Résolution de la honte: La supercherie de l’occupation (From disputed to occupied territories: How Obama and Kerry lied America and the world into accepting the single largest US policy change since Carter)

https://i2.wp.com/anidom.blog.lemonde.fr/files/2009/02/carte-israel-1947-1949.1233585853.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/anidom.blog.lemonde.fr/files/2009/02/carte-israel-1967-1973.1233586037.jpgdisputed-territories-map
china
epa04712851 A handout picture made available by the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) Public Affairs Office on 20 April 2015 shows construction at Mabini (Johnson) Reef in the disputed Spratley Islands in the south China Sea by China on 18 February 2015. Just before the opening of the Balikatan 2015 joint Philippines and US military exercises, Philippine military chief General Gregorio Pio Catapang showed the latest aerial photos of the expansive reclamation and building being done by China in at least seven disputed territories. The Philippines has alleged that China causes economic losses of at least 100 million dollars annually due to its reclamation activities, which have destroyed an estimated 120 hectares of coral reef systems in the Spratlys islands group. EPA/ARMED FORCES OF THE PHILIPPINES HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES
subgeorgiamap
2014_russo-ukrainian-conflict_map-svg
nagorno-karabakh_occupation_map
cyprus_geography
morocco
usa-occupied-territories
Le Conseil de sécurité (…) Déplore vivement qu’Israël persiste et s’obstine dans ces politiques et pratiques et demande au Gouvernement et au peuple israélien de rapporter ces mesures et démanteler les colonies de peuplement existantes, et en particulier, de cesser d’urgence d’établir, édifier et planifier des colonies de peuplement dans les terrioires arabes occupés depuis 1967, y compris Jérusalem ; (…) Demande à tous les Etats de ne fournir à Israël aucune assistance qui serait utilisée spécifiquement pour les colonies de peuplement des territoires occupés. Résolution 465 (1980)
The American vote against Israel in the Security Council Friday was, in a sense, the essential Carter. There was no good reason of state for the United States to reverse its previous refusal (…) That issue is whether friends should be treated differently from enemies. It’s a tough one. That is, it’s a tough one for the United States and especially for the Carter administration. No other country — no other president — has so indulged the luxury of deciding whether to support friends on all occasions regardless of their failings or whether to apply ostensibly universal values and condemn them in particular cases when they are deemed to fall short. (…) it cannot be denied that there is a pack and that it hounds Israel shamelessly and that this makes it very serious when the United States joins it. Jimmy Carter has regularly anguished on this score. This time, in perhaps his last U.N. act of consequence, there was a suggestion in the air that he was finally doing what in his heart he has always wanted to do: vote for what he regarded as virtue. To whatever effect, Ronald Reagan will do it differently. He lacks Jimmy Carter’s general readiness to court the Third World and to grant it, or at least its left-leaning part, something of an exemption from the standards by which nations are usually measured. He is unlikely to regard the United Nations as necessarily the most proper and useful forum in which disputes involving the Third World can be treated in the American interest. Few would expect him to agonize at length over the question of whether the United States should keep off Israel’s back in loaded global forums, funneling its disagreements into bilateral channels, or whether it should join the jackals, as Mr. Carter did on Friday. The Washington Post (Dec. 21, 1980)
On Saturday, March 2, 1980, the United Nations Security Council called a vote on a resolution condemning new Israeli settlements on the West Bank, the Gaza strip, and Jerusalem—in other words, the U.S. was siding with a resolution that denied Israeli sovereignty over Jerusalem.  Anti-Israel resolutions were a perennial at the U.N. in those years.  The U.S., torn between the desire to prod Israel to restrain new West Bank settlements and our longstanding general support for Israel, had abstained on previous similar resolutions.  This time Vance persuaded Carter that the time had come for the U.S. to signal its displeasure with Israel by voting in favor of the resolution.  The resolution passed unanimously, and all hell broke loose.  An angry Robert Strauss, Carter’s campaign chairman, told Carter, “Either this vote is reversed or you can kiss New York goodbye.” Invoking a parliamentary technicality, the U.S. managed to get a revote on the resolution the next day, and changed its vote from “yes” to “abstain.” Carter attempted to explain the “mistake” by claiming that the inclusion of settlements in Jerusalem was supposed to have been struck from the resolution, and said that the U.S. vote resulted from a “failure of communication.”  This story might be true, although it strains credulity.  Copies of the resolution with the Jerusalem language had been circulating at the State Department and the National Security Council well before the vote, making a clear instruction to U.N. Ambassador Donald McHenry an uncomplicated task.  Whatever the truth of the matter, the administration was either politically or diplomatically incompetent.  Vance didn’t help matters by defending the original yes vote to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee four days before the New York primary.  Jewish voters, who had never been enthusiastic about the southern Baptist president anyway, were outraged. Steven Hayward
Nous nous opposons à la référence spécifique à Jérusalem dans cette résolution et nous continuerons à nous opposer à son insertion dans les résolutions futures. Nous ne sommes tout simplement pas d’accord avec le fait de décrire les territoires occupés par Israël lors de la Guerre des Six Jours comme des territoires palestiniens occupés. Madeleine Albright (ambassadeur américain auprès des Nations Unies, 1994)
The Security Council, Shocked by the appalling massacre committed against Palestinian worshippers in the Mosque of Ibrahim in Hebron, on 25 February 1994, during the holy month of Ramadan, Gravely concerned by the consequent Palestinian casualties in the occupied Palestinian territory as a result of the massacre, which underlines the need to provide protection and security for the Palestinian people, Determined to overcome the adverse impact of the massacre on the peace process currently under way, Noting with satisfaction the efforts undertaken to guarantee the smooth proceeding of the peace process and calling upon all concerned to continue their efforts to this end, Noting the condemnation of this massacre by the entire international community, Reaffirming its relevant resolutions, which affirmed the applicability of the Fourth Geneva Convention of 12 August 1949 to the territories occupied by Israel in June 1967, including Jerusalem, and the Israeli responsibilities thereunder, 1.   Strongly condemns the massacre in Hebron and its aftermath which took the lives of more than 50 Palestinian civilians and injured several hundred others; 2.   Calls upon Israel, the occupying Power, to continue to take and implement measures, including, inter alia , confiscation of arms, with the aim of preventing illegal acts of violence by Israeli settlers; 94-13985 (E) /… S/RES/904 (1994) Page 2 3.   Calls for measures to be taken to guarantee the safety and protection of the Palestinian civilians throughout the occupied territory, including, inter alia , a temporary international or foreign presence, which was provided for in the Declaration of Principles (S/26560), within the context of the ongoing peace process … Resolution 904
Condamnant toutes    les    mesures    visant    à    modifier    la    composition     démographique,  le  caractère  et  le  statut  du  Territoire  palestinien  occupé  depuis   1967,   y    compris   Jérusalem -Est,   notamment   la   construction   et   l’expansion   de    colonies de peuplement, le transfert de colons israéliens, la confiscation de terres, la  destruction de maisons et le déplacement de civils palestiniens, en violation du droit  internationa l humanitaire et des résolutions pertinentes, (…) Rappelant  également   l’obligation  faite  aux  forces  de  sécurité  de  l’Autorité   palestinienne  dans  la  Feuille  de  route  du  Quatuor  de  continuer  de  mener  des   opérations  efficaces  en  vue  de  s’attaquer  à  tous  ceux  qui  se  livrent  à  des  activités   terroristes  et  de  démanteler  les  moyens  des  terroristes,  notamment  en  confisquant   les armes illégales,  (…) Condamnant  tous les actes de violence visant des civils, y compris les actes de  terreur,  ainsi  que  tous  les  actes  de  provocation,  d’incitation  à  la  violence  et  de   destruction, (…) Réaffirme   que  la  création  par  Israël  de  colonies  de  peuplement  dans  le   Territoire  palestinien  occupé  depuis  1967,  y  compris  Jérusalem -Est,  n’a  aucun   fondement  en  droit  et  constitue  une  violation  flagrante  du  droit  international  et  un   obstacle  majeur  à  la  réalisation  de  la  solution  des  deux  États  et  à  l’instauration   d’une paix globale, juste et durable; 2. Exige  de  nouveau   d’Israël  qu’il  arrête  immédiatement  et  complètement   toutes  ses  activités  de  peuplement  dans  le  Territoire  palestinien  occupé,  y  compris   Jérusalem -Est,   et  respecte  pleinement  toutes  les  obligations  juridiques  qui  lui   incombent à cet égard (…) Appelle tous les États à faire la distinction, dans leurs relations, entre le territoire de l’État d’Israël et les territoires occupés depuis 1967 … Résolution 2234 (2016)
In fact, this resolution simply reaffirms statements made by the Security Council on the legality of settlements over several decades; it does not break new ground. In 1978, the State Department legal advisor advised the Congress of his conclusion that the Israeli government’s program of establishing civilian settlements in the occupied territory is inconsistent with international law. We see no change since then to affect that fundamental conclusion. You may have heard some criticize this resolution for calling East Jerusalem occupied territory. But to be clear, there was absolutely nothing new in last week’s resolution on that issue. It was one of a long line of Security Council resolutions that included East Jerusalem as part of the territories occupied by Israel in 1967, and that includes resolutions passed by the Security Council under President Reagan and President George H.W. Bush. And remember that every U.S. administration since 1967 – along with the entire international community – has recognized East Jerusalem as among the territories that Israel occupied in the Six Day War. And I want to stress this point: we fully respect Israel’s profound historic and religious ties to the city and its holy sites. This resolution in no manner prejudges the outcome of permanent status negotiations on East Jerusalem, which must of course reflect those ties and realities on the ground. We also strongly reject the notion that somehow the United States was the driving force behind this resolution. The Egyptians and Palestinians had long made clear their intention to bring a resolution to a vote before the end of the year. The United States did not draft or originate this resolution, nor did we put it forward. It was drafted and ultimately introduced by Egypt, which is one of Israel’s closest friends in the region, in coordination with the Palestinians and others. During the course of this process, we made clear to others, including those on the Security Council, that we would oppose any resolution that did not include language on terrorism and incitement. Making such positions clear is standard practice with resolutions at the Security Council. The Egyptians, Palestinians and many others understood that if the text were more balanced, it was possible we would not block it. But we also made crystal clear that the President would not make a final decision about our own position until we saw the final text. In the end, we did not agree with every word in this resolution. There are important issues that are not sufficiently addressed – or addressed at all. But we could not in good conscience veto a resolution that condemns violence and incitement, reiterates what has long been the overwhelming consensus international view on settlements, and calls for the parties to start taking constructive steps to advance the two state solution on the ground.  Ultimately, it will be up to the Israeli people to decide whether the unusually heated attacks that Israeli officials have directed toward this administration best serve Israel’s national interests and its relationship with an ally that has been steadfast in its support. Those attacks, alongside allegations of a U.S.-led conspiracy and other manufactured claims, distract and divert attention from what the substance of this vote really was about. (…) Now, at the same time, we have to be clear about what is happening in the West Bank. The Israeli prime minister publicly supports a two-state solution, but his current coalition is the most right wing in Israeli history, with an agenda driven by the most extreme elements. The result is that policies of this government, which the prime minister himself just described as “more committed to settlements than any in Israel’s history,” are leading in the opposite direction. They’re leading towards one state. In fact, Israel has increasingly consolidated control over much of the West Bank for its own purposes, effectively reversing the transitions to greater Palestinian civil authority that were called for by the Oslo Accords. John Kerry
En fait, cette résolution ne fait que réaffirmer les déclarations faites par le Conseil de sécurité sur la légalité des implantations depuis plusieurs décennies; il n’apporte rien de nouveau. En 1978, le conseiller juridique du Département d’État a informé le Congrès de sa conclusion selon laquelle le programme du gouvernement israélien consistant à établir des implantations civiles dans les territoires occupés était incompatible avec le droit international. Nous ne voyons aucun changement depuis lors pour affecter cette conclusion fondamentale. Vous avez peut-être entendu certains critiquer cette résolution pour avoir qualifié Jérusalem-Est de territoire occupé.  Mais pour être clair, il n’y avait absolument rien de nouveau dans la résolution de la semaine dernière sur cette question. Elle faisait partie d’une longue série de résolutions du Conseil de sécurité qui incluaient Jérusalem-Est comme faisant partie des territoires occupés par Israël en 1967, y compris des résolutions adoptées par le Conseil de sécurité sous le président Reagan et le président George H.W. Bush. Et rappelez-vous que chaque administration américaine depuis 1967 – avec toute la communauté internationale – a reconnu Jérusalem-Est comme faisant parties des territoires qu’Israël a occupés lors de la guerre des Six Jours. Et je tiens à souligner ce point: nous respectons pleinement les liens historiques et religieux profonds d’Israël avec la ville et ses sites saints. Cette résolution ne préjuge en rien du résultat des négociations sur le statut permanent de Jérusalem-Est, qui doivent bien entendu refléter ces liens et ces réalités sur le terrain. John Kerry
Knowing that the Obama administration was not going to restart the peace process, we told them that the least they could do is resurface the issue surrounding the illegality of settlements, something which hasn’t been said since the Carter administration. James Zogby (Arab American Institute)
C’est un moment génial de l’histoire de France. Toute la communauté issue de l’immigration adhère complètement à la position de la France. Tout d’un coup, il y a une espèce de ferment. Profitons de cet espace de francitude nouvelle. Jean-Louis Borloo (ministre délégué à la Ville, avril 2003)
Cette motion est tout à fait opportune sur le plan électoral. Il s’agit du meilleur moyen pour récupérer notre électorat des banlieues et des quartiers, qui n’a pas compris la première prise de position pro-israélienne de Hollande, et qui nous a quittés au moment de la guerre à Gaza. Benoit Hamon
Le texte que nous avons ne se concentre pas exclusivement sur les colonies. Il condamne également la violence et le terrorisme. Il appelle aussi à éviter toute incitation émanant du côté palestinien, donc c’est un texte équilibré. L’objectif principal que nous avons ici est de préserver et de réaffirmer une solution à deux Etats » palestinien et israélien qui cohabiteraient dans la paix et la sécurité. François Delattre (ambassadeur de France auprès des Nations unies)
Je salue le discours clair, courageux et engagé de John Kerry en faveur de la paix au Proche Orient et de la solution des deux Etats, Israël et la Palestine, vivant côte à côte en paix et en sécurité. La France partage la conviction du Secrétaire d’Etat américain de la nécessité et de l’urgence de mettre en œuvre cette solution des deux Etats. C’est parce qu’elle constate elle aussi l’érosion de cette solution que la France a pris l’initiative d’accueillir en juin dernier une première conférence internationale et qu’elle recevra à nouveau ses partenaires à Paris, le 15 janvier prochain. Beaucoup des idées exprimées par John Kerry sont des rappels utiles et nécessaires pour faire avancer la cause de la paix dans cette région tant éprouvée. Comme toujours, la France est prête à y contribuer. Jean Marc Ayraut
La paix entre Israël et la Palestine ne peut être négociée en se focalisant uniquement sur la colonisation israélienne dans les territoires palestiniens occupés. La Grande-Bretagne soutient une solution à deux Etats et considère comme illégale la construction par Israël de colonies dans les territoires palestiniens. Mais il est clair que la colonisation est loin d’être le seul problème dans ce conflit. En particulier, le peuple d’Israël mérite de vivre sans craindre la menace terroriste, à laquelle il est confronté depuis trop longtemps. Nous ne pensons donc pas que la meilleure façon de négocier la paix est de se concentrer sur un seul problème, dans ce cas ci la construction de colonies, alors que le conflit entre Israël et la Palestine est infiniment plus complexe. Nous ne pensons pas qu’il soit opportun d’attaquer un gouvernement allié et démocratiquement élu. Notre gouvernement estime que les négociations peuvent réussir uniquement si elles sont menées par les deux parties, avec le soutien de la communauté internationale. Porte-parole de Theresa May
No Muslim leader can recognize the right of the Jews to any part of Israel or its ancient history because from a Muslim perspective, it is Muslim. Any Muslim who would permanently cede Muslim territory to non-Muslims would lose honor and respect as well as be subject to death. Americans are baffled by this. Arafat made this clear at Camp David with former President Bill Clinton. Mahmoud Abbas therefore needs to say whatever he needs to in order to pacify the Americans, but never give in to permanent territorial compromise. Harold Rhode
En 1947 pour apaiser les tensions, les Nations Unies ont séparé la région en deux, Israël voit alors le jour. La Jordanie, elle, cède un bout de son territoire la Cisjordanie, cela doit devenir le futur État Palestinien. Mais en 1967, Israël entre en guerre contre ses voisins et annexe la Cisjordanie, c’est le début de l’occupation des territoires palestiniens. M6
L’UNESCO est atteinte de deux maux qui risquent de la perdre: le reniement et le déni. Reniement de sa raison d’être en fermant les yeux sur l’éducation à la haine de certains de ses Etats membres, déni de l’histoire en amputant le peuple juif de son identité historique et culturelle. (…) L’Organisation se renie, se fait parjure lorsqu’elle ferme les yeux sur la propagation de la haine dans les manuels scolaires de la plupart des pays arabo-musulmans et de la Palestine. (…) Comment donner crédit à une Organisation qui tout en développant des programmes d’éducation à la paix et à la tolérance accepte que ses Etats-membre profèrent la haine? En rejoignant l’UNESCO les pays signataires ont adhéré aux fondements éthiques de l’Organisation tout en s’engageant à les mettre en œuvre notamment par l’éducation. (…) Reniement de ses valeurs lorsqu’il s’agit des pays arabo-musulmans, mais intransigeance lorsque Israël censure des contenus éducatifs qui appellent à sa destruction. (…) Maison des cultures du monde, de la pensée critique, du dialogue, l’UNESCO, dont un des grands programmes est consacré aux sciences sociales et humaines, joue dangereusement à réviser l’histoire, à se complaire dans un déni de réalité. Dans la pure tradition des révisionnistes, elle a fini par dénier tout lien entre le peuple juif et Jérusalem. Fin octobre 2015, par la décision 185 EX/15, elle a classé le caveau des Patriarches et la tombe de Rachel comme sites musulmans et palestiniens, et exigé qu’Israël les retire de son patrimoine national. Mais elle vient de franchir un pas supplémentaire dans le négationnisme. Le mois d’avril 2016 pourra être retenu dans son histoire comme le jour où le Conseil Exécutif, en grand falsificateur, a dénié tout lien entre les juifs, le Mont du Temple et le mur Occidental. Cette résolution 199 EX/19 a été adoptée par 33 pays, et parmi eux la France (mais pas l’Allemagne, l’Angleterre, l’Irlande du Nord ni les Etats-Unis, qui ont voté contre). Ainsi nos «Lumières» s’estompent sous un épais voile de fumée. Et l’on se demande s’il ne faudrait pas recommander aux Etats-membres de l’UNESCO de promouvoir maintenant une résolution visant carrément à supprimer dans l’Histoire de l’humanité (éditions Unesco) tous les passages relatifs à la présence juive à Jérusalem et dans le royaume de Judée. Conscience intellectuelle des Nations, l’UNESCO est devenue une organisation sous influence, s’inscrivant dans la pure tradition des totalitarismes du XXème siècle. Perdant ainsi sa légitimité, a-t-elle encore sa raison d’être? Bernard Hadjadj
There is one final thing to be said concerning the missing « the. » Some commentators have argued that since the French « version » of 242 does contain the phrase « the territories, » the resolution does in fact require total Israeli withdrawal. This is incorrect — the practice in the UN is that the binding version of any resolution is the one voted upon, which is always in the language of the introducing party. In the case of 242 that party was Great Britain, thus the binding version of 242 is in English. The French translation is irrelevant. Finally, it should also be noted that by withdrawing from Sinai after the peace treaty with Egypt, Israel has already vacated 91 percent of the territories it gained in 1967.
L’Organisation des Nations unies, après avoir obtenu un cessez-le-feu durable à la Guerre des Six jours en 1967, a adopté la résolution 242 [archive], qui requiert selon sa version officielle en français, « retrait des forces armées israéliennes des territoires occupés lors du récent conflit » ; selon sa version officielle en anglais, « withdrawal of Israel armed forces from territories occupied in the recent conflict » ; selon ses versions officielles en espagnol, arabe, russe et chinois (autres langues officielles de l’ONU), un texte dont le sens est le même qu’en français. L’ONU connaît six langues officielles, mais l’anglais et le français ont une prééminence, à égalité, au sein du Conseil de sécurité. La divergence entre la version en anglais et la version française de la même résolution a conduit à des interprétations incompatibles entre elles. L’application de la résolution dans sa version en français signifierait le retrait d’Israël de la totalité des territoires occupés en 1967. La résolution dans sa version en anglais emploie l’expression « from territories » qui pourrait se traduire soit par « de territoires », soit par « des territoires » ; la première traduction sous-entendrait un retrait d’une partie des territoires seulement. Plusieurs diplomates anglo-saxons, protagonistes de la rédaction de la résolution, ont par la suite déclaré que l’absence de l’article défini était volontaire. Arthur Goldberg, ambassadeur des États-Unis à l’ONU à l’époque et Eugene Rostow (en), sous-secrétaire d’État américain aux Affaires politiques sous le gouvernement Lyndon Johnson, ont défendu la position que l’absence de l’article défini afin de marquer qu’Israël n’était pas tenue d’évacuer l’ensemble des territoires occupés. Le diplomate britannique Hugh Foot, connu également en tant que Lord Caradon et parfois présenté comme « l’architecte » de la résolution a été interrogé plusieurs fois sur cette question précise, notamment dans une interview accordée au Journal of Palestine Studies (en) en 1976. Tout en réaffirmant le principe de « l’inadmissibilité de l’acquisition de territoires par la guerre », il précise : « Nous aurions pu dire : ‘Bon, vous revenez à la ligne de 1967’. Mais je connais la ligne de 1967, et elle est mauvaise. On ne peut pas faire pire pour des frontières internationales permanentes. C’est juste là où les troupes se sont arrêtées une certaine nuit de 1948, sans aucun lien avec les besoins de la situation. (…) Si nous avions dit de retourner à la ligne de 1967 — ce qui se serait produit si nous avions spécifié que le retrait devait avoir lieu de tous les territoires — nous aurions eu tort (…) le retrait doit se faire sur la base de — lisons les mots attentivement — frontières sécurisées et reconnues ». Le Conseil de sécurité n’a depuis pas pris de résolution « interprétative » qui aurait levé l’ambiguïté entre les versions linguistiques et les résolutions ultérieures du conseil de sécurité conservent l’ambiguïté. Par exemple la résolution 476 du 30 juin 1980 indique dans sa version française que le Conseil de sécurité « [r]éaffirme la nécessité impérieuse de mettre fin à l’occupation prolongée des territoires arabes occupés par Israël depuis 1967, y compris Jérusalem » avec la locution « of Arab territories ». La résolution 478 du 20 août 1980 reprend dans son point 1 exactement la même formulation. Wikipedia
L’Organisation des Nations unies (ONU) emploie la dénomination « territoires occupés » dans les résolutions 242 puis « territoires palestiniens occupés » depuis les années 1970. La résolution 58/292 du 14 mai 2004 de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies avalise la notion de « territoire palestinien occupé, incluant Jérusalem-Est ». Les Israéliens y font référence par l’acronyme Yesha pour « Judée, Samarie, Gaza » ou les dénomment brièvement « les territoires ». Le gouvernement israélien y voit un « territoire disputé » au statut non défini. Wikipedia
There are disagreements over what the Palestinian territories should be called. The United Nations, the European Union, International Committee of the Red Cross, and the government of the United Kingdom all refer to the « Occupied Palestinian Territory » or « Occupied Palestinian Territories ». The International Court of Justice refers to the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, as « the Occupied Palestinian Territory » and this term is used as the legal definition by the International Court of Justice in the ruling in July 2004. Other terms used to describe these areas collectively include « the disputed territories », and « Israeli-occupied territories ». Further terms include « Palestine », « State of Palestine », « Yesha » (Judea-Samaria-Gaza), « Yosh » (Judea and Samaria), the « Katif Bloc » (the south-west corner of the Gaza Strip), « Palestinian Autonomous Areas » (although this term is also used to specifically refer to Areas A and B), « Palestinian Administered Territories », « administered territories », « territories of undetermined permanent status », « 1967 territories », and simply « the territories ». Many Arab and Islamic leaders, including some Palestinians, use the designation « Palestine » and « occupied Palestine » to imply a Palestinian political or religious claim to sovereignty over the whole former territory of the British Mandate west of the Jordan River, including all of Israel. Many of them view the land of Palestine as an Islamic Waqf (trust) for future Muslim generations. A parallel exists in the aspirations of David Ben-Gurion, Menachem Begin, and other Zionists and Jewish religious leaders to establish Jewish sovereignty over all of Greater Israel in trust for the Jewish people. (…) Many Israelis object to the term « Occupied Palestinian Territories » and similar descriptions because they maintain such designations disregard Israeli claims to the West Bank and Gaza, or prejudice negotiations involving possible border changes, arguing that the armistice line agreed to after the 1948 Arab-Israeli War was not intended as a permanent border. Dore Gold wrote, « It would be far more accurate to describe the West Bank and Gaza Strip as « disputed territories » to which both Israelis and Palestinians have claims. » Wikipedia
The American vote against Israel in the Security Council Friday was, in a sense, the essential Carter. There was no good reason of state for the United States to reverse its previous refusal (…) That issue is whether friends should be treated differently from enemies. It’s a tough one. That is, it’s a tough one for the United States and especially for the Carter administration. No other country — no other president — has so indulged the luxury of deciding whether to support friends on all occasions regardless of their failings or whether to apply ostensibly universal values and condemn them in particular cases when they are deemed to fall short. (…) it cannot be denied that there is a pack and that it hounds Israel shamelessly and that this makes it very serious when the United States joins it. Jimmy Carter has regularly anguished on this score. This time, in perhaps his last U.N. act of consequence, there was a suggestion in the air that he was finally doing what in his heart he has always wanted to do: vote for what he regarded as virtue. To whatever effect, Ronald Reagan will do it differently. He lacks Jimmy Carter’s general readiness to court the Third World and to grant it, or at least its left-leaning part, something of an exemption from the standards by which nations are usually measured. He is unlikely to regard the United Nations as necessarily the most proper and useful forum in which disputes involving the Third World can be treated in the American interest. Few would expect him to agonize at length over the question of whether the United States should keep off Israel’s back in loaded global forums, funneling its disagreements into bilateral channels, or whether it should join the jackals, as Mr. Carter did on Friday. The Washington Post (Dec. 21, 1980)
Il y a bien un conflit israélo-arabe mais aucun conflit israélo-palestinien puisque la Palestine n’existe plus dès lors qu’elle a été remembrée en trois Etats : la Jordanie, Israël et la Cisjordanie. Quand un pays est démembré, son nom disparaît au profit des Etats nouveaux : la Tchécoslovaquie a disparu au profit de la Tchéquie et de la Slovaquie, la Corée a disparu au profit de la Corée du Nord et la Corée du Sud, la Yougoslavie, au profit de la Serbie, la Croatie, la Slovénie etc, et de même l’URSS remplacée par la Russie, la Bielorussie, l’Ukraine etc. Mais les « Palestiniens » ont tous les droits, en particulier celui de squatter le nom de Palestine, laquelle était juive bien avant qu’aucun Etat arabe existe et que la Jordanie et Israël la remplacent. La Jordanie a décidé de renoncer à la Cisjordanie. Dès lors ces territoires se libèrent et sont dits « disputés » et Israël a des droits indiscutables sur la Cisjordanie, et les Arabes qui y vivent aussi. Donc ils sont logiquement, réellement « disputés » comme le disait clairement d’ailleurs François Mitterrand. Là encore, la haine des Juifs et l’amour de ceux qui haïssent l’existence d’Israël font des miracles. Ces territoires sont dits « occupés » en omettant de préciser qu’ils sont occupés par les Juifs et et par les Arabes, et légitimement. Nessim Cohen-Tanugi
In 1947, the UN declared that Palestine, as it was then known, would be partitioned into two states – an Arab state and a Jewish state. Notice, not a Palestinian state, but an Arab state. The Palestinians didn’t quite exist yet, and at least not on the international radar. And the Arabs went to war to destroy the Jewish state when it was created on May 14, 1948. And the city of Jerusalem was divided. The eastern part of the city was occupied by the Jordanians, the West Bank was occupied by the Jordanians. In June, 1967, the Jordanians attacked Israel again. Israel repulsed the attack, reunited Jerusalem under Israeli rule, and captured the West Bank, or as we call it, Judea and Samaria. It is not occupied [under] international law, because the West Bank and East Jerusalem [were] never part of a recognized sovereign country. Nobody in the world, except for Britain and Pakistan, recognized the Jordanian annexation of the West Bank and East Jerusalem. So the entire international law claim is spurious. But when Israel reunited the city…, the Western Wall is in the eastern part of the city. The old city is in the eastern part of the city. We certainly can’t consider our homeland for 3,000 years to be occupied territory. You know, tell a member of the Sioux Nation that his tribal lands are occupied and he can’t live on them. That’s what the UN is telling us. They’re telling us more than that, that by living in them, we’re criminals. Michael Oren
The UNSC resolution sent the following message to the Palestinians: Forget about negotiating with Israel. Just pressure the international community to force Israel to comply with the resolution and surrender up all that you demand. (…) The UN’s highly touted « victory » is a purely Pyrrhic one, in fact a true defeat to the peace process and to the few Arabs and Muslims who still believe in the possibility of coexistence with Israel. Far from moving the region toward peace, the resolution has encouraged the Palestinians to move forward in two parallel paths — one toward a diplomatic confrontation with Israel in the international arena, and the other in increased terror attacks against its people. The coming weeks and months will witness mounting violence on the part of Palestinians toward Israelis — a harmful legacy of the Obama Administration. Khaled Abu Toameh
L’origine du problème, c’est l’occupation israélienne. Mustafa Barghouti (Comité palestinien de Soutien Médical)
Vous voulez la sécurité ? Arrêtez l’occupation ! Marwan Barghouti (Fatah, faction armée de l’OLP d’Arafat)
Le Groupe Arabe souligne sa détermination de s’opposer à toute tentative d’assimiler la résistance à l’occupation à un acte de terrorisme. Ambassadeur de Libye aux Nations Unies (1er octobre 2001)
 Dans la mesure où le détenteur précédent du territoire avait pris possession de ce territoire de manière illégale, le nouveau détenteur, qui le prend ensuite, en exerçant son droit légal à l’autodéfense, a, par rapport au détenteur précédent, une plus grande légitimité. Stephen Schwebel (ancien président de Cour Internationale de Justice de La Haye, 1970)
Au sens juridique du terme, l’expression “Cisjordanie occupée” est inexacte. Un territoire est occupé lorsqu’une partie ou l’ensemble d’un Etat souverain est conquis. Ce qui veut dire que cela ne s’applique pas à la rive occidentale du Jourdain, puisqu’avant 1967, elle ne faisait pas partie d’un Etat souverain. Il y a eu un vide juridique entre 1948 et 1967. Emmanuel Navon (Université de Tel Aviv)
The American representative, Madeleine K. Albright, said that describing Jerusalem as « occupied Palestinian territory » implied Palestinian sovereignty over it and thus contradicted the undertaking Israel and the P.L.O. had reached in the declaration they signed in Washington last September, which said the city’s future would be decided in negotiations between them.  Although the Security Council has adopted many resolutions saying that Jerusalem is part of the Arab territories Israel occupied in the 1967 war, Ms. Albright made clear that the United States would oppose similar language in future United Nations texts. The Clinton Administration has been under strong Congressional pressure to veto the latest resolution because of its references to Jerusalem. A total of 82 Senators sent a letter to President Clinton today urging him to veto any Council resolution « that states or implies Jerusalem is « occupied territory. » The Israeli representative to the United Nations, Gad Yaacobi, told the Council that the reference to Jerusalem was incompatible with the agreement to settle the city’s future by negotiation as well as with Israel’s own position on the matter, which is that « Jerusalem will remain united under Israeli sovereignty as our eternal capital. » Speaking for the P.L.O., Nasser al-Kidwa, its United Nations observer, said every Council resolution dealing with Palestinians had described Jerusalem as part of the occupied territories. He complained that « any change in the language creates the danger of a change in policy » and expressed « disappointment and deep concern » at the American abstention. The New York Times (1994)
The resolution called for Israel to “immediately and completely cease all settlement activities in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem.” East Jerusalem, which contains some of the holiest sites in Judaism, was seized by Israel in the Six-Day War of 1967. (…) Critics of the resolution argue that it’s been decades since the U.S. allowed a U.N. resolution to pass that says East Jerusalem and other lands taken in the 1967 war are occupied Palestinian territory. Previous resolutions the U.S. allowed to pass have instead tended to condemn specific actions of Israelis or the Israeli government, such as the bombing of an Iraqi nuclear reactor in 1981. In another example, a U.N. resolution condemning the 1994 massacre of Muslim worshipers by a Jewish terrorist was passed only when Madeleine Albright, then the U.S. ambassador, demanded a paragraph-by-paragraph vote on it to strip out language implying that Jerusalem was occupied territory. (…) However, the U.S. does not recognize Israeli claims to East Jerusalem either.  Albright’s comments run counter to a 1980 U.N. resolution – supported by the U.S. – that did refer to Jerusalem and other lands taken by Israel in 1967 as occupied territory. But that position was in a sense reversed by Albright’s comments in 1994. CBS news
It’s true the U.S. has not allowed a U.N. Security Council resolution to that effect to pass since 1980, but U.S. policy has been consistent under every Democratic and Republican administration to date. Moreover, the U.S. has allowed other anti-Israel resolutions to pass on a number of occasions before and after 1980. President Obama was the first president to adopt a policy of vetoing all anti-Israel U.N.S.C. resolutions – until now. So not vetoing this resolution is a bit of a punch in the gut, but not a very hard one. It is in no way a change in U.S. policy about the conflict. Mark Mellman
The United States on Friday abstained on a vote over a UN Security Council resolution demanding an end to Israeli settlements in Palestinian territory. By abstaining — instead of vetoing the resolution, as the United States has reliably done to similar measures for decades — the Obama administration allowed the highly symbolic measure to make it through the chamber by a unanimous 14-0 margin. It was the first time in nearly 40 years that the Security Council has passed a resolution critical of Israeli settlements. It was also a firm rebuke of both Netanyahu, who had strongly argued against the resolution, and Trump, who had taken the highly unprecedented move of weighing in on Thursday, before the vote, and pressing for the measure to be vetoed. The Jewish communities in question are in the West Bank and East Jerusalem, both of which were captured by Israel during 1967’s Six-Day War. They range in size from small outposts of just a few dozen people to Ariel, home to some 20,000 people and a thriving university. Two of the more controversial settlements lie inside and adjacent to Hebron, a large Palestinian city that houses the burial place of Abraham, making it one of the holiest sites in both Judaism and Islam. Dozens of Jews and Muslims have been killed in political violence there in recent decades. Israel’s construction of new neighborhoods throughout East Jerusalem is technically as illegal as its settlement building elsewhere in the West Bank, but many American policymakers from both parties have long acknowledged that Jewish neighborhoods in that part of the city would remain under Israeli control in any peace agreement. That’s particularly true of the Jewish Quarter of the Old City, home to the Western Wall, the most religiously important place in Judaism. (…) The resolution demands that Israel “immediately and completely cease all settlement activities in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem,” and declares that the establishment of settlements by Israel has “no legal validity and constitutes a flagrant violation under international law.” This is far stronger language than the United States has ever officially used to describe Israeli settlement activity before. Although the standard US position has for three decades been that such settlements, which are built on land intended to be part of a future Palestinian state, are “obstacles to peace,” the United States has always stopped short of describing them as “illegal” under international law. (…) The text also calls on all member states “to distinguish, in their relevant dealings, between the territory of the State of Israel and the territories occupied since 1967” — language that, as the Times of Israel’s Eric Cortellessa explains, “Israel fears will lead to a surge in boycott and sanctions efforts.” (…) The whole point of the resolution is to further solidify the longstanding international consensus that Israel’s settlement activity is illegal and a roadblock to achieving a peaceful solution to the decades-long Israel-Palestine conflict — in other words, to isolate Israel and show it that the whole world thinks what it is doing is wrong. The hope is that this will make Israel change its policies in order to get back into the good graces of the international community. (…) Still, the resolution could potentially have some longer-term legal and economic implications for Israel. For instance, Tel Aviv University law professor Aeyal Gross writes at Haaretz that the resolution could encourage the International Criminal Court to be more aggressive in its examination of settlement construction. (…) The push to bring this resolution before the Security Council in the last few remaining days of Obama’s term as president seems to have been a calculated move by Palestinian diplomats. The Wall Street Journal reports, “As early as October, Palestinian diplomats at the UN began assessing prospects for a Security Council resolution. They drafted two resolutions: one that would condemn Israel’s rapid expansion of settlements in disputed territories of West Bank and East Jerusalem, and another that would recognize Palestine as a state at the UN.” Arab diplomats told the Journal that the Palestinians ultimately decided to drop the statehood resolution because they believed it would inevitably be vetoed by the Obama administration. The Palestinians appear to have seen a path forward all the same, believing that Obama’s long-held opposition to the Israeli settlements — and deep animosity toward Netanyahu — meant the US president might allow a slightly watered-down resolution to make it through the Security Council. (…) It was decided that Egypt, as the only Arab member of the Security Council, should be the one to sponsor the resolution. And indeed, Egypt was the measure’s initial sponsor. However, on Thursday, just one day before the vote was scheduled to take place, Egypt suddenly announced that it was delaying the vote indefinitely. This was apparently in response to an unprecedented intervention by Trump, in the form of a personal phone call to Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi urging him to table the vote. Netanyahu, who has developed a close relationship with Sisi, also pressed the Egyptian leader to withdraw the measure. The resolution was then reintroduced on Friday by four of the other non-permanent members of the Security Council — New Zealand, Malaysia, Venezuela, and Senegal — but not Egypt. (…) But beyond the White House’s formal statements on the matter, the move was widely seen as Obama’s parting shot at Netanyahu, with whom the president repeatedly clashed throughout his tenure. (…) But Obama’s parting shot was also aimed at Trump, who has indicated he wants to take a much stronger pro-Israel stance. (…) There is strong international consensus on the illegality of Israeli settlements. This is based on the Fourth Geneva Convention, which bans nations from the moving of populations into and the establishing of settlements in the territory of another nation won in war. Israel’s right-wing government, however, disputes that settlements in East Jerusalem and the West Bank are illegal, and maintains that their final status should be determined in future negotiations on Palestinian statehood, not by the United Nations. (…) But there’s another reason the Israeli government cares so much about what happens at the United Nations in particular: Netanyahu’s government believes that the United Nations, and the international community more generally, is biased against Israel, and that it unfairly singles out Israel for censure while ignoring egregious actions by other countries. This argument is not without merit. Indeed, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, who is stepping down at the end of this year after having served two five-year terms, told the Security Council earlier this month that « [d]ecades of political maneuvering have created a disproportionate number of resolutions, reports and committees against Israel,” and said that “[i]n many cases, instead of helping the Palestinian issue, this reality has foiled the ability of the UN to fulfill its role effectively. » This latest action by the UN, then, is interpreted by the Israeli government as part of a broader campaign to delegitimize Israel on the international stage. That the United States, Israel’s closest and most powerful ally, stood aside and let the resolution pass — and, according to Netanyahu, may have even been instrumental in bringing the measure to the Security Council in the first place — makes it even more painful. (…) once in office, Trump could theoretically repeal the resolution by introducing a new resolution at the UN that completely revokes this one. He would then need to get at least eight other countries to vote for it, as well as ensure that none of the Security Council’s other permanent members — Russia, the United Kingdom, France, and China — veto it. (…) But it is extremely unlikely that Haley and the Trump administration would actually be able to get eight other countries on the Security Council to support a measure revoking this most recent resolution. That’s because, as mentioned above, the notion that Israeli settlements are illegal under international law is widely held by UN member countries. Vox
Mr. Kerry claimed Wednesday that Resolution 2334 “does not break new ground.” The reality is that the resolution denies Israel legal claims to the land — including Jewish holy sites such as the Western Wall — while reversing the traditional land-for-peace formula that has been a cornerstone of U.S. diplomacy for almost 50 years. In the world of Resolution 2334, the land is no longer Israel’s to trade for peace. Mr. Kerry also called East Jerusalem “occupied” territory, which contradicts Administration claims in the 2015 Supreme Court case, Zivotofsky v. Kerry, that the U.S. does not recognize any sovereignty over Jerusalem. The larger question is what all this means for the prospects of an eventual settlement. Mr. Kerry made a passionate plea in his speech for preserving the possibility of a two-state solution for Jews and Palestinians. That’s a worthy goal in theory, assuming a Palestinian state doesn’t become another Yemen or South Sudan. But the effect of Mr. Kerry’s efforts will be to put it further out of reach. Palestinians will now be emboldened to believe they can get what they want at the U.N. and through public campaigns to boycott Israel without making concessions. Israelis will be convinced that Western assurances of support are insincere and reversible. WSJ
Last week’s United Nations Security Council resolution on Israel is a weapon of war pretending to be a plea for peace. Israel’s enemies say it has no right to exist. They claim the whole state was built on Arab land and it’s an injustice for Jews to exercise sovereignty there. Palestinians still widely promote this untruth in their official television and newspapers, whether from the PLO-controlled West Bank or Hamas-controlled Gaza. That is the unmistakable subtext of Friday’s U.N. Resolution 2334, despite the lip service paid to peace and the “two-state solution.” The resolution describes Israel’s West Bank towns and East Jerusalem neighborhoods as settlements that are a “major obstacle” to peace. But there was a life-or-death Arab-Israeli conflict before those areas were built, and before Israel acquired the West Bank in the 1967 war. Arab opposition to Israel’s existence predated—indeed caused—that war. It even predated Israel’s birth in 1948, which is why the 1948-49 war occurred. Before World War I, when Britain ended the Turks’ 400-year ownership of Palestine, Arab anti-Zionists denied the right of Jews to a state anywhere in Palestine. Officials of Egypt (in 1979) and Jordan (in 1994) signed peace treaties with Israel, but anti-Zionist hostility remains strong. The Palestinian Authority signed the Oslo Accords in 1993 but continues to exhort its children in summer camps and schools to liberate all of Palestine through violence. Arab efforts to damage Israel have been persistent and various, including conventional war, boycotts, diplomatic isolation, terrorism, lower-intensity violence such as rock-throwing, and missile and rocket attacks. Israel’s defensive successes, however, have constrained Palestinian leaders to rely now chiefly on ideological war to de-legitimate the Jewish State. Highlighting the “occupied territories”—in U.N. resolutions, for example—implies moderation. It suggests an interest only in the lands Israel won in 1967. But the relatively “moderate” Palestinian Authority, in its official daily newspaper, Al-Hayat Al-Jadida, continually refers to Israeli cities as “occupied Haifa” or “occupied Jaffa,” for example. In other words, even pre-1967 Israel is “occupied territory” and all Israeli towns are “settlements.” When David Ben-Gurion declared Israel’s independence in 1948, he invoked the “historical connection of the Jewish people with Palestine,” as recognized in the Palestine Mandate approved in 1922 by the League of Nations. That connection applied to what’s now called the West Bank as it did to the rest of Palestine. Because no nation has exercised generally recognized sovereignty over the West Bank since the Turkish era, the mandate supports the legality of Jewish settlement there. That’s why attacking the settlements’ legality—as opposed to questioning whether they’re prudent—is so insidious. Arguing that it is illegal for Jews to live in the West Bank is tantamount to rejecting Israel’s right to have come into existence.  Friday’s U.N. resolution is full of illogic and anti-Israel hostility. It says disputed issues should be “agreed by the parties through negotiations.” Among the key open issues is who should control the West Bank and East Jerusalem. Yet the resolution calls these areas “Palestinian territory.” So much for negotiations. The resolution says that Jewish West Bank and Jerusalem “settlements” have “no legal validity.” On the basis of a skewed legal analysis that ignored pre-1967 Jewish claims, President Jimmy Carter called the settlements illegal. Knowing that Mr. Carter’s conclusion was wrong and hostile to Israel, President Ronald Reagan repudiated it, and all U.S. administrations since were careful to avoid it. Until now. By reviving Mr. Carter’s legal attack on the settlements, President Obama breaks with good sense and decades of U.S. policy.  The resolution exhorts all countries to distinguish between the territories on either side of the 1949 armistice lines. When Israel, before 1967, was confined within those lines, none of its Arab neighbors respected them as Israel’s legal borders. In each of the 1949 armistice agreements, at the Arab side’s insistence, there is language denying that the lines signify any party’s rights to any land. When the lines might have protected Israel, its neighbors, without U.N. protest, deprecated and violated them. Now that those armistice lines are long gone, the U.N. pretends that they are sacred. (…)  The cause of peace is not served by Israel’s appearing vulnerable. Harmonious U.S.-Israel relations are the best hope for convincing Israel’s enemies that their costly efforts to destroy the Jewish state will be fruitless. They won’t compromise if they believe they have another option. Douglas J. Feith
Kerry’s address was a superbly Zionist and pro-Israel speech. Anyone who truly supports the two-state solution and a Jewish and democratic Israel should welcome his remarks and support them. It’s a binary incidence, with no middle ground. It’s no surprise that those who hastened to condemn Kerry even before he spoke and even more so afterward were Habayit Hayehudi chairman Naftali Bennett and the heads of the settler lobby. Kerry noted in his speech that it is this minority that is leading the Israeli government and the indifferent majority toward a one-state solution. Haaretz
The recent statements by the European Union’s new foreign relations chief Catherine Ashton criticizing Israel have once again brought international attention to Jerusalem and the settlements. However, little appears to be truly understood about Israel’s rights to what are generally called the « occupied territories » but what really are « disputed territories. » That’s because the land now known as the West Bank cannot be considered « occupied » in the legal sense of the word as it had not attained recognized sovereignty before Israel’s conquest. Contrary to some beliefs there has never been a Palestinian state, and no other nation has ever established Jerusalem as its capital despite it being under Islamic control for hundreds of years. The name « West Bank » was first used in 1950 by the Jordanians when they annexed the land to differentiate it from the rest of the country, which is on the east bank of the river Jordan. The boundaries of this territory were set only one year before during the armistice agreement between Israel and Jordan that ended the war that began in 1948 when five Arab armies invaded the nascent Jewish State. It was at Jordan’s insistence that the 1949 armistice line became not a recognized international border but only a line separating armies. (…) After the war in 1967, when Jews started returning to their historic heartland in the West Bank, or Judea and Samaria, as the territory had been known around the world for 2,000 years until the Jordanians renamed it, the issue of settlements arose. However, Rostow found no legal impediment to Jewish settlement in these territories. He maintained that the original British Mandate of Palestine still applies to the West Bank. He said « the Jewish right of settlement in Palestine west of the Jordan River, that is, in Israel, the West Bank, Jerusalem, was made unassailable. That right has never been terminated and cannot be terminated except by a recognized peace between Israel and its neighbors. » There is no internationally binding document pertaining to this territory that has nullified this right of Jewish settlement since. And yet, there is this perception that Israel is occupying stolen land and that the Palestinians are the only party with national, legal and historic rights to it. Not only is this morally and factually incorrect, but the more this narrative is being accepted, the less likely the Palestinians feel the need to come to the negotiating table. Statements like those of Lady Ashton’s are not only incorrect; they push a negotiated solution further away. Danny Ayalon (Dec. 30, 2009)
The state of Israel came into being by the same legitimate process that created the other new states in the region, the consequence of the dismantling of the Ottoman Empire after World War I. Consistent with the traditional practice of victorious states, the Allied powers France and England created Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan, and of course Israel, to consolidate and protect their national interests. This legitimate right to rewrite the map may have been badly done and shortsighted––regions containing many different sects and ethnic groups were bad candidates for becoming a nation-state, as the history of Iraq and Lebanon proves, while prime candidates for nationhood like the Kurds were left out. But the right to do so was bestowed by the Allied victory and the Central Powers’ loss, the time-honored wages of starting a war and losing it. Likewise in Europe, the Austro-Hungarian Empire was dismantled, and the new states of Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia were created. And arch-aggressor Germany was punished with a substantial loss of territory, leaving some 10 million Germans stranded outside the fatherland. Israel’s title to its country is as legitimate as Jordan’s, Syria’s and Lebanon’s. Bruce Thornton
Il y a plus de 200 différends territoriaux dans le monde et l’Union européenne a décidé de se concentrer sur Israël et la Cisjordanie. Le conflit que nous avons avec les Palestiniens est connu et la seule manière d’essayer de le résoudre, c’est de s’assoir autour d’une table pour négocier et discuter. Le fait que les Palestiniens refusent de venir négocier – et notre Premier ministre les a invités à le faire à plusieurs reprises ces derniers mois – montre qu’il n’y a pas de réelle volonté politique en ce sens. Et le fait est que Mahmoud Abbas a pris une décision stratégique il y a deux ou trois ans quand il a choisi d’exercer via la communauté internationale une pression sur Israël en espérant que le gouvernement israélien serait poussé à faire des concessions. Malheureusement pour lui, les Israéliens ne cèdent pas à la pression et nous l’avons montré dans le passé. Quand on a été prêt à faire des concessions territoriales avec l’Egypte et la Jordanie, c‘était parce que la population israélienne se rendait compte que l’autre partie était de bonne foi, mais quand l’autre partie n’est pas vue comme étant de bonne foi, alors les chances de concessions sont vraiment minces. Aliza Bin-Noun (ambassadrice d’Israël en France)
La stratégie des Arabes palestiniens, pour annihiler Israël, de plus en plus clairement, consiste à tabler sur la négation de la légitimité de la souveraineté juive en Terre d’Israël que les non juifs dénomment: « Palestine ». Ils comptent, pour ce faire, s’appuyer sur l’antisémitisme musulman et sur l’antisémitisme chrétien et ils les pratiquent et les diffusent à grande échelle. Ils estiment que leur meilleur argument serait d’ordre juridique contre l’ »occupation ». Il est temps de faire voler en éclats cette manipulation et ce mensonge repris avec constance par les gouvernements occidentaux. Rappelons une fois de plus que la seule base juridique consensuelle en Droit International Public (D.I.P.) quant à la reconnaissance par les Nations du droit imprescriptible du Peuple Juif sur sa patrie historique, est le Traité de San Remo adopté sous les auspices de la Société des Nations (S.D.N.), organisation internationale à vocation universelle, créée après la première guerre mondiale et la dislocation de l’Empire Ottoman. Faisant suite à une déclaration politique du Ministre des Affaires Etrangères de l’une des grandes puissances de cette époque, la Grande–Bretagne, à la demande du Mouvement Sioniste, avant-garde militante du Peuple d’Israël, la Déclaration Balfour, ce traité approuvé par toutes les puissances importantes, reconnaissait au Peuple Juif le droit de rétablir un « foyer national » dans son pays. Le territoire alloué aux Juifs comprenait le territoire israélien actuel, la Judée, la Samarie, Gaza et le territoire actuel de la Jordanie. La seule réserve à cette reconnaissance était le maintien des droits acquis des communautés non-juives. La première partition de la Palestine  par la Grande-Bretagne à qui le traité avait confié un « mandat » pour la mise en œuvre de ce programme, a été réalisée pratiquement dès son entrée en fonction, retirant aux Juifs les 3/5 de leur patrie en les cantonnant en Palestine occidentale, en violation du mandat. L’Etat de Jordanie créé de toutes pièces par la Grande-Bretagne en 1946 s’est emparé par la force et illégalement, avec l’aide empressée des Britanniques, dès la proclamation de l’Etat d’Israël en 1948, de la Judée et de la Samarie. L’Egypte a fait de même pour la région de Gaza. Cette occupation de régions importantes de la Palestine occidentale par ces deux Etats, qui a duré 19 ans, constituait une violation du droit international. La résolution 181, de 1947, de l’A.G. des Nations-Unies, organisation qui a pris la suite de la S.D.N. après la seconde guerre mondiale, une recommandation sans effet obligatoire, prévoyait la création de deux Etats en Palestine occidentale, l’un juif et l’autre arabe et entendait priver les Juifs de leur capitale, Jérusalem, où ils constituaient depuis plus d’un siècle une large majorité des habitants. Tous les Etats arabes et les Arabes palestiniens ont refusé le plan de partage et ont lancé leurs armées pour détruire dans l’œuf l’Etat juif naissant et massacrer la communauté juive de Palestine. Après la signature de l’armistice de Rhodes en 1949, et la surprenante résistance des combattants juifs sortis de l’ombre, ni la Jordanie, ni l’Egypte n’ont songé un seul instant à constituer un Etat arabe palestinien dans les territoires de la Palestine occidentale qu’ils contrôlaient. Ils continuaient d’affirmer publiquement leurs intentions génocidaires contre Israël. Cette attitude a des conséquences de droit: elle rendait la résolution 181 obsolète. Ce qui fait que lorsque Israël répliqua en 1967 à une nouvelle tentative génocidaire massive et déclarée des armées égyptienne, syrienne, jordanienne, iraquienne et d’un contingent algérien, en libérant, entre autres, toute la Palestine occidentale, sur le plan du droit, il ne s’agissait en aucun cas de l’occupation de territoires appartenant à un autre Etat mais bien de terres attribuées au peuple Juif par le Traité de San Remo! C’est pourquoi sur cette base, les villes et villages juifs établis légalement sur ce territoire le sont sur des terres domaniales et évitent l’appropriation de terres appartenant à des communautés non juives par application dudit traité. Léon Rozenbaum
Lorsqu’il s’agit du Proche-Orient, il faut parfois tourner sept fois sa langue dans sa bouche avant de parler. Doit-on avoir peur des mots? Doit-on redouter un déluge de critiques par l’emploi de tel ou tel vocabulaire? Rendre compte de l’actualité israélo-palestinienne relève d’une rigueur sémantique, afin d’éviter les imprécisions, les erreurs, les prises de position qui soulèvent alors la colère de tel ou tel camp. Celui qui tient à une certaine neutralité doit s’interroger sur le sens des mots choisis, mais aussi sur la terminologie entérinée par la presse française et la communauté internationale. Si Israël a gagné les conflits armés, la bataille des mots est pour l’Etat hébreu une lutte acharnée et perpétuelle. Le vocabulaire utilisé influence la perception du conflit, véhicule des idées (parfois erronées) et transmettent une représentation de la réalité. Par exemple, les termes de «Cisjordanie occupée» impliquent que la présence israélienne est illégale. A l’inverse, parler de «Judée Samarie» sous-entend le lien historique de cette terre avec le peuple juif. (…) Les colonies ou implantations israéliennes sont des communautés de peuplement, établies sur les territoires conquis à la suite de la guerre des Six Jours, en Cisjordanie, à Gaza et à Jérusalem-Est. Près de 350.000 habitants juifs vivent dans plus de 130 implantations de Cisjordanie et 180.000 dans une douzaine de quartiers de Jérusalem Est. Ces communautés de peuplement sont appelées «Israel settlement» ou «Jewish settlement» par les médias anglophones, ce qui sous-entend une connotation neutre. Le mot «settlement» se traduit en français par «colonie» ou encore «implantation». Les ouvrages spécialisés, les textes de l’ONU et la presse française utilisent généralement le mot «colonie». Mais les Israéliens dénoncent l’emploi de ce terme qui selon eux a un sens péjoratif et fait référence dans la mémoire collective à la colonisation européenne (notamment à la présence française en Algérie), dont l’image était très négative. Les Israéliens utilisent les mots «implantation» ou encore «avant-poste». Ils défendent une présence juive dans la région qui n’a pas cessé depuis plus de 3.000 ans. Si aux yeux de la communauté internationale les colonies sont illégales, l’État hébreu déclare, quant à lui, qu’aucun traité de paix n’a établi de statut juridique sur ces territoires, que la présence de communautés juives à Hébron est multiséculaire ou que leur création à Jérusalem ou en Samarie est attestée depuis le mandat britannique sur la Palestine. Le terme de «colons» pour désigner les habitants juifs des implantations est systématiquement fustigé par la droite israélienne. (…) L’expression «territoire occupé» renvoie aux territoires conquis par Israël lors de la guerre des Six Jours. Cette terminologie est largement utilisée par la communauté internationale et les médias français. Pour les Israéliens, la Cisjordanie est un «territoire disputé» ou «territoire contesté». Après la guerre des Six Jours, la résolution 242 est votée au Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies. De cette résolution, naît deux interprétations divergentes. Les discussions portent sur la formulation à donner au retrait israélien des territoires conquis. La version française fait état d’un retrait des «territoires occupés», ce qui sous entend de la totalité des territoires conquis en 1967. En anglais, le texte officiel parle d’une évacuation «from occupied territories» («de territoires occupés»), soit un retrait d’une partie des territoires seulement. Pour Israël, seule la traduction anglaise est la bonne. Alors que pour les Arabes, la formule française est la seule valable. Cette formulation délibérée est le résultat de plusieurs mois de négociations diplomatiques. (…) La résolution 58/292 du 14 mai 2004 de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies utilise l’expression «territoire palestinien occupé, incluant Jérusalem-Est». L’emploi du singulier est d’importance car il reconnaît l’intégrité territoriale palestinienne, contrairement à l’appellation fréquemment utilisée de «territoires palestiniens». Lorsque la Transjordanie a annexé la Judée et la Samarie en 1948, aucun Etat, hormis la Grande-Bretagne et le Pakistan, n’a reconnu cette annexion. Les Israéliens rappellent qu’aucune souveraineté antérieure à 1967 n’a jamais été officiellement reconnue sur ces territoires. Les États arabes qui occupaient la région avait insisté en 1949 pour que la ligne d’armistice ne constitue «pas une frontière reconnue internationalement mais seulement une ligne séparant deux armées». (…) Israël est l’un des rares pays considérés comme force occupante dans le monde. Dans de nombreux autres conflits territoriaux, les diplomates évoquent plutôt des «territoires disputés». Il n’a jamais été question d’occupation au Cachemire, revendiqué par l’Inde et la Pakistan. On ne parle pas non plus d’occupation pour la région du Haut-Karabagh, revendiquée par l’Azerbaïdjan et l’Arménie, ni pour la présence turque dans le nord de l’île de Chypre, depuis 1974. (…) La Cisjordanie  (…) est délimitée à l’est par le Jourdain et la Mer Morte; au nord, au sud et à l’ouest par la ligne verte de 1949. Elle couvre une surface de 5.860 km2 et compte en 2010 une population totale estimée à 2.514.845 personnes dont 350.000 Israéliens. La région englobe Jérusalem-Est, les villes de Bethléem, Hébron, Jéricho, Naplouse, Jénine, des implantations israéliennes, telles qu’Ariel, Maale Adumim, ainsi que de nombreux lieux saints des trois religions monothéistes. En novembre 1947, lors du plan de partage de la Palestine mandataire votée par les Nations unies, la Judée-Samarie est initialement attribuée à un futur Etat arabe. A la fin de la première guerre israélo-arabe, la région est annexée par la Transjordanie. En 1950, la Transjordanie prend le nom de Royaume Hachémite de Jordanie pour entériner cette annexion. A la fin de la guerre des Six Jours en 1967, les Jordaniens perdent la Judée-Samarie qui passe sous le contrôle de l’Etat d’Israël (qui ne l’a toutefois pas annexée pour des raisons démographiques). Judée et Samarie font référence aux territoires des deux royaumes bibliques, la Judée (capitale: Jérusalem) et Israël (capitale: Samarie). Elles sont des termes utilisés depuis l’Antiquité, pour désigner différentes parties de ces territoires de la rive occidentale du Jourdain. Ces termes ont été utilisés dans la résolution 181 des Nations unies pour désigner précisément certains des territoires dans le partage de la Palestine en 1948. Le terme Judée-Samarie était communément utilisée par les médias et les instances internationales jusqu’à l’annexion de la région par la Transjordanie. Depuis 1949, la Judée et la Samarie ont été rebaptisées Cisjordanie par la communauté internationale. Étymologiquement, «Cisjordanie» désigne la région «du même côté», la rive ouest du Jourdain, par opposition à «l’autre côté», la rive est du fleuve, la Jordanie. La Cisjordanie est donc un terme récent pour désigner les territoires à l’ouest du Jourdain. En Israël, le gouvernement et la population utilisent la dénomination de «Judée-Samarie», qui affirme le lien historique entre l’identité juive et ce territoire. Les anglophones utilisent l’expression «West Bank» —littéralement «rive ouest»— appellation également géographique et plus neutre vis-à-vis de l’autre rive du Jourdain. Kristell Bernaud
Au cœur du combat diplomatique que les Palestiniens mènent contre Israël figure l’affirmation réitérée que les Palestiniens de Cisjordanie et de la Bande de Gaza résistent à « l’occupation ». (…) Cette argumentation se retrouve absolument partout et en toute occasion chez les porte-parole palestiniens, qui doivent faire face à un consensus grandissant dans l’opinion internationale contre l’utilisation du terrorisme comme instrument politique. Ce vocabulaire et cette logique ont également envahi la sphère diplomatique à l’ONU. En août 2001, un projet de résolution palestinienne au Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies reprenait la formulation palestinienne consacrée pour parler de la bande de Gaza et de la Cisjordanie comme de « territoires palestiniens occupés ». Des références à « l’occupation étrangère d’Israël » se retrouvent également dans le projet de résolution de Durban à la conférence mondiale de l’ONU contre le racisme. Cette répétition systématique des termes «occupation», ou «territoires palestiniens occupés» semble avoir trois fonctions clairement identifiables. En premier lieu, les porte-parole palestiniens espèrent instaurer un contexte politique qui explique et même justifie le choix des Palestiniens d’adopter la violence et le terrorisme pendant l’Intifada en cours. Ensuite, l’exigence des Palestiniens qu’Israël «cesse l’occupation» ne laisse aucune place à un éventuel compromis territorial sur la bande de Gaza ou en Cisjordanie, comme le stipulait la formulation originale de la Résolution 242 du Conseil de Sécurité (…). Enfin, l’utilisation de l’expression « territoires palestiniens occupés » dénie à Israël la possibilité de revendiquer cette terre : si l’on utilisait l’expression « territoires disputés », Israël et les Palestiniens se retrouveraient sur un pied d’égalité. De plus, présenter Israël comme un « occupant étranger » a l’avantage supplémentaire de permettre aux partisans de la cause palestinienne de délégitimer le lien historique entre les Juifs et Israël. C’est devenu un point central des efforts diplomatiques palestiniens depuis l’échec du sommet de Camp David en 2000, et particulièrement depuis la conférence des Nations-Unies à Durban, en 2001. Incontestablement, à Durban, la campagne de délégitimation d’Israël a exploité le mot « occupation » pour évoquer l’occupation nazie de la France pendant la seconde guerre mondiale et l’associer à ce que fait Israël en Cisjordanie et à Gaza. Les termes politiquement connotés de « territoires occupés » ou de « occupation » semblent ne s’appliquer qu’à Israël, et ils ne sont jamais utilisés lorsque d’autres conflits territoriaux sont évoqués, et particulièrement par des tiers. Ainsi, le département d’Etat américain parle-t-il, à propos du Cachemire, de « territoires disputés ». De la même façon, dans son rapport sur les Droits de l’Homme dans les différents pays, le Département d’Etat se réfère à la partie d’Azerbaïdjan revendiquée par des séparatistes arméniens comme à « la région disputée de Nagorno-Karabakh ». (…) Bien sûr, chaque situation est unique, mais dans un grand nombre de cas différents mettant en scène des conflits territoriaux, du Nord de Chypre aux Iles Kourile, en passant par Abu Musa, dans le Golfe Persique (qui a déjà donné lieu à des affrontements armés), le terme « territoire occupé » n’est pas utilisé dans les discussions internationales. De ce fait, le cas de la Cisjordanie et de Gaza apparaît comme une exception unique dans l’histoire contemporaine. En effet, depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, les conflits territoriaux n’ont pas manqué, dans lesquels un territoire était antérieurement sous la souveraineté d’un autre état. Pourtant, cela n’a jamais donné lieu à l’utilisation du terme « territoire occupé » pour décrire le territoire qui était passé sous le contrôle militaire d’un autre Etat, à la suite d’un conflit armé. Israël est entré à Gaza et en Cisjordanie pendant la Guerre des Six jours, en 1967. Les experts juridiques israéliens refusèrent les pressions qui voulaient les amener à définir la bande de Gaza et la Cisjordanie comme des « territoires occupés », ou relevant des traités internationaux statuant sur les occupations militaires. (…) De fait, avant 1967, la Jordanie occupait la Cisjordanie et l’Egypte occupait la bande de Gaza. Leur présence sur ces territoires était le résultat de leur invasion illégale, en 1948, pour contrer la Résolution du Conseil de Sécurité de l’ONU. L’annexion de la Cisjordanie par la Jordanie, en 1950, ne fut reconnue que par la Grande Bretagne (à l’exclusion de Jérusalem) et par le Pakistan, et elle fut refusée par l’immense majorité du reste de la communauté internationale, Etats arabes inclus. (…) Le vocabulaire de « l’occupation » a permis aux porte-parole palestiniens d’obscurcir ces faits historiques. En parlant de façon répétitive d’une « occupation », ils ont réussi à renverser la causalité du conflit, et tout spécialement devant les opinions publiques occidentales. Ainsi, l’actuel conflit territorial est présenté mensongèrement comme étant le résultat d’une décision israélienne « d’occuper » un territoire, plutôt que comme le résultat d’une guerre imposée à Israël par une coalition d’Etats arabes, en 1967. Aux termes de la résolution 242 du Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies du 22 novembre 1967 (qui a servi de base à la Conférence de Madrid, en 1991, et à la Déclaration de Principes de 1993), il est seulement demandé à Israël de se retirer «DE territoires» jusqu’à des «frontières sûres et reconnues», et non «DES territoires», ou «DE TOUS les territoires» conquis lors de la guerre des Six jours. Cette formulation délibérée est le résultat de plusieurs mois de négociations diplomatiques méticuleuses.  Ainsi, le Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies reconnaît à Israël un droit légitime sur une partie de ces territoires, pour rendre ses frontières plus faciles à défendre. (…) Lorsqu’on la conjugue avec la Résolution 338, il est parfaitement clair que seules des négociations pourront déterminer quelles parties de ces territoires deviendront partie intégrante d’Israël et lesquelles seront gardées par l’homologue arabe d’Israël. En réalité, la dernière attribution de territoire, internationalement reconnue, incluant ce qui est aujourd’hui la Cisjordanie et la bande de Gaza, a eu lieu lors du Mandat pour la Palestine de la Société des Nations, en 1922, qui reconnaissait les droits du peuple juif sur l’ensemble des territoires concernés par le Mandat, en ces termes : « le lien historique entre le peuple juif et la Palestine et le bien-fondé de la reconstitution de leur foyer national dans ce pays ont été reconnus». De surcroît, les droits d’Israël ont également été préservés par les Nations-Unies, en vertu de l’article 80 de la charte des Nations Unies, malgré la dissolution de la Société des Nations en 1946. L’article 80 stipule que rien, dans la charte des Nations-Unies, ne peut être interprété de manière qui porte atteinte au droit de quelque peuple ou de quelque pays que ce soit, ou qui modifie les termes des traités internationaux en vigueur ». Ces droits n’ont pas été modifiés par la Résolution 181 de l’Assemblée Générale de l’ONU de novembre 1947 (« le plan de partage » [de la Palestine]) qui était une recommandation non contraignante, et qui a été, de toute façon, rejetée par les Palestiniens et les Etats arabes. D’après ces sources incontestées du droit international, Israël possède des droits légalement reconnus sur la Cisjordanie et Gaza, droits qui semblent être ignorés par ceux des observateurs internationaux qui répètent la formule « territoires occupés », sans avoir la moindre conscience des droits d’Israël à des revendications territoriales. Même si Israël cherche seulement des « frontières sûres » qui englobent une partie de la bande de Gaza ou de la Cisjordanie, il y a un monde de différence entre la situation dans laquelle Israël se présente à la communauté internationale en tant « qu’occupant étranger » sans droits territoriaux, et celle dans laquelle Israël a, sur cette terre, des droits historiques solides qui lui ont été reconnus par les principaux organes qui servent de source à la légitimité internationale depuis un siècle. Dans les années 1980, Herbert Hansell, conseiller juridique du Département d’Etat sous la présidence de Carter, chercha à déplacer la discussion sur l’occupation du territoire lui-même aux Palestiniens qui y vivaient. Il estima que la 4e Convention de Genève de 1949 concernant les occupations militaires s’appliquait à la Bande de Gaza et à la Cisjordanie puisque son objectif suprême était de « protéger la population civile d’un territoire occupé. » [Note: Sous l’administration Carter, cette distinction faite par Hansell entraîna, pour la première fois, une prise de position américaine déclarant illégales les implantations israéliennes, puisqu’elles étaient présentées comme contrevenant à l’Article 49 de la 4e Convention de Genève, qui stipule que « la puissance occupante ne doit pas expulser ni transférer une partie de sa population civile dans les territoires qu’elle occupe ». Ultérieurement, les administrations Reagan et Bush modifièrent la formulation de la période Carter, modifièrent le mode de vote américain à l’ONU, et refusèrent de qualifier d’illégales les implantations israéliennes, tout en continuant à formuler des objections contre cette pratique. Une des raisons de ce revirement était le fait que la 4e Convention s’appliquait à des situations du type de celle de l’Europe occupée par les Nazis, ce qui impliquait « des transferts forcés, la déportation ou le déplacement de masses de gens ». Cette opinion a été officiellement formulée le 1er février 1990 par l’ambassadeur américain aux Nations-Unies à Genève, Morris Abram, qui faisait partie du personnel américain aux procès de Nuremberg et pour qui, de ce fait, les motivations de la 4e Convention de Genève n’avaient pas de secret.] L’analyse juridique de Hansell fut abandonnée pas les administrations Reagan et Bush ; cependant, il avait, d’une certaine manière, changé l’angle sous lequel on considérait les choses, le projecteur passant du territoire à sa population. Même ainsi, les définitions officielles de ce qui est constitutif d’une population occupée ne conviennent pas, et d’autant moins depuis la mise en œuvre des Accords d’Oslo de 1993. A ce moment, Israël transféra les pouvoirs spécifiques de son gouvernement militaire en Cisjordanie et dans la Bande de Gaza à l’Autorité Palestinienne nouvellement créée. Dès 1994, le Conseiller juridique de la Croix-Rouge, le Dr Hans-Peter Gasser, concluait que son organisation n’avait plus aucune raison de surveiller le respect, par Israël, de la 4e Convention de Genève dans la Bande de Gaza et dans la région de Jéricho, puisque la Convention ne s’appliquait plus, l’administration de ces zones étant passée sous contrôle palestinien. (…) Ces derniers mois, Israël a été obligé de continuer à exercer les pouvoirs qui lui restent uniquement en réponse à l’escalade de la violence et des attaques armées lancées par l’Autorité Palestinienne. De ce fait, tout redéploiement militaire défensif israélien est une conséquence directe de la décision palestinienne de se lancer dans une confrontation militaire croissante avec Israël et non la manifestation d’une continuation de l’occupation israélienne, comme le soutiennent les Palestiniens. Car une fois que l’Autorité Palestinienne aura pris la décision stratégique de mettre une fin à la vague de violence actuelle, il n’y a aucune raison pour que la présence militaire israélienne dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie ne retrouve pas son niveau d’avant Septembre 2000, un niveau qui avait une influence minimale sur la vie des Palestiniens. Décrire ces territoires comme « palestiniens » est certes positif pour les objectifs d’une des deux parties, mais cela préjuge des résultats des futures négociations territoriales telles que prévues par la Résolution 242 du Conseil de Sécurité de l’ONU. C’est aussi une façon de nier les droits fondamentaux d’Israël. De surcroît, la référence à une « résistance à l’occupation » est devenue un vulgaire stratagème utilisé par les porte-parole arabes et palestiniens pour justifier une campagne terroriste persistante contre Israël dans un contexte mondial où le consensus contre le terrorisme gagne en force depuis le 11 septembre 2001. Il serait beaucoup plus judicieux de décrire la Cisjordanie et la Bande de Gaza comme des « territoires contestés » sur lesquels les Israéliens et les Palestiniens ont des revendications. Dore Gold

Attention: une supercherie peut en cacher une autre !

Cachemire, Tibet, Taiwan, Kouriles, Paracels, Spratleys, Crimée, Géorgie, Ukraine, Ceuta, Mellila, Sahara occidental, Chypre, Guantanamo, Haut-Karabagh, Papouasie, Malouines, Gibraltar …

Au lendemain d’une résolution onusienne saluée, sous couvert du vieux principe du « cinq minutes pour les juifs, cinq minutes pour Hitler » et entre annexion et militarisation de territoires ou d’ilots entiers, comme « équilibrée » …

Et d’un discours du secrétaire d’Etat John Kerry présenté par le quotidien israélien Haaretz comme « superbement sioniste, pro-Israël et en retard de trois ans » …

Mais dénoncé pour sa rare agressivité et partialité par un gouvernement britannique ayant pourtant approuvé la dite résolution …

Alors qu’un gouvernement français lui aussi sur le départ se prépare à en rajouter une couche …

Pendant qu’amalgamant des résolutions n’ayant jamais à une exception près (7 pour Johnson, 15 pour Nixon, 2 pour Ford, 14 pour Carter, 14 pour Reagan, 9 pour Bush père, 3 pour Clinton, 6 pour Bush fils contre 1 pour Obama) touché à des intérêts vitaux israéliens, nos maitres ès désinformation mettent en avant les précédentes condamnations d’Israël n’ayant pas subi le veto américain …

Comment comprendre …

La forte réaction des seuls Israéliens et d’une infime minorité de leurs soutiens extérieurs …

Sans rappeler l’incroyable mensonge de la même Administration américaine qui s’était vantée un an plus tôt d’avoir retardé l’obtention de l’arme nucléaire à un pays appelant au rayage de la carte d’un de ses voisins …

Prétendant qu’il n’y avait rien de nouveau dans cette résolution sur laquelle, assurant ainsi son passage, leur pays s’était abstenu …

Alors que pour la première fois depuis 36 ans profitant, comme un certain Carter, de leurs dernières semaines au pouvoir  …

Et revenant sur son explicite récusation quatre ans plus tard par l’Administration Clinton et sa secrétaire d’Etat Madeleine Albright …

Comme sa retraduction spécifique dans la résolution onusienne en question par l’absence de référence à Jérusalem …

Les Etats-Unis entérinent ce que l’ONU et le reste du monde ont fait depuis bien longtemps (« territoires occupés »: résolution 242, 1967;  « territoires palestiniens occupés »: années 1970; « territoire palestinien occupé, incluant Jérusalem-Est »: résolution 58/292, 2004)  …

A savoir la supercherie arabe et palestinienne de l’occupation …

Passant de la dénomination neutre, qui est la norme pour les plus de 125 conflits territoriaux de la planète, de « territoires disputés »

A celle, pour le seul conflit israélo-arabe et sans compter la traduction déjà biaisée du français introduisant un article défini indu, de « territoires palestiniens occupés, incluant Jérusalem-Est »

Entrainant dans la foulée, sans parler des campagnes de désinvestissement et boycott auxquelles elle appelle ouvertement comme de la probable radicalisation des exigences palestiniennes, la délégitimation commencée avec les récentes résolutions de l’UNESCO …

Non seulement d’implantations qui seraient de toute façon, pour raisons de sécurité ou démographiques, conservées …

Mais, du Mur occidental du Temple de Jérusalem au Tombeau des patriarches d’Hébron, des lieux les plus sacrés de l’Etat hébreu lui-même ?

Des ‘Territoires occupés’ aux ‘Territoires disputés’

Dore Gold
26/05/2002

Jerusalem Letter / Viewpoints
No. 470 16 janvier 2002

[Traduction française par Liliane Messika pour reinfo-israel.com]

Original anglais : www.jcpa.org/jl/vp470.htm

(Dore Gold est le Président du Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. Auparavant, il avait été l’ambassadeur d’Israël auprès des Nations-Unies, de 1997 à 1999.)

[Nous recommandons chaudement la lecture de cet article – admirablement traduit par Liliane Messika, qui en a respecté toutes les nuances. En effet, il constitue la meilleure mise au point vulgarisée et relativement succincte que je connaisse concernant la situation juridique d’Israël au regard du droit international – qui n’est pas celle que traduit le discours ambiant des politiques et des médias. A ce titre, ce texte constitue la référence obligée pour démontrer l’inanité des accusations récurrentes qui stigmatisent Israël comme « occupant ». Il faut le lire, s’en imprégner et le diffuser largement. Menahem.]

La supercherie de l’occupation

Les porte-parole de l’OLP justifient régulièrement la violence de l’Intifada que Yasser Arafat a lancée contre Israël en septembre 2000 comme une « résistance à l’occupation ». L’argument palestinien est infondé car, jusqu’en septembre 2000, à travers la mise en œuvre des Accords d’Oslo, Israël ne gouvernait plus militairement les Palestiniens et avait transféré 40 des zones sous son contrôle à la nouvelle Autorité Palestinienne.

En conséquence de quoi, d’après l’ancien Premier Ministre, Ehud Barak, 98% de la population palestinienne était sous l’autorité du gouvernement présidé par Yasser Arafat et non sous occupation militaire israélienne. Il est vrai que les Palestiniens n’avaient pas d’Etat, mais ils n’étaient pas non plus sous occupation militaire. En tout état de cause, rien ne peut justifier l’utilisation délibérée du terrorisme contre des civils israéliens, ni lui fournir un « contexte ».

L’occupation, comme accusation

Au cœur du combat diplomatique que les Palestiniens mènent contre Israël figure l’affirmation réitérée que les Palestiniens de Cisjordanie et de la Bande de Gaza résistent à « l’occupation ». Interviewé récemment sur CNN, dans l’émission « Larry King Weekend », Hanan Ashrawi émettait l’espoir que la guerre américaine contre le terrorisme mènerait à des initiatives qui s’occuperaient de ses « causes », de ses racines. Elle poursuivait en citant spécifiquement « l’occupation, qui dure depuis trop longtemps », comme exemple d’une des causes du terrorisme (1). En d’autres termes, selon Ashrawi, la violence de l’Intifada est une conséquence directe de l’occupation.

Mustafa Barghouti, Président du Comité palestinien de Soutien Médical, également invité par CNN, affirme la même chose : « l’origine du problème, c’est l’occupation israélienne. » (2)

Le 16 janvier 2002, c’est Marwan Barghouti, chef de la faction armée de l’OLP d’Arafat, le Fatah, pour la Cisjordanie, qui reprend le même thème dans le Washington Post sous le titre : « Vous voulez la sécurité ? Arrêtez l’occupation ! »

Cette argumentation se retrouve absolument partout et en toute occasion chez les porte-parole palestiniens, qui doivent faire face à un consensus grandissant dans l’opinion internationale contre l’utilisation du terrorisme comme instrument politique.

Ce vocabulaire et cette logique ont également envahi la sphère diplomatique à l’ONU. En août 2001, un projet de résolution palestinienne au Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies reprenait la formulation palestinienne consacrée pour parler de la bande de Gaza et de la Cisjordanie comme de « territoires palestiniens occupés ». Des références à « l’occupation étrangère d’Israël » se retrouvent également dans le projet de résolution de Durban à la conférence mondiale de l’ONU contre le racisme.

L’ambassadeur de Libye aux Nations Unies, s’exprimant au nom de la faction du Groupe Arabe, reprenait, le 1er octobre 2001, ce que les porte-parole palestiniens répétaient depuis longtemps sur les chaînes de télévision câblées : « Le Groupe Arabe souligne sa détermination de s’opposer à toute tentative d’assimiler la résistance à l’occupation à un acte de terrorisme ». (3)

Cette répétition systématique des termes «occupation», ou «territoires palestiniens occupés» semble avoir trois fonctions clairement identifiables.

En premier lieu, les porte-parole palestiniens espèrent instaurer un contexte politique qui explique et même justifie le choix des Palestiniens d’adopter la violence et le terrorisme pendant l’Intifada en cours.

Ensuite, l’exigence des Palestiniens qu’Israël «cesse l’occupation» ne laisse aucune place à un éventuel compromis territorial sur la bande de Gaza ou en Cisjordanie, comme le stipulait la formulation originale de la Résolution 242 du Conseil de Sécurité (voir plus bas).

Enfin, l’utilisation de l’expression « territoires palestiniens occupés » dénie à Israël la possibilité de revendiquer cette terre : si l’on utilisait l’expression « territoires disputés », Israël et les Palestiniens se retrouveraient sur un pied d’égalité. De plus, présenter Israël comme un « occupant étranger » a l’avantage supplémentaire de permettre aux partisans de la cause palestinienne de délégitimer le lien historique entre les Juifs et Israël. C’est devenu un point central des efforts diplomatiques palestiniens depuis l’échec du sommet de Camp David en 2000, et particulièrement depuis la conférence des Nations-Unies à Durban, en 2001. Incontestablement, à Durban, la campagne de délégitimation d’Israël a exploité le mot « occupation » pour évoquer l’occupation nazie de la France pendant la seconde guerre mondiale et l’associer à ce que fait Israël en Cisjordanie et à Gaza. (4)

La terminologie en usage dans d’autres conflits territoriaux

Les termes politiquement connotés de « territoires occupés » ou de « occupation » semblent ne s’appliquer qu’à Israël, et ils ne sont jamais utilisés lorsque d’autres conflits territoriaux sont évoqués, et particulièrement par des tiers. Ainsi, le département d’Etat américain parle-t-il, à propos du Cachemire, de « territoires disputés » (5). De la même façon, dans son rapport sur les Droits de l’Homme dans les différents pays, le Département d’Etat se réfère à la partie d’Azerbaïdjan revendiquée par des séparatistes arméniens comme à « la région disputée de Nagorno-Karabakh ». (6)

Bien qu’en 1975, la Cour de Justice Internationale ait établi que le Sahara occidental n’était pas sous souveraineté marocaine, les incursions militaires marocaines dans cette ancienne colonie espagnole ne sont pratiquement jamais décrites comme un acte « d’occupation ». Dans une décision plus récente de cette même Cour Internationale de Justice, en mars 2001, l’île de Zubarah, dans le Golfe Persique, revendiquée à la fois par l’émirat de Bahrein et par le Qatar, était décrite par la Cour comme un « territoire disputé » jusqu’à ce qu’elle l’attribue finalement au Qatar. (7)

Bien sûr, chaque situation est unique, mais dans un grand nombre de cas différents mettant en scène des conflits territoriaux, du Nord de Chypre aux Iles Kourile, en passant par Abu Musa, dans le Golfe Persique (qui a déjà donné lieu à des affrontements armés), le terme « territoire occupé » n’est pas utilisé dans les discussions internationales. (8)

De ce fait, le cas de la Cisjordanie et de Gaza apparaît comme une exception unique dans l’histoire contemporaine. En effet, depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, les conflits territoriaux n’ont pas manqué, dans lesquels un territoire était antérieurement sous la souveraineté d’un autre état. Pourtant, cela n’a jamais donné lieu à l’utilisation du terme « territoire occupé » pour décrire le territoire qui était passé sous le contrôle militaire d’un autre Etat, à la suite d’un conflit armé.

Aucune souveraineté antérieure officiellement reconnue dans les territoires

Israël est entré à Gaza et en Cisjordanie pendant la Guerre des Six jours, en 1967. Les experts juridiques israéliens refusèrent les pressions qui voulaient les amener à définir la bande de Gaza et la Cisjordanie comme des « territoires occupés », ou relevant des traités internationaux statuant sur les occupations militaires. L’ancien Président de la Cour Suprême, Meïr Shamgar, écrivit, dans les années 1970, que la 4e Convention de Genève, celle de 1949, n’était juridiquement pas applicable dans la bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie, car cette convention « stipule expressément que, pour cela, un Etat souverain devait avoir été expulsé et qu’il devait avoir été un Etat souverain légitime ».

De fait, avant 1967, la Jordanie occupait la Cisjordanie et l’Egypte occupait la bande de Gaza. Leur présence sur ces territoires était le résultat de leur invasion illégale, en 1948, pour contrer la Résolution du Conseil de Sécurité de l’ONU. L’annexion de la Cisjordanie par la Jordanie, en 1950, ne fut reconnue que par la Grande Bretagne (à l’exclusion de Jérusalem) et par le Pakistan, et elle fut refusée par l’immense majorité du reste de la communauté internationale, Etats arabes inclus.

Sur l’insistance de la Jordanie, la ligne d’armistice de 1949, qui constituait la frontière entre Israël et la Jordanie jusqu’en 1967, n’était pas une frontière reconnue internationalement mais seulement une ligne séparant deux armées. L’accord d’armistice précisait textuellement : « Aucune disposition de ce traité ne pourra jamais préjuger des droits, revendications et positions d’aucune des parties, en ce qui concerne le règlement pacifique des problèmes de la Palestine, les disposition du présent accord étant dictées exclusivement par des considérations militaires » (c’est l’auteur qui souligne) (Article II.2)

Comme nous le faisions remarquer plus haut, dans de nombreux cas de l’histoire récente dans lesquels des frontières internationalement reconnues ont été transgressées au cours de conflits armés, et des territoires souverains conquis, le terme « occupation » n’a jamais été utilisé, même quand il s’agit d’agressions caractérisées. Pourtant, dans le cas de la Cisjordanie et de Gaza, où aucune souveraineté reconnue internationalement ne s’exerçait auparavant, la stigmatisation de l’Etat d’Israël comme « occupant » est devenue monnaie courante.

Agression au lieu d’autodéfense

Les juristes internationaux établissent habituellement une distinction entre des situations qualifiées de « conquêtes agressives » et celles qui se produisent après une guerre d’autodéfense. Stephen Schwebel, qui, après avoir été conseiller juridique au Département d’Etat, a présidé la Cour Internationale de Justice de La Haye, écrivait, en 1970, à propos du cas d’Israël : « Dans la mesure où le détenteur précédent du territoire avait pris possession de ce territoire de manière illégale, le nouveau détenteur, qui le prend ensuite, en exerçant son droit légal à l’autodéfense, a, par rapport au détenteur précédent, une plus grande légitimité. » (9)

C’est là que la chronologie historique des événements du 5 juin 1967 revêt toute son importance, car Israël n’a pénétré en Cisjordanie qu’après des tirs répétés d’artillerie et des mouvements de troupes jordaniens franchissant la ligne d’armistice séparant les deux pays. Les attaques jordaniennes ont commencé à 10 heures du matin. Un avertissement israélien a été adressés à la Jordanie, via les Nations Unies, à 11 heures. Malgré cela, les attaques jordaniennes ont continué, jusqu’à ce que les Israéliens réagissent militairement à 12 h 45. A cela il faut ajouter que les forces irakiennes avaient traversé le territoire jordanien et étaient en position pour entrer en Cisjordanie. Dans de telles circonstances, la ligne d’armistice provisoire de 1949 avait perdu toute validité au moment même où les forces jordaniennes violaient l’armistice et passaient à l’attaque. Ainsi, la prise de contrôle de la Cisjordanie par Israël est-elle la conséquence directe d’une guerre défensive.

Le vocabulaire de « l’occupation » a permis aux porte-parole palestiniens d’obscurcir ces faits historiques. En parlant de façon répétitive d’une « occupation », ils ont réussi à renverser la causalité du conflit, et tout spécialement devant les opinions publiques occidentales. Ainsi, l’actuel conflit territorial est présenté mensongèrement comme étant le résultat d’une décision israélienne « d’occuper » un territoire, plutôt que comme le résultat d’une guerre imposée à Israël par une coalition d’Etats arabes, en 1967.

Les droits d’Israël dans les Territoires

Aux termes de la résolution 242 du Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies du 22 novembre 1967 (qui a servi de base à la Conférence de Madrid, en 1991, et à la Déclaration de Principes de 1993), il est seulement demandé à Israël de se retirer «DE territoires» jusqu’à des «frontières sûres et reconnues», et non «DES territoires», ou «DE TOUS les territoires» conquis lors de la guerre des Six jours. Cette formulation délibérée est le résultat de plusieurs mois de négociations diplomatiques méticuleuses. Par exemple, l’Union Soviétique voulait ajouter le mot «tous» devant «territoires», dans le projet britannique qui est devenu la Résolution 242. L’ambassadeur britannique de l’époque auprès de l’ONU, Lord Caradon, résista à ces efforts (10). Les soviétiques ayant échoué dans leur tentative d’utiliser un vocabulaire qui implique un retrait total, il n’y a aucune ambiguïté sur le sens de la clause concernant le retrait dans la Résolution 242, qui a été adoptée à l’unanimité par le Conseil de Sécurité des Nations-Unies.

Ainsi, le Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies reconnaît à Israël un droit légitime sur une partie de ces territoires, pour rendre ses frontières plus faciles à défendre. George Brown, qui était ministre des Affaires Etrangères britannique en 1967, déclara, trois ans plus tard, que le sens de la Résolution 242 était que « Israël ne se retirerait pas de tous les territoires » (11). Lorsqu’on la conjugue avec la Résolution 338, il est parfaitement clair que seules des négociations pourront déterminer quelles parties de ces territoires deviendront partie intégrante d’Israël et lesquelles seront gardées par l’homologue arabe d’Israël.

En réalité, la dernière attribution de territoire, internationalement reconnue, incluant ce qui est aujourd’hui la Cisjordanie et la bande de Gaza, a eu lieu lors du Mandat pour la Palestine de la Société des Nations, en 1922, qui reconnaissait les droits du peuple juif sur l’ensemble des territoires concernés par le Mandat, en ces termes : « le lien historique entre le peuple juif et la Palestine et le bien-fondé de la reconstitution de leur foyer national dans ce pays ont été reconnus». Les membres de la Société des Nations n’ont pas créé les droits du peuple juif, mais ont plutôt ratifié un droit préexistant, qui s’était exprimé par l’aspiration bimillénaire du peuple juif à recréer sa patrie.

De surcroît, les droits d’Israël ont également été préservés par les Nations-Unies, en vertu de l’article 80 de la charte des Nations Unies, malgré la dissolution de la Société des Nations en 1946. L’article 80 stipule que rien, dans la charte des Nations-Unies, ne peut être interprété de manière qui porte atteinte au droit de quelque peuple ou de quelque pays que ce soit, ou qui modifie les termes des traités internationaux en vigueur ». Ces droits n’ont pas été modifiés par la Résolution 181 de l’Assemblée Générale de l’ONU de novembre 1947 (« le plan de partage » [de la Palestine]) qui était une recommandation non contraignante, et qui a été, de toute façon, rejetée par les Palestiniens et les Etats arabes.

D’après ces sources incontestées du droit international, Israël possède des droits légalement reconnus sur la Cisjordanie et Gaza, droits qui semblent être ignorés par ceux des observateurs internationaux qui répètent la formule « territoires occupés », sans avoir la moindre conscience des droits d’Israël à des revendications territoriales. Même si Israël cherche seulement des « frontières sûres » qui englobent une partie de la bande de Gaza ou de la Cisjordanie, il y a un monde de différence entre la situation dans laquelle Israël se présente à la communauté internationale en tant « qu’occupant étranger » sans droits territoriaux, et celle dans laquelle Israël a, sur cette terre, des droits historiques solides qui lui ont été reconnus par les principaux organes qui servent de source à la légitimité internationale depuis un siècle.

Après Oslo, les territoires peuvent-ils encore être qualifiés « d’occupés » ?

Dans les années 1980, Herbert Hansell, conseiller juridique du Département d’Etat sous la présidence de Carter, chercha à déplacer la discussion sur l’occupation du territoire lui-même aux Palestiniens qui y vivaient. Il estima que la 4e Convention de Genève de 1949 concernant les occupations militaires s’appliquait à la Bande de Gaza et à la Cisjordanie puisque son objectif suprême était de « protéger la population civile d’un territoire occupé. » [12]

L’analyse juridique de Hansell fut abandonnée pas les administrations Reagan et Bush ; cependant, il avait, d’une certaine manière, changé l’angle sous lequel on considérait les choses, le projecteur passant du territoire à sa population. Même ainsi, les définitions officielles de ce qui est constitutif d’une population occupée ne conviennent pas, et d’autant moins depuis la mise en œuvre des Accords d’Oslo de 1993.

A ce moment, Israël transféra les pouvoirs spécifiques de son gouvernement militaire en Cisjordanie et dans la Bande de Gaza à l’Autorité Palestinienne nouvellement créée. Dès 1994, le Conseiller juridique de la Croix-Rouge, le Dr Hans-Peter Gasser, concluait que son organisation n’avait plus aucune raison de surveiller le respect, par Israël, de la 4e Convention de Genève dans la Bande de Gaza et dans la région de Jéricho, puisque la Convention ne s’appliquait plus, l’administration de ces zones étant passée sous contrôle palestinien. (13)

Lors de la signature du deuxième accord intérimaire, Oslo II, en septembre 1995, qui étendait l’administration palestinienne à toutes les autres villes de Cisjordanie, le Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, Shimon Peres, déclara : « une fois que cet accord sera mis en œuvre, les Palestiniens ne seront plus du tout sous notre domination. Ils se gouverneront eux-mêmes et nous retournerons à notre patrimoine » (14).

Depuis lors, 98% de la population de la Cisjordanie et de la Bande de Gaza sont sous juridiction palestinienne (15). Israël a transféré 40 domaines de l’autorité civile avec la responsabilité de la sécurité et de l’ordre public à l’Autorité Palestinienne, ne gardant sous son autorité que la sécurité extérieure et la sécurité des citoyens israéliens.

La 4e Convention de Genève, de 1949 (article 6), stipule que la Puissance Occupante n’est soumise à ses dispositions que « tant que cette Puissance exerce les fonctions d’un gouvernement dans ces territoires ». Sous les Ordonnances de La Haye, de 1907, qui avaient précédé la Convention de Genève, un territoire n’était considéré comme occupé que lorsqu’il était véritablement sous le contrôle effectif de l’occupant. De ce fait, d’après les principaux textes internationaux consacrés à l’occupation militaire, le transfert de ses pouvoirs par Israël à l’Autorité Palestinienne a fait qu’il est difficile de continuer à définir la Cisjordanie et Gaza comme des territoires occupés.

Ces derniers mois, Israël a été obligé de continuer à exercer les pouvoirs qui lui restent uniquement en réponse à l’escalade de la violence et des attaques armées lancées par l’Autorité Palestinienne (16). De ce fait, tout redéploiement militaire défensif israélien est une conséquence directe de la décision palestinienne de se lancer dans une confrontation militaire croissante avec Israël et non la manifestation d’une continuation de l’occupation israélienne, comme le soutiennent les Palestiniens. Car une fois que l’Autorité Palestinienne aura pris la décision stratégique de mettre une fin à la vague de violence actuelle, il n’y a aucune raison pour que la présence militaire israélienne dans la Bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie ne retrouve pas son niveau d’avant Septembre 2000, un niveau qui avait une influence minimale sur la vie des Palestiniens.

Décrire ces territoires comme « palestiniens » est certes positif pour les objectifs d’une des deux parties, mais cela préjuge des résultats des futures négociations territoriales telles que prévues par la Résolution 242 du Conseil de Sécurité de l’ONU. C’est aussi une façon de nier les droits fondamentaux d’Israël. De surcroît, la référence à une « résistance à l’occupation » est devenue un vulgaire stratagème utilisé par les porte-parole arabes et palestiniens pour justifier une campagne terroriste persistante contre Israël dans un contexte mondial où le consensus contre le terrorisme gagne en force depuis le 11 septembre 2001.

Il serait beaucoup plus judicieux de décrire la Cisjordanie et la Bande de Gaza comme des « territoires contestés » sur lesquels les Israéliens et les Palestiniens ont des revendications. Comme le déclarait Madeleine Albright, ambassadeur américain auprès des Nations Unies en 1994, « nous ne sommes tout simplement pas d’accord avec le fait de décrire les territoires occupés par Israël lors de la Guerre des Six Jours comme des territoires palestiniens occupés ».

———————————-

Notes :

(1) CNN Larry King Weekend, « La guérison de l’Amérique : Peut-on gagner la guerre contre le terrorisme ? », émission diffusée le 10/11/2001 (CNN.com/transcripts).
(2) Mustafa Barghouti, « Le problème, c’est l’occupation », Al-Ahram, supplément du week-end, 6 décembre 2001.
(3) Anne F. Bayefsky, « Terrorisme et racisme: l’après Durban », Jerusalem Viewpoints, n° 468, 16 décembre 2001.
(4) Voir Bayefsky, op. cit. Les officiels américains et européens utilisent peut-être le terme « occupation » par souci humanitaire en référence aux besoins des Palestiniens, sans nécessairement se conformer au programme politique que l’OLP a appliqué à Durban, ou applique à l’ONU.
(5) U.S. Department of State, Consular Information Sheet: India (travel.state.gov/india.html), 23 Novembre 2001.
(6) 1999 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Azerbaijan, publié par le Comité pour la Démocratie, les Droits de l’Homme et du travail, Département d’Etat américain, 25 février 2000.
(7) Cas concernant les questions de délimitations territoriales et maritimes entre le Qatar et Bahrain, 15 Mars 2001, Jugement sur les attendus, Cour Internationale de Justice, 16 Mars 2000, paragraphe 100.
(8) Le ministre japonais des Affaires Etrangères n’utilise pas la formule « fin de l’occupation russe aux Iles Kourile ». Au lieu de cela, il parle de « résoudre le problème des Territoires du Nord »
(www.mofa.go.jp/region/europe/russia/territory http://www.mofa.go.jp/region/europe/russia/territory). Le Département d’Etat américain, dans ses « Notes de conjoncture », décrit la République turque du Nord de Chypre comme « la zone Nord (qui est) une administration chypriote-turque appuyée par la présence de troupes turques ». Il ne parle pas « d’occupation turque ».
(9) Stephen Schwebel, « Le poids de la conquête », American Journal of International Law, 64 (1970), pp. 345-347.
(10) Vernon Turner, « Les dessous de la résolution 242 – Les points de vue des acteurs de la région », dans UN Security Council Resolution 242 : la construction du processus de paix (Washington: Institut de Washington pour la politique au Proche-Orient, 1993), p. 27.
(11) Meir Rosenne, « Les interprétations légales de la résolution UNSC242, » in UN Security Council Resolution 242: la construction du processus de paix (Washington: Institut de Washington pour la politique au Proche-Orient, 1993), p. 31.
(12) Sous l’administration Carter, cette distinction faite par Hansell entraîna, pour la première fois, une prise de position américaine déclarant illégales les implantations israéliennes, puisqu’elles étaient présentées comme contrevenant à l’Article 49 de la 4e Convention de Genève, qui stipule que « la puissance occupante ne doit pas expulser ni transférer une partie de sa population civile dans les territoires qu’elle occupe ». Ultérieurement, les administrations Reagan et Bush modifièrent la formulation de la période Carter, modifièrent le mode de vote américain à l’ONU, et refusèrent de qualifier d’illégales les implantations israéliennes, tout en continuant à formuler des objections contre cette pratique. Une des raisons de ce revirement était le fait que la 4e Convention s’appliquait à des situations du type de celle de l’Europe occupée par les Nazis, ce qui impliquait « des transferts forcés, la déportation ou le déplacement de masses de gens ». Cette opinion a été officiellement formulée le 1er février 1990 par l’ambassadeur américain aux Nations-Unies à Genève, Morris Abram, qui faisait partie du personnel américain aux procès de Nuremberg et pour qui, de ce fait, les motivations de la 4e Convention de Genève n’avaient pas de secret.
(13) Dr. Hans-Peter Gasser, Conseiller juridique, Comité International de la Croix-Rouge, « sur l’applicabilité de la 4e Convention de Genève, après la Déclaration de principes et l’Accord du Caire », contribution présentée au Colloque International sur les Droits de l ‘homme, Gaza, 10-12 septembre 1994. Gasser n’a pas déclaré que, selon son opinion, les territoires n’étaient plus « occupés », il a seulement souligné les complications entraînées par la mise en oeuvre des Accords d’Oslo.
(14) Discours du Ministre des Affaires Etrangères Shimon Peres, lors de la cérémonie de signature de l’accord intérimaire israélo-palestinien, Washington, D.C., 28 septembre 1995.
(15) Ehud Barak, « Israel a besoin d’un véritable partenaire pour faire la paix », New York Times, 30 juillet 2001.
(16) La violence de l’actuelle Intifada résulte d’une décision stratégique prise par Yasser Arafat, comme en témoigne de nombreux porte-parole palestiniens :
– « Quiconque pense que l’Intifada a démarré à cause de la visite du méprisable Sharon à la mosquée Al-Aqsa a tort… Cette Intifada était planifiée depuis longtemps, très précisément depuis le retour du Président Arafat des négociations de Camp David », a admis le Ministre palestinien de l’information Imad Al-Faluji (Al-Safir, 3 mars 2001, traduction MEMRI). Auparavant, Al-Faluji avait expliqué que le lancement de l’Intifada était le résultat d’une décision stratégique prise par les Palestiniens (Al-Ayyam, décembre 6, 2000).
– Arafat a commencé à appeler à une nouvelle Intifada dans les premiers mois de l’année 2000. Parlant devant la jeunesse du Fatah, à Ramallah, Arafat « a laissé entendre que les Palestiniens étaient susceptibles de recourir à l’option de l’Intifada » (Al-Mujahid, 3 avril 2000).
– Marwan Barghouti, chef du Fatah de Cisjordanie, expliquait, début mars 2000: « Nous devons mener la bataille sur le terrain parallèlement à la bataille de la négociation… je veux dire la confrontation  » (Ahbar Al-Halil , 8 mars 2000). Durant l’été 2000, le Fatah a entraîné la jeunesse palestinienne en vue de la violence prochaine, dans 40 camps de formation.
– L’édition de juillet 2000 du mensuel Al-Shuhada, diffusé dans les Services de Sécurité palestiniens, déclare: « De la délégation aux négociations, dirigée par le commandant et symbole, Abu Amar (Yasser Arafat), au courageux peuple palestinien : soyez prêts. La bataille pour Jérusalem a commencé ». Un mois plus tard, le commandant de la Police palestinienne déclarait au journal palestinien officiel Al-Hayat Al-Jadida : « La police palestinienne sera en tête avec les nobles fils du peuple palestinien, quand l’heure de la confrontation arrivera ». Freih Abu Middein, ministre de la Justice de l’Autorité Palestinienne, avertissait, le même mois: « La violence est proche et les Palestiniens sont disposés à sacrifier 5.000 victimes [s’il le faut] » (Al-Hayat al-Jadida, 24 août 2000 – MEMRI).
– Une autre publication officielle de l’Autorité Palestinienne, Al-Sabah, en date du 11 septembre 2000, déclarait, plus de deux semaines avant la visite de Sharon [au Mont du Temple] : « Nous avancerons et décrèterons une Intifada générale pour Jérusalem. Le temps de l’Intifada est venu, le temps de l’Intifada est venu, le temps du Jihad est venu ».
– Le conseiller d’Arafat, Mamduh Nufal, déclarait au Nouvel Observateur français (1er mars 2001): « Quelques jours avant la visite de Sharon à la Mosquée, quand Arafat nous a demandé d’être prêts à lancer une nouvelle confrontation, j’ai encouragé des démonstrations de masse, et je me suis opposé à l’utilisation d’armes à feu ». Bien entendu, Arafat a finalement opté pour l’utilisation d’armes à feu et les attaques à l’explosif contre les civils israéliens et le personnel de l’armée. Le 30 septembre 2001, Nufal précisait, dans al-Ayyam, qu’Arafat avait en fait donné des ordres aux commandants locaux, le 28 septembre 2000, en vue de confrontations violentes avec Israël.

Voir aussi:

Colonie ou implantation? Outre la guerre des images, la bataille sémantique fait rage au Proche-Orient. La terminologie diffère selon les parties. Elle peut devenir un véritable casse-tête.

Il y a quelques temps, une journaliste fraîchement débarquée en Israël m’a demandé si j’employais le mot «colonie» ou «implantation». J’ai répondu que j’utilisais généralement le terme «implantation». «Pourquoi?», s’est interrogé ma collègue. Sa question m’a alors amenée à réfléchir sur la terminologie du conflit israélo-palestinien.

Lorsqu’il s’agit du Proche-Orient, il faut parfois tourner sept fois sa langue dans sa bouche avant de parler. Doit-on avoir peur des mots? Doit-on redouter un déluge de critiques par l’emploi de tel ou tel vocabulaire? Rendre compte de l’actualité israélo-palestinienne relève d’une rigueur sémantique, afin d’éviter les imprécisions, les erreurs, les prises de position qui soulèvent alors la colère de tel ou tel camp.

Celui qui tient à une certaine neutralité doit s’interroger sur le sens des mots choisis, mais aussi sur la terminologie entérinée par la presse française et la communauté internationale.

Si Israël a gagné les conflits armés, la bataille des mots est pour l’Etat hébreu une lutte acharnée et perpétuelle. Le vocabulaire utilisé influence la perception du conflit, véhicule des idées (parfois erronées) et transmettent une représentation de la réalité. Par exemple, les termes de «Cisjordanie occupée» impliquent que la présence israélienne est illégale. A l’inverse, parler de «Judée Samarie» sous-entend le lien historique de cette terre avec le peuple juif.

Alors, doit-on parler de colonie ou d’implantation? Dire terroriste ou activiste? Territoire occupé ou territoire disputé? Cisjordanie/Judée Samarie? Barrière de sécurité ou mur de l’Apartheid? Esplanade des Mosquées ou Mont du Temple? Indépendance d’Israël ou Nakba? Pour se faire une idée du sens de chaque terme, passons en revue l’essentiel des mots que se disputent les deux parties.

Colonie/Implantation

Les colonies ou implantations israéliennes sont des communautés de peuplement, établies sur les territoires conquis à la suite de la guerre des Six Jours, en Cisjordanie, à Gaza et à Jérusalem-Est. Près de 350.000 habitants juifs vivent dans plus de 130 implantations de Cisjordanie et 180.000 dans une douzaine de quartiers de Jérusalem Est.

Ces communautés de peuplement sont appelées «Israel settlement» ou «Jewish settlement» par les médias anglophones, ce qui sous-entend une connotation neutre. Le mot «settlement» se traduit en français par «colonie» ou encore «implantation». Les ouvrages spécialisés, les textes de l’ONU et la presse française utilisent généralement le mot «colonie».

Mais les Israéliens dénoncent l’emploi de ce terme qui selon eux a un sens péjoratif et fait référence dans la mémoire collective à la colonisation européenne (notamment à la présence française en Algérie), dont l’image était très négative. Les Israéliens utilisent les mots «implantation» ou encore «avant-poste». Ils défendent une présence juive dans la région qui n’a pas cessé depuis plus de 3.000 ans.

Si aux yeux de la communauté internationale les colonies sont illégales, l’État hébreu déclare, quant à lui, qu’aucun traité de paix n’a établi de statut juridique sur ces territoires, que la présence de communautés juives à Hébron est multiséculaire ou que leur création à Jérusalem ou en Samarie est attestée depuis le mandat britannique sur la Palestine.

Le terme de «colons» pour désigner les habitants juifs des implantations est systématiquement fustigé par la droite israélienne.

Terroriste/Activiste, militant, résistant

Le 19 octobre dernier, lorsque le soldat franco-israélien Gilad Shalit a été libéré contre plus de 1.000 prisonniers palestiniens, les Palestiniens ont fêté la libération de «résistants». Du point de vue israélien, Gilad Shalit était échangé contre des «terroristes», auteurs d’attaques contre l’Etat hébreu.

Un terroriste est aux yeux de l’ennemi un résistant. Prenons l’exemple des membres du Hamas, considéré comme une organisation terroriste par les Etats-Unis et l’Union européenne. Pour la presse internationale, il s’agit de «militant» ou «activiste du Hamas». Les médias palestiniens les qualifient de «résistant» (ou «martyr») tandis que pour la presse israélienne, ils sont des «terroristes».

Le gouvernement israélien condamne régulièrement la presse internationale qui emploie frileusement le mot «terroriste».

«Nous avons encore parfois des débats sur ce terme, avoue Marius Schattner, de l’Agence France Presse. Qui peut-on qualifier de terroriste ou pas?»

Territoire occupé/Territoire disputé

L’expression «territoire occupé» renvoie aux territoires conquis par Israël lors de la guerre des Six Jours. Cette terminologie est largement utilisée par la communauté internationale et les médias français. Pour les Israéliens, la Cisjordanie est un «territoire disputé» ou «territoire contesté».

Après la guerre des Six Jours, la résolution 242 est votée au Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies. De cette résolution, naît deux interprétations divergentes. Les discussions portent sur la formulation à donner au retrait israélien des territoires conquis. La version française fait état d’un retrait des «territoires occupés», ce qui sous entend de la totalité des territoires conquis en 1967.

En anglais, le texte officiel parle d’une évacuation «from occupied territories» («de territoires occupés»), soit un retrait d’une partie des territoires seulement. Pour Israël, seule la traduction anglaise est la bonne. Alors que pour les Arabes, la formule française est la seule valable (1).

Cette formulation délibérée est le résultat de plusieurs mois de négociations diplomatiques. George Brown, qui était ministre des Affaires Etrangères britannique en 1967, déclara, trois ans plus tard, que le sens de la résolution 242 était qu’«Israël ne se retirerait pas de tous les territoires».

Comme le déclarait Madeleine Albright, ambassadeur américain auprès des Nations unies en 1994, «nous ne sommes tout simplement pas d’accord avec le fait de décrire les territoires occupés par Israël lors de la Guerre des Six Jours comme des territoires palestiniens occupés» (2). La résolution 58/292 du 14 mai 2004 de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies utilise l’expression «territoire palestinien occupé, incluant Jérusalem-Est» [PDF]. L’emploi du singulier est d’importance car il reconnaît l’intégrité territoriale palestinienne, contrairement à l’appellation fréquemment utilisée de «territoires palestiniens».

Lorsque la Transjordanie a annexé la Judée et la Samarie en 1948, aucun Etat, hormis la Grande-Bretagne et le Pakistan, n’a reconnu cette annexion. Les Israéliens rappellent qu’aucune souveraineté antérieure à 1967 n’a jamais été officiellement reconnue sur ces territoires.

Les États arabes qui occupaient la région avait insisté en 1949 pour que la ligne d’armistice ne constitue «pas une frontière reconnue internationalement mais seulement une ligne séparant deux armées». C’est ce que tentent d’expliquer deux vidéos israéliennes postées sur Internet: l’une émane de l’organisation des localités juives de Judée Samarie, Yesha Council:

L’autre provient du vice-ministre israélien des Affaires étrangères, Danny Ayalon:

Doit-on avoir un Etat pour être «occupé»? Emmanuel Navon, professeur de sciences politiques à l’Université de Tel Aviv, explique:

«Au sens juridique du terme, l’expression “Cisjordanie occupée” est inexacte. Un territoire est occupé lorsqu’une partie ou l’ensemble d’un Etat souverain est conquis. Ce qui veut dire que cela ne s’applique pas à la rive occidentale du Jourdain, puisqu’avant 1967, elle ne faisait pas partie d’un Etat souverain. Il y a eu un vide juridique entre 1948 et 1967.»

Ce à quoi certains répondent:

«Mais qui dit qu’il faut avoir un Etat pour être occupé?»

Après la guerre des Six Jours, Israël occupe militairement la Cisjordanie. Au regard des principes du droit international, l’utilisation de la guerre pour s’emparer de territoires fut condamnée par les résolutions 242 en 1967 et 338 en 1973 du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies. En 2004, un avis de la Cour internationale de Justice des Nations unies rappelle la convention de La Haye de 1907:

«Un territoire est considéré comme occupé lorsqu’il se trouve placé de fait sous l’autorité de l’armée ennemie.»

Israël est l’un des rares pays considérés comme force occupante dans le monde. Dans de nombreux autres conflits territoriaux, les diplomates évoquent plutôt des «territoires disputés». Il n’a jamais été question d’occupation au Cachemire, revendiqué par l’Inde et la Pakistan. On ne parle pas non plus d’occupation pour la région du Haut-Karabagh, revendiquée par l’Azerbaïdjan et l’Arménie, ni pour la présence turque dans le nord de l’île de Chypre, depuis 1974.

Cisjordanie/Judée Samarie

La région est délimitée à l’est par le Jourdain et la Mer Morte; au nord, au sud et à l’ouest par la ligne verte de 1949. Elle couvre une surface de 5.860 km2 et compte en 2010 une population totale estimée à 2.514.845 personnes dont 350.000 Israéliens.

La région englobe Jérusalem-Est, les villes de Bethléem, Hébron, Jéricho, Naplouse, Jénine, des implantations israéliennes, telles qu’Ariel, Maale Adumim, ainsi que de nombreux lieux saints des trois religions monothéistes.

En novembre 1947, lors du plan de partage de la Palestine mandataire votée par les Nations unies, la Judée-Samarie est initialement attribuée à un futur Etat arabe. A la fin de la première guerre israélo-arabe, la région est annexée par la Transjordanie. En 1950, la Transjordanie prend le nom de Royaume Hachémite de Jordanie pour entériner cette annexion.

A la fin de la guerre des Six Jours en 1967, les Jordaniens perdent la Judée-Samarie qui passe sous le contrôle de l’Etat d’Israël (qui ne l’a toutefois pas annexée pour des raisons démographiques).

Judée et Samarie font référence aux territoires des deux royaumes bibliques, la Judée (capitale: Jérusalem) et Israël (capitale: Samarie). Elles sont des termes utilisés depuis l’Antiquité, pour désigner différentes parties de ces territoires de la rive occidentale du Jourdain. Ces termes ont été utilisés dans la résolution 181 des Nations unies pour désigner précisément certains des territoires dans le partage de la Palestine en 1948.

Le terme Judée-Samarie était communément utilisée par les médias et les instances internationales jusqu’à l’annexion de la région par la Transjordanie. Depuis 1949, la Judée et la Samarie ont été rebaptisées Cisjordanie par la communauté internationale. Étymologiquement, «Cisjordanie» désigne la région «du même côté», la rive ouest du Jourdain, par opposition à «l’autre côté», la rive est du fleuve, la Jordanie. La Cisjordanie est donc un terme récent pour désigner les territoires à l’ouest du Jourdain.

En Israël, le gouvernement et la population utilisent la dénomination de «Judée-Samarie», qui affirme le lien historique entre l’identité juive et ce territoire. Les anglophones utilisent l’expression «West Bank» —littéralement «rive ouest»— appellation également géographique et plus neutre vis-à-vis de l’autre rive du Jourdain.

Barrière de sécurité/Mur d’apartheid

La barrière de sécurité est un mur construit depuis 2002 en Cisjordanie, pour délimiter Israël des territoires palestiniens. Sa construction a été décidée pendant la deuxième intifada, à la suite de la vague d’attentats-suicides qui frappaient le cœur d’Israël. L’objectif déclaré de ce mur est de protéger la population israélienne, en empêchant physiquement toute intrusion en provenance des territoires palestiniens. Les partisans de la construction du mur parlent de «barrière», de «clôture de sécurité», ou de «barrière anti-terroriste».

Les opposants à cette barrière la surnomment «mur de la honte», voire «mur de l’apartheid», en référence au régime de ségrégation en vigueur en Afrique du Sud jusqu’en 1991. Les médias de l’Autorité palestinienne se réfèrent à cette barrière en langue arabe par la définition politique de «mur de séparation raciale» (jidar al-fasl al-‘unsuri).

Les médias français utilisent généralement le terme de «barrière de sécurité» ou «mur de séparation».

L’existence de cette barrière est contestée par la communauté internationale. En 2004, un avis de la Cour internationale de Justice la déclare «illégale». Son tracé soulève de nombreuses polémiques. Long de 730 km, la barrière suit la ligne verte, mais pénètre profondément à l’intérieur de la Cisjordanie pour intégrer des colonies juives.

Le mur complique le quotidien des Palestiniens, entraînant des difficultés de déplacement, l’enclavement de certains villages palestiniens et la réquisition de terres palestiniennes.

De son coté, le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères affirme que la construction de la barrière de séparation a permis de sauver un grand nombre de vies et de réduire le nombre d’attentats-suicides en territoire israélien. En 2002, les bombes vivantes ont tuées 194 personnes, 104 en 2003 et 13 en 2005.

Esplanade des Mosquées/Mont du Temple

Situé dans la vieille ville de Jérusalem, l’Esplanade des Mosquées ou le Mont du Temple est l’endroit où selon la tradition juive et islamique, Abraham, père des trois religions monothéistes, est testé par Dieu qui lui demande de sacrifier son fils.

Pour le peuple juif, le Mont du Temple est le premier lieu saint du judaïsme, l’endroit le plus sacré. C’est là qu’il y a près de 3.000 ans, le roi Salomon construisit le premier Temple de Jérusalem qui fut détruit par les Babyloniens en l’an 586 avant l’ère chrétienne. 70 ans plus tard, les juifs, de retour d’exil, édifièrent le deuxième Temple qui fut rasé par les Romains en 70 après JC. L’unique vestige du Temple de Jérusalem aujourd’hui est le mur occidental, appelé Mur des lamentations, devant lequel des milliers de Juifs viennent se prosterner chaque jour.

Pour les musulmans, le Mont du Temple (en arabe Haram esh-Sharif) n’est autre que l’Esplanade des Mosquées. L’Esplanade des Mosquées, troisième lieu saint de l’islam, abrite depuis le VIIe siècle le Dôme du Rocher et la mosquée Al Aqsa.

Selon la tradition, c’est de là que Mahomet accompagné de l’ange Gabriel aurait effectué son voyage nocturne vers le paradis. La gestion de l’ensemble de l’Esplanade des Mosquées a été confiée au Waqf, fondation religieuse islamique.

Ce lieu saint attise les passions et la convoitise des fidèles, juifs et musulmans, car l’Esplanade des Mosquées est construite là où se trouvait le Temple de Jérusalem. Dans le passé, il a été l’objet de violentes émeutes entre Palestiniens et forces de l’ordre israéliennes. L’héritage de ce lieu est d’autant plus d’actualité que l’Unesco vient d’accepter la Palestine comme Etat membre à part entière. Les Israéliens redoutent que les Palestiniens proposent la candidature de l’Esplanade des Mosquées comme partie intégrante de leur patrimoine. Une initiative qui pourrait alors déclencher un conflit religieux.

Indépendance d’Israël/Nakba

Le 14 mai est le jour anniversaire de la déclaration d’indépendance de l’Etat d’Israël (proclamée le 14 Mai 1948), appelé Yom Haatsmaout. La date varie chaque année en fonction du calendrier hébraïque. Dans l’ensemble du pays, cette journée est célébrée par de nombreuses festivités, des cérémonies officielles, démonstrations militaires ou encore concerts en plein air. Il est de tradition d’organiser des pique-niques barbecue.

«Leur indépendance, c’est notre Nakba.» Chaque année, alors que les Israéliens célèbrent leur indépendance, les Palestiniens commémorent la «Nakba», la catastrophe en arabe, que représente pour eux la naissance de l’Etat d’Israël. La «Nakba» marque l’exode de la population arabe palestinienne (entre 700.000 et 900.000 Palestiniens; les Israéliens parlent officiellement de quelque 520.000 Arabes) des régions qui devinrent l’Etat Juif après la première guerre israélo-arabe de 1948. Tous les ans, la «Nakba» est marquée par des manifestations d’Arabes israéliens et des heurts entre l’armée israélienne et les Palestiniens.

Au Proche-Orient, la guerre des mots est menée avec autant d’acharnement que celle des images.

Kristell Bernaud

(1) Charles Enderlin, Le grand aveuglement, Albin Michel.

(2) Meir Rosenne, «Les interprétations légales de la résolution UNSC242» in UN Security Council Resolution 242: la construction du processus de paix (Washington: Institut de Washington pour la politique au Proche-Orient, 1993), p. 31

Voir encore:

Pourquoi le débat israélo-palestinien s’est focalisé sur la question des villes et villages israéliens en Judée-Samarie?

La stratégie des Arabes palestiniens, pour annihiler Israël, de plus en plus clairement, consiste à tabler sur la négation de la légitimité de la souveraineté juive en Terre d’Israël que les non juifs dénomment: « Palestine ». Ils comptent, pour ce faire, s’appuyer sur l’antisémitisme musulman et sur l’antisémitisme chrétien et ils les pratiquent et les diffusent à grande échelle. Ils estiment que leur meilleur argument serait d’ordre juridique contre l’ »occupation ». Il est temps de faire voler en éclats cette manipulation et ce mensonge repris avec constance par les gouvernements occidentaux.

Rappelons une fois de plus que la seule base juridique consensuelle en Droit International Public (D.I.P.) quant à la reconnaissance par les Nations du droit imprescriptible du Peuple Juif sur sa patrie historique, est le Traité de San Remo adopté sous les auspices de la Société des Nations (S.D.N.), organisation internationale à vocation universelle, créée après la première guerre mondiale et la dislocation de l’Empire Ottoman.

Faisant suite à une déclaration politique du Ministre des Affaires Etrangères de l’une des grandes puissances de cette époque, la Grande–Bretagne, à la demande du Mouvement Sioniste, avant-garde militante du Peuple d’Israël, la Déclaration Balfour, ce traité approuvé par toutes les puissances importantes, reconnaissait au Peuple Juif le droit de rétablir un « foyer national » dans son pays.

Le territoire alloué aux Juifs comprenait le territoire israélien actuel, la Judée, la Samarie, Gaza et le territoire actuel de la Jordanie. La seule réserve à cette reconnaissance était le maintien des droits acquis des communautés non-juives.

La première partition de la Palestine  par la Grande-Bretagne à qui le traité avait confié un « mandat » pour la mise en œuvre de ce programme, a été réalisée pratiquement dès son entrée en fonction, retirant aux Juifs les 3/5 de leur patrie en les cantonnant en Palestine occidentale, en violation du mandat.

L’Etat de Jordanie créé de toutes pièces par la Grande-Bretagne en 1946 s’est emparé par la force et illégalement, avec l’aide empressée des Britanniques, dès la proclamation de l’Etat d’Israël en 1948, de la Judée et de la Samarie. L’Egypte a fait de même pour la région de Gaza. Cette occupation de régions importantes de la Palestine occidentale par ces deux Etats, qui a duré 19 ans, constituait une violation du droit international.

La résolution 181, de 1947, de l’A.G. des Nations-Unies, organisation qui a pris la suite de la S.D.N. après la seconde guerre mondiale, une recommandation sans effet obligatoire, prévoyait la création de deux Etats en Palestine occidentale, l’un juif et l’autre arabe et entendait priver les Juifs de leur capitale, Jérusalem, où ils constituaient depuis plus d’un siècle une large majorité des habitants.

Tous les Etats arabes et les Arabes palestiniens ont refusé le plan de partage et ont lancé leurs armées pour détruire dans l’œuf l’Etat juif naissant et massacrer la communauté juive de Palestine.

Après la signature de l’armistice de Rhodes en 1949, et la surprenante résistance des combattants juifs sortis de l’ombre, ni la Jordanie, ni l’Egypte n’ont songé un seul instant à constituer un Etat arabe palestinien dans les territoires de la Palestine occidentale qu’ils contrôlaient. Ils continuaient d’affirmer publiquement leurs intentions génocidaires contre Israël.

Cette attitude a des conséquences de droit: elle rendait la résolution 181 obsolète. Ce qui fait que lorsque Israël répliqua en 1967 à une nouvelle tentative génocidaire massive et déclarée des armées égyptienne, syrienne, jordanienne, iraquienne et d’un contingent algérien, en libérant, entre autres, toute la Palestine occidentale, sur le plan du droit, il ne s’agissait en aucun cas de l’occupation de territoires appartenant à un autre Etat mais bien de terres attribuées au peuple Juif par le Traité de San Remo! C’est pourquoi sur cette base, les villes et villages juifs établis légalement sur ce territoire le sont sur des terres domaniales et évitent l’appropriation de terres appartenant à des communautés non juives par application dudit traité.

Les gouvernements occidentaux qui ont tous le moyen de connaître cette réalité de droit font cependant semblant de croire, contre toute logique juridique, qu’Israël occuperait ces territoires qui lui seraient étrangers, avec toutes les règles du D.I.P. qui en découlent. Ce faisant ils prolongent et aggravent le conflit.

En effet les Arabes palestiniens peuvent dans ce cas légitimement croire qu’il leur suffit d’attendre et que tôt ou tard, la totalité de la Terre d’Israël tombera dans leurs rets. Pour eux, Tel-Aviv est une « colonie ». Ils vont même jusqu’à justifier ainsi leur refus de toute concession comparant leur attitude à celle de la mère véritable dans le fameux jugement du Roi hébreu Salomon!

La tentative du gouvernement français actuel, si clairement en détresse, de fixer le sort d’Israël en convoquant une conférence internationale hors la présence de l’Etat juif souverain relève de la fantasmagorie où le mépris des Juifs est évident. Il est temps de signifier à tous ceux qui se trompent d’époque et de rapport de force militaire, que le royaume latin de Jérusalem a vécu. Les Juifs redevenus Hébreux sont rentrés chez eux pour l’éternité.

Voir encore:

Why are people so upset over the latest U.N. resolution about Israel?

CBS News

December 28, 2016

The Obama administration’s decision to not veto a United Nations resolution sharply critical of Israeli settlements continues to stir debate. But was it really all that different than prior U.N. resolutions that criticized Israel that the U.S. let pass?

The U.N. resolution condemning Israeli settlement activity passed the Security Council last week after the U.S. declined to use its veto power to stop it. Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., instead cast the sole abstaining vote. All other nations on the Security Council voted in favor.

The resolution called for Israel to “immediately and completely cease all settlement activities in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem.”

East Jerusalem, which contains some of the holiest sites in Judaism, was seized by Israel in the Six-Day War of 1967. In a speech before the chamber, Power insisted that her vote did “not in any way diminish the United States’ steadfast and unparalleled commitment to the security of Israel.”

Conservatives and pro-Israel advocates say the resolution signals a major and damaging reversal of U.S. policy in the region. “The White House has abandoned any pretense that the actual parties to the conflict must resolve their differences,” John Bolton, the former U.S. ambassador to the U.N., wrote in the Wall Street Journal on Monday.

But Democrats have argued that conservative criticisms of the White House are unwarranted. As political consultant Mark Mellman pointed out on Twitter, for example, previous administrations have declined to exercise veto powers when it comes to resolutions critical of the Israelis.

“Acting like this is some brand new policy or action just isn’t consistent with reality,” Mellman, who believes the decision to allow the resolution was wrongheaded, told CBS News. “Right or wrong, good or bad, since 1967 American policy has been that the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and Gaza are occupied territories whose final status must be determined by the parties. And the U.S. has consistently opposed Israel’s settlement policy.”

Critics of the resolution argue that it’s been decades since the U.S. allowed a U.N. resolution to pass that says East Jerusalem and other lands taken in the 1967 war are occupied Palestinian territory. Previous resolutions the U.S. allowed to pass have instead tended to condemn specific actions of Israelis or the Israeli government, such as the bombing of an Iraqi nuclear reactor in 1981.

In another example, a U.N. resolution condemning the 1994 massacre of Muslim worshipers by a Jewish terrorist was passed only when Madeleine Albright, then the U.S. ambassador, demanded a paragraph-by-paragraph vote on it to strip out language implying that Jerusalem was occupied territory.

“[W]e oppose the specific reference to Jerusalem in this resolution and will continue to oppose its insertion in future resolutions,” Albright said at the time.

“We simply do not support the description of the territories occupied by Israel in the 1967 war as ‘occupied Palestinian territory,’” Albright said. However, the U.S. does not recognize Israeli claims to East Jerusalem either.

Albright’s comments run counter to a 1980 U.N. resolution – supported by the U.S. – that did refer to Jerusalem and other lands taken by Israel in 1967 as occupied territory. But that position was in a sense reversed by Albright’s comments in 1994.

“It’s true the U.S. has not allowed a U.N. Security Council resolution to that effect to pass since 1980, but U.S. policy has been consistent under every Democratic and Republican administration to date. Moreover, the U.S. has allowed other anti-Israel resolutions to pass on a number of occasions before and after 1980. President Obama was the first president to adopt a policy of vetoing all anti-Israel U.N.S.C. resolutions – until now,” Mellman said.

“So not vetoing this resolution is a bit of a punch in the gut, but not a very hard one. It is in no way a change in U.S. policy about the conflict.”

Voir de plus:

9 questions about the UN vote on Israeli settlements you were too embarrassed to ask

MIDEAST DIPLOMACY; U.N. Security Council Condemns the Hebron Slayings

Paul Lewis
The New York Times
March 19, 1994

UNITED NATIONS, March 18— After three weeks of tortuous negotiations, the Security Council condemned the Hebron massacre today. But the United States strongly disavowed a suggestion in the Council’s resolution that Jerusalem was part of the Israeli-occupied territories, and insisted that the city’s future must be negotiated.

The United States said the language on the status of Jerusalem would have led it to veto the resolution if not for the decision by Syria, Jordan and Lebanon to resume discussions with Israel next month and the agreement between the Palestinian Liberation Organization and Israel to have high-level contacts aimed at restarting the stalled peace effort.

In a maneuver not seen in the Security Council since a debate on Nicaragua in 1985, the United States insisted that the resolution be voted on paragraph by paragraph. Partial Abstention by U.S.

That enabled the United States to abstain on a paragraph that implies that Jerusalem is part of the occupied territories by reaffirming the applicability of the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949, which spells out the rights of civilians caught in war zones, « to the territories occupied by Israel in June 1967, including Jerusalem. »

The United States also abstained on a paragraph that says the massacre three weeks ago « underlines the need to provide protection and security for the Palestinian people. » This language appears to support Palestinian demands for an international protection force in the occupied territories, which the United States opposes unless both sides agree.

The 14 other Council members voted in favor of every paragraph. That enabled Jean-Bernard Merimee, the French representative to the United Nations and President of the Council this month, to declare the resolution adopted once all of its paragraphs had been approved.

The American representative, Madeleine K. Albright, said that describing Jerusalem as « occupied Palestinian territory » implied Palestinian sovereignty over it and thus contradicted the undertaking Israel and the P.L.O. had reached in the declaration they signed in Washington last September, which said the city’s future would be decided in negotiations between them.

Although the Security Council has adopted many resolutions saying that Jerusalem is part of the Arab territories Israel occupied in the 1967 war, Ms. Albright made clear that the United States would oppose similar language in future United Nations texts.

The Clinton Administration has been under strong Congressional pressure to veto the latest resolution because of its references to Jerusalem. A total of 82 Senators sent a letter to President Clinton today urging him to veto any Council resolution « that states or implies Jerusalem is « occupied territory. »

The Israeli representative to the United Nations, Gad Yaacobi, told the Council that the reference to Jerusalem was incompatible with the agreement to settle the city’s future by negotiation as well as with Israel’s own position on the matter, which is that « Jerusalem will remain united under Israeli sovereignty as our eternal capital. »

Speaking for the P.L.O., Nasser al-Kidwa, its United Nations observer, said every Council resolution dealing with Palestinians had described Jerusalem as part of the occupied territories. He complained that « any change in the language creates the danger of a change in policy » and expressed « disappointment and deep concern » at the American abstention.

The resolution today, which « strongly condemns the massacre in Hebron and its aftermath, » gives the Palestinians the firm condemnation they wanted — and in a formal resolution, as they insisted, rather than a statement.

It also urges Israel to disarm settlers in the occupied territories as one way of preventing further « illegal acts of violence. »

But while the resolution goes on to say that « a temporary international or foreign presence » is another measure that might be taken to secure the Palestinians’ safety, it makes clear that this should be the temporary foreign presence foreseen in the declaration signed by Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization last September and « within the context of the ongoing peace process. »

Photo: Madeleine K. Albright, the American delegate to the United Nations, raising her hand yesterday to abstain on the Jerusalem paragraph of the Security Council resolution on the Hebron massacre, after Sir David Hannay, the British delegate, front left, voted to approve the paragraph. (Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times)

Voir de même:

Analysis Kerry’s Speech Was Superbly Zionist, pro-Israel, and Three Years Too Late
The outline presented by Kerry could have pushed Israel and Palestinians into an agreement, if he had put it on the table in 2014. But Netanyahu and Abbas’ hypocritical responses showed why his peace efforts failed
Barak Ravid
Haaretz
Dec 29, 2016

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry chose to devote the main portion of his speech to his personal connection to Israel since his first visit as a young senator 30 years ago. He told of climbing up Masada, swimming in the Dead Sea, going from one biblical city to another, seeing the Holocaust atrocities at Yad Vashem, and even told of how he piloted an air force plane over Israel to understand its security needs.

There aren’t too many other American politicians who know Israel the way John Kerry does. There isn’t a single serving American politician who has delved as deeply into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and has invested in studying and trying to resolve it as John Kerry. These things were clearly reflected in his speech. The secretary of state gave a cogent analysis of where things stand in the peace process these days. He noted the deep distrust between the parties, the despair, anger and frustration on the Palestinian side, and the isolation and indifference on the Israeli side.

Kerry’s address was a superbly Zionist and pro-Israel speech. Anyone who truly supports the two-state solution and a Jewish and democratic Israel should welcome his remarks and support them. It’s a binary incidence, with no middle ground. It’s no surprise that those who hastened to condemn Kerry even before he spoke and even more so afterward were Habayit Hayehudi chairman Naftali Bennett and the heads of the settler lobby. Kerry noted in his speech that it is this minority that is leading the Israeli government and the indifferent majority toward a one-state solution.

Over the past four years, the American secretary of state often acted clumsily, obsessively and even with a touch of messianism, but he did so for a good and just cause. He tried with all his might to end 100 years of conflict to assure the future of Israel, America’s greatest ally, and end Palestinian suffering. Unfortunately, his two partners in this mission, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, simply didn’t want it as much as he did. Over the past four years, Abbas and Netanyahu were mirror images of each other. They focused on preserving the status quo, stayed entrenched in their positions and weren’t willing to take even the smallest risk or shift one millimeter to try and achieve a breakthrough.

Kerry’s speech was long and detailed, but its heart was the outline for peace that he presented. The outline wasn’t intended to be an imposed solution, but to include the basic principles by which all future Israeli-Palestinian negotiations should be conducted. The outline was based on the framework document he had formulated in March 2014 after several months of talks with both parties.

When you read Kerry’s words, you see immediately that he accepted a significant number of Israel’s demands, first and foremost the demand that any future peace agreement include Palestinian recognition of Israel as a Jewish state. Kerry also stated that a solution to the refugee problem would have to be just and practical, one that would not undermine the State of Israel’s character. He said that any future border would be based on leaving the large settlement blocs in Israel’s hands; he clarified that the permanent arrangement must constitute an end to the conflict and preclude any further Palestinian demands, and stressed security arrangements as a central component of any agreement.

At the same time, Kerry’s outline includes a series of compromises that Israel would be required to make, first and foremost allowing Jerusalem to serve as the capital of both states. Kerry clarified that the borders of the Palestinian state would have to be based on the 1967 lines with agreed land swaps of equivalent size, and that Israel must recognize the suffering of the Palestinian refugees.

The main problem with Kerry’s outline is that he presented it too late. He knows that he made a mistake when in March 2014 he did not officially put his framework document, with the same principles that he enumerated in his speech, on the table. His senior advisers admit that if he could go back 33 months in time, Kerry would have presented his peace outline to both sides and summoned them to negotiate on its basis.

Such a “take it or leave it” move at that time would have forced both sides to make strategic decisions. Such a move would also have established the Kerry outline as the basis for all future talks. Its presentation only three weeks before Donald Trump enters the White House, as important as it is, gives it only symbolic worth.

As in many instances in the past, Netanyahu didn’t even bother to listen to Kerry’s remarks or address their merits. He responded with an aggressive statement containing sharp personal criticism of Kerry. There are those who will say that the depths of his declarations reflect the depth of the investigations of him.

Netanyahu’s criticism was spiced with hypocrisy and cynicism. The principles that Kerry enumerated in his address were the same ones Netanyahu agreed to accept in March 2014. The prime minister had reservations, which he planned to express publicly, but in practice he agreed to negotiate on the basis of this very same outline. To this day Netanyahu refuses to admit it.

His political twin, Abbas, reacted with equal hypocrisy. When U.S. President Barack Obama presented the outline to Abbas in March 2014, Abbas promised to think about it and get back to Obama. To this day Obama is still waiting. Even after Kerry’s speech on Wednesday, Abbas refused to say if the outline was acceptable to him or not.

President-elect Trump, who seemed to accept the UN Security Council resolution on the settlements last week, responding to it with a faintly worded tweet, couldn’t restrain himself with Kerry’s speech. Only a short while before Kerry began to speak, Trump shot out three tweets that made his dissatisfaction clear.

Over the past few months, Trump has repeatedly said that one of his goals is to achieve peace between Israel and the Palestinians. He made it clear that he wants to close “the mother of all deals” and end “the war that never ends” between the two sides. Trump even appointed his lawyer and close associate Jason Greenblatt as special envoy to the peace process. Trump and Greenblatt will soon discover that if they want to make this historic deal, it will probably look very much like the one Kerry sketched out in his address.

Voir de plus:

John Kerry’s Fitting Ending

Trashing Israel on the way out the door is the perfect capstone to an ignoble career.

Jim Geraghty

National Review

December 28, 2016

John Kerry ends his long career in politics the same way he began it: disgracefully. Kerry debuted on the national stage in 1971 by telling the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and the American public that U.S. servicemen in Vietnam “raped, cut off ears, cut off heads, taped wires from portable telephones to human genitals and turned up the power, cut off limbs, [blew] up bodies, randomly shot at civilians, razed villages in fashion reminiscent of Genghis Khan.”

It was a stunningly thinly sourced, hotly disputed, and broad accusation, echoing the propaganda of America’s enemies around the world. Perhaps only in the Democratic party of the 1970s could this be the perfect audition for a political career. He would speak for many on the hard left on the day when he declared, “There is no threat. The Communists are not about to take over our McDonald’s hamburger stands.”

Over four decades, Kerry established himself as one of the Democratic party’s loudest, if not wisest, voices in foreign affairs. In 1991, he voted against authorizing military force to expel Iraq from Kuwait, predicting that future historians “will ask why there was such a rush to so much death and destruction when it did not have to happen.” Twelve years later, he voted for the Iraq War, then turned around and tried to run as an antiwar presidential candidate. In September 2003, Kerry sounded as if he supported wartime funding bills — “I don’t think any United States senator is going to abandon our troops and recklessly leave Iraq to whatever follows as a result of simply cutting and running” — but as the Democratic presidential primaries heated up, he decided to vote “no.” That led to his infamous quote, “I actually did vote for the $87 billion before I voted against it.”

In 1997, he wrote a book titled The New War, which touched briefly on terrorism but predicted that the preeminent threat that would face America in the coming years was#…#international crime syndicates. In that book, he saluted “Yasser Arafat’s transformation from outlaw to statesman.” Three times before 9/11, he voted against allowing terrorists to face the death penalty. In his 2004 presidential campaign, Kerry asserted that U.S. interventions had to pass a “global test” for legitimacy.

He loved to reach out to the world’s rogues. In 1985, he traveled to Nicaragua to meet and praise the country’s Communist strongman, Daniel Ortega, and to accuse the Reagan administration of funding terrorism.

He praised the Clinton administration’s 1994 agreement to send aid to North Korea. Pyongyang’s violation of the agreement, a secret uranium-enrichment program, was discovered in 2002. Starting in 2009, he visited Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad several times, and in 2011 he said Assad was “very generous with me in terms of the discussions we have had. . . . My judgment is that Syria will move; Syria will change, as it embraces a legitimate relationship with the United States and the West.”

Against this ignoble record, one wonders why Kerry never seemed to get tired of giving dictators, terrorists, thugs, and brutal regimes the benefit of the doubt and having it blow up in his face.

In some ways, Kerry in 2013 was a perfect choice for Obama’s second secretary of state. For the better part of three decades on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Kerry had spoken as if statecraft and international diplomacy were relatively easy tasks, and only the bunch of idiots in the current administration — Republican or Democrat — could mess it up like this. Finally, Kerry would get the chance to show everybody how it’s done.

We see the results today: Syria is a charnel house. The Middle East has had plenty of bloody wars before, but only this one overwhelmed the countries of Europe with seemingly endless waves of desperate refugees. The preeminent form of Islamic fundamentalism used to be al-Qaeda, a bunch of extremists hiding in the mountains of Afghanistan. Now bloodthirsty Islamists run an actual state in the middle of the Arab world. Four years after the Benghazi attack, only one perpetrator has been brought to justice.

Russia is emboldened, taking over Crimea, biting into Ukraine, and launching not-so-subtle cyber-warfare against the United States. The Iranians, too, are emboldened, despite the much-touted agreement on their nuclear program. China and North Korea keep rattling their sabers. Venezuela is collapsing. The Taliban continues to control swaths of Afghanistan after 15 years of war.

Confronted with this litany of disaster, Kerry would probably point to four years of endless summits, meetings, joint statements, and — whether he’s honest enough to use these words or not — photo opportunities. Just as Hillary Clinton’s millions of miles traveled were supposed to represent some great accomplishment, Kerry will blur the distinction between activity and results. Kerry never seemed to get tired of giving brutal regimes the benefit of the doubt and having it blow up in his face.

American foreign policy has been reduced to Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power’s asking whether Vladimir Putin’s Russia or the Ayatollah’s Iran have any shame. No, of course they don’t, and anyone who’s been paying any attention knows they don’t. The Iranians used children to clear minefields during the Iran–Iraq war. The Russians contaminated two British Airways jetliners with radioactive material in their successful plot to kill former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko. What kind of administration would rely on the Russian and Iranian regimes’ sense of shame to protect civilians in Syria?

Thus, it’s fitting that John Kerry’s last major act as secretary of state is a speech that offers up hot nonsense, a bitterly hostile address that called Israel’s government “the most right-wing in Israeli history, with an agenda driven by its most extreme elements.” (Mind you, the opposing side in this conflict elected Hamas, an actual terrorist group, to govern the Gaza Strip.)

Kerry and the administration assented to a statement declaring that the Western Wall and Temple Mount are illegally occupied, then shamefully insisted “this administration has been Israel’s greatest friend and supporter.” After signing on to the Iran deal, Kerry claimed that “no American administration has done more for Israel’s security than Barack Obama’s.” (Why do Israelis disagree so vehemently?) Kerry warned that Israel had to recognize a Palestinian state or effectively wither under endless terror attacks: “If the choice is one state, Israel can either be Jewish or democratic — it cannot be both — and it won’t ever really be at peace.” He even seemed to suggest that those who support Israel’s current policies are un-American, asking, “How does the U.S. continue to defend that and still live up to our own democratic ideals?”

The cement hardens on the Obama-Kerry foreign-policy legacy: They were toothless and hapless against ISIS, Bashar al-Assad, North Korea, Iran, Russia, China, and the world’s worst and most ruthless regimes. But as for Bibi Netanyahu, they came down on him like a ton of bricks.

— Jim Geraghty is National Review’s senior political correspondent.

Voir par ailleurs:

L’émission Enquête Exclusive surprise en train de MENTIR

Le dernier épisode de l’émission Enquête Exclusive diffusé sur M6 hier soir au sujet de Jérusalem est truffé de mensonges et d’inexactitudes (pour voir le documentaire sur le site de M6, Cliquez Ici). Nous vous les faisons découvrir :

Les Mensonges :

  • Un mensonge historique :

À 00:09:32, le narrateur présente de la façon suivante la création de l’État d’Israël :

En 1947 pour apaiser les tensions, les Nations Unies ont séparé la région en deux, Israël voit alors le jour. La Jordanie, elle, cède un bout de son territoire la Cisjordanie, cela doit devenir le futur État Palestinien. Mais en 1967, Israël entre en guerre contre ses voisins et annexe la Cisjordanie, c’est le début de l’occupation des territoires palestiniens.

C’est là un tel ramassis de MENSONGES que nous ne savons pas par où commencer:

  1. La Cisjordanie faisait partie du Mandat sur la Palestine confié à la Grande-Bretagne par la Société des Nations à la conférence de San Remo en 1922, avec pour objectif d’aider les Juifs à “reconstituer leur foyer national dans ce pays”. La Cisjordanie n’a donc pas été cédée par le Royaume de Jordanie pour créer un État Palestinien.
  2. Israël n’a pas vu le jour en 1947, mais le 14 mai 1948, suite à l’application du plan de partage de la Palestine voté lui le 29 novembre 1947. Immédiatement après sa création, Israël a été attaqué par les pays arabes voisins, mais l’emporte sur le champ de bataille : c’est la guerre d’Indépendance d’Israël.
  3. À la fin de la guerre, la Cisjordanie qui en effet devait faire partie du futur État Arabe créé par le plan de partage de la Palestine, a été annexée par le Royaume de Jordanie qui n’y a pas créé d’État Palestinien.
  • L’utilisation mensongère des cartes :

À 00:49:18, le reportage présente à l’aide d’une série de cartes datées de 1967 à 2016, “l’érosion” des territoires palestiniens en Cisjordanie, après quoi le narrateur conclut :

En 70 ans les territoires palestiniens ont fondu comme neige au soleil.

Voici la première carte de la série montrant les “territoires palestiniens en 1967” :

carte-1967

La carte des territoires palestiniens en 1967

Et la dernière carte de la série montrant la supposée érosion des territoires palestiniens en 49 ans :

carte-2016

La carte des territoires palestiniens en 2016

Or Bernard de la Villardière fait mentir les cartes. En 1967, la Cisjordanie et Gaza n’étaient pas “les territoires palestiniens” d’un État Palestinien, mais deux régions occupées respectivement par la Jordanie et l’Égypte.

Quant à la dernière carte, datée de 2016 et sensée illustrer l’érosion des territoires palestiniens causée par les Israéliens, elle représente en fait le territoire de l’Autorité Palestinienne, la première entité Palestinienne indépendante et souveraine de l’Histoire, entité créée par les Accords d’Oslo signés par le Premier ministre israélien Yitzhak Rabin et le dirigeant de l’Organisation de Libération de la Palestine, Yasser Arafat dans les années 1990.

Il s’agit donc encore une fois d’un MENSONGE.

Les inexactitudes :

  • Une inexactitude chronologique :

À 00:01:17, Bernard de la Villardière présente la situation du conflit Israélo-Palestinien de la façon suivante.

“Alors en septembre 2015, Jérusalem s’est de nouveau embrasée en proie à ce que l’on a appelé l’Intifada des Couteaux”

Or il s’agit d’une erreur, cette dernière vague de violence a débuté le 1er octobre 2015.

  • Le Temple n’a pas disparu par magie :

À 00:07:45, le narrateur tient les propos suivant au sujet du Second Temple :

C’est ce temple juif, disparu il y a près de 2000 ans, qui est au centre de l’inquiétude des Musulmans

Non Monsieur de la Villardière, le Second Temple n’a pas disparu, il a été détruit par les Romains.

“La destruction du Temple de Jérusalem”, peinture de Francesco Hayez, 1867

  • Non, le sergent Elor Azaria n’est pas sorti de prison :

À 1:06:00, le narrateur dit la chose suivante au sujet de l’affaire du sergent Elor Azaria (voir ci-dessus)

Le jeune soldat est autorisé à sortir de prison

Cela laisse croire au spectateur que le sergent Azaria, mis en examen pour homicide involontaire, est sorti de prison, ce qui est faux. Il a eu une permission de 48 heures pour rendre visite à sa famille pour la Pâque juive. Son procès est toujours en cours.

Le sergent Elor Azaria lors de la permission de 48 heures qui lui a été accordée pour passer la Pâque Juive en famille.

  • Ce n’est pas un mur de séparation, mais un mur de sécurité :

À 01:24:15, le directeur de la très douteuse ONG B’Tselem, Haggai El-Ad, explique à Bernard de la Villardière la chose suivante :

Nous avons construit un mur autour de Jérusalem il y a dix ans pour couper la route et isoler les communautés palestiniennes.

Cela est faux, le mur a été construit afin d’empêcher les terroristes palestiniens de venir commettre des attentats-suicides en Israël au cours de la Seconde Intifada.

  • Non, les Palestiniens ne vont pas disparaître :

À 01:28:40, le narrateur dit l’énormité suivante :

Les Palestiniens semblent vouer à disparaître.

Voilà une affirmation peu crédible, étant donné que le taux de fécondité en Palestine est de 4,1 enfants par femme et la croissance démographique annuelle est de 3 %. (Voir le rapport du Bureau Central de statistiques palestinien)

Si Bernard de la Villardière avait pris le temps de vérifier le taux de naissance de la population palestinienne, il se rendrait compte que ces propos sont ahurissants.

En conclusion, cet épisode d’Enquête Exclusive est extrêmement biaisé contre Israël, et contient une quantité incroyable de mensonges et d’inexactitudes. Nous avons contacté M6 pour leur demander des excuses publiques.

Voir enfin:

Le MENSONGE éhonté de Marie Verdier, journaliste à “La Croix”

Il y a 130 ans, La Croix se proclamait “le journal le plus anti-juif de France”, et il aura fallu attendre 1998 pour que le quotidien fasse son mea culpa.

Aujourd’hui, HonestReporting France s’interroge : est-ce que la “journaliste” Marie Verdier, qui est chargée des pays méditerranéens au quotidien, n’est pas une nostalgique de cette lointaine époque ? En effet, Marie Verdier a titré son dernier article de la façon suivante  :

Un titre doublement mensonger, car :

  1. L’État d’Israël n’existe que depuis 1948.
  2. Israël a respecté et respecte de nombreuses résolutions de l’ONU.

Prenons par exemple la Résolution 425 du Conseil de Sécurité de l’ONU :

  • Le contexte :

Le 11 mars 1978, onze terroristes de de l’Organisation de Libération de la Palestine (OLP) infiltrent Israël depuis le Liban. Ils prennent en otage un autobus qui circulait non loin de Tel Aviv, sur la route côtière (qui relie cette dernière à Haïfa), et foncent vers la ville. Bloqués par la police, les terroristes commettent alors un carnage et assassinent 38 civils dont 13 enfants. Cet attentat – le plus meurtrier dans l’histoire d’Israël – est connu sous le nom de “massacre de la route côtière”.

Trois jours plus tard le 14 mars 1978, Tsahal riposte et lance une opération militaire au Sud-Liban afin de détruire les bases de l’OLP situées au sud du fleuve Litani afin de restaurer un climat de sécurité dans le nord d’Israël.

Une carte montrant l’emplacement du fleuve Litani par rapport à la frontière israélo-libanaise

Le 19 mars 1978, le Conseil de Sécurité des Nations unies a adopté la Résolution 425 qui notamment :

Demande à Israël de cesser immédiatement son action militaire contre l’intégrité territoriale du Liban et de retirer sans délai ses forces de tout le territoire libanais

Cette résolution créée aussi la Force intérimaire des Nations unies au Liban – plus connue sous son acronyme, la FINUL, dont la mission perdure jusqu’à ce jour. Les premières forces de la FINUL sont arrivées le 23 mars 1978, et peu après Israël s’est retiré du Sud-Liban, conformément à la Résolution adoptée par le Conseil de sécurité.

  • Conclusion :

Non Madame Verdier, Israël ne fait pas fi des résolutions de l’ONU.

Le problème, c’est que la journaliste persiste dans le mensonge, puisqu’elle écrit plus loin :

Encore une fois, c’est un mensonge, et même un très gros mensonge :

D’abord :

  • Le plan de partage de l’ONU a été accepté par les dirigeants de la communauté juive en Palestine mandataire.
  • Les États arabes ainsi que le Haut Comité arabe l’organe politique central de la communauté arabe de Palestine et “seul représentant de tous les Arabes de Palestine”, ont quant à eux rejeté ce plan.

Le Plan de partage de l’ONU

Ensuite :

  • La création de l’État d’Israël est intervenue le 14 mai 1948 mais immédiatement après la proclamation de l’indépendance, Israël a été attaqué par 5 pays arabes voisins (Égypte, Irak, Syrie, Jordanie et Liban) aidés de deux autres contingents arabes (palestiniens et saoudiens).
  • La Cisjordanie qui en effet devait faire partie du futur État Arabe créé par le plan de partage de la Palestine, a été annexée en 1950 par le Royaume de Jordanie qui n’y a pas créé d’État palestinien.
  • La bande de Gaza, qui devait aussi faire partie du futur État arabe, a été occupée militairement par l’Égypte.

Marie Verdier, qui se présente sur son compte Twitter comme “Journaliste à @LaCroixCom. Service international, spécialiste #Balkans, #Europe du Sud, #Maghreb”, devrait aller relire ses cours d’Histoire et modifier sa description sur son Twitter, car elle ne semble être spécialiste de rien d’autre que du MENSONGE.

PARTAGEZ cet article pour exiger de La Croix et de sa “journaliste” des excuses pour cet article diffamatoire.

3 commentaires pour Résolution de la honte: La supercherie de l’occupation (From disputed to occupied territories: How Obama and Kerry lied America and the world into accepting the single largest US policy change since Carter)

  1. jcdurbant dit :

    Voir encore:

    la paix ne dépend pas des constructions en Cisjordanie. Les territoires contre la paix, c’est le credo ânonné par les nations qui ne comprennent rien à cette guerre qui démarra il y a cent ans lorsqu’il n’y avait ni Etat d’Israël, ni territoires. « La colonisation » (interdite par l’ONU) est ce superbe argument fabriqué par les occidentaux traumatisés par leur passé colonial, pour délégitimer le droit des Juifs à restaurer leur nation.
    Cet argument de la colonisation est destiné aux sociétés occidentales laïques ou athées, mais en aucun cas aux croyants Juifs, Chrétiens ou Musulmans qui savent que la terre est à Dieu et que cette terre en particulier porte les stigmates de l’exégèse juive. Si on considère que les Juifs colonisent Jérusalem, la Judée et la Samarie, ils n’avaient aucun droit de s’installer à Tel-Aviv ou Haïfa. Il s’ensuit au terme de ce raisonnement qu’il faut démanteler l’Etat d’Israël, Etat colonial, Etat illégitime, et en interdire l’accès aux Juifs. Si les Juifs sont des colons à Jérusalem, ils le sont à Tel-Aviv.

    Selon un sondage mené par le Washington Institute for Near East Policy le 24 juin 2014, la majorité des Palestiniens de Cisjordanie et Gaza sont opposés à la solution à deux Etats et revendiquent la totalité de la Palestine historique, signifiant ainsi la destruction de l’Etat d’Israël. Selon l’enquête, 55,4% des Palestiniens de Cisjordanie et 68,4% de leurs voisins gazaouis considèrent que “récupérer la Palestine historique” devrait être “le principal objectif national palestinien pour les cinq prochaines années”, avant la “fin de l’occupation”.

    Une large majorité de Palestiniens estime que la “résistance devrait se poursuivre jusqu’à ce que la Palestine historique soit libérée” même en cas de négociations fructueuses avec Israël. 65,2% des sondés (Cisjordanie et Gaza confondues) se disent prêt à faire partie d’un “programme en étapes en vue de libérer la Palestine historique”. Seuls 30,7% pensent que la solution à deux Etats constitue l’objectif final pour les Palestiniens, en cas d’accord avec Israël. Ça laisse songeur !
    Les Palestiniens estiment majoritairement que les Juifs n’ont aucun droit sur cette Terre. Si l’ONU jouait son rôle de vecteur de Paix, elle devrait voter une résolution affirmant que les Juifs ne sont pas des colons en Palestine.
    Cette seule affirmation permettrait de ramener les Palestiniens à la réalité et d’engager des négociations pour la Paix.

    L’État d’Israël doit être fier de ses racines juives qui permettent le vivre ensemble quelle que soit sa croyance. Le chemin parcouru depuis soixante-dix ans par cet état devenu la huitième puissance mondiale est considérable. Les universitaires et chercheurs israéliens collaborent avec leurs homologues des meilleures universités dans le Monde pour le progrès de la planète.

    Pour ceux qui pensent à tort qu’il suffit d’évacuer des territoires pour obtenir la Paix, qu’ils sachent que la bande de Gaza a été vidée de ses juifs et rendue aux palestiniens depuis plus de dix ans. Au début il n’y avait ni blocus maritime, ni aérien. Les Palestiniens de Gaza ont reçu des milliards de dollars pour construire les infrastructures d’un Etat. Cette terre, qui est la plus fertile de la région, est aujourd’hui une désolation organisée par le Hamas pour servir leur idéologie mortifère. Les Égyptiens, qui ont eux aussi une frontière avec Gaza, ont construit un mur de sécurité encore plus élevé que celui côté israélien. Ce mur égyptien, personne n’en parle, et pourtant il sépare des Arabes d’autres Arabes que tout devrait rapprocher!

    Monsieur de la Villardière est témoin que les musulmans prient à Jérusalem et contrôlent leurs lieux saints. S’il avait fait le même reportage en mai 1967, il aurait constaté que le mur des lamentations était à l’abandon, utilisé pour faire pisser les ânes, et que toutes les synagogues de la vieille ville étaient en ruine incendiées et pillées.
    Avec ses problèmes (quelle ville n’en a pas), Jérusalem est aujourd’hui une ville ouverte et chacune des trois religion gère ses lieux saints.

    Il n’existe aucune raison valable d’empêcher un Juif d’habiter Jérusalem ou Hébron, là où l’Histoire juive est inscrite. Il n’existe aucune raison d’empêcher un Arabe de vivre dignement et tranquillement dans un pays qui le représente…

    Bernard Darmon

    http://www.causeur.fr/m6-israel-jerusalem-villardiere-palestine-41844.html

    J'aime

  2. jcdurbant dit :

    HOW MUCH MORE OBAMA LEGACY CAN WE TAKE ?

    The UNSC resolution sent the following message to the Palestinians: Forget about negotiating with Israel. Just pressure the international community to force Israel to comply with the resolution and surrender up all that you demand.

    They see the UNSC resolution, particularly the US abstention, as a charge sheet against Israel that is to be leveraged in their diplomatic effort to force Israel to its knees.

    The PLO decisions include, among other things, an appeal to the International Criminal Court (ICC) to launch an « immediate judicial investigation into Israeli colonial settlements on the land of the independent State of Palestine. » Another decision envisages asking Switzerland to convene a meeting to look into ways of forcing Israel to apply the Fourth Geneva Convention to the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. The Geneva Convention, adopted in 1949, defines « humanitarian protections for civilians in a war zone. »

    The appeal to the ICC and Switzerland is part of Abbas’s strategy to « internationalize » the conflict with Israel, by involving as many parties as possible. In this context, Abbas is hoping that the UNSC resolution will ensure the « success » of the upcoming French-initiated Middle East peace conference, which is slated to convene in Paris next month. For Abbas, the conference is another tool to isolate Israel in the international community, and depict it as a country that rejects peace with its Arab neighbors.

    In addition, Abbas and his lieutenants in Ramallah are now seeking to exploit the UNSC resolution to promote boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel:

    One of Abbas’s close associates, Mohamed Shtayyeh, hinted that the UNSC resolution should be regarded as a green light not only to boycott Israel, but also to use violence against it. He said that this is the time to « bolster the popular resistance » against Israel. « Popular resistance » is code for throwing stones and petrol bombs and carrying out stabbing and car-ramming attacks against Israelis.

    The UNSC resolution has also encouraged the Palestinians to pursue their narrative that Jews have no historical, religious or emotional attachment to Jerusalem, or any other part of Israel. Sheikh Ekrimah Sabri, a leading Palestinian Islamic cleric and preacher at the Al-Aqsa Mosque, was quick to declare that the Western Wall, the holiest Jewish site in Jerusalem, belongs only to Muslims. Referring to the wall by its Islamic name, Sheikh Sabri announced: « The Al-Buraq Wall is the western wall of the Al-Aqsa Mosque and Muslims cannot give it up. »

    While Abbas and his Palestinian Authority consider the UNSC resolution a license to proceed with their diplomatic warfare to delegitimize and isolate Israel, Hamas and Islamic Jihad, the two groups that seek the elimination of Israel, are also celebrating. The two Gaza-based groups see the resolution as another step toward achieving their goal of replacing Israel with an Islamic empire. Leaders and spokesmen of Hamas and Islamic Jihad were among the first Palestinians to heap praise on the UNSC members who voted in favor of the resolution. They are also openly stating that the resolution authorizes them to step up the « resistance » against Israel in order to « liberate all of Palestine. »

    When Hamas talks about « resistance, » it means launching suicide bombings and rockets against Israel. The Islamist movement does not believe in « light » terrorism such as stones and knife stabbings against Jews.

    Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal, who is based in Qatar, reacted to the UNSC vote by saying that the world should now support his movement’s terror campaign against Israel:

    Islamic Jihad, for its part, characterized the UNSC resolution as a « victory » for the Palestinians, because it enables them to « isolate and boycott Israel » and file charges against it with international institutions.

    Clearly, Hamas and Islamic Jihad see the UNSC resolution as a warning to all Arabs and Muslims against seeking any form of « normalization » with Israel. The two groups are referring to the Palestinian Authority, whose security forces continue to conduct security coordination with Israel in the West Bank, and to those Arab countries that have been rumored to be moving toward some form of rapprochement with Israel.

    The UN’s highly touted « victory » is a purely Pyrrhic one, in fact a true defeat to the peace process and to the few Arabs and Muslims who still believe in the possibility of coexistence with Israel.

    Thus, the UNSC resolution already has had several consequences, none of which will enhance peace between Israelis and Palestinians. Apart from giving a green light to Palestinian groups that wish to destroy Israel, the resolution has prompted Abbas and the Palestinian Authority to toughen their stance, and appear to be more radical than the radicals.

    Far from moving the region toward peace, the resolution has encouraged the Palestinians to move forward in two parallel paths — one toward a diplomatic confrontation with Israel in the international arena, and the other in increased terror attacks against its people. The coming weeks and months will witness mounting violence on the part of Palestinians toward Israelis — a harmful legacy of the Obama Administration…

    Khaled Abu Toameh

    https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/9675/un-obama-palestinians

    J'aime

  3. jcdurbant dit :

    Avec des amis comme ça qui a besoin d’ennemis ?

    L’odieux attentat à Jérusalem dimanche dernier est un signe d’avertissement supplémentaire.

    Jean-Marc Ayrault.

    http://www.lemondejuif.info/2017/01/ignoble-jean-marc-ayrault-qualifie-lattentat-de-jerusalem-davertissement-a-israel/

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :