Présidentielle américaine: Vous avez dit fascisme ? (It’s the imperial Obama presidency model, stupid !)

the-crook
Donald Trump (à droite) et son père, Fred Trump, posent aux côtés du grand promoteur de boxe, Don King, en décembre 1987.
opra
«Qui est vraiment Donald Trump?», par Laure Mandeville
L’amour de l’argent est soit la principale, soit la deuxième motivation à la racine de tout ce que font les Américains.  Tocqueville
Les fascistes de demain s’appelleront eux-mêmes antifascistes. Churchill
The truth is, even with all the actions I’ve taken this year, I’m issuing executive orders at the lowest rate in more than 100 years. So it’s not clear how it is that Republicans didn’t seem to mind when President Bush took more executive actions than I did. Barack Hussein Obama
President Obama has issued a form of executive action known as the presidential memorandum more often than any other president in history — using it to take unilateral action even as he has signed fewer executive orders. When these two forms of directives are taken together, Obama is on track to take more high-level executive actions than any president since Harry Truman battled the « Do Nothing Congress » almost seven decades ago, according to a USA TODAY review of presidential documents. Obama has issued executive orders to give federal employees the day after Christmas off, to impose economic sanctions and to determine how national secrets are classified. He’s used presidential memoranda to make policy on gun control, immigration and labor regulations. Tuesday, he used a memorandum to declare Bristol Bay, Alaska, off-limits to oil and gas exploration. Like executive orders, presidential memoranda don’t require action by Congress. They have the same force of law as executive orders and often have consequences just as far-reaching. And some of the most significant actions of the Obama presidency have come not by executive order but by presidential memoranda. Obama has made prolific use of memoranda despite his own claims that he’s used his executive power less than other presidents.  Obama has issued 195 executive orders as of Tuesday. Published alongside them in the Federal Register are 198 presidential memoranda — all of which carry the same legal force as executive orders. He’s already signed 33% more presidential memoranda in less than six years than Bush did in eight. He’s also issued 45% more than the last Democratic president, Bill Clinton, who assertively used memoranda to signal what kinds of regulations he wanted federal agencies to adopt. Obama is not the first president to use memoranda to accomplish policy aims. But at this point in his presidency, he’s the first to use them more often than executive orders. (…) While executive orders have become a kind of Washington shorthand for unilateral presidential action, presidential memoranda have gone largely unexamined. And yet memoranda are often as significant to everyday Americans than executive orders. (…) Of the dozens of steps Obama announced as part of his immigration plan last month, none was accomplished by executive order. Executive orders are numbered — the most recent, Executive Order 13683, modified three previous executive orders. Memoranda are not numbered, not indexed and, until recently, difficult to quantify. Kenneth Lowande, a political science doctoral student at the University of Virginia (…) found that memoranda appear to be replacing executive orders. (…) « If you look at some of the titles of memoranda recently, they do look like and mirror executive orders, » Lowande said. The difference may be one of political messaging, he said. An « executive order, » he said, « immediately evokes potentially damaging questions of ‘imperial overreach.' » Memorandum sounds less threatening. (…) Presidential scholar Phillip Cooper calls presidential memoranda « executive orders by another name, and yet unique. » (…) Whatever they’re called, those executive actions are binding on future administrations unless explicitly revoked by a future president, according to legal opinion from the Justice Department. USA TODAY
Les drones américains ont liquidé plus de monde que le nombre total des détenus de Guantanamo. Pouvons nous être certains qu’il n’y avait parmi eux aucun cas d’erreurs sur la personne ou de morts innocentes ? Les prisonniers de Guantanamo avaient au moins une chance d’établir leur identité, d’être examinés par un Comité de surveillance et, dans la plupart des cas, d’être relâchés. Ceux qui restent à Guantanamo ont été contrôlés et, finalement, devront faire face à une forme quelconque de procédure judiciaire. Ceux qui ont été tués par des frappes de drones, quels qu’ils aient été, ont disparu. Un point c’est tout. Kurt Volker
Critics have claimed that corner-clearing and other forms of so-called broken-windows policing are invidiously intended to “control African-American and poor communities,” in the words of Columbia law professor Bernard Harcourt. This critique of public-order enforcement ignores a fundamental truth: It’s the people who live in high-crime areas who petition for “corner-clearing.” The police are simply obeying their will. And when the police back off of such order-maintenance strategies under the accusation of racism, it is the law-abiding poor who pay the price. (…) A 54-year-old grandmother (…) understands something that eludes the activists and academics: Out of street disorder grows more serious crime. (…) After the Freddie Gray riots in April 2016, the Baltimore police virtually stopped enforcing drug laws and other low-level offenses. Shootings spiked, along with loitering and other street disorder. (…) This observed support for public-order enforcement is backed up by polling data. In a Quinnipiac poll from 2015, slightly more black than white voters in New York City said they want the police to “actively issue summonses or make arrests” in their neighborhood for quality-of-life offenses: 61 percent of black voters wanted such summons and arrests, with 33 percent opposed, versus 59 percent of white voters in support, with 37 percent opposed. The wider public is clueless about the social breakdown in high-crime areas and its effect on street life. The drive-by shootings, the open-air drug-dealing, and the volatility and brutality of those large groups of uncontrolled kids are largely unknown outside of inner-city areas. Ideally, informal social controls, above all the family, preserve public order. But when the family disintegrates, the police are the second-best solution for protecting the law-abiding. (That family disintegration now frequently takes the form of the chaos that social scientists refer to as “multi-partner fertility,” in which females have children by several different males and males have children by several different females, dashing hopes for any straightforward reuniting of biological mothers and fathers.) This year in Chicago alone, through August 30, 12 people have been shot a day, for a tally of 2,870 shooting victims, 490 of them killed. (By contrast, the police shot 17 people through August 30, or 0.6 percent of the total.) The reason for this mayhem is that cops have backed off of public-order enforcement. Pedestrian stops are down 90 percent. (…) “Police legitimacy” is a hot topic among academic critics of the police these days. Those critics have never answered the question: What should the police do when their constituents beg them to maintain order? Should the cops ignore them? There would be no surer way to lose legitimacy in the eyes of the people who need them most. Heather Mac Donald
Just miles below Mr. Herrou’s self-styled safe haven, citizen collaborators tip off the French police, who have rounded up thousands of migrants over the last year. (…) Young African men, some little more than boys, are routinely pulled off trains, in scenes with ugly echoes of the French persecution of Jews during World War II. (…) On the other hand, people like Mr. Herrou, who has become the de facto leader of a low-key network of citizen smugglers, are countering police efforts in a quasi-clandestine resistance, angered by what they see as the French government’s inhumane response to the crisis. In another demonstration of France’s jumbled approach to migrants, the police know exactly where Mr. Herrou is and what he is doing. Yet they mostly leave him alone. NYT
Notre pays est en colère, je suis en colère et je suis prêt à endosser le manteau de la colère. Donald Trump
I think Oprah would be great. I’d love to have Oprah. I think we’d win easily, actually. Donald Trump
Notre campagne est basée sur les insultes ? Ce n’est rien comparé à Hillary Clinton qui a traité de pitoyables la moitié des supporteurs de Donald Trump. (…) Vous pouvez aligner les chiffres que vous voulez, les gens souffrent. (…) L’Amérique est moins en sécurité aujourd’hui, c’est indéniable. Mike Pence
Selon un sondage Odoxa publié dans Le Parisien dimanche. 86% des Français espèrent que l’ex-première dame américaine emportera la présidentielle, ils ne sont que 11% à souhaiter la victoire du républicain Donald Trump, pour 3% de sans opinion. Hillary Clinton est en tête quel que soit l’appartenance politique des sondés. Dans les partis parlementaires, ils ne sont que 4% à gauche et 11% à droite à soutenir le candidat républicain. Marine Le Pen a annoncé qu’elle votera Trump si elle était américaine, son électorat ne la suit pas puisque 56% des sympathisants du FN sont favorables à Clinton et 39% à Trump. Les Français jugent Hillary Clinton expérimentée et proche des élites (81%), compétente 80% et lui trouvent la stature d’une présidente à 75%. Ils estiment que Donald Trump est agressif (82%), raciste (80%) et dangereux (78%). 94% des Français pensent enfin que Barack Obama est un bon président, contre 8% qui croient qu’il est mauvais. Un résultat inchangé depuis un sondage sur le même sujet il y a trois ans. AFP
J’en suis sûr: Trump n’est pas facsiste. L’utilisation d’un tel terme ne minimise pas seulement les tragédies passées et occulte les dangers futurs, mais il  met injustement en cause ses supporters, qui présentent des doléances légitimes, que les politiciens classiques ignorent à leurs risques et périls. Gianni Rotta
Mr Trump is not a fascist, if by that you mean a successor to Mussolini or Hitler. (…) All these movements had a charismatic leader at their head. None had a coherent set of ideas. Early fascisms had more in common with socialism. Those movements that survived to form dictatorial governments embraced a corporatist sort of capitalism, and set about killing left-wingers. These fascist movements were propelled by the young; Trumpismo, by contrast, has more appeal to the elderly. Perhaps because of this they looked to the future and venerated modernity, whereas Mr Trump often seems to be trying to bring back the 1950s. What does have a familiarly thirties ring to it is the combination of elite-rot and discredited ideas that Mr Trump feeds on. European elites looked unworthy of the description in the 1930s, after a war that had killed more people than any other before it but resolved nothing, followed by the biggest crisis ever faced by capitalism. In Latin America alone 16 countries suffered coups or takeovers by strongmen within a few years of 1929. (…) The dislocations of the 1930s were on a completely different scale to the foreign- and domestic-policy failures of the past decade. Having suffered late-fascism once, the West has some immunity from it, because we know what it looks like. That said, I didn’t think Mr Trump would be the Republican nominee either. The Economist
Il a compris que certaines personnes, plutôt que de cacher leur richesse, voulaient au contraire en faire la promotion. Gwenda Blair
Il a su deviner les goûts des nouveaux riches, parce que ce sont aussi les siens. Il est ce que l’on appelle ici un booster, quelqu’un qui va doper le développement économique d’une ville ou d’un État. Michael Lind
 Son sens de ce que veut le public n’a pas d’équivalent à notre époque. Personne dans les dernières décennies n’a réussi à capter l’attention des Américains aussi longtemps que cet homme. Michael D’Antonio
La phrase « Vous êtes viré ! » – qui est devenue l’une des formules les plus célèbres du vocabulaire populaire – a certainement aussi contribué à l’engouement de la population pour l’émission et pour Trump lui-même.  Elle rappelle aux Américains une vérité essentielle, à savoir que l’on peut échouer, que nos actes ont des conséquences, réalité à laquelle les politiciens ne sont plus soumis et à laquelle l’enseignement actuel se refuse de préparer les élèves.  Les Américains sont fascinés par l’homme d’affaires parce qu’il leur vend à la fois un rêve de succès et un principe de réalité.  Joshua Mitchell (Georgetown)
Incontrôlable, outrancier, provocateur, l’homme a dynamité la politique américaine, prenant à rebrousse-poil les postulats idéologiques traditionnels. Pourfendeur de l’immigration illégale, héraut des « oubliés du système » et chantre de « l’Amérique d’abord », il pétrifie les élites. Mais qui est vraiment Donald Trump ? Le milliardaire à la mèche orangée est-il un diable raciste et machiste qui déteste les musulmans et méprise les femmes ? Un « imposteur » à l’ego surdimensionné ? Ou un businessman patriote qui s’affranchit des limites et veut aller à contre-courant du modèle de globalisation ? Malgré les millions d’articles qui lui sont consacrés, l’homme reste un mystère. Ce livre propose une plongée dans la psychologie et la construction du personnage. Il nous permet aussi de comprendre ce que le phénomène Trump révèle de la révolte profonde qui secoue l’Amérique – et plus largement l’Occident. Enfin, il nous instruit sur les défis posés à l’Europe et à la démocratie. Présentation de l’éditeur
Au-delà de tous ses slogans de campagne, ce que vend le candidat Trump en campagne, c’est… lui-même ! Son profil d’homme d’affaires qui a réussi. Ses capacités de négociateur. Son caractère indomptable et bagarreur. Son côté bad boy qui fait peur et qui projette de la force. Son image d’outsider anti-système. (…) La manière très étudiée dont Trump « vend » son image et sa personne aux électeurs – ses cheveux, ses mimiques, ses postures sur scène – est à cet égard significative. Il a reconnu avoir lui-même choisi pour ses affiches de campagne une photo qui « fait peur ». Novice en politique, l’homme n’en est pas moins un maître de la « com » qu’il pratique avec un brio, une audace et un manque de scrupules qu’on ne retrouve chez aucun de ses concurrents. À travers son compte Twitter, suivi par au moins 5 millions de personnes, il peut lancer ses idées, voir ce qui accroche ou fascine et adapter son discours en fonction des tendances qu’il décèle. Plus que jamais, le mot qui tue, qui piège, qui émeut ou qui détruit a pris le pas sur les débats de fond et les programmes. Ce maniement très personnalisé et très centralisé de la communication politique et des réseaux sociaux lui permet d’anticiper les mouvements de l’opinion. Il y a désormais un lien presque organique entre le milliardaire et le monde de la communication au sens large (médias traditionnels et réseaux sociaux), chacun nourrissant l’autre dans un rapport quasi fusionnel. Donald Trump, de ce point de vue, fait exploser les méthodes traditionnelles de marketing politique – un univers que Barack Obama avait déjà commencé à bouleverser en 2008 en investissant Internet. « Le Donald » invente une nouvelle manière de faire campagne au XXIe siècle. Faut-il avoir peur de Donald Trump ? La question hante la campagne présidentielle américaine depuis plusieurs mois et occupe désormais les pages des journaux quasiment chaque jour. Parfois jusqu’à l’hystérie. Après avoir commencé par rire de la candidature du milliardaire new-yorkais, la jugeant plus ridicule et plus exotique que véritablement dangereuse, les médias et les élites politiques, de gauche comme de droite, crient désormais haro sur le favori de la course républicaine, le dépeignant comme un raciste de la pire espèce. Ses promesses de renvoyer les 11 millions d’illégaux vivant sur le sol américain dans leur pays d’origine, de créer un fichier de surveillance des musulmans et d’« interdire jusqu’à nouvel ordre » à tout musulman étranger d’entrer sur le territoire des États-Unis incitent ses détracteurs à employer à son égard les mots les plus durs. (…) Mais un tel comportement ne suffit pas à justifier les accusations de fascisme qui se sont répandues comme une traînée de poudre dans la presse américaine. Ces anathèmes brouillent les pistes et empêchent une analyse pertinente du profil politique et psychologique de Trump. Malgré ses dérives verbales et ses provocations, il n’a en effet, a priori, pas grand-chose d’un candidat d’extrême droite.(…)  l’homme d’affaires a longtemps été démocrate, pro-avortement et pro-mariage gay, avant de virer républicain dans les années 2000. Un profil que lui reproche d’ailleurs la droite traditionaliste qui l’accuse de représenter les « valeurs new-yorkaises » plutôt que les valeurs conservatrices. La vérité est que Trump n’a pas de credo idéologique fixé et définitif. En 1988, quand il envisageait pour la première fois une candidature à la présidentielle, il avait suggéré qu’il aimerait beaucoup avoir pour vice-présidente… Oprah Winfrey, vedette des médias afro-américaine, connue pour ses opinions très libérales. Un choix qui colle mal avec l’image de raciste qui lui est hâtivement accolée aujourd’hui. Moins anecdotique : il évoque régulièrement la nécessité de mettre urgemment en place un plan pour les quartiers noirs en pleine déshérence – un discours, on en conviendra, très éloigné des vues du Ku Klux Klan. » Laure Mandeville
Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster. If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse. If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot. But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush. Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis. Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria. In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts? Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity. Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements? Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. » (…) How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats? Victor Davis Hanson
 Trump (…) says what he pleases. If he blows himself up with a politically incorrect outburst, what is left simply flows back together, as if Trump were some sort of political version of the Terminator. Trump was supposed to fade last summer. His crudity was said to guarantee that he would lose Republican primaries. Then, pundits said Trump’s vulgar style of primary campaigning would not translate well to the general election. Now, even seasoned politicos confess there are no rules that apply to Donald Trump. He just keeps shouting that things are getting worse and no one will admit it. We live in a politically correct age in which President Obama is unable or unwilling to mention radical Islamists as the terrorists who have killed hundreds in Europe and the United States. No one dares suggest that the more than 300 sanctuary cities in the U.S. are a rebirth of the illiberal and neo-Confederate idea of nullification of federal law. Black Lives Matter is idealized as a civil rights group despite the chants at its protests about violence toward police. Doubling the national debt to nearly $20 trillion in just eight years is regarded as no big deal. The public is growing tired of two realities: the one they see and hear each day, and the official version that has nothing to do with their perceptions. Trump comes along with a ball and chain and throws it right into the elite filtering screen — and the public cheers as the fragile glass explodes. If most politicians are going to deceive, voters apparently prefer raw and uncooked deception rather than the usual seasoned and spiced dishonesty. Will Trump fade in August, implode in September, self-destruct in October — or win in November? No one knows. There are no longer rules to predict how a fed-up public will vote. And there has never been a postmodern candidate like Donald J. Trump. Victor Davis Hanson
Mr. Trump said he wanted to run to represent millions of the silenced. These millions, whether or not he was the first or last primary choice, took him at his word, as their last chance to stop what will likely be a 16-year project to fundamentally transform the U.S. into something that would terrify the Founders. He was not the choice of many conservatives, but for better or worse he is now their only viable choice — and that requires a seriousness that was lacking in the first debate. Trump owes it to these forgotten Deplorables to prepare for the last two debates and to talk about them, and not himself. If he doesn’t, he will wreck their hopes, betray their trust, and walk away a loser as few others in history. But if Trump fights Hillary with a coherent plan that is the antithesis of the last eight years, rather than harping about his business reputation and obsessing with the trivial, he still might win a conservative Congress, a cadre of loyal conservative cabinet officers, a rare chance to remake the Supreme Court in a fashion not seen since the 1930s — and at 70 years of age make all his prior celebrity achievements of the past seem as nothing in comparison. Victor Davis Hanson
The model of the imperial Obama presidency is the greater fear. Over the last eight years, Obama has transformed the powers of presidency in a way not seen in decades. Obama, as he promised with his pen and phone, bypassed the House and Senate to virtually open the border with Mexico. He largely ceased deportations of undocumented immigrants. He issued executive-order amnesties. And he allowed entire cities to be exempt from federal immigration law. The press said nothing about this extraordinary overreach of presidential power, mainly because these largely illegal means were used to achieve the progressive ends favored by many journalists. The Senate used to ratify treaties. In the past, a president could not unilaterally approve the Treaty of Versailles, enroll the United States in the League of Nations, fight in Vietnam or Iraq without congressional authorization, change existing laws by non-enforcement, or rewrite bankruptcy laws. Not now. Obama set a precedent that he did not need Senate ratification to make a landmark treaty with Iran on nuclear enrichment. He picked and chose which elements of the Affordable Care Act would be enforced — predicated on his 2012 reelection efforts. Rebuffed by Congress, Obama is now slowly shutting down the Guantanamo Bay detention center by insidiously having inmates sent to other countries (…) One reason Americans are scared about the next president is that they should be. In 2017, a President Trump or a President Clinton will be able to do almost anything he or she wishes without much oversight — thanks to the precedent of Obama’s overreach, abetted by a lapdog press that forgot that the ends never justify the means. Victor Davis Hanson

Attention: un fascisme peut en cacher un autre !

Gouvernement par décrets, ouverture virtuellement complète des vannes de l’immigration mexicaine, quasi-fin des déportations des immigrants irréguliers, amnesties par fait du prince, villes-refuges quasiment soustraites à la loi fédérale, court-circuitage du Congrès accordant l’accès à l’arme nucléaire à un pays appelant à l’annihilation d’un de ses voisins, explosion complètement inouïe du budget fédéral, loi calamiteuse sur la sécurité sociale, élargissement non maitrisé et caché de terroristes notoires, record largement secret d’exécutions parajudiciaires, dénonciation systématique du prétendu racisme policier privant de fait les plus démunis de leur droit à la sécurité la plus élémentaire  …

Alors qu’après un premier débat présidentiel apparement aussi peu préparé que d’habitude et l’excellente prestation au contraire d’un colistier parfaitement maitre de lui-même et de son sujet, un candidat républicain qui incarne pourtant la colère d’une partie croissante de la population américaine se voit condamné à l’image d’outrances verbales et d’amateurisme qui a jusqu’ici fait son succès …

Et qu’avec l’opinion américaine et encore plus française qui’l produit, un Kommentariat y compris conservateur qui semble avoir déjà largement donné l’élection à une candidate démocrate pourtant largement plombée par les affaires, joue à se faire et à nous faire peur en s’interrogeant gravement sur le prétendu fascisme du candidat républicain …

Pendant que de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, nos belles âmes n’ont pas de mots assez durs pour dénoncer ceux qui pointent les dérives de la politique des bons sentiments et les manquements toujours plus flagrants à la simple légalité

Qui rappelle, avec la correspondante américaine du Figaro Laure Mandeville l’évidente mauvaise foi et forfaiture d’une telle interrogation ?

Et surtout qui souligne avec l’historien américain Victor Davis Hanson …

Derrière le fascisme si bruyamment dénoncé chez le républicain …

Et la traditionnelle relative faveur du président en fin de mandat …

Dont on finira bien par découvrir le calamiteux bilan

La véritable inquiétude du précédent jusqu’ici inédit de par la faillite d’une presse largement aux ordres …

Quelque  soit l’identité ou la couleur politique du prochain locataire de la Maison blanche et futur leader du Monde libre …

D’un modèle proprement impérial d’exercice du pouvoir ?

The Next President Unbound
There is reason to worry about both candidates abusing power as president, because Obama and the press normalized executive overreach.
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review Online
10/2/2016

Donald Trump’s supporters see a potential Hillary Clinton victory in November as the end of any conservative chance to restore small government, constitutional protections, fiscal sanity, and personal liberty.

Clinton’s progressives swear that a Trump victory would spell the implosion of America as they know it, alleging Trump parallels with every dictator from Josef Stalin to Adolf Hitler.

Part of the frenzy over 2016 as a make-or-break election is because a closely divided Senate’s future may hinge on the coattails of the presidential winner. An aging Supreme Court may also translate into perhaps three to four court picks for the next president.

Yet such considerations only partly explain the current election frenzy.

The model of the imperial Obama presidency is the greater fear. Over the last eight years, Obama has transformed the powers of presidency in a way not seen in decades.

Congress talks grandly of “comprehensive immigration reform,” but Obama, as he promised with his pen and phone, bypassed the House and Senate to virtually open the border with Mexico. He largely ceased deportations of undocumented immigrants. He issued executive-order amnesties. And he allowed entire cities to be exempt from federal immigration law.

The press said nothing about this extraordinary overreach of presidential power, mainly because these largely illegal means were used to achieve the progressive ends favored by many journalists.

The Senate used to ratify treaties. In the past, a president could not unilaterally approve the Treaty of Versailles, enroll the United States in the League of Nations, fight in Vietnam or Iraq without congressional authorization, change existing laws by non-enforcement, or rewrite bankruptcy laws.

Not now. Obama set a precedent that he did not need Senate ratification to make a landmark treaty with Iran on nuclear enrichment.

He picked and chose which elements of the Affordable Care Act would be enforced — predicated on his 2012 reelection efforts.

Rebuffed by Congress, Obama is now slowly shutting down the Guantanamo Bay detention center by insidiously having inmates sent to other countries.

Respective opponents of both Trump and Clinton should be worried.

Either winner could follow the precedent of allowing any sanctuary city or state in the United States to be immune from any federal law found displeasing — from the liberal Endangered Species Act and federal gun-registration laws to conservative abortion restrictions.

Could anyone complain if Trump’s secretary of state were investigated by Trump’s attorney general for lying about a private e-mail server — in the manner of Clinton being investigated by Loretta Lynch?

Would anyone object should a President Trump agree to a treaty with Russian president Vladimir Putin in the same way Obama overrode Congress with the Iran deal?

If a President Clinton decides to strike North Korea, would she really need congressional authorization, considering Obama’s unauthorized Libyan bombing mission?

What would Americans say if President Trump’s IRS — mirror-imaging Lois Lerner — hounded the progressive nonprofit organizations of George Soros?

Partisans are shocked that the press does not go after Trump’s various inconsistencies and fibs about his supposed initial opposition to the Iraq War, or press him on the details of Trump University.

Conservatives counter that Clinton has never had to come clean about the likely illegal pay-for-play influence peddling of the Clinton Foundation or her serial lies about her private e-mail server.

But why, if elected, should either worry much about media scrutiny?

Obama established the precedent that a president should be given a pass on lying to the American people. Did Americans, as Obama repeatedly promised, really get to keep their doctors and health plans while enjoying lower premiums and deductibles, as the country saved billions through his Affordable Care Act?

More recently, did Obama mean to tell a lie when he swore that he sent cash to the Iranians only because he could not wire them the money — when in truth the administration had wired money to Iran in the past? Was cash to Iran really not a ransom for American hostages, as the president asserted? Did Obama really, as he insisted, never e-mail Clinton at her private unsecured server?

Can the next president, like Obama, double the national debt and claim to be a deficit hawk?

Congress has proven woefully inept at asserting its constitutional right to check and balance Obama’s executive overreach. The courts have often abdicated their own oversight.

But the press is the most blameworthy. White House press conferences now resemble those in the Kremlin, with journalists tossing Putin softball questions about his latest fishing or hunting trip.

One reason Americans are scared about the next president is that they should be.

In 2017, a President Trump or a President Clinton will be able to do almost anything he or she wishes without much oversight — thanks to the precedent of Obama’s overreach, abetted by a lapdog press that forgot that the ends never justify the means.

Voir aussi:

Is Trump Admiral Bull Halsey or Captain Queeg?

Victor Davis Hanson

National Review

10/4/2016

 In debate No. 2, Trump owes it to the ‘deplorables’ to focus on the issues and exert some self-control. In the first debate, Hillary stuck out her jaw on cybersecurity, the treatment of women, sermons on the need for restrained language, and talk about the shenanigans of the rich — and Trump passed on her e-mail scandals, her denigration of Bill’s women, her reckless smears like “deplorables,” and her pay-for-pay Clinton Foundation enrichment, obsessed instead with the irrelevant and insignificant.
In fact, the first presidential debate resembled the final scene out of the Caine Mutiny. Trump was melting down like the baited Captain Queeg (Humphrey Bogart), in his convoluted wild-goose-chase defenses of his arcane business career. Watching it was as painful as it was for the admiral judges in the movie who saw fellow officer Queeg reduced to empty shouting about strawberries.
Hillary Clinton egged him on in the role of the know-it-all, conniver of the same movie, the smug lieutenant Tom Keefer (Fred MacMurray), who had goaded Queeg, playacted sophisticated and learned — but ultimately proved a vain, empty, and unattractive vessel.
In sum, conservative viewers tuned in, in hopes of seeing Trump as Bull Halsey, the heroic admiral of the Navy’s Third Fleet in WWII, and they got instead Hollywood’s Captain Queeg.
Trump’s detours de nihilo, the constant unanswered race/class/gender jabs by a haughty Hillary, and Trump’s addictions to broken-off phrases, and loud empty superlative adjectives (tremendous, awesome, great, and fantastic) won’t win him the necessary extra 3–4 percent of women, independents, and establishment Never Trump Republicans. Trump’s bragging that he has “properties” in your state or that he found a way to creatively account his way out of income taxes does not come off as synonymous with a plan to make you well off, too.
Moderator Lester Holt did what all mainstream debate moderators of a now corrupt profession customarily do: Before the debate he leaked that they might possibly be conservative, feigned fairness, and then reestablished his left-wing credentials by focusing solely on fact-checking Trump, so that he wouldn’t be targeted later by leftist elites whose pique could lead to temporary ostracism from the people and places Holt values.
So, of course, he audited Trump and exempted Clinton, as if Trump’s businesses were as overtly crooked as the play-for-pay Clinton syndicate, or Trump’s supposed insensitivities to a pampered beauty queen (with a checkered past) were morally equivalent to Hillary’s denigration of Bill’s women who had claimed sexual assault or her eerie post facto chortling over getting a defendant, accused of raping a 12-year-old girl, off with lesser charges.
Most newsreaders know little more than how to news read. So we should not have been surprised that Holt’s audits of Trump on the legality of stop-and-frisk, or Holt’s denial that violent crime was up, was about as accurate as Candy Crowley’s hijacking of the second 2012 debate to rewrite what Barack Obama said into what she thought he should have said. Trump, in fact, was right that his microphone did not work properly and right that the media was biased — but wrong that bringing any of that up mattered in analyses of his debate performance.
The Clinton debate formula should have been clear: Bait and prod Trump to go into egocentric rants about his businesses, or a beauty queen, or another non-story, and then let the moderator massage the playing field, and let Hillary fill in dead time with empty platitudes (we are all racists/we need more solar panels/the wealthy don’t pay their fair share), and unfunded promises, while pandering along race, class, and gender lines.
Trump has to find a way to blow apart that script — largely by repressing his ego and simply not talking about any of his businesses or going down into the Clinton muck. Period.
Who cares about an ancient writ or a spat with a contractor?
He should blunt all Clinton attacks with either an upbeat, simple positive statement (“I built things in Manhattan, where few others on the planet could”), or just offer no more than a ten-second negative joust (“I ran a business that provided jobs and gave people places to live; you, Hillary, helped oversee a foundation syndicate that created nothing really other than cash and free travel for your family and cronies”). Trump should not spend one second beyond that. Any talk about his business or slogging in the mud with Hillary is precious campaign time lost that otherwise could remind the country of her defects and her trite and tired visions as an Obama 2.0.
Otherwise the news cycle should frame the debate. There are about five issues. Trump simply needs to go through them quickly. If he is short, as usual, on specifics, the lack of detail will matter less, the more crises he can cover:
1. Chaos and Change. The world is in chaos — and wants an American leader, not another temporizing college law lecturer or a weak imitation of a tired Angela Merkel. About every week there is either a terrorist attack, news of more scandal, or a riot. The common denominator is that Obama-Hillary lost the country respect and deterrence: No one honors the police and law at home just as no one respects our diplomats and officials abroad. The result is a green light to harm them without expecting consequences. Voters share a collective fear that things of the last Obama-Clinton eight years simply cannot go on as they are.
2. Illegal Immigration. No country can exist without borders. Hillary and Obama have all but destroyed them; Trump must remind us how he will restore them. Walls throughout history have been part of the solution, from Hadrian’s Wall to Israel’s fence with the Palestinians. “Making Mexico pay for the wall” is not empty rhetoric, when $26 billion in remittances go back to Mexico without taxes or fees, largely sent from those here illegally, and it could serve as a source of funding revenueTrump can supersede “comprehensive immigration” with a simple program: Secure and fortify the borders first; begin deporting those with a criminal record, and without a work history. Fine employers who hire illegal aliens. Any illegal aliens who choose to stay, must be working, crime-free, and have two years of residence. They can pay a fine for having entered the U.S. illegally, learn English, and stay while applying for a green card — that effort, like all individual applications, may or may not be approved. He should point out that illegal immigrants have cut in line in front of legal applicants, delaying for years any consideration of entry. That is not an act of love. Sanctuary cities are a neo-Confederate idea, and should have their federal funds cut off for undermining U.S. law. The time-tried melting pot of assimilation and integration, not the bankrupt salad bowl of identity politics, hyphenated nomenclature, and newly accented names should be our model of teaching new legal immigrants how to become citizens.
3. Debt and the Economy. Hillary served in an administration that doubled the national debt to $20 trillion and lobbied to keep interest at near zero to finance it. That incomprehensible sum is a prescription for disaster the moment rates rise. She talks grandly of spending, but never of balancing — largely because she has always lived high on someone else’s money. Slashing defense and raising taxes still got us $500 billion in annual deficits — just what we would expect from those who short the military and soak the well-off in order to waste more money on programs with no record of success. No economy can grow with ever more debt, regulations, and higher taxes.
4. Foreign Policy. The world is becoming a mess, beginning with Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state. Iraq blew up. Syria is a wasteland. So is Libya. ISIS went from declared “jayvees” to undeclared pros. Iran is a regional bully whose neighbors assume it will be nuclear soon. Russia has contempt for the West — NATO and the EU in particular — and seems to be reassembling the old Soviet empire. China is recreating the old Japanese East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere.
Common denominator? They all figured out Obama-Clinton-Kerry weakness — assured that in any crisis the U.S. would predictably back down from any red line, deadline, or step over a line it so loudly and sanctimoniously set. Talking moralistically and provocatively while carrying a tiny stick is a fatal combination. Electing Hillary Clinton in 2016 is like reelecting Jimmy Carter in 1980. When Obama brags abroad “I don’t bluff,” or Hillary chuckles, “We came, we saw, Qaddafi died,” should we laugh or cry?
5. The deterioration of the middle class. Obamacare is ruining health care for the middle classes, who were asked to pay for the poor while the rich found ways to navigate around the rules they created for others. “Free trade” was certainly not “fair trade,” but it did enrich a global elite at the expense of displaced middle-class workers. Where Obama left off with “clingers,” Hillary has now taken up with “deplorables.” Trump might ask her, “Why do you hate a quarter of the country?”
The more viewers experience Hillary as Mommy Dearest, and the less they see Trump as Captain Queeg, the more key missing independent and Republican moderate voters may sneak into the ballot booth, vote for Trump, and deny they ever considered such a thing.
A final note: Mr. Trump said he wanted to run to represent millions of the silenced. These millions, whether or not he was the first or last primary choice, took him at his word, as their last chance to stop what will likely be a 16-year project to fundamentally transform the U.S. into something that would terrify the Founders. He was not the choice of many conservatives, but for better or worse he is now their only viable choice — and that requires a seriousness that was lacking in the first debate.
Trump owes it to these forgotten Deplorables to prepare for the last two debates and to talk about them, and not himself. If he doesn’t, he will wreck their hopes, betray their trust, and walk away a loser as few others in history.
But if Trump fights Hillary with a coherent plan that is the antithesis of the last eight years, rather than harping about his business reputation and obsessing with the trivial, he still might win a conservative Congress, a cadre of loyal conservative cabinet officers, a rare chance to remake the Supreme Court in a fashion not seen since the 1930s — and at 70 years of age make all his prior celebrity achievements of the past seem as nothing in comparison.

Voir également:

Qui a peur de Donald Trump ?

Laure Mandeville
Grand reporter au Figaro

POLITIQUE INTERNATIONALE N° 151 –

PRINTEMPS 2016

Il était une fois un ouragan politique à la tignasse orangée que personne n’attendait. Le 16 juin dernier sur la Cinquième Avenue, Donald Trump, costume bleu et cravate rouge, est debout sur son fameux escalator de la Trump Tower, quartier général de son empire économique et immobilier, et symbole de son insolente fortune. « J’annonce officiellement que je vais concourir pour le poste de président des États-Unis. Nous allons rendre à notre pays sa grandeur », lance le promoteur milliardaire, reprenant ainsi le slogan qu’avait employé Ronald Reagan lors de la campagne de 1980, tandis que la chanson Rocking in the Free World de Neil Young se met à pulser dans des haut-parleurs.

« Le meilleur programme social d’un pays, c’est l’emploi, et je serai le plus grand président créateur de jobs que Dieu ait jamais créé », déclare le candidat à l’investiture républicaine avec l’immodestie qui le caractérise, dénonçant la désindustrialisation de l’Amérique et les termes des traités de libre-échange qui, selon lui, affaiblissent le pays. « Je ramènerai nos emplois de Chine et du Mexique ; je ramènerai notre argent », insiste-t-il, s’indignant de l’endettement colossal des États-Unis vis-à-vis de Pékin et de la « stupidité » des responsables politiques américains qui acceptent cet état de fait. « Il est temps de ramener un vrai leader à Washington. La réalité est que le rêve américain est mort ; mais si je gagne, je le ferai revivre, plus fort, plus grand et meilleur qu’avant », proclame le mogul. Sur sa lancée, il s’attaque bille en tête à la question de l’immigration illégale, l’autre phénomène qui, à ses yeux, porte atteinte aux intérêts du pays. Il promet d’y mettre fin en édifiant un mur sur la frontière avec le Mexique, note que les voisins mexicains « ne nous envoient pas les meilleurs » et dénonce « les violeurs et les criminels » cachés dans le flot des illégaux qui passent la frontière. La saillie, reprise partout à travers la presse, va susciter un tonnerre de protestations dans les milieux libéraux, poussant même plusieurs grandes corporations à dénoncer leurs accords commerciaux avec l’empire Trump, sous la pression de groupes latinos qui l’accusent de racisme et d’intolérance. Nul ne comprend alors qu’en prenant à bras-le-corps la question des frontières et en se posant en homme fort capable de protéger les intérêts du pays contre les vents de la globalisation et de l’immigration illégale le businessman vient de toucher un jackpot électoral qui va le propulser en tête de la course républicaine.

C’est en effet avec moquerie et condescendance que le petit monde des élites politiques accueille l’idée d’une candidature de « the Donald » – un nabab charismatique, charmeur et fracassant, connu pour étaler sa richesse et son succès, qui a animé jusqu’en 2015 l’émission de télé-réalité L’Apprenti devant 30 millions de téléspectateurs fascinés. Ce n’est pas la première fois que l’homme d’affaires caresse l’idée d’une candidature à la présidentielle. En 1988, déjà, il avait envisagé de se présenter (1). Il fit une tentative plus sérieuse en 1999, participant brièvement aux primaires du Parti de la réforme (2) en vue de l’élection présidentielle de 2000 face à Pat Buchanan – un ex-conseiller de Nixon et de Reagan qui surfait sur le thème de l’immigration illégale, de la désindustrialisation du pays et de « L’Amérique d’abord ». Trump explora à nouveau l’éventualité d’entrer dans la course en 2011, d’autant que plusieurs sondages réalisés à l’époque semblaient prometteurs, mais finit par renoncer au mois d’avril. Pendant cette période, il se fit le bruyant porte-voix de l’embarrassant mouvement des « birthers », un groupe anti-Obama qui s’accrochait à l’idée que le président n’était pas né aux États-Unis pour délégitimer sa présidence et réclamer sa démission (3). Conséquence de toutes ces candidatures avortées : quand Donald Trump sort du bois pour de bon en juin 2015, personne ne veut croire un instant à un phénomène sérieux. Une erreur d’appréciation qui va persister des mois durant, malgré la montée de l’homme d’affaires au firmament des sondages dès juillet. Trop débridé, affirment les observateurs quasi unanimes, qui annoncent sa descente aux enfers à chacun de ses nouveaux dérapages ! Trop politiquement incorrect et trop grossier, se disent-ils, tandis que Trump s’en prend successivement aux Mexicains, à la présentatrice Megyn Kelly de Fox News (4), à John McCain (5) et à l’ensemble d’une classe de politiciens jugés « stupides » et « incompétents ». Mais le postulant va déjouer tous les pronostics et effectuer une véritable OPA sur la vague de colère populaire qui monte depuis des années. Cette exaspération sera le moteur d’une campagne construite sur le rejet des élites et de leurs puissants donateurs. « Notre pays est en colère, je suis en colère et je suis prêt à endosser le manteau de la colère », proclame Trump pour expliquer son succès.

Ce mouvement, qui fait exploser les anciens paradigmes, se met en marche à travers tout le pays – comme le révèlent rapidement les dizaines de milliers d’électeurs frustrés qui vont faire la queue pendant des heures dans la chaleur puis la neige et le froid pour assister aux meetings de leur nouveau héros. Aucun des seize autres candidats républicains en lice, parmi lesquels plusieurs gouverneurs connus et influents, ne suscite un enthousiasme comparable, malgré l’aide que leur apportent des « super PACs » financés par de puissants donateurs. Un seul autre prétendant à la Maison-Blanche génère une excitation similaire, mais il se présente du côté démocrate : il s’agit du septuagénaire Bernie Sanders, sénateur socialiste qui appelle, lui aussi, à une révolution politique contre le système. Mais à droite, dès le début, la course se définit par la domination « du » Donald sur tous les autres. Cette domination reste nette, même si une convention contestée sans clair vainqueur devient une hypothèse de plus en plus probable, le milliardaire ayant multiplié les erreurs. Si incroyable que cette idée eût paru il y a encore un an, Trump reste toujours en pole position dans la course à la nomination républicaine, malgré tous les efforts déployés par l’élite du « Grand Old Party » pour s’y opposer. Une chose est sûre : qu’il gagne ou qu’il perde, le milliardaire a déjà bouleversé son parti et toute la donne politique du pays. Dans tous les cas de figure, son succès stupéfiant mérite que l’on se penche plus avant sur le phénomène Trump.

Qui est vraiment cet homme d’affaires qui se permet tous les dérapages verbaux mais continue de susciter l’admiration de millions de ses compatriotes ? Ce personnage hors norme qui a fait voler en éclats toutes les règles de bienséance et tous les codes habituels des campagnes électorales par ses attaques brutales et souvent grossières contre ses adversaires est-il le Hitler ou le Mussolini que ceux-ci dépeignent ? Faut-il voir en lui un extrémiste raciste comme l’affirme la presse libérale et une bonne partie de l’establishment de Washington ? Ou, au contraire, un « démocrate caché » cynique, qui tente de faire main basse sur le parti républicain mais n’a rien de commun avec le conservatisme, comme le clament son rival Ted Cruz et une bonne partie de la droite traditionnelle partie en guerre contre lui ? Ou bien a-t-on affaire, en sa personne, à un « commercial de la politique », un pragmatique opportuniste sans idéologie surfant sur les attentes populaires et tout à fait capable de se recentrer après avoir ferré la base conservatrice du parti ? Autre piste : l’homme n’est-il pas guidé, avant tout, par un ego gigantesque qui l’incite à assouvir à tout prix sa soif de reconnaissance au moyen d’un populisme sans complexes ? Donald Trump est-il tout cela à la fois ? Bref, qui est vraiment cet OVNI politique et devons-nous avoir peur de lui ?

Malgré ses milliers de tweets, ses flots de paroles déversés sur toutes les chaînes télévisées et les innombrables articles qui ont été consacrés à ce personnage hautement médiatisé depuis les années 1980, un mystère continue d’entourer Trump et son premier cercle, resté très peu accessible à la presse, surtout étrangère. « Flashy », tonitruant, l’homme n’en apparaît pas moins bien plus complexe que la caricature qu’il projette, peu conforme au monstre fascisant que les journaux s’acharnent à décrire – bref, difficile à saisir. En réalité, de nombreuses questions demeurent encore sans réponse sur ses intentions et sur ce que ferait un président Trump. « Ce qui frappe, c’est l’imprévisibilité du personnage, nous confiait en décembre l’influent lobbyiste du parti républicain Grover Norquist (6). Trump reste une énigme. Nous ne savons juste pas comment il se comporterait s’il était élu, et cela nous inquiète. »

Pour tenter d’apporter des éléments d’analyse et éclairer le phénomène Trump, il convient de répondre à quatre grandes questions. 1) D’où Donald Trump vient-il, de quelle planète ? Comment a-t-il été formé et par qui ? 2) Comment mène-t-il campagne ? Quel est son programme ? 3) Que sait-on de son profil politique et psychologique, et des tendances autoritaires qu’il semble manifester ? 4) Last but not least : quelle est la nature de la révolte qu’il incarne et chevauche ?

D’où vient Donald Trump ?

Le fils de son père

Impossible de comprendre Donald Trump sans parler de son père. Comme il le répète souvent, la figure paternelle est déterminante pour expliquer son irrépressible ambition, sa discipline, sa persévérance, sa dureté… bref, sa volonté de puissance, calquée sur celle du père Fred Trump. « Être un leader, c’est dans l’ADN », aime-t-il à affirmer dans ses interviews.

Donald Trump naît en 1946 à Brooklyn dans une famille de six enfants, dont il est l’avant-dernier, mais le deuxième fils. Son grand-père Friedrich Drumpf (dont les services d’immigration américains transformeront le nom) a émigré de Brême (Allemagne) en 1885, pour gagner l’eldorado américain. C’est une personnalité aventureuse et haute en couleur. Il a poussé sa chance vers l’Ouest jusqu’à l’État de Washington, puis au Klondike (Canada) et même jusqu’en Alaska, attiré par la ruée vers l’or. Il n’y découvrira pas de précieuses pépites mais amassera un capital en créant des restaurants qui vendent, notamment, la viande des chevaux morts et servent aussi d’hôtel de passe pour les mineurs qui affluent. À son retour dans le Queens, à New York, avec un pactole, il se met à investir dans l’immobilier, avant de mourir en 1918, à 49 ans, emporté par la grippe espagnole.

C’est son jeune fils Fred qui va poursuivre le rêve à force de labeur et d’obstination, travaillant tout en suivant les cours du soir et plaçant l’argent qu’il possède dans la construction d’immeubles d’habitation dans les quartiers de Queens et de Brooklyn, en pleine expansion. La crise de 1929 va dévaster ses affaires, le forçant à mettre la clé sous la porte et à acheter une épicerie pour survivre. Mais Fred va rebondir, investissant de manière judicieuse dans de nouveaux programmes immobiliers, parfois avec l’appui de personnages douteux, puis raflant pour son compte un contrat de l’Agence fédérale qui investit dans la construction de logements destinés aux pauvres et aux classes populaires. En 1954, il sera d’ailleurs éclaboussé par un scandale qui met en cause le fonctionnement de cette Agence. Il est accusé d’avoir lésé d’anciens combattants de la Seconde Guerre mondiale (auxquels étaient destinés les logements) en instaurant, avec l’accord de l’Agence fédérale, un prix de construction beaucoup plus élevé que celui vraiment payé, afin de maximiser le prix de la location. « Je n’ai rien fait d’illégal », affirme-t-il devant le Congrès qui le convoque pour une audition, avant d’expliquer qu’il a seulement profité des « lacunes de la loi ». C’est apparemment la vérité, selon le journaliste Michael D’Antonio, qui raconte l’épisode dans un livre consacré à Trump (7) ; il est cependant clair que le père Trump a, par avidité, violé l’esprit de ces programmes. Le monde de l’immobilier new-yorkais de l’après-guerre dans lequel évolue la famille n’est pas un univers de conte de fées, mais une planète brutale et sans scrupules. Le mot d’ordre de cette ère de forte croissance industrielle qui a vu surgir d’immenses fortunes – Rockefeller, Morgan, Carnegie, Vanderbilt… – donne la prime au succès, pas à la morale ni à la gentillesse. Un contexte qui ne va pas manquer d’influencer le jeune Donald, à la fois tenu d’une main de fer mais aussi inspiré et façonné par son millionnaire de père.

Le futur candidat à l’investiture républicaine grandit dans une belle maison de maître du Queens, mais son père l’emmène souvent sur les chantiers afin de récupérer les loyers auprès d’ouvriers qui triment pour des salaires de misère. Il y découvre que ceux qui n’ont pas les moyens de payer leur loyer en temps et en heure risquent l’expulsion. Une réalité qu’il n’oubliera jamais et qui a sans aucun doute contribué à solidifier sa vision hobbesienne d’un monde sans concession, « fait de gagnants et de perdants ». Ces souvenirs expliquent sans doute pourquoi Trump, tout milliardaire qu’il est devenu, ne s’est jamais senti proche de l’élite bien née qu’il qualifie, avec un sens de la formule bien à lui, de « club du sperme chanceux ». Il semble avoir conservé un lien avec le peuple, une connexion instinctive qui vient de loin. C’est un paradoxe car, nous l’avons dit, il a grandi dans le luxe et la facilité. Son père, qui le forçait à distribuer les journaux pour se faire de l’argent, lui prêtait sa limousine pour accomplir sa tâche quand il neigeait. « Il me disait que j’étais un roi », a confié Trump à D’Antonio. Mais Fred apprend aussi à Donald à travailler sans relâche et à se montrer intransigeant pour survivre. « Sois un tueur », lui recommande-t-il, selon Michael D’Antonio.

Cette philosophie carnassière ne va pas profiter à toute la fratrie de la même manière. La dureté et l’ambition de Fred vont dévaster le fils aîné, Fred Junior, au caractère doux et sociable. Fêtard, fantasque, incapable de satisfaire la soif abyssale de réussite que son père nourrit pour lui, il sera mis au ban de la famille pour avoir choisi une carrière de pilote et pour avoir sombré, sans doute sous la pression familiale, dans l’alcool et l’auto-destruction. Il sera même déshérité par son père, de même que ses enfants, avec l’apparent accord de Donald et du reste de la famille, et mourra à 43 ans, après un véritable naufrage personnel et professionnel, réduit à habiter dans l’un des appartements paternels, où il travaillera… dans une équipe de maintenance des immeubles Trump. Une blessure familiale qui a beaucoup marqué Donald, longtemps petit frère admiratif et un peu jaloux de la personnalité ouverte et charmeuse de son aîné, mais qui n’hésitera pas à reprendre à son compte l’ambition dévorante du père, au point de devenir son préféré et son héritier désigné.

Dans ses jeunes années, Donald est pourtant loin d’incarner un modèle de comportement. Sale gosse bombardant ses professeurs de gommes, achetant des lames de rasoir pour faire des virées « à la West Side Story » dans la rue, il affiche un caractère tempétueux et cherche volontiers la bagarre. « J’adorais me battre », se remémore-t-il dans ses interviews à D’Antonio. Conséquence : son père le retire de l’école privée expérimentale qu’il fréquente dans le Queens pour l’envoyer à l’Académie militaire de New York (dans le New Jersey), un lieu où il va apprendre la discipline et la compétition virile sous la direction de son instructeur Theodore Dobias. Ce dernier n’a pas oublié l’esprit compétitif de son élève, qui « aurait fait n’importe quoi pour gagner ». D’autres auraient souffert de l’expérience, mais Donald résiste aux bizutages et aux rigueurs d’une vie quasi militaire. « Il était toujours fier de lui-même », se souvient Dobias, « il pensait toujours qu’il était le meilleur ».

Cette assurance cachait-elle, en réalité, l’anxiété suscitée par les déboires de son grand frère ? Sans doute. Trump a essayé à plusieurs reprises de défendre son aîné contre le harcèlement répété du père, mais il a fini par s’irriter de ses dérives, de sa faiblesse de caractère et de son incapacité à se défendre et à reprendre le contrôle de lui-même. Pendant ses années d’études à l’université de Fordham, puis à la prestigieuse école d’économie de Wharton (à l’université de Pennsylvanie), Donald ne s’adonnera pour sa part jamais à la boisson et à la drogue qui dominent la scène universitaire des années 1960, en pleine libération des moeurs. Pendant que de nombreux étudiants se laissent pousser les cheveux, fument des joints et rêvent de « peace and love », Donald reste concentré sur sa réussite. Tous les week-ends, tandis que les autres « s’éclatent », il rentre à New York travailler sur les chantiers, pour « apprendre le métier » avec son père. Dans une récente interview accordée au New York Times, l’homme d’affaires explique qu’il avait « tiré les leçons » des mauvais choix de son frère et s’était promis de ne pas se laisser submerger ou dominer par les autres. « La vie, c’est survivre. C’est toujours une question de survie », a-t-il confié à Michael D’Antonio.

L’homme d’affaires new-yorkais

Le background new-yorkais de Donald Trump est le deuxième élément important qu’il faut avoir en tête quand on veut comprendre ce qui a façonné sa personnalité. Donald a fait sa fortune dans la « grosse pomme », dont il est devenu l’un des plus célèbres bâtisseurs et promoteurs immobiliers – la Tour Trump sur la Cinquième Avenue est le navire amiral et le symbole de son empire – avant d’aller planter l’enseigne en énormes lettres dorées sur des immeubles situés aux quatre coins de la planète. Une réussite colossale qui révèle une formidable capacité à naviguer dans les eaux agitées d’un business peuplé de requins sans foi ni loi.

Certains observateurs tendent à sous-estimer ses talents d’homme d’affaires, rappelant qu’il n’est pas un self-made man mais un héritier et qu’il n’aurait sans doute pas réussi sans les millions de Fred. « Il était déjà riche quand il s’est lancé, et il a pu utiliser l’assise financière de son père et ses relations politiques locales », note par exemple Gwenda Blair, auteur d’une biographie sur la dynastie Trump (8). Un diagnostic qui a le don de mettre Donald très en colère. « Mon père m’a donné un million et j’ai maintenant une fortune de 8 milliards de dollars », se défend-il, veillant sur sa réputation avec une attention ombrageuse, presque obsessionnelle.

Le talent, indéniable, de Trump sera de faire fructifier le patrimoine paternel en installant ses projets immobiliers au coeur de Manhattan afin de cibler une nouvelle clientèle : non plus les classes populaires et moyennes, mais les grandes fortunes qui émergent à la fin des années 1970 et dans les années 1980. « Il a compris que certaines personnes, plutôt que de cacher leur richesse, voulaient au contraire en faire la promotion », juge Gwenda Blair. « Il a su deviner les goûts des nouveaux riches, parce que ce sont aussi les siens. Il est ce que l’on appelle ici un booster, quelqu’un qui va doper le développement économique d’une ville ou d’un État », ajoute Michael Lind, auteur d’une histoire économique des États-Unis (9).

Le trait de « génie » de Trump est qu’il comprend plus vite que beaucoup d’autres à quel point argent et célébrité avancent désormais main dans la main dans la fièvre de consommation, de mégalomanie et de désir de richesse qui constitue l’essence des années 1980. Contrairement à son père, dur à la tâche mais peu sociable, Donald est un charmeur, plus semblable en cela à sa mère qui savait briller en public. Il devient l’un des piliers des clubs et des soirées où il faut se montrer pour prouver que l’on fait partie du cercle qui compte. Il continue à ne pas boire, mais ce grand amateur de femmes s’affiche avec des mannequins, ouvre les portes de son luxueux appartement aux journalistes, exhibe volontiers son jet 757 de 100 millions de dollars aux ceintures de sécurité dorées et son yacht de 100 mètres de long. Il multiplie les apparitions télévisées et – au gré, notamment, de ses trois mariages et de ses deux douloureux divorces – fait régulièrement la « Une » des magazines people, assumant sans complexe une notoriété tapageuse. Cette célébrité va lui permettre de devenir leader dans le business du « branding » et d’accoler son nom à des hôtels de luxe en Floride, à des clubs de golf, à des vignes de Virginie, à des cravates, à des chemises, à de la viande de boeuf ou encore à des sources d’eau minérale… En 1987, il publie L’Art du deal, un ouvrage destiné à présenter au commun des mortels les règles de base du monde des affaires et de permettre aux lecteurs de « réussir leur vie ». Le livre fera un tabac et sera vendu à des millions d’exemplaires. Il en publiera une douzaine d’autres. Cette omniprésence – au carrefour de la communication et du business – lui assure une popularité stupéfiante. À la fin des années 1980, Donald Trump est classé septième parmi les hommes les plus admirés en Amérique, derrière le pape Jean-Paul II, Lech Walesa et les quatre présidents américains alors toujours en vie.

La fin des années 1980 et le début des années 1990 seront, pour lui, une époque moins glorieuse. Les journalistes américains, qui finissent par s’intéresser aux failles de l’homme d’affaires, pointent tous du doigt ses déboires dans le secteur des casinos d’Atlantic City, sur la côte Est, où ses entreprises, affaiblies par la crise et incapables de payer leurs dettes, doivent être placées sous la protection de la loi américaine sur les faillites. L’effondrement du casino Taj Mahal – qui devait être un nouveau symbole de l’empire Trump mais qui fut la première de ses sociétés décrétée en banqueroute – a notamment fait l’objet d’enquêtes particulièrement approfondies, vu le fiasco qu’il représenta pour son propriétaire : pour éponger les dettes, il n’eut d’autre choix que de se résoudre à abandonner la moitié de ses parts dans l’investissement et à mettre en vente son yacht et son jet privé. Dans un article récent, le Washington Post (10) souligne que l’histoire du Taj Mahal est d’une vive actualité : Trump avait initialement réussi à convaincre les actionnaires de le suivre sur cet investissement en arguant de la puissance de son nom, de ses capacités de négociateur et du fait qu’il serait donc soutenu par les banques sur le projet. « Exactement ce que Donald Trump fait aujourd’hui avec les électeurs : il leur vend la force de son nom et de son pouvoir de négociation pour les persuader de le soutenir », met en garde le quotidien. Mais dans la tourmente qui soufflait sur le secteur (11), le businessman se révéla incapable de tenir ses promesses. Pour développer ses projets, il dut faire appel à des emprunts à taux d’intérêt prohibitifs (junk bonds), ce qu’il avait toujours exclu. Cet endettement contribua ensuite à précipiter la faillite du Taj Mahal et d’autres casinos de son groupe… Trump se défend aujourd’hui en expliquant qu’il s’est finalement bien sorti du guêpier d’Atlantic City grâce à ses talents de négociateur et qu’il fut loin d’être le seul touché par la tempête. Il reste que, même si le milliardaire n’a pas été mis personnellement en faillite, il est permis de mettre en doute les bénéfices qu’a vraiment tirés la ville d’Atlantic City de son association avec lui…

Aujourd’hui, le candidat s’efforce de faire de cette page de sa biographie une force : ce qui compte, assure-t-il, c’est qu’après cette rude période il a rebondi ! Conscient de la nécessité vitale de « préserver la force de son nom », il passe l’essentiel des années 1990 à orchestrer son « comeback » un peu à la manière d’un Bill Clinton qui a su renaître de ses cendres après l’affaire Lewinsky. Là encore, comme à l’occasion de ses tumultueux mariages et divorces, tous très médiatisés, Trump parvient à vendre au mieux sa légende et à se présenter en exemple de cette fameuse résilience américaine qui peut avoir raison de tous les échecs.

Le showman : quand Donald entre dans les foyers d’Amérique

Au début des années 2000, Donald Trump est toujours bien présent dans l’actualité américaine. Nous l’avons rappelé, il se signale au tournant du siècle par sa candidature présidentielle sous les couleurs du Parti de la réforme, avant de renoncer rapidement face à Pat Buchanan (dont il épousera largement les thèses en 2016). Mais c’est en 2004 qu’il va vraiment faire irruption dans le quotidien des familles américaines, quand il devient soudain le grand héros d’un show de télé-réalité intitulé The Apprentice (L’Apprenti). Cette émission consiste à sélectionner, pour seize semaines, seize candidats (huit filles et huit garçons) qui devront prouver à travers de multiples épreuves qu’ils ont les qualités d’un leader et sont taillés pour gérer un business de haut niveau. La récompense ultime, pour le gagnant, est de passer un an à la tête d’une des entreprises du groupe Trump. L’émission, très divertissante, est bâtie sur l’idée que, pour réussir, il faut savoir se battre, prendre des risques et « être le meilleur ». À chaque épisode, Donald Trump, parfaitement à l’aise à l’écran, apparaît dans le rôle de la statue du commandeur pour prodiguer des conseils, faire visiter son fastueux appartement, commenter les étapes de l’émission et, au final, rendre son verdict. Il se moque des uns et des autres, dialogue, soupèse les qualités des candidats, félicite les gagnants et réprimande les beaux parleurs ou les mauvais joueurs. Surtout, il finit par éliminer le perdant du jour. « Vous êtes viré ! », lance-t-il au malheureux d’un ton sans réplique, après avoir évalué les performances de tous. Le show va devenir un véritable phénomène de société : onze ans durant, il battra les records d’audience du pays, réunissant à son apogée près de 30 millions de téléspectateurs fidèles ! « Son sens de ce que veut le public n’a pas d’équivalent à notre époque. Personne dans les dernières décennies n’a réussi à capter l’attention des Américains aussi longtemps que cet homme », constate Michael D’Antonio, qui voit dans l’émission le summum de la stratégie de « vente » de la marque Trump.

Comment expliquer une telle adhésion ? Peut-être par la jubilation sans complexes avec laquelle il offre du rêve à une Amérique moyenne qui a toujours – contrairement à la France – aimé les riches. À l’ouest de l’Atlantique, tout le monde continue de penser qu’on peut devenir riche en une vie. « L’amour de l’argent est soit la principale, soit la deuxième motivation à la racine de tout ce que font les Américains », remarquait déjà Alexis de Tocqueville, avec sa sagacité coutumière, il y a un peu moins de deux cents ans. La phrase « Vous êtes viré ! » – qui est devenue l’une des formules les plus célèbres du vocabulaire populaire – a certainement aussi contribué à l’engouement de la population pour l’émission et pour Trump lui-même, analyse le professeur de théorie politique Joshua Mitchell, de l’Université de Georgetown (12). « Elle rappelle aux Américains une vérité essentielle, à savoir que l’on peut échouer, que nos actes ont des conséquences, réalité à laquelle les politiciens ne sont plus soumis et à laquelle l’enseignement actuel se refuse de préparer les élèves », ajoute-t-il. Les Américains sont fascinés par l’homme d’affaires parce qu’il leur vend à la fois un rêve de succès et un principe de réalité, argumente Mitchell. Deux ingrédients que l’on retrouve au coeur de sa campagne actuelle.

Une campagne nationaliste et populiste

« L’Amérique d’abord »

Dans L’Apprenti, Donald Trump avait vendu du rêve. Dans la campagne présidentielle de 2016, il commence par vendre un tableau très noir de l’Amérique. Le diagnostic qu’il porte sur le pays est que ce dernier « va très mal » et que le « rêve est mort ». « Nous perdons sur tous les fronts, nous ne savons plus gagner », martèle-t-il sur le chemin de la campagne, au moment où le pays semble pourtant sortir de la crise et a réussi à ramener son taux de chômage à 5 %. Ce diagnostic pessimiste se révèle totalement en phase avec la désillusion qui marque la fin des années Obama. Le rêve « Yes we can » du premier président noir américain, qui espérait réconcilier l’Amérique avec elle-même, s’est enlisé dans les luttes partisanes et la paralysie du Congrès, reflet d’un pays profondément divisé. La reprise économique a, certes, sorti les États-Unis du chômage de masse et de la dépression, mais les salaires sont bas, les emplois précaires et les inégalités plus gigantesques que jamais entre, d’une part, un petit groupe de riches qui ne cessent de s’enrichir et, de l’autre, une classe moyenne qui s’est prolétarisée. Le coup d’arrêt porté à la bulle d’endettement privé qui permettait aux Américains de compenser leurs maigres salaires en achetant des produits chinois bon marché leur a ouvert les yeux sur les dégâts de la globalisation et la désindustrialisation du pays. À l’extérieur, les conflits se multiplient et le terrorisme djihadiste gagne du terrain. Les longues guerres que les États-Unis ont menées au prix de lourds sacrifices, en Afghanistan comme en Irak, et plus récemment en Libye, semblent n’avoir récolté aucun fruit durable : au contraire, le monde apparaît plus instable et plus dangereux que jamais. Les Américains sont inquiets de la porosité des frontières, de la multiplication des attentats islamistes, du recrutement de « loups solitaires » par les réseaux terroristes via Internet. Ben Laden a été tué, mais l’État islamique a surgi en lieu et place d’Al-Qaïda, décapitant des otages américains, faisant exploser les frontières de l’Irak et de la Syrie et promettant de semer le feu, le sang et la discorde à travers la planète. Du coup, bon nombre de citoyens ont le sentiment croissant de ne plus être vraiment protégés…

À cette détresse, Trump répond par le slogan de « l’Amérique d’abord », une réaction nationaliste qui promet de protéger le pays et de lui rendre sa grandeur. Cette promesse s’orchestre autour de trois axes majeurs : 1) lutte contre l’immigration illégale ; 2) protectionnisme assumé ; 3) refus de jouer les gendarmes du monde et repli de la politique étrangère sur une définition restrictive et isolationniste de l’intérêt national.

– Premier axe : la lutte contre l’immigration illégale. Trump brise le consensus qui rassemble depuis des années républicains et démocrates autour d’une approche « douce » et humaniste de la question (consistant essentiellement à tolérer le flot des illégaux et à leur permettre de vivre et de travailler dans une zone grise). Il dénonce l’hypocrisie générale – celle des républicains qui profitent de l’immigration illégale parce qu’elle fournit de la main-d’oeuvre bon marché, comme celle des démocrates qui recherchent le soutien des votes hispaniques. Le milliardaire s’engage à « passer réellement à l’action ». Il annonce son intention d’édifier à la frontière avec le Mexique un mur – « très haut, très beau » -, ajoutant : « La construction, je sais faire. » Il assure dans le même souffle qu’il renverra chez eux les 11 millions d’illégaux présents dans le pays et qu’il ne les autorisera à revenir que de manière légale. Il invoque la nécessité de recréer de « vraies frontières » parce qu’un pays sans frontières, assène-t-il, n’est pas un vrai pays. Un programme que les élites jugent totalement irréaliste mais que le peuple, exaspéré par l’impuissance de Washington, plébiscite. Sur ce point, le candidat à l’investiture républicaine prône une politique très comparable à celle que promeut en France Marine Le Pen (et avant elle son père). Il jure de se montrer ferme là où les politiciens traditionnels semblent avoir renoncé. C’est là l’une des grandes raisons de son succès.

– Deuxième axe : le protectionnisme commercial. Là aussi, à l’instar des Le Pen de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, Trump appelle à refuser l’irréversibilité des vents de la globalisation et à revenir sur les traités de libre-échange qui, depuis les années Clinton, ont été l’un des éléments clés de la doxa économique des élites démocrates comme républicaines. « Nous allons renégocier avec la Chine et le Mexique. Les accords qui ont été signés sont mauvais pour l’Amérique », affirme-t-il, invoquant son art du « deal » pour convaincre les électeurs qu’il arrachera à Pékin et à Mexico des conditions plus favorables, ce qui permettra de faire revenir de nombreux emplois aux États-Unis. La plupart des économistes jugent la promesse illusoire mais, sur ce dossier comme sur de nombreux autres, Trump convainc parce que la population ne croit plus à l’« expertise » des élites. Cette population veut essayer autre chose et voit dans le magnat l’homme capable de révolutionner le statu quo. Peu à peu, les autres candidats – en particulier du côté démocrate – se mettent à faire écho à ses propositions.

– Troisième axe clé : le retour à une approche prudente en politique étrangère. Donald Trump a beau rouler des mécaniques et bomber le torse sur les questions de politique internationale – il déclare notamment qu’il en finira avec l’État islamique, ce que l’actuel président a échoué à accomplir -, son premier réflexe est de redéfinir les circonstances du recours à la force militaire de manière beaucoup plus restrictive qu’au cours des dernières décennies. Bref, il rompt avec l’héritage des néo-conservateurs : avec lui à la Maison-Blanche, c’en sera fini des interventions militaires destinées à exporter la démocratie ou à stabiliser le monde. Il ne croit pas à une « responsabilité particulière » de l’Amérique, contrairement à un Harry Truman, un Ronald Reagan, un Bill Clinton ou un George W. Bush. Si l’on divise les « phases de la politique étrangère américaine » en phases maximalistes et minimalistes, les premières étant marquées par l’interventionnisme et les secondes par le repli, comme le fait Stephen Sestanovitch dans son ouvrage Maximalist, Donald Trump est clairement du côté des prudents qui veulent réduire la voilure. Il ne s’est pas privé de critiquer âprement l’invasion de l’Irak en 2003 – une opération qu’il qualifie d’« erreur majeure ». Il a également exprimé son opposition à l’intervention conduite en Libye par les États-Unis et l’Europe contre le régime de Kadhafi. Quant à la Syrie, il estime qu’il convient de régler le conflit en négociant avec Bachar el-Assad et la Russie. Le magnat new-yorkais partage le mépris de l’actuel président pour le « Washington playbook », ce consensus interventionniste systématique qu’Obama s’est obstiné à combattre pendant sa présidence. Les deux hommes sont tous deux de fervents admirateurs de la politique étrangère de Bush père, beaucoup plus prudente que celle du fils. Bien que Trump ait récemment affirmé qu’il serait éventuellement prêt à déployer 30 000 soldats sur le terrain pour défaire l’État islamique, il apparaît nettement que son instinct est plutôt au désengagement. « Il faudrait beaucoup pour me convaincre d’envoyer des dizaines de milliers d’hommes au Moyen-Orient, même sous la pression du Pentagone », a-t-il confié aux éditorialistes du Washington Post le 21 mars. Sa vision générale est que la menace de l’EI pourrait requérir une opération coup de poing, mais qu’il faut se garder de toute intervention irréfléchie. Cependant, il ne semble pas avoir d’avis très approfondi sur le sujet.

Autre position qui en fait un isolationniste là où Obama faisait plutôt figure de réaliste circonspect : le favori républicain semble douter de la nécessité d’assurer de manière inconditionnelle la sécurité des alliés de l’Amérique, des Européens aux Japonais et aux Sud-Coréens, jugeant qu’ils doivent « s’aider eux-mêmes ». Chez lui, l’idée n’est pas nouvelle : « Le monde nous escroque. L’Allemagne nous escroque comme jamais. L’Arabie saoudite nous escroque comme jamais. La France, ce sont les pires équipiers que j’aie vus de ma vie », disait-il déjà sur CNN en… 2000.

Lors de sa rencontre avec le Washington Post en ce mois de mars 2016, Trump va même jusqu’à exprimer des doutes sur l’engagement des États-Unis au sein de l’Otan – un discours qui le place en rupture avec un consensus bipartisan vieux de soixante-dix ans sur le caractère vital du lien transatlantique et la nécessité de fournir un parapluie de sécurité américain à l’Europe. Pas étonnant, dès lors, qu’il ait exprimé le désir de trouver langue commune avec Vladimir Poutine et qu’il apparaisse prêt à laisser bien plus de latitude aux ambitions de la Russie dans son ex-empire, même si ces ambitions ne peuvent être satisfaites qu’au détriment de l’indépendance de ses voisins. Trump semble, sur cette question, partager l’avis de Pat Buchanan qui nous confiait récemment ne pas comprendre pourquoi l’Otan avait été maintenue après la fin de la guerre froide et pourquoi les Américains devraient « mourir pour les Baltes »… Une approche très inquiétante qui révèle une méconnaissance totale du risque que représente pour l’espace européen le révisionnisme agressif de la Russie poutinienne. L’idée que l’Amérique ait pour mission de défendre l’ordre libéral et démocratique de l’après-guerre semble étrangère à Trump. Ce réflexe isolationniste, quoique peu prisé dans les cercles d’experts américains en politique étrangère, semble traduire une tendance lourde à l’oeuvre dans la société. Mais vu le pragmatisme du candidat – et sa faible connaissance des relations internationales -, il pourrait tout à fait, s’il venait à être élu, revenir sur cette vision des choses. « Nous l’éduquerons », nous a confié une source proche des services de renseignement américains, qui disait ne pas être « particulièrement inquiète » du profil de Trump…

Sus aux élites et au « politiquement correct »

La mise en avant du thème nationaliste n’aurait jamais suffi à propulser Trump en tête de la course à l’investiture républicaine s’il n’avait ajouté à ses propositions une charge véhémente « contre les élites ». Il doit largement son succès à l’idée, martelée en permanence, qu’il est indépendant vis-à-vis de la classe dirigeante et qu’il fait campagne « contre eux et malgré eux ». Contrairement à tous ses rivaux, le milliardaire s’est refusé à utiliser au cours des primaires les services des « Super PACs » et à puiser dans les millions de généreux donateurs. Il a autofinancé sa campagne, en limitant drastiquement les coûts grâce à sa présence permanente et quotidienne dans tous les médias télévisés qui se pressent pour lui donner la parole. « Mes rivaux dépensent les millions des gens qui les contrôlent ; moi, je ne leur dois rien. C’est pourquoi je ferai ce qui est bon pour le pays », ne cesse-t-il de répéter, s’engageant à mettre fin à ce « système de corruption politique » auquel il admet avoir participé en tant qu’homme d’affaires. « Croyez-moi, raconte-t-il aux foules qui se pressent à ses meetings, je connais bien les politiques car j’ai donné de l’argent à tous, démocrates et républicains. J’étais obligé de le faire pour défendre mes affaires, c’est la règle du jeu du système. Je sais à quel point ils sont faibles et dépendants », raconte-t-il.

L’acharnement anti-élites, qui fait merveille dans un pays en rébellion contre Washington, se traduit par son refus de se laisser emprisonner dans les codes de langage et de comportement qui prévalent dans l’establishment politique et médiatique. L’un des attraits de Donald Trump pour ses fans, c’est qu’il est politiquement incorrect dans un pays qui l’est devenu à l’excès. Sur les musulmans et les maux de l’immigration illégale, sur les « toilettes neutres » (13) ou sur la célébration de Noël (dont le nom est peu à peu remplacé par la formule « Joyeuses fêtes » pour ne pas risquer de blesser les non-chrétiens), il « dit les choses telles qu’elles sont », apprécient ses partisans, d’autant moins gênés par ses formules souvent décapantes ou offensantes qu’ils se disent exaspérés par tous ces sujets. À leurs yeux, il parviendra peut-être à rétablir une forme de bon sens et à défendre l’Amérique traditionnelle dont ils ont la nostalgie. À sa manière provocatrice et décomplexée, Trump redonne la parole à cette dernière face à une culture « progressiste » et post-moderne si obsédée par la « défense des minorités » – qu’elles soient raciales, religieuses ou sexuelles – qu’elle semble considérer que tous les maux du monde sont le fait de « l’homme blanc, hétérosexuel, chrétien et occidental ».

Naturellement, ce positionnement iconoclaste suscite une levée de boucliers de l’élite politique et médiatique. Celle-ci est aujourd’hui liguée pour tenter de faire barrage au « grossier personnage ». Une véritable campagne « Non à Trump » bat actuellement son plein. Émissions, articles critiques, rafales de publicités négatives financées par des Super PACs alimentés par de grands donateurs, stratégies destinées à le faire échouer à la convention de Cleveland (nous y reviendrons), voire réunions de brainstorming visant à présenter un « candidat surprise » à l’élection générale si Trump venait malgré tout à rafler la nomination : tout est aujourd’hui envisagé. Pour l’instant, ces attaques semblent se retourner en sa faveur, tant une bonne partie de l’électorat éprouve une haine profonde envers les élites. Mais il reste à voir si ces efforts finiront par affaiblir et faire chuter le candidat dans sa course à la nomination et/ou lors de l’élection générale.

Moi, Donald Trump, je suis le programme

Au-delà de tous ses slogans de campagne, ce que vend le candidat Trump en campagne, c’est… lui-même ! Son profil d’homme d’affaires qui a réussi. Ses capacités de négociateur. Son caractère indomptable et bagarreur. Son côté bad boy qui fait peur et qui projette de la force. Son image d’outsider anti-système. « Il est LE programme, la recette magique offerte aux citoyens pendant un avis de tempête », analyse son biographe Michael D’Antonio. « Il se propose en remède. D’après lui, sa personnalité et ses capacités de leader – de nature presque génétique – permettraient de changer les choses », ajoute l’auteur, visiblement fort sceptique.

La manière très étudiée dont Trump « vend » son image et sa personne aux électeurs – ses cheveux, ses mimiques, ses postures sur scène – est à cet égard significative. Il a reconnu avoir lui-même choisi pour ses affiches de campagne une photo qui « fait peur ». Novice en politique, l’homme n’en est pas moins un maître de la « com » qu’il pratique avec un brio, une audace et un manque de scrupules qu’on ne retrouve chez aucun de ses concurrents. À travers son compte Twitter, suivi par au moins 5 millions de personnes, il peut lancer ses idées, voir ce qui accroche ou fascine et adapter son discours en fonction des tendances qu’il décèle. Plus que jamais, le mot qui tue, qui piège, qui émeut ou qui détruit a pris le pas sur les débats de fond et les programmes. Ce maniement très personnalisé et très centralisé de la communication politique et des réseaux sociaux lui permet d’anticiper les mouvements de l’opinion. Il y a désormais un lien presque organique entre le milliardaire et le monde de la communication au sens large (médias traditionnels et réseaux sociaux), chacun nourrissant l’autre dans un rapport quasi fusionnel. Donald Trump, de ce point de vue, fait exploser les méthodes traditionnelles de marketing politique – un univers que Barack Obama avait déjà commencé à bouleverser en 2008 en investissant Internet. « Le Donald » invente une nouvelle manière de faire campagne au XXIe siècle.

Faut-il avoir peur de Donald Trump ?

Trump n’est pas Hitler

Faut-il avoir peur de Donald Trump ? La question hante la campagne présidentielle américaine depuis plusieurs mois et occupe désormais les pages des journaux quasiment chaque jour. Parfois jusqu’à l’hystérie. Après avoir commencé par rire de la candidature du milliardaire new-yorkais, la jugeant plus ridicule et plus exotique que véritablement dangereuse, les médias et les élites politiques, de gauche comme de droite, crient désormais haro sur le favori de la course républicaine, le dépeignant comme un raciste de la pire espèce. Ses promesses de renvoyer les 11 millions d’illégaux vivant sur le sol américain dans leur pays d’origine, de créer un fichier de surveillance des musulmans et d’« interdire jusqu’à nouvel ordre » à tout musulman étranger d’entrer sur le territoire des États-Unis incitent ses détracteurs à employer à son égard les mots les plus durs. « C’est un fasciste ! », clame par exemple l’ancien président mexicain Vicente Fox.

Ce type d’accusation incendiaire a redoublé quand Trump a relayé sur son propre compte Twitter des messages provenant de comptes liés à des groupes suprémacistes blancs. Les déclarations de David Duke – un ancien dragon du Ku Klux Klan, très lié aux milieux d’extrême droite européens, qui a appelé à voter Trump en raison de ses positions anti-immigration – ont alimenté les soupçons. Le fait, très étrange, que le candidat n’ait pas explicitement condamné le sulfureux Duke lors d’une interview télévisée dominicale – alors qu’il l’avait nettement dénoncé quelques jours plus tôt – a scandalisé le camp républicain qui l’a enjoint, à raison, de s’expliquer. Trump a rectifié le tir quelques heures plus tard par un tweet où il prétendait n’avoir pas entendu clairement le nom de Duke pendant l’interview et a nié toute indulgence à l’égard de cet individu. Mais ses rivaux ont jugé la condamnation trop tardive et estimé que ce manque d’empressement et de clarté le rendait « inéligible ».

Les esprits se sont encore échauffés lorsque, à l’occasion d’un meeting, Trump appela les participants à faire, le bras levé, le serment d’aller voter pour lui – une scène qui a été présentée comme une variante contemporaine du salut nazi. « Je n’avais pas entendu cette comparaison avec Hitler mais c’est une comparaison terrible et je ne suis certainement pas heureux qu’elle soit faite », a-t-il répondu. « Quand j’ai entendu cette comparaison, j’ai été stupéfait. Il s’agissait de quelque chose de totalement inoffensif, nous nous amusions bien ! », a-t-il ajouté, promettant de ne plus recommencer, vu le scandale.

Robert Paxton, célèbre historien du fascisme, professeur à l’Université de Columbia, croit déceler certains parallèles entre la campagne de Trump et les mouvements fascistes du XXe siècle : « Le nationalisme, une politique étrangère agressive, des attaques contre les ennemis à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur qui font fi des processus légaux, une obsession du déclin national et l’appel à l’idée que le pays a besoin d’un homme fort », énumère-t-il (14).

La démonstration est loin d’être vraiment convaincante. Il est vrai que Trump n’hésite pas à répliquer brutalement à ceux qui s’en prennent à lui ou à encourager ses partisans à « corriger » les fauteurs de troubles qui viennent régulièrement perturber ses meetings. « Il faudrait peut-être le secouer un peu car ce qu’il a fait est absolument dégoûtant », claironnait-il en novembre lors d’une réunion électorale à Birmingham (Alabama), après que le service d’ordre eut expulsé un protestataire. « J’aimais bien l’ancien temps. Vous savez comment on traitait les gars qui venaient faire ça ? On les sortait sur des brancards ! », fanfaronnait-il encore en février à Las Vegas, après un incident similaire.

Mais un tel comportement ne suffit pas à justifier les accusations de fascisme qui se sont répandues comme une traînée de poudre dans la presse américaine. Ces anathèmes brouillent les pistes et empêchent une analyse pertinente du profil politique et psychologique de Trump. Malgré ses dérives verbales et ses provocations, il n’a en effet, a priori, pas grand-chose d’un candidat d’extrême droite. Pour certains, comme John Cassidy du New Yorker, sa volonté de stopper l’immigration illégale rappelle les crispations nativistes que l’Amérique a connues dans les années 1830-1840, à l’époque des Know Nothing (15). Mais le label fasciste ne semble pas coller à sa démarche et « met injustement en cause les supporters de Trump, qui présentent des doléances légitimes, que les politiciens classiques ignorent à leurs risques et périls », commente Gianni Rotta dans The Atlantic.

Un pragmatique opportuniste

Contrairement à Marine Le Pen, qui a baigné toute son enfance dans les idées d’extrême droite professées par son père, même si elle s’en est partiellement détachée, l’homme d’affaires a longtemps été démocrate, pro-avortement et pro-mariage gay, avant de virer républicain dans les années 2000. Un profil que lui reproche d’ailleurs la droite traditionaliste (16) qui l’accuse de représenter les « valeurs new-yorkaises » plutôt que les valeurs conservatrices. La vérité est que Trump n’a pas de credo idéologique fixé et définitif. En 1988, quand il envisageait pour la première fois une candidature à la présidentielle, il avait suggéré qu’il aimerait beaucoup avoir pour vice-présidente… Oprah Winfrey, vedette des médias afro-américaine, connue pour ses opinions très libérales. Un choix qui colle mal avec l’image de raciste qui lui est hâtivement accolée aujourd’hui. Moins anecdotique : il évoque régulièrement la nécessité de mettre urgemment en place un plan pour les quartiers noirs en pleine déshérence – un discours, on en conviendra, très éloigné des vues du Ku Klux Klan. »

Voir encore:

Qui est vraiment Donald Trump?

15/09/2016
Dans le livre, Qui est vraiment Donald Trump?, la correspondante du Figaro ­raconte sa face méconnue et la vague sans précédent qui le porte et bouleverse aussi le reste de l’occident. Extraits.
Correspondante du «Figaro» à Washington pendant huit ans, Laure Mandeville a plongé dans l’univers du candidat républicain. Extraits de son dernier livre.
Sur la gigantesque scène de l’arène de Quickens, à Cleveland, une silhouette a surgi. Celle d’un homme maintenu dans l’ombre à dessein, mais marchant dans un chemin de lumière tracé par d’énormes projecteurs. (…) Il ne fait nul doute qu’il s’agit de Donald Trump, nominé républicain de la course présidentielle 2016, dont le sacre va être orchestré au terme des quatre jours d’une convention aux allures de grand-messe hollywoodienne, en cette fin du mois de juillet, après treize mois de batailles sanglantes et de K.O. stupéfiants. Mais en le regardant avancer dans l’ombre, assise dans les gradins au milieu de dizaines de milliers de spectateurs, après avoir suivi pas à pas son irrésistible ascension politique, je me dis que cette apparition est comme une métaphore de l’inconnue énorme que représente toujours le milliardaire new-yorkais. (…) Ce personnage complexe et explosif, qui a pris d’assaut le Parti républicain et fait main basse sur ses électeurs, prenant à rebrousse-poil tous les postulats idéologiques traditionnels, tous les codes de bienséance rhétorique, bref tous les mécanismes bien huilés du monde politique habituel ; cet homme dont la silhouette se découpe en noir sur fond de lumière, ce soir-là, est devenu la page non encore écrite où chacun en Amérique projette espoirs, peurs, doutes, fantasmes, imprécations et interrogations.

Au nom du père

Le soir de son discours d’acceptation de la nomination républicaine, à Cleveland, Donald Trump a secoué la tête, visiblement ému, en parlant de son père. «Je me demande ce qu’il dirait s’il était ici pour voir tout ça ce soir !», s’est-il exclamé en embrassant du regard les milliers de personnes qui l’acclamaient. «Mon papa, Fred Trump, était l’homme le plus intelligent et le plus travailleur que j’ai jamais connu», a-t-il dit. Impossible de comprendre Donald Trump sans parler de la figure paternelle. Comme il le répète souvent, et comme le confirment tous ceux qui le connaissent de longue date, l’homme a été une figure déterminante dans la formation de sa personnalité. Une influence expliquant dans une large mesure son irrépressible ambition, sa discipline, sa persévérance, sa dureté aussi… bref, sa volonté de puissance, dans une large mesure calquée sur celle du père. «Être un leader, c’est dans l’ADN», aime-t-il affirmer dans ses interviews.
C’est à Brooklyn que Donald Trump naît en 1946 dans une famille de six enfants, dont il est l’avant-dernier, mais le deuxième fils. Son grand-père Friedrich Drumpf (dont les services d’immigration américains transformeront le nom) a émigré de Brême en Allemagne en 1885, pour gagner l’eldorado américain. C’est une personnalité aventureuse et haute en couleur. Il a tenté sa chance dans l’Ouest jusqu’à l’État de Washington, puis au Klondike au Canada, et même jusqu’en Alaska, attiré par la ruée vers l’or. Il n’y découvrira pas de précieuses pépites mais amassera un capital en créant des restaurants à qui il arrivait de vendre de la viande de chevaux morts et de servir d’hôtels de passe pour les chercheurs d’or qui affluaient. (…)
C’est son jeune fils Fred qui va poursuivre le rêve américain, à force de labeur et d’obstination, travaillant tout en suivant des cours du soir, et en plaçant l’argent qu’il possède dans la construction d’immeubles d’habitation dans les quartiers de Queens et de Brooklyn, en pleine expansion. (…) Il accumule bientôt une fortune qui le place dans la catégorie des millionnaires américains. Le futur candidat républicain grandit dans une belle maison de maître à colonnades, à laquelle on accède par 17 marches, dans le quartier de Jamaican Estates de Queens, une enclave de prospérité. (…) Son père, qui le forçait à travailler comme livreur de journaux pour apprendre la valeur de l’argent et le sens de l’effort, lui prêtait néanmoins sa limousine pour accomplir sa tâche quand il neigeait! «Il me disait que j’étais un roi», a confié Trump au journaliste D’Antonio. Mais Fred Trump, un traditionaliste qui élève ses enfants à l’ancienne, sûrement pas dans la soie, apprend aussi à Donald à travailler sans relâche et à se montrer intransigeant pour survivre. «Sois un tueur», lui recommande-t-il.

L’irruption médiatique

La limousine glisse sur la 5e Avenue, laissant entrevoir une forêt de gratte-ciel à travers les vitres fumées. La caméra s’attarde sur la porte d’un gigantesque immeuble rutilant, où se détachent les lettres d’or d’un nom célèbre: TRUMP. Puis elle se porte sur l’intérieur du véhicule, pour révéler une silhouette masculine installée sur le siège arrière, dans une pénombre étudiée. Ce jour de 2004, à heure de grande écoute, le milliardaire Donald Trump apparaît à l’écran dans un costume chic, pour lancer son émission de téléréalité «The Apprentice», qui deviendra l’un des succès télévisés les plus retentissants des dernières décennies, avec près de 30 millions de téléspectateurs à son zénith. Pour cette première, il explique qu’il a sélectionné seize jeunes entrepreneurs américains – huit hommes et huit femmes – qui concourront pendant seize semaines et seront progressivement éliminés, avant qu’un gagnant n’émerge. Ce dernier se verra offrir une place de président d’une des compagnies de l’empire Trump, pendant un an, avec «un salaire énorme!», précise le milliardaire. Quand il retrouve les candidats, logés somptueusement dans une suite d’hôtel de ce roi de l’immobilier, Trump donne tout de suite le ton de l’exercice. «Ce sera dur, et sans concession. Mais le jeu en vaut la chandelle.»
(…) C’est avec jubilation qu’il offre du rêve à l’Amérique moyenne qui a toujours aimé les riches – contrairement aux Français – et qui en redemande. De ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, tout le monde pense qu’on peut devenir riche en une vie. «L’amour de l’argent est soit la principale, soit la deuxième motivation à la racine de tout ce que font les Américains», rappelait déjà Alexis de Tocqueville, qui avait décidément tout compris. Trump, qui est aussi là pour «vendre sa marque et son nom» – et du même coup décupler sa fortune -, fascine parce qu’il est l’incarnation de cette ambition-là. «Son sens de ce que veut le public n’a pas d’équivalent à notre époque. Personne dans les dernières décennies n’a réussi à capter l’attention des Américains aussi longtemps que cet homme», constate Michael D’Antonio. (…) Mais l’émission «The Apprentice» est aussi bâtie sur l’idée que, pour réussir, il faut savoir se battre, prendre des risques et «être le meilleur». (…) Les Américains sont fascinés par l’homme d’affaires parce qu’il leur vend à la fois un rêve de succès et un principe de réalité. Deux ingrédients que l’on retrouve au cœur de sa campagne actuelle.

Il était une fois l’armée de Trump

Une véritable «armée» s’est levée à travers les provinces d’Amérique, à la stupéfaction des élites prises de panique. Elle ne porte pas d’uniforme et frappe par son caractère hétérogène. C’est l’armée de Trump, et elle veut conquérir Washington. Faire le ménage. Coiffeurs, comptables, ouvriers, fermiers, entrepreneurs, policiers ou militaires, hommes et femmes. Ils sont des millions d’électeurs dégoûtés de la classe politique traditionnelle à se rallier à la bannière nationaliste et populiste de l’outsider milliardaire qui promet de rendre sa «grandeur à l’Amérique» en bousculant le système. Ils forment une nébuleuse hétéroclite qui transcende les partis, recrutant aussi bien parmi les conservateurs Tea Party et les chrétiens évangélistes que chez les républicains modérés, les indépendants, voire même chez les démocrates des classes moyennes et populaires déçus d’Obama.
(…) «Je suis ici parce que j’ai découvert que Trump n’est pas un imbécile, il a de bonnes idées», a confié Kelly Davis, une quadragénaire «en arrêt maladie» qui a raconté avoir de sérieux problèmes de dos mais avoir fait le déplacement quand même. «J’aime ce qu’il dit sur l’immigration, nous devons renforcer la frontière. Et j’aime aussi son style, sa manière d’identifier les problèmes et de chercher immédiatement une solution», a-t-elle ajouté, précisant être indépendante, mais s’être inscrite sur les listes républicaines exclusivement pour pouvoir voter Trump. (…) À ses côtés, une vieille dame de 70 ans, emmitouflée dans un manteau de laine, se disait enchantée par Trump, parce qu’il est si «différent» des autres. (…) «Les Américains veulent un antihéros», note le journaliste James Poulos… «Aujourd’hui, nous n’avons pas confiance en des héros politiques. Nous ne voulons personne qui nous délivre, qui nous tire vers le haut. Nous voulons juste quelqu’un qui pulvérise ce qui reste de notre monde dysfonctionnel, qui triomphe de nos ennemis les plus durs et nous laisse capables de décider de nos vies entre nous», explique-t-il.

Une rébellion contre la globalisation et le communautarisme

Ne refusant pas le statut de «nation d’immigrants» de l’Amérique, les électeurs de Trump disent accepter tout le monde mais parlent de «respect des lois et des frontières», comme leur champion. Comme lui, ils semblent aussi soucieux de tirer les leçons de l’échec du multiculturalisme en Europe, des récents attentats terroristes islamistes et des problèmes posés par l’intégration de populations musulmanes substantielles sur le continent européen (…). Ils disent refuser la naïveté. De manière plus générale, on sent monter, dans la mouvance Trump, le désir d’envoyer aux oubliettes le fameux communautarisme à l’américaine. Visiblement peu convaincus par un modèle qui ne pense plus la société que comme un arc-en-ciel de catégories raciales, sexuelles ou religieuses, mais semble peiner à trouver ce qui unit la nation, les trumpistes plaident pour le retour «à l’américanisme», une notion plus universaliste. Une aspiration qui, de manière inattendue, fait écho au modèle traditionnel français, qui ignore la race, le genre, l’origine ou la religion, pour ne voir que le citoyen. Mais il s’agit sans aucun doute d’un crime de lèse-majesté pour le modèle communautariste américain.
(…) Trump, personnage bourré de défauts et d’imprévisibilités, est porteur d’un message qui ne peut être ignoré. En esquissant le thème de l’Amérique d’abord, il remet à l’ordre du jour l’idée de limites, de frontières et de donc nation. (…) Donald Trump parle à la hache, mais il révèle l’ampleur des défis et refuse de les éluder. Les réponses qu’il propose sont controversées, potentiellement dangereuses. Mais elles attaquent le sujet central de front. La capacité de l’Occident à protéger sa civilisation et à établir un nouveau modus vivendi avec le monde.
Voir de plus:
Les médias américains n’hésitent plus à dire que Donald Trump est fasciste

Les dernières déclarations et propositions du candidat à l’investiture républicaine choquent de nombreux éditorialistes.

Pour décrire la campagne de Donald Trump, la presse américaine a commencé à utiliser un mot assez rarement utilisé pour décrire des idées politiques aux États-Unis: «fasciste».

C’est particulièrement le cas depuis les attentats du 13 novembre à Paris et à Saint-Denis, qui ont été l’occasion pour Trump, qui est toujours en tête des sondages pour les primaires républicaines à la présidentielle, de renforcer son discours sécuritaire xénophobe et raciste.

«Je ne suis pas sûr que Donald Trump sache vraiment qu’il est un néo-fasciste. Il ne connaît peut être pas assez l’histoire du monde pour être conscient de l’odeur maintenant évidente de sa rhétorique, écrit Michael Tomasky dans The Daily Beast. Arrêtez ce que vous faites et pensez à ceci: je viens d’écrire un paragraphe où je me demande si le candidat principal à la présidentielle d’un de nos deux principaux partis est sciemment fasciste.»

Une force fédérale pour expulser les gens

Dans The New Republic, Jamil Smith déclare d’entrée que «oui, Donald Trump est un fasciste», et l’éditorialiste voit une sorte de version du point Godwin dans la campagne du milliardaire républicain: «Plus il fait campagne (en tête) pour les primaires républicaines, plus la probabilité qu’il ressemble à un nazi augmente.»

Même type d’analyse dans le magazine The Week, où Ryan Cooper écrit:

«Alors que les premières primaires approchent, et que Trump gagne des points dans les sondages, sa descente vers le fascisme progresse plus vite que je ne le craignais.»

Même certains républicains ont commencé à utiliser ce mot pour décrire la campagne du magnat de l’immobilier. C’est notamment le cas de Jim Gilmore, un ancien gouverneur de Virginie qui se présente à la primaire (sans faire campagne), et qui expliquait dans une interview télévisée:

«J’ai dénoncé nombreuses de ses idées, y compris celle de la force fédérale qu’il veut mettre sur pied pour expulser [les immigrés illégaux]. Une sorte d’organisation nationale qui expulserait les gens hors du pays. Je ne suis pas d’accord avec ce genre de choses. J’ai dit que c’était de la rhétorique fasciste.»

Ficher les musulmans

De même, en réaction à la réponse de Trump sur un possible fichage des musulmans, un conseiller de la campagne de Jeb Bush avait tweeté

Le fichage fédéral forcé de citoyens américains basé sur la religion est du fascisme. Point final. Pas d’autre mot pour décrire ça.

Ou encore ce tweet d’un chercheur conservateur qui est conseiller du candidat républicain Marco Rubio:

Trump est un fasciste. Ce n’est pas un terme que j’emploie souvent ou à la légère. Mais il le mérite.

Depuis la semaine dernière, la liste des déclarations controversées de Trump est en effet assez impressionnante.

À la question d’un journaliste de savoir si un fichage systématique des musulmans américains était désirable, Trump avait répondu que ce serait une solution envisageable. Il a ausi parlé de fermer les mosquées aux États-Unis, et d’utiliser la technique de torture dite de «waterboarding», car «croyez-moi, ça marche, et vous savez quoi? si ça ne marche pas, ils le méritent quand même». 

Il a aussi colporté plusieurs mensonges sur les musulmans américains en train de célébrer le 11-Septembre, ainsi que de faux chiffres sur la criminalité des noirs américains, et le weekend dernier, ses supporters ont brutalement expulsé un manifestant noir d’un de ses meetings.

Voir de même:

Donald Trump, Postmodern Candidate

Victor Davis Hanson
Townhall
Aug 04, 2016
Early 20th century modernism ignored classical rules of expression. But late 20th century postmodernism blew up those rules altogether.
Barack Obama was a modernist candidate. He turned out vast numbers of young and minority voters, mastered new social media, and in 2008 overturned the old-guard Democratic furniture such as Hillary Clinton.
In contrast, Donald Trump has simply destroyed normal politics. Unlike Obama with his record Wall Street fundraising of 2008 and 2012, Trump has raised almost no money. He ignores endorsements from political kingpins. Trump has organized no serious voter registration drives. His convention was bizarre, showcasing his kids instead of party bosses and special-interest groups.
How about internal polling? Trump seems to have none.
Sophisticated opposition research? Zilch.
Standard talking points? Not so much.
Teleprompted speeches? Trump prefers ad-hoc stream of consciousness.
Candidates are supposed to avoid the pitfalls of press conferences as much as possible — and prep for days when they are obligated to give them. Not Trump. He thrives on unscripted rants to the press without much worry about what he says.
Candidates dislike and fear reporters, and so seek to flatter them. Trump openly insults them and occasionally kicks them out of his press conferences.
Modern politicians generally avoid getting pulled into nasty, lose-lose fights. Trump welcomes brawls against all comers.Hillary Clinton has taken huge quid-pro-quo contributions from rich people as she damns the influence of big money in politics. Trump cannot seem to find any big donors. He trashes crony capitalist insiders on the grounds that he used to be one himself.
Traditional politicians such as Mitt Romney were perfectly groomed and rarely appeared without tailored suits. Modernist politicians such as Obama like to be photographed on the golf links appearing young, hip and cool, wearing shades and polo shirts.
But Trump defies both traditional and nontraditional tastes by wearing loud, long ties, combing his dyed-yellow hair over a bald spot, and tanning his skin a strange orange hue.
Politicians attack each other while faking politeness. The coolest do it with nuance. Not Trump. He uses taboo words like « liar » and « crooked. »
Modernist candidates voice platitudes about border enforcement. But only a postmodern one would demand that Mexico pay for a wall.
For a modern politician, a gaffe is an inadvertent truthful statement. For a postmodern Trump, the only gaffe imaginable is to stay silent.
All presidential candidates court top party officials, former presidents and defeated rivals, and seek praise from newspapers and magazines.
When Trump either does not win such approval or is ridiculed by major media and those in his own party, he pouts, saying his critics are losers without much clout anyway.
The bible for modern politicians is political correctness. They must defer to every imaginable hyphenated group and « community, » employing euphemisms or self-imposed censorship while sidestepping race, class and gender land mines as much as possible.
Again, not Trump. He says what he pleases. If he blows himself up with a politically incorrect outburst, what is left simply flows back together, as if Trump were some sort of political version of the Terminator.
Trump was supposed to fade last summer. His crudity was said to guarantee that he would lose Republican primaries.
Then, pundits said Trump’s vulgar style of primary campaigning would not translate well to the general election.
Now, even seasoned politicos confess there are no rules that apply to Donald Trump. He just keeps shouting that things are getting worse and no one will admit it.
We live in a politically correct age in which President Obama is unable or unwilling to mention radical Islamists as the terrorists who have killed hundreds in Europe and the United States.
No one dares suggest that the more than 300 sanctuary cities in the U.S. are a rebirth of the illiberal and neo-Confederate idea of nullification of federal law. Black Lives Matter is idealized as a civil rights group despite the chants at its protests about violence toward police.
Doubling the national debt to nearly $20 trillion in just eight years is regarded as no big deal.
The public is growing tired of two realities: the one they see and hear each day, and the official version that has nothing to do with their perceptions.
Trump comes along with a ball and chain and throws it right into the elite filtering screen — and the public cheers as the fragile glass explodes.
If most politicians are going to deceive, voters apparently prefer raw and uncooked deception rather than the usual seasoned and spiced dishonesty.
Will Trump fade in August, implode in September, self-destruct in October — or win in November?
No one knows. There are no longer rules to predict how a fed-up public will vote. And there has never been a postmodern candidate like Donald J. Trump.
Voir aussi:
I Know Fascists; Donald Trump Is No Fascist
Can you imagine Mussolini being accused of endorsing “New York values”?
An elderly man salutes a fascist Italian flag during the funeral of Romano Mussolini, the last surviving child of Benito Mussolini, in Rome. Darrin Zammit Lupi / Reuters
Gianni Riotta
The Atlantic

Jan 16, 2016

Is Donald Trump a fascist? Several commentators in America, my adoptive country, on both the left and right, have essentially compared “The Donald” to Mussolini, the fascist strongman who destroyed my old country Italy for a time, leaving behind half a million dead and the lingering poison of civil war.

“The brand of fascism was invented and exported by Italians,” Vittorio Foa, a Resistance hero and the father of Italy’s Republican Constitution, used to quip. He was right and, having grown up in the birthplace of fascism and lived through its aftereffects, I am dead sure: Trump is not a fascist. Using the label not only belittles past tragedies and obscures future dangers, but also indicts his supporters, who have real grievances that mainstream politicians ignore at their peril. America should tackle the demons Trump unleashes in 2016, not tar him by association with ideas and tactics he doesn’t even know about.

Trump’s xenophobic rhetoric, his demagoguery, and his populist appeals to citizens’ economic anxieties certainly borrow from the fascist playbook. Italy’s fascists capitalized on similar themes in a different era of global uncertainty; in their case, it was the unemployment, veterans’ resentments, unions’ strikes, and political violence that beset the country following World War I. But Trump is, fundamentally, a blustering political opportunist courting votes in a democratic system; he has not called for the violent overthrow of the system itself. And whereas it can be impossible to discern any logic or strategy in Trump’s campaign, the fascists who marched on Rome in 1922 were relentlessly, violently focused on a clear goal: to kill democracy and install a dictatorship.

Nearly 30 years after Il Duce Mussolini, Italy’s dictator from 1922 to 1945, was executed by a partisan firing squad, his ideas were still wreaking havoc across the country; the 1970s were years of clashes between neofascist and communist terrorists that we in Italy called the Anni di Piombo, or years of lead. The neofascists were leading riots in Italy’s south; suspected of bombing banks, trains, and political rallies in the north; and accused of plotting a military coup. The violence killed hundreds of innocent people. I witnessed the destruction every day.

In 1971, when I was a senior in high school, a neofascist leaflet denounced me as a “target to be hit,” listing my phone number and address in Palermo, Sicily (my mom still lives there and answers that number). In October of that year, on a day when I was on duty selling the leftist newspaper Il Manifesto, I watched nervously as a squadraccia, a gang of fascist thugs, paraded across the street from me in full arms, heavy bats in hand, chains wrapped around their chests, black helmets on their heads, brass knuckles shining. Fascist dictators were still running Spain, Greece, and Portugal. The neofascists in Palermo had tried to kill the two young sons of a senator, in revenge against a progressive land reform. Watching the squadraccia I wondered if I too would be wounded, or worse.

This was the menace at the heart of fascism, defined by the display of organized violence and terrorism to win political power, and the ultimate imposition of a totalitarian system hostile to capitalism and individual freedom. By my generation, Mussolini himself had been defeated—though it took the devastation of World War II to dislodge two of Europe’s prominent fascists from power, in Italy and Germany, once they had occupied it. What Italy suffered in the 1970s was a failed effort to reimpose his ideas on the country. Thank God I survived that day in October, but it forced me to rush home and quiz my father about the ideology once again threatening the country. Dad had often reminisced about growing up under Il Duce, calmly noting that “In school they taught us that ‘Il Duce’ will soon trash America and those Negroes.’ And I believed them.” It was a Sicilian barber, just returned to Italy after spending much of his life as a steelworker in Pittsburgh, who changed his mind. “I have seen America, worked in America,” the barber told my father. “America is too strong for us.”

And Italy was ultimately too strong for the fascist resurgence, which ended with the arrests of many of the worst terrorists, but also with job growth, welfare programs, and educational reforms that opened up opportunities for the marginalized of Italian society. All of these policies thinned out the angry masses of discontent, underemployed, and alienated people who had been the best recruits for Mussolini and his successors. Thus in the decades after World War II, Western democracies learned how to prevent fascists from taking power again. The danger I see in Trump is that nobody yet knows how to oppose his particular brand of populism, in America or Europe.

Trump, too, is benefitting from voter discontent. Polls show that many Trump supporters come from the white middle- and working-class, a group whose status and salaries have stagnated for decades; these voters are evidently looking for a leader ready to dignify, if not solve, their problems. But Trump will never master the techniques laid out in 1931 by the then-fascist journalist Curzio Malaparte in his Coup D’etat: The Technique of Revolution, which detailed the clear requirements of the fascist manifesto: Seize and hold state power with a sudden attack, coordinated with cunning and force. There is no fascism without this rational, violent plan to obliterate democracy. From Hitler’s Mein Kampf to Mussolini’s speeches on the Palazzo Venezia balcony, fascists told the crowd openly what their goals were and kept a nefarious, disciplined pace to realize them. Mussolini boasted about reducing Italy’s Parliament “to a fascist barrack,” “stopping any antifascist brain from thinking,” and “creating a new Roman Empire.”

Trump has no clear plan of any kind. He is not about to dissolve the Democratic Party and banish the Clintons, Obama, Noam Chomsky, Michael Moore and Jimmy Fallon to exile on Randall’s Island. Americans will not goose-step down Broadway; no screaming squadraccia of middle-aged Trump fans will occupy Grand Central; Amazon will not be nationalized as a “strategic state asset.” Trump is simply an opportunist, perfectly willing to change course (from, for example, saying America has to accept refugees to insisting he would “send them back” within the span of a month) and say anything (Hillary Clinton, who in 2008 he said would make a “great” president, “got schlonged” in the end). During Thursday’s debate, Ted Cruz, who is battling Trump for voters in Iowa and New Hampshire, accused Trump of holding “New York values,” that “are socially liberal or pro-abortion or pro-gay-marriage, [and] focus around money and the media.” Can you imagine Mussolini being accused of endorsing “New York values”?
Witch-hunts, racism, repression, and state surveillance may plague a democracy without morphing it into a fascist dictatorship.

Trump does however gutsily feel how people distrust the media, and so manages to blur the line between true and false; news organizations’ attempts to check Trump’s “facts” have so far been ineffectual. His campaign is a postmodernist masterpiece: a subjective surrogate for the real world, where truth and reality are irrelevant. It is this, and not the bloody ghost of fascism, that distorts the 2016 race.

Voters are nervously looking for a new political home as traditional parties have proved oblivious to their needs. The same angry migration from the old parties, to fringes of both left and right, is wrecking Europe, as people flock to Marine Le Pen in France, Nigel Farage in the U.K., former comedian Beppe Grillo in Italy, Podemos in Spain, the Finn Party in Finland, Syriza in Greece, and all sorts of populist parties in Eastern Europe. Men and women left in the cold by globalization and rising inequality, scared of immigrants often lumped together with foreign terrorists in the media and the popular imagination: This is not the base for the new Western World Fascist Party, but it is a powder keg powerful enough to inflame societies on both sides of the Atlantic. It will not destroy Western democracies, but it may poison them. Witch-hunts, racism, repression, and state surveillance may plague a democracy without morphing it into a fascist dictatorship.

A sense of proportion is crucial to avoid alienating voters further. Trump’s fans are too few to march on Washington, but way too many to ignore or mock. They want jobs, schools, safe communities. If you keep your eyes on their needs, and not on Trump’s distorted hall of mirrors, you will not see “fascists” but instead people forgotten by both Democrats and Republicans. To successfully oppose Trump’s disastrous agenda, without isolating his base, the 2016 candidates will have find some way to speak to them. As Western democracies continue to face the crises of wars and terrorism abroad, and growing inequality and cultural and political unrest at home, it would be a tragedy to go through them so bitterly divided.

Voir par ailleurs:
Trump and the 1930s
Donald Trump is not a fascist*
J.P.P.
The Economist

May 30th 2016

*THAT there is debate among conservative thinkers about whether the Republican nominee might in fact be a fascist is quite a thing. Andrew Sullivan thinks that to apply the label to Donald Trump might be an insult to fascism. Robert Kagan thinks Mr Trump is a precursor to a 1930s revival in politics. The problem with the comparison is that it comes with an accusation of impending genocide that overshadows whatever enlightenment might come from making it. Mr Trump is not a fascist, if by that you mean a successor to Mussolini or Hitler.

But there was more to fascism than those two ogres. In the mid-1930s fascist movements cropped up in most advanced democracies. At one point it was sufficient to put on an adventurously coloured shirt (any colour as long as it’s not white) to start one. France had the Greenshirts, Ireland the Blueshirts, Britain the Blackshirts. Even tiny Iceland had its Greyshirts. America, being a big place that prizes consumer choice, had both Silvershirts and Khakishirts.

All these movements had a charismatic leader at their head. None had a coherent set of ideas. Early fascisms had more in common with socialism. Those movements that survived to form dictatorial governments embraced a corporatist sort of capitalism, and set about killing left-wingers. These fascist movements were propelled by the young; Trumpismo, by contrast, has more appeal to the elderly. Perhaps because of this they looked to the future and venerated modernity, whereas Mr Trump often seems to be trying to bring back the 1950s.

What does have a familiarly thirties ring to it is the combination of elite-rot and discredited ideas that Mr Trump feeds on. European elites looked unworthy of the description in the 1930s, after a war that had killed more people than any other before it but resolved nothing, followed by the biggest crisis ever faced by capitalism. In Latin America alone 16 countries suffered coups or takeovers by strongmen within a few years of 1929.

« Early fascist movements,” writes Robert Paxton in « The Anatomy of Fascism » (published 12 years before Mr Trump’s rise), “exploited the protests of the victims of rapid industrialisation and globalisation-modernisation’s losers, using, to be sure, the most modern styles and techniques of propaganda. » Their successors, in America and in Western Europe, where far-right parties are also flourishing, do the same. Like early fascisms, they have few ideas to speak of. Rather, they point out that the elites don’t know what they are doing and promise an alternative world of prosperity for all with no sacrifice necessary. Plenty of voters take this as plain-speaking.

The best way to refute the contemporary movements might be to ask them to govern. The experience of all those coloured shirts suggests that at that point they would then change into something different. It might be relatively benign: a movement built around a charismatic leader that sought to take the hard edges off economic change by ending immigration and discouraging trade. Or it might be something more like late-fascism, which only really existed in Italy and Germany.

I don’t think such a thing is possible in America or Western Europe now. The dislocations of the 1930s were on a completely different scale to the foreign- and domestic-policy failures of the past decade. Having suffered late-fascism once, the West has some immunity from it, because we know what it looks like. That said, I didn’t think Mr Trump would be the Republican nominee either. Interrogation
Interviews with a point.

Voir aussi:
Is Donald Trump a Fascist?
Yes and no.
Isaac Chotiner
Slate

Feb. 10 2016

Donald Trump’s overwhelming victory in Tuesday night’s New Hampshire primary makes him, according to both betting markets and many analysts, the favorite to win the Republican nomination. Trump has been written off as an entertainer and circus clown, but he has been tagged with another, much more serious label: fascist. Trump’s campaign has stirred bigoted feelings in the electorate and played to voters’ worst fears and prejudices. And so far, it’s working. Two-thirds of New Hampshire Republicans, according to exit polls, favored Trump’s ban on Muslim immigration.
Isaac Chotiner Isaac Chotiner

To discuss Trump’s rise and its historical echoes, I called Robert Paxton, a leading authority on the history of fascism. A regular contributor to the New York Review of Books and an expert on Vichy France, Paxton has written numerous books on European history. We discussed the ways in which Trump is and is not a fascist, whether Trump believes what he says, and why now, of all times, so many Americans seem to be embracing him. The conversation has been edited and condensed.

Isaac Chotiner: As a historian of fascism, what do you make of Trump’s rise?

Robert Paxton: Well, it’s astonishing and depressing because he’s totally foreign to any of the skills that are wanted in a president of the United States. What we call him is another matter. There are certainly some echoes of fascism, but there are also very profound differences.
Get Slate in your inbox.

Start with the echoes.

First of all, let me preface it by saying that I’m very, very reluctant to use the word fascism loosely, because it’s almost the most powerful epithet you can use. I guess child molester might be a little more powerful but not much.

Nazi maybe, but that’s just a version of fascism.

It’s the same thing. It’s enormously tempting. Anyway, the echoes you can deal with on two levels. First of all, there are the kinds of themes Trump uses. The use of ethnic stereotypes and exploitation of fear of foreigners is directly out of a fascist’s recipe book. “Making the country great again” sounds exactly like the fascist movements. Concern about national decline, that was one of the most prominent emotional states evoked in fascist discourse, and Trump is using that full-blast, quite illegitimately, because the country isn’t in serious decline, but he’s able to persuade them that it is. That is a fascist stroke. An aggressive foreign policy to arrest the supposed decline. That’s another one. Then, there’s a second level, which is a level of style and technique. He even looks like Mussolini in the way he sticks his lower jaw out, and also the bluster, the skill at sensing the mood of the crowd, the skillful use of media.

I read an absolutely astonishing account of Trump arriving for a political speech, somewhere out West I think, and his audience was gathered in an airplane hangar, and he landed his plane at the field and taxied up to the hangar and got out. That is exactly what they did in 1932 for Hitler’s first election victory. No one had ever seen a candidate arrive by plane before; it was absolutely dazzling, the impression given, the decisiveness of power, of authority, of modernity. I suppose it was accidental, but wow, that is an almost letter-perfect replay of a Hitler election tactic. And the capacity of Trump to enlist working-class voters against the left is exactly what Hitler and Mussolini were able to do. There are definitely echoes.

Do you think that Trump is consciously using fascist tropes, or do you think that he’s just sort of stumbled into this?

I doubt it’s conscious. I don’t think he’s a bookish man. I’m sure he’s never read a book about Hitler or Mussolini.

He’ll read your books after this interview.

Perhaps.

When people like you and me watch Trump, I think we tend to assume he is a bullshitter who doesn’t have deeply held positions and is acting to a degree.

Yeah.

I think a lot of people would say, Well, Hitler and Mussolini, they believed what they were doing. Fascists generally believe what they’re doing. In fascism, do you think that there was more bullshit and politicking than people assume?

Totally. One of the reasons I wrote my book was that I was so tired of people interpreting fascism as the application of a program. When you read Hitler’s program, his 21 points, when the party was founded in 1920, and when you read Mussolini’s first program in 1919, it had very little to do with what they eventually did. Mussolini, particularly, came from the left, and his first program included things like the vote for women, the abolition of a monarchy. It was more his style than the details of the program. The details of the program were constantly changing. They say whatever seems to suit the mood of the moment. Mein Kampf is taken as a model that [Hitler] carried out—well, in Mein Kampf, he wants to make peace with the British. They are full of inconsistencies, they were very opportunistic, totally opportunistic, and there was a high degree of change in their programs.

Tell me the ways in which you think Trump is not fascist.

I think there are some powerful differences. To start with, in the area of programs, the fascists offer themselves as a remedy for aggressive individualism, which they believed was the source of the defeat of Germany in World War I, and the decline of Italy, the failure of Italy. World War I, the perceived national decline, they blamed on individualism and their solution was to subject the individual to the interests of the community. Trump, and the Republicans generally, and indeed a great swath of American society have celebrated individualism to the absolute total extreme. Trump’s idea and the Republican plan is to lift the burden of regulation from businesses.

That’s fascinating. Anything else?

The other differences are the circumstances in which we live. Germany had been defeated catastrophically in war. Following which was the depression, which was almost as bad in Germany as it was here. Italy was on the brink of civil war in 1919. There were massive occupations of land by frustrated peasants. The actual problems those countries addressed have no parallel to today. We have serious problems, but there’s no objective conditions that come anywhere near the seriousness of what those countries were facing. There was a groundswell of reaction against the existing constitutions and existing regimes. That’s trumped up here; accidental pun, sorry.

Do you think there’s something about this moment in America that makes the country vulnerable to someone like Trump? Because as you noted, it’s hard to say that America is really in a horrible place.

No, this country has the strongest economy in the world and is still the strongest military power in the world without any close rival. The trends are not downward unless you were offended by the presence of a black man in the White House.

There are only millions of Americans that fit into that category.

I’m afraid so. The argument is very clear. Like the argument of Hitler and Mussolini that the existing government is weak, and therefore, we must have a government that is appropriate to the grandeur of America. The portrayal of Obama as weak, which is astonishing considering the degree to which Obama has used military power.

Nevertheless, a lot of people are left behind in the recovery. Poorly educated white males are left behind, and the country is not better for them, and there are enough of those people to make a huge difference. I don’t think there are enough of those people to elect a president, but they can make a powerful movement.

Again, I’m obviously not comparing Trump to Hitler as a person, but watching the “moderate” Republicans tear each other apart over the last few weeks and then split the vote five ways in New Hampshire last night, I thought of the 1932 election in Germany, with everyone kind of thinking, depending on their interests, that there were bigger threats than Hitler and not focusing on him until it was too late.

Trump understands what the classic demagogues of the 20th century understood: namely, that in a democracy it is possible to gain millions of votes by appealing to the worst in people.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :