Photoshop/25e: Et si la photographie, ça servait d’abord à faire la guerre ? (From fautography to faux-thenticity: is photography the continuation of war by other means ?)

https://i0.wp.com/www.diagonalthoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/coyote.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/www.lagunabeachbikini.com/wordpress/wp-content/images/magazine-covers/FauxtographyJan1995.jpghttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/2752c-10895350_916943658336082_1555813154_n.jpg?w=450&h=450https://i2.wp.com/dd508hmafkqws.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/article_node_view/public/bey_3.jpg

Whatever the other consequences of the kinetic war between Israel and Hezbollah in the summer of 2006, it gave rise to a neologism now commonplace in the blogosphere. In the blog lexicon, fauxtography refers to visual images, especially news photographs, which convey a questionable (or outright false) sense of the events they seem to depict. Apart from the clever word play evident in the term, it is shorthand for a serious criticism of photojournalism products, both the images and the associated text. Since accuracy is a cardinal tenet of journalistic ethics, clearly stated in the ethics code of the Society of Professional Journalists and other professional associations of journalists, the accusation that news products convey a false or distorted impression of news events is potent. Critical questions about the factual accuracy of news reports predated this blogstorm. So, too, did specific questions about the trustworthiness of photojournalism from hotspots in the Middle East. It may well be that the emergence of a concise but powerful term for the central issue in it fostered the development of the blogstorm, apart from the intensity of the kinetic war itself as a contributing factor. While some participants in the fauxtography blogstorm did, indeed, make accusations of media bias—an accusation implicitly echoed in a column by a prominent journalism professor and a paper by a fellow at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center—we will need here to distinguish between the long-running debate about media bias, in general, and the more concrete and specific blogstorm criticism that particular news products generated during the war were fauxtography rather than trustworthy photojournalism. The blogstorm this chapter describes centered on photojournalism during the 2006 Lebanon War; unlike some other blogstorms, however, the foundational issue underlying it predated this war and the central issue argued in it persisted after the event which initiated the blogstorm had concluded. The fauxtography blogstorm is perhaps one of the most complex to have yet occurred. It may help clarify the argumentation in this blogstorm to distinguish two levels: arguments about the reporting of a particular incident in the war, and arguments about journalistic practices in covering the war. The two are intertwined, in that arguments about reporting of specific incidents often led over time to broader, more general criticism of the mainstream news media practices. Stephen D. Cooper (Marshall University)
Quand les riches s’habituent à leur richesse, la simple consommation ostentatoire perd de son attrait et les nouveaux riches se métamorphosent en anciens riches. Ils considèrent ce changement comme le summum du raffinement culturel et font de leur mieux pour le rendre aussi visible que la consommation qu’ils pratiquaient auparavant. C’est à ce moment-là qu’ils inventent la non-consommation ostentatoire, qui paraît, en surface, rompre avec l’attitude qu’elle supplante mais qui n’est, au fond, qu’une surenchère mimétique du même processus. Dans notre société la non-consommation ostentatoire est présente dans bien des domaines, dans l’habillement par exemple. Les jeans déchirés, le blouson trop large, le pantalon baggy, le refus de s’apprêter sont des formes de non-consommation ostentatoire. La lecture politiquement correcte de ce phénomène est que les jeunes gens riches se sentent coupables en raison de leur pouvoir d’achat supérieur ; ils désirent, si ce n’est être pauvres, du moins le paraitre. Cette interprétation est trop idéaliste. Le vrai but est une indifférence calculée à l’égard des vêtements, un rejet ostentatoire de l’ostentation. Plus nous sommes riches en fait, moins nous pouvons nous permettre de nous montrer grossièrement matérialistes car nous entrons dans une hiérarchie de jeux compétitifs qui deviennent toujours plus subtils à mesure que l’escalade progresse. A la fin, ce processus peut aboutir à un rejet total de la compétition, ce qui peut être, même si ce n’est pas toujours le cas, la plus intense des compétitions. (…) Ainsi, il existe des rivalités de renoncement plutôt que d’acquisition, de privation plutôt que de jouissance.(…) Dans toute société, la compétition peut assumer des formes paradoxales parce qu’elle peut contaminer les activités qui lui sont en principe les plus étrangères, en particulier le don. Dans le potlatch, comme dans notre société, la course au toujours moins peut se substituer à la course au toujours plus, et signifier en définitive la même chose. René Girard
First we had « Life » as our major magazine; it was about life. Then the major magazine became « People. » Then « People » was replaced by « Us. » Then « Us » was replaced by « Self. » Paul Stookey
‘I spent the first ten years of my career making girls look thinner -and the last ten making them look larger.’ Robin Derrick (Vogue)
Cela n’a rien d’un progrès féministe. Rejet ou acceptation, cette obsession pour la beauté n’apparaît que chez les femmes célèbres, jamais chez les hommes. Elle ne fait que rappeler que l’apparence est au centre de la vie féminine et passe bien avant leur talent. Samantha Moore (Gender Across Borders)
Le hashtag #NoFilter est un filtre comme les autres, un dévoilement artificiel qui participe à la mise en scène de soi sur les réseaux sociaux. Ce sont des poses, des situations, des angles profondément calculés. On peut appeler ça le management de transparence. Heather Corker
Authenticity is the latest marketing buzz word. Consumers today, Millennials in particular, are told by their peers to be real, to be unique, and to live life without the filter. We see # nofilter photos and # nomakeup selfies online. But what does authenticity really mean in today’s socially-networked, digitally-connected world? And how much are consumers actually willing to reveal; how many filters will they let drop? The social space is a place for self creation and curation. The paradox is this: on social networks consumers magnify the activities of their lives and carefully select the truths they will reveal, all in an effort to appear… authentic. (…) The no filter hashtag itself has become a social norm, a controlled conversation of reality. This is consumers pretending they are willing to present a more naked version of themselves than they would in reality. Our social media profiles are only versions of ourselves; it is the self we want the world to believe we are. We exaggerate the content of our lives and lifestyles across social media so that only the good goes public.(…) Our lives on social media are a world of aspirational authenticity, which we want others to believe we’ve already arrived at. Consumers take the roughness of their lives, polish it, paint it and then post it. Brands must be aware of this veil of self for effective communications. Consumers want to pretend that they want to take you, as a brand, at face value, stripped bare. But what they really want is to feel good about themselves and to maintain their image of ascribing to the authentic. The truth is that consumers don’t want to become too exposed on social media. Walls are tearing down due to the digital, but as consumers learn to manage this new world they will start to build walls back up, to manage and create their image. Consumers want you to make them believe you are authentic. The focus is on them. They want to feel they are being properly represented by your brand – that your brand is part of the authentic image they are curating for themselves. While the desire for authentic marketing is not new – the Dove ‘Real Beauty’ campaigns have been around for a while– the desire is now less a ‘feel good’ story and more a rugged desire by consumers to be accurately represented in advertisements and in engagement by the brands they consume. Brands must give consumers the tools to curate their authenticity alongside the brand. Just as consumers do in their profiles, brands must manage their use of the filter, picking the appropriate unfiltered, bare moments to share. But they must also know when to hold back and which moments need a veil. This is about managed transparency as much for brands as for consumers. Faux-thenticity, or managed authenticity, will create new forms of intimacy between brand and consumer, presenting an opportunity for brands to respond to the consumer complaint that ads are a misrepresentation of who we really are. Heather Corker
Corker used # noshittyphotos as an example of consumers stretching their own capabilities to appear better online. The trend was started by two advertising graduates in Miami who were tired of tourists taking bad pictures of famous views. They created a stencil that showed a pair of footprints and the words « place feet, point and click », found the best place to stand to take the perfect pictures of landmarks in New York and San Francisco, and sprayed the instructions on the floor for tourists. The result was that consumers could take exceptional photos and post them as if they had found the right angle themselves. Marketing magazine
We must accept that photography is a post-production medium. It is used for multimedia, a still image might be from a video. We can embed, geotag. We’re dealing with computer data. We’ve handed digital image making all the aura of analog photography and it’s a camouflage. We know digital image making is not photography as it has been in the past; it has been made for other [new] uses. (…) I’ve always spoken in the digital age of “digital image making,” mainly because it is a manipulable medium. (…) When the Gutenberg press came along, everybody recognized the new formats and made use of its products, books and printed materials, but they didn’t see the long-term consequences: nationalism, democracies, entitlements. Some say the web will bring about as much disruption; I go further and say the web will bring about more. I foresee religion, governments, sex, biology, human evolution all changing radically because of the web. To me those things are clear but it’s not easy to describe to others. The leaps of imagination are difficult to envision. We all go at 90mph looking in the rear-view mirror. When I left the New York Times after three-and-a-half years, it was then I realized what journalism was. It is hardest to see the essentials and necessity of change when you’re inside of something. Fred Ritchin
I, too, have been part of the reverse retouching trend. When editing Cosmopolitan magazine, I also faced the dilemma of what to do with models who were, frankly, frighteningly thin. There are people out there who think the solution is simple: if a seriously underweight model turns up for a shoot, she should be sent home. But it isn’t always that easy. A fashion editor will often choose a model for a shoot that’s happening weeks, or even months, later. In the meantime, a hot photographer will have flown in from New York, schedules will be juggled to put him together with a make-up artist, hairdresser, fashion stylist and various assistants, and a hugely expensive location will have been booked. And a selection of tiny, designer sample dresses will be available for one day only. I have taken anguished calls from a fashion editor who has put together this finely orchestrated production, only to find that the model they picked six weeks ago for her luscious curves and gleaming skin, is now an anorexic waif with jutting bones and acne. Or she might pitch up covered in mysterious bruises (many models have a baffling penchant for horrible boyfriends), or smelling of drink and hung over, as many models live on coffee and vodka just to stay slim. And it’s not just models that cause problems. I remember one shoot we did with a singer, a member of a famous girl band, who was clearly in the grip of an eating disorder. Not only was she so frail that even the weeny dresses, designed for catwalk models, had to be pinned to fit her, but her body was covered with the dark downy hair that is the sure-fire giveaway of anorexia. Naturally, thanks to the wonders of digital retouching, not a trace of any of these problems appeared on the pages of the magazine. At the time, when we pored over the raw images, creating the appearance of smooth flesh over protruding ribs, softening the look of collarbones that stuck out like coat hangers, adding curves to flat bottoms and cleavage to pigeon chests, we felt we were doing the right thing. Our magazine was all about sexiness, glamour and curves. We knew our readers would be repelled by these grotesquely skinny women, and we also felt they were bad role models and it would be irresponsible to show them as they really were. But now, I wonder. Because for all our retouching, it was still clear to the reader that these women were very, very thin. But, hey, they still looked great! They had 22-inch waists (those were never made bigger), but they also had breasts and great skin. They had teeny tiny ankles and thin thighs, but they still had luscious hair and full cheeks. Thanks to retouching, our readers – and those of Vogue, and Self, and Healthy magazine – never saw the horrible, hungry downside of skinny. That these underweight girls didn’t look glamorous in the flesh. Their skeletal bodies, dull, thinning hair, spots and dark circles under their eyes were magicked away by technology, leaving only the allure of coltish limbs and Bambi eyes. A vision of perfection that simply didn’t exist. No wonder women yearn to be super-thin when they never see how ugly thin can be. But why do models starve themselves to be a shape that even high fashion magazines don’t want? Vogue’s Shulman believes a big part of the problem is that the designer’s sample sizes – the catwalk prototypes of their designs – have got ever smaller.(…) To fit these clothes, made by men for boyish bodies, the top model agencies only take on the thinnest girls, who tend to be nearly 6ft tall with 24in waists and 33in hips. This is far thinner than the likes of Cindy Crawford ever was (at 5ft 9in, she had a 26in waist). (…) Yet instead of hiring some healthier ones and encouraging them to eat, some agencies continue to send girls to jobs even when they look positively ill. It’s a crazy system, and one that’s bad for all of us. When the ideal woman is emaciated yet smooth-skinned and glowing, more of us will hate our own unretouched bodies which stubbornly refuse to fit into an impossible ideal. Some of us will starve and binge; others will develop eating disorders; others will opt out completely and give up on being healthily fit. All I can say is that I’m sorry for my small part in this madness. It is time it stopped – for all our sakes. Leah Hardy
Alors que la communication d’H&M est pointée du doigt pour avoir collé des visages de top-modèles sur des corps de synthèse, deux scientifiques américains ont inventé l’outil rêvé des amateurs d’ « avant-après ». Un chercheur en informatique, Hany Farid, et son élève doctorant, Eric Kee, de l’université de Darwood, aux États-Unis ont publié le résultat de leurs recherches la semaine dernière dans une revue scientifique américaine.  Le programme qu’ils ont mis au point permet de faire apparaître, sur une échelle de 1 à 5, l’ampleur des retouches subies par une photo. Et cela donne lieu à des comparaisons saisissantes. Envolés, rides, bourrelets et teint brouillé ! Ces chercheurs espèrent que cela poussera les médias et les publicitaires à adopter une attitude autorégulatrice. Le Figaro madame
Pourtant, le naturel serait la meilleure force de séduction. D’après le sondage OpinionWay, l’absence de naturel est rédhibitoire pour 49 % des hommes, suivi du botox (39 %), du lifting (29 %), des implants mammaires (22 %), le manque de formes (16%). Ces chiffres annonceraient-ils le grand retour de la femme bio ? Les phobiques de la retouche utilisent désormais Internet comme contre-média pour insuffler une nouvelle vision de la beauté. Certains internautes tentent d’abord de démythifier le corps retouché, en mettant en ligne les vidéos de transformation des mannequins lors des séances photo pour dire que les tops aussi sont loin de la perfection. Quand le trombinoscope des modèles au naturel pour un défilé Vuitton avait fuité, le monde s’était surpris à découvrir le teint livide et les cernes des égéries. Sans oublier cet article confession de l’ancienne rédactrice de Cosmopolitan, Leah Hardy, qui tirait la sonnette d’alarme en dénonçant l’usage inversé de Photoshop, pour regonfler des mannequins trop maigres. En parallèle, plusieurs initiatives fleurissent sur la Toile pour réhabiliter le corps normal. Lady Gaga, critiquée lors de sa tournée en 2012 pour avoir pris du poids, avait fièrement publié en réponse des photos d’elle en sous-vêtements sur son réseau social. Ses milliers de fans ont suivi le mouvement en postant des clichés d’eux invitant ainsi à ce que chacun assume mieux son apparence. La « Mother Monster » avait alors baptisé l’événement « The Body Revolution » (la révolution du corps, NDLR). Les photographes aussi se mettent à dénoncer la fausseté des corps médiatisés. L’artiste Gracie Hagen avait fait du bruit en publiant une série de photos de corps droits, magnifiés, puis, juste à côté, le même corps à l’état naturel, c’est-à-dire parfois voûtés, voire flasques. Selon la photographe, « l’imagerie des médias est une illusion qui s’appuie sur la lumière, les bons angles et Photoshop. Les gens peuvent sembler extrêmement attirants dans les bonnes conditions et deux secondes après, être transformés en quelque chose de complètement différent ». Son but était alors de montrer que chacun à une forme et une taille particulière. Et que la silhouette « normale » n’existait pas. C’est aussi dans cet esprit que le site My Body Gallery propose de montrer « à quoi les vraies femmes ressemblent ». Près de 25 000 photos des corps de filles volontaires, classées selon leur âge, taille et poids, y sont accessibles. Comme pour se lancer un seau d’eau dans la figure… et déculpabiliser. Une façon de décrocher notre regard des affiches, s’ouvrir à la réalité et voir les « vrais gens ». Redescendre sur terre, en quelque sorte. Madame Figaro

De la fauxtographie à la fauxthenticité, la photographie a-t-elle jamais servi à autre chose qu’à faire la guerre ?

En ce 25e anniversaire du Photoshop des frères Knoll

A l’heure où nos fabricants de vêtements en sont à coller des visages de mannequins sur des corps de synthèse …

Et nos agences de mode, pour cause de trop grande maigreur, à regonfler numériquement les mannequins en question …

Pendant qu’entre nouveau logiciel de fraude photo, label no filter et vraies fausses fuites de clichés de stars non-retouchés, nos magazines de mode nous refont le coup du retour du naturel …

Et que dans l’athlétisme extrême de l’ultra-marathon, une drogue aussi relaxante que la marijuana  peut devenir une nouvelle arme de la compétition elle-même …

Comment ne pas voir …

Derrière ce refus ostentatoire du faux …

Et à l’instar de cette guerre de l’image que sont devenues nos guerres

L’énième avatar de cette rivalité désormais généralisée mise au jour par René Girard

Autrement dit,  pour détourner la fameuse formule clauswitzienne, la continuation de la guerre par d’autres moyens ?

Le naturel, nouvel outil de communication des stars
Alice Pfeiffer

Le Monde

20.02.2015

La cellulite de Cindy Crawford, la peau imparfaite de Beyoncé… Jamais les photos de stars au naturel n’ont tant circulé. Une manière de se rendre accessible à moindres frais.

La presse people n’aura pas chômé cette semaine. Après la diffusion de clichés non retouchés de Cindy Crawford sur le Web, c’est au tour de Beyoncé d’être mise à nu : des images de sa campagne pour L’Oréal la montrent telle qu’elle est avant le passage des gommes et autres filtres de postproduction. Le constat ? Cellulite pour l’une, peau fatiguée et imparfaite pour l’autre. Débat futile ? Certainement. Pourtant, si leurs origines sont encore troubles (réelle fuite ou stratégie de communication ?), les réactions suscitées sont révélatrices d’évolutions sociales. Contrairement à l’acharnement que suscitaient les photos de paparazzi il y a quelques années, ravis de révéler l’acné naissant ou les bras flasques d’une star, cette fois, la blogosphère est en émoi. De toutes parts sur les réseaux sociaux, on les félicite de leur honnêteté, de leur prise de risque et surtout de leur normalité.

Une authencité très calculée
Cindy Crawford et Beyoncé, deux icônes qui ont fait de leur beauté un piller de leur gloire, descendent de leur piédestal pour soudainement s’apparenter, le temps d’un tweet, au commun des mortels. Il semblerait qu’aujourd’hui, les railleries soient plutôt réservées aux présumées victimes du Botox, comme Renée Zellwegger et Uma Thurman, récemment apparues méconnaissables sur les tapis rouges. Aujourd’hui, dans une confrontation entre nature et culture, entre authenticité fructueuse et « botox bashing », ces fuites mettent en lumière un formidable outil de communication : le naturel calculé au millimètre.

Sur Instagram, dans les magazines de mode ou sur le petit écran, les célébrités n’hésitent plus à mettre en avant un corps de femme lambda : Lara Stone pose en sous-vêtements sans retouche après son accouchement dans System Magazine ; Lena Dunham affiche sans complexe ses rondeurs, parties prenantes de son succès. Un terme émerge même aux Etats-Unis : la « in-between model », qui désigne un mannequin proche des mensurations de la femme moyenne (comprendre taille 40), comme Myla Dalbesio, actuelle égérie Calvin Klein Lingerie.

Les tops jouent de cette tendance avec habileté afin de communiquer sur leur ligne, la qualité de leur peau ou encore leur perte de poids, en prenant des « selfies » accompagnés du hashtag #NoFilter. Le tout dans des situations bien précises : au réveil, dans les coulisses des défilés, quelques jours après leur accouchement… Cara Delevingne, presque aussi connue pour ses « selfies » que pour ses campagnes de pub, a fait de son naturel un art.

Cette tendance s’étend aussi aux castings : de nombreuses agences de mannequins et marques de mode, notamment IMG Models et Marc Jacobs, créent des concours via Instagram, encourageant des jeunes filles à poster des photos d’elles-mêmes, de préférence accompagnées d’un #NoFilter, garant du réalisme du cliché.

Selon le Huffington Post américain, ce hashtag agit comme un « contrat social » entre une célébrité et son audience. Ainsi, ce bref sentiment de proximité agit comme une promesse similaire à celle de la téléréalité. Une peau non retouchée rassure le public « sur la transformation subite que pourrait connaître sa vie grâce à un coup de baguette magique (…) au même titre que la dévaluation des célébrités est là pour lui rappeler qu’elles sont humaines, comme lui », analyse le sociologue François Jost, auteur du Culte du Banal (Editions Biblis, 2013).

Le label #NoFilter
Aujourd’hui, la tendance #NoFilter est poussée à l’extrême. Le site Filter Faker propose de dénoncer les tricheurs : on peut télécharger une photo libellée « no filter » et découvrir si un filtre a été utilisé… ou pas. Parallèlement, d’autres plates-formes comme Retrica ou Afterlight proposent des retouches discrètes à appliquer avant publication sur Instagram. Ni vu ni connu.

L’agence Future Foundation, spécialisée dans les tendances de consommation, a déjà renommé cette mode la « faux-thenticity ». « Le hashtag #NoFilter est un filtre comme les autres, un dévoilement artificiel qui participe à la mise en scène de soi sur les réseaux sociaux. Ce sont des poses, des situations, des angles profondément calculés, analyse Heather Corker, l’une des dirigeantes de l’agence. On peut appeler ça le management de transparence. »

Et les magazines ne se privent pas de surfer sur la vague : la publication canadienne Flare, accusée il y a trois ans d’avoir amaigri Jennifer Lawrence via Photoshop, consacre sa prochaine couverture à cinq mannequins, ni retouchés ni maquillés, accompagnés du titre #wokeuplikethis (« #réveilléetellequelle »). Une façon de se racheter auprès d’un lectorat féminin offusqué.

Cependant, pour Samantha Moore, journaliste pour le site féministe Gender Across Borders, cette tendance est loin d’être positive : « Cela n’a rien d’un progrès féministe. Rejet ou acceptation, cette obsession pour la beauté n’apparaît que chez les femmes célèbres, jamais chez les hommes. Elle ne fait que rappeler que l’apparence est au centre de la vie féminine et passe bien avant leur talent. » A quand des photos volées de Bradley Cooper, Leonardo DiCaprio et autres icônes masculines ?

 Voir aussi:

Comment Photoshop nous a brouillées avec notre corps
Lucile Quillet

Madame Figaro

13 juin 2014

Quand toutes les femmes sont parfaites sur les affiches et dans les magazines, comment accepter son corps, forcément imparfait ? Des initiatives viennent secouer avec malice la dictature de ces corps irréels. Ainsi ces milliers de femmes qui ont envoyé leurs photos pour former une galerie de la féminité telle qu’elle est en vrai.

91% des Français ne se reconnaissent pas dans le physique des personnes qui font la une des magazines féminins. Même les 18-24 ans, qui ont le même âge que les mannequins, sont 83% à ne pas s’identifier pas à eux. Parmi les 1003 personnes interrogées par l’étude d’Opinion Way pour Slendertone, 57% trouvent ces corps « trop parfaits », 21% que les visages, dénués de toute expression, sont presque robotiques. Et presque la moitié des sondés (42 %) tranchent encore plus fort : s’ils ne s’identifient pas, c’est tout simplement car les égéries sur papier glacé n’existent pas dans la vraie vie. Frappés d’une extrême lucidité, ils font la distinction entre deux mondes : celui du réel et celui imprimé en 4 x 3.

Pourtant, tout en sachant que ces images sont truquées, il est difficile de rester imperméable à ces injonctions omniprésentes à la perfection. Ces filles minces, glabres et bronzées s’affichent sur les abribus, dans le métro, dans les magazines. Si bien que l’œil s’habitue à voir des silhouettes élancées et oublie qu’un corps normal est un corps imparfait. Une fois face au miroir, on s’étonne de voir des plis, de gros grains de beauté et des poils. Comme si le monde imprimé était devenu la norme et ce grand mensonge, intégré et reproduit. Dans son livre Beauté Fatale, l’essayiste et journaliste Mona Chollet explique comment les corps imparfaits se jugent même entre eux, plutôt que d’entrer en résistance. « Cernés par les couvertures de magazines comme par autant de reproches visuels qui nous montrent comment nous pourrions être et devrions être, nous vivons sous un éclairage impitoyable. Nous sommes incités à nous montrer aussi impitoyables que lui, à être malveillants, mesquins, haineux », analyse-t-elle.

Au final, seuls 28 % des sondés se trouvent bien comme ils sont et ne souhaitent rien changer à leur corps, rapporte Opinion Way. Sur les 526 femmes interrogées, 57 % sont complexées par leur ventre, 17 % par leurs fesses. Dans un tel contexte, celui qui affirme ne vouloir rien changer à son corps passe pour un arrogant.

L’absence de naturel, rédhibitoire pour la moitié des hommes
Après le ventre plat, les fesses rebondies, le thigh gap, puis les pommettes rehaussées… Les canons de beauté se succèdent et ne se ressemblent pas. Dès qu’un complexe a été résolu, une nouvelle lubie esthétique émerge aussitôt. Elle est aisément reproduite sur Photoshop, moins dans la vraie vie. Quelle que soit la silhouette rêvée, les retouches mettent la barre toujours plus haut. Même les formes fièrement revendiquées par Kim Kardashian, Beyoncé et Rihanna sont lissées, huilées, raffermies. En deux clics, trois mouvements.

Sauf qu’accéder à ce corps irréel peut sembler accessible, tant chaque partie du corps a sa crème dédiée. La femme imparfaite n’a plus d’excuses, seulement une faible volonté. Dans ce contexte, le corps devient une « matrice du moi » comme le dit le sociologue du corps, Georges Vigarello. Il revendiquerait nos choix, notre personnalité, notre histoire. Dans Histoire de la beauté, le corps et l’art d’embellir de la Renaissance à nos jours (Éd. Points), le sociologue explique que l’apparence parfaite est « fondée sur une cohérence intérieure », entre ce qu’on en attend et ce qu’elle est. Une sorte de « je suis qui je montre ». Tout détail corporel qui nous n’aurions pas validé est un parasite, synonyme d’impuissance.

Le retour du naturel ?
Pourtant, le naturel serait la meilleure force de séduction. D’après le sondage OpinionWay, l’absence de naturel est rédhibitoire pour 49 % des hommes, suivi du botox (39 %), du lifting (29 %), des implants mammaires (22 %), le manque de formes (16%). Ces chiffres annonceraient-ils le grand retour de la femme bio ? Les phobiques de la retouche utilisent désormais Internet comme contre-média pour insuffler une nouvelle vision de la beauté. Certains internautes tentent d’abord de démythifier le corps retouché, en mettant en ligne les vidéos de transformation des mannequins lors des séances photo pour dire que les tops aussi sont loin de la perfection. Quand le trombinoscope des modèles au naturel pour un défilé Vuitton avait fuité, le monde s’était surpris à découvrir le teint livide et les cernes des égéries. Sans oublier cet article confession de l’ancienne rédactrice de Cosmopolitan, Leah Hardy, qui tirait la sonnette d’alarme en dénonçant l’usage inversé de Photoshop, pour regonfler des mannequins trop maigres.

25 000 corps normaux de « vraies femmes »

En parallèle, plusieurs initiatives fleurissent sur la Toile pour réhabiliter le corps normal. Lady Gaga, critiquée lors de sa tournée en 2012 pour avoir pris du poids, avait fièrement publié en réponse des photos d’elle en sous-vêtements sur son réseau social. Ses milliers de fans ont suivi le mouvement en postant des clichés d’eux invitant ainsi à ce que chacun assume mieux son apparence. La « Mother Monster » avait alors baptisé l’événement « The Body Revolution » (la révolution du corps, NDLR).

Les photographes aussi se mettent à dénoncer la fausseté des corps médiatisés. L’artiste Gracie Hagen avait fait du bruit en publiant une série de photos de corps droits, magnifiés, puis, juste à côté, le même corps à l’état naturel, c’est-à-dire parfois voûtés, voire flasques. Selon la photographe, « l’imagerie des médias est une illusion qui s’appuie sur la lumière, les bons angles et Photoshop. Les gens peuvent sembler extrêmement attirants dans les bonnes conditions et deux secondes après, être transformés en quelque chose de complètement différent ». Son but était alors de montrer que chacun à une forme et une taille particulière. Et que la silhouette « normale » n’existait pas.

C’est aussi dans cet esprit que le site My Body Gallery propose de montrer « à quoi les vraies femmes ressemblent ». Près de 25 000 photos des corps de filles volontaires, classées selon leur âge, taille et poids, y sont accessibles. Comme pour se lancer un seau d’eau dans la figure… et déculpabiliser. Une façon de décrocher notre regard des affiches, s’ouvrir à la réalité et voir les « vrais gens ». Redescendre sur terre, en quelque sorte.

L’algorithme qui démonte Photoshop
Gaëlle Rolin

Le Figaro madame

07 décembre 2011

Deux scientifiques américains ont créé un programme qui décèle les retouches d’une image

Alors que la communication d’H&M est pointée du doigt pour avoir collé des visages de top-modèles sur des corps de synthèse, deux scientifiques américains ont inventé l’outil rêvé des amateurs d’ « avant-après ».

Un chercheur en informatique, Hany Farid, et son élève doctorant, Eric Kee, de l’université de Darwood, aux États-Unis ont publié le résultat de leurs recherches la semaine dernière dans une revue scientifique américaine.  Le programme qu’ils ont mis au point permet de faire apparaître, sur une échelle de 1 à 5, l’ampleur des retouches subies par une photo. Et cela donne lieu à des comparaisons saisissantes. Envolés, rides, bourrelets et teint brouillé !

Voir les « avant-après »

Ces chercheurs espèrent que cela poussera les médias et les publicitaires à adopter une attitude autorégulatrice. En effet, les lecteurs ne pourront pas aller se plaindre auprès des directeurs artistiques de leur magazine préféré, car le logiciel a besoin de la photo d’origine pour établir l’échelle de retouche. Donc cette préoccupation éthique doit venir, d’abord, des agences et des rédactions.

Cela intervient alors qu’H&M a dû s’expliquer dans le magazine suédois Aftonbladet après avoir eu recours à des corps cyber-dessinés pour sa dernière campagne publicitaire. Les modèles de lingerie incriminés ont d’abord été photographiés sur des mannequins en plastique. Puis les photos ont été retravaillées sur ordinateur pour que les corps prennent un aspect humain. Seulement à la fin de ce processus, ont été collés, sur ces silhouettes, des visages de femmes. Le géant suédois n’a pas cherché à minimiser le phénomène. Mais il a expliqué qu’il ne s’agissait que de mettre en avant les sous-vêtements et que les top-modèles étaient parfaitement au courant.

Certes, le procédé n’est pas très reluisant. Vu la dénaturation des images que provoque la « photoshopisation » à outrance, on finit par avoir le choix entre humaniser un mannequin en plastique ou réifier un mannequin de chair et d’os… Reste à savoir lequel des deux oriente le plus certains consommateurs vers un idéal irréel, qui tend davantage vers les os que vers la chair.

Mais pourquoi les Anglaises se rasent-elles le visage ?
Nicolas Basse

Madame Figaro

18 février 2015
C’est la nouvelle astuce beauté qui séduit les Anglaises : se raser le visage. Avec un double objectif : avoir une peau plus douce et limiter l’apparition des rides. Are you kidding ? L’avis d’un spécialiste.

Outre-Manche, sur le Web, on ne parle que de cela. Depuis quelques semaines, « youtubeuses » et blogueuses vantent les mérites des rasoirs et des miniscalpels servant à… raser leur visage. Une méthode qui permettrait de repousser l’apparition des rides et d’avoir une peau plus douce. Selon ces mêmes internautes, Marilyn Monroe et Elizabeth Taylor étaient déjà de véritables adeptes de cette technique. C’est dire.

Le principe, vanté dans un article du Daily Mail, est simple : se gratter la peau avec un petit scalpel ou se raser avec un rasoir jetable classique pour éliminer le fin duvet qui recouvre le visage afin d’exfolier l’épiderme. La pratique s’inspire du « dermaplaning », très répandu aux États-Unis, qui consiste à gratter la peau jusqu’à l’inflammation cutanée pour permettre une meilleure absorption des soins cosmétiques.

« Une technique farfelue »
Tous les matins, ces Anglaises obsédées par les rides nettoient donc leur peau, s’appliquent un adoucissant, sortent leur mousse, leur rasoir et se rasent délicatement autour des lèvres, sur les joues et dans le cou. Selon Michael Prager, médecin esthétique londonien défenseur de la pratique, se raser aurait le même effet qu’une micro-dermabrasion, en accélérant la production de collagène et en retardant l’apparition des rides.

« Pas du tout, rétorque le dermatologue français Antoine Adam Thierry. Cette technique est farfelue et très peu efficace. Oui, cela doit très légèrement stimuler l’exfoliation de la peau, mais ça ne l’adoucira pas. Franchement, c’est énormément de temps perdu ! Autant se mettre une crème qui aura des effets bien plus nets. Pendant qu’on y est, pourquoi ne pas se frotter le visage avec une pierre ponce ? » Quoi qu’il en soit, de nombreux e-shops proposent déjà des mousses et rasoirs spécialement conçus pour les visages féminins…

Perte de poids extrême : d’anciens obèses témoignent
Juliana Bruno

Le Figaro madame

06 juin 2014

À l’image de Keli Kryfko, ceux qui sont passés du XXL au S témoignent

Keli Kryfko, une jeune Américaine obèse depuis son enfance, est aujourd’hui en passe de devenir Miss Texas après avoir maigri de 45 kilos. Une perte de poids exceptionnelle qui implique également un bouleversement psychologique important. D’autres, passés du XXL au S, témoignent.

Dans une société où le poids est devenu une mesure de la valeur personnelle, un individu obèse ou en surpoids est souvent perçu comme dépourvu de volonté. Alors que la maîtrise du corps est érigée en mantra, la minceur est exigée de tous et par tous. Mais pour ceux qui prennent la décision de perdre du poids, à cause d’un problème de santé ou parce que, comme Keli Kryfko, ils se fixent un objectif très précis, les ressorts sont tout autres. Il s’agit d’affronter un nouveau reflet dans le miroir, de comprendre son corps et de se confronter au regard neuf de son entourage et de la société. Regards croisés.

Un élément déclencheur puissant
« Tout bascule en juillet 2012 quand je réussis mon bac, un vrai soulagement. Je rentre alors à l’université et, après un mois sans être montée sur ma balance, je découvre que j’ai perdu 5 kilos sans avoir changé de régime alimentaire. Je décide alors d’essayer de réduire les quantités et en six mois, je perds 20 kilos », confie Jade. À l’origine de ces pertes de poids extrêmes, plus ou moins conscientes et maîtrisées, un problème de santé, un élément déclencheur ou un objectif éminent, à l’image de celui de Keli Kryfko. « Le jour où j’ai voulu acheter un pull, je l’ai d’abord essayé en M, puis en L mais en réalité, j’ai dû acheter la taille XL. Et là, je me suis dit, plus jamais », se souvient Charles. « Cet objectif permet de se dépasser et désirer atteindre son poids de forme avec une détermination sans faille. Dans une implication totale, le sujet est pleinement centré sur ce qu’il réalise », indique Michèle Freud, auteure de Mincir et se réconcilier avec soi (Éd. Albin Michel). « Néanmoins, il faut savoir rester réaliste, se fixer des objectifs, à court, moyen et long terme. Il est bon de noter que Keli Kryfko s’est, par exemple, allégée de 30 kilos en un an et demi, qu’elle a modifié son alimentation étape par étape, de façon intelligente et avec l’aide d’un coach », prévient Michèle Freud.

Séverine, qui a eu recours à une « Sleeve », opération qui consiste à retirer une grande partie de l’estomac pour former un tube, a perdu près de 50 kilos en une année. « Six mois après l’intervention, je pesais déjà 35 kilos de moins, se rappelle la jeune femme. Je m’étais extrêmement bien préparée en amont. J’ai bénéficié d’un suivi de qualité, psychologue et nutritionniste en tête. » Charles, lui, a opté pour la très célèbre règle des « 5 fruits et légumes par jour », en s’adonnant à quarante-cinq minutes de footing, quatre fois par semaine. « Je ne me suis pas spécialement privé, j’ai simplement adopté une meilleure hygiène de vie », admet le jeune homme qui s’est délesté d’une vingtaine de kilos en l’espace d’une année. Quel que soit le moyen choisi, et même avec l’aide d’un professionnel, une remise en question identitaire vient se poser au moment où le schéma corporel de l’individu se modifie.

Nouveau corps, nouvelle identité

« C’est elle ou ce n’est pas elle ? », avouez que venant de la part d’anciens collègues, c’est dérangeant. »

Le schéma corporel, ou postural, se définit comme la perception du corps solide, entier et achevé. « Le corps se transforme, change et c’est extrêmement stimulant pour la détermination. Mais cette métamorphose peut aussi être la source d’une grande anxiété parce qu’il faut réussir à appréhender une nouvelle image de soi », avance Michèle Freud. « Au départ, j’avais l’impression que mon corps ne m’appartenait pas, comme si je l’avais volé. Cela est allé tellement vite pour moi », se souvient Jade. « J’ai toujours la sensation de peser 80 kilos lorsque je me regarde dans le miroir », renchérit Séverine, pourtant à 53 kilos aujourd’hui. Pour Charles, même constat. « J’ai toujours l’impression d’être gros. Par sécurité, dans les magasins, je vais opter pour une taille de plus même si je sais que ce n’est pas ce qu’il me faut. »
Parfois même, c’est l’entourage qui ne reconnaît pas la personne et cette épreuve peut s’avérer particulièrement déstabilisante. « « C’est elle ou ce n’est pas elle ? », avouez que venant de la part d’anciens collègues, l’interrogation est dérangeante », assène Séverine. « Quand j’apercevais des connaissances dans la rue, je voyais qu’il y avait une hésitation. Peu à peu, j’ai senti le regard des gens changer », reconnaît également Jade.

« Habiter pleinement son corps »
« Il est essentiel de se réapproprier ce nouveau corps, non seulement en le regardant mais il faut surtout ne pas avoir peur de le toucher, le masser, le mouvoir afin de le sentir et plus tard, pouvoir l’habiter pleinement », conseille Michèle Freud. « Après une année de stabilisation, je commence à m’habituer à mon nouveau corps. Je vais à la plage en appréciant ma morphologie, en profitant enfin de tous les avantages de ma transformation. Mais c’est un processus de longue haleine », reconnaît Claire. Et d’ajouter : « Je me suis enfin débarrassée de ma « seconde peau », et j’ai fait la paix avec cet « autre moi ». Mais même lorsque la réconciliation est au rendez-vous, une épée de Damoclès demeure. « Il y a cette sensation que ça ne va pas durer, que c’est provisoire, éphémère. J’ai appris à vivre avec cette peur », conclut Charles. Une crainte sourde, mais malheureusement, profondément ancrée.

A big fat (and very dangerous) lie: A former Cosmo editor lifts the lid on airbrushing skinny models to look healthy

Leah Hardy

The Daily Mail

20 May 2010

Most of us are sensible enough to know that the photographs of models and celebrities in glossy magazines aren’t all they seem.

Using the wonders of digital retouching, wrinkles and spots just disappear; cellulite, podgy tummies, thick thighs and double chins can all be erased to ‘reveal’ surprisingly lean, toned figures.

Stars such as Mariah Carey, Britney Spears and Demi Moore have benefited from this kind of technical tampering.

Kate Winslet – who shed a couple of stones this way in a shoot for a men’s magazine after her normally curvy body was digitally ‘stretched’ – complained that the practise was bad for women, who could never live up to this kind of fake perfection.

But there’s another type of digital dishonesty that’s rife in the beauty industry, and it’s one that you may well never have heard of and may even struggle to believe, but which can be just as poisonous an influence on women.

It’s been dubbed ‘reverse retouching’ and involves using models who are cadaverously thin and then adding fake curves so they look bigger and healthier.

This deranged but increasingly common process recently hit the headlines when Jane Druker, the editor of Healthy magazine – which is sold in health food stores – admitted retouching a cover girl who pitched up at a shoot looking ‘really thin and unwell’.

It sounds crazy, but the truth is Druker is not alone. The editor of the top-selling health and fitness magazine in the U.S., Self, has admitted: ‘We retouch to make the models look bigger and healthier.’

And the editor of British Vogue, Alexandra Shulman, has quietly confessed to being appalled by some of the models on shoots for her own magazine, saying: ‘I have found myself saying to the photographers, « Can you not make them look too thin? »‘
Skinny: Healthy magazine’s cover star Kamila as she appears normally

Skinny: Healthy magazine’s cover star Kamila as she appears normally

Robin Derrick, creative director of Vogue, has admitted: ‘I spent the first ten years of my career making girls look thinner -and the last ten making them look larger.’

Recently, I chatted to Johnnie Boden, founder of the hugely successful clothing brand.

He bemoaned the fact that it was nigh on impossible to find suitable models for his catalogues, which are predominantly aimed at thirty-something mothers.

‘I hate featuring very skinny models,’ he told me. ‘We try to book models who are a healthy size, but we constantly find that when they come to the shoot a few weeks later, they have lost too much weight. It’s a real problem.’

I don’t know if Boden has been forced to resort to reverse retouching, but I have a confession to make.

I, too, have been part of the reverse retouching trend. When editing Cosmopolitan magazine, I also faced the dilemma of what to do with models who were, frankly, frighteningly thin.

There are people out there who think the solution is simple: if a seriously underweight model turns up for a shoot, she should be sent home. But it isn’t always that easy.

A fashion editor will often choose a model for a shoot that’s happening weeks, or even months, later. In the meantime, a hot photographer will have flown in from New York, schedules will be juggled to put him together with a make-up artist, hairdresser, fashion stylist and various assistants, and a hugely expensive location will have been booked.

And a selection of tiny, designer sample dresses will be available for one day only.

I have taken anguished calls from a fashion editor who has put together this finely orchestrated production, only to find that the model they picked six weeks ago for her luscious curves and gleaming skin, is now an anorexic waif with jutting bones and acne.

‘No wonder women yearn to be super-thin – they never see how ugly thin can be’

Or she might pitch up covered in mysterious bruises (many models have a baffling penchant for horrible boyfriends), or smelling of drink and hung over, as many models live on coffee and vodka just to stay slim.

And it’s not just models that cause problems. I remember one shoot we did with a singer, a member of a famous girl band, who was clearly in the grip of an eating disorder.

Not only was she so frail that even the weeny dresses, designed for catwalk models, had to be pinned to fit her, but her body was covered with the dark downy hair that is the sure-fire giveaway of anorexia.

Naturally, thanks to the wonders of digital retouching, not a trace of any of these problems appeared on the pages of the magazine. At the time, when we pored over the raw images, creating the appearance of smooth flesh over protruding ribs, softening the look of collarbones that stuck out like coat hangers, adding curves to flat bottoms and cleavage to pigeon chests, we felt we were doing the right thing.

Our magazine was all about sexiness, glamour and curves. We knew our readers would be repelled by these grotesquely skinny women, and we also felt they were bad role models and it would be irresponsible to show them as they really were.

But now, I wonder. Because for all our retouching, it was still clear to the reader that these women were very, very thin. But, hey, they still looked great!
Leah Hardy

They had 22-inch waists (those were never made bigger), but they also had breasts and great skin. They had teeny tiny ankles and thin thighs, but they still had luscious hair and full cheeks.

Thanks to retouching, our readers – and those of Vogue, and Self, and Healthy magazine – never saw the horrible, hungry downside of skinny. That these underweight girls didn’t look glamorous in the flesh. Their skeletal bodies, dull, thinning hair, spots and dark circles under their eyes were magicked away by technology, leaving only the allure of coltish limbs and Bambi eyes.

A vision of perfection that simply didn’t exist. No wonder women yearn to be super-thin when they never see how ugly thin can be. But why do models starve themselves to be a shape that even high fashion magazines don’t want?

Vogue’s Shulman believes a big part of the problem is that the designer’s sample sizes – the catwalk prototypes of their designs – have got ever smaller.

She says: ‘People say why don’t we use size 12 models; but I can’t if I’m going to do any Prada, Dior, Balenciaga or Chanel collections.’

To fit these clothes, made by men for boyish bodies, the top model agencies only take on the thinnest girls, who tend to be nearly 6ft tall with 24in waists and 33in hips. This is far thinner than the likes of Cindy Crawford ever was (at 5ft 9in, she had a 26in waist).

A glance at model agency websites will reveal clearly reverse retouched images, where ribs and protruding spines have been airbrushed away. Yet instead of hiring some healthier ones and encouraging them to eat, some agencies continue to send girls to jobs even when they look positively ill.

It’s a crazy system, and one that’s bad for all of us. When the ideal woman is emaciated yet smooth-skinned and glowing, more of us will hate our own unretouched bodies which stubbornly refuse to fit into an impossible ideal.

Some of us will starve and binge; others will develop eating disorders; others will opt out completely and give up on being healthily fit.

All I can say is that I’m sorry for my small part in this madness. It is time it stopped – for all our sakes.

NPR
July 05, 2012

Seventeen editor in chief Ann Shoket writes in the latest issue that the magazine’s staff has signed a « Body Peace Treaty » that promises to « never change girls’ body or face shapes » in photos.

Seventeen magazine

Somewhere between school and her extracurricular activities, eighth-grader Julia Bluhm found time to launch a crusade against airbrushed images in one of the country’s top teen magazines.

And this week, she won: Seventeen magazine pledged not to digitally alter body sizes or face shapes of young women featured in its editorial pages, largely in response to the online petition Julia started this spring.

« We should focus on people’s personalities, not just how they look, » she told NPR member station WBUR last month. « If you’re looking for a girlfriend who looks like the models that you see in magazines, you’re never going to find a girlfriend, because those people are edited with computers. »

After hearing too many fellow teens in her ballet class complain about their weight, the 14-year-old started her campaign in April with a petition on Change.org. It called for the magazine to print one unaltered photo spread each month. The petition — and a demonstration at the corporate offices of Hearst, which owns Seventeen — led to more than 80,000 signatures from around the world.

The barrage of correspondence from young girls led Ann Shoket, Seventeen‘s editor-in-chief, to invite Julia for a meeting and subsequently put out a new policy statement on the magazine’s photo enhancements.

The New York Times reports that while Shoket stresses the magazine « never has, never will » digitally alter the body or face shapes of its models, her editor’s letter in the upcoming August issue will reaffirm its commitment. Skolet writes that the entire Seventeen staff has signed an eight-point Body Peace Treaty, promising not to alter natural shapes and include only images of « real girls and models who are healthy. »

« While we work hard behind the scenes to make sure we’re being authentic, your notes made me realize that it was time for us to be more public about our commitment, » Shoket writes in her letter to readers, published in part in Tuesday’s Times. The magazine also promises greater transparency surrounding its photo shoots, showing what goes into the shoots on its behind-the-scenes Tumblr.

Transparency and the new pledge don’t necessarily mean every page in the magazine will be au naturel, because so many pages are filled with ads. The companies doing the advertising aren’t making the same no-Photoshop promise, so it’s unclear what the pact means for digitally enhanced advertisements. Calls to the magazine to comment on the policy haven’t been returned.

« This is a huge victory, and I’m so unbelievably happy, » Julia writes on her online petition page.

But the fight against enhanced images of young girls isn’t over. Inspired by the win, two other middle-school activists are taking on Teen Vogue in a new online petition, which, as of this posting, already has more than 11,000 signatures.

Voir par ailleurs:

Sports
The Debate Over Running While High
For Ultramarathon Runners, Marijuana Has Enormous Benefits—But Is It Ethical?

Frederick Dreier

The Wall Street Journal
Feb. 9, 2015

The grueling sport of ultramarathon has fostered a mingling of two seemingly opposite camps: endurance jocks and potheads.

“If you can find the right level, [marijuana] takes the stress out of running,” says Avery Collins, a 22-year-old professional ultramarathoner. “And it’s a postrace, post-run remedy.”

The painkilling and nausea-reducing benefits of marijuana may make it especially tempting to ultramarathoners, who compete in races that can go far longer—and be much more withering—than the 26.2 miles of a marathon. Ultramarathon is one of the fastest-growing endurance sports; there were almost 1,300 races in the U.S. and Canada in 2014, up from 293 in 2004, according to UltraRunning Magazine.

Ultramarathons last anywhere from 30 to 200 miles, and typically crisscross mountainous terrain and rocky trails. Runners endure stomach cramps and intense pain in their muscles and joints. Competitors often quit after a sudden loss of motivation, matched with the boredom of running for upward of 24 hours straight.

“The person who is going to win an ultra is someone who can manage their pain, not puke and stay calm,” said veteran runner Jenn Shelton. “Pot does all three of those things.”
Advertisement

Shelton said she has trained with marijuana before, but she made a decision to never compete with the drug for ethical reasons, expressly because she believes it enhances performance.

The phenomenon isn’t easily quantified, because even in Colorado, which legalized marijuana, ultra runners declined to go on the record with their marijuana use. But marijuana is a common topic on endurance-running blogs. Often debated is whether marijuana can improve performance, particularly because of its much-heralded capacity for blocking pain. The drug is now legal for medical use in 23 states plus the District of Columbia, and a sizable portion of legal medical users cite chronic pain as a reason.

“There’s good science that suggests cannabinoids block the physical input of pain,” said Dr. Lynn Webster, founder of the Lifetree Pain Clinic in Salt Lake City. Cancer patients have also used marijuana to treat nausea from chemotherapy. For distance runners, nausea can ruin a race, preventing them from ingesting needed calories and nutrients.
Avery Collins runs on a trail near Chautauqua Park in Boulder, Colo. ENLARGE
Avery Collins runs on a trail near Chautauqua Park in Boulder, Colo. Photo: Matthew Staver for The Wall Street Journal

In a nod to the growing acceptance of marijuana as a recreational drug, the World Anti-Doping Agency in 2013 raised the allowable level of THC—the drug’s active ingredient—to an amount that would trigger positive results only in athletes consuming marijuana in competition. That essentially gave the green light to marijuana usage during training, not to mention as a stress reliever the night before a race.

In competition, a WADA spokesman said that marijuana is banned for its perceived performance enhancement, and because its use violates the “spirit of sport.”

USA Track & Field, which governs distance running in America, follows the WADA guideline. “Marijuana is on the banned list and should not be used by athletes at races,” said Jill Geer, a representative with USATF. “We are unequivocal in that.”

‘There’s good science that suggests cannabinoids block the physical input of pain.’
—Dr. Lynn Webster, founder of the Lifetree Pain Clinic

But here’s the catch. Few ultramarathons actually test for drugs, Geer said. Races must pay for drug tests, and the price tag for testing can be prohibitive for smaller events. A USADA spokesperson said that cost for drug testing depends on an event’s location, participation size, length and prominence. The Twin Cities Marathon, for example, spent $3,500 to have USADA conduct six tests at its 2014 event.

In many other sports, a handful of athletes over the years have acknowledged using pot as a painkiller and relaxing agent. Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati—who briefly lost and then regained his 1998 Olympic gold medal after testing positive for pot—admitted that he regularly smoked marijuana during his professional career. Mixed martial arts fighter Nick Diaz is unapologetic for his use of medical marijuana; a positive pot test earned him a yearlong ban in 2012. Retired NFL wide receiver Nate Jackson detailed his marijuana use in a 2013 book, saying he regularly smoked pot to numb his various sports injuries.

Pot’s original inclusion on the Olympic banned list had more to do with politics and ethics than its perceived performance enhancement, said veteran drug tester Don Catlin, who founded the UCLA Olympic Analytic Laboratory. “You can find some people who argue that marijuana has performance-enhancing characteristics. They are few and far between,” he said. “It’s seen more as a drug of abuse than as a drug of performance enhancement.”

The running movement has long been a haven for hippies, and ultramarathons in particular feature an above-average number of ponytailed graybeards.

“There’s a great degree of rugged individualism in every ultramarathoner,” says ultramarathoner Jason “Ras” Vaughn, who operates the popular blog UltraPedestrian.com. “My impression is that the runners who use [marijuana] are people who already smoked it, who now happen to be ultra runners.”

Shelton, the ultra runner who doesn’t use pot during races, said the ultramarathon community generally is aware of those who do so. Pot, she said, is just one of the numerous painkillers that athletes take during the grueling races. It isn’t uncommon for athletes to pop multiple Advil or Tylenol during a 100-mile race.
Collins runs on a trail. ENLARGE
Collins runs on a trail. Photo: Matthew Staver for The Wall Street Journal

Unusually candid about his marijuana usage is Collins. During a typical week at his home in Steamboat Springs, Colo., Collins runs approximately 150 miles and consumes marijuana four or five times. He doesn’t smoke the plant; instead he eats marijuana-laced food, inhales it as water vapor and rubs a marijuana-infused balm onto his legs.

Collins is no back-of-the-pack stoner. In 2014, his first year as a full-time professional runner, he won five ultramarathons. His third-place finish at the Fat Dog 120, a well-known 120-mile race in British Columbia, was the top American result.

Collins says he doesn’t ingest the plant during competitions, though he says he has never been tested. He does train with the drug, on occasion. He says the marijuana balm numbs his leg muscles, and small doses of the plant keep his mind occupied during longer runs, he says. Collins says the miles and hours seem to tick off faster when he is running high.

After a race, Collins eats marijuana candies or cookies to lower his heart rate and relax his muscles.

“You’re running for 17 to 20 hours straight, and when you stop, sometimes your legs and your brain don’t just stop,” Collins said. “Sometimes [pot] is the only way I can fall asleep after racing.”

Collins recently landed a small cash sponsorship with a Colorado company that consults with marijuana growers and sellers. For 2015, he will wear the company’s pot-leaf logo on his jersey and promote the company on social media.

Even as he promotes a marijuana-related sponsor, however, Collins concedes that his latest training strategy—involving shorter, faster, more-focused sessions—doesn’t fit well with running high. So he is doing a lot less of that.

Voir enfin:

Birth of a Washington Word
When warfare gets « kinetic. »
Timothy Noah
Slate
2002

« Retronym » is a word coined by Frank Mankiewicz, George McGovern’s campaign director, to delineate previously unnecessary distinctions. Examples include « acoustic guitar, » « analog watch, » « natural turf, » « two-parent family, » and « offline publication. » Bob Woodward’s new book, Bush at War, introduces a new Washington retronym: « kinetic » warfare. From page 150:
For many days the war cabinet had been dancing around the basic question: how long could they wait after September 11 before the U.S. started going « kinetic, » as they often termed it, against al Qaeda in a visible way? The public was patient, at least it seemed patient, but everyone wanted action. A full military action—air and boots—would be the essential demonstration of seriousness—to bin Laden, America, and the world.
In common usage, « kinetic » is an adjective used to describe motion, but the Washington meaning derives from its secondary definition, « active, as opposed to latent. » Dropping bombs and shooting bullets—you know, killing people—is kinetic. But the 21st-century military is exploring less violent and more high-tech means of warfare, such as messing electronically with the enemy’s communications equipment or wiping out its bank accounts. These are « non-kinetic. » (Why not « latent »? Maybe the Pentagon worries that would make them sound too passive or effeminate.) Asked during a January talk at National Defense University whether « the transformed military of the future will shift emphasis somewhat from kinetic systems to cyber warfare, » Donald Rumsfeld answered, « Yes! » (Rumsfeld uses the words « kinetic » and « non-kinetic » all the time.)
The recent war in Afghanistan demonstrates that when the chips are down, we still find it necessary to go kinetic. Indeed, for all its novel methods of non-kinetic warfare, today’s military is much more deadly than it ever was before. For the foreseeable future, civilians and at least a few soldiers will continue to be killed in war. « Kinetic » seems an objectionable way to describe this reality from the point of view of both doves and hawks. To those who deplore or resist going to war, « kinetic » is unconscionably euphemistic, with antiseptic connotations derived from high-school physics and aesthetic ones traceable to the word’s frequent use by connoisseurs of modern dance. To those who celebrate war (or at least find it grimly necessary), « kinetic » fails to evoke the manly virtues of strength, fierceness, and bravery. Imagine Rudyard Kipling penning the lines, « For it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ ‘Chuck him out, the brute!’/ But it’s ‘Saviour of ‘is country’ when the U.K goes kinetic. » Is it too late to remove this word from the Washington lexicon? Chatterbox suggests a substitute: « fighting. »

Timothy Noah is a former Slate staffer. His  book about income inequality is The Great Divergence.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :