Présidence Trump: Attention, un fascisme peut en cacher un autre (Behind the Left’s constant crying wolf, Trump’s actions are largely an extension of prior temporary policies and a long-overdue return to sanity)

no-borders http://cdn3.i-scmp.com/sites/default/files/styles/landscape/public/images/methode/2017/02/03/21099374-e933-11e6-925a-a992a025ddf7_1280x720.JPG?itok=IYzRzJ5Zhttps://refusefascism.org/wp-content/uploads/IMG_0881.jpghttps://assets.metrolatam.com/cl/2015/10/21/18gnguw7qnrvujpg-1200x800.jpghttp://www.bigbendnewswire.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/1123US_Sunrise_haze_fence_up_hill-Kopie.jpghttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/image.jpeg?w=1200&h=http://atlantablackstar.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Deportation-Obama-HuffPost.jpg
deporter-in-chief
o-deportations
o-deportations-stats
http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/images/2014/02/blogs/graphic-detail/20140208_gdc296.png
Les fascistes de demain s’appelleront eux-mêmes antifascistes. Churchill
Normally intercepts of U.S. officials and citizens are some of the most tightly held government secrets. This is for good reason. Selectively disclosing details of private conversations monitored by the FBI or NSA gives the permanent state the power to destroy reputations from the cloak of anonymity. This is what police states do. (…) Flynn was a fat target for the national security state. He has cultivated a reputation as a reformer and a fierce critic of the intelligence community leaders he once served with when he was the director the Defense Intelligence Agency under President Barack Obama. Flynn was working to reform the intelligence-industrial complex, something that threatened the bureaucratic prerogatives of his rivals. He was also a fat target for Democrats. Remember Flynn’s breakout national moment last summer was when he joined the crowd at the Republican National Convention from the dais calling for Hillary Clinton to be jailed. In normal times, the idea that U.S. officials entrusted with our most sensitive secrets would selectively disclose them to undermine the White House would alarm those worried about creeping authoritarianism. Imagine if intercepts of a call between Obama’s incoming national security adviser and Iran’s foreign minister leaked to the press before the nuclear negotiations began? The howls of indignation would be deafening. In the end, it was Trump’s decision to cut Flynn loose. In doing this he caved in to his political and bureaucratic opposition. Nunes told me Monday night that this will not end well. « First it’s Flynn, next it will be Kellyanne Conway, then it will be Steve Bannon, then it will be Reince Priebus, » he said. Put another way, Flynn is only the appetizer. Trump is the entree. Eli Lake
There does appear to be a well orchestrated effort to attack Flynn and others in the administration. From the leaking of phone calls between the president and foreign leaders to what appears to be high-level FISA Court information, to the leaking of American citizens being denied security clearances, it looks like a pattern. Devin Nunes (House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence)
The United States is much better off without Michael Flynn serving as national security adviser. But no one should be cheering the way he was brought down. The whole episode is evidence of the precipitous and ongoing collapse of America’s democratic institutions — not a sign of their resiliency. Flynn’s ouster was a soft coup (or political assassination) engineered by anonymous intelligence community bureaucrats. The results might be salutary, but this isn’t the way a liberal democracy is supposed to function. Unelected intelligence analysts work for the president, not the other way around. Far too many Trump critics appear not to care that these intelligence agents leaked highly sensitive information to the press — mostly because Trump critics are pleased with the result. « Finally, » they say, « someone took a stand to expose collusion between the Russians and a senior aide to the president! » It is indeed important that someone took such a stand. But it matters greatly who that someone is and how they take their stand. Members of the unelected, unaccountable intelligence community are not the right someone, especially when they target a senior aide to the president by leaking anonymously to newspapers the content of classified phone intercepts, where the unverified, unsubstantiated information can inflict politically fatal damage almost instantaneously. President Trump was roundly mocked among liberals for that tweet. But he is, in many ways, correct. These leaks are an enormous problem. And in a less polarized context, they would be recognized immediately for what they clearly are: an effort to manipulate public opinion for the sake of achieving a desired political outcome. It’s weaponized spin. But no matter what Flynn did, it is simply not the role of the deep state to target a man working in one of the political branches of the government by dishing to reporters about information it has gathered clandestinely. It is the role of elected members of Congress to conduct public investigations of alleged wrongdoing by public officials. In a liberal democracy, how things happen is often as important as what happens. Procedures matter. So do rules and public accountability. The chaotic, dysfunctional Trump White House is placing the entire system under enormous strain. That’s bad. But the answer isn’t to counter it with equally irregular acts of sabotage — or with a disinformation campaign waged by nameless civil servants toiling away in the surveillance state. Those cheering the deep state torpedoing of Flynn are saying, in effect, that a police state is perfectly fine so long as it helps to bring down Trump. It is the role of Congress to investigate the president and those who work for him. If Congress resists doing its duty, out of a mixture of self-interest and cowardice, the American people have no choice but to try and hold the government’s feet to the fire, demanding action with phone calls, protests, and, ultimately, votes. That is a democratic response to the failure of democracy. Sitting back and letting shadowy, unaccountable agents of espionage do the job for us simply isn’t an acceptable alternative. Down that path lies the end of democracy in America. Damon Linker
The model of the imperial Obama presidency is the greater fear. Over the last eight years, Obama has transformed the powers of presidency in a way not seen in decades. Obama, as he promised with his pen and phone, bypassed the House and Senate to virtually open the border with Mexico. He largely ceased deportations of undocumented immigrants. He issued executive-order amnesties. And he allowed entire cities to be exempt from federal immigration law. The press said nothing about this extraordinary overreach of presidential power, mainly because these largely illegal means were used to achieve the progressive ends favored by many journalists. The Senate used to ratify treaties. In the past, a president could not unilaterally approve the Treaty of Versailles, enroll the United States in the League of Nations, fight in Vietnam or Iraq without congressional authorization, change existing laws by non-enforcement, or rewrite bankruptcy laws. Not now. Obama set a precedent that he did not need Senate ratification to make a landmark treaty with Iran on nuclear enrichment. He picked and chose which elements of the Affordable Care Act would be enforced — predicated on his 2012 reelection efforts. Rebuffed by Congress, Obama is now slowly shutting down the Guantanamo Bay detention center by insidiously having inmates sent to other countries (…) One reason Americans are scared about the next president is that they should be. In 2017, a President Trump or a President Clinton will be able to do almost anything he or she wishes without much oversight — thanks to the precedent of Obama’s overreach, abetted by a lapdog press that forgot that the ends never justify the means. Victor Davis Hanson
Key to the strategy of change is to remind citizens that the present action is a corrective of past extremism, a move to the center not to the opposite pole, and must be understood as reluctantly reactive, not gratuitously revolutionary. Such forethought is not a sign of timidity or backtracking, but rather the catalyst necessary to make change even more rapid and effective. Take Trump’s immigration stay. In large part, it was an extension of prior temporary policies enacted by both Presidents Bush and Obama. It was also a proper correction of Trump’s own unwise and ill-fated campaign pledge to temporarily ban Muslims rather than take a pause to vet all immigrants from war-torn nations in the Middle East. Who would oppose such a temporary halt? Obviously Democrats, on the principle that the issue might gain political traction so that they could tar Trump as an uncouth racist and xenophobe, and in general as reckless, incompetent, and confused. Obviously, the Left in general sees almost any restriction on immigration as antithetical to its larger project of a borderless society run by elites such as themselves. Obviously Republican establishmentarians fear any media meme suggesting that they are complicit in an illiberal enterprise. Perhaps the Trump plan was, first, to ensure that radical Islamist terrorists and their sympathizers do not enter the U.S., as they so often enter Europe; second, to send a message to the international community that entry into the country is a privilege not an entitlement; and, third, symbolically to reassert the powers of assimilation, integration, and intermarriage as we slow and refine legal immigration. (The U.S. currently has about 40 million foreign-born residents, or a near record 14 percent of the population; one in four Californians was not born in the United States.) (…) Take the wall with Mexico and the campaign promise to make “Mexico pay.” (…) The aim again is to remind the country that the action is a reaction to past excess and extremism. To take another example, if we are going to get into a minor tiff with Australia over its refugee problem, then it might be wise to explain that Australia’s own refugee policies are among the most restrictive in the world, and that, on principle, the United States cannot involve itself in the internal immigration affairs of other nations and therefore must allow Australia free rein to determine its own immigration future. And we carefully would explain the consequences of that decision of non-interference. In truth, Australia, not Trump, was the more culpable. (Immigrants, many from the Middle East, heading toward Australia will undergo vetting that permits them entry into the U.S. but not into Australia — in a deal that was understandably not much publicized by the lame-duck Obama administration?) In terms of strategy, the Trump people surely grasp the rationale of their opponents: to react hysterically to every presidential act, raising the volume and chaos of dissent to such a level that moderate Republicans go into a fetal position and sigh, “Please just make all this go away” — and thus turn their animus upon their own. Trump may think that the Left’s crying wolf constantly will imperil their authenticity and turn their shrieks into mere background noise Or he may wager that the protesters will raise the temperature so high they themselves will melt down before the administration does. Perhaps. But just as likely, the Left is gambling that each outrage is a small nick to the capillaries of the Trump administration — after a few months the total blood loss will match the fatal damage of an aneurysm. The result will then be such a loss of public credibility that the Trump administration will become paralyzed (think Watergate, Iran-Contra, or the furor over Iraq), or so deterred that it will shift course and fall into line. Trump needs to carefully consider the full effect of executive orders and the certain reactions against them to the second and third degree — not because he should cease issuing them (so far the orders have almost all been inspired), but to ensure that they are effective and understood. In this way, they may win rather than lose public support, especially if the relevant cabinet secretaries are on board and out front with the media. In other words, only by taking actions deliberately and with forethought can he bring about not so much change as a long-overdue return to sanity. Victor Davis Hanson
La chancelière allemande Angela Merkel et les Premiers ministres des 16 Landers allemands ont conclu jeudi un accord visant à faciliter les expulsions de réfugiés dont la demande d’asile a été rejetée. Les expulsions sont normalement du ressort des landers, mais Merkel souhaite coordonner un certain nombre de choses au niveau fédéral pour accélérer les procédures. Le gouvernement fédéral veut s’accaparer plus de pouvoirs pour refuser des permis de séjour et effectuer lui-même les expulsions. L’un des objectifs centraux du plan en 16 points est de construire un centre de rapatriement à Potsdam (Berlin) qui comptera un représentant pour chaque lander. En outre, il prévoit la création de centres d’expulsion à proximité des aéroports pour faciliter les expulsions collectives. Un autre objectif est de faciliter l’expulsion des immigrants qui présentent un danger pour la sécurité du pays et de favoriser les «retours volontaires» d’autres migrants par le biais d’incitations financières s’ils acceptent de quitter le pays avant qu’une décision ait été prise au regard de leur demande d’asile. Une somme de 40 millions d’euros est consacrée à ce projet. Selon le ministère allemand de l’Intérieur, 280.000 migrants ont sollicité l’asile en Allemagne en 2016. C’est trois fois moins que les 890.000 de l’année précédente, au plus fort de la crise des réfugiés en Europe. Près de 430 000 demandes d’asile sont encore en cours d’instruction. L’Express
Jamais les Etats-Unis n’ont expulsé autant d’immigrés clandestins. Au point où « The Economist  » n’hésite pas à qualifier Barack Obama de « deporter-in-chief » (le chef des expulseurs). Depuis son arrivée à la Maison-Blanche, quelque 2 millions de clandestins ont été expulsés, soit à un rythme neuf fois plus élevé qu’il y a vingt ans et un record pour un président américain. Et la « machine infernale à expulser  » coûte cher aux Etats-Unis, plus que tout autre budget fédéral destiné à la lutte contre la criminalité. La conséquence de ces expulsions est lourde. Non seulement elles conduisent à des séparations familiales déchirantes, mais elles appauvrissent l’Amérique, affirme l’hebdomadaire. Le nouveau patron de Microsoft, Satya Nadella, né en Inde, est évidemment l’exemple des bienfaits de l’immigration pour l’économie. La moitié en outre des doctorats universitaires sont obtenus par des immigrés, ainsi que quatre cinquièmes des brevets dans le domaine pharmaceutique. Les refus de plus en plus fréquents d’accorder des permis de séjour à des étudiants réduisent les chances de former de nouveaux Nadella. Sans oublier les clandestins non qualifiés qui acceptent des emplois dont les Américains ne veulent pas… et qui paient leurs impôts. Pour Obama, il s’agit d’un paradoxe qui s’explique peut-être par sa volonté de faire porter le chapeau à son opposition républicaine hostile à son projet de réforme visant à légaliser 12 millions d’immigrés illégaux. Mais le président ne devrait pas utiliser une telle stratégie et plutôt s’employer à enrayer la machine infernale des expulsions. Les Echos (10/02/2014)
Washington s’inquiète de voir la violence liée à la guerre contre les narcotrafiquants empiéter sur les États-Unis (…) La guerre contre le narcotrafic menée par le président Felipe Calderon a provoqué une explosion de violence (plus de 7 200 morts officiellement en 2008). Barack Obama s’est dit mardi «préoccupé par le niveau accru de la violence (…) et son impact sur les communautés vivant de part et d’autre de la frontière.» Dans la foulée, la Maison-Blanche a dévoilé une nouvelle stratégie pour endiguer la montée en puissance des gangs mexicains, qui gagnent des milliards de dollars en exportant la drogue vers les États-Unis, où ils se fournissent en armes et en argent liquide. Washington prévoit d’augmenter les effectifs des agents des ministères de la Justice, du Trésor et de la Sécurité intérieure et ­d’installer de nouveaux outils de surveillance aux postes frontières. L’Administration Obama compte aussi s’appuyer sur les 700 millions de dollars d’aide aux forces de sé­curité mexicaines alloués pour 2008 et 2009. Parallèlement, les États-Unis en­visagent de placer des troupes en état d’alerte, probablement des réservistes de la Garde nationale, qui seraient envoyés à la frontière en cas d’urgence. Ils souhaitent aussi imposer un nouvel accord militaire au Mexique. Le Figaro (25/03/2009)
Newly obtained congressional data shows hundreds of terror plots have been stopped in the U.S. since 9/11 – mostly involving foreign-born suspects, including dozens of refugees. The files (…) give fresh insight into the true scope of the terror threat and cover a wide range of cases, including: A Seattle man plotting to attack a U.S. military facility An Atlantic City man using his “Revolution Muslim” site to encourage confrontations with U.S. Jewish leaders “at their home An Iraq refugee arrested in January, accused of traveling to Syria to “take up arms” with terror groups While the June 12 massacre at an Orlando gay nightclub marked the deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil since 2001, the data shows America has been facing a steady stream of plots. For the period September 2001 through 2014, data shows the U.S. successfully prosecuted 580 individuals for terrorism and terror-related cases. Further, since early 2014, at least 131 individuals were identified as being implicated in terror. Across both those groups, the senators reported that at least 40 people initially admitted to the U.S. as refugees later were convicted or implicated in terror cases. Among the 580 convicted, they said, at least 380 were foreign-born. The top countries of origin were Pakistan, Lebanon and Somalia, as well as the Palestinian territories. (…) Specifically, they show a sharp spike in cases in 2015, largely stemming from the arrest of suspects claiming allegiance to the Islamic State. (…) The allegations detailed in the subcommittee’s research pertain to a range of cases, involving suspects caught traveling or trying to travel overseas to fight, as well as suspects ensnared in controversial sting operations which civil-liberties groups including the ACLU have criticized. In a 2014 report, Human Rights Watch said nearly half of the federal counterterror convictions at the time came from “informant-based cases,” many of them sting operations where the informants played a role in the plot. (…) But even in some of those cases, federal agents got involved after learning of a serious suspected plot. In the case of the Seattle suspect, Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, authorities said he approached someone in 2011 about attacking a military installation. That citizen alerted law enforcement and worked with them to capture Latif and an accomplice. Fox news (June 2016)
A review of information compiled by a Senate committee in 2016 reveals that 72 individuals from the seven countries covered in President Trump’s vetting executive order have been convicted in terror cases since the 9/11 attacks. These facts stand in stark contrast to the assertions by the Ninth Circuit judges who have blocked the president’s order on the basis that there is no evidence showing a risk to the United States in allowing aliens from these seven terror-associated countries to come in. In June 2016 the Senate Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, then chaired by new Attorney General Jeff Sessions, released a report on individuals convicted in terror cases since 9/11. Using open sources (because the Obama administration refused to provide government records), the report found that 380 out of 580 people convicted in terror cases since 9/11 were foreign-born. (…) The Center has extracted information on 72 individuals named in the Senate report whose country of origin is one of the seven terror-associated countries included in the vetting executive order: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. (…) According to the report, at least 17 individuals entered as refugees from these terror-prone countries. Three came in on student visas and one arrived on a diplomatic visa. At least 25 of these immigrants eventually became citizens. Ten were lawful permanent residents, and four were illegal aliens. These immigrant terrorists lived in at least 16 different states, with the largest number from the terror-associated countries living in New York (10), Minnesota (8), California (8), and Michigan (6). Ironically, Minnesota was one of the states suing to block Trump’s order to pause entries from the terror-associated countries, claiming it harmed the state. At least two of the terrorists were living in Washington, which joined with Minnesota in the lawsuit to block the order. Thirty-three of the 72 individuals from the seven terror-associated countries were convicted of very serious terror-related crimes, and were sentenced to at least three years imprisonment. The crimes included use of a weapon of mass destruction, conspiracy to commit a terror act, material support of a terrorist or terror group, international money laundering conspiracy, possession of explosives or missiles, and unlawful possession of a machine gun. Some opponents of the travel suspension have tried to claim that the Senate report was flawed because it included individuals who were not necessarily terrorists because they were convicted of crimes such as identity fraud and false statements. About a dozen individuals in the group from the seven terror-associated countries are in this category. Some are individuals who were arrested and convicted in the months following 9/11 for involvement in a fraudulent hazardous materials and commercial driver’s license scheme that was extremely worrisome to law enforcement and counter-terrorism agencies, although a direct link to the 9/11 plot was never claimed. The information in this report was compiled by Senate staff from open sources, and certainly could have been found by the judges if they or their clerks had looked for it. Another example that should have come to mind is that of Abdul Razak Ali Artan, who attacked and wounded 11 people on the campus of Ohio State University in November 2016. Artan was a Somalian who arrived in 2007 as a refugee. Center for immigration studies

Attention: un fascisme peut en cacher un autre !

Gouvernement par décrets, ouverture virtuellement complète des vannes de l’immigration mexicaine, amnisties par fait du prince, villes-refuges quasiment soustraites à la loi fédérale, court-circuitage du Congrès accordant l’accès à l’arme nucléaire à un pays appelant à l’annihilation d’un de ses voisins, explosion complètement inouïe du budget fédéral, loi calamiteuse sur la sécurité sociale, élargissement non maitrisé et caché de terroristes notoires, record largement secret d’exécutions parajudiciaires, dénonciation systématique du prétendu racisme policier privant de fait les plus démunis de leur droit à la sécurité la plus élémentaire  …

A l’heure où, quand ce n’est pas l’ancien président lui-même, nos beaux esprits et nos belles âmes des médias et du monde du spectacle (ou même apparemment de la fonction publique ou des services secrets ?)

Multiplient, entre révélations d’écoutes secrètes ou analyses de poignées de mains, les fuites, obstructions et  dénigrements pour saboter les premières semaines, certes quelque peu cahotiques, de l’Administration Trump …

(Contrairement à ce que nos médias paresseux et partiaux nous rabâchent, ce n’est pas pour « contacts inappropriés » avec l’ambassadeur russe mais pour mensonge à ses chefs – du moins officiellement – que Flynn démissionne et que – vendetta personnelle ? – le FBI n’a pas hésité à confirmer, pour ceux qui ne le savaient pas encore, la mise sur écoute systématique de tous les contacts des citoyens américains avec l’étranger, hauts fonctionnaires et ambassadeurs compris) …

Pendant que se confirme l’origine majoritairement musulmane des auteurs d’attentats sur le sol américain depuis ou avant le 11 septembre …

Et qu’alors que la fameuse générosité européenne semble se heurter elle aussi au dur mur de la réalité de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, se poursuit l’hallali contre la seule véritable alternance aux cinq années de gâchis socialiste …

Comment ne pas voir …

En creux pour ceux qui ont encore un peu de mémoire …

Et au-delà de l’évident correctif face à la véritable radicalité d’une administration ayant battu tous les records, si l’on ajoute les « memorandums », de décrets présidentiels …

L’incroyable indulgence complice qui avait suivi l’élection de Barack Obama il y a huit ans …

Mais aussi la non moins incroyable amnésie …

Pour une administration qui non seulement appliqua plusieurs moratoires sur l’immigration de certains pays musulmans  …

Mais poursuivit, au moins jusqu’en 2010 et sur fond d’intensification du trafic de drogue, la construction d’un des pas moins de douze murs que compte la planète

Et, entre deux promesses d’amnistie, battit en son temps le record toutes catégories d’expulsions de clandestins ?

Entre les États-Unis et le Mexique, un mur très politique
Philippe Gélie

Le Figaro

02/10/2006

LES ÉTATS-UNIS vont ériger une barrière de 1 120 kilomètres de long sur leur frontière avec le Mexique. La loi adoptée en ce sens par le Sénat vendredi soir, juste avant la fin de la session parlementaire, ignore la volonté du président d’introduire une réforme globale de l’immigration, dans laquelle le volet répressif aurait été complété par un programme d’accueil des travailleurs étrangers. Mais, à cinq semaines des élections de mi-mandat, George W. Bush a annoncé son intention de ratifier la loi telle qu’elle est, plutôt que d’offrir un spectacle de division dans son propre parti.

Le texte prévoit l’érection d’au moins deux rangées de palissades et de grillages sur un peu plus de la moitié des 3 200 kilomètres de frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique, principal point d’entrée des immigrants clandestins. Il donne 18 mois au département de la Sécurité du territoire pour prendre «le contrôle opérationnel» de la frontière, notion définie par l’arrêt de «tous» les passages illégaux. En moyenne, 1,2 million de clandestins sont arrêtés chaque année du côté américain, un chiffre constant depuis dix ans malgré le renforcement incessant des contrôles.

Des obstacles juridiques

Cent vingt kilomètres de palissades existent déjà, le nombre de gardes-frontière a été triplé et 6 000 soldats de la Garde nationale ont été déployés en renfort l’été dernier. Le seul résultat visible jusqu’ici a été de repousser les candidats à l’immigration toujours plus loin dans des zones désertiques, faisant passer le nombre de morts d’une douzaine à 400 par an. Selon les autorités d’Arizona, la fortification de la frontière a donné le jour à une nouvelle criminalité organisée, plus sophistiquée que les passeurs d’autrefois. À raison de 1 600 dollars par immigrant, son chiffre d’affaires atteindrait 2,5 milliards de dollars par an.

La réponse du Congrès a été de budgéter 1,2 milliard de dollars pour lancer un projet qui devrait en coûter au total 7 milliards d’ici à son achèvement fin 2008. Il prévoit la multiplication des drones, des radars, des caméras de surveillance et des plaques sensibles enfouies dans le sol. Les zones concernées par ce «mur» de haute technologie s’étendent sur une partie de la Californie, la quasi-totalité de la frontière sud de l’Arizona et du Nouveau-Mexique, ainsi que deux tronçons le long du Rio Grande au Texas. Le terrain, extrêmement difficile par endroits, jette le doute sur la faisabilité de l’opération : il faudra gravir des sommets escarpés, plonger au fond de canyons ou traverser des rivières rapides.

Des obstacles juridiques sont également prévisibles, la barrière étant censée traverser plusieurs réserves indiennes dont les tribus sont opposées à sa construction. Des associations de protection de la nature prévoient d’introduire des recours en justice au nom du respect de la vie sauvage. Même les ranchers du Texas s’inquiètent de l’impact sur leur main-d’oeuvre de travailleurs frontaliers. «Ce n’est pas réalisable, estime le sénateur de l’Arizona Jim Kolbe, c’est juste une déclaration politique avant les élections.»

Voir aussi:

Barack Obama veut sécuriser la frontière avec le Mexique

Lamia Oualalou, à Rio de Janeiro
Le Figaro

25/03/2009

Washington s’inquiète de voir la violence liée à la guerre contre les narcotrafiquants empiéter sur les États-Unis, alors que Hillary Clinton est attendue mercredi à Mexico.

La secrétaire d’État Hillary Clinton doit s’attendre à un accueil plutôt froid en arrivant au Mexique mercredi. Sa visite, la première d’une série de visites de hauts fonctionnaires avant le voyage du président Barack Obama, prévu à la mi-avril, a pour objectif de panser les plaies alors que les relations entre les deux pays, qui partagent une frontière de 3 000 kilomètres, traversent une phase délicate.

La guerre contre le narcotrafic menée par le président Felipe Calderon a provoqué une explosion de violence (plus de 7 200 morts officiellement en 2008). Barack Obama s’est dit mardi «préoccupé par le niveau accru de la violence (…) et son impact sur les communautés vivant de part et d’autre de la frontière.» Dans la foulée, la Maison-Blanche a dévoilé une nouvelle stratégie pour endiguer la montée en puissance des gangs mexicains, qui gagnent des milliards de dollars en exportant la drogue vers les États-Unis, où ils se fournissent en armes et en argent liquide.

Washington prévoit d’augmenter les effectifs des agents des ministères de la Justice, du Trésor et de la Sécurité intérieure et ­d’installer de nouveaux outils de surveillance aux postes frontières. L’Administration Obama compte aussi s’appuyer sur les 700 millions de dollars d’aide aux forces de sé­curité mexicaines alloués pour 2008 et 2009.

Parallèlement, les États-Unis en­visagent de placer des troupes en état d’alerte, probablement des réservistes de la Garde nationale, qui seraient envoyés à la frontière en cas d’urgence. Ils souhaitent aussi imposer un nouvel accord militaire au Mexique. «La question de la sécurité a pris une place excessive et exclusive, il faut que les États-Unis se recentrent sur la relation commerciale, qui est fondamentale», dit Laura Carlsen, directrice des Amérique au Centre de politique internationale – CIP, basé à Washington.

Représailles commerciales
La semaine dernière, le gouvernement de Felipe Calderon a établi une liste de 90 produits américains qui seront surtaxés à l’entrée du territoire mexicain. Une décision prise en représailles à une mesure du Congrès américain mettant fin à la circulation de camions mexicains au-delà du Rio Grande, comme le prévoyait l’accord de libre-échange nord-américain (Alena), qui unit les États-Unis, le Canada et le Mexique. Le Congrès estime que les véhicules mexicains ne répondent pas aux normes de sécurité américaines. «C’est une mesure protectionniste, dictée par le puissant syndicat de camionneurs Teamsters», tranche Leo Zuckermann, analyste au Cide, un centre d’études politiques et économiques à Mexico.

«En ces moments de crise économique, alors qu’il faut éviter le protectionnisme, les États-Unis envoient un signal négatif au Mexique et au reste du monde», estime le ministre de l’Économie Gerardo Ruiz Mateos. La liste des produits frappés de surtaxe – fruits, légumes, shampoings – exclut les denrées de première nécessité afin de ne pas pénaliser le consommateur. Mexico a également tenu à ce qu’ils proviennent de 40 États américains. «Le but est de montrer à la Maison-Blanche que la relation commerciale pèse dans les deux sens, et qu’elle est fondamentale pour certains États», explique Laura Carlsen.

Pour Barack Obama, la crise avec le Mexique vire au casse-tête. «Il a promis pendant sa campagne de renégocier l’Alena à l’avantage des travailleurs américains, une proposition rejetée par Mexico, rappelle Tomas Ayuso, chercheur au Coha (Conseil sur les affaires hémisphériques) de Washington. Mais il est dangereux de froisser le Mexique, qui est son troisième partenaire commercial.»

Obama semble l’avoir compris. Il a changé de discours, substituant aux critiques des éloges sur «l’ex­tra­ordinaire travail» de Felipe Calderon.

Voir également:

Le mur États-Unis-Mexique en 15 images

Le reportage de Christian Latreille

Radio Canada

7 juin 2016

L’immigration est un sujet controversé de la campagne présidentielle américaine. Le candidat républicain Donald Trump promet notamment de bâtir un mur plus haut et plus long entre les États-Unis et le Mexique. Nous sommes allés voir ce fameux mur.

Le mur entre les deux pays se construit par étapes. Le fondateur de l’association des Anges de la frontière, Enrique Morones, montre deux générations de murs. La première atteint trois mètres et a été fabriquée sous Bill Clinton avec de la tôle recyclée de la guerre du Vietnam. La deuxième, d’environ cinq mètres de hauteur, a été construite sous George W. Bush.

Derrière Enrique Morones, une brèche dans le mur. En fait, le mur n’est pas uniforme et ne s’étend que sur 1120 km des 3200 km de la frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique. Plus souvent une montagne, une rivière ou un désert séparent les deux pays.

Après le mur, le désert. Les bénévoles des Anges de la frontière, un groupe né en 1986, déposent des bouteilles d’eau pour aider ceux qui doivent survivre dans le désert aride après avoir franchi le mur.

Les clandestins attachent des morceaux d’étoffe sous leurs souliers pour éviter de laisser des traces de pas facilement détectables par les gardes-frontières.

La zone de San Diego-Tijuana comprend un des systèmes de sécurité les plus sophistiqués le long de la frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique.

Mur, clôture, caméras, détecteurs et barbelés. Il y a aussi les patrouilleurs qui surveillent continuellement le mur. Malgré tout cet arsenal, de nombreux immigrants réussissent à passer illégalement chaque semaine.

Les clandestins parviennent à percer le mur avec des scies mécaniques. Selon les gardes-frontières, seulement 30 % des clandestins qui tentent d’entrer illégalement au pays se font prendre. « On fait du mieux qu’on peut, avec ce qu’on nous donne », dira l’un d’eux.

Le syndicat des gardes-frontières a appuyé le candidat Donald Trump. Le vice-président, Terence Shigg, apporte des nuances à la position de Trump sur l’immigration. Le candidat républicain propose notamment de déporter les quelque 11 millions de sans-papiers qui se trouvent aux États-Unis. Selon Terence Shigg, la déportation massive n’est pas la solution; il faut plus de gens pour traiter les demandes d’asile, plus de juges en immigration, plus de centres de détention.

Christopher Harris, du syndicat des gardes-frontières, se tient du côté américain de la frontière. À quelques pas de là, il a tué un clandestin; un douloureux souvenir qui le hante encore. Il aime citer une ancienne patronne : « Montrez-moi un mur de 15 pieds, et je vous montrerai une échelle de 16 pieds ».

On estime à près de 11 000 le nombre de personnes mortes depuis 1994 en tentant d’entrer illégalement aux États-Unis. Plusieurs centaines d’entre elles sont enterrées ici, dans ce cimetière de fortune.

Les corps de nombreuses personnes n’ont pas été réclamés. Elles restent donc anonymes. Des « John Doe », comme l’indique l’inscription sur la pierre. C’est pour éviter que les victimes ne tombent dans l’oubli que les Anges de la frontière entretiennent régulièrement le cimetière.

Jeune enfant, Walfred a été abandonné au Guatemala par sa mère, qui a tenté sa chance aux États-Unis. Après quatre ans d’attente, il a réussi à franchir la frontière illégalement pour la rejoindre. Pour le moment, il est protégé par un décret présidentiel signé par Barack Obama en 2012.

Walfred et sa mère connaissent des jours plus heureux. Elle gère une petite entreprise d’entretien ménager, tout en vivant dans la clandestinité. Un sacrifice qu’elle accepte volontiers pour être avec son seul enfant.

Voir encore:

The Obama Administration Stopped Processing Iraq Refugee Requests For 6 Months In 2011

Although the Obama administration currently refuses to temporarily pause its Syrian refugee resettlement program in the United States, the State Department in 2011 stopped processing Iraq refugee requests for six months after the Federal Bureau of Investigation uncovered evidence that several dozen terrorists from Iraq had infiltrated the United States via the refugee program.

After two terrorists were discovered in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 2009, the FBI began reviewing reams of evidence taken from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that had been used against American troops in Iraq. Federal investigators then tried to match fingerprints from those bombs to the fingerprints of individuals who had recently entered the United States as refugees:

An intelligence tip initially led the FBI to Waad Ramadan Alwan, 32, in 2009. The Iraqi had claimed to be a refugee who faced persecution back home — a story that shattered when the FBI found his fingerprints on a cordless phone base that U.S. soldiers dug up in a gravel pile south of Bayji, Iraq on Sept. 1, 2005. The phone base had been wired to unexploded bombs buried in a nearby road.

An ABC News investigation of the flawed U.S. refugee screening system, which was overhauled two years ago, showed that Alwan was mistakenly allowed into the U.S. and resettled in the leafy southern town of Bowling Green, Kentucky, a city of 60,000 which is home to Western Kentucky University and near the Army’s Fort Knox and Fort Campbell. Alwan and another Iraqi refugee, Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, 26, were resettled in Bowling Green even though both had been detained during the war by Iraqi authorities, according to federal prosecutors.

The terrorists were not taken into custody until 2011. Shortly thereafter, the U.S. State Department stopped processing refugee requests from Iraqis for six months in order to review and revamp security screening procedures:

As a result of the Kentucky case, the State Department stopped processing Iraq refugees for six months in 2011, federal officials told ABC News – even for many who had heroically helped U.S. forces as interpreters and intelligence assets. One Iraqi who had aided American troops was assassinated before his refugee application could be processed, because of the immigration delays, two U.S. officials said. In 2011, fewer than 10,000 Iraqis were resettled as refugees in the U.S., half the number from the year before, State Department statistics show.

According to a 2013 report from ABC News, at least one of the Kentucky terrorists passed background and fingerprint checks conducted by the Department of Homeland Security prior to being allowed to enter the United States. Without the fingerprint evidence taken from roadside bombs, which one federal forensic scientist referred to as “a needle in the haystack,” it is unlikely that the two terrorists would ever have been identified and apprehended.

“How did a person who we detained in Iraq — linked to an IED attack, we had his fingerprints in our government system — how did he walk into America in 2009?” asked one former Army general who previously oversaw the U.S. military’s anti-IED efforts.

President Barack Obama has thus far refused bipartisan calls to pause his administration’s Syrian refugee program, which many believe is likely to be exploited by terrorists seeking entry into the United States. The president has not explained how his administration can guarantee that no terrorists will be able to slip into the country by pretending to be refugees, as the Iraqi terrorists captured in Kentucky did in 2009. One of those terrorists, Waad Ramadan Alwan, even came into the United States by way of Syria, where his fingerprints were taken and given to U.S. military intelligence officials.

Obama has also refused to explain how his administration’s security-related pause on processing Iraq refugee requests in 2011 did not “betray our deepest values.”

Voir de même:

Study Reveals 72 Terrorists Came From Countries Covered by Trump Vetting Order

Jessica Vaughan
Center for immigration studies
February 11, 2017

A review of information compiled by a Senate committee in 2016 reveals that 72 individuals from the seven countries covered in President Trump’s vetting executive order have been convicted in terror cases since the 9/11 attacks. These facts stand in stark contrast to the assertions by the Ninth Circuit judges who have blocked the president’s order on the basis that there is no evidence showing a risk to the United States in allowing aliens from these seven terror-associated countries to come in.

In June 2016 the Senate Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, then chaired by new Attorney General Jeff Sessions, released a report on individuals convicted in terror cases since 9/11. Using open sources (because the Obama administration refused to provide government records), the report found that 380 out of 580 people convicted in terror cases since 9/11 were foreign-born. The report is no longer available on the Senate website, but a summary published by Fox News is available here.

The Center has obtained a copy of the information compiled by the subcommittee. The information compiled includes names of offenders, dates of conviction, terror group affiliation, federal criminal charges, sentence imposed, state of residence, and immigration history.

The Center has extracted information on 72 individuals named in the Senate report whose country of origin is one of the seven terror-associated countries included in the vetting executive order: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The Senate researchers were not able to obtain complete information on each convicted terrorist, so it is possible that more of the convicted terrorists are from these countries.

The United States has admitted terrorists from all of the seven dangerous countries:

  • Somalia: 20
  • Yemen: 19
  • Iraq: 19
  • Syria: 7
  • Iran: 4
  • Libya: 2
  • Sudan: 1
  • Total: 72

According to the report, at least 17 individuals entered as refugees from these terror-prone countries. Three came in on student visas and one arrived on a diplomatic visa.

At least 25 of these immigrants eventually became citizens. Ten were lawful permanent residents, and four were illegal aliens.

These immigrant terrorists lived in at least 16 different states, with the largest number from the terror-associated countries living in New York (10), Minnesota (8), California (8), and Michigan (6). Ironically, Minnesota was one of the states suing to block Trump’s order to pause entries from the terror-associated countries, claiming it harmed the state. At least two of the terrorists were living in Washington, which joined with Minnesota in the lawsuit to block the order.

Thirty-three of the 72 individuals from the seven terror-associated countries were convicted of very serious terror-related crimes, and were sentenced to at least three years imprisonment. The crimes included use of a weapon of mass destruction, conspiracy to commit a terror act, material support of a terrorist or terror group, international money laundering conspiracy, possession of explosives or missiles, and unlawful possession of a machine gun.

Some opponents of the travel suspension have tried to claim that the Senate report was flawed because it included individuals who were not necessarily terrorists because they were convicted of crimes such as identity fraud and false statements. About a dozen individuals in the group from the seven terror-associated countries are in this category. Some are individuals who were arrested and convicted in the months following 9/11 for involvement in a fraudulent hazardous materials and commercial driver’s license scheme that was extremely worrisome to law enforcement and counter-terrorism agencies, although a direct link to the 9/11 plot was never claimed.

The information in this report was compiled by Senate staff from open sources, and certainly could have been found by the judges if they or their clerks had looked for it. Another example that should have come to mind is that of Abdul Razak Ali Artan, who attacked and wounded 11 people on the campus of Ohio State University in November 2016. Artan was a Somalian who arrived in 2007 as a refugee.

President Trump’s vetting order is clearly legal under the provisions of section 212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, which says that the president can suspend the entry of any alien or group of aliens if he finds it to be detrimental to the national interest. He should not have to provide any more justification than was already presented in the order, but if judges demand more reasons, here are 72.

Voir aussi:

Homeland Security

Anatomy of the terror threat: Files show hundreds of US plots, refugee connection

Now PlayingWhy are Democrat women so rattled by Trump?

Newly obtained congressional data shows hundreds of terror plots have been stopped in the U.S. since 9/11 – mostly involving foreign-born suspects, including dozens of refugees.

The files are sure to inflame the debate over the Obama administration’s push to admit thousands more refugees from Syria and elsewhere, a proposal Donald Trump has vehemently opposed on the 2016 campaign trail.

“[T]hese data make clear that the United States not only lacks the ability to properly screen individuals prior to their arrival, but also that our nation has an unprecedented assimilation problem,” Sens. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, told President Obama in a June 14 letter, obtained by FoxNews.com.

The files also give fresh insight into the true scope of the terror threat and cover a wide range of cases, including:

  • A Seattle man plotting to attack a U.S. military facility
  • An Atlantic City man using his “Revolution Muslim” site to encourage confrontations with U.S. Jewish leaders “at their homes”
  • An Iraq refugee arrested in January, accused of traveling to Syria to “take up arms” with terror groups

While the June 12 massacre at an Orlando gay nightclub marked the deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil since 2001, the data shows America has been facing a steady stream of plots. For the period September 2001 through 2014, data shows the U.S. successfully prosecuted 580 individuals for terrorism and terror-related cases. Further, since early 2014, at least 131 individuals were identified as being implicated in terror.

Across both those groups, the senators reported that at least 40 people initially admitted to the U.S. as refugees later were convicted or implicated in terror cases.

Among the 580 convicted, they said, at least 380 were foreign-born. The top countries of origin were Pakistan, Lebanon and Somalia, as well as the Palestinian territories.

Both Sessions and Cruz sit on the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, which compiled the terror-case information based on data from the Justice Department, news reports and other open-source information. The files were shared with FoxNews.com.

The files include dates, states of residence, countries of origin for foreign-born suspects, and reams of other details.

Specifically, they show a sharp spike in cases in 2015, largely stemming from the arrest of suspects claiming allegiance to the Islamic State. They also show a heavy concentration of cases involving suspects from California, Texas, New York and Minnesota, among other states.

The senators say the terror-case repository still is missing critical details on suspects’ immigration history, which they say the Department of Homeland Security has “failed to provide.” Immigration data the senators compiled came from other sources.

Sessions and Cruz asked the president in their letter to order the departments of Justice, Homeland Security and State to « update » and provide more detailed information. The senators have sent several letters to those departments since last year requesting immigration histories of those tied to terror.

“The administration refuses to give out the information necessary to establish a sound policy that protects Americans from terrorists,” Sessions said in a statement to Fox News.

Asked about the complaints, DHS spokeswoman Gillian M. Christensen told FoxNews.com the department “will respond to the senators’ request directly and not through the press.”

“More than 100 Congressional committees, subcommittees, caucuses, commissions and groups exercise oversight and ensure accountability of DHS and we work closely with them on a daily basis. We’ve received unprecedented requests from a number of senators and representatives for physical paper files for more than 700 aliens,” she said, adding that officials have to review each page manually for privacy and other issues.

Cruz ran unsuccessfully this year for the Republican presidential nomination. Sessions, an ardent critic of the administration’s immigration policies, is supporting presumptive GOP nominee Trump.

The allegations detailed in the subcommittee’s research pertain to a range of cases, involving suspects caught traveling or trying to travel overseas to fight, as well as suspects ensnared in controversial sting operations which civil-liberties groups including the ACLU have criticized.

In a 2014 report, Human Rights Watch said nearly half of the federal counterterror convictions at the time came from “informant-based cases,” many of them sting operations where the informants played a role in the plot.

The report said: “In some cases the Federal Bureau of Investigation may have created terrorists out of law-abiding individuals by conducting sting operations that facilitated or invented the target’s willingness to act.”

But even in some of those cases, federal agents got involved after learning of a serious suspected plot. In the case of the Seattle suspect, Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, authorities said he approached someone in 2011 about attacking a military installation. That citizen alerted law enforcement and worked with them to capture Latif and an accomplice.

FoxNews.com’s Liz Torrey contributed to this report. 

Voir par ailleurs:

La guerre des cartels mexicains franchit la frontière des Etats-Unis

Déjà, l’Arizona subit une hausse alarmante de la criminalité. Selon différentes sources, l’Etat frontalier serait devenu la principale plaque tournante nord-américaine de l’immigration illégale et du narcotrafic. Ailleurs, sur l’ensemble du territoire, les cartels mexicains contrôleraient la plupart du marché, d’après un rapport du Centre national de renseignement des drogues. Liés aux gangs américains, ils seraient parvenus à s’implanter dans 230 villes des Etats-Unis.

Nicolas Bourcier

EL PASO (TEXAS) ENVOYÉ SPÉCIAL

Le Monde

24.03.2009

« N ‘y allez pas. » D’emblée, l’injonction de Ramon Bracamontes prend des allures de mise en garde. Les mots, le ton de ce journaliste texan d’El Paso, enquêteur reconnu, calme et d’habitude souriant, en disent long sur le degré d’inquiétude qui prévaut de ce côté-ci de la frontière.

Evoquer le Mexique et la ville d’en face, Ciudad Juarez, située juste de l’autre côté du Rio Grande et de son « rideau de fer », c’est prendre le risque de subir une logorrhée interminable de crimes et d’horreurs liés à la guerre des narcotrafiquants et leurs sicaires. « Moi-même, j’ai peur, insiste-t-il. Les autorités américaines au Mexique m’ont affirmé qu’elles ne pouvaient plus assurer la protection des ressortissants des Etats-Unis. Et de ce côté-ci, nous assistons, chaque jour un peu plus, au débordement de cette violence. »

C’est dire l’importance de la première visite, prévue les mercredi 25 et jeudi 26 mars, de la secrétaire d’Etat Hillary Clinton au Mexique. Sa venue a été placée sous le signe de la lutte contre la drogue. Plus de 800 policiers et militaires y ont été tués depuis décembre 2006. Quelque 6 000 assassinats y ont été recensés l’année dernière (le double de 2007). Avant Noël, les autorités ont découvert dans la petite ville de Chilpancingo, enveloppées dans des sacs en plastique, huit têtes décapitées de soldats puis trois autres dans une glacière à Ciudad Juarez en janvier. Quelques jours plus tard, c’était au tour du responsable de la police locale de démissionner sous la pression des cartels de la drogue. Le maire de la ville frontière, lui, a fini par s’installer avec sa famille en face, à El Paso.

Déjà, en décembre 2006, lors de son élection, le président mexicain, Felipe Calderon, avait admis que « le crime organisé était devenu hors de contrôle ». Depuis, le chef de l’Etat, conservateur et partisan d’une stratégie musclée contre le crime organisé, a déployé sur le territoire 45 000 soldats contre les gangs des narcotrafiquants, dont près de 5 000, cagoulés de noir et lourdement armés, pour la seule ville de Ciudad Juarez.

Les arrestations se sont multipliées – souvent de façon arbitraire, d’après les organisations de défense des droits de l’homme. Les règlements de compte dans les prisons ont atteint de nouveaux sommets. Tout comme les attaques contre des domiciles, les extorsions, les saisies de cocaïne, les prises d’otages et les meurtres avec plus de 1 100 homicides pour les seules huit premières semaines de l’année.

Les autorités mexicaines assurent que le pouvoir central est en train de gagner. A les en croire, l’explosion de violence serait paradoxalement le fruit des efforts de l’Etat pour désorganiser le trafic de drogue. En novembre 2008, Noe Ramirez, le procureur en charge de l’unité spécialisée dans le crime organisé, n’a-t-il pas été inculpé pour avoir fourni des informations au cartel de Sinaloa contre un demi-million de dollars par mois ? Et Francisco Velasco Delgado, le chef de la police de Cancun, arrêté pour avoir protégé le cartel dit du Golfe, commanditaire présumé de l’assassinat en janvier d’un général ?

Pour Washington, l’effort reste insuffisant. Rendu public il y a quelques semaines, un document du Pentagone concluait que deux grands pays pouvaient connaître un effondrement rapide de l’Etat : le Pakistan et, précisément, le voisin mexicain. Un avis rejeté fermement par Mexico, mais alimenté depuis par de nombreuses voix. Barry McCaffrey, général à la retraite et « M. Drogue » de Bill Clinton, affirme que les Etats-Unis ne peuvent pas se permettre d’avoir « un narco-Etat à leur porte« , ajoutant que « les dangers et les problèmes croissants du Mexique menacent la sécurité nationale de notre pays ».

Déjà, l’Arizona subit une hausse alarmante de la criminalité. Selon différentes sources, l’Etat frontalier serait devenu la principale plaque tournante nord-américaine de l’immigration illégale et du narcotrafic. Ailleurs, sur l’ensemble du territoire, les cartels mexicains contrôleraient la plupart du marché, d’après un rapport du Centre national de renseignement des drogues. Liés aux gangs américains, ils seraient parvenus à s’implanter dans 230 villes des Etats-Unis.

C’est dans ce contexte que le général Victor Renuart, le chef du commandement de la zone Amérique du Nord, a expliqué, lors d’une audition au Sénat, le 17 mars, que Washington envisageait d’envoyer plus de troupes ou d’agents spécialisés à la frontière. Selon lui, toutes les composantes des forces de l’ordre et de l’armée seront probablement concernées dans ce combat sans pour autant donner une estimation chiffrée des besoins.

Deux semaines auparavant, Rick Perry, le gouverneur républicain du Texas, avait exigé l’envoi de 1 000 hommes supplémentaires. « Je me fiche de savoir s’il s’agit de militaires, de gardes nationaux ou d’agents des douanes, a-t-il lâché. Nous sommes très préoccupés par le fait que le gouvernement fédéral ne s’occupe pas de la sécurité à la frontière de façon adéquate. »

Une équipe formée de représentants de plusieurs agences gouvernementales s’est réunie la semaine dernière afin d’épauler Mexico. Une initiative qui fait suite au déjeuner, le 12 janvier à Washington, entre Barack Obama et le président mexicain. D’après l’hebdomadaire The Economist, citant des sources mexicaines, M. Calderon aurait proposé un « partenariat stratégique » et la mise en place rapide d’un groupe binational d’experts afin d’améliorer la coopération entre les deux pays.

Devant l’éventualité d’une nouvelle militarisation de la frontière, le président mexicain a exhorté, il y a quelques jours, Washington à surveiller, de son côté, plus étroitement ses importations d’armes et leur vente aux particuliers. Il a demandé des contrôles plus stricts à la frontière d’où les cartels reçoivent leur arsenal et des millions de dollars en espèces en provenance des Etats-Unis.

Après Hillary Clinton, le président américain effectuera à son tour une visite officielle, les 16 et 17 avril, au Mexique. La première en Amérique latine depuis son accession à la Maison Blanche.

Nicolas Bourcier – EL PASO (TEXAS) ENVOYÉ SPÉCIAL

En savoir plus sur http://www.lemonde.fr/ameriques/article/2009/03/24/la-guerre-des-cartels-mexicains-franchit-la-frontiere-des-etats-unis_1171893_3222.html#Z3v6zkJA11su7rMg.99

Ce que peut (encore) faire Barack Obama avant la fin de son mandat

Le président sortant a jusqu’au 20 janvier 2017, date de l’investiture de Donald Trump, pour prendre ses dernières mesures.

Lucas Wicky

Le Monde

28.12.2016

Barack Obama entre dans la dernière ligne droite de son mandat présidentiel. Le 20 janvier 2017, Donald Trump, dont l’élection a été confirmée le 19 décembre par le vote des grands électeurs, prêtera serment et s’installera à la Maison Blanche. Le président sortant se trouve ainsi placé dans la position inconfortable du « lame duck » (canard boiteux), selon l’expression consacrée outre-Atlantique : celle d’un élu dont le mandat arrive à terme et qui est toujours en poste, alors que son successeur est déjà élu mais n’occupe pas encore le poste.

Pour autant, M. Obama ne semble pas disposé à faire « profil bas » durant cette période de transition officielle, qui limite, théoriquement, ses marges de manœuvre. Pour preuve, le 20 décembre, il a décrété l’interdiction des forages gaziers et pétroliers dans de vastes zones de l’Arctique et de l’Atlantique. Les observateurs y ont vu une sorte de coup de force avant l’arrivée de M. Trump, tant cette disposition s’inscrit à rebours des orientations de ce dernier, qui, au contraire, a promis de déréguler l’extraction pétrolière pendant son mandat.

Barack Obama va-t-il profiter des prochaines semaines pour faire passer d’autres mesures avant de quitter la fonction présidentielle ? En a-t-il les moyens ? Voici un tour d’horizon des leviers dont il dispose encore, ou pas, et de la pérennité des mesures qu’il pourrait prendre.

Peut-il faire voter de nouvelles réformes ?

Non

En tout cas, pas en passant par le Congrès (pouvoir législatif). Depuis deux ans, M. Obama n’y dispose pas d’une majorité. C’est pourquoi toutes les réformes d’ampleur du président sortant ont été bloquées. Les élections de mi-mandat avaient en effet permis aux républicains d’obtenir la majorité au Sénat, tandis qu’ils contrôlaient la Chambre des représentants depuis 2010. Les démocrates n’ont pas réussi à renverser ce rapport de force lors des dernières élections, en novembre.

Peut-il « contourner » les parlementaires ?

Oui, dans certains cas

Des leviers ont notamment permis à M. Obama d’agir sur la question des armes, de promouvoir la diversité au sein de la Sécurité nationale ou de protéger une partie de la mer de Bering. Il s’agit des executive actions, en l’occurence des décrets présidentiels (executive orders) ou des mémorandums, qui viennent préciser la manière dont une loi existante doit s’appliquer (les décrets doivent nécessairement mentionner la loi concernée, à la différence des mémorandums).

Le président dispose d’un troisième outil afin de se passer de la validation du Sénat : les accords exécutifs. M. Obama y a eu recours en politique étrangère. Par exemple pour « signer l’accord de Paris sur le changement climatique et conclure l’accord controversé sur le programme nucléaire iranien », note John Copeland Nagle, professeur de droit à l’université Notre Dame law school.

M. Obama a toutefois eu moins recours aux décrets présidentiels que ses prédécesseurs républicains, Ronald Reagan et George W. Bush, mais à plus de mémorandums, selon USA Today.

Les décisions prises à travers des « actes exécutifs » sont-elles irréversibles ?

Non

L’utilisation de ces executive actions n’est pas explicitement prévue par la Constitution des Etats-Unis. Leur utilisation a plusieurs fois été jugée abusive ou « anticonstitutionnelle » par les républicains. En réalité, il revient aux tribunaux fédéraux (s’ils sont saisis par un plaignant) ou à la Cour suprême (en cas d’appel) de juger si ces actes exécutifs respectent ou non la Constitution.

Quoi qu’il en soit, la plupart de ces actes exécutifs peuvent être « instantanément défaits par Donald Trump », prévient Vincent Michelot, professeur de civilisation américaine à Sciences Po Lyon.

C’est d’ailleurs ce que promet le futur locataire de la Maison Blanche, qui a l’intention de revenir sur plusieurs réformes de son prédécesseur. Dans son contrat présidentiel, on peut lire ce qu’il compte faire dès son premier jour de mandat :

« Premièrement, abroger toutes les actions exécutives inconstitutionnelles, mémorandums et décrets mis en place par le président Obama. »

Certains actes présidentiels pris par M. Obama peuvent-ils contraindre son successeur ?

Oui

Face au risque de détricotage par son successeur, M. Obama possède une marge de manœuvre : appliquer, à travers des executive actions, des lois n’étant pas prévues pour être réversibles. C’est ce qu’il a fait pour interdire les forages offshore en Arctique et Atlantique : il s’est appuyé sur l’Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, loi sur les terres du plateau continental, qui donne au président le pouvoir de protéger les eaux fédérales et rend cette protection permanente dans le temps.

Le texte actuel ne permet pas d’autoriser à nouveau l’exploitation d’hydrocarbures une fois qu’une zone a été sanctuarisée. Et Vincent Michelot de préciser :

« Certaines règles édictées ces derniers jours seront très difficiles à abroger […] et consommatrices de temps parlementaire. Elles donnent aussi la possibilité aux associations de défense de l’environnement de porter le débat devant le judiciaire, ce qui signifie des procédures d’une durée de deux à quatre ans. »

Ce type de mesure pourrait-il être multiplié dans les prochains jours ? Vincent Michelot n’exclut pas cette possibilité :

« Si d’autres décisions similaires sont dans les tuyaux, notamment en matière d’environnement, M. Obama a tout intérêt à ne pas les annoncer à l’avance, pour bénéficier de l’effet de surprise et surtout mettre l’administration Trump au pied du mur. »

Le président sortant dispose-t-il d’autres pouvoirs en cette fin de mandat ?

Oui

Barack Obama a par exemple la possibilité de suspendre des dirigeants de l’administration ou de l’armée et de rendre publics des programmes confidentiels. L’hebdomadaire de gauche The Nation l’a appelé, début décembre, à utiliser une partie de ces pouvoirs. Notamment pour « déclassifier des documents secrets, gracier des lanceurs d’alertes [comme Chelsea Manning ou Edward Snowden] et punir des hauts responsables ayant abusé de leur pouvoir ». Pour l’heure, le président démocrate n’a pas donné suite à leur demande.

Par ailleurs, l’article II de la Constitution des Etats-Unis confère au président le pouvoir « d’accorder […] des grâces pour crimes contre les Etats-Unis ». Il s’agit d’une prérogative que M. Obama a largement utilisée au cours des derniers jours.

Pour la seule journée du 19 décembre, il a accordé 153 « commutations » (réduction ou suppression de peine) et 78 « pardons » (oubli de la condamnation après que celle-ci a été effectuée et plein rétablissement des droits civils – le vote par exemple). Il a d’ores et déjà battu le record historique du nombre de grâces accordées par un président en exercice.

« Il y aura d’autres grâces présidentielles pour certains condamnés », pronostique Vincent Michelot. L’administration Obama redoute un tournant sécuritaire avec M. Trump. Ce mouvement de grâces est donc également un message politique. Le dernier communiqué de la Maison Blanche sur le sujet est explicite :

« Nous devons rappeler que la grâce est un outil de dernier ressort et que seul le Congrès peut mettre en place les réformes plus larges nécessaires pour assurer à long terme que notre système de justice pénale fonctionne plus équitablement et plus efficacement au service de la sécurité publique. »

Advertisements

5 commentaires pour Présidence Trump: Attention, un fascisme peut en cacher un autre (Behind the Left’s constant crying wolf, Trump’s actions are largely an extension of prior temporary policies and a long-overdue return to sanity)

  1. jcdurbant dit :

    PLEASE ARREST ME, I’M A REFUGEE

    The only way for these refugees already in the U.S. to gain refugee status in Canada is for them to physically cross the border illegally. In fact, as soon as they arrive in the country, these refugees have been tracking down police officers to arrest them. (…) Because they need to report to the authorities within three days of entering Canada, in order to claim refugee status, some have been banging on locals’ doors to use the phone at 2 or 3am.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4224984/Canadian-towns-seeing-influx-refugee-crossings.html

    J'aime

  2. jcdurbant dit :

    NO VICHY, FRANCE ! (What a country — where even the vacuous have a voice !)

    Trump is right. [The media] is the opposition party. Indeed, furiously so, often indulging in appalling overkill. It’s sometimes embarrassing to read the front pages of the major newspapers, festooned as they are with anti-Trump editorializing masquerading as news. Nonetheless, if you take the view from 30,000 feet, better this than a press acquiescing on bended knee, where it spent most of the Obama years in a slavish Pravda-like thrall. Every democracy needs an opposition press. We damn well have one now. (…) What a country — where even the vacuous have a voice ! The anti-Trump opposition flatters itself as “the resistance.” As if this is Vichy France. It’s not. It’s 21st-century America. And the good news is that the checks and balances are working just fine.

    Charles Krauthammer

    J'aime

  3. jcdurbant dit :

    SELF-INFLICTED WATERLOO ?

    It seemed to me that Obama’s adoption of ideas developed at the Heritage Foundation in the early 1990s—and then enacted into state law in Massachusetts by Governor Mitt Romney—offered the best near-term hope to control the federal health-care spending that would otherwise devour the defense budget and force taxes upward. I suggested that universal coverage was a worthy goal, and one that would hugely relieve the anxieties of working-class and middle-class Americans who had suffered so much in the Great Recession. And I predicted that the Democrats remembered the catastrophe that befell them in 1994 when they promised health-care reform and failed to deliver. They had the votes this time to pass something. They surely would do so—and so the practical question facing Republicans was whether it would not be better to negotiate to shape that “something” in ways that would be less expensive, less regulatory, and less redistributive…

    David Frum

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :