Serment d’allégeance: C’est le capitalisme, imbécile! (The Pledge was just an ad to sell magazines)

17 octobre, 2010
https://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/no_more_pledge_allegiencecopy.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/undergod.procon.org/files/1-under-god-images/state-pledge-of-allegiance-requirements-for-schools-map.gifhttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/96c32-ipledgeallegiance.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/www.celebratelove.com/gifs/pledge.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/illegalprotest.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/obama-no-patriotthumbnail.jpgPlusieurs milliers d’Israéliens juifs et arabes ont manifesté hier soir aux cris de « non au fascisme oui à la démocratie » contre un projet de loi controversé exigeant des candidats à la citoyenneté qu’ils prêtent allégeance à « Israël, Etat juif et démocratique ». Le Figaro
Le credo « Multikulti », « nous vivons maintenant côte à côte et nous nous en réjouissons » a échoué, totalement échoué (…) nous n’avons pas besoin d’une immigration qui pèse sur notre système social. Angela Merkel
Le fait, au cours d’une manifestation organisée ou réglementée par les autorités publiques, d’outrager publiquement l’hymne national ou le drapeau tricolore est puni de 7 500 euros d’amende. Lorsqu’il est commis en réunion, cet outrage est puni de six mois d’emprisonnement et de 7 500 euros d’amende. Code pénal francais (Article 433-5-1, Loi n°2003-239 du 18 mars 2003)
Le Gouvernement peut s’opposer par décret en Conseil d’Etat, pour indignité ou défaut d’assimilation, autre que linguistique, à l’acquisition de la nationalité française par le conjoint étranger dans un délai de deux ans à compter de la date du récépissé prévu au deuxième alinéa de l’article 26 ou, si l’enregistrement a été refusé, à compter du jour où la décision judiciaire admettant la régularité de la déclaration est passée en force de chose jugée. La situation effective de polygamie du conjoint étranger ou la condamnation prononcée à son encontre au titre de l’infraction définie à l’article 222-9 du code pénal, lorsque celle-ci a été commise sur un mineur de quinze ans, sont constitutives du défaut d’assimilation. En cas d’opposition du Gouvernement, l’intéressé est réputé n’avoir jamais acquis la nationalité française. Code civil francais (Article 21-4, modifié par Loi n°2006-911 du 24 juillet 2006)
It began as an intensive communing with salient points of our national history, from the Declaration of Independence onwards; with the makings of the Constitution… with the meaning of the Civil War; with the aspiration of the people…
The true reason for allegiance to the Flag is the ‘republic for which it stands’. …And what does that vast thing, the Republic mean? It is the concise political word for the Nation – the One Nation which the Civil War was fought to prove. To make that One Nation idea clear, we must specify that it is indivisible, as Webster and Lincoln used to repeat in their great speeches. And its future? Just here arose the temptation of the historic slogan of the French Revolution which meant so much to Jefferson and his friends, ‘Liberty, equality, fraternity’. No, that would be too fanciful, too many thousands of years off in realization. But we as a nation do stand square on the doctrine of liberty and justice for all… Francis Bellamy
…I would suggest that such practices as the designation of « In God We Trust » as our national motto, or the references to God contained in the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag can best be understood, in Dean Rostow’s apt phrase, as a form a « ceremonial deism, » protected from Establishment Clause scrutiny chiefly because they have lost through rote repetition any significant religious content. Justice Brennan
There are no de minimis violations of the Constitution – no constitutional harms so slight that the courts are obliged to ignore them. Given the values that the Establishment Clause was meant to serve, however, I believe that government can, in a discrete category of cases, acknowledge or refer to the divine without offending the Constitution. This category of « ceremonial deism » most clearly encompasses such things as the national motto (« In God We Trust »), religious references in traditional patriotic songs such as The Star-Spangled Banner, and the words with which the Marshal of this Court opens each of its sessions (« God save the United States and this honorable Court »). These references are not minor trespasses upon the Establishment Clause to which I turn a blind eye. Instead, their history, character, and context prevent them from being constitutional violations at all. Justice O’Connor

No Pasaran!

Alors que dans un pays qui continue obstinement a refuser de décreter sa propre disparition, on manifeste aux cris de « Non au fascisme » contre un serment d’allégeance a l’Etat juif …

Et qu’en pleine crise financiere et economique, une chanceliere allemande dénonce l’échec du multiculturalisme …

Pendant que dans la Patrie autoproclamée des droits de l’homme qui siffle ses hymne national et drapeau mais se réserve le droit de déchéance de nationalité, on se bricole, entre une obligation pour les nouveaux arrivés de s’engager par écrit comme au Quebec a accepter les valeurs de la République et un projet de rétablissement du serment politique pour le président, son petit code patriotique

Voici que l’on découvre, dans le pays meme qui avat inventé le déisme cérémoniel, que le fameux serment d’allégeance au drapeau ne serait, de la part d’un pasteur remercié pour cause de dérive socialisante, qu’une vulgaire pub pour vendre des magazines

The Pledge of Allegiance was just an ad to sell magazines

Twin Cities Daily Planet

Grace Kelly, MN Progressive Project

June 05, 2010

Mike Bellamy teaches English literature and rhetoric at the University of St. Thomas, while also directing an English Master’s Program. Francis Bellamy, who wrote the Pledge of Alllegiance, is the first cousin of Mike’s great-grandfather. Mike Bellamy’s research reveals the following:

The pledge was written by a socialist! Francis Bellamy was a Christian Socialist. As a Baptist minister, Francis got into trouble by trying to insert « social justice » into Christianity. The parish effectively fired him by cutting his salary drastically so that he had to find a different job.

The pledge was an ad campaign to sell magazines in 1892!

Whatever else the « Pledge » has accomplished since then, the flag campaign that made it famous coincided with a huge increase in The Youth’s Companion’s circulation, something like a 50% increase, from about 4000,000, that is, to over 600,000.

The pledge was designed as the beginning of a civil religion, bringing the strength of religious belief into « patriotism ».

Most obvious was the need to acculturate, or « naturalize » as the odd term has it, a teeming influx of immigrants. Their usefulness as immigrant « operatives » who worked in America’s factories did little to ally the uneasiness of nativist sentiment.  It was felt that these great unwashed, especially the more swarthy Eastern and Southern European ones, who « inherit no love for our country, » as Margaret Miller puts it in her history of the « Pledge, » had to be imbued with a « thoroughly American feeling » .

Mike Bellamy gave me permission to publish this:

The Last Page

Many people have been distressed by post-9/11 advertising that confuses patriotism with consumerism. But using the flag to sell things is an old tradition — older than desecration laws that were enacted to criminalize this sort of behavior at the beginning of the last century.

Recently, I came across an earlier, noteworthy conflation of patriotic symbolism with greed. In this case it concerned The Pledge of Allegiance. I learned about this confusion inadvertently researching the life of my great-grandfather, Edward Bellamy, the author of Looking Backward. Edward’s first cousin, Francis Bellamy, briefly became a socialist after reading this celebrated political novel. Francis also wrote the Pledge of Allegiance.

Francis’s stint as a Christian Socialist was enthusiastic, if brief. So too was his tenure as a Baptist Minister. Exploring his life, I was hardly on the lookout for the now only-too-familiar tendency to conflate capitalism with Americanism. Though he did deliver his « Jesus was a Socialist » talk shortly before he wrote the Pledge, Francis played a role in this confusion. It may well be that his turn from socialism to reactionary politics was a reaction to his congregation’s resistance to his left-wing ideas. He preached to them relentlessly about Christian obligations to the poor. They grew weary and fired him. He then quit the ministry altogether.

Francis Bellamy wrote the Pledge the next year. It was the byproduct of a scheme to sell flags to public schools hatched by Francis’s employer. The Youth’s Companion was the best-selling American magazine of the time. The idea was to synchronize simultaneous flag-raisings over the nation’s schoolhouses on Columbus Day in 1892 (the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the New World). These celebrations were to coincide with the opening of the Chicago World’s Fair. For the occasion, the magazine published an elaborate ceremony, written mostly by Bellamy, which included the Pledge.

Over 26,000 flags were sold at cost — or so said The Youth’s Companion. The surrounding campaign certainly enhanced the magazine’s considerable prestige and helped boost its circulation by 50 percent. A variety of pseudo-events were orchestrated by Bellamy, the project manager. These included a Presidential Proclamation, interviews with Congressmen, and boiler-plate editorials distributed to newspapers across the nation. The Pledge attained its canonical status through this media blitz. Nothing of its scope had ever occurred before.

After its appearance, the Pledge has been surrounded by issues of ownership. Years after he wrote it, Francis discovered — thanks to hearing a quiz show on the radio — that the Companion attributed authorship of the Pledge to Bellamy’s deceased boss, unlike Bellamy, a long-time company man at the magazine. Years of depositions, recriminations, and character assassinations ensued. Congress itself finally vindicated Francis, although this didn’t prevent the later publication of a book-length polemic challenging his authorship.

In the meantime, Francis’s politics kept drifting rightward, much like the conservative uses to which the Pledge has since been put. In the xenophobic 1920s he devised « A Plan for a Counterattack on the Nation’s Internal Foes: How to Mobilize the Masses to Support Primary American Doctrines. » This proposal aimed to harness the Pledge to a campaign against « traitors. » For Francis, « traitors » included immigrants, Wobblies, and union members. The proposal was never published (though the desire to use the Pledge to purge has endured).

As I followed Francis Bellamy’s rightward drift, it occurred to me that his eventual identification of Americanism with capitalism was already implicit in the flag-and-pledge campaign. The Companion sent students across the country 100 « free shares » in « the influence of the flag. »  They, in turn, were to raise money to buy their school flags by selling these shares to classmates at 10 cents a share. Though the official theme of the Colombus Day extravaganza was the Enlightenment — manifested, in the inadvertent discovery of the New World and by the establishment of America’s « free » (tax-supported) schools — the flag-and-pledge caper actually equated citizenship with capitalism, and stake-holding with holding stock. Old Glory wasn’t a sacred symbol of the nation’s indivisible unity, but a commodifiable object like any other. In short, commercialized patriotism has been with us for some time, shock sensibilities about the recent unseemly commercialism notwithstanding.

— Michael Bellamy

Let me know if you like this, since Mike Bellamy has given me permission to publish an even longer piece with even better tidbits. History is facinating!

Voir aussi:

National School Celebration of Columbus Day: The Official Programme

(Prepared by Executive Committee, Francis Bellamy, Chairman)

The schools should assemble at 9 A.M. in their various rooms. At 9:30 the detail of Veterans is expected to arrive. It is to be met at the entrance of the yard by the Color-Guard of pupils,—escorted with dignity to the building, and presented to the Principal. The Principal then gives the signal, and the several teachers conduct their students to the yard, to beat of drum or other music, and arrange them in a hollow square about the flag, the Veterans and Color-Guard taking places by the flag itself. The Master of Ceremonies then gives the command “Attention!” and begins the exercises by reading the Proclamation.

1. READING OF THE PRESIDENT’S PROCLAMATION—by the Master of Ceremonies

At the close of the reading he announces, “In accordance with this recommendation by the President of the United States, and as a sign of our devotion to our country, let the Flag of the Nation be unfurled above this School.”

2. RAISING OF THE FLAG—by the Veterans

As the Flag reaches the top of the staff, the Veterans will lead the assemblage in “Three Cheers for ‘Old Glory.’ ”

3. SALUTE TO THE FLAG—by the Pupils

At a signal from the Principal the pupils, in ordered ranks, hands to the side, face the Flag. Another signal is given; every pupil gives the flag the military salute—right hand lifted, palm downward, to a line with the forehead and close to it. Standing thus, all repeat together, slowly, “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.” At the words, “to my Flag,” the right hand is extended gracefully, palm upward, toward the Flag, and remains in this gesture till the end of the affirmation; whereupon all hands immediately drop to the side. Then, still standing, as the instruments strike a chord, all will sing AMERICA—“My Country, ’tis of Thee.”

4. ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF GOD—Prayer or Scripture

5. SONG OF COLUMBUS DAY—by Pupils and Audience

Contributed by The Youth’s Companion Air: Lyons

Columbia, my land! All hail the glad day

When first to thy strand Hope pointed the way.

Hail him who thro’ darkness first followed the Flame

That led where the Mayflower of Liberty came.

Dear Country, the star of the valiant and free!

Thy exiles afar are dreaming of thee.

No fields of the Earth so enchantingly shine,

No air breathes such incense, such music as thine.

Humanity’s home! Thy sheltering breast

Give welcome and room to strangers oppress’d.

Pale children of Hunger and Hatred and Wrong

Find life in thy freedom and joy in thy song.

Thy fairest estate the lowly may hold,

Thy poor may grow great, thy feeble grow bold

For worth is the watchword to noble degree,

And manhood is mighty where manhood is free.

O Union of States, and union of souls!

Thy promise awaits, thy future unfolds,

And earth from her twilight is hailing the sun,

That rises where people and rulers are one.

Theron Brown

6. THE ADDRESS

“The Meaning of the Four Centuries” A Declamation of the Special Address prepared for the occasion by The Youth’s Companion.

7. THE ODE

“Columbia’s Banner,” A Reading of the Poem written for the Occasion by Edna Dean Proctor.

Here should follow whatever additional Exercises, Patriotic Recitations, Historic Representations, or Chorals may be desired.

8. ADDRESSES BY CITIZENS, and National Songs.

Source: The Youth’s Companion, 65 (1892): 446–447. Reprinted in Scot M. Guenter, The American Flag, 1777–1924: Cultural Shifts (Cranbury, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson Press, 1990).


Découverte de l’Amérique/518e: Pire qu’Attila et Hitler réunis! (The trouble with Columbus)

16 octobre, 2010

Image result for diseases of the columbian exchange

Une grande civilisation n’est conquise de l’extérieur que si elle est détruite de l’intérieur. Will Durant 
La manière la plus forte d’adorer Dieu est de lui offrir un sacrifice. […] De plus, la nature nous apprend qu’il est juste d’offrir à Dieu […] les choses précieuses et excellentes, à cause de l’excellence de sa majesté. Or, selon le jugement humain et selon la vérité, rien dans la nature n’est plus grand ni plus précieux que la vie de l’homme ou l’homme lui-même. C’est pourquoi c’est la nature elle-même qui enseigne et apprend à ceux qui n’ont pas la foi, la grâce ou la doctrine […] qu’ils doivent sacrifier des victimes humaines au vrai Dieu ou aux faux dieux qu’ils pensent être le vrai. Bartolomé de las Casas,
Certains spécialistes avancent le chiffre de vingt mille victimes par an au moment de la conquête de Cortès. Même s’il y avait beaucoup d’exagération, le sacrifice humain n’en jouerait pas moins chez les Aztèques un rôle proprement monstrueux. Ce peuple était constamment occupé à guerroyer, non pour étendre son territoire, mais pour se procurer les victimes nécessaires aux innombrables sacrifices recensés par Bernardino de Sahagun. Les ethnologues possèdent toutes ces données depuis des siècles, depuis l’époque, en vérité, qui effectua les premiers déchiffrements de la représentation persécutrice dans le monde occidental. Mais ils ne tirent pas les mêmes conclusions dans les deux cas. Aujourd’hui moins que jamais. Ils passent le plus clair de leur temps à minimiser, sinon à justifier entièrement, chez les Aztèques, ce qu’ils condamnent à juste titre dans leur propre univers. Une fois de plus nous retrouvons les deux poids et les deux mesures qui caractérisent les sciences de l’homme dans leur traitement des sociétés historiques et des sociétés ethnologiques. Notre impuissance à repérer dans les mythes une représentation persécutrice plus mystifiée encore que la nôtre ne tient pas seulement à la difficulté plus grande de l’entreprise, à la transfiguration plus extrême des données, elle relève “modernes sont surtout obsédés par le mépris et ils s’efforcent de présenter ces univers disparus sous les couleurs les plus favorables. (…) Les ethnologues décrivent avec gourmandise le sort enviable de ces victimes. Pendant la période qui précède leur sacrifice, elles jouissent de privilèges extraordinaires et c’est sereinement, peut-être même joyeusement, qu’elles s’avancent vers la mort. Jacques Soustelle, entre autres, recommande à ses lecteurs de ne pas interpréter ces boucheries religieuses à la lumière de nos concepts. L’affreux péché d’ethnocentrisme nous guette et, quoi que fassent les sociétés exotiques, il faut se garder du moindre jugement négatif. Si louable que soit le souci de « réhabiliter » des mondes méconnus, il faut y mettre du discernement. Les excès actuels rivalisent de ridicule avec l’enflure orgueilleuse de naguère, mais en sens contraire. Au fond, c’est toujours la même condescendance : nous n’appliquons pas à ces sociétés les critères que nous appliquons à nous-mêmes, mais à la suite, cette fois, d’une inversion démagogique bien caractéristique de notre fin de siècle. Ou bien nos sources ne valent rien et nous n’avons plus qu’à nous taire : nous ne saurons jamais rien de certain sur les Aztèques, ou bien nos sources valent quelque chose, et l’honnêteté oblige à conclure que la religion de ce peuple n’a pas usurpé sa place au musée planétaire de l’horreur humaine. Le zèle antiethnocentrique s’égare quand il justifie les orgies sanglantes de l’image visiblement trompeuse qu’elles donnent d’elles-mêmes. Bien que pénétré d’idéologie sacrificielle, le mythe atroce et magnifique de Teotihuacan porte sourdement témoignage contre cette vision mystificatrice. Si quelque chose humanise ce texte, ce n’est pas la fausse idylle des victimes et des bourreaux qu’épousent fâcheusement le néo-rousseauisme et le néo-nietzschéisme de nos deux après-guerres, c’est ce qui s’oppose à cette hypocrite vision, sans aller jusqu’à la contredire ouvertement, ce sont les hésitations que j’ai notées face aux fausses évidences qui les entourent. René Girard
The evidence of Aztec cannibalism has largely been ignored and consciously or unconsciously covered up. Michael Harner (New School for Social Research)
Dr. Harner’s theory of nutritional need is based on a recent revision in the number of people thought to have been sacrificed by the Aztecs. Dr. Woodrow Borah an authority on the demography of ancient Mexico at the University of California, Berkeley, has recently estimated that the Aztecs sacrificed 250,000 people a year. This consituted about 1 percent of the region’s population of 25 million. (…) He argues that cannibalism, which may have begun for purely religious reasons, appears to have grown to serve nutritional needs because the Aztecs, unlike nearly all other civilizations, lacked domesticated herbivores such as pigs or cattle. Staples of the Aztec diet were corn and beans supplemented with a few vegetables, lizards, snakes and worms. There were some domesticated turkeys and hairless dogs. Poor people gathered floating mats of vegetation from lakes. (…) In contemporary sources, however, such as the writings of Hernando Cortes, who conquered the Aztecs in 1521, and Bernal Diaz, who accompanied Cortes, Dr. Hamer says there is abundant evidence that human sacrifice was a common event in every town and that the limbs of the victims were boiled or roasted and eaten. Diaz, who is regarded by anthropologists as a highly reliable source, wrote in “The Conquest of New Spain,” for example, that in the town of Tlaxcala “we found wooden cages made of lattice‐work in which men and women were imprisoned and fed until they were fat enough to be sacrificed and eaten. These prison cages existed throughout the country.” The sacrifices, carried out by priests, took place atop the hundreds of steepwalled pyramids scattered about the Valley of Mexico. According to Diaz, the victims were taken up the pyramids where the priests “laid them down on their backs on some narrow stones of sacrifice and, cutting open their chests, drew out their palpitating hearts which they offered to the idols before them. Then they kicked the bodies down the steps, and the Indian butchers who were waiting below cut off their arms and legs. Then they ate their flesh with a sauce of peppers and tomatoes.” (…) Diaz’s accounts indicate that the Aztecs ate only the limbs of their victims. The torsos were fed to carnivores in zoos. According to Dr. Harner, the Aztecs never sacrificed their own people. Instead they battled neighboring nations, using tactics that minimized deaths in battle and maximized the number of prisoners. The traditional explanation for Aztec human sacrifice has been that it was religious—a way of winning the support of the gods for success in battle. Victories procured even more victims, thus winning still more divine support in the next war. (…) Traditional anthropological accounts indicate that to win more favor from the gods during the famine the Aztecs arranged with their neighbors to stage battles for prisoners who could be sacrificed. The Aztecs’ neighbors, sharing similar religious tenets, wanted to sacrifice Aztecs to their gods. The NYT
Specialists in Mesoamerican history are going to be upset about this for obvious reasons. They’re not going to have the people they study looking like cannibals. They’re clinging to a very romantic point of view about the Aztecs. It’s the Hiawatha syndrome. Michael Harner
Some post-conquest sources report that at the re-consecration of Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan in 1487, the Aztecs sacrificed about 80,400 prisoners over the course of four days. This number is considered by Ross Hassig, author of Aztec Warfare, to be an exaggeration. Hassig states « between 10,000 and 80,400 persons » were sacrificed in the ceremony. The higher estimate would average 15 sacrifices per minute during the four-day consecration. Four tables were arranged at the top so that the victims could be jettisoned down the sides of the temple. Nonetheless, according to Codex Telleriano-Remensis, old Aztecs who talked with the missionaries told about a much lower figure for the reconsecration of the temple, approximately 4,000 victims in total. Michael Harner, in his 1977 article The Enigma of Aztec Sacrifice, cited an estimate by Borah of the number of persons sacrificed in central Mexico in the 15th century as high as 250,000 per year which may have been one percent of the population. Fernando de Alva Cortés Ixtlilxochitl, a Mexica descendant and the author of Codex Ixtlilxochitl, estimated that one in five children of the Mexica subjects was killed annually. Victor Davis Hanson argues that a claim by Don Carlos Zumárraga of 20,000 per annum is « more plausible ». Wikipedia
Certains chercheurs ont émis l’hypothèse que l’apport en protéines des aliments dont disposaient les Aztèques était insuffisant, en raison de l’absence de grands mammifères terrestres domesticables, et que les sacrifices humains avaient pour fonction principale de pallier cette carence nutritionnelle. Cette théorie, en particulier quand elle a été diffusée par le New York Times, a été critiquée par la majorité des spécialistes de la Mésoamérique. Michael Harner a notamment accusé les chercheurs mexicains de minimiser le cannibalisme aztèque par nationalisme ; Bernardo R. Ortiz de Montellano, en particulier, a publié en 1979 un article détaillant les failles de l’analyse de Harner, en démontrant notamment que le régime alimentaire aztèque était équilibré, varié et suffisamment riche en protéines, grâce à la pêche d’une abondante faune aquatique et la chasse de nombreux oiseaux, et que donc l’anthropophagie ne pouvait pas être une nécessité, car elle n’aurait pas pu améliorer significativement un apport en protéines déjà suffisant. Michel Graulich a apporté d’autres éléments de critique. Il affirme que si cette théorie était exacte, la chair des victimes aurait dû être distribuée au moins autant aux gens modestes qu’aux puissants, mais il semble que ce n’était pas le cas ; il ajoute que seules les grandes villes pratiquaient le sacrifice humain de masse, et que ce phénomène n’a pas été prouvé dans la plupart des autres populations mésoaméricaines, dont l’alimentation semble pourtant comparable à celle des Aztèques. Wikipedia
Ces indiens, qui nous apparaissent sous un jour si féroce, ont néanmoins été à l’origine du mythe du ‘bon sauvage’. Alfred Métraux
Il n’y a rien de barbare et de sauvage en cette nation, à ce qu’on m’en a rapporté, sinon que chacun appelle barbarie ce qui n’est pas de son usage ; comme de vray il semble que nous n’avons autre mire de la verité et de la raison que l’exemple et idée des opinions et usances du païs où nous sommes. Là est tousjours la parfaicte religion, la parfaicte police, perfect et accomply usage de toutes choses. Ils sont sauvages, de mesmes que nous appellons sauvages les fruicts que nature, de soy et de son progrez ordinaire, a produicts : là où, à la verité, ce sont ceux que nous avons alterez par nostre artifice et detournez de l’ordre commun, que nous devrions appeller plutost sauvages. En ceux là sont vives et vigoureuses les vrayes, et plus utiles et naturelles vertus et proprietez, lesquelles nous avons abastardies en ceux-cy, et les avons seulement accommodées au plaisir de nostre goust corrompu. Et si pourtant la saveur mesme et delicatesse se treuve à nostre gout excellente, à l’envi des nostres, en divers fruits de ces contrées-là, sans culture. Ce n’est pas raison que l’art gaigne le point d’honneur sur nostre grande et puissante mere nature. Nous avons tant rechargé la beauté et richesse de ses ouvrages par nos inventions, que nous l’avons du tout estouffée. Si est-ce que, par tout où sa pureté reluit, elle fait une merveilleuse honte à nos vaines et frivoles entreprinses. (…) il s’en faut tant que ces prisonniers se rendent, pour tout ce qu’on leur fait, qu’au rebours, pendant ces deux ou trois mois qu’on les garde, ils portent une contenance gaye ; ils pressent leurs maistres de se haster de les mettre en cette espreuve ; ils les deffient, les injurient, leur reprochent leur lacheté et le nombre des batailles perdues contre les leurs. J’ay une chanson faicte par un prisonnier, où il y a ce traict : qu’ils viennent hardiment trétous et s’assemblent pour disner de luy : car ils mangeront quant et quant leurs peres et leurs ayeux, qui ont servy d’aliment et de nourriture à son corps. Ces muscles, dit-il, cette cher et ces veines, ce sont les vostres, pauvres fols que vous estes ; vous ne recognoissez pas que la substance des membres de vos ancestres s’y tient encore : savourez les bien, vous y trouverez le goust de vostre propre chair. Invention qui ne sent aucunement la barbarie. Ceux qui les peignent mourans, et qui representent cette action quand on les assomme, ils peignent le prisonnier crachant au visage de ceux qui le tuent et leur faisant la moue. De vray, ils ne cessent jusques au dernier souspir de les braver et deffier de parole et de contenance. Sans mentir, au pris de nous, voilà des hommes bien sauvages ; car, ou il faut qu’ils le soyent bien à bon escient, ou que nous le soyons : il y a une merveilleuse distance entre leur forme et la nostre. (…) Tout cela ne va pas trop mal : mais quoy, ils ne portent point de haut de chausses. Montaigne
Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto is one of the few films that can rightly be described as a journey. The viewer is snatched from the confines (and comforts) of a Hollywood movie and thrown deep into the jungles of Central America. The film itself is a visual masterpiece; shot entirely in a Mayan dialect, Gibson flexes his visual muscles to show rather than tell. Billed as a historical drama, Apocalypto is actually part revenge flick and part chase flick. (…) The plot itself is almost secondary, and little more than an excuse for Gibson to show off his phenomenal film making talents. In addition to the stunning jungle scenes, Gibson treats us to a view of what life in a vast Mayan city may have been like at the height of its culture. Immense pyramids rise out of the foliage; prisoners are sold as slaves and sacrificed in incredibly brutal ways; those not sacrificed are used for human target practice. If you can handle gore (and really, the movie is no more violent–and in some ways, far less so–than, say, Braveheart, which took home 5 Oscars, including Best Picture), do yourself a favor and see this innovative, unique movie. As interesting as the film itself has been the reaction to it by film critics and historians alike. Those who praise the movie almost uniformly mention, if not condemn, Gibson’s infamous anti-Semitic outburst (in the New York Times, A.O. Scott wrote that « say what you will about him–about his problem with booze or his problem with Jews–he is a serious filmmaker »). Other critics have, curiously, dismissed the film because it doesn’t inform us about some of the accomplishments of the Mayans. « It teaches us nothing about Mayan civilization, religion, or cultural innovations (Calendars? Hieroglyphic writing? Some of the largest pyramids on Earth?), » Dana Stevens wrote in Slate. « Rather, Gibson’s fascination with the Mayans seems to spring entirely from the fact (or fantasy) that they were exotic badasses who knew how to whomp the hell out of one another, old-school. » This is a strange criticism. If you were interested in boning up on calendars, hieroglyphics, and pyramids you could simply watch a middle-school film strip. And who complained that in Gladiator Ridley Scott showed epic battle scenes and vicious gladiatorial combat instead of teaching us how the aqueducts were built? And then there have been the multi-culturist complaints. Ignacio Ochoa, the director of the Nahual Foundation, says that « Gibson replays, in glorious big budget Technicolor, an offensive and racist notion that Maya people were brutal to one another long before the arrival of Europeans. » Julia Guernsey, an assistant professor in the department of art and art history at the University of Texas told a reporter after viewing the film, « I hate it. I despise it. I think it’s despicable. It’s offensive to Maya people. It’s offensive to those of us who try to teach cultural sensitivity and alternative world views that might not match our own 21st century Western ones but are nonetheless valid. » Newsweek reports that « although a few Mayan murals do illustrate the capture and even torture of prisoners, none depicts decapitation » as a mural in a trailer for the film does. « That is wrong. It’s just plain wrong, » the magazine quotes Harvard professor William Fash as saying. Karl Taube, a professor of anthropology at UC Riverside, complained to the Washington Post about the portrayal of slaves building the Mayan pyramids. « We have no evidence of large numbers of slaves, » he told the paper. Even the mere arrival, at the end of the film, of Spanish explorers has been lambasted as culturally insensitive. Here’s Guernsey, again, providing a questionable interpretation of the film’s final minutes: « And the ending with the arrival of the Spanish (conquistadors) underscored the film’s message that this culture is doomed because of its own brutality. The implied message is that it’s Christianity that saves these brutal savages. » But none of these complaints holds up particularly well under scrutiny. After all, while it may not mesh well with their post-conquest victimology, the Mayans did partake of bloody human sacrifice. Consider this description of a human sacrifice from the sixth edition of University of Pennsylvania professor Robert Sharer’s definitive The Ancient Maya: The intended victim was stripped, painted blue (the sacrificial color), and adorned with a special peaked headdress, then led to the place of sacrifice, usually either the temple courtyard or the summit of a temple platform. After the evil spirits were expelled, the altar, usually a convex stone that curved the victim’s breast upward, was smeared with the sacred blue paint. The four chaakob, also painted blue, grasped the victim by the arms and legs and stretched him on his back over the altar. The Nacom then plunged the sacrificial flint knife into the victim’s ribs just below the left breast, pulled out the still-beating heart, and handed it to the chilan, or officiating priest. » That exact scene, almost word for word, takes place in Apocalypto. After the Spanish conquest, the Mayans adapted their brutal methods of pleasing the gods to coexist with Christianity. Ambivalent Conquests: Maya and Spaniard in Yucatan, 1517-1570 contains the following description from a contemporary source of a post-invasion sacrifice: The one called Ah Chable they crucified and they nailed him to a great cross made for the purpose, and they put him on the cross alive and nailed his hands with two nails and tied his feet . . . with a thin rope. And those who nailed and crucified the said boy were the ah-kines who are now dead, which was done with consent of all those who were there. And after [he was] crucified they raised the cross on high and the said boy was crying out, and so they held it on high, and then they lowered it, [and] put on the cross, they took out his heart. As for whether or not there have been any murals found portraying decapitation, as Prof. Fash complains, heads were certainly cut off in ceremonial fashion by the Mayans. Again, The Ancient Maya: « The sacrifice of captive kings, while uncommon, seems to have called for a special ritual decapitation . . . The decapitation of a captured ruler may have been performed as the climax of a ritual ball game, as a commemoration of the Hero Twins’ defeat of the lords of the underworld in the Maya creation myth. » The protestation against Mayan slavery, is also off the mark: The Ancient Maya repeatedly refers to the purchasing of slaves. The first European contact with the Maya resulted, ironically, in the Spaniards being enslaved. After a shipwreck, Spanish survivors landed on the east coast of Yucatan, where they were seized by a Maya lord, who sacrificed Valdivia and four companions and gave their bodies to his people for a feast. Geronimo de Aguilar, Gonzalo de Guerrero, and five others were spared for the moment. . . . Aguilar and his companions escaped and fled to the country of another lord, an enemy of the first chieftain. The second lord enslaved the Spaniards, and soon all of them except Aguilar and Guerrero died. And it should be remembered that when the Spanish arrived in force, they had little problem recruiting allies as some Mayans fought with the Spanish against their own Mayan enemies. Matthew Restall’s Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest reports that what has so often been ignored or forgotten is the fact that Spaniards tended also to be outnumbered by their own native allies . . . In time, Mayas from the Calkini region and other parts of Yucatan would accompany Spaniards into unconquered regions of the peninsula as porters, warriors, and auxiliaries of various kinds. Companies of archers were under permanent commission in the Maya towns of Tekax and Oxkutzcab, regularly called upon to man or assist in raids into the unconquered regions south of the colony of Yucatan. As late as the 1690s Mayas from over a dozen Yucatec towns–organized into companies under their own officers and armed with muskets, axes, machetes, and bows and arrows–fought other Mayas in support of Spanish Conquest endeavors in the Petén region that is now northern Guatemala. Which is not to say that Gibson’s film is an entirely accurate portrayal of life in a Mayan village. As they say in the business, for the sake of narrative, certain facts have been altered. The conflation of showing massive temples and then depicting the arrival of the Spanish at the end of the film is almost certainly anachronistic. Though Apocalypto is purposefully vague about its time frame, the appearance of Spanish galleons and conquistadors at the end of the film (as well as the sight of a little girl who might be suffering from small pox) suggests the action takes place in the early- or mid-16th century. But according to Sharer, « by 900 . . . monumental construction–temples, palaces, ball courts . . . [had] ceased at most sites, as did associated features such as elaborate royal tombs and the carved stone and modeled stucco work used to adorn buildings . » Almost any historical drama will contain such problems. That being said, it is specious for professional historians and grievance groups alike to argue that Apocalypto is a wanton desecration of the memories of the Mayan people. While it may be an inconvenient fact that the Mayans were skilled at the art of human cruelty, it is, nevertheless, a fact. Sonny Bunch
Gibson’s [scenes are] vital to his larger purposes regarding the exploration of death, consciousness, and transformation” (Maca and McLeod 2007: 4). In essence, Maca and McLeod grasped the enormous metaphors that Gibson was knitting into the film. (…) Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto, while it may seem on the surface to be another mindless, violent action epic, with the Maya as unwitting casualties, actually sets out to achieve similar goals: an exploration of consciousness and of modern man’s need for renewal and transformation. Like most films involving or based on native culture yet made by non-natives, Apocalypto is a grandiose and intricately nuanced commentary on white society. Because the hero and the villains are indigenous, however, the film also seeks to explore the basis of our humanity, regardless of race and ethnicity. The artistic devices Gibson uses to communicate his ideas draw heavily on tropes, symbols, and plotlines developed by earlier masters; but he also clearly develops and adopts themes and symbolic vehicles that are basic to myth and ritual. (…) Contrary to what some have concluded about this film, Apocalypto does NOT promote, celebrate or otherwise glorify the Spanish or Christianity; it is quite the opposite really. What is celebrated repeatedly is the jungle, a metaphor for peace, the higher mind and a more evolved consciousness. The jungle is a refuge… a place of understanding……where true creation and novelty may unfold……. The leading writers and directors intentionally play with symbols and meanings as a way to innovate. Not all film makers can do this very well. However, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and Apocalypse Now (1979), directed by Stanley Kubrick and Francis Ford Coppola, respectively, are two films that set new models……Both are, explicitly and implicitly, antiwar, anti-US imperialism, and anti-colonialism and focus on the evolution of human consciousness…… These two films are at the center of the visual and philosophical mission of Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto. (…) we can’t help but wonder if the use of the trap in Apocalypto, as a vehicle for awareness, doesn’t also extend to our participation in Mel Gibson’s mission, such that all of us……may have been lured to exactly the space and place of discussion that he intended…. this creates discomfort even to contemplate. Alan Maca and Kevin McLeod
One of the more common struggles within anthropological disciplines is the concept of an emic interpretation (meaning the native or indigenous perceptions), as opposed to an etic interpretation (the perceptions of the observer). In some cases, a “revisionist” will ignore the facts and both the etic and emic interpretations and propose a popular perspective that is void of truth. Some more recent movements such as “aboriginalism” provides a perspective that “Indigenous societies and cultures possess qualities that are fundamentally different from those of non-Aboriginal peoples”. The avoidance of both the etic and emic perspectives will present serious flaws to an investigator and provides ample argument for a strong multidisciplinary approach to anthropological and archaeological research in the establishment of scientific “facts.” One of the more interesting examples of this problem became apparent in the release of the blockbuster film, Apocalypto, directed by actor/director Mel Gibson and produced by Mel Gibson and Bruce Davey, with Executive Producers Ned Dowd and Vicki Christianson. The film spurred a chorus of criticisms and complaints from some critics and members of the academic and native communities, a curious reaction in view of the fact that the film is entirely a work of fiction. In other cases, extraordinary praise and complements came from both critics and academic and Native American communities. A special session was organized at the American Anthropological Association meetings in 2007 entitled “Critiquing Apocalypto: An Anthropological Response to the Perpetuation of Inequality in Popular Media,” which merited being termed a “Presidential Session” sponsored by the Archaeology Division and the Society for Humanistic Anthropology. The obvious glaring flaw is that one would have to assume that it must have been established previously, somehow, that the film was a “perpetuation of inequality.” One of the organizers wrote “Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto is one recent example within a history of cinematic spectacles to draw directly upon anthropological research yet drastically misinform its audience about the nature of indigenous culture”. Additional recent movies depicting the past, such as Gladiator (Ridley Scott, director). Spartacus (Stanley Kubrick, director), Troy (Wolfgang Peterson, Director), or Gibson’s Braveheart and Passion of the Christ proved extraordinarily successful at the box office (Gladiator, Braveheart, Passion of the Christ), but had similar criticisms of “numerous historical inaccuracies and distortions of fact” from critics and academicians. The fascinating dichotomy of the historical truths and inaccuracies depicted in films and the emic and etic issues involved in popular movies representing the past, and in particular, the case of Apocalypto, has prompted a review of the issues of perception, relativism, revisionism, and truth and demonstrates an important need to re-evaluate anthropological trends and interpretations. In this case, the concept of aboriginalism or “exceptionalism” may have been infused in the criticisms, where it is assumed that “Aboriginal individuals and groups…assume rights over their history that are not assumed by or available to non-Aboriginals ». It is clear that many of the criticisms were a direct reflection of the disapproval of Gibson’s previous behavior, as well as a standing resentment because of the film Passion of the Christ, a movie which seemed to serve as a “pebble in the shoe” for many liberal, atheist, and in particular, Jewish people. In other cases, the criticisms were valid observations of the license taken by Gibson and the film staff in different aspects of the film Apocalypto, much of which was done for aesthetic reasons or for story expediency. One of the more comprehensive summaries of the film, the issues, and interviews as well as a host of conflicting criticisms are found online with Flixster. Some of the quibbling may have been as simple as the disagreement as to whether the High Priest had a frown or a smile on his face when he extracted a human heart in Apocalypto. This is a benign discussion and a shallow argument. A far more serious issue however, is the posture that some scholars and Native Americans have taken, which denies that human sacrifice among the Maya even took place. Such positions fall into concepts of “revisionism,” “aboriginalism,” and “relativism” that signals a threat to truth and understanding of the human saga. (…) The site selected was, interestingly enough, an ancient village site, as detected by numerous Preclassic figurine and ceramic fragments found in the area. The basic idea was to construct a Postclassic city, complete with pyramids, structures with columns, outset stairways, causeways, and residence structures. Indeed, the degree of detail in the city was extraordinary.  (…) The entire set was extraordinary in detail and represented a authentic reproduction seldom, if ever, provided on film sets. For an anthropologist, it was a time machine, because the elements, both organic and nonorganic included in the set were all characteristic of urban and village Maya societies, both past and present. However, since part of the story had to involve opulence and splendor, Gibson chose to have a small portion of the reconstructed city, which was the primary plaza and flanking structures, remain in the Classic period style since they generally were larger structures than those of the Postclassic period. A compromise was reached with the Classic period structures showing age with evidence of deterioration and decay on the buildings. In fact, to accommodate the “reality” of the setting, several of the larger Classic period structures were undergoing “remodeling” into architecture more characteristic of the Postclassic period. Even though the entire city was fictitious, the idea was to replicate the situation like that found at sites such as Cobá, Oxtankah, or Ichpaatun in Quintana Roo, Mexico, where large, earlier Classic and early Postclassic period structures were surrounded by a later Postclassic city. Yet, the primary buildings of the main plaza were designed to more closely resemble Tikal (Guatemala) because of the obvious mani- festations of splendor and cultural achievement. Therefore, some of the primary examples of art and architecture were cobbled together as general, generic Maya images. (…) the film was to be produced in Yucatec Maya, since the story was to have taken place in the general vicinity of eastern Quintana Roo, location of the first Spanish contacts by shipwrecked sailors Valdivia, Gerónimo de Aguilar and Gonzalo de Guerrero (1511), and later ship bound contact by Francisco Hernandez de Córdoba (1517) and Juan de Grijalva (1518). It was the relatively small amounts of gold and turquoise objects found among the Maya, a result of trade and contact with the Aztecs, that led to further exploration and organization of the conquest of the Aztecs in 1519 under Hernan Cortés. Furthermore, the Spanish friar, Diego de Landa explains that the Mexica had garrisons in Tabasco and Xicalango, and that the Cocom “brought the Mexican people into Mayapan” and other areas of the Yucatan Peninsula (Landa 1941: 32–36) which would explain the widespread influence that Aztec culture had on the Maya in the Yucatan area. (…) Eastern Yucatan was also selected because it would have been the source of origin for the first contact disease in the continental New World (Small Pox), a point that Gibson wanted to make with a diseased little girl (Aquetzali Garcia) in the film. (…) Upon its release in December 2006, Apocalypto was immediately declared by numerous critics as one of the most outstanding films of its genre and the “most artistically brilliant film” (…) The film was ultimately nominated for three Academy Awards in Makeup, Sound Editing, and Sound Mixing. According to several insid- ers to the movie industry, the film should also have been nominated for Academy Awards for Costume Design, Cinematography, Foreign-Language Film, and Supporting Actor, but Gibson’s unfortunate statements earlier in 2006 damaged his chances for such nominations (…) In spite of the laudatory recognition of the film, many negative criticisms of the film were forthcoming from members of the academic community, and much of this was conveyed to the press. New York Times writer Mark McGuire noted negative comments from anthropologists and professors at SUNY Albany in an article entitled “Apocalypto’ a pack of inaccuracies”. A letter was written to the monthly bulletin of the Society for American Archaeology (“SAA Archaeological Record”) noting that the film had “technical inaccuracies and distortions in its portrayal of the pre-Contact Maya.” “Anyone who cares about the past should be alarmed” and “Apocalypto will have set back, by several decades at least, archaeologists’ efforts to foster a more informed view of earlier cultures”. Harvard scholar David Carrasco, professor of religious history at Harvard was reported to have claimed that “Gibson has made the Maya into ‘slashers’ and their society a hypermasculine fantasy”, a curious interpretation of the film in light of late Postclassic society throughout Mesoamerica. Archaeologist Traci Ardren (University of Miami) spoke out against the film and was quoted extensively throughout U.S. press releases that Apocalypto represented “pornography” (Ardren 2006). Ardren and others had somehow assumed that the story dealt with the Late Classic Maya and the collapse in the ninth century, as one of the criticisms was that the “Spanish arrived over 300 years after the last Maya city was aban- doned” (?). Maya cities along the coastal areas were fully occupied when the Spanish arrived, with hundreds and in several cases, thousands of buildings recorded for several observed sites. However, in a conflicting argument, Ardren noted that she was aware that the “Maya practiced brutal violence upon one another” and that she had “studied child sacrifice during the Classic period” (ibid). Her fallacious supposition that it was Gibson’s intent to infuse his personal religion was evident in the arrival of the Spanish, which suggested to her that Gibson meant “the end is near and the savior has come” and that “Gibson’s efforts…mask his blatantly colonial message that the Maya needed sav- ing because they were rotten at the core” (ibid). The obvious fallacy here is that her position is based entirely on unsupported assertions. She also implied that Gibson was stating that “there was absolutely nothing redeemable about Maya culture” since there was “no mention….made of the achievements in science and art, the profound spirituality and connection to agricultural cycles, or the engineering feats of Maya cities”. Such an odd theoretical position is dealt with by several film critics below. While her criticisms were toned down in the special Presidential Session of the American Anthropological Association meeting in Washington, D.C., Ardren noted that: Aquetzali, (the diseased little girl with the prophetic statements) with her Hollywood lesions and Lacandon inspired styling, encapsulates the big budget manipulation of cultural history and fact that has disturbed so much of the academic and activist communities while simultaneously enthralling so much of the movie-going public. The obvious questions here are, how does the diseased little girl encapsulate a “big budget manipulation of cultural history and fact”? How does this disturb academic and activist communities? The little girl had Small Pox, a reality of death brought by the Spanish to Latin America. And, the Lacandon inspired styling was totally intentional, seeing how the Lacandon are Yucatecan Maya speakers who migrated very late in Maya history to the interior heartland. Other criticisms ranged from the presence of a blue and gold macaw (“wasn’t a scarlet macaw within reach of a multi-million dollar budget?”), the use of the eclipse (“fastest eclipse in history”), and slavery (“While the Maya engaged in slavery, the film’s sister vision of massive subjugated labor is shockingly unfamiliar”). These criticisms are curious. The blue and gold macaw was purposely incorporated to display the opulence and extensive trade networks of the Postclassic Maya, who had trading networks as far south as Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. The eclipse episode would have been disastrous if the audience would have been forced to sit through an entire eclipse time cycle. It is clear from the film that the elite were acutely aware of the solar event, which in reality, they most likely were. I questioned numerous colleagues (Ph.D. level scholars) about when the next eclipse was to occur, and no one could answer, much less a Postclassic populous in a 1511 fictional Maya city. As for slavery, extensive raiding and slave systems existed throughout Mesoamerica during the late Postclassic period. (…) Another curious criticism was the charge that Gibson was using his religious views (i.e., Catholicism) as the “savior” and the “salvation” of the Maya with the arrival of the Spanish. Such arguments indicate an inherent personal prejudice against Gibson. In reality, the Spanish arrival to collect supplies represented a future devastating blow to the Maya, not their salvation, and Gibson and Farhad were fully aware of this. In reality, in addition to a metaphorical “New Beginning,” the segment was designed to provide an avenue for a future sequel, should it be desired, and to explain the separation of Yucatecan speakers into the interior forest to form the Lacandon societies in the sierras of northwestern Guatemala and Chiapas which would have occurred around this time. An even more vehement opposition was voiced by Dr. Julia Gurnsey (University of Texas, Austin) who was “visibly shaken….upset, and not a little angry”. According to the interview conducted by the Austin Statesman, she noted: “I hate it. I despise it. I think it’s despicable. It’s offensive to Maya people. It’s offensive to those of us to try to teach cultural sensitivity and alternative world views that might not match our own twenty-first-century Western ones but are nonetheless valid”. While Gurnsey was totally entitled to her opinion, she was not entitled to change the facts (elaborated below) which characterize the late Postclassic Maya societies of coastal Yucatan. Perhaps one of the more comprehensive criticisms and one that seemed to reflect a majority of the academic resistance was in the March/April 2007 Archaeology magazine which featured an article entitled “Betraying the Maya: Who does the violence in Apocalypto really hurt?” A renowned Maya scholar and colleague noted that the film was “crafted with devotion to detail but with disdain for historical coherence or substance” and that the “film is a big lie about the savagery of the civilization created by the pre-Columbian Maya”. In addition he adds, “Allegory and artistic freedom are well and good, except when they slanderously misrepresent an entire civilization”. In view of the wide public dissemination of these criticisms, it is perhaps worthwhile to explore Freidel’s arguments and compare them to the archaeological, ethnohistoric, ethnographic, and epigraphic facts. According to the criticism, the fallacy was that Gibson did not show the tiered society that Maya civilization represented and “the public deserves a more accurate and sophisticated view of the pre-Columbian Maya, and Gibson ….had the resources, advisors, and talent to have provided it”. (…)The Classic Maya wrote history, scripture, and poetry that contain knowledge of the human condition and spirit, as well as wisdom that compares favorably with that of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and other hearths of civilization. Finally, the accuracy of modern depictions of the ancient Maya matters deeply and personally to those of us who care about the millions of people who speak a Mayan language…. In 2007, movie producer/director Mel Gibson “treated” audiences to a spectacularly inaccurate portrayal of ancient Maya civilization (emphasis mine). Called Apocalypto, Maya rulers and priests were depicted as blood-thirsty savages, Maya farmers as hunters and gatherers, and a Spanish galleon drifting somewhere off the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula seemed the only salvation available to the Comanche and Yaqui actor, Rudy Youngblood, and his brave young wife and two children. It is easy to lament with Freidel and others the lack of additional examples of Maya achievements in Apocalypto, such as ballgames, written scripts, dances, theater, and extensive trade networks. The sophistication of the cityscape, the economic and social activities visible in the film, the elaborate architecture, and the prognostication of the eclipse in Apocalypto implied an extraordinary cultural complexity. The extensive detail built into the cityscape at Veracruz would have allowed a greater insight into the economic, social, and political sophistication of the Maya, and it is unfortunate that more of the art, architecture, and the detailed cultural remains did not see more film time. Another criticism of some merit refers to the murals that were similar to the Preclassic Maya murals of San Bartolo, Peten, Guatemala which were incorporated into the scene, entirely at the whims of the director and the set designer to accommodate the story line. The use of this art was met with resistance by this author because of the obvious chronological disparity and because there were better Postclassic examples from Chichen Itza. The art, however, was selected for aesthetic reasons because it could be portrayed as large enough and explicit enough to mesh with the story. Furthermore, at the time of filming, it was unsure as to whether any images of the murals would be even used or incorporated into the film after editing. The mural moved the film along by allowing the prisoners to realize their fate without additional scenes of conversation. Additional questions posed by Freidel included phrases like “Were Classic Maya cities the dens of iniquity Gibson envisions?” and “Were city dwellers the blood-thirsty predators Gibson portrays?”. He further claims “Direct predation and slaughter of ordinary people is a reality in some times and places, but it is a slander when attributed to the ancient Maya.” With all respect to the need for cultural sensitivity, the arguments posed by Freidel are entirely subjective and unfounded according to the ethnohistoric and archaeological record. Perhaps it would have been useful to have asked the same questions to Capitan Valdivia and the sailors who were with Gonzalo Guerrero and Jeronimo de Aguilar when, after their shipwreck and landing on an Akumal beach in 1511, they were sacrificed and eaten. Would it have been “slanderous” to accuse the Maya of slaughter when referring to members of the Francisco Mirones y Lezcano expedition into the interior of Yucatan who were sacrificed via heart extractions. A similar fate fell upon the Spanish priests, Fray Cristobal de Prada and Jacinto de Vargas, on the island of the Itza in Peten, Guatemala  as well as Friar Domingo de Vico and his associates in Acalan. Direct captive predation slaughter and sacrifice were inflicted on the occupants of the ravaged villages recorded in murals on the walls of the Temple of the Jaguar and the Temple of the Warriors at Chichen Itza. Furthermore, the Apocalypto story takes place in 1511–1518, the proto-Historic period, not the Classic Maya period 600–700 years previous, a detail that seems to have escaped many of the critics. Freidel commented that the film “juxtaposes ideas about social and political failure from the ninth century crisis” or “collapse ” with the “decadence” of the Postclassic period, and that the “term ‘decadent’ is no longer used to describe that period (Postclassic) by Maya archaeologists”. It is partially true that the film juxtaposes ideas about the ninth-century Lowland Maya collapse, but it also includes ideas associated with the Preclassic “collapse” documented in the Mirador Basin of northern Guatemala. Such perceptions are timeless, particularly since many of the same ills are currently ongoing in many areas of the Maya heartland today. Freidel noted incorrectly that “Apocalypto is wrong from the opening shot of an idealized rainforest hamlet” because he has assumed there were no broad areas in the Maya heartland where a small hunting society could have existed. He based this perspective on his surveys on the island of Cozumel, where “the entire landscape was defined by stone walls”. He suggests that along the entire coast of the Yucatan peninsula “the Spanish encountered people living in towns” (ibid) and that “Gibson’s hunter-gatherers are pure fantasy” (ibid). This fallacious argument belies the fact that there were vast sections of rainforest in the interior of the Yucatan shelf that had absolutely no human intervention since about A.D. 840.  (…) Freidel notes that “While the ancient Maya had their shortcomings (??), including the organized violence typical of civilized people (??), they were remarkable in their achievements, and not just the brutal monsters depicted by Gibson”. The dichotomy of these statements is striking: it is precisely the “shortcomings” that Gibson was using as his metaphor for society, and the “organized violence” is a subjective comment of societies whose level of “civilization” may have begun to deteriorate. Freidel also suggests that, based on artistic representa- tions from sites such as Yaxchilan, Tikal, and Piedras Negras and hieroglyphic texts from Dos Pilas, Uaxactun, Yaxuna, and Waka-Peru, the elite were not predators of common people or peasants. This is a flawed perspective perhaps based on a perceived notion of Late Classic societies, not the terminal Postclassic period represented in Apocalypto. This small detail seems to have escaped many of the critics, despite the presence of smallpox on one of the characters and the presence of architecture in the cityscape that was obviously Postclassic period architecture. The Maya had long been subjected to or had adopted Toltec practices (skull racks), at least by about ad 1000 if not earlier, and had direct contact and influence from the Aztec societies (human sacrifice, use of Tlaloc figures, human consumption, trade, exchange). The shocking element of these criticisms is that they totally disregard the numerous colonial documents and writings of Spanish observers, not to mention the vast examples of archaeological data that support the perceptions that Gibson portrayed in the film. Criticisms asserted that the film was a racist depiction. Yet a TMZ poll conducted on line on March 29, 2007 had 79,395 responses to the question “Is Apocalypto racist?” of which 75% (59,546) replied negatively that it was NOT racist. If such a large proportion of the viewing population did not think Apocalypto was racist, why did so many prominent academicians proclaim that it was? (…) The level of sacrifice depicted in Apocalypto was based almost entirely on ethnohistoric data and archaeological interpretation, which coincides with the contextual cultural behavior noted in terminal Postclassic and proto-Historic Mesoamerica. Aztec influence, well established as a major protagonist of human sacrifices, had penetrated much of the Maya region through elaborate trade and exchange systems as well as outright Mexican settlements in the Yucatecan heartland, a concept blamed on the Cocom family. Outright migrations of Nahuatl-speaking occupants also occurred in the Highlands of Guatemala, and in El Salvador and Honduras. The Spaniards encountered widespread sacrifice among the major linguistic groups outside the Mexica homeland, including the Totonac and Maya areas. For example, the Totonac culture at Cempoala and Gulf Coast region practiced extensive human sacrifice, although they occasionally blamed the misdeeds on the Aztecs.  (…) The unusual numbers of sacrifices in Postclassic Mesoamerica were noted by Duran (1994), who recorded that, during Aztec coronation ceremonies, the ….captives were brought out. All of them were sacrificed in honor of his coronation (a pain- ful ceremony), and it was a pathetic thing to see these wretches as victims of Motecuhzoma. …I am not exaggerating; there were days in which two thousand, three thousand, five thou- sand, or eight thousand men were sacrificed. Their flesh was eaten…… The widespread Mesoamerican sacrificial practices (Aztec, Totonac, Mixtec, Zapotec, Maya) were duly recorded by Spanish observers such as Cortés, Sahagun, Duran, Torquemada, Tapia, Diaz de Castillo, Mirones y Lezcano, Avendaño y Loyala, Cárdenas y Valencia, Cervantes de Salazar, Bernardo Casanova, Villagutierre Soto-Mayor, Cogolludo, and Garcia de Palacios at sites such as the Mexican and Guatemalan Highlands, the Totonac Lowlands (i.e., Cempoala) of the Gulf Coast of Mexico, the Yucatecan Coast or the interior heartland region, showing a broad geographical and chronological consistency in the ritual behavior. The Italian translator and publisher Calvo noted, in his newsletter of 1521–1522 that the initial contact at Cozumel by Cortes observed “…men and people wearing fine-woven cloth and of every color, who practice numerous excellent arts such as gold-and silver smithery and European-style jewelry making, in honor of the idols they adore and to whom they sacrifice humans, cutting open their chests and pulling out their hearts which they offer to them” (the idols)….and that they (the Spanish) “cast them down (the idols) and put in place of them the image of our Lord and the Virgin Mary with the Cross, which they held in great veneration, and they themselves cleaned the temple where human blood from the sacrifices had fallen”. Human sacrifices by the Maya were frequently engaged in times of famine and plagues  or “some misfortune”, a point illustrated in Apocalypto.  (…) The stealth attacks were visible in the village scenes of Apocalypto in minute detail, including the wearing of human mandibles as trophies by the dominant leader of the warring band. The fictitious city in Apocalypto had a Tzompantli with vertical poles as that depicted in Chichen Itza and as described by the Spanish. The Aztec Tzompantli clearly had the perforations on the parietal side of the skull so that the skulls were displayed horizontally. The practice of heart extraction has been explicitly defined by Diego de Landa and numerous other Spanish observers. According to the accounts, a victim was often stripped naked, anointed with a blue color, and either tied to poles and shot with arrows (a scene that had been edited out and not included in Apocalypto), or taken to place of sacrifice (temple), seized by four Chacs, and suffered a heart extraction, throwing the decapitated head and body down the steps of the temple precisely as depicted in the film. However, the level of violence according to ethnohistoric accounts included the fact that the body was recovered at the base of the steps and flayed, with the skin worn by the naked priest with dancing in great solemnity, which was a scene NOT depicted in the film. Furthermore, the exaggerated body pit discovered by the escaping Jaguar Paw in Apocalypto is likely to not have existed because, according to Landa, Duran, and other observers, the victims were eaten, another scene NOT depicted in Apocalypto. However, if mass quantifies of victims were sacrificed similar to Duran’s account of the Aztecs, it is entirely possible that such a pit could have existed due to the excess of human flesh that was not consumed. Lopez-Medel (1612) notes that “Those compelled (for sacrifice) were captives and men taken in the wars they made against other pueblos, whom they kept in prisons and in cages for this purpose, fattening them.” The jawbones on arms were equally depicted in Apocalypto, indicating the level of butchery that accompanied Postclassic warfare. The removal and display of human jawbones is also a pan-Mesoamerican feat which dates as early as the Early Classic, based on burials in highland Teotihuacan and the Lowland Maya Mirador Basin site of Tintal. Freidel purports that the Maya were not predators of common people or peasants. However, Villagutierre records that villages were attacked with some regularity in the sixteenth century (…) The extraordinary detail in the murals from Chichen Itza confirms Villagutierre’s observations and suggests that common people and peasants as well as entire villages were targets for pillage, destruction, sacrifices, and captives. (…) The heavily fortified Postclassic sites of Mayapan, Tulum, Ichpaatun, Oxtankab, Tayasal, Muralla de Leon (Rice and Rice 1981), and three walled Terminal Classic sites of Chacchob, Cuca, and Dzonot Ake in the Lowlands as well as the heavily fortified Highland Maya sites of Iximche, Mixco Viejo, Rabinal, and Cumarcaj indicate the defensive postures of late Maya centers, a concept clearly in line with the social and political conditions of conflict and wars that Gibson was suggesting in Apocalypto. One of the more outstanding reviews of Apocalypto was written by Sonny Bunch (2006), an assistant editor at The Weekly Standard who noted the criticisms from academicians, and pointed out that the facts demonstrated either a complete distortion of reality, or a disturbing incompetence by the academic critics. (…) some of the more salient points of his arguments were that almost all critics mentioned Gibson’s alleged anti- Semitic statement and that the film did not inform adequately about the cultural achievements of the ancient Maya. Bunch notes that: ….This is a strange criticism. If you were interested in boning up on calendars, hieroglyph- ics, and pyramids you could simply watch a middle-school film strip. And who complained that in Gladiator, Ridley Scott showed epic battle scenes and vicious gladiatorial combat instead of teaching us how the aqueducts were built? Bunch also confronts the critics that suggest that the film portrayed “….an offensive and racist notion that Maya people were brutal to one another long before the arrival of Europeans…..” Newsweek reports that “although a few Mayan murals do illustrate the capture and even torture of prisoners, none depicts decapitation” as a mural in a trailer for the film does. “That is wrong”. It’s just plain wrong, “the magazine quotes Harvard professor William Fash as saying. Karl Taube, a professor of anthropology at UC Riverside, complained to the Washington Post about the portrayal of slaves building the Mayan pyramids. “We have no evidence of large numbers of slaves,” he told the paper. Even the mere arrival, at the end of the film, of Spanish explorers has been lambasted as culturally insensitive….. Here’s Gurnsey, again, providing a questionable interpretation of the film’s final minutes: “And the ending with the arrival of the Spanish (conquistadors) underscored the film’s message that this culture is doomed because of its own brutality. The implied message is that it’s Christianity that saves these brutal savages. “But none of these complaints holds up particularly well under scrutiny. After all, while it may not mesh well with their post-conquest victimology, the Mayans did partake of bloody human sacrifice.” While there may be some that might question the validity of the Spanish observations, the fact that the ethnohistoric observations match so seamlessly with the archaeological data from both earlier and later periods indicate that such doubts are highly unlikely. (…) It would be difficult to assert that all the scholars who spoke out against Apocalypto were ignorant or incompetent, but why did they make claims that were fallacious or inaccurate in the face of overwhelming data? Why was the response so vehement when many of the issues and situations portrayed in the film were accurate? It is likely that much of the resistance was created by Gibson’s anti-Semitic statement during an arrest about 6 months previous to the release of the film. In some cases, the opposition to Apocalypto may have been simple ignorance. However, it is also implied that scholars wittingly or unwittingly may have ascribed to a “revisionist” and/or “relativist/aboriginalist” perspective, concepts which can fall under the title of “neo-pragmatism”. A “revisionist” or “sham-reasoning” view may either represent an antithesis of truth or a decorative reasoning of truth, or the clarification and establishment of it. In some cases, revisionist perspectives ignore the vast amounts of data that have accumulated over periods of time, and seek to promote that which is ideologically expedient or politically “correct” or convenient within the bounds of “language”. While it is entirely possible that additional data may help establish a more accurate perspective based on additional information, often added by new technologies, the dangers and damage that a revi- sionist/relativist perspective can cause, if incorrect, is that it also has the potential to ultimately deceive and distort the reality of the human existence and defy truth. Such a position is “not to find out how things really are, but to advance (oneself) by making a case for some proposition to the truth-value of which he is indifferent”. It also suggests that “reasoning” can be mainly “decorative” and result in a “rapid deterioration of intellectual vigor”. In other cases, a certain movement purports that “indigenous rights should always trump scientific inquiry”. Such positions defy the establishment of truth and seek for an unqualified political correctness that is both unwarranted and dangerous to the realities of the human saga. On a more subtle note, it can lull a society into an intellectual complacency, generating a moral and intellectual failure to acknowledge or improve on mistakes or violations of accepted values of universal human rights. Perhaps a more viable alternative would be to return to the values of truth in science as determined by vigorous methodological procedure and evaluation via a multitude of multidisciplinary approaches. A solution lies in a return to the philosophical foundations of science such as that proposed by Peirce, Hempel, Haack, and others to organize and understand truth and valid objective reasoning as part of the ultimate goal. As Josh Billings noted more than a century ago, “As scarce as truth is, the supply has always been in excess of the demand”. (…) Such pragmatism formed in the late 1800s as a response to “antiscience” or “nominalist” movements which continue to the present day in scientific philosophy dressed as “relativism” or negative “revisionism.” The role of revisionism is based on the premise that “There is no single, eternal, and immutable ‘truth’ about past events and their meaning. The unending quest of historians for understanding the past – that is, ‘revisionism’ – is what makes history vital and meaningful”. In many cases, further revision of historical information can clarify or enhance the knowledge of the past. In other cases, the revision of history was designed to promote certain agendas or to ease or “whitewash” the uncomfortable aspects of events and actions so that “evil must be forgotten, distorted, skimmed over” and “history loses its value as an incentive and…paints perfect men and noble nations, but it does not tell the truth” (Du Bois).(…) The film Apocalypto is a fictional film which told the story of a chase scene, utilizing certain components of the Postclassic Maya cultural behavior as the setting for the drama which was unfolded. Perhaps the most accurate critique of the film was penned by Allan Maca and Kevin McLeod (2007) at the Presidential Session on Apocalypto at the American Anthropological Association Meeting in Washington, D.C. From their perception, “Gibson’s (scenes are) vital to his larger purposes regarding the exploration of death, consciousness, and transformation”. In essence, Maca and McLeod grasped the enormous metaphors that Gibson was knitting into the film. As Maca and McLeod (2007) note: Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto, while it may seem on the surface to be another mindless, violent action epic, with the Maya as unwitting casualties, actually sets out to achieve similar goals: an exploration of consciousness and of modern man’s need for renewal and transformation. Like most films involving or based on native culture yet made by non-natives, Apocalypto is a grandiose and intricately nuanced commentary on white society. Because the hero and the villains are indigenous, however, the film also seeks to explore the basis of our humanity, regardless of race and ethnicity. The artistic devices Gibson uses to communicate his ideas draw heavily on tropes, symbols, and plotlines developed by earlier masters; but he also clearly develops and adopts themes and symbolic vehicles that are basic to myth and ritual. Gibson utilized graphic scenes to visualize contemporary society and the hypocrisy that permeates the issues: the jungle=higher state of consciousness and peace, a societal refuge and environmental neutrality; “Sacrifices = bloody conflict/ soldiers in the Middle East”; Body Pit=“Nothing (small)compared to the daily abortion rate in the U.S”; Jaguar Paw escape = “the valiant human spirit in the face of unfavorable odds, the freedom from tyranny and social oppression”; environmental degradation near the city = “conspicuous consumption of resources and the contemporary destruction of the environment”; the pit where Jaguar Paw’s family was kept = “struggles , challenges, and obstacles of the contemporary family.” The strategy of joining the past to a critique of the present has been used repeat- edly in films for decades. Wolfgang Petersen, the director of Troy (2004) is reported to have stated: “Look at the present! What the Iliad says about humans and wars is, simply, still true. Power-hungry Agamemnons who want to create a new world order- that is absolutely current. … Of course, we didn’t start saying: Let’s make a movie about American politics, but (we started) with Homer’s epic. But while we were working on it we realized that the parallels to the things that were happening out there were obvious”. A certain level of allegory and metaphor permeated nearly all aspects of the film Apocalypto. As Maca and McLeod note: Contrary to what some have concluded about this film, Apocalypto does NOT promote, celebrate or otherwise glorify the Spanish or Christianity; it is quite the opposite really. What is celebrated repeatedly is the jungle, a metaphor for peace, the higher mind and a more evolved consciousness. The jungle is a refuge… a place of understanding……where true creation and novelty may unfold……. The leading writers and directors intentionally play with symbols and meanings as a way to innovate. Not all film makers can do this very well. However, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and Apocalypse Now (1979), directed by Stanley Kubrick and Francis Ford Coppola, respectively, are two films that set new models……Both are, explicitly and implicitly, antiwar, anti-US imperialism, and anti-colonialism and focus on the evolution of human consciousness…… These two films are at the center of the visual and philosophical mission of Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto….. One of the more interesting concepts that the data on human sacrifice in the Maya/ Mesoamerica area has demonstrated is that the Maya were not radically different from anybody else and that they were consistent with the rest of humanity. The story, metaphorically, could be applied to almost any ancient society in the world. The Maya achieved extraordinary accomplishments comparable with Greeks, Romans, Mesopotamians, Egyptians, and Chinese, and they were no less brutal. But the consciousness of the story was far more profound than a “blood and gore flick.” The story was Gibson’s and Safinia’s to tell and, as Maca and McLeod astutely note, …… we can’t help but wonder if the use of the trap in Apocalypto, as a vehicle for awareness, doesn’t also extend to our participation in Mel Gibson’s mission, such that all of us……may have been lured to exactly the space and place of discussion that he intended…. this creates discomfort even to contemplate….. Apocalypto will be judged in time as a cinema masterpiece, not only in its superb execution of film production, but also as an allegorical reference to the present. The criticisms, which were both accurate and fallacious, will continue to surround this film due to its unique story, the extraordinary setting, the allegorical and metaphorical references, and the various levels of awareness that are inherent in the film regarding the human saga. We are all a part of it. Richard D. Hansen
Columbus makes Hitler look like a juvenile delinquent. Russell Means
It’s almost obscene to celebrate Columbus because it’s an unmitigated record of horror. We don’t have to celebrate a man who was really — from an Indian point of view — worse than Attila the Hun. Hans Koning
Ce que nous savons c’est que cette folie infantile – détenir des armes nucléaires et menacer de s’en servir – est au cœur de la philosophie politique américaine actuelle. Harold Pinter (2005)
For the Christian viewer, the biggest question about Mel Gibson’s movie Apocalypto is: why does its hero turn away from the Cross at the end? All in all, there’s not a lot of Christ — passionate or otherwise — in Apocalypto, Mel Gibson’s first film since The Passion of the Christ. But a crucifix finally shows up at the film’s end, and the film’s response to it is surprisingly equivocal. The movie tells the story of a peaceful 16th-century jungle-dweller named Jaguar Paw. The first quarter of the film presents his idyllic village as a kind of Eden. The second quarter is a vision of Hell, as a raiding party for the nearby Mayan empire torches the town, rapes the women and drags the men to the Mayan capital as featured guests at a monstrous and ongoing sacrifice to the gods. JP watches in horror as a priest has several of his friends spread-eagled on squat stone, then hacks out their still-beating hearts and displays them to a howling crowd. JP narrowly avoids the same fate, escapes, and spends most of the rest of the film picking off an armed pursuit party, one by one, in classic action-film fashion. It is only at the very end that Christianity makes a brief but portentous appearance, aboard a fleet of Spanish ships that appears suddenly on the horizon. JP and his long-suffering wife watch from the jungle as a small boat approaches shore bearing a long-bearded, shiny-helmeted explorer and a kneeling priest holding high a crucifix-topped staff. « Should we join them? » asks his wife. « No, » he replies: They should go back to the jungle, their home. Roll credits. Given Gibson’s fervent Christianity, you might have expected JP to run up and genuflect. Why does he turn away? My colleague, film critic Richard Schickel, has observed that Gibson has little use for the institutional Roman Catholic church, preferring a « less mainstream version of his faith. » True, but the Traditionalists with whom Gibson is often associated are defined primarily by their objections to the liberalizations under the Second Vatican Council of 1962-5 — not an issue in Jaguar Paw’s day. Another explanation is that the director has always been better at Crucifixions than at Resurrections. Just as the risen Christ seemed like something of a tack-on to The Passion, Mel may have little interest in how Christian culture might reconfigure either the peaceful village-dwellers’ way of life or the bloodthirsty Mayans’. The third possibility, it seems to me, is that Gibson does know — and wants no part of it. I tend toward that last one because it reflects a learning curve of my own. About a year ago I visited an exhibit on another Mexican civilization, the Aztecs, at New York’s Guggenheim Museum. The show was cleverly arranged. Visitors walked up the Guggenheim’s giant spiral, the first few twists of which were devoted to the Aztecs’ stunning stylized carvings of snakes, eagles and other god/animals, and explanations of how the ingenious Aztecs filled in a huge lake to lay the foundation for Tenochtitlan, now Mexico City. It was only about halfway up the spiral — when it had become harder to run screaming for an exit — that one encountered a grey-green stone about three feet high. It was sleek and beautiful — almost like a Brancusi sculpture, I thought — until I read the label. It was a sacrifice stone of the sort in the movie. Not a reproduction, not a non-functioning ceremonial model, but the real thing. People had died on this. I felt shocked and a little angry — it was like coming across a gas chamber at an exhibit of interior design. But I kept walking, and at the very top of the museum I encountered another object that might be considered an answer to the sinister rock: a stone cross, carved after the Spanish had conquered the Aztecs and were attempting to convert them to Catholicism. Rather than Jesus’s full body, it bore a series of small relief carvings: his head and wounded hands, blood drops — and a sacrificial Aztec knife. How striking, I thought. Here was a potent work of iconographic propaganda using the very symbols of a brutal religion to turn its values inside out, manipulating its images so that they celebrated not the sacrifice, but the person who was sacrificed. Visually, at least, it seemed an elegant and admirable transition. And after seeing Apocalypto, I wondered why Gibson hadn’t created the cinematic equivalent: an ode to the progression out of savagery, through the vehicle of Christianity. (…) Charles C. Mann, author of the highly respected history 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus (…) first noted a couple of anachronisms in the film. The Mayan capital, including any great temple of the sort in the film, had mysteriously disappeared 700 years before the Spanish arrived. Moreover, although the Mayans probably engaged in some human sacrifice, there is no evidence that they practiced it on the industrial scale depicted in the movie. For that, as the Guggenheim exhibit suggested, one would have to look 300 miles west to the Aztecs, who had made it their religious centerpiece. Hernan Cortes (who probably rounded upward, since he conquered them), claimed the Aztecs dispatched between three and four thousand souls a year that way. Why Gibson decided to turn the Mayans into Aztecs is anyone’s guess. Most interesting, however, was Mann’s observation that if the boat Jaguar Paw sees is indeed the 1519 landing party of Cortes (who pushed quickly through what remained of Mayan territory on his way to the bloody battle of Tenochtitlan), the man holding up the cross was no particular friend to the indians. It was not until 1537, Mann said, that, after considerable debate both ways, Pope Paul III got around to proclaiming that « Indians themselves indeed are true men » and should not be « deprived of their liberty. » In the intervening 18 years roughly a third of Mexico’s 25 million indigenous population died of smallpox the Europeans brought with them, and the Spanish had enslaved most of the remaining six million able-bodied men. And that’s not counting the 100,000 Aztecs Cortes killed at Tenochtitlan alone. So here is the conundrum. If you had to choose between a culture that placed ritualized human slaughter at the center of its faith, but that only managed to kill 4,000 people a year, and a culture that put the sacrificial Lamb of God at the center of the universe but somehow found its way to countenancing the enslavement of millions and the slaughter of hundreds of thousands in the same neighborhood, which would be more appealing. David Biema
Reading the film as a simple account of Christian and colonialist triumphalism at the hands of a traditionalist Catholic filmmaker is too reductive. In 2006, David Van Biema of Time magazine wrote an essay about Gibson and the movie,  in which he wonders why  Gibson ended the film as he did. Specifically: For the Christian viewer, the biggest question about Mel Gibson’s movie Apocalypto is: why does its hero turn away from the Cross at the end? (…) It is only at the very end that Christianity makes a brief but portentous appearance, aboard a fleet of Spanish ships that appears suddenly on the horizon. JP and his long-suffering wife watch from the jungle as a small boat approaches shore bearing a long-bearded, shiny-helmeted explorer and a kneeling priest holding high a crucifix-topped staff. “Should we join them?” asks his wife. “No,” he replies: They should go back to the jungle, their home. Roll credits. He concludes that Gibson, who was also known for being alienated from mainstream Roman Catholicism, understands that the end of one violent civilization means the coming of one in which man’s propensity to violence and domination does not end, but simply takes new forms. (…) To be clear, from the point of view of a believing Christian, it really, really matters that the Gospel is true. The Spanish, whatever their grievous faults and wicked motivations, nevertheless carried with them true religion. (…) The more interesting discussion is why Mel Gibson — a self-tortured, radically alienated, but believing Catholic — had his heroes run away from the people who would be his deliverers. Has anybody seen a Girardian interpretation of Apocalypto? I’d love to read it. I found this short one from the Catholic bishop Robert Barron. It’s a great encapsulation of Girardian theory, and why Apocalypto is a film explaining it (…) here’s the core of Girardian theory: Primitive humans controlled the violence that threatened to overwhelm their societies and civilizations by means of the “scapegoat mechanism.” That is, they convinced themselves that the cause of the disorder was a scapegoat, and that only the sacrifice of the scapegoat would restore order to the civilization. In some civilizations — like the Aztecs’ — this turned into human sacrifice. Aztecs didn’t have the ritual slaughter of human beings because they enjoyed it, necessarily; they believed that the blood of human victims was necessary to keep the gods sated and the fertility cycle going. In Apocalypto, the protagonist, Jaguar Paw, is a tribesman who is hunted by the Maya, who intend to sacrifice him to propitiate their gods. The scapegoat mechanism is at the core of cultural anthropology, says Girard. Anyway, Christianity, alone among all religions, unmasks the lie of the scapegoat mechanism. In the Christian myth (I say “myth” in the technical sense), the god himself becomes the innocent victim, and throws down the scapegoat mechanism. The CBC, in a short piece on Girardian theory, explains: Jesus is innocent, the Gospels insist, and his innocence proclaims the innocence of all scapegoat victims. He reveals the founding violence, hidden from the beginning, because it preserved social peace. A choice is posed: humanity will have peace if it follows the way of life that Jesus preached. If not, it will have worse violence because the old remedy will no longer work once exposed to the light. (…) As Bishop Barron says, Gibson’s movie is a manifestation of Girardian theory. The word “apocalypse” derives from the Greek word meaning “unveiling.” In Apocalypto, the title does double meaning: because of the Book of Revelation (also called “The Apocalypse,”) the “unveiling” leads to the end of the world. This is why the word “apocalypse” has come to mean “end of the world” in popular usage. Gibson’s movie portrays the end of a violent primitive civilization at the hands of a higher Christian civilization, one whose religion unmasks and defeats the scapegoat mechanism that had upheld the dying civilization. It may be the case that Gibson has his heroes turn away from the cross-bearers because that’s what any Indian would normally do in that situation. Jaguar Paw doesn’t know who these strangers are, and that they might save him. It makes sense that he would want to hide out in the jungle and see what happens. Gibson’s decision to have them run away from the cross might not be a theological commentary, but might simply have been an artistic decision. After all, showing the Indians, who had been chased through the jungle for the entire movie by other Indians seeking to take them for ritual sacrifice, ending the film by running into the arms of Spanish Christians would have been seen as aesthetically cheap propaganda. Whatever Gibson’s intentions, a case could be made for a more ambiguous interpretation. It is undeniably true, as a historical matter, that the Spanish ended human sacrifice, and conquered the civilization that depended on human sacrifice. But it is also true that the Spanish were much better at controlling and deploying violence than the Aztecs were. Maintaining Spanish colonial civilization required immense violence. When a person or a civilization becomes Christian, they are still human, and still have to struggle against the “old man,” as Scripture says. There are no utopias. The anthropological and cultural value of Christianity, in this context, is that it does not allow even the Christian to scapegoat victims. Oh, they do! We do, all the time! The Christian faith, though, says: Stop. Look at what you are doing. It’s not right. You are making innocent people suffer. In the US in the Civil Rights Era, Martin Luther King confronted racist white Christians with the Christian message, which was radically incompatible with the unjust social order they had created in the American South, and maintained through violence. Again: Christianity doesn’t mean that sin ceases to exist; it only explains it, and shows a way out of the cycle of violence and retribution. So, look: I have no respect for the view that the native peoples of Mesoamerica were living a tranquil life until they were set upon by Spanish Christian colonialists, who subdued and immiserated them. That is sentimental claptrap. But the Christian analogue to this fairy tale — that the coming of Christianity on the sword tip of the conquistadores led to a kingdom of peace and justice — is also sentimental claptrap. We are not required to believe falsely that there is no moral difference between the Aztecs and the Spanish, and the civilizations they represented. A civilization that practices mass human sacrifice is objectively worse than one that outlaws it. And, for Christians, a civilization that, however grievously flawed, proclaims the truth of Christ is objectively better than one that denies it. But we have to come to terms as well with the violence and darkness that persisted, despite Christianity. After the bloodshed of the 20th century, the West — Christian and post-Christian — should consider exactly how we stand in relation to the bloodthirsty Aztec empire. St. Paul writes in his letter to the Romans that all of creation struggles as in labor pains. And so we will until the end of time, until the real Apocalypse. (…) For readers unfamiliar with the Christian texts, the Book of Revelation — The Apocalypse — predicts a time to come when Christianity will have failed, and the world will be plunged into an abyss of violence … and then Jesus Christ will return. The mass apostasy underway now in the West is a harbinger of the End. Girard says that the Christian unveiling “is wholly good, but we are unable to come to terms with it.” Think of the Spanish conquistadores, who could not come to terms with the religion they professed. Think of the whites of the pre-Civil Rights South. Think of the black, brown, and white Christians today, who sin and exploit others, in defiance of the religion they profess. Think of yourself. (…) Apocalypto is not about Good Spanish Christian Colonialists and Evil Aztec Pagans. It’s about violence, civilization, and religion. The civilizational catastrophe it dramatizes is not just that of the Aztecs. It is, as Girard might have said, our own, because it is the story of blind humanity. Rod Dreher
On sait que les victimes du sacrifice humain aztèque étaient très nombreuses. Il fut un temps, sans doute, où c’était surtout des esclaves, comme cela resta le cas chez les Mayas. Mais la forte expansion de l’empire aztèque fit que rapidement, ce furent les guerriers ennemis capturés qui fournirent l’immense majorité des victimes, suivis par les esclaves, les enfants, les condamnés à mort, des personnes anormales : albinos, nains, bossus, contrefaits, macrocéphales, tous sacrifiables d’office, des personnes libres ordinaires, volontaires (comme des prostituées ou des musiciens) ou non, des étrangers de passage et enfin, dans certains cas précis, des princesses de la cité. (…) La mission des Mexicas est en principe de faire la guerre pour nourrir ciel et terre et pour faire marcher la « machine mondiale ». Mais c’est là un discours particulier, propre essentiellement aux nobles, semble-t-il. En fait, il faut faire la distinction entre guerre fleurie et guerre tout court. Dans les deux, on faisait des prisonniers qui étaient sacrifiés. Mais la guerre ordinaire poursuivait avant tout les objectifs habituels d’une guerre. Il n’était pas question d’attaquer une cité sous prétexte de vouloir nourrir le soleil la terre : il fallait des motivations légitimes, telles que le massacre de marchands ou d’ambassadeurs, le refus de commercer, etc. Le roi doit soumettre ses motifs à une assemblée de vassaux, de guerriers distingués et de citoyens de la cité, qui donnent ou refusent leur approbation. En cas de refus, le roi peut reposer la question et, après un troisième refus, passer outre et procéder à la déclaration de guerre ou, le cas échéant, à une attaque surprise. La guerre fleurie (xochiyaoyotl) en revanche a théoriquement pour seul but la capture de prisonniers à sacrifier. Des batailles de ce nom, modérément sanglantes paraît-il, avaient lieu depuis longtemps, mais la véritable guerre fleurie opposant la Triple Alliance de Mexico, Texcoco et Tlacopan à des cités de la vallée voisine de Puebla, principalement Tlaxcala, Cholula et Huexotzinco, n’aurait été instituée qu’à l’occasion de la grande famine du milieu du XVe s., famine qui fut interprétée comme un châtiment des dieux insuffisamment alimentés. Les armées des deux camps s’opposaient régulièrement sur un champ de bataille précis et capturaient le plus possible de prisonniers pour les immoler ensuite au cours des grandes fêtes des vingtaines, garantissant ainsi aux dieux un garde-manger bien fourni. Deux types de guerres différents selon leurs objectifs, donc, mais deux guerres ritualisées, auxquelles une bonne partie de la population était invitée à s’associer. (…) Cette rigueur extrême dans l’attribution précise des victimes s’explique autant par l’importance religieuse de la capture de victimes que par son rôle de moteur social. L’avancement dans la hiérarchie militaire était en effet conditionné, du moins en grande partie, par le nombre de captifs qu’on avait fait immoler. (…)  Pour les nobles, des captures dans ces guerres confirment leur noblesse et leur qualité d’aigles-jaguars ; elle leur permet de gouverner des cités et de devenir des commensaux du roi.  (…) Sur place, après la prise de la cité, on procède au comptage des captifs obtenus par les différents alliés et des guerriers chevronnés vont faire rapport définitif au roi, en précisant notamment le nombre de nobles qui ont mérité des honneurs pour leur conduite. Ensuite on se met en route avec les prisonniers, dont beaucoup mouraient en chemin. Les Huaxtèques étaient retenus par une corde passée dans le trou qu’ils se percent dans le nez. Aux jeunes qui n’ont pas le nez percé, on met colliers de bois ou on leur entrave bras et pieds. Ceux de Miahuatlan décourageaient toute velléité de fuite en attachant la corde de leur arc au membre viril du captif. Le retour à Mexico donnait lieu à une entrée triomphale remarquable. Les anciens guerriers prêtres et les dignitaires de tout rang des temples attendent les prisonniers à l’entrée de la ville, rangés en ordre d’importance, avec leurs atours spécifiques. Ils encensent les « victimes des dieux », leur donnent un pain sacré enfilé sur des cordes (…) Puis on leur donne à boire le pulque divin (teooctli), les assimilant ainsi aux Mimixcoas, les guerriers sacrificiels proto typiques ivres de pulque. En un premier temps, on s’adresse donc aux prisonniers comme à des ennemis et on met d’emblée les choses au point : ils sont vaincus et leur sort est inéluctable, mais glorieux. En même temps, on leur souhaite la bienvenue, car ils seront bientôt « chez eux » et leur mort les transformera en Mimixcoas et en compagnons du Soleil. On les encense comme des entités sacrées, peut-être aussi pour les purifier en tant que future offrande aux dieux. (…) après avoir visité différents endroits qui joueront un rôle lors de leur mise à mort -le cuauhxicalli, le temalacatl, le tzompantli -, ils vont faire de même devant le souverain dans son palais. Celui-ci, qui est comme « seconde personne du dieu [ … ] et qu’ils adoraient comme des dieux », leur fait donner des vêtements et de la nourriture, voire même des fleurs et des cigares. Le « serpent femelle » ou cihuacoatl, seconde personne du roi, les appelle frères et dit qu’ils sont chez eux, dans leur maison. Il importe en effet d’intégrer les captifs dans le groupe des Mexicas, de faire en sorte qu’ils soient « chez eux ». Parfois, ils reçoivent peut-être des filles de joie qui égaient leurs derniers jours et qui sont ainsi, pour un temps, comme des épouses mexicaines de ces étrangers. Nous connaissons le cas d’un captif de marque qui vécut longtemps en liberté dans la ville avant d’être immolé : la victime devient membre de la cité. (…) Comment expliquer l’intégration-assimilation des prisonniers, dont l’exemple extrême bien connu est celui des Tupinambas du Brésil ? Par le fait que l’autre est différent, donc moindre, et qu’il ne devient une offrande digne qu’à partir du moment où il est acceptable, intégré ? Ou faut-il évoquer René Girard et sa théorie du sacrifice-lynchage ? Selon lui, on ne peut prendre la victime à l’intérieur du groupe, car on risque de provoquer le déchaînement de violence de la vengeance ; mais, d’autre part, l’effet apaisant que doit apporter au groupe le sacrifice ne se produit que si la victime en fait partie. Pour concilier ces impératifs, on la choisit marginale (membre du groupe sans l’être tout à fait, un enfant par exemple) ou étrangère, mais alors on l’intègre, on fait comme si la victime appartenait quand même au groupe. Qu’il y ait dans le sacrifice aztèque une volonté consciente ou non de canaliser la violence interne est possible, mais difficile à démontrer. La composition polyethnique des cités, leur fréquent manque de cohésion, montrent que les risques de violence et de conflits internes n’étaient pas illusoires. (…) Les occasions de conflits étaient donc nombreuses et cette spécificité peut avoir été une des causes de l’inflation sacrificielle. Mais, répétons-le, on ne voit pas comment on pourrait démontrer que le sacrifice humain tendait aussi à éviter la violence interne. Ce qui est sûr en revanche, c’est que la théorie aztèque du sacrifice rendait l’intégration de la victime et sa proximité au sacrifiant (ici, en premier lieu, celui qui avait fait le prisonnier) indispensable : le sacrifiant mourait en effet symboliquement à travers sa victime qui le représentait. Les captifs sont donc confiés aux intendants qui les répartissent dans les maisons de quartier, où ils sont mis dans de grandes cages de bois. Des personnes désignées les gardent, allant jusqu’à dormir sur ces cages; si elles doivent sortir pour des besoins naturels, on les retient par une corde passée autour de la taille. Plusieurs sources s’accordent sur le fait que les prisonniers étaient bien nourris en vue de leur consommation prochaine ; par contre, Mendieta affirme que les captifs, mal nourris, devenaient vite maigres et jaunes. Probablement cela variait-il selon le nombre de captifs, la période de l’année, la cité intéressée, etc. (…) Dans d’autres régions ou royaumes en revanche, on n’immolait pas toujours tous les guerriers prisonniers. Chez les Quichés, seuls les principaux, le seigneur et ses frères, étaient tués et mangés, pour semer l’épouvante. Chez les Mayas, les captifs de basse extraction étaient réduits en esclavage et les seigneurs sacrifiés, quoique parfois ils pussent se racheter. A Miahuatlan, « de ceux qu’ils prenaient en guerre, beaucoup étaient réduits en esclavage », mais on ignore à nouveau si cela concerne aussi les combattants prisonniers. Cette situation, où tous les prisonniers n’étaient pas sacrifiés, était fort répandue et peut donc être supposée plus ancienne que l’immolation générale. (…) L’immolation générale semble donc être un développement tardif à mettre en rapport avec la constante croissance démographique de l’époque ainsi qu’avec la grande extension de l’empire aztèque et l’afflux de captifs dans les cités puissantes. Cette évolution va de pair avec une manière de « démocratisation » du sacrifice humain et du cannibalisme, qui deviennent accessibles même aux guerriers issus du peuple. Non seulement les cités ne sacrifient pas toujours tous leurs captifs, mais souvent, si elles ne sont pas indépendantes, il leur est interdit de le faire parce qu’elles doivent de livrer une partie de leurs captifs en tribut à la cité dont elles dépendent, et ce selon des modalités qui peuvent varier. (…) D’une manière plus générale, Duran raconte que lors de l’inauguration de la pyramide principale du Grand Temple sous Ahuitzotl, on attendait des seigneurs invités qu’ils apportent l’habituel tribut d’esclaves « qu’ils étaient tenus d’apporter pour le sacrifice lors de telles solennités » et il est précisé plus loin qu’il s’agit de « tous les captifs pris en guerre qu’ils devaient en tribut à la Couronne royale de Mexico ». J’ai démontré ailleurs que la chasse à l’homme qu’était la guerre était à bien des égards assimilée à une chasse tout court. Chez les Quichés, les captifs étaient du reste qualifiés de gibier. Non seulement la proximité homme-animal était très grande, mais, on l’a vu dans les mythes, les hommes ont remplacé les animaux comme victimes. (…) Les captifs entrant à Mexico hurlaient comme des bêtes ; une fois sacrifiés, leurs têtes étaient exposées sur le tzompantli où elles devenaient les fruits d’une sorte de verger artificiel qui devait assurer la renaissance des victimes, de même que les rites effectués avec les os du gibier assuraient son retour. La guerre imitait donc la chasse, mais parfois c’était l’inverse, comme lors des fêtes de quecholli, de tititl et d’izcalli (toutes au cours de la saison des pluies, nocturne, présolaire), au cours desquelles avaient lieu de grandes battues au terme desquelles le gibier était sacrifié comme des hommes ou offert au feu (ce qui pouvait également arriver à des guerriers), tandis que les capteurs étaient récompensés comme des guerriers. En quecholli, on allait même jusqu’à assimiler des captifs à des cerfs et à les sacrifier comme tels. (…) Les guerriers sacrifiés n’étaient pas tous d’égale qualité. Il va de soi que la capture d’un roi, d’un seigneur, d’un noble, d’un haut gradé ou d’un vaillant était plus prestigieuse que celle d’un soldat ordinaire et que ces personnes avaient en elles plus de tonalli, de feu intérieur, de chaleur vitale susceptible de vitaliser les dieux et les hommes. Certains types de mise à mort leur étaient d’ailleurs réservés, en particulier le « gladiatorio », qui opposait un prisonnier attaché à une meule par une corde passée autour de la taille et pratiquement désarmé à des guerriers aigles ou jaguars pourvus d’épées à tranchants d’obsidienne. On dit que c’est le roi lui-même qui choisissait les victimes dignes de cet honneur après de multiples vérifications. Si la victime royale ou princière avait été capturée par un roi ou un seigneur, on conservait sa peau que le vainqueur revêtait parfois ou qu’on bourrait de coton ou de paille et pendait dans le temple ou le palais. (….) Il y avait aussi des différences de qualité entre les peuples. Les victimes les plus appréciées étaient celles qui appartenaient à des populations peu éloignées et dès lors pas trop différentes de la Triple Alliance. (…) La mort sacrificielle est (..) un châtiment. Les hommes ont négligé leurs créateurs et doivent expier. Qui plus est, ils sont nés sur terre, dans la matière qui les sépare des dieux et les condamne à mourir. (…) Par la mort héroïque, acceptée, sur le champ de bataille ou la pierre de sacrifice, le guerrier expie et gagne un au-delà glorieux. C’est pourquoi on dit au jeune homme qui avec l’aide d’autres, fait un premier prisonnier, au travers duquel il mourra symboliquement et expiera, que « Tonatiuh Tlaltecuhtli t’ont lavé la face ». Châtiment salvifique, la mort sacrificielle du guerrier est ressentie à la fois comme une gloire, un honneur, et un malheur. (…) Il reste un dernier et vaste sujet qui ne pourra être qu’effleuré ici, c’est celui du nombre des victimes. Un sujet éminemment sensible, qui souvent fait perdre tout sens critique aux chercheurs, trop prompts à vouloir minimiser à tout prix. Il est clair que dans les cités les plus puissantes, les victimes étaient très nombreuses ; elles le paraîtront un peu moins si on considère que nombre d’entre elles, normalement, auraient dû mourir sur le champ de bataille. Il est évident aussi que le nombre de victimes a fortement augmenté à mesure que la puissance grandissante de la Triple Alliance s’appuyait de plus en plus sur la terreur pour assujettir les population. Cette croissance va aussi de pair avec celle de la démographie, surtout entre, mettons, 1450 et 1519. S’il faut en croire Tezozomoc, sous Montezuma l, les Mexicas se réjouissent fort d’avoir fait 200 prisonniers de Chalco en une bataille (donc, probablement des guerriers). Quelques décennies plus tard, Ahuitzotl ramènerait 44.000 captifs (sans doute de tout ordre) de sa campagne au Guerrero ; la région devra être repeuplée par la Triple Alliance. De sa campagne contre Tututepec, Montezuma II et ses alliés ramènent 1350 prisonniers, et une autre fois, 2800, mais une bataille fleurie contre Huexotzinco ferait 10.000 morts. Après la prise de Mexico par Cortés, celui-ci ne peut empêcher ses alliés, notamment tlaxcaltèques, de sacrifier et de manger plus de 15.000 ennemis, chiffre qu’il n’avait pas intérêt à gonfler. Les guerres, faut-il le dire, étaient incessantes et les cités soumises devaient souvent livrer des victimes à sacrifier comme tribut. Dès lors, des fêtes au cours desquelles on immole quelques milliers de victimes deviennent assez rapidement chose courante à Mexico. Durán affirme que sous Montezuma II, il y avait des jours de deux, trois, cinq ou huit mille sacrifiés à Mexico. Pour l’inauguration du temple de Tlamatzinco et du cuauhxicalli, il y en aurait même eu 12.210. On est loin, bien sûr, des chiffres controversés de l’inauguration du Grand Temple de Mexico en 1487 par Ahuitzotl. La plupart des sources en nahuatl et en espagnol s’accordent sur le chiffre de 80.400 victimes sacrifiées à cette occasion, ce qui paraît énorme et a bien sûr donné lieu à toute une littérature révisionniste, certains allant même jusqu’à proposer le chiffre parfaitement fantaisiste de 320 morts seulement. Il faut dire que la circonstance était exceptionnelle. Les travaux ayant débuté sous Tizoc, celui-ci a d’emblée dû se mettre à stocker les victimes pour l’inauguration. Mais il mourut prématurément et Ahuitzotl lui succéda. Il acheva l’agrandissement de la pyramide dont il fit coïncider l’inauguration avec son intronisation, en vue de laquelle il fit également une campagne. Théoriquement, les victimes de cette vaste opération de terreur ont donc effectivement pu compter des dizaines de milliers de victimes. Pour la moyenne annuelle de victimes, les estimations anciennes diffèrent. Une lettre du moine évêque Zumarraga mentionnée par Torquemada mentionne 20.000 enfants sacrifiés par an, mais Clavijero évoque une autre lettre où ce seraient 20.000 personnes par an dans la seule ville de Mexico. Gómara semble faire de 20.000 à 50.000 victimes le total pour le pays tout entier. Il semble s’appuyer sur un propos d’un certain Ollintecuhtli qui, vantant la puissance de Montezuma, aurait dit à Cortés qu’il sacrifiait 20.000 personnes par an. Las Casas en revanche, parfaitement de mauvaise foi, admet tout au plus 10 ou 100 sacrifices par an alors que dans son Apologética, il reprend les données habituelles des autres sources. Dernier élément qui montre le grand nombre de sacrifices, c’est celui concernant les tzompantli ou plates-formes d’exposition des têtes des défunts. Je passe sur le tzompantli imaginaire inventé par Bernal Díaz à Xocotlan, mais à Mexico, selon le conquistador Andrés de Tapia qui, avec un collègue, les aurait comptées, le nombre de têtes s’élevait aux alentours de 136.000. Ici encore, le total est peut-être excessif, mais il montre bien que les victimes étaient nombreuses. Victimes qui, rappelons-le encore, dans des pays dotés d’armes meilleures et où on n’essayait pas de faire prisonnier pendant et après le combat, seraient mortes sur le champ de bataille. Outre les guerriers, il y avait toute une série d’autres victimes que je ne puis que survoler. Les esclaves, fort nombreux, provenaient de la guerre, du tribut ou étaient des condamnés, des enfants vendus ou des personnes qui se vendaient. Seuls pouvaient être sacrifiés, semble-t-il, les condamnés, les esclaves pour dettes de jeu qui ne pouvaient se racheter et les esclaves indociles qui avaient été vendus deux ou trois fois. (…) Un troisième groupe de victimes, bien moins nombreux, comprenait des condamnés à mort, une confirmation de plus du fait que la mort sacrificielle est expiatoire. Les victimes dont il a été question jusqu’à présent sont soit extérieures à la cité, soit marginales. D’autres marginaux sacrifiables sont les enfants – incomplètement intégrés dans le groupe et dépendant de leurs parents – et les personnes anormales, donc potentiellement dangereuses, ou marquées. Les sacrifices d’enfants, victimes faciles à obtenir, évidentes, étaient très fréquents. Des enfants de rois ou de seigneurs étaient requis quand il s’agissait d’assurer le succès des moissons, la bonne marche des saisons étant de la responsabilité des gouvernants. Pour les autres, c’étaient des enfants de prisonniers de guerre, ou, trop fréquemment, au point qu’à Texcoco il aurait fallu légiférer pour y mettre un frein, offert, ou vendus par leurs parents. On achetait aussi des enfants à l’extérieur. (…)  Le cas des albinos, nains, bossus, contrefaits, macrocéphales, tous sacrifiables d’office, semble-t-il, est plus difficile. Certains d’entre eux au moins étaient pourchassés, tous étaient mis à part, en particulier dans l’entourage du souverain, pour son divertissement mais surtout, sans doute, pour les contrôler, comme le porte à croire le fait que Montezuma II avait également concentré autour de lui, à Mexico, les fils des rois, les images de dieux et les animaux de l’empire. Ces personnes étaient immolées quand il y avait manque ou excès de pluie et lors d’éclipses du soleil, soit quand il y avait trop ou trop peu de soleil. Les nains et bossus devaient avoir des affinités avec les Tlaloque, les albinos étaient des élus du soleil. Enfin, dans le temple d’Iztaccinteotl, un dieu du maïs, on sacrifiait, paraît-il, des personnes qui souffraient de maladies contagieuses comme la gale ou la dartre, voire la lèpre, maladies attribuées à la déesse de l’amour Xochiquetzal . Il est d’autres personnes de la cité qui, libres, pouvaient être appelées au sacrifice ou qui le choisissaient. On dit qu’au besoin, le roi pouvait faire sacrifier n’importe quel citoyen. Lors de la fête de la moisson (tlacaxipehualiztli), dans certaines régions, on sacrifiait un étranger de passage qui probablement représentait la dernière gerbe de maïs. Pour la fête des montagnes, on sacrifiait deux vierges du lignage royal de Tezcacoatl, appelé ainsi semble-t-il d’après un des quatre guides des pérégrinations mexicas. On sait par recoupements qu’elles représentaient les déesses Ayopechtli et Atlacoaya, associées à l’eau et aux semis. Outre ces marginales du haut de la société, il y avait celles du bas. L’affirmation de Serna selon laquelle des jeunes femmes de petite vertu étaient recueillies par des prêtres qui leur promettaient de les établir mais les sacrifiaient au cours d’une fête est probablement une broderie sur la description que Sahagún fait de la fête d’ochpaniztli. Mais il y avait aussi les vraies prostituées, qui, en tepeilhuitl, fête au cours de laquelle on célébrait les amours, s’offraient librement au sacrifice en se maudissant et en injuriant les femmes honnêtes. (…) On trouvait aussi des volontaires parmi les musiciens, en échange de l’honneur de jouer du tambour lors d’une fête. Michel Gaulich
Tout mouvement qui prétendrait transcender (ou reléguer au second plan) le combat pour la souveraineté individuelle, en faisant passer d’abord les intérêts de l’élément collectif – classe, race, genre, nation, sexe, ethnie, Église, vice ou profession -, ressortirait à mes yeux à une conjuration pour brider encore davantage la liberté humaine déjà bien maltraitée. Derrière le patriotisme et le nationalisme flamboie toujours la maligne fiction collectiviste de l’identité, barbelés ontologiques qui prétendent agglutiner en fraternité inébranlable les ‘Péruviens’, les ‘Espagnols’, les ‘Français’, les ‘Chinois’, etc. Vous et moi savons que ces catégories sont autant d’abjects mensonges qui jettent un manteau d’oubli sur des diversités et des incompatibilités multiples, prétendent abolir des siècles d’histoire et faire reculer la civilisation vers ces barbares temps antérieurs à la création de l’individualité, c’est-à-dire de la rationalité et de la liberté: trois choses inséparables, sachez-le. Mario Vargas Llosa
On ne sort pas de la pauvreté en redistribuant le peu qui existe, mais en créant plus de richesse. (…) Les économies égalitaristes «n’ont jamais tiré un pays de la pauvreté: elles l’ont toujours appauvri davantage. Et souvent elles ont rogné ou fait disparaître les libertés, du fait que l’égalitarisme exige une planification rigide qui, économique au début, s’étend ensuite à toute la vie sociale. Mario Vargas Llosa
J’étais persuadé qu’un écrivain qui se déclarait libéral n’avait aucune chance de remporter le Nobel. C’est notamment pour cette raison que je pensais que je ne le recevrais jamais, que j’étais trop controversé, mes activités journalistiques et un temps politiques m’ayant entraîné, souvent malgré moi, dans de nombreuses polémiques. Eh bien, je me suis trompé ! {…) J’espère qu’il va encourager les partisans de la démocratie et de la liberté – économique, politique, culturelle… -, ce pour quoi je milite et me bats depuis des décennies dans mes articles de journaux, tous les quinze jours. J’ai toujours combattu l’autoritarisme, de gauche comme de droite. Et je dois dire que malgré des problèmes encore énormes, l’Amérique du Sud est bien orientée, il n’y a plus qu’une dictature – Cuba – et seulement quelques « demi-dictatures » comme le Venezuela de Chavez ou le Nicaragua… La gauche a opéré un tournant démocratique et social-démocrate, ouvert au marché, comme au Chili, au Brésil et en Uruguay, et la droite est elle aussi démocratique, ce qui est nouveau pour le continent sud-américain. Mario Vargas Llosa (prix Nobel de litterature 2010)
Les images du sauvetage des mineurs chiliens ont été sur tous les écrans de télévision. Le récit de leur captivité forcée, puis de leur délivrance, a fait les premières pages. Dans la presse et les médias américains, on en a parlé aussi. Mais on a donné un détail qui semble avoir échappé aux journalistes français (je ne puis imaginer qu’ils l’aient omis volontairement, cela va de soi) : ce sauvetage a été, quasiment de bout en bout, une entreprise américaine.  (…) S’il y avait un Président américain à la Maison blanche, il recevrait Jeff Hart et les autres en héros : mais nous sommes encore en l’ère Obama, hélas. (…) Je dois ajouter à ce que j’ai écrit que, sans l’ouverture et l’esprit d’entreprise du Président du Chili lui-même, Sebastian Piñera, l’action salvatrice du capitalisme américain n’aurait pas été possible. Sebastian Piñera est lui-même un capitaliste qui fait honneur au capitalisme international : si les Etats-Unis étaient gouvernés par un capitaliste, le désastre du golfe du Mexique aurait permis au capitalisme américain de donner sa pleine mesure, mais hélas, disais-je plus haut… Guy Millière

Suite à l’un de nos derniers billets sur Columbus Day

Cet article sur le site conservateur americain Human events …

Qui, au-delà du bien connu génocide et de la mise en esclavage de peuples entiers, a le mérite de rappeler tout ce qu’a rendu possible la découverte de Colomb …

A savoir, pour des peuples qui n’avaient rien demandé a personne, non seulement la scandaleuse imposition du port de vêtements, de l’écriture et du christianisme …

Mais, ajouterions-nous, l’abjecte privation, par le sanguinaire Cortes et pour des générations de jeunes  esclaves ou prisonners de guerre aztèques, de l’insigne privilège d’offrir, par dizaines de milliers annuellement, leurs coeurs encore palpitants à leurs divinités bien-aimées …

Ou des joies si délicatement variées et raffinées des différentes formes de combat gladiatorial, éviscération, crémation,  pendaison, coups de flèches ou de javelines, chute dans le vide, enfouissement vivant, coups de la tête contre un rocher, écrasement dans un filet, noyade, décapitation, dépeçage, lapidation, écorchement vivant, cannibalisme postsacrificiel …

Sans compter tout récemment …

Après les Sartre, Neruda, García Márquez, Paz, Heaney, Fo, Saramago, Grass et autres Pinter …

Et outre, avec leur aventure humaine parfaitement scénarisée, la particulièrement arrogante intervention du capitalisme américain en plein coeur du Chili …

L’avènement de cette abomination des abominations…

Un prix Nobel de littérature authentiquement libéral !!!

Christopher Columbus: Hero

Daniel J. Flynn

Human events

10/11/2010

Upon returning to Spain, Christopher Columbus wrote of his discovery that “Christendom ought to feel delight and make feasts and give solemn thanks to the Holy Trinity.” Until fairly recently, all of Christendom agreed. Just as much of Christendom now recoils at the term “Christendom,” the “delight” and “thanks” for Columbus’ historic voyage hardly remains universal.

The feast day has been transformed into a day of mourning.

Since Berkeley, Calif., jettisoned Columbus Day in favor of Indigenous Peoples’ Day almost two decades ago, Brown University, Santa Cruz, Calif., and Venezuela have similarly ditched the holiday.

“Columbus makes Hitler look like a juvenile delinquent,” professional Indian Russell Means once remarked. Faux Indian Ward Churchill, who has been arrested with Means for blocking a Columbus Day parade in Denver, likens the discoverer to Heinrich Himmler and calls the day honoring him “a celebration of genocide”

Granting Columbus’s bravery, James Loewen writes in Lies My Teacher Told Me that the Genoese sailor “left a legacy of genocide and slavery that endures in some degree to this day.” Howard Zinn dismisses Columbus the seaman as “lucky” and condemns Columbus the man as a practitioner of “genocide” upon a people whose “relations among men, women, children, and nature were more beautifully worked out than perhaps any place in the world.”

Indeed, the explorer initially praised the Indians as “gentle,” “full of love,” “without greed,” and “free from wickedness.” He exclaimed, “I believe there is no better race.” Columbus also reported tribal warfare, cannibalism, castration, the exploitation of women, and slavery. The locals slaughtered the dozens of men he left behind in the New World. Put another way, in 1493 the natives conducted genocide on every European in the Americas.

This is not to whitewash Columbus’s crimes, which have not aged well. The explorer kidnapped natives for show in Spain (none of them made it alive) on his first voyage, enslaved several hundred bellicose Indians on his second visit, and after his third trip faced charges back home of governing as a tyrant. At sea, the admiral and his crew also ate a dolphin—another act that offends 21st-Century tastes.

But fixation upon his sins obscures his accomplishment: Columbus discovered the New World.

Any assessment of the admiral that doesn’t lead with this fact misses the forest for the trees. Enslavement and cultural conquest are common. Discovering two continents is unprecedented. Other than Christ, it is difficult to name a person who has changed the world as dramatically as Columbus has.

Unlike the adventurers of today, who climb tall mountains and balloon over oceans, Columbus did not trek across the Atlantic for the hell of it. If his dangerous journey had been a mission to resolve a mid-life crisis, perhaps his modern detractors would understand it better. As it was, Columbus sailed to enrich his adopted country (he naturally got a cut) and spread Catholicism.

Columbus described the Indians as “a people to be delivered and converted to our holy faith rather by love than by force.” He planted a cross on each island he visited and taught the natives Christian prayer. Elsewhere, his journal obsesses over gold, spices, cotton, and other valuables that might uplift Spain. Given the boogeyman status on the Left of both capitalism and Christianity, it is no surprise that Columbus has himself become a boogeyman.

Had Columbus never discovered America, the Indians never would have discovered Europe. Columbus encountered naked natives with neither the iron nor the courage with which to effectively fight. The civilizations peopling the New World possessed no written language and didn’t use the wheel. All of history points to some kind of eventual conquest. Isn’t it worth celebrating that the pope’s mariner, rather than, say, the henchmen of sultans or khans, discovered the Americas?

No, say the critics of America and the West, who, not coincidentally, are also Columbus’s critics. Multiculturalists see Columbus as the symbol for all subsequent atrocities that befell Native Americans.

Couldn’t he be more plausibly viewed as the catalyst for ensuing greatness?

America first sending men into flight, over the Atlantic, and to the moon; thwarting tuberculosis, yellow fever, and polio; fighting Nazism, Communism, and al Qaeda; serving as a welcome mat to humanity’s “wretched refuse;” inventing the light blub, the telephone, the computer, and the Internet; and standing as a beacon of freedom in an unfree world all happened in the wake of the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria.

Columbus endured the skepticism of potential patrons, a near mutiny, and more than a month at sea to reach the Americas. His good name can probably withstand the assaults of Ward Churchill, Howard Zinn, and the Berkeley city council.

Mr. Flynn is the author of A Conservative History of the American Left (Crown Forum), and editor of http://www.flynnfiles.com. Mr. Flynn has been interviewed on The O’Reilly Factor, Hardball, Fox & Friends, Donahue, and numerous other public affairs television programs. His articles have appeared in The Boston Globe, The Washington Times, The City Journal, The New Criterion, National Review Online, and The American Enterprise, among other publications.

Voir aussi:

The Trouble With Columbus

Paul Gray;Cathy Booth/Miami, Anne Hopkins and Ratu Kamlani/New York

Time

Oct. 07, 1991

Planned more than a century ago as a tribute to the landfall of Christopher Columbus in 1492, a five-story lighthouse now, finally, thrusts itself into the sky over Santo Domingo, in the Dominican Republic. Aggressively supported by the nation’s octogenarian President Joaquin Balaguer, the project will cost, when all the finishing touches are completed, about $20 million. It will also, when the switch is pulled, put on quite a show: 147 giant beams projecting a cross of light 3,000 ft. into the Caribbean night. The lighthouse comes equipped with its own power generators, which was a prudent idea on someone’s part. The Dominican Republic’s electricity system has virtually collapsed for lack of funding. Like the rest of the country, the neighborhoods surrounding this soaring beacon are routinely blacked out 20 hours a day.

The grandiose new lighthouse already looks like an anomaly, while the old poverty huddling at its edges seems all too contemporary. Overarching light and enforced darkness, cheek by jowl. The Manichaean contrast is altogether fitting for this, the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ world-shattering voyage, which is itself increasingly seen in opposing terms of black and white. The Columbus quincentennial officially kicks off this Columbus Day, Oct. 12 — but it has even now generated enough contrast and controversy to outlast its appointed year and, quite possibly, this decade.

At the heart of the hubbub lies a fundamental disagreement, not so much about Columbus himself as about the Columbian legacy. What, in other words, did the enigmatic Genoan set in motion when he first reached the New World? In one version of the story, Columbus and the Europeans who followed him brought civilization to two immense, sparsely populated continents, in the process fundamentally enriching and altering the Old World from which they had themselves come.

Among other things, Columbus’ journey was the first step in a long process that eventually produced the United States of America, a daring experiment in democracy that in turn became a symbol and a haven of individual liberty for people throughout the world. But the revolution that began with his voyages was far greater than that. It altered science, geography, philosophy, agriculture, law, religion, ethics, government — the sum, in other words, of what passed at the time as Western culture.

Increasingly, however, there is a counterchorus, an opposing rendition of the same events that deems Columbus’ first footfall in the New World to be fatal to the world he invaded, and even to the rest of the globe. The indigenous peoples and their cultures were doomed by European arrogance, brutality and infectious diseases. Columbus’ gift was slavery to those who greeted him; his arrival set in motion the ruthless destruction, continuing at this very moment, of the natural world he entered. Genocide, ecocide, exploitation — even the notion of Columbus as a « discoverer » — are deemed to be a form of Eurocentric theft of history from those who watched Columbus’ ships drop anchor off their shores.

Not surprisingly, those who see Columbus’ journey as a triumph of the human progress toward perfection and those who view the same event as a hemispheric rape do not have many kindly things to say to one another. But they are shouting a lot, and this clamor, so far, has defined the ceremonies to come.

Outwardly, at least, the planned hoopla looks much the same as that attending other big-bow-wow anniversaries, such as the bicentennials of the U.S. Declaration of Independence in 1976 or of the French Revolution in 1989. Columbus will be given the now obligatory PBS documentary series for important occasions: Columbus and the Age of Discovery will spread seven hours over four nights, beginning Oct. 6, with the whole shebang to be repeated on Columbus Day. Furthermore, those hungering for Columbus T shirts, watches or other memorabilia should not have to search far to satiate themselves. The spirit of good old-fashioned boosterism in pursuit of tourist revenues is alive and well wherever a claim can be laid to Columbus.

Starting next April 20, Spain will stage Expo ’92, billed as the largest World’s Fair in history. The host city is Seville, which is not far from where the explorer set out on the ocean blue, and the extensive plans for the event include three replica ships — of the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria — to be moored in a re-creation of a 15th century port. Another set of three replica ships will sail from Spain Oct. 12 and retrace Columbus’ first voyage to the New World. In Columbus, Ohio, « the largest city in the world bearing the explorer’s name, » yet another replica of the Santa Maria will be christened Oct. 11 and then docked on the Scioto River downtown. The city’s year-long schedule of events includes performances of new works by its orchestra, opera, ballet and theater groups, not to mention an educational exhibit called « 500 Years of Accounting » to commemorate the Italian invention of double-entry bookkeeping.

And so it will go, in both hemispheres. A 14 1/2-ft. fiber-glass statue of the explorer has gone up in Columbus, Wis. Club Med is struggling to complete a new getaway retreat on the Bahamian island of San Salvador, one of the many spots that claim to be the place where the explorer first landed. Commercialism does, of course, entail risks. Genoa, Columbus’ birthplace, confidently expects at least 2 million visitors to attend its « Man, the Ship and the Sea » extravaganza, which begins May 15, amid rampant rumors in Italy – of corruption and misuse of funds by the planners.

The grandiloquently named Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission, established by Congress in 1984, has also run into some fiduciary problems. Its first chairman, Miami developer and Republican fund raiser John Goudie, resigned last year amid complaints of mismanagement. Meanwhile, the U.S. recession has put a crimp in the commission’s ability to obtain public and private donations. In Florida three separate state Columbus commissions have foundered on a lack of money.

This rain on the Columbus parade is nothing, though, compared with the storm of outrage that the prospect of quincentennial partying has unleashed among the anti-Columbians. « Our celebration is to oppose, » says Evaristo Nugkuag, a member of the Aguaruna people, who is president of the Coordinating Body for the Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations of the Amazon Basin (COICA), an umbrella group in Lima, Peru. On Oct. 7, in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, about 1,000 members of COICA and other groups, representing 24 countries in the Western Hemisphere, will gather at a « Continental Encounter » meeting. One of the purposes is to determine strategies to counter the 1992 Columbus celebrations, including the establishment of an « alternative Seville » at a yet to be chosen site in Mexico. Nugkuag thinks such an antimainstream World’s Fair can be an occasion for reflection rather than celebration: « We want to recover our history to affirm our identity, to achieve true independence from exploitation and aggression and to play a role in determining our future. »

Similar protests have been percolating, or even boiling, for some time. When it opened at the University of Florida’s Museum of Natural History two years ago, an exhibit called « First Encounters: Spanish Explorations in the Caribbean and the United States 1492-1570 » drew spirited opposition from Native American activists, including Russell Means of the American Indian Movement. « Columbus makes Hitler look like a juvenile delinquent! » yelled demonstrators. COLUMBUS MURDERED A CONTINENT read one of the placards. Last July a group of protesters dressed as South American Indians appeared unannounced in Spain, wearing loincloths, their faces and bodies painted. The invaders peacefully entered the shrine of the nation’s patron saint at Santiago de Compostela. They left flowers and other offerings and a message to ask « forgiveness for those who used his name to conquer, murder and destroy peoples. »

Anti-Columbus sentiments are by no means restricted to the descendants of those who were on hand when the Genoan first showed up. Last year the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S. adopted a resolution suggesting how 1492 should be commemorated: « For the descendants of the survivors of the subsequent invasion, genocide, slavery, ‘ecocide’ and exploitation of the wealth of the land, a celebration is not an appropriate observance of this anniversary. »

The charge that Columbus’ arrival instigated genocide has become a major weapon in the anti-Columbian arsenal. George Tinker, a Native American who teaches at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, says of the quincentennial plans: « We’re talking about celebrating the great benefit to some people brought by the murder of other people. » Further to Columbus’ discredit, at the bar of contemporary judgment, is his identity as a white European male. Across the U.S., academicians will be jetting to innumerable conferences where they will give papers on the colonial depredations and horrors that Columbus inaugurated. Author Hans Koning, who has written a scathing biography titled Columbus: His Enterprise (Monthly Review Press; $8.95), sums up this school of scandalized thought: « It’s almost obscene to celebrate Columbus because it’s an unmitigated record of horror. We don’t have to celebrate a man who was really — from an Indian point of view — worse than Attila the Hun. »

Granted, as less vitriolic modern historiography makes clear, Columbus was not the gem of the ocean, the flawless hero of so many earlier hagiographies. But was the historic figure whose name was adopted by a South American republic, the District of Columbia and countless other places and entities, really worse than Hitler or Attila the Hun? What in the New World is going on around here?

For all its intensity, the Columbus controversy has very little to do with 1492 and almost everything to do with 1991. The peoples of the New World, the land that Columbus made inevitable, are engaged in another convulsive attempt to reinvent themselves, to conceive a version of the past that will justify the present and, if possible, shape the future. In older, fixed civilizations, this sort of cultural enterprise would be all but inconceivable. History is what happened and what everyone is stuck with — « a nightmare, » as James Joyce’s Stephen Dedalus described it, « from which I am trying to awake. » But bad dreams have never been popular, particularly in the U.S., where it has been assumed they can be erased by a different way of seeing the things that caused them.

Ironically, Columbus drew much of his stature from one such national mind- change. Prior to the War of 1812, he did not figure large in the U.S. imagination. But after that conflict, American patriots felt an urgent need to link the national cause with non-British heroes: the New World needed new ancestors. Washington Irving’s 1828 A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus glorified a commanding character with an Italian name and sailing under a Spanish flag who nonetheless displayed virtues and characteristics that U.S. citizens, most of them from northern Europe, could admire. Thus did the heyday of Columbus idolatry begin — in an early attempt to provide the nation with the icons of multicultural diversity.

That idolatry is now guttering out — inconveniently, by many people’s lights — for several reasons. The U.S. population is not what it was during the first decades of the 19th century; it now includes a higher percentage of people, and a number of far more vocal people, who feel they have a historic grievance against Columbus and the European invasion he represented. These include, most prominently, Native Americans, many of whom have joined hands with their coevals in Latin and South America to take a stand against a long- ago uninvited guest; and African Americans, whose forebears were packed into slave ships and sent across the Atlantic because the Europeans needed their labor to replace that of the decimated indigenous populations. Their toppling of the Columbus icon represents, at its best, a bid to construct a new national mythology — an urge they paradoxically share with the patriots after the War of 1812.

At the same time, what Columbus actually wrought by bringing Europe into the Americas is being assessed with increased historical sophistication. Two worlds collided nearly 500 years ago, and none of the fallout from that impact now seems as simple as it was once portrayed. Textbooks on American history once began with Columbus’ arrival, as if nothing that had happened before bore mentioning. Those careful enough to note that the explorer found people already living where he touched down did not go on to say very much about them.

Yet there is much to say, as archaeologists, anthropologists and ethnographers have known for a long time. The prospect of the Columbus quincentennial not only lent new urgency to scientific research already under way about the land that the Italian encountered, but also suggested an expanded context in which discoveries could be viewed. « The impetus has changed, » says archaeologist Jerald Milanich, « from a celebration of Columbus and the triumph of European civilization to a new theme: the people that discovered Columbus. There’s a huge amount of research focusing on the impact of native Americans. »

It has never been a secret that the Americas and Europe reciprocally influenced each other, although the focus in much traditional history was on how the colonializers tamed — or exterminated — the natives and resettled the land along European models. The process worked both ways. The New World galvanized the European imagination; knowledge of its existence and its peoples was an important factor in the explosion of the Renaissance, which involved not only the reappropriation of classical learning but also the heady sense of a future yet to be discovered. In « To His Mistress Going to Bed, » written roughly a century after Columbus’ landing, the English poet John Donne describes his lover’s disrobing until her final article of clothing is cast off and then exclaims, « O my America! my new-found land. »

In the current politically correct climate, Donne’s rapturous recognition can easily be dismissed as a typically white European male response toward unclaimed territory, combining voyeurism, sex and predatory aggression. This reading filters out all the fun and, more important, the awe and wonder that the Americas sparked in European minds. And the New World fed Europe more than literary tropes, intellectual excitement and a whiff of the exotic. It fed Europe . . . food, stuff that native Americans had been cultivating for thousands of years and that Europeans had never heard of: peppers, paprika, potatoes, corn, tomatoes.

A wider understanding of this transfer of knowledge from the New World to the Old should by fostered by the Smithsonian Institution’s « Seeds of Change, » the largest exhibition ever mounted at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington. Opening Oct. 12 and running through April 1993, the Smithsonian exhibit sets forth five « natural » elements — sugar, disease, maize, the potato and the horse — the exchange of which has profoundly altered both the New and Old Worlds in the 500 years since Columbus’ first voyage.

The Smithsonian show and much of the other serendipitous scholarly digging in preparation for the Columbus quincentennial actually work quietly against the more extreme positions staked out by those who hate or love what transpired 500 years ago. Thank goodness. Because it is impossible, even with the best will in the world, to find a simple common ground between the contending notions of Civilization or Genocide, Progress or the Cyclical Harmony of the Seasons, Mastering the Land or Living with the Bounty That the Land Will Provide on Its Own.

Impossible, because all these abstractions belong more to the world of morality plays than to the messy arena of history as it occurs. The vast amount of new information being discovered about the New World, both before and after 1492, actually points the way toward a genuinely harmonious understanding of the present moment and how it was achieved. The Columbus quincentennial deserves some credit for focusing this energy and attention. But the worry is that if the debate grows louder and more strident, it could obscure this increasing pool of common knowledge in a shouting match of cliches.

If any book can be said to summon up the passions of this moment, it is Kirkpatrick Sale’s The Conquest of Paradise, (Knopf; $24.95). Published last year, the 453-page popular history has become a call to arms for the anti- Columbians; it is also the book the traditional Columbus faction most loves to hate. Sale is a social historian whose research into Columbus’ life and travels and the explorer’s contemporary world is impressive; his narrative, especially when he joins Columbus aboard the Santa Maria, is gripping. Sale persuasively describes what it must have felt like for the explorer to stumble upon an unimagined world, peopled, as the author notes, by the tribe known as the Tainos, a European name attached to them that was taken from their own word for « good. »

Sale goes on to note that « the Tainos’ lives were in many ways as idyllic as their surroundings, into which they fit with such skill and comfort. They were well fed and well housed, without poverty or serious disease. They enjoyed considerable leisure, given over to dancing, singing, ballgames, and sex, and expressed themselves artistically in basketry, woodworking, pottery, and jewelry. They lived in general harmony and peace, without greed or covetousness or theft. »

Never mind the aesthetic objection that Sale makes these people sound ^ suspiciously like a bunch of New Agers vacationing in the Bahamas. Discount the fact that Sale does not mention evidence of the Tainos’ hierarchic social structure, which included, at the bottom level, slaves.

The deepest problem is that Sale, like others who idealize the people whose fate was sealed by the explorer’s arrival, actually does them another kind of injury. The perfect island race of Sale’s imagination is denied its commonality with the rest of humanity. Father Leonid Kishkovsky of the Orthodox Church in America, who chaired the National Council of the Churches meeting at which the controversial Columbus quincentennial resolution was debated, is one of those who question the notion implicit in Sale’s work that evil was something imported exclusively from Europe: « In a certain sense this is patronizing; it’s as if native indigenous people don’t really have a history, which includes civilization, warfare, empires and cruelties, before white people even arrived. »

Lurking behind Sale’s argument and that of many other vociferous critics is a prelapsarian myth: the world was once perfect and now it isn’t, so someone or something must have ruined it. Many cultures possess a form of this myth; it is particularly strong in Western thought because of the Adam and Eve story in the Old Testament. In the 18th century, Jean Jacques Rousseau popularized a secular version of that Eden story with his writings about the Noble Savage. And part of his inspiration for this concept came from his knowledge of the New World. Even Sale’s anti-Columbian ideas, it seems, owe more to Columbus than some of his readers might imagine.

Mythology is a closed system, a revolving circle of self-reinforcing perceptions. The true history of 1492 and ever after occurred in a different plane of existence, where questions like Were Savages Noble? are either meaningless or susceptible to proof. For too long, the American myth demonized or ignored the people whom Columbus encountered on these shores. Must people now replace this with a new myth that simply demonizes Columbus and Europeans? It is easy to see why former victims might like their turn as heroes. But if that is all the quincentennial produces, an important opportunity for self- reflection will have been wasted.

Celebrate Columbus? Not if that simply means backslapping and flag waving. But it can mean more: taking stock of the long, fascinating record, noting that inevitable conflict resulted in losers as well as winners and produced a mixture of races, customs and habits never before seen in the world. Columbus and all he represents may simply provide an excuse for finger shaking. But perhaps it is possible to celebrate Columbus by trying harder to understand each other and ourselves.

Voir de plus:

Aztec Sacrifices Laid to Hunger, Not Just Religion
Boyce Rensberger
The New York Times
February 19, 1977

The Aztecs sacrificed human beings atop their sacred pyramids not simply for religious reasons but because they had to eat people to obtain protein needed in their diet, a New York anthropologist has suggested.

Based on evidence he has gathered, Dr. Michael Harner, a professor of anthropology at the New School for Social Research, contends that in the 15th century, just before the Spanish conquerors arrived in Mexico, the Aztecs had the most cannibalistic culture known to modern anthropology.

Although most sources on the Aztecs note that human sacrifice and cannibalism were practiced, they seldom suggest that it was anything more than an occasional religious rite.

Dr. Harner’s theory of nutritional need is based on a recent revision in the number of people thought to have been sacrificed by the Aztecs. Dr. Woodrow Borah an authority on the demography of ancient Mexico at the University of California, Berkeley, has recently estimated that the Aztecs sacrificed 250,000 people a year. This consituted about 1 percent of the region’s population of 25 million.

Meat Shortage

While the Aztec civilization, with its architecturally spectacular cities and elaborately codified life‐styles, is usually thought of as having been bountiful, Dr. Harner contends that conventional food in the thickly populated region was not always abundant.

He argues that cannibalism, which may have begun for purely religious reasons, appears to have grown to serve nutritional needs because the Aztecs, unlike nearly all other civilizations, lacked domesticated herbivores such as pigs or cattle.

Staples of the Aztec diet were corn and beans supplemented with a few vegetables, lizards, snakes and worms. There were some domesticated turkeys and hairless dogs. Poor people gathered floating mats of vegetation from lakes.

Humans Fattened in Cages

Dr. Harner’s theories are to be published in a formal article in the February issue of American Ethnologist, a journal of the American Anthropological Association.

“The evidence of Aztec cannibalism.” Dr. Harner wrote for that article, “has largely been ignored and consciously or unconsciously covered up.”

In contemporary sources, however, such as the writings of Hernando Cortes, who conquered the Aztecs in 1521, and Bernal Diaz, who accompanied Cortes, Dr. Hamer says there is abundant evidence that human sacrifice was a common event in every town and that the limbs of the victims were boiled or roasted and eaten.

Diaz, who is regarded by anthropologists as a highly reliable source, wrote in “The Conquest of New Spain,” for example, that in the town of Tlaxcala “we found wooden cages made of lattice‐work in which men and women were imprisoned and fed until they were fat enough to be sacrificed and eaten. These prison cages existed throughout the country.”

The sacrifices, carried out by priests, took place atop the hundreds of steepwalled pyramids scattered about the Valley of Mexico. According to Diaz, the victims were taken up the pyramids where the priests “laid them down on their backs on some narrow stones of sacrifice and, cutting open their chests, drew out their palpitating hearts which they offered to the idols before them.

Then they kicked the bodies down the steps, and the Indian butchers who were waiting below cut off their arms and legs. Then they ate their flesh with a sauce of peppers and tomatoes.”

The skulls were placed on a skull rack near each pyramid, alongside the skulls of previous victims. In TenochtitIan, the royal city of the Aztecs and the precursor of Mexico City. Cortes’s associates counted a minimum of 136,000 skulls on the rack.

Diaz’s accounts indicate that the Aztecs ate only the limbs of their victims. The torsos were fed to carnivores in zoos.

According to Dr. Harner, the Aztecs never sacrificed their own people. Instead they battled neighboring nations, using tactics that minimized deaths in battle and maximized the number of prisoners.

The traditional explanation for Aztec human sacrifice has been that it was religious—a way of winning the support of the gods for success in battle. Victories procured even more victims, thus winning still more divine support in the next war.

Dr. Harner contends that a need for food, particularly during periods of famine, came to be a significant factor, especially as the human population in the Valley of Mexico grew to 25 million.

In 1450, for example, Aztec records indicated that famines were so severe that the royal granaries, which contained the grain surpluses of more than 10 good years, were depleted.

Traditional anthropological accounts indicate that to win more favor from the gods during the famine the Aztecs arranged with their neighbors to stage battles for prisoners who could be sacrificed. The Aztecs’ neighbors, sharing similar religious tenets, wanted to sacrifice Aztecs to their gods.

Voir encore:

Experts on Aztecs Deny Withholding Cannibalism ‘Facts’
Boyce Rensberger
The New York Times
March 3, 1977

A New York anthoropologist’s theory that the Aztecs practiced human sacrifice and cannibalism because they needed to supplement a marginal diet has been sharply criticized by a number of authorities on Aztec life.

The critics say there is substantial evidence indicating that the Aztecs had abundant sources of conventional food and that the cannibalism that existed was practiced strictly for religious reasons.

The criticism was directed at the writings of Dr. Michael Harner, a professor of anthropology at the New School for Social Research, who has asserted that most specialists on Aztec culture have “consciously or unconsciously” covered up evidence of what he believes to be the extent of Aztec cannibalism.

Dr. Harner’s theories were published last week as a formal report in the American Ethnologist, a journal of the American Anthropological Association. After his theory was described in The Times, 17 scholars specializing in Mesoamerican ancient history signed a telegram to The Times dissociating themselves from Dr. Harner’s views.

‘ “No reputable anthoropologist familiar with Aztec culture.” the statement said. “would subscribe to his views. We regard his statement that scholars have consciously or unconsciously suppressed the ‘facts’ about Aztec sacrificial practices as ridiculous.”

Dr. Peter T. Furst, a professor of anthropology at the State Univdrsity or New York at Albany, and a signer of the statement, said in a telephone interview that the Spanish priests who lived among the Aztecs immediately after their conquest by Cortes wrote about the abundance and variety of food available in Aztec markets.

Dr. Furst said that the priests had been astounded by the plentifulness of game such as deer and the pig‐like peccary in forests. He said that Lake Texcoco, in which the imperial island city of Tenochtitlan was situated, was a major wintering place for migratory ducks and geese. He noted also that the Aztecs grew corn and beans and many additional vegetables and received substantial quantities of food as tribute from conquered neighbors.

“The nutritional status of central Mexico of that day was very good,” Dr. Furst said. “There just wasn’t a nutritional need for human flesh.”

Dr. Nancy Troike, an ethnohistorian at the University of Texas and another signer of the statement, said; “The Aztec diet before Conquest was an awful lot better than what the Mexicans are eating today.”

Dr. Troike said that simply because Dr. Harner’s article had been accepted by reputable scientific journal did not mean it was proper for his views to be made known to the public.

“Things like this need to get in schools or any journals where they can be debated.” she said, “but not in the popular press where people are likely to believe anything they read.”

Dr. Furst said that many Aztec scholars would question the suggestion that there were 25 million people living in central Mexico in those days and that 250,000 of them were sacrificed and eaten every year. Those figures, developed by Dr. Woodrow Borah, a specialist on ancient Mexican demography at the University of California, Berkeley, were cited by Dr. Harner.

Dr. Harner argued that the level of human sacrifice had been so great that it could not be explained by religious reasons alone. He suggested that, because the Aztecs had lacked large domesticated animals such as cattle or pigs, they had resorted to cannibalism to meet their need for protein.

“That the scale of human sacrifice was very large, we know,” Dr. Furst said. “The Aztecs carried sacrifice to a much greater degree than anybody else. But is explainable in terns of their religion.”

Dr. Furst said that the Aztecs had believed that their world would be destroyed if the gods were not offered enough human hearts

Dr. Harner said that he was not surprised at the reaction of specialists in Mesoamerican history.

“They’re going to be upset about this! for obvious reasons,” Dr. Harner said. “They’re not going to have the people they study looking like cannibals. They’re clinging to a very romantic point of view about the Aztecs. It’s the Hiawatha syndrome.”

Voir enfin:

Les victimes du sacrifice humain aztèque

Michel Graulich
Civilisations
2002
p. 91-114

On sait que les victimes du sacrifice humain aztèque étaient très nombreuses. Il fut un temps, sans doute, où c’était surtout des esclaves, comme cela resta le cas chez les Mayas. Mais la forte expansion de l’empire aztèque fit que rapidement, ce furent les guerriers ennemis capturés qui fournirent l’immense majorité des victimes, suivis par les esclaves, les enfants, les condamnés à mort, des personnes anormales : albinos, nains, bossus, contrefaits, macrocéphales, tous sacrifiables d’office, des personnes libres ordinaires, volontaires (comme des prostituées ou des musiciens) ou non, des étrangers de passage et enfin, dans certains cas précis, des princesses de la cité.

Comme ailleurs en Amérique (Helfrich 1973 ; chez les Nicaraos du Nicaragua : Oviedo 1.40 c.l, 1959,4 : 373 ; Martyr, 6e déc. 1.6, 1965,2 : 571), à l’apogée de l’empire, les principales catégories étaient donc les guerriers et les esclaves. Elles correspondent aux deux victimes prototypiques du sacrifice humain dans le mythe dit de la création du soleil et de la lune à Teotihuacan : Nanahuatl, qui est revêtu des atours typiques des guerriers immolés et Tecciztecatl, de ceux des esclaves baignés (Sahagún VII c.5). L’imprécision terminologique des sources ne permet pas toujours de bien les distinguer : le mot (malli) désignant le captif de guerre est employé aussi bien pour le combattant destiné au sacrifice que pour les femmes et les enfants réduits en esclavage (Sahagún II c.20, 1950-81, 2 : 47 ; Anales de Cuauhtitlan :37, 59, 60 … ). D’autre part, les guerriers capturés sont parfois appelés esclaves (Sahagún II App. , XII c.34 ; 1950-81 :2 :204, 12 : 95).

  • 1 Voir aussi Ixtlilxochitl, Historia chichimeca c.38, 1975-77: 2: 103. Pour lui, c’est la Triple Al (…)
  • 2 Sur cette guerre et ses autres motivations, notamment politiques, voir Graulich 1994; Duran 1967, (…)

La mission des Mexicas est en principe de faire la guerre pour nourrir ciel et terre et pour faire marcher la « machine mondiale ». Mais c’est là un discours particulier, propre essentiellement aux nobles, semble-t-il. En fait, il faut faire la distinction entre guerre fleurie et guerre tout court. Dans les deux, on faisait des prisonniers qui étaient sacrifiés. Mais la guerre ordinaire poursuivait avant tout les objectifs habituels d’une guerre. Il n’était pas question d’attaquer une cité sous prétexte de vouloir nourrir le soleil la terre : il fallait des motivations légitimes, telles que le massacre de marchands ou d’ambassadeurs, le refus de commercer, etc. Le roi doit soumettre ses motifs à une assemblée de vassaux, de guerriers distingués et de citoyens de la cité, qui donnent ou refusent leur approbation. En cas de refus, le roi peut reposer la question et, après un troisième refus, passer outre et procéder à la déclaration de guerre ou, le cas échéant, à une attaque surprise (Motolinia Memoriales 1.2 c12, 1970 : 157-158, suivi par Mendieta II, cap. 26, 1 : 144)1. La guerre fleurie (xochiyaoyotl) en revanche a théoriquement pour seul but la capture de prisonniers à sacrifier. Des batailles de ce nom, modérément sanglantes paraît-il, avaient lieu depuis longtemps (Chimalpahin 1965 : 152 ; 1997 :66-67 ; Anales de Cuauhtitlan :27, 1945 : 32), mais la véritable guerre fleurie opposant la Triple Alliance de Mexico, Texcoco et Tlacopan à des cités de la vallée voisine de Puebla, principalement Tlaxcala, Cholula et Huexotzinco, n’aurait été instituée qu’à l’occasion de la grande famine du milieu du XVe s., famine qui fut interprétée comme un châtiment des dieux insuffisamment alimentés. Les armées des deux camps s’opposaient régulièrement sur un champ de bataille précis et capturaient le plus possible de prisonniers pour les immoler ensuite au cours des grandes fêtes des vingtaines, garantissant ainsi aux dieux un garde-manger bien fourni2.

Deux types de guerres différents selon leurs objectifs, donc, mais deux guerres ritualisées, auxquelles une bonne partie de la population était invitée à s’associer. Les femmes mariées, les jeunes filles, les recluses des couvents se mettaient à jeûner et s’abstenaient de se laver tandis que les prêtres s’extrayaient en outre du sang tous les quatre jours. Le matin, avant le lever de Vénus, les épouses et soeurs des guerriers en campagne allaient dans de petits oratoires où pendaient les mantes des absents et les os des guerriers qu’ils avaient immolés, et elles encensaient et imploraient les dieux et les os de leur donner la victoire. Elles leur donnaient à déjeuner, notamment de grandes tortillas blanches papalotlaxcalli, et les assuraient que leurs parents n’étaient pas partis au travail comme d’habitude, pour gagner leur vie, mais uniquement ( !) pour le service des dieux. Le roi jeûnait plus fort que les autres jusqu’au retour de l’armée (Tezozomoc c.70, 1878 :539 ; Durán c.46, 1967 :2 : 358-359 ; Pomar 1986 : 68-69).

La campagne était menée par les « seigneurs du soleil ». Les prêtres précédaient les armées d’un jour, portant sur le dos les images des divinités. Avant la bataille, presque toujours en rase campagne, ils s’activaient à allumer du feu (avec les bâtonnets), puis sonnaient les conques. Dès que le feu avait pris, ils donnaient le signal de l’attaque en poussant des cris. Le ou les premiers ennemis capturés étaient immédiatement immolés devant les images divines (Sahagún VIII c.17 §1 ; RG d’Ixtepexi, zapotèque ; d’Alauiztlan, chontal ; d’Ichcateopan, Instlauaca et Tecomastlahuala, mixtèques ; Graulich 1994 : 128). Habituellement, dès le premier choc, une des armées cédait et prenait la fuite. C’est surtout alors, pendant le sauve-qui-peut, qu’avait lieu la capture de prisonniers. Les vaincus se soumettent, éventuellement en obligeant leur roi à capituler, voire en le tuant. Habituellement, la chasse à l’homme se prolonge jusque dans la cité ennemie. Parfois, les Aztèques massacrent tout le monde après quelques sacrifices sur place, ou ils tuent quiconque a plus de huit ans, ou encore ils ne laissent en vie, pour les emmener captifs, qu’un jeune homme sur deux, ou les jeunes garçons et filles. Dans d’autres cas, le mot d’ordre est de capturer tout le monde (Motolinia Mem. II c.13-14, 1970 :158-159, Mendieta 1945 :1 :143-144 ; Tezozomoc 1878 :359, 422-423, 430-431, 342, 344-345 ; Durán 1967 :2. 208, 229, 269, 359).

  • 3 Ainsi, le premier recevait le corps et la cuisse droite, le second la cuisse gauche, le troisième (…)Quand un guerrier capture un vaincu, il dit : « il est comme mon fils chéri » et l’autre répond : « il est mon père chéri » (ca notatzin : Sahagún II c.21, p. 54). La capture n’étant pas toujours facile, parfois on coupe les jarrets de ceux qui se débattent. Plus souvent, on s’y met à plusieurs, au maximum six, pour neutraliser un ennemi ; par la suite, pour le banquet cannibale consécutif au sacrifice, le corps sera réparti entre les six dans l’ordre où ils ont mis la main sur leur victime3. Si plusieurs guerriers réclament un même captif et qu’il n’y a pas de témoins, c’est un « seigneur du soleil » qui départage, éventuellement après avoir entendu le témoignage du prisonnier. En cas de doute persistant, on peut décider de le remettre au temple Huitzcalco (du calpulli de Coatlan) ou au temple de calpulli (sans précision). Tout tromperie en la matière, comme de s’approprier le captif d’un autre ou de donner son propre prisonnier à autrui est puni de mort (Sahagún 1.8 c.17 §1, 1969,2 :317 ; Motolinia Mem. II c.13-14, 1970 : 160 ; Mendieta II c. 27,1945,1 :144 ; Pomar), le coupable fût-il fils de roi (Ixtlilxochitl, Historia Chichimeca c.67, 1975-1976, 2 :170).
  • 4 Pour Cervantes de Salazar, qui diffère ici, celui qui a fait 5 prisonniers « mudava el traje del c (…)

Cette rigueur extrême dans l’attribution précise des victimes s’explique autant par l’importance religieuse de la capture de victimes que par son rôle de moteur social. L’avancement dans la hiérarchie militaire était en effet conditionné, du moins en grande partie, par le nombre de captifs qu’on avait fait immoler. Plusieurs sources plus ou moins concordantes décrivent en détail le processus (Sahagún VIII c.21, 1950-1981, 8 :73-75 p.ex. ; Cervantes de Salazar 1 c.22, 1985 : 43-44). A partir de l’âge de dix ans, le petit garçon, jusqu’alors rasé, se laisse pousser une mèche sur l’arrière du crâne, mèche qu’on lui rase lorsqu’il a fait un premier prisonnier avec l’aide d’autres personnes. A partir de ce moment, il se laisse pousser une mèche sur le côté droit, jusque sous l’oreille. Elle lui vaudra des quolibets s’il revient deux ou trois fois de la guerre sans captif. Celui qui parvient à faire seul un prisonnier devient un « guide de jeunes gens » que le roi lui-même récompense et revêt de vêtements décorés (Sahagún 1950-1981 : 8 :75s.). Les captures suivantes lui vaudront des titres supérieurs et le droit de porter des insignes plus importants. A partir de quatre, il devient « guerrier chef chevronné » (tequihua) et peut prendre place sur la natte de la maison des aigles (cuauhcalli), où se réunissent les grands guerriers. Par la suite, s’il capture encore des Huaxtèques ou d’autres Barbares, il stagne, mais s’il fait des prisonniers de la vallée de Tlaxcala en guerre fleurie il devient huey tiacauh, cuauhyacatl et reçoit du roi de riches atours et insignes. Pour les nobles, des captures dans ces guerres confirment leur noblesse et leur qualité d’aigles-jaguars ; elle leur permet de gouverner des cités et de devenir des commensaux du roi. D’autres titres prestigieux étaient ceux de cuachic, guerrier d’arrière-garde et renfort ultime qui jamais ne recule, et d’Otomi4.

La victoire obtenue, un messager est dépêché chez le roi pour lui annoncer la prise de captifs, puis il est retenu jusqu’à plus ample informé. Sur place, après la prise de la cité, on procède au comptage des captifs obtenus par les différents alliés et des guerriers chevronnés vont faire rapport définitif au roi, en précisant notamment le nombre de nobles qui ont mérité des honneurs pour leur conduite. (Sahagún 1950-1981 : 8 : 72-73). Ensuite on se met en route avec les prisonniers, dont beaucoup mouraient en chemin. Les Huaxtèques étaient retenus par une corde passée dans le trou qu’ils se percent dans le nez. Aux jeunes qui n’ont pas le nez percé, on met colliers de bois ou on leur entrave bras et pieds. Ceux de Miahuatlan décourageaient toute velléité de fuite en attachant la corde de leur arc au membre viril du captif. (Durán c. 42, 1967,2 : 327, 330).

  • 5 Le sacrifice de guerriers est en effet double: l’excision du coeur pour le soleil, la décapitatio (…)

Le retour à Mexico donnait lieu à une entrée triomphale remarquable. Les anciens guerriers prêtres et les dignitaires de tout rang des temples attendent les prisonniers à l’entrée de la ville, rangés en ordre d’importance, avec leurs atours spécifiques. Ils encensent les « victimes des dieux », leur donnent un pain sacré enfilé sur des cordes et leur disent : « Soyez les très bienvenus à cette cour de Mexico Tenochtitlan, dans la mare où chanta l’aigle et siffla le serpent, où volent les oiseaux, où jaillit l’eau bleue pour se mêler à l’eau rouge [ … ], où le dieu Huitzilopochtli a son pouvoir et sa juridiction. Et ne croyez pas qu’il vous a conduits ici par hasard, ni à chercher votre vie, mais pour que vous mouriez pour lui et offriez au couteau votre poitrine et votre gorge5. Et c’est pour cela qu’il vous a été donner de jouir de cette insigne cité, car si ce n’était pour mourir, jamais on ne vous en ouvrirait las portes pour y entrer. Soyez les très bienvenus et ce qui doit vous consoler, c’est que vous êtes ici non par quelque acte femelle et infâme, mais pour des faits d’hommes, pour mourir ici et pour laisser de vous mémoire perpétuelle. » Puis on leur donne à boire le pulque divin (teooctli), les assimilant ainsi aux Mimixcoas, les guerriers sacrificiels proto typiques ivres de pulque.

En un premier temps, on s’adresse donc aux prisonniers comme à des ennemis et on met d’emblée les choses au point : ils sont vaincus et leur sort est inéluctable, mais glorieux. En même temps, on leur souhaite la bienvenue, car ils seront bientôt « chez eux » et leur mort les transformera en Mimixcoas et en compagnons du Soleil. On les encense comme des entités sacrées, peut-être aussi pour les purifier en tant que future offrande aux dieux.

  • 6 La source ne mentionne pas la Terre, second destinataire, mais celle-ci était présente en plusieu (…)

Après avoir présenté les victimes à la population, aux prêtres et en particulier aux guerriers qui, frustrés par l’âge ou leurs devoirs, n’ont pu participer à la chasse à l’homme, on les conduit devant le destinataire premier du sacrifice, Huitzilopochtli6. Ils doivent passer en rang au pied de l’idole, dans son temple, en faisant un profond salut, puis, après avoir visité différents endroits qui joueront un rôle lors de leur mise à mort –le cuauhxicalli, le temalacatl, le tzompantli -, ils vont faire de même devant le souverain dans son palais. Celui-ci, qui est comme « seconde personne du dieu [ … ] et qu’ils adoraient comme des dieux », leur fait donner des vêtements et de la nourriture, voire même des fleurs et des cigares. Le « serpent femelle » ou cihuacoatl, seconde personne du roi, les appelle frères et dit qu’ils sont chez eux, dans leur maison. Il importe en effet d’intégrer les captifs dans le groupe des Mexicas, de faire en sorte qu’ils soient « chez eux ». Parfois, ils reçoivent peut-être des filles de joie qui égaient leurs derniers jours et qui sont ainsi, pour un temps, comme des épouses mexicaines de ces étrangers (C.del Castillo 7r,1991 :128-9). Nous connaissons le cas d’un captif de marque qui vécut longtemps en liberté dans la ville avant d’être immolé (Graulich 2000a) : la victime devient membre de la cité.

Après des danses, dont on ne sait trop si elles sont exécutées par les prisonniers ou leurs vainqueurs ou par les uns et les autres, les seigneurs vaincus viennent faire soumission devant Huitzilopochtli et le devant le roi, en s’extrayant du sang – signe d’humiliation – et en se disant dorénavant serviteurs du dieu. Ils entendent alors les conditions qui leur sont imposées. (Durán c.17, 21, 1967,2 :159-162, 188) Ensuite, les captifs sont confiés aux calpixque en tant que « grâce du soleil-seigneur de la terre » et « fils et vassaux du soleil » (Durán c.21, 1967, 2 : 182, 188 ; Tezozomoc c.29, 62, 1878 : 317, 469, 530) .

Comment expliquer l’intégration-assimilation des prisonniers, dont l’exemple extrême bien connu est celui des Tupinambas du Brésil (Métraux 1967 ; Combès 1992) ? Par le fait que l’autre est différent, donc moindre, et qu’il ne devient une offrande digne qu’à partir du moment où il est acceptable, intégré ? Ou faut-il évoquer René Girard (1972) et sa théorie du sacrifice-lynchage ? Selon lui, on ne peut prendre la victime à l’intérieur du groupe, car on risque de provoquer le déchaînement de violence de la vengeance ; mais, d’autre part, l’effet apaisant que doit apporter au groupe le sacrifice ne se produit que si la victime en fait partie. Pour concilier ces impératifs, on la choisit marginale (membre du groupe sans l’être tout à fait, un enfant par exemple) ou étrangère, mais alors on l’intègre, on fait comme si la victime appartenait quand même au groupe.

Qu’il y ait dans le sacrifice aztèque une volonté consciente ou non de canaliser la violence interne est possible, mais difficile à démontrer. La composition polyethnique des cités, leur fréquent manque de cohésion, montrent que les risques de violence et de conflits internes n’étaient pas illusoires. A l’intérieur même de l’île de Mexico, les Mexicas étaient divisés en deux cités dont l’une a fini par asservir l’autre. A Tenochtitlan, il y avait les habitants les plus anciens, parmi lesquels les Amantèques et les marchands, les calpullis mexicas mais aussi nombre de nouveaux venus, dont les derniers, temporaires, semblent avoir été les Huexotzincas, peu avant la Conquête. D’autres cités de l’époque, comme Texcoco, Cholula, Huexotzinco, etc., abritaient également des populations disparates et notamment, à Cholula par exemple, des Mexicas qui avaient, comme de juste, leur propres intérêts qui ne coïncidaient pas nécessairement avec ceux de leurs hôtes. Les occasions de conflits étaient donc nombreuses et cette spécificité peut avoir été une des causes de l’inflation sacrificielle. Mais, répétons-le, on ne voit pas comment on pourrait démontrer que le sacrifice humain tendait aussi à éviter la violence interne. Ce qui est sûr en revanche, c’est que la théorie aztèque du sacrifice rendait l’intégration de la victime et sa proximité au sacrifiant (ici, en premier lieu, celui qui avait fait le prisonnier) indispensable : le sacrifiant mourait en effet symboliquement à travers sa victime qui le représentait.

Les captifs sont donc confiés aux intendants qui les répartissent dans les maisons de quartier, où ils sont mis dans de grandes cages de bois (Durán c.21, 22, 1967 :2 :182,188, RG d’Amula Ameca ; Mendieta 1945, 1 :151 ; des cages sont figurées dans Sahagún CF II f.58v, VIII f.27r ; la Mapa Quinatzin, etc.). Des personnes désignées les gardent, allant jusqu’à dormir sur ces cages (RG de Metztitlan) ; si elles doivent sortir pour des besoins naturels, on les retient par une corde passée autour de la taille (Sahagún II c.37). Plusieurs sources s’accordent sur le fait que les prisonniers étaient bien nourris (Sahagún VIII c.14 § 8) en vue de leur consommation prochaine (Durán 1967, 2 :169, 188 ; Gómara 1965, 2 :31 ; RG d’Amula Ameca ; Bernai Diaz 1947, 70, 78) ; par contre, Mendieta (1945, 1 :151) affirme que les captifs, mal nourris, devenaient vite maigres et jaunes. Probablement cela variait-il selon le nombre de captifs, la période de l’année, la cité intéressée, etc.

Si un prisonnier parvient à s’échapper, le quartier auquel appartient le gardien coupable doit payer en dédommagement un jeune esclave, une rondache et une charge étoffes (Motolinia Mem. II c.13, 1970 : 160 ; Mendieta II c. 27, 1945,1 :144), mais on parle aussi de mise à mort du responsable (Durán c.19, 1967, 2 : 169). On donnait évidemment la chasse aux fugitifs et selon la relation géographique de Miahuatlan, si on le rattrapait, il était immédiatement mis en pièces. L’évadé de basse condition qui rentrait chez lui était bien reçu et recevait même des étoffes, tandis que s’il était un personnage important, il était sacrifié pour avoir fait honte à sa cité. (Motolinia Mem. 1970 : 159-160 ; Sahagún VIII c.17, 21, 1950- 1981 : 8 : 53, 75 ; selon Ixtlilxóchitl 1975-1977, 2 :102, le noble est pendu). A Teotihuacan, le prisonnier de guerre mené au sacrifice qui parvenait à fuir, à escalader le temple et à passer derrière la statue du dieu échappait au sacrifice (RG San Juan Teotihuacan 1986 :237).

En général, dans les grandes cités de la Triple Alliance et du val de Tlaxcala, on ne relâchait jamais un prisonnier de guerre, surtout s’il était de haut rang (Motolinia, Mem. 1970 :160), sauf, paraît-il, pour persuader un ennemi de se soumettre. Dans ce cas, on libérait un grand seigneur qui retournait chez lui pour y rapporter l’effroyable immolation de ses concitoyens (Cervantes de Salazar c.22, 1985 :42). Une autre exception concernerait le vaillant qui parvenait à vaincre une seigneur mexica au cours du sacrifice dit « gladiatoire ». Paré de la peau du vaincu et de son coeur porté en collier, il était conduit devant le roi qui le nommait capitaine d’une province reculée de l’empire. La source qui rapporte cela, le codex Tudela (fo1.12v), n’est cependant pas des plus sûres et donne une version passablement singulière du « sacrificio gladiatorio ».

Plusieurs sources affirment que les guerriers capturés étaient tous mis à mort. Les renseignements concernent des cités importantes comme Mexico bien sûr (Duran c.20, 21, 1967, 2 : 181-182, 186 ; Motolinia 1970 : 160 ; Mendieta II c.16, c27 ; Ixtlilxóchitl 1975-197, 2 :145), mais aussi Metztitlan (RG) et les cités qui lui faisaient la guerre. On peut supposer qu’il en allait de même à Tepeucila, dans la Mixteca, où on précise qu’on ne faisait la guerre que pour attraper des victimes à immoler (RG de Tilantongo). Pour d’autres cités, comme Coatlan (RG), près de Miahuatlan, on est confronté à l’ambiguïté de la terminologie employée. On y sacrifiait, nous dit-on, « la plupart » des prisonniers, mais le texte poursuit en précisant que les hommes étaient immolés au dieu 7 Lapin et les femmes à 3 Cerf. Ici, visiblement, les captifs de guerre n’incluent pas que les belligérants, étant donné que, normalement, les femmes ne participaient pas au combat, sauf parfois en toute dernière extrémité.

Dans d’autres régions ou royaumes en revanche, on n’immolait pas toujours tous les guerriers prisonniers. Chez les Quichés, seuls les principaux, le seigneur et ses frères, étaient tués et mangés, pour semer l’épouvante (Las Casas 1967,2 : 503-4 ; Torquemada 1969, 2 : 388 suit Las Casas ; voir aussi Carmack 1976 : 269-71). Chez les Mayas, les captifs de basse extraction étaient réduits en esclavage et les seigneurs sacrifiés, quoique parfois ils pussent se racheter. (Gaspar Antonio Chi, dans Tozzer 1941 : 230-32 ; Bosch Garcia 1944 : 95). A Miahuatlan, « de ceux qu’ils prenaient en guerre, beaucoup étaient réduits en esclavage », mais on ignore à nouveau si cela concerne aussi les combattants prisonniers (RG Miahuatlan et Tecuicuilco Atepec Coquiapa Xaltianguez). A Tetela (RG) et alentours, « ils se battaient pour faire des prisonniers dont ils tuaient ceux qu’ils jugeaient bon », ou ils les livraient à leur seigneur qui en faisait ce qu’il voulait, comme de les installer sur des mâts et les faire percer de flèches. A Chimalhuacan, non loin de Coatepec (RG), vers 1400, le roi Tezcapoctzin captura le roi de Xiuhtepec qui paya tribut pour se libérer. Temazcaltepec (RG) faisait la guerre contre les Tarasques et les prisonniers étaient sacrifiés ou réduits en esclavage.

Cette situation, où tous les prisonniers n’étaient pas sacrifiés, était fort répandue et peut donc être supposée plus ancienne que l’immolation générale. Certains témoignages indiquent de surcroît qu’à leurs débuts et jusqu’à une date assez tardive, les Mexicas également ne sacrifiaient qu’un nombre limité de guerriers. Ixtlilxochitl (1975-77, 1 : 330) par exemple relate qu’en 1359, les Tépanèques capturèrent des Acolhuas dont eux-mêmes et leurs alliés mexicas ne sacrifièrent que les vaillants, les autres étant vendus comme esclaves. Sous Axayacatl, des prisonniers de guerre matlatzincas servirent à repeupler la cité de Xalatlauhco, et on peut supposer que ce n’étaient pas seulement des femmes, des enfants et des vieillards (Ixtlilxochitl 1975-77, 2 :144 ; voir aussi Durán c.28, 1967, 2 : 229 : les esclaves appartenaient à ceux qui les avaient capturés mais parfois le roi les prenait pour les immoler, « mais il en donnait le double de richesses de ce qu’ils valaient »). L’immolation générale semble donc être un développement tardif à mettre en rapport avec la constante croissance démographique de l’époque ainsi qu’avec la grande extension de l’empire aztèque et l’afflux de captifs dans les cités puissantes. Cette évolution va de pair avec une manière de « démocratisation » du sacrifice humain et du cannibalisme, qui deviennent accessibles même aux guerriers issus du peuple.

  • 7  » … and here, to Mexico, from everywhere, were brought captives, called « tribute-captives » (Ali (…)

Non seulement les cités ne sacrifient pas toujours tous leurs captifs, mais souvent, si elles ne sont pas indépendantes, il leur est interdit de le faire parce qu’elles doivent de livrer une partie de leurs captifs en tribut à la cité dont elles dépendent, et ce selon des modalités qui peuvent varier. Tel est le cas de Tepeaca qui, vaincu par Montezuma 1 doit fournir tous les 80 jours des captifs de guerre à s. à Mexico (Durán c.18, 1967,2 :158), ou de Tlatelolco, qui, lors de chaque campagne, doit livrer des prisonniers de guerre pour Huitzilopochtli (Tezozomoc c.46, 1878 : 397). Les Tépoztèques de Citlalatomaua, dans le Guerrero méridional, ne sont pas cannibales mais font la guerre pour livrer des esclaves à manger à Montezuma. (RG de Citlalatomaua ; aussi RG de Zumpango). Lorsque ceux d’Acapetlaguaya (RG) capturent une « personne principale », ils l’envoyent au roi à Mexico pour qu’il l’immole. Ceux d’Ahuatlan (RG), près de Puebla, « ne paient pas tribut » à Mexico mais participent à la guerre fleurie et conduisent leurs captifs au sacrifice à Mexico. Les Zapotèques d’Ocelotepec (RG ; voir aussi Soustelle 1955 :102) sont toujours en guerre et quand la prise est bonne, ils envoient quelques captifs à Montezuma « en signe de reconnaissance », « comme présent ». D’une manière plus générale, Duran (c.43, 1967, 2 :334) raconte que lors de l’inauguration de la pyramide principale du Grand Temple sous Ahuitzotl, on attendait des seigneurs invités qu’ils apportent l’habituel tribut d’esclaves « qu’ils étaient tenus d’apporter pour le sacrifice lors de telles solennités » et il est précisé plus loin qu’il s’agit de « tous les captifs pris en guerre qu’ils devaient en tribut à la Couronne royale de Mexico ». Enfin, on sait qu’à l’occasion de la fête de Macuilxochitl, donc le jour 5 Fleur, « de partout on amenait des captifs, appelés maltequime » (Sahagún 1 c.14, 1950-81, 1 :32)7.

J’ai démontré ailleurs que la chasse à l’homme qu’était la guerre était à bien des égards assimilée à une chasse tout court (Graulich 1997). Chez les Quichés, les captifs étaient du reste qualifiés de gibier. Non seulement la proximité homme-animal était très grande, mais, on l’a vu dans les mythes, les hommes ont remplacé les animaux comme victimes. Les sources (Anales de Cuauhtitlan fol.1-3 p.ex.) laissent aussi entendre qu’avant la création du soleil, alors que les peuples nomadisaient, Terre et Feu, qui alors dominaient, se contentaient des prémices de la chasse. Cette offrande autorisait la manducation du reste, de même que seul le sacrifice humain autorisait le cannibalisme. Les captifs entrant à Mexico hurlaient comme des bêtes ; une fois sacrifiés, leurs têtes étaient exposées sur le tzompantli où elles devenaient les fruits d’une sorte de verger artificiel qui devait assurer la renaissance des victimes, de même que les rites effectués avec les os du gibier assuraient son retour. La guerre imitait donc la chasse, mais parfois c’était l’inverse, comme lors des fêtes de quecholli, de tititl et d’izcalli (toutes au cours de la saison des pluies, nocturne, présolaire), au cours desquelles avaient lieu de grandes battues au terme desquelles le gibier était sacrifié comme des hommes ou offert au feu (ce qui pouvait également arriver à des guerriers), tandis que les capteurs étaient récompensés comme des guerriers. En quecholli, on allait même jusqu’à assimiler des captifs à des cerfs et à les sacrifier comme tels. A cette égard, la quête du peyote des Huichols actuels est particulièrement intéressante, car, tout en prolongeant la réactualisation précolombienne des pérégrinations vers la Terre promise ou la terre d’origine, elle perpétue aussi la chasse sacrificielle, le peyote étant assimilé au maïs, au cerf et à l’homme. A l’instar du sacrifiant aztèque, le peyotero, grâce au peyote mis à mort et mangé, monte au ciel et voit son dieu en face.

Les guerriers sacrifiés n’étaient pas tous d’égale qualité. Il va de soi que la capture d’un roi, d’un seigneur, d’un noble, d’un haut gradé ou d’un vaillant était plus prestigieuse que celle d’un soldat ordinaire et que ces personnes avaient en elles plus de tonalli, de feu intérieur, de chaleur vitale susceptible de vitaliser les dieux et les hommes (Sahagún IX c.2, 1950-81, 9 :3 ; aussi chez les Mayas p.ex. : Helfrich 1973 : 51-70). Certains types de mise à mort leur étaient d’ailleurs réservés, en particulier le « gladiatorio », qui opposait un prisonnier attaché à une meule par une corde passée autour de la taille et pratiquement désarmé à des guerriers aigles ou jaguars pourvus d’épées à tranchants d’obsidienne. On dit que c’est le roi lui-même qui choisissait les victimes dignes de cet honneur après de multiples vérifications (Pomar 1986 : 66). Si la victime royale ou princière avait été capturée par un roi ou un seigneur, on conservait sa peau que le vainqueur revêtait parfois ou qu’on bourrait de coton ou de paille et pendait dans le temple ou le palais. (Motolinia Mem. 1 c.18, II c.14, 1970 : 33, 161) .

Autre sacrifice de privilégié, celui que faisaient les Popolocas en l’honneur du « dieu papier » Amateotl, à qui, après la victoire, ils immolaient le « meilleur prisonnier » fait en guise d’action de grâces. Ils trempaient du papier dans le sang du coeur de la victime et le collaient sur l’idole (Histoyre du Méchique 1905 : 95).

  • 8 Les Anales de Cuauhtitlan p. 3 énumèrent comme buts des Chichimèques qui se dispersent en 1 Silex (…)

Il y avait aussi des différences de qualité entre les peuples. Les victimes les plus appréciées étaient celles qui appartenaient à des populations peu éloignées et dès lors pas trop différentes de la Triple Alliance (Motolinia Mem. 1 c.2l, 1970 : 35). Les Yopis, les Tarasques du Michoacan ou les Huaxtèques vivaient trop loin. « La chair de ces populations barbares, explique le cihuacoatl Tlacaelel, qui suggéra la guerre fleurie, n’est pas agréable à notre dieu. Il la tient pour du pain bis et dur et pour du pain fade et non relevé car, comme je le dis, ils sont barbares et de langue étrangère ». Les Tlaxcaltèques en revanche « sont comme du pain chaud à peine sorti du four, tendre et savoureux ». Ce sont là, avec ceux de Huexotzinco, Cholula, Atlixco, Tecoac et Tliliuhquitepec, les victimes préférées de Huitzilopochtli. Les Tlaxcaltèques, les Cholultèques, les Mexicas, les Huexotzincas sont tous d’une même famille, ils appartiennent à une seule et même génération, celle des Chichimèques … (Durán 1967,1 : 32 ; 2.232-235, 417, 449 ; Muñoz Camargo 1892 : 116)8.

L’origine spécifique de certaines victimes pouvait aussi leur conférer une valeur particulière. Ainsi, au mois d’izcalli, consacré au dieu du feu Xiuhtecuhtli, on sacrifiait des victimes appelées Ihuipaneca Temilolca, c’est-à-dire, « ceux de la passerelle de plumes, ceux des colonnes de pierre » (López Austin 1965 : 96 ; Garibay 1956 : 4 : 354). Ihuipan peut signifier aussi « sur la plume » ou « drapeau de plumes ». On sait par les Anales de Cuauhtitlan (p.1) qu’une des trois pierres du foyer s’appelait Ihuitl, « Plume » ; peut-être y avait-il un rapport avec le nom des victimes qui accompagnaient le dieu du feu, dans lequel cas les « colonnes de pierre » pourraient également faire allusion aux pierres qui « gardaient » le feu. Mais les Ihuipaneca Temilolca nous sont connus d’autre part. Chimalpahin parle fréquemment des « anciens », un peuple qu’il appelle les Eztlapictin Teotenanca Teochichimeca Cuixcoca Temimilolca Ihuipaneca Zacanca, et dont le dieu national n’était autre que Nauhyotecuhtli Xippilli, « Seigneur du Quadruple », Prince de Turquoise, c’est-à-dire Xiuhtecuhtli (Chimalpahin, Memorial Breve f.33r, 1991 :50). Sans doute les captifs appartenaient-ils à ce peuple qu’ils représentaient donc et que personnifiait leur dieu tutélaire, le dieu du feu.

Enfin, les futures victimes pouvaient aussi être traitées différemment si elles appartenaient à un roi ou à un seigneur. Dans ce cas, elles entraient dans la ville « en tenant des rondaches et des épées ou encore des encensoirs, des cigares allumés et des fleurs, et en chantant le chant de leur pays, en pleurant et en lamentant leur malheur. » Si leur vainqueur était un roi, elles étaient transportées en litière et recevaient de riches donc (Tezozomoc c.38, 49, 1878 : 360, 410, Mendieta 1945, 1 :146).

  • 9 Sur ce sujet, voir Klein 1994; Graulich 2000b.

Il semble bien, enfin, que parfois des femmes pouvaient être sacrifiées de la même manière que, et avec des prisonniers de guerre, pour des raisons qui ne sont pas spécifiées. Il y a à cela des précédents mythiques. D’abord, bien sûr, le mythe de Coatepec où les 400 Huitznahuas et leur soeur aînée Coyolxauhqui s’arment comme des guerriers pour aller tuer leur mère enceinte au sommet de la colline de Coatepec. Mais Huitzilopochtli naît et tue en premier lieu Coyolxauhqui, qui devient ainsi la toute première victime de Huitzilopochtli. D’autre part, selon les codex Boturini et Aubin, au début de leurs pérégrinations vers leur terre promise, les Mexicas voient, gisant sur des acacias et des cactées, trois Mimixcoas dont une femme, Chimalman, et Huitzilopochtli leur commanda de les sacrifier en tant que prémices de la guerre sacrée menée pour le nourrir. Là aussi, à en croire le Boturini, la femme fut la première victime9. Toujours pendant ces errances, après la défaite de Chapultepec, les filles du roi Huitzilihuitl réclamèrent la craie et les plumes, c’est-à-dire d’être sacrifiées comme des guerriers, ce qui eut lieu (Anales de Tlatelolco 1948 : 36-8). Enfin, après la prise de Tlatelolco par Axayacatl, la reine de cette cité plaignit les femmes, se demandant si on les mènerait au sacrifice avec les guerriers (Tezozomoc c.63, 1878 : 384). Dans ce dernier cas, on a au moins un semblant d’explication puisque, dans la bataille qui s’ensuivit, des femmes nues mais armées firent mine de se battre avec les Mexicas-Tenochcas, tandis que d’autres les bombardèrent de balais, d’instruments de tissage, de lait pressé de leurs seins et d’ordures mélangées à de la terre. Bataille dérisoire, moqueries qui signifiaient que les Tenochcas n’étaient dignes de se battre que contre des femmes, mais participation des femmes à la guerre quand même. D’autre part, l’héroïsme féminin était officiellement reconnu puisque les femmes mortes en premières couches devenaient dans l’au-delà des femmes guerrières compagnes du soleil de l’après-midi.

Dans tous les cas considérés jusqu’à présent, les guerriers sacrifiés sont des ennemis. Il faut toutefois signaler un cas tout à fait exceptionnel où des guerriers mexicas pouvaient être sacrifiés à Mexico. Pendant la fête du mois de panquetzaliztli, une bataille rituelle sanglante opposait des esclaves baignés figurant sans doute Huitzilopochtli à des personnificateurs des demi-frères ennemis du dieu, les 400 Huitznahuas, aidés par des vaillants mexicas. Dans ce combat, les esclaves sacrificiels qui réussissaient à capturer un guerrier l’immolaient sur tambour de bois horizontal en guise d’autel (Sahagún II c.34, 1950- 81,2 : 146).

  • 10 Dans les codex Telleriano-Remensis fol. 32v, 38v, 39r, 40 r, 40v, 4lr, 42v, les guerriers sacrifi (…)
  • 11 Cristobal dei Castillo, auteur assez tardif, doit toutefois être manié avec prudence vu sa manie (…)

Les attributs les plus caractéristiques dont on ornait les victimes guerrières étaient les rayures de craie (tizatl) sur le corps et le duvet (ihuitl) collé sur la tête avec la résine d’une sorte de pin (MarUnez Cortés 1974 : 42)10. Cristabal dei Castillo (f.7, 1991 : 126-29) présente cette pratique comme typiquement mexica, puisque c’est le dieu Tetzauhteotl même qui, au cours des pérégrinations mexicas, aurait instruit un Huitzilopochtli évhémérisé de la manière de traiter les prisonniers de guerre : « Tercera cosa : a los que harán cautivos los pintarán de blanco, los emplumarán con plumón ligero, los curarán, los atarán por el vientre con un cordel grueso y les colgarán plumas de garza. Los harán comer mucho para engordarlos, y cada vez que se cumpla una veintena los matarán, y para que se celebre la fiesta andaran danzando. Y cuando sea la víspera de su muer te, velarán toda la noche, comerán, danzarán y se emborracharán ; y si acaso alguno quiere acostarse con mujeres, le serán ofrecidas prostitutas, habrá muchísimas mujeres pervers as, prostitutas »11. Mais en fait, cette origine mexica est illusoire : les figurations de guerriers ornés de craie et de plumes sont très répandues et se retrouvent notamment dans les codex du groupe Borgia, où Huitzilopochtli brille par son absence, ou encore dans des codex mixtèques (Nuttall p. 4, 20). De plus, dans l’antique mythe pré-aztèque de la création du soleil et de la lune à Teotihuacan, la craie et les plumes ornent Quetzalcoatl, prototype des guerriers héroïques sacrifiés.

  • 12 Voir aussi Garibay, Poes(a Nâhuatl2: 5-6, 42-3, 53-4; Romances de los sefiores de la Nueva España(…)

Les termes mêmes de tizatl, ihuitl peuvent à eux seuls désigner les victimes guerrières, voire même le guerrier en général, ou encore le sacrifice, comme on l’a vu plus haut, à propos des filles de Huitzilihuitl12. A ces attributs s’ajoutaient habituellement la bannière et les atours de papier. Les informateurs de Sahagún (Sahagún II 2 c. 29, 1950-81, 2 :113) décrivent comme suit les guerriers sacrifiés en xocotl huetzi : « on les a couverts de craie (quintiçavia-.J, d’un pagne de papier blanc (amamaxtli), de sortes étoles blanches (amaneapanalli), d’une chevelure de papier (amatzontli), on leur a emplumé la tête (quinquapotonja), ils ont la lèvre ornée du labret de plumes (imjvitençac), ils ont la bouche peinte en rouge (motenchichiloa), ils ont le pourtour creusé des yeux teint en noir (mjxtentlilcomoloa) ».

Il faut souligner encore que tous ces attributs sont ceux de Mixcoatl et des Mimixcoas, prototypes toltèques des guerriers sacrifiés (Durán 1967, 1 :73 et pl.13 ; Codex Telleriano-Remensis f.29v, 38v, 39r ; Codex_Magliabechiano p. 42 ; autres codex : Spranz 1964 : 89- 98 ;voir aussi Seler 1890 : 608, 613-4 ; 1902-23, 1 :264-5 ; 2 :1019 ; 4 :66-7, 72-5, 84-5). Il est tout à fait remarquable que même en panquetzaliztli, au cours de ce mois qui voyait la réactualisation de la victoire de Huitzilopochtli à Coatepec, les multitudes de guerriers sacrifiés étaient toujours affublés comme des Mimixcoas et non des Huitznahuas. Les Mimixcoas étaient les adversaires malheureux de Quetzalcoatl sur la Montagne de Mixcoatl, le Mixcoatepec. Ce mythe du Mixcoatepec servit manifestement de modèle aux Mexicas pour créer leur mythe « national » de la victoire de Huitzilopochtli à Coatepec. J’ai dit ailleurs ma conviction que Mexico-Tenochtitlan, à son origine, était une cité dont la divinité tutélaire était Quetzalcoatl, le vainqueur du Mixcoatepec. Lorsque les Mexicas s’emparèrent du pouvoir dans cette ville, ils mirent Huitzilopochtli à la place de Quetzalcoatl dans les temples et dans les rites. Mais, on le voit, ils n’eurent même pas le temps, ou l’occasion, ou le souci, de modifier complètement les rituels en conséquence (Graulich 1992, 1999 : 187-92).

  • 13 Mendieta 1:110: les gens mettent dans les champs des pierres teintes de chaux ou de craie.

Seler (1902-23, 4 : 96-7) voit dans le duvet blanc des nuages, les âmes des morts devenant des messagers de la pluie. Pour Soustelle (1940 : 72), il était le symbole de l’heureux destin de la victime, le blanc étant « la couleur des premières lueurs du jour » et donc « du premier pas de l’âme ressuscitée, l’envol vers le ciel du guerrier sacrifié ». Pour moi, les plumes et la craie marquaient l’appartenance de la victime au ciel et à la terre. Les plumes sont des éléments aériens ; des boules de duvet, Durán (Ritos C.5, 1967, 1 :47 et pl. 9 ; l’auteur parle de « boules de coton » mais l’illustration montre les habituels duvets) disait qu’elles étaient « les vêtements du ciel ». La craie, par contre, est terrestre. Le rite consistant à s’humilier en mangeant de la terre s’appelait « goûter la craie » (sahagun 1958a : 50-1 et Durán_Ritos c.15, 1967, 1 :147-8)13. Dans le Popol Vuh, c’est pour avoir mangé un oiseau enduit de craie que Cabracan, alourdi, s’effondra et fut enseveli.

On ne sait pas grand-chose sur la signification de cette sorte de loup noir peint autour des yeux et du rouge qui entoure la bouche. Pour ce second élément, peut-être y a-t-il un rapport avec le fait que la bouche des idoles destinataires des sacrifices était ointe du sang des victimes. Quant à la peinture noire autour des yeux, elle est aussi appelée « peinture stellaire ». Le rapport entre les yeux et les étoiles est bien connu, puisque dans l’iconographie mésoaméricaine, les étoiles sont souvent figurées comme des yeux stylisés. Mais la « peinture stellaire » doit probablement aussi rappeler que, la nuit, les guerriers morts deviennent des astres, comme Quetzalcoatl qui devint le soleil ou Vénus, ou comme les 400 jeunes gens du Popol Vuh – équivalents des 400 Mimixcoas ou des 400 Huitznahuass – qui devinrent les Pléiades (Seler 1902-23, 4 : 72-84 ; Caso 1953 : 53).

Les guerriers voués au sacrifice ne représentaient pas seulement les Mimixcoas ou peut-être, parfois, les Huitznahuass. Dans le « gladiatorio », les victimes, qu’on écorchait, étaient Xipe Totec, l’antique dieu vêtu d’une peau d’écorché attesté, avec ses attributs, dès la phase Monte Alban III chez les Zapotèques. C’était une divinité complexe dont on ne sait trop si les victimes le représentaient ou si c’était l’inverse. Quoi qu’il en soit, ses connotations étaient à la fois solaires, lunaires, vénusiennes et en rapport avec le maïs (Graulich 1987). Ses victimes portaient un chapeau conique, une courte jaquette, des ornements et des rubans rouges et blancs (couleurs, aussi, des Mimixcoas) se terminant en queue d’aronde et des triples noeuds en papier. Ils avaient également les bras et la tête couverts de duvet blanc. (Codex Nuttall et Tudela p.ex.).

  • 14 Dans Sahagun (CF 2: 66), il est dit qu’on prenait l’ixiptla parmi les captifs et que « là on chois (…)

Les guerriers voués au sacrifice incarnent-ils parfois d’autres divinités, plus individualisées que les Mimixcoas ou Xipe, qui ne sont avant tout, somme toute, que de la nourriture pour dieux ? La question est complexe, comme l’illustre le cas de l’ixiptla, le personnificateur, l’image de Tezcatlipoca, sacrifié au mois de toxcatl. Précisons qu’un des aspects de Tezcatlipoca est celui de Yaotl, le Guerrier. A Texcoco, selon notre meilleure source sur cette cité, Pomar (1986 : 67), c’était indiscutablement un vaillant captif de Huexotzinco ou Tlaxcala qui l’incarnait. A Mexico, ç’aurait été un esclave baigné d’après Durán (1967, 1 :59 ainsi que Tovar 228 et Acosta 270-1, mais ces deux sources dépendent de Durán), mais Sahagún (1950-81, 2 :66-8 ; 1956, i : 114, 152-3), lui, est moins net : l’ixiptla du dieu était choisi parmi les nombreux ixiptla gardés et entretenus par les intendants (calpixque) ; il y en avait environ 10, des captifs (mamalti) choisis parmi les prisonniers de guerre. Seulement, on l’a vu, les prisonniers de guerre ne sont pas nécessairement des guerriers : ce sont toutes les personnes, hommes, femmes et enfants capturées lors d’une campagne. Le texte espagnol parle d’ailleurs d’un « mancebo escogido », « mancebo, muy acabado en disposicion », choisi pour son aspect physique qui devait être parfait, sans la moindre tache ou marque -ce qui, pour un guerrier, était plutôt rare14.

La question est tout aussi douteuse pour le personnificateur du dieu du feu Xiuhtecuhtli en izcalli. Motolinia (l, c.19, 1970 : 33) le dit un prisonnier de guerre, « uno de los cautivos en la guerra ». Il pourrait bel et bien s’agir d’un guerrier, d’autant plus que dans un autre passage du même chapitre, l’auteur semble (mais pas nécessairement) faire la différence entre esclaves et captifs en parlant de « algunos esclavos y otros cautivos que tenian de guerra ». On ne sait malheureusement pas dans quelle cité se déroule l’izcalli décrit par Motolinia.

Mais il est certain qu’à Mexico et à Tepepulco, le ou les ixiptla du feu étaient des esclaves baignés (Sahagún II c.37-38 et Primeras Memoriales ; Codex Tudela f.28 ; Olivier 1997 : 234- 5).

Enfin, en tlacaxipehualiztli à Tlaxcala, il est question d’un « fils du soleil » immolé lors de l’allumage du feu nouveau à minuit (Motolinia l, c.27, 1970 : 42). C’était « uno de los más principales » dont on peut conjecturer que c’était un guerrier, comme lors des grandes fêtes séculaires du feu nouveau (Sahagún 1950- 81,7 :25-28). Seulement, un « fils du soleil » peut être, mais n’est pas nécessairement, un personnificateur de l’astre. Les mêmes réserves concernent le « messager du soleil » sacrifié le jour 4 Mouvement, nom de l’ère actuelle (Durán 1967, 1 :106-8). Dans une des ces interprétations audacieuses dont il est coutumier, Durán affirme que son ascension des marches de l’édicule sacrificiel imite la course du soleil et donc, que la victime joue le rôle de l’astre. Mais elle n’en a pas les attributs et est immolée d’abord à la terre, puis au soleil, car elle est d’abord décapitée et ensuite seulement, on lui arrache le coeur. Ajoutons que dans un cas au moins, les guerriers immolés peuvent représenter des cerfs, le gibier par excellence. On sait en effet qu’à l’aube de l’ère actuelle, les Mimixcoas furent massacrés parce que, lorsqu’ils tuaient du gibier, ils n’en faisaient pas d’abord l’offrande à leurs parents, Soleil et Terre. Aussi devinrent-ils désormais eux-mêmes la nourriture de ces dieux (Graulich 2000a).

La mort sacrificielle est en effet un châtiment. Les hommes ont négligé leurs créateurs et doivent expier. Qui plus est, ils sont nés sur terre, dans la matière qui les sépare des dieux et les condamne à mourir. « Notre tribut est la mort, que nous avons méritée » (Sahagún VI c.1). Par la mort héroïque, acceptée, sur le champ de bataille ou la pierre de sacrifice, le guerrier expie et gagne un au-delà glorieux. C’est pourquoi on dit au jeune homme qui avec l’aide d’autres, fait un premier prisonnier, au travers duquel il mourra symboliquement et expiera, que « Tonatiuh Tlaltecuhtli t’ont lavé la face » (Sahagún VIII c.2l, 1950-81, 8 : 75 p. ex.). Châtiment salvifique, la mort sacrificielle du guerrier est ressentie à la fois comme une gloire, un honneur, et un malheur. Parmi les catastrophes qu’on annonce à ceux qui sont nés un jour néfaste figure régulièrement le sacrifice. Par exemple, celui qui naît le jour 1 Maison périra d’une mort dangereuse, en guerre ou sur la pierre de sacrifice ou comme esclave baigné, ou bien il commettra un adultère et sera mis à mort ainsi que sa complice, ou il sera vendu comme esclave, ou volera, ou se ruinera au jeu (Sahagún IV c.3 ; V, c.1). Entendre rugir un jaguar est un mauvais présage qui annonce la mort en guerre (Sahagún V c.l). Celui qui gagne au jeu de balle est « grand adultère, et mourra en guerre ou des mains d’une mari outragé » (Tezozomoc c.2, 1878 : 228). Les proverbes et les métaphores aussi sont éloquents. Pour signifier qu’on a bien mis quelqu’un en garde, on dit (Sahagún VI c.43) : « je t’ai donné ton petit drapeau que tu devras prendre en mourant, je t’ai donné ton papier sacrificiel ». A un coupable dont on accepte de taire la faute, mais dont on exige qu’il s’amende, on dit : « je t’applique de la craie blanche et des plumes, je te donne ta bannière et le papier sacrificiel […] je t’enfonce dans la terre, je te donne l’eau épineuse, l’eau de douleur … ». Perdre tout espoir, c’est « recevoir la bannière, les bandes de papier sacrificielles » (Sullivan 1963 ; Preuss 1903a : 190-1 ; 1903b : 256-7). Enfin, Tezozomoc (c.70, 1878 : 516), parle de « pénitent » désigner la victime sacrificielle.

Il reste un dernier et vaste sujet qui ne pourra être qu’effleuré ici, c’est celui du nombre des victimes. Un sujet éminemment sensible, qui souvent fait perdre tout sens critique aux chercheurs, trop prompts à vouloir minimiser à tout prix (Graulich 1991). Il est clair que dans les cités les plus puissantes, les victimes étaient très nombreuses ; elles le paraîtront un moins si on considère que nombre d’entre elles, normalement, auraient dû mourir sur le champ de bataille. Il est évident aussi que le nombre de victimes a fortement augmenté à mesure que la puissance grandissante de la Triple Alliance s’appuyait de plus en plus sur la terreur pour assujettir les population. Cette croissance va aussi de pair avec celle de la démographie, surtout entre, mettons, 1450 et 1519.

S’il faut en croire Tezozomoc, sous Montezuma l, les Mexicas se réjouissent fort d’avoir fait 200 prisonniers de Chalco en une bataille (donc, probablement des guerriers). Quelques décennies plus tard, Ahuitzotl ramènerait 44.000 captifs (sans doute de tout ordre) de sa campagne au Guerrero ; la région devra être repeuplée par la Triple Alliance. De sa campagne contre Tututepec, Montezuma II et ses alliés ramènent 1350 prisonniers, et une autre fois, 2800, mais une bataille fleurie contre Huexotzinco ferait 10.000 morts. Après la prise de Mexico par Cortés, celui-ci ne peut empêcher ses alliés, notamment tlaxcaltèques, de sacrifier et de manger plus de 15.000 ennemis, chiffre qu’il n’avait pas intérêt à gonfler (Gómara 1975, 2 :114).

Les guerres, faut-il le dire, étaient incessantes et les cités soumises devaient souvent livrer des victimes à sacrifier comme tribut. Dès lors, des fêtes au cours desquelles on immole quelques milliers de victimes deviennent assez rapidement chose courante à Mexico. Durán (1967, 2 :415 ; aussi 443, 482) affirme que sous Montezuma II, il y avait des jours de deux, trois, cinq ou huit mille sacrifiés à Mexico. Pour l’inauguration du temple de Tlamatzinco et du cuauhxicalli, il y en aurait même eu 12.210. On est loin, bien sûr, des chiffres controversés de l’inauguration du Grand Temple de Mexico en 1487 par Ahuitzotl. La plupart des sources en nahuatl et en espagnol s’accordent sur le chiffre de 80.400 victimes sacrifiées à cette occasion, ce qui paraît énorme et a bien sûr donné lieu à toute une littérature révisionniste, certains allant même jusqu’à proposer le chiffre parfaitement fantaisiste de 320 morts seulement. Il faut dire que la circonstance était exceptionnelle. Les travaux ayant débuté sous Tizoc, celui-ci a d’emblée dû se mettre à stocker les victimes pour l’inauguration. Mais il mourut prématurément et Ahuitzotl lui succéda. Il acheva l’agrandissement de la pyramide dont il fit coïncider l’inauguration avec son intronisation, en vue de laquelle il fit également une campagne. Théoriquement, les victimes de cette vaste opération de terreur ont donc effectivement pu compter des dizaines de milliers de victimes.

Pour la moyenne annuelle de victimes, les estimations anciennes diffèrent. Une lettre du moine évêque Zumarraga mentionnée par Torquemada (1969, 2 :120) mentionne 20.000 enfants sacrifiés par an, mais Clavijero (1964 : 172) évoque une autre lettre où ce seraient 20.000 personnes par an dans la seule ville de Mexico. Gómara (1975,2 : 91,435) semble faire de 20.000 à 50.000 victimes le total pour le pays tout entier. Il semble s’appuyer sur un propos d’un certain Ollintecuhtli qui, vantant la puissance de Montezuma, aurait dit à Cortés qu’il sacrifiait 20.000 personnes par an. Las Casas (1985 : 247-8) en revanche, parfaitement de mauvaise foi, admet tout au plus 10 ou 100 sacrifices par an alors que dans son Apologética, il reprend les données habituelles des autres sources. Dernier élément qui montre le grand nombre de sacrifices, c’est celui concernant les tzompantli ou plates-formes d’exposition des têtes des défunts. Je passe sur le tzompantli imaginaire inventé par Bernal Díaz à Xocotlan, mais à Mexico, selon le conquistador Andrés de Tapia qui, avec un collègue, les aurait comptées, le nombre de têtes s’élevait aux alentours de 136.000. Ici encore, le total est peut-être excessif, mais il montre bien que les victimes étaient nombreuses. Victimes qui, rappelons-le encore, dans des pays dotés d’armes meilleures et où on n’essayait pas de faire prisonnier pendant et après le combat, seraient mortes sur le champ de bataille.

Outre les guerriers, il y avait toute une série d’autres victimes que je ne puis que survoler. Les esclaves, fort nombreux, provenaient de la guerre, du tribut ou étaient des condamnés, des enfants vendus ou des personnes qui se vendaient. Seuls pouvaient être sacrifiés, semble-t-il, les condamnés, les esclaves pour dettes de jeu qui ne pouvaient se racheter et les esclaves indociles qui avaient été vendus deux ou trois fois (Motolinia 1970 : 174 ; Duran 1 :183,200,210) . A Mexico du moins, on n’aurait pas sacrifié d’esclaves étrangers (Durán 1 :182), quoique selon Cortés (1963 : 26 ; Durán 2 : 465), il y aurait eu aussi des esclaves livrés comme tribut. La tendance à sacrifier de préférence des proches, plus semblables et donc meilleurs, a déjà été observée à propos des guerriers et cadre bien avec l’idée que la victime est substitut du sacrifiant. Si celui-ci était l’État, il pouvait donc puiser dans les esclaves de tribut, par exemple. Sinon, il fallait acheter au marché, au prix de 30 à 40 étoffes par esclave, selon sa qualité, sa perfection physique, ses aptitudes, notamment à chanter et à danser (Sahagún IX c.10). Avant d’incarner une divinité pendant un nombre de jours variable, la victime était rituellement baignée, selon des modalités variables (parmi lesquelles il ne faut pas inclure, semble-t-il, les bains quotidiens à l’eau chaude destinés à engraisser la victime), de manière à la purifier des souillures de sa condition d’esclave (Durán 1 : 64, 181-2). Celle-ci était en effet considérée comme un châtiment, non seulement pour des délits sanctionnés par la loi, mais aussi pour une vie déréglée. Certaines circonstances requéraient des jeunes vierges, parce que les déesses incarnées, ou ce qu’elles représentaient (p.ex., le maïs ), l’étaient.

  • 15 Cervantes de Salazar 1: 46; Tezozomoc 1878: 321; Mendieta 1: 144; Tovar 228; Pomar 1986: 89; Goma (…)

Un troisième groupe de victimes, bien moins nombreux, comprenait des condamnés à mort, une confirmation de plus du fait que la mort sacrificielle est expiatoire. Durán (1 : 185) dit clairement que le sacrifice était une des façons de châtier les criminels. Une bonne partie des condamnations étaient en rapport direct avec le sacrifice, la guerre et le culte (immolation de guerriers nobles qui, capturés, s’étaient échappés et étaient rentrés chez eux ; de gardes qui avaient laissé fuir des captifs ; de gens du commun ayant refusé d’assister à des sacrifices humains ; de serviteurs ayant laissé s’éteindre le feu domestique lors de la fête du Feu nouveau ; d’ennemis de la « guerre fleurie » trouvés en territoire adverse ; d’émissaires considérés comme traîtres ; de voleurs de biens du temple …15), mais elles concernaient aussi les sorciers et les devins qui se trompaient (Torquemada 2 : 386), dans certains cas les adultères et, au Guatemala, les violeurs de vierges (Castañeda Paganini 1959 : 33). On sait par les codex (Borbonicus, Telleriano-Remensis … ) que des exécutions d’adultères pouvaient avoir lieu en présence de la divinité. On tuait de même des criminels et des guerriers devant le souverain pour le « vivifier, renforcer son tonalli (feu intérieur) » (le texte, ambigu, peut désigner les seuls guerriers) (Sahagún IV c.1l, 12). Se pose alors la question du destin dans l’au-delà de ces exécutés : partageaient-ils celui des sacrifiés ? Certaines indications le suggèrent, comme le fait que les parents d’un condamné pour adultère lui faisaient une image de la déesse de l’amour et de la saleté.

Les victimes dont il a été question jusqu’à présent sont soit extérieures à la cité, soit marginales. D’autres marginaux sacrifiables sont les enfants – incomplètement intégrés dans le groupe et dépendant de leurs parents – et les personnes anormales, donc potentiellement dangereuses, ou marquées. Les sacrifices d’enfants, victimes faciles à obtenir, évidentes, étaient très fréquents. Des enfants de rois ou de seigneurs étaient requis quand il s’agissait d’assurer le succès des moissons, la bonne marche des saisons étant de la responsabilité des gouvernants (Motolinia 1970 : 34-5 ; Anales de Cuauhtitlan 1949 : 8). Pour les autres, c’étaient des enfants de prisonniers de guerre, ou, trop fréquemment, au point qu’à Texcoco il aurait fallu légiférer pour y mettre un frein, offert, ou vendus par leurs parents (Ixtlilxochitl 1 : 405, 447). On achetait aussi des enfants à l’extérieur. L’immense majorité d’entre eux étaient offerts aux eaux et aux dieux de la pluie, qu’ils représentaient, peut-être en raison de leur aspect de nains, semblable à celui des Tlaloque. D’autres destinataires étaient Quetzalcoatl (Codex Vaticanus A foI.20), qui, en tant que dieu du vent, appartient aux Tlaloque, un certain Aztacoatl (RG Tetela) et Tezcatlipoca, associé à la fête des enfants morts (Codex Magliabechiano fol. 36v) pour des raisons qui restent à éclaircir. Deux sources mentionnent des immolations d’enfants en cas de guerre (RG Coatepec et Chimalhuacan). Plusieurs, européennes ou assimilées, évoquent du sang d’enfants qui aurait été mélangé à des images de pâte ou à des cendres de divinités mais les textes nahuatl restent discrets sur ce point.

  • 16 Le tonalli des victimes renforce celui des dieux ou des rois. Si je l’invoque ici à propos de ces (…)

Parmi les guerriers captifs, certains pouvaient être choisis pour certains rites particuliers en fonction de leur nom personnel ou gentilice. Parmi les enfants, ceux qui avaient deux boucles au sommet de la tête étaient particulièrement recherchés (Sahagún II c.20), soit parce qu’elles évoquaient le tourbillon dans la lagune qui était un lieu de contact privilégié avec les Tlaloque, soit parce que le mot nahuatl pour les désigner signifiait aussi « grenier » et promettait l’abondance, ou encore, parce que ces enfants avaient un tonalli – un feu intérieur, une force vitale -, particulièrement puissant16. Le cas des albinos, nains, bossus, contrefaits, macrocéphales, tous sacrifiables d’office, semble-t-il, est plus difficile (Tezozomoc 1878 : 517, 563, 601 ; Sahagún VII c.1). Certains d’entre eux au moins étaient pourchassés, tous étaient mis à part, en particulier dans l’entourage du souverain, pour son divertissement mais surtout, sans doute, pour les contrôler, comme le porte à croire le fait que Montezuma II avait également concentré autour de lui, à Mexico, les fils des rois, les images de dieux et les animaux de l’empire. Ces personnes étaient immolées quand il y avait manque ou excès de pluie et lors d’éclipses du soleil, soit quand il y avait trop ou trop peu de soleil. Les nains et bossus devaient avoir des affinités avec les Tlaloque, les albinos étaient des élus du soleil. Enfin, dans le temple d’Iztaccinteotl, un dieu du maïs, on sacrifiait, paraît-il, des personnes qui souffraient de maladies contagieuses comme la gale ou la dartre, voire la lèpre, maladies attribuées à la déesse de l’amour Xochiquetzal (Torquemada 2 :150-1).

Il est d’autres personnes de la cité qui, libres, pouvaient être appelées au sacrifice ou qui le choisissaient. On dit qu’au besoin, le roi pouvait faire sacrifier n’importe quel citoyen (Cortés, RG d’Atlatlahuaca … ). Lors de la fête de la moisson (tlacaxipehualiztli), dans certaines régions, on sacrifiait un étranger de passage qui probablement représentait la dernière gerbe de maïs (RG Teotitlan). Pour la fête des montagnes, on sacrifiait deux vierges du lignage royal de Tezcacoatl (Durán 1 :154), appelé ainsi semble-t-il d’après un des quatre guides des pérégrinations mexicas. On sait par recoupements qu’elles représentaient les déesses Ayopechtli et Atlacoaya, associées à l’eau et aux semis. Outre ces marginales du haut de la société, il y avait celles du bas. L’affirmation de Serna (1892 :357-8) selon laquelle des jeunes femmes de petite vertu étaient recueillies par des prêtres qui leur promettaient de les établir mais les sacrifiaient au cours d’une fête est probablement une broderie sur la description que Sahagún (II c.30) fait de la fête d’ochpaniztli. Mais il y avait aussi les vraies prostituées, qui, en tepeilhuitl, fête au cours de laquelle on célébrait les amours, s’offraient librement au sacrifice en se maudissant et en injuriant les femmes honnêtes (Torquemada 2 : 299). Leur mort est à rapprocher d’un passage de Sahagún (X c.15, 1950-81, 10 :55) qui les caractérise comme menant une vie d’esclave baigné ou de victimes sacrificielle : peut-être vise-t-on leur mode de vie aussi luxueux et éphémère que celui des personnificateurs de dieux – d’autant plus que souvent, elles finissaient par se vendre comme esclaves. On trouvait aussi des volontaires parmi les musiciens, en échange de l’honneur de jouer du tambour lors d’une fête (Codex Tudela).

Bibliographie

Acosta, J. de, 1962 [1589J : Histoire naturelle et morale des Indes occidentales. Traduit par J. Rémy. Payot, Paris.

Anales de Cuauhtitlan. Voir Codex Chimalpopoca

Berlin, H. (éd.)1948 : Anales de Tlatelolco (Unos Annales Históricos de la Nación Mexicana) y Códice de Tlatelolco. Traduit par H. Berlin. Antigua Libreria Robredo, Mexico.

Bosch Garcia,C. 1944 : La esclavidud prehispánica entre los aztecas. Mexico.

Broda, J. 1970 : Tlacaxipehualiztli : A reconstruction of an Aztec calendar festival from 16th century sources. Revista Española de Antropologia Americana 6 :197-274.

Carmack, R. M. 1976, La estratificación quiche ana prehispánica. In Estratificación social en la Mesoamérica prehispánica, édité par P. Carrasco and J. Broda, pp. 245- 277. INAH, Mexico.

Caso, A. 1953, El Pueblo del Sol. FCE, Mexico.

Castañeda Paganini, R. 1959, La cultura tolteca-pipil de Guatemala. Editorial del Ministerio de Educación Pública « José de Piñida Ibarra. », Guatemala.

Castillo, C. del 1991, Historia de la venida de los mexicanos y otros pueblos e Historia de la conquista. Traduit par F. Navarrete Linares. INAH, Mexico.

Cervantes de Salazar, F. 1985, Crónica de la Nueva España. Porrúa, Mexico.

Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, Domingo F. de San Anton Muñon 1965, Relaciones originales de Chalco Amaquemecan. Traduit par S. Rendón.

FCE, Mexico. 1991, Memorial Breve acerca de la fundación de la ciudad de Culhuacan. Traduit par V. M. Castillo. UNAM, Mexico.

Clavijero, Fr. J. 1964, Historia antigua de México, edited by M. Cuevas. Porrua, Mexico.

Codex Chimalpopoca 1938, Die Geschichte der Königreiche von Colhuacan und Mexico. Traduit et commenté parW. Lehmann. Quellenwerke zur alten Geschichte Amerikas 1, Kohlhammer, Stuttgart-Berlin.

Codex Chimalpopoca 1945, Códice Chimalpopoca, Anales de Cuauhtitlan y Leyenda de los Soles. Traduit par P. F. Velázquez. UNAM, Mexico.

Combès, L. 1992, La tragédie cannibale chez les Tupi-Guarani. PUF, Paris.

Cortes, H. 1963, Cartas y documentos. Porrúa, Mexico.

Diaz Del Castillo, B. 1947, Verdadera historia de los sucesos de la conquista de la Nueva España. Biblioteca de Autores Españoles 26, Ediciones Atlas, Madrid.

Durán, F. D. 1967, Historia de los indios de la Nueva España e Islas de la Tierra Firme. Edité par A. M. Garibay K. 2 vols., Porrúa, Mexico.

Garibay K., A. M. 1964-1968, Poesia nahuatl, 3 vols.UNAM-IIH, Mexico.

Girard, R. 1972 La violence et le sacré. Grasset, Paris.

Gomara, Fr. LOPEZ de, 1965-1966, Historia general de las Indias. 2 vols., Iberia, Barcelone.

Graulich, M. 1987, Mythes et rituels du Mexique ancien préhispanique. Académie Royale de Belgique, Mémoires de la Classe des Lettres 67,3, Palais des Académies, Bruxelles.

Graulich, M. 1991, L’inauguration du temple principal de Mexico en 1487. Revista Española de Antropología Americana 21 :121-143.

Graulich, M. 1992, The Aztec « Templo Mayor » Revisited. Ancient America. Contributions to New World Archaeology. Oxbow Monograph 24 : 19-32.

Graulich, M. 1997, Chasse et sacrifice humain chez les Aztèques. Académie Royale des Sciences d’Outre-Mer, Bulletin des Séances 43, 4 : 433-46.

Graulich, M. 1999, Ritos aztecas : las fiestas de las veintenas. Instituto Nacional Indigenista, Mexico.

Graulich, M. 2000a, Tlahuicole, un héroe tlaxcalteca controvertido. In El héroe entre el mito y la historia, édité par F. Navarrete and G. Olivier, pp. 89-99. UNAM, CEMCA, Mexico.

Graulich, M. 2000b, Coyolxauhqui y las mujeres desnudas de Tlatelolco. Estudios de Cultura Nahuatl 31 :77-94

Hassig, R. 1988, Aztec Warfare : Imperial Expansion and Political Control. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman-London.

Guilhem, O. 1997, Moqueries et métamorphoses d’un dieu aztèque. Tezcatlipoca, le « Seigneur au miroir fumant ». Mémoires de l’Institut d’Ethnologie XXXIII, Musée de l’homme, Paris.

Helfrich, K. 1973, Menschenopfer und Tötungsrituale im Kult der Maya. Monumenta Americana 9, Gebr.Mann, Berlin.

Ixtlilxóhitl, F. de Alva, 1975-1977, Obras históricas, édité par E. O’Gorman. 2 vols., UNAM, Mexico.

Jonghe, E. de (ed.) 1905, Histoyre du Méchique. Journal de la Société des Américanistes de Paris 2,1 :10-44.

Klein, C. 1994, Fighting with feminity : gender and war in Aztec Mexico. Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 24 : 219-253.

Landa, D. de, 1941, Landa’s Relación de las cosas de Yucatan. Traduit et annoté par A. M. Tozzer. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University XVIII, Cambridge.

Las Casas, Fray B. de,1967, Apologética historia sumaria, édité par E. O’Gorman. 2 vols., UNAM, Mexico.

Las Casas, Fray B. de,1985, Obra indigenista, édité par J. Alcina Franch, Alianza, Madrid.

Lopez Austin, A. 1965, El Templo Mayor de Mexico-Tenochtitlan según los informantes indígenas. Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 5 : 75-102.

Martinez Cortes, F. 1974, Pegamentos, gomas y resinas en el México prehispánico. SepSetentas, Mexico.

Martir De Angleria, P. 1964-1965, Décadas del Nuevo Mundo. 2 vols., J. Porrúa, Mexico.

Mendieta, F. J. de, 1945, Historia eclesiástica Indiana. 4 vols., Chavez Hayhoe, Mexico.

Metraux, A. 1967, Religions et magies indiennes d’Amérique du Sud. Gallimard, Paris.

Molina, F. A. de, 1970, Vocabulario en lengua castellana y mexicana y mexicana y castellana. Porrua, Mexico.

Motolinia, F. T. De Benavente, 1970, Memoriales e Historia de los Indios de la Nueva Espana, édité par F. de Lejarza. Ediciones Atlas, Madrid.

Muñoz Camargo, D. 1892, Historia de Tlaxcala. Secretariá de Fomento, Mexico.

Oviedo y Valdes, G. Fernandez de, 1959, Historia general y natural de las Indias. 5 vols., Biblioteca de Autores Españoles, Atlas, Madrid.

Piho, V. 1970, Función y simbolismo del atavío azteca. Actes du 38e Congrès International des Américanistes, Stuttgart 1968, (2) :377-384.

Piho, V. 1974, La jerarquía militar azteca. Actes du 40e Congrès International des Américanistes, Rome-Gênes 1972, (2) :273-288.

Pomar, J. B. 1986, Relación de la ciudad y provincia de Tezcoco. Relaciones geográficas del siglo XVI : México, édité par R. Acuña, t. 3, UNAM, Mexico.

Preuss, K. Th. 1903a, Die Feuergötter aIs Ausgangspunkt zum Verständnis der mexikanischen Religion in ihrem Zusammenhange. Mitteilungen der Wiener Anthropologischen Gesellschaft 33 : 129-233.

Preuss, K. Th.1903b, Die Sünde in der Mexikanischen religion. Globus 83 : 253-7, 268-73.

Preuss, K. Th.1984-1988, Relaciónes geográficas del siglo XVI, édité par R. Acuña. 10 vols., UNAM, Mexico.

Sahagún, B. de, 1956, Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España, édité par A.M. Garibay K. Porrua, Mexico.

Sahagún, B. de,1958, Ritos, Sacerdotes y Atavios de los Dioses. Traduit par M. Leon-Portilla. UNAM, Mexico.

Sahagún, B. de,1950-1981[1577] Florentine Codex, General History of the Things of New Spain. Translated by A. J. O. Anderson and Ch. E. Dibble. 12 vols. The School of American Research and the University of Utah, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Seler, E. 1890, Das Tonalamatl der Aubinschen Sammlung und die Verwandten Kalendarbücher. Actes du 7e Congrès International des Américanistes, Berlin 1888 :521-735.

Seler, E.1902-1923, Gesammelte Abhandlungen zur Amerikanischen Sprach-und Altertumskunde. 5 vols., Asher, Berlin.

Serna, J. de la, 1892, Manual de ministros de indios para el conocimiento de sus idolatrías y extirpación de ellas. Anales del Museo Nacional de México 6 : 261-480.

Soustelle, J. 1940, La pensée cosmologique des anciens Mexicains (Représentations du monde et de l’espace). Hermanet, Paris.

Soustelle, J.1955, La vie quotidienne des Aztèques à la veille de la conquête espagnole. Hachette, Paris.

Spranz, B. 1964, Göttergestalten in den mexikanischen Bilderhandschriften der Codex Borgia Gruppe. Acta Humboldtiana 4. F. Steiner, Wiesbaden.

Sullivan, T. D. 1963, Nahuatl proverbs, conundrums, and metaphors, collected by Sahagún. Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 4 :93-177.

Tezozomoc, F. Alvarado, 1878, Crónica mexicana … precedida del Códice Ramirez. Ireneo Paz, Mexico.

Tezozomoc, F. Alvarado,1949, Crónica mexicáyotl. Traduit et établi par A. Leon. UNAM, Mexico.

Torquemada, F. J. de, 1969, Monarquía Indiana. 3 vols., Porrúa, Mexico.

Tovar, J. de, 1972, Manuscrit Tovar. Origines et croyances des Indiens du Mexique, édité par J. Lafaye. Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt, Graz.

Tozzer 1941, voir Landa 1941.

Notes

1 Voir aussi Ixtlilxochitl, Historia chichimeca c.38, 1975-77: 2: 103. Pour lui, c’est la Triple Alliance qui se réunit en conseil de guerre « con sus capitanes y consejeros ».

2 Sur cette guerre et ses autres motivations, notamment politiques, voir Graulich 1994; Duran 1967, 2: 232-3, 235, 417; 1: 32-3; Mufioz Camargo 1892: 116; Motolinia 1970: 219-20.

3 Ainsi, le premier recevait le corps et la cuisse droite, le second la cuisse gauche, le troisième le bras droit, le quatrième bras gauche, le cinquième l’avant-bras droit et le sixième l’avant-bras gauche.

4 Pour Cervantes de Salazar, qui diffère ici, celui qui a fait 5 prisonniers « mudava el traje del cortar del cabello, hazia las orejas, hechas dos rasuras : a este llamaban quachic qu’es el titulo mas honroso. Auiendo muerto seis, se podia cortar el cabello de la media cabeça hasta la frente »; avec 7 tués, il devient cuauhnochtli, avec 10, tlacatecuhtli et en outre seigneur d’un village où il se repose pour le restant de ses jours. Voir sur ce sujet Piho 1970, 1974; Hassig 1988. A Tlaxcala, il y avait des vaillants qui avaient pris ou tué plus de 20,90 et même 100 personnes: Motolinia 1970: 42.

5 Le sacrifice de guerriers est en effet double: l’excision du coeur pour le soleil, la décapitation subséquente pour la terre.

6 La source ne mentionne pas la Terre, second destinataire, mais celle-ci était présente en plusieurs endroits et sous plusieurs formes dans la pyramide principale de Mexico.

7  » … and here, to Mexico, from everywhere, were brought captives, called « tribute-captives » (Ali who lay surrounding, those who held the enemy borders, those who dwelt on the enemy borders, brought their captives, their prisoners here. [These] became their tribute-captives [maltequjhoan]. The stewards [calpixque], each of the stewards, guarded them here …. and if one of them f1ed, … they replaced him; a man was purchased; they delegated another [qujxiptlaiotiaia], they placed in his stead. Then the slaves died, when the feast day was celebrated. »

8 Les Anales de Cuauhtitlan p. 3 énumèrent comme buts des Chichimèques qui se dispersent en 1 Silex 804, avant Quetzalcoatl, toutes les régions qui resteront insoumises à l’empire aztèque (mais sans préciser ce point): Michoacan, Cohuixcon Yopitzinco, Totollan (un quartier de Tlaxcala),Tepeyacac (près de Quecholac), Quauhquechollan, Huexotzinco, Tlaxcala, Tliliuhquitepec, Zacatlantonco et Tototepec.

9 Sur ce sujet, voir Klein 1994; Graulich 2000b.

10 Dans les codex Telleriano-Remensis fol. 32v, 38v, 39r, 40 r, 40v, 4lr, 42v, les guerriers sacrifiés à Mexico lors des occasions les plus diverses en sont ornés. Voir aussi, pex, certains objets archéologiques comme l’os gravé du Musée de l’Homme, seler 1902-23, 2: 682.

11 Cristobal dei Castillo, auteur assez tardif, doit toutefois être manié avec prudence vu sa manie de broder. Le discours de la divinité à Huitzilopochtli évoque assez fort celui de Dieu à Moïse avant l’arrivée dans la Terre promise ( Exode, Lévitique, Nombres, Deutéronome ).

12 Voir aussi Garibay, Poes(a Nâhuatl2: 5-6, 42-3, 53-4; Romances de los sefiores de la Nueva España f.42 v°; l’hymne à Mère des Dieux, Teteo innan, recueilli par Sahagun 1956, 4: 296; à rapprocher du livre 2, App., 1956, 1: 246-7. On envoie de la craie et des plumes comme déclaration guerre: Broda 1970: 204.

13 Mendieta 1:110: les gens mettent dans les champs des pierres teintes de chaux ou de craie.

14 Dans Sahagun (CF 2: 66), il est dit qu’on prenait l’ixiptla parmi les captifs et que « là on choisissait quelqu’un s’il paraissait convenir, s’il était bien de corps. Alors on le prenait et les [sic] confiait aux intendants. Mais celui destiné à être esclave, le capteur le tue ». Je ne sais que faire de cette dernière phrase. Les esclaves sacrificiels incarnant des dieux devaient eux aussi être bien faits physiquement et purs.

15 Cervantes de Salazar 1: 46; Tezozomoc 1878: 321; Mendieta 1: 144; Tovar 228; Pomar 1986: 89; Gomara 1975-7: 95 …

16 Le tonalli des victimes renforce celui des dieux ou des rois. Si je l’invoque ici à propos de ces enfants à tourbillons, c’est grâce à Michel Duquesnoy, à qui je dois la précieuse information qui suit et que je remercie vivement. Il a donc entendu dire par Horacio, un de ses principaux informateurs à San Miguel Tzinacapan, que « el tonal es el remolino que tiene uno en la cabeza. es el remolino de cabellos. Es mejor tener dos remolinos porque es fuerte de su tonaltsi [ …… ] Porque este remolino que tenemos es como un enchufa que tenemos con el sol (in tonal), por alli entra el calor (in tonal dei sol. Cuando tiene uno dos remolinos, tiene dos soles, es como un favor dei sol. Pero es muy daflino para las cosas. »

Auteur

Michel Graulich

Professeur Ordinaire en Histoire de l’Art et Archéologie et en Histoire des Religions, Faculté de Philosophie et Lettres (CP175), Av. F. Roosevelt 50, B-1050 Bruxelles / Directeur d’études à l’Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Section des Sciences religieuses, Sorbonne, 45 rue des Ecoles, F-75005 Paris.

Voir par ailleurs:

Brutally Honest
Sonny Bunch
The Weekly Standard/The Washington Examiner
December 14, 2006

MEL GIBSON’S Apocalypto is one of the few films that can rightly be described as a journey. The viewer is snatched from the confines (and comforts) of a Hollywood movie and thrown deep into the jungles of Central America. The film itself is a visual masterpiece; shot entirely in a Mayan dialect, Gibson flexes his visual muscles to show rather than tell.

Billed as a historical drama, Apocalypto is actually part revenge flick and part chase flick. After being brutally taken from his idyllic home (where his beloved father’s throat was slit by the cruelest of his captors), the hero, Jaguar Paw, narrowly escapes having his heart torn from his chest as part of a human sacrifice. He then leads his tormentors on a harrowing chase through the jungle, utilizing his knowledge of the familiar terrain that surrounds his village to pick off his enemies one by one.

The plot itself is almost secondary, and little more than an excuse for Gibson to show off his phenomenal film making talents. In addition to the stunning jungle scenes, Gibson treats us to a view of what life in a vast Mayan city may have been like at the height of its culture. Immense pyramids rise out of the foliage; prisoners are sold as slaves and sacrificed in incredibly brutal ways; those not sacrificed are used for human target practice. If you can handle gore (and really, the movie is no more violent–and in some ways, far less so–than, say, Braveheart, which took home 5 Oscars, including Best Picture), do yourself a favor and see this innovative, unique movie.

AS INTERESTING as the film itself has been the reaction to it by film critics and historians alike. Those who praise the movie almost uniformly mention, if not condemn, Gibson’s infamous anti-Semitic outburst (in the New York Times, A.O. Scott wrote that « say what you will about him–about his problem with booze or his problem with Jews–he is a serious filmmaker »).

Other critics have, curiously, dismissed the film because it doesn’t inform us about some of the accomplishments of the Mayans. « It teaches us nothing about Mayan civilization, religion, or cultural innovations (Calendars? Hieroglyphic writing? Some of the largest pyramids on Earth?), » Dana Stevens wrote in Slate. « Rather, Gibson’s fascination with the Mayans seems to spring entirely from the fact (or fantasy) that they were exotic badasses who knew how to whomp the hell out of one another, old-school. »

This is a strange criticism. If you were interested in boning up on calendars, hieroglyphics, and pyramids you could simply watch a middle-school film strip. And who complained that in Gladiator Ridley Scott showed epic battle scenes and vicious gladiatorial combat instead of teaching us how the aqueducts were built?

AND THEN there have been the multi-culturist complaints. Ignacio Ochoa, the director of the Nahual Foundation, says that « Gibson replays, in glorious big budget Technicolor, an offensive and racist notion that Maya people were brutal to one another long before the arrival of Europeans. » Julia Guernsey, an assistant professor in the department of art and art history at the University of Texas told a reporter after viewing the film, « I hate it. I despise it. I think it’s despicable. It’s offensive to Maya people. It’s offensive to those of us who try to teach cultural sensitivity and alternative world views that might not match our own 21st century Western ones but are nonetheless valid. »

Newsweek reports that « although a few Mayan murals do illustrate the capture and even torture of prisoners, none depicts decapitation » as a mural in a trailer for the film does. « That is wrong. It’s just plain wrong, » the magazine quotes Harvard professor William Fash as saying.

Karl Taube, a professor of anthropology at UC Riverside, complained to the Washington Post about the portrayal of slaves building the Mayan pyramids. « We have no evidence of large numbers of slaves, » he told the paper.

Even the mere arrival, at the end of the film, of Spanish explorers has been lambasted as culturally insensitive. Here’s Guernsey, again, providing a questionable interpretation of the film’s final minutes: « And the ending with the arrival of the Spanish (conquistadors) underscored the film’s message that this culture is doomed because of its own brutality. The implied message is that it’s Christianity that saves these brutal savages. »

But none of these complaints holds up particularly well under scrutiny. After all, while it may not mesh well with their post-conquest victimology, the Mayans did partake of bloody human sacrifice. Consider this description of a human sacrifice from the sixth edition of University of Pennsylvania professor Robert Sharer’s definitive The Ancient Maya:

The intended victim was stripped, painted blue (the sacrificial color), and adorned with a special peaked headdress, then led to the place of sacrifice, usually either the temple courtyard or the summit of a temple platform. After the evil spirits were expelled, the altar, usually a convex stone that curved the victim’s breast upward, was smeared with the sacred blue paint. The four chaakob, also painted blue, grasped the victim by the arms and legs and stretched him on his back over the altar. The Nacom then plunged the sacrificial flint knife into the victim’s ribs just below the left breast, pulled out the still-beating heart, and handed it to the chilan, or officiating priest.

That exact scene, almost word for word, takes place in Apocalypto.

After the Spanish conquest, the Mayans adapted their brutal methods of pleasing the gods to coexist with Christianity. Ambivalent Conquests: Maya and Spaniard in Yucatan, 1517-1570 contains the following description from a contemporary source of a post-invasion sacrifice:

The one called Ah Chable they crucified and they nailed him to a great cross made for the purpose, and they put him on the cross alive and nailed his hands with two nails and tied his feet . . . with a thin rope. And those who nailed and crucified the said boy were the ah-kines who are now dead, which was done with consent of all those who were there. And after [he was] crucified they raised the cross on high and the said boy was crying out, and so they held it on high, and then they lowered it, [and] put on the cross, they took out his heart.

As for whether or not there have been any murals found portraying decapitation, as Prof. Fash complains, heads were certainly cut off in ceremonial fashion by the Mayans. Again, The Ancient Maya: « The sacrifice of captive kings, while uncommon, seems to have called for a special ritual decapitation . . . The decapitation of a captured ruler may have been performed as the climax of a ritual ball game, as a commemoration of the Hero Twins’ defeat of the lords of the underworld in the Maya creation myth. »

The protestation against Mayan slavery, is also off the mark: The Ancient Maya repeatedly refers to the purchasing of slaves. The first European contact with the Maya resulted, ironically, in the Spaniards being enslaved. After a shipwreck, Spanish

survivors landed on the east coast of Yucatan, where they were seized by a Maya lord, who sacrificed Valdivia and four companions and gave their bodies to his people for a feast. Geronimo de Aguilar, Gonzalo de Guerrero, and five others were spared for the moment. . . . Aguilar and his companions escaped and fled to the country of another lord, an enemy of the first chieftain. The second lord enslaved the Spaniards, and soon all of them except Aguilar and Guerrero died.

And it should be remembered that when the Spanish arrived in force, they had little problem recruiting allies as some Mayans fought with the Spanish against their own Mayan enemies. Matthew Restall’s Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest reports that

what has so often been ignored or forgotten is the fact that Spaniards tended also to be outnumbered by their own native allies . . . In time, Mayas from the Calkini region and other parts of Yucatan would accompany Spaniards into unconquered regions of the peninsula as porters, warriors, and auxiliaries of various kinds. Companies of archers were under permanent commission in the Maya towns of Tekax and Oxkutzcab, regularly called upon to man or assist in raids into the unconquered regions south of the colony of Yucatan. As late as the 1690s Mayas from over a dozen Yucatec towns–organized into companies under their own officers and armed with muskets, axes, machetes, and bows and arrows–fought other Mayas in support of Spanish Conquest endeavors in the Petén region that is now northern Guatemala.

WHICH IS NOT TO SAY that Gibson’s film is an entirely accurate portrayal of life in a Mayan village. As they say in the business, for the sake of narrative, certain facts have been altered. The conflation of showing massive temples and then depicting the arrival of the Spanish at the end of the film is almost certainly anachronistic. Though Apocalypto is purposefully vague about its time frame, the appearance of Spanish galleons and conquistadors at the end of the film (as well as the sight of a little girl who might be suffering from small pox) suggests the action takes place in the early- or mid-16th century. But according to Sharer, « by 900 . . . monumental construction–temples, palaces, ball courts . . . [had] ceased at most sites, as did associated features such as elaborate royal tombs and the carved stone and modeled stucco work used to adorn buildings . »

Almost any historical drama will contain such problems. That being said, it is specious for professional historians and grievance groups alike to argue that Apocalypto is a wanton desecration of the memories of the Mayan people. While it may be an inconvenient fact that the Mayans were skilled at the art of human cruelty, it is, nevertheless, a fact.

Sonny Bunch is assistant editor at THE WEEKLY STANDARD.

Voir aussi:

What Has Mel Gibson Got Against the Church?

Time
Dec. 14, 2006

For the Christian viewer, the biggest question about Mel Gibson’s movie Apocalypto is: why does its hero turn away from the Cross at the end?

All in all, there’s not a lot of Christ — passionate or otherwise — in Apocalypto, Mel Gibson’s first film since The Passion of the Christ. But a crucifix finally shows up at the film’s end, and the film’s response to it is surprisingly equivocal.

The movie tells the story of a peaceful 16th-century jungle-dweller named Jaguar Paw. The first quarter of the film presents his idyllic village as a kind of Eden. The second quarter is a vision of Hell, as a raiding party for the nearby Mayan empire torches the town, rapes the women and drags the men to the Mayan capital as featured guests at a monstrous and ongoing sacrifice to the gods. JP watches in horror as a priest has several of his friends spread-eagled on squat stone, then hacks out their still-beating hearts and displays them to a howling crowd. JP narrowly avoids the same fate, escapes, and spends most of the rest of the film picking off an armed pursuit party, one by one, in classic action-film fashion.

It is only at the very end that Christianity makes a brief but portentous appearance, aboard a fleet of Spanish ships that appears suddenly on the horizon. JP and his long-suffering wife watch from the jungle as a small boat approaches shore bearing a long-bearded, shiny-helmeted explorer and a kneeling priest holding high a crucifix-topped staff. « Should we join them? » asks his wife. « No, » he replies: They should go back to the jungle, their home. Roll credits.

Given Gibson’s fervent Christianity, you might have expected JP to run up and genuflect. Why does he turn away?

My colleague, film critic Richard Schickel, has observed that Gibson has little use for the institutional Roman Catholic church, preferring a « less mainstream version of his faith. » True, but the Traditionalists with whom Gibson is often associated are defined primarily by their objections to the liberalizations under the Second Vatican Council of 1962-5 — not an issue in Jaguar Paw’s day.

Another explanation is that the director has always been better at Crucifixions than at Resurrections. Just as the risen Christ seemed like something of a tack-on to The Passion, Mel may have little interest in how Christian culture might reconfigure either the peaceful village-dwellers’ way of life or the bloodthirsty Mayans’.

The third possibility, it seems to me, is that Gibson does know — and wants no part of it. I tend toward that last one because it reflects a learning curve of my own. About a year ago I visited an exhibit on another Mexican civilization, the Aztecs, at New York’s Guggenheim Museum. The show was cleverly arranged. Visitors walked up the Guggenheim’s giant spiral, the first few twists of which were devoted to the Aztecs’ stunning stylized carvings of snakes, eagles and other god/animals, and explanations of how the ingenious Aztecs filled in a huge lake to lay the foundation for Tenochtitlan, now Mexico City.

It was only about halfway up the spiral — when it had become harder to run screaming for an exit — that one encountered a grey-green stone about three feet high. It was sleek and beautiful — almost like a Brancusi sculpture, I thought — until I read the label. It was a sacrifice stone of the sort in the movie. Not a reproduction, not a non-functioning ceremonial model, but the real thing. People had died on this. I felt shocked and a little angry — it was like coming across a gas chamber at an exhibit of interior design.

But I kept walking, and at the very top of the museum I encountered another object that might be considered an answer to the sinister rock: a stone cross, carved after the Spanish had conquered the Aztecs and were attempting to convert them to Catholicism. Rather than Jesus’s full body, it bore a series of small relief carvings: his head and wounded hands, blood drops — and a sacrificial Aztec knife.

How striking, I thought. Here was a potent work of iconographic propaganda using the very symbols of a brutal religion to turn its values inside out, manipulating its images so that they celebrated not the sacrifice, but the person who was sacrificed. Visually, at least, it seemed an elegant and admirable transition. And after seeing Apocalypto, I wondered why Gibson hadn’t created the cinematic equivalent: an ode to the progression out of savagery, through the vehicle of Christianity.

The answer, of course, is that the cross’s iconography was a lot simpler than Mexican history. I called Charles C. Mann, author of the highly respected history 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus. Mann first noted a couple of anachronisms in the film. The Mayan capital, including any great temple of the sort in the film, had mysteriously disappeared 700 years before the Spanish arrived. Moreover, although the Mayans probably engaged in some human sacrifice, there is no evidence that they practiced it on the industrial scale depicted in the movie For that, as the Guggenheim exhibit suggested, one would have to look 300 miles west to the Aztecs, who had made it their religious centerpiece. Hernan Cortes (who probably rounded upward, since he conquered them), claimed the Aztecs dispatched between three and four thousand souls a year that way. Why Gibson decided to turn the Mayans into Aztecs is anyone’s guess.

Most interesting, however, was Mann’s observation that if the boat Jaguar Paw sees is indeed the 1519 landing party of Cortes (who pushed quickly through what remained of Mayan territory on his way to the bloody battle of Tenochtitlan), the man holding up the cross was no particular friend to the indians. It was not until 1537, Mann said, that, after considerable debate both ways, Pope Paul III got around to proclaiming that « Indians themselves indeed are true men » and should not be « deprived of their liberty. » In the intervening 18 years roughly a third of Mexico’s 25 million indigenous population died of smallpox the Europeans brought with them, and the Spanish had enslaved most of the remaining six million able-bodied men. And that’s not counting the 100,000 Aztecs Cortes killed at Tenochtitlan alone.

So here is the conundrum. If you had to choose between a culture that placed ritualized human slaughter at the center of its faith, but that only managed to kill 4,000 people a year, and a culture that put the sacrificial Lamb of God at the center of the universe but somehow found its way to countenancing the enslavement of millions and the slaughter of hundreds of thousands in the same neighborhood, which would be more appealing?

Perhaps Gibson’s problem is with the institutional church after all. Not the institutional church of Vatican II, but the church that managed to get so mixed up with worldly power that it was able to side with the centurions rather than with Christ for those crucial 18 years.

And perhaps he was right to have Jaguar Paw, having sampled the worst that the first civilization had to offer, take one look at the arrival of the second, and head back into the woods.

Voir également:

 

Mario Vargas Llosa: l’humanisme de droite récompensé

Patrick Leblanc

Cyberpresse.ca

le 12 octobre 2010

Dans l’univers culturel québécois, être un «écrivain engagé» signifie nécessairement militer à gauche. L’attribution du prix Nobel de littérature 2010 à Mario Vargas Llosa provoquera donc sans doute quelques sourcillements. L’auteur péruvien est en effet un vigoureux défenseur du libéralisme politique et économique.

Parmi ses oeuvres de fiction, La fête du bouc (Gallimard, 2002) a été largement citée comme exemple d’un ouvrage dénonçant les méfaits du pouvoir absolu. L’auteur y met en scène les derniers jours de la dictature de Rafael Trujillo en République dominicaine.

Moins connus, Les cahiers de don Rigoberto (Gallimard, 1998) mettent en scène un personnage explicitement libéral, voire libertarien, dont la pensée rejoint celle qui anime Vargas Llosa lui-même.

Ce Don Rigoberto, vendeur d’assurances le jour et écrivain la nuit, écrit notamment dans ses cahiers: «… tout mouvement qui prétendrait transcender (ou reléguer au second plan) le combat pour la souveraineté individuelle, en faisant passer d’abord les intérêts de l’élément collectif – classe, race, genre, nation, sexe, ethnie, Église, vice ou profession -, ressortirait à mes yeux à une conjuration pour brider encore davantage la liberté humaine déjà bien maltraitée.»

Sur le nationalisme plus spécifiquement, Vargas Llosa attribue cette tirade au même personnage: «Derrière le patriotisme et le nationalisme flamboie toujours la maligne fiction collectiviste de l’identité, barbelés ontologiques qui prétendent agglutiner en fraternité inébranlable les ‘Péruviens’, les ‘Espagnols’, les ‘Français’, les ‘Chinois’, etc. Vous et moi savons que ces catégories sont autant d’abjects mensonges qui jettent un manteau d’oubli sur des diversités et des incompatibilités multiples, prétendent abolir des siècles d’histoire et faire reculer la civilisation vers ces barbares temps antérieurs à la création de l’individualité, c’est-à-dire de la rationalité et de la liberté: trois choses inséparables, sachez-le.»

Engagement politique

Au-delà de la fiction, c’est par son action politique que Vargas Llosa a manifesté le plus clairement son engagement envers la liberté.

Préoccupé par l’avenir de son pays, il se porte candidat à l’élection présidentielle de 1990. Dans un Pérou où l’étatisme avait imprégné non seulement la gauche mais aussi le centre et la droite, l’écrivain-politicien proposait un projet de développement économique et social aux antipodes du collectivisme socialiste ou du protectionnisme conservateur. Authentiquement libéral, son programme avait pour objectif de retirer à l’État la responsabilité de la vie économique pour la confier à la société civile et au marché.

«On ne sort pas de la pauvreté en redistribuant le peu qui existe, mais en créant plus de richesse», précise l’écrivain dans ses mémoires politiques (Le Poisson dans l’eau, Gallimard, 1995). Pour lui, les économies égalitaristes «n’ont jamais tiré un pays de la pauvreté: elles l’ont toujours appauvri davantage. Et souvent elles ont rogné ou fait disparaître les libertés, du fait que l’égalitarisme exige une planification rigide qui, économique au début, s’étend ensuite à toute la vie sociale.»

Vargas Llosa n’a pas jeté la serviette après sa défaite électorale. Vingt ans plus tard, il poursuit d’une autre manière son engagement en faveur des libertés économiques et politiques, notamment au sein de l’Atlas Economic Research Foundation, un réseau international auquel est associé l’Institut économique de Montréal et d’autres think tanks canadiens.

En réaction à sa nobélisation, l’écrivain a dit espérer que cette distinction lui était attribuée pour son oeuvre littéraire et non pour ses opinions politiques. N’empêche, on se prend à rêver que l’élite culturelle qui célébrera ce prix saura aussi reconnaître dans l’oeuvre et l’action de Vargas Llosa la possibilité d’un humanisme de droite, un humanisme qu’il devrait être possible de pratiquer dans toutes les cultures et tous les pays, y compris au Québec.

Voir enfin:

« L’impérialisme Américain » au Chili

Guy Millière

Drzz

15 octobre 2010

Les images du sauvetage des mineurs chiliens ont été sur tous les écrans de télévision. Le récit de leur captivité forcée, puis de leur délivrance, a fait les premières pages. Dans la presse et les médias américains, on en a parlé aussi. Mais on a donné un détail qui semble avoir échappé aux journalistes français (je ne puis imaginer qu’ils l’aient omis volontairement, cela va de soi) : ce sauvetage a été, quasiment de bout en bout, une entreprise américaine.

L’entreprise qui a réalisé l’opération, très délicate, et impliquant une extrême précision technologique, est celle d’un homme appelé Jeff Hart. Elle s’appelle Geotech. Elle est basée dans le Colorado. Elle s’est spécialisée dans le forage de puits, et a travaillé sous contrat avec l’armée américaine en Irak, puis en Afghanistan, permettant d’alimenter en eau potable des gens qui n’y avaient pas accès. Jeff Hart et ses équipes ont foré trente trois jours, dans un contexte de risques extrêmes d’éboulement. Le conduit creusé a été équipé de façon à ce que puissent y circuler des capsules conçues sur la base de technologies mises an point par la Nasa. Les mineurs emprisonnés ont bénéficié pendant tout le temps de leur emprisonnement des conseils, méthodes et moyens de la Nasa pour garder leur équilibre physique, sous la supervision du docteur Polk. Ils ont, avant remontée à la surface, absorbé une boisson spécialement conçue par la Nasa encore, destinée à compenser les différences de pression et les risques de vertige et de malaise liés à la remontée.

Jeff Hart, ses équipes, le Dr Polk, la Nasa n’ont fait que leur devoir moral. Ils ont montré que les Etats-Unis restaient une puissance indispensable et généreuse. Même Barack Obama qui, en général, préfère s’excuser pour l’existence des Etats-Unis n’a pu faire autrement que prononcer une phrase : « Nous sommes fiers de tous les américains qui ont travaillé avec nos amis chiliens de façon à tout faire pour que ces mineurs rentrent chez eux ».

S’il y avait un Président américain à la Maison blanche, il recevrait Jeff Hart et les autres en héros : mais nous sommes encore en l’ère Obama, hélas.

Si les journalistes faisaient leur travail d’information, le détail que je viens d’exposer ne leur aurait pas échappé.

Il semble que lorsqu’il s’agit de critiquer les Etats-Unis, de les fustiger, de les traîner dans la boue, il ne manque jamais de bonnes volontés. Lorsqu’il s’agit de donner de simples faits montrant ce que les Etats-Unis sont essentiellement, les bonnes volontés semblent défaillir.

Faut-il le rappeler, en effet ? L’essentiel des technologies qui permettent la mondialisation accélérée dans laquelle nous sommes et contre laquelle certains pestent tout en utilisant en parallèle leur smartphone ou leur ordinateur portable, et internet à très haut débit, sont américaines. Et ce qui en elles n’est pas américain est le plus souvent israélien.

L’essentiel des aides et actions humanitaires sur la planète, quel que soit le continent, sont américaines aussi.

On pourrait ajouter accessoirement que sans les Etats-Unis, l’Europe occidentale aurait connu un tout autre destin à l’issue de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale : cela devrait aller sans dire. Cela va, à mes yeux, beaucoup mieux en le disant.

C’est pour toutes ces raisons et un nombre infini d’autres que j’aime les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et le peuple américain, et que je continuerai à les aimer.

Ceux qui veulent continuer à fustiger « l’impérialisme américain », eux, méritent plus que jamais mon profond mépris.

PS. Je dois ajouter à ce que j’ai écrit que, sans l’ouverture et l’esprit d’entreprise du Président du Chili lui-même, Sebastian Piñera, l’action salvatrice du capitalisme américain n’aurait pas été possible. Sebastian Piñera est lui-même un capitaliste qui fait honneur au capitalisme international : si les Etats-Unis étaient gouvernés par un capitaliste, le désastre du golfe du Mexique aurait permis au capitalisme américain de donner sa pleine mesure, mais hélas, disais-je plus haut…

COMPLEMENT:

Relativism, Revisionism, Aboriginalism, and Emic/Etic Truth: The Case Study of Apocalypto

Richard D. Hansen

In: Chacon R., Mendoza R. (eds) The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research

R.D. Hansen, Ph.D. (*)
Department of Anthropology, Institute of Mesoamerican Studies, Idaho State University, 921 South 8th Ave., Stop 8005 Gravely Hall, Pocatello, ID 83209, USA

Foundation for Anthropological Research & Environmental Studies (FARES), Pocatello, ID 83209, USA.
e-mail: hansric2@isu.edu

R.J. Chacon and R.G. Mendoza (eds.), The Ethics of Anthropology 147 and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare,
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-1065-2_8, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Abstract

Popular film depictions of varied cultures, ranging from the Chinese, Africans, and Native Americans have repeatedly provided a variant perception of the culture. In works of fiction, this flaw cannot only provide us with entertainment, but with insights and motives in the ideological, social, or economic agendas of the authors and/or directors as well as those of the critics. Mel Gibson’s Maya epic Apocalypto has provided an interesting case study depicting indigenous warfare, environmental degradation, and ritual violence, characteristics that have been derived from multidisciplinary research, ethnohistoric studies, and other historical and archaeological investigations. The film received extraordinary attention from the public, both as positive feedback and negative criticism from a wide range of observers. Thus, the elements of truth, public perception, relativism, revisionism, and emic/etic perspectives coalesced into a case where truth, fiction, and the virtues and vices of the authors and director of the film as well as those of critics were exposed. A fictional movie such as Apocalypto can provide entertainment and/or evoke moods and thoughts that usually extend beyond the “normal” as a work of art. In documentaries and academic publications and presentations, however, such flaws are much more serious, and provide distortions and misrepresentations of the “truth” that are (equally) perpetuated in literature and popular perceptions.

While certain criticisms of Hollywood portrayals of varied cultures can be justi- fied, particular academic and social agendas equally use aboriginalism, relativism, and revisionism as an attempt to distort the past and manipulate academic and social fabric. Claims of “cultural or religious inequality” are flawed if and when they dis- tort truth, as best determined by multidisciplinary scientific studies, involving a full range of scientific query and investigation, ethnography, ethnohistory, and extensive methodological procedure. A solution lies in a return to the philosophical foundations of science a la Peirce, Hempel, and Haack, among others, to organize and understand an objective truth as part of the ultimate goal in anthropological research.

Introduction

One of the more common struggles within anthropological disciplines is the concept of an emic interpretation (meaning the native or indigenous perceptions), as opposed to an etic interpretation (the perceptions of the observer) (Pike 1967). In some cases, a “revisionist” will ignore the facts and both the etic and emic interpretations and propose a popular perspective that is void of truth. Some more recent movements such as “aboriginalism” provides a perspective that “Indigenous societies and cultures possess qualities that are fundamentally different from those of non-Aboriginal peoples” (McGhee 2008:579). The avoidance of both the etic and emic perspectives will present serious flaws to an investigator and provides ample argument for a strong multidisciplinary approach to anthropological and archaeological research in the establishment of scientific “facts.” One of the more interesting examples of this problem became apparent in the release of the blockbuster film, Apocalypto, directed by actor/director Mel Gibson and produced by Mel Gibson and Bruce Davey, with Executive Producers Ned Dowd and Vicki Christianson. The film spurred a chorus of criticisms and complaints from some critics and members of the academic and native communities, a curious reaction in view of the fact that the film is entirely a work of fiction. In other cases, extraordinary praise and com- plements came from both critics and academic and Native American communities. A special session was organized at the American Anthropological Association meetings in 2007 entitled “Critiquing Apocalypto: An Anthropological Response to the Perpetuation of Inequality in Popular Media,” which merited being termed a “Presidential Session” sponsored by the Archaeology Division and the Society for Humanistic Anthropology. The obvious glaring flaw is that one would have to assume that it must have been established previously, somehow, that the film was a “perpetuation of inequality.” One of the organizers wrote “Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto is one recent example within a history of cinematic spectacles to draw directly upon anthropological research yet drastically misinform its audience about the nature of indigenous culture” (Ardren 2007a; emphasis mine). Additional recent movies depicting the past, such as Gladiator (Ridley Scott, director). Spartacus (Stanley Kubrick, director), Troy (Wolfgang Peterson, Director), or Gibson’s Braveheart and Passion of the Christ proved extraordinarily successful at the box office (Gladiator, Braveheart, Passion of the Christ), but had similar criticisms of “numerous historical inaccuracies and distortions of fact” from critics and academicians (e.g., Winkler and Martin 2004: Xi, 2007). The fascinating dichotomy of the historical truths and inaccuracies depicted in films and the emic and etic issues involved in popular mov- ies representing the past, and in particular, the case of Apocalypto, has prompted a review of the issues of perception, relativism, revisionism, and truth and demonstrates an important need to re-evaluate anthropological trends and interpretations. In this case, the concept of aboriginalism or “exceptionalism” may have been infused in the criticisms, where it is assumed that “Aboriginal individuals and groups…assume rights over their history that are not assumed by or available to non-Aboriginals” (McGhee 2008: 581). It is clear that many of the criticisms were a direct reflection of the disapproval of Gibson’s previous behavior (Bunch 2006), as well as a standing resentment because of the film Passion of the Christ, a movie which seemed to serve as a “pebble in the shoe” for many liberal, atheist, and in particular, Jewish people. In other cases, the criticisms were valid observations of the license taken by Gibson and the film staff in different aspects of the film Apocalypto, much of which was done for aesthetic reasons or for story expediency. One of the more comprehensive summaries of the film, the issues, and interviews as well as a host of conflicting criticisms are found online with Flixster (http://www. flixster.com/actor/mel-gibson/mel-gibson-apocalypto).

Some of the quibbling may have been as simple as the disagreement as to whether the High Priest had a frown or a smile on his face when he extracted a human heart in Apocalypto. This is a benign discussion and a shallow argument. A far more seri- ous issue however, is the posture that some scholars and Native Americans have taken, which denies that human sacrifice among the Maya even took place. Such positions fall into concepts of “revisionism,” “aboriginalism,” and “relativism” that signals a threat to truth and understanding of the human saga. This chapter will explore this dichotomy through an examination of the historical setting of Apocalypto, the acclaims and criticisms of the film, and explore in greater depth just one of the criticisms that the Maya were not practicing large-scale human sacrifice by the Late Postclassic period, and that depiction as such represented an “inequality,” “racism,” and “slander.” The reality of the depicted sacrifice scenes in Apocalypto, as deter- mined by ethnohistoric, ethnographic, iconographic, and archaeological data sug- gests that many of the critics may have subscribed to a revisionist/relativist/ aboriginalist perspective which distorts the past and creates a philosophical dilemma that can be addressed by a return to a scientific model proposed by Peirce, Hempel, Haack, and others as a theoretical solution to the issue.

Historical Context

In August 2004, this author (Hansen) was requested to attend a series of meetings at the headquarters of Icon Productions in Santa Monica, California to discuss the ancient Maya. The interests of Mel Gibson, Farhad Safinia, and producer Stephen McEveety of Icon Productions were the perspectives of ancient Maya culture that were observed in the National Geographic film, “Dawn of the Maya” (National Geographic 2004). The meetings resulted in lengthy discussions on nearly every aspect of Maya civilization, chronologies, and societal evolution. This further evolved into several trips to the Maya area, particularly Tikal and the Mirador Basin of northern Guatemala, where Gibson asked questions, toured sites, engaged in discussions with local Maya inhabitants and workers, and explored the environmental and cultural aspects of Maya civilization. His interest in the Preclassic societies of the Mirador Basin, the Classic cultures as portrayed at Tikal, Palenque, and Copan, and the Postclassic cultures of Mayapan, Tulum, and Iximche led him and associate Farhad Safinia to write the story line for a movie (see Padgett 2006a, b:60). In par- ticular, he wanted a film to be a “chase scene” because it had the more “universal appeal” and was something that he had wanted to do for some time (Flixster 2006:10). A script was drafted by Gibson and Safinia, and research was imple- mented for setting and filming locations. Hotel facilities were reviewed in Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, and Mexico, with the final location selected in Veracruz, Mexico, because of adequate hotel space, ease of access, abundant industrial capability, and sufficient infrastructure for a movie of this nature.

An elaborate set depicting a Maya Postclassic period city was built to accommodate the story. Gibson and his award winning set production engineer, Thomas E. Sanders, built the entire set on an area of about 40 acres (35 ha) on a sugar cane farm bordering a small section of forest behind a hill near the small town of Boqueron, located about 40 miles to the west of Veracruz. A common misconception is that the film used computer graphics to depict the city, which was entirely untrue. Hansen was brought in for consultations and observation on two separate occasions during the middle and termination of the construction of the ancient cityscape. The site selected was, interestingly enough, an ancient village site, as detected by numerous Preclassic figurine and ceramic fragments found in the area. The basic idea was to construct a Postclassic city, complete with pyramids, structures with columns, outset stairways, causeways, and residence structures (Figs. 8.1–8.4). Indeed, the degree of detail in the city was extraordinary. Site designer Tom Sanders was quoted as saying that the film was “the hardest set he had ever worked on” (Padgett 2006a, b:61; personal communication to Hansen 2006), a revealing comment considering the extraordinary sets that Sanders has created and worked on (e.g., Saving Private Ryan, Hook, Jurassic Park 3, Superman, Braveheart, Dracula). Corn processing facilities, cacao preparation areas, basketry and mat production areas, cotton processing and weaving areas, tropical fruit, bean, and chile produc- tion areas, hide tanneries, textile dyeing vats, wood working shops, butcher shops, markets, ceramic and figurine manufacturing, sweat baths, monuments, and resi- dences were all prepared with maximum detail (Figs. 8.5–8.9). Corn husks, iguana skins, mats, turtle shells, ceramic bowls, cooking pots, storage vessels, gourds, baskets, mats, hammocks, ropes, wooden artifacts, lithic waste flakes, grinding stones, feath- ers, and dogs, ducks, and turkeys were all present within the extensive residential zone (Figs. 8.10–8.14). Existent Ceiba trees, the sacred trees of the Maya, were left standing and incorporated within the city as part of the props (Fig. 8.15). The entire set was extraordinary in detail and represented a authentic reproduction seldom, if ever, provided on film sets. For an anthropologist, it was a time machine, because the elements, both organic and nonorganic included in the set were all characteristic of urban and village Maya societies, both past and present (Figs. 8.16–8.19). However, since part of the story had to involve opulence and splendor, Gibson chose to have a small portion of the reconstructed city, which was the primary plaza and flanking structures, remain in the Classic period style since they generally were larger structures than those of the Postclassic period (Fig. 8.20). A compromise was reached with the Classic period structures showing age with evidence of deterioration and decay on the buildings. In fact, to accommodate the “reality” of the setting, several of the larger Classic period structures were undergoing “remodeling” into architecture more characteristic of the Postclassic period (Figs. 8.21 and 8.22). Even though the entire city was fictitious, the idea was to replicate the situation like that found at sites such as Cobá, Oxtankah, or Ichpaatun in Quintana Roo, Mexico (Boot 2007), where large, earlier Classic and early Postclassic period structures were surrounded by a later Postclassic city. Yet, the primary buildings of the main plaza were designed to more closely resemble Tikal (Guatemala) because of the obvious mani- festations of splendor and cultural achievement. Therefore, some of the primary examples of art and architecture were cobbled together as general, generic Maya images. Chenes and Puuc art were selected on the facades of temples, primarily due to “artistic license,” since it was the most glaringly opulent Yucatecan Maya-related art, and only a minor detail in Gibson’s mind, in comparison to the story that was to be unfolded (Figs. 8.23 and 8.24). Since the story was set in sixteenth-century coastal Yucatan, the language needed to be Yucatec to provide linguistic authenticity and a realistic context. It was difficult to conceive of a Maya warrior shouting, in English, “Come on Joe, let’s go get him!”

Costumes, ornaments, and props were produced in warehouses and workshops in Veracruz supervised by property master Richard (Rick) Young, costume designer Mayes C. Rubeo (Avatar), armourer Simon Atherton, (Gladiator, Saving Private Ryan, Robin Hood, Clash of the Titans), and a large and diverse staff of outstanding artists, hair, and makeup designers (http://www.visualhollywood.com/movies/apoc- alypto/credits.php). Extraordinary attention to detail of tattoos, jewelry, textiles, headdresses, banners, shields, weapons, and ceramics was based on images, monuments, ceramics, and murals from archaeological contexts (Figs. 8.25 and 8.26).

Filming was initially conducted in the Catemaco region to the south of Veracruz where a section of primal, original rainforest could still be found for the hunting camp scenes. Gibson employed cutting-edge digital camera technology consisting of Panavision’s Genesis system, providing extraordinary capability for specific scenes, and he worked with Oscar-award winning cinematographer Dean Semler (Dances with Wolves) to produce the visual effects he wanted. Actors were, for the most part, selected by Gibson and nearly all had no previous film experience (exceptions were Raoul Trujillo {Black Robe, The New World} and Mayra Sérbulo) (Padgett 2006a, b). Gibson’s coaching was exceptional because the actors were credible with no previous experience.

As noted earlier, the film was to be produced in Yucatec Maya, since the story was to have taken place in the general vicinity of eastern Quintana Roo, location of the first Spanish contacts by shipwrecked sailors Valdivia, Gerónimo de Aguilar and Gonzalo de Guerrero (1511), and later ship bound contact by Francisco Hernandez de Córdoba (1517) and Juan de Grijalva (1518). It was the relatively small amounts of gold and turquoise objects found among the Maya, a result of trade and contact with the Aztecs, that led to further exploration and organization of the conquest of the Aztecs in 1519 under Hernan Cortés. Furthermore, the Spanish friar, Diego de Landa explains that the Mexica had garrisons in Tabasco and Xicalango, and that the Cocom “brought the Mexican people into Mayapan” and other areas of the Yucatan Peninsula (Landa 1941: 32–36) which would explain the widespread influ- ence that Aztec culture had on the Maya in the Yucatan area.

The language training came under the tutelage of Hilario Chi Canul, a native monolingual Yucatecan Maya speaker who eventually learned Spanish at age 14, and who was the Mexican National Champion of Indigenous Maya Oratory in 2007. Dr. Barbara MacLeod (U of Texas, Austin) provided additional postfilming lan- guage assistance overdubbing and off-camera lines (see http://www.jonesreport. com/articles/121206_anthropologist_apocalypto.html). Eastern Yucatan was also selected because it would have been the source of origin for the first contact disease

in the continental New World (Small Pox), a point that Gibson wanted to make with a diseased little girl (Aquetzali Garcia) in the film. Set production and filming began in September 2005, and extended through June of 2006, with additional shoots in Costa Rica and England during June and July. Since the shooting was not done on a controlled set, it was subject to extremely rugged weather conditions, including extensive heat, humidity, and copious amounts of rain, which delayed the entire film about 3–4 months. Film editing was under the direction of Gibson and John Wright (Hunt for Red October, Speed, Passion of the Christ)

Apocalypto: Reactions

Upon its release in December 2006, Apocalypto was immediately declared by numerous critics as one of the most outstanding films of its genre and the “most artistically brilliant film” (e.g., Finke 2010; see also Bunch 2006; Berardinelli 2006; McCarthy 2006; Souter 2006; Baumgarten 2006; King 2007 ). Film critic Christopher Jacobs (2006) noted that “‘Apocalypto’ is not only a well-made film, an interesting anthropological artifact, and food for philosophical–political specula- tion, but is itself a revelation heralding the end of an era in motion picture production” (Jacobs 2006; see http://www.und.edu/instruct/cjacobs/Reviews. htm#apocalypto). Talk show hosts Alex Jones and Paul Watson called it the “most powerful film of all time” (Jones and Watson 2006). The film quickly climbed to No. 1 at the box office the first week of its release on December 2006, beating out “Happy Feet,” “The Holiday,” “Casino Royale,” and “Blood Diamond.” Similar responses were obtained in Europe and Asia, where the film remained at No. 1 for more than 4 weeks. The film established the UK box office record for the biggest opening weekend for a foreign language film, and reportedly earned $120.6 mil- lion (Finke 2010). Gibson received the Trustee Award from First Americans in the Arts (FAITA) and the Latino Business Associations Chairman’s Visionary Award. The film won the Dallas-Fort Worth Critics Association Award, the Central Ohio Film Critics Association (FOFCA), and the Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cinematography. The film was ultimately nominated for three Academy Awards in Makeup, Sound Editing, and Sound Mixing. According to several insid- ers to the movie industry, the film should also have been nominated for Academy Awards for Costume Design, Cinematography, Foreign-Language Film, and Supporting Actor, but Gibson’s unfortunate statements earlier in 2006 damaged his chances for such nominations (personal communication to Hansen, Feb. 2007; per- sonal communication to Hansen, Mar. 2007; see also Finke 2010). It was nomi- nated in the foreign language category for a Golden Globe Award. The film was also nominated for Best Direction and Best International Film in the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Films. It was nominated as the Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography in Theatrical Releases by the American Society of Cinematographers as well as Best Film not in the English Language by the British Academy of Film and Television (BAFTA).

In spite of the laudatory recognition of the film, many negative criticisms of the film were forthcoming from members of the academic community, and much of this was conveyed to the press. New York Times writer Mark McGuire noted negative comments from anthropologists and professors at SUNY Albany in an article enti- tled “Apocalypto’ a pack of inaccuracies” (McGuire 2006). A letter was written to the monthly bulletin of the Society for American Archaeology (“SAA Archaeological Record”) noting that the film had “technical inaccuracies and distortions in its por- trayal of the pre-Contact Maya.” “Anyone who cares about the past should be alarmed” and “Apocalypto will have set back, by several decades at least, archaeolo- gists’ efforts to foster a more informed view of earlier cultures” (Lohse 2007:3). Harvard scholar David Carrasco, professor of religious history at Harvard was reported to have claimed that “Gibson has made the Maya into ‘slashers’ and their society a hypermasculine fantasy” (Miller 2006:14), a curious interpretation of the film in light of late Postclassic society throughout Mesoamerica. Archaeologist Traci Ardren (University of Miami) spoke out against the film and was quoted extensively throughout U.S. press releases that Apocalypto represented “pornography” (Ardren 2006). Ardren and others had somehow assumed that the story dealt with the Late Classic Maya and the collapse in the ninth century, as one of the criticisms was that the “Spanish arrived over 300 years after the last Maya city was aban- doned” (?) (Ardren ibid: 2; interrogative mine). Maya cities along the coastal areas were fully occupied when the Spanish arrived, with hundreds and in several cases, thousands of buildings recorded for several observed sites. However, in a conflict- ing argument, Ardren noted that she was aware that the “Maya practiced brutal violence upon one another” and that she had “studied child sacrifice during the Classic period” (ibid). Her fallacious supposition that it was Gibson’s intent to infuse his personal religion was evident in the arrival of the Spanish, which sug- gested to her that Gibson meant “the end is near and the savior has come” and that “Gibson’s efforts…mask his blatantly colonial message that the Maya needed sav- ing because they were rotten at the core” (ibid). The obvious fallacy here is that her position is based entirely on unsupported assertions. She also implied that Gibson was stating that “there was absolutely nothing redeemable about Maya culture” since there was “no mention….made of the achievements in science and art, the profound spirituality and connection to agricultural cycles, or the engineering feats of Maya cities” (Ardren 2006:2). Such an odd theoretical position is dealt with by several film critics below (see Bunch 2006). While her criticisms were toned down in the special Presidential Session of the American Anthropological Association meeting in Washington, D.C., Ardren noted that:

Aquetzali, (the diseased little girl with the prophetic statements) with her Hollywood lesions and Lacandon inspired styling, encapsulates the big budget manipulation of cultural history and fact that has disturbed so much of the academic and activist communities while simultaneously enthralling so much of the movie-going public (Ardren 2007b:1).

The obvious questions here are, how does the diseased little girl encapsulate a “big budget manipulation of cultural history and fact”? How does this disturb aca- demic and activist communities? The little girl had Small Pox, a reality of death brought by the Spanish to Latin America. And, the Lacandon inspired styling was totally intentional, seeing how the Lacandon are Yucatecan Maya speakers who migrated very late in Maya history to the interior heartland.

Other criticisms ranged from the presence of a blue and gold macaw (“wasn’t a scarlet macaw within reach of a multi-million dollar budget?”), the use of the eclipse (“fastest eclipse in history”), and slavery (“While the Maya engaged in slavery, the film’s sister vision of massive subjugated labor is shockingly unfamiliar”) (Stone 2007:2–3). These criticisms are curious. The blue and gold macaw was purposely incorporated to display the opulence and extensive trade networks of the Postclassic Maya, who had trading networks as far south as Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. The eclipse episode would have been disastrous if the audience would have been forced to sit through an entire eclipse time cycle. It is clear from the film that the elite were acutely aware of the solar event, which in reality, they most likely were. I questioned numerous colleagues (Ph.D. level scholars) about when the next eclipse was to occur, and no one could answer, much less a Postclassic populous in a 1511 fictional Maya city. As for slavery, extensive raiding and slave systems existed throughout Mesoamerica during the late Postclassic period. Landa notes that the Cocom leadership “oppressed the poor and made many slaves” (Landa 1941:32,35; see also Antonio Chi 1582:230–232), and that Cocom rulership “made slaves” and “made slaves of the poorer people” (ibid:36), although the practice apparently extended to much earlier periods.

Another curious criticism was the charge that Gibson was using his religious views (i.e., Catholicism) as the “savior” and the “salvation” of the Maya with the arrival of the Spanish (e.g., McAnany and Gallareta 2010:142). Such arguments indicate an inherent personal prejudice against Gibson. In reality, the Spanish arrival to collect supplies represented a future devastating blow to the Maya, not their sal- vation, and Gibson and Farhad were fully aware of this (see Maca and McLeod 2007 discussion below). In reality, in addition to a metaphorical “New Beginning,” the segment was designed to provide an avenue for a future sequel, should it be desired, and to explain the separation of Yucatecan speakers into the interior forest to form the Lacandon societies in the sierras of northwestern Guatemala and Chiapas which would have occurred around this time.

An even more vehement opposition was voiced by Dr. Julia Gurnsey (University of Texas, Austin) who was “visibly shaken….upset, and not a little angry” (Garcia 2006). According to the interview conducted by the Austin Statesman, she noted: “I hate it. I despise it. I think it’s despicable. It’s offensive to Maya people. It’s offensive to those of us to try to teach cultural sensitivity and alternative world views that might not match our own twenty-first-century Western ones but are none- theless valid” (Garcia 2006). While Gurnsey was totally entitled to her opinion, she was not entitled to change the facts (elaborated below) which characterize the late Postclassic Maya societies of coastal Yucatan.

Perhaps one of the more comprehensive criticisms and one that seemed to reflect a majority of the academic resistance was in the March/April 2007 Archaeology magazine which featured an article entitled “Betraying the Maya: Who does the violence in Apocalypto really hurt?” A renowned Maya scholar and colleague noted that the film was “crafted with devotion to detail but with disdain for historical coherence or substance” and that the “film is a big lie about the savagery of the civi- lization created by the pre-Columbian Maya” (Freidel 2007). In addition he adds, “Allegory and artistic freedom are well and good, except when they slanderously misrepresent an entire civilization” (emphasis, mine). In view of the wide public dissemination of these criticisms, it is perhaps worthwhile to explore Freidel’s argu- ments and compare them to the archaeological, ethnohistoric, ethnographic, and epigraphic facts.

According to the criticism, the fallacy was that Gibson did not show the tiered society that Maya civilization represented and “the public deserves a more accurate and sophisticated view of the pre-Columbian Maya, and Gibson ….had the resources, advisors, and talent to have provided it” (Freidel 2007:39; see also Ardren 2006). “Courtiers, craftsmen, warriors, and merchants – the usual professions of urban life – have been documented archaeologically and pictorially in the Classic Maya record” (Freidel 2007:38). According to Freidel, Apocalypto degraded the cultural accomplishments and intellectual achievements of the Maya:

The Classic Maya wrote history, scripture, and poetry that contain knowledge of the human condition and spirit, as well as wisdom that compares favorably with that of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and other hearths of civilization. Finally, the accuracy of modern depictions of the ancient Maya matters deeply and personally to those of us who care about the mil- lions of people who speak a Mayan language…. (Freidel 2007:41).

In 2007, movie producer/director Mel Gibson “treated” audiences to a spectacularly inac- curate portrayal of ancient Maya civilization (emphasis mine). Called Apocalypto, Maya rulers and priests were depicted as blood-thirsty savages, Maya farmers as hunters and gatherers, and a Spanish galleon drifting somewhere off the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula seemed the only salvation available to the Comanche and Yaqui actor, Rudy Youngblood, and his brave young wife and two children.

It is easy to lament with Freidel and others the lack of additional examples of Maya achievements in Apocalypto, such as ballgames, written scripts, dances, the- ater, and extensive trade networks. The sophistication of the cityscape, the eco- nomic and social activities visible in the film, the elaborate architecture, and the prognostication of the eclipse in Apocalypto implied an extraordinary cultural com- plexity. The extensive detail built into the cityscape at Veracruz would have allowed a greater insight into the economic, social, and political sophistication of the Maya, and it is unfortunate that more of the art, architecture, and the detailed cultural remains did not see more film time.

Another criticism of some merit refers to the murals that were similar to the Preclassic Maya murals of San Bartolo, Peten, Guatemala which were incorporated into the scene, entirely at the whims of the director and the set designer to accom- modate the story line. The use of this art was met with resistance by this author because of the obvious chronological disparity and because there were better Postclassic examples from Chichen Itza. The art, however, was selected for aes- thetic reasons because it could be portrayed as large enough and explicit enough to mesh with the story. Furthermore, at the time of filming, it was unsure as to whether any images of the murals would be even used or incorporated into the film after edit- ing. The mural moved the film along by allowing the prisoners to realize their fate without additional scenes of conversation.

Additional questions posed by Freidel included phrases like “Were Classic Maya cities the dens of iniquity Gibson envisions?” and “Were city dwellers the blood- thirsty predators Gibson portrays?” (Freidel 2007:38). He further claims “Direct pre- dation and slaughter of ordinary people is a reality in some times and places, but it is a slander when attributed to the ancient Maya.” With all respect to the need for cul- tural sensitivity, the arguments posed by Freidel are entirely subjective and unfounded according to the ethnohistoric and archaeological record. Perhaps it would have been useful to have asked the same questions to Capitan Valdivia and the sailors who were with Gonzalo Guerrero and Jeronimo de Aguilar when, after their shipwreck and landing on an Akumal beach in 1511, they were sacrificed and eaten (Cervantes de Salazar 1941:236; Landa 1941:8). Would it have been “slanderous” to accuse the Maya of slaughter when referring to members of the Francisco Mirones y Lezcano expedition into the interior of Yucatan who were sacrificed via heart extractions (Scholes and Adams 1991). A similar fate fell upon the Spanish priests, Fray Cristobal de Prada and Jacinto de Vargas, on the island of the Itza in Peten, Guatemala (Cano 1697/1984:17) as well as Friar Domingo de Vico and his associ- ates in Acalan (Villagutierre 1701/1983: 49). Direct captive predation slaughter and

sacrifice were inflicted on the occupants of the ravaged villages recorded in murals on the walls of the Temple of the Jaguar and the Temple of the Warriors at Chichen Itza (Miller 1977; Morris et al. 1931) (Figs. 8.27–8.31). Furthermore, the Apocalypto story takes place in 1511–1518, the proto-Historic period, not the Classic Maya period 600–700 years previous, a detail that seems to have escaped many of the crit- ics. Freidel commented that the film “juxtaposes ideas about social and political failure from the ninth century crisis” or “collapse ” with the “decadence” of the Postclassic period, and that the “term ‘decadent’ is no longer used to describe that period (Postclassic) by Maya archaeologists” (Freidel 2007:39). It is partially true that the film juxtaposes ideas about the ninth-century Lowland Maya collapse, but it also includes ideas associated with the Preclassic “collapse” documented in the Mirador Basin of northern Guatemala (see Hansen et al. 2002; Schreiner 2000a, b, 2001, 2002). Such perceptions are timeless, particularly since many of the same ills are currently ongoing in many areas of the Maya heartland today.

Freidel noted incorrectly that “Apocalypto is wrong from the opening shot of an idealized rainforest hamlet” because he has assumed there were no broad areas in the Maya heartland where a small hunting society could have existed. He based this perspective on his surveys on the island of Cozumel, where “the entire landscape was defined by stone walls” (Freidel 2007: 39). He suggests that along the entire coast of the Yucatan peninsula “the Spanish encountered people living in towns” (ibid) and that “Gibson’s hunter-gatherers are pure fantasy” (ibid). This fallacious argument belies the fact that there were vast sections of rainforest in the interior of the Yucatan shelf that had absolutely no human intervention since about A.D. 840 (Wahl 2000, 2005; Wahl et al. 2005, 2006, 2007). Landa notes that the exploration of Hernan Cortes into the interior of Tabasco, Campeche, and Peten in 1524 indi- cated vast vacant areas of forest (Cortés 1986:372) and subsequent colonial docu- ments such as Avendaño y Loyola testify as to the complete isolation and total abandonment of vast sections with absolutely no human presence (Avendaño y Loyola 1987: 16, 56, 59–64). Landa notes that the inhabitants (“tribes”) “wandered around in the uninhabited parts of Yucatan for 40 years” (Landa 1941:30–31) and that they engaged in “hunting in companies of 50, more or less, and when they reach the town, they make their presents to their lord and distribute the rest as among friends” (ibid: 97). A similar situation occurred with the migration of Canek’s soci- ety from the area of Mayapan to Lake Peten Itza where the populations wandered “for many years in the wilderness” (Villagutierre Soto-Mayor 1701/1983: 24).

The Mexica term for the hunters and hunting camps in tropical forests was amiz- tequihuaque, and amiztlatoque (see Carrasco 1971:359), suggesting that hunters enjoyed a certain status or class in much the same fashion as the merchants. Gibson’s portrayal of small hunting hamlets in the middle of an unpopulated jungle is there- fore far more realistic and probable during the Late Postclassic period than the alternative proposed by Freidel.

Freidel notes that “While the ancient Maya had their shortcomings (??), includ- ing the organized violence typical of civilized people (??), they were remarkable in their achievements, and not just the brutal monsters depicted by Gibson” (Freidel 2007:39) (interrogatives mine). The dichotomy of these statements is striking: it is precisely the “shortcomings” that Gibson was using as his metaphor for society, and the “organized violence” is a subjective comment of societies whose level of “civi- lization” may have begun to deteriorate (Collier 1999; Stewart et al. 2001; Collier et al. 2003; Skaperdas 2009). Freidel also suggests that, based on artistic representa- tions from sites such as Yaxchilan, Tikal, and Piedras Negras and hieroglyphic texts from Dos Pilas, Uaxactun, Yaxuna, and Waka-Peru, the elite were not predators of common people or peasants (ibid: 40). This is a flawed perspective perhaps based on a perceived notion of Late Classic societies, not the terminal Postclassic period rep- resented in Apocalypto (see below). This small detail seems to have escaped many of the critics, despite the presence of smallpox on one of the characters and the presence of architecture in the cityscape that was obviously Postclassic period architecture. The Maya had long been subjected to or had adopted Toltec practices (skull racks), at least by about ad 1000 if not earlier, and had direct contact and influence from the Aztec societies (human sacrifice, use of Tlaloc figures, human consumption, trade, exchange). The shocking element of these criticisms is that they totally disregard the numerous colonial documents and writings of Spanish observers, not to mention the vast examples of archaeological data that support the perceptions that Gibson portrayed in the film.

Criticisms asserted that the film was a racist depiction. Yet a TMZ poll (http:// http://www.tmz.com/2007/03/23/mel-goes-ballistic-f-you) conducted on line on March 29, 2007 had 79,395 responses to the question “Is Apocalypto racist?” of which 75% (59,546) replied negatively that it was NOT racist. If such a large proportion of the viewing population did not think Apocalypto was racist, why did so many prom- inent academicians proclaim that it was?

As with any film of a historical nature, some of the criticisms of Apocalypto have merit. However, many, indeed most of the criticisms do not. As noted earlier, the film was a piece of fiction, a story, and Gibson was within his right to tell the story as he saw fit, particularly if it adhered to the ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological facts. It may be useful, therefore, to examine the criticisms in light of an anthropological approach and evaluate the merits of them. While there were many criticisms that would merit ample discussion in this chapter, a review of some of the major complaints, such as the level and degree of violence portrayed in the movie, requires further examination in light of multidisciplinary data because it has relevance to anthropological discourse.

Maya Human Sacrifice and Warfare Behavior

The level of sacrifice depicted in Apocalypto was based almost entirely on ethnohistoric data and archaeological interpretation, which coincides with the contextual cultural behavior noted in terminal Postclassic and proto-Historic Mesoamerica. Aztec influence, well established as a major protagonist of human sacrifices, had pene- trated much of the Maya region through elaborate trade and exchange systems as well as outright Mexican settlements in the Yucatecan heartland, a concept blamed on the Cocom family (Landa 1941:32–39; see Squier Note 66 in de Palacio and Diego de 1576; Bray 1977; Finamore and Houston 2010:177). Outright migrations of Nahuatl-speaking occupants also occurred in the Highlands of Guatemala, and in El Salvador and Honduras. The Spaniards encountered widespread sacrifice among the major linguistic groups outside the Mexica homeland, including the Totonac and Maya areas. For example, the Totonac culture at Cempoala and Gulf Coast region practiced extensive human sacrifice (Diaz de Castillo 1965:102–103), although they occasionally blamed the misdeeds on the Aztecs. At Quiahuitztlan on the eastern Gulf Coast, the “fat Cacique” complained that “every year, many of their sons and daugh- ters were demanded of them for sacrifice” and that the Aztec “tax-gatherers carried off their wives and daughters if they were handsome, and ravished them” (Diaz de Castillo 1965:90). Bernal Diaz de Castillo noted the situation with respect to the towns near the coast:

When Pedro de Alvarado reached these towns …….he found in the cues bodies of men and boys who had been sacrificed, and the walls and altars stained with blood and the hearts placed as offerings before the Idols. He also found the stones on which the sacrifices were made and the stone knives with which to open the chest so as to take out the heart……he found most of the bodies without arms or legs….that they had been carried off to be eaten… I will not say any more of the number of sacrifices, although we found the same thing in every town we afterwards entered (Diaz de Castillo 1965:85).

The Spanish did not have to enter deep into Aztec territory to detect the practice of human sacrifices, but rather, such behavior occurred on, or near the coast which would have had contact with the Lowland Maya. On another occasion, Diaz de Castillo notes that Cortes and his small army “slept in another small town” (near the Gulf Coast), where also many sacrifices had been made, but as many readers will be tired of hearing of the great number of Indian men and women whom we found sacrificed in all the towns and roads we passed (ibid:86–87).

The unusual numbers of sacrifices in Postclassic Mesoamerica were noted by Duran (1994), who recorded that, during Aztec coronation ceremonies, the ….captives were brought out. All of them were sacrificed in honor of his coronation (a pain- ful ceremony), and it was a pathetic thing to see these wretches as victims of Motecuhzoma. …I am not exaggerating; there were days in which two thousand, three thousand, five thou- sand, or eight thousand men were sacrificed. Their flesh was eaten…… (Duran 1994:407).

The widespread Mesoamerican sacrificial practices (Aztec, Totonac, Mixtec, Zapotec, Maya) were duly recorded by Spanish observers such as Cortés, Sahagun, Duran, Torquemada, Tapia, Diaz de Castillo, Mirones y Lezcano, Avendaño y Loyala, Cárdenas y Valencia, Cervantes de Salazar, Bernardo Casanova, Villagutierre Soto-Mayor, Cogolludo, and Garcia de Palacios at sites such as the Mexican and Guatemalan Highlands, the Totonac Lowlands (i.e., Cempoala) of the Gulf Coast of Mexico, the Yucatecan Coast (i.e., Landa 1941; Herrera 1601/1941; Cervantes de Salazar 1941) or the interior heartland region (Cano 1697/1984; Scholes and Adams 1991; Avendaño y Loyola 1987; Cogolludo 1688/2008; Villagutierre Soto-Mayor 1701/1983), showing a broad geographical and chronological consistency in the ritual behavior. The Italian translator and publisher Calvo noted, in his newsletter of 1521–1522 that the initial contact at Cozumel by Cortes observed “…men and people wearing fine-woven cloth and of every color, who practice numerous excellent arts such as gold-and silver smithery and European-style jewelry making, in honor of the idols they adore and to whom they sacrifice humans, cutting open their chests and pulling out their hearts which they offer to them” (the idols)….and that they (the Spanish) “cast them down (the idols) and put in place of them the image of our Lord and the Virgin Mary with the Cross, which they held in great veneration, and they themselves cleaned the temple where human blood from the sacrifices had fallen” (Calvo 1985: 11).

Human sacrifices by the Maya were frequently engaged in times of famine and plagues (Landa 1941:54) or “some misfortune” (ibid: 115), a point illustrated in Apocalypto. The defensive posture of wells, plazas, and residential patterns was so that the Maya could avoid being “captured, sold, and sacrificed” (Herrera 1601/1941:217), and that the “number of people sacrificed was great”(ibid).

Earlier Mexican influences, such as the Toltec presence at Chichen Itza appar- ently also had a profound influence on sacrificial conduct at an even earlier point in the Postclassic period in the Maya area. The Toltec/Toltec influences are believed to be associated with the Tzompantli skull racks in stone in the Great Plaza at Chichen Itza and other sites such as Uxmal. Cano notes the extraction of the hearts of Fray Christobal de Prada and Fray Jacintho de Vargas by the high priest “Cuin Kenek” (Cano 1697/1984:17).

The rituals enacted in the sacrificial executions of Father Diego Delgado, Don Cristobal Na (the chieftain of Tipu who had been converted to Christianity), and 13 Spanish soldiers involved the extraction of hearts and offerings to “idols” as well as the placement of all heads on poles (Tzompantli?) on a small hill near the city (Villagutierre 1701/1983: 92). Cogolludo notes the sacrifice, decapitation, and placement of heads on stakes (Tzompantli) in the village of Chemax (Cogolludo 1688/2008: 359; see also page 24, 47).

Furthermore, writings by Cervantes de Salazar noted that the Maya from Cozumel had a “great fear” of those along the coast because “they were at war with those of that coast” (Cervantes de Salazar 1941:233), indicating a constant and consistent state of warfare among the coastal Maya of Yucatan during the late Postclassic- Proto-Historic periods. In addition, some of the extraordinary exploits of Jeronimo de Aguilar were because of his valor on the battlefield against foes entrenched in enduring “hatreds” among the coastal and interior Maya (ibid:237–238). The con- stant state of warfare was also noted by Landa (1941:41–42) in which more than 150,000 men died in battle, and created a scenario of conflict, revenge, and hatred that worked to the advantage of the Spaniards (ibid). Such warfare involved stealth attacks and brutal treatment of captives:

Guided by a tall banner, they went out in great silence from the town and thus they marched to attack their enemies, with loud cries and with great cruelties, when they fell upon them unprepared….After the victory they took the jaws off the dead bodies and with the flesh cleaned off, they put them on their arms. In their wars they made great offerings of the spoils, and if they made a prisoner of some distinguished man, they sacrificed him immedi- ately, not wishing to leave any one alive who might injure them afterwards. The rest of the people remained captive in the power of those who had taken them (Landa 1941:123).

The stealth attacks were visible in the village scenes of Apocalypto in minute detail, including the wearing of human mandibles as trophies by the dominant leader of the warring band. The fictitious city in Apocalypto had a Tzompantli with vertical poles as that depicted in Chichen Itza (see Eberl 2001: 318) and as described by the Spanish. The Aztec Tzompantli clearly had the perforations on the parietal side of the skull so that the skulls were displayed horizontally. The practice of heart extrac- tion has been explicitly defined by Diego de Landa and numerous other Spanish observers. According to the accounts, a victim was often stripped naked, anointed with a blue color, and either tied to poles and shot with arrows (a scene that had been edited out and not included in Apocalypto), or taken to place of sacrifice (temple), seized by four Chacs, and suffered a heart extraction, throwing the decapitated head and body down the steps of the temple (Landa 1941: 117–123; see also the Florentine Codex, p. 58) precisely as depicted in the film. However, the level of violence according to ethnohistoric accounts included the fact that the body was recovered at the base of the steps and flayed, with the skin worn by the naked priest with dancing in great solemnity (Landa 1941:120; Herrera 1601/1941: 219), which was a scene NOT depicted in the film. Furthermore, the exaggerated body pit discovered by the escaping Jaguar Paw in Apocalypto is likely to not have existed because, according to Landa, Duran, and other observers, the victims were eaten (Landa 1941: 120; see also Lopez-Medel 1612: L. 227), another scene NOT depicted in Apocalypto. However, if mass quantifies of victims were sacrificed similar to Duran’s account of the Aztecs, it is entirely possible that such a pit could have existed due to the excess of human flesh that was not consumed.

Lopez-Medel (1612) (1941: 222) notes that “Those compelled (for sacrifice) were captives and men taken in the wars they made against other pueblos, whom they kept in prisons and in cages for this purpose, fattening them.” The jawbones on arms were equally depicted in Apocalypto, indicating the level of butchery that accompanied Postclassic warfare. The removal and display of human jawbones is also a pan-Mesoamerican feat which dates as early as the Early Classic, based on burials in highland Teotihuacan and the Lowland Maya Mirador Basin site of Tintal (Tintal Burial 1) (Hansen et al. 2006). Lopez-Medel also notes that Maya “sacri- fices….were so many in number” (Lopez-Medel (1612/1941: 222).

Freidel purports that the Maya were not predators of common people or peasants. However, Villagutierre records that villages were attacked with some regularity in the sixteenth century:

In 1552 the cruel and barbarous Lacandones, not content with the raids they had made every year on Spanish and Christian Indian villages in the province of Chiapas, which were closest to them, robbing, killing, taking their wives and children captive in order to sacrifice them to their idols, and having already destroyed 14 villages, continued their customary raids from two villages farthest away in the mountains….and at night attacked two other villages….. They killed and captured many people and sacrificed the children on the church altars, at the foot of the cross, taking out their hearts and smearing the holy images venerated in the temples with the blood. When all this was done, they destroyed and burned the villages, taking with them the men and women as captives….. (Villagutierre 1701/1983:44)

The extraordinary detail in the murals from Chichen Itza confirms Villagutierre’s observations and suggests that common people and peasants as well as entire villages were targets for pillage, destruction, sacrifices, and captives (Morris 1931: Plates 139–147; Miller 1977). The extraordinary detail in the murals in the Temple of the

Warriors shows the assault on a village with elite and commoner residences under siege (Figs. 8.27 and 8.28), with the heart extractions and slaughter of male and female captives who had been smeared with blue paint prior to heart extraction at the village (Morris et al. 1931: Plate 144; see Figs. 8.29 and 8.30) and the depictions of more formal heart extractions from captives in a temple complex (ibid: Plate 145; see Fig. 8.31).

The antiquity and geographical extent of Maya human sacrifices is ubiquitous throughout the Maya Lowlands. Explicit images of human captives and heart extrac- tion sacrifices were found in graffiti on Classic period architecture (post occupa- tional?) at Tikal (Orrego and Larios 1983: 169, 172). Excavations at the Maya site of Colha, Belize, revealed an extraordinary pit dating to the Terminal Late Classic period (ca. ad 800–900) which had been placed at the base of a structure (Operation 2011) that yielded 30 decapitated skulls, of which 10 were from children (Mock 1994; Massey 1994; Hester et al. 1983:49–53; see Figs. 8.32 and 8.33). In addition, the bodies of 20 people had been recovered at the base of the nearby pyramid stair- case (Operation 2012; Hester et al. 1983:51).

Such dramatic evidence over a vast area of the Maya Lowlands indicates that human sacrifice and human heart extractions were a widespread and common occur- rence. The heavily fortified Postclassic sites of Mayapan, Tulum, Ichpaatun, Oxtankab, Tayasal, Muralla de Leon (Rice and Rice 1981), and three walled Terminal Classic sites of Chacchob, Cuca, and Dzonot Ake (Webster 1980) in the

Lowlands as well as the heavily fortified Highland Maya sites of Iximche, Mixco Viejo, Rabinal, and Cumarcaj indicate the defensive postures of late Maya centers, a concept clearly in line with the social and political conditions of conflict and wars that Gibson was suggesting in Apocalypto.

One of the more outstanding reviews of Apocalypto was written by Sonny Bunch (2006), an assistant editor at The Weekly Standard who noted the criticisms from academicians, and pointed out that the facts demonstrated either a complete distor- tion of reality, or a disturbing incompetence by the academic critics. While the complete version of the review can be seen at (http://www.weeklystandard.com/ Content/Public/Articles/000/000/013/075khpyy.asp), some of the more salient points of his arguments were that almost all critics mentioned Gibson’s alleged anti- Semitic statement and that the film did not inform adequately about the cultural achievements of the ancient Maya. Bunch notes that:

….This is a strange criticism. If you were interested in boning up on calendars, hieroglyph- ics, and pyramids you could simply watch a middle-school film strip. And who complained that in Gladiator, Ridley Scott showed epic battle scenes and vicious gladiatorial combat instead of teaching us how the aqueducts were built? (emphasis mine)

Bunch also confronts the critics that suggest that the film portrayed “….an offensive and racist notion that Maya people were brutal to one another long before the arrival of Europeans…..” Newsweek reports that “although a few Mayan murals do illustrate the capture and even torture of prisoners, none depicts decapitation” as a mural in a trailer for the film does. “That is wrong”. It’s just plain wrong, “the magazine quotes Harvard professor William Fash as saying. Karl Taube, a professor of anthropology at UC Riverside, complained to the Washington Post about the portrayal of slaves building the Mayan pyramids. “We have no evidence of large numbers of slaves,” he told the paper.

Even the mere arrival, at the end of the film, of Spanish explorers has been lambasted as culturally insensitive….. Here’s Gurnsey, again, providing a questionable interpretation of the film’s final minutes: “And the ending with the arrival of the Spanish (conquistadors) underscored the film’s message that this culture is doomed because of its own brutality. The implied message is that it’s Christianity that saves these brutal savages. “But none of these complaints holds up particularly well under scrutiny. After all, while it may not mesh well with their post-conquest victimology, the Mayans did partake of bloody human sacrifice.” (emphasis mine)

While there may be some that might question the validity of the Spanish observa- tions, the fact that the ethnohistoric observations match so seamlessly with the archaeological data from both earlier and later periods indicate that such doubts are highly unlikely. The Maya had vast areas of forest without populations, small hunt- ing groups and camps, chronic warfare and insidious attacks on enemies and sacri- ficial victims. Captives were exploited as slaves throughout Mesoamerica. One of the best comprehensive studies of human sacrifice in the Maya/Mesoamerica area was published by Ruben G. Mendoza (Mendoza 2007; see also Chacon and Dye 2007; Chacon and Mendoza 2007). Warriors wore the jawbones of slain foes, cap- tured male and female captives, and engaged in exotic trade systems ranging from the Gulf Coast to Costa Rica. A detailed stucco panel at the site of Tonina, Chiapas, Mexico shows a decapitated sacrificial victim clasped in the hand of the Ak Ok Cimi, a death deity. Another stucco panel depicts a decapitated head on a leaf-covered Tzompantli. Sacrificial rituals included painting the sacrificial victims blue, erecting tzompantlis where human heads were skewered, sacrificing human victims on the “cues” or temples with heart extractions. Victims were decapitated, with the bodies rolled down the staircase and subsequently flayed and butchered (not depicted in the film). Priests and nobility were acutely aware of solar and celes- tial phenomena such as eclipses, which were celebrated with sacrifices during plagues, famine, or other misfortune.

It would be difficult to assert that all the scholars who spoke out against Apocalypto were ignorant or incompetent, but why did they make claims that were fallacious or inaccurate in the face of overwhelming data? Why was the response so vehement when many of the issues and situations portrayed in the film were accurate? It is likely that much of the resistance was created by Gibson’s anti-Semitic statement during an arrest about 6 months previous to the release of the film. In some cases, the opposition to Apocalypto may have been simple ignorance. However, it is also implied that scholars wittingly or unwittingly may have ascribed to a “revisionist” and/or “relativist/aboriginalist” perspective, concepts which can fall under the title of “neo-pragmatism” (see Buchler 1955:251–289; Haack 1998; Rorty 1982, 1991). A “revisionist” or “sham-reasoning” view may either represent an antithesis of truth or a decorative reasoning of truth, or the clarification and establishment of it (Haack 1997a, 1998; Peirce 1886: in Hartshorne and Weiss, Vol. I, pp. 57–59; McPherson 2003). In some cases, revisionist perspectives ignore the vast amounts of data that have accumulated over periods of time, and seek to promote that which is ideologically expedient or politically “correct” or convenient within the bounds of “language” (e.g., Rorty 1982; McPherson 2003). While it is entirely possible that additional data may help establish a more accurate perspective based on additional information, often added by new technologies, the dangers and damage that a revi- sionist/relativist perspective can cause, if incorrect, is that it also has the potential to ultimately deceive and distort the reality of the human existence and defy truth. Such a position is “not to find out how things really are, but to advance (oneself) by making a case for some proposition to the truth-value of which he is indifferent” (Haack 1997a:2). It also suggests that “reasoning” can be mainly “decorative” and result in a “rapid deterioration of intellectual vigor” (Peirce I: 57–58, in Hartshorne et al. 1931–1958; see Haack 1998:32). In other cases, a certain movement purports that “indigenous rights should always trump scientific inquiry” (Gillespie 2004:174, citing Zimmerman et al. 2003). Such positions defy the establishment of truth and seek for an unqualified political correctness that is both unwarranted and dangerous to the realities of the human saga. On a more subtle note, it can lull a society into an intellectual complacency, generating a moral and intellectual failure to acknowl- edge or improve on mistakes or violations of accepted values of universal human rights.

Perhaps a more viable alternative would be to return to the values of truth in sci- ence as determined by vigorous methodological procedure and evaluation via a multitude of multidisciplinary approaches. A solution lies in a return to the philo- sophical foundations of science such as that proposed by Peirce, Hempel, Haack, and others to organize and understand truth and valid objective reasoning as part of the ultimate goal. As Josh Billings noted more than a century ago, “As scarce as truth is, the supply has always been in excess of the demand” (Shaw 1865; Cited in Haack 1997b:241).

Charles Peirce, arguably the “greatest of American philosophers” (Haack 1997a:1) has been credited, along with William James as the creator of “pragma- tism” in scientific reasoning (ibid). Peirce had been strongly influenced by the German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1996) (1781, 1787) and the earlier scientists such as Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo (Peirce 1877, cited in Buchler 1955:6). He wrote that he had also been profoundly influenced by the Scottish theologian John Duns Scotus (1265–1308). Peirce noted that one can “opine that there is such a thing as Truth,” meaning that “you mean that something is SO….whether you or I, or anybody thinks it is so or not….The essence of the opinion is that there is some- thing that is SO, no matter if there be an overwhelming vote against it” (Peirce 1898(2):135). He also noted that, in order to determine the veracity of a subject, one would have to “find out the right method of thinking and…follow it out” so that “truth can be nothing more nor less than the last result to which the following out of this method would ultimately carry us” (Peirce 1898 (5):553). The importance of a multidisciplinary approach is such that as “we push our archaeological and other studies, the more strongly will that conclusion force itself on our minds for- ever-or would do so, if study were to go on forever….” (Peirce 1898 (5):565–566). The result would “ultimately yield permanent, rational agreement among all inquir- ers, however various their beliefs at the outset” (Brunning and Forster 1997a, b:8; Buchler 1955; Hempel 1965:141). Therefore, the purpose of science was to “look the truth in the face, whether doing so be conducive to the interests of society or not” (Peirce 1901:300).

Such pragmatism formed in the late 1800s as a response to “antiscience” or “nominalist” movements which continue to the present day in scientific philosophy dressed as “relativism” or negative “revisionism.” The role of revisionism is based on the premise that “There is no single, eternal, and immutable ‘truth’ about past events and their meaning. The unending quest of historians for understanding the past – that is, ‘revisionism’ – is what makes history vital and meaningful” (McPherson 2003).

In many cases, further revision of historical information can clarify or enhance the knowledge of the past. In other cases, the revision of history was designed to promote certain agendas or to ease or “whitewash” the uncomfortable aspects of events and actions so that “evil must be forgotten, distorted, skimmed over” and “history loses its value as an incentive and…paints perfect men and noble nations, but it does not tell the truth” (Du Bois 1935, cited in Williams 2005:10–11). A posi- tive example of revisionism deals with the new data showing the precocious devel- opment of the Preclassic Maya in the Mirador Basin of northern Guatemala, a concept which fundamentally changed the understanding of the developmental and evolutionary history of the ancient Maya (e.g., Dahlin 1984; Hansen 1984, 2001, 2005; Matheny 1987). Another example is the understanding of royal marriage arrangements in ancient Egypt, such as the incestual relationship of Tutankhamun’s mother, as determined through DNA (Hawass 2010). A negative example of revi- sionism is the movement to deny that the Holocaust existed in Europe in World War II (e.g., Barnes 1968, 1969; Hoggan 1969; see Lipstadt 1994).

The “science” of historical revisionism infers that further studies would lead to the same fundamental premise, regardless of the personal opinions or perspectives. In this sense, an objective “absolute truth” is the ultimate goal or “ideal,” a la Peirce and Hempel, so that infinite, multidisciplinary studies or new technologies would lead to the same conclusions, “independent of individual opinion or preference” (Hempel 1965:141), a concept which had previously been eloquently espoused by Peirce (Vol. 8: 12, see Delaney 1993:46). In this sense, “truth is a property-and a property which, unlike justification or probability on present evidence, depends on more than the present memory and experience of the speaker” and is “the one insight of ‘realism’ that we should not jettison” (Putnam 1990:32). The quest for truth then becomes a refining process, an improvement on previously established precepts that were correct. A fundamental “truth” that has to be substantially altered because of new information from increasing multidisciplinary data or new technologies was never true in the first place, and, in this sense, can be discarded with a revision that can be justified with an eye always on the original premise that was corrected. The process becomes one of refining accuracy and an identification with a continuing community and probability (Sellars 1970:102).

Some of the more radical oppositions to the concept of the Peircean realism have been voiced by Richard Rorty and Donald Davidson (Rorty 1982, 1989, 1991, 1992; Davidson 1986) who have been dubbed “neo-pragmatists” and “relativists” (Haack 1998:31). Rorty has been one of the most influential forces in the “relativistic” thought, in which he notes that he does “not have much use for notions like… ‘objec- tive truth’” (Rorty 1992:141) because “science is no more than the handmaiden of technology” (Rorty 1989: 3–4), or the “human world, the world according to concep- tual and linguistic conditions” (Hausman 1997:198). According to Rorty, “truth is made because truth belongs to sentences and ‘Where there are no sentences, there is no truth’” (ibid:202). In like manner, Davidson’s position is that “what gives truth value is the cumulative mass of accepted beliefs that serve as backing for individual sentences when these are consistent with that mass of beliefs” (Hausman 1997:206). This would create what Rorty has referred to as a “seesaw” meaning that one “would never know when we were at the end of inquiry” (Rorty 1989:11, 1991:131).

The response to such a position was posited by Peirce, however, who saw the entire issue as a perspective of hope, “…more than a purely intellectual conception of pos- sibility…..(but)…that there is an actual, concrete state to be expected” (Hausman 1997:219). The refinement of intellectual knowledge, however, begs the need for a multidisciplinary approach, and, in the case of ancient societies, the combined and coordinated efforts of linguistics, ethnohistory, ethnography, archaeology, and the sociocultural and biological anthropology so as to cover a broader range of the emic and etic perspectives of the society. Such refining “truths,” when built line upon line and precept upon precept, lead one to arrive at the same conclusions regardless of the personal differences of opinion or biases that were inherent in the observer.

The film Apocalypto is a fictional film which told the story of a chase scene, utilizing certain components of the Postclassic Maya cultural behavior as the setting for the drama which was unfolded.

Perhaps the most accurate critique of the film was penned by Allan Maca and Kevin McLeod (2007) at the Presidential Session on Apocalypto at the American Anthropological Association Meeting in Washington, D.C. From their perception, “Gibson’s (scenes are) vital to his larger purposes regarding the exploration of death, consciousness, and transformation” (Maca and McLeod 2007: 4). In essence, Maca and McLeod grasped the enormous metaphors that Gibson was knitting into the film. As Maca and McLeod (2007) note:

Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto, while it may seem on the surface to be another mindless, violent action epic, with the Maya as unwitting casualties, actually sets out to achieve similar goals: an exploration of consciousness and of modern man’s need for renewal and transformation. Like most films involving or based on native culture yet made by non-natives, Apocalypto is a grandiose and intricately nuanced commentary on white society. Because the hero and the villains are indigenous, however, the film also seeks to explore the basis of our humanity, regardless of race and ethnicity. The artistic devices Gibson uses to communicate his ideas draw heavily on tropes, symbols, and plotlines developed by earlier masters; but he also clearly develops and adopts themes and symbolic vehicles that are basic to myth and ritual.

Gibson utilized graphic scenes to visualize contemporary society and the hypocrisy that permeates the issues: the jungle=higher state of consciousness and peace, a societal refuge and environmental neutrality; “Sacrifices = bloody conflict/ soldiers in the Middle East”; Body Pit=“Nothing (small)compared to the daily abortion rate in the U.S”; Jaguar Paw escape = “the valiant human spirit in the face of unfavorable odds, the freedom from tyranny and social oppression”; environmental degradation near the city = “conspicuous consumption of resources and the contemporary destruction of the environment”; the pit where Jaguar Paw’s family was kept = “struggles , challenges, and obstacles of the contemporary family.”

The strategy of joining the past to a critique of the present has been used repeat- edly in films for decades. Wolfgang Petersen, the director of Troy (2004) is reported to have stated:

“Look at the present! What the Iliad says about humans and wars is, simply, still true. Power-hungry Agamemnons who want to create a new world order- that is absolutely current. … Of course, we didn’t start saying: Let’s make a movie about American politics, but (we started) with Homer’s epic. But while we were working on it we realized that the parallels to the things that were happening out there were obvious” (Kniebe 2004; cited in Winkler 2007:8)

A certain level of allegory and metaphor permeated nearly all aspects of the film Apocalypto. As Maca and McLeod (2007:2) note:

Contrary to what some have concluded about this film, Apocalypto does NOT promote, celebrate or otherwise glorify the Spanish or Christianity; it is quite the opposite really. What is celebrated repeatedly is the jungle, a metaphor for peace, the higher mind and a more evolved consciousness. The jungle is a refuge… a place of understanding……where true creation and novelty may unfold…….

The leading writers and directors intentionally play with symbols and meanings as a way to innovate. Not all film makers can do this very well. However, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and Apocalypse Now (1979), directed by Stanley Kubrick and Francis Ford Coppola, respectively, are two films that set new models……Both are, explicitly and implicitly, antiwar, anti-US imperialism, and anti-colonialism and focus on the evolution of human consciousness…… These two films are at the center of the visual and philosophical mission of Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto…..

One of the more interesting concepts that the data on human sacrifice in the Maya/ Mesoamerica area has demonstrated is that the Maya were not radically different from anybody else and that they were consistent with the rest of humanity. The story, metaphorically, could be applied to almost any ancient society in the world. The Maya achieved extraordinary accomplishments comparable with Greeks, Romans, Mesopotamians, Egyptians, and Chinese, and they were no less brutal. But the con- sciousness of the story was far more profound than a “blood and gore flick.” The story was Gibson’s and Safinia’s to tell and, as Maca and McLeod astutely note, …… we can’t help but wonder if the use of the trap in Apocalypto, as a vehicle for aware- ness, doesn’t also extend to our participation in Mel Gibson’s mission, such that all of us……may have been lured to exactly the space and place of discussion that he intended…. this creates discomfort even to contemplate….. (ibid: 6).

Apocalypto will be judged in time as a cinema masterpiece, not only in its superb execution of film production, but also as an allegorical reference to the present. The criticisms, which were both accurate and fallacious, will continue to surround this film due to its unique story, the extraordinary setting, the allegorical and metaphori- cal references, and the various levels of awareness that are inherent in the film regarding the human saga. We are all a part of it.

References

Ardren, Traci 2006 Is “Apocalypto” Pornographic. Archaeology, Online Reviews, December 5, 2006. (http://www.archaeology.org/online/reviews/apocalypto.html)

Ardren, Traci 2007a Critiquing Apocalypto: An Anthropological Response to the Perpetuation of Inequality in Popular Media. Abstract submitted for a Presidential Session, sponsored by the Archaeology Division and the Society for Humanistic Anthropology, American Anthropological Association. Traci Ardren, Organizer & Chair.

Ardren, Traci 2007b Reception Theory and the Reinvention of Alexander, Xerxes, and Jaguar Paw in 21st Century Popular Media. Paper delivered at the Presidential Session, Critiquing Apocalypto: An Anthropological Response to the Perpetuation of Inequality in Popular Media, Organized and chaired by Traci Ardren. November 2007, Washington, D.C.

Avendaño y Loyola, Fray Andrés de 1987 Relation of Two Trips to Petén: Made for the Conversion of the Heathen Ytzaex and Cehaches (Relación de las dos Entradas que hize a Petén Ytza para la conversion de los Ytzaex y Cehaches Paganos), translated by Charles P. Bowditch and Guillermo Rivera, edited with notes by Frank E. Comparato. Labyrinthos, Culver City, California.

Barnes, Harry Elmer 1968 Zionist Fraud. In American Mercury, Fall 1968.
Barnes, Harry Elmer 1969 Zionist Fraud. Reprinted appendix in The Myth of the Six Million by

David Hoggan, Noontide Press, Los Angeles, pp. 117 ff.
Baumgarten, Marjorie 2006 Apocalypto. The Austin Chronicle, Dec. 8, 2006. http://www.

austinchronicle.com/gyrobase/Calendar/Film?Film = oid%3A425445
Berardinelli, James 2006 Apocalypto: A Movie Review. Reel Views. http://www.reelviews.net/

php_review_template.php?identifier = 877
Boot, Erik 2007 Oxtankah-Summary of Recent Research. Maya News Updates 2007, No 11. http://

mayanewsupdates.blogspot.com/2007_02_18_archive.html

Bray, Warwick 1977 Maya Metalwork and Its External Connections. In Social Process in Maya Prehistory, edited by Norman Hammond, pp. 365–403. Academic Press, New York.

Brunning, Jacqueline and Paul Forster (editors) 1997a The Rule of Reason: The Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, edited by Jacqueline Brunning and Paul Forster. University of Toronto Press, Toronto, Buffalo, London.

Brunning, Jacqueline and Paul Forster 1997b Introduction. In The Rule of Reason: The Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce, edited by Jacqueline Brunning and Paul Forster, pp. 3–12. University of Toronto Press, Toronto, Buffalo, London.

Buchler, Justus 1955 Philosphical Writings of Peirce, edited by Justus Buchler. Dover Publications, New York.

Bunch, Sonny 2006 Brutally Honest: The Multicultural Set Doesn’t like Mel Gibson’s “Apocalypto” because of its Depiction of Mayan Brutality. The Weekly Standard, Dec. 15, 2006. (http://www. weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/013/075khpyy.asp?page = 2)

Calvo, Andrea 1985 (1522) News of the Islands and the Mainland Newly Discovered in India by the Captain of His Imperial Majesty’s Fleet. Translated and with notes by Edward F. Tuttle. Labyrinthos, Culver City, California.

186 R.D. Hansen

Cano, Fray Agustin 1697 (1984) Manche and Peten: The Hazards of Itza Deceit and Barbarity, translated by Charles P. Bowditch and Guillermo Rivera, with additional comments by Adela C. Breton. Edited with notes by Frank E. Comparato. Labyrinthos. Culver City.

Carrasco, Pedro 1971 Social Organization of Ancient Mexico. In Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volume 10, Archaeology of Northern Mesoamerica, edited by Gordon F. Ekholm and Ignacio Bernal, pp. 349–375. University of Texas Press, Austin and London.

Cervantes de Salazar 1941 Cronica de la Nueva España, Libro Segundo, Capitulos XXV-XXIX, pp. 110–122. In Landa’s Relación de las Cosas de Yucatan. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, edited by Alfred M. Tozzer, Appendix B, pp. 233–239. Harvard University. Vol. XVIII, Cambridge.

Chacon, Richard J., and David H. Dye (editors) 2007 The Taking and Displaying of Human Body Parts as Trophies by Amerindians, edited by Richard J. Chacon and David H. Dye. Springer Science and Business Media, LLC.

Chacon, Richard J., and Ruben G. Mendoza (editors) 2007 North American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence, edited by Richard J. Chacon and Ruben G. Mendoza. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

Chi, Gaspar Antonio, 1582/1941 Relacion. In Landa’s Relación de las Cosas de Yucatan. Edited with notes by Alfred M. Tozzer, pp. 230–232. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Vol. XVIII. Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Cogolludo, Diego López de 1688 / 2008 Historia de Yucatan. Linkgua Ediciones, Barcelona, Spain. Collier, Paul. 1999. On the Economic Consequences of Civil War. Oxford Economic Papers 51:

168–183.
Collier, Paul, V.L. Elliott, Håvard Hegre, Anke Hoeffler, Marta Reynal-Querol, and Nicholas

Sambanis. 2003. Breaking the Conflict Trap: Civil War and Development Policy. Washington,

DC: World Bank and Oxford University Press.
Cortés, Hernan 1986 Hernan Cortes: Letters from Mexico. Translated and edited by Anthony

Pagden and Introduction by J.H. Elliot. Yale University Press, New Haven and London. Dahlin, Bruce H. 1984 A Colossus in Guatemala: The Pre-Classic Maya City of El Mirador.

Archaeology 37 (5):18–25.
Davidson, Donald 1986 The Coherence Theory of Truth and Knowledge. In Truth and

Interpretations: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson, edited by Ernest Lepore,

Basil Blackwell, Oxford.
Delaney, C.F. 1993 Science, Knowledge, and Mind: A Study in the Philosophy of C.S. Peirce.

University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, London.
Diaz de Castillo, Bernal 1965 The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico. Noonday Press, New York. Duran, Fray Diego. 1994 The History of the Indies of New Spain. University of Oklahoma Press:

Norman and London.
Eberl, Marcus 2001 Death and Conceptions of the Soul. In Maya: Divine Kings of the Rain Forest,

edited by Nikolai Grube, pp. 311–319. Konnemann Press, Germany.
Finamore, Daniel, and Stephen D. Houston, 2010 Fiery Pool: The Maya and the Mythic Sea.

Peabody Essex Museum, in association with Yale University Press, New Haven and London. Finke, Nikke 2010 Can Oscar Voters Forgive & Not Forget Mel. Deadline Hollywood. Sept. 22,

2010. http://www.deadline.com/?s = apocalypto.
Flixster 2006 Apocalypto. (http://www.flixster.com/actor/mel-gibson/mel-gibson-apocalypto). Freidel, David A. 2007 Betraying the Maya: Who does the violence in Apocalypto really hurt?

Archaeology, March/April 2007:38–41.
Garcia, Chris 2006 A History Professor Explains where Mel Gibson got it very very wrong. The

American Statesman, Austin, Texas. (http://www.austin360.com/movies/content/shared/mov- ies/stories/2006/12/history.html), (http://www.statesman.com/search/content/shared/movies/ stories/2006/12/history.html)

Garcia de Palacio, Diego de 1576 (1985) Letter to the King of Spain, Being a Description of the Ancient Provinces of Guazacapan, Izalco, Cuscatlan, and Chiquimula, in the Audiencia of Guatemala, with an Account of the Languages, Customs, and Religion of their Aboriginal Inhabitants, and a Description of the Ruins of Copan. Translated and with notes by Ephraim G.

8 Relativism, Revisionism, Aboriginalism, and Emic/Etic Truth… 187

Squier, and additional notes by Alexander von Frantzius, and Frank E. Comparato. Labyrinthos,

Culver City, California, 1985; 66 pp.
Gillespie, Jason D. 2004 Review of Zimmerman, Larry J., Karen D. Vitelli and Julie Hollowell-

Zimmer (2003), Canadian Journal of Archaeology 28:172–175.
Haack, Susan 1997a Science, Scientism, and Anti-Science in the Age of Preposterism.

Skeptical Inquirer, November/December 1997, pp. 1–10. (http://www.csicop.org/si/9711/

preposterism.html).
Haack, Susan 1997b The First Rule of Reason. In The Rule of Reason: The Philosphy of Charles

Sanders Peirce, edited by Jacqueline Brunning and Paul Forster, pp. 241–261. University of

Toronto Press, Toronto, Buffalo, London.
Haack, Susan 1998 “We Pragmatists….”: Peirce and Rorty in Conversation. In Manifesto of

A Passionate Moderate. University of Chicago Press, 1998:31–47.
Hansen, Richard D. 1984 Excavations on Structure 34 and the Tigre Area, El Mirador, Peten,

Guatemala: A New Look at the Preclassic Lowland Maya. Master’s thesis, Brigham Young

University, Provo, Utah. 645 pp.
Hansen, Richard D. 2001 The First Cities- The Beginnings of Urbanization and State Formation in

the Maya Lowlands. In Maya: Divine Kings of the Rain Forest, edited by Nikolai Grube, pp.

50–65. Konemann Press. Verlag, Germany.
Hansen, Richard D. 2005 Perspectives on Olmec-Maya Interaction in the Middle Formative

Period. In New Perspectives on Formative Mesoamerican Cultures, edited by Terry G. Powis,

pp. 51–72. BAR International Series 1377, Oxford, England.
Hansen, Richard D., Steven Bozarth, John Jacob, David Wahl, and Thomas Schreiner 2002

Climatic and Environmental Variability in the Rise of Maya Civilization: A Preliminary Perspective from Northern Peten. Ancient Mesoamerica, 13 (2002):273–295. Cambridge University Press.

Hansen, Richard D., Beatriz Balcarcel, Edgar Suyuc, Hector E. Mejia, Enrique Hernandez, Gendry Valle, Stanley P. Guenter, and Shannon Novak. 2006 Investigaciones arqueológicas en el sitio Tintal, Peten. In XIX Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en Guatemala, edited by Juan Pedro Laporte, Barbara Arroyo, Hector E. Mejia, pp. 683–694. Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes, Instituto de Antropología e Historia, Asociación Tikal, Fundación Arqueológica del Nuevo Mundo.

Hartshorne, Charles, Paul Weiss, and Arthur Burks (editors) 1931–1958 Collected Papers, Volumes 1–7. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass.

Hausman, Carl R. 1997 Charles S. Peirce’s Evolutionary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. Hawass, Zahi. 2010 King Tut’s Family Secrets. National Geographic, Vol. 218, No. 3, pp. 34–59,

September 2010.
Hempel, Carl G. 1965 Aspects of Scientific Explanation and Other Essays in the Philosophy

of Science. The Free Press, New York; Collier-MacMillan Limited, London.
Herrera 1601/1941 Historia General de los Hechos de los Castellanos en las Islas y Tierra Firme del Mar Océano, Decada IV, Libro X, Caps. I-IV. In Landa’s Relación de las Cosas de Yucatan. Edited with notes by Alfred M. Tozzer, pp. 213–220. Papers of the Peabody Museum of

American Archaeology and Ethnology, Vol. XVIII. Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Hester, Thomas R., Harry J. Shafer, Jack D. Eaton, R.E.W. Adams, and Giancarlo Ligabue 1983

Colha’s Stone Tool Industry. Archaeology, Vol. 36, No. 6, pp. 46–52.
Hoggan, David 1969 The Myth of the Six Million. Noontide Press, Los Angeles.
Jacobs, Christopher P. 2006 Apocalypto blends action and allegory. High Plains Reader: Selected

Film Reviews, by Christopher P. Jacobs. Dec. 12, 2006. http://www.und.edu/instruct/cjacobs/

Reviews.htm#apocalypto

Jones, Alex and Paul Joseph Watson 2006 Apocalypto: The Most Powerful Film of all Time. Prison Planet, December 11, 2006. http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/december2006/ 111206apocalypto.htm

Kant, Immanuel 1996 (1781, 1787) Critique of Pure Reason. Unified edition, translated by Werner S. Pluhar, and Introduction by Patricia Kitcher. Hackett Publishing Company, Inc., Indianapolis/Cambridge.

188 R.D. Hansen

King, Byron 2007 Apocalypto: A Movie Review. In Whiskey and Gunpowder: In The Independent Investor’s Daily Guide to Gold, Commodities, Profits and Freedom. Jan. 4, 2007. http://whiskeyandgunpowder.com/apocalypto-a-movie-review

Kniebe, Tobias 2004 Homer ist, wenn man trotzdem lacht: ‘Troja’- Regisseur Wolfgang Petersen uber die mythischen Wurzeln des Erzahlens und den Achilles in uns allen, Suddeutsche Zeitung, May 11, 2004. http://www.sueddeutsche.de/kultur/artikel/607/31576/print.html

Landa, Diego de 1941 Landa’s Relación de las Cosas de Yucatan. Edited with notes by Alfred M. Tozzer. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Vol. XVIII. Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Lipstadt, Deborah 1994 Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory . Plume Publishing, Penguin Books, New York, London, 1994.

Lohse, Jon C. 2007 Letters to the Editor. In The SAA Archaeological Record, Vol. 7, No. 2, March 2007, p. 3.

Lopez-Medel, Tomas 1612 Relacion. Papeles de Muñoz, Tomo 42, Academia de Historia, Madrid. In Landa’s Relación de las Cosas de Yucatan. Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, edited by Alfred M. Tozzer, Appendix B, pp. 221–229. Harvard University. Vol. XVIII, Cambridge.

Maca, Alan and Kevin McLeod 2007 Blockbusting Apocalypto. Paper delivered in the Presidential Session Critiquing Apocalypto: An Anthropological Response to the Perpetuation of Inequality in Popular Media, Annual Meeting, American Anthropological Association, Washington, D.C. November 2007. 6 pp. A Presidential Session, sponsored by the Archaeology Division and the Society for Humanistic Anthropology, Traci Ardren, Organizer & Chair.

Massey, Virginia K. 1994 Osteological Analysis of the Skull Pit Children. In Continuing Archaeology at Colha, Belize, edited by Thomas R. Hester, Harry J. Schafer, and Jack D. Eaton, Studies in Archaeology 16, pp. 209–220. Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, University of Texas, Austin.

Matheny, Ray T. 1987 Early States in the Maya Lowlands during the Late Pre-Classic Period: Edzna and El Mirador. In City States of the Maya: Art and Architecture, edited by Elizabeth B. Benson, pp. 1–44. Rocky Mountain Institute for Pre-Columbian Studies, Denver, Colorado.

McAnany, Patricia A., and Tomás Gallareta Negrón 2010 Bellicose Rulers and Climatological Peril?: Retrofitting Twenty-First-Century Woes on Eighth-Century Maya Society. In Questioning Collapse: Human Resilience, Ecological Vulnerability, and the Aftermath of Empire, edited by Patricia A. McAnany and Norman Yoffee, pp. 142–175. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, et.al.

McCarthy, Todd. 2006 Apocalypto. Variety: Film, RBL, a division of Reed Elsevier, Inc. Dec. 4, 2006. http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117932232.html?categoryid = 31&cs = 1&p = 0

McGhee, Robert 2008 Aboriginalism and the Problems of Indigenous Archaeology. American Antiquity, 74(4): 579–597.

McGuire, Mark 2006 “Apocalypto” a pack of inaccuracies. The San Diego Union-Tribune, December 12, 2006. http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20061212/news_1c12mel.html McPherson, James M. 2003 Revisionist Historians. In Perspectives, American Historical

Association President’s Column, September 2003. http://www.historians.org/perspectives/

issues/2003/0309/0309pre1.cfm

Mendoza, Rubén G 2007 The Divine Gourd Tree: Tzompantli Skull Racks, Decapitation Rituals and Human Trophies in Ancient Mesoamerica. In The Taking and Displaying of Human Body Parts as Trophies by Amerindians, edited by Richard J. Chacon and David H. Dye, pp. 396–439. Springer Science and Business Media. http://csumb.academia.edu/RubenMendoza/ Papers/119375/The_Divine_Gourd_Tree_Tzompantli_Skull_Racks_Decapitation_Rituals_ and_Human_Trophies_in_Ancient_Mesoamerica

Miller, Arthur G. 1977 Captains of the Itza: Unpublished Mural Evidence from Chichen Itza. In Social Process in Maya Prehistory: Essays in Honor of Sir Eric Thompson, edited by Norman Hammond, pp. 197–225. Academic Press, New York.

Miller, Lisa 2006 Beliefwatch: Sacrifice. Newsweek, Dec. 11, 2006, pp. 14.

8 Relativism, Revisionism, Aboriginalism, and Emic/Etic Truth… 189

Mock, Shirley Boteler 1994 Destruction and Denouement during the Late Terminal Classic: The Colha Skull Pit. In Continuing Archaeology at Colha, Belize, edited by Thomas R. Hester, Harry J. Schafer, and Jack D. Eaton, Studies in Archaeology 16, pp. 221–231. Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, University of Texas, Austin.

Morris, Earl H., Jean Charlot, and Ann Axtell Morris 1931 Temple of the Warriors at Chichen Itza, Yucatan. Carnegie Institution of Washington, Publication No. 406. Volume II-Plates.

Orrego-Corzo, Miguel and Rudy Larios Villalta 1983 Reporte de las Investigaciones Arqueológicas en el Grupo 5E-11, Tikal Peten. Insituto de Antropologia e Historia de Guatemala, Parque Nacional Tikal.

Padgett, Tim 2006a Mel Gibson’s Casting Call: For his new film, Apocalypto, the director went for authenticity over star power. Time, Arts & Entertainment, Thursday, Mar 9, 2006.

Padgett, Tim 2006b Apocalypto Now. Time magazine, March 27, 2006: 58–61.
Peirce, Charles S. 1898 (1931–1958) Collected Papers, edited by Charles Hartshorne, Paul Weiss,

and Arthur Burks, Volumes 1–7; Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass. 1931–1958. Peirce, Charles S. 1886 Qualitative Logic. In Collected Papers, edited by Charles Hartshorne,

Paul Weiss, and Arthur Burks. Harvard University Press, Cambridge. Vol. 1, 1932.
Peirce, Charles S. 1901 Review of Pearson’s The Grammar of Science. In Popular Science Monthly 58 (Jan 1901):296–306. Republished in The Essential Peirce: Selected Philosophical Writings, Volume 2, 1998, edited by the Peirce Edition Project, Nathan Houser, General Editor, pp.

57–66.
Pike, Kenneth L. 1967. “Etic and emic standpoints for the description of behavior.”In Language

and Thought: An Enduring Problem in Psychology, edited by Donald C. Hildum, pp. 32–39.

Princeton, NJ: D. Van Norstrand Company.
Putnam, Hilary 1990 Realism with a Human Face, edited by James Conant. Harvard University

Press, Cambridge.
Rice, Don S., and Prudence M. Rice 1981 Muralla de Leon: A Lowland Maya Fortification.

Journal of Field Archaeology, Vol. 8, pp. 271–288.
Rorty, Richard 1982 Consequences of Pragmatism. Harvester. Hassocks, Sussex, 1982.
Rorty, Richard 1989 Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Rorty, Richard 1991 Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Rorty, Richard 1992 Trotsky and the Wild Orchids. Common Knowledge Vol. 1 (3), 1992: 140–153. Schreiner, Thomas 2000a Maya Use of Vegetal and Mineral Additives to Architectural Lime

Products. Program Abstracts from Archaeometry: 32nd International Symposium, May 15–19,

2000, pp. 246. Conaculta-INAH, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City. Schreiner, Thomas 2000b. Social and Environmental Impacts of Mesoamerican Lime Burning. Abstract in GEOS, Unión Geofísica Mexicana, A.C.: Estudios del Cuaternario, Vol. 20, No. 3,

pp. 170. Mexico.
Schreiner, Thomas 2001 Fabricación de Cal en Mesoamerica: Implicaciones para los Mayas del

Preclásico en Nakbe, Peten. In XIV Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueologicas en Guatemala, editado por J.P. Laporte, Ana C. de Suasnavar, y Barbara Arroyo, pp. 405–418. Museo Nacional de Arqueologia y Etnologia, Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes, Instituto de Antropologia e Historia, Asociacion Tikal.

Schreiner, Thomas 2002 Traditional Maya Lime Production: Environmental and Cultural Implications of a Native American Technology. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Architecture University of California, Berkeley.

Scholes, France V., and Eleanor Adams 1991 Documents Relating to the Mirones Expedition to the Interior of Yucatan, 1621–1624, compiled by France V. Scholes and Eleanor Adams, translated by Robert D. Wood, and additional notes by Frank E. Comparato. Labyrinthos, Culver City, California.

Sellars, Wilfrid 1970 Are there Non-Deductive Logics? In Essays in Honor of Carl G. Hempel: A Tribute on the Occasion of his Sixty-Fifth Birthday, edited by Nicholas Rescher, pp. 83–103. D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland.

Shaw, Henry Wheeler 1865 Affurisms from Josh Billings: His Sayings, 1865.

190 R.D. Hansen

Skaperdas, Stergios 2009 The Costs of Organized Violence: A Review of the Evidence. CESIFO Working Paper No. 2704, Category 2: Public Choice. http://econpapers.repec.org/paper/ cesceswps/_5f2704.htm

Souter, Collin 2006 Apocalypto. Efilmcritic.com. Dec 8, 2006. http://efilmcritic.com/review.php? movie = 15289&reviewer = 233

Stewart, Frances, Cindy Huang, and Michael Wang 2001 “Internal Wars in Developing Countries: An Empirical Overview of Economic and Social Consequences.” In War and Underdevelopment, Vol. 1. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Stone, Andrea 2007 Orcs in Loincloths. Archaeology, Online Reviews. January 3, 2007. (http:// http://www.archaeology.org/online/reviews/apocalypto2.html)

Villagutierre Soto-Mayor, Juan de 1701/1983 History of the Conquest of the Province of the Itza: Subjugation and Events of the Lacandon and Other Nations of Uncivilized Indians in the Lands from the Kingdom of Guatemala to the Provinces of Yucatan in North America, translated by Robert D. Wood, 1983. Labyrinthos, Culver City, California. p. 480.

Wahl, David Brent 2000 A Stratigraphic Record of Environmental Change from a Maya Reservoir in the Northern Peten, Guatemala. M.A. Thesis, Geography Dept., University of California, Berkeley. 53 pp.

Wahl, David Brent 2005 Climate Change and Human Impacts in the Southern Maya Lowlands: A Paleoecological Perspective from the Northern Peten, Guatemala. Ph.D. dissertation, Dept. of Geography, University of California, Berkeley; Committee: Roger Byrne, Lynn Ingram, Richard Hansen; May 2005,

Wahl, David, Thomas Schreiner, and Roger Byrne 2005 La secuencia paleo-ambiental de la Cuenca Mirador en Peten. In XVIII Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en Guatemala, 2004, edited by Juan Pedro Laporte, Barbara Arroyo, Hector E. Mejia, pp. 53–58. Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes, Instituto de Antropologia e Historia, Asociacion Tikal, FAMSI, Inc.

Wahl, David, Roger Byrne, Thomas Schreiner, and Richard Hansen 2006 Holocene vegetation change in the northern Peten and its implications for Maya prehistory. Quaternary Research, 65:380–389. University of Washington. (http://www.sciencedirect.com; http://www.elsevier. com/locate/yqres).

Wahl, David, Roger Byrne, Thomas Schreiner, and Richard Hansen 2007 Palaeolimnological Evidence of late-Holocene Settlement and Abandonment in the Mirador Basin, Peten, Guatemala. The Holocene 17 (6):813–820. Sage Publications. (http://hol.sagepub.com/cgi/ content/abstract/17/6/813)

Wahl, David, Thomas Schreiner, Roger Byrne, and Richard Hansen 2007 A Paleoecological Record from a Maya Reservoir in the North Peten. Latin American Antiquity 18:212–222. Webster, David 1980 Spatial Bounding and Settlement History at Three Walled Northern Maya

Centers. American Antiquity, Vol. 45, No. 4, pp. 834–844.
Williams, David 2005 A People’s History of the Civil War: Struggles for the Meaning of Freedom.

The New Press, New York, London.
Winkler, Martin M. (editor) 2004 Gladiator: Film and History. Blackwell Publishing.
Winkler, Martin M. (editor) 2007 Troy: From Homer’s Iliad to Hollywood Epic. Blackwell

Publishing Ltd. http://books.google.com/books?id = nQ1PSLJAdSQC&pg = PA11&lpg = PA11 &dq = Winkler++film + critic + 2007&source = bl&ots = 7dYx29Yn7D&sig =UC6BJ2YlBorP0 py_6cnbTnkww14&hl = en&ei = pHDbTP3ZDIG-sQODyYCHCA&sa = X&oi = book_result& ct = result&resnum = 3&ved = 0CCMQ6AEwAg#v = onepage&q&f = false

Zimmerman, Larry J., Karen D. Vitelli, and Julie Hollowell-Zimmer (editors) 2003 Ethical Issues in Archaeology. AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, California.

Voir enfin:

Religion, Violence, And ‘Apocalpyto’

A new discovery from pre-Spanish Mexico:

Mexican archaeologists have discovered what they say is the first temple of a pre-Hispanic fertility god known as the Flayed Lord who is depicted as a skinned human corpse.

The discovery is being hailed as significant by authorities at Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History because it is a whole temple, not merely depictions of the deity, which have been found in other cultures.

… “Priests worshipped Xipe Totec by skinning human victims and then donning their skins. The ritual was seen as a way to ensure fertility and regeneration,” according to the AP.

Xipe Totec was widely worshiped by Aztecs at the time of the Spanish conquest. From the Wikipedia entry:

Various methods of human sacrifice were used to honour this god. The flayed skins were often taken from sacrificial victims who had their hearts cut out, and some representations of Xipe Totec show a stitched-up wound in the chest.

“Gladiator sacrifice” is the name given to the form of sacrifice in which an especially courageous war captive was given mock weapons, tied to a large circular stone and forced to fight against a fully armed Aztec warrior. As a weapon he was given a macuahuitl (a wooden sword with blades formed from obsidian) with the obsidian blades replaced with feathers. A white cord was tied either around his waist or his ankle, binding him to the sacred temalacatl stone. At the end of the Tlacaxipehualiztli festival, gladiator sacrifice (known as tlauauaniliztli) was carried out by five Aztec warriors; two jaguar warriors, two eagle warriors and a fifth, left-handed warrior.

“Arrow sacrifice” was another method used by the worshippers of Xipe Totec. The sacrificial victim was bound spread-eagled to a wooden frame, he was then shot with many arrows so that his blood spilled onto the ground. The spilling of the victim’s blood to the ground was symbolic of the desired abundant rainfall, with a hopeful result of plentiful crops. After the victim was shot with the arrows, the heart was removed with a stone knife. The flayer then made a laceration from the lower head to the heels and removed the skin in one piece. These ceremonies went on for twenty days, meanwhile the votaries of the god wore the skins.

Another instance of sacrifice was done by a group of metalworkers who were located in the town of Atzcapoatzalco, who held Xipe Totec in special veneration. Xipe was a patron to all metalworkers (teocuitlapizque), but he was particularly associated with the goldsmiths. Among this group, those who stole gold or silver were sacrificed to Xipe Totec. Before this sacrifice, the victims were taken through the streets as a warning to others.

Other forms of sacrifice were sometimes used; at times the victim was cast into a firepit and burned, others had their throats cut.

Here is what sacrifice two other Mesoamerican gods was like:

Xiuhtecuhtli is the god of fire and heat and in many cases is considered to be an aspect of Huehueteotl, the “Old God” and another fire deity.

Both Xiuhtecuhtli and Huehueteotl were worshipped during the festival of Izcalli. For ten days preceding the festival various animals would be captured by the Aztecs, to be thrown in the hearth on the night of celebration.

To appease Huehueteotl, the fire god and a senior deity, the Aztecs had a ceremony where they prepared a large feast, at the end of which they would burn captives; before they died they would be taken from the fire and their hearts would be cut out. Motolinía and Sahagún reported that the Aztecs believed that if they did not placate Huehueteotl, a plague of fire would strike their city. The sacrifice was considered an offering to the deity.

Xiuhtecuhtli was also worshipped during the New Fire Ceremony, which occurred every 52 years, and prevented the ending of the world. During the festival priests would march to the top of the volcano Huixachtlan and when the constellation “the fire drill” (Orion’s belt) rose over the mountain, a man would be sacrificed. The victim’s heart would be ripped from his body and a ceremonial hearth would be lit in the hole in his chest. This flame would then be used to light all of the ceremonial fires in various temples throughout the city of Tenochtitlan.

A Harvard historian has more information about Mesoamerican human sacrifice.

When you hear people condemning the Spanish conquest for what it did to the native inhabitants, think of the fact that within a decade of the Spanish conquest, human sacrifice ended. That is something to be grateful for, and indeed proud of. We do not need to believe that the conquistadores were saints — they certainly were not — to recognize this.

Too few people saw director Mel Gibson’s stunning 2006 film Apocalypto, which is very violent (it’s Gibson, after all), but as an adventure and suspense movie, is terrific. Gibson fudged historical facts, and acknowledged that. It’s supposedly about the Mayas on the eve of the Spanish conquest, but the kind of human sacrifice depicted in the film was an Aztec thing, and anyway, Mayan civilization had already faded from history before the Spanish arrived. The Spanish conquered the Aztecs, and other Mesoamerican peoples. Nevertheless, the film (which is not about the Spanish!) is a gripping depiction of the terror of that culture of death.

At the time, Apocalypto was read — misread, I think — as an apologia for colonialism. It’s understandable, given Gibson’s fervent Catholicism. But the truth is almost certainly more complicated. Keep in mind how violent Gibson’s films are (the ones he’s directed, that is), and how Apocalypto, his most violent, begins with this Will Durant quote:

A great civilisation is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within.

Aztec civilization — the one that resembles the civilization in the movie; I can’t figure out why Gibson called them Maya — was obsessed by death and violence. Given how spectacularly Gibson blew up his marriage, his career, and his life, in the years around the film’s release (his drunk driving arrest, the collapse of his marriage, etc.), it’s interesting to consider this unusual movie as a window into the soul of a man whose inner violence eventually bested him, and destroyed him.

[In what follows, I’m going to reveal a spoiler about the movie. Don’t read on if you don’t want to know it.]

Reading the film as a simple account of Christian and colonialist triumphalism at the hands of a traditionalist Catholic filmmaker is too reductive. In 2006, David Van Biema of Time magazine wrote an essay about Gibson and the movie,  in which he wonders why  Gibson ended the film as he did. Specifically:

For the Christian viewer, the biggest question about Mel Gibson’s movie Apocalypto is: why does its hero turn away from the Cross at the end?

The movie tells the story of a peaceful 16th-century jungle-dweller named Jaguar Paw. The first quarter of the film presents his idyllic village as a kind of Eden. The second quarter is a vision of Hell, as a raiding party for the nearby Mayan empire torches the town, rapes the women and drags the men to the Mayan capital as featured guests at a monstrous and ongoing sacrifice to the gods. JP watches in horror as a priest has several of his friends spread-eagled on squat stone, then hacks out their still-beating hearts and displays them to a howling crowd. JP narrowly avoids the same fate, escapes, and spends most of the rest of the film picking off an armed pursuit party, one by one, in classic action-film fashion.

It is only at the very end that Christianity makes a brief but portentous appearance, aboard a fleet of Spanish ships that appears suddenly on the horizon. JP and his long-suffering wife watch from the jungle as a small boat approaches shore bearing a long-bearded, shiny-helmeted explorer and a kneeling priest holding high a crucifix-topped staff. “Should we join them?” asks his wife. “No,” he replies: They should go back to the jungle, their home. Roll credits.

He concludes that Gibson, who was also known for being alienated from mainstream Roman Catholicism, understands that the end of one violent civilization means the coming of one in which man’s propensity to violence and domination does not end, but simply takes new forms. Van Biema talks about the film in context of a visit he made to an exhibition in NYC. Any kind of modern sentimentalizing of the Aztecs will not survive an encounter with their artifacts:

The third possibility, it seems to me, is that Gibson does know — and wants no part of it. I tend toward that last one because it reflects a learning curve of my own. About a year ago I visited an exhibit on another Mexican civilization, the Aztecs, at New York’s Guggenheim Museum. The show was cleverly arranged. Visitors walked up the Guggenheim’s giant spiral, the first few twists of which were devoted to the Aztecs’ stunning stylized carvings of snakes, eagles and other god/animals, and explanations of how the ingenious Aztecs filled in a huge lake to lay the foundation for Tenochtitlan, now Mexico City.

It was only about halfway up the spiral — when it had become harder to run screaming for an exit — that one encountered a grey-green stone about three feet high. It was sleek and beautiful — almost like a Brancusi sculpture, I thought — until I read the label. It was a sacrifice stone of the sort in the movie. Not a reproduction, not a non-functioning ceremonial model, but the real thing. People had died on this. I felt shocked and a little angry — it was like coming across a gas chamber at an exhibit of interior design.

But I kept walking, and at the very top of the museum I encountered another object that might be considered an answer to the sinister rock: a stone cross, carved after the Spanish had conquered the Aztecs and were attempting to convert them to Catholicism. Rather than Jesus’s full body, it bore a series of small relief carvings: his head and wounded hands, blood drops — and a sacrificial Aztec knife.

How striking, I thought. Here was a potent work of iconographic propaganda using the very symbols of a brutal religion to turn its values inside out, manipulating its images so that they celebrated not the sacrifice, but the person who was sacrificed. Visually, at least, it seemed an elegant and admirable transition. And after seeing Apocalypto, I wondered why Gibson hadn’t created the cinematic equivalent: an ode to the progression out of savagery, through the vehicle of Christianity.

Van Biema then talks about how the Spanish did end human sacrifice, but ended up enslaving Aztecs (those they didn’t kill), and in any case there was a mass die-off when the Spanish inadvertently introduced smallpox into the native population. Van Biema:

So here is the conundrum. If you had to choose between a culture that placed ritualized human slaughter at the center of its faith, but that only managed to kill 4,000 people a year, and a culture that put the sacrificial Lamb of God at the center of the universe but somehow found its way to countenancing the enslavement of millions and the slaughter of hundreds of thousands in the same neighborhood, which would be more appealing?

Read the whole thing. 

To be clear, from the point of view of a believing Christian, it really, really matters that the Gospel is true. The Spanish, whatever their grievous faults and wicked motivations, nevertheless carried with them true religion. If you don’t believe that there is any such thing as true religion, well, I respect that, but I’m not really interested in having that discussion here. The more interesting discussion is why Mel Gibson — a self-tortured, radically alienated, but believing Catholic — had his heroes run away from the people who would be his deliverers.

Has anybody seen a Girardian interpretation of Apocalypto? I’d love to read it. I found this short one from the Catholic bishop Robert Barron. It’s a great encapsulation of Girardian theory, and why Apocalypto is a film explaining it:

If you don’t have time to watch that five-minute video, here’s the core of Girardian theory: Primitive humans controlled the violence that threatened to overwhelm their societies and civilizations by means of the “scapegoat mechanism.” That is, they convinced themselves that the cause of the disorder was a scapegoat, and that only the sacrifice of the scapegoat would restore order to the civilization. In some civilizations — like the Aztecs’ — this turned into human sacrifice. Aztecs didn’t have the ritual slaughter of human beings because they enjoyed it, necessarily; they believed that the blood of human victims was necessary to keep the gods sated and the fertility cycle going. In Apocalypto, the protagonist, Jaguar Paw, is a tribesman who is hunted by the Maya, who intend to sacrifice him to propitiate their gods.

The scapegoat mechanism is at the core of cultural anthropology, says Girard. Anyway, Christianity, alone among all religions, unmasks the lie of the scapegoat mechanism. In the Christian myth (I say “myth” in the technical sense), the god himself becomes the innocent victim, and throws down the scapegoat mechanism. The CBC, in a short piece on Girardian theory, explains:

Jesus is innocent, the Gospels insist, and his innocence proclaims the innocence of all scapegoat victims. He reveals the founding violence, hidden from the beginning, because it preserved social peace. A choice is posed: humanity will have peace if it follows the way of life that Jesus preached. If not, it will have worse violence because the old remedy will no longer work once exposed to the light.

Keep in mind that Girard, a Stanford scholar who is considered to be one of the greats of the 20th century, didn’t make these claims as some sort of Christian apologetic. He was making an objective claim about human nature and culture. As Bishop Barron says, Gibson’s movie is a manifestation of Girardian theory. The word “apocalypse” derives from the Greek word meaning “unveiling.” In Apocalypto, the title does double meaning: because of the Book of Revelation (also called “The Apocalypse,”) the “unveiling” leads to the end of the world. This is why the word “apocalypse” has come to mean “end of the world” in popular usage. Gibson’s movie portrays the end of a violent primitive civilization at the hands of a higher Christian civilization, one whose religion unmasks and defeats the scapegoat mechanism that had upheld the dying civilization.

It may be the case that Gibson has his heroes turn away from the cross-bearers because that’s what any Indian would normally do in that situation. Jaguar Paw doesn’t know who these strangers are, and that they might save him. It makes sense that he would want to hide out in the jungle and see what happens. Gibson’s decision to have them run away from the cross might not be a theological commentary, but might simply have been an artistic decision. After all, showing the Indians, who had been chased through the jungle for the entire movie by other Indians seeking to take them for ritual sacrifice, ending the film by running into the arms of Spanish Christians would have been seen as aesthetically cheap propaganda.

Whatever Gibson’s intentions, a case could be made for a more ambiguous interpretation. It is undeniably true, as a historical matter, that the Spanish ended human sacrifice, and conquered the civilization that depended on human sacrifice. But it is also true that the Spanish were much better at controlling and deploying violence than the Aztecs were. Maintaining Spanish colonial civilization required immense violence. When a person or a civilization becomes Christian, they are still human, and still have to struggle against the “old man,” as Scripture says. There are no utopias. The anthropological and cultural value of Christianity, in this context, is that it does not allow even the Christian to scapegoat victims. Oh, they do! We do, all the time! The Christian faith, though, says: Stop. Look at what you are doing. It’s not right. You are making innocent people suffer. 

In the US in the Civil Rights Era, Martin Luther King confronted racist white Christians with the Christian message, which was radically incompatible with the unjust social order they had created in the American South, and maintained through violence. Again: Christianity doesn’t mean that sin ceases to exist; it only explains it, and shows a way out of the cycle of violence and retribution.

So, look: I have no respect for the view that the native peoples of Mesoamerica were living a tranquil life until they were set upon by Spanish Christian colonialists, who subdued and immiserated them. That is sentimental claptrap. But the Christian analogue to this fairy tale — that the coming of Christianity on the sword tip of the conquistadores led to a kingdom of peace and justice — is also sentimental claptrap. We are not required to believe falsely that there is no moral difference between the Aztecs and the Spanish, and the civilizations they represented. A civilization that practices mass human sacrifice is objectively worse than one that outlaws it. And, for Christians, a civilization that, however grievously flawed, proclaims the truth of Christ is objectively better than one that denies it.

But we have to come to terms as well with the violence and darkness that persisted, despite Christianity. After the bloodshed of the 20th century, the West — Christian and post-Christian — should consider exactly how we stand in relation to the bloodthirsty Aztec empire. St. Paul writes in his letter to the Romans that all of creation struggles as in labor pains. And so we will until the end of time, until the real Apocalypse.

Here’s something truly ominous. Girard died a few years ago. In 2009, near the end of his life, he published a piece in First Things, titled “On War And Apocalypse” Excerpt:

Christianity is the only religion that has foreseen its own failure. This prescience is known as the apocalypse. Indeed, it is in the apocalyptic texts that the word of God is most forceful, repudiating mistakes that are entirely the fault of humans, who are less and less inclined to acknowledge the mechanisms of their violence. The longer we persist in our error, the stronger God’s voice will emerge from the devastation. This is why no one wants to read the apocalyptic texts that abound in the synoptic gospels and Pauline epistles. This is also why no one wants to recognize that these texts rise up before us because we have disregarded the Book of Revelation. Once in our history the truth about the identity of all humans was spoken, and no one wanted to hear it; instead we hang ever more frantically onto our false differences.

Two world wars, the invention of the atomic bomb, and all the rest of the modern horrors have not sufficed to convince humanity, and Christians above all, that the apocalyptic texts might concern the disaster that is underway. Violence has been unleashed across the whole world, and our paradox is this: By getting closer to Alpha, we are going toward Omega; by better understanding the origin, we can see every day a little better that the origin is coming closer. Our fetters were put in place by the founding murder and unshackled by the Passion—with the result of liberating planet-wide violence.

We cannot refasten the bindings because we now know that the scapegoats of sacrifice are innocent. Christ’s Passion unveiled the sacrificial origin of humanity once and for all. It dismantled the sacred and revealed its violence. And yet, the Passion freed violence at the same time that it freed holiness. The modern form of the sacred is thus not a return to some archaic form. It is a sacred that has been satanized by the awareness we have of it, and it indicates, through its excesses, the imminence of the Second Coming.

For readers unfamiliar with the Christian texts, the Book of Revelation — The Apocalypse — predicts a time to come when Christianity will have failed, and the world will be plunged into an abyss of violence … and then Jesus Christ will return. The mass apostasy underway now in the West is a harbinger of the End.

Girard says that the Christian unveiling “is wholly good, but we are unable to come to terms with it.” Think of the Spanish conquistadores, who could not come to terms with the religion they professed. Think of the whites of the pre-Civil Rights South. Think of the black, brown, and white Christians today, who sin and exploit others, in defiance of the religion they profess. Think of yourself.

More Girard:

Few Christians still talk about the apocalypse, and they usually have a completely mythological conception of it. They think that the violence of the end of time will come from God himself. They cannot do without a cruel God. Strangely, they do not see that the violence we ourselves are in the process of amassing and that is looming over our own heads is entirely sufficient to trigger the worst. They have no sense of humor.

Violence is a terrible adversary, since it always wins. Desiring war can thus become a spiritual attitude. We have to fight a violence that can no longer be controlled or mastered. More than ever, I am convinced that history has meaning, and that its meaning is terrifying.

Girard then takes the essay into a consideration of the meaning of Islamic terrorist violence. Read the whole thing. It’s not easy to understand, I must tell you. Here is one outstanding point:

Western rationalism operates like a myth: We always work harder to avoid seeing the catastrophe. We neither can nor want to see violence as it is.

All too true. Apocalypto is not about Good Spanish Christian Colonialists and Evil Aztec Pagans. It’s about violence, civilization, and religion. The civilizational catastrophe it dramatizes is not just that of the Aztecs. It is, as Girard might have said, our own, because it is the story of blind humanity.


L’humanitaire, ca sert aussi à faire la guerre (Humanitarian aid: From well-intentioned stupidity to permanent feature of military strategy)

15 octobre, 2010
HumanitarianCamp (palestinien) : Partout ailleurs, un « camp de réfugiés » est une ville de toile faite de tentes et plantée sur la boue ou la poussière. Un « camp » de « réfugiés » palestiniens n’est pas un camp, n’a pas de tentes et n’abrite pas de réfugiés : c’est une ville en dur, avec des rues, des immeubles élevés, etc. Il abrite des Palestiniens parqués de force par leurs « frères arabes » et arnaqués par les « leaders » palestiniens. N’invoquer que le misérabilisme victimaire. Cameraman, SVP, pas trop de plans sur ces immeubles – il faut faire dans le style bidonville.
Hamas : organisation charitable ; pourvoyeur de services sociaux pour les Palestiniens ; vecteur de La Rage et de La Frustration. Partisan irréductible de l’extermination des Juifs et d’Israël. Ne traiter le fait que comme exagération rhétorique bien compréhensible de la part des Victimes.
ONG: organisation auto-chargée d’avaliser la moindre baliverne émise par les organisations palestiniennes. N’ont jamais rencontré de dictateur arabe dont elles ne croient à la bonne foi, ni de tueur qui n’ait de circonstances atténuantes.
Palestinien: (1) bébé phoque de la Gauche européenne et de la Droite bien-pensante. (2) Espèce de victime largement préférée au Tibétain, au Darfourien, à l’Indio et autres. A l’avantage sur les autres d’être corrélatif de la haine du Juif. (3) D’apparition récente, inventé par le Colonel Nasser et fort prisé des régimes arabes et musulmans les jours de sommets diplomatiques. (4) N’est jamais responsable des conséquences de ses actions: c’est toujours la faute des autres.
Réfugié: s’il est palestinien, caste héréditaire : on est réfugié de père en fils et de mère en fille, comme certains sont cordonniers ou serfs. Exception géopolitique unique : nul ne parle de « réfugiés » allemands (12 millions d’expulsés en 1945) ni de leurs enfants, petits-enfants et arrières petits enfants. Entretenu depuis 1948 par le contribuable occidental (UNWRA), ce qui permet de maudire ce dernier du matin au soir. Laurent Murawiec
Le soutien public international détruit tout élan vers les réformes, le développement, la capacité de créer la richesse nationale et de l’exporter. Il alimente la corruption et les conflits internes et favorise le maintien de régimes pluriannuels. Dambiso Moyo
Selon plusieurs estimations, entre 15 et 20% des habitants des camps de réfugiés sont des refugee warriors qui, entre un repas et un traitement médical repartent en guerre. Linda Polman
Grâce aux gains des négociations avec les organisations internationales, les groupes en lutte mangent et s’arment, en plus de payer leurs troupes. Linda Polman
In the end, he claimed, the R.U.F. had escalated the horror of the war (and provoked the government, too, to escalate it) by deploying special “cut-hands gangs” to lop off civilian limbs. “It was only when you saw ever more amputees that you started paying attention to our fate,” he said. “Without the amputee factor, you people would never come.” Linda Polman
The conventional wisdom was that Sierra Leone’s civil war had been pure insanity. But Polman had heard it suggested that the R.U.F.’s rampages had followed from “a rational, calculated strategy.” The idea was that the extreme violence had been “a deliberate attempt to drive up the price of peace.” (…). Sowing horror to reap aid, and reaping aid to sow horror, Polman argues, is “the logic of the humanitarian era.” In case after case, a persuasive case can be made that, overall, humanitarian aid did as much or even more harm than good.
The scenes of suffering that we tend to call humanitarian crises are almost always symptoms of political circumstances and there’s no apolitical way of responding to them – no way to act without having a political effect. At the very least, the role of the officially neutral, apolitical aid worker in most contemporary conflicts is, as Nightingale forewarned, that of a caterer: humanitarianism relieves the warring parties of many of the burdens (administrative and financial) of waging war, diminishing the demands of governing while fighting, cutting the cost of taking casualties, and supplying food, medicine, and logistical support that keep armies going. At its worst, impartiality in the face of atrocity can be indistinguishable from complicity. Polman takes aim at everything from the mixture of casual cynicism and extreme self-righteousness by which aid workers insulate themselves from their surroundings to the deeper decadence of a humanitarianism that pays war taxes of anywhere from fifteen per cent of the value of the aid it delivered to eighty per cent.
And then there’s what happened in Sierra Leone after the amputations brought the peace, which brought the U.N., which brought the money, which brought the N.G.O.s All of them, as Polman tells it, wanted a piece of the amputee action. It got to the point where the armless and legless had piles of extra prosthetics in their huts and still went around with their stubs exposed to satisfy the demands of press and N.G.O. photographers, who brought yet more money and more aid … Officers of the new Sierra Leone government had only to put out a hand to catch some of the cascading aid money.
Most instances of humanitarian intervention in conflict zones has probably resulted in prolonging conflicts, and (…) in some cases it may be that conflicts were made more severe in order to attract humanitarian interventions. Philip Gourevitch

Et si l’humanitaire servait aussi à faire la guerre ?

En cette année, plus de mille milliards de dollars d’aides financières plus tard, du 50e anniversaire des indépendances de pays africains s’enfonçant toujours un peu plus dans le chaos et la gabegie

Et au lendemain de la publication d’un enième programme de politique extérieure socialiste appelant à toujours plus des mêmes recettes qui ont produit l’actuel fiasco

Telle est la question que soulève le dernier livre traduit en anglais de la journaliste neerlandaise Linda Polman (« The Crisis Caravan: What’s Wrong with Humanitarian Aid? »)

Rappelant au-dela des centaines de kilomètres de routes qui ne mènent nulle part, des « éléphants blancs »  mais inutilisables ou des « cathédrales dans le désert » sans produits ou débouchés …

L’inquiétante face cachée d’une aide humanitaire qui, entre son chiffre d’affaires de 160 milliards de dollars, ses  37,000 organisations et ses  250 000  employés, multiplie non seulement gaspillages, rapports bidons et chiffres gonflés ..

Mais, en refusant de prendre en compte la dimension politique de son action, contribue directement, comme au Rwanda, en Sierra Leone, au Congo ou au Darfour (comme, avant eux, la Croix rouge dans les camps nazis?), à l’intensité et à la duree des guerres et massacres …

Au point même d’en avoir fait, entre les camps de refugiés réduits à des camps de base pour génocidaires et l’aide alimentaire détournée pour nourrir les insurgés et sans parler de la diabolique vague d’amputations du Sierra Leone, un élément essentiel et permanent de la stratégie militaire des groupes en question …

Mais, depuis plus de 60 ans et à coup des mêmes milliards de dollars ou d’euros, le Machin fait-il autre chose avec les véritables pouponnières de terroristes que sont devenus les « camps » des pretendus réfugiés palestiniens du Proche-Orient?

The Crisis Caravan: What’s Wrong with Humanitarian Aid?

Richard Gowan

The National

Oct 8, 2010

At a recent conference on humanitarian aid, some American undergraduates asked a relief expert how to find work with charities in Darfur. He looked nostalgic. Back in the Balkans in the 1990s, he said, you hung out in a bar near the war zone until you got a job. This sort of mock-heroic amateurism draws an odd mix of young idealists and ageing alcoholics to aid work. It’s a bad business model. You would not staff a hospital or a hedge fund by grabbing whoever was in the pub next door. But humanitarian aid is big business nonetheless, employing 250,000 personnel worldwide for $16 billion a year.

The sheer scale of the humanitarian enterprise often gets played down. NGOs responding to the latest crisis emphasise that every donation can save lives, but in reality over two-thirds of all relief money comes from governments, with the US in the lead. Yet Linda Polman – a Dutch journalist who covered relief efforts for two decades – believes that aid operations are not only dysfunctional but contribute to human suffering.

This is, she argues, partially down to the way international agencies operate. There’s a mismatch between the amount of cash donors pump into the system and aid workers’ ability to put it to good use. Polman’s new book, The Crisis Caravan, bulges with examples of well-intentioned stupidity. She tells of plane-loads of soft toys flown to central Africa and a shipment of racy lingerie sent to Sri Lanka after the 2003 tsunami.

Some reviewers have compared these vignettes to the writings of Graham Greene and Evelyn Waugh. This is rather too generous. Polman’s book falls squarely into a genre of eyewitness critiques of international crisis management that emerged in the 1990s as journalists reeled from Somalia to Srebrenica before eventually heading to Afghanistan. Works in this genre – of which Polman’s previous book about UN peacekeepers, 1997’s We Did Nothing, is a minor classic – tend to involve a set of near-identical anecdotes.Before starting The Crisis Caravan I scribbled down some predictions about scenes that might occur in the book. I foresaw an account of a French restaurant in a war zone, with aid officials callously slurping fine wine. There would be a moment in which the author, having come face to face with new horrors, gazes at banal Western television in a hotel to try to escape. A horribly ill-informed American missionary must also surely feature.

Every one of these episodes duly crops up, pretty much to the letter, including catching an ice-skating contest on French TV after a day in an African refugee camp. « All night I watched finalists performing triple jumps in glittering costumes, » she recalls. This may have been affecting at the time, but it comes across as an over-stylised bid for pathos. For all that, she risked her life compiling her stories, and many still have a real sting. One particularly revolting passage involves the Christ End Time Movement International, a supposed « charity » set up by profiteers in Sierra Leone to scam money flying war orphans for treatment in Germany. The children « had to be amputees and no older than 18, » the chief racketeer told Polman, but the youngest was five and « really cute ». The patients were already well cared for in their home country, it wasn’t clear that the were all really orphans and the organisers wanted $1.5 m that could be better spent in Sierra Leone itself. But everyone loves a good airlift.

In focusing on aid-manipulators like these, Polman wants to raise her analysis above the level of other 21st-century war memoirs. Her core argument is not simply that the aid community includes a lot of fools and knaves. Instead she claims that warlords have learned how to control and exploit humanitarian aid flows, using supplies to keep their followers happy – or under control – while ensuring their opponents remain cut off.

Polman roots her assault on aid as a « weapon of war » in her experiences among refugees from the Rwandan genocide in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (then Zaire) in the mid-1990s. After the world failed to halt the 1994 Hutu-led genocide against the Rwandan Tutsis, there was almost nothing that outsiders would not give these refugees. The problem was that the recipients were not the Tutsi victims of the genocide. Instead, they were Hutus, and their ranks included many unashamed genocidaires. The regime that had ordered the killing of one million people ran a government-in-exile in the camps.

What makes this tale all the more depressing is that many aid agencies were complicit in propping up this monstrous system. NGOs scrabbled for contracts to service the camps, and if one finally gave up out of disgust, numerous others were ready to take its place. For Polman, this is indicative of a recurrent problem. Humanitarian organisations, from the International Red Cross to tiny one-man NGOs, claim to be above politics. Helping the needy is their sole goal. Yet by ignoring politics – or pretending to do so – they play into the hands of those malign forces that exploit aid for political ends.

If that was true in the Congo in the 1990s, it is also the case in today’s high-profile trouble-spots like Darfur. There, the Sudanese government has forced nearly 3 million people into camps fed, watered and very patchily administered by the UN and NGOs. Immigrants from elsewhere in Africa have occupied the displaced population’s land. The aid community effectively underwrites Sudan’s strategy to cleanse Darfur of its former inhabitants. Polman highlights this case, although in less detail than some earlier crises. Bizarrely, she quotes a passage from a novel by a US author (What is the What by Dave Eggers) to illustrate Darfur’s plight, undercutting the usual realism of her reportage.

Most thoughtful humanitarian workers would agree with much of her overall diagnosis of their industry’s ills. But what is the alternative? Polman asks her readers to « have the audacity to ask whether doing something is always better than doing nothing, » but she ultimately shies away from calling for a full-scale bonfire of aid agencies and NGOs. The book’s greatest weakness is that it fails to grapple with new forces shaping the future of humanitarian action. The Crisis Caravan first appeared in Dutch in 2008. There have been severe setbacks to the humanitarian project since then, and these have not resulted from organisational incompetence on the ground but international political shifts.

In 2009, the Sri Lankan government barred aid to civilians during in its campaign to crush the Tamil Tigers. There have been warnings that other governments facing internal resistance, will follow the same path – in part because they are increasingly unconcerned by criticism from western governments and NGOs as power shifts to China and India. Polman hardly addresses the implications of these geopolitical trends. This weakens her analysis of a case like Darfur, where Sudan’s behaviour and the West’s ability to intervene are constantly complicated by China’s steadfast support for President Omar al Bashir.

Meanwhile, the financial crisis has set limits on the amount of funding available for humanitarian operations. The international response to this year’s Haitian earthquake was generous, but that following Pakistan’s floods this summer was pathetically slow. Funds for other cases – even former priorities such as Iraq – have been hard to come by. The crisis caravan isn’t about to grind to halt. New donors are getting involved in aid. Brazil, for example, is investing in humanitarian assistance as a strategic priority.

Nonetheless, it remains to be seen whether the concept of apolitical international humanitarian assistance – the idea that Polman considers so wrong-headed – can survive the transition to a multipolar world. There is a plausible scenario in which aid becomes increasingly Balkanised, with China taking bilateral responsibility for starving North Koreans, India helping the Myanmarese and so forth, out of straightforward self-interest.

In this scenario, the largely western (and western-funded) aid workers on the receiving end of Linda Polman’s polemic will see their importance decline. Her book feels, if not outdated, then at least like a description of an era of do-goodery that may soon fade away. However humanitarianism evolves, there will probably still be French restaurants filled aid workers. And there will be no shortage of profiteers and warlords ready to take advantage of Chinese and Indian assistance, just as they have siphoned off western aid dollars. For all its flaws, The Crisis Caravan is a powerful primer in the realities of life in crisis zones – and how hard it is to provide real relief to the vulnerable.

Voir aussi:

Les aides qui n’aident pas

ESM

24 septembre 09

Il s’agit des… et ce sont les intellectuels africains eux-mêmes qui le dénoncent.

L’humanitarisme ne réduit pas la pauvreté. Au contraire. Il engraisse les corrompus, enrichit les dictateurs, habitue les gens à mendier. Lorsqu’il n’allonge pas les guerres. Ce sont les économistes africains qui le dénoncent.

Au milieu du siècle dernier, à partir de l’indépendance, l’Afrique a profité à divers titre d’aides financières pour plus de mille milliards de dollars sans que cela ait amené à une réduction de la pauvreté. Au contraire, entre 1970 et 1998, période où ont afflué vers le continent les plus grandes contributions de l’étranger, la pauvreté est montée de 11 à 66%.

Dans son essai intitulé « Dead aid. Why aid is not working and how there is better way for Africa », l’économiste zambien Dambisa Moyo rapporte ces faits, et d’autres données en démonstration du fait que la coopération au développement en Afrique a été jusqu’à présent un échec. Réfuter sa thèse est difficile. En effet, il y a trente ans, des pays comme le Burundi et le Burkina Faso, actuellement deux des États les plus pauvres du monde, avaient un PIB par habitant supérieur à celui de la Chine et, comme l’a rappelé le 11 Juillet dans son discours d’Accra (au Ghana) le président américain Barack Obama, en 1961, le Kenya alors Colonie britannique, vantait un PIB par habitant supérieur à celui de la Corée du Sud, mais depuis lors s’est laissé amplement dépassé.

Où a fini tout cet argent ?

Ce sont des faits sur lesquels il convient de réfléchir, et d’autant plus au lendemain d’un G8, celui qui vient de se terminer à l’Aquila, qui a vu lancer un nouveau programme triennal d’aides à l’Afrique pour un total de 20 milliards de dollars, qui vont s’ajouter aux fonds déjà considérables destinés au développement, aux urgences humanitaires et à l’effacement de la dette étrangère contractée par les pays africains compris dans la catégorie des 27 États les plus pauvres et les plus endettés au monde, comme il en avait été décidé par le G8 de 2005.

Le soutien public international, explique Moyo, « détruit tout élan vers les réformes, le développement, la capacité de créer la richesse nationale et de l’exporter. Il alimente la corruption et les conflits internes et favorise le maintien de régimes pluriannuels ».

Un autre économiste africain est du même avis, le kenyan James Shikwati : les aides financent d’énormes bureaucraties, contribuent à rendre envahissante la corruption, étouffent la libre initiative, permettent aux leaders politiques d’ignorer les besoins de leurs compatriotes. Partout ils ont créé une mentalité paresseuse et ont habitué les africains à être des assistés et des mendiants. Parmi les exemples les plus sensationnels, Shikwati cite le Nigeria et la République Démocratique du Congo qui, malgré leurs immenses richesses, n’ont rien fait pour réduire la pauvreté et font pression pour être classés parmi les nations les plus nécessiteuses afin de pouvoir recevoir des aides ultérieures.

C’est là le paradoxe africain : plus les ressources augmentent, plus la pauvreté croît. Au Nigeria, pendant des décennies premier producteur de pétrole de l’Afrique subsaharienne (dépassé en 2008 par l’Angola), 70% de la population vit toujours avec moins d’un dollar par jour et 92% avec moins de deux. Une réponse à la question inévitable (mais comment est-ce possible?) a été donnée par Barack Obama, déjà cité, parlant à Accra où il s’est rendu en visite tout de suite après la fin du G8. Dans un mémorable discours le président américain a adressé aux africains des reproches qu’avant lui, seul le pape Benoît XVI, pendant son voyage en Afrique d’avril, avait osé formuler lors d’occasions officielles et avec autant de fermeté.

Tant de gâchis de ressources doit être imputé au tribalisme, à la mal-gouvernance, à la corruption dont sont responsables les gouvernements africains. L’Occident n’est pas coupable de la banqueroute du Zimbabwe, des guerres où on fait combattre les enfants et des autres plaies qui affligent le continent : « Aucun pays – a dit Obama – ne peut créer de richesse si ses leaders exploitent l’économie pour s’enrichir. Aucun entrepreneur ne veut investir dans un pays dont le gouvernement prélève 20% sur tout. Personne n’a envie de vivre dans un pays où règnent férocité et corruption. Ceci n’est pas démocratie, mais tyrannie, même si quelquefois on va voter. Et cela doit finir ».

Le cimetière des éléphants blancs

Le problème est comment faire pour induire les gouvernements africains à changer de route.

Sur ce point il manque une résolution. Mais au moins, disent Moyo et Shikwati, les donateurs peuvent commencer à inverser la tendance, en réduisant les programmes de coopération sans craindre les inévitables critiques initiales de ceux qui, comme Bob Geldof (Ndr: chanteur irlandais, milliardaire spécialisé dans le « caritatif »…, plusieurs fois nommé pour recevoir le Prix Nobel de la paix), sont convaincus que le défaut fondamental des aides internationales est qu’elles sont insuffisantes. En réalité, même Bob Geldof pourrait se convaincre qu’il est temps d’en finir avec les « éléphants blancs » – ainsi sont appelés dans le monde de la coopération internationale les innombrables projets trop coûteux et réalisés sans en évaluer l’opportunité. Au sommet de la liste, il y des centaines de kilomètres de routes qui relient rien à rien et traversent des régions dans lesquelles presque personne ne dispose d’une automobile.

Mais ce sont aussi des « éléphants blancs » les structures hospitalières suréquipées mais inutilisables parce que construites dans des pays dépourvus de médecins, ou les édifices scolaire inaugurés avec fierté et ensuite restés vides par manque d’enseignants, qui sont si peu nombreux en Afrique que les classes de 40-50 élèves sont la règle est et pas rares celles qui dépassent la centaine : en 2005 au Burundi, avec l’introduction de l’instruction primaire gratuite, les proviseurs se sont vus contraints de former des classes de 250 enfants.

Par contre on appelle des « cathédrales dans le désert » les usines dont n’est jamais sorti aucun produit fini ou qui ont tourné à un rythme tellement bas qu’elles ont échoué en très peu de temps, comme celle pour la production du beurre de karité construite dans les années Quatre-vingt-dix par la coopération italienne au Burkina Faso, dans une région où personne ne cultivait le karité et où il manquait l’eau, nécessaire en grande quantité pour l’indispensable travail à froid des graines.

Le génocide assisté

Mais, tout en voulant donner raison à Dambisa Moyo, il y a un secteur de la coopération internationale dont l’utilité semble très évidente, et qui exclut sans discussion l’éventualité de le suspendre ou même seulement de le reformuler : il s’agit des aides humanitaires. Pourtant même là quelque chose ne fonctionne pas. Et il ne s’agit pas seulement de gaspillages, de rapports lacunaires sur les frais et les résultats atteints et de chiffres gonflés sur l’existence d’une urgence pour obtenir plus de fonds.

Dans un livre récemment publié par les éditions Mondadori, L’industria della solidarietà, la journaliste hollandaise Linda Polman soulève de sérieuses questions sur les résultats des activités humanitaires. Le principe de la Croix rouge Internationale de secourir tous ceux qui en ont besoin, qu’ils soient victimes ou agresseurs, fait par exemple, que ceux qu’on nomme refugee warriors, les combattants, qui se mélangent aux civils dans les camps de réfugiés, bénéficient de l’assistance fournie par les Organisations non gouvernementales : « Selon plusieurs estimations – écrit Polman – entre 15 et 20% des habitants des camps de réfugiés sont des refugee warriors qui, entre un repas et un traitement médical repartent en guerre ».

Le pire s’est passé en 1994 dans les camps préparés à Goma, République Démocratique du Congo, pour accueillir les réfugiés du Rwanda voisin, transformé en un abattoir à ciel ouvert par les extrémistes hutu décidés à exterminer les tutsi et les hutu qui n’étaient pas d’accord avec eux. Poursuivis par le Front patriotique rwandais à dominante tutsi, les hutu ont fui au-delà de la frontière, parmi eux, beaucoup d’auteurs de la tentative de génocide, y compris les militaires et l’entière classe politique, qui continuèrent pendant quelque temps le massacre des tutsi (et des hutu qui voulaient rentrer dans leur patrie), retournant chaque soir dans les camps transformés en quartiers militaires sous les yeux des opérateurs. « Quand les principes humanitaires cessent-ils d’être éthiques ? », questionne Polman.

Quand les ONG traitent avec les criminels

Mais il y a plus grave encore, c’est la quantité astronomique d’argent et de biens destinés aux populations qui, sous forme de droits pour le transit des convois, d’exactions, de pourcentages délivrés aux autorités politiques et militaires en échange de la permission d’intervenir dans un territoire donné, et ainsi de suite, passent des ONG dans les mains des adversaires qui disposent ainsi de ressources toujours renouvelées pour continuer à combattre et à s’acharner sur les civils. « Grâce aux gains des négociations avec les organisations internationales – soutient Polman – les groupes en lutte mangent et s’arment, en plus de payer leurs troupes » et ceci influe de manière décisive sur l’intensité et sur la durée des guerres. Dans le jargon des spécialistes, ces négociations s’appellent « shaking hands with the devil ». Pactes avec le diable

Voir egalement:

“Alms Dealers”

Philip Gourevitch

The New Yorker

October 11, 2010

Humanitarian Aid;

“The Crisis Caravan: What’s Wrong with Humanitarian Aid?” (Metropolitan; $24);

Linda Polman;

“Contemporary States of Emergency” (Zone; $36.95);

Didier Fassin;

Mariella Pandolfi;

Liz Waters (translated by)

ABSTRACT: A CRITIC AT LARGE about Linda Polman’s “The Crisis Caravan: What’s Wrong with Humanitarian Aid?”

In Biafra in 1968, a generation of children was starving to death. This was a year after oil-rich Biafra had seceded from Nigeria, and, in return, Nigeria had attacked and laid siege to Biafra. Mentions Frederick Forsyth. The humanitarianism that emerged from Biafra is probably the most enduring legacy of the ferment of 1968 in global politics.

Three decades later, in Sierra Leone, a Dutch journalist named Linda Polman visited Makeni, the headquarters of the Revolutionary United Front rebels. The conventional wisdom was that Sierra Leone’s civil war had been pure insanity. But Polman had heard it suggested that the R.U.F.’s rampages had followed from “a rational, calculated strategy.” The idea was that the extreme violence had been “a deliberate attempt to drive up the price of peace.”

Do doped-up maniacs really go a-maiming in order to increase their country’s appeal in the eyes of international aid donors? Does the modern humanitarian-aid industry help create the kind of misery it is supposed to redress? That is the central contention of Polman’s new book, “The Crisis Caravan: What’s Wrong with Humanitarian Aid?” (Metropolitan; $24), translated by the excellent Liz Waters. Sowing horror to reap aid, and reaping aid to sow horror, Polman argues, is “the logic of the humanitarian era.” In case after case, a persuasive case can be made that, overall, humanitarian aid did as much or even more harm than good.

The godfather of modern humanitarianism was a Swiss businessman named Henri Dunant, who founded the International Committee of the Red Cross. Humanitarianism also had a godmother named Florence Nightingale, who rejected the idea of the Red Cross from the outset. By easing the burden on war ministries, Nightingale argued, volunteer efforts could simply make waging war more attractive, and more probable. Polman has come back from fifteen years of reporting in the places where aid workers ply their trade to tell us that Nightingale was right. The scenes of suffering that we tend to call humanitarian crises are almost always symptoms of political circumstances and there’s no apolitical way of responding to them – no way to act without having a political effect. At the very least, the role of the officially neutral, apolitical aid worker in most contemporary conflicts is, as Nightingale forewarned, that of a caterer: humanitarianism relieves the warring parties of many of the burdens (administrative and financial) of waging war, diminishing the demands of governing while fighting, cutting the cost of taking casualties, and supplying food, medicine, and logistical support that keep armies going. At its worst, impartiality in the face of atrocity can be indistinguishable from complicity. Polman takes aim at everything from the mixture of casual cynicism and extreme self-righteousness by which aid workers insulate themselves from their surroundings to the deeper decadence of a humanitarianism that pays war taxes of anywhere from fifteen per cent of the value of the aid it delivered to eighty per cent. Mentions “Contemporary States of Emergency” (Zone; $36.95), edited by Didier Fassin and Mariella Pandolfi.

Voir enfin:

We Did Nothing: Why the Truth Doesn’t Always Come Out When the UN Goes in by Linda Polman

Reviewed by Mark Thwaite

Ready Steady books

19/09/2004

I’d have to say that this is a must-read. The UN are, consistantly, evoked as some kind of liberal White (sic) Knight in this bad, bad world. Even those concerned by America’s recent (ahem) robustness have held up the UN as the route to a better future (witness, in the UK, the difference in public opinion over supporting the invasion of Iraq with/without « UN approval »). Polman clearly punctures the ridiculous fallacy that « the UN » is something somehow separate from its members, specifically the permanent Five (the US, UK, France, Russia and China – the WWII victors plus Beijing). A favourite activity (and she singles out ex-US President Bill Clinton as the master of this) is to blame the UN for taking on a peace-keeping mission (e.g. in Somalia) that one of the permanent members has decided upon and then refused to back properly (with kit, soldier and/or funding). As Boutros-Ghali says, quoted by Polman, after hearing Clinton say, « the UN should learn to say No »: « It is not the UN that says Yes or No to anything. It is the Member States. » And the Member States vote for political reasons, and most usually the way the Five tell them to.

Polman’s mixture of (absurdist) frontline anecdotes (M.A.S.H. meets the reality of Mogadishu) and press reports (from AP, Reuters, de Volkskrant) is well done (if sometimes a little repetitive) and her thesis is compellingly hammered home. The UN costs per annum what Americans spend at the florists each year – and the Five who direct it have the cheek to blame it for failed missions that they impose on an organisation that they perenially underfund. The racism involved in all this will be apparent to anyone who has ever watched the TV news: Blue Helmets, in dangerous situations, are almost always Black/Asian soldiers (often from Pakistan, India, West African countries): « in Kuwait, for example, British soldiers clear mines with British detectors while detectorless Bangledeshis do the same job by prodding the ground with sticks. » Third World soldiers do all the UN’s dirty work – and understandably: for poor countries their soldiers have become an income generating export product.

« The West is providing the canons, the Third World the fodder. » And whilst Black soldiers die in failed missions, predominantly Western privateers and profiteers follow the UN around providing services (from catering to building work) for the soldiers, their command, and often to the local war chiefs too. Polman follows this circus in, amongst other places (her second chapter is entitled Haiti, Rwanda, Bosnia, Somalia and Thirteen Other Disaster Zones), Somalia, Haiti and Rwanda – and the picture is curiously and depressingly the same.

Both a more interesting, humane and incisive writer than Janine di Giovanni, whose Madness Visible traverses similar ground, Polman’s account (which the Guardian rather hyped as « one of the most affecting pieces of writing about man’s inhumanity this side of Primo Levi ») of the stupidity, desperate failure and deep-seated mendacity of « peacekeeping » missions, and the UN itself, should be read as widely as possible. A peaceful world is not likely to arise because of an all-powerful UN, but it is absolutely certainly not going to come about via an institution that is never allowed to stand on its own feet and apart from the countries who half-fund and wholly-hamstring it.


Retraites: PS/CGT, plus hypocrite que moi tu meurs! (France’s strikes: Will the irresponsible and demagogic street theater ever end?)

13 octobre, 2010
Comparative table retirement age Europe
Du fait de la croissance de la population âgée, en 2050, il n’y aurait plus que 1,4 actif pour un inactif de plus de 60 ans, contre 2,2 en 2005. INSEE
Je leur demande d’ailleurs de descendre dans la rue mais d’une maniere pacifique. Segolene Royal
Les syndicats ont gagné la bataille de l’opinion. L’intersyndicale n’a jamais appelé à une grève reconductible. S’ils le font, ce sera à cause de l’absence de réponse du gouvernement. La grande majorité de salariés n’ont pas les moyens de se lancer dans des grèves à répétition. François Chérèque (secrétaire général de la CFDT)
Ce ne serait pas forcément rendre service aux salariés, au mouvement social. Jean-Marie Le Guen (député PS)
Le PS n’a pas à appeler aux grèves (…) le PS doit faire en sorte que ce mouvement trouve son débouché politique au Parlement et le moment venu, en 2012, à la présidentielle. Le rôle du PS, ce n’est pas d’organiser des mouvements de rue, c’est de proposer des solutions. Quand les partis politiques font du syndicalisme, ils ne sont pas dans leur rôle, quand des syndicalistes font de la politique, ils ne sont pas dans leur rôle non plus. François Hollande (ancien premier secrétaire du PS)
Le PS dans le respect des décisions des syndicats appelle les français à peser massivement sur une question majeure. Si le pays venait à être bloqué, Nicolas Sarkozy en porterait seul la responsabilité. C’est lui qui veut l’épreuve de force. David Assouline (point de presse hebdomadaire du PS)
Si nous avons une situation d’intensification, de radicalisation, c’est directement la conséquence non pas d’une posture de fermeté mais probablement d’orgueil du président de la République qui refuse de négocier. Benoît Hamon (porte-parole PS)
Les organisations syndicales ont fait preuve d’une très grande responsabilité, c’est le pouvoir qui est en train de jouer la stratégie de la tension. Jean-Marc Ayrault (président du groupe socialiste à l’Assemblée nationale)
Les agents des terminaux pétroliers ne font pas grève pour eux. La grève a été décidée par la CGT au niveau national pour mettre une pression forte sur le gouvernement et faire capoter la réforme des retraites. Salarié du port désirant rester anonyme
Je répète que les 62 ans de 2018 pèseront moins lourd biologiquement que les 60 ans de 1982. Dans les siècles passés, on était vieux à 45 ou 50 ans. Éric Woerth  (ministre du Travail)
Si on arrive à vivre 100 ans, on ne va pas continuer à avoir la retraite à 60. Dominique Strauss-Kahn
Une augmentation de deux ans de l’âge légal de départ à la retraite suffirait à stabiliser la part des pensions dans le PIB pour les deux prochaines décennies. (…) Relever l’âge légal de la retraite doit être le point de départ de la réforme. Rapport du FMI (dirige par Dominique Strauss-Kahn)
Les lycéens et les étudiants devraient manifester pour défendre la réforme car elle est d’abord faite pour eux. Sans elle, ils seraient condamnés à payer deux fois: pour leur propre retraite et pour celle de leurs parents. C’est cela qui serait vraiment injuste. (…), les syndicats posent comme condition préalable à tout accord l’abandon par le gouvernement du report de l’âge de la retraite à 62 ans, mesure préconisée par toutes les organisations internationales y compris encore la semaine dernière par le FMI et pratiquée par tous les autres pays. Je comprends que les syndicats refusent de cautionner une réforme difficile. Mais, pour leur donner satisfaction, fallait-il renoncer au principe même de la réforme qui est démographique pour répondre à un problème, lui-même démographique?  (…) quel que soit le système retenu, on reste dans le cadre d’un régime de retraite par répartition, dont le déterminant est toujours le même, à savoir la démographie. Si les actifs ne travaillent pas plus longtemps pour tenir compte de l’allongement de l’espérance de vie, alors il faut baisser les pensions ou augmenter massivement les prélèvements obligatoires, ce que le président de la République a toujours refusé. Raymond Soubie (conseiller social de l’Elysee)

Blocage des ports, terminaux pétroliers et raffineries (11 sur 12, depuis 3 semaines a Marseille), menaces de ruptures d’approvisionnement dans les stations-service et de  pénurie de carburant, blocage des lycees, trains et vols annules, fermeture de la Tour Eiffel …

Alors qu’apres le vote de l’Assemblee et du Senat pour l’allongement de l’âge légal de départ en retraite à 62 ans …

Et a coup de menaces de greve reconductible ou illimitee et de surenchere d’appels a descendre dans la rue, la France qui a deja l’un des ages de depart a la retraite les plus bas d’Europe joue a nouveau a se faire peur …

Retour, avec la chronique – sortant pour une fois de sa posture o combien confortable d’eternel donneur de lecons- de l’ancien journaliste du Monde Daniel Schneiderman …

Sur l’eternel jeu de dupes de ces jeunes qui, a chaque nouvelle loi, manifestent systematiquement contre leurs propres interets

Ces irresponsables politiques et syndicaux qui tentent de nous refaire le coup du CPE d’il y a  4 ans ou un delinquant multirecidiviste squattant alors l’Elysee depuis bientot 10 ans avait retire un texte deja vote par le Parlement …

Et surtout l’insigne hypocrisie et irresponsabilite d’un parti socialiste qui, contre l’avis de son candidat le plus credible depuis bien des annees,  pousse hypocritiquement et  demagogiquement les feux de la contestation et de la radicalisation contre une reforme qu’il sait non seulement necessaire mais dont il espere secretement l’adoption …

Retraites : l’axiome secret de Thomas Legrand

Daniel Schneidermann

On peut le prendre par n’importe quel bout : la succès de la journée de mobilisation contre la réforme des retraites représente d’abord un très grave risque pour les socialistes. C’était le thème de l’édito de Thomas Legrand, retour de grève, sur France Inter. Je résume la pensée legrandienne : plus longtemps durera la grève reconductible, plus le PS se trouvera embarqué dans un mouvement qu’il ne maitrise pas, environné par les « ultras », cerné par les « surenchères », avec le risque de devoir, ensuite, au pouvoir, assumer un grand écart entre ce mouvement et une politique décevante, forcément décevante.

C’est un  paradoxe intéressant, entièrement dicté par un axiome secret, accepté par la quasi-totalité des éditorialistes français : la réforme du gouvernement est la seule imaginable, les socialistes et les syndicalistes le savent bien, et souhaitent secrètement son adoption. Bravo ! Il faut encourager les éditorialistes en surpoids de lucidité. Il faut donc pousser jusqu’au bout les conséquences de l’axiome de Legrand. Révélons-le donc : le succès de cette mobilisation est  un risque considérable pour les syndicats, entraînés dans l’impasse par leur base, et une jeunesse, également irresponsables.

A cet égard, l’entrée des lycéens dans le mouvement est particulièrement préoccupante pour eux. Si Ségolène Royal, qui a compris le danger, appelle les jeunes à manifester, c’est évidemment dans le but, faisant fonction d’épouvantail, de les faire rentrer dans les lycées. Et si tous les lemmings de l’exécutif la traitent d’irresponsable, c’est au contraire dans le dessein inavoué de radicaliser la jeunesse.

Car plus le mouvement sera puissant, plus éclatant sera le triomphe final du gouvernement. L’essouflement des grèves en fin de semaine, qui permettrait l’adoption de la loi, serait une défaite pour lui, la bataille de l’opinion (l’essentielle) étant d’ores et déjà perdue. A l’inverse, plus longue sera la pénurie d’essence, plus on s’entre-tuera dans les files d’attente aux stations-service, plus durs seront les blocages des lycées, plus sa victoire finale (qui ne fait aucun doute, puisqu’il-ne-reculera-pas) apparaitra éclatante à l’électorat de droite. A cet égard, on notera le machiavelisme du pouvoir, qui agite le spectre de la suppression de l’ISF à quelques heures des manifestations, dans le but évident de les faire grossir encore.

Voir aussi :

Une trop puissante mobilisation peut finir par embarrasser le PS…

Thomas Legrand

France inter

13 octobre 2010

Oui, c’est ça le paradoxe, la grève reconductible (et sa radicalisation) peut devenir encombrante pour le parti socialiste. Le PS n’est pas à l’origine du mouvement bien sûr, c’est un mouvement syndical mais depuis le début, les leaders socialistes prennent bien soin –et c’est naturel- de l’accompagner et d’apparaître dans les cortèges. Le mouvement étant populaire et particulièrement soutenu par l’opinion, le principal parti d’opposition ne peut qu’en être. Encore faut-il savoir comment en être. Appeler la jeunesse à manifester, comme l’a fait Ségolène Royal hier sur TF1, n’est pas forcement l’implication la plus fine ! Le problème pour un parti qui est en phase d’élaboration de son programme d’alternance, c’est d’être à ce point embringué dans un mouvement dont il ne contrôle pas l’évolution ! La puissance du mouvement ne veut pas forcément dire sa radicalisation. Pour l’instant du moins, ce n’est pas le cas, mais si ça le devient, les socialistes en pâtiront. Le meilleur scénario pour le PS serait que la grève reconductible soit suivie jusqu’à samedi, date de la prochaine manifestation, et que ça s’arrête. Bien sûr, le Président pourrait alors dire et faire dire qu’il a réussi à réformer les retraites. Il détiendrait enfin son brevet de réformateur, lui qui s’est fait élire (non pas sur la réforme des retraites qui ne faisait pas parti de son programme avant la crise) mais sur l’idée qu’il pourrait faire bouger une société qu’il juge engoncée dans son conservatisme. Nicolas Sarkozy ne serait pas dans la lignée du président « fainéant » Chirac, comme il l’avait lui-même qualifié.

Donc un mouvement qui se terminerait samedi serait bon pour le président et pour le PS ?!

Pour le Président, c’est plus compliqué. Il serait donc tenté de se présenter avantageusement comme réformateur qui a su affronter et surmonter le plus « grand mouvement de tous les temps » (attendez-vous au déluge de superlatifs)…mais en réalité il n’est pas sûr que le bilan politique soit positif en vue de 2012 : le sentiment d’injustice qu’inspire cette réforme, et à en croire les sondages, bien au-delà de l’électorat de gauche, montre que, sur les retraites, Nicolas Sarkozy a déjà perdu la bataille de l’opinion. De plus l’opposition n’aura pas de mal à démontrer que le problème du financement des retraites n’est pas réglé… Du coup la question des retraites sera encore au cœur du débat pendant la présidentielle. Si le mouvement, au contraire se poursuit, se radicalise, devient une contestation de la jeunesse ou un blocage économique, ce serait l’incertitude pour la majorité mais ce serait aussi un grand danger pour le PS. Le risque, pour lui, serait de se retrouver dans l’obligation d’accompagner une radicalisation qui se traduirait forcément par une radicalisation de l’image et du discours du PS. Or cet emballement ferait faire au principal parti de l’opposition un grand écart entre son discours contestataire et la politique qui serait réellement mise en place si le PS accédait au pouvoir. Ce grand écart serait d’autant plus spectaculaire que, de l’autre coté, les recommandations du FMI sur la nécessité de reculer l’âge légal du départ à la retraite seront toujours opposées au parti socialiste. Le projet alternatif du PS ne ressemble pas à ce que recommande le FMI de Dominique Strauss-Kahn, mais il ne ressemble pas non plus à l’idée que l’on se fait du projet d’un parti qui accompagnerait une contestation radicale de la réforme des retraites. Le grand écart en politique n’est pas la figure la plus confortable. Martine Aubry n’est pas Rudolf Noureev.

Voir de meme :

DSK, meilleur socialiste pour battre Sarkozy

Nicolas Barotte

Le Figaro

Selon un sondage OpinionWay, le directeur du FMI fait figure de champion des électeurs de gauche pour 2012.

L’ordre du quarté ne change guère. À un an des primaires de désignation du candidat socialiste à la présidentielle, ils sont quatre à jouer la partie avec quelques chances d’y parvenir. «Le casting des impétrants est bien installé dans les esprits», estime-t-on au siège du Parti socialiste. Les présupposés de victoire aussi.

Les sympathisants de gauche, à lire notre baromètre OpinionWay, croient à une large majorité (65 %) que Dominique Strauss-Kahn « peut battre Nicolas Sarkozy ». Sont cités ensuite Martine Aubry (34 %), Ségolène Royal (23 %) et François Hollande (14 %).

Le classement est le même lorsqu’on demande aux personnes sondées qui des quatre a la stature d’un président : 63 % répondent DSK, 31 % Aubry, 24 % Royal et 15 % Hollande. Si le directeur du Fonds monétaire international décide d’être candidat, il sera sans doute accueilli à bras ouverts. S’il renonce, la première secrétaire du PS part avec un net avantage sur ses deux principaux concurrents : Royal et Hollande. Les autres candidats, comme Manuel Valls ou Pierre Moscovici, n’ont pas été testés.

La bataille est-elle déjà jouée ? Évidemment non, car, dans le détail, chaque candidat a ses forces et ses faiblesses. OpinionWay a cherché à comparer les compétences de chacun auprès de l’électorat de gauche. Au vu des résultats, les profils des candidats sont très différents.

Dominique Strauss-Kahn apparaît comme le candidat de la régulation. Il surclasse ses rivaux sur la capacité à restaurer le rôle de la France dans le monde avec 56 % de citations (sa fonction de directeur du FMI lui donne une aura internationale), et sur les compétences pour rétablir la croissance économique et le pouvoir d’achat (son passé d’ancien ministre de l’Économie lui donne un légitimité sur le sujet). En revanche, il apparaît éloigné des préoccupations quotidiennes des Français : seulement 26 % des personnes interrogées le jugent « proche » , derrière Martine Aubry (38 %) et Ségolène Royal (28 %). Martine Aubry incarne, elle, une candidature de protection. Elle est jugée plus efficace que les autres sur les questions de santé ou de retraites (44 % la citent en première) ou en matière de réparation des inégalités sociales, de formation ou d’emploi. Ancienne ministre des Affaires sociales, la numéro un du PS est en pointe du combat contre la réforme des retraites. Consciente de ses atouts, elle mène aussi campagne autour du concept de « société du soin mutuel », le « care ». À l’inverse, elle manque d’une stature internationale : c’est sur la restauration du rôle de la France dans le monde qu’elle obtient son plus mauvais résultat.

Troisième dans la course, Ségolène Royal joue sur le terrain de l’humanité. Éducation, réduction des inégalités sociales et environnement sont ses points forts. Mais c’est seulement sur ce dernier sujet qu’elle est jugée plus efficace que les autres présidentiables avec 27 % de citations. Ségolène Royal tire aussi parti de son passé ministériel et de sa campagne présidentielle marquée sous le signe de la croissance verte. Mais elle ne tire pas profit d’avoir pris position sur la sécurité plus tôt que les autres (avec 16 % contre 30 %, par exemple, pour DSK qui n’a pas pris position). Elle reste cependant la principale rivale des deux favoris. Elle leur a proposé de discuter « d’un dispositif gagnant », c’est-à-dire pourquoi ne pas s’entendre sur une candidature commune.

Si DSK, Aubry et Royal s’entendent, « alors je suis deuxième dans la course », s’amuse parfois François Hollande. Dernier dans toutes les catégories, l’ancien premier secrétaire incarne finalement une candidature équilibrée : sans réel point fort mais sans faiblesse relative. Sur l’ensemble des questions, il oscille entre 10 % de citations (pour le rôle de la France dans le monde) et 15 % (sur l’emploi).

Par rapport à la précédente enquête, réalisée en mai, chaque prétendant a plutôt progressé, signe que l’image globale du PS s’améliore. Ségolène Royal et François Hollande enregistrent les plus forts bonds, de quatre, cinq ou six points parfois (+ 6 pour Royal en matière de pouvoir d’achat ; + 5 sur l’emploi pour Hollande). Mais sur deux questions, il leur reste à tous à faire des efforts : en matière de sécurité et d’environnement, un tiers des personnes interrogées ne citent aucun des quatre candidats comme le plus performant.

Voir enfin :

Soubie : « Les lycéens doivent défendre la réforme »

Interview Challenges.fr Raymond Soubie, conseiller social à l’Elysée, estime que les jeunes devraient défendre une réforme des retraites faite pour eux.

Alors que les manifestations en France semblent mobiliser davantage les jeunes générations que les journées précédentes, le conseiller social du président de la République, Raymond Soubie, fait notamment le point sur la méthode de Nicolas Sarkozy dans la conduite de la réforme.

De plus en plus de lycéens et d’étudiants rejoignent la contestation contre la réforme des retraites. Avez-vous peur que le conflit s’embrase?

– Les lycéens et les étudiants devraient manifester pour défendre la réforme car elle est d’abord faite pour eux. Sans elle, ils seraient condamnés à payer deux fois: pour leur propre retraite et pour celle de leurs parents. C’est cela qui serait vraiment injuste.

Dans cette réforme, on ne reconnaît pas vraiment la méthode Soubie, celle de la négociation avec les partenaires sociaux. Comment l’expliquez-vous?

– La méthode du président de la République a toujours consisté à préconiser pour la conduite des réformes à la fois la détermination et le dialogue avec les partenaires sociaux. Sur le sujet des retraites, je rappelle que d’innombrables travaux ont été menés depuis le livre blanc de Michel Rocard en 1991, tous concordants. Je rappelle aussi que, pour cette réforme, le dialogue a été mené pendant plusieurs mois par le ministre du Travail. Tout récemment encore, à l’occasion des débats à l’Assemblée nationale puis au Sénat, des demandes des syndicats ont été prises en compte sur la pénibilité, les carrières longues ainsi que sur la retraite des mères de famille de trois enfants et des parents d’enfant handicapé.

Alors pourquoi ça bloque?

– Malheureusement, les syndicats posent comme condition préalable à tout accord l’abandon par le gouvernement du report de l’âge de la retraite à 62 ans, mesure préconisée par toutes les organisations internationales y compris encore la semaine dernière par le FMI et pratiquée par tous les autres pays. Je comprends que les syndicats refusent de cautionner une réforme difficile. Mais, pour leur donner satisfaction, fallait-il renoncer au principe même de la réforme qui est démographique pour répondre à un problème, lui-même démographique? Il s’agit quand même de l’avenir de nos retraites et de celles de nos enfants. Je sais bien que certains préféreraient une baisse de pension à un recul de l’âge de départ. Ce n’est pas la position du gouvernement.

Selon les simulations de la Caisse d’assurance vieillesse, il manquerait 4 milliards d’euros pour assurer le financement de la réforme en 2018. Confirmez-vous ces calculs?

– La réforme permet à nos régimes de retraite d’atteindre l’équilibre dès 2018. Toutefois, cette situation d’ensemble implique que certains régimes seraient en équilibre tandis que d’autres connaîtraient plus structurellement une situation de déficit. C’est le cas en particulier de la Caisse nationale d’assurance vieillesse (Cnav) qui présenterait un déficit de 2,3 milliards d’euros en 2018. C’est pourquoi, lors de l’examen du projet de loi à l’Assemblée nationale, le gouvernement a déposé un amendement qui prévoit le principe d’un examen, en 2014, d’un éventuel transfert des recettes ou de charges entre régimes afin d’assurer l’équilibre de l’ensemble des régimes de retraite et en particulier de la Cnav. Il est prématuré aujourd’hui d’en examiner les modalités, celles-ci devant prendre en compte la situation de chaque régime en 2014.

Pourquoi ne pas avoir lancé le chantier d’une grande réforme de structure, à côté de cette réforme urgente, comme le réclament certains centristes ?

– Le président de la République et le gouvernement ne sont pas défavorables à ce que les travaux se poursuivent sur les avantages et les inconvénients d’une réforme dite systémique (comptes notionnels ou régimes par points). Mais, il faut rappeler que, quel que soit le système retenu, on reste dans le cadre d’un régime de retraite par répartition, dont le déterminant est toujours le même, à savoir la démographie. Si les actifs ne travaillent pas plus longtemps pour tenir compte de l’allongement de l’espérance de vie, alors il faut baisser les pensions ou augmenter massivement les prélèvements obligatoires, ce que le président de la République a toujours refusé. Ajoutons qu’une réforme systémique exige de longues années avant de pouvoir être mise en œuvre comme le montre l’exemple de la Suède. La situation de nos régimes de retraite montre qu’on ne peut pas attendre pour prendre des mesures structurelles.

Propos recueillis par Dominique Perrin, journaliste à Challenges, mardi 12 octobre 2010.


Columbus Day/518e: Une révérence presque mystique (We’re kinda proud of that ragged old flag)

12 octobre, 2010
Cherchez l'erreur (Obama, Iowa, Sep 2007)
Obama
Le fait, au cours d’une manifestation organisée ou réglementée par les autorités publiques, d’outrager publiquement l’hymne national ou le drapeau tricolore est puni de 7 500 euros d’amende. Lorsqu’il est commis en réunion, cet outrage est puni de six mois d’emprisonnement et de 7 500 euros d’amende. Code pénal francais (Article 433-5-1, Loi n°2003-239 du 18 mars 2003)
During a rendition of the national anthem, when the flag is displayed all present except those in uniform should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. US flag code
Je jure allégeance au drapeau des États-Unis d’Amérique et à la République qu’il représente, une nation unie sous l’autorité de Dieu, indivisible, avec la liberté et la justice pour tous. Serment du drapeau (Francis Bellamy, revise en 1954 par Eisenhower)
Without this phrase ‘under God,’ The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag might have been recited with similar sincerity by Muscovite children at the beginning of their school day. Rev. George Macpherson Docherty (New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, Washington DC, Feb. 1954)
I was brought up in Scotland, and in Scotland, we sang, ‘God save our gracious king. George Macpherson Docherty
From this day forward, the millions of our schoolchildren will daily proclaim in every city and town, every village and rural schoolhouse, the dedication of our nation and our people to the Almighty — a patriotic oath and a public prayer. Eisenhower (1954)
To believe that patriotism will not flourish if patriotic ceremonies are voluntary and spontaneous instead of a compulsory routine is to make an unflattering estimate of the appeal of our institutions to free minds. Justice Robert H. Jackson (West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, the United States Supreme Court, 1943)
The American flag, then, throughout more than 200 years of our history, has come to be the visible symbol embodying our Nation. It does not represent the views of any particular political party, and it does not represent any particular political philosophy. The flag is not simply another ‘idea’ or ‘point of view’ competing for recognition in the marketplace of ideas. Millions and millions of Americans regard it with an almost mystical reverence regardless of what sort of social, political, or philosophical beliefs they may have. I cannot agree that the First Amendment invalidates the Act of Congress, and the laws of 48 of the 50 States, which make criminal the public burning of the flag. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist (1989)
We do not consecrate the flag by punishing its desecration, for in doing so we dilute the freedom that this cherished emblem represents. Justice William J. Brennan
The truth is that right after 9/11 I had a pin. Shortly after 9/11, particularly because as we’re talking about the Iraq war, that became a substitute for I think true patriotism, which is speaking out on issues that are of importance to our national security. I decided I won’t wear that pin on my chest. Instead, I’m going to try to tel l the American people what I believe will make this country great, and hopefully that will be a testament to my patriotism. Obama (October 04, 2007)
As I’ve said about the flag pin, I don’t want to be perceived as taking sides. There are a lot of people in the world to whom the American flag is a symbol of oppression. And the anthem itself conveys a war-like message. You know, the bombs bursting in air and all. It should be swapped for something less parochial and less bellicose. I like the song ‘I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing.’ If that were our anthem, then I might salute it. Reponse parodique attribuee au sénateur Obama

Dis moi comment tu traites ton drapeau, je te dirai qui tu es!

Eclairage nocturne obligatoire, exposition interdite en cas de pluie ou vent violents, positionnement nécessairement près du coeur pour tout port en épinglette ou en badge, nettoyage hebdomadaire obligatoire, interdiction de l’exposer abimé, corbeilles publiques et incinérateurs spécifiques pour la destruction des drapeaux usagés, interdiction de le poser sur le sol, lui marcher dessus ou de le tremper dans un liquide quelconque, interdiction formelle de l’incliner devant quelque autorité que ce soit, prééminence obligatoire sur un mât comportant de multiples drapeaux, protocole spécifique de pliage, affichage ou sens de déploiement, fete annuelle specifique (Flag day, le 14 juin), multiplication des poemes et chansons en son honneur …

En ce 518e anniversaire de l’arrivée de Christophe Colomb au Nouveau Monde …

Qui, aux portes de ce qu’il croyait etre l’empire chinois, le vit échanger, on le sait avec les indigènes, la catastrophique rougeole contre la non moins redoutable maladie vénerienne de la syphilis  …

Et qui, fêté aux Etats-Unis le 2e lundi d’octobre, voit nos amis hispanophones célebrer leur Race (pardon:  « hispanité« ) …

Pendant qu’au Pays autoproclamé des droits de l’homme, contraint néanmoins lui aussi il y a 7 ans de bricoler en catastrophe son propre code patriotique, nos chères têtes blondes sifflent copieusement l’hymne au sang impur ou arrachent son drapeau du fronton de nos mairies quand on ne prime pas les courageux anticonformistes qui se torchent avec …

Retour, histoire de comprendre les mémorables empoignades (mais jamais, 1er amendement oblige, jusqu’a l’interdiction) qu’avaient déclenché lors de la guerre du Vietnam son autodafé public ou plus récemment la tentative de certaines écoles d’en supprimer ou, au lendemain des attentats du 11/9, rétablir l’obligation du serment d’allegeance

Comme le quasi-scandale national qu’a pu provoquer au cours de la dernière présidentielle, le refus du futur premier président américain du Tiers-monde non seulement de manifester le respect élémentaire du a son hymne national mais de porter en temps de guerre les couleurs de son pays en boutonnière  …

Sur la véritable religion civile qu’est devenue, dans la première nation proprement mondialisée de l’histoire moderne, la bannière rouge blanche et bleue qui inspira à la Patrie autoproclamée des droits de l’homme son propre tricolore.

Et notamment, au-dela de son rituel le plus visible et le plus connu  du serment d’allegeance lancé il y a un peu plus d’un siècle par un pasteur socialiste dans un magazine de jeunes en l’honneur justement du 400e anniversaire de l’arrivée de Colomb …

Les règles particulièrement méticuleuses du code du drapeau

Le code du drapeau américain

25 août 2010

L’une des premières choses qui frappe lorsque l’on arrive aux USA est l’omniprésence du drapeau US : Sur les autobus, les métros, devant tous les édifices, la plupart des maisons et bien entendu les entreprises qui veulent attirer la clientèle patriotique en affichant des drapeaux en masse (parfois de très très grande taille !).

J’ai donc voulu en savoir plus et ai questionné plusieurs collègues qui m’ont appris l’existence d’un « code du drapeau Américain » dont je vais vous parler aujourd’hui.

Ce code du drapeau définit des règles très strictes et assez incroyables. Jugez plutôt :

* Le drapeau Américain, affiché en extérieur, doit être descendu et retiré chaque nuit sauf si il est éclairé par un projecteur. On ne peut pas laisser les USA dans l’ombre !

* De même, le drapeau ne doit pas être exposé à la pluie et aux vents violents.

* Le drapeau ne peut être porté en pin’s ou en badge que si ce dernier est positionné près du coeur du porteur.

* Le drapeau Américain doit être considéré comme un être vivant. Il est irrespectueux et illégal de le jeter à la poubelle. Des corbeilles spécifiques sont prévues à cet effet en divers lieux publics. Les drapeaux usagés sont ensuite incinérés selon un protocole précis.

* Il est interdit de poser le drapeau Américain sur le sol ou de lui marcher dessus. De même, il est interdit de le tremper dans un liquide quelconque.

* Lorsqu’il est sur un mât comportant de multiples drapeaux, le drapeau des USA doit être celui placé tout en haut. Il est illégal de placer le drapeau Américain en dessous d’un autre drapeau !

* Le drapeau ne peut être affiché abîmé. Il doit être immédiatement remplacé si il devient usagé.

Il existe également un protocole spécifique pour plier le drapeau, l’afficher correctement, le déployer dans la bonne direction, etc. ainsi que de nombreuses autres règles et… chansons à la gloire du drapeau. A ce point, c’est en fait pratiquement un culte !

D’ailleurs, tous les matins, les élèves des écoles Américaines doivent réciter le « pledge of allegiance » en classe, jusqu’au niveau lycée selon le souvenir de mes collègues :

« Je jure allégeance au drapeau des États-Unis d’Amérique et à la République qu’il représente, une nation unie sous l’autorité de Dieu, indivisible, avec la liberté et la justice pour tous. »

Notez au passage que les USA ne reportent qu’à l’autorité de Dieu et de personne d’autre. « One nation under God » et dont le drapeau doit être au dessus de tous les autres. Entre Dieu et le reste du monde. Ni plus ni moins. Ça c’est du patriotisme !

Pour finir, une petite question à laquelle je vais vous demander de répondre dans les commentaires. Lorsque le drapeau Américain est mis en berne (décès d’un membre important du gouvernement, commémoration militaire, etc.), tous les drapeaux US doivent suivre le même protocole à l’exception d’un seul, lequel ???

Voir aussi:

I am the Flag

Ruth Apperson Rous

I am the flag of the United States of America.

I was born on June 14, 1777, in Philadelphia.

There the Continental Congress adopted my stars and stripes as the national flag.

My thirteen stripes alternating red and white, with a union of thirteen white stars in a field of blue, represented a new constellation, a new nation dedicated to the personal and religious liberty of mankind.

Today fifty stars signal from my union, one for each of the fifty sovereign states in the greatest constitutional republic the world has ever known.

My colors symbolize the patriotic ideals and spiritual qualities of the citizens of my country.

My red stripes proclaim the fearless courage and integrity of American men and boys and the self-sacrifice and devotion of American mothers and daughters.

My white stripes stand for liberty and equality for all.

My blue is the blue of heaven, loyalty, and faith.

I represent these eternal principles: liberty, justice, and humanity.

I embody American freedom: freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the press, and the sanctity of the home.

I typify that indomitable spirit of determination brought to my land by Christopher Columbus and by all my forefathers – the Pilgrims, Puritans, settlers at James town and Plymouth.

I am as old as my nation.

I am a living symbol of my nation’s law: the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights.

I voice Abraham Lincoln’s philosophy: « A government of the people, by the people,for the people. »

I stand guard over my nation’s schools, the seedbed of good citizenship and true patriotism.

I am displayed in every schoolroom throughout my nation; every schoolyard has a flag pole for my display.

Daily thousands upon thousands of boys and girls pledge their allegiance to me and my country.

I have my own law—Public Law 829, « The Flag Code » – which definitely states my correct use and display for all occasions and situations.

I have my special day, Flag Day. June 14 is set aside to honor my birth.

Americans, I am the sacred emblem of your country. I symbolize your birthright, your heritage of liberty purchased with blood and sorrow.

I am your title deed of freedom, which is yours to enjoy and hold in trust for posterity.

If you fail to keep this sacred trust inviolate, if I am nullified and destroyed, you and your children will become slaves to dictators and despots.

Eternal vigilance is your price of freedom.

As you see me silhouetted against the peaceful skies of my country, remind yourself that I am the flag of your country, that I stand for what you are – no more, no less.

Guard me well, lest your freedom perish from the earth.

Dedicate your lives to those principles for which I stand: « One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. »

I was created in freedom. I made my first appearance in a battle for human liberty.

God grant that I may spend eternity in my « land of the free and the home of the brave » and that I shall ever be known as « Old Glory, » the flag of the United States of America.

Voir egalement:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shWyIxnjNAI

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/johnnycash/raggedoldflag.html

« Ragged Old Flag »

Johnny Cash

I walked through a county courthouse square

On a park bench, an old man was sittin’ there.

I said, « Your old court house is kinda run down,

He said, « Naw, it’ll do for our little town ».

I said, « Your old flag pole is leaned a little bit,

And that’s a ragged old flag you got hangin’ on it ».

He said, « Have a seat », and I sat down,

« Is this the first time you’ve been to our little town »

I said, « I think it is »

He said « I don’t like to brag, but we’re kinda proud of

That Ragged Old Flag

« You see, we got a little hole in that flag there,

When Washington took it across the Delaware.

and It got powder burned the night Francis Scott Key sat watching it,

writing « Say Can You See »

It got a rip in New Orleans, with Packingham & Jackson

tugging at its seams.

and It almost fell at the Alamo

beside the Texas flag,

But she waved on though.

She got cut with a sword at Chancellorsville,

And she got cut again at Shiloh Hill.

There was Robert E. Lee and Beauregard and Bragg,

And the south wind blew hard on

That Ragged Old Flag

« On Flanders Field in World War I,

She got a big hole from a Bertha Gun,

She turned blood red in World War II

She hung limp, and low, a time or two,

She was in Korea, Vietnam, She went where she was sent

by her Uncle Sam.

She waved from our ships upon the briny foam

and now they’ve about quit wavin’ back here at home

in her own good land here She’s been abused,

She’s been burned, dishonored, denied an’ refused,

And the government for which she stands

Has been scandalized throughout out the land.

And she’s getting thread bare, and she’s wearin’ thin,

But she’s in good shape, for the shape she’s in.

Cause she’s been through the fire before

and I believe she can take a whole lot more.

« So we raise her up every morning

And we bring her down slow every night,

We don’t let her touch the ground,

And we fold her up right.

On second thought

I *do* like to brag

Cause I’m mighty proud of

That Ragged Old Flag »

Voir par ailleurs:

Board Votes to Require Recitation of Pledge at Public Schools

Edward Wyatt

The NYT

October 18, 2001

The New York City Board of Education unanimously adopted a resolution last night to require all public schools to lead students in the Pledge of Allegiance at the beginning of every school day and at all schoolwide assemblies and events.

The resolution, which also states that students and staff members will neither be compelled to participate nor disciplined if they choose not to recite the pledge, is essentially a copy of a state education law already on the books.

But the requirement to recite the pledge has been all but ignored at most New York City schools for much of the last 30 years, since the waning days of the Vietnam War, education officials say.

Ninfa Segarra, the president of the Board of Education and the sponsor of the resolution, said,  »It’s a small way to thank the heroes of 9/11 and let them know they won’t be forgotten in our public schools. »

Schools Chancellor Harold O. Levy said yesterday afternoon that he also supported the resolution, but he cautioned that citizens have a greater responsibility to guard against discrimination and to tolerate dissenting views.

But the New York Civil Liberties Union objected strongly to the proposal, noting that the New York City school system has many students who are not American citizens. Those students are likely  »to be scapegoated or targeted for harassment » if they do not participate, said Donna Lieberman, interim director of the organization.

In 1943, the United States Supreme Court ruled in West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette that public school students could not be compelled to recite the Pledge of Allegiance. In that landmark decision, Justice Robert H. Jackson wrote,  »To believe that patriotism will not flourish if patriotic ceremonies are voluntary and spontaneous instead of a compulsory routine is to make an unflattering estimate of the appeal of our institutions to free minds. »

The resolution comes as school districts around the country grapple with the issue of what displays of patriotism are appropriate at a time of both national pride and mourning. The school board in Madison, Wis., created an uproar when it initially banned the pledge of allegiance despite a new state law calling for a daily display of patriotism. But this week, the board reversed it decision after hundreds of residents protested.

In the Madison case, opponents of saying the pledge said that it was militaristic and that the words  »under God, » which were added to the pledge in 1954, were a religious reference that did not belong in public schools.

No such sentiments were voiced yesterday at the Board of Education’s headquarters in Brooklyn. When Ms. Segarra announced at an afternoon session of the board that the resolution was likely to be adopted later that evening, a crowd of nearly 100 students, teachers and others attending the meeting burst into applause.

At the evening meeting, several people spoke in favor of the resolution, including Curtis Sliwa, the radio personality and founder of the Guardian Angels.

Mr. Sliwa spoke of his uncle, who he said was a custodian at James Madison High School in Brooklyn, and whose job it was to make sure every classroom had a flag.

 »If one of those flags was spoiled or tattered, he would make sure to replace it, » Mr. Sliwa said.

He said he supported the pledge resolution because  »it brings everyone together » in what has long been a racially divided city that places more emphasis on differences than similarities.

Mr. Levy, who will be responsible for making sure the resolution is put into effect, was more cautious in his support.

 »At every opportunity, » he said,  »we should make sure that tolerance is something that we teach, both by example and by reminding people what’s important. »

Teachers and children should also be reminded  »to be protective of particularly the Muslim children and children who wear traditional garb, » Mr. Levy said.  »This is what it is to be an American, as well as saluting the flag. »

The resolution also sets a goal for schools to display the American flag outside the building and in as many classrooms as is practical, and it encourages schools to form color guards to present the flags of the city, state and nation at assemblies.

State education law already has similar requirements, going so far as to set out the sizes of flags and the materials of which they should be made.

The law also requires the observance of Flag Day, June 14, in all schools, and the teaching of proper care of the flag: it should be brushed with a soft cloth once a week, for example.

But both the state and the new city regulation make implicit note of the Supreme Court’s ruling in saying that neither teachers nor students can be compelled to participate in the pledge. The state regulation specifically notes a lower court’s ruling that those refusing to salute the flag may not be required to stand or to leave the room.

Voir aussi:

http://www.policyarchive.org/handle/10207/275

Flag Protection: A Brief History and Summary of Recent Supreme Court Decisions and Proposed Constitutional Amendment

Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service

June 2006

Abstract:

Many Members of Congress see continued tension between « free speech » decisions of the Supreme Court, which protect flag desecration as expressive conduct under the First Amendment, and the symbolic importance of the United States flag. Consequently, every Congress that has convened since those decisions were issued has considered proposals that would permit punishment of those who engage in flag desecration. The 106th Congress narrowly failed to send a constitutional amendment to allow punishment of flag desecration to the States. In the 107th and 108th Congresses, such proposals were passed by the House.

This report is divided into two parts. The first gives a brief history of the flag protection issue, from the enactment of the Flag Protection Act in 1968 through current consideration of a constitutional amendment. The second part briefly summarizes the two decisions of the United States Supreme Court, Texas v. Johnson and United States v. Eichman, that struck down the state and federal flag protection statutes as applied in the context punishing expressive conduct.

In 1968, Congress reacted to the numerous public flag burnings in protest of the Vietnam conflict by passing the first federal flag protection act of general applicability. For the next 20 years, the lower courts upheld the constitutionality of this statute and the Supreme Court declined to review these decisions. However, in Texas v. Johnson, the majority of the Court held that a conviction for flag desecration under a Texas statute was inconsistent with the First Amendment and affirmed a decision of the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals that barred punishment for burning the flag as part of a public demonstration.

In response to Johnson, Congress passed the federal Flag Protection Act of 1989. But, in reviewing this act in United States v. Eichman, the Supreme Court expressly declined the invitation to reconsider Johnson and its rejection of the contention that flag-burning, like obscenity or « fighting words, » does not enjoy the full protection of the First Amendment as a mode of expression. The only question not addressed in Johnson, and therefore the only question the majority felt necessary to address, was « whether the Flag Protection Act is sufficiently distinct from the Texas statute that it may constitutionally be applied to proscribe appellees’ expressive conduct. » The majority of the Court held that it was not.

Congress, recognizing that Johnson and Eichman had left little hope of an antidesecration statute being upheld, has considered in each Congress subsequent to these decisions a constitutional amendment to empower Congress to protect the physical integrity of the flag. In the 109th Congress, H.J.Res. 5, H.J.Res.10, and S.J.Res. 12 would authorize Congress to prohibit and penalize desecration of the flag of the United States. H.J.Res. 5 would also authorize the States to prohibit and penalize desecration. On June 22, 2005, the House passed H.J.Res. 10 by a vote of 286 to 130. The Senate is expected to take up the proposed amendment in late June 2006.

Voir enfin:

Amendment on Flag Burning Fails by One Vote in Senate

Carl Hulse And John Holusha

The NYT

June 27, 2006

WASHINGTON, June 27 — The Senate today fell one vote short of approving a constitutional amendment that would have enabled Congress to ban desecration of the American flag.

The vote was 66 to 34. To pass, the measure needed 67 votes.

The excruciatingly close vote was a disappointing blow to supporters who have fought since 1989 to create a constitutional amendment. But it was the closest they have come to achieving their goal in three attempts in the Senate.

Opponents had argued that the the initiative amounted to tampering with the Bill of Rights. Some accused Republicans of trying to create a divisive issue for this fall’s congressional elections. « This is politics at its worst, » said Senator Frank Lautenberg, Democrat of New Jersey.

But the advocates of the measure said the flag was a unique national symbol that merited special standing. « It is time that this body acted to protect Old Glory, » said Senator Jim Bunning, Republican of Kentucky.

Senator Orrin Hatch, Republican of Utah and the chief sponsor of the amendment, predicted before the vote that those who opposed the amendment would be penalized by the voters if it was again defeated.

« I think this is getting to where they are not going to be able to escape the wrath of the voters, » said Mr. Hatch.

But opponents, mainly Democrats, criticized the Republican leadership for devoting Senate attention to the amendment when the nation faces other serious problems and for tampering with the Constitution’s Bill of Rights in response to relatively rare incidents of flag burning.

« This objectionable expression is obscene, it is painful, it is unpatriotic, » said Senator Daniel Inouye, Democrat of Hawaii and winner of the Medal of Honor for his service in World War II. « But I believe Americans gave their lives in many wars to make certain all Americans have a right to express themselves, even those who harbor hateful thoughts. »

In the debate, proponents sought to make a case of high principle: recapturing for Congress a power taken away by the Supreme Court in a 1989 decision.

That decision, in a Texas case, said flag burning was an expression of free speech and invalidated the flag desecration laws in 48 states.

Senator Hatch said the amendment would « restore the constitution to what it was before unelected jurists changed it five to four. » He went on to say, « Five lawyers decided 48 states were wrong. »

With the July 4 holiday looming and elections within sight, even senators opposing the amendment were careful to express their reverence for the flag and their revulsion at any desecration. But Senator Russell D. Feingold, Democrat of Wisconsin, noted that 17 years after the court’s decision, « Our nation is still standing strong. »

Mr. Feingold said the proposal would « cut back the Bill of Rights for the first time. » The debate seemed at times to have echoes of the Vietnam war era, with Senator Thomas R. Carper, Democrat of Delaware, observing that flag burning was a common form of protest in the 1970’s but has been little seen since then.

« It hardly ever happens, » he said warning that if the amendment passes, flag burning might become more attractive to political protesters.

But Senator Mel Martinez, Republican of Florida, said any desecration of the flag was unacceptable, saying, « People place great importance in symbols of national unity. »

Senators favoring the amendment and legislation prohibiting desecration of the flag emphasized that the court’s ruling had effectively changed the Constitution and that the amendment could restore the previous condition.

« This is the only way to balance the branches of government, » said Senator Tom Coburn, Republican of Oklahoma. Along with other senators, he said the first amendment was meant to apply to speech only, not behavior.

But Senator Patrick Leahy, Democrat of Vermont, denounced the measure as an effort to « seek to turn the flag into a political weapon. » He said supporters of the amendment wanted to « try to stir public passion for political ends. »

Among those calling the proposal unnecessary was Senator Richard J. Durbin, Democrat of Illinois, who countered with a proposal that would protect the flag and also restrict the antigay and other demonstrations at military funerals and at national cemeteries. Mr. Durbin’s measure was also defeated.The amendment, a single sentence stating that « the Congress shall have the power to prohibit the physical desecration of the flag of the United States, » has already passed the House of Representatives, so a Senate vote approving it would have sent the measure to the states, most of which have adopted expressions of opposition to flag desecration.

Carl Hulse reported from Washington for this article and John Holusha from New York.


Geert Wilders: Détruisez ce mur du mensonge sur la vraie nature de l’islam (Islam is the Communism of today)

6 octobre, 2010
Combattez les jusqu’à ce qu’il n’y ait plus d’incroyants et jusqu’à ce que tous croient en Allah. Le Coran (8 :39)
Je fus convaincu de combattre tous les hommes, jusqu’à ce qu’ils déclarent : ‘Il n’y a pas de Dieu hors d’Allah’. Mohammed
L’islam, au Moyen Age, a réussi la première expérience socialiste dans le monde. Muhammad fut l’imam du socialisme. Nasser
Le vrai visage de l’islam se dévoile lorsqu’il est appliqué intégralement… or, l’islam ne peut croître que voilé… du moins en terre à conquérir. Elizabeth Richard
De même que longtemps les intellectuels demeurèrent dans la cécité volontaire devant l’épouvante que transportait la forme prise dans l’histoire par l’idéal communiste, sous prétexte que cet idéal concentrait l’espoir des malheureux, de même cette posture de cécité volontaire trouve sa reprise depuis les attentats de New York, mais par rapport à l’islam. Sous le même prétexte : l’islam est aujourd’hui la foi des opprimés comme le communisme l’était hier, ce qui justifie l’islamophilie contemporaine par la même tournure d’esprit que se justifiait la soviétophilie d’hier. Robert Redeker
Comme jadis avec le communisme, l’Occident se retrouve sous surveillance idéologique. L’islam se présente, à l’image du défunt communisme, comme une alternative au monde occidental. À l’instar du communisme d’autrefois, l’islam, pour conquérir les esprits, joue sur une corde sensible. Il se targue d’une légitimité qui trouble la conscience occidentale, attentive à autrui : être la voix des pauvres de la planète. Hier, la voix des pauvres prétendait venir de Moscou, aujourd’hui elle viendrait de La Mecque ! Aujourd’hui à nouveau, des intellectuels incarnent cet oeil du Coran, comme ils incarnaient l’oeil de Moscou hier. Ils excommunient pour islamophobie, comme hier pour anticommunisme. (…) À l’identique de feu le communisme, l’islam tient la générosité, l’ouverture d’esprit, la tolérance, la douceur, la liberté de la femme et des moeurs, les valeurs démocratiques, pour des marques de décadence. (…) Ce sont des faiblesses qu’il veut exploiter au moyen «d’idiots utiles», les bonnes consciences imbues de bons sentiments, afin d’imposer l’ordre coranique au monde occidental lui-même. (…) Comme aux temps de la guerre froide, violence et intimidation sont les voies utilisées par une idéologie à vocation hégémonique, l’islam, pour poser sa chape de plomb sur le monde. Benoît XVI en souffre la cruelle expérience. Comme en ces temps-là, il faut appeler l’Occident «le monde libre» par rapport au monde musulman, et comme en ces temps-là les adversaires de ce «monde libre», fonctionnaires zélés de l’oeil du Coran, pullulent en son sein. Robert Redeker
Nous imaginons, parce que la Guerre froide est finie en Europe, que toute la série de luttes qui ont commencé avec la Première guerre mondiale et qui sont passées par différents mouvements totalitaires — fasciste, nazi et communiste — était finalement terminée. (…) Hors de la Première guerre mondiale est venue une série de révoltes contre la civilisation libérale. Ces révoltes accusaient la civilisation libérale d’être non seulement hypocrite ou en faillite, mais d’être en fait la grande source du mal ou de la souffrance dans le monde. (…)  l’islamisme et un certain genre de pan-arabisme dans les mondes arabe et musulman sont vraiment d’autres branches de la même impulsion. Mussolini a mis en scène sa marche sur Rome en 1922 afin de créer une société totalitaire parfaite qui allait être la résurrection de l’empire romain. En 1928, en Egypte, de l’autre côté de la Méditerranée, s’est créée la secte des Frères musulmans afin de ressusciter le Califat antique de l’empire arabe du 7ème siècle, de même avec l’idée de créer une société parfaite des temps modernes. Bien que ces deux mouvements aient été tout à fait différents, ils étaient d’une certaine manière semblables. (…) Le fascisme en Italie est arrivé au pouvoir en 1922 et il est demeuré puissant jusqu’à ce qu’il soit renversé par les Américains et les Anglais. L’islamisme est arrivé au pouvoir en divers endroits, commençant en 1979 avec l’Ajatollah Khomeini en Iran. Le baasisme est encore une autre variante de la même chose, et probablement que dans les jours à venir, en Irak, il sera renversé par les mêmes Américains et Anglais qui ont renversé Mussolini. L’islamisme est arrivé au pouvoir en Iran en 1979, et la révolution islamique en Iran était une vraie force mondiale. Alors l’islamisme est arrivé au pouvoir au Soudan et en Afghanistan, et pendant un moment il a semblé progressé tout à fait bien. Les Iraniens sont chi’ites et les autres pays sont sunnites, donc ce sont des dénominations différentes de l’Islam. Mais, cependant, c’était un mouvement qui jusqu’à récemment semblait avancer d’une manière traditionnelle — c’est-à-dire par la capture d’Etats. (…) De même que les progressistes européens et américains doutaient des menaces de Hitler et de Staline, les Occidentaux éclairés sont aujourd’hui en danger de manquer l’urgence des idéologies violentes issues du monde musulman. Paul Berman
Dans le monde moderne, même les ennemis de la raison ne peuvent être ennemis de la raison. Même les plus déraisonnables doivent être, d’une façon ou d’une autre, raisonnables. (…) En cohérence avec cette idée, les socialistes regardaient ce qui se passait outre-Rhin et refusaient simplement de croire que ces millions d’Allemands avaient adhéré à un mouvement politique dont les principes conjuguaient théories paranoïaques du complot, haines à glacer le sang, superstitions moyenâgeuses et appel au meurtre. (…) Les kamikazés étaient certes fous, mais la faute en incombait à leurs ennemis, pas à leurs dirigeants ni à leurs propres doctrines. (…) le nihilisme palestinien ne pouvait signifier qu’une chose: que leur souffrance était encore pire … Paul Berman
L’islam n’est pas seulement une conviction religieuse, ‘mais’ une idéologie révolutionnaire et le Jihad se rapporte à ce combat révolutionnaire, partout, autour de cette terre, à détruire tous les Etats et gouvernements qui s’opposeront à l’idéologie et au programme de l’islam. Abdul Ala Maududi
Les raisons pour lesquelles je suis contre l’islam, ne sont pas parce que c’est une religion, mais parce que c’est une idéologie politique impérialiste, que c’est une domination déguisée en religion. Parce que l’islam ne suit pas la règle d’or, il attire des individus violents. Ali Sina
La répartition du monde dans la maison islam et la maison de la guerre, montrent des parallèles avec la vision du monde communiste. Le fanatisme agressif du croyant est du même ressort. Bernard Lewis
Il me semble qu’on assiste aujourd’hui à un réveil des peuples européens et des citoyens face à la vague d’islamisme conquérant et au silence des élites (lorsqu’elles ne sont pas complices). Riposte Laïque en est un exemple frappant mais il n’est pas le seul. Une grande partie des élites ont certes capitulé, mais elles se sont ce faisant coupées de la majorité des populations européennes, qui subissent quotidiennement les effets de l’islamisation de l’espace public. Dans ces circonstances, je pense que les réactions de rejet et de résistance vont se multiplier et que l’enjeu capital est de parvenir à leur donner une expression politique durable. Ce que les médias et les intellectuels bien-pensants (comme Caroline Fourest) appellent le « populisme » n’est que l’expression légitime du peuple, bâillonné par les grands médias et privé de ses droits fondamentaux par le recul de la démocratie concomitant à la construction européenne, qui favorise l’expansion de l’islamisme en Europe. Paul Landau
En 1848, Karl Marx inaugurait son manifeste avec cette phrase désormais célèbre : « Un fantôme entoure Europe, le fantôme du communisme. » De nos jours, c’est un autre fantôme qui entoure l’Europe. C’est le fantôme de l’islam. Ce danger est également politique. L’islam n’est pas seulement une religion, comme beaucoup le pensent : l’islam est avant tout et surtout une idéologie politique.
L’islam est le communisme contemporain. Cependant, en raison de notre incapacité d’avoir su solder le communisme, nous démontrons notre impuissance à maîtriser, tant nous sommes prisonniers de la vieille banalité communiste de la dissimulation et de la tromperie verbale, qui jadis envahissaient les nations de l’est et viennent désormais nous envahir tous. Comme ils se posaient déjà en aveugles face au communisme, de même, cette même gauche, par sa défaillance passée, ferme les yeux devant l’islam. Ils servent aujourd’hui les mêmes arguments qu’hier, de la détente, des meilleures relations, de l’apaisement. Ils prétendent, que notre ennemi est aussi amoureux de la paix que nous, que, si nous faisions un pas vers lui, il fera de même, qu’il ne demande que du respect et que, si nous le respectons, il nous respectera aussi. Nous entendons les énièmes répétitions de ce vieux moralisme égalitariste. Ils s’évertuent à déclarer que « l’impérialisme » occidental est aussi destructeur que l’impérialisme soviétique. Aujourd’hui, ils lancent que « l’impérialisme » occidental est aussi mauvais que le terrorisme islamiste.
Lorsque Ronald Reagan visitait Berlin encore séparé, il y a 23 ans, non loin d’ici, près de la porte de Brandenburg, ce dernier déclarait au Secrétaire Général Soviétique : « Monsieur Gorbachev, détruisez ce mur ! » Monsieur Reagan n’était pas un pacifiste, mais un homme qui disait la vérité et qui aimait la liberté. Nous aussi, nous devons aujourd’hui détruire un mur. Ce n’est pas un mur de béton, mais un mur du mensonge, sur la vraie nature de l’islam. Geert Wilders

Epuration politique, parti unique, totalitarisme, effacement de la separation privé/public,  transformation du système éducatif en appareil d’endoctrinement general, mise au pas de l’art, la littérature, les sciences et la religion, oppression et assignation de certains groupes a un statut de seconde classe, fanatisation et appel à la lutte, machiavelisme politique, antisémitisme …

A l’heure ou, face a la pression islamiste, nos élites politico-médiatiques mettent en jeu nos libertés si chèrement acquises » …

Retour sur le récent discours du député néerlandais Geert Wilders à Berlin.

Qui a le mérite de rappeler, contre le émur du mensonge qu’est devenu le politiquement correct, la vraie nature de l’islam.

Et la menace qu’il constitue, comme précédemment l’idéologie communiste, pour nos societés ouvertes …

Geert Wilders à Berlin : « L’islam est le communisme contemporain »

Riposte laique

4 octobre 2010

Traduction Sylvia Bourdon

Cher Amis, je suis heureux d’être aujourd’hui à Berlin. Comme vous le savez, cette invitation de mon ami René Stadtkewitz, lui a coûté son statut de membre de la CDU de Berlin. Cependant, René ne s’est pas laissé intimider. Il n’a pas trahi ses convictions. Son éviction fut pour René l’occasion de fonder son propre parti politique. René, je te remercie pour cette invitation et te souhaite le succès que tu mérites avec ton nouveau parti.

Mes amis, comme vous le savez peut-être, ces dernières semaines furent pour moi épuisantes. En début de semaine nous avons pu former avec succès un gouvernement minoritaire avec les libéraux et les chrétiens démocrates, soutenus par mon parti. Cela est un événement historique pour les Pays Bas. Je suis fier d’avoir pu y contribuer. En ce moment même, dans le cadre d’une conférence, les chrétiens démocrates doivent décider leur entrée dans cette coalition.

S’ils le font, nous serons en mesure de reconstruire notre pays, de garder notre identité nationale et d’offrir à nos enfants un futur meilleur. Malgré mon agenda chargé, c’était pour moi une obligation de venir à Berlin, car, l’Allemagne aussi a besoin de défendre son identité allemande et de résister à l’islamisation de l’Allemagne.

La Chancelière Angela Merkel déclare que l’islamisation de l’Allemagne est inévitable. Elle appelle les citoyens à s’adapter aux changements provoqués par l’immigration. Elle souhaite que vous vous adaptiez à cette situation.

Le Président de la CDU déclare – je cite : « Les mosquées deviendront plus qu’avant une partie du paysage de nos villes. » fin de la citation. Mes amis, nous ne devons pas accepter l’inacceptable, sans essayer de tourner cette page. Il est notre devoir de politique, de préserver notre nation pour nos enfants.

J’espère que le mouvement de René sera autant couronné de succès que mon propre parti Partij voor de Vrijheid, comme celui de Oskar Freysinger, la Schweizerische Volkspartei en Suisse, ou celui de Pia Kjaersgaards, le Dansk Folkeparti au Danemark et autres mouvements du genre. Ma très chère amie, Pia, déclarait récemment à l’invitation de la Sverigedemokraterna : « Je ne suis pas venue, afin de me mêler de la politique intérieure suédoise. Cela est l’affaire des Suédois. Non, je suis venue car, malgré des différences certaines, le débat Suédois me fait penser au débat que nous avons déjà mené depuis 15 ans au Danemark. Et, je suis venue en Suède, car cela concerne aussi le Danemark. Nous ne pouvons pas rester assis là, les bras tombants et être des témoins muets du développement politique de la Suède. »

Ceci est valable pour moi en tant que Néerlandais concernant l’Allemagne. Je suis ici, parce que l’Allemagne est pour les Pays Bas et le reste du monde de grande importance parce que, sans un partenaire allemand fort, le « International Freedom Alliance » « Alliance Internationale pour la Liberté » ne pourra jamais être portée sur les fonds baptismaux. Mes chers amis, demain est le jour de l’unification allemande. Demain, depuis exactement vingt ans, votre grande nation se réunifiait, suite à la faillite de l’idéologie communiste. Le jour de la réunification de l’Allemagne est un jour important pour toute l’Europe.

L’Allemagne est la plus grande démocratie d’Europe. L’Allemagne est le moteur économique de l’Europe. La prospérité et le progrès de l’Allemagne sont nécessaires pour nous tous car, la prospérité et le progrès de l’Allemagne est une condition pour la prospérité et le progrès de l’Europe. Cependant, si je suis aujourd’hui devant vous, c’est pour vous mettre en garde d’un danger de séparation. L’identité nationale de l’Allemagne, sa démocratie, sa prospérité économique sont menacées par l’idéologie politique de l’islam.

En 1848, Karl Marx inaugurait son manifeste avec cette phrase désormais célèbre : « Un fantôme entoure Europe, le fantôme du communisme. » De nos jours, c’est un autre fantôme qui entoure l’Europe. C’est le fantôme de l’islam. Ce danger est également politique. L’islam n’est pas seulement une religion, comme beaucoup le pensent : l’islam est avant tout et surtout une idéologie politique.

Cette constatation n’est pas nouvelle. Je voudrais citer à partir de ce bestseller et la série télévisée de la BBC ; The Triumph of the West, (Le Triomphe de l’Occident) ce qu’écrivait le très réputé historien d’Oxford, J.M. Roberts en 1985 :

« Alors que nous parlons sans précaution de l’islam, comme d’une ‘religion’, ce mot véhicule beaucoup de significations intermédiaires, en particulier dans l’histoire de l’Europe de l’ouest. Le musulman est d’abord et avant tout le membre d’une communauté, le disciple d’un chemin bien précis. Le partisan d’un système de droit bien précis et qui revendique une opinion théologique bien précise. » Fin de la citation.

Le professeur Flamand, Urbain Vermeulen, qui fut le président du European Union of Arabists and Islamicists, souligne également que « l’islam est d’abord un système juridique, une loi » avant d’être une religion. Fin de la citation.

L’historien politique Américain, Mark Alexander écrit, je cite : « L’erreur majeure est de considérer l’islam comme une autre des grandes religions mondiales. Ce n’est pas ainsi que nous devons réfléchir. L’islam est politique, sinon, il n’est rien. Cependant, bien évidemment qu’il est politique avec une dimension spirituelle …, qui rien n’arrêtera, jusqu’à ce que l’occident disparaisse, jusqu’à ce que l’occident soit réellement, totalement islamisé. » fin de citation.

Cela ne sont pas uniquement des déclarations des adversaires de l’islam. Des intellectuels musulmans disent aussi la même chose. Pour ceux qui ont lu le coran, la sira et les hadithes, il n’y a aucun doute sur la nature de l’islam. Abdul Ala Maududi, un influent penseur pakistanais du 20ème siècle a écrit, je le cite tout en soulignant que ce ne sont pas mes mots, mais ceux d’un savant influent islamique : « L’islam n’est pas seulement une conviction religieuse, ‘mais’ une idéologie révolutionnaire et le Jihad se rapporte à ce combat révolutionnaire, partout, autour de cette terre, à détruire tous les Etats et gouvernements qui s’opposeront à l’idéologie et au programme de l’islam. » fin de citation.

Ali Sina, un apostat Iranien, qui vit au Canada, mentionne qu’il y a une règle d’or au cœur de chaque religion – que nous devons traiter les autres, comme nous aimerions qu’ils nous traitent. En islam, cette règle ne vaut que pour les frères de croyance, pas pour les infidèles.

Ali Sina déclare – je cite – « Les raisons pour lesquelles je suis contre l’islam, ne sont pas parce que c’est une religion, mais parce que c’est une idéologie politique impérialiste, que c’est une domination déguisée en religion. Parce que l’islam ne suit pas la règle d’or, il attire des individus violents. » fin de citation.

Une étude sans aucune passion sur le début de l’histoire de l’islam montre de façon incontestable que c’était le but de Mohammed, de conquérir son propre peuple, les Arabes, de les unifier sous sa domination pour ensuite conquérir le monde et le dominer.

Cela était l’idée à l’origine, qui était ostensiblement politique et qui fut soutenue par le pouvoir militaire. « Je fus convaincu de combattre tous les hommes, jusqu’à ce qu’ils déclarent : ‘Il n’y a pas de Dieu hors d’Allah’ lançait Mohammed dans son dernier discours. Il réalisa cela en total accord avec la loi coranique dans la sourate : 8 :39 : « Combattez les jusqu’à ce qu’il n’y ait plus d’incroyants et jusqu’à ce que tous croient en Allah. »

Selon la mythologie, Mohammed fondait l’islam à la Mecque, après que l’ange Gabriel en l’an 610 lui apparut pour la première fois. Les douze premières années, l’islam, plutôt religieux que politique, ne fut pas un grand succès. En 622, Mohammed se dirigea avec son petit groupe de 150 partisans pour Yatrib, une oasis majoritairement juive. C’est là qu’il fit ériger la première mosquée de l’histoire, prit le pouvoir politique, intitula Yatrib du nom de Medine, ce qui signifie « la ville du prophète » et débuta sa carrière en tant que maître militaire et politique qui conquit toute l’Arabie. Ce qui, par cette migration, marqua le calendrier islamique de hidschra, et transforma l’islam en mouvement politique. A la mort de Mohammed, l’islam se transforma concrètement, se basant sur ses paroles en charia, un système législatif qui légitime une domination répressive basée sur le divin, y compris les règles du Jihad et pour le contrôle absolu des fidèles et infidèles. La charia est la loi de l’Arabie Saoudite, de l’Iran et d’autres Etats musulmans. Elle est aussi d’une importance centrale pour ‘Organization of the Islamic Conference’, qui stipule dans l’article 24 de sa ‘déclaration des droits de l’homme’ au Caire, qu’en islam ‘tous les droits et les libertés sont soumis à la charia islamique’. L’OIC n’est pas une institution religieuse, mais une représentation politique.

C’est la force électorale la plus importante au sein des Nations Unis qui rédige des rapports sur la soi-disant ‘islamophobie’ des pays occidentaux et nous reproche de porter atteinte aux droits de l’homme. Afin d’exprimer cela en langage biblique : Ils cherchent l’éclat de verre dans notre œil et ignorent la poutre dans le leur.

Avant de continuer et afin d’éviter tout malentendu, je voudrais souligner que je parle de l’islam et non des musulmans. Je fais toujours une différence entre les hommes et l’idéologie, entre musulmans et l’islam. Il existe un grand nombre de musulmans modérés, cependant l’idéologie de l’islam n’est pas modérée et possède des ambitions globales. Ses intentions sont d’imposer au monde la loi islamique, la charia. Cela doit être obtenu par le Jihad.

La bonne nouvelle est que des millions de musulmans dans le monde, parmi eux, un grand nombre en Allemagne et dans les Pays-Bas, ne suivent pas la charia, encore moins le Jihad. La mauvaise nouvelle est que, ceux qui passeront à l’acte, sont prêt à utiliser tous les moyens afin d’atteindre leur but idéologique et révolutionnaire. En 1954, l’historien anglo-britannique, le professeur Bernard Lewis écrivit dans son essai : Communisme et islam, sur, je cite « le totalitarisme dans la tradition politique islamique », fin de citation. Le professeur Lewis continu, je cite : « que la répartition du monde dans la maison islam et la maison de la guerre, montrent des parallèles avec la vision du monde communiste. Le fanatisme agressif du croyant est du même ressort. » fin de citation. Mark Alexander lui, estime que, la nature de l’islam se différencie très peu des visions idéologiques totalitaires du national socialisme et du communisme. Il énumère les caractéristiques suivantes sur ces trois idéologies :

• Premièrement : Ils procèdent à l’épuration politique, afin de nettoyer la société de ce qu’ils estiment non désirable.

• Deuxièmement : Ils ne tolèrent qu’un seul parti politique. Là, où l’islam tolère d’autres partis, il exige cependant que tous les partis soient islamiques.

• Troisièmement : ils obligent le peuple de se diriger vers le chemin qu’ils imposent.

• Quatrièmement : ils gomment les différences libérales entre le domaine du privé et du public.

• Cinquièmement : Ils transforment le système éducatif en un appareil d’endoctrinement général.

• Sixièmement : Ils établissent les règles pour l’art, la littérature, les sciences et la religion.

• Septièmement : ils oppriment les êtres, auxquels est assigné un statut de seconde classe.

• Huitièmement : ils créent une sorte d’état émotionnel prèt du fanatisme ou l’ajustement s’identifie par le combat et la dominance.

• Neuvièmement : Ils se comportent de manière provocatrice face à leurs adversaires et méprisent de leur côté, toutes concessions alors qu’ils considèrent comme une faiblesse la complaisance de leurs rivaux.

• Dixièmement : Ils considèrent la politique comme l’expression du pouvoir.

• Et enfin, ils sont antisémites.

Il existe un autre parallèle remarquable, mais celui-là n’est pas une caractéristique de ces trois idéologies politiques, mais une caractéristique de l’occident. C’est apparemment, l’incapacité de l’occident à reconnaître le danger. La condition à comprendre le danger politique est l’empressement de voir la réalité, même si cette dernière est désagréable. Hélas, il semblerait que les politiques modernes aient perdu cet empressement.

Notre incompétence nous mène à nier les faits logiques et historiques, malgré notre expérience. Qu’est ce qui ne va pas chez l’homme occidental, moderne, que nous répétions toujours et toujours les mêmes erreurs ? Il n’y a pas meilleur endroit afin de réfléchir à cette question, qu’ici à Berlin, l’ancienne capitale du Reich du mal, d’une Allemagne nazi et, cette même ville qui ensuite fut prisonnière durant 40 ans de cette soi-disant ‘democratie’ de la République ‘Démocratique’ Allemande. Lorsque les citoyens de l’Europe de l’Est se détournèrent en 1989 du communisme, ils furent inspirés par des dissidents comme Alexandre Soljenitsine, Vaclav Havel, Vladimir Bukowski et d’autres, qui leur disaient que les hommes ont des droits, mais aussi des devoirs de vivre ‘dans la vérité’. La liberté exige une veille constante. Cela vaut aussi pour la vérité. Seulement, Soljenitsine ajoutait que ‘la vérité est rarement agréable ; elle est presque sans exception amère’.

Regardons ensemble cette amère vérité. Nous avons perdu notre capacité à reconnaître le danger et à comprendre la vérité, car nous ne savons plus évaluer la liberté. Les politiques de pratiquement tous les partis établis promeuvent l’islamisation. Ils applaudissent chaque nouvelle école islamique, banque islamique et chaque nouvelle cour islamique. Ils considèrent que l’islam vaut notre culture. Islam ou liberté . Cela ne leur signifie rien. Mais cela signifie beaucoup pour nous. L’estabishment en son intégralité, les élites, les universités, les églises, les syndicats, les médias, les politiques, mettent en jeu nos libertés si chèrement acquises. Ils évoquent l’égalité, mais curieusement, refusent de voir qu’en islam, les femmes ont moins de droits que les hommes et que les incroyants ont également moins de droits que les partisans de l’islam.

Allons nous répéter les événements tragiques de la République de Weimar ? Allons nous nous soumettre à l’islam, car notre dévotion à la liberté est morte ? Non, cela ne se passera pas ainsi. Nous ne sommes pas comme Madame Merkel. Nous n’acceptons pas que l’islamisation soit devenu un fait établi. Nous devons préserver la liberté. Même si nous l’avons déjà partiellement perdue, nous devons la retrouver dans le cadre des élections démocratiques. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous avons besoin de nouveaux partis qui défendent ce que signifie la liberté. Afin de soutenir ces partis, j’ai tenu à créer l’International Freedom Alliance. (Alliance Internationale de la Liberté).

Comme vous le savez, je suis poursuivi aux Pays-Bas. Lundi, je dois me présenter devant le tribunal et durant tout le mois qui va suivre, je devrais le consacrer à cette procédure. Cette procédure fut instruite contre moi, parce que j’ai exprimé mon avis sur l’islam et parce que j’ai tenu des conférences, écris des chroniques et montré mon film Fitna sur ce sujet. Je vis sous protection policière constante, car des extrémistes islamistes veulent m’assassiner. Et, c’est moi que l’on instruit devant les tribunaux, dont l’establishment néerlandais se compose pour la plus grande partie de non musulmans. C’est ceux là même qui veulent me contraindre au silence.

Je suis traîné devant les tribunaux, car mon pays ne peut plus exercer son droit exclusif à la liberté. Hélas, nous ne disposons pas, comme aux Etats Unis d’un droit à la liberté de parole, inscrit dans la constitution, qui garantie aux hommes la liberté d’expression et rend ainsi possible avec leurs paroles, d’initier ouvertement des débats. Contrairement aux Etats Unis, les Etats nationaux et de plus en plus l’Union Européenne, nous prescrivent, à nous citoyens, même aux politiques démocratiquement élus, comment, je dois penser et ce que je peux dire. Ce qu’il nous est désormais interdit de dire est que notre culture, en comparaison d’autres cultures est supérieure. De telles déclarations sont désormais considérées comme discriminantes, même haineuses…

A travers les écoles, les médias, nous sommes quotidiennement endoctrinés par le message que toutes les cultures se valent et que si une culture est pire que les autres, c’est la nôtre. Un torrent de sentiments de culpabilité et de honte concernant notre identité, à laquelle nous tenons, se déverse sur nous. On nous recommande de bien vouloir respecter tout le monde, sauf nous-même. Cela est le message de la gauche et de l’establishment du politiquement correct. Ils veulent éveiller en nous, le sentiment de honte envers notre propre identité, afin que nous nous écartions de toute action de la défendre. Cette obsession destructrice de nos élites politiques et culturelles, envahies par le sentiment occidental de culpabilité, obstrue la vérité sur les vues que l’islam a sur nous. Le coran qualifie les non-croyants de kouffar, ce qui signifie littéralement « ceux qui refusent » ou les « ingrats ». En conséquence, les incroyants sont « coupables ».

L’islam enseigne que nous sommes tous nés croyants. L’islam enseigne que, si nous ne sommes pas des croyants aujourd’hui, cela est de notre faute ou la faute de nos ancêtres. Ce qui signifie que nous sommes considérés comme kafir « coupables », car nous-même ou nos ancêtres sommes des apostats. Et que, selon l’avis de certain, nous méritons d’être soumis. Nos intellectuels d’aujourd’hui sont totalement aveugles face aux dangers de l’islam. Le dissident soviétique, Vladimir Bukovsky déclarait que l’occident a omit lors de la chute du communisme, de dénoncer ceux qui jouaient le jeu des communistes en prêchant pour la détente politique, pour la réduction des tensions internationales et pour une coexistence pacifique. Il souligne que la guerre froide – je cite – « était une guerre que nous n’avons jamais gagnée. Nous n’avons même pas lutté. La plupart du temps, l’occident s’adonnait à la politique de l’apaisement face au bloc soviétique et, les pacifistes ne gagnent jamais les guerres. » fin de citation.

L’islam est le communisme contemporain. Cependant, en raison de notre incapacité d’avoir su solder le communisme, nous démontrons notre impuissance à maîtriser, tant nous sommes prisonniers de la vieille banalité communiste de la dissimulation et de la tromperie verbale, qui jadis envahissaient les nations de l’est et viennent désormais nous envahir tous. Comme ils se posaient déjà en aveugles face au communisme, de même, cette même gauche, par sa défaillance passée, ferme les yeux devant l’islam. Ils servent aujourd’hui les mêmes arguments qu’hier, de la détente, des meilleures relations, de l’apaisement. Ils prétendent, que notre ennemi est aussi amoureux de la paix que nous, que, si nous faisions un pas vers lui, il fera de même, qu’il ne demande que du respect et que, si nous le respectons, il nous respectera aussi. Nous entendons les énièmes répétitions de ce vieux moralisme égalitariste. Ils s’évertuent à déclarer que « l’impérialisme » occidental est aussi destructeur que l’impérialisme soviétique. Aujourd’hui, ils lancent que « l’impérialisme » occidental est aussi mauvais que le terrorisme islamiste.

Dans mon discours prêt de Ground Zero, le 11 septembre dernier à New York, je soulignais qu’il fallait désormais arrêter ce petit jeu de la culpabilisation de l’occident, de l’Amérique, que les prêcheurs islamistes jouent avec nous. Nous mêmes, nous devons arrêter de jouer ce jeu. A ceux là, j’adresse le même message. C’est une offense de nous raconter que nous sommes coupables et que nous méritons ce qui nous arrive. Nous méritons encore moins de devenir des étrangers dans nos propres pays. Nous ne devons pas accepter ces offenses. Parce que premièrement, la civilisation occidentale est la plus libre et la plus florissante de la terre. C’est bien pour cela qu’autant d’immigrants veulent venir chez nous.

Deuxièmement, nous ne connaissons pas de culpabilité collective. Des individus libres sont des acteurs moraux libres, qui sont exclusivement responsables de leurs faits et gestes. Je suis très heureux d’être ce jour à Berlin afin de lancer ce message, qui est particulièrement important en Allemagne. Ce qui pu se passer dans le passé dans votre pays, pour cela la génération actuelle n’est pas coupable. Ce qui pu encore se passer dans le passé, ce n’est pas une excuse pour punir les Allemands d’aujourd’hui. Cependant, vous n’avez aucune excuse de vous retirer du combat pour votre propre identité. Il est de votre responsabilité d’éviter les erreurs du passé. Il est également de votre responsabilité d’être aux côtés de ceux qui sont menacés par l’islam. Comme l’Etat d’Israël et de ses citoyens juifs.

La République de Weimar rejetait le combat pour la liberté et fut écrasée par une idéologie totalitaire avec des conséquences catastrophiques pour l’Allemagne, le reste de l’Europe et le monde. Ne laissez pas passer l’occasion de combattre pour votre liberté. Je suis très heureux d’être parmi vous aujourd’hui, car il semble, que, 20 ans après la réunification, cette nouvelle génération ne ressent plus de sentiment de culpabilité d’être allemand. L’actuel débat qui fait rage sur le livre récemment publié de Thilo Sarrazin est un signe que l’Allemagne s’apaise avec elle même. Je n’ai pas encore lu le livre du Dr. Sarrazin, mais je constate que, pendant que les élites du politiquement correct s’insurgent contre ses thèses et intervinrent en faveur de sa démission de dirigeant de la Bundesbank, la grande majorité des Allemands approuvent et estiment que le Dr. Sarrazin a mis l’accent sur un sujet urgent et brûlant. « L’Allemagne capitule » alerte Sarrazin et appelle les Allemands à contrecarrer ce process. L’énorme succès du livre prouve qu’un grand nombre d’Allemands sont du même avis.

Les Allemands ne veulent pas voir leur pays disparaître, malgré l’endoctrinement politique qu’on leur fait subir. L’Allemagne n’a plus honte de retrouver sa fierté nationale. En ces temps difficiles, qui menacent nos identités nationales, nous devons nous défaire de ce sentiment de culpabilité, nous ne devons plus nous sentir coupable d’être ce que nous sommes. Nous ne sommes pas « kafir » nous ne sommes pas coupables. Comme les autres peuples aussi, les Allemands ont le droit de rester ce qu’ils sont. Les Allemands ne doivent pas devenir Français, ni Hollandais, ni Américains, ni Turcs. Ils doivent rester Allemands.

Lorsque le Premier Ministre Erdogan visitait l’Allemagne en 2008, ce dernier recommandait fermement aux Turcs qui vivent en Allemagne de rester Turcs. Il déclarait mot pour mot : « l’assimilation est un crime contre l’humanité ». Erdogan aurait pu avoir raison, s’il s’était adressé aux Turcs en Turquie. Seulement voilà, l’Allemagne est le pays des Allemands. En conséquence, les Allemands ont le droit de demander que ceux qui viennent sur leur territoire afin d’y vivre, s’adaptent aux usages du pays. Ils ont le droit – non – ils ont le devoir envers leurs enfants d’exiger que les nouveaux arrivants respectent l’identité Allemande et son droit à la garder.

Nous devons réaliser que l’islam se propage de deux manières. Comme ce n’est pas une religion, la conversion n’est qu’un phénomène marginal. Historiquement, l’islam se propageait soit par la force militaire ou par l’arme de l’hirjra, l’immigration. Mohammed conquit Medine par l’immigration. Hirjra signifie ce que nous observons aujourd’hui. L’islamisation de l’Europe avance continuellement. Cependant, l’occident n’a pas de stratégie pour gérer l’idéologie islamiste, étant donné que nos élites déclarent que nous devons nous adapter, au lieu du contraire. Dans ces circonstances, nous pouvons nous inspirer de l’Amérique, la nation la plus libre du monde. Les Américains sont fiers de leur nation, de leurs acquits, de leur drapeau.

Nous devons également être fiers de notre nation. Les Etats Unis furent depuis toujours une terre d’immigration. Le Président Theodore Roosevelt avait une vision claire des devoirs des immigrants. Voici ce qu’il déclarait à ce sujet, je cite : « Nous devons exiger que l’immigrant, qui arrive avec de bonnes intentions, devienne Américain et s’assimile. Il doit être traité comme tous les autres en totale égalité. Cela est valable uniquement si le sujet devient un Américain et rien qu’un Américain. Il ne peut exister deux appartenances. Nous avons de l’espace que pour une seule loyauté et cela est la loyauté au peuple Américains. » fin de citation. Ce n’est pas mon devoir de définir ce qu’est l’identité nationale allemande. Cela est de votre responsabilité. Seulement, ce que je sais est que la culture allemande, ainsi que celle de ses voisins et donc, de mon pays, prend ses racines dans les fondements humanistes du judéo-christianisme.

Chaque politique responsable a l’obligation de garder ces valeurs face aux idéologies qui les menacent. Une Allemagne couverte de mosquées et envahie de femmes voilées n’est plus l’Allemagne de Goethe, Schiller, Heine, Bach et Mendelssohns. Ce serait pour nous tous une grand perte. Il est de la plus haute importance que vous, en tant que nation, soigniez et gardiez ces racines. Autrement, il ne vous sera plus possible de garder votre identité. Vous disparaîtriez en tant que peuple. Vous perdriez votre liberté. Et, avec vous, toute l’Europe perdrait sa liberté. Mes amis, lorsque Ronald Reagan visitait Berlin encore séparé, il y a 23 ans, non loin d’ici, près de la porte de Brandenburg, ce dernier déclarait au Secrétaire Général Soviétique : « Monsieur Gorbachev, détruisez ce mur ! » Monsieur Reagan n’était pas un pacifiste, mais un homme qui disait la vérité et qui aimait la liberté. Nous aussi, nous devons aujourd’hui détruire un mur. Ce n’est pas un mur de béton, mais un mur du mensonge, sur la vraie nature de l’islam.

La International Freedom Alliance (Alliance Internationale pour la Liberté) a l’intention de coordonner tous les efforts nécessaires. Parce que nous disons la vérité, les électeurs de mon parti Partij voor de Vrijheid et d’autres partis comme le Dansk Fokeparti, la Schweizerische Volkspartei, nous a permis de nous positionner pour influencer le processus décisionnaire de la politique. A partir de l’opposition ou avec le soutien d’un gouvernement minoritaire, comme nous souhaitons le mettre en œuvre aux Pays Bas. Le Président Reagan a démontré qu’en disant la vérité, on peut changer le cours de l’histoire. Il a montré qu’il n’y a jamais de raison de désespérer. Jamais ! Réalisez naturellement votre devoir. N’ayez pas peur. Dites la vérité. Ensemble nous pouvons préserver la liberté et, mes amis, nous allons la garder notre liberté.

MercI.

Voir aussi:

Allemagne: Après Thilo Sarrazin, la féministe Alice Schwarzer attaque de front la réalité islamiste

Anne Zelensky

Riposte laique

4 octobre 2010

Et de deux ! Un nouvel ouvrage virulent pose la question de l’intégration et de l’islam en Allemagne. : « La grande dissimulation : pour l’intégration, contre l’islamisme ». Cet ouvrage collectif, écrit pas des journalistes et militants, est chapeauté par Alice Schwarzer, une grande figure du féminisme et du journalisme outre Rhin. Après Thilo Sarrazin, c’est donc une autre personnalité reconnue et issue de la gauche, qui s’attaque de front aux symptômes d’une islamisation de l’Allemagne. Thilo Sarrazin, rappelons le, membre du SPD ( Parti socialiste allemand ) et de l’exécutif de la banque fédérale allemande, a publié un livre « L’Allemagne se saborde », brulôt contre les musulmans. Il a fait un tabac auprès du public, et déchaîné les habituelles anathèmes de racisme et islamophobie.

Alice Schwarzer, dans son livre, n’a pas peur de parler de « croisade dirigée vers le cœur de l’Europe dans les années 80 »et désigne le voile comme « drapeau et symbole des islamistes ». Elle en demande l’interdiction à l’école. Pour l‘heure seules les enseignantes ne sont pas autorisées à le porter à l’école. Alice, féministe historique en Allemagne et journaliste de renom, est fidèle à ses engagements . Je l’ai connue en France aux débuts des années 7O, dans le mouvement féministe. Elle vivait alors en France. Elle était de tous nos combats. Nous sommes devenues compagnes de lutte et amies. Quand elle est repartie en Allemagne, elle y a importé notre Manifeste des 343, ( pour l’avortement libre ) qui a fait là bas aussi grand bruit. Puis elle a fondé « Emma » magazine féministe qui a fêté ses trente ans et qui a réussi à toucher un vaste public, tout en restant très radical. Elle n’a pas raté une occasion de pourfendre les thèses d’un Cohn Bendit et nous partageons la même vision pragmatique et ambitieuse du féminisme.

Contrairement à la majorité de nos féministes hexagonales, Alice a su faire passer dans la réalité ses convictions, par le succès populaire de son magazine, et sa présence sur la scène médiatique. Elle prend des risques pour sa carrière et son image en dénonçant ainsi la contradiction insoluble entre islam et république. Une note d’espoir dans son livre : selon une enquête sur les musulmanes en Allemagne, seule une minorité d’entre elles portent le voile. C’est avec cette majorité silencieuse de femmes qu’Alice Scwharzer veut dialoguer et non avec les représentants d’organismes intégristes, qui sont là bas aussi, les seuls interlocuteurs des pouvoirs publics.

L’enjeu est de taille : il s’agit de faire émerger une parole raptée et détournée par des porte parole autoproclamés des musulmans, et de marquer la différence entre cette minorité extrémiste et l’ensemble des musulmans manipulés. Les élus se sont fait piéger par un « faux dialogue » et une « fausse tolérance », pour des raisons électoralistes. A nous, représentants vigilants de la société civile de faire entendre notre voix, par dessus les lâchetés conjuguées des politiques et de leurs alliés, les médias.

L’Allemagne, par les voix courageuses de Sarrazin et de Schwarzer, montre que l’ère de l’aveuglement arrive à son terme. Leur exemple est d’autant plus encourageant que ce sont deux personnalités issues de la gauche. Ils ont fait le même chemin que nous à RL et ont accepté d’admettre la dure réalité : nous ne sommes plus de cette gauche là, qui pactise avec le fascisme vert. Partout en Europe, monte le même rejet de cette complicité honteuse. Cette voix nouvelle est inclassable, elle a parfois une provenance, la gauche, mais elle n’a plus d’appartenance autre que la recherche de vérité, dans le souci essentiel de protéger nos idéaux républicains.

Voir enfin:

Paul Landau : « Face à l’islamisation, nous assistons à un réveil des peuples européens »

Propos recueillis par Bonapartine

Riposrte laique

4 octobre 2010

Paul Landau est un écrivain et chercheur franco-israélien, spécialiste des mouvements islamistes, auteur d’un Rapport sur l’Union des Organisations islamiques de France intitulé « Le vrai visage de l’UOIF, remis par le Centre Simon Wiesenthal en octobre 2004 au Ministre de l’Intérieur Dominique de Villepin.

En 2005 est publié aux éditions du Rocher « Le Sabre et le Coran, Tariq Ramadan et les frères musulmans à la conquête de l’Europe », dont il dira dans une interview donnée à Roger Heurtebise le 21.10.08 : « Je me suis intéressé à l’islamisme après le 11 septembre 2001. J’ai voulu comprendre la genèse du phénomène Al-Qaïda, ce qui m’a conduit à étudier le mouvement des frères musulmans, leur histoire, leur stratégie et leur implantation en Europe … »

En 2007, les éditions du Rocher publient un second essai « Pour Allah jusqu’à la mort », dans lequel Paul Landau ouvrira » des pistes de compréhension sur les causes de l’engagement » (article de J.F Chabot du 09.09.08) de plusieurs jeunes convertis à un islam radical à travers l’Europe, les Etats-Unis et l’Australie. Essai dont il fera une présentation détaillée lors d’une conférence donnée à l’Association France Israël le 16.06.09.

Dans la présente interview, Paul Landau nous livre ses analyses sur l’actualité de ces derniers mois en France et en Israël.

Riposte Laïque : Le 31 mai 2010, la marine israélienne a abordé l’un des six bateaux de la flottille qualifiée par Guy Millière de « Flottille de la propagande terroriste ». Israël a dès lors été mis au banc des accusés par la communauté internationale, y compris en France où l’ensemble de la classe politique mais aussi les médias et un certain nombre de commentateurs ont violemment condamné l’intervention de l’armée israélienne sur le Marmara. J’imagine que les Israéliens doivent se sentir incompris, voire humiliés devant la violence des réactions de la communauté internationale. Que regard portez-vous sur l’épisode de « La Flottille de Gaza » ?

Paul Landau : Guy Millière a raison de parler de « flottille de la propagande terroriste ». Tout le problème est que cette propagande, aussi énorme et monstrueuse soit-elle, fonctionne. Israël a été accusé par les médias et a même accepté (à tort à mon avis) de constituer une commission d’enquête, alors que les faits parlaient d’eux-mêmes. En réalité, nous avons eu affaire à une opération de djihad déguisée en opération humanitaire ….

Le plus humiliant pour les citoyens israéliens n’était toutefois pas tant la réaction internationale, qui était prévisible (nous avons une certaine expérience en la matière) que le fait que les échelons supérieurs de l’armée et du gouvernement aient envoyé les soldats de Tsahal affronter à mains nues des terroristes du djihad, dont on savait parfaitement qu’ils étaient armés et prêts à mourir … Je pense qu’il y a eu, plus qu’une négligence des Renseignements militaires, une erreur de conception, ce qui est encore plus grave.

Riposte Laïque : L’organisation JCall a lancé un « Appel à la raison » en vue, affirme-t-elle, de « promouvoir la paix au Proche-Orient ». Sous couvert de nobles intentions, JCall n’alimente-t-elle pas en réalité les discours caricaturaux de ceux qui, en France, n’ont de cesse de dénigrer Israël ainsi que la politique de l’actuel gouvernement israélien ?

Paul Landau : Absolument, JCall rend un bien mauvais service à Israël et à la démocratie en général, en prétendant imposer une « solution » à l’Etat hébreu, sous couvert de promouvoir la paix. Le discours de JCall, qui qualifie de « faute morale » la présence juive en Judée-Samarie (Cisjordanie), n’est pas tellement éloigné de celui des ennemis d’Israël. J’en donnerai pour preuve les divagations anti-israéliennes d’un Mohamed Sifaoui, signataire de JCall, qui reprend à son compte les accusations lancées par JCall contre le gouvernement de M. Nétanyahou, dans un style, il est vrai, beaucoup moins policé que celui des initiateurs de JCall.

De même, lorsque Bernard-Henri Lévy laisse entendre, dans les colonnes de Ha’aretz (quotidien israélien de la « gauche caviar » équivalent du Monde), que les dirigeants actuels ne sont pas intelligents et leur distribue des « notes » avec le mépris dédaigneux propre à l’intellectuel de Saint-Germain, Mohamed Sifaoui, lui, va encore plus loin en insultant Nétanyahou et Liebermann ainsi que tous ceux qui les soutiennent, dans un style qui rappelle un peu celui de Gringoire ou de Je suis partout ….

Bien entendu, on ne peut comparer les propos, encore relativement mesurés, de Bernard-Henri Lévy aux insultes de Mohamed Sifaoui qui s’exprime comme une « racaille » de banlieue, mais dans le fond, leur discours est identique. Il exprime un mépris fondamental pour le gouvernement israélien et surtout pour le peuple d’Israël.

Riposte Laïque : Nous assistons depuis un certain nombre d’années à une progression exponentielle d’un antisémitisme et d’un antisionisme à l’échelle mondiale : l’Affaire Al-Doura, le Rapport Goldstone, le boycott des produits israéliens, la « Semaine de l’Apartheid d’Israël ». Barcelone a de son côté accueilli « le Tribunal Russell ». En France, les chiffres de l’antisémitisme progressent de nouveau et notre école laïque et républicaine observe également une recrudescence constante des comportements antisémites chez certains élèves. Comment expliquez-vous ce que Gilles-William Goldnadel appelait dans un remarquable article publié sur son blog le 08 mars 2010 « Les silences du monde » face aux vagues d’antisémitisme et d’antisionisme observées à l’échelon planétaire ?

Paul Landau : La vague actuelle d’antisémitisme s’inscrit dans le droit fil de celle qui a commencé il y a près d’une décennie, environ un an avant le 11 septembre, à Durban. Le silence des médias et d’une large partie de la classe politique (même si le ministre de l’Intérieur Hortefeux se distingue à mon avis par son attitude assez combattive sur la question) s’explique par la même configuration que le sociologue Shmuel Trigano avait dénoncée à l’époque, quand il avait été un des premiers à attirer l’attention sur ce phénomène. Les Juifs et Israël éprouvent aujourd’hui une terrible solitude, car non seulement ils ne sont pas soutenus (avec de rares exceptions) mais en outre, ils sont accusés d’être les responsables des maux qui les frappent.

Il y a là une inversion caractéristique qui n’est pas nouvelle : les Juifs, on le sait, ont toujours été accusés d’être coupables des crimes de leurs ennemis. Ce processus d’inversion remonte au Moyen-Age et il a été finalement analysé par Pierre-André Taguieff dans « La nouvelle propagande antijuive » (parue aux éditions PUF), étude dans laquelle il montre que les accusations actuelles (comme l’affaire Al-Dura) remettent au goût du jour des thématiques anciennes comme celle du Juif assassin d’enfants. Taguieff a d’ailleurs qualifié l’affaire Al-Dura de « premier crime rituel » contemporain …

Riposte Laïque : Le 18 juin 2010, Riposte Laïque a organisé un « Apéro saucisson pinard » interdit ensuite par la Préfecture de police qui le considérait « créateur de risques graves à l’ordre public ». Après avoir suscité des réactions dans le monde entier, cette initiative a provoqué notamment en France un tollé politico-médiatique d’une violence inouïe. Que pensez-vous de cette initiative et des réactions souvent outrancières qu’elle a déclenchées ?

Paul Landau : Je pense que cette initiative était tout à fait légitime et que ceux qui l’ont condamnée ont oublié le sens du mot démocratie. Mais votre question me permet de clarifier un point important. Nous devons lutter bec et ongle contre l’islam radical, contre l’islamisation de la société et contre tout discours islamiste anti-occidental ou antijuif. Je ne pense pas, comme Daniel Pipes, qu’on puisse affirmer que « l’islam radical est le problème et l’islam modéré la solution ». Car l’islam modéré, pour autant qu’il existe, tarde à se manifester … Mais je pense, par contre, qu’il faut toujours restreindre la cible de notre combat pour ne pas faire le jeu des islamistes qui utilisent le sentiment de victimisation que peuvent éprouver certains musulmans. Exigeons des musulmans de France ce que le judaïsme et le christianisme ont accepté depuis longtemps : que la pratique de l’islam soit confinée à l’espace privé et non ostentatoire. C’est pourquoi je soutiens sans la moindre réserve le combat de Riposte Laïque contre les prières musulmanes dans les rues de Paris.

Riposte Laïque : Le 16.06.09, vous aviez donné une conférence à l’Association France Israël sur le thème de l’islamisation de l’Europe et vous y aviez présenté votre essai « Pour Allah jusqu’à la mort ». A la fin de la conférence, je me souviens que vous étiez relativement optimiste sur la capacité de l’Europe à résister à l’islamisme. Aujourd’hui, afficheriez-vous le même optimisme ou diriez-vous, pour ne prendre que l’exemple de la France, que les élites françaises ont ou semblent avoir capitulé face à l’islamisme ? Et si oui, pourquoi ?

Paul Landau : Je maintiens mon appréciation relativement optimiste et je m’en explique. Il me semble qu’on assiste aujourd’hui à un réveil des peuples européens et des citoyens face à la vague d’islamisme conquérant et au silence des élites (lorsqu’elles ne sont pas complices). Riposte Laïque en est un exemple frappant mais il n’est pas le seul. Une grande partie des élites ont certes capitulé, mais elles se sont ce faisant coupées de la majorité des populations européennes, qui subissent quotidiennement les effets de l’islamisation de l’espace public. Dans ces circonstances, je pense que les réactions de rejet et de résistance vont se multiplier et que l’enjeu capital est de parvenir à leur donner une expression politique durable.

Ce que les médias et les intellectuels bien-pensants (comme Caroline Fourest) appellent le « populisme » n’est que l’expression légitime du peuple, bâillonné par les grands médias et privé de ses droits fondamentaux par le recul de la démocratie concomitant à la construction européenne, qui favorise l’expansion de l’islamisme en Europe. C’est ce phénomène que dénonce Bat Ye’or dans son dernier livre, Le spectre du Califat (qui sort ces jours-ci aux éditions Les Provinciales). Je pense que le travail de Riposte Laïque et d’organisations similaires dans d’autres pays est en train de porter ses fruits.


Dhimmitude: Vous avez dit « religions du livre »? (Islamic tolerance: When intolerance learns to talk the language of tolerance)

3 octobre, 2010
Image result for Myth of Islamic tolerance" src="http://www.jihadwatch.org/myth.jpg
La tolérance illimitée doit mener à la disparition de la tolérance. Si nous étendons la tolérance illimitée même à ceux qui sont intolérants, si nous ne sommes pas disposés à défendre une société tolérante contre l’impact de l’intolérant, alors le tolérant sera détruit, et la tolérance avec lui. Je ne veux pas dire par là qu’il faille toujours empêcher l’expression de théories intolérantes. Tant qu’il est possible de les contrer par des arguments logiques et de les contenir avec l’aide de l’opinion publique, on aurait tort de les interdire. Mais il faut toujours revendiquer le droit de le faire, même par la force si cela devient nécessaire, car il se peut fort bien que les tenants de ces théories se refusent à toute discussion logique et […] ne répondent aux arguments que par la violence. Nous devrions donc revendiquer, au nom de la tolérance, le droit de ne pas tolérer les intolérants. Il faudrait alors considérer que tout mouvement prêchant l’intolérance se place hors la loi et que l’incitation à l’intolérance est criminelle au même titre que l’incitation au meurtre. Karl Popper
L’intolérance a appris à parler la nouvelle langue de la tolérance et se montre d’autant plus efficace qu’elle n’est pas perçue comme telle. Pierre-Andre Taguieff
La libération de la Palestine, d’un point de vue spirituel, fera bénéficier la Terre Sainte d’une atmosphère de sécurité et de quiétude, ce qui assurera la sauvegarde des lieux saints et garantira la liberté du culte en permettant à chacun de s’y rendre, sans distinction de race, de couleur, de langue ou de religion. Charte de l’OLP (article 16)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique (…) est guidé par la tolérance islamique quand il traite avec les fidèles d’autres religions. Il ne s’oppose à eux que lorsqu’ils sont hostiles. Sous la bannière de l’islam , les fidèles des trois religions , l’islam , le christianisme et le judaïsme , peuvent coexister pacifiquement. Mais cette paix n’est possible que sous la bannière de l’islam. Charte du Hamas (art. 31)
L’arabe et l’islam sont la langue et la religion palestinienne officielle. Le christianisme et toutes les autres religions monothéistes seront également vénérés et respectés. Constitution de l’Etat de Palestine (3e projet, article 5, mars 2003)
La liberte de pratiquer la religion et d’acceder aux lieux sera garantie dans la mesure ou (…) elle ne diffame pas la religion monotheiste. Projet de constitution de l’Etat de Palestine (art. 44)
Le statut du dhimmi n’est pas individuel mais concerne des collectivités, des “nations” (millet, du temps des Ottomans) politiquement soumises au pouvoir islamique depuis la “conquête”. Dans cette perspective, on ne peut reconnaître en droit un État juif (et en fait tout État qui ne serait pas musulman), ce qui impliquerait l’autodétermination et la souveraineté d’une collectivité, dont le seul statut possible sous l’islam est celui de dhimmi. Shmuel Trigano
Il faudrait veiller à expurger du discours chrétien contemporain des expressions aussi dangereuses que « les trois religions abrahamiques », « les trois religions révélées » et même « les trois religions monothéistes » (parce qu’il y en a bien d’autres). La plus fausse de ces expressions est « les trois religions du Livre ». Elle ne signifie pas que l’islam se réfère à la Bible, mais qu’il a prévu pour les chrétiens, les juifs, les sabéens et les zoroastriens une catégorie juridique, « les gens du Livre », telle qu’ils peuvent postuler au statut de dhimmi , c’est-à-dire, moyennant discrimination, garder leur vie et leurs biens au lieu de la mort ou de l’esclavage auxquels sont promis les kafirs, ou païens. Alain Besancon
Les concepts de «laïcité», de «droits de l’homme», sont ainsi insensiblement vidés ou détournés de leur sens initial. Mais l’islamophilie impénitente ferme les yeux devant la présentation de l’islam, «béatifié» par les nouveaux penseurs musulmans. Elle y trouve des avantages, en plus de celui, non négligeable, de se libérer de la désagréable culpabilité qui fonde, en grande partie, cet amour de l’islam. Les avantages, on les devine aisément… En effet, les islamophiles chrétiens espèrent bien, avec l’appui des musulmans, regagner un peu de terrain religieux et entamer cette laïcité pure et dure qu’ils n’ont, au fond, jamais vraiment digérée. Les islamophiles laïcs de gauche voient dans le nombre des musulmans un appui politique contre Israël, l’Amérique et la politique libérale. Et les Juifs paieront pour cette islamophilie aux deux visages, qui plonge ses racines dans la culpabilité. (…) Il faut qu’ils soient considérés comme coupables pour que les deux autres religions soient libérées de leur dette à leur égard. Ces deux autres religions, en effet, se sont inspirées du judaïsme, le christianisme en prétendant le parfaire, l’islam en le récupérant, en l’absorbant et en accusant les Juifs d’avoir falsifié leurs textes. Anne-Marie Delcambre

Au lendemain de la rencontre a Paris de certaines personnalites juives dont le president du CRIF avec un president de l’Autorite palestinienne qui vient de confirmer qu’il n’accepterait la presence d’aucun juif en Palestine …

Et d’une enieme tentative de forcage de blocus de Gaza par cette fois un bateau de pacifistes juifs

Pendant que se confirme, a l’instar de l’implication d’Arafat dans  les attentats du Hamas de la fin des annees 2000 comme de l’intifada de 20001, le « partage des tâches entre l’Autorité palestinienne et le Hamas » …

Retour avec Alain Besancon, Anne-Marie Delcambre et Jacques Ellul en cette 30e commemoration de l’ attentat palestinien de la synagogue de la rue Copernic qui avait vu nos gouvernants s’inquieter des seules victimes “innocentes”

Sur, via le  si tendance concept de « religions du livre », cette singuliere aptitude de  l’intolérance à « parler la nouvelle langue de la tolérance »  …

Et surtout cette etrange fascination des milieux chretiens et occidentaux pour une religion …

Qui n’a de cesse, comme l’illustrent particulierement clairement les multiples projets de constitution pour un Etat palestinien, de les ramener en fait au bon vieux statut multiseculaire de « protégés » …

Auto-islamisation

 » A terme, on peut craindre que certains milieux ne s’islamisent sans même s’en rendre compte, et que cette évolution ne prépare un basculement de la société toute entière. « 

Entretien avec  ALAIN BESANCON, de l’Institut

(Propos recueillis par Michel Gurfinkiel)

Professeur à l’Ecole pratique des hautes études, membre de l’Académie des Sciences morales et politiques, Alain Besançon observait voici sept ans dans son livre Trois tentations de l’Eglise  qu’il y avait  désormais « plus de musulmans pratiquants en France que de catholiques pratiquants « . Fait exceptionnel pour un laïc,  il a présenté ses analyses – à la demande du pape – devant le synode des évêques.

Comment expliquer qu’une partie de l’Eglise soit tentée par une  » alliance  » avec l’islam ?

AB. Je ne sais pas quelle est exactement  l’étendue de ce courant. Mais je constate qu’il rencontre, en effet, un certain écho dans l’Eglise en général et dans l’Eglise de France en particulier. Ce succès – petit ou grand – tient avant tout à une méconnaissance presque totale de l’islam, de sa doctrine, de sa doctrine et de son modus operandi. La plupart des évêques ou des clercs ne jugent pas utile d’étudier de façon approfondie cette religion, à laquelle nous sommes pourtant confrontés à chaque instant. Et ceux qui font cet effort n’ont en général accès qu’à des ouvrages marqués par l’influence de Louis Massignon, professeur au Collège de France jusqu’à sa mort en 1962, qui fut certes un grand orientaliste, mais qui a disséminé deux conceptions fausses : l’idée selon laquelle le Coran – dont les qualités littéraires ou spirituelles propres ne sont pas ici en cause –  serait une Deutéro-Bible, une répétition ou une continuation de la Bible judéo-chrétienne ; et une seconde idée, non moins fallacieuse, selon laquelle l’islam s’inscrirait dans la tradition abrahamique, telle que l’Eglise l’a toujours définie.

A bien des égards, l’islam constitue pourtant  un danger pour l’Eglise ?

Peut-être. Mais le comportement  d’une institution telle que l’Eglise n’est pas dicté seulement par des faits, ni mêmes par des dogmes. Il dépend aussi des  » états d’esprit « , des représentations, de la sensibilité qui règne à un moment donné. Une partie de l’Eglise se refuse absolument à regarder le monde actuel en termes de conflits, de camp opposés, de  » choc des civilisations « .  Elle nie donc les tensions avec l’islam, ou bien, si ce déni est impossible, elle fait comme si elle en était la principale responsable. Par ailleurs, l’Eglise veut  être, plus que jamais, au service des pauvres. Or les musulmans apparaissent, à tort ou à raison, comme les pauvres par excellence, à l’échelle planétaire…

Un œcuménisme mal compris ?

L’œcuménisme justement conduit – entre Eglises chrétiennes et à plus forte raison entre chrétiens et non-chrétiens – suppose une très grande sûreté dans le maniement des concepts théologiques. Il suppose, précisément,  de faire passer la doctrine avant les  » états d’esprit « . Tout laisser-aller en ces matières,  toute fausse symétrie, peuvent être extrêmement dangereux.  Je suis frappé, par exemple, du dérapage  qui entoure le concept  (d’origine islamique) de  » religions du Livre « . Les chrétiens, qui l’emploient de plus en plus couramment,  y compris dans les sermons dominicaux, l’interprètent comme une commune dévotion des juifs, des chrétiens et des musulmans envers la Bible. Alors que les musulmans lui donnent un tout autre sens : le statut inférieur mais  » protégé  » réservé  à tous les non-musulmans qui peuvent se prévaloir d’un texte révélé, quel qu’il soit –  juifs et chrétiens, bien sûr, mais aussi sabéens ou zoroastriens, voire même hindous et bouddhistes…

Entretenir ces confusions revient à favoriser systématiquement l’islam ?

A terme, on peut craindre que certains milieux ne s’islamisent sans même s’en rendre compte, et que cette évolution ne prépare un basculement de la société toute entière. Ce ne serait pas la première fois. Au VIIe siècle, les sociétés chrétiennes du Moyen-Orient, de l’Egypte à l’Anatolie en passant par le Levant,  solidement installées dans leur foi mais éclatées en Eglises ou sectes multiples, se sont ralliées du jour au lendemain à un islam qu’ils prenaient pour une secte chrétienne un peu plus  » moderne « , un peu plus militante.

Le rôle de l’ultra-gauche ?

On constate de rapprochements,  sur les sujets les plus variés, y compris la défense du voile islamique, entre certains chrétiens, l’islamisme et une ultra-gauche qui semble être entrée dans un nouveau cycle ascendant. S’agit-il d’arrangements transitoires, d’alliances tactiques,  ou de quelque chose de plus durable ? Il est trop tôt pour le dire. Mais on peut supposer que dans ces amalgames, les chrétiens seront les premiers perdants.

Voir aussi:

Islamophilie et culpabilité

Anne-Marie Delcambre

10/05/2005

Ce texte daté du 24 février 2005, a été mis en ligne le 4 mai 2005 sur le site Liberty Vox. Nous le reprenons ci-dessous, après corrections, mise en page et annotations. Menahem Macina.

Depuis plus de vingt ans, beaucoup d’intellectuels européens – religieux et laïcs – éprouvent une réelle attirance pour l’islam. On peut parler de véritable islamophilie.

C’est ainsi que l’on «redécouvre» la civilisation de l’islam, on exalte sa mystique, on vante sa tolérance, etc. En revanche, on dénonce le matérialisme de l’Occident, son amour de l’argent, sa pornographie, sa technique inhumaine. On va même jusqu’à estimer que nous devrions nous inspirer de la sagesse et de la spiritualité musulmanes, nous y trouverions des réponses pour combler le vide intellectuel et spirituel de notre pauvre Occident.

Innombrables sont les témoignages d’intellectuels, principalement français, en faveur de l’islam. À tel point qu’en 1991, Jacques Ellul (1) pouvait écrire : «Restait quand même pour moi la question insoluble : comment des générations d’intellectuels arabisants avaient-ils pu se tromper de façon radicale au sujet de l’islam, en le présentant comme une terreur et une menace ? […] Il y a là un mystère de création d’opinion publique durable mais tenue aujourd’hui pour complètement fausse, que je n’ai jamais vu expliqué ni même abordé».

Si cet éminent savant, de famille juive mais converti au protestantisme, se disait bouleversé par l’islamophilie grandissante, c’est qu’en tant que juriste, il connaissait parfaitement le danger que représente la fixité des textes dans cette religion si juridique qu’est l’islam, et il n’oubliait pas les statuts d’infériorité réservés aux non-musulmans en terre d’islam, «comparables à ceux du serf, au Moyen-Âge». Il pensait même que l’islam n’était pas étranger à l’introduction dans le christianisme de l’idée de guerre sainte, c’est-à-dire la conception que la guerre peut être bonne. Effectivement, quand on remarque l’énorme distance entre les textes des Évangiles et certains textes du droit canon de l’Église catholique romaine, on peut être fortement tenté de penser qu’il y a eu «subversion du christianisme» et Jacques Ellul a peut-être raison de croire que l’islam n’y est pas totalement étranger.

Parallèlement à son chapitre consacré à l’islam dans Subversion du Christianisme, écrit en 1983, ce «grand dérangeur» qu’était Jacques Ellul, écrivait la préface au livre très documenté de Bat Ye’or sur le problème des dhimmis : The Dhimmi. Jews and Christians under Islam (Condition des juifs et des chrétiens vivant dans une société musulmane) [2]. Ce que pensait Jacques Ellul, c’est que le monde musulman n’avait pas évolué dans sa façon de considérer le non-musulman : «Nous sommes avertis par là de la façon dont seraient traités ceux qui y seraient absorbés», écrivait-il. Et il ne craignait pas, lui, le théologien spécialiste des religions, de présenter l’islam «comme une religion totalitaire fondée sur la notion de Droit divin à caractère non-évolutif». Le message de Jacques Ellul aboutit à prôner une certaine prudence vis-à-vis d’une religion dont les textes conduisent à privilégier la guerre, quand les conditions sont jugées favorables.

Or, paradoxalement, une sorte de cécité a atteint nos intellectuels en Occident. S’ils savent encore lire les textes archaïques de la religion catholique et les dénoncer avec virulence, en revanche, s’agissant d’islam, les textes les plus rétrogrades ne suscitent aucune réaction. Au point qu’Hermann Tertach, un éditorialiste du quotidien espagnol de centre gauche El Pais – repris dans le Courrier international n° 734, du 25 Novembre au 1er Décembre 2004 -, ne craint pas d’écrire que l’Europe occidentale fait preuve d’une tolérance béate. Elle fait tout son possible pour que les immigrés musulmans ne renoncent pas à leur identité et à leur culture. Toute mesure n’allant pas dans le sens de cette louable intention est aussitôt jugée raciste et xénophobe. Les élites européennes prônent la tolérance, y compris envers les intolérants. Pour ces élites, commente l’éditorialiste, les populations musulmanes finiront par s’intégrer, et elles sont porteuses d’une pluralité culturelle qui ne peut qu’enrichir nos sociétés européennes. Que les jeunes musulmans des banlieues représentent le fer de lance de l’antisémitisme européen ne les préoccupe guère. Ces jeunes immigrés sont défavorisés, et tout le monde sait que les Juifs sont de gros capitalistes exploiteurs liés à l’Amérique et à Israël! Qu’il y ait, dans des pays européens, des quartiers où la constitution nationale s’applique moins que la loi islamique (Charî’a), cela ne les empêche pas de dormir. Que l’on rencontre de plus en plus de femmes voilées, de femmes battues, cela importe peu. L’hebdomadaire allemand Der Spiegel, pourtant peu suspect de xénophobie, publiait, en octobre 2004, un dossier accablant sur les mauvais traitements subis par les femmes musulmanes en Allemagne. Mais, à force d’avoir répété pendant tant d’années que toutes les idées étaient bonnes, les intellectuels pouvaient-ils réagir, surtout contre une religion aussi chérie et défendue par leurs écrits ?

Une alliance s’est d’ailleurs créée, depuis un certain temps, entre chrétiens et laïcs qui se disent athées, pour défendre l’islam, la religion du pauvre et de l’opprimé !

Il aura fallu, semble-t-il, l’assassinat du cinéaste Théo Van Gogh, le 2 novembre 2004, à Amsterdam, pour que certains se réveillent et que ce grand mensonge, cette alliance commencent à se fissurer.

Ceci d’autant plus que cette islamophilie a, pour contrepartie, une judéophobie de plus en plus visible, laquelle ne s’exerce pas directement, mais à travers le sionisme qu’il est devenu politiquement correct de dénoncer! En fin de compte, ce sont les Juifs qui font les frais de cette islamophilie dénoncée par Jacques Ellul. Ils sont les victimes de cette alliance contre nature qui s’établit automatiquement, dès qu’il s’agit de l’islam, entre chrétiens et laïcs d’extrême gauche.

Pour comprendre une si étrange alliance, il est nécessaire de se pencher sur la nature de cette islamophilie. C’est alors seulement qu’on pourra en connaître les raisons.

L’islamophilie émane en tout premier lieu des milieux catholiques.

Un des principaux responsables de cette islamophilie est incontestablement le grand orientaliste, Louis Massignon. C’est lui qui a encouragé l’élan de curiosité et de sympathie pour le monde arabe et pour l’islam. Massignon admirait le travail de Lyautey sur le plan politique et aimait le zèle missionnaire du père de Foucauld. Sans doute y avait-il, chez Massignon, la nostalgie des vertus chevaleresques dont la France démocratique et laïque du début du vingtième siècle semblait, à ses yeux, quelque peu dépourvue. L’attirance pour l’islam avait malheureusement, chez lui, pour contrepartie, un certain mépris pour les Juifs et le judaïsme. Massignon fut antisioniste. Il traversa, dans les années trente, une courte crise d’antisémitisme, dont il se reprit. Mais il trouvait injuste l’installation en Terre sainte des Ashkénazes, insuffisamment croyants et «sémites» à ses yeux. La prise de Nazareth par les sionistes le consterna. Dans ses dernières années, il prit la défense des Algériens avec une vigueur qui ne pouvait que lui attirer la sympathie des musulmans.

Or, Massignon et sa thèse sur le fameux mystique musulman Hallaj, exécuté en 922, ont eu sur les intellectuels chrétiens et musulmans une énorme influence. Massignon compare Hallaj à la figure du Christ. Il opère un rapprochement entre Fatima, la fille du Prophète, et la Vierge Marie, et surtout, il affirme que l’islam est une religion abrahamique. Les élucubrations mystiques de Massignon seront dénoncées par certains, comme Claudel, qui voyait, dans le texte de Massignon de 1929, « Prière pour Sodome », «un prodigieux amas de foutaises». Mais si pour quelques-uns de ses contemporains, Massignon paraît étrange, surtout lorsque marié et père de famille, il demande à devenir prêtre melkite, selon donc le rite oriental, ce sont néanmoins ses idées qui seront retenues par le concile Vatican II pour les passages relatifs aux musulmans.

On ne saurait s’étonner que la littérature sur l’islam, qui s’est développée après le Concile, pousse encore plus loin l’islamophilie. Massignon voyait l’islam comme un «schisme abrahamique». Or, les catholiques du vingt et unième siècle ont un enthousiasme délirant pour la religion de «l’Autre» ; la foi est sans frontière, et la poussée affective en faveur de l’islam ne connaît plus de mesure. Il faut aimer les musulmans d’un amour sans limites. La littérature catholique qui va en ce sens est dépourvue de bases scientifiques solides. Il suffit d’aimer, c’est ce qu’elle ne cesse de répéter avec une rare inconscience, prenant à la lettre la phrase de Saint Augustin «Aime et fais ce que tu veux».

Faut-il renvoyer aux nombreux ouvrages de Pères blancs, en particulier, dont on se demande pourquoi ils ne sont pas encore musulmans, mais ils ignorent sans doute ce que dit le Coran concernant les chrétiens (sourate 9, verset 30 «qu’Allah les tue!»), car cette islamophilie n’est absolument pas payée de retour [3]. Les musulmans ne sont en rien attirés par le christianisme qui leur paraît une religion dépassée par l’islam, faussée et antinaturelle. De plus, le polythéisme catholique avec la Trinité est une abomination, le seul crime qui ne puisse être pardonné par Allah !

Quand on regarde, dans les librairies, la littérature favorable à l’islam, dit Alain Besançon [4], elle est le plus souvent écrite par des prêtres catholiques, disciples de Massignon ou influencés par ce grand orientaliste. Or, leur attirance pour l’islam dérive de plusieurs sentiments.

C’est tout d’abord le fait que «ces ecclésiastiques, affolés par le refroidissement de la foi et de la pratique en pays chrétiens, particulièrement en Europe, admirent la dévotion musulmane. Ils s’émerveillent de ces hommes qui, dans le désert ou dans un hangar industriel de France, de Belgique ou d’Allemagne, se prosternent, cinq fois par jour, pour la prière rituelle. Ils estiment qu’il vaut mieux croire à quelque chose que de ne rien croire du tout […] Ils confondent foi et religion». En fait, les ecclésiastiques catholiques assistent, impuissants, à la déchristianisation de l’Europe. Ils voient les églises quasiment vides et, en revanche, ils constatent que les mosquées sont pleines, même si ces mosquées sont des caves, des bâtiments sordides. Et les églises aux trois quarts vides, cette laïcité triomphante de l’occident, le mépris du religieux, tout cela est devenu insupportable pour les prêtres catholiques, dont certains s’adaptent mal au monde moderne, d’autant plus que leur célibat les marginalise et que les accusations récentes de pédophilie rendent ce célibat suspect. Mal perçus par la société laïque individualiste, ils éprouvent de la sympathie pour l’islam communautariste où tous se sentent très proches, là, «les croyants sont des frères» ! Mais ils oublient un peu vite, ou ils ne savent pas que «le musulman est le frère du musulman», pas le frère du non-musulman!

La deuxième raison de cette islamophilie des prêtres catholiques, réside dans «la haute place que prennent Jésus et Marie dans le Coran, sans qu’ils fassent attention [au fait] que ce Jésus et cette Marie sont des homonymes qui n’ont de commun que le nom avec le Jésus et la Marie qu’ils connaissent». Ce dernier point est grave, souligne Alain Besançon, «parce qu’il perturbe la relation entre chrétiens et juifs». Car, pour les prêtres catholiques, les musulmans paraissent «meilleurs» que les juifs, puisqu’ils honorent Jésus et Marie, ce que les juifs ne font pas. Et là, judaïsme et islam sont comparés, avec un avantage pour l’islam.

Avantage accentué par le fait que le judaïsme paraît plus fermé. L’islam est plus universaliste, il s’adresse à tous les peuples et ne conçoit de privilège pour aucun. Tout au plaisir de se rapprocher de «ses frères musulmans», le catholique s’éloigne insensiblement des adeptes de la Bible juive, leur reprochant implicitement d’être restés entre eux, de n’avoir pas accepté la venue du Messie. Reproche non dit, jamais avoué, mais qui pèse sur les relations judéo-chrétiennes, il ne faut pas se leurrer.

La deuxième source d’islamophilie est constituée par les intellectuels laïcs, souvent athées, politiquement d’extrême gauche. Ce sont des tiers-mondistes impénitents qui sont dans la repentance et la culpabilité permanentes. Ils battent leur coulpe parce qu’ils estiment être du côté des Blancs colonialistes, exploiteurs. Ils sanglotent et demandent pardon, mais, en plus, ils ont décidé de réparer; de réparer le mal causé par les croisades, de réparer l’injustice d’avoir ignoré la grandeur de l’islam. Alors, de la part de ces intellectuels, on assiste à une réécriture du passé, de l’histoire, entièrement favorable aux musulmans. Plus question de critiquer, d’ironiser. Il faut rendre leur fierté aux peuples humiliés, présenter leur religion de manière positive. On parle de l’islam des lumières, de religion de paix, d’amour et de tolérance. On «redresse» la situation, en ce qui concerne les conquêtes musulmanes, qui auraient été tout à fait pacifiques. Les coupables, ce sont les Européens, avec leur esprit de conquête, d’abord les croisades, puis la colonisation. Le jihâd n’est plus appelé «guerre sainte», mais simplement combat spirituel contre soi-même [5].

La question qui se pose est alors la suivante: pourquoi l’opinion publique est-elle disposée à accepter comme allant de soi cette «désinformation» contraire au bon sens ? (3)

Une première explication est la présence, dans ces pays européens, de millions de musulmans. Ils vont rester, ils vont devoir s’intégrer. Alors il faut absolument trouver tout le positif de la situation. Les sociétés occidentales sont des sociétés vieillissantes, la jeunesse musulmane est un apport qu’il faut prendre en considération et apprendre à aimer. D’autre part, ces sociétés occidentales sont des sociétés qui ont fait appel à une main-d’œuvre nécessaire pour les travaux pénibles que les Européens ne veulent plus faire. Du point de vue économique, on ne peut les ignorer et ils nous donnent mauvaise conscience. Les Occidentaux, s’ils sont chrétiens, se sentent doublement culpabilisés. Ils se souviennent qu’il faut accueillir l’étranger : « Tu traiteras l’étranger comme l’un des tiens », surtout l’étranger le plus pauvre, car les chrétiens se veulent charitables. Culpabilité économique doublée d’une culpabilité religieuse. Cette culpabilité religieuse est d’autant plus légitime, que le Pape lui-même a fait acte de repentance, battant sa coulpe pour ce qui s’était produit dans le passé.

La deuxième explication, c’est que cette islamophilie tente de faire oublier la légende noire de l’islam, la mauvaise image renvoyée par le miroir de l’Occident chrétien concernant cette religion. Malheureusement, en même temps, chemine la tentation non avouée de réduire notre culpabilité envers le peuple juif, d’effacer l’horrible passé de la Shoah, la mémoire de l’Holocauste. En effet, les chrétiens islamophiles deviennent amis des musulmans et ennemis des Israéliens. On se libère de la culpabilité engendrée par le génocide de la Shoah en traitant les Juifs sionistes de persécuteurs. C’est ainsi que certains milieux chrétiens constituent les Palestiniens en figure substituée du Juif persécuté, qui a pour fin d’effacer les fautes commises au temps du nazisme. De plus, faire des Juifs sionistes les nouveaux nazis, permet de s’adonner tranquillement à une islamophilie d’autant plus grande que, du point de vue religieux, ne se sont pas effacées de la mémoire collective catholique ces expressions: «les Juifs, peuple déicide» et «hors de l’Église point de salut».

Personne, depuis le Concile de Vatican II, n’oserait traiter les Juifs de peuple déicide, mais les chrétiens ne craignent aucunement de traiter les responsables israéliens de bourreaux. Et ils peuvent donc dénoncer l’arrogance sioniste, main dans la main avec les islamo-gauchistes. Et c’est ainsi que cette étrange alliance s’explique par la culpabilité que les uns et les autres éprouvent vis-à-vis des musulmans, certes, mais aussi vis-à-vis des Juifs ; et, en fin de compte, ce sont les Juifs qui paient l’addition et font les frais de cette islamophilie. Car les islamophiles de tous bords ferment les yeux sur les propos antisémites des musulmans, en rendant responsable la politique israélienne et en excusant ce nouvel antisémitisme [par] la faiblesse économique de ces populations musulmanes défavorisées. Un «rap» qui circule sur Internet et qui a pour matière «Nique les Juifs» en est un excellent exemple. C’est un groupe de jeunes de 12-13 ans, mais on peut se demander «Qui tire les ficelles» ?

Une collègue, professeur d’italien, Véronique Lippmann, m’écrivait, à propos de cette islamophilie «béate», qui ferme les yeux sur les propos antisémites des jeunes musulmans: «Cette islamophilie béate n’hésite pas, en revanche, à dénoncer les actes antisémites lorsqu’ils sont commis par l’extrême droite, comme pour se dédouaner, ce qui lui permet de rappeler, en même temps, que les musulmans sont aussi victimes de l’extrême droite. Comment ensuite accuser d’antisémitisme une victime du racisme ? Comme si l’un empêchait l’autre. L’antisémitisme n’est reconnu que s’il vient de l’extrême droite, sans aucune allusion à la religion. Au nom de l’antiracisme, on banalise l’antisémitisme.»

Et les chrétiens islamophiles, eux, deviennent ennemis des Juifs, sans pour autant devenir amis des musulmans, car il est demandé aux catholiques de «collaborer avec leurs frères musulmans», mais de laisser ces derniers pleinement libres. Autrement dit, les musulmans sont libres de convertir les chrétiens mais pas l’inverse ! Des journaux, comme le journal La Croix, portent des titres suggestifs «le Coran à découvrir», «Une prière», la Fatiha. Ne parlons pas d’ecclésiastiques comme les pères Lelong, Borrmans, des évêques, comme Mgr Brunin, qui estiment que les exigences spirituelles du dialogue islamo-chrétien s’appliquent aux chrétiens beaucoup plus qu’aux musulmans. Le père Borrmans dans «Orientations pour un dialogue entre chrétiens et musulmans» (1987) va si loin que, pour lui, il n’y a, en islam, ni «fatalisme», ni «juridisme», ni «laxisme», ni «immobilisme», ni «fanatisme». Les chrétiens sont invités à une «saine émulation spirituelle» et à une «spiritualité sans frontière». Alain Besançon écrit : «On m’a assuré que l’auteur de ce livre, instruit par l’expérience, le regrette maintenant et qu’il verse aujourd’hui les larmes de Saint Pierre. Mais le livre est toujours en vente». Le dit Père Borrmans a accepté de participer aux Mélanges rédigés en hommage au Père Antoine Moussali, qui, lui, se méfiait des pièges du dialogue islamo-chrétien. Mais est-il vraiment repenti ? (5)

Seulement, l’islamophilie n’est pas née quand les pays européens étaient puissants. Jacques Ellul remarque : «j’ajouterai quand même une pointe assez méchante: cette mauvaise conscience (ressentie par les intellectuels et un bon nombre de chrétiens), elle est quand même née à partir du moment où nous avons été vaincus. Tant que nous étions les plus forts, nous gardions la bonne conscience du «civilisateur» (6).

L’islamophilie vient du fait que les pays musulmans sont forts économiquement, par leur nombre. Dans les pays européens, les musulmans représentent une puissance électorale ; à cela s’ajoute le problème des conversions à l’islam, de plus en plus nombreuses. Des filles épousent des garçons musulmans et leurs enfants sont musulmans d’office. Des garçons se convertissent à l’islam – ce qui leur semble facile – pour épouser des filles musulmanes. La société déchristianisée ne saurait les freiner. Quitter le christianisme pour l’islam apporte «une bouffée d’air frais», un parfum d’exotisme. Quant aux femmes, certaines occidentales se sentent mal à l’aise par rapport à une société qui connaît le risque du célibat, la peur de la solitude, et épouser un musulman leur permet de satisfaire un besoin de mari et d’enfants, dans le cadre d’un mariage classique.

Jane Benigni fait remarquer très justement un autre élément sociologique concernant l’attirance des occidentaux islamophiles pour «la famille musulmane». Les hommes, lassés des revendications des féministes et des exigences des femmes libérées ne verraient pas d’un si mauvais œil une société où la femme soumise serait ramenée à la cuisine ! Et pourquoi pas plusieurs femmes… soumises bien entendu. Et ainsi le machisme se trouverait revigoré. On épouserait d’abord des femmes musulmanes bien rodées, et les autres suivraient. Les mariages mixtes entre chrétiens et musulmans jouent un rôle certain dans cette islamophilie ambiante.

En parallèle, je citerai le billet du docteur André Nahum, du 23 Février 2005, sur Radio Judaïques FM, qui a choisi de retenir le cri d’alarme du président Moshé Katsav quant à l’avenir de la diaspora: «Le peuple juif est en perte de vitesse au niveau démographique, économique et culturel». Le docteur Nahum rappelle un sondage récent du journal La Croix, qui semble confirmer ce déclin annoncé. Sur 60 millions de Français, 360.000 d’entre eux se déclareraient juifs. Et le docteur Nahum d’ajouter «nous sommes loin des 600.000 ou 700.000 âmes dont on parlait naguère». Le président Katsav demande aux dirigeants juifs de cesser de pratiquer la politique de l’autruche et de réagir face à une situation qui signifie, à moyen terme, la quasi-disparition des communautés juives en diaspora et particulièrement en Europe et en France!

Que penser de ce cri d’alarme, sinon qu’il évoque un retour du communautarisme ?

Or, la société laïque ne peut permettre qu’on raisonne en termes de communautés religieuses. Il faut opter pour l’humanisme qui libère, contre le communautarisme qui enferme. La présence, dans les pays européens, d’organisations islamiques actives, censées représenter les musulmans, pose de nouveau le problème de la laïcité face aux religions, et pour la France, la République s’enlise s’agissant de la menace du communautarisme musulman.

«Un spectre hante le monde: celui des communautés closes, exclusives et guerrières», dit Pierre-André Taguieff dans son dernier livre La République enlisée (7). Et les Juifs ont raison d’avoir peur. Taguieff avoue que les ennemis d’une république laïque et vraiment démocratique utilisent les armes de la modernité intellectuelle pour abolir la laïcité : «L’intolérance a appris à parler la nouvelle langue de la tolérance et se montre d’autant plus efficace qu’elle n’est pas perçue comme telle». On est, dit-il, en «pleine corruption idéologique». La République est confrontée à des «stratèges cyniques» qui n’hésitent pas à détourner les mots et les concepts de leur sens originel pour parvenir à leurs fins.

Les concepts de «laïcité», de «droits de l’homme», sont ainsi insensiblement vidés ou détournés de leur sens initial. Mais l’islamophilie impénitente ferme les yeux devant la présentation de l’islam, «béatifié» par les nouveaux penseurs musulmans. Elle y trouve des avantages, en plus de celui, non négligeable, de se libérer de la désagréable culpabilité qui fonde, en grande partie, cet amour de l’islam. Les avantages, on les devine aisément… En effet, les islamophiles chrétiens espèrent bien, avec l’appui des musulmans, regagner un peu de terrain religieux et entamer cette laïcité pure et dure qu’ils n’ont, au fond, jamais vraiment digérée. Les islamophiles laïcs de gauche voient dans le nombre des musulmans un appui politique contre Israël, l’Amérique et la politique libérale.

Et les Juifs paieront pour cette islamophilie aux deux visages, qui plonge ses racines dans la culpabilité. Beaucoup de juifs se sentent angoissés par cette islamophilie parce qu’ils pressentent qu’ils vont être ressentis comme gênants et coupables. Il faut qu’ils soient considérés comme coupables pour que les deux autres religions soient libérées de leur dette à leur égard. Ces deux autres religions, en effet, se sont inspirées du judaïsme, le christianisme en prétendant le parfaire, l’islam en le récupérant, en l’absorbant et en accusant les Juifs d’avoir falsifié leurs textes. Pour les musulmans, la vraie Thora, l’Évangile authentique, ne doivent pas être cherchés ailleurs que dans le Coran. Les vrais disciples des prophètes Abraham, Moïse ou Jésus, ce sont les musulmans. Leurs disciples d’hier et d’aujourd’hui sont des faussaires, des menteurs, des corrupteurs de textes, des associationnistes (8) [6].

Beaucoup de musulmans sont persuadés que le Coran est la seule vérité. Or, dans ce texte sacré, il n’y a pas égalité entre musulmans et non-musulmans. Un statut inférieur de «protégés» [7] est même prévu dans la loi islamique pour ces derniers. Et cela, l’engouement subit des intellectuels européens pour l’islam, n’en a même pas idée. Ces intellectuels conformistes, pétris de bons sentiments et de la culpabilité d’être des colonisateurs, ne veulent pas croire qu’il puisse y avoir des textes mortifères dans la religion des économiquement faibles, la religion de ceux qui ont été colonisés et exploités. De même, ils ne veulent pas admettre qu’il puisse y avoir des croyants fanatiques prêts à la violence… Les vingt attentats antimusulmans dénombrés aux Pays-Bas, à la suite de l’assassinat de Théo Van Gogh, démontrent violemment, malheureusement, que beaucoup ne veulent plus de cette islamophilie béate et irresponsable, et que la société occidentale repose sur des valeurs qu’il importe de faire respecter fermement si nous ne voulons pas être victimes des ennemis de ces valeurs [8].

Il n’est pas inutile de citer la conclusion de Hermann Tertach dans l’article d’El Pais

« Peut-être faudrait-il un peu plus d’estime de soi de la part des sociétés et des États européens, un peu de bon sens, de la tolérance mais aussi de la fermeté, et assez d’intelligence pour voir que, jamais depuis le nazisme, nous n’avons été aussi menacés. Et enfin un instinct de survie. »

* Docteur en Droit, Docteur en civilisation islamique et professeur d’arabe littéraire.

Note de la Rédaction de Liberty Vox [1].

Cet article fut écrit, à l’origine, pour Les Cahiers Rationalistes. À l’issue d’un débat houleux au sein de la rédaction, et contre l’avis d’Alain Policar, le directeur de la publication, et de Jean-Philippe Catonné, qui soutenaient Anne-Marie Delcambre, ce texte fut refusé à l’écrasante majorité. La lâcheté de certains de nos contemporains nous aura au moins permis de vous faire découvrir cette passionnante étude et de compter désormais parmi nous ce courageux chercheur.

———————-

Notes de l’auteur

(1) Jacques Ellul, agrégé de droit, historien, sociologue et théologien protestant est décédé en 1994 à l’âge de 82 ans. Il nous a laissé une œuvre considérable (53 ouvrages et un millier d’articles traduits en une dizaine de langues). Enseignant à l’université de Bordeaux, ses cours sur l’Histoire des institutions ne laissaient jamais les étudiants indifférents. En 1991 paraissait Ce Dieu injuste, théologie chrétienne pour le peuple d’Israël. Il souligne : «Lorsque les chrétiens tombent dans la violence et l’antisémitisme, ils sont en contradiction avec leur texte fondateur, ce qui n’est pas le cas de l’islam».

(2) Alain Besançon, préface au livre de Jacques Ellul Islam et judéo-christianisme, PUF, 2004, p. 26.

(3) Le succès de livres iconoclastes concernant l’islam tend à prouver que l’opinion publique n’est pas entièrement convaincue par les arguments de ces intellectuels religieux ou athées islamophiles, mais que la peur d’être traité de raciste et d’islamophobe freine les réactions. La judéophobie, qui est devenue de plus en plus forte dans certains quartiers, a conduit certains milieux juifs à réagir, ce qui a un peu libéré les individus de cette chape de plomb qui s’était abattue sur eux. Mais il est vrai que la crainte de dénoncer le caractère violent de l’islam obéit à un souci de paix publique, au détriment de la vérité scientifique. Or, une société laïque a le devoir de mettre en garde contre le danger des textes religieux pris à la lettre.

(4) Cité par Alain Besançon, p 204.

(5) Marie Thérèse Urvoy m’a fait remarquer que, dans l’ouvrage Enquêtes sur l’islam, Editions Desclée de Brouwer, 2004, p 319, note 38, le père Borrmans parle de nombreux intellectuels courageux, et il cite Tariq Ramadan, Islam, le face-à-face des civilisations (Quel projet pour quelle modernité ?) Lyon, Tawhid, 1995.

(6) Jacques Ellul, Op. cit., p. 45.

(7) Pierre-André Taguieff, La république enlisée, Éditions Des Syrtes, 2005.

(8) Voir l’excellente étude de Daniel Sibony «Nom de Dieu», Seuil 2002

———————-

Bibliographie de l’auteur

Alain Besançon, Trois tentations dans l’Eglise, Calmann-Levy, 1996.

Jean-Luc Brunin, L’islam… tout simplement, Les Éditions de l’Atelier, Éditions ouvrières, 2003.

Jean Delumeau, Un christianisme pour demain (Le christianisme va-t-il mourir?), Hachette Littératures, 1977.

Christian Destremau et Jean Moncelon, Massignon, Paris, Plon, 1994.

Anne-Marie Delcambre, Joseph Bosshard et Alii, Enquêtes sur l’islam, Desclée de Brouwer, 2004.

Jacques Ellul, Islam et judéo-christianisme, PUF, 2004.

Pierre-André Taguieff, La République Enlisée, Éditions Des Syrtes, 2005.

Guy Lafon, Abraham ou l’invention de la foi, Seuil, 1996.

Blanche de Richemont, Éloge du désert, Presses de la Renaissance, 2004.

Daniel Sibony, Nom de Dieu, Seuil, 2002

———————-

Notes de Menahem Macina

[1] Nous avons présenté ce nouveau site tout récemment, sur upjf.org, voir : « ’Liberty Vox’ : un nouveau site est né ».

[2] Nous avons mis en ligne le texte de cette préface sur le présent site, voir « Préface de J. Ellul au premier ouvrage de Bat Ye’or ».

[3] Les événements tragiques du 27 mars 1996, où sept moines trappistes furent enlevés, puis massacrés par le GIA, ont, hélas, démontré la prégnance et l’actualité de ce verset coranique, et l’absence totale de reconnaissance de ces musulmans extrémistes, dont les maquisards étaient pourtant soignés par ces religieux, au grand dépit du gouvernement algérien.

[4] Sur les positions très en pointe de ce remarquable intellectuel chrétien, voir, entre autres, sur le présent site, l’interview d’Alain Besançon par Michel Gurfinkiel : « L’Eglise face à la tentation de l’islam ».

[5] Il faut préciser honnêtement que c’est une des acceptions de ce terme. Ce qui est erroné en revanche est d’affirmer qu’il n’y a pas de djihad guerrier, ce que l’histoire, tant ancienne que moderne, infirme du tout au tout.

[6] La traduction française de ce terme arabe – Mushrikun, de shrik, association – est, en général, « associateurs », c’est-à-dire les polythéistes et, parmi eux, les chrétiens qui ’associent’ à Allah un Fils et un Esprit Saint, considérés, selon le mystère de la Trinité, comme étant, également et consubstantiellement, de même nature divine.

[7] Allusion aux dhimmis. C’est l’occasion de renvoyer à l’article récent d’Anne-Marie Delcambre, « Le Nouveau Négationnisme », dans lequel elle défend, bec et ongles, l’honneur de l’historienne de la dhimmitude, Bat Ye’or.

[8] Une prise de conscience commence à se faire jour dans certains cercles, y compris en milieu catholique. Exemple : le Père Giuseppe de Rosa, de la très catholique revue des Pères Jésuites de Rome, la Civiltà Cattolica, exprimait sans ménagement, il y a deux ans, sa vision pessimiste du danger que constitue l’Islam pour le christianisme, et son appel à un sursaut défensif de l’Eglise et des chrétiens face aux dégâts causés par l’Islam sectaire et fanatique. Voir : « Oppression des chrétiens en pays musulmans »; voir également l’article de P. Lurçat : « Islam: vers un changement d’attitude du Vatican ? ».

———————-

Mis en ligne le 10 mai 2005, par M. Macina, sur le site www.upjf.org.

Voir egalement:

[Texte écrit en mai 1983 et traduit en anglais pour le livre de Bat Ye’or, The Dhimmi : Jews and Christians under Islam (publié en février 1985 aux Etats-Unis/Grande-Bretagne; (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press/Associated University Presses). Ce texte – publié dans les éditions en anglais, hébreu et russe – n’a jamais paru en français.]

Le Dhimmi: Profil de l’opprimé en Orient et en Afrique du nord depuis la conquête arabe

Préface

Jacques Ellul

Ce livre est très important car il aborde un des problèmes les plus délicats de notre monde, délicat par la difficulté même du sujet, a savoir la réalité de l’Islam dans sa doctrine et sa pratique à l’égard des non-musulmans, et délicat par l’actualité du sujet, et les sensibilités que se sont révélées un peut partout dans le monde. Il y a un demi-siècle, la question de savoir quelle était la situation des non-musulmans en terre d’Islam n’aurait exalté personne. On aurait pu en faire une description historique, qui aurait intéressé les spécialistes, ou une analyse juridique (je pense aux travaux de M. Gaudefroy-Demombynes et de mon ancien collègue G.-H. Bousquet qui a décrit tant de choses sur des aspects du droit musulman sans que cela ait suscité la moindre polémique), ou un débat philosophique et théologique, mais assurément sans passion. Ce qui concernait l’Islam et le monde musulman appartenait à un passé, non pas mort, mais certainement pas plus vivant que la chrétienté médiévale. Les peuples musulmans n’avaient aucune puissance, ils étaient extraordinairement divisés, un grand nombre d’entre eux étaient soumis à la colonisation. Les Européens, hostiles à la colonisation, avaient de la sympathie pour les « Arabes », mais cela n’allait pas au-delà ! Et tout à coup, depuis 1950, la scène change complètement.

Je crois qu’on peut discerner quatre étapes : la première, la volonté de se libérer des envahisseurs. Mais en cela, les musulmans n’étaient pas « originaux » : la guerre d’Algérie et tout ce qui a suivi n’était qu’une conséquence de la première guerre du Vietnam. C’est un mouvement général de décolonisation qui s’engage. Et ceci va amener ces peuples à se vouloir une certaine identité, à être par eux-mêmes non seulement libérés des Européens, mais différents. Et qualitativement différents. La seconde étape en résulte : ce qui faisait la spécificité de ces peuples c’était non pas une particularité ethnique ou une organisation, mais une religion. Et l’on voit paraître, à l’intérieur même de mouvements de gauche socialistes ou même communistes, un retour au religieux. Se trouve alors tout à fait rejetée la tendance à la création d’un Etat laïque, comme l’avait voulu Atatürk par exemple. Très souvent on pense que l’explosion de religiosité islamique est le fait particulier de Khomeiny. Mais non. Il ne faut pas oublier la guerre atroce en Inde en 1947 entre musulmans et hindous sur le seul fondement religieux. Le nombre des victimes fut de plus d’un million et on ne peut pas considérer que cette guerre ait eu une autre origine que l’indépendance d’une République islamique (puisque tant que les musulmans étaient intégrés dans le monde hindou bouddhiste, il n’y avait pas de massacre). Le Pakistan se proclamera officiellement République Islamique en 1953 (donc justement au moment du grand effort de ces peuples de retrouver leur identité). Depuis cette époque, il n’y a pas eu d’année sans que ne se marque le renouveau religieux de l’Islam (la reprise de la conversion de l’Afrique Noire à l’Islam, le retour des populations détachées vers la pratique des rites, l’obligation pour des Etats arabes socialistes de se proclamer « musulmans », etc.…) si bien que l’Islam est actuellement la religion la plus active, la plus vivante dans le monde. Et l’extrémisme de l’Imam Khomeiny ne peut se comprendre que dans la perspective de ce mouvement. Il n’est pas du tout un fait extraordinaire, à part : il en est la suite logique. Mais, et c’est le troisième élément, au fur et à mesure de cette renaissance religieuse, on assiste à une prise de conscience d’une certaine unité du monde islamique, au-delà des diversités politiques et culturelles. Bien entendu, ici il ne faut pas oublier tous les conflits entre Etats musulmans, les divergences d’intérêts, les guerres mêmes, mais cette évidence de leurs conflits ne doit pas nous faire oublier une réalité plus fondamentale : leur unité religieuse en face du monde non musulman.

Et ici il y a un phénomène qui est intéressant : je serais tenté de dire que ce sont les « autres », les pays « communistes », « chrétiens », etc… qui accentuent la tendance à l’unité du monde musulman, et en quelque sorte jouent le rôle de « compresseur », pour amener ce monde à s’unifier ! Enfin, et c’est évidemment le dernier facteur, la découverte de la puissance économique et pétrolière. Je n’insiste pas. En somme une marche cohérente : indépendance politique – remontée religieuse – puissance économique. Ceci a retourné la face du monde en moins d’un demi-siècle. Et actuellement nous assistons à une vaste opération de propagande islamique, création de mosquées partout, même en URSS, diffusion de la littérature et de la culture arabe, récupération d’une histoire : l’Islam se glorifie maintenant d’avoir été le berceau de toutes les civilisations alors que l’Europe avait sombré dans la barbarie et que l’Orient était sans cesse déchiré. L’Islam, origine de toutes les sciences et de tous les arts, c’est un discours que nous entendons constamment. Ceci a probablement moins atteint les Etats-Unis que la France, (pourtant il faut rappeler les Black Moslims). Mais si je juge par rapport à la situation française, c’est qu’elle me paraît tout à fait exemplaire.

Dès lors, sitôt que l’on aborde un problème de l’Islam, on entre dans un domaine où toutes les sensibilités sont exaspérées. En France, on ne supporte plus les critiques adressées à l’Islam ou à des pays arabes. Ceci s’explique par bien des raisons : la mauvaise conscience d’avoir été envahisseur et colonisateur de l’Afrique du Nord. La mauvaise conscience de la guerre d’Algérie (qui entraînent en « contre-coup », l’adhésion à l’adversaire et le jugement favorable). La découverte du fait, exact, que dans la culture occidentale on a occulté pendant des siècles la valeur de l’apport musulman à la civilisation (et de ce fait, on passe à l’autre extrême). La multiplication des travailleurs immigrés (en France) d’origine arabe, qui représentent maintenant une population importante, généralement malheureuse, méprisée, (avec un certain racisme), ce qui fait que les intellectuels, les chrétiens, etc., sont remplis de bons sentiments envers eux et ne supportent plus critiques. On assiste alors à une réhabilitation générale de l’Islam qui s’exprime de deux façons. D’abord sur le plan intellectuel, il y a un nombre croissant d’œuvres qui correspondent à une recherche apparemment scientifique et qui se donnent pour objectif déclaré de détruire des préjugés, des images toutes faites (et fausses) de l’Islam, aussi bien en tant que doctrine, qu’en tant que coutumes et mœurs. Ainsi on « démontre » qu’il est faux que les Arabes aient été des envahisseurs cruels, qu’ils aient répandu la terreur et massacré les peuples qui ne se soumettaient pas. Il est faux que l’Islam soit intolérant, au contraire, c’est la tolérance même. Il est faux que la femme ait eu un statut inférieur et qu’elle ait été exclue de la cité. Il est faux que le jihad (la guerre sainte) soit une guerre matérielle, etc., etc… Autrement dit : tout ce que l’on a considéré comme historiquement certain au sujet de l’Islam était l’effet de la propagande, et on a implanté en Occident des images fausses, que l’on prétend rétablir maintenant dans la vérité. On se réfère à une interprétation très spirituelle du Coran et on cherche à prouver l’excellence des mœurs des pays musulmans.

Mais il n’y a pas que cela, dans nos pays, l’Islam exerce une séduction d’ordre spirituel. Dans la mesure où le christianisme n’a plus la valeur religieuse qu’il avait, et où il est radicalement critiqué, dans la mesure où le communisme a perdu son prestige et son message d’espoir, le besoin religieux de l’homme européen a cherché une autre dimension pour s’investir et voici que l’on a découvert l’Islam ! Il ne s’agit plus du tout de débats intellectuels : mais de véritables adhésions religieuses. Et plusieurs intellectuels français de grand renom on fait une conversion retentissante à l’Islam. On présente celui-ci comme un progrès évident par rapport au christianisme, on se réfère aux grands mystiques musulmans. On rappelle que les trois religions du Livre sont parents (juifs – chrétiens – musulmans). Toutes trois se réclament de l’ancêtre Abraham. Et la plus avancée des trois… c’est évidemment la dernière, la plus récente. Je n’exagère rien. Il y a même, parmi les Juifs, des intellectuels sérieux pour espérer sinon une fusion, du moins une conciliation entre les trois. Or, si je décris ces phénomènes européens, c’est dans la mesure où, qu’on le veuille ou non, l’Islam se donne une vocation universelle, se déclare la seule religion qui doive amener l’adhésion de tous : nous ne devons garder aucune illusion, aucune partie du monde ne sera indemne. Maintenant que l’Islam a un pouvoir national, militaire, économique, il cherchera à s’étendre sur le plan religieux à tout le monde. Et le Commonwealth britannique ainsi que les Etats-Unis seront visés aussi. En face de cette expansion (la troisième de l’Islam), il ne faut pas réagir par un racisme, ni par une fermeture orthodoxe, ni par des persécutions ou la guerre. Il doit y avoir une réaction d’ordre spirituel et d’ordre psychologique (ne pas se laisser emporter par la mauvaise conscience) et une réaction d’ordre scientifique. Qu’en est-il au juste ? Qu’est-ce qui est exact? les cruautés de la conquête musulmane ou bien la douceur, la bénignité du Coran ? Qu’est-ce qui est exact sur le plan de la doctrine et sur le plan de l’application, de la vie courante dans le monde musulman ? et il faudra faire du travail intellectuellement sérieux, portant sur des points précis. Il est impossible de juger de façon générale le monde islamique, il y a eu cent cultures diverses absorbées par l’Islam. Il est impossible d’étudier d’un trait toutes les croyances, toutes les traditions, toutes les applications. On ne peut faire ce travail que de façon limitée sur des séries de questions, pour « faire le point » du vrai et du faux.

Tel est le contexte dans lequel se situe le livre de Bat Ye’or sur le dhimmi. Et c’est un travail exemplaire dans le grand débat où nous sommes engagés. Je ne vais pas ici ni raconter le livre ni chanter ses mérites, mais seulement souligner son importance. Le dhimmi est donc celui qui vit dans une société musulmane, sans être musulman (juifs, chrétiens, et, éventuellement « animistes »). Cet homme a un statut social, politique, économique, particulier. Et il importe essentiellement de savoir en effet comment ont été traités ces « réfractaires ». Mais il faut tout de suite se rendre compte de la dimension de ce thème : en effet, c’est beaucoup plus que l’étude d’une « condition sociale » parmi d’autres. Le lecteur verra que, par bien des points, le dhimmi est comparable au serf européen du Moyen-Age. Mais la condition du serf était le résultat d’un certain nombre d’évolutions historiques (transformation de l’esclavage, disparition de l’Etat, apparition de la féodalité, etc…). Et par conséquent, lorsque les conditions historiques changent, la situation du serf évolue, jusqu’à disparaître. Il n’en est pas de même pour le dhimmi : ce n’est pas du tout le résultat d’un hasard historique, c’est ce qui doit être, du point de vue religieux et du point de vue de la conception musulmane du monde. C’est à dire c’est l’expression de la conception totale, permanente, fondée théologiquement de la relation entre l’Islam et le Non-Islam. Ce n’est pas un accident historique qui pourrait avoir un intérêt rétrospectif, mais un devoir être. Par conséquent, c’est à la fois un sujet historique (chercher les données intellectuelles et décrire les applications passées) et un sujet actuel, de pleine actualité dans la mesure de l’expansion de l’Islam. Et il faut en effet lire le livre de Bat Ye’or comme un livre d’actualité. Il importe de savoir aussi exactement que possible ce que les musulmans ont fait de ces peuples soumis non-convertis, parce que c’est ce qu’ils feront (et font encore maintenant). Je pense que le lecteur ne sera pas immédiatement convaincu par cette affirmation.

Quand même, n’est-ce pas, les notions, les concepts évoluent. La conception chrétienne de Dieu ou de Jésus-Christ n’est plus pour les chrétiens la même aujourd’hui que celle du Moyen-Age. Et l’on peut multiplier les exemples. Mais précisément ce qui me paraît intéressant, frappant dans l’Islam, une de ses singularités, c’est la fixité des concepts. D’une part, il est évident que les choses évoluent d’autant plus qu’elles ne sont pas idéologiquement fixées. Le régime des Césars à Rome pouvait se transformer beaucoup plus que le régime stalinien, parce qu’il n’y avait aucun cadre doctrinal et idéologique, qui lui donnait une continuité, une rigueur. Là où l’organisation sociale est fondée sur un « système », elle tend à se reproduire beaucoup plus exactement. Or, l’Islam, encore plus que ne le fût le christianisme, est une religion qui prétend donner une forme définitive à l’ordre social, aux relations entre les hommes, et encadrer chaque moment de la vie de chacun. Donc il tend à une fixité que la plupart des autres formes sociales n’avaient pas. Mais bien plus, on sait que la doctrine tout entière de l’Islam (y compris sa pensée religieuse) a pris un aspect juridique. Tous les textes ont été soumis à une interprétation de type juridique, et toutes les applications (même du spirituel) ont eu un aspect juridique. Or, il ne faut pas oublier que le juridique a une orientation très nette : fixer – fixer les relations – arrêter le temps – fixer les significations (arriver à ce qu’un mot ait un sens et un seul) – fixer les interprétations. Tout ce qui est juridique évolue le plus lentement possible et n’obéit à aucun bouleversement. Bien entendu, il peut y avoir évolution (dans la pratique, la jurisprudence, etc.) mais lorsqu’il y a un texte qui est considéré comme texte « fondateur » en quelque sorte, il suffit que l’on veuille s’y rapporter de nouveau, et ce que l’on avait créé comme nouveauté s’effondre. Et telle était bien la situation de l’Islam. Le juridisme introduit partout produisait une fixité (non pas absolue, ce qui est impossible, mais maximale) ce qui fait que l’étude historique est essentielle. Lorsqu’on se rapporte à un mot, à une institution islamique du passé, il faut savoir, tant que le texte fondamental (ici le Coran) n’est pas changé, quelles que soient les transformations apparentes, les évolutions, il peut toujours y avoir retour sur les principes et les données d’origine, et cela d’autant plus que l’Islam a réussi (ce qui a toujours été tellement rare) l’intégration entre le religieux, le politique, le moral, le social, le juridique, et l’intellectuel : constituant un ensemble rigoureux où chaque élément est une partie du tout.

Mais apparaît tout de suite un débat au sujet de ce « Dhimmi. Ce mot veut en effet dire « Protégé ». Et c’est un des arguments des défenseurs modernes de l Islam : le dhimmi n’a jamais été ni persécuté ni maltraité (sauf accident), bien au contraire : il est un protégé. Quel meilleur exemple du libéralisme de l’Islam. Voici des hommes qui ne partagent aucune croyance musulmane, et au lieu de les exclure, on les protège. J’ai lu de nombreux textes montrant qu’aucune autre société ni religion n’a été aussi tolérante, n’au aussi bien protégé les minorités. Bien entendu, on en profite pour mettre en cause le christianisme médiéval (que je ne défendrai pas), en soulignant que jamais l’Islam n’a connu l’Inquisition ou la « chasse aux sorcières ». Acceptons ce point de vue, et bornons-nous à réfléchir à ce mot lui-même : le « protégé ». Et il faut bien se demander « protégé contre qui ? » Dans la mesure où cet « étranger » est en terre d’Islam, cela ne peut évidemment être que contre les musulmans eux-mêmes. Le terme de protégé implique en soi une hostilité latente, c’est ce qu’il importe de bien comprendre. On avait une institution comparable dans la Rome primitive, avec le « cliens » – : l’étranger est toujours un ennemi. Il doit être traité comme ennemi, (même s’il n’y a pas de situation de guerre). Mais si cet étranger obtient la faveur d’un chef de grande famille, il devient son protégé (cliens) et il peut résider à Rome : il sera « protégé » contre les agressions que n’importe quel citoyen romain pouvait faire, par son « patron ». Cela veut dire en réalité que le protégé n’a aucun droit véritable. Le lecteur de ce livre verra que la condition du dhimmi est définie par un traité passé entre lui (ou son groupe) et tel groupe musulman (la dhimma). Ce traité présente un aspect juridique, mais c’est ce que nous appellerions un contrat inégal : en effet, la dhimma est une « charte octroyée » (voir C. Chehata sur le Droit Musulman), ce qui implique deux conséquences. La première, c’est que celui qui octroie la charte peut aussi bien la révoquer. En réalité, ce n’est pas un contrat « consensuel » formé par la volonté de deux parties. Et, en fait, c’est un arbitraire. Le concédant décide seul de ce qu’il octroie (d’où une grande variété possible de conditions). La seconde, c’est que nous sommes dans une situation qui est l’inverse de ce que l’on a essayé de construire avec la théorie des droits de l’homme et selon laquelle, du fait que l’on est un homme, on a, obligatoirement, un certain nombre de droits, donc ceux qui ne les respectent pas sont eux, dans une situation de mal. Au contraire, avec l’idée de charte octroyée, on n’a pas de droits que pour autant qu’ils sont reconnus dans cette charte et pour autant qu’elle dure. Par soi-même, et en tant qu’ « existant », on n’a aucun droit à faire valoir. Et c’était bien la condition du dhimmi. Or, j’indiquais plus haut pourquoi, ceci ne varie pas dans le cours de l’histoire : c’est non pas un aléa social, mais un concept enraciné.

Aujourd’hui pour l’Islam conquérant tous ceux qui ne se reconnaissent pas musulmans, n’ont pas de droits humains reconnus en tant que tels. Ils retrouveraient dans une société islamique la même condition de dhimmi. D’où le caractère parfaitement illusoire et fantaisiste d’une solution du drame du Proche-Orient par la création d’une fédération englobant Israël dans un ensemble de peuples et d’Etats musulmans, ou encore celle d’un Etat « Judéo-Islamique ». Ceci est impensable du point de vue musulman. Ainsi suivant que l’on prend le mot « protégé » dans le sens moral ou dans le sens juridique, on peut en avoir deux interprétations exactement contradictoires. Et ceci est tout à fait caractéristique des débats auxquels on assiste au sujet de l’Islam. Malheureusement, il faut prendre le mot dans sons sens juridique. Je sais bien que l’on objectera : mais le dhimmi avait des « droits ». Certes. Mais des droits octroyés. Tout le point est là. Si nous prenons par exemple le Traité de Versailles de 1918, l’Allemagne a reçu un certain nombre de « droits » octroyés par son vainqueur. Et ce fut qualifié de Diktat. Ceci montre à quel point l’étude de cet ordre de problème est délicate. Car les appréciations peuvent entièrement varier selon que l’on a un à priori favorable ou défavorable à l’Islam, et en même temps une étude vraiment scientifique, « objective » (mais personnellement je ne crois pas à l’objectivité en Sciences humaines, au mieux le chercheur peut être honnête et faire la critique de ses présupposés) devient extrêmement difficile. Et cependant disions-nous, justement parce que les passions sont extrêmes, une étude de ce type est dorénavant indispensable pour toutes les questions qui concernent l’Islam.

Alors la question se pose pour ce livre : est-ce que nous sommes en présence d’un livre scientifique ? J’avais fait un compte-rendu de ce livre, paru d’abord en français * (édition beaucoup moins complète et riche, surtout pour les annexes, qui sont essentielles) dans un grand journal. Et j’ai reçu une lettre très violente d’un collègue, spécialiste des questions musulmanes [Professeur Claude Cahen], me disant que ceci était un livre de pure polémique, qui n’avait aucun caractère sérieux. Mais ses critiques manifestaient qu’il n’avait pas lu ce livre, et ses arguments (à partir de mon texte) étaient intéressants pour révéler « a contrario » le caractère scientifique de cette étude. Tout d’abord il employait « l’argument d’autorité », il me renvoyait à des études sur le problème, qu’il estimait indiscutables et scientifiques (celles de S.D. Goitein, Bernard Lewis, et Norman Stillman), en général favorables à l’attitude musulmane. J’ai soumis l’objection à Bat Ye’or, qui m’a répondu qu’elle connaissait personnellement les trois auteurs et avait tenu compte de leurs travaux. Le contraire m’eût étonné, étant donné l’ampleur des recherches de l’auteur ! Elle maintint qu’une lecture attentive de leurs écrits ne permettait pas une interprétation aussi restrictive.

Mais a partir de ces livres, quels étaient les arguments de fond pour critiquer l’analyse de Bat Ye’or ? Tout d’abord, que l’on ne peut généraliser la condition du dhimmi, et qu’il y a eu une très grande diversité dans leur situation. Or, précisément, c’est bien ce que montre notre livre, qui est très habilement construit : à partir de données communes, d’un fondement identique, l’auteur donne des documents permettant de se faire une idée précisément sur ces différences, selon qu’on envisage le dhimmi au Maghreb, en Perse, en Arabie, etc… Et l’on constate effectivement une très grande diversité dans les réalités de l’existence du dhimmi, mais cela ne change rien à la réalité profonde identique de sa condition. Le second argument, c’est qu’on a beaucoup exagéré les « persécutions », il parle de « quelques accès de colère populaire »… mais, d’une part, ce n’est pas là-dessus que Bat Ye’or se fonde, d’autre part, c’est ici que paraît l’esprit partisan : « les quelques accès » ont été historiquement très nombreux et les massacres des dhimmis fréquents. Il ne faut pas aujourd’hui rejeter ces témoignages considérables (que l’on a autrefois trop fait valoir) de tueries de juifs ou de chrétiens, dans tous les pays occupés par les Arabes et les Turcs, qui se reproduisaient fréquemment, et au cours desquelles les forces de l’ordre n’intervenaient pas. Le dhimmi avait peut-être des droits aux yeux des autorités, et officiellement, mais quand la haine populaire se déchaînait pour un motif souvent incompréhensible, ils étaient sans défense et sans protection. C’était l’équivalent des pogroms. Sur ce point, c’est mon correspondant qui n’est pas scientifique. Il atteste en troisième lieu que les dhimmis avaient des « droits » personnels et confessionnels. Mais, n’étant pas juriste, il ne voit pas la différence entre droits personnels et droits octroyés. Nous en avons parlé plus haut, et l’argument ne porte pas puisque précisément Bat Ye’or étude de façon tout à fait satisfaisante ces droits en question.

Il souligne en outre que les juifs ont atteint, en pays musulmans, leur plus haut niveau de culture, et qu’ils considéraient les Etats dont ils dépendaient comme leur Etat. Sur le premier point, je dirai qu’il y a eu une énorme diversité. Il est bien exact que dans certains pays arabes et à certaines époques, les juifs – et les chrétiens – ont obtenu un haut niveau de culture et de bien –être. Mais notre livre ne le nie pas. Et ce n’est pas un fait extraordinaire : à Rome, à partir du 1er siècle, après Jésus-Christ, il arrivait que des esclaves (restant toujours esclaves) avaient une situation très remarquable, ils exerçaient presque toutes les professions intellectuelles (professeurs, médecins, ingénieurs, etc.), ils dirigeaient des entreprises et pouvaient même être à leur tour propriétaires d’esclaves. Il n’empêche qu’ils étaient esclaves. Et c’est un peu la question des dhimmis, qui en effet avaient un rôle économique important (comme c’est très bien montré dans ce livre) et pouvaient être « heureux » : il n’empêche qu’ils étaient des inférieurs dont le statut, très variable, les faisait étroitement dépendants et… sans « droits ». Quant à dire qu’ils considéraient l’Etat dont ils dépendaient comme leur Etat, ceci n’a jamais été vrai des chrétiens. Quant aux juifs, ils avaient été dispersés depuis si longtemps dans le monde, qu’ils n’avaient pas d’autre possibilité. Mais on sait qu’il n’y eut de véritable courant « assimilationniste » que dans les démocraties occidentales. Enfin ce critique déclare qu’il y a eu « dégradation pendant les temps contemporains de la condition des juifs en pays islamique ». Et il ne faut pas juger de la condition du dhimmi d’après ce qui s’est passé aux 19e – 20e siècles. Je suis alors obligé de me demander si l’auteur de ces critiques n’obéit pas, comme beaucoup d’historiens, à un embellissement du passé. Il suffit de constater la remarquable concordance entre les sources historiques se rapportant à des faits et les données de base d’origine pour penser que l’évolution n’a pas dû être si complète.

Si je me suis étendu un peu longuement sur ces critiques, c’est qu’elles m’ont paru importantes pour cerner le caractère « scientifique » de ce livre. Quant à moi, je considère, en effet, cette étude comme très honnête, peu polémique et aussi objective qu’il est possible (compte tenu que j’appartiens à l’Ecole d’historiens pour qui l’objectivité pure, au sens absolu du mot, ne peut pas exister). Nous avons là une très grande richesse de sources assemblées, une utilisation correcte des documents, un souci de placer chaque situation dans son contexte historique. Par conséquent, un certain nombre des exigences scientifiques pour un ouvrage de cet ordre. Et c’est pourquoi je considère cette étude comme tout à fait exemplaire et significative. Mais aussi, intervenant dans le « contexte sensible » que je rappelais plus haut, c’est un livre qui apporte un avertissement décisif. Le monde islamique n’a pas évolué dans sa façon de considérer le non musulman, et nous sommes avertis par-là de la façon dont seraient traités ceux qui y seraient absorbés. C’est une lumière pour notre temps.

Bordeaux, mai 1983

* Le Monde, 18 novembre 1980

—————-

Jacques Ellul, juriste, historien, théologien et sociologiste, est décédé en 1994. De son vivant, il a publié plus de 600 articles et 48 livres, traduits dans une douzaine de langues, plus de la moitié en anglais. De 1953 à 1970 il fut un membre du Conseil National de l’Eglise Protestante Reformée de France. Professeur d’Histoire et de Sociologie des Institutions à l’Université de Bordeaux, son œuvre inclut des études sur les institutions médiévales d’Europe, l’effet de la technologie moderne sur la société contemporaine, ainsi que la théologie morale. Il fut reconnu par des circles académiques américains, comme l’un des plus importants penseurs contemporains.

Voir enfin:

LE NOUVEAU NEGATIONNISME

Anne-Marie Delcambre , islamologue et professeur d’arabe .

Observatoire de l’islam en Europe

May 06, 2005

Tout le monde est d’accord pour stigmatiser le négationnisme d’extrême-droite , à savoir la position de ceux qui nient ou minimisent le génocide des juifs par les nazis pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale , et notamment l’existence des chambres à gaz . Or nous sommes confrontés aujourd’hui à un négationnisme d’un genre nouveau . Il s’agit de la position de ceux , musulmans ou islamophiles , qui nient ou minimisent le caractère violent et guerrier de l’islam . C’est ici qu’intervient l’affaire Bat Yé’or . Les faits sont les suivants : le 10 mars 2005 l’historienne Bat Yé’or parle dans le journal « Le Point » de son dernier ouvrage « Eurabia » .L’interview est suivi d’un article de Malek Chebel intitulé « Ne semez pas la confusion » proprement insultant pour une historienne mondialement connue , citée dans tous les ouvrages honnêtes qui entreprennent de traiter le problème du statut juridique du non-musulman en terre d’islam.

Le titre de l’article annonce la couleur négationniste « Ne semez pas la confusion » . C’est curieux comme ce titre me rappelle ce verset coranique « Ne semez pas la corruption sur la terre » qui s’adresse aux juifs (sourate 5 , verset

69/64 ) :« Ils s’évertuent à semer le scandale sur la terre alors qu’Allah n’aime pas les Semeurs de scandale » . Malek Chebel dans le journal « La Croix » avait déjà cité ce verset pour démontrer qu’aucune guerre n’est sainte en islam et que ce sont les juifs qui allument le feu de la guerre « Chaque fois que fut allumé un feu pour la guerre , Nous l’éteignîmes » Et c’est Allah qui parle !

Mais là où il ne s’agit plus de non-dit coranique sous-jacent mais de véritable attaque ad hominem c’est lorsque Malek Chebel réduit en cendres la crédibilité scientifique de Ba Yé’or . : si l’on considère que l’Histoire est une science , dit-il , elle demande des « historiens sérieux , formés et surtout non complaisants » . Mais si l’on considère l’histoire comme un récit « les idéologues de mauvais augure ont le loisir de semer la confusion et le doute » .Malek Chebel ne laisse à Bat Yé’or aucune porte de sortie « scientifique » . Elle est dans le premier cas une historienne pas sérieuse , pas formée et surtout complaisante et dans le deuxième cas une idéologue sinistre qui peut à son aise faire son sale travail de démolition !

Mais là où Malek Chebel veut en venir – et il y vient vite – c’est assimiler Bat Yé’or à Oriana Fallaci . Ce n’est pas une vraie historienne , une historienne scientifique . Elle raconte n’importe quoi comme une journaliste , elle est emportée par sa haine de l’islam . Alors que Malek Chebel n’a certainement jamais rencontré Bat Yé’or il écrit « Il n’est question que d’émotion » « d’une propagande qui parle au nom d’un passé révolu et qui vise à condamner collectivement les Arabes » . Une femme émotive , menée par sa sensibilité et son émotivité , la fameuse image qui ressort de tous les textes de la grande période classique qualifiée par ce petit monsieur « d’âge d’or » : la femme assimilée à l’enfant et à l’eunuque , émotive et instable , pleurant facilement et mangeant tout le temps . Pauvre Bat Yé’or , si sérieuse , admirée par son mari , son plus fidèle supporter . Mais que cette savante se rassure . Monsieur Chabel qui ne me connaît pas , lors d’un salon du livre à Toulon m’a littéralement insultée en me qualifiant de « fragile » . ! Même les ecclésiastiques présents à la conférence , pourtant pétris de charité chrétienne , me conseillèrent de porter plainte . Mais que peut-on faire contre la calomnie , c’est la seule défense des faibles !

Cependant il faut croire que Bat Yé’or joue le rôle de catalyseur et polarise toute l’agressivité de cet éminent anthropologue , psychanalyste , sociologue , psychologue . Il s’attribue même la qualification d’islamologue . Je crois que s’il progresse je le verrai bientôt devenu professeur d’arabe ! . Non seulement Bat Yé’or n’est pas une vraie historienne mais c’est une juive ingrate . L’article très habilement établit un parallèle entre « la magnanimité de l’islam classique , celui des Lumières .. et les Rois catholiques qui ont spolié les Juifs « Bat Yé’or ne fait que prendre prétexte de la déliquescence du monde arabe actuel pour régler des ardoises anciennes » Fine mouche le Malek Chebel , il sait qu’en écrivant cela il va toucher une corde sensible chez les Juifs de gauche qui portent toujours en eux le souvenir de l’Inquisition et du déplorable traitement des Juifs en chrétienté. Mais Malek Chebel est un habile homme , il ne prolonge pas trop l’attaque . . Brusquement il affecte de revenir à une objectivité sans faille « les faits , rien que les faits , et pas de subjectivisme élastique , ni d’opportunisme à bas prix » . Pourtant Malek Chebel n’abandonne pas sa proie . Il revient tel un roquet qui ne veut pas lâcher son os . Il veut disqualifier totalement cette historienne qui l’empêche de vendre sa marchandise : l’islam des lumières , mille fois plus tolérant que le christianisme médiéval . Et lentement on sent poindre dans l’article le mépris , ce mépris que les musulmans réservaient, à la belle époque classique , aux dhimmis , ces non musulmans tout juste bons à payer en étant humiliés « Le prétendu travail de Bat Yé’or jette de l’huile sur le feu » et voici le coup le plus bas « heureusement que les Maures du Maghreb accueillirent avec bienveillance les nombreux juifs pourchassés ! » Bat Yé’or fait partie de ces « revanchards » qui osent critiquer leurs anciens bienfaiteurs . Ingrate et comme si cela ne suffisait pas au palmarès des défauts , elle est calculatrice , intéressée « tout est calculé , adroit » . « On négocie pour avoir du succès »ce qui n’est guère probable ! Bat Yé’or saura que seuls les livres de Malek Chebel méritent d’être des succès de librairie !Ils sont tellement scientifiques ! Il faut que ce prétendu psychanalyste fasse attention , la mégalomanie le guette !

Malek Chebel voulait la mort scientifique de Bat Yé’or . Certains lecteurs du journal « le Point » ne se sont pas trompés quand ils ont parlé d’assassinat de Bat Yé’or . Pourtant Malek Chebel devrait se montrer plus charitable . Il sait ce que cela fait d’être « démoli » par la critique . .Michel Onfray , dans son « Traité d’athéologie »[1]dénonce le « Dictionnaire amoureux de l’islam » de Malek Chebel , « partial et partiel » : l’islam , religion de paix et d’amour( !) qui tolère le vin ( « il n’a jamais été question de supprimer radicalement le vin , mais seulement d’en dissuader les bons croyants » , p 617) , voilà un singulier paradoxe en évitant dans les entrées de ce dictionnaire vraiment amoureux : Guerre , Razzias , Combat , Conquêtes , Antisémitisme – ce qui constitue tout de même , dit Onfray , l’essentiel de la vie du Prophète et de l’islam pendant des siècles , en revanche il y a un texte sur les Croisades . Même remarque sur l’absence d’entrée à Juifs , Antisémitisme .. Quant à la sexualité , on lira avec bonheur : « L’islam a libéré le sexe et en a fait un lieu d’extrême sociabilité » p 561[2]

Pour un Michel Onfray qui a remarqué que jamais le texte même du Coran n’était critiqué pas plus d’ailleurs que le prophète de l’islam et que ledit Malek Chebel était un défenseur de sa culture , sans objectivité aucune , que de pauvres lecteurs abusés par ses informations partielles , tronquées , partiales ! Ce prestidigitateur extrêmement habile et fin connaisseur du monde occidental jouait sur du velours en écrivant un article destiné à des non spécialistes . Il savait qu’on risquait de le croire , d’autant plus qu’il cite des historiens juifs pour prouver qu’il n’y aurait jamais eu de discrimination envers les non musulmans . Seulement il cite imprudemment Bernard Lewis ; à moins que , parfaitement cynique , il n’ait eu l’audace de penser que son mensonge découvert il serait trop tard pour effacer ses propos négationnistes . Car Malek Chebel a honteusement menti ; et Bat Yé’or serait parfaitement en droit d’intenter un procès en diffamation au journal « Le point »

En effet j’ai attentivement consulté le livre de Bernard Lewis « Juifs en terre d’islam » , Champs-Flammarion , 2OO2 . Ce qu’écrit Malek Chebel est faux .

Bernard Lewis va aussi loin que Bat Ye’or dans la description de la condition du dhimmi :

p 29 « Selon son interprétation habituelle , la djizya n’était pas seulement un impôt , mais un instrument symbolique de SOUMISSION »

p 50 « l’injure est souvent violente . Les juifs sont traditionnellement qualifiés de singes et les chrétiens de porcs «

p 53 « les stigmates de cette infériorité sont multiformes … tel était également le but des réglementations marocaines qui obligeaient les juifs à aller pieds nus ou à porter des babouches de paille tressée chaque fois qu’ils s’aventuraient hors du ghetto »

Mais surtout Lewis reprend la thèse d’Antoine Fattal « le statut légal des non-musulmans en pays d’islam » , Beyrouth 1958

« Les dhimmis ne sauraient appartenir aux élites guerrières . Ils n’avaient pas le droit de monter à cheval et quand ils chevauchaient un âne ce devait être en amazone , comme une femme . Plus grave , le port des armes leur était strictement interdit … Ils n’avaient pas le droit de se défendre quand des gamins leur lançaient des pierres , forme de distraction qui , dans beaucoup d’endroits , s’est perpétuée jusqu’à nos jours »D’où ce sentiment d’insécurité et de précarité ( p54) p 58 « le statut des dhimmis était perçu comme VIL ET MEPRISABLE . Le dhimmi représentait aux yeux des musulmans l’archétype de l’inférieur et de l’opprimé »

Malek Chebel a menti et il l’a fait sciemment . Je le répète c’est avec plaisir que j’accepterais de témoigner dans un procès en diffamation . Mais ici je voudrais citer le grand savant Jacques Ellul qui a voulu rédiger la préface à la version anglaise du livre de Bat Yé’or[3] et qui écrit « « c’est pourquoi je considère cette étude comme tout à fait exemplaire et significative . C’est un livre qui apporte un avertissement décisif . Le monde islamique n’a pas évolué dans sa façon de considérer le non musulman , et nous sommes avertis par là de la façon dont seraient traités ceux qui y seraient absorbés . C’est une lumière pour notre temps »

C’est la réponse de Jacques Ellul à l’article négationniste de Malek Chebel , c’est la meilleure défense de celle dont le nom d’emprunt , Bat Yé’or , signifie en hébreu « fille du Nil » ; car toute la vie de cette femme , juive d’origine égyptienne , aura été un combat pour que les juifs et les chrétiens ne soient plus jamais assujettis à ce statut de seconde zone que l’islam , appliqué à la lettre , leur réserve . Ce que seul un juriste comme Jacques Ellul avait compris c’est que les droits du dhimmis étaient des droits seulement OCTROYES qui pouvaient donc être retirés . En préfaçant le livre de Bat Yé’or Jacques Ellul voulait donner un avertissement assez solennel . Cet avertissement il est à souhaiter que beaucoup l’entendent aujourd’hui.

Voir par ailleurs:

Les projets de constitution palestinienne (1993-2000) : l’islam comme élément de souveraineté

Jean-François LEGRAIN Chercheur CNRS/GREMMO -Maison de l’Orient Méditerranéen Lyon

(…)

2.4. L’islam comme élément de souveraineté

Les 4 premiers drafts s’étaient abstenus d’aborder les questions de la religion de l’État et des sources de la législation. Il ne s’agissait en rien, selon Anîs Al-Qâsim, d’un oubli mais de la volonté de reporter une prise de décision susceptible de diviser à la rédaction d’une constitution définitive élaborée en toute liberté dans le cadre d’un État souverain (QASEM (AL-), A. 1992-1994, 199-200).

La religion n’en était pas pour autant ignorée et figurait dans divers dispositifs concernant les libertés. Ainsi, le 1er draft, dans son article 62, garantit que ”toute personne jouira de la liberté de pensée, de conscience et de religion” (l’article 67 de la 2e mouture supprime la mention de la liberté de religion et la remplace par celle de la liberté d’expression, correction reprise par l’article 14 de la 3e mouture, ou 29 du ministère de la Justice), une affirmation complétée par l’article 79 (article 18 des versions adoptées par le CLP), selon lequel ”la liberté de foi (‘aqîda), et de pratique des rites religieux est garantie sous réserve de l’absence de trouble de l’ordre public ou des bonnes mœurs” (l’article 34 de la version du ministère de la Justice mentionne la même garantie en omettant toute limite), et par l’article 80 qui stipule que ”l’accès aux Lieux-Saints, aux bâtiments et aux lieux [sic, le texte ici utilisé ayant sans doute oublié l’adjectif ”religieux” présent dans le 2e draft ] avec l’intention de les visiter est garanti pour l’ensemble des citoyens et des étrangers sans distinction, de même [qu’est garantie] pour les fidèles la liberté d’y pratiquer le culte dans le cadre du respect de la politique de sécurité, de l’ordre public ou des bonnes mœurs” (repris dans l’article 36 de la version du ministère de la Justice).

Dans le cadre du principe de la souveraineté de la loi, l’article 83 (repris en des termes comparables dans l’article 91 du 2e draft, 38 des 3e et 4e, 9 des versions adoptées par le CLP) stipule également que ”les gens, quels qu’ils soient, sont égaux devant le [système] judiciaire. Tous, quels qu’ils soient, sont égaux devant la loi et bénéficient sans aucune discrimination d’un droit égal de protection, que cette discrimination soit due à la race, à la couleur, au sexe, à la langue, à la religion, à l’opinion politique, à l’origine, […]”.

Quoique vague dans sa définition des bénéficiaires, l’article 73-2 stipule enfin que ”les minorités (al-aqalliyât) et autres [sic, la maladresse de la phrase tient peut-être à l’oubli d’un mot dans la source utilisée, la 2e mouture mentionnant dans son article 78-2 au contenu identique ”les minorités religieuses et autres”, texte repris à l’identique dans l’article 25-2 des 3e et 4e drafts] auront le droit d’établir des écoles privées […]”. Ce lien entre ”minorités religieuses” et écoles privées n’apparaît plus dans les versions adoptées par le CLP qui se contentent dans leur article 24-d de mentionner : ”Les écoles et instituts privés suivront les curricula mis en place par l’Autorité nationale […]” pas plus que dans la version du ministère de la Justice qui autorise ”les individus et les organismes” (article18-2) à ouvrir de telles écoles.

Ignorant Jérusalem comme capitale politique comme déjà souligné, le 2e draft inclut pourtant la ville dans la Palestine dont il trace le cadre constitutionnel mais dans le cadre de la défense de certaines libertés et sous un mode d’appréhension religieux. C’est en effet à l’occasion des articles traitant des Lieux-Saints, de la liberté d’accès et de culte que Jérusalem est mentionnée : ”Jérusalem est une ville sainte pour les 3 religions célestes. En devoir de fidélité au patrimoine spirituel de la Palestine, les autorités palestiniennes se doivent d’aménager les conditions de la coexistence et de la tolérance entre les religions à Jérusalem et dans le reste de la Palestine” (article 84). Les articles 85 et 86 reprennent ensuite les articles 79 (en ajoutant la liberté de culte à la liberté de foi et de pratique des rites religieux) et 80 du 1er draft déjà cités. Les 3e et 4e drafts avec leurs articles 31 à 33 reproduisent les mêmes dispositifs. La version de Bir Zeit (article 22 du chapitre 2) comme celle du ministère de la Justice (article 19) reproduisent ce texte sur Jérusalem, ville sainte, mais les textes adoptés par le CLP l’ignorent comme celui de Ali Khashan. A cette occasion, les auteurs du 2e draft ont introduit la notion de ”patrimoine spirituel” de la Palestine ; le préambule des versions adoptées par le CLP parlera de ”composantes spirituelles”. Si aucune des textes n’en donne une définition précise, la référence dans le même contexte aux ”religions célestes” renvoie à un univers explicitement musulman.

Le serment imposé dans des termes identiques depuis le 1er draft au président de l’ AP lors de son intronisation et aux membres du Conseil s’insère lui-même dans une vision religieuse du monde en l’absence toutefois de connotation confessionnelle particulière : ”Je jure devant Dieu le Très-Grand d’être loyal à la patrie et à ses [principes] sacrés, à son héritage national […]” (articles 5 et 16 dans le 1er draft, devenus 7 dans le 2e, 51 dans le 3e, 69 dans le 4e, puis 35 et 57, 36 et 52 dans les versions adoptées par le CLP).

Dans le cadre de la description des rouages de l’AP, le 1er draft prévoyait également dans son article 30 qu’un ”bureau de la législation et de la fatwa” sera établi sous la direction d’un conseiller juridique nommé par le président. De façon générale, ce dîwân aura pour prérogatives de fournir le conseil juridique au Conseil et aux divers départements dans les affaires qui lui seront présentées et de préparer les projets de lois, les motions législatives et les décrets. Administrativement, ce dîwân dépendra du département de la Justice”. Cette institution disparaît ensuite du 2e draft ([22]).

L’entrée en force de l’islam intervient en fait à partir de la 1ère des versions élaborées par le Comité Juridique du CLP à la mi-juin 1996 et se retrouve avec quelques modifications dans les versions adoptées ultérieurement par le CLP lui-même, les textes de Ali Khashan et de la ”Commission de rédaction de la constitution” témoignant de l’attachement à l’islam le plus poussé. Cette ”islamisation” va de pair avec la ”redécouverte” de l’appartenance de la Palestine à l’ensemble arabe déjà mentionnée.

C’est à partir de la 6e mouture en effet que l’islam est proclamé ”religion officielle en Palestine”, expression que l’on retrouve à l’identique dans les versions ultérieures adoptées par le CLP, mais néanmoins dans des contextes différents. La version adoptée en 1ère lecture avait en effet retenu pour article 4-1 : ”La Palestine est le berceau des 3 religions célestes. L’islam est la religion officielle en Palestine et les autres religions [y jouissent] du respect et de la sanctification requis” ([23]). Cette appréhension religieuse de la Palestine disparaît entre la 2e et la 3e lecture du texte au terme d’un débat. Le texte ultime retient donc pour article 4-1 le texte suivant : ”L’islam est la religion officielle en Palestine et les autres religions célestes [y jouissent] du respect et de la sanctification requis”.

Cette caractérisation n’entraîne cependant pas d’identification confessionnelle du président. Aucune des versions consultées ne prescrit d’ailleurs de caractère pré-requis pour une candidature à ce poste, à l’exception de celles du ministère de la Justice qui exige de tout candidat qu’il soit ”Palestinien des 2 pères, qu’il jouisse de l’ensemble des ses droits civils et politiques et soit âgé de 40 ans au moins” (article 78) et de Ali Khashan pour qui le candidat à la présidence doit être ”Arabe palestinien des 2 pères et jouir de l’ensemble des ses droits civils et politiques” (article 91).

La mention de la charî ’a intervient quant à elle à partir du 7e draft élaboré par le ministère de la Justice selon lequel ”les principes de la charî’ a islamique constituent une source principale de la législation” [souligné par moi] (article 4), mention qui apparaît conjointement à la proclamation de la langue arabe langue officielle de Palestine mais en l’absence de la mention de l’islam comme religion d’État. Le texte de Ali Khashan fait de la charî ’a ” la source principale de la législation” [souligné par moi] (article 4) mais en l’absence également de toute mention de l’islam comme religion officielle, et la 10e mouture aurait également stipulé que ”les principes de la charî’ a constituent la source principale de la législation” [souligné par moi] (CHASE, A. 1997, 39). La version adoptée en 1ère lecture par le CLP, suivie par les versions adoptées en 2e et 3e lectures, revient quant à elle à l’expression retenue par le 7e draft ne faisant de la charî ’a qu’ une source principale de la législation, et non la source (article 4-2). Trois ans plus tard, la ”Commission de rédaction de la constitution” faisait des ”principes de la charî’ a la source principale de la législation” [souligné par moi] et de l’islam ”la religion officielle de l’État”.

Conjointement à l’introduction de la charî ’a comme référence juridique, les moutures les plus récentes enferment explicitement le citoyen dans une appartenance à une communauté religieuse par un certain nombre de dispositifs. La version rédigée par Bir Zeit (article 6 du chapitre 6) comme celle du ministère de la Justice s’étaient contentées de mentionner 3 catégories de tribunaux, réguliers, religieux et spéciaux, sans en définir le champ de compétence. L’article 98 de la mouture adoptée en 1ère lecture par le CLP, repris dans l’article 114-b de la version adoptée en 3e lecture, assujettit explicitement les questions de droit personnel à des cours religieuses. L’article 96 du 1er draft (105 du 2e, 107 du 3e, 121 du 4e, repris sous une forme légèrement différentes dans les articles 110 puis 109 des versions adoptées par le CLP), qui stipulait que ”les lois, les motions, les statuts et décrets en vigueur dans la bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie avant la promulgation de cette loi le demeureront sous réserve qu’ils ne contredisent aucune de ses dispositions et ce jusqu’à la loi les amende ou les annule”, laissait place certes au maintien des cours religieuses sans le spécifier. Dorénavant, outre le fait qu’un individu ne saurait être que musulman ou chrétien (le cas des juifs ne se pose pour le moment que pour les Samaritains), sans que le musulman puisse se convertir à l’une des diverses déclinaisons de la foi chrétienne, il se trouve de facto enfermé dans les inégalités induites par les divers codes religieux en matière de mariage (une musulmane ne peut épouser qu’un musulman) ou de divorce (refusé par les chrétiens uniates, courant chez les musulmans), de témoignage, d’héritage, etc. Du coup, certains pourront considérer que l’article 9 sur l’égalité du citoyen face à la loi se trouve invalidé.

Ayant fait de la charî ’a la source principale de la législation, le texte de Ali Khashan s’abstient de mentionner ces dispositifs confessionnels et ignore toute référence aux ”religions célestes”, En des termes comparables à ceux employés par les versions rédigées par le CNP et le CLP il stipule que ”la liberté de conscience est absolue. La liberté de croyance (i ’tiqâd) est garantie de même que sont protégés les lieux de culte, la liberté de pratiquer les rites des religions ainsi que les processions et réunions religieuses conformément aux coutumes observées” (article 45) et affirme que ”les Palestiniens sont égaux devant la loi. Aucune distinction en matière de droits ou de devoirs publics n’intervient entre eux pour des raisons de sexe, d’origine, de langue, de religion ou de foi” (article 28). Religion et traditions ne sont pas oubliées pour autant. L’article 10 fait ainsi de ”la famille la base de la société. Elle repose sur la religion, les bonnes mœurs et l’amour de la patrie” et l’article 17 n’est pas exempt d’ambiguïtés en accordant ”à la femme palestinienne le droit de participer effectivement à la vie politique, sociale, culturelle et économique. La loi oeuvrera à abolir toutes les entraves qui interdisent le développement de la femme et sa participation à la construction de la famille et de la société en conformité avec les traditions arabes originelles”.

La ”Commission de rédaction de la constitution” offre à l’évidence la plus grande place à l’islam et aux 2 autres religions du Livre dans leur acception islamique. Les premiers mots de son préambule, lui-même précédé de la basmala, y sont consacrés : ”Confiants en Dieu et croyant en l’importance mondiale de la Palestine, lieu de rencontre des révélations célestes voulu par Dieu […], les Palestiniens etc.”, un lien entre la terre et les ”révélations” (al-risâlât) à plusieurs reprises mentionné. L’article 5 fait ainsi de l’islam ”la religion officielle de l’État qui [offre] aux révélations célestes respect et sanctification”. L’article 6, enfin, stipule que ”les principes de la charî ’a islamique constituent la source principale de la législation. En ce qui concerne les adeptes des révélations célestes, ils bénéficient d’un régime de statut personnel dans la mesure où il s’accorde avec les stipulations de la constitution et la préservation de l’unité, de la pérennité et du développement du peuple palestinien”. Dans cette même logique, l’article 38 stipule que ”la liberté de foi, de culte et de pratique des rites religieux est garantie dans la mesure où elle ne constitue ni un trouble de l’ordre public ni une insulte pour les révélations célestes”.


Anti-américanisme: Bigard-Ahmadinejade, même combat! (After the Holocaust deniers, Iranian leader updates his appeal to the world’s anti-capitalists and 9/11 truthers)

1 octobre, 2010
BigardComment la puissance américaine a-t-elle été contestée le 11 septembre 2001? Sujet de géographie du brevet francais (2005)
Aucun avion ne s’est écrasé sur le Pentagone. Thierry Meyssan
Moi j’ai tendance à être plutôt souvent de l’avis de la théorie du complot.(…) Parce que  je pense qu’on nous ment sur énormément de choses: Coluche, le 11-Septembre. (…) c’était bourré d’or les tours du 11-Septembre, et puis c’était un gouffre à thunes parce ce que ça a été terminé, il me semble, en 73 et pour recâbler tout ça, pour mettre à l’heure de toute la technologie et tout, c’était beaucoup plus cher de faire les travaux que de les détruire. Marion Cotillard
[Est-ce que tu penses que Bush peut être à l’origine de ces attentats (les attentats du 11-Septembre) ?] Je pense que c’est possible. Je sais que les sites qui parlent de ce problème sont des sites qui ont les plus gros taux de visites. (…) Et donc je me dis, moi qui suis très sensibilisée au problème des nouvelles techniques de l’information et de la communication, que cette expression de la masse et du peuple ne peut pas être sans aucune vérité. (…) Je ne te dis pas que j’adhère à cette posture, mais disons que je m’interroge quand même un petit peu sur cette question.(…) C’est la responsabilité de chaque blogueur de se faire son idée. Christine Boutin (nov. 2006)
Je suis allée voir l’ambassadeur iranien à l’époque et il a dit que bien sûr c’était vrai. » (…) Elle affirme donc que la CIA et d’autres agences étaient au courant qu’il y aurait quelque chose le 11 septembre? « Absolument ». Doit-on comprendre qu’il s’agit d’un complot interne US ou que al-Qaïda est le responsable? « Tout le monde est responsable. Si seulement vous en saviez plus, c’est encore plus déprimant. » Juliette Binoche (sept. 2007)
Il est sûr et certain maintenant que les deux avions qui sont écrasés soit disant dans la forêt et au Pentagon n’existent pas, il n’y a jamais eu d’avions, ces deux avions volent encore, c’est un mensonge absolument énorme (…) et l’on commence à penser très sérieusement que ni al Qaida et ni aucun ben Laden n’a été responsable des attentats su 11 Septembre (…) Non, c’est un missile américain qui frappe le Pentagone, tout simplement donc ils ont provoqué eux mêmes, ils ont tué des Américains. (…)  c’est une démolition programmée les tours du World Trade Center (…) tous les spécialistes de la terre sont d’accord là-dessus. Jean-Marie Bigard
Je pense que ce qui s’est passé le 11 septembre 2001 est un des éléments les plus marquants de notre jeune siècle, mais détermine aussi tout ce qui s’est passé jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Je pense que ce qui s’est passé le 11 septembre 2001 et la version officielle qui a été donnée par les Américains est obligatoirement questionnable. Il faut absolument se poser la question. On ne peut pas prendre l’information officielle de manière… (…) On ne peut pas, c’est impossible. Il suffit d’examiner ce qui s’est passé cette journée pour poser des questions. Le problème, c’est que les réponses n’ont pas été données par les commissions officielles américaines (…). Je ne parle pas de complot car on n’en est pas là pour l’instant. Le problème c’est de savoir ce qui s’est passé sur cette journée très très spéciale (…). J’ai eu la chance de travailler sur le document «Apocalypse» sur la deuxième guerre mondiale. Le devoir de mémoire, c’est dire: est-ce-que ça s’est déjà passé et est-ce qu’on peut en tirer des conséquences? La montée de Hitler et du nazisme, c’est l’invention d’un système de communication extrêmement bien huilé. Toutes ces choses, on l’a déjà vécu. Goebbels a dit «Plus le mensonge est gros, plus il passe». Donc on doit se poser la question de ce qui s’est passé le 11 septembre. Internet est le seul endroit où le déni est débattu (…). Comment on peut faire tomber trois tours avec deux avions? (…) Il s’est passé le même jour une attaque sur le Pentagone où un avion de ligne est censé avoir fait une manoeuvre absolument incroyable pour rentrer dans le Pentagone, le bâtiment le plus surveillé et le plus protégé au monde, sur lequel il n’y a aucune image, à part cinq secondes d’un film. Et le troisième événement c’est un avion où des Américains extrêmement braves attaquent les terroristes et plantent l’avion eux-mêmes pour sauver le président américain (…). Je parle du vol 93.  Matthieu Kassovitz (sep. 2007)
Comme vous vous êtes libérés de l’esclavage des moines, des rois et du féodalisme, vous devriez vous libérer des déceptions, des chaînes et de l’exploitation du système capitaliste. Ben Laden (sept. 2007)
La révolution iranienne fut en quelque sorte la version islamique et tiers-mondiste de la contre-culture occidentale. Il serait intéressant de mettre en exergue les analogies et les ressemblances que l’on retrouve dans le discours anti-consommateur, anti-technologique et anti-moderne des dirigeants islamiques de celui que l’on découvre chez les protagonistes les plus exaltés de la contre-culture occidentale. Daryiush Shayegan
L’islamisme tire son langage, ses objectifs et ses aspirations au moins autant des formes les plus grossières du marxisme que de la religion. Ses leaders sont aussi influencés par Lénine, Sartre, Staline et Fanon que par le prophète. Azar Nafisi
This is the ideological component of Ahmadinejad’s grand strategy: To overcome the limitations imposed on Iran by its culture, geography, religion and sect, he seeks to become the champion of radical anti-Americans everywhere. That’s why so much of his speech last week was devoted to denouncing capitalism, the hardy perennial of the anti-American playbook. But that playbook needs an update, which is where 9/11 « Truth » fits in. Bret Stephens

Attention: un bouffon peut en cacher bien d’autres!

Apres nos Meyssan, Boutin, Binoche, Cotillard, Bigard et Kassovitz nationaux … Ahmadinejade!

Au lendemain, a la veille d’une enieme negociation ou d’eniemes menaces de sanctions, d’une enieme provocation annuelle en direct du siege de l’ONU par un pantin des mollahs aussi fidele que le Beaujolais nouveau

Bret Stephens du WSJ decrypte la derniere mise a jour de la strategie ideologique d’une mollahcratie condamnee, comme nombre de nos Bigard ou Kassovitz ou Ben Laden ou Zawahiri, a l’eternelle surenchere

Et a ratisser de plus en plus large pour maintenir leur capacite de provocation et s’attirer les sympathies d’une sorte de front commun et mondial du ressentiment

What Ahmadinejad Knows

Iran’s president appeals to 9/11 Truthers.

Bret Stephens

September 28, 2010

Let’s put a few facts on the table.

• The recent floods in Pakistan are acts neither of God nor of nature. Rather, they are the result of a secret U.S. military project called HAARP, based out of Fairbanks, Alaska, which controls the weather by sending electromagnetic waves into the upper atmosphere. HAARP may also be responsible for the recent spate of tsunamis and earthquakes.

• Not only did the U.S. invade Iraq for its oil, but also to harvest the organs of dead Iraqis, in which it does a thriving trade.

• Faisal Shahzad was not the perpetrator of the May 1 Times Square bombing, notwithstanding his own guilty plea. Rather, the bombing was orchestrated by an American think tank, though its exact identity has yet to be established.

• Oh, and 9/11 was an inside job. Just ask Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

The U.S. and its European allies were quick to walk out on the Iranian president after he mounted the podium at the U.N. last week to air his three « theories » on the attacks, each a conspiratorial shade of the other. But somebody should give him his due: He is a provocateur with a purpose. Like any expert manipulator, he knew exactly what he was doing when he pushed those most sensitive of buttons.

He knew, for instance, that the Obama administration and its allies are desperate to resume negotiations over Iran’s nuclear programs. What better way to set the diplomatic mood than to spit in their eye when, as he sees it, they are already coming to him on bended knee?

He also knew that the more outrageous his remarks, the more grateful the West would be for whatever crumbs of reasonableness Iran might scatter on the table. This is what foreign ministers are for.

Finally, he knew that the Muslim world would be paying attention to his speech. That’s a world in which his view of 9/11 isn’t on the fringe but in the mainstream. Crackpots the world over—some

of whom are reading this column now—want a voice. Ahmadinejad’s speech was a bid to become theirs.

This is the ideological component of Ahmadinejad’s grand strategy: To overcome the limitations imposed on Iran by its culture, geography, religion and sect, he seeks to become the champion of radical anti-Americans everywhere. That’s why so much of his speech last week was devoted to denouncing capitalism, the hardy perennial of the anti-American playbook. But that playbook needs an update, which is where 9/11 « Truth » fits in.

Could it work? Like any politician, Ahmadinejad knows his demographic.

The University of Maryland’s World Public Opinion surveys have found that just 2% of Pakistanis believe al Qaeda perpetrated the attacks, whereas 27% believe it was the U.S. government. (Most respondents say they don’t know.) Among Egyptians, 43% say Israel is the culprit, while another 12% blame the U.S. Just 16% of Egyptians think al Qaeda did it. In Turkey, opinion is evenly split: 39% blame al Qaeda, another 39% blame the U.S. or Israel. Even in Europe, Ahmadinejad has his corner. Fifteen percent of Italians and 23% of Germans finger the U.S. for the attacks.

Deeper than the polling data are the circumstances from which they arise. There’s always the temptation to argue that the problem is lack of education, which on the margins might be true. But the conspiracy theories cited earlier are retailed throughout the Muslim world by its most literate classes, journalists in particular. Irrationalism is not solely, or even mainly, the province of the illiterate.

Nor is it especially persuasive to suggest that the Muslim world needs more abundant proofs of American goodwill: The HAARP fantasy, for example, is being peddled at precisely the moment when Pakistanis are being fed and airlifted to safety by U.S. Marine helicopters operating off the USS Peleliu.

What Ahmadinejad knows is that there will always be a political place for what Michel Foucault called « the sovereign enterprise of Unreason. » This is an enterprise whose domain encompasses the politics of identity, of religious zeal, of race or class or national resentment, of victimization, of cheek and self-assertion. It is the politics that uses conspiracy theory not just because it sells, which it surely does, or because it manipulates and controls, which it does also, but because it offends. It is politics as a revolt against empiricism, logic, utility, pragmatism. It is the proverbial rage against the machine.

Chances are you know people to whom this kind of politics appeals in some way, large or small. They are Ahmadinejad’s constituency. They may be irrational; he isn’t crazy.

Voir aussi:

Kassovitz, Cotillard… ces people qui théorisent le complot

Jonathan Schel

Slate

le 27 septembre 2009

Mathieu Kassovitz, acteur et réalisateur («La Haine»), a porté plainte vendredi 25 septembre contre l’Express et le Journal du Dimanche pour diffamation publique. Il leur reproche de l’avoir comparé à Joseph Goebbels et à l’historien révisionniste Robert Faurisson après une polémique autour des attentats du 11-Septembre. Le 15 septembre, invité de l’émission «Ce soir ou jamais», Mathieu Kassovitz a été interrogé par Frédéric Taddéi sur la remise en cause de la version officielle sur le 11-Septembre: «Est-ce que vous pensez que c’est digne d’intérêt, est-ce qu’il faut poser le débat ou ignorer cette contestation?» « La version officielle est obligatoirement questionnable» avait-il répondu.

Et voilà, c’est reparti. 16 février 2007, Marion Cotillard dans l’émission «Paris dernière»: «Je pense qu’on nous ment sur énormément de choses: Coluche, le 11 septembre». 5 septembre 2008, Jean-Marie Bigard, chez Laurent Ruquier: «c’est un mensonge absolument énorme, quoi». 16 septembre 2009, Matthieu Kassovitz dans «Ce soir ou jamais»: «Goebbels a dit: plus le mensonge est gros plus il passe. Donc on doit se poser la question de ce qui s’est passé le 11 septembre 2001».

Mais quelle mouche a piqué nos people? Il n’y a guère qu’en France qu’on entend aussi régulièrement des personnalités publiques évoquer les théories du complot. Il faut dire qu’il n’y a aussi qu’en France qu’on publie régulièrement des livres comme «L’Effroyable Imposture» de Thierry Meyssan ou le tout récent «11 septembre: les vérités cachées» d’Eric Raynaud, objet du dérapage de Kassovitz. Ce qui frappe, en tous cas, en mettant ces propos bout à bout, c’est l’immense confusion qui semble régner dans le cerveau de nos stars.

Bigard tire son savoir sur le 11 septembre 2001 de «Lose Change, un truc sur lequel on a accès sur internet (sic)»: «quand même on est absolument sûrs et certains maintenant que les deux avions, qui se sont soi-disant écrasés sur la forêt et le Pentagone, n’existent pas, il n’y a jamais eu d’avions, ces deux avions volent encore». Les avions n’existent pas, et en même temps, ils volent encore, prodige digne des plus grands illusionnistes. Avec un peu de bon sens, Cotillard évite d’extrapoler sur le rapprochement qu’elle suggère entre le 11 septembre et la mort de Coluche. Mais ensuite, elle se lance: «c’était un gouffre à thunes parce qu’elles (les tours) ont été terminées il me semble en 73 et pour recâbler tout ça, pour mettre à l’heure de toute la technologie (sic), c’était beaucoup plus cher de faire des travaux et caetera que de les détruire». La destruction du World Trade Center et du Pentagone s’expliquerait donc par un besoin de «mettre à l’heure de toute la technologie». Intéressant.

Et puis il y a Kassovitz. Le cinéaste est aussi comédien et vient de prêter sa voix à «Apocalypse», le documentaire sur la deuxième guerre mondiale de Daniel Costelle et Isabelle Clarke. C’est donc nimbé de savoir sur le nazisme qu’il se lance dans le parallèle avec notre passé récent: «emmener tout un peuple sans question à la guerre mondiale, on a déjà vécu avec Hitler, c’est les inventeurs du nazisme», balance-t-il après avoir évoqué les guerres en Afghanistan et en Irak et la «mise à mort» de Saddam Hussein, suggérant clairement un parallèle entre la dictature allemande des années 30 et le gouvernement américain d’aujourd’hui. Il ose aussi citer Goebbels pour nous amener à nous «poser la question de ce qui s’est passé le 11 septembre 2001». Kassovitz précise plusieurs fois qu’il ne parle «pas de complot», mais que faut-il déduire de cette tirade contre les médias: «ce qui s’est passé le 11 septembre 2001 et la version officielle donnée par les Américains est obligatoirement questionnable. (…) Internet est le seul endroit où ce sujet est actuellement débattu, il est mis en déni (sic) par les journalistes officiels parce qu’ils ont peur de se rendre compte qu’ils n’ont pas cette liberté de parole».

Au bout du compte, une question se pose, qui n’a rien à voir avec les problèmes de «câblage» des tours jumelles, ou les maximes de Goebbels. Pourquoi fait-on parler ces gens de ce sujet? Quelles compétences ont un humoriste, une actrice et un réalisateur pour juger de la vérité historique? Dans le cas de Bigard et de Cotillard, ce sont les artistes eux-mêmes qui abordent la question. Mais hier soir, c’est Frédéric Taddéi qui a enjoint Kassovitz de s’exprimer sur un livre qui, selon ses propres termes, «conteste la version des attentats telle qu’on la connaît depuis huit ans». Présentation subtilement tendancieuse (si ce qu’on nous dit n’est qu’une «version», la vérité est forcément ailleurs) qui n’a pas manqué d’échauffer les sangs de Matthieu Kassovitz.

A lire aussi notre série sur «Pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas eu d’autre 11-Septembre» et le «11-Septembre nouveau est arrivé»

Image de une: «Ground Zero, le 15 septembre 2001». REUTERS

Lire l’article original sur Slate.fr

Liens:

[1] http://www.dailymotion.com/bookmarks/al-fred/video/x4l5ue_marion-cotillard-derape-sur-le-11-s_news

[2] http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6nxbd_jeanmarie-bigard-et-le-11septembre_news

[3] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEwfEGOO554

[4] http://www.amazon.fr/septembre-vérités-cachées-Eric-Raynaud/dp/2753804818

[5] http://www.slate.fr/story/pourquoi-n’y-t-il-plus-de-11-septembre

[6] http://www.slate.fr/story/10261/fermez-les-yeux-bouchez-vous-les-oreilles-le-11-septembre-nouveau-est-arrive

[7] http://www.slate.fr/source/jonathan-schel

[8] http://www.slate.fr/story/pourquoi-n’y-t-il-pas-eu-un-autre-11-septembre


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :