Révolution numérique: Comment le logiciel dévore le monde (How software is eating the world)

https://i0.wp.com/colin-verdier.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/pacman.pnghttps://i2.wp.com/colin-verdier.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Development.jpgWe are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy. More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not. Why is this happening now? Six decades into the computer revolution, four decades since the invention of the microprocessor, and two decades into the rise of the modern Internet, all of the technology required to transform industries through software finally works and can be widely delivered at global scale. Over two billion people now use the broadband Internet, up from perhaps 50 million a decade ago, when I was at Netscape, the company I co-founded. In the next 10 years, I expect at least five billion people worldwide to own smartphones, giving every individual with such a phone instant access to the full power of the Internet, every moment of every day. On the back end, software programming tools and Internet-based services make it easy to launch new global software-powered start-ups in many industries—without the need to invest in new infrastructure and train new employees. (…) With lower start-up costs and a vastly expanded market for online services, the result is a global economy that for the first time will be fully digitally wired—the dream of every cyber-visionary of the early 1990s, finally delivered, a full generation later. Perhaps the single most dramatic example of this phenomenon of software eating a traditional business is the suicide of Borders and corresponding rise of Amazon. In 2001, Borders agreed to hand over its online business to Amazon under the theory that online book sales were non-strategic and unimportant. Today, the world’s largest bookseller, Amazon, is a software company—its core capability is its amazing software engine for selling virtually everything online, no retail stores necessary. On top of that, while Borders was thrashing in the throes of impending bankruptcy, Amazon rearranged its web site to promote its Kindle digital books over physical books for the first time. Now even the books themselves are software. Today’s largest video service by number of subscribers is a software company: Netflix. How Netflix eviscerated Blockbuster is an old story, but now other traditional entertainment providers are facing the same threat. Comcast, Time Warner and others are responding by transforming themselves into software companies with efforts such as TV Everywhere, which liberates content from the physical cable and connects it to smartphones and tablets. Today’s dominant music companies are software companies, too: Apple’s iTunes, Spotify and Pandora. Traditional record labels increasingly exist only to provide those software companies with content. (…) Today’s fastest growing entertainment companies are videogame makers—again, software—with the industry growing to $60 billion from $30 billion five years ago. And the fastest growing major videogame company is Zynga (maker of games including FarmVille), which delivers its games entirely online. (…) Meanwhile, traditional videogame powerhouses like Electronic Arts and Nintendo have seen revenues stagnate and fall. The best new movie production company in many decades, Pixar, was a software company. Disney—Disney!—had to buy Pixar, a software company, to remain relevant in animated movies. Photography, of course, was eaten by software long ago. It’s virtually impossible to buy a mobile phone that doesn’t include a software-powered camera, and photos are uploaded automatically to the Internet for permanent archiving and global sharing. Companies like Shutterfly, Snapfish and Flickr have stepped into Kodak’s place. Today’s largest direct marketing platform is a software company—Google. Now it’s been joined by Groupon, Living Social, Foursquare and others, which are using software to eat the retail marketing industry. (…) Today’s fastest growing telecom company is Skype, a software company that was just bought by Microsoft for $8.5 billion. (…) Meanwhile, the two biggest telecom companies, AT&T and Verizon, have survived by transforming themselves into software companies, partnering with Apple and other smartphone makers. LinkedIn is today’s fastest growing recruiting company. Software is also eating much of the value chain of industries that are widely viewed as primarily existing in the physical world. In today’s cars, software runs the engines, controls safety features, entertains passengers, guides drivers to destinations and connects each car to mobile, satellite and GPS networks. (…) Today’s leading real-world retailer, Wal-Mart, uses software to power its logistics and distribution capabilities, which it has used to crush its competition. Likewise for FedEx, which is best thought of as a software network that happens to have trucks, planes and distribution hubs attached. And the success or failure of airlines today and in the future hinges on their ability to price tickets and optimize routes and yields correctly—with software. Oil and gas companies were early innovators in supercomputing and data visualization and analysis, which are crucial to today’s oil and gas exploration efforts. Agriculture is increasingly powered by software as well, including satellite analysis of soils linked to per-acre seed selection software algorithms. The financial services industry has been visibly transformed by software over the last 30 years. Practically every financial transaction, from someone buying a cup of coffee to someone trading a trillion dollars of credit default derivatives, is done in software. And many of the leading innovators in financial services are software companies, such as Square, which allows anyone to accept credit card payments with a mobile phone, and PayPal, which generated more than $1 billion in revenue in the second quarter of this year, up 31% over the previous year. Health care and education, in my view, are next up for fundamental software-based transformation. (…) Even national defense is increasingly software-based. The modern combat soldier is embedded in a web of software that provides intelligence, communications, logistics and weapons guidance. Software-powered drones launch airstrikes without putting human pilots at risk. Intelligence agencies do large-scale data mining with software to uncover and track potential terrorist plots (…) It’s not an accident that many of the biggest recent technology companies—including Google, Amazon, eBay and more—are American companies. Our combination of great research universities, a pro-risk business culture, deep pools of innovation-seeking equity capital and reliable business and contract law is unprecedented and unparalleled in the world. Still, we face several challenges. (…) many people in the U.S. and around the world lack the education and skills required to participate in the great new companies coming out of the software revolution. This is a tragedy since every company I work with is absolutely starved for talent. Qualified software engineers, managers, marketers and salespeople in Silicon Valley can rack up dozens of high-paying, high-upside job offers any time they want, while national unemployment and underemployment is sky high. This problem is even worse than it looks because many workers in existing industries will be stranded on the wrong side of software-based disruption and may never be able to work in their fields again. There’s no way through this problem other than education, and we have a long way to go. Marc Andreessen
L’ère du pure playing est terminée ; désormais le logiciel va s’immiscer dans tous les secteurs de l’économie, s’hybrider avec le matériel et affecter les positions et les niveaux de marge de tous les acteurs en place. (…) Le logiciel est donc la solution à l’un des plus graves problèmes auxquels sont exposées nos finances publiques : à la clef de ces innovations, il y a des milliards d’euros de réduction des dépenses publiques ; l’administration elle-même n’échappera pas à ce rouleur compresseur : animée de la volonté d’améliorer la qualité du service rendu aux administrés, convaincue du rôle qu’elle peut jouer dans l’amorçage d’un écosystème d’innovation ou simplement contrainte par l’impératif de la réduction des coûts, elle viendra progressivement à la stratégie de government as a platform – et laissera des sociétés logicielles opérer à sa place des services publics sous une forme plus innovante et mieux adaptée aux besoins particuliers des administrés. Il est important de prendre la mesure de ces bouleversements. Aucun secteur ne sera épargné. A toutes les industries, il arrivera ce qui est arrivé à la musique, à la presse, à la publicité et à la vente de détail. Le fait que les autres secteurs ne puissent être exclusivement immatériels ne change rien à l’affaire. Apple et surtout Amazon ne sont déjà pas des pure players. Ces deux entreprises couronnées de succès ont su développer une offre composite, mi-matérielle, mi-logicielle, qui fait jouer à plein, sur un marché essentiellement matériel, le potentiel de disruption du logiciel connecté en réseau. D’où vient ce potentiel de disruption ? Lorsqu’un logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur, il capte à terme l’essentiel de la marge, pour quatre raisons : parce que le logiciel se positionne littéralement over the top et devient le maillon qui détermine l’allocation des ressources dans la chaîne de valeur ; parce que le logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur prioritairement au contact du client ou de l’utilisateur, ce qui lui confère un avantage supplémentaire dans la captation de la valeur ; enfin, parce que le logiciel permet de connecter les utilisateurs en réseau et d’incorporer au processus de production leurs traces d’utilisation et contributions. C’est le maillon logiciel qui permet à une chaîne de valeur de faire levier de la multitude et de parvenir aux rendements d’échelle considérables qui font la scalabilité des modèles économiques d’aujourd’hui. (…) Bien sûr, il n’y a là rien de nouveau depuis l’ouvrage fondateur de Clayton Christensen : les grands groupes éprouvent les plus grandes difficultés à anticiper et à s’emparer des innovations de rupture. Mais la France, avec sa tradition colbertiste et la discipline d’exécution de ses champions nationaux, si proches du pouvoir politique, n’est-elle pas la seule (avec la Corée du Sud peut-être) à pouvoir forcer ses grands groupes à se faire violence et à relever les défis d’après la révolution numérique ? Il faut en effet considérer la thèse de Scott D. Anthony : puisqu’une poignée de sociétés logicielles, devenues des géants, ont pris une avance impossible à rattraper, l’innovation de rupture doit maintenant retrouver sa place dans les stratégies des grands groupes, seuls à pouvoir mobiliser suffisamment de ressources dans de courts délais pour forcer des disruptions sur leurs marchés… plutôt que d’être dévorés par un logiciel développé par d’autres ! Nos sociétés logicielles (Dassault Systèmes, Atos, CapGemini…) affirmeront avec force que, bien sûr, elles s’efforcent de mieux se positionner dans la chaîne de valeur. Mais les problèmes sont systémiques. Il y a maintes raisons à cette incapacité de sociétés françaises à s’imposer sur des marchés logiciels globaux. Par exemple, pour innover en rupture dans les grands groupes comme pour les startups, il faut des investissements considérables, réalisés dans des délais très courts. C’est ce genre d’efforts que font les géants du logiciel aux Etats-Unis pour acquérir et consolider leurs positions : Facebook a investi depuis sa création près de 1,5 milliard de dollars, sans avoir prouvé sa capacité à générer des revenus à hauteur de son cours d’introduction en bourse. Palantir, société fondée par Peter Thiel, a levé, depuis sa création en 2004, 301 millions de dollars sans encore avoir stabilisé son modèle économique. C’est la finalité du venture capital que de mobiliser de telles sommes en dehors des grandes organisations pour aider des entreprises innovantes à prendre des positions stratégiques sur d’immenses marchés qu’elles contribuent à transformer voire à créer, avant même de prouver leur profitabilité. (…) Pour faire émerger des champions logiciels, il ne faut pas seulement du venture capital, il faut aussi un environnement juridique favorable à l’émergence d’applications innovantes, qui sont les plateformes logicielles mondiales de demain. Même si la disruption vient d’un grand groupe, ce dernier est souvent aiguillonné par une startup (laquelle est alors rachetée par le second mover), comme le montre l’exemple d’AT&T et de Twilio. Or de nombreux indices nous suggèrent que la France entrave l’essor de l’innovation logicielle : confusion entre recherche et développement et innovation ; obsession du brevet et de la propriété intellectuelle ; frilosité des grands groupes (voyez le parcours du combattant de Capitaine Train pour mettre en place son application de réservation de billets de train) ; captation des compétences informatiques, par ailleurs dévalorisées, par les SSII ; fonctionnement du marché du travail et des assurances sociales inadapté aux cycles courts d’innovation ; multiplication des obstacles juridiques au référencement des contenus ou à l’exploitation des données (dans l’éducation, dans la santé et peut-être bientôt dans les médias) ; fiscalité défavorable au venture capital ; multiples réglementations sectorielles constituant des barrières à l’entrée infranchissables pour les nouveaux acteurs, par ailleurs sous-financés. Tout cela mis ensemble forme un écosystème hostile à l’innovation : les innovateurs français doivent surmonter plus d’obstacles que leurs concurrents étrangers, et les venture capitalists préfèrent parier sur ces derniers plutôt que sur nos startups françaises. Qui, dans ces conditions, prendra les positions dominantes sur les marchés logiciels globaux de demain ? Les Microsoft, Apple, Google et Amazon de la santé, de l’éducation, de l’automobile seront-ils français ou américains ? La deuxième série de conséquences est d’ordre fiscal. Ce n’est pas ici le lieu pour s’étendre sur ce sujet, mais il est facile de comprendre que si la partie logicielle des activités dans tous les secteurs est opérée par des sociétés étrangères, alors l’impôt sur les sociétés et la TVA (jusqu’en 2019 sur les prestations de service immatériel) sur ces activités, qui captent l’essentiel de la marge, seront payés à l’étranger plutôt qu’en France. Comme le secteur financier, le secteur logiciel, parce que ses actifs et ses prestations sont immatériels, se prête tout particulièrement à l’optimisation fiscale. Dans la bataille pour la localisation des bases fiscales, mieux vaut favoriser l’émergence en France d’acteurs dominants sur les marchés logiciels globaux plutôt que de laisser les marges de toutes les chaînes de valeur dans tous les secteurs, y compris ceux dans lesquels nous sommes aujourd’hui les plus forts (voyez Veolia, Renault ou nos géants de la grande distribution), s’échapper dans les comptes de sociétés étrangères à la suite de disruptions logicielles et d’une restructuration en profondeur de la chaîne de valeur. Nicolas Colin

Netscape, Google, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, iTunes, Spotify, Pandora, Neflix, Twilio, Zynga, Shutterfly, Snapfish, Flickr, ebay, Paypal, AdWords, Kindle, TripAdvisor, Expedia, Booking.com, AirNnB, Waze, GPS, Amadeus, Groupon, Linkedin, Skype, Foursquare, Pixar …

Alors qu’au pays aux éternels trois millions de chômeurs, un jeune entrepreneur  et l’organe de presse qui publiait sa tribune libre se voient assigner en justice pour avoir osé remettre en question les méthodes anticoncurrentielles d’une compagnie de taxis …

Et qu’une simple pub pour une berline hybride américaine moquant gentiment la patrie des 35 h tourne quasiment à l’incident diplomatique …

Pendant que, sur fond d’exil fiscal à la fois extérieur et intérieur,  toutes nos industries sont peu à peu happées (et nous-mêmes fichés mieux que ne le ferait la NSA elle-même !)  par la numérisation du pop store et du airbnb

Et que sur la seule force de son innovation technologique un petit pays comme Israël a quasiment rattrapé, en PIB par capita,  un pays comme la France …

Retour, avec ledit entrepreneur Nicolas Colin, sur la révolution numérique, fameusement décrite par l’un de ses plus grands chantres, Marc Andriessen, co-créateur du premier moteur de recherche Mosaic, comme une dévoration …

Et une dévoration largement américaine …

Le logiciel dévore le monde… depuis les États-Unis
Nicolas Colin
L’age de la multittude
4 novembre 2012

Marc Andreessen, concepteur du premier navigateur graphique, Mosaic, et désormais l’un des plus influents venture capitalists du marché, a pour habitude de déclarer que « le logiciel dévore le monde ». Il a explicité sa formule dans un article paru l’année dernière dans le Wall Street Journal : l’ère du pure playing est terminée ; désormais le logiciel va s’immiscer dans tous les secteurs de l’économie, s’hybrider avec le matériel et affecter les positions et les niveaux de marge de tous les acteurs en place.

Apple, Google et Amazon sont exemplaires des disruptions que le logiciel inflige à différents secteurs de l’économie. Avec l’iPod et iTunes, Apple a imposé un nouveau modèle économique à l’industrie de la musique. Avec son moteur de recherche et la régie AdWords, Google a capté une part croissante des recettes publicitaires en ligne et généralisé la mesure de la performance dans ce secteur, bouleversant au passage les modèles économiques de tous les acteurs qui dépendent de la publicité, notamment les médias. Amazon a déployé une infrastructure globale et ouverte pour la vente en ligne et, en raccourcissant sans cesse ses délais de livraison, s’apprête à s’attaquer aux positions des géants de la grande distribution. Wal-Mart l’a bien compris et a décidé de prendre les devants en cessant de vendre les terminaux Kindle, suggérant une guerre à venir entre le géant de la grande distribution et celui de la vente en ligne. Le vainqueur, heureusement ou malheureusement, est connu d’avance – après tout, Wal-Mart a, à l’époque, lui-même provoqué la faillite de la plupart de ses concurrents dans la distribution alimentaire aux Etats-Unis.

Le logiciel a donc d’ores et déjà transformé quatre grands secteurs de l’économie : les industries culturelles, la publicité, les médias et la vente de détail. Mais, comme nous le rappelle Marc Andreessen, il ne va pas s’arrêter là. Toutes les industries sont concernées par la voracité du logiciel, y compris celles dont la composante matérielle est irréductible :

le marché du tourisme est depuis longtemps transformé par le logiciel. Nous connaissons les TripAdvisor, Expedia et autres Booking.com, sans lesquels nous ne saurions plus planifier nos voyages ni réserver de billets d’avions ou de chambres d’hôtels. Nous connaissons moins les plateformes de gestion de réservations telles qu’Amadeus, qui forment l’infrastructure logicielle mondiale du marché du transport aérien. Et le tourisme n’a pas fini d’être bouleversé par le logiciel : par exemple, HipMunk ou Capitaine Train le bouleversent par le design, ou encore la déferlante AirBnB agrandit considérablement le marché en mettant les hôtels en concurrence avec les particuliers qui louent leurs chambres inoccupées ; les transports sont l’une des autres transformations en cours. A l’aide d’une application simple et séduisante, la société Uber, succès quasi-instantané, prépare une rude concurrence aux sociétés de taxi en imposant une disponibilité et une qualité de service jusqu’ici réservée aux clients des chauffeurs de maître. Waze, GPS collaboratif, propose d’optimiser les trajets en ville en s’appuyant exclusivement sur les données d’utilisation de la communauté, y compris pour dessiner les fonds de cartes. La Google Car montre la voie aux constructeurs automobiles pour la mise au point des futures voitures sans chauffeur. Et, comme nous le suggère Rob Coneybeer, une multitude de voitures sans chauffeur, mises bout à bout et circulant sur des voies réservées, forment une solution de transport collectif bien plus efficiente que le train ; les infrastructures urbaines font l’objet d’un considérable effort de disruption de la part d’IBM, qui réorganise progressivement son offre de services autour de la thématique des smart cities – jusqu’à supplanter les Veolia ou GDF-Suez dans le redéploiement du réseau de gestion de l’eau sur l’île de Malte. Dans son sillage, de nombreuses startups inventent les objets connectés qui vont nous aider à mieux suivre et maîtriser notre consommation d’énergie, notre consommation d’eau, notre gestion des déchets, etc. Les smart grids propulsés par des innovations logicielles vont donc progressivement révolutionner la production et la consommation d’énergie. Comme nous l’explique Tim Wu dans The New Republic, ces smart grids, formés par une multitude d’objets connectés, vont devenir l’infrastructure distribuée de la production d’énergie de demain, une infrastructure plus résiliente que nos réseaux actuels, qui n’aurait probablement pas fait défaut après le passage de l’ouragan Sandy ; les banques sont saisies depuis longtemps par le logiciel, mais elles se sont protégées jusqu’ici de toute disruption par des efforts de lobbying fondés sur la sensibilité des données qu’elles manipulent et le caractère essentiel de leur activité pour les économies nationales. Malgré tout, le secteur bancaire n’en a plus pour longtemps : le prêt entre particuliers s’attaque aux positions des banques sur le marché du crédit ; le crowdfunding vient pallier aux déficiences de leurs activités de prêt aux entreprises et d’investissement ; les solutions de paiement conçues en marge du système bancaire se multiplient, y compris via l’introduction de monnaies alternatives ; même les services de banque de détail vont être transformés à terme grâce aux efforts acharnés de sociétés prometteuses telles que Simple ; un consensus se forme déjà sur les prochains secteurs candidats à la disruption. L’éducation est l’un d’entre eux. L’endettement des étudiants des universités américaines a atteint un niveau insoutenable, accélérant la péremption du modèle universitaire actuel et intensifiant les efforts d’innovation pour le soumettre à l’ascendant du logiciel. L’université de Stanford a récemment pris une initiative qui pourrait creuser encore plus l’écart entre les universités les plus prestigieuses et les autres sur le marché mondial de l’enseignement supérieur. La société Clever a mis au point une API pour faciliter la connexion au réseau des écoles et l’ouverture des données du système éducatif ; la santé est l’autre secteur bientôt exposé à une prise en main par l’industrie du logiciel. La e-santé commence avec le Quantified Self, cette pratique consistant à permettre aux individus de mesurer leurs données personnelles, notamment de santé, et de suivre leur évolution dans le temps pour en tirer des leçons et rétroagir sur leur comportement. Elle se poursuit par des disruptions de l’exercice de la médecine ou du remboursement des soins qui sont probablement, bien plus que les médicaments génériques ou la chimérique « responsabilisation des assurés », la meilleure promesse de maîtrise des dépenses publiques de santé sur le long terme. Le logiciel est donc la solution à l’un des plus graves problèmes auxquels sont exposées nos finances publiques : à la clef de ces innovations, il y a des milliards d’euros de réduction des dépenses publiques ; l’administration elle-même n’échappera pas à ce rouleur compresseur : animée de la volonté d’améliorer la qualité du service rendu aux administrés, convaincue du rôle qu’elle peut jouer dans l’amorçage d’un écosystème d’innovation ou simplement contrainte par l’impératif de la réduction des coûts, elle viendra progressivement à la stratégie de government as a platform – et laissera des sociétés logicielles opérer à sa place des services publics sous une forme plus innovante et mieux adaptée aux besoins particuliers des administrés.

Il est important de prendre la mesure de ces bouleversements. Aucun secteur ne sera épargné. A toutes les industries, il arrivera ce qui est arrivé à la musique, à la presse, à la publicité et à la vente de détail. Le fait que les autres secteurs ne puissent être exclusivement immatériels ne change rien à l’affaire. Apple et surtout Amazon ne sont déjà pas des pure players. Ces deux entreprises couronnées de succès ont su développer une offre composite, mi-matérielle, mi-logicielle, qui fait jouer à plein, sur un marché essentiellement matériel, le potentiel de disruption du logiciel connecté en réseau.

D’où vient ce potentiel de disruption ? Lorsqu’un logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur, il capte à terme l’essentiel de la marge, pour quatre raisons :

parce que le logiciel se positionne littéralement over the top et devient le maillon qui détermine l’allocation des ressources dans la chaîne de valeur ;
parce que le logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur prioritairement au contact du client ou de l’utilisateur, ce qui lui confère un avantage supplémentaire dans la captation de la valeur ;
enfin, parce que le logiciel permet de connecter les utilisateurs en réseau et d’incorporer au processus de production leurs traces d’utilisation et contributions. C’est le maillon logiciel qui permet à une chaîne de valeur de faire levier de la multitude et de parvenir aux rendements d’échelle considérables qui font la scalabilité des modèles économiques d’aujourd’hui. Nous en voyons déjà de nombreux exemples : le moteur de recommandation d’Amazon, fondé sur nos historiques d’achat ; la régie publicitaire AdWords, fondée sur nos clics ; l’application Facebook tout entière, fondée sur le partage de notre intimité. Parce qu’il permet d’incorporer des milliards d’utilisateurs à la chaîne de production, le logiciel atteint des rendements d’échelle sans précédent dans l’histoire. Il est donc compréhensible qu’il capte l’essentiel de la marge ;
combinées, ces trois caractéristiques suggèrent pourquoi les marchés logiciels sont toujours concentrés. Nous l’avons appris avec Microsoft dès les années 1980. Nous en avons la confirmation avec Google depuis le milieu des années 2000. Amazon est en train de balayer toute concurrence sur le marché de la vente en ligne, comme le confirme le repli en bon ordre de la FNAC. Il en va de même sur le marché de l’Internet mobile, que Google et Apple sont vouées à se partager en duopole. Les acteurs du logiciel dominent leurs marchés et leur position dominante leur permet de capter l’essentiel de la marge.

Il n’y a pas d’opposition entre la thèse d’Andreessen et celle des tenants de la renaissance du hardware, tels Rob Coneybeer ou Paul Graham, lequel confirme que les nouvelles promotions de Y Combinator comptent de plus en plus d’innovateurs dans le hardware. Il n’y a pas d’opposition car le hardware nouveau est du hardware connecté : un nouveau point de contact entre le réseau et ses utilisateurs, mesuré et commandé par du logiciel. En revanche, il y a à cela une conséquence majeure : de plus en plus, le fabricant du hardware va être un sous-traitant d’un opérateur logiciel. Sa marge sera celle d’un sous-traitant, contraint de sans cesse baisser ses prix et de réaliser des gains de productivité. Le logiciel est aux acteurs de l’économie traditionnelle ce que Wal-Mart est à ses fournisseurs : un rouleau compresseur qui réduit à néant la marge d’exploitation et force la délocalisation des chaînes de production dans des pays où le prix de la main-d’oeuvre est plus faible. Dans le partage de la valeur entre les activités traditionnelles et les nouveaux maillons logiciels, ce sont les seconds qui se tailleront la part du lion.

Il y a deux séries de conséquences à cela.

La première est d’ordre industriel. Comme déjà évoqué, sur ces marchés concentrés il n’y a pas beaucoup de places à prendre. Un marché logiciel est un monopole ou un duopole qui ne ménage qu’à sa marge un peu de place pour des acteurs de niche. Il s’agit par ailleurs de marchés globaux, car c’est à l’échelle globale qu’on peut parvenir aux rendements d’échelle qui font l’essentiel de la valeur… et le pouvoir de marché. La question est donc celle de la place des entreprises françaises sur ce marché : certaines s’imposeront-elles comme les géants mondiaux du logiciel dans tel ou tel secteur, ou bien laisseront-elles les entreprises américaines occuper ces positions stratégiques en se repliant sur la fabrication de matériel à bas coûts et à faibles marges (id est la perspective que nous offre le rapport Gallois) ?

L’état des choses est peu rassurant. Confrontées aux menaces de disruption issues du secteur du logiciel, la plupart des entreprises françaises comprennent qu’il se passe quelque chose mais préfèrent, pour affronter le danger, nouer des partenariats… avec des sociétés américaines ! Voyages-SNCF n’est pas une position prise par la SNCF sur le marché du logiciel dans le secteur du tourisme, mais une joint-venture avec la société américaine Expedia. De même, Veolia n’a pas investi dans une nouvelle activité de gestion d’infrastructure logicielle, mais a préféré pour cela conclure un partenariat avec IBM. La FNAC est en partenariat avec Kobo, société canadienne, pour la vente de liseuses et donc de livres électroniques. On sait comment tout cela finit : à terme, l’essentiel de la marge sera dans la partie logicielle, donc dans les comptes de sociétés américaines (ou canadiennes) et sur les feuilles de paie de salariés américains, tandis que nos ex-champions nationaux se seront transformés en vulgaires sous-traitants à faibles marges d’exploitation.

Au-delà de ces accords par lesquels nos sociétés abandonnent la valeur future à leurs partenaires étrangers, un autre danger est d’être tout simplement à côté de la plaque. Il n’est pas certain, c’est le moins que l’on puisse dire, que nos géants industriels aient réalisé qu’ils avaient affaire à une concurrence bien plus intense, féroce et imprévisible que tout ce qu’ils ont connu par le passé. Les géants du logiciel, ceux-là même qui dévorent les secteurs de l’économie les uns après les autres, jouent plusieurs coups à l’avance, mobilisent des quantités considérables de capital, ne versent pas de dividendes car ils réinvestissent tout (ou presque) en R&D, et surtout font levier de la multitude pour atteindre des rendements d’échelle sans précédent dans l’histoire de l’industrie.

Face à cela, Renault travaille à mettre au point une plateforme logicielle, R-link, qui est une option payante proposée sur certains nouveaux modèles seulement. A ce rythme-là, bon courage pour concurrencer Google et Apple sur le marché des voitures connectées ! Pour se préparer à la disruption logicielle, Renault devrait frapper beaucoup plus vite et plus fort, équiper gratuitement tous les modèles dans toutes les gammes, et même rappeler les modèles anciens pour les connecter en même temps qu’on fait la vidange. De même, alors qu’AT&T vient d’enrichir son offre d’une API déployée en 90 jours pour rendre son réseau téléphonique programmable (en réaction à l’effort d’innovation de la startup Twilio, du portefeuille de 500startups), on attend en vain les innovations sur le marché français des télécommunications en dehors de la diversification des forfaits téléphoniques ou de la baisse des prix forcée par l’entrée de Free sur le marché.

Bien sûr, il n’y a là rien de nouveau depuis l’ouvrage fondateur de Clayton Christensen : les grands groupes éprouvent les plus grandes difficultés à anticiper et à s’emparer des innovations de rupture. Mais la France, avec sa tradition colbertiste et la discipline d’exécution de ses champions nationaux, si proches du pouvoir politique, n’est-elle pas la seule (avec la Corée du Sud peut-être) à pouvoir forcer ses grands groupes à se faire violence et à relever les défis d’après la révolution numérique ? Il faut en effet considérer la thèse de Scott D. Anthony : puisqu’une poignée de sociétés logicielles, devenues des géants, ont pris une avance impossible à rattraper, l’innovation de rupture doit maintenant retrouver sa place dans les stratégies des grands groupes, seuls à pouvoir mobiliser suffisamment de ressources dans de courts délais pour forcer des disruptions sur leurs marchés… plutôt que d’être dévorés par un logiciel développé par d’autres !

Nos sociétés logicielles (Dassault Systèmes, Atos, CapGemini…) affirmeront avec force que, bien sûr, elles s’efforcent de mieux se positionner dans la chaîne de valeur. Mais les problèmes sont systémiques. Il y a maintes raisons à cette incapacité de sociétés françaises à s’imposer sur des marchés logiciels globaux.

Par exemple, pour innover en rupture dans les grands groupes comme pour les startups, il faut des investissements considérables, réalisés dans des délais très courts. C’est ce genre d’efforts que font les géants du logiciel aux Etats-Unis pour acquérir et consolider leurs positions : Facebook a investi depuis sa création près de 1,5 milliard de dollars, sans avoir prouvé sa capacité à générer des revenus à hauteur de son cours d’introduction en bourse. Palantir, société fondée par Peter Thiel, a levé, depuis sa création en 2004, 301 millions de dollars sans encore avoir stabilisé son modèle économique. C’est la finalité du venture capital que de mobiliser de telles sommes en dehors des grandes organisations pour aider des entreprises innovantes à prendre des positions stratégiques sur d’immenses marchés qu’elles contribuent à transformer voire à créer, avant même de prouver leur profitabilité. Comme nous le rappelle Scott D. Anthony dans l’article référencé plus haut,

The restless individualism of baby boomers clashed with increasingly hierarchical organizations. Innovators began to leave companies, band with like-minded “rebels,” and form new companies. Given the scale required to innovate, however, these rebels needed new forms of funding. Hence the emergence of the VC-backed start-up.

Pour faire émerger des champions logiciels, il ne faut pas seulement du venture capital, il faut aussi un environnement juridique favorable à l’émergence d’applications innovantes, qui sont les plateformes logicielles mondiales de demain. Même si la disruption vient d’un grand groupe, ce dernier est souvent aiguillonné par une startup (laquelle est alors rachetée par le second mover), comme le montre l’exemple d’AT&T et de Twilio. Or de nombreux indices nous suggèrent que la France entrave l’essor de l’innovation logicielle : confusion entre recherche et développement et innovation ; obsession du brevet et de la propriété intellectuelle ; frilosité des grands groupes (voyez le parcours du combattant de Capitaine Train pour mettre en place son application de réservation de billets de train) ; captation des compétences informatiques, par ailleurs dévalorisées, par les SSII ; fonctionnement du marché du travail et des assurances sociales inadapté aux cycles courts d’innovation ; multiplication des obstacles juridiques au référencement des contenus ou à l’exploitation des données (dans l’éducation, dans la santé et peut-être bientôt dans les médias) ; fiscalité défavorable au venture capital ; multiples réglementations sectorielles constituant des barrières à l’entrée infranchissables pour les nouveaux acteurs, par ailleurs sous-financés.

Tout cela mis ensemble forme un écosystème hostile à l’innovation : les innovateurs français doivent surmonter plus d’obstacles que leurs concurrents étrangers, et les venture capitalists préfèrent parier sur ces derniers plutôt que sur nos startups françaises. Qui, dans ces conditions, prendra les positions dominantes sur les marchés logiciels globaux de demain ? Les Microsoft, Apple, Google et Amazon de la santé, de l’éducation, de l’automobile seront-ils français ou américains ?

La deuxième série de conséquences est d’ordre fiscal. Ce n’est pas ici le lieu pour s’étendre sur ce sujet, mais il est facile de comprendre que si la partie logicielle des activités dans tous les secteurs est opérée par des sociétés étrangères, alors l’impôt sur les sociétés et la TVA (jusqu’en 2019 sur les prestations de service immatériel) sur ces activités, qui captent l’essentiel de la marge, seront payés à l’étranger plutôt qu’en France. Comme le secteur financier, le secteur logiciel, parce que ses actifs et ses prestations sont immatériels, se prête tout particulièrement à l’optimisation fiscale. Dans la bataille pour la localisation des bases fiscales, mieux vaut favoriser l’émergence en France d’acteurs dominants sur les marchés logiciels globaux plutôt que de laisser les marges de toutes les chaînes de valeur dans tous les secteurs, y compris ceux dans lesquels nous sommes aujourd’hui les plus forts (voyez Veolia, Renault ou nos géants de la grande distribution), s’échapper dans les comptes de sociétés étrangères à la suite de disruptions logicielles et d’une restructuration en profondeur de la chaîne de valeur. C’est ce message que j’ai cherché à faire passer dans mon intervention mardi dernier aux Rencontres parlementaires sur l’économie numérique. A suivre !

EDIT, 15 novembre 2012, une présentation de cette intervention téléchargeable sur slideshare.
Vous êtes la multitude !

Voir aussi:

L’industrie du taxi à la frontière de l’innovation
Nicolas Colin
L’âge de la multitude
15 avril 2014

Jacques Rosselin avait publié l’information il y a quelques jours, mais un éditorial du 11 avril dernier écrit par Jean-Christophe Tortora, président-directeur général de La Tribune, lui a donné beaucoup plus d’ampleur : suite à une plainte contre X déposée par Nicolas Rousselet, PDG du groupe G7, Jean-Christophe Tortora et moi-même sommes mis en examen pour diffamation. L’origine de cette plainte est un texte intitulé « Les fossoyeurs de l’innovation », publié le 15 octobre 2013 sur le blog de L’Âge de la multitude et reproduit le même jour sur le site de La Tribune à la demande d’Eric Walther, directeur de la rédaction. Ce texte, qui discute la vision de l’innovation de Nicolas Rousselet, a été écrit dans le contexte de la préparation du fameux décret dit des « 15 minutes », dont il était l’un des défenseurs les plus visibles.

L’annonce de cette mise en examen a déclenché un débat de fond autour de la question de l’innovation – tant la surprise a été grande à l’idée qu’une prise de position sur cette question cruciale pour l’avenir de la Nation puisse donner lieu à un procès pénal. Une multitude de personnes, connues ou inconnues, m’ont exprimé des marques de soutien, et je les en remercie chaleureusement. Un #hashtag a même pris son envol. Des arbitres se sont curieusement interposés pour essayer de renvoyer les protagonistes dos à dos. Quant à moi, je voudrais saisir cette occasion pour refaire le point sur la question de l’innovation.

Lorsque nous avons entrepris d’écrire L’Âge de la multitude, Henri Verdier et moi-même avions l’ambition, immodeste, d’expliquer la révolution numérique et ses conséquences aux décideurs de notre pays. Notre objectif était de démontrer que l’économie numérique n’est pas un phénomène marginal indigne d’intérêt pour nos responsables politiques et nos capitaines d’industrie, mais au contraire une économie en plein essor dominée par quelques grandes entreprises américaines, géants industriels qui jouent plusieurs coups à l’avance sur le grand échiquier de l’économie globale. Bref, une question très sérieuse qui mérite l’attention prioritaire de nos dirigeants au plus haut niveau. Pour l’instant, le numérique dévore le monde exclusivement depuis les Etats-Unis. Mais d’autres pays peuvent désormais prendre leur part de cette voracité, pourvu que la compréhension de l’économie numérique soit partagée par leurs élites – c’est à cet effort de compréhension qu’Henri et moi avons souhaité contribuer avec L’Âge de la multitude.

Ce qui est en jeu, dans l’économie numérique, c’est l’avenir de notre pays : notre croissance, nos emplois, nos services publics, notre protection sociale. Si nous réussissons la transition numérique de l’économie française, alors nous resterons l’un des pays les plus développés du monde ; si, au contraire, nous échouons, nous devrons renoncer à notre modèle social et deviendrons progressivement pour les Etats-Unis ce que les anciennes colonies françaises ont été pour la France prospère des Trente glorieuses : une source de matière première (dans l’économie numérique = de la R&D et des données) et un simple marché de débouchés où plus aucune entreprise ne paiera d’impôts – les entreprises étrangères parce qu’elles n’auront même pas besoin de s’établir sur notre territoire pour y faire des affaires ; les entreprises françaises parce que leurs marges seront anéanties par de vains efforts de compétitivité.

Voir encore:

Why Software Is Eating The World
Marc Andreessen
The Wall Street Journal
August 20,2011

This week, Hewlett-Packard (where I am on the board) announced that it is exploring jettisoning its struggling PC business in favor of investing more heavily in software, where it sees better potential for growth. Meanwhile, Google plans to buy up the cellphone handset maker Motorola Mobility. Both moves surprised the tech world. But both moves are also in line with a trend I’ve observed, one that makes me optimistic about the future growth of the American and world economies, despite the recent turmoil in the stock market.

In an interview with WSJ’s Kevin Delaney, Groupon and LinkedIn investor Marc Andreessen insists that the recent popularity of tech companies does not constitute a bubble. He also stressed that both Apple and Google are undervalued and that « the market doesn’t like tech. »

In short, software is eating the world.

More than 10 years after the peak of the 1990s dot-com bubble, a dozen or so new Internet companies like Facebook and Twitter are sparking controversy in Silicon Valley, due to their rapidly growing private market valuations, and even the occasional successful IPO. With scars from the heyday of Webvan and Pets.com still fresh in the investor psyche, people are asking, « Isn’t this just a dangerous new bubble? »

I, along with others, have been arguing the other side of the case. (I am co-founder and general partner of venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz, which has invested in Facebook, Groupon, Skype, Twitter, Zynga, and Foursquare, among others. I am also personally an investor in LinkedIn.) We believe that many of the prominent new Internet companies are building real, high-growth, high-margin, highly defensible businesses.

Today’s stock market actually hates technology, as shown by all-time low price/earnings ratios for major public technology companies. Apple, for example, has a P/E ratio of around 15.2—about the same as the broader stock market, despite Apple’s immense profitability and dominant market position (Apple in the last couple weeks became the biggest company in America, judged by market capitalization, surpassing Exxon Mobil). And, perhaps most telling, you can’t have a bubble when people are constantly screaming « Bubble! »

But too much of the debate is still around financial valuation, as opposed to the underlying intrinsic value of the best of Silicon Valley’s new companies. My own theory is that we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.

Why is this happening now?

Six decades into the computer revolution, four decades since the invention of the microprocessor, and two decades into the rise of the modern Internet, all of the technology required to transform industries through software finally works and can be widely delivered at global scale.

Over two billion people now use the broadband Internet, up from perhaps 50 million a decade ago, when I was at Netscape, the company I co-founded. In the next 10 years, I expect at least five billion people worldwide to own smartphones, giving every individual with such a phone instant access to the full power of the Internet, every moment of every day.

On the back end, software programming tools and Internet-based services make it easy to launch new global software-powered start-ups in many industries—without the need to invest in new infrastructure and train new employees. In 2000, when my partner Ben Horowitz was CEO of the first cloud computing company, Loudcloud, the cost of a customer running a basic Internet application was approximately $150,000 a month. Running that same application today in Amazon’s cloud costs about $1,500 a month.

With lower start-up costs and a vastly expanded market for online services, the result is a global economy that for the first time will be fully digitally wired—the dream of every cyber-visionary of the early 1990s, finally delivered, a full generation later.

Perhaps the single most dramatic example of this phenomenon of software eating a traditional business is the suicide of Borders and corresponding rise of Amazon. In 2001, Borders agreed to hand over its online business to Amazon under the theory that online book sales were non-strategic and unimportant.

Today, the world’s largest bookseller, Amazon, is a software company—its core capability is its amazing software engine for selling virtually everything online, no retail stores necessary. On top of that, while Borders was thrashing in the throes of impending bankruptcy, Amazon rearranged its web site to promote its Kindle digital books over physical books for the first time. Now even the books themselves are software.

Today’s largest video service by number of subscribers is a software company: Netflix. How Netflix eviscerated Blockbuster is an old story, but now other traditional entertainment providers are facing the same threat. Comcast, Time Warner and others are responding by transforming themselves into software companies with efforts such as TV Everywhere, which liberates content from the physical cable and connects it to smartphones and tablets.

Today’s dominant music companies are software companies, too: Apple’s iTunes, Spotify and Pandora. Traditional record labels increasingly exist only to provide those software companies with content. Industry revenue from digital channels totaled $4.6 billion in 2010, growing to 29% of total revenue from 2% in 2004.

Today’s fastest growing entertainment companies are videogame makers—again, software—with the industry growing to $60 billion from $30 billion five years ago. And the fastest growing major videogame company is Zynga (maker of games including FarmVille), which delivers its games entirely online. Zynga’s first-quarter revenues grew to $235 million this year, more than double revenues from a year earlier. Rovio, maker of Angry Birds, is expected to clear $100 million in revenue this year (the company was nearly bankrupt when it debuted the popular game on the iPhone in late 2009). Meanwhile, traditional videogame powerhouses like Electronic Arts and Nintendo have seen revenues stagnate and fall.

The best new movie production company in many decades, Pixar, was a software company. Disney—Disney!—had to buy Pixar, a software company, to remain relevant in animated movies.

Photography, of course, was eaten by software long ago. It’s virtually impossible to buy a mobile phone that doesn’t include a software-powered camera, and photos are uploaded automatically to the Internet for permanent archiving and global sharing. Companies like Shutterfly, Snapfish and Flickr have stepped into Kodak’s place.

Today’s largest direct marketing platform is a software company—Google. Now it’s been joined by Groupon, Living Social, Foursquare and others, which are using software to eat the retail marketing industry. Groupon generated over $700 million in revenue in 2010, after being in business for only two years.

Today’s fastest growing telecom company is Skype, a software company that was just bought by Microsoft for $8.5 billion. CenturyLink, the third largest telecom company in the U.S., with a $20 billion market cap, had 15 million access lines at the end of June 30—declining at an annual rate of about 7%. Excluding the revenue from its Qwest acquisition, CenturyLink’s revenue from these legacy services declined by more than 11%. Meanwhile, the two biggest telecom companies, AT&T and Verizon, have survived by transforming themselves into software companies, partnering with Apple and other smartphone makers.

LinkedIn is today’s fastest growing recruiting company. For the first time ever, on LinkedIn, employees can maintain their own resumes for recruiters to search in real time—giving LinkedIn the opportunity to eat the lucrative $400 billion recruiting industry.

Software is also eating much of the value chain of industries that are widely viewed as primarily existing in the physical world. In today’s cars, software runs the engines, controls safety features, entertains passengers, guides drivers to destinations and connects each car to mobile, satellite and GPS networks. The days when a car aficionado could repair his or her own car are long past, due primarily to the high software content. The trend toward hybrid and electric vehicles will only accelerate the software shift—electric cars are completely computer controlled. And the creation of software-powered driverless cars is already under way at Google and the major car companies.

Today’s leading real-world retailer, Wal-Mart, uses software to power its logistics and distribution capabilities, which it has used to crush its competition. Likewise for FedEx, which is best thought of as a software network that happens to have trucks, planes and distribution hubs attached. And the success or failure of airlines today and in the future hinges on their ability to price tickets and optimize routes and yields correctly—with software.

Oil and gas companies were early innovators in supercomputing and data visualization and analysis, which are crucial to today’s oil and gas exploration efforts. Agriculture is increasingly powered by software as well, including satellite analysis of soils linked to per-acre seed selection software algorithms.

The financial services industry has been visibly transformed by software over the last 30 years. Practically every financial transaction, from someone buying a cup of coffee to someone trading a trillion dollars of credit default derivatives, is done in software. And many of the leading innovators in financial services are software companies, such as Square, which allows anyone to accept credit card payments with a mobile phone, and PayPal, which generated more than $1 billion in revenue in the second quarter of this year, up 31% over the previous year.

Health care and education, in my view, are next up for fundamental software-based transformation. My venture capital firm is backing aggressive start-ups in both of these gigantic and critical industries. We believe both of these industries, which historically have been highly resistant to entrepreneurial change, are primed for tipping by great new software-centric entrepreneurs.

Even national defense is increasingly software-based. The modern combat soldier is embedded in a web of software that provides intelligence, communications, logistics and weapons guidance. Software-powered drones launch airstrikes without putting human pilots at risk. Intelligence agencies do large-scale data mining with software to uncover and track potential terrorist plots.

Companies in every industry need to assume that a software revolution is coming. This includes even industries that are software-based today. Great incumbent software companies like Oracle and Microsoft are increasingly threatened with irrelevance by new software offerings like Salesforce.com and Android (especially in a world where Google owns a major handset maker).

In some industries, particularly those with a heavy real-world component such as oil and gas, the software revolution is primarily an opportunity for incumbents. But in many industries, new software ideas will result in the rise of new Silicon Valley-style start-ups that invade existing industries with impunity. Over the next 10 years, the battles between incumbents and software-powered insurgents will be epic. Joseph Schumpeter, the economist who coined the term « creative destruction, » would be proud.

And while people watching the values of their 401(k)s bounce up and down the last few weeks might doubt it, this is a profoundly positive story for the American economy, in particular. It’s not an accident that many of the biggest recent technology companies—including Google, Amazon, eBay and more—are American companies. Our combination of great research universities, a pro-risk business culture, deep pools of innovation-seeking equity capital and reliable business and contract law is unprecedented and unparalleled in the world.

Still, we face several challenges.

First of all, every new company today is being built in the face of massive economic headwinds, making the challenge far greater than it was in the relatively benign ’90s. The good news about building a company during times like this is that the companies that do succeed are going to be extremely strong and resilient. And when the economy finally stabilizes, look out—the best of the new companies will grow even faster.

Secondly, many people in the U.S. and around the world lack the education and skills required to participate in the great new companies coming out of the software revolution. This is a tragedy since every company I work with is absolutely starved for talent. Qualified software engineers, managers, marketers and salespeople in Silicon Valley can rack up dozens of high-paying, high-upside job offers any time they want, while national unemployment and underemployment is sky high. This problem is even worse than it looks because many workers in existing industries will be stranded on the wrong side of software-based disruption and may never be able to work in their fields again. There’s no way through this problem other than education, and we have a long way to go.

Finally, the new companies need to prove their worth. They need to build strong cultures, delight their customers, establish their own competitive advantages and, yes, justify their rising valuations. No one should expect building a new high-growth, software-powered company in an established industry to be easy. It’s brutally difficult.

I’m privileged to work with some of the best of the new breed of software companies, and I can tell you they’re really good at what they do. If they perform to my and others’ expectations, they are going to be highly valuable cornerstone companies in the global economy, eating markets far larger than the technology industry has historically been able to pursue.

Instead of constantly questioning their valuations, let’s seek to understand how the new generation of technology companies are doing what they do, what the broader consequences are for businesses and the economy and what we can collectively do to expand the number of innovative new software companies created in the U.S. and around the world.

That’s the big opportunity. I know where I’m putting my money.

—Mr. Andreessen is co-founder and general partner of the venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz. He also co-founded Netscape, one of the first browser companies.

Voir enfin:

Brain scan
Disrupting the disrupters
Marc Andreessen made his name taking on Microsoft in the browser wars. Now he is stirring things up again as a venture capitalist
The Economist
Sep 3rd 2011

“SOFTWARE is eating the world,” proclaims Marc Andreessen, the 40-year-old co-founder of Andreessen Horowitz, a venture-capital firm in Silicon Valley that has leapt to prominence since he set it up in mid-2009 with his partner, Ben Horowitz. That alimentary analogy is shorthand, in Andreessen-speak, for the phenomenon in which industry after industry, from media to financial services to health care, is being chewed up by the rise of the internet and the spread of smartphones, tablet computers and other fancy electronic devices. Mr Andreessen and his colleagues are doing their best to speed up this digital digestion process—and make money from it as they do so.

Andreessen Horowitz has raised piles of cash from investors—it has some $1.2 billion under management—and has been eagerly putting the money to work both in large deals, such as a $50m investment in Skype, an internet-calling service recently acquired by Microsoft, and in a host of smaller companies, such as TinyCo, a maker of mobile games. It has also taken stakes in several of the biggest social-networking firms, including Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare (a service that lets people broadcast their whereabouts to their friends). Along the way it has attracted some prominent supporters. Larry Summers, a former treasury secretary, is a special adviser to the firm and Michael Ovitz, a former Hollywood power-broker, is among its investors.

Some rivals argue that by making big bets on relatively mature companies such as Facebook, Mr Andreessen’s firm is acting more like a private-equity firm than as a nurturer of fledgling businesses—and is contributing to a bubble in tech valuations too. “They’re behaving in ways that will not be helpful to them in the long run,” gripes a financier at a competing venture firm, who insists on anonymity for fear of alienating Andreessen Horowitz’s influential founders.

Pooh-poohing such criticisms, Mr Andreessen argues that “growth” investments, such as the one in Skype—which was sold to Microsoft for $8.5 billion in May, netting Andreessen Horowitz a return of over three times its original stake—make sense because profound changes in the technological landscape mean some relatively big companies can still grow to many times their current size. He reckons that talk of overheated valuations among social-media firms is being driven by people who got their fingers burned in the dotcom bust and can’t see that the world has changed since then. “All this bubble stuff is people fighting the last war,” he says.

Mr Andreessen is also frustrated with Cassandras who occasionally predict that innovation in computer science is pretty much over. Andreessen Horowitz’s partners believe there are still plenty more “black swans”—ideas with the potential to trigger dramatic changes in technology—to come in computing, which explains why they have resisted the temptation to copy other big venture outfits that have diversified into new areas such as biotech and clean tech. “This is an evergreen area. Just when you think computer science is stabilising, everything changes,” he says.

For instance, he believes that networking and storage technology is about to go through the same kind of fundamental transition that the server business experienced in the late 1990s, when expensive, proprietary servers were replaced by much cheaper ones that used new technology. That shift made possible the explosive growth of firms such as Google and Facebook, who bought large numbers of cheap servers to power their businesses. Mr Andreessen reckons a similar change in the networking and storage world will lead to the creation of many more new companies.

He is also convinced that there will be dramatic changes in the realm of personal technology. One of the companies that Andreessen Horowitz has invested in is Jawbone. Best known for its Bluetooth-equipped headsets and portable speakers, the firm is developing plans for a range of wearable smart devices that operate on a single software platform, or “body-area network”. “Jawbone is the new Sony,” claims Mr Andreessen, who predicts that its future products will prove wildly successful as people carry more and more networked gadgets around with them.

From boom to bust

It is tempting to discount such a grandiose claim as typical venture-capital puffery. But Mr Andreessen is hardly a typical venture capitalist. Raised in small towns in Iowa and Wisconsin, he started playing around on the internet while at university and co-created Mosaic, which became the first widely used web browser. After moving to Silicon Valley, he started Netscape Communications when he was 22 years old. Its stockmarket flotation in 1995 marked the beginning of the dotcom boom and made Mr Andreessen a celebrity in the business world.

Having at first dismissed Netscape, Microsoft sought to crush the fledgling company, whose browser posed a threat to the dominance of Microsoft’s Windows platform. Mr Andreessen maintains that most big companies are painfully slow to react to upstarts that might threaten their business—a point made in Clayton Christensen’s book, “The Innovator’s Dilemma”, which is one of the few business-school texts Mr Andreessen thinks is worth reading. But he admits Microsoft “did a remarkably good job” in the 1990s.

After a bruising battle a much-diminished Netscape was sold to AOL in 1999 and Mr Andreessen went on to found Loudcloud, a cloud-computing firm, with Mr Horowitz and other executives. But Loudcloud was soon caught up in the fallout from the dotcom bust. To survive, it shed staff, renamed itself Opsware and focused on software development before being sold to Hewlett-Packard for $1.6 billion in 2007. Mr Andreessen then spent some time as an angel investor before launching Andreessen Horowitz.

Mr Andreessen’s own experience as practising entrepreneur makes him ideally placed to counsel the bosses of start-ups that his firm has funded, including Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Mark Pincus of Zynga, a social-gaming company. Mr Andreessen seems especially fond of what he calls “founder CEOs”, perhaps because he was once one himself. Many venture firms tend to back young entrepreneurs for a period before replacing them with professional managers. But Mr Andreessen argues that founders who stuck with their businesses for a long while were often the ones who created many of the biggest successes in technology, including Microsoft (Bill Gates), Amazon (Jeff Bezos) and Oracle (Larry Ellison).

“Just when you think computer science is stabilising, everything changes.”

Another reason that Mr Andreessen has become something of an entrepreneur-magnet is his extensive network of contacts in Silicon Valley. He sits on the boards of Hewlett-Packard, eBay and Facebook, among others. This gives him an ideal perch from which to spot trends forming. “Marc has a view of the entire tech ecosystem that very few people have,” says David Lieb, the boss of Bump, a wireless start-up in which Andreessen Horowitz has invested.

His fans claim that Mr Andreessen’s ability to draw insightful conclusions from these trends helps Andreessen Horowitz stand out from the crowd. “In a world where there is a lot of dreaming, hoping and guessing, Marc takes a really analytical approach,” says Mr Summers, who signed on as a part-time adviser to the firm after meeting with a number of other venture outfits. Mr Andreessen’s symbiotic relationship with Mr Horowitz, a highly experienced manager, is also said to be central to the firm’s success. Tim Howes, a co-founder of RockMelt, a browser company in which Andreessen Horowitz has invested, jokes that the two men have worked together for so long that they are like an old married couple who complement one another perfectly.

The Hollywood treatment

Their partnership has spawned a bold new approach to firm-building in Silicon Valley. Most venture firms employ a skeleton staff of in-house experts in areas such as recruiting and marketing to help advise start-ups. Andreessen Horowitz, which has a total staff of 36, has taken a different approach. In addition to its six general partners, the firm has hired a bevy of executives who are specialists in particular areas, including 11 dedicated to recruitment. This set-up, says Mr Andreessen, is inspired by Creative Artists Agency, which used to be run by Mr Ovitz. It and other Hollywood talent-management companies spend a great deal of time nurturing directors and film stars, and helping them to find jobs. Andreessen Horowitz wants to do the same thing for talented tech folk, whose career paths might one day involve a stint at one of the firms it backs.

This in-house entourage also reflects Mr Andreessen’s firm belief that many start-ups today are damaging their prospects by starving areas such as sales and marketing of investment on the often misguided assumption the internet will magically guarantee them a sizeable market. Mr Andreessen says he really wants to back “full-spectrum firms” that aim to be outstanding in every operational area, rather than just a few. Andreessen Horowitz’s team will provide advice and guidance on how best to achieve this.

Many of these firms will be American ones. Mr Andreessen won’t rule out investing in other countries—Skype, for example, started in Estonia and is now based in Luxembourg—but says his firm has a preference for America because he believes it remains the best place in the world to build companies. Still, many internet start-ups need to think global early on these days, which is one reason why Andreessen Horowitz has engaged Mr Summers to give it advice on everything from pricing strategies to geopolitics.

Yet Mr Andreessen is especially bullish about Silicon Valley, where the process of knowledge-sharing that drives innovation has been greatly accelerated by the internet and the rise of social networking. “It now feels like we were operating in the Stone Age when I first came out here,” he says. Another notable change is a democratisation of entrepreneurialism in the Valley. Entrepreneurs no longer simply follow a well-worn path to venture funds’ doors from a handful of giant technology companies such as HP and Intel; today they come from a much wider range of backgrounds. In addition, says Mr Andreessen, there has recently been “a massive brain drain from Boston to the Valley, which has all but gutted Boston as a place for high-tech entrepreneurship”.

This narrow geographic focus means that Andreessen Horowitz could be in danger of missing out on the fat profits to be made backing entrepreneurial outfits founded in some of the world’s largest and fastest-growing markets. But Mr Andreessen likes to point out that it is no accident that Silicon Valley has produced a string of success stories from Netscape to eBay, Google, Facebook and Twitter. China, India and other markets may be exciting places, but a large proportion of the software that is “eating the world” still seems to come from California.

2 commentaires pour Révolution numérique: Comment le logiciel dévore le monde (How software is eating the world)

  1. Have you ever considered about including a little bit more than just your
    articles? I mean, what you say is valuable and all.

    Nevertheless think of if you added some great visuals or
    videos to give your posts more, « pop »! Your content is excellent but with images and
    clips, this website could certainly be one of the greatest
    in its niche. Wonderful blog!

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :