Présidence Trump: Vous avez dit accident de l’histoire ? (As Trump keeps defying economic and diplomatic logic, even critics wonder if pigs can fly after all)

Le vieux monde se meurt, le nouveau monde tarde à apparaître et dans ce clair-obscur surgissent les monstres. Antonio Gramsci
Si Trump est élu, l’économie américaine va s’écrouler et les marchés financiers ne vont jamais s’en remettre. Paul Krugman (2016)
No, pigs do not fly. Donald Trump is dreaming. Robert Brusca (FAO Economics, 12.10.2016)
Au moins, Donald Trump a eu le mérite d’encourager le débat sur l’impact de la mondialisation sur l’économie, c’est sain. Steven Friedman
Donald Trump has a big promise for the U.S. economy: 4% growth. No chance, say 11 economists surveyed by CNNMoney. And a paper published Tuesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco backs them up. (…) The Republican presidential nominee made the promise in a speech in New York in September. « I believe it’s time to establish a national goal of reaching 4% economic growth, » he said. Since the Great Recession, growth has averaged 2%. Brusca and the other economists surveyed say that 4% growth is impossible, or at least highly unlikely. The reasons: Unemployment is already really low, lots of Baby Boomers are retiring, and there are far fewer manufacturing jobs today than in past decades. Trump’s team says it will get to 4% growth with tax cuts, better trade deals and more manufacturing jobs. One reason for slower growth is lower productivity — for example, how many widgets an assembly line worker can produce in an hour. Another problem is that the example of the assembly line worker is increasingly outdated: America has shed about 5.6 million manufacturing jobs since 2000, mostly because of innovation and partly because of trade, studies show. Manufacturing jobs tend to have higher productivity — and wages — than jobs in other service industries like retail, education and health care, which have added lots of low-productivity jobs while manufacturing jobs have disappeared. Interestingly, American manufacturers are producing more than ever before — in dollar terms. But as technology replaces jobs on the assembly line, more goods can be produced with fewer workers. On top of that, the economy is already near what economists consider full employment, meaning the unemployment rate can’t go much lower. The unemployment rate is 5% and was as low as 4.7% earlier this year. It can’t go much lower because there will always be people leaving jobs or searching for them. If the job market is already near capacity, the economy can’t expand much more, economists say. Unemployment did go really low in 2000 — as low as 3.8% — and the economy was growing above a 4% pace. But the San Francisco Fed attributes those good times to the late 1990s internet revolution. (…) Many economists call for more spending on building new roads, bridges and highways, as do both Trump and Hillary Clinton. (…) Many experts say comprehensive immigration reform — a path to citizenship — would create more documented workers. Historically, documented workers tend to have higher productivity than undocumented workers because they generally have higher job skills and can take on jobs that produce more valuable goods. Productivity has nothing to do with work ethic. CNN (12.10.2018)
The Soviet Union was famously described as « Upper Volta with rockets », a catchphrase that was updated by the geographically precise to become « Burkina Faso with rockets ». It was a powerfully succinct description. The United States was rich and space-age powerful; the Soviet Union was poor and space-age powerful. The contradictions and paradoxes that stemmed from that could never fully be resolved – least of all by the citizens of the Soviet Union themselves. During the 1930s, Stalin turned Russia into an industrially powerful nation, and made his Soviet compatriots feel proud of what they had achieved. The defeat of Hitler’s might, at the cost of millions of lives, was also seen as proof of Soviet greatness. The idea that Soviet was best took deep root. It convinced some Western visitors, and millions of Russians. Even now, many Russians find it hard to believe that there was anything wrong with the model itself. In last night’s episode of the Cold War series, interviewees visibly hankered after a time when Khrushchev was in his Kremlin, and all was right with the Soviet world. (…) While Cold War stripped some of the humbug from old-fashioned propaganda, Tim Whewell’s Correspondent special, « Two Weddings and the Rouble », was a bleak illustration of life in Russia today, seven years after the final collapse of the superpower and the propaganda machine. The Cold War has vanished; and with it, the heart of Russia’s pride. (…) The film resolutely avoided politics, though the story of the collapsing rouble – six to the dollar one day, 20 to the dollar a few days later – always lurked in the background. But the underlying theme was best expressed by the father who angrily complained that « this once-great country has been robbed and humiliated ». Humiliated: certainly. Russia these days is now Upper Volta without the rockets (all its best scientists have gone abroad; those who remain are usually unpaid). But robbed? Who did the robbing, and why? The comment reflected the still-deep Russian fatalism which enables millions to believe that somebody else is always responsible, and that Russians can change nothing themselves. It is not true – but many Russians believe it to be true, which comes to almost the same thing. (…) As Whewell noted, this is a country which has worshipped « one false prophet too many ». Gagarin and the sputnik era are still glowingly remembered as the time when the Soviet Union truly seemed great. As for the future: it sometimes seems difficult to find a Russian who has room for any optimism at all. Katya’s parents, it seems fair to guess, will never believe in anything again. As for Katya herself – maybe. If not, Russia is truly lost. The Independent
We hear too much about Vladimir Putin these days and not nearly enough about the actual forces reshaping the world. Yes, the Russian president has proved a brilliant tactician. And, President Trump’s fantasies aside, he is a ruthless enemy of American power and European coherence. Yet Russia remains a byword for backwardness and corruption. Its gross domestic product is less than 10% that of the U.S. or the European Union. With a declining population and a fundamentally adverse geopolitical situation, the Russian Federation remains a shadow of its Soviet predecessor. Add up the consequences of Mr. Putin’s troops, nukes, disinformation campaigns, financial aid to populist parties—and throw in the power of his authoritarian example. Russia still does not have the ability to roll back the post-1990 democratic revolution, overpower the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or dissolve the EU. The West is in crisis because of European weakness, not Russian strength. Some of the Continent’s difficulties are well known. France foolishly imagined the euro would contain the rise of a newly united Germany after the Cold War. In fact it has propelled Germany’s unprecedented economic rise while driving a wedge between Europe’s indebted South and creditor North. The Continent’s so-called migration policy is a humanitarian and a political disaster. Berlin’s feckless approach to security has left Europe’s most important power a geopolitical midget, lecturing sanctimoniously while others shape the world. Meanwhile the EU’s Byzantine government machinery grinds at an ever slower pace, creating openings for Mr. Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Europe’s weakness invites authoritarian assertion in the borderlands. Walter Russell Mead
My [Chinese] interlocutors say that Mr Trump is the US first president for more than 40 years to bash China on three fronts simultaneously: trade, military and ideology. They describe him as a master tactician, focusing on one issue at a time, and extracting as many concessions as he can. They speak of the skilful way Mr Trump has treated President Xi Jinping. “Look at how he handled North Korea,” one says. “He got Xi Jinping to agree to UN sanctions [half a dozen] times, creating an economic stranglehold on the country. China almost turned North Korea into a sworn enemy of the country.” But they also see him as a strategist, willing to declare a truce in each area when there are no more concessions to be had, and then start again with a new front. For the Chinese, even Mr Trump’s sycophantic press conference with Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, in Helsinki had a strategic purpose. They see it as Henry Kissinger in reverse. In 1972, the US nudged China off the Soviet axis in order to put pressure on its real rival, the Soviet Union. Today Mr Trump is reaching out to Russia in order to isolate China. In the short term, China is talking tough in response to Mr Trump’s trade assault. At the same time they are trying to develop a multiplayer front against him by reaching out to the EU, Japan and South Korea. But many Chinese experts are quietly calling for a rethink of the longer-term strategy. They want to prepare the ground for a new grand bargain with the US based on Chinese retrenchment. Many feel that Mr Xi has over-reached and worry that it was a mistake simultaneously to antagonise the US economically and militarily in the South China Sea. Instead, they advocate economic concessions and a pullback from the aggressive tactics that have characterised China’s recent foreign policy. Mark Leonard
In the one year since President Trump took office, the first quarter of 2017 through the first quarter of 2018, real GDP grew at a 2.55 percent annual rate. This is higher than the growth for six of the eight years former President Obama was in office, or even five of the eight years when former President George W. Bush was in office. Moreover, the economic growth rate in the first year of Trump in office is higher than the average annual growth rate for the entire presidencies of both Obama at 2.05 percent and Bush at 1.71 percent. For the full 65 years from the first quarter of 1953 through the first quarter of 2018, annual real GDP growth in the United States averaged 2.95 percent, which is still substantially higher than the first year under Trump. The growth rate for the second quarter of 2018 is 4.1 percent. This is a nice sign of American prosperity and is the strongest quarter of economic growth since the third quarter of 2014. Net exports contributed about 1 percent, while the change in private inventories subtracted 1 percent. Lots of changes like this happen on a quarter by quarter basis and should not be taken too seriously. (…) While the GDP growth of any one quarter can be offset, revised or magnified in subsequent quarters, a pattern appears to be emerging under the stewardship of the Trump administration, which makes a lot of sense, at least to me. (…) When it comes to trade, there are problems and risks in the vision Trump is carrying out. Trade should be free and with minimum barriers placed on American exports to other countries and foreign exports to the United States. (…) Finally, we have had a serious government spending problem in the United States for years. The economist Milton Friedman was famous for saying “government spending is taxation.” (…) The latest GDP figure is a great number that aids our recovery from the awful 16 years under Bush and Obama. It will also reduce deficits in the long term if such robust economic growth continues. But the challenge is far from over. We have a lot of work to do to fan the flames of prosperity and to hold at bay the prosperity killers. But one step forward is still one step forward, and it is a heck of a lot better than one step backward. Arthur B. Laffer
So much for “secular stagnation.” You remember that notion, made fashionable by economist Larry Summers and picked up by the press corps to explain why the U.S. economy couldn’t rise above the 2.2% doldrums of the Obama years. Well, with Friday’s report of 4.1% growth in the second quarter, the U.S. economy has now averaged 3.1% growth for the last six months and 2.8% for the last 12. The lesson is that policies matter and so does the tone set by political leaders. For eight years Barack Obama told Americans that inequality was a bigger problem than slow economic growth, that stagnant wages were the fault of the rich, and that government through regulation and politically directed credit could create prosperity. The result was slow growth, and secular stagnation was the intellectual attempt to explain that policy failure. The policy mix changed with Donald Trump’s election and a Republican Congress to turn it into law. Deregulation and tax reform were the first-year priorities that have liberated risk-taking and investment, spurring a revival in business confidence and growth to give the long expansion a second wind. (…) Deregulation signaled to business that arbitrary enforcement and compliance costs wouldn’t be imposed on ideological whim. Tax reform broke the bottleneck on capital mobility and investment from the highest corporate tax rate in the developed world. Above all, the political message from Washington after eight years is that faster growth is possible and investment to turn a profit is encouraged. (…) It would be nice to think that all Americans would take satisfaction in this growth. But in the polarized politics of 2018, the same people who said this growth revival could never happen are now saying that it can’t last. It’s a “sugar high,” as Mr. Summers has put it, due to one-time boosts like government spending and consumption. (…) There are risks to this outlook, not least from Mr. Trump’s tariff policies.. (…) The way to help the economy is for Mr. Trump to build on this week’s trade truce with the European Union, withdraw the tariffs on both sides, and work toward a “zero tariff” deal. Meantime, wrap up the Nafta revision with Mexico and Canada within weeks so Congress can approve it this year. Mr. Trump could claim he had honored another campaign promise while removing a pall on investmentWSJ
One thing came through loud and clear in President Trump’s press conference Wednesday with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. When they announced an alliance against third parties’ “unfair trading practices,” they didn’t even have to mention China by name for listeners to know who their target was. Cooperation between the U.S. and EU will squeeze China’s protectionist model, and even before this agreement, there’s been evidence that China is already running up the white flag. Yes, China is acting tough in one sense, quickly imposing tariffs in retaliation for those enacted by the Trump administration. But while U.S. stocks approach all-time highs and the dollar grows stronger, Chinese stocks are in a bear market, down 25% since January. The yuan had its worst single month ever in June, and is well on its way to a repeat this month. Chinese corporate bonds have defaulted at a record rate in the past six months, yet this week China unveiled a new stimulus program designed to encourage even more corporate borrowing. (…) Weakening one’s currency is a standard weapon in trade wars, and one that China has often been accused of using—including in a tweet by Mr. Trump last week. Devaluation would be even more dangerous in this case because of China’s power to dump the $1.4 trillion in U.S. Treasury securities it holds. But by denying its intention to plunge the yuan, China has disarmed itself voluntarily. This was no act of noble pacifism; it had to be done. Devaluing the currency would risk scaring investors away, an existential threat to an emerging economy. For China, whose state-capitalism model has so far never produced a recession, such capital flight might expose previously hidden economic weaknesses. These weaknesses accumulate without the market discipline that occasional recessions impose. The fragility of China’s economy can be seen in its growth rate, which is slowing despite rising financial leverage, and in its overinvestment in commodities and real estate. The escalating trade war with the U.S. could tip China into the unknown territory of recession—and then capital flight could push it into a financial crash and depression. That would create mass joblessness in an economy that has never recorded unemployment higher than 4.3%. With that scenario in mind, the Chinese government must be wondering whether it has enough riot police. The risk of capital flight is real. The last time China let the yuan weaken—a slide that began in early 2014 and was punctuated in mid-2015 by the abandonment of the dollar peg in favor of a basket of currencies—the Chinese ended up losing almost $1 trillion in foreign reserves, which they have yet to recover. Now the sharp weakening of the yuan shows some degree of capital flight again is under way. No wonder that, despite tough talk from some quarters, the PBOC disarmed itself voluntarily to avoid further capital flight. The bank also is already offering to reimburse local firms for tariffs on imported U.S. goods. What’s more, China has put out a yard sign for international investors by announcing unilateral easing of foreign-ownership restrictions in some industries. China is beginning to realize that trade war isn’t really war. It’s more like a drinking contest at a fraternity: the game is less inflicting harm on your opponent than inflicting it on yourself, turn by turn. In trade wars, nations impose burdensome import tariffs on themselves in the hope that they’ll be able to stomach the pain longer than their competitor. Why play such a game? Because a carefully chosen act of self-harm can be an investment toward a worthy goal. For example, President Reagan’s arms race against the Soviet Union in the 1980s was in some sense a costly self-imposed tax. But it turned out the U.S. could bear the burden better than the Soviets could—Uncle Sam eventually out-drank the Russian bear and won the Cold War. The U.S. will win the trade war with China in the same way. The PBOC’s statements show that the Chinese understand they are too vulnerable to take very many more drinks. The only question is what they will be willing to offer Mr. Trump to get him to take yes for an answer. No wonder Beijing has ordered its state-influenced media to stop demonizing Mr. Trump—officials are desperate to minimize the pain when President Xi Jinping has to cut the inevitable deal. The drinking-contest metaphor takes us only so far. The wonderful thing about reciprocal trade is that it is a positive-sum game in which all contestants are made better off. If the conflict forces China to accept more foreign investors and goods, comply with World Trade Organization rules, and respect foreign intellectual property, it may feel it has lost but will in fact be better off. With this openness, both economic and political, China could spur a decadeslong second wave of growth that would bring hundreds of millions still living in rural poverty into glittering new cities. It took Nixon to go to China and show it the way to the 20th century. Now, through the unlikely method of trade war, Donald Trump is ushering China into the 21st century. Donald Luskin
Si l’on regarde les faits, et uniquement les faits, un constat s’impose: on ne peut pas trouver dans l’histoire récente des Etats-Unis un président ayant mené à bien autant de réformes en un laps de temps si court. Même Reagan a mis trois ans à réformer la fiscalité américaine! Trump, lui, l’a fait en quelques mois. Alors certes, «The Donald» n’a pas réussi à démanteler complètement l’Obamacare, suite aux oppositions rencontrées dans son propre parti ; mais sa réforme fiscale inclut la fin du «mandat individuel», cette fameuse obligation de souscrire à une assurance santé. Plus exactement, l’amende pour le non-respect de cette obligation est supprimée par la réforme. Cette mesure était nécessaire. En 2009, les conséquences de cette mesure coercitive, emblématique de la présidence d’Obama, ne s’étaient pas fait attendre. Il y avait eu d’énormes bugs informatiques qui ont découragé des millions de personnes de souscrire en ligne. Puis des millions d’Américains ont été contraints de résilier leur assurance privée, alors que nombre d’entre eux n’en ressentaient nullement l’envie. Depuis 2009, plus de 2 400 pages de réglementations se sont accumulées pour réguler le fonctionnement du système. Le président Obama avait promis de baisser les franchises de santé grâce à ce programme, mais ce fut tout le contraire: elles ont augmenté de 60 % en moyenne. Les primes d’assurance ont bondi dans l’ensemble de 25 % (et même jusqu’à 119 % dans l’état d’Arizona). Les assureurs ne s’en sortaient plus à cause des réglementations très strictes qui leur ont été imposées. Obama avait aussi promis de baisser le prix de l’assurance santé d’environ 2 500 dollars par famille et par an ; en réalité, le prix a augmenté de 2 100 dollars! Trump met fin à cette dérive en ouvrant le système un peu plus à la concurrence et en donnant aux Américains la liberté de choisir. (…) La réforme fiscale adoptée par le Congrès des États-Unis contient de nombreuses mesures audacieuses, que les Américains attendaient. Par exemple la baisse de la taxe sur les bénéfices des entreprises (de 35 % à 21 %), qui s’accompagne d’une déduction fiscale généreuse pour les entreprises dont les profits ne sont déclarés qu’au travers des revenus de leurs propriétaires. Plusieurs taxes ont par ailleurs été supprimées, comme la taxe minimum de 20 % sur les bénéfices effectifs. Surtout, le président Trump a entamé une vaste opération visant à rapatrier entre 2 000 et 4 000 milliards de dollars de profits placés à l’étranger, en diminuant la taxe sur ces profits de 35 % à moins de 15 %. Autre mesure symbolique: la suppression de la taxe sur les héritages au-dessous de 10 millions de dollars satisfait une large partie de l’électorat républicain. Certains Etats dont la fiscalité est particulièrement élevée, comme la Californie, seront également obligés de se réformer pour faire face à la suppression de certaines déductions fiscales. Leurs habitants ne pourront plus en effet déduire l’impôt sur le revenu local de leurs impôts fédéraux. Plusieurs mesures abolissent l’interdiction des forages de pétrole en Alaska. À l’heure actuelle, Trump a ouvert toutes les possibilités d’exploitation sur le continent américain, ce qui fera du pays l’un des principaux exportateurs de matières premières. Trump se positionne ainsi en ennemi du politiquement correct et reste méfiant à l’égard des gourous du réchauffement climatique. Il a été le seul à avoir le courage de se retirer de la COP 21, cette mascarade coûteuse qui consiste à organiser de gigantesques réunions de chefs d’État aux frais des contribuables. Il a supprimé la prime à la voiture électrique (pour une économie de 7 milliards de dollars) ainsi que les subventions aux parcs d’éoliennes. Enfin, Trump s’est attaqué aux réglementations. Entre janvier et décembre 2017, il a supprimé la moitié (45 000) des pages que contient le Code des réglementations. Plus de 1 500 réglementations importantes ont été abolies, dont beaucoup dans le domaine de l’environnement. Les économies obtenues sont estimées à plus de 9 milliards de dollars. Faisant fi des protestations, il a libéré le secteur d’internet de plusieurs contraintes anachroniques. Au plan international, Trump s’oppose à la Chine dont les pratiques commerciales douteuses ont fait l’objet d’enquêtes de la part de Washington. Mais cette position juste face aux Chinois ne devrait pas conduire la Maison Blanche à cautionner des mesures restrictives de la liberté du commerce et des échanges, qui risqueraient de peser sur la croissance américaine et même mondiale. (…) En tout état de cause, en ce début janvier 2018, l’économie américaine semble partir sur des bases solides. Le troisième trimestre de croissance s’est élevé à plus de 3 %, et le taux de chômage est au plus bas, à seulement 4.1 % (2.1 millions d’emplois créés en une année, du jamais vu depuis 1990), et même à 6.8 % pour la population noire, un taux qui n’a jamais été si faible depuis 1973. Les effets des baisses d’impôt se font d’ores et déjà sentir: des entreprises comme AT&T, Comcast, Wells Fargo, Boeing, Nexus Services ont annoncé des primes et des hausses de salaires. Nicolas Lecaussin
Volontarisme fiscal, brutalité commerciale : les critiques pleuvent sur la méthode du président américain, mais les États-Unis affichent d’excellentes performances économiques. Sur le climat, l’Iran, Israël, il s’est mis au ban de la communauté internationale. Ses tweets rageurs matinaux, son imprévisibilité, sa brutalité, laissent pantois. Ses démêlés avec le FBI et la justice interrogent sur sa capacité à mener son mandat jusqu’à son terme. Et pourtant. La méthode de Donald Trump, exposée il y a trente ans déjà, dans son best-seller l’Art du deal, du temps où le futur président de la première puissance mondiale n’était qu’un loup new-yorkais de l’immobilier, semble faire mouche. Depuis qu’il est installé à la Maison-Blanche, Donald Trump l’a éprouvée à plusieurs reprises, notamment avec la Corée du Nord. Il profère les pires menaces, exerce une pression maximale sur l’adversaire ou le partenaire, puis se dit prêt à discuter. Sur le front commercial, le président américain a marqué des points. Il a arraché des concessions au Brésil, son deuxième fournisseur d’acier ainsi qu’à la Corée du Sud. Évidemment, disposer du plus gros budget militaire de la planète (610 milliards de dollars, davantage que les sept pays suivants réunis) et diriger la première économie (un PIB de 19.000 milliards de dollars, une fois et demie celui de la Chine) offre quelques arguments. (…) L’issue est encore très incertaine, mais Trump a réussi à amener les Chinois à la table pour discuter d’une réduction du déficit commercial américain. Washington n’a pas non plus gagné son bras de fer contre l’Europe. (…) «Sa tactique de négociation est de taper fort et de se faire mousser auprès de son électorat, ajoute Florence Pisani, économiste chez Candriam et coauteur d’un livre sur l’économie américaine. C’est un jeu assez dangereux, car cela crée de l’incertitude et reporte les projets d’investissement.» Les bons indicateurs qui se succèdent semblent pourtant démentir cette vision pessimiste. À 3,9 %, le chômage est au plus bas depuis près de vingt ans, l’industrie crée des emplois, les ménages ont davantage confiance qu’au début du mandat. (…) « Il n’y a pas eu de changement majeur de tendance depuis l’arrivée de Trump, nuance Christian Leuz, économiste allemand installé depuis quinze ans aux États-Unis, à l’University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Obama a laissé une économie en bonne santé, il est encore trop tôt pour attribuer les bons résultats à Trump. » Ce leg solide est aussi largement imputable à dix ans de politique monétaire généreuse de la Fed, rappellent de nombreux économistes. Sa réforme fiscale, arrachée de haute lutte au Congrès, devrait tout de même avoir un impact positif sur l’économie. Elle a gonflé le profit des entreprises et permis à certaines comme Apple de rapatrier des milliards mis à l’abri à l’étranger. Florence Pisani pondère encore: une enquête récente de la réserve fédérale d’Atlanta indique que moins de 10 % des entreprises envisagent d’investir davantage malgré les réductions d’impôt. Quant aux ménages, ils pourraient perdre en impôts locaux (ceux des États) ce qu’ils ont gagné sur les impôts fédéraux. Même si le programme des grands travaux reste encore dans le flou, les dépenses votées par le Congrès devraient cependant soutenir l’activité de 0,3 % de PIB supplémentaire, concède Florence Pisani. Un surcroît de dépenses qui pourrait léguer au successeur de Trump «un déficit budgétaire de plus de 5 % du PIB et une dette alourdie», avertit Steven Friedman. Fabrice Nodé-Langlois
Selon la première estimation du Département du commerce, la croissance au second trimestre atteint 4,1% en rythme annuel. On n’a pas vu de conjoncture aussi favorable aux États-Unis depuis 2014. Donald Trump qualifie ces chiffres de «fascinants» et de «tout à fait tenables». Il y voit la preuve que sa politique de déréglementation et de baisses d’impôts porte ses fruits. D’autant que l’estimation de l’expansion de janvier à mars est révisée à la hausse de 2 à 2, 2% en rythme annuel. (…) Voilà déjà plus d’un an qu’il tourne en dérision les experts qui affirment qu’il ne sera pas possible de dépasser durablement 3% de croissance. Leurs arguments sont toujours que l’Amérique approche de la fin d’un très long cycle d’expansion engagé depuis l’été 2009, que la croissance démographique est désormais modeste et surtout que les hausses de productivité ne sont pas suffisantes pour renouer avec des taux de croissance dignes des années Reagan. Au cours du premier semestre l’expansion atteint néanmoins 3,1%. Si la montée des barrières douanières, les relèvements de taux directeurs par la Réserve fédérale et la hausse des coûts des matières premières ne font pas dérailler la conjoncture, le pari de Donald Trump peut être gagné, au moins en 2018. (…) Avec un taux de chômage au plus bas depuis la fin du siècle dernier, des créations d’emplois encore très fortes en moyenne de 215.000 postes par mois depuis janvier et une inflation de l’ordre de 2%, il pense présenter à l’opinion un premier bilan positif. Surtout s’il arrive à passer sous silence que, contrairement à l’orthodoxie fiscale prônée jadis par le Parti républicain, le déficit budgétaire en forte hausse est en partie responsable de l’accélération actuelle de la croissance. Signe de la confiance et du moral élevé des Américains, la consommation, qui représente plus des deux tiers du Produit intérieur brut (PIB) aux États-Unis, bondit au rythme de 4% au second trimestre, après une maigre progression de 0,5% de janvier à mars. Paradoxalement, les fortes tensions commerciales entre Washington et ses partenaires ont stimulé la croissance au cours du printemps. Dans l’anticipation de droits de douane chinois sur les denrées agricoles, les producteurs américains de soja ont par exemple tout fait pour avancer leurs livraisons avant le mois de juillet, date d’entrée en vigueur des mesures de rétorsion décidées par Pékin. Près d’un quart de la croissance a été donc généré par le commerce extérieur. Pierre-Yves Dugua
En 1917, contre les thèses de Marx, c’est en Russie, à Saint Pétersbourg, qu’éclate la Révolution. Enjeu intellectuel et enjeu politique, [Gramsci] va s’efforcer de comprendre pourquoi la Révolution a eu lieu en Russie et non en Allemagne, en France ou dans le Nord de l’Italie. Autour de la Révolution de 1917, s’ordonnent aussi une série de questionnements fondamentaux pour comprendre la pensée de Gramsci: hégémonie, crises, guerres de mouvements ou de positions, blocs historiques… Il distingue deux types de sociétés. Pour faire simple, celles où il suffit, comme en Russie, de prendre le central téléphonique et le palais présidentiel pour prendre le pouvoir. La bataille pour «l’hégémonie» vient après, ce sont les sociétés «orientales» qui fonctionnent ainsi… Et celles, plus complexes, où le pouvoir est protégé par des tranchées et des casemates, qui représentent des institutions culturelles ou des lieux de productions intellectuelles, de sens, qui favorisent le consentement. Dans ce cas, avant d’atteindre le central téléphonique, il faut prendre ces lieux de pouvoir. C’est ce que l’on appelle le front culturel, c’est le cas des sociétés occidentales comme la société française, italienne ou allemande d’alors. Au contraire de François Hollande et de François Lenglet, Antonio Gramsci ne croit pas à l’économicisme, c’est-à-dire à la réduction de l’histoire à l’économique. Il perçoit la force des représentations individuelles et collectives, la force de l’idéologie… Ce refus de l’économicisme mène à ouvrir le «front culturel», c’est-à-dire à développer une bataille qui porte sur la représentation du monde tel qu’on le souhaite, sur la vision du monde… Le front culturel consiste à écrire des articles au sein d’un journal, voire à créer un journal, à produire des biens culturels (pièces de théâtre, chansons, films etc…) qui contribuent à convaincre les gens qu’il y a d’autres évidences que celles produites jusque-là par la société capitaliste. La classe ouvrière doit produire, selon Gramsci, ses propres références. Ses intellectuels, doivent être des «intellectuels organiques», doivent faire de la classe ouvrière la «classe politique» chargée d’accomplir la vraie révolution: c’est-à-dire une réforme éthique et morale complète. L’hégémonie, c’est l’addition de la capacité à convaincre et à contraindre. Convaincre c’est faire entrer des idées dans le sens commun, qui est l’ensemble des évidences que l’on ne questionne pas. La crise (organique), c’est le moment où le système économique et les évidences qui peuplent l’univers mental de chacun «divorcent». Et l’on voit deux choses: le consentement à accepter les effets matériels du système économique s’affaiblit (on voit alors des grèves, des mouvements d’occupation des places comme Occupy Wall Street, Indignados, etc); et la coercition augmente: on assiste alots à la répression de grèves, aux arrestations de syndicalistes etc… Au contraire, un «bloc historique» voit le jour lorsqu’un mode de production et un système idéologique s’imbriquent parfaitement, se recoupent: le bloc historique néolibéral des années 1980 à la fin des années 2000 par exemple. Car le néolibéralisme n’est pas qu’une affaire économique, il est aussi une affaire éthique et morale. (…) il apporte à l’œuvre de Marx l’une des révisions ou l’un des compléments les plus riches de l’histoire du marxisme. Pour beaucoup de socialistes, il faut attendre que les lois de Marx sur les contradictions du capitalisme se concrétisent pour que la Révolution advienne. La Révolution d’Octobre, selon Gramsci, invalide cette thèse. Elle se fait «contre le Capital», du nom du grand livre de Karl Marx. Antonio Gramsci fascine au-delà de la gauche… Ainsi en France, en Italie ou en Autriche, des courants d’extrême droite se sont réclamés d’une version tronquée et biaisée du gramscisme. Ce «gramscisme de droite» faisait l’impasse sur l’aspect «économique» du gramscisme et le caractère émancipateur pour n’en retenir que la méthode le «combat culturel». Gaël Brustier
Les prédécesseurs de Trump, depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, voyaient dans la promotion d’un ordre libéral international, appuyé sur un tissu d’alliances, de forums multilatéraux et d’interdépendances économiques, la source de projection de la puissance américaine. Trump renverse la table. Ces règles restreignent l’Amérique: elles lui imposent des tabous et des normes bridant sa puissance, ne lui permettant pas de défendre au mieux ses intérêts. L’Amérique se laisse berner par ses partenaires commerciaux ; ses alliés profitent de sa générosité pour se comporter en passagers clandestins et financer leurs systèmes sociaux sous couvert de parapluie militaire américain. Dans un monde de jeu à somme nulle, le rapport de force brut favorisera le plus fort, donc l’Amérique. Ces thèmes ne sont pas nouveaux pour Trump qui répète ces antiennes depuis les années 1980. Sur le plan intérieur comme international, la question se pose: Donald Trump est-il un accident de l’histoire, élu sur un concours de circonstances, ou la manifestation de forces plus profondes traversant l’Amérique? Certes les idiosyncrasies du président sont incontestables. Sa vulgarité et sa personnalité brutale, son parcours d’homme d’affaires passé par la télé réalité ainsi que son inexpérience gouvernementale en font à coup sûr un animal politique sans précédent dans l’histoire américaine. De plus, son impopularité (à relativiser par le soutien fidèle de sa base) et les incertitudes pesant autour de l’enquête du Procureur Muller laissent certains espérer que la parenthèse sera de courte durée, qu’il suffit de s’armer de patience. Il faut doucher cet optimisme: le parti démocrate est profondément divisé et peine à faire émerger de nouvelles personnalités. L’économie américaine se porte bien, malgré des réalités souvent plus dures masquées par les statistiques, des inégalités aux addictions aux drogues. La réélection de Trump en 2020 n’est pas du tout à exclure ; mais l’enjeu va bien au-delà. Traiter Donald Trump comme une aberration historique qui sera suivie par un retour à «la normale» représenterait une erreur majeure de la part des Européens, pour trois raisons principales. Tout d’abord, l’Amérique traverse une période de questionnement profond sur son leadership international et les objectifs de sa politique étrangère, conséquence tardive de la fin de la Guerre Froide qui l’a privée d’adversaire clair et donc de continuité stratégique. Tous les présidents élus depuis la fin de la guerre froide, l’ont été sur une plateforme plaçant la priorité sur le plan intérieur: Bill Clinton insistant sur l’économie, George W. Bush comme Barack Obama contre l’interventionnisme de leur prédécesseur. Les divisions profondes qui affectent les États-Unis et l’absence de priorité internationale qui fasse consensus, Chine, terrorisme, immigration, commerce international, doivent nous préparer à une politique américaine plus erratique et déterminée par des considérations intérieures et électorales. Deuxièmement, le désastre irakien et la crise financière ont encouragé une tendance au repli et nourri le scepticisme d’une partie non négligeable de l’électorat quant à l’engagement international des États-Unis. L’observateur de Washington ne peut à cet égard que constater le décalage profond entre les experts de politique étrangère peuplant les think tanks et revues du reste de la population américaine. Durant la campagne présidentielle, Hillary Clinton avait ainsi dû changer de position sur le traité de libre-échange transpacifique pour suivre l’électorat, tandis que Trump pouvait brandir avec fierté la longue liste des experts de sécurité nationale «Never Trump» qui s’opposait à lui. Le fameux volte-face d’Obama sur la ligne rouge en Syrie a été largement critiqué à Washington comme à Paris, y compris par des membres de son entourage, mais soutenu par une large majorité de la population. À cet égard, Trump s’inscrit dans une forme de continuité avec son prédécesseur, Barack Obama, tout aussi prompt à dénoncer les experts interventionnistes de Washington. Les deux présidents partagent un scepticisme face à la notion «d’exceptionnalisme» américain. Obama comme Trump se gardent bien de voir une quelconque mission civilisatrice dans la politique étrangère américaine, promouvant le «nation building at home». Les conséquences étaient différentes: le scepticisme d’Obama sur les limites de puissance américaine l’entraînait à favoriser les accords multilatéraux comme le JCPOA ou l’accord de Paris sur le climat. À l’inverse, Trump prône l’unilatéralisme botté, dans la tradition du nationalisme martial d’un Andrew Jackson, président entre 1829 et 1837. Mais les deux approches sont deux pôles d’un même mouvement de retrait et de normalisation de la puissance américaine. Enfin, repli ou non, l’Europe perd sa centralité stratégique pour les États-Unis. Obama dénonçait déjà dans un entretien au journaliste Jeffrey Goldberg les alliés européens «passagers clandestins». Plutôt que de regretter sa non-intervention en Syrie, c’est l’intervention en Libye qu’Obama désigne comme son principal échec de politique étrangère, pointant du doigt la France et la Grande Bretagne responsables de ne pas avoir assuré la reconstruction post-conflit. L’une des principales annonces de politique étrangère fut le «pivot» vers l’Asie. Le réengagement américain en Europe fut tardif et réticent, provoqué par l’annexion de la Crimée par la Russie en 2014. Mais ici aussi Obama a laissé Angela Merkel et François Hollande en première ligne pour négocier les accords de Minsk avec Vladimir Poutine. Les années 1990, caractérisées par l’attention portée à l’expansion de l’OTAN et les interventions américaines (tardives) dans les Balkans seront probablement une exception, reliquat de la guerre froide et d’un bref moment unipolaire triomphant. (…) Cela implique un investissement considérable dans notre défense et sécurité: l’Europe est-elle prête à affronter seule une crise comparable aux Balkans dans sa périphérie demain? La crise syrienne, avec ses conséquences sur l’Union Européenne en matière de réfugiés et l’émergence de Daesh, devrait servir de réveil stratégique. Or, la posture européenne s’est essentiellement limitée à espérer un engagement américain. Au-delà de l’investissement dans le militaire, les Européens doivent prendre les mesures pour se préserver des conséquences des décisions américaines, en particulier des sanctions extraterritoriales. Aujourd’hui Trump exploite la faiblesse des Européens. Peut-être cette séquence n’est elle qu’un cycle de plus dans le balancier permanent entre repli égoïste et aventurisme messianique qu’Henry Kissinger a souvent déploré dans l’histoire diplomatique américaine. Après les années de doute de la présidence Carter, post Watergate et Vietnam ont suivi l’optimisme triomphant des années Reagan. Mais l’Europe ne peut fonder sa stratégie sur cet espoir. De plus, même si le successeur de Trump renoue avec l’internationalisme, l’Europe n’en sera pas moins vue comme un partenaire secondaire, grevée par ses divisions et sa faiblesse militaire. Benjamin Haddad
Donald Trump est un cauchemar pour ses angéliques adversaires. Ils voudraient voir en lui un plouc en sursis. Mais les faits leur donnent tort. Certes, l’acteur Robert De Niro a reçu, dimanche, les vivats du public new-yorkais pour avoir crié sur scène, les poings levés : « Fuck Trump  !  » (« J’emmerde Trump  !  »). Après la décision du président américain de suspendre un temps, le 24 mai, les discussions avec la Corée du Nord, Le Monde avait titré, avec d’autres : « La méthode Trump en échec ». Or l’Histoire se montre aimable avec le proscrit du show-biz, des médias et autres enfants de chœur. L’accord conclu, mardi à Singapour, entre Trump et Kim Jong-un est un coup de maître. Il se mesure à l’aigreur des dépités. Alors que les « experts » prédisaient le clash et la duperie, tous deux ont signé un document dans lequel le Coréen réaffirme « son engagement ferme et inébranlable en faveur d’une dénucléarisation complète de la péninsule coréenne ». Les pinailleurs pinaillent. Le jeune tyran n’est pas devenu pour autant fréquentable, après s’être ainsi habilement hissé au niveau de la première démocratie du monde. Sa dictature communiste demeure encore ce qui se fait de pire. Toutefois, ce qui restait d’anachronique dans ce reliquat de guerre froide prend théoriquement fin. Il est à espérer que Trump et les dirigeants de la Corée du Sud sauront inciter le despote à ouvrir rapidement son pays-prison au monde qu’il a choisi d’approcher et de visiter. La poignée de main de mardi est déjà de celles qui resteront dans les livres. À ce rituel, le Coréen n’a pas eu à malaxer les doigts de l’Américain, à la manière d’Emmanuel Macron, pour mimer sa domination. Vendredi, des médias ont désigné le président français vainqueur de Trump, au G7 (Québec), au prétexte qu’il avait laissé la trace « féroce » de son pouce sur la peau de son rival. « Ma poignée de main, ce n’est pas innocent  », avait théorisé le chef de l’État il y a un an. En dépit de ses pénibles défauts, Trump se grandit de l’infantilisme de ses adversaires. Ceux qui reprochent au milliardaire hâbleur ses foucades et son narcissisme se comportent en prêcheurs apeurés et plaintifs, dépassés par les événements. Ivan Rioufol
Emmanuel Macron ne voit pas que l’histoire s’écrit sans lui. Les « populistes » qu’il méprise sont ceux qui, forts du soutien de leurs électeurs, remportent les victoires. Donald Trump vient de signer avec la Corée du Nord, mardi, un accord capital sur la dénucléarisation progressive de la péninsule coréenne. Le texte, à compléter, éloigne la perspective d’un conflit nucléaire. En s’opposant à l’arrivée en Italie d’un bateau transportant des clandestins, Matteo Salvini, le ministre de l’Intérieur italien, a également démontré que la détermination d’un homme à appliquer son programme était plus efficace qu’un bavardage multilatéral, incapable de produire une ligne claire. Face à Trump et à Salvini, Macron ne cache plus son aversion. Benjamin Griveaux, porte-parole du gouvernement, a qualifié le rapprochement historique entre les Etats-Unis et la Corée du nord de simple « événement significatif », alors même que Trump et Kim Jong Un ont confirmé, ce mercredi, des invitations dans leur pays respectif. Hier, le chef de l’Etat a dénoncé, parlant du refus italien d’accueillir l’Aquarius et ses 629 clandestins, « la part de cynisme et d’irresponsabilité » du nouveau gouvernement. La France s’est pourtant gardée d’ouvrir, même en Corse, un de ses ports au navire indésirable. L’Aquarius a finalement trouvé à accoster à Valence (Espagne). Les donneurs de leçons feraient mieux de s’abstenir quand eux-mêmes se révèlent incapables d’appliquer ce qu’ils exigent des autres… Le président français a eu les honneurs de la presse américaine pour sa « féroce » poignée de main avec Trump, lors du G7 : elle a laissé la trace de son pouce sur la peau du président américain. Cette vacuité dans l’évaluation des rapports de force résume la détresse du camp du Bien, confronté à sa marginalisation. Car un basculement idéologique est en cours, sous la pression des nations excédées. Trump est plus populaire aux Etats-Unis que Macron ne l’est en France. Les sondages soutiennent Salvini. Le chef de l’Etat se trompe d’adversaires quand il réserve ses attaques à ces fortes têtes, tout en ménageant ceux qui insultent la France. Ivan Rioufol
Selon moi, Macron n’a pas apporté une révolution telle qu’il le prétend. Au contraire, il nous fait vivre un grand bond en arrière. Il fait revivre ce que les Français croyaient pouvoir rejeter. Les Français pensaient avoir compris que Macron avait analysé la fracture entre les élites et le peuple. Malheureusement, on se rend compte, au contraire, que Macron a redynamisé le pouvoir des élites en canalisant la société civile qu’il avait appelée à la rescousse pour en faire un parti godillot. (…) Macron achève le système. C’est un accident de l’Histoire dans la mesure où sa venue a surpris tout le monde. Il y a encore un an, personne ne le voyait arriver à ce point de son parcours politique. Il a bénéficié d’un effondrement des partis qui étaient des partis vermoulus. Il n’a suffi qu’à donner un coup d’épaule pour qu’ils s’effondrent. Il a également bénéficié de cette coalition des affaires contre François Fillon dans la dernière ligne droite. Il est le produit d’un monde finissant. Il est un des rares, en Europe, à défendre une vision postnationale, une Europe souveraine, et à ne pas comprendre que tout ne se résume pas à l’économie. (…) Il ne veut expliquer les grandes questions sociétales qu’à travers l’économie et, donc, avec une vue beaucoup trop restreinte pour répondre aux questions liées à l’immigration, au communautarisme et à la montée de l’islam radical. Ce sont des sujets qui, pour lui, sont des impensés politiques. (…) Je pense qu’il y a beaucoup d’impostures dans ses postures. Il fait croire qu’il est ce Nouveau Monde. Pour l’instant, tout démontre qu’il n’a fait que reproduire la vieille technocratie, le monde des experts, le monde des financiers, le monde de Bercy. Tout ce monde-là a repris les commandes. Au contraire, François Fillon avait demandé le courage de la vérité. On peut donc se demander si son éviction n’était pas due au fait qu’il se soit peut-être approché de trop près du sujet brûlant de la dénonciation de cette mascarade et ces grands mensonges qui font croire qu’on peut faire une démocratie sans le peuple. Macron a théorisé lui-même son rôle de Président Jupiter, c’est-à-dire de Dieu coupé du peuple. (…)  je pense qu’il n’a fait que reprendre ce que les Américains ont précisément rejeté. Je vois notre Président comme étant un Barack Obama blanc ou un Justin Trudeau intellectuel. On voit bien que la politique de Barack Obama a conduit à l’éviction de Hillary Clinton et à l’élection de son exact contraire Donald Trump. Je fais le pari que si Macron poursuit dans cette voie du politiquement correct qu’il a réhabilité à l’image de ce qu’était Barack Obama, il va accélérer les processus de rejet de ce monde faux et de cet establishment que Donald Trump a réussi à pulvériser malgré tous ses défauts. (…) Si on trace ces lignes tel que je vous les décris, je pense que son essoufflement est programmé. Il a fait l’impasse sur de grandes questions qui se posent dès à présent. Comment répondre à une immigration de peuplement ? Comment répondre à un islam radical et colonisateur ? Comment répondre à une fracturation de la société ? Comment répondre au terrorisme ? Nous ne pouvons pas répondre à toutes ces questions simplement par l’économie. Toute sa campagne a été construite sur le rejet des populismes et sur le rejet d’un discours qui, précisément, alerte sur ces grandes questions sociétales. Or, nous voyons bien que, partout en Europe, l’opinion se raidit. Par conséquent, soit Macron est obligé de se dédire, et dans ce cas il va falloir qu’il fasse un grand travail de retour sur lui-même, soit il continue dans un aveuglement et dans une sorte d’idéologie « béni-oui-ouiste » qui l’empêchera d’apporter les réponses qu’attendent les Français. Nous le voyons en Allemagne, avec le discrédit de la chancelière après sa politique qui avait été soutenue par Emmanuel Macron. Nous le voyons aussi en Autriche, en Catalogne et même chez nous, en Corse, avec ce réveil identitaire. Toutes ces réactions sont le produit d’un impensé d’une partie de la politique qui se berce de politiquement correct, qui pense que l’immigration n’est pas un problème et que les peuples peuvent indifféremment se remplacer. Ivan Rioufol

Attention: un accident historique peut en cacher un autre !

Croissance à plus de 4%, taux de chômage au plus bas (4.1 % , 2.1 millions d’emplois créés en une année, du jamais vu depuis 1990), y compris pour les minorités (6.8 % pour la population noire, du jamais vu depuis 45 ans !), renégociation d’accords ou de traités commerciaux (Brésil, Corée du sud, Europe, Chine) …

A l’heure où après avoir prédit l’apocalypse …

Suite à l’élection du président Trump …

Nos beaux et bons esprits ont de plus en plus de mal à expliquer …

Sans compter, avec peut-être 10 points d’écart, l‘inversion des courbes de popularité entre les deux côtés de l’Atlantique …

La désormais indéniable embellie de l’économie américaine …

Comme, à l’instar d’une « Haute Volta » réduite outre « ses fusées » à sa capacité de nuisance et de l’Iran à la Corée du nord ou aux territoires dit palestiniens, le début de reflux et de marginalisation des forces du mal les plus radicales …

Comment ne pas voir …

L’obstination économiciste comme l’aveuglement post-nationaliste et immigrationniste des conséquences sociales et culturelles de la mondialisation ….

De la part de ses homologues français ou allemand  pour ce qu’elle est vraiment ….

A savoir de plus en plus décalée par rapport aux aspirations des peuples

Comme à la réalité gramcscienne de l’histoire elle-même ?

« Emmanuel Macron est un accident de l’Histoire. Il a bénéficié de l’effondrement des partis vermoulus »

Ivan Rioufol publie, aux Éditions de L’Artilleur, un livre intitulé Macron, la grande mascarade. Sa thèse est limpide : Macron n’a pas apporté la révolution, comme il veut le faire croire, mais il fait vivre au contraire un grand bond en arrière. Il a redynamisé le pouvoir des élites en canalisant la société civile qu’il avait appelée à la rescousse pour n’en faire qu’un parti godillot.
Boulevard Voltaire
21 décembre 2017

Ivan Rioufol, vous publiez aux Éditions de L’Artilleur un livre intitulé Macron, la grande mascarade. Pourquoi ce titre ?

J’ai appelé ce livre ainsi en hommage à Nicolás Gómez Dávila. Il explique, dans l’un de ses aphorismes, que toute époque finit en mascarade.
La thèse que je défends est le fruit de mes observations quasi quotidiennes. Selon moi, Macron n’a pas apporté une révolution telle qu’il le prétend. Au contraire, il nous fait vivre un grand bond en arrière. Il fait revivre ce que les Français croyaient pouvoir rejeter. Les Français pensaient avoir compris que Macron avait analysé la fracture entre les élites et le peuple. Malheureusement, on se rend compte, au contraire, que Macron a redynamisé le pouvoir des élites en canalisant la société civile qu’il avait appelée à la rescousse pour en faire un parti godillot.

Vous affirmez que Macron n’est qu’un accident de l’Histoire. Ne serait-il pas davantage une conséquence de notre époque ?

Macron achève le système. C’est un accident de l’Histoire dans la mesure où sa venue a surpris tout le monde. Il y a encore un an, personne ne le voyait arriver à ce point de son parcours politique. Il a bénéficié d’un effondrement des partis qui étaient des partis vermoulus. Il n’a suffi qu’à donner un coup d’épaule pour qu’ils s’effondrent. Il a également bénéficié de cette coalition des affaires contre François Fillon dans la dernière ligne droite. Il est le produit d’un monde finissant. Il est un des rares, en Europe, à défendre une vision postnationale, une Europe souveraine, et à ne pas comprendre que tout ne se résume pas à l’économie. Je lui fais le procès de ne voir que d’un œil. Il ne veut expliquer les grandes questions sociétales qu’à travers l’économie et, donc, avec une vue beaucoup trop restreinte pour répondre aux questions liées à l’immigration, au communautarisme et à la montée de l’islam radical. Ce sont des sujets qui, pour lui, sont des impensés politiques.

Pour reprendre Gramsci, Macron serait-il le vieux monde qui tarde à disparaître ?

En effet, c’est un peu cela. Je pense qu’il y a beaucoup d’impostures dans ses postures. Il fait croire qu’il est ce Nouveau Monde. Pour l’instant, tout démontre qu’il n’a fait que reproduire la vieille technocratie, le monde des experts, le monde des financiers, le monde de Bercy. Tout ce monde-là a repris les commandes. Au contraire, François Fillon avait demandé le courage de la vérité. On peut donc se demander si son éviction n’était pas due au fait qu’il se soit peut-être approché de trop près du sujet brûlant de la dénonciation de cette mascarade et ces grands mensonges qui font croire qu’on peut faire une démocratie sans le peuple. Macron a théorisé lui-même son rôle de Président Jupiter, c’est-à-dire de Dieu coupé du peuple.

Tsípras, Renzi, Trudeau… Le monde occidental semble céder à la mode du Young Leaders. Cela expliquerait-il l’élection de Macron ?

Non, je pense que le jeunisme est accessoire, dans cette affaire-là. Naturellement, sa jeunesse, son intelligence tactique incontestable, sa dextérité et ses qualités lui ont facilité la tâche. Je ne dis pas qu’il en soit dépourvu, mais je pense qu’il n’a fait que reprendre ce que les Américains ont précisément rejeté. Je vois notre Président comme étant un Barack Obama blanc ou un Justin Trudeau intellectuel. On voit bien que la politique de Barack Obama a conduit à l’éviction de Hillary Clinton et à l’élection de son exact contraire Donald Trump. Je fais le pari que si Macron poursuit dans cette voie du politiquement correct qu’il a réhabilité à l’image de ce qu’était Barack Obama, il va accélérer les processus de rejet de ce monde faux et de cet establishment que Donald Trump a réussi à pulvériser malgré tous ses défauts.

Selon vous, la mascarade cessera d’ici 2022, ou est-il parti pour rester un 2e mandat ? La bulle Macron pourrait-elle éclater ?

Si on trace ces lignes tel que je vous les décris, je pense que son essoufflement est programmé. Il a fait l’impasse sur de grandes questions qui se posent dès à présent. Comment répondre à une immigration de peuplement ? Comment répondre à un islam radical et colonisateur ? Comment répondre à une fracturation de la société ? Comment répondre au terrorisme ? Nous ne pouvons pas répondre à toutes ces questions simplement par l’économie.
Toute sa campagne a été construite sur le rejet des populismes et sur le rejet d’un discours qui, précisément, alerte sur ces grandes questions sociétales. Or, nous voyons bien que, partout en Europe, l’opinion se raidit. Par conséquent, soit Macron est obligé de se dédire, et dans ce cas il va falloir qu’il fasse un grand travail de retour sur lui-même, soit il continue dans un aveuglement et dans une sorte d’idéologie « béni-oui-ouiste » qui l’empêchera d’apporter les réponses qu’attendent les Français. Nous le voyons en Allemagne, avec le discrédit de la chancelière après sa politique qui avait été soutenue par Emmanuel Macron. Nous le voyons aussi en Autriche, en Catalogne et même chez nous, en Corse, avec ce réveil identitaire. Toutes ces réactions sont le produit d’un impensé d’une partie de la politique qui se berce de politiquement correct, qui pense que l’immigration n’est pas un problème et que les peuples peuvent indifféremment se remplacer.

Macron serait-il capable d’éviter, pour reprendre le titre d’un de vos livres, « cette guerre civile qui vient » ?

Je ne dis pas que Macron va accélérer ce processus. Mais je crains que, par la paresse intellectuelle de son idéologie et le confort intellectuel qui consiste à ne pas vouloir s’arrêter sur les grandes questions existentielles, il aggrave cette lente dissolution de la France. Cela pourrait aussi désemparer davantage cette société oubliée, cette France périphérique qui ne se reconnaît ni en lui ni en d’autres. En général, elle s’abstient ou vote pour le Front national.

Voir aussi:

Et si Donald Trump n’était pas qu’un accident historique ?

FIGAROVOX/ANALYSE – Benjamin Haddad pense que les Européens auraient tort de croire que Donald Trump est une parenthèse historique.


Benjamin Haddad est chercheur au Hudson Institute, un think tank spécialisé dans les relations internationales à Washington.


Le sommet du G7 au Canada, quelques jours après l’imposition de tarifs douaniers sur l’acier et l’aluminium sur les partenaires commerciaux des États-Unis, a illustré une fois de plus les différends entre les Européens et le président Donald Trump. On a finalement surestimé, peut-être par vœu pieux, l’imprévisibilité de Trump. Sur les tarifs douaniers, l’accord nucléaire iranien, Jérusalem ou encore le climat, le président américain, inspiré de son slogan America First, finit par mettre en œuvre ses promesses de campagnes de façon unilatérale et péremptoire, au détriment de la relation transatlantique.

Les prédécesseurs de Trump, depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, voyaient dans la promotion d’un ordre libéral international, appuyé sur un tissu d’alliances, de forums multilatéraux et d’interdépendances économiques, la source de projection de la puissance américaine. Trump renverse la table. Ces règles restreignent l’Amérique: elles lui imposent des tabous et des normes bridant sa puissance, ne lui permettant pas de défendre au mieux ses intérêts. L’Amérique se laisse berner par ses partenaires commerciaux ; ses alliés profitent de sa générosité pour se comporter en passagers clandestins et financer leurs systèmes sociaux sous couvert de parapluie militaire américain. Dans un monde de jeu à somme nulle, le rapport de force brut favorisera le plus fort, donc l’Amérique. Ces thèmes ne sont pas nouveaux pour Trump qui répète ces antiennes depuis les années 1980.

Sur le plan intérieur comme international, la question se pose: Donald Trump est-il un accident de l’histoire, élu sur un concours de circonstances, ou la manifestation de forces plus profondes traversant l’Amérique? Certes les idiosyncrasies du président sont incontestables. Sa vulgarité et sa personnalité brutale, son parcours d’homme d’affaires passé par la télé réalité ainsi que son inexpérience gouvernementale en font à coup sûr un animal politique sans précédent dans l’histoire américaine. De plus, son impopularité (à relativiser par le soutien fidèle de sa base) et les incertitudes pesant autour de l’enquête du Procureur Muller laissent certains espérer que la parenthèse sera de courte durée, qu’il suffit de s’armer de patience.

Il faut doucher cet optimisme: le parti démocrate est profondément divisé et peine à faire émerger de nouvelles personnalités. L’économie américaine se porte bien, malgré des réalités souvent plus dures masquées par les statistiques, des inégalités aux addictions aux drogues. La réélection de Trump en 2020 n’est pas du tout à exclure ; mais l’enjeu va bien au-delà.

Traiter Donald Trump comme une aberration historique qui sera suivie par un retour à «la normale» représenterait une erreur majeure de la part des Européens, pour trois raisons principales.

Tout d’abord, l’Amérique traverse une période de questionnement profond sur son leadership international et les objectifs de sa politique étrangère, conséquence tardive de la fin de la Guerre Froide qui l’a privée d’adversaire clair et donc de continuité stratégique. Tous les présidents élus depuis la fin de la guerre froide, l’ont été sur une plateforme plaçant la priorité sur le plan intérieur: Bill Clinton insistant sur l’économie, George W. Bush comme Barack Obama contre l’interventionnisme de leur prédécesseur. Les divisions profondes qui affectent les États-Unis et l’absence de priorité internationale qui fasse consensus, Chine, terrorisme, immigration, commerce international, doivent nous préparer à une politique américaine plus erratique et déterminée par des considérations intérieures et électorales.

Deuxièmement, le désastre irakien et la crise financière ont encouragé une tendance au repli et nourri le scepticisme d’une partie non négligeable de l’électorat quant à l’engagement international des États-Unis. L’observateur de Washington ne peut à cet égard que constater le décalage profond entre les experts de politique étrangère peuplant les think tanks et revues du reste de la population américaine. Durant la campagne présidentielle, Hillary Clinton avait ainsi dû changer de position sur le traité de libre-échange transpacifique pour suivre l’électorat, tandis que Trump pouvait brandir avec fierté la longue liste des experts de sécurité nationale «Never Trump» qui s’opposait à lui. Le fameux volte-face d’Obama sur la ligne rouge en Syrie a été largement critiqué à Washington comme à Paris, y compris par des membres de son entourage, mais soutenu par une large majorité de la population.

À cet égard, Trump s’inscrit dans une forme de continuité avec son prédécesseur, Barack Obama, tout aussi prompt à dénoncer les experts interventionnistes de Washington. Les deux présidents partagent un scepticisme face à la notion «d’exceptionnalisme» américain. Obama comme Trump se gardent bien de voir une quelconque mission civilisatrice dans la politique étrangère américaine, promouvant le «nation building at home». Les conséquences étaient différentes: le scepticisme d’Obama sur les limites de puissance américaine l’entraînait à favoriser les accords multilatéraux comme le JCPOA ou l’accord de Paris sur le climat. À l’inverse, Trump prône l’unilatéralisme botté, dans la tradition du nationalisme martial d’un Andrew Jackson, président entre 1829 et 1837.

Mais les deux approches sont deux pôles d’un même mouvement de retrait et de normalisation de la puissance américaine.

Enfin, repli ou non, l’Europe perd sa centralité stratégique pour les États-Unis. Obama dénonçait déjà dans un entretien au journaliste Jeffrey Goldberg les alliés européens «passagers clandestins». Plutôt que de regretter sa non-intervention en Syrie, c’est l’intervention en Libye qu’Obama désigne comme son principal échec de politique étrangère, pointant du doigt la France et la Grande Bretagne responsables de ne pas avoir assuré la reconstruction post-conflit. L’une des principales annonces de politique étrangère fut le «pivot» vers l’Asie. Le réengagement américain en Europe fut tardif et réticent, provoqué par l’annexion de la Crimée par la Russie en 2014. Mais ici aussi Obama a laissé Angela Merkel et François Hollande en première ligne pour négocier les accords de Minsk avec Vladimir Poutine. Les années 1990, caractérisées par l’attention portée à l’expansion de l’OTAN et les interventions américaines (tardives) dans les Balkans seront probablement une exception, reliquat de la guerre froide et d’un bref moment unipolaire triomphant.

Que peuvent les Européens face à cette puissance plus erratique, plus repliée, moins européenne? À court terme, rester unis et fermes sur leurs positions tout en essayant de maintenir le lien avec le président pour assurer le damage control: l’approche privilégiée par Emmanuel Macron est la seule réaliste. À cet égard, il est le pendant international du Congrès, de la justice américaine, voire de certains conseillers du président Trump qui ont, tant bien que mal, réussi à maîtriser certains des instincts présidentiels. Le Pentagone, dirigé par le général James Mattis, assure la continuité de la fermeté vis-à-vis de Moscou: les sanctions contre la Russie n’ont pas été levées par exemple, et l’administration a renforcé la présence militaire en Europe de l’Est dans le cadre de l’opération de réassurance de l’OTAN.

Les décrets exécutifs sur l’immigration ont été fortement retoqués par la justice, tandis que les principales dispositions d’Obamacare n’ont pu être annulées, faute de majorité au Sénat.

Mais à long terme, les Européens doivent se préparer à une Amérique distante voire hostile. L’Europe ne doit pas abandonner la promotion de son modèle de multilatéralisme et de coopération mais sa défense passe par la prise en compte du fait qu’il est l’exception, plutôt que la norme aujourd’hui. Cela implique un investissement considérable dans notre défense et sécurité: l’Europe est-elle prête à affronter seule une crise comparable aux Balkans dans sa périphérie demain? La crise syrienne, avec ses conséquences sur l’Union Européenne en matière de réfugiés et l’émergence de Daesh, devrait servir de réveil stratégique. Or, la posture européenne s’est essentiellement limitée à espérer un engagement américain. Au-delà de l’investissement dans le militaire, les Européens doivent prendre les mesures pour se préserver des conséquences des décisions américaines, en particulier des sanctions extraterritoriales. Aujourd’hui Trump exploite la faiblesse des Européens.

Peut-être cette séquence n’est elle qu’un cycle de plus dans le balancier permanent entre repli égoïste et aventurisme messianique qu’Henry Kissinger a souvent déploré dans l’histoire diplomatique américaine. Après les années de doute de la présidence Carter, post Watergate et Vietnam ont suivi l’optimisme triomphant des années Reagan. Mais l’Europe ne peut fonder sa stratégie sur cet espoir. De plus, même si le successeur de Trump renoue avec l’internationalisme, l’Europe n’en sera pas moins vue comme un partenaire secondaire, grevée par ses divisions et sa faiblesse militaire. L’incertitude durable autour de la posture américaine doit entraîner l’Europe à s’engager dans la voie de l’autonomie stratégique.

Voir également:

Croissance : la conjoncture sourit à Donald Trump
Les États-Unis enregistrent au second trimestre la plus forte croissance depuis 2014, à 4,1% en rythme annuel, selon une première estimation. De quoi renforcer le président dans sa certitude que sa politique de déréglementation et de baisses d’impôts est la bonne.
Pierre-Yves Dugua
Le Figaro
27/07/2018

De notre correspondant à Washington

L’économie américaine se porte aussi bien que prévu. Selon la première estimation du Département du commerce, la croissance au second trimestre atteint 4,1% en rythme annuel. On n’a pas vu de conjoncture aussi favorable aux États-Unis depuis 2014.

Donald Trump qualifie ces chiffres de «fascinants» et de «tout à fait tenables». Il y voit la preuve que sa politique de déréglementation et de baisses d’impôts porte ses fruits. D’autant que l’estimation de l’expansion de janvier à mars est révisée à la hausse de 2 à 2, 2% en rythme annuel.

«Le monde entier nous envie», selon Trump

«Depuis notre arrivée nous constatons la création de 400.000 emplois dans le secteur manufacturier… des milliards de dollars reviennent vers les États-Unis… des usines rouvrent… les demandes d’indemnisation chômage sont au plus bas depuis près de 50 ans… Le monde entier nous envie» proclame le président, convaincu que la presse américaine refuse d’admettre le succès de sa politique.

Voilà déjà plus d’un an qu’il tourne en dérision les experts qui affirment qu’il ne sera pas possible de dépasser durablement 3% de croissance. Leurs arguments sont toujours que l’Amérique approche de la fin d’un très long cycle d’expansion engagé depuis l’été 2009, que la croissance démographique est désormais modeste et surtout que les hausses de productivité ne sont pas suffisantes pour renouer avec des taux de croissance dignes des années Reagan.

Au cours du premier semestre l’expansion atteint néanmoins 3,1%. Si la montée des barrières douanières, les relèvements de taux directeurs par la Réserve fédérale et la hausse des coûts des matières premières ne font pas dérailler la conjoncture, le pari de Donald Trump peut être gagné, au moins en 2018.

Les élections législatives en ligne de mire

En fait, il ne faut à Donald Trump que cinq mois de conjoncture aussi porteuse. C’est l’horizon économique très court qui suffit à ce président politiquement incorrect pour aborder avec sérénité les élections législatives de novembre prochain. Avec un taux de chômage au plus bas depuis la fin du siècle dernier, des créations d’emplois encore très fortes en moyenne de 215.000 postes par mois depuis janvier et une inflation de l’ordre de 2%, il pense présenter à l’opinion un premier bilan positif. Surtout s’il arrive à passer sous silence que, contrairement à l’orthodoxie fiscale prônée jadis par le Parti républicain, le déficit budgétaire en forte hausse est en partie responsable de l’accélération actuelle de la croissance.

Signe de la confiance et du moral élevé des Américains, la consommation, qui représente plus des deux tiers du Produit intérieur brut (PIB) aux États-Unis, bondit au rythme de 4% au second trimestre, après une maigre progression de 0,5% de janvier à mars.

Paradoxalement, les fortes tensions commerciales entre Washington et ses partenaires ont stimulé la croissance au cours du printemps. Dans l’anticipation de droits de douane chinois sur les denrées agricoles, les producteurs américains de soja ont par exemple tout fait pour avancer leurs livraisons avant le mois de juillet, date d’entrée en vigueur des mesures de rétorsion décidées par Pékin. Près d’un quart de la croissance a été donc généré par le commerce extérieur.

Voir de même:

Économie américaine: et si Trump réussissait?

Fabrice Nodé-Langlois

Le Figaro

18/05/2018

DÉCRYPTAGE – Volontarisme fiscal, brutalité commerciale : les critiques pleuvent sur la méthode du président américain, mais les États-Unis affichent d’excellentes performances économiques.

Sur le climat, l’Iran, Israël, il s’est mis au ban de la communauté internationale. Ses tweets rageurs matinaux, son imprévisibilité, sa brutalité, laissent pantois. Ses démêlés avec le FBI et la justice interrogent sur sa capacité à mener son mandat jusqu’à son terme.

Et pourtant. La méthode de Donald Trump, exposée il y a trente ans déjà, dans son best-seller l’Art du deal, du temps où le futur président de la première puissance mondiale n’était qu’un loup new-yorkais de l’immobilier, semble faire mouche. Depuis qu’il est installé à la Maison-Blanche, Donald Trump l’a éprouvée à plusieurs reprises, notamment avec la Corée du Nord. Il profère les pires menaces, exerce une pression maximale sur l’adversaire ou le partenaire, puis se dit prêt à discuter.

Sur le front commercial, le président américain a marqué des points. Il a arraché des concessions au Brésil, son deuxième fournisseur d’acier ainsi qu’à la Corée du Sud. Évidemment, disposer du plus gros budget militaire de la planète (610 milliards de dollars, davantage que les sept pays suivants réunis) et diriger la première économie (un PIB de 19.000 milliards de dollars, une fois et demie celui de la Chine) offre quelques arguments. «Face à des “petits” pays, les États-Unis ont des leviers de négociations, commente Steven Friedman, économiste américain chez BNP Paribas AM. Mais avec des grands pays comme la Chine, il faudra sûrement de longues négociations pour trouver un compromis.»

De fait, Washington et Pékin ont repris leurs négociations vendredi. L’Administration Trump a fixé un ultimatum à mardi prochain, 22 mai: faute d’accord, les États-Unis imposeront des droits de douane sur des produits chinois importés représentant une valeur de 50 milliards de dollars. L’issue est encore très incertaine, mais Trump a réussi à amener les Chinois à la table pour discuter d’une réduction du déficit commercial américain.

L’Europe prévient l’OMC qu’elle est prête à riposter

Washington n’a pas non plus gagné son bras de fer contre l’Europe. L’Union européenne affiche au moins une unité de façade. Elle a même notifié, vendredi, à l’OMC (Organisation mondiale du commerce) qu’elle est prête à prendre des contre-mesures tarifaires. Au sommet de Sofia, jeudi, les chefs d’État européens ont répété qu’ils voulaient d’abord une exemption définitive des surtaxes sur l’acier et l’aluminium avant de négocier une plus grande ouverture de leur marché.

«Au moins, Donald Trump a eu le mérite d’encourager le débat sur l’impact de la mondialisation sur l’économie, c’est sain», remarque Steven Friedman, pourtant critique du président. «Sa tactique de négociation est de taper fort et de se faire mousser auprès de son électorat, ajoute Florence Pisani, économiste chez Candriam et coauteur d’un livre sur l’économie américaine (*). C’est un jeu assez dangereux, car cela crée de l’incertitude et reporte les projets d’investissement.» Les bons indicateurs qui se succèdent semblent pourtant démentir cette vision pessimiste. À 3,9 %, le chômage est au plus bas depuis près de vingt ans, l’industrie crée des emplois, les ménages ont davantage confiance qu’au début du mandat. Résumé en langage Trump, cela donne ce tweet, publié jeudi: «Malgré la chasse aux sorcières dégoûtante, illégale et injustifiée, nous avons accompli les meilleurs 17 premiers mois d’une Administration dans l’histoire américaine».

Un leg solide

«Il n’y a pas eu de changement majeur de tendance depuis l’arrivée de Trump, nuance Christian Leuz, économiste allemand installé depuis quinze ans aux États-Unis, à l’University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Obama a laissé une économie en bonne santé, il est encore trop tôt pour attribuer les bons résultats à Trump.»

Ce leg solide est aussi largement imputable à dix ans de politique monétaire généreuse de la Fed, rappellent de nombreux économistes. Sa réforme fiscale, arrachée de haute lutte au Congrès, devrait tout de même avoir un impact positif sur l’économie. Elle a gonflé le profit des entreprises et permis à certaines comme Apple de rapatrier des milliards mis à l’abri à l’étranger. Florence Pisani pondère encore: une enquête récente de la réserve fédérale d’Atlanta indique que moins de 10 % des entreprises envisagent d’investir davantage malgré les réductions d’impôt.

Quant aux ménages, ils pourraient perdre en impôts locaux (ceux des États) ce qu’ils ont gagné sur les impôts fédéraux. Même si le programme des grands travaux reste encore dans le flou, les dépenses votées par le Congrès devraient cependant soutenir l’activité de 0,3 % de PIB supplémentaire, concède Florence Pisani.

Un surcroît de dépenses qui pourrait léguer au successeur de Trump «un déficit budgétaire de plus de 5 % du PIB et une dette alourdie», avertit Steven Friedman. Il faudra attendre la fin de l’année pour mieux mesurer l’impact des mesures de Trump. Surtout, il ne faut jamais oublier qu’aux États-Unis, en matière de politique intérieure, rien ou presque ne se décide sans le Congrès. «Il y a comme un pacte de Faust entre Trump et les parlementaires républicains, explique Christian Leuz. En échange d’avancées sur des sujets qui leur sont chers, ils sont obligés d’accepter le style Trump.» Jusqu’à ce que les divergences sur l’immigration et le libre-échange, ou les élections de novembre, ne fassent voler ce pacte en éclats.

(*) «L’Économie américaine», avec Anton Brender, éditions La Découverte.

Voir de plus:

Politiquement incorrectes, les réformes de Trump sont un succès pour l’économie américaine

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Un an après l’arrivée fracassante du nouvel occupant de la Maison-Blanche, l’économie américaine est au beau fixe. Nicolas Lecaussin décrypte les réussites de la politique fiscale de Trump.


Nicolas Lecaussin est directeur de l’IREF (Institut de Recherches Économiques et Fiscales, Paris).


Dans un éditorial publié en 2016, avant le changement à la Maison Blanche, l’économiste Paul Krugman, titulaire du prix Nobel, écrivait: «Si Trump est élu, l’économie américaine va s’écrouler et les marchés financiers ne vont jamais s’en remettre». Un an après sa prise de fonction, le président Trump est à la tête d’un pays en plein boom économique, et dont l’indice boursier a battu tous les records.

On m’objectera que Trump est provocateur, imprévisible, irascible. Qu’il ne peut pas s’empêcher de tweeter tout (et surtout n’importe quoi). Mais si l’on regarde les faits, et uniquement les faits, un constat s’impose: on ne peut pas trouver dans l’histoire récente des Etats-Unis un président ayant mené à bien autant de réformes en un laps de temps si court. Même Reagan a mis trois ans à réformer la fiscalité américaine! Trump, lui, l’a fait en quelques mois.

Alors certes, «The Donald» n’a pas réussi à démanteler complètement l’Obamacare, suite aux oppositions rencontrées dans son propre parti ; mais sa réforme fiscale inclut la fin du «mandat individuel», cette fameuse obligation de souscrire à une assurance santé. Plus exactement, l’amende pour le non-respect de cette obligation est supprimée par la réforme.

Cette mesure était nécessaire. En 2009, les conséquences de cette mesure coercitive, emblématique de la présidence d’Obama, ne s’étaient pas fait attendre. Il y avait eu d’énormes bugs informatiques qui ont découragé des millions de personnes de souscrire en ligne. Puis des millions d’Américains ont été contraints de résilier leur assurance privée, alors que nombre d’entre eux n’en ressentaient nullement l’envie. Depuis 2009, plus de 2 400 pages de réglementations se sont accumulées pour réguler le fonctionnement du système. Le président Obama avait promis de baisser les franchises de santé grâce à ce programme, mais ce fut tout le contraire: elles ont augmenté de 60 % en moyenne. Les primes d’assurance ont bondi dans l’ensemble de 25 % (et même jusqu’à 119 % dans l’état d’Arizona).

Les assureurs ne s’en sortaient plus à cause des réglementations très strictes qui leur ont été imposées. Obama avait aussi promis de baisser le prix de l’assurance santé d’environ 2 500 dollars par famille et par an ; en réalité, le prix a augmenté de 2 100 dollars! Trump met fin à cette dérive en ouvrant le système un peu plus à la concurrence et en donnant aux Américains la liberté de choisir.

Ce n’est pas tout. La réforme fiscale adoptée par le Congrès des États-Unis contient de nombreuses mesures audacieuses, que les Américains attendaient. Par exemple la baisse de la taxe sur les bénéfices des entreprises (de 35 % à 21 %), qui s’accompagne d’une déduction fiscale généreuse pour les entreprises dont les profits ne sont déclarés qu’au travers des revenus de leurs propriétaires. Plusieurs taxes ont par ailleurs été supprimées, comme la taxe minimum de 20 % sur les bénéfices effectifs.

Surtout, le président Trump a entamé une vaste opération visant à rapatrier entre 2 000 et 4 000 milliards de dollars de profits placés à l’étranger, en diminuant la taxe sur ces profits de 35 % à moins de 15 %.

Autre mesure symbolique: la suppression de la taxe sur les héritages au-dessous de 10 millions de dollars satisfait une large partie de l’électorat républicain.

Certains Etats dont la fiscalité est particulièrement élevée, comme la Californie, seront également obligés de se réformer pour faire face à la suppression de certaines déductions fiscales. Leurs habitants ne pourront plus en effet déduire l’impôt sur le revenu local de leurs impôts fédéraux.

Plusieurs mesures abolissent l’interdiction des forages de pétrole en Alaska. À l’heure actuelle, Trump a ouvert toutes les possibilités d’exploitation sur le continent américain, ce qui fera du pays l’un des principaux exportateurs de matières premières. Trump se positionne ainsi en ennemi du politiquement correct et reste méfiant à l’égard des gourous du réchauffement climatique. Il a été le seul à avoir le courage de se retirer de la COP 21, cette mascarade coûteuse qui consiste à organiser de gigantesques réunions de chefs d’État aux frais des contribuables. Il a supprimé la prime à la voiture électrique (pour une économie de 7 milliards de dollars) ainsi que les subventions aux parcs d’éoliennes.

Enfin, Trump s’est attaqué aux réglementations. Entre janvier et décembre 2017, il a supprimé la moitié (45 000) des pages que contient le Code des réglementations. Plus de 1 500 réglementations importantes ont été abolies, dont beaucoup dans le domaine de l’environnement. Les économies obtenues sont estimées à plus de 9 milliards de dollars. Faisant fi des protestations, il a libéré le secteur d’internet de plusieurs contraintes anachroniques.

Au plan international, Trump s’oppose à la Chine dont les pratiques commerciales douteuses ont fait l’objet d’enquêtes de la part de Washington. Mais cette position juste face aux Chinois ne devrait pas conduire la Maison Blanche à cautionner des mesures restrictives de la liberté du commerce et des échanges, qui risqueraient de peser sur la croissance américaine et même mondiale. On songe ici à la proposition faite par la Chambre des Représentants de faire payer aux multinationales une taxe de 20 % sur les achats faits à des filiales étrangères de leur groupe. Ou encore, celle du Sénat de réimposer les sociétés américaines au taux de 13 % sur les services facturés de l’étranger par les sociétés du groupe.

En tout état de cause, en ce début janvier 2018, l’économie américaine semble partir sur des bases solides. Le troisième trimestre de croissance s’est élevé à plus de 3 %, et le taux de chômage est au plus bas, à seulement 4.1 % (2.1 millions d’emplois créés en une année, du jamais vu depuis 1990), et même à 6.8 % pour la population noire, un taux qui n’a jamais été si faible depuis 1973.

Les effets des baisses d’impôt se font d’ores et déjà sentir: des entreprises comme AT&T, Comcast, Wells Fargo, Boeing, Nexus Services ont annoncé des primes et des hausses de salaires.

Le pire ennemi de Trump est certainement lui-même. Cet homme d’affaires n’est pas un politicien professionnel. Saura-t-il alors se contrôler, pour continuer à remettre l’Amérique sur les rails et mépriser l’idéologiquement correct, sans se laisser aller à des provocations futiles?

Voir encore:

Donald Trump has a big promise for the U.S. economy: 4% growth.

No chance, say 11 economists surveyed by CNNMoney. And a paper published Tuesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco backs them up.
« No, pigs do not fly, » says Robert Brusca, senior economist at FAO Economics, a research firm. « Donald Trump is dreaming. »
The Republican presidential nominee made the promise in a speech in New York in September. « I believe it’s time to establish a national goal of reaching 4% economic growth, » he said.
Since the Great Recession, growth has averaged 2%. Brusca and the other economists surveyed say that 4% growth is impossible, or at least highly unlikely. The reasons: Unemployment is already really low, lots of Baby Boomers are retiring, and there are far fewer manufacturing jobs today than in past decades.

Trump’s team says it will get to 4% growth with tax cuts, better trade deals and more manufacturing jobs.

One reason for slower growth is lower productivity — for example, how many widgets an assembly line worker can produce in an hour.

Another problem is that the example of the assembly line worker is increasingly outdated: America has shed about 5.6 million manufacturing jobs since 2000, mostly because of innovation and partly because of trade, studies show.

Manufacturing jobs tend to have higher productivity — and wages — than jobs in other service industries like retail, education and health care, which have added lots of low-productivity jobs while manufacturing jobs have disappeared.

Interestingly, American manufacturers are producing more than ever before — in dollar terms. But as technology replaces jobs on the assembly line, more goods can be produced with fewer workers.

On top of that, the economy is already near what economists consider full employment, meaning the unemployment rate can’t go much lower.

The unemployment rate is 5% and was as low as 4.7% earlier this year. It can’t go much lower because there will always be people leaving jobs or searching for them.

If the job market is already near capacity, the economy can’t expand much more, economists say.

Unemployment did go really low in 2000 — as low as 3.8% — and the economy was growing above a 4% pace. But the San Francisco Fed attributes those good times to the late 1990s internet revolution.

There are solutions to boost growth, the Fed notes.

Many economists call for more spending on building new roads, bridges and highways, as do both Trump and Hillary Clinton.

After World War II, the creation of the Interstate Highway System was a major boost to productivity and growth. You could go much faster from point A to point B.

Other solutions are a little more dreamy.

Many experts say comprehensive immigration reform — a path to citizenship — would create more documented workers. Historically, documented workers tend to have higher productivity than undocumented workers because they generally have higher job skills and can take on jobs that produce more valuable goods. Productivity has nothing to do with work ethic.

Outside of immigration reform and infrastructure spending, the Federal Reserve says America needs a game-changing invention, such as the IT innovation in the 1990s. New technology from fast-growing countries like China and India may also help too.

« Another wave of the IT revolution from machine learning and robots could boost productivity growth, » says Federal Reserve senior research adviser John Fernald.

Voir aussi:

American prosperity of Trump era marks real turning point in history
Arthur Laffer
The Hill
07/28/18

Gross domestic product, or GDP, is the measure of choice when assessing the health of any economy, especially in the United States. GDP, which is measured at annual rates, includes the value of production of all goods and services produced in a country. In the one year since President Trump took office, the first quarter of 2017 through the first quarter of 2018, real GDP grew at a 2.55 percent annual rate. This is higher than the growth for six of the eight years former President Obama was in office, or even five of the eight years when former President George W. Bush was in office.

Moreover, the economic growth rate in the first year of Trump in office is higher than the average annual growth rate for the entire presidencies of both Obama at 2.05 percent and Bush at 1.71 percent. For the full 65 years from the first quarter of 1953 through the first quarter of 2018, annual real GDP growth in the United States averaged 2.95 percent, which is still substantially higher than the first year under Trump.

The growth rate for the second quarter of 2018 is 4.1 percent. This is a nice sign of American prosperity and is the strongest quarter of economic growth since the third quarter of 2014. Net exports contributed about 1 percent, while the change in private inventories subtracted 1 percent. Lots of changes like this happen on a quarter by quarter basis and should not be taken too seriously.

The Commerce Department releases its quarterly estimates, but it has also revised a lot of historical numbers, although usually by only very small amounts. Perhaps its biggest revision was for the first four quarters of the Trump presidency. What had been an estimated annual growth of 2.82 percent was revised down to 2.55 percent, even though the first quarter of 2018 itself was revised up from 2 percent to 2.2 percent. This example is only meant to show the fragility of these numbers.

While the GDP growth of any one quarter can be offset, revised or magnified in subsequent quarters, a pattern appears to be emerging under the stewardship of the Trump administration, which makes a lot of sense, at least to me. I believe that people individually, and the economy collectively, respond strongly to economic incentives.

Other economists do not concur on this point. Jason Furman, the top economist for Obama, disagrees with me on the effects that Trump policies have on real GDP growth. In fact, using the ploy of damning with faint praise, he said of the 2017 tax cuts in a recent debate, “I think policy can make a difference. The tax cuts will make a very, very small positive difference, probably about half of one-tenth of 1 percent.”

History tells us a very different story than the naysayers. Lowering taxes and decreasing regulation has had powerful effects on growth over long periods of time. Taxes have a very important impact on employment, jobs, output and growth. An economy quite simply cannot be taxed into prosperity. The tax cuts signed by Trump stand in stark contrast to the tax increases under Obama. Corporate and personal tax rates were way too high. The Republican bill reduced those tax rates a lot. It included 100 percent expensing of capital expenditures, territorial taxation, and the elimination of state and local tax deductions to promote growth.

Trump has also waged war on debilitating regulations, including eliminating the Affordable Care Act individual mandate, along with reducing other health care and energy regulations as well. Monetary policy is now refocusing on market forces rather than zero interest rates, which means that money will flow to where it is needed, not to where some university professors believe it should go.

When it comes to trade, there are problems and risks in the vision Trump is carrying out. Trade should be free and with minimum barriers placed on American exports to other countries and foreign exports to the United States. We should, as a world, move to zero tariffs everywhere. We should eliminate other barriers and trade subsidies. Obviously, such an ideal world is not plausible, but there is no reason we cannot try.

Foreigners produce some things better than we do, and we produce some things better than they do. Both Americans and foreigners alike would be foolish in the extreme if Americans did not sell foreigners those products Americans make better than foreigners in exchange for those products foreigners make better than Americans do. It is a winning strategy for everyone and makes for great prosperity around the world.

Finally, we have had a serious government spending problem in the United States for years. The economist Milton Friedman was famous for saying “government spending is taxation.” He is completely correct. If a country taxes people who work and pays people when they do not work, then it is unsurprising if a lot more people choose not to work.

The latest GDP figure is a great number that aids our recovery from the awful 16 years under Bush and Obama. It will also reduce deficits in the long term if such robust economic growth continues. But the challenge is far from over. We have a lot of work to do to fan the flames of prosperity and to hold at bay the prosperity killers. But one step forward is still one step forward, and it is a heck of a lot better than one step backward.

Arthur B. Laffer is chairman of Laffer Associates. He was an economic adviser to the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump and served as an economic adviser to the White House during the Reagan administration.

Voir également:

The Return of 3% Growth
Tax reform and deregulation have lifted the economy out of the Obama doldrums.
The Wall Street Journal
July 28, 2018

So much for “secular stagnation.” You remember that notion, made fashionable by economist Larry Summers and picked up by the press corps to explain why the U.S. economy couldn’t rise above the 2.2% doldrums of the Obama years. Well, with Friday’s report of 4.1% growth in the second quarter, the U.S. economy has now averaged 3.1% growth for the last six months and 2.8% for the last 12.

The lesson is that policies matter and so does the tone set by political leaders. For eight years Barack Obama told Americans that inequality was a bigger problem than slow economic growth, that stagnant wages were the fault of the rich, and that government through regulation and politically directed credit could create prosperity. The result was slow growth, and secular stagnation was the intellectual attempt to explain that policy failure.

The policy mix changed with Donald Trump’s election and a Republican Congress to turn it into law. Deregulation and tax reform were the first-year priorities that have liberated risk-taking and investment, spurring a revival in business confidence and growth to give the long expansion a second wind.

The nearby chart shows GDP growth by quarter over the last four years. The numbers show that the long, weak expansion that began in mid-2009 had flagged to below 2% growth in the last half of 2015 and in 2016. Nonresidential fixed investment in particular had slumped to an average quarterly increase of merely 0.6% in those final two years of the Obama Presidency. An economic expansion that was already long in the tooth began to fade and could have slid into recession with a negative shock.

The Paul Ryan-Donald Trump growth agenda was targeted to revive that investment weakness. Deregulation signaled to business that arbitrary enforcement and compliance costs wouldn’t be imposed on ideological whim. Tax reform broke the bottleneck on capital mobility and investment from the highest corporate tax rate in the developed world. Above all, the political message from Washington after eight years is that faster growth is possible and investment to turn a profit is encouraged.

The chart and the second-quarter GDP report show that this policy mix is working. Growth popped to a higher plane of nearly 3% in the middle of 2017 as business and consumer confidence increased with the Trump Administration’s policies taking center stage. A growth dip in the last quarter of 2017 on tax-reform uncertainties carried over to the start of the first quarter, but growth has since accelerated.

The acceleration has been driven by business investment, which increased 6.3% in 2017 and has averaged 9.4% in the first half of 2018. This investment surge has come in productive areas like equipment and commercial construction. It has not come from padding inventories that have to be sold down, or in a housing mania like the one that drove growth in the mid-2000s. Both housing and inventories subtracted from growth in the second quarter.

It would be nice to think that all Americans would take satisfaction in this growth. But in the polarized politics of 2018, the same people who said this growth revival could never happen are now saying that it can’t last. It’s a “sugar high,” as Mr. Summers has put it, due to one-time boosts like government spending and consumption.

But there are reasons to think that a 3% growth pace can continue with the right policies. The investment boom will drive productivity gains and job creation that will flow to higher wages and lift consumer spending. Inventories will have to be replenished and new household formation is increasing again, which should help housing demand.

Most intriguing is that the government’s annual revisions to long-term GDP on Friday showed a sharp increase in the personal savings rate. The increase was due to an upward revision in wages and salaries and jumped to 6.7% from 3.4% for 2017 and averaged 7% in the first half of this year. That’s about $500 billion more in the pockets of Americans than previously estimated and helps to explain why consumer spending has remained strong. With tight labor markets, consumer spending should keep contributing to growth.

There are risks to this outlook, not least from Mr. Trump’s tariff policies. This is the President’s version of Mr. Obama’s regulatory assault, with arbitrary victims, uncertainty that limits business investment, and the risks of escalation. Mr. Trump crowed at the White House on Friday that his trade policies are helping the economy, but the second-quarter lift from net exports isn’t likely to last amid foreign retaliation for his steel and aluminum tariffs.

The way to help the economy is for Mr. Trump to build on this week’s trade truce with the European Union, withdraw the tariffs on both sides, and work toward a “zero tariff” deal. Meantime, wrap up the Nafta revision with Mexico and Canada within weeks so Congress can approve it this year. Mr. Trump could claim he had honored another campaign promise while removing a pall on investment.

The other major risk is the Federal Reserve’s attempt to unwind the extraordinary monetary policies of the last decade. If near-zero rates and trillions in bond-buying lifted asset prices artificially, as some of our friends think, then reversing those policies could cause those prices to fall with uncertain results.
All of which is another reason to thank tax reform and deregulation for unleashing animal spirits and giving the expansion renewed life. It’s worth recalling that not a single Democrat in Congress voted for tax reform and nearly all of them opposed every vote to repeal the Obama Administration’s onerous rules. Had they prevailed, we’d still be experiencing secular stagnation instead of arguing if 4.1% growth is too much of a good thing.

Voir par ailleurs:

Putin Is Weak. Europe Doesn’t Have to Be
Moscow is a sideshow. The real dangers come from within the Continent.
Walter Russell Mead
WSJ
July 23, 2018

We hear too much about Vladimir Putin these days and not nearly enough about the actual forces reshaping the world. Yes, the Russian president has proved a brilliant tactician. And, President Trump’s fantasies aside, he is a ruthless enemy of American power and European coherence. Yet Russia remains a byword for backwardness and corruption. Its gross domestic product is less than 10% that of the U.S. or the European Union. With a declining population and a fundamentally adverse geopolitical situation, the Russian Federation remains a shadow of its Soviet predecessor. Add up the consequences of Mr. Putin’s troops, nukes, disinformation campaigns, financial aid to populist parties—and throw in the power of his authoritarian example. Russia still does not have the ability to roll back the post-1990 democratic revolution, overpower the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or dissolve the EU.

The West is in crisis because of European weakness, not Russian strength. Some of the Continent’s difficulties are well known. France foolishly imagined the euro would contain the rise of a newly united Germany after the Cold War. In fact it has propelled Germany’s unprecedented economic rise while driving a wedge between Europe’s indebted South and creditor North. The Continent’s so-called migration policy is a humanitarian and a political disaster. Berlin’s feckless approach to security has left Europe’s most important power a geopolitical midget, lecturing sanctimoniously while others shape the world. Meanwhile the EU’s Byzantine government machinery grinds at an ever slower pace, creating openings for Mr. Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Europe’s weakness invites authoritarian assertion in the borderlands.

Another failure of equal consequence still is not widely understood: the failure to integrate the countries of Central and Eastern Europe into Western prosperity and institutional life. The world’s 10 fastest-shrinking countries are all in Eastern Europe: Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine. All expect to see their populations shrink at least 15% by 2050. For the enterprising and mobile, there is good news; between three million and five million Romanians live and work in other EU countries, enjoying opportunities they could not find at home. But for those who cannot or do not wish to move on, life can be hard. Almost 30 full years after the fall of communism, more than one-fourth of Romanians live on less than $5.50 a day. Across Romania, less than half of households have an internet connection, and only 52% have a computer. Romania and Bulgaria—where living standards are lower than in Turkey—are exceptionally poor. Conditions are better elsewhere, but the gap between prosperous European countries like Germany and postcommunist states like Poland remains immense. Poles on average earn only a third as much as Germans. The rural, eastern parts of Poland are poorer still. Conditions in ex-Soviet countries like Armenia, Belarus, Georgia and Ukraine are even worse. Corruption is rampant, with weak institutions unable to stop it.

The hubris that led so many in the West to believe that Europe had entered a posthistorical paradise is fading. A clearer if darker picture has emerged. Swaths of Central and Eastern Europe will not smoothly and painlessly assimilate into the West. If voters in these countries lose faith that Western ideas and institutions can improve their lives, the political gap between East and West will widen. When the EU is more preoccupied with internal divisions, it is less able to respond effectively to Russian moves.

Europe’s weakness has provided Mr. Putin with opportunities to promote Russian power by supporting populist parties across the EU and deepening his relationship with leaders like Hungary’s Viktor Orbán. Yet even in the age of Trump, Moscow is too weak, too poor, too regressive and too remote to shape European politics. The days when Russian rulers like Catherine the Great and Alexander I could direct events across the Continent are gone for good. The collapse of the Soviet Union and the unification of Germany mean the most important relationship in the trans-Atlantic world is between Washington and Berlin.

President Trump is right that much of the trans-Atlantic relationship needs to be rethought. He is right that Germany asks too much and offers too little for the current relationship to be sustainable. He is right that the European Union has worked itself into a political crisis, and that the Continent’s errors and illusions strengthen Mr. Putin’s hand. But if the president thinks Mr. Putin’s Russia can serve as the linchpin of a new American security strategy, he is overestimating Russia’s capacity, misreading Mr. Putin’s goals, and underestimating the importance of the trans-Atlantic alliance. Moscow is a sideshow. To protect American prosperity and security, Mr. Trump most needs to strike a deal with Berlin.

Voir également:

Televison: From Burkina Faso with rockets to Upper Volta without
Steve Crashaw
The Independent
15 November 1998

The Soviet Union was famously described as « Upper Volta with rockets », a catchphrase that was updated by the geographically precise to become « Burkina Faso with rockets ». It was a powerfully succinct description. The United States was rich and space-age powerful; the Soviet Union was poor and space-age powerful. The contradictions and paradoxes that stemmed from that could never fully be resolved – least of all by the citizens of the Soviet Union themselves.

During the 1930s, Stalin turned Russia into an industrially powerful nation, and made his Soviet compatriots feel proud of what they had achieved. The defeat of Hitler’s might, at the cost of millions of lives, was also seen as proof of Soviet greatness.

The idea that Soviet was best took deep root. It convinced some Western visitors, and millions of Russians. Even now, many Russians find it hard to believe that there was anything wrong with the model itself. In last night’s episode of the Cold War series, interviewees visibly hankered after a time when Khrushchev was in his Kremlin, and all was right with the Soviet world.

« Sputnik », the title of last night’s episode, is the Russian word for a fellow-traveller: the spaceship was seen as a travelling companion for the planet earth. Here it was that we found true Soviet heroes, including Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space. As a Moscow baker declared – still misty-eyed, after all these years: « Gagarin, he was everybody’s love. He and his smile. I still keep his photograph. »

Television news may sometimes seem deeply superficial – never mind the reality, listen to that fabulous soundbite. But television history, with the participation of those who were in the front row of the stalls or even centre-stage at the events described, can, at its best, be more enlightening than anything that you could have read in the newspapers at the time. Series like the Cold War put things neatly into perspective, with descriptions of historic events coming directly from witnesses and participants – last night included a Soviet rocket designer, an aide to Khrushchev, and Gagarin’s running-mate. The heroism and the lies are equally visible.

The Cold War series gives a small example of why it must sometimes be quite fun to be a media billionaire. You flick your fingers, and unbelievable projects just happen. A few years ago, Ted Turner, creator of CNN, mused that he would like to do a definitive history of the Cold War. And thus it came to pass, without all the doggedly begging memos to potential backers which are usually par for the course. Turner was put in touch with Jeremy Isaacs, who had produced the landmark World at War series. Isaacs, in turn, gathered a team of experienced producers and writers, including highly respected figures like the journalist Neal Ascherson and (for last night’s programme on the space race) defence specialist Lawrence Freedman. Unsurprisingly, the result is much more than just televisual flam.

Last night’s programme included some dramatic eyewitness accounts of events – like a Soviet space disaster, where one woman remembered how « people fell like burning torches from the top of the rocket ». Her words were accompanied by dramatic pictures from the heart of the conflagration – pictures that you can be sure never appeared on the Soviet Nine O’Clock News. At that time, Soviet disasters were strictly not for public consumption.

At the same time, Sputnik exposed the absurdity that accompanied the whole notion of the space race. Shamed by the early Soviet lead, America had to prove that anything Russia could do, America could do better; Russia responded in kind. America became so fixated with the idea of the « missile gap » – that is, let’s spend more billions of dollars on defence – that they found one even when it did not exist. Almost forty years on, President Kennedy’s defence secretary, Robert McNamara, cheerfully acknowledged: « A major charge was that there was a missile gap. It took us about three weeks to determine: yes, there is a gap – but the gap is in our favour. » Was that what Time or Newsweek were writing at the time? Unlikely.

While Cold War stripped some of the humbug from old-fashioned propaganda, Tim Whewell’s Correspondent special, « Two Weddings and the Rouble », was a bleak illustration of life in Russia today, seven years after the final collapse of the superpower and the propaganda machine. The Cold War has vanished; and with it, the heart of Russia’s pride. Whewell’s film focused on two newly-marrieds. On the one hand, there was Yuri, the self-confident young entrepreneur who was about to take his new wife Yulia on a honeymoon to Thailand (they had already been to Cyprus; but there were too many Russians, so they wanted something more exotic). On the other, there was Katya, the 18-year-old accounts clerk who trudged round looking for jobs that might, if she was lucky, pay her one or two dollars a day.

Hauntingly photographed by Ian Perry (lots of wistfully Russian townscapes at dawn), « Two Weddings », a depiction of life in the provincial town of Yaroslavl, painted a simple portrait of Russia’s sadness. We saw the queues of blood donors, who come back day after day in the hope that they can thus earn a few more kopecks. We met the father who boasted of a good day in the potato fields by telling us of what he had managed to steal: « Today I took three buckets out. » And, above all, we are confronted with the despair. Vodka was described as the only way of blotting everything else out, if only for a short while. As one character said: « A swamp doesn’t go anywhere. It silts up – that’s what’s happening to our state. »

The film resolutely avoided politics, though the story of the collapsing rouble – six to the dollar one day, 20 to the dollar a few days later – always lurked in the background. But the underlying theme was best expressed by the father who angrily complained that « this once-great country has been robbed and humiliated ». Humiliated: certainly. Russia these days is now Upper Volta without the rockets (all its best scientists have gone abroad; those who remain are usually unpaid). But robbed? Who did the robbing, and why? The comment reflected the still-deep Russian fatalism which enables millions to believe that somebody else is always responsible, and that Russians can change nothing themselves. It is not true – but many Russians believe it to be true, which comes to almost the same thing.

As Whewell noted, this is a country which has worshipped « one false prophet too many ». Gagarin and the sputnik era are still glowingly remembered as the time when the Soviet Union truly seemed great. As for the future: it sometimes seems difficult to find a Russian who has room for any optimism at all. Katya’s parents, it seems fair to guess, will never believe in anything again. As for Katya herself – maybe. If not, Russia is truly lost.

Voir de plus:

The Chinese are wary of Donald Trump’s creative destruction

Mark Leonard

The Financial Times

July 24, 2018

Donald Trump is leading a double life. In the west, most foreign policy experts see him as reckless, unpredictable and self-defeating. But though many in Asia dislike him as much as the Europeans do, they see him as a more substantial figure. I have just spent a week in Beijing talking to officials and intellectuals, many of whom are awed by his skill as a strategist and tactician.

One of the people I met was the former vice-foreign minister He Yafei. He shot to global prominence in 2009 when he delivered a finger-wagging lecture to President Barack Obama at the Copenhagen climate conference before blowing up hopes of a deal. He is somewhat less belligerent where Mr Trump is concerned. He worries that strategic competition has become the new normal and says that “trade wars are just the tip of the iceberg”.

Few Chinese think that Mr Trump’s primary concern is to rebalance the bilateral trade deficit. If it were, they say, he would have aligned with the EU, Japan and Canada against China rather than scooping up America’s allies in his tariff dragnet. They think the US president’s goal is nothing less than remaking the global order.

They think Mr Trump feels he is presiding over the relative decline of his great nation. It is not that the current order does not benefit the US. The problem is that it benefits others more in relative terms. To make things worse the US is investing billions of dollars and a fair amount of blood in supporting the very alliances and international institutions that are constraining America and facilitating China’s rise.

In Chinese eyes, Mr Trump’s response is a form of “creative destruction”. He is systematically destroying the existing institutions — from the World Trade Organization and the North American Free Trade Agreement to Nato and the Iran nuclear deal — as a first step towards renegotiating the world order on terms more favourable to Washington.

Once the order is destroyed, the Chinese elite believes, Mr Trump will move to stage two: renegotiating America’s relationship with other powers. Because the US is still the most powerful country in the world, it will be able to negotiate with other countries from a position of strength if it deals with them one at a time rather than through multilateral institutions that empower the weak at the expense of the strong.

My interlocutors say that Mr Trump is the US first president for more than 40 years to bash China on three fronts simultaneously: trade, military and ideology. They describe him as a master tactician, focusing on one issue at a time, and extracting as many concessions as he can. They speak of the skilful way Mr Trump has treated President Xi Jinping. “Look at how he handled North Korea,” one says. “He got Xi Jinping to agree to UN sanctions [half a dozen] times, creating an economic stranglehold on the country. China almost turned North Korea into a sworn enemy of the country.” But they also see him as a strategist, willing to declare a truce in each area when there are no more concessions to be had, and then start again with a new front.

For the Chinese, even Mr Trump’s sycophantic press conference with Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, in Helsinki had a strategic purpose. They see it as Henry Kissinger in reverse. In 1972, the US nudged China off the Soviet axis in order to put pressure on its real rival, the Soviet Union. Today Mr Trump is reaching out to Russia in order to isolate China.

In the short term, China is talking tough in response to Mr Trump’s trade assault. At the same time they are trying to develop a multiplayer front against him by reaching out to the EU, Japan and South Korea. But many Chinese experts are quietly calling for a rethink of the longer-term strategy. They want to prepare the ground for a new grand bargain with the US based on Chinese retrenchment. Many feel that Mr Xi has over-reached and worry that it was a mistake simultaneously to antagonise the US economically and militarily in the South China Sea.

Instead, they advocate economic concessions and a pullback from the aggressive tactics that have characterised China’s recent foreign policy. They call for a Chinese variant of “splendid isolationism”, relying on growing the domestic market rather than disrupting other countries’ economies by exporting industrial surpluses.

So which is the real Mr Trump? The reckless reactionary destroying critical alliances, or the “stable genius” who is pressuring China? The answer seems to depend on where you ask the question. Things look different from Beijing than from Brussels.

The writer is director of the European Council on Foreign Relations

Voir encore:

China Is Losing the Trade War With Trump
It’s like a drinking contest: You harm yourself and hope your opponent isn’t able to withstand as much.
Donald L. Luskin
WSJ
July 27, 2018

One thing came through loud and clear in President Trump’s press conference Wednesday with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. When they announced an alliance against third parties’ “unfair trading practices,” they didn’t even have to mention China by name for listeners to know who their target was. Cooperation between the U.S. and EU will squeeze China’s protectionist model, and even before this agreement, there’s been evidence that China is already running up the white flag.

Yes, China is acting tough in one sense, quickly imposing tariffs in retaliation for those enacted by the Trump administration. But while U.S. stocks approach all-time highs and the dollar grows stronger, Chinese stocks are in a bear market, down 25% since January. The yuan had its worst single month ever in June, and is well on its way to a repeat this month. Chinese corporate bonds have defaulted at a record rate in the past six months, yet this week China unveiled a new stimulus program designed to encourage even more corporate borrowing.

That’s probably why Yi Gang, a governor of the People’s Bank of China, took the extraordinary step of channeling Herbert Hoover, saying in a statement this month that “the fundamentals of China’s economy are sound.” And it’s why Sun Guofeng, head of the PBOC’s financial research institute, said, China “will not make the yuan’s exchange rate a tool to cope with trade conflicts.”

Weakening one’s currency is a standard weapon in trade wars, and one that China has often been accused of using—including in a tweet by Mr. Trump last week. Devaluation would be even more dangerous in this case because of China’s power to dump the $1.4 trillion in U.S. Treasury securities it holds. But by denying its intention to plunge the yuan, China has disarmed itself voluntarily. This was no act of noble pacifism; it had to be done. Devaluing the currency would risk scaring investors away, an existential threat to an emerging economy. For China, whose state-capitalism model has so far never produced a recession, such capital flight might expose previously hidden economic weaknesses.

These weaknesses accumulate without the market discipline that occasional recessions impose. The fragility of China’s economy can be seen in its growth rate, which is slowing despite rising financial leverage, and in its overinvestment in commodities and real estate. The escalating trade war with the U.S. could tip China into the unknown territory of recession—and then capital flight could push it into a financial crash and depression. That would create mass joblessness in an economy that has never recorded unemployment higher than 4.3%. With that scenario in mind, the Chinese government must be wondering whether it has enough riot police.
The risk of capital flight is real. The last time China let the yuan weaken—a slide that began in early 2014 and was punctuated in mid-2015 by the abandonment of the dollar peg in favor of a basket of currencies—the Chinese ended up losing almost $1 trillion in foreign reserves, which they have yet to recover. Now the sharp weakening of the yuan shows some degree of capital flight again is under way.
No wonder that, despite tough talk from some quarters, the PBOC disarmed itself voluntarily to avoid further capital flight. The bank also is already offering to reimburse local firms for tariffs on imported U.S. goods. What’s more, China has put out a yard sign for international investors by announcing unilateral easing of foreign-ownership restrictions in some industries.
China is beginning to realize that trade war isn’t really war. It’s more like a drinking contest at a fraternity: the game is less inflicting harm on your opponent than inflicting it on yourself, turn by turn. In trade wars, nations impose burdensome import tariffs on themselves in the hope that they’ll be able to stomach the pain longer than their competitor.
Why play such a game? Because a carefully chosen act of self-harm can be an investment toward a worthy goal. For example, President Reagan’s arms race against the Soviet Union in the 1980s was in some sense a costly self-imposed tax. But it turned out the U.S. could bear the burden better than the Soviets could—Uncle Sam eventually out-drank the Russian bear and won the Cold War.
The U.S. will win the trade war with China in the same way. The PBOC’s statements show that the Chinese understand they are too vulnerable to take very many more drinks. The only question is what they will be willing to offer Mr. Trump to get him to take yes for an answer. No wonder Beijing has ordered its state-influenced media to stop demonizing Mr. Trump—officials are desperate to minimize the pain when President Xi Jinping has to cut the inevitable deal.
The drinking-contest metaphor takes us only so far. The wonderful thing about reciprocal trade is that it is a positive-sum game in which all contestants are made better off. If the conflict forces China to accept more foreign investors and goods, comply with World Trade Organization rules, and respect foreign intellectual property, it may feel it has lost but will in fact be better off. With this openness, both economic and political, China could spur a decadeslong second wave of growth that would bring hundreds of millions still living in rural poverty into glittering new cities.
It took Nixon to go to China and show it the way to the 20th century. Now, through the unlikely method of trade war, Donald Trump is ushering China into the 21st century.
 
Mr. Luskin is chief investment officer at Trend Macrolytics LLC.

Voir enfin:

Pourquoi citent-ils tous Gramsci?

Le nom de Gramsci revient sans cesse depuis plusieurs mois, dans les médias, sur les réseaux sociaux, il est cité en permanence. Qui est-il et quelle est sa pensée?

Gaël Brustier
Slate
24 janvier 2017

Le 9 novembre 2016, au lendemain de l’élection de Donald Trump, sur les réseaux sociaux circulait cette phrase d’Antonio Gramsci:

«Le vieux monde se meurt, le nouveau monde tarde à apparaître et dans ce clair-obscur surgissent les monstres».

Lundi 23 janvier, au lendemain du premier tour de la primaire de gauche, Benoît Hamon citait le philosophe à son tour :

«Je pense à cette définition de la crise d’Antonio Gramsci qui dit que la crise c’est quand le vieux est mort et que le neuf ne peut pas naître et nous sommes dans un moment comme celui-là, et il a rajouté que de ce clair-obscur peut naître un monstre.»

Il est devenu fréquent d’entendre des hommes politiques ou des commentateurs invoquer Gramsci, souvent pour dire que les victoires des idées précèdent les victoires politiques ou électorales. Mais cet intellectuel italien est un penseur trop important pour en rester là et ne pas le découvrir un peu davantage. S’il est autant cité en ce début de XXIe c’est qu’il a forgé des outils intellectuels essentiels aujourd’hui…

L’unité obsessionnelle

Homme politique, journaliste et penseur italien né en 1891, Gramsci est d’abord sarde, c’est-à-dire d’une île de Méditerranée périphérique par rapport au reste du Royaume d’Italie tout juste unifié. Issu d’un milieu pauvre, élève particulièrement brillant, enfant très tôt atteint de tuberculose osseuse qui le maintient à une taille de 1m50, il sera préoccupé par la question de cette unité du pays.

Son parcours le mène à Turin dans le Piémont, au Nord, où il fera ses études. C’est là qu’il s’établit et vit, en tant que journaliste et intellectuel, parmi les ouvriers de la capitale du Piémont. Il participe notamment à l’aventure du Biennio Rosso, «deux années rouges», faites de mobilisations paysannes et de manifestations ouvrières qui descendent jusqu’aux zones rurales du Pô.

Du Piémont, Gramsci est bien placé pour analyser ces fractures du pays. Le Nord industriel et le Sud paysan ne sont un que formellement par la couronne royale, et maintenus d’un bloc seulement par un système politique à la fois libéral et autoritaire qui parvient, notamment, à susciter le consentement des masses paysannes du Sud, au sein d’un «bloc méridional».

Sa vie intellectuelle le mène alors d’abord vers le socialisme car pour Gramsci, c’est l’avènement d’une société socialiste qui peut permettre d’achever l’unité italienne, et accomplira un saut civilisationnel de l’ampleur de la Renaissance.

Ouvrir le front culturel

En 1917, contre les thèses de Marx, c’est en Russie, à Saint Pétersbourg, qu’éclate la Révolution. Enjeu intellectuel et enjeu politique, il va s’efforcer de comprendre pourquoi la Révolution a eu lieu en Russie et non en Allemagne, en France ou dans le Nord de l’Italie. Autour de la Révolution de 1917, s’ordonnent aussi une série de questionnements fondamentaux pour comprendre la pensée de Gramsci: hégémonie, crises, guerres de mouvements ou de positions, blocs historiques…

Il distingue deux types de sociétés. Pour faire simple, celles où il suffit, comme en Russie, de prendre le central téléphonique et le palais présidentiel pour prendre le pouvoir. La bataille pour «l’hégémonie» vient après, ce sont les sociétés «orientales» qui fonctionnent ainsi… Et celles, plus complexes, où le pouvoir est protégé par des tranchées et des casemates, qui représentent des institutions culturelles ou des lieux de productions intellectuelles, de sens, qui favorisent le consentement. Dans ce cas, avant d’atteindre le central téléphonique, il faut prendre ces lieux de pouvoir. C’est ce que l’on appelle le front culturel, c’est le cas des sociétés occidentales comme la société française, italienne ou allemande d’alors.

Au contraire de François Hollande et de François Lenglet, Antonio Gramsci ne croit pas à l’économicisme, c’est-à-dire à la réduction de l’histoire à l’économique. Il perçoit la force des représentations individuelles et collectives, la force de l’idéologie… Ce refus de l’économicisme mène à ouvrir le «front culturel», c’est-à-dire à développer une bataille qui porter sur la représentation du monde tel qu’on le souhaite, sur la vision du monde…

Le front culturel consiste à écrire des articles au sein d’un journal, voire à créer un journal, à produire des biens culturels (pièces de théâtre, chansons, films etc…) qui contribuent à convaincre les gens qu’il y a d’autres évidences que celles produites jusque-là par la société capitaliste.

L’hégémonie, c’est l’addition de la capacité à convaincre et à contraindre

La classe ouvrière doit produire, selon Gramsci, ses propres références. Ses intellectuels, doivent être des «intellectuels organiques», doivent faire de la classe ouvrière la «classe politique» chargée d’accomplir la vraie révolution: c’est-à-dire une réforme éthique et morale complète. L’hégémonie, c’est l’addition de la capacité à convaincre et à contraindre.

Convaincre c’est faire entrer des idées dans le sens commun, qui est l’ensemble des évidences que l’on ne questionne pas.

La crise (organique), c’est le moment où le système économique et les évidences qui peuplent l’univers mental de chacun «divorcent». Et l’on voit deux choses: le consentement à accepter les effets matériels du système économique s’affaiblit (on voit alors des grèves, des mouvements d’occupation des places comme Occupy Wall Street, Indignados, etc); et la coercition augmente: on assiste alots à la répression de grèves, aux arrestations de syndicalistes etc…

Au contraire, un «bloc historique» voit le jour lorsqu’un mode de production et un système idéologique s’imbriquent parfaitement, se recoupent: le bloc historique néolibéral des années 1980 à la fin des années 2000 par exemple. Car le néolibéralisme n’est pas qu’une affaire économique, il est aussi une affaire éthique et morale.

Le communisme

C’est en France, à Lyon, en janvier 1926, qu’Antonio Gramsci prend la tête du Parti communiste italien, issu d’une scission de l’aile gauche du Parti socialiste italien au congrès de Livourne, cinq ans plus tôt. Faisant le choix des communistes contre les socialistes «maintenus», il est donc chargé de forger le noyau dirigeant du parti qui deviendra après 1945 le plus puissant et le plus brillant d’Occident. Son portrait orne encore les permanences du parti centriste, très lointain héritier (!) du PCI.

En 1922, son ancien collègue à Avanti!, un journal socialiste, Benito Mussolini (1883-1945), socialiste renégat qui a fondé le mouvement fasciste, a pris le pouvoir. Il fait voter en 1926 des lois qui lui donnent de larges pouvoirs. Gramsci, pourtant député de Venise, est arrêté en novembre de cette même année.

En 1927, Mussolini le fait emprisonner pour vingt ans, «pour empêcher son cerveau de fonctionner», dixit le procureur fasciste de l’époque. Il ne tiendra que 10 ans, avant de mourir des conséquences d’une tuberculose osseuse mal soignée, dans les geôles, puis les cliniques du régime. Mais il aura auparavant réussi à écrire une œuvre politique majeure: les Cahiers de prison.

Car dans sa cellule, il obtient progressivement le droit de disposer de quatre livres en même temps, et de quoi écrire. Naît alors progressivement une somme dans laquelle il utilise des «codes» pour tromper la censure..

A travers ces écrits, il devient le grand penseur des crises, casquette qui lui donne tant de pertinence aujourd’hui, et surtout depuis 2007 et 2008 que la crise financière propage ses effets. Dans ces Cahiers, il apporte à l’œuvre de Marx l’une des révisions ou l’un des compléments les plus riches de l’histoire du marxisme. Pour beaucoup de socialistes, il faut attendre que les lois de Marx sur les contradictions du capitalisme se concrétisent pour que la Révolution advienne. La Révolution d’Octobre, selon Gramsci, invalide cette thèse. Elle se fait «contre le Capital», du nom du grand livre de Karl Marx.

Au-delà de la gauche

Antonio Gramsci fascine au-delà de la gauche… Ainsi en France, en Italie ou en Autriche, des courants d’extrême droite se sont réclamés d’une version tronquée et biaisée du gramscisme. Ce «gramscisme de droite» faisait l’impasse sur l’aspect «économique» du gramscisme et le caractère émancipateur pour n’en retenir que la méthode le «combat culturel».

A gauche, en France, il a souvent été caricaturé ou dédaigné. On parle souvent de «combat culturel contre le FN» alors que le changement éthique et moral concerne, si l’on suit Gramsci, tous les aspects de la vie sociale et englobe donc, logiquement, le combat contre l’extrême droite, qui ne peut pas être «détaché».

On retrouve Gramsci dans les combats du Tiers Monde, on le retrouve dans les travaux d’Edward Said ou de Joseph Massad, dans les Subaltern Studies en Inde notamment…

En France, le philosophe André Tosel se réclame de Gramsci, auteur cette année d’un Étudier Gramsci paru aux Editions Kimé, ouvrage majeur pour comprendre l’auteur des Cahiers de Prison. Les économiste et sociologue Cédric Durand et Razmig Keucheyan, appliquent les outils de Gramsci notamment à l’analyse et la critique du processus d’intégration européenne. Il font le lien avec les thèses de Nicos Poulantzas qui prolongea, comme Stuart Hall, ainsi qu’Ernesto Laclau et Chantal Mouffe, les thèses et travaux de Gramsci. Appartenant au courant post-marxiste, Chantal Mouffe, qui intervient de plus en plus en France, est l’inspiratrice de PODEMOS, le nouveau parti de la gauche radicale espagnole. Deux de ses fondateurs et principaux animateurs –Pablos Iglesias et Inigo Errejon– se réclament de l’héritage de Gramsci.

Le penseur italien fait partie du patrimoine intellectuel de l’Europe. Il a forgé des outils qui sont utiles aujourd’hui pour analyser le monde, comprendre comment les gens le voient et participent à la vie sociale, comment individus et médias interagissent, comment les représentations et les identités se forment continuellement et magmatiquement. Il a donné naissance à des écoles de pensée foisonnantes et utiles pour qui veut agir sur le monde.

6 Responses to Présidence Trump: Vous avez dit accident de l’histoire ? (As Trump keeps defying economic and diplomatic logic, even critics wonder if pigs can fly after all)

  1. jcdurbant dit :

    VOTE FOR THE WRECKING BALL !


    The traditional post-Reagan GOP is not what it usually is. Currently it is the minority partner in a coalition government with the president — a “party of one” with a fervent following in the tens of millions. But that “party of one” has a number of significant accomplishments while also acting as a giant wrecking ball on assumptions, standards, unwritten rules and codes of conduct.

    Many of those unwritten rules are better off demolished — or at least left naked in the public square — including, especially, the overwhelming liberal bias in legacy media, save for Fox News. Twitter feeds have become the best indicator of what the members of the media actually think. The collective mask hasn’t just slipped, it’s been ripped off.

    The president’s brand of political hardball upsets many in the GOP, even unbalancing more than a few. “Trump Derangement Syndrome” is real. The president has, however, surrounded himself with superb Cabinet members, especially on matters of national security. His commitment to originalist judges and a sizable military rebuildare the two most consequential aspects of his tenure. The economy is cooking, and while deficits have risen, the stimulus of deep and broad tax cuts is just now kicking in, with a promise of a long stretch of economic growth above 3 percent needed to bring many of the country’s poorest into the middle class. It’s true that tariffs are dragging on this economic liftoff, but they are better imposed at the beginning of a boom than at the end of one. And while lowering trade tensions with our allies is a necessity, going a few rounds with China on its systemic corruption and violation of fair trade norms is overdue (as is candor about their aggressions in the South China Sea and in cyberspace).

    This president talks — and tweets — loudly, and often to the confusion of his home audience, but he carries and has used the very biggest of sticks. When the U.S. military pummeled Russian mercenaries in Syria, Moscow got the clearest message anyone can get anywhere. The Iranians will be treated to the same if they challenge an American vessel at sea or critical infrastructure at home. Russians meddle again with our elections at their genuine peril.

    This coalition hasn’t been easy, but the GOP will be fine. But what Trump has done to the Democrats and the establishment media won’t be undone for a long time. He has radicalized both into engines of extremist rhetoric and policy. They will blame Trump, of course, for their outrage and sputtering, and he deserves a lot of the blame (or credit, depending on your point of view). Trump intentionally incites his opponents with mockery and disdain. So did Barack Obama. So did all of the legions of George W. Bush opponents when politics began going off the rails.

    So here’s the question facing the voters this fall: Do they vote to ratchet up this culture of conflict and chaos, or to return Republican legislative majorities that have figured out how to work with this most unusual of presidents?

    Electing Democrats to a majority in the House or the Senate at the height of the party’s lurch left would be a disaster: Impeachment, demands for massive income tax hikes and the effort to abolish ICE would follow, while also throwing the military rebuild into reverse and the economy into paralysis because of the inability of business to predict the future with anything like certainty. A radicalized Democratic Party puffed by a Trump-loathing Manhattan-Beltway elite wouldn’t bring us a political environment as fraught as 1861 or even 1968, but the Clinton impeachment and the Watergate scandal eras are fair parallels to the atmosphere that would follow if Rep. Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) returns to power or Sen. Charles E. Schumer (N.Y.) gets his wish to run the Senate…

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/even-if-you-loathe-trump-vote-republican/2018/07/30/f60c6928-9406-11e8-810c-5fa705927d54_story.html

    Aimé par 1 personne

  2. jcdurbant dit :

    DUR DUR, LE TRUMP BASHING ! (On a mal pour eux, les pauvres !)

    La méthode Trump : un succès ?
    C dans l’air
    02.08.18

    Donald Trump serait-il passé maître de la volte-face ? Après la Corée du Nord, l’Iran est à son tour confronté aux humeurs changeantes du président américain. Une semaine après avoir publié un tweet de menace fracassant, Trump se dit maintenant prêt à rencontrer les dirigeants iraniens pour discuter d’un nouvel accord. Mais cette stratégie ne semble pas fonctionner avec le président Hassan Rohani, imperméable aux « menaces, sanctions et effets d’annonce ». Pour le ministre des Affaires étrangères iranien, « les Etats-Unis ne peuvent s’en prendre qu’à eux-mêmes d’avoir quitté la table des négociations », faisant référence à leur retrait de l’accord sur le nucléaire.

    Après avoir traité l’Europe d’« ennemie », Donald Trump change également de ton avec ses alliés européens. Pour tenter de désamorcer la guerre commerciale engagée entre les deux puissances, le chef d’Etat américain a rencontré le président de la Commission européenne, Jean-Claude Juncker. Au cœur des négociations : une réduction des barrières douanières et une augmentation des échanges dans certains domaines. Pourtant à l’issue de cette rencontre, les deux camps semblaient avoir une interprétation différente des termes de l’accord, notamment sur la question de l’agriculture. Entre « concessions » et provocations, Donald Trump est-il un interlocuteur fiable pour l’Union Européenne ?

    Si la méthode Trump sème le chaos à l’international, elle semble efficace à l’intérieur des Etats-Unis. Avec la politique de « l’Amérique d’abord », une promesse martelée durant sa campagne, le pays affiche un taux de chômage en baisse et une croissance économique à 4,1% au deuxième trimestre. Une performance que Donald Trump n’a pas manqué de souligner, en comparant les chiffres de son prédécesseur Barack Obama. Malgré les affaires et les scandales qui ternissent sa réputation, le président américain reste populaire auprès de son électorat, profitant de ce qu’il appelle un « retournement économique historique ». Mais sa ligne politique peut-elle tenir à long terme ?

    Malgré le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord iranien et le retour des sanctions, l’Iran répondra-t-il à l’invitation de Donald Trump ? Le président américain fait-il miroiter de fausses promesses aux alliés européens ? L’embellie économique aux Etats-Unis n’est-elle qu’un mirage ?

    Invités :

    François DURPAIRE – Historien, spécialiste des Etats-Unis

    Emmanuel LECHYPRE – Editorialiste économique

    Azadeh KIAN – Sociologue, spécialiste de l’Iran

    Nabil WAKIM – Journaliste au Monde

    https://www.france.tv/france-5/c-dans-l-air/582923-la-methode-trump-un-succes.html

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=La+m%C3%A9thode+Trump+%3A+un+succ%C3%A8s+%3F+C+dans+l%27air

    J'aime

  3. jcdurbant dit :

    ENOUGH TELEPROMPTED SPEECHES ON DEMOCRACY (On balance: One president is responsible for America’s retreat from supporting democracy abroad, and it isn’t Trump)

    More than a generation has passed since America hailed the 1991 Soviet collapse as the dawn of a new world order, wide open to the spread of freedom and democracy. That euphoria is long gone, replaced these days by apprehension. For years now, authoritarian rulers have been on a roll, with such aggressive dictatorships as China, Russia and Iran gaining military muscle, influence and turf. Around the globe, freedom and democracy have been broadly in decline.

    Is there any serious chance that on President Donald Trump’s watch, these dismal trends might be stopped, or even reversed? Could his push to “Make America Great Again” conceivably catalyze a global comeback for democracy? The answer might surprise you.

    It’s clear that to Trump’s more ardent critics, such questions are absurd. He’s a grandiose businessman from Queens, prone to hyperbole and rude toward many Washington totems. He appeals in the main to voters who would never think of applying for membership in the Council on Foreign Relations. In choosing the slogan “America First,” Trump adopted (whether he knew it or not) the phrase of 20th century isolationists who wanted to keep America out of the great and vital struggle for freedom that was World War II. How could such a president be good for American foreign policy?

    In a column last month for The Dallas Morning News, the president of Washington-based Freedom House, Michael J. Abramowitz, and his colleague, Sarah N. Repucci, denounced Trump as a dictator-loving democracy-dismissing reinforcer of “neo-isolationism.” They were elaborating on a Freedom House report released in January that described democracy worldwide as not only in its 12th straight year of decline, but in accelerating “crisis,” with the acceleration due substantially to Trump. The report accused Trump of everything from “hostility and skepticism toward binding international agreements,” to abandoning America’s leadership of the free world, to rarely using the word “democracy” during his trips abroad.

    Such sweeping damnation of Trump skips right past some essential elements of the big picture, starting with the context that by the time Trump reached the White House, freedom and democracy worldwide had been declining for roughly a decade. For most of that decade the president was Barack Obama, whose foreign policy was a sweeping exercise in American retreat. As the Freedom House report delicately summed it up, the Obama administration in its foreign policy statements defended “democratic ideals,” but “its actions often fell short.”

    The Obama shortfall had devastating effects on American power, credibility, allies and interests abroad. While running up a huge national debt to fund a ballooning welfare state, Obama gutted the U.S. military, to such an extent that during his final month in office there was an interval in which the U.S. Navy did not have a single aircraft carrier operating at sea.

    Obama began his presidency by appeasing Russia with a “reset” that included reneging on promises of missile defense for Eastern Europe. He announced to the United Nations that American exceptionalism was no more exceptional than that of any other country, and he promised to place at the center of U.S. foreign policy the U.N. — where Security Council permanent members Russia and China wield veto power right alongside the U.S., Britain and France.

    When Iranians rose up in mass protests against their brutally repressive government in 2009, Obama passively bore “witness,” assuring the world that the long arc of history would sort things out. When the Arab Spring broke out in 2011, Obama led from behind on Libya. Then he left the fragmented country to the feckless mercies of the U.N., the Arab League and the terrorists who in Benghazi in 2012 slaughtered four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador — while Obama, running for re-election, assured Americans that terrorism was on the run, and the tide of war was receding.

    Obama pledged a “pivot” to Asia, which to China’s likely relief never took place. He proclaimed in 2011 that Syria’s dictator, Bashar Assad, must go — but did nothing to ensure that Assad went. Instead, in 2013 Obama erased his own “red line” over Assad’s use of chemical weapons, and invited Russia into Syria, where Putin dug in to support Assad.

    Obama embraced Cuba’s brutal Fidel Castro dictatorship, while snubbing, insulting and undercutting Israel, the only full democracy in the Middle East. Obama up-ended the hard-won stability in Iraq by pulling out all U.S. forces, discounted the terrorists of ISIS as the “JV team” during their rise, and, while ISIS was beheading American prisoners on video, Obama put out the message that more Americans die from accidents involving guns, cars and bathtubs than from terrorist attacks. Under the euphemism of “strategic patience,” Obama largely ignored North Korea’s nuclear and missile tests, while totalitarian dictator Kim Jong Un consolidated power, bulked up his nuclear arsenal and built long-range rockets.

    Obama’s signature foreign-policy venture, the Iran nuclear deal — reached with the help of Russian and China, over the protests of existentially threatened Israel — did not close Iran’s path to the bomb. By lifting nuclear sanctions, it did succeed in allowing Iran’s terror-sponsoring regime lavish access to global resources, topped off with a U.S. “claims settlement” of $1.7 billion shipped secretly to Iran in cash.

    As Obama pulled America back, opportunistic dictatorships stepped forward. China moved full speed ahead to develop a blue water navy, bully its neighbors and expand its clout in Asia by building artificial islands, topped with military bases, along major shipping routes in the South China Sea. Russia seized Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, and in 2015 began bombing in Syria to support the Assad regime. Iran pocketed Obama’s giveaway nuclear deal, and carried on testing ballistic missiles and stirring up carnage in its pursuit of hegemony in the Middle East.

    During Obama’s tenure, ambitious despotisms were increasingly emboldened to test the limits of U.S. tolerance. The accelerating dynamic was that they learned from each other, and sometimes cooperated with each other, against a listless U.S. The result was, if not quite an axis of evil, a rising network of predatory tyrannies: chief among them Beijing, Moscow, Tehran and Pyongyang. This gang of thugs, not Trump’s “America First” policy, pose the core danger, worldwide, to democracy today.

    When Trump took charge in January 2017, Obama bequeathed him a weakened, humiliated and increasingly threatened America. The country’s credibility — vital to deterrence — was in tatters, its global leadership role in a tailspin.

    Trump, with his version of “America First,” has been pulling America out of that trajectory. Whether you love or loathe his words, many of his actions are now pushing back against the rising gang of tyrannies. For the first time in years, this is creating room to revive the spread of freedom, or at least arrest its decline. Domestically, Trump has been easing the smothering hand of government, reviving the American dynamism with which free markets and democracy combined long ago to vault the U.S. to the status of world superpower, and spread its influence around the world.

    Most important, Trump has been pushing to rebuild the U.S. military and wielding it to claw back some of the U.S. credibility and security squandered by Obama. Within his first year in office, Trump provided the leadership, and new rules of military engagement, to evict ISIS from its caliphate.

    When Syria’s Assad was caught early last year using chemical weapons on his own people, Trump didn’t dismiss this atrocity as a far-off attack of no concern to the U.S. He set about restoring the red line erased by Obama. Trump had the U.S. military fire 59 Tomahawk missiles at the Syrian air base that had launched the chemical attacks. When Assad was caught yet again using chemical weapons, earlier this year, Trump enlisted America’s two democratic cohorts among the permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, Britain and France, to help carry out strikes on Syrian chemical weapons facilities.

    Trump’s much-criticized demands for NATO members to spend more on defense are not about America walking away from NATO, but about America leading NATO. Mainly, he’s telling the complacent welfare states of Europe, notably Germany, that if they want to deter a rearming and aggressive Russia, they’d better invest seriously in defense.

    Whatever Trump’s skepticism and hostility toward international agreements, he seems broadly astute at distinguishing good agreements from bad. In pulling the U.S. out of the farcical Iran nuclear deal this past May, he did not make the world more dangerous. Rather, he is demanding that the free world face up to the dangers still on the rise and seek a genuine solution.

    And though Trump does not habitually deliver teleprompted speeches on democracy during his trips abroad, his administration did not respond to Iranian protests in June by passively invoking the long arc of history. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivered a rousing speech on the corruption, brutality and malign character of Iran’s regime, effectively aligning the Trump administration with the protesters.

    Trump has made a strong point of supporting two of the world’s most threatened and pivotal democracies: Israel and Taiwan — the world’s great example of what a democratic China could look like. Trump made good on years of broken American promises by moving the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. He is encouraging official exchanges between the U.S. and Taiwan, and this June the U.S. confirmed publicly, for the first time since 2007, that it was sailing destroyers through the Taiwan Strait. These are deeds that speak volumes about the value Trump places on defending democracy abroad.

    To be sure, some of Trump’s moves have been troubling, including his praise of Kim Jong Un at the Singapore summit and Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. It also remains to be seen whether his showdowns over tariffs will lead to more open markets or ruinous trade wars.

    But on balance, Trump’s “America First” presidency is turning out in practice to be neither isolationist nor dismissive of freedom and democracy abroad. On the ground, his policy of “Peace through strength,” cribbed from President Ronald Reagan, has its similarities to Reagan’s defense of U.S. interests. Reagan was savaged by critics at the time as a war-mongering know-nothing from Hollywood. But it worked out pretty well.

    Claudia Rosett is a foreign policy fellow with the Washington-based Independent Women’s Forum.

    https://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/commentary/2018/08/10/one-president-responsible-americas-retreat-supporting-democracy-abroad-isnt-trump

    Aimé par 1 personne

  4. jcdurbant dit :

    WHAT TRICKLE DOWN ?

    Depuis l’élection de Donald Trump, 1 million de nouveaux emplois de « production de biens » ont vu le jour, aussi bien dans les activités minières ou industrielles. Le taux de création d’emplois ouvriers est au plus haut depuis près de 30 ans. Au-delà du chiffre, ce qui doit être constaté, c’est que la tendance à la désindustrialisation a été brisée, et que le nombre d’emplois dans ces secteurs repart à la hausse. Cela montre qu’il n’y pas de fatalité concernant la désindustrialisation. Depuis le creux de la crise de 2008, 3 millions d’emplois ont été créés dans ces secteurs. Ce qui est intéressant dans l’analyse faite par le Washington post, c’est de voir que les zones rurales sont concernées, et notamment les territoires qui ont voté majoritairement pour Donald Trump. Selon les données du Brookings Institute, l’emploi rural a progressé de 5.1% (en termes annualisés) au premier trimestre 2018 (à titre de comparaison, l’emploi total en France progresse de 0.8% sur la dernière année). La croissance américaine ne s’est pas soudainement portée vers ces emplois et ces territoires, ce sont toujours les métropoles qui dominent et qui domineront, mais ce que l’on peut observer, c’est que la stratégie menée d’une économie « à plein régime » est en train d’atteindre les zones qui avaient été le plus affectées lors du processus de mondialisation, notamment depuis l’arrivée de la Chine dans l’OMC, à la fin de l’année 2001. Dans un autre registre, il faut aussi remarquer que le taux de chômage est de 3.9%, 3.4% pour les blancs, 6.3% pour les afro-américains (ce qui est un record bas) 4.7% pour les hispaniques, et 3.0% pour les asiatiques. Donc, au-delà de la question des électeurs de Trump, il faut reconnaître une situation d’emploi très favorable dans le pays, et qui touche l’ensemble de la population. Les demandes d’allocations chômage dans le pays viennent de toucher un point bas de 49 ans… nous sommes dans un monde parallèle lorsque l’on veut comparer notre situation à celle des Etats-Unis. (…) Il serait quand même abusif de dire que [Trump] n’y est pour rien. Le principal acteur de ce tracteur économique qu’est aujourd’hui l’économie américaine est la FED, dont le président, Jerome Powell a été nommé par Donald Trump. Le travail de ses prédécesseurs, Ben Bernanke et Janet Yellen a été essentiel dans le contexte que nous connaissons aujourd’hui, mais le travail de Powell peut également être salué en ce sens. Après la phase de décollage, il a pour rôle de faire trouver à la croissance américaine un rythme de croisière optimal, sans en briser l’élan. C’est une étape décisive qu’il réussit plutôt correctement pour le moment. Il faudra observer la suite avec vigilance. On peut aussi mettre en avant le rôle joué par la dérégulation que met en place Donald Trump, que l’on y soit opposé ou non, cela crée de l’emploi dans le secteur pétrolier. (…) [en France] En pratique cela suggère de modifier le mandat de la Banque centrale européenne et de lui donner l’ordre de poursuivre un objectif de plein emploi, ce qui conduirait à un gros changement de braquet de la politique macroéconomique européenne. Cela est donc parfaitement faisable sur le papier, mais cela suppose de convaincre nos partenaires européens, et cela suppose surtout de convaincre nos propres dirigeants que leur politique est parfaitement inefficace comparativement à ce que peuvent faire les États-Unis. Or, la remise en question n’a pas exactement l’air d’être une option pour l’exécutif actuel. Dans de telles conditions, et s’il ne faut pas se résigner, il faudra simplement observer le narratif que va préparer l’exécutif pour essayer de justifier son échec économique qui est déjà en train de prendre forme, tandis que les Etats-Unis continuent de croître à 3.1% avec une situation de plein emploi. Ce sera la faute de quelqu’un, sans doute des « fainéants » ou des « réfractaires » au changement. Ces mêmes « déplorables » qui retrouvent du boulot aux Etats-Unis.

    Nicolas Goetzmann

    http://www.atlantico.fr/decryptage/donald-trump-ouvriers-americains-cols-bleus-croissance-non-stop-boom-emplois-dure-lecon-pour-france-nicolas-goetzmann-3521651.html

    J'aime

Répondre

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur la façon dont les données de vos commentaires sont traitées.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :