Lincoln: Jusqu’à ce que chaque goutte de sang jaillie sous le fouet soit payée par une autre versée par l’épée (Not perfect but important: Spielberg’s film reminds us that Lincoln was first and foremost a politician)

C’est à la sueur de ton visage que tu mangeras du pain, jusqu’à ce que tu retournes dans la terre, d’où tu as été pris; car tu es poussière, et tu retourneras dans la poussière. Genèse 3: 19
Nous espérons du fond du cœur, nous prions avec ferveur, que ce terrible fléau de la guerre s’achève rapidement. Si, cependant, Dieu veut qu’il se poursuive jusqu’à ce que sombrent les richesses accumulées par 250 ans de labeur non partagé de l’esclave ainsi que jusqu’à ce que chaque goutte de sang jaillie sous le fouet soit payée par une autre versée par l’épée, comme il a été dit il y a trois mille ans, il nous faudra reconnaître que “les décisions du Seigneur sont justes et vraiment équitables ». Lincoln (Deuxième discours d’investiture, le 4 mars 1865)
Avec le temps, Lincoln en était venu à voir la guerre comme un châtiment divin de Dieu pour le péché de l’esclavage, et d’une certaine façon, il vit la mort de Willie comme la croix personnelle qu’il devait porter pour expier ce crime. (…) Sa détermination à faire le ménage de l’esclavage lui venait d’une croyance qu’il agissait comme la main de Dieu, et quand les dirigeants commencent à penser de cette façon, ils apparaissent soit comme des fous dangereux soit comme des illuminés. Josh Zeitz
It would have been astounding if Steven Spielberg had not produced a boffo performance in recreating America’s greatest statesman, and he did. The script reveals the qualities that made Lincoln one of the most universally admired figures in world history. The self-made man without chippiness; the very ethical man who was, yet, far from a prude nor above a political ruse; the intellectual autodidact who was subject to moroseness but never without a sense of humor, worn but not altogether exasperated by an impossible wife nor broken by the death of two sons in adolescence, disappointed but never angry at the countless betrayals he endured — all emerge in Daniel Day Lewis’s brilliant performance in the title role. It would be unfair to compare any of his successors to Lincoln, as such a leader is unique and only a very few statesmen in the history of democracy anywhere bear any comparison with him. (…) Given the greatness of their principal subjects and the high drama of their times, there was no need or justification for Lincoln or Hyde Park on Hudson to invent history. Spielberg represents the passage by the House of Representatives of the constitutional amendment abolishing slavery in the session ending in February 1865 as utterly essential to achieve the full enactment of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. To breathe life into this canard, he claims that the peace talks Lincoln had with Confederate vice president Alexander Stephens in that month would have been successful if Congress had not not already been committed to the Thirteenth (abolition) Amendment. This is bunk. The new Congress would easily have adopted the Amendment; there were already more than a million emancipated slaves in Union-occupied Confederate territory, and undoing Emancipation would have been out of the question. The end of slavery was bound to be a condition of readmission of the Confederate states, most of which were then in Union hands. Nor was slavery discussed at the Hampton Roads meeting with Stephens. They never got past the southern insistence on a cease-fire while reentry into the Union was negotiated. (When Lincoln declined to negotiate with “Americans who have taken up arms against [the] government,” and one of Stephens’s colleagues replied that Britain’s King Charles I had, Lincoln responded in his usual laconic way that his “principal recollection of the matter is that King Charles lost his head.”) Conrad Black
Every good story needs an antihero. Lincoln also follows the motives and machinations of Thaddeus Stevens, the stern, steely eyed chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, a position that in the 19th century doubled as House Majority Leader. He was « the dictator of the house »—a zealot in the cause of freedom and racial equality. Brilliant, sharp-tongued, and tremendously intimidating to friend and foe alike. In life, Stevens had little patience for Lincoln, whom he viewed as a temporizing moderate. In Spielberg’s movie, he is the president’s sworn enemy, cautiously willing to drop his armor and work with the president to abolish slavery. Tommy Lee Jones captures Stevens’s spirit well. Unfortunately, Kushner’s writing leaves the part flat. In the film, Stevens deploys clever ad hominem attacks to smack down his opponents; in life, he never needed to resort to cheap shots, for he was deft at using cold, hard logic to leave his adversaries the laughing stock of the chamber. In the film, Kushner ascribes Stevens’s hatred of slavery to his secret private life. (Spoiler alert: if you don’t know much about Thaddeus Stevens and haven’t seen Lincoln yet, skip the rest of this paragraph). Indeed, Stevens’s life partner of 20 years was Lydia Hamilton Smith, whom the world knew as his black housekeeper. It was the worst-kept secret in Washington. But Stevens’s relationship with Smith was an outgrowth of his conviction, not the cause of it. He grew up in Vermont, where he likely never met an African American. After college at Dartmouth, he moved to Adams County, Pennsylvania, on the border between slavery and freedom. There, as a young and starving attorney, he took on the case of one Norman Bruce, a Maryland farmer whose slave, Charity Butler, had fled across the state line with her two young children—one of them still a baby. Bruce tracked down his property and sued for their return; Charity sued for her freedom, claiming that she had ceased to be a slave the moment she stepped foot on free soil. Stevens was a clever attorney, and he won the trial for Bruce. Charity Butler and her children were remanded to slavery. Within three years, Stevens became an almost fanatical abolitionist. He put skin in the game, too, conducting fugitive slaves along the Underground Railroad, through his home and office, even while serving as a member of Congress. The realization of what he had done, and the memory of it, made him sick. He was unforgiving of other people’s shortcomings, because he was unforgiving of his own. The film captures none of this complexity, a fact attributable to the one-dimensional way in which Stevens is written. Spielberg’s film makes Stevens an unnatural compromiser. He wasn’t. He was a politician’s politician and had no problem crawling in the mud to achieve an objective. A year and a half after the events portrayed in the movie, Stevens gave a rousing campaign speech in which he excoriated the Democratic party. « We shall hear it repeated ten thousand times, » he intoned, « the cry of ‘Negro Equality!’ The radicals would thrust the negro into your parlors, your bedrooms, and the bosoms of your wives and daughters….And then they [Democrats] will send up the grand chorus from every foul throat, ‘nigger,’ ‘nigger,’ ‘nigger,’ ‘nigger!’ ‘Down with the nigger party, we’re for the white man’s party.’ These unanswerable arguments will ring in every low bar room and be printed in every Blackguard sheet throughout the land whose fundamental maxim is ‘all men are created equal.' » In one paragraph, he managed to take down the crude racial incitements of his opponents, while simultaneously assuring listeners that those incitements were false. That was a politician. Josh Zeitz
In fact, Goodwin’s central argument (and, by default, Spielberg’s) originated with John Nicolay and John Hay, Lincoln’s White House aides, who play bit roles in Spielberg’s film. Twenty-five years after the president’s assassination, they published his authorized Lincoln biography. Enjoying exclusive access to Lincoln’s papers, which were otherwise embargoed until 1947, they were the first to claim Lincoln’s mastery of his fractious cabinet, his evolving genius for military strategy, his mystical bond with the citizenry, and his deep intelligence. As Nicolay assured Robert Lincoln, « we hold that your father was something more than a mere make-weight in the cabinet… We want to show that he formed a cabinet of strong and great men—rarely equaled in any historical era—and that he held, guided, controlled, curbed and dismissed not only them but other high officers civilian and military, at will, with perfect knowledge of men. » It’s that notion that informs Spielberg’s film. Lincoln’s faced a very real dilemma in January 1865, and the film does a masterful job of explaining his complex set of exigencies. The war was nearing its end. The president had grounded the Emancipation Proclamation in his wartime powers as commander-in-chief. A cessation of hostilities would undermine the legal basis of that order, and it was not inconceivable that the courts might order the re-enslavement of millions of African Americans, including many who fought in the Union Army. The new Congress, which was scheduled to convene in December 1865, was sure to pass the measure, as Republicans had routed their opponents in the recent election. Lincoln even had the option of calling the new Congress into session early. But he was under intense pressure to negotiate peace with the Confederacy, and he needed the amendment in order to make abolition a sine qua non. Only when the rebels realized that slavery could not be saved would they lay down their arms. The film shows Lincoln prevailing over the opposition of his advisers. But while it’s true that Lincoln’s original cabinet was an unruly and independent bunch, by January 1865 the president had grown weary of the incessant squabbling and back-stabbing. He scrapped his Team of Rivals for a Team of Loyalists. Those who couldn’t find comity, like Salmon P. Chase, the fiercely antislavery Treasury Secretary, and Postmaster Montgomery Blair, a cantankerous conservative, were out, replaced by men who understood that they served at the pleasure of the president. Attorney General Edward Bates retired to his home in Missouri, replaced by James Speed, a Lincoln loyalist and slavery foe. Interior Secretary John Usher was swapped out for James Harlan, one of Lincoln’s staunchest supporters in the Senate. Of the original cabinet, those remaining—Secretary of State William Seward, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, and Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles—were deeply loyal to the president. It’s therefore highly unlikely that Lincoln had to do much cajoling and convincing when he announced his intention to push for the 13th Amendment. But if Spielberg’s narrative is a little off, his principal argument isn’t. Lincoln did, in fact, assume great risk in backing the amendment during his re-election canvass the year before, and he placed the weight of his presidency behind it in 1865.
Spielberg’s film also credits Lincoln with sanctioning, and in some cases directly negotiating, the brazen use of patronage appointments to buy off the requisite number of lame duck Democratic congressmen. Here, the record is hazy. Historians generally agree that the president issued broad instructions to Seward, who in turn hired a group of lobbyists from his home state of New York to approach potential apostates. It’s highly implausible that Lincoln dealt directly with these men, or that he immersed himself in the details. He was too smart a politician to do that. But he did whip hard for the amendment. He visited a Democratic congressman whose brother had fallen in battle, to tell him that his kin « died to save the Republic from death by the slaveholders’ rebellion. I wish you could see it to be your duty to vote for the Constitutional amendment ending slavery. » That scene is true to history.
Lincoln is not a perfect film, but it is an important film. Spielberg has positioned his work as something that should unite a divided nation in the aftermath of the 2012 election, but, paradoxically, his story points to a different conclusion. Sean Wilentz, one of those rare historians who moves seamlessly between the academy and the public sphere, noted that « Abraham Lincoln was, first and foremost, a politician. » Lincoln probably didn’t bribe congressmen to pass the 13th Amendment, but he instructed others to do so. He forged a deep connection with soldiers and their families, and won 78 percent of the soldier vote in 1864 because of it. He knew the power of his office, and used it. (…) Steven Spielberg’s film reminds us that there was another Lincoln: a profoundly controversial, loved and hated president. Before his apotheosis on Good Friday, 1865, he was scorned as much as he was revered. « It is a little singular that I who am not a vindictive man should have always been before the people for election in canvasses marked for their bitterness, » Lincoln told Hay. But Abraham Lincoln understood that politics was combat. He was able to reconcile his supreme confidence and a people’s touch. He came to believe that he was the hand of God without believing that he was God. Josh Zeitz

Retour, en ces temps de réécriture intéressée et de reconstitutions cinématographiques plus ou moins fantaisistes de l’histoire …

Sur le dernier morceau de bravoure de Steven Spielberg sur les derniers mois de la carrière et de la vie du président Lincoln et notamment le passage à la Chambre des Représentants de l’abolition de l’esclavage …

Qui malgré les habituelles erreurs factuelles du genre comme le fait par exemple que le vote de l’abolition de l’esclavage ne fut jamais en doute, la faiblesse exagérée de ses conseillers ou ennemis ou qu’aucun des sénateurs du Connecticut ne vota contre (mais bien, comme il vient de s’en rendre compte, le Mississipi) …

Réussit néanmoins  grâce à la magistrale prestation de Daniel Day-Lewis à bien rendre, du moins vu d’aujourd’hui, tant les côtés illuminé que politicien consommé du personnage …

Fact-Checking ‘Lincoln’: Lincoln’s Mostly Realistic; His Advisers Aren’t

Joshua Zeitz

Spielberg’s film gets the president’s disposition right, but doesn’t quite do justice to everyone else.

In May 1862, to the considerable frustration of anti-slavery stalwarts in his own party, Abraham Lincoln overturned an order issued by General David Hunter that would have freed every slave across vast swaths of the southern Atlantic coast. It wasn’t the first time that the president subordinated his personal antipathy toward slavery to placating the border states, and it wouldn’t be the last.

Slavery was crumbling fast. Lincoln knew it and encouraged it. The year 1862 would see the president sign legislation banning the « peculiar institution » in Washington, DC and the western territories. Even as he disavowed abolition as a primary objective, Lincoln privately beseeched border state representatives to emancipate their slaves under generous terms, before the tide of war swept away the whole system under no terms at all. « You can not if you would, be blind to the signs of the times, » he warned. Still, he couldn’t abide General Hunter’s order. « I wanted him to do it, » Lincoln explained to a friend, « not say it. »

This was Abraham Lincoln in a nutshell. Inscrutable and unknowable, he was, by his own admission, « rather inclined to silence. » William Herndon, his law partner, worked beside him for 16 years but found him the most « shut-mouthed man who ever lived. »

How, then, can we access his mind, 150 years after the fact, when those closest to him found Lincoln so impenetrable in his own time? Relative to other presidents, he wrote comparatively few letters, and virtually none of a personal nature. We have no diaries with which to work, and obviously no film footage or recordings. Much is left to context, and invariably, to imagination.

Steven Spielberg’s new biopic, Lincoln, is probably the most ambitious Lincoln film in the history of its medium. Based largely on Doris Kearns Goodwin’s monumental volume Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, the film follows Lincoln over the last four months of his presidency, as he simultaneously works to draw the Civil War to a close and secures congressional passage of the 13th Amendment. Though Spielberg wisely confined himself to just one chapter of Goodwin’s expansive history, the argument is unmistakably hers: Lincoln was a strong executive, astute in all matters political and military. He placed his former rivals in positions of considerable influence and then wielded firm authority over an unruly and divided cabinet to achieve great things.

In fact, Goodwin’s central argument (and, by default, Spielberg’s) originated with John Nicolay and John Hay, Lincoln’s White House aides, who play bit roles in Spielberg’s film. Twenty-five years after the president’s assassination, they published his authorized Lincoln biography. Enjoying exclusive access to Lincoln’s papers, which were otherwise embargoed until 1947, they were the first to claim Lincoln’s mastery of his fractious cabinet, his evolving genius for military strategy, his mystical bond with the citizenry, and his deep intelligence. As Nicolay assured Robert Lincoln, « we hold that your father was something more than a mere make-weight in the cabinet… We want to show that he formed a cabinet of strong and great men—rarely equaled in any historical era—and that he held, guided, controlled, curbed and dismissed not only them but other high officers civilian and military, at will, with perfect knowledge of men. » It’s that notion that informs Spielberg’s film.

Lincoln’s faced a very real dilemma in January 1865, and the film does a masterful job of explaining his complex set of exigencies. The war was nearing its end. The president had grounded the Emancipation Proclamation in his wartime powers as commander-in-chief. A cessation of hostilities would undermine the legal basis of that order, and it was not inconceivable that the courts might order the re-enslavement of millions of African Americans, including many who fought in the Union Army. The new Congress, which was scheduled to convene in December 1865, was sure to pass the measure, as Republicans had routed their opponents in the recent election. Lincoln even had the option of calling the new Congress into session early. But he was under intense pressure to negotiate peace with the Confederacy, and he needed the amendment in order to make abolition a sine qua non. Only when the rebels realized that slavery could not be saved would they lay down their arms.

The film shows Lincoln prevailing over the opposition of his advisers. But while it’s true that Lincoln’s original cabinet was an unruly and independent bunch, by January 1865 the president had grown weary of the incessant squabbling and back-stabbing. He scrapped his Team of Rivals for a Team of Loyalists. Those who couldn’t find comity, like Salmon P. Chase, the fiercely antislavery Treasury Secretary, and Postmaster Montgomery Blair, a cantankerous conservative, were out, replaced by men who understood that they served at the pleasure of the president. Attorney General Edward Bates retired to his home in Missouri, replaced by James Speed, a Lincoln loyalist and slavery foe. Interior Secretary John Usher was swapped out for James Harlan, one of Lincoln’s staunchest supporters in the Senate. Of the original cabinet, those remaining—Secretary of State William Seward, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, and Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles—were deeply loyal to the president.

It’s therefore highly unlikely that Lincoln had to do much cajoling and convincing when he announced his intention to push for the 13th Amendment. But if Spielberg’s narrative is a little off, his principal argument isn’t. Lincoln did, in fact, assume great risk in backing the amendment during his re-election canvass the year before, and he placed the weight of his presidency behind it in 1865.

Spielberg’s film also credits Lincoln with sanctioning, and in some cases directly negotiating, the brazen use of patronage appointments to buy off the requisite number of lame duck Democratic congressmen. Here, the record is hazy. Historians generally agree that the president issued broad instructions to Seward, who in turn hired a group of lobbyists from his home state of New York to approach potential apostates. It’s highly implausible that Lincoln dealt directly with these men, or that he immersed himself in the details. He was too smart a politician to do that. But he did whip hard for the amendment. He visited a Democratic congressman whose brother had fallen in battle, to tell him that his kin « died to save the Republic from death by the slaveholders’ rebellion. I wish you could see it to be your duty to vote for the Constitutional amendment ending slavery. » That scene is true to history.

Lincoln did, in fact, tell Congressman James Alley, « I am the President of the United States, clothed with immense power, and I expect you to procure those votes. » Or at least that’s how Alley remembered it, 23 years after the fact. If those were Lincoln’s precise words (unlikely, as they don’t sound like him; he was a man who liked things done, not said), the president probably didn’t bellow them across the room, but rather, slyly conveyed his determination to use patronage as a blunt legislative instrument. But a movie is a movie, not a scholarly monograph, and screenwriter Tony Kushner’s use of the line does no real violence to Lincoln’s larger position.

Having begun his political career as a Whig, a party founded in opposition to the heavy-handed leadership of Andrew Jackson, Lincoln still believed that presidents should defer to Congress. Though the war ironically demanded that he preside over a massive expansion of executive authority, he rarely demanded much of the legislative branch and even more rarely used his veto power. More usually, he sidestepped Congress when he thought it necessary. His campaign for the 13th Amendment was a rare example of intercession in the legislative process, and Spielberg and Kushner are right to emphasize that point. Whether Lincoln would have continued this active role during Reconstruction, we will never know.

***

Much has been said about Daniel Day-Lewis’s imagination of Lincoln’s voice. The high pitch, the raspy texture, the vague traces of a Southern Indiana draw—it’s probably closer to contemporary descriptions than any previous attempt on stage or screen. But it’s the disposition that is pure genius. Day-Lewis perfectly captures what John Hay described as « that weary, introverted look » of Lincoln’s. He also captures his exhaustion.

The presidency ages its incumbents prematurely, but none so much as Lincoln. He worked 14 hour days. During critical battles, he stayed up until the early daylight hours, reviewing telegraphic dispatches from the War Department. He battled chronic insomnia. Unlike modern presidents, Lincoln never took a vacation. He worked seven days each week, 52 weeks of the year, and left Washington only to visit the front or, on one occasion, to dedicate a battleground cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The president once told the journalist Noah Brooks that « nothing could touch the tired spot within, which was all tired. » Day-Lewis makes you believe it. He plays Lincoln as he really was: a man in his mid-50s, shivering with cold in the dead of winter, weary, concerned, bones aching, mind distracted.

The most touching scenes in the film probe the depth of the Lincoln family’s sorrow, as they continue to struggle with the death of their middle son, Willie, three years earlier. After Willie’s death, the president took to locking himself in the boy’s bedroom each Thursday, retreating for hours at a time into his private grief. « He was too good for this earth, » Lincoln said, with tears in his eyes, « …but then we loved him so. » Their younger son, Tad, became his father’s constant companion. Many nights, Tad fell asleep in his father’s office, until Lincoln knelt by his side and carried him off to bed. Day-Lewis reenacts this ritual with powerful authenticity and emotion.

Over time, Lincoln came to view the war as God’s divine punishment for the sin of slavery, and in some fashion, he saw Willie’s death as the personal cross that he must bear to atone for that crime. The film does not make Lincoln out to be humble, and indeed he wasn’t. « It is absurd to call him a modest man, » Hay later remarked. « No great man was ever modest. » Lincoln’s « intellectual arrogance and unconscious assumption of superiority » were hallmarks of his personality. His certainty allowed him to preside over a carnival of death. As Day-Lewis plays the part, Lincoln has the people’s touch, but he never once confuses himself for common. His determination to clean house of slavery stemmed from a belief that he was acting as the hand of God, and when leaders begin to think that way, they either become very frightening or other-worldly. Day-Lewis gets that, too.

Every good story needs an antihero. Lincoln also follows the motives and machinations of Thaddeus Stevens, the stern, steely eyed chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, a position that in the 19th century doubled as House Majority Leader. He was « the dictator of the house »—a zealot in the cause of freedom and racial equality. Brilliant, sharp-tongued, and tremendously intimidating to friend and foe alike. In life, Stevens had little patience for Lincoln, whom he viewed as a temporizing moderate. In Spielberg’s movie, he is the president’s sworn enemy, cautiously willing to drop his armor and work with the president to abolish slavery.

Tommy Lee Jones captures Stevens’s spirit well. Unfortunately, Kushner’s writing leaves the part flat. In the film, Stevens deploys clever ad hominem attacks to smack down his opponents; in life, he never needed to resort to cheap shots, for he was deft at using cold, hard logic to leave his adversaries the laughing stock of the chamber. In the film, Kushner ascribes Stevens’s hatred of slavery to his secret private life. (Spoiler alert: if you don’t know much about Thaddeus Stevens and haven’t seen Lincoln yet, skip the rest of this paragraph). Indeed, Stevens’s life partner of 20 years was Lydia Hamilton Smith, whom the world knew as his black housekeeper. It was the worst-kept secret in Washington.

But Stevens’s relationship with Smith was an outgrowth of his conviction, not the cause of it. He grew up in Vermont, where he likely never met an African American. After college at Dartmouth, he moved to Adams County, Pennsylvania, on the border between slavery and freedom. There, as a young and starving attorney, he took on the case of one Norman Bruce, a Maryland farmer whose slave, Charity Butler, had fled across the state line with her two young children—one of them still a baby. Bruce tracked down his property and sued for their return; Charity sued for her freedom, claiming that she had ceased to be a slave the moment she stepped foot on free soil. Stevens was a clever attorney, and he won the trial for Bruce. Charity Butler and her children were remanded to slavery. Within three years, Stevens became an almost fanatical abolitionist. He put skin in the game, too, conducting fugitive slaves along the Underground Railroad, through his home and office, even while serving as a member of Congress. The realization of what he had done, and the memory of it, made him sick. He was unforgiving of other people’s shortcomings, because he was unforgiving of his own. The film captures none of this complexity, a fact attributable to the one-dimensional way in which Stevens is written.

Spielberg’s film makes Stevens an unnatural compromiser. He wasn’t. He was a politician’s politician and had no problem crawling in the mud to achieve an objective. A year and a half after the events portrayed in the movie, Stevens gave a rousing campaign speech in which he excoriated the Democratic party. « We shall hear it repeated ten thousand times, » he intoned, « the cry of ‘Negro Equality!’ The radicals would thrust the negro into your parlors, your bedrooms, and the bosoms of your wives and daughters….And then they [Democrats] will send up the grand chorus from every foul throat, ‘nigger,’ ‘nigger,’ ‘nigger,’ ‘nigger!’ ‘Down with the nigger party, we’re for the white man’s party.’ These unanswerable arguments will ring in every low bar room and be printed in every Blackguard sheet throughout the land whose fundamental maxim is ‘all men are created equal.' » In one paragraph, he managed to take down the crude racial incitements of his opponents, while simultaneously assuring listeners that those incitements were false. That was a politician.

* * *

One can find matters small and large with which to quibble. With the exception of Secretary of State William Seward (played convincingly by David Strathairn), Lincoln presents almost every public figure as either comical, quirky, weak-kneed or pathetically self-interested. Only the president is able to rise above the moment and see the end game. This treatment does injustice to men like Rep. James Ashley, Sen. Charles Sumner, and Sen. Ben Wade (misidentified in the credits as « Bluff » Wade, his nickname, for when challenged to a duel by a pro-slavery congressman he accepted and chose broadswords. His foe assumed that he was bluffing but didn’t care to find out.). These men were serious, committed legislators who fought a lonely fight for black freedom before the war, and a difficult struggle for black equality after it. They deserve better.

In the film, Stevens and Lincoln meet secretly to agree on strategy. There, Stevens lays out his plan for Reconstruction, including a massive expropriation of rebel plantations and land redistribution to freedmen and loyal whites. Lincoln tells Stevens that they will soon be « enemies » but for now, they are friends. The scene constitutes a clumsy attempt to deal with a complicated historical question. Stevens did not formulate his plan for Reconstruction until after Lincoln’s death, and the president had not yet decided on his own course of action. It is likely that he would not have embraced the radical blueprint in its entirety. But Lincoln did not view the radicals as enemies.

« They are nearer to me than the other side, in thought and sentiment, though bitterly hostile personally, » he told Hay. « They are utterly lawless—the unhandiest devils in the world to deal with—but after all their faces are set Zionwards. » Inadvertently, Spielberg has echoed a discredited school of Reconstruction historiography that dominated the field in the early 20th century. It doesn’t seem likely that Spielberg actually believes this interpretation, for his closing scene includes Lincoln’s fire-and-brimstone premonition that « every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another with the sword. » Lincoln could be just as cruel as Stevens.

Smaller quibbles:

The film’s gray-haired House Speaker, Schuyler Colfax, looks nothing like the young, black-haired House Speaker, Schulyer Colfax, in real life (interestingly, he does look a lot like Colfax’s much older predecessor, Galusha Grow).

Spielberg changed the names of many Democratic opponents of the 13th Amendment. That fact alone is problematic, but one of the pseudonyms assigned to a proslavery congressman, if I heard it right, is « Washburn. » There were actually four Washburn brothers who served in Congress before, during and after the war, and they all opposed slavery. Their mother would be very upset.

Hay and Nicolay are portrayed as cowering in Lincoln’s presence. They wouldn’t have. They knew him more intimately than anyone outside of his family, and they were brash, arrogant White House aides whom many people found a little too big for their britches (« a fault for which it seems to me either Nature or our tailors are to blame, » Hay once quipped.) Tony Kushner should have asked Aaron Sorkin to help write their parts.

* * *

But these are trivial objections, mostly. Lincoln is not a perfect film, but it is an important film. Spielberg has positioned his work as something that should unite a divided nation in the aftermath of the 2012 election, but, paradoxically, his story points to a different conclusion. Sean Wilentz, one of those rare historians who moves seamlessly between the academy and the public sphere, noted that « Abraham Lincoln was, first and foremost, a politician. » Lincoln probably didn’t bribe congressmen to pass the 13th Amendment, but he instructed others to do so. He forged a deep connection with soldiers and their families, and won 78 percent of the soldier vote in 1864 because of it. He knew the power of his office, and used it.

Days before Lincoln opened in limited release, the United States reelected its first black president. Barack Obama makes no secret of his love for Lincoln. He opened his first national campaign on the steps of the Illinois State Capitol, the building where Lincoln delivered his famous « House Divided » speech. Both men served several years in the Illinois state legislature, and both were elected to one term in Congress before improbably ascending to the presidency. A particular strain of history has imagined Lincoln as a great conciliator. Barack Obama has aspired to rise above politics and forge unity in a sharply divided polity. Like Lincoln, his enemies have made it all but impossible for him to do so.

Steven Spielberg’s film reminds us that there was another Lincoln: a profoundly controversial, loved and hated president. Before his apotheosis on Good Friday, 1865, he was scorned as much as he was revered. « It is a little singular that I who am not a vindictive man should have always been before the people for election in canvasses marked for their bitterness, » Lincoln told Hay. But Abraham Lincoln understood that politics was combat. He was able to reconcile his supreme confidence and a people’s touch. He came to believe that he was the hand of God without believing that he was God.

One has to assume that President Obama will soon take the opportunity to see Lincoln. If he does, we can hope that the film reminds him that he is clothed with immense power, and he should continue to use it in ways that will prove untidy in the moment, but wise in the rear-view mirror of history.

Voir aussi:

Le Mississippi abolit enfin l’esclavage grâce au film Lincoln

Slate

18/02/2013

Le dernier Steven Spielberg, Lincoln, qui retrace la bataille du 16e président américain pour l’adoption du 13e amendement abolissant l’esclavage aux Etats-Unis a permis sa ratification tardive et officielle dans l’Etat du Mississippi… 148 ans après, commente le Clarion Ledger.

C’est un professeur d’université, Ranjan Batra qui, après avoir vu le film et fait une rapide recherche sur Internet pour connaître les Etats ratificateurs, s’est rendu compte que le Mississippi n’avait toujours pas ratifié l’amendement.

Historiquement, après le vote de l’amendement par le Congrès en janvier 1865, ce dernier avait été proposé aux Etats fédérés pour ratification. Le 6 décembre 1865, il avait reçu les deux tiers des votes nécessaires grâce à la ratification de la Géorgie. Le Delaware, le Kentucky, le New Jersey et le Mississippi avaient clairement rejeté la mesure.

Dans les années suivantes, ces Etats ont ratifié le 13e amendement, à l’exception du Mississippi, qui a attendu 1995 pour faire cette démarche. Cependant, comme le note le site U.S. Constitution, «comme l’Etat ne l’a jamais notifié à l’Archiviste des Etats-Unis, la ratification n’est pas officielle».

L’envoi de la copie de la ratification au Bureau du registre fédéral des archives nationales est en effet nécessaire pour sa prise en compte officielle. Mais cela n’a pas été le cas pour le Mississippi en 1995, pour des raisons qui restent toujours inconnues.

Un collègue de Batra, Ken Sullivan, contacta alors le bureau du secrétaire d’Etat Delbert Hosemann, qui accepta de faire les démarches nécessaires. Le 30 janvier dernier, la copie de la résolution de 1995 adoptée par le Parlement du Mississippi a ainsi été enfin envoyée. L’accusé de réception du Registre fédéral, reçu le 7 février a alors officiellement entériné la ratification du 13e amendement de la Constitution.

Lincoln, nommé dans douze catégories aux prochains Oscars, a en revanche eu un impact négatif pour un autre Etat, le Connecticut. Après avoir vu dans le film deux membres du Congrès du Connecticut voter contre l’abolition de l’esclavage, Joe Courtney, aussi représentant du Connecticut au Congrès, a tenu à vérifier les faits. Et il découvrit que Spielberg s’était bien trompé sur ce point, tous les représentants du Connecticut ayant voté en faveur du 13e amendement à la Chambre des Représentants.

Dans une lettre envoyée au réalisateur et à Dreamworks, l’élu a alors demandé que la modification soit apportée, afin que son Etat ne soit pas mis injustement du mauvais côté de l’histoire, surtout pour un thème aussi sensible que l’esclavage.

Voir également:

This Congressman Fact-Checked ‘Lincoln’ and Won

Reuters

Adam Clark Estes

Feb 5, 2013

If there is such a thing as winning at fact-checking, Rep. Joe Courtney gets a gold medal for calling out factual errors in Stephen Spielberg’s Lincoln. The Connecticut congressman wants it fixed, too.

Courtney was watching Lincoln over the weekend — better late than never, right? — when he was a little taken aback by the scene showing two Connecticut congressman voting against ending slavery. « ‘Wow. Connecticut voted against abolishing slavery?' » Courtney remembers other theater-goers asking after the scene. « I obviously had the same reaction. It was really bugging me. » Being a Connecticut congressman himself and a onetime history major at Tufts, Courtney went digging for facts in the archives, and facts are what he found. « After some digging and a check of the Congressional Record from January 31, 1865, » Courtney explained in a letter to Spielberg and DreamWorks explaining his findings. « I learned that in fact, Connecticut’s entire Congressional delegation, including four members of the House of Representatives … all voted to abolish slavery. »

Courtney goes on to ask, quite politely, that this « distortion of easily verifiable facts » be corrected « if possible … before Lincoln is released on DVD. » Neither Spielberg nor Dreamworks has responded yet, but this has to be embarrassing for both parties. It’s not like they didn’t do their research. Spielberg and Tony Kushner, the movie’s screenwriter, did a fair amount of research in the years-long process of making the film and met with the country’s top Lincoln scholars. Since the premiere, the film’s historical accuracy — historical assertiveness, even — has been praised by film critics and historians alike. People fact-checked Lincoln, too, and while folks like Joshua Zeitz at The Atlantic found some nuanced errors, everyone apparently missed the Connecticut vote count detail.

The big question now, of course, is whether Spielberg will actually change the film. If he does, Courtney definitely wins at fact-checking, and if he doesn’t, well he’s still an exceptional Connecticutian. We’ll know by February 26, when Lincoln is scheduled be released on DVD. Until then, we’re on the edge of our seats.

Voir enfin:

A propos du dernier film de Steven Spielberg: “Lincoln”

A l’encontre

le 29 – janvier – 2013

Fin janvier 2013, le dernier film de Steven Spielberg consacré aux derniers mois de la présidence Lincoln (1861-1865) est sorti sur les écrans suisses. Ce film a stimulé de nombreuses discussions dans les pays anglo-saxons. Nous pensons que deux textes publiés sur le site de nos amis américains de l’International Socialist Organization intéresseront nos lecteurs et lectrices. Il s’agit d’un compte rendu, publié le 29 novembre 2012, d’Alan Maass, suivi d’une brève réplique, en date du 8 janvier 2013, de Charlie Post. (Rédaction A l’Encontre)

Lincoln l’inflexible

Alan Maass

Il est toujours préoccupant de voir que les personnes avec lesquelles vous êtes toujours en désaccord apprécient le film que vous aimez alors que les personnes avec lesquelles vous êtes rarement en divergence ne peuvent pas le supporter.

Les représentants les plus en vue de l’establishment politique et médiatique, d’un côté, ont apprécié le dernier film de Steven Spielberg, Lincoln, parce qu’ils considèrent qu’il s’agit d’une leçon sur les merveilles du compromis bipartisan.

Je pense que ce lieu commun a dû être manifeste pour quiconque a vu le film. Une poignée de journalistes ont sans doute lu la description du film destinée à la presse. Celle-ci indique que Lincoln traite de la façon dont le 13e amendement [de la Constitution des Etats-Unis, lequel abolit l’esclavage et la servitude involontaire sur son territoire] a été adopté par un Congrès divisé et partisan. Sur cette base, ils ont décidé que cela devait être une fable sur le Washington [la capitale politique fédérale] d’aujourd’hui, avec Lincoln comme remplaçant de Barack Obama et les manœuvres visant à mettre un terme légal au crime historique de l’esclavage comme n’étant rien d’autre que l’équivalent XIXe siècle de la campagne cynique de photo op [photo opportunity, soit un moment particulier, «historique», au cours duquel une «célébrité» peut être photographiée] d’Obama avec le gouverneur du New Jersey, Chris Christie, après l’ouragan Sandy. Vous avez bien lu, il ne s’agit pas d’une invention de ma part [1]!

Ces personnes ont complètement, épouvantablement, tort.

Lincoln, en réalité, parle d’un président qui refuse les compromis lorsqu’il s’est agi de faire disparaître l’esclavage de la Constitution; un président qui ne fait des compromis ni avec ses ennemis politiques, ni avec ses alliés, ni avec ses proches conseillers, ni avec les «modérés» vacillant au centre – et qui est déterminé, frisant le fanatisme, à atteindre cette fin par tous les moyens.

Le fait que l’on puisse se tromper au point de confondre cela avec le Washington d’aujourd’hui – où quiconque qui s’y trouve, en particulier Barack Obama – dépasse mon entendement.

De l’autre côté, certaines voix à gauche ont critiqué Lincoln car il met en scène «des personnages afro-américains qui ne font à peu près rien, si ce n’est d’attendre passivement que des hommes blancs les libèrent»[2], pour «empêcher efficacement l’intégration des Noirs en tant qu’acteurs politiques de plein droit»[3] ainsi que pour enseigner «qu’un changement radical se déroule au travers de la triangulation, des accords de coulisses ainsi que par un empressement à renoncer à toute pureté idéologique» [4].

Elles n’ont pas tout à fait tort. Toutefois, elles se trompent sur la plupart des points.

Lincoln ne concerne pas, en premier lieu, tout ce qui s’est produit d’important au cours de la Guerre civile.

Il est exact que Lincoln ne met pas en scène, parmi ses principaux personnages, des esclaves noirs ou des soldats noirs de l’Union et que le film, par conséquent, ne présente pas la façon dont les Noirs ont joué un rôle central, catalyseur, dans leur propre émancipation.

Il est également vrai que Lincoln ne représente pas le mouvement abolitionniste ainsi que le rôle décisif qu’il a joué. A une merveilleuse exception près, les opposants radicaux de l’esclavage sont présentés dans le film comme unidimensionnels et un peu bêtes. Spielberg et Tony Kushner, le scénariste, auraient pu faire mieux. Pour être juste, toutefois, je doute vraiment du fait que l’on puisse considérer Lincoln comme le dernier mot sur les abolitionnistes radicaux ainsi que sur leur importance historique.

Voyez donc Glory [film de 1989 réalisé par Edward Zwick, mettant en scène le 54e régiment du Massachusetts, composé de soldats afro-américains], si vous ne l’avez pas encore fait, et lisez au sujet des abolitionnistes jusqu’à ce que quelqu’un fasse un film qui soit digne de leurs mémoires.

En attendant, Lincoln mérite cependant d’être vu comme quelque chose de plus qu’un «film au sujet de vieux hommes blancs portant barbes et perruques».

Le film ne concerne qu’un seul épisode – celui du vote de la Chambre des Représentants, au cours des derniers mois de la Guerre civile, du 13e amendement proscrivant l’esclavage – d’une lutte de plusieurs décennies. Il s’agit toutefois d’un épisode crucial.

C’est aussi un film qui traite d’une figure de cette lutte. Mais Lincoln est l’une des plus importantes personnalités dans la lutte contre l’esclavage, son histoire est digne d’être comprise. Il s’agit de celle d’un modéré politique qui a été transformé par les événements, qui est parvenu, malgré ces défauts, à la hauteur de l’occasion historique qu’il vivait, alors que d’autres autour de lui ne l’ont pas fait. C’est également celle de quelqu’un dont la contribution à la cause de la liberté a été profonde.

Je ne me préoccupe guère de corriger les experts qui souhaitent engager Lincoln dans un débat sur pourquoi les Démocrates et les Républicains ont besoin de s’accorder sur la réduction du déficit. Je suppose que ces personnes ne lisent pas ce site internet [SocialistWorker.org].

Je parie cependant qu’il y a des lecteurs qui se demandent si Spielberg a réalisé un autre spectacle hollywoodien vide, passant à côté des réelles questions historiques. Mon opinion est que cela n’est pas le cas et mon conseil est que vous devriez donner une chance à Lincoln.

*****

Lincoln traite-t-il donc bien, ainsi que l’a écrit Corey Robin, des «hommes blancs de la démocratie»?

Spielberg et Kushner ont échoué à créer un seul personnage Noir qui participe aux débats autour desquels tourne le film.

Le décor est, en effet, principalement constitué des coulisses du pouvoir à Washington, desquelles, en vertu de cette même Constitution que Lincoln voulait changer, les Noirs étaient exclus. Cependant, ainsi que l’a souligné Kate Masur dans un article du New York Times, deux personnages du film, les domestiques de la Maison Blanche, Elizabeth Keckley et William Slade, étaient de véritables personnalités, parties prenantes d’une «communauté organisée et très politisée d’Afro-Américains libres» à Washington. Keckley a collecté de l’argent et sollicité des dons de nourriture et de vêtements pour les réfugiés noirs du Sud, alors que Slade était un dirigeant d’une organisation de Noirs qui tentait de promouvoir les droits civils.

Dans un film où les principaux personnages parlent (et parlent, parlent et parlent encore) de l’esclavage, de la politique et de la politique antiesclavagiste, des personnages noirs auraient vraiment pu tenir certaines de ces conversations.

Cela dit, deux points importants doivent être mentionnés en faveur de Spielberg et de Kushner. Premièrement, Lincoln traite de l’esclavage. Cette remarque peut sembler stupide. Elle ne l’est pourtant pas. Il existe une vaste industrie artisanale dans les départements d’histoire des universités qui met de côté l’esclavage comme le facteur principal de la Guerre civile. C’est encore pire lorsque l’on regarde la culture populaire. Songez seulement au nombre de fois que vous avez entendu, comme première remarque au sujet de la Guerre civile: elle a dressé «des frères les uns contre les autres», il s’agit d’un conflit tragique, les sudistes étaient des gentlemen, et blablabla.

Spielberg et Kushner ont réalisé un film dans lequel l’esclavage est la seule question politique d’importance. Il s’agit d’une claire reconnaissance de ce qu’il y avait de plus révolutionnaire au sujet de la Guerre civile. C’est là quelque chose à porter à leur crédit.

Deuxièmement, le seul fait que les Noirs ne soient pas présentés tout au long du film comme «des acteurs politiques de plein droit» ne signifie pas pour autant que le film ne leur reconnaisse pas ce rôle. Je crois, en fait, que la lutte des Noirs pour leur propre émancipation est présente au second plan tout au long du film en raison de la manière dont il débute.

Les premières minutes de Lincoln, à l’instar d’un autre film de Spielberg, traitant de la Deuxième guerre mondiale, Il faut sauver le soldat Ryan, déroule d’horribles images du champ de bataille. Dès le départ sonne ainsi le glas terrible de la plus sanglante guerre de l’histoire des Etats-Unis. De façon tout aussi importante, on voit aussi quelque chose d’autre: des soldats Noirs, combattant dans les rangs de l’Union, sont impliqués dans la bataille. Les Noirs furent, en partie, initialement recruté dans les armées de l’Union au cours de la guerre une fois que des abolitionnistes, comme Frederick Douglass, eussent vaincu les réticences initiales de Lincoln. C’est là une autre étape cruciale sur le chemin qui transforma la Guerre civile en une lutte révolutionnaire visant à détruire l’esclavage.

La scène suivante se déroule après les combats. Deux soldats Noirs discutent avec Lincoln, en visite sur le champ de bataille. Le premier soldat tente de maintenir la conversation autour d’histoires de guerre, alors que le second ne veut rien entendre de cela: il souhaite savoir si Lincoln pense qu’il est juste que les Noirs ne perçoivent pas la même solde et qu’ils ne puissent pas être promus.

La conversation est interrompue par deux jeunes soldats blancs. Ils disent avoir été présents lorsque Lincoln a délivré sa fameuse Adresse de Gettysburg [un discours de 2 minutes prononcé le 18 novembre 1863] sur le site de la bataille la plus importante de la guerre. Ils commencent alors à la réciter.

Cela peut ressembler à une niaiserie visant à prouver la «grandeur» de Lincoln. Cette anecdote est toutefois plus vraie que nature et comprend quelque chose d’important: les morts et la violence de la Guerre civile étaient tels que les soldats engagés dans cette guerre ressentaient le besoin d’être guidé par un objectif politique leur permettant de soutenir le sacrifice. La capacité de Lincoln d’exprimer les buts et les idéaux du «côté nordiste» était, ainsi, l’une des armes secrètes de l’Armée de l’Union.

Les deux jeunes recrues rejoignent leurs unités avant même d’avoir pu terminer leur discours, laissant ainsi le second soldat Noir réciter: «C’est à nous de faire en sorte que ces morts ne soient pas morts en vain; à nous de vouloir qu’avec l’aide de Dieu notre pays renaisse dans la liberté; à nous de décider que le gouvernement du peuple, par le peuple et pour le peuple, ne disparaîtra jamais de la surface de la terre.»

Ces paroles me semblent être un défi à Lincoln, non moins que les questions du soldat concernant les soldes inégales. Utilisant les mêmes paroles que Lincoln, il demande en faveur de quoi toutes ces souffrances et luttes ont été menées. La Guerre civile se terminera-t-elle par une «renaissance dans la liberté»? Qu’est-ce que Lincoln entend entreprendre à cette fin?

*****

Il s’est avéré que Lincoln a été déchiré par cette même question: la guerre se terminera-t-elle ou non par la mort de l’esclavage?

Lincoln, souvenons-nous, était un juriste et non un théoricien politique. Il voyait la question de l’esclavage à travers ses lunettes juridiques. Il a dévoilé, en 1862, une Proclamation d’émancipation dans laquelle il était déclaré que tous les esclaves des Etats du sud encore en rébellion étaient «libres pour toujours» à compter du nouvel An [1er janvier 1863].

C’est là une autre indication de la transformation de Lincoln en un modéré souhaitant le compromis en un dirigeant de guerre prêt à prendre des mesures révolutionnaires. A partir de cet instant, ainsi que Lincoln l’a parfaitement compris, l’armée de l’Union est devenue une armée de libération, dès lors que l’émancipation pouvait être mise en œuvre partout où elle s’enfonçait dans le Sud. La révolte des esclaves du Sud, fuyant les plantations, était soutenue par les armes et les canons de l’Union.

La Proclamation d’émancipation était toutefois clairement une mesure de guerre. Une scène du début du film montre le président s’étendant sur les différents scénarios par lesquels une cour de justice en temps de paix pourrait la déclarer inconstitutionnelle. Si la Proclamation d’émancipation ne garantit pas que les anciens esclaves seront «libres à jamais», qu’est-ce que le permettra? La réponse de Lincoln: passer le 13e amendement, encastrant la liberté dans la Constitution elle-même.

Une complication se présente toutefois: le Sud était proche d’une défaite miliaire au début de 1865. Ainsi que William Seward, le secrétaire d’Etat de Lincoln, le démontre au début du film: une majorité de nordistes pourrait soutenir le 13e amendement pour autant que le Sud soit toujours en guerre de telle sorte que l’ennemi soit privé de sa principale source de travail. Les plus conservateurs parmi eux, cependant, seraient hésitants face à une telle action radicale si la guerre s’achevait.

Lincoln aboutit donc à la conclusion qu’il doit voir passer le 13e amendement avant l’achèvement de la guerre. La course aux votes – tout en empêchant à la Confédération d’accepter les termes de la capitulation – est l’intrigue fondamentale de Lincoln.

Une fois qu’il s’est entendu sur ce qui devait être fait, Lincoln utilise tous les moyens en son pouvoir pour atteindre cette fin. Là où il peut faire appel aux «meilleurs d’entre eux» [the better angels of our nature dans le texte, allusion aux derniers mots du premier discours d’investiture de Lincoln], il plaide auprès des opposants démocrates afin qu’ils soient du bon côté lors d’un moment historique. Là où il ne le peut pas, il emploie un trio de louches bonhommes afin de les faire chanter et de les soudoyer afin d’obtenir leurs votes.

Il autorisa, parmi ses camarades de parti républicains, le leader de l’aile conservatrice du parti, Preston Blair, d’engager des négociations secrètes de paix avec la Confédération comme condition d’un vote unitaire des républicains en faveur de l’amendement. Cela alors même que Lincoln savait qu’il ne pouvait conclure la paix avant le vote.

Il demanda aux républicains radicaux de faire tout ce qui était possible afin de faire passer l’amendement, y compris de limiter leur rhétorique de telle sorte qu’ils ne se mettent pas à dos les votes des conservateurs qu’il entendait réunir. Lincoln dépeint les radicaux comme méfiants face aux motivations du président. Thaddeus Stevens, l’un des dirigeants radicaux, reconnaît que Lincoln a franchi le point de non-retour. «Abraham Lincoln nous a demandé de travailler avec lui afin de conduire l’esclavage à la mort», dit-il.

*****

Selon Aaron Bady, un critique radical du film, tout cela est seulement «le triomphe d’un politique faiseur de compromis.» Ce que je ne comprends pas, toutefois, est ceci: où est le compromis?

Lincoln n’a pas demandé aux radicaux de soutenir un amendement édulcoré ou une mesure de compromis. Le 13e amendement met l’esclavage hors la loi, point à la ligne. Lincoln, d’un autre côté, a permis à un allié plus conservateur de tenter de négocier un terme à la guerre, alors qu’il planifiait de le trahir si la paix aboutissait trop rapidement.

Il faut ajouter, pour être clair, qu’en empêchant une négociation de paix, Lincoln prolongeait une guerre qui était, alors, sans précédent par l’ampleur de ses destructions et le nombre de ses morts.

Etait-ce un compromis que de demander à Thaddeaus Stevens de ne pas déclarer, lors du débat au Congrès, qu’il espérait que le 13e amendement conduirait à une égalité complète entre les Noirs et les blancs? Le Stevens du film [joué par Tommy Lee Jones] se débat douloureusement pour contenir ses convictions les plus profondes. Il distingue toutefois, à la fin, ce qui fait la différence entre un compromis face à un principe et une manœuvre tactique en vue d’atteindre une fin. Le passage du 13e amendement a fait plus de bruit que le plus remarquable des discours de Stevens.

L’ironie de la critique formulée par Aaron Bady [du New ¥ork Times] est que, dans l’histoire réelle de la Guerre civile, Lincoln se distingue à chaque tournant crucial par son refus du compromis. Cela contraste avec ses compagnons de parti républicains, y compris ceux bénéficiant de solides références abolitionnistes, disposés à en faire. Lincoln a rejeté auparavant d’autres appels à la négociation avec le sud, au risque même de perdre le pouvoir au profit des démocrates lors des élections. Une fois qu’il a arrêté une politique au sujet de l’émancipation ou de la formation de régiments de soldats Noirs, Lincoln a résisté à toutes les propositions visant à en limiter la portée.

Le film de Spielberg, en ce sens, confirme les observations d’un journaliste radical, vivant à la même époque en Angleterre, qui a écrit avec perspicacité au sujet de la Guerre civile aux Etats-Unis lorsqu’il n’étudiait pas l’économie politique.

maxlincoln_prdKarl Marx a ainsi reconnu l’importance titanesque de la lutte contre l’esclavage mais aussi le rôle particulier joué par Lincoln [voir la remarquable introduction de Robin Blackburn à un recueil de textes de Marx et Lincoln Une révolution inachevée, Ed. Syllepse pour le français]:

«La figure de Lincoln est originale dans les annales de l’histoire. Nulle initiative, nulle force de persuasion idéaliste, nulle attitude ni pose historiques. Il donne toujours à ses actes les plus importants la forme la plus anodine […]

Rien n’est plus facile que de relever, dans les actions d’État de Lincoln, des traits inesthétiques, des insuffisances logiques, des côtés burlesques et des contradictions politiques […]

Néanmoins, Lincoln prendra place immédiatement aux côtés de Washington dans l’histoire des États-Unis et de l’humanité. De fait, aujourd’hui que l’événement le plus insignifiant assume en Europe un air mélodramatique, n’est-il pas significatif que dans le Nouveau-Monde les faits importants se drapent dans le voile du quotidien?»

[Article publié le 12 octobre 1862 dans le journal autrichien Die Presse, l’article traite de l’importance et de la signification de la Proclamation d’émancipation pour le 1er janvier 1863, faite le 22 septembre 1862, et qui est, selon Marx dans le même article, «qui est le document le plus important de l’histoire américaine depuis la fondation de l’Union puisqu’il met en pièces la vieille Constitution américaine: son manifeste sur l’abolition de l’esclavage.» – traduction de R. Dangeville]

Lincoln mérite d’être célébré non parce qu’il était un grand penseur abolitionniste ou un organisateur mais en raison du rôle historique particulier qu’il joua en tant que dirigeant politique de la classe dirigeante nordiste lorsque le conflit avec le pouvoir esclavagiste a éclaté. Quels que soient ses défauts, Lincoln ne s’est pas dérobé ou n’a pas renoncé à ce rôle. Il a plutôt relevé le défi à chaque tournant dans la chaîne continue des événements.

*****

Je suis convaincu que certaines des hésitations qui empêchent de comprendre Lincoln tiennent dans le fait que l’on observe la Guerre civile à travers les lunettes de la politique américaine des XXe et XXIe siècles. Nous serions scandalisé si Steven Spielberg réalisait un film sur la façon dont Lyndon Johnson a signé le Civil Rights Act de 1964. Quelle est donc la différence avec Lincoln?

En un mot, il s’agit de celle-ci: Lincoln était le dirigeant politique du capitalisme nordiste à une époque où ce dernier était engagé dans une bataille pour la domination des Etats-Unis dans leur ensemble contre les dominants réactionnaires d’un système sudiste qui leur permettait d’extraire leurs énormes richesses du travail esclave. Les intérêts du capitalisme aux Etats-Unis coïncidèrent – probablement pour la dernière fois dans l’histoire du monde, ainsi qu’il le semble – avec une extension massive de la démocratie et de la liberté pour mettre un terme à l’esclavage.

Afin de conduire le Nord à la victoire, Lincoln a été forcé de participer à l’une des luttes les plus importantes jamais connues aux Etats-Unis en faveur de la justice. Lincoln n’a pris aucune part dans l’ouverture de cette lutte et qu’une très faible dans ce qui devait aboutir à un conflit ouvert. Il a toutefois été un acteur important à la fin de celle-ci, en y endossant un rôle particulier. Le film de Spielberg saisit ce rôle d’une façon remarquable.

Cela ne signifie pas pour autant que nous ignorions les limites de Lincoln ainsi que ses côtés franchement réactionnaires. Alors que les données historiques sont très claires sur le fait que Lincoln a été personnellement dégoûté par l’esclavage, il est tout aussi établi qu’il soutenait des idées racistes. En 1858, deux ans avant qu’il occupe la Maison-Blanche, par exemple, lors d’un débat, Lincoln nia qu’il soutenait «l’égalité sociale et politique des races blanches et noires», déclarant, «au même titre que quiconque, je suis en faveur de disposer de la position supérieure assignée à la race blanche».

Je pense qu’il y a de bonnes preuves que ses idées ont été réélaborées en raison de l’engagement de Lincoln dans une lutte qui a changé l’histoire, ce que le film suggère d’ailleurs. Je pense également que c’est une bonne chose que Lincoln ne le voile pas de pureté.

Une fois que toutes ses machinations pour faire passer le 13e amendement ont passé – à la fin du film – et lui permettent alors d’exprimer ses vues au sujet de l’égalité et de ce qu’il envisage pour l’avenir au sujet des relations entre les Blancs et les Noirs, sa réponse est maladroite et hésitante. «Je pense que nous allons nous habituer les uns aux autres», conclut-il.

La puissance émotionnelle du moment vient plutôt de la réaction de Stevens, qui s’enfuit avec l’original de l’amendement pour une célébration spéciale. C’est là sans doute la scène la plus susceptible de vous arracher des larmes.

La transformation politique de Lincoln, plutôt que personnelle, est cependant indubitable. Dans son premier discours d’investiture, en 1861, Lincoln déclare qu’il n’a aucune intention «de mettre une entrave à l’institution de l’esclavage». Dans son second discours, il affirme – dans un discours répété à la fin de Lincoln: «Nous espérons du fond du cœur, nous prions avec ferveur, que ce terrible fléau de la guerre s’achève rapidement. Si, cependant, Dieu veut qu’il se poursuive jusqu’à ce que sombrent les richesses accumulées par 250 ans de labeur non partagé de l’esclave ainsi que jusqu’à ce que chaque goutte de sang jaillie sous le fouet soit payée par une autre versée par l’épée, comme il a été dit il y a trois mille ans, il nous faudra reconnaître que “les décisions du Seigneur sont justes et vraiment équitables”.» [Traduction française, complétée, tirée d’un site officiel des Etats-Unis.]

Le film de Spielberg et Kushner apporte sans doute une nouvelle immédiateté à ces paroles. Leur argument tient sans doute en ceci: Lincoln avait la possibilité de mettre un terme à l’une des guerres les plus sanglantes jusqu’alors avec toutefois la perspective que la justice – ainsi qu’il la comprenait – demeure incertaine. Lincoln a choisi de poursuivre la guerre afin de persévérer dans la voie de la justice.

C’est quelque chose qui méritait qu’on en fasse un film. (Traduction A l’Encontre)

[1] http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/11/if-only-obamas-and-chris-christies-critics-could-watch-lincoln/264482/

[2] http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/13/opinion/in-spielbergs-lincoln-passive-black-characters.html?pagewanted=all

[3] http://coreyrobin.com/2012/11/25/steven-spielbergs-white-men-of-democracy/

[4] http://jacobinmag.com/2012/11/lincoln-against-the-radicals-2/

_______

Les mauvais services rendus par “Lincoln”

Par Charlie Post

Le compte rendu d’Alan Maass du film de Spielberg, Lincoln, a ajouté un peu de complexité aux débats sur ce film excellent – mais opère une explication historique faussée.

Des esclaves noirs qui se sont échappés en Caroline du Sud et cultiventdu coton pour eux (autour de 1862-1865)

Des esclaves noirs qui se sont échappés en Caroline du Sud et cultivent du coton pour eux (autour de 1862-1865)

Maass a tout à fait raison lorsqu’il dit que Lincoln n’a jamais été, aussi bien dans le film que dans la réalité historique, un «grand faiseur de compromis». Les parallèles avec Obama, malgré les désirs du scénariste Tony Kushner (voir son interview révélateur avec Bill Moyers [1]) ne sont pas fondés. Ainsi que le montrent des biographies de Lincoln – en particulier celles de James McPherson Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution (Oxford University Press, 1992) et d’Eric Foner The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery (Norton & Company, 2011) –, une fois que ce dernier est parvenu à une position politique, il n’en a jamais varié.

Nous devrions toutefois être clairs sur le fait que Lincoln était, pour reprendre les termes de McPherson, un «révolutionnaire réticent». Lincoln était un pragmatique. Il réagissait aux «faits du terrain»: en particulier devant les fuites en masse d’esclaves durant la guerre (ce que W.E.B. DuBois [1868-1963, sociologue, historien, activiste des droits civiques; il fut le premier Afro-Américain à obtenir un doctorat, créateur de la National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] a appelé la «grève générale») et l’effondrement de l’esclavage qui en a été la conséquence.

C’est précisément cette «réticence» de Lincoln à conduire une révolution complète dans le Sud au cours de la Guerre civile – ainsi que le rôle décisif joué par les fuites en masse des plantations par les esclaves – qui manque dans le portrait hagiographique de Spielberg et Kushner.

Il ne suffit pas de dire que «Lincoln ne concerne pas tout ce qui s’est déroulé au cours de la Guerre civile». La décision de Spielberg et Kushner de se concentrer exclusivement sur les machinations parlementaires qui entourent le 13e amendement, bien que permettant de réaliser un film magnifique, produit une vision de l’émancipation profondément faussée.

Lincoln est, tout d’abord, présenté comme un avocat cohérent d’une abolition immédiate, sans compensation et permanente de l’esclavage. Il s’agit là d’une position qu’il a finalement adoptée seulement au milieu de l’année 1862. Avant sa décision de publier la Proclamation d’émancipation, Lincoln a promu, sans succès, différents plans en vue d’une émancipation graduelle, avec compensation des maîtres (en particulier ceux des Etats «frontaliers» [expression désignant les Etats esclavagistes restés dans les rangs de l’Union après la Sécession des Etats du Sud, les premiers étant sur la frontière entre les Etats «libres» et «esclavagistes»]) ainsi que l’établissement de colonies pour les Afro-Américains en Amérique centrale, dans les Caraïbes ou en Afrique.

Le film, ensuite, exagère grandement l’impact du 13e amendement. Une grande partie de la recherche historique réalisée au cours des vingt dernières années a démontré qu’à partir de la fin de l’année 1864, l’esclavage comme base de la production dans le Sud était mort.

Alors que certains dirigeants politiques de la Confédération ont pu croire que «l’institution particulière» [formule fallacieuse servant à désigner, sans la nommer, l’institution esclavagiste] pouvait être réanimée, les anciens esclaves eux-mêmes – en joignant les armées de l’Union comme espions, travailleurs et soldats ainsi qu’en auto-organisant des proto-syndicats, en saisissant les plantations abandonnées et autres activités du même ordre – ont détruit l’esclavage. Selon Kevin Anderson, dans son ouvrage Marx at the Margins [lire la traduction de la conclusion de cet ouvrage sur ce site en date du 16 juillet 2012 http://alencontre.org/societe/marx-plus-que-dans-les-marges.html%5D, Marx a adopté la notion de «l’auto-émancipation» à partir de la lutte des esclaves au cours de la Guerre civile des Etats-Unis. Pour le dire simplement, le 13e amendement a légalement reconnu la réalité de la lutte de classes dans le Sud.

[… L’auteur conclu en se demandant comment les défenseurs d’une tradition du «socialisme à partir d’en bas» réagiraient devant un film traitant des grandes luttes ouvrières des années 1930 aux Etats-Unis en se concentrant sur un arrêt de la Cour suprême en 1937 portant sur la constitutionnalité des nouveaux syndicats plutôt que sur les luttes ouvrières elles-mêmes. – Réd.] (Traduction A l’Encontre)

6 Responses to Lincoln: Jusqu’à ce que chaque goutte de sang jaillie sous le fouet soit payée par une autre versée par l’épée (Not perfect but important: Spielberg’s film reminds us that Lincoln was first and foremost a politician)

  1. Very great post. I simply stumbled upon your weblog and
    wanted to say that I have truly loved browsing your blog posts.
    After all I’ll be subscribing for your rss feed and I am hoping you write again soon!

    J'aime

  2. hollywood dit :

    Hello! This is kind of off topic but I need some guidance from an established blog.
    Is it difficult to set up your own blog? I’m not very techincal but
    I can figure things out pretty quick. I’m thinking about making
    my own but I’m not sure where to start. Do you have any tips
    or suggestions? With thanks

    J'aime

Votre commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Google. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur la façon dont les données de vos commentaires sont traitées.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :