Cherchez l’erreur: Seuls neuf monuments du 11 septembre hors EU pour plus de 90 nations touchées et zéro au Moyen-orient hors Israël (Only nine 9/11 memorials outside of US and zero in the Middle east outside of Israel)

9/11 Living Memorial Plaza (Ramot, Jerusalem, Israel)
911 debris (Caen, France)
911 Monument (Copenhagen, Denmark)911 monument, Irelandhttps://i1.wp.com/web.archive.org/web/20060928073137im_/http://www.omnidecor.net/media/news/news_memoriaeluce.jpg NZ911 Pentagon memorial (Patch Barracks, Stuttgart/Vaihingen)Si le monde vous hait, sachez qu’il m’a haï avant vous. (…) S’ils m’ont persécuté, ils vous persécuteront aussi. Jésus (Jean 15: 18, 20)
Voici, je vous envoie comme des brebis au milieu des loups. Soyez donc prudents comme les serpents, et simples comme les colombes … Vous serez haïs de tous, à cause de mon nom … Le disciple n’est pas plus que le maître, ni le serviteur plus que son seigneur. Il suffit au disciple d’être traité comme son maître, et au serviteur comme son seigneur. S’ils ont appelé le maître de la maison Béelzébul, à combien plus forte raison appelleront-ils ainsi les gens de sa maison! Ne les craignez donc point; car il n’y a rien de caché qui ne doive être découvert, ni de secret qui ne doive être connu. Ce que je vous dis dans les ténèbres, dites-le en plein jour; et ce qui vous est dit à l’oreille, prêchez-le sur les toits. Ne craignez pas ceux qui tuent le corps et qui ne peuvent tuer l’âme … Jésus (Matthieu 10: 16-28)
Tout pays du monde a un ou plusieurs événements à déplorer dont son peuple demeure à jamais marqué. Toute famille vit aussi des tragédies ou la perte d’êtres chers qui laissent sur elle des marques permanentes. Pourtant, l’Histoire a rarement vu une série d’évènements et de tragédies d’une telle ampleur être vécue simultanément par des personnes du monde entier et se dérouler sous leurs yeux. La plupart d’entre nous nous souviendrons toujours du lieu où nous étions lorsque nous avons d’abord été informés des attentats terroristes du 11 septembre puis que nous en avons été les témoins. Ronald K. Noble (Interpol, 2009)
As we approach the 10th anniversary of the murder of thousands of citizens from more than 90 countries, I keep asking myself whether we are finally safe from the global terror threat. Since those shocking attacks of 9/11, the death of Osama bin Laden, the elimination of terrorist training camps in Afghanistan and the concentrated international pressure on Al Qaeda have reshaped the nature of the threat confronting us. We’ve seen terror attempts foiled by a combination of heightened security and awareness, improved intelligence gathering, robust enforcement by police and prosecutors, quick actions by an observant public and sheer luck: the “Detroit Christmas plot,” the “shoe bomber,” the Times Square bomber. Yet we’ve also seen appalling carnage in Bali, Casablanca, Kampala, London, Madrid, Moscow and Mumbai and throughout Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan. Tragically, this list is far from exhaustive. In my official visits to 150 countries, I have witnessed first-hand the transformation from the post-9/11 single-minded focus by governments and law enforcement on Al Qaeda and foreign-born terrorists, to today’s concerns about foreign criminals generally, and cybercrime and security more specifically. The question as we look forward, therefore, is how can we protect our countries from Al Qaeda’s remaining elements and from other emerging serious criminal threats on the horizon? What has become clear to me is that unprecedented levels of physical and virtual mobility are both shaping and threatening our security landscape. With more people traveling by air than ever before — one billion international air arrivals last year with national and international air passenger figures estimated to reach around three billion by 2014 — I see the systematic screening of the passports and names of those crossing our borders as a top priority. Citizens now submitted to stringent physical security checks in airports worldwide would be incredulous to learn that 10 years after 9/11, authorities today still allow one-out-of-two international airline passengers to cross their borders without checking whether they are carrying stolen or lost travel documents. Yet all the evidence shows us that terrorists exploit travel to the fullest, often attempting to conceal their identity and their past by using aliases and fraudulent travel documents. This global failure to properly screen travelers remains a clear security gap, all the more deplorable when the information and technology are readily available. Currently, less than a quarter of countries perform systematic passport checks against Interpol’s database, with details of 30 million stolen or lost travel documents. This failure puts lives at risk. But preventing dangerous individuals from crossing borders at airports is only half the challenge. At a time when global migration is reaching record levels — there were an estimated 214 million migrants in 2010 — I see a need for migrants to be provided biometric e-identity documents that can be quickly verified against Interpol’s databases by any country, anytime and anywhere. Verification prior to the issuance of a work or residence permit would facilitate the efficient movement of migrants while enhancing the security of countries. Virtual mobility also throws up its own security challenges. In 2000, less than 400 million individuals were connected to the Internet; an estimated 2.5 billion people will be able to access the net by 2015. Extensive use of the Internet and freely accessible email accounts allowed Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the principal architect of 9/11, to communicate quickly and effectively with co-conspirators. A decade later, we see the same power targeting new generations to radicalize and spawn “lone wolf” terrorists. The trial in Germany of a young man who blamed online jihadist propaganda for the double murder he committed is just one recent example. I believe that the Internet has replaced Afghanistan as the terrorist training ground, and this should concern us the most. Ronald K. Noble (Interpol, 2011)
More than 90 countries lost citizens in the attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where a hijacked jet crashed into a field. In all, nearly 3,000 people were killed, including 60 police officers and 343 firefighters who responded to the scene in New York City. US State department
Excluding the 19 perpetrators, 373 foreign nationals representing more than 12% of the total number of deaths perished in the attacks, the majority being British, Indian, and Dominican. Wikipedia
Officially named Le Mémorial de Caen, un musée pour la paix – « The Caen Memorial, a Museum for Peace, » the Caen Memorial is regarded as the best World War II museum in France. With over 6,000,000 visitors since it opened, it is the second most visited site in Normandy after Mont-St-Michel. Established in 1988, the Caen Memorial focuses on the events leading up to and after D-Day (Jour J). Visitors walk through an excellent five-part presentation: the lead-up to World War II; the Battle of Normandy; two powerful video presentations; the Cold War; and the ongoing movement for peace. The last section includes a Gallery of Nobel Peace Prizes, celebrating such figures as Andrei Sakharov, Elie Wiesel and Desmond Tutu. The museum also includes exhibits on other failures and triumphs of peace, such as September 11 and the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Caen Memorial is the only place outside of the U.S. (as of 2004) that displays remnants of the 9/11 attacks. Mémorial de Caen
The 9/11 Living Memorial Plaza is a cenotaph located on a hill in Arazim Valley of Ramot, northern site of East Jerusalem. The plaza, built on 5 acres (2.0 ha), is to remember and honor the victims of the 9/11 attacks. The cenotaph measures 30 feet and is made of granite, bronze and aluminum. It takes the form of an American flag, waving and transforming into a flame at the tip. A piece of melted metal from the ruins of the Twin Towers forms part of the base on which the monument rests. A glass pane over the metal facilitates viewing. The names of the victims, including five Israeli citizens, are embedded on the metal plate and placed on the circular wall. The monument is strategically located within view of Jerusalem’s main cemetery, Har HaMenuchot. The folded part of the flag is reminiscent of the collapse of the towers in a cloud of dust. The flag morphs into a six-meter high memorial flame representative of a torch. It is the only monument outside of the United States which lists the names of the nearly 3,000 victims of the 9/11 attacks. The cenotaph was designed by award-winning artist Eliezer Weishoff. It was commissioned by the Jewish National Fund (JNF/KKL) at a cost of ₪ 10 million ($2 million). The inauguration ceremony was held on 12 November 2009 with representation from the US Ambassador to Israel, James B. Cunningham, members of the Israeli Cabinet and legislature, family of victims and others. Mémorial du 11 septembre de Jérusalem

Afrique du sud, Allemagne, Argentine, Australie, Bangladesh, Belgique, Bermudes, Biélorussie, Brésil, Canada, Chili, Chine, Colombie, Congo, Corée du sud, Côte d’ivoire, R. Dominicaine, Equateur, Espagne, Ethiopie, France, Ghana, Guyane, Haïti, Hong Kong, Honduras, Inde, Indonésie, Irlande, Israël, Italie, Jamaïque, Japon, Jordanie, Liban, Lituanie, Malaisie, Mexique, Moldavie, Nouvelle Zélande, Nigeria, Ouzbekistan, Pays-Bas, Pakistan, Paraguay, Pérou, Philippines, Pologne, Portugal, Roumanie, Royaume-Uni, Russie, Salvador, Suède, Suisse, Taïwan, Trinidad et Tobago, Ukraine, Venezuela, Yougoslavie …

Alors que le monde s’apprête à commémorer le 20e anniversaire du plus grand génocide d’après-45 …

Où le Monde libre est resté largement indifférent …

Et où hélas le pays autoproclamé des droits de l’homme a même eu sa part toujours impunie et sera, significativement, représenté à Kigali par une maitresse-menteuse

Pendant qu’aux Etats-Unis mêmes un Prédateur-en-chef en panne de popularité propose un dernier nettoyage de printemps des fonds de tiroir de son prédécesseur via le rapport du Sénat sur les méthodes d’interrogatoire musclées de la CIA post-11-Septembre …

Retour sur le plus grand massacre international de l’histoire récente …

Qui fera, quasiment en direct pour des millions de téléspectateurs sur la planète entière, près de 3 000 victimes et touchera plus de 90 nations de par le monde …

Mais qui, étrangement si l’on en croit le site 9/11 memorials (hélas pas à jour), ne verra la création, hors Etats-Unis, que de neuf monuments dans le monde (dont un seul en France à Caen) …

Dont aucun – surprise ! – au Moyen-Orient hors Israël !

Le Secrétaire Général d’INTERPOL revient sur « l’autre crise mondiale » à l’occasion de l’anniversaire de l’attentat à la bombe de 1993 contre le World Trade Center

Ronald K. Noble

Interpol

26 février 2009

Cette Lettre ouverte du Secrétaire Général Ronald K. Noble a été publiée à 12 h 18, heure de New York, soit exactement l’heure à laquelle un camion piégé a explosé devant le World Trade Center le 26 février 1993.

LYON (France) – Alors que les dirigeants du monde entier se débattent toujours contre la pire crise financière que nous connaissions depuis sept décennies, je voudrais attirer l’attention sur une autre crise mondiale qui, dans un certain sens, a commencé à cette même date, il y a 16 ans : le premier attentat terroriste contre le World Trade Center perpétré par Al-Qaïda.

Aussi choquant qu’il ait pu être, cet attentat a été perçu par une bonne partie de l’opinion internationale comme un acte isolé – aussi marquant par ce en quoi il avait échoué que par son bilan – et non comme le premier signe avant-coureur d’une menace qui changerait pour toujours la face de la sécurité mondiale.

Le 11-Septembre, avec la mort de milliers d’Américains et de citoyens de 91 autres pays, l’insouciance devait céder la place à une prise de conscience mondiale de la menace que constituait Al- Qaida. Cet attentat a galvanisé INTERPOL et ses 187 pays membres.

Pourtant, les mesures de sécurité mises en place après l’attentat terroriste de 1993 n’ont pas empêché les attaques contre la même cible 102 mois plus tard. Et 90 mois seulement se sont écoulés depuis le 11-Septembre.

De nombreux autres attentats ont eu lieu en Afrique, en Asie et en Europe, et le nombre inquiétant de catastrophes évitées de peu depuis laisse à penser qu’en Amérique aussi, « la marge de sécurité se réduit au lieu d’augmenter » comme l’a sobrement indiqué la Commission fédérale des États-Unis sur la prévention de la prolifération des armes de destruction massive et du terrorisme dans son rapport publié en décembre dernier. La Commission a conclu que lors du prochain attentat – et certains éléments portent à croire qu’il y en aura un autre – Al-Qaïda pourrait choisir l’arme nucléaire ou biologique.

En 1993 comme le 11-Septembre, il était manifeste que le principal maillon faible en matière de sécurité était le bastion afghan d’Al-Qaïda, où les terroristes étaient entraînés. Les États-Unis et ses alliés ont donc lancé leur « guerre contre la terreur » d’abord en Afghanistan, puis en Iraq puis de nouveau en Afghanistan.

Le réel danger que représente actuellement Al-Qaïda en dehors de l’Iraq et de l’Afghanistan demeure un danger face auquel les armées sont mal équipées et que les gouvernements ont été lents à mesurer, quels que soient la force, le courage et l’ampleur de leur sacrifice. C’est pourquoi nous devons employer la même quantité de ressources, la même attention et la même énergie que celles consacrées aux armées à donner les moyens d’agir à la communauté policière internationale.

Et il faut le faire dès à présent. Lorsqu’un conflit classique s’achève, les troupes rentrent chez elles, et commence alors le long processus de la reconstruction. Il en va tout autrement avec les terroristes internationaux liés à Al-Qaïda. Ce qui les motive ne s’effacera pas avec la signature d’un cessez-le-feu ou d’un traité de paix. Ils dirigeront sur d’autres cibles leur haine et leur désir de tuer des innocents.

La plus grosse difficulté en matière de sécurité à laquelle nous soyons confrontés aujourd’hui est la mobilité des terroristes. C’est aussi celle à laquelle il est le plus facile de remédier, par un mélange de volonté gouvernementale au niveau national et de coopération policière multilatérale par l’intermédiaire d’INTERPOL.

À l’heure actuelle, plus de 800 millions de voyageurs internationaux franchissent les frontières sans que leur passeport fasse l’objet de vérifications dans la base de données mondiale d’INTERPOL, qui contient près de 10 millions d’enregistrements sur des passeports déclarés volés ou perdus, et cela bien que le cerveau du premier attentat contre le World Trade Center soit entré aux États-Unis en utilisant un passeport iraquien volé.

INTERPOL a suivi 14 affaires différentes de migration clandestine d’Iraquiens voyageant avec de faux passeports au cours des deux dernières années. Au total, 74 passeports de dix pays européens ont été utilisés, dont seulement 24 avaient été enregistrés dans la base de données d’INTERPOL sur les documents de voyage volés ou perdus, la seule de ce type qui existe au monde. Les ressortissants iraquiens ont été arrêtés aux frontières de trois pays différents.

Dans l’une de ces affaires, le même Iraquien a été intercepté à trois reprises sur une période de trois mois, à chaque fois en possession d’un passeport volé différent d’un pays européen. Même si rien ne prouve que les personnes arrêtées se déplaçaient pour commettre des actes de terreur, il est très facile d’imaginer que les membres d’une cellule terroriste puissent recourir aux mêmes filières pour entrer dans des pays à des fins bien plus sinistres qu’une demande d’asile.

Il convient également de prendre en compte les autres points noirs importants de la sécurité mondiale :

Aujourd’hui, des terroristes sont régulièrement poursuivis et condamnés sans que leurs empreintes digitales soient prises et diffusées au niveau international, et cela bien que la comparaison d’empreintes soit le principal moyen d’établir leur véritable identité.

Aujourd’hui, des terroristes présentant des liens avec Al-Qaïda s’évadent de prison sans que les pays soient alertés ou que des mandats d’arrêt internationaux soient délivrés, et cela bien que nombre de ces évadés tentent de frapper encore. Sur au moins 13 hommes d’Al-Qaïda qui se sont échappés d’une prison au Yémen en février 2006, six ont participé par la suite à des attentats terroristes de grande ampleur.

Aujourd’hui, n’importe quel terroriste peut ouvrir un compte dans une banque étrangère en présentant un passeport frauduleux sans que la banque soit en mesure de vérifier s’il a été déclaré volé, et cela bien que nous sachions que « suivre la piste de l’argent » est une méthode efficace pour mettre au jour les réseaux terroristes internationaux.

Aujourd’hui, un terroriste pris en train d’essayer d’entrer dans un pays au moyen d’un passeport volé ou frauduleux est simplement renvoyé par avion à son point de départ ou autorisé à poursuivre son voyage.

Si nous ajoutons à cela la dévastation que pourrait causer un attentat terroriste à l’arme nucléaire ou biologique dans les cinq prochaines années, comme l’a prédit la Commission sur la prévention de la prolifération des armes de destruction massive et du terrorisme, il nous faut bien conclure que l’heure n’est plus à l’insouciance.

Ce mois-ci, une vidéo a commencé à circuler dans laquelle le professeur koweïtien Abdallah Nafisi exprime ouvertement son espoir de voir les partisans d’Al-Qaïda mener à bien des attaques biologiques sur tout le territoire des États-Unis ou faire exploser une centrale nucléaire dans ce pays et ôter la vie à quelque 300 000 innocents.

Si certes la perspective des pertes en vies humaines et des destructions que causerait un nouvel attentat devrait suffire à elle seule à justifier que l’on s’intéresse de nouveau à ce que peut faire la police pour empêcher Al-Qaïda de commettre de tels actes, nous ne devons pas oublier pour autant les conséquences certaines et catastrophiques qui s’ensuivraient inévitablement sur l’économie.

Le coût des attentats du 11-Septembre a été colossal mais l’économie mondiale, à cette époque, était forte ; une récidive aujourd’hui, avec une économie mondiale qui chancèle, pourrait être désastreuse.

Aussi, à l’heure où toute l’attention est centrée sur la crise économique mondiale, j’encouragerais nos dirigeants à ne pas oublier ce qui a permis le premier attentat contre le World Trade Center et à écouter plutôt les conseils de la Commission sur la prévention de la prolifération des armes de destruction massive et du terrorisme : « Si la communauté internationale n’agit pas de façon résolue et de toute urgence, il est plus que probable qu’une arme de destruction massive sera utilisée pour commettre un attentat terroriste quelque part dans le monde d’ici la fin de 2013 ».

Il est temps d’unir nos forces et de redéployer nos ressources afin d’aider à colmater les brèches dans le dispositif de sécurité et à empêcher les futurs attentats terroristes du type de celui que le professeur Abdallah Nafisi a prédit et en comparaison desquels, selon lui, les attentats du 11-Septembre et par conséquent celui de 1993 contre le World Trade Center ne seraient rien.

Voilà quelle est l’autre crise mondiale que nous sommes bien trop nombreux à continuer d’ignorer.

Voir aussi:

Preventing the Next 9/11

Ronald K. Noble

International Herald Tribune

05 septembre 2011

As we approach the 10th anniversary of the murder of thousands of citizens from more than 90 countries, I keep asking myself whether we are finally safe from the global terror threat.

Since those shocking attacks of 9/11, the death of Osama bin Laden, the elimination of terrorist training camps in Afghanistan and the concentrated international pressure on Al Qaeda have reshaped the nature of the threat confronting us.

We’ve seen terror attempts foiled by a combination of heightened security and awareness, improved intelligence gathering, robust enforcement by police and prosecutors, quick actions by an observant public and sheer luck: the “Detroit Christmas plot,” the “shoe bomber,” the Times Square bomber.

Yet we’ve also seen appalling carnage in Bali, Casablanca, Kampala, London, Madrid, Moscow and Mumbai and throughout Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan. Tragically, this list is far from exhaustive.

In my official visits to 150 countries, I have witnessed first-hand the transformation from the post-9/11 single-minded focus by governments and law enforcement on Al Qaeda and foreign-born terrorists, to today’s concerns about foreign criminals generally, and cybercrime and security more specifically.

The question as we look forward, therefore, is how can we protect our countries from Al Qaeda’s remaining elements and from other emerging serious criminal threats on the horizon?

What has become clear to me is that unprecedented levels of physical and virtual mobility are both shaping and threatening our security landscape. With more people traveling by air than ever before — one billion international air arrivals last year with national and international air passenger figures estimated to reach around three billion by 2014 — I see the systematic screening of the passports and names of those crossing our borders as a top priority.

Citizens now submitted to stringent physical security checks in airports worldwide would be incredulous to learn that 10 years after 9/11, authorities today still allow one-out-of-two international airline passengers to cross their borders without checking whether they are carrying stolen or lost travel documents.

Yet all the evidence shows us that terrorists exploit travel to the fullest, often attempting to conceal their identity and their past by using aliases and fraudulent travel documents.

This global failure to properly screen travelers remains a clear security gap, all the more deplorable when the information and technology are readily available. Currently, less than a quarter of countries perform systematic passport checks against Interpol’s database, with details of 30 million stolen or lost travel documents. This failure puts lives at risk.

But preventing dangerous individuals from crossing borders at airports is only half the challenge. At a time when global migration is reaching record levels — there were an estimated 214 million migrants in 2010 — I see a need for migrants to be provided biometric e-identity documents that can be quickly verified against Interpol’s databases by any country, anytime and anywhere. Verification prior to the issuance of a work or residence permit would facilitate the efficient movement of migrants while enhancing the security of countries.

Virtual mobility also throws up its own security challenges. In 2000, less than 400 million individuals were connected to the Internet; an estimated 2.5 billion people will be able to access the net by 2015.

Extensive use of the Internet and freely accessible email accounts allowed Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the principal architect of 9/11, to communicate quickly and effectively with co-conspirators.

A decade later, we see the same power targeting new generations to radicalize and spawn “lone wolf” terrorists. The trial in Germany of a young man who blamed online jihadist propaganda for the double murder he committed is just one recent example.

I believe that the Internet has replaced Afghanistan as the terrorist training ground, and this should concern us the most.

Cyberspace can be both a means for, and a target of terrorism and crime, undermining the critical infrastructure of governments and businesses. Yet until now there has been no meaningful effort to prepare countries to tackle this global threat in the future.

This is why Interpol’s 188 member countries unanimously approved the creation in Singapore of a global complex to better prepare the world to fight cybercrime and enhance cybersecurity.

So as we honor the memories of those who perished 10 years ago, it is time to ask ourselves if we have done all that we can to prevent another 9/11 or other serious attack. A great deal has been done to make us all safer, but far too little to make sure that we are safe from the global terror and criminal threat.

If we act today, in 10 years’ time, we may not just be catching up after the latest attack, we may have prevented it.

Ronald K. Noble is Secretary General of INTERPOL.

Un commentaire pour Cherchez l’erreur: Seuls neuf monuments du 11 septembre hors EU pour plus de 90 nations touchées et zéro au Moyen-orient hors Israël (Only nine 9/11 memorials outside of US and zero in the Middle east outside of Israel)

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :