Mal de dos : Attention, un mal peut en cacher un autre (Back pain: When your mind uses physical pain to protect you from psychic pain)

https://i0.wp.com/ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51yvtnNhYYL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/livingmaxwell.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/john-sarno-767x1024.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/www.macroeditions.com/data/prodotti/cop/galleria/big/g/guerir-le-mal-de-dos.jpgUn coeur joyeux est un bon remède, Mais un esprit abattu dessèche les os. Proverbes 17: 22
L’opprobre me brise le coeur et je suis malade. Psaumes 69: 21
La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
Plus d’un siècle après que Charcot a démontré que les hystériques n’étaient pas des simulateurs et que Freud a découvert l’inconscient, il nous est difficile d’accepter que nos souffrances puissent être à la fois réelles et sans cause matérielle. Georges Saline (responsable du département santé environnement de l’INVS)
Chacun a bien compris que « syndrome du bâtiment malsain » est la traduction politiquement correcte d’ »hystérie collective ». Le Monde
Musculoskeletal pain is very common. A review of prevalence studies indicated that in adult populations almost one fifth reported widespread pain, one third shoulder pain, and up to
one half reported low back pain in a 1-month period
(McBeth & Jones 2007)
Les muscles sont riches en terminaisons nerveuses, et lorsque le cerveau «en situation de stress», transmet trop d’informations aux nerfs, ils se trouvent alors saturés. Le muscle va y répondre par une crispation, une contraction musculaire, qui peut être la cause d’une douleur locale ou d’une douleur projetée. Et l’état de stress chronique favorise les poussées inflammatoires sur les articulations par la libération dans le sang de substances inflammatoires. Il suffit d’avoir un peu d’arthrose et d’être stressé pour que les articulations se mettent à exprimer une souffrance. Dr Gilles Mondoloni
We have incredible healing mechanisms that have evolved over millions of years. No matter how severe, injuries heal. Continuing pain is always the signal that TMS has begun. Consider that a fracture of the largest bone in the body, the femur (thigh bone), takes only six weeks to heal and will be stronger at the fracture site than it was before the break. Strong support that whiplash is part of TMS came to my attention in the Medical Science section of the New York Times from a piece published in the May 7, 1996, issue titled « In One Country, Chronic Whiplash Is Uncompensated (and Unknown). John E. Sarno
In a survey done in 1975 it was found that 88 per cent of patients with TMS had histories of up to five common mindbody disorders, including a variety of stomach symptoms, such as, heartburn, acid indigestion, gastritis and hiatal hernia; problems lower in the intestinal tract, such as spastic colon, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation; common allergic conditions, such as hay fever and asthma; a variety of skin disorders, such as ecema, acne, hives and psoriasis; tension or migraine headache; frequent urinary tract or respiratory infections; and dizziness or ringing in the ears. . . . » (…) Even when there are structural abnormalities found in the back and in arthritic joints, many with such pathology have no symptoms; others have pain symptoms disproportionate to the actual pathology of the normal aging process. Even after surgeries to correct these « abnormalities » the pain continues. (…) . . . insight oriented therapy is the choice for people with TMS or its equivalents. The therapists to whom I refer patients are trained to help them explore the unconscious and become aware of feelings that are buried there, usually because they are frightening, embarrassing or in some way unacceptable. These feelings, and the rage to which they often give rise, are responsible for the many mindbody symptoms I have described. When we become aware of these feelings, in some cases by gradually becoming able to feel them, the physical symptoms because unnecessary and go away. (…) . . . insight oriented therapy is the choice for people with TMS or its equivalents. The therapists to whom I refer patients are trained to help them explore the unconscious and become aware of feelings that are buried there, usually because they are frightening, embarrassing or in some way unacceptable. These feelings, and the rage to which they often give rise, are responsible for the many mindbody symptoms I have described. When we become aware of these feelings, in some cases by gradually becoming able to feel them, the physical symptoms because unnecessary and go away. John Sarno (…) The pain will not stop unless you are able to say, « I have a normal back; I now know that the pain is due to a basically harmless condition, initiated by my brain to serve a psychological purpose. (…) The brain tries desperately to divert our attention from rage in the unconscious. . . . So we must bring reason to the process! This is the heart of the very important concept. . . . (…) Remember, the purpose of the pain is to divert attention from what’s going on emotionally and to keep you focused on the body. (…) For some people simply shifting attention from the physical to the psychological will do the trick. Others need more information on how the strategy works, and still others require psychotherapy. John Sarno
Our results suggest that chronic symptoms were not usually caused by the car accident. Expectation of disability, a family history, and attribution of pre-existing symptoms to the trauma may be more important determinants for the evolution of the late whiplash syndrome. Dr. Harald Schrader et al
The study in Lithuania provides a healthy reminder to Western societies that a heavy price is paid when a culture of self-imposed victimhood and self-serving litigation develops. One part of that price appears in impersonal numbers: lost efficiency, soaring costs, unfair usurpation of health-care resources. But a far more tragic cost is personal: individuals shackled for years by their belief that inescapable pain rules their lives day after day. Christian Science Monitor
I’ve seen patients 25 years down the road still having problems. The condition can become chronic, he said, when people alter their posture to relieve the pain of injured tendons and muscles. « They begin to compensate. and these compensations also cause problems. Dr. Barry August (New York University Medical Center)
And then, in an instant, I started to cry. Not little tears, not sad, quiet oh-my-back-hurts-so-much tears, but the deepest, hardest tears I’ve ever cried. Out of control tears, anger, rage, desperate tears. And I heard myself saying things like, Please take care of me, I don’t ever want to have to come out from under the covers, I’m so afraid, please take care of me, don’t hurt me, I want to cut my wrists, please let me die, I have to run away, I feel sick-and on and on, I couldn’t stop and R–, bless him, just held me. And as I cried, and as I voiced these feelings, it was, literally, as if there was a channel, a pipeline, from my back and out through my eyes. I FELT the pain almost pour out as I cried. It was weird and strange and transfixing. I knew–really knew–that what I was feeling at that moment was what I felt as a child, when no one would or could take care of me, the scaredness, the grief, the loneliness, the shame, the horror. As I cried, I was that child again and I recognized the feelings I have felt all my life which I thought were crazy or at the very best, bizarre. Maybe I removed myself from my body and never even allowed myself to feel when I was young. But the feelings were there and they poured over me and out of me. TMS Patient
Dr. Sarno’s theory can be stated simply: Most muscular/ skeletal pain is usually the result of early infantile and childhood trauma which has been repressed. The emotion involved is invariably that of profound anger and rage. Our mind plays tricks and confuses us into focusing our attention on physical pain while the real problem is in our not facing and uncovering our repressed emotions, particular deep rage. Sarno’s thesis is quite different from Janov’s in that the cure to Sarno’s Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) is simply to come to realize that the origin of the pain is from the unconscious mind and not from any bodily abnormality. Janov’s primal theory, on the other hand, emphasizes that this insightful knowledge is not curative; that what is needed for cure is a full re-living of the original repressed trauma. The disorders which are encompassed by this syndrome include, low back and leg pain, most neck and shoulder pain, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. The author believes that anxiety and depression are both TMS equivalents. (…) The author surmises that the source of the pain in TMS is mild oxygen deprivation to the involved tissues and organ systems. At a very deep unconscious level repressed rage is the cause of the pain. Sarno takes issue with the medical profession since most physicians do not accept that the primary cause of many such chronic pain syndromes are psychological problems. Most physicians recognize that emotions play a role in such problems but are quick to find an inconsequential abnormality which they believe to be the cause of the TMS symptoms. (…) Unless the patient can become convinced that his back or neck is normal, the pain will continue. They must be reassured and then really come to believe that « . . . structural abnormalities that have been found on X ray, CT scan or MRI are normal changes associated with activity and aging. »  This newly acquired belief, Dr. Sarno writes, will thwart the strategy of the brain to make one become fixated on the body and instead begin to understand that the problem is an unfelt trauma stored in one’s unconscious. It is as though the mind fears the release of the repressed rage. To make the pain go away the patient must acknowledge and accept the true basis of the pain. Think psychologically and talk to your brain! This will divert attention from the body. Insight, knowledge, and understanding are the cures for the TMS symdrome. (…) This was a patient, who at first despite knowing and accepting the source of her back pain, did not improve. Instead, the author writes, this patient’s pain became worse. He believes that her symptoms were exacerbated in a desperate attempt by the body to prevent their being released into consciousness — into her knowing their actual source. « The feelings would not be denied expression, » he wrote, « and when they exploded into consciousness the pain disappeared. It no longer had a purpose; it had failed in its mission. » (…) It is the unconscious repressed rage which is the source of the chronic pain, not the anger and rage which is consciously known by the patient. (…) There is an inexorable press by the unconscious to release and reveal its past traumas. When the patient understands the repressed presence of rage the feelings will stop trying to become conscious and « removal of that threat eliminates the need for physical distraction, and the pain stops. » John A. Speyrer
Quand un patient arrive dans une consultation d’hopital, la routine est de faire un scanner IRM. Invariablement, on observe une quelconque anormalité anatomique comme un disque déplacé, une sténose spinale, ou de l’arthrite spinale. Alors le docteur déclare quelque chose comme : « C’est à cause du disque que vous avez mal » et dirige le patient vers la thérapie physiologique destinée à traiter le disque, avec de faibles résultats à long terme. En étudiant la littérature médicale, le Dr Sarno avait remarqué que si vous prenez une centaine de patients entre 40 et 60 ans ne présentant aucune douleur du dos et que vous leur faites passer un scanner IRM, dans 65% des cas vous constatez qu’il existe un disque déplacé ou une sténose spinale SANS douleur (New England Journal of Medicine, article 1994). Alors il s’est posé la question : « Si ce n’est pas le disque qui cause la douleur, alors c’est quoi ? » Il a découvert que les gens qui souffraient avaient des tensions chroniques et des spasmes musculaires dans le cou, le dos, les épaules ou les fessiers. Il affirme que lorsqu’un muscle est tendu de façon chronique, le sang ne peut pas circuler normalement à cet endroit ; il y a un manque d’oxygène et cela cause une douleur sévère. Vous pouvez aussi imaginer un muscle tendu enserrant un nerf et provoquant les symptômes de la sciatique. L’important ici, c’est que le Dr Sarno ne dit pas à ses patients que la douleur est dans leur tête. Il leur donne une véritable explication physiologique. Et nous allons bientôt voir la connexion logique avec les émotions. Le Dr Sarno s’est demandé : « Et d’abord, pourquoi est-ce que les gens ont les muscles tendus de façon chronique ? » Il a trouvé l’explication suivante. C’est que nombre de nos concitoyens grandissent dans des familles dans lesquelles ils apprennent, à un certain niveau (inconscient), que ce n’est pas bien d’exprimer sa colère ou sa peur. C’est un problème parce qu’en grandissant nous traversons des événements spécifiques ou des traumatismes qui suscitent la colère ou la peur. Et dès que ces émotions émergent dans le corps, notre inconscient dit en substance : « Ce n’est pas bien ni sécurisant de ressentir ces choses ». Alors, selon Sarno, l’inconscient provoque la crispation et le raidissement des muscles afin que la douleur nous détourne de ce qui nous met en colère ou nous fait peur. Quelquefois, ce processus de douleur peut continuer pendant des dizaines d’années. Dr Eric Robins

Attention: un mal peut en cacher un autre !

« Dorsalgies », « lombalgies », « lumbago », « mal de reins », « tour de rein », « sciatiques » …

Alors qu’en ce meilleur des mondes où les bébés se vendent désormais sur catalogue

Et où même les bâtiments tombent malades …

Nos thérapeutes et nos médias multiplient, sur fond de victimisation devenue folle, les appellations et les spécialités médicales comme les thérapies et les formules pharmacologiques censées y remédier …

Comment ne pas s’étonner de l’étrange consensus autour de cette quasi-épidémie qu’il est devenu normal d’appeler mal du siècle ?

Et du tout autant singulier silence sur les travaux du Dr Sarno (seulement traduit en français l’an dernier) …

Qui, remarquant le fréquent décalage entre les anormalités anatomiques et les douleurs ressenties ou la tendance desdites douleurs à se déplacer à mesure qu’elles étaient « guéries » ..

A depuis longtemps montré que nombre de nos douleurs physiques chroniques …

Ne sont souvent qu’une manière pour notre cerveau de nous détourner de douleurs psychiques plus profondes ou plus anciennes ?

Book Review: The Mindbody Prescription: Healing the Body, Healing the Pain by John E. Sarno, M.D. Warner Books, 1998, pp. 210

Reviewed by John A. Speyrer

I first learned of Dr. John E. Sarno when he was a guest on Larry King’s television show a few years ago. The author is professor of Clinical Rehabilitation Medicine at the New York University School of Medicine and an attending physician at the Howard A. Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine at New York University Medical Center. His theories seemed to be related to primal therapy so I had intended to eventually read what he had to say about the cause and cure of back ailments. Then recently while surfing the internet I ran across a website with book reviews of both Sarno’s book and Janov’s The Primal Scream. I thought that perhaps Sarno’s theories were closer related to Janov’s primal theory than I had originally surmised so I decided to read his book, The Mindbody Prescription.

Dr. Sarno’s theory can be stated simply: Most muscular/ skeletel pain is usually the result of early infantile and childhood trauma which has been repressed. The emotion involved is invariably that of profound anger and rage. Our mind plays tricks and confuses us into focusing our attention on physical pain while the real problem is in our not facing and uncovering our repressed emotions, particular deep rage. Sarno’s thesis is quite different from Janov’s in that the cure to Sarno’s Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) is simply to come to realize that the origin of the pain is from the unconscious mind and not from any bodily abnormality. Janov’s primal theory, on the other hand, emphasizes that this insightful knowledge is not curative; that what is needed for cure is a full re-living of the original repressed trauma.

The disorders which are encompassed by this syndrome include, low back and leg pain, most neck and shoulder pain, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. The author believes that anxiety and depression are both TMS equivalents.

Dr. Sarno writes:

« In a survey done in 1975 it was found that 88 per cent of patients with TMS had histories of up to five common mindbody disorders, including a variety of stomach symptoms, such as, heartburn, acid indigestion, gastritis and hiatal hernia; problems lower in the intestinal tract, such as spastic colon, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation; common allergic conditions, such as hay fever and asthma; a variety of skin disorders, such as ecema, acne, hives and psoriasis; tension or migraine headache; frequent urinary tract or respiratory infections; and dizziness or ringing in the ears. . . . » p. 29
Even when there are structural abnormalities found in the back and in arthritic joints, many with such pathology have no symptoms; others have pain symptoms disproportionate to the actual pathology of the normal aging process. Even after surgeries to correct these « abnormalities » the pain continues.

The author surmises that the source of the pain in TMS is mild oxygen deprivation to the involved tissues and organ systems. At a very deep unconscious level repressed rage is the cause of the pain. Sarno takes issue with the medical profession since most physicians do not accept that the primary cause of many such chronic pain syndromes are psychological problems. Most physicians recognize that emotions play a role in such problems but are quick to find an inconsequential abnormality which they believe to be the cause of the TMS symptoms.

If the cause of the pain is oftentimes repressed rage, what is the role of psychotherapy in the elimination of the chronic pains of TMS? After giving his patient a physical exam to eliminate any gross physical abnormality from consideration, Dr. Sarno primarily uses education to explain the operation and power of repressed feelings. He believes that the pain, weakness, stiffness, burning pressure and numbness caused by a reduced a blood flow causes no permanent damage to the tissues.

Unless the patient can become convinced that his back or neck is normal, the pain will continue. They must be reassured and then really come to believe that « . . . structural abnormalities that have been found on X ray, CT scan or MRI are normal changes associated with activity and aging. »

This newly acquired belief, Dr. Sarno writes, will thwart the strategy of the brain to make one become fixated on the body and instead begin to understand that the problem is an unfelt trauma stored in one’s unconscious. It is as though the mind fears the release of the repressed rage. To make the pain go away the patient must acknowledge and accept the true basis of the pain. Think psychologically and talk to your brain! This will divert attention from the body. Insight, knowledge, and understanding are the cures for the TMS symdrome.

Psychotherapy is rarely used. Dr. Sarno explains its role:

« . . . insight oriented therapy is the choice for people with TMS or its equivalents. The therapists to whom I refer patients are trained to help them explore the unconscious and become aware of feelings that are buried there, usually because they are frightening, embarrassing or in some way unacceptable. These feelings, and the rage to which they often give rise, are responsible for the many mindbody symptoms I have described. When we become aware of these feelings, in some cases by gradually becoming able to feel them, the physical symptoms because unnecessary and go away. » p. 161
On page 13 one of his patients described what seems to have been a primal regression encouraged by her husband’s support: »And then, in an instant, I started to cry. Not little tears, not sad, quiet oh-my-back-hurts-so-much tears, but the deepest, hardest tears I’ve ever cried. Out of control tears, anger, rage, desperate tears. And I heard myself saying things like, Please take care of me, I don’t ever want to have to come out from under the covers, I’m so afraid, please take care of me, don’t hurt me, I want to cut my wrists, please let me die, I have to run away, I feel sick-and on and on, I couldn’t stop and R–, bless him, just held me. And as I cried, and as I voiced these feelings, it was, literally, as if there was a channel, a pipeline, from my back and out through my eyes. I FELT the pain almost pour out as I cried. It was weird and strange and transfixing. I knew–really knew–that what I was feeling at that moment was what I felt as a child, when no one would or could take care of me, the scaredness, the grief, the loneliness, the shame, the horror. As I cried, I was that child again and I recognized the feelings I have felt all my life which I thought were crazy or at the very best, bizarre. Maybe I removed myself from my body and never even allowed myself to feel when I was young. But the feelings were there and they poured over me and out of me. »
This was a patient, who at first despite knowing and accepting the source of her back pain, did not improve. Instead, the author writes, this patient’s pain became worse. He believes that her symptoms were exacerbated in a desperate attempt by the body to prevent their being released into consciousness — into her knowing their actual source. « The feelings would not be denied expression, » he wrote, « and when they exploded into consciousness the pain disappeared. It no longer had a purpose; it had failed in its mission. » (The author’s emphasis.) It is the unconscious repressed rage which is the source of the chronic pain, not the anger and rage which is consciously known by the patient.

There is an inexorable press by the unconscious to release and reveal its past traumas. When the patient understands the repressed presence of rage the feelings will stop trying to become conscious and « removal of that threat eliminates the need for physical distraction, and the pain stops. »

Sarno claims the rate of « cure » is between 90 and 95 per cent and yet his practice is comprised mostly of sufferers who have gone to him as a last resort — those who have been suffering for decades. He has treated over 10,000 patients and will only accept a patient who he believes can accept the psychological explanation as the cause of their distress. Being convinced and coming to believe that the pain has its origins in repressed feelings is essential for the treatment to be successful. This is a maxim of the treatment and is repeated throughout the book. It is not a form of denial of the existence of the pain but only an affirmation and acceptance of its true origin.

Dr. Sarno writes that one must accept the emotional explanation in order to get well.

« Increasingly, we discussed the pain with the patient, where it came from and why it would go away once the psychological poison was revealed. » p. 105
« He (the patient) understood and accepted the principle of psychological causation as applicable to his symptoms — and he got better. » p. 111
« In many cases merely acknowledging that a symptom may be emotional in origin is enough to stop it. » p. 113.
« I would tell patients their backaches were induced by stress and tension, and if they were open to that idea, they got better. » p. 113
« The pain will not stop unless you are able to say, « I have a normal back; I now know that the pain is due to a basically harmless condition, initiated by my brain to serve a psychological purpose. . . . » p. 142
« The brain tries desperately to divert our attention from rage in the unconscious. . . . So we must bring reason to the process! This is the heart of the very important concept. . . . » p. 144
« I tell my patients that they must consciously think about repressed rage and the reasons for it whenever they are aware of the pain. » p. 145
« Remember, the purpose of the pain is to divert attention from what’s going on emotionally and to keep you focused on the body. » p. 148
« For some people simply shifting attention from the physical to the psychological will do the trick. Others need more information on how the strategy works, and still others require psychotherapy. » p. 149
An extensive bibliography is contained in The Mindbody Prescription. Sections of the book include discussions of the the psychosomatic theories of Walter B. Canon, Heinz Kohut, Franz Alexander, Stanley Coen, Candace Pert, Sigmund Freud, Graeme Taylor, and others. A technical appendix with more indepth studies is included.

The author has also written:

Healing Back Pain: The Mind-Body Connection
Mind over Back Pain : A Radically New Approach to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Back Pain

Voir aussi:

Health
Pain Relief
When Back Pain Starts In Your Head
Is repressed anger causing your back pain?

Mike McGrath

Prevention.com

November 3, 2011
John Sarno, MD, thinks that virtually all lower back pain is caused not by structural abnormalities but by repressed rage.

He’s written three books about it, including The Mindbody Prescription. A professor of clinical rehabilitation medicine at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City, Dr. Sarno believes that to protect you from acting on—or being destroyed by—that rage, your unconscious mind distracts you from the anger by creating a socially acceptable malaise: lower back pain.

Noted integrative medicine specialist and Prevention advisor Andrew Weil, MD, is a big fan of Dr. Sarno’s theory. So are actress Anne Bancroft and ABC-TV correspondent John Stossel—three of the thousands who report that Dr. Sarno cured their back pain.

What is the cure? In a word, awareness. Accept that your brain is trying to protect you from the rage, and the pain will go away. How’s that for « instant »?

Dr. Sarno has coined the term TMS— »Tension Myositis Syndrome »—to describe this « psychophysiological » condition. The brain, he says, mildly oxygen-deprives our back muscles and certain nerves and tendons to distract us and prevent our repressed anger from lashing out.

He readily acknowledges that this diagnosis is controversial. In fact, he tells Prevention, « Most people won’t buy it. But my TMS patients who do accept it cure themselves. » John Stossel was a hard sell. « I tried chiropractic. I tried acupuncture. I tried every back chair and special pillow I could find, » he recalls. His back still hurt so much that he spent entire meetings stretched out on the floor. This went on for 15 years, until a colleague told him about Dr. Sarno.

Stossel, the kind of reporter who would normally try to debunk such a theory, says that « it sounded ridiculous » to him. « But my back really hurt, and my medical insurance paid for 80%. So I went to see him, read one of his books, and—except for some occasional twinges—got better immediately. »

But it didn’t last. « Six months later, the pain came back, and Dr. Sarno gave me a kind of ‘I told you so’ look. I hadn’t done one thing he had strongly suggested, which was to attend one of his seminars. So I went, got better again, and I’ve been virtually pain-free for 10 years. »

Are you at risk for rage-induced back pain? Dr. Sarno has found that people with certain personality traits are at higher risk for this back pain disorder, specifically intelligent, talented, compulsive perfectionists and those who tend to put the needs of others first.

Voir encore:

In One Country, Chronic Whiplash Is Uncompensated (and Unknown)
Denise Grady
The New York Times

May 7, 1996

In, Lithuania, rear-end collisions happen much as they do in the rest of the world. Cars crash, bumpers crumple and tempers flare. But drivers in cars that have been hit there do not seem to suffer the long-term complaints so common in other countries: the headaches or lingering neck pains that have come to be known as chronic whiplash, or whiplash syndrome.

Cars are no safer in Lithuania, and the average neck is not any stronger. The difference, a new study says, might be described as a matter of indemnity.

Drivers in Lithuania did not carry personal-injury insurance at the time of the study, and people there were not in the habit of suing one another. Most medical bills were paid by the government. And although some private insurance is now appearing, at the time there were no claims to be filed, no money to be won and nothing to be gained from a diagnosis of chronic whiplash. Most Lithuanians, in fact, had never heard of whiplash.

The circumstances in Lithuania are described in the current issue of The Lancet, a British medical journal, by a team of Norwegian researchers who conducted a study there. The results, they wrote, suggest that the chronic whiplash syndrome « has little validity. »

The study was prompted by « an explosion of chronic-whiplash cases in Norway, » said Dr. Harald Schrader, a neurologist at University Hospital in Trondheim. He explained: « We are topping the world list. In a country of 4.2 million, we have 70,000 people in a patients’ organization who feel they have chronic disability because of whiplash. People are claiming compensation for injuries from mechanical forces not more than you would get in daily life, from coughing, sneezing, running down the steps, plopping into a chair. And they are getting millions of kroner in compensation. It’s mass hysteria. »

Dr. Schrader said he and his colleagues had chosen Lithuania for a study of whiplash « because there is no awareness there about whiplash or potential disabling consequences, and no, or very seldom, insurance for personal injury. »

Without disclosing the purpose of the study, the researchers gave health questionnaires to 202 drivers whose cars had been struck from behind one to three years earlier. The accidents varied in severity; 11 percent of the cars had severe damage, and the rest had either mild or moderate damage.

The drivers were questioned about symptoms, and their answers were compared with the answers of a control group, made up of the same number of people, of similar ages and from the same town, who had not been in a car accident. The study found no difference between the two groups.

Thirty-five percent of the accident victims reported neck pain, but so did 33 percent of the controls. Similarly, 53 percent who had been in accidents had headaches, but so did 50 percent of the controls. The researchers concluded, « No one in the study group had disabling or persistent symptoms as a result of the car accident. »

Dr. Schrader said he and his colleagues had been astounded by the results. Even though they were skeptical about chronic whiplash, they had expected that a few genuine cases would turn up. But not one did, not even among the 16 percent of drivers who recalled having neck pain shortly after their accidents.

When the subjects were finally told the real purpose of the study, they were amazed to learn that anyone could think that an accident that had happened more than a year ago could still be causing health problems. Dr. Schrader recalled, « They said, ‘Headaches? Why don’t you ask me why after two years I still haven’t got the spare part for my bumper?’ « 

When the findings were publicized in Norway, Dr. Schrader said, the leader of the whiplash patients’ organization threatened to sue him. Questions were also raised about whether the research had been financed by the insurance industry. The answer is no, he said; the money came from his university.

Dr. Schrader said he did not doubt the existence of short-term whiplash injuries but did doubt the validity of chronic cases. His conclusions agree with those of a study, published a year ago in the journal Spine, that concluded that about 90 percent of whiplash injuries healed on their own in days or a few weeks and needed very little treatment.

But other injuries may persist, physicians say. « You can’t conclude from this small study that whiplash syndrome doesn’t exist, » said Dr. Paul McCormick, an associate professor of neurosurgery at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. « But the researchers are right on in questioning the prevalence. »

Dr. McCormick said that some patients sustained lasting, identifiable injuries from whiplash but that milder cases were hard to diagnose. « We don’t have objective criteria for those, » he said. « There’s no lab test. » Soft-tissue injuries do not show up clearly on X-rays or in M.R.I. scans. The diagnosis is based on symptoms reported by the patient, who may or may not be reliable. « We have to be careful as scientists and human beings not to see everyone as scheming and lying, » Dr. McCormick said.

Other specialists also say that some chronic whiplash cases are real. « I’ve seen patients 25 years down the road still having problems, » said Dr. Barry August, a dentist who is a director of the head and facial pain-management program at New York University Medical Center. The condition can become chronic, he said, when people alter their posture to relieve the pain of injured tendons and muscles. « They begin to compensate, » he said, « and these compensations also cause problems. »

Dr. August also questioned the methods in the Lancet study. Even though the people in the control group had not been in car accidents, they might have had other injuries, he said. « Falling down the stairs, slipping on the ice, can set off a whiplash injury, » he said, « and it can be longstanding. For controls, you’d need to look at people without any injuries, even in childhood. »

Whiplash is the bane of the insurance industry. From half to two-thirds of all the people who file injury claims from car accidents report back and neck sprains. Insurers say some of those claims are false, or exaggerated.

The National Insurance Crime Bureau estimates that $16 of every $100 paid out in auto injury claims is for fraudulent claims and that half of that amount is paid for « exaggerated soft-tissue claims, » which include whiplash. Phony medical claims cost the insurance industry billions of dollars; those expenses are passed on to the public and add from $100 to $130 to the price of each car-insurance policy, said Carolyn Gorman, a spokeswoman for the Insurance Information Institute in Washington.

« Whiplash is a claim that’s growing, » Ms. Gorman said. « But you can’t be glib and think everybody’s faking it. For someone who really has whiplash, it is painful and it can last a long time and cost a lot of money. But it’s hard to tell whether someone has it. You can’t prove it. »

Voir également:

Necessary Pain?
Christian ScienceMonitor

May 14, 1996

You might say personal-injury lawyers are feeling the lash of The Lancet.

In an era when a tiny slice of the American electorate – plaintiff’s lawyers – are vetoing legislation through massive political contributions and backstage lobbying, it’s of more than passing interest to see a rebuke from the scientific community.

This comes in the form of a study of whiplash published in the British medical journal, The Lancet.

A team of Norwegian researchers studied the cases of 202 Lithuanian drivers involved in rear-ended car accidents of varying seriousness. Those studied reported an incidence of neck and headache problems similar to that of a control group not involved in auto accidents. But in no case did any of the collision victims report the kind of persisting pain known in lawsuits as whiplash.

Almost no private auto insurance is available in Lithuania. And people generally haven’t heard of whiplash. So the researchers drew the undeniably logical conclusion that chronic whiplash exists only where people are mentally conditioned to expect and/or benefit financially from it. And also where the insurance and legal system provides a framework to nourish its supposed existence.

Not surprisingly, when the study results were announced, Dr. Harald Schrader, a hospital neurologist on the research team, was threatened with suit by the head of a whiplash-patients organization in Norway. (There are some 70,000 people in that organization who claim chronic disability.)

No one, of course, should suggest singling out the victims for blame. A whole system is geared to reinforce their belief in their continuing infirmity. That system includes well-intentioned lawmakers, fee-seeking lawyers, and busy (and sometimes unethical) health-care providers.

But the study in Lithuania provides a healthy reminder to Western societies that a heavy price is paid when a culture of self-imposed victimhood and self-serving litigation develops.

One part of that price appears in impersonal numbers: lost efficiency, soaring costs, unfair usurpation of health-care resources. But a far more tragic cost is personal: individuals shackled for years by their belief that inescapable pain rules their lives day after day. Instead of threatening suit, those people might spare a word of gratitude to Dr. Shrader and his colleagues. His team offers them the beginning of knowledge to set them free.

Voir enfin:EFT et le modèle de Sarno
Extrait d’un communiqué de presse présenté par le Dr Eric Robins, urologue californien.
http://www.emofree.com/Pain-management/pain-sarno-eric.htm

3 juillet 2008

Le Docteur John Sarno, professeur de médecine à l’Université de New York, voit quotidiennement des patients atteints des pires douleurs chroniques au monde. La plupart souffrent de douleurs graves (cou, dos, épaules, fessiers) depuis 10 à 30 ans, la plupart ont reçu de multiples injections épidurales, subi une ou plusieurs opérations chirurgicales et se sont soumis à des séances de kinésithérapie pendant des années. Tous ont été victimes de mécanismes d’action terribles (par exemple, passer sous un camion ou un boeing) et leurs radios ressemblent à celles d’Elephant Man : ils auraient donc de bonnes raisons de souffrir.
Avec cette cohorte de patients, Sarno obtient un pourcentage de guérison de 70% (à la fois pour la douleur et pour la fonctionnalité), ainsi qu’un taux supplémentaire de 15% de patients se sentant beaucoup mieux (avec 40 à 80% d’amélioration). Et il a eu ces résultats avec environ 12 000 patients.

Quand un patient arrive dans une consultation d’hopital, la routine est de faire un scanner IRM. Invariablement, on observe une quelconque anormalité anatomique comme un disque déplacé, une sténose spinale, ou de l’arthrite spinale. Alors le docteur déclare quelque chose comme : « C’est à cause du disque que vous avez mal » et dirige le patient vers la thérapie physiologique destinée à traiter le disque, avec de faibles résultats à long terme.

En étudiant la littérature médicale, le Dr Sarno avait remarqué que si vous prenez une centaine de patients entre 40 et 60 ans ne présentant aucune douleur du dos et que vous leur faites passer un scanner IRM, dans 65% des cas vous constatez qu’il existe un disque déplacé ou une sténose spinale SANS douleur (New England Journal of Medicine, article 1994). Alors il s’est posé la question : « Si ce n’est pas le disque qui cause la douleur, alors c’est quoi ? »
Il a découvert que les gens qui souffraient avaient des tensions chroniques et des spasmes musculaires dans le cou, le dos, les épaules ou les fessiers. Il affirme que lorsqu’un muscle est tendu de façon chronique, le sang ne peut pas circuler normalement à cet endroit ; il y a un manque d’oxygène et cela cause une douleur sévère. Vous pouvez aussi imaginer un muscle tendu enserrant un nerf et provoquant les symptômes de la sciatique.
L’important ici, c’est que le Dr Sarno ne dit pas à ses patients que la douleur est dans leur tête. Il leur donne une véritable explication physiologique. Et nous allons bientôt voir la connexion logique avec les émotions.

Le Dr Sarno s’est demandé : « Et d’abord, pourquoi est-ce que les gens ont les muscles tendus de façon chronique ? » Il a trouvé l’explication suivante. C’est que nombre de nos concitoyens grandissent dans des familles dans lesquelles ils apprennent, à un certain niveau (inconscient), que ce n’est pas bien d’exprimer sa colère ou sa peur.
C’est un problème parce qu’en grandissant nous traversons des événements spécifiques ou des traumatismes qui suscitent la colère ou la peur. Et dès que ces émotions émergent dans le corps, notre inconscient dit en substance : « Ce n’est pas bien ni sécurisant de ressentir ces choses ». Alors, selon Sarno, l’inconscient provoque la crispation et le raidissement des muscles afin que la douleur nous détourne de ce qui nous met en colère ou nous fait peur. Quelquefois, ce processus de douleur peut continuer pendant des dizaines d’années.

Alors, comment le Dr Sarno obtient-il ses merveilleux résultats ? Il amène ses patients à deux conférences. Dans la première, il dit aux gens : « Ce n’est pas le disque déplacé ni une autre anormalité anatomique qui cause votre douleur. La plupart des gens de votre âge qui vivent sans douleur ont aussi un disque déplacé ou une sténose spinale. Ce qui vous cause de la douleur, c’est l’état chronique de tension et de spasme de vos muscles. »
Dans la deuxième conférence, le Dr Sarno leur dit : « Quand vous avez mal, je veux que vous remarquiez contre quoi vous êtes en colère ou de quoi vous avez peur. » Ensuite, il leur fait tenir un journal, ou bien il les inscrit à des séances de thérapie de groupe, ou encore il leur fait suivre une psychothérapie (« behavioral therapy », psychothérapie comportementale). Il dit que 20% de ses patients n’étaient pas conscients de ce qui les mettait en colère ou les rendait anxieux ; ils avaient besoin de travailler avec un thérapeute pour entrer en contact avec leur matériel réprimé ou inconscient.

Le Dr Eric Robins commente :
« J’explique le modèle de Sarno quand je fais une conférence à cause des résultats étonnants qu’il obtient. Dans l’un de ses livres les plus récents, Sarno explique que ce modèle émotionnel ne concerne pas seulement la douleur musculo-squelettale, mais qu’il peut être utilisé pour la plupart des maladies chroniques ou fonctionnelles. Je suis certain qu’il est évident pour vous que certaines des méthodes qu’il utilisait sont archaiques comparées à la rapidité et à l’efficacité d’EFT. Nous pouvons nous attendre à des résultats meilleurs et plus rapides avec EFT puisque cette dernière technique est la meilleure et la plus rapide des techniques mental-corps utilisées cliniquement à l’heure actuelle dans le monde. »

Voir enfin:

Pour en finir avec le mal de dos
Martine Betti-Cusso

Le Figaro

27/02/2015
Le médecin ostéopathe et acupuncteur, Dr Gilles Mondoloni nous parle du mal du siècle, le mal de dos. Il prône un traitement global pour prévenir et guérir de ce mal. Les habitudes de vie, le stress ou l’alimentation sont aussi responsables.

LE FIGARO MAGAZINE – Pourquoi souffre-t-on du dos?

Dr Gilles MONDOLONI – Parce que nous sommes de plus en plus sédentaires, nous faisons peu de sport et ce déconditionnement à l’effort a pour effet d’affaiblir les muscles. Il y a aussi les postures inadéquates et une alimentation favorable à la prise de poids et nuisible aux articulations. De plus, nous vivons avec un stress répété qui participe à la survenue du mal de dos et à sa chronicisation. Enfin, il y a l’usure des disques et des articulations consécutive au vieillissement… L’état de notre dos reflète notre hygiène de vie et notre santé psychique et physique.

Toutes les tranches d’âges sont affectées, des enfants aux seniors…

Les enfants et les adolescents peuvent ressentir des douleurs dans le dos dues à une croissance rapide et à la pratique de sports intenses. Il s’agit le plus souvent de spondylolisthésis, ce qui correspond à une petite fracture de la dernière vertèbre lombaire suivie de son glissement sur celle située au-dessous. Lorsque les douleurs se situent en haut du dos, derrière les omoplates, ce peut être la maladie de Scheuermann, laquelle se caractérise par une altération des disques. Elle se traite notamment par des exercices de rééducation.

Et quels sont les problèmes les plus fréquents chez l’adulte?

Eux souffrent de discopathies. Les problèmes de disques dont font partie les lumbagos (fissure du disque intervertébral), les hernies discales (déplacement d’une partie des disques intervertébraux) et les sciatiques (compression d’un nerf) apparaissent autour de la quarantaine. Le senior, lui, sera atteint plus souvent d’arthrose, ce qui entraînera des douleurs localisées dans le dos et limitera ses mouvements. Mais il faut savoir que les maux de dos les plus fréquents sont les tensions musculaires, souvent liées à des facteurs de stress et à des mauvaises positions lesquels vont provoquer des contractions musculaires qui vont bloquer des pans entiers du rachis.

Comment diagnostiquez-vous l’origine d’un mal de dos?

Je commence par questionner mon patient sur ses antécédents, sur sa manière de vivre, sur les circonstances d’apparition de ses douleurs, sur le cheminement de son mal de dos. Ce qui me permet de connaître son hygiène de vie, ses faiblesses et les causes probables de son mal de dos. Puis je l’examine. En croisant les informations obtenues par l’interrogatoire et l’examen clinique, et sans recourir systématiquement à des radios, scanners ou IRM, j’aboutis à un diagnostic précis. Ceci est fondamental: on ne doit pas traiter un mal de dos sans en connaître précisément la cause. La plupart du temps, le mal provient d’un ensemble de facteurs où se mêlent les habitudes de vie, l’émotionnel, l’alimentation. C’est une erreur que de ne s’attacher qu’aux symptômes. On doit considérer le patient comme un tout et soigner autant la cause que la conséquence du mal.

Comment les facteurs psychologiques, le stress ou l’anxiété agissent-ils sur le dos?

Il y a différentes explications. Les muscles sont riches en terminaisons nerveuses, et lorsque le cerveau «en situation de stress», transmet trop d’informations aux nerfs, ils se trouvent alors saturés. Le muscle va y répondre par une crispation, une contraction musculaire, qui peut être la cause d’une douleur locale ou d’une douleur projetée. Et l’état de stress chronique favorise les poussées inflammatoires sur les articulations par la libération dans le sang de substances inflammatoires. Il suffit d’avoir un peu d’arthrose et d’être stressé pour que les articulations se mettent à exprimer une souffrance.
Comment soignez-vous vos patients?

Je propose toujours une prise en charge globale, avec fréquemment des manipulations lorsqu’il n’y a pas de contre-indications. Elles sont très efficaces, en particulier pour soigner les cervicalgies, dorsalgies et lombalgies communes, lesquelles sont liées à l’usure d’un disque entre les vertèbres, à l’arthrose ou à des tensions musculaires ou ligamentaires. Lorsqu’il y a une inflammation dans le dos (poussée d’arthrose, crise de sciatique…) et si la situation l’exige, je vais prescrire des anti-inflammatoires. Si l’inflammation est de faible intensité, je vais recourir aux oligoéléments, à la phytothérapie, à la micronutrition, à l’acupuncture, qui agit sur la douleur, sur la contracture musculaire mais aussi sur le stress, l’anxiété, la circulation de l’énergie. Cette approche globale, sans effet indésirable, optimise l’efficacité des soins. Pour preuve, des patients en stade préopératoire qui me sont adressés par des neurochirurgiens sont une fois sur deux suffisamment améliorés pour éviter l’opération ou la reporter à plus tard.

Dans quels cas les manipulations sont-elles recommandées et contre-indiquées?

Elles sont incontournables pour traiter les douleurs mécaniques, qu’elles soient cervicales, dorsales ou lombaires. Souvent, ces douleurs apparaissent à l’effort, lorsque la personne est en mouvement, et durent moins d’une demi-heure lorsque l’on se lève le matin. Les manipulations vont permettre de détendre les muscles coincés qui bloquent les articulations. En revanche, les manipulations sont non recommandées voire contre-indiquées en cas de douleurs inflammatoires. Celles-ci surviennent ou persistent au repos et s’installent la nuit, en exigeant plus d’une demi-heure de «dérouillage» le matin. Elles sont aussi contre-indiquées en cas d’ostéoporose, de tumeurs osseuses et d’infection des vertèbres.

Comment bien manipuler?
D’abord en restant à l’écoute des sensations et des réactions du patient. Je manipule à contre-sens de la douleur, en partant des zones les moins douloureuses et les moins raides. Les pressions doivent être mesurées, douces, progressives. Et j’ajouterai qu’il faut faire preuve d’une grande prudence au niveau des cervicales. Ce sont des articulations fragiles qui, à la faveur d’une manipulation brutale, peuvent se fissurer et entraîner de rares mais graves accidents vasculaires cérébraux. Théoriquement, les manipulations au niveau des cervicales sont du seul ressort des médecins et doivent être précédées de radios du cou. Avant toute manipulation, il faut exiger un diagnostic médical précis. On ne manipule pas à tout va. Il est indispensable de se renseigner sur la formation suivie par le praticien. Le titre de docteur en médecine est une précaution supplémentaire pour profiter au mieux des bienfaits des manipulations sans s’exposer à des risques.

Quelle différence entre l’ostéopathie et la chiropractie?

Ce sont des techniques proches et complémentaires. La chiropractie est plutôt centrée sur la colonne vertébrale et utilise des techniques généralement plus appuyées. L’ostéopathie a un champ d’action plus large. Elle va traiter l’ensemble des affections neuromusculaires mais aussi des pathologies viscérales. Les deux méthodes sont efficaces. C’est le thérapeute qui fait la différence. Or beaucoup ne sont pas suffisamment formés, ce qui jette un discrédit sur ces disciplines tout à fait nobles.

Que pensez-vous des méthodes de Mézières ou de Mc Kenzie?

La méthode Mc Kenzie consiste à faire travailler la colonne vertébrale en extension et donne des résultats intéressants. La méthode Mézières est une technique de rééducation qui opère sur l’ensemble de la musculature du corps. Chaque approche est pertinente. Elles visent à corriger les déséquilibres et à tonifier les muscles.

Quels sont les gestes et postures à privilégier?

Pour commencer, il est nécessaire d’adopter des gestes souples et d’avoir le réflexe de se tenir droit le plus souvent possible. Lorsque l’on se penche au sol pour ramasser un objet lourd, il faut utiliser la position du balancier. On prend appui en mettant une main sur un point fixe et on lève la jambe opposée en arrière pour tenir l’équilibre. Les charges lourdes doivent être portées au plus près du corps, au niveau du centre de gravité. En position debout, il s’agit de répartir le poids du corps sur les deux jambes, en gardant les pieds suffisamment écartés pour maintenir une bonne stabilité. Ces simples postures suffisent à économiser les muscles et les articulations.

Vous affirmez que l’alimentation joue un rôle dans le mal de dos. Dans quelle mesure?

Déjà, être en surpoids ne peut qu’aggraver les maux de dos ou les provoquer parce que les kilos en trop entraînent une plus forte pression du corps sur les vertèbres et les disques intervertébraux. Mais il faut savoir aussi qu’une carence en oligoéléments favorise la survenue de discopathies: le disque moins bien nourri aura tendance à se fissurer plus facilement. Par ailleurs, des composés comme les oméga 3 ou des épices comme le curcuma ont des effets anti-inflammatoires naturels qui vont participer à réduire la douleur. Je conseille de limiter les viandes grasses, les fromages, les charcuteries, les viennoiseries et tout ce qui acidifie l’organisme. Evidemment, je recommande d’arrêter le tabac: les études montrent que les personnes qui fument ont plus de douleurs dorsales et lombaires que les non-fumeurs.

Quand faut-il recourir aux médicaments et aux infiltrations?

Je recours aux anti-inflammatoires en cas de sciatique, de lumbago, de névralgie cervico-brachiale… Sinon, je prescris des antalgiques – paracétamol, codéine ou tramadol – en fonction de l’intensité de la douleur, lorsque l’approche ostéopathique et acupuncture ne suffit pas à soulager le patient. Je propose les infiltrations , qui sont efficaces quand elles sont bien utilisées, en cas de fortes poussées inflammatoires d’arthrose ou de sciatiques douloureuses ou paralysantes. Je les prescris rarement pour les lumbagos, car l’ostéopathie suffit à les traiter.
Et quand faut-il recourir à la chirurgie?

Elle est nécessaire dans le cas d’importantes hernies discales qui vont entraîner des douleurs permanentes et intolérables. Mais aussi dans le cas de certaines sciatiques paralysantes, de canal lombaire rétréci ou d’arthrose très invalidante qui étrangle véritablement le nerf… Quand les traitements médicamenteux et naturels ont été bien réalisés pendant suffisamment de temps mais sont restés inefficaces, il faut s’orienter rapidement vers une chirurgie, car un nerf trop comprimé pendant trop longtemps peut parfois ne plus cicatriser et laisser des séquelles comme des paralysies.

Le Dr Gilles Mondoloni est attaché des hôpitaux de Paris (service du Dr Jean-Yves Maigne), chargé d’enseignement en ostéopathie à la faculté de médecine et l’auteur de Stop au mal de dos, à paraître le 5 avril aux éditions Solar.
La bonne position au bureau
Passer huit heures par jour mal assis derrière un bureau est destructeur pour le dos. D’où l’importance de veiller au confort de sa chaise et à sa posture. La chaise doit être réglable, disposer d’un dossier qui maintienne fermement le dos et d’un siège pivotant pour éviter les torsions.
Il faut se tenir droit, les fesses calées au fond du siège et les pieds bien à plat. Un repose-pieds permet de diminuer les tensions. Les avant-bras doivent reposer sur la table. Evitez la position penchée pour écrire. L’écran de l’ordinateur doit être face à vous et son milieu doit se situer à la hauteur des yeux de façon à permettre de garder la tête droite. Il est déconseillé de rester assis plus de deux heures d’affilée. Alors, prenez un temps d’arrêt pour faire quelques pas ou pour vous étirer afin de détendre votre dos.
Plein le dos du stress!
Le stress chronique est responsable de bien des maux, des troubles digestifs aux problèmes de peau, des troubles cardiaques aux douleurs lombaires. Le mal de dos serait en effet un signe d’alerte, signifiant que nous avons dépassé nos limites. Le stress participe à l’apparition du mal de dos et à sa chronicisation, car il augmente les contractures musculaires et la sensibilité à la douleur. Selon le rhumatologue Jean-Yves Maigne, le stress «est capable de déclencher, d’entretenir ou d’amplifier un mal de dos. Il augmente la tension musculaire et peut être responsable de cervicalgies ou de dorsalgies de tension.
Il peut aussi dérégler le système nerveux qui commande la douleur. Un grand nombre de souffrances trouvent ainsi leur origine. Cela crée un état douloureux chronique qui se manifeste particulièrement au niveau du dos.» De plus, il participe à affaiblir les défenses immunitaires de l’organisme, ce qui pourrait contribuer à la survenue de zones d’inflammation sur des disques intervertébraux. Et cela crée un cercle vicieux, car souffrir du mal de dos constitue en soi un facteur de stress. Pour préserver son dos, il faut donc savoir se détendre: par des exercices de respiration, des massages ou en recourant à des méthodes de relaxation comme la sophrologie.

Voir pa ailleurs

Designer babies? It looks like racism and eugenics to me
Julie Bindel
The case of a lesbian couple suing a sperm bank over their black donor has laid bare the ethical minefield of the ‘gayby’ boom
Jennifer Cramblett is taking legal action against a Chicago-area sperm bank after she became pregnant with sperm donated by a black man instead of a white man as she had intended. Photograph: Mark Duncan/AP
3 October 2014

The designer baby trend has been laid bare with the case of a lesbian couple who are suing a sperm bank after one of them became pregnant with sperm donated by an African American instead of the white donor they had chosen. The birth mother, Jennifer Cramblett, was five months pregnant in 2012 when she and her partner learned that the Midwest Sperm Bank near Chicago had selected the wrong donor. Cramblett said she decided to sue to prevent the sperm bank from making the same mistake again, and is apparently seeking a minimum of $50,000 (£30,000) in damages.

I understand concerns about mixed-race babies being raised by white parents in white neighbourhoods. Suffering racism at school or in the streets and having to go home to a white family that cannot properly understand or offer informed support can make it significantly worse. But those that make use of commercial services in order to reproduce should be prepared to move house if something unexpected arises. After all, a child can be born with a disability that requires care that is unavailable locally.

I know white people who have adopted black children. They tend to ensure that the children have black peers and elders to contribute to their upbringing. At least one of these couples, when told a black child would be placed with them, quite seriously considered whether they would be doing right by the child. This is a million miles away in terms of attitude and actions from the Cramblett case.

I can only wonder what the damages, if the case is successful, will be used for. Relocation to an area more ethnically diverse, perhaps? The reality is that house prices in white areas in the US are generally more expensive than those in mixed areas, so I am unsure what the money is needed for. Hurt feelings? Whichever way this issue is approached, it smacks of racism.

With the designer “gayby” boom looking set to expand even further, there are some important questions to ask about the ethics of commercialised reproduction. In London alone there are a number of clinics offering sperm for sale; brokers that arrange wombs-to-rent, often in countries where women are desperately poor and sometimes coerced into being surrogates; and egg donation that can cause significant pain and health risks to the donors. There is also the “mix and match” temptation that comes with choosing eggs and sperm from a catalogue. There is even an introduction agency for those who wish to meet the sperm while it is encased in a body.

In the 1970s and 80s, before commercialisation, lesbians who wanted a baby of their own would often ask male friends to donate sperm, but – like anything where money can be made – the product began to be sold. I recall more than one white lesbian couple opting for sperm from a black or Asian donor because they thought mixed-race babies more attractive than white ones. I have interviewed gay men, who opted for IVF with an egg donor, who flicked through catalogues of Ivy league, blonde, posh young women trying to decide what type of nose they would prefer their baby to have. This smacks of eugenics to me.

And if something unexpectedly happens in such circumstances, just remember: if the child you end up with does not exactly fit your ideal requirements, you can’t give it back – and nor should you even suggest that something bad has happened to you.

Voir enfin:

Une femme lesbienne porte plainte pour avoir accouché d’une enfant métis
Valeurs actuelles

07 Septembre 2015

Faits divers. Une lesbienne de l’Ohio aux Etats-Unis a porté plainte après avoir accouché d’une petite-fille métis, qui ne correspondait pas au sperme commandé.
Un enfant à la carte ? C’est que réclamait Jennifer Cramblett déçue par le « service après-vente » de la clinique dans laquelle elle s’est rendue pour une GPA dans l’Ohio.

Une erreur dans le numéro du donneur

La femme de 37 ans, homosexuelle et en couple avec Amanda Zinkon, voulait un enfant et A eu recours à une banque de sperme de l’Illinois en 2011. Auprès de celle-ci, Jennifer avait « commandé » le numéro 380, c’est-à-dire le sperme d’un donneur de race blanche, blond aux yeux bleus. Mais le numéro, écrit à la main par l’employé, a été mal écrit et pris pour le numéro 330, celui d’un donneur afro-américain. La blonde Jennifer a alors accouché d’une petite-fille métis, Payton.

« Tout le soin qu’elles avaient mis à sélectionner la bonne parenté du donneur était réduit à néant »

Apprendre que l’enfant commandé n’allait pas être le bon a dévasté la jeune femme lors de sa grossesse. Selon son avocat, « Tout le soin qu’elles avaient mis à sélectionner la bonne parenté du donneur était réduit à néant. En un instant. L’excitation qu’elle avait ressentie pendant sa grossesse, ses projections, s’étaient muées en colère, en déception et en peur. »

Une peur de l’exclusion

Parmi ses motifs de craintes, emmener sa fille… chez le coiffeur : « pour Jennifer, ce n’est pas quelque chose d’anodin, parce que Payton a les cheveux crépus d’une petite Africaine », « pour que sa fille ait une coupe de cheveu décente, Jennifer doit se rendre dans un quartier noir où son apparence diffère des autres et où elle n’est pas la bienvenue » explique son avocat.

En outre, les deux femmes habitent dans une communauté très peu mélangée et craignent que leur fille soit l’une des seuls enfants métis et soit exclue en raison de sa couleur de peau, notamment au sein de sa famille.

Des dommages et intérêts exigés pour avoir accouché du mauvais donneur

La banque de sperme avait envoyé un mot d’excuses et remboursé tous les frais. Mais ce n’est pas suffisant pour Jennifer qui a décidé de poursuivre en justice la banque de sperme pour obtenir des dommages et intérêts supplémentaires. Si sa demande a été rejetée par un juge la semaine dernière, les jeunes femmes sont décidées à resoumettre l’affaire à la cour pour négligences au mois de décembre.

2 commentaires pour Mal de dos : Attention, un mal peut en cacher un autre (Back pain: When your mind uses physical pain to protect you from psychic pain)

  1. janerees2012 dit :

    Diagnostic elements are crossed with the areas of expertise of a basic health care professionals to help you choose the most appropriate physician for your specific problem. Koondal allows you to be supported in the most optimal way. see more: http://www.koondal.com/

    J'aime

  2. janerees2012 dit :

    Satisfied whether the Koondal experience , make us know to increasingly improve the relevance of our diagnosis, our recommendations and our advice . Koondal is a scholar of modern times, it is even smarter it boasts a rich and diverse collective intelligence. please see more: http://www.koondal.com/

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :