Retraites: Retour sur la tragi-comédie française (Should Obama run in France next time?)

Anti-Obama banner
De toutes les tyrannies, celle qui vise le bien de ses victimes est sans doute la plus oppressive. Il est sans doute préférable de vivre sous le joug de pillards impudents que sous celui de moralistes excités et omnipotents. La cruauté du pillard s’endort parfois, sa cupidité se rassasie, mais ceux qui nous tourmentent pour notre propre bien n’auront jamais de cesse puisqu’ils ont la bénédiction de leur conscience. C.S. Lewis
Dans les générations futures, nous pourrons regarder en arrière et dire à nos enfants que c’est à ce moment-ci que nous avons commencé à fournir des soins aux malades et un bon travail à ceux qui n’en avaient pas. C’est à ce moment-ci que les océans ont commencé à ralentir leur montée et que notre planète a commencé à guérir. C’est à ce moment-ci que nous avons mis fin à une guerre et donné la sécurité à notre nation et rétabli notre image du dernier espoir, du meilleur espoir sur terre. Obama (juin 2008)
Part of the reason that our politics seems so tough right now and facts and science and argument does not seem to be winning the day all the time is because we’re hardwired not to always think clearly when we’re scared. And the country’s scared.Obama (octobre 2010)
For the young, street riots are a sort of generational rite of passage. They replay the Revolution as their parents did in May 1968. The comparison is somewhat irrelevant: May 1968 was a Parisian rebellion of rich kids asking for more personal freedom in a still-authoritarian society dominated by the haughty figure of Gen. Charles de Gaulle. At that time, there was no unemployment, no fear for the future. Also in May 1968, there was no equivalent of the violent mobs we see today. This new kind of gratuitous violence is the regrettable outcome of decades of uncontrolled immigration, a lack of opportunities, and police tolerance for vast lawless suburban zones. Guy Sorman

Et si Obama avait tout simplement été élu dans le mauvais pays ?

Alors qu’une juge fédérale de Virginie accueille favorablement la plainte d’un citoyen de cet Etat demandant l’annulation de la loi obligeant tous les Américains à acquérir une assurance maladie pour cause d’ »atteinte à la liberté individuelle et au droit des Etats » …

Et qu’a la veille d’elections de mi-mandat annoncees catastrophiques pour son camp, un president Obama en chute libre dans les sondages ne reconnait plus ses electeurs assailis par « la peur et la frustration »

Pendant que dans une France ou le president « voulait être le JFK francais » et « vendre the American dream » mais « ressemble maintenant à Louis XVI attendant son procès en 1793 », nos anarchos-intermittents du spectacle tentent de reprendre la Bastille (ou du moins son opera) et nos cheres tetes blondes nous refont le coup de l’intifada

Retour, avec l’essayiste Guy Sorman, sur l’enieme episode de la tragi-comedie francaise

The left seems to have forgotten Marx’s line about history repeating itself as tragedy and farce.

Guy Sorman

The WSJ

October 21, 2010

The French have a long tradition of taking to the streets as an irrational answer to economic reforms. In 1848, when a democratically elected government tried to contain monetary inflation, the nascent Socialist Party raised barricades in Paris. Alexis de Tocqueville, then a member of the parliament, wrote in his « Memoires » that the French knew a lot about politics and understood nothing about economics. The current disruption of French cities by strikes and riots illustrates the continuity of this political culture.

The pretext for the current « social movement, » as we call it in French, is a perfectly rational initiative by President Nicolas Sarkozy to raise the legal age of retirement to 62 from 60. It had been lowered to 60 from 65 in 1983 by the socialist François Mitterrand. Going up to 62 is thus a modest return to sanity: 62 happens to be the average in the European Union.

The rationale behind this reform—an aging population—can be understood by all the French. Longer life expectancy and slow economic growth offer no other choice to save the public pension funds from bankruptcy. Why then such a violent reaction from the street?

The leftist unions that have started the strikes represent the public sector, a quarter of the active population. For them, any change in the pension-fund regulations is but a first breach in the welfare state. The French left sees how the Scandinavian, German and British governments are cutting spending in the name of sound finance and stronger growth.

The French unions fear that France will follow. Since they represent the public sector, they are not that interested in reviving the market economy. Moreover, the welfare state is perceived by the French left as a historical conquest on the road to socialism, which remains the ultimate goal. Knowing who the unions represent allows us to understand their choice for violence over negotiations: France is not a northern European, pragmatic country.

This does not suffice to explain the support for the strikers by high school students and the mild sympathy from a majority of the French—or at least the passivity of the silent majority. Mr. Sarkozy’s character may explain, in part, the mixed feeling of the French toward the strikes and the riots. The president is a polarizing figure who is generating stronger hostility from the left than his older conservative predecessors did.

What’s more, the French are proud of their Revolution: To replay it, in a less bloody and more theatrical form, is often perceived as a patriotic and cultural duty. It does not help that in the French school curriculum the 1789-1793 Revolution is taught with enthusiasm by leftist teachers. They apparently missed Marx’s line about history repeating itself as tragedy and farce.

For the young, street riots are a sort of generational rite of passage. They replay the Revolution as their parents did in May 1968. The comparison is somewhat irrelevant: May 1968 was a Parisian rebellion of rich kids asking for more personal freedom in a still-authoritarian society dominated by the haughty figure of Gen. Charles de Gaulle. At that time, there was no unemployment, no fear for the future. Also in May 1968, there was no equivalent of the violent mobs we see today. This new kind of gratuitous violence is the regrettable outcome of decades of uncontrolled immigration, a lack of opportunities, and police tolerance for vast lawless suburban zones.

The current violence will subside when the French citizenry gets tired of the theatrics and demands order. In 1968, the de Gaulle government was able to re-establish order when the French could not find any more gasoline at the pump. The same dénouement can be expected this time, and nothing will be resolved: The pension age will be raised to 62, but the real battle will take place later.

The debate over how to strike the right balance between the welfare state that Europeans love and a dynamic economy started many years ago in the Scandinavian countries. Denmark, for one, came up with the creative concept of « flexisecurity »: The labor market has been deregulated, and dismissed employees are immediately sent to training schools and must accept the first new job offered to them. Less regulation has actually created more jobs. Germany has rekindled the job market by reducing unemployment benefits.

The United Kingdom under David Cameron is shifting welfare support from the middle class toward the real poor. In France, Mr. Sarkozy—who was elected on a free-market platform— has in office become enamored with statism, like all his predecessors.

To conclude that France never changes, however, would be slightly mistaken. In spite of a Napoleonic right and a Marxist left, the French economy has become much more market-oriented than it was 20 or 30 years ago. The best and the brightest now want to become entrepreneurs, not top bureaucrats. Such an evolution was not desired by political leaders but instead has been forced on French society through the liberating influence of globalization and the European Union. This confrontation between Mr. Sarkozy and the unions doesn’t mean much compared to those historical trends.

Mr. Sorman, a contributing editor at City Journal, is the author, most recently, of « Economics Does Not Lie: A Defense of the Free Market in a Time of Crisis » (Encounter Books, 2009).

Voir aussi:

Ils sont fous ces Américains!

Guy Sorman

Le future, c’est tout de suite

19 octobre 2010

New-York:

Imagine-t-on un Français refuser la Sécurité sociale? Mais comparer la France et les Etats-Unis , bis repetita, c’est ne rien comprendre ni à l’un ni à l’autre . Ce jour, une juge fédérale de Virginie a accueilli favorablement la plainte d’un citoyen de cet Etat demandant l’annulation de la loi obligeant tous les Américains à acquérir une assurance maladie ( dit Obamacare ) : une telle contrainte « serait une atteinte à la liberté individuelle telle que définie par la Constitution des Etats-Unis » et une « atteinte au droit des Etats à qui Washington ne saurait imposer une telle contrainte ».

Des plaintes comparables ont été déposées dans vingt Etats, à ce jour: certaines aboutiront ce qui , pour un moment tout du moins, interrompra la généralisation de l’assurance maladie telle que le Congrès l’avait adoptée. A terme , il reviendra à la Cour Suprême de rétablir l’Obamacare ou de l’interdire: entre temps , il est aussi envisageable qu’une future majorité Républicaine annule cette loi ce qui rendra le contentieux inutile.

Il n’empêche que le principe même de la conformité ou non de l’assurance maladie obligatoire à la Constitution continuera à faire débat . Magistrat, conservateur il est vrai, à la Cour Suprême , Samuel Alito déclarait hier à New York devant la rédaction de City Journal, que l’on pouvait « aimer ou ne pas aimer la Constitution des Etats-Unis mais qu’elle était la Constitution » et donc , incontournable. » Les Etats-Unis , ajoutait-il ne sont pas comme l’Europe , gouvernés par les hommes mais par la Loi qui gouverne les hommes ».

Mais cette Constitution , sacrée , est très succinte : elle exige donc d’être interprétée par la Cour. Alito fait partie de la majorité actuelle  ( surnommée la Cour John Roberts , du nom de son Président tout aussi conservateur ) qui s’appuie sur le texte et les intentions supposées des Péres fondateurs , de manière à bloquer tout ce qui dans les lois contemporaines, pourrait limiter les libertés personnelles et le droit des Etats. La méfiance envers le pouvoir central inspire Alito parce que telle fut  aussi la préoccupation centrale des fondateurs : ceux-ci craignaient le despotisme plus qu’ils ne se souciaient de l’effciacité de l’Etat. Résister à l’air du temps, c’est la philosophie juridique des conservateurs qui dominent en ce moment la Cour. Le gouvernement américain en paraît paralysé : de fait , il l’est souvent mais les fondateurs estimaient que cette inefficacité garantirait la nation contre les passions de ses dirigeants. Ils considéraient aussi que les meilleures décisions possibles étaient celles que les citoyens prenaient pour eux-même, individuellement. C’est ainsi que les Etats-Unis constituent une image inversée de l’Europe ; et c’est pourquoi , la machine Républicaine , dopée au thé ,accuse Obama d’ Européaniser l’Amérique.

A l’inverse, on me demande aux Etats-Unis, d’expliquer les grèves françaises, vécues par les Américains comme un vent de folie et une atteinte inacceptable aux libertés individuelles. Il me faut alors rappeler combien en France, on aime jouer la Révolution: l’Histoire se répète en farce , écrivait Karl Marx. Toute farce n’est cependant pas drôle.

Répondre

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur la façon dont les données de vos commentaires sont traitées.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :