Barbie/60e: Les sionistes ont même inventé les poupées Barbie ! (From high-end German call girl to America’s iconic Barbie doll, sexist and anorexic scourge of the feminists or shameful Jewish symbol of decadence of the perverted West)

lilivsbarbie
Ruth and Elliot Handler, both raised in Colorado, pose with an early version of Barbie. Photo courtesy of Mattel
barbie-museum-prague
lilliebarbie1
lillibarbie2
lilibarbie4
bbLilli
Image result for A Barbie for Every Body
A création 1959, poupée Barbie coûtait 3$. Aujourd’hui faut débourser, moyenne, dollars.
Image result for A Barbie for Every Body
Barbie (Andy Warhol, 1985)
https://file1.bibamagazine.fr/var/bibamagazine/storage/images/culture/evenements/une-exposition-sur-les-poupees-barbie-a-paris-53395/405188-1-fre-FR/Une-exposition-sur-les-poupees-Barbie-a-Paris_width1024.png

Checking out the barbies in Prague (Aug. 2013)Les poupées Barbie juives, avec leurs vêtements révélateurs, leurs postures, accessoires et outils honteux sont un symbole de la décadence de l’Occident perverti. Prenons garde à ces dangers et faisons très attention. Comité saoudien pour la promotion de la vertu et la prévention du vice
It is no problem that little girls play with dolls. But these dolls should not have the developed body of a woman and wear revealing clothes. These revealing clothes will be imprinted in their minds and they will refuse to wear the clothes we are used to as Muslims. Sheik Abdulla al-Merdas (Riyadh mosque preacher)
Saudi Arabia’s religious police have declared Barbie dolls a threat to morality, complaining that the revealing clothes of the « Jewish » toy — already banned in the kingdom — are offensive to Islam. The Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice, as the religious police are officially known, lists the dolls on a section of its Web site devoted to items deemed offensive to the conservative Saudi interpretation of Islam. « Jewish Barbie dolls, with their revealing clothes and shameful postures, accessories and tools are a symbol of decadence to the perverted West. Let us beware of her dangers and be careful, » said a message posted on the site. A spokesman for the Committee said the campaign against Barbie — banned for more than 10 years — coincides with the start of the school year to remind children and their parents of the doll’s negative qualities. Speaking to The Associated Press by telephone from the holy city of Medina, he claimed that Barbie was modeled after a real-life Jewish woman. Although illegal, Barbies are found on the black market, where a contraband doll could cost $27 or more. Sheik Abdulla al-Merdas, a preacher in a Riyadh mosque, said the muttawa, the committee’s enforcers, take their anti-Barbie campaign to the shops, confiscating dolls from sellers and imposing a fine. Fox news
Born a busty, bathing suit-clad  »teen-age fashion model » in the 1959 Mattel catalogue, Barbie in the book is shown dressed for success as  »Campus Belle, »  »Career Girl » and  »Student Teacher » in the mid-1960’s; as a nurse and a doctor by 1973, and, most recently, as a silver-gilded astronaut and glitter rock star. (…) While her critics may say she is no more than a mannequin, Billy Boy refers to Barbie as a  »life style. »  »Every woman has a Barbie quality about her, » he said. Marilyn Motz, a professor of popular culture at Bowling Green State, has a different view.  »The whole point of the Barbie doll is that she owns things and buys things, » said Professor Motz, who published a study of Barbie in 1983. She said that the doll, if copied to scale as a life-size woman, would have a torso measuring 33 inches at the bust, 18 inches at the waist and 28 inches at the hips – a feminine ideal that, she pointed out, is  »almost not possible anatomically. » NYT (1987)
Barbie, the fashion doll famous around the world, celebrates her 60th anniversary on Saturday with new collections honoring real-life role models and careers in which women remain under-represented. It is part of Barbie’s evolution over the decades since her debut at the New York Toy Fair on March 9, 1959. To mark the milestone, manufacturer Mattel Inc created Barbie versions of 20 inspirational women from Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka to British model and activist Adwoa Aboah. The company also released six dolls representing the careers of astronaut, pilot, athlete, journalist, politician and firefighter, all fields in which Mattel said women are still under-represented. Barbie is a cultural icon celebrated by the likes of Andy Warhol, the Paris Louvre museum and the 1997 satirical song “Barbie Girl” by Scandinavian pop group Aqua. She was named after the daughter of creator Ruth Handler. Barbie has taken on more than 200 careers from surgeon to video game developer since her debut, when she wore a black-and-white striped swimsuit. After criticism that Barbie’s curvy body promoted an unrealistic image for young girls, Mattel added a wider variety of skin tones, body shapes, hijab-wearing dolls and science kits to make Barbie more educational. Barbie is also going glamorous for her six-decade milestone. A diamond-anniversary doll wears a sparkly silver ball gown. Reuters
Barbie Millicent Roberts, from Wisconsin US, is celebrating her 60th birthday. She is a toy. A doll. Yet she has grown into a phenomenon. An iconic figure, recognised by millions of children and adults worldwide, she has remained a popular choice for more than six decades – a somewhat unprecedented feat for a doll in the toy industry. She is also, arguably, the original “influencer” of young girls, pushing an image and lifestyle that can shape what they aspire to be like. (…) When Barbie was born many toys for young girls were of the baby doll variety; encouraging nurturing and motherhood and perpetuating the idea that a girl’s future role would be one of homemaker and mother. Thus Barbie was born out of a desire to give girls something more. Barbie was a fashion model with her own career. The idea that girls could play with her and imagine their future selves, whatever that may be, was central to the Barbie brand. However, the “something more” that was given fell short of empowering girls, by today’s standards. And Barbie has been described as “an agent of female oppression”. The focus on play that imagined being grown up, with perfect hair, a perfect body, a plethora of outfits, a sexualised physique, and a perfect first love (in the equally perfect Ken) has been criticised over the years for perpetuating a different kind of ideal – one centred around body image, with dangerous consequences for girls’ mental and physical health. (…) Exposure to unhealthy, unrealistic and unattainable body images is associated with eating disorder risk. Indeed, the increasing prevalence of eating disorder symptoms in non-Western cultures has been linked to exposure to Western ideals of beauty. Barbie’s original proportions gave her a body mass index (BMI) so low that she would be unlikely to menstruate and the probability of this body shape is less than one in 100,000 women. (…) With growing awareness of body image disturbances and cultural pressures on young girls, many parents have begun to look for more empowering toys for their daughters. Barbie’s manufacturer, Mattel, has been listening, possibly prompted by falling sales, and in 2016 a new range of Barbies was launched that celebrated different body shapes, sizes, hair types and skin tones. (…) If Barbie was about empowering girls to be anything that they want to be, then the Barbie brand has tried to move with the times by providing powerful role playing tools for girls. (…) Such changes can have a remarkable impact on how young girls imagine their career possibilities, potential futures, and the roles that they are expected to take. Mattel’s move to honour 20 women role models including Japanese Haitian tennis player Naomi Osaka – currently the world number one – with her own doll is a positive step in bringing empowering role models into the consciousness of young girls. Gemma Witcomb
Ruth Moskowicz was born into a family of Russian Jewish immigrants in Denver, Colorado in 1916. She married her high school boyfriend, an artistic young man named Elliot Handler, and they moved to Los Angeles in 1938. After her husband decided to make their furniture out of two new plastics, Lucite and Plexiglas, Ruth ambitiously suggested that he turn furniture making into a business. (…) During World War II, the Handlers started a company, Mattel, combining Elliot’s name with the last name of their partner, Harold Matson. On weekends home from wartime duties at Camp Robert, California, Elliot made toy furniture for Ruth to sell. (…) The Handlers took their two teenagers — Barbara and Ken — on a trip to Europe in 1956. There, they saw a doll that looked like an adult woman, vastly different from the baby dolls most little girls owned. Ruth was inspired. Three years later, Mattel’s version, Barbie, would debut, with a wardrobe of outfits that could be purchased separately. In 1960, the Handlers took Mattel public, with a valuation of $10 million ($60.3 million in 2003 dollars). It was on its way to the Fortune 500, and Barbie quickly became an icon, with ever-changing wardrobe and career options that mirrored women’s changing aspirations. PBS
Ruth Mosko (…) was born November 4, 1916, to Jacob Joseph Mosko (née Moskowicz), a blacksmith, and Ida Rubinstein, a housewife. Ruth was the youngest of 10 children. Her father arrived at Ellis Island in 1907. After telling immigration officials that he was a blacksmith, he was sent to Denver, the center of the railroad industry. In 1908, his wife, Ida, arrived in America with their six children and joined her husband in Colorado. (…) In 1941 Ruth left her secretarial job at Paramount to work with her husband, who was designing and making furniture and household accessories out of the new acrylic materials, Lucite and Plexiglas. Her husband produced the pieces and she did the selling. (…) In 1945, they (…) and Harold “Matt” Matson started Mattel Creations, joining elements of Matt’s and Elliot’s names. Under the Mattel moniker, the two partners began fabricating dollhouse furniture. Ruth continued to run the marketing department. Due to his poor health, Matt soon sold his share to Elliot. The company had its first hit toy in 1947 with a ukulele called Uke-A-Doodle. That proved such a success that Mattel switched to making nothing but toys. Ruth drove Mattel’s business decisions, while her husband nurtured new toys. (…) After watching her daughter, Barbara, ignore her baby dolls to play make-believe with paper dolls representing adult women, Ruth realized there may be a niche for a three-dimensional doll that encouraged girls to imagine the future. When visiting Germany in 1956, Ruth saw a doll that looked like a teenager, and this doll inspired her to follow her dream. Mattel’s designers spent several years creating Ruth’s doll using the German doll as an inspiration. Barbie Millicent Roberts debuted at the American Toy Fair in New York City in 1959. Ruth named the blond 11-and-a-half-inch doll for her daughter, who was a 17-year-old attending a local Los Angeles high school. Dressed in a black and white striped swimsuit with the necessary accessories of sunglasses, high-heeled shoes and gold-colored hoop earrings, Barbie’s body was not only shapely but also had a movable head, arms and legs. Barbie had a chic wardrobe that had to be purchased separately and updated regularly. Barbie was a marketing sensation. Within a year of her introduction in 1959, Barbie became the biggest selling fashion doll of all time. Sales increased with the introduction of different Barbie dolls and accessories. Barbie became a staple in the toy chests of little girls everywhere. It was Ruth’s marketing genius that changed toy marketing when she acquired the rights to produce the popular “Mickey Mouse Club” products in 1955. The cross-marketing promotion became common practice for future companies. Barbie made her first television appearance on the “The Mickey Mouse Club.” This marketing technique helped sell 351,000 Barbie dolls in the first year at $3 each. Barbie quickly became an icon, with her ever-changing wardrobe and career options that mirrored women’s changing aspirations. (…) Over the years, Barbie changed jobs more than 75 times, becoming a dentist, a paleontologist, an Air Force fighter pilot, a World Cup soccer competitor, a firefighter and a candidate for president. Even in demanding positions, though, Barbie retained her fashion sense. She was joined by friends and family over the years, including Ken, Midge, Skipper and Christie. Barbie kept up with current trends in hairstyles, makeup and clothing. (…) Barbie’s world is more than a doll and accessories. Kids today can use their high-tech gadgets and interactive smartphones and apps to personalize their Barbie doll experience. Other licensed products include books, apparel, home furnishings and home electronics. She even has a YouTube site and a Facebook page. But Barbie’s popularity doesn’t stop there. The Musée des Arts Décoratifs, which is affiliated with the Louvre in Paris, held a Barbie exhibit in 2016. The exhibit featured 700 Barbie dolls displayed on two floors, as well as works by contemporary artists and documents (newspapers, photos, video) representing Barbie. Barbie has become a popular collectible among adults. Collectors prize early numbered Barbie dolls from 1969 and the 1990’s, as well as a range of rare and special editions of the iconic toy. Over the past few years, Mattel transformed Barbie, and she now may look a bit more like those who play with her, curves and all. The new 2016 Barbie Fashionistas doll line includes four body types (the original and three new bodies), seven skin tones, 22 eye colors, 24 hairstyles and countless on-trend fashions and accessories. With these changes, Barbie added diversity and more variety in styles, fashions, shoes and accessories. Mattel claims girls everywhere will now have infinitely more ways to spark their imagination and play out their stories. Cyndy Thomas Klepinger
When Ruth Handler (formerly Moskowitz) traveled to Switzerland in 1956 with her family, her husband Elliot and their children Barbara and Kenneth, they came across a small figurine, blonde, thin, and tall at 11 inches (28 cm), whose name was Lilli. The Lilli doll was a novelty item for adults. The all-American Barbie doll, named for little Barbara Handler of course, which debuted in 1959 would become a mass-produced doll for young girls (and also boys, we don’t judge, and neither should you) and end up being the most popular doll in the history of toys. The Ken doll, which debuted a few years later, was named for Ruth Handler’s son Kenneth, of course. Ruth Handler’s story, and Barbie’s, is part and parcel of the American story. The daughter of Polish-Jewish immigrants, Ruth Moskowitz was born the youngest of 10 children in Denver, Colorado. As a teenager she was sent to be a shop-girl in her aunt’s store, where she not only learned the basics of running a business, but to love it. During her marriage to Elliot Handler, the two formed a business in plastic and wood, making props and toys for Hollywood studios and toy shops nationwide. Along with another business partner, the Handlers formed “Mattel”. In 1959, after three years of development, Barbie sprang fully formed into the world, bathing suit and all. Barbie was a child’s toy with adult outfits, accessories, and most importantly – a job. (…) The Barbie doll was the first doll aimed at girls that was an adult, not a doll in the shape of a baby or a doll that was a child, but a doll with which the young girl could play at being a grown up and dress up with her most loyal doll companion. The Barbie doll doesn’t “look” Jewish. But her heritage is Jewish and full of chutzpah. Ruth Handler was ambitious and held her own in the so-called man’s world of business. She thought of young girls not merely as consumers, but as the future generation of women in America and all around the world. Well, almost all. Back in 2003 Saudi officials declared the “Jewish Barbie Dolls” a threat to morality. Though Barbie’s Jewish roots are bleached blonde, Ruth Handler and consequently Barbie is particularly Jewish-American. Just by immigrating from Europe, changing her name and weaving herself into the very fabric of American life, the Barbie doll became international and a part of culture that is both inspired and inspirational. Melodie Barron
Ruth Handler (née le 4 novembre 1916, décédée le 27 avril 2002) est une femme d’affaires américaine qui a révolutionné l’industrie du jouet en 1959 en créant la poupée Barbie, du nom de sa fille Barbara, et la poupée Ken du nom de son fils Kenneth. La poitrine opulente, la taille fine et les longues jambes de Barbie allaient totalement à l’encontre du style rond et asexué des poupées de l’époque et firent date, par leur audace et leur réalisme, dans l’histoire du jouet pour petites filles. Née Ruth Mosko, Ruth Handler était la plus jeune des dix enfants d’une famille d’immigrants judéo-polonais. Avec son époux Elliot Handler et le designer Harold Mattson, elle avait créé Mattel en 1945, un nom formé du Matt de Mattson et du El d’Elliot. (…) Ruth Handler avait constaté que sa fille Barbara, une préado de 10 ans, préférait jouer avec ses poupées de papier qu’avec ses poupées de petite fille et qu’elle leur octroyait des rôles d’adultes. Forte de cette observation Ruth voulut produire une poupée en plastique d’apparence adulte, mais son mari et M. Matson ont pensé que le jouet serait invendable. Lors d’un voyage en Europe du couple, Ruth découvre la poupée allemande Bild Lilli (qui était en fait un jouet gag pour adultes créé d’après le personnage de BD Lilli qui paraissait dans le journal Bill Zeitung) dans un magasin suisse et la ramène à la maison. Une fois rentrée donc, Ruth Handler retravaille le design de la poupée et la baptise Barbie en référence à sa fille Barbara. Barbie fait ses débuts à la foire de jouet de New York, le 9 mars 1959. La poupée est vite devenue un immense succès, lançant les Handlers et leur société de jouets vers la gloire et la fortune. Par la suite ils ajouteraient un petit ami pour Barbie nommé Ken, en référence à Kenneth, leur fils. D’autres personnages viendront enrichir la gamme « des amis et de la famille ». Le monde de Barbie prenait forme. Ruth Handler a plus tard affirmé que, lorsqu’elle a acheté « Bild Lilli », elle ignorait que c’était un jouet pour adulte. Ruth Handler a expliqué qu’elle a pensé que cela « était important pour l’estime d’une fille qu’elle joue avec une poupée avec une poitrine adulte » et Barbie a été créée pour jouer ce rôle. Si la poupée commercialisée à l’origine était transposée à taille humaine, ses mensurations auraient été assez irréalistes et de nombreux critiques ont prétendu que les mesures ont été basées sur la fantaisie masculine plutôt que la métrique humaine réelle. Au fil des années les mensurations peu réalistes de Barbie ont continué à être controversées, avec beaucoup de théories qui expliquent que de jouer avec une poupée Barbie diminue l’estime de soi et complexe les petites filles. En réponse à ces critiques, à la fin des années 1990, Mattel a ajusté le tour de poitrine en le diminuant et a augmenté le tour de taille, même si ces nouvelles mensurations sont encore loin des femmes réelles. Wikipedia
Barbie est une poupée de 29 cm commercialisée depuis 1959 par Mattel, une société américaine de jouets et jeux. Elle reprenait la forme adulte, les cheveux blonds et le principe de Bild Lilli, première poupée mannequin lancée en Allemagne un peu plus tôt. Si la Barbie caractéristique est blonde aux cheveux longs et aux traits européens, sa couleur de cheveux varie en fait considérablement et son type ethnique s’est diversifié dès 1967 et plus systématiquement à partir de 1980, si bien qu’à ce jour il existe une Barbie pour à peu près tous les groupes ethniques du monde. Elle exerce de multiples métiers et professions tels que : docteur, enseignante, jockey, vétérinaire, hôtesse de l’air, Chevalier du Roi, Première-Dame (CNN) etc. En 1997, Mattel a vendu sa milliardième poupée Barbie. En 2009, et malgré une forte baisse des ventes due à la concurrence, la poupée a généré plus d’un milliard d’euros de chiffre d’affaires. En fin d’année 2015, un petit garçon apparait pour la 1re fois dans une des publicités de la marque, vantant les qualités de la Barbie habillée par l’entreprise de mode italienne Moschino3. Cette publicité qui a créé l’événement au niveau mondial, est alors acclamée par la critique, tandis que la Barbie Moschino, elle, se retrouve très vite en rupture de stock. En 2016, face à l’accélération de la chute des ventes de Barbie, Mattel va beaucoup plus loin dans sa démarche de diversification, en lançant trois nouvelles silhouettes de Barbie aux côtés de la Barbie traditionnelle ; l’une de ces nouvelles silhouettes, baptisée en anglais « Curvy » (« arrondie »), propose une Barbie bien en chair, presque dodue, assez éloignée de la Barbie d’origine. (…) Mattel est une société américaine de jouets et jeux fondée en 1945 par Harold Matson et Elliot Handler, d’où le nom de l’entreprise : Mat+Ell = Mattel. C’est la femme d’Elliot Handler, Ruth Handler, qui créa Barbie (diminutif de leur fille Barbara) en 1959 en reprenant les caractéristiques de Bild Lilli, une poupée allemande avec un corps d’adulte, des cheveux blonds et une garde-robe contemporaine, prototype de la poupée mannequin. La première poupée Barbie a été présentée à l’American International Toy Fair de New York le 9 mars 1959 par sa créatrice Ruth Handler. Le succès presque immédiat de ce nouveau genre de poupée poussa son époux et un associé à créer la société Mattel Creations. La poupée Barbie avec sa poitrine opulente, sa taille fine et ses longues jambes allaient, en effet, totalement à l’encontre du style rond et asexué des poupées de l’époque. En cela, elle fut la seconde poupée au corps adulte après la Bild Lilli. En effet, en 1951, le dessinateur Reinhard Beuthin crée pour une bande-dessinée dans le magazine allemand Bild Zeitung une poupée : la Bild Lilli. Quatre ans plus tard, l’entreprise Hauser commercialise la poupée. Lors d’un voyage en famille à Lucerne en Suisse en 1956, Barbara, la fille de Elliot et Ruth Handler, réclama à ses parents un jouet peu commun pour l’époque : une poupée mannequin du nom de Lilli. Ce jouet au regard taquin et à forte poitrine intrigua Ruth Handler, mais, ce n’est seulement qu’en observant sa fille jouer des heures durant avec la poupée Lilli que la directrice de Mattel décida de produire ce même jouet aux États-Unis. Ainsi, la famille Handler ramena Lilli dans ses valises sur le continent américain et trois ans plus tard, Mattel lança son nouveau jouet : la poupée Barbie, qui, excepté quelques modifications au niveau du maquillage, était la parfaite réplique de la poupée allemande Lilli. Le succès de Barbie se répand dans tous les États-Unis comme une trainée de poudre, et très vite, la nouvelle poupée de Mattel envahit les magasins de jouets européens. En 1963, Rolf Hausser, directeur de l’entreprise de jouets O&M Hausser et créateur de Lilli, découvre avec surprise sa poupée dans une vitrine de magasin de jouets à Nuremberg la copie parfaite de sa Lilli rebaptisée Barbie. Rolf, décida dans un premier temps de poursuivre le géant Mattel en justice, mais raisonné par son frère et compte tenu du peu de ressources financières de la petite entreprise allemande, les poursuites furent abandonnées. En 1964, Rolf Hausser vendit les droits de la poupée Lilli à Mattel pour sauver l’entreprise familiale qui fit faillite malgré tout quelques années plus tard. Barbie est le diminutif de Barbara, le prénom de la fille de Ruth Handler20. Ses mensurations, initialement hypertrophiées, sont ramenées à des proportions plus habituelles au fil des années. (…) En (…) 1986 (…) Des Barbie représentant le monde entier sont également commercialisées : la Barbie japonaise, la Barbie indienne, la Barbie hispanique (qui sera connue comme Theresa, une des amies de Barbie) la Barbie allemande, la Barbie irlandaise… (…) En 2016, la Barbie traditionnelle aux longues jambes, à la poitrine imposante et à la taille ultra-fine se voit concurrencée par trois Barbie nouvelles : « Tall » (grande et longiligne), « Petite » (toute menue), et « Curvy » (« bien en chair », avec moins de poitrine, mais un petit ventre rond, des hanches plus larges, ainsi que des fesses et des cuisses arrondies). Ces évolutions, qui constituent en fait une révolution de l’approche marketing de la marque au point que Barbie « Curvy » fait la couverture de Time Magazine, résultent d’une remise en cause rendue indispensable par la perte de part de marché des poupées Barbie (ventes en baisse de 16 % en 2014, après une chute de 6 % l’année précédente), accentuée encore par la perte de la licence Disney pour commercialiser la poupée Elsa tirée de La Reine des neiges, et récupérée par Hasbro ; cette perte représente pour Mattel une perte de chiffre d’affaires évaluée à 500 millions de dollars. Cependant, cet abandon de la silhouette traditionnelle de Barbie présente d’intéressantes possibilités de développement, dans la mesure où il entraînera un renouvellement accéléré de la garde-robe : Barbie « Curvy » ne peut en effet pas enfiler les vêtements de la Barbie traditionnelle. La nouvelle démarche de la marque vise à se rapprocher de la réalité de la population féminine américaine en abandonnant une partie des stéréotypes véhiculés par Barbie, au profit de nouveaux canons de beauté popularisés par des personnalités telles que Mariah Carey, Kim Kardashian, Beyoncé, Christina Hendricks31, Meghan Trainor, voire Melissa McCarthy et sa ligne de vêtements en « taille plus ».Développé dans le plus grand secret sous le nom de code de « Project Dawn »31, ce virage radical n’est pas sans risque : les clientes habituelles peuvent se sentir trahies, et les mères des petites filles à qui on offre une Barbie « Curvy » peuvent y voir une critique voilée de l’embonpoint de leur progéniture33. De plus, ce changement de stratégie va constituer un cauchemar logistique pour gérer dans la pratique ces nouvelles variantes, sans même parler des problèmes qu’il a fallu résoudre pour traduire les trois nouvelles appellations dans des douzaines de langues différentes. Face à la chute des ventes, cependant, Mattel n’avait plus le choix. Et les difficultés à affronter ne font que refléter le statut d’icône américaine qu’a atteint Barbie depuis bien des années, puisque 92 % des Américaines ont possédé une Barbie entre l’âge de 3 ans et l’âge de 12 ans. Toujours est-il que, selon Le Journal de Montréal qui publie les images de ces nouvelles « Barbie Fashionistas », « la nouvelle Barbie « Curvy » pourrait changer la façon dont les femmes se perçoivent ». Parallèlement aux poupées Barbie disponibles dans les grandes surfaces et à destination des enfants, la société Mattel commercialise depuis les années 1990 des poupées Barbie de collection. La marque s’inspire principalement de la culture populaire de masse telle que : le cinéma, la musique et la télévision, afin de créer une gamme exclusivement basée autour de ces disciplines. Ces poupées Barbie à tirage limité sont vendues dans des magasins spécialisés à un prix beaucoup plus élevé. (…) D’autres poupées Barbie sont habillées par de grands couturiers110, avec, entre autres, pour les cinquante ans de Barbie en 2009, cinquante créateurs qui ont participé au relooking de celle-ci. : Givenchy, Oscar de la Renta (1998), Karl Lagerfeld111 (2009), Calvin Klein, Versace, Vera Wang, Christian Dior (1995 et 1997), Louis Vuitton112 (2011), Yves Saint Laurent, Christian Louboutin, Jean Paul Gaultier (2 poupées), Robert Mackie, Chantal Thomass et plus récemment en 2014 : une « barbie » Karl Lagerfeld, etc. (…) Barbie est fréquemment associée au monde de la joaillerie, pour l’édition de poupées en éditions limitées. Ainsi, la poupée Barbie neuve la plus chère est celle créée par Stefano Canturi130 présentée en Australie en 2010, avec un tarif de 500 000 dollars. Le précédent record pour le prix unitaire datait de 2008 avec une poupée à 94 800 dollars présentée au Mexique. (…) En Arabie saoudite, pour justifier l’interdiction des poupées Barbie dans le royaume, le Comité pour la promotion de la vertu et la prévention du vice (organisme chargé de la police religieuse) déclara : « Les poupées Barbie juives, avec leurs vêtements révélateurs, leurs postures, accessoires et outils honteux sont un symbole de la décadence de l’Occident perverti. Prenons garde à ces dangers et faisons très attention. » Pour les psychiatres, Barbie est un fantasme d’adulte mais pas de petites filles. Dans un brûlot intitulé Toy-Monster : the Big Bad World of Mattel, le journaliste et essayiste américain Jerry Oppenheimer présente le designer de Barbie, Jack Ryan, comme un pervers sexuel. Pour l’essayiste, Barbie serait l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son inventeur : une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultrafine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. Des parents l’accusent de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie. La pédopsychiatre Gisèle George et la psychanalyste Claude Halmos rejettent l’idée que Barbie ait un quelconque pouvoir, cette dernière va plus loin en disant que la construction psychique d’un enfant dépend des adultes et non pas des objets qui l’entourent. Cette polémique persiste, et des chercheurs en médecine montrent que les mensurations de Barbie ne sont pas compatibles avec une vie normale, et qu’elle conduit à adopter des conduites alimentaires anorexiques. Fin 2013, une campagne est lancée en vue de promouvoir l’image d’une Barbie plus « ronde ». En 1992, Mattel commercialise la Teen Talk Barbie : elle peut émettre quelques phrases « comme les ados » à propos de shopping, vêtements, pizzas etc. La phrase : « Math class is tough! » (« Les maths, c’est dur ! ») attire la réprobation de l’Association américaine des femmes diplômées des universités (AAUW). Mattel retire rapidement la phrase du « répertoire » de Barbie. Par contre la phrase : « Allons faire les courses après l’école » ne fut jamais retirée de l’exemplaire français de la Teen Talk Barbie malgré les réticences de l’AAUW. Hugo Chávez, le président vénézuélien, a proposé de fabriquer des « poupées avec des visages d’Indiens » pour remplacer « la Barbie, qui n’a rien à voir avec notre culture »141. En 2010, la sortie de Barbie Vidéo Girl suscite l’inquiétude du FBI. Cette poupée équipée d’une caméra et d’un écran LCD pourrait être utilisée selon l’agence comme un moyen détourné de produire du contenu pédopornographique. Durant le premier semestre 2012, Barbie fait de la politique, mais sans prendre parti, avec la commercialisation de la poupée Yes She Can. La même année, Valeria Lukyanova se fait remarquer par les médias du monde entier en se faisant surnommer la « Barbie vivante ». À la suite de la publication d’un rapport en octobre 2013144, les associations Peuples Solidaires et China Labor Watch ont lancé une campagne pour dénoncer les conditions de travail des ouvrières et ouvriers chinois qui fabriquent les poupées Barbie. La campagne « Barbie ouvrière » a été lancée peu avant Noël 2013 afin de sensibiliser les consommateurs et de faire pression sur l’entreprise Mattel. Wikipedia
Lilli est une poupée mannequin produite de 1955 à 1961 par la société allemande O. & M. Hausser. Elle apparaît pour la première fois en 1952 dans une bande dessinée publiée dans le journal allemand Bild Zeitung. Sa morphologie adulte, ses cheveux implantés et sa fabrication en matière plastique avec plusieurs trousseaux de vêtements contemporains en tissus, ont été repris aux États-Unis pour devenir la poupée Barbie. À l’origine, Lilli est un personnage de bande dessinée créé par Reinhard Beuthien. Elle fait sa première apparition le 24 juin 1952 dans le journal Bild Zeitung. Devant le succès remporté par ce personnage, Bild décide d’en faire une poupée pour la commercialiser en tant que mascotte. Le journal fait alors appel à la société allemande O. & M. Hausser, un fabricant de jouets établi à Neustadt et dirigé par les frères Rolf et Kurt Hausser. Créée par Max Weissbrodt, la poupée Lilli est lancée le 12 août 1955. O. & M. Hausser lui adjoint des meubles ainsi qu’une garde-robe conséquente inspirée de la mode des années 50, dessinée par Martha Maar et confectionnée par la société 3M Puppenfabrik. Avec son corps de jeune femme sexy, sa bouche sensuelle, son maquillage et ses yeux « en coulisse », Lilli tranche avec les poupées-fillettes et les poupons joufflus. Elle promeut un nouveau modèle : la poupée mannequin. Des poupées-femmes existaient déjà avant l’apparition de Lilli mais dans la plupart des cas elles n’étaient pas considérées comme des jouets et n’étaient pas destinées aux enfants.L’arrivée de Barbie sur le marché du jouet va lui être fatale. Lors d’un séjour en Europe, Ruth Handler, co-fondatrice de la société Mattel avec son mari Elliot, découvre la poupée Lilli dans une boutique suisse. De retour aux États-Unis, Ruth Handler décide de s’en inspirer pour créer la poupée Barbie. Wikipedia
On s’en doutait, les mensurations de la poupée Barbie de Mattel sont inapplicables à un humain. Le site anglais rehabs.co a décidé de se pencher sur la question en comparant le corps de Barbie à celui d’une Américaine moyenne. Cette étude fait partie d’un rapport sur les désordres alimentaires et les problèmes des jeunes filles avec leur image. Le verdict est sans appel : si Barbie était en chair et en os, elle serait en très mauvaise santé. Son cou est beaucoup trop long et 15 cm plus fin que celui d’une femme normale. Sans ce soutien, sa tête tombe donc sur le côté. Avec une taille de 40 cm, impossible de loger tous les organes. Adieu l’estomac et une bonne partie de l’intestin. Sa taille est également trop fine puisqu’elle ne représenterait que 56% des hanches. Ses jambes, elles, sont anormalement longues et beaucoup trop maigres. Résultat, avec des chevilles de 15 cm, soit la même taille du pied d’un enfant de trois ans, elle ne tiendrait pas debout. Impossible de marcher donc, ni même de se soutenir avec les mains, car des poignets de 7,6 cm ne sont pas suffisants pour porter son corps. Si Barbie était vivante, elle serait donc constamment allongée, et ne pourrait pas survivre longtemps à cause de ses problèmes d’organes. Top santé
Mais vous ne vous rendez pas compte à quoi on s’est heurtés quand on a introduit Barbie en France il y a vingt-cinq ans. Aux mêmes comportements de refus que ceux qui avaient accueilli Barbie dix ans plus tôt aux Etats-Unis. Cette première poupée sexuée, en pleine Amérique puritaine, elle ne passait pas du tout. Nous avons mis dix ans à remonter la pente. Robert Gerson (Mattel France)
Certes, celui qui a conçu la Barbie n’avait pas une once de féminisme : il a projeté l’image d’un objet sexuel, d’après un prototype américain à la Jane Mansfield. En revanche, on ne peut pas donner à Barbie un pouvoir qu’elle n’a pas : une poupée ne peut pas influer sur l’orientation sexuelle, professionnelle, ou quoi que ce soit d’autre… Gisèle George (pédopsychiatre)
Il est devenu courant d’accuser les objets : la violence serait de la faute de la télé, l’anorexie, celle de Barbie… mais on oublie l’essentiel : la construction psychique d’un enfant dépend des adultes qui l’entourent. Une petite fille conçoit la féminité à travers ce que sa mère ressent et vit pour elle-même, et à travers la façon dont son père ou un compagnon masculin considère sa mère. Claude Halmos (psychanalyste)
Si Playmobil fait l’unanimité auprès des parents, ce n’est pas le cas de Barbie, la plus célèbre des poupées, qui a fêté ses 50 ans en 2009 et s’est retrouvée, cette année encore, parmi les cadeaux les plus offerts aux petites filles pour Noël. Avec ses mensurations improbables – soit 95-45-82 à l’échelle humaine -, Barbie est accusée de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie. Dans l’Hexagone, de plus en plus de mamans répugnent à l’offrir à leurs filles. Avec 3 millions de poupées vendues par an en France sur une cible de… 3 millions de petites filles âgées de 2 à 9 ans, le fabricant Mattel n’est pourtant pas encore aux abois. « 80 % de l’offre Barbie et ses accessoires, château, voiture, chevaux… est renouvelé chaque année », explique Arnaud Roland-Gosselin, directeur marketing de Mattel France. De quoi entretenir l’intérêt des petites consommatrices, qui possèdent, chacune, une moyenne de douze poupées. Dernière excentricité marketing en date, la sortie, pour les fêtes de fin d’année, d’une Barbie chaussée par le créateur Christian Louboutin : 115 euros le modèle avec ses escarpins à semelle rouge. En 2009, Barbie aura été à l’honneur : les plus grands créateurs lui ont consacré un défilé en février lors de la semaine de la mode à New York, un livre-coffret luxueux retraçant sa saga a été édité chez Assouline et les studios Universal ont annoncé qu’elle allait bientôt être l’héroïne d’une superproduction hollywoodienne. Pour autant, la poupée n’a pas fêté son cinquantième anniversaire en toute sérénité. Dans un brûlot intitulé Toy-Monster : the Big Bad World of Mattel (« Jouet-Monstre : le grand méchant monde de Mattel ») et publié aux Etats-Unis chez Wiley-Blackwell, le journaliste et essayiste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sérieusement le mythe. Auteur de la biographie non autorisée de Bill et Hillary Clinton, Jerry Oppenheimer présente dans son ouvrage le père de Barbie, Jack Ryan, comme un pervers sexuel. Pour l’essayiste, Barbie serait l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son inventeur : une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultrafine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. De quoi effrayer encore davantage les mamans ? (…) Les enfants ne voient pas le jouet au premier degré, comme les adultes, assure pour sa part Patrice Huerre, chef du service de psychiatrie de l’enfant et de l’adolescent à l’hôpital d’Antony (Hauts-de-Seine) et auteur de Place au jeu : jouer pour apprendre à vivre (Nathan, 144 pages, 14,95 euros). « Les enfants ne sont pas empêchés de rêver par la forme d’un objet, la preuve : d’un caillou, ils font un bolide », précise Patrice Huerre. En revanche, certains jouets, en rupture avec leur époque, peuvent, selon le psychiatre, avoir un pouvoir d’anticipation, comme la littérature de fiction. « Barbie, ce fantasme d’adulte, anticipe sur la révolution sexuelle, Mai 68, la contraception, et l’émancipation des femmes…, estime-t-il. Elle est entrée en résonance avec une attente implicite des enfants, qui sont ensuite devenus les adolescents des années 1968 ». Le médecin a coorganisé cette année au Musée des arts décoratifs de Paris une exposition intitulée « Quand je serai grand, je serai… » Dans ce cadre, il avait été demandé à 600 enfants de dire ce qu’ils aimeraient faire plus tard, et de désigner les jouets symbolisant le mieux leurs aspirations. On y trouvait en bonne place la fameuse Barbie. Le Monde
La milliardième Barbie va être vendue cette année. La maison Mattel, qui fabrique la poupée mannequin, a annoncé cette nouvelle de poids la semaine dernière, en la lestant d’autres chiffres considérables: six millions de Barbie vendues chaque année en France, une progression de 20% entre 1995 et 1996, six poupées en moyenne entre les mains de chaque fillette de ce pays. Une affaire qui marche, en somme. Et pourtant, comme à chaque fois qu’elle convoque la presse pour parler de Barbie, la firme s’est armée d’une escouade de spécialistes de l’enfance: psychologue, sociologue, pédiatre, professeur » Pour dire quoi? Que Barbie est «un jeu de rêve pour une meilleure adaptation à la réalité» (Armelle Le Bigot, chargée d’études), qu’elle est un «facteur de structuration de la personnalité chez la petite fille» (Dominique Charton, psychothérapeute), que «l’intérêt de Barbie est d’être liée aux évolutions sociales de la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle» (Gilles Brougère, professeur de sciences de l’éducation à Paris-Nord). En résumé, parents, «ne vous inquiétez pas »» (Edwige Antier, pédiatre). S’inquiéter? Bigre » Il y aurait donc lieu de se faire du souci quand une gamine joue aux Barbie. C’est en tout cas ce que Mattel semble indiquer en s’évertuant ainsi à se justifier. (…) Dans le dossier de presse, Gilles Brougère rappelle qu’«à cette époque, Barbie, plus qu’aujourd’hui, sentait le soufre.» De son côté, Armelle Le Bigot, qui écoute depuis des années des mères pour le compte de Mattel, se souvient que «les premières réactions des mamans étaient plutôt musclées. Elles nous parlaient de « cette bonne femme, « cette Américaine, « cette pute» » Par bonheur pour Mattel, les premières utilisatrices de Barbie ont grandi, sont devenues parfois mères à leur tour et c’est cette génération-là qui cause aujourd’hui dans les panels d’Armelle Le Bigot. Désormais, c’est du tout-cuit. «Barbie est dédiabolisée», diagnostique la chargée d’études. Les mères seraient même rassurées de voir que leurs filles, même en caleçon et baskets, «rêvent de belles robes et de paillettes, comme elles au même âge». Ces changements n’ont pas bousculé l’approche prudente des dirigeants de Mattel France. Interrogé sur cette stratégie défensive, le PDG finit par admettre que «non, Barbie ne dérange plus». Et ajoute: «Je me demande si ce n’est pas moi qui me fais un peu de cinéma de temps en temps. » Sibylle Vincendon
Barbie idéalisée, un peu trop parfaite, a sans doute existé à une certaine époque mais elle appartient aujourd’hui au passé. Pour nous, toutes les filles sont belles, quelles que soient leur silhouette, leur taille, la couleur de leurs cheveux, et les poupées doivent être le reflet de cette diversité. Robert Best (designer en chef chez Mattel)
Barbie est bien plus qu’un simple jouet, elle est un personnage emblématique de notre culture et de notre société. L’engouement pour Barbie s’est appuyé sur l’univers très vite créé par Mattel autour du personnage, avec sa famille, ses amis, ses activités, une savante alchimie qui permet aux enfants de projeter leur imagination dans toutes les situations. Anne Monier (Musée des Arts Décoratifs)
C’est la poupée la plus célèbre du monde, et sans doute aussi la plus critiquée, pour ses mensurations improbables et son inatteignable perfection. Barbie se dévoile dans une exposition inédite à Paris qui raconte l’histoire de cette icône de beauté de 29 centimètres. « Barbie est bien plus qu’un simple jouet, elle est un personnage emblématique de notre culture et de notre société », explique à l’AFP Anne Monier, commissaire de l’exposition (jusqu’au 18 septembre au Musée des Arts Décoratifs), la première de cette ampleur dans un musée français. Quelque 700 poupées y sont présentées avec autant de tenues. Avec ses cheveux blond platine, ses jambes interminables et sa poitrine généreuse, Barbie s’est distinguée dès sa naissance, il y a 57 ans, par sa ressemblance avec une jeune femme adulte, une révolution dans le monde des poupons qui régnaient jusqu’alors en maîtres dans les coffres à jouets. Oeuvre de l’Américaine Ruth Handler, épouse du cofondateur de la société Mattel, qui lui donna le prénom de sa fille Barbara, elle fit sa première apparition publique le 9 mars 1959, à la foire du jouet de New York, avant de connaître un immense succès commercial, d’abord aux Etats-Unis puis en Europe. Le cap du milliard de Barbie vendues dans le monde a été franchi dans le monde en 1997. Au fil des années, la reine des poupées a élargi la palette de ses compétences, des plus classiques aux plus insolites: infirmière, top modèle, danseuse, gymnaste mais aussi astronaute (elle a posé le pied sur la Lune avant Neil Armstrong) ou encore présidente des Etats-Unis. Cette gloire planétaire va apporter à Barbie son lot de controverses, ses détracteurs lui reprochant de renvoyer une image trop stéréotypée de la femme, celle d’une européenne, active, blonde et mince. Des psychiatres ont affirmé qu’elle était un fantasme d’adulte avant d’être un jouet de petites filles. Des parents l’ont accusée d’encourager l’anorexie chez les adolescentes. Des scientifiques sont allés jusqu’à démontrer que si Barbie était une vraie femme, elle pèserait 49 kilos et mesurerait 175 cm, son tour de taille ferait 45 cm et ses pieds 21 cm. Ils en ont conclu que la pauvre créature serait alors obligée de marcher à quatre pattes car ses pieds et ses jambes ne pourraient pas la porter. En 2009, le journaliste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sévèrement l’image de la belle – qui célébrait cette année-là son cinquantième anniversaire – en la décrivant comme l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son designer: une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultra fine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. « La Barbie idéalisée, un peu trop parfaite, a sans doute existé à une certaine époque mais elle appartient aujourd’hui au passé », assure à l’AFP Robert Best, designer en chef chez Mattel. « Pour nous, toutes les filles sont belles, quelles que soient leur silhouette, leur taille, la couleur de leurs cheveux, et les poupées doivent être le reflet de cette diversité », poursuit-il. Témoin de cette volonté, les trois nouvelles versions lancées par Mattel en début d’année: la grande, la petite, et surtout la ronde, une Barbie potelée, tout en courbes, qui s’éloigne de la poupée d’origine pour s’approcher de Madame Tout Le Monde. Une stratégie visant aussi à endiguer l’érosion des ventes. L’enseigne américaine a déjà fait plusieurs tentatives pour ouvrir Barbie à la différence, sans pour autant faire évoluer ses mensurations. En 1980, elle avait commercialisé Black Barbie, une Barbie noire. L’arrivée des trois nouvelles silhouettes a été célébrée par l’hebdomadaire américain Time qui a mis Barbie en couverture en janvier avec cette question, posée par la poupée elle-même: « A présent, peut-on arrêter de parler de mon corps ? » Le Parisien
La poupée traverse les générations. Depuis sa création, 1 milliard de modèles ont été vendus dans le monde et chaque année, environ 58 millions de poupées sont achetées. En 1959, la poupée californienne, produite par Mattel, débarque dans les foyers comme un pavé dans la marre. Pour la première fois, une poupée type adulte et sexualisée vient casser les modèles traditionnels des poupées enfantines. Emerge alors un jouet aux allures de femme irréaliste : des jambes interminables, une poitrine pulpeuse et une taille de guêpe. Barbie a alors des proportions inhumaines. Face aux critiques récurrentes, et surtout à la chute des ventes, Mattel opère une petite révolution en 2015 : les premières poupées à corpulences dites “normales” sont commercialisées. Aujourd’hui, Barbie n’est plus seulement cette mannequin blonde californienne au teint hâlé. Moins stéréotypée, elle est blonde, brune, rousse, à la peau noire, blanche, métisse… Elle met des pantalons et des jupes, travaille au McDo, danse ou dirige une entreprise. Selon la marque, 55% des poupées vendues dans le monde n’auraient ni les cheveux blonds, ni les yeux bleus. La marque s’efforce de déconstruire les clichés sexistes de sa poupée, parfois non sans mal. En novembre 2014, Mattel sort Barbie, je peux être une ingénieure informatique, un livre qui dépeint une jeune femme nulle en informatique et incapable de faire quoique ce soit sans l’aide de ses amis masculins… Face à la polémique, Mattel présente ses excuses et retire le livre de la vente. Les Echos
Puisant dans les collections des Arts Décoratifs et dans les archives inédites de la maison Mattel®, l’exposition s’efforce d’offrir deux lectures possibles, pour les enfants en évoquant la pure jubilation d’un jouet universellement connu, et pour les adultes, en replaçant cette figure phare depuis 1959 dans une perspective historique et sociologique. 700 Barbies sont ainsi déployées sur 1500m2, aux côtés d’œuvres issues des collections du musée (poupées, tenues), mais également d’œuvres d’artistes contemporains, de documents (journaux, photographies, vidéo) qui contribuent à contextualiser les « vies de Barbie ». Au-delà d’être un jouet, Barbie est le reflet d’une culture et de son évolution. On l’a d’abord associée à l’American way of life avant d’incarner une dimension plus universelle, épousant les changements sociaux, politiques, culturels. Elle évolue dans le confort moderne tout en épousant de nouvelles causes, questionnant les stéréotypes, haïe pour ce qu’elle représenterait d’une femme idéalisée, et pourtant autonome et indépendante, adoptant toutes ambitions de l’époque contemporaine. Ses silhouettes, ses coiffures, ses costumes, sont le fruit de quelques secrets de fabrication dont certains sont révélés pour l’occasion à travers maquettes ou témoignages de ceux qui font le succès de Barbie. Un succès qui tient à la capacité de la poupée à suivre l’évolution de son époque pour se renouveler tout en restant la même. Un succès qui imprègne la culture populaire depuis sa création jusqu’à nos jours, mais qui inspire aussi les artistes. Certains, comme Andy Warhol, en ont fait le portrait quand d’autres l’ont largement détourné. Nombreux sont les créateurs qui ont croisé son chemin de passionnée de mode, pour laquelle chacun a déjà imaginé les tenues les plus extravagantes ou les plus élégantes. Quelques-unes de ses robes de collections sont ainsi signées par des couturiers, parmi lesquels Thierry Mugler, Christian Lacroix, Jean Paul Gaultier, Agnès B, Cacharel ou encore Christian Louboutin. Sa garde-robe déployée pour l’occasion sur plusieurs mètres de cimaises n’est autre que le reflet de la mode dont le musée sortira en contrepoint quelques-unes des pièces les plus parlantes. Musée des Arts décoratifs
When I set out to write about the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of the “doll wars”, at the centre of it was the doll that has dominated the pink toy shelves for three generations — Barbie. I wanted to uncover her secret history and how she has battled to keep her image and her near-monopoly market power for over five decades. The story of Barbie begins with Ruth Handler, born Ruth Moskowicz, the youngest of ten children, born in 1916 to a Jewish-Polish family in Colorado. Her father, a blacksmith, emigrated from Poland, finding work in Denver and sending for his wife and children two years later. The Moskowiczs were extremely poor and, when Ruth’s mother became ill, Ruth’s sister turned surrogate mother, which some people misinterpreted: “It has been suggested to me once or twice that this supposed ‘rejection’ by my mother may have been what spurred me to become the kind of person who always has to prove herself. This seems like utter nonsense.” Nonsense or not, the doll she claims to have invented would never become a mother. Rather, Barbie was destined to live the early dreams of Hertopia: a self-realised woman on her own. Ruth founded Mattel with her husband Elliot Handler, whom she had met at a Jewish youth dance in 1929. They married and had a daughter and a son, Barbara and Kenneth — the dolls Barbie and Ken were born later. In 1956, during a family trip to Switzerland, Handler came across a German doll called Bild Lilli. Lilli was a popular doll in post-war Germany but she was not a child’s plaything, she was an adult toy based on a cartoon. Bluntly, Lilli dolls were designed for sex-hungry German men who bought her for girlfriends and mistresses in lieu of flowers, or as a suggestive gift. Her promotional brochures had such phrases as “Gentlemen prefer Lilli. Whether more or less naked, Lilli is always discreet.” In Switzerland, Handler tucked Lilli in her suitcase, brought her back to the Mattel headquarters in California and launched Barbie based on her image. The story of Barbie’s success is inextricably tied to her secret past. A multimillion-dollar campaign began, led by another controversial Jewish immigrant, Ernst Ditcher, an Austrian psychologist turned American marketing guru. Dr Dichter used Freudian psychology to convince mothers to bring a hyper-sexualised adult doll into the hearts and minds of little girls. The Barbie campaign, along with many other consumer marketing campaigns he led, made him the nemesis of mid-century feminists. Dichter’s notorious reputation was based on his manipulation of human desire. He applied psychoanalysis to selling, forever shaping America’s consumption fetishism: a desire to own stuff — which has yet to subside. As Barbie’s sales soared, Lilli’s owners sued unsuccessfully for patent infringement. Until the early 2000s, Barbie reigned supreme. The challenge, when it came, was from a different doll, and another Jewish entrepreneur. In 1995, Islamic fundamentalists in Kuwait issued a fatwa against Barbie, a ruling under Islamic law prohibiting the buying or selling of this she-devil. In 2003, when Saudi Arabia outlawed the sale of Barbie dolls, the Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice announced that the “Jewish Barbie” is the symbol of decadence to the perverted West. Orly Lobel
So it turns out Barbie’s original design was based on a German adult gag-gift escort doll named Lilli. That’s right, she wasn’t a dentist or a surgeon, an Olympian gymnast, a pet stylist or an ambassador for world peace. And she certainly wasn’t a toy for little girls… Unbeknownst to most, Barbie actually started out life in the late 1940s as a German cartoon character created by artist Reinhard Beuthien for the Hamburg-based tabloid, Bild-Zeitung. The comic strip character was known as “Bild Lilli”, a post-war gold-digging buxom broad who got by in life seducing wealthy male suitors. She was famously quick-witted and known to talk back when it came to male authority. In one cartoon, Lilli is warned by a policeman for illegally wearing a bikini out on the sidewalk. Lilli responds, “Oh, and in your opinion, what part should I take off?” She became so popular that in 1953, the newspaper decided to market a three-dimensional version which was sold as an adult novelty toy, available to buy from bars, tobacco kiosks and adult toy stores. They were often given out as bachelor party gag gifts and dangled from a car’s rearview mirror. Parents considered the doll inappropriate for children and a German brochure from the 1950s described Lilli as “always discreet,” and with her impressive wardrobe, she was “the star of every bar”. She did indeed have such a wide range of outfits and accessories you could buy for her, that eventually little girls began wanting her as a playdoll too. While toy factories tried to cash in on her popularity with children, Lilli still remained a successful adult novelty, especially outside of Germany. A journalist for The New Yorker magazine, Ariel Levy, later referred to Lilli as a “sex doll”. In the 1950s, one of the founders of Mattel, Ruth Handler (pictured above), was travelling to Europe and bought a few Lilli dolls to take home. She re-worked the design of the doll and later debuted Barbie at the New York toy fair on March 9, 1959. Mattel acquired the rights to Bild Lilli in 1964, and production of the German doll ceased. (Funny how Barbie’s lighter skin tone was just about the only noticeable change in the early days). (…) So which version would you prefer? Barbie’s ballsy European precursor or Mattel’s squeaky clean lookalike? MessyNessy

Après l’école, Supermanl’humourla fête nationale, Thanksgiving, les droits civiques, les Harlem globetrotters et le panier à trois points, le soft power, l’Amérique, le génocide et même eux-mêmes  et sans parler des chansons de Noël et de la musique pop ou d’Hollywood, la littérature… les poupées Barbie  !

Corps de jeune femme sexy, bouche sensuelle, maquillage, yeux « en coulisse », silhouette élancée, poitrine pulpeuse, taille de guêpe, jambes interminables, pute, call-girl de luxe, seins en obus, visage enfantin, objet sexuel,  prototype américain à la Jane Mansfield, fantasme d’adulte, qui fausse l’image de la femme, encourage l’anorexie, mensurations improbables, proportions inhumaines, inatteignable perfection, icône de beauté, image trop stéréotypée de la femme, européenne, active, blonde et mince, vêtements révélateurs, postures, accessoires et outils honteux, menace morale, symbole de la décadence de l’Occident perverti, Américaine, juive …

Au lendemain de la fête des droits de la femme …

Et en ce 60e anniversaire de la poupée Barbie

Devinez par qui a été (re)créée …

A partir de la sulfureuse mascotte pour hommes tirée d’une bande dessinée du tabloid allemand Bild …

Et avant sa renaissance, politiquement correct et diversité obligent il y a trois ans, en modèle aux multiples professions, formes et tailles de la femme moderne aux 27 teints de peau, 22 couleurs d’yeux et 24 coiffures …

Comme, avant elle l’ultime repoussoir Disney, sa muséification française …

Cette ultime icône de la beauté américaine…

Devenue épouvantail préféré des féministes et des psys …

Et symbole juif, pour les diverses polices religieuses des Etats musulmans, de la « décadence de l’Occident perverti » ?

Saudi Religious Police Say Barbie Is a Moral Threat
Fox News
September 10, 2003

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates —  Saudi Arabia’s religious police have declared Barbie dolls a threat to morality, complaining that the revealing clothes of the « Jewish » toy — already banned in the kingdom — are offensive to Islam.

The Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice, as the religious police are officially known, lists the dolls on a section of its Web site devoted to items deemed offensive to the conservative Saudi interpretation of Islam.

« Jewish Barbie dolls, with their revealing clothes and shameful postures, accessories and tools are a symbol of decadence to the perverted West. Let us beware of her dangers and be careful, » said a message posted on the site.

A spokesman for the Committee said the campaign against Barbie — banned for more than 10 years — coincides with the start of the school year to remind children and their parents of the doll’s negative qualities.

Speaking to The Associated Press by telephone from the holy city of Medina (search), he claimed that Barbie was modeled after a real-life Jewish woman.

Although illegal, Barbies are found on the black market, where a contraband doll could cost $27 or more.

Sheik Abdulla al-Merdas, a preacher in a Riyadh mosque, said the muttawa, the committee’s enforcers, take their anti-Barbie campaign to the shops, confiscating dolls from sellers and imposing a fine.

« It is no problem that little girls play with dolls. But these dolls should not have the developed body of a woman and wear revealing clothes, » al-Merdas said.

« These revealing clothes will be imprinted in their minds and they will refuse to wear the clothes we are used to as Muslims. »

U.S.-based Mattel Inc. (search), which has been making the doll since 1959, did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment.

Women in Saudi Arabia must cover themselves from head to toe with a black cloak in public. They are not allowed to drive and cannot go out in public unaccompanied by a male family member.

Other items listed as violations on the site included Valentine’s Day gifts, perfume bottles in the shape of women’s bodies, clothing with logos that include a cross, and decorative copies of religious items or text — offensive because they could be damaged and thus insult Islam.

An exhibition of all the offensive items is found in Medina, and mobile tours go around to schools and other public areas in the kingdom.

The Committee acts as a monitoring and punishing agency, propagating conservative Islamic beliefs according to the teachings of the puritan Wahhabi (search) sect, adhered to the kingdom since the 18th century, and enforcing strict moral code.

Voir aussi:

Meet Lilli, the High-end German Call Girl Who Became America’s Iconic Barbie Doll

MessyNessy
January 29, 2016

So it turns out Barbie’s original design was based on a German adult gag-gift escort doll named Lilli. That’s right, she wasn’t a dentist or a surgeon, an Olympian gymnast, a pet stylist or an ambassador for world peace. And she certainly wasn’t a toy for little girls…

Unbeknownst to most, Barbie actually started out life in the late 1940s as a German cartoon character created by artist Reinhard Beuthien for the Hamburg-based tabloid, Bild-Zeitung. The comic strip character was known as “Bild Lilli”, a post-war gold-digging buxom broad who got by in life seducing wealthy male suitors.

She was famously quick-witted and known to talk back when it came to male authority. In one cartoon, Lilli is warned by a policeman for illegally wearing a bikini out on the sidewalk. Lilli responds, “Oh, and in your opinion, what part should I take off?”

She became so popular that in 1953, the newspaper decided to market a three-dimensional version which was sold as an adult novelty toy, available to buy from bars, tobacco kiosks and adult toy stores. They were often given out as bachelor party gag gifts and dangled from a car’s rearview mirror.

Parents considered the doll inappropriate for children and a German brochure from the 1950s described Lilli as “always discreet,” and with her impressive wardrobe, she was “the star of every bar”. She did indeed have such a wide range of outfits and accessories you could buy for her, that eventually little girls began wanting her as a playdoll too. While toy factories tried to cash in on her popularity with children, Lilli still remained a successful adult novelty, especially outside of Germany. A journalist for The New Yorker magazine, Ariel Levy, later referred to Lilli as a “sex doll”.

In the 1950s, one of the founders of Mattel, Ruth Handler (pictured above), was travelling to Europe and bought a few Lilli dolls to take home. She re-worked the design of the doll and later debuted Barbie at the New York toy fair on March 9, 1959.

Mattel acquired the rights to Bild Lilli in 1964, and production of the German doll ceased. (Funny how Barbie’s lighter skin tone was just about the only noticeable change in the early days).

And the rest is a history you’re a little more familiar with, and no doubt one Mattel is a little more comfortable with…

So which version would you prefer? Barbie’s ballsy European precursor or Mattel’s squeaky clean lookalike?

Voir également:

Barbie Millicent Roberts, from Wisconsin US, is celebrating her 60th birthday. She is a toy. A doll. Yet she has grown into a phenomenon. An iconic figure, recognised by millions of children and adults worldwide, she has remained a popular choice for more than six decades – a somewhat unprecedented feat for a doll in the toy industry.

She is also, arguably, the original “influencer” of young girls, pushing an image and lifestyle that can shape what they aspire to be like. So, at 60, how is the iconic Barbie stepping up to support her fellow women and girls?

When Barbie was born many toys for young girls were of the baby doll variety; encouraging nurturing and motherhood and perpetuating the idea that a girl’s future role would be one of homemaker and mother. Thus Barbie was born out of a desire to give girls something more. Barbie was a fashion model with her own career. The idea that girls could play with her and imagine their future selves, whatever that may be, was central to the Barbie brand.

However, the “something more” that was given fell short of empowering girls, by today’s standards. And Barbie has been described as “an agent of female oppression”. The focus on play that imagined being grown up, with perfect hair, a perfect body, a plethora of outfits, a sexualised physique, and a perfect first love (in the equally perfect Ken) has been criticised over the years for perpetuating a different kind of ideal – one centred around body image, with dangerous consequences for girls’ mental and physical health.

Body image

Toys have a significant influence on the development of children, far beyond innocent play. Through play, children mimic social norms and subtle messages regarding gender roles, and stereotypes can be transmitted by seemingly ubiquitous toys. Early studies in the 1930s by Kenneth and Mamie Clark showed how young black girls would more often choose to play with a white doll rather than a black doll, as the white doll was considered more beautiful – a reflection of internalised feelings as a result of racism.

The same supposition – that girls playing with Barbie may internalise the unrealistic body that she innocently promotes – has been the subject of research and what is clear is that parents are often unaware of the potential effects on body image when approving toys for their children.

A group of UK researchers in 2006 found that young girls aged between five-and-a-half and seven-and-a-half years old who were exposed to a story book with Barbie doll images had greater body dissatisfaction and lower body esteem at the end of the study compared to young girls who were shown the same story with an Emme doll (a fashion doll with a more average body shape) or a story with no images.

More worrying, there were no differences between groups of girls aged five-and-a half and eight-and-a-half years of age, with all girls showing heightened body dissatisfaction. Another study ten years later found that exposure to Barbie dolls led to a higher thin-ideal internalisation, supporting findings that girls exposed to thin dolls eat less in subsequent tests.

Exposure to unhealthy, unrealistic and unattainable body images is associated with eating disorder risk. Indeed, the increasing prevalence of eating disorder symptoms in non-Western cultures has been linked to exposure to Western ideals of beauty. Barbie’s original proportions gave her a body mass index (BMI) so low that she would be unlikely to menstruate and the probability of this body shape is less than one in 100,000 women.

Changing shape

With growing awareness of body image disturbances and cultural pressures on young girls, many parents have begun to look for more empowering toys for their daughters. Barbie’s manufacturer, Mattel, has been listening, possibly prompted by falling sales, and in 2016 a new range of Barbies was launched that celebrated different body shapes, sizes, hair types and skin tones.

These have not been without criticism; the naming of the dolls based on their significant body part (curvy, tall, petite) is questionable and again draws attention to the body, while “curvy” Barbie, with her wider hips and larger thighs, remains very thin. Despite this, these additions are a welcome step in the right direction in allowing girls to play with Barbie dolls that provide more diversity.

More than a body

If Barbie was about empowering girls to be anything that they want to be, then the Barbie brand has tried to move with the times by providing powerful role playing tools for girls. No longer is Barbie portrayed in roles such as the air hostess – or, when promoted to pilot, still dressed in a feminine and pink version of the uniform. Modern pilot Barbie is more appropriately dressed, with a male air steward as a sidekick.

Such changes can have a remarkable impact on how young girls imagine their career possibilities, potential futures, and the roles that they are expected to take. Mattel’s move to honour 20 women role models including Japanese Haitian tennis player Naomi Osaka – currently the world number one – with her own doll is a positive step in bringing empowering role models into the consciousness of young girls.

Children who are less stereotyped in their gender and play are less likely to be stereotyped in their occupations and are more creative. But of course, society needs to mirror this. In the week when Virgin Atlantic abolished the requirement to wear make up for female cabin crew, the arduous journey away from constraining female body and beauty ideals could slowly be taking off. But in a culture where female ageing is now an aesthetic pressure felt by many, perhaps Mattel will show us diversity in age and womanhood? Happy 60th birthday to the still 20-year-old looking Barbie.

Voir de même:

(Reuters) – Barbie, the fashion doll famous around the world, celebrates her 60th anniversary on Saturday with new collections honoring real-life role models and careers in which women remain under-represented.

It is part of Barbie’s evolution over the decades since her debut at the New York Toy Fair on March 9, 1959.

To mark the milestone, manufacturer Mattel Inc created Barbie versions of 20 inspirational women from Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka to British model and activist Adwoa Aboah.

The company also released six dolls representing the careers of astronaut, pilot, athlete, journalist, politician and firefighter, all fields in which Mattel said women are still under-represented.

Barbie is a cultural icon celebrated by the likes of Andy Warhol, the Paris Louvre museum and the 1997 satirical song “Barbie Girl” by Scandinavian pop group Aqua. She was named after the daughter of creator Ruth Handler.

Barbie has taken on more than 200 careers from surgeon to video game developer since her debut, when she wore a black-and-white striped swimsuit. After criticism that Barbie’s curvy body promoted an unrealistic image for young girls, Mattel added a wider variety of skin tones, body shapes, hijab-wearing dolls and science kits to make Barbie more educational.

Barbie is also going glamorous for her six-decade milestone. A diamond-anniversary doll wears a sparkly silver ball gown.

Voir de plus:

Un milliard de Barbie adoptées. Mal acceptée il y a vingt-cinq ans, la poupée ne fait plus peur aux mères.
Sibylle Vincendon
Libération
28 juin 1997

La milliardième Barbie va être vendue cette année. La maison Mattel, qui fabrique la poupée mannequin, a annoncé cette nouvelle de poids la semaine dernière, en la lestant d’autres chiffres considérables: six millions de Barbie vendues chaque année en France, une progression de 20% entre 1995 et 1996, six poupées en moyenne entre les mains de chaque fillette de ce pays. Une affaire qui marche, en somme. Et pourtant, comme à chaque fois qu’elle convoque la presse pour parler de Barbie, la firme s’est armée d’une escouade de spécialistes de l’enfance: psychologue, sociologue, pédiatre, professeur » Pour dire quoi? Que Barbie est «un jeu de rêve pour une meilleure adaptation à la réalité» (Armelle Le Bigot, chargée d’études), qu’elle est un «facteur de structuration de la personnalité chez la petite fille» (Dominique Charton, psychothérapeute), que «l’intérêt de Barbie est d’être liée aux évolutions sociales de la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle» (Gilles Brougère, professeur de sciences de l’éducation à Paris-Nord). En résumé, parents, «ne vous inquiétez pas »» (Edwige Antier, pédiatre).

S’inquiéter?

Bigre » Il y aurait donc lieu de se faire du souci quand une gamine joue aux Barbie. C’est en tout cas ce que Mattel semble indiquer en s’évertuant ainsi à se justifier. «Mais vous ne vous rendez pas compte à quoi on s’est heurtés quand on a introduit Barbie en France il y a vingt-cinq ans», s’exclame Robert Gerson, le PDG de Mattel France. «Aux mêmes comportements de refus que ceux qui avaient accueilli Barbie dix ans plus tôt aux Etats-Unis. Cette première poupée sexuée, en pleine Amérique puritaine, elle ne passait pas du tout » Nous avons mis dix ans à remonter la pente.» Dans le dossier de presse, Gilles Brougère rappelle qu’«à cette époque, Barbie, plus qu’aujourd’hui, sentait le soufre.» De son côté, Armelle Le Bigot, qui écoute depuis des années des mères pour le compte de Mattel, se souvient que «les premières réactions des mamans étaient plutôt musclées. Elles nous parlaient de « cette bonne femme, « cette Américaine, « cette pute» » Par bonheur pour Mattel, les premières utilisatrices de Barbie ont grandi, sont devenues parfois mères à leur tour et c’est cette génération-là qui cause aujourd’hui dans les panels d’Armelle Le Bigot. Désormais, c’est du tout-cuit. «Barbie est dédiabolisée», diagnostique la chargée d’études. Les mères seraient même rassurées de voir que leurs filles, même en caleçon et baskets, «rêvent de belles robes et de paillettes, comme elles au même âge». Ces changements n’ont pas bousculé l’approche prudente des dirigeants de Mattel France. Interrogé sur cette stratégie défensive, le PDG finit par admettre que «non, Barbie ne dérange plus». Et ajoute: «Je me demande si ce n’est pas moi qui me fais un peu de cinéma de temps en temps»;

Voir de même:

Pour les psychiatres, Barbie est un fantasme d’adulte mais pas de petites filles
Si Barbie s’est retrouvée, cette année encore, parmi les cadeaux les plus offerts aux petites filles pour Noël, elle est accusée de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie.
Véronique Lorelle
Le Monde
29 décembre 2009

Si Playmobil fait l’unanimité auprès des parents, ce n’est pas le cas de Barbie, la plus célèbre des poupées, qui a fêté ses 50 ans en 2009 et s’est retrouvée, cette année encore, parmi les cadeaux les plus offerts aux petites filles pour Noël. Avec ses mensurations improbables – soit 95-45-82 à l’échelle humaine -, Barbie est accusée de fausser l’image de la femme et d’encourager notamment l’anorexie. Dans l’Hexagone, de plus en plus de mamans répugnent à l’offrir à leurs filles.
Avec 3 millions de poupées vendues par an en France sur une cible de… 3 millions de petites filles âgées de 2 à 9 ans, le fabricant Mattel n’est pourtant pas encore aux abois. « 80 % de l’offre Barbie et ses accessoires, château, voiture, chevaux… est renouvelé chaque année », explique Arnaud Roland-Gosselin, directeur marketing de Mattel France.
De quoi entretenir l’intérêt des petites consommatrices, qui possèdent, chacune, une moyenne de douze poupées. Dernière excentricité marketing en date, la sortie, pour les fêtes de fin d’année, d’une Barbie chaussée par le créateur Christian Louboutin : 115 euros le modèle avec ses escarpins à semelle rouge.
En 2009, Barbie aura été à l’honneur : les plus grands créateurs lui ont consacré un défilé en février lors de la semaine de la mode à New York, un livre-coffret luxueux retraçant sa saga a été édité chez Assouline et les studios Universal ont annoncé qu’elle allait bientôt être l’héroïne d’une superproduction hollywoodienne. Pour autant, la poupée n’a pas fêté son cinquantième anniversaire en toute sérénité.
Dans un brûlot intitulé Toy-Monster : the Big Bad World of Mattel (« Jouet-Monstre : le grand méchant monde de Mattel ») et publié aux Etats-Unis chez Wiley-Blackwell, le journaliste et essayiste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sérieusement le mythe. Auteur de la biographie non autorisée de Bill et Hillary Clinton, Jerry Oppenheimer présente dans son ouvrage le père de Barbie, Jack Ryan, comme un pervers sexuel. Pour l’essayiste, Barbie serait l’incarnation du fantasme ultime de son inventeur : une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultrafine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin. De quoi effrayer encore davantage les mamans ?
« Certes, celui qui a conçu la Barbie n’avait pas une once de féminisme : il a projeté l’image d’un objet sexuel, d’après un prototype américain à la Jane Mansfield, estime Gisèle George, pédopsychiatre, auteur de La Confiance en soi de votre enfant (Odile Jacob, 2008, 227 p., 7,50 euros). En revanche, on ne peut pas donner à Barbie un pouvoir qu’elle n’a pas : une poupée ne peut pas influer sur l’orientation sexuelle, professionnelle, ou quoi que ce soit d’autre… »
Pouvoir d’anticipation
Un point de vue que partage Claude Halmos, psychanalyste et écrivain. « Il est devenu courant d’accuser les objets : la violence serait de la faute de la télé, l’anorexie, celle de Barbie… mais on oublie l’essentiel : la construction psychique d’un enfant dépend des adultes qui l’entourent. » Selon la psychanalyste, « une petite fille conçoit la féminité à travers ce que sa mère ressent et vit pour elle-même, et à travers la façon dont son père ou un compagnon masculin considère sa mère ».Les enfants ne voient pas le jouet au premier degré, comme les adultes, assure pour sa part Patrice Huerre, chef du service de psychiatrie de l’enfant et de l’adolescent à l’hôpital d’Antony (Hauts-de-Seine) et auteur de Place au jeu : jouer pour apprendre à vivre (Nathan, 144 pages, 14,95 euros).
« Les enfants ne sont pas empêchés de rêver par la forme d’un objet, la preuve : d’un caillou, ils font un bolide », précise Patrice Huerre.
En revanche, certains jouets, en rupture avec leur époque, peuvent, selon le psychiatre, avoir un pouvoir d’anticipation, comme la littérature de fiction. « Barbie, ce fantasme d’adulte, anticipe sur la révolution sexuelle, Mai 68, la contraception, et l’émancipation des femmes…, estime-t-il. Elle est entrée en résonance avec une attente implicite des enfants, qui sont ensuite devenus les adolescents des années 1968″.
Le médecin a coorganisé cette année au Musée des arts décoratifs de Paris une exposition intitulée « Quand je serai grand, je serai… » Dans ce cadre, il avait été demandé à 600 enfants de dire ce qu’ils aimeraient faire plus tard, et de désigner les jouets symbolisant le mieux leurs aspirations. On y trouvait en bonne place la fameuse Barbie.
Voir de plus:

On s’en doutait, les mensurations de la poupée Barbie de Mattel sont inapplicables à un humain. Le site anglais rehabs.co a décidé de se pencher sur la question en comparant le corps de Barbie à celui d’une Américaine moyenne. Cette étude fait partie d’un rapport sur les désordres alimentaires et les problèmes des jeunes filles avec leur image. Le verdict est sans appel : si Barbie était en chair et en os, elle serait en très mauvaise santé.

Son cou est beaucoup trop long et 15 cm plus fin que celui d’une femme normale. Sans ce soutient, sa tête tombe donc sur le côté. Avec une taille de 40 cm, impossible de loger tous les organes. Adieu l’estomac et une bonne partie de l’intestin. Sa taille est également trop fine puisqu’elle ne représenterait que 56% des hanches. Ses jambes, elles, sont anormalement longues et beaucoup trop maigres.

Résultat, avec des chevilles de 15 cm, soit la même taille du pied d’un enfant de trois ans, elle ne tiendrait pas debout. Impossible de marcher donc, ni même de se soutenir avec les mains, car des poignets de 7,6 cm ne sont pas suffisants pour porter son corps.

Si Barbie était vivante, elle serait donc constamment allongée, et ne pourrait pas survivre longtemps à cause de ses problèmes d’organes.

Voir encore:

Blonde et icône à la fois, la poupée Barbie entre au musée à Paris

Le Parisien
10 mars 2016

C’est la poupée la plus célèbre du monde, et sans doute aussi la plus critiquée, pour ses mensurations improbables et son inatteignable perfection. Barbie se dévoile dans une exposition inédite à Paris qui raconte l’histoire de cette icône de beauté de 29 centimètres.
« Barbie est bien plus qu’un simple jouet, elle est un personnage emblématique de notre culture et de notre société », explique à l’AFP Anne Monier, commissaire de l’exposition (jusqu’au 18 septembre au Musée des Arts Décoratifs), la première de cette ampleur dans un musée français. Quelque 700 poupées y sont présentées avec autant de tenues.
Avec ses cheveux blond platine, ses jambes interminables et sa poitrine généreuse, Barbie s’est distinguée dès sa naissance, il y a 57 ans, par sa ressemblance avec une jeune femme adulte, une révolution dans le monde des poupons qui régnaient jusqu’alors en maîtres dans les coffres à jouets.
Oeuvre de l’Américaine Ruth Handler, épouse du cofondateur de la société Mattel, qui lui donna le prénom de sa fille Barbara, elle fit sa première apparition publique le 9 mars 1959, à la foire du jouet de New York, avant de connaître un immense succès commercial, d’abord aux Etats-Unis puis en Europe. Le cap du milliard de Barbie vendues dans le monde a été franchi dans le monde en 1997.
« L’engouement pour Barbie s’est appuyé sur l’univers très vite créé par Mattel autour du personnage, avec sa famille, ses amis, ses activités, une savante alchimie qui permet aux enfants de projeter leur imagination dans toutes les situations », explique Anne Monier.
Au fil des années, la reine des poupées a élargi la palette de ses compétences, des plus classiques aux plus insolites: infirmière, top modèle, danseuse, gymnaste mais aussi astronaute (elle a posé le pied sur la Lune avant Neil Armstrong) ou encore présidente des Etats-Unis.
Cette gloire planétaire va apporter à Barbie son lot de controverses, ses détracteurs lui reprochant de renvoyer une image trop stéréotypée de la femme, celle d’une européenne, active, blonde et mince.
– Call-girl de luxe… –
Des psychiatres ont affirmé qu’elle était un fantasme d’adulte avant d’être un jouet de petites filles. Des parents l’ont accusée d’encourager l’anorexie chez les adolescentes.
Des scientifiques sont allés jusqu’à démontrer que si Barbie était une vraie femme, elle pèserait 49 kilos et mesurerait 175 cm, son tour de taille ferait 45 cm et ses pieds 21 cm.
Ils en ont conclu que la pauvre créature serait alors obligée de marcher à quatre pattes car ses pieds et ses jambes ne pourraient pas la porter.
En 2009, le journaliste américain Jerry Oppenheimer écorne sévèrement l’image de la belle – qui célébrait cette année-là son cinquantième anniversaire – en la décrivant comme l?incarnation du fantasme ultime de son designer: une call-girl de luxe, à la taille ultra fine, aux seins en obus et au visage enfantin.
« La Barbie idéalisée, un peu trop parfaite, a sans doute existé à une certaine époque mais elle appartient aujourd’hui au passé », assure à l’AFP Robert Best, designer en chef chez Mattel.
« Pour nous, toutes les filles sont belles, quelles que soient leur silhouette, leur taille, la couleur de leurs cheveux, et les poupées doivent être le reflet de cette diversité », poursuit-il.
Témoin de cette volonté, les trois nouvelles versions lancées par Mattel en début d’année: la grande, la petite, et surtout la ronde, une Barbie potelée, tout en courbes, qui s’éloigne de la poupée d’origine pour s’approcher de Madame Tout Le Monde. Une stratégie visant aussi à endiguer l’érosion des ventes.
Les nouvelles Barbie disposeront de 27 teints de peau, 22 couleurs d’yeux et 24 coiffures.
L’enseigne américaine a déjà fait plusieurs tentatives pour ouvrir Barbie à la différence, sans pour autant faire évoluer ses mensurations. En 1980, elle avait commercialisé Black Barbie, une Barbie noire.
L’arrivée des trois nouvelles silhouettes a été célébrée par l’hebdomadaire américain Time qui a mis Barbie en couverture en janvier avec cette question, posée par la poupée elle-même: « A présent, peut-on arrêter de parler de mon corps ? »

Voir aussi:

60 ans après, Barbie a bien changé

TIMELINE // Barbie célèbre ses 60 ans cette année. Si la poupée américaine n’a pas pris de ride, elle a néanmoins subi quelques modifications.

Camille Wong
Les Echos
03/01/2019

La poupée traverse les générations. Depuis sa création, 1 milliard de modèles ont été vendus dans le monde et chaque année, environ 58 millions de poupées sont achetées. En 1959, la poupée californienne, produite par Mattel, débarque dans les foyers comme un pavé dans la marre. Pour la première fois, une poupée type adulte et sexualisée vient casser les modèles traditionnels des poupées enfantines.

Emerge alors un jouet aux allures de femme irréaliste : des jambes interminables, une poitrine pulpeuse et une taille de guêpe. Barbie a alors des proportions inhumaines. Face aux critiques récurrentes, et surtout à la chute des ventes, Mattel opère une petite révolution en 2015 : les premières poupées à corpulences dites “normales” sont commercialisées.

Aujourd’hui, Barbie n’est plus seulement cette mannequin blonde californienne au teint hâlé. Moins stéréotypée, elle est blonde, brune, rousse, à la peau noire, blanche, métisse… Elle met des pantalons et des jupes, travaille au McDo, danse ou dirige une entreprise. Selon la marque, 55% des poupées vendues dans le monde n’auraient ni les cheveux blonds, ni les yeux bleus.

La marque s’efforce de déconstruire les clichés sexistes de sa poupée, parfois non sans mal. En novembre 2014, Mattel sort Barbie, je peux être une ingénieure informatique, un livre qui dépeint une jeune femme nulle en informatique et incapable de faire quoique ce soit sans l’aide de ses amis masculins… Face à la polémique, Mattel présente ses excuses et retire le livre de la vente.

Voir également:

How Jewish is Barbie?

Orly Lobel’s new book examines the doll’s history – and the many broiguses she’s been caught up in

April 5, 2018

When I was a little girl, my mother videotaped me playing with Barbie dolls and other toys. It was my short-lived acting career but it was a prelude to my real career: it was research.

My mother is a psychology professor at Tel-Aviv University and she ran studies all over the world showing me having fun with girl toys and boy toys. She then asked participants questions about my intellect, popularity, abilities and found that without exception whether she ran the study in Israel or Europe or Asia or North America, the result was the same. When I was shown playing with the boy toys I was perceived as more intelligent and more likely to be a leader in my social group. When I was playing with Barbies and other girly toys the subjects of her studies thought less of me.

Needless to say, a side-effect of her research was inadvertently turning her daughter into a critic of the toy industry and our gendered culture from a very early age. Years passed and I became a military commander in the IDF, a lawyer, a law professor, an author and a mother, and the insights I learned from those early psychology experiments persisted: how we play matters. Toys are a serious business.

When I set out to write about the fascinating behind-the-scenes story of the “doll wars”, at the centre of it was the doll that has dominated the pink toy shelves for three generations — Barbie. I wanted to uncover her secret history and how she has battled to keep her image and her near-monopoly market power for over five decades. The story of Barbie begins with Ruth Handler, born Ruth Moskowicz, the youngest of ten children, born in 1916 to a Jewish-Polish family in Colorado.

Her father, a blacksmith, emigrated from Poland, finding work in Denver and sending for his wife and children two years later. The Moskowiczs were extremely poor and, when Ruth’s mother became ill, Ruth’s sister turned surrogate mother, which some people misinterpreted: “It has been suggested to me once or twice that this supposed ‘rejection’ by my mother may have been what spurred me to become the kind of person who always has to prove herself. This seems like utter nonsense.” Nonsense or not, the doll she claims to have invented would never become a mother. Rather, Barbie was destined to live the early dreams of Hertopia: a self-realised woman on her own. Ruth founded Mattel with her husband Elliot Handler, whom she had met at a Jewish youth dance in 1929. They married and had a daughter and a son, Barbara and Kenneth the dolls Barbie and Ken were born later. In 1956, during a family trip to Switzerland, Handler came across a German doll called Bild Lilli. Lilli was a popular doll in post-war Germany but she was not a child’s plaything, she was an adult toy based on a cartoon. Bluntly, Lilli dolls were designed for sex-hungry German men who bought her for girlfriends and mistresses in lieu of flowers, or as a suggestive gift. Her promotional brochures had such phrases as “Gentlemen prefer Lilli. Whether more or less naked, Lilli is always discreet.”

In Switzerland, Handler tucked Lilli in her suitcase, brought her back to the Mattel headquarters in California and launched Barbie based on her image. The story of Barbie’s success is inextricably tied to her secret past. A multimillion-dollar campaign began, led by another controversial Jewish immigrant, Ernst Ditcher, an Austrian psychologist turned American marketing guru. Dr Dichter used Freudian psychology to convince mothers to bring a hyper-sexualised adult doll into the hearts and minds of little girls.

The Barbie campaign, along with many other consumer marketing campaigns he led, made him the nemesis of mid-century feminists. Dichter’s notorious reputation was based on his manipulation of human desire. He applied psychoanalysis to selling, forever shaping America’s consumption fetishism: a desire to own stuff — which has yet to subside.

As Barbie’s sales soared, Lilli’s owners sued unsuccessfully for patent infringement. Until the early 2000s, Barbie reigned supreme. The challenge, when it came, was from a different doll, and another Jewish entrepreneur.

When I first tried to interview Isaac Larian, the man who introduced Bratz to the world, I hit a wall. His company, MGA’s communications department told me that it had no obligation to talk about its affairs.

I continued trying to contact him when, one day, out of the blue, I received the following e-mail: “Dear Orly, I understand that you are writing a book about [Mattel/MGA] and have talked to some of the lawyers and jurors in this case. Mattel’s stated goal (since they aren’t able to compete and innovate) was to ‘litigate MGA to death.’ Mattel has a history of using litigation to stifle innovation. . . . This time they faced a persistent Iranian Jewish immigrant who stood up to them and prevailed. I would be happy to discuss further detail as I was personally involved from day 1 in this case. Thanks & Best Regards, Isaac Larian CEO MGA Entertainment”.

Larian was positioning himself in the battle against Mattel, now the largest toy-maker in the world, and in his correspondence with me, as the underdog Jewish immigrant entrepreneur.

His email signature ended with the mantra “Fortune Favors the Bold”. This is his favourite maxim, which he has also placed in strategic spots on MGA’s walls, such as the corporate boardroom where I interviewed him.

Boldness is at the heart of Larian’s personality. Nevertheless, along with his loudly defiant nature, Larian has a soft side, which he is confident enough to display. He weeps in public, writes poetry, enjoys fashion and, well, loves his dolls. Mattel’s early days parallel MGA’s — Ruth Handler’s immigrant rags-to-riches story and her statements about being bold shows that she had far more in common with Isaac Larian than with Robert Eckert, the CEO of Mattel during the Barbie-Bratz battles, which ended, after eight years, in a bitter and costly stalemate.

In 1995, Islamic fundamentalists in Kuwait issued a fatwa against Barbie, a ruling under Islamic law prohibiting the buying or selling of this she-devil.

In 2003, when Saudi Arabia outlawed the sale of Barbie dolls, the Committee for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice announced that the “Jewish Barbie” is the symbol of decadence to the perverted West.

Voir de même:

Répondre

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur la façon dont les données de vos commentaires sont traitées.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :