Prix Nobel de littérature: Attention, une polémique peut en cacher une autre (From one truth-bender to another: Can half-true stories make great literature ?)

alex3wars-unwomanly-facelast-of-the-sovietsvoicesC’est avec les beaux sentiments qu’on fait de la mauvaise littérature. André Gide
You can have your cake and eat it too. Bob Dylan (1969)
When Gide notes this in his Journal on 2 September 1940, he is not implying, inversely, that “bad feelings” constitute a sufficient condition for producing “good literature”; he is pointing out that there is a danger inherent in noble sentiment when it comes to writing. As Gide explains in the same diary passage, “good intentions often make for the worst art and . . . the artist runs the risk of damaging his art by wanting it to be edifying.” Gide goes on to mention a famous poem that he personally finds mediocre—Charles Péguy’s “Eve”—and posits that the many readers admiring it “remove themselves from the realm of art and place themselves in a completely different vantage point.” Similarly, the altruistic ideas increasingly put forth in Le Clézio’s fiction—the defense of children, women, and autochthonous cultures, the necessity of establishing a dialogue with different peoples, the virtues of multiculturalism, the importance of ecology, and even the more private experience of an “extase matérielle” (the “material ecstasy” described in his important, homonymous, essay collection of 1967) that an individual can acquire by getting beyond self-consciousness and fully immersing his senses in the very matter of the natural world—tend to diminish proportionately other qualities essential to literature as an art form, notably the aesthetics of style and the exploration, not the mere naming or categorical manipulation, of emotions. Gide’s admonition looms over Le Clézio’s recent fiction, notably his latest novel, Ritournelle de la faim (2008); and this impression can only be reinforced by another comparison with Modiano, whose territory Le Clézio has entered with this new book, as it were. Le Clézio had already built a plot around a Jewish woman surviving during the Occupation. That book, Wandering Star, published in French in 1992 and initially set in Le Clézio’s hometown of Nice, also tellingly—that is, somewhat artificially—employs a Palestinian woman as the other main character. The new novel, Ritournelle de la faim, evokes the arrest of Paris Jews, among several other events concerning the intersecting lives of a few Parisians; and the story mostly takes place in the French capital, the setting of much of Modiano’s fiction as well. (…) Excepting Soliman’s affection for his niece and the love between her and Feld, most of the relationships among these characters are less moving than merely symbolic of suffering, hypocrisy, indifference, treachery, or deceit, the latter especially aimed at the young and innocent, like Ethel, or at members of a defenseless minority group, here the Jews even as, in earlier books, Palestinians, Africans, and remote Amerindian tribes (two of whom, the Emberas and the Waunanas, the author came to know during long sojourns in Panama in the early 1970s), were given this role. A sort of abstract or intellectual compassion is created: our empathy is based as much on what we already know about the period as on the feelings embodied in the plot itself. Only the best-known historical events, however tragic or gruesome, form the backdrop: the Exposition Coloniale, the rise of anti-Semitic sentiment in France in the 1930s, the specters of notorious politicians, the gloomy spectacle of fleeing civilians as the German army invades northern France at the onset of the Second World War, and, finally, the roundup of Jews at the Vél d’Hiv before their deportation to the extermination camps. In this kind of historical fiction, the novelist could have drawn on more obscure, equally revealing events that would have given his book originality. Instead, he exhibits all the standard clichés of this dismal period as his heroine, Ethel, shines forth virtuously. Le Clézio’s storytelling prowess cannot conceal an array of mostly one-dimensional characters and a schematic plot enabling predictable responses to be given to predictable, if essential, questions: in a word, the novel is edifying in the sense that Gide warned of. When I was writing (about Wandering Star) in this journal a decade ago, I observed that Le Clézio could get beyond ideological considerations and put his finger on suffering. Here the conventional narrative structure above all highlights a shifting series of negative and positive acts, each associated with a moral idea, alongside a few daydreams, some pleasantly farfetched like Soliman’s vision of an Indian pavilion in a tropical garden stuck in the middle of the then-suburbs of the City of Light, others sinister like anti-Semitism or Ethel’s father’s desperate search for money, which implies stealing from his own daughter. In contrast, Modiano’s novels about the same period emphasize human behavior as ambiguous and ungraspable: no ideas with easily definable contours emerge; a powerful sentiment of existential unease prevails. John Taylor
No award, with the exception of the Nobel for Peace, excites as much a priori lobbying and speculation, and post-hoc controversy, as the Nobel Prize for Literature. While some decisions, like last year’s honoring of Alice Munro, have been embraced, certain past selections have spurred political fulmination ( e.g., Knut Hamsun, Mo Yan) and others, plain old-fashioned head-scratching. The inscrutable selection committee is famous for its surprises: who would have banked on the acerbic Austrian, Elfriede Jelinek? And there is banking involved, of a sort. According to the Wall Street Journal of October 7th (two days prior to the 2014 announcement) the British betting corporation Ladbrokes was offering odds of 12/1 on Philip Roth, 25/1 on Bob Dylan (a weird perennial favorite) and, sharing the lead around 4/1, Haruki Murakami and Kenyan poet Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. But hey, was there a leak in the famous Stockholm security system? Apparently the name of Patrick Modiano, which had been buried at 100/1, shot up in the final few days to 10/1! One thing is clear: Nobel readers have a penchant for French writers. In Literature prizes granted since 1901, France leads the inkstained pack with fifteen winners. (The US comes next with 11. Smallish Sweden has eight, understandably: home-team advantage.) The first winner, in 1901, was French poet Sully Prudhomme. Then came the likes of Gide, Mauriac, Sartre, Camus, le Clezio, etc etc… and now– I was in Massachusetts, half-listening to a French radio station through the Internet, when the proud news interrupted the music, followed by a disarming first reaction clip from the startled winner: ‘C’est bizarre!’ I smiled. My sentiments exactly. At least he’s honest. I haven’t read all of Modiano’s books, the autobiographical novels, stories, and an actual autobiography, and one reason is that, as he himself has said, they all bear considerable resemblance to one another, both in the famous Modiano l’heure bleue atmosphere, in their rudimentary narrative structure, and in their subject matter. Someone is seeking a shadowy remembered figure through the streets of Paris, through certain layers of time: the Occupation, the chaotic Sixties. A man seeks a woman. A child, his father. Or brother. Modiano himself explained in an interview that when he has finished one novel, it seems to reproach him: what that novel wanted to express was not expressed well enough, and so he must commence another, to try to get closer to the essence. He also mentioned that he never re-reads his past work. QED. There is something addictive about a Modiano! The simple sentences pull one in; the nostalgia of loss and pain of youth and the hunt for a vague, romantic Other are easy to relate to. And there’s always the hope of salvation through a chance encounter in a café. His novels sell out like hot brioche in France; they make perfect Metro reading. (That’s not a put-down. In the Metro everyone packs a good read.) They distill something quintessentially French: espresso and heartache, idealism and betrayal and Gauloise smoke, self-absorption and the mist rising from the Seine. But will these books travel, as the oenophiles ask about wines? The question seems justified by Alfred Nobel’s stipulation that the prize go to “the person who shall have produced in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction.” Enigmatic as that is, surely it implies a high degree of relevance beyond one country’s history and culture. Was Milan Kundera never considered? Compared to previous years, the committee’s statement regarding the choice of Modiano sounds oddly elliptical: “for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation.” Modiano himself commented on this in an interview a few days later, saying, in his halting, cautious and also elliptical way, that his writing is in fact primarily about forgetting, about the omnipresence of forgetting. ‘Memory succeeds in piercing our forgetting–that mass of forgetting. They should have recognized (my work as) ‘the art of forgetting.’ An interesting correction. His oeuvre may or may not be finally judged as slight and repetitive but, given that interesting correction, I’ll be reading Modiano again. Kai Maristed
American journalists found their own reasons to celebrate her win. She was a woman writing about the effect of world events on ordinary people; she was an outspoken advocate for peace and respect for the environment. Since the Nobel Prize goes almost exclusively to novelists and poets, writers working in the sprawling, ill-defined world of “nonfiction” welcomed Alexievich’s win as an acknowledgment that even true stories can make great literature. There was some confusion, however, about the lineaments of Alexievich’s chosen genre. The Western press described her as an “investigative journalist” and “contemporary historian,” accepting her work as accurate documentation of Soviet and post-Soviet reality. In interviews, however, Alexievich has stressed the literary nature of her intentions and methods, and she rejects the title of “reporter.” Her work opts for subjective recollection over hard evidence; she does not attempt to confirm any of her witnesses’ accounts, and she chooses her stories for their narrative power, not as representative samples. Her newly translated book Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets bears no resemblance to “investigative journalism.” There is another, less obvious layer of ambiguity to Alexievich’s work and its reception. Though she has discussed her artistic approach in interviews, her books do not include a clear explanation of her methods. The casual reader can only guess at the extent to which she has pruned her interviews. It’s no surprise that most readers have accepted Secondhand Time as historically accurate. The American marketing encourages such an interpretation: The book is labeled as “oral history.” But as I discovered from examining earlier versions of the same stories that have not been translated into English, Alexievich treats her interviews not as fixed historical documents, but as raw material for her own artistic and political project. Her extensive editing—not only for clarity or focus, but to reshape meaning—brings Secondhand Time out of the realm of strictly factual writing. And by seeking to straddle both literature and history, Alexievich ultimately succeeds at neither. (…) Noticeably absent from Secondhand Time is the cynicism of the late Soviet era. By the 1970s, many Soviet citizens talked the Soviet talk in public but traded Brezhnev jokes at home. While some political dissidents were full-blooded martyrs, others used samizdat to earn money or win Western support. Yet the simple story of dissident heroes, tragic victims, conformists, and villains remains popular in the Western press. This helps account for the almost reflexive rapture with which many critics greeted Secondhand Time. It also helps explain Alexievich’s Nobel. Read as a work of literature, however, the book feels repetitive and heavy-handed, reinforcing conventional wisdom about the Soviet and post-Soviet world while providing few new insights. (…) In Russian, Alexievich’s chosen genre is sometimes called “documentary literature”: an artistic rendering of real events, with a degree of poetic license. The idea is not new, in Russia or elsewhere. Another Nobel laureate, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, is an obvious point of comparison, as is Alexievich’s mentor, the Belarusian writer Ales Adamovich, who used historical documents as sources for his artistic depictions of World War II. But Alexievich goes unusually far in eliminating narrative trappings and relying almost exclusively on witness testimony that floats free of context. Alexievich has the unusual habit of continuing to rewrite her books after they have been published, releasing them in new editions. She says this is because she sees them as living documents, and because she goes back to re-interview her subjects over the years. But sometimes she rewrites passages in ways that are primarily aesthetic—even at the cost of creating discrepancies—or that seem to reflect her evolving political values. I was recently surprised to read an article by one of Alexievich’s French translators, Galia Ackerman, analyzing some of these revisions. Ackerman and her co-author, Frédérick Lemarchand, found phrases that had migrated from one person’s testimony to another’s, or from Alexievich’s reflections to those of an interview subject. An interview is used to support one message in one work and another in a second, either through editing or by removing context. Such changes point to the danger of understanding Alexievich’s “voices” as historical testimony, or interpreting them as evidence of a single, immutable truth. (…) As such alterations make clear, Alexievich’s apparent reliance on other people’s voices doesn’t mean that she has removed herself from her books; she has only made herself less visible. She edits, reworks, and rearranges her interview texts, cleansing them of any strangeness that doesn’t serve her purposes. In doing so, she reduces the historical value of her work, effaces the texture of individual character, and eliminates the rhythm on which drama depends. It’s hard to get through Secondhand Time, not only because the subject matter is so painful, but because the testimonies are monotonous. As I read the book, I often wished that I could hear how Alexievich’s witnesses really sounded: their regional accents, their tone of voice, the pacing of their speech. I longed for the idiosyncrasies, false notes, and digressions of an actual interview. (…) Alexievich bends her subjects into familiar literary, mythological, or historical types, with little regard for social context or specificity. Poets, playwrights, and novelists are free to pick and choose from the material provided by the real world, and embellish and invent as they please. Their work is judged on its success in conveying a deeper, more abstract kind of truth—what in Russian is called istina, as opposed to pravda, the literal truth, the facts. Literary nonfiction writers, who search for deep truths while remaining faithful to facts, have obligations to both istina and pravda. They shape chaotic reality into compelling narrative, but they aren’t supposed to invent, or to edit so heavily that their subjects become unrecognizable. In exchange for this fidelity, nonfiction writers receive the trust of the reader, who accepts the improbable or poorly written simply because it is true. Without the imprimatur of nonfiction, it is unlikely that Alexievich’s work would have won so much praise around the world. Rather than being taken as objective confirmation of the awfulness of the Soviet Union and Russia, the book might have been interpreted as an expression of the views of one particular writer. Readers would have been more skeptical about Alexievich’s shocking stories and less tolerant of her lack of nuance. Under scrutiny, Secondhand Time falls short as both fact and art. Sophie Pinkham
A force de manier, on finit par remanier – seul le naïf pourra croire à un simple et inoffensif « découpage » à la lecture de la Fin de l’homme rouge. C’est bien de libre réécriture dont il s’agit, et d’une pratique qui prend le risque du révisionnisme le plus classique.(…) L’homo sovieticus dont elle veut tirer le portrait, qui la fascine tant – elle et ses lecteurs occidentaux –, n’est au départ qu’un bon mot, une blague potache – née, semble-t-il, dans l’émigration des années 1960 et faite pour railler les prétentions du régime soviétique à vouloir créer un homme nouveau. Quand l’auteur de la Fin de l’homme rouge prend l’affaire au sérieux, elle ne fait que perpétuer, de manière paradoxale, un mythe soviétique, en adoptant une terminologie qui tient littéralement de la caricature. La situation est digne des meilleurs films comiques de l’âge d’or du cinéma soviétique (d’ailleurs totalement absents du livre, alors même qu’aujourd’hui encore, en Russie, ils constituent un univers référentiel très important) ! Yoann Barbereau
Pour conclure, on se pose la question de savoir si des témoignages tirés de l’histoire soviétique et librement réécrits, coupés, arrangés et placés hors contexte historique et temporel peuvent être livrés et reçus comme tels. Matière première pour la fiction ou document historique ? Certes, Svetlana Alexievitch elle-même n’insiste pas sur le côté documentaire de son œuvre, en la qualifiant de « romans de voix », mais le fait même d’indiquer les noms, l’âge, la fonction de chaque personne interrogée entretient la confusion chez le lecteur par la mise en œuvre d’une esthétique du témoignage. Mais une esthétique du témoignage est-elle possible sans éthique du témoignage ? On est en droit de poser la question suivante : si les livres d’Alexievitch n’avaient pas ces mentions de noms de témoins et si elle les avait présentés comme de la fiction (en somme, la littérature de fiction est le plus souvent inspirée des histoires réelles), quelle aurait été la réception de cette œuvre ? Aurions-nous eu le même engouement que provoque chez le lecteur le sentiment de vérité ? Serions-nous bouleversés par ces histoires dont beaucoup nous seraient parues, du coup, incroyables ? Le récit prend ici son caractère d’authenticité et de vérité qui exerce un travail émotionnel sur celui qui le reçoit. C’est la fonction de la télé-réalité et de l’exposition généralisée du « vrai malheur » de « vrais gens » qui a gagné les médias depuis quelques années et qui substitue à la critique politique des problèmes sociaux un espace intime dominé par les affects et le psychisme. L’exemple de l’œuvre d’Alexievitch et de sa réception nous montrent à la fois les enjeux et les limites d’une littérature de témoignage qui ne serait pas fermement enracinée dans une perspective critique et historique ainsi que les limites d’une « dissidence » ou d’une « discordance » qui ne serait pas restituée avec précision dans son contexte historique. Le témoignage a, à coup sûr, sa place dans l’œuvre littéraire, d’autant plus que depuis la Shoah et la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le rapport entre le témoignage et l’histoire est repensé à grands frais. Mais la responsabilité du témoin face à la mémoire collective engage tout autant l’acteur que le narrateur, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit de deux personnes différentes. François Dosse insiste sur l’articulation nécessaire du témoignage, mémoire irremplaçable mais insuffisante, et du discours de la socio-histoire, travail indispensable d’analyse explicative et compréhensive. Si, pour reprendre la formule chère à Paul Ricœur, le témoignage a d’autant plus sa place dans la littérature que les générations présentes entretiennent une dette envers le passé (et envers le futur avec l’avenir contaminé de Tchernobyl), ce qui conduit à donner la parole aux « sans parole », aux vaincus de l’histoire, il implique en retour de redoubler de précaution face aux usages de la mémoire, mémoire aveugle, prisonnière d’imaginaires sociaux et historiques particuliers que le narrateur ne saurait faire passer pour des universaux. En ce sens, on devrait évaluer l’œuvre de Svetlana Alexievitch, qui appartient à un genre littéraire particulier basé sur une construction avec une très forte charge émotionnelle où les témoins sont transformés en porteurs « types » de messages idéologiques, avec des critères littéraires, plutôt que d’y chercher des vérités documentées comme l’a trop souvent fait la presse française et internationale. Galia Ackerman  et Frédérick Lemarchand

Attention: une polémique peut en cacher une autre !

En ces temps étranges de beurre et d’argent du beurre

Où en politique comme en littérature

Les beaux sentiments finissent par tenir lieu de vérité ou de réalité ..

Qui se souvient du premier prix Nobel décerné l’an dernier à une journaliste

Qui non contente de « littérariser » les témoignages qui font la valeur documentaire de ses livres …

Va jusqu’à les réécrire au fur et à mesure des nouvelles éditions ?

Du bon et du mauvais usage du témoignage dans l’œuvre de Svetlana Alexievitch
Galia Ackerman  [*]Essayiste et journaliste
et Frédérick Lemarchand Université de Caen Basse-Normandie

1On assiste, depuis les dernières décennies, à une prolifération de documents à caractère historiographique sur le XXe siècle ; le « vécu » est en vogue, tout autant que la mémoire fantasmatique de l’ex-URSS devenue — du moins le croit-on — enfin accessible depuis la fin de la guerre froide. On est confronté à une avalanche de livres, de reportages et de films documentaires, sans compter l’inévitable « télé-réalité », si près du réel… Et l’on aspire, dans une post-histoire réconciliée avec elle-même, à découvrir enfin la vérité que les appareils d’État nous avaient si longtemps cachée. Cependant, le genre documentaire, dont les règles ne sont pas réellement délimitées, pose de nombreuses questions, d’autant plus que la déontologie n’en est pas proprement établie, contrairement au travail de l’historien professionnel. S’il est évident qu’un document à l’état pur n’existe que dans des archives, l’écriture d’un livre ou la réalisation d’un film supposent une modification du document originel par sa soumission à des procédés tels que le découpage et le montage, notamment dans le passage de l’oral à l’écrit. Partant, si le degré de réécriture répond d’abord à une question de forme esthétique, il n’en constitue pas moins un problème éthique, d’autant plus que les « voix discordantes » qui se sont élevées et s’élèvent encore pour rendre compte d’une tragédie encore largement enfouie sous une mémoire officielle, ou historique, reposent sur rien moins que la mémoire de dizaines de millions de victimes (purges, famines programmées), la liquidation de la culture russe et d’une grande partie de ses acteurs par le régime, la spoliation et la contamination de millions d’hectares de terres jadis habitables (notamment après Tchernobyl). En d’autres termes, nous sommes ici confrontés à une mémoire traumatique renvoyant peu ou prou à toutes les formes imaginables de la catastrophe moderne ou de la « tempête du progrès » : totalitarisme, massacres de masse en temps de guerre, déportation, famines, crime écologique… La question de savoir jusqu’à quel point nous sommes en droit de réécrire un témoignage sans le dénaturer, sans porter atteinte à son authenticité, n’en a que plus de pertinence. C’est ce genre de questions que se posaient, par exemple, Ilya Ehrenbourg et Vassili Grossman lors de la rédaction du Livre noir [1][1] Vassili Grossman et Ilya Ehrenbourg, Le Livre noir,… où l’équipe du Comité antifasciste juif rassembla des témoignages de survivants de l’Holocauste. Ces questions se posent désormais avec la même acuité dans l’analyse des œuvres de témoignages issues de l’expérience soviétique, et en particulier s’agissant de celles qui portent sur la période totalitaire.
2Dans la mesure où elle témoigne plus généralement de l’expérience de la catastrophe dans l’histoire soviétique et post-soviétique, une œuvre comme celle de l’écrivain biélorusse Svetlana Alexievitch, dont les livres n’ont pas encore fait l’objet d’études systématiques en France, pourrait constituer un cas idéal-typique des questions que pose la conception d’une part, et la réception occidentale d’autre part, d’une littérature perçue comme l’expression d’une « voix discordante » à l’est — parce que sensément proche de la vérité —, depuis la Grande Guerre Patriotique (La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme [2][2] Presses de la Renaissance, 2004 (traduit par Galia…), jusqu’à la chute du système soviétique (Les derniers témoins [3][3] Presses de la Renaissance, 2005 (traduit par Anne … et Ensorcelés par la mort [4][4] Plon, 1995 (traduit par Sophie Benech).), en passant par la guerre d’Afghanistan (Les cercueils de zinc [5][5] Christian Bourgois, 1991/2002 (traduit par Wladimir…) et Tchernobyl (La supplication [6][6] Editions Lattès, 1998 (traduit par Galia Ackerman et…). Nous proposons de retracer les premiers pas de l’analyse de la démarche de cet auteur original qui a ému tant de lecteurs dans des dizaines de pays.
Littérature et témoignage
3Il nous faut tout d’abord opérer une distinction entre la littérature de témoignage dont les auteurs ont fait directement l’expérience de ce dont ils témoignent, comme Primo Levi ou Varlam Chalamov, et les témoignages collectés par des journalistes, écrivains ou historiens, qui visent à présenter un événement à travers des récits, concordants ou contradictoires, en accompagnant ceux-là de commentaire et d’analyse. Cependant, l’œuvre de Svetlana Alexievitch reste un phénomène à part au sein de cette littérature riche et variée, raison pour laquelle la presse française, en panne de classement, l’a comparée à Varlam Chalamov ou à Jean Hatzfeld. Il y a, à ce phénomène, plusieurs raisons. Les cinq livres représentent des collections de témoignages consacrés chaque fois à un événement majeur de l’histoire soviétique : la Seconde Guerre mondiale (vue par les femmes et les enfants), la guerre d’Afghanistan, la catastrophe de Tchernobyl et l’éclatement de l’URSS. Ces livres ne sont pas tous construits de la même façon : La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, Les cercueils de zinc et La supplication combinent de longs monologues avec des séquences de courts extraits de témoignages qui forment une sorte de « chœurs », en allusion à la tragédie grecque ; deux autres livres, Les derniers témoins et Ensorcelés par la mort, ont une structure plus linéaire : les témoignages s’y enchaînent sans entrer en interaction, ce qui s’explique visiblement par leur nature. Cependant, l’essentiel de la méthode employée par Svetlana Alexievitch ne change pas d’un livre à l’autre. Selon ses propres affirmations, elle collecte pour chaque livre cinq cents à sept cents témoignages [7][7] Ce chiffre figure dans sa propre présentation sur son…, puis les trie pour n’en sélectionner que quelques dizaines, particulièrement poignants, et en faire finalement « un roman des voix ». Mis à part son premier livre, La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, achevé en 1983 et publié pour la première fois en 1985, dans lequel elle décrit succinctement ses rencontres avec les personnes interviewées, sa présence est toujours effacée de sorte que l’on est confronté uniquement à des voix qui racontent chacune leur histoire, affirment chacune leur « vérité ». En fait, c’est dans cet effacement apparent de l’auteur par rapport aux personnes interviewées et à l’événement qu’elle ne décrit ni ne commente que réside l’originalité de sa méthode. « Il y a des choses dans l’homme dont l’art ne soupçonne pas l’existence, ne les devine pas », écrit Svetlana Alexievitch [8][8] Cf. le website de Svetlana Alexievitch.. « Et moi, je n’écris pas une histoire sèche, nue d’un événement, j’écris l’histoire des sentiments. Qu’est-ce que l’homme pensait, comprenait et retenait pendant un tel événement ? En quoi croyait-il ou ne croyait-il pas ? Quelles illusions, espoirs, peurs avait-il ? C’est ce qu’on ne peut imaginer, inventer, en tout cas, pas dans une telle multitude de détails véridiques. Nous oublions rapidement comment nous étions il y a dix, vingt ou cinquante ans. Et parfois, nous en avons honte, ou ne croyons plus avoir vécu une telle chose. L’art peut mentir, le document trompe… Mais je compose le monde de mes livres de milliers de voix, de destins, de morceaux de notre quotidien et de notre existence… Ma chronique englobe des dizaines de générations (sic !). Elle commence par la mémoire des gens qui avaient connu la révolution, qui ont traversé des guerres, des camps staliniens, et elle continue jusqu’à aujourd’hui. C’est l’histoire d’une âme — de l’âme russe… ».
4L’intention de l’auteur est pour le moins ambitieuse et novatrice : capter ce que « l’art » (faut-il entendre : les autres écrivains et les artistes ?) n’a pas su explorer, écrire l’histoire des sentiments de plusieurs générations de Soviétiques, montrer « le petit homme face à la grande utopie, au mystère du communisme », faire parler les gens qui « ont aimé cette idée, ont tué en son nom, et qui maintenant essaient de s’en éloigner, de s’en libérer, de devenir comme tout le monde ». Il s’agit en outre, à travers cette phénoménologie des sentiments, de construire à chaque fois une image kaléidoscopique des plus grands événements formateurs de l’histoire soviétique, à partir de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et jusqu’à l’éclatement final de l’Empire. Voici ce que Svetlana Alexievitch répond à la question d’un journaliste sur sa méthode de travail, lors d’un débat télévisé : « Le problème ne consiste pas à collecter le matériau. Le problème, c’est d’avoir une vision. Cela veut dire qu’il faut d’abord que je m’assemble moi-même, que j’élabore ma propre vision : pour pouvoir arracher à la réalité ordinaire sa couverture émotionnelle si banale, il est crucial d’avoir une vision du monde. Et après, je me mets à chercher des gens. Des gens bouleversés par l’événement que je veux raconter, bouleversés par le mystère même de la vie, le mystère de la guerre, le mystère de chaque existence humaine, le mystère des recherches d’un sens… Et alors, ce n’est plus du journalisme, mais de la littérature [9][9] Cf. la transcription de cette interview sur le site…. »
5L’ambition intellectuelle de l’auteur ne fait-elle pas pendant à son ambition artistique ? Dans la même interview, elle confie : « Il ne me suffit pas d’écouter une personne, je dois ensuite transformer cette horreur en un objet artistique… Mes larmes m’importent peu… Mais aller jusqu’au bout dans ma réflexion, extraire un sens, donc faire un effort intellectuel, c’est cela qui me demande un courage particulier. » Au cours d’une récente table ronde, Svetlana Alexievitch a ainsi déploré l’incurie des écrivains contemporains face à la réalité de plus en plus terrible et imprévisible : « Je pense que nous, les écrivains, ne faisons pas notre travail principal : nous n’avons pas de nouvelles idées. Nous ne les produisons pas, nous ne réfléchissons pas jusqu’au bout, nous pleurons comme des demoiselles chez Tourgueniev, nous nous fâchons. Or, les gens qui ont la vocation de penser ne doivent pas se fâcher contre l’Histoire [10][10] Cf. le site du journal-Internet BelaPAN, 26.7.2002…. » Au nom de cette réflexion qui lui permet d’élaborer sa vision propre, elle a souvent déclaré que la place de l’artiste, de l’écrivain, n’est pas sur les barricades mais au contraire « en retrait » de l’histoire : « Il est difficile, surtout chez nous, en Biélorussie, de rester à son bureau, de s’inventer une tour intellectuelle et de s’y terrer. C’est tout bonnement impossible. Mais en même temps, des doutes me tourmentent : que chercher dans la foule à la fin du XXe siècle ? Et cette foule, de quoi est-elle capable à part la destruction ? La barricade n’est-elle pas dangereuse pour un artiste, n’y gâche-t-il pas sa vision, son ouïe ? Et qu’est-ce qu’on peut juste voir à partir de la barricade ? Rien d’autre qu’une cible de tir [11][11] Cf. le site de la radio Svoboda, programme de Lev Roïtman,…… » La tâche que s’assigne Svetlana Alexievitch — et pour laquelle elle préfère rester loin des « barricades » — est sans doute titanesque, comparable à celles que se sont donné deux géants de la littérature russe du XXe siècle, Vassili Grossman et Alexandre Soljenitsyne, auteurs d’œuvres monumentales et essentielles. Comme elle l’affirme, « j’ai rempli honnêtement mon devoir d’écrivain. C’est ainsi que j’ai été élevée par la culture et la littérature russes [12][12] Ibid. ».
6S’agissant du procédé, l’auteur, après avoir très brièvement énoncé le sujet, laisse parler les témoins, en ne les interrompant que rarement, voire jamais. Mais il ne s’agit pas, comme nous allons le voir et contrairement aux apparences, de témoignages bruts : la parole de chacun est soigneusement traitée, découpée et arrangée de telle sorte qu’elle devienne un élément constitutif d’un agencement artistique. Selon ses propres définitions, Svetlana Alexievitch essaie de créer un « roman des voix » ou « un chœur des voix », où chaque partie vocale est orchestrée par l’écrivain. Elle a souvent répété qu’elle se voyait « comme un chercheur d’or qui passe au tamis des tonnes de matière brute afin de trouver tantôt un récit entier, tantôt une page, tantôt une ligne, dignes de Dostoïevski ». Le condensé de ces récits, de ces pages, de ces lignes est ensuite arrangé par thèmes ou suivant d’autres critères d’ordre esthétique, de façon à former un ensemble de fragments dont la puissance bouleverse le lecteur occidental — et plus largement étranger à l’histoire soviétique — par la force, voire la cruauté des images, celles d’une histoire authentiquement tragique : ici, une infirmière qui ronge avec ses dents le bras blessé d’un soldat, dans La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme [13][13] Presses de la Renaissance, 2004 (traduit par Galia…, là, les ossements roses de bébés brûlés par les nazis (à la différence de la cendre noire des adultes), dans Les derniers témoins [14][14] Ce livre n’a pas encore été publié en France., là encore la chair déchiquetée de soldats russes en Afghanistan que l’on rassemble à la pelle, dans des seaux, dans Les cercueils de zinc [15][15] Christian Bourgois, 1991/2002. ou enfin une jeune mariée qui enlève à la main des lambeaux d’organes internes pourrissants de son mari gravement irradié dans La supplication. C’est ce principe qui a suscité de très nombreuses adaptations théâtrales des œuvres d’Alexievitch, par le développement d’une esthétique du fragment ressaisi dans une totalité dramatique qui dépasse le pathos du récit individuel. L’homme y est le plus souvent réduit à un geste, à un moment, à une circonstance spectaculaire de sa vie, et devient de ce fait un symbole universel dont le nom, qui figure pourtant dans le livre, n’a plus d’importance.
La curieuse histoire de Tamara Oumniaguina
7Faute de pouvoir examiner ici toute l’œuvre d’Alexievitch, nous partirons d’un livre, La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, que nous avons choisi pour la raison suivante : dans la perspective de la réédition de son livre en russe et en allemand, et aussi pour sa première édition en français, l’auteur a procédé à sa réécriture. Après avoir ajouté quelques scènes rayées par la censure et par sa propre autocensure, ainsi que des pages du journal qu’elle avait tenu pendant la collecte des interviews, elle a réécrit pratiquement tous les témoignages pour en renforcer l’effet dramatique. C’est grâce à cette réécriture que nous pouvons pénétrer dans le laboratoire de Svetlana Alexievitch et analyser sa méthode littéraire, notamment dans l’analyse des contenus [16][16] Dans cette analyse, nous nous appuyons sur nos précédentes….
8Au-delà d’un simple travail stylistique, le procédé qu’emploie Alexievitch consiste notamment à réutiliser certains témoignages, mais en les arrangeant différemment et en les mettant dans un contexte différent, soit à la faveur d’une réédition de ses œuvres, soit pour les placer dans d’autres essais. Ainsi, dans l’essai Paysage de la solitude, Svetlana Alexievitch présente trois générations de femmes de la même famille [17][17] Littératures métisses, Le Paresseux, n°25, 2003, A…. Ce texte illustre parfaitement l’ambiguïté entre document et récit romancé que l’auteur entretient savamment. Dans l’essai, il est question de trois femmes qui représentent trois époques différentes :
9« Voici l’histoire de trois personnes appartenant à la même famille : une grand-mère, sa fille et sa petite-fille. Tel est le destin de cette famille que d’être composée uniquement de femmes. Le grand-père est mort il y a dix ans, le père, il n’y a pas longtemps. La petite-fille étudie à la fac, elle a vingt ans, et pour l’instant, elle n’a pas l’intention de se marier. Elles vivent toutes les trois ensemble, dans un grand appartement, à Minsk. »
10Cette introduction est suivie de trois récits, qui sont présentés comme étant contemporains, dont le premier est celui de « Tamara Stepanovna Oumniaguina, la grand-mère, qui, pendant la guerre, a servi au service sanitaire de l’armée ». Retenons qu’en 2003, au moment de la publication de l’essai écrit sur la commande du festival des Littératures métisses, Madame Oumniaguina était en vie et partageait un appartement avec sa fille et sa petite-fille. Or, on retrouve la même Tamara Oumniaguina livrant le même témoignage dans le premier livre d’Alexievitch, La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, achevé en 1983 et publié en 1985 ! La dame y est présentée de la façon suivante :
11« C’est une femme petite, très “domestique”, et en même temps, ce n’est pas une personne, mais un nerf ouvert. Pour cette nature poétique, très sensible, tout était encore plus difficile que pour les autres. C’est pourquoi elle n’a pas la sensation d’un passé éloigné, elle répète tout le temps en se souvenant : “Même aujourd’hui, on peut perdre la raison d’un tel tableau”… Je ne peux oublier sa façon de raconter. Elle était une conteuse rare ».
12Ce n’est pas tout. L’histoire change encore dans l’édition française de La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, parue en 2005. Voici ce que nous y apprenons au sujet du même personnage :
13« J’avais une amie : Tamara Stepanovna Oumniaguina », écrit Svetlana Alexievitch. « Mais nous n’avions jamais parlé de la guerre, elle refusait d’aborder le sujet… Et puis, un jour, je reçois un coup de fil : “Viens, j’ai peur de mourir bientôt. Mon cœur me joue des tours. Et je crains de ne pas avoir le temps”. Ce qui est arrivé. Quelques jours après notre conversation… Hémorragie cérébrale. Ses dernières paroles, rapportées par les médecins à sa fille : “Je n’ai pas eu le temps…” De quoi n’avait-elle pas eu le temps ? … On ne le saura jamais. C’est pourquoi je n’ai pas retranché un mot de son récit. J’ai tout conservé ».
14On reste perplexe, car il s’agit pour l’essentiel toujours du même récit. Il est plus court dans la première version du livre que dans la deuxième, et il est différemment découpé dans l’essai mentionné ci-dessus. Admettons qu’en 2003 Madame Oumniaguina était encore en vie, et qu’elle soit en effet décédée à la fin de 2003 ou début 2004, cela signifie que son témoignage daté au plus tard de 1983 a été recueilli en pleine époque soviétique. Or, l’intérêt du témoignage réside justement, comme nous l’avons rappelé en introduction, dans son inscription dans le contexte de l’époque où il a été donné. Outre le fait qu’il y a mensonge délibéré concernant les « révélations » de la dame sur son lit de mort en 2003, alors que Svetlana Alexievitch avait noté son témoignage vingt ans auparavant, nos repères sont finalement complètement brouillés car on ne raconte pas de la même façon « à chaud » ou avec un recul temporel, et surtout, dans un contexte historique totalement changé. C’est qu’entre-temps, un événement de taille s’était produit : l’éclatement de l’Union soviétique, précédé de l’éclatement de l’idéologie communiste officielle et de son système de valeurs. Svetlana Alexievitch n’a-t-elle pas écrit elle-même : « Mon but : avant tout obtenir la vérité de ces années-là. De ces jours-là. Une vérité débarrassée de toute fausseté de sentiments. Sans doute, juste après la Victoire, la personne aurait-elle raconté une guerre, et dix ans plus tard, une autre, parce qu’elle engrange désormais dans ses souvenirs sa vie toute entière. Son être tout entier. La manière dont elle a vécu ces dernières années, ce qu’elle a lu, ce qu’elle a vu, les gens qu’elle a rencontrés. Enfin, le fait d’être heureux ou malheureux [18][18] La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, pp. 14-15. » ?
15On est donc en droit de se poser des questions sur ce récit où aucun mot n’aurait été « retranché ». La deuxième version est-elle la version complète du témoignage raconté en 1983 ? L’interviewée a-t-elle raconté à l’auteur des choses différentes avant de mourir ? La deuxième version ne serait-elle pas agrémentée d’éléments stylistiques censés en renforcer la dimension tragique, mais sortis tout droit de l’imagination de l’auteur ?
16La fiction ne s’arrête pas là. Dans l’essai cité ci-dessus, le deuxième récit est celui de la fille de Madame Oumniaguina, Margarita Pogrebitskaïa. Celle-ci parle de sa vie et de sa foi en l’idée socialiste, en sa Patrie, de la déception que lui a causé l’effondrement des valeurs auxquelles elle avait cru sa vie durant. En fait, ce récit présente une version soigneusement expurgée du récit de la même personne publié dans le livre Ensorcelés par la mort. Dans le livre, achevé en 1993, Madame Pogrebitskaïa, médecin âgée de 52 ans, se trouve, au moment de ses confidences, à l’hôpital psychiatrique, après une tentative de suicide. La femme y parle après un énorme choc émotionnel qui l’a amenée à vouloir mourir : elle y raconte notamment la mort atroce du fils de sa belle-fille et d’une autre parente, assassinés par des Azéris à Bakou lors d’un pogrom contre les Arméniens. A-t-on le droit de citer une partie de ce récit, dix ans plus tard, pour illustrer un propos totalement différent, et comme si cette femme se livrait en 2003 ?
Du témoignage à la fiction
17Procédons encore à quelques comparaisons entre la version initiale qui date de 1983 au plus tard (les témoignages ont été collectés, nécessairement, au cours des années précédentes), et celle qui a été remaniée vingt ans plus tard. Voici l’histoire de la partisane Fiokla Strouï de la région de Vitebsk. Amputée de ses deux jambes gelées pendant l’encerclement de son détachement par les Allemands, elle est devenue, après la guerre, une responsable de l’administration locale. Dans la version 1983, elle parle de ses activités après la guerre et conclut ainsi :
18« Or, je recevais une pension, je pouvais vivre pour moi. Mais je ne pouvais rester à la maison, je voulais être utile. Je voulais être comme tout le monde. Je vis ici avec ma sœur… On nous a construit une maison…
19C’est une bonne maison. Vaste, haute. Je n’ai pas encore vu de maisons avec des plafonds aussi hauts… (réplique d’Alexievitch)
20Non, me prend par la main Fiokla Fiodorovna, elle te semble tellement haute, parce qu’il n’y a pas d’enfants dedans [19][19] Toutes les citations de la version 1983 sont traduites…… »
21Voilà comment cette fin est aménagée dans la version 2004 :
22« Or, je recevais une pension, je pouvais vivre pour moi, pour moi seule. Mais je voulais vivre pour les autres. Je suis une communiste…
23Je ne possède rien en propre. Juste des décorations : ordres, médailles, diplômes d’honneur. C’est l’État qui a construit ma maison. Si elle paraît si grande, et que les plafonds semblent si hauts, c’est parce qu’il n’y a pas d’enfants dedans, c’est la seule raison… Nous sommes deux à vivre là : ma sœur et moi. Elle est à la fois ma sœur, ma mère, ma nounou. Je suis vieille à présent… Le matin, je ne peux plus me lever toute seule…
24Nous vivons ensemble toutes les deux, nous vivons du passé. Nous avons un beau passé… Notre vie a été dure mais belle et honnête, et je ne regrette pas mon sort. Je ne regrette pas ma vie [20][20] Les citations sont faites d’après l’édition française…… »
25Comme il est difficile de supposer que le passage ajouté dans la version 2004 ait pu être supprimé par la censure, il faut croire qu’il s’agit d’un embellissement qui rend le portrait de Fiokla Strouï plus expressif : une Soviétique fière de son passé et en même temps si fragile, dépendante. Ces motifs se répètent à plusieurs reprises dans le livre, en créant une image collective d’une humble héroïne qui se cramponne à son passé.
26Passons maintenant à l’histoire d’Antonina Lenkova de Berdiansk, une jeune fille cultivée qui adorait Lidia Tcharskaïa, Tourgueniev et la poésie, et qui est devenue, pendant la guerre, mécanicienne dans un atelier militaire. Dans le texte de 1983, son discours n’a pas de caractéristiques linguistiques particulières, mais dans la version 2004, elle commence à répéter fréquemment une expression assez vulgaire que nous pouvons rendre par : « Oh ! putain de ta mère ! ». Si ce refrain obsessionnel ne cadre pas vraiment avec une lectrice assidue de la prose russe sentimentale, il permet par contre d’individualiser le personnage. La comparaison entre deux versions est, ici aussi, explicite :
27« Nous étions une usine sur roues… Une machine-outil était servie par deux personnes dont chacune travaillait douze heures de suite, sans une seule minute de pause. Au moment du déjeuner, du dîner, du petit-déjeuner, le coéquipier prenait le relais. Et si c’était le tour de votre coéquipier d’être de corvée, vous étiez bon pour turbiner vingt-quatre heures d’affilée. Le plus difficile était l’assemblage. Ici, il n’y avait pas de changement d’équipe. L’ordre était — un moteur en vingt-quatre heures. Le travail ne s’arrêtait pas même sous les bombes. L’on mourait, en enlaçant les moteurs… On travaillait dans la neige, dans la boue. Et il n’y avait pas un seul cas de travail bâclé…
28Une fois, je crois que c’était à Zimovniki, j’étais à peine arrivée pour dormir deux heures qu’un bombardement a commencé. Je me suis dit : mieux vaut être tuée qu’être privée d’un bon roupillon. Je me suis tourné sur l’autre côté et je me suis bouché les oreilles. Et là, parmi le fracas des bombes qui explosaient pas très loin, j’ai distingué le bruit d’un objet tombé tout près. La bombe allait exploser, mais il n’y a pas eu d’explosion. Ca a foiré, je pouvais donc dormir, et j’ai plongé dans un sommeil profond. » (Version 1983)
29Nous étions une usine sur roues… Une machine-outil était servie par deux personnes dont chacune travaillait douze heures de suite, sans une seule minute de pause. Au moment du déjeuner, du dîner, du petit-déjeuner, le coéquipier prenait le relais. Et si c’était le tour de votre coéquipier d’être de corvée, vous étiez bon pour turbiner vingt-quatre heures d’affilée. On bossait dans la neige, dans la boue. Sous les bombes. Et personne ne disait plus que nous étions de jolies filles. Mais on avait pitié des jolies filles à la guerre, on les plaignait davantage, c’est vrai. Ca faisait de la peine de les enterrer… Ca faisait de la peine de devoir expédier un avis de décès à leurs mamans… Oh ! putain de ta mère !…
30Je rêve souvent de mes camarades… Je rêve de la guerre… Et plus le temps passe, plus ça m’arrive souvent. Dans un rêve, une seconde suffit pour voir se dérouler ce qui, dans la vie, prend généralement des années. Mais parfois, je ne sais plus bien où est le rêve et où la réalité… Je crois que c’était à Zimovniki,où je devais faire une sieste de deux heures : j’étais à peine arrivée qu’un bombardement a commencé. Oh, putain de ta mère !… Je me suis dit : mieux vaut être tuée qu’être privée d’un bon roupillon… Je me suis endormie en pensant : pourvu que je voie maman en rêve. Même si, à dire vrai, pendant la guerre je ne faisais jamais de rêves. Quelque part dans le voisinage a retenti une violente explosion. Toute la maison a tremblé. Mais je me suis endormie quand même… » (Version 2004)
31Sont soulignés les passages qui sont entièrement absents dans la version 1983. Là aussi, l’auteur renforce le caractère dramatique du récit, en y rajoutant un passage qu’elle a peut-être entendu de la bouche d’un homme, sur la mort de jolies filles, ainsi que le passage probablement inventé sur les rêves qui est censé souligner la sensibilité profonde de cette dame ayant perdu sa santé à la guerre. La version 2004 arrête le récit à ses maladies incapacitantes, alors que dans la version 1983, Madame Lenkova raconte qu’elle a eu deux fils et qu’elle a pu obtenir, malgré son état de santé, deux diplômes de l’enseignement supérieur : d’abord, celui d’hydrologue, et ensuite, celui de journaliste.
32Dans le récit d’Oumniaguina, déjà citée, la réécriture est également importante :
33« Je revois tout, j’imagine : comment les tués gisent – bouches ouvertes, tripes à l’extérieur. J’ai vu dans ma vie moins de bois coupé que de cadavres… À la guerre, les gars disaient : “S’il faut mourir, que ce soit avec Tamara, avec elle, on va rigoler aussi dans l’au-delà”. Je le raconte pour expliquer que j’étais une jeune fille gaillarde, forte. Mais dès que la guerre fut terminée, c’en était fini. Je n’en peux plus… Cinéma, livres — de toute façon, on n’y trouve pas ce que nous avons vu. Je n’ai lu nulle part à quel point on a peur à la guerre. On a tellement peur, surtout dans un combat au corps à corps, qu’après, on bégaie pendant des jours, on n’arrive pas à prononcer un mot correctement. Est-ce que celui qui n’y a pas été peut le comprendre ? » (Version 1983)
34« Je revois tout et j’imagine : les corps gisant, la bouche ouverte, ils criaient et n’ont pas achevé leur cri, leurs tripes qui s’échappent de leur ventre… J’ai vu dans ma vie moins de bois coupé que de cadavres… Et quelle épouvante ! Quelle épouvante lors des combats au corps à corps, quand les hommes s’affrontent à la baïonnette. La baïonnette au clair. On se met à bégayer, pendant plusieurs jours on ne parvient plus à prononcer un mot correctement. On perd l’usage de la parole. Qui pourrait comprendre ça s’il ne l’a pas connu lui-même ? Et comment le raconter ? Avec quels mots ? Quel visage ? Certains y arrivent plus ou moins… Ils en sont capables… Mais moi, non. Je pleure. Or, il faut, il faut que ça reste. Il faut transmettre tout ça. Que quelque part dans le monde on puisse encore entendre nos cris… Nos hurlements… Notre souffle. » (Version 2004)
35Est souligné, là aussi, le passage qui n’appartient pas à la version initiale, mais qui, par contre, correspond bien aux interrogations de l’écrivain elle-même qui semble mettre ainsi ses propres paroles dans la bouche d’un témoin. Ce procédé est répété à la fin du témoignage de Tamara Oumniaguina qui raconte comment, à Stalingrad, elle a sauvé un soldat soviétique et un Allemand, en les traînant, à tour de rôle, d’un champ de bataille :
36« Maintenant, lorsque je pense à cette histoire, je m’étonne toujours de moi-même. C’était pendant les combats les plus terribles. Lorsque je voyais des fascistes tués, je me réjouissais, j’étais heureuse qu’on en ait autant trucidés. Et ici ? Je suis médecin, je suis une femme… Et je sauvais la vie. La vie humaine nous était précieuse. Je sauvais le monde…
37Après la guerre, je n’arrivais pas à m’habituer qu’il ne fallait plus avoir peur du ciel. Lorsque je me suis démobilisée, avec mon mari, et que nous rentrions chez nous, je ne pouvais regarder par la fenêtre. Tellement de destruction, tellement de dévastation… Des cheminées noires, vides qui semblaient, je ne sais pourquoi, très hautes. Je me souviens d’un four blanc avec sa cheminée, planté au milieu d’un champ. Juste un four au milieu d’un grand champ plat. » (Version 1983)
38« On était pourtant à Stalingrad… Aux heures les plus effroyables de la guerre. Et malgré tout, je ne pouvais pas tuer… abandonner un mourant… Ma très précieuse… On ne peut avoir un cœur pour la haine et un autre pour l’amour. L’homme n’a qu’un seul cœur, et j’ai toujours pensé préserver le mien.
39Après la guerre, pendant longtemps j’ai eu peur du ciel, peur même de lever la tête en l’air. J’avais peur de voir un champ labouré… Or, déjà les freux s’y promenaient paisiblement… Les oiseaux ont vite oublié la guerre… » (Version 2004)
40Dans ce passage, sont soulignées deux phrases qui ont des correspondances dans la version 1983, sans pour autant faire partie du témoignage de Madame Oumniaguina. En fait, la première phrase appartient à Svetlana Alexievitch, qui conclut ainsi le témoignage de Véra Maksimovna Berestova, lieutenant du service médical de l’armée, qui est supprimé dans la version 2004 :
41« L’homme peut-il avoir un cœur pour la haine et un autre pour l’amour ? Cette femme n’avait qu’un cœur »
42Quant à la deuxième phrase attribuée à Madame Oumniaguina, elle est puisée dans le témoignage de la partisane Véra Iossifovna Odinets qui est supprimé dans la version 2004 :
43« La partisane Véra Iossifovna Odinets ne pouvait voir, pendant longtemps, la terre labourée, il lui semblait que c’étaient des traces d’un bombardement ou d’un pilonnage récent [21][21] Cf. pp. 274 et 275 de l’édition russe citée.. »
44On voit clairement que pour construire une image de Madame Oumniaguina, Svetlana Alexievitch, outre qu’elle recourt aux moyens d’individualisation et de dramatisation que nous avons déjà observés, lui attribue également ses propres propos, ainsi que des sentiments d’un autre témoin. Il s’agit de procédés simples, mais efficaces de la création d’un personnage littéraire, et les exemples de ce type pourraient être facilement multipliés si l’on fait une comparaison systématique entre les deux versions.
45L’on pourrait objecter que la version réécrite de La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme a beau avoir subi un traitement littéraire qui en diminue le caractère documentaire en faveur de la dimension tragique, rien ne prouve que cette méthode de travail fut également utilisée par Svetlana Alexievitch dans l’écriture des « versions originelles » de ses cinq livres [22][22] Il existe également une nouvelle version remaniée des…. Faute de pouvoir accéder aux archives de l’écrivain et faire la lumière sur son processus créatif, nous possédons néanmoins certaines indications. L’une est fournie par le procès qui fut intenté à l’auteur par quelques personnages des Cercueils de zinc, militaires ou mères de soldats et officiers morts en Afghanistan : leurs témoignages, anonymes dans le livre (la liste des témoins est donnée au début, mais on ne peut formellement attribuer tel témoignage à telle personne de la liste), auraient été en quelque sorte « détournés » par la réécriture, la mise hors contexte et le refus de prendre en compte leur sensibilité et leur culture politique [23][23] Au procès organisé à Minsk, en 1993, avec le soutien…. Ce procès, qui n’est nullement celui de la liberté de l’écrivain dans le traitement de n’importe quel sujet, nous ramène à la question initiale : témoignage ou fiction ? Une précieuse possibilité de pénétrer dans le « laboratoire » de l’écrivain nous a été fournie par Tatiana Loguinova, la cameraman de Minsk qui a accompagné Svetlana Alexievitch dans son périple « tchernobylien ». Tatiana a filmé 41 heures d’entretiens de l’écrivain avec la majorité des témoins qui figurent dans La supplication, entretiens — encore en notre possession — dont nous avons pu visionner les plus importants, dont celui qui commence et celui qui clôt le livre. On se rend alors compte à quel point les entretiens filmés furent modifiés dans le livre, avec l’utilisation des mêmes procédés que ceux décrits précédemment. Cela est tout particulièrement vrai pour le cas de Valentina Panassevitch, épouse d’un liquidateur défunt. Au cours de l’entretien, Svetlana Alexievitch incite cette femme, qui était follement amoureuse de son mari, à raconter les rapports qu’elle a eus avec lui dans les derniers mois, voire les derniers jours de sa vie, alors qu’il était littéralement transformé en un déchet radioactif monstrueux et pourrissant. Sous prétexte que « l’on est entre femmes », Alexiévitch incite Valentina à lui livrer ses confessions intimes en lui annonçant qu’elle a coupé le micro… ce qu’elle ne fait pas. Au fil de leur dialogue, Alexiévitch commente le récit de Madame Panasevitch par des phrases qui, dans le livre, sont finalement placées dans la bouche de cette dernière.
46Pour conclure sur ce point, il peut paraître curieux qu’une œuvre aussi complexe que celle de Svetlana Alexievitch n’ait fait, à notre connaissance, l’objet d’aucune étude plus sérieuse en France, malgré les centaines d’articles de journaux et d’émissions radio qui lui furent consacrés, malgré plusieurs prix internationaux décernés à cet auteur qui a publié en une vingtaine de langues et vendu des millions d’ouvrages. On pourra encore se demander comment la sorte de portrait collectif d’homo sovieticus, saisi dans quatre moments cruciaux de son existence (la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la guerre d’Afghanistan, Tchernobyl et l’éclatement de l’Union soviétique) que l’auteur a essayé de créer à travers cinq livres a été reçu hors de l’ex-URSS. Ainsi, la question que nous allons aborder à présent est, selon nous, plus problématique.
Du témoignage au révisionnisme historique
47Les questions de l’authenticité, de la datation et de l’absence de contexte dans lequel se sont déroulées les interviews conduites par Svetlana Alexievitch ne sont pas les seules questions que pose cette œuvre très émouvante. Lorsque nous lui avions demandé, quelques années plus tôt, de verser les entretiens qu’elle avait réalisés dans les zones contaminées au fonds Tchernobyl que nous voulions créer au Mémorial de Caen, elle répondit à notre grande stupéfaction, qu’elle n’avait gardé aucune trace de ces bandes, que telle n’était pas sa vocation d’écrivain. Sans traces ni archives, nous penchons donc radicalement du côté de la littérature et non plus de celui de la « vérité historique » prônée par l’auteur. Mais la méthode utilisée par Svetlana Alexievitch contient une autre faille que nous ne pouvons passer sous silence.
48La publication de l’édition française de La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, a été saluée par la presse française comme une révélation, car rares sont ceux qui en Occident mesurent l’immense exploit du peuple soviétique dans la guerre contre l’envahisseur nazi. Cependant, ceux qui connaissent bien l’histoire de cette guerre et ont eu le bonheur de lire non seulement des romans officiels soviétiques comme La jeune garde d’Alexandre Fadeïev, mais aussi les livres de Vassili Grossman ou de Gueorgui Vladimov (Le général et son armée), pourraient se poser un certain nombre de questions. Le projet de l’écrivaine biélorusse désormais rendue célèbre par son travail sur Tchernobyl (La supplication) et la guerre d’Afghanistan (Les cercueils de zinc) consiste, comme nous l’avons montré, à produire une œuvre littéraire qui, tout en satisfaisant aux exigences de la littérature (liberté de l’auteur de réécrire la parole des témoins), puisse s’inscrire dans le cadre d’une historiographie de la mémoire collective appréhendée à hauteur d’homme, par le biais du témoignage. Seulement l’ouvrage accueilli en France comme étant l’expression d’une « vérité » exprimée par la voix des femmes engagées volontaires sur le front russe, présente en fait plus d’ambiguïté qu’il n’est censé en dépasser. C’est au début de la décennie quatre-vingt que la jeune journaliste soviétique S. Alexiévitch, sur les conseils de l’écrivain biélorusse de renom Ales Adamovitch, décide d’aller questionner plusieurs centaines de femmes qui ont fait l’expérience volontaire du front, afin de transformer en une sorte de portrait collectif le vécu de ces centaines de milliers de combattantes. Prêtes à sacrifier leur vie (et celle des autres) pour la Patrie et pour Staline, comme il est abondamment rappelé au fil des témoignages, aucune de ces femmes – à l’époque âgées d’à peine vingt ans – ne semble donc avoir de recul par rapport à la manière de mener la guerre, y compris des sacrifices inutiles de centaines de milliers de soldats et des sacrifices volontaires de populations civiles. Le sort de centaines d’Oradour-sur-Glane biélorusses a été scellé au Kremlin qui dirigeait des opérations de partisans insensées, malgré d’horribles représailles. Il s’ensuit que quarante ans plus tard, au moment des enquêtes (avant la Perestroïka), on pourra donc s’interroger sur les limites de la « vérité profonde » de leur récit, nécessairement reconstruit a posteriori, et surtout sur leur volonté de maintenir vivant le portrait de la « femme vaillante » soviétique. Si l’on peut considérer qu’elles demeurent sincères — à leurs engagements — face à la journaliste, on ne peut pour autant en conclure à l’universalité de leur propos sans interroger le type d’humanité de l’homme qu’a cherché à produire l’imaginaire stalinien.
49L’écrivain qui a défini son genre comme un « roman des voix » est donc à l’écoute de personnages dont elle réécrit les propos pour forger des images à forte charge émotionnelle. Cependant, on ne voit nulle part de tentative critique de confronter ces récits forts aux faits établis et connus grâce à différentes historiographies dont certaines ont eu recours au témoignage. Au contraire, elle entend nier la valeur de l’histoire connue pour en écrire une autre, que personne n’a sue, comme si toute l’historiographie existante n’était qu’une sorte de propagande officielle. C’est ainsi que dans La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme elle dénonce, avec une verve féministe un peu obsolète, la guerre décrite par les hommes, par la « conspiration masculine », qui a fait florès dans le cadre de sa réception en Europe : « Nous sommes prisonniers d’images “masculines” et de sensations “masculines” de la guerre » écrit-elle. « De mots “masculins”… Les récits de femmes sont d’une autre nature et traitent d’un autre sujet. La guerre “féminine” possède ses propres couleurs, ses propres odeurs, son propre éclairage et son propre espace de sentiments. Ses propres mots enfin. On n’y trouve ni héros ni exploits incroyables, mais simplement des individus absorbés par une inhumaine besogne humaine. Et ils (les humains !) n’y sont pas les seuls à souffrir : souffrent avec eux la terre, les oiseaux, les arbres. La nature entière » (p. 9).
50Ce désir de faire abstraction de l’histoire de la Grande Guerre patriotique [24][24] C’est ainsi qu’on appelait en URSS le volet soviétique… conduit finalement à des aberrations particulièrement regrettables pour le lecteur occidental qui, dans la plupart des cas, éprouvera quelques difficultés à replacer ces témoignages dans un contexte historique approprié. C’est ainsi que ces femmes présentées comme « hypersensibles » et par là même source de vérité n’ont pas fait mention une seule fois, dans leurs récits sur l’occupation de la Biélorussie survenue dans les premiers jours de l’offensive nazie contre l’URSS, du sort réservé par les nazis aux Juifs. Il est rigoureusement impossible qu’aucune d’elles n’ait jamais rien vu, rien su, rien entendu : rien qu’en Biélorussie, quatre cent mille Juifs au moins furent victimes de la politique d’extermination commencée bien avant la proclamation de la « solution finale », et le plus souvent avec le concours d’une partie de la population locale [25][25] Voir Vassili Grossman, Vie et Destin, Pocket, 2002…. Dans cette seule république soviétique, on dénombra plus d’une centaine de ghettos et de camps improvisés dont le grand ghetto de Minsk qui renfermait près de cent mille personnes [26][26] Il existait trois ghettos à Minsk, dont le plus grand,…. Comment se fait-il que la sensibilité de ces jeunes filles, car elles étaient jeunes voire très jeunes à l’époque, soit passée outre de telles atrocités ? Il s’agit en fait d’une question de méthode.
51Svetlana Alexievitch, qui nie la possibilité d’une sensibilité masculine, a cherché ses interlocutrices essentiellement dans des clubs de vétérans : elle ne s’est donc entretenue qu’avec les patriotes les plus endurcies qui avaient intériorisé les consignes de la politique stalinienne — notoirement antisémite — de l’après-guerre. Rappelons qu’il était alors d’usage d’occulter totalement l’histoire de la Shoah et de ne parler que d’extermination de « citoyens soviétiques [27][27] Ainsi, le tirage du « Livre noir », recueil de documents… ». Mais si les vaillantes combattantes de la Seconde Guerre mondiale évitaient de parler de la Shoah, elles ont été, par contre, très franches dans la description crue de la guerre, ce qui est certainement le mérite de l’auteur qui a su gagner leur confiance. Dans ce sens, La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme eut, au moment de sa publication en 1985, l’effet d’une vérité « révélée », car ces femmes parlaient non seulement de leur besogne militaire, mais aussi de leur quotidien dans l’armée ou chez les partisans. Cette approche, ainsi que la reconnaissance du rôle joué par les femmes, ces oubliées de la guerre dans la société machiste soviétique, furent perçues comme une véritable révolution des idées. Cependant, à y regarder de plus près, l’image collective de cette jeune Soviétique intrépide chez Alexievitch n’est pas très différente de celle que les idéologues du régime instillaient dans la conscience des masses. Que penser d’une jeune partisane qui, après plusieurs séances d’atroces tortures, donne au nazi qui l’interroge un cours de quatre heures sur l’invincibilité du marxisme-léninisme ? Que penser d’une jeune mère, agent de liaison de la résistance, qui frotte régulièrement avec du sel et de l’ail son bébé âgé de quelques mois pour qu’il ait de la fièvre et pleure, afin de traverser des postes de contrôle allemands ? Ou encore de celle qui attache des tracts tout autour du corps de sa fillette, sous la robe, pour traverser ainsi la ville et qui fait placer une bombe dans le panier que porte son enfant ? Que penser de toutes ces innombrables jeunes filles qui exhortaient leurs supérieurs de pouvoir partir combattre en première ligne pour mourir à coup sûr pour la Patrie et pour Staline ? L’auteur ne se laisse-t-il pas prendre au leurre de ces femmes qui, tout en racontant leurs histoires remplies de détails cruels et imagés, idéalisent leur image en vertu de l’idéologie encore en vigueur à la fin de l’époque communiste ? Nous pourrions, avec E. Bloch [28][28] E. Bloch, Héritage de ce temps, Paris, Payot, 1978… dont les travaux sur la non-contemporaneité des couches sociales physiquement co-présentes ont largement éclairé l’énigmatique question du nazisme, supposer que des imaginaires sociaux plus anciens du système soviétique, l’imaginaire stalinien en l’occurrence, puissent continuer à produire du sens bien après la disparition « officielle » du stalinisme. Comme de nombreux vétérans poursuivis par une expérience traumatique, ces femmes, à présent âgées, n’ont pu trouver pour pouvoir rendre compte de leurs actes et rationaliser leur malheur, d’autre système de valeurs que celui qui les a conduites au front. Probablement parce qu’il n’en existe précisément pas d’autre que l’on puisse mettre à la place : ni l’idéal des Lumières, ni les droits de l’homme. Finalement, si l’auteur de l’ouvrage s’attache à donner une dimension humaine au mythe en mettant en avant force détails intimes, la banalité de la vie quotidienne ne vient-elle pas justement masquer ici l’essentiel de ce que nous dit ce texte sur la force destructrice qu’exerce l’imaginaire stalinien sur les esprits, dans la société et dans les corps ? Le hiatus est que l’auteur ne porte aucun regard sur ce problème, ne pose aucune question. Peut-être ne connaît-elle elle-même que trop mal cette aveuglante histoire ? Quel est alors l’intérêt de publier vingt ans après sa première édition soviétique, et dix ans après l’effondrement de l’URSS, un tel ouvrage en l’état, en y ajoutant certes quelques extraits omis par la censure et par l’autocensure de l’auteur, et en faisant un travail stylistique supplémentaire, mais sans formuler véritablement de nouvelles interrogations ? Il est indéniable que les femmes enquêtées auraient aujourd’hui pour une large part un autre regard sur leur histoire — il en est ainsi de la mémoire collective dans sa capacité d’oubli et dans le jeu qu’elle installe entre le réel et le sujet, fût-il collectif. Si nous remodelons constamment « la réalité » en fonction des nouveaux contextes d’énonciation, le livre lui-même est désormais daté.
Vérité historique ou perpétuation d’un mythe soviétique ?
52Telle est la question que l’on se pose déjà à la lecture de la première version de La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, achevée en 1983. Or, dans les années quatre-vingt-dix, la vérité sur la guerre partisane en Biélorussie a commencé à sortir au grand jour. S’il reste difficile de donner une évaluation globale du mouvement des partisans en Biélorussie, à cause de sa diversité idéologique dans la mesure où il existait aussi des groupes nationalistes, surtout en Biélorussie occidentale annexée en 1940 en vertu du pacte Molotov-Ribbentrop, qui combattaient à la fois les Allemands et les Soviétiques et dont l’histoire est encore très mal connue [29][29] Des mouvements partisans nationalistes et la résistance…, on peut néanmoins affirmer que tous les groupes d’obédience soviétique étaient dirigés depuis Moscou. La « science historique » soviétique a fabriqué une image de « vengeurs populaires » et exalté les exploits militaires des partisans, en ignorant leur rôle en tant que « bras long » du NKVD. En vertu de la directive du Sovnarkom [30][30] Abréviation pour le Conseil des Commissaires du Peuple,… de l’URSS du 29 juin 1941 sur le caractère inadmissible de toute forme de vie civile sous l’occupation, les partisans brûlaient des écoles de village et liquidaient les « traîtres » tels que des responsables locaux (des starosty et des maires), des instituteurs, des policiers, des paysans qui vendaient du blé aux Allemands, souvent avec leurs familles. Selon les calculs de l’historien polonais Youri Touronok, les trois quarts des décès de la population civile pendant l’occupation de la Biélorussie ont été causés par l’activité des partisans soviétiques et nationalistes (y compris, bien sûr, les représailles allemandes [31][31] Cf. Youri Touronok, Biélorussie sous l’occupation allemande…), de sorte que Vassili Bykov, le classique de la littérature biélorusse, dont l’œuvre fut presque entièrement consacrée à la Seconde Guerre mondiale, a parlé à maintes reprises de la « guerre civile » qui eut lieu dans son pays. Apparemment, dans la polémique suscitée par les recherches de Touronok et de quelques autres historiens, par exemple A. Koloubovitch, Svetlana Alexievitch s’est rangée du côté de Bykov. Dans une interview publiée dans les Izvestia, le 29 février 1996, elle affirmait notamment que les partisans formaient des « bandes » dirigées par des petits despotes qui pouvaient fusiller n’importe qui, et que « les gens dans des villages mettaient souvent sur le même plan les Allemands et les partisans ». Mais alors comment expliquer que dans une nouvelle édition, pourtant très soigneusement remaniée pour accentuer le caractère dramatique des témoignages, elle n’a pas introduit le moindre commentaire qui aurait aidé le lecteur à comprendre les raisons de l’hécatombe subie par le peuple biélorusse en général, et par les habitants juifs de ce pays en particulier ? Rappelons que selon les statistiques officielles, un habitant sur quatre en Biélorussie a péri pendant la guerre, alors que pour l’ensemble de la population soviétique, ce chiffre était de dix pour cent ?
53En 1988, le dissident soviétique Alexandre Ginzburg a prononcé une phrase remarquable : « L’Union Soviétique est un pays unique au monde : depuis vingt ou trente ans pas un seul communiste n’y est né [32][32] Interview dans la revue Continent , 89/1, Albin Michel,… ». En effet, depuis les années soixante, l’idéologie soviétique s’était graduellement effritée pour ne plus représenter qu’un rituel auquel plus personne ou presque n’attachait de grande importance : c’était la règle du jeu, sans plus, ce qui devait être tenu pour « vérité », mais auquel on ne demandait pas vraiment de croire. Et s’il en avait été autrement, il y a fort à parier que l’effondrement spectaculaire du régime communiste ne se serait pas passé dans l’indifférence générale ! Il suffit de lire un seul ouvrage tel que Vie et Destin de Vassili Grossman, achevé vers 1960 [33][33] Le manuscrit de ce livre confisqué en 1960 par le KGB…, sans parler d’une multitude d’autres romans, témoignages, mémoires, etc., pour se convaincre que l’humanité soviétique n’était pas constituée, même à l’époque stalinienne, que d’homines sovietici, mais de gens très différents, les véritables partisans du régime étant fortement minoritaires au sein d’une population dominée et terrorisée par les purges. On pourra donc à juste titre se demander d’où Svetlana Alexievitch puise son interminable galerie de personnages qui racontent leurs convictions communistes dans la mesure où il ne s’agit pas que d’anciens partisans ou combattants de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, mais aussi de militaires soviétiques qui se sont battus en Afghanistan et de leurs parents, de suicidés lors de l’effondrement de l’Union soviétique, de ceux qui ont été touchés par l’immense drame de Tchernobyl ? Visiblement, le facteur géographique joue là un rôle important. Après la guerre, la Biélorussie où se déroulent la plupart des enquêtes de Svetlana Alexievitch a probablement été la république la plus « communiste » de toute l’Union soviétique, pour la simple raison que c’était aussi la république la plus industrialisée, où se trouvaient notamment des fleurons de l’industrie militaire. Même à l’époque post-communiste, ce pays est resté une sorte de réserve naturelle du soviétisme, comme en témoigne le monument aux soldats-internationalistes soviétiques morts en Afghanistan à Minsk, inauguré par le président Alexandre Loukachenko en 1997.
54Cependant, cet homo sovieticus qui fascine tant l’écrivain — et son public occidental — n’est pas un type figé d’un livre à l’autre. À ce titre, il est intéressant de noter que dans le livre Les derniers témoins, on trouve quelques récits d’enfants qui racontent le sort des Juifs : à la différence des anciennes combattantes au moral inébranlable, les gens ayant subi les traumatismes de la guerre en tant qu’enfants étaient visiblement moins engagés politiquement et donc plus libres dans leurs souvenirs. En général, les « voix » dans les livres d’Alexievitch deviennent plus libres au fur et à mesure de l’avancement de la perestroïka et du dépérissement du système soviétique. Dans ce sens, l’ensemble de son œuvre est un précieux témoignage de l’évolution de l’homo sovieticus dans la dernière période de l’existence de cette espèce humaine unique. Et c’est pour cette même raison que son dernier livre, La supplication, achevé en 1997, se démarque tellement du reste de son œuvre : ce sont des textes issus de témoignages de gens libérés d’une chape idéologique, et qui se retrouvent « hommes nus sur une terre nue » (expression aimée de l’écrivain), devant une catastrophe de dimensions cosmiques (car la radioactivité agit pendant des centaines de milliers d’années). On ne peut donc que déplorer que l’auteur se soit mise à réécrire ses livres et à brouiller de cette façon les pistes de leur lecture sociologique.
55Pour conclure, on se pose la question de savoir si des témoignages tirés de l’histoire soviétique et librement réécrits, coupés, arrangés et placés hors contexte historique et temporel peuvent être livrés et reçus comme tels. Matière première pour la fiction ou document historique ? Certes, Svetlana Alexievitch elle-même n’insiste pas sur le côté documentaire de son œuvre, en la qualifiant de « romans de voix », mais le fait même d’indiquer les noms, l’âge, la fonction de chaque personne interrogée entretient la confusion chez le lecteur par la mise en œuvre d’une esthétique du témoignage. Mais une esthétique du témoignage est-elle possible sans éthique du témoignage ? On est en droit de poser la question suivante : si les livres d’Alexievitch n’avaient pas ces mentions de noms de témoins et si elle les avait présentés comme de la fiction (en somme, la littérature de fiction est le plus souvent inspirée des histoires réelles), quelle aurait été la réception de cette œuvre ? Aurions-nous eu le même engouement que provoque chez le lecteur le sentiment de vérité ? Serions-nous bouleversés par ces histoires dont beaucoup nous seraient parues, du coup, incroyables ? Le récit prend ici son caractère d’authenticité et de vérité qui exerce un travail émotionnel sur celui qui le reçoit. C’est la fonction de la télé-réalité et de l’exposition généralisée du « vrai malheur » de « vrais gens » qui a gagné les médias depuis quelques années et qui substitue à la critique politique des problèmes sociaux un espace intime dominé par les affects et le psychisme. L’exemple de l’œuvre d’Alexievitch et de sa réception nous montrent à la fois les enjeux et les limites d’une littérature de témoignage qui ne serait pas fermement enracinée dans une perspective critique et historique ainsi que les limites d’une « dissidence » ou d’une « discordance » qui ne serait pas restituée avec précision dans son contexte historique. Le témoignage a, à coup sûr, sa place dans l’œuvre littéraire, d’autant plus que depuis la Shoah et la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le rapport entre le témoignage et l’histoire est repensé à grands frais. Mais la responsabilité du témoin face à la mémoire collective engage tout autant l’acteur que le narrateur, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit de deux personnes différentes. François Dosse [34][34] In Témoignage et écriture de l’histoire. Décade de… insiste sur l’articulation nécessaire du témoignage, mémoire irremplaçable mais insuffisante, et du discours de la socio-histoire, travail indispensable d’analyse explicative et compréhensive. Si, pour reprendre la formule chère à Paul Ricœur, le témoignage a d’autant plus sa place dans la littérature que les générations présentes entretiennent une dette envers le passé (et envers le futur avec l’avenir contaminé de Tchernobyl), ce qui conduit à donner la parole aux « sans parole », aux vaincus de l’histoire, il implique en retour de redoubler de précaution face aux usages de la mémoire, mémoire aveugle, prisonnière d’imaginaires sociaux et historiques particuliers que le narrateur ne saurait faire passer pour des universaux. En ce sens, on devrait évaluer l’œuvre de Svetlana Alexievitch, qui appartient à un genre littéraire particulier basé sur une construction avec une très forte charge émotionnelle où les témoins sont transformés en porteurs « types » de messages idéologiques, avec des critères littéraires, plutôt que d’y chercher des vérités documentées comme l’a trop souvent fait la presse française et internationale.
Notes
[*] Auteur de Tchernobyl : retour sur un désastre, Gallimard Folio, 2007.
[1] Vassili Grossman et Ilya Ehrenbourg, Le Livre noir, 1, et Le Livre noir, 2, Livre de poche, 2001.
[2] Presses de la Renaissance, 2004 (traduit par Galia Ackerman et Paul Lequesne).
[3] Presses de la Renaissance, 2005 (traduit par Anne Coldéfy-Faucard).
[4] Plon, 1995 (traduit par Sophie Benech).
[5] Christian Bourgois, 1991/2002 (traduit par Wladimir Berelowitch, avec la collaboration d’Elisabeth Mouravieff).
[6] Editions Lattès, 1998 (traduit par Galia Ackerman et Pierre Lorrain).
[7] Ce chiffre figure dans sa propre présentation sur son website, mais elle donne parfois un chiffre bien inférieur. Ainsi, dans un entretien accordé à la radio Écho de Moscou, elle parle de 200-300 personnes interviewées pour chaque livre. Cf. le site Ekho Moskvy, 7.7.2001 (en russe).
[8] Cf. le website de Svetlana Alexievitch.
[9] Cf. la transcription de cette interview sur le site du canal télévisé russe « Koultoura », le 24.5.2004 (en russe).
[10] Cf. le site du journal-Internet BelaPAN, 26.7.2002 (en russe).
[11] Cf. le site de la radio Svoboda, programme de Lev Roïtman, 9.10.1999 (en russe).
[12] Ibid.
[13] Presses de la Renaissance, 2004 (traduit par Galia Ackerman et Paul Lequesne).
[14] Ce livre n’a pas encore été publié en France.
[15] Christian Bourgois, 1991/2002.
[16] Dans cette analyse, nous nous appuyons sur nos précédentes publications. Voir G. Ackerman, F. Lemarchand, « Vérité ou perpétuation d’un mythe ? », La Quinzaine Littéraire, n°880 (1-15 juillet 2004) ; G. Ackerman, « Le témoignage est-il soluble dans la littérature ? Lire l’œuvre de Svetlana Alexievitch », Cahiers d’Histoire Sociale, n°25, 2005.
[17] Littératures métisses, Le Paresseux, n°25, 2003, Angoulême.
[18] La guerre n’a pas un visage de femme, pp. 14-15.
[19] Toutes les citations de la version 1983 sont traduites par G. Ackerman d’après l’édition : Svetlana Alexievitch, Ou voïny ne jenskoïe litso. Posledniïe svideteli, Moscou, Editions Ostojié, 1998. Il s’agit d’une réédition russe, non remaniée par rapport au texte original de 1985.
[20] Les citations sont faites d’après l’édition française et parfois légèrement modifiées pour les rapprocher de l’original russe. Le texte russe qui a servi pour la traduction française fut également utilisé pour la nouvelle édition russe. Cf. Ou voïny ne jenskoïe litso, Editions Palmira, Moscou, 2004.
[21] Cf. pp. 274 et 275 de l’édition russe citée.
[22] Il existe également une nouvelle version remaniée des Derniers témoins, celle-là même qui a servi pour la traduction française.
[23] Au procès organisé à Minsk, en 1993, avec le soutien des militaires, Svetlana Alexievitch a été accusée de dénigrer la mémoire des soldats péris en Afghanistan. Sous la pression internationale, ce procès s’est soldé pratiquement par un non-lieu : l’auteur a été condamnée à s’excuser devant un plaignant. Les matériaux relatifs à ce procès ont été publiés dans : Svetlana Alexievitch, Les cercueils de zinc, Christian Bourgois, Paris, 2002.
[24] C’est ainsi qu’on appelait en URSS le volet soviétique de la Seconde Guerre mondiale.
[25] Voir Vassili Grossman, Vie et Destin, Pocket, 2002 (première édition, 1980) ou la récente exposition intitulée La Shoah par balle.
[26] Il existait trois ghettos à Minsk, dont le plus grand, qui a existé d’août 1941 à octobre 1943, était le deuxième, par sa population, après celui de Lvov (136 000 personnes) sur le territoire soviétique.
[27] Ainsi, le tirage du « Livre noir », recueil de documents et de témoignages sur l’extermination des Juifs soviétiques par les nazis, fut entièrement détruit en 1949 et le livre n’a été publié en ex-URSS qu’à l’époque post-soviétique (sa première publication en langue russe, en Israël, date de 1980). Cf. Vassili Grossman et Ilya Ehrenbourg, Le Livre noir 1 et Le Livre noir 2, op. cit.
[28] E. Bloch, Héritage de ce temps, Paris, Payot, 1978/1935.
[29] Des mouvements partisans nationalistes et la résistance au régime communiste ont existé partout dans les territoires annexés. Après la fin de la guerre, la résistance a continué pendant quelques années en Ukraine occidentale et dans les Pays Baltes, ainsi qu’au Caucase. Il ne faut pas oublier non plus l’armée Vlassov, composée essentiellement de prisonniers de guerre soviétiques, et qui comptait deux millions d’hommes, qui a combattu du côté nazi.
[30] Abréviation pour le Conseil des Commissaires du Peuple, nom donné à l’époque au Conseil des ministres.
[31] Cf. Youri Touronok, Biélorussie sous l’occupation allemande (en langue biélorusse), Minsk, 1993.
[32] Interview dans la revue Continent , 89/1, Albin Michel, p. 86.
[33] Le manuscrit de ce livre confisqué en 1960 par le KGB surgit miraculeusement en Occident en 1980 où il est immédiatement publié pour devenir, aux yeux de beaucoup, le Guerre et Paix du XXe siècle.
[34] In Témoignage et écriture de l’histoire. Décade de Cerisy, 21-31 juillet. Paris, L’Harmattan, 2003, 480 p.

Voir aussi:

Witness Tampering
Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich crafts myths, not histories.
Sophie Pinkham
New Republic
August 29, 2016

Until she won the Nobel Prize in literature last year, Belarusian writer Svetlana Alexievich was largely unknown in the English- and Russian-speaking worlds. After beginning her career as a reporter, she has spent the past three decades working at the boundary of journalism and literature. Her books, which she calls “novels in voices,” are based on hundreds of interviews with ordinary citizens about some of the most painful episodes of the twentieth century: World War II, Chernobyl, the Soviet war in Afghanistan. She uses the voices of witnesses, interspersed with her own reflections, to express the collective trauma of world-historical events.

A pacifist opposed to Vladimir Putin, Alexievich was the perfect Nobel laureate for a new Cold War, as tensions between Russia and the West reached the highest levels in decades. Born in Ukraine in 1948 and raised in Belarus, Alexievich stood for post-Soviet people struggling nonviolently against Putin’s Russia, which many considered a new incarnation of the Soviet Union. In her Nobel lecture, Alexievich expressed a low opinion of the Soviet era’s utopian dreams:

I reconstruct the history … of how people wanted to build the Heavenly Kingdom on earth. Paradise! The City of the Sun! In the end, all that remained was a sea of blood, millions of ruined human lives.

In post-Nobel interviews, she criticized Putin and his involvement in the war in eastern Ukraine. Members of the Russian opposition were pleased; some mainstream Russian commentators denounced her Nobel selection as a political statement.

American journalists found their own reasons to celebrate her win. She was a woman writing about the effect of world events on ordinary people; she was an outspoken advocate for peace and respect for the environment. Since the Nobel Prize goes almost exclusively to novelists and poets, writers working in the sprawling, ill-defined world of “nonfiction” welcomed Alexievich’s win as an acknowledgment that even true stories can make great literature.

There was some confusion, however, about the lineaments of Alexievich’s chosen genre. The Western press described her as an “investigative journalist” and “contemporary historian,” accepting her work as accurate documentation of Soviet and post-Soviet reality. In interviews, however, Alexievich has stressed the literary nature of her intentions and methods, and she rejects the title of “reporter.” Her work opts for subjective recollection over hard evidence; she does not attempt to confirm any of her witnesses’ accounts, and she chooses her stories for their narrative power, not as representative samples. Her newly translated book Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets bears no resemblance to “investigative journalism.”

There is another, less obvious layer of ambiguity to Alexievich’s work and its reception. Though she has discussed her artistic approach in interviews, her books do not include a clear explanation of her methods. The casual reader can only guess at the extent to which she has pruned her interviews. It’s no surprise that most readers have accepted Secondhand Time as historically accurate. The American marketing encourages such an interpretation: The book is labeled as “oral history.” But as I discovered from examining earlier versions of the same stories that have not been translated into English, Alexievich treats her interviews not as fixed historical documents, but as raw material for her own artistic and political project. Her extensive editing—not only for clarity or focus, but to reshape meaning—brings Secondhand Time out of the realm of strictly factual writing. And by seeking to straddle both literature and history, Alexievich ultimately succeeds at neither.

Secondhand Time concludes a five-book cycle called “Voices of Utopia.” Only two other volumes are currently available in English. Zinky Boys, published in Russian in 1989, was praised, both inside and outside the Soviet Union, for calling attention to the horrific consequences of the Soviet war in Afghanistan, which was fought under the cover of heavy censorship; Voices From Chernobyl is probably Alexievich’s most admired work, a chronicle of the gruesome fallout of the nuclear disaster. In Secondhand Time, Alexievich turns to the fall of the Soviet Union—another genre of catastrophe.

Secondhand Time rehearses the familiar story of perestroika, glasnost, and the wild hopes and lost illusions of the post-Soviet 1990s. As the Soviet Union crumbled, members of the intelligentsia rejoiced in the idea that they would now be able to read and say whatever they pleased. But teachers, engineers, and doctors soon found themselves working as tradespeople, struggling to survive. Treasured libraries were sold off for grocery money, and the newly free market was flooded with trashy detective novels and porn. Russia’s nearly religious worship of great writers seemed to disappear overnight. As one of Alexievich’s eyewitnesses observes, “Words no longer meant anything.” All that mattered was money. Facing severe economic hardship, even starvation, many concluded that the Soviet Union had been a better deal.

Tales of suicide and thoughts of death form the core of Secondhand Time. A Soviet general hangs himself in his Kremlin office after the failed putsch against Gorbachev in 1991. A proud veteran of World War II commits suicide at the Brest fortress he once defended, leaving a note cursing Boris Yeltsin. One elderly man tells Alexievich that he denounced his uncle for hiding grain during the war. The uncle was promptly executed. “I want to die a communist,” the old man declares; if he is not a communist, he is complicit in murder and has suffered for nothing. Russia’s suicide rate peaked in the mid-’90s, at the staggering annual rate of 40 deaths per 100,000 people. As they saw their civilization disappear, Alexievich suggests, communist true believers lost their reason for living.

Noticeably absent from Secondhand Time is the cynicism of the late Soviet era. By the 1970s, many Soviet citizens talked the Soviet talk in public but traded Brezhnev jokes at home. While some political dissidents were full-blooded martyrs, others used samizdat to earn money or win Western support. Yet the simple story of dissident heroes, tragic victims, conformists, and villains remains popular in the Western press. This helps account for the almost reflexive rapture with which many critics greeted Secondhand Time. It also helps explain Alexievich’s Nobel. Read as a work of literature, however, the book feels repetitive and heavy-handed, reinforcing conventional wisdom about the Soviet and post-Soviet world while providing few new insights.

“I’m piecing together the history of ‘domestic,’ ‘interior’ socialism,” Alexievich writes at the beginning of Secondhand Time, “as it existed in a person’s soul.” She is interested not in what happened, or why, but in how people felt about it, and she draws on some of the techniques of traditional history and journalism without assuming the responsibilities of either. While her early work was more traditionally journalistic, over time she has stripped away context (most testimonies are prefaced with only a name, age, and profession) and relied increasingly on collages of unattributed quotations. Early in Secondhand Time, Alexievich writes:

History is concerned solely with the facts; emotions are outside of its realm of interest. In fact, it’s considered improper to admit feelings into history. But I look at the world as a writer and not a historian. I am fascinated by people.

In reality, some historians are very concerned with emotions. Recent years have seen a number of works focusing on subjective experiences of the Soviet period, such as Jochen Hellbeck’s Revolution on My Mind: Writing a Diary Under Stalin. And emotions aren’t off-limits to journalists, either. In A Small Corner of Hell: Dispatches From Chechnya, the late Anna Politkovskaya draws on “the logic of feelings” to describe the year of the Moscow theater massacre, when she helped Russian authorities negotiate with Chechen terrorists. Politkovskaya’s heroic work is an outstanding example of the use of first-hand testimony to illuminate a historical event, and it stays within the bounds of journalistic convention.

Alexievich doesn’t need to depart from history or journalism to write about feelings. Why, then, has she chosen the “novel in voices”? In an interview with Le Figaro, she explained, “I felt constrained by that profession [journalism]. The subjects I wanted to write about—the mystery of the human soul, evil—didn’t interest newspapers, and news reporting bored me.”

In Russian, Alexievich’s chosen genre is sometimes called “documentary literature”: an artistic rendering of real events, with a degree of poetic license. The idea is not new, in Russia or elsewhere. Another Nobel laureate, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, is an obvious point of comparison, as is Alexievich’s mentor, the Belarusian writer Ales Adamovich, who used historical documents as sources for his artistic depictions of World War II. But Alexievich goes unusually far in eliminating narrative trappings and relying almost exclusively on witness testimony that floats free of context.

Alexievich has the unusual habit of continuing to rewrite her books after they have been published, releasing them in new editions. She says this is because she sees them as living documents, and because she goes back to re-interview her subjects over the years. But sometimes she rewrites passages in ways that are primarily aesthetic—even at the cost of creating discrepancies—or that seem to reflect her evolving political values.

I was recently surprised to read an article by one of Alexievich’s French translators, Galia Ackerman, analyzing some of these revisions. Ackerman and her co-author, Frédérick Lemarchand, found phrases that had migrated from one person’s testimony to another’s, or from Alexievich’s reflections to those of an interview subject. An interview is used to support one message in one work and another in a second, either through editing or by removing context. Such changes point to the danger of understanding Alexievich’s “voices” as historical testimony, or interpreting them as evidence of a single, immutable truth.

Some of the stories in Secondhand Time first appeared in Enchanted by Death, which was published in 1993. (It has not been translated into English.) When I looked at the two versions side by side, I had the impression that I was comparing drafts of monologues from a play. Words, sentences, and passages were rearranged, removed, or added. The cumulative effect gave the revised version a sharper, more dramatic flavor, and an ideological message more in line with Western values. The choices were those of an author, not a reporter.

The story of Alexander Porfirievich Sharpilo, a pensioner who set himself on fire, is included in both Enchanted by Death and Secondhand Time, as told by his neighbor. For some reason, this neighbor’s name varies slightly: She is called Maria Tikhonovna Isaichik in Enchanted by Death and Marina Tikhonovna Isaichik in Secondhand Time. In the first version, she says:

In my village, when I was still young, there was an old man, he liked to watch children die.… He wasn’t crazy, he was okay, he had a wife and kids, and went to church. He lived for a long time.…

In Secondhand Time, she says:

Well … in our village, where I lived with my parents before I was married, there was an old man who liked to come and watch people die. The women would shame him and chase him away: “Shoo, devil!” but he’d just sit there. He ended up living a long time. Maybe he really was a devil!

The two versions convey different pictures of the old man. Despite the bizarre detail about liking to “watch children die,” the first version is less dramatic, less like a fairy tale and more like real life. The second version is more obviously “literary.” There are factual discrepancies, as well. In 1993’s Enchanted by Death, Isaichik says she is 80, which means she would have been born in 1912 at the very latest; in Secondhand Time she says she turned 16 when the Second World War ended, so she would have been born in 1929. The dead Sharpilo is 60 years old in Enchanted by Death and 63 in Secondhand Time, another reminder of Alexievich’s intentionally hazy chronology.

Some of the revisions serve a clear poetic purpose. In Enchanted by Death, for instance, Isaichik says that her neighbor was buried “without an orchestra, without music,” and that only his ex-wife wept. In Secondhand Time, she says that he was buried “with music, with tears. Everyone wept.” This small shift in detail alters our sense of the social context in which Sharpilo committed suicide. It emphasizes the solidarity of the Belarusian villagers, rather than Sharpilo’s loneliness and social isolation in the wake of divorce and retirement. Alexievich claims to be concerned with the truths of her subjects’ inner lives, but she revises their testimony until she has arrived at the kind of truth she set out to find.

The version of Sharpilo’s story presented in Secondhand Time eliminates Isaichik’s rather straightforward nostalgia for socialism and adds condemnations of Soviet and post-Soviet leaders alike. The revised version also puts significantly more emphasis on the horrors of war, Alexievich’s great theme, adding a passage lamenting the German massacre of the village’s Jews and offering a story about a neighbor who hid Jewish children. Isaichik says that her mother gave the children milk before they were caught by the Germans, whose dogs ripped them apart so savagely that “there was nothing but rags left of them.” The Germans tied the heroic neighbor to a motorcycle and made her run “until her heart burst.” It’s hard to imagine why Alexievich would have left such a tragic, cinematic episode out of the first version. In any case, the story of the Jewish children ties Isaichik’s story to one of history’s darkest episodes, making it easier for the reader (especially the foreign reader) to connect with Secondhand Time.

As such alterations make clear, Alexievich’s apparent reliance on other people’s voices doesn’t mean that she has removed herself from her books; she has only made herself less visible. She edits, reworks, and rearranges her interview texts, cleansing them of any strangeness that doesn’t serve her purposes. In doing so, she reduces the historical value of her work, effaces the texture of individual character, and eliminates the rhythm on which drama depends. It’s hard to get through Secondhand Time, not only because the subject matter is so painful, but because the testimonies are monotonous. As I read the book, I often wished that I could hear how Alexievich’s witnesses really sounded: their regional accents, their tone of voice, the pacing of their speech. I longed for the idiosyncrasies, false notes, and digressions of an actual interview.

There is little room, in Alexievich’s work, for anything that does not lend itself to meditations on the soul or the nature of good and evil. When she can’t link her material to world history, she turns to Greek tragedy. Introducing the story of a woman who left her husband and children to marry a man serving a life sentence for murder, Alexievich writes that some people involved felt that this was a tale that should be handled by a court, not a writer. (Perhaps they were unfamiliar with crime reporting, or Dostoevsky.) In response, Alexievich compares the woman to Medea, but Medea is a mythical character, a distillation and exaggeration of the most extreme human impulses. Alexievich bends her subjects into familiar literary, mythological, or historical types, with little regard for social context or specificity.

Poets, playwrights, and novelists are free to pick and choose from the material provided by the real world, and embellish and invent as they please. Their work is judged on its success in conveying a deeper, more abstract kind of truth—what in Russian is called istina, as opposed to pravda, the literal truth, the facts. Literary nonfiction writers, who search for deep truths while remaining faithful to facts, have obligations to both istina and pravda. They shape chaotic reality into compelling narrative, but they aren’t supposed to invent, or to edit so heavily that their subjects become unrecognizable. In exchange for this fidelity, nonfiction writers receive the trust of the reader, who accepts the improbable or poorly written simply because it is true.

Without the imprimatur of nonfiction, it is unlikely that Alexievich’s work would have won so much praise around the world. Rather than being taken as objective confirmation of the awfulness of the Soviet Union and Russia, the book might have been interpreted as an expression of the views of one particular writer. Readers would have been more skeptical about Alexievich’s shocking stories and less tolerant of her lack of nuance. Under scrutiny, Secondhand Time falls short as both fact and art.

Voir par ailleurs:

TWO HESITATIONS ABOUT THE RECENT FICTION OF J. M. G. LE CLÉZIO
John Taylor
Michigan Quaterly Review
Summer 2009

Ritournelle de la faim. By J. M. G. Le Clézio. Paris: Gallimard, 2008. Pp. 209. $32.37.

J. M. G. Le Clézio (b. 1940) was not on my short list of French writers whom I thought might, and hoped would, win the 2008 Nobel Prize. I had long imagined that one of an elderly trio (Jacques Réda, Philippe Jaccottet, Yves Bonnefoy), whose poetry, poetic prose, and essays have nourished me constantly for some three decades, would eventually get the award; and then, when I learned from the noon radio news that Le Clézio had been chosen, several of his French contemporaries also came to mind. There is not room here to name them all; even less to explain the respective differences with which they develop themes that are expressed in Le Clézio’s own work as well, namely the constitution of the self, the place of the Other, the lasting consequences of history, and the writer’s openness to the outside world. Broadly speaking, whereas many postwar French writers have excelled in autobiography, Le Clézio (who by no means avoids this genre) has also been characterized by his attraction to other places, other mentalities, and otherness in general; that is, to what lies outside the self.

Let me nevertheless focus on one of these other writers who came to mind. Patrick Modiano (b. 1945) is often mentioned in the same breath as Le Clézio, yet too often only because he can be defined, for practical purposes, as the other best-selling novelist from their generation who is published at Gallimard. Actually, their dichotomy runs deeper, and the profoundest aspect of it may well be this tension between autobiography and fictionally transposed autobiography. In the early 1980s when I was living in Paris, an apartment-building neighbor well-versed in French fiction had another, provocative, way of distinguishing the two writers. My friend claimed that a reader’s literary tastes could be deduced by asking whether he or she preferred Le Clézio or Modiano. If you answered Le Clézio, who was the author of Les Géants (1973)—her favorite—and a few similar “almost-experimental but eminently readable novels,” as she put it, then this implied that you sided with the avant-garde. Le Clézio could not himself be considered innovative, but his work pointed in that direction. It would thus be likely, she claimed, that you also appreciated some of the New Novelists, such as Claude Simon, Marguerite Duras, or Nathalie Sarraute, and maybe even the (considerably less readable) Tel Quel group, however doubtful it was that Le Clézio had been influenced whatsoever by such writers. If you opted for Modiano, that meant that you had a predilection for “traditional fiction,” which to her mind indicated novels hardly more ambitious than romans de gare, those low-brow detective stories that you might buy at a train-station newspaper shop in order to while away the time during your trip.

It was only in the mid- to late-1990s, long after I had moved to the Lower Loire Valley (and had also lost track of my friend), that I finally read Modiano’s and Le Clézio’s fiction, Le Clézio’s in preparation for an essay that appeared in the Winter 1999 issue of this journal. By those years, even a trenchant advocate of the modernity of Le Clézio’s work would have agreed that his writing had evolved in ways that made the contrast with Modiano more complicated and, moreover, invalidated the opposition between traditional and avant-garde literature as far as these two novelists were concerned. Le Clézio had written compelling autobiographical novels, especially Onitsha (1991), about a eight-year-old boy who meets his father, an English physician, in Nigeria for the first time after the Second World War, and The Prospector (1985), about a Mauritian magistrate-grandfather’s secret passion for searching for gold on Rodrigues Island. These realistic novels—my own favorites among his prolific oeuvre—lightly fictionalized Le Clézio’s own fatherless childhood and colorful family background, which is connected variously to Brittany, the town of Nice, England, Nigeria, and the island of Mauritius. (His adult life has subsequently led him to live extensively in both Mexico and New Mexico, not to mention that his wife, Jemia, is Moroccan.) Multiculturalism comes naturally to Le Clézio, and he has long ruminated on the issue, indeed while writing novels like these. Like some of the less directly autobiographical fiction that he had also already written or was then writing (the evocation of Arabic culture in Désert, published in 1980, offers an early example), his work typically voyages well beyond the borders of the Hexagon (as the French ironically nickname France) and usually avoids narrow “Franco-French” topics (as the French also put it, disparagingly), all the while raising important questions about the relationship between Western and non-Western civilizations as well as about an individual’s place in the natural world. This latter theme runs through another significant novel—my third favorite—La Quarantaine (1995), which describes a young man’s self-liberation in a tropical setting as he becomes aware of every detail in his surroundings by fully opening up his five senses. Yet there is nothing stylistically stunning or formally pioneering about these books: they are well-told tales.

As for Modiano, he continued in the 1990s, and still continues, to produce variations on what can be called his one story, more or less, which usually involves the Occupation, vague crimes, a search for personal identity, and amorous or familial relationships that often are based on, or end in, a disappearance. (Le Clézio and Modiano share the missing-father theme.) However, it had become clear even by the mid-1980s that he had not only a single enigmatic, anxiety-ridden story to tell, but also a unique style in which to tell it: a style marked by highly crafted syntactic limpidity as well as by subtle semantic mysteries—once again, a constantly suspenseful ambiguity surrounding key events and feelings—and by an unmistakable personal “music,” as French readers and reviewers frequently point out. Most importantly, the author of Honeymoon (one of his few novels that have been translated into English, and relatively little of Le Clézio’s fiction has been rendered as well) evokes in uncannily haunting yet often indirect ways how the Shoah has indelibly marked us all, even if we were born after the Second World War and even, in fact, if the plot of the novel ignores this specific topic. Interestingly enough, when I paid a visit to Nathalie Sarraute at her apartment one afternoon in the spring of 1997, she spontaneously asked if I had ever read Modiano, adding that he was one of the young writers—she was ninety-seven years old at the time—whom she most admired. And on another afternoon, in 2004, this same question was raised by a ninety-four-year-old Julien Gracq, about whom more forthwith.

I have extended my friend’s comparison between Modiano and Le Clézio because it already suggests certain French literary goals that are not always understood by Americans. I noted that Le Clézio’s tales were “well-told.” But in an important (exclusively French?) sense this is not enough. I am not at all sure that Le Clézio wields a highly personal style. His writing is smooth, but it is not distinctive. One of the obstacles is that French is not a heavily accented language, and a poet or writer needs to discover ways to craft this inherent, standardizing, sometimes almost soporific or smothering smoothness into something particular, unique. By declaring this, I would like to recall, in contrast, Maurice Blanchot’s famous quip about Gracq’s boldly mellifluous, syntactically elaborate, highly adjectival and adverbial style: Gracq “writes well,” according to Blanchot (who was replying to an attack on Gracq’s style, made by the academic critic René Etiemble), because he “writes badly,” that is, departs from school-instilled stylistic norms, the most salient of which are succinctness and syntactic clarity. (Modiano writes with exceptional clarity; the personal qualities of his style derive from other departures from mainstream stylistic or rhetorical habits, such as his particular use of transitions; and, above all, from an indefinable, delicate, personal touch that probably can be analyzed only on the phonetic level.) What I am positing is that Le Clézio’s style does not induce a strong aesthetic experience in the reader and that it is effective on other levels, increasingly those concerning cultural and political ideas. It is difficult to think of another important French novelist who writes at a further stylistic remove from his own mentor, Henri Michaux, about whom he in fact wrote a paper for his Diplôme d’Études Supérieures in 1964, long before defending in 1983 a doctoral thesis in history about the Michoacán region of Mexico. (A rich knowledge and adamant defense of Amerindian cultures are two other telltale traits of his intellectual make-up and commitment.) Le Clézio was obviously interested in Michaux’s attraction to the exotic, to the Other, to the possibility of “getting out of one’s self,” as the latter phrased it, and probably less so in the inventive stylist that the at once self-probing and ever-inquisitive travel writer of A Barbarian in Asia also was.

Some of you are protesting: Who cares about style if the tale is well told, a quality in fact proving that the style is good? But ponder the question of style in its relation to a narrator’s subjectivity, which even the most extroverted, empathetic outlook cannot do away with, and style especially in its relation to the nature of the emotions conjured up in or by a work of art. Whence my second hesitation about Le Clézio’s recent fiction: the appropriateness of André Gide’s famous warning that “it is with good feelings that one produces bad literature.”

When Gide notes this in his Journal on 2 September 1940, he is not implying, inversely, that “bad feelings” constitute a sufficient condition for producing “good literature”; he is pointing out that there is a danger inherent in noble sentiment when it comes to writing. As Gide explains in the same diary passage, “good intentions often make for the worst art and . . . the artist runs the risk of damaging his art by wanting it to be edifying.” Gide goes on to mention a famous poem that he personally finds mediocre—Charles Péguy’s “Eve”—and posits that the many readers admiring it “remove themselves from the realm of art and place themselves in a completely different vantage point.” Similarly, the altruistic ideas increasingly put forth in Le Clézio’s fiction—the defense of children, women, and autochthonous cultures, the necessity of establishing a dialogue with different peoples, the virtues of multiculturalism, the importance of ecology, and even the more private experience of an “extase matérielle” (the “material ecstasy” described in his important, homonymous, essay collection of 1967) that an individual can acquire by getting beyond self-consciousness and fully immersing his senses in the very matter of the natural world—tend to diminish proportionately other qualities essential to literature as an art form, notably the aesthetics of style and the exploration, not the mere naming or categorical manipulation, of emotions.

Gide’s admonition looms over Le Clézio’s recent fiction, notably his latest novel, Ritournelle de la faim (2008); and this impression can only be reinforced by another comparison with Modiano, whose territory Le Clézio has entered with this new book, as it were. Le Clézio had already built a plot around a Jewish woman surviving during the Occupation. That book, Wandering Star, published in French in 1992 and initially set in Le Clézio’s hometown of Nice, also tellingly—that is, somewhat artificially—employs a Palestinian woman as the other main character. The new novel, Ritournelle de la faim, evokes the arrest of Paris Jews, among several other events concerning the intersecting lives of a few Parisians; and the story mostly takes place in the French capital, the setting of much of Modiano’s fiction as well. If Réda is the poet of Paris in our time, Modiano has created countless unforgettable images of the city in his prose; and, as I have stated, Modiano’s fiction is intimately related to the Shoah and its most pervasive, invisible, ramifications. On these levels, Le Clézio’s novel pales in comparison, though he admits—in an autobiographical conclusion to the novel—that although Paris is not his hometown it has long haunted him for reasons that have to do with his mother. This kind of venturing into an unknown world that comprises troubling personal motivations is, of course, to his credit. In his best work, which tends to understate this intimate aspect (for Le Clézio is discreet, even modest), such venturing can become quite spellbinding.

Le Clézio’s story initially concerns one Samuel Soliman, an army doctor who has served in the French Congo, now settled in Paris for his retirement, who buys the pavilion used by India at the Exposition Coloniale. He intends to reconstruct it on a vacant lot that he has acquired on the rue de l’Armorique—one of the street names that has long haunted the author (as we learn at the end) and a coincidental nod, among the numerous multicultural allusions made in this novel, to Le Clézio’s own Celtic family roots. In the little time that Soliman has left to live, he only manages to plant tropical plants on the lot, thereby turning it into an exotic garden.

Soliman is the great uncle of Ethel Brun, a girl whom he takes under his wing and who will grow in importance as the plot evolves after his death in 1934. Although Le Clézio surely did not plan it this way, the novel could not be timelier in that Ethel’s father agrees to dubious financial speculations and eventually goes bankrupt, in the meantime robbing his daughter of the inheritance that Soliman has set aside for her. As Ethel comes of age and is forced to be brave and resourceful (for neither of her parents is able to cope with these dire years), she falls in love with Laurent Feld, a Jew who lives in England and sees her only now and then. Finally, there is a Russian émigrée, Xénia, who becomes Ethel’s friend for a while and, above all, enables the author to mention the Russian Revolution and its aftermath alongside other major events in a plot that spans one of the worst half-centuries in European history.

Excepting Soliman’s affection for his niece and the love between her and Feld, most of the relationships among these characters are less moving than merely symbolic of suffering, hypocrisy, indifference, treachery, or deceit, the latter especially aimed at the young and innocent, like Ethel, or at members of a defenseless minority group, here the Jews even as, in earlier books, Palestinians, Africans, and remote Amerindian tribes (two of whom, the Emberas and the Waunanas, the author came to know during long sojourns in Panama in the early 1970s), were given this role.

A sort of abstract or intellectual compassion is created: our empathy is based as much on what we already know about the period as on the feelings embodied in the plot itself. Only the best-known historical events, however tragic or gruesome, form the backdrop: the Exposition Coloniale, the rise of anti-Semitic sentiment in France in the 1930s, the specters of notorious politicians, the gloomy spectacle of fleeing civilians as the German army invades northern France at the onset of the Second World War, and, finally, the roundup of Jews at the Vél d’Hiv before their deportation to the extermination camps. In this kind of historical fiction, the novelist could have drawn on more obscure, equally revealing events that would have given his book originality. Instead, he exhibits all the standard clichés of this dismal period as his heroine, Ethel, shines forth virtuously. Le Clézio’s storytelling prowess cannot conceal an array of mostly one-dimensional characters and a schematic plot enabling predictable responses to be given to predictable, if essential, questions: in a word, the novel is edifying in the sense that Gide warned of. When I was writing (about Wandering Star) in this journal a decade ago, I observed that Le Clézio could get beyond ideological considerations and put his finger on suffering. Here the conventional narrative structure above all highlights a shifting series of negative and positive acts, each associated with a moral idea, alongside a few daydreams, some pleasantly farfetched like Soliman’s vision of an Indian pavilion in a tropical garden stuck in the middle of the then-suburbs of the City of Light, others sinister like anti-Semitism or Ethel’s father’s desperate search for money, which implies stealing from his own daughter. In contrast, Modiano’s novels about the same period emphasize human behavior as ambiguous and ungraspable: no ideas with easily definable contours emerge; a powerful sentiment of existential unease prevails.

At the beginning of Ritournelle de la faim, Le Clézio inserts a prose text describing the hunger that he himself knew as a child during the Second World War. (This “ritornello,” “refrain,” or musical “burden” of hunger can also be heard in his previous novel, Ourania, issued in 2006.) He describes running alongside American army trucks, reaching out his hand for chewing gum, chocolate, and bread; he mentions Spam and Carnation milk. But at the end of these brief, vivid, personal memories, he adds that “another kind of hunger” will be narrated in “the story that follows.” This second, main, story seems to relate to the novelist’s own family, specifically to his mother; it is probably a fictional transposition of facts known to or suspected by the author. There is a sort of laboratory effect whereby Le Clézio seems to study his imagined immediate ancestors through a pane of glass that he has intentionally distorted by means of fiction. In any event, what is recounted—and leaves at least this reader wishing for something more grippingly and authentically personal, even in a fictional mode—can thus be viewed as unconsciously informing the early, untold, life of the boy with whom Ethel is pregnant at the end of the story; even as a similar story must underlie the early life of the running boy—Le Clézio—who will be born at the beginning of the war. The final autobiographical text is entitled “Today”—perhaps announcing a sequel?

Voir enfin:

Fuse Book Commentary: Patrick Modiano — An Oddly Elliptical Choice for the Nobel Prize for Literature

Patrick Modiano’s simple sentences pull one in; the nostalgia of loss and pain of youth and the hunt for a vague, romantic Other are easy to relate to.

Nobel laureate Patrick Modiano — His novels sell out like hot brioche in France; they make perfect Metro reading.

(Note: In early November, The Arts Fuse will post a review of the latest work of Patrick Modiano in English translation: Suspended Sentences: Three Novellas from Yale University Press.)

Kai Maristed

The Arts fuse
Oct 23 2014

No award, with the exception of the Nobel for Peace, excites as much a priori lobbying and speculation, and post-hoc controversy, as the Nobel Prize for Literature. While some decisions, like last year’s honoring of Alice Munro, have been embraced, certain past selections have spurred political fulmination ( e.g., Knut Hamsun, Mo Yan) and others, plain old-fashioned head-scratching. The inscrutable selection committee is famous for its surprises: who would have banked on the acerbic Austrian, Elfriede Jelinek? And there is banking involved, of a sort. According to the Wall Street Journal of October 7th (two days prior to the 2014 announcement) the British betting corporation Ladbrokes was offering odds of 12/1 on Philip Roth, 25/1 on Bob Dylan (a weird perennial favorite) and, sharing the lead around 4/1, Haruki Murakami and Kenyan poet Ngugi Wa Thiong’o. But hey, was there a leak in the famous Stockholm security system? Apparently the name of Patrick Modiano, which had been buried at 100/1, shot up in the final few days to 10/1!

One thing is clear: Nobel readers have a penchant for French writers. In Literature prizes granted since 1901, France leads the inkstained pack with fifteen winners. (The US comes next with 11. Smallish Sweden has eight, understandably: home-team advantage.) The first winner, in 1901, was French poet Sully Prudhomme. Then came the likes of Gide, Mauriac, Sartre, Camus, le Clezio, etc etc… and now–

I was in Massachusetts, half-listening to a French radio station through the Internet, when the proud news interrupted the music, followed by a disarming first reaction clip from the startled winner: ‘C’est bizarre!’ I smiled. My sentiments exactly. At least he’s honest. I haven’t read all of Modiano’s books, the autobiographical novels, stories, and an actual autobiography, and one reason is that, as he himself has said, they all bear considerable resemblance to one another, both in the famous Modiano l’heure bleue atmosphere, in their rudimentary narrative structure, and in their subject matter. Someone is seeking a shadowy remembered figure through the streets of Paris, through certain layers of time: the Occupation, the chaotic Sixties. A man seeks a woman. A child, his father. Or brother. Modiano himself explained in an interview that when he has finished one novel, it seems to reproach him: what that novel wanted to express was not expressed well enough, and so he must commence another, to try to get closer to the essence. He also mentioned that he never re-reads his past work. QED.

There is something addictive about a Modiano! The simple sentences pull one in; the nostalgia of loss and pain of youth and the hunt for a vague, romantic Other are easy to relate to. And there’s always the hope of salvation through a chance encounter in a café. His novels sell out like hot brioche in France; they make perfect Metro reading. (That’s not a put-down. In the Metro everyone packs a good read.) They distill something quintessentially French: espresso and heartache, idealism and betrayal and Gauloise smoke, self-absorption and the mist rising from the Seine. But will these books travel, as the oenophiles ask about wines? The question seems justified by Alfred Nobel’s stipulation that the prize go to “the person who shall have produced in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction.” Enigmatic as that is, surely it implies a high degree of relevance beyond one country’s history and culture. Was Milan Kundera never considered?

Compared to previous years, the committee’s statement regarding the choice of Modiano sounds oddly elliptical: “for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation.” Modiano himself commented on this in an interview a few days later, saying, in his halting, cautious and also elliptical way, that his writing is in fact primarily about forgetting, about the omnipresence of forgetting. ‘Memory succeeds in piercing our forgetting–that mass of forgetting. They should have recognized (my work as) ‘the art of forgetting.’ An interesting correction. His oeuvre may or may not be finally judged as slight and repetitive but, given that interesting correction, I’ll be reading Modiano again.


Kai Maristed studied political philosophy in Germany, and now lives in Paris and Massachusetts. She has reviewed for the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, and other publications. Her books include the short story collection Belong to Me, and Broken Ground, a novel.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :