cependant, outre qu’Oswald ne semble jamais avoir été en contact avec des secrets sur Atsugi, personne n’a jamais réussi à établir un lien entre Oswald et cet évènement. Ainsi, le U2 de Powers a été abattu par une salve de missiles SA-2 chanceuse (à moins que Powers ait été sous son plafond normal) et aucun renseignement spécial n’a été nécessaire à cet effet. (…) En mars 1961, alors qu’il a eu quelques contacts avec l’ambassade américaine à Moscou en vue de son retour aux États-Unis, Oswald rencontre Marina Nikolayevna Prusakova, une jeune étudiante en pharmacie de 19 ans, lors d’un bal au palais des Syndicats. Ils se marient moins d’un mois plus tard et s’installent dans l’appartement d’Oswald. Oswald a écrit plus tard dans son journal qu’il a épousé Marina uniquement pour faire du mal à son ex-petite amie, Ella Germain. En mai 1961, Oswald réitère à l’ambassade américaine son souhait de retourner aux États-Unis, cette fois avec son épouse. Lors d’un voyage en juillet à Moscou, Oswald va avec Marina, enceinte de leur premier enfant, à l’ambassade américaine pour demander un renouvellement de son passeport. Ce renouvellement est autorisé en juillet, mais la lutte avec la bureaucratie soviétique va durer bien plus longtemps. Lorsque le premier enfant des Oswald, June, naît en février 1962, ils sont encore à Minsk. Finalement, ils reçoivent leur visa de sortie en mai 1962, et la famille Oswald quitte l’URSS et embarque pour les États-Unis le 1er juin 1962. La famille Oswald s’installe à Fort Worth (près de Dallas) vers la mi-juin 1962, d’abord chez son frère Robert, ensuite chez sa mère, début juillet, et enfin dans un petit appartement fin juillet, lorsque Lee trouve un travail dans une usine métallurgique. Le FBI s’intéresse naturellement à Lee et provoque deux entretiens avec lui, le 26 juin et le 16 août. Les entretiens ne révélant rien de notable, l’agent chargé du dossier demande à Oswald de contacter le FBI si des Soviétiques le contactaient, et conclut ses rapports en recommandant de fermer le dossier. Cependant, dès le 12 août, Lee écrit au Socialist Workers Party, un parti trotskiste, pour leur demander de la documentation, et continue de recevoir trois périodiques russes. Vers la fin août, les Oswald sont introduits auprès de la petite communauté de Russes émigrés de Dallas. Ceux-ci n’aiment pas particulièrement Oswald, qui se montre désagréable, mais prennent en pitié Marina, perdue dans un pays dont elle ne connait même pas la langue que Lee refuse de lui apprendre. C’est dans le cadre de ces contacts qu’Oswald rencontre George de Mohrenschildt (en), un riche excentrique d’origine russe de 51 ans qui prend Oswald en sympathie. Les relations entre Oswald et Mohrenschildt ont été source de nombreuses spéculations, et certains ont cru voir dans Mohrenschildt un agent ayant participé à une conspiration, sans jamais trouver d’élément factuel qui démontre cette hypothèse. (…) En février 1963, alors que les relations entre Lee et Marina s’enveniment jusqu’à la violence, Oswald prend un premier contact avec l’ambassade d’URSS en laissant entendre qu’il souhaite y retourner. C’est aussi au cours de ce mois que les Oswald rencontrent Ruth Paine, qui allait devenir, avec son mari Michael, très proche des Oswald. Rapidement, Ruth et Marina deviennent amies au cours du mois de mars 1963, et c’est à la fin du mois que Lee demande à Marina de prendre des photos de lui avec ses armes. C’est également au cours de ce mois qu’Oswald commence à préparer l’assassinat du général Walker, que les deux armes commandées lui furent livrées, que Lee perdit son travail chez Jaggers et que l’agent Hosty du FBI commença un réexamen de routine du dossier de Oswald et Marina (six mois s’étant écoulés depuis son dernier entretien avec Oswald), au cours duquel il découvrit une note du FBI de New York sur un abonnement de Lee au Worker, journal communiste, ce qui l’intrigua et le poussa à rouvrir le dossier. Toutefois, avant que Hosty ait pu traiter le dossier, il se rendit compte que les Oswald avaient quitté Dallas. Le général Edwin Walker (en), un héros de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, est un anticommuniste virulent et partisan de la ségrégation raciale. Walker a été relevé de son commandement en Allemagne et muté à Hawaï en avril 1961 par le président Kennedy après qu’il eut distribué de la littérature d’extrême-droite à ses troupes. Il démissionne alors de l’armée en novembre 1961 et se retire à Dallas pour y commencer une carrière politique. Il se présente contre John Connally pour l’investiture démocrate au poste de gouverneur du Texas en 1962, mais est battu par Connally qui est finalement élu gouverneur. À Dallas, Walker devient la figure de proue de la John Birch Society, une organisation d’extrême-droite basée au Massachusetts. Walker représente tout ce que déteste Oswald et il commence à le surveiller en février 1963, prenant notamment des photos de son domicile et des environs. Le 10 avril 1963, alors qu’il est congédié de chez Jaggars-Chiles-Stovall depuis dix jours, il laisse une note en russe à Marina et quitte son domicile avec son fusil. Le soir même, alors que Walker est assis à son bureau, on tire sur lui d’une distance de 30 mètres. Walker survit par un simple coup de chance : la balle frappe le châssis en bois de la fenêtre et est déviée. Lorsqu’Oswald rentre chez lui, il est pâle et semble effrayé. Quand il dit à Marina ce qu’il vient de faire, elle lui fait détruire l’ensemble des documents qu’il a rassemblés pour préparer sa tentative d’assassinat, bien qu’elle conserve la note en russe. L’implication d’Oswald dans cette tentative ne sera connue des autorités qu’après la mort d’Oswald, lorsque cette note, ainsi qu’une photo de la maison de Walker, accompagnées du témoignage de Marina, leur parviendra. La balle récupérée dans la maison de Walker est trop endommagée pour permettre une analyse balistique, mais l’analyse de cette balle par activation neutronique par le HSCA permet de déterminer qu’elle a été produite par le même fabricant que la balle qui tua Kennedy. Sans emploi, Oswald confie Marina aux bons soins de Ruth Paine et part à La Nouvelle-Orléans pour trouver du travail. (…) Marina le rejoint le 10 mai. Oswald semble à nouveau malheureux de son sort, et quoiqu’il ait perdu ses illusions sur l’Union soviétique, il oblige Marina à écrire à l’ambassade d’URSS pour demander l’autorisation d’y retourner. Marina reçoit plusieurs réponses peu enthousiastes de l’ambassade, mais entretemps les espoirs d’Oswald se sont reportés sur Cuba et Fidel Castro. Il devient un ardent défenseur de Castro et décide de créer une section locale de l’association Fair Play for Cuba. Il consacre 22,73 dollars à l’impression de 1 000 tracts, 500 demandes d’adhésion et 300 cartes de membres pour Fair Play for Cuba et Marina signe du nom de « A.J. Hidell » comme président de la section sur une des cartes. (…)  Il fait, le 5 août 1963, une tentative d’infiltration des milieux anti-castristes, et se présente comme un anticommuniste auprès de Carlos Bringuier (en), délégué à La Nouvelle-Orléans de l’association des étudiants cubains en proposant de mettre ses capacités de Marine au service des anti-castristes. (…)  Oswald envisage de détourner un avion vers Cuba, mais Marina réussit à l’en dissuader, et l’encourage à trouver un moyen légal d’aller à Cuba. En l’absence de liaison entre les États-Unis et Cuba, Lee commence à envisager de passer par le Mexique. (…)  Oswald est dans un bus reliant Houston à Laredo le 26 septembre, et continue ensuite vers Mexico. Là, il tente d’obtenir un visa vers Cuba, se présentant comme un défenseur de Cuba et de Castro, et en affirmant qu’il veut ensuite continuer vers l’URSS. L’ambassade lui refuse le visa s’il n’avait pas au préalable un visa soviétique. L’ambassade d’URSS, après avoir consulté Moscou, refuse le visa. Après plusieurs jours de va-et-vient entre les deux ambassades, Oswald rejeté et mortifié retourne à Dallas. (…) Michael Paine (en), le mari de Ruth, a une conversation politique avec Oswald et se rend compte que malgré sa désillusion à l’égard des régimes socialistes, il est encore un fervent marxiste qui pense que la révolution violente est la seule solution pour installer le socialisme. Pendant les semaines suivantes, la situation entre Marina et Lee se dégrade à nouveau, tandis que le FBI de Dallas s’intéresse à nouveau à Oswald du fait de son voyage à Mexico.(….)  Marina découvre que Lee a à nouveau écrit à l’ambassade d’URSS, et qu’il s’est inscrit sous un faux nom à son logement, et ils se disputent au téléphone à ce sujet. Le 19 novembre, le Dallas Time Herald publie le trajet que le président Kennedy utilisera lors de la traversée de la ville. Comme Oswald a pour habitude de lire le journal de la veille qu’il récupère dans la salle de repos du TSBD, on présume qu’il a appris que le président passerait devant les fenêtres du TSBD le 20 ou le 21 novembre. Wikipedia
En tant qu’ancien ancien chef espion roumain sous les ordres directs du KGB soviétique, il est parfaitement évident pour moi que la Russie est derrière la disparition des armes de destruction massive de Saddam Hussein. Après tout, c’est la Russie qui au départ a aidé Saddam en acquérir. L’Union soviétique et tous les États du bloc soviétique ont toujours eu un mode opératoire normalisé d’enterrement pour les armes de destruction massive  — baptisé « Sarindar en roumain, ce qui signifie « issue de secours ». Je l’ai mis en place en Libye. C’était pour débarrasser les despotes du tiers-monde de toute trace de leurs armes chimiques si jamais les impérialistes occidentaux se rapprochaient trop d’eux. Nous voulions nous assurer qu’ils ne pourraient jamais remonter à nous, et nous voulions également entraver l’ouest en ne leur donnant rien qu’ils puissent utiliser dans leur propagande contre nous. Toutes les armes chimiques devaient être immédiatement brûlées ou enfouies profondément en mer. En revanche, la documentation technique devait être préservée en microfiches enterrées dans des containers étanches pour la reconstruction future. Les armes chimiques, en particulier celles produites dans les pays du tiers monde, qui n’ont pas d’installations de production sophistiquées, perdent souvent leurs propriétés létales après quelques mois en entrepôt et sont systématiquement jetées de toute façon. Et toutes les usines d’armes chimiques avaient une couverture civile rendant la détection difficile, peu importe les circonstances. Le plan comprenait une routine de propagande élaborée. Toute personne accusant Muammar Khadhafi de posséder des armes chimiques pouvait être ridiculisé. Des mensonges, que des mensonges ! Venez en Libye et voyez pour vous-mêmes ! Nos organisations occidentales de gauche, comme le Conseil mondial de la paix, existaient à seule fin de propagande, que nous leur fournissions. Ces mêmes groupes recrachent exactement les mêmes thèmes aujourd’hui. Nous avons toujours compté sur leur expertise pour l’organisation de grandes manifestations de rue en Europe de l’ouest contre l’Amérique belliqueuse chaque fois que nous avons voulu détourner l’attention du monde des crimes des régimes vicieux que nous parrainions. L’Irak, à mon avis, avait  son propre plan « Sarindar » en direct de Moscou. Il en avait certainement un dans le passé. Nicolae Ceausescu me l’a dit, et il l’avait entendu de Leonid Brezhnev. du président du KGB Iouri Andropov, et plus tard, Yevgeny Primakov, me l’a répété. Dans les années 1970, Primakov a géré les programmes d’armement de Saddam Hussein. Après cela, comme vous le savez, il est promu chef du service du renseignement extérieur soviétique en 1990, et ministre russe des affaires étrangères en 1996 et en 1998, au premier ministre. Ce que vous ignorez peut-être est que Primakov déteste Israël et a toujours soutenu le radicalisme arabe. C’était un ami personnel de Saddam Hussein et il a visité Bagdad à plusieurs reprises après 1991, pour aider tranquillement Saddam à  jouer son jeu de cache-cache. Le bloc soviétique a non seulement vendu à Saddam ses armes de destruction massive, mais il leur a montré comment les faire « disparaître ». La Russie est toujours à l’ œuvre. Primakov se rendait régulièrement à Bagdad de décembre 2003 à quelques jours avant la guerre, ainsi qu’une équipe d’experts militaires russes dirigée par deux généraux de haut niveau à la « retraite », Vladislav Achalov, un ancien vice-premier ministre de la défense et Igor Maltsev, un ancien chef d’état-major russe de l’armée de l’air. Ils ont tous été décorés par le ministre de la Défense irakien. Ils  n’étaient clairement pas là pour donner des conseils militaires à Saddam pour la guerre à venir — les lanceurs de Katioucha de Saddam vintage de la seconde guerre mondiale, et ses chars T-72, des véhicules de combat BMP-1 et des avions de chasse MiG étaient tous évidemment inutiles contre l’Amérique. « Je ne vais pas à Bagdad pour boire un café, » avait déclaré Achalov aux médias par la suite. Ils étaient là pour orchestrer le plan « Sarindar » de l’Irak. L’armée américaine  a en fait déjà trouvé la seule chose qui aurait pu survivre sous le plan soviétique classique « Sarindar » de  liquidation des arsenaux d’armes en cas de défaite dans la guerre — les documents technologiques montrant comment reproduire des stocks d’armes en quelques semaines. Un tel plan a sans doute été mis en place depuis août 1995 — quand le gendre de Saddam, le général Hussein Kamel, qui avait dirigé les programmes nucléaires, chimiques et biologiques de l’Irak pendant 10 ans, a fait défection vers la Jordanie.  En août, les inspecteurs de l’UNSCOM et l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) ont fouillé un élevage de poulets appartenant à la famille de Kamel et trouvé plus d’une centaine de malles métalliques et boîtes contenant la documentation traitant de toutes les catégories d’armes, notamment nucléaires. Pris en flagrant délit, l’Iraq a enfin reconnu son « programme de guerre biologique, y compris d’armement, » et  publié un « Rapport de divulgation complet et final » et remis des documents sur l’agent neurotoxique VX et des armes nucléaires. Saddam a alors attiré le général Kamel, feignant de pardonner sa défection. Trois jours plus tard, Kamel et plus de 40 membres de la famille, y compris les femmes et les enfants, ont été assassinés, dans ce que la presse irakienne officielle décrit comme une « administration spontanée de justice tribale ». Après avoir envoyé ce message à son peuple intimidé, misérable, Saddam a ensuite fait une démonstration de coopération avec l’inspection de l’ONU, étant donné que Kamel venait de toute façon de compromettre tous ses programmes. En novembre 1995, il a publié une seconde « Rapport de divulgation complet et final » quant à ses programmes de missiles prétendument inexistants. Ce même mois, la Jordanie a intercepté une importante cargaison de composants de missiles de haute qualité destinées à l’Iraq. L’UNSCOM a bientôt repêché du Tigre des composants de missiles similaires, réfutant à nouveau les dénégations de Saddam. En juin 1996, Saddam a claqué la porte à l’inspection de l’UNSCOM de tout « mécanismes de dissimulation ». Le 5 août 1998, il a stoppé la coopération avec l’UNSCOM et l’AIEA complètement, et ils se sont retirés le 16 décembre 1998. Saddam avait encore quatre ans pour développer et cacher ses armes de destruction massive sans aucun regards indiscrets gênants. Les résolutions du Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies 1115, (21 juin 1997), 1137 (12 novembre 1997) et 1194 (9 septembre 1998) ont été émises condamnant l’Irak — des paroles inefficaces qui n’ont eu aucun effet. En 2002, sous la pression d’un énorme regroupement de militaires américains par une nouvelle administration américaine, Saddam a refait encore un autre « Rapport de divulgation complet et final »qui se révéla plein de « fausses déclarations » et constitueant un autre « violation substantielle » des inspections de l’ONU et de l’AIEA et des paragraphes 8 à 13 de la résolution 687 (1991). C’est juste quelques jours après cette dernière « divulgation », après une décennie d’intervention avec l’ONU et le reste du monde au nom de l’Irak, que Primakov et son équipe d’experts militaires s’est posé à Bagdad — même si, avec 200 000 soldats américains à la frontière, la guerre était imminente, et Moscou ne pouvait plus sauver Saddam Hussein. Primakov était sans aucun doute là pour régler les derniers détails du plan « Sarindar » et rassurer Saddam que a tempête passée Moscou reconstruirait ses armes de destruction massive pour un bon prix. M. Poutine aime tirer sur l’Amérique et veut réaffirmer la place de la Russie dans les affaires mondiales. Pourquoi il ne profiterait pas de cette occasion ? En tant que ministre des affaires étrangères et premier ministre, Primakov est l’auteur de la stratégie de « multipolarité »  pour faire contrepoids à un leadership américain élevant la Russie au statut de grande puissance en Eurasie. Entre les 9 et 12 février, M. Poutine a visité l’Allemagne et la France pour proposer un alignement tactique des trois puissances contre les États-Unis pour défendre les inspections au lieu de la guerre. Le 21 février, la Douma russe a appelé les parlements allemand et français à se joindre à eux  les 4 et  7 mars à Bagdad, pour « empêcher l’agression militaire américaine contre l’Irak. » Des foules de gauchistes européens, ancrées depuis des générations dans la propagande de gauche tout droit sortie de Moscou, continuent à trouver la ligne attrayante. Les tactiques de M. Poutine ont marché. Les États-Unis ont remporté une victoire militaire éclatante, démolissant une dictature sans détruire le pays, mais ils ont commencé à perdre la paix. Alors que les troupes américaines ont révélé les fosses communes des victimes de Saddam, les forces anti-américaines en Europe occidentale et ailleurs, ont multiplié les attaques au vitriol, accusant Washington de rapacité pour le pétrole et de pas vraiment s’occuper des armes de destruction massive, ou d’avoir exagéré les risques, comme s’il n’y avait aucune raison de s’inquiéter des armes de destruction massive. Ion Mihai Pacepa
Moscou, bien sûr, n’a jamais rien admis devant nous, dirigeants des services de renseignement de substitution des Soviets, sur toute implication dans l’assassinat de Kennedy. Le Kremlin savait que toute indiscrétion pouvait déclencher la troisième guerre mondiale. Mais pendant 15 ans de mon autre vie, au sommet de la communauté du renseignement du bloc soviétique, j’ai participé à un effort mondial de désinformation visant à détourner l’attention de l’implication du KGB avec Oswald, le Marine américain, qui avait fait défection vers Moscou, était retourné aux États-Unis et avait tué le président Kennedy. Nous avons lancé des rumeurs, publié des articles et même produit des livres, insinuant que les coupables étaient aux Etats-Unis, pas en Union soviétique. Notre ultime « preuve » était une note adressée à « M. Hunt, » datée du 8 novembre 1963 et signée par Oswald, copie de qui est apparu aux Etats-Unis en 1975. Nous savions que la note était un faux, mais des experts américains en graphologie ont certifié qu’elle était authentique, et les théoriciens de la conspiration l’ont connectée à l’agent de la CIA E. Howard Hunt, alors bien connu depuis l’affaire du Watergate et l’ont utilisée pour « prouver » que la CIA était impliquée dans l’assassinat de Kennedy. Enfin, des documents originaux du KGB tirés des Archives de Mitrokhin, apparues dans les années 1990, ont prouvé que la note avait été contrefaite par le KGB pendant le scandale du Watergate. La fausse note avait été vérifiée deux fois pour « authenticité » par la direction des opérations techniques du KGB (UTO) et approuvée pour utilisation. En 1975 le KGB a envoyé du Mexique trois photocopies de la note aux mordus de la conspiration aux États-Unis (les règles du KGB autorisent seulement  l’utilisation de photocopies de documents contrefaits, pour éviter un examen attentif de l’original). Après l’effondrement de l’Union soviétique, j’espérais que les nouveaux dirigeants de Moscou pourraient révéler la main du KGB dans l’assassinat de Kennedy. Au lieu de cela, ils ont publié en 1993 “Passeport pour l’assassinat : l’histoire jamais racontée de Lee Harvey Oswald par le Colonel du KGB qui le connaissait”, un livre affirmant qu’une enquête approfondie sur Oswald n’avait pas trouvé la moindre implication soviétique avec lui. Les bourreaux ne s’incriminent jamais. Dans les années 90, l’ancien officier du KGB  Vassili Mitrokhine, aidé par le MI6 britannique, a réussi à faire sortir de Moscou  quelque 25 000 pages de documents hautement confidentiels du KGB. Ils représentent une infime partie des archives du KGB, estimé à quelque 27 milliards de pages (les Archives de la Stasi est-allemande en contenaient 3 milliards). Ils représentent une infime partie des archives du KGB, estimé à quelque 27 milliards pages (les Archives de la Stasi est-allemande avaient 3 milliards). Néanmoins, le FBI a qualifié les archives Mitrokhin d’ “informations les plus complètes et les plus approfondies jamais reçues d’aucune source. » Selon cette archive, le premier livre américain sur l’assassinat: Oswald : Assassin ou bouc émissaire?, qui accuse la CIA et le FBI du crime, a été orchestré par le KGB. L’auteur du livre, Joachim Joesten, communiste allemand naturalisé américain, a passé cinq jours à Dallas après l’assassinat, puis est allé en Europe et a disparu. Quelques mois plus tard le livre de Joesten a été publié par le communiste américain Carlo Aldo Marzani (New York), qui a reçu 80 000 $ du KGB pour produire des livres pro-soviétiques, plus de 10 000 $ annuels  pour en faire de la publicité agressive. D’autres documents dans les Archives de Mitrokhin identifient le premier critique américain de cet ouvrage, Victor Perlo, comme un agent du KGB. Le livre de Joesten a aussi reçu une dédicace de l’Américain Mark Lane, décrit dans les Archives de Mitrokhin comme un homme de gauche ayant reçu anonymement  de l’argent du KGB. En 1966, Lane a publié le best-seller Jugement hâtif, alléguant que Kennedy avait été tué par un groupe de droite américain. Ces deux livres ont encouragé les gens ayant la moindre expertise dans le domaine à se joindre à la mêlée. Chacun a vu les événements de son propre point de vue, mais tous accusaient de ce crime des éléments liés aux États-Unis de ce crime. Le procureur de la Nouvelle-Orléans Jim Garrison a enquêté dans son district quartier et arrêté en 1967 un homme local, qu’il accuse d’avoir conspiré avec des éléments des services de renseignement américains pour assassiner Kennedy afin de l’arrêter dans ses efforts pour mettre fin à la guerre froide. L’accusé a été acquitté en 1969, mais Garrison s’est accroché à son histoire, écrivant tout d’abord Un Héritage de pierre (Putnam, 1970) et publiant finalement Sur la piste des assassins (Sheriden Square, 1988), un des livres qui a inspiré le film d’Oliver Stone « JFK ». La conspiration pour l’assassinat de Kennedy était née — et elle n’est jamais morte. Selon un autre document, le chef du KGB Yury Andropov a informé en avril 1977 le Politburo que le KGB avait lance une nouvelle campagne de desinformatsiya pour impliquer davantage « les services spéciaux américains » dans l’assassinat de Kennedy. Malheureusement, les Archives de Mitrokhin sont muettes sur le sujet après cela. (…) Au cours de mes dix dernières années en Roumanie, j’ai réussi aussi équivalent du pays de la NSA, et je me suis familiarisé avec les systèmes de code utilisés dans l’ensemble de la communauté du renseignement bloc soviétique. Cette connaissance m’a permis de se rendre compte que les lettres anodin à consonance de Oswald et son épouse soviétique à l’ambassade soviétique à Washington, D.C. (mise à disposition de la Commission Warren) constituaient messages voilées du KGB. En eux, j’ai trouvé la preuve que Oswald a été envoyé aux États-Unis pour une mission temporaire, et qu’il avait prévu de revenir à l’Union soviétique impénétrable après avoir accompli sa tâche. Il m’a fallu plusieurs années de passer au crible le bon grain de l’ivraie en passant par les tas de rapports d’enquête générées par la mort violente du jeune président américain, mais quand j’ai fini j’étais fasciné par la richesse des empreintes digitales du KGB dans toute l’histoire d’Oswald et son assassin, Jack Ruby. (…) Prenons la note manuscrite en russe qu’Oswald a laissé à sa femme soviétique, Marina, juste avant sa tentative de tuer  le général américain Edwin Walker comme entrainement avant de passer à l’assassinat du président Kennedy. Cette remarque très importante contient deux codes du KGB : amis (code pour agent de soutien) et la Croix Rouge (code pour aide financière). Dans cette note, Oswald dit à Marina quoi faire dans le cas où il serait arrêté. Il souligne qu’elle doit communiquer avec le « ambassade » (soviétique), qu’ils y ont « des amis ici » et que la « Croix rouge » va l’aider financièrement. Particulièrement significative est l’instruction d’Oswald pour qu’elle puisse « envoyer à l’ambassade les informations sur ce qui m’est arrivé. » A cette époque, le code pour l’ambassade était « Bureau », mais il semble qu’Oswald voulait s’assurer que Marina comprendrait qu’elle doit immédiatement informer l’ambassade soviétique. Il convient de noter que Marina n’a pas mentionné cette note aux autorités américaines après l’arrestation d’Oswald. Il a été constaté à l’accueil de Ruth Paine, une amie américaine avec laquelle Marina séjournait au moment de l’assassinat. (…) Il y a nombre d’éléments prouvant la connexion d’Oswald avec le KGB. Un élément tangible est la lettre envoyée à l’ambassade soviétique à Washington quelques jours après sa rencontre avec « Camarade Kostin » à Mexico. Ailleurs Oswald nomme la personne qu’il avait rencontrée là « Camarade Kostikov. » La CIA a identifié Valery Kostikov comme officier du département de la PGU treizième « affaires humides » (humide étant un euphémisme pour sanglante). Une ébauche manuscrite de cette lettre a été trouvée parmi les effets d’Oswald après l’assassinat. Ladite Ruth Paine a témoigné qu’Oswald avait re-écrit cette lettre plusieurs fois avant de la taper à la machine. Marina a déclaré qu’il « retapé l’enveloppe dix fois. » C’était important pour lui. Une photocopie de la lettre finale Qu’Oswald a envoyé à l’ambassade soviétique a été récupérée par la Commission Warren. Permettez-moi de citer cette lettre, dans laquelle j’ai également inséré d’Oswald plus tôt la version de projet entre parenthèses: « c’est pour vous informer des événements récents depuis mes rencontres avec le camarade Kostin [dans le projet: « de nouvelles informations depuis mes entrevues avec camarade Kostine »] à l’ambassade de l’URSS, Mexico, Mexique. Je n’ai pu rester au Mexique [croisés en projet: « Parce que j’ai considéré inutile »] indefinily à cause de mes limitations de visas mexicain qui était de 15 jours seulement. Je ne pouvais pas prendre le risque de demander un nouveau visa [dans le projet: « demande une prorogation »] à moins d’utiliser mon vrai nom, alors je suis retourné aux États-Unis. » Le fait qu’Oswald a utilisé un nom de code opérationnel pour Kostikov confirme pour moi que tant sa rencontre avec Kostikov à Mexico que sa correspondance avec l’ambassade soviétique à Washington ont été menées dans un contexte opérationnel PGU. Le fait qu’Oswald n’a pas utilisé son vrai nom pour obtenir son visa mexicain confirme cette conclusion. Maintenant nous allons juxtaposer cette lettre combinée avec le guide gratuit Esta Semana-Cette semaine, 28 septembre – 4 octobre 1963 et un dictionnaire espagnol-anglais, tous deux retrouvés parmi les effets d’Oswald. Le guide a un numéro de téléphone de l’ambassade soviétique souligné, les noms de Kosten et Osvald sont en cyrillique sur la page listant les « Diplomates à Mexico » et cochés à côté de cinq salles de cinéma sur la page précédente. A l’arrière de son dictionnaire espagnol-anglais Oswald a écrit: « acheter des billets [pluriel] pour la corrida, » et les arènes de la Plaza México sont entourés sur sa carte de la ville de Mexico. Est également indiqué sur la carte d’Oswald, le Palais des beaux-arts, un lieu de prédilection pour les touristes le dimanche matin pour regarder le Ballet Folklórico. (Cliquez ici pour voir ces documents, les notes manuscrites d’Oswald et autres matériaux semblables.) Contrairement à ce que prétend Oswald, il n’a pas été constamment observé à l’ambassade soviétique pendant son séjour à Mexico, bien que la CIA ait eu des caméras de surveillance filmant l’entrée de l’ambassade à ce moment-là. En résumé, tous les faits ci-dessus, l’ensemble me suggèrent qu’Oswald a eu recours à la « réunion du fer » ou un imprévu — Jeleznaïa yavka en russe — pour un entretien urgent avec Kostikov à Mexico. La « réunion de fer » était une procédure standard du KGB pour les situations d’urgence, fer signifiant cuirassé ou invariable. Dans ma journée,  j’ai approuvé une certaine « réunions de fer » à Mexico (un endroit préféré pour contacter nos agents importants vivant aux États-Unis), et d’Oswald « réunion de fer » me semble typique. Cela signifie : une brève rencontre dans une salle de cinéma pour  convenir d’un rendez-vous pour le lendemain à la corrida (…) Bien sûr, je ne peux pas être sûr que tout s’est passé exactement ainsi, chaque agent ayant ses propres particularités. Mais cependant, ils sont raccordés, il est clair que Kostikov et Oswald sont satisfaisaits secrètement de ce week-end du 28 et 29 septembre 1963. Sur les points suivants, mardi, toujours à Mexico, il a téléphoné à l’ambassade soviétique de l’ambassade cubaine et a demandé au garde de service de le connecter avec « Camarade Kostikov » avec qui il avait « parlé le 28 septembre. » Ce coup de téléphone a été intercepté par la CIA. (…) Pendant toutes ces années, j’ai passé ses liens d’Oswald chercher avec le KGB, j’ai pris les informations factuelles, vérifiables sur sa vie qui avait été mises à jour par le gouvernement américain et les chercheurs privés, et je les ai examinées à la lumière de modèles opérationnels PGU — peu connus des étrangers en raison du secret absolu alors — comme aujourd’hui — endémique en Russie. De nouvelles perspectives sur l’assassinat me sont soudainement apparues. L’expérience d’Oswald comme marine servant au Japon, par exemple, est parfaitement dans le modèle de la PGU pour recruter des militaires américains en dehors des Etats-Unis que j’avais depuis de nombreuses années appliqué aux opérations roumaines. Il était aussi évident que le casier à un terminal de bus qu’Oswald avait utilisé en 1959, après son retour aux États-Unis du Japon, de déposer un sac polochon rempli de photos d’avions militaires américains était en fait une une des procédures de base des services secrets. Au cours de ces années, l’utilisation de ces casiers faisait fureur au PGU — et le dé. Les opérations d’espionnage soviétiques peuvent être isolées par leurs patrons, si vous êtes familier avec eux. Les experts du contre-espionnage appellent ces patrons « preuve opérationnelle », montrant les empreintes digitales de l’auteur. (…) Comme un opérateur radar à la base aérienne d’Atsugi au Japon, Oswald savait l’altitude de vol des avions-espion super-secrets de la CIA, le U-2 survolant l’Union soviétique, sur cette base. En 1959, lorsque j’étais chef de station dse renseignement de la Roumanie en Allemagne de l’Ouest, une exigence soviétique envoyé m’a demandé de « tout, y compris les rumeurs, » sur l’altitude de vol des avions U-2. Le ministère de la défense soviétique savait que les avions U-2 avaient survolé l’Union soviétique plusieurs fois, mais son Air Defense Command n’avait pas pu le suivre parce que les radars soviétiques de l’époque n’arrivaient pas à atteindre une telle altitude. Francis Gary Powers, le pilote de l’U-2 que les Soviétiques avaient abattu le 1er mai 1960, croyaient que les soviétiques étaient en mesure de le faire parce qu’Oswald leur avait fourni l’altitude de son vol. Selon la déclaration de Powers, Oswald avait accéder « non seulement aux codes radar et radio, mais aussi pour le nouveau radar de recherche de la hauteur MPS-16 d’engrenage et la hauteur à laquelle l’U-2 volait, qui fut l’un des secrets les plus hautement classifiés. Il semble que Oswald, qui fit défection vers l’Union soviétique en 1959, était une des personnes dans le public ayant assisté au procès de  Moscou de Powers. Le 15 février 1962, Oswald a écrit à son frère Robert: « J’ai entendu sur la Voix de l’Amérique qu’ils ont sorti le pilote de l »avion espion U2 Powers. Voilà une grande nouvelle où que vous soyez je suppose. Il semblait être un homme de type américain agréable, lumineux, quand je l’ai vu à Moscou ». C’était une procédure normale pour le KGB d’offrir à Oswald d’assister à un procès comme l’une des récompenses pour avoir permis à l’Union soviétique d’abattre l’U-2. (…) Le recrutement de subalternes militaires américains a été une des priorités les plus importantes de la PGU à cette époque. La chasse aux « serzhant » était ma priorité absolue au cours des trois années (1957-59) où j’ai été affecté comme rezident en Allemagne de l’Ouest, et c’était toujours une priorité absolue en 1978, quand j’ai rompu avec le communisme. Bien sûr le PGU aurait voulu recruter des colonels américains, mais ils étaient difficiles d’approche, alors que les officiers subalternes étaient plus accessibles et pouvaient fournir des renseignements excellents s’ils étaient  bien guidés. Le Sergent Robert Lee Johnson est un bon exemple. Dans les années 1950, ‘il fut affecté à l’étranger où, comme Oswald, il s’éprit du communisme. En 1953, Johnson est subrepticement entré une unité militaire soviétique à Berlin-est, où il a demandé — comme Oswald l’a évidemment fait — l’asile politique dans le « paradis des travailleurs ». Une fois là, Johnson a été recruté par le PGU et persuadé de retourner temporairement aux États-Unis pour effectuer une « mission historique » avant de commencer sa nouvelle vie en Union soviétique — comme ce fut le cas avec Oswald. Finalement, le sergent Johnson a secrètement reçu le plus haut grade de l’Armée rouge et reçu par écrit les félicitations de Khrouchtchev lui-même. D’après le colonel PGU Vitaly Yurchenko, qui a fait défection à la CIA en 1985 et refait défection peu de temps après, l’adjudant-chef américain John Anthony Walker, un autre « serzhant » — était l’agent le plus important dans l’histoire du PGU, « dépassant en importance, même le vol soviétique de l’anglo-américain pour la première bombe atomique. » John F. Lehman, qui était  Secrétaire de la marine américaine lorsque Walker a été arrêté, a accepté. (…) En octobre 1962, la Cour suprême allemande a monté un procès public de Bogdan Stashinsky, un transfuge du renseignement soviétique qui avait été décoré par Khrouchtchev pour avoir assassiné des ennemis de l’Union soviétique vivant à l’Ouest. Cet essai a révélé Khrouchtchev au monde comme un boucher politique impitoyable. En 1963 le dictateur soviétique autrefois flamboyant était déjà un souverain paralysé et à bout de souffle. La moindre odeur de toute implication soviétique dans l’assassinat du président américain aurait pu être fatale à Khrouchtchev. Ainsi, le KGB — comme l’a fait mon DIE — a annulé toutes les opérations visant à assassiner des ennemis à l’Ouest. Le PNR a vainement tenté de déprogrammer Oswald. Les documents disponibles montrent que, pour prouver à la PGU qu’il était capable d’effectuer en toute sécurité l’assassinat attribué, Oswald a fait ue répétition en tirant  — bien que le ratant de peu — sur le général américain Edwin Walker. Oswald mis en place un ensemble, complet avec des photos, montrant comment il avait planifié cette opération, et puis il a apporté ce matériau à Mexico pour montrer au « Camarade Kostin, » son agent, ce qu’il pouvait faire. Même si il avait réussi la tentative d’assassinat de Walker sans être identifié, Moscou est restée inflexible. Le têtu Oswald a été dévasté, mais en fin de compte il est allé de l’avant tout seul, tout à fait convaincu qu’il s’acquittait de sa mission « historique ». Il avait tout juste 24 ans, et il avait fait de son mieux pour obtenir des armes de façon moins évidente et pour fabriquer des pièces d’identité, en utilisant le matériel technique que le KGB lui avait enseigné. Jusqu’au bout, il a également suivi les instructions d’urgence, que lui avait été initialement fournies par le KGB — ne rien reconnaître et demander un avocat. Comme Oswald en savait déjà trop sur le plan original, cependant, Moscou s’est arrangé pour le faire taire pour toujours, s’il devait commettre l’impensable. C’était un autre modèle soviétique. Sept chefs de la police politique soviétique ont été secrètement ou ouvertement assassinés pour les empêcher d’incriminer le Kremlin. Certains ont été empoisonnés (Vyacheslav Menzhinsky en 1934), d’autres ont été exécutés comme des espions occidentaux (Genrikh Yagoda en 1938, Nikolay Yezhov en 1939, Lavrenty Beriya et Vsevolod Merkulov en 1953 et Viktor Abakumov en 1954). En outre, immédiatement après la nouvelle de l’assassinat de Kennedy, Moscou a lancé l’Opération « Dragon », un effort de désinformation dans lequel mon service était très impliqué. Le but — qui a très bien réussi — devait rejeter la faute sur divers éléments aux Etats-Unis pour avoir tué leur propre président. (…) Khrouchtchev, qui avait été mon patron de fait pendant neuf ans, était irrationnel. Aujourd’hui, les gens se souviennent de lui comme un paysan terre-à-terre qui a corrigé les méfaits de Staline. Le Khrouchtchev que je connaissais était sanglant, Sarrasins et extraverti, et il avait tendance à détruire tous les projets une fois qu’il mettait la main dessus. L’irrationalité de Khrouchtchev avait fait de lui le leader soviétique le plus controversé et les plus imprévisible. Il a démasqué les crimes de Staline, mais il a fait des assassinats politiques un instrument principal de sa propre politique étrangère. Il a écrit une politique de coexistence pacifique avec l’Occident, mais il a fini par pousser le monde au bord de la guerre nucléaire. Il a conclu la première entente sur le contrôle des armes nucléaires, mais il a essayé de consolider la position de Fidel à la tête de Cuba à l’aide d’armes nucléaires. Il a réparé les relations de Moscou avec la Yougoslavie de Tito, mais il a rompu avec Pékin et détruit ainsi l’unité du monde communiste. Le 11 septembre 1971 Khrouchtchev est décédé dans l’ignominie, comme une non personne, mais pas avant de voir ses mémoires publiés à l’Ouest donnant sa propre version de l’histoire. Ion Mihai Pacepa
A wit observed once that Austria should be credited with an astounding double historical achievement – managing to convince the world that Beethoven was an Austrian and that Hitler was a German. However, the former Soviet Union perpetrated possibly an even more blatant example of perception management. This was when Soviet dictator Josef Stalin and his successor, Nikita Khrushchev, attempted simultaneously to whitewash Stalin’s duplicitous wartime pact with Hitler and to blacken Pope Pius XII as a Hitler sympathiser. Stalin of course was Hitler’s ally for the first part of World War II. On August 23, 1939, the world learned of the notorious Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact (named after the foreign ministers of the Soviet Union and the Third Reich), under which central and eastern Europe was to be divided into Soviet and German spheres of influence. The pact cleared the way for Hitler to invade Poland on September 1, 1939, with Stalin following suit on September 17. World War II had begun. From September 1, 1939, until June 22, 1941 – that is, not less than 21 months of this global conflict’s 67-month duration – Stalin supplied Hitler’s war machine with grain, fuel, strategic minerals, valuable intelligence and other crucial aid for Hitler’s bid to enslave central and western Europe. Only during the war’s latter 46-months – the period that Russians refer to as their Great Patriotic War – were Stalin and Hitler enemies. From late 1944, however, Stalin moved to erase any memory of those crucial opening 21 months that included his collaboration with Hitlerism. Another major component of Moscow’s re-writing of the history of wartime Europe was to fabricate evidence suggesting the existence of a secret pact between Pope Pius XII and Hitler. That the Kremlin was behind this concerted attempt to smear the Vatican as being pro-Nazi has recently been revealed by historians and confirmed by the highest-ranking intelligence officer ever to defect from the former communist Eastern bloc.  Joseph Poprzeczny

Attention: une fièvre tueuse peut en cacher une autre!

A l’heure où sortent dans la revue Books des extraits du livre du journaliste du NYT Mark Mazzetti (« The Drone Zone« ) sur le président américain qui, mine de rien, aura finalement liquidé plus de monde que Guantanamo n’en aura jamais incarcéré …

Pendant qu’après s’être débarrassé d’Eltsine et des autres gêneurs y compris jusqu’en Grande-Bretagne ou en Géorgie et devant la pusillanimité de l’Occident, la bande d’anciens kagébistes de Poutine poursuit sur sa lancée en Crimée et en Ukraine …

Retour, avec probablement le meilleur connaisseur encore vivant de la réalité de ce monde parallèle des guerres secrètes dans lequel nous vivons …

A savoir  le Mitrokhine roumain mais en plus gradé, le général Ion Mihai Pacepa et ancien chef des services secrets roumains, autrement dit le fonctionnaire le plus haut placé des services d’espionnage de l’ancien bloc soviétique à avoir jamais fait défection et qui sait tellement de choses qu’il vit toujours  caché quelque part aux Etats-Unis …

Sur l’autre « fiève tueuse », oubliée, des kagébistes et de leurs successeurs …

Mais surtout, avec l’incroyable exemple de l’assassinat du président Kennedy sans parler du financement des terroristes palestiniens, de la disparition des ADM de Saddam Hussein ou des tentatives d’assassinat physique ou moral d’au moins deux papes, sur la redoutable efficacité de leur campagnes d’intoxication (via notamment, de R. Palme Dutt, Joachim Joesten et Carlo Aldo Marzani à Victor Perlo, I. F. Stone et Mark Lane, toute une série de compagnons de route occidentaux) et de la crédulité de nos populations …

Qui fait que plus de 50 ans après, une majorité d’Occidentaux continuent à croire que les Américains auraient fait assassiner l’un de leurs présidents préférés …

Alors que, du recrutement de l’ancien Marine au Japon pour sa connaissance de l’altitude de vol ayant permis l’interception de l’U2 de Gary Powers à sa défection et son mariage en URSS, ses contacts avec des opérateurs soviétiques au Mexique et le codage de ses lettres et documents, les empreintes du KGB sont partout …

Jusqu’à peut-être, suite à sa répétition d’assassinat sur un officier américain et sa décision de poursuivre tout seul une opération qui avait été décommandée suite au témoignage public en Allemagne d’un agent soviétique passé à l’Ouest (un certain Bogdan Stashinsky) et ayant été décoré par Krouchtchev pour assassinats d’ennemis à l’étranger, son élimination ?

The New Proof of the KGB’s Hand in JFK’s Assassination

Ion Mihai Pacepa

PJ Media

November 20th, 2013

It has been 50 years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, and most of the world still wrongly believes that the culprit was the CIA, or the FBI, or the mafia, or right-wing American businessmen. It has been also 50 years since the Kremlin started an intense, worldwide disinformation operation, codenamed “Dragon,” aimed at diverting attention away from the KGB’s connection with Lee Harvey Oswald. Not unrelated are the facts that Oswald was an American Marine who defected to Moscow, returned to the United States three years later with a Russian wife, killed President Kennedy, and was arrested before being able to carry out his plan to escape back to Moscow. In a letter dated July 1, 1963, Oswald asked the Soviet embassy in Washington, D.C., to grant his wife an immediate entrance visa to the Soviet Union, and to grant another one to him, separtably (misspelling and emphasis as in the original).

The Kremlin’s “Dragon” operation is described in my book Programmed to Kill: Moscow’s Responsibility for Lee Harvey Oswald’s Assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy. In 2010, this book was presented at a conference of the Organization of American Historians together with a review by Prof. Stan Weber (McNeese State University). He described the book as “a superb new paradigmatic work on the death of President Kennedy” and a “must read for everyone interested in the assassination.”[i]

Programmed to Kill is a factual analysis of that KGB crime of the century committed during the Khrushchev era. In those days, the former chief KGB adviser in Romania had become the head of the almighty Soviet foreign espionage service and pushed me up to the top levels of the Soviet bloc intelligence clique. My book also contains a factual presentation of Khrushchev’s frantic efforts to cover his backside. Recalling that the 1914 assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Serbian terrorist Gavrilo Princip had set off the First World War, Khrushchev was afraid that, if America should learn about the KGB’s involvement with Oswald, it might ignite the first nuclear war. Khrushchev’s interests happened to coincide with those of Lyndon Johnson, the new U.S. president, who was facing elections in less than a year, and any conclusion implicating the Soviet Union in the assassination would have forced Johnson to take undesired political or even military action, adding to his already widely unpopular stance on the war in Vietnam.

According to new KGB documents, which became available after Programmed to Kill was published, the Soviet effort to deflect attention away from the KGB regarding the Kennedy assassination began on November 23, 1963—the very day after Kennedy was killed—and it was introduced by a memo to the Kremlin signed by KGB chairman Vladimir Semichastny. He asked the Kremlin immediately to publish an article in a “progressive paper in one of the Western countries …exposing the attempt by reactionary circles in the USA to remove the responsibility for the murder of Kennedy from the real criminals, [i.e.,] the racists and ultra-right elements guilty of the spread and growth of violence and terror in the United States.”81JTEUZYdHL._SL1500_

The Kremlin complied. Two months later, R. Palme Dutt, the editor of a communist-controlled British journal called Labour Monthly, signed an article that raised the specter of CIA involvement without offering a scintilla of evidence. “[M]ost commentators,” Dutt wrote, “have surmised a coup of the Ultra-Right or racialists of Dallas . . . [that], with the manifest complicity necessary of a very wide range of authorities, bears all the hallmarks of a CIA job.” Semichastny’s super secret letter and Dutt’s subsequent article were revealed by former Russian president Boris Yeltsin in his book The Struggle for Russia, published 32 years after the Kennedy assassination.

No wonder Yeltsin was ousted by a KGB palace coup that transferred the Kremlin’s throne into the hands of the KGB—which still has a firm grip on it. On December 31, 1999, Yeltsin stunned Russia and the rest of the world by announcing his resignation. “I understand that I must do it,”[ii] he explained, speaking in front of a gaily-decorated New Year’s tree along with a blue, red and white Russian flag and a golden Russian eagle. Yeltsin then signed a decree “On the execution of the powers of the Russian president,” which states that under Article 92 Section 3 of the Russian Constitution, the power of the Russian president shall be temporarily performed by Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, starting from noon on December 31, 1999.[iii] For his part, the newly appointed president signed a decree pardoning Yeltsin, who was allegedly connected to massive bribery scandals, “for any possible misdeeds” and granted him “total immunity” from being prosecuted (or even searched and questioned) for “any and all” actions committed while in office. Putin also gave Yeltsin a lifetime pension and a state dacha.[iv]

Soon after that, the little window into the KGB archive that had been cracked opened by Yeltsin was quietly closed. Fortunately, he had first been able to reveal Semichastny’s memo, which generated the Kennedy conspiracy that has never stopped.

Dutt’s article was followed by the first book on the JFK assassination published in the U.S., Oswald: Assassin or Fall Guy? It was authored by a former member of the German Communist Party, Joachim Joesten, and it was published in New York in 1964 by Carlo Aldo Marzani, a former member of the American Communist Party and a KGB agent. Joesten’s book alleges, without providing any proof, that Oswald was “an FBI agent provocateur with a CIA background”. Highly classified KGB documents smuggled out of Russia with British MI-6 help by KGB defector Vasili Mitrokhin in 1993—long after the two U.S. government investigations into the assassination had been completed—show that in the early 1960s, Marzani received subsidies totaling $672,000 from the Central Committee of the Communist Party. That raises the question of why Marzani was paid by the party and not by the KGB, whose agent he was. The newly released Semichastny letter gives us the answer: on the next day after the assassination, the Kremlin took over management of the disinformation operation aimed at blaming America for the JFK assassination. That is why Oswald: Assassin or Fall Guy? was promoted by a joint party/KGB operation.

The book’s first review, which praised it to the skies, was signed by Victor Perlo, a member of the American Communist Party, and was published on September 23, 1964, in New Times, which I knew as a KGB front at one time printed in Romania. On December 9, 1963, the “progressive” American journalist I. F. Stone published a long article in which he tried to justify why America had killed its own president. He called Oswald a rightist crackpot, but put the real blame on the “warlike Administration” of the United States, which was trying to sell Europe a “nuclear monstrosity.” Stone has been identified as a paid KGB agent, codenamed “Blin.”

Joesten dedicated his book to Mark Lane, an American leftist who in 1966 produced the bestseller Rush to Judgment, alleging Kennedy was assassinated by a right-wing American group. Documents in the Mitrokhin Archive show that the KGB indirectly sent Mark Lane money ($2,000), and that KGB operative Genrikh Borovik was in regular contact with him. Another KGB defector, Colonel Oleg Gor­dievsky (former KGB station chief in London), has identified Borovik as the brother-in-law of Col. General Vladimir Kryuchkov, who in 1988 became chairman of the KGB and in August 1991 led the coup in Moscow aimed at restoring the Soviet Union.

The year 1967 saw the publication of two more books attributed to Joesten: The Case Against Lyndon Johnson in the Assassination of President Ken­nedy and Oswald: The Truth. Both books suggested that President Johnson and his CIA had killed Kennedy. They were soon followed by Mark Lane’s A Citizen’s Dissent (1968). Lane has also intensively traveled abroad to preach that America is an “FBI police state” that killed its own president.

With such books, the Kennedy conspiracy was born, and it never stopped. The growing popularity of books on the JFK assassination has encouraged all kinds of people with any sort of remotely related background expertise to join the party, each viewing events from his own narrow perspective. Several thousand books have been written on the JFK assassination, and the hemorrhage continues. In spite of this growing mountain of paper, a satisfactory explanation of Oswald’s motivation has yet to be offered, primarily because the whole important dimension of Soviet foreign policy concerns and Soviet intelligence practice in the late 1950s and early 1960s has not been addressed in connection with Oswald by any competent authority. Why not? Because none of their authors had ever been a KGB insider, familiar with its modus operandi.

By its very nature espionage is an arcane and duplicitous undertaking, and in the hands of the Soviets it developed into a whole philosophy, every aspect of which had its own set of tried and true rules and followed a prescribed pattern. To really understand the mysteries of Soviet espionage, it will not help to see a spy movie or read a spy novel, as entertaining as that might be. You must have lived in that world of secrecy and deceit for a whole career, as I did, and even then you may not fathom its darker moments, unless you are one of the few at the very top of the pyramid.

Therefore, I have put together a short PowerPoint presentation of such darker moments that are crucial for understanding how the Kremlin has been able to fool the rest of the world into believing that America killed one of its most beloved presidents. Click here to read “11 Facts That Destroy JFK Conspiracy Theories.” Let’s step back together into that world of Soviet espionage and deceit. At the end of our tour d’horizon, I hope you’ll agree with me that the Soviets had a hand in the assassination of President Kennedy. I also hope that afterwards you will look with different eyes upon other documents relating to the JFK assassination that may turn up in the future. Perhaps you may spot additional Soviet/Russian maneuverings hidden behind them.

Voir aussi:

Programmed to Kill

Jamie Glazov

Front Page Magazine

October 03, 2007

The highest ranking intelligence official to have ever defected from the Soviet bloc discloses new facts about Lee Harvey Oswald, the Soviet KGB and the Kennedy Assassination.

Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Lt. Gen. Ion Mihai Pacepa, the highest ranking intelligence official ever to have defected from the Soviet bloc. In 1989, Romania’s president Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife were executed at the end of a trial where most of the accusations had come word-for-word out of Pacepa’s book, Red Horizons, republished in 27 countries. Pacepa’s newest book is Programmed to Kill: Lee Harvey Oswald, the Soviet KGB, and the Kennedy Assassination.

FP: Lt. Gen Ion Mihai Pacepa, welcome to Frontpage Interview.

Pacepa: It is a great honor for me to be here. Yours is one of the few magazines that truly understand the Kremlin.

FP: Mr. Pacepa, you had direct knowledge of the KGB’s ties to Oswald and you also have had access to newly disclosed KGB documents. Tell us a bit about your own personal expertise in terms of this subject and the recently declassified evidence you have seen. Then kindly share with us the conclusions you have arrived at.

Pacepa: Moscow, of course, admitted nothing to us, the leaders of the Soviets’ surrogate intelligence services, about any involvement in the Kennedy assassination. The Kremlin knew that any indiscretion could start World War III. But for 15 years of my other life at the top of the Soviet bloc intelligence community, I was involved in a world-wide disinformation effort aimed at diverting attention away from the KGB’s involvement with Lee Harvey Oswald, the American Marine who had defected to Moscow, returned to the U.S., and killed President Kennedy.

We launched rumors, published articles and even produced books insinuating that the culprits were in the U.S., not in the Soviet Union. Our ultimate “proof” was a note addressed to “Mr. Hunt,” dated November 8, 1963 and signed by Oswald, copies of which turned up in the U.S. in 1975. We knew the note was faked, but American graphological experts certified that it was genuine, and conspiracy theorists connected it to the CIA’s E. Howard Hunt, by then well known from the Watergate affair, and used it to “prove” that the CIA was implicated in the Kennedy assassination.

Original KGB documents in the Mitrokhin Archive, brought to light in the 1990s, finally proved that the note was forged by the KGB during the Watergate scandal. The forged note was twice checked for “authenticity” by the KGB’s Technical Operations Directorate (OTU) and approved for use. In 1975 the KGB mailed three photocopies of the note from Mexico to conspiracy buffs in the United States.[1] (The KGB rules allowed only photocopies of counterfeited documents to be used, to avoid close examination of the original).

After the Soviet Union collapsed, I hoped the new leaders in Moscow might reveal the KGB hand in the Kennedy assassination. Instead, in 1993 they published Passport to Assassination: the Never-Before-Told Story of Lee Harvy Oswald by the KGB Colonel Who Knew Him, a book claiming that a thorough investigation into Oswald had found no Soviet involvement with him whatsoever.[2] Hangmen do not incriminate themselves.

FP: Can you go into a bit of detail about what the Mitrokhin Archive is?

Pacepa: In the 1990s, retired KGB officer Vasily Mitrokhin, helped by the British MI6, smuggled ca 25,000 pages of highly confidential KGB documents out of Moscow. They represent a minuscule part of the KGB archive, estimated to be some 27 billion pages (the East German Stasi archive had 3 billion). Nevertheless, the FBI described the Mitrokhin Archive as “the most complete and extensive intelligence ever received from any source.” According to this archive, the first American book on the assassination, Oswald: Assassin or Fall Guy?, which blames the CIA and the FBI for the crime, was masterminded by the KGB. The book’s author, Joachim Joesten, a German-born American communist, spent five days in Dallas after the assassination, then went to Europe and disappeared from sight. A few months later Joesten’s book was published by American communist Carlo Aldo Marzani (New York), who received $80,000 from the KGB to produce pro-Soviet books, plus an annual $10,000 to advertise them aggressively. Other documents in the Mitrokhin Archive identify the first American reviewer of this book, Victor Perlo, as an undercover KGB operative.

Joesten’s book was dedicated to American Mark Lane, described in the Mitrokhin Archive as a leftist who anonymously received money from the KGB. In 1966 Lane published the bestseller Rush to Judgment, alleging that Kennedy was killed by a right-wing American group. These two books encouraged people with any remotely related background expertise to join the fray. Each viewed events from his own perspective, but all accused elements in the U.S. of that crime. New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison looked around his home district and in 1967 arrested a local man, whom he accused of conspiring with elements of U.S. intelligence to murder Kennedy in order to stop the latter’s efforts to end the Cold War. The accused was acquitted in 1969, but Garrison clung to his story, first writing A Heritage of Stone (Putnam, 1970) and eventually publishing On the Trail of the Assassins (Sheriden Square, 1988), one of the books that inspired Oliver Stone’s movie JFK.

The Kennedy assassination conspiracy was born—and it never died. According to another document, in April 1977 KGB chairman Yury Andropov informed the Politburo that the KGB was launching a new desinformatsiya campaign to further implicate “American special services” in the Kennedy assassination. Unfortunately, the Mitrokhin Archive is silent on the subject after that.

FP: You have discovered documents personally written by the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, suggesting that he was linked to the KGB’s department for assassination abroad, and that he had returned to the U.S. from the Soviet Union only temporarily, on a mission. Two federal investigations and over 2,500 books have looked into the assassination, but no one has raised this matter. How come?

Pacepa: Because no assassination investigators or researchers were sufficiently familiar with KGB operational codes and practices. The FBI recently told the U.S. Congress that only a native Arabic speaker could catch the fine points of an al-Qaida telephone intercept—especially one containing intelligence doubletalk. I spent 23 years of my other life speaking in such codes. Even my own identity was codified. In 1955, when I became a foreign intelligence officer, I was informed that from then on my name would be Mihai Podeanu, and Podeanu I remained until 1978, when I broke with communism. All my subordinates—and the rest of the Soviet bloc foreign intelligence officers—used codes in their written reports, when talking with their sources, and even in conversations with their own colleagues. When I left Romania for good, my espionage service was the “university,” the country’s leader was the “Architect,” Vienna was “Videle,” and so on.

In an interview published in the U.S., KGB general Boris Solomatin, a long-time deputy chief of the PGU (Soviet foreign intelligence), once stated: « I don’t make out of myself a man who knows everything in intelligence—as some former officers of the First Department [i.e., the PGU] who have written their books try to do. In intelligence and counterintelligence only the man who is heading these services knows everything. I am saying this because all the questions concerning ciphers and cipher machines were under another department—in a directorate outside of mine, similar to your National Security Agency. »[3]

During my last ten years in Romania I also managed the country’s equivalent of NSA, and I became familiar with the code systems used throughout the Soviet bloc intelligence community. This knowledge allowed me to realize that the innocuous-sounding letters from Oswald and his Soviet wife to the Soviet embassy in Washington, D.C. (made available to the Warren Commission) constituted veiled messages to the KGB. In them I found proof that Oswald was sent to the U.S. on a temporary mission, and that he planned to return to the inscrutable Soviet Union after accomplishing his task.

It took me many years to sift the wheat from the chaff in going through the piles of investigative reports generated by the violent death of the young American president, but when I finished I was fascinated by the wealth of KGB fingerprints all over the story of Oswald and his killer, Jack Ruby.

FP: So give us some concrete KGB fingerprints.

Pacepa: Let’s take the handwritten note in Russian Oswald left his Soviet wife, Marina, just before he tried to kill American general Edwin Walker in a dry run before going on to assassinate President Kennedy. That very important note contains two KGB codes: friends (code for support officer) and Red Cross (code for financial help). In this note, Oswald tells Marina what to do in case he is arrested. He stresses that she should contact the (Soviet) “embassy,” that they have “friends here,” and that the “Red Cross” will help her financially. Particularly significant is Oswald’s instruction for her to “send the embassy the information about what happened to me.” At that time the code for embassy was “office,” but it seems that Oswald wanted to be sure Marina would understand that she should immediately inform the Soviet embassy. It is noteworthy that Marina did not mention this note to U.S. authorities after Oswald’s arrest. It was found at the home of Ruth Paine, an American friend with whom Marina was staying at the time of the assassination.

FP: The Warren Commission and the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded that Oswald had no connection whatsoever with the KGB. But according to your book, Oswald secretly met an officer of the KGB’s assassination department in Mexico City just a few weeks before shooting President Kennedy. What’s the evidence?

Pacepa: There are many bits of evidence proving Oswald’s connection with the KGB. A tangible one is the letter he sent to the Soviet embassy in Washington a few days after meeting “Comrade Kostin” in Mexico City. Elsewhere Oswald identified the person he had met there as “Comrade Kostikov.” The CIA has identified Valery Kostikov as an officer of the PGU’s Thirteenth Department for “wet affairs” (wet being a euphemism for bloody). A handwritten draft of that letter was found among Oswald’s effects after the assassination. The previously mentioned Ruth Paine testified that Oswald re-wrote that letter several times before typing it on her typewriter. Marina stated he “retyped the envelope ten times.” It was important to him. A photocopy of the final letter Oswald sent to the Soviet embassy was recovered by the Warren Commission. Let me quote from that letter, in which I have also inserted Oswald’s earlier draft version in brackets:

“This is to inform you of recent events since my meetings with comrade Kostin [in draft: “of new events since my interviews with comrade Kostine”] in the Embassy of the Soviet Union, Mexico City, Mexico. I was unable to remain in Mexico [crossed out in draft: “because I considered useless”] indefinily because of my mexican visa restrictions which was for 15 days only. I could not take a chance on requesting a new visa [in draft: “applying for an extension”] unless I used my real name, so I returned to the United States.”

The fact that Oswald used an operational codename for Kostikov confirms to me that both his meeting with Kostikov in Mexico City and his correspondence with the Soviet Embassy in Washington were conducted in a PGU operational context. The fact that Oswald did not use his real name to obtain his Mexican visa confirms this conclusion.

Now let’s juxtapose this combined letter against the free guide book Esta Semana-This Week, September 28 – October 4, 1963, and a Spanish-English dictionary, both found among Oswald’s effects. The guide book has the Soviet embassy’s telephone number underlined, the names Kosten and Osvald noted in Cyrillic on the page listing “Diplomats in Mexico,” and check marks next to five movie theaters on the previous page.[4] In the back of his Spanish-English dictionary Oswald wrote: “buy tickets [plural] for bull fight,”[5] and the Plaza México bullring is encircled on his Mexico City map.[6] Also marked on Oswald’s map is the Palace of Fine Arts,[7] a favorite place for tourists to assemble on Sunday mornings to watch the Ballet Folklórico. (Click here to see these documents, Oswald’s handwritten notes and other similar materials.)

Contrary to what Oswald claimed, he was not observed at the Soviet embassy at any time during his stay in Mexico City, although the CIA had surveillance cameras trained on the entrance to the embassy at that time.[8] In short, all of the above facts taken together suggest to me that Oswald resorted to an unscheduled or “iron meeting”—zheleznaya yavka in Russian—for an urgent talk with Kostikov in Mexico City. The “iron meeting” was a standard KGB procedure for emergency situations, iron meaning ironclad or invariable.

In my day I approved quite a few “iron meetings” in Mexico City (a favorite place for contacting our important agents living in the U.S.), and Oswald’s “iron meeting” looks to me like a typical one. That means: a brief encounter at a movie house to arrange a meeting for the following day at the bullfights (in Mexico City they were held at 4:30 on Sunday afternoon); a brief encounter in front of the Palace of Fine Arts to pass Kostikov one of the bullfight tickets Oswald had bought; and a long meeting for discussions at the Sunday bullfight.

Of course, I cannot be sure that everything happened exactly that way—every case officer had his own quirks. But however they may have connected, it is clear that Kostikov and Oswald did secretly meet over that weekend of September 28-29, 1963. On the following Tuesday, still in Mexico City, he telephoned the Soviet embassy from the Cuban embassy and asked the guard on duty to connect him with “Comrade Kostikov” with whom he had “talked on September 28.” That phone call was intercepted by the CIA.

FP: Every communist party was managed by a Soviet-style politburo, all Soviet bloc armies wore the same uniform, every East European police force was replaced by a Soviet-style militia. How was this Soviet pattern reflected in the bloc’s intelligence community?

Pacepa: “Everything you’ll see here is identical to what I saw in your service,” Sergio del Valle—Cuban minister of interior and overall chief of both domestic security and foreign intelligence—told me in 1972, when he introduced me to the managers of the Cuban espionage service, the DGI.[9] Even the DGI officers’ training was based on the same manuals we in the Romanian espionage service, the DIE—Departamentul de Informatii Externe—had gotten from the PGU.

Yes, Soviet intelligence, like the Soviet government in general, had a strong penchant for patterns. By its very nature espionage is an arcane and duplicitous undertaking, but in the hands of the Soviets it developed into a whole philosophy, every aspect of which had its own set of tried and true rules and followed a prescribed pattern.

During the many years I spent researching Oswald’s ties with the KGB, I took the factual, verifiable information on his life that had been developed by the U.S. government and relevant private researchers, and I examined it in the light of PGU operational patterns—little known by outsiders because of the utter secrecy then—as now—endemic to Russia. New insights into the assassination came suddenly to life. Oswald’s experiences as a Marine serving in Japan, for instance, perfectly fit the PGU template for recruiting American servicemen outside the United States that I for many years had applied to Romanian operations. It also was obvious that the locker at a bus terminal Oswald used in 1959, after returning to the U.S. from Japan, to deposit a duffel bag stuffed with photographs of U.S. military planes was in fact an intelligence dead drop.[10] During those years the use of such lockers was all the rage with the PGU—and the DIE.

Soviet espionage operations can be isolated out by their patterns, if you are familiar with them. Counterintelligence experts call these patterns “operational evidence,” showing the fingerprints of the perpetrator.

FP: Most of the work on the Kennedy assassination suggests that Oswald was a low-ranking Marine who had no important information to offer the KGB. He was also clearly disturbed and somewhat of a loose-cannon. If that is true, why would the KGB have recruited him?

Pacepa: That was Soviet dezinformatsyia—disseminated by my DIE as well, at KGB behest. The truth is quite different. Here is one example. As a radar operator at Atsugi Air Base in Japan, Oswald knew the flight altitude of the CIA’s super-secret U-2 spy planes flying over the Soviet Union from that base. In 1959, when I was chief of Romania’s intelligence station in West Germany, a Soviet requirement sent to me asked for “everything, including rumors,” about the flight altitude of the U-2 planes. The Soviet Defense Ministry knew that U-2 planes had flown over the Soviet Union several times, but its Air Defense Command had not been able to track them because the Soviet radars of those days did not reach ultra-high altitudes.

Francis Gary Powers, the U-2 pilot whom the Soviets shot down on May 1, 1960, believed that the Soviets were able to get him because Oswald had provided them with the altitude of his flight. According to Powers’ statement, Oswald had access “not only to radar and radio codes but also to the new MPS-16 height-finding radar gear” and the height at which the U-2 flew, which was one of the most highly classified secrets.[11]

It seems that Oswald, who defected to the Soviet Union in 1959, was one of the people in the audience attending Powers’s spectacular trial in Moscow. On February 15, 1962, Oswald wrote to his brother Robert: “I heard over the voice of America that they released Powers the U2 spy plane fellow. That’s big news where you are I suppose. He seemed to be a nice, bright american-type fellow, when I saw him in Moscow.”[12]

It would have been normal procedure for the KGB to take Oswald to observe the Powers trial as one of the rewards given him for having enabled the Soviet Union to shoot down the U-2.

FP: Yuri Nosenko, a KGB officer who defected to the U.S. in 1964, told assassination researcher Gerald Posner: “I am surprised that such a big deal is made of the fact that [Oswald] was a Marine. What was he in the Marine Corps—a major, a captain, a colonel?”[13] How do you explain Nosenko’s statement?

Pacepa: I know for a fact that Nosenko was a bona fide defector. But he belonged to a KGB domestic department and knew nothing about PGU foreign sources—just as a middle level FBI agent would know nothing about CIA sources abroad.

Recruiting low-ranking American servicemen was one of the PGU’s highest priorities in those days. Hunting for a “serzhant” was my top priority during the three years (1957-59) I was assigned as rezident in West Germany, and it was still a top priority in 1978, when I broke with Communism. Of course the PGU would have liked to recruit American colonels, but they were difficult to approach, whereas low-ranking officers were more accessible and could provide excellent information if given the right guidance.

Sergeant Robert Lee Johnson is a good example. In the 1950s he was stationed abroad where, like Oswald, he became infatuated with communism. In 1953 Johnson surreptitiously entered a Soviet military unit in East Berlin, where he asked—as Oswald evidently did—to be granted political asylum in the “workers’ paradise.” Once there, Johnson was recruited by the PGU and persuaded to return temporarily to the U.S. to carry out a “historic task” before starting his new life in the Soviet Union—as was the case with Oswald. Eventually, Sgt. Johnson was secretly awarded the rank of Red Army major and received written congratulations from Khrushchev himself.[14]

According to PGU Col. Vitaly Yurchenko, who defected to the CIA in 1985 and soon redefected, U.S. Chief Warrant Officer John Anthony Walker—another “serzhant”—was the greatest agent in PGU history, “surpassing in importance even the Soviet theft of the Anglo-American blueprints for the first atomic bomb.” John F. Lehman, who was the U.S. secretary of the Navy when Walker was arrested, agreed.[15]

FP: In 1962, when Oswald returned from the Soviet Union, he brought with him a 13-page document entitled “Historic Diary.” Why was it called that?

Pacepa: “Historic” was a PGU slogan at the time. The term was introduced by General Aleksandr Sakharovsky, a former Soviet chief adviser to Romania’s Securitate who rose to head the PGU for an unprecedented fourteen years. “Historic” was his favorite expression. The Securitate had the “historic task” to weed out the bourgeoisie from the Romanian soil, as he constantly preached at us. The “historic duty” of the PGU was to dig the grave of the international bourgeoisie. Dogonyat i peregonyat was our “monumentalnaya, historic task,” he told us right after Khrushchev had launched that famous slogan of his about catching up with the West and overtaking it in the space of ten years.

Personal diaries were also Sakharovsky’s invention. All our illegal officers and agents sent to the West under a fictitious biography had to take along some kind of written memory aid, so that they could remember exactly where they had supposedly been when, and what they had done in various periods of their alleged lives. Up to the end of the 1950s, these notes had been taken abroad in the form of microdots or on soft film concealed in some everyday object, but of course they presented the potential risk of becoming incriminating evidence if ever found. In January 1959 Sakharovsky ordered all Soviet bloc foreign intelligence services to conceal those biographies in the form of diaries, drafts of books, personal letters or autobiographical notes. These notes were drafted by disinformation specialists, copied out by hand by the illegal or intelligence agent concerned, usually just before leaving for the West, and then carried across the border openly.

A microscopic examination of Oswald’s “Historic Diary” did indeed show that “it was written in one or two sessions.”[16] It was also copied out in great haste, as suggested by the many spelling inaccuracies.

FP: Your book takes an intriguing twist in the way it tells the plot. In the end, you find that the evidence suggests that Oswald lost PGU (Soviet Foreign Intelleigence) support, and that he went alone to kill President Kennedy. This is a bit of an eye-brow raiser. Tell us what you know and explain your interpretation please.

Pacepa: In October 1962, the West German Supreme Court mounted a public trial of Bogdan Stashinsky, a Soviet intelligence defector who had been decorated by Khrushchev for having assassinated enemies of the Soviet Union living in the West. This trial revealed Khrushchev to the world as a callous political butcher. By 1963 the once flamboyant Soviet dictator was already a crippled ruler gasping for air. The slightest whiff of any Soviet involvement in the assassination of the American president could have been fatal to Khrushchev. Thus, the KGB—as did my DIE—canceled all operations aimed at assassinating enemies in the West.

The PGU unsuccessfully tried to deprogram Oswald. The available documents show that, to prove to the PGU that he was capable of securely carrying out the assigned assassination, Oswald conducted a dry run by shooting at—although narrowly missing—American general Edwin Walker. Oswald put together a package, complete with photographs, showing how he had planned this operation, and then he took this material to Mexico City to show “Comrade Kostin,” his case officer, what he could do. Even though he had pulled off the Walker assassination attempt without being identified as the perpetrator, Moscow remained adamant.

The stubborn Oswald was devastated, but in the end he went ahead on his own, utterly convinced he was fulfilling his “historic” task. He was just 24 years old, and he had done his best to obtain weapons in an inconspicuous way and to fabricate identity documents, using the tradecraft the KGB had taught him. Up until the very end he also followed the emergency instructions he had originally been given by the KGB—admit nothing and ask for a lawyer.

Since Oswald already knew too much about the original plan, however, Moscow arranged for him to be silenced forever, if he should go on to commit the unthinkable. That was another Soviet pattern. Seven chiefs of the Soviet political police itself were secretly or openly assassinated to prevent them from incriminating the Kremlin. Some were poisoned (Vyacheslav Menzhinsky in 1934), other were executed as Western spies (Genrikh Yagoda in 1938, Nikolay Yezhov in 1939, Lavrenty Beriya and Vsevolod Merkulov in 1953, and Viktor Abakumov in 1954).

Furthermore, immediately upon news of Kennedy’s assassination Moscow launched Operation “Dragon,” a disinformation effort in which my service was deeply involved. The aim—which has succeeded only too well—was to throw the blame on various elements in the United States for killing their own president.

FP: A first review of Programmed to Kill, by Publishers Weekly, states that your book is based on old intelligence anecdotes and offers no convincing Soviet motives for the assassination. What do you have to say to that?

Pacepa: On January 3, 1988, The New York Times published a similar review of my first book, Red Horizons, stating that it contained only “squalid anecdotes” about Romanian president Nicolae Ceausescu. But two years later Ceausescu was executed at the end of a trial whose accusations came almost word-for-word out of Red Horizons—which is still in print.

FP: So wasn’t all of this – if it is true—a bit crazy for Khrushchev to have risked? It could have caused a world war, no?

Pacepa: Khrushchev, who was my de facto boss for nine years, was irrational. Today, people remember him as a down-to-earth peasant who corrected the evils of Stalin. The Khrushchev I knew was bloody, brash and extroverted, and he tended to destroy every project once he got his hands on it. Khrushchev’s irrationality made him the most controversial and unpredictable Soviet leader. He unmasked Stalin’s crimes, but he made political assassination a main instrument of his own foreign policy. He authored a policy of peaceful coexistence with the West, but he ended up by pushing the world to the brink of nuclear war. He concluded the first agreement for the control of nuclear arms, but he tried to secure Fidel Castro’s position at the helm of Cuba with the help of nuclear arms. He repaired Moscow’s relations with Yugoslavia’s Tito, but he broke those with Beijing and thereby destroyed the unity of the Communist world. On September 11, 1971 Khrushchev died in ignominy, as a non-person, although not before seeing his memoirs published in the West giving his own version of history.

FP: Lt. Gen Ion Mihai Pacepa, thank you kindly for joining Frontpage Interview. Aside from the new revelations and important facts and questions you have brought to the forefront about the Kennedy assassination, your book serves as yet another reminder of the evil nature of the KGB and the truly dark and sinister entity that we faced in the Soviet regime.

Thank you for your fight for the truth and for historical memory.

It was an honor to speak with you again.

Pacepa: I greatly appreciate your courage in being willing to debate this controversial subject.

Notes:

[1] Cristopher Andrew and Vasily Mitrokhin, The Mitrokhin Archive and the Secret History of the KGB (New York, Perseus Books Group, 1999), p. 229.

[2] Oleg Nechiporenko, Passport to Assassination: the Never-Before-Told Story of Lee Harvy Oswald by the KGB Colonel who knew him (New York: Carol Publishing Group, 1993).

[3] Washington Post Magazine, April 23, 1995.

[4] Warren Commission Exhibit 2486.

[5] Testimony of Ruth Hyde Paine, Warren Commission Vol. 3, pp. 12-13.

[6] Warren Commission Exhibit 1400.

[7] Priscilla Johnson McMillan, Marina and Lee (New York: Harper & Row, 1977), p. 496.

[8] Edward Jay Epstein, Legend: The Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald (New York: Reader’s Digest Press), p. 16.

[9] Dirección General de Inteligencia

[10] Epstein, Legend, p. 89.

[11] Francis Gary Powers, with Curt Gentry, Operation Overflight: The U-2 spy pilot tells his story for the first time (New York: Holt, Rinehart, 1970), p. 357.

[12] Warren Commission Exhibit 315.

[13] Gerald Posner, Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Assassination of JFK (New York: Random House, 1993), p. 49.

[14] Christopher Andrew and Oleg Gordievsky, KGB: The Inside Story Of Its Foreign Operations from Lenin to Gorbachev (New York: HarperCollins, 1990), p. 462.

[15] John Barron, Breaking the Ring (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987), pp. 148, 212.

[16] Epstein, Legend, pp. 109, 298n.

Jamie Glazov is Frontpage Magazine’s editor. He holds a Ph.D. in History with a specialty in Russian, U.S. and Canadian foreign policy. He is the author of Canadian Policy Toward Khrushchev’s Soviet Union and is the co-editor (with David Horowitz) of The Hate America Left. He edited and wrote the introduction to David Horowitz’s Left Illusions. His new book is United in Hate: The Left’s Romance with Tyranny and Terror. To see his previous symposiums, interviews and articles Click Here. Email him at jglazov@rogers.com.

Voir aussi:

The Kremlin’s Killing Ways

A long tradition continues.

Ion Mihai Pacepa

The National Review

November 28, 2006

There is no doubt in my mind that the former KGB/FSB officer Alexander Litvinenko was assassinated at Putin’s order. He was killed, I believe, because he revealed Putin’s crimes and the FSB’s secret training of Ayman al-Zahawiri, the number-two in al Qaeda. I know for a fact that the Kremlin has repeatedly used radioactive weapons to kill political enemies abroad. In the late 1970s, Leonid Brezhnev gave Ceausescu, via the KGB and its Romanian sister, the Securitate, a soluble radioactive thallium powder that could be put in food; the poison was to be used for killing political enemies abroad. According to the KGB, the radioactive thallium would disintegrate inside the victim’s body, generating a fatal, galloping form of cancer and leaving no trace detectable in an autopsy. The substance was described to Ceausescu as a new generation of the radioactive thallium weapon unsuccessfully used against KGB defector Nikolay Khokhlov in West Germany in 1957. (Khokhlov lost all his hair but did not die.) Its Romanian codename was “Radu” (from radioactive), and I described it in my first book, Red Horizons, published in 1987. The Polonium 210 that was used to kill Litvinenko seems to be an upgraded form of “Radu.”

Assassination as Foreign Policy

The Kremlin’s organized efforts to assassinate political enemies abroad (not solely by means of poison, of course) started a couple of months after the XXth Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, held in February 1956, at which Khrushchev exposed Stalin’s crimes. The following April, General Ivan Anisimovich Fadeyev, the chief of the KGB’s new 13th Department, responsible for assassinations abroad, landed in Bucharest for an “exchange of experience” with the DIE, the Romanian foreign intelligence service to which I belonged. Before that, Fadeyev had headed the huge KGB intelligence station in Karlhorst, East Berlin, and he was known throughout our intelligence community as a bloodthirsty man whose station had kidnapped hundreds of Westerners and whose troops had brutally suppressed the June 13, 1953, anti-Soviet demonstrations in East Berlin.

Fadeyev began his “exchange of experience” in Bucharest by telling us that Stalin had made one inexcusable mistake: He had aimed the cutting edge of the state security apparatus against “our own people.” When Khrushchev had delivered his “secret speech,” the only thing he had intended was to correct that aberration. “Our enemies” were not in the Soviet Union, Fadeyev explained. The bourgeoisie in America and Western Europe wanted to wipe out Communism. They were “our deadly enemies.” They were the “rabid dogs” of imperialism. We should direct our sword’s cutting edge against them, and only against them. That was what Nikita Sergeyevich had really wanted to tell us in his “secret speech.”

In fact, Fadeyev said, one of Khrushchev’s very first foreign-policy decisions had been his 1953 order to have one such “rabid dog” secretly assassinated: Georgy Okolovich, the leader of the National Labor Alliance (Natsionalnyy Trudovoy Soyuz, or NTS), one of the most aggressively anti-Communist Russian émigré organizations in Western Europe. Unfortunately, Fadeyev told us, once in place, the head of the assassination team, Nikolay Khokhlov, had defected to the CIA and publicly displayed the latest secret weapon created by the KGB: an electrically operated gun concealed inside a cigarette pack, which fired cyanide-tipped bullets. And because troubles never came alone, Fadeyev added, two other KGB officers familiar with the assassination component had defected soon after Khokhlov: Yury Rastvorov in January 1954, and Petr Deryabin in February 1954.

This setback, Fadeyev said, had led to drastic changes. First, Khrushchev had ordered his propaganda machinery to spread the rumor worldwide that he had abolished the KGB’s assassination component. Then he baptized assassinations abroad with the euphemism “neutralizations,” rechristened the 9th Section of the KGB — as the assassination component had been called up to that time — as the 13th Department, buried it under even deeper secrecy, and placed it under his own supervision. (Later, after the 13th Department became compromised, the name was once again changed.)

Next, Khrushchev had introduced a new “methodology” for carrying out neutralization operations. In spite of the KGB’s penchant for bureaucratic paperwork, these cases had to be handled strictly orally and kept forever secret. They also had to be kept completely secret from the Politburo and every other governing body. “The Comrade, and only the Comrade,” Fadeyev emphasized, could now approve neutralizations abroad. (Among those in top circles throughout the bloc, the term “the Comrade” colloquially designated a given country’s leader.) Regardless of any evidence that might be produced in foreign police investigations, the KGB — along with its sister services — was never under any circumstances to acknowledge its involvement in assassinations abroad; any such evidence was to be dismissed out of hand as a ridiculous accusation. And, finally, after each operation, the KGB was surreptitiously to spread “evidence” abroad accusing the CIA or other convenient “enemies” of having done the deed, thereby, if possible, killing two birds with one stone. Then Khrushchev ordered the KGB to develop a new generation of weapons that would kill without leaving any detectable trace in the victim’s body.

Before Fadeyev left Bucharest, the DIE had established its own component for neutralization operations, which was named Group Z, because the letter Z was the final letter of the alphabet, representing the “final solution.” This new unit then proceeded to conduct the first neutralization operation in the Soviet bloc under Khrushchev’s new rules. In September 1958 Group Z, assisted by a special East German Stasi team, kidnapped Romanian anti-Communist leader Oliviu Beldeanu from West Germany. The governments of East Germany and Romania placed the onus for this crime on the CIA’s shoulders, publishing official communiqués stating that Beldeanu had been arrested in East Germany after having allegedly been secretly infiltrated there by the CIA in order to carry out sabotage and diversion operations.

Exporting a Tradition

Vladimir Putin appears to be only the latest in the long line of Russian tsars who have upheld the tradition of assassinating anyone who stood in their way. The practice goes back at least as far as the XIVth century’s Ivan the Terrible, who killed thousands of boyars and other people, including Metropolitan Philip and Prince Alexander Gorbatyl-Shuisky for having refused to swear an oath of allegiance to his eldest son, an infant at the time. Peter the Great unleashed his political police against everybody who spoke out against him, from his own wife, to drunks who told jokes about his rule; he even had the political police lure his own son and heir, the tsarevich Aleksey, back to Russia from abroad and torture him to death.

Under Communism, arbitrary assassinations became a state policy. In an August 11, 1918, handwritten order demanding that at least 100 kulaks be hanged in the town of Penza to set an example, Lenin wrote: “Hang (hang without fail, so the people see) no fewer than one hundred known kulaks, rich men, bloodsuckers … Do it in such a way that people for hundreds of [kilometers] around will see, tremble, know and scream out: they are choking and strangling to death these bloodsucking kulaks.” (This letter was part of an exhibit entitled “Revelations from the Russian Archives,” which was displayed at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., in 1992)

During Stalin’s purges alone, some nine million people lost their lives. Out of the seven members of Lenin’s Politburo at the time of the October Revolution, only Stalin was still alive when the massacre was over.

What I have always found even more disturbing than the brutality with which those crimes were carried out is the Soviet leaders’ deep involvement in them. Stalin personally ordered that Leon Trotsky, the co-founder of the Soviet Union, be assassinated in Mexico. And Stalin himself handed the Order of Lenin to the Spanish Communist Caridad Mercader del Rio, whose son, the Soviet intelligence officer Ramón Mercader, had killed Trotsky in August 1940 by bashing in his head with an ice axe. Similarly, Khrushchev with his own hands pinned the highest Soviet medal on the jacket of Bogdan Stashinsky, a KGB officer who in 1962 had killed two leading anti-Communist émigrés in West Germany.

My first contact with the Kremlin’s “neutralization” operations took place on November 5, 1956, when I was in training at the ministry of foreign trade for my cover position of deputy chief of the Romanian Mission in West Germany. Mihai Petri, a DIE officer acting as deputy minister, told me that the “big boss” needed me immediately. The “big boss” was undercover KGB general Mikhail Gavrilyuk, Romanianized as Mihai Gavriliuc and the head of the DIE.

“Is khorosho see old friend, Ivan Mikhaylovich,” I heard from the man relaxing in a comfortable chair facing Gavriliuc’s desk. It was General Aleksandr Sakharovsky, who got up out of the chair and held out his hand. He had created the DIE and, as its chief Soviet intelligence adviser, had been my de facto boss until a couple of months earlier, when Khrushchev had selected him to head the almighty PGU (Pervoye Glavnoye Upravleniye, or First Chief Directorate of the KGB, the Soviet Union’s foreign intelligence service). “Let me introduce you to Ivan Aleksandrovich,” he said, pointing to a scruffy peasant-type sporting gold-rimmed glasses. He was General Ivan Serov, the new chairman of the KGB. Both visitors were wearing flowered Ukrainian folkshirts over baggy, flapping trousers, in stark contrast to the gray and buttoned-up Stalin-style suits that had until recently been a virtual KGB uniform. (Even today it is still a mystery to me why most of the top KGB officers I knew would take such pains to imitate whatever Soviet leader happened to be in power at the moment. Was it merely an oriental inheritance from tsarist times, when Russian bureaucrats went to inordinate lengths to flatter their superiors?)

The visitors told us that the previous night Hungarian premier Imre Nagy, who had announced Hungary’s secession from the Warsaw Pact and asked the United Nations for help, had sought refuge in the Yugoslavian Embassy. Romanian ruler Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej and Politburo member Walter Roman (who knew Nagy from the war years when both had been working for the Comintern in Moscow) agreed to be flown to Budapest to help the KGB kidnap Nagy and bring him to Romania. Major Emanuel Zeides, the chief of the German desk, who spoke fluent Hungarian, would go with them as translator. “When Zeides Vienna you chief nemetskogo otdeleniya,” Gavriliuc told me, finally clarifying why I had been summoned. That meant I was to hold the bag as chief of the DIE’s German desk.

On November 23, 1956, the three Soviet Politburo members who had coordinated from Budapest the military intervention against Hungary sent an enciphered telegram to Khrushchev:

Comrade Walter Roman, who arrived in Budapest together with Comrade Dej yesterday, November 22, had long discussions with Nagy. … Imre Nagy and his group left the Yugoslavian Embassy and are now in our hands. Today the group will leave for Romania. Comrade Kadar and the Romanian comrades are preparing an adequate press communiqué. Malenkov, Suslov, Aristov.

A year later, Nagy and the principal members of his cabinet were hanged, after a showtrial the KGB organized in Budapest.

In February 1962 the KGB narrowly missed assassinating the shah of Iran, who had committed the unpardonable “crime” of having removed a Communist government installed in the northwestern part of Iran. The DIE’s chief razvedka (Russian for foreign intelligence) adviser never told us in so many words that the KGB had failed to kill the shah, but he asked us to order the DIE station in Tehran to destroy all its compromising documents, to suspend all its agents’ operations, and to report everything, including rumors, about an attempt on the shah’s life. A few days later he canceled the DIE plan to kill its own defector Constantin Mandache in West Germany with a bomb mounted in his car because, the adviser told us, the remote control, which had been supplied by the KGB for this operation, might malfunction. In 1990 Vladimir Kuzichkin, a KGB officer who had been directly involved in the failed attempt to kill the shah and who had afterwards defected to the West, published a book (Inside the KGB: My Life in Soviet Espionage, Pantheon Books, 1990) in which he describes the operation. According to Kuzichkin, the shah escaped alive because the remote control used to set off a large quantity of explosives in a Volkswagen car had malfunctioned.

Silencing Dissent

On Sunday, March 20, 1965, I paid my last visit to Gheorghiu-Dej’s winter residence in Predeal. As usual, I found him with his best friend, Chivu Stoica, Romania’s honorary head. Dej complained of feeling weak, dizzy, and nauseous. “I think the KGB got me,” he said, only half in jest. “They got Togliatti. That’s for sure,” Stoica squeaked ominously.

Palmiro Togliatti, the head of the Italian Communist party, had died on August 21, 1964, while on a visit to the Soviet Union. The word at the top of the bloc foreign intelligence community was that he had died from a rapid form of cancer, after having been irradiated by the KGB on Khrushchev’s order while vacationing in Yalta. His assassination had been provoked by the fact that, while in the Soviet Union, he had written a “testament” in which he had expressed profound discontent with Khrushchev’s failures. Togliatti’s frustrations expressed not only his personal view but also that of Leonid Brezhnev. According to Dej, these suspicions were confirmed by the facts that Brezhnev had attended Togliatti’s funeral in Rome; that in September 1964 Pravda had published portions of Togliatti’s “testament”; and that five weeks later Khrushchev was dethroned after being accused of harebrained schemes, hasty decisions, actions divorced from reality, braggadocio, and rule by fiat.

I saw Dej give a shiver. He had also been critical of Khrushchev’s foreign policy. Moreover, a year earlier he had expelled all KGB advisers from Romania, and the previous September he had expressed to Khrushchev his concern about Togliatti’s “strange death.” During the March 12, 1965, elections for Romania’s Grand National Assembly, Gheorghiu-Dej still looked vigorous. A week later, however, he died of a galloping form of cancer. “Assassinated by Moscow” is what the new Romanian leader, Nicolae Ceausescu, whispered to me a few months after that. “Irradiated by the KGB,” he murmured in an even lower voice, claiming, “That was firmly established by the autopsy.” The subject had come up because Ceausescu had ordered me immediately to obtain Western radiation detection devices (Geiger-Müller counters) and have them secretly installed throughout his offices and residences.

Soon after the Soviet-led invasion of Prague, Ceausescu switched over from Stalinism to Maoism, and in June 1971 he visited Red China. There he learned that the KGB had organized a plot to kill Mao Zedong with the help of Lin Biao, the head of the Chinese army, who had been educated in Moscow. The plot failed, and Lin Biao unsuccessfully tried to fly out of China in a military plane. His execution was announced only in 1972. During the same year I learned details about that Soviet plot from Hua Guofeng, the minister of public security — who in 1977 would become China’s supreme leader.

“Ten,” Ceausescu remarked to me. “Ten international leaders the Kremlin killed or tried to kill,” he explained, counting them off on his fingers. Laszlo Rajk and Imre Nagy of Hungary; Lucretiu Patrascanu and Gheorghiu-Dej in Romania; Rudolf Slansky, the head of Czechoslovakia, and Jan Masaryk, that country’s chief diplomat; the shah of Iran; Palmiro Togliatti of Italy; American President John F. Kennedy; and Mao Zedong. (Among the leaders of Moscow’s satellite intelligence services there was unanimous agreement that the KGB had been involved in the assassination of President Kennedy.)

On the spot, Ceausescu ordered me to create a super-secret counterintelligence unit for operations in socialist countries (i.e., the Soviet bloc). “You have one thousand personnel slots for this.” His added caveat was that the new unit should be “nonexistent.” No name, no title, no plate on the door. The new unit received only the generic designation U.M. 0920/A, and its head was given the rank of chief of a DIE directorate.

Ordered to Kill

On the unforgettable day of July 22, 1978, Ceausescu and I were hiding inside a pelican blind in a remote corner of the Danube Delta, where not even a passing bird could overhear us. As a man of discipline and a former general, he had long been fascinated by the structured society of the white pelicans. The very old birds — the grandparents — always lay up on the front part of the beach, close to the water and food supply. Their respectful children lined up behind them in orderly rows, while the grandchildren spent their time horsing around in the background. I had often heard my boss say he wished Romania had the same rigid social structure.

“I want you to give ‘Radu’ to Noel Bernard,” Ceausescu whispered into my ear. Noel Bernard was at that time the director of Radio Free Europe’s Romanian program, and for years he had been infuriating Ceausescu with his commentaries. “You don’t need to report back to me on the results,” he added. “I’ll learn them from Western newspapers and …” The end of Ceausescu’s sentence was masked by the methodical rat-a-tat of his submachine gun. He aimed with ritual precision, first at the front line of pelicans, then at the middle distance, and finally at the grandchildren in the back.

For 27 years I had been living with the nightmare that, sooner or later, such orders to have someone killed would land on my plate. Up until that order from Ceausescu, I had been safe, as it was the DIE chief who was in charge of neutralization operations. But in March 1978 I had been appointed acting chief of the DIE, and there was no way for me now to avoid involvement in political assassinations, which had grown into a main instrument of foreign policy throughout the Soviet bloc.

Two days later Ceausescu sent me to Bonn to deliver a secret message to Chancellor Helmut Schimdt, and there I requested political asylum in the U.S.

The Killings Continue

Noel Bernard continued to inform the Romanians about Ceausescu’s crimes, and on December 21, 1981, he died of a galloping form of cancer. On January 1, 1988, his successor, Vlad Georgescu, started serializing my book Red Horizons on RFE. A couple of months later, when the serialization ended, Georgescu informed his listeners that the Securitate had repeatedly warned him that he would die if he broadcast Red Horizons. “If they kill me for serializing Pacepa’s book, I’ll die with the clear conscience that I did my duty as a journalist,” Georgescu stated publicly. A few months later, he died of a galloping form of cancer.

The Kremlin also continued secretly killing its political opponents. In 1979, Brezhnev’s KGB infiltrated Mikhail Talebov into the court of the pro-American Afghan premier Hafizullah Amin as a cook. Talebov’s task was to poison the prime minister. After several failed attempts, Brezhnev ordered the KGB to use armed force. On December 27, 1979, fifty KGB officers from the elite “Alpha” unit, headed by Colonel Grigory Boyarnov, occupied Amin’s palace and killed everybody inside to eliminate all witnesses. The next day Brezhnev’s KGB brought to Kabul Bebrak Kemal, an Afghan Communist who had sought refuge in Moscow, and installed him as prime minister. That KGB neutralization operation played a role in generating today’s international terrorism.

On May 13, 1981, the same KGB organized, with help from Bulgaria, an attempt to kill Pope John Paul II, who had started a crusade against Communism. Mehmet Ali Aqca, who shot the pope, admitted that he had been recruited by the Bulgarians, and he identified his liaison officers in Italy: Sergey Antonov, deputy chief of the Balkanair office in Rome, who was arrested; and major Zhelvu Vasilief, from the military attaché office, who could not be arrested because of his diplomatic status and was recalled to Sofia. Aqca also admitted that, after the assassination, he was to be secretly taken out of Italy in a TIR truck (in the Soviet bloc the TIR trucks were used by the intelligence services for operational activities). In May 1991 the Italian government reopened its investigation into the assassination attempt, and on March 2, 2006, it concluded that the Kremlin had indeed been behind it.

On Christmas Day of 1989, Ceausescu was executed at the end of a trial in which the accusations came almost word for word out of Red Horizons. I recently learned from Nestor Ratesh, a former director of RFE’s Romanian program, who has spent two years researching Securitate archives, that he has obtained enough evidence to prove that both Noel Bernard and Vlad Georgescu were killed by the Securitate at Ceausescu’s order. The result of his research will be the subject of a book to be published by RFE.

Strong Arms and Stability

When the Soviet Union collapsed, the Russians had a unique chance to cast off their old Byzantine form of police state, which has for centuries isolated the country and has left it ill-equipped to deal with the complexities of modern society. Unfortunately, the Russian have not been up to that task. Since the fall of Communism they have been faced with an indigenous form of capitalism run by old Communist bureaucrats, speculators, and ruthless mafiosi that has widened social inequities. Therefore, after a period of upheaval, the Russians have gradually — and perhaps thankfully — slipped back into their historical form of government, the traditional Russian samoderzhaviye, a form of autocracy traceable to the 14th century’s Ivan the Terrible, in which a feudal lord ruled the country with the help of his personal political police. Good or bad, the old political police may appear to most Russians as their only defense against the rapacity of the new capitalists at home.

It will not be easy to break a five-century-old tradition. That does not mean that Russia cannot change. But for that to happen, the U.S. must help. We should stop pretending that Russia’s government is democratic, and assess it for what it really is: a band of over 6,000 former officers of the KGB — one of the most criminal organizations in history — who grabbed the most important positions in the federal and local governments, and who are perpetuating Stalin’s, Khrushchev’s, and Brezhnev’s practice of secretly assassinating people who stand in their way. Killing always comes with a price, and the Kremlin should be forced to pay it until it will stop the killings.

—Lt. General Ion Mihai Pacepa is the highest-ranking intelligence officer ever to have defected from the former Soviet bloc. His book Red Horizons has been republished in 27 countries.

Seeing Red

Spontaneous anti-American demonstrations? Think again.

Ion Mihai Pacepa

National Review on line

March 18, 2003

Over the March 15-16 weekend there were simultaneous anti-American and pro-peace demonstrations around the world, with the largest in Athens and Moscow. It is significant that the headquarters of the Soviet-created World Peace Council (WPC) is now in Athens, and that its honorary chairman is still the same KGB asset, Romesh Chandra, who chaired this Cold War organization during the years when I was a Communist general. This current bashing of the U.S. makes me believe I am watching a revival of an old stage drama, the lines of which I know by heart. Back in the 1970Ss the drama featured that same Ramesh Chandra and consisted of the WPC’s virulent offensive to counteract American efforts aimed at protecting the world against Communist expansion.

In fact, the WPC Secretariat recently recognized that the WPC has “participated in or co-organized” the current worldwide anti-American demonstrations. On December 14, 2002, the WPC convened a meeting of its Communist-style Executive Committee and then issued an official communiqué stating, in vintage Soviet language: “The Bush administration is intensifying readiness for the unilateral attack on Iraq, and this unilateralism of hegemony is becoming the biggest threat to world peace.” An international appeal published by the WPC Secretariat on the same day confirmed that the WPC had indeed been involved in organizing anti-American demonstrations in “USA, Great Britain, Florence, Prague and in many other European capitals, as well as in other countries.” The WPC appeal called upon “the peoples and movements of the world aspiring to peace and justice to unite their voices and actions against the U.S. war on Iraq.”

The WPC was created by Moscow in the 1950s and had only one task: to portray the United States as being run by a “war-mongering government.” To make it look like a Western organization, Moscow headquartered it in Paris, but in 1954 the French government accused the WPC of being a Soviet puppet and kicked it out of France. Therefore, its headquarters were moved to Soviet-occupied Vienna, and then to Prague when Austria became neutral. It is remarkable that, after the Soviet Union collapsed and the United States remained the only superpower, Romesh Chandra moved his WPC to Athens and focused its operations toward “waging a struggle against the New World Order.” According to its current charter, adopted during a 1996 Peace Congress in Mexico, the WPC has now “broadened into a worldwide mass movement” whose task is to support “those people and liberation movements” fighting “against [American] imperialism.”

Back in the 1970s, when Moscow appointed Romesh Chandra to head the WPC, it introduced him to the world as being an “apolitical” Indian. In reality, Chandra was a member of the National Committee of the Communist Party of India, one of the foreign Communist parties most loyal to the Soviet Union at that time. Khrushchev himself approved a $50 million annual budget for the “new” WPC (the money was delivered by the KGB in the form of laundered cash dollars, in order to hide its Soviet origin), and tasked Chandra to focus the WPC effort on condemning the American intervention in Vietnam as a “murderous adventure” and to require all WPC national branches to initiate demonstrations around the world against America’s imperialism and its war in Vietnam.

Until 1978, when I left Romania for good, I managed the Romanian side of the WPC, whose operations implicated thousands of undercover Soviet-bloc intelligence officers and many other thousands of paid and voluntary Communist activists. By that time Chandra’s WPC had reportedly collected 700 million signatures on a “ban-the-American-atomic-bomb” petition that had been drafted in Moscow and adopted by a peace conference convened in Stockholm. In a 1981 article published in the Comintern journal entitled Problems of Peace and Socialism (the English translation of which was called World Marxist Review), Chandra wrote: “The struggle to curb the arms race has become a mass demonstration against the deployment of new U.S. missiles.” Soon after that, Chandra and his WPC unleashed a worldwide offensive against the deployment by the United States of Pershing and Cruise missiles in Europe, and it organized “global campaigns” to protest the production of the neutron bomb announced by U.S. president Jimmy Carter and against the U.S. decision on “Star Wars,” WPC’s derisive term for the American strategic defense initiative (SDI).

In 1851 Karl Marx issued his now famous dictum: “History always repeats itself, the first time as tragedy, and the second as farce.” The new anti-American Axis Beijing-Moscow-Berlin-Paris is indeed a farcical effort to revive the anti-Americanism created by the WPC and its sponsors during the Cold War era.

— General Ion Mihai Pacepa is the highest-ranking intelligence officer ever to have defected from the former Soviet bloc. He is currently finishing a new book, Red Roots: The origins of today’s anti-Americanism.

Voir également:

Ex-spy fingers Russians on WMD

Ion Mihai Pacepa

The Washington Times

On March 20, Russian President Vladimir Putin denounced the U.S.-led « aggression » against Iraq as « unwarranted » and « unjustifiable. » Three days later, Pravda said that an anonymous Russian « military expert » was predicting that the United States would fabricate finding Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov immediately started plying the idea abroad, and it has taken hold around the world ever since.

As a former Romanian spy chief who used to take orders from the Soviet KGB, it is perfectly obvious to me that Russia is behind the evanescence of Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction. After all, Russia helped Saddam get his hands on them in the first place. The Soviet Union and all its bloc states always had a standard operating procedure for deep sixing weapons of mass destruction — in Romanian it was codenamed « Sarindar, meaning « emergency exit. »I implemented it in Libya. It was for ridding Third World despots of all trace of their chemical weapons if the Western imperialists ever got near them. We wanted to make sure they would never be traced back to us, and we also wanted to frustrate the West by not giving them anything they could make propaganda with.

All chemical weapons were to be immediately burned or buried deep at sea. Technological documentation, however, would be preserved in microfiche buried in waterproof containers for future reconstruction. Chemical weapons, especially those produced in Third Worldcountries,which lack sophisticated production facilities, often do not retainlethal properties after a few months on the shelf and are routinely dumped anyway. And all chemical weapons plants had a civilian cover making detection difficult, regardless of the circumstances.

The plan included an elaborate propaganda routine. Anyone accusing Moammar Gadhafi of possessing chemical weapons would be ridiculed. Lies, all lies! Come to Libya and see! Our Western left-wing organizations, like the World Peace Council, existed for sole purpose of spreading the propaganda we gave them. These very same groups bray the exact same themes to this day. We always relied on their expertise at organizing large street demonstrations in Western Europe over America’swar-mongering whenever we wanted to distract world attention from the crimes of the vicious regimes we sponsored.

Iraq, in my view, had its own « Sarindar » plan in effect direct from Moscow. It certainly had one in the past. Nicolae Ceausescu told me so, and he heard it from Leonid Brezhnev. KGB chairman Yury Andropov, and later, Gen. Yevgeny Primakov, told me so too. In the late 1970s, Gen. Primakov ran Saddam’s weapons programs. After that, as you may recall, he was promoted to head of the Soviet foreign intelligence service in 1990, to Russia’s minister of foreign affairs in 1996, and in 1998, to prime minister. What you may not know is that Primakov hates Israel and has always championed Arab radicalism. He was a personal friend of Saddam’s and has repeatedly visited Baghdad after 1991, quietly helping Saddam play his game of hide-and-seek.

The Soviet bloc not only sold Saddam its WMDs, but it showed them how to make them « disappear. » Russia is still at it. Primakov was in Baghdad from December until a couple of days before the war, along with a team of Russian military experts led by two of Russia’s topnotch « retired »generals,Vladislav Achalov, a former deputy defense minister, and Igor Maltsev, a former air defense chief of staff. They were all there receiving honorary medals from the Iraqi defense minister. They clearly were not there to give Saddam military advice for the upcomingwar—Saddam’sKatyusha launchers were of World War II vintage, and his T-72 tanks, BMP-1 fighting vehicles and MiG fighter planes were all obviously useless against America. « I did not fly to Baghdad to drink coffee, » was what Gen. Achalov told the media afterward. They were there orchestrating Iraq’s « Sarindar » plan.

The U.S. military in fact, has already found the only thing that would have been allowed to survive under the classic Soviet « Sarindar » plan to liquidate weapons arsenals in the event of defeat in war — the technological documents showing how to reproduce weapons stocks in just a few weeks.

Such a plan has undoubtedly been in place since August 1995 — when Saddam’s son-in-law, Gen. Hussein Kamel, who ran Iraq’s nuclear, chemical and biological programs for 10 years, defected to Jordan. That August, UNSCOM and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors searched a chicken farm owned by Kamel’s family and found more than one hundred metal trunks and boxes containing documentation dealing with all categories of weapons, including nuclear. Caught red-handed, Iraq at last admitted to its « extensive biological warfare program, including weaponization, » issued a « Full, Final and Complete Disclosure Report » and turned over documents about the nerve agent VX and nuclear weapons.

Saddam then lured Gen. Kamel back, pretending to pardon his defection. Three days later, Kamel and over 40 relatives, including women and children, were murdered, in what the official Iraqi press described as a « spontaneous administration of tribal justice. » After sending that message to his cowed, miserable people, Saddam then made a show of cooperation with U.N. inspection, since Kamel had just compromised all his programs anyway. In November 1995, he issued a second « Full, Final and Complete Disclosure » as to his supposedly non-existent missile programs. That very same month, Jordan intercepted a large shipment of high-grade missile components destined for Iraq. UNSCOM soon fished similar missile components out of the Tigris River, again refuting Saddam’s spluttering denials. In June 1996, Saddam slammed the door shut to UNSCOM’s inspection of any « concealment mechanisms. » On Aug. 5, 1998, halted cooperation with UNSCOM and the IAEA completely, and they withdrew on Dec. 16, 1998. Saddam had another four years to develop and hide his weapons of mass destruction without any annoying, prying eyes. U.N. Security Council resolutions 1115, (June 21, 1997), 1137 (Nov. 12, 1997), and 1194 (Sept. 9, 1998) were issued condemning Iraq—ineffectual words that had no effect. In 2002, under the pressure of a huge U.S. military buildup by a new U.S. administration, Saddam made yet another « Full, Final and Complete Disclosure, » which was found to contain « false statements » and to constitute another « material breach » of U.N. and IAEA inspection and of paragraphs eight to 13 of resolution 687 (1991).

It was just a few days after this last « Disclosure, » after a decade of intervening with the U.N. and the rest of the world on Iraq’s behalf, that Gen. Primakov and his team of military experts landed in Baghdad — even though, with 200,000 U.S. troops at the border, war was imminent, and Moscow could no longer save Saddam Hussein. Gen. Primakov was undoubtedly cleaning up the loose ends of the « Sarindar » plan and assuring Saddam that Moscow would rebuild his weapons of mass destruction after the storm subsided for a good price.

Mr. Putin likes to take shots at America and wants to reassert Russia in world affairs. Why would he not take advantage of this opportunity? As minister of foreign affairs and prime minister, Gen. Primakov has authored the « multipolarity » strategy of counterbalancing American leadership by elevating Russia to great-powerstatusinEurasia. Between Feb. 9-12, Mr. Putin visited Germany and France to propose a three-power tactical alignment against the United States to advocate further inspections rather than war. On Feb. 21, the Russian Duma appealed to the German and French parliaments to join them on March 4-7 in Baghdad, for « preventing U.S. military aggression against Iraq. » Crowds of European leftists, steeped for generations in left-wing propaganda straight out of Moscow, continue to find the line appealing.

Mr. Putin’s tactics have worked. The United States won a brilliant military victory, demolishing a dictatorship without destroying the country, but it has begun losing the peace. While American troops unveiled the mass graves of Saddam’s victims, anti-American forces in Western Europe and elsewhere, spewed out vitriolic attacks, accusing Washington of greed for oil and not of really caring about weapons of mass destruction, or exaggerating their risks, as if weapons of mass destruction were really nothing very much to worry about after all.

It is worth remembering that Andrei Sakharov, the father of the Soviet hydrogen bomb, chose to live in a Soviet gulag instead of continuing to develop the power of death. « I wanted to alert the world, » Sakharov explained in 1968, « to the grave perils threatening the human race thermonuclear extinction, ecological catastrophe, famine. » Even Igor Kurchatov, the KGB academician who headed the Soviet nuclear program from 1943 until his death in 1960, expressed deep qualms of conscience about helping to create weapons of mass destruction. « The rate of growth of atomic explosives is such, » he warned in an article written together with several other Soviet nuclear scientists not long before he died, « that in just a few years the stockpile will be large enough to create conditions under which the existence of life on earth will be impossible. »

The Cold War was fought over the reluctance to use weapons of mass destruction, yet now this logic is something only senior citizens seem to recall. Today, even lunatic regimes like that in North Korea not only possess weapons of mass destruction, but openly offer to sell them to anyone with cash, including terrorists and their state sponsors. Is anyone paying any attention? Being inured to proliferation, however, does not reduce its danger. On the contrary, it increases it.

Ion Mihai Pacepa, a Romanian, is the highest-ranking intelligence officer ever to have defected from the former Soviet bloc.

How the Soviet KGB created Conspiracy Theories

Aug, 4 2013

The black propaganda tools of a very shrewd and cynical Soviet KGB created many of the ideas that are still echoed today as « conspiracy theories ». I have been reading and researching conspiracy-theories for the last 20 years and in time, my suspicions were aroused because so many of these theories were directed at the USA specifically. « Why is America always the culprit in these theories? » I asked myself. Is there an actual conspiracy behind these conspiracy-theories?

Ever since the early days of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, the Russians were very well-versed in spying, counter-intelligence, disinformation, propaganda, placing « sleepers » into various countries, recruiting American journalists, filmmakers and academics for their agenda. Compared to their expertise, Americans were, for the longest time, naive amateurs (as the recent NSA outings have shown, America is no longer an amateur). To give you a taste for the outrageous extent of their campaign these are three fairly popular examples of conspiracy-theories that were planted by the KGB. It often surprises me how supposedly suspicious and skeptical « conspiracy theorists » rarely ask about the origins of a theory and who benefits from certain information.

Example 1: Operation Infektion

Operation: INFEKTION was a KGB disinformation campaign to spread information that the United States invented HIV/AIDS as part of a biological weapons research project at Fort Detrick, Maryland. The Soviet Union used it to undermine the United States’ credibility, foster anti-Americanism, isolate America abroad, and create tensions between host countries and the U.S. over the presence of American military bases (which were often portrayed as the cause of AIDS outbreaks in local populations).

Source: Operation INFEKTION

This is former Soviet Prime Minister Yevgeni Primakov who was the first to confess to « Operation Infektion »:

The « AIDS Conspiracy Theory » is still quite popular, showing how easily disinformation, once disseminated, gains a life of its own and plenty of followers.

Example 2: The JFK Conspiracy Theory

One of the very first JFK-Conspiracy books to be published was in 1964 by Joachim Joesten. The book was titled « Oswald: Assassin or Fall Guy » and was published prior to the Warren Report. In this book it was claimed that JFK was killed by the CIA and that Oswald was not a lone gunman. The book has been used by many subsequent conspiracy-theorists, including Oliver Stone and his movie JFK, to support their views. In fact, it is still parroted to this day.

Only decades later, with the fall of the Soviet Union, it was proven that Joesten was a paid KGB Agent and the publisher was a KGB Front. The purpose of this conspiracy-theory was once again to discredit America and the CIA and sow doubt and fear in the populace. It was quite a successful operation, judging from the thousands of books and articles that still emulate the original KGB-message.

Source: The Sword and the Shield (among other sources)

Example 3: Islamic Anti-Americanism

Evidence has been steadily mounting that Anti-American sentiment in the Muslim world is not exclusively a creation of American Interventionism, but has been generously fueled by the Soviet KGB as well.

One of the operating principles of the Soviets was to look for already existing antagonism toward the U.S. and blow it out of proportion through added disinformation. Another tactic was to wait for the U.S. to make mistakes – such as those in foreign policy – and to then emphasize and mass-publish those mistakes. Anything to create anger and rage toward America was a good tool for the KGB, whether it had a factual basis or not.

In a recent book titled « Disinformation », former KGB Agent Ion Mihai Pacepa (image above) writes that his colleague and acquaintance Yuri Andropov (image below), the head of the KGB in the 1960s, was taksed with reviving anti-semitism in conjuction with anti-Americanism among Arabs and Persians. The goal was to « convince muslims that America was ruled by Jews ». For this purpose the « Palestinian Liberation Army » was founded and trained by KGB special ops and books were published that displayed Israelis, Zionists and Americans as the worlds foremost threat to peace. It was hoped that by teaching muslims that America was ruled by the « Council of the Wise Elders of Zion », who were plotting to take over the whole world, that violence and terrorism against the U.S. would follow. Pacepa writes:

« In 1972 I received from the KGB an Arabic translation of the old Russian forgery, “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.” We also received « documentary » material in Arabic produced by the Soviet disinformation « proving » America was a Zionist country whose aim was to transform the Islamic world into a Jewish fief. My DIE was ordered to disseminate these documents within its targeted Islamic countries. During my later years in Romania, the DIE disseminated thousands of copies of “The Protocols” and similar “documents” each month. The fruit of the KGB’s disinformation campaign was seen on Sept. 11, 2001. The weapon of choice for that horrific act was a hijacked airplane – a concept invented and perfected by Andropov’s disinformation machinery.

What is interesting about this campaign is that they may still be going on, decades after the Cold War ended. For example, among intelligence circles it is rumored that the Danish « Mohammed Cartoon » affair that transpired in 2005 and caused Islamic unrest and violence across the world, was orchestrated by the SVR – which is the successor of the KGB. Oleg Kalugin, former KGB Major, has gone public with this theory, saying that in the past the KGB has often used Danish journalists to disseminate agitation propaganda. He says it is no coindidence that the Jyllands Posten editor who commisioned the cartoons – Flemming Rose – was a correspondent to Moscow and has published several Russian-Propaganda articles against Chechnya. Flemming Rose was also married to the daughter of a KGB-officer. Next thing you know he is publishing articles that cause Islamic outrage against the West.

But if true (and thats really an IF in this case), why would modern Russia still be applying these Cold War tactics? Well, Russia is still in competition to the west for resources and oil and dominance. Their covert operation tools having worked in the past it follows that they would continue to use them.

Skyfloating

Aug, 4 2013

There were many, many more ideas and theories planted into the American mind by the KGB. History will remember the KGB as the foremost experts of disinformation. Most of this propaganda was part of a kind of political warfare termed Active Measures by the Soviets.

Active measures ranged « from media manipulations to special actions involving various degrees of violence ». They were used both abroad and domestically. They included disinformation, propaganda, counterfeiting official documents, assassinations, and political repression, such as penetration in churches, and persecution of political dissidents. Active measures included the establishment and support of international front organizations (e.g. the World Peace Council); foreign communist, socialist and opposition parties; wars of national liberation in the Third World; and underground, revolutionary, insurgency, criminal, and terrorist groups. The intelligence agencies of Eastern Bloc states also contributed to the program, providing operatives and intelligence for assassinations and other types of covert operations. Retired KGB Maj. Gen. Oleg Kalugin described active measures as « the heart and soul of Soviet intelligence »: « Not intelligence collection, but subversion: active measures to weaken the West, to drive wedges in the Western community alliances of all sorts, particularly NATO, to sow discord among allies, to weaken the United States in the eyes of the people of Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and thus to prepare ground in case the war really occurs. » Active measures was a system of special courses taught in the Andropov Institute of KGB situated at SVR headquarters in Yasenevo, near Moscow.

A few more of the « active measures » taken by the Soviets were:

* Creating the conspiracy-theory that the moon landing was a hoax.

* Trying to discredit Martin Luther King Jr. as an « agent of the Government »

* Creating racial tensions between black and whites by writing bogus letters from the Ku Klux Klan, distributing explosive packages in New York.

* Creating the conspiracy-theory that fluoridated drinking water was a US-Government conspiracy for population control.

* And much, much more, too much to go into here.

Source: The Mitrokhin Archive (among other sources).

My personal conclusion from all this is that when reading information I first ask: Where is it from and who benefits? Not all information is based on innocent research or inquiry.

Related Post: The Peace Movement was a Soviet Psy-Operation

Voir par ailleurs:

Les assauts de Moscou contre le Vatican

Le KGB a fait de la corruption de l’Église une priorité.

Ion Mihai Pacepa

4 février 2007

L’Union Soviétique ne s’est jamais sentie à l’aise de vivre dans le même monde que le Vatican. Les plus récentes découvertes montrent que le Kremlin était prêt à tout pour combattre le ferme anticommunisme de l’Église Catholique.

En mars 2006, une commission parlementaire italienne concluait « au-delà de tout doute raisonnable que les dirigeants de l’Union Soviétique avaient pris l’initiative d’éliminer le pape Karol Wojtyla, » en représailles de son soutien en Pologne au mouvement dissident Solidarność. En janvier 2007, quand des documents dévoilent que le nouvellement nommé archevêque de Varsovie Stanislas Wielgus a collaboré avec la police politique de l’ère communiste de Pologne, il admet les accusations et démissionne. Le jour suivant, le recteur de la cathédrale Wawel de Kracovie, site funéraire des rois et reines polonais, démissionnait pour la même raison. On a alors appris que Michal Jagosz, un membre du tribunal du Vatican pour la béatification du pape Jean-Paul II, était accusé d’être un ancien agent secret communiste ; selon les médias polonais, il avait été recruté en 1984 avant de quitter la Pologne pour prendre poste au Vatican. Aujourd’hui, un livre est sur le point d’être publié qui identifiera 39 autres prêtres dont les noms ont été trouvés dans les fichiers de la police secrète de Kracovie, et dont certains sont actuellement évêques. De plus, il semble que cela ne fait qu’effleurer la surface des choses. Une commission spéciale va bientôt commencer des investigations sur le passé de tous les religieux durant l’ère communiste, car des centaines d’autres prêtres catholiques de ce pays sont soupçonnés d’avoir collaboré avec la police secrète. Et il ne s’agit que de la Pologne – les archives du KGB et celles de la police politique du reste de l’ancien bloc soviétique restent à ouvrir sur les opérations menées contre le Vatican.

Dans mon autre vie, lorsque j’étais au centre des guerres de Moscou contre les services secrets étrangers, j’ai moi-même été impliqué dans un effort délibéré du Kremlin pour calomnier le Vatican en décrivant le Pape Pie XII comme un sympathisant nazi au coeur dur. Finalement, l’opération n’a pas causé de dommage durable, mais elle a laissé un mauvais arrière goût dont il est difficile de se débarrasser. Cette histoire n’a encore jamais été racontée auparavant.

Combattre l’Église

En février 1960, Nikita Khrushchev approuva un plan ultra-secret pour détruire l’autorité morale du Vatican en Europe de l’Ouest. L’idée est née du cerveau du patron du KGB Alexandre Shelepin et d’Aleksey Kirichenko, le membre du Politburo responsable des opérations internationales. Jusqu’à présent, le KGB avait combattu son « ennemi mortel » en Europe de l’Est, où le Saint-Siège avait été cruellement attaqué comme un repère d’espions à la solde de l’impérialisme américain, et ses représentants sommairement emprisonnés comme espions. Maintenant, Moscou voulait que le Vatican soit discrédité par ses propres prêtres, sur son propre territoire, en tant que bastion du nazisme.

Eugenio Pacelli, le Pape Pie XII, fut choisi comme cible principale du KGB, son incarnation du mal, parce qu’il était décédé en 1958. « Les morts ne peuvent pas se défendre » était le dernier leitmotiv du KGB. Moscou venait juste de se faire regarder de travers pour avoir monté une machination et emprisonné un prélat vivant du Vatican, le cardinal Jòzsef Mindszenty, Primat de Hongrie, en 1948. Pendant la révolution politique hongroise de 1956, il s’était échappé de sa détention et trouva asile à l’ambassade des États-Unis de Budapest, où il commença à rédiger ses mémoires. Quand les détails de la machination dont il avait été victime furent dévoilée aux journalistes occidentaux, il fut considéré par la plupart comme un héro et un martyr.

Comme Pie XII avait été le nonce apostolique à Munich et à Berlin lorsque les nazis commencèrent leur tentative d’accès au pouvoir, le KGB a voulu le décrire comme un antisémite qui avait encouragé l’Holocauste d’Hitler. La difficulté résidait dans le fait que l’opération ne devait pas permettre qu’on soupçonne si peu que ce soit l’implication du bloc soviétique. Tout le sale boulot devait être pris en charge par des mains occidentales en utilisant des preuves venant du Vatican lui-même. Cela éviterait de reproduire une autre erreur commise dans l’affaire Mindszenty, qui avait été accusé sur la base de faux documents soviétiques et hongrois [1].

Pour éviter une nouvelle catastrophe comme celle de Mindszenty, le KGB avait besoin de plusieurs documents originaux du Vatican, même n’ayant qu’un lointain rapport avec Pie XII, que les experts en désinformation pourrait légèrement modifier et projeter sous une « lumière appropriée » pour montrer la « véritable image » du Pape. Le problème était que le KGB n’avait pas accès aux archives du Vatican et c’est là que le DIE dont je faisais partie, les services secrets roumains, entrait en jeu. Le nouveau chef des services secrets soviétiques, le général Alexandre Sakharovsky avait créé le DIE en 1949 et avait été jusqu’à peu notre conseiller en chef soviétique ; il savait que le DIE était en excellente position pour contacter le Vatican et obtenir les autorisations pour faire des recherches dans ses archives. En 1959, alors que j’avais été affecté à l’Allemagne de l’Ouest sous la couverture de porte-parole de la Mission Roumaine, j’ai organisé un échange d’espions où deux officiers du DIE (le colonel Gheorghe Horobet et le major Nicolae Ciuciulin), qui avaient été pris sur le fait en Allemagne de l’Ouest, ont été échangés contre l’évêque catholique Augustin Pacha, emprisonné par le KGB sur la fausse accusation d’espionnage et qui fut finalement rendu au Vatican via l’Allemagne de l’Ouest.

Infiltrer le Vatican

« Siège-12 » était le nom de code donné à cette opération contre Pie XII, et j’en devins l’homme-clef en Roumanie. Pour faciliter mon travail, Sakharovsky m’avait autorisé à informer (faussement) le Vatican que la Roumanie était prête à renouer ses relations interrompues avec le Saint-Siège, en échange de l’accès à ses archives et d’un prêt sans intérêt sur 25 ans d’un milliard de dollars [2]. L’accès aux archives du Pape, devais-je expliquer au Vatican, était nécessaire pour trouver des racines historiques permettant au gouvernement roumain de justifier publiquement son revirement à l’égard du Saint-Siège. Le milliard (non, ce n’est pas une faute typographique), m’a-t-on dit, a été mis en jeu pour rendre plus plausible la soi-disant volte-face de la Roumanie. « S’il y a une chose que les moines comprennent, c’est l’argent » faisait remarquer Sakharovsky.

Mon implication récente dans l’échange de Mgr Pacha contre les deux officiers du DIE m’ouvrit en effet des portes. Un mois après avoir reçu les instructions du KGB, j’ai eu mon premier contact avec un représentant du Vatican. Pour des raisons de confidentialité, cette réunion — et la plupart de celles qui ont suivi — se tint en Suisse dans un hôtel de Genève. J’y fus présenté à un « membre influent du corps diplomatique » qui, m’avait-on dit, avait commencé sa carrière en travaillant aux archives du Vatican. Il s’appelait Agostino Casaroli, et j’appris bientôt qu’il était effectivement influent. Il me donna sur le champ accès aux archives du Vatican, et bientôt, trois jeunes officiers du DIE se faisant passer pour des prêtres roumains épluchèrent les archives papales. Casaroli acquiesça aussi « sur le principe » à la demande de Bucarest pour le prêt sans intérêt, mais dît que le Vatican désirait y mettre certaines conditions [3].

Pendant les années 1960 à 1962, le DIE parvint à dérober des centaines de documents liés de près ou de loin au pape Pie XII venant des archives du Vatican ou de la bibliothèque apostolique. Tout était immédiatement envoyé au KGB par courrier spécial. En réalité, aucun document compromettant contre le pontife ne fut trouvé dans tous ces documents photographiés en secret. Il s’agissait principalement de copies de lettres personnelles et de transcriptions de réunions et de discours, toutes rédigées dans le monotone jargon diplomatique auquel on peut s’attendre. Néanmoins, le KGB continua de demander d’autres documents. Et nous leur en avons envoyés d’autres.

Le KGB produit une pièce de théâtre

En 1963, le général Ivan Agayant, le célèbre chef du département de désinformation du KGB, atterrit à Bucarest pour nous remercier de notre aide. Il nous dît que « Siège-12 » avait abouti à une efficace pièce de théâtre attaquant le pape Pie XII, intitulée Le Vicaire (The Deputy), une référence indirecte au Pape comme représentant du Christ sur Terre. Agayants se vantait d’avoir inventé lui-même les grandes lignes de la pièce et nous dit qu’elle avait un volumineux appendice de documents réunis par ses experts grâce aux documents que nous avions dérobés au Vatican. Agayants nous dît aussi que le producteur du Vicaire, Erwin Piscator, était un communiste dévoué qui avait des liens de longue date avec Moscou. En 1929, il avait fondé le Théâtre Prolétaire à Berlin, puis avait demandé l’asile politique à l’Union soviétique lorsqu’Hitler était arrivé au pouvoir, et avait « émigré » quelques années plus tard aux États-Unis. En 1962, Piscator était de retour à Berlin Ouest pour produire Le Vicaire.

Pendant toutes mes années en Roumanie, j’ai toujours pris ce que me disaient mes patrons du KGB avec précaution, parce qu’ils avaient l’habitude de manipuler les faits de manière à faire de l’espionnage soviétique l’origine de tout. Mais j’avais des raisons de croire les fanfaronnades d’Agayants. C’était une légende vivante dans le domaine de la désinformation. En 1943, alors qu’il résidait en Iran, Agayants lança un rapport de désinformation disant qu’Hitler avait entraîné une équipe spéciale pour kidnapper le président Franklin Roosevelt à l’ambassade américaine à Tehéran, pendant un sommet allié qui devait s’y tenir. Le résultat fut que Roosevelt accepta d’installer son quartier général dans une villa à l’intérieur du périmètre de « sécurité » de l’ambassade soviétique, gardée par un grosse unité militaire. Tout le personnel soviétique affecté à la villa était constitué d’officiers du renseignement sous couverture qui parlaient anglais mais qui, à de rares exceptions près, l’avaient caché pour pouvoir écouter ce qui se disait. Même avec les moyens techniques limités de l’époque, Agayants a été capable de fournir heure par heure à Staline des rapports sur ses hôtes américains et britanniques. Ceux-ci aidèrent Staline à obtenir de Roosevelt l’accord tacite de conserver les pays baltes et le reste des territoires occupés par l’Union Soviétique en 1939-40. On raconte qu’Agayants avait aussi incité Roosevelt à appeler familièrement Staline « Oncle Joe » pendant le sommet. Selon Sakharovsky, Staline y trouva encore plus de plaisir qu’en ses gains territoriaux. On dit qu’il s’esclama joyeusement « L’infirme est à moi ! ».

Un an avant la sortie du Vicaire, Agayants réussit un autre coup de maître. Il fabriqua de toutes pièces un manuscrit conçu pour convaincre l’Occident que le Kremlin avait profondément une haute opinion des Juifs ; il fut publié en Europe de l’ouest avec un grand succès populaire, sous le titre Notes for a journal. Le manuscrit fut attribué à Maxim Litvinov [4] né Meir Walach, un ancien commissaire soviétique aux affaires étrangères, qui avait été limogé en 1939 lorsque Staline a purgé son appareil diplomatique des Juifs en préparation du pacte de « non agression » avec Hitler [5]. Ce livre d’Agayants était si parfaitement contrefait que l’historien britannique spécialiste de la Russie soviétique le plus éminent, Edward Hallet Carr, fut totalement convaincu de son authenticité et en écrivit même la préface [6].

Le Vicaire vit le jour en 1963 comme le travail d’un allemand de l’ouest inconnu nommé Rolf Hochhuth, sous le titre Der Stellvertreter christliches Trauerspiel (Le Vicaire, une tragédie chrétienne). Sa thèse centrale était que Pie XII avait soutenu Hitler et encouragé l’Holocauste. Elle provoqua immédiatement une grande controverse sur Pie XII, qui était décrit comme un homme froid et sans cœur plus préoccupé par les propriétés du Vatican que par le sort des victimes d’Hitler. Le texte original est une pièce de huit heures, terminée par 40 à 80 pages (selon l’édition) de ce que Hochhuth appelait « documentation historique ». Dans un article de journal publié en Allemagne en 1963, Hochhuth défend son portrait de Pie XII en disant : « Les faits sont là : quarante pages serrées de documentation dans l’appendice de ma pièce. » Dans une interview radiophonique donnée à New York en 1964, lorsque Le Vicaire y fut joué pour la première fois, Hochhuth dit : « J’ai trouvé nécessaire d’ajouter à la pièce un appendice historique, cinquante à quatre-vingt pages (selon la taille de l’impression). » Dans l’édition originale, l’appendice est intitulée « Historische Streiflichter » (éclairage historique). Le Vicaire a été traduit en près de 20 langues, coupé drastiquement et l’appendice souvent omise.

Avant d’écrire Le Vicaire, Hochhuth, qui n’avait pas le baccalauréat (Abitur), avait travaillé à différents postes insignifiants pour la maison d’édition Bertelsmann. Dans des interviews, il déclarait qu’il avait pris un congé en 1959 pour aller à Rome où il passa trois mois à parler aux gens puis à rédiger la première ébauche de la pièce, et où il posa « une série de questions » à un évêque dont il refusait de dire le nom. Très peu vraisemblable ! À peu près au même moment, je rendais des visites régulières au Vatican comme messager accrédité d’un chef d’État, et je n’ai jamais pu entraîner dans un coin un quelconque évêque bavard — et ce n’est pas faute d’avoir essayé. Les officiers clandestins du DIE que nous avions infiltrés au Vatican rencontrèrent aussi des difficultés insurmontables pour pénétrer dans les archives secrètes du Vatican, alors même qu’ils avaient une couverture de prêtres en béton.

Pendant mes derniers jours au DIE, si je demandais à mon chef du personnel, le général Nicolae Ceausescu (le frère du dictateur), de me donner un récapitulatif du dossier d’un subordonné, il me demandait à chaque fois « Promotion ou déchéance ? » Pendant ses dix premières années, Le Vicaire eu plutôt pour effet la déchéance du Pape. La pièce suscita une rafale de livres et d’articles, certains accusant et d’autres défendant le pontife. Certains allèrent jusqu’à rejeter la responsabilité des atrocités d’Auschwitz sur les épaules du pape, certains démolirent méticuleusement les arguments de Hochhuth, mais tous contribuèrent à attirer l’attention qu’on portait alors à cette pièce plutôt snob. Aujourd’hui, beaucoup de personnes qui n’ont jamais entendu parlé du Vicaire sont sincèrement convaincues que Pie XII était un homme froid et méchant qui détestait les Juifs et aida Hitler à s’en débarrasser. Comme avait l’habitude de me dire Yuri Andropov, l’incomparable maître de la tromperie soviétique, les gens sont plus prompts à croire la saleté que la sainteté.

Les mensonges dévoilés

Vers le milieu des années 1970, Le Vicaire commença à s’essouffler. En 1974, Andropov nous avoua que si l’on avait su alors ce qu’on sait aujourd’hui, nous n’aurions jamais dû nous en prendre à Pie XII. Ce qui fit alors la différence fut la parution de nouvelles informations montrant qu’Hitler, loin d’être ami avec Pie XII, avait en fait conspiré contre lui.

Quelques jours seulement avant l’aveu d’Andropov, l’ancien commandant suprême de l’escadron SS en Italie pendant la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, le général Karl Friedrich Otto Wolff, était relaché de prison et confessait qu’en 1943, Hitler lui avait donné l’ordre d’enlever le pape Pie XII au Vatican. Cet ordre était si confidentiel qu’il n’est jamais apparu après la guerre dans aucune archive nazie ni n’est ressorti d’aucun interrogatoire par les alliés des officiers SS et de la Gestapo. Dans sa confession, Wolff déclare qu’il avait répondu à Hitler qu’il lui faudrait six semaines pour mettre l’ordre à exécution. Hitler, qui rendait responsable le pape du renversement du dictateur italien Benito Mussolini, voulait que ce soit fait sur le champ. Finalement, Wolff persuada Hitler que les conséquences d’un tel plan seraient très négatives et le Fürher y renonça.

C’est seulement dans l’année 1974 que le cardinal Mindszenty publia ses mémoires, qui décrivaient avec force détails le coup monté dont il avait été victime dans la Hongrie communiste. Sur la foi de documents fabriqués, il fut accusé de « trahison, abus de devises étrangères et conspiration », accusations « toutes punissables de mort ou d’emprisonnement à vie ». Il décrivit aussi comment ses « confessions » falsifiées prirent vie d’elles-mêmes. « Il me semblait que tout le monde reconnaîtrait immédiatement que ce document était une grossière contrefaçon, tellement il était l’œuvre d’un esprit maladroit et inculte » écrit le cardinal. « Mais quand par la suite j’ai pris connaissance des livres, journaux et magazines étrangers qui parlaient de mon affaire et commentaient mes « confessions », j’ai réalisé que le public avait dû conclure que la « confession » avait bien été écrite par moi, bien que dans un état de semi-conscience et sous l’influence d’un lavage de cerveau… Que la police ait publié un document qu’ils avaient eux-mêmes créé paraissait finalement trop gros pour être cru. » De plus, Hanna Sulner, l’expert en graphologie hongroise utilisée pour circonvenir le cardinal, qui s’est échappée à Vienne, a confirmé qu’elle avait fabriqué de toutes pièces la « confession » de Mindszenty.

Quelques années plus tard, le pape Jean-Paul II ouvrit le procès en canonisation de Pie XII, et les témoins du monde entier ont implacablement prouvé que Pie XII était un ennemi d’Hitler, et non un ami. Israel Zoller, le grand rabbin de Rome entre 1943 et 1944, lorsqu’Hitler reprit la ville, consacra un chapitre entier de ses mémoires à louer le gouvernement de Pie XII. « Le Saint Père rédigea de sa main une lettre aux évêques leur donnant l’instruction de renforcer les barrières des couvents et monastères, afin qu’ils puissent devenir des refuges pour les Juifs. Je connais un couvent où les soeurs dorment dans la cave pour donner leurs lits aux réfugiés juifs. » Le 25 juillet 1944, Zoller a été reçu par le pape Pie XII. Les notes prises par le secrétaire d’État [NdT : en fait pro-secrétaire d’État] du Vatican Giovanni Battista Montini (qui deviendra le pape Paul VI) montrent que Rabbi Zoller remerciait le Saint Père pour tout ce qu’il avait fait pour la communauté juive de Rome — et ces remerciements furent retransmis à la radio. Le 13 février 1945, Rabbi Zoller était baptisé par l’évêque auxiliaire de Rome Luigi Traglia dans l’église Sainte Marie des Anges. Pour exprimer sa gratitude envers Pie XII, Zoller prit le nom chrétien d’Eugenio (le nom du pape). Un an plus tard, la femme et la fille de Zoller furent aussi baptisées.

David G. Dalin, dans Le mythe du pape d’Hitler : Comment le pape Pie XII a sauvé des Juifs des nazis, publié il y a quelques mois, a rassemblé d’autres preuves incontestables de l’amitié d’Eugenio Pacelli pour les Juifs qui a commencé bien avant qu’il ne soit pape. Au début de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, la première encyclique du pape Pie XII était tellement anti-hitlérienne que la Royal Air Force et l’Armée de l’Air française en ont lâché 88.000 exemplaires au-dessus de l’Allemagne.

Durant les 16 dernières années, la liberté de religion a été restaurée en Russie et une nouvelle génération s’est battu pour développer une nouvelle identité nationale. On peut seulement espérer que le président Vladimir Poutine prendra conscience de l’utilité d’ouvrir les archives du KGB et de les étaler au grand jour pour que tout le monde puisse voir comment les communistes ont calomnié l’un des plus grand papes du siècle dernier.

P.-S.

Le général Ion Mihai Pacepa est le plus haut gradé de tous les espions qui ont jamais fuit le bloc soviétique. Son livre Red Horizons a été publié dans 27 pays. Cet article est la traduction d’un article de National Review Online

Notes

[1] Le 6 février 1949, quelques jours seulement avant la fin du procès, Hanna Sulner, l’experte en graphologie hongroise qui avait fabriqué les « preuves » utilisées contre le cardinal s’est échappé à Vienne et a montré des microfilms des « documents » sur lesquels le procès était fondé, qui étaient tous des documents fabriqués, « certains ostensiblement de la main du cardinal, d’autre portant sa soi-disant signature », produit par elle.

[2] Les relations de la Roumanie avec le Vatican avaient été rompues en 1951, lorsque Moscou avait accusé la nonciature apostolique de Roumanie d’être la couverture d’un avant-poste de la CIA et avait fermé ses bureaux. Les locaux de la nonciature à Bucarest sont devenus ceux du DIE, et abritent aujourd’hui une école de langues étrangères.

[3] En 1978, lorsque j’ai quitté définitivement la Roumanie, j’étais encore en train de négocier ce prêt, qui s’était alors réduit à 200 millions de dollars.

[4] NdT : voir la revue française de science politique .

[5] Le pacte de non agression entre Staline et Hitler fut signé le 23 août 1939 à Moscou. Il contenait un protocole secret qui partageait la Pologne entre les deux signataires et donnait aux soviétiques le champ libre en Estonie, Létonie, Finlande, Bessarabie et la Bukovine du Nord

[6] Carr a écrit une histoire de la Russie soviétique en dix volumes.

Voir encore:

THE COLD WAR:

How Moscow framed Pope Pius XII as pro-Nazi

Joseph Poprzeczny

News Weekly

April 28, 2007

Last year an Italian parliamentary commission concluded “beyond any reasonable doubt” that Moscow was behind the 1981 assassination attempt on Pope John Paul II. Now, according to Joseph Poprzeczny, evidence has surfaced exposing Moscow as being the instigator of the character assassination of the wartime Pope Pius XII.

A wit observed once that Austria should be credited with an astounding double historical achievement – managing to convince the world that Beethoven was an Austrian and that Hitler was a German.

However, the former Soviet Union perpetrated possibly an even more blatant example of perception management. This was when Soviet dictator Josef Stalin and his successor, Nikita Khrushchev, attempted simultaneously to whitewash Stalin’s duplicitous wartime pact with Hitler and to blacken Pope Pius XII as a Hitler sympathiser.

Stalin of course was Hitler’s ally for the first part of World War II. On August 23, 1939, the world learned of the notorious Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact (named after the foreign ministers of the Soviet Union and the Third Reich), under which central and eastern Europe was to be divided into Soviet and German spheres of influence.

The pact cleared the way for Hitler to invade Poland on September 1, 1939, with Stalin following suit on September 17. World War II had begun.

From September 1, 1939, until June 22, 1941 – that is, not less than 21 months of this global conflict’s 67-month duration – Stalin supplied Hitler’s war machine with grain, fuel, strategic minerals, valuable intelligence and other crucial aid for Hitler’s bid to enslave central and western Europe.

Only during the war’s latter 46-months – the period that Russians refer to as their Great Patriotic War – were Stalin and Hitler enemies.

From late 1944, however, Stalin moved to erase any memory of those crucial opening 21 months that included his collaboration with Hitlerism.

Another major component of Moscow’s re-writing of the history of wartime Europe was to fabricate evidence suggesting the existence of a secret pact between Pope Pius XII and Hitler.

That the Kremlin was behind this concerted attempt to smear the Vatican as being pro-Nazi has recently been revealed by historians and confirmed by the highest-ranking intelligence officer ever to defect from the former communist Eastern bloc.

English historian Michael Burleigh has reviewed two recent books on Eugenio Pacelli, the wartime pope – The Myth of Hitler’s Pope: How Pope Pius XII Rescued Jews from the Nazis (2005), by Rabbi David G. Dalin, and Righteous Gentiles: How Pius XII and the Catholic Church Saved Half a Million Jews from the Nazis (2005) by Ronald J. Rychlak.

Burleigh has concluded from these studies that the portrayal of Hitler and Pius XII as allies was a deliberate Kremlin disinformation campaign launched even before the war ended.

“Soviet attempts to smear Pius had actually commenced as soon as the Red Army crossed into Catholic Poland,” says Burleigh.

“To be precise, they hired a militantly anti-religious propagandist, Mikhail Markovich Sheinmann, to write a series of tracts claiming there had been a ‘secret’ pact between Hitler and the Vatican to enable ‘Jesuits’ to proselytise in the wake of Operation Barbarossa.

“Apart from the inherent improbability of this claim, Soviet attempts to frame Pius for a ‘pact’ were ironic, in a guilty sort of way, in view of the August 1939 Nazi-Soviet Pact, replete with its secret clauses carving up Poland and the Baltic states, which had precipitated the outbreak of war.”

So Stalin, a party to a pact with Hitler, initiated the propaganda campaign claiming that the Vatican had done so. And to further embellish this canard, the oft-used ploy of maligning the Jesuits was revived.

However, any serious historians of Hitler’s Lebensraum – Hitler’s plan to expand the Third Reich eastward and to kill, deport or enslave the subject populations of the conquered countries in order to create “living space” for the Aryan people – know that neither Catholicism nor the Jesuits had any place in a Germanised east (any more than religion of any sort was allowed any place under communism).

After the war, the Kremlin’s smear campaign was taken up by Holocaust-denier David Irving’s “soul mate”, the left-wing German playwright Rolf Hochhuth, author of the 1963 Schillerian drama, The Deputy, with its fictitious claims about Pius XII.

Burleigh says: “Hochhuth’s play, which drew heavily upon Sheinmann’s lies and falsehoods, inspired two scholarly critiques of Pius and the Catholic Church by, respectively, Guenter Lewy (1964) and Saul Friedländer (1966).

“Neither availed himself of the thirteen volumes of published wartime Vatican documents, and both relied heavily on German records, which are hardly an unimpeachable source on the Pope.

“These were followed by the works of Robert Katz, who was successfully sued for defamation by Pius’s niece, and John Morley, a Catholic priest. These personages were harbingers of future trends.”

Burleigh says Rabbi Dalin “explains in his powerful and closely-argued polemic against the Pope’s detractors, the most recent assault on Pius’s reputation came from liberal, secular Jews, whose anti-Catholicism is as pathological as the anti-Semitism they see lurking around every corner, and from dissident or renegade Catholics, who use the Holocaust as the biggest available moral stick with which to assault the conservative turn within their own Church.”

Some gullible people all too readily swallowed the early lying Stalin-Scheinmann campaign.

Burleigh says of Rychlak: “He patiently goes through every shifting charge and smear against Pius, highlighting his consistency in condemning Nazism as a form of neo-pagan state worship, and the terrible dilemmas he faced during the war.

“The Pope did not have the luxury of being some grandstanding US politician or rent-a-moralist; what he said had real consequences for real people, and it was not his job to thrust martyrdom upon them.

“When the Church did speak out, as it did, without circumspection, through Vatican Radio broadcasts about the plight of Jews and Christians in Poland, or when the Dutch Catholic bishops protested during round-ups of Jews in Amsterdam, the Nazis carried out terrible reprisals against Catholic priests, or, in the Dutch case, maliciously deported Jewish converts to Catholicism, who had hitherto been exempted, while leaving converts to Protestantism alone.”

But anti-Pius campaigning didn’t end with Stalin.

This year, Ion Pacepa, a two-star Romanian Securitate general and the highest-ranking intelligence official to defect from the Eastern bloc, unexpectedly re-surfaced to provide the true background to the revived anti-Pius campaign in an article, “Moscow’s Assault on the Vatican: The KGB made corrupting the Church a priority”, in National Review (January 25, 2007).

Pacepa, who defected in 1978 and published several important exposés including his memoirs Red Horizons (1988), was prompted to write about this because of two recent developments.

The first came in March 2006 with an Italian parliamentary commission concluding “beyond any reasonable doubt that the leaders of the Soviet Union took the initiative to eliminate the pope, Karol Wojtyla”, due to of his backing for Poland’s anti-communist Solidarity movement.

The second came in January this year when documents showed Warsaw’s just-appointed Archbishop Stanislaw Wielgus had collaborated with Polish communist secret police as a student.

“The Soviet Union was never comfortable living in the same world with the Vatican,” said Pacepa.

“The most recent disclosures document that the Kremlin was prepared to go to any lengths to counter the Catholic Church’s strong anti-communism.

“In my other life, when I was at the centre of Moscow’s foreign-intelligence wars, I myself was caught up in a deliberate Kremlin effort to smear the Vatican, by portraying Pius XII as a cold-hearted Nazi sympathiser.

“Ultimately, the operation did not cause any lasting damage, but it left a residual bad taste that is hard to rinse away. The story has never before been told.”

He said that in February 1960 Khrushchev approved a top-secret KGB plan to help destroy the Vatican’s moral authority across Western Europe.

Until then the KGB had combated Christianity across Eastern Europe, “where the Holy See had been crudely attacked as a cesspool of espionage in the pay of American imperialism”.

Now the Kremlin set out to discredit the Vatican by using its own priests and to smear Pius as a Nazi collaborator, especially after his death in 1958.

“Dead men cannot defend themselves” was the KGB’s slogan, according to Pacepa.

Because Pius served as Papal Nuncio (ambassador for the Holy See) in Germany when Nazism was gaining power, the KGB set about depicting him as an anti-Semite who encouraged Hitler’s Holocaust.

“The hitch was that the operation was not to give the least hint of Soviet bloc involvement,” says Pacepa.

What followed was a convoluted plot called “Seat 12” that even Ian Fleming couldn’t match.

Pacepa was to be the contact man with the Vatican. “To facilitate my job, [Soviet intelligence chief] Sakharovsky authorised me to (falsely) inform the Vatican that [communist] Romania was ready to restore its broken relations with the Holy See, in exchange for access to its archives and a one-billion-dollar, interest-free loan for 25-years,” writes Pacepa.

Access to Papal archives, the Vatican was told, was needed to find historical roots to help Romania’s government to publicly justify its change of heart toward the Holy See over the break-off of diplomatic relations in 1951.

Some documents, though in no way incriminating, were thereby deviously obtained and handed to the KGB.

The next step came in 1963 when KGB disinformation chief, General Ivan Agayants, told Pacepa that operation Seat 12 “had materialised into a powerful play attacking Pope Pius XII, entitled The Deputy, an oblique reference to the Pope as Christ’s representative on earth.”

“Agayants took credit for the outline of the play, and he told us that it had voluminous appendices of background documents put together by his experts with help from the documents we had purloined from the Vatican.

“Agayants also told us that The Deputy’s producer, Erwin Piscator, was a devoted communist who had a longstanding relationship with Moscow.

“In 1929 he had founded the Proletarian Theatre in Berlin, then sought political asylum in the Soviet Union when Hitler came to power, and a few years later had ’emigrated’ to the US.

“In 1962 Piscator had returned to West Berlin to produce The Deputy.

“The Deputy saw the light in 1963 as the work of an unknown West German named Rolf Hochhuth, under the title Der Stellvertreter. Ein christliches Trauerspiel (The Deputy, a Christian Tragedy).”

– Joseph Poprzeczny is a Perth-based freelance journalist and historical researcher. He is author of Odilo Globocnik, Hitler’s Man in the East, (Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland and Company, 2004). Softcover: 447 pages. Rec. price: US$45.00.

Voir enfin:

Obama, le président des drones

Stephen Holmes

Article paru dans la «London Review of Books», traduit par Sandrine Tolotti

« BoOks »

27-02-2014

Dans son livre « The Drone Zone », Mark Mazzetti, du « New York Times », explique la « fièvre tueuse » d’un président humaniste. Et ça fait froid dans le dos.

« Ce n’est pas lié au fait d’essayer de ne pas conduire des gens à Guantánamo»: en ce 6 juin 2013, la syntaxe chantournée d’Eric Holder devant la sous-commission du Sénat trahit l’immense embarras du ministre de la Justice des États-Unis, qui s’efforce de défendre le programme d’assassinats ciblés du président Obama. Il n’est pas le seul des porte-parole de l’administration à peiner lorsqu’il faut répondre aux questions sur la politique américaine de largage de drones sur le monde.

1. La hantise des agents de la CIA

L’une des principales thèses du livre que Mark Mazzetti consacre au sujet est la suivante: la CIA et le Pentagone ont décidé de traquer et tuer les ennemis présumés pour éviter les méthodes extrajudiciaires de capture et d’interrogatoire adoptées par le prédécesseur d’Obama à la Maison-Blanche. L’auteur réitère l’accusation à de multiples reprises, avec un sens de l’euphémisme qui n’appartient qu’à lui:

En l’absence de possibilités de placer en détention les suspects de terrorisme, et faute de goût pour les vastes opérations terrestres en Somalie, l’option de tuer était parfois bien plus attirante que celle de capturer.

Ou :

L’exécution était le mode d’action privilégié en Somalie et, comme le confie l’un des agents impliqués dans la planification de la mission, « nous ne l’avons pas pris parce qu’il aurait été difficile de trouver un endroit où le mettre ».

En d’autres termes, l’administration a mis le paquet sur ce qui ressemble fort à des exécutions extrajudiciaires, faute de mieux, après avoir fermé les sites de détention secrets de Bush et décidé de ne plus envoyer personne à Guantánamo, où le tiers environ de la centaine de grévistes de la faim a bénéficié d’une forme sinistre d’Obamacare, les tubes dans le nez.

Mazzetti apporte une autre explication, inexprimée et peut-être inexprimable, de l’escalade dans la guerre des drones: les membres de l’appareil du renseignement craignaient d’être un jour tenus pour pénalement responsables de l’usage de la torture, un crime dans le droit américain. A le croire, la multiplication des assassinats par drones fut en partie motivée par des murmures de rébellion au sein de la CIA, où règne une peur légendaire d’être désigné à la vindicte par des responsables politiques manipulateurs.

Au moment de la brillante entrée en fonctions d’Obama, l’agence était apparemment préoccupée à l’idée que des «agents officiant en secret dans les prisons de la CIA puissent être poursuivis pour leur travail». Cette crainte a refroidi l’enthousiasme des interrogateurs pour l’extorsion d’informations par la violence physique et psychologique:

Chaque coup reçu par la CIA concernant son programme de détention secrète et d’interrogatoires inclinait un peu plus ses dirigeants à faire ce calcul morbide: l’agence se porterait bien mieux si elle tuait les terroristes présumés plutôt que de les incarcérer.

Selon John Rizzo, un juriste de l’organisation, les responsables de l’administration Obama «ne sont jamais venus dire qu’ils allaient commencer d’assassiner les suspects parce qu’ils ne pouvaient pas les interroger, mais personne ne pouvait s’y tromper […]. À partir du moment où le temps des interrogatoires était révolu, il ne restait que l’assassinat».

Résumant ses entretiens avec Rizzo et d’autres membres du sérail, Mazzetti conclut:

Les drones armés, et la politique d’assassinat ciblé en général, ont offert un nouveau cap à un service d’espionnage qui commençait de se sentir carbonisé par les années vouées à la politique de détention secrète et d’interrogatoires.

Voilà une façon incendiaire d’insinuer que la «critique de gauche» d’une politique de sécurité nationale certes inutilement dure et supervisée avec nonchalance, mais rarement mortelle, porte une certaine responsabilité dans le revirement d’Obama en faveur de la mort subite par drones.

Mazzetti lui-même ne l’évoque pas, mais la thèse selon laquelle les principes progressistes en la matière engendrent plus de cruauté qu’ils n’en évitent est depuis longtemps l’une des flèches préférées des conservateurs. Avant de devenir ministre de la Justice sous la seconde administration Bush, Michael Mukasey avait avisé les défenseurs des libertés civiles que le sang ne maculerait pas les mains des hommes qui torturaient les prisonniers de guerre mais les leurs. La gauche, affirma-t-il étrangement dans le «Wall Street Journal», se comportait de manière criminelle en plaidant pour le contrôle judiciaire des décisions de l’exécutif en matière de détention:

L’effet involontaire d’un avis de la Cour suprême qui étendrait sa juridiction sur les détenus de Guantánamo pourrait être de créer à l’avenir une préférence pour l’assassinat plutôt que la capture des terroristes présumés.

Tout ce qu’allaient obtenir ces défenseurs des droits, ce serait la mort des suspects, pas leur juste traitement.

2. La revanche de John Brennan

Mais est-ce vraiment en suivant un scénario antilibéral écrit par les faucons de l’ère Bush qu’Obama a troqué la détention secrète pour le tir à vue? La supposition possède un accent de vérité. Le programme de drones armés a au minimum des liens de sang avec le programme Bush de détention sans inculpation. Une parenté dont témoigne notamment ce principe qu’elles ont en commun: les ennemis présumés ne méritent pas un procès leur permettant de prouver qu’ils sont innocents des charges retenues contre eux.

L’idée que les deux politiques procèdent de la même sensibilité est également étayée par la trajectoire professionnelle de John Brennan, un ancien de la CIA récemment devenu directeur de l’agence. Après avoir été son directeur exécutif adjoint sous George Bush, Brennan est revenu aux affaires publiques (il avait été entre-temps P-DG d’une officine privée de renseignement) en 2008 comme conseiller d’Obama pour la lutte antiterroriste et, selon certains, simili-confesseur, bénissant les frappes mortelles du président au nom de leur conformité avec la philosophie catholique de la guerre juste.

Quoi qu’il en soit, Brennan a joué un rôle clé dans la transformation spectaculaire de la CIA en «machine à tuer, organisation obsédée par la chasse à l’homme». Plus concrètement, la «liste des hommes à abattre», durant le premier mandat Obama, fut «coétablie dans le bureau de John Brennan au sous-sol de la Maison-Blanche».

Voilà qui donne un indice des origines de l’actuelle politique des drones. Brennan fut, sous Bush, un avocat déclaré de la détention illimitée, de la «restitution» illégale [rendition] des suspects à des pays connus pour leurs piètres performances en matière de respect des droits de l’homme, et de l’interrogatoire musclé (mais pas du waterboarding). Ce sont même précisément ces états de service – et cela nous ramène plus directement à notre sujet – qui ont fait capoter sa nomination à la tête de la CIA en 2008, suite au rejet du Sénat.

Il ne semble pas tiré par les cheveux d’imaginer que, meurtri par ce retour de bâton contre les pratiques antiterroristes de l’ère Bush, Brennan ait été l’un des cerveaux de la conversion aux machines à tuer téléguidées. Avec cette nouvelle méthode de lutte contre les combattants ennemis, les agents du renseignement étaient beaucoup moins guettés par le spectre de la responsabilité pénale et autres phénomènes torpilleurs de carrière. La trajectoire déviée de Brennan jusqu’à la direction de la CIA, surtout si l’on y ajoute sa déclaration stupéfiante de juin 2011 sur l’absence de victimes civiles des drones, semble ainsi confirmer l’hypothèse récurrente du livre de Mazzetti: la présidence «assassine» d’Obama s’est construite par souci d’impunité de la CIA.

3. Pour en finir avec l’Irak

Que les «opérations imprévues à l’étranger» d’Obama, au nom tellement inoffensif, descendent en ligne directe de la guerre globale contre le terrorisme de Bush ne devrait pourtant pas nous surprendre. Un changement de président ne provoque jamais de bouleversement de la politique de défense quand le jeu partisan, les pesanteurs bureaucratiques, les droits acquis et l’opinion publique ne bougent que légèrement – si d’aventure ils bougent – à la faveur de l’élection. Comme l’écrit Mazzetti:

Les fondations de la guerre secrète ont été posées par un président républicain conservateur et avalisées par un président démocrate progressiste tombé amoureux de l’héritage.

Mais pourquoi exactement Obama a-t-il fait de l’assassinat télécommandé la pièce maîtresse de sa politique antiterroriste? La question ne relève pas de la simple curiosité. Il faut commencer par tirer au clair les motivations de l’administration pour pouvoir jauger les justifications qu’elle présente à l’opinion.

Mazzetti a pris un bon départ, mais il passe à côté d’une bonne partie de l’histoire, qui commence avec la rupture entre Obama et la conception de la sécurité nationale qu’avait Bush. Cela va presque sans dire, mais le passage aux drones est le résultat logique de la promesse faite par le nouveau président de se désengager des guerres d’invasion et d’occupation de l’ère précédente

Après la crise financière de 2008, les responsables américains ont commencé à douter du bien-fondé de cette prodigalité pour des projets chimériques comme la réconciliation ethnique et religieuse en Irak ou la construction de l’État en Afghanistan. Ces deux guerres dévoraient encore une part démesurée des ressources limitées dont dispose le pays pour sa défense, à commencer par l’attention des plus hauts responsables.

Mais l’électorat américain était devenu de plus en plus indifférent à leur égard, et de plus en plus dubitatif sur leur contribution à la sécurité nationale. Quant aux décideurs politiques, ils voyaient à l’évidence l’invasion de l’Irak, ayant par mégarde enfanté un allié chiite de l’Iran, comme un fiasco absolu. Et, en Afghanistan, les soldats formés par les États-Unis commençaient à tirer sur leurs instructeurs, laissant entendre que la capacité de l’Amérique à transmettre des compétences dépassait de loin sa capacité à inspirer de la loyauté.

Obama s’est désolidarisé de Bush quand il a abandonné l’espoir de transformer les anciens États sponsors du terrorisme en alliés dignes de confiance. Et les événements postérieurs sont venus confirmer de manière retentissante qu’il était sage de circonscrire la lutte antiterroriste aux seuls acteurs non étatiques.

L’inquiétant flot d’armes qui s’est déversé des arsenaux de Kadhafi sur le Mali et la Syrie a ainsi rappelé aux responsables américains que le changement de régime anarchique nourrit parfois la prolifération. La chute d’un dictateur dans des régions rompues à l’art de la contrebande ne peut qu’inonder le marché noir d’armes dangereuses, proposées à des prix défiant toute concurrence. Heureusement pour les néocons obsédés par le terrorisme nucléaire, Saddam Hussein ne possédait pas l’arsenal dont ils avaient argué pour justifier l’opération de renversement du régime.

À vrai dire, pendant qu’Obama se démène pour gérer au mieux l’héritage de la destruction mutuelle assurée, la dissuasion nucléaire a pris une forme radicalement nouvelle. Les États puissants n’assurent plus la paix en menaçant de s’envoyer des armes incroyablement destructrices.

Ce sont les États faibles qui veulent la bombe pour agiter le spectre d’une perte de contrôle au cas où un pays étranger soutiendrait un brutal changement de pouvoir. La frappe israélienne contre le réacteur syrien en 2007 a empêché Bachar el-Assad de s’y essayer. Mais force est de se demander si son usage – à petite échelle, mais incontestable – du gaz sarin vise à faire frémir les puissances occidentales à l’idée des conséquences d’un effondrement de son régime.

4. L’exception Ben Laden

Obama a donc décidé d’en finir avec les guerres contre les États parrains présumés du terrorisme pour des raisons parfaitement claires. Mais pourquoi a-t-il autorisé l’usage offensif des drones? Est-ce, comme le prétendent ses partisans, parce que cette forme de belligérance est la manière la plus efficace de protéger les Américains contre des attentats particulièrement meurtriers?

Ce serait une excellente justification. Cette explication suppose malheureusement que le président dispose d’un moyen de calcul réaliste des effets de sa politique sur la sécurité nationale.

En parlant de la «fièvre tueuse» d’Obama, expression qu’il utilise ailleurs pour évoquer les carnages commis par les groupes terroristes, Mazzetti invite ses lecteurs au doute sur la sincérité de l’administration quand elle plaide pour les drones armés avec des arguments du type «votre-sécurité-s’en-trouve-améliorée». Lesquels doutes redoublent quand on lit que «la CIA avait l’aval de la Maison-Blanche pour mener des frappes au Pakistan, même quand ses « cibleurs » n’étaient pas certains de l’identité de l’homme qu’ils étaient en train de tuer».

Avant de reconnaître que «toute frappe de drone est une exécution», Richard Blee, l’ancien chef de l’unité de la CIA en charge de la chasse à Ben Laden, a confié à Mazzetti que l’agence avait mis la barre plus bas en matière d’identification des cibles parce que les espions américains ne «voulaient plus savoir qui nous assassinions avant qu’on appuie sur la détente».

Ils ne voulaient plus savoir. C’est un propos extraordinaire, cette ignorance volontaire ne pouvant qu’accroître le risque de responsabilité pénale au cas improbable où le jour du jugement dernier finirait par venir.

Lire la suite sur BoOks.fr


12 years a slave: Hollywood récompensera-il le premier film bondage sur l’esclavage de l’histoire ? (Uncle Tom’s cabin meets Justine: is history really served when slavery flicks go from spaghetti western to torture porn ?)

22 février, 2014
https://i2.wp.com/screenrobot.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/12-years-a-slave-solomon-new-york.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/www-deadline-com.vimg.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/12-Years-a-Slave-Hanging-Scene__140129072127.jpgIl faut avoir le courage de vouloir le mal et pour cela il faut commencer par rompre avec le comportement grossièrement humanitaire qui fait partie de l’héritage chrétien. (..) Nous sommes avec ceux qui tuent. André Breton
Bien avant qu’un intellectuel nazi ait annoncé ‘quand j’entends le mot culture je sors mon revolver’, les poètes avaient proclamé leur dégoût pour cette saleté de culture et politiquement invité Barbares, Scythes, Nègres, Indiens, ô vous tous, à la piétiner. Hannah Arendt (1949)
Après Auschwitz, nous pouvons affirmer, plus résolument que jamais auparavant, qu’une divinité toute-puissante ou bien ne serait pas toute bonne, ou bien resterait entièrement incompréhensible (dans son gouvernement du monde, qui seul nous permet de la saisir). Mais si Dieu, d’une certaine manière et à un certain degré, doit être intelligible (et nous sommes obligés de nous y tenir), alors il faut que sa bonté soit compatible avec l’existence du mal, et il n’en va de la sorte que s’il n’est pas tout-puissant. C’est alors seulement que nous pouvons maintenir qu’il est compréhensible et bon, malgré le mal qu’il y a dans le monde. Hans Jonas
Christs, Vierges, Pietàs, Crucifixions, enfers, paradis, offrandes, chutes, dons, échanges: la vision chrétienne du monde semble revenir en force. Où? Dans le domaine de l’art le plus contemporain. (…) L’homme y est réinterprété comme corps incarné, faible, en échec. Cette religion insiste sur l’ordinaire et l’accessible, elle est hantée par la dérision, la mort et le deuil. Après une modernité désincarnée proposant ses icônes majestueuses, on en revient à une image incarnée, une image d’après la chute. En profondeur, il se dit là un renversement des modèles de l’art lui-même: A Prométhée succède Sisyphe ou mieux le Christ souffrant, un homme sans modèle, sans lien, inscrit dans une condition humaine à laquelle il ne peut échapper. Yves Michaud (4e de couverture, L’art contemporain est-il chrétien, Catherine Grenier)
C’est comme une fête foraine, les jeux avec les pinces… Le monde est atroce, mais il y a bien pire : c’est Dieu. On ne peut pas comprendre Haïti. On ne peut même pas dire que Dieu est méchant, aucun méchant n’aurait fait cela. Christian Boltanski
Le grand ennemi de la vérité n’est très souvent pas le mensonge – délibéré, artificiel et malhonnête – mais le mythe – persistant, persuasif et irréaliste. John Kennedy
Cette Administration met en avant un faux choix entre les libertés que nous chérissons et la sécurité que nous procurons… Je vais donner à nos agences de renseignement et de sécurité les outils dont ils ont besoin pour surveiller et éliminer les terroristes sans nuire à notre Constitution et à notre liberté. Cela signifie l’arrêt des écoutes téléphoniques illégales de citoyens américains, l’arrêt des lettres de sécurité nationale pour espionner les citoyens américains qui ne sont pas soupçonnés d’un crime. L’arrêt de la surveillance des citoyens qui ne font rien de plus que protester contre une mauvaise guerre. L’arrêt de l’ignorance de la loi quand cela est incommode. Obama (août 2007)
Qu’est donc devenu cet artisan de paix récompensé par un prix Nobel, ce président favorable au désarmement nucléaire, cet homme qui s’était excusé aux yeux du monde des agissements honteux de ces Etats-Unis qui infligeaient des interrogatoires musclés à ces mêmes personnes qu’il n’hésite pas aujourd’hui à liquider ? Il ne s’agit pas de condamner les attaques de drones. Sur le principe, elles sont complètement justifiées. Il n’y a aucune pitié à avoir à l’égard de terroristes qui s’habillent en civils, se cachent parmi les civils et n’hésitent pas à entraîner la mort de civils. Non, le plus répugnant, c’est sans doute cette amnésie morale qui frappe tous ceux dont la délicate sensibilité était mise à mal par les méthodes de Bush et qui aujourd’hui se montrent des plus compréhensifs à l’égard de la campagne d’assassinats téléguidés d’Obama. Charles Krauthammer
Les drones américains ont liquidé plus de monde que le nombre total des détenus de Guantanamo. Pouvons nous être certains qu’il n’y avait parmi eux aucun cas d’erreurs sur la personne ou de morts innocentes ? Les prisonniers de Guantanamo avaient au moins une chance d’établir leur identité, d’être examinés par un Comité de surveillance et, dans la plupart des cas, d’être relâchés. Ceux qui restent à Guantanamo ont été contrôlés et, finalement, devront faire face à une forme quelconque de procédure judiciaire. Ceux qui ont été tués par des frappes de drones, quels qu’ils aient été, ont disparu. Un point c’est tout. Kurt Volker
L’abolition est due au grand réveil religieux: sous l’impulsion des pasteurs, des centaines de milliers d’Anglais signent des pétitions contre l’esclavage. Olivier Pétré-Grenouilleau (…) Le système esclavagiste était rentable et il aurait pu s’adapter à la nouvelle période. On a même calculé que la productivité d’un esclave pouvait être équivalente, voire supérieure, à celle d’un salarié. Olivier Pétré-Grenouilleau
La traite n’avait pas pour but d’exterminer un peuple. L’esclave était un bien qui avait une valeur marchande qu’on voulait faire travailler le plus possible. Olivier Pétré-Grenouilleau
« Cargaison » précieuse face au risque financier que prenait l’armateur, leurs conditions de détention s’améliorèrent au cours des siècles, leur taux de mortalité étant de 10 % à 20 %, avec des pics à 40 %. Pour les historiens, l’estimation la plus probable s’établit à 13 % sur les quatre siècles que dure la traite alors que la mortalité moyenne d’un équipage était tout juste inférieure. Wikipedia
On dispose de peu d’éléments sur le nombre de captifs décédés sur le sol africain. (…) Raymond L. Cohn, un professeur d’économie dont les recherches sont centrées sur l’histoire économique et les migrations internationales estime que 20 à 40 % des captifs mouraient au cours de leur transport à marche forcée vers la côte, et que 3 à 10 % disparaissaient en y attendant les navires négriers. On arrive à un total compris entre 23 et 50 %. (…) À la fin du XVIIIe siècle, en Guadeloupe, le taux de mortalité des esclaves oscillait entre 30 et 50 pour mille. En métropole, le taux de mortalité était compris entre 30 et 38 pour mille.  (…) Pour les négriers nantais, la mortalité moyenne était de 17,8 %. Il ne s’agit que d’une moyenne. Certaines traversées pouvaient se faire sans aucun décès tandis que d’autres pouvaient enregistrer une mortalité de 80 % voire davantage. Wikipedia
Pour le XVIe siècle, le nombre des esclaves chrétiens razziés par les musulmans est supérieur à celui des Africains déportés aux Amériques. Il est vrai que la traite des Noirs ne prendra vraiment son essor qu’à la fin du XVIIe siècle, avec la révolution sucrière dans les Antilles. Mais, selon Davis, il y aurait eu environ un million de Blancs chrétiens réduits en esclavage par les barbaresques entre 1530 et 1780. Mais il ne faut pas se focaliser sur la question des chiffres, afin d’établir une sorte d’échelle de Richter des esclavages. Ce que le travail de Davis permet d’affirmer, c’est que cet esclavage des chrétiens entre le XVIe et le XVIIIe siècle renvoie à une réalité non négligeable. Rien de plus. S’il est resté pour une large part ignoré, c’est qu’il n’a pas laissé beaucoup de traces. Les esclaves blancs étaient en effet principalement, à 90%, des hommes, qui ne faisaient pas souche en terre d’Islam, à l’inverse des Africains aux Amériques. C’est aussi que le questionnement est souvent premier en histoire (on se pose des questions, puis l’on recherche les sources permettant éventuellement d’y répondre) et que cet esclavage n’a pas beaucoup intéressé les historiens. (…) Il est différent à plusieurs titres. Tout d’abord, cet esclavage ne répond pas à la même logique. Au départ, les barbaresques se livrent à des opérations de course et de piraterie sur les côtes de la Méditerranée, comme c’est l’usage chez certains peuples marins depuis la plus Haute Antiquité. On avait pris l’habitude depuis l’époque byzantine de rédiger des traités prévoyant l’échange réciproque d’esclaves. Puis, les chrétiens se mobilisant pour «racheter» leurs proches tombés en esclavage, l’affaire devint plus rentable pour les razzieurs. C’est paradoxalement cette perspective financière qui accentua les raids musulmans à partir du XVIe siècle. En devenant directement et assez facilement monnayables, les esclaves devinrent des proies plus séduisantes que les navires ou les cargaisons. Les barbaresques se mirent alors à multiplier leurs razzias sur les côtes de la Méditerranée, notamment en Italie du Sud. Dans le cas de la traite transatlantique, l’esclavage répondait à un autre but : fournir une main-d’oeuvre bon marché aux colonies. Les Noirs ne pouvaient être rachetés mais seulement – rarement – se racheter eux-mêmes. Ils firent souche en Amérique, ce qui ne fut jamais le cas des chrétiens. (…) On ne devrait pas en effet parler d’une «traite» des Blancs car les musulmans cherchaient de l’argent plus ou moins rapidement, ils ne se sont pas livrés à un trafic de main-d’oeuvre. Au bout de quelques années, les esclaves chrétiens étaient soit rachetés et ils rentraient chez eux, ou ils disparaissaient. Le taux de mortalité était assez fort. Autour de 15%, selon Davis. Olivier Pétré-Grenouilleau
A la différence de l’islam, le christianisme n’a pas entériné l’esclavage. Mais, comme il ne comportait aucune règle d’organisation sociale, il ne l’a pas non plus interdit. Pourtant, l’idée d’une égalité de tous les hommes en Dieu dont était porteur le christianisme a joué contre l’esclavage, qui disparaît de France avant l’an mil. Cependant, il ressurgit au XVIIe siècle aux Antilles françaises, bien que la législation royale y prescrive l’emploi d’une main-d’oeuvre libre venue de France. L’importation des premiers esclaves noirs, achetés à des Hollandais, se fait illégalement. (…) Le mouvement part d’Angleterre, le pays qui a déporté au XVIIIe siècle le plus de Noirs vers l’Amérique. La force du mouvement abolitionniste anglais repose principalement sur la prédication des pasteurs évangélistes. Il en résulte une interdiction de la traite par l’Angleterre (1806) et les autres puissances occidentales (France, 1817), puis une abolition de l’esclavage lui-même dans les colonies anglaises (1833) et françaises (1848). Décidée par l’Europe, la suppression de la traite atlantique est imposée par elle aux Etats pourvoyeurs d’esclaves de l’Afrique occidentale. (…) Cependant, rien de pareil n’a eu lieu dans le monde musulman. L’esclavage étant prévu par l’islam, il eût été impie de le remettre en cause. Aussi, l’autre grande forme de la traite vers l’Afrique du Nord et le Moyen-Orient continua de plus belle au XIXe siècle, qui correspondit à son apogée. Et, parallèlement, des Européens continuaient d’être razziés en Méditerranée et réduits en esclavage à Alger, Oran, Tunis ou Salé (Rabat). D’où l’expédition de 1830 à Alger. Finalement, ce fut la colonisation qui mit presque entièrement fin à la traite musulmane. Jean-Louis Harouel
How likely is it that the chief White House butler not only witnessed his mother raped and his father murdered by a plantation owner’s racist son but also had an intermittently estranged son of his own who became, first, one of the Fisk University student heroes of the Nashville lunch-counter sit-ins; second, one of the original Freedom Riders; third, so close an aide to King that he was in the Memphis motel room with Ralph Abernathy, Andrew Young, and Jesse Jackson when King was assassinated; fourth, a beret-wearing Black Panther in Oakland; fifth, an unsuccessful candidate for Congress; sixth, a leader of the South Africa divestment movement; and, seventh, a successful candidate for Congress? Hendrik Hertzberg
The Butler is fiction, although its audience may assume otherwise. Those cagey words “inspired by a true story” can be deceptive. The script was triggered by Wil Haygood’s 2008 Washington Post article “A Butler Well Served by This Election.” Published after Obama’s landmark victory, and later spun into a book, it unearthed the story of former White House butler Eugene Allen, who served American presidents for 34 years. But screenwriter Danny Strong (HBO’s Game Change) has created a fictional butler named Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker), whose life mirrors the drama of the civil rights movement with cut-glass symmetry. Straining to serve an overcharged agenda, The Butler is a broadly entertaining, bluntly inspirational history lesson wrapped around a family saga that gives new resonance to the term “domestic drama.” Director Lee Daniels (Precious, The Paperboy) is not known for subtlety, and this movie is no exception. But at the heart of its sprawling narrative, he has corralled some fine performances. Whitaker navigates gracefully between his public and private personae—White House butlers he says, have two faces: their own “and the ones we got to show the white man.” As Cecil stoically weathers the upheavals of history, and his splintered family, we can feel him being gradually crushed under the weight of his own quiet dignity, yet mustering shy increments of resistance over the decades. Between his role as a virtually mute servant/sage in the White House and a beleaguered patriarch trying to hold together his middle-class family, this a character with a lot on his plate. The story’s long march begins with Cecil’s boyhood on a cotton plantation in the South in 1926, where he sees his father shot dead in a field for looking the wrong way at a white man. Cecil is adopted by a thin-lipped matriarch who tells him, “I’m going to teach you how to be a house nigger.” Which sounds strange coming from the mouth of Vanessa Redgrave. The term “house nigger,” and the n-word in general, recurs again and again, shocking us each time, and never letting us forget that there’s no higher house than the White House. A model of shrewd obedience, Cecil learns to make the perfect martini, to be invisible in a room, and to overhear affairs of estate in stony silence—unless asked for his opinion, which he’ll pretend to offer with a wry, Delphic diplomacy that makes the questioner feel validated. The script goes out of its way to ennoble Cecil’s work, plucking a quote from Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. —”the black domestic defies racial stereotyping by being hardworking and trustworthy … though subservient, they are subversive without even knowing it.” The Uncle Tom issue is front and centre, especially in Cecil’s feud with his radicalized son Louis (David Oyelowo), who rejects his father as a race traitor. The conflict comes to a head amid a family debate about the merits of Sidney Poitier, a legendary actor brashly dismissed by Louis as “a white man’s fantasy of what he wants us to be.” The fondly nostalgic references to In the Heat of the Night and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner may fly over the heads of younger viewers. But it’s a lovely scene, mixing rancour and wit and a deft touch. Although this is a movie on a mission, it does have a sense of humour. When Cecil’s eldest son, shows up to dinner in his Black Panther beret and black leather, with a girlfriend sporting a vast Angela Davis Afro, it’s pure caricature as Daniels presents a whole other take on Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, played as both drama and farce. Brian D. Johnson
The best aspect about America is its egalitarianism. The country respects and rewards the talented and the sincere. And despite serious racial issues, we saw America electing a black President, creating history. And as Hollywood runs up to the Academy Awards on March 2, one of the questions is, will Steve McQueen be the first black director to win the Oscar. Interestingly, his 12 Years A Slave is all about the struggle of one black man to escape humiliating captivity he faces in the white man’s den. At the moment, McQueen – though with an emotionally engaging film behind him – is not the favourite to walk away with the best director statuette. But if he does, he would be the first black helmer to actually clinch this Oscar, although there have been two other black directors who were nominated in the past. One of them was John Singleton for the 1992 Boyz n the Hood, and the other was Lee Daniels in 2009 for Precious. McQueen’s win could be as historic as Kathryn Bigelow’s 2009 triumph with The Hurt Locker. She was the first woman director to have won the best director Oscar. In a way, McQueen’s nomination comes in a year when black moviemakers have done exceedingly well. Fruitvale Station – about a real incident where a black teenager was killed by the police in Oakland — got the big prize at the Sundance Film Festival. And works like 42 (the black baseball player, Jackie Robinson biopic) and The Butler (probing the African American role in U.S. history) have been, along with 12 Years A Slave, lauded by critics. On top of this, Hollywood and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have been talking about lack of diversity in the race for the Oscars. The Hindustan Times
Cheryl Boone Isaacs … est la première Afro-américaine à prendre la direction de la prestigieuse Académie des Arts et des Sciences du Cinéma à Hollywood, et la troisième femme choisie pour le job. Cheryl Boone Isaacs vient d’être élue au poste suprême du comité des Oscars. Gala
12 Years a Slave a définitivement enterré Le Majordome L’une des surprises des Oscars 2014, c’est l’absence du Majordome qui n’a donc aucune nomination. Eliminé des Golden Globes, on pouvait encore imaginer que le film de Lee Daniels soit présent dans la course aux Oscars. Raté. Le Majordome est peut-être sorti trop tôt (en août aux USA) et surtout, il s’est fait enterrer par le drame de Steve McQueen. Sur un sujet proche (l’esclavage et le combat pour les droits civiques), la fresque de Lee Daniels semble bien sage face au déchaînement de violence, de conscience et de surcinéma du film de McQueen. Avec son sujet édifiant, ses performances intenses et sa mise en scène puissante, 12 Years a Slave a le profil type du « film à Oscars ». Mais on sait que certains votants risquent d’être rebutés par sa violence. Finalement, Lee Daniels aurait été un bon compromis avec ses prestations moins agressives et ses stars plus facilement oscarisables (Oprah Winfrey, ignoré pour son retour au ciné après Beloved et quinze ans d’absence, et surtout Forest Whitaker). Première
Avec ce grand spectacle typiquement hollywoodien (les oscars vont pleuvoir !), le cinéaste réussit l’osmose délicate entre le film commercial et le cinéma d’auteur. Depuis Hunger, par exemple, on sait qu’à l’instar de Theo Angelopoulos ou Andreï Tarkovski il adore les plans fixes démesurément étirés, mais calculés à la seconde près, qui créent une réalité parallèle, plus vraie que la vraie. On en a plusieurs ici, dont celui, totalement incongru dans un film américain, où le héros, lynché, est suspendu à une corde, ses pieds touchant le sol par intermittence. Il attend. Il entend des enfants jouer et rire au loin. La durée même de cette séquence magnifique fait naître la peur. On dirait un suspense à la Hitchcock… Question sadisme, Steve McQueen est un orfèvre : dans Hunger, on le sentait radieux de détailler, une à une, les plaies sur le corps meurtri de Michael Fassbender. Il ne semble pas mécontent, ici, de filmer un à un les coups de fouet reçus par la bien-aimée du frustré. Mais curieusement, ce pointillisme lui permet, à chaque film, de fuir le réalisme. Son art repose sur l’artifice. Sous sa caméra, le destin de Solomon Northup n’est plus un fait divers, mais une abstraction lyrique. Presque un opéra. Télérama
Je peux dire que j’aimé ce film. Bien sur il est très didactique et manichéen ( les gentils blancs du nord, le héros Brad Pitt quand même très gonflé de se donner le rôle du sauveur en tant que producteur du film!!!!) mais c est un film qui reste très fort , tres beau et plein d humanités , avec une belle réalisation , de bons acteurs, une lenteur assumée et salutaire . L intérêt de ce film pour moi est surtout que j y ai emmené ma fille de 14 ans et qu elle a beaucoup aimé. Ce genre de film est un bon rappel de ce dont est capable l humanité lorsqu il n y a pas d égalité entre les gens, lorsque les lois permettent à certains de se croire supérieur , nul est à l abris de devenir un bourreau lorsque l on le laisse faire !!! Cela paraît évident mais dans un contexte mondial de montée des intolérances , du racisme, dans un pays Côme la France où certains trouvent comique de comparer une ministre à une guenon , je pense malheureusement que ce film à encore un rôle à jouer!!! Un film scolaire disent certains, c est vrai! A faire voire au scolaire!! Oui Paulineeliane | 21/02/2014 à 11h51
Difficile de trouver plus contradictoire que Django Unchained de Quentin Tarantino et 12 Years A Slave de Steve McQueen : les deux films – dans lesquels figurent d’ailleurs Brad Pitt et Michael Fassbender – revisitent la même histoire sombre (l’esclavagisme) avec une approche si différente qu’ils se révèlent complémentaires. Autrement dit, ici, chez Steve McQueen, on n’est pas venu pour rire. Chose que l’on savait déjà pour avoir vu ses précédents films, Hunger et Shame qui avaient autant à voir avec des spectacles de Florence Foresti que Véronique Sanson avec un groupe de métal allemand. (…) Comme dans Hunger et Shame, qui parlaient d’oppression et de claustration – l’univers carcéral pour le premier, l’addition sexuelle pour le second -, la mise en scène de Steve McQueen se révèle aussi virtuose que discutable comme lors de ce plan-séquence qui semble durer une vie et qui nous rapproche de la mort. On y voit Solomon pendu à une corde, sur la pointe des pieds, pataugeant dans la boue pour éviter l’asphyxie. McQueen obtient sur la durée un vrai malaise. Tout circule, tout y est montré, dénoncé : le voyeurisme, la passivité, l’indifférence, l’exploitation, l’obscénité, la cruauté ordinaire etc. On est bien loin de la fresque académique, policée. Et, en même temps, il y a un tour de force ostentatoire, une volonté de s’afficher en grand cinéaste rétif aux normes et aux conventions, au-dessus de ce qu’il doit filmer. Steve McQueen avoue dans le dossier de presse : « Je ne voulais pas minimiser ce qui lui est arrivé. Il ne s’agit pas de choquer les gens – cela ne m’intéresse pas -, mais il s’agit de faire preuve de responsabilité face à cette histoire. » TF1
Fidèle à ses motifs favoris, le dolorisme et l’incarcération, physique ou mentale (l’agonie de l’activiste irlandais Bobby Sands dans Hunger, l’aliénation au sexe dans Shame), McQueen concentre son propos sur la réalité crue des sévices dont étaient quotidiennement victimes des millions d’individus. Passages à tabac, viols, tortures, assassinats ou travail forcé entraînant la mort, séparation des familles, humiliation permanente sans oublier le maintien systématique dans l’analphabétisme. Le cinéaste joue sur toute la gamme de la révulsion, alternant chocs brutaux (long plan séquence d’une flagellation) et insoutenable immobilisme (scène de pendaison où, tandis que l’homme agonise en se hissant sur les orteils, une normalité écœurante bourdonne autour de lui). Toutefois, McQueen a pris le parti de faire de cette addition d’horreurs l’exclusif argument de son réquisitoire. Cette virulence rageuse finit par occulter involontairement une dimension essentielle. L’ignominie de l’esclavage est tout entière contenue dans son caractère institutionnel, dans le fait qu’il répondait à des besoins économiques précis. Le droit des planteurs à disposer des individus à leur guise, pour se remplir les poches ou pour assouvir leurs pires pulsions, en est la conséquence. Or, représenter les esclavagistes comme des sadiques compulsifs (Michael Fassbender en roue libre) revient à faire le procès de l’anomalie, d’une folie sanguinaire dont cette institution a toléré l’existence. Comme si la dénonciation de la mécanique d’un système abominable ne suffisait pas, et que pour susciter l’émotion – une vertu américaine -, il fallait renoncer à pointer du doigt la source du mal pour n’en montrer que les effets pervers. Libération
12 Years a Slave uses sadistic art to patronize history Brutality, violence and misery get confused with history in 12 Years a Slave, British director Steve McQueen’s adaptation of the 1853 American slave narrative by Solomon Northup, who claims that in 1841, away from his home in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., he was kidnapped and taken South where he was sold into hellish servitude and dehumanizing cruelty. 12-years-a-slave-filmFor McQueen, cruelty is the juicy-arty part; it continues the filmmaker’s interest in sado-masochistic display, highlighted in his previous features Hunger and Shame. Brutality is McQueen’s forte. As with his fine-arts background, McQueen’s films resemble museum installations: the stories are always abstracted into a series of shocking, unsettling events. With Northup (played by Chiwetel Ejiofor), McQueen chronicles the conscious sufferance of unrelenting physical and psychological pain. A methodically measured narrative slowly advances through Northup’s years of captivity, showcasing various injustices that drive home the terrors Black Africans experienced in the U.S. during what’s been called “the peculiar institution.” Depicting slavery as a horror show, McQueen has made the most unpleasant American movie since William Friedkin’s1973 The Exorcist. That’s right, 12 Years a Slave belongs to the torture porn genre with Hostel, The Human Centipede and the Saw franchise but it is being sold (and mistaken) as part of the recent spate of movies that pretend “a conversation about race.” (…) For commercial distributor Fox Searchlight, 12 Years a Slave appears at an opportune moment when film culture–five years into the Obama administration–indulges stories about Black victimization such as Precious, The Help, The Butler, Fruitvale Station and Blue Caprice. (What promoter Harvey Weinstein has called “The Obama Effect.”) This is not part of social or historical enlightenment–the too-knowing race-hustlers behind 12 Years a Slave, screenwriter John Ridley and historical advisor Henry Louis Gates, are not above profiting from the misfortunes of African-American history as part of their own career advancement. But McQueen is a different, apolitical, art-minded animal. The sociological aspects of 12 Years a Slave have as little significance for him as the political issues behind IRA prisoner Bobby Sands’ hunger strike amidst prison brutality visualized in Hunger, or the pervy tour of urban “sexual addiction” in Shame. McQueen takes on the slave system’s depravity as proof of human depravity. (…) It proves the ahistorical ignorance of this era that 12 Years a Slave’s constant misery is excused as an acceptable version of the slave experience. McQueen, Ridley and Gates’ cast of existential victims won’t do. Northup-renamed-Platt and especially the weeping mother Liza (Adepero Oduye) and multiply-abused Patsey (Lupita Nyong‘o), are human whipping posts–beaten, humiliated, raped for our delectation just like Hirst’s cut-up equine. (…) These tortures might satisfy the resentment some Black people feel about slave stories (“It makes me angry”), further aggravating their sense of helplessness, grievance–and martyrdom. It’s the flipside of the aberrant warmth some Blacks claim in response to the superficial uplift of The Help and The Butler. And the perversion continues among those whites and non-Blacks who need a shock fest like 12 Years a Slave to rouse them from complacency with American racism and American history. But, as with The Exorcist, there is no victory in filmmaking this merciless. The fact that McQueen’s harshness was trending among Festivalgoers (in Toronto, Telluride and New York) suggests that denial still obscures the history of slavery: Northup’s travail merely makes it possible for some viewers to feel good about feeling bad (as wags complained about Spielberg’s Schindler’s List as an “official” Holocaust movie–which very few people wanted to see twice). McQueen’s fraudulence further accustoms moviegoers to violence and brutality.The very artsiness of 12 Years a Slave is part of its offense. The clear, classical imagery embarrasses Quentin Tarantino’s attempt at visual poetry in Django Unchained yet this “clarity” (like Hans Zimmer’s effective percussion score) is ultimately depressing. McQueen uses that art staple “duration” to prolong North’s lynching on tiptoe and later, in endless, tearful anticipation; emphasis on a hot furnace and roiling waves adds nature’s discomfort; an ugly close-up of a cotton worm symbolizes drudgery; a slave chant (“Run, Nigger, Run,”) contrasts ineffectual Bible-reading; and a shot of North’s handwritten plea burns to embers. But good art doesn’t work this way. Art elates and edifies–one might even prefer Q.T.’s jokey ridiculousness in Django Unchained, a different kind of sadism. (…) Steve McQueen’s post-racial art games and taste for cruelty play into cultural chaos. The story in 12 Years a Slave didn’t need to be filmed this way and I wish I never saw it. Armand White
As is the case with “Django Unchained”, McQueen’s film is a vehicle for his preoccupations. With Tarantino, these primarily revolve around revenge, a theme common to so many of the Hong Kong gangster or samurai movies that he has absorbed. For McQueen, the chief interest is in depicting pain with some of the most dramatic scenes involving whippings and other forms of punishment. I was expecting the worst after seeing McQueen’s “Hunger”, a film about the Provo IRA hunger strike led by Bobby Sands that was more about bedsores and beatings than politics. Thankfully, the latest film is a lot more restrained than I had expected but still mostly focused on the physical torments of being a slave. I found myself wondering if the casting of Sarah Paulson as the sadistic wife of a sadistic plantation owner was deliberate since she is part of the company of actors featured on “American Horror Story”, the AMC cable TV show that pushes the envelope in terms of graphic scenes of torture, dismemberment, etc. This season Paulson is playing a witch, as part of a series on Black witches taking revenge on their white witch enemies who had tormented them during slavery. I half expected Paulson’s character to stick a pin in a Solomon Northup voodoo doll. While one cannot gainsay the importance of Solomon Northup’s memoir that was used by the abolitionist movement in the same way that “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was, I have to wonder whether McQueen’s film was hampered by a story that was essentially one-dimensional. If you take the opportunity to read “12 Years a Slave” , you will be struck by the underdeveloped relationships between Northup and other characters. Both Parks and McQueen take liberties with the memoir to flesh out the film with such relationships but there is still something missing. In the memoir and in the films, there is never any sense of the emotional pain of being separated from your family—something that cuts far deeper than a whip. Louis Proyect
When the abolitionists invited an ex-slave to tell his story of experience in slavery to an antislavery convention, and when they subsequently sponsored the appearance of that story in print, they had certain clear expectations, well understood by themselves and well understood by the ex-slave, too. (…) We may think it pretty fine writing and awfully literary, but the fine writer is clearly David Wilson rather than Solomon Northup. (…) The dedication, like the pervasive style, calls into serious question the status of ‘Twelve Years a Slave’ as autobiography and/or literature. James Olney
The prominent New York politician and abolitionist, Henry Northup, sensed an opportunity. Henry had helped Solomon escape from Louisiana, and as a descendant of the family that originally owned Solomon’s ancestors, perhaps felt personally responsible for him as well. But Henry was also a politician with an agenda. He wanted to promote the abolitionist cause and gain media attention for a lawsuit he hoped to file against Solomon’s kidnappers. Put simply, the book was written “with a purpose,” as the historian Ira Berlin puts it in his introduction to the new Penguin edition. (The media strategy worked, though only partially: The kidnappers were soon arrested but acquitted four years later after the media had moved on.) Perhaps more cynically, some people wanted to cash in on Northup’s story. Henry asked a lawyer and fledging poet, David Wilson, if he’d be willing to interview Solomon and turn his story into a book. Though a respected legal figure, the 32-year-old Wilson had little success as a writer and jumped at the chance. Thus, “12 Years a Slave” wasn’t even written by Solomon Northup but by a white amanuensis. Eric Herschthal
There were four million slaves in the U.S. in 1860 and several hundred thousand slave owners. It wasn’t just a homogeneous system. It had every kind of human variation you can imagine. There were black plantation owners in Louisiana, black slave owners. (…) Remember, this book is one of the most remarkable first-person accounts of slavery. But it’s also a piece of propaganda. It’s written to persuade people that slavery needs to be abolished. He doesn’t say anything about sexual relations he may have had as a slave. There’s no place for such a discussion because of the purpose of the book. (…) Harriet Jacobs was condemned by many people for revealing this, even antislavery people. (…) Obviously, it wasn’t a best seller. Maybe it will be now. But it’s widely known. It’s used all over the place in history courses. Along with Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, this is probably the most widely read of what we call the slave narratives. (…) The daddy, I suppose, of all this was “Glory,” which came out in the late ‘80s. “Roots,” of course, comes before that. All of them suffer from what I see as the problem of Hollywood history. Even in this movie, there’s a tendency toward: You’ve got to have one hero or one figure. That’s why historians tend to be a little skeptical about Hollywood history, because you lose the sense of group or mass. (…) I think this movie is much more real, to choose a word like that, than most of the history you see in the cinema. It gets you into the real world of slavery. That’s not easy to do. Also, there are little touches that are very revealing, like a flashback where a slave walks into a shop in Saratoga. Yes, absolutely, Southerners brought slaves into New York State. People went on vacation, and they brought a slave. Foner
La Seconde Guerre mondiale a duré cinq ans, mais il y a des centaines et des centaines de films sur cette guerre et sur l’Holocauste. L’esclavage a duré quatre siècles, mais moins de 20 films y sont consacrés. Steve McQueen
I am British. My parents are from Grenada. My mother was born in Trinidad. Grenada is where Malcolm X’s mother comes from. Stokely Carmichael is Trinidadian. We could go on and on. It’s about that diaspora. (…) I made this film because I wanted to visualize a time in history that hadn’t been visualized that way. I wanted to see the lash on someone’s back. I wanted to see the aftermath of that, psychological and physical. I feel sometimes people take slavery very lightly, to be honest. I hope it could be a starting point for them to delve into the history and somehow reflect on the position where they are now. (…) I think people are ready. With Trayvon Martin, voting rights, the 150th anniversary of the abolition of slavery, 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and a black president, I think there’s a sort of perfect storm of events. I think people actually want to reflect on that horrendous recent past in order to go forward. Steve McQueen
When I was in Savannah, Ga., they were telling me how they used to have special chains for the Igbos [a Nigerian ethnic group]. I told the man, “I’m Igbo.” Not having any sense of the internationalism of this event is a bad thing. I loved the fact that there were people from different places coming together to tell this story. Chiwetel Ejiofor
We’re talking about the reduction of truth to accuracy. What matters ultimately in a work of narrative is if the world and characters created feels true and complete enough for the work’s purposes. Isaac Butler
This is a minor point, but I felt the film possibly over-emphasised Solomon Northup’s social standing in New York state prior to his enslavement. In the film, Northup appears as a wealthy, successful individual, making a good living as a carpenter and musician. He wears smart clothes and appears to live in a tolerant, racially integrated community where skin colour does not matter. But in reality, Northern black people were everyday victims of white racism and discrimination, and in the free states of the North, black people were typically the ‘last hired and first fired’. Notably, in his autobiography Northup himself describes the everyday “obstacle of color” in his life prior to his kidnapping and subsequent enslavement. Nevertheless, I can understand why the filmmakers wanted to present a strong juxtaposition between Northup’s life as a free man in the North and the physical and mental trauma he endured while enslaved in the South. Emma McFarnon
At the beginning of 12 Years a Slave, the kidnapped freeman Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), has a painful sexual encounter with an unnamed female slave in which she uses his hand to bring herself to orgasm before turning away in tears. The woman’s desperation, Solomon’s reserve, and the fierce sadness of both, is depicted with an unflinching still camera which documents a moment of human contact and bitter comfort in the face of slavery’s systematic dehumanization. (…) And yet, for all its verisimilitude, the encounter never happened. It appears nowhere in Northup’s autobiography, and it’s likely he would be horrified at the suggestion that he was anything less than absolutely faithful to his wife. Director Steve McQueen has said that he included the sexual encounter to show « a bit of tenderness … Then after she’s climaxes, she’s back … in hell. » The sequence is an effort to present nuance and psychological depth — to make the film’s depiction of slavery seem more real. But it creates that psychological truth by interpolating an incident that isn’t factually true. This embellishment is by no means an isolated case in the film. For instance, in the film version, shortly after Northup is kidnapped, he is on a ship bound south. A sailor enters the hold and is about to rape one of the slave women when a male slave intervenes. The sailor unhesitatingly stabs and kills him. This seems unlikely on its face—slaves are valuable, and the sailor is not the owner. And, sure enough, the scene is not in the book. A slave did die on the trip south, but from smallpox, rather than from stabbing. Northup himself contracted the disease, permanently scarring his face. It seems likely, therefore, that in this instance the original text was abandoned so that Ejiofor’s beautiful, expressive, haunting features would not go through the entire movie covered with artificial Hollywood scar make-up. Instead of faithfulness to the text, the film chooses faithfulness to Ejiofor’s face, unaltered by trickery. Other changes seem less intentional. Perhaps the most striking scene in the film involves Patsey, a slave who is repeatedly raped by her master, Epps, and who as a consequence is jealously and obsessively brutalized by Mistress Epps. In the movie version, Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o) comes to Northup in the middle of the night and begs him, in vivid horrific detail, to drown her in the swamp and release her from her troubles. (…) in the book, it is Mistress Epps who wants to bribe Northup to drown Patsey. Patsey wants to escape, but not to drown herself. The film seems to have misread the line, attributing the mistress’s desires to Patsey. (…) In short, it seems quite likely that the single most powerful moment in the film was based on a misunderstood antecedent. (…) Often published by abolitionist presses or in explicit support of the abolitionist cause, slave narratives represented themselves as accurate, first-person accounts of life under slavery. Yet, as University of North Carolina professor William Andrews has discussed in To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, the representation of accuracy, and, for that matter, of first-person account, required a good deal of artifice. To single out just the most obvious point, Andrews notes that many slave narratives were told to editors, who wrote down the oral account and prepared them for publication. Andrews concludes that « It would be naïve to accord dictated oral narratives the same discursive status as autobiographies composed and written by the subjects of the stories themselves. »  12 Years a Slave is just such an oral account. Though Northup was literate, his autobiography was written by David Wilson, a white lawyer and state legislator from Glens Falls, New York. While the incidents in Northup’s life have been corroborated by legal documents and much research, Andrews points out that the impact of the autobiography—its sense of truth—is actually based in no small part on the fact that it is not told by Northup, but by Wilson, who had already written two books of local history. Because he was experienced, Andrews says, Wilson’s « fictionalizing … does not call attention to itself so much » as other slave narratives, which tend to be steeped in a sentimental tradition « that often discomfits and annoys 20th-century critics. » Northup’s autobiography feels less like fiction, in other words, because its writer is so experienced with fiction. Similarly, McQueen’s film feels true because it is so good at manipulating our sense of accuracy. The first sex scene, for example, speaks to our post-Freud, post-sexual-revolution belief that, isolated for 12 years far from home, Northup would be bound to have some sort of sexual encounters, even if (especially if?) he does not discuss them in his autobiography. The difference between book and movie, then, isn’t that one is true and the other false, but rather that the tropes and tactics they use to create a feeling of truth are different. The autobiography, for instance, actually includes many legal documents as appendices. It also features lengthy descriptions of the methods of cotton farming. No doubt this dispassionate, minute accounting of detail was meant to show Northup’s knowledge of the regions where he stayed, and so validate the truth of his account. To modern readers, though, the touristy attention to local customs can make Northup sound more like a traveling reporter than like a man who is himself in bondage. Some anthropological asides are even more jarring; in one case, Northup refers to a slave rebel named Lew Cheney as « a shrewd, cunning negro, more intelligent than the generality of his race. » That description would sound condescending and prejudiced if a white man wrote it. Which, of course, a white man named David Wilson did. A story about slavery, a real, horrible crime, inevitably involves an appeal to reality—the story has to seem accurate if it is to be accepted as true. But that seeming accuracy requires artifice and fiction—a cool distance in one case, an acknowledgement of sexuality in another. And then, even with the best will in the world, there are bound to be mistakes and discrepancies, as with Mistress Epps’s plea for murder transforming into Patsey’s wish for death. Given the difficulties and contradictions, one might conclude that it would be better to openly acknowledge fiction. From this perspective, Django Unchained, which deliberately treats slavery as genre, or Octavia Butler’s Kindred, which acknowledges the role of the present in shaping the past through a fantasy time-travel narrative, are, more true than 12 Years a Slave or Glory precisely because they do not make a claim to historical accuracy. But refusing to try to recapture the experience and instead deciding to, say, treat slavery as a genre Western, can be presumptuous in its own way as well. The writers of the original slave narratives knew that to end injustice, you must first acknowledge that injustice exists. Accurate stories about slavery—or, more precisely, stories that carried the conviction of accuracy, were vital to the abolitionist cause. And, for that matter, they’re still vital. Outright lies about slavery and its aftermath, from Birth of a Nation to Gone With the Wind, have defaced American cinema for a long time. To go forward more honestly, we need accounts of our past that, like the slave narratives themselves, use accuracy and art in the interest of being more true. That’s what McQueen, Ejiofor, and the rest of the cast and crew are trying to do in 12 Years a Slave. Pointing out the complexity of the task is not meant to belittle their attempt, but to honor it. Noah Berlatsky

Oncle Tom ou les infortunes de la vertu ?

Réalisateur plasticien d’avant garde britannique récemment venu au cinéma avec deux films célébrant le martyre des prisonniers de l’IRA en grève de la faim (« Hunger« ) et les joies tristes de l’addiction à la pornographie (« Shame« ), radicalité et sauvagerie digne des meilleures installations ou vidéos d’avant-garde (masturbation à deux, flagellations esquisement dolorisantes à la Mel Gibson, viol en plan jouissivement subjectif, pendaison lente à souhait),  film tournant rapidement entre morceaux de bravoure et interminables plans séquences  au concours de sévices, adaptation du même titre d’une célèbre histoire d’esclave en fuite (Douze ans d’esclavage, brûlot abolitionniste écrit en fait par un avocat blanc (un certain David Wilson) un an après et avec le même succès que La Case de l’Oncle Tom), infortuné héros passant d’une improbable bourgeoisie à un monde de dégénérés où l’on massacre au moindre caprice des hommes et des femmes qu’il avait alors coûté une petite fortune de faire venir d’Afrique, étiquette de rigueur « inspirée d’une histoire vraie », dérision systématique du christianisme sans lequel il n’y aurait pas eu d’abolition, omerta systématique des fournisseurs africains et arabes de la traite sans parler des razzias en Europe, réalisateur et acteurs d’origine africaine ou habitués des films d’horreur ou de perversion, brève et ultime caution de l’acteur-producteur Brad Pitt en sauveur venu de nulle part, nouvelle présidente noire des oscars …

Alors qu’avec la pluie de récompenses qui, à une semaine d’oscars pour la première fois dirigés par une personne de couleur, continue à pleuvoir sur le chef d’oeuvre absolu sur l’esclavage que nous ont annoncé les critiques, la pression monte sur Hollywood pour consacrer le premier réalisateur noir de l’histoire …

Et qu’un an après après les deux oscars du western spaghetti de l’esclavage de Tarantino (et deux des mêmes acteurs: Pitt et Fassbender), le pauvre « Majordome » n’a toujours pas récolté la moindre nomination

Comment ne pas voir avec l’auteur même de ce véritable concours de sévices de deux heures qu’il va désormais falloir infliger aux enfants de nos écoles …

L’ultime effet de la présidence d’un homme qui, dès avant même sa prise de fonction, avait non seulement déjà donné au monde le prix Nobel de la paix le plus rapide de l’histoire …

Mais réussi à reprendre et amplifier, des  liquidations ciblées à la mise sur écoutes de la planète entière, à peu près l’ensemble des mesures politiques de son prédécesseur honni ?

« 12 Years a Slave » : l’esclave se rebiffe

McQueen résume l’esclavage américain à un concours de sévices.

Bruno Icher

Libération

21 janvier 2014

En un peu plus d’un an, le cinéma américain aura donc produit trois films de grande envergure consacrés à ce pan d’histoire toujours incandescent qu’est la monstruosité de l’esclavage : Django Unchained de Quentin Tarantino, Lincoln de Steven Spielberg et, enfin, 12 Years a Slave de Steve McQueen. Un curieux triptyque, hétérogène et discordant, mais dont la proximité tient davantage du symptôme que de la coïncidence, comme pour souligner que la question est loin d’être réglée dans le pays dont Barack Obama est le président depuis cinq ans.

Cible. Cette lacune mémorielle relève, du moins dans la représentation populaire qui en a été faite, de l’évidence. Depuis près d’un siècle, en gros depuis le révisionniste Naissance d’une nation de David Wark Griffith, et même en comptant le très aimable Autant en emporte le vent et l’Esclave libre de Raoul Walsh, le cinéma s’obstine à regarder ailleurs, vouant à l’oubli, voire au déni, cette honte nationale, contrairement au génocide indien, l’autre péché originel de l’Amérique.

La liste est longue des événements et des personnalités dont l’industrie s’est toujours pudiquement détournée, depuis les grandes révoltes d’esclaves en Virginie ou en Louisiane (Nat Turner, Charles Deslondes, Denmark Vesey…) jusqu’aux pionniers de l’abolitionnisme dont Frederick Douglass, premier homme politique noir américain. Steve McQueen a d’ailleurs parfaitement résumé le contexte dans une interview au Guardian : «Hollywood a fait plus de films sur les esclaves romains que sur les esclaves américains.»

C’est donc probablement avec le désir de pulvériser un des derniers tabous du cinéma que le réalisateur britannique s’est lancé dans le projet, mettant tant de force dans ses coups qu’il a pris le risque de manquer sa cible. Il a adapté le livre de Solomon Northup, charpentier et musicien noir de l’Etat de New York, kidnappé et vendu en 1841 par deux escrocs. Miraculeusement sauvé en 1853, l’homme a passé le reste de son existence à raconter le calvaire de ces douze années de captivité dans des plantations de Louisiane où il fut la victime et le témoin de l’atroce condition des esclaves.

Fidèle à ses motifs favoris, le dolorisme et l’incarcération, physique ou mentale (l’agonie de l’activiste irlandais Bobby Sands dans Hunger, l’aliénation au sexe dans Shame), McQueen concentre son propos sur la réalité crue des sévices dont étaient quotidiennement victimes des millions d’individus. Passages à tabac, viols, tortures, assassinats ou travail forcé entraînant la mort, séparation des familles, humiliation permanente sans oublier le maintien systématique dans l’analphabétisme. Le cinéaste joue sur toute la gamme de la révulsion, alternant chocs brutaux (long plan séquence d’une flagellation) et insoutenable immobilisme (scène de pendaison où, tandis que l’homme agonise en se hissant sur les orteils, une normalité écœurante bourdonne autour de lui).

Sadiques.

Toutefois, McQueen a pris le parti de faire de cette addition d’horreurs l’exclusif argument de son réquisitoire. Cette virulence rageuse finit par occulter involontairement une dimension essentielle. L’ignominie de l’esclavage est tout entière contenue dans son caractère institutionnel, dans le fait qu’il répondait à des besoins économiques précis. Le droit des planteurs à disposer des individus à leur guise, pour se remplir les poches ou pour assouvir leurs pires pulsions, en est la conséquence.

Or, représenter les esclavagistes comme des sadiques compulsifs (Michael Fassbender en roue libre) revient à faire le procès de l’anomalie, d’une folie sanguinaire dont cette institution a toléré l’existence. Comme si la dénonciation de la mécanique d’un système abominable ne suffisait pas, et que pour susciter l’émotion – une vertu américaine -, il fallait renoncer à pointer du doigt la source du mal pour n’en montrer que les effets pervers.

Voir aussi:

12 Years a Slave

TF1

05 décembre 2013

22/01/2014

Les États-Unis, quelques années avant la guerre de Sécession. Solomon Northup, jeune homme noir originaire de l’État de New York, est enlevé et vendu comme esclave. Face à la cruauté d’un propriétaire de plantation de coton, Solomon se bat pour rester en vie et garder sa dignité. Douze ans plus tard, il va croiser un abolitionniste canadien et cette rencontre va changer sa vie…

La critique : Puissant mais forcément douteux.

Difficile de trouver plus contradictoire que Django Unchained de Quentin Tarantino et 12 Years A Slave de Steve McQueen : les deux films – dans lesquels figurent d’ailleurs Brad Pitt et Michael Fassbender – revisitent la même histoire sombre (l’esclavagisme) avec une approche si différente qu’ils se révèlent complémentaires. Autrement dit, ici, chez Steve McQueen, on n’est pas venu pour rire. Chose que l’on savait déjà pour avoir vu ses précédents films, Hunger et Shame qui avaient autant à voir avec des spectacles de Florence Foresti que Véronique Sanson avec un groupe de métal allemand.

En effet, le parcours de Solomon Northup, soutenu par l’interprétation émotionnelle de Chiwetel Ejiofor, mari et père de famille riche, vivant dans un état de New York, drogué, kidnappé puis réduit à travailler comme esclave dans des champs de coton en Louisiane, met sens dessus dessous. Comme dans Hunger et Shame, qui parlaient d’oppression et de claustration – l’univers carcéral pour le premier, l’addition sexuelle pour le second -, la mise en scène de Steve McQueen se révèle aussi virtuose que discutable comme lors de ce plan-séquence qui semble durer une vie et qui nous rapproche de la mort. On y voit Solomon pendu à une corde, sur la pointe des pieds, pataugeant dans la boue pour éviter l’asphyxie. McQueen obtient sur la durée un vrai malaise. Tout circule, tout y est montré, dénoncé : le voyeurisme, la passivité, l’indifférence, l’exploitation, l’obscénité, la cruauté ordinaire etc. On est bien loin de la fresque académique, policée. Et, en même temps, il y a un tour de force ostentatoire, une volonté de s’afficher en grand cinéaste rétif aux normes et aux conventions, au-dessus de ce qu’il doit filmer. Steve McQueen avoue dans le dossier de presse : « Je ne voulais pas minimiser ce qui lui est arrivé. Il ne s’agit pas de choquer les gens – cela ne m’intéresse pas -, mais il s’agit de faire preuve de responsabilité face à cette histoire. »

McQueen ne cherche pas l’apitoiement, le pleurnichage. Il préfère intimider. C’est exactement ce que Abdellatif Kechiche recherchait avec Vénus Noire, le film qu’il avait réalisé avant La vie d’Adèle et qui, moins linéaire, plus complexe, affichait une radicalité et une sauvagerie encore plus inouïes. Kechiche proposait une expérience infiniment plus forte, plus métaphysique, que celle, plus physique, de McQueen. Comme la Vénus Hottentote de Kechiche, Solomon plante ses yeux dans les nôtres. Le passé regarde le présent, en lambeaux.

Romain LE VERN

12 Years a Slave

Bien des livres et des films, depuis longtemps, ont raconté l’esclavage en Amérique. On sait moins, cependant, ou pas assez, qu’avant même la guerre de Sécession, à la frontière invisible entre Etats abolitionnistes et esclavagistes (fifty-fifty, semble-t-il), des hommes de main, sortes de marchands de sommeil de l’époque, kidnappaient des Blacks, libres citoyens américains, et les vendaient à des propriétaires terriens sans scrupule. Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) a réellement existé (1) . Son sort est d’autant plus tragique qu’il se croit, non sans inconscience, à l’abri de l’horreur. Il vit dans l’Etat de New York, s’habille comme les bourgeois blancs qu’il fréquente et savoure, avec femme et enfants, sa renommée naissante de musicien. D’où sa stupéfaction de se retrouver, soudain, victime d’un piège ourdi en Louisiane par deux tristes sires et plongé dans un cauchemar qu’il pensait réservé aux autres. Un corps, il n’est plus que ce corps anonyme sans la moindre parcelle d’âme, balancé d’une plantation l’autre, selon les revers de fortune de ses divers propriétaires. Son calvaire va durer douze ans, de 1841 à 1853…

C’est ce temps immobile que filme le cinéaste, cette lente chute du héros à travers plusieurs cercles de l’enfer. Il observe, surtout, les ravages du mal sur des esprits dits civilisés. L’inconscience des bourreaux le trouble et leurs failles le fascinent. Le film faiblit, d’ailleurs, lorsqu’il s’attarde sur des silhouettes à la psychologie simplette : saint Brad Pitt, archange miraculeux qui libère le héros, ou Paul Dano, jeune démon sans nuances, qui l’enfonce. C’est à son comédien favori, Michael Fassbender, que le cinéaste réserve le rôle le plus soigné, le plus ambigu, le plus maléfique. Après en avoir fait un nouveau Messie (dans Hunger) et un pharisien moderne ( dans Shame), il le métamorphose en nid à complexes, en paratonnerre de frustrations : un patient du Dr Freud avant la lettre. Un être apeuré de ne pas se montrer à la hauteur d’une classe sociale qu’il méprise. Et totalement dominé par des pulsions sexuelles qui le poussent à se punir en châtiant l’objet de ses désirs — une jeune esclave noire qu’il adore et détruit. Il est clair, pour Steve McQueen, que c’est la frustration qui engendre le mal : l’aveuglement sur soi et la haine de l’autre sont indissolublement liés, comme le couteau et la plaie.

Avec ce grand spectacle typiquement hollywoodien (les oscars vont pleuvoir !), le cinéaste réussit l’osmose délicate entre le film commercial et le cinéma d’auteur. Depuis Hunger, par exemple, on sait qu’à l’instar de Theo Angelopoulos ou Andreï Tarkovski il adore les plans fixes démesurément étirés, mais calculés à la seconde près, qui créent une réalité parallèle, plus vraie que la vraie. On en a plusieurs ici, dont celui, totalement incongru dans un film américain, où le héros, lynché, est suspendu à une corde, ses pieds touchant le sol par intermittence. Il attend. Il entend des enfants jouer et rire au loin. La durée même de cette séquence magnifique fait naître la peur. On dirait un suspense à la Hitchcock…

Question sadisme, Steve McQueen est un orfèvre : dans Hunger, on le sentait radieux de détailler, une à une, les plaies sur le corps meurtri de Michael Fassbender. Il ne semble pas mécontent, ici, de filmer un à un les coups de fouet reçus par la bien-aimée du frustré. Mais curieusement, ce pointillisme lui permet, à chaque film, de fuir le réalisme. Son art repose sur l’artifice. Sous sa caméra, le destin de Solomon Northup n’est plus un fait divers, mais une abstraction lyrique. Presque un opéra. — Pierre Murat

(1) Solomon Northup a relaté son aventure dans un livre, Twelve Years a slave.

“Je veux faire des films, pas de l’argent”, Steve McQueen, cinéaste intransigeant

Entretien | Il enflamme Hollywood en réveillant la violence d’histoires vraies enfouies dans les mémoires. Rencontre avec Steve McQueen, réalisateur de “12 Years a slave”.

Télérama

25/01/2014

Propos recueillis par Frédéric Strauss – Télérama n° 3341

Son homonymie avec un acteur célèbre aurait pu lui sembler malencontreuse, ou simplement peu pratique. Mais Steve McQueen ignore superbement la star qui l’a précédé. « Question suivante », répond-il quand on l’invite à nous ­parler de son patronyme. Et quand on s’enquiert de sa famille, originaire de la Grenade : « Question suivante. » On ose demander ce que faisaient ses parents : « Ils travaillaient ! »

Massif, ce cinéaste britannique de 44 ans impressionne aussi par un tempérament étonnamment irascible. L’atmosphère est ­tendue ; la rencontre, dans un hôtel parisien, un mauvais moment à passer… Mais, au fond, qu’importe, puisque la parole malgré tout se livre, aussi réfléchie, généreuse et profonde qu’elle se plaît à être cassante et lapidaire.

L’intransigeance de ce Steve McQueen pas du tout séducteur exprime aussi une attitude envers le cinéma. Il n’y est venu qu’en 2008, alors qu’il était depuis plusieurs années un créateur reconnu dans le domaine des installations vidéo, un artiste d’envergure célébré par le prix Turner en 1999. C’est avec cette autorité qu’il a abordé la réalisation. Montrant d’emblée une maîtrise impressionnante. Et s’attaquant à des sujets ambitieux, chargés de vérité, de souffrance : dans Hunger, la grève de la faim de l’Irlandais Bobby Sands, membre de l’IRA ; dans Shame, l’addiction maladive à la pornographie.

Et aujourd’hui, l’esclavage dans 12 Years a slave, adaptation d’un récit publié aux Etats-Unis en 1853 (et désormais disponible sous le titre Douze Ans d’esclavage, aux éditions Entremonde). Avec ce nouveau film, qui a touché aux Etats-Unis un large public, Steve McQueen laisse sa grande rigueur formelle évoluer vers une forme de cinéma plus classique. Mais il ne relâche en rien la tension de son regard, qui continue à nous faire voir la réalité en face. Avec une dureté salutaire, naturelle chez lui.

Il semble que vous ayez gardé un souvenir assez dur de votre scolarité à Londres : est-ce parce que vous avez été victime d’attitudes racistes ?

Pas d’attaques personnelles, non. Mais les élèves étaient encore prisonniers de leur classe sociale. Quand je suis ­retourné dans mon lycée, pour une ­remise de prix, il y a onze ans, le directeur a fait un discours disant que, dans les années 80, à l’époque où j’y étais, ce lycée était institutionnellement raciste, car les seuls élèves dont on se préoccupait vraiment étaient ceux qui, venant de milieux favorisés, avaient des chances d’aller à Cambridge. Les élèves noirs ou de milieux défavorisés ne comptaient pas. C’était quelque chose que je savais, mais de l’entendre dit à voix haute et très officiellement, c’était à la fois étrange et très intéressant.

Quand avez-vous compris que vous pourriez trouver votre voie dans l’expression visuelle ?

Depuis le tout premier jour ! J’ai toujours dessiné, c’était dans mes gènes. Il n’y a pas eu de révélation me faisant soudain comprendre que j’étais un artiste. J’ai simplement fait ce que j’aimais, toujours. Après le lycée, je suis entré dans une école d’art, j’ai passé une année pendant laquelle tout le monde était libre d’imaginer devenir photographe, graphiste, peintre… J’ai choisi les beaux-arts. Je voulais peindre. Mais du jour où j’ai mis la main sur une caméra, tout a changé. Je n’ai plus pensé qu’à faire des films, faire de l’art avec le langage du cinéma.

“Le cinéma, c’est le pouvoir du récit, comme le roman.”

Vous avez tourné trois films de cinéma après avoir réalisé, quinze années durant, des films d’art et des installations vidéo. Votre regard change-t-il d’une discipline à l’autre ?

Non, je suis un artiste, c’est tout. La différence, c’est que l’art est abstrait, comme la poésie, qui se sert du langage d’une manière fragmentée. Le cinéma, c’est le pouvoir du récit, comme le roman. On utilise donc les mêmes mots, qu’on fasse des films d’art ou des films commerciaux, mais on utilise ces mots différemment. Les écrivains qui sont aussi des poètes ont la même expérience que moi.

Dans une de vos créations les plus connues, Charlotte (2004), vous filmez en gros plan l’œil de Charlotte Rampling et votre doigt qui le touche. Est-ce une volonté de déranger, justement, le regard ?

Mon envie n’était pas de déranger. Je n’avais jamais rencontré Charlotte Rampling. Je l’avais bien sûr vue au ­cinéma et dans les magazines, mais toujours dans des images. Ce qui m’intéressait, c’était d’accéder à son visage directement, comme si je retraversais à l’envers toutes les images d’elle, pour arriver à sa présence réelle. Quand j’ai touché son œil, j’ai eu une décharge électrique, et Charlotte aussi. C’était très étrange. La peau autour de l’œil de Charlotte était lourde. C’était comme un bijou dont la beauté se cachait sous un voile.

Tous vos films de cinéma racontent des expériences humaines extrêmes. Il y a quand même là une envie de défi ?

Oui et non. Pour que je tourne un film de cinéma, et que j’accepte donc tous les sacrifices que ça représente, il me faut une raison très forte. Par exemple, l’histoire de Bobby Sands et des grévistes de la faim, que je racontais dans Hunger. Une histoire forte parce qu’elle n’avait jamais été racontée. Dix hommes étaient morts dans une prison britannique après avoir cessé de s’alimenter en signe de protestation, et tout le monde faisait comme si ça n’avait jamais existé. Voilà pourquoi il fallait faire ce film. Ça a peut-être quelque chose d’un défi, mais il s’agit d’abord pour moi d’exprimer ce qui fait surgir des émotions violentes.

Vos films donnent le sentiment que vous montrez des choses jusque-là invisibles…

Effectivement. Quand Hunger est sorti, les Anglais ont reconnu pour la première fois les atrocités commises dans la prison de Maze, en Irlande du Nord. Le film a permis de libérer une parole, des gens ont admis ce qu’ils avaient toujours refusé de reconnaître. La même chose se produit avec 12 Years a slave, qui ouvre une discussion sur l’esclavage qui n’avait jamais eu lieu. C’est comme une pierre qu’on jette à la surface d’un lac et qui déclenche un effet de vague.

“Je veux raconter les histoires qu’on cache sous le tapis.”

Le pouvoir du cinéma est de nous obliger à voir ?

Le pouvoir du cinéma est énorme. Mais je ne suis pas engagé dans une croisade. Je suis un cinéaste, un conteur d’histoires. Je participe à l’industrie du divertissement. Avec la volonté de raconter les histoires qu’on cache sous le tapis.

Montrer l’esclavage, c’est faire apparaître ce qui était caché ?

Je n’avais vu aucun film montrant vraiment la réalité de l’esclavage, qui a pourtant duré quatre cents ans. La Seconde Guerre mondiale n’a duré que cinq ans, et les films sur cette guerre et sur l’Holocauste sont devenus un genre à part entière, et des classiques du cinéma. Mais des films sur l’esclavage, il y en a eu si peu, à peine une vingtaine. Les gens ont toujours eu peur de cette période de l’Histoire, et c’est compréhensible car c’était horrible, violent, infâme. Ça ne peut qu’embarrasser tout le monde, mais il faut pourtant regarder les choses en face, montrer ce passé pour comprendre notre présent et comprendre aussi, possiblement, notre avenir.

Michael Fassbender et Chiwetel Ejiofor, dans le dernier film

Michael Fassbender et Chiwetel Ejiofor, dans le dernier film du Britannique, 12 Years a slave. © DR

Comment en êtes-vous venu à raconter l’histoire vraie que retrace 12 Years a slave ?

Je voulais parler d’un Noir américain qui vivait libre dans le Nord des Etats-Unis et était arraché à la vie normale qu’il menait pour être réduit à l’état d’esclave, dans le Sud. Un homme auquel tout le monde pouvait s’identifier. Mon idée n’était pas de raconter le destin d’un Noir venu d’Afrique, car cela avait été fait dans la série télé Racines, en 1977. Le scénario n’était pas facile à développer.

Ma femme, Bianca Stigter, qui est historienne, a commencé des recherches et a découvert ce livre, 12 Years a slave, de Solomon Northup. Elle me l’a apporté en me disant :« Je crois que j’ai trouvé ce que tu veux. » C’était vraiment un euphémisme, car chaque page de ce livre racontait exactement ce que j’avais voulu faire sans y parvenir. Les détails donnés, le sentiment d’un récit lyrique, tout était à couper le souffle. Quand j’ai terminé cette lecture, je m’en suis voulu de n’avoir pas eu connaissance de l’existence d’un tel livre. Et puis j’ai réalisé que personne, autour de moi, ne le connaissait.

Un téléfilm adapté du même livre avait été diffusé en 1984 par la télé américaine, mais il a été oublié, aussi…

Sans même s’arrêter à ce téléfilm de Gordon Parks, Solomon Northup’s Odyssey, on doit souligner que le livre a été publié il y a cent soixante ans. Et pendant tout ce temps, il est resté dans l’ombre. Pourquoi est-ce que je connais Anne Frank et pas Solomon Northup ? Pour moi, ce livre était l’équivalent, dans l’histoire de l’Amérique, du Journal d’Anne Frank.

“L’esclavage était une industrie mondiale qui dépassait largement les Etats-Unis.”

Il fallait donc un cinéaste extérieur aux Etats-Unis pour dire toute l’importance de ce livre ?

Je ne me considère pas comme quelqu’un d’extérieur aux Etats-Unis. Mes parents sont venus des Antilles, et je fais partie de cette diaspora. La seule différence entre moi et des Noirs américains, c’est que leurs ancêtres ont pris le chemin qui partait à droite et les miens, celui qui partait à gauche. La mère de Malcom X venait de la Grenade, où mes parents sont nés. Colin Powell, Sidney Poitier, Marcus Garvey, Harry Belafonte, tous ces gens-là sont issus de familles des Antilles. L’esclavage était une industrie mondiale qui dépassait largement les Etats-Unis.

Votre film montre un monde où les sentiments n’ont plus leur place : tout est haine ou indifférence, endurcissement…

Non, il y a des sentiments très profonds dans ce film ! Bien sûr, pour survivre, Solomon doit mettre ses sentiments de côté. Mais il ne peut pas devenir aussi inhumain que le monde où il se retrouve. S’endurcir totalement lui est impossible. Il reste un être humain. Les forces de l’esprit lui permettent de tenir. C’était, de toute façon, le seul choix qui restait aux esclaves, mes ancêtres : décider de ne pas mourir. Subir des ­situations inhumaines, endurer la souffrance, mais vivre. Tenir bon, pour l’amour de leurs enfants.

Une scène très impressionnante montre Solomon pendu, ses pieds touchant à peine le sol, et les autres esclaves obligés de l’ignorer…

S’ils décident de l’aider, ils seront pendus à côté de lui. Avec cette scène, je voulais montrer l’esclavage comme une torture physique et mentale. Je me souviens d’avoir tourné un film dans une mine en Afrique du Sud et res­senti ce climat de terreur : les gens faisaient comme s’ils ne nous voyaient pas, ils avaient été habitués à obéir à une loi. C’est quelque chose qui a existé dans tous les pays où la terreur a régné, dans les régimes fascistes, dans la France occupée. Et ça existe encore.

Vous semblez avoir voulu éviter le sentimentalisme d’un certain cinéma américain…

Oui, ce qui m’intéresse, c’est la réalité, montrer ce qu’elle était et ne pas utiliser cette reconstitution à une autre fin. Soit on fait vraiment un film sur l’esclavage, soit on ne fait rien. Je ne voulais pas d’une vision édulcorée. Pourtant, l’histoire semble un conte. Un conte très sombre qu’auraient pu écrire les frères Grimm. Solomon est jeté dans un monde tellement terrible que ça ne semble pas réel. Quand j’ai lu le livre, je me disais : est-ce de la science-fiction ? Cela a-t-il bel et bien eu lieu ?

Votre film arrive après Le Majordome et d’autres films signés par des cinéastes noirs abordant la question des discriminations raciales. Le signe d’un vrai changement ?

Absolument, quelque chose s’est produit. Je ne sais pas combien de temps cela durera. On ne peut mésestimer, dans ce phénomène, le rôle du président Obama. Avec ce président noir, une autre perspective est apparue, le droit à une expression nouvelle a été donné. Ceux qui ne voulaient pas soutenir ce genre de projets le font. Et peut-être même que certains se disent que ces histoires ont aujourd’hui des atouts commerciaux. Il y a encore beaucoup de films à faire sur l’esclavage. Non pas que ce soit une obligation morale. Mais il s’agit d’histoires très prenantes, très fortes, voilà pourquoi il faut les raconter. Parce que les gens voudront ­aller au cinéma pour voir quelque chose de jamais vu.

Le retentissement de 12 Years a slave aux Etats-Unis vous ouvre les portes de Hollywood : êtes-vous intéressé par cette opportunité ?

Les gens pensent qu’il n’y a que cette voie, Hollywood. C’est une illusion. Ma motivation n’est pas là. Je veux seulement faire les meilleurs films possibles. A Hollywood ou ailleurs. De toute façon, je ne sais pas ce que c’est, Hollywood. J’y suis peu allé. J’y ai rencontré des gens très bien, curieusement. Mais ça reste loin de moi, car je n’ai jamais mêlé l’art au monde des affaires. Sinon, je porterais des chemises à rayures avec des bretelles, je travaillerais à Wall Street ou à la City de Londres. Mais l’argent est la dernière chose à laquelle je pense. Le fait que 12 Years a slave soit devenu un tel succès est une surprise. Je comprends que ça intéresse beaucoup de gens, qui me voient comme un cinéaste capable de faire un succès au box-office. Mais je veux faire des films, pas de l’argent.

Steve McQueen en quelques dates

1969 Naissance à Londres

1993 Bear, premier film d’art qui le fait connaître.

2003 Exposition au musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris.

2008 Hunger, premier film de cinéma, Caméra d’or au festival de Cannes.

2013 Grande rétrospective de ses créations d’art contemporain au Schaulager de Bâle.

2014 12 Years a slave dans la course aux oscars.

12 years a slave

Ecran large

Simon Riaux

22 nov. 2013

Un blanc au cou tanné par le soleil explique à une douzaine d’esclaves comment récolter la canne à sucre. Un homme ingère mécaniquement un repas frugal, avant de tenter une expérience calligraphique à l’aide de jus de mûres. Dans l’obscurité du cabanon où lui et ses semblables s’entassent pour dormir, une compagne d’infortune essaie de lui soutirer une affection tarie depuis longtemps. Les images s’entrechoquent, s’affrontent et s’annulent, difficile d’en retirer un sens, une temporalité, leur unité se dérobe à nos yeux. En quelques plans et moins de cinq minutes, Steve McQueen se casse volontairement les dents sur un impossible défi : retranscrire la réalité de l’esclavage. Puisque nous ne pouvons appréhender les tenants et aboutissants de cette condition, le réalisateur effectue un retour en arrière pour faire sien le dispositif du texte autobiographique dont s’inspire 12 Years a slave, soit l’histoire d’un homme libre, parfaitement étranger au concept de servitude, transformé du jour au lendemain en simple objet amputé de sa moindre parcelle d’humanité.

Ce principe, très loin de n’être qu’un simple dispositif articulant le récit, s’avère le moteur essentiel de son sens. Car le caractère et la personnalité de Solomon Northup permettent au spectateur de s’identifier tout à fait à cet individu libre, heureux, qui a tout fait pour préserver son quotidien des turpitudes de l’époque. Il y est parvenu et autorise le public, quelque soit ses connaissances du sujet abordé, son rapport à l’histoire ou à son propre passé d’embarquer à ses côtés. Steve McQueen et son œuvre se situent ainsi aux antipodes d’un Majordome désireux de flatter le public, de lui infliger une caresse de cathéchèse qui n’a d’universelle que le nom.

Le film n’en deviendra que plus terrible et impitoyable. Nous ne sommes pas ici face à un simple drame historique, ni même à une tragédie brillamment construite et exécutée. Ce qui se joue sous nos yeux est la déconstruction systématique du rêve américain. Ce rêve que Solomon vit sans en être tout à fait conscient, dont toutes les figures se retrouveront brisées à ses pieds. D’abord convaincu que le piège dans lequel il est tombé ne se refermera pas tout à fait sur lui, il se persuadera ensuite que son instruction pourra le prémunir des pires traitements, il lui faudra enfin accepter que son courage, son humanité comme sa persévérance ne pourront rien contre ceux qui le possèdent désormais. Cet itinéraire d’une noirceur absolue, le métrage le balise de séquences simultanément splendides et implacables, à l’image de cet homme tout juste lynché puis pendu, dont les orteils s’étirent pour lui offrir un sursis de vie, alors qu’autour de lui celle de la plantation se déroule imperturbable. On pense bien évidemment au Strange Fruit de Billie Holliday, tétanisé par une horreur cristalline, dont l’acuité pure nous saisit à la gorge.

Mais McQueen, non content de parsemer son film de nombreux morceaux de bravoure et autres plans séquences, n’oublie jamais qu’il traite de personnages avant de manier concepts et figures mythologiques. À la manière de Hunger ou Shame, ce sont l’enfermement et les rapports de domination qui innervent le scénario, les relations éminemment perverses de déprédation qui motivent cette étude d’une période aussi ténébreuse que mal connue. Servi par des acteurs magnétiques, baignés dans la lumière crue et irréelle de Louisiane, le récit explore pour mieux les révéler les tréfonds d’un mal sans fin, dont on ne se relève pas. Car, et c’est là le plus terrible message délivré par 12 Years a slave, on ne sort pas de l’esclavage. Si Solomon sera ultimement sauvé des griffes de l’ogre Epps (impérial Fassbender), il ne retrouvera jamais sa fierté d’homme ou sa dignité de citoyen. En témoigne la dernière réplique du personnage, réduit à s’excuser d’être une victime intégrale. La phagotrophie de l’homme par l’homme est une plaie qui ne se referme pas, une indignité qui ne connaît pas l’oubli. Point de commémoration ou de réconciliation chez McQueen, mais le dévoilement impudique d’une cicatrice véritable.

Can’t Trust It

Armond White

City arts

Oct 16, 2013

12 Years a Slave uses sadistic art to patronize history

Brutality, violence and misery get confused with history in 12 Years a Slave, British director Steve McQueen’s adaptation of the 1853 American slave narrative by Solomon Northup, who claims that in 1841, away from his home in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., he was kidnapped and taken South where he was sold into hellish servitude and dehumanizing cruelty.

12-years-a-slave-filmFor McQueen, cruelty is the juicy-arty part; it continues the filmmaker’s interest in sado-masochistic display, highlighted in his previous features Hunger and Shame. Brutality is McQueen’s forte. As with his fine-arts background, McQueen’s films resemble museum installations: the stories are always abstracted into a series of shocking, unsettling events. With Northup (played by Chiwetel Ejiofor), McQueen chronicles the conscious sufferance of unrelenting physical and psychological pain. A methodically measured narrative slowly advances through Northup’s years of captivity, showcasing various injustices that drive home the terrors Black Africans experienced in the U.S. during what’s been called “the peculiar institution.”

Depicting slavery as a horror show, McQueen has made the most unpleasant American movie since William Friedkin’s1973 The Exorcist. That’s right, 12 Years a Slave belongs to the torture porn genre with Hostel, The Human Centipede and the Saw franchise but it is being sold (and mistaken) as part of the recent spate of movies that pretend “a conversation about race.” The only conversation this film inspires would contain howls of discomfort.

For commercial distributor Fox Searchlight, 12 Years a Slave appears at an opportune moment when film culture–five years into the Obama administration–indulges stories about Black victimization such as Precious, The Help, The Butler, Fruitvale Station and Blue Caprice. (What promoter Harvey Weinstein has called “The Obama Effect.”) This is not part of social or historical enlightenment–the too-knowing race-hustlers behind 12 Years a Slave, screenwriter John Ridley and historical advisor Henry Louis Gates, are not above profiting from the misfortunes of African-American history as part of their own career advancement.

But McQueen is a different, apolitical, art-minded animal. The sociological aspects of 12 Years a Slave have as little significance for him as the political issues behind IRA prisoner Bobby Sands’ hunger strike amidst prison brutality visualized in Hunger, or the pervy tour of urban “sexual addiction” in Shame. McQueen takes on the slave system’s depravity as proof of human depravity. This is less a drama than an inhumane analysis–like the cross-sectional cut-up of a horse in Damien Hirst’s infamous 1996 museum installation “Some Comfort Gained From the Acceptance of the Inherent Lies in Everything.”

hirst some comfort gained

Because 12 Years of Slave is such a repugnant experience, a sensible viewer might be reasonably suspicious about many of the atrocities shown–or at least scoff at the one-sided masochism: Northup talks about survival but he has no spiritual resource or political drive–the means typically revealed when slave narratives are usually recounted. From Mandingo and Roots to Sankofa, Amistad, Nightjohn and Beloved, the capacity for spiritual sustenance, inherited from the legacy of slavery and survival, was essential (as with Baby Sugg’s sermon-in-the-woods in Beloved and John Quincy Adams and Cinque’s reference to ancestors in Amistad) in order to verify and make bearable the otherwise dehumanizing tales.

It proves the ahistorical ignorance of this era that 12 Years a Slave’s constant misery is excused as an acceptable version of the slave experience. McQueen, Ridley and Gates’ cast of existential victims won’t do. Northup-renamed-Platt and especially the weeping mother Liza (Adepero Oduye) and multiply-abused Patsey (Lupita Nyong‘o), are human whipping posts–beaten, humiliated, raped for our delectation just like Hirst’s cut-up equine. Hirst knew his culture: Some will no doubt take comfort from McQueen’s inherently warped, dishonest, insensitive fiction.

These tortures might satisfy the resentment some Black people feel about slave stories (“It makes me angry”), further aggravating their sense of helplessness, grievance–and martyrdom. It’s the flipside of the aberrant warmth some Blacks claim in response to the superficial uplift of The Help and The Butler. And the perversion continues among those whites and non-Blacks who need a shock fest like 12 Years a Slave to rouse them from complacency with American racism and American history. But, as with The Exorcist, there is no victory in filmmaking this merciless. The fact that McQueen’s harshness was trending among Festivalgoers (in Toronto, Telluride and New York) suggests that denial still obscures the history of slavery: Northup’s travail merely makes it possible for some viewers to feel good about feeling bad (as wags complained about Spielberg’s Schindler’s List as an “official” Holocaust movie–which very few people wanted to see twice). McQueen’s fraudulence further accustoms moviegoers to violence and brutality.

The very artsiness of 12 Years a Slave is part of its offense. The clear, classical imagery embarrasses Quentin Tarantino’s attempt at visual poetry in Django Unchained yet this “clarity” (like Hans Zimmer’s effective percussion score) is ultimately depressing. McQueen uses that art staple “duration” to prolong North’s lynching on tiptoe and later, in endless, tearful anticipation; emphasis on a hot furnace and roiling waves adds nature’s discomfort; an ugly close-up of a cotton worm symbolizes drudgery; a slave chant (“Run, Nigger, Run,”) contrasts ineffectual Bible-reading; and a shot of North’s handwritten plea burns to embers. But good art doesn’t work this way. Art elates and edifies–one might even prefer Q.T.’s jokey ridiculousness in Django Unchained, a different kind of sadism.

Chiwetel Ejiofor in AmistadMcQueen’s art-world background recalls Peter Greenaway’s high-mindedness; he’s incapable of Q.T.’s stupid showmanship. (He may simply be blind to American ambivalence about the slave era and might do better focusing on the crimes of British imperialism.) Instead, every character here drags us into assorted sick melancholies–as Northup/Platt, Ejiofor’s sensitive manner makes a lousy protagonist; the benevolent intelligence that worked so well for him as the translator in Amistad is too passive here; he succumbs to fate, anguish and torment according to McQueen’s pre-ordained pessimism. Michael Fassbender’s Edwin Epps, a twisted slaveholder (“a nigger-breaker”) isn’t a sexy selfish lover as Lee Daniels flirtatiously showed in The Butler; Epps perverts love in his nasty miscegenation with Patsey (whose name should be Pathos).

And Alfre Woodard as a self-aware Black plantation mistress rapidly sinks into unrescuable psychosis. Ironically, Woodard’s performance is weird comic relief–a neurotic tribute to Butterfly McQueen’s frivolous Hollywood inanity but from a no-fun perspective. By denying Woodard a second appearance, director McQueen proves his insensitivity. He avoids any hopefulness, preferring to emphasize scenes devoted to annihilating Nyong’o’s body and soul. Patsey’s completely unfathomable longing for death is just art-world cynicism. McQueen’s “sympathy” lacks appropriate disgust and outrage but basks in repulsion and pity–including close-up wounds and oblivion. Patsey’s pathetic corner-of-the-screen farewell faint is a nihilistic trope. Nothing in The Exorcist was more flagrantly sadistic.

***

Some of the most racist people I know are bowled over by this movie. They may have forgotten Roots, never seen Sankofa or Nightjohn, disliked Amistad, dismissed Beloved and even decried the violence in The Passion of the Christ, yet 12 Years a Slave lets them congratulate themselves for “being aghast at slavery.” This film has become a new, easy reproof to Holocaust deniers. But remember how in Public Enemy’s “Can’t Truss It,” pop culture’s most magnificent account of the Middle Passage, Chuck D warned against the appropriation of historical catastrophe for self-aggrandizement: “The Holocaust /I’m talkin’ ‘bout the one still goin’ on!”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=am9BqZ6eA5c

The egregious inhumanity of 12 Years a Slave (featuring the most mawkish and meaningless fade-out in recent Hollywood history) only serves to perpetuate Hollywood’s disenfranchisement of Black people’s humanity. Brad Pitt, one of the film’s producers, appears in a small role as a helpful pacifist—as if to save face with his real-life multicultural adopted family. But Pitt’s good intentions (his character promises “There will be a reckoning”) contradict McQueen, Ridley and Gates’ self-serving motives. The finite numeral in the title of 12 Years a Slave compliments the fallacy that we look back from a post-racial age, that all is in ascent. But 12 Years a Slave is ultimate proof that Hollywood’s respect for Black humanity is in absurd, patronizing, Oscar-winning decline.

Steve McQueen’s post-racial art games and taste for cruelty play into cultural chaos. The story in 12 Years a Slave didn’t need to be filmed this way and I wish I never saw it.

7 Films About Slavery

Screening Slavery

Louis Proyect

Counterpunch

December 20-22, 2013

In a podcast discussion between veteran film critic Armond White and two younger film journalists focused on their differences over “12 Years a Slave” (White, an African-American with a contrarian bent hated it), White argued in favor of benchmarks. How could the two other discussants rave about Steve McQueen’s film without knowing what preceded it? That was all the motivation I needed to see the two films White deemed superior to McQueen’s—“Beloved” and “Amistad”—as well as other films about slavery that I had not seen before, or in the case of Gillo Pontecorvo’s “Queimada” and Kenji Mizoguchi’s “Sansho the Bailiff” films I had not seen in many years. This survey is not meant as a definitive guide to all films about the “peculiar institution” but only ones that are most familiar. Even if I characterize a film as poorly made, I still recommend a look at all of them since as a body of work they shed light on the complex interaction of art and politics, a topic presumably of some interest to CounterPunch readers.

“Django Unchained”

Since I walked out of Tarantino’s film after twenty minutes at a press screening last year, I only decided to watch it in its entirety to complete this survey. As is the case with “12 Years a Slave”, which was voted best film of 2013 by my colleagues in New York Film Critics Online, Tarantino’s film was considered a Major Statement about slavery a year earlier.

As I sat through the first twenty minutes last year, I found myself growing increasingly uneasy with the frequency of the word “nigger”. Yes, I understood that the Old South was full of racists but I could not help but feel that it was just Tarantino up to his old tricks of using the word in a kind of “bad boy” gesture to ramp up his mostly young, white, and male audience especially when the word was used by white characters, including ones played by Tarantino himself. This year I could not help but be reminded of Miami Dolphins Richie Incognito’s bullying messages to teammate Jonathan Martin.

I say this as someone who has enjoyed Tarantino’s past work, with their trademark mash-up of pop culture and ultra-violence. This time around the jokes seemed stale and the violence gratuitous. For example, there’s a scene in which a posse of racists led by plantation owner Don Johnson advance on Django and his fellow bounty-hunter played by Christoph Waltz. The posse is wearing KKK-type hoods for reasons not exactly clear to me. Why would there be a need in a Slavocracy to conceal your identity when lynchings took place in broad daylight, often administered by the cops? Apparently the hoods were a comic prop for Jonah Hill, who in a cameo role complained about not being able to see properly through the eyeholes. This Mel Brooks type shtick went on for what seemed an eternity. If I had been one of Tarantino’s trusted advisers, I would have told him that it was bad enough to use such a lame joke and even worse to keep it going so long. But when you have generated millions of dollars for Harvey Weinstein, nobody is in such a position. What Tarantino wants, Tarantino gets.

Having sat through the entire film this go-round, I could devote thousands of words to what was wrong but will just offer just one brief observation. Samuel Jackson played a “house Negro”, who as Malcolm X used to put it “loved the master more than they loved themselves.” What Tarantino has done is transform this into “hating Black people more than he hates himself”. As Stephen, Leonard DiCaprio’s servant, Jackson demonstrates a sadistic pleasure in seeing “niggers” beaten and killed. Is there any evidence from the history of slave society that any Black servant ever descended into such a degraded and psychopathic state? Tarantino’s excuse, of course, is that he is not making history—only a movie. I could buy this if the movie was wittier and more quickly paced. At 165 minutes, it is sixty minutes too long. But as a Major Statement on slavery, it is not.

“12 Years a Slave”

Despite the perception that Steve McQueen was the first to make a film based on his “discovery” of a neglected memoir by the main character, there was an earlier version made by Gordon Parks for PBS American Playhouse in 1985 titled “Solomon Northup’s Odyssey” that can be seen on Amazon.com. Parks took greater liberties with Solomon Northup’s memoir than McQueen but essentially they tell the same story.

Parks is best known for “Shaft”, the 1971 “blaxploitation” classic. His version of Solomon Northup is somewhat evocative of the genre since his hero is heavily muscled and equal to any man, Black or white, in a fist fight. Adding his own concerns to the memoir, Parks depicts Northup as the object of resentment from other slaves for his literacy, vocabulary, and generally sounding like a white man. They want to drag him down to their level, something he resists.

McQueen takes similar liberties, transforming Harriet Shaw, the Black wife of a cruel plantation owner, into someone with snarling contempt for her own people in the absence of any such evidence in Northup’s memoir.

As is the case with “Django Unchained”, McQueen’s film is a vehicle for his preoccupations. With Tarantino, these primarily revolve around revenge, a theme common to so many of the Hong Kong gangster or samurai movies that he has absorbed. For McQueen, the chief interest is in depicting pain with some of the most dramatic scenes involving whippings and other forms of punishment.

I was expecting the worst after seeing McQueen’s “Hunger”, a film about the Provo IRA hunger strike led by Bobby Sands that was more about bedsores and beatings than politics. Thankfully, the latest film is a lot more restrained than I had expected but still mostly focused on the physical torments of being a slave. I found myself wondering if the casting of Sarah Paulson as the sadistic wife of a sadistic plantation owner was deliberate since she is part of the company of actors featured on “American Horror Story”, the AMC cable TV show that pushes the envelope in terms of graphic scenes of torture, dismemberment, etc. This season Paulson is playing a witch, as part of a series on Black witches taking revenge on their white witch enemies who had tormented them during slavery. I half expected Paulson’s character to stick a pin in a Solomon Northup voodoo doll.

While one cannot gainsay the importance of Solomon Northup’s memoir that was used by the abolitionist movement in the same way that “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was, I have to wonder whether McQueen’s film was hampered by a story that was essentially one-dimensional. If you take the opportunity to read “12 Years a Slave” , you will be struck by the underdeveloped relationships between Northup and other characters. Both Parks and McQueen take liberties with the memoir to flesh out the film with such relationships but there is still something missing. In the memoir and in the films, there is never any sense of the emotional pain of being separated from your family—something that cuts far deeper than a whip. Northup comes across as someone completely outraged by the injustice of being kidnapped and sold into slavery and little else. Who can blame him? But much more is needed to create the kind of drama found in “Sansho the Bailiff” that is discussed later.

“Beloved”

Just 8 minutes short of three hours, this Jonathan Demme film based on a Toni Morrison novel is as overextended and self-indulgent as “Django Unchained” but much worse. It was produced by Oprah Winfrey and features her in the role of Sethe, a former slave living in the outskirts of Cincinnati. In the opening scene, household utensils are hurled about by poltergeists in a manner now familiar from films like…like “Poltergeist” actually.

Not long afterwards Paul D. (Danny Glover) shows up to save the day. As a former slave from the same plantation as Sethe, he is looking for work and to rekindle a relationship with her. It helps that he is able to quell the poltergeists, the answer to a haunted woman’s dreams.

But that’s not the end of Sethe’s woes. About an hour into the film, Sethe and Paul D. return home to discover a young woman has materialized on their front lawn out of nowhere. Essentially she takes over from the poltergeists creating a strange bond with Sethe based on a kind of craving for attention so extreme that Sethe’s teenaged daughter Denver is tempted to run away, just as her two younger brothers did after the poltergeist intervention of the opening scene.

Eventually we discover that Beloved, the name of the mysterious young woman, is a supernatural presence spawned by a tragic event that took place on the plantation Sethe fled. Although the screenwriter and the director did not intend it as such, I found Beloved so weird that it was hard for me to get deeper into the troubled relationship between Sethe and her new quasi-adopted daughter.

Perhaps that’s a function of a misbegotten adaptation of Morrison’s novel but just as likely it is my reaction to a heavy dose of magical realism that suffuses the novel and the film. As anybody who has read my critique of “Beasts of the Southern Wild” understands, magical realism makes me break out in hives even when it is the work of Nobelists like Toni Morrison or Gabriel García Márquez.

The overripe aesthetics, however, cannot compensate for what is essentially the same fare as “12 Years a Slave”, namely a horror show about beatings, degradation, and racism. Unlike “Django Unchained” and “12 Years a Slave”, “Beloved” was not hailed as a great film when it came out. Some critics viewed it as a sign of Jonathan Demme’s decline; others saw it as the result of Oprah Winfrey’s vanity. With such an enormous emotional and financial commitment to the film, Winfrey underwent a major bout of depression when it bombed at the box office and in the press. People like Jeff St. Clair, whose film savvy I hold in high regard, are fans of “Beloved”. That’s reason enough to give it a shot on Amazon.com. I can’t imagine myself watching it again, however.

“Amistad”

If you are looking for evidence that Stephen Spielberg is one of the few genuine auteurs on the scene today (a term coined by François Truffaut to describe how certain directors shape their films according to a unique creative vision), there’s no better place to look than this 1997 film based on an historical event, the slave revolt of 1839 that led to a historic trial with a happy ending.

The slaves function pretty much as ET did, strange creatures only wishing to go home while John Quincy Adams, the ex-president who argued their case before the Supreme Court, is a kind of prequel to Abraham Lincoln—an enlightened white politician who frees the slaves. What’s missing, however, is the viewpoint of the slaves. Unlike ET, they are capable of seeing the world just like us. But David Franzoni’s script treats them as exotic objects, all the more unknowable through their use of a native language that frequently goes un-subtitled. This is all the more egregious in the opening scene of the film when they commandeer the ship, murdering the entire crew except for the captain and his mate who are ordered to sail them back to Africa. In this scene, not a single word comes out of the slaves’ mouths except at the maximum volume and accompanied by grimacing of the sort seen on the faces of arch-villains in the silent movies of the 1920s. One imagines Spielberg directing his Black actors, “Louder…and arch your eyebrows higher”. I suspect that Paul Greenglass, the director of “Captain Phillips”, must have studied the film carefully in order to develop an approach to his Somali pirate characters.

“Amistad” is basically courtroom drama with Matthew McConaughey as the defense attorney (upon appeal, John Quincy Adams played by Anthony Hopkins takes over.) He argues on strictly legalistic grounds that the slaves were taken from Sierra Leone, a colony of Great Britain that had declared slavery illegal. It has all the dramatic intensity of the debate in the House of Representatives that occupied the final hour of “Lincoln”. If that is your cup of tea, the film is worth watching.

“Sansho the Bailiff”

Despite the fact that this film took place under feudalism, the major characters were slaves rather than peasants paying tribute of the sort dramatized in “The Seven Samurai” and other classics. Furthermore, even if they were Japanese, they had much in common with Solomon Northup insofar as they were free people kidnapped and sold into slavery.

The film was made by Kenji Mizoguchi in 1954 and is regarded as one of the greatest ever made in Japan. I would include it in my list of the ten greatest ever made.

After a feudal governor is banished to a far-off province because of his too generous treatment of the serfs, his wife Tamaki, his young son Zushio, and Zushio’s younger sister Anju proceed on foot to the distant home of a family relative. On their way, they are delivered by a supposedly well-meaning older woman into the arms of slavers who sell the two children to Sansho the Bailiff and the mother to a remote brothel on an island. They were victims just as was Solomon Northup who went to Washington, DC to play his fiddle for good wages at a circus but ended up on the auction block.

Unlike “12 Years a Slave”, the relationships between brother and sister are extremely well-developed. That, of course, is the license afforded by fiction. You are not bounded by the need to be accurate. Imagination rules. There’s a scene that mirrors the one in McQueen’s film in which Northup is forced to whip Patsey for a trivial offense. In “Sansho the Bailiff”, Zushio is ordered to brand the forehead of a seventy-year old slave who tried to run away. Unlike Northup, he has become so hardened by the punishment meted out to him by Sansho’s thugs that he follows this order unflinchingly. Afterwards Anju cries out to him that he has forsaken the values that their father taught them: “Without mercy, man is not a human being.”

Throughout their ordeal, brother and sister never forget their mother. They (and we) pine for their reunion. Eventually Zushio escapes Sansho’s compound, and makes his way to a feudal lord who felt remorse over his father’s treatment, so much so that he promotes him governor over Sansho as repentance. Zushio’s first act is to free all the slaves, even if this means violating feudal laws and resigning from his post.

Apart from the human drama, Mizoguchi was a great visual poet who made the Japanese countryside his greatest protagonist alongside the enslaved children and their long-lost mother. Although I am not that impressed with Anthony Lane’s film reviews in the New Yorker magazine, I am happy to repeat his words about “Sansho the Bailiff” as reported in Wikipedia: “I have seen Sansho only once, a decade ago, emerging from the cinema a broken man but calm in my conviction that I had never seen anything better; I have not dared watch it again, reluctant to ruin the spell, but also because the human heart was not designed to weather such an ordeal.”

“Queimada”

That’s the title of the 1969 Italian film directed by Gillo Pontecorvo, best known for “Battle of Algiers”, that can now be seen for free on Youtube. The English version is titled “Burn!” and though unfortunately missing about 20 minutes from the uncut version still fairly serviceable.

There is probably no other film that conveys the complexity of the colonial revolution than “Queimada”, which means burned in Italian. This is the name of a fictional Caribbean island that bears a striking resemblance to Cuba and Haiti even if it is ruled by Portuguese rather than the Spanish or French. It got its name from the peasant revolts that frequently led to sugar crops being burned.

Sir William Walker, played by Marlin Brando as if he was reprising his Fletcher Christian role, is a functionary of a British sugar company sent to Queimada to manipulate the slaves into overthrowing their masters. Unlike his American Filibuster namesake who went to Nicaragua to reinstate slavery, the British mercenary saw the benefits of abolishing slavery just as Great Britain did long before Lincoln. In a meeting with Portuguese plantation owners, Walker makes the case for free labor in distinctly non-abolitionist terms:

Gentlemen, let me ask you a question. Now, my metaphor may seem a trifle impertinent, but I think it’s very much to the point. Which do you prefer – or should I say, which do you find more convenient – a wife, or one of these mulatto girls? No, no, please don’t misunderstand: I am talking strictly in terms of economics. What is the cost of the product? What is the product yield? The product, in this case, being love – uh, purely physical love, since sentiments obviously play no part in economics.

Quite. Now, a wife must be provided with a home, with food, with dresses, with medical attention, etc, etc. You’re obliged to keep her a whole lifetime even when she’s grown old and perhaps a trifle unproductive. And then, of course, if you have the bad luck to survive her, you have to pay for the funeral!

It’s true, isn’t it? Gentlemen, I know it’s amusing, but those are the facts, aren’t they? Now with a prostitute, on the other hand, it’s quite a different matter, isn’t it? You see, there’s no need to lodge her or feed her, certainly no need to dress her or to bury her, thank God. She’s yours only when you need her, you pay her only for that service, and you pay her by the hour! Which, gentlemen, is more important – and more convenient: a slave or a paid worker?

This is mostly a film about the villainous but charismatic Sir William Walker but there is also a lot more of the viewpoint and agency of the slaves than in “Amistad”. That is to be expected when the screenwriter is somebody like Franco Solinas, who was a partisan during WWII and a long-time member of the CP. But one certainly would have not suspected that Solinas also wrote Spaghetti Westerns of the sort that inspired “Django Unchained”. In an eye-opening profile of “un-American Westerns” by J. Hoberman in the New York Review of Books, we learn that these were Spaghetti Westerns with a difference:

Déclassé, outlandish, and brutal, The Big Gundown has the standard Spaghetti Western virtues; its originality lay in making its true protagonist the fugitive. The irrepressible Cuchillo (played by Tomas Milian) turns out to be a disillusioned supporter of Benito Juarez with a class analysis (he is in fact an innocent witness to the crime). Van Cleef’s character realizes that he is the tool of ruthless plutocrats and capitalist running dogs. Thus, Solinas would use the Western as an arena in which to play out the struggle dramatized in The Battle of Algiers. “Political films are useful on the one hand if they contain a correct analysis of reality and on the other if they are made in such a way to have that analysis reach the largest possible audience,” he told an interviewer in 1967.

Too bad this angle was missing in “Django Unchained”. It would have made for a better film as well as better politically.

“Quilombo”

This amounts to saving the best for last. Like “Burn!”, this subtitled 1984 Brazilian film can be watched for free on Youtube. Quilombo is the word for escaped slave settlement. After seeing this joyous celebration of African freedom, I feel like presenting a petition to the Hollywood studios that they make movies about slave revolts or liberation struggles next year rather than another Major Statement about how terrible slavery was.

Based on historical events, the escape of slaves to the mountains of Palmares in 17th century Brazil, the film is a celebration of Afro-Brazilian culture with children using the capoeira against their would-be Portuguese captors. This high-kicking form of martial arts was disguised as a dance in order to prevent its practitioners being punished for developing combat skills.

The escaped slaves reconstitute themselves as African communities in the highlands and freely choose kings to lead them in struggle against a much better armed foe. The finale of the film depicts a battle in the Palmares that is as exciting as anything I have seen in a Japanese or American costume drama like “Braveheart” or “Seven Samurai”.

And throughout, there is the film score by Gilberto Gil that contains some of the greatest music he ever composed, including the song “Quilombo.”

Your first reaction to “Quilombo” is to question whether such a scenario could apply to the United States since we never saw a Palmares, or did we? While the immediate post-Civil War period under Reconstruction was not an attempt to recreate African life in the wilderness, the net effect was even more emancipating—to use the right word.

Hollywood has never made a single film about Black Power in the Deep South until 1873 when the Democrats and Republicans cut a deal to put the racists back into power in Dixie. Well, I take that back. There were a couple, now that I remember, one called “Gone with the Wind” and the other “Birth of a Nation”. Isn’t it about time that we had a movie with sympathetic major characters that are Black legislators in Mississippi or Alabama to atone for the racist crap of the past? Someone get Oprah Winfrey on the phone and line up a couple of million dollars or so. That’s all we need to make a great movie, since the reality it is based on is so inspiring.

Louis Proyect blogs at http://louisproyect.org and is the moderator of the Marxism mailing list. In his spare time, he reviews films for CounterPunch.

12 Years as Slave

Bruce Bennet

Mad about movies

Jan, 2014

Wince-inducing statement film

The much-heralded “12 Years a Slave” takes the most brutal and dehumanizing acts of the antebellum American South and displays them in an unrelenting fashion, making it both an incredibly uncomfortable and unforgettable movie.

But the question remains: To what end are these events depicted?

Devoid of any meaningful psychological analysis of either the slave owners who perpetuated unspeakable atrocities or of the slaves who were their victims, “12 Years a Slave” serves primarily as a graphic, suffocating sad collection of horrendous images that pummels the audience for over two hours.

For that you can bet there will be many industry accolades–the film is already the frontrunner to take home the best picture Oscar at next month’s Academy Awards. Hollywood, after all, loves to recognize those films it deems IMPORTANT.

For its shock value and the subject material involved, “12 Years” is groundbreaking and worthy of discussion. But shouldn’t there be more to the “hard truth” than simply being hard to watch?

Director Spike Jonze is known for his art-house films that often portray the myriad indignities a human body can suffer, and it appears he’s culled from Solomon Northrup’s 1853 memoir all the lynchings, beatings, rapings, and other abominations and made a well-crafted, superbly-acted horror show.

Northrup is portrayed nobly and sensitively by terrific British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor, (Outstanding in “Dirty Pretty Things”) and the screenplay written by John Ridley describes how the New York-born “free negro” was kidnapped in 1841 and sold into slavery to work on the plantations of Louisiana. Forced to take another name and not reveal his true identity or details about his wife and family, Northrup works for several plantation owners, including a malevolent sadist (Michael Fassbender) and another who is less cruel (Benedict Cumberbatch). Northrup decides to (mostly) cooperate, incredulously witnessing that this is by no means a guarantee of mercy.

No doubt “12 Years a Slave” will provoke comparison to films like “Schindler’s List” that have attempted to make a visceral statement about evil men perpetrating vile acts against other men. But while Spielberg weaved a complex story with layered emotional complexity around his occasionally graphic imagery, Jonze’s film appears obsessed with the gruesomeness of the act itself. Many scenes go on so long that the initial shock wears off and the viewer’s attention is distracted from the grotesque nature of the scene itself to the unbridled determination of the filmmakers to make a statement.

Indeed, “12 Years a Slave” is an unsettling film to watch. Sometimes challenging, even shocking material can have profound merit in the realm of artistic endeavor. Examining an important topic like slavery, an adaptation of Northrup’s memoir could have had remarkable educational, even inspirational value.

But “12 Years a Slave” is generally more concerned with making its audience wince than with forging an indelible imprint on the soul.

Rated R for violence/cruelty, some nudity and sexuality.

Grade: C+

Bruce Bennett has been the primary contributor to Mad About Movies since it began in 2003. He is an award winning film and theater critic who, since 2000, has been writing a weekly column in The Spectrum daily newspaper in southern Utah as well as serving as a contributing editor of “The Independent,” a monthly entertainment magazine. He is also the co-host of “Film Fanatics” a movie review show which earned a Telly in 2009. Bruce is also a featured contributor at: RottenTomatoes.com

His motto: « I see bad movies so you don’t have to. »

Will Steve McQueen be the first black director to win an Oscar?

Gautaman Bhaskaran

Hindustan Times

February 08, 2014

The best aspect about America is its egalitarianism. The country respects and rewards the talented and the sincere. And despite serious racial issues, we saw America electing a black President, creating history.

And as Hollywood runs up to the Academy Awards on March 2, one of the questions is, will Steve McQueen be the first black director to win the Oscar. Interestingly, his 12 Years A Slave is all about the struggle of one black man to escape humiliating captivity he faces in the white man’s den.

At the moment, McQueen – though with an emotionally engaging film behind him – is not the favourite to walk away with the best director statuette. But if he does, he would be the first black helmer to actually clinch this Oscar, although there have been two other black directors who were nominated in the past. One of them was John Singleton for the 1992 Boyz n the Hood, and the other was Lee Daniels in 2009 for Precious.

McQueen’s win could be as historic as Kathryn Bigelow’s 2009 triumph with The Hurt Locker. She was the first woman director to have won the best director Oscar.

In a way, McQueen’s nomination comes in a year when black moviemakers have done exceedingly well. Fruitvale Station – about a real incident where a black teenager was killed by the police in Oakland — got the big prize at the Sundance Film Festival. And works like 42 (the black baseball player, Jackie Robinson biopic) and The Butler (probing the African American role in U.S. history) have been, along with 12 Years A Slave, lauded by critics.

On top of this, Hollywood and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have been talking about lack of diversity in the race for the Oscars.

Curiously, while black American helmers have done poorly, black actors have fared very well.

Chiwetel Ejiofor plays the protagonist Solomon Northup in 12 Years A Slave.

Solomon Northup (played by Ejiofor) was a free man who was abducted and sold into slavery.

Benedict Cumberbatch will also be seen in this film portraying the role of the benevolent slave master William Ford.

A shocking still with Sarah Paulson and Lupita Nyong’o.

Lupita Nyong’o has been appreciated for her stellar performance in the film.

Hattie McDaniel was the first black actor to win an Oscar in a supporting role way back in 1939 for Gone with the Wind – that brilliant movie on the American Civil War adapted from Margaret Mitchell’s only novel.

During the 1960s, Sidney Poitier took the best actor Oscar for Lilies of the Field. He was remarkable as a handyman helping some nuns to raise a chapel in a desert. Black actors, however, had to wait 40 long years before the Oscar went to Denzel Washington – Training Day in 2001. That year came as double whammy for black artists. Halle Berry became the first black to win the best actress Oscar for Monster’s Ball.

More recently, the likes of Morgan Freeman, Forest Whitaker and Viola Davis have been nominated for Academy Awards, and have won in some cases.

But no Oscar has ever rolled on to a black producer’s lap. Ditto, a black director. Will McQueen change this by beating his rivals?

An Escape From Slavery, Now a Movie, Has Long Intrigued Historians

Michael Cieply

The NYT

September 22, 2013

LOS ANGELES — In the age of “Argo” and “Zero Dark Thirty,” questions about the accuracy of nonfiction films have become routine. With “12 Years a Slave,” based on a memoir published 160 years ago, the answers are anything but routine.

Written by John Ridley and directed by Steve McQueen, “12 Years a Slave,” a leading contender for honors during the coming movie awards season, tells a story that was summarized in the 33-word title of its underlying material.

Published by Derby & Miller in 1853, the book was called: “Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued in 1853, From a Cotton Plantation Near the Red River, in Louisiana.”

The real Solomon Northup — and years of scholarly research attest to his reality — fought an unsuccessful legal battle against his abductors. But he enjoyed a lasting triumph that began with the sale of some 30,000 copies of his book when it first appeared, and continued with its republication in 1968 by the historians Sue Eakin and Joseph Logsdon.

Speaking on Friday, Mr. Ridley said he decided simply to “stick with the facts” in adapting Northup’s book for the film, which is set for release on Oct. 18 by Fox Searchlight Pictures. Mr. Ridley said he was helped by voluminous footnotes and documentation that were included with Ms. Eakin’s and Mr. Logsdon’s edition of the book.

For decades, however, scholars have been trying to untangle the literal truth of Mr. Northup’s account from the conventions of the antislavery literary genre.

The difficulties are detailed in “The Slave’s Narrative,” a compilation of essays that was published by the Oxford University Press in 1985, and edited by Charles T. Davis and Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Mr. Gates is now credited as a consultant to the film, and he edited a recent edition of “Twelve Years a Slave.”)

“When the abolitionists invited an ex-slave to tell his story of experience in slavery to an antislavery convention, and when they subsequently sponsored the appearance of that story in print, they had certain clear expectations, well understood by themselves and well understood by the ex-slave, too,” wrote one scholar, James Olney.

Mr. Olney was explaining pressures that created a certain uniformity of content in the popular slave narratives, with recurring themes that involved insistence on sometimes questioned personal identity, harrowing descriptions of oppression, and open advocacy for the abolitionist cause.

In his essay, called “I Was Born: Slave Narratives, Their Status as Autobiography and as Literature,” Mr. Olney contended that Solomon Northup’s real voice was usurped by David Wilson, the white “amanuensis” to whom he dictated his tale, and who gave the book a preface in the same florid style that informs the memoir.

“We may think it pretty fine writing and awfully literary, but the fine writer is clearly David Wilson rather than Solomon Northup,” Mr. Olney wrote.

In another essay from the 1985 collection, titled “I Rose and Found My Voice: Narration, Authentication, and Authorial Control in Four Slave Narratives,” Robert Burns Stepto, a professor at Yale, detected textual evidence — assurances, disclaimers and such — that Solomon Northup expected some to doubt his story.

“Clearly, Northup felt that the authenticity of his tale would not be taken for granted, and that, on a certain peculiar but familiar level enforced by rituals along the color line, his narrative would be viewed as a fiction competing with other fictions,” wrote Mr. Stepto.

Mr. Stepto did not question Mr. Northup’s veracity; but he spotted one prominent example of a story point that conformed neatly to expectations. Mr. Northup’s account of being saved with the help of a Canadian named Samuel Bass (played in the film by Brad Pitt), wrote Mr. Stepto, “represents a variation on the archetype of deliverance in Canada.”

In an interview by phone on Friday, David A. Fiske — who recently joined Clifford W. Brown Jr. and Rachel Seligman in writing “Solomon Northup: The Complete Story of the Author of Twelve Years a Slave” — said he believed he had now identified an Ontario-born man as the actual Samuel Bass to whom Northup referred.

Mr. Fiske, who did some paid research for the film, said that overall he had high confidence in the accuracy of Northup’s account. “He had a literalist approach to recording events,” he said.

Both Mr. Olney and Mr. Stepto had a further reservation, however. Each noted that a dedication page added to “Twelve Years a Slave” — which devoted the book to Harriet Beecher Stowe, and called it “another key” to her novel, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” — helped blur the line between literal and literary truth.

“The dedication, like the pervasive style, calls into serious question the status of ‘Twelve Years a Slave’ as autobiography and/or literature,” Mr. Olney wrote.

Still, Mr. Ridley said the heavily documented story, with its many twists and turns, had an unpredictability that is a hallmark of the real.

“Life happens, it’s a lot stranger than the false beats that occur when people try to jam a narrative” into an expected framework, he said.

Voir aussi:

How 12 Years a Slave Gets History Right: By Getting It Wrong

Steve McQueen’s film fudges several details of Solomon Northup’s autobiography—both intentionally and not—to more completely portray the horrors of slavery.

Noah Berlatsky

Oct 28 2013

At the beginning of 12 Years a Slave, the kidnapped freeman Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), has a painful sexual encounter with an unnamed female slave in which she uses his hand to bring herself to orgasm before turning away in tears. The woman’s desperation, Solomon’s reserve, and the fierce sadness of both, is depicted with an unflinching still camera which documents a moment of human contact and bitter comfort in the face of slavery’s systematic dehumanization. It’s scenes like these in the film, surely, that lead critic Susan Wloszczyna to state that watching 12 Years a Slave makes you feel you have « actually witnessed American slavery in all its appalling horror for the first time. »

And yet, for all its verisimilitude, the encounter never happened. It appears nowhere in Northup’s autobiography, and it’s likely he would be horrified at the suggestion that he was anything less than absolutely faithful to his wife. Director Steve McQueen has said that he included the sexual encounter to show « a bit of tenderness … Then after she’s climaxes, she’s back … in hell. » The sequence is an effort to present nuance and psychological depth — to make the film’s depiction of slavery seem more real. But it creates that psychological truth by interpolating an incident that isn’t factually true.

This embellishment is by no means an isolated case in the film. For instance, in the film version, shortly after Northup is kidnapped, he is on a ship bound south. A sailor enters the hold and is about to rape one of the slave women when a male slave intervenes. The sailor unhesitatingly stabs and kills him. This seems unlikely on its face—slaves are valuable, and the sailor is not the owner. And, sure enough, the scene is not in the book. A slave did die on the trip south, but from smallpox, rather than from stabbing. Northup himself contracted the disease, permanently scarring his face. It seems likely, therefore, that in this instance the original text was abandoned so that Ejiofor’s beautiful, expressive, haunting features would not go through the entire movie covered with artificial Hollywood scar make-up. Instead of faithfulness to the text, the film chooses faithfulness to Ejiofor’s face, unaltered by trickery.

It seems quite likely that the single most powerful moment in the film was based on a misunderstood antecedent.

Other changes seem less intentional. Perhaps the most striking scene in the film involves Patsey, a slave who is repeatedly raped by her master, Epps, and who as a consequence is jealously and obsessively brutalized by Mistress Epps. In the movie version, Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o) comes to Northup in the middle of the night and begs him, in vivid horrific detail, to drown her in the swamp and release her from her troubles. This scene derives from the following passage at the end of Chapter 13 of the autobiography:

Nothing delighted the mistress so much as to see [Patsey] suffer, and more than once, when Epps had refused to sell her, has she tempted me with bribes to put her secretly to death, and bury her body in some lonely place in the margin of the swamp. Gladly would Patsey have appeased this unforgiving spirit, if it had been in her power, but not like Joseph, dared she escape from Master Epps, leaving her garment in his hand.

As you can see, in the book, it is Mistress Epps who wants to bribe Northup to drown Patsey. Patsey wants to escape, but not to drown herself. The film seems to have misread the line, attributing the mistress’s desires to Patsey. Slate, following the lead of scholar David Fiske (see both the article and the correction) does the same. In short, it seems quite likely that the single most powerful moment in the film was based on a misunderstood antecedent.

Critic Isaac Butler recently wrote a post attacking what he calls the « realism canard »—the practice of judging fiction by how well it conforms to reality. « We’re talking about the reduction of truth to accuracy, » Butler argues, and adds, « What matters ultimately in a work of narrative is if the world and characters created feels true and complete enough for the work’s purposes. » (Emphasis is Butler’s.)

His point is well-taken. But it’s worth adding that whether something « feels true » is often closely related to whether the work manages to create an illusion not just of truth, but also of accuracy. Whether it’s period detail in a costume romance or the brutal cruelty of the drug trade in Breaking Bad, fiction makes insistent claims not just to general overarching truth, but to specific, accurate detail. The critics Butler discusses may sometimes reduce the first to the second, but they do so in part because works of fiction themselves often rely on a claim to accuracy in order to make themselves appear true.

This is nowhere more the case than in slave narratives themselves. Often published by abolitionist presses or in explicit support of the abolitionist cause, slave narratives represented themselves as accurate, first-person accounts of life under slavery. Yet, as University of North Carolina professor William Andrews has discussed in To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, the representation of accuracy, and, for that matter, of first-person account, required a good deal of artifice. To single out just the most obvious point, Andrews notes that many slave narratives were told to editors, who wrote down the oral account and prepared them for publication. Andrews concludes that « It would be naïve to accord dictated oral narratives the same discursive status as autobiographies composed and written by the subjects of the stories themselves. »

12 Years a Slave is just such an oral account. Though Northup was literate, his autobiography was written by David Wilson, a white lawyer and state legislator from Glens Falls, New York. While the incidents in Northup’s life have been corroborated by legal documents and much research, Andrews points out that the impact of the autobiography—its sense of truth—is actually based in no small part on the fact that it is not told by Northup, but by Wilson, who had already written two books of local history. Because he was experienced, Andrews says, Wilson’s « fictionalizing … does not call attention to itself so much » as other slave narratives, which tend to be steeped in a sentimental tradition « that often discomfits and annoys 20th-century critics. » Northup’s autobiography feels less like fiction, in other words, because its writer is so experienced with fiction. Similarly, McQueen’s film feels true because it is so good at manipulating our sense of accuracy. The first sex scene, for example, speaks to our post-Freud, post-sexual-revolution belief that, isolated for 12 years far from home, Northup would be bound to have some sort of sexual encounters, even if (especially if?) he does not discuss them in his autobiography.

We can’t « actually witness … American slavery » on film or in a book. You can only experience it by experiencing it. Pretending otherwise is presumptuous.

The difference between book and movie, then, isn’t that one is true and the other false, but rather that the tropes and tactics they use to create a feeling of truth are different. The autobiography, for instance, actually includes many legal documents as appendices. It also features lengthy descriptions of the methods of cotton farming. No doubt this dispassionate, minute accounting of detail was meant to show Northup’s knowledge of the regions where he stayed, and so validate the truth of his account. To modern readers, though, the touristy attention to local customs can make Northup sound more like a traveling reporter than like a man who is himself in bondage. Some anthropological asides are even more jarring; in one case, Northup refers to a slave rebel named Lew Cheney as « a shrewd, cunning negro, more intelligent than the generality of his race. » That description would sound condescending and prejudiced if a white man wrote it. Which, of course, a white man named David Wilson did.

A story about slavery, a real, horrible crime, inevitably involves an appeal to reality—the story has to seem accurate if it is to be accepted as true. But that seeming accuracy requires artifice and fiction—a cool distance in one case, an acknowledgement of sexuality in another. And then, even with the best will in the world, there are bound to be mistakes and discrepancies, as with Mistress Epps’s plea for murder transforming into Patsey’s wish for death. Given the difficulties and contradictions, one might conclude that it would be better to openly acknowledge fiction. From this perspective, Django Unchained, which deliberately treats slavery as genre, or Octavia Butler’s Kindred, which acknowledges the role of the present in shaping the past through a fantasy time-travel narrative, are, more true than 12 Years a Slave or Glory precisely because they do not make a claim to historical accuracy. We can’t « actually witness … American slavery » on film or in a book. You can only experience it by experiencing it. Pretending otherwise is presumptuous.

But refusing to try to recapture the experience and instead deciding to, say, treat slavery as a genre Western, can be presumptuous in its own way as well. The writers of the original slave narratives knew that to end injustice, you must first acknowledge that injustice exists. Accurate stories about slavery—or, more precisely, stories that carried the conviction of accuracy, were vital to the abolitionist cause.

And, for that matter, they’re still vital. Outright lies about slavery and its aftermath, from Birth of a Nation to Gone With the Wind, have defaced American cinema for a long time. To go forward more honestly, we need accounts of our past that, like the slave narratives themselves, use accuracy and art in the interest of being more true. That’s what McQueen, Ejiofor, and the rest of the cast and crew are trying to do in 12 Years a Slave. Pointing out the complexity of the task is not meant to belittle their attempt, but to honor it.

Voir également:

How Accurate Is 12 Years a Slave?

12 Years a Slave We’ve sorted out what’s fact and what’s fiction in the new Steve McQueen movie.

Forrest Wickman

Slate

Steve McQueen’s devastating new movie, 12 Years a Slave, begins with the words “based on a true story” and ends with a description of what happened to Solomon Northup and his assailants after he was restored to freedom. What happens in between, as Northup is kidnapped into 12 years of slavery in the South, frequently beggars the imagination. Should you believe even the most incredible details of its story?

With a few rare exceptions, yes. 12 Years a Slave is based on the book of the same name, which was written by Northup with the help of his “amanuensis” and ghostwriter, David Wilson. Aspects of the story’s telling have been questioned by some historians for matching the conventions of the slave narrative genre a little too neatly, but its salient facts were authenticated by the historian Sue Eakin and Joseph Logsdon for their landmark 1968 edition of the book. (They were also reported at the time of the book’s release—in the New York Times and elsewhere.)

As adapted by screenwriter John Ridley from Northup’s book and Eakin and Logsdon’s footnotes, the film adaptation hews very closely to Northup’s telling. While much of the story is condensed, and a few small scenes are invented, nearly all of the most unbelievable details come straight from the book, and many lines are taken verbatim. As Frederick Douglass wrote of the book upon its release in 1853, “Its truth is stranger than fiction.”

Solomon Northup was the son of Mintus Northup, who was a slave in Rhode Island and New York until his master freed him in his will. Solomon was born a free man and received an unusually good education for a black man of his time, eventually coming to work as a violinist and a carpenter. As in the movie, he was married to Anne Hampton, who was of mixed race, and they had three children—Elizabeth, Margaret, and Alonzo. His wife and children were away when he was offered an unusually profitable gig from his eventual kidnappers, who called themselves Hamilton and Brown.

The movie prefaces its scenes of Northup in New York with a flash-forward that is McQueen and Ridley’s invention: Solomon, while enslaved, turns to find an unidentified woman in bed with him. She grabs his hand and uses it to bring herself to orgasm. McQueen has said of the scene: “I just wanted a bit of tenderness—the idea of this woman reaching out for sexual healing in a way, to quote Marvin Gaye. She takes control of her own body. Then after she’s climaxed, she’s back where she was. She’s back in hell, and that’s when she turns and cries.

In his book, Northup refused to say whether Hamilton and Brown were guilty of his kidnapping. He notes that he got extraordinary headaches after having a drink with them one night, and became sick and delirious soon afterward, but cannot conclude with assurety that he was poisoned. “Though suspicions of Brown and Hamilton were not unfrequent,” he writes, “I could not reconcile myself to the idea that they were instrumental to my imprisonment.”

Northup came around to accepting their role in his kidnapping and unlawful sale—an unusual occurrence, but not unique to Northup—soon after the book was published. “Hamilton” and “Brown” weren’t even their real names. A judge, Thaddeus St. John of New York, read the book soon after its release, and realized that he himself had run into the two kidnappers when they were with Northup. Their real names were Alexander Merrill and Joseph Russell, but they asked that St. John, who knew them, not use their real names around Northup. The next time St. John saw them, they had come into some newfound wealth: They carried ivory canes and sported gold watches. Northup and St. John eventually met up, recognized each other immediately, and brought their case against Merrill and Russell. (A note about the case appeared in the New York Times.) Merrill and Russell apparently got off unpunished, after their case was dropped on technicalities.

The Journey Into Slavery

The movie’s telling of Northup’s journey into slavery in Louisiana matches Northup’s account almost exactly. Northup says he was beaten with a paddle until the paddle broke, only to be whipped after that, all just for asserting his true identity. We see this in the movie. But an attempted mutiny by Northup and others ends much differently in the film than it does in his own account.

Northup did hatch an elaborate plan to take over a ship with a freeman named Arthur and a slave named Robert (played in the movie by Michael K. Williams). But that plan did not end with Robert coming to the defense of Eliza (Adepero Oduye) against an apparent rape attempt by a sailor, and then being stabbed by that sailor. What foiled their plans was simpler: Robert got smallpox and died.

Northup gives a more charitable account of his onetime master, William Ford, than the movie does. “There never was a more kind, noble, candid, Christian man than William Ford,” Northup writes, adding that Ford’s circumstances “blinded [Ford] to the inherent wrong at the bottom of the system of Slavery.” The movie, on the other hand, frequently undermines Ford, highlighting his hypocrisy by, for example, overlaying his sermons with the mournful screams of his slave Eliza.

Northup actually had two violent encounters with Tibeats. The first scuffle, over a set of nails, is shown in the movie: According to Northup, Tibeats tried to whip him, Northup resisted, and eventually Northup grabbed Tibeats’ whip and beat his aggressor. Afterward, Northup was left bound and on the point of hanging for several hours, before Ford rescued him.

In the book, there is a second brawl over another of Tibeats’ unreasonable demands. According to Northup, he again prevailed, but was afraid of the repercussions, and so this time attempted to run away. Unable to survive on his own in the surrounding swamps, he eventually returned in tatters to Ford, who had mercy on him.

Judging from Northup’s book, Epps was even more villainous and repulsive than the movie suggests. In addition to his cruel “dancing moods”—during which he would force the exhausted slaves to dance, screaming “Dance, niggers, dance,” and whipping them if they tried to rest—Epps also had his “whipping moods.” When he would come home drunk and overcome with one of these moods, he would drive the slaves around the yard, whipping them for fun.

There’s another small change. The scene that introduces Epps—his reading of Luke 12:47 as a warning to slaves—is actually borrowed from another of the book’s characters: Ford’s brother-in-law, Peter Tanner. In the movie, Northup’s time with Tanner—with whom he lived after his first fight with Tibeats—is omitted.

Northup does not portray the relationship between Epps and Patsey as explicitly as the movie does, but he does refer to Epps’ “lewd intentions” toward her. As we see in the film, Mistress Epps encourages Master Epps to whip her, out of her own jealousy. This culminates in the horrible whipping shown in the movie, which Northup describes as “the most cruel whipping that ever I was doomed to witness,” saying she was “literally flayed.” Her request afterward that Northup kill her, to put her out of her misery, is the movie’s own invention, but it’s a logical one: Patsey is described as falling into a deep depression and, it’s implied, dreaming of the relief death would offer her.*

As in the book, Mistress Shaw is the black wife of a plantation owner. However, Patsey’s conversation with Shaw is invented. McQueen and Ridley said they wanted to give Woodard’s character a voice.

As unlikely as his character is—an abolitionist in Louisiana, and a contrarian who everyone likes—Bass is drawn straight from the book’s account. His argument with Epps (“but begging the law’s pardon, it lies,” “There will be a reckoning yet”) is reproduced almost verbatim.

The real Bass, in fact, did more for Northup, sending multiple letters on his behalf, meeting with him in the middle of the night to hear his story, and—when they initially got no response from their letters—vowing to travel up to New York himself, to secure Northup’s freedom. The process took months, and Northup’s freedom eventually came from Bass’s first letter after all, so the movie understandably chooses to elide all this.

The Return Home

Northup’s return home is much as it is in the book, including Solomon’s learning that his daughter Margaret (who was 7 years old when he last saw her) now had a child of her own, named Solomon Northup. One devastating detail is left out: After 12 years apart, Margaret did not recognize her father.

*Correction, Nov. 4, 2013: This post was corrected to suggest a scene from the movie 12 Years a Slave was drawn from the book. The original article was accurate: Patsey’s plea for Northup to kill her was an invention of the movie. The original language has been restored.

Voir encore:

Historian at the Movies: 12 Years a Slave reviewed

Emma McFarnon

13th January 2014

As part of our new series, Dr Emily West, an associate professor of history at the University of Reading, reviews 12 Years a Slave – a true story about a free black man from upstate New York who is abducted and sold into slavery

Q: Did you enjoy the film?

A: The subject matter made 12 Years a Slave a very uncomfortable film to watch, although some of the actors gave astonishing performances.

I thought Chiwetel Ejiofor (as Solomon Northup) acted with incredible intensity, as did Michael Fassbender, who played Northup’s violent and sadistic master, Edwin Epps.

Steve McQueen’s unique direction used lingering close ups and poignant imagery of rural Louisiana in the days of slavery, which only added to the great tragedy of Northup’s harrowing story.

Enslaved people commonly described having ‘trees of scars’ on their backs – the result of brutal whippings they received from their masters or other people, and this film shockingly displayed the regularity of such treatment.

Moreover, we also witnessed, in truly horrific fashion, the myriad of circumstances under which enslaved men and women’s ‘trees of scars’ came into being. In one incident, Edwin Epps forces Solomon Northup at gunpoint to whip another slave, Patsey, until she collapses from pain. Yet Patsey’s only ‘crime’ was to leave her plantation in search of a bar of soap to clean herself.

Overall, I was pleased to see the highly realistic depictions of enslaved women’s lives in this film, especially the often-brutal sexual assaults they endured at the hands of white men. For example, Edwin Epps rapes Patsey and takes a sadistic pleasure in seeing her whipped. Mrs Epps, the plantation mistress, reacts in a typically jealous fashion by ‘blaming the victim’, and lashing out violently against Patsey.

White women rarely sought to help their enslaved women enduring sexual abuse.

Q: Was the film historically accurate?

A: I have never seen a film represent slavery so accurately. The film starkly and powerfully unveiled the sights and sounds of enslavement – from slaves picking cotton as they sang in the fields, to the crack of the lash down people’s backs.

I found the scene in the New Orleans slave market especially moving because of the juxtaposition between the refined, mid-19th-century house, from which a trader sold enslaved people, and the raw nakedness and commodification of the black bodies within it.

The trader made men and women strip naked for potential purchasers who looked inside slaves’ mouths to check the quality of their teeth. Buyers also ran their hands down slaves’ backs and arms to check for physical strength and agility, and no doubt they also viewed the naked enslaved women in terms of their sexual attractiveness and childbearing ability.

It was heartbreaking to see Solomon Northup’s friend, Eliza, so cruelly separated from her two children, Emily and Randall, as they were all sold to different owners.

We also heard a lot about the ideology behind enslavement. Masters such as William Ford (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) and Edwin Epps, although very different characters, both used an interpretation of Christianity to justify their ownership of slaves. They believed the Bible sanctioned slavery, and that it was their ‘Christian duty’ to preach the scriptures to their slaves.

Q: What did the film get right?

A: The film depicted the overall slave regime and all its horrors extremely well, but it also added depth and nuance to our understanding of slavery’s complexities. Masters such as Edwin Epps commonly hired out their slaves in times of economic need, and in the film we see Solomon Northup and other enslaved men being hired to a man to chop sugar cane – a crop grown primarily in Louisiana in the United States.

I was also impressed by the film’s awareness of social class: Solomon Northup comes into contact with various white men of lower social standing, some of whom are paid by Epps to labour alongside slaves. Indeed, it is one of these men, known only as ‘Bass’ (played by Brad Pitt), who helps Northup escape his ordeal. Bass brings an acquaintance of Solomon Northup to the plantation to confirm his free status, after which Northup returns to his family.

The film also got the smaller details right. For example, all enslaved people leaving their plantations had to have a written pass, in case they came across white patrollers (people employed to track down runaway slaves). When Solomon Northup leaves his plantation on an errand for Mrs Epps, he wore such a pass around his neck.

The film also succeeded in highlighting the stark visual contrast between the opulence of plantations mansions and the dingy, cramped, over-crowded quarters of the enslaved.

Q: What did it miss?

A: This is a minor point, but I felt the film possibly over-emphasised Solomon Northup’s social standing in New York state prior to his enslavement. In the film, Northup appears as a wealthy, successful individual, making a good living as a carpenter and musician. He wears smart clothes and appears to live in a tolerant, racially integrated community where skin colour does not matter.

But in reality, Northern black people were everyday victims of white racism and discrimination, and in the free states of the North, black people were typically the ‘last hired and first fired’. Notably, in his autobiography Northup himself describes the everyday “obstacle of color” in his life prior to his kidnapping and subsequent enslavement.

Nevertheless, I can understand why the filmmakers wanted to present a strong juxtaposition between Northup’s life as a free man in the North and the physical and mental trauma he endured while enslaved in the South.

Voir encore:

An Essentially American Narrative

A Discussion of Steve McQueen’s Film ‘12 Years a Slave’

Interviews by NELSON GEORGE

The NYT

October 11, 2013

Amid comic book epics, bromantic comedies and sequels of sequels, films about America’s tortured racial history have recently emerged as a surprisingly lucrative Hollywood staple. In the last two years, “The Help,” “Lincoln, » »Django Unchained, » »42” and “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” have performed well at the box office, gathering awards in some cases and drawing varying degrees of critical acclaim.

The latest entry in this unlikely genre is “12 Years a Slave,” the director Steve McQueen’s adaptation of Solomon Northup’s 1853 memoir. A free black man living in Saratoga, N.Y., Northup (played by Chiwetel Ejiofor) was kidnapped in 1841 and sold into brutal servitude in the Deep South. During his ordeal, he labors at different plantations, including the one owned by the sadistic Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender), who has a tortured sexual relationship with the slave Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o).

Following a buzzed-about preview screening at the Telluride Film Festival and the audience award at the Toronto International Film Festival, “12 Years a Slave” arrives in theaters Friday amid much online chatter that it may be headed for Oscar nominations. But Mr. Ejiofor, who portrays Northup, and Mr. McQueen, known for the bracingly austere “Hunger” and “Shame,” both say that getting audiences to see an uncompromisingly violent and quietly meditative film about America’s “peculiar institution” is still a challenge even with the presence of a producer, Brad Pitt, in a small role.

While the material was developed by Americans (including the screenwriter John Ridley) the director and most of the major cast members are British, a topic of concern among some early black commentators.

On a sweltering afternoon in SoHo last month, the author and filmmaker Nelson George led a round-table discussion at the Crosby Street Hotel with Mr. Ejiofor and Mr. McQueen. Joining them to provide a wider historical and artistic context were the Columbia University professor Eric Foner, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning “Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery,” among other books; and the artist Kara Walker, whose room-size tableaus of the Old South employing silhouettes have redefined how history and slavery are depicted in contemporary art and influenced many, including the “12 Years a Slave” production team. Current civil rights issues including the New York police practice of stop and frisk, recently declared unconstitutional; sexuality and slavery; Hollywood’s version of American history; and the themes of Obama-era cinema were among the topics of the sharp but polite dialogue. These are excerpts from the conversation.

Mr. Ejiofor, center, in the film “12 Years a Slave.”

Jaap Buitendijk/Fox Searchlight Pictures

Mr. Ejiofor, center, in the film “12 Years a Slave.”

Q. I wanted to start with contemporary analogues. One thing that came to mind was stop and frisk, a way the New York City police could stop a black or Latino male. I thought of Solomon as a character who, for a lot of contemporary audiences, would be that young black person. [To Mr. McQueen and Mr. Ejiofor] When you were seeking a way into the slave story, was what happens now part of that?

Steve McQueen Absolutely. History has a funny thing of repeating itself. Also, it’s the whole idea of once you’ve left the cinema, the story continues. Over a century and a half to the present day. I mean, you see the evidence of slavery as you walk down the street.

What do you mean?

McQueen The prison population, mental illness, poverty, education. We could go on forever.

Chiwetel, how did you balance what’s going on in the world with [Northup’s] reality?

Chiwetel Ejiofor That wasn’t the approach for me. I was trying to tell the story of Solomon Northup as he experienced his life. He didn’t know where all this was going. My journey started finishing a film in Nigeria. The last day, I went to the slave museum in Calabar, which was four or five rooms and some books, some interesting drawings of what they thought happened to people when the boats took them over. I left the following day and came to Louisiana. In my own way, I traveled that route.

Professor, your reaction to the film, its place in the contemporary discussion about slavery.

Eric Foner I believe this is a piece of history that everybody — black, white, Asian, everybody — has to know. You cannot understand the United States without knowing about the history of slavery. Having said that, I don’t think we should go too far in drawing parallels to the present. Slavery was a horrific institution, and it is not the same thing as stop and frisk. In a way, putting it back to slavery takes the burden off the present. The guys who are acting in ways that lead to inequality today are not like the plantation owner. They’re guys in three-piece suits. They’re bankers who are pushing African-Americans into subprime mortgages.

Kara, what are your thoughts on this?

Kara Walker There’s a uniquely American exuberance for violence or an exuberance for getting ahead in the world and making a name for themselves. I’m talking about the sort of plantation class that fought for the entrenchment of the slave system. That’s not something that can be overlooked when you think about the mythology of what it means to be an American, that one can become a self-made man if one is white and male and able.

Foner One of the things I liked about the movie and the way it portrayed violence, it’s pretty hard to take sometimes. But what it really highlights is the capriciousness of it. The owners, at one moment they’re trying to be pleasant, and the next moment they’re whipping you. You’re always kind of on this edge of not knowing. In fact slavery is like that at large. You don’t know when you’re going to be sold away from your family. People like to have some kind of stability in their life, but you can’t as a slave.

Servitude and Sexuality

There’s a lot of things to say about sex in the film, but one of the things that is going to leap out is Alfre Woodard’s character [Mistress Shaw, described in the book as the black wife of a white plantation owner].

McQueen In the book, she doesn’t say anything. I had a conversation with John Ridley, and I said: “Look, we need a scene with this woman. I want her to have tea.” It was very simple. Give her a voice.

Walker It’s not that it was that uncommon. That planter would be sort of the crazy one, the eccentric one, and she’s getting by.

Ejiofor It was against the law to marry, but it did happen.

Foner There were four million slaves in the U.S. in 1860 and several hundred thousand slave owners. It wasn’t just a homogeneous system. It had every kind of human variation you can imagine. There were black plantation owners in Louisiana, black slave owners.

Walker I was going to ask a question about a black woman who appears, a mysterious woman Solomon has sex with. She has sex with him, rather. I thought she was going to be a character in the film, and then she wasn’t.

McQueen Slaves are working all day. Their lives are owned, but those moments, they have to themselves. I just wanted a bit of tenderness — the idea of this woman reaching out for sexual healing in a way, to quote Marvin Gaye. She takes control of her own body. Then after she’s climaxed, she’s back where she was. She’s back in hell, and that’s when she turns and cries.

Solomon has a wife beforehand. In the film it seems as if he lived with Eliza [a fellow slave]. Then obviously [he has] some kind of relationship with Patsey, a friendship. But I wondered about Solomon’s own sexual expression.

Ejiofor His sexuality felt slightly more of a tangent. I think the real story is where sex is in terms of power.

Foner Remember, this book is one of the most remarkable first-person accounts of slavery. But it’s also a piece of propaganda. It’s written to persuade people that slavery needs to be abolished. He doesn’t say anything about sexual relations he may have had as a slave. There’s no place for such a discussion because of the purpose of the book.

Walker But in “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl” [by Harriet Ann Jacobs] and other slave narratives written by women, that’s always kind of the subtext, because there are children that are produced, relationships that are formed or allegiances that are formed with white men in order to have freedom.

Foner Harriet Jacobs was condemned by many people for revealing this, even antislavery people.

Walker Yes, but it’s always the subtext. Even “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” It’s like, there’s little mulatto children, and that’s the evidence.

Unlike most American directors, you’re not cutting all over the place. You put the camera there, and you let us experience the moment that is part of the lore of America, the slave master raping the black female slave [Patsey].

McQueen I didn’t want people to get out of it. Within that you see his actual love for her in a way. Obviously, the love isn’t given back to him, and it’s a horrendous rape.

Walker Staying on that scene and coming back to Patsey over and over, she is abused and deteriorating and wanting to die. We don’t need to see that scene over and over again.

McQueen I have huge sympathy for Epps, though. He’s in love with this woman and he doesn’t understand it. Why is he in love with this slave? He goes about trying to destroy his love for her by destroying her. The madness starts.

A View From Abroad

One of the things that has come up in early response to the film is a question from some black folks in America about the perspective, the fact that you are both foreigners, as it were.

Walker It will never be right for the black folks in America, I’m sorry. You can say it’s a historical document ——

McQueen Can I jump in there, please? I am British. My parents are from Grenada. My mother was born in Trinidad. Grenada is where Malcolm X’s mother comes from. Stokely Carmichael is Trinidadian. We could go on and on. It’s about that diaspora.

Ejiofor When I was in Savannah, Ga., they were telling me how they used to have special chains for the Igbos [a Nigerian ethnic group]. I told the man, “I’m Igbo.” Not having any sense of the internationalism of this event is a bad thing. I loved the fact that there were people from different places coming together to tell this story.

McQueen The only thing you can say about it is: Why was this book lost in America?

Foner Obviously, it wasn’t a best seller. Maybe it will be now. But it’s widely known. It’s used all over the place in history courses. Along with Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, this is probably the most widely read of what we call the slave narratives.

The Past in Hollywood’s Lens

Foner [To McQueen] I think it’s good that you are not a Hollywood director. Most Hollywood history is self-important in a way that this movie is not.

Walker The audience is intelligent. They could actually stand in Solomon’s shoes and go through the adventure together instead of the kind of voice-over Hollywood black Americana thing. That’s what I’m talking about with ownership. Over the years, you have this kind of heavy-handed style of narration. Cicely Tyson comes out with the makeup on and tells her story in “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.”

Can I bring up those heavy-handed Hollywood movies, since we’re on that topic? “Lincoln” as well as, obviously, “Django.” It seems like in the last few years, there have been black historical dramas that have been made out of Hollywood. We can throw in “The Help,” “The Butler.” There’s one theory that this is all a reaction to Obama’s presidency.

Ejiofor There’s probably not one cause. I’d say that’s true for a couple of those movies. Obama gets elected. People think we haven’t done the Jackie Robinson story yet. And some of these stories are great stories. The received idea has been it doesn’t sell well. But you have a couple of movies do incredibly good business.

Walker But Obama also wrote his autobiography. I think that might be a part of it, not just that there’s a person in power, but that he’s a best-selling author, getting large portions of America — black, white and other — to become a part of his story.

Foner The daddy, I suppose, of all this was “Glory,” which came out in the late ‘80s. “Roots,” of course, comes before that. All of them suffer from what I see as the problem of Hollywood history. Even in this movie, there’s a tendency toward: You’ve got to have one hero or one figure. That’s why historians tend to be a little skeptical about Hollywood history, because you lose the sense of group or mass.

Ejiofor But that’s movies as well.

Walker I was going to disagree a little bit. I didn’t find him particularly heroic, in that Frederick Douglass sense. He’s a little bit more compromised by more than just slavery. There’s this past, what he does or doesn’t do for Patsey. All of that makes him a much more complicated figure in a way.

McQueen I don’t think we should underplay Obama’s presidency and the effect of these films coming to fruition. The problem is: When he’s not the president anymore, will these films still exist?

The Historical Moment

[To the filmmakers] There’s a lot of talk about awards for the film. Is that relevant to you?

Ejiofor I’m always nervous when people start talking about hype and heat. It’s a story about a man who went through something remarkable. I feel like that still deserves its own reflection.

McQueen I made this film because I wanted to visualize a time in history that hadn’t been visualized that way. I wanted to see the lash on someone’s back. I wanted to see the aftermath of that, psychological and physical. I feel sometimes people take slavery very lightly, to be honest. I hope it could be a starting point for them to delve into the history and somehow reflect on the position where they are now.

[To Walker and Foner] What are your feelings about the impact it will have on people?

Walker I’m a sponge for historical images of black people and black history on film. It doesn’t happen often enough, and it doesn’t happen artfully enough most of the time when it does happen. I came away with this really kind of awful sense that I didn’t want to leave. The texture of the film made me want to stay in this space that would not be hospitable to me. Thinking also about who would see the film, I think about my parents, in Georgia. I think about the theater where they will see the film. People will go to the mall to see one of those Tyler Perry films and action films. Would this film make it there, and if it did, would it translate? My hope was that this film would reach that audience down there and have that sort of complicated space open up for them that wasn’t just an easy laugh or an easy cry.

Foner I think this movie is much more real, to choose a word like that, than most of the history you see in the cinema. It gets you into the real world of slavery. That’s not easy to do. Also, there are little touches that are very revealing, like a flashback where a slave walks into a shop in Saratoga. Yes, absolutely, Southerners brought slaves into New York State. People went on vacation, and they brought a slave.

McQueen I think people are ready. With Trayvon Martin, voting rights, the 150th anniversary of the abolition of slavery, 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and a black president, I think there’s a sort of perfect storm of events. I think people actually want to reflect on that horrendous recent past in order to go forward.

Oscar Whisper Campaigns: The Slurs Against ’12 Years,’ ‘Captain Phillips,’ ‘Gravity’ and ‘The Butler’

Scott Feinberg

10/23/2013

THR’s awards analyst breaks down how this year’s top contenders are being targeted for accuracy — and how they’re fighting back.

How do you know it’s awards season in Hollywood? When people start trash-talking good movies! As this year’s race to the Dolby gets underway, here are five examples of how contenders are being targeted — and defended.

FILM: 12 Years a Slave

CRITICISM: The best picture frontrunner is always targeted, and this one is no exception. No one disputes its central facts — in mid-19th century America, a free black man from the north named Solomon Northup was kidnapped and sold into slavery in the south — which were recounted in Northup’s autobiography and substantiated by historians. But an article in The New York Times on Sept. 22 dredged up and highlighted a 1985 essay by another scholar, James Olney, that questioned the « literal truth » of specific incidents in Northup’s account and suggested that David Wilson, the white « amanuensis » to whom Northup had dictated his story, had taken the liberty of sprucing it up to make it even more effective at rallying public opinion against slavery.

BACKLASH: Henry Louis Gates, one of America’s most well-known and respected scholars of black history and a co-editor of the 1985 compilation of essays in which Olney’s piece was included, served as a paid consultant on the film and spoke out in its defense after the Times article. « I know Northup’s narrative like the back of my hand and [the filmmakers] followed the text with great fidelity, » he told Mother Jones. « There’s no question about the historical accuracy. They did a wonderful job. »

FILM: Captain Phillips

CRITICISM: The New York Post ran a story on Oct. 13 with the headline « Crew Members: ‘Captain Phillips’ Is One Big Lie, » wherein it quoted several people who served under Richard Phillips on the cargo ship that he was captaining when it was hijacked — who were not named — ridiculing the film’s heroic portrayal of him. According to them, Phillips had a reputation for recklessness, disregarded warnings about piracy that could have prevented the incident and has since reframed the facts to make himself appear more heroic. The Post reported that crewmembers who cooperated with the film « were paid as little as $5,000 for their life rights by Sony and made to sign nondisclosure agreements — meaning they can never speak publicly about what really happened on that ship. »

BACKLASH: Many dismissed the Post story because it didn’t identify the crewmembers, who might be among the nine currently suing the cargo company for not better protecting them. Additionally, director Paul Greengrass wrote during a Reddit « Ask Me Anything » session that he and former 60 Minutes producer Michael Bronner, a colleague, « researched the background of the Maersk Alabama hijacking in exhausting detail over many months » and are « 100 percent satisfied that the picture we present of these events in the film … is authentic. I stand by the picture I give in the film, absolutely. » Phillips’ chief mate Shane Murphy also told a reporter emphatically, « The movie is accurate. »

FILM: Gravity

CRITICISM: Critics have cheered the drama for portraying space so convincingly, but some scientists have received it less kindly. On Oct. 6, noted astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson fact-checked it on Twitter in a series of 20 late-night tweets, pointing out, among other things, that satellites orbit Earth west to east so it’s strange that their debris orbited east to west; that the Hubble, the International Space Station and a Chinese Space Station are actually too far apart to be within sightlines of one another; and that, in zero-gravity conditions, a person would not drift away just because a tether is disconnected.

BACKLASH: On Oct. 10, Tyson posted a long note to Facebook remarking that he was « stunned » by the amount of media attention that his tweets received and stating, for the record, that he actually enjoyed the film. « For a film « to ‘earn’ the right to be criticized on a scientific level is a high compliment indeed, » he insisted, and he said that he regretted « not first tweeting the hundred things the movie got right. » Additionally, astronaut Buzz Aldrin wrote a guest column in the Oct. 11 issue of THR in which he asserted, « I was so extravagantly impressed by the portrayal of the reality of zero gravity. Going through the space station was done just the way that I’ve seen people do it in reality. » He acknowledged that the film was not devoid of scientific errors, but wrote that he was overall « very, very impressed » with it.

FILM: Lee Daniels’ The Butler

CRITICISM: The film revolves around one Cecil Gaines, a black man who worked in the White House under each president from Eisenhower to Reagan. The character is based on Eugene Allen, a black man who worked in the White House under each president from Truman through Reagan. In addition to that minor discrepancy, critics have highlighted the fact that the real man had one son, not two; that the son he had was neither killed in Vietnam, as one fictional son is, nor a radical member of the Black Panther party who later ran for elected office, as the other is; that he did not leave his job out of displeasure with Reagan’s Apartheid policy, but was actually particularly fond of the Reagans and just retired; and that there is no record of him ever meeting President Obama, although he did attend Obama’s first inauguration.

BACKLASH: The film advertises itself as being « inspired by true events, » not faithfully re-creating them, so those associated with it suggest that these creative liberties should be non-issues. To this end, the WGA has officially classified Danny Strong’s script as an original screenplay, not one adapted from Wil Haygood’s 2008 Washington Post article that it acknowledges in its credits, and The Weinstein Co. is pushing it for a best original screenplay Oscar nomination.

FILM: Saving Mr. Banks

CRITICISM: Critics of the drama about the making of Mary Poppins say that it presents a sanitized, whitewashed version of Walt Disney (played by Tom Hanks), noting that Disney’s movie studio, which financed and is distributing the film, would never associate itself with anything else. Disney was, in fact, not just a happy-go-lucky dreamer, but also a somewhat controversial figure: a hardcore right-winger who clashed bitterly with labor unions and whose views toward racial and religious minorities were not always admirable — facts that are, of course, not touched upon in Banks. According to Hanks, Disney wouldn’t even allow the filmmakers to show three-packs-a-day smoker Disney with a cigarette in his hands.

BACKLASH: The film has been wholeheartedly endorsed by composer Richard Sherman, who was one of only two songwriters ever under contract to Disney — the other was his late brother and collaborator Robert, with whom he co-wrote the score for Mary Poppins — and who knew Walt better than just about anyone who is alive today. It’s hard to imagine that he would so closely align himself with a film that misrepresented Disney’s essence.

In 12 Years a Slave, a broken Christianity

Valerie Elverton Dixon

Faithstreet

Religion ought to connect us.

The root of the word is ligare. It is the same root as the word ligature, the stuff that holds the skeleton together. At its best, religion helps us to see the spiritual ligature that connects us, and shows us that the notion that we are individual particles floating separate and apart in a beam of sunlight is a deception. We are tied together by the breath of life.

When religion rips, tears, breaks, fractures, it leaves our fragile humanity broken, dazed, confused, and dangerous. From this brokenness true horrors are born. One such abomination was the slave system in the United States depicted in the recently-released movie “12 Years a Slave.” This movie, based on a true story, follows Solomon Northup from his comfortable life as a free African American musician living with this wife and two children in New York state to a life in slavery after he is kidnapped in Washington, D.C. It is a powerful film that tells a powerful story that many people in the United Sates do not want to remember.

The movie shows us a fractured Christianity. People take their Bible in pieces. A slave owner uses a tiny fragment of Scripture to justify torture. An African American woman who has found favor with her master, who lives well with servants serving her, finds solace in the story of the Exodus of the Hebrew slaves from Egypt. She believes that God in God’s own time will deliver an epic punishment for the sin of slavery. Another fragment. Then there is the white itinerant worker who tells the slave owner that there is no justice in slavery, that there are laws that apply to all human beings equally.

Did the slave system break religion or did a broken religion allow the slave system?

In the movie we see how the songs of faith —Roll Jordan Roll— gave enslaved people the strength to endure the degradations of slavery. And those indignities were numerous: children sold away from parents causing ceaseless lamentation, the humiliation of losing sovereignty over one’s own body. Someone else can use your body for work, sex, revenge, physical and psychological torture, and the satisfaction of their own insane will-to-power.

We see the sad fact that oppression oppresses everyone—slave master, mistress, all classes and all races. Everyone is afraid.

Thomas Jefferson knew this to be true about slavery. In his “Notes on the State of Virginia,” he describes African Americans through the lens of white supremacy. His prediction on the possibility of the races ever living together in harmony in the United States is thoroughly pessimistic. However he is clear-eyed when he sees the harm slavery does to both master and slave. He writes: “The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.” (Query XVIII) He writes further: “Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever: that considering numbers, nature and natural means only, a revolution of the wheel of fortune, an exchange of situation, is among possible events: that it may become probable by supernatural interference! The Almighty has no attribute which can take side with us in such a contest.”

The fear of such retribution has kept white supremacy in place all these years. The fear that if oppressed people ever get power that they will perpetrate the same oppression as was perpetrated against them forces people to continue living inside delusions of race, class, sex, sexual orientation. And we too often use religion as a justification for this fear.

I say: 12 Years a Slave is a difficult movie to watch, but an important movie to see. It is important to see so that we may knit together the various strands of our religious faith and let it bind us back to true human unity, back to our own humanity, back to justice and even to love.

Valerie Elverton Dixon is the founder of JustPeaceTheory.com and author of Just Peace Theory Book One: Spiritual Morality, Radical Love, and the Public Conversation.

Voir encore:

12 Years a Slave

What could any of us do, but pray for mercy?

Kenneth R. Morefield

Christianity today

October 18, 2013

I’d be skeptical of any review of 12 Years a Slave (which won the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto International Film Festival last weekend and releases to theaters next month) that does not begin and end with « Lord, have mercy on us. » For all its technical merits, the film stands or falls as a moral argument: « Slavery is an evil that should befall no one, » says Bass, played by the film’s producer – Brad Pitt – in a small but crucial role.

12 Years a Slave makes plenty of assertions. Some are subtle; most are painfully simple. But all of them come in an immersive experience that operates from the inside out, that moves the viewer by engaging the whole person – body, mind, and soul.

The story is based on the narrative of Solomon Northrup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free black citizen from New York who is kidnapped while on a trip to Washington, D.C. and sold into slavery. We’re meant to assume that he is drugged by his white performing partners.

When he awakes in a basement cell, the camera pans slowly upward to the Washington skyline, juxtaposing icons of freedom and democracy with the painful image of imprisonment and oppression. It is a forceful shot, perhaps the most on-the-nose of the film, and I wouldn’t be surprised if less sympathetic reviewers accuse McQueen of being too heavy handed.

Except how can one be too heavy handed about slavery? Isn’t part of our irritation because we want, need, and have come to expect our individual and corporate failures to be forgiven as soon as they are acknowledged and glossed over in safe abstractions and historical generalizations?

In many ways, Northrup, an educated free man, is the ideal avatar for the modern audience. He, like us, does not come to slavery naturally or easily. Also like us, he tries and fails to understand slavery, master its internal logic, and use his intelligence to do the right things in order to survive. Solomon frequently replies with some form of « just as instructed » when confronted by power, as though perfectly following instructions gives some modicum of protection in a world where nobody forces the rich and powerful to be fair and reasonable.

But what if there is no rhyme or reason, no logic, no right move to be played? How can someone find protection in being a perfect slave, when slavery itself is a series of irreconcilable orders and impossible commands? We all like to believe that we could transcend these circumstances, that the values and beliefs instilled in us could equip us to make the right decisions. But what about when one must always do more with less – with, for instance, a quota system that calls for whipping a man at the end of each day if he picks less than average? When the demands of a mistress and those of a master are in conflict, how can one please them both? What about when the choice is between picking up a lash or consigning others to the noose?

It’s also convenient to think that we would be like Bass, aware of the evils of slavery and willing to risk our own safety to confront it. But Bass acts out of a sense of duty, not personal goodness. In a scene that may resonate the most with modern audiences, Master Ford (Benedict Cumberbatch) gives in to evil against his own inclination for the most prosaic of reasons – debt – and the film shines here, and throughout, when it illustrates and explores different kinds of bondage without undercutting the place of total enslavement in the hierarchy of evils.

Of course, we would all rather be in debt than enslaved. But perhaps by seeing how going against conscience chips away at our humanity (rather than simply blasting it to smithereens), we begin to understand how some of the conflicts faced by the characters are primal and eternal, not just political or of the moment. Because 12 Years a Slave frames its moral conundrums in these terms, it feels the most contemporarily relevant of all the depictions of slavery we see at the movies.

It seems important here to understand how the film depicts religion and, specifically, Christianity. McQueen often lets the sound or dialogue from one scene continue after the visuals have transferred to the next, and this device is used pointedly when the words of sermons given by Master Ford are superimposed onto the reality of the lives his slaves live. And Master Epps’s (Fassbinder) theology is openly repugnant to modern sensibilities—he uses the language of the Bible (« that’s scripture ») to insist that God has appointed the order of slave and master. After one brutal act of torture, he proclaims that « there is no sin, » since a man may do as he pleases with his property.

Yet the film is not simply and only anti-Christian. Certainly, Pitt’s character speaks and acts in moral terms. But more than that, 12 Years doesn’t shy away from showing the inexpressibly complicated relationship the slaves have with the God of their oppressors. Embittered by the hypocrisy and sanctimony of the slave-owners and angry at God’s seeming abandonment of him and his fellow slaves, Solomon often rages silently, as all his doubts and anger must be repressed.

Others are able to find solace in furtive expression of faith. One prays, « God love him; God bless him; God keep him » over a buried comrade. Even that moment comes with some bitterly cynical overtones: God keep him better than he kept him in this life.

Yet the film’s emotional zenith comes in a cathartic moment when Solomon participates in a spiritual. Ejiofor is able to convey so much in his vocal inflections: anger, despair, renewal, and, finally hope. Hope for what? Earlier he has said, « I don’t want to survive; I want to live. » The spiritual, I would argue, indicates that he can hope to survive until one day he will live again.

The other masterful scene in the film is Solomon’s farewell to Patsy, a fellow slave whom the film painfully but rightly never mentions again. The resolution to Solomon’s story is laced with pain, not triumph, as he comes to realize that with new life comes survivor’s guilt—and grief for all those still waiting to live again.

God have mercy on us all until they do.

Caveat Spectator

12 Years a Slave is rated R, as it should be. It contains multiple usages of painful language, depictions of lynching, murder, and torture. There is nudity and depictions of human sexuality. A major theme of the film is the dehumanizing effects of slavery. In presenting such a theme, it is often painful to watch, as it should be.

Kenneth R. Morefield is an Associate Professor of English at Campbell University. He is the editor of Faith and Spirituality in Masters of World Cinema, Volumes I & II, and the founder of 1More Film Blog.

Voir aussi:

The Realism Canard, Or: Why Fact-Checking Fiction Is Poisoning Criticism.

Isaac Butler

Parabasis

October 09, 2013

(UPDATE: Hello Dish readers and others who have been sent here from various corners of the internet. Welcome! This is Parabasis, a blog about culture and politics. I’m Isaac Butler, an erstwhile theater director and writer. I write most (but not all) of this site. You all might be particularly interested in The Fandom Issue, a special week-long series we did devoted to issues of fandom in popular culture.)

Every work of fictional narrative art takes place within its own world. That world may resemble our world. But it is never our world. It is always the world summoned into being in the gap between its creators and its audience.

Yet at the same time, the art we experience shapes our view of the world. As Oscar Wilde puts it in the Decay of Lying:

Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. This results not merely from Life’s imitative instinct, but from the fact that the self-conscious aim of Life is to find expression, and that Art offers it certain beautiful forms through which it may realise that energy. It is a theory that has never been put forward before, but it is extremely fruitful, and throws an entirely new light upon the history of Art.

Wilde discusses this in terms of appreciating sunsets through the lens of Turner; perhaps our modern day equivalent is juries being incapable of understanding that real world evidence gathering isn’t like CSI.

This odd tension– that narrative art creates its own world yet helps shape our view of ours– has given birth to (or at least popularity to) a new brand of criticism that measures a story against real life to point out all the ways that it is lacking. You’ve seen it before, right? « Five Things Parks & Rec gets right about small town budgeting bylaws. » Now with Gravity busting box office records, we’re getting astronauts and scientists telling us that there are many points where the film departs from real life. Entire critical careers are now founded on churning out « What X Gets Right/Wrong About Y » blog posts, posts that often completely ignore issues of aesthetics, construction, theme or effect to simply focus on whether in « real life » a given circumstance of a story would be possible.

In real life, people don’t talk the way they do in movies or television or (especially) books. Real locations aren’t styled, lit, or shot the way they are on screen. The basic conceits of point of view in literature actually make no sense and are in no way « realistic. » Realism isn’t verisimilitude. It’s a set of stylistic conventions that evolve over time, are socially agreed upon, and are hotly contested. The presence of these conventions is not a sign of quality. Departure from them is not a sign of quality’s absence.

The Realism Canard is the most depressing trend in criticism I have ever encountered. I would rather read thousands of posts of dismissive snark about my favorite books than read one more blog post about something that happened in a work of fiction wasn’t realistic or factually accurate to our world as we know it. Dismissive snark, after all, just reflects badly on whomever wrote it (at best) and (at worst) cheapens the work it is written about. The Realism Canard gradually cheapens art itself over time. It’s worse that the reduction of art to plot, or to « content. » Those can still form the basis of interesting conversations. Instead, we’re talking here not only about the complete misreading of what something is (fiction vs. nonfiction), but the holding of something to a standard it isn’t trying to attain and often isn’t interested in (absolute verisimilitude). We’re talking about the reduction of truth to accuracy. We’re talking about reducing the entire project of fiction so that we can, as Grover Norquist said of the Federal Government, get it to the size where it can be drowned in the bathtub.

And I suspect on some level this is part of the point of the The Realism Canard. That art in its size and complexity is too much to handle sometimes, and too troubling. That even though we say fiction’s job is to take us out of ourselves, we don’t really want to be pushed. So we must take it down a peg, to a point where it is beneath us and thus can be put in its place. And the easiest way to do this is to cross check it against « real life » and find it lacking.

Take this piece about Breaking Bad in The New Inquiry. It has some interesting points to make about the show’s racial politics, but before it can get there it, it must shrink the show to manageable size by trying to come up with ways that its depiction of the drug trade isn’t « realistic, » landing on the show’s overemphasis on the purity of Walter’s meth. Set aside that the author’s critique of the show’s purity emphasis on realism grounds is wrong (purity matters because Walt is a wholesaler and the purer his product is the more that it can be stepped on by the people he sells it to), and set aside that the purity matters for character reasons (no one has ever been able to do what Walt figures out). The accuracy question with regard to Breaking Bad is a complete sideshow. Breaking Bad is not a work of realism. Its aesthetic and language is highly stylized, and its plotting is all clockwork determinism, as anyone who has watched the second season can attest. It’s not trying to exist in our world. It’s trying to exist in its world. You might as well criticize it for having a sky that’s yellower than ours.

I don’t mean to pick on that TNI piece, it just happened to be the latest one I’d read. At least it has something beyond factchecky questions to ask. Once you get through that bit, it’s well written and eye opening to some racial dynamics I’m ashamed to admit I hadn’t fully considered. But still. The Realism Canard is a problem, and it’s everywhere (here’s another one from Neil deGrasse Tyson about Gravity) and I feel it spreading more than ever over the internet’s criticosphere.

Are there exceptions to this? Obviously. There are works where the idea that what you are watching is a fictional representation of things fairly close to our own world is part of the works’ value, whether it be « based on a true story » films like Zero Dark Thirty and The Fifth Estate or social issue (and agit prop) works like Won’t Back Down. And there are ways of discussing the differences between art and life that illuminate rather than reduce. That ask the question « what does it mean that they changed this thing about our world? » rather than assuming some kind of cheating or bad faith. Or ways that treat these differences not as a form of criticism, but rather a form of interesting trivia. Or, in the case of Mythbusters, edutainment.

There is also the issue of representational politics, particularly in light of what we know of narrative’s deep intertwining with the processes of stereotype formation in the brain. But I do not think it’s inconsistent to argue for diverse representations of the underrepresented– and more characters that are fully rounded– and the imaginative power of art.

What matters ultimately in a work of narrative is if the world and characters created feels true and complete enough for the work’s purposes. It does not matter, for example, that the social and economic structure of The Hunger Games makes absolutely no sense. What matters is whether or not the world works towards the purposes of the novel rather than undermining them. People praise August Wilson’s portrayal of poor and working class African American life in Pittsburgh, but many of his plays feature an off stage character who is over three hundred years old and has magic powers. One of them ends with a cat coming back from the dead.

The Wire’s « realism » and « accuracy » are both shouted from the rooftops, but, for all of its deeply known and felt and researched world-building, it abandons both when it needs to. There is no way that Hamsterdam would exist in present day Baltimore. It’s a thought experiment, an attempt to game out what drug legalization might be like. No one really cares, because it works within the confines of the show. Season 5’s fake serial killer plotline is not actually any more preposterous than Hamsterdam. But it doesn’t work largely because the shortened episode order left Simon et al without enough time to adequately set it up and the tonal shift in Season 5 to a more satirical, broadly-painted mode feels abrupt and off-putting. The problem, in other words, has nothing to do with whether it would really happen, or how journalism or policing really work. It’s about the world the show has created and its integrity.

Voir de même:

12 Years a Slave: the book behind the film

As Steve McQueen’s Oscar favourite 12 Years a Slave opens at cinemas, Sarah Churchwell returns to the 1853 memoir that inspired it – one of many narratives that exposed the brutal truth about slavery, too long ignored or sentimentalised by Hollywood

Sarah Churchwell

The Guardian

10 January 2014

In 1825 a fugitive slave named William Grimes wrote an autobiography in order to earn $500 to purchase freedom from his erstwhile master, who had discovered his whereabouts in Connecticut and was trying to remand Grimes back into slavery. At the end of his story the fugitive makes a memorable offer: « If it were not for the stripes on my back which were made while I was a slave, I would in my will, leave my skin a legacy to the government, desiring that it might be taken off and made into parchment, and then bind the constitution of glorious happy and free America. » Few literary images have more vividly evoked the hypocrisy of a nation that exalted freedom while legitimising slavery.

12 Years a Slave: A True Story of Betrayal, Kidnap and Slavery (Hesperus Classics)

by Solomon Northup

The Life of William Grimes was the first book-length autobiography by a fugitive American slave, in effect launching a new literary genre, the slave narrative. (The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, published in 1789, is widely regarded as the first ever, but Equiano published his book in Britain.) Scholars have identified about 100 American slave narratives published between 1750 and 1865, with many more following after the end of the civil war. The most famous are those by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, but the release of a new film has stirred interest in the account of a man named Solomon Northup. His book, Twelve Years a Slave, one of the longest and most detailed slave narratives, was a bestseller when it appeared in 1853. Directed by Steve McQueen and starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender, Brad Pitt and Benedict Cumberbatch, the film version, which opens in the UK today, has already been hailed as an Oscars front-runner.

This is something of an accomplishment for the first major Hollywood film to be inspired by a slave’s account of his own suffering. America’s vexed relationship with its legacy of slavery has always been reflected in its cinema; landmark films such as the virulently racist Birth of a Nation (1915), the first film ever screened at the White House, and the blockbuster apologia for slavery that was Gone With the Wind (1939), whitewashed in every sense popular images of institutionalised slavery. Slave narratives are the most powerful corrective we have to such distortions and evasions, firsthand accounts from some of the people who suffered the atrocities of slavery.

Gone with the Wind Vivien Leigh and Hattie McDaniel in Gone With the Wind. Photograph: Everett Collection / Rex Feature

Unlike most authors of slave narratives, Northup was not a fugitive when he co-authored his book with a white man named David Wilson: he was a free man who had been kidnapped as an adult and sold into slavery. In 1841 the 33-year-old son of a former slave was living in upstate New York with his wife and children. He could read and write, was a skilled violinist, had done some farming and was working as a carpenter. One day he was approached by two white men who made him a generous financial offer to join a travelling music show. Without telling his wife or friends (thinking, he wrote, that he would be back before he was missed), Northup travelled to Washington DC with them, where he was drugged, had his free papers stolen, and awoke in chains on the floor of the notorious Williams Slave Pen (ironically now the site of the Air and Space Museum). Protesting that he was a free man, Northup was beaten nearly to death and warned that he would be killed if he ever spoke up again. He was a slave now, and had no rights. Describing his march through the nation’s capital in chains, Northup delivers an embittered denunciation in the same spirit as that of William Grimes: « So we passed, handcuffed and in silence, through the streets of Washington – through the capital of a nation, whose theory of government, we were told, rests on the foundation of man’s inalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness! Hail! Columbia, happy land, indeed! »

Taken to New Orleans, Northup was sold at auction, and sent to the plantations of Louisiana bayou country. For the next 12 years, along with several hundred other local slaves, Northup was beaten, whipped, starved, and forced to work six days a week (with three days off at Christmas, « the carnival season with the children of bondage »), for a series of increasingly venal masters. Only on Sundays were slaves permitted to work for themselves, earning a few pennies to purchase such necessities as eating utensils. (Good Christian slave-owners would whip a slave and pour salt into the wounds, but wouldn’t dream of breaking the sabbath.)

At first, Northup found himself in the comparatively benign hands of William Ford, a minister who never questioned the slave system he had inherited, but never abused his slaves either. But soon Ford was in financial difficulties, and sold Northup to the vicious John Tibeats, an irrational, violent man who nearly killed Northup more than once. After attempting to run away, and being passed to another merciless owner, Northup was sold to Edwin Epps, a drunken, sadistic bully, who ran the plantation where Northup would work until he was finally rescued.

Along the way Northup chronicles in some detail life on a plantation, cataloguing everything from the method for cultivating cotton and sugar cane to the proper handles for various axes. And he explains the penal system of torture and threat that all slaves endured. The barbarity of slave life was not limited to the large structural injustice of bondage: it also licensed masters to behave as unreasonably as they pleased. The daily unfairnesses that resulted were, in Northup’s telling, often the most intolerable aspect of slavery. Once Tibeats flew at Northup with an axe, threatening to cut off his head for using the wrong nails, although the nails had been given to Northup by the overseer. He tells of a young slave doing a task as instructed, then sent on another task, only to be whipped for not finishing the first, despite having been ordered to interrupt it. « Maddened at such injustice, » the young slave seized an axe and « literally chopped the overseer in pieces »; he continued to justify his action even as the rope was put around his neck.

12 YEARS A SLAVE Michael Fassbender and Chiwetel Ejiofor in 12 Years a Slave. Photograph: Sportsphoto Ltd/Allstar

For female slaves, bondage often included another agony: rape. Rape is a theme in most slave narratives; the 1857 autobiography of William Anderson (comprehensively subtitled Twenty-four Years a Slave; Sold Eight Times! In Jail Sixty Times!! Whipped Three Hundred Times!!! or The Dark Deeds of American Slavery Revealed) goes further, addressing the incest that often ensued: the slave south, he writes, « is undoubtedly the worst place of incest and bigamy in the world ». Northup does not mention the endemic incest of slavery, but he does dwell on the torment of a fellow slave named Patsey, who was repeatedly raped by Epps. The narrative euphemises Epps’s assaults with conventionally acceptable phrases such as « lewd intentions ». But the implications are clear: « If she uttered a word in opposition to her master’s will, the lash was resorted to at once, to bring her to subjection. » Meanwhile Patsey was constantly attacked by her mistress, for « seducing » her husband. Northup tried to reason with Mrs Epps: « She being a slave, and subject entirely to her master’s will, he alone was answerable. » But Mrs Epps continued to persecute Patsey, resorting to such petty tyrannies as denying her soap. When Patsey ran to a neighbouring plantation to borrow some, Epps accused her of meeting a lover. He had her stripped naked, turned face down, tied hand and foot to four stakes, and whipped until she was flayed, at which point brine was poured upon her back. Patsey survived, but Northup writes that the ordeal broke her.

Eventually a Canadian named Bass came to Epps’s plantation and was heard voicing abolitionist sentiments, a dangerous heresy in the slaveholding south. Northup’s narrative stages a debate between Bass and Epps: Epps offers the standard justification for slavery, that black people were naturally bestial and ignorant, and thus deserved subjugation. Bass counters with the circular nature of this argument: « You’d whip one of them if caught reading a book, » Bass points out. « They are held in bondage, generation after generation, deprived of mental improvement, and who can expect them to possess much knowledge? … If they are baboons, or stand no higher in the scale of intelligence than such animals, you and men like you will have to answer for it … Talk about black skin, and black blood; why, how many slaves are there on this bayou as white as either of us? And what difference is there in the colour of the soul? Pshaw! The whole system is as absurd as it is cruel. »

This is one of the most surprising aspects of Northup’s narrative: its clarity about the workings of the « peculiar institution » as a system. Chattel slavery, Northup writes, « brutalised » master and slave alike; this is why slave-owners behaved so monstrously, even against their best financial interests (a dead slave, after all, was lost money). Surrounded by appalling human suffering on a daily basis, slave-owners became inured and desensitised to it, « brutified and reckless of human life ». Northup goes further, declaring: « It is not the fault of the slaveholder that he is cruel, so much as it is the fault of the system under which he lives. » In the same spirit, he repeatedly insists that not all slave-owners were depraved, defending William Ford and others he encountered. These people were not inherently evil; rather, « the influence of the iniquitous system necessarily fosters an unfeeling and cruel spirit ». Equally modern is the book’s cogency about the madness of a race-based slavery in which so-called « black » slaves could in fact be lighter skinned than their owners. Northup pointedly describes one slave, who was « far whiter than her owner, or any of his offspring. It required a close inspection to distinguish in her features the slightest trace of African blood. »

It was Bass who came to Northup’s aid, risking his own life to get a letter to Northup’s family and friends in New York. They took the letter to a white man named Henry Northup, a relative of the man who had owned and freed Solomon’s father. Henry Northup travelled to Louisiana in early 1853, where he was assisted by the local authorities, who offered their support on the basis that the whole slave system depended on the « good faith » of distinguishing between free men and slaves. This is one way of putting it, although there was not much good faith evident in chattel slavery. A far more likely explanation relates back to the fact that many slaves had white skin: it was in the best interests of any free person in a slave country to protect the rights of other free people. Solomon Northup was liberated, and the two Northup men (sharing a name only by virtue of the system they were engaged in fighting), travelled together to Washington DC, where they tracked down the men who had sold Solomon into slavery and brought them to trial.

The defence offered by the slave-traders comes as a shock to the reader: they argued that Solomon Northup had voluntarily sold himself into slavery. As defences go, this may not sound convincing, but the argument was actually that Northup had agreed to engage in a scam with his « kidnappers »: they would sell Northup into slavery, secure his release with his free papers, and then divide the proceeds. The case was never argued in the nation’s capital, however: Northup was unable to testify in court because he was black.

The trial made it into the newspapers, fanning the flames of a heated national debate about the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. Designed to mediate between the demands of slaveholders and the rights recognised by free states in the struggle over the status of runaway slaves, the law criminalised helping runaways and declared that if a person were accused of being a fugitive slave, an affidavit by the claimant was sufficient to establish title. Those identified as fugitive slaves had no right to a jury trial and could not testify on their own behalf, which unsurprisingly led to a great surge in the number of free black people who were conscripted into slavery. Like Solomon Northup, they could not testify in their own defence.

Beloved Kimberly Elise, Oprah Winfrey and Thandie Newton in Beloved.

The blatant injustice of the new law, and the widespread feeling that slave states’ rights had trumped those of free states, led to a great outcry. For the next decade, the papers were filled with stories such as that of Margaret Garner, an escaped slave who in 1856 murdered her baby rather than see it forced into slavery (the true story that inspired Toni Morrison’s novel Beloved). When Garner was brought to trial, abolitionists used the case to argue that the Fugitive Slave Law was not only unconstitutional; it was so twisted that it had driven a mother to murder her own child in order to save it from « the seething hell of American slavery ». But the law was clear: Garner and her family were returned to slavery. The presiding commissioner ruled that « it was not a question of feeling to be decided by the chance current of his sympathies; the law of Kentucky and of the United States made it a question of property ».

Reading countless such stories in the newspapers, an abolitionist teacher named Harriet Beecher Stowe began writing a novel, which she based in part on an 1849 slave narrative called The Life of Josiah Henson. In June 1851 the first instalment of Uncle Tom’s Cabin appeared in the Nationalist Era, an abolitionist magazine. Readers were gripped, and when the book was published in 1852 its sales were spectacular: 20,000 copies were sold in the first three weeks, 75,000 in the first three months; 305,000 in the first year. By 1857 Uncle Tom’s Cabin was still selling 1,000 copies a week, and during the civil war the (probably apocryphal) story circulated that when Abraham Lincoln met Stowe he greeted her by saying, « So this is the little lady who started this great war. »

Uncle Tom’s Cabin was calculated to appeal to the conflicted emotions of 19th-century Americans, making them feel the suffering and injustice of slavery, rather than offering philosophical or legal arguments against it. Stowe uses the techniques of sentimental fiction to show the devastating effects of slavery on family life, charging that it is the Christian duty of every good woman in the nation to fight against it. In one key chapter, a senator’s wife, « a timid, blushing little woman », challenges her husband explicitly on the Fugitive Slave Law, informing him that it’s « downright cruel and unchristian » and chastising him for his support of it: « You ought to be ashamed, John! Poor, homeless, houseless creatures! It’s a shameful, wicked, abominable law, and I’ll break it, for one, the first time I get a chance … I can read my Bible; and there I see that I must feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and comfort the desolate; and that Bible I mean to follow. » It was a brilliantly effective strategy, cutting across the divided heart of antebellum America and persuading white Christians across the country to join the abolitionist cause.

Unsurprisingly, Uncle Tom’s Cabin was excoriated in the south as malicious propaganda; slavery advocates argued that theirs was a benign, paternalistic system. No one had ever heard of such viciousness as that shown, for example, by Stowe’s villain, the cruel Simon Legree, who owns a cotton plantation in the Red River region of Louisiana. Determined to vindicate her depiction of American slavery, Stowe published A Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin in 1853, in which she listed a number of documentary sources that corroborated her account. One slave she contacted was the runaway Harriet Jacobs, who had been giving abolitionist speeches in the north-east; instead of letting Stowe tell her story, Jacobs decided to write her own, which was published in 1861 as Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. An account that Stowe did use in her Key was the story of Northup, which she had read about in the New York Times, and whose experience on a plantation near the Red River closely resembled her portrait of life on Legree’s fictional plantation.

That same year, Northup and David Wilson, a white lawyer and aspiring author, published Twelve Years a Slave, which was dedicated to Stowe and marketed as « another Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin ». It was a huge success, selling 30,000 copies in its first two years, three times as many as had The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass when it appeared in 1845. Several more editions followed, and the press continued to cover the story of Northup’s ultimately fruitless efforts to prosecute the men who had kidnapped him. Meanwhile, he may have been working with the Underground Railroad to help fugitive slaves escape to Canada, and began travelling around the north-east making speeches in support of abolition. He was also involved in several theatre productions based on his book, but none were successful.

Over the years, Northup’s book fell into obscurity; when slave narratives began to enter the American curriculum in the 1980s, they were generally represented by those of Douglass and Jacobs, which are both self-authored and stylistically superior to Northup’s ghost-written account. There is some irony to this latter point, as both Jacobs and Douglass were initially accused of being incapable of writing such fine books, an assumption that owed something to racism but more to the denial of literacy to American slaves. As Henry Louis Gates Jr, an expert on slave narratives and consultant on the film 12 Years a Slave, has noted, literacy « was the very commodity that separated animal from human being, slave from citizen ». Douglass writes in My Bondage of the moment when, having learned to read, he realised that his illiteracy was itself « the bloody whip, for my back, and here was the iron chain; and my good, kind master, he was the author of my situation ». With literacy Douglass « now understood what had been to me a most perplexing difficulty – to wit, the white man’s power to enslave the black man … From that moment, I understood the pathway from slavery to freedom. »

Slave-owners understood this, too, and responded savagely to any slave’s attempts to learn to read or write; a common punishment was amputation. As a result, literacy among slaves was very low and most fugitive slaves relied on white « amanuenses » to record their stories for them. Even the few who could write were still edited or endorsed by white abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison or Lydia Maria Child, a patronage system that offered insufficient challenge to the pro-slavery argument that slaves were incapable of learning. When slave narratives were rediscovered in the 20th century, the fact that most had been ghosted or edited by white people once again raised the question of their authenticity: many historians repeated the century-old charge that the narratives were exaggerated or fabricated by abolitionists. Unfortunately, much of the US coverage of McQueen’s film has rehearsed these invidious questions, but the underlying truths of the atrocities of slavery are beyond dispute, and not altered by the fact that any narrative is, by definition, constructed.

In the case of Northup, his account was verified by the historian who recovered his story, a woman named Sue Eakin. Twelve years old when she discovered a copy of Northup’s narrative in a local plantation in 1930, Eakin was intrigued to find it described the area in which she lived. Six years later, as a student at Louisiana State University, she found a copy of the book in a local bookstore. The owner sold it to her for 25 cents, telling her it was worthless: « There ain’t nothing to that old book. Pure fiction. » Eakin would devote her life, she later said, to proving him wrong.

Eakin set about discovering everything she could about Northup’s life, tracking down its details, using the legal and financial records of the men who owned him to corroborate his account of his enslavement. (Northup himself quotes more than once from such records: « The deed of myself from Freeman to Ford, as I ascertained from the public records in New-Orleans on my return, was dated June 23d 1841. »)

Unlike many slave narratives, Northup’s named names: the people who mistreated him were still alive, and their own records substantiate the facts of his story. Eakin died in 2009; three years later amateur historian David Fiske published Solomon Northup: His Life Before and After Slavery. Between them, Eakin and Fiske established that Northup played a significant role in his book’s composition, working closely with Wilson over the three months they wrote it. Fiske even found reports of corroboration made by Edwin Epps himself, from union soldiers who met him in Louisiana during the civil war: « Old Mr Epps yet lives, and told us that a greater part of the book was truth, » they reported in 1866.

In her extensive notes to Twelve Years a Slave, Eakin adds some fascinating details to Northup’s story. He alludes early in his narrative to habits of « shiftlessness and extravagance » into which he had fallen before his capture; Eakin remarks that such habits might help explain the court records showing he was convicted of three incidences of assault, as well as arrests for public drunkenness. His capricious decision to accompany his kidnappers to Washington also seems characteristic, and Eakin even hints that the conspiracy theory of Northup’s abduction may not have been entirely implausible. She was unable to ascertain what happened to Northup after 1863; there were rumours that he was kidnapped again, or murdered, but Fiske found evidence that Northup was in Vermont in the 1860s, and reports that his lectures may have become viewed as a local nuisance. Northup may have « given up, resorted to drink, and sunk below the surface ». Or perhaps he lit out like Huck Finn for the territory of the west.

These less than hagiographic details have not made their way into McQueen’s film, and given that it was produced as a corrective to a century of Hollywood sentimentalising and glorifying slavery, this is neither surprising nor objectionable. It seems McQueen also underplayed Northup’s insistence that not all his owners were cruel – again this is understandable, especially given that Northup’s protestations may have been designed to placate white readers. But slaves don’t have to be saints or their masters monsters in order for slavery to be an atrocity: our stories will remain trapped in simplistic pieties until we can admit that a man could be a rogue and still have been martyred by a barbaric system in a land that has yet to accept the terms of William Grimes’s offer, and admit how bound its constitution is by the flayed skin of its victims.

• Steve McQueen’s film is on general release.

12 Years a Slave (2013)

Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Brad Pitt, Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch

based on the 1853 autobiography ‘Twelve Years a Slave’ by Solomon Northup

This is no fiction, no exaggeration. If I have failed in anything, it has been in presenting to the reader too prominently the bright side of the picture. I doubt not hundreds have been as unfortunate as myself; that hundreds of free citizens have been kidnapped and sold into slavery, and are at this moment wearing out their lives on plantations… -Solomon Northup, 1853, Twelve Years a Slave

Questioning the Story:

During what years was Solomon Northup a slave?

Like in the movie, the real Solomon Northup was tricked and sold into slavery in 1841 and did not regain his freedom until January 3, 1853.

Was Solomon Northup married with two children?

In researching the 12 Years a Slave true story, we discovered that Solomon Northup married Anne Hampton on Christmas Day, 1828. Unlike the movie, they had three children together, not two. Their daughter Margaret and son Alonzo are portrayed in the movie, while their other child, Elizabeth, was omitted. At the time of the kidnapping, Elizabeth, Margaret and Alonzo were 10, 8 and 5, respectively.

Solomon Northup with Wife Anne and Children

Left: From back to front, actors Kelsey Scott, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Quvenzhané Wallis and Cameron Zeigler portray the Northup family in the movie. Right: Solomon Northup is reunited with his wife and children at the end of his 1853 memoir.

While enslaved, did Solomon Northup pleasure a woman he discovered was in bed with him?

No, the flash-forward scene that unfolds early in the 12 Years a Slave movie is entirely fictitious and was created by director Steve McQueen and screenwriter John Ridley. « I just wanted a bit of tenderness—the idea of this woman reaching out for sexual healing in a way, to quote Marvin Gaye. She takes control of her own body. Then after she’s climaxed, she’s back where she was. She’s back in hell, and that’s when she turns and cries. »

Did Solomon Northup really play the violin?

Yes. During our investigation into the 12 Years a Slave true story, we learned that Solomon began playing the violin during the leisure hours of his youth, after he finished his main duty of helping his father on the farm. In his memoir, he calls the violin « the ruling passion of my youth, » going on to say, « It has also been the source of consolation since, affording pleasure to the simple beings with whom my lot was cast, and beguiling my own thoughts, for many hours, from the painful contemplation of my fate. »

Did two men really trick Solomon into going to Washington, D.C. with them?

Yes. Solomon met the two men in the village of Saratoga Springs, New York. The men had heard that Solomon was an « expert player of the violin ». They identified themselves using fake names and told him that they were part of a circus company that was looking for someone with his precise musical talent. The two men, later identified as Joseph Russell and Alexander Merrill, asked Solomon to accompany them on a short journey to New York City and to participate with them in performances along the way. They only delivered one performance to a sparse crowd, and it consisted of Russell and Merrill performing somewhat elementary feats like tossing balls, frying pancakes in a hat, ventriloquism and causing invisible pigs to squeal.

Once in New York City, Russell and Merrill encouraged Solomon to go to Washington, D.C. with them, reasoning that the circus would pay him high wages, and since it was the summer season, the troupe would be traveling back north anyway.

Did Solomon’s kidnappers really drug him?

As he indicated in his autobiography, the real Solomon Northup is not positive that he was in fact drugged, however, he remembers various clues that led him to that conclusion. He had spent the day with Alexander Merrill and Joseph Russell making stops at a number of saloons in Washington, D.C. They were observing the festivities that were part of the great funeral procession of General Harrison. At the saloons, the two men would serve themselves, and they would then pour a glass and hand it to Solomon. As he states in his memoir, he did not become intoxicated.

By late afternoon, he fell ill with a severe headache and nausea. His sickness progressed until he was insensible by evening. He was unable to sleep and was stricken with severe thirst. He recalls several people entering the room where he had been staying. They told him that he needed to come with them to see a physician. Shortly after leaving his room and heading into the streets, his memory escapes him and the next thing he remembers is waking up handcuffed and chained to the floor of the Williams Slave Pen in Washington, D.C.

Solomon Northup Washington Slave Pen

Left: Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) wakes up handcuffed and chained to the floor of a Washington, D.C. slave pen in the movie. Right: An 1860s photograph of a real Alexandria, Virginia slave pen.

Why didn’t Solomon tell anyone that he was a free man?

Shortly after his kidnapping, Solomon did try to tell the slave dealer James H. Birch (spelled « Burch » in the book and movie) that he was a free man. Like in the movie, he also told Birch where he was from and asked Birch to remove the irons that were shackling him. The slave dealer refused and instead called upon another man, Ebenezer Rodbury, to help hold Solomon down by his wrists. To suppress Solomon’s claims of being a free man, Birch whipped him with a paddle until it broke and then with a cat-o’-nine tails, delivering a severe number of lashes. Solomon addresses the lashings in his memoir, « Even now the flesh crawls upon my bones, as I recall the scene. I was all on fire. My sufferings I can compare to nothing else than the burning agonies of hell! » Following the lashings, Birch told Solomon that he would kill him if he told anyone else that he was a free man.

Below is a picture of Birch’s slave pen in Alexandria, Virginia, circa 1865. It had been used to house slaves being shipped from Northern Virginia to Louisiana. The building still stands today and is currently home to the offices of the Northern Virginia Urban League. It should be noted again that this is not the D.C. slave pen where Solomon was held. Solomon was held at the Williams Slave Pen (aka The Yellow House), which was the most notorious slave pen in the capital. The Williams Slave Penn was located at roughly 800 Independence Avenue SW, one block from the Capitol, and is now the site of the headquarters of the Federal Aviation Administration.

James H. Birch

Left: The real James H. Birch’s slave pen in Alexandria, Virginia, circa 1865. Right: Actor Christopher Berry portrays slave dealer Birch (spelled « Burch » in the movie).

Did a sailor really murder one of the slaves on the ship?

No. The real Solomon Northup did come up with a plan to take over the brig Orleans along with two other slaves, Arthur and Robert. However, unlike what happens in the film, Robert did not die after being stabbed when he came to the defense of Eliza, who in the movie is on the verge of being raped by a sailor. Instead, Robert died from smallpox and the plan to take over the ship was scrapped.

Was Solomon Northup’s name really changed?

Yes. Evidence discovered while researching the true story behind 12 Years a Slave confirmed that Solomon Northup’s name was in fact changed to Platt Hamilton. An official record of the name appears on the April 1841 manifest of the brig Orleans, the ship that carried Northup southward from the Port of Richmond, Virginia to the Port of New Orleans, Louisiana. The portion of the ship’s manifest that displays the name « Platt Hamilton » is pictured below. -Ancestry.com

Brig Orleans Manifest

Solomon Northup’s slave name Platt Hamilton appears on the April 1841 ship manifest of the brig Orleans, supporting his story.

Is William Ford (Benedict Cumberbatch) accurately portrayed in the movie?

No. The movie paints William Ford (Benedict Cumberbatch) as a hypocrite, contradicting his Christian sermons by overlaying them with his slave Eliza’s agonizing screams. In his memoir, Solomon Northup offers the utmost words of kindness for his former master, stating that « there never was a more kind, noble, candid, Christian man than William Ford. » Northup blames William Ford’s circumstances and upbringing for his involvement in slavery, « The influences and associations that had always surrounded him, blinded him to the inherent wrong at the bottom of the system of Slavery. » He calls the real William Ford a « model master », going on to write, « Were all men such as he, Slavery would be deprived of more than half its bitterness. »

Did Northup really get into a scuffle with Tibeats over a set of nails?

Yes. Like in the movie, the scuffle over the nails resulted in a carpenter named John M. Tibeats trying to whip Northup, but Northup fended off the attack, grabbed the whip, and began to strike his attacker. Afterward, Tibeats fetched two overseers that he knew on neighboring plantations. The men bound Northup and put a noose around his neck. They led him out to a tree where they were going to hang him, but were stopped and chased off by Mr. Chapin, a just overseer who worked for William Ford. When Ford returned from a trip later that day, he personally cut the cord from Northup’s wrists, arms, and ankles, and he slipped the noose from Northup’s neck.

Not depicted in the movie, the 12 Years a Slave true story brings to light a second scuffle that Northup got into with Tibeats while Ford and Chapin were away, resulting in Tibeats chasing Northup with an axe. Fearing impending retaliation from Tibeats, that time he ran away. However, Northup returned to the plantation after being unable to survive on his own in the harshness of the surrounding swamps. Even though he was forgiven by Ford, the plantation owner decided to sell Northup in part to prevent any more feuds with Tibeats. To Northup’s misfortune, he ended up being bought by a much crueler master, Edwin Epps.

Was Edwin Epps really as cruel as the movie portrays?

Yes. In fact, the real Edwin Epps was crueler than actor Michael Fassbender portrays him to be in the movie. In addition to Edwin Epps being overcome by « dancing moods », where he would force the exhausted slaves to dance, in real life, Epps also had his « whipping moods ». Epps usually found himself in a « whipping mood » when he was drunk. He would drive the slaves around the yard and whip them for fun.

Edwin Epps House

The real Edwin Epps house (left) prior to its restoration and relocation. The single story Louisiana cottage was less grand than the house shown in the movie. Northup helped to build the home for Epps’ family.

Did Edwin Epps really obsess over his female slave Patsey?

Yes, but the movie puts more focus on Edwin Epps’s alternating passion for and disgust with Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o) than Northup’s memoir. In his book, the real Solomon Northup refers to Epps’s « lewd intentions » toward Patsey, especially when he was intoxicated.

Did Edwin Epps really chase after Solomon with a knife?

Yes. In the movie, after Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) fetches Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o), he tells her not to look in Epps direction and to continue on walking. Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender), who was half intoxicated and contemplating satisfying his lewd intentions toward Patsey, demands to know exactly what Solomon said to Patsey. When Solomon refuses to tell him, he chases after Solomon with a knife, eventually tripping over the fence of a pig pen. In the book, he does chase after Solomon with a knife, but there is no mention of him tripping over the fence.

Did Mistress Epps really encourage her husband to whip Patsey?

Yes. Despite Patsey having a remarkable gift for picking cotton quickly, she was one of the most severely beaten slaves. This was mainly due to Mistress Epps encouraging her husband Edwin to whip Patsey because, as Northup writes, Patsey had become the « slave of a licentious master and a jealous mistress. » Northup goes on to describe her as the « enslaved victim of lust and hate », with nothing delighting Mistress Epps more than seeing Patsey suffer. Northup states that it was not uncommon for Mistress Epps to hurl a broken bottle or billet of wood at Patsey’s face.

As portrayed in the 12 Years a Slave movie, in his book Northup describes one of the whippings that Patsey received as being « the most cruel whipping that ever I was doomed to witness—one I can never recall with any other emotion than that of horror ». It was during this whipping that Epps forced Northup to deliver the lashings. After Northup pleaded and reluctantly whipped Patsey more than forty times, he threw down the whip and refused to go any further. It was then that Epps picked up the whip and applied it with « ten-fold » greater force than Northup had.

Edwin Epps and Patsey

Left: Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o) pleads with her master, Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender). Right: A drawing in Northup’s 1853 memoir depicts the « staking out and flogging » of Patsey, who can be seen on the ground. Epps is shown directing Solomon to continue the lashings after Solomon throws down the whip and refuses.

Did Patsey really beg Solomon to end her life?

No. This pivotal, emotionally-charged scene is perhaps the movie’s biggest blunder with regard to the true story. It was most likely unintentional and is the result of the filmmakers misreading a line in Northup’s autobiography. In the book, Northup is discussing the suffering of Patsey, who was lusted for by her master and hated by his jealous wife.

« Nothing delighted the mistress so much as to see [Patsey] suffer, and more than once, when Epps had refused to sell her, has she tempted me with bribes to put her secretly to death, and bury her body in some lonely place in the margin of the swamp. Gladly would Patsey have appeased this unforgiving spirit, if it had been in her power, but not like Joseph, dared she escape from Master Epps, leaving her garment in his hand. »

It is rather obvious that it is Mistress Epps who wants to bribe Northup to kill Patsey. Patsey wants to escape like Joseph, not kill herself. It seems that the filmmakers misread the line, attributing Mistress Epps’ wishes to Patsey. It is a little discouraging to realize that this crucial scene was likely the result of a misunderstood antecedent. -TheAtlantic.com

Did Patsey and Mistress Shaw really talk over tea?

No. In the movie, Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o) and Mistress Shaw (Alfre Woodard), the black wife of a plantation owner, have a conversation over tea. This scene was invented for the film. Director Steve McQueen wanted to give Mistress Shaw (Alfre Woodard) a voice.

Did Armsby betray Northup by letting Epps know about Northup’s letter to his friends in New York?

Yes. In his memoir, Northup describes Armsby as a man who came to the plantation looking to fill the position of overseer but was reduced to labor with the slaves. In an effort to better his role on the plantation, he divulged Northup’s secret to Edwin Epps. When Epps confronted Northup, he denied ever writing the letter and Epps believed him.

Although it is not shown in the movie, this was not the first time that Solomon Northup tried to have someone help him send a letter home. When he was on the ship that brought him south, a sailor helped him mail a letter he’d written. That letter actually made it home to New York and was obtained by attorney Henry B. Northup, a relative of Solomon’s father’s former master. Since Solomon was not yet aware of his final destination, he could not provide a location in the letter. Officials in New York told Henry that no action would be taken until they knew where to look for Solomon.

Was Brad Pitt’s character, Samuel Bass, based on a real person?

Yes. Samuel Bass’s portrayal in the 12 Years a Slave movie is very accurate to how Northup describes him in the book, including his argument with Edwin Epps. Much of what Bass (Brad Pitt) says during that scene is taken almost verbatim from the book, « …but begging the law’s pardon, it lies. … There’s a sin, a fearful sin, resting on this nation, that will not go unpunished forever. There will be a reckoning yet—yes, Epps, there’s a day coming that will burn as an oven. It may be sooner or it may be later, but it’s a coming as sure as the Lord is just. »

Did the real Samuel Bass help to free Northup?

Yes. Like in the movie, Samuel Bass, who also appears in Northup’s autobiography, was influential in Northup’s release. As the movie indicates, Samuel Bass was a Canadian who was in Louisiana doing carpentry work for Northup’s owner, Edwin Epps. Northup began assisting Bass and eventually decided to confide in him after he learned that Bass was against slavery. After Solomon shared his story of being tricked and kidnapped into slavery, Samuel Bass became determined to help him, even vowing to travel to New York himself. Bass wrote letters on Solomon’s behalf to various individuals back in New York. The first of these letters ended up being the one that set in motion the events that led to Solomon’s release from slavery in early 1853. -Solomon Northup: The Complete Story of the Author of Twelve Years a Slave

Henry B. Northup

Attorney Henry B. Northup, a relative of Solomon’s father’s former master, rescued Solomon from slavery.

Who was responsible for Solomon Northup’s release?

The letters written by Samuel Bass that were sent to New York eventually caught the attention of New York Whig attorney Henry B. Northup, who was a relative of Solomon’s father’s former master. Henry was a part of the family that took in Solomon’s father Mintus after he was freed.

Realizing the injustice, Henry made the long journey south to Louisiana and successfully brokered a deal for Solomon’s release. After he rescued Solomon, he returned home with him and fought to bring Solomon’s kidnappers to justice. Henry was also instrumental in securing a publisher for the memoir that would tell Solomon’s story, and in finding the ghost writer, David Wilson, who lived within five miles of Henry’s home. Henry hoped that the book would alert the public to his case against Solomon’s two kidnappers.

Were Solomon Northup’s parents slaves?

Our exploration into the true story behind 12 Years a Slave brought to light the fact that Solomon’s father Mintus Northup was a former slave who had been emancipated in approximately 1798. His mother had never been a slave. She was a mulatto and was three quarters white (her name is never mentioned in the book). Solomon was therefore born a free man in 1807, at a time when slavery still existed in New York. Solomon’s father had been a slave to Capt. Henry Northup, a Loyalist who freed Mintus around 1798 as part of a provision in his will. Mintus took his master’s surname.

What happened to Solomon Northup after he was freed?

Ghost Writer David Wilson

With input from Northup, ghost writer David Wilson, an attorney and great orator, wrote the memoir.

Upon his return home to Saratoga Springs, New York, Northup shared his story and gave interviews to the local press. His story became well known in the North and he started to speak at abolitionist rallies. An 1855 New York State Census confirms that he had indeed returned to his wife Anne, as the two were together again. He also lists himself as a land owner and a carpenter.

In the hands of a ghost writer by the name of David Wilson (pictured), Northup started to provide input for his book. It was published around the middle of July, 1853, after just three and a half months of research, writing, and interviews by the white ghost writer Wilson, who was himself a prominent New York lawyer and author of two books about local history. Henry Northup, the attorney who helped to free Solomon, also contributed to the production of the book and encouraged its speedy publication in an effort to garner public interest in bringing Northup’s kidnappers to trial.

Were Solomon Northup’s kidnappers ever brought to justice?

No. With the help of public interest in Northup, partially as the result of his book, attorney Henry Northup set his sights on two men, Alexander Merrill and Joseph Russell, who were believed to have played pivotal roles in the kidnapping. The two men were arrested but never convicted. Disagreements over where the case should be tried, New York or the District of Columbia, led to the decision over jurisdiction to be sent to the New York Supreme Court and then to the New York Court of Appeals. This was after three of the four counts against the two men had already been dropped since it was determined that these counts originated in Washington, D.C., not the state of New York.

During this time, the men in custody applied for release. Joseph Russell’s bail was nominal and Alexander Merrill’s bail was set at $800. The New York Court of Appeals reversed the decision of the lower courts, citing that the indictment legally could not be split, with one count being valid while the other three were ruled invalid due to issues over jurisdiction. In May of 1857, the case was discharged and the two men were never brought to trial. -Twelve Years a Slave – Dr. Sue Eakin Edition

When and how did Solomon Northup die?

The last known details about Solomon Northup’s life are mostly speculative and no one is certain of his exact fate. It is believed that he might have been involved with the Underground Railroad up until the start of the American Civil War. There are also reports of angry mobs disrupting speeches that he gave at abolitionist rallies. This includes speeches that he was giving in Canada in the summer of 1857. Some believe that this could have led to him being murdered, while others have conjectured that it’s possible he was kidnapped again, or that his two former kidnappers who had been on trial went looking for Northup and killed him. Certain members of his family have passed down the story that he had been killed in Mississippi in 1864, but there is no evidence to support that claim. An 1875 New York State Census lists his wife Anne’s marital status as « Widowed ». No grave of Solomon Northup has ever been found. -Solomon Northup: The Complete Story of the Author of Twelve Years a Slave

Is it possible that Solomon Northup planned his kidnapping with the two men in order to split the profits?

Though the idea might seem far-fetched, there has always been some conjecture that Solomon Northup was a willing accomplice to his kidnappers, Alexander Merrill and Joseph Russell. The theory was that Northup planned to split with Merrill and Russell the profits from being sold into slavery after he would either escape or have Merrill and Russell subsequently arrange for him to be freed. In a response to reader inquiries, a newspaper column that appeared in The Saratoga Press at the time goes as far as to raise the possibility that the case against Merrill and Russell was thrown out for such reasons.

« We would answer by saying that since the indictment was found, the District Attorney was placed in possession of facts that whilst proving their guilt in a measure, would prevent a conviction. To speak more plainly, it is more than suspected that Sol Northup was an accomplice in the sale, calculating to slip away and share the spoils, but that the purchaser was too sharp for him, and instead of getting the cash, he got something else. »

According to the testimony of John S. Enos, Alexander Merrill had attempted this scenario earlier in his kidnapping career. Yet, with regard to Northup, no evidence was ever found to prove that he was involved in his own kidnapping and the events chronicled in his book Twelve Years a Slave have been widely accepted as being none other than the true story. -Twelve Years a Slave – Dr. Sue Eakin Edition

Voir aussi:

ADDITIONAL HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

by historian David Fiske

David Fiske’s interest in Solomon Northup began in the 1990s, when he visited the Old Fort House Museum in Fort Edward, New York. This house is possibly the only structure still standing in which Northup resided. An exhibit at the museum mentioned Northup’s book, Twelve Years a Slave, and Fiske became curious and slowly began researching N orthup’s life after his rescue. He recently worked with several other researchers, Professor Clifford Brown and Rachel Seligman to write a full biography of Northup: Solomon Northup: The Complete Story of the Author of Twelve Years a Slave.

Q: Solomon Northup was not the only free black pers on who was kidnapped and sold as a slave – can you talk about how much of a problem kidnapping was before the Civil War and if black people in the North were aware of the threat of bei ng kidnapped? Blacks (both free persons and slaves) were kidnappe d and sold as slaves even in colonial times. The despicable practice was carried on with greater fre quency after 1808, the year that the federal government banned the importation of slaves. Slaves could no longer be brought into the U.S. from other countries–a very good thing–but there was an unfortunate side-effect. The supply of additional slave labor (much desired by plantation owners in t he South) was reduced, causing the value of slaves to rise–which made it very profitable for criminals to kidnap black people and transport them to a sla ve market where they could be sold. Slave traders, anx ious to acquire slaves to send to the South, probably did not ask questions about where these bl ack people had come from. In New York State, the law recognized that kidnappi ng could be accomplished by trickery, because the statute against kidnapping included an old word “in veigling,” which meant the same thing. The law further provided that those accused of kidnapping c ould not argue as a defense that their victims had left with them willingly. Citizens in the northern states, including blacks, had some idea of the possibility of black people be ing lured away and sold as slaves. An acquaintance of S olomon Northup, Norman Prindle, claimed, after Northup’s return to the North, that back in 1841 he had warned Northup that the men he met in Saratoga might have other plans for him once they g ot him south. However, Northup either trusted the men or was so much in need of money that he decided to take the risk.

Q: What did Solomon Northup do after he was rescued from slavery? Northup was reunited with his family (who had reloc ated from Saratoga to Glens Falls) a few weeks after being freed. Remarkably, in the first few day s of February 1853, he appeared at anti-slavery 32 meetings with several famous abolitionists (includi ng Frederick Douglass). Just one month earlier, he had still been a slave! The general public was very interested in his story of kidnapping, slavery, and rescue, and he worked with David Wilson, an attorney and author, to compo se a book, Twelve Years a Slave . The book was quite popular, and Northup traveled around giving l ectures and selling copies of his book. He was also involved with some theatrical productions based on his narrative. One newspaper noted that, during Northup’s travels, he was generous toward fugitive slaves he encountered. Given his personal experience as a sla ve, it is understandable (predictable, even) that h e would want to help others who had escaped from a li fe of servitude. There is evidence that he participated in the Underground Railroad, working w ith a Vermont minister to help escaped slaves reach freedom in Canada. The last reference to Northup’s presence was a reco llection by the minister’s son, who said that Northup had visited his father once after the Emanc ipation Proclamation in 1863. After that, no newspaper articles or personal papers have been fou nd that mention contact with Northup. Neither the circumstances of his death, nor his burial site, ar e known.

Q: What did Northup’s family do while he was a slav e in Louisiana? As Northup mentioned in Twelve Years a Slave , his wife Anne had a successful career as a cook a t various dining establishments in the Saratoga/Glens Falls area of New York. After the disappearance of her husband–along with his earnings–she probably needed additional income. In the fall of 1841 she moved to New York City with her family. She worked there for the wealthy woman, Madame Eliza Jumel (who was once the wife of Vice President Aaro n Burr). Anne was Madame Jumel’s cook and resided at her mansion in Washington Heights (which is today open to the public as the Morris-Jumel Mansion). Her children filled other roles: Elizabe th assisted at the mansion, Margaret served as a playmate for a young girl who was related to Jumel, and Alonzo was a footman and did minor chores. The family’s stay with Jumel lasted from one to tw o years, after which mother and children returned to Saratoga. After a few years, the family moved to Glens Falls, a bit north of Saratoga, where Anne ran the kitchen at the Glens Falls Hotel. The famil y (which now included Margaret’s husband Philip Stanton and their children) was living in Glens Fal ls in 1853 when Northup was rescued and rejoined his family. In the 1860s, the family (though apparently not Nor thup himself) moved to nearby Moreau (to a neighborhood known as Reynolds Corners). Anne proba bly still worked as a cook locally, and during the summers she would work at a hotel at Bolton Lan ding on Lake George. Anne died in 1876 at Reynolds Corners.

Q: Why was the book Twelve Years a Slave so popular before the Civil War? Northup’s book was not the only one that gave a fir st-hand account of slavery, but his had a unique perspective because he was a free man who had becom e a slave, whereas other writers had grown up as slaves. Northup was able to make comparisons bet ween his life as a free person and his life as a slave. In addition, Northup’s book was surprisingly even-handed. He did not condemn all Southerners–he mentions how several of them, such a s Master Ford and overseer Chapin (whose name 33 in real life was Chafin), had treated him kindly. A s one review of the book in a northern newspaper said at the time: “Masters and Overseers who treat ed slaves humanely are commended; for there, as here, were good and bad men.” Authors of slave narratives who had escaped slavery by running away had an extra motivation to portray slavery in a very bad light–they had to jus tify why they had become fugitives. Northup, however, should never have been a slave in the firs t place (“if justice had been done,” he told Samuel Bass, “I never would have been here”). Northup ther efore had little motivation to exaggerate the evils of slavery. He surely describes the many sufferings endured by slaves, but he also tells about their everyday life, the ways they supported one another, and the few occasional sources of pleasure they had. By telling the good as well as the bad, Northu p’s account came across as authentic and convincing.

Q: Did Solomon Northup help with the Underground Ra ilroad once he was free again and how did he get involved? In the early 1860s (and possibly earlier) he worked on the Underground Railroad in Vermont. The Underground Railroad was a system run by anti-slave ry advocates which helped slaves who had run away from the South. Northup, Tabbs Gross (another black man) and Rev. John L. Smith energetically helped fugitives make their way north, to Canada an d freedom. The details of how Northup became involved are not known, but it seems likely that, during his lecture tours, he at some point met Gross, a former slave w ho traveled around New York and New England at the same time as Northup, and who also gave lecture s. At any rate, the minister’s son recalled later o n that Northup and Gross were constantly at work aidi ng fugitives. Northup no doubt tackled this mission with his customary initiative and competenc e, and ended up keeping many fugitives from being returned to servility.

Q: What became of Northup’s slave masters — Willia m Prince Ford, Edwin Epps and Mistress Epps? William Prince Ford was forced to sell Northup afte r he experienced financial difficulties The man he sold him to, John M. Tibaut (called Tibeats in Nort hup’s book and in the film) could not afford to pay Northup’s full value, so Ford was in a way still a part-owner. This is why Ford was able to prevent Tibaut from murdering Northup. Ford was a prominent Baptist minister, serving several congregations. One of them, the Springhill Baptist Church, expelle d him for heresy, partly because he had allowed a Methodist to take communion at the church (an examp le of his generous spirit). Ford wore several other hats: in addition to operating the lumber mi ll where Northup worked, Ford manufactured bricks and mattresses. The woman Ford was married to while Northup was his slave, Martha (Tanner) Ford passed away in 1849, and he got married a second time, to Mary Daw son. Rev. Ford passed away on August 23, 1866 and was buried in a cemetery known as the Old Chene y Cemetery in Cheneyville, Louisiana. Edwin Epps had wanted to contest Northup’s removal from his possession, but his legal counsel 34 advised him that the case was so clear-cut (due to documents presented in court in Marksville, Louisiana, which proved Northup had been born free) , that he should simply give up Northup rather than incur pointless legal expenses, and he did so. Epps gave up drink while Northup was still his slav e, since Northup mentions that in his book. Epps continued working his plantation after Northup’s de parture. The 1860 Federal Census shows that he had assets amounting to over $20,000. During the Civil War some northern soldiers sought out the Epps plantation as the army worked its way through Louisiana. They found many people, both black and white, who remembered Northup and his fiddle-playing, and they even located Epps. Wha t Northup wrote in his book, Epps told the soldiers, was mostly true, and in a back-handed com pliment to Northup he told them that he was an “unusually smart nigger.” Epps died on March 3, 186 7. His place of burial is uncertain. The house that Northup and carpenter Samuel Bass wo rked on for Epps still exists. It has avoided destruction several times, and has also been moved several times. It is now located on the campus of the Louisiana State University at Alexandria, and i t has been declared a historic structure. Mistress Epps, whose maiden name was Mary Robert, b ecame the “Natural Tutrix” (or guardian) of her and her husband’s minor children following Epps ’ death. However she died soon afterward. Many, if not all, of the children left Louisiana and relo cated to various places in Texas.

Q: Were the men involved in Solomon Northup’s kidna pping ever brought to justice? The slave trader in Washington, D.C. who purchased Northup from the men who lured him away from Saratoga was identified as James H. Birch, and was brought up on charges in that city when Northup was on his way home from Louisiana. In Washington, the law at that time did not permit black people to testify in court, and without Northup’s testimo ny, there was little evidence of the crime, so Birc h was not convicted. It surely helped that Birch had some influential friends in the city. In 1854, over a year after Northup was freed, a man who had read Twelve Years a Slave helped to identify the two men who had taken Northup to Washi ngton. (Their real names were Alexander Merrill and Joseph Russell–they had given Northup aliases. They were arrested, jailed, indicted, and put on trial. After various delays and appeals, the case a gainst them was dropped without explanation in 1857 . Their only punishment was the seven months they spe nt in jail while awaiting trial before they were released on bail.

Q: Solomon Northup was able to read and write–how d id he get his education? In New York State, blacks had never been formally e xcluded from the schools. In the city of Albany, slave children in colonial times attended school al ongside white children. Even when slavery was still allowed in New York, a state law specified that sla ve owners had to teach their slaves to read, so tha t they could read the Bible. As time went on, some large cities had separate sch ools for black students (which was permitted under state law). During his childhood, Northup lived in small towns in Washington County, which would not have had enough money to establish separate sch ools for blacks, so he probably attended school with white pupils from his neighborhood. Acquaintan ces of Northup and his father (who was illiterate 35 but whom Northup wrote made sure his sons received an education) were Quakers, to whom education was very important, so that may have offered extra encouragement for him to learn. Northup tells of his love of reading as a boy, so he probably built on what basic, formal schooling he received due to his curiosity and intelligence.

Q: Is it true that 12 Years a Slave was actually written by a ghost writer named David Wilson, who was an abolitionist? David Wilson certainly assisted Northup with his bo ok, but he was not a ghost writer. Ghost writers typically write behind the scenes on behalf of some one else, implying that a book was actually authored by that person. When the book was first pu blished in 1853, Wilson was clearly identified as its editor–he even wrote an Editor’s Preface. Ther e was nothing furtive about Wilson having been helped with the writing of the book. The precise method of Wilson’s and Northup’s collab oration is not known, but based on Wilson’s preface, newspaper reports at the time, and a lette r written later on by a relative of one of the prin cipals in Northup’s story, Wilson extensively interviewed Northup, undoubtedly taking copious notes. Northup, who during his years of slavery had no way to record information, must have constantly reviewed in his head the events he had experienced, committing to memory the details of people he had met and places he had been. Wilson wrote that h e was entirely convinced of the authenticity of Northup’s recounting, because Northup had « invariab ly repeated the same story without deviating in the slightest particular. » Even Edwin Epps, located by Union soldiers when the y reached Louisiana during the Civil War, admitted that Northup had pretty much told the trut h in his book. After Wilson had put the words onto paper, Northup reviewed them closely. He « carefully perused the manuscript, dictating an alteration wherever the mo st trivial inaccuracy has appeared, » Wilson says. I t is likely that the writing style–with its literary flourishes and turns of phrase–can be attributed to Wilson, but Northup was clearly satisfied that Wils on got all the facts right and he was also comfortable with the final wording. Though Wilson has sometimes been described as an ab olitionist, there is no evidence of that. One newspaper at the time said of Wilson: « I believe he never was suspected of being an Abolitionist–he may be anti-slavery–somewhat conservative. » A few y ears after Twelve Years a Slave was published, Wilson was identified as a member of the American P arty (called the “Know-Nothings”), which had no strong stance concerning slavery. In Wilson’s ow n words, in his preface to the book, he writes « Unbiased, as he conceives, by any prepossessions o r prejudices, the only object of the editor has bee n to give a faithful history of Solomon Northup’s lif e, as he received it from his lips. » 36 SHIP MANIFEST FOR THE BRIG ORLEANS, THE VESSEL THAT TRANSPORTED NORTHUP TO LOUISIANA AFTER HIS CAPTURE 37

Voir enfin:

I Was Born »: Slave Narratives, Their Status as Autobiography and as Literature

James Olney

Jstor

Callaloo, No. 20 (Winter, 1984), pp. 46-73

The Johns Hopkins University Press

Anyone who sets about reading a single slave narrative or even two or three slave narratives might be forgiven the natural assumption that such a narrative will be, or ought to be, a unique production; for – so would go the unconscious argument – are not slave narratives autobiography, and is not every autobiography the unique tale, uniquely told, of a unique life ? If such a reader should proceed to take up another half dozen narrative show ever (and there is a great lot of them from which to choose the half dozen), a sense not of uniqueness but of overwhelming sameness is almost certain to be the result. And if our reader continues through two or three dozen more slave narratives, still having  hardly begun to broach the whole body of material (one estimate puts the number of extant narratives at over six thousand), he is sure to come away dazed by the mere repetitiveness of it all: seldom will he discover anything new or different but only, always more and more of the same. This raises a number of difficult questions both for the student of autobiography and the student of Afro-American literature. Should the narrative be so cumulative and so invariant ? Why so repetitive and so much alike ? Are the slave narratives classifiable under some larger grouping (are they history or literature or autobiography or polemical writing ? and what relationship do these larger groupings bear to one another?); or do the narratives represent a mutant development really different in kind from any other mode of writing that might initially seem to relate to them as parent, as sibling, as cousin, or as some other formal relation? What narrative mode, what manner of do we find in the slave narratives, and story-telling, what is the place of memory both in this particular variety of narrative and in autobiography more generally? What is the relationship of the slave narratives to later narrative modes and later thematic complexes of Afro-American writing? The questions are multiple and manifold. I propose to come at them and to offer some tentative answers by first making some observations about autobiography and its special nature as a memorial, creative act; then outlining some of the common themes and nearly invariable conventions of slave narratives; and finally attempting to determine the place of the slave narrative 1) in the spectrum of autobiographical writing 2) in the historyof American literaturea, and 3) in the making of an Afro-American literary tradition.

I have argued elsewhere that there are many different ways that we can legitimately understand the word and the act of autobiography; here, however, I want to restrict myself to a fairly conventional and common-sense understanding of autobiography. I will not attempt to define autobiography but merely to describe a certain kind of autobiographical performance – not the only kind by any means but the one that will allow us to reflect most clearly on what goes on in slave narratives. For present purposes, then, autobiography may be understood as a recollective/narrative act in which the writer, from a certain point in his life – the present -, looks back over the events of that life and recounts them in such a way as to show how that past history has led to this present state of being. Exercising memory, in order that he may recollect and narrate, the autobiographer is not a neutral and passive recorder but rather a creative and active shaper.

Recollection, or memory, in this way a most creative faculty, goes backward so that narrative its twin and counterpart may go forward: memory and narration move along the same line only in reverse direc tions. Or as in Heraclitus, the way up and the way down, the way back and the way forward, are one and the same. When I say that memory is immensely creative I do not mean that it creates for its events that never occurred (of course this can happen too, but that is another matter). What I mean instead is that memory creates the significance of events in discovering the pattern into which those events fall. And such a pattern, in the kind of autobiography where memory rules, will be at eleologic alone bringing us,in and through narration and asit were by an inevitable process, to the end of all past moments which is the present. It is in the inter lay of past and resent,of present memory over on its to reflecting past experience way becoming present being, that events are liftedout of time to be resituated not in mere chronological sequence but in patterned significance.

Paul Ricoeur,in apaper on « Narrative and Hermeneutics,makes the ina different but in a that allows us to sort point slightly way way out theplace of timeand memoryboth in autobiographyin general and in theAfro-Americanslave narrative in particular. »Poiesis, »according to Ricoeur’s analysis, »bothreflectasnd resolvestheparadox of time »;and he continues: »It reflects it to the extent that the act of combinesinvarious two emplotment proportions temporal and theother The first be chronological non-chronological. may one called theepisodicdimension.It characterizesthestoryas made out ofevents.The secondis the dimension thanks to which dimensions, configurational the plot construessignificantwholes out of scatteredevents. »‘ In autobiographyit is memory that in there collecting and retelling of events,effects »emplotment »it is memory that,shaping the past act is for »thecon- cording configuration present, responsible to the ofthe dimension »that »construes wholesout of scat- figurational significant teredevents. »Itisforthisreasonthatina classicofautobiographical literature like for is not Augustine’s Confessions, example, memory only I should verysubject writing. imagine, the mode but becomes the ofthe however,thatanyreaderofslavenarrativeiss mostimmediatelystruck by thealmostcompletedominanceof « theepisodicdimension, »the totallack of dimension, »and thevirtual nearly any « configurational absence of any referenceto memoryor any sense thatmemorydoes anythingbut make the past factsand eventsof slaveryimmediately presentto thewriterand his reader.(Thus one oftengets, »I can see evennow …. I can stillhear. .. ., » etc.) Thereis a verygood reason forthis,butitsbeinga verygood reasondoes notaltertheconsequence thattheslave narrative,witha veryfewexceptions,tendsto exhibit a highlyconventionalr,igidlyfixedformthatbearsmuchthesamerela- tionshiptoautobiographyina fullsenseas paintingbynumbersbears to paintingas a creativeact.

I say there is a good reason for this, and there is: The writerof a slave narrative finds himself in an irresolvably tight bind as a result of the very intention and premise of his narrative, which is to give a picture of »slavery as it is. »Thus it is the writer’s claim, it must be his claim, that he is not he is not and he is not emplotting, fictionalizing, performinagnyactofpoiesis(=shaping, making).To givea truepic- tureof slaveryas it it reallyis, he mustmaintainthathe exercises a clear-glassn,eutralmemorythatisneithercreativenorfaulty-indeed, ifitwerecreativeitwould be eo ipso faulty for »creative »would be understood by skeptical readers as a synonym for »lying. »Thus the ex-slave narrator is debarred from use of a memory that would make anything of his narrative beyond or other than the purely, merely episodic, and he is denied access, by the very nature and intent of his venture, to the configuration a dimension of narrative.

Of the kind of memorycentralto the act of autobiographyas I describeditearlier,ErnstCassirerhas written: »Symbolicmemoryis theprocessby whichmannotonlyrepeatshispastexperiencebutalso

reconstructshisexperienceI.maginationbecomesa necessaryelement oftruerecollection.I »n thatword »imagination,h »owever,liesthejoker foran ex-slavewho would writethenarrativeof his lifein slavery.

Whatwe findAugustinedoinginBook X oftheConfessions-offering up a disquisitionon memorythatmakesbothmemoryitselfand the narrativethatitsurroundsfullysymbolic-would be inconceivablein aslavenarrativeO.fcourseex-slavesdoexercisememoryintheirnar- ratives,buttheynevertalkaboutitas Augustinedoes,as Rousseau does, as Wordsworthdoes, as Thoreau does, as HenryJamesdoes, as

a hundredother (notto novelistslike do. autobiographers say Proust)

Ex-slavescannot talk about it because of the premisesaccordingto

whichtheywrite,one of thosepremisesbeingthatthereis nothing

doubtfulor about on the it is assumed mysterious memory: contrary,

to be a clear,unfailingrecordof eventssharpand distincthatneed

onlybe transformeidntodescriptivelanguagetobecomethesequen- tialnarrativeofa lifeinslavery.Inthesameway,theex-slavewriting his narrativecannotaffordto put thepresentin conjunctionwiththe past (again withveryrarebut significanetxceptionsto be mentioned later)forfearthatin so doinghe will appear, fromthepresent,to be

and so and the As a theslave reshaping distorting falsifying past. result,

narrativeis most oftena non-memorialdescriptionfittedto a pre- formedmold,a moldwithregulardepressionshereandequallyregular prominencetshere-virtuallyobligatoryfiguress,cenes,turnsofphrase, observances,and authentications-thatcarryoverfromnarrativeto narrativeand giveto themas a groupthespeciescharacterthatwe designateby thephrase »slave narrative. »

Whatisthisspeciescharacterbywhichwemayrecognizea slave narrativeT?hemostobvious markisthatitisanextreme-

mixed distinguishing orallofthe

ly productiontypicallyincludingany following:

an engravedportraitor photographof the subjectof the narrative; authenticatintgestimonialsp,refixedor postfixed;poeteicpigraphss,nat- chesofpoetryin thetext,poemsappended;illustrationbsefore,in the middleof,orafterthenarrative ofthenarrative

itself;2interruptions

properby way of declamatoryaddressesto the readerand passages thatas to stylemightwell come froman adventurestory,a romance,

ora novelof a ofdocuments-letters sentiment; bewilderingvariety

to and fromthe narrator,bills of sale, newspaperclippings,notices

of slave auctionsand of escaped slaves, certificateosf marriage,of

manumission,ofbirthand death,wills,extractsfromlegalcodes-

thatappear beforethetext,in thetextitself,in footnotes,and in ap-

pendices;and sermonsand anti-slaveryspeechesand essaystackedon

at theend to demonstrate activitiesof thenarrator.In post-narrative

pointingout the extremelymixednatureof slave narrativesone im-

mediatelyhas to acknowledgehow mixedand impureclassic autobiographieasre or can be also. The lastthreebooks ofAugustine’s

Confessions,forexample,areina differenmtodefromtherestofthe

volume, and Rousseau’s Confessions,which begins as a novelistic

romanceand ends in a paranoid shambles,can hardlybe considered

modallyconsistentandallofa piece.Orifmentionismadeofthelet-

ters and to slave thenone thinks prefatory appended narratives, quickly

of thelettersat thedivideof Franklin’sAutobiography,whichhave muchthesameextra-textueaxlistenceasletterastoppositeendsofslave narratives.But all thissaid, we mustrecognizethatthenarrativelet-

tersortheappendedsermonshaven’tthesameintentionas theFranklin

lettersorAugustine’sexegesisofGenesis;andfurtherm,oreimportant,

all themixed, elementsinslavenarratives heterogeneoush,eterogeneric

come to be so regular,so constant,so indispensableto themode that theyfinallyestablisha setofconventions-a seriesofobservancesthat become virtuallyde riguer-for slave narrativesunto themselves.

The conventionsforslave narrativeswereso earlyand so firmly establishedthatone can imaginea sortof masteroutlinedrawnfrom thegreatnarrativesand guidingthelesserones. Such an outlinewould look somethinglike this:

A. Anengravedportrait,signedbythenarrator.

B. A titlepage thatincludestheclaim,as an integralpartoftheti- tle, »WrittenbyHimself »(orsomeclosevariant: »Writtenfroma state- mentof FactsMade by Himself »;or « Writtenby a Friend,as Related to Him by BrotherJones »;etc.)

C. A handfulof testimonialsand/orone or moreprefacesor in-

troductionwsritteneitherbyawhiteabolitionistfriendofthenarrator

(WilliamLloyd Garrison,WendellPhillips)or by a whiteamanuen-

sis/editor/author forthetext(JohnGreenleafWhit- actuallyresponsible

tier,David Wilson,LouisAlexisChamerovzow),inthecourseofwhich

prefacethereaderis told thatthenarrativeis a « plain,unvarnished

tale »and thatnaught »hasbeensetdowninmalice,nothingexaggerated,

nothingdrawnfromtheimagination »-indeed,thetale,itis claimed, understatesthe horrorsof slavery.

D. A poeticepigraph,bypreferencferomWilliamCowper. E. Theactualnarrative:

1. a firstsentencebeginning, »I was born … , » thenspecifyinga placebutnota dateofbirth;

2. a accountof often a white sketchy parentage,, involving father;

3. descriptionofa cruelmaster,mistresso,roverseer,detailsoffirst observedwhippingandnumerousubsequentwhippingsw,ithwomen veryfrequentlythe victims;

4. anaccountofoneextraordinarilsytrong,hardworkingslave- often »pureAfrican »-who, because thereis no reasonforit,refuses

to be whipped;

5. recordofthebarriersraisedagainstslaveliteracyandtheover-

whelmingdifficultieesncounteredin learningto read and write;

6. descriptionofa « Christian »slaveholder(oftenofonesuchdying in terror)and theaccompanyingclaimthat »Christian »slaveholders

are invariablyworsethanthoseprofessingno religion;

7. descriptionoftheamountsandkindsoffoodandclothinggiven

toslaves,theworkrequiredofthem,thepatternofa day,a week, a year;

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

51

8. account of a slave auction, of familiesbeing separated and

destroyed,ofdistraughmtothersclingingtotheirchildrenastheyare tornfromthem,of slave cofflesbeingdrivenSouth;

9. descriptionofpatrols,offailedattempt(s)toescape,ofpursuit by men and dogs;

10. descriptionofsuccessfulattempt(s)toescape,lyingbyduring

theday, travellingby nightguidedby theNorthStar,receptionin a freestatebyQuakerswho offera lavishbreakfastand muchgenial

thee/thouconversation;

11. takingofa newlastname(frequentlyonesuggestedbya white abolitionistt)oaccordwithnewsocialidentityas a freeman,butreten- tionoffirstnameas a markofcontinuityofindividualidentity;

12. reflectionosn slavery.

F. Anappendixorappendicescomposedofdocumentarymaterial-

billsofsale,detailsofpurchasefromslavery,newspaperitems-, fur-

therreflectionosn slavery,sermons,anti-slaveryspeeches,poems,ap- peals to thereaderforfundsand moralsupportin thebattleagainst

slavery.

Aboutthis’MasterPlan forSlave Narratives(« theironyofthephras-

neitherunintentionanlor twoobservations ing being insignificant)

shouldbe made: First,thatitnotonlydescribesratherlooselya great manylessernarrativebsutthatitalso describesquitecloselythegreatest ofthemall, NarrativeoftheLifeofFrederickDouglass, An American Slave, WrittenbyHimself,3whichparadoxicallytranscendstheslave narrativemode whilebeingat thesame timeitsfullest,mostexact representativeS;econd, thatwhat is beingrecountedin thenarratives is nearlyalways therealitiesof theinstitutionof slavery,almostnever

ofthenarrator(here,as often, emotional, growth

theintellectual, moral

Douglass succeedsin beingan exceptionwithoutceasingto be thebest

example:he goesbeyondthesingleintentionofdescribingslavery,but he also describesitmoreexactlyand moreconvincinglythananyone else). The lives of thenarrativesare never,or almostnever,therefor themselveasnd fortheirown intrinsic, interesbtut

intheircapacityas illustrationosfwhatslaveryisreallylike.Thusin

one sensethenarrativelivesoftheex-slaveswereas muchpossessed

and used by the abolitionistsas theiractual lives had been by

slaveholders.This is why JohnBrown’sstoryis titledSlave Lifein

unique nearlyalways

and subtitled »A NarrativeoftheLife, and only Sufferings,

Georgia

EscapeofJohnBrown,A FugitiveSlave, »anditiswhyCharlesBall’s story (which reads like historicalfictionbased on very extensive research)is called Slaveryin theUnitedStates,withthesomewhatex- tendedsubtitle »A NarrativeoftheLifeand AdventureosfCharlesBall, A BlackMan, who livedfortyearsinMaryland,SouthCarolinaand Georgia,as a slave, undervariousmasters,and was one yearin the

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

52

navywithCommodoreBarney,duringthelatewar. Containingan ac- countof themannersand usages of theplantersand slaveholdersof theSouth-a descriptionoftheconditionandtreatmenotftheslaves, withobservationusponthestateofmoralsamongsthecottonplanters,

and the and

perils sufferings fugitive escaped

ofa slave,who twice from thecottoncountry. »Thecentralfocusofthesetwo,as ofnearlyall

thenarrativesi,s slavery,an institutionand an externalreality,rather thana particularand individualifeas itis knowninternallyand sub-

thenarratives are all trainedon one and the same objectivereality,theyhave a

Thismeansthatunlike in jectively. autobiography general

coherentand definedaudience,theyhave behindthemand guidingthem

an organizedgroup of « sponsors, »and theyare possessed of very specificmotives,intentionsa,ndusesunderstoodbynarratorss,pon- sors,and audiencealike: to revealthetruthof slaveryand so to bring about itsabolition.How, then,could thenarrativesbe anythingbut verymuchlike one another?

Severaloftheconventionsofslave-narrativweritingestablishedby

thistriangularelationshipofnarratora,udience,and sponsorsand the logicthatdictatesdevelopmentofthoseconventionswillbearand will reward closer scrutiny.The conventionsI have in mind are both thematicand formaland theytendto turnup as oftenin theparapher- naliasurroundingthenarrativesas inthenarrativesthemselvesI.have alreadyremarkedontheextra-textualelttersocommonlyassociated

withslavenarrativeasndhave that

suggested they logic

havea different about themfromthelogicthatallows or impelsFranklinto include similarlyaliendocumentsinhisautobiographyt;hesameistrueofthe

signedengravedportraitsor photographso frequentlyto be foundas

inslavenarrativesT.he andthe

frontispieces portrait signature(which

one mightwell findin othernineteenth-centurayutobiographical documentsbutwithdifferenmtotivation),liketheprefatoryandap-

pendedletters,thetitulartag « Writtenby Himself, »and thestandard

opening »I was born, »are intendedto attestto thereal existenceof

a narrator,thesensebeingthatthestatusofthenarrativewillbe con-

tinuallycalledintodoubt,so itcannotevenbegin,untilthenarrator’s

realexistenceisfirmlyestablishedO.fcoursetheargumentoftheslave

narrativesis thattheeventsnarratedare factualand truthfualnd that

theyallreallyhappenedtothenarratorb,utthisisa second-stageargu-

ment;priorto theclaimoftruthfulnesisthesimple,existentiacllaim:

« I exist. » lettersall Photographs,portraitss,ignaturesa,uthenticating

makethesameclaim: »Thismanexists. »Onlythencanthenarrative

begin.And how do mostofthemactuallybegin?Theybeginwiththe existentiacllaimrepeated. »I was born »are thefirstwordsofMoses Roper’sNarrativea,nd theyarelikewisethefirstwordsofthenarratives ofHenryBibband HarrietJacobs,ofHenryBox Brown4and William

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

53

Wells Brown,of FrederickDouglass5and JohnThompson,of Samuel RinggoldWardandJamesW. C. Penningtono,fAustinStewardand JamesRoberts,ofWilliamGreenand WilliamGrimes,ofLevinTilmon and PeterRandolph,ofLouis Hughesand LewisClarke,ofJohnAn- drewJacksonandThomasH. Joneso,fLewisCharltonandNoahDavis, ofJamesWilliamsand WilliamParkerand Williamand EllenCraft (wheretheopeningassertionis variedonlyto theextentofsaying, »My wifeand myselfwereborn »).6

We can see thenecessityforthisfirstand mostbasic assertionon thepartoftheex-slaveinthecontrarysituationofan autobiographer likeBenjaminFranklinW.hileanyreaderwasfreetodoubtthemotives ofFranklin’msemoir,noonecoulddoubthis andsoFranklin

existence, beginsnotwithanyclaimsorproofsthathewasbornandnowreally

existsbutwithan explanationofwhyhe has chosento writesucha

documentas theone in hand. Withtheex-slave,however,it was his

existenceand his nothisreasonsfor thatwerecalled identity, writing,

intoquestion:iftheformercould be establishedthelatterwould be obviousand thesamefromone narrativeto another.Franklincitesfour motivesforwritinghisbook(tosatisfydescendantsc’uriosityt;ooffer an exampleto others;to providehimselfthepleasureofrelivingevents inthetelling;tosatisfyhisownvanity),andwhileonecanfindnar- rativesby ex-slavesthatmighthave in themsomethingofeach ofthese motives-JamesMars, forexample,displaysin partthefirstof the motives,Douglass inpartthesecond,JosiahHensoninpartthethird, and SamuelRinggoldWardinpartthefourth-thetruthis thatbehind everyslave narrativethatis in any way characteristiocr representative thereis the one same persistentand dominantmotivation,which is determinedbytheinterplayofnarrator,sponsors,and audienceand whichitselfdeterminetshenarrativeintheme,content,and form.The themeis therealityof slaveryand thenecessityof abolishingit; the contentisa seriesofeventsanddescriptiontshatwillmakethereader see and feeltherealitiesofslavery;and theformis a chronological, episodicnarrativebeginningwithan assertionof existenceand sur- roundedby various testimonialevidencesforthatassertion.

In thetitleand subtitleofJohnBrown’snarrativecitedearlier-Slave

in A Narrative the

Life Georgia: of Life,Sufferings, Escape of

and John Brown,AFugitiveSlave-we seethatthethemepromisestobetreated on two levels, as it were titularand subtitular:the social or institu-

tionaland thepersonalor individual.What typicallyhappensin the

actualnarrativese,speciallythebestknownand mostreliableofthem,

is thatthesocial theme,therealityofslaveryand thenecessityof abolishingit,trifurcateosn thepersonallevelto becomesubthemesof

and freedom not sightcloselyrelatedmattersn,evertheleslseadintooneanotherinsuch

and at first literacyi,dentity, which,though obviously

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

54

a that end

and

up beingaltogetherinterdependent virtually

Nar-

way they

as thematicstrands.Here,as so often,

indistinguishable Douglass’

rativeis at oncethebestexample,theexceptionaclase,and thesupreme

achievementT.hefulltitleofDouglass’bookisitselfclassic:Narrative

of the Life of FrederickDouglass, An AmericanSlave, Writtenby

Himself.7Thereis muchmoreto thephrase »writtenby himself, »of

course,thanthemerelaconicstatementofa fact:itisliterallya part

ofthenarrativeb,ecominganimportanthematicelementintheretell-

ingofthelifewhereinliteracy,identitya,nda senseoffreedomare

all and withouthefirst, to

acquiredsimultaneously according Douglass, thelattertwo would neverhave been. The dual factof literacyand

identity(« written »and »himself »r)eflectbsackontheterribleironyof the phrase in apposition, »An AmericanSlave »: How can both of these-« American »and « Slave »-be true?And thisin turncarriesus back to thename, « FrederickDouglass, » whichis writtenall around thenarrativei:n thetitle,on the and as thelastwords

of the text:

Sincerelyand earnestlyhopingthatthislittlebook may do somethingtowardthrowinglighton theAmericanslave system, andhasteningthegladdayofdeliverancetothemillionsofmy

brethrenin bonds-faithfullyrelyingupon the power of truth, love, and justice,forsuccessin myhumbleefforts-andsolemn-

lypledgingmyselfanew to thesacredcause,–I subscribemyself, FREDERICK DOUGLASS

« Isubscribemyself »-IwritemyselfdowninlettersI,underwritmey identityand myverybeing,as indeedI have done in and all through theforegoingnarrativethathas broughtmeto thisplace,thismoment, thisstateof being.

The to utterhis and more to utterit in ability name, significantly

themysteriouscharactersona pagewhereitwillcontinuetosound

insilenceso as readerscontinuetoconstruethe iswhat long characters,

Douglass’ Narrativeis about, forin thatletteredutteranceis assertion ofidentityand inidentityisfreedom-freedomfromslavery,freedom fromignorance,freedomfromnon-being,freedomeven fromtime. WhenWendellPhillips,ina standardletterprefatorytoDouglass’Nar- rative,says thatin thepast he has always avoided knowingDouglass’ « real name and birthplace » because it is « still dangerous, in Massachusetts,forhonestmentotelltheirnames, »oneunderstands wellenoughwhathe meansby « yourrealname »and thedangerof tellingit-« Nobody knowsmyname, »JamesBaldwinsays.Andyet

in a veryimportantway Phillipsis profoundlywrong,forDouglass had beensayinghis »realname »eversinceescapingfromslaveryin

engravedportrait,

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

55

theway in whichhe wentabout creatingand assertinghis identityas a freeman:FrederickDouglass.IntheNarrativehesayshisrealname notwhenhe revealsthathe « was born »FrederickBaileybutwhenhe putshissignaturbeelowhisportraibteforethebeginningand subscribes himselfagain aftertheend of thenarrative.Douglass’ name-changes and self-namingare highlyrevealingat each stage in his progress: « FrederickAugustusWashingtonBailey »by thenamegivenhimby hismotherh,ewasknownas »FrederickBailey »orsimply »Fred »while growingup; heescapedfromslaveryunderthename »Stanley, »but whenhe reachedNew York took thename « FrederickJohnson. »(He wasmarriedinNewYorkunderthatname-and givesacopyofthe marriagecertificatien thetext-by theRev. J.W. C. Penningtonwho had himselfescapedfromslaverysometenyearsbeforeDouglass and who wouldproducehisown narrativesomefouryearsafterDouglass.) Finally,in New Bedford,he foundtoo manyJohnsonsand so gave to

hishost( one ofthetoo the many-Nathan Johnson) privilege

ofnam- inghim, »buttoldhimhe mustnottakefromme thenameof ‘Frederick.’

Imustholdontothat,topreservea senseofmyidentity.T »husa new social identitybut a continuityof personalidentity.

In narratingtheeventsthatproducedbothchangeand continuity in his life,Douglass regularlyreflectsback and forth(and herehe is verymuchtheexception)fromthepersonwrittenabout to theperson writingf,romanarrativeofpasteventstoapresentnarratorgrown out of thoseevents.In one marvellouslyrevealingpassage describing thecoldhesufferefdromas a child,Douglasssays,’My feethavebeen so crackedwiththefrost,thatthepen withwhichI am writingmight belaidinthegashes. »One mightbeinclinedtoforgethatitisa vastly

writtenabout,butitis a personwriting person very

different fromthe

and effectivreeminderto referto the in- significant immensely writing

strumentas a way ofrealizingthedistancebetweentheliterate,ar- ticulatewriterand the illiterate,inarticulatesubjectof the writing. Douglasscouldhavesaidthatthecoldcausedlesionsinhisfeeta quarter ofan inchacross,butinchoosingthewritinginstrumenhteldat the presentmoment-« the pen withwhichI am writing »-by one now known to the world as FrederickDouglass, he dramatizeshow far removedhe is fromtheboy once called Fred(and other,worsenames, of course)withcracksin his feetand withno moreuse fora pen than foranyoftheothersignsand appendagesoftheeducationthathehad beendeniedand thathewouldfinallyacquireonlywiththegreatest

success,as we feelin difficulty greatest, telling

butalso withthe most thequalityofthenarrativenow flowingfromtheliteraland symbolic

heholdsinhishand.Herewehave andfreedom, pen literacyi,dentity,

theomnipresenthematictrioof themostimportantslave narratives, all conveyedin a singlestartlingimage.8

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

56

Thereis, however,onlyone FrederickDouglass amongtheex-slaves who told theirstoriesand the storyof slaveryin a singlenarrative, and in even the best known, most highlyregardedof the other narratives-those,forexample,by WilliamWellsBrown,CharlesBall, HenryBibb,JosiahHenson,SolomonNorthup,J.W. C. Pennington, and Moses Roper–all theconventionsare observed-conventionsof content,theme,form,and style-but theyremainjustthat:conven- tionsuntransformeadndunredeemedT.hefirsthreeoftheseconven- tionalaspectsofthenarrativesare,as I have alreadysuggested,pretty clearlydeterminebdy therelationshibpetweenthenarratorhimselfand thoseI have termedthesponsors(as wellas theaudience)ofthenar- rative.Whentheabolitionistsinvitedan ex-slaveto tellhisstoryof

experiencein slaveryto an anti-slaveryconvention,and when they

subsequentlysponsoredtheappearanceof thatstoryin print,1t0hey

had certainclear wellunderstood themselveasnd well expectations, by

understoodby theex-slavetoo, about thepropercontento be observ- ed, theproperthemeto be developed,and theproperformto be follow- ed. Moreover,content,theme,and formdiscoveredearlyon an ap-

propriatestyleand thatappropriatestylewas also thepersonalstyle displayedby thesponsoringabolitionistsin thelettersand introduc- tionstheyprovidedso generouslyforthenarrativesI.tisnotstrange, ofcourse,thatthestyleofan introductionand thestyleofa narrative shouldbe one and thesame in thosecases whereintroductionand nar- rativewerewrittenbythesameperson-CharlesStears writingin- troductionandnarrativeofBoxBrown,forexample,orDavid Wilson writingprefaceand narrativeof Solomon Northup.What is strange,

and a deal more is theinstancein whichthe perhaps, good interesting,

styleoftheabolitionistintroducercarriesoverintoa narrativethat iscertifiedas « WrittenbyHimself, »andthislatterinstanceisnotnear- lyso isolatedas onemightinitiallysuppose.I wanttolooksomewhat at threevariationson thatI taketo

closely stylisticinterchange repre-

sentmoreor less the of be- adequately spectrum possiblerelationships

tweenprefatorystyleand narrativestyle,or moregenerallybetween sponsorand narrator:HenryBox Brown,wheretheprefaceand nar- rativeare bothclearlyin themannerof CharlesStearns;SolomonNor- thup,wherethe enigmaticalprefaceand narrative,althoughnot so clearlyas inthecaseofBoxBrown,areneverthelesbsothintheman- nerofDavid Wilson;andHenryBibb,wheretheintroductionissign- ed byLuciusC. Matlackand theauthor’sprefacebyHenryBibb,and wherethenarrativeis « Writtenby Himself »-but wherealso a single

is in controlof author’s and narrativealike. style introduction, preface,

HenryBox Brown’sNarrative,we are told on the title-page,was WRITTEN FROM A

STATEMENT OF FACTS MADE BY HIMSELF. WITH REMARKS UPON THE REMEDY FOR SLAVERY. BY CHARLES STEARNS.

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

57

Whetheritis intentionaolr not,theorderoftheelementsand thepunc- tuationofthissubtitle(withfullstopsafterlinestwoand three)make

itveryunclearjustwhatis beingclaimedabout authorshipand stylistic responsibilityforthenarrative.Presumablythe »remarksupon the remedyforslavery »are by CharlesStearns(who was also, at 25 Cor- nhill,Boston,thepublisherof theNarrative),but thistitle-pagecould wellleavea readerindoubtaboutthepartyresponsibleforthestylistic mannerofthenarration.Such doubtwillsoon be dispelled,however, ifthereaderproceedsfromCharlesStearns' »preface »to Box Brown’s « narrativet »o CharlesStearns' »remarksupon theremedyforslavery. » The is a most most most

preface poetic, high-flown, grandiloquent perorationthat,oncecrankedup, carriesrightoverintoand through thenarrativetoissueintheappendedremarkswhichcometoan end in a REPRESENTATION OF THE BOX in whichBox Brownwas

transportedfromRichmondto Philadelphia.Thus fromthepreface:

seesomenewthing,n’ortogratifyanyinclinationonthepartofthe hero of thefollowingstoryto be honoredby man, is thissimpleand touchingnarrativeoftheperilsofa seekerafterthe’boon ofliberty,’ introducedto thepubliceye . … , » etc.-the sentencegoes on three timeslongerthanthisextractd,escribingasitproceeds »thehorridsuf-

ofone as, ina shutoutfromthe ofheaven, ferings portableprison, light

and nearly deprived of its balmy air, he pursued his fearful journey…..  » As is usual in suchprefaces,we are addresseddirectly

« Not forthe of to a desireto ‘hearand purpose administering prurient

by

theauthor: »O reader,as this tale,letthe you peruse heart-rending

tearofsympathyrollfreelyfromyoureyes,and letthedeep fountains

ofhumanfeelingw,hichGodhasimplantedinthebreastofeveryson

anddaughterofAdam,burstforthfromtheirenclosure,untila stream

shallflowtherefromon to thesurroundingworld,ofso invigorating

and a nature,as toarousefromthe’deathofthesin’of purifying slavery,

and cleansefromthepollutionsthereof,all withwhom you may be connected. »We maynotbe overwhelmedbythesenseofthissentence but surelywe mustbe by its richrhetoricalmanner.

Thenarrativeitselfw,hichisallfirstpersonand »theplainnarrative ofourfriend, »as theprefacesays,beginsinthismanner:

I amnotabouttoharrowthefeelingsofmyreadersbya ter-

rificrepresentationof theuntoldhorrorsof thatfearfuslystem

ofoppressionw,hichforthirty-thrleoengyearsentwineditssnaky

foldsaboutmysoul,as theserpentofSouthAmericacoilsitself

aroundtheformofitsunfortunatveictim.It is notmypurpose

to descenddeeplyintothedarkand noisomecavernsofthehell

of and fromtheir abode thoselost slavery, drag frightful spirits

who hauntthesouls of thepoor slaves, daily and nightlywith theirfrightfuplresence,and withthefearfusloundoftheirter-

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

58

rificinstrumentosf torture;forotherpens farabler thanmine

have that ofthelaborofan effectuallpyerformed portion exposer

of the enormitiesof slavery. Sufficeittosayofthispieceoffinewritingthatthepen-than which therewereothersfarabler-was heldnotbyBoxBrownbutbyCharles Stearnsand thatitcouldhardlybe furtheremovedthanitisfromthe penheldbyFrederickDouglass,thatpenthatcouldhavebeenlaidin thegashesin his feetmade by thecold. At one pointin his narrative Box Brownis made to say (afterdescribinghow his brotherwas turn- ed away froma streamwiththeremark »We do not allow niggersto fish »), »Nothingdaunted,however,by thisrebuffm, ybrotherwent

successfulin his obtain- undertaking,

to another and was place,

quite

inga plentifuslupplyofthefinnytribe. » »It maybe thatBox Brown’s

storywas toldfrom »a statementoffactsmadebyhimself, »butafter

thosefactshavebeendressedup intheexoticrhetoricaglarmentspro-

videdbyCharlesStearnsthereispreciouslittleofBoxBrown(other

thanthe of thebox itself)thatremainsin thenarrative. representation

And indeed for everyfact thereare pages of self-conscious,self-

gratifyings,elf-congratulatorpyhilosophizingby CharlesStearns,so thatifthereis any lifehereat all it is thelifeof thatman expressed in his veryown overheatedand foolishprose.12

David Wilsonis a good deal morediscreethanCharlesStearns,and

the relationshipof prefaceto narrativein Twelve Years a Slave is

thereforae deal more butalso more than great questionable, interesting,

intheNarrativeofHenryBox Brown.Wilson’sprefaceis a page and a halflong; Northup’snarrative,witha song at theend and threeor

fourappendices,is threehundredthirtypages long. In the preface Wilsonsays, « Many of thestatementcsontainedin thefollowingpages are corroboratedby abundantevidence-othersrestentirelyupon Solomon’sassertionT.hathehasadheredstrictlytothetrutht,heeditor, at least, who has had an opportunityof detectingany contradiction or discrepancyin his statementsi,s well satisfied.He has invariably repeated the same story without deviating in the slightest particular…. « 13 Now Northup’snarrativeis not only a verylong onebutisfilledwitha vastamountofcircumstantial andhence

detail,

itstrainsa reader’scredulitysomewhatto be toldthathe « invariably

repeatedthesame storywithoutdeviatingin theslightestparticular. » Moreover,sincethestyleofthenarrative(as I shallargueina mo-

ment)isdemonstrablynotNorthup’sown,wemightwellsuspecta fill- inginand fleshingouton thepartof-perhaps notthe »onliebegetter » butatleast-theactualauthorofthenarrativeB.utthisisnotthemost

of Wilson’s in the nor theone performance preface

interestinagspect thatwillrepayclosestexamination.Thatcomeswiththeconclusion of theprefacewhichreads as follows:

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

59

It is believedthatthefollowingaccountofhis [Northup’s]ex-

perienceon Bayou Boeufpresentsa correctpictureof Slavery, in all itslightsand shadows,as itnow existsin thatlocality.Un-

biased,as heconceives,byanyprepossessionsorprejudices,the onlyobjectoftheeditorhasbeentogiveafaithfuhlistoryof Solomon Northup’slife,as he receivedit fromhis lips.

In the ofthat accomplishment object,

thenumerousfaultsof and of it be withstanding style expression may

foundto contain.

To sortout,asfaraspossible,whatisbeingassertedherewewould

do well to startwiththefinalsentence,whichis relativelyeasy to understand.To acknowledgefaultsin a publicationand to assume

forthemis ofcoursea in responsibility commonplacegesture prefaces,

thoughwhythequestionofstyleand expressionshouldbe so impor- tantingiving »afaithfuhlistory »ofsomeone’slife »as…receiv-

ed . . . fromhislips »isnotquiteclear;presumablythevirtuesofstyle

he trustshe has succeeded,not-

itwhatever expression superadded history give

and are to thefaithful to

literarymeritsitmaylayclaimto,andinsofaras thesefallshortthe

authorfeelsthe need to acknowledgeresponsibilityand apologize. Neverthelessp,uttingthisambiguityaside,thereisno doubtaboutwho isresponsibleforwhatinthissentence,which,ifI mightreplacepro- nounswithnames,would read thus: »In theaccomplishmenotf that object,David Wilsontruststhathe [David Wilson]has succeeded,not-

thenumerousfaultsof and of which

withstanding

David Wilsonassumes

style expression[for

it be found thereader responsibility] may by

penetrableboth in syntaxand in the assertiontheyare presumably designedto make. Castingthefirststatementas a passive one (« It is

believed.. . ») and danglinga participlein the second (« Unbias- ed . . . « ), so thatwe cannotknowineithercase towhomthestate- mentshould be attached,Wilson succeeds in obscuringentirelythe authoritybeingclaimedforthenarrative.1I4t would take too much

to the the (one however, space analyze syntax, psychology might, glance

at thefamiliaruse ofNorthup’sgivenname),and thesenseofthese

affirmationsb,ut I would challengeanyone to diagramthe second sentence(« Unbiased . . . « ) withany assuranceat all.

As to thenarrativeto whichtheseprefatorysentencesrefer:When

we get a sentencelike this one describingNorthup’sgoing into a

swamp-« My midnightintrusionhad awakenedthefeatheredtribes

tocontain. »Thetwoprecedingsentencesh,owever,arealtogetherim-

relativesofthe tribeo’fBoxBrown/Charles which [near ‘finny Steams],

seemedto throngthemorassin hundredsof thousands,and theirgar-

rulousthroatspouredforthsuchmultitudinoussounds-therewas such

a of sullen in thewaterall aroundme- fluttering wings-such plunges

that I was affrightedand appalled » (p. 141)-when we get such a

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

60

sentencewe maythinkitprettyfinewritingand awfullyliteraryb,ut thefinewriterisclearlyDavid WilsonratherthanSolomonNorthup. Perhapsa betterinstanceofthewhiteamanuensis/sentimentnaolvelist

hismannered overthefaithful as receivedfromNor- laying style history

thup’slipsistobefoundinthisdescriptionofa Christmascelebration wherea huge meal was providedby one slaveholderforslaves from surroundingplantations: »Theyseat themselvesat therustictable- themaleson one side,thefemaleson theother.The twobetweenwhom theremayhavebeenan exchangeoftendernessi,nvariablymanageto sitopposite;fortheomnipresenCtupid disdainsnottohurlhisarrows into the simpleheartsof slaves » (p. 215). The entirepassage should be consultedto get the fulleffectof Wilson’s stylisticextravagances whenhepullsthestopsout,butanyreadershouldbe forgivenwho declinestobelievethatthislastclause,withitsreferencteo « thesimple heartsofslaves »and its inverted

self-conscious, syntax(« disdainsnot »), was writtenby someonewho had recentlybeen in slaveryfortwelve

years. »Red, »we aretoldbyWilson’sNorthup, »isdecidedlythefavorite coloramongtheenslaveddamselsofmyacquaintance.Ifa redribbon does notencircletheneck,you willbe certainto findall thehairoftheir wooly heads tiedup withred stringsof one sortor another »(p. 214). In the light of passages like these, David Wilson’s apology for « numerousfaultsof styleand of expression »takes on all sortsof in- terestingnew meaning.The rustictable, the omnipresentCupid, the simpleheartsofslaves,and thewoollyheadsofenslaveddamsels,like thefinnyand featheredtribes,mightcomefromanysentimentanlovel ofthenineteenthcentury-one,say,byHarrietBeecherStowe;and so it comes as no greatsurpriseto read on the dedicationpage the following: »To HarrietBeecherStowe:WhoseName,Throughouthe World,IsIdentifiedwiththeGreatReformT:hisNarrative,Affording AnotherKey to UncleTom’s Cabin, Is RespectfullyDedicated. » While notsurprisingg,iventhestyleofthenarrative,thisdedicationdoes lit- tleto clarifytheauthoritythatwe are asked to discoverin and behind thenarrative,and thededication,like thepervasivestyle,calls into seriousquestionthestatusof Twelve Yearsa Slave as autobiography and/orliterature.15

ForHenryBibb’snarrativeLuciusC. Matlacksuppliedan introduc-

tionin a mightypoeticvein in whichhe reflectson theparadox that

outofthehorrorsofslaveryhave comesomebeautifulnarrativepro-

ductions. »Gushingfountainsof poetic thought,have startedfrom

beneaththerod ofviolence,thatwilllongcontinueto slakethefeverish

thirstofhumanityoutraged,untilswellingtoa flooditshallrushwith

wastingviolenceovertheill-gottenheritageoftheoppressor.Startling

incidents far

authenticated, excelling touchingpathos,

fictionin their fromthepenofself-emancipatesdlaves,do nowexhibitslaveryinsuch

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

61

revoltingaspects,as to securetheexecrationsof all good men,and

becomea monumentmoreenduringthanmarble,intestimonystrong

as sacredwritagainstit. »16The pictureMatlackpresentsof an outrag-

ed humanitywitha feverishthirstforgushingfountainstartedup by

therodofviolenceisa peculiaroneandonethatseems,psychologically

speaking, not very healthy. At any rate, the narrativeto which

Matlack’sobservationshaveimmediatereferencweas,ashesays,from

the of a slave severaltimes), pen self-emancipated (self-emancipated

anditdoesindeedcontain incidentwsithmuch

startling touchingpathos

about them;butthereallycuriousthingabout Bibb’snarrativeis that

itdisplaysmuchthesame florid,sentimentald,eclamatoryrhetoricas

we findin or as-told-tonarrativesand also in ghostwritten prefaces

suchas thoseby CharlesStearns,Louis AlexisChamerovzow,and LuciusMatlackhimselfC.onsidertheaccountBibbgivesofhiscourt- shipandmarriage.Havingdeterminedbya hundredsignsthatMalin- dalovedhimevenashelovedher-« I couldreaditbyheralwaysgiv- ingme thepreferencoef hercompany;by herpressinginvitationsto visiteven in oppositionto her mother’swill. I could read it in the languageofherbrightand sparklingeye,penciledby theunchangable fingerofnature,thatspakebutcouldnotlie »(pp. 34-35)-Bibb decid- ed to speak and so, as he says, « broachedthe subjectof marriage »:

I said, »I neverwillgivemyheartnorhandtoanygirlinmar-

untilI firstknowhersentiments the sub- riage, upon all-important

jectsof Religionand Liberty.No matterhow well I mightlove her,norhow greatthesacrificein carryingout theseGod-given principles.And I herepledgemyselffromthiscourseneverto be shakenwhilea singlepulsationofmyheartshallcontinueto throbforLiberty. »

Anddidhis »deargirl »funkthechallengethusproposedbyBibb? Farfromit-if anythingsheprovedmorehigh-mindedthanBibb himself.

WiththisideaMalindaappearedtobewellpleased,andwith a smileshelookedmeinthefaceandsaid, »Ihavelongenter- tained the same views, and this has been one of the greatest reasonswhyI havenotfeltinclinedtoenterthemarriedstatewhile a slave;Ihavealwaysfelta desiretobefree;Ihavelongcherish- ed a hope thatI shouldyetbe free,eitherby purchaseor running away.InregardtothesubjectofReligion,Ihavealwaysfeltthat itwas a good thing,and somethingthatI would seekforat some futureperiod. »

Itisalltothegood,ofcourse,thatnoonehaseverspokenorcould everspeakasBibbandhisbelovedaresaidtohavedone-no one,that is,outsidea bad, sentimentanlovelofdatec. 1849.17Thoughactual- lywrittenbyBibb,thenarrativef,orstyleandtone,mightas wellhave

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

62

beentheproductofthepenofLuciusMatlack.Butthecombination ofthesentimentarlhetoricofwhitefictionand whitepreface-writing witha realisticpresentationofthefactsofslavery,all paradingunder the bannerof an authentic-and authenticated-personalnarrative, producessomethingthatis neitherfishnorfowl.A textlikeBibb’sis committedtotwoconventionaflormst,heslavenarrativeandthenovel ofsentimenta,nd caughtbybothitis unableto transcendeither.Nor

Considerone smallbutrecurrenatnd tellingdetailin therelation- shipofwhitesponsorto black narrator.JohnBrown’snarrative,we are toldby Louis AlexisChamerovzow,the »Editor »(actuallyauthor) of Slave Lifein Georgia,is « a plain, unvarnishedtale of real Slave- life »;EdwinScrantom,inhisletter »recommendatoryw, »ritesto Austin Stewardofhis Twenty-TwoYearsa Slave and FortyYearsa Freeman, « Letitsplain,unvarnishedtalebe sentout,and thestoryofSlavery and its abominations,again be told by one who has feltin his own personitsscorpionlash,and theweightofitsgrindingheel »;thepreface writer(« W. M. S. ») forExperienceofa Slave inSouthCarolinacalls it « theunvarnished,but ower truetale of JohnAndrewJackson,the

ofhis »ex-slave, »saysof TheNarrativeofJamesWilliams, »Thefollow- ingpagescontainthesimpleand unvarnishedstoryofan AMERICAN SLAVE »; RobertHurnardtellsus thathe was determinedto receive and transmitSolomon Bayley’sNarrative »in his own simple,unvar- nished style »; and HarrietTubman too is given the « unvarnished » honorifibcySarahBradfordinherprefaceto ScenesintheLifeofHar- rietTubman: »Itisproposedinthislittlebooktogivea plainandun- varnishedaccountofsomescenesandadventureisnthelifeofa woman who, thoughone of earth’slowly ones, and of dark-huedskin,has shownan amountofheroisminhercharacterarelypossessedbythose ofanystationinlife. »Thefactthatthevarnishislaidonverythickly indeedin severalof these(Brown,Jackson,and Williams,forexam-

is but it is not theessential whichis to ple) perhapsinteresting, point,

be foundin therepeateduse of just thisword-« unvarnished »-to describeall thesetales.The OxfordEnglishDictionarywilltellus (which we shouldhave surmisedanyway)thatOthello,anotherfigureof »dark- huedskin »butvastlyheroiccharacterf,irstusedtheword »unvarnish- ed »-« I willa roundunvarnish’dtaledeliver/Of mywholecourseof love »;andthat,atleastsofarastheOED recordgoes,theworddoes notturnup againuntilBurkeuseditin1780,some175yearslater(« This

UncleTom’sCabin sensibility produced

is thereasonfarto seek:the that

was closelyalliedto theabolitionistsensibilitythatsponsoredtheslave narrativesand largelydeterminedthe formthey should take. The master-slaverelationshipmightgo undergroundor itmightbe turned insideout but it was not easily done away with.

Carolinianslave »;JohnGreenleafWhittier, the escaped apparently dupe

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

63

is a true,unvarnished,undisguisedstateoftheaffair »).I doubtthat anyonewould imaginethatwhiteeditors/amanuensehsad an obscure passagefromBurkeinthebackoftheircollectivemind-or deepdown inthatmind-when theyrepeatedlyusedthiswordtocharacterizethe narrativeoftheirex-slaves.No, itwas certainlya Shakespeareanhero theywereunconsciouslyevoking,and notjustany Shakespeareanhero but always Othello, theNoble Moor.

Various narratorsof documents »writtenby himself »apologize for

theirlack of grace or styleor writingability,and again various nar-

rators thattheirsare factual,realistic but say simple, presentations;

noex-slavethatI havefoundwhowriteshisownstorycallsitan « un-

varnished »tale: thephraseis specificto whiteeditors,amanuenses, writersa,ndauthenticatorMs.oreover,toturnthematteraround,when

an ex-slavemakesan allusionto Shakespeare(whichis naturallya very infrequenotccurrencet)osuggestsomethingabouthissituationorim-

ofhis theallusionis neverto Othello.Frederick plysomething character,

Douglass, forexample,describingall theimaginedhorrorsthatmight overtakehimand hisfellowsshouldtheytryto escape,writes, »I say,

thispicturesometimesappalled us, and made us:

‘ratherbear those ills we had, Than flyto others,thatwe knew not of. »‘

Thus it was in the lightof Hamlet’s experienceand characterthat

Douglass saw his own, not in the lightof Othello’s experienceand

character.Not so WilliamLloyd Garrison,however,who says in the

prefaceto Douglass’ Narrative, »I am confidenthatit is essentially

trueinallitsstatementst;hatnothinghasbeensetdowninmalice,

nothingexaggeratedn,othingdrawnfromtheimagination…. « 18We can be sure that it is entirelyunconscious,this regularallusion to

Othello,butitsaysmuchaboutthepsychologicarlelationshipofwhite patronto black narratorthattheformershouldinvariablysee thelat- ter not as Hamlet, not as Lear, not as Antony, or any other Shakespeareanhero but always and only as Othello.

When you shall theseunluckydeeds relate,

Speak of themas theyare. Nothingextenuate,

Nor set down aughtin malice. Then mustyou speak Of one thatlov’d not wiselybut too well;

Of one not easily jealous, but, beingwrought, Perplex’din the extreme….

TheMoor, Shakespeare’sor Garrison’s,wasnoble,certainlyb,uthe

was also a creatureofunreliablecharacterand irrational passion-such,

at least,seemsto havebeenthelogicoftheabolitionistsa’ttitudetoward

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

64

theirex-slavespeakersand narrators-and it was just as well forthe whitesponsorto keep him,ifpossible,on a prettyshortleash. Thus itwas thattheGarrisonians-thoughnotGarrisonhimself-wereop- posed to theidea (and lettheiroppositionbe known)thatDouglass and WilliamWellsBrownshouldsecurethemselveasgainsttheFugitive Slave Law by purchasingtheirfreedomfromex-mastersa;nd because it mightharmtheircause theGarrisoniansattemptedalso to prevent WilliamWellsBrownfromdissolvinghismarriage.The reactionfrom theGarrisoniansand fromGarrisonhimselfwhenDouglass insisted

ongoinghisownwayanyhowwasbothexcessiveandrevealing,sug- gestingthatforthemtheMoor had ceased to be noble whilestill,un-

fortunatelyr,emaininga Moor. My Bondageand My Freedom,Gar-

risonwrote, »initssecondportion,is reekingwiththevirusofper-

sonal towardsWendell and theold malignity Phillips,myself, organiza-

tionists and and basenesstowardsas true generally, fullofingratitude « 19

and disinterestefdriendsas any man everyethad upon earth. That

thissimplyis not trueof My Bondage and My Freedomis almostof

secondaryinterestowhatthewordsI haveitalicizedrevealofGar-

rison’sattitudetowardhis ex-slaveand theunconsciouspsychology

ofbetrayed,outragedproprietorshilpyingbehindit.And whenGar-

risonwroteto his wifethatDouglass’ conduct »has been impulsive,

inconsiderateand highlyinconsistent »and to Samuel J. May that

Douglasshimselfwas « destitutoefeveryprincipleofhonor,ungrateful

to thelast and malevolentin the is clear: degree spirit, »20 picture pretty

forGarrison,Douglass had becomeOthellogonewrong,Othellowith all his dark-huedskin,his impulsivenessand passion but none of his nobilityof heroism.

TherelationshiopfsponsortonarratordidnotmuchaffecDtouglass’ ownNarrative:hewas capableofwritinghisstorywithoutaskingthe Garrisoniansl’eave or requiringtheirguidance.ButDouglass was an

manand an writera,nd othernar- extraordinary altogetherexceptional

rativesby ex-slaves,even thoseentirely »Writtenby Himself, »scarce- ly riseabove thelevel of thepreformedi,mposedand acceptedcon- ventional.Of thenarrativesthatCharlesNicholsjudgesto have been writtenwithoutthehelpofan editor-thoseby »FrederickDouglass, WilliamWells Brown,JamesW. C. Pennington,Samuel Ringgold Ward, Austin Steward and perhaps Henry Bibb »21-none but Douglass’ has any genuineappeal in itself,apartfromthetestimony itmightprovideaboutslavery,oranyrealclaimtoliterarymeritA.nd whenwegobeyondthisbarehandfulofnarrativestoconsiderthose writtenunderimmediateabolitionistguidanceand control,we find, as we mightwell expect,even less of individualdistinctionor distinc- tivenessas thenarratorshow themselvesmoreor less contentto re- main slaves to a prescribed,conventional,and imposed form; or

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

65

perhapsitwould be morepreciseto say thattheywerecaptiveto the abolitionistintentionsand so thequestionof theirbeingcontentor

otherwisheardlyenteredin.Justasthetriangularelationshiepmbracing sponsor,audience,and ex-slavemadeofthelattersomethingotherthan an entirelyfreecreatorinthetellingofhislifestory,so also itmade

ofthenarrativperoduced(alwayskeepingtheexceptionaclase inmind) somethingotherthanautobiographyinanyfullsenseand something otherthanliteraturein any reasonableunderstandingof thattermas

an act of creativeimagination.An autobiographyor a piece of im- aginativeliteraturemay of courseobservecertainconventions,but it cannotbe only,merelyconventionalwithoutceasingto be satisfac- toryas eitherautobiographyor literaturea,nd thatis thecase, I should say, withall theslave narrativesexceptthegreatone by Frederick Douglass.

Butherea mostinterestinpgaradoxarises.Whilewemaysaythat

theslavenarrativedso notqualifyas eitherautobiographyorliterature,

and whilewe mayargue,againstJohnBaylissand GilbertOsofskyand others,thattheyhave no realplace inAmericanLiterature(justas we mightargue,and on thesame grounds,againstEllenMoers thatUncle Tom’sCabinisnota greatAmericannovel),yettheundeniablefact is thattheAfro-American traditiontakesitsstart,in themecer-

literary

tainlybut also oftenin contentand form,fromtheslave narratives.

RichardWright’sBlack Boy, whichmanyreaders(myselfincluded) would take to be his supremeachievementas a creativewriter,pro- videstheperfectcase inpoint,thougha hostofotherscouldbe adduc- ed thatwouldbe nearlyas exemplary(DuBois’ variousautobiographical works;Johnson’sAutobiographyofan Ex-ColouredMan; Baldwin’s autobiographicalfictionand essays; Ellison’sInvisibleMan; Gaines’ AutobiographyofMissJanePittman;MayaAngelou’swritinge;tc.). In effectW, rightlooks back to slave narrativesat thesame timethat he projectsdevelopmentsthatwould occurin Afro-Americanwriting afterBlackBoy(publishedin1945).ThematicallyB,lackBoyreenacts boththegeneral,objectiveportrayaloftherealitiesofslaveryas an institution(transmutedto whatWrightcalls « The EthicsofLivingJim Crow » in thelittlepiece thatlies behindBlack Boy) and also thepar-

ticular,individualcomplexof literacy-identity-freedtohmatwe find at the thematicenterof all of the most importantslave narratives. IncontentandformaswellBlackBoyrepeats,mutatismutandism,uch of thegeneralplan givenearlierin thisessaydescribingthetypicalslave narrativeW:rightl,iketheex-slave,afteramoreorlesschronological, episodicaccountof theconditionsof slavery/JimCrow, includinga

vivid of the or near

particularly description difficulty impossibility-

butalso theinescapablenecessity-ofattainingfullliteracy,tellshow he escapedfromsouthernbondage,fleeingtowardwhathe imagined

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

66

would be freedom,a new and the to exercisehis identity, opportunity

hard-wonliteracyina northernf,ree-statceity.Thathedidnotfind

exactlywhat he expectedin Chicago and New York changesnothing about Black Boy itself:neitherdid Douglass findeverythinghe an-

ticipatedor desiredin theNorth,but thatpersonallyunhappyfactin

no way affectshis Narrative.Wright,impelledby a nascentsense of

freedomthatgrewwithinhim in directproportionto his increasing

literacy(particularlyin thereadingofrealisticand naturalistifciction),

fledtheworldoftheSouth,and abandonedtheidentitythatworld

had imposeduponhim(« I was whatthewhiteSouthcalleda ‘nigger »‘),

insearchofanotheridentity,theidentityofa writer,preciselythat

writerwe know as « RichardWright. » »Fromwherein thissouthern

darknesshadIcaughtasenseoffreedom? »2W2rightcoulddiscover

only one answer to his question: « It had been only through

books . . . thatI hadmanagedtokeepmyselfaliveina negativelyvital

way » (p. 282). It was in his abilityto construelettersand in thebare

possibilityofputtinghislifeintowritingthatWright »caughta sense

offreedom »and knewthathe mustworkout a new « I could identity.

submitandlivethelifeofa genialslave, »Wrightsays, »but, »headds,

« thatwas impossible »(p. 276). Itwas impossiblebecause,likeDouglass and otherslaves,he had arrivedat thecrossroadswherethethreepaths

of freedom

literacy,identity, met, knowledge

and aftersuch therewas

no turningback.

BlackBoy resembleslave narrativeisn manywaysbutin otherways

itis differenftromits and ancestors.It is ofmore crucially predecessors

thantrivial that narrativedoes not with insignificance Wright’s begin

« Iwasborn, »norisitundertheguidanceofanyintentionorimpulse otherthanitsown, and whilehis book is largelyepisodicin structure, itis also-precisely by exerciseofsymbolicmemory-« emplotteda »nd

insucha as toconstrue wholesout « configurational » way « significant

ofscatteredevents. »UltimatelyW,rightfreedhimselfromtheSouth-

atleastthisiswhathisnarrativerecounts-andhewasalsofortunate-

lyfree,as theex-slavesgenerallywerenot,fromabolitionistcontrol

and freeto exercisethatcreativememorythatwas peculiarlyhis. On

thepenultimatpeageofBlackBoyWrightsays, »I was leavingtheSouth to flingmyselfintotheunknown,to meetothersituationsthatwould

perhapselicitfromme otherresponses.And ifI could meetenough

ofa different and I learn life,then,perhaps,gradually slowly might

who I was, whatI mightbe. I was notleavingtheSouthto forgethe South,butso thatsomedayI mightunderstandit,mightcometoknow whatitsrigorshaddonetome,toitschildrenI. fledso thatthenumb- nessofmydefensivelivingmightthawout and letmefeelthepain- yearslaterandfaraway-of whatlivingintheSouthhadmeant. »Here Wrightnotonlyexercisesmemorybutalso talksaboutit,reflecting

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

67

on itscreative,therapeuticr,edemptivea,nd liberatingcapacities.In his conclusionWrightharksback to thethemesand theformof the

slavenarrativesa,ndatthesametimeheanticipatesthemeandform in a greatdeal of morerecentAfro-Americanwriting,perhapsmost notablyinInvisibleMan. BlackBoyislikea nexusjoiningslavenar- rativesof thepast to themostfullydevelopedliterarycreationsof the presentt:hroughthepowerofsymbolicmemoryittransformtsheearlier narrativemodeintowhateveryonemustrecognizeas imaginative, creativeliteratureb,othautobiographyand fiction.In theirnarratives we mightsay, theex-slavesdid thatwhich,all unknowinglyon their partandonlywhenjoinedtocapacitiesandpossibilitiesnotavailable to them,led righton to the traditionof Afro-Americanliteratureas we know it now.

NOTES

1ProfessorRicoeurhas generouslygivenme permissionto quote fromthisunpublishedpaper.

2 I haveinmindsuchillustrationass thelargedrawingreproduced

as to Andrew a SlaveinSouth frontispiece John Jackson’Esxperienceof

Carolina(London:Passmore& Alabaster,1862),describedas a « Fac-

simileofthegimletwhichI usedtoborea holeinthedeckofthevessel »;

theengraveddrawingofa torturemachinereproducedon p. 47 ofA Narrativeof the Adventuresand Escape of Moses Roper, from

AmericanSlavery(Philadelphia:Merrihew& Gunn, 1838); and the « REPRESENTATION OF THE BOX, 3 feet1 inchlong,2 feetwide, 2 feet6 incheshigh, »in whichHenryBox Browntravelledby freight fromRichmondto Philadelphia,reproducedfollowingthetextof the Narrativeof HenryBox Brown,Who Escaped fromSlaveryEnclosed in a Box 3 FeetLong and 2 Wide. Writtenfroma Statementof Facts Made by Himself.WithRemarksupon theRemedyforSlavery.By CharlesSteams. (Boston: Brown& Stearns,1849). The verytitleof Box Brown’sNarrativedemonstratesomethingof themixedmode of slavenarrativesO.nthequestionofthetextofBrown’snarrativesee also notes4 and 12 below.

3 Douglass’NarrativedivergesfromthemasterplanonE4(hewas himselftheslave who refusedto be whipped),E8 (slave auctionshap- penednottofallwithinhisexperienceb,uthedoestalkofthesepara- tionof mothersand childrenand thesystematicdestructionof slave families),and E10 (he refusesto tellhow he escaped because to do so would close one escape routeto thosestillin slavery;in theLifeand TimesofFrederickDouglass he revealsthathis escape was different fromtheconventionalone). Forthepurposesofthepresentessay-

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

68

and also, I think,in general-the Narrativeof 1845 is a much more

and a betterbook than twolater

interesting Douglass’ autobiographical

texts:My Bondage and My Freedom(1855) and Lifeand Timesof

FrederickDouglass (1881). These lattertwo are diffuseproductions

(Bondage and Freedomis threeto fourtimeslongerthanNarrative,

Lifeand Timesfiveto sixtimeslonger)thatdissipatethefocalizedenergy

of the Narrativein lengthyaccounts of post-slaveryactivities-

abolitionistspeeches,recollectionsoffriendst,ripsabroad,etc.Inin-

terestingways it seemsto me thattherelativeweaknessof thesetwo

laterbooksisanalogoustoa similarweaknessintheextendedversion

of RichardWright’sautobiographypublishedas AmericanHunger (orginallyconceivedas partofthesametextas BlackBoy).

4 This is true of the version labelled « firstEnglish edition »-

NarrativeoftheLifeofHenryBox Brown,WrittenbyHimself(Man- chesterL:ee&Glynn,1851)-butnotoftheearlierAmericanedition- NarrativeofHenryBox Brown,Who EscapedfromSlaveryEnclosed ina Box3 FeetLongand2 Wide.Writtenfroma StatementofFacts Made by Himself.WithRemarksupon theRemedyforSlavery.By

CharlesSteams. (Boston:Brown& Stearns,1849). On thebeginning of theAmericaneditionsee thediscussionlaterin thisessay, and on therelationshipbetweenthetwo textsof Brown’snarrativesee note 12 below.

5 Douglass’ Narrative begins this way. Neither Bondage and FreedomnorLifeand Timesstartswiththeexistentiaalssertion.This

is one thing,thoughby no meanstheonlyor themostimportantone,

thatremovesthelattertwobooks fromthecategoryofslavenarrative.

It is as ifby 1855 and evenmoreby 1881 FrederickDouglass’ existence

and his weresecure and wellknownthat identity enough sufficiently

he no longerfeltthenecessityof thefirstand basic assertion.

6 WiththeexceptionofWilliamParker’s »The Freedman’sStory » (publishedin theFebruaryand March1866issuesofAtlanticMonthly) all thenarrativelsistedwere Thereare more

separatepublications. many brief »narratives »-so briefthat theyhardlywarrantthe title »nar-

rative »:froma singleshortparagraphtothreeorfourpagesinlength-

thirtysuchinthecollectionofBenjaminDrewpublishedas TheRefugee: A North-SideViewofSlavery.I havenottriedtomultiplytheinstances by citingminorexamples;thoselistedin thetextincludethemostim- portantofthenarratives-Roper,Bibb,W. W. Brown,Douglass, Thompson, Ward, Pennington,Steward, Clarke, the Crafts-even JamesWilliams,thoughitisgenerallyagreedthathisnarrativiesa fraud perpetratedon an unwittingamanuensis,JohnGreenleafWhittierI.n additionto thoselistedin thetext,thereare a numberof othernar- rativesthatbeginwithonlyslightvariationson theformulaictag-

that with »I was born »;thereare,for or begin example,twenty-five

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

69

WilliamHayden: »Thesubjectofthisnarrativweasborn »;MosesGran-

dy: »MynameisMosesGrandy;Iwasborn »;AndrewJackson »:I,An-

drew was Elizabeth lifehas beenan event- Jackson, born »; Keckley: »My

fulone. I was born »; Thomas L. Johnson: »Accordingto information

receivedfrommymotheri,fthereckoningis correctI, was born… « 

more thantheseis thevariation Solomon Perhaps interesting playedby

Northup,who was born a freeman in New York State and was kid- nappedand sentintoslaveryfortwelveyears;thushe commencesnot with »I was born »butwith »Havingbeenborna freeman »-as itwere theparticipialcontingencythatendowshisnarrativewitha special poignancyand a markeddifferencferomothernarratives.

Thereis a niceand ironicturnon the »I was born »insistencein the

ratherfoolishscenein UncleTom’s Cabin (ChapterXX) whenTopsy

famouslyopinesthatshewas notmadebutjust »grow’d. »MissOphelia catechizesher: » ‘Wherewereyou born? »Neverwas born!’persisted

Topsy. » Escaped slaves who hadn’tTopsy’s peculiarcombinationof Stowe-icresignationand manichighspiritsin thefaceofan imposed

non-existencweere toassertoverandover, »I non-identity, impelled

was born. »

7 Douglass’titleisclassictothedegreethatitisvirtuallyrepeated

by HenryBibb, changingonly thename in theformulaand inserting « Adventures,p »resumablyto attractspectacle-lovinrgeaders:Narrative oftheLifeand AdventuresofHenryBibb,An AmericanSlave, Writ-

tenby Himself.Douglass’ Narrativewas publishedin 1845, Bibb’s in 1849.I suspectthatBibbderivedhistitledirectlyfromDouglass. That ex-slaveswritingtheirnarrativeswereaware ofearlierproductionsby fellowex-slaves(and thuswereimpelledto samenessin narrativeby outrightimitationas well as by theconditionsof narrationadduced inthetextabove) ismadeclearintheprefaceto TheLifeofJohnThomp- son,A FugitiveSlave; ContainingHis Historyof25 YearsinBondage, andHisProvidentialEscape.WrittenbyHimself(WorcesterP:ublish- edbyJohnThompson,1856),p. v: « Itwas suggestedtomeabouttwo yearssince,afterrelatingto manythemainfactsrelativeto mybon- dage and escape to theland of freedom,thatit would be a desirable thingtoputthesefactsintopermanentform.I firstsoughttodiscover whathadbeensaidbyotherpartnersinbondageonce,butinfreedom now…. » Withthisforewarningthereadershouldnotbe surprised to discoverthatThompson’snarrativefollowstheconventionsof the formverycloselyindeed.

8 However much Douglass changed his narrativein successive incarnations-theopeningparagraph,forexample,underwentcon- siderabletransformation-hcehose to retainthissentenceintact.It oc- curson p. 52 oftheNarrativeoftheLifeofFrederickDouglass . . . ed. BenjaminQuarles (Cambridge,Mass., 1960); on p. 132 ofMy Bon-

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

70

dageandMyFreedom,intro.PhilipS. Foner(NewYork,1969);and on p. 72 ofLifeand TimesofFrederickDouglass, intro.RayfordW.

Logan (New York, 1962).

9 For convenienceI have adopted thislistfromJohnF. Bayliss’in-

troductiontoBlackSlaveNarratives(NewYork,1970),p. 18.Aswill be apparent,however,I do notagreewiththepointBaylisswishesto

make withhis list. Having quoted fromMarion Wilson Starling’sun- publisheddissertation, »The Black Slave Narrative:Its Place in AmericanLiteraryHistory, »to theeffecthattheslave narrativese,x- cept those fromEquiano and Douglass, are not generallyvery distinguishedasliteratureB,aylisscontinues: »Starlingisbeingunfair heresincethenarrativesdo showa diversityofinterestinsgtyles… Theleadingnarratives,uchas thoseofDouglass,WilliamWellsBrown, Ball,Bibb,Henson,Northup,Penningtona,nd Roperdeservetobe con- sideredfora in American a the

place literature, place beyond historical. »Since Ball’s narrativewas writtenby one « Mr. Fisher »and

Northup’sbyDavid Wilson,andsinceHenson’snarrativsehowsa good

dealofthecharlantryonemightexpectfroma manwhobilledhimself

toincludethemamongthoseslavenarrativesaidtoshowthegreatest literarydistinctionT.o putitanotherway,itwouldbeneithersurpris- ingnorspeciallymeritoriouisfMr. Fisher(a whiteman),David Wilson (a whiteman),andJosiahHenson(TheOriginalUncleTom)wereto display »a diversityofinterestinsgtyles »whentheirnarrativesareput alongsidethoseby Douglass, W. W. Brown,Bibb, Penningtona,nd

Butthe fact,as I shall in thetext,is that Roper. reallyinteresting argue

theydo not show a diversityof interestinsgtyles.

10Here we discoveranotherminorbut revealingdetailof thecon-

vention itselfJ.ustasitbecameconventionatlohavea establishing sign-

ed and so it became at least portrait authenticatinlgetters/prefaces,

semi-conventionatlo have an imprintreadingmore or less like this:

« Boston:Anti-SlaveryOffice,25 Cornhill. »A Cornhilladdressis given

for,amongothers,thenarrativesof Douglass, WilliamWells Brown,

Box Brown,Thomas Jones,JosiahHenson,Moses Grandy,and James

as ‘The UncleTom, »itseemsatbesta errorfor Original strategic Bayliss

Williams.The lastoftheseis especiallyinterestinfgor,althoughitseems thathisnarrativeis at least Williamsis on this

semi-fraudulent, point,

as on so

11NarrativeofHenryBoxBrown…. (Boston:Brown& Stears,

many others,altogetherepresentative.

merely

1849), p. 25.

12 The questionof thetextof Brown’sNarrativeis a good deal more

complicatedthanI have space to show, but thatcomplicationrather

thaninvalidates above. The textI strengthens my argument analyze

above was publishedin Boston in 1849. In 1851 a « firstEnglishedi- tion »was publishedinManchesterwiththespecification »Writtenby

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

71

Himself. »It would appear that in preparingthe Americanedition Steamsworkedfroma ms.copyofwhatwouldbe publishedtwoyears lateras thefirstEnglishedition-or fromsome ur-textlyingbehind both. In any case, Stearnshas laid on theTrue AbolitionistStylevery heavily,but thereis already,in theversion »Writtenby Himself, »a good deal of theabolitionistmannerpresentin diction,syntax,and tone.IfthefirstEnglisheditionwas reallywrittenbyBrownthiswould makehiscase parallelto thecase ofHenryBibb,discussedbelow,where theabolitioniststyleinsinuatesitselfintothetextand takesoverthe styleof thewritingeven when thatis actuallydone by an ex-slave. Thisis nottheplace forit,buttherelationshipbetweenthetwotexts, thevariationsthatoccurin them,and theexplanationforthosevaria- tionswould providethesubjectforan immenselyinterestinsgtudy.

13 TwelveYearsa Slave: NarrativeofSolomonNorthup,a Citizen

of New-York,Kidnapped in WashingtonCity in 1841, and Rescued in 1853,froma CottonPlantationNear theRed River,in Louisiana

(Auburn:Derby & Miller,1853), p. xv. Referencesin thetextare to thisfirstedition.

14 IamsurprisedthatRobertStepto,inhisexcellentanalysisofthe internawl orkingsoftheWilson/Northupbook, doesn’tmakemoreof thisquestionofwheretolocatetherealauthorityofthebook. SeeFrom BehindtheVeil:A StudyofAfro-AmericanNarrative(Urbana,Ill., 1979), pp. 11-16.

Whether or not,Gilbert misleadsreaders intentionally Osofskybadly

ofthebook

calledPuttin’On Ole Massa whenhefails unfortunately

toincludethe »Editor’sPreface »byDavid Wilsonwithhisprintingof

TwelveYearsa Slave: NarrativeofSolomonNorthup.Thereis nothing

inOsofsky’stexttosuggesthatDavid WilsonoranyoneelsebutNor-

thuphad anythingto do withthenarrative-on thecontrary: »Nor-

thup,Brown,andBibb,astheirautobiographiesdemonstratew,ere

menof wisdomand talent.Each was of his

creativity, capable writing life with (PuttinO’nOleMassa York,

story sophistication » [New

p. 44). Northuppreciselydoes notwritehislifestory,eitherwithor

1969],

withoutsophisticationa,nd Osofskyis guiltyof badly obscuringthis fact.Osofsky’sliteraryjudgementw,ithtwo-thirdosfwhichIdonot

agree,is that »TheautobiographieosfFrederickDouglass,HenryBibb,

and SolomonNorthupfuseimaginativestylewithkeennessofinsight.

They are penetratingand self-criticasl,uperiorautobiographyby any standards »(p. 10).

15 To anticipateone possibleobjection,I would arguethatthecase is essentiallydifferenwtithTheAutobiographyofMalcolmX, written

byAlexHaley. To putitsimply,thereweremanythingsincommon between Haley and Malcolm X; between white ama- nuenses/editors/authoransdex-slaves,ontheotherhand,almost nothingwas shared.

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

72

16 Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An AmericanSlave, WrittenbyHimself.Withan IntroductionbyLucius C. Matlack (New York: Publishedby the Author; 5 Spruce Street, 1849), p. i. Page citationsin the textare fromthisfirstedition.

Itisa thatinmodern ofslavenarratives-the greatpity reprintings

threeinOsofsky’sPuttinO’nOleMassa,forexample-theillustrations in theoriginalsare omittedA. modemreadermissesmuchoftheflavor ofa narrativelikeBibb’swhentheillustrationss,o fullofpathosand tendersentimentn,otto mentionsomeexquisitecrueltyand violence, arenotwiththetext.The twoillustrationosn p. 45 (captions: »Can

a motherforgethersucklingchild? »and « The tendermerciesof the

wickedare cruel »),theone on p. 53 (« Nevermindthemoney »),and

theone on p. 81 (« My heartis almostbroken »)can be takenas typical.

An interestinpgsychologicalfactabout theillustrationisn Bibb’snar-

rativeis thatof thetwenty-onetotal,eighteeninvolvesome formof

physicalcruelty,tortureo,rbrutalityT.heuncaptionedillustrationof

133 of two naked slaves on whom some infernal is be- p. punishment

ingpractisedsaysmuchabout(inMatlack’sphrase)thereader’sfeverish thirstforgushingbeautifulfountains »startedfrombeneaththerod of violence. »

17 Or 1852, thedate of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. HarrietBeecherStowe recognizeda kindrednovelisticspiritwhenshereadone (justas David Wilson/SolomonNorthupdid). In 1851,whenshewas writingUncle Tom’s Cabin, Stowe wroteto FrederickDouglass sayingthatshe was seekinginformationabout lifeon a cottonplantationforhernovel: « I have beforeme an able paper writtenby a southernplanterin which thedetails& modusoperandiaregivenfromhispointofsight-I am anxioustohavesomemorefromanotherstandpoint-Iwishtobe able tomakea picturethatshallbegraphic& truetonatureinitsdetails- Such a personas HenryBibb, ifin thiscountry,mightgive me just thekindofinformationI desire. »Thisletteris datedJuly9, 1851and has been transcribedfroma photographicopy reproducedin Ellen Moers, HarrietBeecherStowe and AmericanLiterature(Hartford, Conn.: Stowe-DayFoundation,1978),p. 14.

18 Sincewritingtheabove, I discoverthatinhisLifeand Times

Douglass saysoftheconclusionofhisabolitionistwork, »Othello’soc-

cupationwasgone »(NewYork:Collier-Macmillan1,962,p. 373),but thisstillseemstomerathera differenmtatterfromthewhitesponsor’s invariantallusionto Othelloin attestingto thetruthfulneosfs theblack narrator’saccount.

A contemporaryreviewerofTheInterestingNarrativeoftheLife of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, theAfricanwrote,in The GeneralMagazineandImpartialReview(July1789), »Thisis’a round unvarnishedtale’ofthechequeredadventuresofan African …. « (see

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

73

appendixto vol. I of The Lifeof Olaudah Equiano, ed. Paul Edwards [London: Dawsons of Pall Mall, 1969].

JohnGreenleafWhittiert,houghstungonceinhissponsorshipof JamesWilliams’Narrative,didnotshrinkfroma second,similarven-

ture,writingi,n his « introductorynote » to theAutobiographyof the Rev. JosiahHenson (Mrs. HarrietBeecherStowe’s « Uncle Tom ») – also knownas UncleTom’sStoryofHis LifeFrom1789to 1879-« The earlylifeoftheauthor,as a slave, . . . provesthatintheterriblepic- turesof ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ thereis ‘nothingextenuateor aughtset downinmalice »‘(Boston:B. B. Russell& Co., 1879,p. viii).

19 Quoted by Philip S. Foner in the introductionto My Bondage

and My Freedom,pp. xi-xii.

20 BothquotationsfromBenjaminQuarles, « The BreachBetween

DouglassandGarrison, »JournaolfNegroHistory,XXIII(April1938), p. 147, note 19, and p. 154.

21 ThelistisfromNichols’unpublishedoctoraldissertation(Brown

University1,948), « A Studyof theSlave Narrative, »p. 9. 22BlackBoy:A RecordofChildhoodandYouth(NewYork,1966),

p. 282.

This content downloaded from 193.54.110.35 on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 03:24:13 AM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

That, the integrity of the piece and of the world it creates, of its internal logics and rules, is what matters. My hope was always that as genre gestures got more integrated into mainstream literature and television and film, the overreliance on realism-based critiques would fade. Instead, it’s intensified and is becoming a major mode of critical discourse. It’s sad, really. There’re so many more riches to be discovered in fiction if we could just let ourselves see them and not be so afraid that it might take us somewhere new.


Education: Une soi-disant théorie du genre qui n’existe pas (It’s not gender theory, stupid ! – French socialist government caught playing sorcerer’s apprentices with children’s minds after boycott)

2 février, 2014
https://i0.wp.com/www.franceinfo.fr/sites/default/files/imagecache/462_ressource/2014/01/29/1298673/images/ressource/maxstockworld305578.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/www.medialibre.eu/cms/wp-content/uploads/yapb_cache/gender.2atjyde6tce80g8sggcoowko0.brydu4hw7fso0k00sowcc8ko4.th.jpegIl n’y a plus ni Juif ni Grec, il n’y a plus ni esclave ni homme libre, il n’y a plus ni homme ni femme; car tous vous êtes un en Jésus-Christ. Paul
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. […]  Le mieux est de laisser le christianisme mourir de mort naturelle. (…) Le dogme du christianisme s’effrite devant les progrès de la science. (…) Quand la connaissance de l’univers se sera largement répandue (…) alors la doctrine chrétienne sera convaincue d’absurdité. Hitler (1941)
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude.  G.K. Chesterton
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. René Girard
Le genre est culturellement construit, indépendamment de l’irréductibilité biologique qui semble attachée au sexe. Judith Butler
Eduquer pour changer les mentalités et transformer la société Devenue une obligation légale depuis 2001, l’ éducation à la sexualité à l’école est peu appliquée: les moyens comme la volonté manquent. Come nous le montrent des programmes expérimentés dans nos territoires, elle a pourtant comme conséquence à court terme une baisse des violences, une meilleure attention des élèves, une prévention accrue dans le domaine de la santé et à plus long terme une baisse des violences faites aux femmes, un recul du machisme, une baisse sensible des suicides chez les adolescents et une plus grande facilité d »émancipation des femmes et des hommes des rôles qui leurs ont assignés.  Le poids des rôles sociaux, des préjugés qui, pèse sur la possibilité des individus à exprimer librement et vivre sereinement leur genre et leur sexualité, lorsqu’ils s’écartent des modèles dominants. L’éducation permettra de déconstruire les préjugés de genre, sexistes, et de lutter contre les violences et discriminations qu’ils engendrent. Nous formerons tous les acteurs éducatifs à la question de l’éducation aux rapports entre les sexes, à partir d’un travail sur les stéréotypes et les assignations de genre. Pour tous les élèves de la classe de CP à la terminale, et tous les ans, 6 heures d’éducation à la sexualité, à l’égalité et au respect mutuel, seront assurées. Les  intervenants extérieurs devront nouer des liens avec les acteurs scolaires et extra-scolaires liés à l’établissement afin d’intégrer la question de l’égalité entre les sexes et les sexualités dans un projet global. Convention égalité réelle (page 36, PS, 11 décembre 2010)
La théorie du genre, qui explique «l’identité sexuelle» des individus autant par le contexte socio-culturel que par la biologie, a pour vertu d’aborder la question des inadmissibles inégalités persistantes entre les hommes et les femmes ou encore de l’homosexualité, et de faire œuvre de pédagogie sur ces sujets. (…) Le vrai problème de société que nous devons régler aujourd’hui, c’est l’homophobie, et notamment les agressions homophobes qui se développent en milieu scolaire. L’école doit redevenir un sanctuaire, et la prévention de la délinquance homophobe doit commencer dès le plus jeune âge. Un jeune homosexuel sur cinq a déjà été victime d’une agression physique, et près d’un sur deux a déjà été insulté. Il est essentiel d’enseigner aux enfants le respect des différentes formes d’identité sexuelle, afin de bâtir une société du respect. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem (secrétaire nationale du PS aux questions de société, 31 août 2011)
La révolution française est l’irruption dans le temps de quelque chose qui n’appartient pas au temps, c’est un commencement absolu, c’est la présence et l’incarnation d’un sens, d’une régénération et d’une expiation du peuple français. 1789, l’année sans pareille, est celle de l’engendrement par un brusque saut de l’histoire d’un homme nouveau. La révolution est un événement méta-historique, c’est-à -dire un événement religieux. La révolution implique l’oubli total de ce qui précède la révolution. Et donc l’école a un rôle fondamental, puisque l’école doit dépouiller l’enfant de toutes ses attaches pré-républicaines pour l’élever jusqu’à devenir citoyen. C’est à elle qu’il revient de briser ce cercle, de produire cette auto-institution, d’être la matrice qui engendre en permanence des républicains pour faire la République, République préservée, république pure, république hors du temps au sein de la République réelle, l’école doit opérer ce miracle de l’engendrement par lequel l’enfant, dépouillé de toutes ses attaches pré-républicaines, va s’élever jusqu’à devenir le citoyen, sujet autonome. Et c’est bien une nouvelle naissance, une transsubstantiation qui opère dans l’école et par l’école, cette nouvelle église avec son nouveau clergé, sa nouvelle liturgie, ses nouvelles tables de la Loi. La société républicaine et laïque n’a pas d’autre choix que de «s’enseigner elle-même » (Quinet) d’être un recommencement perpétuel de la République en chaque républicain, un engendrement continu de chaque citoyen en chaque enfant, une révolution pacifique mais permanente. Vincent Peillon (« La Révolution française n’est pas terminée », 2008)
Le gouvernement s’est engagé à « s’appuyer sur la jeunesse pour changer les mentalités », notamment par le biais d’une éducation au respect de la diversité des orientations sexuelles. L’engagement de notre ministère dans l’éducation à l’égalité et au respect de la personne est essentiel et prend aujourd’hui un relief particulier. Il vous appartient en effet de veiller à ce que les débats qui traversent la société française ne se traduisent pas, dans les écoles et les établissements, par des phénomènes de rejet et de stigmatisation homophobes. (…) La lutte contre l’homophobie en milieu scolaire, public comme privé, doit compter au rang de vos priorités. J’attire à ce titre votre attention sur la mise en œuvre du programme d’actions gouvernemental contre les violences et les discriminations commises à raison de l’orientation sexuelle ou de l’identité de genre. Je souhaite ainsi que vous accompagniez et favorisiez les interventions en milieu scolaire des associations qui luttent contre les préjugés homophobes, dès lors que la qualité et la valeur ajoutée pédagogique de leur action peuvent être établies. Je vous invite également à relayer avec la plus grande énergie, au début de l’année, la campagne de communication relative à la « ligne azur », ligne d’écoute pour les jeunes en questionnement à l’égard de leur orientation ou leur identité sexuelles. Dans l’attente des conclusions du groupe de travail sur l’éducation à la sexualité, vous serez attentif à la mise en œuvre de la circulaire du 17 février 2003 qui prévoit cette éducation dans tous les milieux scolaires et ce, dès le plus jeune âge. La délégation ministérielle de prévention et de lutte contre la violence dirigée par Eric Debarbieux, permettra de mieux connaître la violence spécifique que constitue l’homophobie. Enfin, vous le savez, j’ai confié à Michel Teychenné une mission relative à la lutte contre l’homophobie, qui porte notamment sur la prévention du suicide des jeunes concernés. Je vous remercie de leur apporter tout le concours nécessaire à la réussite de leurs missions. Je souhaite que 2013 soit une année de mobilisation pour l’égalité à l’école. Vincent Peillon (minitre de l’Education nationale, Lettre aux Recteurs d’Académies, 4 janvier 2013)
2.1.1 À l’école primaire, l’éducation à la sexualité suit la progression des contenus fixée par les programmes pour l’école. Les temps qui lui sont consacrés seront identifiés comme tels dans l’organisation de la classe. Ils feront cependant l’objet, en particulier aux cycles 1 et 2, d’une intégration aussi adaptée que possible à l’ensemble des autres contenus et des opportunités apportées par la vie de classe ou d’autres événements. Aussi, à l’école, le nombre de trois séances annuelles fixé par l’article L. 312-16 du code de l’éducation doit-il être compris plutôt comme un ordre de grandeur à respecter globalement dans l’année que comme un nombre rigide de séances qui seraient exclusivement dévolues à l’éducation à la sexualité. L’ensemble des questions relatives à l’éducation à la sexualité est abordé collectivement par l’équipe des maîtres lors de conseils de cycle ou de conseils de maîtres. Les objectifs de cet enseignement intégré aux programmes ainsi que les modalités retenues pour sa mise en œuvre feront en outre l’objet d’une présentation lors du conseil d’école. Ministère de l’Education nationale (Circulaire N°2003-027 DU 17-2-2003 L’éducation à la sexualité dans les écoles, les collèges et les lycées)
La vocation de l’école, c’est d’apprendre. D’apprendre quoi aux enfants? D’apprendre à lire, à compter, à écrire. D’apprendre aussi les valeurs de la République. Que parmi ces valeurs de la République, il y a la liberté, l’égalité, la fraternité.  L’égalité, c’est notamment l’égalité entre les filles et les garçons. C’est cela qu’on apprend aujourd’hui  à l’école aux enfants. Est-ce que ça a quelque chose à voir avec le contenu de ces SMS, avec une soi-disant théorie du genre qui n’existe pas, avec des cours d’éducation sexuelle. (…) On ne parle aucunement de sexualité à des enfants de primaire. On leur parle de ce que les filles et les garçons doivent pouvoir ambitionner d’être à égalité plus tard dans les rêves qu’ils font, dans les ambitions professionnelles qu’ils peuvent avoir’. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem (Europe 1, 29 janvier 2014)
L’Education nationale refuse totalement la « théorie du genre » et les instrumentalisations de ceux, qui, venus de l’extrême droite, négationnistes, sont en train de vouloir répandre l’idée qui fait peur aux parents et qui blessent les enseignants que tel serait notre point de vue. Vincent Peillon
Venant d’apprendre que, selon Vincent Peillon, ministre de l’éducation nationale  »la théorie du genre ne sera pas enseignée à l’école » je pense que ses propos concernent sans doute l’enseignement de la théorie du genre à l’école primaire, car pour ma part, en tant que professeur de science économiques et sociales (SES) dans l’enseignement secondaire, cela fait bientôt 25 ans que je l’enseigne à mes élèves, non par volonté de prosélytisme, mais tout simplement parce que l’analyse des inégalités liées au genre, et donc ce qu’il est convenu d’appeler la « théorie du genre », fait partie des programmes officiels de ma discipline.(…) Pour notre part nous considérons que la théorie du genre est bien l’exemple emblématique d’une théorie émancipatrice puisqu’elle produit des savoirs qui peuvent avoir des effets sur les pratiques et les représentations des individus. Voilà pourquoi la théorie du genre correspond à un moment fort de notre enseignement et nous nous opposerons énergiquement à toute tentative visant à remettre en cause sa place dans nos programmes. Jean-Yves Mas (professeur de SES au lycée de Montreuil, 93)
Du bleu et du rose partout dans le ciel de Paris : les manifestants contre le projet de loi sur le mariage pour tous ont déferlé dans les rues de la capitale en agitant des milliers de fanions, de drapeaux et de banderoles à ces deux couleurs. Ils en ont saturé les écrans télé. Rose et bleu, la « manif » est la croisade des enfants. Bleu ou rose : les deux couleurs qui marquent les bébés à l’instant de leur naissance assignent à chacun, définitivement, sa résidence sexuelle. La médecine, l’état civil et ses premiers vêtements enferment l’enfant à peine né dans l’alternative du genre. « Tu seras un papa bleu, mon fils. » « Tu seras une maman rose, ma fille. » (…) Bleu et rose sont les couleurs d’un marquage permettant de commencer dès la naissance la reproduction sociale du genre. Cette stratégie de communication, qui emprunte sa symbolique aux couleurs des layettes, a été évidemment voulue par les adversaires de la loi Taubira. (…) Le « bleu et rose » est une innovation dans les couleurs de la rhétorique militante. On connaissait le bleu « Marine », le vert des écolos, le rouge de la gauche… Le bleu et rose est plus qu’un signe de ralliement original. C’est un slogan. Le drapeau français brandi dans la manif n’est plus bleu, blanc, rouge, mais bleu ciel, blanc et rose.En 1998, les Français avaient célébré la victoire d’une équipe « black, blanc, beur » lors de la Coupe du monde de football. Le peuple de la diversité renommait ainsi les trois couleurs du drapeau français. Le jeu verbal sur les trois « b » réunissait trois langages, le « black » américain faisait écho aux mouvements noirs pour les droits civiques, le « beur » repris au verlan des quartiers avait la même sonorité émancipatrice, le « blanc » était l’élément neutre de cette série, désignant avec humour les autres. Ce n’étaient pas trois communautés, mais trois façons d’être français qui avaient gagné ensemble. De la même façon, la victoire de l’Afrique du Sud dans la Coupe du monde de rugby 1995 avait marqué la naissance de la « nation arc-en-ciel ». L’arc-en-ciel est plus que la réunion de toutes les couleurs, il symbolise un continuum, le spectre de la lumière blanche décomposée, il offre une diversité potentiellement infinie de nuances. C’est pourquoi le drapeau arc-en-ciel est aussi celui de l’association Lesbiennes, gays, bi et trans (LGBT). Chacun est différent et l’union des différences fait une société apaisée et fusionnelle. Bleu, blanc, rose, le drapeau national, infantilisé, est au contraire l’emblème d’un peuple de « Blancs » que ne distingue entre eux que le genre attribué à la naissance. Un genre qui garde l’innocence de l’enfance – Freud ? connais pas – et sa pureté sexuelle. (…) Ce logo, qui mime la naïveté d’un dessin d’enfant, est clairement sexiste : le père protecteur et fort, le fils volontaire et décidé, la mère qui suit, et la petite fille timide. Le dispositif proclame l’homosocialité de la reproduction. La petite fille a sa mère pour modèle, le petit garçon, son père. (…) A part ces quelques dérapages, blanches sur fond bleu ou rose, roses sur fond blanc, les mêmes quatre silhouettes soudées de la famille exemplaire sont reproduites par milliers, exactement semblables : un cauchemar identitaire. Hommes, femmes : le principe d’identification du genre est emprunté aux pictogrammes des toilettes publiques. Chacun derrière sa porte. Chacun son destin. Chacun sa façon de faire pipi, debout ou assis. Ces manifestants, qui revendiquent « du sexe, pas du genre ! », utilisent des symboles et des logos qui disent au contraire : « Ne troublez pas le genre », « Rallions-nous aux pictogrammes des toilettes, ils sont naturels ». Pour ces prisonniers de leur anatomie puérile, traduite en contraintes sociales du genre, quelle sexualité « naturelle » ? Leur innocence bleu et rose n’autorise que le coït matrimonial pour faire des filles et des fils qui seront les clones de leurs parents et ajouteront un module à la farandole. Aucune place n’est faite aux enfants différents ! Aucune place pour les pères à cheveux longs, les femmes et les filles en pantalon, les mères voilées, les pères en boubou ! Aucune place pour les familles différentes aux parentés multiples – monoparentales, recomposées, adoptives – ! Aucune place pour les familles arc-en-ciel. La famille nucléaire dessinée sur le logo et présentée comme naturelle n’est que le mariage catholique bourgeois du XIXe, adopté au XXe siècle par les classes moyennes et désormais obsolète. C’est une famille étouffante et répressive, la famille où ont souffert Brasse-Bouillon et Poil de carotte, famille haïssable de Gide, noeud de vipères de Mauriac. (…) Papa bleu et maman rose ne sont pas un couple hétérosexuel, mais une paire de reproducteurs « blancs ». Florence Dupont (Ancienne élève de l’Ecole normale supérieure, agrégée de lettres classiques, professeur de latin à Paris-Diderot)
Moi, je suis convaincue qu’à l’époque moderne, la plus grande victoire du diable, c’est d’avoir fait croire qu’il n’existait pas. Et à partir du moment où on croit que le diable n’existe pas, on est évidemment pas du tout en mesure de s’en protéger. Et fondamentalement dans toutes les opérations aujourd’hui de manipulation et d’atteinte à la vie et à l’intégrité humaine, J’y vois l’oeuvre démoniaque et de ses armées. On ricanera peut-être à m’entendre utiliser ces notions … mais il me semble qu’il faut revenir à ces notions qui sont le fondamental de nos fondamentaux. … Le fondamental de nos fondamentaux, c’est l’adversaire que nous avons sur la plan spirituel. (…) Parce moi que je vivais dans un quartier populaire où la délinquence ou la décadence ou la dégénérence ou la présence, je dirais mortifère, des agents démoniaques qu’on trouve au sein du parti socialiste, au sein du parti communiste, dans les organisations droitsdel’hommistes et humanistes qui quadrillent ces quartiers. Il faut bien comprendre cela ici – j’insiste beaucoup – que les quartiers populaires sont quadrillés par les armées de Satan. (…) Il y a aussi bien sûr la franc-maçonnerie, ça c’est clair, c’est le fond …L’UMPS, voire même au-delà, ils sont infiltés partout. Farida Belghoul
Premièrement, Vincent Peillon a tout à fait raison. On n’enseigne pas la théorie du genre à l’école. On l’expérimente et on la met en pratique. Premier mensonge énorme. Monsieur Peillon joue sur les mots. Monsieur Peillon se fout de la gueule du monde. Il n’y a pas de rumeur, il y a une réalité. Le gouvernement a un programme totalitaire. Il veut détruire tout ce qui structure et ce qui identifie les gens: la famille, le sexe, la nation. Eric Zemmour
Dans sa lettre du 4 janvier adressée aux recteurs, Vincent Peillon affirme sa volonté de révolutionner la société en se servant de l’école : « le gouvernement s’est engagé à s’appuyer sur la jeunesse pour changer les mentalités, notamment par le biais d’une éducation au respect de la diversité des orientations sexuelles », affirme-t-il en début de lettre. On remarque les termes : « s’appuyer sur la jeunesse » pour « changer les mentalités ». Qui ? Le gouvernement. En réalité, c’est donc lui qui choisit les orientations politiques et morales qui doivent prévaloir dans la société. Ce n’est plus la famille, l’école et la société adulte qui éduquent la jeunesse. Contrairement à la Déclaration universelle des Droits de l’Homme de 1948, c’est donc désormais l’État en France qui se pose en seul détenteur de la vérité. On assiste à une dérive théocratique de l’État républicain actuel. Et cette jeunesse, qui, par définition, ne possède pas encore les repères lui permettant de poser des choix par elle-même, il la mobilise dans le sens qu’il juge bon, selon le schéma de la révolution culturelle. La position de Vincent Peillon est vraiment choquante. Lorsqu’il s’appuie sur la jeunesse comme moteur révolutionnaire, renouant avec l’esprit de 1968, le gouvernement sort à l’évidence de son rôle : il instrumentalise la jeunesse à des fins politiques, pour changer les représentations sexuelles et morales dominantes. Ce faisant, il change les règles du jeu au sein de l’École publique en abandonnant ostensiblement l’exigence de neutralité. L’État sort également de son devoir de neutralité et de respect des droits éducatifs familiaux et de l’intimité des enfants lorsque le ministre demande aux recteurs de renforcer les campagnes d’information sur la ligne azur. Ainsi, contrairement à ce qui est affiché, il ne s’agit plus de lutter contre des stigmatisations homophobes en tant que telles, il s’agit bien plutôt d’inciter activement les jeunes en recherche d’identité (comme le sont par construction tous les adolescents) à explorer pour eux-mêmes la voie de l’homosexualité ou de la transsexualité. De même, lorsque le ministre encourage les recteurs à faire intervenir davantage les associations de lutte contre l’homophobie, il encourage en pratique l’ingérence dans l’enceinte de l’école d’associations partisanes engagées dans la banalisation et la promotion des orientations sexuelles minoritaires, si l’on se réfère à la liste des associations agréées par l’Éducation nationale pour intervenir sur ces thématiques dans les établissements. Il favorise donc des prises de paroles unilatérales auprès des jeunes, sur un sujet qui n’a pas encore été tranché par le législateur. (…) Durant la période soviétique, comme durant d’autres périodes totalitaires, il était habituel de se servir des enfants pour démasquer et sanctionner les opinions dissidentes des parents. C’était l’époque de la délation par ses propres enfants. Revenir à de telles pratiques inhumaines et profondément immorales serait une grave régression de l’État de droit. Non content enfin de mettre au pas les écoles publiques, le gouvernement entend aussi museler les écoles privées en bafouant clairement leur caractère propre. Il est évident que les écoles dont le projet éducatif et l’identité sont fondés sur la foi seront opposées à la légalisation du mariage homosexuel. Leur demander d’être neutres sur ce sujet n’a aucun sens, si ce n’est celui de leur faire renier purement et simplement leur vocation spécifique. Anne Coffinier
Son intention et son but sont de démolir les vieilles formes et les règles conventionnelles. Et plus ce cheval de Troie apparaît étrange, non conformiste, inassimilable, plus il lui faut de temps pour être accepté. En fin de compte, il est adopté, et par la suite il fonctionne comme une mine, quelle que soit sa lenteur initiale. Il sape et fait sauter la terre où il a été planté. Les vieilles formes littéraires auxquelles on a été habitué apparaissent à la longue démodées, inefficaces. (…) Pour mener à bien une œuvre littéraire, il faut avant tout être modeste et ne pas ignorer que tout ne se joue pas dans le fait d’être gay ou quoi que ce soit de comparable sociologiquement [par exemple, être incestée]. (…) Plus le point de vue est particulier, plus l’entreprise d’universalisation exige une attention soutenue aux éléments formels qui sont susceptibles d’être ouverts à l’histoire tels que les thèmes, les sujets du récit en même temps que la forme globale du travail. C’est finalement par l’entreprise d’universalisation qu’une œuvre littéraire peut se transformer en machine de guerre.  Monique Wittig (p 98- 102, 2007)
Je pense que le « genre » est une idéologie. Cette haine de la différence est celle des pervers, qui ne la supportent pas. Freud disait que le pervers est celui qu’indisposait l’absence de pénis chez sa mère. On y est. Boris Cyrulnik
Alors que la polémique sur la théorie du genre ne cesse d’enfler, l’expérience tragique menée au milieu des années 1960 par son concepteur, le sexologue et psychologue néo-zélandais John Money, refait surface, comme le rapporte vendredi lepoint.fr. Une expérimentation souvent occultée par les disciples actuels des études du genre, car celle-ci, conduite sur deux jumeaux canadiens nés garçons, mais dont l’un d’eux sera élevé comme une fille, tournera mal. Spécialiste de l’hermaphrodisme à l’université américaine Johns Hopkins, John Money définit dès 1955 le genre comme la conduite sexuelle qu’on choisit d’adopter, en dehors de notre sexe de naissance. (…) En 1966, des parents vont offrir au médecin controversé la possibilité de tester sur leurs propres enfants la théorie du genre. Les époux Reimer sont parents de jumeaux âgés de huit mois. Alors qu’ils souhaitaient les faire circoncire, l’opération a mal tourné sur l’un des deux bébés, Bruce, dont le pénis s’est retrouvé brûlé à la suite d’une cautérisation électrique. Son frère, Brian, a pour sa part échappé à l’opération.Pour John Money, c’est l’occasion de montrer sur un modèle vivant que le sexe biologique n’est qu’un leurre. Il propose donc aux parents désemparés d’élever Bruce comme une fille, sans jamais lui révéler son sexe de naissance. Bruce, qui s’appelle désormais Brenda, reçoit d’abord un traitement hormonal, puis se voit retirer ses testicules quatorze mois plus tard. Désormais fille, «Bruce-Brenda» porte des robes et joue à la poupée. Pendant toute leur enfance, les jumeaux Brian et Brenda suivent un développement harmonieux, faisant de l’expérience du sexologue une réussite. Du moins c’est ce que John Money, qui garde un œil sur leur évolution en les recevant une fois par an, croit. Il publie d’ailleurs de nombreux articles sur le sujet, puis un livre en 1972, Homme-femme, garçon-fille, dans lequel il affirme que c’est l’éducation et non le sexe de naissance qui détermine si l’on est homme ou femme. Mais si Brenda a vécu une enfance sans heurts, les choses se compliquent à l’adolescence. Sa voix devient plus grave et elle se sent attirée par les filles. Petit à petit, elle rejette son traitement au profit d’un autre à la testostérone. Car, au fond, elle se sent davantage garçon que fille. Désemparé, le couple Reimer avoue la vérité à ses enfants. Dès lors, Brenda redevient un homme, David, auquel on crée chirugicalement un pénis et retire les seins. Ce dernier se mariera même à une femme, à l’âge de 24 ans. Mais cette expérience identitaire hors norme a laissé des dégâts irréparables chez les jumeaux. Brian se suicide en 2002, David en mai 2004. Le Figaro
Je précise d’emblée que je ne soutiens en rien les mouvements qui appellent à boycotter l’école et qui manipulent les esprits. Mais il ne faut pas abandonner ce débat à l’extrême droite. Or, dans ce qui est dénoncé aujourd’hui, il y a une part de réalité. Certes, la théorie du genre en tant que telle n’est pas enseignée à l’école primaire mais plusieurs de ses postulats y sont diffusés. (…) Pour les tenants de cette théorie, l’identité sexuelle est, de part en part, construite. Selon eux, il n’y a pas de continuité entre le donné biologique – notre sexe de naissance – et notre devenir d’homme ou de femme. C’est, poussé à l’extrême, la formule de Simone de Beauvoir dans Le Deuxième sexe «On ne naît pas femme, on le devient». Et les théoriciens du genre poursuivent: à partir du moment où tout est «construit», tout peut être déconstruit. (…) Prenons les «ABCD de l’égalité», qui sont des parcours proposés aux élèves et accompagnés de fiches pédagogiques pour les enseignants. Ils sont supposés servir à enseigner l’égalité hommes-femmes. Qu’en est-il? Dans une fiche, intitulée «Dentelles, rubans, velours et broderies», on montre un tableau représentant Louis XIV enfant qui porte une robe richement ornée et des rubans rouges dans les cheveux. L’objectif affiché? Faire prendre conscience aux élèves de l’historicité des codes auxquels ils se soumettent et gagner de la latitude par rapport à ceux que la société leur impose aujourd’hui… (…) l’objectif est (…) d’«émanciper» l’enfant de tous les codes. Ce qui aboutit à l’abandonner à un ensemble de «possibles», comme s’il n’appartenait à aucune histoire, comme si les adultes n’avaient rien à lui transmettre. Or, il est faux de dire qu’on «formate» un enfant, on ne fait que l’introduire dans un monde qui est plus vieux que lui. (…) On n’est plus dans le simple apprentissage de la tolérance. (…) Sans scrupules, l’école est entraînée dans une politique d’ingénierie sociale. Tout en se donnant bonne conscience, le gouvernement encourage un brouillage très inquiétant. Savons-nous bien ce que nous sommes en train de faire? A l’âge de l’école primaire, les enfants ont besoin de s’identifier, et non pas de se désidentifier. A ne plus vouloir d’une éducation sexuée, on abandonne nos enfants aux stéréotypes les plus kitsch des dessins animés. (…) Il faudrait surtout en finir avec cette mise en accusation systématique du passé. Notre civilisation occidentale, et spécialement française, n’est pas réductible à une histoire faite de domination et de misogynie. Sur la différence des sexes, la France a su composer une partition singulière, irréductible à des rapports de forces. L’apparition d’une culture musulmane change-t-elle la donne? Elle nous confronte en tout cas à une culture qui n’a pas le même héritage en matière d’égalité des sexes. Ce qui me paraît dangereux dans cette «chasse aux stéréotypes» est le risque de balayer d’un revers de main tout notre héritage culturel. Dans un tel contexte, quelle œuvre littéraire, artistique ou cinématographique ne tombera pas sous le coup de l’accusation de «sexisme»? (…) Il existe une volonté de transformer la société, de sortir de toute normativité pour aboutir à un relativisme complet. Le gouvernement Ayrault est en pointe sur ce combat. On l’a vu lors du débat sur le Mariage pour tous. Il ne devrait pas être impossible de dire que l’homosexualité est une exception et que l’hétérosexualité est la norme. La théorie de l’interchangeabilité des sexes se diffuse. Or, nous avons un corps sexué qui est significatif par lui-même et qui ne compte pas pour rien dans la construction de soi. (…) Le principe de l’égalité est incontesté aujourd’hui. Certes, il existe encore ce fameux “plafond de verre” empêchant les femmes d’accéder aux plus hauts postes et des inégalités salariales. Mais les progrès sont inouïs. Doit-on, comme l’a fait récemment le gouvernement, imposer aux hommes de prendre un congé parental? On en arrive à punir la famille parce qu’un homme est récalcitrant à s’arrêter de travailler! Et puis, faut-il rappeler qu’il n’y a pas de cordon ombilical à couper entre un père et son enfant? (…) Je n’ai guère le goût des analogies historiques mais, s’il existe une leçon à retenir des totalitarismes nazi et stalinien, c’est que l’homme n’est pas un simple matériau que l’on peut façonner. Avec la théorie du genre, l’enjeu est anthropologique.  Bérénice Levet
On assiste à une alliance objective entre les catholiques traditionalistes et des musulmans rigoristes pour qu’on ne touche pas à l’identité sexuée de leurs enfants dans le cadre de la scolarité. Cela montre que l’image d’une école dans laquelle certains enseignements seraient difficiles à dispenser à cause de la présence de jeunes musulmans est simpliste. Il y a aussi des élèves catholiques qui les refusent! (…) On peut les convaincre en expliquant d’abord ce qu’on veut faire. Et surtout pas en les faisant convoquer individuellement par les directeurs comme j’ai entendu que le ministère le souhaitait. Cela ne fera que les stigmatiser encore plus. Il faut organiser des réunions collectives pour expliquer le but de ces ABCD [modules de sensibilisation contre les stéréotypes sexués]. Il faut aller plus loin. Je pense que l’enseignement de l’égalité tel qu’il est pensé dans ces ABCD n’est pas pertinent. C’est une méthode très morale, culpabilisante pour les enseignants: on leur demande de se surveiller pour ne pas véhiculer des stéréotypes. Mais on ne déconstruit pas comme ça des schémas sexués ! Il faut développer un enseignement long et laisser les instituteurs se l’approprier sans faire appel à des intervenants extérieurs. Nacina Guénif
La question des fondements scientifiques des études de genre se pose. En 2009, un journaliste norvégien, Harald Eia, y consacre un documentaire. Son point de départ : comment est-il possible qu’en Norvège, championne des politiques du  » genre « , les infirmières soient des femmes et les ingénieurs des hommes ? Il interroge quatre sommités : le professeur américain Richard Lippa, responsable d’un sondage mondial sur les choix de métiers selon les sexes (réponse : les femmes préfèrent les professions de contacts et de soins), le Norvégien Trond Diseth, qui explore les jouets vers lesquels des nourrissons tendent les mains (réponse : tout ce qui est doux et tactile pour les filles), puis Simon Baron-Cohen, professeur de psychopathologie du développement au Trinity College de Cambridge, et l’Anglaise Anne Campbell, psychologue de l’évolution. Ces spécialistes répondent que naître homme ou femme implique des différences importantes. Et que leur inspirent les  » études de genre »? Eclats de rire. L’évolution de l’espèce, le bain d’hormones dans lequel se fabrique notre cerveau font du masculin et du féminin des sexes distincts. Tout aussi intelligents, mais pas identiques. Il présente leurs réactions aux amis du « genre ». Qui les accusent d' » être des forcenés du biologisme « . Soit. Eia les prie alors d’exposer leurs preuves que le sexe ne serait qu’une construction culturelle… Silence. Après la diffusion de son film, en 2010, le Nordic Gender Institute fut privé de tout financement public. Le Point
L’éducation va enseigner aux enfants qu’ils ne naissent pas filles ou garçons comme Dieu l’a voulu mais qu’ils le choisissent de le devenir avec des intervenants homos ou lesbiennes qui viendront leur bourrer la tête d’idées monstrueuses. SMS JRE
« Comment on sait qu’on est homo ? Parce que moi je ne ressens rien pour les filles… Rien non plus d’ailleurs pour les garçons… »  Eric, 14 ans Ligne Azur
« Je dors souvent chez une copine depuis la rentrée. La dernière fois, il s’est passé quelque chose. On s’est embrassées et on s’est caressées. J’ai trouvé que c’était bien. Est-ce que ça veut dire que je suis homosexuelle ? Je ne veux pas être gouine, ce serait la honte. Je ne sais pas trop si j’ai envie de recommencer avec ma copine. » Elodie, 16 ans Ligne Azur
Des situations individuelles diverses Le tableau ci-dessous montre la multiplicité des situations individuelles. Même si elle est majoritaire et présentée comme norme, l’hétérosexualité n’est pas la seule voie. Le contexte (lieu, moment, durée, à deux ou à plusieurs…) est aussi un facteur déterminant du vécu de chacun-e. Prenons l’exemple d’un homme (en bleu dans le tableau ci-dessous) qui se situe dans la « norme » hétérosexuelle (…) Au-delà de l’exemple en bleu dans ce tableau, on voit qu’il existe pour chacun-e un éventail de possibilités. De plus, ce que je fais (mes pratiques sexuelles) n’est pas nécessairement connecté à la façon dont je définis mon orientation (Homo, Bi ou hétérosexuelle). Chacun-e doit pouvoir y trouver son équilibre. Et vous, dans le tableau, où vous situez-vous ? Ligne Azur
Ligne Azur, c’est quoi ? Créé en 1997, Ligne Azur est à la fois un service d’écoute et un site Internet qui informent et soutiennent toute personne (jeune ou adulte) qui se pose des questions sur son attirance et/ou ses pratiques sexuelle avec une personne du même sexe Qu’elles se définissent, ou pas, comme homo-, bi- ou hétérosexuelle, certaines personnes n’ont pas la possibilité d’échanger librement et en toute confiance sur les difficultés qu’elles rencontrent ou pourraient rencontrer dans le cadre de leurs relations affectives et sexuelles (santé sexuelle). Cela constitue une inégalité sociale en termes de santé et d’accès aux soins. Ligne Azur propose aussi ce service aux parents, enseignants, éducateurs, etc. qui se trouveraient confrontés à une personne (jeune ou non) en difficulté par rapport à son identité ou son orientation sexuelle. Qui vous répond ? Basée en France, l’équipe de Ligne Azur est constituée de professionnel-le-s formé-e-s au counseling (démarche centrée sur la personne). Le premier soutien qu’ils/elles apportent est de permettre la parole ou l’écrit, sans jugement moral. Ils/elles installent ainsi une reconnaissance de la demande de l’appelant ou de l’internaute et peuvent l’aider à valoriser sa santé sexuelle. L’autre objectif du dispositif est de dédramatiser la situation et de rassurer la personne qui nous sollicite. Ligne Azur est un service de SIS Association Ligne Azur
Sida Info Service a été créée le 23 octobre 1990 par l’Agence française de lutte contre le sida (AFLS) en partenariat avec l’association AIDES. Convaincue par Pierre KNEIP (1944-1995), alors responsable bénévole de la permanence téléphonique de AIDES Ile-de-France, l’AFLS a voulu, à l’instar de ce qui se faisait déjà dans plusieurs pays d’Europe, compléter le dispositif de lutte contre le sida en mettant en place une ligne téléphonique nationale sous la forme d’un numéro vert (gratuit) accessible 24 h sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7. Depuis sa création, Sida Info Service (devenue par la suite SIS-Association) agit comme une association engagée dans le domaine de la lutte contre le VIH/sida. Elle s’appuie sur les principes affirmés dès l’origine : renforcement de l’autonomie et de la dignité des personnes et reconnaissance des besoins et des savoir-faire des communautés quant à leur santé (santé au sens défini par l’OMS dans le préambule de 1946 comme « un état de complet bien-être physique, mental et social et ne consiste pas seulement en une absence de maladie ou d’infirmité. »). L’objectif initial s’est étendu progressivement aux problématiques connexes liées à l’infection par le virus de l’immunodéficience humaine (VIH) et à des pathologies inhérentes aux risques sexuels, aux maladies chroniques, à l’exercice des droits des personnes et des malades, à leur soutien et leur accompagnement. Plus largement, SIS-Association agit pour répondre à tout ce qui relève de la lutte contre le VIH/sida, les hépatites, pour la santé sexuelle et contre les exclusions. Le respect de l’anonymat, de la confidentialité des échanges et le principe de non jugement, accompagnent ses activités et son développement et constituent son éthique. SIS Association (Sida info Service)
Pour la troisième année consécutive, le ministère soutient le dispositif Ligne Azur afin de sensibiliser les élèves et de leur procurer des outils d’aide et d’accompagnement efficace contre le rejet de la différence et l’homophobie. Cette campagne s’inscrit dans le cadre de l’action de lutte contre toutes les formes de discrimination en milieu scolaire. Service d’écoute, de parole et de soutien, Ligne Azur s’adresse aux adolescents qui s’interrogent sur leur orientation sexuelle, ainsi qu’aux éducateurs, aux enseignants et aux parents qui sont confrontés aux interrogations des jeunes. Des écoutants professionnels sont joignables: par téléphone au 0810 20 30 40 au prix d’un appel local à partir d’un téléphone fixe du lundi au dimanche de 8h à 23h sur le site internet http://www.ligneazur.org. Il est possible de poser ses questions ou de demander à se faire rappeler En soutenant Ligne Azur, le ministère agit concrètement pour sensibiliser les élèves et leur procurer des outils d’aide et d’accompagnement efficaces, contre le rejet de la différence et l’homophobie. Il diffuse ainsi dans tous les collèges et lycées un kit de communication à destination des adolescents. Ces kits comprennent affiches et cartes mémo pour présenter le dispositif. Education.gouv
De la maternelle au baccalauréat Lutte contre l’homophobie Le ministère est engagé dans la lutte contre toutes les formes de discriminations et dans la promotion de l’égalité des chances. Il agit contre l’homophobie et de l’aide aux élèves qui en sont victimes. Le rôle de l’École L’École doit contribuer à : promouvoir l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes faire prendre conscience des discriminations apprendre le respect de l’autre et de ses différences faire reculer les stéréotypes (…) Au printemps 2013, pour la quatrième année consécutive le ministère s’associe à une campagne de promotion de la Ligne Azur. Cette campagne rappelle l’existence du dispositif aux collégiens et aux lycéens. Un kit de communication comprenant affiches et cartes mémo est adressé à tous les collèges et lycées. La Ligne Azur est un dispositif téléphonique et internet d’information, d’écoute et de soutien des jeunes. Elle est dédiée à leurs questions sur l’orientation sexuelle. Des écoutants professionnels sont joignables : par téléphone au 0810 20 30 40 au prix d’un appel local à partir d’un téléphone fixe du lundi au dimanche de 8h à 23h sur le site internet http://www.ligneazur.org. Il est possible de poser ses questions ou de demander à se faire rappeler (…) Trois associations, Contact, Estim’ et SOS Homophobie ont reçu un agrément national. Contact Aide des jeunes à communiquer avec leurs parents ou leur entourage, lutte contre les discriminations, etc. http://www.asso-contact.org Estim’ Intervient auprès des élèves pour les aider à mieux vivre et à assumer leur sexualité, leurs différences, et accepter celles des autres. http://www.estim-asso.org SOS Homophobie Sos Homophobie est une association de lutte contre les discriminations et les agressions à caractère homophobe et transphobe. http://www.sos-homophobie.org/ Education.gouv
Le genre est un concept. Ce n’est ni une théorie ni une idéologie, mais un outil qui aide à penser.  Eric Fassin
La « théorie du genre » n’existe que dans la tête des opposants à l’égalité des droits. Cette croyance repose sur le fantasme selon lequel le sexe et la sexualité pourraient être déterminés par un simple discours. Parlez d’homosexualité et vous deviendrez homosexuel. Evoquez les multiples façons dont les rôles masculins et féminins ont été pensés au cours de l’histoire, et vous risquez de susciter toutes sortes de déviance de genre ! Dans la réalité, l’identité est un processus beaucoup plus complexe. Et c’est précisément cette complexité que des chercheuses et des chercheurs interrogent en endocrinologie, en histoire, en droit, en sociologie, etc. Ils nous invitent à réfléchir à la façon dont nous nous pensons, individuellement et collectivement. C’est un travail critique très enrichissant pour une société. Mais, ce travail demande aussi du courage et de la générosité, car il faut admettre de se défaire de ses certitudes et de questionner son propre parcours à la lumière du parcours des autres. Les adversaires de la « théorie du genre » préfèrent imaginer des ennemis, dont le projet serait d’abolir – mais par quels moyens ? – toutes les distinctions sociales – voire anatomiques – entre hommes et femmes. Ils confondent à dessein égalité et identité, différence et hiérarchie. Et pour mieux convaincre, ils adossent leur raisonnement à un discours nationaliste, la  » théorie du genre  » venant nécessairement des Etats-Unis. Bruno Perreau (professeur au MIT et chercheur associé aux universités de Cambridge et Harvard)
Loin d’être une théorie, le genre est un concept. Il s’agit d’un outil d’analyse, qui permet aux chercheurs d’étudier divers phénomènes sociaux, et à tout le monde de mieux comprendre comment s’articulent notamment les identités d’homme et de femme. On pourrait argumenter qu’une théorie spécifique est fausse, en avançant des preuves à son encontre, on ne peut pas dire de même d’un outil analytique. Parler de « théorie du genre » permet de supposer que le genre n’est pas vrai. Or en tant que concept, le genre peut être plus ou moins pertinent ou utile, mais pas vrai ou faux. (…) Si les chercheurs sont d’accord pour utiliser le concept de genre pour étudier les définitions sociales du féminin et du masculin, la nature et l’origine de ces normes ne font pas l’unanimité. C’est la raison pour laquelle il existe non pas une mais des « théories du genre ». Longtemps, une des théories dominantes a été celle de la socialisation du genre. L’idée était que l’on « apprend » son genre, donc le comportement approprié à son sexe biologique, jusqu’à l’âge d’environ cinq ans, à travers l’éducation de ses parents et par mimétisme de son entourage. On devient ainsi socialement fille ou garçon, et le genre ne change plus après cela. A la fin des années 80, les sociologues américains Candace West et Don H. Zimmerman, ont avancé une théorie différente. Selon eux, nous ne sommes pas notre genre, nous le « faisons » en permanence. Un système de sanctions et de récompenses sociales nous incite à agir en conformité avec les normes de genre, et en le faisant nous reproduisons ces mêmes normes. A son tour, cette théorie a été critiquée, et depuis, la discussion continue. Rue 89
Le concept de « gender » est né aux Etats-Unis dans les années 1970 d’une réflexion autour du sexe et des rapports hommes / femmes. Le mouvement féministe, qui a pris de l’ampleur après la révolution sexuelle, cherche à faire entendre sa voix au sein des institutions de recherche. Il s’agit de faire reconnaître un engagement qui se veut de plus en plus une réflexion renouvelée sur le monde. C’est un psychologue, Robert Stoller, qui popularise en 1968 une notion déjà utilisée par ses confrères américains depuis le début des années 1950 pour comprendre la séparation chez certains patients entre corps et identité. De là l’idée qu’il n’existe pas une réelle correspondance entre le genre (masculin/féminin) et le sexe (homme/femme). Dès 1972, en s’appuyant sur l’articulation entre la nature et la culture développée par l’anthropologue français Claude Lévi-Strauss, la sociologue britannique Anne Oakley renvoie le sexe au biologique et le genre au culturel. Les universitaires américaines récusent le rapprochement souvent effectué entre les femmes et la nature (principalement à cause de leurs facultés reproductives) alors que les hommes seraient du côté de la culture. Un retentissant article publié en 1974 par l’anthropologue Sherry Ortner en rend les termes particulièrement explicites : « Femme est-il à homme ce que nature est à culture ? » En anthropologie, c’est à Margaret Mead que revient une première réflexion sur les rôles sexuels dans les années 1930. L’étude des rôles assignés aux individus selon les sexes et des caractères proprement féminins et masculins permet de dégager l’apprentissage de ce qui a été donné par la nature. Une fois le genre distingué du sexe, les chercheurs se concentrent sur les rapports homme/femme. L’historienne américaine Joan W. Scott incite à voir plus loin qu’une simple opposition entre les sexes. Celle-ci doit être considérée comme « problématique » et constituer, en tant que telle, un objet de recherche. Si le masculin et le féminin s’opposent de manière problématique, c’est parce que se jouent entre eux des rapports de pouvoir où l’un domine l’autre. Mais si le genre est d’emblée pensé comme une construction sociale, il n’en est pas de même du sexe, vu comme une donnée naturelle ou plus probablement « impensée ». C’est l’historien Thomas Laqueur qui démontrera le caractère construit historiquement du sexe et de son articulation avec le genre. Dans La Fabrique du sexe (1992), il met en évidence la coexistence (voire la prédominance du premier sur le second) de deux systèmes biologiques. Ainsi, pendant longtemps, le corps était vu comme unisexe et le sexe féminin était un « moindre mâle » tandis que nous serions passés au XIXe siècle à un système fondé sur la différence biologique des sexes. Une fois le sexe devenu tout aussi culturel que le genre, la sexualité devient aux yeux des chercheurs l’objet d’une nouvelle réflexion. L’influence du philosophe français Michel Foucault (particulièrement dans la décennie 1980 durant laquelle ses œuvres ont été traduites aux Etats-Unis) est ici primordiale. Le genre est ainsi articulé au pouvoir et à sa « mise en discours » puis relié à l’analyse de la sexualité et de ses normes. La fin des années 1980 voit un début d’institutionnalisation. Emprunté au vocabulaire psychologique et médical par la sociologie, le terme gagne d’autres disciplines comme l’histoire. Avant que le genre ne devienne un outil d’analyse, l’histoire des femmes s’attachait à faire affleurer des récits jusque-là invisibles, quitte à présenter les femmes de manière essentialiste, c’est-à-dire avec des caractéristiques propres et immuables telles que des qualités émotionnelles par exemple. L’analyse du genre ramène les spécificités prétendument féminines à la lumière d’un moment et d’une société donnés. Ainsi, les études de genre permettront de reconnaître le caractère construit socialement des données historiques sur les femmes ainsi que celles sur les hommes. Si le genre rend visible le sexe féminin, il implique que l’homme ne soit plus neutre et général mais un individu sexué. A partir de ce constat a pu se développer une histoire des hommes et des masculinités, principalement autour de la revue américaine Men and Masculinities dirigée par Michael Kimmel. Les questions autour du genre, de par leur nette déviation dès le milieu des années 1980 vers la sexualité, ont contribué à diviser les féministes en deux clans. Les plus radicales se sont attachées à montrer le caractère oppressif de la hiérarchie des sexes en termes de sexualité avec un avantage systématique attribué à l’homme, considéré dans sa globalité comme un mâle dominant. D’autres, comme les Américaines Gayle Rubin et Judith Butler, montrent que le rapport entre les sexes n’implique pas seulement une hiérarchie entre les genres mais également une injonction normative. (…) Le concept de genre a eu des difficultés à s’implanter en France, principalement à cause d’une méfiance envers le féminisme américain jugé par trop communautariste et radical. Durant les années 1980, l’université française cherchait à se prémunir contre le politique. De par leur nécessaire passage par le militantisme, les études féministes s’éloignèrent donc du cadre de la recherche. Les expressions « rapports de sexe » ou « rapports sociaux de sexe » ont longtemps été préférées à la notion de genre jugée trop floue. Ce vocabulaire est en adéquation avec l’approche féministe matérialiste influencée par l’école marxiste qui caractérise la première génération de chercheuses dans les années 1970, avec les sociologues Christine Delphy, Nicole-Claude Mathieu et Colette Guillaumin. (…) Le concept de genre a réellement commencé à se diffuser en France au milieu des années 1990, lorsque la Communauté européenne s’est penchée sur les questions de genre et de parité dans la recherche d’une égalité effective. A partir de 1993, les débats sur la parité incitent les travaux sur le genre à prendre en compte le champ politique. Dès les années 1970, les travaux de Janine Mossuz-Lavau sur la visibilité des femmes en rapport au vote, aux élections et à l’éligibilité ont permis un premier rapprochement entre les études de genre et le champ politique. La sociologie du travail achèvera de convaincre de la nécessité de prendre en compte le sexe de manière systématique. Dans ce cadre, on assiste, durant les années 1990, à la création de modules de recherche spécifiques comme le Mage (Marché du travail et genre) autour de la sociologue Margaret Maruani qui, après s’être intéressée à la division sexuelle du travail, analyse aujourd’hui la division sexuelle du marché du travail. Que ce soit en histoire, en anthropologie ou aujourd’hui dans la plupart des sciences sociales, en France, le genre est l’objet d’un intérêt grandissant au sein de l’université alors qu’aux Etats-Unis, le concept utilisé à outrance semble avoir perdu sa force de provocation et sa valeur heuristique, c’est-à-dire qu’il ne permet plus de découvrir de nouvelles pistes de recherche ou de poser un regard neuf sur des thèmes classiques. Les jeunes chercheurs français qui s’intéressent à cette thématique sont d’autant plus enthousiastes qu’ils se trouvent dégagés du militantisme qui entravait la reconnaissance de leurs prédécesseurs. En ce sens, leur principal enjeu revient à donner au genre un statut théorique dénué d’idéologie au sein des sciences humaines. Sciences humaines
Pour parler du genre, ses détracteurs utilisent l’expression « théorie du genre » plutôt qu' »étude », un changement de terme qui a pour objectif de semer le doute sur son aspect scientifique. (…) Les chercheurs refusent donc l’utilisation du terme « théorie du genre », préférant parler d' »études sur le genre », puisqu’il s’agit d’un vaste champ interdisciplinaire regroupant tous les pans des sciences humaines et sociales (histoire, sociologie, géographie, anthropologie, économie, sciences politiques…). Leurs travaux analysent donc des objets de recherche traditionnels tels que le travail ou les migrations, en partant d’un postulat nouveau : le sexe biologique ne suffit pas à faire un homme ou une femme, les normes sociales y participent grandement. (…) S’il est vrai que le développement des études de genre est lié au mouvement féministe des années 1970, le concept de gender (« genre ») n’est pas créé par les féministes. Il apparaît dans les années 1950 aux Etats-Unis dans les milieux psychiatriques et médicaux. Le psychologue médical américain John Money parle ainsi pour la première fois des « gender roles » en 1955 afin d’appréhender le cas des personnes dont le sexe chromosomique ne correspond au sexe anatomique. En 1968, le psychiatre et psychanalyste Robert Stoller utilise quant à lui la notion de « gender identity » pour étudier les transsexuels, qui ne se reconnaissent pas dans leur identité sexuelle de naissance. C’est dans les années 1970 que le mouvement féministe se réapproprie les questions de genre pour interroger la domination masculine. Les « gender studies » (« études de genre ») se développent alors dans les milieux féministes et universitaires américains, s’inspirant notamment de penseurs français comme Simone de Beauvoir – et son célèbre « On ne naît pas femme, on le devient » –, Michel Foucault ou Pierre Bourdieu. En France, la sociologue Christine Delphy est l’une des premières introduire le concept en France, sous l’angle d’un « système de genre », où la femme serait la catégorie exploitée et l’homme la catégorie exploitante. Mais la greffe ne s’opère réellement que dans les années 1990, lorsque le débat sur la parité s’installe au niveau européen. La promotion de l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes devient l’une des tâches essentielles de la Communauté européenne avec l’entrée en vigueur du traité d’Amsterdam en 1999, notamment dans son article 2. Le concept de genre s’est développé comme une réflexion autour de la notion de sexe et du rapport homme/femme. Loin de nier la différence entre le sexe féminin et le sexe masculin, le genre est utilisé par les chercheurs comme un outil permettant de penser le sexe biologique (homme ou femme) indépendamment de l’identité sexuelle (masculin ou féminin). Il ne s’agit donc pas de dire que l’homme et la femme sont identiques, mais d’interroger la manière dont chacun et chacune peut construire son identité sexuelle, aussi bien à travers son éducation que son orientation sexuelle (hétérosexuelle, homosexuelle, etc.). En dissociant intellectuellement le culturel et le biologique, le concept de genre interroge les clichés liés au sexe. Par exemple, l’idée selon laquelle les femmes sont plus naturellement enclines à s’atteler aux tâches domestiques que les hommes est de l’ordre de la construction sociale et historique, et non pas liée au fait que la femme dispose d’un vagin et d’ovaires. Pour les détracteurs du genre, la construction d’une personne en tant qu’individu se fait dans l’assujettissement à des normes dites « naturelles » et « immuables » : d’un côté les femmes, de l’autre les hommes. Mais certains travaux de biologiste, tels ceux de l’Américaine Anne Fausto-Sterling, montrent que l’opposition entre nature et culture est vaine, les deux étant inextricables et participant d’un même mouvement. Il ne suffit pas de dire que quelque chose est biologique pour dire que c’est immuable. C’est l’exemple du cerveau humain : il évolue avec le temps, et de génération en génération. Quand le ministère de l’éducation a annoncé sa volonté d’introduire le concept de genre dans les manuels scolaires des classes de première, la sphère catholique et conservatrice s’est insurgée contre une « théorie » quelle accusait de nier l’individu au profit de sa sexualité. Dans une lettre envoyée au ministre de l’éducation, Luc Chatel, en août 2011 et signée par 80 députés UMP, on peut lire que, « selon cette théorie [du genre], les personnes ne sont plus définies comme hommes et femmes mais comme pratiquants de certaines formes de sexualité ». Un mot d’ordre relayé par Gérard Leclerc dans un éditorial de France catholique datant de mai 2011, dans lequel il pointe la menace de ce qu’il qualifie d' »arme à déconstruire l’identité sexuelle ». C’est d’ailleurs cet argument qui nourrit l’idée – répandue par la plupart des sites régionaux de La Manif pour tous – selon laquelle « le vrai but du mariage homosexuel est d’imposer la théorie du genre ». Mais les études sur le genre, et a fortiori le texte proposé pour les manuels de SVT par le ministère, insistent au contraire sur la différence entre identité sexuelle et orientation sexuelle. Il s’agit d’étudier comment s’articulent ces deux mouvements entre eux, et non de substituer l’un à l’autre. Par exemple, les personnes transsexuelles interrogent leur genre, et non pas leur sexualité. On peut changer de genre sans changer de préférence sexuelle. Le Monde
Comprendre que ce qui se passait était un bouleversement des liens d’alliance, de filiation, de germanité, et que le mouvement de tout cela n’était pas du tout l’individualisation, au sens de I, me, ego, myself dont on nous a rebattu les oreilles pendant une décennie, mais une modification de ces relations et de tout ce qui se construit avec elles. Et cette métamorphose des relations se produisait parce qu’était en train de se produire une révolution qu’il n’est pas exagéré, je pense, de nommer la deuxième révolution démocratique, qui est la révolution de l’égalité de sexe. Le moteur des changements de la parenté, de la redéfinition des liens d’alliance, de filiation, de germanité, et du rapport entre eux, est le fait d’essayer d’organiser des liens de parenté sous l’égide de l’égalité des sexes. Quelque chose de vraiment nouveau se joue là, puisque non seulement aucune société humaine n’a été organisée sur un principe d’égalité des sexes, mais nos propres sociétés démocratiques modernes, qui valorisaient l’égalité et la liberté comme leurs valeurs ultimes, avaient justement fait une exception: à l’intérieur d’une valeur individu intégrant les valeurs de liberté et d’égalité, justement dans la famille, il était annoncé que les rapports entre les hommes et les femmes, en particulier dans le couple, dans la petite famille conjugale, seraient des rapports hiérarchiques. Hiérarchie du couple, à travers la puissance maritale, et hiérarchie sexuée dans les rapports de filiation, à travers la puissance paternelle. (…)  c’est bien à penser mieux encore les métamorphoses de la parenté que nous sommes arrivés. A partir de là, le problème pour moi concerne en effet la question de l’égalité. Si nous réfléchissons en termes de relations de parenté, la question peut se poser ainsi: quelle est la particularité d’une relation humaine en tant qu’elle est spécifiquement humaine (…) La différence est que les relations proprement humaines ne sont pas simplement calées sur des régularités (elles peuvent l’être, des habitudes, des choses qui se refont à l’identique), mais qu’elles sont référées à des règles, ou encore à des normes, et donc médiées par des règles, des normes… Nous sommes capables d’agir en tant que. C’est cette médiation qui fait que la relation n’est pas seulement intersubjective, mais qu’entre nous la relation en cause est chaque fois définie : quelle est cette relation ? Une relation de locuteur à auditeur ? De conférencier à auditoire ? De prof à élève ? De mère à fille ?… Nous avons à notre disposition tout un répertoire de relations, et chaque fois nous nous comportons en montrant que nous savons quelles sont les attentes de cette relation. C’est la relation introduite par ce qu’on appelle le symbolique, ou l’institutionnel : le fait qu’on accorde sens, valeur, signification à des relations sous la forme de système d’attentes. (…) si je suis dans une relation de parenté, je m’attends à ce que l’autre se cale sur des droits, des devoirs, des interdits. Pas de famille humaine sans la médiation d’un système symbolique de parenté, qui énonce justement pour chaque relation de quelles attentes elle est investie, quels droits, quels devoirs, quels interdits, et comment ces différentes relations ne sont pas une liste mais sont articulées les unes aux autres pour former un système de parenté, qui lui-même n’est pas isolable mais intégré dans un système social plus large, qui est un système religieux, politique, cosmologique, etc. Dans les changements que notre système de parenté a vécu du fait de l’égalité de sexe, le plus important est à mon avis le démariage. Ce que j’ai appelé le démariage n’est pas simplement le fait qu’on se marie moins, ni le divorce, mais le fait que le mariage moderne (pas celui du Moyen-âge, mais le mariage moderne) organisait tout le système de parenté qui a été le nôtre depuis l’entrée dans la modernité jusqu’aux années 60. Le mariage guidait l’ensemble de la question familiale. Une famille n’existait que mariée. En dehors du mariage, on n’était pas censé avoir une famille. Le mariage organisait la notion de couple. En dehors du couple marié, il n’y avait pas vraiment de couple. Il organisait la paternité, c’était l’institution qui donnait des pères aux enfants, et hors du mariage il n’y avait pas vraiment de pères. Et d’une certaine façon il organisait également la filiation, parce qu’en dehors du mariage aucun enfant ne bénéficiait pleinement de la double lignée paternelle et maternelle, de la plénitude de la filiation. Le démariage est la traduction d’un système égalitaire : quand on remet en cause l’idée d’un couple marié par principe hiérarchique entre l’homme et la femme, l’époux et l’épouse, on a une traduction qui est le démariage. Le mariage devient une question privée. Se marier, ne pas se marier, se démarier a été remis aux individus eux-mêmes. Il s’agit donc de l’équivalent, dans le domaine de la parenté, de ce qui s’est produit dans le domaine politique quand la religion, qui était une affaire commune par définition, a été intégrée comme une affaire de conscience personnelle. Il y avait toujours de la religion, mais tout était changé, comme au moment de la Révolution française, par exemple. Parce que c’était à chacun d’avoir à penser la question religieuse, il fallait réorganiser le lien social et politique sur d’autres bases: inventer la laïcité etc. Si le mariage devient une question de conscience personnelle, s’il est possible de le choisir, ne pas le choisir, choisir de le rompre, alors il faut également réorganiser la parenté. Mais le point où l’on retrouve la parentalité, c’est que plus on a organisé le démariage, plus on a abandonné ce modèle du couple marié, plus on a créé des situations où dans la filiation, dans la naissance, dans la trajectoire biographique d’un enfant, dans sa vie quotidienne, il y avait plus d’un homme et une femme. Il est important de comprendre que le modèle un homme une femme, pas un de moins pas un de plus, est un modèle matrimonial, et n’est pas, comme on le dit quelquefois, un modèle biologique. C’est un modèle qui était porté par notre système matrimonial où par définition on était censé être à la fois le géniteur de l’enfant, son père domestique et son père par le droit. Tout était censé se rassembler sur une seule tête masculine, une seule tête féminine. Aujourd’hui, parmi les enjeux sur lesquels nous devons travailler ensemble, c’est le fait que notre société organise des relations dans lesquelles il y a plus d’un homme et une femme, et qu’elle ne sait pas quoi en faire. Premièrement, on peut citer toutes les situations d’engendrement d’enfant avec des tiers donneurs : tiers donneurs d’ovocytes, de sperme, d’embryons, éventuellement de capacité gestatrice, pour les gestations pour autrui. On organise tout cela (pas les GPA chez nous), on le fait, on considère donc qu’il y a des engendrements à plus de deux. Mais une fois qu’on l’a fait, on le cache. On le fait et on l’oublie. Notre système de droit efface ce qu’il a fait, efface le don, les donneurs, les anonymise, les oublie, et on fait comme si le couple qui a reçu l’enfant, reçu le don, était celui qui avait engendré tout seul. Ce problème suscite aujourd’hui beaucoup de débats. N’a-t-on pas tort de ne pas assumer ce qu’on fait ? C’est le problème que posent en particulier ceux qui demandent à connaître leurs origines et qui souhaitent avoir à la fois des parents et des donneurs, pour pouvoir être réintégrés dans la vie commune. Même chose pour l’adoption : l’adoption plénière a pendant longtemps été organisée. Il y a donc plus d’un homme et d’une femme dans la vie d’une enfant (ses parents de naissance et ses parents adoptifs). On l’a fait mais on l’a effacé aussi, en assimilant la filiation adoptive à une filiation par le sang, pourrait-on dire, en effaçant toute l’histoire antérieure de l’enfant, et en prétendant même que l’enfant était “né de” ses parents adoptifs. Donc là encore des pluri-parentalités (au sens où il y a plus d’un homme et une femme en situation parentale, en fonction parentale), mais qu’on efface. Même chose enfin d’une certaine façon pour les familles recomposées, où sont présents des beaux-pères, des belles-mères, auxquels on ne sait pas très bien quelle place donner. C’est un immense champ pour nous tous, et nous devrions le discuter avec une réflexion renouvelée sur la relation, la question des places. Avoir des places oui, mais pas forcément toujours les mêmes. Il peut y avoir aujourd’hui enrichissement par de nouvelles places. (…) Pour expliciter cette conclusion, partons d’une phrase de Wittgenstein, “Tu ne peux pas dire : au tennis, il est interdit de marquer des buts.” On ne peut pas marquer des buts au tennis, bien sûr. Est-ce pour autant interdit ? Non, ce n’est pas interdit. La notion même d’interdit suppose quelque chose que vous pourriez faire, et qu’on vous empêche de faire. Or marquer des buts au tennis n’est pas quelque chose que vous pourriez faire et qu’on vous empêche de faire. C’est quelque chose qu’on ne peut tout simplement pas faire au tennis, sinon on joue à autre chose. Cette remarque familière, qui demande un travail immense, la marque de Wittgenstein, introduit la distinction entre l’interdit et l’impossible. Marquer des buts au tennis n’est pas interdit, mais impossible. Mais quelle est cette forme d’impossible ? La question nous renvoie au monde symbolique des places. Si l’on veut que le mot tennis ait un sens, qu’un jeu soit entièrement constitué sur les règles d’un jeu qui soit le tennis, alors il faut admettre que dans ces règles constitutives, rien n’est prévu qui permet des buts. Quand vous apprenez à l’enfant à parler, quand vous le faites entrer dans l’interlocution, en parlant de lui en troisième personne, en vous adressant à lui en deuxième personne, et que peu à peu il va apprendre à dire “je”, ce qu’il va apprendre est que chez les humains, il y a des choses qui sont impossibles et qui ne sont justement pas interdites. Il y a des choses qu’on ne peut pas faire, bien que personne ne vous empêche de les faire. Mais si on les faisait, alors on ne pourrait pas jouer au jeu du langage ensemble. Dans mon livre, je prends cet exemple: “tu ne peux pas dire la mâle et le femelle.” Ce n’est pas interdit, mais s’il n’y a pas des règles constitutives du langage auxquelles on se tient, on ne peut pas jouer ensemble au jeu du langage. Je pense donc qu’il est très important de comprendre que les systèmes de parenté reposent sur des règles constitutives. Ces règles peuvent changer, elles peuvent évoluer. Mais ce dont on ne peut pas se passer, c’est d’avoir les références à des règles communes, un monde commun finalement. Notre responsabilité aujourd’hui est d’être capables, à notre tour, après les autres, à notre place nouvelle, d’énoncer quelles sont les règles communes du jeu de la parenté auxquelles nous voulons jouer ensemble aujourd’hui. Ces règles ne sont pas exactement les mêmes que celles du passé, mais la naïveté est de croire qu’il serait plus démocratique, comme cela a pu être dit, de s’en passer.(…) L’enjeu est de dire que dans ces relations entre les humains, dont j’ai dit qu’elles sont médiées par des attentes, ces attentes rendent les choses possibles ou impossibles, et pas simplement permises ou interdites. On ne peut pas ramener tous les faits humains à la question de ce qui est permis et interdit. Cela ne permettrait pas de comprendre que des choses doivent d’exister à la règle. L’exemple qui est toujours pris pour le faire comprendre est le rapprochement entre le vivre en société et les jeux de société. Vous ne pouvez pas déplacer un pion, et que ce soit un coup comme on dit au jeu d’échecs, s’il n’y a pas les règles du jeu d’échecs. Vous pouvez toujours prendre un objet qui a telle forme dans votre main, le lever, le poser. Mais ce qui fait que c’est un coup dans le jeu, c’est justement qu’un pur geste physique est transformé en quelque chose qui a du sens, qui s’appelle un coup dans le jeu, par l’existence constitutive d’une règle du jeu. Cet exemple, on peut l’élargir à la vie sociale en général. Nous avons des façons d’agir qui peuvent être comprises comme un coup dans le jeu. Vous allez faire ceci ou cela dans vos rapports avec votre mère, votre père, votre fils, mais vous serez comme quelqu’un qui joue un coup dans le jeu, comme si vous étiez en quelque sorte les personnages d’une dramaturgie sociale, une dramaturgie dont nous empruntons les vêtements, les rôles, mais qui n’a pas de coulisses. Nous sommes des personnages qui jouons un jeu, au sens théâtral ou social, mais sans coulisses : pas besoin d’aller imaginer qu’après les masques sont enlevés, et qu’apparaissent les vraies personnes. Vous ne les trouvez pas, les vraies personnes : ces rôles, c’est nous, notre façon d’être. L’important est de faire comprendre qu’une société doit toujours dire quelle est sa règle du jeu, ou ses règles du jeu. Il est naïf de croire qu’on peut s’en passer, en renvoyant à chacun le soin de dire la règle qu’il veut. Par exemple il y en a qui trouvent ennuyeux de définir une femme : “une femme, un homme, ça fait réac… Que chacun définisse son genre. Moi je me sens femme, ou bien je ne me sens pas etc.” C’est un ressenti. Mais si chacun a son ressenti intérieur, on ne peut jouer à aucun jeu. L’enjeu est d’apprendre qu’on ne met pas en cause la singularité des gens, l’unicité des vies, si on rappelle qu’il faut des institutions justes, un monde commun dans lequel on définit la règle du jeu qui définit le possible et l’impossible. Au contraire, elle ouvre aux gens des possibilités. (…) l’introduction au monde de la règle rend des choses impossibles, mais en rend aussi possibles. L’exemple bête est le jeu d’échecs. Mais ça rend aussi possible la parenté, etc. Un des problèmes dans une société individualiste est qu’on croit que les règles sociales nous briment, ne font que nous brider. Cette conception est une conception de l’authenticité de l’être avant la chute, une conception chrétienne dont on peut remonter l’histoire. Mais la théologie chrétienne elle-même n’est pas si simplette. Cette idée qu’on pourrait tout faire si on n’était pas bridé par les lois, est ridicule d’un point de vue sociologique du langage, puisque c’est ce qui rend possible d’agir à la manière humaine. Effectivement, ça rend par le même mouvement des choses possibles et impossibles. Irène Théry

Attention: un mensonge peut en cacher bien d’autres !

A l’heure où, après le mariage pour tous au forceps, la France découvre la double vie de son président supposément « normal »

Et, à l’occasion de la polémique suscitée par un tout récent et inédit boycott des écoles, l’expérimentation d’ateliers dans plus de 500 écoles primaires ayant pour but de « déconstruire les stéréotypes » filles-garçons dès le plus jeune âge …

Où, contrairement aux dénégations de nos gouvernants et de leurs relais médiatiques, l’éducation sexuelle est non seulement bien au programme

Mais que, sans compter les terribles ratés – commodément passés sous silence – de leur histoire, les termes mêmes d’une prétendument inexistante (mais pourtant déjà polémique sous le précédent gouvernement) théorie du genre font partie du discours et des réflexions tant desdits dirigeants que des chercheurs …

Et surtout que ledit ministère n’hésite pas à faire appel à des intervenants extérieurs dont plusieurs associations fondées par des mouvements gay …

Comment ne pas voir, au-delà des récupérations plus ou moins douteuses voire des délires communautaristes des leaders du boycott tels que Farida Belghoul, la réalité d’une idéologie et d’un pouvoir engagé, dans son obsession de l’égalité, dans la remise en cause de tout un modèle familial et donc de société ?

Théorie du genre: «Il est essentiel d’enseigner aux enfants le respect des différentes formes d’identité sexuelle, afin de bâtir une société du respect»

31 août 2011

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, secrétaire nationale du PS aux questions de société et porte-parole de Ségolène Royal.

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, secrétaire nationale du PS aux questions de société et porte-parole de Ségolène Royal. P. FAYOLLE / SIPA

INTERVIEW – Selon Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, secrétaire nationale du PS aux questions de société et porte-parole de Ségolène Royal, les parlementaires n’ont pas à faire d’incursion dans le contenu des manuels scolaires…

Ce mercredi, le secrétaire général de l’UMP, Jean-François Copé, a soutenu sans réserve les 80 députés réclamant le retrait de manuels scolaires qui reprennent la théorie du genre, en estimant qu’ils «posent une vraie question».

A l’inverse, le Parti socialiste a fait savoir mardi que «cette tentative de députés est inacceptable sur la forme comme sur le fond». Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, secrétaire nationale du PS aux questions de société et porte-parole de Ségolène Royal, explique à 20Minutes pourquoi les parlementaires ne doivent pas se mêler du contenu des manuels scolaires.

Pourquoi la lettre des 80 parlementaires UMP vous semble-t-elle problématique?

Parce que les députés n’ont pas à écrire les programmes, sauf s’il s’agit de théories qui touchent aux valeurs de la nation, telles que la condamnation du négationnisme ou a contrario les lois mémorielles. La dernière fois que la droite a voulu écrire un manuel scolaire c’était en 2005, quand le même Christian Vanneste voulait inscrire le rôle positif de la colonisation dans les livres d’histoire.

Le politique n’a pas à écrire l’histoire ou à expliquer la science, il doit changer la société. Sans compter que ce qui fait réagir ces 80 députés, ce qui leur semble plus insupportable que tout, ce n’est pas la précarité dans laquelle on plonge délibérément l’école, mais quelques phrases qui froissent leurs convictions personnelles rétrogrades.

En quoi la «théorie du genre» peut-elle aider à changer la société?

La théorie du genre, qui explique «l’identité sexuelle» des individus autant par le contexte socio-culturel que par la biologie, a pour vertu d’aborder la question des inadmissibles inégalités persistantes entre les hommes et les femmes ou encore de l’homosexualité, et de faire œuvre de pédagogie sur ces sujets.

Les manuels de sciences et vie de la terre (SVT) ne devraient-ils pas enseigner la sexualité humaine en se limitant strictement à sa dimension biologique, et pas à sa dimension sociale?

Le vrai problème de société que nous devons régler aujourd’hui, c’est l’homophobie, et notamment les agressions homophobes qui se développent en milieu scolaire. L’école doit redevenir un sanctuaire, et la prévention de la délinquance homophobe doit commencer dès le plus jeune âge. Un jeune homosexuel sur cinq a déjà été victime d’une agression physique, et près d’un sur deux a déjà été insulté. Il est essentiel d’enseigner aux enfants le respect des différentes formes d’identité sexuelle, afin de bâtir une société du respect.

Voir aussi:

Les sciences économiques et sociales, pionnières de la théorie du genre

Jean-Yves Mas (enseignant)

Le Monde

31.01.2014

Venant d’apprendre que, selon Vincent Peillon, ministre de l’éducation nationale  »la théorie du genre ne sera pas enseignée à l’école » je pense que ses propos concernent sans doute l’enseignement de la théorie du genre à l’école primaire, car pour ma part, en tant que professeur de science économiques et sociales (SES) dans l’enseignement secondaire, cela fait bientôt 25 ans que je l’enseigne à mes élèves, non par volonté de prosélytisme, mais tout simplement parce que l’analyse des inégalités liées au genre, et donc ce qu’il est convenu d’appeler la « théorie du genre », fait partie des programmes officiels de ma discipline.

En effet, en seconde, le programme comporte la question suivante :  »Comment devenons-nous des acteurs sociaux ? », afin de traiter cette problématique les instruction officielles indiquent qu’  »On montrera que la famille et l’école jouent chacune un rôle spécifique dans le processus de socialisation des jeunes. On prendra en compte le caractère différencié de ce processus en fonction du genre et du milieu social ». De même le programme de première, pour traiter la question  »Comment la socialisation de l’enfant s’effectue-t-elle ? » précise qu’  »on étudiera les processus par lesquels l’enfant construit sa personnalité par l’intériorisation/ incorporation de manières de penser et d’agir socialement situées (…). On mettra aussi en évidence les variations des processus de socialisation en fonction des milieux sociaux et du genre, en insistant plus particulièrement sur la construction sociale des rôles associés au sexe ». En terminale , le programme de l’option Sociologie et science Politique (SSP) comporte une question intitulée  »Comment s’organise la compétition politique en démocratie ? », et les instructions rajoutent :  »Centré sur le gouvernement représentatif, ce point permettra d’étudier les enjeux socio-politiques de la compétition électorale contemporaine. (…). On identifiera les biais liés au genre et la difficulté particulière rencontrée pour assurer une représentation équitable des deux sexes en politique. »

SENSIBILISER LES ELEVES

On le voit, les questions abordées par l’enseignement des SES permettent de sensibiliser les élèves aux inégalités hommes/femmes que ce soit dans les sphères domestiques, professionnelles, scolaires ou politiques. Mais l’enseignement des SES permet aussi lors de l’étude de  »la socialisation » d’analyser les pratiques sociales à l’origine de ces inégalités, et notamment la persistance de différences notables dans les attitudes encouragées ou découragées selon le genre de l’enfant par les institutions de socialisation. L’étude des catalogues de jouets à Noël se révèle à ce propos tout à fait instructive et suscite de plus un vif intérêt de la part de nos élèves.

Enfin les programmes de SES permettent de montrer, dans le chapitre consacré aux conflits sociaux et à leur évolution, que face à la domination masculine les femmes ne sont pas restées passives mais qu’elles ont lutté pour leur émancipation notamment par leur mobilisation collective.

Grâce à ces luttes elles ont obtenu certains acquis dont il est important de souligner la fragilité puisque ceux-ci sont souvent menacés. Nous tenons de plus à préciser que sensibiliser les élèves aux inégalités de genre, ce n’est en rien proposer un enseignement moralisateur et  »politiquement correct », mais c’est, en partant du constat factuel des inégalités entre homme et femme, montrer comment les sciences sociales, conformément à leur projet fondateur, expliquent les représentations et les pratiques sociales des individus par le rôle de la socialisation et de l’environnement socio-culturel dans lequel ils évoluent. Précisons que les savoirs transmis lors de l’étude des inégalités de genre sont des savoirs  »stabilisés », établis par de nombreuses études et enquêtes de terrain répondant aux critères élémentaires de la scientificité, comme l’ensemble des savoirs transmis dans le cadre des programmes scolaires.

Notre objectif est d’essayer de déconstruire certains stéréotypes sur le genre afin notamment de  »dé-naturaliser » des comportement ou des pratiques qui sont avant tout de nature sociale. Car les dominants ont toujours intérêt à naturaliser des situations qui sont le produit de rapports de force. En effet les inégalités liées au genre ne doivent rien, ou en tout cas, très peu à la nature, à l’instinct ou à une quelconque tradition, mais beaucoup voire tout, aux rapports sociaux entre hommes et femmes. Elles n’ont donc rien de naturelles ni d’immuables. En montrant que le genre est une construction sociale, les SES, conformément à leur vocation citoyenne, s’inscrivent aussi dans un projet éthique qui vise à lutter contre toutes les formes de discriminations liées au sexisme, de même que dans d’autre parties de notre enseignement nous entendons lutter contre le racisme ou l’homophobie.

Pour notre part nous considérons que la théorie du genre est bien l’exemple emblématique d’une théorie émancipatrice puisqu’elle produit des savoirs qui peuvent avoir des effets sur les pratiques et les représentations des individus. Voilà pourquoi la théorie du genre correspond à un moment fort de notre enseignement et nous nous opposerons énergiquement à toute tentative visant à remettre en cause sa place dans nos programmes.

Jean-Yves Mas, professeur de SES au lycée de Montreuil (93)

Voir également:

« La théorie du genre entraîne l’école dans l’ingénierie sociale »

Pour la philosophe Bérénice Levet, en menant «la chasse aux stéréotypes»,le gouvernement joue aux apprentis sorciers.

Marie-Amélie Lombard

Le Figaro

30/01/2014

Docteur en philosophie, Bérénice Levet travaille à un essai sur La théorie du genre ou le monde rêvé des anges, à paraître chez Grasset en septembre 2014. Elle est l’auteur de Le Musée imaginaire d’Hannah Arendt, Stock, 2012.

LE FIGARO. – L’Éducation nationale est-elle en train d’introduire «la théorie du genre» à l’école?

Bérénice LEVET. – Je précise d’emblée que je ne soutiens en rien les mouvements qui appellent à boycotter l’école et qui manipulent les esprits. Mais il ne faut pas abandonner ce débat à l’extrême droite. Or, dans ce qui est dénoncé aujourd’hui, il y a une part de réalité. Certes, la théorie du genre en tant que telle n’est pas enseignée à l’école primaire mais plusieurs de ses postulats y sont diffusés.

Avant tout, quelle définition donnez-vous de la théorie du genre?

Pour les tenants de cette théorie, l’identité sexuelle est, de part en part, construite. Selon eux, il n’y a pas de continuité entre le donné biologique – notre sexe de naissance – et notre devenir d’homme ou de femme. C’est, poussé à l’extrême, la formule de Simone de Beauvoir dans Le Deuxième sexe «On ne naît pas femme, on le devient». Et les théoriciens du genre poursuivent: à partir du moment où tout est «construit», tout peut être déconstruit.

Quels sont les exemples de l’application de cette théorie à l’école?

Prenons les «ABCD de l’égalité», qui sont des parcours proposés aux élèves et accompagnés de fiches pédagogiques pour les enseignants. Ils sont supposés servir à enseigner l’égalité hommes-femmes. Qu’en est-il? Dans une fiche, intitulée «Dentelles, rubans, velours et broderies», on montre un tableau représentant Louis XIV enfant qui porte une robe richement ornée et des rubans rouges dans les cheveux. L’objectif affiché? Faire prendre conscience aux élèves de l’historicité des codes auxquels ils se soumettent et gagner de la latitude par rapport à ceux que la société leur impose aujourd’hui…

N’est-ce pas une simple façon de montrer que la façon de s’habiller a évolué au fil du temps?

Non, l’objectif est bien d’«émanciper» l’enfant de tous les codes. Ce qui aboutit à l’abandonner à un ensemble de «possibles», comme s’il n’appartenait à aucune histoire, comme si les adultes n’avaient rien à lui transmettre. Or, il est faux de dire qu’on «formate» un enfant, on ne fait que l’introduire dans un monde qui est plus vieux que lui. Kierkegaard parle d’un «désespoir des possibles» qui ne se transforme jamais en nécessité.

Quels autres exemples vous semblent condamnables?

Le film Tomboy – «garçon manqué» en français -, de la réalisatrice Céline Sciamma, a été montré l’an dernier à 12 500 élèves parisiens, de la dernière année de maternelle au CM2. Quel est le propos du film? Une petite fille, Laure, se fait passer pour un garçon auprès des enfants avec qui elle joue et se fait appeler Michaël. Qu’est-il écrit dans le dossier pédagogique? «Laure semble pouvoir aller au bout de la possibilité Michaël»… On n’est plus dans le simple apprentissage de la tolérance.

Le danger n’est-il pas surtout d’imposer à l’école un fatras mal assimilé des études de genre qui sont un champ de la recherche universitaire? Le gouvernement joue-t-il aux apprentis sorciers?

Sans scrupules, l’école est entraînée dans une politique d’ingénierie sociale. Tout en se donnant bonne conscience, le gouvernement encourage un brouillage très inquiétant. Savons-nous bien ce que nous sommes en train de faire? A l’âge de l’école primaire, les enfants ont besoin de s’identifier, et non pas de se désidentifier. A ne plus vouloir d’une éducation sexuée, on abandonne nos enfants aux stéréotypes les plus kitsch des dessins animés.

N’est-ce pas pour autant utile d’affirmer l’égalité des sexes dès le plus jeune âge?

Il faudrait surtout en finir avec cette mise en accusation systématique du passé. Notre civilisation occidentale, et spécialement française, n’est pas réductible à une histoire faite de domination et de misogynie. Sur la différence des sexes, la France a su composer une partition singulière, irréductible à des rapports de forces. L’apparition d’une culture musulmane change-t-elle la donne? Elle nous confronte en tout cas à une culture qui n’a pas le même héritage en matière d’égalité des sexes. Ce qui me paraît dangereux dans cette «chasse aux stéréotypes» est le risque de balayer d’un revers de main tout notre héritage culturel. Dans un tel contexte, quelle œuvre littéraire, artistique ou cinématographique ne tombera pas sous le coup de l’accusation de «sexisme»?

Selon vous, sous couvert de lutter contre les stéréotypes, on peut bouleverser en profondeur la société?

Il existe une volonté de transformer la société, de sortir de toute normativité pour aboutir à un relativisme complet. Le gouvernement Ayrault est en pointe sur ce combat. On l’a vu lors du débat sur le Mariage pour tous. Il ne devrait pas être impossible de dire que l’homosexualité est une exception et que l’hétérosexualité est la norme. La théorie de l’interchangeabilité des sexes se diffuse. Or, nous avons un corps sexué qui est significatif par lui-même et qui ne compte pas pour rien dans la construction de soi.

L’égalité hommes-femmes n’est cependant pas acquise aujourd’hui. Comment s’y prendre pour la renforcer?

Le principe de l’égalité est incontesté aujourd’hui. Certes, il existe encore ce fameux “plafond de verre” empêchant les femmes d’accéder aux plus hauts postes et des inégalités salariales. Mais les progrès sont inouïs. Doit-on, comme l’a fait récemment le gouvernement, imposer aux hommes de prendre un congé parental? On en arrive à punir la famille parce qu’un homme est récalcitrant à s’arrêter de travailler! Et puis, faut-il rappeler qu’il n’y a pas de cordon ombilical à couper entre un père et son enfant?

A vous entendre, les dérives que vous dénoncez risquent de ne pas se limiter à l’école.

Je n’ai guère le goût des analogies historiques mais, s’il existe une leçon à retenir des totalitarismes nazi et stalinien, c’est que l’homme n’est pas un simple matériau que l’on peut façonner. Avec la théorie du genre, l’enjeu est anthropologique. Montesquieu écrivait: «Dans un temps d’ignorance, on n’a aucun doute, même lorsqu’on fait les plus grands maux. Dans un temps de lumière, on tremble encore lorsqu’on fait les plus grands biens».

Voir aussi:

« ABCD de l’égalité » : qu’est-ce que c’est exactement ?

Le dispositif lancé par Vincent Peillon et Najat Vallaud-Belkacem est loin de faire l’unanimité. Même si personne ne sait vraiment de quoi il s’agit.

Le Point

30/01/2014

L’ABCD de l’égalité, dans le viseur des organisateurs de boycott des écoles contre un supposé enseignement de la « théorie du genre », est une expérimentation pour lutter contre les stéréotypes filles-garçons à l’école. Ce dispositif, élaboré par le ministère de l’Éducation nationale et le ministère des Droits des femmes, est expérimenté de la grande section de maternelle au CM2 depuis la Toussaint dans 600 classes de 275 écoles dans 10 académies (Bordeaux, Clermont-Ferrand, Créteil, Corse, Guadeloupe, Lyon, Montpellier, Nancy-Metz, Rouen, Toulouse) pour « faire prendre conscience aux enfants des limites qu’ils se fixent eux-mêmes, des phénomènes d’autocensure trop courants, leur donner confiance en eux, leur apprendre à grandir dans le respect des autres ». Après évaluation, il doit être généralisé à la rentrée 2014.

Les mouvances qui ont appelé à des journées de retrait de l’école accusent le gouvernement de vouloir nier les différences biologiques. « Jamais aucun professeur n’a pu imaginer de nier les différences, alors qu’il enseigne précisément le respect des différences et de cette différence fondamentale filles-garçons », a déclaré Vincent Peillon mardi soir à l’Assemblée nationale.

Stéréotypes

« En reconnaissant la différence biologique, nous voulons tout de même qu’il y ait égalité entre les femmes et les hommes au sein de la société, en particulier dans le choix des métiers », a ajouté le ministre de l’Éducation. « On peut mesurer d’ailleurs le progrès des sociétés à leur capacité de considérer qu’il y a égalité entre les hommes et les femmes : égalité politique, égalité civile, égalité intellectuelle, égalité éducative. »

Des stéréotypes – comme une fille est forcément « coquette », « docile », « soigneuse », et un garçon « courageux », indépendant » ou « énergique » – pèsent sur leurs attentes, leurs ambitions, leur orientation professionnelle et leur place dans la société, selon un rapport de l’Inspection générale de l’Éducation nationale. Les femmes sont ainsi moins représentées dans les métiers scientifiques, perçoivent un salaire moindre à diplôme égal et subissent davantage le temps partiel. Sans oublier la persistance de violences sexistes.

Ces préjugés peuvent conduire les filles au « complexe de Cendrillon : je fais des études, mais j’attends le prince charmant », explique une des présentations du site http://www.cndp.fr/ABCD-de-l-égalité/accueil.html. Celui-ci propose aussi des ressources pédagogiques aux enseignants pour aborder en classe l’égalité garçons-filles, dans les cours d’arts plastiques, d’éducation physique sportive, d’histoire…

Contre l’homophobie

Un tableau d’Auguste Renoir, Mme Charpentier et ses enfants, mettant en scène une femme et ses filles permet ainsi de comparer les représentations des enfants aujourd’hui et il y a un siècle. Les écoliers peuvent dire ce qu’ils en pensent spontanément, parler des couleurs, des vêtements…

L’enseignant peut expliquer que la mère portait, suivant la mode de l’époque, un corset, vêtement qui entravait les mouvements et rendait la position assise inconfortable, c’est pourquoi elle est alanguie. Ou encore que jusqu’à six ans garçons et filles portaient des robes, puis les petits garçons s’habillaient en culottes courtes. Une évolution qu’on peut constater aussi dans les portraits de Louis Napoléon Bonaparte. Les élèves peuvent imaginer comment ces enfants s’habilleraient aujourd’hui.

Les détracteurs d’un supposé enseignement de la théorie du genre dénoncent aussi l’intervention d’associations LGBT (Lesbiennes, gay, bi, trans). Ces associations peuvent intervenir non pas dans les écoles, mais dans des lycées, à la demande du chef d’établissement, sans lien avec l’ABCD de l’égalité, dans le cadre d’une sensibilisation contre l’homophobie.

Voir de même:

Boris Cyrulnik face au suicide des enfants

Le Point

29/09/2011

Entretien. Dans « Quand un enfant se donne ‘la mort' » (Odile Jacob), Boris Cyrulnik tente de comprendre l’inexplicable.

Boris Cyrulnik, neurospychiatre et éthologue. Boris Cyrulnik, neurospychiatre et éthologue. © Khanh Renaud/Square pour « Le Point »

Propos recueillis par Émilie Lanez

En France, entre 40 et 100 enfants de moins de 12 ans se suicident chaque année. Pourquoi un enfant veut-il mourir ? Une question à laquelle Boris Cyrulnik, à la demande de Jeannette Bougrab, secrétaire d’État à la Jeunesse, répond en explorant le monde, méconnu, dans lequel grandissent nos enfants. Le neuropsychiatre appelle à des changements radicaux.

Le Point : Pourquoi un rapport sur les très rares suicides des enfants ?

Boris Cyrulnik : On meurt plus fréquemment par suicide que par accident de la route. Or, si de nombreux chercheurs ont travaillé à comprendre le suicide des adultes et des adolescents, jamais celui des enfants prépubères, dont le monde mental différe totalement de celui de leurs aînés, n’a été étudié. Je prends volontiers la parabole du canari dans la mine de charbon. Les mineurs avaient pour coutume de descendre avec un canari. Lorsque celui-ci suffoquait, ils savaient qu’un coup de grisou arrivait. Le suicide d’enfant, comme le canari dans la mine, est une alerte, l’indicateur de dysfonctions sociales.

Est-on prédiposé au suicide ?

Il y a un facteur génétique, mais il existe mille autres facteurs. Le suicide obéit à une convergence de causes, dont l’isolement sensoriel est le carrefour.

Les gènes ne déterminent-ils rien ?

Le gène existe, toutefois il n’est pas une fatalité. Les gènes impliquent la couleur de nos yeux, notre taille ou certaines maladies, mais il faut tout autant tenir compte du climat de l’école, de l’ambiance en famille. Distinguer l’inné et l’acquis est une absurdité. C’est une erreur qui a longtemps interdit à la science de penser.

Rien n’est jamais joué, donc tout se construit ?

À peine le gène s’exprime-t-il que cette expression est pétrie, sculptée par les pressions du milieu. C’est ce qu’on nomme l’épigenèse, et celle-ci commence dès avant la naissance. Freud l’avait compris. Il parlait d’une forêt dans laquelle on marche la première fois. Nos pas s’y fraient un chemin. Désormais, l’information dans notre cerveau empruntera plus volontiers ce chemin qu’un autre. Prenons l’exemple d’un enfant génétiquement sain, porté par une mère stressée par la guerre. Cet enfant sain sera in utero façonné par le malheur de la mère. À la naissance, il sera 50 % plus petit, plus léger qu’un enfant moyen et il souffrira d’une atrophie fronto-limbique. Il a donc été altéré par l’épigenèse. Attention, le façonnage peut être inverse. Un enfant, faible transporteur de sérotonine, donc hypervulnérable, porté par une mère heureuse, dans un milieu stable, deviendra un adulte équilibré, tout juste plus enclin à l’émotion. Le gène est déterminant de pas grand-chose, tandis que l’épigenèse, elle, est très déterminante, elle sculpte l’expression des gènes et du cerveau.

Si tout va mal autour d’un enfant, peinera-t-il forcément à se construire ?

Non, pas du tout. Un confrère a travaillé sur les enfants d’un village de Belgique durement ébranlé par la fermeture de la mine de charbon. Chômage, pauvreté, choc culturel. Pourtant, les enfants s’y développent harmonieusement. Pourquoi ? Parce que, alors que leurs parents travaillent au loin, ils sont entourés de substituts efficaces. Des enseignants, des moniteurs de foot, des voisines. Il faut tout un village pour élever un enfant. Nos sociétés ont oublié cette sagesse, d’ailleurs faites-en l’expérience, allez gronder le fils de votre voisine ! L’accent est trop porté sur la mère, certes importante, mais qui éduque, entourée d’un père, d’une famille, d’un quartier. On sous-estime grandement l’importance pour l’enfant de ses pairs. S’il vit harmonieusement dans sa classe, s’il y a des camarades, il s’attache et se développe. J’aimerais qu’on vivifie la culture du quartier, la pratique sportive en club, le scoutisme, tout ce qui favorise de multiples attachements.

À quel âge l’épigenèse s’arrête-t-elle ?

Jusqu’à 120 ans, l’épigenèse fonctionne. Même dans les maladies d’Alzheimer, on observe encore quelques bourgeonnements synaptiques, même raréfiés. Chez les enfants, l’épigenèse est puissante. À cet âge, cela synaptise à toute allure dans les lobes préfrontaux.

Alors pourquoi un enfant se suicide-t-il ?

Se suicide-t-il vraiment ? Veut-il vraiment se donner la mort ? Le suicide d’un enfant n’est pas un désir de mort, mais le désir de tuer cette manière de vivre qui le fait souffrir, tuer le conflit de ses parents, son isolement. Le suicide adolescent diffère, car intellectuellement il sait ce qu’est la mort. Ce n’est qu’entre 7 et 9 ans que l’enfant intériorise la conception de l’irrémédiabilité de la mort. Aujourd’hui, d’ailleurs, j’observe que les enfants ont accès de plus en plus tôt à cette notion. Une maturité intellectuelle précoce qui pose problème, car elle s’acquiert au prix de l’angoisse. Cessons de les forcer, de les surstimuler, surtout les filles.

Pourtant, les garçons se suicident plus ?

Les filles font dix fois plus de tentatives, mais les garçons aboutissent plus.

Garçon ou fille, observez-vous des différences ?

L’ontogenèse sexuelle commence au stade embryonnaire. La testostérone des embryons est un puissant déterminant biologique qui crée les organes des filles ou ceux des garçons. Puis la culture, qui commence dès la naissance, entoure différemment un bébé fille et un bébé garçon.

Les partisans de la théorie du genre considèrent qu’on éduque distinctement les filles des garçons pour perpétuer la domination masculine. Les croyez-vous ?

Je ne crois pas du tout à la suprématie des garçons, bien au contraire. Vers 17 mois, les filles disposent de cinquante mots, de règles de grammaire et d’un début de double réarticulation, par exemple être capable de dire « réembarquons », au lieu de « on va encore une fois dans cette barque ». Avec quatre phonèmes, les filles expriment un discours. Les garçons obtiennent cette performance six mois plus tard ! 75 % des garçons commettent de petites transgressions (chiper un biscuit, pincer un bras, etc.), contre 25 % des filles. Alors ces filles, plus dociles, parlant aisément, sont bien mieux entourées. Il est plus aisé d’élever une fille qu’un garçon. D’ailleurs, en consultation de pédopsychiatrie, il n’y a que des petits garçons, dont le développement est bien plus difficile. Certains scientifiques expliquent ce décalage par la biologie. La combinaison de chromosomes XX serait plus stable, parce qu’une altération sur un X pourra être compensée par l’autre X. La combinaison XY serait, elle, en difficulté évolutive. Ajoutons à cela le rôle majeur de la testostérone, l’hormone de la hardiesse et du mouvement, et non de l’agressivité, comme on le croit souvent. À l’école, les garçons ont envie de grimper aux murs, ils bougent, ils souffrent d’être immobilisés. Or notre société ne valorise plus la force et le courage physique, mais l’excellence des résultats scolaires. Elle valorise la docilité des filles.

Pourquoi n’avoir rien dit dans cette querelle autour de la théorie du genre ?

Je pense que le « genre » est une idéologie. Cette haine de la différence est celle des pervers, qui ne la supportent pas. Freud disait que le pervers est celui qu’indisposait l’absence de pénis chez sa mère. On y est.

Pourtant, ces théories font observer que les filles, meilleures à l’école, sont beaucoup moins nombreuses dans les études prestigieuses ?

C’est vrai, mais il n’est pas dit que cela dure. Aux États-Unis et au Canada, les filles ont envahi les grandes écoles. Et on est obligé d’aider les garçons à y parvenir. Notre système scolaire gagnerait à arrêter la culture du sprint. Prenons modèle sur l’Europe du Nord, qui a supprimé les notations jusqu’à l’âge de 12 ans, réduit drastiquement le nombre d’heures de cours, qui caracole en tête des classements, et dont le taux de suicide chez les enfants et les adolescents a diminué de 40 %.

Supprimer les notes ?

Un enfant qui grandit avec papa et maman qui s’aiment, sa petite chambre à lui, des devoirs surveillés, aura forcément de bonnes notes. Les notes ne sont pas un reflet de l’intelligence, mais le miroir de la stabilité affective.

Quand un enfant se donne ‘la mort »‘. Attachement et sociétés, de Boris Cyrulnik (Odile Jacob, 160 p., 21,90 euros).

Voir également:

L’expérience tragique du gourou de « la théorie du genre »

John Money, le père de la « théorie du genre », l’avait testée sur des jumeaux. Récit.

Le Point

31/01/2014

Qu’est-ce que le genre, ce drôle de mot pratiqué des seuls grammairiens ? Il est un complexe outil intellectuel à double face. D’un côté, une grille de lecture pertinente qui questionne les rôles que la société impose à chaque sexe, le plus souvent au détriment des femmes. De l’autre, il abrite une réflexion militante… D’après elle, l’identité sexuelle ne saurait se résumer à notre sexe de naissance ni se restreindre à notre rôle sexuel social. Chacun doit devenir libre de son identité, se choisir, se déterminer, expérimenter… Et basta, l’humanité est arbitrairement divisée en masculin ou féminin.

Les « études de genre », terme traduit de l’anglais gender studies, ne sont pas récentes. Explorées par la fameuse universitaire américaine Judith Butler dans les années 70, elles naissent sous la plume et le bistouri d’un sexologue et psychologue néo-zélandais, John Money. C’est lui qui, en 1955, définit le genre comme la conduite sexuelle qu’on choisira d’habiter, hors de notre réalité corporelle. Or le personnage est controversé. Spécialiste de l’hermaphrodisme à l’université américaine Johns Hopkins, il y étudie les enfants naissant intersexués et s’interroge sur le sexe auquel ils pourraient appartenir. Lequel doit primer ? Celui mal défini que la nature leur a donné ? Celui dans lequel les parents choisiront de les éduquer ? Il est rarement mis en avant par les disciples des études de genre de quel drame humain et de quelle supercherie scientifique le père du genre, John Money, se rendit responsable.

« Lavage de cerveau »

En 1966, le médecin est contacté par un couple effondré, les époux Reimer. Ils sont parents de jumeaux âgés de 8 mois, qu’ils ont voulu faire circoncire. Las, la circoncision de David par cautérisation électrique a échoué, son pénis est brûlé. Brian, son jumeau, n’a, lui, pas été circoncis. Que faire de ce petit David dont la verge est carbonisée ? Money voit dans cette fatale mésaventure l’occasion de démontrer in vivo que le sexe biologique est un leurre, un arbitraire dont l’éducation peut émanciper. Il convainc les parents d’élever David comme une fille, de ne jamais lui dire – ni à son frère – qu’il est né garçon. Le médecin administre à l’enfant, rebaptisé Brenda, un traitement hormonal et, quatorze mois plus tard, lui ôte les testicules. Ses parents la vêtent de robes, lui offrent des poupées, lui parlent au féminin.

A 6 ans, les jumeaux paraissent s’être conformés au rôle sexuel qu’on leur a attribué. Ce serait donc bien l’éducation et la société qui feraient le sexe… Brian est un garçon harmonieux, Brenda une gracieuse fillette. Money les examine une fois par an. Bien qu’ils aient 6 ans, il les interroge sur leurs goûts sexuels, leur demande de se toucher. « C’était comme un lavage de cerveau », confiera Brenda-David plus tard à John Colapinto, qui, en 1998, écrira l’histoire dans Rolling Stones puis dans un livre, « As Nature Made Him : The Boy Who Was Raised As A Girl ».

Combat féministe

Money est convaincu d’avoir prouvé que le sexe biologique s’efface pour peu qu’on lui inculque un autre « genre ». Il publie de nombreux articles consacrés au cas « John-Joan » (c’est ainsi qu’il nomme David-Brenda), puis, en 1972, un livre, « Man – Woman, Boy – Girl ». Il y affirme que seule l’éducation fait des humains des sujets masculins ou féminins. La « théorie du genre » est née.

Seulement, Brenda grandit douloureusement. A l’adolescence, elle sent sa voix devenir grave, confie être attirée par les filles, refuse la vaginoplastie que veut lui imposer Money. Brenda cesse d’avaler son traitement, se fait prescrire de la testostérone, divague, boit trop. Brenda se sent garçon engoncé dans un corps de fille. Effarés, les parents révèlent la vérité aux jumeaux. Brenda redevient David, il se marie à une femme. Mais les divagations identitaires ont ébranlé les garçons. En 2002, Brian se suicide. Le 5 mai 2004, David fait de même. De cette fin tragique Money ne fait point état. En 1997, Milton Diamond, professeur d’anatomie et de biologie reproductive à l’université de Hawaï, dénonce la falsification. Money réplique en évoquant une conspiration fomentée par des personnes « pour qui la masculinité et la féminité seraient d’origine génétique »… Est-ce si faux ?

Ce fait divers est étranger à la délicate, et bien réelle, question des personnes nées avec une identité sexuelle incertaine, dont le ressenti psychique ou physique demeure flou. Et, si cette histoire fut un drame, c’est bien parce qu’un enfant fut forcé à vivre selon une identité qui ne lui convenait pas et qu’à lui comme à son frère fut imposé un mensonge ravageur. Il importe de préciser que cette expérience ne saurait entacher les études de genre, qui d’ailleurs s’éloigneront de ces errements du champ médical pour se nourrir du combat féministe puis des travaux de l’anthropologie, interrogeant l’influence de la culture sur la nature, jusqu’à devenir un sujet transversal mêlant littérature, philosophie, sociologie…

Les doutes de la Norvège, pionnier du  » genre « 

La question des fondements scientifiques des études de genre se pose. En 2009, un journaliste norvégien, Harald Eia, y consacre un documentaire. Son point de départ : comment est-il possible qu’en Norvège, championne des politiques du  » genre « , les infirmières soient des femmes et les ingénieurs des hommes ? Il interroge quatre sommités : le professeur américain Richard Lippa, responsable d’un sondage mondial sur les choix de métiers selon les sexes (réponse : les femmes préfèrent les professions de contacts et de soins), le Norvégien Trond Diseth, qui explore les jouets vers lesquels des nourrissons tendent les mains (réponse : tout ce qui est doux et tactile pour les filles), puis Simon Baron-Cohen, professeur de psychopathologie du développement au Trinity College de Cambridge, et l’Anglaise Anne Campbell, psychologue de l’évolution. Ces spécialistes répondent que naître homme ou femme implique des différences importantes. Et que leur inspirent les  » études de genre »? Eclats de rire. L’évolution de l’espèce, le bain d’hormones dans lequel se fabrique notre cerveau font du masculin et du féminin des sexes distincts. Tout aussi intelligents, mais pas identiques. Il présente leurs réactions aux amis du « genre ». Qui les accusent d' » être des forcenés du biologisme « . Soit. Eia les prie alors d’exposer leurs preuves que le sexe ne serait qu’une construction culturelle… Silence. Après la diffusion de son film, en 2010, le Nordic Gender Institute fut privé de tout financement public

Voir encore:

Masculin-féminin : cinq idées reçues sur les études de genre

Lucie Soullier et Delphine Roucaute

Le Monde

25.05.2013

En protestant contre la loi autorisant le mariage aux personnes de même sexe, les membres de la « Manif pour tous » ont également ravivé la polémique sur le genre. « Le vrai but du mariage homosexuel est d’imposer la théorie du genre », affirment certains détracteurs du mariage pour tous. Qui affirment, dans la foulée, que la société serait menacée par ce qu’ils assurent être une idéologie niant la réalité biologique.

Ces inquiétudes avaient déjà agité les milieux catholiques en 2011, lorsque le ministère de l’éducation avait annoncé l’introduction du concept de genre dans certains manuels scolaires. A l’époque, la polémique avait mobilisé militants conservateurs et députés. Parmi eux, 80 députés UMP avaient purement et simplement réclamé le retrait, dans les manuels de sciences de la vie et de la terre (SVT) des classes de première, de la référence à une identité sexuelle qui ne serait pas uniquement déterminée par la biologie mais également par des constructions socio-culturelles. De son côté, l’Eglise catholique avait réagi avec le texte Gender, la controverse, publié par le Conseil pontifical pour la famille.

Loin d’être une idéologie unifiée, le genre est avant tout un outil conceptuel utilisé par des chercheurs qui travaillent sur les rapports entre hommes et femmes.

Le genre est-il une théorie ?

Pour parler du genre, ses détracteurs utilisent l’expression « théorie du genre » plutôt qu' »étude », un changement de terme qui a pour objectif de semer le doute sur son aspect scientifique. Mgr Tony Anatrella, dans la préface de Gender, la controverse, explique ainsi que la théorie du genre est un « agencement conceptuel qui n’a rien à voir avec la science ».

Les chercheurs refusent donc l’utilisation du terme « théorie du genre », préférant parler d' »études sur le genre », puisqu’il s’agit d’un vaste champ interdisciplinaire regroupant tous les pans des sciences humaines et sociales (histoire, sociologie, géographie, anthropologie, économie, sciences politiques…). Leurs travaux analysent donc des objets de recherche traditionnels tels que le travail ou les migrations, en partant d’un postulat nouveau : le sexe biologique ne suffit pas à faire un homme ou une femme, les normes sociales y participent grandement.

Le genre est-il une idéologie ?

« Le genre est un concept. Ce n’est ni une théorie ni une idéologie, mais un outil qui aide à penser », insiste le sociologue Eric Fassin, spécialiste de ces questions. A l’intérieur même des études de genre, plusieurs écoles existent, comme dans tous les domaines des sciences sociales. Par exemple, les travaux de la sociologue du travail Margaret Maruani analysent l’histoire de l’accès des femmes au travail tandis que le psychiatre Richard Rechtman utilise la notion de genre pour interroger la manière dont un individu construit son d’identité.

Les chercheurs sur le genre sont-ils militants ?

S’il est vrai que le développement des études de genre est lié au mouvement féministe des années 1970, le concept de gender (« genre ») n’est pas créé par les féministes. Il apparaît dans les années 1950 aux Etats-Unis dans les milieux psychiatriques et médicaux. Le psychologue médical américain John Money parle ainsi pour la première fois des « gender roles » en 1955 afin d’appréhender le cas des personnes dont le sexe chromosomique ne correspond au sexe anatomique.

En 1968, le psychiatre et psychanalyste Robert Stoller utilise quant à lui la notion de « gender identity » pour étudier les transsexuels, qui ne se reconnaissent pas dans leur identité sexuelle de naissance.

C’est dans les années 1970 que le mouvement féministe se réapproprie les questions de genre pour interroger la domination masculine. Les « gender studies » (« études de genre ») se développent alors dans les milieux féministes et universitaires américains, s’inspirant notamment de penseurs français comme Simone de Beauvoir – et son célèbre « On ne naît pas femme, on le devient » –, Michel Foucault ou Pierre Bourdieu.

En France, la sociologue Christine Delphy est l’une des premières introduire le concept en France, sous l’angle d’un « système de genre », où la femme serait la catégorie exploitée et l’homme la catégorie exploitante. Mais la greffe ne s’opère réellement que dans les années 1990, lorsque le débat sur la parité s’installe au niveau européen. La promotion de l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes devient l’une des tâches essentielles de la Communauté européenne avec l’entrée en vigueur du traité d’Amsterdam en 1999, notamment dans son article 2.

Les études de genre nient-elles la différence entre les sexes ?

Le concept de genre s’est développé comme une réflexion autour de la notion de sexe et du rapport homme/femme. Loin de nier la différence entre le sexe féminin et le sexe masculin, le genre est utilisé par les chercheurs comme un outil permettant de penser le sexe biologique (homme ou femme) indépendamment de l’identité sexuelle (masculin ou féminin). Il ne s’agit donc pas de dire que l’homme et la femme sont identiques, mais d’interroger la manière dont chacun et chacune peut construire son identité sexuelle, aussi bien à travers son éducation que son orientation sexuelle (hétérosexuelle, homosexuelle, etc.).

En dissociant intellectuellement le culturel et le biologique, le concept de genre interroge les clichés liés au sexe. Par exemple, l’idée selon laquelle les femmes sont plus naturellement enclines à s’atteler aux tâches domestiques que les hommes est de l’ordre de la construction sociale et historique, et non pas liée au fait que la femme dispose d’un vagin et d’ovaires.

Pour les détracteurs du genre, la construction d’une personne en tant qu’individu se fait dans l’assujettissement à des normes dites « naturelles » et « immuables » : d’un côté les femmes, de l’autre les hommes. Mais certains travaux de biologiste, tels ceux de l’Américaine Anne Fausto-Sterling, montrent que l’opposition entre nature et culture est vaine, les deux étant inextricables et participant d’un même mouvement. Il ne suffit pas de dire que quelque chose est biologique pour dire que c’est immuable. C’est l’exemple du cerveau humain : il évolue avec le temps, et de génération en génération.

Les études de genre confondent-elles le genre et l’identité sexuelle ?

Quand le ministère de l’éducation a annoncé sa volonté d’introduire le concept de genre dans les manuels scolaires des classes de première, la sphère catholique et conservatrice s’est insurgée contre une « théorie » quelle accusait de nier l’individu au profit de sa sexualité. Dans une lettre envoyée au ministre de l’éducation, Luc Chatel, en août 2011 et signée par 80 députés UMP, on peut lire que, « selon cette théorie [du genre], les personnes ne sont plus définies comme hommes et femmes mais comme pratiquants de certaines formes de sexualité ».

Un mot d’ordre relayé par Gérard Leclerc dans un éditorial de France catholique datant de mai 2011, dans lequel il pointe la menace de ce qu’il qualifie d' »arme à déconstruire l’identité sexuelle ». C’est d’ailleurs cet argument qui nourrit l’idée – répandue par la plupart des sites régionaux de La Manif pour tous – selon laquelle « le vrai but du mariage homosexuel est d’imposer la théorie du genre ».

Mais les études sur le genre, et a fortiori le texte proposé pour les manuels de SVT par le ministère, insistent au contraire sur la différence entre identité sexuelle et orientation sexuelle. Il s’agit d’étudier comment s’articulent ces deux mouvements entre eux, et non de substituer l’un à l’autre. Par exemple, les personnes transsexuelles interrogent leur genre, et non pas leur sexualité. On peut changer de genre sans changer de préférence sexuelle.

Dans une réponse au député UMP Jean-Claude Mignon qui, dans une question à l’Assemblée, demandait que les nouveaux manuels de SVT soient retirés de la vente, le ministre de l’éducation Luc Chatel souligne bien que « la ‘théorie du genre’ n’apparaît pas dans le texte des programmes de SVT ». « La thématique ‘féminin/masculin’, en particulier le chapitre ‘devenir homme ou femme’, permet à chaque élève d’aborder la différence entre identité sexuelle et orientation sexuelle, à partir d’études de phénomènes biologiques incontestables, comme les étapes de la différenciation des organes sexuels depuis la conception jusqu’à la puberté », ajoute le ministère.

Voir encore:

« Théorie du genre », « études sur le genre » : quelle différence ?

Propos recueillis par Mattea Battaglia

Le Monde

22.04.2013

Bruno Perreau est professeur au MIT et chercheur associé aux universités de Cambridge et Harvard. Il est l’auteur de Penser l’adoption (PUF, 2012).

La droite catholique dit redouter la propagation de la « théorie du genre » en France. Un groupe de députés UMP réclame d’ailleurs, depuis décembre, la création d’une « commission d’enquête » pour en estimer la diffusion. Mais qu’entendent-ils exactement par « théorie du genre » ?

La « théorie du genre » n’existe que dans la tête des opposants à l’égalité des droits. Cette croyance repose sur le fantasme selon lequel le sexe et la sexualité pourraient être déterminés par un simple discours. Parlez d’homosexualité et vous deviendrez homosexuel. Evoquez les multiples façons dont les rôles masculins et féminins ont été pensés au cours de l’histoire, et vous risquez de susciter toutes sortes de déviance de genre ! Dans la réalité, l’identité est un processus beaucoup plus complexe. Et c’est précisément cette complexité que des chercheuses et des chercheurs interrogent en endocrinologie, en histoire, en droit, en sociologie, etc. Ils nous invitent à réfléchir à la façon dont nous nous pensons, individuellement et collectivement. C’est un travail critique très enrichissant pour une société. Mais, ce travail demande aussi du courage et de la générosité, car il faut admettre de se défaire de ses certitudes et de questionner son propre parcours à la lumière du parcours des autres.

Les adversaires de la « théorie du genre » préfèrent imaginer des ennemis, dont le projet serait d’abolir – mais par quels moyens ? – toutes les distinctions sociales – voire anatomiques – entre hommes et femmes. Ils confondent à dessein égalité et identité, différence et hiérarchie. Et pour mieux convaincre, ils adossent leur raisonnement à un discours nationaliste, la  » théorie du genre  » venant nécessairement des Etats-Unis.

Ces « études sur le genre », que vous distinguez de la « théorie du genre », se développent-elles en France ?

Il existe effectivement en France un faisceau de chercheuses et de chercheurs qui, dans de nombreuses universités, incorporent le genre dans leurs travaux, voire en font l’objet principal de leurs recherches. Il ne s’agit pas d’un phénomène nouveau : déjà dans les années 1970, même si le terme genre n’était pas lui-même utilisé, des universitaires comme Colette Guillaumin, Nicole-Claude Matthieu, René Schérer ou bien sûr Michel Foucault conduisaient cette réflexion critique au sein du CNRS, à l’EHESS et à l’université Paris-8, pour ne donner que quelques exemples. Parallèlement les mouvements sociaux ont contribué à inscrire à l’agenda politique des questions comme l’égalité hommes-femmes ou la reconnaissance des minorités sexuelles. De nouvelles pratiques sociales, familiales notamment, ont également émergé. Via les nouveaux médias, les jeunes générations sont exposées – mais aussi produisent – un ensemble d’informations et de références culturelles où sexe et sexualité jouent un rôle crucial. Il est donc essentiel de penser ces phénomènes.

Vous dites qu’il y a un réel besoin d’aborder ces questions parmi les plus jeunes…

Ce sont les étudiants eux-mêmes qui souhaitent mieux comprendre ces questions et demandent des cours sur le sujet. Grâce à l’engagement de quelques centaines d’universitaires – qui ont souvent, ce faisant, mis en « danger » leur propre carrière – des programmes sont apparus pour répondre aux besoins des étudiants, parmi lesquels le Master Genre de l’EHESS, le programme PRESAGE à Sciences Po, Paris-7, Paris-8, Toulouse Le Mirail, des formations au sein du nouveau campus Condorcet, etc. Ces programmes questionnent l' »orthodoxie » disciplinaire de l’université française. Mais, beaucoup reste à faire : l « immense majorité des étudiants en France ne seront jamais exposés à ces savoirs critiques, pourtant essentiels pour appréhender la complexité d’un monde qu’ils vont bientôt marquer de leur empreinte.

Voir de même:

Les gender studies pour les nul(-le)s

Sandrine Teixido, Héloïse Lhérété et Martine Fournier

Sciences Humaines

 30/01/2014

Faut-il enseigner les études de genre (rebaptisées « théorie du genre » par leurs adversaires) à l’école ? La polémique suscitée par cette question révèle le rapport ambivalent que la France entretient à l’égard des gender studies, champ d’étude né aux Etats-Unis, toujours soupçonné de s’inscrire dans une démarche militante, féministe, homo et transsexuelle. En réalité, les études de genre constituent un domaine de recherche pluridisciplinaire dont on peut retracer la genèse, les développements, les références et les enjeux. Dont acte.

Le concept de « gender » est né aux Etats-Unis dans les années 1970 d’une réflexion autour du sexe et des rapports hommes / femmes. Le mouvement féministe, qui a pris de l’ampleur après la révolution sexuelle, cherche à faire entendre sa voix au sein des institutions de recherche. Il s’agit de faire reconnaître un engagement qui se veut de plus en plus une réflexion renouvelée sur le monde.

C’est un psychologue, Robert Stoller (1), qui popularise en 1968 une notion déjà utilisée par ses confrères américains depuis le début des années 1950 pour comprendre la séparation chez certains patients entre corps et identité. De là l’idée qu’il n’existe pas une réelle correspondance entre le genre (masculin/féminin) et le sexe (homme/femme). Dès 1972, en s’appuyant sur l’articulation entre la nature et la culture développée par l’anthropologue français Claude Lévi-Strauss, la sociologue britannique Anne Oakley (2) renvoie le sexe au biologique et le genre au culturel.

Les universitaires américaines récusent le rapprochement souvent effectué entre les femmes et la nature (principalement à cause de leurs facultés reproductives) alors que les hommes seraient du côté de la culture. Un retentissant article publié en 1974 par l’anthropologue Sherry Ortner (3) en rend les termes particulièrement explicites : « Femme est-il à homme ce que nature est à culture ? » En anthropologie, c’est à Margaret Mead que revient une première réflexion sur les rôles sexuels dans les années 1930 (4). L’étude des rôles assignés aux individus selon les sexes et des caractères proprement féminins et masculins permet de dégager l’apprentissage de ce qui a été donné par la nature.

Objet et genèse d’un champ de recherche

Une fois le genre distingué du sexe, les chercheurs se concentrent sur les rapports homme/femme. L’historienne américaine Joan W. Scott (5) incite à voir plus loin qu’une simple opposition entre les sexes. Celle-ci doit être considérée comme « problématique » et constituer, en tant que telle, un objet de recherche. Si le masculin et le féminin s’opposent de manière problématique, c’est parce que se jouent entre eux des rapports de pouvoir où l’un domine l’autre.

Mais si le genre est d’emblée pensé comme une construction sociale, il n’en est pas de même du sexe, vu comme une donnée naturelle ou plus probablement « impensée ». C’est l’historien Thomas Laqueur qui démontrera le caractère construit historiquement du sexe et de son articulation avec le genre. Dans La Fabrique du sexe (1992), il met en évidence la coexistence (voire la prédominance du premier sur le second) de deux systèmes biologiques. Ainsi, pendant longtemps, le corps était vu comme unisexe et le sexe féminin était un « moindre mâle » tandis que nous serions passés au XIXe siècle à un système fondé sur la différence biologique des sexes.

Une fois le sexe devenu tout aussi culturel que le genre, la sexualité devient aux yeux des chercheurs l’objet d’une nouvelle réflexion. L’influence du philosophe français Michel Foucault (particulièrement dans la décennie 1980 durant laquelle ses œuvres ont été traduites aux Etats-Unis) est ici primordiale. Le genre est ainsi articulé au pouvoir et à sa « mise en discours » puis relié à l’analyse de la sexualité et de ses normes.

La fin des années 1980 voit un début d’institutionnalisation. Emprunté au vocabulaire psychologique et médical par la sociologie, le terme gagne d’autres disciplines comme l’histoire. Avant que le genre ne devienne un outil d’analyse, l’histoire des femmes s’attachait à faire affleurer des récits jusque-là invisibles, quitte à présenter les femmes de manière essentialiste, c’est-à-dire avec des caractéristiques propres et immuables telles que des qualités émotionnelles par exemple. L’analyse du genre ramène les spécificités prétendument féminines à la lumière d’un moment et d’une société donnés. Ainsi, les études de genre permettront de reconnaître le caractère construit socialement des données historiques sur les femmes ainsi que celles sur les hommes. Si le genre rend visible le sexe féminin, il implique que l’homme ne soit plus neutre et général mais un individu sexué. A partir de ce constat a pu se développer une histoire des hommes et des masculinités, principalement autour de la revue américaine Men and Masculinities dirigée par Michael Kimmel.

Les questions autour du genre, de par leur nette déviation dès le milieu des années 1980 vers la sexualité, ont contribué à diviser les féministes en deux clans. Les plus radicales se sont attachées à montrer le caractère oppressif de la hiérarchie des sexes en termes de sexualité avec un avantage systématique attribué à l’homme, considéré dans sa globalité comme un mâle dominant.

L’élargissement aux minorités sexuelles

D’autres, comme les Américaines Gayle Rubin et Judith Butler, montrent que le rapport entre les sexes n’implique pas seulement une hiérarchie entre les genres mais également une injonction normative. En 1984, G. Rubin (6) élargit la réflexion théorique aux sexualités qui échappent à la norme comme le sadomasochisme ou la pornographie. J. Butler (7), en 1990, tente de poser un regard transversal qui inclut autant les femmes, les gays et les lesbiennes que d’autres minorités qui ne se réduisent à aucune des deux premières catégories. Pour J. Butler, si le sexe est tout autant culturel que le genre, ce dernier s’entend comme un discours performatif sur lequel on pourrait agir et ainsi apporter des modifications aux habitus imposés par la société.

Cette grille d’analyse élargit la recherche aux minorités telles que les homosexuels, les lesbiennes ou les transgenres. Les études de genre peuvent exister à part entière puisque l’oppression ne concerne plus seulement les femmes, la domination n’émanant pas uniquement des hommes mais du système hétérosexuel. Les études gay et lesbiennes, et plus tard la théorie , insisteront sur une analyse de la norme imposée au genre ou non. Ainsi, le cas des lesbiennes peut être analysé sous l’angle du genre, en tant que femmes, comme au regard de la norme, en tant que déviantes. Le mouvement queer se joue de la multiplicité des identités sexuelles établies selon les nécessités et les contingences.

De même, le travail de l’historien américain George Chauncey (8) sur la culture gay new-yorkaise pendant l’entre-deux-guerres croise les paramètres du genre et de la sexualité de manière fructueuse. Il montre comment on est passé d’un système du genre où la relation homosexuelle reposait sur les identités homme/femme (seul celui des deux hommes qui présentait un comportement féminin était stigmatisé) à un système où l’homosexualité est jugée à l’aune de l’hétérosexualité. Dans le second cas (correspondant à la période actuelle), tout homosexuel est stigmatisé en regard de sa sexualité. L’historien a aussi mis au jour une coexistence des deux systèmes dans le New York contemporain où certaines communautés latinos continueraient de fonctionner selon un binarisme de genre.

La greffe française

Le concept de genre a eu des difficultés à s’implanter en France, principalement à cause d’une méfiance envers le féminisme américain jugé par trop communautariste et radical. Durant les années 1980, l’université française cherchait à se prémunir contre le politique. De par leur nécessaire passage par le militantisme, les études féministes s’éloignèrent donc du cadre de la recherche.

Les expressions « rapports de sexe » ou « rapports sociaux de sexe » ont longtemps été préférées à la notion de genre jugée trop floue. Ce vocabulaire est en adéquation avec l’approche féministe matérialiste influencée par l’école marxiste qui caractérise la première génération de chercheuses dans les années 1970, avec les sociologues Christine Delphy, Nicole-Claude Mathieu et Colette Guillaumin.

Elles rejoignent le travail de dénaturalisation initié par les universitaires américaines, principalement à travers la remise en cause du travail domestique comme activité naturelle de la femme.

C. Delphy centre sa réflexion sur l’oppression comme construction sociale. Elle s’oppose à une vision différencialiste et identitaire qui voit les femmes comme un groupe homogène avec des caractéristiques spécifiquement féminines. Elle inverse la problématique initiale : la masculinité et la féminité ne peuvent expliquer la hiérarchie et la domination, non moins que le sexe n’expliquerait le genre.

Les groupes d’hommes et de femmes n’ont été constitués que parce que l’institution sociale de la hiérarchie (et par là s’entend l’organisation sociale) est un principe premier, de même que c’est le genre qui donne sens à la caractéristique physique du sexe (qui ne recélerait en soi aucun sens).

Le concept de genre a réellement commencé à se diffuser en France au milieu des années 1990, lorsque la Communauté européenne s’est penchée sur les questions de genre et de parité dans la recherche d’une égalité effective. A partir de 1993, les débats sur la parité incitent les travaux sur le genre à prendre en compte le champ politique. Dès les années 1970, les travaux de Janine Mossuz-Lavau (9) sur la visibilité des femmes en rapport au vote, aux élections et à l’éligibilité ont permis un premier rapprochement entre les études de genre et le champ politique.

La sociologie du travail achèvera de convaincre de la nécessité de prendre en compte le sexe de manière systématique. Dans ce cadre, on assiste, durant les années 1990, à la création de modules de recherche spécifiques comme le Mage (Marché du travail et genre) autour de la sociologue Margaret Maruani qui, après s’être intéressée à la division sexuelle du travail, analyse aujourd’hui la division sexuelle du marché du travail.

Que ce soit en histoire, en anthropologie ou aujourd’hui dans la plupart des sciences sociales, en France, le genre est l’objet d’un intérêt grandissant au sein de l’université alors qu’aux Etats-Unis, le concept utilisé à outrance semble avoir perdu sa force de provocation et sa valeur heuristique, c’est-à-dire qu’il ne permet plus de découvrir de nouvelles pistes de recherche ou de poser un regard neuf sur des thèmes classiques. Les jeunes chercheurs français qui s’intéressent à cette thématique sont d’autant plus enthousiastes qu’ils se trouvent dégagés du militantisme qui entravait la reconnaissance de leurs prédécesseurs. En ce sens, leur principal enjeu revient à donner au genre un statut théorique dénué d’idéologie au sein des sciences humaines.

REFERENCES

Ce texte est une version actualisée de l’article « Les gender studies » publié dans Sciences Humaines, n° 157, février 2005.

Qu’est-ce que la « théorie du genre » ?

29 Janvier 2014

 Grégoire Lecalot, Alice Serrano

DECRYTAGE | Le ministre de l’Education nationale est monté au créneau mardi pour rassurer des parents au sujet d’une rumeur insinuant que la « théorie du genre » est enseignée à l’école. Pour ceux qui l’ont lancée, on cherche à gommer les différences sexuelles entre hommes et femmes. Depuis quelques années, cette idée se répand en France, et le mariage homosexuel, adopté l’an dernier, lui a donné un coup d’accélérateur. Elle relève pourtant du fantasme. Mais un fantasme bien utile, politiquement, pour certains.

La « théorie du genre » n’existe pas. En elle-même, l’idée tient déjà d’une rumeur, d’une mauvaise compréhension. Elle puise ses racines dans un domaine d’études universitaires qui est né aux Etats-Unis et y a connu un certain succès jusqu’aux années 70 : les « gender studies », littéralement, études sur le genre.

Les chercheurs ont voulu comprendre pourquoi et comment naissent les inégalités sociales entre hommes et femmes. Ils en ont décortiqué les mécanismes dans les champs politiques, sociaux, artistiques, historiques, philosophiques etc. Ces études ont donné lieu à des controverses passionnées entre chercheurs, mais elles n’ont jamais débouché sur aucune théorie politique. Il s’agit d’un domaine d’études universitaires.

Des féministes au Vatican

Toutefois, le féminisme des années 60-70 a commencé à utiliser ces recherches pour contester la domination sociale masculine. Le schéma femmes à la maison-hommes au travail ne reposait sur rien d’autre que des constructions sociales.

Avec les mutations dans la structure de la vie familiale, comme la hausse continue du nombre de familles recomposées ou la progression du travail féminin, la crainte d’une disparition du schéma familial traditionnel a commencé à se diffuser sourdement. Des réformes comme le mariage homosexuel l’ont accéléré. Et la prétendue « théorie du genre », qui viserait à gommer les différences entre hommes et femmes, a donné un visage à ces craintes. C’est sur elle, mais sans la nommer, que le pape Benoît XVI fait tomber les foudres vaticanes.

Epouvantail politique

Dès lors, la « théorie du genre » devient un épouvantail politique pour lutter contre des réformes sociales. Dernier exemple en date, l’appel au boycott des classes un jour par mois, lancé par une ancienne militante de la cause « beur » des les années 80, aujourd’hui proche de l’extrême droite. Elle utilise la « théorie du genre » contre un programme scolaire visant à lutter dès le plus jeune âge contre les clichés garçons-filles, qui servent de fondations, à l’âge adulte, aux inégalités sociales hommes-femmes.

Voir également:

Papa bleu, maman rose

Le Monde

13.04.2013

Florence Dupont (Ancienne élève de l’Ecole normale supérieure, agrégée de lettres classiques, elle est professeur de latin à Paris-Diderot.)

Du bleu et du rose partout dans le ciel de Paris : les manifestants contre le projet de loi sur le mariage pour tous ont déferlé dans les rues de la capitale en agitant des milliers de fanions, de drapeaux et de banderoles à ces deux couleurs. Ils en ont saturé les écrans télé. Rose et bleu, la « manif » est la croisade des enfants.

Bleu ou rose : les deux couleurs qui marquent les bébés à l’instant de leur naissance assignent à chacun, définitivement, sa résidence sexuelle. La médecine, l’état civil et ses premiers vêtements enferment l’enfant à peine né dans l’alternative du genre. « Tu seras un papa bleu, mon fils. » « Tu seras une maman rose, ma fille. »

D’un coup d’oeil, le médecin ou la sage-femme a repéré les organes génitaux qui vont officiellement déterminer l’un ou l’autre sexe du bébé – tant pis s’il y a un doute… Il faut choisir tout de suite. L’acte de naissance devra dans les trois jours dire si c’est une fille ou garçon.

L’éducation commence immédiatement, pas de pipi-caca incontrôlé. Le bébé bien propre dans sa couche est asexué. La puéricultrice lui met un ruban rose ou bleu au poignet. Chacun va s’évertuer à lui inculquer son genre. Caroline doit savoir tout de suite qu’elle est une adorable petite créature dans sa layette rose, et Thibaut en bleu ciel entendre qu’il est un petit mec « qui sait déjà ce qu’il veut ». Chacun doit s’extasier, à un premier sourire séducteur, « c’est bien une fille », à la première colère, « c’est bien un garçon ».

Quelques parents rebelles habillent de jaune ou de vert pomme leur nouveau-né sous l’oeil courroucé du personnel des maternités. Si en plus l’enfant s’appelle Claude ou Dominique, ces parents-là ne leur facilitent pas le travail. Comment s’y retrouver ? Car il faut s’y retrouver ! Bleu et rose sont les couleurs d’un marquage permettant de commencer dès la naissance la reproduction sociale du genre.

Cette stratégie de communication, qui emprunte sa symbolique aux couleurs des layettes, a été évidemment voulue par les adversaires de la loi Taubira. Ils ont fait de leur mieux pour brouiller leur image de droite. Sur le modèle du « mariage pour tous », ils ont inventé la « manif pour tous », pour faire oublier qu’ils manifestent contre l’égalité. En parlant de « manif », ils empruntent au peuple de gauche son vocabulaire. La manif ! On s’encanaille pour la bonne cause. Mais ont-ils assez réfléchi à la mythologie des couleurs choisies pour leur campagne ?

Le « bleu et rose » est une innovation dans les couleurs de la rhétorique militante. On connaissait le bleu « Marine », le vert des écolos, le rouge de la gauche… Le bleu et rose est plus qu’un signe de ralliement original. C’est un slogan. Le drapeau français brandi dans la manif n’est plus bleu, blanc, rouge, mais bleu ciel, blanc et rose.

En 1998, les Français avaient célébré la victoire d’une équipe « black, blanc, beur » lors de la Coupe du monde de football. Le peuple de la diversité renommait ainsi les trois couleurs du drapeau français. Le jeu verbal sur les trois « b » réunissait trois langages, le « black » américain faisait écho aux mouvements noirs pour les droits civiques, le « beur » repris au verlan des quartiers avait la même sonorité émancipatrice, le « blanc » était l’élément neutre de cette série, désignant avec humour les autres. Ce n’étaient pas trois communautés, mais trois façons d’être français qui avaient gagné ensemble.

De la même façon, la victoire de l’Afrique du Sud dans la Coupe du monde de rugby 1995 avait marqué la naissance de la « nation arc-en-ciel ». L’arc-en-ciel est plus que la réunion de toutes les couleurs, il symbolise un continuum, le spectre de la lumière blanche décomposée, il offre une diversité potentiellement infinie de nuances. C’est pourquoi le drapeau arc-en-ciel est aussi celui de l’association Lesbiennes, gays, bi et trans (LGBT). Chacun est différent et l’union des différences fait une société apaisée et fusionnelle.

Bleu, blanc, rose, le drapeau national, infantilisé, est au contraire l’emblème d’un peuple de « Blancs » que ne distingue entre eux que le genre attribué à la naissance. Un genre qui garde l’innocence de l’enfance – Freud ? connais pas – et sa pureté sexuelle.

Le logo dessiné sur ces fanions rose et bleu répète à l’infini l’image de la famille « naturelle ». Quatre silhouettes blanches – un père, une mère et un fils, une fille – sont accrochées l’une à l’autre comme dans les guirlandes de papier découpé que les enfants font à la petite école. Le papier est plié en accordéon ; le modèle est dessiné sur le premier pli, on découpe, et en dépliant, on obtient une ribambelle de figures toutes semblables qui se tiennent par la main et forment une farandole. Chaque logo est ainsi un morceau de la guirlande. Toutes les familles sont identiques. Ce sont des clones.

Que nous dit cette famille exemplaire ? Au centre, un homme et une femme se donnent la main, chacun d’eux tenant de l’autre main un enfant du même sexe qu’eux, un garçon ou une fille. Les adultes sont grands, les enfants sont leurs doubles en petit. Ils sont identifiables par les signes extérieurs de leur genre, distribués en marqueurs binaires. L’homme a, comme le jeune garçon, les cheveux courts et des pantalons. La femme a les cheveux mi-longs, la petite fille a des couettes ; toutes les deux ont une jupe qui entrave leur marche, au point que la fillette a les deux jambes soudées.

Les deux enfants tendent leur bras libre pour entraîner leurs parents « à la manif ». Le petit garçon tire son père avec force. La petite fille ne fait qu’esquisser le geste de son frère. L’homme est légèrement plus grand que la femme, il se tient fermement sur ses deux pieds, c’est lui qui conduit sa femme qu’il tient de sa main droite. Elle est légèrement en arrière.

Ce logo, qui mime la naïveté d’un dessin d’enfant, est clairement sexiste : le père protecteur et fort, le fils volontaire et décidé, la mère qui suit, et la petite fille timide. Le dispositif proclame l’homosocialité de la reproduction. La petite fille a sa mère pour modèle, le petit garçon, son père.

Les organisateurs ont enjoint à leurs troupes de n’utiliser que le matériel de campagne, créé et fourni par eux. Ils veulent garder la maîtrise de la communication. On comprend pourquoi en voyant quelques initiatives locales qui ont échappé à leur contrôle politique et révèlent les non-dits du logo.

L’affiche d’un collectif de Bordeaux, publié sur Internet, reprend les quatre figures, mais sans la fiction puérile du papier découpé. Le cadre énonciatif a changé, ce sont les adultes qui s’expriment dans l’image. L’homme, beaucoup plus grand que sa femme, se tourne vers elle pour l’entourer d’un bras protecteur. Celle-ci a les cheveux très longs et une minijupe. Maman est sexy. La fillette, carrément derrière, a au contraire une longue robe. Les enfants n’entraînent plus les parents à la manif, ce sont eux qui les y mènent. Garçon et fille se tournent vers eux apeurés. Et le père est si grand qu’il arrache presque le bras de son fils.

A part ces quelques dérapages, blanches sur fond bleu ou rose, roses sur fond blanc, les mêmes quatre silhouettes soudées de la famille exemplaire sont reproduites par milliers, exactement semblables : un cauchemar identitaire.

Hommes, femmes : le principe d’identification du genre est emprunté aux pictogrammes des toilettes publiques. Chacun derrière sa porte. Chacun son destin. Chacun sa façon de faire pipi, debout ou assis. Ces manifestants, qui revendiquent « du sexe, pas du genre ! », utilisent des symboles et des logos qui disent au contraire : « Ne troublez pas le genre », « Rallions-nous aux pictogrammes des toilettes, ils sont naturels ». Pour ces prisonniers de leur anatomie puérile, traduite en contraintes sociales du genre, quelle sexualité « naturelle » ? Leur innocence bleu et rose n’autorise que le coït matrimonial pour faire des filles et des fils qui seront les clones de leurs parents et ajouteront un module à la farandole.

Aucune place n’est faite aux enfants différents ! Aucune place pour les pères à cheveux longs, les femmes et les filles en pantalon, les mères voilées, les pères en boubou ! Aucune place pour les familles différentes aux parentés multiples – monoparentales, recomposées, adoptives – ! Aucune place pour les familles arc-en-ciel.

La famille nucléaire dessinée sur le logo et présentée comme naturelle n’est que le mariage catholique bourgeois du XIXe, adopté au XXe siècle par les classes moyennes et désormais obsolète. C’est une famille étouffante et répressive, la famille où ont souffert Brasse-Bouillon et Poil de carotte, famille haïssable de Gide, noeud de vipères de Mauriac.

Sur les logos bleu et rose des adversaires du mariage pour tous, la famille est filtrée par le regard des enfants, les adultes n’existent que pour être leur papa et leur maman naturels. Papa bleu et maman rose ne sont pas un couple hétérosexuel, mais une paire de reproducteurs « blancs ».

Florence Dupont (Ancienne élève de l’Ecole normale supérieure, agrégée de lettres classiques, elle est professeur de latin à Paris-Diderot.)

Voir enfin:

Les Lobbies en action

Vigie des familles
25 novembre 2013

Le concept de genre se diffuse à partir de trois leviers : égalité, stéréotype, homophobie.
En changeant le sens des mots, les programmes d’action du gouvernement, qui entendent lutter pour l’égalité, contre les stéréotypes et contre l’homophobie, mettent en place une nouvelle vision de la société pour « réformer notre civilisation ». Ce phénomène n’est pas réservé à la France. Il est mondial et sa promotion se fait aussi par les instances internationales (ONU, Conseil de L’Europe, Parlement européen…).
Le but poursuivi est de détruire, sous les oripeaux d’une notion d’égalité dévoyée, le modèle de référence basé sur l’altérité homme-femme et sur la différenciation sexuelle. Corps et culture sont découplés, dissociés dans une schizophrénie intellectuelle : toute différence est niée, le corps refusé. Dérive marxiste dont le but est de faire voler en éclat la famille, taxée de « traditionnelle », et de la remplacer par l’Etat-Mère égalitariste qui s’occupe de tout, nivelle tout…
Qui promeut cette idéologie ?

A l’ONU

Sommet mondial de Pékin sur la femme (1995)

C’est l’ONU qui a utilisé le concept de genre pour la première fois dans des textes officiels lors du Sommet mondial sur la Femme à Pékin en 1995. Depuis, le Conseil de l’Europe, le Parlement européen, l’UNESCO… ont suivi. Ainsi le mot genre a remplacé progressivement le mot sexe dans les textes officiels, les conventions, les résolutions et les directives européennes.

Au cœur de cette évolution, le Sommet Mondial de la Femme de 1995 avait suscité une espérance sans précédent sur l’engagement des femmes dans la société. On sait qu’elle a été aussi le lieu d’affrontements idéologiques et de diffusion d’un nouveau vocabulaire, signe d’une remise en cause de l’anthropologie humaine, par exemple les droits sexuels et génésiques.

A Pékin, le comité directeur de la conférence a proposé la définition suivante : « Le genre se réfère aux relations entre hommes et femmes basées sur des rôles socialement définis que l’on assigne à l’un ou l’autre sexe ».

CONSEIL DE L’EUROPE

 Résolution 1728 sur la discrimination sur la base de l’orientation sexuelle et de l’identité de genre. Avril 2010.

En 2010, l’Assemblée parlementaire du Conseil de l’Europe précisait que « l’identité de genre désigne l’expérience intime et personnelle de son genre telle que vécue par chacun. »

CNCDH (COMMISSION NATIONALE CONSULTATIVE DES DROITS DE L’HOMME)

la CNCDH estime nécessaire une refonte de la législation française concernant l’identité de genre, comme le préconisent les institutions internationales européennes. La CNCDH, qui ne se prononce pas ici sur le plan anthropologique mais au nom de la lutte contre toutes les formes de discrimination, demande la rectification des termes « identité sexuelle » présents dans la loi, jugeant qu’ils entraînent une confusion entre genre et détermination sexuelle et biologique. Elle propose de les remplacer par les termes d’ »identité de genre ».

 

EN FRANCE

  • Projet de loi pour l’égalité  entre les hommes et les femmes :

Réforme du congé parental

Le projet de loi engage la réforme du complément de libre choix d’activité (CLCA) pour favoriser le retour des femmes vers l’emploi et rééquilibrer la répartition des responsabilités parentales au sein du couple. Aujourd’hui, 96% des bénéficiaires du CLCA sont des femmes.

Seuls 18 000 pères y ont recours.

Objectif : 100 000 hommes en congé parental d’ici 2017. Comment ? Une période de six mois du complément de libre choix d’activité sera réservée au second parent, s’ajoutant aux droits existants pour les familles ayant un enfant. Les parents de 2 enfants continueront à bénéficier de 3 ans de congé à condition que le deuxième parent en utilise au moins 6 mois.

Cette réforme est indissociable de l’effort très important pour renforcer l’offre d’accueil de la petite enfance. Elle sera applicable pour les enfants nés ou adoptés à partir du 1er juillet 2014.

• Programme d’actions gouvernemental contre les violences et les discriminations commises à raison de l’orientation sexuelle ou de l’identité de genre. 31 octobre 2012.
• Etudes de genre

Site l’université Paris 8  ICI

Objectif : Le Master « Genre(s), pensées des différences, rapports de sexe » de Paris 8 est une formation pluridisciplinaire. Il vise à interroger la construction, la représentation et l’inscription des identités et des différences de sexe dans les sociétés, les cultures, les institutions, les discours et les textes. La question des rapports « de sexe » affecte toutes les pratiques sociales et traverse tous les champs de pensée. Le Master « Genre(s), pensées des différences, rapports de sexe » cherche donc à favoriser les démarches transversales et transdisciplinaires, à la mesure de son objet.

• Sciences-Po – Paris

Depuis septembre 2011 des cours obligatoires sont consacrés à l’enseignement du Gender, intitulé : Programme Présage.

À l’origine du projet, deux femmes économistes de l’OFCE, soutenues par Jean‐Paul Fitoussi, président de l’Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques (OFCE) et par

Emmanuelle Latour de l’Observatoire de la parité créé en 1995. Celles‐ci déclarent qu’il faut en finir avec l’inégalité entre les hommes et les femmes dans l’entreprise. Pour les promoteurs de l’opération, le but est éminemment politique : « On veut faire progresser le combat contre les inégalités entre homme et femmes. »

En regardant d’un peu plus près, on comprend mieux l’intention. En particulier, grâce à l’évènement initiatique baptisée Queerqueek(La semaine queer) de Sciences Po, lancée du 3 au 6 mai 2010, comme une avant‐première des Gender studies. Car bien que les créatrices s’en défendent, il s’agit bien d’une étude centrée sur une réflexion identitaire.

Le programme de cette Semaine queer — « semaine du genre et des sexualités » — est explicite. L’individu postmoderne ne se reconnaît plus dans la société « hétérosexiste » : la différence des sexes est une dictature puisqu’elle est imposée par la nature. Pour être libre, l’individu doit pouvoir se choisir. Son droit le plus fondamental est « le droit d’être moi », de se choisir en permanence alors que la nature impose d’être un homme ou une femme.

• Queer week 2012
ICI

http://queerweek.com

  • • Prix de la Ville de Paris pour les Etudes de Genre

4 juillet 2012 ICI

  • • Congrès Institut du genre 3-5 septembre 2014

Les études de genre sont depuis plusieurs décennies en plein développement à l’échelle internationale. Créé en janvier 2012 à l’initiative de l’InSHS‐CNRS, l’Institut du Genreorganise son premier congrès international des « Études de genre en France » les 3, 4 et 5septembre 2014 à l’Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon.

  • • Petite enfance

 Rapport sur l’égalité entre les filles et des garçons dans les modes d’accueil de la petite enfance

Rapport de l’IGAS : ICI (Décembre 2012)

Le rapport souligne la nécessité de s’engager dans une éducation à l’égalité entre filles et garçons dès le plus jeune âge (0‐3 ans) par le biais d’une démarche partenariale nommée « PASS‐ÂGE ». Cette démarche repose sur cinq axes et quinze mesures parmi lesquelles la sensibilisation et la formation des personnels de crèches, la construction d’un pacte éducatif pour l’enfance, ou encore le développement de la mixité des professionnel‐les de la petite enfance. Le rapport propose également de mener une vaste politique de sensibilisation de la société et de responsabilisation des acteurs, notamment avec le monde du jouet, des vêtements, des livres et des médias. Comme le rappelle la ministre, nous avons besoin d’« un changement des mentalités, pour un changement de réalité. »

 • Une crèche gender en France

La crèche Bourdarias, visitée en septembre par Najat Vallaud-Belkacem et Dominique

Bertinotti, applique la méthode suédoise de non-différenciation des sexes. Le personnel encadrant de cette crèche veille spécifiquement à prodiguer une éducation neutre. Un mode de fonctionnement inspiré de la Suède. Plus de petits garçons ou de petites filles, mais rien que des «amis».

  • • Education Nationale

Lettre du ministre aux Recteurs d’Académies

Madame la Rectrice, Monsieur le Recteur,

Le gouvernement s’est engagé à « s’appuyer sur la jeunesse pour changer les mentalités », notamment par le biais d’une éducation au respect de la diversité des orientations sexuelles. L’engagement de notre ministère dans l’éducation à l’égalité et au respect de la personne est essentiel et prend aujourd’hui un relief particulier. Il vous appartient en effet de veiller à ce que les débats qui traversent la société française ne se traduisent pas, dans les écoles et les établissements, par des phénomènes de rejet et de stigmatisation homophobes.

….

La lutte contre l’homophobie en milieu scolaire, public comme privé, doit compter au rang de vos priorités. J’attire à ce titre votre attention sur la mise en œuvre du programme d’actions gouvernemental contre les violences et les discriminations commises à raison de l’orientation sexuelle ou de l’identité de genre. Je souhaite ainsi que vous accompagniez et favorisiez les interventions en milieu scolaire des associations qui luttent contre les préjugés homophobes, dès lors que la qualité et la valeur ajoutée pédagogique de leur action peuvent être établies. Je vous invite également à relayer avec la plus grande énergie, au début de l’année, la campagne de communication relative à la « ligne azur », ligne d’écoute pour les jeunes en questionnement à l’égard de leur orientation ou leur identité sexuelles.

Dans l’attente des conclusions du groupe de travail sur l’éducation à la sexualité, vous serez attentif à la mise en œuvre de la circulaire du 17 février 2003 qui prévoit cette éducation dans tous les milieux scolaires et ce, dès le plus jeune âge.

La délégation ministérielle de prévention et de lutte contre la violence dirigée par Eric Debarbieux, permettra de mieux connaître la violence spécifique que constitue l’homophobie. Enfin, vous le savez, j’ai confié à Michel Teychenné une mission relative à la lutte contre l’homophobie, qui porte notamment sur la prévention du suicide des jeunes concernés. Je vous remercie de leur apporter tout le concours nécessaire à la réussite de leurs missions.

Je souhaite que 2013 soit une année de mobilisation pour l’égalité à l’école.

Je vous prie de croire, Madame la Rectrice, Monsieur le Recteur, en l’assurance de ma considération distinguée.

Vincent PEILLON

(Extraits de la lettre du ministre)

• Ligne Azur  ICI

Ligne Azur est un service anonyme et confidentiel d’aide à distance pour toute personne s’interrogeant sur sa santé sexuelle (orientation / attirance, identité et pratiques …). Ce dispositif s’adresse également à leurs proches. La brochure « tombe la culotte » a été retirée suite aux protestations d’associations de parents.

  • • SOS homophobie retrouve son agrément national auprès des collèges et lycées.

Petite victoire pour l’association SOS homophobie: elle bénéficie de nouveau de l’agrément du ministère de l’Éducation nationale pour intervenir en milieu scolaire le tribunal administratif de Paris le lui avait retiré après une plainte de laConfédération nationale des associations familiales catholiques. Même privée d’agrément, SOS homophobie avait été félicitée pourson travail par le ministère de l’Éducation nationale qui n’a pas hésité à braver une décision judiciaire.

• Colloque « Eduquer contre l’homophobie dès l’école primaire », par le SNUipp-FSU

À l’occasion de cet événement organisé le 16 mai, jour de lutte contre l’homophobie, le syndicat a «mis à disposition» des professeurs des «outils théoriques et pratiques pour avancer» ICI

Le rapport de 192 pages déroule de nombreux chapitres, comme «Le genre, ennemi principal de l’égalité» ou «Déconstruire la complémentarité des sexes», et propose une vingtaine de «préparations pédagogiques» et ouvrages «de référence».

  • • Homophobie et harcèlement à l’école: rapport de Michel Teychenné

Discriminations lgbt – phobes à l’école état des lieux et recommandations ICI

Rapport de Michel Teychenné à Monsieur le Ministre de l’éducation nationale (Juin 2013)

  • • Programmes du Ministère de l’Education nationale pour l’égalité

 2013, l’année de mobilisation pour « l’égalité entre les filles et les garçons à l’école »  ICI

2013 constituera une année de mobilisation pour « l’égalité à l’école » associant l’ensemble des acteurs éducatifs et associatifs.

  • • L’apprentissage de l’égalité de la maternelle au lycée
  • • Une culture de l’égalité : la lutte contre les stéréotypes de l’école maternelle au lycée
  • • Le service public de l’orientation au service de la mixité
  • • Pour un respect mutuel : mieux éduquer à la sexualité
  • • Projet de loi sur la refondation de l’école

Il s’agit : « de substituer à des catégories comme le sexe ou les différences sexuelles, quirenvoient à la biologie, le concept de genre qui lui, au contraire, montre que lesdifférences entre les hommes et les femmes ne sont pas fondées sur la nature, maissont historiquement construites et socialement reproduites. »

  • • ABCD de l’Egalité

Décryptage XX-XY. Pour en finir avec les stéréotypes, l’Education nationale lance un dispositif expérimental. ICI

Dès cette rentrée, le ministère de Vincent Peillon, en collaboration avec celui de sa collègue aux Droits des femmes, Najat VallaudBelkacem, lance un dispositif baptisé «les ABCD de l’égalité» dans dix académies

«La formation des enseignants est au centre du dispositif, souligne Patrick Bacry, de la Mission égalité filles‐garçons de l’académie de Créteil, l’une des dix pionnières qui vont expérimenter les ABCD de l’égalité. « Il ne s’agit surtout pas d’en faire des boucs émissaires. Mais c’est un problème sociétal qui les touche aussi. Même s’ils font de leur mieux, de façon tout à fait inconsciente, ils peuvent avoir des comportements nourrissant des stéréotypes ou les laissant s’exprimer. A tous les niveaux, des inspecteurs jusqu’aux élèves euxmêmes, il faut encourager une prise de conscience.»

L’expérience va être évaluée au printemps 2014. Si elle se révèle concluante, elle sera étendue à la rentrée suivante à d’autres académies et progressivement généralisée.

Ce panorama n’est pas exhaustif, mais nous donne une idée de la technique tentaculaire (gender meanstreaming) des tenants de l’idéologie.

Quelques figures militantes et systématiquement présentes sur le terrain :

Didier Eribon (1953) est « un intellectuel, sociologue et philosophe français. ». Il est professeur à la Faculté de philosophie, sciences humaines et sociales de l’université d’Amiens et chercheur au CURAPP‐ESS (Centre de recherches sur l’action publique et le politique ‐ Épistémologie et sciences sociales). Biographe et ami du philosophe contemporain Michel Foucault (1926‐1984), l’un des penseurs de la « French theory » et source principale d’inspiration de Judith Butler, Eribon contribue à différents contenus de Ligne Azur, et a dirigé pour Larousse la rédaction du « dictionnaire des cultures gay et lesbienne ». Ce philosophe qui prétend repenser la famille révèle dans son livre autobiographique « Retour à Reims » la haine immense vouée à son père, qu’il refuse de revoir jusqu’à son décès, le mépris que lui vouent toujours ses frères et sœurs et son grand‐père dont il a ouvertement honte…« Nous devons travailler (…) à l’élargissement jamais terminé des possibilités des droits auxquels peuvent aspirer les individus et les modes de vie qui sont les leurs. Ce qui implique de continuer à défaire la norme hétérosexuelle partout où elle était, partout où elle revient, et à combattre la brutalité des discours qui à nouveau, encore et encore, ont essayé de l’imposer et de la ré‐imposer ! »

Daniel Borillo (1961) anime deux séminaires de recherche, l’un sur le droit de la sexualité dans le cadre de Paris X ‐Nanterre1 et l’autre sur les politiques publiques de l’égalité des chances et la lutte contre les discriminations dans un laboratoire du CNRS à Paris2. Il enseigne également le droit privé, le droit pénal et le droit civil espagnol.Il a été à l’origine en 2004, avec Didier Eribon, du «Manifeste pour l’égalité des droits» qui a conduit au premier mariage entre personnes du même sexe en France, célébré illégalement à Bègles par le député‐maire Noël Mamère. Le 5 décembre 2012, Daniel Borillo participe à une conférence à Sciences Po Paris organisée par le MJS, Amnesty International, le Front de Gauche et des associations de gauche et d’extrêmegauche. Au cours de la conférence, ses propos comparant les opposants au mariage homosexuel à des Nazis font polémique. Il fait partie de ces « juristes de référence » que le Comité National Consultatif d’Ethique a audités pour élaborer le projet de loi du « mariage pour tous. « La loi n’a pas pour mission de signifier la nature sexuée du parent, mais simplement sa fonction parentale. (…) Si les hommes et les femmes ont les mêmes droits et les mêmes obligations, et si ces fonctions sont interchangeables, pourquoi donc maintenir la distinction terminologique [père/mère] dans la loi ? Comment estil réactualisé, ce discours d’évidence, qui fonde l’imaginaire de la filiation sur la biologie ? (…) »

Eric Fassin (1959) : Ancien élève de l’École normale supérieure et agrégé d’anglais, il est chercheur à l’Institut de recherche interdisciplinaire sur les enjeux sociaux (sciences sociales, politique, santé), unité mixte de recherche associant le CNRS, l’Inserm, l’EHESS et l’université de Paris XIII2. Sociologue engagé dans le débat public, il travaille sur la politisation des questions sexuelles et raciales, en France et aux États‐Unis.

Irène Théry (1952) : (sociologue, directrice d’étude à l’EHESS, nommée présidente d’un groupe de travail par Dominique Bertinotti dans le cadre de la Loi Famille) «Dans la culture occidentale moderne, il y a une certaine mythologie de la famille conjugale » et les manifestations contre la Loi Taubira auraient révélé « un attachement absolument i-maitrisé, incontrôlé, à cette mythologie » de la famille père-mère-enfant. « Pour moi c’est clair, le grand moteur du changement, c’est l’égalité des sexes ». Elle dit aussi que «[…] la grande révolution qu’on vit aujourd’hui, c’est essayer de vivre dans une société fondée sur la valeur cardinale de l’égalité de sexe, et ça bouleverse la famille, le couple, la filiation […] ça bouleverse aussi l’idée que seule la relation de sexes opposés serait fondée dans la nature des choses et donc ça introduit des relations de mêmes sexes […] »

Anne Verjus (docteur en études politiques, membre du laboratoire Triangle CNRS-ENS Lyon).  Elle affirme nécessaire de «Disjoindre la parentalité et la conjugalité». Elle propose «dès la naissance des enfants juste après le sevrage une (…) résidence alternée». Elle propose également de penser «à faire des enfants avec son meilleur ami plutôt qu’avec son amant». « Aujourd’hui, je pense qu’on est dans un troisième changement qui est la remise en cause du sexualisme et de la bi-catégorisation […] On était dans le conjugalisme, après on était dans le sexualisme, et là, on serait dans quelque chose qui pourrait être de l’ordre de l’inter-sexualisme »

Caroline Mecary (1963)(Avocate au barreau de Paris, membre de Europe Ecologie les Verts, conseillère régionale en Île-de-France, militante en faveur du mariage de personnes de même sexe et des personnes LGBT, notamment dans le cadre de son activité professionnelle).  « Pour pouvoir abolir le mariage, il faut d’abord que tout le monde puisse en bénéficier. […] [l’abolition] est l’étape suivante ».


Carthage: Cachez ce sacrifice que je ne saurai voir ! (Child sacrifice in Carthage: New study uncovers overwhelming evidence of their colleagues’ whitewashing)

25 janvier, 2014
https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/46/Alfons_Mucha_-_1896_-_Salammb%C3%B4.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/piratenews.org/cabiria4.jpghttps://scontent-a-cdg.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1/p480x480/1544303_3916496527916_1253364715_n.jpgLe roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, prit avec lui sept cents hommes tirant l’épée pour se frayer un passage jusqu’au roi d’Édom; mais ils ne purent pas. Il prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
Devrai-je sacrifier mon enfant premier-né pour payer pour mon crime, le fils, chair de ma chair, pour expier ma faute? On te l’a enseigné, ô homme, ce qui est bien et ce que l’Eternel attend de toi: c’est que tu te conduises avec droiture, que tu prennes plaisir à témoigner de la bonté et qu’avec vigilance tu vives pour ton Dieu. Michée 6: 7-8
Les bras d’airain allaient plus vite. Ils ne s’arrêtaient plus. Chaque fois que l’on y posait un enfant, les prêtres de Moloch étendaient la main sur lui, pour le charger des crimes du peuple, en vociférant : « Ce ne sont pas des hommes, mais des boeufs ! » et la multitude à l’entour répétait : « Des boeufs ! des boeufs ! » Les dévots criaient : « Seigneur ! mange ! ». Gustave Flaubert (Salammbô)
Pour les sacrifices d’enfants, il est si peu impossible qu’au siècle d’Hamilcar on les brûlât vifs, qu’on en brûlait encore au temps de Jules César et de Tibère, s’il faut s’en rapporter à Cicéron (Pro Balbo) et à Strabon (liv. III). Flaubert (Réponse à des critiques, 1863)
Aujourd’hui on repère les boucs émissaires dans l’Angleterre victorienne et on ne les repère plus dans les sociétés archaïques. C’est défendu. René Girard
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
J’espère offrir mon fils unique en martyr, comme son père. Dalal Mouazzi (jeune veuve d’un commandant du Hezbollah mort en 2006 pendant la guerre du Liban, à propos de son gamin de 10 ans)
Nous n’aurons la paix avec les Arabes que lorsqu’ils aimeront leurs enfants plus qu’ils ne nous détestent. Golda Meir
Si l’on accepte que les sacrifices d’enfants étaient pratiqués à relativement grande échelle, on commence à comprendre ce qui était peut-être la raison d’être de la fondation de cette colonie. Peut-être que la raison pour laquelle les fondateurs de Carthage et des cités voisines ont quitté leur terre natale de Phénicie – le Liban moderne – était justement cette pratique religieuse inhabituelle qui leur était reprochée. Peut-être que les futurs Carthaginois étaient comme les Pères pèlerins qui fuyèrent Plymouth – tellement fervents dans leur dévotion à leurs dieux qu’ils n’étaient plus bienvenus chez eux. Rejeter l’idée du sacrifice d’enfant nous prive tout simplement d’une vue d’ensemble. Dr Josephine Quinn

C’est Flaubert qui avait raison !

A l’heure où l’on vient de reconnaitre l’innocence d’un juif  accusé faussement d’un crime rituel d’enfant et brûlé au bûcher en Lorraine il y a presque trois siècles et demi …

Mais où l’on attend toujours la vérité sur la fausse accusation d’assassinat d’enfant portée par France 2 et son indéboulonnable correspondant Charles Enderlin contre l’Armée israélienne il y aura bientôt 14 ans …

Face justement à des gens qui, profitant de leur actuel statut de « damnés de la terre » de l’Occident,  revendiquent à leur tour et explicitement le sacrifice de leurs propres enfants …

Comment ne pas s’étonner, devant l’évidence qui s’accumule (jusqu’à même en faire la raison d’être de cette colonie phénicienne ?), de ce refus continué de nombre d’historiens actuels de reconnaitre la prévalence du sacrifice humain et notamment d’enfants dans la fameuse Carthage mais aussi jusqu’en Sicile et dans la péninsule italienne ?

Ancient Greek stories of ritual child sacrifice in Carthage are TRUE, study claims

Bodies of children were buried in special cemeteries called tophets

Researchers from Oxford University said there that the archaeological, literary, and documentary evidence for child sacrifice is ‘overwhelming’

Historians think practice could hold the key to why Carthage was founded

Ancient Carthage was a Phoenician colony located in what is now Tunisia

Sarah Griffiths

23 January 2014

The Daily Mail

After decades of historians denying that the Carthaginians sacrificed their children as described in Greek accounts, a new study claims to have found ‘overwhelming’ evidence that the ancient civilisation really did carry out bloodthirsty practice.

Carthaginian parents ritually sacrificed young children as an offering to the gods and laid them to rest in special infant burial grounds, according to a team of international researchers.

They said that the archaeological, literary and documentary evidence for child sacrifice is ‘overwhelming’.

Carthaginian parents ritually sacrificed young children as an offering to the gods and laid them to rest in special infant burial grounds called tophets, according to a team of international researchers. A tophet outside Carthage is pictured

Carthaginian parents ritually sacrificed young children as an offering to the gods and laid them to rest in special infant burial grounds called tophets, according to a team of international researchers. A tophet outside Carthage is pictured

CHILD SACRIFICE IN ANCIENT CARTHAGE

Carthaginian parents ritually sacrificed young children as an offering to the gods and laid them to rest in special infant burial grounds called tophets.

The practice could hold the key to why Ancient Carthage was founded in the first place.

Babies of just a few weeks old were sacrificed.

Dedications from the children’s parents to the gods are inscribed on slabs of stone above their cremated remains, ending with the explanation that the god or gods concerned had ‘heard my voice and blessed me’.

An Oxford University professor said that people might have sacrificed their children out of profound religious piety, or a sense that the good the sacrifice could bring the family or community as a whole outweighed the life of the child.

We think of human sacrifice as a terrible practice because we view it in modern terms, but people looked at it differently 2,500 years ago.

The backlash against the notion of Carthaginian child sacrifice began in the second half of the 20th century and was led by scholars from Tunisia and Italy – the very countries in which tophets have also been found.

It was first documented by Greek and Roman writers who seemed more interested than critical of the unusual practice.

A collaborative paper by academics from institutions across the globe, including Oxford University reveals that previous well-meaning attempts to interpret these ancient burial grounds, called tophets, simply as child cemeteries, are misguided.

Instead, the researchers think the practice of child sacrifice could even hold the key to why the civilisation was founded in the first place.

The research pulls together literary, epigraphical, archaeological and historical evidence and confirms the Greek and Roman account of events that held sway until the 1970s, when scholars began to argue that the theory was simply anti-Carthaginian propaganda.

‘It’s becoming increasingly clear that the stories about Carthaginian child sacrifice are true. This is something the Romans and Greeks said the Carthaginians did and it was part of the popular history of Carthage in the 18th and 19th centuries,’ said Dr Josephine Quinn, of the university’s Faculty of Classics, who an author of the paper, published in the journal Antiquity.

‘But in the 20th century, people increasingly took the view that this was racist propaganda on the part of the Greeks and Romans against their political enemy and that Carthage should be saved from this terrible slander,’ she said.

‘What we are saying now is that the archaeological, literary, and documentary evidence for child sacrifice is overwhelming and that instead of dismissing it out of hand, we should try to understand it.’

The city-state of ancient Carthage was a Phoenician colony located in what is now Tunisia. It operated from around 800BC until 146BC, when it was destroyed by the Romans.

Babies of just a few weeks old were sacrificed by the Carthaginians at locations known as tophets.

Dedications from the children’s parents to the gods are inscribed on slabs of stone above their cremated remains, ending with the explanation that the god or gods concerned had ‘heard my voice and blessed me’.

Dr Quinn said: ‘People have tried to argue that these archaeological sites are cemeteries for children who were stillborn or died young, but quite apart from the fact that a weak, sick or dead child would be a pretty poor offering to a god and that animal remains are found in the same sites treated in exactly the same way, it’s hard to imagine how the death of a child could count as the answer to a prayer.

‘It’s very difficult for us to recapture people’s motivations for carrying out this practice or why parents would agree to it, but it’s worth trying.

‘Perhaps it was out of profound religious piety, or a sense that the good the sacrifice could bring the family or community as a whole outweighed the life of the child.

‘We have to remember the high level of mortality among children – it would have been sensible for parents not to get too attached to a child that might well not make its first birthday.’

Dr Quinn said that we think of human sacrifice as a terrible practice because we view it in modern terms, but people looked at it differently 2,500 years ago.

‘Indeed, contemporary Greek and Roman writers tended to describe the practice as more of an eccentricity or historical oddity – they’re not actually very critical,’ she said.

‘We should not imagine that ancient people thought like us and were horrified by the same things.’

The backlash against the notion of Carthaginian child sacrifice began in the second half of the 20th century and was led by scholars from Tunisia and Italy – the very countries in which tophets have also been found.

Dr Quinn said: ‘Carthage was far bigger than Athens and for many centuries much more important than Rome, but it is something of a forgotten city today.

Babies were sacrificed by the Carthaginians at tophets. Dedications from the children’s parents to the gods are inscribed on slabs of stone above their cremated remains, ending with the explanation that the god or gods concerned had ‘heard my voice and blessed me’ A tophet in Marsala, Sicily is pictured

Babies were sacrificed by the Carthaginians at tophets. Dedications from the children’s parents to the gods are inscribed on slabs of stone above their cremated remains, ending with the explanation that the god or gods concerned had ‘heard my voice and blessed me’ A tophet in Marsala, Sicily is pictured

‘If we accept that child sacrifice happened on some scale, it begins to explain why the colony was founded in the first place.

‘Perhaps the reason the people who established Carthage and its neighbours left their original home of Phoenicia – modern-day Lebanon – was because others there disapproved of their unusual religious practice.

She explained that child abandonment was common in the ancient world and human sacrifice is found in many historical societies, but child sacrifice is relatively uncommon.

‘Perhaps the future Carthaginians were like the Pilgrim Fathers leaving from Plymouth – they were so fervent in their devotion to the gods that they weren’t welcome at home any more, Dr Quinn said.

‘Dismissing the idea of child sacrifice stops us seeing the bigger picture.’

Les fouilles dans Zama révèlent que les Carthaginois ne sacrifient pas les enfants

Piero Bartoloni, chef du Département de l’archéologie phénicienne-punique à Universita ‘di Sassari et élève préféré de la célèbre archéologue Sabatino Moscati.

Les fouilles dans Ashkelon prouvent que les Romains noyaient et jetaient leurs bébés de sexe masculin

Les fœtus mort-nés dans des urnes perpétuent le mensonge de Diodore de Sicile

Traduit de l’italien avec l’aimable autorisation de Pasquale Mereu, Karalis, Sardaigne, Italie De IGN Italie mondial Nation (mai 2007)

Les fouilles dans Zama, Tunis, révèlent que la pratique de sacrifices d’enfants par les Phéniciens est un mythe. Le mythe est né à l’âge gréco-romain avec Diodore de Sicile. Il a fait une demande que 310 avant JC, les Carthaginois se souvenaient qu’ils ne respectent pas leurs Chronos dieu avec le sacrifice annuel des enfants de familles nobles. A cause de cela, dans quelques jours, ils ont massacré deux cents enfants. Des découvertes archéologiques récentes ont désavoué cette tradition religieuse macabre, ce qui démontre que les Phéniciens il n’ya aucune trace de sacrifices humains. Il apparaît dans une interview, dans le nouveau numéro de la revue italienne: « Archeologia Viva, » avec le professeur Piero Bartoloni, chef du Département de l’archéologie phénicienne-punique à Universita ‘di Sassari , Italie, et un élève préféré de la célèbre archéologue Sabatino Moscati. Il a entrepris une vaste campagne de fouilles à Zama, la Tunisie, qui est lié à la chute de Carthage après la bataille de Zama en 202 avant JC La bataille s’est terminée la deuxième guerre punique. Il déclare que, « Dans les temps anciens, pour dix enfants qui sont nés, sept sont morts dans la première année et sur ​​les trois restée, un seul est devenu un adulte maintenant je demande:. est-il raisonnable que, avec un tel niveau de la mortalité infantile, ces gens ont tué leurs propres enfants « ? Dix nécropoles sont les lieux de repos des enfants fait, il a été découvert -. Bartoloni révèle – que la plus grande partie d’environ 6000 enfants urnes trouvé à Carthage, contenir des os de fœtus, donc des bébés morts-nés. Les petits enfants plus âgés demeurent un problème. Ils probablement décédés avant leur initiation, une cérémonie qui correspond au baptême catholique. Flames en quelque sorte ont été impliqués, parce que la même initiation comprenait le « passage du feu » de l’enfant, accompagné de son parrain. Ils ont sauté sur des charbons ardents, comme écrit dans la Bible, le Livre des Rois.

Curriculum Vitae et studiorum di Piero Bartoloni (en italien)

Piero Bartoloni si è laureato dans Lettere presso l `insegnamento di Filologia Semitica, Relatore Sabatino Moscati, con una tesi sull` insediamento di M