Gaza: Pas de deuxième Syrie à Gaza ! (We see what Qatar’s and Turkey’s meddling in Syria has led to: Palestinian human rights activist denounces Hamas and Qatari-Turkish interference in Gaza)

Ce que le kamikaze humanitaire guette, ce n’est pas les dégâts qu’il va faire, mais les dégâts qu’on va lui faire. Et ce sont ces dégâts inversés qui sont censés faire des dégâts. Le kamikaze humanitaire est un kamikaze d’un genre mutant, tout à fait neuf, parfaitement inédit : c’est un kamikaze oxymore. C’est l’idée que les dégâts seront extrêmement collatéraux, diffus, les explications très confuses, les analyses rendues très compliquées puisque le mot humanitaire, lâché comme une bombe, est brandi comme l’arme à laquelle on ne peut rien rétorquer : on ne fait pas la guerre à la paix. Le mot humanitaire est un mot qui a tout dit. Son drapeau est intouchable, son pavillon est insouillable. C’est l’idée que, déguisé en pacifiste, le terroriste aura de son côté, tout blotti contre la coque de son navire naïf rempli de gentillesse gentille et d’idéaux grands, d’ambitions fraternelles, la communauté internationale. Car c’est le monde entier qui, tout à coup, forme une communauté. Le mot humanitaire, forcément inoffensif, ne saurait être offensé, attaqué : c’est une paix qui avance sur les flots, on ne bombarde pas une paix, on ne crible pas de flèches, de balles, une colombe qui passe, même si cette colombe est pilotée par Mohammed Atta, je veux dire ses avatars paisibles, ses avatars innocents, ses avatars gentils, ses avatars qui avancent avec des sentiments plein les poches et la rage entre les dents, et la haine dans les yeux au moment même du sourire. Il y avait les kamikazes volants, voici les kamikazes flottants. Les kamikazes de la vitesse du son ? Démodées. Voici les kamikazes, déguisés en bonnes fées, de la langueur des flots, voici les kamikazes de la vitesse de croisière. Les kamikazes comme des poissons sur les flots, dont l’aide qu’ils apportent est un costume, une panoplie, un déguisement. Ils attendent qu’Israël riposte, autrement se donne tort. Kamikazes qui voudraient non seulement nous faire accroire qu’ils sont pacifistes, mais qu’ils sont passifs. Kamikazes déclencheurs de bavures officielles, au fil de l’eau. Non plus descendant des nuages, s’abattant comme autant de foudres, mais des kamikazes bien lents, bien tranquilles, bien plaisanciers. Des kamikazes bercés par la vague, et qui savent ce qu’ils viennent récolter : des coups, et par conséquent de la publicité. Des kamikazes au long cours qui viennent, innocemment, fabriquer de la culpabilité israélienne. Yann Moix
In a post-imperial, post-colonial world, Israel’s behaviour troubled and jarred. The spread of television and then the internet, beamed endless pictures of Israeli infantrymen beating stone-throwers and, later, Israeli tanks and aircraft taking on Kalashnikov-wielding guerrillas. It looked like a brutal and unequal struggle. Liberal hearts went out to the underdog – and anti-Semites and opportunists of various sorts joined in the anti-Israeli chorus. Israelis might argue that the (relatively) lightly armed Hamasniks in Gaza want to drive the Jews into the sea; that the struggle isn’t really between Israel and the Palestinians but between little Israel and the vast Arab and Muslim worlds, which long for Israel’s demise ; even that Israel isn’t the issue, that Islamists seek the demise of the West itself, and that Israel is merely an outpost of the far larger civilisation that they find abhorrent and seek to topple. But television doesn’t show this bigger picture; images can’t elucidate ideas. It shows mighty Israel crushing bedraggled Gaza. Western TV screens never show Hamas – not a gunman, or a rocket launched at Tel Aviv, not a fighter shelling a nearby kibbutz. In these past few weeks, it has seemed as if Israel’s F-16s and Merkava tanks and 155mm artillery have been fighting only wailing mothers, mangled children, run-down concrete slums. Not Hamasniks. Not the 3,000 rockets reaching out for Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Beersheba. Not mortar bombs crashing into kibbutz dining halls. Not rockets fired at Israel from Gaza hospitals and schools, designed to provoke Israeli counterfire that could then be screened as an atrocity. In the shambles of this war, a few basic facts about the contenders have been lost: Israel is a Western liberal democracy, where Arabs have the vote and, like Jews, are not detained in the middle of the night for what they think or say. While there is a violent, Right-wing fringe, Israelis remains basically tolerant, even in wartime, even under terrorist provocation. Their country is a scientific, technological and artistic powerhouse, in large measure because it is an open society. On the other side are a range of fanatical Muslim organisations that are totalitarian. Hamas holds Gaza’s population as a hostage in an iron grip and is intolerant of all “others” – Jews, homosexuals, socialists. How many Christians have remained in Gaza since the violent 2007 Hamas takeover? The Palestinians have been treated badly, there is no doubt about that. Britain, America, fellow Arabs, Zionists – all are to blame. But so are they, having rejected two-state compromises offered in 1937, 1947, 2000 and 2008. They should have a state of their own, in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and Gaza. This is fair, this would constitute a modicum of justice. But this is not what Hamas wants. Like Isis in Iraq and Syria, like al Qaeda, the Shabab in Somalia and Boko Haram in Nigeria, it seeks to destroy Western neighbours. And the Nick Cleggs of this world, who call on Britain to suspend arms sales to Israel, are their accomplices. It’s as if they really don’t understand the world they live in, like those liberals in Britain and France who called for disarmament and pro-German treaty revision in the Thirties. But the message is clear. The barbarians truly are at the gates.  Benny Morris
It is by now no secret that Qatar has emerged as Hamas’ home away from home and ATM. Shaikh Tamim’s father, Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited Gaza in 2012 when he was still the ruler of Qatar, pledging $400 million in economic aid. Most recently, Doha tried to transfer millions of dollars via Jordan’s Arab Bank to help pay the salaries of Hamas civil servants in Gaza, but the transfer was apparently blocked at Washington’s request. Since 2011, Qatar has been the home of the aforementioned Khaled Meshal, who runs Hamas’s leadership. During a recent appearance on Qatar’s media network Al Jazeera Arabic, Meshal blessed the individuals who kidnapped and ultimately murdered three Israeli teenagers. He boasted that Hamas was a unified movement and that its military wing reports to him and his associates in the political bureau. American officials have revealed that Qatar also hosts several other Hamas leaders. Israeli authorities reportedly intercepted an individual in April on his way back from meeting a member of Hamas’s military wing in Qatar who gave him money and directives intended for Hamas cells in the West Bank. Israeli and Egyptian officials report that Qatar is so eager for a political win at Cairo’s expense that it actually urged Hamas to reject the Egyptian cease-fire initiative last week. Doha is also using its vast petroleum wealth to striking diplomatic effect: one UN official source suggests that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon would not have made it to Doha for cease-fire talks on Sunday if the Qataris hadn’t chartered him a plane out of their own pocket.  Turkey, for its part, has emerged as one of the most strident supporters of Hamas on the world stage. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vociferously advocated for Hamas while his government has found ways to donate hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Hamas, mostly through infrastructure projects, but also through materials and reportedly even direct financial support. Turkey is also home to Salah Al-Arouri, founder of the West Bank branch of the Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military wing. He reportedly has been given “sole control” of Hamas’s military operations in the West Bank, and two Palestinians arrested last year for smuggling money for Hamas into the West Bank admitted they were doing so on Al-Arouri’s orders. He is also suspected of being behind a recent surge in kidnapping plots from the West Bank. An Israeli security official recently noted, “I have no doubt that Al-Arouri was connected to the act” of kidnapping that helped set off the latest round of violence between the parties, which has seen hundreds killed and thousands wounded, nearly all of them Palestinians. Al-Arouri, it should be noted, was among the high-level Hamas officials who met with the amir of Kuwait on Monday to discuss cease-fire terms (…). So as Washington considers cutting a deal brokered by Qatar and Turkey for an end to the latest round of hostilities, it bears pointing out why these two countries are so influential with Hamas in the first place: because they empower the terrorist movement and provide it with a free hand for operations. A cease-fire is obviously desirable, but not if the cost is honoring terror sponsors. There must be others who can mediate. Interestingly, both Ankara and Doha count themselves among America’s friends. But their support for terrorist entities—not just Hamas—has become so obvious that U.S. legislators began to send concerned letters to officials from both countries last year. This alone is a sign that America must set the bar higher for the behavior of its allies and not reward them for bad behaviorDavid Andrew Weinberg and Jonathan Schanzer
Lorsque Ban Ki Moon s’est rendu à Jérusalem, le 22 juillet, pour faire pression en vue d’un cessez-le-feu à Gaza et d’en revenir à des discussions sur les causes fondamentales du conflit palestino-israélien, Netanyahu a littéralement « explosé » de colère : « Vous ne pouvez pas parler au Hamas. Ce sont des extrémistes islamistes au même titre qu’Al Qaïda, l’Etat Islamique, les Taliban ou Boko Haram ! Passant inaperçues pour lui, ses paroles ne sont pas tombées dans l’oreille d’un sourd, dans le monde islamiste. Là  les observateurs suivaient à la trace chaque stade du conflit à Gaza, dès qu’on a compris qu’il s’élevait à un niveau comparable à la guerre contre Al Qaïda. Aussi, après avoir freiné l’opération contre le Hamas, Israël pourrait bien se rendre compte qu’il a mis la main dans un nouveau nid de frelons. En ce moment-même, l’Etat Islamique et le Front Al Nosra combattent pour étendre leurs avant-postes syriens et irakiens par une poussée au Liban même. Et ils ne s’arrêtront sans doute pas en si bon chemin. Si les Jihadistes en mouvement ont eu la possibilité d’évaluer que Tsahal est incapable de vaincre le Hamas, ils pourraient bien se retourner contre Israël et lui poser une nouvelle menace extrêmement dangereuse. 4. L’Iran aura bien pris note, de son côté, du fait que, deux fois de suite en deux ans, les dirigeants israéliens ont préféré s’abstenir d’apporter une conclusion victorieuse à une guerre débutée par des forces paramilitaires que Téhéran a préalablement renforcées, entraînées et financées – d’abord le Hezbollah, dans la Guerre du Liban en 2006, qui s’est terminée par un tracé de zone gérée par la FINUL, et actuellement , un conflit avec les Islamistes palestiniens qui semble se terminer de la même façon. Debka
Faisant état de sources fiables, Rafik Chelly a ajouté que « Des avions sont arrivés en Libye à partir du Qatar, et elles étaient pleines de djihadistes, ce qui explique les succès d’Ansar al-charia, notamment leur occupation d’une base militaire à Benghazi… Le nombre de ces éléments terroristes qui viennent de l’EIIL, dont beaucoup de tunisiens, oscille entre 4000 et 5000. Leur objectif, imposer leur domination sur la capitale, ensuite occuper Zentan , auquel cas, le danger sur la Tunisie n’en sera que plus grand avec le franchissement des frontières….. ». Contacté par le correspondant de Tunisie-Secret à Tunis, Rafik Chelly a indiqué que parmi ces 5000 djihadistes, il y a près de 200 éléments de nationalité française. Autrement dit, des binationaux. On rappellera ici que, déjà en janvier 2014, Rafik Chelly a déclaré que au quotidien Attounisia (17 janvier), que « 4500 djihadistes tunisiens appartenant au mouvement d’Ansar al-charia, sont actuellement dans des camps d’entrainement en Libye ». Les 5000 djihadistes en question reviennent donc à leur point de départ, la Libye, où ils ont été entrainés et d’où les services qataris les ont transportés vers la Syrie, dès la fin de l’année 2011. On précisera enfin que, sur la base de rapports de renseignement parvenus au journal algérien « Al-Bilad al-Jazairiya », celui-ci a révélé, dans son édition du 4 juillet dernier que des djihadistes libyens appartenant à Ansar al-charia, ainsi que des éléments de l’EIIL, se sont rencontrés dans une ville en Turquie pour conclure un accord consistant à transférer les djihadistes d’origine maghrébine présents en Irak, à les transférer vers la Libye pour renforcer les rangs d’Ansar al-charia dans ce pays ainsi qu’en Tunisie. Le même rapport de renseignement indique que l’EIIL a décidé d’élargir son djihad au Maghreb arabe et dans le Sahel, loin d’un Moyen-Orient déjà partiellement conquisNebil Ben Yahmed
From Hamas’s point of view, it must be a source of immense delight to witness the strains, and practical fallout, in the relationship between Washington and Jerusalem. It wins an election in which the US insisted it be allowed to take part, even though it has never renounced terrorism. It murders its way to control of Gaza. It diverts Gaza’s resources to turn the Strip into one great big terrorist bunker. It hits Israel, over and over and over again. It intimidates international journalists to not report on and film its attack methods. And the international community condemns Israel, the UN sets up inquiries into Israeli war crimes, and Israel’s allies limit its arms supplies. Times of Israel
Les missiles qui sont aujourd’hui lancés contre Israël sont, pour chacun d’entre eux, un crime contre l’humanité, qu’il frappe ou manque [sa cible], car il vise une cible civile. Les agissements d’Israël contre des civils palestiniens constituent aussi des crimes contre l’humanité. S’agissant des crimes de guerre sous la Quatrième Convention de Genève – colonies, judaïsation, points de contrôle, arrestations et ainsi de suite, ils nous confèrent une assise très solide. Toutefois, les Palestiniens sont en mauvaise posture en ce qui concerne l’autre problème. Car viser des civils, que ce soit un ou mille, est considéré comme un crime contre l’humanité. (…) Faire appel à la CPI [Cour pénale internationale] nécessite un consensus écrit, de toutes les factions palestiniennes. Ainsi, quand un Palestinien est arrêté pour son implication dans le meurtre d’un citoyen israélien, on ne nous reprochera pas de l’extrader. Veuillez noter que parmi les nôtres, plusieurs à Gaza sont apparus à la télévision pour dire que l’armée israélienne les avait avertis d’évacuer leurs maisons avant les explosions. Dans un tel cas de figure, s’il y a des victimes, la loi considère que c’est le fait d’une erreur plutôt qu’un meurtre intentionnel, [les Israéliens] ayant suivi la procédure légale. En ce qui concerne les missiles lancés de notre côté… Nous n’avertissons jamais personne de l’endroit où ces missiles vont tomber, ou des opérations que nous effectuons. Ainsi, il faudrait s’informer avant de parler de faire appel à la CPI, sous le coup de l’émotion. Ibrahim Khreisheh (émissaire palestinien au CDHNU, télévision de l’Autorité palestinienne, 9 juillet 2014)
La Palestine n’est pas un État partie au Statut de Rome. La Cour n’a reçu de la Palestine aucun document officiel faisant état de son acceptation de sa compétence ou demandant au Procureur d’ouvrir une enquête au sujet des crimes allégués, suite à l’adoption de la résolution (67/19) de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies en date du 29 novembre 2012, qui accorde à la Palestine le statut d’État non membre observateur. Par conséquent, la CPI n’est pas compétente pour connaître des crimes qui auraient été commis sur le territoire palestinien. CPI
When the Palestinian Authority (PA) was established 1994, I noticed that most Palestinian and Israeli human rights organizations continued monitoring the Israeli occupation, but that nobody wanted to pay any attention to the PA’s violations. In a meeting held in March 1996, the board members of B’Tselem decided that they would not concern themselves with PA abuses. That’s why I left. I wanted to fill a role that I thought was very important, but that was empty. (…) I think that if the Palestinians want to form a successful civil society, live in a democracy, and respect human rights, we will have to build institutions with our own hands. We should not lay our fate in other people’s hands. We have done so quite enough over the past sixty years. We are still demanding a state from the international community instead of building it ourselves. I think that it is the time for the Palestinians to start building their own democracy right now. I believe that democracy has never been offered by leaders or governments. Democracy is determined by the people themselves. (…) Creating a human rights organization under an Arab regime is like committing suicide. Yasser Arafat was used to doing whatever he wanted without being criticized or monitored. When I started watching, investigating, criticizing, he started to look at me in a very bad light. The Palestinian Authority defamed us and slandered us. Among other accusations, they said that we serve the enemy’s interests. When we started to publish reports on PA human rights violations, the reports became sexy news material for the international community. They were particularly well-reported by the Israeli media. The issue was especially sexy because, as you know, I had spent the past seven and a half years criticizing only Israel. Arafat saw me as a traitor. (…) In my opinion, the establishment of a Palestinian state is not only related to the Israelis. It concerns the Palestinians. We have had a very bad experience with building a state, developing it, and keeping it alive. That brings me to the September 2005 Israeli disengagement from Gaza. Everybody thought that the Israeli disengagement would be a kind of test for the Palestinians. It would test whether we are really able to build our own state and manage our daily lives ourselves. In my opinion, we totally failed to manage Gaza, develop it, and build infrastructure. Today, fewer and fewer Palestinian voices speak up in favor of es-tablishing a state. Everybody has his own horrible troubles. The only people calling for a state right now are the politicians. Politicians around the world are buying and selling blood. This is the only income that they have. And that’s exactly what Arafat practiced with the Palestinians. I remember with great sadness what happened when he started creating an Intifada and threatening the Israelis. Palestinian security workers went to the schools, ordered the schoolmasters to close the schools, and then sent the schoolchildren to throw stones at the Israelis. That was a very horrible thing to do. Politicians sacrifice their people to achieve their political interests. This is unfortunately the Palestinian attitude. (…) Gaza is a big problem for the Palestinians, Israelis, and Egyptians. The international community becomes more and more afraid of the Palestinians because Hamas reflects such a negative side of Palestinian politics. I don’t think that Hamas will ever offer Gaza back to Abbas. The question is: Who is going to control Hamas? Hamas right now oppresses the Gazan people. But who will contain Hamas? I don’t think that dialogue will solve the problem. We will all be watching whether Hamas can manage Gaza and keep it functioning. The Arab countries should put more effort into solving the conflict between Hamas and Fatah. The problem is that the Arab countries are so divided, some supporting Hamas against Fatah and some supporting Fatah against Hamas. This won’t help the situation. (…) I think there is a lack of good will and leadership on both sides. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict also tends to become a commercial conflict. Everybody is making something off this conflict. There are countries that have an interest in perpetuating the fighting. The Iranians, for example, are trying to provoke a regional war using Hezbollah and Hamas. I don’t think the Palestinians will have the same opportunities for peace that we were offered between 1947 and July 2000. Palestinian violence has probably caused some countries to want not to get involved anymore. ‘…) Don’t forget that we are living under a Taliban regime in the Gaza Strip. Our fieldworker hesitates before investigating cases there. The situation for human rights organizations sometimes reminds me of the Saddam Hussein regime. We can’t monitor the Gaza Strip the way we used to monitor it when it was PA territory. We are trying to collect data from newspapers and other organizations that operate in the area. We are in touch with some journalists there. But we face serious opposition and danger. (…) The best opportunity for us to make peace with Israel was probably in 1978 or 1979 when Egyptian president Anwar Sadat visited Israel. He suggested that Yasser Arafat join him, but Arafat refused. The most important thing for us to do now is learn from the mis-takes we made between 1947 and today so that we don’t repeat them. We should put these mistakes on the table and study them well. After studying our mistakes, I think the solution will be very easy to createBassem Eid
There is no doubt there’s an atmosphere of fear and terror in Gaza. Others were executed in various gatherings under the pretext of their being collaborators with Israel. Hamas has a physical presence in almost every house in Gaza and can listen to what’s being said. It’s a Stasi regime par excellence. The population is much more scared of Hamas than it is of the Israeli soldiers,” Eid said. Hamas, for its part, is more worried about the possible return of control of the Gaza Strip to the Palestinian Authority than it is of an Israeli military incursion. In my opinion, Hamas is willing to pay its last drop of blood to prevent Abbas and his PA from setting foot in Gaza. These people (Hamas) are fighting for their existence. Bassem Eid
En tant que Palestinien, je dois avouer : je suis responsable d’une partie de ce qui s’est passé. En tant que Palestinien, je ne peux pas nier ma responsabilité dans la mort de mon propre peuple. La majorité des Palestiniens s’est opposée aux tirs de roquettes contre Israël. Les Palestiniens ont compris que ces missiles ne servaient à rien. Les Palestiniens ont appelé le Hamas à cesser les tirs et à essayer de négocier avec l’occupation israélienne. Mais le Hamas n’a jamais considéré les besoins des Palestiniens. Seulement ses propres intérêts politiques. Et ils ont continué à tirer des roquettes sur Israël, en sachant très bien quel serait le résultat: le Hamas a ouvert la route de la mort sur notre peuple. Nous savions que le Hamas creusait des tunnels qui mèneraient à notre destruction. Nous savons tous que trois personnes vivent sur ​​chaque mètre carré de la bande de Gaza et le Hamas sait que toute attaque par Israël conduirait à une mort massive. Mais les dirigeants du Hamas sont plus intéressés par leurs victoires que par la vie de leurs victimes. En effet, le Hamas a besoin de ces décès afin de prétendre à la victoire. La mort de son propre peuple donne au Hamas ce pouvoir qui lui permet d’accumuler plus d’argent et plus de bras. Le Hamas n’a jamais été intéressé par la libération du peuple palestinien de l’occupation. Et Israël ne pourrait jamais détruire l’infrastructure mise en place par le Hamas. Seulement, nous, le peuple palestinien, pourrions le démanteler. Qu’aurions-nous pu faire? Les habitants de la bande de Gaza avaient la responsabilité de se rebeller contre le pouvoir du Hamas. Oui, le contrôle du Hamas est mortel et les gens ont eu peur d’exprimer leur mécontentement face à son règne et sa mauvaise gestion. Et pourtant, nous avons abdiqué, nous en portons la responsabilité. Nous le savions, et nous avons laissé faire. Ces décès (plus de 1.800 à ce jour, près de 0,1% de la population de la bande de Gaza) pourront-ils nous enseigner une leçon que nous n’oublierons jamais? L’idée que nous devons nous débarrasser du Hamas et complètement démilitariser Gaza. Ensuite, nous allons ouvrir les points de passage frontaliers. Je dis cela en tant que Palestinien fidèle et parce que je m’inquiète pour mon propre peuple. Je n’ai aucune confiance dans les initiatives européennes et américaines. Il n’y a qu’une seule initiative à laquelle je peux croire et en laquelle j’ai confiance: une initiative trilatérale qui comprend l’Egypte, les Palestiniens et Israël. Sinon, il n’y aura pas de calme ou d’apaisement dans la bande de Gaza ou en Israël. Nous ne devons pas permettre à la bande de Gaza de devenir la victime des complots et des intrigues arabes. L’Egypte a toujours été le médiateur légitime, et si on avait écouté un peu plus l’Egypte de nombreuses vies auraient été sauvées. Le Qatar et la Turquie n’ont aucun rapport avec le peuple palestinien, et nous n’avons rien en commun. Ces deux Etats ont tenté de saboter chaque tentative de cessez-le-feu. À mon avis, au moins deux tiers des morts palestiniens sont victimes du complot turco-qatari. Nous voyons ce à quoi a conduit l’ingérence du Qatar et de la Turquie en Syrie. Je ne veux pas les voir établir une « deuxième Syrie » dans la bande de Gaza. Bassem Eid
Personnellement je ne vois pas l’origine des problèmes actuels dans  »l’occupation ». Non pas parce que ce terme est impropre pour caractériser le rapport entre Israël et les Palestiniens, car alors les Palestiniens devraient aussi utiliser ce terme  »occupation » lorsque la Jordanie et l’Egypte occupaient la  »Cisjordanie » (appellation de la Jordanie) et Gaza… Mais surtout parce que la belligérance entre les Juifs et les Arabes n’a pas commencé en 1967. Si l’on veut une vraie paix, une paix définitive, c’est à cet état de belligérance qu’il faut mettre fin. Je n’ai personnellement pas de recette magique, mais il me semble qu’il faut désamorcer la cause de cette belligérance. Depuis 1921, toutes les guerres déclenchées par les Arabes contre les Juifs, puis contre Israël, sont fondées sur le refus arabe de considérer : – que les Juifs ont un droit historique d’appartenance à cette région, au nom d’une histoire de 3000 ans d’attachement à cette région. – que les Juifs tout comme les Arabes ont le droit de se constituer en Etat-Nation et de disposer d’eux mêmes, au moins sur une partie de ce que fut leur patrie. Je suis peut-être naïf, mais il me semble que si le monde arabo-musulman dont font partie les Palestiniens, reconnaissait ce droit, (et non pas seulement Israël comme  »fait accompli »), alors disparaîtrait la cause de la belligérance, et alors toutes les questions soi-disant  »litigieuses », liées au territoire et aux frontières, seraient résolues en un tour de main. Jean-Pierre Lledo
Remember that when President Sadat made peace with Israel in 1979 he got back all of his country’s land from the Israelis, without shedding any blood. This is a real peace. Arafat rejected Sadat’s offer to join him in Israel but imagine if he had accepted. Think how many settlements would never have been created in the occupied territories and think that Palestine could have been established all that time ago. I want to move forward and to look to our children’s future. In my opinion, history should be dismissed and people like us should look ahead. Palestinian leaders continue to demand that Israel remove more than 160 checkpoints in the occupied territories, evacuate so-called « the illegal settlements », allow Palestinian workers to enter Israel to work, and demolish the wall that separates Palestinians from Israelis (and other Palestinians). But to what end? After the last six years of Intifada, we Palestinians have lost so much – not least more than 4,000 of our people killed by the Israelis. Consider also that since Israel left Gaza in September of 2005, the Palestinians have created chaos. So who will make this right of return applicable? In January 2007 there were 17 Palestinians killed by Israelis, but there were 35 Palestinians killed by Palestinians, so, right or return of right to live? (…) Three years ago, I went to visit the Palestinian village of Qariut, located between Ramalla and Nablus. The Israeli occupation confiscated their land and established a settlement called Eli. When I left the people in Qariut I asked them once specific question: if the Israelis were to evacuate Eli settlements tomorrow, would you agree to give the land and the houses for your brothers, the refugees? And nobody agreed… So, if even the Palestinians are not willing to accept this right of return, how can we expect Israelis will do it? All of the peace accords and initiatives since 1993 talk about the return of the Palestinian refugees to the Palestinian state, and all of these peace accords and initiatives got the blessing of the Palestinian leaders, but all of these initiatives have been rejected by the Palestinians refugees themselves. There is no common ground or status between the Palestinian refugees and their leaders. And for the lack of the common ground, we are loosing, land, property and lives.  Bassem Eid

Attention: une Syrie peut en cacher une autre !

Alors qu’après l’assaut terroristo-médiatique contre Israël  …

Et l’annonce turque d’une énième « flottille de la paix » contre le blocus de Gaza …

Le Hamas et ses idiots utiles médiatiques s’apprêtent, pour continuer à « fabriquer de la culpabilité israélienne » mais contre toute évidence, à nous refaire le coup du tribunal international …

Comment ne pas voir avec le bien improbable et solitaire fondateur d’une ONG qui s’intéresse aux violations palestiniennes des droits de l’homme Bassem Eid …

Et à l’instar de ces images recyclées du conflit syrien lui-même …

La véritable menace qui pointe derrière tout cela …

A savoir, avec les appuis des suspects habituels de Doha et d‘Istanbul, la syrianisation du conflit de Gaza en particulier et de la Palestine en général ?

Le Hamas a besoin des morts palestiniens pour crier victoire
Bassem Eid

I24news

10 août 2014

Depuis plus de 26 ans, je consacre ma vie à la défense des droits de l’Homme. J’ai assisté à des guerres, à la terreur et la violence. Pourtant, le mois dernier (de l’enlèvement suivi du meurtre de trois adolescents juifs, à l’assassinat du jeune Mohammed abu Khdeir, puis la guerre à Gaza) a été la période de ma vie la plus difficile politiquement et émotionnellement.

Je vis à Jérusalem-Est et j’ai été témoin de la dévastation de la vie dans ma ville. Une fois de plus, la Route 1 est devenue la ligne de démarcation entre l’Est et l’Ouest. Juifs et Arabes ont peur des ombres de l’un et de l’autre. Des résidents palestiniens de Jérusalem ont attaqué les infrastructures publiques de Beit Hanina et Shuhafat, causant d’énormes dégâts aux feux de circulation, au tramway, et aux sources de courant électrique. Je ne peux pas accepter cela comme signe de protestation civique: il s’agit de pure vengeance. Et la coexistence pour laquelle j’ai lutté toute ma vie a été pendue, exécutée sur la place publique.

J’ai mal.

Il ne fait aucun doute que la mort et la destruction dans la bande de Gaza est un tsunami. Les deux peuples sont en difficulté, mais chaque côté nient la douleur de l’autre… ce qui ne fait que l’empirer.

Et pourtant, en tant que Palestinien, je dois avouer : je suis responsable d’une partie de ce qui s’est passé. En tant que Palestinien, je ne peux pas nier ma responsabilité dans la mort de mon propre peuple.

La majorité des Palestiniens s’est opposée aux tirs de roquettes contre Israël. Les Palestiniens ont compris que ces missiles ne servaient à rien. Les Palestiniens ont appelé le Hamas à cesser les tirs et à essayer de négocier avec l’occupation israélienne. Mais le Hamas n’a jamais considéré les besoins des Palestiniens. Seulement ses propres intérêts politiques. Et ils ont continué à tirer des roquettes sur Israël, en sachant très bien quel serait le résultat: le Hamas a ouvert la route de la mort sur notre peuple.

Nous savions que le Hamas creusait des tunnels qui mèneraient à notre destruction.

Nous savons tous que trois personnes vivent sur ​​chaque mètre carré de la bande de Gaza et le Hamas sait que toute attaque par Israël conduirait à une mort massive. Mais les dirigeants du Hamas sont plus intéressés par leurs victoires que par la vie de leurs victimes.

En effet, le Hamas a besoin de ces décès afin de prétendre à la victoire. La mort de son propre peuple donne au Hamas ce pouvoir qui lui permet d’accumuler plus d’argent et plus de bras.

Le Hamas n’a jamais été intéressé par la libération du peuple palestinien de l’occupation. Et Israël ne pourrait jamais détruire l’infrastructure mise en place par le Hamas. Seulement, nous, le peuple palestinien, pourrions le démanteler.

Qu’aurions-nous pu faire? Les habitants de la bande de Gaza avaient la responsabilité de se rebeller contre le pouvoir du Hamas. Oui, le contrôle du Hamas est mortel et les gens ont eu peur d’exprimer leur mécontentement face à son règne et sa mauvaise gestion. Et pourtant, nous avons abdiqué, nous en portons la responsabilité.

Nous le savions, et nous avons laissé faire.

Ces décès (plus de 1.800 à ce jour, près de 0,1% de la population de la bande de Gaza) pourront-ils nous enseigner une leçon que nous n’oublierons jamais? L’idée que nous devons nous débarrasser du Hamas et complètement démilitariser Gaza. Ensuite, nous allons ouvrir les points de passage frontaliers. Je dis cela en tant que Palestinien fidèle et parce que je m’inquiète pour mon propre peuple.

Je n’ai aucune confiance dans les initiatives européennes et américaines. Il n’y a qu’une seule initiative à laquelle je peux croire et en laquelle j’ai confiance: une initiative trilatérale qui comprend l’Egypte, les Palestiniens et Israël. Sinon, il n’y aura pas de calme ou d’apaisement dans la bande de Gaza ou en Israël.

Nous ne devons pas permettre à la bande de Gaza de devenir la victime des complots et des intrigues arabes. L’Egypte a toujours été le médiateur légitime, et si on avait écouté un peu plus l’Egypte de nombreuses vies auraient été sauvées.

Le Qatar et la Turquie n’ont aucun rapport avec le peuple palestinien, et nous n’avons rien en commun. Ces deux Etats ont tenté de saboter chaque tentative de cessez-le-feu. À mon avis, au moins deux tiers des morts palestiniens sont victimes du complot turco-qatari.

Nous voyons ce à quoi a conduit l’ingérence du Qatar et de la Turquie en Syrie. Je ne veux pas les voir établir une « deuxième Syrie » dans la bande de Gaza.

L’Egypte sait que ces complots sont aussi dirigés contre son régime. Nous ne pouvons qu’espérer que le président égyptien, Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, ne se perdra pas dans l’épaisse confusion entourant la région, et qu’il parviendra à sortir son propre peuple et nous les Palestiniens, de ce bourbier islamique et religieux.

Il est grand temps pour les Israéliens et les Palestiniens de trouver une alternative à la guerre. Et oui, c’est véritablement possible avec l’aide de l’Egypte.

Bassem Eid est un activiste des droits de l’homme et un commentateur politique

Voir également:

Réponse de Jean-Pierre Lledo, cinéaste et essayiste 

Bien cher Bassem,

Avec cette nouvelle guerre, je pensais beaucoup à vous, depuis que nous avions en Juin, de la même tribune à Jérusalem, parlé  »de la culture de la honte et de l’honneur » dans les sociétés arabes, et je dois dire que j’avais été impressionné par votre franchise, osant parler devant un public juif de ce fléau du crimes d’honneur plus fort dans la société palestinienne, que partout ailleurs, dont sont principalement victimes les femmes, .

En lisant cette tribune, je suis tout autant touché par la liberté de pensée qui est la vôtre. C’est pour ma part la première fois que je lis un texte d’un Palestinien qui n’accuse pas l’Autre, mais soi-même.

J’espère que nous aurons l’occasion très bientôt de nous revoir pour approfondir nos pensées.

En attendant, je voudrais quand même vous dire que personnellement je ne vois pas l’origine des problèmes actuels dans  »l’occupation ».

Non pas parce que ce terme est impropre pour caractériser le rapport entre Israël et les Palestiniens, car alors les Palestiniens devraient aussi utiliser ce terme  »occupation » lorsque la Jordanie et l’Egypte occupaient la  »Cisjordanie » (appellation de la Jordanie) et Gaza…

Mais surtout parce que la belligérance entre les Juifs et les Arabes n’a pas commencé en 1967.

Si l’on veut une vraie paix, une paix définitive, c’est à cet état de belligérance qu’il faut mettre fin.

Je n’ai personnellement pas de recette magique, mais il me semble qu’il faut désamorcer la cause de cette belligérance.

Depuis 1921, toutes les guerres déclenchées par les Arabes contre les Juifs, puis contre Israël, sont fondées sur le refus arabe de considérer :

– que les Juifs ont un droit historique d’appartenance à cette région, au nom d’une histoire de 3000 ans d’attachement à cette région.

– que les Juifs tout comme les Arabes ont le droit de se constituer en Etat-Nation et de disposer d’eux mêmes, au moins sur une partie de ce que fut leur patrie.

Je suis peut-être naïf, mais il me semble que si le monde arabo-musulman dont font partie les Palestiniens, reconnaissait ce droit, (et non pas seulement Israël comme  »fait accompli »), alors disparaîtrait la cause de la belligérance, et alors toutes les questions soi-disant  »litigieuses », liées au territoire et aux frontières, seraient résolues en un tour de main.

Voila ce que je tenais à vous dire, tout en vous remerciant pour la franchise de votre point de vue.

(petite remarque encore : 1800 victimes représentent 0,1% – et non  »1% » de la population gazaoui. comme vous l’avez écrit. Parmi lesquels les 3/4 sont sans doute des combattants Hamas déguisés en  »civils »).

Jean-Pierre Lledo

Voir aussi:

Explosif : le Qatar a transporté 5000 terroristes de l’EIIL en Libye

Nebil Ben Yahmed

Tunisie secret

9 Août 2014

C’est Rafik Chelly, ex directeur de la sécurité présidentielle (1984-1987), ancien haut responsable des services de renseignement tunisien et actuel secrétaire général du « Centre Tunisien des Etudes de Sécurité Globale », qui vient de l’affirmer dans une interview au quotidien arabophone Attounissia. Cela signifie qu’après avoir activement contribué à l’embrasement de la Syrie et de l’Irak, le Qatar veut déplacer le feu de la guerre civile et de la barbarie en Libye, c’est-à-dire, inévitablement, en Tunisie et en Algérie.

D’abord une précision : contrairement à ce qui a été dit dans certains médias tunisiens, l’interview de Rafik Chelly n’a pas été publiée dans le quotidien algérien « Al-Khabar », mais dans le journal tunisien Al-Tounissia, le 4 août 2014.

Par son mutisme, la troïka a boosté Abou Iyadh

A la question « Est-il vrai que l’occupation de la Tunisie –comme le pensent certains observateurs pessimistes- par des organisations terroristes n’est qu’une question de temps, et que nous allons vivre le scénario libyen, syrien et irakien ? », l’ancien haut responsable au ministère de l’Intérieur, Rafik Chelly, a répondu : « On doit d’abord revenir à l’historique des événements qui nous ont mené à la situation actuelle. Aussi, depuis l’annonce par Abou Iyadh de la création d’Ansar al-charia, en avril 2011, après avoir bénéficié de l’amnistie générale, il a fait une démonstration de force en mai 2012, en sortant à Kairouan avec 5000 de ses adeptes. Malgré la menace que ces derniers constituaient sur la sécurité nationale, la troïka a observé le mutisme, ce qui a encouragé Abou Iyadh et ses troupes de réapparaitre l’année suivante, en déclarant qu’il est capable de mobiliser 50 000 personnes. Son intention était de profiter de la situation pour déclarer la ville de Kairouan émirat islamiste, ce qui a inquiété Ennahda, qui a interdit cette manifestation pour préserver son image auprès de l’opinion publique tunisienne et internationale… ».

Selon Rafik Chelly, c’est après l’assassinat de Chokri Belaïd et Mohamed Brahmi qu’Ali Larayedh a été contraint de classer Ansar al-charia comme une organisation terroriste, en dépit de l’opposition radicale de certains hauts responsables d’Ennahda. Et c’est à la suite de cette décision tardive que les dirigeants d’Ansar al-charia ont fui la Tunisie vers la Libye, où ils ont rejoint Abou Iyadh pour constituer, des camps d’entrainement à Sebrata et à Derna.

C’est le Qatar qui a rapatrié les djihadistes de l’EIIL

A la seconde question, «Ne pensez vous pas que c’est l’échec des islamistes en Libye qui a mis toute la région en danger imminent ? », Rafik Chelly a répondu que « L’échec cuisant des islamistes après les dernières élections du Conseil National a constitué un tournant périlleux. Il y a eu l’opération de l’aéroport (Libye), ensuite les déplacements d’Abdelhakim Belhadj, de Belkaïd et d’Ali Sallabi en Turquie, au Qatar et en Irak pour rencontrer l’EIIL, et ce pour deux raisons : primo, rapatrier les djihadistes maghrébins en Libye, secundo, conclure des contrats de vente d’armes modernes, avec l’accord de certains pays. L’aéroport de Syrte a été aménagé pour accueillir les cargos d’armes, de même que l’aéroport de Miitika ».

Faisant état de sources fiables, Rafik Chelly a ajouté que « Des avions sont arrivés en Libye à partir du Qatar, et elles étaient pleines de djihadistes, ce qui explique les succès d’Ansar al-charia, notamment leur occupation d’une base militaire à Benghazi… Le nombre de ces éléments terroristes qui viennent de l’EIIL, dont beaucoup de tunisiens, oscille entre 4000 et 5000. Leur objectif, imposer leur domination sur la capitale, ensuite occuper Zentan , auquel cas, le danger sur la Tunisie n’en sera que plus grand avec le franchissement des frontières….. ». Contacté par le correspondant de Tunisie-Secret à Tunis, Rafik Chelly a indiqué que parmi ces 5000 djihadistes, il y a près de 200 éléments de nationalité française. Autrement dit, des binationaux.

Rencontre secrète dans une ville turque

On rappellera ici que, déjà en janvier 2014, Rafik Chelly a déclaré que au quotidien Attounisia (17 janvier), que « 4500 djihadistes tunisiens appartenant au mouvement d’Ansar al-charia, sont actuellement dans des camps d’entrainement en Libye ». Les 5000 djihadistes en question reviennent donc à leur point de départ, la Libye, où ils ont été entrainés et d’où les services qataris les ont transportés vers la Syrie, dès la fin de l’année 2011.

On précisera enfin que, sur la base de rapports de renseignement parvenus au journal algérien « Al-Bilad al-Jazairiya », celui-ci a révélé, dans son édition du 4 juillet dernier que des djihadistes libyens appartenant à Ansar al-charia, ainsi que des éléments de l’EIIL, se sont rencontrés dans une ville en Turquie pour conclure un accord consistant à transférer les djihadistes d’origine maghrébine présents en Irak, à les transférer vers la Libye pour renforcer les rangs d’Ansar al-charia dans ce pays ainsi qu’en Tunisie. Le même rapport de renseignement indique que l’EIIL a décidé d’élargir son djihad au Maghreb arabe et dans le Sahel, loin d’un Moyen-Orient déjà partiellement conquis.

 Voir également:

Tsahal Peut-Elle Se Contenter De Demi-Victoires ?
Debka files

Jerusalem plus

L’Iran et Al Qaïda prennent bonne note de la victoire limitée d’Israël sur le Hamas, noyau dur d’un embryon d’armée palestinienne.

Alors que la délégation israélienne est arrivée au Caire pour des pourparlers indirects avec le Hamas, à la fin des premières 24h d’un cessez-le-feu de 3 jours dans la guerre à Gaza, les porte-parole du gouvernement israélien ont produit d’énormes efforts, mardi soir 5 août, pour convaincre le public que la guerre à Gaza était en voie de se terminer et que l’ennemi avait subi d’énormes dégradations de ses capacités d’agression.

Le chef d’Etat-Major le Lieutenant-Général Benny Gantz a continué, jusqu’à présent, à déclarer : « Nous nous acheminons maintenant, vers une période de reconstruction ». Ce n’est pas exactement le message que les soldats voulaient entendre de la part de leur Commandant en chef, alors qu’ils se retiraient des champs de bataille de Gaza, après 28 jours d’âpres combats et de lourdes pertes (64 tués dans Tsahal). Mais les artistes en relations publiques du gouvernement étaient déjà en train d’exposer toute l’horreur d’un scénario de simulation décrivant une opération théorique devant aboutir à la conquête de la totalité de la Bande de Gaza.

Ce scenario, qu’on dit avoir été présenté au Cabinet de sécurité, la semaine dernière, au cours du débat sur les tactiques à employer lors de la prochaine phase d’opération, aurait coûté des centaines de vies humaines parmi les soldats israéliens et mené à une réoccupation d’une durée de cinq ans, afin de purger le territoire des 20.000 terroristes présents et de démanteler leur machine de guerre.

Ce scénario a été imaginé pour faire taire les mécontents, à commencer par les citoyens vivant à portée étroite de la Bande de Gaza, qui refusaient de retourner dans leurs maisons, à cause du danger qui n’est pas totalement éliminé.

Les alternatives que le Cabinet a examinées n’ont jamais contenu l’occupation totale de la Bande de Gaza. L’option la plus sérieuse envisagée par les Ministres et qui a été rejetée dès la première semaine de guerre, consistait à envoyer des troupes pour une frappe-éclair, afin de détruire les centres de commandement du Hamas et le noyau dur de sa structure militaire et de ressortir rapidement. Si cette option avait été appliquée à un stade précoce du conflit, plutôt que de prolonger dix jours de frappes ininterrompues et sans réels résultats probants, cela aurait permis de sauver des pertes lourdes du côté palestinien et la dévastation de leurs propriétés, d’une étendue qui trouble aussi pas mal d’ Israéliens.

Et cette semaine encore, les hommes politiques dirigeant la guerre, ont décidé de l’écourter, sans prêter le moindre égard aux avis concernant l faisabilité des opérations, pouvant conduire cette mission anti-terroriste vers une conclusion victorieuse, pour la population vivant sous la menace terroriste du Hamas depuis plus d’une décennie.

La décision d’en venir plutôt à un cessez-le-feu et à des discussions indirectes avec le Hamas a été coûteuse pour le Premier Ministre Binyamin Netanyahu, qui lui a valu le plus de critiques à l’intérieur. Au premier jour du cessez-le-feu, mardi, la côte de popularité de Binyamin Netanyahu a subi une perte sèche autour de 60%, ce qui équivaut au niveau des sondages juste avant la guerre, après avoir crever des plafonds frôlant les 80% au pic de l’opération.

La façon dont les dirigeants israéliens ont géré et conclu la guerre à Gaza a quatre conséquences qui dépassent sa sphère immédiate :

1. Le fait qu’après avoir subi un coup sévère, le Hamas tient encore le choc et conserve indemne l’essentiel de son infrastructure militaire, lui apportant le prestige du noyau dur d’une sorte d’armée régulière palestinienne, dont ne disposaient pas les Islamistes avant le lancement de l’Opération Bordure Défensive, le 7 juillet.

Ce noyau dur est déjà une force combattante active, dote d’un bon entraînement au combat et d’une certaine popularité nationale – non seulement à Gaza, mais aussi sur les domaines de l’Autorité Palestinienne dans les territoires cisjordaniens.

Aussi voit-on le Hamas arriver au Caire à la table des négociations, avec cette carte d’une réputation militaire fraîchement refaite.

2. Les perspectives d’un accommodement d’après-guerre qui puisse changer le paysage global du terrorisme dans la Bande de Gaza sont assez faibles. Les tacticiens du gouvernement israélien ont fait allusion au fait que Mahmoud Abbas pourrait convenir en tant que personnalité aux commandes d’un tel accommodement. C’est, proprement, une chimère. La branche armée du Hamas n’envisagerait pas cinq minutes de laisser les mains libres à un tel rival sur leur chasse gardée. Et, quoi qu’il en soit, Abbas ne montre pas d’inclination particulière à se conformer à aucun schéma directeur israélien de nouvelle gouvernance à Gaza.

3. Lorsque Ban Ki Moon s’est rendu à Jérusalem, le 22 juillet, pour faire pression en vue d’un cessez-le-feu à Gaza et d’en revenir à des discussions sur les causes fondamentales du conflit palestino-israélien, Netanyahu a littéralement « explosé » de colère : « Vous ne pouvez pas parler au Hamas. Ce sont des extrémistes islamistes au même titre qu’Al Qaïda, l’Etat Islamique, les Taliban ou Boko Haram !

Passant inaperçues pour lui, ses paroles ne sont pas tombées dans l’oreille d’un sourd, dans le monde islamiste. Là  les observateurs suivaient à la trace chaque stade du conflit à Gaza, dès qu’on a compris qu’il s’élevait à un niveau comparable à la guerre contre Al Qaïda. Aussi, après avoir freiné l’opération contre le Hamas, Israël pourrait bien se rendre compte qu’il a mis la main dans un nouveau nid de frelons. En ce moment-même, l’Etat Islamique et le Front Al Nosra combattent pour étendre leurs avant-postes syriens et irakiens par une poussée au Liban même. Et ils ne s’arrêtront sans doute pas en si bon chemin.

Si les Jihadistes en mouvement ont eu la possibilité d’évaluer que Tsahal est incapable de vaincre le Hamas, ils pourraient bien se retourner contre Israël et lui poser une nouvelle menace extrêmement dangereuse.

4. L’Iran aura bien pris note, de son côté, du fait que, deux fois de suite en deux ans, les dirigeants israéliens ont préféré s’abstenir d’apporter une conclusion victorieuse à une guerre débutée par des forces paramilitaires que Téhéran a préalablement renforcées, entraînées et financées – d’abord le Hezbollah, dans la Guerre du Liban en 2006, qui s’est terminée par un tracé de zone gérée par la FINUL, et actuellement , un conflit avec les Islamistes palestiniens qui semble se terminer de la même façon.

DEBKAfile Analyse Exclusive :debka.com

Adaptation : Marc Brzustowski.

Voir encore:

International media failed professionally and ethically in Gaza
Op-ed: According to civilian death toll measure, Nazi Germany – which had one million dead civilians in World War II – was a victim of the aggressive US, which lost ‘only’ 12,000 civilians.
Eytan Gilboa
Ynet news

08.13.14

The media coverage of wars affects the global public opinion, leaders and decision making. Its trends can determine the results just as much as what it achieved in the battlefield.

The main problem presented in the media during all of Israel’s wars and operations in the past decade is proportionality and the number of civilian casualties. The media is the main source of information on the extent, type and source of losses.

The coverage of Operation Protective Edge and the civilian casualties in the global media, mainly in the West, was characterized by an anti-Israel bias and serious professional and ethical failures. They appeared in all components of the journalistic coverage: Pictures, headlines, reports, editorials and cartoons.

The images from Gaza showed only what Hamas permitted the media to broadcast and describe. Hamas terrorized and censored journalists. It only allowed them to broadcast images of destruction and killing of civilians, particularly women and children, and staged situations on the ground.

There were no images of rockets launched from populated areas and from within UNRWA schools, mosques and hospitals. There were only images of civilians’ bodies and funerals and very few images of Hamas fighters, if any.

Media outlets around the world failed to mention the restricting conditions they had operated under in Gaza, which unavoidably led to false and misleading reports.

Only after they left Gaza, few journalists like the Italian Gabriele Barbati and the French Gallagher Fenwick dared to expose the way Hamas terrorized journalists, its use of civilians as human shields and its failed launches which resulted in the killing of children, like at the Shati refugee camp on July 28. This is an ethical failure.

The media have turned the civilian death toll into the only measure of the justness of the Israeli warfare. The New York Times and Haaretz, for instance, published the Gaza death toll on their front pages every day. The message is clear: The higher the number of civilian casualties, the more « war crimes » Israel is committing.

This measure is groundless. According to its distorted logic, Nazi Germany – which had one million dead civilians in World War II – was the victim of the aggressiveness of the United States, which lost « only » 12,000 civilians, and Britain, which lost « only » 67,000 civilians. This is a logic and ethical failure.

The media knew that the reports published by the Palestinians, the United Nations and the Red Cross about civilian victims in all the conflicts since the first Lebanon War until today were false. In Operation Protective Edge as well, the claims of 75-80% civilian casualties are false.

The New York Times and the BBC, which emphasized the « victim competition, » are now admitting that the reported number of civilian deaths contradicts statistical tests. This is a professional failure.

China and India’s broadcast networks exposed the missing context of Israel’s efforts to avoid harming civilians and Hamas’ counteractions. Who would have thought that communist China’s international broadcast network (CCTV) would cover the Gaza conflict in a much more accurate and balanced way than the British BBC?

This surprising fact points more than anything to the anti-Israel bias and perhaps anti-Semitism of Western media outlets. The biased and misleading coverage contributed to the hasty calls to prosecute Israel for war crimes, to mass protests against Israel and to anti-Semitic incidents in Europe.

The Western media must report to their consumers about their professional and ethical failures in Gaza. I seriously doubt they have the courage to probe their own failures as they often demand from governments and organizations.

Prof. Eytan Gilboa is the director of the School of Communication and a senior research associate at the BESA Center for Strategic Studies at Bar-Ilan University.

Des journalistes d’Al-Jazeera utilisent leurs comptes Facebook et Twitter comme outils de propagande au service du Hamas

hamas

Par Y. Yehoshua, B. Chernitsky et Y. Graff *

La couverture du conflit de Gaza par la chaîne qatarie Al-Jazeera révèle le soutien absolu de l’émir qatari, Cheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, accordé au Hamas. Avec le conflit,  la chaîne est devenue un puissant organe de propagande du Hamas. Elle a transmis les messages du mouvement, sa couverture du conflit était partiale, au point que les intervenants des émissions en direct de la chaîne qui osaient émettre des critiques, même légères, du Hamas, rencontraient censure et opprobre. Le fait est que les partisans du Hamas ont lancé la campagne « Un million de mercis à Al-Jazeera » sur Twitter, pour exprimer leur gratitude envers la chaîne qui « penchait en faveur de la résistance ». [1]

« Un million de mercis à Al-Jazeera »

La position pro-Hamas de la chaîne est également perceptible dans l’activité en ligne de ses journalistes, animateurs et présentateurs sur les médias sociaux. Leurs pages Facebook et Twitter sont inondées d’éloges de la branche militaire du Hamas, des Brigades Izz al-Din al-Qassam, pour leur guerre contre Israël, y compris pour les tirs de roquettes, l’utilisation de tunnels et les prétendus enlèvements de soldats israéliens. Dans la lignée de la politique étrangère qatarie, ils fustigent l’Egypte et son président, Abd Al-Fattah Al-Sissi, pour la couverture médiatique égyptienne du conflit.

Un article paru dans le quotidien qatari Al-Quds Al-Arabi explique le phénomène : « La douleur et l’angoisse des journalistes d’Al-Jazeera devant la tragédie des Palestiniens dans la bande [de Gaza], en Cisjordanie et dans la Jérusalem occupée, a incité un grand nombre d’entre eux à renforcer leur activité sur les médias sociaux, dès la minute où ils quittaient la salle de rédaction… » La présentatrice d’Al-Jazeera Khadija Benguenna a confié au quotidien : « Cette fois, les médias sociaux ont joué un rôle plus important, plus actif et plus fervent que les médias traditionnels. Les images et les articles parvenaient aux internautes en temps réel, au moment du bombardement, [et] chacun pouvait voir les roquettes de la résistance voler dans le ciel des villes israéliennes… » [2]

Extraits de messages des journalistes et présentateurs d’Al-Jazeera sur les médias sociaux :

Soutien aux tirs de roquettes sur Israël

Les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera se sont montrés solidaires de l’action militaire du Hamas contre Israël et ont salué ses succès. Dans une série de tweets en date du 9 juillet, [3] le correspondant Amer Al-Kubaisi a exprimé son soutien aux tirs de roquettes du Hamas sur Israël : « Malgré le siège [du président égyptien] Al-Sissi de Gaza et l’élimination des tunnels, le Hamas améliore ses roquettes à la fois en qualité et en quantité, terrorise et surprend Israël à Tel-Aviv, Haïfa et Jérusalem ».

Plus tard le même jour, il tweete : « Le Hamas ne renoncera à aucun missile de longue portée. Il les a développés lui-même et les a envoyés sur Haïfa et Jérusalem. C’est ce qui terrifie le renseignement israélien. Etre armé signifie être en vie. »

Dans un autre tweet, il ajoute : « Les dispositifs d’armement chimique se trouvent à Haïfa. Un coup asséné sur l’un d’eux revient à rayer un quart des Israéliens de la Palestine historique. Israël lutte pour ne pas être évacué… »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Le 17 juillet, Al-Kubaisi tweetait un poster montrant diverses roquettes du Hamas, avec des détails sur la portée de chacune, et demandait aux followers de retweeter. Il écrit : « Ici, en une image, vous pouvez apprendre à connaître les roquettes d’Al-Qassam, leur portée, et les villes qu’elles peuvent atteindre. Si vous aimez cette image, retweetez-la. »

Poster tweeté par Al-Kubaisi

Ahmed Mansour, présentateur de l’émission Without Borders d’Al-Jazeera, s’est également solidarisé des tirs de roquettes du Hamas. Le 9 juillet, Mansour écrit sur sa page Facebook : « Israël est stupéfait et déconcerté par les roquettes de la résistance palestinienne qui l’ont frappé en profondeur, atteignant Tel Aviv, Jérusalem et Haïfa, malgré le siège de Gaza par Al-Sissi et son gouvernement…  Si la résistance reçoit les armes qui lui permettront de s’occuper du lâche Israël, stupéfait et pétrifié, alors les Israéliens vivront dans des abris ou fuiront le pays. » [4]

Le post d’Ahmed Mansour

Le présentateur Jalal Chahda a tweeté, le 15 juillet : « Le système du Dôme de fer israélien est un tigre de papier, plus faible qu’une toile d’araignée, un échec, inutile contre les roquettes de la noble résistance, qui défend l’honneur de la oumma. » [5]

Tweet de Jalal Chahda

Un autre journaliste d’Al-Jazeera s’est montré solidaire des tirs de roquettes par le Hamas : le présentateur d’In Depth, Ali Al-Zafiri, a tweeté le 12 juillet : « Al-Ja’bari [6] vous bombarde depuis la tombe. » Il a ajouté le hashtag #Praise_Qassam à son tweet. [7]

Tweet d’Ali Al-Zafiri

Dans un tweet du 29 juillet, le correspondant d’Al-Jazeera au Pakistan, Ahmad Mowaffagh Zaidan, a fait l’éloge de la branche militaire du Hamas, les Brigades Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam, et de leur chef Mohammed Deif. Il a tweeté : « Ils ont relevé nos têtes » avec leurs tirs de roquettes sur Israël. Le lendemain, il demandait à Allah de les protéger. [8]

Les tweets d’Ahmad Zaidan

Soutien aux incursions en Israël et aux enlèvements de soldats

Les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera ont exprimé leur soutien aux autres actions du Hamas contre Israël et contre les soldats israéliens. Le 17 juillet, Ahmed Mansour postait un statut Facebook louant l’incursion du Hamas par un tunnel près du kibboutz de Sufa, disant qu’elle
« devrait être enseignée dans les plus grandes académies militaires comme l’une des opérations de résistance les plus remarquables contre de grandes armées. C’est une opération qui surpasse tous les films hollywoodiens, une réalité qui dépasse la fiction ». Il a ajouté : « Les Brigades Al-Qassam et la résistance palestinienne battent le record de la gloire et de l’héroïsme de la oumma. »

Le post d’Ahmed Mansour

Jalal Chahda a soutenu la construction de tunnels par le Hamas, tweetant : « Les tunnels de Gaza sont le cimetière des sionistes. » Il a également salué la résistance armée en général : « Dans le passé, je croyais que la résistance armée en Palestine occupée était l’une des méthodes de libération, et aujourd’hui, je suis convaincu que la résistance armée est la seule méthode. »

Les tweets de Jalal Chahda

Des reporters se sont réjouis lorsque le Hamas a affirmé avoir capturé le soldat israélien « Shaul Aaron » ; Israël a plus tard statué que le Sgt Oron Shaul avait été tué dans l’action, et que son lieu d’inhumation était inconnu. Juste avant l’annonce de la capture par le Hamas, Amer Al-Kubaisi a tweeté : « Dans 10 minutes, le Hamas fera une annonce importante. Personnellement, je hume un [Gilad] Shalit. » Al-Kubaisi s’est plus tard vanté d’être « le premier journaliste au monde à avoir parlé de la capture d’un ‘nouveau Shalit’, avant même l’annonce d’Al-Qassam. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

La présentatrice Salma Al-Jamal s’est également réjouie de l’annonce de l’enlèvement du Hamas sur Facebook. [9] Le 20 juillet, elle a partagé l’annonce du Hamas et écrit : « Allah Akbar, un nouveau Gilad Shalit a été capturé. » La présentatrice Khadija Benguenna a également acclamé l’annonce, tweetant : « Allah Akbar et Allah soit loué pour la capture d’un soldat sioniste » [10]

Le post de Salma Al-Jamal

Tweet de Khadija Benguenna

Diffuser la propagande du Hamas

En plus de glorifier et de soutenir l’aile militaire du Hamas, les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera ont diffusé les messages du mouvement via leurs comptes de médias sociaux, partageant et retweetant des déclarations de responsables du Hamas, des vidéos du Hamas et des URL de sites web et de comptes du Hamas, de ses partisans et affiliés.

Par exemple, le 18 juillet, suite à la fermeture du compte Twitter d’Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam, [11] Ali Al-Zafiri a tweeté sur le nouveau compte d’Al-Qassam, appelant ses partisans à le suivre. Il écrit : « [C’est] le nouveau compte des Brigades Al-Qassam, l’aile de notre oumma – puisque Twitter a fermé leur compte d’origine. Vous êtes priés de le soutenir, le suivre et le partager. C’est le moins [qu’on puisse faire]. »

Tweet d’Ali Al-Zafiri

Khadija Benguenna a également partagé des informations d’un autre organe d’information au service du Hamas, Al-Risala Radio, sur sa page Facebook. Le 28 juillet, elle a posté un lien accompagné du commentaire suivant : « La couverture se poursuit sur la radio Al-Risala. »

Le post de Khadija Benguenna

Jalal Chahda a tweeté une citation de l’ancien dirigeant spirituel du Hamas, le cheikh Ahmed Yassine, éliminé par Israël en 2004 : « Je demeurerai un combattant du jihad jusqu’à ce que mon pays soit libéré, car je ne crains pas la mort. »

Tweet de Jalal Chahda

Critique de l’Egypte, de son président, de ses médias et de son armée

Dans le contexte de l’animosité égyptienne envers le Hamas et son principal bailleur de fonds, le Qatar, les journalistes, invités et présentateurs d’Al-Jazeera ont également utilisé leurs comptes de médias sociaux pour attaquer l’Egypte et le président Abd Al-Fattah Al-Sissi. Ils ont également fustigé la couverture médiatique égyptienne du conflit actuel, et critiqué l’armée égyptienne pour son inaction.

Dans ses tweets du 26 juillet, Amer Al-Kubaisi s’en est plus particulièrement pris à Al-Sissi : « Connaissez-vous Sisinyahu ? » a-t-il tweeté, avec une photo d’un Al-Sissi déguisé en juif. Le lendemain, il a tweeté : « Al-Sissi soutient [Khalifa] Haftar, Al-Sissi soutient Bachar [Al-Assad], Al-Sissi soutient [Nouri] Al-Maliki, Al-Sissi soutient [Benjamin] Netanyahu. Il soutient l’église avant la mosquée, les chiites avant les sunnites, et les juifs avant les musulmans. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Ahmed Mansour a critiqué l’armée égyptienne sur Facebook ; le 19 juillet, il écrit : « L’armée qui ferme le passage de Rafah et empêche les convois humanitaires et médicaux d’arriver jusqu’à la population de Gaza, en proie à une guerre d’extermination, n’est pas l’armée égyptienne ; c’est l’armée d’Al-Sissi, qui tue le peuple égyptien et assiège la population de Gaza – car la [vraie] armée égyptienne est l’armée de soutien à Gaza et de défense du peuple égyptien. Quand l’armée égyptienne reviendra-t-elle ? » Dans un autre post, il qualifie le président Al-Sissi, et l’émir des Émirats arabes unis, le cheikh Al-Nahyan, de « sionistes arabes ».

Le 21 juillet, Mansour écrit : « Chaque jour, les Brigades Al-Qassam soulignent que ce sont elles qui opèrent et mènent la bataille de Gaza, sur le plan militaire et en matière de renseignement, de politique et d’information, tandis que Netanyahou, les dirigeants israéliens et leurs alliés arabes sionistes, dirigés par Al-Sissi et [le président des Emirats arabes unis Khalifa] bin Zayed, s’enfoncent dans le mensonge, le brouillard et la défaite mentale, militaire et politique. »

Les posts d’Ahmed Mansour

Jamal Chahda a tweeté : « L’armée égyptienne a annoncé que 13 nouveaux tunnels dans la bande de Gaza ont été détruits. C’est ainsi qu’[ils] expriment leur solidarité avec Gaza et sa population assiégée. »

Tweet de Jamal Chahda

Le présentateur d’Al-Jazeera Jamal Rayyan a maudit les médias égyptiens, les qualifant d’« ordures ». [12] Il a également tweeté des vidéos de personnalités médiatiques égyptiennes attaquant Al-Jazeera et lui-même personnellement, pour ses déclarations anti-égyptiennes, ajoutant : « Un ami m’a suggéré d’organiser des ateliers avec des personnalités des médias égyptiens. Je lui ai dit : ‘Impossible. Ce sont des ordures. On ne peut les changer. Il serait plus facile de recréer les Egyptiens à partir de zéro’. »

Les tweets de Jamal Rayyan

Le 20 juillet, la présentatrice Ghada Owais a posté une image accompagnée d’une déclaration soulignant que l’Egypte avait empêché les délégations médicales d’entrer dans la bande de Gaza, sous la légende : « Libre à vous d’interpréter. » [13]

Le post de Ghada Owais

Critique de l’Autorité palestinienne et de ses dirigeants

Les journalistes ont également sévèrement critiqué l’Autorité palestinienne et ses dirigeants. Le 23 juillet, Amer Al-Kubaisi a publié un avis moqueur, « Porté disparu », du chef du gouvernement de réconciliation Rami Hamdallah, pour son inaction dans la crise de Gaza. L’avis appelle à le livrer au peuple palestinien pour qu’il puisse présenter sa démission.

Dans un autre tweet, le 21 juillet, Al-Kubaisi écrit : « L’Intifada est la mère des Palestiniens, et la résistance est leur père. Le père oeuvre à Gaza et la mère, en Cisjordanie, va bientôt se manifester. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Khadija Benguenna écrit, le 26 juillet : « Pourquoi Abu Mazen traîne-t-il des pieds face à l’éventualité d’une adhésion au Traité de Rome, qui permettrait à la Palestine de devenir membre de la Cour pénale internationale ? C’est le meilleur moyen d’assiéger Netanyahu et de le piéger en Israël. »

Tweet de Khadija Benguenna

Pour la disparition d’Israël et des régimes arabes

En plus de soutenir le Hamas, certains journalistes ont aussi évoqué en filigrane leur espoir de voir Israël disparaître. Le 20 juillet, Ahmed Mansour a tweeté une vidéo du cheikh Ahmad Yassin prédisant qu’Israël allait disparaître d’ici à 2027.

Le 20 juillet, Salma Al-Jamal a cité l’imam égyptien pro-Frères musulmans Mohammad Al-Ghazali (décédé en 1996), qui a annoncé qu’après la chute des régimes arabes viendrait celle d’Israël. Elle a ajouté : « Bientôt, avec l’aide d’Allah. »

Tweet d’Ahmed Mansour
 

Tweet de Salma Al-Jamal

Post de Khadija Benguenna du 28 juillet montrant un drapeau israélien brûlé dans une récente manifestation en Algérie

* Y. Yehoshua est vice-président des recherches et directrice de MEMRI Israël ; B. Chernitsky et Y. Graff sont chargés de recherche au MEMRI.

Notes :
[1] Palinfo.com, 23 juillet 2014.
[2] Al-Quds Al-Arabi (Londres), le 14 juillet 2014.
[3] Twitter.com/amer_alkubaisi.
[4] Facebook.com/ahmed.mansour.1276487.
[5] Twitter.com/ChahdaJalal.
[6] Le chef de l’aile militaire du Hamas tué par Israël en novembre 2012.
[7] Twitter.com/AliAldafiri.
[8] Twitter.com/Ahmadmuaffaq.
[9] Facebook.com/SalmaAljamal.NewsPresenter
[10] Twitter.com/khadijabenguen.
[11] Voir MEMRI Dépêche spéciale n ° 5813, « Following Twitter Shutdown Of Hamas’ Al-Qassam Brigades Account – One Week Later, A New Account Is Active, »  du 31 juillet 2014.
[12] Twitter.com/jamalrayyan.
[13] Facebook.com/1ghada.owais.

Le « siège israélien de Gaza » : un mythe savamment exploité

Dr Zvi Tenney
Ambassador of Israel (ret)
http://www.zvitenney.info

La bande de Gaza a une frontière commune non seulement avec Israël mais aussi avec l’Egypte. Les 13 kilomètres de cette frontière sont contrôlés par l’Egypte et non par Israël. Le point de passage de Rafah sur cette frontière permet le passage de personnes désirant voyager de par le monde après être passées par Egypte.

Mais plus important encore est le fait que toute marchandise peut passer d’Israël à la bande de Gaza à l’exception d’armes et d’une courte liste de matériaux pouvant être utilisés à des fin de terrorisme .N’oublions pas que Gaza est gouverné depuis 2007 par le Hamas, une organisation terroriste, condamnée par tous les pays occidentaux, qui affiche ouvertement son refus de l’existence d’Israël qu’il a comme objectif de détruire.

Les marchandises qui passent d’Israël à la bande de Gaza sont de toute sorte, produits de consommation courante, équipements et produits médicaux, fuel et courant électrique…..Les super marchés, les centres commerciaux, les hôtels, les restaurants y sont donc abondamment achalandés. Les témoignages sur ce fait ne manquent pas et les photos des lieux étonnent toujours car on croierait
voir les photos d’une ville ocidentale florissante.

Rappelons à ce propos que durant les premiers cinq mois de 2014 ,18 000 camions de marchandises ont passé d’Israël à la bande de Gaza transportant plus de 228 000 tonnes de marchandises, commandés par des commerçants et des hommes d’affaires locaux qui entrent constamment en Israël pour y faire leurs achats. Ceci sans parler de quantités importantes d’eau et de l’approvisionnement de plus de la moitié de la consommation d’électricité de toute la bande de Gaza.

Par ailleurs durant les cinq premiers mois de 2014 plus de 60 000 habitants de la bande de Gaza sont rentrés en Israël dont évidemment ceux qui avaient besoin de soins médicaux et d’hospitalisation.

Il est donc clair qu’il n’y a absolument pas de siège ou de blocus terrestre qu’Israël impose à la bande de Gaza .Le seul blocus qu’Israël surveille de près et qui est le prétexte pour les anti israéliens de parler « de blocus total de Gaza par Israël », est le blocus maritime. Un blocus qui dans les conditions d’hostilité extrême du Hamas contre Israël est tout à fait compréhensible pour éviter l’importation d’armes dangereuses comme par exemple des missiles de longue portée en provenance de l’Iran.

Ce genre de blocus est d’ailleurs permis par les législations internationales et a en effet été accepté comme étant légitime par une Commission spéciale convoquée en 2011 par le Secrétaire général de l’ONU pour examiner ce blocus maritime qu’Israël est obligé d’imposer compte tenu du constant comportement agressif du Hamas contre Israël qui subit depuis de nombreuses années déjà des tirs de roquettes du Hamas ayant pour cible les populations civiles en Israël….Et cela bien qu’Israël ait complètement évacué la bande de Gaza en 2005.
Cette commission avait conclu que l’approvisionnement de Gaza devait être assurée, comme c’est le cas depuis toujours, par les passages frontaliers terrestres.

Les vociférations du Hamas et de ses supporters affirmant que les tirs de roquettes sur Israël sont « un acte de résistance à l’occupation israélienne » de Gaza ou qu’ils ont comme objectif de mettre fin au « siège israélien », ne sont donc que prétexte bancal pour justifier la mise en action de l’idéologie du Hamas de mettre fin, pour raison religieuse, à l’existence d’Israël comme inscrit dans sa convention….Il est navrant que nombreux anti israéliens de par le monde tombent dan ce panneau tendu par le Hamas et ses supporters.

Voir de même:

The international media’s hypocrisy – the Hamas case
Op-ed: Most of the international media have decided for you in advance that Israel is the bad guy in the story. It focuses on every Gaza casualty while ignoring civilian deaths in Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Libya and Kenya.
Yossi Levy
Ynet news

08.09.14

In the summer of 1999 more than 2,000 civilians were killed by NATO air forces which bombed cities and villages in what was the former Yugoslavia. As Ambassador to Belgrade, I still feel the pain and the agony of that horrible summer. It wasn’t only Serbian military bases that were bombed but also, albeit unintentionally, hospitals, schools, libraries, and even a train over a bridge. Serbia, as you all know, had not launched even a single missile towards any NATO capital city.

The media in the countries that were involved in the military operation did not, however, start their daily broadcasting with updates on the number of civilian dead; they didn’t mention the death toll every 30 minutes and, actually, did not even send camera crews to show their shocked viewers in London and Hamburg the horrors and bloodshed of demolished streets and hospitals.

Losing Hasbara
‘Smashing a peanut with a hammer’: Foreign journalists on int’l coverage of Gaza fighting / Polina Garaev
Since Gaza op started, IDF released scores of videos of pilots calling off strikes and Israel urging Gazans to evacuate, but foreign reporters tell Ynet that in Europe a photo of dead Palestinians is worth more than a thousand Israeli words.

As far as Western media were concerned, the Serbian civilian victims had no names and no faces. It is the same today with regards to the women and children killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, who have been killed in massive numbers over the past decade or more, who were the tragic victims of Western air forces bombing terrorist targets in both countries.

Does anyone know how many innocents have been victims of Western pilots in the last decade? Nobody bothers to count them because the European media knows full well that war has its own cruel rules – that in war, yes, innocent people do unfortunately die.

With one exception. The war between Israel and Hamas with its Jihadi Islamic terror. When it comes to this war, European media has different standards. The tragic innocent victims who have been killed by the Israeli Defence Forces dominate practically every news outlet and their deaths have been reported in the most dramatic way time and time again. Meanwhile, as we speak, innocents are dying in Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Libya, and Kenya, usually on a vaster scale than in Gaza, but the media is uninterested in people who die in those countries who have had an extra piece of bad luck – Israel didn’t kill them, so the world doesn’t care.

The death of innocent people is always a tragedy. But I do not know any other army in the world that is as careful as one can be in wartime as the IDF is. Very often IDF units even cancel operations because of fears for civilian safety. Only the IDF actually warns in advance where and when it is going to hit, giving civilians time to leave specific areas. Hamas is the party here that forces Palestinian civilians to stay in their homes and thus endanger their lives. In the midst of this, Israeli pilots face a cruel dilemma: if they fire at a rocket launcher near a hospital or a mosque they may kill civilians; if they do not, the rocket, once it is fired, may kill Israelis near a hospital or a synagogue.

It is very easy to judge young men on such desperate missions from the comfort of a couch in a safe city far away. Israel fights for its life against an organization which, all too often merely described in the media as “militants”, is the actual government in Gaza, an organisation that calls not only for the destruction of the State of Israel but for the murder of all Jews wherever they are. The Hamas charter is a barbaric, anti-semitic and medieval document which calls openly to murder Jews. After it accuses the Jews for all the calamities of the humanity, article 7 simply says: if a Jew hides behind a rock or a tree, the rock and the tree will shout to the Moslems, come and kill him. This is a clear anti-Semitic rhetoric you can find on daily basis among Hamas leaders (Osama Hamdan, Fauzi Barhum and many others) preaching to their crowds in Arabic. Did you read about it in the media? I believe you did not.

Has the media in Europe also forgotten that Hamas, which fires rockets at civilians all over Israel, are the same people that a decade ago during the Second Intifada murdered hundreds of Israeli civilians by blowing them up in restaurants, bars and night clubs? Surely not. The media knows the facts, but in too many cases does not report the truth. It knowingly betrays its duty to tell the world what is really happening in the Gaza Strip.

The media knows as well that Hamas opposes all and any political solutions between Israel and the Palestinian people. In fact, a two-state solution, which we still hope to achieve, would be the worst nightmare for Hamas because what it wants is a single Islamic Greater Palestine ruled by Sharia Law in which people will be beheaded, the hands of thieves chopped off, and city squares turned into fairgrounds of public torture and execution, including stoning women for adultery and homosexuals for, well, being homosexual.

Hamas is the dystopian nightmare that Israel is fighting. Europe has known for a long time that Hamas, which is essentially a localized version of Al Qaeda, is a mortal enemy of Israel, but first and foremost it is the enemy of the Palestinian people because of its blindness and fanaticism. Hamas prevents the Palestinian people from attaining the freedom, prosperity and independence they deserve.

Even Egypt, the most important Arab country, accuses Hamas of war crimes against its own people, and puts the responsibility on Hamas for the escalation of the current conflict. Egypt offered a ceasefire two weeks ago; Israel accepted, Hamas did not. Since then Israel has agreed to several truces while Hamas has violated all of them.

In spite of that, anyone who listens to some European media would think Israel somehow wants to conquer Gaza. This is probably the biggest lie of all. Israel left Gaza in 2005, evacuating all its bases and uprooting all Jewish communities. For the first time since the beginning of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Palestinians were given full control over a territory on which they could have built a good economy and thriving society. Instead, they chose an Islamist terrorist organization to control their lives. Gaza became an armed base for escalated, indiscriminate attacks on Israel. In the last nine years, 15,000 missiles have been fired into Israel from Gaza with no provocation or justification. What would you do if a terrorist organization dedicated to your annihilation bombarded you for nearly a decade?

Violence and killing is the raison d’etre of Hamas. Unfortunately, despite the plain facts, many in the media and the international community are not listening. The claim that Israel is always “guilty” is only the latest echo of the old cry that “the Jews” are guilty. This is truly a miserable hour for Europe’s media, which is attacking, often viciously, not the terrorist Islamic Hamas, but its victim – Israel, a fellow democracy which fights for its survival in a region that is becoming more and more chaotic by the day.

One could understand such perverse instincts from the media in the Arab world, perhaps, but one expects better from the European media towards a fellow democracy which is fighting Jihadi madness on its own doorstep.

Most of the international media have decided for you in advance that Israel is the bad guy in the story. This biased approach is not a beautiful chapter in the history of the world media, and perhaps in the loaded history between European nations and the Jewish people.

Yossi Levy is the Israeli ambassador to Serbia and Montenegro

Voir encore:

 

Why Qatar and Turkey Can’t Solve the Crisis in Gaza
A bad idea
David Andrew Weinberg and Jonathan Schanzer
National Interest
July 23, 2014

With Washington desperate for a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas, and with Egypt having flamed out as a broker of calm, two of Hamas’s top patrons are about to be rewarded with a high-profile diplomatic victory. U.S. and Israeli media are now reporting that the White House may be looking to Qatar and Turkey to help negotiate an end to the hostilities. Qatar, in fact, held a high-profile cease-fire summit in Doha on Sunday that included Palestinian Authority president Mahmoud Abbas, UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon, the Norwegian foreign minister, and Hamas leader Khaled Meshal.

No progress was reported on Sunday. But using the good offices of Qatar is a huge mistake. The same goes for Turkey. In exchange for fleeting calm, the United States will have effectively given approval to these allies-cum-frenemies to continue their respective roles as sponsors of Hamas, which is a designated terrorist group in the United States.
Since a visit to Turkey by Qatar’s ruler Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, and amidst reports that Meshal has been shuttling between the two countries, Doha and Ankara have been floating terms of a joint cease-fire proposal that would reportedly grant Hamas significant benefits. Specifically, the deal would grant Hamas an open border in Gaza that would allow the group to continue to smuggle rockets and other advanced weaponry at an ever alarming pace.

The Israelis see this as a nonstarter. But the White House is nevertheless working the phones with Qatar and Turkey to see if a deal can be struck.

Since the war broke out in early July, Secretary of State John Kerry has reached out at least three times by phone to Turkey’s Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and six times to his Qatari counterpart, Khalid Al Attiyah (Kerry’s Mideast chief boasted last month that the secretary of state “is in very constant contact” with FM Al-Attiyah and even “keeps his number on his own cell phone”). Kerry was also expected to visit Qatar before Egypt’s aborted cease-fire proposal.

It is by now no secret that Qatar has emerged as Hamas’ home away from home and ATM. Shaikh Tamim’s father, Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited Gaza in 2012 when he was still the ruler of Qatar, pledging $400 million in economic aid. Most recently, Doha tried to transfer millions of dollars via Jordan’s Arab Bank to help pay the salaries of Hamas civil servants in Gaza, but the transfer was apparently blocked at Washington’s request.

Since 2011, Qatar has been the home of the aforementioned Khaled Meshal, who runs Hamas’s leadership. During a recent appearance on Qatar’s media network Al Jazeera Arabic, Meshal blessed the individuals who kidnapped and ultimately murdered three Israeli teenagers. He boasted that Hamas was a unified movement and that its military wing reports to him and his associates in the political bureau. American officials have revealed that Qatar also hosts several other Hamas leaders. Israeli authorities reportedly intercepted an individual in April on his way back from meeting a member of Hamas’s military wing in Qatar who gave him money and directives intended for Hamas cells in the West Bank.

Israeli and Egyptian officials report that Qatar is so eager for a political win at Cairo’s expense that it actually urged Hamas to reject the Egyptian cease-fire initiative last week. Doha is also using its vast petroleum wealth to striking diplomatic effect: one UN official source suggests that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon would not have made it to Doha for cease-fire talks on Sunday if the Qataris hadn’t chartered him a plane out of their own pocket.

Turkey, for its part, has emerged as one of the most strident supporters of Hamas on the world stage. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vociferously advocated for Hamas while his government has found ways to donate hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Hamas, mostly through infrastructure projects, but also through materials and reportedly even direct financial support.

Turkey is also home to Salah Al-Arouri, founder of the West Bank branch of the Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military wing. He reportedly has been given “sole control” of Hamas’s military operations in the West Bank, and two Palestinians arrested last year for smuggling money for Hamas into the West Bank admitted they were doing so on Al-Arouri’s orders. He is also suspected of being behind a recent surge in kidnapping plots from the West Bank. An Israeli security official recently noted, “I have no doubt that Al-Arouri was connected to the act” of kidnapping that helped set off the latest round of violence between the parties, which has seen hundreds killed and thousands wounded, nearly all of them Palestinians.

Al-Arouri, it should be noted, was among the high-level Hamas officials who met with the amir of Kuwait on Monday to discuss cease-fire terms (he is pictured in the middle of the couch here).

So as Washington considers cutting a deal brokered by Qatar and Turkey for an end to the latest round of hostilities, it bears pointing out why these two countries are so influential with Hamas in the first place: because they empower the terrorist movement and provide it with a free hand for operations. A cease-fire is obviously desirable, but not if the cost is honoring terror sponsors. There must be others who can mediate.

Interestingly, both Ankara and Doha count themselves among America’s friends. But their support for terrorist entities—not just Hamas—has become so obvious that U.S. legislators began to send concerned letters to officials from both countries last year. This alone is a sign that America must set the bar higher for the behavior of its allies and not reward them for bad behavior.

David Andrew Weinberg, a former Democratic Professional Staff Member at the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Jonathan Schanzer is Vice President for Research at the Foundation and a former intelligence analyst at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Voir aussi:

Bientôt une nouvelle flottille contre le blocus de Gaza
Le Point

12/08/2014

Des navires devraient appareiller avant la fin de l’année. La précédente tentative, en 2010, s’était soldée par la mort de 10 activistes turcs.

Une coalition internationale d’activistes a annoncé mardi son intention de faire appareiller, avant la fin de l’année, une nouvelle flottille pour briser le blocus maritime imposé par Israël à la bande de Gaza. « Nous voulons envoyer cette flottille en 2014 », a déclaré à la presse cette coalition, dont fait partie l’ONG islamique turque IHH à l’origine d’une précédente tentative équivalente qui s’était soldée par la mort de dix activistes turcs en mai 2010. Les organisateurs n’ont pas précisé le calendrier de l’opération lors de leur conférence presse, organisée dans les locaux de la Fondation pour l’aide humanitaire (IHH), à Istanbul.

« C’est une réaction à la solidarité croissante avec le peuple palestinien qui se manifeste à travers le monde », a justifié le groupe un mois après le début de la nouvelle offensive lancée par l’armée israélienne sur la bande de Gaza. Les navires qui composeront cette nouvelle flottille partiront de plusieurs ports du monde entier pour transporter de l’aide humanitaire à destination des Palestiniens. « Nous allons former cette flottille avec l’objectif de montrer que la communauté internationale ne peut pas croiser les bras lorsqu’on attaque des civils et que sont commis des crimes contre l’humanité », a expliqué l’activiste canadien Ehab Lotayef.

Une ONG proche des autorités

Le blocus de Gaza a été imposé en 2007 afin, selon l’État hébreu, d’empêcher la livraison d’armes aux Palestiniens des islamistes duHamas qui contrôlent ce territoire. En mai 2010, l’assaut des commandos israéliens contre le navire amiral de la première flottille, le Mavi Marmara, avait provoqué la mort de 10 citoyens turcs et généré une grave crise diplomatique entre les gouvernements israélien et turc. La justice turque a ouvert en 2012 un procès par contumace contre quatre anciens responsables de l’armée israélienne. Des négociations ont débuté entre les deux pays pour l’indemnisation des victimes turques, mais elles n’ont pour l’heure pas abouti.

Élu dimanche président dès le premier tour de scrutin, le Premier ministre islamo-conservateur turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan a multiplié ces dernières semaines les violentes attaques contre la nouvelle intervention militaire de l’État hébreu à Gaza. L’ONG IHH est considérée comme proche des autorités d’Ankara. Le Mavi Marmarafera partie de la nouvelle expédition qui, a indiqué Durmus Aydin, un responsable d’IHH, « n’est d’aucune façon soutenue par le gouvernement turc ».

Voir encore:

Echec du blocus de Gaza ?

Les restrictions imposées à la bande de Gaza, en place depuis la prise de contrôle par le Hamas en 2007, sont au cœur des négociations pour un accord à long terme. Le Hamas déclare vouloir la liberté pour Gaza, mais utilisera très probablement un accès facilité pour faire entrer des armes

Mitch Ginsburg

The Times of Israel

15 août 2014

Mitch Ginsburg est le correspondant des questions militaires du Times of Israel

Les négociations au Caire, apparemment renouvelées pour cinq jours mercredi, avec des tirs de roquettes et les ripostes à minuit, ont été menées à huis clos.

Il y a de nombreux sujets à débattre, le rôle, désormais de l’Autorité palestinienne à Gaza, le retour des dépouilles des deux soldats israéliens, l’avenir des hommes armés palestiniens arrêtés lors de l’opération, la notion, peut-être, de démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza, la durée du cessez-le-feu.

Pourtant, au cœur de la discussion, se trouve très probablement le blocus, le mécanisme qui restreint, à un petit filet, les marchandises entrant dans Gaza, et dans une plus grande mesure, tout ce qui laisse l’enclave de 362 kilomètres carrés coincée entre Israël, l’Egypte et la mer.

Une rapide observation des différents points de passage, pour les personnes et les biens, peut aider à brosser un tableau de la situation actuelle, de son évolution au cours des années passées et où tout cela pourrait conduire à la fin de la campagne actuelle.

Kerem Shalom est ajourd’hui l’unique passage d’entrée et de sortie pour les marchandises à Gaza. En 2005, avant l’arrivée du Hamas au pouvoir, une moyenne mensuelle de 10 400 camions de vivres entrait à Gaza depuis Israël. Après que le Hamas, une organisation terroriste ouvertement engagée à la destruction d’Israël, ait gagné une élection populaire et, avec une efficacité brutale, ait renversé le pouvoir de l’Autorité palestinienne à Gaza en 2007, Israël a imposé un blocus sur la bande de Gaza.

Pour les trois premières années, de juin 2007 à juin 2010, au cours desquelles seules les « vivres vitales » étaient autorisées à entrer dans la bande, une moyenne mensuelle de 2 400 camions passait dans Gaza, selon les statistiques fournies par l’organisation Gisha qui milite pour une circulation plus libre des marchandises vers et depuis Gaza.

Le blocus, empêchant tout de l’essence au bœuf, a été fortement modifié après l’incident du Mavi Marmara en mai 2010 au cours duquel des commandos de marine israéliens, attaqués, ont tué 10 activistes turcs sur un navire cherchant à briser le blocus. En réponse, Israël a facilité le blocus en permettant à presque toutes les marchandises d’entrer dans Gaza.

La question épineuse était, pourtant, et continue à être, les restrictions sur les ravitaillements à double utilisation, ceux qui ont le potentiel d’être utilisés pour des objectifs néfastes.

Le premier d’entre eux est le ciment. La population civile de Gaza a besoin de matériels de construction. Gisha estime que Gaza manque de 75 000 maisons et de 259 écoles.

En outre, 10 000 maisons ont été détruites pendant l’opération Bordure protectrice, à la fois par les tirs israéliens et les bombes palestiniennes. L’industrie de construction à Gaza emploie 70 000 travailleurs, déclare la cofondatrice de Gisha,Sari Bashi, et représentait à une époque jusqu’à 28 % du PIB.

Pourtant, les priorités du Hamas à Gaza sont évidemment différentes et le ciment est utilisé à des fins militaires.

Khaled Meshaal, le chef du bureau politique du Hamas, a admis cela au cours d’une conférence tenue à Damas plusieurs mois après l’opération Plomb durci en 2008-2009, selon des éléments du Centre de Renseignement et d’Information Meir Amit. « En apparence, les images visibles sont des négociations au sujet de la réconciliation et de la construction. Pourtant, les images cachées sont qu’une grande partie de l’argent et de l’effort est investie dans la résistance et dans les préparations militaires », explique Meshaal.

Tout cela était nulle part plus évident que dans les arches uniformes faites en ciment qui ont été trouvées pour soutenir le réseau de tunnels d’attaque du Hamas creusé sous la frontière vers Israël.

Le général de Brigade Michael Edelstein, le commandant de la Division Gaza, a déclaré durant une réunion à proximité de la frontière de Gaza il y a deux semaines, que le Hamas avait créé un « métro de terreur » à Gaza, en utilisant des dizaines de millions de dollars et « des milliers de tonnes de ciment ».

Les sites de lancement de roquettes, les tunnels internes, les bunkers ont tous été fortifiés avec du ciment.

Selon le Centre Meir Amit, une organisation dirigée par d’anciens officiers israéliens des renseignements, le ciment passait vers Gaza par des souterrains très tranquillement avant l’arrivée au pouvoir en Egypte d’Abdel Fatah el-Sissi. Il a réduit le flot des marchandises depuis son territoire à travers les tunnels.

Aujourd’hui, un rapport récent suggère que le ciment est soit produit à Gaza à partir de matériel brut, comme des cendres et du sable de mer, ou pris à des organisations internationales, qui demandent l’importation de ciment ou soumettent des plans et des rapports d’information aux autorités israéliennes afin de recevoir une autorisation pour importer du ciment dans Gaza.

Bashi a également déclaré que le carburant était à une époque considéré comme une substance à double emploi, puisqu’il est utilisé pour les roquettes, et, qu’aujourd’hui, il est autorisé à entrer librement dans Gaza.

Le Coordinateur des activités du gouvernement dans les tTerritoires (COGAT) pour l’armée a envoyé environ 7,6 millions de litres de carburant et de benzène dans Gaza pendant le seul mois mois de guerre. (Un total de 3 324 camions de ravitaillement sont entrés dans Gaza via Israël depuis le début de l’opération Bordure protectrice le 8 juillet, selon les chiffres de COGAT).

Mentionnant un taux de chômage de 45 % dans Gaza, alors qu’il était de 18 % l’an passé, Bashi a déclaré que les restrictions ont échoué à empêcher la construction de tunnels et ont, au lieu de cela, puni les habitants, créant une situation économique qui est totalement néfaste à la stabilité. « C’est une erreur de voir cela comme un jeu sans effets », a-t-elle déclaré.

Pourtant, le prix en sang payé par les Israéliens pour (au moins temporairement) se débarasser de la menace des tunnels, couplé à l’insécurité perturbant la vie des résidents des régions à la frontière, rend très improbable qu’Israël autorisera le transport libre et ouvert du ciment vers Gaza à cette période. Et particulièrement maintenant que les tunnels sous Rafah ont été fermés.

Très probablement, cela sera confié à des acteurs responsables et supervisé au maximum (Israël a perdu 64 soldats pendant le premier mois de combat, onze ont été tués par des hommes armés du Hamas sortis des tunnels vers Israël, et beaucoup plus au cours des recherches et de la démolition des tunnels à l’intérieur de Gaza).

Les marchandises sortant peuvent, elles aussi, passer uniquement à travers Kerem Shalom. Le point de passage vers l’Egypte, à Rafah, est totalement fermé aux marchandises.

Et tandis que les Gazaouis peuvent exporter peu de produits, les entreprises israéliennes profitent des ventes d’import des commodités,comme les mangues ou le bœuf vers Gaza.

Udi Tamir, un des propriétaires de Egli Tal, une des plus importants importateurs de bétail, a déclaré que l’industrie envoie environ 35 000 têtes de bétail à Gaza chaque année par exemple. Il déclaré avec malice au cours d’une conversation, il y a quelques années, que certains éleveurs de bétail israéliens pourraient vouloir offrir au nouveau président élu Recep Tayyip Erdogan une récompense pour l’ensemble de sa carrière.

De janvier à juin 1014, une moyenne mensuelle de 17 camions de produits est sortie de Gaza, 2 % de la moyenne avant 2007, selon les chiffres de Gisha, et tandis qu’à une époque Gaza exportait 85 % de ses marchandises vers la Cisjordanie et Israël, aujourd’hui, sur la base d’une politique israélienne de séparation entre la Cisjordanie contrôlée par l’Autorité palestinienne et la bande de Gaza contrôlée par le Hamas, théoriquement aucune marchandise n’est autorisée à voyager de Gaza, à travers Israël, vers la Cisjordanie.

Selon Gisha, un total de 49 camions pour une organisation internationale, quatre camions de bureaux d’écoles pour l’Autorité palestinienne et deux camions de feuilles de palmiers pour Israël sont tout ce qui a passé vers Israël et la Cisjordanie depuis mars 2012.

Dans ce domaine, très probablement, un progrès pourrait être atteint en prenant relativement peu de risque pour la sécurité et avec un bénéfice palpable.

Les points de passages pour piétons

Le passage d’Erez est la voie pour les personnes entre Israël, Gaza et la Cisjordanie. Le point de passage de Rafah, ouvert et fermé par intermittence au cours des dernières années et très minutieusement surveillé par l’Egypte, est la voie principale depuis la bande de Gaza pour le voyage international.

Ainsi, de janvier à juin de cette année, une moyenne mensuelle de 6 445 personnes ont quitté Gaza par Rafah, un chiffre qui représente environ 16 % de la moyenne durant ces mêmes mois en 2013, lorsque l’Egypte était aux mains du prédécesseur de Sissi, Mohammed Morsi. Depuis le début de la guerre, le passage a été fermé presque complètement.

Sur la même période, les chiffres de Gisha montrent qu’une moyenne mensuelle de
5 920 Palestiniens ont quitté Gaza à travers Erez. La plupart étaient des patients médicaux et leurs compagnons et des hommes d’affaires.

Selon Gisha, des personnes en deuil d’un proche de premier degré sont autorisés à voyager en Cisjordanie, comme le sont les chrétiens qui souhaitent visiter les lieux saints, les proches au premier degré souhaitant participer à un mariage, les étudiants en voyage vers l’étranger, les orphelins sans liens de premier degré à Gaza. Ceux qui souhaitent se marier en Cisjordanie ou les étudiants souhaitant y étudier, par exemple, ne sont pas autorisés à quitter Gaza par Erez.

Bashi a noté que 31 % des personnes dans Gaza ont des proches en Cisjordanie. Elle appelle à une plus grande liberté de mouvement, comme c’est autorisé par les évaluations sécuritaires.

Le Shin Bet a pourtant, au cours des années passées, intercepté à de nombreuses reprises des messages entre Gaza et la Cisjordanie et a averti, même avant l’enlèvement du 12 juin de trois adolescents israéliens puis leur meurtre, apparemment organisé depuis Gaza, que le Hamas a constamment cherché à dynamiser les vieilles cellules terroristes en Cisjordanie.

Des armes

Sans aéroports et sans ports, les voies réelles et employées pour introduire en contrebande des armes professionnelles à Gaza, a déclaré un ancien officer des renseignement au cours de la campagne actuelle, étaient depuis « l’axe de résistance », l’Iran le Hezbollah et la Syrie, vers le Soudan et, de là, vers le nord, via la péninsule du Sinaï en direction des tunnels de Rafah et Gaza.

Peut-être parce que le flot d’idéologie terroriste et de matériel n’est pas seulement allé au nord-ouest vers Gaza, mais aussi au sud-est vers Rafah, la péninsule du Sinaï, et le reste de l’Egypte, en y alimentant la violence, le président egyptien Sissi a largement éradiqué les tunnels de Rafah qui étaient utilisés pour transporter tout, des voitures et du ciment aux roquettes M-302.

Comme le trafic de drogue, la circulation d’armes ne peut pourtant jamais être pleinement arrêtée.

En mars dernier, des commandos de marine israéliens sont montés à bord du navire Klos-C enregistré au Panama et ont trouvé 40 roquettes M-302 et 180 cartouches de mortiers de 120 mm sous des tonnes de ciment. Un rapport des Nations unies a trouvé que les armes étaient en réalité envoyées depuis l’Iran mais a contesté l’affirmation israélienne qu’elles étaient destinées à Gaza.

Ni les officiels israéliens ni ceux des Nations unies n’ont fourni de preuves tangibles quant à la destination finale des armes. Il serait pourtant difficile d’expliquer pourquoi les troupes israéliennes intercepteraient pas un navire à plus de 1 800 kilomètres nautiques de ses eaux territoriales, à moins que le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu et d’autres croient vraiment que les armes auraient pu être tirées sur les citoyens israéliens.

Le Hamas exige la levée du blocus et l’ouverture du port, une réussite tangible qui pourrait être présentée aux habitants de Gaza comme un signe d’autonomie et de liberté.

De telles exigences sont pourtant contrebalancées par ses efforts incessants d’importer le type d’armes qui a fait du Hezbollah une force de combat si terrifiante dans la région.

Mercredi soir, peu avant la fin du cessez-le-feu prolongé, le Hamas a montré des images de roquettes M-75 fabriquées sur place, nettoyées avec amour et exposées comme des planches de surf. Les métaux qui les composent, et les explosives dans l’ogive, doivent être attrapées dans les filets adaptés du blocus israéliens.

A la fin de cette campagne, comme après l’incident du Mavi Marmara, de nombreux éléments du blocus seront mis sur la table des négociations.

Israël, sur une base pragmatique, sera relativement flexible pour des concessions qui renforcent l’économie comme, par exemple, l’export de fraises ou d’autres produits. Mais il sera beaucoup plus strict sur l’importation de marchandises à double utilisation qui permettent notamment la construction de M-75.

La difficulté sera de trouver la formule qui élargit les trous du filet pour soutenir les Gazaouis ordinaires, accorder des réussites à l’Autorité palestinienne plutôt qu’au Hamas, et permette à Israël de s’assurer que le Hamas, avec son allégeance jurée au djihad, sera restreint dans son intention de suivre l’exemple du groupe terroriste libanais, le Hezbollah.

STOP QATAR’S TERROR FUNDING

Qatar is the largest supplier of finance to Hamas in Gaza. The weapons that Qatar financed were used to launch indiscriminate attacks on civilians in the last few weeks and led to Operation Protective Edge.

Qatar and its leader are pouring billions of dollars into an organisation defined as terrorist by the majority of the world and are hosting its leader Khaled Mashal, in prosperous safety in Doha as he plots to wage a religious war against the “infidels”. We citizens of London, Israelis and Jews alike, would like to show the world the significance of Qatar in this conflict. Qatar fuels religious wars all over the world and especially in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon.

We believe that directing the world’s attention to Qatar, especially when their hosting of the World Cup is questionable due to the possibility of bribery and slave labour, will pressure it and its leaders and may cause them to reconsider their stance towards funding terrorism. This is the start of a relentless and continuous campaign that we are intending to initiate against Qatar.

As part of this campaign we will demonstrate and protest in front of the Qatari embassies, Al Jazeera’s centres, Harrods (one of their most recent and prestigious purchases) and all associated parties. Your signature on this petition will give the emphasis and assurance for our struggle and efforts to sever the roots of global terrorism by cutting off its funding. The Israeli and Jewish organisations will be those who will deliver the message to the Emir of Qatar via his embassies and to the media.

This petition is written in English, Hebrew, Arabic and Spanish and we are hoping that it will be translated to as many languages as possible. Thank you for your assistance, please sign and share the petitions with all lovers of peace and stability.

To: Mr. Shaikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar
We write this open letter in protest at the growing support that the Qatari government affords to Hamas. Hamas is designated as a terrorist organisation by the European Union, the United States of America, Canada, Australia, Japan and many countries in the Middle East. Qatar is the only country in the Arab World that supports and funds Hamas, the terrorist organisation that initiated the war in Gaza.

We are aware of Qatar’s claim that it contributes generously toward the people of Gaza but the results prove different. Your Highness’ and Qatar’s financial contribution was not used to set up hospitals, housing and schools, nor was it used to build bomb shelters and install warning systems for the Gazan people. It was used and is being used to acquire and produce missiles, build terror tunnels and to train children as fighters. Hamas also endlessly promotes Shahada meaning death for a religious cause while killing as many “infidels” as possible may it be men, women or children.

It is a shame that Your Highness and Qatar’s government did not use its influence over Hamas to persuade them to accept the Egyptian ceasefires. Hamas has consistently rejected them time after time while Israel has accepted them unconditionally. Your Highness’ real concern for the Gazans’ wellbeing could have saved hundreds if not thousands of lives and prevented the wounding and displacement of tens of thousands if the influence over Hamas has been exercised to force them to stop shooting and accept the truce.

Al Jazeera, the Television Network owned, funded and broadcast from Qatar has become a propaganda tool for a terrorist organisation promoting a deceptive and inaccurate picture of the conflict. Al Jazeera’s journalists failed to report on the launching pads, booby-trapped facilities and housing of rockets in UNRWA and other UN facilities. They also didn’t report on the schools, kindergartens, mosques and other public buildings used by Hamas for attacking the citizens of Israel through the firing of thousands of rockets indiscriminately. But worst of all they failed to report on the thousands used as human shields (men, women and children) as a despicable tool of media manipulation while putting those innocent lives at risk. Al Jazeera, especially the Arabic language channel, has become a news agency promoting Hamas. Its broadcasting incites the Arab world to follow the terrorist path and in the process damages its reputation as a respectable and impartial independent news network. In case Qatar wants to plead ignorance to the above, we will be able to enlighten them with facts.

Your Highness, the Qatari financial wealth is able to buy you assets around the world. Qatar’s opportunity to host the World Cup in 2022 will place it in the centre of world attention. However Qatar’s association with Hamas, other terrorist groups and the support that is offered to them casts doubts on Qatar’s position as a nation committed to peace and counter-terrorism despite being a member of the International Treaty for Counter-Terrorism of 1999. According to the treaty all member states are obligated to refrain from funding terror and to punish any known body or person who does so.

Qatar has clearly abused the Treaty by funding modern terrorism and especially the Hamas. To the dismay of the Arab World and its allies, the fighting in Gaza has exposed Doha as a centre for terrorism and a haven forterrorists. A clear example is the hospitality afforded by Qatar toKhaled Mashal, a notorious arch-terrorist and the leader of the Hamas. Mr Mashal terrorises Israel and ordering his people to die for “a religious cause” while he lives in luxury far from harm.
Note to forward to your friends:

Hi!

I just signed the petition « Emir of Qatar: Stop Qatar’s Terror Funding » on Change.org.

It’s important. Will you sign it too? Here’s the link:

http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/emir-of-qatar-stop-qatar-s-terror-funding?recruiter=140784870&utm_campaign=signature_receipt&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition

Thanks!

A Plea for Realism

Bassem Eid

Common grounds
The time has come for the Palestinian public to acknowledge the reality in which they live. A century of national struggle and 34 years spent resisting the occupation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem has not yet brought us peace, and the right of Palestinian self-determination has yet to be actualized. The largely ineffectual “peace process” has been characterized by the expansion of illegal Israeli settlements in the Occupied territories, numerous closures, and the constant humiliation of a frustrated Palestinian public. The al-Aqsa intifada grew from decades of injustice and discontent and did not erupt in a vacuum.

The reality in which we now live is that of an uneven struggle where Palestinian fighters, despite all their bravery, do not stand a chance against Israel’s military might. It is a reality of fruitless appeals to the international community and the Arab world, whom the Palestinians still rely upon to defend their cause. The international community does show some sympathy for the Palestinian struggle, but in the realm of international politics and diplomacy, sympathy holds little weight in the face of the economic, political and military power of Israel and its allies.

I believe that the violent path chosen by Palestinians in the al-Aqsa intifada has failed. This violence achieved little beyond an overwhelming Israeli military response, and the Palestinians, who have no means to win a military victory, pay a very high price in the confrontation. The use of firearms by Palestinians clouds the issue and provides the Israelis and their foreign sympathizers with a means of justifying the disproportionate “response” of the Israeli military. Moreover, violence diverts the attention of the world from the real issue – the injustice endured by the Palestinian people – and Palestinians are consequently portrayed as a fundamentally violent and irresponsible people, a people with whom it is not possible to make peace.

The violence characterizing the al-Aqsa Intifada prompted the demise of the Israeli liberal left, and a concurrent swing to the right of the Israeli political spectrum, empowering the current government under Ariel Sharon to reject any concessions or compromises.

It is time for the Palestinian people to accept this reality and to direct their struggle into a more pragmatic strategy. This does not mean that the struggle has to end. On the contrary, while a violent struggle seems unlikely to achieve the liberation of the Palestinian territories and the establishment of a Palestinian state, a sudden halt of the intifada would be perceived as a victory for Sharon’s government, thereby seemingly confirming that the brutal suppression of the intifada was well founded.

In my opinion, non-violent resistance is the best possible means of ending the current deadlock. Non-violence does not imply passivity in the face of the occupation. On the contrary, it can be a very powerful means of resistance, one that requires as much bravery and heroism as any armed operation.

Several non-violent actions have been successfully orchestrated recently, most notably those at Birzeit University, demonstrating that the Israeli army is helpless in confronting this kind of resistance. Non-violent resistance can include all segments of the Palestinian people, with a very important role to be played by women and children.

Non-violence will also enable the Palestinian people to communicate their message much more effectively in clearly articulated demands. Take the old city of Hebron, for example, where 40,000 Palestinians have lived under a strict curfew for a large part of the al-Aqsa intifada. What if every day at 4 pm, Palestinians sat outside their doorstep for an hour, drinking tea or smoking narguilah, without the use of stones or slogans. They would be in blatant disregard of the curfew imposed upon them, and there is no guarantee that the response of the Israeli army would be non-violent, but the message would be clear and powerful: it is unacceptable to lock 40,000 people indoors for the security of 400 Israeli settlers.

Non-violence would be a more pragmatic way of resisting the occupation. However, just as the Palestinians have to display pragmatism in how they resist the occupation, they have to be equally realistic in the goals they seek to achieve through resistance. Even though the PLO recognized the existence of Israel in 1988, many Palestinians still cannot bring it upon themselves to openly acknowledge Israel’s right to exist. I believe that a future with Israel is better than no future at all. Palestinians need to state very clearly and unequivocally that they do not question the existence of the State of Israel in its pre-1967 borders, and that the singular goal of the al-Aqsa intifada is the liberation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Future negotiations on questions such as the right to return will have to take Israel’s concerns into consideration. Embracing such an attitude is obviously painful for us Palestinians, who have already conceded so much, but the time has come to face reality.

# # #

Bassem Eid is Director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group in Jerusalem (www.phrmg.org).

Voir de plus:

An Interview with Bassem Eid of Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group
Abram Shanedling

Hasbara fellowships

Jun 24, 2011

The Executive Director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group explains why he sees little progress in Palestinian-Israeli negotiations.
The Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG) was established in 1996 in response to the deteriorating state of human rights under the newly established Palestinian Authority (PA). Today, PHRMG, based in Jerusalem, monitors human rights abuse against Palestinians in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Founder and Executive Director of PHRMG Bassem Eid shared his opinion on the Arab Spring, Israeli-Palestinian relations, and the Obama administration.

What is your view of the current state of the « Arab Spring?”

Bassem Eid (BE): I don’t believe that in the days of Obama we are going to see any peace in the Middle East. It looks like everything is moving backward. Islamism is increasing and it’s not only putting Israel under pressure but also the Arab democrats under pressure. Egypt in my opinion is going to be completely occupied by an Islamist brotherhood, and Syria will likely go down the same path.

How do you see this impacting Israeli-Palestinian relations?

BE: To make peace, I don’t think the Palestinians and Israelis are ready. Palestinians don’t want to be considered Muslim and don’t want to establish an Islamist state. When [Palestinians] want to make peace with Israel, no Arab country will support us. So we have a difficulty on how to present our ideas.

How about Israel?

BE: Israel is in a very difficult situation. Everybody is worried and everybody completely has the feeling that danger surrounds us.

How do you see the issue of Palestinian refugees seriously factoring in on future negotiations?

BE: It’s a very strong card that the PA is holding, but nobody believes that the Palestinians will all be back, especially those descendents. I think it is an issue that is already agreed between the Palestinians and Israelis.

Everybody talks about right of return within the Palestinian state only. The majority of Palestinians in the Diaspora prefer to get financial compensation instead of coming back, especially to a Palestinian state under the PA.

How does Hamas and Gaza fit into everything, especially with the recent reconciliation deal struck between the PA and Hamas?

BE: Today Gaza is not just a problem for Israel, but for the Palestinians in the West Bank as well as the Arab World. In the past few years, [PA President] Mahmoud Abbas has failed to build any strategy for the peace process, so he went and made the reconciliation deal.

Do you think the reconciliation deal will amount to anything?

BE: Past agreements between the PA and Hamas have usually failed. Even though the PA and Hamas signed this deal, to this day, they have not figured out a new prime minister. I am a person who believes that if any election takes place among the Palestinians, Hamas will win. This would be a big disaster for the Palestinians, the Israelis, and the world.

You sound quite pessimistic, but is there anything the the U.S. can do?

BE: With Islamism spreading in the region, I think we have a window this year for peace, but after a year, the gates of peace will unfortunately close.

This article was adapted from an original published June 24, 2011 by Abram Shanedling on PolicyMic.com

Voir de même:

An Israeli and a Palestinian scathed by South Africa apartheid rhetoric
Despite their limited knowledge of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, South Africans have many prejudices that are being fueled by anti-Israel groups
Benjamin Pogrund and Bassem Eid

Haaretz

May 4, 2012

The two of us, an Israeli and a Palestinian, went to South Africa recently to speak about the Middle East. For understandable reasons, South Africa is a major source for the « Israel is apartheid » accusation; it stems from the fact that many South Africans, especially blacks, relate Israel’s treatment of Palestinians to their own history of racial discrimination.

And indeed, in the several dozen meetings we addressed, we repeatedly heard the apartheid accusation. No, we replied: Apartheid does not exist inside Israel; there’s discrimination against Arabs but it’s not South African apartheid. On the West Bank, there is military occupation and repression, but it is not apartheid. The apartheid comparison is false and confuses the real problems.

As we traveled around the country, it became clear to us that South Africans generally have limited knowledge about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. But they hold many prejudices and these are fed and manipulated by organizations that are vehemently anti-Israel – to the extent of calling for destruction of the Jewish state, as the Palestinian Solidarity Campaign, the Muslim Judicial Council and the Russell Tribunal have done. Black trade unions join in the attacks and so do some people of Jewish origin.

Our host was the South African Jewish Board of Deputies. During 10 days we spoke on five university campuses, at several public meetings and to journalists, and were on radio programs, including one aired by a Muslim station.

We were shown an e-mail calling for protests against our visit: It seemed that the anti-Israel hard-liners were upset by an Israeli and a Palestinian speaking on the same platform and promoting peace. But there were no protests: The worst we experienced was a knot of about six people standing quietly outside one meeting. We were also warned to expect « tough questions, » but we didn’t hear any. Instead, the large audiences – people of all colors, and mainly non-Jews – were attentive and wanted information about the current state of play in the conflict.

There were some hostile comments such as the silly sneer that Israel is « terrified of a few suicide bombers » and that it is « hogwash » to call Hamas a terrorist organization. In a more serious vein were repeated references to the Palestinian « right of return. » It cannot be said whether those who spoke were genuinely responding to the plight of the refugees, or were cynically using it as a reasonable-sounding slogan although it in effect calls for elimination of the Jewish state.

Nelson Mandela’s words in support of Palestinian freedom were flung at us (and also appear in propaganda leaflets issued by Palestinian-supporting organizations ). He was quoted as saying: « But we know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians. » Mandela did indeed say that, on December 9, 1997, on the occasion of Palestinian Solidarity Day, and it still resonates strongly among South Africans. But it’s actually half of what he said in the context of a call for freedom for all people. He also explained the greater context and the dishonesty of the propagandists in singling out Israel: « … without the resolution of conflicts in East Timor, the Sudan and other parts of the world. »

Other falsities we heard were that only Jews are allowed to own or rent 93 percent of the land in Israel, and that Israel’s restrictions on marriage (which in actuality derive from Jewish, Muslim and Christian religious authorities ) are the same as apartheid South Africa’s prohibition of marriage – or sex – across color lines.

There was also an earlier statement by the South African Council of Churches in support of Israel Apartheid Week in which it claimed that « Israel remained the single supporter of apartheid when the rest of the world implemented economic sanctions, boycotts and divestment to force change in South Africa. » That, of course, is nonsense: Israel did trade with apartheid South Africa – but so did the entire world, starting with oil sales by Arab states, and including the United States, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Soviet Union and many in Africa.

BDS, the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, is noisily vocal and gets publicity in South African media. While we were there it ran Israel Apartheid Week programs on several university campuses. But the movement did not garner wide support; some scheduled speakers did not even turn up. Its boast that more than 100 universities worldwide took part in the week doesn’t amount to much: Apartheid weeks have been going on for eight years and out of the 100 this year, 60 were held on American campuses (out of 4,000 universities and colleges in that country ). Not much progress there.

We did not pre-plan what we were going to say. But a consensus emerged: First, we both spoke in bleak terms about peace prospects in the near future; second, we each castigated our own leaderships for double-talk and pretense, and for their lack of boldness and vision, and we pointed to the growth of Jewish settlements on the West Bank as undermining the chances for an agreement.

We stressed that we welcomed interest in our part of the world – but warned that some members of Palestinian solidarity movements have never visited the occupied territories, and they damage the Palestinian cause abroad because they act out of ignorance, and foster division and hatred between Arabs and Jews. They do not help to bring peace.

Our strangest meeting was with scores of Congolese who asked us to explain why their conflict – ongoing since 1960 with a toll of perhaps more than 7 million people dead – receives less attention in South African and other media than does the Israeli-Palestinian struggle. It was painful listening to their recital of mass rapes and murders. But it was difficult to empathize with them when one speaker blamed the Jews, whom he said controlled the world and the media, and when a former army officer asked us for money to go and fight the Congolese government.

Bassem Eid is director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group and a former researcher for B’Tselem. Benjamin Pogrund, South African-born, was founder of Yakar’s Center for Social Concern in Jerusalem.

Voir aussi:

LIFE IS BETTER THAN DEATH: INTERVIEW WITH BASSEM EID
Interviewed by Joel B. Pollak

New Society (Harvard college Middle East Journal)

January 29, 2008

Joel B. Pollak ’99 is a graduate of Harvard College and the University of Cape Town. He was a political speechwriter for the Leader of the Opposition in South Africa from 2002 to 2006 and is a second-year student at Harvard Law School.

***

Bassem Eid is the Executive Director and co-founder of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG), which tracks human rights violations against Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, regardless of who commits them. He is a former fieldworker for B’Tselem, the Israeli human rights organization focusing on the occupied territories. Eid’s work at PHRMG has concentrated on documenting violations by the Palestin-ian Authority against its own citizens. In recent years he has also moni-tored abuses committed by the Fatah and Hamas factions in their internec-ine struggles. Eid has received numerous human rights awards and frequently addresses Israeli and foreign audiences about the human rights problems facing Palestinians. Earlier this year, he teamed up with left-wing Israeli politician Yossi Beilin at the Doha Debates, arguing that Palestinians should abandon the right of return for the sake of peace with Israel.
New Society: Tell me about your life—where you are from, and how you came to be where you are today.
Bassem Eid: I am Palestinian and I was born in the Old City in East Jerusalem. I lived there for eight years, but then in 1966, for no reason, the Jorda-nian government established a refugee camp called Shuefat Refugee Camp near the French Hill in Jerusalem. The Jordanian government removed 500 families from the Old City, mainly from the Jewish Quarter. It was exactly one year before the 1967 war. I lived in the refugee camp for 32 years from 1966 until 1999. For the past four years, I have been living in Jericho.

I finished secondary school in one of the municipality schools in East Jerusalem. Then I attended Hebrew University for two years and studied journalism, but I couldn’t continue for financial reasons. After leaving the university, I worked as a freelance journalist for Palestin-ian and Israeli newspapers until 1988 before joining B’Tselem, an Israeli human rights organization that investigates rights violations in the occupied territories. In mid-1996, I resigned from B’Tselem and founded the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG), which is where I still am today.

NS: Why did you leave B’Tselem?

Eid: When the Palestinian Authority (PA) was established 1994, I noticed that most Palestinian and Israeli human rights organizations continued monitoring the Israeli occupation, but that nobody wanted to pay any attention to the PA’s violations. In a meeting held in March 1996, the board members of B’Tselem decided that they would not concern themselves with PA abuses. That’s why I left. I wanted to fill a role that I thought was very important, but that was empty.

NS: So you left that same year?

Eid: Yes. The decision came out in March, and I left at the end of July 1996 to set up the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group. Our main aim is to observe the Palestinian Authority’s violations. Between 1996 and 2000, our publications did not cover Israeli violations at all. All of our reports and press releases responded to Palestinian Authority abuses. We only started collecting data on Israeli violations after the second Intifada broke out in September 2000. Then we started to investigate Israeli killings, assassinations, house demolitions, and the use of the excessive force. In the meantime, we continued to collect information about Palestinian Authority violations.
Today, we are probably the organization with the most extensive data on internal killings among the Palestinians. I believe we are the only organization, for example, that investigates the murder of collaborators by Palestinians. We also investigate long-term imprisonment without charge, torture, the conduct of the state security court, and deaths that occur in Palestinian detention centers. We collect information on these issues and update our reports everyday.

NS: Why do you think B’Tselem chose not to monitor the Palestinian Authority?

Eid: In my opinion, that was a wise decision. At that time, there were still large areas under Israeli occupation and B’Tselem still had a lot of work to do to expose rights violations by the Israeli army in the occupied territories.
On the other side, I think that if the Palestinians want to form a successful civil society, live in a democracy, and respect human rights, we will have to build institutions with our own hands. We should not lay our fate in other people’s hands. We have done so quite enough over the past sixty years. We are still demanding a state from the international community instead of building it ourselves. I think that it is the time for the Palestinians to start building their own democracy right now. I believe that democracy has never been offered by leaders or governments. Democracy is determined by the people themselves.

NS: How did the Palestinian Authority react to your new organization?

Eid: Creating a human rights organization under an Arab regime is like committing suicide. Yasser Arafat was used to doing whatever he wanted without being criticized or monitored. When I started watch-ing, investigating, criticizing, he started to look at me in a very bad light. The Palestinian Authority defamed us and slandered us. Among other accusations, they said that we serve the enemy’s interests.

When we started to publish reports on PA human rights viola-tions, the reports became sexy news material for the international community. They were particularly well-reported by the Israeli media. The issue was especially sexy because, as you know, I had spent the past seven and a half years criticizing only Israel. Arafat saw me as a traitor.
We had a very tough period and had to get through many tough moments. Sometimes, ironically, these fears and difficulties gave us more energy and made us become even more committed to the sub-ject. We decided to continue in spite of all the danger surrounding us. And here we are! We still exist.

NS: Has your work become easier or more difficult since Arafat’s death?

Eid: Well, I think the PA does not really exist anymore. It exists in the pages of newspapers rather than on the ground itself. The PA com-pletely destroyed itself during the past seven years. They got themselves into huge trouble.
As far as my work is concerned, I feel very secure right now. Eve-ryone knows me where I live in Jericho. I’m very satisfied with what I’m doing.

NS: What do you think of the prospects for Palestinians right now? Will there be a Palestinian state? Is the two-state solution still viable?

Eid: It must be possible to create a Palestinian state. The question is how. How will we deal with it? How will we build it? How will we unite to establish good institutions?

In my opinion, the establishment of a Palestinian state is not only related to the Israelis. It concerns the Palestinians. We have had a very bad experience with building a state, developing it, and keeping it alive.

That brings me to the September 2005 Israeli disengagement from Gaza. Everybody thought that the Israeli disengagement would be a kind of test for the Palestinians. It would test whether we are really able to build our own state and manage our daily lives ourselves. In my opinion, we totally failed to manage Gaza, develop it, and build infrastructure.

Today, fewer and fewer Palestinian voices speak up in favor of es-tablishing a state. Everybody has his own horrible troubles. The only people calling for a state right now are the politicians.

Politicians around the world are buying and selling blood. This is the only income that they have. And that’s exactly what Arafat prac-ticed with the Palestinians. I remember with great sadness what happened when he started creating an Intifada and threatening the Israelis. Palestinian security workers went to the schools, ordered the schoolmasters to close the schools, and then sent the schoolchildren to throw stones at the Israelis. That was a very horrible thing to do. Politicians sacrifice their people to achieve their political interests. This is unfortunately the Palestinian attitude.
Look at Prime Minister Salaam Fayyad, who is saying, “No more resistance!” This is a huge change. One can resist, but one must also protect oneself and one’s survival. People were born to live, not to die. When you are alive, you can choose to resist, but you can also choose to build, to achieve things, to reach for what you want. When you die, you just die. This is a good lesson for the Palestinians right now: sacrificing ourselves will not help us achieve anything. We won’t achieve anything with violent resistance.

We are having to face the consequences of our actions over the past seven years. In my opinion, the Palestinians totally lost their way during the past seven years. Things will get worse if we continue in the same way. We will have to change our direction.

NS: What do you think should happen in Gaza?

Eid: Gaza is a big problem for the Palestinians, Israelis, and Egyptians. The international community becomes more and more afraid of the Palestinians because Hamas reflects such a negative side of Palestinian politics. I don’t think that Hamas will ever offer Gaza to back to Abbas.

The question is: Who is going to control Hamas? Hamas right now oppresses the Gazan people. But who will contain Hamas? I don’t think that dialogue will solve the problem.
We will all be watching whether Hamas can manage Gaza and keep it functioning. The Arab countries should put more effort into solving the conflict between Hamas and Fatah. The problem is that the Arab countries are so divided, some supporting Hamas against Fatah and some supporting Fatah against Hamas. This won’t help the situation.

I don’t think the international community can do very much on this issue, besides continuing to provide important humanitarian aid to the people of Gaza. On the whole, though, it’s too early right now to tell what will happen to Gaza and Hamas.

NS: What about Hamas in the West Bank. Are they a factor?

Eid: They do exist in the West Bank, but what’s happening in Gaza could never happen in the West Bank.

This is not only because Fatah is stronger than Hamas, but also be-cause of the Israeli occupation in the West Bank. Israelis will never allow Hamas militants to take over Jenin, facing Afula.

Of course, Hamas will still threaten to occupy the West Bank, to jeopardize any peace agreement, and to harm the Palestinian Presi-dent and government in the West Bank. I don’t think we will see peace in the near future.
Daily life in the West Bank will become a little bit easier, though, according to the promises of Ehud Olmert and Mahmoud Abbas. But I think the peace process will take much longer than anybody expects.

NS: What do you think is the main reason that the conflict continues?

Eid: I think there is a lack of good will and leadership on both sides. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict also tends to become a commercial conflict. Everybody is making something off this conflict. There are countries that have an interest in perpetuating the fighting. The Iranians, for example, are trying to provoke a regional war using Hezbollah and Hamas.

I don’t think the Palestinians will have the same opportunities for peace that we were offered between 1947 and July 2000. Palestinian violence has probably caused some countries to want not to get involved anymore. The foreign policy of the international community is totally biased.

NS: When you say that foreign policy is biased, you mean in which direction?

Eid: Well, the problem is that the international community is not united. Countries are divided. Policies are divided. So many different biased policies are involved in this conflict. In this kind of situation, I don’t think that the Palestinians or the Israelis will be able to reach a kind of final peace or a final agreement between themselves.

NS: Do you think there’s a possibility that Israelis and Palestinians will be able to build something out of the cooperation that still exists between them in some areas? Are these areas of cooperation possible foundations for peace?

Eid: Small-scale cooperation is very important. But I don’t think a permanent solution is possible right now. Let us talk about a tempo-rary one, instead. This is what Abbas and Olmert are doing right now. Let us release few thousand Palestinian prisoners, let us evacuate a couple of checkpoints, let us open the gates of the wall between villages and clinics or schools, let us issue a couple of tens of thou-sands of work permits to Palestinians so that they can work in Israel—this is what we are negotiating with the Israelis now.

When you talk about the state, the settlements, the borders, and the water, the Israelis say, this is so complicated, let’s leave it to the end. In the meanwhile, let’s do things step-by-step. That is how we are today negotiating with the Israelis. Many of these small things will probably continue to be delivered in the future.

NS: How do you feel about the situation? What motivates you?

Eid: I’m very angry and frustrated. I’m hopeless. I know my ideas provoke people, but I’m not a politician. I care much more about people’s lives rather than their lands. Land you can get everywhere in the world, but you can never replace lives. I don’t want to hear about killings, I don’t want to hear about shootings. I hate violence.

I am 48 years old. I had never, ever in my life seen a tank shooting until the past six or seven years. Since then, when I’ve gone to Ramal-lah, Bethlehem, Jericho, I’ve been so afraid. I’ve seen the kinds of things I never want to see again. I don’t like the way we are militariz-ing the conflict. It’s horrible. And I don’t like the way we’re making it religious. That brings great danger.

Looking back through history, one finds several examples of con-flicts that were solved without any kind of bloodshed. So I do believe that we can solve our conflict. We will have to learn from the experi-ences of others.

NS: What did you learn when you went to South Africa this year?

Eid: South Africa is very interesting. But it couldn’t be a model for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. There are some very good things in the South African case that we can learn from. The Truth and Reconcilia-tion Committee, for example.
The most important lesson is that the people in South Africa built their democracy and institutions with their own hands. Nobody offered it to them. I hope Palestinians will learn from that.

But otherwise, the South African case is very different from our situation. It involved people fighting against one apartheid govern-ment. In the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, you are not talking about one government or one nation. It’s totally different. We are not fighting for a one-state solution. Of course we are not.

What I learnt in South Africa is that some Islamists in South Africa are totally disconnected from the realities and still believe that the solution will be one state—an Islamic state. I found that very horrible.

NS: Do people in the West Bank and East Jerusalem want one state or two states, or do they want something else entirely?

Eid: At the moment, I think the Palestinians want a three-state solu-tion for two nations—Gaza, the West Bank, and Israel. Of course, there are still some disconnected Palestinians and Israelis who believe in a one-state solution. But I think that the Palestinians dream of creating our own independent, democratic, anti-Islamist country. And I think the Israelis want their own Jewish, Zionist country. I think both people have a right to their own states.

NS: What do you think the role should be of the Palestinian Diaspora, people in other parts of the region and other parts of the world?

Eid: That’s a really a big problem right now. I don’t believe that all the Palestinian refugees would like to come back. Israel will never open its doors to those refugees. The Palestinians shouldn’t have to continue sacrificing themselves for the right of return, a dream that will never be applicable on the ground. There are refugees around the world. All nations have refugees. This is an international problem. Refugees should be able to move to the West Bank or other countries. They should be more realistic about the situation.

NS: How are your ideas received by other Palestinians?

Eid: I don’t think that most Palestinians agree with me. And politi-cians are completely ignorant of my ideas because they don’t serve their political interests. We are a totally unstable society. Our opinions change ever day. Sometimes we feel powerful and energetic; some-times we feel tired and hopeless. I prefer talking to people when they are tired. Then they are more likely to listen to new ideas.

NS: What are your perceptions of Israeli human rights groups? Are they succeeding in their work?

Eid: I think they are doing a good job. We, the Palestinians, have learnt a lot from the Israeli organizations. There are Palestinians who are critical of the Israeli organizations, but mostly they are people who have no real idea of what is going on. I know what happens inside the Israeli organizations. I think that they are doing the maximum they can do to improve the daily lives of the Palestinians. If you go to the High Court, you will realize that most of the appeals made on behalf of Palestinians have been presented by Israeli groups and Israeli lawyers, not Palestinian ones.

NS: Are you able to monitor what’s going on in Gaza right now?

Eid: That’s very, very difficult. Don’t forget that we are living under a Taliban regime in the Gaza Strip. Our fieldworker hesitates before investigating cases there. The situation for human rights organizations sometimes reminds me of the Saddam Hussein regime. We can’t monitor the Gaza Strip the way we used to monitor it when it was PA territory. We are trying to collect data from newspapers and other organizations that operate in the area. We are in touch with some journalists there. But we face serious opposition and danger.

NS: What advice would you like to give to the Palestinians?

Eid: The best opportunity for us to make peace with Israel was probably in 1978 or 1979 when Egyptian president Anwar Sadat visited Israel. He suggested that Yasser Arafat join him, but Arafat refused.

The most important thing for us to do now is learn from the mis-takes we made between 1947 and today so that we don’t repeat them. We should put these mistakes on the table and study them well. After studying our mistakes, I think the solution will be very easy to create.

Voir enfin:

Christian In Israel
Abandoned by the Israeli Left: The story of Bassem Eid
Palestinian activist reflects on what went wrong in peace process, and what can be done now.
David Parsons
The Jerusalem Post
06/25/2012

Back during the first Palestinian intifada (1987 to 1993), the Israeli human rights organization B’Tselem latched on to a young Palestinian field worker named Bassem Eid and turned him into the darling of the Israeli Left. He reported on many of the incidents of alleged use of force against Palestinian civilians, and was sent on speaking tours to dozens of nations around the world.

But when the Olso peace process was launched, Bassem Eid saw his hopes for a free and democratic Palestinian state dashed by the new regime set up by PLO leader Yasser Arafat. So he set up his own organization to monitor violations of human rights being committed by the Palestinian Authority against his own people. By the time the second intifada broke out in the year 2000, Bassem was watching his dreams of peace and coexistence between Israel and the Palestinians go up in smoke.

8 commentaires pour Gaza: Pas de deuxième Syrie à Gaza ! (We see what Qatar’s and Turkey’s meddling in Syria has led to: Palestinian human rights activist denounces Hamas and Qatari-Turkish interference in Gaza)

  1. […] le Mont du Temple (pardon: l’Esplanade des mosquées) et de représentants des financiers du terrorisme qatari et saoudien, que l’on continue à refuser de nommer […]

    J'aime

  2. […] le Mont du Temple (pardon: l’Esplanade des mosquées) et de représentants des financiers du terrorisme qatari et saoudien, que l’on continue à refuser de nommer […]

    J'aime

  3. […] le Mont du Temple (pardon: l’Esplanade des mosquées) et de représentants des financiers du terrorisme qatari et saoudien, que l’on continue à refuser de nommer […]

    J'aime

  4. […] savoir, des financiers avérés même du PSG et du terrorisme qui continuent à avoir leurs entrées tant à Washington qu’à Londres ou Paris, la chaine […]

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :