Hommage à Irving Kristol: Pas de beurre sans canons (There Is no military free lunch)

Guns for butter
Un néoconservateur est un homme de gauche qui s’est fait braquer par la réalité. Un néolibéral est un homme de gauche qui s’est fait lui aussi agresser par la réalité, mais n’a pas porté plainte. Irving Kristol
Les Soviétiques font passer les canons au-dessus du beurre, mais nous plaçons presque tout au-dessus des canons. (…) Mais (…) la puissance militaire soviétique ne disparaîtra pas juste parce que nous refusons de la regarder. Margaret Thatcher (1976)
There is good reason — perhaps even right reason — for the administration’s position. It has to do with our definition of the American national interest in the Gulf. This definition does not imply a general resistance to ‘aggression.’ … And this definition surely never implied a commitment to bring the blessings of democracy to the Arab world. … [No military] alternative is attractive, since each could end up committing us to govern Iraq. And no civilized person in his right mind wants to govern Iraq. Irving Kristol
The only innovative trend in our foreign-policy thinking at the moment derives from a relatively small group, consisting of both liberals and conservatives, who believe there is an « American mission » actively to promote democracy all over the world. This is a superficially attractive idea, but it takes only a few moments of thought to realize how empty of substance (and how full of presumption!) it is. In the entire history of the U.S., we have successfully « exported » our democratic institutions to only two nations — Japan and Germany, after war and an occupation. We have failed to establish a viable democracy in the Philippines, or in Panama, or anywhere in Central America. Irving Kristol
Neo-conservatism is not at all hostile to the idea of a welfare state, but it is critical of the Great Society version of this welfare state. In general, it approves of those social reforms that, while providing needed security and comfort to the individual in our dynamic, urbanized society, do so with a minimum of bureaucratic intrusion in the individual’s affairs. Such reforms would include, of course, social security, unemployment insurance, some form of national health insurance, some kind of family assistance plan, etc. In contrast, it is skeptical of those social: programs that create vast and energetic bureaucracies to “solve social problems.” In short, while being for the welfare state, it is opposed to the paternalistic state. It also believes that this welfare state will best promote the common good if it is conceived in such a way, as not to go bankrupt. Irving Kristol (« What Is a ‘Neo-Conservative’?”, Newsweek, January 19, 1976)
La question légitime à se poser au sujet de n’importe quel programme, c’est: « cela marchera-t-il »?
Car il y a une chose que le peuple américain sait au sujet du sénateur McCarthy: il est, comme eux, irrévocablement anti-communiste. Conviction qu’ils ne partagent en aucune façon concernant les porte-paroles de la gauche américaine. Et avec une certaine justification. (1952)
C’est l’engagement pleinement assumé des néoconservateurs d’expliquer au peuple américain pourquoi il a raison et aux intellectuels pourquoi ils ont tort.
Aux Etats-Unis aujourd’hui, la loi insiste sur le fait qu’une fille de 18 ans a le droit à la fornication publique dans un film pornographique – mais seulement si elle est payée le salaire minimum.
Aussi loin que je me souvienne, j’ai été néo-quelque chose: néo-marxiste, néo-trotskyste, néo-gauchiste, néo-conservateur et, en religion, toujours néo–orthodoxe, même quand j’étais néo-trotskyste et néo-marxiste. Je vais finir néo-. Juste néo-, c’est tout. Néo-tiret-rien. Irving Kristol
Qui sait si la déliaison des individualités ne nous réserve pas des épreuves qui n’auront rien à envier, dans un autre genre, aux affres des embrigadements de masse? Marcel Gauchet
In April 1991, in the fallout of the Gulf War, Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein brutally suppressed Kurds and Shiites who were answering U.S. President George H.W. Bush’s call to overthrow him. With America standing by, Saddam used his Army helicopters to ensure the perpetuation of his bloody rule. Although many in the United States protested, one observer forcefully supported the White House’s decision not to intervene at that moment. (…) The observer was Irving Kristol, the so-called « godfather » of neoconservatism. But if that doesn’t sound like neoconservatism, it’s because, well, it isn’t. Kristol’s pronouncement was, in fact, plain realpolitik, as far as possible from the pro-intervention hawkishness that characterizes neoconservatism today. This doesn’t mean Kristol, who died Sept. 18 at 89, wasn’t a neoconservative. Rather, it shows how much Kristol’s neoconservatism — the movement he invented, or at least successfully branded and marketed — differed from its descendents today. In fact, the original strand of neoconservatism didn’t pay any attention to foreign policy. Its earliest members were veterans of the anti-communist struggles who had reacted negatively to the leftward evolution of American liberalism in the 1960s. They were sociologists and political scientists who criticized the failures and unintended consequences of President Lyndon Johnson’s « Great Society » programs, especially the war on poverty. They also bemoaned the excesses of what Lionel Trilling called the « adversary culture » — in their view, individualistic, hedonistic, and relativistic — that had taken hold of the baby-boom generation on college campuses. Although these critics were not unconditional supporters of the free market and still belonged to the liberal camp, they did point out the limits of the welfare state and the naiveté of the boundless egalitarian dreams of the New Left. These thinkers found outlets in prestigious journals like Commentary and The Public Interest, founded in 1965 by Kristol and Daniel Bell (and financed by Warren Demian Manshel, who helped launch Foreign Policy a few years later). Intellectuals like Nathan Glazer, Seymour Martin Lipset, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, James Q. Wilson, and a few others took to the pages of these journals to offer a more prudent course for American liberalism. They were criticized for being too « timid and acquiescent » by their former allies on the left, among them Michael Harrington, who dubbed them « neoconservatives » to ostracize them from liberalism. Although some rejected the label, Kristol embraced it. He started constructing a school of thought, both by fostering a network of like-minded intellectuals (particularly around the American Enterprise Institute) and by codifying what neoconservatism meant. This latter mission proved challenging, as neoconservatism often seemed more like an attitude than a doctrine. Kristol himself always described it in vague terms, as a « tendency » or a « persuasion. » Even some intellectuals branded as part of the movement were skeptical that it existed. « Whenever I read about neoconservatism, » Bell once quipped, « I think, ‘That isn’t neoconservatism; it’s just Irving.’ » Regardless of what it was, neoconservatism started to achieve a significant impact on American public life, questioning the liberal take on social issues and advancing innovative policy ideas like school vouchers and the Laffer Curve. If the first generation of neoconservatives was composed of New York intellectuals interested in domestic issues, the second was formed by Washington Democratic operatives interested in foreign policy. This strand gave most of its DNA to latter-day neocons — and Kristol played only a tangential role. The second wave of neoconservatives came in reaction to the nomination of George McGovern as the 1972 Democratic presidential candidate. Cold War liberals deemed McGovern too far to the left, particularly in foreign policy. He suggested deep cuts in the defense budget, a hasty retreat from Vietnam, and a neo-isolationist grand strategy. New neocons coalesced around organizations like the Coalition for a Democratic Majority and the Committee on the Present Danger, journals like Norman Podhoretz’s Commentary (the enigmatic Podhoretz being the only adherent to neoconservatism in all its stages), and figures like Democratic Sen. Henry « Scoop » Jackson — hence their alternative label, the « Scoop Jackson Democrats. » These thinkers, like the original neoconservatives, had moved from left to right. Many of them, even if members of the Democratic Party, ended up working in the Reagan administration. Others joined the American Enterprise Institute and wrote for Commentary and the editorial pages of the Wall Street Journal. Moreover, some original neoconservatives, like Moynihan, became Scoop Jackson Democrats. Thus, the labels became interchangeable and the two movements seemed to merge. But this elided significant differences between them. On domestic issues, Scoop Jackson Democrats remained traditional liberals. In the 1970s, while Jackson was advocating universal health care and even the control of prices and salaries in times of crisis, Kristol was promoting supply-side economics and consulting for business associations and conservative foundations. On foreign-policy issues, Scoop Jackson Democrats emphasized human rights and democracy promotion, while Kristol was a classical realist. They agreed, however, on the necessity of a hawkish foreign and defense policy against the Soviet empire. (…) Although a few other neoconservatives followed Kristol’s realist line (Glazer and, to some extent, Jeane Kirkpatrick), for most of the others the idea of retrenching and playing a more modest international role disturbingly looked like the realpolitik that had led to détente and other distasteful policies. The vast majority of Scoop Jackson Democrats advocated a more assertive and interventionist posture and continued to favor at least a dose of democracy promotion (most notably Joshua Muravchik, Ben Wattenberg, Carl Gershman, Michael Ledeen, Elliott Abrams, Podhoretz, and others). Their legacy would prevail. Thus, the neocons — the third wave — were born in the mid-1990s. Their immediate predecessors, more so than the original neoconservatives, provided inspiration. But they developed their ideas in a new context where America had much more relative power. And this time, they were firmly planted on the Republican side of the spectrum. Kristol’s son, Bill, played a leading role, along with Robert Kagan, in this resurrection through two initiatives he launched — the Weekly Standard magazine and the Project for the New American Century (PNAC), a small advocacy think tank. Bill Kristol and Kagan initially rejected the « neoconservative » appellation, preferring « neo-Reaganism. » But the kinship with the second age, that of the Scoop Jackson Democrats, was undeniable, and there was a strong resemblance in terms of organizational forms and influence on public opinion. Hence the neoconservative label stuck. The main beliefs of the neocons — originated in a 1996 Foreign Affairs article by Kagan and Bill Kristol, reiterated by PNAC, and promulgated more recently by the Foreign Policy Initiative — are well-known. American power is a force for good; the United States should shape the world, lest it be shaped by inimical interests; it should do so unilaterally if necessary; the danger is to do too little, not too much; the expansion of democracy advances U.S. interests. But what was Irving Kristol’s view on these principles and on their application? Toward the end of his life, the elder Kristol tried to triangulate between his position and that of most neocons, arguing in 2003 that there exists « no set of neoconservative beliefs concerning foreign policy, only a set of attitudes » (including patriotism and the rejection of world government), and minimizing democracy promotion. But at this point, the movement’s center of gravity was clearly more interventionist and confident of the ability to enact (democratic) change through the application of American power than Kristol could countenance. He kept silent on the 2003 invasion of Iraq, while the Scoop Jackson Democrats and third-wave neocons cheered. Thus, ironically, when most people repeat the line about Kristol being « the godfather of neoconservatism, » they assume he was a neocon in the modern sense. But this ignores his realist foreign policy — while also obscuring the impressive intellectual and political legacy he leaves behind him on domestic issues. Justin Vaïsse
Pour beaucoup d’analystes, le néoconservatisme est un phénomène spécifiquement américain: affirmation vigoureuse des «valeurs américaines» face au relativisme, opposition au libéralisme progressiste, défense du rôle social de la religion et de la tradition, souverainisme et promotion d’une politique étrangère «musclée» – autant de traits qui n’auraient pas cours dans notre «vieille Europe». Pourtant l’observation de l’évolution de la vie intellectuelle française au cours des vingt dernières années conduit à se rendre à l’évidence: il existe bel et bien des convergences frappantes entre une partie significative de notre intelligentsia – qui n’est d’ailleurs pas la moins influente – et les thèses de ces «neocons» qui ont fait couler tant d’encre ces dernières années. Plusieurs ouvrages récents argumentent dans ce sens: Les Maoccidents de Jean Birnbaum (Stock, 2009) est un réquisitoire implacable contre la «Génération» des ex-maoïstes soixante-huitards. La pensée anti-68 de Serge Audier (La Découverte, 2008), qui s’intéresse à la lecture de mai 1968, en général d’une grande sévérité, qui s’est peu à peu imposée dans le débat d’idées en France. (…) Daniel Lindenberg, qui publie ces jours-ci Le procès des Lumières (Seuil, 2009), va plus loin: le néoconservatisme serait un phénomène mondialisé, voire majoritaire dans le monde intellectuel. (…) On retrouve dans de telles analyses les grands thèmes de la pensée néoconservatrice américaine. Comme le montre Serge Audier, l’analyse de l’individualisme contemporain par Manent et Gauchet, caractérisée par son pessimisme extrême, reprend les conclusions d’une certaine sociologie américaine – celle d’un Daniel Bell ou d’un Christopher Lasch, auteur de La Culture du Narcissisme – qui a nourri la charge anti-libérale des «neocons». Pierre Manent se réfère fréquemment à leur maître à penser, le philosophe Leo Strauss, qui mettait en garde contre le caractère relativiste et donc nihiliste des Lumières et de la modernité. On retrouve chez des auteurs comme Manent et Gauchet la critique, caractéristique du néoconservatisme, de la «culture des droits». Même si elle est moins dirigée contre l’Etat-Providence qu’outre-Atlantique, on y retrouve la même focalisation sur le bilan négatif des mouvements des années 1960 et notamment de l’héritage de mai 1968, interprété comme un triomphe du narcissisme et du culte des jouissances matérielles. L’importance de la religion pour cimenter la communauté des citoyens n’est pas oubliée: il y a lieu de s’inquiéter de la «radicalisation fondamentaliste et universaliste de l’idée démocratique» qu’entraîne la disparition des derniers «vestiges de la forme religieuse» (Gauchet) et de «la vacuité spirituelle de l’Europe indéfiniment élargie» (Manent). (…) De façon surprenante, du moins à première vue, la vision du monde de certaines figures emblématiques de Mai 1968 n’est pas très éloignée. Elle est même plus radicale encore. Comme le raconte Jean Birnbaum, les têtes pensantes de la «Génération», formée à Normale Sup dans les séminaires de Louis Althusser et Jacques Lacan avant de s’engager avec ferveur, le «petit livre rouge» à la main, dans les rangs de la Gauche prolétarienne (GP), sont bien loin de la foi progressiste de leur jeunesse. En témoigne ce colloque organisé au théâtre Hébertot le 10 novembre 2003, «La question des Lumières», véritable rassemblement d’anciens militants (ou compagnons de route) de la GP, qui voit l’ensemble des participants (à la notable exception de Bernard-Henri Lévy) communier dans une remise en cause radicale de l’héritage des Lumières. Le thème du débat: l’œuvre de Benny Lévy, ex-leader de la GP sous le nom de Pierre Victor, décédé quelques jours auparavant, et le livre réquisitoire de Jean-Claude Milner, Les Penchants Criminels de l’Europe démocratique. La thèse de ce dernier est terrible, extrême: l’Europe doit son unification à la Shoah, «solution» à la question juive posée par la modernité rationaliste et universaliste elle-même. Birnbaum rappelle le soutien actif apporté à l’entreprise de Milner par Benny Lévy, ancien secrétaire de Sartre passé du maoïsme au judaïsme orthodoxe, fondateur avec Alain Finkielkraut et Bernard-Henri Lévy de l’Institut d’études lévinassiennes – personnage à l’influence restée intacte parmi ses anciens camarades. L’Europe des Lumières est selon Milner le «régime de l’illimité»: à l’intérieur, son souci essentiel est la satisfaction sans fin des intérêts de l’individu abstrait; à l’extérieur, son obsession est de favoriser l’expansion sans limites du droit et de la paix. Elle cherche ainsi à étendre son type de société à l’humanité entière. Un obstacle, pourtant, se dresse sur sa route: les porteurs du nom juif, incarnation par excellence du «limité», de la singularité, de la filiation. Cette Europe-là ne peut souhaiter que la destruction d’Israël, Etat juif à l’heure où règne l’universalisme abstrait; Etat qui incarne, par excellence, la «frontière» à une époque où l’Europe les abolit – en bref un Etat-Nation «à l’ancienne», incarné, charnel. C’est de cette Europe que provient aujourd’hui le danger principal pour les Juifs. Le vieux nationalisme européen, celui qu’a pu incarner un Charles Maurras, reprochait autrefois aux Juifs d’être les agents du cosmopolitisme, errant à la surface de la terre sans patrie ni frontières. Mais aujourd’hui, c’est l’Europe qui incarne cet «illimité», ce cosmopolitisme destructeur des singularités que dénonçait Maurras. Et c’est elle qui menace les Juifs, car ils disposent maintenant d’une patrie. (…) La critique, ici, est culturelle autant que politique. Dans cette veine, se distingue une autre figure de notre paysage intellectuel: Alain Finkielkraut. Sans appartenir pleinement à l’une des chapelles, il mène une réflexion personnelle qui puise abondamment aux deux sources néo-tocquevillienne et néo-lévinassienne (on en croise fréquemment les représentants dans son émission «Ripostes»). Ce qui le préoccupe au plus haut point, c’est le déclin de la «haute culture». «Tout est devenu culture, culture de la drogue, culture rock, culture des gangs de rue et ainsi de suite sans la moindre discrimination»: cette phrase n’est pas extraite de La Défaite de la Pensée mais de The Closing of the American Mind le best-seller du «neocon» Allan Bloom, le plus illustre disciple de Leo Strauss. La proximité de l’argumentation des deux ouvrages saute aux yeux. Le relativisme généralisé, nous dit «Finkie» à longueur d’émissions, le triomphe d’une «culture de masse» abêtissante, reflète et accentue le déchaînement narcissique et l’atomisation de la société. Il sécrète une nouvelle barbarie qui prospère sur les ruines de la Culture et détruit la politique. Cette argumentation arendtienne et tocquevillienne – mais aussi, donc, straussienne – a bel et bien des implications politiques: il faut résister au multiculturalisme, expression du relativisme, et surtout lutter à tout prix pour restaurer la transmission des valeurs et le respect de l’autorité – c’est-à-dire prendre le parti du «survivant», qui reçoit et transmet un héritage, contre le «moderne» qui sacralise l’individu. (…) «Un néoconservateur», clamait Irving Kristol, «c’est un homme de gauche qui a été agressé par la réalité». La réalité sociale contemporaine est en effet ce qui consterne au plus haut point les néoconservateurs à la française. Cette réalité, c’est d’abord l’absence du peuple. Ce peuple dans lequel ils plaçaient autrefois tous leurs espoirs s’est désagrégé en une «société d’individus», s’est vautré dans les jouissances matérielles, il a perdu la «common decency» dont parlait George Orwell. Il ne porte plus la promesse d’une nouvelle société; à en croire certains propos d’un Finkielkraut, il porte plutôt en lui une nouvelle forme de barbarie, celle qui sévit aujourd’hui dans nos banlieues. Nos intellectuels sont passés de l’antitotalitarisme, avec sa critique de l’optimisme historique et de l’idéologie du progrès, à la désillusion envers toute perspective progressiste.  (…) Contrairement à leurs homologues américains, ils se tiennent à bonne distance de la politique partisane: ils ont tiré les leçons des errements des intellectuels français au XXème siècle, et affichent pour certains un certain fatalisme. Ils n’ont pas lancé de vaste offensive politique, avec think tanks, revues et relais dans le monde politique et l’administration. La thèse de Daniel Lindenberg selon laquelle l’hégémonie du néoconservatisme aurait accouché du sarkozysme n’est pas entièrement convaincante. Mais l’influence que leur procure leur magistère intellectuel est réelle: on en trouve la trace dans les discours contre l’égalitarisme à l’école, le communautarisme, la «repentance» face au passé national, etc… (…) On a parfois présenté les néoconservateurs américains comme des «nouveaux jacobins» (au sens originel du terme) ou comme des «wilsoniens bottés», mus par le messianisme des Lumières. C’est tout le contraire. Ils croient certes qu’il faut défendre avec vigueur la liberté contre la tyrannie (contre le relativisme, la «douceur» et l’esprit de faiblesse caractéristiques de l’esprit démocratique même). Mais ils croient d’abord et surtout à la vérité de leurs traditions et valeurs nationales. (…) La seule vraie différence est l’obsession des «neocons», que ne partagent pas les Français, pour la politique étrangère. Sans doute la puissance des Etats-Unis leur attribue-t-elle à leurs yeux une mission particulière dans la défense de l’Occident en péril contre ses ennemis extérieurs. Les néoconservateurs français les retrouvent toutefois dans la dénonciation de la tendance européenne au pacifisme munichois (Finkielkraut, Milner) et dans l’appel à «des nations qui se comportent comme des nations» contre l’angélisme démocratique (Gauchet). Sans oublier le combat contre l’illusion dangereuse d’un «gouvernement mondial». Car là où leurs cousins américains fustigent l’ONU, les Français ont trouvé leur bête noire: cette Union européenne «sans corps», sans identité et sans frontières définies, triomphe «anti-politique» du règne du marché et du droit, pointe avancée du «patriotisme constitutionnel» d’Habermas et du projet kantien de paix perpétuelle. (…) Au bout du compte, malgré la valeur intellectuelle indéniable de leur réflexion, malgré le nombre des références, malgré la sophistication du propos, les réalités socio-économiques sont évacuées au profit d’un discours essentiellement moralisant. Telle est, selon Zeev Sternhell (Les Anti-Lumières, Fayard, 2006), la source du succès du néoconservatisme: il «a réussi à convaincre la grande majorité des Américains que les questions essentielles dans la vie d’une société ne sont pas les questions économiques, et que les questions sociales sont en réalité des questions morales». Contre leurs contempteurs (on se souvient de la violente controverse qui a suivi la publication du pamphlet, il est vrai très polémique, de Daniel Lindenberg sur «les nouveaux réactionnaires», et qui ne manquera pas d’être ravivée par le dernier ouvrage de son auteur), les néoconservateurs à la française défendront toujours le devoir de l’intellectuel de mener une critique lucide de la modernité et d’avertir leur contemporains des dangers qu’ils courent, et crieront toujours à la police de la pensée. Il n’empêche que leur discours doit continuer d’être examiné et critiqué, car il met en jeu la conception même que l’on se fait de la démocratie. Pour eux en effet, la démocratie n’est pas un projet inachevé, sans cesse à construire et à parfaire: il s’agit d’un legs, certes précieux, mais dont la fuite en avant menace d’entraîner la perte. Une dynamique à contenir, voire à bloquer, plutôt qu’à approfondir. Robert Landy

Au lendemain de l’annonce, dans son obsession à se démarquer du néo-conservatisme de son prédécesseur, de l’abandon du bouclier antimissile et à nouveau (contre les promesses faites mais ils doivent avoir l’habitude!) des pays de l’Europe centrale et de l’est comme la Tchécoslovaquie ou la Pologne par le nouveau Chamberlain de la Maison Blanche …

Et de la disparition, à 89 ans bien remplis, d’Irving Kristol, parrain du néoconservatisme et de tous les gens de gauche qui comme lui avaient, selon son mot fameux, été « braqués par la réalité » et avaient dès lors décidé de placer le pragmatisme au-dessus de l’idéologie et du mépris des aspirations des gens ordinaires.

Retour, en guise d’hommage et d’avertissement renouvelé à la fois, sur sa tribune classique de février 1990 (que le NYT venait d’ailleurs de ressortir).

Rappelant les faux calculs de ceux qui critiquaient la très faible hausse des dépenses militaires présentées par le ministre de la défense de Bush père Dick Cheney.

Au moment où revenait sur le tapis avec la fin de la guerre froide (comme aujourd’hui avec la fin de la guerre en Irak et la crise financière) le vieux débat (déjà à la veille de l’entrée en guerre des Etats-Unis en 1917 suite à la démission du Secrétaire d’Etat pacifiste William Bryan Jennings et au sujet notamment de la construction d’usines de nitrates en Alabama « pour l’engrais en temps de paix et la poudre à canon en temps de guerre ») sur les « dividendes de la paix » et du « beurre contre les canons » …

There Is No Military Free Lunch
Irving Kristol
The New York Times
February 2, 1990

Now that the cold war is over and I need worry less about my personal safety and welfare, I find myself contemplating with pleasure all the money I shall save and be able to spend. These savings are of a peculiar kind: they represent expenditures I had thought of making but that no longer seem necessary.

To cope with the prospect of nuclear war, I had wondered about the advisability of purchasing a large country estate, which would shelter my wife, children, grandchildren and perhaps the families of a few nieces and nephews. To reach this refuge, I would need a large, fast station wagon, perhaps two. There would be other expenses, too, and I have calculated the total cost in the vicinity of $1.5 million, with maintenance costs of about $25,000 a year.

What a blessing to be relieved of such expenditures! There are so many needs I can satisfy with this saving. We can at last have our kitchen redone; we can take a long-delayed, unhurried holiday in Europe; we can double our contributions to charity – and more. We shall, of course, pay for these expenditures with a credit card. We shall also, of course, end up filing for bankruptcy.

A combination of hypothetical savings with actual spending is a clear path to financial ruin. Nevertheless, much of the discussion of a peace dividend, and the uses to which it might be put, revolves around exactly such a combination.

Those hypothetical savings are enormous. If we simply forget about providing ourselves with new land-based nuclear missiles, consigning the MX and Midgetman to oblivion, we would save $10 billion annually in the years ahead. That’s a lot of money, and under present circumstances a sensible idea. But while forgetting the MX and the Midgetman, we ought to remember that they barely exist. This is a hypothetical saving of a hypothetical expenditure. It gives us no cash in hand. Surely, however, there are real cash savings, in addition to such hypothetical savings, that will be available from a reduction in the Pentagon’s budget? Yes, there are – but they will be far more modest than one realizes. The villain is inflation.

Let us assume that we insist the Pentagon’s budget should remain exactly at its current level, with no adjustment for inflation. Let us further assume that we can look forward to economic growth of 3 percent a year, with inflation at 4 percent. Neither assumption seems particularly radical, and both allow more of the resources created by economic growth to be allocated to nonmilitary purposes. What’s wrong with that? Is it not a prudent and responsible reaction to the end of the cold war? Indeed, might we not think of a real (inflation-adjusted) cut in the military budget of another 3 percent, which would provide us with far more  »extra » money? Many liberals in Congress have exactly such thoughts.

Well, we had better not think too seriously along any such lines, because the interaction of these  »modest » assumptions will engender immodest results. This flows from the compounding effect of inflation, which can be devastating to anyone or anything with a static or declining income. If we take the more ambitious cut of 7 percent annually (4 percent inflation plus 3 percent cash), in 10 years we shall have a military budget, in 1990 dollars, of less than one-half the present size.

Even with fixing that budget at its current level, and with no further cuts, a decade from now it will be about 33 percent smaller (in 1990 dollars) than is the case today. We are talking about a truly radical shrinkage in our military establishment.

One does not wish to exaggerate. After any combination of these projected paths for the military budget, we shall still have a military establishment that will be more than negligible. It will probably be slightly superior to Japan’s, though perhaps not quite a match for Syria’s tanks and air power. It ought to be sufficient to deter a hostile power from invading our territory. Our military condition would be comparable to Sweden’s today.

Will we tolerate such a diminution of our position as a world power? Are we willing to relinquish the possibility of intervening anywhere, ever, to help shape a world order in flux? Will we count on our nursing homes and day care centers, rather than our Navy, Air Force and Marines, to deter foreign nations from taking actions offensive and hostile to us? Are we content to become a larger Sweden, existing comfortably, if a bit precariously, on the margin of world affairs?

I don’t believe it. Such a prospect goes too profoundly against the grain. Even Congress, which would dearly love to spend every penny of that dividend – if it existed – is likely to find such a future intolerable.

So we shall discover, after the dust has cleared, that there is a consensus in the vicinity of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney’s proposal to increase the defense budget, but only by a couple of percentage points below the inflation rate. If we have decent growth, we’ll end up with a small cash dividend next year, maybe $6 billion to $8 billion. If we have a period of slow growth, the dividend will not materialize. Meanwhile, our military establishment will experience a moderate (though real) decline – one that does not disarm us precipitously.

The odd thing is that since 1985 the military budget has been experiencing, under Congressional pressure, almost exactly the nominal increase and real cut Secretary Cheney proposes.

So where has the  »peace dividend » gone? In part, it has been spent on social programs, and in part it has been used to keep the budget deficit from getting even larger than it is. All in all, it has been virtually invisible. It would take at least a decade for this  »peace dividend » simply to pay for the bailout of the savings and loan industry.

Discussion of the  »peace dividend » is a distraction from the main debate taking place in Washington: To what degree should the fruits of economic growth, represented by increased Government revenues, be spent on social programs as against reducing the budget deficit? Conservatives will say that reducing the deficit must take priority. Liberals may not deny the importance of reducing the deficit but will demand a tax increase to cope with our social problems and social needs.

That is the real debate. As it proceeds, you will not hear serious people in Congress or the executive branch chattering about a  »peace dividend, » which has already been swallowed up by the deficit and mandated outlays on the environment, the drug war, medical services to the elderly and other popular programs.

Irving Kristol was publisher of The National Interest and co-editor of The Public Interest, quarterly journals.

Voir aussi:

Irving Kristol, Godfather of Conservatism, Dies
Barry Gewen
The New York Times
September 19, 2009

Irving Kristol, the political commentator who, as much as anyone, defined modern conservatism and helped revitalize the Republican Party in the late 1960s and early ’70s, setting the stage for the Reagan presidency and years of conservative dominance, died Friday in Arlington, Va. He was 89 and lived in Washington.

His son, William Kristol, the commentator and editor of the conservative magazine The Weekly Standard, said the cause of death was complications of lung cancer.

Mr. Kristol exerted an influence across generations, from William F. Buckley to the columnist David Brooks, through a variety of positions he held over a long career: executive vice president of Basic Books, contributor to The Wall Street Journal, professor of social thought at New York University, senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

He was commonly known as the godfather of neoconservatism, even by those who were not entirely sure what the term meant. In probably his most widely quoted comment — his equivalent of Andy Warhol’s 15 minutes of fame — Mr. Kristol defined a neoconservative as a liberal who had been “mugged by reality.”

It was a description that summarized his experience in the 1960s, along with that of friends and associates like Daniel Bell, Nathan Glazer and Daniel Patrick Moynihan. New Deal Democrats all, they were social scientists who found themselves questioning many of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society ideas.

Mr. Kristol translated his concerns into a magazine. In 1965, with a $10,000 contribution from a wealthy acquaintance, he and Daniel Bell started The Public Interest. Its founding is generally considered the beginning of neoconservatism. “Something like a ‘movement’ took shape,” Mr. Kristol wrote, “with The Public Interest at (or near) the center.”

The Public Interest writers did not take issue with the ends of the Great Society so much as with the means, the “unintended consequences” of the Democrats’ good intentions. Welfare programs, they argued, were breeding a culture of dependency; affirmative action created social divisions and did damage to its supposed beneficiaries. They placed practicality ahead of ideals. “The legitimate question to ask about any program,” Mr. Kristol said, “is, ‘Will it work?’,” and the reforms of the 1960s and ’70s, he believed, were not working.

For more than six decades, beginning in 1942, when he and other recent graduates of City College founded Enquiry: A Journal of Independent Radical Thought, his life revolved around magazines. Besides The Public Interest, Mr. Kristol published, edited and wrote for journals of opinion like Commentary, Encounter, The New Leader, The Reporter and The National Interest.

All were “little magazines,” with limited circulations, but Mr. Kristol valued the quality of his readership more than the quantity. “With a circulation of a few hundred,” he once said, “you could change the world.”

Small circles and behind-the-scenes maneuverings suited him. He never sought celebrity; in fact, he was puzzled by writers who craved it. Described by the economics writer Jude Wanniski as the “hidden hand” of the conservative movement, he avoided television and other media spotlights; he was happier consulting with a congressman like Jack Kemp about the new notion of supply-side economics and then watching with satisfaction as Mr. Kemp converted President Ronald Reagan to the theory. Mr. Kristol was a man of ideas who believed in the power of ideas, an intellectual whose fiercest battles were waged against other intellectuals.

A major theme of The Public Interest under Mr. Kristol’s leadership was the limits of social policy; he and his colleagues were skeptical about the extent to which government programs could actually produce positive change.

Neoconservatism may have begun as a dispute among liberals about the nature of the welfare state, but under Mr. Kristol it became a more encompassing perspective, what he variously called a “persuasion,” an “impulse,” a “new synthesis.” Against what he saw as the “nihilistic” onslaught of the ’60s counterculture, Mr. Kristol, in the name of neoconservatism, mounted an ever more muscular defense of capitalism, bourgeois values and the aspirations of the common man that took him increasingly to the right.

For him, neoconservatism, with its emphasis on values and ideas, had become no longer a corrective to liberal overreaching but an “integral part” of conservatism and the Republican Party, a challenge to liberalism itself, which, in his revised view, was a destructive philosophy that had lost touch with ordinary people.

Neoconservatism maintained a lingering sympathy for certain aspects of Roosevelt’s New Deal, but its focus had shifted to the culture wars and to upholding traditional standards. Liberalism led to “moral anarchy,” Mr. Kristol said, arguing the point with one of his wisecracking encapsulizations: “In the United States today, the law insists that an 18-year-old girl has the right to public fornication in a pornographic movie — but only if she is paid the minimum wage.”

Mr. Kristol’s rightward drift, though it brought him new allies like Buckley and Robert Bartley, the head of The Wall Street Journal’s editorial board, broke up the original Public Interest family. Mr. Moynihan went on to a celebrated career as a Democratic senator from New York, and Mr. Bell gave up the coeditorship of the magazine in the early ’70s, declaring himself a socialist in economics, a liberal in politics and a conservative in culture. (He was replaced by Nathan Glazer.)

But neoconservatism turned quite literally into a family affair for Mr. Kristol. His wife, Gertrude Himmelfarb, a distinguished historian of 19th-century England, wrote books and articles critical of modern permissiveness and urged a return to Victorian values. His son, William, who had been Vice President Dan Quayle’s chief of staff, became a leading spokesman for neoconservatism in his own right as a television commentator, the editor of The Weekly Standard and briefly a columnist for The New York Times. Friends referred to them as America’s first family of neoconservatism.

Mr. Kristol’s weapon of choice was the biting polemical essay of ideas, a form he mastered as part of the famed circle of writers and critics known as the New York Intellectuals, among them the ferocious literary brawlers Mary McCarthy and Dwight Macdonald. Mr. Kristol once described feeling intimidated at a cocktail party when he was seated with Ms. McCarthy on one side, Hannah Arendt on the other and Diana Trilling across from him.

He learned the hard way that he was not destined to be an author of books. In the late 1950s he spent three months researching a study of the evolution of American democracy, only to abandon the project, he said, once he realized “it was all an exercise in futility.” An attempted novel was consigned to his incinerator. “I was not a book writer,” he said.

The four volumes published under his name — “On the Democratic Idea in America” (1972), “Two Cheers for Capitalism” (1978), “Reflections of a Neoconservative” (1983) and “Neoconservatism: The Autobiography of an Idea” (1995) — are collections of previously published articles.

As an essayist, Mr. Kristol was sharp, witty, aphoristic and assertive. “Equivocation has never been Irving Kristol’s long suit,” his friend Robert H. Bork said of him. Before achieving his reputation as a writer on political and social affairs, he was a wide-ranging generalist. In the 1940s and ’50s, his subjects included Einstein, psychoanalysis, Jewish humor and the Marquis de Sade.

His erudition could burst out at unexpected moments. An attack on environmental extremists uses a quotation from Auden; a passage about American men’s obsession with golf cites T.S. Eliot. But he could be a verbal streetfighter as well. John Kenneth Galbraith, he wrote, “thinks he is an economist and, if one takes him at his word, it is easy to demonstrate that he is a bad one.” After it was revealed that Magic Johnson had tested HIV positive, Mr. Kristol wrote: “He is a foolish, reckless man who does not merit any kind of character reference.”

Mr. Kristol seemed to need enemies: the counterculture, the academic and media professionals who made up what he called the New Class, and finally liberalism in its entirety. And he certainly made enemies with his harsh words.

Yet underlying the invective was an innate skepticism, even a quality of moderation and self-mockery, which was often belied by his single-mindedness. This stalwart defender of free enterprise could manage only two cheers for capitalism. “Extremism in defense of liberty,” he declared, taking issue with Barry Goldwater, “is always a vice because extremism is but another name for fanaticism.” And the two major intellectual influences on him, he said, were Lionel Trilling, “a skeptical liberal,” and Leo Strauss, “a skeptical conservative.”

“Ever since I can remember,” he said in summing himself up, “I’ve been a neo-something: a neo-Marxist, a neo-Trotskyist, a neo-liberal, a neo-conservative and, in religion, always a neo-orthodox, even while I was a neo-Trotskyist and a neo-Marxist. I’m going to end up a neo. Just neo, that’s all. Neo-dash-nothing.”

Irving William Kristol was born on Jan. 20, 1920, in Brooklyn into a family of low-income, nonobservant Jews. His father, Joseph, a middleman in the men’s clothing business, went bankrupt several times; his mother, Bessie, died of cancer when he was 16. “We were poor, but then everyone was poor, more or less,” Mr. Kristol recalled.

In the late 1930s he attended City College, the highly politicized, overwhelmingly Jewish New York institution where his indignation at the injustices of the Great Depression pushed him to the left, but not the far left. In the large, dingy school cafeteria were a number of alcoves where students could gather with like-minded colleagues. There was an athlete’s alcove, a Catholic alcove, a black alcove, an ROTC alcove. But the alcoves that later became famous were Numbers One and Two.

Alcove One held leftists of various stripes; Alcove Two housed the Stalinists, including a young Julius Rosenberg. The Stalinists outnumbered the anti-Stalinists by as much as 10-1, but among the anti-Stalinists were Mr. Bell as well as the future sociologist Seymour Martin Lipset and the future literary critic Irving Howe.

Mr. Howe recruited Mr. Kristol into the Trotskyists, and though Mr. Kristol’s career as a follower of the apostate Communist Leon Trotsky was brief, it lasted beyond his graduation from City College, long enough for him to meet Ms. Himmelfarb at a Trotskyist gathering in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. He fell in love, and the two were married in 1942, when she was 19 and he was just short of his 22nd birthday. Besides William, they also had a daughter, Elizabeth. They, along with their mother and five grandchildren, survive him.

After marrying, Mr. Kristol followed his wife to Chicago, where she was doing graduate work and where he had what he called “my first real experience of America.” Drafted into the Army with a number of Midwesterners who were street-tough and often anti-Semitic, he found himself shedding his youthful radical optimism. “I can’t build socialism with these people,” he concluded. “They’ll probably take it over and make a racket out of it.”

In his opinion, his fellow GI’s were inclined to loot, rape and murder, and only Army discipline held them in check. It was a perception about human nature that would stay with him for the rest of his life, creating a tension with his alternative view that ordinary people were to be trusted more than intellectuals to do the right thing.

After the war he and Ms. Himmelfarb spent a year in Cambridge, England, while she pursued her studies. When they returned to the United States in 1947, he took an editing job with Commentary, then a liberal anti-Communist magazine. In 1952, at the height of the McCarthy era, he wrote what he called the most controversial article of his career: “ ‘Civil Liberties,’ 1952 — A Study in Confusion.” It criticized many of those defending civil liberties against the government inquisitors, saying they failed to understand the conspiratorial danger of Communism. Though he called Senator McCarthy a “vulgar demagogue,” the article was remembered for a few lines: “For there is one thing that the American people know about Senator McCarthy: he, like them, is unequivocably anti-Communist. About the spokesmen for American liberalism, they feel they know no such thing. And with some justification.”

After leaving Commentary, Mr. Kristol spent 10 months as executive director of the anti-Communist organization the American Committee for Cultural Freedom, and in 1953 he removed to England to help found Encounter magazine with the poet Stephen Spender. They made an unlikely pair: Mr. Spender, tall, artsy, sophisticated; Mr. Kristol, short, brash, still rough around the edges. Together, they made Encounter one of the foremost highbrow magazines of its time.

But another explosive controversy awaited Mr. Kristol. It was later revealed that the magazine had been receiving financial support from the C.I.A. Mr. Kristol always denied any knowledge of the connection. But he hardly appeased his critics when he added that he did not disapprove of the C.I.A.’s secret subsidies.

Back in New York at the end of 1958, Mr. Kristol worked for a year at another liberal anti-Communist magazine, The Reporter, then took a job at Basic Books, rising to executive vice president. In 1969 he left for New York University, and while teaching there he became a columnist for The Wall Street Journal.

It was during this time that Mr. Kristol became uncomfortable with liberalism, his own and others’. He supported Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey in his 1968 presidential campaign against Richard M. Nixon, saying that “the prospect of electing Mr. Nixon depresses me.” But by 1970 he was dining at the Nixon White House, and in 1972 he came out in favor of Nixon’s re-election. By the mid-’70s he had registered as a Republican.

Always the neoconservative, however — aware of his liberal, even radical, roots and his distance from traditional Republicanism — he was delighted when another Democratic convert, President Ronald Reagan, expressed admiration for Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1987 he left New York University to become the John M. Olin Distinguished Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

By now Mr. Kristol was battling on several fronts. He published columns and essays attacking liberalism and the counterculture from his perches at The Wall Street Journal and The Public Interest, and in 1978 he and William E. Simon, President Nixon’s secretary of the treasury, formed the Institute for Educational Affairs to funnel corporate and foundation money to conservative causes. In 1985 he started The National Interest, a journal devoted to foreign affairs.

But Mr. Kristol wasn’t railing just against the left. He criticized America’s commercial class for upholding greed and selfishness as positive values. He saw “moral anarchy” within the business community, and he urged it to take responsibility for itself and the larger society. He encouraged businessmen to give money to political candidates and help get conservative ideas across to the public. Republicans, he said, had for half a century been “the stupid party,” with not much more on their minds than balanced budgets and opposition to the welfare state. He instructed them to support economic growth by cutting taxes and not to oppose New Deal institutions.

Above all, Mr. Kristol preached a faith in ordinary people. . “It is the self-imposed assignment of neoconservatives,” he wrote, “to explain to the American people why they are right, and to the intellectuals why they are wrong.”

Mr. Kristol saw religion and a belief in the afterlife as the foundation for the middle-class values he championed. He argued that religion provided a necessary constraint to antisocial, anarchical impulses. Without it, he said, “the world falls apart.” Yet Mr. Kristol’s own religious views were so ambiguous that some friends questioned whether he believed in God. In 1996, he told an interviewer: “I’ve always been a believer.” But, he added, “don’t ask me in what.”

“That gets too complicated,” he said. “The word ‘God’ confuses everything.”

In 2002, Mr. Kristol received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, often considered the nation’s highest civilian honor. It was another satisfying moment for a man who appears to have delighted in his life or, as Andrew Sullivan put it, “to have emerged from the womb content.”

He once said that his career had been “one instance of good luck after another.” Some called him a cheerful conservative. He did not dispute it. He had had much, he said, “to be cheerful about.”

COMPLEMENT:

Was Irving Kristol a Neoconservative?

In April 1991, in the fallout of the Gulf War, Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein brutally suppressed Kurds and Shiites who were answering U.S. President George H.W. Bush’s call to overthrow him. With America standing by, Saddam used his Army helicopters to ensure the perpetuation of his bloody rule.

Although many in the United States protested, one observer forcefully supported the White House’s decision not to intervene at that moment. « There is good reason — perhaps even right reason — for the administration’s position, » he wrote. « It has to do with our definition of the American national interest in the Gulf. This definition does not imply a general resistance to ‘aggression.’ … And this definition surely never implied a commitment to bring the blessings of democracy to the Arab world. … [No military] alternative is attractive, since each could end up committing us to govern Iraq. And no civilized person in his right mind wants to govern Iraq. »

The observer was Irving Kristol, the so-called « godfather » of neoconservatism. But if that doesn’t sound like neoconservatism, it’s because, well, it isn’t. Kristol’s pronouncement was, in fact, plain realpolitik, as far as possible from the pro-intervention hawkishness that characterizes neoconservatism today. This doesn’t mean Kristol, who died Sept. 18 at 89, wasn’t a neoconservative. Rather, it shows how much Kristol’s neoconservatism — the movement he invented, or at least successfully branded and marketed — differed from its descendents today.

In fact, the original strand of neoconservatism didn’t pay any attention to foreign policy. Its earliest members were veterans of the anti-communist struggles who had reacted negatively to the leftward evolution of American liberalism in the 1960s. They were sociologists and political scientists who criticized the failures and unintended consequences of President Lyndon Johnson’s « Great Society » programs, especially the war on poverty. They also bemoaned the excesses of what Lionel Trilling called the « adversary culture » — in their view, individualistic, hedonistic, and relativistic — that had taken hold of the baby-boom generation on college campuses. Although these critics were not unconditional supporters of the free market and still belonged to the liberal camp, they did point out the limits of the welfare state and the naiveté of the boundless egalitarian dreams of the New Left.

These thinkers found outlets in prestigious journals like Commentary and The Public Interest, founded in 1965 by Kristol and Daniel Bell (and financed by Warren Demian Manshel, who helped launch Foreign Policy a few years later). Intellectuals like Nathan Glazer, Seymour Martin Lipset, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, James Q. Wilson, and a few others took to the pages of these journals to offer a more prudent course for American liberalism. They were criticized for being too « timid and acquiescent » by their former allies on the left, among them Michael Harrington, who dubbed them « neoconservatives » to ostracize them from liberalism.

Although some rejected the label, Kristol embraced it. He started constructing a school of thought, both by fostering a network of like-minded intellectuals (particularly around the American Enterprise Institute) and by codifying what neoconservatism meant. This latter mission proved challenging, as neoconservatism often seemed more like an attitude than a doctrine. Kristol himself always described it in vague terms, as a « tendency » or a « persuasion. » Even some intellectuals branded as part of the movement were skeptical that it existed. « Whenever I read about neoconservatism, » Bell once quipped, « I think, ‘That isn’t neoconservatism; it’s just Irving.’ » Regardless of what it was, neoconservatism started to achieve a significant impact on American public life, questioning the liberal take on social issues and advancing innovative policy ideas like school vouchers and the Laffer Curve.

If the first generation of neoconservatives was composed of New York intellectuals interested in domestic issues, the second was formed by Washington Democratic operatives interested in foreign policy. This strand gave most of its DNA to latter-day neocons — and Kristol played only a tangential role.

The second wave of neoconservatives came in reaction to the nomination of George McGovern as the 1972 Democratic presidential candidate. Cold War liberals deemed McGovern too far to the left, particularly in foreign policy. He suggested deep cuts in the defense budget, a hasty retreat from Vietnam, and a neo-isolationist grand strategy. New neocons coalesced around organizations like the Coalition for a Democratic Majority and the Committee on the Present Danger, journals like Norman Podhoretz’s Commentary (the enigmatic Podhoretz being the only adherent to neoconservatism in all its stages), and figures like Democratic Sen. Henry « Scoop » Jackson — hence their alternative label, the « Scoop Jackson Democrats. »

These thinkers, like the original neoconservatives, had moved from left to right. Many of them, even if members of the Democratic Party, ended up working in the Reagan administration. Others joined the American Enterprise Institute and wrote for Commentary and the editorial pages of the Wall Street Journal. Moreover, some original neoconservatives, like Moynihan, became Scoop Jackson Democrats. Thus, the labels became interchangeable and the two movements seemed to merge.

But this elided significant differences between them. On domestic issues, Scoop Jackson Democrats remained traditional liberals. In the 1970s, while Jackson was advocating universal health care and even the control of prices and salaries in times of crisis, Kristol was promoting supply-side economics and consulting for business associations and conservative foundations. On foreign-policy issues, Scoop Jackson Democrats emphasized human rights and democracy promotion, while Kristol was a classical realist. They agreed, however, on the necessity of a hawkish foreign and defense policy against the Soviet empire.

These differences became most visible at the end of the Cold War. Now that the « evil empire » had fallen, what was America to do? Was the defense and promotion of democracy and human rights the reason for fighting the Soviets — or was it the other way round, just a useful tool in this fight? Kristol, who had always taken the second view, logically advocated restraint and pragmatism for post-Cold War America and had these words for some of his « fellow » neoconservatives:

The only innovative trend in our foreign-policy thinking at the moment derives from a relatively small group, consisting of both liberals and conservatives, who believe there is an « American mission » actively to promote democracy all over the world. This is a superficially attractive idea, but it takes only a few moments of thought to realize how empty of substance (and how full of presumption!) it is. In the entire history of the U.S., we have successfully « exported » our democratic institutions to only two nations — Japan and Germany, after war and an occupation. We have failed to establish a viable democracy in the Philippines, or in Panama, or anywhere in Central America.

Although a few other neoconservatives followed Kristol’s realist line (Glazer and, to some extent, Jeane Kirkpatrick), for most of the others the idea of retrenching and playing a more modest international role disturbingly looked like the realpolitik that had led to détente and other distasteful policies. The vast majority of Scoop Jackson Democrats advocated a more assertive and interventionist posture and continued to favor at least a dose of democracy promotion (most notably Joshua Muravchik, Ben Wattenberg, Carl Gershman, Michael Ledeen, Elliott Abrams, Podhoretz, and others). Their legacy would prevail.

Thus, the neocons — the third wave — were born in the mid-1990s. Their immediate predecessors, more so than the original neoconservatives, provided inspiration. But they developed their ideas in a new context where America had much more relative power. And this time, they were firmly planted on the Republican side of the spectrum.

Kristol’s son, Bill, played a leading role, along with Robert Kagan, in this resurrection through two initiatives he launched — the Weekly Standard magazine and the Project for the New American Century (PNAC), a small advocacy think tank. Bill Kristol and Kagan initially rejected the « neoconservative » appellation, preferring « neo-Reaganism. » But the kinship with the second age, that of the Scoop Jackson Democrats, was undeniable, and there was a strong resemblance in terms of organizational forms and influence on public opinion. Hence the neoconservative label stuck.

The main beliefs of the neocons — originated in a 1996 Foreign Affairs article by Kagan and Bill Kristol, reiterated by PNAC, and promulgated more recently by the Foreign Policy Initiative — are well-known. American power is a force for good; the United States should shape the world, lest it be shaped by inimical interests; it should do so unilaterally if necessary; the danger is to do too little, not too much; the expansion of democracy advances U.S. interests.

But what was Irving Kristol’s view on these principles and on their application? Toward the end of his life, the elder Kristol tried to triangulate between his position and that of most neocons, arguing in 2003 that there exists « no set of neoconservative beliefs concerning foreign policy, only a set of attitudes » (including patriotism and the rejection of world government), and minimizing democracy promotion. But at this point, the movement’s center of gravity was clearly more interventionist and confident of the ability to enact (democratic) change through the application of American power than Kristol could countenance. He kept silent on the 2003 invasion of Iraq, while the Scoop Jackson Democrats and third-wave neocons cheered.

Thus, ironically, when most people repeat the line about Kristol being « the godfather of neoconservatism, » they assume he was a neocon in the modern sense. But this ignores his realist foreign policy — while also obscuring the impressive intellectual and political legacy he leaves behind him on domestic issues.

Voir aussi:

Idéologie: les néoconservateurs français n’ont pas disparu

A l’image de leurs inspirateurs américains, ils dénoncent la dérive de nos démocraties marquées par le triomphe du narcissisme et de la «culture des droits».

La guerre d’Irak, qu’ils ont ardemment souhaitée et préparée, a fait pâlir leur étoile. Mais les néoconservateurs américains, ce groupe d’intellectuels partis de la gauche (souvent du trotskisme) pour occuper, pour certains d’entre eux, des positions de premier plan dans les administrations de Ronald Reagan puis de George W. Bush, auront exercé une influence profonde sur la vie intellectuelle et politique outre-Atlantique. Leur éminence grise, Irving Kristol, est mort il y a quelques jours à l’âge de quatre-vingt neuf ans, moins d’un an après le retour triomphal au pouvoir du «libéralisme» (la gauche au sens américain) honni que représente l’investiture de Barack Obama.

Pour beaucoup d’analystes, le néoconservatisme est un phénomène spécifiquement américain: affirmation vigoureuse des «valeurs américaines» face au relativisme, opposition au libéralisme progressiste, défense du rôle social de la religion et de la tradition, souverainisme et promotion d’une politique étrangère «musclée» – autant de traits qui n’auraient pas cours dans notre «vieille Europe». Pourtant l’observation de l’évolution de la vie intellectuelle française au cours des vingt dernières années conduit à se rendre à l’évidence: il existe bel et bien des convergences frappantes entre une partie significative de notre intelligentsia – qui n’est d’ailleurs pas la moins influente – et les thèses de ces «neocons» qui ont fait couler tant d’encre ces dernières années.

Plusieurs ouvrages récents argumentent dans ce sens: Les Maoccidents de Jean Birnbaum (Stock, 2009) est un réquisitoire implacable contre la «Génération» des ex-maoïstes soixante-huitards. La pensée anti-68 de Serge Audier (La Découverte, 2008), qui s’intéresse à la lecture de mai 1968, en général d’une grande sévérité, qui s’est peu à peu imposée dans le débat d’idées en France.

Le premier passe au crible la trajectoire de ces normaliens «passés du culte de l’Orient rouge à la défense de l’Occident». Le deuxième décrypte, entre autres développements, les thèses d’un courant qui se réclame de Tocqueville pour mettre en garde contre les dangers de l’évolution de nos démocraties – évolution dont mai 1968 constitue un moment clé. A première vue tout devrait opposer ces deux groupes. Pourtant, leurs conclusions sur la nature et les dangers de la modernité démocratique se recoupent largement – et rejoignent la vision du monde propagée par les néo-conservateurs outre-Atlantique. Daniel Lindenberg, qui publie ces jours-ci Le procès des Lumières (Seuil, 2009), va plus loin: le néoconservatisme serait un phénomène mondialisé, voire majoritaire dans le monde intellectuel.

L’angoisse des néo-tocquevilliens

On ne présente plus Marcel Gauchet, l’influent directeur de la revue Le Débat, autrefois proche de Claude Lefort et Cornelius Castoriadis. Son recueil d’articles publiés depuis une vingtaine d’années, La démocratie contre elle-même (Gallimard, 2002), dresse un tableau particulièrement sombre de la société contemporaine. En se débarrassant des éléments archaïques avec lesquels elle coexistait – la survivance de traditions préétablies –  la démocratie est revenue à sa source: les principes des Lumières, c’est-à-dire d’abord les droits de l’homme. La dynamique individualiste et égalitaire de la société démocratique qu’avait décrite Tocqueville a conduit au déchaînement incontrôlé des individualités narcissiques, au détriment de tout sens du collectif.

Le «droits-de-l’hommisme» en est l’expression: devenu l’idéologie dominante, il vient accentuer ce phénomène, favoriser son extension sans limites. Ainsi la démocratie est-elle conduite à saper ses propres fondements. D’un régime politique fondé sur l’auto-gouvernement, la délibération collective, elle se réduit progressivement à la gestion des multiples demandes individuelles à satisfaire. La politique est remplacée par le droit et le marché. La nation, cadre de la délibération collective, se vide de sa substance sous la pression d’une «embardée non-politique, voire anti-politique», la construction européenne, qui se réduit à un «territoire d’expérimentation de l’idéologie des droits de l’individu».

Cette analyse rejoint celle de Pierre Manent, un disciple de Raymond Aron qui, lui, ne vient pas de la gauche mais de la mouvance conservatrice. Il résume sa lecture de la situation politique contemporaine dans La Raison des Nations (Gallimard, 2006): le culte démocratique de la pitié – de la «douceur» pour reprendre un terme employé par Tocqueville – conduit à l’indifférenciation entre le moi et l’autre. Cette «passion de la ressemblance» a atteint son paroxysme en mai 1968, véritable «explosion de douceur» qui a cherché – et réussi – à effacer toutes les distances. «Entre gouvernants et gouvernés, c’est la fin de la hauteur gaullienne; entre enseignants et enseignés, c’est la fin de la discipline napoléonienne».

L’abolition de la peine de mort dans les démocraties européennes est la manifestation la plus éclatante de ce renversement du rapport entre l’individu et l’Etat. Mais la dynamique égalitaire et universaliste inhérente à la démocratie ne produit que nivellement et atomisation. Au nom de l’unification de l’humanité, elle finit même par s’attaquer à la Nation elle-même, pourtant le cadre de toute existence politique, le «principe unificateur de nos vies»: la construction européenn, qui ne crée aucune nouvelle «forme politique»  de gouvernement, est toute entière tendue vers la l’absolutisation de la garantie des droits individuels.

On retrouve dans de telles analyses les grands thèmes de la pensée néoconservatrice américaine. Comme le montre Serge Audier, l’analyse de l’individualisme contemporain par Manent et Gauchet, caractérisée par son pessimisme extrême, reprend les conclusions d’une certaine sociologie américaine – celle d’un Daniel Bell ou d’un Christopher Lasch, auteur de La Culture du Narcissisme – qui a nourri la charge anti-libérale des «neocons». Pierre Manent se réfère fréquemment à leur maître à penser, le philosophe Leo Strauss, qui mettait en garde contre le caractère relativiste et donc nihiliste des Lumières et de la modernité.

On retrouve chez des auteurs comme Manent et Gauchet la critique, caractéristique du néoconservatisme, de la «culture des droits». Même si elle est moins dirigée contre l’Etat-Providence qu’outre-Atlantique, on y retrouve la même focalisation sur le bilan négatif des mouvements des années 1960 et notamment de l’héritage de mai 1968, interprété comme un triomphe du narcissisme et du culte des jouissances matérielles. L’importance de la religion pour cimenter la communauté des citoyens n’est pas oubliée: il y a lieu de s’inquiéter de la «radicalisation fondamentaliste et universaliste de l’idée démocratique» qu’entraîne la disparition des derniers «vestiges de la forme religieuse» (Gauchet) et de «la vacuité spirituelle de l’Europe indéfiniment élargie» (Manent).

Le retour au Livre des ex-maos

De façon surprenante, du moins à première vue, la vision du monde de certaines figures emblématiques de Mai 1968 n’est pas très éloignée. Elle est même plus radicale encore. Comme le raconte Jean Birnbaum, les têtes pensantes de la «Génération», formée à Normale Sup dans les séminaires de Louis Althusser et Jacques Lacan avant de s’engager avec ferveur, le «petit livre rouge» à la main, dans les rangs de la Gauche prolétarienne (GP), sont bien loin de la foi progressiste de leur jeunesse.

En témoigne ce colloque organisé au théâtre Hébertot le 10 novembre 2003, «La question des Lumières», véritable rassemblement d’anciens militants (ou compagnons de route) de la GP, qui voit l’ensemble des participants (à la notable exception de Bernard-Henri Lévy) communier dans une remise en cause radicale de l’héritage des Lumières. Le thème du débat: l’œuvre de Benny Lévy, ex-leader de la GP sous le nom de Pierre Victor, décédé quelques jours auparavant, et le livre réquisitoire de Jean-Claude Milner, Les Penchants Criminels de l’Europe démocratique.

La thèse de ce dernier est terrible, extrême: l’Europe doit son unification à la Shoah, «solution» à la question juive posée par la modernité rationaliste et universaliste elle-même. Birnbaum rappelle le soutien actif apporté à l’entreprise de Milner par Benny Lévy, ancien secrétaire de Sartre passé du maoïsme au judaïsme orthodoxe, fondateur avec Alain Finkielkraut et Bernard-Henri Lévy de l’Institut d’études lévinassiennes – personnage à l’influence restée intacte parmi ses anciens camarades.

L’Europe des Lumières est selon Milner le «régime de l’illimité»: à l’intérieur, son souci essentiel est la satisfaction sans fin des intérêts de l’individu abstrait; à l’extérieur, son obsession est de favoriser l’expansion sans limites du droit et de la paix. Elle cherche ainsi à étendre son type de société à l’humanité entière. Un obstacle, pourtant, se dresse sur sa route: les porteurs du nom juif, incarnation par excellence du «limité», de la singularité, de la filiation.

Cette Europe-là ne peut souhaiter que la destruction d’Israël, Etat juif à l’heure où règne l’universalisme abstrait; Etat qui incarne, par excellence, la «frontière» à une époque où l’Europe les abolit – en bref un Etat-Nation «à l’ancienne», incarné, charnel. C’est de cette Europe que provient aujourd’hui le danger principal pour les Juifs. Le vieux nationalisme européen, celui qu’a pu incarner un Charles Maurras, reprochait autrefois aux Juifs d’être les agents du cosmopolitisme, errant à la surface de la terre sans patrie ni frontières. Mais aujourd’hui, c’est l’Europe qui incarne cet «illimité», ce cosmopolitisme destructeur des singularités que dénonçait Maurras. Et c’est elle qui menace les Juifs, car ils disposent maintenant d’une patrie. Milner, commente Birnbaum, établit une forme d’équivalence entre Maurrassiens et Juifs. Il semble bien dire qu’il faut désormais choisir Maurras contre Voltaire.

Ce discours radical contient bien une critique de la raison démocratique proche de celle des néo-tocquevilliens – menée ici aussi au nom de l’Etat-Nation traditionnel. Chez Milner comme chez Manent et Gauchet, son caractère «charnel», son «épaisseur» culturelle et religieuse, socle d’une communauté véritable, s’opposent en tous points à la logique des droits individuels et à l’unification européenne. Birnbaum résume ainsi le credo politique qui était devenu celui de Benny Lévy, passé du petit livre rouge à l’étude de la Torah: «toute politique digne de ce nom est d’abord une pastorale; le Pasteur garde et guide chacun de ses moutons».

La démocratie moderne, qui a «mis le peuple à la place du souverain pour faire du pouvoir un lieu vide, est une impasse». Lévy la qualifie «d’empire du rien», règne d’une «transcendance vide»: «absence de pasteur et règne du troupeau, ignorance de la Loi et prolifération des droits, oubli des hauteurs et bassesse de l’individu-roi». Face à ce relativisme et à ce nihilisme propres à la modernité, qui se sont radicalisés à l’époque contemporaine, l’auteur d’Etre Juif prône le retour au Livre (un judaïsme «d’affirmation», qui ne ménage pas ses critiques contre les Juifs «assimilés») et la rupture avec l’Europe.

Les deux Occidents

Nos pourfendeurs de la modernité, qu’ils se réclament plutôt de Tocqueville ou plutôt de Lévinas, sont en phase avec Leo Strauss lorsque ce dernier déclare que «l’homme occidental est devenu ce qu’il est et est ce qu’il est par la conjonction de la foi biblique et de la pensée grecque». La grande faute des Lumières, fondées sur la croyance en la toute-puissance de la Raison, est d’avoir méprisé «Athènes et Jérusalem», introduit le scepticisme et le relativisme alors qu’il fallait voir dans les textes des Anciens des vérités éternelles.

«A cet Occident-là, issu des Lumières, qui prétend débarrasser l’individu des contraintes de la tradition», note Jean Birnbaum, «ils en opposent un autre, respectueux de son héritage et qui affirme le primat de la communauté culturelle». «Etre d’Occident, ici, ce n’est pas appartenir à une même ethnie, encore moins à une même race, c’est partager des symboles, incarner une langue, reconnaître les événements spirituels par quoi cette civilisation s’est construite: miracle grec, droit romain, éthique biblique, révolution chrétienne, voire pensée libérale».

La critique, ici, est culturelle autant que politique. Dans cette veine, se distingue une autre figure de notre paysage intellectuel: Alain Finkielkraut. Sans appartenir pleinement à l’une des chapelles, il mène une réflexion personnelle qui puise abondamment aux deux sources néo-tocquevillienne et néo-lévinassienne (on en croise fréquemment les représentants dans son émission «Ripostes»). Ce qui le préoccupe au plus haut point, c’est le déclin de la «haute culture». «Tout est devenu culture, culture de la drogue, culture rock, culture des gangs de rue et ainsi de suite sans la moindre discrimination»: cette phrase n’est pas extraite de La Défaite de la Pensée mais de The Closing of the American Mind le best-seller du «neocon» Allan Bloom, le plus illustre disciple de Leo Strauss.

La proximité de l’argumentation des deux ouvrages saute aux yeux. Le relativisme généralisé, nous dit «Finkie» à longueur d’émissions, le triomphe d’une «culture de masse» abêtissante, reflète et accentue le déchaînement narcissique et l’atomisation de la société. Il sécrète une nouvelle barbarie qui prospère sur les ruines de la Culture et détruit la politique. Cette argumentation arendtienne et tocquevillienne – mais aussi, donc, straussienne – a bel et bien des implications politiques: il faut résister au multiculturalisme, expression du relativisme, et surtout lutter à tout prix pour restaurer la transmission des valeurs et le respect de l’autorité – c’est-à-dire prendre le parti du «survivant», qui reçoit et transmet un héritage, contre le «moderne» qui sacralise l’individu.

Cette lutte, pourrait-on dire, commence à l’Ecole. On peut en effet oser le parallèle avec le célèbre «notre route commence à Bagdad» de Richard Perle, car les deux sont considérés – où l’ont été, en ce qui concerne l’Irak – comme la «mère de toutes les batailles» dans le grand combat pour la restauration des valeurs de l’Occident.

La grande cause de l’institution scolaire en péril rassemble tous les néoconservateurs français, qu’ils se définissent comme tocquevilliens, arendtiens ou lévinassiens. Elle obsède Finkielkraut et reçoit l’appui de Gauchet. Milner, quant à lui, est l’auteur de la première grande charge intellectuelle contre le «pédagogisme», De l’Ecole, publié en 1984. L’évolution de l’école en France depuis quelques décennies, disent-ils, c’est le triomphe d’un égalitarisme niveleur, d’une pédagogie destructrice de l’autorité, l’alignement sur le niveau des plus faibles, le dénigrement de l’excellence. L’idéologie fallacieuse qui conduit à placer l’élève – et non le Savoir – «au centre du système» est le symptôme et le principal agent d’une grave dérive de notre démocratie. Cette idéologie détruit la Culture et le sens civique – elle menace donc la civilisation occidentale, mais aussi la démocratie elle-même.

Quelle politique?

«Un néoconservateur», clamait Irving Kristol, «c’est un homme de gauche qui a été agressé par la réalité». La réalité sociale contemporaine est en effet ce qui consterne au plus haut point les néoconservateurs à la française. Cette réalité, c’est d’abord l’absence du peuple. Ce peuple dans lequel ils plaçaient autrefois tous leurs espoirs s’est désagrégé en une «société d’individus», s’est vautré dans les jouissances matérielles, il a perdu la «common decency» dont parlait George Orwell. Il ne porte plus la promesse d’une nouvelle société; à en croire certains propos d’un Finkielkraut, il porte plutôt en lui une nouvelle forme de barbarie, celle qui sévit aujourd’hui dans nos banlieues.

Nos intellectuels sont passés de l’antitotalitarisme, avec sa critique de l’optimisme historique et de l’idéologie du progrès, à la désillusion envers toute perspective progressiste. Ainsi, leur critique de l’individualisme contemporain s’est-elle éloignée de celle que formulait autrefois l’Ecole de Francfort pour rejoindre les contours familiers de la vieille pensée antimoderne de droite. Toute trace des acquis positifs de la modernité démocratique, particulièrement lorsqu’ils sont récents, disparaît de leurs écrits.

Les promesses encore en partie inaccomplies des Lumières – l’émancipation et l’autonomie de l’individu, les avancées de l’égalité sociale, les progrès vers le règne du droit et de la paix à l’échelle mondiale – les préoccupent beaucoup moins que les dangers que nous courons en continuant à les poursuivre. Il faut défendre la démocratie contre elle-même en sauvant ce qui peut l’être: l’Ecole, la Nation, la Culture, voire la Religion. Ne subsiste, en somme, que la hantise de la décadence.

«Pour bien aimer la démocratie, il faut l’aimer modérément», nous dit Pierre Manent. Les néoconservateurs à la française ne préparent certes aucune contre-révolution. Si «nous ne pouvons garder le silence sur les dangers auxquels la démocratie s’expose elle-même et expose l’excellence humaine», elle doit être préservée, ne serait-ce que parce qu’en donnant à tous la liberté, elle l’accorde aussi à ceux qui recherchent cette excellence, disait Strauss. Toutefois, laisser libre cours à la dynamique individualiste, égalitaire et universaliste inhérente à la démocratie expose à de très graves périls. Gauchet va même jusqu’à affirmer: «Qui sait si la déliaison des individualités ne nous réserve pas des épreuves qui n’auront rien à envier, dans un autre genre, aux affres des embrigadements de masse?»

Contrairement à leurs homologues américains, ils se tiennent à bonne distance de la politique partisane: ils ont tiré les leçons des errements des intellectuels français au XXème siècle, et affichent pour certains un certain fatalisme. Ils n’ont pas lancé de vaste offensive politique, avec think tanks, revues et relais dans le monde politique et l’administration. La thèse de Daniel Lindenberg selon laquelle l’hégémonie du néoconservatisme aurait accouché du sarkozysme n’est pas entièrement convaincante. Mais l’influence que leur procure leur magistère intellectuel est réelle: on en trouve la trace dans les discours contre l’égalitarisme à l’école, le communautarisme, la «repentance» face au passé national, etc…

Les autres implications politiques de leur discours sont en général moins explicites mais ne se déduisent pas moins aisément: nos sociétés, disent-ils en somme, ne souffrent pas d’un excès d’inégalité sociale mais d’une fuite en avant de «l’esprit d’égalité extrême» (Finkielkraut); et s’il faut s’inquiéter du règne du néolibéralisme, c’est surtout en tant que conséquence du «droits de l’hommisme», du règne sans partage de l’individu-roi émancipé des traditions: «la consécration des droits de chacun débouche sur la dépossession de tous» (Gauchet).

On a parfois présenté les néoconservateurs américains comme des «nouveaux jacobins» (au sens originel du terme) ou comme des «wilsoniens bottés», mus par le messianisme des Lumières. C’est tout le contraire. Ils croient certes qu’il faut défendre avec vigueur la liberté contre la tyrannie (contre le relativisme, la «douceur» et l’esprit de faiblesse caractéristiques de l’esprit démocratique même). Mais ils croient d’abord et surtout à la vérité de leurs traditions et valeurs nationales.

C’est ainsi que pour les «neocons » comme John Bolton ou Paul Wolfovitz, la Constitution des Etats-Unis était la seule source de légitimité possible, le droit international n’étant qu’une mascarade. S’il y a une vérité donc, c’est celle qu’incarnent les valeurs de l’Occident – cette civilisation occidentale dont la spécificité a été soulignée par Huntington, et qui est aussi celle du fameux diptyque «Athènes et Jérusalem» de Strauss – et non celle de l’universalité de la raison humaine. Les ex-maos néo-lévinassiens se réclament d’un universalisme «en intensité», qui part du particulier pour atteindre une portée universelle (celle, par exemple, de la Torah) contre l’universalisme «en extension», absorbant tout dans la généralité, qui est celui des Lumières.

La seule vraie différence est l’obsession des «neocons», que ne partagent pas les Français, pour la politique étrangère. Sans doute la puissance des Etats-Unis leur attribue-t-elle à leurs yeux une mission particulière dans la défense de l’Occident en péril contre ses ennemis extérieurs. Les néoconservateurs français les retrouvent toutefois dans la dénonciation de la tendance européenne au pacifisme munichois (Finkielkraut, Milner) et dans l’appel à «des nations qui se comportent comme des nations» contre l’angélisme démocratique (Gauchet). Sans oublier le combat contre l’illusion dangereuse d’un «gouvernement mondial».

Car là où leurs cousins américains fustigent l’ONU, les Français ont trouvé leur bête noire: cette Union européenne «sans corps», sans identité et sans frontières définies, triomphe «anti-politique» du règne du marché et du droit, pointe avancée du «patriotisme constitutionnel» d’Habermas et du projet kantien de paix perpétuelle.

Deux conceptions de la démocratie

Tout ce discours se déploie, comme disait Kristol, au nom de la réalité. Mais de quelle réalité parlent-ils? Narcissisme, vulgarité des mass media, indifférence à la sphère publique… : les réflexions de nos intellectuels néoconservateurs entrent bien évidemment en résonance avec notre expérience d’occidentaux du début du XXIème siècle. Mais le bilan de la «culture des droits» est-il si négatif? Le déclin des traditions n’a-t-il pas aussi mené à davantage d’autonomie? Le legs des années 1960-70 (féminisme, mouvements pour la reconnaissance des droits des homosexuels, des cultures minoritaires) n’a-t-il pas été un facteur de progrès? La culture populaire ne produit-elle que médiocrité et nihilisme? Le grand danger du monde dans lequel nous vivons est-il vraiment le règne du «droits de l’hommisme»? Les Juifs ont-ils été victimes de la philosophie d’Emmanuel Kant plus que du nationalisme du sang et du sol? La construction européenne représente-t-elle vraiment la mort du politique et la destruction de la nation? Et nos sociétés sont-elles réellement menacées par un trop-plein d’égalité?

Ce que traduit le discours sans nuance, à sens unique, des néoconservateurs made in France, c’est un certain mépris de la réalité politique, historique, économique, sociale. Ce mépris est flagrant lorsque l’on considère leur cheval de bataille favori: la question scolaire. Alors que toutes les études et comparaisons internationales soulignent le caractère particulièrement élitiste et inégalitaire du système éducatif français, le phénomène de la «baisse du niveau» sous l’effet d’un égalitarisme excessif est présenté comme une vérité établie. Les propos de Jean-Claude Milner sur Les Héritiers de Pierre Bourdieu et Jean-Claude Passeron («livre antisémite» car «les héritiers, ce sont les Juifs») ne sont que la pointe extrême de ce refus de se confronter aux faits.

Au bout du compte, malgré la valeur intellectuelle indéniable de leur réflexion, malgré le nombre des références, malgré la sophistication du propos, les réalités socio-économiques sont évacuées au profit d’un discours essentiellement moralisant. Telle est, selon Zeev Sternhell (Les Anti-Lumières, Fayard, 2006), la source du succès du néoconservatisme: il «a réussi à convaincre la grande majorité des Américains que les questions essentielles dans la vie d’une société ne sont pas les questions économiques, et que les questions sociales sont en réalité des questions morales».

Contre leurs contempteurs (on se souvient de la violente controverse qui a suivi la publication du pamphlet, il est vrai très polémique, de Daniel Lindenberg sur «les nouveaux réactionnaires», et qui ne manquera pas d’être ravivée par le dernier ouvrage de son auteur), les néoconservateurs à la française défendront toujours le devoir de l’intellectuel de mener une critique lucide de la modernité et d’avertir leur contemporains des dangers qu’ils courent, et crieront toujours à la police de la pensée. Il n’empêche que leur discours doit continuer d’être examiné et critiqué, car il met en jeu la conception même que l’on se fait de la démocratie. Pour eux en effet, la démocratie n’est pas un projet inachevé, sans cesse à construire et à parfaire: il s’agit d’un legs, certes précieux, mais dont la fuite en avant menace d’entraîner la perte. Une dynamique à contenir, voire à bloquer, plutôt qu’à approfondir.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :