Société: Comme une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang (From François Fillon to David Hamilton, the same fashion the populace banishes or acclaims its kings)

Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Saniette (Monsieur): Homme foncièrement bon et simple, d’une grande timidité, il recherche le contact humain mais fait souvent preuve de maladresse. Il fréquente assidûment le salon des Verdurin qui se disent être ses amis, en fait, il est leur souffre-douleur ainsi que celui de la « petite bande ». Parfois la cruauté des convives à son égard atteint des sommets surprenants. Les Verdurin sont heureux d’avoir tous les soirs à leur table un bouc émissaire mais pour que Saniette n’abandonne pas définitivement leur salon, ils alternent savamment méchanceté et paroles aimables. Lorsque, encouragé par l’acquiescement des convives, M Verdurin devient par trop cruel et grossier envers le falot Saniette, sa femme intervient pour le tempérer, non pas par bonté d’âme mais tout simplement pour que Saniette ne quitte pas le salon. Mais les remissions sont de courte durée et les attaques reprennent de plus belle. Malgré les humiliations, Saniette retourne fidèlement chez ses bourreaux comme un chien battu retourne chez son maître (est-ce un hasard si le nom de « Saniette » est l’anagramme de « Sainteté » ?). Proust, ses personnages
Jewish religious law holds that the child of a Jewish mother is a Jew, but Proust never considered himself one, and neither did his friends. Still, his parentage occasionally presented difficulties. Once, as a young man, he stood silent and unresponsive when a revered mentor, Comte Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac, delivered an anti-Semitic tirade in the company of friends and then asked Proust for his opinion on the 1894 conviction of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, a Jew, who had been tried for treason on the charge of selling military secrets to the Germans. The next day, Proust wrote to Montesquiou that he had not said anything because, although he himself was Catholic like his father and brother, his mother was Jewish: “I am sure you understand that this is reason enough for me to refrain from such discussions.” Whether Proust’s private frankness made up for his public reticence is a vexing question, and all the more so because he went on to confide that he was “not free to have the ideas I might otherwise have on the subject.” Proust’s tacit fear, in other words, was that if he defended the Jews he would be taken for a Jew, and what he wanted above all was to be thought of as a Christian gentleman. He even seemed to leave open the possibility that Montesquiou might be right: that only filial piety forbade him from thinking as Montesquiou did. (…) Proust was only as forthright as his social cowardice—his fear of sacrificing his respectability—would allow. He was to find his courage when events made it easier to be courageous. By 1898, more and more people had become convinced that Dreyfus had been railroaded, and an uproar ensued that was to shake French society for years. The salon of Mme. Genevieve Straus (the widow of the composer Georges Bizet), where Proust had been a habitue for several years, turned into a Dreyfusard hotbed. Old friends of the anti-Dreyfus persuasion, including the painter Edgar Degas, stalked off and never came back. Drawing strength from those around him, Proust now joined in the growing drumbeat for a retrial that was led by the novelist Emile Zola. He was even to boast that he was the first of the Dreyfusards, because he secured the signature of his literary hero Anatole France on a petition. Still, when an anti-Semitic newspaper numbered him among the “young Jews” who defied decency and right thinking, Proust, who at first thought to correct the paper’s misapprehension, decided to keep quiet, lest he draw any more attention to himself. He must have known that, in the eyes of anti-Dreyfusards, his political affiliations only served to confirm the sad fact of his birth. If the Dreyfus affair exposed the moral cretinism that extended into the upper echelons of French society, this hardly deterred Proust from wanting a place in that world. His social career had begun during his last year of high school, when, thanks to the mothers of some of his school friends, he gained admission to certain exclusive Parisian salons. His chum Jacques Bizet, whom he had tried to seduce, without success, made it up to him by serving as his ticket to the beau monde. At the salon of Mme. Straus, young Bizet’s mother, Proust became acquainted with artistic and aristocratic grandees like the composer Gabriel Fauré, the writer Guy de Maupassant, the actress Sarah Bernhardt, and Princesse Mathilde, the niece of Napoleon I. In time he became a regular at Princesse Mathilde’s as well, where the old-line nobility rubbed shoulders with arrivistes, and distinguished Jews mingled with those who detested them. (The writer Léon Daudet, to whom Proust would dedicate a volume of his novel, confided to his diary after one party: “The imperial dwelling was infested with Jews and Jewesses.”) Another hostess conquered by the high-flying young Proust was Mme. Madeleine Lemaire, renowned for her musical gatherings. It was she who introduced him to Montesquiou-Fezensac, the aristocratic poet whose opinions on Jews Proust was willing to overlook for the sake of the Count’s artistic and social cachet. And there was something else: Montesquiou was boldly aboveboard about his homosexuality, at a time when, as Carter writes, “few Frenchmen dared, if they cared for their reputation and social standing, to display amorous affection for another man.” This frankness earned Proust’s regard—although he was, of course, ambivalent about going public on the issue of his own sexual nature. (…) Normality, decency, goodness are, in short, the rarest of commodities in Proust’s world. Nor does their scarcity make them prized, except in the eyes of Marcel and a few other uncharacteristic souls. Instead, decency is seen by most as a social handicap; the Verdurins’ circle of bourgeois snobs, for example, barely tolerates a stammering, clumsy paleographer named Saniette. Monsieur Verdurin’s mockery of Saniette’s speech impediment makes “the faithful burst out laughing, looking like a group of cannibals in whom the sight of a wounded white man has aroused the thirst for blood.” And nowhere is this savage tribalism more marked than in the antipathy that those who consider themselves true Frenchmen feel for Jews. Anti-Semitism is everywhere in Proust’s novel. Perhaps the most repellent instance occurs when the madam of a cheap brothel Marcel is visiting touts the exotic richness of the prostitute Rachel’s flesh: “And with an inane affectation of excitement which she hoped would prove contagious, and which ended in a hoarse gurgle, almost of sensual satisfaction: ‘Think of that, my boy, a Jewess! Wouldn’t that be thrilling? Rrrr!’ ” Those in the highest reaches of society share the sentiments of the lowest. Thus, Charlus is given to maniacal explosions of loathing for Jews, while the Prince de Guermantes, Swann tells Marcel, hates Jews so much that, when a wing of his castle caught fire, he let it burn to the ground rather than send for fire extinguishers to the house next door, which happened to be the Rothschilds’. Swann is himself one of the rare Jews allowed entrance to the highest society, which leads to the outrage of the Duc de Guermantes when Swann, who had always impressed him as a Jew of the right sort, “an honorable Jew,” turns out to be an outspoken Dreyfusard. As in its sentiments toward Jews, so in every other way, the social world in Proust is revealed as a “realm of nullity.” Any glimmer of moral discrimination, let alone of true understanding, shines like a beacon; for the most part, darkness prevails. In the famous closing scene of The Guermantes Way, the duke and duchess, on their way to a dinner party, are bidding good evening to Swann and Marcel. The duchess inquires whether Swann will join them on a trip to Italy ten months hence; Swann replies that he is mortally ill and will be dead by then. The duchess does not know how to respond: “placed for the first time in her life between two duties as incompatible as getting into her carriage to go out to dinner and showing compassion for a man who was about to die, she could find nothing in the code of conventions that indicated the right line to follow.” With his “instinctive politeness,” Swann senses the duchess’s discomfort and says he must not detain them: “he knew that for other people their own social obligations took precedence over the death of a friend.” And yet, although the duke and duchess do not have a moment to spare to comfort their dying friend, they nevertheless do delay their departure while the duchess, who is wearing black shoes with her red dress, changes at her husband’s insistence into a more suitable pair of red shoes. This portrait of gross moral insensibility in the face of death is comedy of manners at its most scathing, perhaps even overdone: the duke complains that his wife is dead-tired, and that he is dying of hunger. The indignant Marcel rewards the stupidity of these preposterous creatures with unforgettable strokes of cold fury. Marcel’s triumph is that he does find a way to bear it, indeed to overcome it. In Time Regained, after spending years in a sanatorium, he is on his way to a party hosted by the Duchesse de Guermantes. The previous day he had experienced what he thought was his final disillusionment with the life of literature, but as he enters the courtyard of the Guermantes mansion a revelatory sensation changes his life. A car nearly hits him, and when he steps back out of its way he places his foot on a paving stone that is slightly lower than the one next to it; this unevenness underfoot fills him with an inexplicable and extraordinary joy. Rocking back and forth on the irregular pavement, Marcel remembers standing on two uneven stones in the baptistery of St. Mark’s in Venice, and all the various sensations associated with that particular moment come flooding back. Similar marvels await him when he enters the Guermantes house and, twice more, involuntary memories overwhelm him in their glory. He is supremely happy, but cannot at first explain it. Why should this sudden efflorescence of memory have “given me a joy which . . . sufficed, without any other proof, to make death a matter of indifference”? He concludes that such episodes of transfiguring lucidity, for as long as they last, annihilate time, and are the most that a living man will know of eternity. (…) At last Marcel has penetrated the real world, and sees what he is supposed to do with his new knowledge: to write the book that one is reading. The awareness of time’s passing spurs him to get down to the serious work that will offer him life’s supreme pleasure: illuminating the nature of timelessness. “How happy would he be, I thought, the man who had the power to write such a book! What a task awaited him!” (…) His vision of human solitude in the face of death reminds one of Edvard Munch’s great and dreadful painting Grief, in which a roomful of people are arrayed around the bed of a dead woman: no one touches or even looks at anyone else; each is locked in his own impenetrable sorrow, mourning by himself and, one suspects, for himself. But unlike Munch, Proust does admit the possibility of consolation, even of redemption. The writer Bergotte dies while sitting in a museum and looking at a patch of yellow wall in a painting by his beloved Vermeer. This devotional attitude moves Marcel to think of “a different world, a world based on kindness, scrupulousness, self-sacrifice, a world entirely different from this one and which we leave in order to be born on this earth, before perhaps returning there. . . . So that the idea that Bergotte was not permanently dead is by no means improbable.” It is this spiritual capaciousness that Saul Bellow’s Mr. Sammler has in mind when he speaks of In Search of Lost Time as “a high-ceilinged masterpiece.” (…) A lifetime of hard suffering went into this masterpiece, and, for better and for worse, it is humanity in its heartache and failure that enjoys pride of place. Algis Valiunas
Le règne du roi n’est que l’entracte prolongé d’un rituel sacrificiel violent. Gil Bailie
Parfois, la durée du règne [du nouveau roi] est fixée dès le départ: les rois de Djonkon (…) régnaient sept ans à l’origine. Chez les Bambaras, le nouveau roi déterminait traditionnellement lui-même la longueur de son propre règne. On lui passait au cou une bande de coton, dont deux hommes tiraient les extrémités en sens contraire pendant qu’il extrayait d’une calebasse autant de cailloux qu’il pouvait en tenir. Ces derniers indiquaient le nombre d’années de son règne, à l’expiration desquelles on l’étranglait. (…) Le roi paraissait rarement en public. Son pied nu ne devait jamais toucher le sol, car les les récoltes en eussent été desséchées; il ne devait rien ramasser sur la terre non plus. S’il venait à tomber de cheval, on le mettait autrefois à mort. Personne n’avait le droit de dire qu’il était malade; s’il contractait une maladie grave, on l’étranglait en grand secret. . . . On croyait qu’il contrôlait la pluie et les vents. Une succession de sécheresses et de mauvaises récoltes trahissait une relâchement  de sa force et on l’étranglait en secret la nuit. Elias Canetti
Le roi ne règne qu’en vertu de sa mort future; il n’est rien d’autre qu’une victime en instance de sacrifice, un condamné à mort qui attend son exécution. (…) Prévoyante, la ville d’Athènes entretenait à ses frais un certain nombre de malheureux […]. En cas de besoin, c’est-à-dire quand une calamité s’abattait ou menaçait de s’abattre sur la ville, épidémie, famine, invasion étrangère, dissensions intérieures, il y avait toujours un pharmakos à la disposition de la collectivité. […] On promenait le pharmakos un peu partout, afin de drainer les impuretés et de les rassembler sur sa tête ; après quoi on chassait ou on tuait le pharmakos dans une cérémonie à laquelle toute la populace prenait part. […] D’une part, on […] [voyait] en lui un personnage lamentable, méprisable et même coupable ; il […] [était] en butte à toutes sortes de moqueries, d’insultes et bien sûr de violences ; on […] [l’entourait], d’autre part, d’une vénération quasi-religieuse ; il […] [jouait] le rôle principal dans une espèce de culte.  René Girard
Le roi a une fonction réelle et c’est la fonction de toute victime sacrificielle. Il est une machine à convertir la violence stérile et contagieuse en valeurs culturelles positives. René Girard
Pour qu’il y ait cette unanimité dans les deux sens, un mimétisme de foule doit chaque fois jouer. Les membres de la communauté s’influencent réciproquement, ils s’imitent les uns les autres dans l’adulation fanatique puis dans l’hostilité plus fanatique encore. René Girard
Il arrive que les victimes d’une foule soient tout à fait aléatoires ; il arrive aussi qu’elles ne le soient pas. Il arrive même que les crimes dont on les accuse soient réels, mais ce ne sont pas eux, même dans ce cas-là, qui joue le premier rôle dans le choix des persécuteurs, c’est l’appartenance des victimes à certaines catégories particulièrement exposées à la persécution. (…) il existe donc des traits universels de sélection victimaire (…) à côté des critères culturels et religieux, il y en a de purement physiques. La maladie, la folie, les difformités génétiques, les mutilations accidentelles et même les infirmités en général tendent à polariser les persécuteurs. (…) l’infirmité s’inscrit dans un ensemble indissociable du signe victimaire et dans certains groupes — à l’internat scolaire par exemple — tout individu qui éprouve des difficultés d’adaptation, l’étranger, le provincial, l’orphelin, le fils de famille, le fauché, ou, tout simplement, le dernier arrivé, est plus ou moins interchangeables avec l’infirme. (…) lorsqu’un groupe humain a pris l’habitude de choisir ses victimes dans une certaine catégorie sociale, ethnique, religieuse, il tend à lui attribuer les infirmités ou les difformités qui renforceraient la polarisation victimaire si elles étaient réelles. (…) à la marginalité des miséreux, ou marginalité  du dehors, il faut en ajouter une seconde, la marginalité du dedans, celle des riches et du dedans. Le monarque et sa cour font parfois songer à l’oeil d’un ouragan. Cette double marginalité suggère une organisation tourbillonnante. En temps normal, certes, les riches et les puissants jouissent de toutes sortes de protections et de privilèges qui font défaut aux déshérités. Mais ce ne sont pas les circonstances normales qui nous concernent ici, ce sont les périodes de crise. Le moindre regard sur l’histoire universelle révèle que les risques de mort violente aux mains d’une foule déchaînée sont statistiquement plus élevés pour les privilégiés que pour toute autre catégorie. A la limite ce sont toutes les qualités extrêmes qui attirent, de temps en temps, les foudres collectives, pas seulement les extrêmes de la richesse et de la pauvreté, mais également ceux du succès et de l’échec, de la beauté et de la laideur, du vice de la vertu, du pouvoir de séduire et du pouvoir de déplaire ; c’est la faiblesse des femmes, des enfants et des vieillards, mais c’est aussi la force des plus forts qui devient faiblesse devant le nombre (…) La reine appartient à plusieurs catégories victimaires préférentielles; elle n’est pas seulement reine mais étrangère. Son origine autrichienne revient sans cesse dans les accusations populaires. Le tribunal qui la condamne est très fortement influencé par la foule parisienne. Notre premier stéréotype est également présent: on retrouve dans la révolution tous les traits caractéristiques des grandes crises qui favorisent les persécutions collectives. (…) Je ne prétends pas que cette façon de penser doive se substituer partout à nos idées sur la Révolution française. Elle n’en éclaire pas moins d’un jour intéressant une accusation souvent passée sous silence mais qui figure explicitement au procès de la reine, celui d’avoir commis un inceste avec son fils. René Girard
Nous sommes une société qui, tous les cinquante ans ou presque, est prise d’une sorte de paroxysme de vertu – une orgie d’auto-purification à travers laquelle le mal d’une forme ou d’une autre doit être chassé. De la chasse aux sorcières de Salem aux chasses aux communistes de l’ère McCarthy à la violente fixation actuelle sur la maltraitance des enfants, on retrouve le même fil conducteur d’hystérie morale. Après la période du maccarthisme, les gens demandaient : mais comment cela a-t-il pu arriver ? Comment la présomption d’innocence a-t-elle pu être abandonnée aussi systématiquement ? Comment de grandes et puissantes institutions ont-elles pu accepté que des enquêteurs du Congrès aient fait si peu de cas des libertés civiles – tout cela au nom d’une guerre contre les communistes ? Comment était-il possible de croire que des subversifs se cachaient derrière chaque porte de bibliothèque, dans chaque station de radio, que chaque acteur de troisième zone qui avait appartenu à la mauvaise organisation politique constituait une menace pour la sécurité de la nation ? Dans quelques décennies peut-être les gens ne manqueront pas de se poser les mêmes questions sur notre époque actuelle; une époque où les accusations de sévices les plus improbables trouvent des oreilles bienveillantes; une époque où il suffit d’être accusé par des sources anonymes pour être jeté en pâture à la justice; une époque où la chasse à ceux qui maltraitent les enfants est devenu une pathologie nationale. Dorothy Rabinowitz
La participation médiocre, les conditions de cette victoire dans le contexte du «Fillongate», puis face à un adversaire «repoussoir», dans sa fonction d’épouvantail traditionnel de la politique française, donnent à cette élection un goût d’inachevé. Les Français ont-ils jamais été en situation de «choisir»? Tandis que la France «d’en haut» célèbre son sauveur providentiel sur les plateaux de télévision, une vague de perplexité déferle sur la majorité silencieuse. Que va-t-il en sortir? Par-delà l’euphorie médiatique d’un jour, le personnage de M. Macron porte en lui un potentiel de rejet, de moquerie et de haine insoupçonnable. Son style «jeunesse dorée», son passé d’énarque, d’inspecteur des finances, de banquier, d’ancien conseiller de François Hollande, occultés le temps d’une élection, en font la cible potentielle d’un hallucinant lynchage collectif, une victime expiatoire en puissance des frustrations, souffrances et déceptions du pays. Quant à la «France d’en haut», médiatique, journalistique, chacun sait à quelle vitesse le vent tourne et sa propension à brûler ce qu’elle a adoré. Jamais une présidence n’a vu le jour sous des auspices aussi incertains. Cette élection, produit du chaos, de l’effondrement des partis, d’une vertigineuse crise de confiance, signe-t-elle le début d’une renaissance ou une étape supplémentaire dans la décomposition et la poussée de violence? En vérité, M. Macron n’a aucun intérêt à obtenir, avec «En marche», une majorité absolue à l’Assemblée qui ferait de lui un nouvel «hyperprésident» censé détenir la quintessence du pouvoir. Sa meilleure chance de réussir son mandat est de se garder des sirènes de «l’hyperprésidence» qui mène tout droit au statut de «coupable idéal» des malheurs du pays, à l’image de tous ses prédécesseurs. De la part du président Macron, la vraie nouveauté serait dans la redécouverte d’une présidence modeste, axée sur l’international, centrée sur l’essentiel et le partage des responsabilités avec un puissant gouvernement réformiste et une Assemblée souveraine, conformément à la lettre – jamais respectée – de la Constitution de 1958. Maxime Tandonnet (07.05.2017)
La violente polémique qui secoue la candidature de François Fillon à l’élection présidentielle n’a rien d’une surprise. Il fallait s’y attendre. La vie politique française n’a jamais supporté les têtes qui dépassent, les personnalités qui prennent l’ascendant. Dans l’histoire, les hommes d’État visionnaires, ceux qui ont eu raison avant tout le monde, ont été descendus en flammes et leur image est restée maudite des décennies ou des siècles après leur mort (…) Dans mon livre les Parias de la République(Perrin, 2017), j’ai raconté la descente aux enfers de ces parias qui furent aussi de grands hommes d’État, et une femme Premier ministre, leur diabolisation qui les poursuit jusqu’aux yeux de la postérité. Cet ouvrage annonce aussi la généralisation et la banalisation de la figure du paria dans la vie politique contemporaine. La médiatisation, Internet et la puissance des réseaux sociaux, les exigences de transparence, la défiance face à l’autorité et surtout, la personnalisation du pouvoir à outrance, transforme tout homme ou femme incarnant de pouvoir en bouc émissaire des frustrations et des angoisses d’une époque. Qui ne se souvient à quel point Nicolas Sarkozy fut traîné dans la boue de 2007 à 2012? Dans un tout autre genre, François Hollande a aussi connu, à la tête de l’État, le vertige de l’humiliation. La diabolisation des hommes politiques s’accélère: non seulement Sarkozy, puis Hollande, mais aussi Alain Juppé et Manuel Valls viennent de chuter. L’hécatombe est désormais inarrêtable… Sans aucun doute, le tour viendra d’Emmanuel Macron, et sa chute sera aussi subite et aussi violente que son ascension fondée sur la sublimation d’une image. (…) Oui, il fallait s’attendre, tôt ou tard, à la lapidation de François Fillon. Le prétexte de l’emploi de son épouse à ses côtés est ambigu. Le recrutement de proches par des responsables politiques est une vieille – et mauvaise – habitude française. Alexandre Millerand , Vincent Auriol, François Mitterrand employaient leur fils à l’Elysée et Jacques Chirac sa fille. Combien de ministres ont recruté un proche dans leurs cabinets? Combien de fils et de fille «de» ont hérité de la position politique de leur père? 20% des parlementaires emploient un membre de leur famille. L’un des plus hauts responsables actuels de la République a l’habitude de salarier sa femme auprès de lui. Tout cela est bien connu. À l’évidence, cette pratique n’est pas à l’honneur de notre République. Mais tout le monde s’en est jusqu’à présent accommodé, hypocritement, sans poser de question. Personne ne s’est interrogé sur la nature et l’effectivité des tâches accomplies par le conjoint ou le parent. Et voici que soudain, le dossier est opportunément rouvert, contre François Fillon. (…) L’homme se prête particulièrement à une diabolisation. Son caractère à la fois discret et volontariste a tout pour exaspérer un microcosme politico-médiatique plus enclin à idolâtrer le clinquant stérile et l’impuissance bavarde. La ligne de défense de François Fillon transparaît dans son discours du 29 janvier. Il s’apprête à endosser le rôle de paria, comptant sur un retournement en sa faveur. En témoigne la présence de Pénélope à ses côtés. Sa parole, conservatrice et libérale, semble avoir été façonnée pour exacerber les haines des idéologues de la table rase: «On me décrit comme le représentant d’une France traditionnelle. Mais celui qui n’a pas de racines marche dans le vide. Je ne renie rien de ce qu’on m’a transmis, rien de ce qui m’a fait, pas plus ma foi personnelle que mes engagements politiques». Peut-il réussir? In fine, le résultat des élections de 2017 dépendra du corps électoral: emprise de l’émotionnel ou choix d’un destin collectif? Mais au-delà, une grande leçon de ces événements devrait s’imposer: l’urgence de refonder la vie politique française, sur une base moins personnalisée et plus collective, tournée vers le débat d’idées et non plus l’émotion – entre haine et idolâtrie – autour de personnages publics. Maxime Tandonnet (30.01.2017)
Un homme d’État doit concilier trois qualités: une vision de l’histoire, le sens du bien commun et le courage personnel. Ils sont très peu nombreux à avoir durablement émergé dans l’histoire politique française. En effet, en raison de leur supériorité, ils sont rapidement pris en chasse par le marais et réduits au silence avant d’être lapidés. Le véritable homme d’État est un paria en puissance. Le Général de Gaulle fut un paria tout à fait particulier, un paria qui a réussi. Il faut se souvenir de la manière dont il fut traité dans les années 1950 et 1960. Il était en permanence insulté, qualifié de réactionnaire et de fasciste. Dans Le Coup d’État permanent, François Mitterrand utilise à son propos les mots de «caudillo, duce, führer…». C’est un comble pour le chef de la résistance française au nazisme… S’il fut un paria qui a réussi, c’est en raison de sa place hors norme dans l’histoire, auteur de l’appel du 18 juin 1940 et de la décolonisation. Mais dès lors, il n’est plus vraiment un paria au sens de la définition que j’en donne, son image à la postérité étant largement positive et consensuelle. (…) la lecture des livres de René Girard, notamment La violence et le sacré et Les choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde m’a inspiré l’idée de cet ouvrage sur les parias de la République. Sa grille de lecture peut s’appliquer à l’histoire politique française: la quête d’un bouc émissaire, victime expiatoire de la violence collective, et son lynchage par lequel la société politique retrouve son unité. Le cas d’Édith Cresson est intéressant à cet égard. Quand on lit la presse de l’époque, quand on replonge dans les actualités du début des années 1990, la violence, la férocité de son lynchage nous apparaissent comme sidérantes. On a beaucoup parlé de ses maladresses, provocations et fautes de communication qui furent réelles. Mais l’acharnement contre elle, les insultes, la caricature, la diffamation contre une femme Premier ministre qui prenait une place convoitée par des hommes, a atteint des proportions vertigineuses. On en a oublié des aspects positifs de sa politique: le rejet des 35 heures, la promotion de l’apprentissage, des privatisations et de la politique industrielle, la volonté de maîtriser les frontières. Elle fut vraiment une femme lynchée. Et sur ce sacrifice, les politiques de son camp ont tenté de se refaire une cohésion. Sans succès. Encore aujourd’hui, je constate à quel point elle fut haïe. Des personnalités de droite ou de gauche m’ont vivement reproché de tenter de la «réhabiliter» parmi mes parias! De fait, je ne cherche pas à la réhabiliter et ne cache rien de ses erreurs, mais je mets le doigt sur un épisode qui n’est pas à l’honneur de la classe politique française. La violence est certes inhérente à la république dès lors que la république suppose une concurrence pour les postes, les mandats, les honneurs. Cette violence devrait être tempérée par la morale, le sens de l’honneur, du respect des autres, par les valeurs au sens du duc de Broglie. Elle ne l’a pas été à l’égard d’Édith Cresson. Elle l’est de moins en moins aujourd’hui, comme en témoigne la multiplication des lynchages politico-médiatiques à tout propos. (…) Nicolas Sarkozy a fait l’objet d’un lynchage permanent et violent pendant son quinquennat: insultes au jour le jour, calomnies et les aspects positifs du bilan de son action ont été étrangement passés sous silence. Pourtant, il me semble trop tôt pour lui appliquer le qualificatif de paria au sens où je l’entends dans mon ouvrage, supposant un bannissement qui se poursuit dans l’histoire. Comment sera-t-il jugé dans vingt ans? Qui peut le dire? Souvenons-nous de Mitterrand et de Chirac. Leur fin de règne fut pathétique, pitoyable. Qui s’en souvient encore? La mémoire contemporaine est tellement courte… Aujourd’hui, ils sont plutôt encensés et n’ont rien de parias… (…) [François Fillon] a le profil d’un bouc émissaire, sans aucun doute, faute de pouvoir parler de paria à ce stade. D’ici à l’élection présidentielle et par la suite, s’il l’emporte, il sera inévitablement maltraité et son tempérament à la fois réservé et volontaire ne peut qu’exciter la hargne envers lui. Il faut noter que François Hollande, quoi qu’on en pense, n’a pas été épargné par le monde médiatique et la presse qu’il croyait tout acquise à sa cause… C’est une vraie question que je me pose: le président de la République, qui incarnait du temps du général de Gaulle et de Pompidou, le prestige, l’autorité, la grandeur nationale, est-il en train de devenir le bouc émissaire naturel d’un pays en crise de confiance? Ultramédiatisé, il incarne à lui tout seul le pouvoir politique dans la conscience collective. Mais ne disposant pas d’une baguette magique pour régler les difficultés des Français, apaiser leurs inquiétudes, il devient responsable malgré lui de tous les maux de la création. Je pense qu’il faut refonder notre vision du pouvoir politique, lui donner une connotation moins personnelle et individualiste. Le temps est venu de redécouvrir les vertus d’une politique davantage axée sur l’engagement collectif, le partage de la responsabilité, entre le chef de l’État, le Premier ministre, la majorité, la nation, au service du bien commun. Maxime Tandonnet (13.01.2017)
«J’avais ourdi le complot» raconte l’avocat Robert Bourgi dans l’émission de BFM, intitulée «Qui a tué François Fillon?» Son témoignage nous remémore le fond des ténèbres atteintes par la politique française il y a tout juste un an. (…) Aujourd’hui, la mode est à l’optimisme. Le discours dominant dans les médias et la presse sublime la recomposition de la classe politique et son rajeunissement. Le nouveau monde aurait définitivement enterré l’ancien. Les événements de l’hiver 2017 semblent être à des années-lumière. La France a le plus jeune président de son histoire. Un grand balayage a entraîné le renouvellement du visage des députés et des ministres. La croissance est au rendez-vous, et «France is back», la France est de retour. Et si tout cela n’était qu’illusion? Et si les causes profondes du Fillongate de 2017, la pire catastrophe démocratique de l’histoire contemporaine, bien loin de se résorber, n’avaient jamais été aussi vivaces sous le couvercle du brouhaha quotidien? Le déclin de la culture et de l’intelligence politiques est au centre du grand malaise, touchant en premier lieu les élites dirigeantes et médiatiques. (…) Où a-t-on vu, depuis la déflagration de 2017, le moindre essai de réflexion sur un régime politique évidemment à bout de souffle, fondé sur l’idolâtrie narcissique, la démagogie, la dissimulation, l’impuissance publique, la frime inefficace, la fuite devant la réalité et le sens de l’intérêt général au profit de l’image? Nulle part! Cette réflexion est comme interdite, étouffée par le carcan d’un abêtissement collectif. (…) La cassure entre le peuple et la classe dirigeante, comme le souligne le nouveau sondage CEVIPOF 2018 sur la confiance des Français, n’a jamais été aussi profonde: comme les années précédentes, 77 % des Français ont une image négative de la politique qui leur inspire de la méfiance (39 %), du dégoût (25 %), de l’ennui (9 %), de la peur (3%). Loin de l’effervescence joyeuse de la «France d’en haut», la fracture démocratique, ce mal qui ronge le pays, ne cesse de s’aggraver. L’obsession élyséenne, quintessence de la dérive mégalomaniaque de la politique française au détriment du bien commun de la Nation, et les guerres d’ego qui ont conduit les Républicains à cette hallucinante déflagration de 2017, vont-elles enfin cesser? En effet, la chute du FN et du PS, les tâtonnements de LREM, pourraient ouvrir un nouvel espace aux Républicains. Ont-ils enfin décidé de se mettre au service du pays et non d’eux-mêmes? Tout laisse penser que non. La révolte des barons contre M. Wauquiez donne le sentiment que rien n’a changé à cet égard. (…) Le récit de M. Bourgi sur BFM est purement anecdotique. Il est l’arbre qui cache la forêt. La politique française connaît une vertigineuse crise du sens dont le séisme de 2017 fut la première manifestation. D’autres viendront, plus terribles encore. Aujourd’hui, rien n’a changé. Le mélange de nihilisme et de fureur narcissique, sur les ruines de l’intelligence politique, n’en finit pas de détruire la démocratie. Vous avez aimé 2017? Vous allez adorer 2022! Maxime Tandonnet
J’apprends non sans stupéfaction que Flavie Flament, dans l’émission « Philosophie » d’Arte, que chacun peut consulter, se réjouit, trente ans après, de la stratégie qu’elle a mise en œuvre pour devenir « le bourreau de son bourreau », stratégie qui lui a permis de se « reconstruire ». Elle parle d’Hamilton comme d’un monstre de lâcheté, mort de manière vulgaire et sans panache, le visage couvert d’un sac en plastique, car il ne supportait pas de voir son image. On a rarement été plus loin dans l’ignominie. (…) Cette sordide histoire m’a rappelé celle de Valérie Solanas, intellectuelle féministe radicale, qui appelait dans son Scum Manifeste à châtrer les hommes et qui tenta d’abattre Andy Warhol et deux de ses compagnons. Elle passera trois ans en prison, soutenue par les féministes américaines (le National Organization for Women) qui voyait en elle la championne la plus remarquable des droits des femmes. Lou Reed, lui, chanta: « Je crois bien que j’aurais appuyé sur l’interrupteur de la chaise électrique moi-même. » Sans recourir à de telles extrémités, on s’interrogera légitimement – Houellebecq l’avait fait à l’époque – sur la haine des sexes et la férocité du désir de vengeance de femmes sans doute humiliées et blessées à un âge où elles idéalisaient encore les rapports amoureux. Mais quoi qu’ait subi Flavie Flament de la part de David Hamilton, ce qui n’est pas prouvé, sa jouissance à l’annonce de son suicide et la stratégie à long terme mise pour y parvenir, me laisse pour le moins songeur. Je me garderai bien de me scandaliser, ne sachant ce qui relève d’une obsession pathologique ou d’un désir immodéré de rester sous les feux de la rampe en un temps où ce genre de dénonciation vous valorise plus qu’il n’inspire le dégoût. Faut-il vraiment, comme le suggère Madame Taubira, que les hommes apprennent ce qu’est l’humiliation ? Auquel cas je ne saurai leur conseiller meilleure maîtresse que Flavie Flament. Roland Jaccard
Tout au long de la campagne, les affaires ont contribué à envoyer par le fond les chances de succès de l’ancien Premier ministre. Ces révélations poursuivaient-elles un calcul politique ou personnel? Qui a tué François Fillon? Voilà les questions posées par une équipe de BFMTV dans un documentaire exceptionnel diffusé ce lundi soir sur notre antenne. A la croisée des regards, les journalistes du Canard enchaîné, bien sûr, qui ont dévoilé peu à peu les vicissitudes présumées du clan Fillon. Devant nos caméras, Hervé Liffran et Isabelle Barré l’assurent: leur travail ne doit rien à une « taupe » à droite, ni à une quelconque aide extérieure. C’est naturellement qu’après le premier tour de la primaire, ils se sont penchés sur les déclarations de patrimoine et de revenus du couple, puis ont découvert, intrigués, que Penelope Fillon avait travaillé pour La Revue des deux mondes, mais aussi et surtout comme collaboratrice parlementaire de son mari et du suppléant de celui-ci pendant huit ans, dans la plus grande discrétion. Naturellement que les montants perçus pour une activité peu évidente (100.000 euros brut entre mai 2012 et décembre 2013 pour la revue et 500.000 euros brut perçus auprès du Palais-Bourbon) les ont intéressés. « Pas de Dark Vador, pas de force obscure », sourit aujourd’hui Isabelle Barré. Pourtant le 24 janvier à 18 heures, lorsque le compte Twitter du Canard enchaîné jette son pavé dans la mare, les principales figures de la droite, alors réunies autour d’une galette des rois dans les locaux de campagne de leur candidat, sont persuadées qu’il s’agit là d’un acte de malveillance, peut-être venu de l’intérieur. Parmi les figures entretenant une inimitié notoire avec François Fillon, les noms de Jean-François Copé et Rachida Dati courent sur les lèvres. Tous deux écartent toujours ces allégations. « Si on devait mettre en cause tous ceux à qui François Fillon a fait du mal, la liste serait longue », ajoute l’ancien ministre du Budget. La piste d’un « cabinet noir » élyséen, lancée par François Fillon lui-même, ne mènera pas plus loin. De toute façon, les revenus des Fillon ne sont pas un secret pour tout le monde: à l’Assemblée nationale, 95 personnes ont accès aux fiches de paie des collaborateurs dans le cadre de leur travail. S’il est difficile de savoir d’où sont partis les premiers coups, nombreux sont ceux à avoir cherché à achever François Fillon. Dès fin janvier, c’est François Bayrou qui cherche un « plan B » à la droite et au centre. Début février, le président du Sénat, Gérard Larcher, veut mettre un terme à l’équipée, après avoir appris que les enfants de François Fillon avaient aussi été rémunérés par la Haute assemblée durant le mandat sénatorial de leur père. Peu à peu, les leaders de la droite prennent leurs distances. (…) Pendant toute cette période, Nicolas Sarkozy, vaincu à la primaire, joue un jeu trouble. Comme nous le raconte Rachida Dati, tout le monde ne cesse de l’appeler: Xavier Bertrand, François Bertrand, Laurent Wauquiez. Tous veulent qu’il pousse François Fillon à l’abandon. « A la faveur de chacun d’entre eux… Tout le monde voulait y aller! » s’amuse l’ancienne Garde des Sceaux. BFM
L’homme qui a offert des costumes à François Fillon, Robert Bourgi, s’est vanté chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin, avec une faconde que n’auraient pas reniée «Les Tontons flingueurs», d’avoir «ourdi un complot» contre le candidat pour peser dans sa chute. Invité chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin sur RMC ce 29 janvier, Robert Bourgi, proche de Nicolas Sarkozy et des cercles du pouvoir, a fait de nouvelles révélations sardoniques sur son ancien «ami» François Fillon. L’homme de loi a reconnu avoir monté un complot contre l’ancien Premier ministre de Nicolas Sarkozy, avec l’intention de «le niquer» pendant la campagne présidentielle. Sa ruse : lui offrir des costumes hors de prix. Le jour de la diffusion du documentaire «Qui a tué François Fillon ?» sur BFM TV, Robert Bourgi est venu livrer les dessous de son «complot». Il donne le ton en jetant d’emblée à Jean-Jacques Bourdin : «Votre service de sécurité m’a enlevé ma boîte à outils. J’avais la sulfateuse, le marteau et les clous pour le cercueil pour Monsieur Fillon mais pour vous, j’ai quelque chose.» Et l’homme de dégainer un mètre de couturière, pour prendre les mesures de l’animateur. «Ce sera pas Arny’s, ce sera Petit Bateau», rit-il, très content de sa blague. Il déroule alors l’historique qui le fait apparaître comme un intriguant, avide de relations de pouvoir, éclairant d’un jour nouveau les réseaux d’influence et alliances impitoyables autour des têtes de l’UMP, devenue les Républicains en 2015. L’avocat d’origine libano-sénégalaise Robert Bourgi, figure de la Françafrique, a toujours courtisé les puissants : Jacques Chirac, Omar Bongo, Laurent Gbagbo et surtout son «ami» Nicolas Sarkozy. Il explique avoir fréquenté régulièrement François Fillon pendant son mandat de Premier ministre. (…) Mais Robert Bourgi s’est retourné contre l’ancien Premier ministre lorsque deux journalistes lui ont livré un scoop signé François Hollande durant la campagne de la primaire. Le duo confie à l’avocat : «Ton ami Fillon a demandé la peau de ton ami Sarko.» L’ancien chef du gouvernement avait demandé que la justice accélère concernant les affaires dans lesquelles était impliqué l’ancien chef d’Etat. Dès lors, Robert Bourgi se métamorphose en nettoyeur des couloirs feutrés des cabinets ministériels. (…) Il décide alors de fomenter un complot, selon ses propres termes, contre le Sarthois en exploitant ses faiblesses. (…) Robert Bourgi ne souhaitait pas parler chiffon mais tentait d’influencer François Fillon sur le choix de ses lieutenants. Il souhaitait le voir s’entourer «de compagnons de Nicolas Sarkozy» qui voulaient le «servir», en lui conseillant de les inclure dans son «comité politique». Aucun retour. Et c’est en homme vexé de ne pas arriver à faire aboutir ses petites manœuvres qu’il se plaint : «Il m’a humilié.» Russia Today
Je lui ai dit : « Nicolas, il n’ira jamais à l’Elysée » […] parce que je vais le niquer, j’avais ourdi le complot […] à cause du comportement de Fillon à mon endroit qui n’était pas correct. Je savais exactement que j’allais payer ces costumes par chèque et que j’allais appeler mon ami Valdiguié au JDD, lui montrer le chèque. Quand on a fait campagne sur les vertus morales, la difficulté des Français à joindre les deux bouts, je me suis dit : « C’est quelque chose qui va le tuer ». Robert Bourgi
François Fillon, j’ai décidé de le tuer pour diverses raisons. D’abord parce qu’il a violé toutes les règles de l’amitié avec moi. J’ai toujours été correct avec lui, […] j’ai toujours défendu la position de Fillon auprès de Nicolas dans le but de les réunir un jour ou l’autre. […] Il passait son temps à démolir Nicolas Sarkozy. Il l’a toujours détesté, il a toujours eu les mots les plus inélégants à son égard. A chaque fois je lui disais : « François, tu n’as pas le droit de parler de Nicolas comme ça » […] François Fillon m’avait promis d’être un peu plus loyal à l’endroit de Nicolas Sarkozy, il n’a jamais tenu parole. Robert Bourgi
En fait, je fais au mois de janvier, une conférence sur Bourreaux et victimes. Et on se rend compte qu’à un moment donné, la victime peut devenir aussi quelque part – c’est pour ça que je parlais de stratégie – le bourreau de son bourreau en retournant effectivement ça. Et je pense que c’est là-dessus qu’on se reconstruit. (…) Et la façon dont il est mort m’a vraiment interrogée. Il est mort avec un sac en plastique sur la tête. (…) Il est mort d’une façon vulgaire. (…) Il avait pas de panache.  Certains mettent en scène leur mort (…) Je me suis consolée quelque part en me disant qu’il s’était regardé. Quand on se met un sac en plastique de supermarché  sur la tête et qu’on disparait de cette façon là dans un petit appartement du boulevard de Montparnasse, il y a quand même (…) quelque chose de fou. Flavie Flamant
Au lieu de lui tirer une balle, vous lui envoyez un missile. Raphael Enthoven

Attention: une curée peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où, forts de leur coup, BFM et France 5 nous balancent en boucle …

Leur publireportage sur le « niquage » du candidat Fillon il y a un an par un porte-flingue de Nicolas Sarkozy …

Mais où, fortes du nombre désormais de leur côté et avec la complicité active de prétendus philosophes sur des prétendues chaines culturelles, certaines femmes se laissent emporter par la plus primaire des vindictes anti-hommes

Comment avec Maxime Tandonnet …

Qui, après avoir un moment conseillé l’ancien président Sarkozy, avait écrit des pages éloquentes sur la bouc-émissarisation de la politique française …

Ne pas repenser à la si pertinente définition proustienne du fonctionnement fondamental de nos sociétés comme de nos foules …

Qui « gouvernées par l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage » …

Se muent pour « chasser ou acclamer ses rois » …

En « bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang » ?

Derrière Bourgi, la déliquescence de la politique française
Maxime Tandonnet
Le Figaro
31/01/2018

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Après la diffusion d’un reportage de BFM en début de semaine, on voudrait croire que c’est bien Robert Bourgi qui a «tué François Fillon». Il n’en est rien, selon Maxime Tandonnet : l’assassin court toujours, et il n’a pas fini de faire des victimes. Il s’agit de la crise du sens que traverse la politique française.


Ancien conseiller de Nicolas Sarkozy, haut-fonctionnaire, Maxime Tandonnet décrypte chaque semaine l’exercice de l’État pour le FigaroVox. Il a écrit Les parias de la République (éd. Perrin, 2017).


«J’avais ourdi le complot» raconte l’avocat Robert Bourgi dans l’émission de BFM, intitulée «Qui a tué François Fillon?» Son témoignage nous remémore le fond des ténèbres atteintes par la politique française il y a tout juste un an. Qu’est-ce que la politique? En principe, le débat d’idées, le choix d’un projet en vue de bâtir un destin commun et de régler le mieux possible les défis du présent et de l’avenir. Ces révélations donnent un nouvel aperçu du pire de la vie publique, un cocktail de batailles d’ego, de rancœurs, de vengeances personnelles qui anéantit toute idée de bien commun et d’intérêt général.

Aujourd’hui, la mode est à l’optimisme. Le discours dominant dans les médias et la presse sublime la recomposition de la classe politique et son rajeunissement. Le nouveau monde aurait définitivement enterré l’ancien. Les événements de l’hiver 2017 semblent être à des années-lumière. La France a le plus jeune président de son histoire. Un grand balayage a entraîné le renouvellement du visage des députés et des ministres. La croissance est au rendez-vous, et «France is back», la France est de retour.

Et si tout cela n’était qu’illusion? Et si les causes profondes du Fillongate de 2017, la pire catastrophe démocratique de l’histoire contemporaine, bien loin de se résorber, n’avaient jamais été aussi vivaces sous le couvercle du brouhaha quotidien?

Le déclin de la culture et de l’intelligence politiques est au centre du grand malaise, touchant en premier lieu les élites dirigeantes et médiatiques. Toute la vie politico-médiatique se ramène désormais à des effets de personnalisation narcissique au détriment des convictions. La Nation doit voter pour l’image d’un individu, les sensations qu’il inspire, une image parfaitement volatile, conditionnée par les soubresauts des émotions collectives, au fil de l’actualité et du matraquage médiatique. Dès lors s’efface la notion de choix de société sur les grands sujets du moment: l’école, l’industrie, la dette, l’immigration, le chômage, l’autorité de l’État, la sécurité, la refondation de l’Europe…

Où a-t-on vu, depuis la déflagration de 2017, le moindre essai de réflexion sur un régime politique évidemment à bout de souffle, fondé sur l’idolâtrie narcissique, la démagogie, la dissimulation, l’impuissance publique, la frime inefficace, la fuite devant la réalité et le sens de l’intérêt général au profit de l’image? Nulle part! Cette réflexion est comme interdite, étouffée par le carcan d’un abêtissement collectif.

«Renouvellement», disiez-vous? La cassure entre le peuple et la classe dirigeante, comme le souligne le nouveau sondage CEVIPOF 2018 sur la confiance des Français, n’a jamais été aussi profonde: comme les années précédentes, 77 % des Français ont une image négative de la politique qui leur inspire de la méfiance (39 %), du dégoût (25 %), de l’ennui (9 %), de la peur (3%). Loin de l’effervescence joyeuse de la «France d’en haut», la fracture démocratique, ce mal qui ronge le pays, ne cesse de s’aggraver.

L’obsession élyséenne, quintessence de la dérive mégalomaniaque de la politique française au détriment du bien commun de la Nation, et les guerres d’ego qui ont conduit les Républicains à cette hallucinante déflagration de 2017, vont-elles enfin cesser? En effet, la chute du FN et du PS, les tâtonnements de LREM, pourraient ouvrir un nouvel espace aux Républicains. Ont-ils enfin décidé de se mettre au service du pays et non d’eux-mêmes? Tout laisse penser que non. La révolte des barons contre M. Wauquiez donne le sentiment que rien n’a changé à cet égard. Summum de l’absurdité et de l’obsession élyséenne: plutôt que de se pencher sur les raisons profondes de la crise politique française, certains, songeant uniquement à leur destin personnel, ramènent déjà la question des «primaires» de 2022, sans la moindre considération pour leur faillite en 2016-2017!

Le récit de M. Bourgi sur BFM est purement anecdotique. Il est l’arbre qui cache la forêt. La politique française connaît une vertigineuse crise du sens dont le séisme de 2017 fut la première manifestation. D’autres viendront, plus terribles encore. Aujourd’hui, rien n’a changé. Le mélange de nihilisme et de fureur narcissique, sur les ruines de l’intelligence politique, n’en finit pas de détruire la démocratie. Vous avez aimé 2017? Vous allez adorer 2022!

Voir aussi:

David Hamilton: Flament glose…
Roland Jaccard

Causeur

3 février 2018

J’aimais bien David Hamilton de quelques années mon aîné, que je croisais parfois boulevard Montparnasse. Ses photos avaient bercé mon adolescence. Et personne n’y voyait rien d’obscène. Les plus grands artistes avaient travaillé avec lui et même Alain Robbe-Grillet avait signé un livre : Rêves de jeunes filles avec Hamilton dont la notoriété s’étendait au monde entier. Il y régnait un érotisme doux, presque chaste, qui n’offusquait personne. Ses films, en revanche, passaient inaperçus : le photographe avait éclipsé le cinéaste dont on retiendra néanmoins Laura ou les ombres de l’été avec Dawn Dunlap actrice à laquelle Olivier Mathieu a rendu un bel hommage dans Le Portrait de Dawn Dunlap.

Je savais par un ami commun que la situation de David Hamilton était devenue précaire et que certaines rétrospectives de son œuvre avaient été annulées après des accusations de pédophilie : sans doute portait-il aux très jeunes filles un amour immodéré. Mais jamais la justice, en dépit de deux plaintes, ne l’avait jugé coupable. Et voici que trente années plus tard, une présentatrice de télévision, Flavie Flament, un de ses anciens modèles le prend pour cible dans un médiocre roman intitulé : La Consolation. Le nom de Hamilton sent alors le soufre, tout comme ceux de Weinstein, d’Allen, de Polanski, de Balthus et de tant d’autres.

Devenir « le bourreau de son bourreau »
Sans doute lassé par une époque où la délation et la vulgarité commandent l’esprit du temps, David Hamilton se donne la mort dans des circonstances encore mal élucidées. On le trouve étouffé dans la nuit du 25 novembre 2016 « avec un sac plastique sur la tête » et la porte ouverte de son appartement. Certains pensent qu’il aurait pu être assassiné. Je crois surtout qu’il était dégoûté par un monde où il n’avait plus sa place et qu’il en a tiré la conclusion logique.

Mais j’apprends non sans stupéfaction que Flavie Flament, dans l’émission « Philosophie » d’Arte, que chacun peut consulter, se réjouit, trente ans après, de la stratégie qu’elle a mise en œuvre pour devenir « le bourreau de son bourreau », stratégie qui lui a permis de se « reconstruire ».

Elle parle d’Hamilton comme d’un monstre de lâcheté, mort de manière vulgaire et sans panache, le visage couvert d’un sac en plastique, car il ne supportait pas de voir son image. On a rarement été plus loin dans l’ignominie. Et, au passage, tous ceux qui ont eu recours au sac plastique pour se suicider apprécieront… s’ils en ont encore l’occasion.

Au mauvais souvenir de Lou Reed
Cette sordide histoire m’a rappelé celle de Valérie Solanas, intellectuelle féministe radicale, qui appelait dans son Scum Manifeste à châtrer les hommes et qui tenta d’abattre Andy Warhol et deux de ses compagnons. Elle passera trois ans en prison, soutenue par les féministes américaines (le National Organization for Women) qui voyait en elle la championne la plus remarquable des droits des femmes. Lou Reed, lui, chanta: « Je crois bien que j’aurais appuyé sur l’interrupteur de la chaise électrique moi-même. »

Sans recourir à de telles extrémités, on s’interrogera légitimement – Houellebecq l’avait fait à l’époque – sur la haine des sexes et la férocité du désir de vengeance de femmes sans doute humiliées et blessées à un âge où elles idéalisaient encore les rapports amoureux. Mais quoi qu’ait subi Flavie Flament de la part de David Hamilton, ce qui n’est pas prouvé, sa jouissance à l’annonce de son suicide et la stratégie à long terme mise pour y parvenir, me laisse pour le moins songeur. Je me garderai bien de me scandaliser, ne sachant ce qui relève d’une obsession pathologique ou d’un désir immodéré de rester sous les feux de la rampe en un temps où ce genre de dénonciation vous valorise plus qu’il n’inspire le dégoût. Faut-il vraiment, comme le suggère Madame Taubira, que les hommes apprennent ce qu’est l’humiliation ? Auquel cas je ne saurai leur conseiller meilleure maîtresse que Flavie Flament.

Voir également:

DOCUMENTAIRE – Qui a tué François Fillon? L’enquête de BFMTV

BFM

29/01/2018

D’affaire en affaire, de coup de théâtre en coup de théâtre, les espoirs de la droite et de son candidat à la présidentielle, François Fillon, se sont évaporés pendant la campagne. Un mystère demeure: quelqu’un voulait-il la peau de François Fillon? C’est la question que s’est posée une équipe de BFMTV dans un documentaire exceptionnel diffusé ce lundi soir à 22h40 sur notre antenne.

La campagne présidentielle s’est éloignée depuis longtemps et, avec elle, ses illusions perdues, mais François et Penelope Fillon sont toujours mis en examen pour détournement de fonds publics. L’enquête doit être bouclée au cours de cette année 2018.

« Pas de Dark Vador »
S’ils sont sous le coup de cette procédure judiciaire, c’est en raison d’une affaire qui a éclaté au grand jour il y a un an: les soupçons d’emplois fictifs visant Penelope Fillon, l’épouse de celui qui était le candidat de la droite au scrutin suprême. Tout au long de la campagne, les affaires ont contribué à envoyer par le fond les chances de succès de l’ancien Premier ministre. Ces révélations poursuivaient-elles un calcul politique ou personnel? Qui a tué François Fillon? Voilà les questions posées par une équipe de BFMTV dans un documentaire exceptionnel diffusé ce lundi soir sur notre antenne.

A la croisée des regards, les journalistes du Canard enchaîné, bien sûr, qui ont dévoilé peu à peu les vicissitudes présumées du clan Fillon. Devant nos caméras, Hervé Liffran et Isabelle Barré l’assurent: leur travail ne doit rien à une « taupe » à droite, ni à une quelconque aide extérieure. C’est naturellement qu’après le premier tour de la primaire, ils se sont penchés sur les déclarations de patrimoine et de revenus du couple, puis ont découvert, intrigués, que Penelope Fillon avait travaillé pour La Revue des deux mondes, mais aussi et surtout comme collaboratrice parlementaire de son mari et du suppléant de celui-ci pendant huit ans, dans la plus grande discrétion. Naturellement que les montants perçus pour une activité peu évidente (100.000 euros brut entre mai 2012 et décembre 2013 pour la revue et 500.000 euros brut perçus auprès du Palais-Bourbon) les ont intéressés. « Pas de Dark Vador, pas de force obscure », sourit aujourd’hui Isabelle Barré.

Des fiches de paie accessibles à 95 personnes
Pourtant le 24 janvier à 18 heures, lorsque le compte Twitter du Canard enchaîné jette son pavé dans la mare, les principales figures de la droite, alors réunies autour d’une galette des rois dans les locaux de campagne de leur candidat, sont persuadées qu’il s’agit là d’un acte de malveillance, peut-être venu de l’intérieur. Parmi les figures entretenant une inimitié notoire avec François Fillon, les noms de Jean-François Copé et Rachida Dati courent sur les lèvres. Tous deux écartent toujours ces allégations. « Si on devait mettre en cause tous ceux à qui François Fillon a fait du mal, la liste serait longue », ajoute l’ancien ministre du Budget.

La piste d’un « cabinet noir » élyséen, lancée par François Fillon lui-même, ne mènera pas plus loin. De toute façon, les revenus des Fillon ne sont pas un secret pour tout le monde: à l’Assemblée nationale, 95 personnes ont accès aux fiches de paie des collaborateurs dans le cadre de leur travail.

Qui veut débrancher la candidature de François Fillon?
S’il est difficile de savoir d’où sont partis les premiers coups, nombreux sont ceux à avoir cherché à achever François Fillon. Dès fin janvier, c’est François Bayrou qui cherche un « plan B » à la droite et au centre. Début février, le président du Sénat, Gérard Larcher, veut mettre un terme à l’équipée, après avoir appris que les enfants de François Fillon avaient aussi été rémunérés par la Haute assemblée durant le mandat sénatorial de leur père.

Peu à peu, les leaders de la droite prennent leurs distances. François Fillon lui-même ne se rend pas service, en affirmant à la télévision qu’il renoncera s’il venait à être mis en examen. Or, quand cette mise en examen lui est notifiée le 28 février par une convocation judiciaire que lui annonce Patrick Stefanini, son directeur de campagne, François Fillon ne renonce pas à faire campagne. Et le meeting du Trocadéro, lors de la matinée pluvieuse du 5 mars à Paris, lui servira de tremplin vers le mur du premier tour du 23 avril.

Pendant toute cette période, Nicolas Sarkozy, vaincu à la primaire, joue un jeu trouble. Comme nous le raconte Rachida Dati, tout le monde ne cesse de l’appeler: Xavier Bertrand, François Bertrand, Laurent Wauquiez. Tous veulent qu’il pousse François Fillon à l’abandon. « A la faveur de chacun d’entre eux… Tout le monde voulait y aller! » s’amuse l’ancienne Garde des Sceaux. Alain Juppé l’appelle aussi, mais tombe sur le répondeur de l’ancien président de la République, à ce moment-là tranquillement installé au parc des Princes devant un match du Paris-Saint-Germain. Devant le peu de cohésion de son camp, et l’obstination de François Fillon, le maire de Bordeaux jette lui aussi l’éponge.

Voir de même:

«Je vais le niquer» : les révélations truculentes de Robert Bourgi, le «tueur» de Fillon

L’homme qui a offert des costumes à François Fillon, Robert Bourgi, s’est vanté chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin, avec une faconde que n’auraient pas reniée «Les Tontons flingueurs», d’avoir «ourdi un complot» contre le candidat pour peser dans sa chute.

Invité chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin sur RMC ce 29 janvier, Robert Bourgi, proche de Nicolas Sarkozy et des cercles du pouvoir, a fait de nouvelles révélations sardoniques sur son ancien «ami» François Fillon. L’homme de loi a reconnu avoir monté un complot contre l’ancien Premier ministre de Nicolas Sarkozy, avec l’intention de «le niquer» pendant la campagne présidentielle. Sa ruse : lui offrir des costumes hors de prix.

Le jour de la diffusion du documentaire «Qui a tué François Fillon ?» sur BFM TV, Robert Bourgi est venu livrer les dessous de son «complot». Il donne le ton en jetant d’emblée à Jean-Jacques Bourdin : «Votre service de sécurité m’a enlevé ma boîte à outils. J’avais la sulfateuse, le marteau et les clous pour le cercueil pour Monsieur Fillon mais pour vous, j’ai quelque chose.» Et l’homme de dégainer un mètre de couturière, pour prendre les mesures de l’animateur. «Ce sera pas Arny’s, ce sera Petit Bateau», rit-il, très content de sa blague.

Il déroule alors l’historique qui le fait apparaître comme un intriguant, avide de relations de pouvoir, éclairant d’un jour nouveau les réseaux d’influence et alliances impitoyables autour des têtes de l’UMP, devenue les Républicains en 2015.

L’avocat d’origine libano-sénégalaise Robert Bourgi, figure de la Françafrique, a toujours courtisé les puissants : Jacques Chirac, Omar Bongo, Laurent Gbagbo et surtout son «ami» Nicolas Sarkozy. Il explique avoir fréquenté régulièrement François Fillon pendant son mandat de Premier ministre. L’homme de loi révèle que le Sarthois souhaitait savoir ce que Nicolas Sarkozy pensait de lui.

Mais Robert Bourgi s’est retourné contre l’ancien Premier ministre lorsque deux journalistes lui ont livré un scoop signé François Hollande durant la campagne de la primaire. Le duo confie à l’avocat : «Ton ami Fillon a demandé la peau de ton ami Sarko.» L’ancien chef du gouvernement avait demandé que la justice accélère concernant les affaires dans lesquelles était impliqué l’ancien chef d’Etat.

Une haine nourrie envers François Fillon pour défendre Nicolas Sarkozy

Dès lors, Robert Bourgi se métamorphose en nettoyeur des couloirs feutrés des cabinets ministériels.

«François Fillon, j’ai décidé de le tuer pour diverses raisons. D’abord parce qu’il a violé toutes les règles de l’amitié avec moi. J’ai toujours été correct avec lui, […] j’ai toujours défendu la position de Fillon auprès de Nicolas dans le but de les réunir un jour ou l’autre. […] Il passait son temps à démolir Nicolas Sarkozy», explique-t-il. Et Robert Bourgi ne plaisante pas avec le sujet. «Il l’a toujours détesté, il a toujours eu les mots les plus inélégants à son égard. A chaque fois je lui disais : « François, tu n’as pas le droit de parler de Nicolas comme ça » […] François Fillon m’avait promis d’être un peu plus loyal à l’endroit de Nicolas Sarkozy, il n’a jamais tenu parole», déplore l’avocat.

J’avais déjà conçu le projet que j’ai réalisé de niquer François Fillon

Il décide alors de fomenter un complot, selon ses propres termes, contre le Sarthois en exploitant ses faiblesses. «J’avais déjà conçu le projet que j’ai réalisé de niquer François Fillon, c’est mieux que tuer», explique-t-il en toute décontraction. «Je savais que l’homme avait des relations étranges avec l’argent parce que nous avions beaucoup parlé, François Fillon et moi», avoue-t-il.

Au cours d’un petit déjeuner au Ritz, Robert Bourgi piège François Fillon. «Je lui dis : « Comme je te sens amoureux de belles choses je vais t’offrir trois costumes pour ta campagne« », raconte-t-il. Le candidat LR accepte sur le champ, mais Robert Bourgi ne règle pas les complets, laissant passer quatre mois jusqu’en février 2017. Pendant ce temps, il dit avoir envoyé de nombreux textos à l’élu de la Sarthe, qui n’a jamais répondu.

Les petites manœuvres de Robert Bourgi pour placer d’anciens proches de Sarkozy

Robert Bourgi ne souhaitait pas parler chiffon mais tentait d’influencer François Fillon sur le choix de ses lieutenants. Il souhaitait le voir s’entourer «de compagnons de Nicolas Sarkozy» qui voulaient le «servir», en lui conseillant de les inclure dans son «comité politique». Aucun retour. Et c’est en homme vexé de ne pas arriver à faire aboutir ses petites manœuvres qu’il se plaint : «Il m’a humilié.»

J’avais ourdi le complot

Alors que François Fillon est en lice pour le second tour de la primaire de la droite, Nicolas Sarkozy confie à l’avocat lors d’un rendez-vous : «Tu as suivi les sondages, ils sont favorables à Fillon. Tu sais, il va droit à l’Elysée.» «Je lui ai dit : « Nicolas, il n’ira jamais à l’Elysée » […] parce que je vais le niquer, j’avais ourdi le complot […] à cause du comportement de Fillon à mon endroit qui n’était pas correct. Je savais exactement que j’allais payer ces costumes par chèque et que j’allais appeler mon ami Valdiguié [rédacteur en chef] au JDD, lui montrer le chèque. Quand on a fait campagne sur les vertus morales, la difficulté des Français à joindre les deux bouts, je me suis dit : « C’est quelque chose qui va le tuer »», justifie l’avocat.

 Ne t’inquiète pas ma fille, je me vengerai

Puis l’affaire s’emballe, en écho avec les soupçons d’emplois fictifs visant sa femme Pénélope Fillon. Sur le plateau du même Jean-Jacques Bourdin, François Fillon qualifie l’avocat d’«homme âgé qui n’a plus aucune espèce de responsabilité». La fille de Robert Bourgi l’appelle en larmes pour l’en informer. L’avocat piqué au vif, toujours aussi à l’aise avec son rôle de porte-flingue, conclut son entreprise de démolition : «Je lui ai dit : « Ne t’inquiète pas ma fille, je me vengerai »». Mission accomplie.

Voir par ailleurs:

Proust’s Way

Love, death, society, art, time, timelessness–and (perhaps) the greatest novelist of the 20th century.

Among the great modern artists, some seem to possess a boundless vitality, a spiritual extravagance that, even in the face of life’s hot suffering, causes them to profess their gratitude for the very fact of existence and to pour forth their praise of nobility, goodness, beauty, fortitude, love. Goethe, Beethoven, Victor Hugo, and Tolstoy are perhaps the foremost such figures.

Admirers of Wagner might place him, too, among the life-enhancers; yet he could write, at the age of thirty-nine, “I lead an indescribably worthless life . . . [F]or me, enjoyment, love are imaginary, not experienced.” Flaubert, who consecrated himself to a prose so beautiful that no real life could touch it, found himself exclaiming with envy at the sight of a bourgeois family enjoying a picnic, “They have it right.” In bitterness of heart, Kafka let loose with “I am made of literature,” meaning he was unfit for life.

And then there is the case of Marcel Proust (1871-1922), whose 3,000-page novels À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time) outshines the masterworks of Wagner, Flaubert, and Kafka but whose life makes theirs look unattainably bold and merry by comparison. Proust may have been the greatest novelist of the 20th century, but he is almost singlehandedly responsible for turning the term “exquisite sensibility” into a jeer. Everyone knows about the madeleine that Proust’s narrator, Marcel, dunks in his tea, triggering a monumental reflux of childhood memories; the asthma that hounded Proust to an early death; the silent, cork-lined room that he rarely left. Speaking to William F. Buckley, Jr. at the height of the cold war, a prominent European intellectual upheld the honor of European manhood by declaring, “We’re not all a bunch of little Prousts over there.”

Sickly, homosexual, addicted to the social whirl, the real-life Proust seemed, to his contemporaries, irreparably frivolous, terminally brittle. Everyone recognized his brilliance, but no one thought he would forge anything lasting out of it. An 1893 portrait by Jacques-Emile Blanche, who was to make his reputation by painting artistic eminences, depicts Proust as a ludicrous dandy in wing collar and cravat. His forehead has a greenish cast, like a week-old bruise, while the rest of his face is waxen. The flower on his lapel, which picks up his facial coloring, bears a disturbing resemblance to an out-sized malign insect. The eyes, though large and alert, do not reveal anything remarkable behind them. There is nothing to indicate that this young man might be more than a fop smitten with his own elegance. The only hint of otherworldliness is in the morbid tints of his face, which suggest that life is already beginning to prove too much for him and that his days are numbered.

To be sure, modern art has made room for, has even become the preserve of, wayward and misshapen souls. In 1918, with his masterpiece largely finished, Proust himself wrote that contemporary reality yielded its subtlest favors to the debauched and the incurable, and (referring to certain 19th-century artists) that “an unknown part of the mind or an additional nuance of affection was bursting with all the drunkenness of a Musset or a Verlaine, with all the perversions of a Baudelaire or a Rimbaud, even a Wagner, with the epilepsy of a Flaubert.” Suffering has its perquisites, and Proust took them for everything he could.

Yet he was also to prove himself a titan. Two identically titled new biographies help us see how, from unprepossessing beginnings, he did it. Both William C. Carter’s Marcel Proust: A Life1 and Jean-Yves Tadié’s Marcel Proust: A Life2 provide moving and cogent accounts of a life that ultimately had a single raison d’être.

The two books differ somewhat in approach. Carter, a professor of French at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is more considerate to the American reader, deftly filling in the social and political background of Proust’s life and work—as in the case of the Dreyfus affair, which figures so prominently in Proust’s novel. Tadié, who teaches at the Sorbonne in Paris and is widely acknowledged as the world’s leading authority on Proust, takes it for granted that his reader knows things that most Americans do not. His book, which appeared in France in 1996 and which Carter cites repeatedly and respectfully, is the superior work of scholarship, but it is studded with impedimenta that sometimes make for tough going. (Tadié will record who wrote a review in a certain newspaper on a given day, for instance, but not what the review said, or set down the guest lists for parties that Proust attended, without a clue as to who these people were.) Still, there is much that Tadié knows that one is grateful to have between the covers of a book, and taken together Carter and Tadié constitute a treasure trove.

_____________

Marcel Proust was the son of Adrien Proust, an eminent Parisian doctor, and his wife, born Jeanne Weil. The father was Catholic and the mother Jewish. Although she herself refused to convert, Jeanne agreed that their children would be raised as Catholics. As it happened, however, neither parent practiced his faith and, once Marcel had made his first communion, his church-going days were pretty much over.

Jewish religious law holds that the child of a Jewish mother is a Jew, but Proust never considered himself one, and neither did his friends. Still, his parentage occasionally presented difficulties. Once, as a young man, he stood silent and unresponsive when a revered mentor, Comte Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac, delivered an anti-Semitic tirade in the company of friends and then asked Proust for his opinion on the 1894 conviction of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, a Jew, who had been tried for treason on the charge of selling military secrets to the Germans. The next day, Proust wrote to Montesquiou that he had not said anything because, although he himself was Catholic like his father and brother, his mother was Jewish: “I am sure you understand that this is reason enough for me to refrain from such discussions.”

Whether Proust’s private frankness made up for his public reticence is a vexing question, and all the more so because he went on to confide that he was “not free to have the ideas I might otherwise have on the subject.” Proust’s tacit fear, in other words, was that if he defended the Jews he would be taken for a Jew, and what he wanted above all was to be thought of as a Christian gentleman. He even seemed to leave open the possibility that Montesquiou might be right: that only filial piety forbade him from thinking as Montesquiou did. In Carter’s view, “Proust stated his position and his independence, but he might have been less ambiguous about the ethical implications of racist remarks.” Carter is too kind. Proust was only as forthright as his social cowardice—his fear of sacrificing his respectability—would allow.

He was to find his courage when events made it easier to be courageous. By 1898, more and more people had become convinced that Dreyfus had been railroaded, and an uproar ensued that was to shake French society for years. The salon of Mme. Genevieve Straus (the widow of the composer Georges Bizet), where Proust had been a habitue for several years, turned into a Dreyfusard hotbed. Old friends of the anti-Dreyfus persuasion, including the painter Edgar Degas, stalked off and never came back. Drawing strength from those around him, Proust now joined in the growing drumbeat for a retrial that was led by the novelist Emile Zola. He was even to boast that he was the first of the Dreyfusards, because he secured the signature of his literary hero Anatole France on a petition. Still, when an anti-Semitic newspaper numbered him among the “young Jews” who defied decency and right thinking, Proust, who at first thought to correct the paper’s misapprehension, decided to keep quiet, lest he draw any more attention to himself. He must have known that, in the eyes of anti-Dreyfusards, his political affiliations only served to confirm the sad fact of his birth.

_____________

If the Dreyfus affair exposed the moral cretinism that extended into the upper echelons of French society, this hardly deterred Proust from wanting a place in that world. His social career had begun during his last year of high school, when, thanks to the mothers of some of his school friends, he gained admission to certain exclusive Parisian salons. His chum Jacques Bizet, whom he had tried to seduce, without success, made it up to him by serving as his ticket to the beau monde. At the salon of Mme. Straus, young Bizet’s mother, Proust became acquainted with artistic and aristocratic grandees like the composer Gabriel Fauré, the writer Guy de Maupassant, the actress Sarah Bernhardt, and Princesse Mathilde, the niece of Napoleon I. In time he became a regular at Princesse Mathilde’s as well, where the old-line nobility rubbed shoulders with arrivistes, and distinguished Jews mingled with those who detested them. (The writer Léon Daudet, to whom Proust would dedicate a volume of his novel, confided to his diary after one party: “The imperial dwelling was infested with Jews and Jewesses.”)

Another hostess conquered by the high-flying young Proust was Mme. Madeleine Lemaire, renowned for her musical gatherings. It was she who introduced him to Montesquiou-Fezensac, the aristocratic poet whose opinions on Jews Proust was willing to overlook for the sake of the Count’s artistic and social cachet. And there was something else: Montesquiou was boldly aboveboard about his homosexuality, at a time when, as Carter writes, “few Frenchmen dared, if they cared for their reputation and social standing, to display amorous affection for another man.” This frankness earned Proust’s regard—although he was, of course, ambivalent about going public on the issue of his own sexual nature.

Not that it was any secret to those who knew him. In high school, Proust had laid elaborate sexual siege to friends, writing them letters fraught with passion. When his disposition became apparent to his father, in the name of decency the agitated Dr. Proust slipped the boy ten francs and sent him off to a (female) prostitute; the mission wound up a fiasco when Proust broke a chamber pot and spoiled the romance of the moment.

Such happiness as Proust had from love was not made to last. Probably his first consummated affair was with the composer Reynaldo Hahn, whom he met at Mme. Lemaire’s when he was twenty-two and Hahn nineteen. Raw nerves and ceaseless importunity characterized Proust’s love for Hahn, who quickly tired of his friend’s demanding antics. But it was really Proust who fell out of love first, as he fell in love with the stripling Lucien Daudet, son of the novelist Alphonse Daudet and brother of the venomous Leon. Proust would even fight a duel with a journalist, himself homosexual, who hinted salaciously in print that his friendship with Lucien was not quite respectable; both duelists fired and missed.

Proust had good reason to keep his intimate proclivities under wraps. But biographers have their job to do, and Carter and Tadié leave little unsaid. Both record his favored mode of sexual recreation: going to a homosexual brothel and masturbating while watching as the man he had hired masturbated in front of him. If this procedure failed of its effect, the obliging prostitute would bring in a pair of hungry rats and loose them on each other, a spectacle that would invariably afford Proust the needed relief. (For this information we have the testimony both of one such prostitute and of the writer André Gide, in whom Proust confided.)

To the innocent observer, Proust’s sexual preferences may well appear about as demented as such things get; but normality of any kind was never Proust’s strong suit. Abysmal health plagued him his life long, and he cultivated the perpetual invalid’s peculiarities. Wracked by asthma, he spent six hours a day burning eucalyptus powders and inhaling the fumes. He needed veronal and opium and morphine to sleep, caffeine to revive him and also to help his asthma. The huge doses he took of caffeine brought on angina; the sedatives and painkillers destroyed his ability to register temperature, so that on sweltering days he would wear a heavy coat. A year’s supply of medications cost him the equivalent of $20,000 in today’s money. (His parents left him an inheritance of some $4.6 million, so the expenses were not insupportable.)

_____________

From his early twenties, Proust kept vampire’s hours, sleeping during the day and venturing abroad only under cover of darkness. As he grew older and sicker, he ventured out less and less. His cork-lined room became his refuge. Illness, he wrote to a friend, had made it necessary for him “to do without nearly everything and to replace people by their images and life by thought.” He subscribed to a device called the theatrophone, over which he could hear live operatic and dramatic performances without leaving his bed. He hired the best string quartet in Paris to play just for him in the middle of the night. In his latter days, he subsisted largely on ice cream and iced beer, ordered from the Ritz.

And through the worst of his misery, when it was almost impossible to eat, sleep, or breathe, he worked. From his youth he had wanted to be a writer, but the full seriousness of his vocation did not impress itself upon him until he was well into his thirties. His first book, Plaisirs et Jours (Pleasures and Days), a collection of stories, poems, and pastiches, had appeared when he was twenty-three and was generally dismissed as a fussy curiosity. Fuming at the critics’ condescension, Proust set to work on a vast autobiographical novel, Jean Santeuil, which he abandoned after five years and a thousand pages. He translated a volume of John Ruskin, the English art and social critic; produced essays of his own on such artists as Watteau, Chardin, Rembrandt, Moreau, and Monet; and worked abortively on another novel that converged with a study of the literary critic Sainte-Beuve.

His painful failures made for an invaluable apprenticeship. Though the record is hazy, it was perhaps in 1908 that Proust conceived the work for which he would be known; by the next year, the novel was well tinder way. Carter says that by 1916 or soon thereafter, Proust “gave his book its ultimate shape if not its final dimensions,” but his tugging and worrying at the manuscript would continue to his final days. À la recherche du temps perdu appeared in eight volumes, published between 1913 and 1927, the last four posthumously. The titles of the constituent parts are Du côté de chez Swann (Swann’s Way), À l’ombre des jeunes filles en fleur (In the Shade of the Young Girls in Flower), Le côté de Guermantes (The Guermantes Way), Sodome et Gomorrhe (Sodom and Gomorrah), La prisonnière (The Captive), Albertine disparue (Albertine Gone), and Le temps retrouvé (Time Regained).3

_____________

Proust’s novel takes as its great themes the illusions and disappointments of love, friendship, and society (in the limited sense of that word), and the joyous satisfactions of art. The book opens with the narrator’s reminiscence—his name is Marcel, although one has to read over 2,000 pages to find that out—of lying in bed as a boy and waiting for his mother’s good-night kiss; proceeds to a recollection of youthful days in the countrified Parisian suburb of Combray; then goes back to a time before Marcel was born and portrays the agonizing love of Monsieur Swann, an old friend of the family, for the courtesan Odette de Crécy.

Most of the rest of the book has to do with Marcel’s being in love, seeing others in love, and going to parties. His first romance, physically quite innocent but emotionally flaying, is with the Swanns’ daughter, Gilberte. (Unlike his creator, Marcel is heterosexual.) Next comes Albertine, whom Marcel singles out from a fascinating crowd of rowdy girls in the seaside resort of Balbec; this love is not innocent and is even more destructive. Meanwhile Marcel becomes friendly with the Duchesse de Guermantes, who embodies a social grandeur that sets him dreaming; gets to know the novelist Bergotte and the painter Elstir, who provide lessons in what art can and cannot do; mixes with the Verdurins, a couple of distasteful bourgeois climbers, and their circle of fools; and is courted in a most unnerving fashion by the Baron de Charlus, lord prince of the sodomites. Interleaved throughout are meditations and conversations on actual and imagined works of art, ladies’ fashions, etymology, military strategy, homosexuality, anti-Semitism, social transformations, time, and timelessness.

For most of the novel, finally, Marcel is a writer manqué, an aspirant who lacks the understanding to conceive a novel and the will to see it through. The book then records the process by which he becomes the writer who has written the extraordinary work one is reading. “And thus,” he concludes, “my whole life up to the present day might and yet might not have been summed up under the title: A Vocation.”

What does that “vocation” reveal? No other writer/narrator has attended with such extravagant care to the surface of things: the grace or ungainliness of a gesture, the historical associations of a great name, the import of a gravely formal bow in response to a friendly greeting, the radiance of a distinguished smile or shirtfront, party talk that goes on for miles. Yet, although the charms of love, friendship, and society present a brilliant and beguiling surface, they never please Marcel for long. Real life is to be found elsewhere, and only the rare soul manages to find it.

For Marcel, there is no desire more imperious than the desire to know. It is the motive force of his life and of his relentless pursuit of what he calls reality. The words “real” and “reality” must recur a thousand times in this novel, being signposts—like “virtue” for Machiavelli, “happiness” for Tolstoy, or “good” for Hemingway—that lead the reader to the heart of its unfolding significance. But to disclose the reality at life’s core requires one to experience illusion, in all its manifold and obdurate guises, and this experience is Marcel’s meat and drink.

Nowhere in Proust’s world are illusion’s guises harder to penetrate than when it comes to sex and love. The Proustian lover typically ascribes to the object of his desire all manner of enchanting virtues, which generally have no basis in fact, and then torments himself with a plague of suspected vices, which as a rule prove only too real. Every conceivable infidelity must be envisioned in gross detail, since as long as one is in love one can never assure oneself of the reality of the beloved’s heart. This ignorance is torture—but knowledge brings an end to love itself. Even carnal knowledge is no knowledge at all, only an initiation into the pangs of uncertainty.

In the early stages of Swann’s love for Odette, he believes he knows her better than anyone else does; the rumors he has heard that she is an elegant whore who has been kept by a number of men cannot be true, for she is incomparably sensitive and kind and good. In time he finds out otherwise. But even when Swann falls out of love, he cannot be indifferent to Odette unless he continues to possess her; his only recourse is to marry this woman whom he knows to be a slut.

Marcel emulates Swann in his need—ruinous to a lover, exceedingly useful to an aspiring writer—to know everything about the woman he loves, especially the worst. Albertine’s fishy answers to some pointed questions about a sexually charged encounter she has had with Gilberte (Swann’s daughter and Marcel’s first love) set the young man’s mental wheels turning. Once the lever is tripped and the questions begin, there is no stopping them. Jealous obsession is a perpetual-motion machine; it will quit its savage taunting only when love is smashed to pieces, and maybe not even then.

As it happens—as it always happens in Proust—Marcel’s worst imaginings turn out to be true: tireless researches and numberless rounds of cat and mouse confirm that Albertine is a lesbian. When she leaves him and is killed in a riding accident, Marcel is grief-stricken; but in due course his tender memories give way to renewed jealousy, a jealousy “stamped with the character, at once tormenting and solemn, of puzzles left forever insoluble by the death of the one person who could have explained them.”

_____________

Then there is the case of the Baron de Charlus, who chats with the young man at a party and invites him up to his place afterward. This nobleman, whom Marcel has heard spoken of as the lover of Mme. Swann, is a caricature of virility, swaggering like a preening cock and proclaiming his disgust with the effeminacy of modern youth. He intimates to Marcel that he might be interested in taking him under his protection and bestowing upon him the untold benefits of his exalted position, his peerless taste, his unrivaled knowledge of the world. But when they next meet, Charlus is outraged at the young man’s ignorance, presumption, and cloddishness. Their friendship is finished before it ever really gets started.

The next sighting clarifies matters: Marcel spies Charlus in the courtyard of the Guermantes mansion—Charlus belongs to that venerable family—evidently bemused by the look of a tailor named Jupien who has a shop there. After a wordless mating dance, the two men withdraw to Jupien’s shop, where they have at it with vociferous gusto. The noise they make—Marcel can hear but cannot see them—sounds as though one might be slitting the other’s throat, so close are the groans of pleasure to those of pain. Once the indispensable facts are known, everything else falls into place. Charlus is in love with an ideal manliness because he is, in the crucial respect, a woman.

The long meditation on homosexuality that follows this episode is often taken to be Proust’s definitive word on the subject. Some passages are certainly heartfelt and magniloquent: “a race upon which a curse is laid and which must live in falsehood and perjury because it knows that its desire, that which constitutes life’s dearest pleasure, is held to be punishable, shameful, an inadmissible thing.” Marcel is even capable of attributing to sexual collisions like Charlus’s and Jupien’s a kind of sublime necessity:

[T]his Romeo and this Juliet may believe with good reason that their love is not a momentary whim but a true predestination, determined by the harmonies of their temperaments, and not only by their own personal temperaments but by those of their ancestors, by their most distant strains of heredity, so much so that the fellow creature who is conjoined with them has belonged to them from before their birth, has attracted them by a force comparable to that which governs the worlds on which we spent our former lives.

But as Marcel comes to know more and more about Charlus, his frothy enthusiasm turns to disgust and horror. At the funeral of Charlus’s wife, whom Charlus has spoken of as the most noble and beautiful person he had ever known, the Baron tries to pick up an altar boy. When World War I depletes the supply of eligible men, he takes to molesting children. He bankrolls a male brothel, of which Jupien becomes the innkeeper. There Marcel, who has wandered in innocently one night, sees Charlus chained to a bed and beaten with a whip studded with nails, afterward protesting to Jupien that his torturer was not “sufficiently brutal.” When Charlus leaves, Jupien boasts to Marcel that his establishment has the toniest, most cultivated clientele. Marcel replies that it is “worse than a madhouse, since the mad fancies of the lunatics who inhabit it are played out as actual, visible drama—it is a veritable pandemonium.”

_____________

Normality, decency, goodness are, in short, the rarest of commodities in Proust’s world. Nor does their scarcity make them prized, except in the eyes of Marcel and a few other uncharacteristic souls. Instead, decency is seen by most as a social handicap; the Verdurins’ circle of bourgeois snobs, for example, barely tolerates a stammering, clumsy paleographer named Saniette. Monsieur Verdurin’s mockery of Saniette’s speech impediment makes “the faithful burst out laughing, looking like a group of cannibals in whom the sight of a wounded white man has aroused the thirst for blood.” And nowhere is this savage tribalism more marked than in the antipathy that those who consider themselves true Frenchmen feel for Jews.

Anti-Semitism is everywhere in Proust’s novel. Perhaps the most repellent instance occurs when the madam of a cheap brothel Marcel is visiting touts the exotic richness of the prostitute Rachel’s flesh: “And with an inane affectation of excitement which she hoped would prove contagious, and which ended in a hoarse gurgle, almost of sensual satisfaction: ‘Think of that, my boy, a Jewess! Wouldn’t that be thrilling? Rrrr!’ ”

Those in the highest reaches of society share the sentiments of the lowest. Thus, Charlus is given to maniacal explosions of loathing for Jews, while the Prince de Guermantes, Swann tells Marcel, hates Jews so much that, when a wing of his castle caught fire, he let it burn to the ground rather than send for fire extinguishers to the house next door, which happened to be the Rothschilds’. Swann is himself one of the rare Jews allowed entrance to the highest society, which leads to the outrage of the Duc de Guermantes when Swann, who had always impressed him as a Jew of the right sort, “an honorable Jew,” turns out to be an outspoken Dreyfusard.

As in its sentiments toward Jews, so in every other way, the social world in Proust is revealed as a “realm of nullity.” Any glimmer of moral discrimination, let alone of true understanding, shines like a beacon; for the most part, darkness prevails. In the famous closing scene of The Guermantes Way, the duke and duchess, on their way to a dinner party, are bidding good evening to Swann and Marcel. The duchess inquires whether Swann will join them on a trip to Italy ten months hence; Swann replies that he is mortally ill and will be dead by then. The duchess does not know how to respond: “placed for the first time in her life between two duties as incompatible as getting into her carriage to go out to dinner and showing compassion for a man who was about to die, she could find nothing in the code of conventions that indicated the right line to follow.”

With his “instinctive politeness,” Swann senses the duchess’s discomfort and says he must not detain them: “he knew that for other people their own social obligations took precedence over the death of a friend.” And yet, although the duke and duchess do not have a moment to spare to comfort their dying friend, they nevertheless do delay their departure while the duchess, who is wearing black shoes with her red dress, changes at her husband’s insistence into a more suitable pair of red shoes.

This portrait of gross moral insensibility in the face of death is comedy of manners at its most scathing, perhaps even overdone: the duke complains that his wife is dead-tired, and that he is dying of hunger. The indignant Marcel rewards the stupidity of these preposterous creatures with unforgettable strokes of cold fury. On another distressing occasion, a doctor preoccupied with his social calendar pronounces casually that Marcel’s grandmother is dying, and Marcel observes, “Each of us is indeed alone.” One has friends and lovers and family, one mixes in the best society, but finally one has no intimates. Death comes for us strictly one by one—a thought hardly to be borne.

_____________

Marcel’s triumph is that he does find a way to bear it, indeed to overcome it. In Time Regained, after spending years in a sanatorium, he is on his way to a party hosted by the Duchesse de Guermantes. The previous day he had experienced what he thought was his final disillusionment with the life of literature, but as he enters the courtyard of the Guermantes mansion a revelatory sensation changes his life. A car nearly hits him, and when he steps back out of its way he places his foot on a paving stone that is slightly lower than the one next to it; this unevenness underfoot fills him with an inexplicable and extraordinary joy.

Rocking back and forth on the irregular pavement, Marcel remembers standing on two uneven stones in the baptistery of St. Mark’s in Venice, and all the various sensations associated with that particular moment come flooding back. Similar marvels await him when he enters the Guermantes house and, twice more, involuntary memories overwhelm him in their glory. He is supremely happy, but cannot at first explain it. Why should this sudden efflorescence of memory have “given me a joy which . . . sufficed, without any other proof, to make death a matter of indifference”? He concludes that such episodes of transfiguring lucidity, for as long as they last, annihilate time, and are the most that a living man will know of eternity.

But just when he believes himself certain of the ultimate reality of timelessness, he is reminded sharply that time, too, is undeniably real. The party to which he is presently admitted strikes him, at first, as a masquerade, where everyone has been made up to look old. But the truth is that everyone looks old because everyone is old. Marcel has been away a long time, and time has done its work. Withered, sagging, shuffling, sputtering, wheezing, this assemblage of geezers and crones is the sad remnant of a company once distinguished for its beauty and vigor.

At last Marcel has penetrated the real world, and sees what he is supposed to do with his new knowledge: to write the book that one is reading. The awareness of time’s passing spurs him to get down to the serious work that will offer him life’s supreme pleasure: illuminating the nature of timelessness. “How happy would he be, I thought, the man who had the power to write such a book! What a task awaited him!”

_____________

Love, death, society, art: Proust takes on the great themes. Does he do them justice?

Love as Proust writes about it is love as he experienced it: a neediness so desperate no possible response can satisfy it, a relentless harrying demand for complete possession, intensified by the perversity or promiscuity or unavailability of the beloved. What Proust knows of love he knows as almost no one else does. On jealousy—and the hatred and self-hatred it causes—he is an indisputable authority, who has perhaps only Shakespeare for a rival. But about love itself, Shakespeare knows a great deal else, while Proust has the specialist’s habit of going on about his subject as though it were the only thing deserving attention. The effect is of moral lopsidedness and incompletion, as though Tolstoy had devoted the whole of Anna Karenina to Anna and Vronsky’s wretched adultery without the counterweight of Levin and Kitty’s triumphant love; such a novel could still be a great one, but something vital would be missing.

Complicating this picture of Proustian love is Marcel’s attitude toward homosexuality. Although Proust enjoys cult status among homosexuals, the treatment of homosexuality in his great novel is, as we have seen, anything but purely admiring. André Gide, outspoken champion of homosexual freedom, chastised Proust, though only in private, for the disservice he did the cause: by taking an “impartial point of view,” Gide said, Proust had “branded this subject with a red-hot iron that serves conventional morality far more effectively than the most emphatic moral treatises.” (And Gide was commenting only on Sodom and Gomorrah; he had yet to read the brothel scene, which takes place in Time Regained.)

Gide later relented of his severity, after a conversation with Proust left him with the realization “that what we find ignoble, derisive, or disgusting [in his book] does not seem to him so repulsive.” But can it really be that Proust intended the reader to see Marcel’s revulsion at the scene in the male brothel as wrong, or as some sort of moral defect? Admittedly, there are passages (like the one quoted earlier) in which Marcel rises to an overt defense of homosexuality; and a rhetorical ploy he favors is to compare the plight of homosexuals to that of the Jews. Yet although Marcel may claim that the two conditions are morally comparable, he shows otherwise. If there is an unsavory Jew or two in the novel—the social-climbing writer Bloch, for instance—their peccadilloes do not approach the patent monstrosities of Charlus.

While Proust spends countless pages of fevered analysis on love, death gets only a few brief passages—but they are extraordinary. Marcel’s most exacting criticism of society is that its forms do not accommodate the fact of mortality: the overriding concern with propriety turns the heart to stone, and the death of a friend or relative only gets in the way of those who go on living. His vision of human solitude in the face of death reminds one of Edvard Munch’s great and dreadful painting Grief, in which a roomful of people are arrayed around the bed of a dead woman: no one touches or even looks at anyone else; each is locked in his own impenetrable sorrow, mourning by himself and, one suspects, for himself.

But unlike Munch, Proust does admit the possibility of consolation, even of redemption. The writer Bergotte dies while sitting in a museum and looking at a patch of yellow wall in a painting by his beloved Vermeer. This devotional attitude moves Marcel to think of “a different world, a world based on kindness, scrupulousness, self-sacrifice, a world entirely different from this one and which we leave in order to be born on this earth, before perhaps returning there. . . . So that the idea that Bergotte was not permanently dead is by no means improbable.” It is this spiritual capaciousness that Saul Bellow’s Mr. Sammler has in mind when he speaks of In Search of Lost Time as “a high-ceilinged masterpiece.”

_____________

In the end, of course, there is only one sort of life that Proust believes to be worth living: the life of the artist. Neither bourgeois respectability nor aristocratic gaiety possesses any lasting hold on Marcel; both represent the unreal world he finds his way out of, and are of interest only insofar as they give him something to write about. But more towering artists than Proust have rendered ordinary lives with an imaginative sympathy that makes such lives extraordinary. Indeed, this imaginative sympathy, this sense that life holds out the possibility of fulfillment and happiness even for people who do not happen to be artists, is what makes both Goethe and Tolstoy greater writers than Proust.

As for those masters—Flaubert, Joyce, Wallace Stevens—who claim that art is the best thing life has to offer, none of them delivers so grandly as Proust. But here another irony needs to be registered. For what lives most memorably in his novel is not the “real” world of Marcel’s highest aspirations but the “unreal” world, the world of thumbscrew love and puddinghead society; the timeless reality Marcel evokes seems dim indeed beside Charlus’s bed of pain or the duchess’s red shoes. A lifetime of hard suffering went into this masterpiece, and, for better and for worse, it is humanity in its heartache and failure that enjoys pride of place.

Whether Proust found the joy in the writing of his novel that Marcel professes to know is a question. The writing certainly took everything he had. His devoted housekeeper Céleste Albaret recalled that one night in the spring of 1922 Proust summoned her and declared, “I have important news. Tonight, I wrote the word ‘end.’ Now I can die.” He did everything that he had it in him to do. That is a claim few can make.

_____________

1 Yale University Press, 960 pp., $35.00.

2 Translated by Evan Cameron. Viking, 934 pp., $45.00.

3 The first English translation of the novel (1922-1931), by C.K. Scott-Moncrieff, is justly renowned; F. Scott Fitzgerald called it “a masterpiece in itself.” Revised by Terence Kilmartin (1982), it is still available under the title Remembrance of Things Past, and this is the translation I will be referring to (Vintage paperback). D.J. Enright’s further revision of this version bears the more accurate title In Search of Lost Time (Modern Library). Penguin Books promises yet another translation due out next year.

Répondre

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur la façon dont les données de vos commentaires sont traitées.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :