Martin Luther King/43e: C’est une histoire trop grandiose pour s’attarder sur des balivernes (Too great a story to deal in trivia)

St MLKJe rêve que mes quatre petits enfants vivront un jour dans un pays où on ne les jugera pas à la couleur de leur peau mais à la nature de leur caractère. Martin Luther King
Je regrette d’avoir à le dire mais la grande majorité des Américains blancs sont racistes, que ce soit consciemment ou inconsciemment. Martin Luther King (1968)
Comme tout le monde, j’aimerais vivre une longue vie. La longévité a sa place. Mais je ne m’en soucie pas à présent. J’ai vu la Terre Promise. Je n’irai peut-être pas avec vous. Mais sachez-le ce soir, nous irons, notre peuple ira sur la Terre Promise ! Martin Luther King (1968)
Let us be honest with ourselves, and say that we, our standards have lagged behind at many points. Negroes constitute ten percent of the population of New York City, and yet they commit thirty-five percent of the crime. St. Louis, Missouri: the Negroes constitute twenty-six percent of the population, and yet seventy-six percent of the persons on the list for aid to dependent children are Negroes. We have eight times more illegitimacy than white persons. We’ve got to face all of these things. We must work to improve these standards. We must sit down quietly by the wayside, and ask ourselves: “Where can we improve?” What are the things that white people are saying about us? They say that we want integration because we want to marry white people. Well, we know that is a falsehood. We know that. We don’t have to worry about that. Then on the other hand, they say some other things about us, and maybe there is some truth in them. Maybe we could be more sanitary; maybe we could be a little more clean. You may not have enough money to take a weekend trip to Paris, France, and buy all of the fascinating and enticing perfumes. You may not be able to do that, but you are not so poor that you cannot buy a five cents bar of soap so that you can wash before … And another thing my friends, we kill each other too much. We cut up each other too much. (Yes, Yes sir) There is something that we can do. We’ve got to go down in the quiet hour and think about this thing. We’ve got to lift our moral standards at every hand, at every point. You may not have a Ph.D. degree; you may not have an M.A. degree; you may not have an A.B. degree. But the great thing about life is that any man can be good, and honest, and ethical, and moral, and can have character. We must walk the street every day, and let people know that as we walk the street, we aren’t thinking about sex every time we turn around. We are not animals to be degraded at every moment. We know that we’re made for the stars, created for eternity, born for the everlasting, and we stand by it. Martin Luther King
Our nation was born in genocide when it embraced the doctrine that the original American, the Indian, was an inferior race. Even before there were large numbers of Negroes on our shores, the scar of racial hatred had already disfigured colonial society. From the sixteenth century forward, blood flowed in battles over racial supremacy. We are perhaps the only nation which tried as a matter of national policy to wipe out its indigenous population. Martin Luther King
Today the exploration of space is engaging not only our enthusiasm but our patriotism. Developing it as a global race we have intensified its inherent drama and brought its adventure into every living room, nursery, shop and office. No such fervor or exhilaration attends the war on poverty. Without denying the value of scientific endeavor, there is a striking absurdity in committing billions to reach the moon where no people live, while only a fraction of that amount is appropriated to service the densely populated slums. If these strange values persist, in a few years we can be assured that when we set a man on the moon, with an adequate telescope he will be able to see the slums on earth with their intensified congestion, decay and turbulence. On what scale of vales is this a program of progress?  Martin Luther King
Some of us who have already begun to break the silence of the night have found that the calling to speak is often a vocation of agony, but we must speak. (…) Over the past two years, as I have moved to break the betrayal of my own silences and to speak from the burnings of my own heart, as I have called for radical departures from the destruction of Vietnam, many persons have questioned me about the wisdom of my path. At the heart of their concerns this query has often loomed large and loud: Why are you speaking about war, Dr. King? Why are you joining the voices of dissent? Peace and civil rights don’t mix, they say. Aren’t you hurting the cause of your people, they ask? And when I hear them, though I often understand the source of their concern, I am nevertheless greatly saddened, for such questions mean that the inquirers have not really known me, my commitment or my calling. Indeed, their questions suggest that they do not know the world in which they live. (…) A few years ago there was a shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real promise of hope for the poor — both black and white — through the poverty program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the buildup in Vietnam and I watched the program broken and eviscerated as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on war, and I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such. (…) As I have walked among the desperate, rejected and angry young men I have told them that Molotov cocktails and rifles would not solve their problems. I have tried to offer them my deepest compassion while maintaining my conviction that social change comes most meaningfully through nonviolent action. But they asked — and rightly so — what about Vietnam? They asked if our own nation wasn’t using massive doses of violence to solve its problems, to bring about the changes it wanted. Their questions hit home, and I knew that I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the oppressed in the ghettos without having first spoken clearly to the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today — my own government. Martin Luther King (1967)
We are now making demands that will cost the nation something. You can’t talk about solving the economic problem of the Negro without talking about billions of dollars. You can’t talk about ending slums without first saying profit must be taken out of slums. You’re really tampering and getting on dangerous ground because you are messing with folk then. You are messing with the captains of industry….Now this means that we are treading in difficult waters, because it really means that we are saying that something is wrong…with capitalism…here must be a better distribution of wealth and maybe America must move toward a Democratic Socialism. Martin Luther King
Je sers d’écran blanc sur lequel les gens de couleurs politiques les plus différentes peuvent projeter leurs propres vues. Obama
Obama surfe sur cette vague d’aspiration des Blancs qui se projettent sur lui. Il parle d’espoir, de changement, d’avenir… Il se cache derrière ce discours éthéré, sans substance, pour permettre aux Blancs de projeter sur lui leurs aspirations. Il est prisonnier car à la minute où il révélera qui il est vraiment, ce en quoi il croit vraiment, son idéologie, il perdra toute sa magie et sa popularité de rock-star. (…) Il est prisonnier, car il ne peut pas être lui-même. (…) Les Blancs sont l’électorat naturel de Barack Obama. (…) C’est ça l’ironie: il a fallu que Barack Obama gagne les voix blanches pour emporter les voix noires. Shelby Steele
Pourquoi les Démocrates feraient-ils l’impasse sur leur propre histoire entre 1848 et 1900 ? Peut-être parce que ce n’est pas le genre d’histoire des droits civiques dont ils veulent parler – peut-être parce que ce n’est pas le genre d’histoire de droits civiques qu’ils veulent avoir sur leur site Web. David Barton
Si Obama était blanc, il ne serait pas dans cette position. Et s’il était une femme, il ne serait pas dans cette position. Il a beaucoup de chance d’être ce qu’il est. Geraldine Ferraro (ex-colistière du candidat démocrate de 1984 et proche d’Hillary Clinton, mars 2008)
Ce scénario était fondé sur des informations fausses. Des gens ont témoigné devant le Congrès du fait que le FBI avait fabriqué certaines informations, comme celle selon laquelle Martin et Coretta songeaient au divorce. […] C’est une histoire trop grandiose pour s’attarder sur des balivernes. […] Je veux que quelqu’un fasse pour Martin Luther King ce que Sir Richard Attenborough a fait pour Gandhi. Andrew Young
In the last 30 years we have trapped King in romantic images or frozen his legacy in worship. His strengths have been needlessly exaggerated, his weaknesses wildly overplayed. (…) King’s failures were significant, but they pale in comparison to the majestic good he did. As King knew, character should never be judged in Manichaean terms. Human striving to do right must balance human wrongdoing, since, at its best, life is a tattered quilt of the good and the bad. King lived a life obsessed with helping others. He loved when he was hated. Her forgave when he was despised. … If he could forgive his enemies and friends for their faults, we can forgive him his. We need not idolize King to appreciate his worth; neither do we need to honor him by refusing to confront his weaknesses and his limitations. In assessing King’s life, it would be immoral to value the abstract good of human perfection over concrete goods like justice, freedom, and equality — goods that King valued and helped make more accessible in our national life. Michael Eric Dyson
Americans don’t have much patience with complicated heroes. We like them simple and unthreatening, preferably reducible to a single idea or expression. There are few historical figures who illustrate this tendency better than the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., a man whose entire career is often summarized in the phrase  »I have a dream. » (…) In  »I May Not Get There With You, » Michael Eric Dyson argues that we have tarnished King’s true legacy by translating it into a cliché. We have sanitized his ideas to make them sound less radical, twisted his identity so he appears more saintly and ceded control of his image to various powers — from the federal government that made his birthday an official holiday to the King family itself, which has aggressively and profitably marketed his memory. Dyson castigates King’s foes and fans alike.  (…) Dyson’s achievement is to have recovered the discomfortingly radical core of King’s message and reminded us why J. Edgar Hoover called him  »the most dangerous Negro in America. » It is sometimes forgotten that many of the liberal admirers so fond of King when he was the messenger of nonviolent integration ( »the poster boy for Safe Negro Leadership, » in Dyson’s words) grew disenchanted with him when he espoused more radical ideas in his later years. Confronted with seemingly ineradicable white racism and persistent black poverty in the North, King concluded that nothing short of  »radical moral surgery » was required to heal the country. (…) He viewed the Vietnam War as an extension of America’s domestic racism and lost considerable support by advocating various black nationalist and socialist ideas. His own Southern Christian Leadership Conference put tremendous pressure on him to moderate his views and, although he won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, by 1968 his name had slipped off the Gallup poll’s list of the 10 most admired Americans. The book is at its best when Dyson provides close readings of the less well-known sermons, drawing on King’s unambiguously radical ideas to rescue him from his conservative usurpers and undercut their sanitized portrait. Indeed, Dyson proposes a 10-year moratorium on reading King’s  »I Have a Dream » speech so that the rest of his ideas — like his defense of wide-ranging affirmative action programs in  »Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, » his last Sunday morning sermon — might come to the fore. Dyson argues that the  »Dream » speech has become an unwitting enemy of King’s genuine moral complexity. (…) Dyson gives us a thoroughly contemporary King, an enigmatic hero whose flaws and failings make him more, not less, relevant to our times. Still, his painstaking analysis of King’s promiscuity and plagiarism (Dyson describes King’s habit of  »sampling » from other sources as  »more Miles Davis than Milli Vanilli ») too often reads like a politically correct laundry list, and it borders on the absurd when he suggests that in his flagrant sexual affairs King exploded  »in orgasm to keep his spirit from exploding. » Similarly, when Dyson equates King’s sexism with that of the rapper Tupac Shakur, he diminishes King for the sake of a glib pop culture comparison. Although Dyson fulfills his promise to  »provide a fresh interpretation of a peculiarly American life, » I kept hoping he might step back and question the whole enterprise of icon rescue itself. It sometimes seems as if the culture industry packages new heroes no less frequently than the fashion industry alters hemlines or tie widths. Was the Malcolm X revival of only a few years ago — to which Dyson’s  »Making Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X » contributed — a genuine movement or merely a marketing opportunity? Will Dyson’s reclaimed and updated King really bolster young African-Americans or the political left? One might actually read  »I May Not Get There With You » as a pointed lesson about how absurdly easy it is for ideologues of every political stripe to misappropriate and profit from even the most powerful ideas and sophisticated thinkers. Too often the rhetorical battle over a hero’s image gets confused with the political struggle itself. So can the defenders of King’s  »true » legacy finally declare victory, or has the real fight only just begun? Robert S. Boynton
Loin des déchirements des années 1960, King est devenu une figure consensuelle. « J’ai fait un rêve », répète-t-on sans cesse. Une phrase résume partout son fameux discours de 1963 à Washington : « Je fais le rêve qu’un jour mes quatre jeunes enfants vivront dans une nation où ils seront jugés, non pas sur leur couleur de peau, mais d’après le contenu de leur personnalité. » (« the content of their character »). Autrement dit, si Martin Luther King, Jr. est devenu à titre posthume un saint national, c’est parce qu’il aurait été « aveugle à la race » (color-blind). Or King n’était pas un saint – en tout cas, il n’avait rien de lénifiant. Non qu’il s’agisse de rappeler ici, pour le dénigrer, les faiblesses de l’homme (du plagiat de jeunesse aux aventures du pasteur adultère). Mais si l’on veut comprendre sa mort violente, il faut lui restituer sa force de scandale. King n’était pas un doux rêveur inoffensif. Comme le souligne avec force le critique noir Michael Eric Dyson, les années 1960 aux Etats-Unis, en se radicalisant, ont radicalisé aussi le pasteur de l’église baptiste. En 1968, le mouvement pour les droits civiques a perdu son innocence, et King avec lui. Après 1965, King s’éloigne d’une approche morale pour privilégier une approche politique. Il ne suffit pas d’en appeler à la justice. S’il ne renonce jamais à la non-violence, de plus en plus, pour penser les rapports de force, il met en cause l’ordre des choses. La réforme exigée suppose selon lui une « restructuration de la société américaine dans son entier. » En effet, désormais, la question raciale lui apparaît bien comme une question sociale. Les droits formels sont nécessaires ; ils ne sont pas suffisants : la ghettoïsation des populations de couleur est inséparable des inégalités économiques. A Memphis, il trouve la mort en venant soutenir une grève d’éboueurs noirs, dans le cadre de la Campagne des pauvres. Il s’agit donc de la distribution de la richesse, de l’organisation de la société étatsunienne tout entière, bref, du capitalisme. N’allons pas croire pour autant que King renonce à la race, pour penser la classe en dernière instance. En effet, en déplaçant le combat, du Sud au Nord des Etats-Unis, le pasteur pouvait mesurer à quel point le racisme n’était pas cantonné dans les terres des Confédérés. A Chicago, où il se bat pour les droits sociaux, le logement ou l’emploi, l’hostilité n’est pas moindre que dans l’Alabama, quand il luttait pour les droits civiques, contre la ségrégation. Le racisme n’est donc pas seulement une trace du passé, legs de la guerre de Sécession, car cent ans plus tard, « la plupart des Américains sont inconsciemment racistes. » Autrement dit, après le racisme revendiqué, King découvre l’ampleur de la discrimination raciale qui s’affiche moins, mais qui n’a pas besoin d’être consciente pour instituer une hiérarchie raciale. Le problème ne se résume pas aux intentions, bonnes ou mauvaises ; c’est le résultat qui compte, à savoir la discrimination. La radicalisation de Martin Luther King, Jr. ne s’arrête pas là. Un an avant sa mort, jour pour jour, le prix Nobel de la Paix s’était publiquement engagé à New York contre la guerre du Vietnam : il était venu, « le temps de briser le silence ». C’était rompre avec le président Johnson, et s’exposer à l’hostilité des médias, de Time au New York Times. Pour King, le combat pour la paix rejoint l’engagement pour les droits civiques. C’est que « la guerre est l’ennemi des pauvres » : ce sont leurs enfants qui meurent au Vietnam, et c’est l’argent de la guerre contre la pauvreté qui est dilapidé dans l’effort militaire. Quant aux Vietnamiens, « ils doivent voir les Américains comme d’étranges libérateurs »… C’est pourquoi, plutôt que de combattre le communisme, « il nous faut, par une action positive, chercher à éradiquer ces conditions de pauvreté, d’insécurité et d’injustice qui sont le sol fertile où pousse et prospère la semence du communisme. » (…) Son héritage est donc bien un enjeu politique. Aux Etats-Unis, les conservateurs s’emploient depuis le début des années 1990 à en faire le héraut d’une Amérique « aveugle à la race ». L’intellectuel noir Shelby Steele opposait déjà en 1990, en écho au discours de 1963, « le contenu de notre personnalité » à la couleur de peau – et depuis, cette version « color blind » du militant des droits civiques s’est imposée, y compris dans des travaux universitaires parmi les plus sérieux. Jusque dans les campagnes électorales, on invoque l’autorité de King contre les politiques de discrimination positive (affirmative action). Or, comme le démontrait en 2003 Tim Wise, militant blanc de l’antiracisme, loin d’être « aveugle à la race », le pasteur noir s’est mainte fois prononcé pour des politiques prenant en compte le critère racial. En 1963, il écrivait déjà : « Dès qu’on soulève l’idée d’un traitement compensatoire ou préférentiel pour les Noirs, certains de nos amis reculent avec horreur. Le Noir devrait bénéficier de l’égalité, ils en conviennent, mais il ne devrait rien demander de plus. En apparence, c’est raisonnable ; mais ce n’est pas réaliste. Car il est évident que dans une course, l’homme qui franchit la ligne de départ trois cents mètres après son concurrent devra accomplir un exploit inouï pour le rattraper. » Si l’enjeu est actuel, c’est bien sûr que l’anniversaire de la mort de Martin Luther King, Jr. tombe en plein dans la campagne démocrate pour la nomination. Un candidat noir est-il condamné à choisir entre le racisme anti-blanc et le moralisme incolore ? On sait ce que l’alternative a coûté à Jesse Jackson dans les années 1980 : constamment renvoyé au premier terme, il n’était qu’un candidat noir – enfermé dans sa race, et donc inéligible. Aujourd’hui, c’est tout le sens de la polémique lancée autour des sermons du pasteur Jeremiah Wright : Obama est sommé de choisir entre le racisme et l’aveuglement à la race. On reviendra sur sa réponse. Mais il vaut la peine aussi de s’intéresser au sermon si contesté – sans se limiter aux extraits diffusés par la chaîne Fox, d’une droite sans mélange, ouvertement engagée contre Obama. Jeremiah Wright n’est pas le raciste anti-blanc qu’on nous a montré. Sans doute reprend-il d’un ambassadeur blanc, interviewé justement sur Fox, une fameuse citation de Malcolm X, la plus controversée, après la mort du président Kennedy (« the chickens have come home to roost », soit à peu près « tu récolteras la tempête »). Cependant, son discours rappelle tout autant Martin Luther King, Jr. : la guerre du Vietnam lui faisait dire que son pays était « le plus grand fournisseur de violence au monde aujourd’hui. » Il avait déjà rappelé que « notre nation est née d’un génocide », en rappelant le sort des Indiens d’Amérique, et à la fin de sa vie, il caractérisait la discrimination raciale dans le Nord du pays comme « un génocide psychologique et spirituel ». Il ne s’agit pourtant pas d’antiaméricanisme : l’un et l’autre appellent le pays à un examen de conscience. Nulle modération dans ce discours. Le style prophétique du prédicateur noir n’est pas mièvre. Pour autant, King était-il raciste ? L’apôtre de la non-violence était-il violent ? Ou bien, ne donnait-il pas plutôt à voir et à penser la violence de la discrimination ? Et comment le faire en s’aveuglant à la race ? En tout cas, ceux qui voulaient le tuer ne s’y sont pas trompés : son message était bien politique ; il bousculait l’Amérique des années 1960. Et leur violence lui a donné raison. Eric Fassin
Il y a, cependant, des considérations pratiques occasionnelles qui justifient les tergiversations, voire la répression. Au cours de la l’hystérie médiatique Monica Lewinsky, Bill Clinton a été neutralisé, incapable de mener à bien les tâches qui étaient les siennes avec le cafouillage sur les taches des robes bleues et la configuration exacte du pénis présidentiel. Il aurait pu être  désastreusement distrayant si, pendant la crise des missiles cubains, on avait appris que les frères Kennedy se faisaient Marilyn Monroe à tour de rôle. Les grandes affaires du monde sont plus importantes que ces anecdotes. La vision de MLK n’a pas encore été entièrement accomplie: jusqu’à qu’elle le soit, son héritage doit être protégé, comme l’a été la réputation publique des Kennedy en leur temps. Tant pis si cela requiert une dose d’aseptisation, la lutte continue pour les droits civiques n’est pas chose futile. Néanmoins, je préférerais de beaucoup voir le film de Greengrass que celui de Spielberg, pas vous? John Sutherland (The Guardian)

Après la béatification,… la canonisation?

En ce 43e anniversaire (hier en fait) de l’assassinat du pasteur Martin Luther King

Qui serait probablement le premier choqué aujourd’hui de voir un président américain élu non pour la nature de son caractère mais pour la couleur de sa peau

Confirmation, après les pressions contre la mini-série Kennedy (sexe, drogue et relations mafieuses obligent), de son statut de véritable saint laïc en tout cas à Hollywood …

Avec tous ces projets de films hagiographiques (pas moins de quatre dont un de Spielberg et une mini-série) …

Mais surtout le report possible de deux d’entre eux et notamment de celui du Britannique Paul Greengrass …

Pour cause, suite aux protestations des héritiers, de lèse-majesté.

Comme la référence, outre au plagiat de sa thèse, à son recours de plus en plus massif sous la pression des dernières années à l’alcool et au sexe (y compris, si l’on en croit les écoutes du FBI, tarifé) et partant à l’effondrement de son mariage

Sans compter, selon le bon vieux et proprement stalinien principe du « il ne faut pas désespérer Watts », cette défense pour le moins audacieuse, par le journal de la gauche bien-pensante britannique The Guardian, de l’hagiographie contre la vérité historique.

Le même qui publie à longueur de pages les dépêches diplomatiques volées du site du hacker australien Julian Assange …

Universal lâche un biopic polémique sur Martin Luther King

Slate

5 avril 2011

Du rififi à Montgomery Les studios Universal ont décidé de lâcher Memphis, un projet de film sur Martin Luther King porté par le réalisateur Paul Greengrass (Bloody Sunday, United 93, Green Zone, la série des Jason Bourne…), qu’ils prévoyaient de sortir à l’occasion du prochain Martin Luther King Day, en janvier 2012. La raison officielle est qu’ils craignent que le film ne puisse pas être prêt à temps, mais il existe une raison officieuse, selon le site Deadline, qui a révélé l’information:

«Les héritiers King se montraient très critiques envers le projet et ont exercé des pressions sur le studio pour qu’il l’abandonne. […] La famille aurait fait savoir qu’elle pourrait manifester publiquement son déplaisir concernant le scénario de Greengrass.»

Si ce dernier pourrait faire rebondir ce projet chez un autre studio, le site Obsessed with Film estime qu’il doit être «actuellement vraiment furieux, car cette annulation vient seulement quelques mois après son essai infructueux pour lancer un biopic de Jimi Hendrix […] car les héritiers de la légende du rock n’étaient pas satisfait de ses plans».

«Fondé sur des informations fausses»

Le même site développe aussi les grandes lignes du projet Memphis:

«Il devait se concentrer sur les derniers moments controversés de Martin Luther King en mars-avril 68, de son combat pour les droits des éboueurs de Memphis à ses relations enflammées avec le président Johnson en raison de leur désaccord sur le Vietnam, en passant par sa vision du Black Power et de la classe ouvrière. Le film devait aussi s’attarder sur sa vie personnelle, alors qu’à l’époque sa tabagie s’intensifiait, son mariage s’effondrait et qu’il consommait des quantités déraisonnables de nourriture et d’alcool.»

Un ami et confident de King, Andrew Young, ancien maire d’Atlanta, s’en est lui pris au projet dans les colonnes du quotidien britannique The Independent on Sunday:

«Ce scénario était fondé sur des informations fausses. Des gens ont témoigné devant le Congrès du fait que le FBI avait fabriqué certaines informations, comme celle selon laquelle Martin et Coretta songeaient au divorce. […] C’est une histoire trop grandiose pour s’attarder sur des balivernes. […] Je veux que quelqu’un fasse pour Martin Luther King ce que Sir Richard Attenborough a fait pour Gandhi.»

Spielberg a un projet

Deadline estime que cette attitude pourrait également s’expliquer par l’existence d’un autre projet porté par le scénariste Ronald Harwood (Le Pianiste de Polanski) et les studios Dreamworks de Steven Spielberg, qui ont payé les droits pour pouvoir utiliser les discours du leader des droits civiques. Un troisième projet sur Martin Luther King, Selma, du réalisateur Lee Daniels, a lui échoué à se lancer.

Revenant sur cette affaire et sur celle de la mini-série sur les Kennedy tournée puis refusée par une chaîne américaine, le chroniqueur John Sutherland livre un point de vue ambigu dans The Guardian, en estimant qu’un certain degré de réécriture de l’Histoire peut encore se justifier:

«La vision de MLK n’a pas encore été entièrement accomplie: jusqu’à qu’elle le soit, son héritage doit être protégé, comme l’a été la réputation publique des Kennedy en leur temps. Tant pis si cela requiert une dose d’aseptisation, la lutte continue pour les droits civiques n’est pas chose futile. Néanmoins, je préférerais de beaucoup voir le film de Greengrass que celui de Spielberg, pas vous?»

Voir aussi :

Opposition To Martin Luther King Films Reveals Hard Truths About Biopic Biz

Mike Fleming

Deadline

April 4, 2011

Few Hollywood films are as difficult to mount as the biopics of historical figures. From The Hurricane to Malcolm X, A Beautiful Mind to Munich, The Social Network to even the most recent Best Picture Oscar winner The King’s Speech, there is always criticism that the filmmakers have been either too tough or too soft on flawed protagonists. It also isn’t unusual for that criticism to begin in the early script stage, even though screenplays get rewritten and vetted so much that a first or second draft might not reflect what ultimately ends up in the finished film. A recent target was Clint Eastwood’s J. Edgar, whose script bizarrely was critiqued in The New York Times by a screenwriter who’d done a Hoover film years earlier and thus may have had a vested interest in seeing the new project not best his own. But what happens when the family and friends of a biopic subject get an early look at a script and don’t like what they’ve read? Should studios and/or distributors succumb to such pressure from insiders or ignore them? And what exactly in biopics constitutes fact vs fiction?

Martin Luther King Jr was killed 43 years ago today. Deadline revealed last Friday that Universal Pictures had dropped the Scott Rudin-produced and Paul Greengrass-directed MLK project Memphis. I’d heard that the decision came after the King estate and MLK confidante Andrew Young applied pressure. Young has confirmed to me (interview below) he did indeed contact Universal and objected to a Memphis script draft that, among other things, depicted marital infidelity in Dr. King’s final days. Young said he also refuted a depiction of himself securing a hotel room for a young woman who had accompanied King’s brother to Memphis.

I learned that Young was told by Universal that it would not move forward with Memphis in response to his claims of factual inaccuracies. A studio spokesperson continues to claim that Universal’s decision was based on scheduling, specifically uncertainty whether the movie could be ready for release in time for MLK’s birthday next February. The studio denied outside pressure played any role in deep-sixing the pic.

But this is not the first time Young has had reservations about the factual accuracy of a MLK biopic. He confirmed to me he also raised objections to purported facts in the script Selma, including mentions of infidelity as well. The on-again-off-again indie drama, developed by Precious helmer Lee Daniels with backing from The Weinstein Company, is about King’s march to the steps of the State Capital Building in Montgomery weeks after marchers demonstrating about voter rights were brutally beaten by law enforcement officials on the Edmund Pettis Bridge. « They didn’t even identify the woman who started that march, Amelia Boynton, who was beaten on the bridge and left for dead on Bloody Sunday, » Young told me. « You want to talk about a role for Oprah, there it is. They said, ‘We have our script,’ and I said, ‘No, you don’t.’ They call it poetic license, but I told them it doesn’t make sense to take poetic license when the real story is more powerful. »

Despite Young’s objections, the filmmakers behind both Selma and Memphis still hope to get their MLK projects made. Rudin and Greengrass are now looking for a new home in hopes of keeping their film on track for its February release. I read a draft of their Memphis from late last year. In my opinion, the film isn’t a biopic as much as a depiction of Dr. King’s final days as he struggled to organize a protest march on behalf of striking black municipal sanitation workers. That is juxtaposed with an intense manhunt for King’s assassin James Earl Ray, involving some of the federal authorities who, at Hoover’s direction, had dogged King’s every step with wiretaps and whispering campaigns before the civil rights leader’s death. Greengrass’s script is powerful stuff, and by the end, honors King’s struggle and ultimate sacrifice. But infidelity — which comes up in any Internet search on Dr. King — is in the script.

Young is admittedly protective of the reputation of his close friend, and said he pines for someone to do for King what Richard Attenborough did for Gandhi. He tells me when he read the script for Memphis, « I thought it was fiction. » As for the depiction of infidelity, Young said: « There is testimony in congressional hearings that a lot of that information was manufactured by the FBI and wasn’t true. The FBI testified to that. I was saying simply, why make up a story when the true story is so great? My only concern here is honoring the message of Martin Luther King’s life, and how you can change the world without killing anybody. You’ve seen glimpses of that in the fall of the Berlin Wall, in Poland, South Africa, in a movement in Egypt that began with prayers, where even mercenaries and the most brutal soldiers have trouble shooting someone on their knees. These regimes crumbled before non-violent demonstrations, and that is a message the world needs. »

I suggested that when films canonize subjects, audiences can sense it, and that is why good biopics mix reverence with warts-and-all treatment. Young said: « It’s not wrong if the warts are there. But we had the most powerful and understanding wives in history, Coretta, my wife Jean, and Ralph Abernathy’s wife Juanita. These women were more dedicated and enthusiastic in pushing us into these struggles than anybody, and the inference Coretta might have been upset about Martin being gone so much or them having marital troubles, it’s just not true. Maybe I’m piqued because nobody read my book, and I tried to be honest, and I was there. We were struggling with history that we didn’t even understand, but somehow by the grace of God it came out right. We were trying to change the world, not by any means necessary, but by being dedicated to loving our enemies and praying for those who persecuted us. That’s hard to believe in this day and age. But I can remember when everybody had guns in the South, and after Martin’s house was bombed, they all came. He sent them home. Time after time, our nonviolent commitment was put the test, but that was one test we passed, even in extremely difficult circumstances. » Young said he offered input on Memphis, but hasn’t heard back. « I said I would pay my own way to LA to sit with the writers, tell what really went on, and give them names, but nobody took me up on it, » he said.

But that’s because the filmmakers of Memphis were still waiting on a Universal greenlight. Both Greengrass (on Bloody Sunday and United 93) and Rudin (The Social Network) are veterans of the vetting process. During Oscar season, much was made of the way that input from Facebook influenced some scenes in The Social Network, but Rudin and director David Fincher and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin stood their ground when Facebook asked for changes to scenes the filmmakers had corroborated independently. In the end, Mark Zuckerberg embraced it.

Hollywood has long tried to find a way to tackle King’s life for a feature film, but it was deemed too sprawling. There are now at least four different projects in the works. While HBO’s 7-hour miniseries adaptation of Taylor Branch’s book trilogy intends to cover King’s voluminous civil rights activist career from start to finish, it seems somehow appropriate that feature films like Memphis break off pieces of MLK’s journey, showing different sides of one complex legend.

Voir également:

British film of Luther King’s life halted as family objects

Spielberg waits in the wings as supporters of the murdered human rights leader say Greengrass project would resort to trivia and smears

Emily Dugan

3 April 2011

A major Hollywood biopic of Martin Luther King has been dropped after friends and family of the murdered civil rights leader called it a « false » portrayal.

Memphis, a film about Dr King’s final days in 1968, directed and written by British film-maker Paul Greengrass, was supposed to begin filming in June. Now Greengrass, the Bafta -winning director, is said to be seeking a new backer after Universal Pictures declined to go ahead with the project.

The script is understood to have focused on Dr King’s troubles towards the end of his life, including alleged problems in his marriage and a smoking and drinking problem.

Andrew Young, a former friend and confidant of Dr King contacted Universal to register his objections. He told the IoS: « It was a script based on false information. There was congressional testimony saying that the FBI manufactured certain things, like the fact that Martin and Coretta [his wife] were thinking about divorce. To say they were not getting along is absolutely ridiculous. I feel this is too great a story to deal in trivia.

« You have a number of British writers who do not know the history and do not talk to people…. I want someone to do with Martin Luther King what Sir Richard Attenborough did with Gandhi. »

Dr King’s estate is understood to have made it clear they were also prepared to go public with their feelings about Greengrass’s script.

A source close to the film said Universal abandoned the project for « business reasons » because it would not have been completed for its February 2012 target date.

The church minister, a symbol for the global civil rights movement, was shot dead in Memphis 43 years ago tomorrow. He was only 39.

Greengrass and producer Scott Rodin were seen in Memphis scouting locations for their film in February.

A rival biopic of Dr King, produced by Steven Spielberg, is also being written. Dr King’s family sold the « life rights » to DreamWorks in May 2009, but it has yet to begin filming. The sale sparked a lawsuit among King’s children, with Martin Luther King III and the Rev Bernice King claiming their brother Dexter had negotiated a deal without their knowledge.

Voir de plus:

Martin Luther King – a whitewash can be right

Viewers would probably prefer a warts-and-all Dr King biopic. But his legacy is worth protecting

John Sutherland

The Guardian

April 2011

Question: what do Saif al-Islam Gaddafi and Martin Luther King Jr have in common? Answer: both are suspected of having plagiarised their PhD theses. A 1980s committee of investigation went further, in the case of MLK, and put on record that his doctorate was undeserved. Had young Martin’s examiners failed his thesis, as they should have done, and drummed him out of Boston University in disgrace, he could have gone on to dream all he wanted – and posterity would, for the larger part, never have heard of him.

King died, by a still-mysterious assassin’s hand, 43 years ago today. And the dream he proclaimed on 28 August 1963 has gone some way to being realised, with an African American in the White House. It should be a time of rejoicing.

It isn’t. It’s a time of ignominious squabbling. Paul Greengrass, the British film director, has been rudely decommissioned by Universal Studios from doing a big budget biopic of King after protest from the family. The Kings’ objections have been made public by Andrew Young – a black city mayor and comrade of King in the 1960s. Having pored over the script, these defenders of « the legacy » determined that Greengrass was intending to concentrate overly on « trivia ».

The PhD jiggery-pokery is one such trivial thing. Weightier, probably, is the evidence of the microphones the odious J Edgar Hoover had the FBI put under MLK’s bedsprings as he lodged in motels in his civil rights marches across America. There were, as the biographer David Garrow has established, flagrant infidelities. Hoover, one is told, circulated recordings of the black leader’s « catting around » in his bizarre quest to prove that he was a communist stooge.

The family would rather Greengrass had followed the line of Coretta King’s wifely My Life With Martin Luther King Jr. Or, as Young put it, they wanted « someone to do with Martin Luther King what Sir Richard Attenborough did with Gandhi ». Steven Spielberg is said to be willing to be that someone.

Meanwhile the latest biography of Gandhi, by Joseph Lelyveld, has been denounced in India and banned in Gujarat (Gandhi’s home state) for delving into his sexual tastes. And the History Channel had commissioned a mini-series, The Kennedys, due to start this week; but at the last minute it has caved into pressure on grounds of too much attention to « trivia’ – sex, drugs, mafiosi. The series was, it has said, « not fit for the History Channel » (not history?).

This nervousness about how to square biography with hagiography focuses attention on the primary problem in all commemoration of the great and the good. On one side are those like Thomas Carlyle, who was convinced that humans needed icons to hold them together as communities. In a godless age the iconic slot is filled by biography of great men – and, if necessary, bucketfuls of whitewash.

There is an alternative doctrine more popular today – what one might call the blackwash biography. It takes as its premise the belief that only after death, when libel no longer threatens, can the truth be told. Blackwash justifies itself in ways that can be worthy or prurient. The worthy justification is that the public does not have to be deluded to make correct judgments. There are, however, occasional practical considerations that justify pussy-footing, even suppression. During the Monica Lewinsky feeding frenzy Bill Clinton was neutered, incapable of carrying out the duties of office with the kerfuffle about stains on blue dresses and the exact configuration of the presidential penis.

It might have been disastrously distracting if, during the Cuban missile crisis, it had been known the Kennedy brothers were passing Marilyn Monroe round between them. The great affairs of the world are more important than such trivia. MLK’s vision has not yet been entirely fulfilled. Until it is his legacy must be protected, as was the Kennedys’ public reputation. If that requires a bucketful of whitewash, so be it. The continuing struggle for civil rights is non-trivial.

Nonetheless, I would much rather see Greengrass’s film than Spielberg’s. Wouldn’t you?

Voir encore:

Martin Luther King (1929 – 1968)

Un pasteur contre la ségrégation raciale

Martin Luther King (39 ans) est assassiné dans un motel de Memphis le soir du 4 avril 1968.

André Larané.

Hérodote

La mort tragique et ô combien prévisible du pasteur noir soulève une immense émotion aux États-Unis et dans le monde entier… cependant que les ghettos noirs des grandes villes américaines sombrent dans des émeutes d’une extrême violence.

Le jour de Martin Luther KingChaque année, le troisième lundi de janvier, les habitants des États-Unis commémorent le jour de Martin Luther King junior en souvenir de son action et de sa mort tragique.

Un apôtre de la non-violence Pendant une douzaine d’années, le pasteur King a lutté contre la ségrégation raciale pratiquée dans le sud des États-Unis.

Il s’est fait connaître à Montgomery (Alabama) à l’occasion d’un boycott de la compagnie d’autobus de la ville, coupable de tolérer la ségrégation dans ses véhicules. Il a entrepris ce boycott après qu’une couturière noire de 42 ans, Rosa Parks, ait refusé de céder sa place à un Blanc, le 1er décembre 1955.

Martin Luther King junior, jeune pasteur baptiste de la ville, est porté à la tête du mouvement de protestation et il organise aussitôt celui-ci en s’inspirant des actions non-violentes conduites par Gandhi aux Indes contre le colonisateur britannique.

Les Noirs d’Atlanta choisissent jour après jour de marcher plutôt que de prendre l’autobus. Cela dure un an. Privée de recettes, la compagnie doit rendre les armes et met fin à la ségrégation dans ses autobus. L’affaire prend une ampleur nationale et la Cour constitutionnelle déclare la ségrégation dans les bus inconstitutionnelle !

Martin Luther King prend alors la tête du Mouvement des droits civiques. Il triomphe le 28 août 1963, sous la présidence de John Fitzgerald Kennedy, à l’occasion de la Marche sur Washington. Devant 250.000 sympathisants, sur les marches du Mémorial Lincoln de la capitale fédérale, il prononce alors son plus fameux discours : «I have a dream…» («Je fais un rêve…»).

Extrait : I have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers…» (Je fais un rêve qu’un jour, les petits enfants noirs et les petits enfants blancs joindront leurs mains comme frères et soeurs…).

Mais la haine a bientôt raison de la non-violence. Le président Kennedy est assassiné et de premières émeutes éclatent dans les ghettos noirs tandis que le nouveau président, Lindon Baines Johnson, signe le 2 juillet 1964, en présence de Martin Luther King, la loi sur les droits civiques mettant fin à toute forme de ségrégation.

Le 14 octobre 1964, Martin Luther King reçoit le Prix Nobel de la paix. Mais son Mouvement est de plus en plus contesté et concurrencé par des mouvements qui prônent la violence, comme les Black Muslims (Musulmans noirs), dont le chef, Malcolm X, est assassiné le 21 février 1965.

Année après année, les violences rythment désormais la marche des Noirs vers l’émancipation civique. Après Watts, faubourg de Los Angeles, en août 1965, voici que flambent les ghettos de Chicago, en juillet 1966, puis de Detroit et Newark, en juillet 1967.

Une mort chargée d’espoirC’est dans cette atmosphère de tension que le pasteur est assassiné à Memphis. Son meurtrier est un repris de justice blanc, James Earl Ray. Il sera condamné à la prison à vie.

Aux Jeux Olympiques de Mexico, qui suivent le drame de quelques mois, des champions noirs américains lèvent le poing sur le podium et tournent le dos à la bannière étoilée. La même année, des professeurs admettent le principe de développer la place des Noirs et des minorités dans l’enseignement de l’histoire. C’est le début du mouvement PC («politically correct»).

La décennie qui suit est marquée par un profond bouleversement des esprits et une crise morale sans précédent. Les tensions raciales s’apaisent peu à peu. Aujourd’hui, l’intégration des Noirs, qui représentent un dixième de la population américaine, ne soulève plus guère d’opposition même si ce groupe reste handicapé par un grand retard économique et social.

Voir par ailleurs:

Detour to the Promised Land
A search for the real Martin Luther King Jr., who is hidden from those who know only his oratory.

Robert S. Boynton

The New York Times

January 23, 2000

I MAY NOT GET THERE WITH YOU
The True Martin Luther King, Jr.
By Michael Eric Dyson.
404 pp. New York:
The Free Press. $25.

Americans don’t have much patience with complicated heroes. We like them simple and unthreatening, preferably reducible to a single idea or expression. There are few historical figures who illustrate this tendency better than the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., a man whose entire career is often summarized in the phrase  »I have a dream. »

But what exactly was that dream? It’s sometimes hard to remember. In the 32 years since his assassination, King’s patrimony has been claimed by every ideological group imaginable. The civil rights establishment understandably sees him as one of its own. But so do such Christian conservatives as Randall Terry of Operation Rescue and Ralph Reed, who cite King’s vision as the basis for their own activism. King’s famous plea that his children be judged not  »by the color of their skin but by the content of their character » has become the battle cry for conservative advocates of colorblind policies. And in 1997, when Californians opposed to affirmative action wanted a suitable image for Proposition 209, they chose a picture of King at the 1963 March on Washington.

So malleable is King’s message that his  »dream » sometimes seems to stand for everything and nothing. In  »I May Not Get There With You, » Michael Eric Dyson argues that we have tarnished King’s true legacy by translating it into a cliché. We have sanitized his ideas to make them sound less radical, twisted his identity so he appears more saintly and ceded control of his image to various powers — from the federal government that made his birthday an official holiday to the King family itself, which has aggressively and profitably marketed his memory. Dyson castigates King’s foes and fans alike.  »In the last 30 years we have trapped King in romantic images or frozen his legacy in worship, » he writes.  »His strengths have been needlessly exaggerated, his weaknesses wildly overplayed. »

A Baptist minister and the Ida B. Wells Barnett university professor at DePaul University, Dyson is a prolific cultural critic who mixes journalism and scholarship (a hybrid he calls  »biocriticism ») to create a largely convincing portrait of the  »lost » King, emphasizing the years from 1965 to 1968, when he focused on race, poverty and militarism, the  »triplets of social misery. » Although there is little new material here, Dyson’s achievement is to have recovered the discomfortingly radical core of King’s message and reminded us why J. Edgar Hoover called him  »the most dangerous Negro in America. » It is sometimes forgotten that many of the liberal admirers so fond of King when he was the messenger of nonviolent integration ( »the poster boy for Safe Negro Leadership, » in Dyson’s words) grew disenchanted with him when he espoused more radical ideas in his later years. Confronted with seemingly ineradicable white racism and persistent black poverty in the North, King concluded that nothing short of  »radical moral surgery » was required to heal the country.  »I am sorry to have to say that the vast majority of white Americans are racists, either consciously or unconsciously, » he declared the year he died. He viewed the Vietnam War as an extension of America’s domestic racism and lost considerable support by advocating various black nationalist and socialist ideas. His own Southern Christian Leadership Conference put tremendous pressure on him to moderate his views and, although he won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, by 1968 his name had slipped off the Gallup poll’s list of the 10 most admired Americans.

The book is at its best when Dyson provides close readings of the less well-known sermons, drawing on King’s unambiguously radical ideas to rescue him from his conservative usurpers and undercut their sanitized portrait. Indeed, Dyson proposes a 10-year moratorium on reading King’s  »I Have a Dream » speech so that the rest of his ideas — like his defense of wide-ranging affirmative action programs in  »Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, » his last Sunday morning sermon — might come to the fore. Dyson argues that the  »Dream » speech has become an unwitting enemy of King’s genuine moral complexity.  »If we are forced to live without that speech for a decade, we may be forced to live it instead. In so doing, we can truly preserve King’s hope for racial revolution, » he writes.

Dyson gives us a thoroughly contemporary King, an enigmatic hero whose flaws and failings make him more, not less, relevant to our times. Still, his painstaking analysis of King’s promiscuity and plagiarism (Dyson describes King’s habit of  »sampling » from other sources as  »more Miles Davis than Milli Vanilli ») too often reads like a politically correct laundry list, and it borders on the absurd when he suggests that in his flagrant sexual affairs King exploded  »in orgasm to keep his spirit from exploding. » Similarly, when Dyson equates King’s sexism with that of the rapper Tupac Shakur, he diminishes King for the sake of a glib pop culture comparison.

Although Dyson fulfills his promise to  »provide a fresh interpretation of a peculiarly American life, » I kept hoping he might step back and question the whole enterprise of icon rescue itself. It sometimes seems as if the culture industry packages new heroes no less frequently than the fashion industry alters hemlines or tie widths. Was the Malcolm X revival of only a few years ago — to which Dyson’s  »Making Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X » contributed — a genuine movement or merely a marketing opportunity? Will Dyson’s reclaimed and updated King really bolster young African-Americans or the political left? One might actually read  »I May Not Get There With You » as a pointed lesson about how absurdly easy it is for ideologues of every political stripe to misappropriate and profit from even the most powerful ideas and sophisticated thinkers. Too often the rhetorical battle over a hero’s image gets confused with the political struggle itself. So can the defenders of King’s  »true » legacy finally declare victory, or has the real fight only just begun?

Robert S. Boynton has written for The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker and The Atlantic Monthly.

Voir enfin:

Martin Luther King, Jr. n’était pas « aveugle à la race »

Martin Luther King, Jr. fut assassiné il y a quarante ans, le 4 avril 1968 ; il n’avait pas encore quarante ans. Rien d’accidentel dans ce meurtre, ni d’imprévu : agressions et attentats le poursuivaient depuis des années. La veille même de sa mort, à Memphis, il prononçait un discours prophétique. Les menaces se rapprochaient alors, il les évoquait sans détour. « Comme tout le monde, j’aimerais vivre une longue vie. La longévité a sa place. Mais je ne m’en soucie pas à présent. » Car, tel Moïse, « j’ai vu la Terre Promise. Je n’irai peut-être pas avec vous. Mais sachez-le ce soir, nous irons, notre peuple ira sur la Terre Promise ! » La fin de sa vie fut donc la chronique d’une mort annoncée.

Pourquoi tant de haine ? Cette violence contre l’apôtre de la non-violence paraît aujourd’hui incompréhensible : il fait l’unanimité, jusque chez les conservateurs. C’est depuis Ronald Reagan qu’un jour férié lui est consacré. Loin des déchirements des années 1960, King est devenu une figure consensuelle. « J’ai fait un rêve », répète-t-on sans cesse. Une phrase résume partout son fameux discours de 1963 à Washington : « Je fais le rêve qu’un jour mes quatre jeunes enfants vivront dans une nation où ils seront jugés, non pas sur leur couleur de peau, mais d’après le contenu de leur personnalité. » (« the content of their character »). Autrement dit, si Martin Luther King, Jr. est devenu à titre posthume un saint national, c’est parce qu’il aurait été « aveugle à la race » (color-blind).

Or King n’était pas un saint – en tout cas, il n’avait rien de lénifiant. Non qu’il s’agisse de rappeler ici, pour le dénigrer, les faiblesses de l’homme (du plagiat de jeunesse aux aventures du pasteur adultère). Mais si l’on veut comprendre sa mort violente, il faut lui restituer sa force de scandale. King n’était pas un doux rêveur inoffensif. Comme le souligne avec force le critique noir Michael Eric Dyson, les années 1960 aux Etats-Unis, en se radicalisant, ont radicalisé aussi le pasteur de l’église baptiste. En 1968, le mouvement pour les droits civiques a perdu son innocence, et King avec lui.

Après 1965, King s’éloigne d’une approche morale pour privilégier une approche politique. Il ne suffit pas d’en appeler à la justice. S’il ne renonce jamais à la non-violence, de plus en plus, pour penser les rapports de force, il met en cause l’ordre des choses. La réforme exigée suppose selon lui une « restructuration de la société américaine dans son entier. » En effet, désormais, la question raciale lui apparaît bien comme une question sociale. Les droits formels sont nécessaires ; ils ne sont pas suffisants : la ghettoïsation des populations de couleur est inséparable des inégalités économiques. A Memphis, il trouve la mort en venant soutenir une grève d’éboueurs noirs, dans le cadre de la Campagne des pauvres. Il s’agit donc de la distribution de la richesse, de l’organisation de la société étatsunienne tout entière, bref, du capitalisme.

N’allons pas croire pour autant que King renonce à la race, pour penser la classe en dernière instance. En effet, en déplaçant le combat, du Sud au Nord des Etats-Unis, le pasteur pouvait mesurer à quel point le racisme n’était pas cantonné dans les terres des Confédérés. A Chicago, où il se bat pour les droits sociaux, le logement ou l’emploi, l’hostilité n’est pas moindre que dans l’Alabama, quand il luttait pour les droits civiques, contre la ségrégation. Le racisme n’est donc pas seulement une trace du passé, legs de la guerre de Sécession, car cent ans plus tard, « la plupart des Américains sont inconsciemment racistes. » Autrement dit, après le racisme revendiqué, King découvre l’ampleur de la discrimination raciale qui s’affiche moins, mais qui n’a pas besoin d’être consciente pour instituer une hiérarchie raciale. Le problème ne se résume pas aux intentions, bonnes ou mauvaises ; c’est le résultat qui compte, à savoir la discrimination.

La radicalisation de Martin Luther King, Jr. ne s’arrête pas là. Un an avant sa mort, jour pour jour, le prix Nobel de la Paix s’était publiquement engagé à New York contre la guerre du Vietnam : il était venu, « le temps de briser le silence ». C’était rompre avec le président Johnson, et s’exposer à l’hostilité des médias, de Time au New York Times. Pour King, le combat pour la paix rejoint l’engagement pour les droits civiques. C’est que « la guerre est l’ennemi des pauvres » : ce sont leurs enfants qui meurent au Vietnam, et c’est l’argent de la guerre contre la pauvreté qui est dilapidé dans l’effort militaire. Quant aux Vietnamiens, « ils doivent voir les Américains comme d’étranges libérateurs »… C’est pourquoi, plutôt que de combattre le communisme, « il nous faut, par une action positive, chercher à éradiquer ces conditions de pauvreté, d’insécurité et d’injustice qui sont le sol fertile où pousse et prospère la semence du communisme. »

Ces mots résonnent tout particulièrement aujourd’hui, à l’heure du « conflit des civilisations » – les funérailles de Coretta King, sa veuve, ont donné l’occasion de le souligner en 2006. Dans son discours, King évoquait « l’urgence farouche de l’instant » (« the fierce urgency of now »), soit contre la « procrastination », le péril imminent du « trop tard ». Ce n’est pas un hasard si Barack Obama reprend la formule pour expliquer sa candidature – son urgence : il est connu pour son opposition à la guerre en Irak. Mais il est aussi le premier candidat noir qui peut espérer la nomination d’un des deux grands partis pour l’élection présidentielle américaine. Comment ne pas penser le lien entre les deux ? Cette rhétorique ne doit donc pas être prise à la légère : elle nous invite à penser l’actualité politique de Martin Luther King, Jr., soit l’imbrication des questions de classe et de race, mais aussi leur articulation avec les enjeux de la guerre et de la paix. King ne faisait pas seulement la morale ; il faisait bien de la politique. D’ailleurs, il en est mort. S’il n’avait été qu’un saint, il n’aurait pas été un martyr.

Son héritage est donc bien un enjeu politique. Aux Etats-Unis, les conservateurs s’emploient depuis le début des années 1990 à en faire le héraut d’une Amérique « aveugle à la race ». L’intellectuel noir Shelby Steele opposait déjà en 1990, en écho au discours de 1963, « le contenu de notre personnalité » à la couleur de peau – et depuis, cette version « color blind » du militant des droits civiques s’est imposée, y compris dans des travaux universitaires parmi les plus sérieux. Jusque dans les campagnes électorales, on invoque l’autorité de King contre les politiques de discrimination positive (affirmative action). Or, comme le démontrait en 2003 Tim Wise, militant blanc de l’antiracisme, loin d’être « aveugle à la race », le pasteur noir s’est mainte fois prononcé pour des politiques prenant en compte le critère racial. En 1963, il écrivait déjà : « Dès qu’on soulève l’idée d’un traitement compensatoire ou préférentiel pour les Noirs, certains de nos amis reculent avec horreur. Le Noir devrait bénéficier de l’égalité, ils en conviennent, mais il ne devrait rien demander de plus. En apparence, c’est raisonnable ; mais ce n’est pas réaliste. Car il est évident que dans une course, l’homme qui franchit la ligne de départ trois cents mètres après son concurrent devra accomplir un exploit inouï pour le rattraper. »

Si l’enjeu est actuel, c’est bien sûr que l’anniversaire de la mort de Martin Luther King, Jr. tombe en plein dans la campagne démocrate pour la nomination. Un candidat noir est-il condamné à choisir entre le racisme anti-blanc et le moralisme incolore ? On sait ce que l’alternative a coûté à Jesse Jackson dans les années 1980 : constamment renvoyé au premier terme, il n’était qu’un candidat noir – enfermé dans sa race, et donc inéligible. Aujourd’hui, c’est tout le sens de la polémique lancée autour des sermons du pasteur Jeremiah Wright : Obama est sommé de choisir entre le racisme et l’aveuglement à la race. On reviendra sur sa réponse.

Mais il vaut la peine aussi de s’intéresser au sermon si contesté – sans se limiter aux extraits diffusés par la chaîne Fox, d’une droite sans mélange, ouvertement engagée contre Obama. Jeremiah Wright n’est pas le raciste anti-blanc qu’on nous a montré. Sans doute reprend-il d’un ambassadeur blanc, interviewé justement sur Fox, une fameuse citation de Malcolm X, la plus controversée, après la mort du président Kennedy (« the chickens have come home to roost », soit à peu près « tu récolteras la tempête »). Cependant, son discours rappelle tout autant Martin Luther King, Jr. : la guerre du Vietnam lui faisait dire que son pays était « le plus grand fournisseur de violence au monde aujourd’hui. » Il avait déjà rappelé que « notre nation est née d’un génocide », en rappelant le sort des Indiens d’Amérique, et à la fin de sa vie, il caractérisait la discrimination raciale dans le Nord du pays comme « un génocide psychologique et spirituel ». Il ne s’agit pourtant pas d’antiaméricanisme : l’un et l’autre appellent le pays à un examen de conscience.

Nulle modération dans ce discours. Le style prophétique du prédicateur noir n’est pas mièvre. Pour autant, King était-il raciste ? L’apôtre de la non-violence était-il violent ? Ou bien, ne donnait-il pas plutôt à voir et à penser la violence de la discrimination ? Et comment le faire en s’aveuglant à la race ? En tout cas, ceux qui voulaient le tuer ne s’y sont pas trompés : son message était bien politique ; il bousculait l’Amérique des années 1960. Et leur violence lui a donné raison. Espérons que cette histoire appartient au passé.

2 commentaires pour Martin Luther King/43e: C’est une histoire trop grandiose pour s’attarder sur des balivernes (Too great a story to deal in trivia)

  1. jcdurbant dit :

    Voir aussi:

    Tu as complètement pris possession de mon corps. C’est un esclavage insupportable.

    Gandhi (lettre à l’architecte allemand Hermann Kallenbach, 1914, reproduite dans « Grande âme : Mahatma Gandhi et sa lutte avec l’Inde » de Joseph Lelyveld, 2011)

    L’écriture de cette biographie est perverse par nature. Le peuple du Gujarat ne tolérera jamais une telle insulte vis-à-vis de Gandhi.

    Narendra Modi (ministre en chef de l’Etat du Gujarat)

    Si j’étais né en Allemagne et y gagnais ma vie, je revendiquerais l’Allemagne comme ma patrie au même titre que le plus grand des gentils Allemands et le défierais de m’abattre ou de me jeter au cachot; je refuserais d’être expulsé ou soumis à toute mesure discriminatoire. Et pour cela, je n’attendrais pas que mes coreligionaires se joignent à moi dans la résistance civile mais serais convaincu qu’à la fin ceux-ci ne manqueraient pas de suivre mon exemple. Si un juif ou tous les juifs acceptaient la prescription ici offerte, ils ne pourraient être en plus mauvaise posture que maintenant. Et la souffrance volontairement subie leur apporterait une force et une joie intérieures que ne pourraient leur apporter aucun nombre de résolutions de sympathie du reste du monde.

    Gandhi (le 26 novembre, 1938)

    Il vous faut abandonner les armes que vous avez car elles n’ont aucune utilité pour vous sauver vous ou l’humanité. Vous inviterez Herr Hitler et signor Mussolini à prendre ce qu’ils veulent des pays que vous appelez vos possessions…. Si ces messieurs choisissent d’occuper vos maisons, vous les évacuerez. S’ils ne vous laissent pas partir librement, vous vous laisserez abattre, hommes, femmes et enfants, mais vous leur refuserez toute allégeance.

    Gandhi (conseil aux Britanniques, 1940)

    J'aime

  2. […] Du rififi à Montgomery Les studios Universal ont décidé de lâcher Memphis, un projet de film sur Martin Luther King porté par le réalisateur Paul Greengrass (Bloody Sunday, United 93, Green Zone, la série des Jason Bourne…), qu’ils prévoyaient de sortir à l’occasion du prochain Martin Luther King Day, en janvier 2012. La raison officielle est qu’ils craignent que le film ne puisse pas être prêt à temps, mais il existe une raison officieuse, selon le site Deadline, qui a révélé l’information: «Les héritiers King se montraient très critiques envers le projet et ont exercé des pressions sur le studio pour qu’il l’abandonne. […] La famille aurait fait savoir qu’elle pourrait manifester publiquement son déplaisir concernant le scénario de Greengrass.» (…) «Il devait se concentrer sur les derniers moments controversés de Martin Luther King en mars-avril 68, de son combat pour les droits des éboueurs de Memphis à ses relations enflammées avec le président Johnson en raison de leur désaccord sur le Vietnam, en passant par sa vision du Black Power et de la classe ouvrière. Le film devait aussi s’attarder sur sa vie personnelle, alors qu’à l’époque sa tabagie s’intensifiait, son mariage s’effondrait et qu’il consommait des quantités déraisonnables de nourriture et d’alcool.»Un ami et confident de King, Andrew Young, ancien maire d’Atlanta, s’en est lui pris au projet dans les colonnes du quotidien britannique The Independent on Sunday: «Ce scénario était fondé sur des informations fausses. Des gens ont témoigné devant le Congrès du fait que le FBI avait fabriqué certaines informations, comme celle selon laquelle Martin et Coretta songeaient au divorce. […] C’est une histoire trop grandiose pour s’attarder sur des balivernes. […] Je veux que quelqu’un fasse pour Martin Luther King ce que Sir Richard Attenborough a fait pour Gandhi.» Deadline estime que cette attitude pourrait également s’expliquer par l’existence d’un autre projet porté par le scénariste Ronald Harwood (Le Pianiste de Polanski) et les studios Dreamworks de Steven Spielberg, qui ont payé les droits pour pouvoir utiliser les discours du leader des droits civiques. Un troisième projet sur Martin Luther King, Selma, du réalisateur Lee Daniels, a lui échoué à se lancer. Revenant sur cette affaire et sur celle de la mini-série sur les Kennedy tournée puis refusée par une chaîne américaine, le chroniqueur John Sutherland livre un point de vue ambigu dans The Guardian, en estimant qu’un certain degré de réécriture de l’Histoire peut encore se justifier: "La vision de MLK n’a pas encore été entièrement accomplie: jusqu’à qu’elle le soit, son héritage doit être protégé, comme l’a été la réputation publique des Kennedy en leur temps. Tant pis si cela requiert une dose d’aseptisation, la lutte continue pour les droits civiques n’est pas chose futile. Néanmoins, je préférerais de beaucoup voir le film de Greengrass que celui de Spielberg, pas vous?" Slate […]

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 572 autres abonnés

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :