Irak/9e: Comment perdre une guerre déjà gagnée (How Obama lost Iraq)

L’Irak (…) pourrait être l’un des grands succès de cette administration. Joe Biden (10.02.10)
We think a successful, democratic Iraq can be a model for the entire region. Obama (12.12.11)
There is no question that the United States was divided going into that war. But I think the United States is united coming out of that war. We all recognize the tremendous price that has been paid in lives, in blood. And yet I think we also recognize that those lives were not lost in vain. (…) As difficult as [the Iraq war] was, and the cost in both American and Iraqi lives, I think the price has been worth it, to establish a stable government in a very important region of the world. Leon Panetta  (secrétaire américain à la Défense)
Il y a d’abord eu moins de morts qu’au Vietnam. De mémoire, il y a eu 13 500 soldats morts (sic) alors qu’en Irak il y en a eu 4 500. On est dans une autre dimension : trois fois moins pour une durée égale. Et surtout, l’armée américaine qui repart du Vietnam est une armée démoralisée, défaite. Là ce n’est pas le cas. Les Américains partent au fond assez tranquillement. Il n’y a pas eu de scènes d’évacuation comme à Saïgon. Ils quittent le pays avec l’accord du gouvernement en place. (…)Les Américains ont renversé Saddam Hussein, c’était le but. Ils ont installé un gouvernement démocratiquement élu, il n’y a pas de doutes là-dessus. Voilà pour les points positifs. Les points négatifs, c’est qu’il y a eu des dizaines de milliers de morts et une guerre civile en Irak. Le prix à payer est extrêmement lourd. D’autant qu’on n’a pas l’impression que l’économie de l’Irak a redémarré. Lorsque l’on reprend ce que l’on disait il y a huit ans, comme quoi c’était une guerre pour mettre la main sur le pétrole ; on constate que le pétrole n’a pas redémarré. Le but politique de détruire un régime dictatorial a été atteint, mais le prix à payer a été extrêmement élevé. Jean-Dominique Merchet (spécialiste des questions de défense)
The military recommended nearly 20,000 troops, considerably fewer than our 28,500 in Korea, 40,000 in Japan, and 54,000 in Germany. The president rejected those proposals, choosing instead a level of 3,000 to 5,000 troops. A deployment so risibly small would have to expend all its energies simply protecting itself — the fate of our tragic, missionless 1982 Lebanon deployment — with no real capability to train the Iraqis, build their U.S.-equipped air force, mediate ethnic disputes (as we have successfully done, for example, between local Arabs and Kurds), operate surveillance and special-ops bases, and establish the kind of close military-to-military relations that undergird our strongest alliances. The Obama proposal was an unmistakable signal of unseriousness. It became clear that he simply wanted out, leaving any Iraqi foolish enough to maintain a pro-American orientation exposed to Iranian influence, now unopposed and potentially lethal. (…) The excuse is Iraqi refusal to grant legal immunity to U.S. forces. But the Bush administration encountered the same problem, and overcame it. Obama had little desire to. Indeed, he portrays the evacuation as a success, the fulfillment of a campaign promise. Charles Krauthammer

A l’heure où, avec le pitoyable retrait américain et des prétendus mensonges de Bush au soi-disant « million de morts », de « l’exécution sommaire de Sadam Hussein » à  « la honte d’Abou Ghraib » ou  du « déclenchement d’une véritable guérilla » à la « communautarisation » d’un État supposé « laïc » sans oublier la « guerre pour le pétrole, nos médias nous ressortent les contre-vérités habituelles  sur l’Irak…

Et où, à moins d’un an d’une présidentielle rien de moins qu’assurée, le Carter noir de la Maison Blanche s’attribue les mérites d’une victoire militaire pour une guerre contre laquelle il s’était fait élire …

Tout en se retrouvant,  du fait de son évident manque de conviction (le débat sur le nombre de troupes et les garanties d’immunité apparaissant plutôt comme un prétexte) et malgré  les quelque 40 000 hommes encore dans la région notamment au Koweit voisin, sans les moindres troupes sur place …

Retour, avec Charles Krauthammer, sur la manière dont l’actuelle Administration américaine vient de réussir l’exploit… de perdre une guerre déjà gagnée!

Who Lost Iraq?

You know who.

Charles Krauthammer

The NRO

November 3, 2011

Barack Obama was a principled opponent of the Iraq War from its beginning. But when he became president in January 2009, he was handed a war that was won. The surge had succeeded. Al-Qaeda in Iraq had been routed, driven to humiliating defeat by an Anbar Awakening of Sunnis fighting side-by-side with the infidel Americans. Even more remarkably, the Shiite militias had been taken down, with American backing, by the forces of Shiite prime minister Nouri al-Maliki. They crushed the Sadr militias from Basra to Sadr City.

Al-Qaeda decimated. A Shiite prime minister taking a decisively nationalist line. Iraqi Sunnis ready to integrate into a new national government. U.S. casualties at their lowest ebb in the entire war. Elections approaching. Obama was left with but a single task: Negotiate a new status-of-forces agreement (SOFA) to reinforce these gains and create a strategic partnership with the Arab world’s only democracy.

He blew it. Negotiations, such as they were, finally collapsed last month. There is no agreement, no partnership. As of December 31, the American military presence in Iraq will be liquidated.

And it’s not as if that deadline snuck up on Obama. He had three years to prepare for it. Everyone involved, Iraqi and American, knew that the 2008 SOFA calling for full U.S. withdrawal was meant to be renegotiated. And all major parties but one (the Sadr faction) had an interest in some residual stabilizing U.S. force, like the postwar deployments in Japan, Germany, and Korea.

Three years, two abject failures. The first was the administration’s inability, at the height of American post-surge power, to broker a centrist nationalist coalition governed by the major blocs — one predominantly Shiite (Maliki’s), one predominantly Sunni (Ayad Allawi’s), one Kurdish — that among them won a large majority (69 percent) of seats in the 2010 election.

Vice President Joe Biden was given the job. He failed utterly. The government ended up effectively being run by a narrow sectarian coalition where the balance of power is held by the relatively small (12 percent) Iranian-client Sadr faction.

The second failure was the SOFA itself. The military recommended nearly 20,000 troops, considerably fewer than our 28,500 in Korea, 40,000 in Japan, and 54,000 in Germany. The president rejected those proposals, choosing instead a level of 3,000 to 5,000 troops.

A deployment so risibly small would have to expend all its energies simply protecting itself — the fate of our tragic, missionless 1982 Lebanon deployment — with no real capability to train the Iraqis, build their U.S.-equipped air force, mediate ethnic disputes (as we have successfully done, for example, between local Arabs and Kurds), operate surveillance and special-ops bases, and establish the kind of close military-to-military relations that undergird our strongest alliances.

The Obama proposal was an unmistakable signal of unseriousness. It became clear that he simply wanted out, leaving any Iraqi foolish enough to maintain a pro-American orientation exposed to Iranian influence, now unopposed and potentially lethal. Message received. Just this past week, Massoud Barzani, leader of the Kurds — for two decades the staunchest of U.S. allies — visited Tehran to bend a knee to both Pres. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

It didn’t have to be this way. Our friends did not have to be left out in the cold to seek Iranian protection. Three years and a won war had given Obama the opportunity to establish a lasting strategic alliance with the Arab world’s second most important power.

He failed, though he hardly tried very hard. The excuse is Iraqi refusal to grant legal immunity to U.S. forces. But the Bush administration encountered the same problem, and overcame it. Obama had little desire to. Indeed, he portrays the evacuation as a success, the fulfillment of a campaign promise.

But surely the obligation to defend the security and the interests of the nation supersede personal vindication. Obama opposed the war, but when he became commander-in-chief the terrible price had already been paid in blood and treasure. His obligation was to make something of that sacrifice, to secure the strategic gains that sacrifice had already achieved.

He did not, failing at precisely what this administration so flatters itself for doing so well: diplomacy. After years of allegedly clumsy brutish force, Obama was to usher in an era of not hard power, not soft power, but smart power.

Which turns out in Iraq to be . . . no power. Years from now we will be asking not “Who lost Iraq?” — that already is clear — but “Why?”

Voir aussi:

What Obama Left Behind in Iraq

Fouad Ajami

The WSJ

December 17, 2011

There’s no need to fear the deference of Iraq’s Shiites toward Iran.

‘The tide of war is receding, and the soul of Baghdad remains, the soul of Iraq remains, » Vice President Joe Biden said at Camp Victory, by the Baghdad airport, earlier this month, in the countdown to the official end of the Iraq war. In truth, the receding tide Mr. Biden glimpsed was that of American power and influence in Iraq and in the Greater Middle East.

This wasn’t something the people of that region pined for. These are lands that crave the protection of a dominant foreign power as they feign outrage at its exercise. Nor was it decreed by the objective facts of American power, for this country still possesses all the ingredients of influence and prestige. It was, rather, a decision made in the course of the Obama presidency—the ebb of our power has become a self-fulfilling prophesy.

America was never meant to stay in Iraq indefinitely. In all fairness to President Obama, he had ridden the disappointment with Iraq from the state legislature in Illinois to the White House. He was not a pacifist, he let it be known. He did not oppose all wars. It was only « dumb » wars he was against. In every way he could, he kept Iraq at arm’s length. He never partook of the view that we had secured strategic gains in that country worth preserving. It was thus awkward to watch the president on Monday, with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki by his side, explaining as we exit that « We think a successful, democratic Iraq can be a model for the entire region. » The words rang hollow.

A president who understood the stakes would have had no difficulty justifying a residual American presence in Iraq. But not this president. At the core of Mr. Obama’s worldview lies a pessimism about America and the power of its ideals and reach in the world.

The one exception to this strategic timidity is the pride Mr. Obama takes in prosecuting the war against terrorists. In a moment evocative of George W. Bush, Mr. Obama last week swatted away the charge that he had been appeasing America’s enemies abroad: « Ask Osama bin Laden and the 22 out of 30 top Al Qaeda leaders who’ve been taken off the field whether I engage in appeasement. » Fair enough.

But the world demands more than that, it begs for a larger strategic reading of things.

We shall never know with certainty what was possible and open to us in Iraq. On the face of it, the Iraqis wanted us out, and Mr. Maliki and his coalition had been unwilling to give our troops legal immunity from prosecution. But how we got there is less understood. The U.S. commanders on the ground thought that a residual presence of 20,000 soldiers would suffice to keep the order in Iraq and give the United States an anchor in that country. The White House had proposed a much lower figure, somewhere between 3,000 and 5,000. That force level would have been unsustainable, a target for the disgruntled and the conspirators.

No Iraqi government would run the gauntlet of a divided country, and a feisty parliament, for that sort of deal. Mr. Maliki may not be fully tutored in the ways of American democracy, but he is shrewd enough to recognize that this American leader was not invested in Iraq’s affairs.

Six years ago, when this war was still young and its harvest uncertain, a brilliant Iraqi diplomat and writer, Hassan al- Alawi, wrote a provocative book titled « al-Iraq al-Amriki » (« American Iraq »). It was proper, he observed, to speak of an American Iraq as one does of a Sumerian, a Babylonian, an Abbasid, an Ottoman, then a British Iraq. He didn’t think that America would stick around long in Iraq, but he thought the American impact would be monumental.

Whereas British Iraq empowered the Sunnis, the Americans would tip the scales in favor of the Shiites. All three principal communities in Iraq had a vested interest in American protection. The Kurds, the most pro- American population in the region, were desperate to have America remain—a balance to the power of Turkey, a buffer between their autonomous zone in the north and the Baghdad government. The Sunnis, the erstwhile masters of the country, had come around: An American presence with enough authority would be their shield against a sectarian, Shiite regime that would cut them out of the spoils.

Ironically, the Shiite majority, the followers of the radical cleric Moqtada al-Sadr aside, had a vested interest in an American deterrent on the ground. For all their edge in the politics of Baghdad, the Shiites are still given to a healthy measure of paranoia about the world around them. The Iraq midwifed by U.S. power had been delivered into a hostile neighborhood. The Sunni Arabs had yet to accept and make their peace with the rise of a Shiite-led government in Baghdad. And the rebellion in Syria added to the uncertainty, feeding the anxiety of Mr. Maliki and the Shiite political class over a Syrian regime to their west ruled by the Sunni majority. There is also Turkey, large and now with economic means and a view of itself as a protector of the Sunnis of the region.

And there remained Iran, to the east, with the traffic of commerce and pilgrimage, with the religious entanglements born of a common Shiite faith. For the Sunni Arabs—and for Americans who had opposed this war—Iraq is destined to slip, nay it has already slipped, into the orbit of the Persian theocracy. The American war, with all its sacrifices, had simply created a « sister republic » of the Persian state, it is said.

Those who love to organize an untidy world have spoken of a « Shiite crescent » that stretches from Iran, through Iraq, all the way to the Mediterranean and Syria and Lebanon. But the image is false. Iraq is a big and proud country, with a strong sense of nationalism, and oil wealth of its own. An Iraqi political class, with its vast oil reserves, has no interest in ceding its authority to the Iranians.

The Shiism that straddles the boundaries of the two countries divides them as well. The sacred lands of Shiism are in Iraq, and the Shiism of the Iraqis is Arab through and through. The pride of Najaf is great, I can’t see it deferring to the religious authority of strangers.

One of our ablest diplomats, Ryan Crocker, then ambassador to Baghdad, now our envoy in Kabul, once pronounced the definitive judgment on these contested Iraqi matters: « In the end, what we leave behind and how we leave will be more important than how we came. » It so happened that when it truly mattered, the president who called the shots on Iraq had his gaze fixated on the past and its disputations.

Mr. Ajami is a senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution and co-chair of Hoover’s Working Group on Islamism and the International Order.

Voir enfin:

Irak : la fin d’une sale guerre

Philippe Rioux

La Dépêche

19/12/2011

Barack Obama avait promis un retrait total des troupes américaines. Celui-ci est effectif depuis hier. Neuf ans de guerre s’achèvent sur un bilan très contrasté.

Jusqu’au dernier moment, la date de l’évacuation des dernières troupes américaines d’Irak aura été tenue secrète, par crainte d’un attentat qui vienne endeuiller cette journée historique. Hier à l’aube, neuf ans après avoir envahi le pays pour renverser le dictateur Saddam Hussein, le dernier convoi composé de 110 véhicules transportant environ 500 soldats issus de la 3e brigade de la 1re division de cavalerie a traversé la frontière à 7 h 30 locales (5 h 30 à Paris). Le dernier véhicule est passé huit minutes plus tard et l’émotion était tangible parmi les soldats, dont beaucoup avaient accroché des bannières étoilées dans leurs véhicules.

L’opération « Iraqi Freedom » – la guerre la plus controversée depuis celle du Vietnam – s’achève donc dans l’amertume. Certes, le tyran Saddam Hussein a été renversé ; certes l’Irak a connu ses premières élections démocratiques depuis cinquante ans. Mais à quel prix ? Plus de 100 000 morts parmi les civils sont à déplorer – certains observateurs avancent même des centaines de milliers de victimes. Des conflits ethnico-religieux entre sunnites, chiites et kurdes menacent la stabilité d’un gouvernement très fragile. Le bloc laïque Iraqiya de l’ancien Premier ministre Iyad Allaoui a d’ailleurs décidé de suspendre à partir de samedi sa participation aux travaux du Parlement. L’économie du pays est exsangue : les services de base comme la distribution de l’électricité et de l’eau potable sont défectueux et la reprise des exportations du pétrole – 2,2 millions de barils par jour soit 7 milliards de dollars par mois – sont bien faibles.

Espoir de paix

Cette troisième guerre du Golfe, guerre « préventive » théorisée par George W. Bush après les attentats du 11-Septembre 2001 et qui a été émaillée de nombreux scandales dont le symbole reste celui de la prison d’Abou Ghraib, aura aussi coûté cher aux États-Unis. Financièrement (770 milliards de dollars par an), humainement (4 484 soldats morts) et moralement.

Reste que la fin d’une guerre, aussi controversée soit-elle, doit laisser place à l’espoir de la paix. Dans les rues de Bagdad hier, c’est cet espoir qui animait l’homme de la rue, à l’heure où l’Irak écrit un nouveau chapitre de son histoire.

——————————————————————————–

Les 6 dossiers noirs de Bagdad

1. Une guerre lancée sur des mensonges.

Après la deuxième guerre du Golfe de 1991, les Nations Unies adoptent la résolution 687 réclamant à l’Irak d’accepter la destruction de toutes les armes chimiques, biologiques et des infrastructures les produisant. Des inspections des Nations Unies et de l’Agence Internationale pour l’Énergie Atomique (AIEA) s’enchaînent alors jusqu’en 1998, puis reprennent en 2002 après une nouvelle résolution du Conseil de sécurité. Washington acquiert la certitude que Saddam Hussein dissimule aux inspecteurs des armes de destruction massive (ADM). Mais ni la CIA, ni les services secrets britanniques ne peuvent apporter de preuves formelles. Le 5 février 2003, le secrétaire d’État américain Colin Powell présente devant le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies des photos satellites montrant selon lui des camions-laboratoires. L’ex-général brandit ensuite une fiole contenant une poudre blanche : de l’anthrax. Craignant un veto de la France (lire ci-contre), de la Russie et de la Chine, les États-Unis et la Grande Bretagne lanceront la guerre sans l’aval de l’ONU. La guerre sera ensuite « légitimée » par d’autres résolutions du Conseil de sécurité. À noter qu’aux États-Unis et au Royaume-Uni, plusieurs enquêtes sont en cours pour déterminer s’il y a eu mensonge ou pas.

2. Les morts américains et irakiens.

En mars 2003, la coalition amenée par les États-Unis, le Royaume-Uni et l’Australie, compte 48 pays. Selon des sites Internet indépendants qui comptabilisent les morts (icasualties.org et antiwar.com), le bilan de la guerre est, du 20 mars 2003 au 1er décembre 2011, de 4 803 morts dans la coalition dont 4 484 soldats américains. A ces nombres s’ajoutent plus de 36 000 blessés dans la coalition dont 32 226 Américains. Du côté des civils, le nombre de victimes reste difficile à établir, mais tous les observateurs évoquent plus de 100000 morts. Depuis mars 2003, les pertes civiles s’étaleraient entre 104 035 et 113 680, selon l’organisation britannique IraqBodyCount.org. L’institut de sondage britannique Opinion research business a estimé à plus d’un million le nombre de victimes irakiennes entre mars 2003 et août 2007. Tandis que la revue The Lancet estimait en octobre 2006 que le nombre de décès irakiens imputables à la guerre était de 655 000. Le Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (UNHCR) a comptabilisé en ce mois de décembre 1 323 250 réfugiés dont 549 150 reçoivent une aide.

3. L’exécution sommaire de Sadam Hussein.

Après plusieurs mois passés dans la clandestinité, l’ex-dictateur Saddam Hussein est arrêté par les Américains dans une cave de Tikrit dans la nuit du 13 au 14 décembre 2003. Le monde entier découvre les images d’un raïs méconnaissable, hirsute, hagard. En juillet 2004, le Tribunal spécial irakien (TSI), le juge pour génocide, crime contre l’humanité et crime de guerre, avec plusieurs autres membres du parti Baas. Saddam Hussein a retrouvé sa verve, invective le tribunal à plusieurs reprises durant le procès qui dure plusieurs mois. Le 15 mars 2006, il se déclare à la barre toujours président de l’Irak et appelle les Irakiens à combattre les Américains. Le 19 juin, le procureur général requiert la peine de mort contre l’ancien président. Le 5 novembre, Saddam Hussein est condamné à mort par pendaison pour crime contre l’humanité. Le 30 décembre 2006, l’ancien président irakien est exécuté à Bagdad à 6 h 0 5. Son corps sera enterré dans le centre d’Aouja, à 180 km au nord de Bagdad et 4 km au sud de Tikrit. Cette exécution sommaire déclenche une vive polémique, certains dénonçant une « mascarade » et une « parodie de justice ».

4. La honte d’Abou Ghraib

En août 2003, l’armée américaine rouvre le complexe pénitentiaire d’Abou Ghraib, construit dans les années 60 et situé à 32 km de Bagdad. Une prison de sinistre mémoire, lieu de torture du régime de Saddam. En 2004, la diffusion de photographies montrant des détenus irakiens humiliés par des militaires américains déclenche le scandale d’Abou Ghraib. Les photos montrent des soldats irakiens torturés, attachés par des câbles électriques, obligés de poser nus les uns sur les autres, menacés par des chiens de garde. Leurs dépouilles sont désacralisées après leur mort. Le tollé international oblige les États-Unis à ouvrir une enquête. En 2006, onze soldats américains sont jugés et condamnés pour les faits de tortures commis dans la prison. En mai 2006, George W. Bush admet que la prison était la « plus grosse erreur » des Américains en Irak. Abou Ghraib est aujourd’hui « Prison centrale de Bagdad » et peut accueillir 15 000 détenus.

5. Le terrorisme, les enlèvements

L’occupation de l’Irak par les Américains a déclenché une vraie guérilla. Pillages, affrontements, règlements de compte sont le lot quotidien de nombreuses villes du pays sur fond d’affrontements religieux et ethniques entre sunnites et chiites. Les forces de la coalition – dont le commandement est bunkérisé dans la « zone verte » ultra-sécurisée de Bagdad – sont confrontées à l’hostilité de la population et à des actes terroristes de plus en plus violents. En 2004, des attentats quasi quotidiens frappent les forces militaires d’occupation et les civils travaillant pour eux. Les attentats de Qahtaniya, le 14 août 2007, sont les plus meurtriers avec 572 morts et 1 562 blessés.

Aux attentats s’est aussi ajoutée la multiplication des prises d’otages opérées par des fidèles de Saddam, des djihadistes étrangers, des islamistes et des salafistes. En mai 2004, Nick Berg, un homme d’affaires américain, est décapité par les hommes de Zarqaoui. Le 20 août 2004, les journalistes français Christian Chesnot et Georges Malbrunot sont enlevés par un groupe jusqu’alors inconnu, l’Armée islamique en Irak. Les Français sont libérés le 21 décembre 2004. Le 5 janvier 2005, Florence Aubenas (photo) est à son tour enlevée à Bagdad. Sa détention prendra fin le 12 juin.

6. D’un État laïc au régime communautariste

À la faveur d’un coup d’État en 1968, Saddam Hussein devient vice-président de l’Irak, puis président du pays à partir de 1979. Dirigé par le puisant parti Baas – nationaliste arabe, laïc et socialiste – l’Irak apparaît alors aux yeux de certains occidentaux comme un rempart contre l’Iran islamique. En 1988, au sortir de huit ans de guerre avec l’Iran, l’Irak est exsangue, au bord de la banqueroute. Saddam Hussein envahit alors le Koweït, déclenchant la 2e Guerre du golfe et subissant un très dur embargo. Au cours de cette guerre, Saddam Hussein a remis au goût du jour les valeurs islamiques. La guerre de 2003 et la chute du régime ont conduit à un éclatement de l’État. Les anciens conflits religieux entre chiites et sunnites sont réapparus. Les États-Unis sont toutefois parvenus, après un gouvernement provisoire, à organiser les premières élections libres. Mais le gouvernement communautariste reste très fragile.

——————————————————————————–

Et maintenant au tour de l’Afghanistan

Après l’Irak, l’Afghanistan sera le prochain théâtre d’opérations militaires que les États-Unis vont quitter, conformément aux promesses de Barack Obama. Le président des États-Unis avait fait deux promesses aux Américains : un retrait d’Irak dès que possible et la victoire en Afghanistan. La première promesse est effective. La seconde pourrait bientôt l’être. Les États-Unis sont en passe de remporter le « dur conflit » en Afghanistan, a affirmé à des militaires américains mercredi dernier le secrétaire américain à la Défense, Leon Panetta, sur une base de l’est de l’Afghanistan. « Nous sommes à un point où nous faisons d’énormes progrès. Y a-t-il encore des menaces, y a-t-il encore des défis que nous allons devoir affronter ? Évidemment », a-t-il ajouté devant 200 des 600 hommes de la base.

« En fin de compte, ici en Afghanistan, nous allons pouvoir mettre en place un pays capable de se gouverner et de se protéger lui-même », a-t-il poursuivi, promettant que les États-Unis s’assureraient que ni les talibans ni Al-Qaïda ne pourraient « jamais plus trouver de refuge » en Afghanistan. L’Otan, États-Unis en tête, a entamé cette année le retrait progressif de la totalité de ses troupes de combat, censé s’achever fin 2014. Quelque 33 000 militaires américains auront quitté l’Afghanistan d’ici à fin septembre 2012, dont 10 000 d’ici à fin décembre. La France retirera un quart de ses soldats d’ici à fin 2012, a annoncé en juillet Nicolas Sarkozy.

——————————————————————————–

Expert : Jean-Dominique Merchet, spécialiste des questions de défense

Le prix à payer est extrêmement lourd

Certains évoquent pour l’armée américaine un nouveau Vietnam. Est-ce pertinent ?

Non, il n’y a pas de similitudes. Il y a d’abord eu moins de morts qu’au Vietnam. De mémoire, il y a eu 13 500 soldats morts alors qu’en Irak il y en a eu 4 500. On est dans une autre dimension : trois fois moins pour une durée égale. Et surtout, l’armée américaine qui repart du Vietnam est une armée démoralisée, défaite. Là ce n’est pas le cas. Les Américains partent au fond assez tranquillement. Il n’y a pas eu de scènes d’évacuation comme à Saïgon. Ils quittent le pays avec l’accord du gouvernement en place.

Pour autant, les États-Unis ont-ils gagné cette guerre ?

Les Américains ont renversé Saddam Hussein, c’était le but. Ils ont installé un gouvernement démocratiquement élu, il n’y a pas de doutes là-dessus. Voilà pour les points positifs. Les points négatifs, c’est qu’il y a eu des dizaines de milliers de morts et une guerre civile en Irak. Le prix à payer est extrêmement lourd. D’autant qu’on n’a pas l’impression que l’économie de l’Irak a redémarré. Lorsque l’on reprend ce que l’on disait il y a huit ans, comme quoi c’était une guerre pour mettre la main sur le pétrole ; on constate que le pétrole n’a pas redémarré. Le but politique de détruire un régime dictatorial a été atteint, mais le prix à payer a été extrêmement élevé.

Cette guerre a-t-elle changé la façon dont les États-Unis appréhendent les conflits armés ?

Les guerres d’Irak et d’Afghanistan se ressemblent un peu. Ce sont des guerres qui se font au sein de populations musulmanes, relativement hostiles et en tout cas très partagées. Ce sont des guerres de contre-insurrection. Cela a amené les Américains à beaucoup réfléchir sur cette notion, y compris en reprenant des auteurs français sur la guerre d’Algérie. Mais cela n’est pas forcément un modèle pour les guerres d’avenir ; cela ne marche que lorsque l’on peut s’appuyer sur un gouvernement et des forces locales assez puissantes.

A l’ONU en 2003, le « non » de la France

En 2003, les États-Unis auront tenté jusqu’au bout de convaincre les membres du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies de l’existence d’armes de destructions massives en Irak. Des armes que Saddam Hussein aurait dissimulées depuis des années aux nombreux inspecteurs de l’ONU et de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA). Mais ni la CIA, ni les services britanniques n’ont produit jusqu’à présent des preuves irréfutables. Le 5 février 2003, le Conseil de sécurité se réunit une dernière fois. Le secrétaire d’État et ancien général Colin Powell, qui a des doutes à titre personnel, fait tout de même le job et présente des « preuves » : photographies aériennes de camions-laboratoires, enregistrements, fiole contenant, dit-il, de l’anthax…

En réponse, le 14 février, Dominique de Villepin, ministre français des Affaires étrangères, va prononcer un discours historique, celui du « non » de la France à cette guerre à venir. « C’est un vieux pays, la France, d’un vieux continent comme le mien, l’Europe, qui vous le dit aujourd’hui, qui a connu les guerres, l’occupation, la barbarie », conclut De Villepin qui, fait rare, sera applaudi. Craignant un veto de la France, de la Russie et de la Chine, les États-Unis passeront outre pour s’engager dans la guerre.

Voir enfin:

2 commentaires pour Irak/9e: Comment perdre une guerre déjà gagnée (How Obama lost Iraq)

  1. […] nombre de troupes et les garanties d’immunité apparaissant plutôt comme un prétexte), de perdre une guerre déjà gagnée … jc durbant @ 18:53 Catégorie(s): Bobologie et dhimmitude etDe la guerre et de […]

    J'aime

  2. […] entre sa guerre et ses milliards (60 milliards de dollars de reconstruction, 800 avec la guerre !), se retrouve […]

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :