« Bus de l’aparheid »: Pour d’obscures raisons, les Arabes se font exploser dans les bus et les Israéliens trouvent ça très gênant (How are you supposed to cohabit with people theologically, politically and culturally committed to your destruction ?)

Toutes choses égales par ailleurs, Chavez, c’est de Gaulle plus Léon Blum. De Gaulle parce qu’il a changé fondamentalement les institutions et puis Léon Blum, c’est-à-dire le Front populaire, parce qu’il lutte contre les injustices. Moi je dis, et ça pourra m’être reproché, (…) que le monde gagnerait à avoir beaucoup de dictateurs comme Hugo Chavez puisqu’on prétend que c’est un dictateur. Il a pendant ces quatorze ans respecté les droits de l’homme. Victorin Lunel (ministre de l’Outre-Mer, envoyé de la France à l’enterrement de Chavez)
La libération de la Palestine a pour but de “purifier” le pays de toute présence sioniste. (…) Le partage de la Palestine en 1947 et la création de l’État d’Israël sont des événements nuls et non avenus. (…) La Charte ne peut être amendée que par une majorité des deux tiers de tous les membres du Conseil national de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine réunis en session extraordinaire convoquée à cet effet. Charte de l’OLP (articles 15, 19 et 33, 1964)
Les enfants de la nation du Hezbollah au Liban sont en confrontation avec [leurs ennemis] afin d’atteindre les objectifs suivants : un retrait israélien définitif du Liban comme premier pas vers la destruction totale d’Israël et la libération de la Sainte Jérusalem de la souillure de l’occupation … Charte du Hezbollah (1985)
Israël existe et continuera à exister jusqu’à ce que l’islam l’abroge comme il a abrogé ce qui l’a précédé. Hasan al-Bannâ (préambule de la charte du Hamas, 1988)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique est un mouvement palestinien spécifique qui fait allégeance à Allah et à sa voie, l’islam. Il lutte pour hisser la bannière de l’islam sur chaque pouce de la Palestine. Charte du Hamas (Article six, 1988)
If, and as long as between the Jordan and the sea, there is only one political entity, named Israel, it will end up being either non-Jewish or non-democratic…If the Palestinians vote in elections, it is a binational state, and if they don’t, it is an apartheid state. Ehud Barak (security conference, 2010)
« Separate but equal? » Yediot Ahranot
On the bus to Israeli apartheid. Haaretz
The separate bus lines for Palestinians that went into operation on Monday recall racial segregation in the United States and are bringing Israel closer to apartheid. Aeyal Gross (Haaretz)
Many people don’t class the Israeli situation as apartheid because for a long time, Israel refrained from the characteristics of petty apartheid, like separate roads, cafés and buses. This bus situation is a step in the direction of petty apartheid because people are being segregated in their daily activities. Ofra Yeshua-Lyth
For some strange reason, Arabs blow themselves up in buses and Israelis find that very unnerving. Yisrael Maida
The mayor told the government that people are afraid on the buses because of security problems and fights with Palestinians and he needs separate lines.  If you take a bus at five in the afternoon the bus is full of Arabs and there is no place to sit. And people are afraid someone will blow it up. Chen Keddem (spokeswoman for Eli Shaviro, the mayor of the West Bank settlement of Ariel)
Obviously, everyone will start screaming ‘apartheid’ and ‘racism’ now. This really doesn’t feel right, and maybe [the ministry] should find a different solution, but the situation right now is impossible. One driver (Ynet news service)
Driving a bus full of only Palestinians might turn out to be tricky. It could be unnerving and it might also create other problems. It could be a scary thing. Driver
There are two reasons for the move. First, there’s the obvious security issue: there is a dreadful history of Palestinian suicide bombing on Israeli buses. Israelis are understandably afraid, especially in the context of mass incitement by the Palestinian Authority, and would rather Palestinians took their trips to Israel on their own buses. (Are you absolutely sure you wouldn’t feel the same way?) The second reason, which explains why Israel has made its move now, is that due to more generous arrangements for the Palestinians, Israel is now granting more work permits. More workers, more buses. More Palestinian workers, more buses for Palestinians.  The Commentator
The situation in the past few months in which Israeli citizens have been compelled to ride on bullet-proof buses under IDF instruction and find buses full of people from the Arab population, is absurd, not to mention the security risk involved. On the other hand, the Arab population is compelled to pay a fortune for unlicensed drivers to pick them up straight from the crossing. The current solution is good for all. It allows Arabs to ride cheaper and regulated buses. Herzl Ben-Ari (Karnei Shomron Regional Council Chairman)
Maintaining tight security in one of the top terror targets in the world will inevitably bump up repeatedly – and unpleasantly – against issues of human rights.  Jake Wallis Simons
Critics note that the impetus behind the new lines wasn’t to ease the burden of Palestinian commuters, but rather a response to appeals by Jewish settler leaders who didn’t want to share buses with Palestinians. That point is accepted by the spokeswoman for Eli Shaviro, the mayor of the West Bank settlement of Ariel, who pushed for the lines, Ben Hur, the chairman of the Afakim Bus Co., which runs the lines, and the Transportation Ministry. Many settler leaders have long pushed for such a move, and the decision comes as their sway within Likud is on the rise. (…) A Palestinian placed a bomb on a Tel Aviv municipal bus last year that wounded 21. Between the late 1990s through the mid 2000s, Palestinian suicide bombers waged scores of attacks against Israeli targets, many of them public buses. Those attacks have since subsided. Palestinians and Israelis living side-by-side in the West Bank are governed by a dual system riven with inequalities that rarely make headlines in Israel. Parallel legal systems govern the lives of both peoples. Israelis charged with a crime in the West Bank are channeled into Israel’s criminal justice system, where the rights and legal protections are on par with any Western democracy. Palestinians are subjected to military courts, established after Israel won the West Bank from Jordan during the Arab-Israeli war in 1967. Many of the protections enshrined in Israel’s legal code don’t exist in the military courts, where military appellate court judges draw on Jordanian law, British-era laws and Israeli military decrees dating back to 1967. Israel says the dual systems are necessary to battle Palestinian terror networks. The WSJ
The term « apartheid state, » as applied to Israel, gained traction largely as a result of former US President Jimmy Carter’s 2006 book « Israel: Peace Not Apartheid. » The term « apartheid » refers to the conditions that formerly existed in South Africa where a 20% white minority controlled the 80% black majority through a brutally oppressive regime, which included segregationist laws and police who routinely brutalized and killed them with impunity. Blacks could not vote own property or businesses under apartheid. Those who have used the same term to describe Israel have fundamentally misapplied its meaning, failing to take into account circumstances so incongruent to comparative realities on the ground it renders the user of said term illiterate, seriously prejudiced, or both. Indeed, how come virtually every group of people have at least one country they call home, but if the Jews want one they are deemed « racist? » Another under publicized fact is that the Arabs who live in Israel are quite content living under Israeli law. They vote, own property and businesses, and face no segregation. In fact, life in Israel is so appealing that on a couple of occasions when the Palestinian Authority publically threatened to annex east Jerusalem, the Israeli office of immigration was flooded by Arabs applying for citizenship in Israel, because they did not want to live under Arab rule. (…) In South Africa, the apartheid system was an outgrowth from the British Commonwealth. Its intent was to ensure whites remained in control. In Israel’s case its birth was approved by a 72% majority vote of the United Nations. The Arabs had already received almost 90% of the land originally set aside by the British as a national homeland for the Jewish people. Yet in spite of being overwhelming beneficiaries of what was to be Jewish land, the Arabs refused to accept a tiny partition for a Jewish state. They attacked Israel 24 hours after it declared statehood. Since then, the Arabs have made Israel’s destruction a cornerstone of their existence. Groups such as the PLO, Hamas, Fatah and Hezbollah have been birthed, each with charters requiring the destruction of Israel and the eradication of Zionism. Terror attacks have been perpetrated against Israeli civilians since it became a state. Between 1948 and 1999, some 2,000 Israelis had been killed by terrorists, which amounts to an average of 43 killings annually. In 2000, construction of Israel’s security barrier began. This is also when the second « Intifada » started. The year 2000 also saw a spike in the average of civilians killed from 43 to 288 per year, until 2003, when the first phase of the barrier was completed. That’s an increase of over 600% annually. Apparently Israel’s critics conveniently ignored this when making “apartheid wall” accusations. Today, with approximately 70% of the security barrier complete, the number of terror attacks has been dramatically reduced. In spite of the reduction in killings, Arab leaders continue to laud murderers as heroes, naming streets and public squares after them. When officials like Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas are publically honoring murderers, is it any wonder Israel has to take proactive measures to protect its civilians by constructing a security barrier? By attempting to ensure its survival as the only home of the Jewish people against Arabs who are theologically, politically and culturally committed to its destruction, Israel is labeled an « apartheid state. » Dan Calic

Comment est-on censé cohabiter avec des gens « théologiquement, politiquement et culturellement engagés à la destruction » de son Etat ?

Après les freedom rides de Meat Shearim …

Et le passage catastrophique d’une comédienne suppléante d’un candidat à un poste de représentant des Français de l’étranger de toute évidence non préparée dans une émission de divertissement de France 2 …

Pendant que nos ministres socialistes se pâment sur les mérites du premier dictateur venu …

Et qu’en Israël même sans parler des retraités du FBI israélien qui se sentent obligés de jouer aux « juifs utiles », les dirigeants palestiniens peaufinent leur « nouvelle stratégie de « résistance populaire » qui évite de recourir aux attentats et aux armes à feu pour se concentrer sur des manifestations coordonnées contre la présence israélienne dans les Territoires » ….

Retour sur le dernier épisode de la campagne de diffamation contre Israël …

Suite aux accusations d’apartheid de journaux et groupes de défense des droits civiques israéliens contre, suite à la hausse des travailleurs de Cisjordanie autorisés à travailler en Israël et la pression des implantations israéliennes, l’instauration par le Ministère israélien de nouveaux bus pour les travailleurs palestiniens …

Où, comme précédemment pour la barrière de sécurité qui a presque totalement réduit les attentats dont le nombre de victimes au moment de sa construction en 2000 étaient montés à 288 par an, nombre de nos belles âmes oublient les conditions très particulières de cohabitation avec une population dont les dirigeants sont, comme le rappelle l’éditorialiste israélien Dan Calic, « théologiquement, politiquement et culturellement engagés à la destruction » de votre Etat …

Apartheid? Think again

Op-ed: Why is Israel considered racist for seeking to protect itself against hostile, murderous Arabs?

Dan Calic

04.03.13

The term « apartheid state, » as applied to Israel, gained traction largely as a result of former US President Jimmy Carter’s 2006 book « Israel: Peace Not Apartheid. » The term « apartheid » refers to the conditions that formerly existed in South Africa where a 20% white minority controlled the 80% black majority through a brutally oppressive regime, which included segregationist laws and police who routinely brutalized and killed them with impunity. Blacks could not vote own property or businesses under apartheid.

Those who have used the same term to describe Israel have fundamentally misapplied its meaning, failing to take into account circumstances so incongruent to comparative realities on the ground it renders the user of said term illiterate, seriously prejudiced, or both.

Indeed, how come virtually every group of people have at least one country they call home, but if the Jews want one they are deemed « racist? »

Another under publicized fact is that the Arabs who live in Israel are quite content living under Israeli law. They vote, own property and businesses, and face no segregation. In fact, life in Israel is so appealing that on a couple of occasions when the Palestinian Authority publically threatened to annex east Jerusalem, the Israeli office of immigration was flooded by Arabs applying for citizenship in Israel, because they did not want to live under Arab rule.

By contrast, South Africa’s blacks certainly weren’t lining up at government offices desperate to remain subjugated under apartheid.

In South Africa, the apartheid system was an outgrowth from the British Commonwealth. Its intent was to ensure whites remained in control. In Israel’s case its birth was approved by a 72% majority vote of the United Nations. The Arabs had already received almost 90% of the land originally set aside by the British as a national homeland for the Jewish people.

Yet in spite of being overwhelming beneficiaries of what was to be Jewish land, the Arabs refused to accept a tiny partition for a Jewish state. They attacked Israel 24 hours after it declared statehood.

Killers honored

Since then, the Arabs have made Israel’s destruction a cornerstone of their existence. Groups such as the PLO, Hamas, Fatah and Hezbollah have been birthed, each with charters requiring the destruction of Israel and the eradication of Zionism.

Terror attacks have been perpetrated against Israeli civilians since it became a state. Between 1948 and 1999, some 2,000 Israelis had been killed by terrorists, which amounts to an average of 43 killings annually. In 2000, construction of Israel’s security barrier began. This is also when the second « Intifada » started.

The year 2000 also saw a spike in the average of civilians killed from 43 to 288 per year, until 2003, when the first phase of the barrier was completed. That’s an increase of over 600% annually. Apparently Israel’s critics conveniently ignored this when making “apartheid wall” accusations.

Today, with approximately 70% of the security barrier complete, the number of terror attacks has been dramatically reduced.

In spite of the reduction in killings, Arab leaders continue to laud murderers as heroes, naming streets and public squares after them. When officials like Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas are publically honoring murderers, is it any wonder Israel has to take proactive measures to protect its civilians by constructing a security barrier?

By attempting to ensure its survival as the only home of the Jewish people against Arabs who are theologically, politically and culturally committed to its destruction, Israel is labeled an « apartheid state. » Yet it seems those who invoke such labels deserve a label of their own: Anti-Semites.

Voir aussi:

Slandering the Jewish state

Op-ed: Instead of criticizing ‘Israeli apartheid,’ rights group should focus on Syria, Saudi Arabia

Gerald M. Steinberg

Ynetnews

03.12.12

Over the past few weeks « Israeli apartheid week » events have occurred at a number of campuses throughout North America and Europe. This year’s timing is especially unfortunate: while this political warfare, accompanied by BDS (boycott, divestment and sanctions) campaign is happening, the Syrian regime is massacring its own people.

In light of this, it is especially sad that people who call themselves human rights activists waste their time and energy attacking Israel. It is clear that the campaign explicitly targets the existence of Israel as the nation-state of the Jewish people. In the words of Professor Irwin Cotler, former Canadian attorney general, « Let there be no mistake about it: to indict Israel as an Apartheid State is prologue and justification for the dismantling of the Jewish State, for the criminalization of its supporters, and for the consequential silencing of their speech. »

BDS Campaign

This campaign immorally exploits the suffering of the real victims of apartheid and racism, and transforms a complex political dispute between the Palestinians and Israel into a racial conflict. The comparison was categorically rejected and denounced by Judge Richard Goldstone in The New York Times. Goldstone, who is a former justice of the South African Constitutional Court, wrote that, « In Israel, there is no apartheid. Nothing there comes close to the definition of apartheid under the 1998 Rome Statute… »

Goldstone added that « while ‘apartheid’ can have broader meaning, its use is meant to evoke the situation in pre-1994 South Africa. It is an unfair and inaccurate slander against Israel, calculated to retard rather than advance peace negotiations. »

Many others who had experienced the real apartheid expressed similar views. Benjamin Pogrund, who was a journalist in South Africa, wrote, « Use of the apartheid label is at best ignorant and naive and at worst cynical and manipulative. »

Infinite hypocrisy

This cynicism is especially prominent now that Assad’s regime is mercilessly massacring its own people. During the past month, hundreds of people were murdered just in the city of Homs. But in Syria, where an Alawite minority has been oppressing the Sunni majority for decades, the regime – like other dictatorships – was immune to criticism until the outbreak of brutal violence in the recent months, especially from groups claiming to promote human rights.

Does a state in which a small minority violently oppresses the majority not deserve a week (in Israel’s case, actually a month) of attention focused on its crimes? And what about Saudi Arabia, which bans members of other religions from entering parts of the country, and where women are not allowed to drive or leave their house without a family member accompanying them? Where is “Saudi discrimination week”? And we haven’t even mentioned the situation of Christians in Israel’s neighbors, in Gaza and in the West bank. The examples are infinite, as is the hypocrisy.

In the face of these blatant double standards, the power of the « apartheid » campaign is derived from resources that are available in both political and financial forms. Politically, as noted, this divisive agenda is supported by the Arab and Islamic blocs in the United Nations and associated institutions, with active support from Russia and China. They firmly reject any attempt to condemn real human rights violations, and use anti-Israel campaigns to divert criticism.

Financially, the availability of significant European government funding allows ostensible human rights organizations to actively promote the « apartheid » libel. At the same time, these organizations are embarrassingly silent when faced with human rights violations in the Muslim-Arab world in general and in Syria specifically. At most, they issue belated and half-hearted condemnations.

Finally, the crude exploitation of the « apartheid » libel and the accompanying BDS campaigns are the antithesis of the mutual acceptance required for peace, and serve the purposes of murderous dictatorships. As Judge Goldstone wrote, « The mutual recognition and protection of the human dignity of all people is indispensable to bringing an end to hatred and anger. The charge that Israel is an apartheid state is a false and malicious one that precludes, rather than promotes, peace and harmony. »

Gerald M. Steinberg is the founder and president of NGO Monitor and professor of political science at Bar Ilan University

Voir également:

Palestinian-only buses: Israeli apartheid?

 Jake Wallis Simons

March 4th, 2013

Israel has been accused of encouraging racial segregation after a new Palestinian-only bus service was launched

The balance between security and civil liberties is a delicate one in Israel. A few years ago I was travelling there with a few friends from Britain. One of us happened to be of African Islamic heritage. The security personnel at Ben Gurion airport gave him an especially hard time, questioning him at length in private and searching his luggage forensically. It was unsettling for him, and awkward – to say the least – for the rest of us. Was this racism? Or the necessary evil of prudent security measures? I take no pleasure in suggesting that it was the latter. Actually, the friend in question feels the same way.

This is the episode that springs to mind when I learn that Israel has launched Palestinian-only buses on Highway Five between the West Bank and Tel Aviv. The Transport Ministry explained that the new bus service was intended to « improve public transport services for Palestinian workers entering Israel », replacing unofficial buses that were demanding « exorbitant prices ». They also said that Palestinian workers would not be prevented from travelling on regular public transport, either in Israel or on the West Bank.

Palestinian rights groups, however, were concerned that this was a fig-leaf for what would become wholesale discrimination at checkpoints, with Israeli police taking matters into their own hands and forcing Palestinians to use the new buses exclusively.

Defenders of the plan offer a rationale that is largely security-based. As Yisrael Maidad, a prominent figure on the Israeli Right, sardonically put it, « since we ride buses with Arabs every day in Israel, it’s not a racist thing but for some strange reason, Arabs blow themselves up in buses and Israelis find that very unnerving. »

The language is inflammatory, but the statement is not without its kernel of truth. Maintaining tight security in one of the top terror targets in the world will inevitably bump up repeatedly – and unpleasantly – against issues of human rights. The question, as with my experience at Ben Gurion airport, is where one draws the line. In Israel, this matter is debated frequently and officially by moral philosophers and religious figures, particularly when it comes to military operations. They get it wrong sometimes, and spectacularly so. But often, on a day-to-day basis, they get it right.

Nevertheless, it has to be noted that the timing is strange. Apart from the blast on the bus in Tel Aviv during the last Gaza offensive, there hadn’t been a suicide attack on Israel’s bus network for six and a half years, which is a striking figure given that 29,000 Palestinians commute to Israel daily. This suggests that although the new bus service is being used by some groups to highlight security concerns, its real purpose is far more practical. Having said that, the current plans are merely one step away from enforced segregation; this may very well cause more problems than it solves, and may set a troubling precedent.

But as the fur flies in the media and the blogosphere, it seems to me that one point has not been made clearly enough. It has become a cliché to criticise Israel for being an apartheid state. Given the fact that the introduction of a segregated bus route provokes such a domestic and international furore, does this epithet withstand scrutiny? Many, such as Aeyal Gross in Ha’aretz, are arguing vociferously that the current issue demonstrates that we are « on the bus to Israeli apartheid ». Which suggests that we aren’t there yet.

Voir encore:

Split Israel Bus Lines Spur Segregation Debate

New Transport for Palestinian Workers From West Bank Brings Touchy Issue of Inequality Between Two Peoples to Forefront

Charles Levinson

Wall Street journal

March 4, 2013

TEL AVIV—New bus lines for Palestinians, created at the urging of Jewish settler leaders in the West Bank, have sparked a debate over segregation in Israel and refocused attention on the inequalities that govern Palestinians and Israelis in the territory.

The two new lines began operating on Monday, ferrying Palestinian day laborers commuting between the West Bank and blue-collar jobs in Tel Aviv. Previously, those Palestinians commuted via a series of private minibuses—whose fares are far higher than on the new public bus lines—or on public bus lines serving primarily Jewish settlers in the northern West Bank.

The new bus lines have created a controversy in Israel, rare in a country whose conflict-hardened citizens appear to have grown weary of headlines dealing with the daily grind of Israel’s management of the West Bank amid a low-intensity conflict with the Palestinians.

« Separate but equal? » asked Israel’s centrist daily Yediot Ahranot newspaper on Monday. « On the bus to Israeli apartheid, » read an editorial headline in the left-of-center Haaretz paper.

Both Jewish Israelis and Palestinians can still ride on both the new and the old lines, said Israel’s Minister of Transportation Yisrael Katz, a conservative stalwart within Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud Party. That means they are not legally segregated, he says.

« Adding new bus lines servicing Palestinian areas is not segregation, » a Katz spokesman said. « Anyone can ride on any bus. There are now just more buses. »

Indeed, several Palestinian laborers returning on the new bus line from Tel Aviv to the West Bank on Monday said the new lines appeared to be an improvement that will ease their arduous daily commute, at least a little.

But critics note that the impetus behind the new lines wasn’t to ease the burden of Palestinian commuters, but rather a response to appeals by Jewish settler leaders who didn’t want to share buses with Palestinians. That point is accepted by the spokeswoman for Eli Shaviro, the mayor of the West Bank settlement of Ariel, who pushed for the lines, Ben Hur, the chairman of the Afakim Bus Co., which runs the lines, and the Transportation Ministry.

Many settler leaders have long pushed for such a move, and the decision comes as their sway within Likud is on the rise.

« The mayor told the government that people are afraid on the buses because of security problems and fights with Palestinians and he needs separate lines, » said Shaviro spokeswoman Chen Keddem.

The roughly 50,000 Palestinians who have permits to work in Israel have been carefully screened and vetted by Israeli security services.

Ms. Keddem said that verbal squabbles—but not physical ones—do take place on mixed Palestinian-Israeli buses, but mostly over competition for seats. Ms. Keddem said she wasn’t aware of any more serious security incidents.

« If you take a bus at five in the afternoon the bus is full of Arabs and there is no place to sit, » she said. « And people are afraid someone will blow it up. »

A Palestinian placed a bomb on a Tel Aviv municipal bus last year that wounded 21. Between the late 1990s through the mid 2000s, Palestinian suicide bombers waged scores of attacks against Israeli targets, many of them public buses. Those attacks have since subsided.

Palestinians and Israelis living side-by-side in the West Bank are governed by a dual system riven with inequalities that rarely make headlines in Israel.

Parallel legal systems govern the lives of both peoples. Israelis charged with a crime in the West Bank are channeled into Israel’s criminal justice system, where the rights and legal protections are on par with any Western democracy. Palestinians are subjected to military courts, established after Israel won the West Bank from Jordan during the Arab-Israeli war in 1967.

Many of the protections enshrined in Israel’s legal code don’t exist in the military courts, where military appellate court judges draw on Jordanian law, British-era laws and Israeli military decrees dating back to 1967. Israel says the dual systems are necessary to battle Palestinian terror networks.

« Buses are a symbol of segregation, » said Hagit Ofran, of Peace Now, an Israeli pro-peace group. « That may be the reason we get so much interest about it. Segregation is all over the occupation, but when it comes to buses it looks very bad. »

Anything that hints at segregation, with its historical connection to South African apartheid and the American civil-rights movement, is a particularly explosive issue in a country that takes pride in being a Western-style democracy.

But the issue has increasingly sneaked into the public debate. The country’s Minister of Defense, Ehud Barak, was perhaps the first senior Israeli leader to publicly warn that Israel’s policies in the West Bank risked leading Israel toward being « an apartheid state. »

« If, and as long as between the Jordan and the sea, there is only one political entity, named Israel, it will end up being either non-Jewish or non-democratic…If the Palestinians vote in elections, it is a binational state, and if they don’t, it is an apartheid state, » Mr. Barak said at a security conference in 2010.

All six living ex-directors of Israel’s internal Shin Bet security service, the lead agency in fighting Palestinian terror, recently participated in the Oscar-nominated documentary The Gatekeepers, to warn against Israel’s continued presence in the West Bank.

Voir de plus:

Separate but equal bus lines?

Ynetnews

03.04.13

Palestinian workers travelling between West Bank, Israel to use separate public transportation after settlers complain of potential security risks. Leftists call these ‘apartheid lines’, Transportation Minister Katz says ‘Palestinians entering Israel will be able to ride on all public transportation lines’

Reuters, Itamar Fleishman

Tension, delays and chaos ensue on the first day segregated, Palestinian-Israeli bus lines are operated in the West Bank.

On Monday morning, a riot broke out at the exit point of the Eyal crossing, adjacent to Qalqilya after numerous Palestinian laborers could not get to work within the Green Line. They protested the fact that as of now, they must arrive at the crossing from far-off places in the West Bank since the new bus lines are their only means of entering central Israel.

In response, Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz said that « Palestinians entering Israel will be able to ride on all public transportation lines, including all those already existing in the West Bank. »

In addition, according to a Transport Ministry announcement, Katz instructed that all new Afikim bus company lines will be reinforced immediately according to demand. « In light of the great overflow on the few lines operated this morning, the ministry will asses the possibility that lines will leave from additional West Bank points, making it easier for the travelers. »

Israel launched two Palestinians-only bus lines in the West Bank on Monday, a step an Israeli rights group described as racist and which the Transport Ministry called an improvement in service.

The ministry opened the lines, to be used by Palestinian laborers travelling between the West Bank and Israel, after settlers complained that Palestinians on mixed buses were a security risk.

The separate Palestinian bus line initiative aroused a wave of reactions from both sides of the Israeli political spectrum. Leftists called upon the Transport Ministry to cancel what they call « Apartheid lines. »

Meretz Chairwoman Zahava Gal-On turned to Katz and demanded that he « immediately cancel the segregated lines in the West Bank. Separate bus lines for Palestinians prove that occupation and democracy cannot coexist, » she said.

According to Gal On, the decision to separate between Jews and Arabs stems from settler pressure and not from the desire to improve upon services for the Palestinians. « Separation on buses based on ethnicity was customary in the past in racist regimes around the world and is unacceptable in a democratic country. »

Peace Now activists also protested the operation of these lines and said, « the decision to (operate) separate bus lines in the territories is shocking and turns racism into the norm. A Palestinian Rosa Parks is needed to insist upon sitting on Jewish bus lines, (someone) who won’t surrender to discrimination. »

Conversely, Karnei Shomron Regional Council Chairman Herzl Ben-Ari, one of the leading pressure-putters on the Transport Ministry for finding a solution to the overload and the tension on the regular West Bank bus lines commented as well.

Ben-Ari said that « the situation in the past few months in which Israeli citizens have been compelled to ride on bullet-proof buses under IDF instruction and find buses full of people from the Arab population, is absurd, not to mention the security risk involved. On the other hand, the Arab population is compelled to pay a fortune for unlicensed drivers to pick them up straight from the crossing. The current solution is good for all. It allows Arabs to ride cheaper and regulated buses. »

« Creating separate bus lines for Israeli Jews and Palestinians is a revolting plan, » Jessica Montell, director of the B’Tselem rights group, said on Army Radio. « This is simply racism. Such a plan cannot be justified with claims of security needs or overcrowding. »

עומס בעלייה לאוטובוס. הבוקר במעבר אייל (צילום: גור דותן)

Overload on Palestinians-only buses (Photo: Gur Dotan)

Ibrahim, from the West Bank village of Bidya said, « it is impossible for to make it all the way here. I need to leave an hour and a half earlier because I live far from the Eyal crossing, and if I miss the bus – my whole workday is gone. »

Fauzi, who lives in the village of Zaita, adjacent to the West Bank city of Ariel, requested to arrive to work in Israel and was also delayed at the Eyal crossing. He expressed his frustration regarding the situation and said « this chaos is unclear to me. I need to drive an hour and a half just to get to the bus, and now it is not clear if there are even enough buses. »

Additional laborers who arrived at the crossing, verbally confronted Transport Ministry and Afikim bus company representatives, who were guarded by police officers who arrived at the scene to maintain order.

« The Ministry of Transport has not issued any instruction or prohibition that prevents Palestinian workers from travelling on public transport in Israel nor in Judea and Samaria, » it said, referring to the West Bank.

« Furthermore, the Ministry of Transport is not authorized to prevent any passenger from using public transport services. »

Rights groups, however, voiced concern that Israeli police at checkpoints in the West Bank would remove Palestinian passengers from regular bus lines and order them to use the new ones.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said all Palestinians returning to the West Bank would be searched for stolen property, describing this as a routine Israeli precaution.

He said he did not know whether and how this might affect Palestinian travel on regular buses.

Voir de plus:

Penser qu’il s’agit de ségrégation est d’une incongruité absolue

Gilles-William Goldnadel

Avocat franco-israélien, essayiste et militant associatif

Newsring

07 mars 2013

D’après ce que je sais, il ne s’agit pas du tout de ségrégation, c’est un service de transport qui a été mis en place, à des prix particuliers, pour les Arabes de Cisjordanie. Pour autant, si un Arabe de Cisjordanie veut prendre un bus israélien ou avec des Juifs, il ne va pas être rejeté. Donc, de ce point de vue-là, le parallèle avec l’apartheid sud-africain de la grande époque ou bien avec la ségrégation dans le Sud des Etats-Unis est particulièrement injuste et injustifié. C’est une facilité qui a été faite pour améliorer le sort des Palestiniens et on est en train de transformer ça, de manière totalement abusive, en un outil de ségrégation, ce qui est faux.

Qu’il y ait un climat de peur parce que des Palestiniens se sont fait sauter dans des bus, je peux parfaitement le comprendre. De la même manière qu’il est très compréhensible qu’un Palestinien qui n’a rien à se reprocher n’aime pas se voir regarder de travers. C’est la situation qui veut cela mais nous sommes ici à des années lumières du principe juridique d’une ségrégation entre telle ou telle ethnie. Justement, les choses étant ce qu’elles sont dans ce bas monde, on a sans doute en raison de cela voulu faciliter la vie des Arabes, et de manière assez perverse, ça se retourne contre l’autorité qui veut améliorer la situation. Je pressens qu’en raison de cette polémique on finisse par revenir sur cette décision et les premiers perdants seront, une fois de plus, les Arabes de Palestine.

Concernant les deux bus incendiés, il y a des gens qui ont envie de jeter de l’huile sur le feu et, comme la polémique a l’air de prendre, ils appuient là où ça fait mal. Mais ça ne valide en rien l’hypothèse de la ségrégation. Pour bien connaître Israël et les israéliens, je sais qu’il ne leur serait jamais venu à l’idée de faire un bus qui serait strictement autorisé pour telle ethnie et strictement prohibé pour une autre. C’est une incongruité absolue quand on connaît le système israélien et, d’ailleurs, ce serait contraire à la loi.

On a voulu mettre en place un service qui était objectivement pour faciliter la vie des Arabes donc des esprits chagrins ont considéré que, puisqu’il s’agissait de bus pour des Arabes, cela voulait dire que l’on séparait les Juifs des Arabes Dès lors, la polémique s’est enflammée.

Nous ne sommes pas dans une situation actuelle où les Arabes viennent se faire sauter dans les bus. Heureusement, cela fait des années que ce n’est pas arrivé. Donc le fantasme en question ou la peur, même compréhensible, ne sont pas prégnants. A l’époque où les bus explosaient sans cesse, je comprends très bien qu’un israélien qui voyait un Arabe rentrer dans un bus avec un grand anorak se demandait ce qu’il y avait dessous. Mais quel rapport avec la ségrégation? C’est simplement la crainte et le soupçon qui prévalent évidemment dans ce type de situation. Les choses étaient-elles bien différentes après l’explosion du métro de Saint Michel en 1995?

Voir aussi:

Israël: deux bus destinés aux travailleurs palestiniens incendiés

L’Express

05/03/2013

Deux bus destinés aux travailleurs palestiniens se rendant en Israël ont été incendiés dans le nord du pays. La mise en place de ces lignes lundi avait provoqué la colère des Palestiniens et des défenseurs des droits de l’homme.

ISRAEL – Le lancement des lignes reliant le passage d’Eyal, près de Qalqiliya, à Tel-Aviv fait suite à des protestations de colons mécontents de devoir partager les transports avec les Palestiniens.

Les véhicules n’auront roulé que quelques heures. Deux bus, utilisés sur les nouvelles lignes destinées aux travailleurs palestiniens se rendant en Israël, ont « apparemment été incendiés » dans le nord du pays, dans la nuit de lundi à mardi.

« Nous explorons toutes les pistes », a indiqué la porte-parole de la police, Louba Samri. Celle-ci précise qu’une enquête sur le sinistre, dans le village arabe israélien de Kfar Qassem, a été ouverte et qu’aucun suspect n’a été arrêté.

Des sources policières citées par la radio militaire estiment que les véhicules ont été incendiés en signe de protestation: Israël a lancé lundi un service de bus destiné aux travailleurs palestiniens, s’attirant des accusations de « ségrégation » dans les transports, de la part d’organisations de défense des droits de l’homme.

« Une mesure raciste »

« C’est une politique de ségrégation raciste qu’appliquent tous les gouvernements israéliens consécutifs », a déclaré mardi le vice-ministre palestinien du Travail Assef Saïd. Le secrétaire général du Syndicat des travailleurs palestiniens a de son côté dénoncé « une mesure raciste » dans une déclaration à la radio officielle Voix de la Palestine, soulignant que « les bus utilisés par les travailleurs sont souvent visés par les colons et les extrémistes israéliens ».

Le lancement des lignes reliant le passage d’Eyal, près de Qalqiliya, dans le nord de la Cisjordanie, à l’agglomération de Tel-Aviv fait suite à des protestations de colons mécontents de devoir partager les transports avec les Palestiniens, invoquant des risques d’attentat. Jusqu’à présent, les travailleurs palestiniens empruntant ce passage se rendaient jusqu’à un arrêt de bus proche d’une colonie juive, où ils embarquaient avec les passagers israéliens, ou utilisaient des transporteurs clandestins.

« Les nouvelles lignes de bus ne sont pas deux lignes séparées pour les Palestiniens mais plutôt deux lignes dédiées, destinées à améliorer les services de transports offerts aux travailleurs palestiniens qui entrent en Israël par le passage d’Eyal », s’est défendu Israël Katz, le ministre israélien des Transports.

Le maire d’une colonie a demandé l’aide de l’armée

Celui-ci a affirmé que ces nouvelles lignes visaient à « remplacer les opérateurs pirates qui transportent les travailleurs à des prix exorbitants », et a indiqué s’assurer que « les Palestiniens entrant en Israël puissent circuler à bord de tous les transports publics, y compris les lignes opérant en Judée-Samarie [Cisjordanie] ».

Le maire de la colonie d’Ariel, dans le nord de la Cisjordanie, Ron Nachman, décédé depuis, avait indiqué en novembre sur sa page Facebook avoir demandé à l’armée, à la police et au ministère des Transports, d' »empêcher les Palestiniens de monter dans des bus desservant Ariel ». Il avait assuré que ses interlocuteurs « travaillaient à une solution ».

En 2011, des activistes palestiniens ont été arrêtés pour être montés dans des bus israéliens en Cisjordanie, en signe de protestation contre la ségrégation.

Avec AFP

Voir enfin:

Israël craint le début d’une nouvelle intifada

Adrien Jaulmes

Le Figaro

24/02/2013

La mort d’un jeune Palestinien dans une prison israélienne intervient dans un climat déjà très détérioré.

De notre correspondant à Jérusalem

La mort d’un détenu palestinien dans une prison israélienne a fait encore monter la tension en Cisjordanie ce week-end, où les incidents entre Palestiniens et soldats israéliens se sont récemment multipliés au point de faire craindre à Israël le début d’une nouvelle intifada.

Arafat Jaradat, un Palestinien âgé de 30 ans, est mort samedi après-midi dans la prison israélienne de Meggido, officiellement d’un arrêt cardiaque.

Résidant d’un village proche de Hébron, Jaradat avait été arrêté lundi près de la colonie de Kiryat Arba pour avoir jeté des pierres contre des soldats et des civils israéliens. Ayant reconnu les faits, il avait été incarcéré à la prison de Meggido en attendant d’être jugé. Selon les autorités israéliennes, il souffrait de traumatismes dus à des blessures anciennes et, après son examen par un médecin, son interrogatoire avait été suspendu. Cette version des faits n’a pas convaincu la famille de Jaradat, qui a affirmé qu’il était en parfaite santé. Les autorités palestiniennes ont demandé l’ouverture d’une enquête. Le ministre palestinien des Prisonniers, Issa, Qaraqaë, a affirmé dimanche soir lors d’une conférence de presse que l’autopsie du détenu avait révélé «des fractures sur tout le corps et sur le crâne» de la victime, ce qui, selon lui «prouve qu’Israël l’a assassiné».

Des milliers de détenus en grève de la faim

Plusieurs milliers de détenus Palestiniens ont annoncé qu’ils suivraient une journée de grève de la faim en solidarité avec Jaradat. Cette mort survient dans un climat déjà particulièrement tendu. Depuis plusieurs jours, les manifestations se multiplient en Cisjordanie pour réclamer la libération de quatre détenus palestiniens en grève de la faim intermittente depuis plusieurs mois.

Deux de ces détenus, Samir Issaoui et Iman Sharouna, font partie du millier de prisonniers palestiniens libérés en échange du soldat Gilad Shalit. Ils ont été de nouveau arrêtés pour avoir repris leurs activités clandestines. Les deux autres, Jafar Ezzedine et Tariq Kaadan, membre du Djihad islamique, ont été arrêtés ces derniers mois pour avoir fomenté des attentats en Cisjordanie.

Les manifestations de soutien à ces quatre détenus se sont multipliées. Vendredi, la police israélienne est intervenue devant la prison d’Ofer, à côté de Ramallah, et dans la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem pour disperser des manifestants palestiniens. La mort de Jaradat a donné le signal d’autres manifestations en Cisjordanie.

Pour ajouter à la détérioration du climat, trois Palestiniens ont été blessés par balles près de la colonie de Shilo, dans le nord de la Cisjordanie. Les colons sont soupçonnés d’avoir ouvert le feu.

Les incidents se sont multipliés en Cisjordanie depuis la fin de l’opération «Pilier de défense» lancée par Israël en novembre 2012 contre le Hamas à Gaza. À plusieurs reprises, ces derniers mois, l’armée israélienne a mis en garde contre la possibilité d’une troisième intifada. Les Israéliens accusent l’Autorité palestinienne de fomenter ces troubles, selon la nouvelle stratégie de «résistance populaire», qui évite de recourir aux attentats et aux armes à feu pour se concentrer sur des manifestations coordonnées contre la présence israélienne dans les Territoires.

7 Responses to « Bus de l’aparheid »: Pour d’obscures raisons, les Arabes se font exploser dans les bus et les Israéliens trouvent ça très gênant (How are you supposed to cohabit with people theologically, politically and culturally committed to your destruction ?)

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