Ebola: C’est Sarkozy qui avait raison (Perfect storm: Outdated beliefs and funeral rituals, witch craftery, denial, conspiracy theories, suspicion of local governments, distrust of western medicine, civil war, corrupt dictatorship, collapsed health systems)

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/10405614_4809587734638_648492990704325538_n.jpg?oh=2c9c795d1d03a335609916c27cf1b805&oe=54B2DF56&__gda__=1424902741_06ca2d972aa259e25142ae08c8c666e1

Nous sommes là pour dire et réclamer : laissez entrer les peuples noirs sur la grande scène de l’Histoire. Aimé Césaire
Ebola (…) J’ai l’impression qu’il y a vraiment un programme d’extermination qui est en train d’être mis en place … Dieudonné
Le drame de l’Afrique, c’est que l’homme africain n’est pas assez entré dans l’histoire. Le paysan africain, qui, depuis des millénaires, vit avec les saisons, dont l’idéal de vie est d’être en harmonie avec la nature, ne connaît que l’éternel recommencement du temps rythmé par la répétition sans fin des mêmes gestes et des mêmes paroles. Dans cet imaginaire, où tout recommence toujours, il n’y a de place ni pour l’aventure humaine, ni pour l’idée de progrès. Dans cet univers où la nature commande tout, l’homme échappe à l’angoisse de l’histoire qui tenaille l’homme moderne mais reste immobile au milieu d’un ordre immuable où tout semble écrit d’avance. Jamais l’homme ne s’élance vers l’avenir. Jamais il ne lui vient à l’idée de sortir de la répétition pour s’inventer un destin. Le problème de l’Afrique, et permettez à un ami de l’Afrique de le dire, il est là. Guaino-Sarkozy
Moi, je pense que non seulement l’homme africain est entré dans l’histoire mais qu’il a même été le premier à y entrer. Rama Yade
Quelqu’un est venu ici vous dire que ‘l’Homme africain n’est pas entré dans l’histoire’. Pardon, pardon pour ces paroles humiliantes et qui n’auraient jamais dû être prononcées et – je vous le dis en confidence – qui n’engagent ni la France, ni les Français. Ségolène Royal
Et si Sarkozy avait raison… (…) L’opinion africaine dite intellectuelle s’est mobilisée, depuis quelques temps, contre le discours de Dakar du président français Nicolas Sarkozy, considéré, à notre avis, sans raison, de discours raciste, méprisant, humiliant. Et pourtant il ne faisait que nous rappeler, amicalement, sans doute d’une manière brutale et maladroite, qu’il était temps que nous sortions de la préhistoire pour entrer dans l’histoire contemporaine d’un monde qui est faite d’imagination, de techniques, de sciences, au lieu de nous complaire dans la médiocrité actuelle de nos choix. Il nous faut, en effet, sortir de notre logique fataliste, fondée sur un ancrage intellectuel, philosophique et culturel dans un passé plusieurs fois centenaire alors que le siècle qui frappe à notre porte exige notre entrée dans l’histoire contemporaine. Baba Diouf (Le Soleil)
Aid, by itself, has never developed anything, but where it has been allied to good public policy, sound economic management, and a strong determination to battle poverty, it has made an enormous difference in countries like India, Indonesia, and even China. Those examples illustrate another lesson of aid. Where it works, it represents only a very small share of the total resources devoted to improving roads, schools, heath services, and other things essential for raising incomes. Aid must not overwhelm or displace local efforts; instead, it must settle with being the junior partner. Because of Africa’s needs, and the stubborn nature of its poverty, the continent has attracted far too much aid and far too much interfering by outsiders. (…) In the last 20 years, some states — like Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Mali — have broken the mould, recognized the importance of taking charge, and tried to use aid more strategically and efficiently. Some commentators would add Benin, Zambia, and Rwanda to that list. But most African governments remain stuck in a culture of dependence or indifference. There are still too many dictators in Africa (six have been in office for more than 25 years) and many elected leaders behave no differently. (…) The Blair Commission Report on Africa in 2005 reported that 70,000 trained professionals leave Africa every year, and until they — and the 40 percent of the continent’s savings that are held abroad — start coming home, we need to use aid more restrictively. An obvious solution is to focus aid on the small number of countries that are trying seriously to fight poverty and corruption. Other countries will need to wait — or settle with only small amounts of aid — until their politics or policies or attitudes to the private sector are more promising. We should also consider introducing incentives for countries to match outside assistance with greater progress in raising local funds. (…) We must not be distracted by recent news of Africa’s « spectacular » growth and its sudden attractiveness to private investment. Some basic things are changing on the continent, with real effects for the future; above all, Africans are speaking out and refusing to accept tired excuses from their governments. But the truth is that most of Africa’s growth — based on oil and mineral exports — has not made a whit of difference to the lives of most Africans. Political freedoms shrank on the continent last year, according to the U.S.-based Freedom House index. A quarter of school-age children are still not enrolled, according to World Bank statistics; many of those that are, are receiving a very mediocre education. And agricultural productivity — the key to reducing poverty — is essentially stagnant. The really good news is likely to stay local and seep out in small doses, until it eventually overwhelms the inertia and indifference of governments. Five years ago, Kenya managed to double its tax revenues because a former businessman, appointed to head the national revenue agency, took a hatchet to the dishonest practices of many tax collectors. He had every reason to do so. Only five percent of Kenya’s budget comes from foreign aid, compared with 40 percent in neighboring countries. This is a good example of the sometimes-perverse effects of aid, but also of the importance of imagination and individual initiative in promoting a better life for Africans. Robert Calderisi
A month ago I visited Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. This suburb of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to more than one million people, who eke out a living in an area of about one square mile — roughly 75% the size of New York’s Central Park. (…)  Kibera festers in Kenya, a country that has one of the highest ratios of development workers per capita. This is also the country where in 2004, British envoy Sir Edward Clay apologized for underestimating the scale of government corruption and failing to speak out earlier. Giving alms to Africa remains one of the biggest ideas of our time — millions march for it, governments are judged by it, celebrities proselytize the need for it. Calls for more aid to Africa are growing louder, with advocates pushing for doubling the roughly $50 billion of international assistance that already goes to Africa each year. Yet evidence overwhelmingly demonstrates that aid to Africa has made the poor poorer, and the growth slower. The insidious aid culture has left African countries more debt-laden, more inflation-prone, more vulnerable to the vagaries of the currency markets and more unattractive to higher-quality investment. It’s increased the risk of civil conflict and unrest (the fact that over 60% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population is under the age of 24 with few economic prospects is a cause for worry). Aid is an unmitigated political, economic and humanitarian disaster. Few will deny that there is a clear moral imperative for humanitarian and charity-based aid to step in when necessary, such as during the 2004 tsunami in Asia. Nevertheless, it’s worth reminding ourselves what emergency and charity-based aid can and cannot do. Aid-supported scholarships have certainly helped send African girls to school (never mind that they won’t be able to find a job in their own countries once they have graduated). This kind of aid can provide band-aid solutions to alleviate immediate suffering, but by its very nature cannot be the platform for long-term sustainable growth. Whatever its strengths and weaknesses, such charity-based aid is relatively small beer when compared to the sea of money that floods Africa each year in government-to-government aid or aid from large development institutions such as the World Bank. Over the past 60 years at least $1 trillion of development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Yet real per-capita income today is lower than it was in the 1970s, and more than 50% of the population — over 350 million people — live on less than a dollar a day, a figure that has nearly doubled in two decades. Even after the very aggressive debt-relief campaigns in the 1990s, African countries still pay close to $20 billion in debt repayments per annum, a stark reminder that aid is not free. In order to keep the system going, debt is repaid at the expense of African education and health care. Well-meaning calls to cancel debt mean little when the cancellation is met with the fresh infusion of aid, and the vicious cycle starts up once again. (…) The most obvious criticism of aid is its links to rampant corruption. Aid flows destined to help the average African end up supporting bloated bureaucracies in the form of the poor-country governments and donor-funded non-governmental organizations. In a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in May 2004, Jeffrey Winters, a professor at Northwestern University, argued that the World Bank had participated in the corruption of roughly $100 billion of its loan funds intended for development. As recently as 2002, the African Union, an organization of African nations, estimated that corruption was costing the continent $150 billion a year, as international donors were apparently turning a blind eye to the simple fact that aid money was inadvertently fueling graft. With few or no strings attached, it has been all too easy for the funds to be used for anything, save the developmental purpose for which they were intended. (…) A constant stream of « free » money is a perfect way to keep an inefficient or simply bad government in power. As aid flows in, there is nothing more for the government to do — it doesn’t need to raise taxes, and as long as it pays the army, it doesn’t have to take account of its disgruntled citizens. No matter that its citizens are disenfranchised (as with no taxation there can be no representation). All the government really needs to do is to court and cater to its foreign donors to stay in power. Stuck in an aid world of no incentives, there is no reason for governments to seek other, better, more transparent ways of raising development finance (such as accessing the bond market, despite how hard that might be). The aid system encourages poor-country governments to pick up the phone and ask the donor agencies for next capital infusion. It is no wonder that across Africa, over 70% of the public purse comes from foreign aid. (…) Africa remains the most unstable continent in the world, beset by civil strife and war. Since 1996, 11 countries have been embroiled in civil wars. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in the 1990s, Africa had more wars than the rest of the world combined. (…) Proponents of aid are quick to argue that the $13 billion ($100 billion in today’s terms) aid of the post-World War II Marshall Plan helped pull back a broken Europe from the brink of an economic abyss, and that aid could work, and would work, if Africa had a good policy environment. Dambisa Moyo
En Afrique, oui, il y a un risque d’épidémisation, mais je ne pense pas qu’elle puisse s’étendre au reste du monde. Bien sûr, il y aura des cas sporadiques en Occident, on recensera encore quelques personnes contaminées venues d’Afrique, ainsi que quelques cas d’infections survenues au contact de ces malades. Mais cela restera très rare. D’une part, les conditions du cycle de propagation naturelle du virus ne sont pas réunies comme c’est le cas en Afrique, où nous avons un parasite porteur du virus, de fortes concentrations humaines, certains comportements humains ou rites particuliers (comme toucher les morts), des conditions sanitaires défavorables, un certain type d’alimentation, etc. D’autre part, le développement de la médecine occidentale permet de mettre en place des moyens d’action pour éviter une généralisation, avec notamment l’isolement absolu du patient, un strict protocole, des équipements médicaux pointus et le développement de stratégies de détection rapide du virus. Malgré un manque au niveau des traitements à l’heure actuelle, le risque n’est donc pas majeur dans les pays développés, mais Ebola sera l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines. Le XXe siècle a marqué le retour des épidémies : dans les années 70, sont apparues les fièvres hémorragiques (dont Ebola); dans les années 80, le VIH; dans les années 90, l’hépatite C; et dans les années 2000, le Sras, la grippe H1N1, le chikungunya, etc. Ces maladies n’ont pas toutes les mêmes caractéristiques épidémiologiques ni la même transmission vectorielle, mais elles se sont propagées à cause d’une série de facteurs, comportementaux et environnementaux. Les échanges, les migrations, les voyages intercontinentaux, mais aussi la pénétration humaine en forêt et la déforestation, qui ont amené les hommes à entrer en contact avec une faune sauvage porteuse d’agents pathogènes, ont favorisé la contamination. Et l’Afrique est un continent qui a un lot considérable d’agents infectieux. Il ne faut d’ailleurs pas oublier qu’Ebola n’est pas le seul fléau en Afrique. Des études ont montré que ce continent concentre 70% des cas de VIH et 90% des cas de choléra. Et 90% des décès de paludisme surviennent en Afrique. Mais il y a aussi toute une conjonction qui fait que c’est un continent malade. La structure sanitaire y est déficitaire, du fait des régimes instables ou des zones de guerre. C’est aussi un territoire de migration. Et encore une fois, les comportements humains sont souvent responsables de la propagation des virus. L’éducation en général, et l’éducation sanitaire en particulier, joue un rôle fondamental. De simples gestes d’hygiène permettraient de réduire les fléaux médicaux qui touchent l’Afrique. Par exemple, les diarrhées «normales» tuent chaque année des centaines de milliers d’enfants. Se laver les mains permettrait de réduire de 50% le taux de mortalité.(…)  Mais Ebola est plus dangereux dans le sens où tous les émonctoires (l’urine, la salive, le liquide séminal…) sont vecteurs de transmission. Le simple fait de toucher le patient est dangereux, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec le sida. Néanmoins, le sida est une maladie chronique de longue durée, tandis qu’Ebola est une maladie très aiguë, avec un très fort taux de mortalité, très rapide. Avec Ebola, l’épidémisation est donc moins forte. (…) J’espère en tout cas qu’Ebola servira de déclencheur pour les différents régimes politiques, qu’ils deviendront plus désireux d’investir l’argent dans un système de santé efficace, sans détourner les fonds. J’espère aussi que cette épidémie va faire prendre conscience aux organisations internationales qu’il faut accorder une aide majeure à l’Afrique, et lui apporter une aide logistique et humaine plus importante. On a commencé, mais c’est encore timide. Pour ce qui est de la société elle-même, des efforts considérables d’information sont à faire. Mais passé une période d’incompréhension et la recherche de responsables (la population met notamment en cause les pouvoirs politiques), la société pourra peut-être aussi changer beaucoup de comportements. Jean-Pierre Dedet
« After the typhoon, we got flooded with calls asking, ‘How do I give?' » Sweeny said. « With this (Ebola), we’re not getting those kinds of requests. » Why the difference? For starters, it’s been evident that national governments will need to shoulder the bulk of the financial burden in combatting Ebola, particularly as its ripple effects are increasingly felt beyond the epicenter in West Africa. Regine A. Webster of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which advises nonprofits on disaster response strategies, said the epidemic blurred the lines in terms of the categories that guide some big donors. « This is a confusing issue for the private donor community — is it a disaster, or a health problem? » Webster said. « Institutions and individuals have been quite slow to respond. » Officials at InterAction, an umbrella group for U.S. relief agencies active abroad, see other intangible factors at work, including the video and photographic images emerging from West Africa. Joel Charny, InterAction’s vice president for humanitarian policy, said it was clear from the imagery out of Haiti and the Philippines that donations could help rebuild shattered homes and schools, while the images of Ebola are more frightening and less conducive to envisioning a happy ending. « People give when they see that there’s a plausible solution, » Charny said. « They can say, ‘If I give my $50 or $200, it’s going to translate in some tangible way into relieving suffering.’ … That makes them feel good. » « With Ebola, there’s kind of a fear factor, » he said. « Even competent agencies are feeling somewhat overwhelmed, and the nature of the disease — being so awful — makes it hard for people to engage. » Huffington Post
Le drame avec Ebola, c’est que cette épidémie s’attaque cruellement et insidieusement à nos valeurs culturelles ! Il y a par exemple la question des enterrements traditionnels, où les familles touchent le corps pendant les rites funéraires. Qui, à présent, pour s’occuper d’une personne emportée par le virus Ebola ? Au Liberia, de nombreux malades atteints par le virus Ebola, préfèrent rester chez eux plutôt que de se rendre dans les centres de santé. La psychose s’est répandue partout. Nul ne se sent désormais à l’abri, dans une Afrique lacérée par des traditions hétéroclites et des pratiques religieuses tenaces. Combattre le virus Ebola, que d’engagements, d’implications mais surtout de renoncements ! Des marchés aux rassemblements qu’occasionnent les naissances, les mariages, les baptêmes, les deuils, les prières et autres rites funéraires, les Africains aiment à s’illustrer comme de bons exemples. Qu’ils soient simples fidèles, parents, amis, connaissances ou voisins, ils ne veulent pas se voir rejetés pour avoir failli un tant soit peu.(…) Avec Ebola, au-delà des modes de vie, c’est aussi le mode de fonctionnement de la cellule familiale et de la société tout entière qu’il faudra revoir. Il faudra oser s’attaquer à des valeurs ancrées dans la cosmogonie africaine, revisiter nos croyances et nos comportements. De vrais défis ! Au Nigeria, on a dû incinérer le cadavre d’une victime d’Ebola. Le médecin qui l’avait soigné a aussi été mis en quarantaine. Pourra-t-on intégrer ces pratiques dans les nouvelles habitudes ? Il le faut pourtant. Pire que la peste et le choléra réunis, l’épidémie d’Ebola détruit les espaces de solidarité. Les pesanteurs socioculturelles ajoutées au manque de moyens (humains, matériels, financiers), le manque de coordination des actions, font de la fièvre rouge, une maladie aussi redoutable qu’effroyable sur le continent. Le médecin traitant, lui-même, est vulnérable. Une implication de l’Occident est requise. Elle doit être forte. Mais, parce qu’il engloutit des sommes colossales, l’Occident doit exiger en contrepartie que les dirigeants africains s’assument plus sérieusement que face au SIDA. En effet, le problème de la délinquance politique et économique reste toujours posé du côté de l’Afrique. Outre les questions relatives à l’hygiène publique et à l’assainissement, des problèmes de mal gouvernance se trouvent au cœur même de la gestion de nos grands fléaux. Pour le cas d’Ebola, celle-ci se propage parce que les politiques africaines de développement, de santé, d’environnement, de population tout court, sont généralement inadéquates. A preuve, des mesures préventives sont recommandées, sans que des dispositions ne soient toujours prises pour annihiler les conséquences fâcheuses au plan socio-économique. Il est bien de défendre aux gens de manger de la viande de brousse ou de chauves-souris, pour se prémunir contre l’infection au virus d’Ebola. Mais, que faire pour compenser les pertes au niveau des chasseurs, des intermédiaires et des vendeurs de viandes prisées de certaines populations ? Il faudra veiller à une saine utilisation des fonds qui seront mis à la disposition des Etats frappés par le mal. Le passé est à ce sujet suffisamment lourd d’enseignements. Face au SIDA, que n’a-t-on pas vu sur ce continent? La délinquance à tous les étages, impliquant des personnes insignifiantes et des hauts cadres, y compris le sommet de l’Etat. Face à l’épidémie d’Ebola, des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises. Si Ebola fait des ravages au point d’ébranler l’âme de l’Afrique, il faut éviter que les délinquants à col blanc ne perpétuent continuellement la saignée du continent, en profitant sans vergogne et impunément des efforts de la communauté internationale. L’expérience de fléaux comme celle du SIDA montre qu’en Afrique, une saine gestion des fonds, sur fond de bonne gouvernance politique, est un bon préalable au recul de l’épidémie. Le Pays
L’état de vétusté des infrastructures sanitaires, la faiblesse des ressources humaines, les problèmes d’hygiène et les traditions funéraires, entre autres, font des pays africains un terreau fertile à la propagation de ce virus. Dans le domaine culturel justement, cette épidémie est en train de détruire l’âme africaine. Les efforts pour contenir les infections commandent, entre autres, une attitude à la limite du rejet des victimes. Les parents et voisins sont invités à éviter de toucher aux corps des personnes ayant succombé, afin d’éviter tout risque de contamination par le virus. Nul doute que cette capacité du virus à se transmettre même après la mort de sa victime, est une cause de panique au sein des populations et cela sape les valeurs légendaires de solidarité africaine de même que des pans de la culture en ce qui concerne le traitement des corps des personnes décédées. (…) la vérité c’est que l’Afrique a, une fois de plus, failli. Comme à son habitude, elle aura manqué de prospective. Si non, comment comprendre qu’un virus qui a fait son apparition depuis 1976 et fait jusque-là de nombreuses victimes en Afrique centrale, n’ait pas, près de 40 ans après, encore été pris au sérieux au point qu’il puisse ressurgir et faire autant de victimes ? Comment comprendre que malgré tous les discours sur la souveraineté de l’Afrique, le sort et le salut du continent soient encore entre les mains des mêmes Occidentaux régulièrement conspués ? Que reste-t-il vraiment encore de la fierté des Africains ? Hélas, tout ce qui intéresse vraiment les dirigeants africains, c’est le pouvoir. (…) Aux Africains donc de se ressaisir, à commencer par leurs dirigeants, pour mériter le respect qu’ils réclament des autres, mais aussi et surtout pour prendre en main eux-mêmes leur destin. Le Pays
Ebola met à nu les tares des systèmes sanitaires africains La gouvernance des Etats africains présente beaucoup d’insuffisances. (…) Une des illustrations les plus frappantes de ce fait est la situation chaotique dans laquelle se trouvent nos systèmes de santé. En effet, la propagation du virus Ebola a contribué à mettre à nu toute l’étendue de cette triste réalité, qui doit désormais interpeller toutes les consciences. Lorsque l’on fait l’état des lieux, l’on peut avoir des raisons objectives d’être remonté contre nos gouvernants.Les zones d’ombre sont nombreuses. Elles se rapportent notamment à l’insuffisance du personnel soignant qualifié, au niveau rudimentaire des plateaux techniques, à la gestion artisanale des structures de santé, au manque de professionnalisme et de motivation des agents de santé, etc. Dans ces conditions, l’on comprend pourquoi la moindre épidémie peut constituer une véritable épreuve pour les autorités sanitaires. (…) Lorsque l’on prend le cas du Libéria qui est l’un des pays le plus touché par le virus, l’on peut tomber des nues de constater que ce pays, qui est indépendant depuis 1847, dispose seulement de 250 médecins, soit un ratio effroyable d’un ou de deux médecins pour 100 000 habitants. Il n’est donc pas étonnant que le pays de William Tolbert ait beaucoup de mal à déployer un personnel qualifié suffisant, pour la prise en charge des personnes infectées et affectées. Que l’on n’aille surtout pas brandir l’insuffisance de moyens financiers pour justifier cet état de fait. En effet, le Libéria regorge d’énormes richesses minières dont l’exploitation judicieuse pourrait permettre au peuple libérien de sortir la tête de l’eau. Malheureusement, ces richesses sont exploitées au profit d’une caste politique qui vit sur un îlot d’opulence, dans un océan de misère et d’indigence indescriptibles. L’exemple du Libéria est celui de la plupart des Etats africains. Lorsqu’il s’agit de répondre aux besoins de base des populations en termes d’éducation, de santé, de logement, l’on n’hésite pas en haut lieu à invoquer le manque de moyens financiers et à tendre sans gêne la sébile à la communauté internationale. Par contre, lorsqu’il s’agit de dépenser pour réaliser des activités dont l’intérêt pour les populations n’est pas évident, l’argent est vite mobilisé. Pour revenir à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, l’on a envie de dire que l’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision. Gouverner, dit-on, c’est prévoir. Mais en Afrique, c’est tout le contraire. C’est le pilotage à vue qui est érigé en mode de gouvernance. Lorsque survient la moindre urgence, c’est le sauve-qui-peut, nos Etats donnant l’impression d’être complètement désarmés. D’ailleurs, le fait qui consiste pour les princes qui nous gouvernent de courir, toutes affaires cessantes, en Occident, même pour soigner leurs petits bobos, est un aveu du peu d’intérêt et de crédit qu’ils accordent à nos structures sanitaires et à nos spécialistes de la santé. La tendance est loin d’être inversée. En effet, nos hôpitaux se présentent de plus en plus comme des antichambres de la mort : les urgences médicales sont difficilement assurées, l’encombrement et l’insalubrité crèvent les yeux. Le Pays
It is traditional beliefs and modern expressions of Christianity that is contributing to the spread of Ebola. This is not just a biomedical crisis, this is driven by beliefs, behaviours and denial. (…) It is enough to have one person who, for example, is at a funeral and can go on to contaminated 10 to 20 people, and it all starts again. (…) We thought it was over, and then a very well known person, a woman who was a powerful traditional practitioner and the head of a secret society, died (…) ‘People from three countries came to her funeral, there dozens of people got infected. From there the virus spread to Sierra Leone and Liberia. (…) It took about 1,000 Africans dying and two Americans being repatriated. That’s basically the equation in the value of life and what triggers an international response. Professor Peter Piot (director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)
Ultimately the spread is due to different cultural practices, as well as infrastructure. Chief among these is how people handle disease, from the avoidance, to the treatment, containment, and the handling of the victims. One aspect of certain beliefs and practices in the area is a deep distrust of medicine, as accusations of cannibalism by doctors, alongside suspicion that the disease is caused by witchcraft, and other conspiracy theories have caused riots outside treatment centres in Sierra Leone, and families to break into hospital to remove patients. The primary issue, however, is the funerary practices. The virus is able to capitalize on the tenderness in West African traditions, with devastating results. Traditional funeral proceedings in West Africa in involve lots of touching, kissing, and general handling (like washing) of the deceased; each victim, in effect, becomes far more dangerous after the virus has killed. A big part of this containment is the fact that urban centres are both better able to handle dangerous cases, and less likely to host them in the first place. This is especially bad, because it means that the most deadly strains are spread the most, and milder variants go extinct. The good news? It’s unlikely that Ebola will become a global pandemic. While there is some possibility of mutations occurring that increase the ability to spread, the fundamental mechanism that makes it deadly would likely be interrupted. The bad news is that until the population is educated in hygiene, the medical establishment, and the dangers of eating carrier species (pig, monkeys, and bats) the virus will continue to ravage these smaller villages. Oneclass
The idea is to train these people here to go back and disseminate the main instructions about the disease.” An Ebola infection often looks like malaria at first, so people may not suspect they have it. It later progresses to the classic symptoms of a hemorrhagic fever, with vomiting, diarrhea, high fever and both internal and external bleeding. With so many bodily fluids pouring from a patient, it is easy to see how caregivers could become infected. we’ve shown people how to do a traditional burial, only wearing gloves. And you can allow the body to be washed briefly. Workers have been attentive to the traditions, allowing the body to be wrapped without exposing people to the virus.” Genetic analysis of the virus causing the current outbreaks show it’s distinct from the virus seen in east Africa. This suggests it may be from a local source. No one’s sure just where Ebola cames from. It can affect great apes but fruit bats are a prime suspect. Today

 C’est Sarkozy qui avait raison !

Croyances et rites funéraires d’un autre âge, sorcellerie, déni, théories du complot, suspicion généralisée des administrations locales, méfiance à l’égard de la médecine occidentale, guerres civiles, dictatures corrompues, effondrement des systèmes de santé, attaques de centres d’isolement  …

A l’heure où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule aide au développement !) …

Un continent qui continue à concentrer les misères du monde (70% des cas de VIH, 90% des cas de choléra et des décès de paludisme, entre 26 et 40% d’alphabétisation, sans parler des filles, pour les pays les plus pauvres) 

Est en train, avec l’une des pires épidémies de son histoire et pendant qu’à l’instar de leurs coreligionnaires d’Irak les djihadistes sahéliens multiplient les exactions, de démontrer au monde toute l’étendue de son sous-développement …

Pendant que jusqu’en Occident même certains propagent les pires théories du complot

Comment ne pas repenser aux paroles, qui avait tant été dénoncées, du discours de Dakar de l’ancien président Sarkozy de juillet 2007 sur la non-entrée dans l’histoire de l’homme noir ?

Et ne pas voir, comme l’ont bien perçu nombre de commentateurs en Afrique même, que c’était bien Sarkozy qui avait raison ?

RAVAGES DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Quand Ebola ébranle l’âme de l’Afrique
Avec le virus Ebola, l’identité culturelle est dangereusement remise en cause par une épidémie qui, du début de l’année à ce jour, a fait 887 morts en Afrique subsaharienne. Des cas ont été signalés aux Etats-Unis.

Le Pays

5 août 2014

Si les deux cas révélés aux Etats-Unis étaient effectivement hors de danger, cela augurerait de bonnes perspectives pour la recherche. Celle-ci semble piétiner depuis la découverte du virus en 1976. A ce propos, l’Occident n’est point exempt de critique. Pourquoi avoir tant négligé les risques de propagation du mal qui avait d’abord sévi en Afrique centrale ? Sans aller jusqu’à jeter l’anathème sur l’Occident, il conviendrait de s’interroger sur le manque patent de médicaments à ce jour : insuffisance de ressources ou tout simplement manque de volonté politique ? Avec les révélations de cas en Occident (Etats-Unis), il faut souhaiter de meilleures dispositions, afin que la recherche vienne à bout de ce fléau.

Ebola s’attaque à nos valeurs culturelles

En tout cas, selon l’OMS, il existe des traitements, même si aucun vaccin homologué n’a encore vu le jour. Cela vient ainsi contredire les idées reçues selon lesquelles la maladie est mortelle à 100%. Que dire du docteur Kent Brantly et de son assistante Nancy Writebol, de retour aux Etats-Unis, après avoir contracté le virus lors de leur mission au Liberia ? Hospitalisés, ils avaient reçu plusieurs injections d’un mystérieux sérum baptisé ZMapp, conçu à San Diego en Californie. Les deux coopérants qui se trouvaient dans un état critique, seraient aujourd’hui dans un état « stable ». Jusque-là, le sérum n’avait été testé que sur quatre singes infectés par Ebola. Ils ont survécu après avoir reçu une dose du produit.Malheureusement, des membres des personnels de santé d’Afrique n’auront pas eu la chance des deux experts américains. Tombés les armes à la main, ces médecins, infirmiers ou sages-femmes méritent d’être célébrés. Le drame avec Ebola, c’est que cette épidémie s’attaque cruellement et insidieusement à nos valeurs culturelles ! Il y a par exemple la question des enterrements traditionnels, où les familles touchent le corps pendant les rites funéraires. Qui, à présent, pour s’occuper d’une personne emportée par le virus Ebola ? Au Liberia, de nombreux malades atteints par le virus Ebola, préfèrent rester chez eux plutôt que de se rendre dans les centres de santé.

La psychose s’est répandue partout. Nul ne se sent désormais à l’abri, dans une Afrique lacérée par des traditions hétéroclites et des pratiques religieuses tenaces. Combattre le virus Ebola, que d’engagements, d’implications mais surtout de renoncements ! Des marchés aux rassemblements qu’occasionnent les naissances, les mariages, les baptêmes, les deuils, les prières et autres rites funéraires, les Africains aiment à s’illustrer comme de bons exemples. Qu’ils soient simples fidèles, parents, amis, connaissances ou voisins, ils ne veulent pas se voir rejetés pour avoir failli un tant soit peu.

La lutte contre Ebola est difficile, mais pas impossible ! Elle devra se mener vaille que vaille, au plan individuel et collectif. Avec Ebola, au-delà des modes de vie, c’est aussi le mode de fonctionnement de la cellule familiale et de la société tout entière qu’il faudra revoir. Il faudra oser s’attaquer à des valeurs ancrées dans la cosmogonie africaine, revisiter nos croyances et nos comportements. De vrais défis ! Au Nigeria, on a dû incinérer le cadavre d’une victime d’Ebola. Le médecin qui l’avait soigné a aussi été mis en quarantaine. Pourra-t-on intégrer ces pratiques dans les nouvelles habitudes ? Il le faut pourtant. Pire que la peste et le choléra réunis, l’épidémie d’Ebola détruit les espaces de solidarité.

Des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises

Les pesanteurs socioculturelles ajoutées au manque de moyens (humains, matériels, financiers), le manque de coordination des actions, font de la fièvre rouge, une maladie aussi redoutable qu’effroyable sur le continent. Le médecin traitant, lui-même, est vulnérable. Une implication de l’Occident est requise. Elle doit être forte. Mais, parce qu’il engloutit des sommes colossales, l’Occident doit exiger en contrepartie que les dirigeants africains s’assument plus sérieusement que face au SIDA. En effet, le problème de la délinquance politique et économique reste toujours posé du côté de l’Afrique. Outre les questions relatives à l’hygiène publique et à l’assainissement, des problèmes de mal gouvernance se trouvent au cœur même de la gestion de nos grands fléaux. Pour le cas d’Ebola, celle-ci se propage parce que les politiques africaines de développement, de santé, d’environnement, de population tout court, sont généralement inadéquates. A preuve, des mesures préventives sont recommandées, sans que des dispositions ne soient toujours prises pour annihiler les conséquences fâcheuses au plan socio-économique. Il est bien de défendre aux gens de manger de la viande de brousse ou de chauves-souris, pour se prémunir contre l’infection au virus d’Ebola. Mais, que faire pour compenser les pertes au niveau des chasseurs, des intermédiaires et des vendeurs de viandes prisées de certaines populations ?

Il faudra veiller à une saine utilisation des fonds qui seront mis à la disposition des Etats frappés par le mal. Le passé est à ce sujet suffisamment lourd d’enseignements. Face au SIDA, que n’a-t-on pas vu sur ce continent? La délinquance à tous les étages, impliquant des personnes insignifiantes et des hauts cadres, y compris le sommet de l’Etat. Face à l’épidémie d’Ebola, des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises. Si Ebola fait des ravages au point d’ébranler l’âme de l’Afrique, il faut éviter que les délinquants à col blanc ne perpétuent continuellement la saignée du continent, en profitant sans vergogne et impunément des efforts de la communauté internationale. L’expérience de fléaux comme celle du SIDA montre qu’en Afrique, une saine gestion des fonds, sur fond de bonne gouvernance politique, est un bon préalable au recul de l’épidémie.

Voir aussi:

PROPAGATION DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Ebola ou la désintégration des peuples
C’est le branle-bas de combat dans tous les pays ou presque. Ceux qui sont touchés cherchent les voies et moyens de contenir le virus ; les autres pays prennent des mesures nécessaires pour prévenir une quelconque infection. En plus de la sous-région ouest-africaine où le cap des 1 000 morts d’Ebola a été dépassé, selon les chiffres de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), les Etats-Unis d’Amérique, l’Inde et le Canada font face à la menace Ebola à travers leurs ressortissants vivant dans les pays touchés. Le virus fait des ravages au point d’être classé ennemi public à l’échelle mondiale.

Le Pays

10 août 2014

Pour l’Afrique, la situation est critique

En effet, face à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, la communauté internationale est à présent sur le pied de guerre. L’OMS, au regard de l’ampleur que prend l’épidémie, a estimé que «les conditions d’une urgence de santé publique de portée mondiale sont réunies » et a sonné la mobilisation générale.

Pour l’Afrique particulièrement, la situation est critique. L’état de vétusté des infrastructures sanitaires, la faiblesse des ressources humaines, les problèmes d’hygiène et les traditions funéraires, entre autres, font des pays africains un terreau fertile à la propagation de ce virus. Dans le domaine culturel justement, cette épidémie est en train de détruire l’âme africaine. Les efforts pour contenir les infections commandent, entre autres, une attitude à la limite du rejet des victimes. Les parents et voisins sont invités à éviter de toucher aux corps des personnes ayant succombé, afin d’éviter tout risque de contamination par le virus. Nul doute que cette capacité du virus à se transmettre même après la mort de sa victime, est une cause de panique au sein des populations et cela sape les valeurs légendaires de solidarité africaine de même que des pans de la culture en ce qui concerne le traitement des corps des personnes décédées. Les mesures prises de part et d’autre pour limiter la propagation du virus sont, bien entendu, fort compréhensibles. Les contrôles des passagers dans bien des pays en Afrique de l’Ouest, participent des moyens de contenir l’épidémie. Mais, on peut s’interroger sur l’efficacité de telles mesures. Les frontières en Afrique, faut-il le rappeler, sont très poreuses et il n’est pas évident de pouvoir soumettre à des tests toutes les personnes qui vont d’un pays à un autre. Cela est surtout vrai pour ceux qui voyagent en train, en bus ou par divers autres moyens de déplacement. Ils sont difficiles à passer au scanner des forces de contrôle. C’est le cas notamment des voyageurs qui empruntent de simples pistes et sentiers reliant des pays. Cela dit et loin de jouer les oiseaux de mauvais augure, il est certain que le virus touche déjà bien plus de pays ouest-africains que la Sierra Leone, le Liberia, la Guinée et le Nigeria. Il ne faut pas se leurrer, le mal touche probablement plus de pays qu’on ne le pense. Et cela n’est pas sans conséquence sur l’intégration des peuples et les activités économiques. En effet, les mesures de riposte ou de prévention prises par la plupart des pays, ont un impact certain sur la libre circulation des personnes. Les entrées étant plus contrôlées aux frontières terrestres ou aériennes des pays, les voyages sont rendus de facto, plus difficiles. De plus, la psychose des contaminations amène des populations à limiter par elles-mêmes leurs déplacements vers d’autres pays, à défaut de les annuler purement et simplement.

La volonté politique et les moyens ne sont pas à la hauteur

En cela, on peut dire que le virus Ebola est un facteur de désintégration des peuples. Et cette désintégration s’accompagne d’une morosité des activités économiques. En témoigne la suspension des liaisons aériennes entre certains pays. L’espoir une fois de plus pourrait venir de l’Occident, notamment de l’Amérique. En tout cas, il est attendu beaucoup du sérum expérimental développé par les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Il faut croiser les doigts pour que ce vaccin soit le plus rapidement possible, disponible avant 2015, comme initialement prévu et qu’il soit efficace. Certes, on peut se dire qu’il aura fallu que les économies et des vies occidentales soient en danger pour que la réponse s’organise à l’échelle mondiale et que des esquisses de solution voient le jour. Mais ce serait faire un faux procès à l’Occident que de ne voir la situation que sous ce prisme. Les Occidentaux défendent leurs intérêts et c’est, le moins du monde, normal. Il est de bon ton que les Etats-Unis d’Amérique se préoccupent du sort de leurs compatriotes contaminés par un virus de l’autre côté de la planète et cela devrait donner à réfléchir à bien des gouvernants. Car, la vérité c’est que l’Afrique a, une fois de plus, failli. Comme à son habitude, elle aura manqué de prospective. Si non, comment comprendre qu’un virus qui a fait son apparition depuis 1976 et fait jusque-là de nombreuses victimes en Afrique centrale, n’ait pas, près de 40 ans après, encore été pris au sérieux au point qu’il puisse ressurgir et faire autant de victimes ? Comment comprendre que malgré tous les discours sur la souveraineté de l’Afrique, le sort et le salut du continent soient encore entre les mains des mêmes Occidentaux régulièrement conspués ? Que reste-t-il vraiment encore de la fierté des Africains ? Hélas, tout ce qui intéresse vraiment les dirigeants africains, c’est le pouvoir. C’est le moins que l’on puisse dire au regard du fait qu’ils sont incapables de résoudre les problèmes de santé et d’éducation des populations pour ne citer que cela. L’Afrique devrait pouvoir prendre en charge elle-même la recherche dans des domaines où ses intérêts sont en jeu. Elle a la matière grise pour cela. Seulement, l’esprit d’anticipation fait largement défaut. On attend toujours que la situation soit hors de contrôle ou en passe de l’être, pour réagir. De plus, la volonté politique et les moyens ne sont pas à la hauteur pour des pays qui rêvent d’émergence. Il n’y a qu’à observer les parts des budgets réservées à la recherche qui, comme on le sait, sont généralement modiques sous nos tropiques. Pourtant, il est évident que dans la lutte contre le virus Ebola et les autres maladies qui écument le continent, si les chercheurs africains arrivaient à mettre au point des vaccins ou des remèdes dont la qualité scientifique est éprouvée, le reste du monde ne pourrait que s’incliner devant de telles découvertes. C’est dire que le respect et la reconnaissance des autres en matière de recherches scientifiques comme dans bien d’autres domaines, se méritent. Aux Africains donc de se ressaisir, à commencer par leurs dirigeants, pour mériter le respect qu’ils réclament des autres, mais aussi et surtout pour prendre en main eux-mêmes leur destin.

Voir encore:

PROPAGATION DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Quand Ebola met à nu les tares des systèmes sanitaires africains
La gouvernance des Etats africains présente beaucoup d’insuffisances. Il n’y a que les personnes de mauvaise foi qui peuvent en douter. Une des illustrations les plus frappantes de ce fait est la situation chaotique dans laquelle se trouvent nos systèmes de santé. En effet, la propagation du virus Ebola a contribué à mettre à nu toute l’étendue de cette triste réalité, qui doit désormais interpeller toutes les consciences. Lorsque l’on fait l’état des lieux, l’on peut avoir des raisons objectives d’être remonté contre nos gouvernants.

Pousdem Pickou

Le Pays
21 août 2014

L’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision

Les zones d’ombre sont nombreuses. Elles se rapportent notamment à l’insuffisance du personnel soignant qualifié, au niveau rudimentaire des plateaux techniques, à la gestion artisanale des structures de santé, au manque de professionnalisme et de motivation des agents de santé, etc. Dans ces conditions, l’on comprend pourquoi la moindre épidémie peut constituer une véritable épreuve pour les autorités sanitaires. Certes, Ebola n’est pas comme les autres maladies infectieuses, mais la précarité et le dénuement dans lesquels évoluent les systèmes sanitaires de bien des Etats africains, peuvent expliquer en partie sa propagation. Lorsque l’on prend le cas du Libéria qui est l’un des pays le plus touché par le virus, l’on peut tomber des nues de constater que ce pays, qui est indépendant depuis 1847, dispose seulement de 250 médecins, soit un ratio effroyable d’un ou de deux médecins pour 100 000 habitants. Il n’est donc pas étonnant que le pays de William Tolbert ait beaucoup de mal à déployer un personnel qualifié suffisant, pour la prise en charge des personnes infectées et affectées. Que l’on n’aille surtout pas brandir l’insuffisance de moyens financiers pour justifier cet état de fait. En effet, le Libéria regorge d’énormes richesses minières dont l’exploitation judicieuse pourrait permettre au peuple libérien de sortir la tête de l’eau. Malheureusement, ces richesses sont exploitées au profit d’une caste politique qui vit sur un îlot d’opulence, dans un océan de misère et d’indigence indescriptibles. L’exemple du Libéria est celui de la plupart des Etats africains. Lorsqu’il s’agit de répondre aux besoins de base des populations en termes d’éducation, de santé, de logement, l’on n’hésite pas en haut lieu à invoquer le manque de moyens financiers et à tendre sans gêne la sébile à la communauté internationale. Par contre, lorsqu’il s’agit de dépenser pour réaliser des activités dont l’intérêt pour les populations n’est pas évident, l’argent est vite mobilisé. Pour revenir à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, l’on a envie de dire que l’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision. Gouverner, dit-on, c’est prévoir.

Il y a urgence à repenser les systèmes de santé des pays africains

Mais en Afrique, c’est tout le contraire. C’est le pilotage à vue qui est érigé en mode de gouvernance. Lorsque survient la moindre urgence, c’est le sauve-qui-peut, nos Etats donnant l’impression d’être complètement désarmés. D’ailleurs, le fait qui consiste pour les princes qui nous gouvernent de courir, toutes affaires cessantes, en Occident, même pour soigner leurs petits bobos, est un aveu du peu d’intérêt et de crédit qu’ils accordent à nos structures sanitaires et à nos spécialistes de la santé. La tendance est loin d’être inversée. En effet, nos hôpitaux se présentent de plus en plus comme des antichambres de la mort : les urgences médicales sont difficilement assurées, l’encombrement et l’insalubrité crèvent les yeux. Ces réalités laissent de marbre certains gouvernants. C’est dans ce contexte que certains Etats africains poussent l’indécence jusqu’à l’extrême, en parlant d’émergence. Face à un tel ridicule qui consiste à se chatouiller pour rire, l’on a envie de se poser la question suivante : Sacrée Afrique, quand est-ce que tu vas cesser d’être la risée des autres ? Cela dit, aujourd’hui plus jamais, il y a urgence à repenser les systèmes de santé des pays africains. Cela nécessite certes des moyens financiers, mais surtout de l’ingéniosité et de la volonté politique. L’Afrique a certainement des chercheurs de qualité. Mais encore faut-il qu’ils aient le minimum de moyens pour mener leurs recherches. C’est en adoptant de nouvelles résolutions, en termes de bonne gouvernance, que l’on pourra dire que l’Afrique a tiré leçon des ravages que la fièvre rouge est en train de faire sur son sol.

Voir de plus:

L’homme africain et l’histoire

Henri Guaino
Le Monde

26.07.2008

Il y a un an à Dakar, le président de la République française prononçait sa première grande allocution en terre africaine. On sait le débat qu’elle a provoqué. Jamais pourtant un président français n’avait été aussi loin sur l’esclavage et la colonisation : « Il y a eu la traite négrière. Il y a eu l’esclavage, les hommes, les femmes, les enfants achetés et vendus comme des marchandises. Et ce crime ne fut pas seulement un crime contre les Africains, ce fut un crime contre l’homme, ce fut un crime contre l’humanité tout entière (…). Jadis les Européens sont venus en Afrique en conquérants. Ils ont pris la terre de vos ancêtres. Ils ont banni les dieux, les langues, les croyances, les coutumes de vos pères. Ils ont dit à vos pères ce qu’ils devaient penser, ce qu’ils devaient croire, ce qu’ils devaient faire. Ils ont eu tort. »

Mais il a voulu rappeler en même temps que, parmi les colons, « il y avait aussi des hommes de bonne volonté (…) qui ont construit des ponts, des routes, des hôpitaux, des dispensaires, des écoles (…) ». Il doit beaucoup à Senghor, qui proclamait : « Nous sommes des métis culturels. » C’est sans doute pourquoi il a tant déplu à une certaine intelligentsia africaine qui trouvait Senghor trop francophile. Il ne doit en revanche rien à Hegel. Dommage pour ceux qui ont cru déceler un plagiat. Reste que la tonalité de certaines critiques pose une question : faut-il avoir une couleur de peau particulière pour avoir le droit de parler des problèmes de l’Afrique sans être accusé de racisme ?

A ceux qui l’avaient accusé de racisme à propos de Race et culture (1971), Lévi-Strauss avait répondu : « En banalisant la notion même de racisme, en l’appliquant à tort et à travers, on la vide de son contenu et on risque d’aboutir à un résultat inverse de celui qu’on recherche. Car qu’est-ce que le racisme ? Une doctrine précise (…). Un : une corrélation existe entre le patrimoine génétique d’une part, les aptitudes intellectuelles et les dispositions morales d’autre part. Deux : ce patrimoine génétique est commun à tous les membres de certains groupements humains. Trois : ces groupements appelés « races » peuvent être hiérarchisés en fonction de la qualité de leur patrimoine génétique. Quatre : ces différences autorisent les « races » dites supérieures à commander, exploiter les autres, éventuellement à les détruire. »

Où trouve-t-on une telle doctrine dans le discours de Dakar ? Où est-il question d’une quelconque hiérarchie raciale ? Il est dit, au contraire : « L’homme africain est aussi logique et raisonnable que l’homme européen. » Et « le drame de l’Afrique n’est pas dans une prétendue infériorité de son art, de sa pensée, de sa culture, car pour ce qui est de l’art, de la pensée, de la culture, c’est l’Occident qui s’est mis à l’école de l’Afrique ».

Est-ce raciste de dire : « En écoutant Sophocle, l’Afrique a entendu une voix plus familière qu’elle ne l’aurait cru et l’Occident a reconnu dans l’art africain des formes de beauté qui avaient jadis été les siennes et qu’il éprouvait le besoin de ressusciter » ?

Parler de « l’homme africain » était-il raciste ? Mais qui a jamais vu quelqu’un traité de raciste parce qu’il parlait de l’homme européen ? Nul n’ignore la diversité de l’Afrique. A Dakar, le président a dit : « Je veux m’adresser à tous les Africains, qui sont si différents les uns des autres, qui n’ont pas la même langue, la même religion, les mêmes coutumes, la même culture, la même histoire, et qui pourtant se reconnaissent les uns les autres comme Africains. »

Chercher ce que les Africains ont en commun n’est pas plus inutile ni plus sot que de chercher ce que les Européens ont en partage. L’anthropologie culturelle est un point de vue aussi intéressant que celui de l’historien sur la réalité du monde.

UN DISCOURS POUR LA JEUNESSE

Revenons un instant sur le passage qui a déchaîné tant de passions et qui dit que « l’homme africain n’est pas assez entré dans l’histoire ». Nulle part il n’est dit que les Africains n’ont pas d’histoire. Tout le monde en a une. Mais le rapport à l’histoire n’est pas le même d’une époque à une autre, d’une civilisation à l’autre. Dans les sociétés paysannes, le temps cyclique l’emporte sur le temps linéaire, qui est celui de l’histoire. Dans les sociétés modernes, c’est l’inverse.

L’homme moderne est angoissé par une histoire dont il est l’acteur et dont il ne connaît pas la suite. Cette conception du temps qui se déploie dans la durée et dans une direction, c’est Rome et le judaïsme qui l’ont expérimentée les premiers. Puis il a fallu des millénaires pour que l’Occident invente l’idéologie du progrès. Cela ne veut pas dire que dans toutes les autres formes de civilisation il n’y a pas eu des progrès, des inventions cumulatives. Mais l’idéologie du progrès telle que nous la connaissons est propre à l’héritage des Lumières.

En 1947, Emmanuel Mounier partait à la rencontre de l’Afrique, et en revenant il écrivit : « Il semble que le temps inférieur de l’Africain soit accordé à un monde sans but, à une durée sans hâte, que son bonheur soit de se laisser couler au fil des jours et non pas de brûler les espaces et les minutes. » Raciste, Mounier ?

A propos du paysan africain, le discours parle d’imaginaire, non de faits historiques. Il ne s’agissait pas de désigner une classe sociale, mais un archétype qui imprègne encore la mentalité des fils et des petits-fils de paysans qui habitent aujourd’hui dans les villes.

L’Afrique est le berceau de l’humanité, et nul n’a oublié ni l’Egypte ni les empires du Ghana et du Mali, ni le royaume du Bénin, ni l’Ethiopie. Mais les grands Etats furent l’exception, dit Braudel, qui ajoute : « L’Afrique noire s’est ouverte mal et tardivement sur le monde extérieur. » Raciste, Braudel ?

L’homme africain est entré dans l’histoire et dans le monde, mais pas assez. Pourquoi le nier ?

Ce discours ne s’adressait pas aux élites installées, aux notables de l’Afrique. Mais à sa jeunesse qui s’apprête à féconder l’avenir. Et il lui dit : « Vous êtes les héritiers des plus vieilles traditions africaines et vous êtes les héritiers de tout ce que l’Occident a déposé dans le coeur et dans l’âme de l’Afrique », la liberté, la justice, la démocratie, l’égalité vous appartiennent aussi.

L’Afrique n’est pas en dehors du monde. D’elle aussi, il dépend que le monde de demain soit meilleur. Mais l’engagement de l’Afrique dans le monde a besoin d’une volonté africaine, car « la réalité de l’Afrique, c’est celle d’un grand continent qui a tout pour réussir et qui ne réussit pas parce qu’il n’arrive pas à se libérer de ses mythes ». Cessons de ressasser le passé et tournons-nous ensemble vers l’avenir. Cet avenir a un nom : l’Eurafrique, et l’Union pour la Méditerranée en est la première étape. Voilà ce que le président de la République a dit en substance à Dakar.

On a beaucoup parlé des critiques, moins de ceux qui ont approuvé, comme le président de l’Afrique du Sud, M. Thabo Mbeki. On n’a pas parlé du livre si sérieux, si honnête d’André Julien Mbem, jeune philosophe originaire du Cameroun. Parlera-t-on du livre si savant à paraître bientôt à Abidjan de Pierre Franklin Tavares, philosophe spécialiste de Hegel, originaire du Cap-Vert ?

L’éditorial du quotidien sénégalais Le Soleil du 9 avril dernier était intitulé : « Et si Sarkozy avait raison ? » Bara Diouf, grande figure du journalisme africain, qui fut l’ami de Cheikh Anta Diop (1923-1986, historien et anthropologue sénégalais), écrivait : « Le siècle qui frappe à notre porte exige notre entrée dans l’histoire contemporaine. »

Raciste, Bara Diouf ou mauvais connaisseur de l’Afrique ?

Toute l’Afrique n’a pas rejeté le discours de Dakar. Encore faut-il le lire avec un peu de bonne foi. On peut en discuter sans mépris, sans insultes. Est-ce trop demander ? Et si nous n’en sommes pas capables, à quoi ressemblera demain notre démocratie ?

Henri Guaino est conseiller spécial du président de la République

Voir encore:

Ebola : « Le risque n’est pas majeur dans les pays développés »
Tatiana Salvan

Libération

17 octobre 2014

INTERVIEW Selon le microbiologiste Jean-Pierre Dedet, les conditions d’une épidémie ne sont pas réunies en Occident. Mais Ebola sera bien l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines.

Avec l’annonce d’un deuxième cas d’infection par le virus Ebola aux Etats-Unis, l’Occident redoute plus que jamais qu’Ebola ne franchisse les frontières. La France vient d’annoncer la mise en place d’un dispositif de contrôle sanitaire dans les aéroports français. Mais pour Jean-Pierre Dedet, professeur émérite à l’université Montpellier I et microbiologiste, auteur de Epidémies, de la peste noire à la grippe A/H1N1 (2010), l’épidémie d’Ebola restera concentrée en Afrique.

Sur le même sujetLe Sénégal n’est plus touché par Ebola
Selon l’OMS, l’épidémie d’Ebola pourrait faire 10 000 nouveaux cas par semaine. Existe-il un véritable risque de pandémie ?

En Afrique, oui, il y a un risque d’épidémisation, mais je ne pense pas qu’elle puisse s’étendre au reste du monde. Bien sûr, il y aura des cas sporadiques en Occident, on recensera encore quelques personnes contaminées venues d’Afrique, ainsi que quelques cas d’infections survenues au contact de ces malades. Mais cela restera très rare. D’une part, les conditions du cycle de propagation naturelle du virus ne sont pas réunies comme c’est le cas en Afrique, où nous avons un parasite porteur du virus, de fortes concentrations humaines, certains comportements humains ou rites particuliers (comme toucher les morts), des conditions sanitaires défavorables, un certain type d’alimentation, etc. D’autre part, le développement de la médecine occidentale permet de mettre en place des moyens d’action pour éviter une généralisation, avec notamment l’isolement absolu du patient, un strict protocole, des équipements médicaux pointus et le développement de stratégies de détection rapide du virus. Malgré un manque au niveau des traitements à l’heure actuelle, le risque n’est donc pas majeur dans les pays développés, mais Ebola sera l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines.

Comment situer Ebola par rapport aux autres grandes épidémies ?

Le XXe siècle a marqué le retour des épidémies : dans les années 70, sont apparues les fièvres hémorragiques (dont Ebola); dans les années 80, le VIH; dans les années 90, l’hépatite C; et dans les années 2000, le Sras, la grippe H1N1, le chikungunya, etc. Ces maladies n’ont pas toutes les mêmes caractéristiques épidémiologiques ni la même transmission vectorielle, mais elles se sont propagées à cause d’une série de facteurs, comportementaux et environnementaux. Les échanges, les migrations, les voyages intercontinentaux, mais aussi la pénétration humaine en forêt et la déforestation, qui ont amené les hommes à entrer en contact avec une faune sauvage porteuse d’agents pathogènes, ont favorisé la contamination. Et l’Afrique est un continent qui a un lot considérable d’agents infectieux.

Il ne faut d’ailleurs pas oublier qu’Ebola n’est pas le seul fléau en Afrique. Des études ont montré que ce continent concentre 70% des cas de VIH et 90% des cas de choléra. Et 90% des décès de paludisme surviennent en Afrique. Mais il y a aussi toute une conjonction qui fait que c’est un continent malade. La structure sanitaire y est déficitaire, du fait des régimes instables ou des zones de guerre. C’est aussi un territoire de migration. Et encore une fois, les comportements humains sont souvent responsables de la propagation des virus.

Les fléaux médicaux en Afrique en 2012 comparés à l’épidémie d’Ebola en 2014

L’éducation est donc essentielle pour éviter les épidémies ?

L’éducation en général, et l’éducation sanitaire en particulier, joue un rôle fondamental. De simples gestes d’hygiène permettraient de réduire les fléaux médicaux qui touchent l’Afrique. Par exemple, les diarrhées «normales» tuent chaque année des centaines de milliers d’enfants. Se laver les mains permettrait de réduire de 50% le taux de mortalité.

Peut-on comparer le virus Ebola au VIH ?

Ils ont un point commun : la transmission directe interhumaine. Mais Ebola est plus dangereux dans le sens où tous les émonctoires (l’urine, la salive, le liquide séminal…) sont vecteurs de transmission. Le simple fait de toucher le patient est dangereux, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec le sida. Néanmoins, le sida est une maladie chronique de longue durée, tandis qu’Ebola est une maladie très aiguë, avec un très fort taux de mortalité, très rapide. Avec Ebola, l’épidémisation est donc moins forte.

Cette épidémie peut influencer le mode de fonctionnement de la société africaine ?

J’espère en tout cas qu’Ebola servira de déclencheur pour les différents régimes politiques, qu’ils deviendront plus désireux d’investir l’argent dans un système de santé efficace, sans détourner les fonds. J’espère aussi que cette épidémie va faire prendre conscience aux organisations internationales qu’il faut accorder une aide majeure à l’Afrique, et lui apporter une aide logistique et humaine plus importante. On a commencé, mais c’est encore timide.

Pour ce qui est de la société elle-même, des efforts considérables d’information sont à faire. Mais passé une période d’incompréhension et la recherche de responsables (la population met notamment en cause les pouvoirs politiques), la société pourra peut-être aussi changer beaucoup de comportements.

Voir de même:

Peur
Le virus Ebola alimente les théories du complot
Pierre Haski
Rue 89
03/08/2014

Obama veut imposer une « tyrannie médicale » et des médecins apportent la maladie en Afrique. Voilà les explications qui émergent alors que l’épidémie s’amplifie, et menacent prévention et mesures de précaution.

Une épidémie d’une maladie incurable, mystérieuse, alimente toujours les théories du complot ou les thèses farfelues. Ce fut le cas du sida dans les années 80, avant que le monde devienne -hélas- familier de ce virus ; c’est aujourd’hui le cas d’Ebola, qui sévit en Afrique de l’ouest.

Le rapatriement aux Etats-Unis, samedi, d’un médecin américain contaminé par le virus Ebola, a donné un nouvel élan aux amateurs de complots, jouant avec le risque de prolifération de l’épidémie sur le sol américain.

Le Dr Kent Brantly, qui travaillait au Libéria avec les patients d’Ebola, a été contaminé et rapatrié samedi à Atlanta, où il est arrivé revêtu d’un scaphandre de protection, suffisamment fort pour descendre seul de l’ambulance. Une deuxième américaine contaminée devrait être rapatriée dans les prochains jours, dans les mêmes conditions.

« Complot eugéniste et mondialiste »
Dès samedi, l’un des « complotistes » les plus célèbres des Etats-Unis, Alex Jones, qui débusque le « globaliste » derrière chaque geste de l’administration américaine et a l’oreille du « Tea Party », s’en est ému dans une vidéo sur son site Infowars.com et sur YouTube. Il s’insurge :

« Mesdames, Messieurs, c’est sans précédent pour un gouvernement occidental d’amener une personne atteinte de quelque chose d’aussi mortel qu’Ebola dans leur propre pays. (…) C’est le signe qu’on cherche à susciter la terreur et l’effroi, afin d’imposer une tyrannie médicale encore plus forte. »

Pour ce « guerrier de l’info », comme il se décrit, qui n’a pas moins de 250 000 abonnés à son compte Twitter, le virus ne restera pas confiné à l’hôpital et s’échappera. « Il s’agit d’un gouvernement et d’un système politique qui se moquent des gens », accusant les « eugénistes “ et les ‘mondialistes’ de déployer un scénario catastrophe.

Au même moment, pourtant, les autorités américaines expliquent qu’elles ont ramené le Dr Brantly à Atlanta pour lui donner une chance de survivre, en renforçant ses défenses dans l’espoir qu’il surmonte l’attaque du virus. Le taux de mortalité de cette souche d’Ebola n’est ‘que’ de 60% environ, contre plus de 90% pour d’autres épidémies antérieures en Afrique.

Et ils le font dans l’endroit le plus adapté : Atlanta est le siège du Centre de contrôle des maladies infectieuses (CDC) aux Etats-Unis, et de l’un des seuls labos au monde spécialisés dans les virus, un laboratoire de niveau P4, le plus élevé et dans lequel la sécurité est la plus rigoureuse, avec plusieurs sas de décontamination pour s’y déplacer. L’autre labo du même type au monde se trouve … à Lyon.

‘Ebola, Ebola’
Il n’y a pas qu’aux Etats-Unis que la menace d’Ebola suscite fantasmes et peurs quasi-millénaristes : Adam Nossiter, l’envoyé spécial du New York Times racontait il y a quelques jours de Guinée –l’un des pays les plus touchés par Ebola– comment des villageois ont constitué des groupes d’autodéfense pour empêcher les équipes médicales d’approcher. ‘Partout où elles passent, on voit apparaître la maladie’, dit un jeune Guinéen interdisant l’accès de son village.

Son récit se poursuit :

‘Les travailleurs [sanitaires] et les officiels, rendus responsables par des populations en panique pour la propagation du virus, ont été menacés avec des couteaux, des pierres et des machettes, et leurs véhicules ont parfois été entourés par des foules menaçantes. Des barrages de troncs d’arbre interdisent l’accès aux équipes médicales dans les villages où l’on soupçonne la présence du virus. Des villageois malades ou morts, coupés de toute aide médicale, peuvent dès lors infecter d’autres personnes.

C’est très inhabituel, on ne nous fait pas confiance, dit Marc Poncin, coordinateur pour la Guinée de Médecins sans Frontières, le principal groupe luttant contre le virus. Nous ne pouvons pas stopper l’épidémie.’
Le journaliste ajoute que les gens s’enfuient à la vue d’une croix rouge, et crient ‘Ebola, Ebola’ à la vue d’un Occidental. Un homme en train de creuser une tombe pour un patient décédé du virus conclut : ‘nous ne pouvons rien faire, seul Dieu peut nous sauver’.

Sur le site du New Yorker, Richard Preston, auteur d’un livre sur Ebola dont nous avons cité de larges extraits récemment, raconte qu’au Libéria, les malades d’Ebola quittent la capitale, Monrovia, dont le système de santé est dépassé par l’épidémie, et retournent dans leur village d’origine pour consulter des guérisseurs ou simplement rejoindre leurs familles. Au risque de diffuser un peu plus le virus.

Le sida pour ‘décourager les amoureux’
Peurs, fantasmes, parano sont fréquents à chaque nouvelle maladie. Ce fut le cas lors de l’apparition du sida au début des années 80. A Kinshasa, durement touchée par la pandémie, la population n’a pas cru aux explications officielles sur la transmission sexuelle du virus, et avait rebaptisé le sida ‘Syndrome inventé pour décourager les amoureux’… Les églises évangélistes s’en étaient emparées pour parler de ‘punition divine’ et recruter un peu plus de brebis égarées.

Pire, en Afrique du Sud, la méfiance vis-à-vis de la médecine occidentale a gagné jusqu’au Président de l’époque, Thabo Mbeki, qu’on aurait cru plus prudent, et qui avait encouragé le recours à des remèdes traditionnels plutôt que les antirétroviraux qui commençaient à faire leur apparition et ont, depuis, fait leurs preuves. Un temps précieux, et beaucoup de vies humaines, ont été sacrifiés dans cette folie.

Avec le temps, la connaissance de la maladie et de ses modes de transmission a progressé, même s’il reste de nombreuses inégalités dans les accès aux soins.

Bien que le virus ait été identifié en 1976, il y a près de quatre décennies, les épidémies ont été très localisées, et de brève durée. Elle reste donc peu connue en dehors des spécialistes, et surtout entourée d’une réputation terrifiante : pas de remède, fort taux de mortalité, virus mutant…

Avec retard, la mobilisation internationale se met en place pour contenir l’épidémie apparue en Afrique de l’Ouest. L’information des populations n’est pas la tache la moins importante. Même s’il est probable qu’aucun argument rationnel ne pourra convaincre Alex Jones et ses disciples que l’administration Obama, malgré tous ses défauts, n’est pas en train d’importer Ebola pour quelque projet d’eugénisme au sein de la population américaine…

Voir par ailleurs:

Kissing the Corpses in Ebola Country
Ebola victims are most infectious right after death—which means that West African burial practices, where families touch the bodies, are spreading the disease like wildfire.

Abby Hagelage

The Daily beast
08.13.14

From 8 a.m. to midnight, wearing three pairs of gloves, the young men of Sierra Leone bury Ebola casualities. An activity that’s earned the Red Cross recruits an unwelcome designation: The Dead Body Management Team.

Some days, just one call to collect a newly deceased victim comes in from the Kailahun district. Some days, the team receives nine. The calls from medical professionals at isolation centers are met with relief. These bodies have been quarantined. The infection can—with copious amounts of disinfectant (bleach) and meticulous attention to detail—end there. Once cleaned and sealed in two body bags, the corpse will be driven to a fresh row of graves. In gowns, boots, goggles, and masks, the men will lower the body into a 6-foot grave below. In these burials, safety trumps tradition.

The harder phone calls that the Dead Body Management Team receives, and the more dangerous burials they perform, take place in the communities themselves. Here, they must walk a delicate line between allowing the family to perform goodbye rituals and safeguarding the living from infecting themselves. The washing, touching, and kissing of these bodies—typical in many West African burials—can be deadly. But prohibiting communities from properly honoring their dead ones—and thereby worsening their distrust in medical professionals—can be deadly, too.

Insufficient medical care, shortage of supplies, and lack of money are undoubtedly contributing to an epidemic the World Health Organization has a deemed a “national disaster.” But with a death toll now topping 1,000 in four countries, it’s the battle over dead bodies that is fueling it.

***

In the remains of a deceased victim, Ebola lives on. Tears, saliva, urine, blood—all are inundated with a lethal viral load that threatens to steal any life it touches. Fluids outside the body (and in death, there are many) are highly contagious. According to the World Health Organization, they remain so for at least three days.

Dr. Terry O’Sullivan, director of the Center for Emergency Management and Homeland Security Policy Research, spent three years volunteering in Sierra Leone. He hasn’t witnessed an Ebola outbreak directly, but has watched a hemorrhagic fever overtake the body—which he describes in vivid detail. “Those that have just died are teeming with virus, in all their fluids,” says O’Sullivan. “That is in fact the worst point because their immune systems are failed…they are leaking out of every orifice. They are extremely dangerous.” A passage in the 2004 paper Containing a Haemorrhagic Fever Epidemic published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases paints an even bleaker picture. Citing two specific studies, the authors suggest that a “high concentration of the virus is secreted on the skin of the dead.”

With fluids seeping out of every body opening, and potentially every pore, it’s no mystery why the burial rituals of West Africa pose such a danger. In a pamphlet on safety methods for treating victims of Ebola, The World Health Organization outlines proper procedures to prevent infection from spreading outward from a deceased Ebola victim. “Be aware of the family’s cultural practices and religious beliefs,” the WHO document reads. “Help the family understand why some practices cannot be done because they place the family or others at risk for exposure…explain to the family that viewing the body is not possible.”

Villagers began running from the ambulances, trying to burn down hospitals, and attacking humanitarian workers.

Telling this to the families of deceased is one thing—making sure they understand is entirely another. In Sierra Leone, a country whose literacy rate in 2013 was just over 35 percent, it’s particularly challenging. In neighboring Guinea and Liberia, two places with similar levels of poverty and illiteracy, education alone isn’t a viable solution either.

It’s a phenomenon O’Sullivan witnessed firsthand in Sierra Leone. “People have no idea how infectious diseases work. They see people go into the hospital sick and come out dead—or never come out at all,” he says. “They think if they can avoid the hospital they can survive.” This mistrust of the medical world seems to be validated when a family is prohibited from honoring the dead, participating in the funeral, or even seeing the body.

Prior Ebola outbreaks in Africa, specifically in Uganda in 2000, have yielded similar reactions among afflicted communities. Dr. Barry Hewlett and Dr. Bonnie Hewlett, the first anthropologist to be invited by WHO to join a medical intervention team, studied the Ugandan Ebola outbreak. In a book cataloging their experience—Ebola, Culture, and Politics: The Anthropology of an Emerging Disease— they explore the dangers of African burial rituals, as well as the dangers of prohibiting them.

In the Ugandan ceremonies the Hewletts witnessed, the sister of the deceased’s father is responsible for bathing, cleaning, and dressing the body in a “favorite outfit.” This task, they write, is “too emotionally painful” for the immediate family. In the event that no aunt exists, a female elder in the community takes this role on. The next step, the mourning, is where the real ceremony takes place. “Funerals are major cultural events that can last for days, depending on the status of the deceased person,” they write. As the women “wail” and the men “dance,” the community takes time to “demonstrate care and respect for the dead.” The more important the person, the longer the mourning. When the ceremony is coming to a close, a common bowl is used for ritual hand-washing, and a final touch or kiss on the face of the corpse (which is known as a “a love touch”) is bestowed on the dead. When the ceremony has concluded, the body is buried on land that directly adjoins the deceased’s house because “the family wants the spirit to be happy and not feel forgotten.”

According to the Hewletts’ analysis, these burial rituals and funerals are a critical way for the community to safely transfer the deceased into the afterlife. Prohibiting families from performing such rites is not only viewed as an affront to the deceased, but as actually putting the family in danger. “In the event of an improper burial, the deceased person’s spirit (tibo) will cause harm and illness to the family,” the Hewletts write. In Sierra Leone, O’Sullivan experienced similar sentiments when proper burials were not performed. “It is tragic. In those countries they feel very strongly about being able to say goodbye to their ancestors. To not be able to have that ritual, or treat them with the respect they traditionally give for those who passed away is very difficult,” says O’Sullivan. “Especially in concert with the fear of the disease in general.”

Worse than stopping burial rites, found the Hewletts, is keeping the body (and the burial) hidden. Barring relatives from seeing the dead in Uganda fueled hostility and fear—leading some communities to believe that medical professionals were keeping the corpses for nefarious purposes. A mass graveyard near an airfield—an attempt to remedy the problem by allowing families to see, but not touch, the graves—didn’t help. Villagers began running from the ambulances, trying to burn down hospitals, and attacking humanitarian workers. They feared the disease—but they feared the medicine even more, as well as the people delivering it.

***

In a July 28 interview with ABC News, Dr. Hilde de Clerck of Doctors Without Borders described resistance from residents in Sierra Leone, who, he says, accused him and his colleagues of bringing the disease to the country. “To control the chain of disease transmission it seems we have to earn the trust of nearly every individual in an affected family,” de Clerck said. It is, in this case, a seemingly impossible feat.

There aren’t enough health-care workers in all of West Africa to ensure that community burials are performed safely. There aren’t enough in the world to convince every family that banning such a burial isn’t the work of the devil. “It’s gotten out of control,” says O’Sullivan of this new outbreak. “So many people involved who have responded to this in the past are completely overwhelmed. They can’t get the messages out.” Until the medical community can win the trust of West Africans, the infected will miss their chance at potentially life-saving medicine.

Without it, their family members will likely face the same fate.

Voir aussi:

 As Ebola epidemic tightens grip, west Africa turns to religion for succour
Fears evangelical churches that hold thousands and services promising ‘healing’ could ignite new chains of transmission

Monica Mark, west Africa correspondent

The Guardian

17 October 2014

Every Sunday since she can remember, Annette Sanoh has attended church in Susan’s Bay, a slum of crowded tin-roofed homes in Freetown. Now as the Ebola epidemic mushrooms in the capital of Sierra Leone, Sanoh has started going to church services almost every night.

“I believe we are all in God’s hands now. Business is bad because of this Ebola problem, so rather than sit at home, I prefer to go to church and pray because I don’t know what else we can do,” said Sanoh, a market trader. At the church she attends, a small building jammed between a hairdresser’s and two homes, she first washes her hands in a bucket of chlorinated water before joining hands with fellow church members as they pray together.

“We pray Ebola will not be our portion and we pray for hope,” said Sanoh, as the disease this week reached the last remaining district that hadn’t yet recorded a case.

By any measure, West Africa is deeply religious and the region is home to some of the world’s fastest-growing Muslim and Christian populations. Posters and banners strewn across the city are constant reminders of the hope many find in spirituality amid a fearful and increasingly desperate situation. In one supermarket, a notice asking customers to pray for Ebola to end was taped on to a fridge full of butter. It urged Muslims to recite the alfathia; Christians, Our Father; and Hindus Namaste. “For non-believers, please believe in God. Amen, Amina,” it finished.

But officials have fretted about the impact of influential spiritual leaders, worrying that evangelical churches which sometimes hold thousands of faithful and services promising “healing” could ignite new chains of transmission.

As the outbreak races into its eleventh month, leaving behind almost 4,500 dead across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, experts have warned that an influx of international aid can only contain the epidemic alongside other measures in communities.

“Control of transmission of Ebola in the community, that’s going to be the key for controlling this epidemic,” said Professor Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, speaking at Oxford University on Thursday.

“Will it be possible without the vaccine? We really don’t know, because it supposes a massive behavioural change in the community; behavioural change about funeral rites, so people don’t touch dead bodies any longer, in carers, as people could be infected while transporting someone to a hospital.”

But there are signs that messages are filtering through. Some churches are playing a critical role in educating their congregations about the disease, which is spread through direct contact with body fluids of those already showing symptoms.

In Liberia, pastor Amos Teah, said once full pews were now largely empty as members feared gathering in crowds, while he has changed the way he conducts his Methodist church services.

“These days we go to church, we sing, but we no longer carry out the tradition of passing the peace. We no longer shake hands. We are even thinking about using spoons to serve communion … to drop the bread into a person’s palm, avoiding all contacts with that person. The church has placed strong emphasis on prevention,” he said.

Among other changes, women no longer wore veils to church, as they were often shared among churchgoers.

In Guinea, an 85% Muslim country, Abou Fofana said he had stopped going to mosque for another reason. “Even though I survived Ebola, nobody wants to come near me. Even my children have faced problems as a result.”

He said he still continued to pray at home. Like many survivors, he credits his faith in helping him pull through.

At the MSF centre in Sierra Leone’s forested interior of Kailahun, Malcolm Hugo, a psychologist, said he hadn’t been able to find an imam willing to visit the centre. So the church services are “mainly filled with Muslims attending,” said Hugo, one particularly bad afternoon in which several children had died.

Health experts and officials warn that the longer the epidemic is left unchecked, the greater the risk of it spreading to other countries in a region where families extend across porous borders.

However, in one piece of rare good news, the UN health agency officially declared an end on Friday to the Ebola outbreak in Senegal. The WHO commended the country on its “diligence to end the transmission of the virus,” citing Senegal’s quick and thorough response.

A case of Ebola in Senegal was confirmed on 29 August in a young man who had travelled by road to Dakar from Guinea, where he had direct contact with an Ebola patient. By 5 September laboratory samples from the patient tested negative, indicating that he had recovered from Ebola. The declaration from WHO came because Senegal made it past the 42-day mark, which is twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola, without detecting more such cases.

“Senegal’s response is a good example of what to do when faced with an imported case of Ebola,” the WHO said in a statement. “The government’s response plan included identifying and monitoring 74 close contacts of the patient, prompt testing of all suspected cases, stepped-up surveillance at the country’s many entry points and nationwide public awareness campaigns.”

“While the outbreak is now officially over, Senegal’s geographical position makes the country vulnerable to additional imported cases of Ebola virus disease,” WHO said.

Additional reporting by Wade Williams in Monrovia

Voir également:

Why foreign aid and Africa don’t mix
Robert Calderisi, Special to CNN
August 18, 2010

Editor’s note: Robert Calderisi has 30 years of professional experience in international development, including senior positions at the World Bank. He is the author of « The Trouble with Africa: Why Foreign Aid Isn’t Working. » He writes for CNN as part of Africa 50, a special coverage looking at 17 African nations marking 50 years of independence this year.

Friday, Charles Abugre of the UN Millennium Campaign writes for CNN about why aid is important for Africa and how it can be made more effective.

(CNN) — I once asked a president of the Central African Republic, Ange-Félix Patassé, to give up a personal monopoly he held on the distribution of refined oil products in his country.

He was unapologetic. « Do you expect me to lose money in the service of my people? » he replied.

That, in a nutshell, has been the problem of Africa. Very few African governments have been on the same wavelength as Western providers of aid.

Aid, by itself, has never developed anything, but where it has been allied to good public policy, sound economic management, and a strong determination to battle poverty, it has made an enormous difference in countries like India, Indonesia, and even China.

Those examples illustrate another lesson of aid. Where it works, it represents only a very small share of the total resources devoted to improving roads, schools, heath services, and other things essential for raising incomes.

Aid must not overwhelm or displace local efforts; instead, it must settle with being the junior partner.

Because of Africa’s needs, and the stubborn nature of its poverty, the continent has attracted far too much aid and far too much interfering by outsiders.

From the start, Western governments tried hard to work with public agencies, but fairly soon ran up against the obvious limitations of capacity and seriousness of African states.

Early solutions were to pour in « technical assistance, » i.e. foreign advisers who stayed on for years, or to try « enclave » or turn-key projects that would be independent of government action.

More recently, Western agencies have worked with non-government organizations or the private sector. Or, making a virtue of necessity, they have poured large amounts of their assistance directly into government budgets, citing the need for « simplicity » and respect for local « sovereignty. »

Through all of this, the development challenge was always on somebody else’s shoulders and governments have been eager receivers, rather than clear-headed managers of Western generosity.

In the last 20 years, some states — like Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Mali — have broken the mould, recognized the importance of taking charge, and tried to use aid more strategically and efficiently. Some commentators would add Benin, Zambia, and Rwanda to that list.

But most African governments remain stuck in a culture of dependence or indifference. There are still too many dictators in Africa (six have been in office for more than 25 years) and many elected leaders behave no differently.

In Zambia last year, journalist Chansa Kabwela sent photographs of a woman giving birth on the street outside a major hospital (where she had been refused admission) to the president’s office, hoping he would look into why this had happened.

Instead, the president, Rupiah Banda, ordered the journalist prosecuted for promoting pornography. She was later acquitted.

Government callousness is one thing. Discouraging investors is even worse. No aid professional ever suggested that outside help was more important than private effort; on the contrary, foreign aid was intended to help lay the foundations for greater public confidence and private savings and investment.

Few economists thought that aid would create wealth, although most hoped that it would help distribute the benefits of growth more evenly. It was plain that institutions, policy, and individual effort were more important than money.

So, where — despite decades of aid — the conditions for private savings and investment are still forbidding, it is high time we ask ourselves why we are still trying to improve them.

The Blair Commission Report on Africa in 2005 reported that 70,000 trained professionals leave Africa every year, and until they — and the 40 percent of the continent’s savings that are held abroad — start coming home, we need to use aid more restrictively.

An obvious solution is to focus aid on the small number of countries that are trying seriously to fight poverty and corruption. Other countries will need to wait — or settle with only small amounts of aid — until their politics or policies or attitudes to the private sector are more promising.

We should also consider introducing incentives for countries to match outside assistance with greater progress in raising local funds.

President Obama is being criticized for increasing U.S. contributions to the international fight against HIV/AIDS by only two percent, with the result that people in Uganda are already being turned away from clinics and condemned to die.

When challenged, U.S. officials have had a fairly solid answer. Uganda has recently discovered oil and gas deposits but has gone on a spending spree, reportedly ordering fighter planes worth $300 million from Russia, according to a recent report in the New York Times.

Does a government that shows such wanton disregard for common sense or even good taste really have the moral basis for insisting on more help with AIDS?

We must not be distracted by recent news of Africa’s « spectacular » growth and its sudden attractiveness to private investment. Some basic things are changing on the continent, with real effects for the future; above all, Africans are speaking out and refusing to accept tired excuses from their governments.

But the truth is that most of Africa’s growth — based on oil and mineral exports — has not made a whit of difference to the lives of most Africans.

Political freedoms shrank on the continent last year, according to the U.S.-based Freedom House index.

A quarter of school-age children are still not enrolled, according to World Bank statistics; many of those that are, are receiving a very mediocre education. And agricultural productivity — the key to reducing poverty — is essentially stagnant.

The really good news is likely to stay local and seep out in small doses, until it eventually overwhelms the inertia and indifference of governments.

Five years ago, Kenya managed to double its tax revenues because a former businessman, appointed to head the national revenue agency, took a hatchet to the dishonest practices of many tax collectors. He had every reason to do so. Only five percent of Kenya’s budget comes from foreign aid, compared with 40 percent in neighboring countries.

This is a good example of the sometimes-perverse effects of aid, but also of the importance of imagination and individual initiative in promoting a better life for Africans.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Robert Calderisi.

Development aid to Africa
Top 10 « official development assistance » recipients in 2008:

1 Ethiopia $3.327 billion
2 Sudan $2.384 billion
3 Tanzania $2.331 billion
4 Mozambique $1.9994 billion
5 Uganda $1.657 billion
6 DR Cong $1.610 billion
7 Kenya $1.360 billion
8 Egypt $1.348 billion
9 Ghana $1.293 billion
10 Nigeria $1.290 billion

Net official development assistance to Africa in 2008: $44 billion.

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Voir encore:

Why Foreign Aid Is Hurting Africa
Money from rich countries has trapped many African nations in a cycle of corruption, slower economic growth and poverty. Cutting off the flow would be far more beneficial, says Dambisa Moyo.
Dambisa Moyo
WSJ

March 21, 2009

A month ago I visited Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. This suburb of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to more than one million people, who eke out a living in an area of about one square mile — roughly 75% the size of New York’s Central Park. It is a sea of aluminum and cardboard shacks that forgotten families call home. The idea of a slum conjures up an image of children playing amidst piles of garbage, with no running water and the rank, rife stench of sewage. Kibera does not disappoint.

What is incredibly disappointing is the fact that just a few yards from Kibera stands the headquarters of the United Nations’ agency for human settlements which, with an annual budget of millions of dollars, is mandated to « promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. » Kibera festers in Kenya, a country that has one of the highest ratios of development workers per capita. This is also the country where in 2004, British envoy Sir Edward Clay apologized for underestimating the scale of government corruption and failing to speak out earlier.

Giving alms to Africa remains one of the biggest ideas of our time — millions march for it, governments are judged by it, celebrities proselytize the need for it. Calls for more aid to Africa are growing louder, with advocates pushing for doubling the roughly $50 billion of international assistance that already goes to Africa each year.

Yet evidence overwhelmingly demonstrates that aid to Africa has made the poor poorer, and the growth slower. The insidious aid culture has left African countries more debt-laden, more inflation-prone, more vulnerable to the vagaries of the currency markets and more unattractive to higher-quality investment. It’s increased the risk of civil conflict and unrest (the fact that over 60% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population is under the age of 24 with few economic prospects is a cause for worry). Aid is an unmitigated political, economic and humanitarian disaster.

Few will deny that there is a clear moral imperative for humanitarian and charity-based aid to step in when necessary, such as during the 2004 tsunami in Asia. Nevertheless, it’s worth reminding ourselves what emergency and charity-based aid can and cannot do. Aid-supported scholarships have certainly helped send African girls to school (never mind that they won’t be able to find a job in their own countries once they have graduated). This kind of aid can provide band-aid solutions to alleviate immediate suffering, but by its very nature cannot be the platform for long-term sustainable growth.

Whatever its strengths and weaknesses, such charity-based aid is relatively small beer when compared to the sea of money that floods Africa each year in government-to-government aid or aid from large development institutions such as the World Bank.

Over the past 60 years at least $1 trillion of development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Yet real per-capita income today is lower than it was in the 1970s, and more than 50% of the population — over 350 million people — live on less than a dollar a day, a figure that has nearly doubled in two decades.

Even after the very aggressive debt-relief campaigns in the 1990s, African countries still pay close to $20 billion in debt repayments per annum, a stark reminder that aid is not free. In order to keep the system going, debt is repaid at the expense of African education and health care. Well-meaning calls to cancel debt mean little when the cancellation is met with the fresh infusion of aid, and the vicious cycle starts up once again.

In Zambia, former President Frederick Chiluba (with wife Regina in November 2008) has been charged with theft of state funds. AFP/Getty Images
In 2005, just weeks ahead of a G8 conference that had Africa at the top of its agenda, the International Monetary Fund published a report entitled « Aid Will Not Lift Growth in Africa. » The report cautioned that governments, donors and campaigners should be more modest in their claims that increased aid will solve Africa’s problems. Despite such comments, no serious efforts have been made to wean Africa off this debilitating drug.

The most obvious criticism of aid is its links to rampant corruption. Aid flows destined to help the average African end up supporting bloated bureaucracies in the form of the poor-country governments and donor-funded non-governmental organizations. In a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in May 2004, Jeffrey Winters, a professor at Northwestern University, argued that the World Bank had participated in the corruption of roughly $100 billion of its loan funds intended for development.

As recently as 2002, the African Union, an organization of African nations, estimated that corruption was costing the continent $150 billion a year, as international donors were apparently turning a blind eye to the simple fact that aid money was inadvertently fueling graft. With few or no strings attached, it has been all too easy for the funds to be used for anything, save the developmental purpose for which they were intended.

In Zaire — known today as the Democratic Republic of Congo — Irwin Blumenthal (whom the IMF had appointed to a post in the country’s central bank) warned in 1978 that the system was so corrupt that there was « no (repeat, no) prospect for Zaire’s creditors to get their money back. » Still, the IMF soon gave the country the largest loan it had ever given an African nation. According to corruption watchdog agency Transparency International, Mobutu Sese Seko, Zaire’s president from 1965 to 1997, is reputed to have stolen at least $5 billion from the country.

It’s scarcely better today. A month ago, Malawi’s former President Bakili Muluzi was charged with embezzling aid money worth $12 million. Zambia’s former President Frederick Chiluba (a development darling during his 1991 to 2001 tenure) remains embroiled in a court case that has revealed millions of dollars frittered away from health, education and infrastructure toward his personal cash dispenser. Yet the aid keeps on coming.

A nascent economy needs a transparent and accountable government and an efficient civil service to help meet social needs. Its people need jobs and a belief in their country’s future. A surfeit of aid has been shown to be unable to help achieve these goals.

A constant stream of « free » money is a perfect way to keep an inefficient or simply bad government in power. As aid flows in, there is nothing more for the government to do — it doesn’t need to raise taxes, and as long as it pays the army, it doesn’t have to take account of its disgruntled citizens. No matter that its citizens are disenfranchised (as with no taxation there can be no representation). All the government really needs to do is to court and cater to its foreign donors to stay in power.

Stuck in an aid world of no incentives, there is no reason for governments to seek other, better, more transparent ways of raising development finance (such as accessing the bond market, despite how hard that might be). The aid system encourages poor-country governments to pick up the phone and ask the donor agencies for next capital infusion. It is no wonder that across Africa, over 70% of the public purse comes from foreign aid.

In Ethiopia, where aid constitutes more than 90% of the government budget, a mere 2% of the country’s population has access to mobile phones. (The African country average is around 30%.) Might it not be preferable for the government to earn money by selling its mobile phone license, thereby generating much-needed development income and also providing its citizens with telephone service that could, in turn, spur economic activity?

Look what has happened in Ghana, a country where after decades of military rule brought about by a coup, a pro-market government has yielded encouraging developments. Farmers and fishermen now use mobile phones to communicate with their agents and customers across the country to find out where prices are most competitive. This translates into numerous opportunities for self-sustainability and income generation — which, with encouragement, could be easily replicated across the continent.

To advance a country’s economic prospects, governments need efficient civil service. But civil service is naturally prone to bureaucracy, and there is always the incipient danger of self-serving cronyism and the desire to bind citizens in endless, time-consuming red tape. What aid does is to make that danger a grim reality. This helps to explain why doing business across much of Africa is a nightmare. In Cameroon, it takes a potential investor around 426 days to perform 15 procedures to gain a business license. What entrepreneur wants to spend 119 days filling out forms to start a business in Angola? He’s much more likely to consider the U.S. (40 days and 19 procedures) or South Korea (17 days and 10 procedures).

Even what may appear as a benign intervention on the surface can have damning consequences. Say there is a mosquito-net maker in small-town Africa. Say he employs 10 people who together manufacture 500 nets a week. Typically, these 10 employees support upward of 15 relatives each. A Western government-inspired program generously supplies the affected region with 100,000 free mosquito nets. This promptly puts the mosquito net manufacturer out of business, and now his 10 employees can no longer support their 150 dependents. In a couple of years, most of the donated nets will be torn and useless, but now there is no mosquito net maker to go to. They’ll have to get more aid. And African governments once again get to abdicate their responsibilities.

In a similar vein has been the approach to food aid, which historically has done little to support African farmers. Under the auspices of the U.S. Food for Peace program, each year millions of dollars are used to buy American-grown food that has to then be shipped across oceans. One wonders how a system of flooding foreign markets with American food, which puts local farmers out of business, actually helps better Africa. A better strategy would be to use aid money to buy food from farmers within the country, and then distribute that food to the local citizens in need.

Then there is the issue of « Dutch disease, » a term that describes how large inflows of money can kill off a country’s export sector, by driving up home prices and thus making their goods too expensive for export. Aid has the same effect. Large dollar-denominated aid windfalls that envelop fragile developing economies cause the domestic currency to strengthen against foreign currencies. This is catastrophic for jobs in the poor country where people’s livelihoods depend on being relatively competitive in the global market.

To fight aid-induced inflation, countries have to issue bonds to soak up the subsequent glut of money swamping the economy. In 2005, for example, Uganda was forced to issue such bonds to mop up excess liquidity to the tune of $700 million. The interest payments alone on this were a staggering $110 million, to be paid annually.

The stigma associated with countries relying on aid should also not be underestimated or ignored. It is the rare investor that wants to risk money in a country that is unable to stand on its own feet and manage its own affairs in a sustainable way.

Africa remains the most unstable continent in the world, beset by civil strife and war. Since 1996, 11 countries have been embroiled in civil wars. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in the 1990s, Africa had more wars than the rest of the world combined. Although my country, Zambia, has not had the unfortunate experience of an outright civil war, growing up I experienced first-hand the discomfort of living under curfew (where everyone had to be in their homes between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m., which meant racing from work and school) and faced the fear of the uncertain outcomes of an attempted coup in 1991 — sadly, experiences not uncommon to many Africans.

Civil clashes are often motivated by the knowledge that by seizing the seat of power, the victor gains virtually unfettered access to the package of aid that comes with it. In the last few months alone, there have been at least three political upheavals across the continent, in Mauritania, Guinea and Guinea Bissau (each of which remains reliant on foreign aid). Madagascar’s government was just overthrown in a coup this past week. The ongoing political volatility across the continent serves as a reminder that aid-financed efforts to force-feed democracy to economies facing ever-growing poverty and difficult economic prospects remain, at best, precariously vulnerable. Long-term political success can only be achieved once a solid economic trajectory has been established.

“ The 1970s were an exciting time to be African. Many of our nations had just achieved independence, and with that came a deep sense of dignity, self-respect and hope for the future. ”

Proponents of aid are quick to argue that the $13 billion ($100 billion in today’s terms) aid of the post-World War II Marshall Plan helped pull back a broken Europe from the brink of an economic abyss, and that aid could work, and would work, if Africa had a good policy environment.

The aid advocates skirt over the point that the Marshall Plan interventions were short, sharp and finite, unlike the open-ended commitments which imbue governments with a sense of entitlement rather than encouraging innovation. And aid supporters spend little time addressing the mystery of why a country in good working order would seek aid rather than other, better forms of financing. No country has ever achieved economic success by depending on aid to the degree that many African countries do.

The good news is we know what works; what delivers growth and reduces poverty. We know that economies that rely on open-ended commitments of aid almost universally fail, and those that do not depend on aid succeed. The latter is true for economically successful countries such as China and India, and even closer to home, in South Africa and Botswana. Their strategy of development finance emphasizes the important role of entrepreneurship and markets over a staid aid-system of development that preaches hand-outs.

African countries could start by issuing bonds to raise cash. To be sure, the traditional capital markets of the U.S. and Europe remain challenging. However, African countries could explore opportunities to raise capital in more non-traditional markets such as the Middle East and China (whose foreign exchange reserves are more than $4 trillion). Moreover, the current market malaise provides an opening for African countries to focus on acquiring credit ratings (a prerequisite to accessing the bond markets), and preparing themselves for the time when the capital markets return to some semblance of normalcy.

Governments need to attract more foreign direct investment by creating attractive tax structures and reducing the red tape and complex regulations for businesses. African nations should also focus on increasing trade; China is one promising partner. And Western countries can help by cutting off the cycle of giving something for nothing. It’s time for a change.

Dambisa Moyo, a former economist at Goldman Sachs, is the author of « Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa. »

Corrections & Amplifications

In the African nations of Burkina Faso, Rwanda, Somalia, Mali, Chad, Mauritania and Sierra Leone from 1970 to 2002, over 70% of total government spending came from foreign aid, according to figures from the World Bank. This essay on foreign aid to Africa incorrectly said that 70% of government spending throughout Africa comes from foreign aid.

Voir de même:

This Is Why Americans Are Donating Less To Fight Ebola Than Other Recent Disasters
Associated Press
10/16/2014

NEW YORK (AP) — Individual Americans, rich or not, donated generously in response to many recent international disasters, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and last year’s Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. The response to the Ebola epidemic is far less robust, and experts are wondering why.

There have been some huge gifts from American billionaires — $50 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, $11.9 million from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s foundation, and a $25 million gift this week from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan. Their beneficiaries included the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

But the flow of smaller donations has been relatively modest.

The American Red Cross, for example, received a $2.8 million share of Allen’s donations. But Jana Sweeny, the charity’s director of international communications, said that’s been supplemented by only about $100,000 in gifts from other donors. By comparison, the Red Cross received more than $85 million in response to Typhoon Haiyan.

« After the typhoon, we got flooded with calls asking, ‘How do I give?' » Sweeny said. « With this (Ebola), we’re not getting those kinds of requests. »

Why the difference? For starters, it’s been evident that national governments will need to shoulder the bulk of the financial burden in combatting Ebola, particularly as its ripple effects are increasingly felt beyond the epicenter in West Africa.

Regine A. Webster of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which advises nonprofits on disaster response strategies, said the epidemic blurred the lines in terms of the categories that guide some big donors.

« This is a confusing issue for the private donor community — is it a disaster, or a health problem? » Webster said. « Institutions and individuals have been quite slow to respond. »

Officials at InterAction, an umbrella group for U.S. relief agencies active abroad, see other intangible factors at work, including the video and photographic images emerging from West Africa. Joel Charny, InterAction’s vice president for humanitarian policy, said it was clear from the imagery out of Haiti and the Philippines that donations could help rebuild shattered homes and schools, while the images of Ebola are more frightening and less conducive to envisioning a happy ending.

« People give when they see that there’s a plausible solution, » Charny said. « They can say, ‘If I give my $50 or $200, it’s going to translate in some tangible way into relieving suffering.’ … That makes them feel good. »

« With Ebola, there’s kind of a fear factor, » he said. « Even competent agencies are feeling somewhat overwhelmed, and the nature of the disease — being so awful — makes it hard for people to engage. »

Gary Shaye, senior director for emergency operations with Save The Children, suggested that donors were moved to help after recent typhoons, tsunamis and earthquakes because of huge death tolls reported in the first wave of news reports. The Ebola death toll, in contrast, has been rising alarmingly but gradually over several months.

Like other organizations fighting Ebola, Save the Children is trying to convey to donors that it urgently needs private gifts — cherished because they can be used flexibly — regardless of how much government funding is committed.

« We need both — it’s not either/or, » said Shaye. He said Save the Children was particularly reliant on private funding to underwrite child-protection work in the three worst-hit countries — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — where many children have been isolated and stigmatized after their parents or other relatives got Ebola.

By last count, Shaye said, Save the Children had collected about $500,000 in private gifts earmarked for the Ebola crisis.

« We’re proud that we raised $500,000 — but we’re talking about millions in needs that we will have, » he said.

Another group working on the front lines in West Africa is the Los Angeles-based International Medical Corps, which runs a treatment center in Liberia and plans to open one soon in Sierra Leone.

Rebecca Milner, a vice president of the corps, said it had been a struggle to raise awareness when Ebola-related fundraising efforts began in earnest in midsummer.

« It took a while before people began to respond, but now there’s definitely increased concern, » she said.

Thus far, Milner said, gifts and pledges earmarked for the Ebola response have totaled about $2.5 million — compared with about $6 million that her organization received in the first three months after the Haiti earthquake.

Among the groups most heartened by donor response is Doctors without Borders, which is widely credited with mounting the most extensive operations of any non-governmental organization in the Ebola-stricken region.

Thomas Kurmann, director of development for the organization’s U.S. branch, said American donors had given $7 million earmarked for the Ebola response, a portion of the roughly $40 million donated worldwide.

« It’s very good news, » Kurmann said. « There’s been significantly increased interest in the past three months. »

Doctors Without Borders said this week that 16 of its staff members have been infected with Ebola and nine have died.

A smaller nonprofit, North Carolina-based SIM USA, found itself in the headlines in August and September, when two of its American health workers were infected with Ebola in Liberia. Both survived.

SIM’s vice president for finance and operations, George Salloum, said the missionary organization — which typically gets $50 million a year in donations — received several hundred thousand dollars in gifts specifically linked to those Ebola developments.

Even as the crisis worsens, Salloum said nonprofits active in the Ebola zone need to be thinking long-term.

« At some point, we’ll be beyond the epidemic, » he said. « Then the challenge will be how to deal with the aftermath, when thousands of people have been killed. What about the elders, the children? There will be a lot of work for years. »

Support UNICEF’s efforts to combat Ebola through the fundraising widget below.

Voir enfin:

‘SNL’ Has One of the Year’s Most Surprisingly Sharp Critiques of Poverty Aid in Africa
Zak Cheney-Rice

Mic

October 15, 2014

Saturday Night Live still manages to surprise once in a while. The long-running sketch comedy show has drawn criticism for its lack of diversity and questionable joke decisions of late, but this past weekend saw its satirical gears in rare form:

The sketch features guest host Bill Hader as Charles Daniels, a soft-voiced, thick-bearded incarnation of a common late night infomercial trope, the philanthropy fund spokesperson. The clip opens with shots of an unnamed African village, where residents pass the time by gazing longingly into the camera and dolefully stirring pots of stew.

« For only 39 cents a day, » Daniels says to his viewers, « you can provide water, food and medicine for these people … That’s less than a small cup of coffee. »

« Ask for more, » whispers a villager played by Jay Pharoah. « Why you starting so low? »

So begins a three-minute interrogation around why this « cheap-ass white man » is asking for so little money — « [the] number has been decided by very educated and caring people, » Daniels claims — and more importantly, why he thinks throwing money at this problem will solve it in the first place.

The sketch ends with Daniels’ implied abduction, along with demands for a larger sum in exchange for his release. The question of where he’s getting a 39-cent cup of coffee remains unanswered.

While it’s unclear why the black performers are talking like they’re in a Good Times parody, the sketch brings up some valid political points. For one, the long-term effectiveness of foreign aid has been questioned for years, with critics at outlets ranging from CNN to the Wall Street Journal claiming it can foster a relationship of « dependence » while ultimately providing cosmetic solutions that fail to address systemic issues.

Even CARE, one of the biggest charities in the world, rejected $45 million a year in federal funding in 2007 because American food aid was so « plagued with inefficiencies » as to be detrimental, according to the New York Times (by the same token, many such organizations disagree).

SNL illustrates this perfectly when Daniels implies the villagers are ungrateful when they ask for more. « You know, for a starving village, you people have a lot of energy, » he says.

The sketch also touches on monolithic Western views of African diversity: When the villagers ask Daniels which country he thinks he’s in, he simply responds, « Africa. »

Considering SNL’s less than sterling record on racial humor, the overall pointedness of this skit is a pleasant surprise. Best-case scenario, it indicates that producer Lorne Michaels’ recent emphasis on casting and writer diversity is incrementally starting to pay dividends.

3 commentaires pour Ebola: C’est Sarkozy qui avait raison (Perfect storm: Outdated beliefs and funeral rituals, witch craftery, denial, conspiracy theories, suspicion of local governments, distrust of western medicine, civil war, corrupt dictatorship, collapsed health systems)

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :