Soft power: Vous avez dit nation de boutiquiers ? (How Britain became a soft power superpower)

unnamed1unnamed2 https://i0.wp.com/cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/original-size/images/2015/07/articles/body/20150718_woc000.png

Great Britain’s medal tally at the Summer Olympics
Gold  Silver Bronze
gbmedals riomedals britmedals rio-qui-paye-le-mieux-ses-athletes-web-tete-0211186866405 unnamed3 unnamed4 unnamed5 unnamed7 unnamed6 unnamed9Aller fonder un vaste empire dans la vue seulement de créer un peuple d’acheteurs et de chalands semble, au premier coup d’oeil, un projet qui ne pourrait convenir qu’à une nation de boutiquiers. C’est cependant un projet qui accomoderait extrêmement mal une nation toute composée de gens de boutique mais qui convient parfaitement bien à une nation dont le gouvernement est sous l’influence des boutiquiers. Adam Smith
L’ Angleterre est une nation de boutiquiers.
Napoléon
Les Anglais ont toujours quelque chose de nouveau que nous, on n’a pas ! Michaël D’Almeida
De l’Australie jusqu’à Trinidad et Tobago, le portrait de la reine Elisabeth II a orné les monnaies de 33 pays différents – plus que n’importe qui au monde. Le Canada fut le premier a utiliser l’image de la monarque britannique, en 1935, quand il a imprimé le portrait de la princesse, agée de 9 ans, sur son billet de 20 dollars. Au fil des années, 26 portraits d’Elisabeth II seront utilisés dans le Royaume-Uni et dans ses colonies, anciennes et actuelles et territoires – la plupart one été commandés dans le but express d’apparaitre sur des billets de banque. Toutefois, certains pays, comme la Rhodésie (aujourd’hui le Zimbabwe), Malte ou les Fidji, se sont servis de portraits déjà existants. La Reine est souvent montrée dans une attitude formelle, avec sa couronne et son spectre, bien que le Canada ou l’Australie préfère la représenter dans une simple robe et un collier de perles. Et alors que de nombreux pays mettent à jour leurs devises afin de refléter l’âge de la Reine, d’autres aiment la garder jeune. Lorsque le Belize a redessiné sa monnaie en 1980, il a choisi un portrait qui avait déjà 20 ans. Time
Un grand nombre de nations a conservé la reine comme chef d’Etat et elle est donc toujours représentée sur les billets de banques de nombreux pays. La Reine est présente sur les billets de 33 pays. Peter Symes
Of 31 sports, GB finished on the podium in 19 – a strike rate of just over 61%. That percentage is even better if you remove the six sports – basketball, football, handball, volleyball, water polo and wrestling – Britain were not represented in. Then it jumps to 76%. The United States won medals in 22 sports, including 16 swimming golds. In terms of golds, GB were way ahead of the pack, finishing with at least one in 15 sports, more than any other country, even the United States. GB dominated track cycling, winning six of 10 disciplines and collecting 11 medals in total, nine more than the Dutch and Germans in joint second. GB also topped the rowing table, with three golds – one more than Germany and New Zealand – and were third in gymnastics, behind the US and Russia. BBC
On July 14th an index of “soft power”—the ability to coax and persuade—ranked Britain as the mightiest country on Earth. If that was unexpected, there was another surprise in store at the foot of the 30-country index: China, four times as wealthy as Britain, 20 times as populous and 40 times as large, came dead last. (…) Britain scored highly in its “engagement” with the world, its citizens enjoying visa-free travel to 174 countries—the joint-highest of any nation—and its diplomats staffing the largest number of permanent missions to multilateral organisations, tied with France. Britain’s cultural power was also highly rated: though its tally of 29 UNESCO World Heritage sites is fairly ordinary, Britain produces more internationally chart-topping music albums than any other country, and the foreign following of its football is in a league of its own (even if its national teams are not). It did well in education, too—not because of its schools, which are fairly mediocre, but because its universities are second only to America’s, attracting vast numbers of foreign students.(…) Governance was the category that sank undemocratic China, whose last place was sealed by a section dedicated to digital soft-power—tricky to cultivate in a country that restricts access to the web. (…) But many of the assets that pushed Britain to the top of the soft-power table are in play. In the next couple of years the country faces a referendum on its membership of the EU; a slimmer role for the BBC, its prolific public broadcaster; and a continuing squeeze on immigration, which has already made its universities less attractive to foreign students. Much of Britain’s hard power was long ago given up. Its soft power endures—for now. The Economist
Although beaten to the top spot in this year’s index, the UK continues to boast significant advantages in its soft power resources. These include the significant role that continues to be played by both state-backed assets (i.e. BBC World Service, DfID, FCO and British Council) and private assets and global brands (e.g. Burberry and British Airways). Additionally, the British Council, institutions like the British Museum, and the UK’s higher education system are all pillars of British soft power. The UK’s rich civil society and charitable sector further contribute to British soft power. Major global organisations that contribute to development, disaster relief, and human rights reforms like Oxfam, Save the Children, and Amnesty International are key components in the UK’s overall ability to contribute to the global good – whether through the state, private citizens, or a network of diverse actors. The UK’s unique and enviable position at the heart of a number of important global networks and multi-lateral organisations continues to confer a significant soft power advantage. As a member of the G-7, G-20, UN Security Council, European Union, and the Commonwealth, Britain has a seat at virtually every international table of consequence. No other country rivals the UK’s diverse range of memberships in the world’s most influential organisations. In this context, a risk exists that the UK’s considerable soft power clout would be significantly diminished should it vote to leave the European Union. The soft power 30
The United States takes the top spot of the 2016 Soft Power 30, beating out last year’s first-place finisher, the United Kingdom. America topping the rankings this year is perhaps a strange juxtaposition to Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, currently threatening to tear up long-held, bi-partisan principles of American foreign policy – like ending the US’s stated commitment to nuclear non-proliferation. On the other hand, President Obama’s final year as Commander-in-Chief has been a busy one for diplomatic initiatives. The President managed to complete his long-sought Iran Nuclear Deal, made progress on negotiating free trade agreements with partners across the Oceans Atlantic and Pacific, and re-established diplomatic relations with Cuba after decades of trying to isolate the Communist Caribbean Island. These major soft power plays have paid dividends for perceptions of the US abroad, as it finished higher in the international polling this year, compared to 2015. Perhaps not dragged down as much by attitudes to its foreign policy, the US’s major pillars of soft power have been free to shine, as measured in our Digital, Education, and Culture sub-indices. The US is home to the biggest digital platforms in the world, including Facebook, Twitter, and WhatsApp, and the US State Department sets the global pace on digital diplomacy. Likewise, the US maintains its top ranking in the Culture and Education sub-indices this year. The US welcomed over 74 million international tourists last year, many of whom are attracted by America’s cultural outputs that are seemingly omnipresent around the globe. In terms of education, the US has more universities in the global top 200 than any other country in the world, which allows it to attract more international students than any other country – by some margin as well. (…) Home to many of the biggest tech brands in the world, the US is the global leader in digital technology and innovation. The Obama Administration and State Department developed the theory and practice of online-driven campaigning and ‘digital diplomacy’. The way the US has developed and leveraged digital diplomacy, gives the nation a significant soft power boost. (…) It’s not just foreign policy that can drag down the image of America. Regular news stories of police brutality, racial tension, gun violence, and a high homicide rate (compared to other developed countries) all remind the world that America has its faults on the home front too. Speaking of which, the forthcoming Presidential election will have leaders in a lot of world capitals nervous at prospect of a Trump presidency. The soft power 30
With nearly 84 million tourists arriving annually, France maintains the title of the world’s most visited country. Yet while the strength of its cultural assets – the Louvre, its cuisine, the Riviera – have helped it hold onto this title, the country remains vulnerable. In the last year, France made headlines for the horrific terror attacks that shook its capital. Since the beginning of his mandate, President François Hollande has struggled to revitalise the French economy. Unemployment has risen steadily, and businesses are weary of France’s seemingly over-regulated and overprotective market. Its “new-blood” Minister of the Economy, Emmanuel Macron, is labouring to shake things up. His newly announced political movement, En Marche! (Forward) hopes to break party lines and revive the Eurozone’s second largest economy. Only time can tell if the initiative will pay dividends. Until then, France can still count on its unequalled diplomatic prowess to safeguard its position near the top of the Soft Power 30. It remains a global diplomatic force, asserting its presence through one of the most extensive Embassy networks. (…) France’s soft power strengths lie in a unique blend of culture and diplomacy. It enjoys, for historic reasons, links to territories across the planet, making it the only nation with 12 time zones. Its network of cultural institutions, linguistic union “la Francophonie” and network of embassies allow it to engage like no other. Its top rank in the Engagement sub-index comes as no surprise. (…) France continues to struggle as a result of the global financial crisis and President Hollande’s failure to lift the nation’s economic competitiveness has delayed its full recovery. Germany’s economy, in comparison, makes France look in need of reform. The soft power 30
Le secret de la réussite made in Britain ? « C’est simple : l’argent », répond Steve Haake, le directeur du Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre à l’université de Sheffield Hallam. Depuis une vingtaine d’années, le Royaume-Uni a investi massivement dans le sport de haut niveau : 274 millions de livres (316 millions d’euros) rien que sur ces quatre dernières années pour les sports olympiques. C’est cinq fois plus qu’il y a vingt ans. Il faut remonter à l’humiliation des Jeux d’Atlanta en 1996 pour comprendre. Cette année-là, le pays termine 37e au tableau des médailles avec un seul titre olympique. Le premier ministre d’alors, John Major, décide d’intervenir. Ordre est donné d’investir dans le sport de haut niveau une large part de l’argent de la National Lottery, qui sert normalement à financer des actions caritatives ou culturelles. L’effet se fait sentir rapidement et le Royaume-Uni passe au dixième rang aux Jeux de Sydney en 2000. « Mais ça s’est vraiment accéléré en 2007, quand Londres a obtenu l’organisation des Jeux de 2012 », explique Steven Haake. Le financement a soudain triplé, avec une approche ultra-compétitive. Pas question de s’intéresser au développement du sport pour tous ou amateur. Chaque discipline financée reçoit un objectif chiffré de médailles olympiques. Les résultats sont immédiats : le Royaume-Uni finit quatrième à Pékin en 2008 (47 médailles) et troisième de « ses » Jeux, quatre ans plus tard, avec un record de 65 récompenses, dont 29 titres. Le système mis en place est ultra-élitiste. En cas d’échec d’une discipline, le financement est retiré. Ainsi, pour les Jeux de Londres, UK Sport, l’organisme qui supervise le haut niveau, finançait 27 sports différents. A une exception près, tous ceux qui n’ont pas eu de médaille ont vu leur enveloppe supprimée pour les quatre années suivantes. Le basket-ball, le handball, le volley-ball, l’haltérophilie masculine l’ont appris à leurs dépens… Seuls les résultats comptent. (…)« Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio » Pour les Jeux de Rio, le Royaume-Uni a maintenu son soutien financier, contrairement à beaucoup de nations, qui ont relâché leurs efforts une fois les Jeux organisés chez elles. Mais l’aide a été encore plus ciblée : seules vingt disciplines ont reçu de l’argent, alors que l’enveloppe totale a augmenté de 3 %. « C’est un système impitoyable, reconnaît Girish Ramchandani, également de l’université Sheffield Hallam, spécialiste du financement dans le sport. Mais ça marche. Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio. » (…) Cet argent qui coule à flots a permis aux athlètes de haut niveau de se concentrer uniquement sur leur sport. Les plus prometteurs touchent jusqu’à 28 000 livres (32 000 euros) par an, sans compter l’enveloppe que reçoit leur fédération pour payer les entraîneurs et les équipements. Qu’elle parait loin, l’époque où Daley Thompson, l’un des meilleurs décathloniens de tous les temps, devait rendre son survêtement aux couleurs britanniques après les Jeux de Los Angeles en 1984. Reste que l’argent n’explique pas tout. A Rio, nombre d’athlètes s’étonnent des succès britanniques et expriment des doutes quant à l’intégrité de certaines performances. Les prouesses de Mo Farah, qui a remporté la médaille d’or du 10 000 mètres, et espère décrocher celle du 5 000 mètres, dimanche 21 août, interrogent. Son entraîneur, Alberto Salazar, n’a-t-il pas été accusé lui-même de dopage par une enquête de la BBC, il y a un an ? La domination sans partage de l’équipe de cyclisme sur piste, avec douze médailles, dont six en or, fait aussi grincer des dents, alors que celle-ci avait été médiocre aux Championnats du monde organisés à Londres en mars. « Il faudrait demander la recette à nos voisins, car je n’arrive pas à comprendre. Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde. C’est la première fois que je vis les Jeux en tant qu’entraîneur et je vois des choses… », s’interrogeait Laurent Gané, l’entraîneur de l’équipe de France, après le bronze de ses hommes dans une épreuve de vitesse dont ils étaient les rois il n’y a encore pas si longtemps. Off the record, on évoque un autre type de dopage, technologique, avec des hypothèses comme un engrenage dans les roues. Un bruit de moteur qui avait aussi parcouru les routes du Tour de France, dominé par Chris Froome (troisième de l’épreuve sur route à Rio) ces dernières années. Pour Steve Haake, de l’université de Sheffield Hallam, ces doutes sont compréhensibles dans le climat de scandales de dopage permanent. Mais il estime que l’explication est plus prosaïque : « Les équipes britanniques se concentrent sur les Jeux olympiques, qui sont la clé de leur financement. Alors, c’est normal qu’elles n’impressionnent pas aux Championnats du monde, qui ne sont pas leur priorité. » Et surtout, il estime que le système actuel, avec des financements garantis sur une, voire deux olympiades, permet de travailler dans la durée. « Ce qu’il se passe actuellement ne va pas s’arrêter à Rio. » Il y a de fortes chances que les concurrents des Britanniques jalousent encore leurs performances aux Jeux de Tokyo en 2020. Le Monde
Avec 66 médailles (dont 27 en or !), la Grande-Bretagne s’est hissée avec brio à la deuxième place du classement général des Jeux olympiques, dimanche 21 août. Elle a ainsi surclassé la Chine et la Russie, qui jouent habituellement des coudes avec les Etats-Unis. Cette performance des Britanniques n’est pas une parfaite surprise. Quatrième en 2008 à Pékin puis troisième en 2012 à domicile, la Grande-Bretagne compte désormais parmi les meilleures nations olympiques. Mais comment ses athlètes, arrivés dixièmes à Athènes en 2004, ont-ils réussi cette folle ascension ? La débâcle des Jeux d’Atlanta, en 1996, a créé un électrochoc. Cette année-là, la Team GB termine 36e, avec une seule médaille d’or. Le Premier ministre conservateur, John Major, décide de mettre un terme à cette humiliation sportive. Désormais, le sport de haut niveau britannique est financé par la Loterie nationale, qui lui reverse une partie de ses profits. Le programme s’est intensifié progressivement, pour atteindre 75% du budget total du sport britannique. Cette enveloppe s’élève ainsi à plus de 400 millions d’euros pour la période 2013-2017, afin de préparer les Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de Rio (…) En plus de la grosse cagnotte de la loterie, UK Sport, l’organisme qui gère la Team GB, a fait un choix « brutal mais efficace », explique encore le Guardian. Les fonds sont attribués en fonction des résultats. Les sports qui gagnent touchent plus que les autres, ce qui explique pourquoi l’aviron et le cyclisme, qui ont rapporté chacun quatre médailles d’or en 2012, ont depuis reçu respectivement 37 et 35 millions d’euros. L’haltérophilie, en revanche, a reçu un peu moins de 2 millions, selon le budget présenté par UK Sport. Les Britanniques appellent cela la « no compromise culture » (culture de l’intransigeance). « Les millions investis dans le sport olympique et paralympique ont un seul objectif : gagner des médailles », explique le Guardian. UK Sport investit dans les sports « en fonction de leur potentiel podium lors des deux prochains Jeux ». Ces sommes ont permis de professionnaliser des athlètes, qui peuvent donc se consacrer entièrement à leur discipline, mais aussi leurs entraîneurs. L’argent a également été investi dans la recherche et les équipements de pointe, pour le cyclisme notamment, dans lequel le matériel est particulièrement important. Le bureau des chercheurs de la Fédération britannique de cyclisme a même un nom : le « Secret Squirrel Club », chargé de mettre au point les guidons moulés, les peintures ultra-fines et les casques aérodynamiques qui peuvent offrir aux pistards quelques centièmes de seconde d’avance. Ces équipements peuvent faire la différence, ne serait-ce qu’en en mettant plein la vue aux adversaires. En envoyant une délégation très étoffée (…) c’est tout de même mathématique. Davantage de compétiteurs, c’est davantage de chances de médailles, surtout pour les pays riches. (…) Message reçu à Londres, qui a envoyé 366 athlètes à Rio. C’est moins que les 542 sportifs présentés en 2012, mais la Team GB jouait alors à domicile, bénéficiant de qualifications automatiques. Ils étaient 313 à Pékin en 2008, 271 à Athènes en 2004, 310 à Sydney en 2000, et 300 à Atlanta en 1996. A l’exception des Jeux de Londres, donc, la délégation de Grande-Bretagne-Irlande du Nord – sa dénomination officielle – présentée à Rio est la plus importante depuis les Jeux olympiques de Barcelone en 1992 (371 athlètes). En préparant en priorité les JO La stratégie britannique est bien différente de celle des Français. Francetv sport la résume ainsi : « Contrairement à la France qui entend jouer toutes les compétitions [championnats du monde, championnats d’Europe, JO…] à fond, les Britanniques sont prêts à en sacrifier certaines (…) La méthode agace et suscite la jalousie, de la part des Français notamment, qui ont dominé le classement en 1996 et 2000, et dont le bilan est, cette année, famélique (une seule médaille, en bronze). L’entraîneur Laurent Gané semble surpris de voir les Britanniques survoler les épreuves sur piste. « Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde », s’étonne-t-il dans Le Monde. France infos

Vous avez dit nation de boutiquiers ?

Investissement massif issu de la loterie (400 millions), quasi-salarisation des athlètes (mais pas de primes individuelles),  mise exclusive et sans concession sur les seules disciplines gagnantes (35 millions d’euros pour le cyclisme,  1,5 million pour un tennis de table sans résultat), investissement dans la technologie de pointe et approche scientifique de la performance,  délégation très étoffée, priorité absolue aux JO (quitte à faire l’impasse sur les championnats du monde ou d’Europe) et concentration sur les sports les plus « payants »…

A l’heure où un pays à l’économie, la population et la superficie respectivement huit fois, cinq fois et 35 fois moindre fait quasiment jeu égal et avait même dépassé en influence ces deux dernières années la première puissance mondiale …

Et où avec l’auto-effacement  de ladite première puissance mondiale, le Moyen-Orient est à feu et à sang et une Russie et une Chine assoiffées de revanche menacent impunément les frontières de leurs voisins …

Comment ne pas voir l’ironie de la reprise et de la domination par l’ancienne puissance coloniale d’un concept (« sof power ») créé à l’origine par un Américain (Joseph Nye) en réponse à un historien britannique (Paul Kennedy) qui prédisait à la fin des années 80 l’inéluctabilité du déclin américain ?

Mais surtout le redoutable pragmatisme d’un pays qui il y a vingt ans ne finissait que 36e (pour une seule misérable médaille d’or) …

Et qui non content de laisser loin derrière (avec un avantage – excusez du peu – de pas moins de 18 médailles d’or !) une France au même poids démographique et économique …

Dépasse aujourd’hui en médailles la première population et la 2e puissance économique mondiales ?

Millions de la Loterie, choix drastiques et coups de chance : comment la Grande-Bretagne a raflé tant de médailles à RioLes Britanniques se sont hissés à la deuxième place du tableau des médailles, devant la Chine et la Russie. Mais comment ont-ils fait ?
Camille Caldini
France Tvinfos
21/08/2016Avec 66 médailles (dont 27 en or !), la Grande-Bretagne s’est hissée avec brio à la deuxième place du classement général des Jeux olympiques, dimanche 21 août. Elle a ainsi surclassé la Chine et la Russie, qui jouent habituellement des coudes avec les Etats-Unis. Cette performance des Britanniques n’est pas une parfaite surprise. Quatrième en 2008 à Pékin puis troisième en 2012 à domicile, la Grande-Bretagne compte désormais parmi les meilleures nations olympiques. Mais comment ses athlètes, arrivés dixièmes à Athènes en 2004, ont-ils réussi cette folle ascension ?En collectant des millions grâce à la Loterie
La débâcle des Jeux d’Atlanta, en 1996, a créé un électrochoc. Cette année-là, la Team GB termine 36e, avec une seule médaille d’or. Le Premier ministre conservateur, John Major, décide de mettre un terme à cette humiliation sportive. Désormais, le sport de haut niveau britannique est financé par la Loterie nationale, qui lui reverse une partie de ses profits.Le programme s’est intensifié progressivement, pour atteindre 75% du budget total du sport britannique. Cette enveloppe s’élève ainsi à plus de 400 millions d’euros pour la période 2013-2017, afin de préparer les Jeux olympiques et paralympiques de Rio, détaille le Guardian (en anglais). Les athlètes britanniques ont d’ailleurs été invités à dire tout le bien qu’ils pensaient de la Loterie nationale, « en insistant sur le lien entre l’achat d’un ticket et les chances de médailles », ajoute le quotidien.

En misant tout sur les gagnants

En plus de la grosse cagnotte de la loterie, UK Sport, l’organisme qui gère la Team GB, a fait un choix « brutal mais efficace », explique encore le Guardian. Les fonds sont attribués en fonction des résultats. Les sports qui gagnent touchent plus que les autres, ce qui explique pourquoi l’aviron et le cyclisme, qui ont rapporté chacun quatre médailles d’or en 2012, ont depuis reçu respectivement 37 et 35 millions d’euros. L’haltérophilie, en revanche, a reçu un peu moins de 2 millions, selon le budget présenté par UK Sport.

Les Britanniques appellent cela la « no compromise culture » (culture de l’intransigeance). « Les millions investis dans le sport olympique et paralympique ont un seul objectif : gagner des médailles », explique le Guardian. UK Sport investit dans les sports « en fonction de leur potentiel podium lors des deux prochains Jeux ».

En investissant dans la technologie de pointe

Ces sommes ont permis de professionnaliser des athlètes, qui peuvent donc se consacrer entièrement à leur discipline, mais aussi leurs entraîneurs. L’argent a également été investi dans la recherche et les équipements de pointe, pour le cyclisme notamment, dans lequel le matériel est particulièrement important. Le bureau des chercheurs de la Fédération britannique de cyclisme a même un nom : le « Secret Squirrel Club« , chargé de mettre au point les guidons moulés, les peintures ultra-fines et les casques aérodynamiques qui peuvent offrir aux pistards quelques centièmes de seconde d’avance.

Ces équipements peuvent faire la différence, ne serait-ce qu’en en mettant plein la vue aux adversaires. « Tout le monde regarde les vélos des autres », raconte en effet Laurent Gané, entraîneur de l’équipe de France de vitesse sur piste, au Monde. Et le relayeur Michaël D’Almeida le concède, dans le même quotidien : « Les Anglais ont toujours quelque chose de nouveau que nous, on n’a pas ! »

En envoyant une délégation très étoffée

La Chine le prouve à Rio, cela ne suffit pas. Mais c’est tout de même mathématique. Davantage de compétiteurs, c’est davantage de chances de médailles, surtout pour les pays riches. « Les pays les plus riches ont tendance à mieux réussir, non seulement parce qu’ils envoient davantage d’athlètes, mais aussi parce qu’ils sont mieux préparés », explique le journal canadien Toronto Star (article en anglais).

Message reçu à Londres, qui a envoyé 366 athlètes à Rio. C’est moins que les 542 sportifs présentés en 2012, mais la Team GB jouait alors à domicile, bénéficiant de qualifications automatiques. Ils étaient 313 à Pékin en 2008, 271 à Athènes en 2004, 310 à Sydney en 2000, et 300 à Atlanta en 1996. A l’exception des Jeux de Londres, donc, la délégation de Grande-Bretagne-Irlande du Nord – sa dénomination officielle – présentée à Rio est la plus importante depuis les Jeux olympiques de Barcelone en 1992 (371 athlètes).

En préparant en priorité les JO

La stratégie britannique est bien différente de celle des Français. Francetv sport la résume ainsi : « Contrairement à la France qui entend jouer toutes les compétitions [championnats du monde, championnats d’Europe, JO…] à fond, les Britanniques sont prêts à en sacrifier certaines (…) Et si le Royaume-Uni est aussi haut placé, c’est peut-être tout simplement grâce à cette stratégie du ‘tout pour les JO’. »  Cela semble payer. A Rio, le cyclisme a rapporté 12 médailles à la Team GB : 11 sur piste dont 6 en or, et une sur route. En 2008 et 2012, ils avaient déjà glané 8 médailles d’or.

La méthode agace et suscite la jalousie, de la part des Français notamment, qui ont dominé le classement en 1996 et 2000, et dont le bilan est, cette année, famélique (une seule médaille, en bronze). L’entraîneur Laurent Gané semble surpris de voir les Britanniques survoler les épreuves sur piste. « Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde », s’étonne-t-il dans Le Monde. De là aux soupçons de dopage ou de tricherie technologique, il n’y a qu’un petit pas, que le coach français s’est retenu de faire, s’interrompant au milieu d’une phrase : « C’est la première fois que je vis les Jeux en tant qu’entraîneur et je vois des choses… »

En profitant des exclusions russes et des ratés chinois

Il faut bien l’admettre, il y a aussi une petite part de chance dans le succès de la Team GB, qui peut remercier la Russie et la Chine.

En 2012, la Russie talonnait la Grande-Bretagne, avec ses 81 médailles dont 23 en or. Pour Rio, le scandale du dopage organisé par l’Etat a contraint Moscou a réduire sa délégation : seulement 271 athlètes au lieu de 389 et aucun athlète paralympique. Conséquence directe : le compteur de médailles d’or russe s’est arrêté à 17. En athlétisme en particulier, cette absence russe a été une bénédiction pour la Team GB, qui avait terminé quatrième en 2012, derrière les Américains, les Russes et les Jamaïcains.

Un autre géant a trébuché à Rio, laissant à la Grande-Bretagne une chance de se hisser sur le podium final : la Chine. Le bilan mitigé de ses athlètes a presque tourné à l’affaire d’Etat à Pékin. La Chine a multiplié les contre-performances, au badminton, au plongeon et en gymnastique, des disciplines où elle a pourtant l’habitude de s’illustrer. L’équipe chinoise de gymnastique quitte Rio sans aucune médaille d’or, du jamais-vu depuis les JO de Los Angeles en 1984.

Voir aussi:

JO 2016 : comment les Britanniques ont acheté leurs médailles
Eric Albert

Le Monde

20.08.2016

La BBC est passée en mode surchauffe depuis une semaine. Sa « Team GB » réussit des Jeux olympiques impressionnants, engrange médaille après médaille, et les commentateurs de la chaîne publique se perdent en superlatifs et en compliments.
Avec 67 médailles, dont 27 en or, le Royaume-Uni a pris une surprenante deuxième place au tableau des nations, derrière les Etats-Unis (105 breloques) et loin devant la France – même population, même poids économique –, septième avec neuf médailles d’or.

Le secret de la réussite made in Britain ? « C’est simple : l’argent », répond Steve Haake, le directeur du Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre à l’université de Sheffield Hallam. Depuis une vingtaine d’années, le Royaume-Uni a investi massivement dans le sport de haut niveau : 274 millions de livres (316 millions d’euros) rien que sur ces quatre dernières années pour les sports olympiques. C’est cinq fois plus qu’il y a vingt ans.

Système ultra-élitiste
Il faut remonter à l’humiliation des Jeux d’Atlanta en 1996 pour comprendre. Cette année-là, le pays termine 37e au tableau des médailles avec un seul titre olympique. Le premier ministre d’alors, John Major, décide d’intervenir. Ordre est donné d’investir dans le sport de haut niveau une large part de l’argent de la National Lottery, qui sert normalement à financer des actions caritatives ou culturelles. L’effet se fait sentir rapidement et le Royaume-Uni passe au dixième rang aux Jeux de Sydney en 2000.

« Mais ça s’est vraiment accéléré en 2007, quand Londres a obtenu l’organisation des Jeux de 2012 », explique Steven Haake. Le financement a soudain triplé, avec une approche ultra-compétitive. Pas question de s’intéresser au développement du sport pour tous ou amateur. Chaque discipline financée reçoit un objectif chiffré de médailles olympiques. Les résultats sont immédiats : le Royaume-Uni finit quatrième à Pékin en 2008 (47 médailles) et troisième de « ses » Jeux, quatre ans plus tard, avec un record de 65 récompenses, dont 29 titres.

Le système mis en place est ultra-élitiste. En cas d’échec d’une discipline, le financement est retiré. Ainsi, pour les Jeux de Londres, UK Sport, l’organisme qui supervise le haut niveau, finançait 27 sports différents. A une exception près, tous ceux qui n’ont pas eu de médaille ont vu leur enveloppe supprimée pour les quatre années suivantes. Le basket-ball, le handball, le volley-ball, l’haltérophilie masculine l’ont appris à leurs dépens… Seuls les résultats comptent. Le mythique fair-play britannique appartient au passé.

« Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio »
Pour les Jeux de Rio, le Royaume-Uni a maintenu son soutien financier, contrairement à beaucoup de nations, qui ont relâché leurs efforts une fois les Jeux organisés chez elles. Mais l’aide a été encore plus ciblée : seules vingt disciplines ont reçu de l’argent, alors que l’enveloppe totale a augmenté de 3 %. « C’est un système impitoyable, reconnaît Girish Ramchandani, également de l’université Sheffield Hallam, spécialiste du financement dans le sport. Mais ça marche. Le ratio de médailles par rapport au nombre de sports financés a augmenté, de 62 % à Londres à 80 % à Rio. »

L’équipe de plongeon britannique doit ainsi une fière chandelle à Tom Daley, médaillé de bronze à Londres. Grâce à ce succès sur le fil, la discipline a conservé son financement. Aujourd’hui, elle en récolte les fruits : à Rio, elle a déjà obtenu trois médailles, une de chaque couleur.

Cet argent qui coule à flots a permis aux athlètes de haut niveau de se concentrer uniquement sur leur sport. Les plus prometteurs touchent jusqu’à 28 000 livres (32 000 euros) par an, sans compter l’enveloppe que reçoit leur fédération pour payer les entraîneurs et les équipements. Qu’elle parait loin, l’époque où Daley Thompson, l’un des meilleurs décathloniens de tous les temps, devait rendre son survêtement aux couleurs britanniques après les Jeux de Los Angeles en 1984.

Scandales de dopage
Reste que l’argent n’explique pas tout. A Rio, nombre d’athlètes s’étonnent des succès britanniques et expriment des doutes quant à l’intégrité de certaines performances. Les prouesses de Mo Farah, qui a remporté la médaille d’or du 10 000 mètres, et espère décrocher celle du 5 000 mètres, dimanche 21 août, interrogent. Son entraîneur, Alberto Salazar, n’a-t-il pas été accusé lui-même de dopage par une enquête de la BBC, il y a un an ?

La domination sans partage de l’équipe de cyclisme sur piste, avec douze médailles, dont six en or, fait aussi grincer des dents, alors que celle-ci avait été médiocre aux Championnats du monde organisés à Londres en mars. « Il faudrait demander la recette à nos voisins, car je n’arrive pas à comprendre. Ce sont des équipes qui ne font rien d’extraordinaire pendant quatre ans et, arrivées aux Jeux, elles surclassent tout le monde. C’est la première fois que je vis les Jeux en tant qu’entraîneur et je vois des choses… », s’interrogeait Laurent Gané, l’entraîneur de l’équipe de France, après le bronze de ses hommes dans une épreuve de vitesse dont ils étaient les rois il n’y a encore pas si longtemps.

Off the record, on évoque un autre type de dopage, technologique, avec des hypothèses comme un engrenage dans les roues. Un bruit de moteur qui avait aussi parcouru les routes du Tour de France, dominé par Chris Froome (troisième de l’épreuve sur route à Rio) ces dernières années.

Pour Steve Haake, de l’université de Sheffield Hallam, ces doutes sont compréhensibles dans le climat de scandales de dopage permanent. Mais il estime que l’explication est plus prosaïque :

« Les équipes britanniques se concentrent sur les Jeux olympiques, qui sont la clé de leur financement. Alors, c’est normal qu’elles n’impressionnent pas aux Championnats du monde, qui ne sont pas leur priorité. »
Et surtout, il estime que le système actuel, avec des financements garantis sur une, voire deux olympiades, permet de travailler dans la durée. « Ce qu’il se passe actuellement ne va pas s’arrêter à Rio. » Il y a de fortes chances que les concurrents des Britanniques jalousent encore leurs performances aux Jeux de Tokyo en 2020.

Voir également:

Rio Olympics 2016: Team GB medal haul makes them a ‘superpower of sport’

Great Britain’s Olympic review

Great Britain is « one of the superpowers of Olympic sport » after its performance in Rio, according to UK Sport chief executive Liz Nicholl.

A total of 67 medals with 27 golds put Team GB second in the medal table – above China for the first time since it returned to the Games in 1984.

« It shows we are a force to be reckoned with in world sport, » Nicholl said.

Britain is the first country to improve on a home medal haul at the next Games, beating the 65 medals from London 2012.

They won gold medals across more sports than any other nation – 15 – and improved on their medal haul for the fifth consecutive Olympics.

The Queen offered her « warmest congratulations » for an « outstanding performance » in Rio, while the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry said the team were an « inspiration to us all, young and old ».

The money behind the medals

UK Sport is the body responsible for distributing funds from national government to Olympic sports.

Team GB’s 67 medals in Brazil cost an average of just over £4m per medal in lottery and exchequer funding over the past four years – a reported cost of £1.09 per year for each Briton.

Nicholl added: « Half of the investment that we’re putting into Rio success also feeds into Tokyo [2020 Olympics]. We’re very confident that we’ve got a system here that’s working and that’s quite exceptional around the world. »

Chief executive of British Gymnastics Jane Allen told BBC Radio 5 live: « You wouldn’t want to be in some of the other countries at the moment, who are examining themselves.

« UK Sport has made those sports that receive the funding be accountable for their results. This is the end result in Rio – the country should expect a return for their investment, it is incredible. »

« It’s tough to imagine a stronger performance, » said Bill Sweeney, chief executive of the BOA.

« When you get into the [Olympic] village there’s been a real collective team spirit around Team GB – you just got a sense that this was a team that wanted to do something really special. »

Britain had been set a target by UK Sport to make Rio its most successful ‘away’ Olympics by beating the 47 medals from Beijing in 2008, but Nicholl said there had been an « aspirational » aim to surpass the achievements of London 2012.

Sweeney said he « wasn’t surprised » by the extent of the success, but that beating China « wasn’t on the radar » before the Games.

« China are a massive nation, aren’t they? Goodness knows how much money they spend on it, » he said.

« To be able to beat them is absolutely fantastic.

Sweeney said it would be difficult for Britain to replicate their position in the medal table at Tokyo 2020, at which he predicted hosts Japan, China, Russia and Australia would all improve.

How has China reacted?

China did top one table in Rio – that of fourth-place finishes, according to data from Gracenote Sports.

They had 25, with the US next on 20 and Britain third on 16.

Gracenote head of analysis Simon Gleave said China’s decline in medals from London 2012 « has been primarily due to the sports of badminton, artistic gymnastics and swimming ».

China Daily said: « In contrast with China’s previous obsession with gold medals, the general public is learning to enjoy the sports themselves rather than focusing on the medal count. Winning gold medals does not mean everything anymore in China. »

Swimmer Fu Yuanhui’s enthusiasm at winning a bronze medal « took Chinese viewers by surprise », said Global Times. « They are used to their athletes focusing in interviews on their desire to win glory for the country. »

Many users of the Chinese social media site Weibo posted messages using the hashtag #ThisTimeTheChinaTeamAreGolden, saying their athletes were still « the best » irrespective of their placing in their events.

Voir encore:

Rio Olympics 2016: How did Team GB make history?

Tom Fordyce

BBC

22 August 2016

It has been an Olympic fiesta like never before for Britain: their best medal haul in 108 years, second in the medal table, the only host nation to go on to win more medals at the next Olympics.

Never before has a Briton won a diving gold. Never before has a Briton won a gymnastics gold. There have been champions across 15 different sports, a spread no other country can get close to touching.

It enabled Liz Nicholl, chief executive of UK Sport, the body responsible for distributing funds from national government to Olympic sports, to declare on the final day of competition in Rio that Britain was now a « sporting superpower ».

Only 20 years ago, GB were languishing 36th in the Atlanta Olympics medal table, their entire team securing only a single gold between them. This is the story of a remarkable transformation.

Biased judges or gracious defeat? What China thinks of GB going second
‘Superpower’ Team GB a ‘world force’

Money talks

As that nadir was being reached back in 1996, the most pivotal change of all had already taken place.

The advent of the National Lottery in 1994, and the decision of John Major’s struggling government to allocate significant streams of its revenue to elite Olympic sport, set in motion a funding spree unprecedented in British sport.

From just £5m per year before Atlanta, UK Sport’s spending leapt to £54m by Sydney 2000, where Britain won 28 medals to leap to 10th on the medal table. By the time of London 2012 – third in the medal table, 65 medals – that had climbed to £264m. Between 2013 and 2017, almost £350m in public funds will have been lavished on Olympic and Paralympic sports.

It has reinvigorated some sports and altered others beyond recognition.

Gymnastics, given nothing at all before Atlanta, received £5.9m for Sydney and £14.6m in the current cycle. In Rio, Max Whitlock won two gymnastics golds; his team-mates delivered another silver and three bronzes.

As a talented teenage swimmer, Adam Peaty relied on fundraising events laid on by family and friends to pay for his travel and training costs. That changed in 2012, when he was awarded a grant of £15,000 and his coach placed on an elite coaching programme. In Rio he became the first British male to win a swimming gold in 28 years.

There are ethical and economic debates raised by this maximum sum game. Team GB’s 67 medals won here in Brazil cost an average of £4,096,500 each in lottery and exchequer funding over the past four years.
Average cost of Games to each Briton
As determined by the Sport Industry Research Centre

At a time of austerity, that is profligate to some. To others, the average cost of this Olympic programme to each Briton – a reported £1.09 per year – represents extraordinary financial and emotional value. Joe Joyce’s super-heavyweight silver medal on Sunday was the 700th Olympic and Paralympic medal won by his nation since lottery funding came on tap.

« The funding is worth its weight in gold, » says Nicholl.

« It enables us to strategically plan for the next Games even before this one has started and makes sure we don’t lose any time. We can maintain the momentum of success for every athlete with medal potential through to the next Games. »

All in the detail

The idea of marginal gains has gone from novelty to cliche over the past three Olympic cycles, but three examples from Rio underline how essential to British success it remains.

In the build-up to these Olympics, a PhD student at the English Institute of Sport named Luke Gupta examined the sleep quality of more than 400 elite GB athletes, looking at the duration of their average sleep, issues around deprivation and then individual athletes’ perception of their sleep quality.

His findings resulted in an upgrading of the ‘sleep environment’ in the Team GB boxing training base in Sheffield – 37 single beds replaced by 33 double and four extra-long singles; sheets, duvets and pillows switched to breathable, quick drying fabrics; materials selected to create a hypo-allergenic barrier to allergens in each bedroom.

« On average, the boxers are sleeping for 24 minutes longer each night, » says former Olympic bronze medallist and now consultant coach Richie Woodhall.

« When you add it up over the course of a cycle it could be as much as 29 or 30 days’ extra sleep. That can be the difference between winning a medal or going out in the first round. »

In track cycling, GB physio Phil Burt and team doctor Richard Freeman realised saddle sores were keeping some female riders out of training.

Their response? To bring together a panel of experts – friction specialist, reconstructive surgeons, a consultant in vulval health – to advise on the waxing and shaving of pubic hair. In the six months before Rio not a single rider complained of saddle sores.

Then there is the lateral thinking of Danny Kerry, performance director to the Great Britain women’s hockey team that won gold in such spectacular fashion on Friday.

« Everyone puts a lot of time into the physiological effects of hockey, but what we’ve done in this Olympic cycle is put our players in an extremely fatigued state, and then ask them to think very hard at the same time, » Kerry told BBC Sport.

« We call that Thinking Thursday – forcing them to consistently make excellent decisions under that fatigue. We’ve done that every Thursday for a year. »

Britain won that gold on a penalty shootout, standing firm as their Dutch opponents, clear favourites for gold, missed every one of their four attempts.
Virtuous circles

Success has bred British success.

That hockey team featured Helen and Kate Richardson-Walsh, in their fifth Olympic cycle, mentoring 21-year-old Lily Owsley, who scored the first goal in the final. A squad that won bronze in London were ready to go two better in Brazil.

« We’ve retained eight players who had medals around their necks already, » says Kerry. « We added another eight who have no fear.

« It gave us a great combination of those who know what it’s all about, and those who have no concept at all of what it’s all about, and have just gone out and played in ruthless fashion.

« We get carried away with some of the hard science around sport, but there’s so much value in how you use characters and how you bring those qualities and traits to the fore. You see that on the pitch. Leverage on the human beings as much as the science. »

In the velodrome, experience and expertise is being recycled with each successive Games.

Paul Manning was part of the team pursuit quartet that won bronze in Sydney, silver in Athens and gold in Beijing. As his riding career came towards the end, he was one of the first to graduate through the Elite Coaching Apprenticeship Programme, a two-year scheme that offered an accelerated route into high-performance coaching for athletes already in British Cycling’s system.

In Rio he coached the women’s pursuit team to their second gold in two Olympics, his young charge Laura Trott also winning omnium gold for the second Games in a row.

Then there is Heiko Salzwedel, head of the men’s endurance squad, back for his third spell with British Cycling having worked under the visionary Peter Keen from 2000 to 2002 and then Sir Dave Brailsford between 2008 and 2010.

Expertise developed, expertise retained. A culture where winning is expected, not just hoped for.

« We have got the talent in this country and we know that we can recruit and keep the very best coaches, sports scientists and sports medics, » says Nicholl.

« It is now a system that provides the very best support for that talent. »

Competitive advantages

Funding has not flowed to all British sports equally, because in some there is a greater chance of success than others.

On Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, Britain’s rowers dominated the regatta, winning three gold medals and two silvers.

With 43 athletes they also had the biggest team of any nation there. Forty-nine of the nations there qualified teams of fewer than 10 athletes. Thirty-two had a team of just one or two rowers.

Only nine other nations won gold. In comparison, 204 nations were represented in track and field competition at Rio’s Estadio Olimpico, and 47 nations won medals.

British efforts in the velodrome, where for the third Olympics on the bounce they ruled the boards, were fuelled by a budget over the four years from London of £30.2m, up even from the £26m they received in funding up to 2012.

In comparison, the US track cycling team – which won team pursuit silver behind Britain’s women, and saw Sarah Hammer once again push Trott hard for omnium gold, has only one full-time staff member, director Andy Sparks.

Then there is the decline of other nations who once battled with Britain for the upper reaches of the medal table, and frequently sat far higher.

In 2012, Russia finished fourth with 22 golds. They were third in 2008 and third again in 2004.

This summer, despite escaping a total ban on their athletes in the wake of the World Anti-Doping Agency’s McLaren Report, they finished with 19 golds for fourth, permitted to enter only one track and field athlete, Darya Klishina.

Australia, Britain’s traditional great rivals? Eighth in 2012, sixth in Beijing, fourth in Athens, 10th here in Brazil.

In Rio, 129 different British athletes have won an Olympic medal.

It is a remarkable depth and breadth of talent – a Games where 58-year-old Nick Skelton won a gold and 16-year-old gymnast Amy Tinkler grabbed a bronze, a fortnight where Jason Kenny won his sixth gold at the age of 28 and Mo Farah won his ninth successive global track title.

The abilities of those men and women has been backed up by similar aptitude in coaching and support.

In swimming there is Rebecca Adlington’s former mentor, Bill Furniss, who has taken a programme that won just one silver and two bronzes in London and, with a no-compromise strategy, taken them to their best haul at an Olympics since 1908.

In cycling, there has been the key hire of New Zealand sprint specialist Justin Grace, the coach behind Francois Pervis’ domination at the World Championships, a critical influence on Kenny, Callum Skinner, Becky James and Katy Marchant.

« We have got the talent in this country, and we know we can recruit and keep the very best coaches, sports scientists and sports medics, » says Nicholl.

« It is a system that provides the very best support for that talent. We do a lot in terms of people development. We are conscious when people are recruited to key positions as coaches they are not necessarily the finished article in their broader skills.

« We provide support so that coaches across sports can network and learn from each other. That improves their knowledge expertise and the support systems they’ve got. »

It is an intimidating thought for Britain’s competitors. After two decades of consistent improvement, Rio may not even represent the peak.

Voir encore:

‘Brutal but effective’: why Team GB has won so many Olympic medals

Sports that have propelled Britain up the medal table have received extra investment while others have had their funding cut altogether
Josh Halliday

15 August 2016

In the past 24 hours Team GB have rewritten their Olympic history, moving ahead of China into second place in the Rio 2016 medals table after winning a record-breaking five gold medals in a single day.
Team GB’s Olympic success: five factors behind their Rio medal rush

With Olympic champions in tennis, golf, gymnastics and cycling – and another assured in sailing – the team’s directors hailed national lottery funding and the legacy of London 2012 for the Rio goldrush. So how has funding in British sport changed in the run-up to Super Sunday?

UK Sport, which determines how public funds raised via the national lottery and tax are allocated to elite-level sport, has pledged almost £350m to Olympic and Paralympic sports between 2013 and 2017, up 11% on the run-up to London 2012.

Those sports that have fuelled the rise in Britain’s medal-table positions over the past eight years – athletics, boxing and cycling, for example – were rewarded with increased investment. “It’s a brutal regime, but it’s as crude as it is effective,” said Dr Borja Garcia, a senior lecturer in sports management and policy at Loughborough University.

Sports that failed to hit their 2012 medal target – including crowd-pleasers such as wrestling, table tennis and volleyball – either had their funding reduced or cut altogether. Has that affected their prospects in Rio? It may be too soon to tell, but so far swimming is the only sport that has won medals at this Olympics after having it funding cut post-2012.

The aim is quite simple: to ensure Great Britain becomes the first home nation to deliver more medals at the following away Games. As it stands after day nine on Sunday, Team GB has one more medal than at the equivalent stage in London – their most successful ever Games.

Swimming

Spearheaded by the gold medal-winning Adam Peaty, Team GB has already secured its biggest Olympic medal haul in the pool since 1984, but it was one of the elite sports to have its funding slashed from £25.1m to £20.8m after a disappointing London 2012, when its three medals missed the target of between five and seven.

With six medals so far in Rio – one gold and five silvers – it has already passed its target of five for this Olympic Games. Its national governing body, British Swimming, will hope to be rewarded for this success with an increase in funding before Tokyo 2020.

UK Sport funding for medal-winning Olympians is assured, but some of the clubs where they spend long hours training are struggling to survive. Peaty’s City of Derby swimming club was almost forced to close last year when two pools in the city shut down for nearly three months, its chairman, Peter Spink, said.

“If we hadn’t got the focus of the council back on to swimming, things would have got a lot worse for us,” he said. “Worst case, closure could have happened. I don’t think I felt we got that close fortunately but unless we did something drastic and worked our way through it then, if not closed, we would have been a very much diminished club.”

Steve Layton, the club’s secretary, credited the local authority for fixing a roof at one pool and reopening another that had previously been closed, but added that it was only a matter of time before one of the “not fit for purpose” facilities was permanently closed down.

The club is trying to raise sponsorship money through partnerships with local companies, he said, but has so far been unable to raise enough money to pay for coaches rather than rely on volunteers. The ultimate aim is to raise enough investment for an Olympic-standard 50m pool in Derby, so that the Adam Peatys of tomorrow are not confined to the city’s 25m pools.

“Swimming is not like football. It doesn’t draw the crowds and we are in times of austerity. We understand all that, but we are trying to get sponsorship to give us some support,” Layton said.

The grand rhetoric of an Olympic legacy after London 2012 did not add up to much for cities such as Derby, but Spink said he was hopeful now of more investment in swimming following Team GB’s success in Rio. “The legacy of the London Olympics was always a big thing. We saw that a little bit, but of late that has dwindled a bit. The issues we have in Derby demonstrate that there really wasn’t the appetite either in local or national government to fund sport in that way,” he said.

Cycling
Along with a knighthood for Bradley Wiggins, an increase in funding followed Team GB’s cycling success in London 2012. Their final tally of 12 medals exceeded the target of between six and 10, resulting in a boost to British Cycling’s coffers from £26m to £30.2m.

In Rio, Team GB has secured six medals – four gold and two silver – and smashed two world records, with both the women’s and men’s team pursuit taking gold. It is well on the way to reaching its final Rio target of between eight and 10 medals.

Gymnastics
Max Whitlock competes in the men’s pommel horse event final.

Max Whitlock’s heroics in the Olympics arena on Super Sunday ended a 116-year wait for a British gymnastics Olympic champion.

His double gold also boosted Team GB’s medal count in the sport to four, with Louis Smith winning silver in the pommel horse and Bryony Page becoming the first British woman to win an Olympic trampoline medal by claiming silver in Rio.

Having previously lost all of its elite-level funding, British gymnastics has experienced a steady increase in public investment over the past 20 years, from £5.9m at Sydney 2000 to £14.6m in the current cycle, after it benefited from a 36% funding increase after beating its medal target in London 2012.
Funding for individual athletes
Advertisement

In addition to the funding given to each sport’s governing body, some elite stars – described by UK Sport as “podium-level athletes – also qualify for individual funding to help with living costs.

Medallists at the Olympic Games, senior world championships and Paralympics gold medallists can receive up to £28,000 a year in athlete performance awards funded by the national lottery.

Sportsmen and women who finish in the top eight in the Olympics can receive up to £21,500 a year. Future stars, those expected to win medals on the world or Olympic stage within four years, can get up to £15,000 a year.
Has it worked?

Most experts agree that UK Sports “no compromise” funding approach has underpinned Great Britain’s rise from 36th in the medal table in Atlanta in 1996 to third at London 2012.

“It’s a very rational, cold approach. Medals have gone up. British elite sport is certainly booming. The returns of medals per pound is there,” said Garcia.

Some critics, however, say UK Sport’s approach has gone too far and is damaging grassroots sport. They have argued that focusing disproportionately on sports such as cycling, sailing and rowing has meant those such as basketball risk withering because they were unable to demonstrate they would win a medal at either of the next two Olympics.
Advertisement

“We can ask all the philosophical questions, which are valid. What about basketball, which has a lot of social potential in the inner cities? What about volleyball? What about fencing? Why focus on specific sports?” said Garcia.

“Participation is going down. Why do we invest all this money in all those medals? Just to get the medals? To get people active? To make Great Britain’s name known around the world? With a cold analysis of the objectives and the money invested, yes it has worked.

“I have some sympathy for UK Sport as an organisation. They were given the objectives and they delivered.”

In May, Sport England, which focuses on grassroots sport, unveiled a four-year strategy to target inactivity. More than a quarter of the population is officially defined as inactive because they do less than 30 minutes of activity a week, including walking.

The move is a lurch away from the earlier strategy, which was set before London 2012 and focused on getting more people to play more sport with only mixed results.

Severe cuts to local authority budgets are also squeezing resources at the grassroots level. Councils across England have been forced to make cuts since 2010, when grant funding for local authorities was cut by a fifth, more than twice the level of cuts to the rest of the UK public sector
Jazz Carlin celebrates after winning silver in the women’s 800m freestyle final.

Jazz Carlin celebrates winning silver in the women’s 800m freestyle final. Photograph: Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

Many smaller, older swimming pools are being closed at a time when more people are being inspired to get in the water, thanks in part to Team GB medal winners Jazz Carlin, Siobhan-Marie O’Connor and Peaty.

The Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) said this weekend that there had been a huge jump in the number of people searching online for their nearest leisure pool during the first few days of the Games.
Advertisement

Alison Clowes, the ASA’s head of media, said 80,000 people had used its “poolfinder” app between 5 and 11 August – almost double the rate for the same period in July – and the ASA was getting dozens of phone inquiries too. “We’ve already seen a boost from our Olympic successes, which is great,” she said.

Meanwhile, the average level of swimming proficiency among schoolchildren requires improvement. ASA research shows that 52% of children leave school unable to swim 25 metres unaided.

Jennie Price, the chief executive of Sport England, said: “Watching our athletes achieving great things in Rio is truly inspirational, particularly for young people. Whether it encourages them to get more active, try something new or even strive for gold themselves one day, Team GB is making a massive contribution to sport back home.

“A relatively small number of sports feature regularly on prime-time TV, so for many the Olympic Games is the moment that catapults them onto the screens of the nation. We need to capitalise on that, for example with programmes like Backing the Best where Sport England supports young talented athletes at the beginning of their sporting careers.

“There will be new Max Whitlocks and Kath Graingers out there who Sport England will support through our funding of the talent system, but most won’t reach those heights. Our main aim is making sure all young people get a positive experience when they try a sport and whatever they choose to do, come away with the good basic skills and having had a great time.”

Soft power, hard power et smart power: le pouvoir selon Joseph Nye

Avec ce nouvel ouvrage, l’internationaliste américain poursuit sa réflexion sur la notion du pouvoir étatique au XXIe siècle. Après avoir défini le soft et le smart power, comment Joseph Nye voit-il le futur du pouvoir?

En Relations Internationales, rien n’exprime mieux le succès d’une théorie que sa reprise par la sphère politique. Au XXIe siècle, seuls deux exemples ont atteint cet état: le choc des civilisations de Samuel Huntington et le soft power de Joseph Nye. Deux théories américaines, reprises par des administrations américaines. Deux théories qui, de même, ont d’abord été commentées dans les cercles internationalistes, avant de s’ouvrir aux sphères politiques et médiatiques.

Le soft power comme réponse au déclinisme

Joseph Nye, sous-secrétaire d’Etat sous l’administration Carter, puis secrétaire adjoint à la Défense sous celle de Bill Clinton, avance la notion de soft power dès 1990 dans son ouvrage Bound to Lead. Depuis, il ne cesse de l’affiner, en particulier en 2004 avec Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics. Initialement, le soft power, tel que pensé par Nye, est une réponse à l’historien britannique Paul Kennedy qui, en 1987, avance que le déclin américain est inéluctable[1]. Pour Nye, la thèse de Kennedy est erronée ne serait-ce que pour une raison conceptuelle: le pouvoir, en cette fin du XXe siècle, a muté. Et il ne peut être analysé de la même manière aujourd’hui qu’en 1500, date choisie par Robert Kennedy comme point de départ de sa réflexion. En forçant le trait, on pourrait dire que l’Etat qui aligne le plus de divisions blindées ou de têtes nucléaires n’est pas forcément le plus puissant. Aucun déclin donc pour le penseur américain, mais plus simplement un changement de paradigme.

Ce basculement de la notion de puissance est rendu possible grâce au concept même de soft power. Le soft, par définition, s’oppose au hard, la force coercitive, militaire le plus généralement, mais aussi économique, qui comprend la détention de ressources naturelles. Le soft, lui, ne se mesure ni en « carottes » ni en « bâtons », pour reprendre une image chère à l’auteur. Stricto sensu, le soft power est la capacité d’un Etat à obtenir ce qu’il souhaite de la part d’un autre Etat sans que celui-ci n’en soit même conscient « Co-opt people rather than coerce them »[2].

Time to get smart ?

Face aux (très nombreuses) critiques, en particulier sur l’efficacité concrète du soft power, mais aussi sur son évaluation, Joseph Nye va faire le choix d’introduire un nouveau concept: le smart power. La puissance étatique ne peut être que soft ou que hard. Théoriquement, un Etat au soft power développé sans capacité de se défendre militairement au besoin ne peut être considéré comme puissant. Tout au plus influent, et encore dans des limites évidentes. A l’inverse, un Etat au hard power important pourra réussir des opérations militaires, éviter certains conflits ou imposer ses vues sur la scène internationale pour un temps, mais aura du mal à capitaliser politiquement sur ces «victoires». L’idéal selon Nye ? Assez logiquement, un (savant) mélange de soft et de hard. Du pouvoir « intelligent »: le smart power.

Avec son dernier ouvrage, The Future of Power, Joseph Nye ne révolutionne pas sa réflexion sur le pouvoir. On pourrait même dire qu’il se contente de la récapituler et de se livrer à un (intéressant) exercice de prospective… Dans une première partie, il exprime longuement sa vision du pouvoir dans les relations internationales (chapitre 1) et s’attache ensuite à différencier pouvoir militaire (chapitre 2), économique (chapitre 3) et, bien sûr, soft power (chapitre 4). La seconde partie de l’ouvrage porte quant à elle sur le futur du pouvoir (chapitre 5), en particulier à l’aune du «cyber» (internet, cyber war et cyber attaques étatiques ou provenant de la société civile, etc.). Dans son 6e chapitre, Joseph Nye en revient, une fois encore, à la question, obsédante, du déclin américain. La littérature qu’il a déjà rédigée sur le sujet ne lui semblant sûrement pas suffisante, Joseph Nye reprend donc son bâton de pèlerin pour nous expliquer que non, décidément, les Etats-Unis sont loin d’être en déclin.

Vers la fin des hégémonies

Et il n’y va pas par quatre chemins: la fin de l’hégémonie américaine ne signifie en rien l’abrupte déclin de cette grande puissance qui s’affaisserait sous propre poids, voire même chuterait brutalement. La fin de l’hégémonie des Etats-Unis est tout simplement celle du principe hégémonique, même s’il reste mal défini. Il n’y aura plus de Rome, c’est un fait. Cette disparation de ce principe structurant des relations internationales est la conséquence de la revitalisation de la sphère internationale qui a fait émerger de nouveaux pôles de puissance concurrents des Etats-Unis. De puissants Etats commencent désormais à faire entendre leur voix sur la scène mondiale, à l’image du Brésil, du Nigeria ou encore de la Corée du sud, quand d’autres continuent leur marche forcée vers la puissance comme la Chine, le Japon et l’Inde. Malgré cette multipolarité, le statut prééminent des Etats-Unis n’est pas en danger. Pour Joseph Nye, un déclassement sur l’échiquier n’est même pas une possibilité envisageable et les différentes théories du déclin américain nous apprendraient davantage sur la psychologie collective que sur des faits tangibles à venir. «Un brin de pessimisme est simplement très américain»[3] ose même ironiser l’auteur.

Même la Chine ne semble pas, selon lui, en mesure d’inquiéter réellement les Etats-Unis. L’Empire du milieu ne s’édifiera pas en puissance hégémonique, à l’instar des immenses empires des siècles passés. Selon lui, la raison principale en est la compétition asiatique interne, principalement avec le Japon. Ainsi, « une Asie unie n’est pas un challenger plausible pour détrôner les Etats-Unis »[4] affirme-t-ilLes intérêts chinois et japonais, s’ils se recoupent finalement entre les ennemis intimes, ne dépasseront pas les antagonismes historiques entre les deux pays et la Chine ne pourra projeter l’intégralité de sa puissance sur le Pacifique, laissant ainsi une marge de manœuvre aux Etats-Unis.

Cette réflexion ne prend cependant pas en compte la dimension involontaire d’une union, par exemple culturelle à travers les cycles d’influence mis en place par la culture mondialisée[5]. Enfin, la Chine devra composer avec d’autres puissances galopantes, telle l’Inde. Et tous ces facteurs ne permettront pas à la Chine, selon Joseph Nye, d’assurer une transition hégémonique à son profit. Elle défiera les Etats-Unis sur le Pacifique, mais ne pourra prétendre porter l’opposition sur la scène internationale.

De la stratégie de puissance au XXIe siècle

Si la fin des alternances hégémoniques, et tout simplement de l’hégémonie, devrait s’affirmer comme une constante nouvelle des relations internationales, le XXIe siècle ne modifiera pas complètement la donne en termes des ressources et formes de la puissance. La fin du XXe siècle a déjà montré la pluralité de ses formes, comme avec le développement considérable du soft power via la culture mondialisée, et les ressources, exceptées énergétiques, sont pour la plupart connues. Désormais, une grande puissance sera de plus en plus définie comme telle par la bonne utilisation, et non la simple possession, de ses ressources et vecteurs d’influence. En effet, «trop de puissance, en termes de ressources, peut être une malédiction plus qu’un bénéfice, si cela mène à une confiance excessive et des stratégies inappropriées de conversion de la puissance».[6]

De là naît la nécessité pour les Etats, et principalement les Etats-Unis, de définir une véritable stratégie de puissance, de smart power. En effet, un Etat ne doit pas faire le choix d’une puissance, mais celui de la puissance dans sa globalité, sous tous ses aspects et englobant l’intégralité de ses vecteurs. Ce choix de maîtriser sa puissance n’exclue pas le recours aux autres nations. L’heure est à la coopération, voire à la copétition, et non plus au raid solitaire sur la sphère internationale. Même les Etats-Unis ne pourront plus projeter pleinement leur puissance sans maîtriser les organisations internationales et régionales, ni même sans recourir aux alliances bilatérales ou multilatérales. Ils sont voués à montrer l’exemple en assurant l’articulation politique de la multipolarité. Pour ce faire, les Etats-Unis devront aller de l’avant en conservant une cohésion nationale, malgré les déboires de la guerre en Irak, et en améliorant le niveau de vie de leur population, notamment par la réduction de la mortalité infantile. Cohésion et niveau de vie sont respectivement vus par l’auteur comme les garants d’un hard et d’un soft power durables. A contrario, l’immigration, décriée par différents observateurs comme une faiblesse américaine, serait une chance pour l’auteur car elle est permettrait à la fois une mixité culturelle et la propagation de l’american dream auprès des populations démunies du monde entier.

En face, la Chine, malgré sa forte population, n’a pas la chance d’avoir de multiples cultures qui s’influencent les unes les autres pour soutenir son influence culturelle. Le soft power américain, lui, a une capacité de renouvellement inhérente à l’immigration de populations, tout en s’appuyant sur «[des] valeurs [qui] sont une part intrinsèque de la politique étrangère américaine»[7].

Ces valeurs serviront notamment à convaincre les « Musulmans mondialisés » («Mainstream Muslims») de se ranger du côté de la démocratie, plutôt que d’Etats islamistes. De même, malgré les crises économiques et les ralentissements, l’économie américaine, si elle ne sert pas de modèle, devra rester stable au niveau de sa production, de l’essor de l’esprit d’entreprise et surtout améliorer la redistribution des richesses sur le territoire. Ces enjeux amèneront «les Etats-Unis [à]redécouvrir comment être une puissance intelligente»(p.234).

Le futur du pouvoir selon Joseph Nye

L’ouvrage de Joseph Nye, s’il apporte des éléments nouveaux dans la définition contemporaine de la puissance, permet également d’entrevoir le point de vue d’un Américain -et pas n’importe lequel…- sur le futur des relations internationales. L’auteur a conscience que:

«Le XXIe siècle débute avec une distribution très inégale [et bien évidemment favorable aux Etats-Unis] des ressources de la puissance»[8]

Pour autant, il se montre critique envers la volonté permanente de contrôle du géant américain. Certes, les forces armées et l’économie restent une nécessité pour la projection du hard power, mais l’époque est à l’influence. Et cette influence, si elle est en partie culturelle, s’avère être aussi politique et multilatérale. Le soft power prend du temps dans sa mise-en-œuvre, notamment lorsqu’il touche aux valeurs politiques, telle la démocratie. Ce temps long est gage de réussite, pour Joseph Nye, à l’inverse des tentatives d’imposition par Georges Bush Junior, qui n’avait pas compris que  les nobles causes peuvent avoir de terribles conséquences.

Dans cette quête pour la démocratisation et le partage des valeurs américaines, la coopération interétatique jouera un rôle central. Pour lui, les Etats-Unis sont non seulement un acteur majeur, mais ont surtout une responsabilité directe dans le développement du monde. La puissance doit, en effet, permettre de lutter pour ses intérêts, tout en relevant les grands défis du XXIe siècle communs à tous, comme la gestion de l’islam politique et la prévention des catastrophes économiques, sanitaires et écologiques. Les Etats-Unis vont ainsi demeurer le coeur du système international et, Joseph Nye d’ajouter:

«penser la transition de puissance au XXIe siècle comme la conséquence d’un déclin des Etats-unis est inexact et trompeur […] L’Amérique n’est pas en absolu déclin, et est vouée à rester plus puissant que n’importe quel autre Etat dans les décennies à venir»[9]

Comment dès lors résumer le futur des relations internationales selon Joseph Nye? Les Etats-Unis ne déclineront pas, la Chine ne les dépassera pas, des Etats s’affirmeront sur la scène mondiale et le XXIe siècle apportera son lot d’enjeux sans pour autant mettre à mal le statut central des Etats-Unis dans la coopération internationale. Dès lors, à en croire l’auteur, le futur de la puissance ne serait-il pas déjà derrière nous?

1 — Naissance et déclin des grandes puissances, Payot, 1989

2 — Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics, Public Affairs, 2004, p. 5

3 — « A strand of cultural pessimism is simply very American » (p.156)

4 — « an allied Asia is not a plausible candidate to be the challenger that displaces the United-States » (p.166)

5 — Fregonese, Pierre-William, La hallyu coréenne ou l’opportunité d’un soft power asiatique, La Nouvelle Revue Géopolitique, n.122, août 2013

6 — « too much power (in terms of resources) can be a curse, rather than a benefit, if it leads to overconfidence and inappropriate strategies for power conversion » (p.207)

7 —« values are an intrinsic part of American foreign policy » (p.218)

8 — « The twenty-firt century began with a very unequal distribution of power resources » (p.157)

9 — « describing power transition in the twenty-first century as an issue of American decline is inaccurate and misleading […] America is not in absolute decline, and it is likely to remain more powerful than any single state in the coming decades ». (p.203)

 Voir aussi:

Power

Softly does it

The awesome influence of Oxbridge, One Direction and the Premier League

The Economist

Jul 18th 2015

HOW many rankings of global power have put Britain at the top and China at the bottom? Not many, at least this century. But on July 14th an index of “soft power”—the ability to coax and persuade—ranked Britain as the mightiest country on Earth. If that was unexpected, there was another surprise in store at the foot of the 30-country index: China, four times as wealthy as Britain, 20 times as populous and 40 times as large, came dead last.

Diplomats in Beijing won’t lose too much sleep over the index, compiled by Portland, a London-based PR firm, together with Facebook, which provided data on governments’ online impact, and ComRes, which ran opinion polls on international attitudes to different countries. But the ranking gathered some useful data showing where Britain still has outsized global clout.

Britain scored highly in its “engagement” with the world, its citizens enjoying visa-free travel to 174 countries—the joint-highest of any nation—and its diplomats staffing the largest number of permanent missions to multilateral organisations, tied with France. Britain’s cultural power was also highly rated: though its tally of 29 UNESCO World Heritage sites is fairly ordinary, Britain produces more internationally chart-topping music albums than any other country, and the foreign following of its football is in a league of its own (even if its national teams are not). It did well in education, too—not because of its schools, which are fairly mediocre, but because its universities are second only to America’s, attracting vast numbers of foreign students.

Britain fared least well on enterprise, mainly because it spends a feeble 1.7% of GDP on research and development (South Korea, which came top, spends 4%). And the quality of its governance was deemed ordinary, partly because of a gender gap that is wider than that of most developed countries, as measured by the UN. Governance was the category that sank undemocratic China, whose last place was sealed by a section dedicated to digital soft-power—tricky to cultivate in a country that restricts access to the web. The political star of social media, according to the index, is Narendra Modi, India’s prime minister, whose Facebook page generates twice as many comments, shares and thumbs-ups as that of Barack Obama.

The index will cheer up Britain’s government, which has lately been accused of withdrawing from the world. But many of the assets that pushed Britain to the top of the soft-power table are in play. In the next couple of years the country faces a referendum on its membership of the EU; a slimmer role for the BBC, its prolific public broadcaster; and a continuing squeeze on immigration, which has already made its universities less attractive to foreign students. Much of Britain’s hard power was long ago given up. Its soft power endures—for now.

Voir également:

The U.S. Jumps to the Top of the World’s ‘Soft Power’ Index

Fortune

June 14, 2016

In an interview on Fox News on Monday, Donald Trump suggested that President Barack Obama was either weak, dumb, or nefarious, saying, “Look, we’re led by a man that either is not tough, not smart, or he’s got something else in mind.”

But President Obama’s work over the last eight years to reposition the U.S. as more diplomatic and less belligerent seems to be paying some dividends, at least according to a survey released today by the London PR firm Portland in partnership with Facebook.

In the Soft Power 30 report, an annual ranking of countries on their ability to achieve objectives through attraction and persuasion instead of coercion, the U.S. leapfrogged the U.K. and Germany to claim the top spot, while Canada, under its popular and photogenic new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, jumped France to claim fourth place.

Based on a theory of global political power developed by Joseph Nye, a Harvard political science professor, the survey uses both polling and digital data to rank countries on more than 75 metrics gathered under the three pillars of soft power: political values, culture, and foreign policy.

According to survey author Jonathan McClory, the U.S.’s jump to the top spot had a lot to do with the fact that President Obama’s last year as Commander-in-Chief was “a busy one for diplomatic initiatives.”

“The President managed to complete his long-sought Iran Nuclear Deal, made progress on negotiating free trade agreements with partners across the Oceans Atlantic and Pacific, and re-established diplomatic relations with Cuba after decades of trying to isolate the Communist Caribbean Island. These major soft power plays have paid dividends for perceptions of the U.S. abroad,” the author wrote.

The report also praised U.S. contributions in the digital world, via Facebook FB 0.81% , Twitter TWTR 0.11% , and the like, and the fact that it has more universities in the global top 200 than any other country.

The report did admit that U.S.’s rise was a bit odd, though, at least under current circumstances.

“America topping the rankings this year is perhaps a strange juxtaposition to Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, currently threatening to tear up long-held, bi-partisan principles of American foreign policy—like ending the U.S.’s stated commitment to nuclear non-proliferation,” the author wrote.

The U.K.’s slip from the top spot seemed to have more to do with U.S. strength than its own weakness. “The U.K. continues to boast significant advantages in its soft power resources,” the report notes. Indeed, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron cited last year’s No. 1 ranking in the report as proof of his country’s international influence, the Financial Times reports.

But, the survey adds, Brexit could have devastating effects: “No other country rivals the U.K.’s diverse range of memberships in the world’s most influential organisations. In this context, a risk exists that the U.K.’s considerable soft power clout would be significantly diminished should it vote to leave the European Union.”

The ranking includes several surprising countries, like Russia (27th place). “With its annual military parades and occasional encroachments into European air and naval space, soft power might not spring to mind when thinking about the Russian Federation,” McClory writes. But, the report notes, Russia’s investment in the global, multilingual TV channel RT, as well as its diplomatic work in Syria, seem to be paying dividends.

Argentina climbed onto the list in the 30th and final spot, spurred by optimism that new, reform-minded President Mauricio Macri would further integrate it into the global diplomatic community. It was the only Latin American country other than Brazil to make the list.

 

It’s All About the Elizabeths

TIME

From Australia to Trinidad and Tobago, Queen Elizabeth II’s portrait has graced the currencies of 33 different countries — more than that of any other individual. Canada was the first to use the British monarch’s image, in 1935, when it printed the 9-year-old Princess on its $20 notes. Over the years, 26 different portraits of Elizabeth have been used in the U.K. and its current and former colonies, dominions and territories — most of which were commissioned with the direct purpose of putting them on banknotes. However, some countries, such as Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), Malta and Fiji, used already existing portraits. The Queen is frequently shown in formal crown-and-scepter attire, although Canada and Australia prefer to depict her in a plain dress and pearls. And while many countries update their currencies to reflect the Queen’s advancing age, others enjoy keeping her young. When Belize redesigned its currency in 1980, it selected a portrait that was already 20 years old.

Voir de même:

The Portraits of Queen Elizabeth II
… as they appear on World Banknotes
Elizabeth Alexandra Mary of the House of Windsor has been Queen of the United Kingdom since 1952, when she succeeded her father, King George VI, to the throne. Queen Elizabeth II, as the head of the Commonwealth of Nations, is also Head of State to many countries in the Commonwealth. Although She remains Head of State to many countries, over the years many member nations of the Commonwealth have adopted constitutions whereby The Queen is no longer Head of State.

Queen Elizabeth’s portrait undoubtedly appeared more often on the banknotes of Great Britain’s colonies, prior to the colonies gaining independence and the use of her portrait is not as common as it once was. However, there are a number of nations who retain her as Head of State and she is still portrayed on the banknotes of numerous countries. The Queen has been depicted on the banknotes of thirty-three issuing authorities, as well as on an essay prepared for Zambia. The countries and issuing authorities that have used portraits of The Queen are (in alphabetical order):Australia
Bahamas
Belize
Bermuda
British Caribbean Territories
British Honduras
Canada
Cayman Islands
Ceylon
Cyprus
East African Currency Board
East Caribbean States
Falkland Islands
Fiji
Gibraltar
Great Britain (Bank of England)
Guernsey
Hong Kong
Isle of Man
Jamaica
Jersey
Malaya and North Borneo
Malta
Mauritius
New Zealand
Rhodesia and Nyasaland
Rhodesia
Saint Helena
Scotland (Royal Bank of Scotland)
Seychelles
Solomon Islands
Southern Rhodesia
Trinidad and Tobago
Zambia (essay only)

Arguably, there is some duplication in this list, depending on how it is viewed. Should British Honduras and Belize be counted as one issuing authority? If not, then perhaps Belize should be broken into ‘Government of Belize’, ‘Monetary Authority of Belize’ and ‘Central Bank of Belize’. Similar arguments can be made for the amalgamation of British Caribbean Territories and the East Caribbean States, or for splitting Southern Rhodesia into ‘Southern Rhodesia Currency Board’ and ‘Central Africa Currency Board’. Such decisions can be made by collectors for their own reference, but this list of countries should satisfy most collectors.

In total, there have been twenty-six portraits used on the various banknotes bearing the likeness of Queen Elizabeth. This study identifies the twenty-six individual portraits that have been used and also identifies the numerous varieties of the engravings, which are based on the portraits. The varieties of portraits on the banknotes are due, in the main, to different engravers, but there are some varieties due to different photographs from a photographic session being selected by different printers or issuing authorities.

The list that follows this commentary identifies the twenty-six portraits, the photographer or artist responsible for the portrait (where possible), and the date the portrait was executed. Portraits used on the banknotes come from one of several sources. Most are official photographs that are distributed regularly by Buckingham Palace for use in the media and in public places. Some of the portraits have been especially commissioned, usually by the issuing authority, although, in the case of the two paintings adapted for use on the notes (Portraits 9 and 19), it was not the issuing authority that commissioned the paintings. In the case of the portraits used by the Bank of England, a number of the portraits have been drawn by artists without specific reference to any single portrait.

It is interesting to observe that many portraits of Her Majesty have been used some years after they were originally executed. There is often a delay in presenting a portrait on a banknote that is to be issued to the public, because of the time required to produce a note from the design stage. Therefore, it is unusual to see a portrait appear on a banknote in less than two years after the original portrait was executed.

However, some portraits are introduced onto banknotes many years after they were taken. Portrait 9, which is based on the famous painting by Pietro Annigoni, was completed in 1955 but did not appear on a banknote until 1961. The last countries to introduce this portrait to their notes were the Seychelles and Fiji, who placed the portrait on their 1968 issues. Similarly, Portrait 17 was taken at the time of Her Majesty’s Silver Jubilee in 1977 and made its first appearance on the notes of New Zealand in 1981, but it was only introduced to the notes of the Cayman Islands in 1991. Perhaps the longest delay in using a portrait belongs to Belize. Portrait 13 was taken in 1960 and first used on the New Zealand banknotes in 1967, which is in itself a reasonable delay. Belize introduced the image to its banknotes in 1980, some twenty years after the portrait was taken.

Apart from the portrait of Queen Elizabeth as a young girl on the Canadian 20-dollar notes of 1935, the earliest portrait used on the banknotes is Portrait 6, which appears on the Canadian notes issued in 1954. The portrait used for the Canadian notes was taken in 1951 when Elizabeth was yet to accede to the throne. Undoubtedly there was a touch of nationalism is the choice of the portrait, as the photographer, Yousuf Karsh, was a Canadian. Karsh was born in Turkish Armenia but found himself working in Quebec at the age of sixteen for his uncle, who was a portrait photographer. Karsh became one of the great portrait photographers of the twentieth century and took numerous photographs of The Queen, although this is his only portrait of Her Majesty to appear on a banknote.

Portrait 6 is particularly famous because the original engraving of The Queen, which appeared on the 1954 Canadian issues, showed a ‘devil’s head’ in her hair. After causing some embarrassment to the Bank of Canada, the image was re-engraved and the notes reprinted. Notes with the modified portrait appeared from 1955.

While there have been some very famous photographers to have taken The Queen’s portrait, Dorothy Wilding is the photographer to have taken most portraits for use on world banknotes. Wilding had been a court photographer for King George VI and many of the images of the King that can be found on banknotes, coins and postage stamps throughout the Commonwealth were copied from her photographs. On the accession of Queen Elizabeth, Wilding was granted the same duty by the new monarch. Shortly after Elizabeth became Queen many photographs of the new monarch were taken by Wilding. These photographs were required for images that could be used on coins, stamps, banknotes and for official portraits that could be hung in offices and public places.

In her autobiography, In Pursuit of Perfection, Wilding says of the images she created:
‘Of all the stamps of Queen Elizabeth II reproduced from my photographs, I think the two most outstanding are the one-cent North Borneo, and our own little everyday 2½d. It is interesting to see that the Group of Fiji Islanders have chosen to use for some of their stamps the head taken from the full length portrait of Annigoni … and for the others, one of my standard portraits which have been commonly used throughout the Colonial stamp issue of the present reign.’
From her description of the postage stamps, it is possible that Wilding was unaware her images were also being used on banknotes. The image on the North Borneo stamp, preferred by Wilding, is very similar to Portrait 3 but taken at a slightly different angle. The image on the English 2½d stamp is similarly akin to Portrait 4.

Anthony Buckley was another prolific photographer of The Queen, and his work is well represented in the engravings of Her Majesty on the banknotes. An English photographer, most of Buckley’s portraits were taken in the 1960s and 1970s. His work has also been adapted for use on numerous postage stamps throughout the world.

One of the interesting aspects to the portraits of Queen Elizabeth, which appear on world banknotes, is the style of portrait chosen by each issuing authority. How does each issuing authority wish to portray The Queen? Some of the portraits are formal, showing The Queen as a regal person, and some show her in relatively informal dress. While most issuing authorities have chosen to show The Queen in formal attire, the Bank of Canada has always shown The Queen without any formal regalia and always without a tiara. It has been suggested that this may be due to a desire to appease the French elements of Canada.

Australia originally opted to show Her Majesty in formal attire. Portrait 5 shows a profile of The Queen wearing the State Diadem and Portrait 12 shows Her Majesty in the Regalia of the Order of the Garter. When preparations were being made to commission a portrait for the introduction of decimal currency into Australia, the Chairman of the Currency Note Design Group advised that, for the illustration of The Queen (Portrait 12), the ‘General effect [is] to be regal, rather than « domestic » …’ However, the most recent portrait used on Australian banknotes (Portrait 21) shows The Queen in informal attire, perhaps even displaying a touch of ‘domesticity’. This is possibly a reflection of changing attitudes to the monarchy in Australia.

While Canada and Australia may opt to use informal images of The Queen, most issuing authorities continue to depict Her Majesty regally. In many portraits she is depicted wearing the Regalia of the Order of the Garter. In other portraits she is often dressed formally, wearing Her Royal Family Orders. In most portraits she is wearing some of her famous jewellery. In the following descriptions of the portraits, various tiaras, diadems, necklaces and jewellery worn by Her Majesty are described, although not all items have been identified.

Of interest, in the following descriptions, are the differences observed in the same portraits engraved by different security printers. In several instances the same portrait has been use by different security printers and the rendition of the portrait is noticeably variant for the notes prepared by the different companies. Portrait 4 gives a good example of the different renditions of the Dorothy Wilding portrait by Bradbury Wilkinson, Thomas De La Rue, Waterlow and Sons, and Harrisons.

Another example can be seen in Portrait 16, which is used on banknotes issued by Canada and the Solomon Islands. In the engraving used by the Solomon Islands, prepared by Thomas De La Rue, The Queen looks severe, but on the Canadian notes prepared by the British American Bank Note Company and by the Canadian Bank Note Company there is a suggestion of a smile. The Canadian notes achieve the difference by including a subtle shaded area on Her Majesty’s left cheek, just to the right of her mouth.

While there have been thirty-three issuing authorities to have prepared banknotes bearing The Queen’s portrait (excluding the Zambian essay), Fiji has used the most number of portraits, being six in total. Three issuing authorities have used five portraits: the Bank of England, Bermuda, and Canada.

The following list of portraits is ordered by the date on which the banknotes, on which the portraits appear, were first released into circulation, rather than the date on which the portraits were executed. Where the portrait was used by more than one issuing authority, the list of issuing authorities is ordered by the date on which the authority first used the portrait. Next to each issuing authority are the reference numbers from the Standard Catalog of World Paper Money (SCWPM, Volume 2, Ninth Edition and Volume 3, Eighth Edition) that indicate those notes of the issuing authority which bear the portrait.

Voir de plus:

Queen Elizabeth II has, of course, been pictured on British currency for much of her reign, but she has also appeared on the money of various British Commonwealth states and Crown dependencies. With such a long reign and so many nations issuing money with her image on it over the years, there are enough banknote portraits to construct a sort of aging timeline for the Queen. The age given below for each portrait is her age when the picture was made, which is not always the same as the year the banknote was issued (more information can be found at this interesting site maintained by international banknote expert Peter Symes). Here is Elizabeth through the years, on money.

1. Canada, 20 dollars, age 8

Navonanumis

She was just a princess then. Her picture appeared on Canadian banknotes long before anything issued by the Bank of England.

2. Canada, 1 dollar, age 25

Lithograving

From a portrait taken by a Canadian photographer the year before she ascended the throne.

3.  Jamaica, 1 pound, age 26

Numismondo

Newly queen.

4. Mauritius, 5 rupees, age 29

CollectionPpyowb

From a painting commissioned in the 1950s by the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers, for Fishmongers’ Hall in London.

5. Cayman Islands, 100 dollars, age 34

Downies

Here she’s wearing the Russian style Kokoshnik tiara.

6. Australia, 1 dollar, age 38

Leftover Currency

Not long after this portrait was taken, she would meet the Beatles.

7. St. Helena, 5 pounds, age 40

MeBankNotes

Perfecting the art of looking casual while wearing bling.

8. Isle of Man, 50 pounds, age 51

Leftover Currency

More bling for this portrait from her Silver Jubilee.

9. Jersey, 1 pound, age 52

Leftover Currency

Wisdom, experience, soulful eyes.

10. Australia 5 dollars, age 58

Currency Guide

The confidence to go casual.

11. New Zealand, 20 dollars, age 60

1kpmr.com

Not the most flattering one. The green tint doesn’t help.

12. Gibraltar, 50 pounds, age 66

Leftover Currency

Silver hair and shiny diamonds. From a photograph taken at Buckingham Palace.

13. Fiji, 5 dollars, age 73

BanknoteWorld

More silver hair, more shiny diamonds, and not so much smoothing of the wrinkles.

14. Jersey, 100 pounds, age 78

Downies

Face lined, eyes sparkly. She is looking right at you, and she looks good.

15. Canada, 20 dollars, age 85

GDC.net

Back to Canada, where it all began, and where they like their Queen a bit laid back.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :