Rencontres en ligne: Quant trop de choix tue le choix (The date not taken: is dating’s globalization the end of monogamy?)

Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division (…) et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10: 34-36)
Le silence éternel de ces espaces infinis m’effraie. Pascal
This cloverleaf madness just fills me with sadness. We glide on these streams just postponing our dreams. The love that’s inside us How come it divides us? It just ain’t like Cole Porter It’s just all too short order. Michael Franks
Dans notre époque dérégulée, individualiste, où l’on se voit de moins en moins dicter sa conduite par sa famille ou par son village, c’est l’intégralité de la vie qui est entrée dans le règne de l’hyperchoix. Dans le monde actuel, libéré d’un cadre institutionnel ou coutumier très contraignant, on a le sentiment de toujours pouvoir choisir et une impression d’illimité. Gilles Lipovetsky (philosophe, université de Grenoble)
Nike propose aujourd’hui une chaussure unique, au look déterminé par le futur acheteur. Les sites de rencontres se multiplient sur la bulle, internet, en proposant un choix de plus en plus précis de la personne que l’on souhaite avoir à ses côtés : intelligent, gentil, mais aussi des caractéristiques incroyablement millimétrées (les pieds sur terre, mais pas ennuyeux, entre 1,77 mètre et 1, 82 m….). On customize à tout-va, parce que l’on a un choix insensé. Le nombre de célibataires explose littéralement dans les grandes villes, on peut donc choisir ce que l’on veut, on a le choix…Mais le paradoxe du choix, est que dès que l’on manque d’options, on parvient très facilement à attribuer sa déconvenue ou sa frustration à la Société ou à la terre entière ! Par contre, si on est malheureux dans un contexte de choix multiple et d’abondance, on s’attribue la responsabilité de l’échec. Mais l’être humain n’apprécie que très peu l’échec, surtout quand il ne le partage avec personne. In fine s’installe une certaine perplexité face à ces choix multiples, qui nous encourage à ne plus nous engager véritablement, que ce soit en amour, en amitié ou même professionnellement. Pseekliss
Le zap relationnel et de l’industrialisation de la drague sont des thèmes en lien avec celui des sites de rencontres amoureuses. L’immense possibilité des rencontres proposée par les quelques 1000 sites de rencontres en France influe sur la durée des relations. Selon une étude menée par le CSA, 62 % des personnes inscrites sur des sites de rencontres en lignes recherchent des aventures sans lendemain alors que seul 35 % désirent une relation sérieuse. Selon cette même étude, seul un tiers des désinscrits ont rencontré quelqu’un pour une durée non précisée, et plus de 70 % des personnes inscrites pensent que les sites de rencontres n’influent en rien sur l’obtention d’un rendez vous significatif. Wikipedia
Seules 5 % des rencontres déboucheraient sur une relation durable. Un chiffre à manier avec précaution, tout comme celui relatif au nombre des habitués de sites : les listes d’abonnés ne sont pas toujours remises à jour… Sciences humaines
A large array of options may diminish the attractiveness of what people actually choose, the reason being that thinking about the attractions of some of the unchosen options detracts from the pleasure derived from the chosen one. Barry Schwartz
Internet dating has made people more disposable. (…) Internet dating may be partly responsible for a rise in the divorce rates.(…) Low quality, unhappy and unsatisfying marriages are being destroyed as people drift to Internet dating sites. (…) The market is hugely more efficient … People expect to—and this will be increasingly the case over time—access people anywhere, anytime, based on complex search requests … Such a feeling of access affects our pursuit of love … the whole world (versus, say, the city we live in) will, increasingly, feel like the market for our partner(s). Our pickiness will probably increase. (…) Above all, Internet dating has helped people of all ages realize that there’s no need to settle for a mediocre relationship. Comments from dating sites managers
Online dating does nothing more than remove a barrier to meeting. Online dating doesn’t change my taste, or how I behave on a first date, or whether I’m going to be a good partner. It only changes the process of discovery. As for whether you’re the type of person who wants to commit to a long-term monogamous relationship or the type of person who wants to play the field, online dating has nothing to do with that. That’s a personality thing. Alex Mehr (Zoosk)
The future will see better relationships but more divorce. The older you get as a man, the more experienced you get. You know what to do with women, how to treat them and talk to them. Add to that the effect of online dating. I often wonder whether matching you up with great people is getting so efficient, and the process so enjoyable, that marriage will become obsolete. Dan Winchester
Historically, relationships have been billed as ‘hard’ because, historically, commitment has been the goal. You could say online dating is simply changing people’s ideas about whether commitment itself is a life value. Look, if I lived in Iowa, I’d be married with four children by now. That’s just how it is. Greg Blatt (Match.com)
I think divorce rates will increase as life in general becomes more real-time. Think about the evolution of other kinds of content on the Web—stock quotes, news. The goal has always been to make it faster. The same thing will happen with meeting. It’s exhilarating to connect with new people, not to mention beneficial for reasons having nothing to do with romance. You network for a job. You find a flatmate. Over time you’ll expect that constant flow. People always said that the need for stability would keep commitment alive. But that thinking was based on a world in which you didn’t meet that many people. Another online-dating exec hypothesized an inverse correlation between commitment and the efficiency of technology. Niccolò Formai (Badoo)
 Premarital sex used to be taboo. So women would become miserable in marriages, because they wouldn’t know any better. But today, more people have had failed relationships, recovered, moved on, and found happiness. They realize that that happiness, in many ways, depends on having had the failures. As we become more secure and confident in our ability to find someone else, usually someone better, monogamy and the old thinking about commitment will be challenged very harshly. Societal values always lose out. Noel Biderman (Ashley Madison)
You could say online dating allows people to get into relationships, learn things, and ultimately make a better selection. But you could also easily see a world in which online dating leads to people leaving relationships the moment they’re not working—an overall weakening of commitment. Gian Gonzaga (eHarmony)
You can say three things. First, the best marriages are probably unaffected. Happy couples won’t be hanging out on dating sites. Second, people who are in marriages that are either bad or average might be at increased risk of divorce, because of increased access to new partners. Third, it’s unknown whether that’s good or bad for society. On one hand, it’s good if fewer people feel like they’re stuck in relationships. On the other, evidence is pretty solid that having a stable romantic partner means all kinds of health and wellness benefits. Eli Finkel (Northwestern University)
I’ve seen a dramatic increase in cases where something on the computer triggered the breakup. People are more likely to leave relationships, because they’re emboldened by the knowledge that it’s no longer as hard as it was to meet new people. But whether it’s dating sites, social media, e‑mail—it’s all related to the fact that the Internet has made it possible for people to communicate and connect, anywhere in the world, in ways that have never before been seen. Gilbert Feibleman (divorce attorney)
The positive aspects of online dating are clear: the Internet makes it easier for single people to meet other single people with whom they might be compatible, raising the bar for what they consider a good relationship. But what if online dating makes it too easy to meet someone new? What if it raises the bar for a good relationship too high? What if the prospect of finding an ever-more-compatible mate with the click of a mouse means a future of relationship instability, in which we keep chasing the elusive rabbit around the dating track? Of course, no one knows exactly how many partnerships are undermined by the allure of the Internet dating pool. But most of the online-dating-company executives I interviewed while writing my new book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, agreed with what research appears to suggest: the rise of online dating will mean an overall decrease in commitment. (… ) At the selection stage, researchers have seen that as the range of options grows larger, mate-seekers are liable to become “cognitively overwhelmed,” and deal with the overload by adopting lazy comparison strategies and examining fewer cues. As a result, they are more likely to make careless decisions than they would be if they had fewer options, and this potentially leads to less compatible matches. Moreover, the mere fact of having chosen someone from such a large set of options can lead to doubts about whether the choice was the “right” one. No studies in the romantic sphere have looked at precisely how the range of choices affects overall satisfaction. But research elsewhere has found that people are less satisfied when choosing from a larger group: in one study, for example, subjects who selected a chocolate from an array of six options believed it tasted better than those who selected the same chocolate from an array of 30. On that other determinant of commitment, the quality of perceived alternatives, the Internet’s potential effect is clearer still. Online dating is, at its core, a litany of alternatives. And evidence shows that the perception that one has appealing alternatives to a current romantic partner is a strong predictor of low commitment to that partner. (…)  People seeking commitment—particularly women—have developed strategies to detect deception and guard against it. A woman might withhold sex so she can assess a man’s intentions. Theoretically, her withholding sends a message: I’m not just going to sleep with any guy that comes along. Theoretically, his willingness to wait sends a message back: I’m interested in more than sex. But the pace of technology is upending these rules and assumptions. Relationships that begin online, Jacob finds, move quickly. He chalks this up to a few things. First, familiarity is established during the messaging process, which also often involves a phone call. By the time two people meet face-to-face, they already have a level of intimacy. Second, if the woman is on a dating site, there’s a good chance she’s eager to connect. But for Jacob, the most crucial difference between online dating and meeting people in the “real” world is the sense of urgency. Occasionally, he has an acquaintance in common with a woman he meets online, but by and large she comes from a different social pool. “It’s not like we’re just going to run into each other again,” he says. “So you can’t afford to be too casual. It’s either ‘Let’s explore this’ or ‘See you later.’ ” Social scientists say that all sexual strategies carry costs, whether risk to reputation (promiscuity) or foreclosed alternatives (commitment). As online dating becomes increasingly pervasive, the old costs of a short-term mating strategy will give way to new ones. Jacob, for instance, notices he’s seeing his friends less often. Their wives get tired of befriending his latest girlfriend only to see her go when he moves on to someone else. Also, Jacob has noticed that, over time, he feels less excitement before each new date. “Is that about getting older,” he muses, “or about dating online?” How much of the enchantment associated with romantic love has to do with scarcity (this person is exclusively for me), and how will that enchantment hold up in a marketplace of abundance (this person could be exclusively for me, but so could the other two people I’m meeting this week)? Dan Slater

Véritable zap relationnel, surcharge cognitive, insatisfaction induite par le trop-plein de choix, obsolescence programmée des relations …

A l’heure où, avec la véritable pandémie de divorces, les inscriptions aux sites de rencontre explosent …

Pendant que (on mesure tout le chemin parcouru depuis l’époque de notre seul président jusqu’ici mort sur son lieu de travail) la pression se maintient sur nos hommes politiques ou sportifs les plus tentés de jouer avec le feu des relations tarifées ou avec mineures …

Retour en ces lendemains de Saint Valentin plus ou moins bien vécus et avec la revue américaine The Atlantic …

Sur, sans parler des innombrables arnaques généralement africaines, les effets de la mondialisation des choix sentimentaux et matrimoniaux sur nos vies amoureuses et de moins en moins maritales …

A Million First Dates

How online romance is threatening monogamy

Dan Slater

The Atlantic

After going to college on the East Coast and spending a few years bouncing around, Jacob moved back to his native Oregon, settling in Portland. Almost immediately, he was surprised by the difficulty he had meeting women. Having lived in New York and the Boston area, he was accustomed to ready-made social scenes. In Portland, by contrast, most of his friends were in long-term relationships with people they’d met in college, and were contemplating marriage.

Jacob was single for two years and then, at 26, began dating a slightly older woman who soon moved in with him. She seemed independent and low-maintenance, important traits for Jacob. Past girlfriends had complained about his lifestyle, which emphasized watching sports and going to concerts and bars. He’d been called lazy, aimless, and irresponsible with money.

Before long, his new relationship fell into that familiar pattern. “I’ve never been able to make a girl feel like she was the most important thing in my life,” he says. “It’s always ‘I wish I was as important as the basketball game or the concert.’ ” An only child, Jacob tended to make plans by negotiation: if his girlfriend would watch the game with him, he’d go hiking with her. He was passive in their arguments, hoping to avoid confrontation. Whatever the flaws in their relationship, he told himself, being with her was better than being single in Portland again.

After five years, she left.

Now in his early 30s, Jacob felt he had no idea how to make a relationship work. Was compatibility something that could be learned? Would permanence simply happen, or would he have to choose it? Around this time, he signed up for two online dating sites: Match.com, a paid site, because he’d seen the TV ads; and Plenty of Fish, a free site he’d heard about around town.

“It was fairly incredible,” Jacob remembers. “I’m an average-looking guy. All of a sudden I was going out with one or two very pretty, ambitious women a week. At first I just thought it was some kind of weird lucky streak.”

After six weeks, Jacob met a 22-year-old named Rachel, whose youth and good looks he says reinvigorated him. His friends were jealous. Was this The One? They dated for a few months, and then she moved in. (Both names have been changed for anonymity.)

Rachel didn’t mind Jacob’s sports addiction, and enjoyed going to concerts with him. But there were other issues. She was from a blue-collar military background; he came from doctors. She placed a high value on things he didn’t think much about: a solid credit score, a 40-hour workweek. Jacob also felt pressure from his parents, who were getting anxious to see him paired off for good. Although a younger girlfriend bought him some time, biologically speaking, it also alienated him from his friends, who could understand the physical attraction but couldn’t really relate to Rachel.

In the past, Jacob had always been the kind of guy who didn’t break up well. His relationships tended to drag on. His desire to be with someone, to not have to go looking again, had always trumped whatever doubts he’d had about the person he was with. But something was different this time. “I feel like I underwent a fairly radical change thanks to online dating,” Jacob says. “I went from being someone who thought of finding someone as this monumental challenge, to being much more relaxed and confident about it. Rachel was young and beautiful, and I’d found her after signing up on a couple dating sites and dating just a few people.” Having met Rachel so easily online, he felt confident that, if he became single again, he could always meet someone else.

After two years, when Rachel informed Jacob that she was moving out, he logged on to Match.com the same day. His old profile was still up. Messages had even come in from people who couldn’t tell he was no longer active. The site had improved in the two years he’d been away. It was sleeker, faster, more efficient. And the population of online daters in Portland seemed to have tripled. He’d never imagined that so many single people were out there.

“I’m about 95 percent certain,” he says, “that if I’d met Rachel offline, and if I’d never done online dating, I would’ve married her. At that point in my life, I would’ve overlooked everything else and done whatever it took to make things work. Did online dating change my perception of permanence? No doubt. When I sensed the breakup coming, I was okay with it. It didn’t seem like there was going to be much of a mourning period, where you stare at your wall thinking you’re destined to be alone and all that. I was eager to see what else was out there.”

The positive aspects of online dating are clear: the Internet makes it easier for single people to meet other single people with whom they might be compatible, raising the bar for what they consider a good relationship. But what if online dating makes it too easy to meet someone new? What if it raises the bar for a good relationship too high? What if the prospect of finding an ever-more-compatible mate with the click of a mouse means a future of relationship instability, in which we keep chasing the elusive rabbit around the dating track?

Of course, no one knows exactly how many partnerships are undermined by the allure of the Internet dating pool. But most of the online-dating-company executives I interviewed while writing my new book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, agreed with what research appears to suggest: the rise of online dating will mean an overall decrease in commitment.

“The future will see better relationships but more divorce,” predicts Dan Winchester, the founder of a free dating site based in the U.K. “The older you get as a man, the more experienced you get. You know what to do with women, how to treat them and talk to them. Add to that the effect of online dating.” He continued, “I often wonder whether matching you up with great people is getting so efficient, and the process so enjoyable, that marriage will become obsolete.”

“Historically,” says Greg Blatt, the CEO of Match.com’s parent company, “relationships have been billed as ‘hard’ because, historically, commitment has been the goal. You could say online dating is simply changing people’s ideas about whether commitment itself is a life value.” Mate scarcity also plays an important role in people’s relationship decisions. “Look, if I lived in Iowa, I’d be married with four children by now,” says Blatt, a 40‑something bachelor in Manhattan. “That’s just how it is.”

Another online-dating exec hypothesized an inverse correlation between commitment and the efficiency of technology. “I think divorce rates will increase as life in general becomes more real-time,” says Niccolò Formai, the head of social-media marketing at Badoo, a meeting-and-dating app with about 25 million active users worldwide. “Think about the evolution of other kinds of content on the Web—stock quotes, news. The goal has always been to make it faster. The same thing will happen with meeting. It’s exhilarating to connect with new people, not to mention beneficial for reasons having nothing to do with romance. You network for a job. You find a flatmate. Over time you’ll expect that constant flow. People always said that the need for stability would keep commitment alive. But that thinking was based on a world in which you didn’t meet that many people.”

“Societal values always lose out,” says Noel Biderman, the founder of Ashley Madison, which calls itself “the world’s leading married dating service for discreet encounters”—that is, cheating. “Premarital sex used to be taboo,” explains Biderman. “So women would become miserable in marriages, because they wouldn’t know any better. But today, more people have had failed relationships, recovered, moved on, and found happiness. They realize that that happiness, in many ways, depends on having had the failures. As we become more secure and confident in our ability to find someone else, usually someone better, monogamy and the old thinking about commitment will be challenged very harshly.”

Even at eHarmony—one of the most conservative sites, where marriage and commitment seem to be the only acceptable goals of dating—Gian Gonzaga, the site’s relationship psychologist, acknowledges that commitment is at odds with technology. “You could say online dating allows people to get into relationships, learn things, and ultimately make a better selection,” says Gonzaga. “But you could also easily see a world in which online dating leads to people leaving relationships the moment they’re not working—an overall weakening of commitment.”

Indeed, the profit models of many online-dating sites are at cross-purposes with clients who are trying to develop long-term commitments. A permanently paired-off dater, after all, means a lost revenue stream. Explaining the mentality of a typical dating-site executive, Justin Parfitt, a dating entrepreneur based in San Francisco, puts the matter bluntly: “They’re thinking, Let’s keep this fucker coming back to the site as often as we can.” For instance, long after their accounts become inactive on Match.com and some other sites, lapsed users receive notifications informing them that wonderful people are browsing their profiles and are eager to chat. “Most of our users are return customers,” says Match.com’s Blatt.

In 2011, Mark Brooks, a consultant to online-dating companies, published the results of an industry survey titled “How Has Internet Dating Changed Society?” The survey responses, from 39 executives, produced the following conclusions:

“Internet dating has made people more disposable.”

“Internet dating may be partly responsible for a rise in the divorce rates.”

“Low quality, unhappy and unsatisfying marriages are being destroyed as people drift to Internet dating sites.”

“The market is hugely more efficient … People expect to—and this will be increasingly the case over time—access people anywhere, anytime, based on complex search requests … Such a feeling of access affects our pursuit of love … the whole world (versus, say, the city we live in) will, increasingly, feel like the market for our partner(s). Our pickiness will probably increase.”

“Above all, Internet dating has helped people of all ages realize that there’s no need to settle for a mediocre relationship.”

Alex Mehr, a co-founder of the dating site Zoosk, is the only executive I interviewed who disagrees with the prevailing view. “Online dating does nothing more than remove a barrier to meeting,” says Mehr. “Online dating doesn’t change my taste, or how I behave on a first date, or whether I’m going to be a good partner. It only changes the process of discovery. As for whether you’re the type of person who wants to commit to a long-term monogamous relationship or the type of person who wants to play the field, online dating has nothing to do with that. That’s a personality thing.”

Surely personality will play a role in the way anyone behaves in the realm of online dating, particularly when it comes to commitment and promiscuity. (Gender, too, may play a role. Researchers are divided on the question of whether men pursue more “short-term mates” than women do.) At the same time, however, the reality that having too many options makes us less content with whatever option we choose is a well-documented phenomenon. In his 2004 book, The Paradox of Choice, the psychologist Barry Schwartz indicts a society that “sanctifies freedom of choice so profoundly that the benefits of infinite options seem self-evident.” On the contrary, he argues, “a large array of options may diminish the attractiveness of what people actually choose, the reason being that thinking about the attractions of some of the unchosen options detracts from the pleasure derived from the chosen one.”

Psychologists who study relationships say that three ingredients generally determine the strength of commitment: overall satisfaction with the relationship; the investment one has put into it (time and effort, shared experiences and emotions, etc.); and the quality of perceived alternatives. Two of the three—satisfaction and quality of alternatives—could be directly affected by the larger mating pool that the Internet offers.

At the selection stage, researchers have seen that as the range of options grows larger, mate-seekers are liable to become “cognitively overwhelmed,” and deal with the overload by adopting lazy comparison strategies and examining fewer cues. As a result, they are more likely to make careless decisions than they would be if they had fewer options, and this potentially leads to less compatible matches. Moreover, the mere fact of having chosen someone from such a large set of options can lead to doubts about whether the choice was the “right” one. No studies in the romantic sphere have looked at precisely how the range of choices affects overall satisfaction. But research elsewhere has found that people are less satisfied when choosing from a larger group: in one study, for example, subjects who selected a chocolate from an array of six options believed it tasted better than those who selected the same chocolate from an array of 30.

On that other determinant of commitment, the quality of perceived alternatives, the Internet’s potential effect is clearer still. Online dating is, at its core, a litany of alternatives. And evidence shows that the perception that one has appealing alternatives to a current romantic partner is a strong predictor of low commitment to that partner.

“You can say three things,” says Eli Finkel, a professor of social psychology at Northwestern University who studies how online dating affects relationships. “First, the best marriages are probably unaffected. Happy couples won’t be hanging out on dating sites. Second, people who are in marriages that are either bad or average might be at increased risk of divorce, because of increased access to new partners. Third, it’s unknown whether that’s good or bad for society. On one hand, it’s good if fewer people feel like they’re stuck in relationships. On the other, evidence is pretty solid that having a stable romantic partner means all kinds of health and wellness benefits.” And that’s even before one takes into account the ancillary effects of such a decrease in commitment—on children, for example, or even society more broadly.

Gilbert Feibleman, a divorce attorney and member of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, argues that the phenomenon extends beyond dating sites to the Internet more generally. “I’ve seen a dramatic increase in cases where something on the computer triggered the breakup,” he says. “People are more likely to leave relationships, because they’re emboldened by the knowledge that it’s no longer as hard as it was to meet new people. But whether it’s dating sites, social media, e‑mail—it’s all related to the fact that the Internet has made it possible for people to communicate and connect, anywhere in the world, in ways that have never before been seen.”

Since Rachel left him, Jacob has met lots of women online. Some like going to basketball games and concerts with him. Others enjoy barhopping. Jacob’s favorite football team is the Green Bay Packers, and when I last spoke to him, he told me he’d had success using Packers fandom as a search criterion on OkCupid, another (free) dating site he’s been trying out.

Many of Jacob’s relationships become physical very early. At one point he’s seeing a paralegal and a lawyer who work at the same law firm, a naturopath, a pharmacist, and a chef. He slept with three of them on the first or second date. His relationships with the other two are headed toward physical intimacy.

He likes the pharmacist most. She’s a girlfriend prospect. The problem is that she wants to take things slow on the physical side. He worries that, with so many alternatives available, he won’t be willing to wait.

One night the paralegal confides in him: her prior relationships haven’t gone well, but Jacob gives her hope; all she needs in a relationship is honesty. And he thinks, Oh my God. He wants to be a nice guy, but he knows that sooner or later he’s going to start coming across as a serious asshole. While out with one woman, he has to silence text messages coming in from others. He needs to start paring down the number of women he’s seeing.

People seeking commitment—particularly women—have developed strategies to detect deception and guard against it. A woman might withhold sex so she can assess a man’s intentions. Theoretically, her withholding sends a message: I’m not just going to sleep with any guy that comes along. Theoretically, his willingness to wait sends a message back: I’m interested in more than sex.

But the pace of technology is upending these rules and assumptions. Relationships that begin online, Jacob finds, move quickly. He chalks this up to a few things. First, familiarity is established during the messaging process, which also often involves a phone call. By the time two people meet face-to-face, they already have a level of intimacy. Second, if the woman is on a dating site, there’s a good chance she’s eager to connect. But for Jacob, the most crucial difference between online dating and meeting people in the “real” world is the sense of urgency. Occasionally, he has an acquaintance in common with a woman he meets online, but by and large she comes from a different social pool. “It’s not like we’re just going to run into each other again,” he says. “So you can’t afford to be too casual. It’s either ‘Let’s explore this’ or ‘See you later.’ ”

Social scientists say that all sexual strategies carry costs, whether risk to reputation (promiscuity) or foreclosed alternatives (commitment). As online dating becomes increasingly pervasive, the old costs of a short-term mating strategy will give way to new ones. Jacob, for instance, notices he’s seeing his friends less often. Their wives get tired of befriending his latest girlfriend only to see her go when he moves on to someone else. Also, Jacob has noticed that, over time, he feels less excitement before each new date. “Is that about getting older,” he muses, “or about dating online?” How much of the enchantment associated with romantic love has to do with scarcity (this person is exclusively for me), and how will that enchantment hold up in a marketplace of abundance (this person could be exclusively for me, but so could the other two people I’m meeting this week)?

Using OkCupid’s Locals app, Jacob can now advertise his location and desired activity and meet women on the fly. Out alone for a beer one night, he responds to the broadcast of a woman who’s at the bar across the street, looking for a karaoke partner. He joins her. They spend the evening together, and never speak again.

“Each relationship is its own little education,” Jacob says. “You learn more about what works and what doesn’t, what you really need and what you can go without. That feels like a useful process. I’m not jumping into something with the wrong person, or committing to something too early, as I’ve done in the past.” But he does wonder: When does it end? At what point does this learning curve become an excuse for not putting in the effort to make a relationship last? “Maybe I have the confidence now to go after the person I really want,” he says. “But I’m worried that I’m making it so I can’t fall in love.”

Voir aussi:

Trop de choix tue-t-il le désir ?

L’infini des possibles nous est offert

Catherine Segal

Cles

Tanya se souvient encore de l’impression de suffocation. A l’infini, des paquets de céréales s’alignaient sur des mètres et des mètres de linéaires. Des dizaines, peut-être même des centaines de sortes. Toutes subtilement différentes et toutes potentiellement parfaites.

Consommation, vie privée… Nous avons la liberté de choisir. Est-ce un privilège ou une addiction ?

Face à la multitude des options, nous sommes désemparés. Notre cerveau aussi.

Lancés dans une éternelle quête du meilleur, nous sommes stressés par le trop.

« Les yeux me sortaient de la tête, mon cerveau était comme dans du coton, je n’arrivais pas à comprendre ce que je voyais. Impossible de me décider pour quoi que ce soit. Ma sensation dans cet hypermarché de Menlo Park était terrible », raconte-t-elle. Et si nouvelle. A son arrivée en Californie, la jeune étudiante qu’elle était alors venait de passer les dix-huit premières années de sa vie dans la jungle amazonienne, sans électricité ni eau courante, dans des communautés indigènes auprès desquelles travaillaient ses parents. « Nous mangions ce que nous trouvions, explique-t-elle. Nous vivions du troc, de la pêche. Quant aux céréales, les seules que j’avais jamais vues c’étaient les corn flakes. »

Cette enfance d’une grande frugalité est loin de ce que vit aujourd’hui Tanya, mère de famille de 43 ans, dans sa maison de Philadelphie au frigo bien rempli. Et son histoire est à des années-lumière de notre quotidien d’individus du premier monde qui acceptons de nous prêter à chaque instant à un jeu décadent, certains diront à un supplice de riches : l’embarras du choix.

Nous ne le savons que trop : choisir est devenu un exercice difficile. Des milliers d’appareils électroménagers, de marques de chips ou de modèles de voitures, mais aussi de filières académiques, de romans d’amour ou de sources d’information nous sont accessibles à tout instant, et à tout instant, il nous revient de décider ce que nous allons en faire. C’est notre liberté, notre privilège, pensons-nous. « Dans notre époque dérégulée, individualiste, où l’on se voit de moins en moins dicter sa conduite par sa famille ou par son village, c’est l’intégralité de la vie qui est entrée dans le règne de l’hyperchoix, analyse le philosophe Gilles Lipovetsky, professeur à l’université de Grenoble. Dans le monde actuel, libéré d’un cadre institutionnel ou coutumier très contraignant, on a le sentiment de toujours pouvoir choisir et une impression d’illimité. »

On n’est plus obligé d’adopter le métier de ses parents, de vivre dans la même ville toute sa vie, ou d’avoir des enfants avant 30 ans simplement parce qu’il est de bon ton de le faire. Tout est a priori ouvert et cette liberté-là, conquise au cours des dernières décennies, n’a pas de prix. En revanche, on est en train de comprendre qu’elle a très certainement un coût.

Toujours pas d’hypertemps

Celui de notre temps, pour commencer. Si l’hyperchoix est furieusement tendance, l’hypertemps, lui, n’est toujours pas d’actualité : nos journées restent obstinément bloquées sur une durée de vingt-quatre heures. Notre temps libre est le premier à faire les frais de cette tension.

On aurait voulu croire que, le choix garantissant un certain bonheur, il serait de l’intérêt de tous de le diversifier, comme l’ont théorisé les économistes classiques. « On dit que le choix est essentiel au bien-être et bien entendu, c’est vrai, analyse le psychosociologue américain Barry Schwartz, auteur du “Paradoxe du choix”. En revanche, depuis une trentaine d’années, alors que les choix des individus se sont libérés, les pays développés se rendent compte, ô surprise, que plus de choix ne correspond pas forcément à plus de bonheur. » Las, l’Homo œconomicus ultrarationnel de Jean-Baptiste Say et Adam Smith, censé raisonner « utile » et « optimisé », devient simple Homo sapiens singulièrement dépourvu à l’heure de choisir entre cent dix-sept modèles de machines à café pendant une pause déjeuner minutée (exemple réel, voir http://www.darty.com). Le plus probable est qu’il y sacrifiera son samedi, pesant longuement le pour et le contre de chaque appareil, cherchant le meilleur rapport qualité-prix. Une tracasserie qu’ignoraient les économistes des Lumières dont l’époque était encore marquée par la pénurie. De leur temps, on pouvait affirmer sans risque qu’à chaque produit correspondait un besoin ; on partait de si peu !

Au fond, qu’est-ce qui nous met si mal à l’aise ? Ecartons d’emblée les bouffées de culpabilité qui pourraient assombrir nos consciences, pauvres individus gâtés alors que le reste du monde manque de tout… Ce n’est pas l’effet secondaire le plus partagé, ni le plus douloureux.

L’explication est ailleurs. « Notre erreur est de nous obstiner à rechercher ce qui est soi-disant meilleur, explique Barry Schwartz. Lorsque nous nous imaginons qu’il existe quelque part un choix optimal, nous sommes toujours déçus par le nôtre. »

On pourrait se fixer comme objectif de se contenter d’un resto, de vacances ou d’un jean dont les vertus seraient « suffisantes », et arrêter de chercher le Graal sitôt les critères essentiels réunis. Mais ce n’est pas du tout comme cela que l’on procède. Parent, on veut « ce qu’il y a de mieux » pour l’éducation de son enfant ; patient, on recherche le « meilleur spécialiste » pour se soigner – qui se contenterait d’un chirurgien « suffisamment bon » ? Devant l’abondance des possibles, les expressions « à peu près » et « plus ou moins » sont hérétiques. Ce que l’on choisit est prié de nous correspondre au plus près.

Une situation naturellement inconnue dans des pays moins favorisés, comme ceux du bloc de l’Est à l’époque soviétique. « A Varsovie, quand j’étais enfant dans les années 1970 et 1980, c’était simple : quel que soit l’objet ou le produit alimentaire, soit il y en avait, soit il n’y en avait pas ! se rappelle Agnieszka Dellfina, artiste photographe polonaise de 36 ans. Parfois c’étaient les chaussures. On attendait des semaines entières, et hop ! il y avait un arrivage. Alors tout le monde se précipitait et, à l’école, on se retrouvait tous avec les mêmes. Pareil pour les meubles : on était sur liste d’attente pour acheter un canapé ou du carrelage. Et quand notre tour arrivait, on prenait ce qu’il y avait sans se demander si on aimait la couleur ou pas. Puis le Mur est tombé, et nous avons eu progressivement accès à tout. Cela tombait bien, pile quand je devenais ado et que j’avais envie de montrer qui j’étais avec mes vêtements. »

La prétention d’être unique

Montrer qui l’on est, ne pas ressembler à son voisin : la diversification des choix répond à la prétention d’être unique et libéré des tabous sociaux ou religieux d’autrefois. « On choisit désormais avec qui l’on vit, si l’on se marie ou pas, si l’on divorce ou pas, si l’on a des enfants ou pas et si oui à quel moment, remarque Gilles Lipovetsky. La vie privée est devenue très compliquée. »

Aux Etats-Unis, une quadra, Lori Gottlieb, a transformé sa quête ratée de l’homme idéal en best-seller (« Marry Him, The case for settling for Mr. Good Enough » (« Epouse-le. Pourquoi il faut se contenter de Monsieur Suffisamment Bon »). Parmi les soixante et un critères extrêmement précis que cette femme libre de ses choix avait elle-même définis pour le futur homme de sa vie, on trouvait, outre les classiques « intelligent » ou « gentil », des précisions millimétrées comme « optimiste mais pas naïf », « les pieds sur terre mais pas ennuyeux » ou encore « plus de 1,77 mètre mais moins d’1,83 mètre ». Son psy l’a mise en garde : l’homme parfait n’existe pas. Et même si elle le rencontrait, rien ne dit qu’il la trouverait à son goût ! Elle a fini par renoncer à sa chimère.

Dans les grandes villes, le nombre de célibataires explose. D’après l’Insee, un adulte sur trois vit seul en France, et un sur deux à Paris (étude réalisée en 2008). Or, sur Internet, les sites de rencontre multicritères, qui permettent théoriquement de calibrer nos amants pour qu’ils entrent dans nos placards sur mesure, n’ont bizarrement rien résolu. Mathilde, ravissante célibataire de 42 ans, en est témoin : « J’ai testé un site sur lequel on peut sélectionner les profils des hommes intéressants pour les mettre dans son panier, comme pour faire ses courses, explique-t-elle. Sur cent cinquante profils, on en garde facilement une quinzaine. Soit beaucoup plus que le nombre moyen de rencontres intéressantes que l’on peut faire en sortant un soir ! » Quelques mois et un coup de foudre plus tard, Mathilde en a eu assez. « Je me suis rendu compte qu’il y avait un énorme biais dans cette façon d’engager une relation avec quelqu’un, avoue-t-elle. On est extrêmement tenté de se reconnecter au site, même si l’on a commencé une relation en laquelle on croit. On se dit que l’on peut toujours être déçu, et qu’il vaut mieux conserver une roue de secours en attendant d’être sûr de sa décision. »

Car tel est bien là le paradoxe du choix : lorsque l’on manque d’options, on peut facilement attribuer ses malheurs et frustrations à la terre entière. Mais si l’on est malheureux dans un contexte de choix pléthorique, on se sent seul responsable. On maudit son manque de discernement. Et notre aversion naturelle pour l’échec nous décourage de nous engager, de peur de nous tromper. La civilisation de l’hyperchoix est aussi celle de la perplexité.

Le cerveau affolé

On se rappelle la fameuse histoire de l’âne de Buridan, mort de faim et de soif entre son picotin d’avoine et son seau d’eau, faute d’avoir pu décider par lequel commencer. A vrai dire, l’être humain fait à peine mieux. Notre cerveau se montre même très décevant dès qu’il s’agit de délibérer entre plus de trois ou quatre options. « La partie frontale, celle qui prend les décisions, est apparue plus récemment dans l’évolution que la partie postérieure qui gère les routines, et sa capacité est bien plus limitée, explique Etienne Koechlin, chercheur à l’Inserm et directeur du laboratoire de neurosciences cognitives à l’Ecole normale supérieure. Nous savons sans problème gérer simultanément plusieurs tâches parfaitement maîtrisées, comme se lever le matin ou se brosser les dents. Mais devant un grand nombre de nouvelles décisions à prendre, notre système a du mal. C’est ce qui explique qu’un conducteur débutant soit stressé au volant, alors que quelqu’un qui a une voiture depuis vingt ans se montre plus détendu. »

Pas de chance, il ne nous en faut pas beaucoup pour affoler nos neurones. « Le cerveau est mal à l’aise avec les choix multiples comportant de nombreuses alternatives, explique Etienne Koechlin. Les individus sont capables d’examiner jusqu’à trois ou quatre choix en parallèle, pas plus, et quoi qu’il arrive, le cerveau procède par élimination progressive des options, jusqu’à revenir à un choix binaire. » Jusqu’à la délibération finale : ce choix que je suis en train de faire, vaut-il vraiment mieux que de ne rien faire du tout ?

Nous nous croyons libres comme l’air, mais c’est compter sans nos limites physiologiques qui, elles, sont fort têtues. L’hyperchoix, qui suppose que nous soyons en mesure de réaliser un arbitrage entre toutes les options, se résume le plus souvent à une « hyperoffre », c’est-à-dire à une avalanche de possibilités entre lesquelles nous sommes, en réalité, totalement incapables de choisir. On ne s’étonnera donc pas que, devant une situation à la limite de nos capacités physiologiques d’arbitrage, fuite et non-choix soient des solutions très prisées.

Il y a quelques années, Sheena Iyengar, chercheuse à l’université de Columbia et auteure de « The Art of Choosing », s’est livrée à une amusante expérience : dans une épicerie, elle a installé un étal avec six sortes de pots de confiture. Résultat : peu d’affluence, mais environ 30 % des personnes ayant visité le stand lui ont acheté un pot. Le lendemain, Sheena Iyengar s’est installée au même endroit, disposant cette fois-ci un choix de vingt-quatre pots de confiture aux parfums différents. Franc succès, les clients se sont pressés sur le stand, attirés par ce choix étonnant de saveurs. Mais surprise : seuls 3 % de ces curieux sont passés à l’achat.

En 2009, le cabinet britannique Aon Consulting, qui a étudié six cent cinquante entreprises dans treize secteurs d’activité différents, a remarqué que, face à une large variété de placements pour leur retraite, la grande majorité des salariés se réfugiaient dans l’option par défaut, par peur de l’inconnu ou par inertie. Même constat de l’assureur Axa qui, la même année, a publié un livre blanc suggérant que diminuer d’un tiers l’offre de fonds d’investissement avait un effet incitatif sur les particuliers, jusque-là découragés par l’abondance des possibilités. C’est à se demander si le succès planétaire du smartphone d’Apple ne réside pas dans le fait qu’il a été lancé avec très peu de déclinaisons. Si Apple en avait proposé d’emblée dix sortes différentes, l’engin aurait-il eu le même succès ?

Pourtant, contre vents et marées, le choix reste un puissant argument de vente. « C’est, depuis cinquante ans, l’un des positionnements-clés d’Auchan, explique Pascale Carle, directrice des études et de la prospective du groupe pour la France. Même si nous décidons d’avoir une offre large en produits bio ou éthiques par exemple, nous continuons à proposer tout le reste, pour vous laisser le choix. A vous consommateurs d’acheter ce que vous voulez. »

Le confort des limites

S’arracher les cheveux au rayon surgelés n’est certes pas l’indice d’une crise de civilisation. Mais l’obligation de s’interroger sur ses désirs à toutes les étapes de son existence est, pour Barry Schwartz, un facteur de stress, qu’il n’hésite pas à lier à certaines tendances suicidaires. « Les cas de dépression clinique ont augmenté en flèche dans le monde occidental alors que les gens sont de plus en plus libres et qu’ils ne manquent de rien, observe le psychosociologue. Vu le confort dans lequel ils vivent, on les imaginerait plutôt le sourire aux lèvres et pourtant ils vont voir des psys et sont sous antidépresseurs.

L’une des raisons possibles à cela est qu’ils sont accablés par le nombre de choix qu’il leur revient de faire et que, constamment, ils ont la sensation que les décisions qu’ils prennent ne sont pas les meilleures. Avec, à la clé, une avalanche de regrets, petits et grands, et de culpabilité. » Comme si trop de liberté remettait en cause leur équilibre. Alors qu’avoir des limites, « comme un poisson rouge dans son bocal », selon l’expression de Schwartz, est tellement plus confortable.

Du coup, tous les stratagèmes sont bons pour limiter les choix. Les hebdomadaires rivalisent de couvertures sur les meilleurs lycées ou hôpitaux. Classements, hit-parades, best of, bancs d’essai, comparateurs en ligne, sont autant d’outils qui nous aident à border l’océan des possibles.

Certains consommateurs s’inventent même des contraintes. Adeptes de la décroissance et du recyclage qui achètent le moins possible ou fervents locavores qui n’optent que pour des aliments de saison produits dans un périmètre de quelques dizaines de kilomètres, tous s’inscrivent dans une logique de refus de l’hyperchoix. « C’est un bocal comme un autre, observe Barry Schwartz. On décide de ne manger que de la nourriture produite localement pour des raisons éthiques, mais surtout on restreint ses possibilités de choix. » On retrouve le confort d’un univers redevenu gérable avec en prime la satisfaction d’avoir fait une bonne action.

Se structurer, avoir des critères, savoir apprécier ce que l’on a sans regretter ce que l’on aurait pu avoir, sont des forces que l’on acquiert généralement avec l’âge. Mais elles peuvent aussi résulter d’une éducation particulière. « Dans la jungle, la lecture était notre seule distraction. Or, nous n’avions pas assez de livres, raconte Tanya. On possédait une encyclopédie en plusieurs volumes. Je les ai tous lus plusieurs fois. J’ai grandi en pensant qu’il était normal de lire et relire sans arrêt la même chose. Alors, la première fois que je suis allée à la bibliothèque en Californie… » Elle sourit, les yeux brillants. « J’étais au paradis. Je ne pouvais pas tout lire, et pourtant il n’y en avait jamais trop ! »

Comme si le meilleur moyen d’être heureux face à l’hyperchoix était d’avoir appris, une fois pour toutes, à accepter la frustration. Une façon de remettre l’abondance à sa juste place : celle d’un luxe stimulant et délicieux, à condition d’être capable de s’en passer.

Mercedes Erra, présidente exécutive d’Euro-RCSG Worldwide :

“L’hyperchoix a atteint une limite”

Nous vivons dans une société d’hyperchoix, mais celui-ci répond-il encore à nos désirs ?

Il a atteint une limite. Lorsque les différences entre les produits deviennent trop sophistiquées, elles ne sont plus lisibles. Il est clair que l’innovation pour l’innovation a fait son temps. Et avec la crise, certains consommateurs ont déserté les hypermarchés puisqu’ils savent qu’ils ne pourront acheter que le premier prix. Ils veulent le produit « juste » et n’ont pas besoin d’être exposés à l’ensemble du choix.

Les marques commencent-elles, du coup, à communiquer différemment ?

Oui. Les prochaines années verront sans doute le déclin du marketing à tous crins, au profit de la créativité. Si Evian résiste un peu mieux que les autres eaux, c’est parce qu’elle raconte la jeunesse et que rien n’est plus « aspirationnel » dans un monde qui vieillit. Les marques ont intérêt à porter haut leurs produits icônes et à ne pas les laisser tomber au profit d’innovations plus discutables. Ainsi le polo Lacoste se décline-t-il aux couleurs des saisons. Les éditions spéciales, les séries limitées d’un produit consacré par le temps, permettent de cultiver le mythe en évitant le piège de l’hyperchoix.

Superchoix, hyperchoix… Quelle est la prochaine étape ?

Pour certains types de produits, ce sera le sur-mesure. C’est une tendance croissante dans le luxe, mais pas seulement : Nike iD propose une chaussure unique, au look déterminé par son acheteur. La « customisation » vient de loin : c’est la redécouverte de l’artisanat, du temps où la production de masse n’existait pas.

Voir également:

Trop de choix peut tuer le désir !

Le choix tue-t-il le désir ?

10 Juillet 2012

Nike propose aujourd’hui une chaussure unique, au look déterminé par le futur acheteur. Les sites de rencontres se multiplient sur la bulle, internet, en proposant un choix de plus en plus précis de la personne que l’on souhaite avoir à ses côtés : intelligent, gentil, mais aussi des caractéristiques incroyablement millimétrées ( les pieds sur terre, mais pas ennuyeux, entre 1,77 mètre et 1, 82 m….). On customize à tout-va, parce que l’on a un choix insensé. Le nombre de célibataires explose littéralement dans les grandes villes, on peut donc choisir ce que l’on veut, on a le choix…Mais le paradoxe du choix, est que dès que l’on manque d’options, on parvient très facilement à attribuer sa déconvenue ou sa frustration à la Société ou à la terre entière ! Par contre, si on est malheureux dans un contexte de choix multiple et d’abondance, on s’attribue la responsabilité de l’échec. Mais l’être humain n’apprécie que très peu l’échec, surtout quand il ne le partage avec personne. In fine s’installe une certaine perplexité face à ces choix multiples, qui nous encourage à ne plus nous engager véritablement, que ce soit en amour, en amitié ou même professionnellement.

Alors, face à cette négation, que faire pour se réconcilier avec sa liberté de choix ?

Ne pas tomber dans la « facilité » en se laissant prendre au piège de la multiplicité des critères proposés. Cesser sans aucun doute de rechercher systématiquement le « mieux », en songeant qu’il existe un mari ou une femme idéale. Le sommes-nous nous-même ?

Se connaître avant toute chose, car la bonne décision, le bon choix, c’est celle, ou celui, qui correspond à ses véritables aspirations, ses attentes sincères sans se voiler la face ou se mentir, sans nécessairement s’adapter au choix !

Pour ma part, je pense que le choix ne tue pas le désir, mais il l’étouffe, surtout si l’on ne se connait pas véritablement. Devant un trop grand nombre de choix ou d’options, notre système a beaucoup de mal. L’individu est capable de prendre en compte 3 ou 4 possibilités maximum, et quoi qu’il advienne le cerveau procède par élimination jusqu’à revenir à un choix binaire. Et puis, lorsqu’il s’agit de rencontrer un homme ou une femme, êtes-vous certain d’avoir déposé votre regard, sur plus de 10 hommes ou femmes dans une seule soirée ? Un homme ou une femme que vous désirez réellement ? Ou alors, aviez-vous la possibilité ou la nécessité de devoir faire, à ce moment-là, un choix qui vous engage ?….

12 commentaires pour Rencontres en ligne: Quant trop de choix tue le choix (The date not taken: is dating’s globalization the end of monogamy?)

  1. […] revue américaine The Atlantic revient sur les effets de la mondialisation des choix sentimentaux et matrimoniaux sur nos vies amoureuses et de moins en moins maritales […]

    J'aime

  2. […] à notre dernier billet concernant les effets, sur nos vies amoureuses, de l’hyperchoix des sites de rencontres […]

    J'aime

  3. jcdurbant dit :

    Voir aussi:

    Je crois que le modèle de couple que nos grands-parents nous ont légué a volé en éclats. Aujourd’hui, tout le monde veut sa part du gâteau. Nous sommes partagés entre le besoin d’amour et l’envie de papillonner. La liberté individuelle a été placée au sommet de toutes nos valeurs, et le sexe devient la nouvelle lutte sociale. C’est à qui aura les meilleurs orgasmes ! Lorsque je rencontre une fille sur le marché de la séduction, me dire que je vais rester avec elle est tout sauf une évidence. Comment gérer cette nouvelle donne ? Je l’ignore. Je ne suis pas sûr que nous en reviendrons indemnes. Il y aura sans doute de plus en plus de personnes sous antidépresseurs ou de sex addicts.

    Il est clair que les sociétés commerciales qui gèrent ces sites exploitent le besoin grandissant de rencontres et de sexe. Elles s’abritent derrière une grande hypocrisie : faire croire que tout le monde peut trouver l’amour. Du coup les « moches », les « chiants » et les « désespérés » tentent leur chance auprès des « beaux » et des « cool » ! Évidemment, ils se font jeter. C’est très violent, ça renforce la misère sexuelle dénoncée, mais curieusement ça ne les décourage pas. J’ai retrouvé, dix ans après mes premières inscriptions, les mêmes personnes aigries voguant de site en site.

    Stéphane Rose

    J'aime

  4. […] l’heure où, via les réseaux sociaux ou les sites de rencontre, l’Internet permet non seulement de rester en contact avec ceux que l’on aime mais de […]

    J'aime

  5. […] l’heure où, via les réseaux sociaux ou les sites de rencontre, l’Internet permet non seulement de rester en contact avec ceux que l’on aime mais de […]

    J'aime

  6. […] l’heure où, via les réseaux sociaux ou les sites de rencontre, l’Internet permet non seulement de rester en contact avec ceux que l’on aime mais de […]

    J'aime

  7. […] l’heure où, via les réseaux sociaux ou les sites de rencontre, l’Internet permet non seulement de rester en contact avec ceux que l’on aime mais de […]

    J'aime

  8. […] l’heure où, via les réseaux sociaux ou les sites de rencontre, l’Internet permet non seulement de rester en contact avec ceux que l’on aime mais de […]

    J'aime

  9. bonjour,
    merci pour les explications!le rencontre sur internet peuvent avoir des avantages positifs comme négatifs mais tous dépend de soi même.

    J'aime

  10. jcdurbant dit :

    « les sites changent moins les pratiques amoureuses que la manière de les raconter et les pratiques plus que les normes » …

    Voir aussi:

    Dans la littérature ou le cinéma, on présente la rencontre amoureuse comme l’oeuvre du hasard. Les sites de rencontre font vaciller ce mythe de l’amour aveugle en invitant à expliciter les goûts amoureux. En fait, les sites changent moins les pratiques amoureuses que la manière de raconter cet événement. Privées du récit amoureux traditionnel, les rencontres en ligne laissent un doute sur la nature des relations qui en découlent. Cela conduit de nombreux utilisateurs à ne pas mentionner qu’ils se sont rencontrés sur internet. Ils craignent que leur relation soit dévalorisée et jugée moins “sérieuse” que celles qui débutent ailleurs. (…) Les rencontres en ligne se rapprochent sous plusieurs aspects du modèle des dates aux Etats-Unis, ces rendez-vous entre deux personnes avec une connaissance préalable parfois très limitée et dont l’engagement réciproque est faible. Le date ne marque pas nécessairement le début d’une relation, il n’est qu’un rendez-vous pour tâter le terrain et on peut “dater” simultanément avec plusieurs partenaires potentiels. (…) Les rencontres en ligne se déroulent en dehors et à l’insu du cercle de sociabilité. Cela facilite les relations passagères, notamment pour les femmes dont le comportement sexuel fait toujours objet d’un contrôle social important de la part de l’entourage. Le risque d’être stigmatisée comme “fille facile” est plus faible lorsque les partenaires se recrutent sur internet. Cela ne permet pourtant pas de conclure à un changement des représentations relatives à la sexualité féminine. Les sites semblent changer les pratiques plus que les normes sexuelles.(…) Sur ces sites, comme ailleurs, qui se ressemble s’assemble ! Les grands sites généralistes comme Meetic accueillent une population diversifiée et invitent les membres à faire le tri par la suite. Cette sélection amoureuse en ligne est souvent présentée comme un “choix sur profil”. C’est oublier la communication écrite ! Les usagers s’évaluent aussi en fonction des messages qu’ils s’échangent. C’est à ce moment qu’ils éliminent les interlocuteurs à qui ils n’ont rien à dire pour privilégier ceux dont la proximité sociale facilite l’échange.(…) Chez les usagers scolairement dotés, les fautes d’orthographe conduisent souvent à disqualifier un partenaire potentiel. Le maniement de la langue permet de situer la personne socialement mais il est également jugé en termes moraux ou renvoyé à des traits de caractère. Les fautes de syntaxe ou d’orthographe sont associées à la négligence, à la jeunesse ou à un manque de valeur.

    Marie Bergström

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :