Epidémies: Vers le retour de la « grippe espagnole » ? (Will the « Spanish flu » strike back ?)

Egon Schiele's family (just before his death from the Spanish flu, 1918)Image

ECH18540151_1.jpg

Car alors, la détresse sera si grande qu’il n’y en a point eu de pareille depuis le commencement du monde jusqu’à présent, et qu’il n’y en aura jamais. Jésus (Mathieu 24: 21)
Les événements qui se déroulent sous nos yeux sont à la fois naturels et culturels, c’est-à-dire qu’ils sont apocalyptiques. Jusqu’à présent, les textes de l’Apocalypse faisaient rire. Tout l’effort de la pensée moderne a été de séparer le culturel du naturel. La science consiste à montrer que les phénomènes culturels ne sont pas naturels et qu’on se trompe forcément si on mélange les tremblements de terre et les rumeurs de guerre, comme le fait le texte de l’Apocalypse. Mais, tout à coup, la science prend conscience que les activités de l’homme sont en train de détruire la nature. C’est la science qui revient à l’Apocalypse. René Girard
The pandemic in 1918 was hardly the first influenza pandemic, nor was it the only lethal one. Throughout history, there have been influenza pandemics, some of which may have rivaled 1918’s lethality. A partial listing of particularly violent outbreaks likely to have been influenza include one in 1510 when a pandemic believed to come from Africa “attacked at once and raged all over Europe not missing a family and scarce a person” (Beveridge, 1977). In 1580, another pandemic started in Asia, then spread to Africa, Europe, and even America (despite the fact that it took 6 weeks to cross the ocean). It was so fierce “that in the space of six weeks it afflicted almost all the nations of Europe, of whom hardly the twentieth person was free of the disease” and some Spanish cities were “nearly entirely depopulated by the disease” (Beveridge, 1977). In 1688, influenza struck England, Ireland, and Virginia; in all these places “the people dyed . . . as in a plague” (Duffy, 1953). A mutated or new virus continued to plague Europe and America again in 1693 and Massachusetts in 1699. “The sickness extended to almost all families. Few or none escaped, and many dyed especially in Boston, and some dyed in a strange or unusual manner, in some families all were sick together, in some towns almost all were sick so that it was a time of disease” (Pettit, 1976). In London in 1847 and 1848, more people died from influenza than from the terrible cholera epidemic of 1832. In 1889 and 1890, a great and violent worldwide pandemic struck again (Beveridge, 1977). But 1918 seems to have been particularly violent. It began mildly, with a spring wave. In fact, it was so mild that some physicians wonder if this disease actually was influenza. Typically, several Italian doctors argued in separate journal articles that this “febrile disease now widely prevalent in Italy [is] not influenza” (Policlinico, 1918). British doctors echoed that conclusion; a Lancet article in July 1918 argued that the spring epidemic was not influenza because the symptoms, though similar to influenza, were “of very short duration and so far absent of relapses or complications” (Little et al., 1918). Within a few weeks of that Lancet article appearing, a second pandemic wave swept around the world. It also initially caused investigators to doubt that the disease was influenza—but this time because it was so virulent. It was followed by a third wave in 1919, and significant disease also struck in 1920. (Victims of the first wave enjoyed significant resistance to the second and third waves, offering compelling evidence that all were caused by the same virus. It is worth noting that the 1889–1890 pandemic also came in waves, but the third wave seemed to be the most lethal). The 1918 virus, especially in its second wave, was not only virulent and lethal, but extraordinarily violent. It created a range of symptoms rarely seen with the disease. After H5N1 first appeared in 1997, pathologists reported some findings “not previously described with influenza” (To et al., 2001). In fact, investigators in 1918 described every pathological change seen with H5N1 and more (Jordon, 1927: 266–268). Symptoms in 1918 were so unusual that initially influenza was misdiagnosed as dengue, cholera, or typhoid. (…) Then, the Army called them “atypical pneumonias.” Today we would call this atypical pneumonia Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). (…) Physicians tried everything they knew, everything they had ever heard of, from the ancient art of bleeding patients, to administering oxygen, to developing new vaccines and sera (chiefly against what we now call Hemophilus influenzae—a name derived from the fact that it was originally con-sidered the etiological agent—and several types of pneumococci). Only one therapeutic measure, transfusing blood from recovered patients to new victims, showed any hint of success. (…) Some nonmedical interventions did succeed. Total isolation, cutting a community off from the outside world, did work if done early enough. Gunnison, Colorado, a town that was a rail center and was large enough to have a college, succeeded in isolating itself. So did Fairbanks, Alaska. American Samoa escaped without a single case, while a few miles away in Western Samoa, 22 percent of the entire population died. (…) Even if isolation only slowed the virus, it had some value. One of the more interesting epidemiologic findings in 1918 was that the later in the second wave someone got sick, the less likely he or she was to die, and the more mild the illness was likely to be. This was true in terms of how late in the second wave the virus struck a given area, and, more curiously, it was also true within an area. That is, cities struck later tended to suffer less, and individuals in a given city struck later also tended to suffer less. Thus west coast American cities, hit later, had lower death rates than east coast cities, and Australia, which was not hit by the second wave until 1919, had the lowest death rate of any developed country. (…) Similarly, the first cities struck—Boston, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Louisville, New York, New Orleans, and smaller cities hit at the same time—all suffered grievously. But in those same places, the people struck by influenza later in the epidemic were not becoming as ill, and were not dying at the same rate, as those struck in the first 2 to 3 weeks. Cities struck later in the epidemic also usually had lower mortality rates. (…) The same pattern held true throughout the country and the world. (…) another hypothesis, although entirely speculative, may be worth exploring. If one steps back and looks at the entire United States, it seems that people across the country infected with the virus in September and early to mid-October suffered the most severe attacks. Those infected later, in whatever part of the country they were, suffered less. At the peak of the pandemic, then, the virus seemed to still be mutating rapidly, virtually with each passage through humans, and it was mutating toward a less lethal form. We do know that after a mild spring wave, after a certain number of passages through humans, a lethal virus evolved. Possibly after additional passages it became less virulent. This makes sense particularly if the virus was immature when it erupted in September, if it entered the human population only a few months before the lethal wave. (…) In the United States, national and local government and public health authorities badly mishandled the epidemic, offering a useful case study. The context is important. Every country engaged in World War I tried to control public perception. To avoid hurting morale, even in the nonlethal first wave the press in countries fighting in the war did not mention the outbreak. (But Spain was not at war and its press wrote about it, so the pandemic became known as the Spanish flu). (…) It is very possible that we will never know with certainty where the 1918 virus crossed into man. In the 1920s and 1930s, outstanding investigators in several countries launched massive reviews of evidence searching for the site of origin. They could not definitively answer the question. But they were unanimous in believing that no known outbreak in China could, as one investigator said, “be reasonably regarded as the true forerunner” of the epidemic. They considered the most likely sites of origin to be France and the United States, and most agreed with Macfarlane Burnet, who concluded that the evidence was “strongly suggestive” that the 1918 influenza pandemic began in the United States, and that its spread was “intimately related to war conditions and especially the arrival of American troops in France” (Burnet and Clark, 1942). My own research also makes me think that the United States was the most likely site of origin. The unearthing of previously unknown epidemiologic evidence has led me to advance my own hypothesis that the pandemic began in rural Kansas and traveled with draftees to what is now Fort Riley. (…) Virtually every expert on influenza believes another pandemic is nearly inevitable, that it will kill millions of people, and that it could kill tens of millions—and a virus like 1918, or H5N1, might kill a hundred million or more—and that it could cause economic and social disruption on a massive scale. This disruption itself could kill as well. Given those facts, every laboratory investigator and every public health official involved with the disease has two tasks: first, to do his or her work, and second, to make political leaders aware of the risk. The preparedness effort needs resources. Only the political process can allocate them. Stacey L. Knobler, Alison Mack, Adel Mahmoud and Stanley M. Lemon (2005)
The history of human coronaviruses began in 1965 when Tyrrell and Bynoe found that they could passage a virus named B814. It was found in human embryonic tracheal organ cultures obtained from the respiratory tract of an adult with a common cold. The presence of an infectious agent was demonstrated by inoculating the medium from these cultures intranasally in human volunteers; colds were produced in a significant proportion of subjects, but Tyrrell and Bynoe were unable to grow the agent in tissue culture at that time. At about the same time, Hamre and Procknow were able to grow a virus with unusual properties in tissue culture from samples obtained from medical students with colds. Both B814 and Hamre’s virus, which she called 229E, were ether-sensitive and therefore presumably required a lipid-containing coat for infectivity, but these 2 viruses were not related to any known myxo- or paramyxoviruses. While working in the laboratory of Robert Chanock at the National Institutes of Health, McIntosh et al reported the recovery of multiple strains of ether-sensitive agents from the human respiratory tract by using a technique similar to that of Tyrrell and Bynoe. These viruses were termed “OC” to designate that they were grown in organ cultures. Within the same time frame, Almeida and Tyrrell performed electron microscopy on fluids from organ cultures infected with B814 and found particles that resembled the infectious bronchitis virus of chickens. The particles were medium sized (80–150 nm), pleomorphic, membrane-coated, and covered with widely spaced club-shaped surface projections. The 229E agent identified by Hamre and Procknow and the previous OC viruses identified by McIntosh et al had a similar morphology. In the late 1960s, Tyrrell was leading a group of virologists working with the human strains and a number of animal viruses. These included infectious bronchitis virus, mouse hepatitis virus and transmissible gastroenteritis virus of swine, all of which had been demonstrated to be morphologically the same as seen through electron microscopy. This new group of viruses was named coronavirus (corona denoting the crown-like appearance of the surface projections) and was later officially accepted as a new genus of viruses. Ongoing research using serologic techniques has resulted in a considerable amount of information regarding the epidemiology of the human respiratory coronaviruses. It was found that in temperate climates, respiratory coronavirus infections occur more often in the winter and spring than in the summer and fall. Data revealed that coronavirus infections contribute as much as 35% of the total respiratory viral activity during epidemics. Overall, he proportion of adult colds produced by coronaviruses was estimated at 15%. (…) Given the enormous variety of animal coronaviruses, it was not surprising when the cause of a very new, severe acute respiratory syndrome, called SARS, emerged in 2002–2003 as a coronavirus from southern China and spread throughout the world with quantifiable speed. This virus grew fairly easily in tissue culture, enabling quick sequencing of the genome. Sequencing differed sufficiently from any of the known human or animal coronaviruses to place this virus into a new group, along with a virus that was subsequently cultured from Himalayan palm civets, from which it presumably had emerged. During the 2002–2003 outbreak, SARS infection was reported in 29 countries in North America, South America, Europe and Asia. Overall 8098 infected individuals were identified, with 774 SARS-related fatalities.26 It is still unclear how the virus entered the human population and whether the Himalayan palm civets were the natural reservoir for the virus. (…) Curiously data from seroepidemiologic studies conducted among food market workers in areas where the SARS epidemic likely began indicated that 40% of wild animal traders and 20% of individuals who slaughter animals were seropositive for SARS, although none had a history of SARS-like symptoms. These findings suggest that these individuals were exposed through their occupation to a SARS-like virus that frequently caused asymptomatic infection. Infection control policies may have contributed to the halt of the SARS epidemic. The last series of documented cases to date, in April 2004, were laboratory-acquired. (…) Since 2003, five new human coronaviruses have been discovered. Three of these are group I viruses that are closely related and likely represent the same viral species. Jeffrey S Kahn and Kenneth McIntosh (Nov 2005)
Le site d’origine de la pandémie de grippe de 1918 qui a tué plus de 50 millions de personnes dans le monde est vivement débattu. Alors que le Midwest des États-Unis, la France et la Chine ont tous été identifiés comme des candidats potentiels par les chercheurs en médecine, le contexte militaire de la pandémie a été pratiquement ignoré. A l’inverse, les historiens militaires se sont peu intéressés à une maladie mortelle qui souligne la relation réciproque entre champ de bataille et front intérieur. Cet article réexamine le débat sur les origines et la diffusion de la grippe de 1918 dans le contexte de la guerre mondiale, comblant ainsi les écarts entre l’histoire sociale, médicale et militaire. Une perspective multidisciplinaire combinée à de nouvelles recherches dans les archives britanniques et canadiennes révèle que la grippe de 1918 est probablement apparue pour la première fois en Chine au cours de l’hiver 1917-18, se diffusant à travers le monde lorsque des populations auparavant isolées sont entrées en contact les unes avec les autres sur les champs de bataille d’Europe. Les peurs ethnocentriques – à la fois officielles et populaires – ont facilité sa propagation le long des voies militaires qui avaient été tracées à travers le monde pour soutenir l’effort de guerre sur le front occidental. Mark Osborne Humphries (2014)
L’historien Christopher Langford a montré que la Chine avait souffert d’un taux de mortalité dû à la grippe espagnole inférieur à celui des autres pays, ce qui suggère une certaine immunité dans la population en raison d’une exposition antérieure au virus. Dans son nouveau rapport, Humphries prouve archives à l’appui qu’une maladie respiratoire qui a frappé le nord de la Chine en novembre 1917 a été identifiée un an plus tard par les autorités sanitaires chinoises comme identique à la grippe espagnole. Il a également retrouvé des dossiers médicaux indiquant que plus de 3 000 des 25 000 travailleurs du Chinese Labour Corps qui avaient été transportés  en l’Europe via le Canada à partir de 1917 avaient été mis en quarantaine médicale, beaucoup d’entre eux présentant des symptômes pseudo-grippaux (…) Humphries rapporte qu’une épidémie d’infections respiratoires, qui à l’époque étaient qualifiées de « mal de l’hiver » endémique par les responsables locaux de la santé, causaient des dizaines de morts par jour dans les villages le long de la Grande Muraille de Chine. La maladie s’est propagée à 300 miles (500 kilomètres) en six semaines fin 1917. D’abord considérée comme peste pulmonaire, la maladie a tué à un rythme beaucoup plus faible que ce qui est typique pour cette maladie. Humphries a découvert que dans un rapport de 1918 un responsable de la légation britannique en Chine avait écrit que la maladie était en fait la grippe. Humphries a fait ces découvertes lors de recherches dans les archives historiques canadiennes et britanniques qui contiennent les documents de guerre du Chinese Labour Corps et de la légation britannique à Pékin. Au moment de l’épidémie, des responsables britanniques et français formaient le Chinese Labour Corps, qui a finalement envoyé quelque 94 000 ouvriers du nord de la Chine vers le sud de l’Angleterre et la France pendant la guerre. « L’idée était de libérer des soldats pour aller au front à un moment où ils manquaient désespérément de main-d’œuvre », explique Humphries. Le transport des ouvriers en contournant l’Afrique prenait trop de temps et immobilisait trop d’expéditions, de sorte que les autorités britanniques se sont tournées vers l’option canadienne via Vancouver sur la côte ouest canadienne puis par train à Halifax sur la côte est, d’où ils pouvaient être envoyés en Europe. Le besoin de main-d’œuvre était si désespéré que le 2 mars 1918, un navire chargé de 1 899 hommes du Chinese Labour Corps quitta le port chinois de Wehaiwei pour Vancouver malgré la «peste» qui empêcha le recrutement de travailleurs là-bas. En réaction aux sentiments anti-chinois qui sévissaient dans l’Ouest canadien à l’époque, les trains qui transportaient les travailleurs de Vancouver furent plombés, rappelle Humphries. Des gardes spéciaux du service des chemins de fer surveillaient les ouvriers, qui étaient gardés dans des camps entourés de barbelés. Les journaux avaient l’interdiction de rendre compte de leur mouvement. Environ 3 000 des travailleurs se sont retrouvés en quarantaine médicale, leurs maladies étant souvent imputées à leur nature « paresseuse » par les médecins canadiens, selon Humphries : « Ils avaient des opinions très stéréotypées et racistes sur les Chinois ». Les médecins traitaient les maux de gorge avec de l’huile de ricin et renvoyaient les Chinois dans leurs camps. Les ouvriers chinois arrivèrent dans le sud de l’Angleterre en janvier 1918 et furent envoyés en France, où l’hôpital chinois de Noyelles-sur-Mer enregistra des centaines de décès dus à des maladies respiratoires. (…) Humphries admet qu’une réponse définitive au mystère des origines de la grippe espagnole est encore loin. « Ce dont nous avons vraiment besoin, c’est d’un échantillon du virus conservé dans un enterrement pour que les experts médicaux le découvrent. Cela aurait les meilleures chances de régler le débat. » (…) Ce que confirme Higgins: « Je dirais que le message à retenir de tout cela est de garder un œil sur la Chine » en tant que source de maladies émergentes. Il souligne les inquiétudes concernant la grippe aviaire et le virus du SRAS, tous deux apparus en Asie au cours de la dernière décennie. L’épidémie de SRAS a fait peut-être 775 morts en 2003, et la grippe aviaire A (H5N1) a tué 384 personnes depuis 2003, selon l’Organisation mondiale de la santé, qui surveille attentivement les signes d’une épidémie de la maladie. (…) L’histoire a le don de se répéter, rappelle-t-il, et les recherches sur les origines de la grippe de 1918 pourraient aider à éviter qu’un tel fléau ne se reproduise. Dan Vergano (2014)
Tôt ou tard, un virus va balayer le monde. En l’espace de quelques semaines. Il va toucher des personnes de tous âges et remplir les salles d’hôpitaux et les morgues locales. OMS (2001)
Le présent plan mondial OMS de préparation à une pandémie de grippe a été préparé pour aider les Etats Membres de l’OMS et les responsables de la préparation médicale de santé publique et d’urgence à faire face à la menace et à la survenue de la grippe pandémique. Il s’agit d’une mise à jour, considérablement révisée, de l’Influenza pandemic plan. The role of WHO and guidelines for national and regional planning, publié par l’OMS en 1999 et qui le remplace. Ce nouveau plan tient compte de la possibilité de l’existence prolongée d’un virus grippal potentiellement pandémique, tel que le virus appartenant au sous-type H5N1, qui sévit dans les élevages de volailles d’Asie depuis 2003. Il prend également en compte la possibilité de la survenue simultanée d’événements ayant un potentiel pandémique, présentant une menace variable selon les pays, comme cela a été le cas en 2004 avec les flambées de virus H7N3 dans les élevages de volailles du Canada et de virus H5N1 en Asie. (…) Il est impossible de prévoir à l’avance quand pourrait avoir lieu la prochaine pandémie, ou la gravité de ses conséquences. En moyenne, trois pandémies par siècle ont été documentées depuis le XVIe siècle, se produisant à des intervalles de 10 à 50 ans. Au cours du XXe siècle, de telles pandémies se sont produites en 1918, 1957 et 1968. On estime que celle de 1918 a tué plus de 40 millions de personnes en moins d’un an, avec des pics de mortalité chez les sujets âgés de 20 à 45 ans. Les pandémies de 1957 et 1968 ont été moins meurtrières (1 à 4 millions de décès selon les estimations, principalement dans les groupes à risque classiques que constituent par exemple les personnes âgées), mais elles ont néanmoins pesé lourdement sur les ressources en soins de santé de nombreux pays. Si un virus grippal pandémique analogue à celui qui a sévi en 1918 devait réapparaître, même en tenant compte des progrès de la médecine réalisés depuis lors, on pourrait s’attendre à un nombre sans précédent de malades et de décès. Les voyages aériens pourraient accélérer la propagation d’un nouveau virus et diminuer le temps disponible pour préparer les interventions. Les systèmes de soins de santé pourraient être rapidement surchargés, les économies mises à rude épreuve et l’ordre social ébranlé. Si l’on estime qu’il est quasiment impossible d’arrêter la propagation d’un virus pandémique, il devrait être possible d’en réduire les conséquences au minimum en se préparant à l’avance à relever le défi. OMS (2005)
La «grippe de Hongkong» alias «grippe de 68» est pourtant la plus récente des pandémies grippales. Troisième du XXe siècle après la «grippe espagnole» (20 à 40 millions de morts en 1918-1920) et la «grippe asiatique» (2 millions de morts en 1957), elle a fait le tour du monde entre l’été 1968 et le printemps 1970, tuant environ un million de personnes, selon les estimations de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS). Combien en France ? Il a fallu la grande peur d’une nouvelle pandémie liée à l’émergence du virus H5N1 pour que l’on s’aperçoive que nul n’avait fait le compte. C’est ainsi que les statisticiens et épidémiologistes Antoine Flahault et Alain-Jacques Valleron viennent de découvrir, au terme d’une analyse encore inédite des fichiers de mortalité conservés par l’unité CEPIDC (Centre épidémiologique sur les causes médicales de décès) de l’Inserm, l’ampleur exacte de cette grippe «oubliée» : «25 068 morts en décembre 1969 et 6 158 en janvier 1970, soit 31 226 en deux mois, révèle Antoine Flahault. La grippe de Hongkong a tué en France deux fois plus que la canicule de 2003 ! Fait frappant, cette énorme surmortalité saisonnière est passée pratiquement inaperçue.» A la fin des sixties, la grippe, ses malades et ses morts n’intéressent pas. Ni les pouvoirs publics, ni le public, ni les médias. L’événement est sur la Lune avec l’équipage d’Apollo 12, au Vietnam où l’Amérique s’enlise, au Biafra qui agonise, en Chine où s’achève la Révolution culturelle, à l’Elysée où s’installe Pompidou avec mission de gérer l’après-68 et les grèves qui perlent toujours dans les entreprises, les universités et les lycées. Mais assurément pas dans les hôpitaux. Témoin la presse française qui, en cet hiver 1969, alors même que la grippe de Hongkong atteint son apogée dans l’Hexagone, consacre des articles sporadiques à l’«épidémie» ­ on n’use pas alors du mot «pandémie». (…) La grippe, dont nul ne signale les morts, est alors moins qu’un fait divers. C’est un «marronnier d’hiver», écrit France-Soir… Un marronnier pour tous, sauf pour les collaborateurs du réseau international de surveillance de la grippe créé par l’OMS dès sa fondation, en 1947. Un article du Times de Londres les a alertés, le 12 juillet 1968, en signalant une forte vague de «maladie respiratoire» dans le sud-est de la Chine, à Hongkong. C’est dans cette colonie britannique surpeuplée qu’avaient été recensées, en 1957, les premières victimes du virus de la «grippe asiatique». Depuis, Hongkong est devenu, pour les épidémiologistes, la sentinelle des épidémies dont la Chine communiste est soupçonnée d’être le berceau. Fin juillet 1968, le Dr W. Chang dénombre 500 000 cas dans l’île. La «grippe de Hongkong» est née. Le virus, expédié sur un lit de glace à Londres où siège l’un des deux centres internationaux de référence de la grippe, est identifié comme une «variante» du virus de la grippe asiatique, un virus de type A2 ­ on dirait aujourd’hui H2. Erreur : on établira bientôt, après de vifs débats d’experts, qu’il s’agit d’un virus d’un nouveau genre, baptisé ultérieurement H3. Qu’importe, il voyage. Et vite. Profitant de l’émergence des transports aériens de masse. Gagne Taiwan, puis Singapour et le Vietnam. Ironie de la guerre : en septembre, il débarque en Californie avec des marines de retour au pays. Ironie de la science : au cours de ce même mois, il décime les rangs d’un Congrès international qui réunit à Téhéran 1 036 spécialistes des maladies infectieuses tropicales. «C’était un gag», raconte le virologiste Claude Hannoun, pionnier du vaccin antigrippal français et futur directeur du centre de référence de la grippe à l’Institut Pasteur. «Le troisième jour, alors que j’étais cloué au lit, un confrère m’a dit qu’il y avait plus de monde dans les chambres qu’en session. Près de la moitié des participants sont tombés malades sur place ou à leur retour chez eux.» Une enquête montrera qu’ils ont contribué à l’introduction du virus non seulement en Iran, mais dans huit pays de trois continents, du Sénégal au Koweït en passant par l’Angleterre et la Belgique. Fin 1968, le virus a traversé les Etats-Unis, tuant plus de 50 000 personnes en l’espace de trois mois. En janvier 1969, il accoste l’Europe de l’Ouest, mais sans grands dégâts, et en mai il semble avoir disparu de la circulation. Tant et si bien qu’en octobre 1969, lorsque l’OMS réunit à Atlanta une conférence internationale sur la grippe de Hongkong, les scientifiques estiment que la pandémie est finie, et plutôt bien : «Il n’y a pas eu de grand excès de mortalité, excepté aux Etats-Unis», conclut alors l’Américain Charles Cockburn. «En décembre, ça a été la douche froide», dit Claude Hannoun. Le virus de Hongkong est revenu en Europe. Méchant, cette fois. D’autant plus que le Vieux Continent a négligé de préparer un vaccin adéquat. Certes, en France, on a vacciné. Quelques jours durant, le service de vaccination de Lyon a même été pris d’assaut. «Il y a eu un moment où les vaccinations se faisaient sur le trottoir, avec des étudiants en médecine recrutés dans les amphis et la police qui bloquait les accès de la rue», raconte le Pr Dellamonica. Hélas, à la différence des vaccins américains, les produits français, fabriqués alors de façon assez artisanale par Pasteur (Paris) et Mérieux (Lyon), n’incluent pas la souche de Hongkong, malgré un débat d’experts. «De fait, les vaccins ont été d’une efficacité très médiocre ­ 30 % au lieu de l’usuel 70 %», relève Claude Hannoun. Autres temps, autres moeurs : nul n’a alors accusé les experts de la grippe et/ou le ministre de la Santé, Robert Boulin, d’avoir négligé ce «marronnier d’hiver» qui a envoyé 31 000 personnes au cimetière. On est loin de la France du sang contaminé dénonçant les responsabilités des politiques et des scientifiques, loin de ce début de millénaire où gouvernements et experts égrènent avec angoisse le nombre de personnes mortes d’avoir été contaminées par des volailles excrétant le virus aviaire H5N1 (une soixantaine en deux ans), guettent les premiers frémissements d’une «humanisation» du virus et se préparent, à coups de millions de dollars, à affronter les retombées sanitaires, économique. «A la fin des années 60, on a confiance dans le progrès en général, et le progrès médical en particulier, analyse Patrice Bourdelais, historien de la santé publique à l’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales. Il y a encore beaucoup de mortalité infectieuse dans les pays développés, mais la plupart des épidémies y ont disparu grâce aux vaccins, aux antibiotiques et à l’hygiène. La grippe va donc, inéluctablement, disparaître.» Pour la communauté scientifique, la pandémie de Hongkong est cependant un choc. «Elle a sonné l’alarme, réveillé la peur de la catastrophe de 1918 et boosté les recherches sur le virus», dit Claude Hannoun. L’Institut Pasteur lui demande en effet dès 1970 de laisser ses travaux sur la fièvre jaune pour revenir à la grippe. «C’est elle aussi qui a dopé la production de vaccins, passée en France de 200 000 doses par an en 1968 à 6 millions en 1972.» Pour les épidémiologistes, «la grippe de Hongkong est entrée dans l’histoire comme la première pandémie de l’ère moderne. Celle des transports aériens rapides. La première, aussi, à avoir été surveillée par un réseau international, note Antoine Flahault. De fait, elle est la base de tous les travaux de modélisation visant à prédire le calendrier de la future pandémie». La grippe de Hongkong a bouclé son premier tour du monde en un an avant de revenir attaquer l’Europe. Elle nous dit que le prochain nouveau virus ceinturera la planète en quelques mois. Libération (2005)
La grippe espagnole, de triste mémoire, fut responsable de plus de 20 millions de morts. Que se passerait-il en cas de résurgence d’un tel virus ? Une catastrophe. Le pire est que les médicaments existent, mais qu’ils ne sont pas disponibles à grande échelle. Le virus de la grippe est en perpétuelle mutation et certaines souches sont très dangereuses. L’épidémie la plus tristement célèbre fut celle de 1918 qui fit plusieurs millions de morts. La grippe est aussi la maladie infectieuse qui tue le plus de personne en France chaque année. Cette maladie est donc loin d’être inoffensive et il est important de se vacciner. Devant les risques d’une nouvelle pandémie (épidémie mondiale), deux universitaires australiens se sont posé la question de nos solutions dans le cas d’un nouveau scénario catastrophe. Ils constatent en premier lieu que les risques d’un tel scénario sont réels dès lors que les transports aériens permettraient de propager le virus très rapidement dans le monde. Ils observent ensuite qu’il ne serait pas possible de fabriquer à temps suffisamment de doses de vaccins pour protéger les populations. Dès lors ils préconisent le stockage des deux médicaments antiviraux existants de manière à pouvoir les distribuer largement à la population en cas de besoin. En effet, si ces deux médicaments, le relenza et le Tamiflu (non encore commercialisés en France), sont efficaces, ils restent chers, ce qui explique leur faible taux de prescription. La faiblesse des deux dernières épidémies n’a pas non plus permis le développement de leurs marchés. En les stockant, les gouvernements les achèteraient en grande quantité, ce qui permettrait de faire baisser considérablement les coûts. Cela permettrait surtout à tous d’y avoir accès et donc de se mettre à l’abris d’un tel fléau. En effet, à défaut de stockage, seules quelques centaines de milliers de traitements seraient disponibles pour Europe et une pénurie serait vite alarmante. La question mériterait en tous cas un vrai débat ouvert et public. Dr Philippe Presles (2001)
Au cours du XXe siècle, trois pandémies majeures ont traversé l’Europe en 1918, 1957 et 1968. Celle de 1918 dura quelques semaines et fit plus de dégâts que la grande guerre : 30 millions de victimes. La reconstitution ultérieure du génome de ce virus baptisé à tort « espagnol » a révélé l’existence d’un cocktail particulièrement dévastateur. Il s’agissait d’un virus aviaire (hébergé par un oiseau) probablement hybridé avec une souche humaine. Le tout avait transité par le porc avant d’infecter l’homme. Ce virus est en fait très déconcertant. Il peut être très contagieux et affecter un nombre important de personnes sans gravité. Il peut aussi avoir une létalité élevée, sans être très contagieux. Entre ces deux extrêmes, toutes les versions intermédiaires existent et on rencontre donc une famille de virus de deux types différents (A et B). Au cours d’un séminaire consacré aux « états de la grippe » qui vient de se tenir à Paris, les experts de cette pathologie ont débattu d’une pathologie qui est loin d’avoir livré tous ses secrets. Malgré les observatoires et réseaux de surveillance mis en place dans le monde, nombre de questions restent sans réponse : faut-il généraliser la vaccination ? Quelle place pour les antiviraux ? Comment protéger les populations à risque ? Mais une question tracasse tout le monde : une épidémie grave comme celle de 1918 peut elle se reproduire en Europe ? « Certainement et cela arrivera. La création naturelle d’un virus hybride se produit régulièrement. Mais les conditions pour qu’il soit dangereux sont difficiles à remplir. La percée d’un virus pandémique est un événement de faible fréquence », précise Claude Hannoun membre honoraire de l’Institut Pasteur. L’organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) est tout aussi inquiète. « Une pandémie de grippe majeure est fort probable et nous y sommes faiblement préparés », indique l’organisation genevoise dans ses mises en garde. L’OMS n’hésite pas à manier un scénario qui donnent le frison : « Tôt ou tard, un virus va balayer le monde. En l’espace de quelques semaines. Il va toucher des personnes de tous âges et remplir les salles d’hôpitaux et les morgues locales. » Heureusement il n’en est pas toujours ainsi : « La grippe est en général une maladie bénigne qui ne requiert pas d’acte médical », déclare Claudie Locquet, médecin généraliste à Brest. En d’autres termes, et pour reprendre le vieil adage des grands mères d’autrefois : « Il faut une semaine pour soigner une grippe en prenant des médicaments et sept jours pour la guérir en ne prenant rien du tout. » Mais, en fait, ce n’est pas si simple. « Il y a en France 1 million de personnes âgées particulièrement vulnérables qui sont exposées à un risque très important » indique Joël Belmin, gériatre au centre hospitalier René-Muret à Sevran. La pandémie de 1968 a mis en lumière une autre caractéristique du virus : son « ingéniosité ». Cette année-là, il trouva le moyen, de muter en cours d’épidémie, échappant ainsi aux défenses immunitaires développées par la première vague de malades. « Comme le virus n’était pas tout à fait le même, certains sujet ont contracté la maladie deux fois à quelques semaines d’intervalle », précise Claude Hannoun. La vaccination reste la meilleure prévention, mais son efficacité varie en fonction de deux paramètres : la variabilité du virus et l’état du système immunitaire de l’hôte dont l’efficacité décroît avec l’âge. « Quand il y a concordance entre les souches vaccinales et le virus circulant l’efficacité peut atteindre 90 % chez les enfants et les jeunes adultes », indique le professeur Paul Leophonte, pneumologue au CHU de Toulouse. Malgré ces résultats, la vaccination n’est pas toujours bonne presse au pays de Pasteur. Les jeunes l’assimilent parfois « à un traitement pour les vieux ». Le non-remboursement (pour les moins de soixante-cinq ans) lui donne de surcroît une réputation de remède inefficace. Par ailleurs, les parents rechignent à faire vacciner les jeunes enfants, à cause d’un calendrier vaccinal déjà bien rempli. Certains médecins entretiennent d’ailleurs cette mauvaise réputation pour des raisons pas toujours avouables. « C’est dommage car les enfants sont le premier réservoir du virus », précise Catherine Olivier, du CHU Louis Mourier de Colombes. L’arrivée prochaine d’un vaccin sous forme de spray nasal devrait atténuer ces réticences. Les Echos
La question n’est pas de savoir si, mais quand cela sera se produira. Michael Osterholm
On commémore cette année la paix revenue il y a un siècle, mais on oublie de s’interroger sur l’épidémie de grippe dite espagnole qui, la même année, fit environ 100 millions de victimes : quatre fois plus que la guerre elle-même. Sur cette épidémie, on sait aujourd’hui à peu près tout. A partir de cadavres retrouvés congelés en Alaska, il a été possible de reconstituer le virus dit H1 N1, une grippe particulièrement agressive et toujours latente. Sous différentes formes, en mutation constante, la grippe accompagne l’humanité depuis toujours, explique Michael Osterholm, une autorité mondiale sur le sujet, directeur du Centre de recherche sur les maladies infectieuses à l’université du Minnesota. (…) Les historiens de l’Antiquité, rappelle Osterholm, témoignaient déjà des ravages de la grippe à Athènes. Sans doute, en raison de cette familiarité avec la grippe, celle-ci ne marque pas les esprits durablement, au contraire d’épidémies exceptionnelles, telles les grandes pestes. Nous allons voir que cette relative indifférence et cette faculté d’oubli sont ce qui rend la grippe à terme d’autant plus dangereuse et nous, démunis face à la prochaine épidémie.  Celle de 1918 fut particulièrement tueuse en raison de l’agressivité du virus et parce que, mondialisée par les voyages maritimes, elle a terrassé des peuples qui n’avaient jamais été immunisés : en quelques mois, la maladie fit des ravages de Rio, au Brésil, à Bombay, en Inde, en passant par la Nouvelle-Zélande, l’Iran, la Chine, l’Europe, la Russie, l’Alaska. On a pu reconstituer son cheminement par bateau, où un marin contagieux suffit à diffuser la maladie d’une escale à l’autre. Ce ne fut pas une grippe de saison telle qu’on en connaît chaque hiver, certes douloureuse mais qui, au pire, ne tue que des personnes âgées ou des nourrissons. En 1918, la moyenne d’âge des morts, dit Osterholm, fut de 27 ans. Certains mouraient dans la journée. Lorsqu’un virus comparable, mais atténué, a réapparu en 2009, la moyenne d’âge des victimes fut de 40 ans, ce qui, compte tenu de l’espérance de vie plus longue, reflète les décès de 1918. Cent millions de morts en 1918, sur une planète trois fois moins peuplée, cela représenterait aujourd’hui 300 millions de décès : la grippe espagnole fit plus de victimes en un an que le sida sur les trente-cinq dernières années. Cette grippe « espagnole » pourrait-elle revenir et sommes-nous préparés à l’affronter ? « Elle reviendra nécessairement, dit Osterholm. On ne sait pas quand, mais c’est certain, et, non, nous ne sommes pas du tout préparés à l’affronter. » Mon interlocuteur explique aussi que la grippe de 1918, dite espagnole, n’a pas surgi en Espagne, mais probablement au Kansas, d’où un soldat américain l’aurait transportée en Europe, non sans avoir contaminé ses camarades de combat sur les vaisseaux de transport et dans les camps : les victimes furent particulièrement nombreuses dans le corps expéditionnaire américain, où le virus tua beaucoup plus que les armes allemandes. Pourquoi « espagnole » ? L’épidémie fut initialement repérée en France et en Allemagne, particulièrement chez les soldats. Mais, pour ne pas semer la panique, les autorités civiles et militaires étouffèrent l’affaire ; la presse, censurée, n’en parla pas. Les malades furent regroupés, isolés en quarantaine, à l’abri de toute inquisition. Quand la grippe atteignit l’Espagne, qui était un pays neutre, où la presse était libre, on ignorait que la grippe ravageait les pays voisins. La presse et les autorités de santé en conclurent que la maladie était locale, et celles-ci l’ont logiquement qualifiée d’espagnole. Les autres pays, contaminés, ont repris ce qualificatif à leur compte : il est constant dans toutes les épidémies historiques de l’attribuer aux étrangers. La syphilis, naguère, était appelée napolitaine par les Français et française par les Britanniques. Les Espagnols, bien qu’innocents, furent particulièrement frappés. La ville de Zamora perdit 3 % de sa population, en grande partie en raison de l’incompréhension de l’épidémie. Les esprits éclairés savaient qu’il fallait isoler les malades, mais l’évêque local, persuadé qu’il s’agissait d’un châtiment divin, multiplia les messes, les processions et le nombre des… infections. Serait-on plus rationnel aujourd’hui ? Pas totalement, craint Osterholm : « Les situations de panique suscitent des comportements irrationnels et raniment la pensée magique. » On l’a vu récemment en Afrique dans les pays atteints par le virus Ebola et on le découvre dans le comportement d’Occidentaux qui refusent toute vaccination. Osterholm et les épidémiologues contemporains ont désormais la prudence scientifique de désigner les grippes par leur année : celle de 2009, par exemple, qui probablement commença au Mexique, n’est pas mexicaine mais millésimée 2009. Le retour d’une grippe tueuse plutôt que de saison est certain, selon Osterholm, parce qu’on constate le rythme cyclique des épidémies : les virus mutent et alternent. En 1918 et en 2009, le monde est atteint par le virus tueur qui se distingue par la jeunesse des victimes : en 2009, 300 000 victimes sont recensées, dont 80 % ont moins de 37 ans. Tandis qu’en 1957 et 1968 deux épidémies mondiales ne tuent que les personnes âgées fragiles. De plus, les foyers de départ sont plus nombreux que jamais, toujours en des lieux où les hommes cohabitent avec les animaux, particulièrement les élevages de porcs et de poulets : une épidémie démarre là où un virus par mutation passe de l’animal à l’homme. Comme l’humanité entière consomme maintenant de la viande, les exploitations géantes se multiplient, particulièrement en Chine : autant de foyers potentiels pour les grippes à venir. Il se trouve malheureusement que la Chine est mal préparée à détecter les épidémies à leur naissance et peu portée sur la transparence : lorsqu’une épidémie se déclara dans la province de Canton, en 2002, il fallut attendre que des voyageurs occidentaux, passant par Hongkong, en soient infectés et parviennent au Canada pour qu’on comprenne la nature et la violence de l’épidémie dite SRAS, une pneumonie atypique : des semaines perdues, des milliers de victimes, jusqu’au Canada, avant qu’on ne comprenne la nécessité d’isoler les malades pour arrêter la contagion. Isoler les malades et aussi exterminer tous les chiens de Canton quand on eut compris, un peu tard, qu’ils étaient les vecteurs de la maladie. Les dirigeants chinois, dit Osterholm, prenant acte de ce que les Chinois furent en nombre les premières victimes, sont aujourd’hui plus coopératifs. Ajoutons pour mémoire, en plus de la gravité de la menace, les transports aériens, qui ont remplacé les navires de 1918, diffusant les malades contagieux de manière quasi instantanée. En admettant que l’épidémie sera certaine, comment s’y préparer et, autant que faire se peut, y résister ? Les vaccins contre la grippe ? Il vaut mieux être vacciné que non, dit Osterholm, mais « il faut être honnête avec le public : mieux vaut admettre que le vaccin ne protège pas intégralement plutôt que de laisser croire en son efficacité totale ». Selon les années, le vaccin protège de 10 % à 80 %. Disons 50 % en moyenne. Mais réduire de moitié le risque de contracter la maladie, et de la répandre, justifie en soi une vaccination générale. Jusqu’ici, faute d’avoir su l’expliquer honnêtement, on suscite en retour une négligence générale des populations à risque, voire, en Europe et aux Etats-Unis, une hostilité de principe contre toute vaccination. Ainsi réapparaissent en France des maladies qu’on croyait éteintes, comme la rougeole, car aucune maladie contagieuse ne disparaît jamais si la vaccination s’arrête. Pour noircir le tableau, j’apprends par Osterholm qu’il n’existe aucun stock significatif de vaccins contre la grippe nulle part au monde : les vaccins sont produits, lentement, six mois en moyenne, avec des techniques qui remontent aux années 1940, au fur et à mesure de la demande, pour l’essentiel dans des laboratoires chinois et indiens. Si une épidémie de grippe tueuse se déclenche, si elle est certaine et si nous n’avons pas de vaccin, que faire ? Osterholm souhaite que l’opinion publique prenne la mesure du danger et que l’on assiste à une mobilisation financière et intellectuelle comparable à ce que déclencha l’épidémie du sida. Mais, malgré un investissement de l’ordre de 1 milliard de dollars par an, de la part du gouvernement américain pour l’essentiel, le vaccin contre le sida n’a toujours pas été trouvé, bien que, chaque année, on l’annonce comme imminent. Les thérapies, qui ne font que contenir la maladie, sont loin d’être totalement protectrices, leur efficacité diminue et leur coût est si élevé que la plupart des malades, en Afrique surtout, n’y ont pas accès. Se préparer à une épidémie de grippe exigerait donc une prise de conscience de ce que le risque est encore plus important qu’avec le sida. Il existe un précédent d’éradication d’une maladie contagieuse, celle de la variole dans les années 1970, à la suite d’un accord entre les Etats-Unis et l’URSS, qui, à l’époque, codirigeaient la planète. Sans aucune nostalgie pour cette période de guerre froide où l’on côtoyait la destruction nucléaire, Osterholm rappelle que, quand les deux grandes puissances prenaient une décision, celle-ci s’imposait, de fait, au monde entier. Il n’existe plus d’autorité mondiale effective et il était plus facile de contenir la variole hier que ce ne serait le cas demain pour la grippe. Rappelons que la stratégie d’élimination de la variole revient à un épidémiologiste américain, William Foege : sa méthode consistait, chaque fois qu’un cas était repéré, à vacciner l’entourage, un encerclement de la maladie qui finit par ne plus pouvoir se répandre. La solution ultime contre la grippe, dit Osterholm, serait la création d’un vaccin universel contre toutes les formes de grippe : c’est envisageable, ce serait long et la mise au point exigerait une concentration de moyens comparable au projet Manhattan, qui, en 1944, aboutit à la création de la bombe atomique. Ce serait donc contre la grippe un projet Manhattan à rebours, au service de la vie, pas de la mort. Mais « le monde n’a aucune conscience de la menace, aucun sentiment d’urgence ». On préfère « lutter contre le changement climatique », sans aucun résultat, d’ailleurs. Toute comparaison est hasardeuse, mais Osterholm rappelle qu’au XIVe siècle la peste tua un tiers de l’humanité et congela les civilisations pour deux siècles. Au regret de devoir accabler un peu plus le lecteur, avec Osterholm nous évoquons le second risque sanitaire qui nous menace : la perte d’efficacité des antibiotiques à la suite de leur utilisation excessive. Si une épidémie de grippe mortelle peut être comparée à un tsunami, dit Osterholm, l’inefficacité croissante des antibiotiques ressemble à un tsunami au ralenti. Sait-on assez que la tuberculose est de retour, souvent transportée par des migrants venus d’Afrique et de l’Inde et que, dans un tiers des cas, les antibiotiques classiques sont désormais sans effet ? Cette résistance des germes, qui s’adaptent pour résister, laisse l’humanité chaque jour un peu plus désarmée contre le retour des maladies infectieuses les plus traditionnelles, et la mutation de nouveaux germes, comme Ebola ou Zika, par exemple, qui est devenu sexuellement transmissible. Osterholm envisage qu’en 2050 50 millions de malades mourront en raison de l’inefficacité des traitements antibiotiques. On le sait, mais comme le tsunami est lent et invisible, le comportement des patients, et du corps médical, n’évolue pas. Devrait-on attendre quelque drame sanitaire collectif atteignant la vieille Europe pour se réveiller ? C’est ainsi qu’englué dans la politique à court terme et les mythes on ne distingue plus ce qui est superficiel de ce qui change vraiment le cours de l’Histoire. Guy Sorman
Aujourd’hui, les chercheurs estiment qu’entre 50 et 100 millions de personnes sont mortes de la grippe espagnole. Un chiffre invraisemblable, et ce d’autant plus qu’à l’époque, on ne recensait encore qu’environ 2 milliards d’habitants sur la Terre. Cette grippe est considérée comme la pire de toutes les épidémies. Pire, même, que celles qui ont accompagné la chute de l’Empire romain ou que la peste bubonique, la peste noire du Moyen Âge. De nos jours encore, un siècle après la “grippe mondiale”, après des décennies de progrès fulgurants dans la médecine, bien des énigmes subsistent : par quelle espèce animale avait-elle été transmise à l’homme ? Cela s’était-il produit dans les campagnes du Kansas, aux États-Unis ? Ou étaient-ce des ouvriers chinois qui l’y avaient importée ? Les épidémiologistes ont reconstitué la diffusion de la grippe à partir de rapports d’hôpitaux, de décomptes des décès, d’articles de journaux, de statistiques des armées et des autorités. Ils identifient plusieurs caractéristiques qui en font le prototype d’une pandémie moderne (de pan, mot grec qui veut dire “tous”). Au printemps 1918, des médecins de la caserne de Riley, au Kansas, ont décrit quelque chose que les historiens de la médecine ont identifié plus tard comme la première manifestation du virus. Le 4 mars, le cuisinier s’était fait porter pâle. Une semaine plus tard, 100 recrues étaient hospitalisées et plus de 500 étaient contaminées. La pathologie semblait relativement bénigne. Mais si ces jeunes soldats se trouvaient à Riley, c’était pour y suivre un entraînement avant d’être déployés en Europe, aussi ont-ils emporté avec eux le déclencheur de la maladie, dans les transports de troupes qui traversaient l’Atlantique, et jusqu’au front. C’est dans les tranchées et les abris surpeuplés, où les soldats vivaient dans des conditions d’hygiène abominables, qu’a dû se produire une mutation qui a rendu le virus plus dangereux. Lors d’une deuxième vague, les militaires l’ont transmis aux civils dans leurs pays d’origine. Jamais encore le monde n’avait été à ce point interconnecté, ce qui a encore favorisé sa diffusion. (…) Les belligérants, par leur silence, ont aggravé les choses. Les articles faisant état de l’apparition du virus dans les Flandres au printemps 1918 ont été interdits de publication. Ce n’est qu’en juin que la maladie a été décrite en détail, et ce, dans l’Espagne neutre, où la presse n’était pas soumise à la censure. L’affaire a eu d’autant plus de retentissement que le roi Alphonse XIII lui-même est tombé malade, si bien que, rapidement, bien des pays en sont venus à parler de “grippe espagnole”. Et même là où on lui donnait un autre nom, ce dernier était toujours associé à l’idée d’une menace venue de l’étranger : au Sénégal, on l’appelait la grippe brésilienne, au Brésil la grippe allemande, en Pologne la grippe bolchevique, en Perse la grippe britannique. Les gens de l’époque n’ont jamais pu en déterminer l’origine. Certes, les scientifiques étaient en réalité sur les traces du virus depuis la fin du XIXsiècle, mais leurs informations n’étaient évidemment pas accessibles au grand public. Ce n’est que quand des chercheurs de l’équipe du virologiste Jeffery Taubenberger, près de quatre-vingts ans plus tard, ont découvert des restes humains datant de la dernière année de la guerre qu’il leur a été possible de séquencer des brins de l’ARN du virus. En 2005, ils ont décrit le pathogène meurtrier dans la revue Science : il s’agissait d’un virus de la grippe A de type H1N1. Au bout d’un an d’analyses génétiques, Taubenberger a écrit que tous les virus des grippes mondiales de type A devaient être des descendants de ce pathogène — “ce qui fait du virus de 1918 la ‘mère de toutes les pandémies’”. (…) Toutefois, la pandémie de 1918-1919 présente des particularités qui peuvent être synonymes d’espoir. Si elle nous sert aujourd’hui de modèle, elle s’est déroulée dans des conditions inhabituelles. Le front de l’Ouest constituait un foyer idéal. Des variantes agressives du virus ont pu se répandre dans les tranchées, bien qu’elles aient tué beaucoup plus de malades, et beaucoup plus vite, que la première vague, dans le Kansas. De plus, la population civile était tout autant affectée par les privations que les soldats, durant la quatrième année de guerre. Bien souvent, la santé n’était pas une priorité pour les États. Enfin, en 1918, il n’existait encore aucun antibiotique contre les pneumonies bactériennes, lesquelles étaient la cause la plus courante de décès en tant qu’infections secondaires chez les victimes de la grippe. On peut donc considérer que l’humanité était particulièrement vulnérable au moment où la nature a fait apparaître ce virus. Dans l’ensemble, le monde était certes effectivement moderne, mais il ne se faisait encore qu’une idée imparfaite de l’omniprésence des microbes. À l’opposé, aujourd’hui, la planète est reliée par des réseaux de transports d’une densité et d’une rapidité sans précédent. Nous sommes quatre fois plus nombreux à y vivre qu’à l’époque. Par conséquent, le temps nécessaire à l’enrayement d’une épidémie est d’autant plus court. C’est pour cette raison que les chercheurs étudient au plus vite chaque nouveau virus, même si son impact paraît négligeable par rapport à d’autres maladies contagieuses. Quelques années plus tard, immanquablement, il n’en reste que le souvenir d’une inquiétude exagérée : la grippe aviaire, la grippe porcine – finalement, pourquoi n’ont-elles pas été si terribles ? Fort heureusement, il faut que se conjuguent un grand nombre de facteurs pour que surgisse un agent pathogène potentiellement destructeur, qui fera dire aux scientifiques : “cette fois, ça y est”. Die Zeit
It’s hard to name many Hollywood blockbusters that are as invested in the realities of science as Contagion. There certainly are plenty of enormously successful science-fiction films that abuse science in the name of drama, like Outbreak and The Day After Tomorrow, but very few Hollywood productions realistically portray the process of science, both its successes and frustrations. That’s what makes Contagion unique. Although it is by no means flawlessly accurate – it’s not a NOVA documentary – Contagion has been well fact-checked compared to most science-y blockbusters. New scientist
I find Contagion interesting not just for putting virology on the screen, but for making public health workers its heroes. Scientists may not get treated very well in Hollywood, but at least they show up in movies sometimes. I cannot think of another movie where epidemiologists get the star treatment. Contagion finds the detective story in their work. It shows how reconstructing the course of an outbreak can provide crucial clues, such as how many people an infected person can give a virus to, how many of them get sick, and how many of them die. Figuring out the history of an epidemic can help take away its future. The trouble that Germany had in tracking down the source of their deadly E. coli outbreak earlier this year (cucumbers from Spain—no, wait, bean sprouts from Germany—no, hold on, fenugreek seeds from Egypt) shows that public health systems can stumble in even the wealthiest countries on Earth. A major virus outbreak would be a much bigger challenge. Whether Contagion turns out to be fantasy or prophecy depends a lot on how well our public health system will perform. It also depends, as you point out, on how quickly we can find vaccines and make them. At the screening, I raised that point with Lipkin. He said he’s gotten some guff from his colleagues for the speed at which the scientists in the movie whip up a vaccine. But he personally thought that part of Contagion was too slow. Lipkin acknowledged that standard vaccine production is glacial. That’s because of inertia, not science, he says. The technique of making flu vaccines in eggs was developed over five decades ago. Lipkin and his colleagues are now capable of figuring out how to trigger immune reactions to exotic viruses from animals in a matter of weeks, not months. And once they’ve created a vaccine, they don’t have to use Eisenhower-era technology to manufacture it in bulk. Instead of making vaccines in chicken eggs, they can use insect cells, even yeast cells. Not all viruses will be easy to target, Lipkin granted. HIV will remain tough to vaccinate, because it mutates quickly and can lurk in cells for years. But other viruses (like the ones Lipkin stitched together for Contagion) could be addressed quickly, if only we could drag vaccine development into the 21st century. The tools are all here, Lipkin argued; we just need to use them properly. So now I see the ending of the Contagion differently than I did the first time. It’s not a Hollywood mandate to have the audience leave the theater on happy note. It’s a hint of what might be. Carl Zimmer
Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion (…) deals with a pandemic-like influenza virus to which no one in the population has been previously exposed and which has the potential to do a tremendous amount of harm. It was an interesting movie. Typically when movies take on science, they tend to sacrifice the science in favor of drama. That wasn’t true here. The moviemakers did a very good job of illustrating how Southeast Asia can essentially serve as a « genetic reassortment laboratory » with influenza strains being created as a combination event among strains from pigs and chickens (and in this case, bats) to create a strain that the population has never seen before. They do a very good job of explaining that possibility and in showing how easy the virus can spread from one person to another. In fact, in bringing up the concept of contagiousness as « R0, » they compare the R0 of influenza, polio, and smallpox. It’s very interesting that they were willing to spend time explaining what contagiousness means. They also do an excellent job of describing the phenomenon of fomites — that one can, in fact, transmit microorganisms very easily by shaking a hand or touching a martini glass or a door handle. The camera lingered on these different items to the point that it essentially becomes a commercial for hand sanitizer (which they actually show at one point during the movie). They discuss how difficult it is to try and stop this virus. (…) In discussing how they would go about making a vaccine, they make a distinction between a whole kill virus and a live attenuated vaccine. They show how the CDC, through active case hunting, can actually figure out exactly how this virus was generated and collaborate with academia — in this case, a virologist in California named Sussman, played by Elliott Gould. You have to be able to imagine Elliott Gould as a virologist, but if you can, it really is a nice touch, showing how he is the first to be able to grow the virus in cell culture, allowing a vaccine to be made. The movie then explores the difficulties in trying to decide who can get vaccine, given that the supply is limited. These are all the issues that we faced when we talked about the possibility of how devastating the most recent swine flu pandemic could be. The movie is quite accurate as it portrays how society breaks down in the face of potentially millions of deaths caused by limited vaccine and limited food supplies.  (…) The movie also shows the antiscience forces. In this case, it’s in the person of the appropriately named Alan Krumwiede, who is played by Jude Law. Krumwiede is a paranoid conspiracy theorist who believes that this is all just a government plot, and he is very antiscience. He has created a treatment (that he has taken himself), called Forsythia, a homeopathic remedy, which obviously is of no value because it is simply something diluted to the point that it’s not there anymore. He claims that he has been treated by this product, even though he was actually never sickened by the virus. The movie demonstrates the impact of the Internet. In this case, Krumwiede has a blog called « Truth Serum Now » that creates — or feeds into — a lot of mistrust in the general population. In Contagion, Dr. Sanjay Gupta interviews a CDC official played by Laurence Fishburne, and he gives Krumwiede equal time. It’s interesting that what the conspiracy theorist talks about is people. Krumwiede confronts Fishburne with questions such as « What did you know? » and « When did you know it? » when, in fact, the issues are « How can we identify this virus?, » « How can we make a vaccine against it?, » and « How can we prevent its spread? » It’s an issue of science, not an issue of people. But in this movie, Sanjay Gupta, playing himself, makes it an issue about people — another example of art imitating life, because Gupta has been perfectly willing to allow antivaccine celebrities to be on his show. In another interesting example of art imitating life, Jude Law [reportedly] actually believes in homeopathy. In summary, Contagion is an excellent movie in that it is willing to allow science to prevail over drama. Paul A. Offit (MD, vaccine coinventor)
Il est aussi à noter, vu le cycle de réapparition des épidémies de grippe mortelle s’espaçant, au maximum constaté, de 39 ans, la dernière datant de 1968, l’OMS prévoit « statistiquement » l’apparition d’une pandémie de grippe mortelle d’ici 2010 à 2015. Wikipedia
Tous les virus grippaux à l’origine de pandémies ou d’alertes pandémiques au XXe siècle proviennent du virus H1N1 de 1918, après des recombinaisons plus ou moins complexes. Pr Patrick Berche (microbiologiste, Hôpital Necker, Paris)
Le monde de 1918 et celui d’aujourd’hui ne sont en rien comparables. Le virus et son pouvoir pathogène ne sont pas le seul paramètre d’une épidémie ou d’une pandémie, que ce soit au niveau de la morbidité ou de la mortalité. Aujourd’hui, nous disposons de connaissances scientifiques sur le virus, contrairement à 1918 (H1N1 ne sera isolé chez l’homme qu’en 1933). Nous disposons d’antiviraux et de vaccins. Des antibiotiques permettent de traiter les surinfections. Sans parler de la surveillance épidémiologique, mise en place depuis 1995, et des plans de réponse épidémique prévus, même si tout n’est pas parfait. (…) En période de crise, l’information est une denrée aussi importante pour limiter l’effet d’une épidémie que les antiviraux, mais une denrée des plus problématiques à gérer. La communication préventive vise à limiter le phénomène de panique, mais doit en même temps encourager les gens à ne pas rester passifs. Il s’agit sans doute d’un des domaines où nous avons le moins avancé en matière de préparation. Patrick Zylberman (historien de la médecine et de la santé publique)

Quand la science revient à l’Apocalypse …

A l’heure où la planète entière (et notamment l’hémisphère nord) se prépare à un éventuel assaut hivernal de la grippe A ex-porcine …

Retour sur ce qui se trouve être l’un de ses plus terribles ancêtres, à savoir la tristement fameuse « grippe espagnole » de 1918-1919 qui fit, on le sait, plus de victimes que la 1ère Guerre mondiale dont elle fut le prolongement (et d’abord chez les soldats eux-mêmes, dont le poète d’origine polonaise Appolinaire ou, parmi les non-combattants, l’écrivain français Edmond Rostand ou le peintre autrichien Egon Schiele)…

D’origine chinoise (Canton, février 1918) comme la plupart des autres qui suivront à l’instar de la grippe dite « de Hong Kong » repérée 50 ans plus tard par les autorités alors britanniques mais issue de la Chine communiste …

Qui – qui s’en souvient encore ? – aura quand même fait 31 000 morts en deux mois pour une France de 50 millions d’habitants et 50 000 en trois mois pour une Amérique de 200 millions …

Puis (via des travailleurs chinois ?), américaine (camps de l’Armée américaine, Caroline du Sud), elle suivit les troupes américaines en Europe…

Mais, après son arrivée en France (Bordeaux, avril 1918) puis en Italie et avant son arrivée dans les colonies européennes en Afrique et en Asie, ce n’est qu’en Espagne que l’on prit conscience de son caractère épidémique et que, pays neutre dans la guerre non astreint à la censure militaire contre toute information pouvant révéler des faiblesses à l’ennemi, on put commencer à en parler ouvertement, d’où son nom, qui lui est restée, de grippe espagnole…

Avec un bilan total pour ses trois vagues de quelque 30 millions de victimes (dont plus de 400 000 en France), elle constitue la plus grande épidémie de l’histoire, qualifiée par JI. Waring de « plus grand holocauste médical de l’histoire » (2% de la population mondiale sur 50% infectés, soit 1 milliard d’individus, dont 4 % en Europe et jusqu’à 22 % aux Samoa occidentales!)…

Contrairement aux autres épidémies qui tuent les personnes âgées (soit quand même entre 250 000 et 500 000 victimes chaque année dans le monde, dont entre 1 500 et 2 000 en France ou 36 000 aux Etats-Unis), celle-ci a tué majoritairement les individus de 20 à 40 ans mais indirectement en permettant, via l’affaiblissement des défenses individuelles des personnes infectées et avant l’utilisation des antibiotiques pourtant découverts 20 ans plus tôt, l’aggravation fatale de complications normalement bénignes (bronchite, bronchiolite, pneumonie)…

Mais ce qu’on sait moins, c’est qu’avec le jeu naturel des mutations, lesdits virus vont au bout d’un moment être capables de résister aux réponses immunitaires que les populations ont développées contre eux…

Ou, à la faveur de contacts avec des populations animales (notamment dans l’élevage intensif qui pourrait favoriser les recombinaisons de virus), d’anciennes souches peuvent faire leur réapparition sur des populations humaines qui avec les années – même si information conditions et moyens sanitaires sont aujourd’hui, du moins dans les pays développés et mis à part les risques de surréaction comme en 1976 dans les Etats-Unis de Gerald Ford, bien supérieurs à 1918 – ont perdu leur immunité contre elles (a contrario la relative immunité aujourd’hui des plus de 60 ans pourrait s’expliquer par l’exposition de ces derniers au virus de 1950 dont le H1N1 actuel pourrait être le descendant direct)…

D’où le retour régulier de grandes épidémies comme celles de 1946 – 1948, 1957 – 1958, 1968 – 1969, 1977 – 1978 et… l’actuelle!

Et l’importance de la récupération, par les chercheurs comme il y a dix ans dans un petit village de l’île de l’extrême Nord de la Norvège, de corps de personnes mortes de cette infection à partir desquels ils pourraient isoler le virus et l’étudier …

L’histoire du virus H1N1 reconstituée
Sandrine Cabut
Le Figaro
03/09/2009

Ce nouveau pathogène, comme tous les virus de pandémie grippale, est un descendant du terrible agent de la grippe espagnole.

D’où vient le virus grippal H1N1 inédit qui fait aujourd’hui le tour de la planète à une vitesse fulgurante ? Si les chercheurs n’ont pas encore fini de retracer toutes les étapes de son parcours extrêmement complexe, ils ont identifié avec certitude un de ses lointains et illustres ancêtres. «Le H1N1 de la pandémie de 2009 est un descendant de quatrième génération du virus de la grippe espagnole de 1918», soulignait récemment le Pr Anthony Fauci, des NIH (Instituts nationaux de la santé américains) dans le New England Journal of Medicine. Un arrière-petit-fils, en quelque sorte, qui ressemble finalement peu à son aïeul, tant sur le plan génétique que sur celui de sa virulence.

Le terrible virus de la grippe espagnole, qui avait fait entre 20 et 50 millions de victimes dans le monde, peut d’ailleurs se vanter de bien d’autres filiations. «Tous les virus grippaux à l’origine de pandémies ou d’alertes pandémiques au XXe siècle proviennent du virus H1N1 de 1918, après des recombinaisons plus ou moins complexes», explique le Pr Patrick Berche, microbiologiste à l’hôpital Necker de Paris. Reconstituée peu à peu par les virologues et les épidémiologistes, l’histoire des virus grippaux (dont il existe trois familles : A, B, C) et en particulier des sous-types A (H1N1) ressemble de plus en plus à une saga familiale.

Les oiseaux porteurs

Voilà donc plus de quatre-vingt-dix ans que ces agents infectieux circulent en continu dans le monde, infestant différentes espèces animales et se modifiant génétiquement en voyageant de l’une à l’autre. «Pour comprendre ce qui s’est passé depuis 1918, il ne faut pas considérer les virus grippaux comme des entités distinctes, mais imaginer leurs huit gènes comme des membres d’une équipe», explique Anthony Fauci. Une équipe dont les membres jouent ensemble… Jusqu’à être transférés dans une autre formation sportive pour la rendre plus performante.

Depuis 1918 – ce qui s’est passé avant reste un mystère, en l’absence de données scientifiques -, le principal réservoir des virus H1N1 est aviaire, les oiseaux, et en particulier les oiseaux sauvages, sont porteurs mais non sensibles à l’infection. Parallèlement, des souches de H1N1 ont circulé depuis cette date en permanence dans les espèces porcines et humaine. Chez l’homme, ces virus H1N1 se sont transformés au fil du temps et ont été responsables de grippes saisonnières banales entre 1918 et 1957. Banales à quelques exceptions près… «En 1946 et en 1950 sont apparues deux nouvelles souches assez virulentes, qui ont diffusé dans plusieurs pays avant de régresser», raconte Patrick Berche, qui assimile ces deux épidémies à des pandémies «abortives». Selon lui, le virus H1N1 actuel descendrait en ligne directe de celui de 1950, ce qui pourrait expliquer que les plus de 60 ans soient relativement protégés actuellement.

En 1957, coup de théâtre. Les virus H1N1 quittent brutalement la scène humaine. Ils disparaissent complètement pour être cette année-là remplacés par une nouvelle souche, H2N2, à l’origine de la deuxième pandémie grippale du XXe siècle, apparue en Asie. «Le virus A (H2N2) est nouveau, les anticorps issus des infections antérieures ne se révèlent d’aucune efficacité contre lui, car il est le résultat d’un réassortiment entre virus humains (H1N1) et aviaires», écrit le Pr Claude Hannoun, un des spécialistes de cette maladie en France, dans son ouvrage La Grippe : ennemie intime, à paraître le 10 septembre.

Un événement capital en 1998

Comme c’est souvent le cas, le nouveau virus pandémique «cannibalise» totalement les autres. «Les virus H1N1 ne réapparaîtront chez l’homme que vingt ans plus tard, en 1977, poursuit Patrick Berche. Et, ce qui est extraordinaire, c’est qu’ils reviennent alors génétiquement identiques à ceux de 1950. Les scientifiques pensent aujourd’hui qu’il s’agit soit d’un virus congelé quelque part qui a ressurgi, soit d’une contamination provenant d’un laboratoire.» Après 1977, ces virus H1N1 reprennent leur circulation hivernale classique dans l’espèce humaine.

En 1998, un événement capital pour la suite va se produire chez des porcs américains : un virus H1N1 porcin se recombine avec des souches aviaires et humaines. Quelques cas humains d’infection par ce nouveau virus complexe ont été décrits ces dernières années aux États-Unis. En avril dernier, quand les scientifiques du centre de contrôle des maladies (CDC) ont disséqué le génome du nouveau H1N1, ils ont retrouvé six gènes de l’agent isolé en1998, associés à deux gènes provenant de virus infectant des porcs européens… Comment s’est faite cette dernière rencontre génétique ? Retrouvera-t-on un jour le tout premier patient infecté ? Pour les scientifiques, il reste encore beaucoup d’inconnues. Mais ils sont de plus en plus nombreux à suggérer qu’une surveillance plus attentive du monde porcin aurait permis une détection plus précoce de ce nouveau H1N1.

Voir aussi:

Six cadavres, un virus et une enzyme
En manchettes sur le Net
Agence Science-Presse
Semaine du 24 août 98

Une équipe de scientifiques de quatre pays a commencé la semaine dernière à déterrer des cadavres, à 966 km du Pôle Nord. La recherche d’une réponse à un mystère vieux de 80 ans.

Il y a 80 ans, au lendemain de la Première Guerre mondiale, un virus que l’on allait connaître sous le nom de grippe espagnole tuait plus de 20 millions de personnes en quelques mois, et puis, disparaissait sans laisser de traces. A ce jour, on ne sait toujours pas d’où il venait, comment il a pu frapper aussi vite et avec une telle vigueur, ni ce qui l’a fait partir.

Mais depuis le début de la semaine dernière, une équipe de 15 scientifiques provenant de quatre pays – Canada, Etats-Unis, Grande-Bretagne et Norvège – se trouve dans un petit village de l’île de Longyearbyen, à l’extrême Nord de la Norvège, dans l’espoir d’obtenir la réponse: ces experts se sont rendus là-bas pour déterrer six cadavres, six jeunes hommes décédés de la grippe espagnole en octobre 1918; six personnes qui, parce qu’elles ont été enterrées à seulement 966 km du Pôle Nord, donc dans le permafrost – de la terre gelée en permanence – pourraient toujours contenir en elles une « version originale » du virus. Comme s’il avait été conservé au congélateur.

La mission, envisagée depuis cinq ans, n’est pas sans susciter la controverse. Quelques-uns craignent évidemment un réveil du virus avant qu’on n’ait pu l’isoler, même si la plupart des experts s’entendent pour dire qu’après huit décennies, il est peu probable qu’il subsiste un seul échantillon vivant de ce micro-organisme. Les 15 scientifiques ont donc dû transporter, sur cette terre isolée de 1500 habitants dépourvue de tout équipement médical de pointe, une batterie d’équipements de décontamination et d’isolation.

Même un échantillon mort pourrait toutefois être d’une valeur inestimable pour ceux qui tentent de mettre au point des vaccins contre des souches inédites de virus, disent tous ceux qui font la promotion d’une telle expédition depuis plus de cinq ans – une semblable, en Alaska, avait abouti à un échec.

Sauf que pendant qu’avait lieu le débarquement dans cette île de l’Arctique, d’autres scientifiques, bien au chaud dans leur laboratoire, annonçaient avoir découvert une enzyme dont la particularité serait justement de rendre mortelles certaines souches du virus de la grippe. Plusieurs n’ont pas manqué de faire le lien avec la grippe espagnole, soulignait CNN la semaine dernière.

Dans un article paru dans les Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Yoshihiro Kawaoka et ses collègues de l’Université du Wisconsin écrivent en effet que la souche la plus virulente de l’influenza A utilise une enzyme appelée plasmine, qui agit comme un renfort: on savait déjà qu’une protéine de l’influenza A devait être coupée en deux morceaux pour pouvoir infecter les cellules saines, et que les enzymes appelées protéases se chargeaient de ce travail. Il semble d’après la dernière étude que la plasmine vienne s’ajouter à l’arsenal pour aider à « diviser » la protéine.

Pour arriver à cette découverte, les chercheurs se sont penchés sur une souche du virus que l’on suppose être une descendante de la souche responsable en 1918 de la grippe espagnole. On n’a pas retrouvé ce « mécanisme » d’utilisation d’un renfort dans 10 autres souches de l’influenza également testées pour les fins de l’étude. Cette découverte permet donc d’espérer une meilleure compréhension des mécanismes derrière les souches les plus virulentes de l’influenza.

En attendant, l’exhumation se poursuit dans cette île de l’Arctique. Cette partie moins agréable du travail doit durer quatre semaines, et l’analyse des échantillons, dans des laboratoires dispersés sur deux continents, pourrait s’étaler sur 18 mois.

***

Au fait, saviez-vous pourquoi ça s’appelait « grippe espagnole »? Parce que l’Espagne était un pays neutre pendant la Première Guerre mondiale. Pour cette raison, elle avait été le premier pays à admettre publiquement l’existence d’une épidémie… pendant que ses voisins, en guerre, préféraient garder la chose secrète

Voir également:

Le virus de la grippe A ne devrait pas muter
J.B.
Le Figaro/AFP
02/09/2009

Une étude américaine montre que le H1N1 ne se combine pas avec les autres souches de la grippe saisonnière pour former un «super-virus». Il est en revanche bien plus virulent que celles-ci.

Enfin une nouvelle rassurante sur le front de la lutte contre la grippe A H1N1. Selon une étude publiée mardi par l’Université américaine du Maryland, le virus responsable de la pandémie ne devrait pas muter et ne devrait donc pas devenir plus virulent qu’il ne l’est déjà. Utilisant des furets infectés par trois différents virus de la grippe, dont le H1N1, des chercheurs ont observé que ce dernier ne se combinait pas avec les deux autres souches virales de la grippe saisonnière 2009 pour former un «super-virus».

En revanche, l’étude montre que le H1N1 est déjà plus virulent que les deux autres virus. Au cours de cette étude, il a écarté les virus de la grippe traditionnelle, se reproduisant dans le corps des furets en moyenne deux fois plus rapidement. «Le H1N1 a toutes les caractéristiques d’un pathogène totalement adapté à l’organisme humain», observe le virologue Daniel Perez, directeur du programme agricole de prévention et de contrôle de la grippe aviaire basé à l’Université du Maryland, et principal auteur de ces travaux. «Je ne suis pas surpris que ce virus soit plus virulent pour la simple raison qu’il est nouveau et que les sujets infectés n’ont pas eu le temps de développer une immunité, alors que les autres pathogènes plus anciens de la grippe se heurtent à une résistance immunitaire», explique ce spécialiste.

«Les résultats de cette étude laissent penser que le virus H1N1 (…) pourrait également être plus contagieux», a relevé pour sa part le Dr Anthony Fauci, directeur de l’Institut national américain des allergies et des maladies infectieuses (NIAID) qui a financé cette recherche. Il faut en effet distinguer la virulence, la force du virus, de son infectiosité, sa capacité à se transmettre d’un individu à un autre. «Ces nouvelles données, bien que préliminaires, montrent la nécessité d’une vaccination contre la grippe saisonnière et la grippe porcine cet automne et cet hiver», a-t-il estimé dans un communiqué. En effet, si les chercheurs écartent le risque d’une combinaison des virus, ils n’écartent pas la possibilité d’une co-infection, c’est à dire une infection simultanée par le nouveau virus et les deux autres virus prédominants de la grippe saisonnière. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires sur ce point.

Inquiétudes sur la fabrication des vaccins

Alors que les chercheurs insistent sur la nécessaire vaccination de la population, l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) s’inquiète sur les capacités de production de vaccins contre la grippe H1N1 des grands laboratoires. La faute à un rendement moins bon qu’attendu de la souche utilisée. Margaret Chan, directrice générale de l’OMS, indiquait le week-end dernier que l’on ne disposerait pas de vaccins en quantité suffisante «dans les prochains mois». Elle estimait à 900 millions de doses la capacité annuelle de production mondiale de vaccins anti-grippaux, pour une population mondiale de 6,8 milliards d’habitants. L’OMS avait estimé en juillet que les grands laboratoires pourraient produire 4,8 milliards de doses par an. Mais elle est revenue sur ce chiffre à la mi-août en indiquant qu’il faudrait diviser par deux voire par quatre ces estimations – soit une prévision de production annuelle d’environ 1,2 milliard de doses. Les chiffres avancés ce week-end sont donc encore en-dessous de ces prévisions. De leur côté, les grands laboratoires de production n’ont pas nié un rendement de la souche plus bas qu’envisagé.

Voir de plus:

Patrick Zylberman, historien de la médecine, spécialiste de la grippe espagnole
« Grippe : 2009 n’est pas 1918 »
Le Monde
08.05.09

Historien de la médecine et de la santé publique au Centre de recherche médecine, sciences, santé et société (Cermes, CNRS-Inserm-EHESS, Paris), Patrick Zylberman a étudié les grandes pandémies, et notamment la façon dont la France avait réagi à la grippe espagnole qui, en 1918 et 1919, a fait plus de 50 millions de morts dans le monde. Il commente la façon dont les autorités sanitaires ont appréhendé les périodes de crise sanitaire et met en garde vis-à-vis des pièges de comparaisons anachroniques.

Quel regard portez-vous sur l’épisode actuel d’épidémie de grippe A (H1N1) ?

Le plus frappant est, au Mexique, les décès des jeunes adultes. Cela a immédiatement fait penser à la pandémie de 1918, qui s’en était pris à la classe d’âge des 16 à 40 ans, plutôt qu’aux personnes âgées ou aux tout-petits.

N’y a-t-il pas une forme d’anachronisme à comparer les deux épisodes ?

Absolument. La pandémie de 1918 est devenue une figure de rhétorique. Depuis le syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère (SRAS), en 2003, tous les médecins, épidémiologistes et responsables de santé publique présentent le retour de la grippe espagnole comme le prochain « holocauste ». On comprend bien pourquoi : il faut frapper fort les imaginations pour que les responsables politiques, les citoyens mettent la main à la poche afin que la collectivité soit prête à faire face.

Or, le monde de 1918 et celui d’aujourd’hui ne sont en rien comparables. Le virus et son pouvoir pathogène ne sont pas le seul paramètre d’une épidémie ou d’une pandémie, que ce soit au niveau de la morbidité ou de la mortalité.

Aujourd’hui, nous disposons de connaissances scientifiques sur le virus, contrairement à 1918 (H1N1 ne sera isolé chez l’homme qu’en 1933). Nous disposons d’antiviraux et de vaccins. Des antibiotiques permettent de traiter les surinfections. Sans parler de la surveillance épidémiologique, mise en place depuis 1995, et des plans de réponse épidémique prévus, même si tout n’est pas parfait.

Qu’a-t-on appris de 1918 ?

Voyez la réaction particulièrement remarquable des autorités de Hongkong en 1997, face à la grippe du poulet. Après quelques décès humains, on a abattu l’ensemble des volailles, ce qui a été une très bonne décision. La réaction au SRAS s’est assez mal passée au début, mais ensuite, les gouvernements, en Asie et au Canada, ont repris les rênes et s’en sont plutôt bien tirés.

Il y a un acquis, c’est incontestable. Est-il suffisant ? La dernière étude en date sur la préparation antipandémique faite en 2006 par la London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine concluait que si quelques pays comme la France ou la Grande-Bretagne étaient relativement bien préparés, ce n’était pas le cas général en Europe.

Est-ce qu’en 1918, on a eu le sentiment immédiat de faire face à une pandémie ?

Les autorités ont été totalement prises au dépourvu. N’oublions pas que la guerre n’était pas terminée. Les pays éloignés de zones de combat, comme les Etats-Unis, ne savaient pas non plus à quoi ils avaient affaire. Ce qui a contribué sans doute à la très haute mortalité (4 % en Europe, jusqu’à 22 % aux Samoa occidentales), c’est précisément la forte désorganisation des pouvoirs publics et leurs faibles moyens d’action (fermeture des lieux publics).

L’exemple de 1976 n’est-il pas l’illustration qu’une surréaction des autorités peut produire plus de dégâts que l’épidémie en elle-même ?

L’épidémie de 1976 aux Etats-Unis est en effet celle « qui n’a jamais eu lieu »… Il y a eu quelques cas dans un fort du New Jersey. Ils ont tout de suite créé une panique, précisément parce que le souvenir de 1918 était très vivace. Il s’agissait d’une souche H1N1, qui n’avait pas circulé aux Etats-Unis depuis 1920, ce qui a conduit le président Gerald Ford à faire vacciner toute la population américaine. La campagne s’est arrêtée au bout de deux mois, en raison d’accidents vaccinaux, et aussi parce que le virus s’était évaporé. La décision de vacciner avait été prise pour des raisons beaucoup plus émotives que scientifiques.

La réaction actuelle des autorités sanitaires est-elle là encore émotive ?

Aujourd’hui, certains reprochent à l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) d’avoir « surréagi ». C’est injuste : tous les gouvernements qui ont mis en place des plans de réponse se sont inspirés de celui de l’OMS. Celle-ci a simplement élevé son niveau d’alerte pour avoir une influence un peu plus grande auprès des gouvernements concernés : renforcer ses bureaux régionaux, envoyer ses équipes sur le terrain… Depuis 2003, toutes les discussions sur la préparation contre les épidémies, le bioterrorisme, etc., posent la question brûlante du mode de réponse collective à adopter : l’OMS doit-elle en être l’état-major ? L’Europe y serait plutôt favorable, l’Amérique du Nord un peu moins. L’Asie beaucoup moins encore.

Quel est l’impact possible de cette prépandémie dans les pays pauvres qui commencent à être touchés ?

C’est le grand souci. Une seconde vague aggravée dans l’hémisphère Nord à l’automne ferait bien plus de dégâts dans les pays n’ayant pas de système de santé adéquat ou des traitements antiviraux, que dans les pays riches bien équipés pour faire face à l’infection. Il y aurait des moyens de ralentir la propagation de l’épidémie en partageant une partie – entre 10 % et 20 % disent les experts – des stocks d’antiviraux avec les pays à faibles revenus. Politiquement cela paraît délicat : les opinions publiques risqueraient là de ne pas être très « partageuses ».

Cette préoccupation publique pour la gestion des risques est-elle le signe d’une évolution de nos sociétés ?

Absolument. Le passage de ces problématiques de la sphère technique à la sphère publique est même une évolution remarquable qui est une des raisons pour lesquelles le monde actuel est totalement différent de celui de 1918. Le tournant a lieu dans les années 1980 avec les préoccupations croissantes face aux maladies émergentes, surtout l’épidémie de VIH/sida, ainsi qu’avec les crises de sécurité alimentaire de la fin du XXe siècle.

Quel rôle jouent les médias dans l’évolution de ces perceptions ?

Ils jouent un rôle crucial et les gouvernements le savent bien. En période de crise, l’information est une denrée aussi importante pour limiter l’effet d’une épidémie que les antiviraux, mais une denrée des plus problématiques à gérer. La communication préventive vise à limiter le phénomène de panique, mais doit en même temps encourager les gens à ne pas rester passifs. Il s’agit sans doute d’un des domaines où nous avons le moins avancé en matière de préparation.

Pourquoi cela ?

Les gouvernements rechignent à se séparer d’une partie du contrôle de l’information et le milieu des médias a peu théorisé ces questions.

Propos recueillis par Paul Benkimoun, Stéphane Foucart et Hervé Morin

Voir encore:

L’Europe reste sous la menace d’une pandémie majeure de grippe
Chaque année, plus de 100 millions de personnes sont infectées par la grippe dans l’hémisphère Nord. En moyenne un enfant sur trois et un adulte sur dix peuvent être touchés. La vaccination reste la meilleure prévention de ce fléau dont l’impact économique peut être très lourd quand la souche est virulente.
Alain Perez
Les Echos
28 nov. 2001

Maladie bénigne ou épidémie ravageuse ? Chaque année à l’entrée de l’hiver, la question se pose : quelle sera la virulence du virus de la grippe ? Au cours du XXe siècle, trois pandémies majeures ont traversé l’Europe en 1918, 1957 et 1968. Celle de 1918 dura quelques semaines et fit plus de dégâts que la grande guerre : 30 millions de victimes. La reconstitution ultérieure du génome de ce virus baptisé à tort « espagnol » a révélé l’existence d’un cocktail particulièrement dévastateur. Il s’agissait d’un virus aviaire (hébergé par un oiseau) probablement hybridé avec une souche humaine. Le tout avait transité par le porc avant d’infecter l’homme.

Ce virus est en fait très déconcertant. Il peut être très contagieux et affecter un nombre important de personnes sans gravité. Il peut aussi avoir une létalité élevée, sans être très contagieux. Entre ces deux extrêmes, toutes les versions intermédiaires existent et on rencontre donc une famille de virus de deux types différents (A et B). Au cours d’un séminaire consacré aux « états de la grippe » qui vient de se tenir à Paris, les experts de cette pathologie ont débattu d’une pathologie qui est loin d’avoir livré tous ses secrets. Malgré les observatoires et réseaux de surveillance mis en place dans le monde, nombre de questions restent sans réponse : faut-il généraliser la vaccination ? Quelle place pour les antiviraux ? Comment protéger les populations à risque ?

Mais une question tracasse tout le monde : une épidémie grave comme celle de 1918 peut elle se reproduire en Europe ? « Certainement et cela arrivera. La création naturelle d’un virus hybride se produit régulièrement. Mais les conditions pour qu’il soit dangereux sont difficiles à remplir. La percée d’un virus pandémique est un événement de faible fréquence », précise Claude Hannoun membre honoraire de l’Institut Pasteur. L’organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) est tout aussi inquiète. « Une pandémie de grippe majeure est fort probable et nous y sommes faiblement préparés », indique l’organisation genevoise dans ses mises en garde. L’OMS n’hésite pas à manier un scénario qui donnent le frison : « Tôt ou tard, un virus va balayer le monde. En l’espace de quelques semaines. Il va toucher des personnes de tous âges et remplir les salles d’hôpitaux et les morgues locales. »

Populations vulnérables
Heureusement il n’en est pas toujours ainsi : « La grippe est en général une maladie bénigne qui ne requiert pas d’acte médical », déclare Claudie Locquet, médecin généraliste à Brest. En d’autres termes, et pour reprendre le vieil adage des grands mères d’autrefois : « Il faut une semaine pour soigner une grippe en prenant des médicaments et sept jours pour la guérir en ne prenant rien du tout. » Mais, en fait, ce n’est pas si simple. « Il y a en France 1 million de personnes âgées particulièrement vulnérables qui sont exposées à un risque très important » indique Joël Belmin, gériatre au centre hospitalier René-Muret à Sevran. La pandémie de 1968 a mis en lumière une autre caractéristique du virus : son « ingéniosité ». Cette année-là, il trouva le moyen, de muter en cours d’épidémie, échappant ainsi aux défenses immunitaires développées par la première vague de malades. « Comme le virus n’était pas tout à fait le même, certains sujet ont contracté la maladie deux fois à quelques semaines d’intervalle », précise Claude Hannoun.

La vaccination reste la meilleure prévention, mais son efficacité varie en fonction de deux paramètres : la variabilité du virus et l’état du système immunitaire de l’hôte dont l’efficacité décroît avec l’âge. « Quand il y a concordance entre les souches vaccinales et le virus circulant l’efficacité peut atteindre 90 % chez les enfants et les jeunes adultes », indique le professeur Paul Leophonte, pneumologue au CHU de Toulouse. Malgré ces résultats, la vaccination n’est pas toujours bonne presse au pays de Pasteur. Les jeunes l’assimilent parfois « à un traitement pour les vieux ». Le non-remboursement (pour les moins de soixante-cinq ans) lui donne de surcroît une réputation de remède inefficace. Par ailleurs, les parents rechignent à faire vacciner les jeunes enfants, à cause d’un calendrier vaccinal déjà bien rempli. Certains médecins entretiennent d’ailleurs cette mauvaise réputation pour des raisons pas toujours avouables. « C’est dommage car les enfants sont le premier réservoir du virus », précise Catherine Olivier, du CHU Louis Mourier de Colombes. L’arrivée prochaine d’un vaccin sous forme de spray nasal devrait atténuer ces réticences.

Reste « l’affaire des antibiotiques ». En France, les médecins continuent de prescrire des antibiotiques inefficaces sur les souches virales. Même en cas de risque du surinfection bactérienne, l’antibiothérapie n’apporte aucun avantage et cet effet été démontré. Mais personne ne voit vraiment de solution à ce problème « culturel » bien installé dans les têtes dont la conséquence principale est d’augmenter la résistance à ces médicaments. « Si on ne donne pas des antibiotiques le patient se sent mal soigné », justifie Paul Leophonte. Quand au traitement par les nouveaux antiviraux (inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase) leur efficacité symptomatique est démontrée mais attention au timing. Pour être efficace, ils doivent être pris dès l’apparition de la maladie. Bonne chance enfin aux partisans de l’homéopathie qui séduit encore 15 % de Français. « Ce traitement ne présente pas d’effets tangibles et tous les essais cliniques sont négatifs » indique Claudie Locquet.

Voir encore:

Pandémie de grippe : rien n’est prêt !

La grippe espagnole, de triste mémoire, fut responsable de plus de 20 millions de morts. Que se passerait-il en cas de résurgence d’un tel virus ? Une catastrophe. Le pire est que les médicaments existent, mais qu’ils ne sont pas disponibles à grande échelle.

Le virus de la grippe est en perpétuelle mutation et certaines souches sont très dangereuses. L’épidémie la plus tristement célèbre fut celle de 1918 qui fit plusieurs millions de morts. La grippe est aussi la maladie infectieuse qui tue le plus de personne en France chaque année. Cette maladie est donc loin d’être inoffensive et il est important de se vacciner.

Devant les risques d’une nouvelle pandémie (épidémie mondiale), deux universitaires australiens se sont posé la question de nos solutions dans le cas d’un nouveau scénario catastrophe.

Ils constatent en premier lieu que les risques d’un tel scénario sont réels dès lors que les transports aériens permettraient de propager le virus très rapidement dans le monde. Ils observent ensuite qu’il ne serait pas possible de fabriquer à temps suffisamment de doses de vaccins pour protéger les populations. Dès lors ils préconisent le stockage des deux médicaments antiviraux existants de manière à pouvoir les distribuer largement à la population en cas de besoin. En effet, si ces deux médicaments, le relenza et le Tamiflu (non encore commercialisés en France), sont efficaces, ils restent chers, ce qui explique leur faible taux de prescription. La faiblesse des deux dernières épidémies n’a pas non plus permis le développement de leurs marchés.

En les stockant, les gouvernements les achèteraient en grande quantité, ce qui permettrait de faire baisser considérablement les coûts. Cela permettrait surtout à tous d’y avoir accès et donc de se mettre à l’abris d’un tel fléau. En effet, à défaut de stockage, seules quelques centaines de milliers de traitements seraient disponibles pour Europe et une pénurie serait vite alarmante. La question mériterait en tous cas un vrai débat ouvert et public.

Voir enfin:

Les épidemies de grippe en Afrique et en Asie soulignent l’urgence de renforcer la surveillance mondiale et de se préparer à une pandémie

Les experts décident de la composition du vaccin antigrippal pour la saison 2003-2004 dans l’hémisphère Nord

Au moment où les experts se réunissent cette semaine à Genève pour déterminer la composition du vaccin antigrippal pour l’hiver prochain, les épidémies en République démocratique du Congo et à Madagascar illustrent la menace que la grippe fait toujours peser dans les pays en développement.

Jusqu’à présent, les effets de la grippe dans les pays en développement sont loin d’avoir attiré une grande attention. Pourtant, le risque d’en mourir y est plus grand que dans les pays industrialisés, à cause de la malnutrition, des maladies concomitantes, comme le SIDA, qui augmentent le risque de complications, de l’inexistence de la vaccination dans beaucoup de cas, des conflits armés, qui conduisent les populations à fuir de leur domicile, ce qui complique les traitements et favorise la propagation des virus, et de l’insuffisance des services de santé, rarement à la hauteur des besoins. La grippe peut alors faire des ravages. On en a un exemple avec l’épidémie qui a débuté à Madagascar l’été dernier. Sur son passage, elle a tué plus de 800 personnes et drainé une grande partie des ressources du système de santé malgache. Il semble que le virus qui en est la cause balaye désormais l’Afrique. En République démocratique du Congo, le Ministère de la Santé rapporte que 1,5 millions de personnes sont tombées malades et 2 000 en sont mortes. Et l’épidémie n’est pas terminée…

Ainsi que le rappelle le docteur Gro Harlem Brundtland, Directeur général de l’OMS, « le monde entier vit sous la menace de la grippe. Elle tue déjà un million de personnes chaque année et, tôt ou tard, une pandémie va se déclencher. Face au problème, soit nous mettons en place un puissant système de surveillance mondiale et de solides infrastructures, soit nous en subirons les conséquences. Aujourd’hui, nous ne sommes pas prêts à affronter la prochaine pandémie et il est urgent de commencer à se préparer. »

Constitué de 112 centres nationaux dans 83 pays, le réseau mondial de surveillance de la grippe de l’OMS est notre première ligne de défense. Il surveille en permanence les rapports d’épidémie, comme ceux en provenance d’Afrique. Il bénéficie également de l’expertise et des des laboratoires des quatre centres de référence et de recherche de l’OMS sur la grippe à Atlanta (Etats-Unis d’Amérique), Londres (Royaume-Uni), Melbourne (Australie) et Tokyo (Japon). Ce réseau de surveillance et de laboratoires aide l’OMS a surveiller l’activité grippale dans toutes les régions du monde et permet d’envoyer rapidement les virus isolés et les informations aux Centres collaborateurs pour l’identification immédiate des souches. Hélas, ce réseau ne couvre toujours pas certaines zones géographiques.

Les épidémies récentes en Afrique illustrent bien la nécessité d’une riposte vigoureuse et générale. Mais de graves problèmes persistent, pas seulement dans les pays en développement. Un seul pays, le Canada, dispose d’un plan complet de lutte contre la grippe. La couverture vaccinale reste faible, notamment dans les populations les plus vulnérables, dont les personnes âgées. Il arrive que, dans certains pays développés, les taux de vaccination dans les groupes à haut risque ne dépassent pas 10 % et qu’ils tombent même à zéro dans les pays en développement.

Reconnaissant la nécessité de réduire l’impact des épidémies annuelles et de se préparer à affronter la prochaine pandémie, le Conseil exécutif de l’OMS a recommandé à la Cinquante-Sixième Assemblée mondiale de la Santé d’adopter un plan de coordination des activités. Lors de cette Assemblée en mai à Genève, l’OMS demandera à ses Etats Membres de renforcer le réseau de surveillance, de faire le nécessaire pour améliorer la couverture vaccinale, de soutenir la recherche pour l’amélioration du vaccin et de commencer à établir des politiques nationales de lutte contre la grippe.

Etre prêt signifie, au niveau individuel, de se faire vacciner tous les ans. La composition du vaccin antigrippal pour la saison prochaine a été annoncée aujourd’hui. Les experts ont recommandé pour la saison 2003 – 2004 (hémisphère Nord) d’inclure dans le vaccin les éléments suivants :

  • Souche analogue à A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1)
  • Souche analogue à B/Hong Kong/330/2001
  • La décision concernant l’élément A(H3N2) est reportée au 14 mars 2003 pour permettre l’analyse des données les plus récentes.

Toutes les recommandations de l’OMS sont publiées dans le Relevé épidémiologique hebdomadaire de l’OMS et transmises aux autorités sanitaires, aux autorités nationales de réglementation et aux fabricants de vaccins.

Voir encore:

1968, la planète grippée

Un an après être partie de Hongkong, la grippe fait, en deux mois, 31 226 morts en France, deux fois plus que la canicule de 2003. A l’époque, ni les médias ni les pouvoirs publics ne s’en étaient émus. Alors que la propagation de la grippe aviaire inquiète, retour sur cette première pandémie de l’ère moderne.

Corinne Bensimon
Libération

« On n’avait pas le temps de sortir les morts. On les entassait dans une salle au fond du service de réanimation. Et on les évacuait quand on pouvait, dans la journée, le soir. » Aujourd’hui chef du service d’infectiologie du centre hospitalo-universitaire de Nice, le professeur Dellamonica a gardé des images fulgurantes de cette grippe dite «de Hongkong» qui a balayé la France au tournant de l’hiver 1969-1970. Agé alors d’une vingtaine d’années, il travaillait comme externe dans le service de réanimation du professeur Jean Motin, à l’hôpital Edouard-Herriot de Lyon. «Les gens arrivaient en brancard, dans un état catastrophique. Ils mouraient d’hémorragie pulmonaire, les lèvres cyanosées, tout gris. Il y en avait de tous les âges, 20, 30, 40 ans et plus. Ça a duré dix à quinze jours, et puis ça s’est calmé. Et étrangement, on a oublié.»

La «grippe de Hongkong» alias «grippe de 68» est pourtant la plus récente des pandémies grippales. Troisième du XXe siècle après la «grippe espagnole» (20 à 40 millions de morts en 1918-1920) et la «grippe asiatique» (2 millions de morts en 1957), elle a fait le tour du monde entre l’été 1968 et le printemps 1970, tuant environ un million de personnes, selon les estimations de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS). Combien en France ? Il a fallu la grande peur d’une nouvelle pandémie liée à l’émergence du virus H5N1 pour que l’on s’aperçoive que nul n’avait fait le compte. C’est ainsi que les statisticiens et épidémiologistes Antoine Flahault et Alain-Jacques Valleron (1) viennent de découvrir, au terme d’une analyse encore inédite des fichiers de mortalité conservés par l’unité CEPIDC (Centre épidémiologique sur les causes médicales de décès) de l’Inserm, l’ampleur exacte de cette grippe «oubliée» : «25 068 morts en décembre 1969 et 6 158 en janvier 1970, soit 31 226 en deux mois, révèle Antoine Flahault. La grippe de Hongkong a tué en France deux fois plus que la canicule de 2003 ! Fait frappant, cette énorme surmortalité saisonnière est passée pratiquement inaperçue.»

A la fin des sixties, la grippe, ses malades et ses morts n’intéressent pas. Ni les pouvoirs publics, ni le public, ni les médias. L’événement est sur la Lune avec l’équipage d’Apollo 12, au Vietnam où l’Amérique s’enlise, au Biafra qui agonise, en Chine où s’achève la Révolution culturelle, à l’Elysée où s’installe Pompidou avec mission de gérer l’après-68 et les grèves qui perlent toujours dans les entreprises, les universités et les lycées. Mais assurément pas dans les hôpitaux. Témoin la presse française qui, en cet hiver 1969, alors même que la grippe de Hongkong atteint son apogée dans l’Hexagone, consacre des articles sporadiques à l’«épidémie» ­ on n’use pas alors du mot «pandémie».

Un «marronnier d’hiver» pour «France-Soir»

«La vague de froid qui a récemment recouvert la France a provoqué plusieurs épidémies de grippe, affectant notamment le Sud-Ouest», observe le Monde du 3 décembre. 10 % du personnel de la SNCF de la région Toulouse-Pyrénées est malade, rapporte France-Soir dans un articulet. Et le 18 décembre, en pleine ascension de la mortalité grippale, le Monde titre «L’épidémie de grippe paraît régresser en France» et raconte brièvement ses effets si secondaires : «La CPAM de Périgueux a dû fermer ses bureaux pour cause de maladie du personnel», des trains sont annulés faute de cheminots, des écoles sont en berne pour cause de profs enfiévrés, le chancelier allemand Willy Brandt est alité, comme une bonne partie de l’Europe de l’Est…

Que l’«épidémie» frappe urbi et orbi l’humble et le puissant, voilà d’ailleurs qui déchaîne l’humour plus que l’émoi. Le 31 décembre 1969, pour le réveillon, le Monde offre un billet badin décrivant, en direct de Londres, le délicieux chaos qui grippe la perfide Albion (plus durement touchée que la France) : les hôpitaux de la capitale devenus le «dernier salon où l’on cause» puisqu’on y rencontre artistes et célébrités politiques, celui de Birmingham «qui embauche n’importe qui» afin de faire face à la défection de «500 infirmières», les queues devant les pharmacies pour les livraisons d’aspirine, les pannes d’électricité faute de techniciens, les lignes de métro interrompues faute de conducteurs… En janvier, Paris Match n’envoie pas ses paparazzi dans les urgences saturées mais dans l’alcôve Louis XVI où s’alanguit Marina Vlady : «Non, titre l’hebdo, Marina n’a pas la grippe de Hongkong, elle tourne son nouveau film.» La grippe, dont nul ne signale les morts, est alors moins qu’un fait divers. C’est un «marronnier d’hiver», écrit France-Soir…

Un marronnier pour tous, sauf pour les collaborateurs du réseau international de surveillance de la grippe créé par l’OMS dès sa fondation, en 1947. Un article du Times de Londres les a alertés, le 12 juillet 1968, en signalant une forte vague de «maladie respiratoire» dans le sud-est de la Chine, à Hongkong. C’est dans cette colonie britannique surpeuplée qu’avaient été recensées, en 1957, les premières victimes du virus de la «grippe asiatique». Depuis, Hongkong est devenu, pour les épidémiologistes, la sentinelle des épidémies dont la Chine communiste est soupçonnée d’être le berceau. Fin juillet 1968, le Dr W. Chang (2) dénombre 500 000 cas dans l’île. La «grippe de Hongkong» est née.

Vaccinations sur le trottoir

Le virus, expédié sur un lit de glace à Londres où siège l’un des deux centres internationaux de référence de la grippe, est identifié comme une «variante» du virus de la grippe asiatique, un virus de type A2 ­ on dirait aujourd’hui H2. Erreur : on établira bientôt, après de vifs débats d’experts, qu’il s’agit d’un virus d’un nouveau genre, baptisé ultérieurement H3 (3). Qu’importe, il voyage. Et vite. Profitant de l’émergence des transports aériens de masse. Gagne Taiwan, puis Singapour et le Vietnam. Ironie de la guerre : en septembre, il débarque en Californie avec des marines de retour au pays. Ironie de la science : au cours de ce même mois, il décime les rangs d’un Congrès international qui réunit à Téhéran 1 036 spécialistes des maladies infectieuses tropicales. «C’était un gag», raconte le virologiste Claude Hannoun, pionnier du vaccin antigrippal français et futur directeur du centre de référence de la grippe à l’Institut Pasteur. «Le troisième jour, alors que j’étais cloué au lit, un confrère m’a dit qu’il y avait plus de monde dans les chambres qu’en session. Près de la moitié des participants sont tombés malades sur place ou à leur retour chez eux.» Une enquête montrera qu’ils ont contribué à l’introduction du virus non seulement en Iran, mais dans huit pays de trois continents, du Sénégal au Koweït en passant par l’Angleterre et la Belgique (4).

Fin 1968, le virus a traversé les Etats-Unis, tuant plus de 50 000 personnes en l’espace de trois mois. En janvier 1969, il accoste l’Europe de l’Ouest, mais sans grands dégâts, et en mai il semble avoir disparu de la circulation. Tant et si bien qu’en octobre 1969, lorsque l’OMS réunit à Atlanta une conférence internationale sur la grippe de Hongkong, les scientifiques estiment que la pandémie est finie, et plutôt bien : «Il n’y a pas eu de grand excès de mortalité, excepté aux Etats-Unis», conclut alors l’Américain Charles Cockburn. «En décembre, ça a été la douche froide», dit Claude Hannoun. Le virus de Hongkong est revenu en Europe. Méchant, cette fois. D’autant plus que le Vieux Continent a négligé de préparer un vaccin adéquat.

Certes, en France, on a vacciné. Quelques jours durant, le service de vaccination de Lyon a même été pris d’assaut. «Il y a eu un moment où les vaccinations se faisaient sur le trottoir, avec des étudiants en médecine recrutés dans les amphis et la police qui bloquait les accès de la rue», raconte le Pr Dellamonica. Hélas, à la différence des vaccins américains, les produits français, fabriqués alors de façon assez artisanale par Pasteur (Paris) et Mérieux (Lyon), n’incluent pas la souche de Hongkong, malgré un débat d’experts. «De fait, les vaccins ont été d’une efficacité très médiocre ­ 30 % au lieu de l’usuel 70 %», relève Claude Hannoun. Autres temps, autres moeurs : nul n’a alors accusé les experts de la grippe et/ou le ministre de la Santé, Robert Boulin, d’avoir négligé ce «marronnier d’hiver» qui a envoyé 31 000 personnes au cimetière. On est loin de la France du sang contaminé dénonçant les responsabilités des politiques et des scientifiques, loin de ce début de millénaire où gouvernements et experts égrènent avec angoisse le nombre de personnes mortes d’avoir été contaminées par des volailles excrétant le virus aviaire H5N1 (une soixantaine en deux ans), guettent les premiers frémissements d’une «humanisation» du virus et se préparent, à coups de millions de dollars, à affronter les retombées sanitaires, économiques, politiques… et judiciaires d’une hypothétique pandémie qui ferait, selon les spéculations, entre 2 et 7 millions de victimes.

«La peur de la catastrophe»

«A la fin des années 60, on a confiance dans le progrès en général, et le progrès médical en particulier, analyse Patrice Bourdelais (5), historien de la santé publique à l’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales. Il y a encore beaucoup de mortalité infectieuse dans les pays développés, mais la plupart des épidémies y ont disparu grâce aux vaccins, aux antibiotiques et à l’hygiène. La grippe va donc, inéluctablement, disparaître.» Pour la communauté scientifique, la pandémie de Hongkong est cependant un choc. «Elle a sonné l’alarme, réveillé la peur de la catastrophe de 1918 et boosté les recherches sur le virus», dit Claude Hannoun. L’Institut Pasteur lui demande en effet dès 1970 de laisser ses travaux sur la fièvre jaune pour revenir à la grippe. «C’est elle aussi qui a dopé la production de vaccins, passée en France de 200 000 doses par an en 1968 à 6 millions en 1972.» Pour les épidémiologistes, «la grippe de Hongkong est entrée dans l’histoire comme la première pandémie de l’ère moderne. Celle des transports aériens rapides. La première, aussi, à avoir été surveillée par un réseau international, note Antoine Flahault. De fait, elle est la base de tous les travaux de modélisation visant à prédire le calendrier de la future pandémie». La grippe de Hongkong a bouclé son premier tour du monde en un an avant de revenir attaquer l’Europe. Elle nous dit que le prochain nouveau virus ceinturera la planète en quelques mois.

(1) Unité 707 de l’Inserm-Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, à Paris.

(2) Bulletin de l’OMS n° 41, 1969.

(3) On sait aujourd’hui que le virus de la «grippe de Hongkong» est du type H3N2. Il serait le fruit d’une hybridation entre le virus de la «grippe asiatique» H2N2, en circulation dans la population depuis son apparition en 1957, et un virus de type H3 tel celui isolé chez un canard sauvage, en Ukraine, au début des années 60.

(4) In The Lancet, 11 janvier 1969.

(5) Les Epidémies terrassées, une histoire de pays riches, Ed. La Martinière, 2003.

COMPLEMENT:

Contagion, the Movie: An Expert Medical Review
Paul A. Offit, MD
Medscape
September 13, 2011

Editor’s Note:
We thought that Medscape readers would be interested in hearing from one of our infectious disease experts about the medical aspects of the movie Contagion. So often, science is trumped by drama in popular movies — but not this time, says Paul A. Offit, MD, a vaccine coinventor in real life. The movie was filmed in part at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, so we also provide links to stories about the work being done at CDC every day.

Hi. My name is Paul Offit, and I’m talking to you today from the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. I thought it might be fun to talk about a movie that I saw this weekend, Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion. This movie deals with a pandemic-like influenza virus to which no one in the population has been previously exposed and which has the potential to do a tremendous amount of harm. It was an interesting movie. Typically when movies take on science, they tend to sacrifice the science in favor of drama. That wasn’t true here.

The moviemakers did a very good job of illustrating how Southeast Asia can essentially serve as a « genetic reassortment laboratory » with influenza strains being created as a combination event among strains from pigs and chickens (and in this case, bats) to create a strain that the population has never seen before. They do a very good job of explaining that possibility and in showing how easy the virus can spread from one person to another. In fact, in bringing up the concept of contagiousness as « R0, » they compare the R0 of influenza, polio, and smallpox. It’s very interesting that they were willing to spend time explaining what contagiousness means.

They also do an excellent job of describing the phenomenon of fomites — that one can, in fact, transmit microorganisms very easily by shaking a hand or touching a martini glass or a door handle. The camera lingered on these different items to the point that it essentially becomes a commercial for hand sanitizer (which they actually show at one point during the movie).

They discuss how difficult it is to try and stop this virus. The heroes of the story are vaccines. In discussing how they would go about making a vaccine, they make a distinction between a whole kill virus and a live attenuated vaccine. They show how the CDC, through active case hunting, can actually figure out exactly how this virus was generated and collaborate with academia — in this case, a virologist in California named Sussman, played by Elliott Gould. You have to be able to imagine Elliott Gould as a virologist, but if you can, it really is a nice touch, showing how he is the first to be able to be able to grow the virus in cell culture, allowing a vaccine to be made.

The movie then explores the difficulties in trying to decide who can get vaccine, given that the supply is limited. These are all the issues that we faced when we talked about the possibility of how devastating the most recent swine flu pandemic could be. The movie is quite accurate as it portrays how society breaks down in the face of potentially millions of deaths caused by limited vaccine and limited food supplies. It’s really well done.

The movie also shows the antiscience forces. In this case, it’s in the person of the appropriately named Alan Krumwiede, who is played by Jude Law. Krumwiede is a paranoid conspiracy theorist who believes that this is all just a government plot, and he is very antiscience. He has created a treatment (that he has taken himself), called Forsythia, a homeopathic remedy, which obviously is of no value because it is simply something diluted to the point that it’s not there anymore. He claims that he has been treated by this product, even though he was actually never sickened by the virus. The movie demonstrates the impact of the Internet. In this case, Krumwiede has a blog called « Truth Serum Now » that creates — or feeds into — a lot of mistrust in the general population.

In Contagion, Dr. Sanjay Gupta interviews a CDC official played by Laurence Fishburne, and he gives Krumwiede equal time. It’s interesting that what the conspiracy theorist talks about is people. Krumwiede confronts Fishburne with questions such as « What did you know? » and « When did you know it? » when, in fact, the issues are « How can we identify this virus?, » « How can we make a vaccine against it?, » and « How can we prevent its spread? » It’s an issue of science, not an issue of people. But in this movie, Sanjay Gupta, playing himself, makes it an issue about people — another example of art imitating life, because Gupta has been perfectly willing to allow antivaccine celebrities to be on his show. In another interesting example of art imitating life, Jude Law [reportedly] actually believes in homeopathy.

In summary, Contagion is an excellent movie in that it is willing to allow science to prevail over drama. It is quite well done, so I recommend it. Thank you.

Voir aussi:

Could They Really Make a Vaccine So Quickly?

Dear Art—

I read your last dispatch on the train into New York today. I got out at Grand Central Station and passed a traffic jam on Vanderbilt Avenue that formed behind a squad of police searching the trunk of a black car. You could feel the 9/11 jitters quivering in the air again in advance of the 10th anniversary—another situation in which fear of the unknown was surging. I headed west, to watch Contagion again and to moderate a talk afterward between the scientific consultant Ian Lipkin and the screenwriter Scott Burns. On the way, I passed a bus with a poster for the movie plastered across its side. Splayed across the frantic faces of Matt Damon and Gwyneth Paltrow was a line of dialogue from the film: “Don’t talk to anyone. Don’t touch anyone.”

Later, watching the movie again, I realized this was a brilliant—but telling—reversal. On the poster, the words sound like they might be said by a mother to her children—shouted, actually, as a preface to panic. But Burns wrote the line with a very different meaning.

It is uttered by Kate Winslet, who plays an epidemiological intelligence officer. (That’s a real job, by the way. I wish I had a job title half as cool as that.) Winslet comes to Minnesota just as the epidemic begins and before people have started to panic. She figures out that a colleague of the ill Gwyneth Paltrow might have been exposed to the virus when he picked her up at the airport, so she calls him on his cell phone to track him down. He’s on a bus, already sick. As she races into a car to meet him, she tells him to get out of the bus right away. “Don’t talk to anyone. Don’t touch anyone,” she says.

In the movie, the line isn’t about avoiding a virus. It’s about keeping a virus to yourself. In other words, it’s about public health. I find Contagion interesting not just for putting virology on the screen, but for making public health workers its heroes. Scientists may not get treated very well in Hollywood, but at least they show up in movies sometimes. I cannot think of another movie where epidemiologists get the star treatment. Contagion finds the detective story in their work. It shows how reconstructing the course of an outbreak can provide crucial clues, such as how many people an infected person can give a virus to, how many of them get sick, and how many of them die. Figuring out the history of an epidemic can help take away its future. The trouble that Germany had in tracking down the source of their deadly E. coli outbreak earlier this year (cucumbers from Spain—no, wait, bean sprouts from Germany—no, hold on, fenugreek seeds from Egypt) shows that public health systems can stumble in even the wealthiest countries on Earth. A major virus outbreak would be a much bigger challenge. Whether Contagion turns out to be fantasy or prophecy depends a lot on how well our public health system will perform.

It also depends, as you point out, on how quickly we can find vaccines and make them. At the screening, I raised that point with Lipkin. He said he’s gotten some guff from his colleagues for the speed at which the scientists in the movie whip up a vaccine. But he personally thought that part of Contagion was too slow.

What?

Lipkin acknowledged that standard vaccine production is glacial. That’s because of inertia, not science, he says. The technique of making flu vaccines in eggs was developed over five decades ago. Lipkin and his colleagues are now capable of figuring out how to trigger immune reactions to exotic viruses from animals in a matter of weeks, not months. And once they’ve created a vaccine, they don’t have to use Eisenhower-era technology to manufacture it in bulk. Instead of making vaccines in chicken eggs, they can use insect cells, even yeast cells.

Not all viruses will be easy to target, Lipkin granted. HIV will remain tough to vaccinate, because it mutates quickly and can lurk in cells for years. But other viruses (like the ones Lipkin stitched together for Contagion) could be addressed quickly, if only we could drag vaccine development into the 21st century. The tools are all here, Lipkin argued; we just need to use them properly.

So now I see the ending of the Contagion differently than I did the first time. It’s not a Hollywood mandate to have the audience leave the theater on happy note. It’s a hint of what might be.

COMPLEMENT:

Guy Sorman – Quand la grippe espagnole se réveillera

Guy Sorman a rencontré Michael Osterholm, éminent spécialiste des maladies infectieuses. L’humanité n’est pas à l’abri d’un nouveau virus tueur.

Guy Sorman

Coronavirus : la grippe espagnole, mère de toutes les pandémies

Stefan Schmitt et Anna-Lena Scholz

Die Zeit
14/02/2020

Si le coronavirus de Wuhan inquiète la communauté internationale, il paraît presque inoffensif comparé aux terribles ravages causés il y a un siècle par la grippe espagnole.

Cette fois, ça y est ? C’est fondamentalement la question que se posent les microbiologistes chaque fois qu’apparaît un nouveau virus qui affecte soudain l’homme. Ou sera-ce le suivant qui sera capable de provoquer une catastrophe planétaire, comme autrefois la grippe espagnole ? Ce qui, du reste, n’est pas un nom adapté. Il vaudrait mieux parler de “grippe mondiale” (nous allons y revenir).

Autrefois, c’était entre 1918 et 1919, à la fin de la tragédie dans laquelle les monarchies de la vieille Europe avaient plongé leurs peuples. Cette tragédie qui s’était étendue à une grande partie du globe et avait préparé le terrain à la campagne exterminatrice du virus, qui allait faire plus de victimes que toutes les batailles et escarmouches depuis 1914. Aujourd’hui, les chercheurs estiment qu’entre 50 et 100 millions de personnes sont mortes de la grippe espagnole. Un chiffre invraisemblable, et ce d’autant plus qu’à l’époque, on ne recensait encore qu’environ 2 milliards d’habitants sur la Terre.

Pire que la peste

Cette grippe est considérée comme la pire de toutes les épidémies. Pire, même, que celles qui ont accompagné la chute de l’Empire romain ou que la peste bubonique, la peste noire du Moyen Âge. De nos jours encore, un siècle après la “grippe mondiale”, après des décennies de progrès fulgurants dans la médecine, bien des énigmes subsistent : par quelle espèce animale avait-elle été transmise à l’homme ? Cela s’était-il produit dans les campagnes du Kansas, aux États-Unis ? Ou étaient-ce des ouvriers chinois qui l’y avaient importée ? Les épidémiologistes ont reconstitué la diffusion de la grippe à partir de rapports d’hôpitaux, de décomptes des décès, d’articles de journaux, de statistiques des armées et des autorités. Ils identifient plusieurs caractéristiques qui en font le prototype d’une pandémie moderne (de pan, mot grec qui veut dire “tous”).

Au printemps 1918, des médecins de la caserne de Riley, au Kansas, ont décrit quelque chose que les historiens de la médecine ont identifié plus tard comme la première manifestation du virus. Le 4 mars, le cuisinier s’était fait porter pâle. Une semaine plus tard, 100 recrues étaient hospitalisées et plus de 500 étaient contaminées. La pathologie semblait relativement bénigne. Mais si ces jeunes soldats se trouvaient à Riley, c’était pour y suivre un entraînement avant d’être déployés en Europe, aussi ont-ils emporté avec eux le déclencheur de la maladie, dans les transports de troupes qui traversaient l’Atlantique, et jusqu’au front.

Une redoutable agressivité

C’est dans les tranchées et les abris surpeuplés, où les soldats vivaient dans des conditions d’hygiène abominables, qu’a dû se produire une mutation qui a rendu le virus plus dangereux. Lors d’une deuxième vague, les militaires l’ont transmis aux civils dans leurs pays d’origine. Jamais encore le monde n’avait été à ce point interconnecté, ce qui a encore favorisé sa diffusion. “La pandémie s’est répandue dans le monde entier, mais l’Afrique et l’Asie en ont souffert de façon disproportionnée, écrit Tilli Tansey, historienne de la médecine, dans la revue scientifique Nature.

Plus de Kényans sont morts que d’Écossais, plus d’Indonésiens que de Néerlandais.”

Les belligérants, par leur silence, ont aggravé les choses. Les articles faisant état de l’apparition du virus dans les Flandres au printemps 1918 ont été interdits de publication. Ce n’est qu’en juin que la maladie a été décrite en détail, et ce, dans l’Espagne neutre, où la presse n’était pas soumise à la censure. L’affaire a eu d’autant plus de retentissement que le roi Alphonse XIII lui-même est tombé malade, si bien que, rapidement, bien des pays en sont venus à parler de “grippe espagnole”. Et même là où on lui donnait un autre nom, ce dernier était toujours associé à l’idée d’une menace venue de l’étranger : au Sénégal, on l’appelait la grippe brésilienne, au Brésil la grippe allemande, en Pologne la grippe bolchevique, en Perse la grippe britannique.

Les gens de l’époque n’ont jamais pu en déterminer l’origine. Certes, les scientifiques étaient en réalité sur les traces du virus depuis la fin du XIXsiècle, mais leurs informations n’étaient évidemment pas accessibles au grand public. Ce n’est que quand des chercheurs de l’équipe du virologiste Jeffery Taubenberger, près de quatre-vingts ans plus tard, ont découvert des restes humains datant de la dernière année de la guerre qu’il leur a été possible de séquencer des brins de l’ARN du virus. En 2005, ils ont décrit le pathogène meurtrier dans la revue Science : il s’agissait d’un virus de la grippe A de type H1N1. Au bout d’un an d’analyses génétiques, Taubenberger a écrit que tous les virus des grippes mondiales de type A devaient être des descendants de ce pathogène — “ce qui fait du virus de 1918 la ‘mère de toutes les pandémies’”.

Aujourd’hui, la grippe espagnole n’est pas seulement un concept réservé aux spécialistes, le virus fait partie de l’inconscient collectif. Le H1N1, le VIH, le virus du Sras, le 2019-nCoV… Ce qui se cache derrière la sécheresse de ces appellations ne se limite pas à des diagnostics médicaux. Le virus est depuis longtemps une métaphore des peurs qui sous-tendent une société : la peur de la contagion, de l’intrus, de l’invisible. Ce qui est là en jeu, c’est le risque non seulement pour son propre organisme, mais aussi pour l’organisme collectif. Et là où rôde la peur de l’étranger, la politisation n’est jamais bien loin. Ce qu’a démontré à l’extrême le fanatisme racial du national-socialisme, qui avait régulièrement recours au vocabulaire de “la purification” et de “l’hygiène” de “l’organisme national” allemand.

Sinistres fantasmes

Comme l’a établi la sociologue de la culture Brigitte Weingart à propos de l’hystérie autour du sida dans les années 1980, quiconque parle de virus entreprend de “dresser des barrières”, en affirmant l’opposition entre sain et malade, intérieur et extérieur, les siens et l’étranger. Dans l’imaginaire de l’humanité, l’effondrement du système immunitaire entraîne alors l’effondrement du contrôle politique. La thérapie ? L’isolation par le masque, l’interdiction de vol, la fermeture des frontières. Ce qui peut avoir un sens sur le plan médical favorise de sinistres fantasmes.

La grippe espagnole a été le précurseur de tout cela. Dans les années 1957, 1968 et 2009, le monde a connu d’autres pandémies de grippe. Mais aucune n’a atteint ne serait-ce que vaguement l’étendue de la grippe espagnole. Certes, au tout début du XXIe siècle, deux variantes de la grippe aviaire ont contaminé plus de 2000 personnes et coûté la vie à quelques centaines d’entre elles, sans toutefois jamais atteindre la portée épidémique que redoutait le corps médical “si un nouveau virus de la grippe animal développait la capacité d’être transmissible à l’homme, puis d’homme à homme”. Cent ans après la grippe espagnole, le spécialiste des infections Michael Osterholm a ainsi lancé un avertissement dans les pages du New York Times :

La question n’est pas de savoir si, mais quand cela sera se produira.”

Toutefois, la pandémie de 1918-1919 présente des particularités qui peuvent être synonymes d’espoir. Si elle nous sert aujourd’hui de modèle, elle s’est déroulée dans des conditions inhabituelles. Le front de l’Ouest constituait un foyer idéal. Des variantes agressives du virus ont pu se répandre dans les tranchées, bien qu’elles aient tué beaucoup plus de malades, et beaucoup plus vite, que la première vague, dans le Kansas. De plus, la population civile était tout autant affectée par les privations que les soldats, durant la quatrième année de guerre. Bien souvent, la santé n’était pas une priorité pour les États. Enfin, en 1918, il n’existait encore aucun antibiotique contre les pneumonies bactériennes, lesquelles étaient la cause la plus courante de décès en tant qu’infections secondaires chez les victimes de la grippe.

On peut donc considérer que l’humanité était particulièrement vulnérable au moment où la nature a fait apparaître ce virus. Dans l’ensemble, le monde était certes effectivement moderne, mais il ne se faisait encore qu’une idée imparfaite de l’omniprésence des microbes. À l’opposé, aujourd’hui, la planète est reliée par des réseaux de transports d’une densité et d’une rapidité sans précédent. Nous sommes quatre fois plus nombreux à y vivre qu’à l’époque. Par conséquent, le temps nécessaire à l’enrayement d’une épidémie est d’autant plus court. C’est pour cette raison que les chercheurs étudient au plus vite chaque nouveau virus, même si son impact paraît négligeable par rapport à d’autres maladies contagieuses. Quelques années plus tard, immanquablement, il n’en reste que le souvenir d’une inquiétude exagérée : la grippe aviaire, la grippe porcine – finalement, pourquoi n’ont-elles pas été si terribles ?

Fort heureusement, il faut que se conjuguent un grand nombre de facteurs pour que surgisse un agent pathogène potentiellement destructeur, qui fera dire aux scientifiques : “cette fois, ça y est”.

Voir enfin:

Aux origines de la grippe espagnole
Courrier international
12/05/2014

Une étude scientifique suggère que le virus de la grippe espagnole, qui a tué 50 millions de personnes en 1918, tiendrait sa virulence de traits hérités d’un virus de la grippe aviaire. Et explique pourquoi ce sont surtout des gens jeunes qui ont succombé à ce fléau.

En 1917 comme en 1919, l’espérance de vie des Américains était de 51 ans. Entre ces deux années, en 1918, elle a chuté à 39 ans. Un spectaculaire retour en arrière que l’on doit à la grippe espagnole. En un an, cette pandémie a tué entre 50 et 100 millions de gens. Bien plus que les quatre années de la Première guerre mondiale et plus que la peste bubonique pendant tout le Moyen-Age, rappelle le magazine Time. Autre particularité, ce virus de souche H1N1 a particulièrement touché les hommes et les femmes dans la vingtaine. Un paradoxe qui intrigue les chercheurs depuis des années, souligne l’hebdomadaire américain.

Mais une équipe menée par le chercheur en biologie de l’évolution Michael Worobey, de l’université d’Arizona, vient d’émettre plusieurs hypothèses qui permettraient d’expliquer la virulence du virus, en particulier sur des gens dans la force de la jeunesse. Selon l’article qu’elle a publié dans Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), le virus dévastateur de la grippe espagnole serait une souche humaine qui aurait acquis des gènes venant d’un virus aviaire. Ce qui lui aurait permis d’échapper au système immunitaire humain et de se répandre très rapidement.

Défenses acquisesQuant au fait que ce soient les adultes entre 20 et 40 ans qui ont le plus succombé à l’épidémie, les chercheurs
supposent que l’explication réside dans l’histoire des épidémies de grippe précédant 1918 : “L’immunité acquise [pendant l’enfance], ou plutôt l’absence d’immunité, semble avoir été un facteur décisif”, explique Worobey.

Les chercheurs ont en fait enquêté sur les épidémies précédant  la grippe espagnole en analysant des échantillons de sang datant de 1918. Pour ce faire, ils ont recensé les anticorps présents, et découvert que les personnes nées entre 1880 et 1900 – la génération la plus touchée par l’épidémie de grippe espagnole – avaient surtout été exposées à des souches de virus de type H3N8, et étaient démunis d’anticorps contre H1N1. En revanche, la génération née après 1900 a, elle, été exposée à d’autres variantes de H1N1, ce qui leur a donné une meilleure résistance à la grippe espagnole.

Quels enseignements en tirer ? Il faudrait peut-être adapter le profil des vaccins aux différentes générations, selon qu’elles ont été – ou non – exposées à des souches spécifiques dans leur prime jeunesse, suggère l’article scientifique publié dans PNAS.

COMPLEMENT:

Spanish flu: 100 years on
Why the flu of 1918 was so deadly
David Robson
31st October 2018

The Spanish flu killed quickly, and it killed in huge numbers. Other flu pandemics in modern times have been far less deadly. Why?

If you are reading this article, you have probably lived through at least one global flu pandemic – one just as contagious as the deadly 1918 strain. There was the 1957 outbreak (the so-called ‘Asian flu’) and the ‘Hong Kong flu’ in 1968. Forty years later, in 2009, there was ‘swine flu’.

Each pandemic had similar origins, emerging, one way or another, from an animal virus that evolved to be to able pass between humans. Yet the death tolls were barely comparable. Between 40 and 50 million are thought to have died from the 1918 strain – compared to two million for the Asian and Hong Kong influenzas, and 600,000 for the 2009 swine flu, both of which had a mortality rate of less than 1%.

The human cost of the 1918 pandemic was so great that many doctors continue to describe it as the “greatest medical holocaust in history”.  But what made it so deadly? And could that knowledge help us prepare for a similar pandemic today?

An understanding of these pandemics would be impossible without a recognition of the huge leaps in medicine over the 20th Century. Doctors in 1918 had only just discovered the existence of viruses. “And they certainly didn’t know that this was a virus causing these diseases,” says Wendy Barclay at Imperial College London. They were a long way from the anti-viral medications and vaccines that can now help to stem the spread and promote a quicker recovery.

Many flu deaths are also caused by secondary, bacterial infections that take root in the weakened body, leading to pneumonia. Antibiotics like penicillin – discovered in 1928 – now allow doctors to reduce that risk, but in 1918 there was no such treatment. Nor did they have vaccines, which now help to protect those who are most at risk. “Our health care infrastructure and diagnostic and therapeutic tools are so much more advanced,” says Jessica Belser, who works at the influenza division of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Besides the lack of basic medical tools in 1918, deaths would have also been a direct result of the appalling living conditions at this tragic time in human history. The trenches would have been the perfect breeding grounds for infections among the World War One soldiers. “The virus emerged when populations, which previously had little contact with each other, were brought together on the battlefield,” says Patrick Saunders-Hastings at Carleton University in Ottawa. “And on a lot of cases they were dealing with other injuries and they were under-nourished.” Vitamin B deficiencies, in particular, have been noted to increase mortality rates in later pandemics, he says.

Even those left at home were still living in closed, crowded conditions that led to greater exposure to the virus. This not only accelerated transmission, increasing the chances that people would become infected; it also increased the severity of the symptoms. “We know that the bigger the dose that gets into you, the sicker you get, because the virus is able to overwhelm the immune system and take a hold more potently in your body,” says Barclay.

“It’s well understood that improved sanitation and hygiene, associated with industrialisation and general reductions in poverty, have contributed significantly to overall reductions in infectious disease mortality in the 20th Century,” agrees Kyra Grantz at the University of Florida. Analysing records from Chicago during the 1918 pandemic, she has shown that factors such as population density and unemployment directly influenced someone’s chance of catching the disease.

Interestingly, the data from Chicago also appeared to show a strong link between mortality risk and rates of illiteracy within different regions of the city. This may be because illiteracy was simply a proxy for other factors associated with poverty. But it’s possible that a person’s lack of education also played a direct role in the disease’s progression.

By the time the techniques to capture, store, cultivate and analyse viruses had been invented, the original deadly strain had long since disappeared

“There were tremendous efforts made by public health officials to halt the outbreak in Chicago, including a city-wide quarantine, school closures, and bans on certain social gatherings,” Grantz says. “Those measures will only be effective if people are aware of and adhere to them.”

Such factors notwithstanding, many scientists believe that the virus itself was also particularly virulent – although it has taken more than a century to understand exactly why.

By the time the techniques to capture, store, cultivate and analyse viruses had been invented, the original deadly strain had long since disappeared. But recent advances in genomic technology have now allowed scientists to resurrect an active virus from blueprints from inert historic samples, which they have then used to infect laboratory animals such as monkeys to study its effects.

Besides replicating very quickly, the 1918 strain seems to trigger a particularly intense response from the immune system, including a ‘cytokine storm’ – the rapid release of immune cells and inflammatory molecules. Although a robust immune response should help us fight infection, an over-reaction of this kind can overload the body, leading to severe inflammation and a build-up of fluid in the lungs that could increase the chance of secondary infections. The cytokine storm might help to explain why young, healthy adults – who normally find it easier to shake off flu – were the worst affected, since in this case their stronger immune systems created an even more severe cytokine storm.

To understand why the 1918 strain would have had this effect, we need to return to its origins.

The 1918 flu is thought to have only just evolved from a strain that typically infected birds – acquiring mutations that allowed it to infect the upper respiratory system. This meant that it could be transmitted through the air – in coughs and sneezes – more easily.

It’s not good for the virus to kill the host as soon as it infects it, because that host has less chance of passing the virus on to other people – Wendy Barclay

This is important for two reasons. Without previous exposure to the virus, the body’s immune system would not have been able to produce an efficient response.

Just as importantly, however, the virus itself had not yet fully adapted to life in a human body. Contrary to expectations, it is not normally within a flu virus’s interests to kill the host. “It’s not good for the virus to kill the host as soon as it infects it, because that host has less chance of passing the virus on to other people,” says Barclay. Instead, it just needs to hitch a ride for long enough to spread through your coughs and sneezes. As a result, most viruses evolve to become less pathogenic overtime – but the 1918 virus had not yet made those adjustments.

The later pandemics, in contrast, had already incorporated some of these adaptations before they spread across the world – and were less deadly as a result.

The 1957 pandemic, for instance, emerged when an existing human strain of the virus acquired some genes from an avian variety. The result was highly contagious strain, but the existing human components meant it was still less deadly than a virus of purely of avian origins. Similarly, the 1968, the so-called Hong Kong flu came from another “reassorted” version of existing viruses that already carried the less virulent adaptations.

The 2009 pandemic, meanwhile, was a swine flu that had originated in pigs – which, although not identical to humans, are at least closer to us than birds, meaning that it had already accrued some adaptations that toned down its virulence.

Studying these processes not only help us understand tragedies of the past; by identifying the genetic features that were responsible for the devastating effects of the 1918 pandemic, we may be better prepared to prevent similar tragedies in the future.

“From my perspective, having more information about past pandemic viruses can help guide our decision making and knowledge and guide how we will best address future pandemic threats,” says Belser.

David Robson is a senior journalist at BBC Future.

Voir enfin:

Paths of Infection: The First World War and the Origins of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

Mark Osborne Humphries (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada)

War in history

Sage journals

January 8, 2014

Abstract

The origin site for the 1918 influenza pandemic which killed more than 50 million people worldwide has been hotly debated. While the mid-western United States, France, and China have all been identified as potential candidates by medical researchers, the military context for the pandemic has been all but ignored. Conversely, military historians have paid little attention to a deadly disease which underlines the reciprocal relationship between battlefield and home front. This paper re-examines the debate about the origins and diffusion of the 1918 flu within the context of global war, bridging gaps between social, medical, and military history in the process. A multidisciplinary perspective combined with new research in British and Canadian archives reveals that the 1918 flu most likely emerged first in China in the winter of 1917–18, diffusing across the world as previously isolated populations came into contact with one another on the battlefields of Europe. Ethnocentric fears – both official and popular – facilitated its spread along military pathways that had been carved out across the globe to sustain the war effort on the Western Front.

Epidemics typically travel along a society’s most important and active lines of communication. The deadliest epidemics in history have been those which followed new paths carved out when previously isolated populations came into sustained contact with one another. Sometimes these paths were essentially economic, with new diseases following emergent patterns of trade. In the sixth century the Byzantine Empire was struck by the plague of Justinian, probably transmitted with shipments of grain from North Africa that were being imported to feed the empire’s expanding cities.1 Likewise, the Black Death of the mid-fourteenth century moved across the Mediterranean as Italian traders began plying the waters between the Black Sea and Sicily with greater frequency.2 Severe epidemics have also followed military conquest or imperial expansion, moving along the sinews of war and empire. In the sixteenth century the Spanish invasion of the Aztec and Incan empires devastated Aboriginal populations of the ‘New World’ in several epidemics of smallpox and influenza.3 Asiatic cholera had long been endemic in India before it was exported to the Middle East and then Europe by a British military expedition from the subcontinent to Oman in 1821.4

Given the historical link between war and epidemic disease, it is not surprising that at the outbreak of the Great War in 1914 public health officials feared that a global war might bring new diseases home to civilian populations. ‘The trail of infected armies leaves a sad tale of sickness amongst the women and children and non-combatants. Laws and regulations may govern the conduct of war, but disease and infections recognise no such laws and refuse to signal [s/c] out the combatant only,’ wrote future Canadian surgeon general Guy Carleton Jones in August 1914. ‘Thus we see that war forces itself on the civilian, on the innocent child, on the non-combatant who stays at home … for who can tell, or count up, or even recognise the victims of war when it once places its hand on a country?’5 Four years later, his worst fears were realized.

The 1918 influenza pandemic circled the globe in three waves: the first in the spring of 1918, the second in the autumn, and the third in the winter of 1918-19, extending in some places into 1920. The first wave is said to have caused few deaths but much sickness; it would probably have gone unnoticed in history were it not for the second and more deadly autumn wave between August and December 1918 that caused the majority of deaths. In the first wave it was the armies that suffered most severely. In the autumn and winter waves, soldiers and civilians alike died from secondary pneumonia infections which caused people to turn blue from lack of oxygen and cough up purulent, bloody sputum. It was a strange and terrifying epidemic.6

Yet researchers have been strangely reluctant to link the dual global catastrophes of war and disease in their analyses. Those studying the social and military history of the Great War have largely ignored the effects of disease on the battlefield or the ways in which mobilizing massive international armies may have facilitated the development of the pan demic.7 Those few historians who have chosen to look at the link between war and influenza have concentrated almost exclusively on writing national histories which examine how military-medical infrastructures coped with a major epidemic crisis.8 Social historians of disease and medicine have typically chosen to concentrate on national and often local studies which examine flu’s effects on specific communities and social groups.9 Medical researchers, on the other hand, have been most concerned with establishing the pandemic’s demographic impact, sequencing the virus’s genes, or using the pandemic experience to model future public health responses.10 The result is a fragmented field in which researchers rarely talk to one another. It also means that histories of the pandemic – a term which refers to a global outbreak of disease – have ironically been localized. The opportunity to examine the pandemic’s relationship to a very global war has been missed.

This paper re-examines the 1918 flu’s origins and its pattern of diffusion as military events. It seeks to situate the disease within the larger social and military context of the First World War and the massive movements of population which it entailed. In reevaluating the epidemiological and historical evidence, and building on the work of previous scholars in a variety of fields, it posits that the most likely origin site for this flu was China where, during the winter of 1917-18, a new and deadly virus first appeared and then diffused around the globe with the mobilization of the Chinese Labour Corps (CLC). It criss-crossed the planet in a matter of months, following the sinews of war, moving from China, to North America, to Europe, to Africa, and then back again, killing millions in the process. The flu was thus a global disaster precipitated and best understood as a consequence of the transnational and novel nature of the First World War. Between 1914 and 1918 the centuries-old pattern of the outward movement of populations from Europe to the rest of the world was reversed as millions of colonizers, colonized, and independent non-European actors converged on battlefields and troopships from across the globe. The result was the most deadly epidemic in history.

We now know that influenza is caused by a virus which finds its natural home in wild ducks and only infects humans when it crosses the species barrier, sometimes directly passing from birds to people, sometimes moving through an intermediary species such as pigs or horses.11 When an animal virus becomes a human disease, it has the potential to cause a pandemic because people have no prior immunity; there have been five such episodes in the last 125 years- 1889,1918,1957,1968, and 2009.12 The 1918 virus was by far the most severe, and researchers are still not sure why. What is clear is that it had a highly unusual combination of genetic characteristics which made it both deadly and easily transmissible.13 Most unusually, it also killed those members of society who normally survive the flu with few complications: young, otherwise healthy adults between the ages of 18 and 40. Researchers think this may be because the 1918 virus turned the body’s immune system against itself, making it most deadly for those with particularly robust internal defences.14

While we are learning much about the genetic nature of the virus from samples obtained from frozen corpses and archived medical slides, we know less about where it came from.15 The search for the genesis of the 1918 flu began soon after the pandemic’s second wave subsided in the late autumn of 1918. As the eminent epidemiologist Edwin Oakes Jordan noted in his 1927 study – which remains the most comprehensive epidemiological work on the pandemic – ‘its origin is largely shrouded in obscurity’.16 Although he believed it must have radiated outwards from either a single ‘endemic focus’ or from several foci, the data and knowledge available in 1927 made it difficult if not impossible to settle upon a definite epicentre.17 Jordan decided to focus his research on reports of unusually virulent respiratory diseases with similar symptomologies to the influenza seen in the deadly autumn wave but published prior to the pandemic’s recognized first wave in April and May 1918. From his readings of the periodical literature, he identified three possible sites: British military camps in Great Britain and France (1916-17), Haskell, Kansas (March 1918), or China (winter 1917-18). In all three cases Jordan concluded that there was evidence that an unusually virulent and deadly respiratory disease of unknown origins was present well in advance of the first recognized wave of flu, but ultimately he decided that the evidence available in 1927 did not allow him to reach a firm conclusion about which site was the primary place of infection. Researchers still debate a European, American, or Asian origin for the virus today.

Beginning in the late 1990s, virologist John Oxford authored a series of articles which built a new case for a European origin site.18 Like Jordan, his studies point to two specific outbreaks of a respiratory disease elusively called ‘purulent bronchitis’ by the British army’s doctors at two army bases in France and England.19 The first began in late December 1916, peaking in January and February 1917, at Étaples in northern France. The second occurred in March and April 1917 at Aldershot barracks, south-west of London. Both epidemics were written up in the Lancet by the doctors who witnessed them in the spring and autumn of 1917, well before the actual pandemic began. The articles describe soldiers dying with symptoms that resembled those seen in the deadly autumn wave of the 1918 flu: bloody sputum production, tachycardia, a high temperature, and a dusky heliotrope cyanosis which often preceded an unusually frequent pattern of deaths.20

In the view of Oxford and his colleagues the peculiar conditions of trench warfare allowed these local outbreaks to emerge as a new pandemic virus, incubated by a lethal combination of gas, filth, overcrowding, and human cohabitation with livestock, specifically pigs and fowl.21 This suggestion is based on the assumption that pandemic viruses might emerge in fits and starts as a new strain begins to slowly cross the species barrier from birds or pigs to human beings.22 If this happened, it would be expected that the virus would initially be extremely lethal, but would also spread inefficiently while it adapted to its human hosts, which would result in short-lived and highly localized outbreaks of disease.23 Oxford and his co-authors suggest that this is what happened during the 1916-17 outbreaks at Aldershot and Étaples, arguing that these constituted ‘herald waves’, or early instances of a new animal virus crossing the species barrier for the first time,24 part of a seeding process in which a new and virulent form of influenza was planted around the world in the years before the pandemic and exploded from the metaphorical soil into a global pandemic during the autumn of 1918.25

Oxford and colleagues assume that the pandemic’s explosion in the summer and autumn of 1918 can be explained by the massive movements of demobilized armies. They write: ‘demobilization in the autumn of 1918 would have provided an ideal set of circumstances for intimate person-to-person spread and wide dispersion as young soldiers returned home by sea and rail to countries around the entire globe’.26 This, they argue, explains the long interval between the earlier cases and those in the autumn of 1918. While it is an intriguing hypothesis, it also underlines the necessity of situating flu research within a wider historical context. Demobilization cannot account for the diffusion of a fatal pandemic wave which began in late August and peaked in late October and early November, as none of the belligerents demobilized until well after the crisis passed. The German army, for example, was the first to disengage from the Western Front and return within its home borders after the armistice of 11 November, but even its march did not begin until 21 November.27 On the other side, the first British troops were not ordered home until mid-December, while the majority of Canadian soldiers – the largest of the imperial contingents – did not begin to return to the Dominion until the late winter and spring of 1919.28 Likewise, the Americans did not repatriate their army until well into 1919; as late as August of that year, there were still 156,000 US soldiers in Europe – or about 20 per cent of wartime strength.29 The majority of French soldiers remained along the banks of the Rhine until after the Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28 June 1919; indeed, at the end of May, the French were still making preparations for a full-scale invasion of Germany in the event the Germans refused to sign the treaty.30 In sum, the armies of the Great War did not demobilize en masse until well after the pandemic’s third wave had ended in most locations, meaning that demo bilization alone cannot account for the explosion of flu in the autumn of 1918. In the absence of this trigger, it is difficult to establish an unbroken epidemic chain linking the earlier European outbreaks of purulent bronchitis with the 1918 pandemic, despite the extensive and detailed medical records available for most armies throughout the period.

There are viable alternatives to the European hypothesis. In 1927, after discarding the outbreaks at Aldershot and Étaples, Jordan turned to an unusual public health report from Haskell, Kansas, dated March 1918 that linked an outbreak of influenza to deaths from pneumonia. Because the first wave of flu was known to have been rampant in American military camps in April and May 1918, it seemed possible to Jordan that the disease might have first appeared in Haskell and was then transmitted to the army camps as civilian recruits were called to the colours. Once in the ranks of the army, it would have spread quickly from west to east across the United States and then across the Atlantic to Europe throughout the summer of 1918, perhaps mutating somewhere overseas, before radiating outwards from the continent’s west coast in the early autumn with renewed force.31 In recent years John Barry has become the most vocal proponent of the American origins theory. In his book The Great Influenza and in other articles, Barry builds on Jordan’s findings to argue that flu overwhelmed a local doctor in Haskell County, Loring Miner, forcing him to sleep in his buggy between night calls until he eventually became so perplexed by the disease that he filed a report with the United States Public Health Service in late March.32 But this note comprises only single sentence in the 5 April 1918 issue of Public Health Reports. It reads: On March 30, 1918, the occurrence of 18 cases of influenza of severe type, from which 3 deaths resulted, was reported at Haskell, Kansas.’33 Using the local gossip columns of the Santa Fe Monitor, Barry was able to further elaborate on the significance of this otherwise obscure reference to flu activity, suggesting that these cases had actually occurred in February but were only reported at the end of March before finally being published in April.34 He argues that from this localized outbreak the flu spread to nearby Camp Funston, Kansas, at the beginning of March, then to other army camps across the United States, and later around the world after American troops arrived in Europe.35

At first glance the American hypothesis appears convincing. Like Oxford’s theory, it presents an early case of a similar type of disease; the American theory also better fits the general epidemiological pattern while remaining consistent with the historical record and other scientific research. But in order to accept Haskell as the origin site for the pandemic, we must agree that it is the earliest outbreak of the disease evident in the record. At the same time, while Miner’s report suggests anecdotally that morbidity and mortality were high, we must also ask whether they were unusual. It is possible to examine both questions using the medical records kept by the US Army which provide the most complete picture of respiratory illness activity in the United States for the immediate pre-pandemic period in 1917 and 1918.36 An examination of the admission rates for the winter and spring of 1917-18 for flu-like illnesses and pneumonia suggests that morbidity and mortality spiked in two waves in December-January 1917-18 and March-April 1918 (see Table l).37 The annual admission rate (which measures morbidity) in December and January was 312.94 and 344.58 per 1,000 white soldiers and 312.28 and 308.41 per 1,000 African American soldiers. Morbidity dropped off significantly in February before moving higher in March and April to 363.91 and 493.2 per 1,000 white soldiers and 582.16 and 649.87 for African American doughboys. The number of admissions to hospital per 1,000 soldiers was also almost three times higher than it had been the previous year, indicating that both the December-January and March-April waves were unusually severe and thus abnormal. But the earlier wave, which occurred almost three months before the Haskell outbreak, was by far the more deadly of the two. While annualized mortality was higher in the spring wave, the case-fatality rate (which measures the virulence of the disease) for white soldiers in December was 1.5 per cent and in January, 1.69 per cent; for African Americans it was 7.09 and 5.22 per cent respectively.38 In contrast, case-fatality rates were much lower in the March and April wave; in fact, December was an even more deadly month for African American flu victims than the period between August and November 1918, when the majority of recognized pandemic deaths took place.39 This suggests that the Haskell outbreak was not the primary site of the 1918 flu’s emergence; perhaps, though, it may have been among the first civilian encounters with the disease.

Although Barry was correct to conclude that flu was first reported in the civilian population at Haskell, it is unlikely that it was the origin site for the 1918 virus given the clear existence of another severe wave three months earlier which was reported across US Army hospitals. Edwin Oakes Jordan identified only one other possible site for the origins of the 1918 flu: China. South East Asia had been linked to the origins of previous pandemics – at least in the minds of their chroniclers, and we now know that new strains of influenza have often originated in Asia.40 In 1927 Jordan observed that several contemporary English-speaking writers suggested that the flu had been brought to Europe by the CLC, raised by the French and British in northern China for service on the Western Front. One author described ‘a curious, mild, febrile disease reported among Chinese labor troops on the coast of France early in the spring of 1918, about which [he had] never been able to obtain definite clinical or epidemiological information’.41 Given the limitations of the available sources, language difficulties, and a lack of detailed epidemiological records from the Chinese interior, Jordan concluded that although he could not dismiss the possibility, he was unable to fully test the hypothesis.42 In recent years the Chinese origins theory has gained new support from researchers such as Christopher Langford, Dorothy A. Pettit, and Janice Bailie, who have uncovered evidence of a severe form of respiratory illness, initially diagnosed as pneumonic plague, circulating in the interior of China during the winter of 1917-18.43 They point out that victims died from a severe form of pneumonia, sometimes in a matter of one or two days, suffering from symptoms similar to those seen in the outbreak of influenza in the autumn of 1918. Most unusually for plague, the disease spread sporadically and the case-fatality rate remained low, which casts doubt on the contemporary diagnosis. These researchers argue that it was not in fact plague at all but was actually the earliest outbreak of pandemic influenza, and conclude that the disease then spread outwards from China.44 Again they cite the mobilization of the CLC as the main vector in transmitting the flu around the globe. 39

The Chinese origins theory has failed to gain acceptance among historians, mainly because of the circumstantial nature of the case and the contemporary identification of the disease as pneumonic plague. Langford, as a result, and Pettit and Bailie have been wisely cautious in their interpretation of a limited body of evidence, mainly drawn from public health reports, newspapers, and colonial office records. As part of a larger study of influenza in the Canadian Expeditionary Force and the pandemic in wartime Canada, new evidence has been uncovered in Canadian and British sources from China, North America, and Europe which builds on the case made by these other researchers to support a Chinese origin for the 1918 pandemic. This evidence, contextualized by a close reading of the military sources, allows us to construct an unbroken epidemiological chain from the interior of China to the battlefields of Europe.

In November 1917 a strange, contagious, and deadly disease of unknown origin began to spread in northern China. In mid-December, reports from Shansi province indicated that it was possibly an outbreak of pneumonic plague.45 Pneumonic plague is the most virulent form of the disease caused by the bacillus Yersinia pestis.46 Unlike bubonic plague, which is spread by bites from the fleas which live on rats and other small rodents, the pneumonic form of the disease spreads by aerosolized droplet infection, from human to human.47 This more severe form of the illness, which most likely caused the Black Death of the 1300s, commonly arises as a secondary source of infection during an outbreak of bubonic plague.48 If a person who contracts bubonic plague develops a lung infection, the bacteria can be coughed out and spread from human to human.49 Plague was suspected in 1917 because the last eruption of that deadly illness in China occurred only a few years before, in 1911, when it killed tens of thousands of people. Prevention efforts by Chinese and Western doctors led to the isolation of the plague bacterium, and by 1917 it could be identified in the laboratory. When word of the new outbreak reached Peking (Beijing) late that year, British and French doctors of the international legation assembled to confer on the steps they could take to stop the disease from spreading.50 Their biggest fear was that it might reach the treaty ports and then be exported to the rest of the world.

To contain the disease the international legation doctors recommended that the Chinese government institute quarantines along the Great Wall and at various railway stations in the interior. It also recommended that the government send Western as well as Chinese doctors to the epicentre to investigate the source of the outbreak, manage containment efforts, and determine the identity of the disease in the laboratory.51 But the Chinese government was not so quick to respond as the legation doctors would have liked.52 Instead of taking the foreigners at their word, the Chinese government was listening to counter-reports from Chinese officials in the interior who said the disease was not pneumonic plague, but merely a severe form of’winter sickness’ endemic to the region.53 European and American doctors believed this to be indicative of ‘typical’ Chinese backwardness rather than any familiarity or traditional knowledge about the signs and symptoms of a local illness.54 In late December the legation sent a team of Western doctors to identify the outbreak, while the Chinese government dispatched Dr Wu Lien-Teh, a European-trained physician who had earned a reputation as China’s premier ‘plague fighter’during the 1911 outbreak.55

The editors of the North China Herald applauded the decision to send Wu to investigate a disease whose identity was ‘altogether too vague for any opinion to be formed’.56 It proved to be a difficult disease to track. Initial reports indicated that it had spread almost 500 kilometres from a single epicentre in six weeks, and that most of those who came in contact with its victims later developed the disease.57 But the messages reaching both the legation and the newspapers were confused and based largely on rumour.58 Wherever the Western doctors went, they had difficulty finding the scientific evidence 50  necessary to confirm the identity of the disease.59 When Wu Lien-Teh and his team appeared at one village to look for plague victims to autopsy and take samples from, they were mobbed.60 Without any laboratory confirmation of the outbreak’s cause, the Chinese government remained reluctant to enact quarantines and travel restrictions.61 In large part this was because those Chinese officials who had witnessed the outbreak denied that it was plague.62 The initial symptoms of pneumonic plague include fever, headache, weak ness, pneumonia, shortness of breath, and coughing, sometimes producing purulent or bloody sputum, all of which were observed in 1917-18.63 The main epidemiological indicator of plague would have been a massive case-fatality rate. The pneumonic form of the disease kills within a matter of a few hours or days, with its victims dying of severe lung infections and bronchopneumonia.64 Almost no one recovers from infection. Chinese officials thus pointed to the mild nature of the disease and a low case-fatality rate as proof that it was merely a severe form of’winter sickness’ rather than pneumonic plague, claiming that there had been no more than 100 deaths in total.65

In the end, though, Wu and his team were able to secure samples from several bodies, and on 12 January they announced that they had confirmed the presence of plague bacteria in the laboratory.66 But there is good reason to doubt the certainty of this diagnosis.67 Internal communications, preserved in the records of the British Foreign Office, between the legation and its doctors confirm that it was difficult for the team to obtain samples from plague victims and then to establish the cause of the disease with any degree of certainty.68 Whenever plague appeared to have been confirmed in one location, reports from other sites cast doubt on the diagnosis. Chinese officials remained adamant throughout that the outbreak was minor and probably due to something other than pneumonic plague. In its investigation of plague in Nanking, Western doctors on the Plague Service of the Board of the Interior reported at the end of March 1918:

Based on observations made in the three northern plague provinces, we are surprised that there has been so little plague here, even allowing that some of it has been covered up. It is not three  weeks since the first death, and not over twenty deaths are on record. We are also surprised that the authorities did not earlier avail themselves of the services of the foreign physicians here, freely offered … [Some] twenty-three deaths were reported and investigated today, but not one of them proved to be from plague. Two children who are on the sick list are suspicious.69

Clearly something was killing people in Nanking, causing doctors to investigate dozens of deaths a day, but it was not pneumonic plague.70 Chinese officials remained adamant that it was Western fear-mongering and that the plague diagnosis had been erroneous. After causing a riot while attempting to obtain samples for testing from one site, Dr Wu was relieved of his duties at the head of the Chinese investigation, officially because of angina pectoris.7′ Pettit and Bailie believe it more likely that the doctor was fired because he refused to toe the government line.72 They argue that Wu’s announcement to the press that he had identified the disease may have been designed to force the Chinese government to implement protective measures that would have restricted movement of people and trade. According to later news reports at the time, when two Chinese doctors were asked to independently test Wu’s samples for the presence of the plague bacteria, their results were negative for the bacterium Yersinia pestis. One of those doctors, Dr Huang, also had significant experience of working with plague bacteria in the laboratory in the 1910-11 outbreak, and he concluded from his study that ‘it is doubtful whether [Wu’s] cases were suffering from pneumonic plague’. If Wu’s diagnosis was correct, it is difficult to understand why the 1917-18 outbreak of pneumonic plague did not receive more attention from plague researchers after the disease subsided. Instead it was soon forgotten.73

This first 1917-18 epidemic in China ended as quickly as it began in the early spring of 1918, before the diagnostic riddle could be solved. However, it reappeared the following autumn with renewed force. In the second week of November the international legation again received reports that an epidemic of pneumonic plague was raging in northern China. The symptoms and epidemiology were identical to those described the previous year, but the mortality was higher: the epidemic was said to be causing 20 to 30 deaths a day in some towns.74 Again, the European legation in Peking requested an investigation. A request was made to General Pao, the Tuchun or warlord of Heilongjiang, asking him to look into a severe outbreak of pneumonic plague at Tsitsihar.75

Ί at once sent officers from the army medical department in this office to make careful enquiries,’ he reported, and it was found that a kind of very sudden influenza was prevalent in the country round the provincial capital. The epidemic had been very virulent at first and fatal cases had occurred

At the top of the report a British official at the legation wrote his conclusions: ‘Plague: alleged outbreak was really influenza.’77 Nevertheless, Chinese officials had been similarly dismissive the previous year, so the international legation remained determined to make its own diagnosis. But a report from one of its doctors in the interior proved conclusive:

I have the honour to report that there has been an epidemic of Spanish Influenza in this Province similar probably to that which is reported from other parts of China; but the number of deaths has been very great and the sickness would appear to have been more serious in Sinkiang than elsewhere.

He continued:

The sickness was first reported from over the Russian border whence it was brought into Sinkiang by Chinese returning to their homes after a season of poppy cultivation in Russian territory: of these there are said to have been thirty thousand last year. The epidemic spread quickly from Tacheng towards Urumchi. The first cases reported in this neighbourhood occurred at a Mongol camp to the north of the city, and I am told by officials and missionaries that not one of the two hundred Mongols in the camp survived. It then raged in Urumchi and spread thence eastwards via Kucheng to Hami, and also via Turfan along the South Road to Kashgar … I first heard of the epidemic on my arrival at Hami. It was there spoken of as plague and I thought at first, from the number of deaths which I knew were occurring that it might be an outbreak of plague … On my arrival at Kucheng the worst seemed to be over but it was said that a great many deaths were still occurring among children: and the sickness was past before I reached Urumchi. The officials have shown their usual apathy … The epidemic at Urumchi was so great that for a time nearly all the shops were closed and business was at a standstill. The symptoms were described by Chinese as headache, pain in the bones, weakness, and sometimes fever and vomiting … it was quite a common sight to see carters and others drop down in the streets of Urumchi … When the epidemic was at its worst, there were seventy to eighty deaths a day at Kucheng. At Hami I believe the death rate was decidedly lower. It was, as usual in cases of this sort, very difficult to get definite information, and many wild rumours were circulating.78

This description of the epidemic and its elusive nature is identical to descriptions provided the previous year. It too had seemingly come from Mongolia with travellers from beyond the Great Wall. This time, however, a more conclusive diagnosis could be attached to the disease: Spanish influenza.79 In the minds of Western and Chinese officials at the time, the two outbreaks were clearly linked and caused by the same disease.

Comprehensive analysis of the available flu data by Christopher Langford and Wataru Iijima reveals that, while China did experience an epidemic, it was much less virulent than in the rest of the world – which is surprising, given the size and density of the Chinese population.80 At Shanghai the crude mortality ratio was lower among the Chinese population in 1918 than it was for any other year between 1913 and 1919.81 According to statistics compiled by Langford, during that period the average mortality for all causes was 14.62 deaths per 1,000 persons.82 In 1918 and 1919 the observed mortality was actually significantly lower than was expected: 12.8 and 14.3 per 1,000 per sons, 12.4 per cent and 2.2 per cent below the expected average.83 A similar pattern is evident for Hong Kong, where officials recorded that it was an extremely noteworthy fact that Hong Kong enjoyed an astonishing immunity to influenza during the worldwide pandemic of the closing months of 1918 … Had the disease prevailed in Hong Kong in similar form and with the same intensity as it did in many parts of British India, the mortality that it would have caused in the crowded parts of Hong Kong City is terrible to contemplate.84

Between 1913 and 1917 average mortality was 22.46 deaths per 1,000 persons. In 1918 and 1919 it was slightly elevated to 24.5 and 23.3 deaths per 1,000, increases of only 8.3 per cent and 3.6 per cent respectively. As Christopher Langford has shown, this is consistent with the evidence for other port cities in China.85 In comparison, in New York, mortality rose by 24.8 per cent in 1918 from an expected rate of 13.62 per 1,000 persons (1913-17) to 18.1 deaths per 1,000.86 In England and Wales the average number of deaths for the eight-year period preceding the pandemic was 14.04 deaths per 1,000 persons. In 1918 it rose 18.8 per cent to 17.3 deaths per 1,000.87 In Sri Lanka the death rate rose 17.3 per cent in 1918 from an average of 28.2 per 1,000 persons (1913-17) to 34.1 per 1,000. In Bombay, the average mortality for the period 1910 to 1917 was 32.83 deaths per 1,000 persons. In 1918 those numbers climbed 80 82 per cent to 59.61 deaths per 1,000; in 1919 they were higher still at 113 per cent of expected mortality.88 In examining why flu deaths should be so low in Chinese treaty ports, which had a population density comparable to Sri Lanka and Bombay, and much lower than either New York or London, Christopher Langford proposed an intriguing explanation. ‘The most obvious explanation is that many people in China had some previous exposure to the virus responsible for the outbreak,’ he writes, ‘or one closely related to it, and so had a degree of immunity to the disease … It could well be, then, that the influenza virus responsible for the 1918-19 pandemic originated in China.’89 Yet given a lack of evidence to confirm an early outbreak of flu-like disease until 1919, he concludes: ‘if so … it developed there fairly unobtrusively, since no serious outbreak of influenza seems to have occurred in China in the years leading up to 1918-19’.90 But had the outbreak which was reported as plague in 1917-18 actually been influenza, this would help to explain why the number of deaths was so low in China in 1918-19. When a population is exposed to a virus, those who survive infection develop a degree of immunity to subsequent outbreaks of the same or similar viruses. If the flu originated in China, diffused around the globe, and then returned the following year in a modified form, this would explain why Langford found that flu mortality did not peak in Shanghai or Hong Kong until February and June of 1919 respectively.91

While this presents a compelling, albeit circumstantial, case for the misidentification of flu as plague in China during the winter of 1917-18, only DNA testing of samples from these earlier outbreaks can truly confirm or deny the theory. But if flu did originate in China during the autumn and winter of 1917-18, then the available evidence must also prove that it travelled quickly and undetected to Europe while at the same time account ing for the known spring outbreaks in North America in March and April 1918.92 According to Langford and Pettit and Bailie, the most likely vector was the mobilization and deployment of the CLC from the British treaty port of Weihaiwei.93 Port Edward, as it was also known, was leased by the British government in 1898 as a countermeasure to the Russian acquisition of Port Arthur on the opposite side of the Gulf of Chihli.94 The territory was located on the eastern coast of the Shandong peninsula and included both the island fortress-city and a small territory on the mainland. As the Chinese government was concerned about remaining neutral in the eyes of the Central Powers, recruiting took place in the interior of northern China under the direction of local Chinese agents hired on contract.95 The recruits were then funnelled to Weihaiwei and into British leased territory, where they were inducted into the CLC.96 In the winter of 1917 the number of Chinese labourers in barracks at Weihaiwei and at the various depots on the mainland swelled in preparation for their movement to Europe.97 The problem was that not enough transports had been secured to ship the more than 20,000 labourers a month who were arriving at the island.98 The crowded conditions provided a perfect breeding ground for disease as Chinese workers from many different parts of the interior of northern China were suddenly thrown together in hastily arranged quarters on the coast.

During 1917-18, 94,000 Chinese workers were shipped by the British from China.99 Initially they were transported from Weihaiwei to Europe via Singapore, Durban, and Cape Town, or through the Mediterranean via the Suez Canal. Both routes tied up vitally important troop transports and surface escorts which were most needed in the Atlantic.100 The fastest and safest way to Europe was instead to move the CLC via Vancouver, across Canada to Halifax, and then on to France.101 In the spring of 1917 the Foreign Office requested that Ottawa allow the Chinese labourers to pass through the Dominion of Canada and that the government of Robert Borden arrange for their transportation. The Canadian prime minister agreed, but it was not a simple matter.102 Chinese immigration was a sensitive subject in Canada, and there were nativist fears that the labourers might try to escape while travelling across country.103 To ensure that they did not do so, special Railway Service Guards from the army were placed on the trains, and guards were also stationed at the camps encased in barbed wire fences.104 Newspapers were banned from reporting on the movement of the CLC and the whole enterprise was kept secret.105

At Christmas, stories began to appear in the Canadian papers about a strange new epidemic in China. ‘Epidemic of Pneumonia in Chinese Province,’ read the Toronto Globe’s headline of 5 January 1918. ‘The epidemic of pneumonia which broke out about a week ago along the Shansi-Mongolia border has reached Fengchengting, Province of Shansi, 160 miles northwest of Pekin [sic], and is causing alarm among the foreigners there.’106 On the 17th the paper reported that in China ‘[people are] dying by scores from pneumonia’.107 At the end of the weekend, readers found that the epidemic had worsened yet again.108 Censorship regulations meant that the Globe was unable to report that during the outbreak alone, 25,000 Chinese workers were being transported to Europe via Canada, many coming from the plague-affected areas in China.109 British officials at Weihaiwei wondered whether it was advisable to continue transporting the labour corps under such dangerous circumstances. Ί need hardly point out that if cases of plague were to break out in the coolie depot, the consequences might be grave in the extreme,’ wrote the governor of Weihaiwei to T.J. Bourne, the head British recruiter at Weihaiwei, in mid-January; ‘perhaps the … Canadian government would also object to Chinese emigrants from plague-infected areas passing through their ports or travelling on their railways’.110 Nothing was said about the potential health effects for the workers, and transportation continued all the same. Officials’ worst fears were confirmed when plague did in fact break out among the Chinese workers waiting to embark for Canada at Weihaiwei. On 1 March 1918 a recruiting officer at the island city sent a telegram to the director of transports and shipping in London which read: ‘1,600 coolies are ready to embark at Chengyang in Conconada. Recruiting there is stopped by plague. At Weihaiwei there are 2,480 coolies not yet free from infection and probably ready to embark in about six weeks time.’111 Despite the presence of plague, the Conconada loaded 1,899 members of the labour corps the next day, and set sail for Vancouver.112 The ship arrived at William Head on 23 March, with one death from pneumonia having occurred at sea.113 Soon after they arrived, it was clear that the workers would not be healthy enough to send on to Europe for some time. By early April, of the 3,660 Chinese labourers then housed at William Head, as many as 300, or roughly 8 per cent, were under medical treatment.114 In April, Canadian Surgeon General Guy Carleton Jones sent an order to the commander of Military District 11 (Victoria, British Columbia) asking him to ensure that precautions be taken to guarantee that, when the remaining members of the CLC were ordered overseas, no contagious diseases be allowed to come in contact with the civilian population.115 The disease which kept more than 3,000 Chinese labourers in quarantine is not described in the surviving records, but, according to the research of Gregory James, at least one of those quarantined from the Conconada died of pneumonia.116 We also know that, not long after the surgeon general’s request, London decided to cancel the CLC programme because of the danger posed by plague in China.117 The British government, anxious to end its commitments to those labourers already in Canada, decided to transfer the remaining workers, healthy or not, from Vancouver to New York and on to Europe.118

While medical inspections of embarking CLC labourers were carried out at Weihaiwei, they were not taken seriously. The European military doctors who inspected recruits were most concerned about looking for what they regarded as ‘Asian’ diseases like trachoma.119 Some doctors boasted of having examined 3,000 ‘patients’ in a single day – an impossibility but an exaggeration that speaks to the cursory nature of the medical inspections carried out on the docks in China.120 At the same time Canadian physi cians tended to downplay or ignore common ‘European’ diseases among the labourers, instead emphasizing the ‘inferior’ and ‘lazy’ nature of their patients when they came down with colds and sore throats. For example, H.D. Livingstone, a young Canadian Army Medical Corps doctor from Listowel, Ontario, who was sent to oversee the passage of labourers from Weihaiwei in the autumn of 1917, described how he and other European doctors dealt with common complaints such as sore throats and persistent coughs which plagued the CLC contingents on their voyages:

A coolie would come in and we would say to him ‘what sickness have you?’ He would reply (taking the most common complaint) ‘throat sore’ – how long have you had it? He would usually exaggerate and say 20 days or 15 days or some such big number to try and impress on us how sick he really was. Then after depressing the tongue and examining the throat I’d give him some Pat. Choir. Tablets at the same time saying ‘Take two every two hours and suck them’ then perhaps if he complained very much we would force down two ounces of castor oil and then practically shoved him out of the room saying at the same time ‘come back tomorrow if no better’ but the thought of the castor oil usually kept them away.121

The Canadian civilian quarantine service took little interest in the Chinese labourers, despite long-standing fears which linked disease and immigration on Canada’s west coast. In the case of the CLC, they were understood to be transients moving across the country to a further destination. As long as the military took precautions to isolate them from the general Canadian population and ensure that they did not ‘escape’ while in transit, quarantine officials were satisfied.122

In Canada, the medical records of those soldiers detailed to guard Chinese labourers – the Railway Service Guards – provide evidence of increased respiratory disease activity in the winter of 1917-18. Because the viruses and bacteria that affect the human respiratory system are always in circulation, when examining hospital or health records for any period one would expect to find evidence of disease activity. But large, sustained spikes in the number of admissions for respiratory complaints over several days or weeks would signify the presence of a disease-causing agent within the population – although it is impossible to determine from the existing records whether such activity was the result of a normal seasonal flu or a new type of virus. An examination of the unit’s daily orders nevertheless shows that in the winter of 1917-18 there were 32 cases of influenza reported among Canadian soldiers assigned to the Chinese workers between November 1917 and April 1918 (Figure l).123

As the members of the CLC arrived in France from southern England, they were sent to the ‘Coolie Camp’ outside Étaples, near Noyelles-sur-Mer – close to the base where Oxford noted the outbreak of purulent bronchitis.124 There, Number 3 Native Labour General Hospital, or the Chinese Hospital as it was also known, served the needs of the CLC in France and Belgium. The hospital’s commanding officer, Colonel Gray, typified the attitudes displayed by the British War Office towards Chinese labourers during the war: he was far more interested in the temperature of his stove than in the hundreds of ill Chinese workers who filled his hospital. As Gray recorded the hospital’s official daily war diary in the winter of 1917-18, he usually took care to note the exact heat at which his stove burned. It seems he was trying to invent a more efficient fuel mixture, as he also recorded how various alterations to the coke would affect the longevity of the fire and its temperature. He tried soaking the coke in oil and letting it dry. He experimented with adding a number of chemicals to the marinade and putting it into the stove when it was still wet. He even tried adding additional fuels. But while Gray studied his stove, a remarkable number of his patients at the hospital were dying from severe pneumonia infections – providing the first evidence to support Jordan’s 1927 report of a strange respiratory infection among Chinese workers in France.125

In February 1918, there were 9 deaths in the Étaples hospital, recorded as being from either pneumonia or tuberculosis, with 1,360 admissions during the month, mostly for trachoma. In March, the hospital reported 14 deaths from lung conditions, including 3 deaths from ‘acute bronchitis’ within 4 days, from a total of967 admissions. In April, there were 5 deaths from vari ous lung conditions. In May, there were a total of 25 deaths from respiratory diseases, including 4 from pneumonia and acute bronchitis on 1 May and 5 from what was assumed to be tuberculosis on 5 May. On 2 May, the war diary noted that an epidemic of influenza had begun.

The respiratory epidemic was preceded on 14 January 1918 by the death of the hospital’s two pigs.126 Unlike the many Chinese patients who died in hospital, an autopsy was performed on the second pig to determine its cause of death. The pathologist’s report suggested that the animal had died of a generic ‘swine fever’, which in 1918 simply meant that it died of an unknown disease. While today swine fever is used a synonym for hog cholera, in 1918, that disease was indistinguishable from a host of other illnesses, including swine flu.127 While it is impossible to establish what the pigs died of, influenza is one of the few diseases which can kill both humans and pigs. While Oxford and Barry cite human and animal cohabitation in Europe and in Kansas as evidence that a disease had the opportunity to cross the species barrier, here we find unusual evidence that both humans and pigs were dying of epidemic disease at the same time and in the same place.128 It would seem that these same respiratory diseases were circulating among Chinese labourers elsewhere in Europe around the same time. The records of the majority of CLC units do not appear to have survived in the archives, but references to the CLC in the files of other units are informative. The first reports of influenza in Canadian military records, for example, actually refer directly to members of the CLC. On 13 April 1918, at Number 9 Canadian General Hospital in Shorncliffe, England, ‘one Chinese patient [was] admit ted in [a] dying condition from [the] Labour Camp’.129 The ‘Labour Camp’, also known as the ‘Chinese Camp’, provided temporary housing for Chinese workers as they made their way to France en route from Canada.130 A few days later, on 25 April, the war diary recorded that ‘several Chinamen [sic] [were in a] special ward sick with Purulent Bronchitis’.131 The following day the number of cases increased and a second ward had to be opened for the labourers. According to the Assistant Director of Medical Services, Shorncliffe, the cases of purulent bronchitis seem to have first appeared among the members of the CLC, as it was not then circulating among Canadian troops in the area.132

Meanwhile, Chinese labourers continued to die at Noyelles-sur-Mer – some diagnosed with tuberculosis, others with respiratory infections. In June there were 4 deaths: 3 from bronchitis and 1 from pneumonia. In July there were a total of 16 deaths: although 11 had no cause of death specified in the war diary, 3 deaths were from bronchitis, 1 was from pneumonia, and, most significantly, 1 was from influenza. In August, there were another 3 deaths, one again being listed as due to acute bronchitis. Between January and the beginning of September, there were a total of 64 deaths from respiratory diseases (including tuberculosis) when typically the hospital only admitted between 500 and 1,000 patients per month, most of whom were treated for trachoma. The deaths stopped at Noyelles just as the severe wave of the influenza pandemic began.133

In September, when the fatal wave of flu was beginning to decimate populations around the world, there were no deaths reported in the Chinese Hospital as being due to respiratory illness of any kind – the first month this had happened since December 1917. In October, as the flu was sweeping across Canada, killing thousands in Montreal and Toronto, there was one death reported from pneumonia even though the hospital continued to admit a typical 596 patients. In November, 661 patients were admitted to hospital and there were a total of 11 deaths, none of which were recorded as being due to influenza, pneumonia, or another respiratory illness. The December war diary is missing, but even if the epidemic did suddenly erupt in the hospital, it did not rage into January 1919 as there were only 5 deaths from flu, pneumonia, or bron chitis, and a total of 36 deaths from all causes. A possible explanation is that members of the CLC – or significant portions of the workers – had acquired immunity to a similar virus at some point before the autumn of 1918.134 If so, they may even have spread it to the neighbouring British camp at Etaples. This pattern of diffusion is supported by an analysis of how the second known wave of flu spread outwards from an epicentre on the English Channel. Alfred Crosby argues that the original virus mutated in midsummer 1918, appearing almost simultaneously in France, the United States, and Africa at the end of August, and exploded from those three locations around the world.135 He writes: In the latter part of August 1918, the Spanish influenza virus mutated, and epidemics of unprecedented virulence exploded in the same week in three port cities thousands of miles apart: Freetown, Sierra Leone; Brest, France; and Boston, Massachusetts. Whether these explosions were three manifestations of a single mutation of the virus which originated in one of the three ports and almost simultaneously traveled to the other two or were three different simultaneous mutations will never be known. All we can say is that the first hypothesis is improbable and the second extremely improbable. Perhaps the truth is something entirely different.136

We can now say that the second wave of influenza spread out from southern England, specifically the ports of Plymouth and Devonport. Plymouth was a land and sea transportation hub, connected by railway to Shorncliffe and the nearby port facilities at Folkestone. Chinese labourers had frequently been offloaded at Plymouth and shipped by rail to Kent, and the port’s logbooks record the arrival and departure of dozens of units from the interior of England.137 Just as the death rate was beginning to subside in Noyelles-sur-Mer, on 26 July the admiral in charge of Devonport issued general order 653, which read:

Epidemic of Influenza: Surgeon-General Sir Humphry D. Rolleston and Fleet-Surgeon Robert W.G. Stewart arrived at the Port on 25th July, and will remain for such time as may be necessary, to investigate cases of serious illness arising from influenza. Every facility is to be afforded these officers in their investigations.138 As Rolleston and Stewart made their way to Plymouth to investigate reports of a new and more deadly iteration of the disease, HMS Mantua set sail for Freetown, Sierra Leone.139

The Mantua was a 10,000-ton ship built in 1909 to service the Australian run by the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company. With room for 600 passengers in peacetime, it was refitted as an armed merchant cruiser for service during the Great War. Before sailing from port, it took on 10,000 pounds of fresh meat and 365 tons of fresh water.140 On 1 August, the Mantua set sail from Plymouth Harbour (across the bay from Devonport) for the British West African colony. On 8 August, an epidemic recorded as being due to ‘influenza’ began on board. On the 10th, there were 25 sick; by the 12th, 74; and on the 13th, 103. When the ship made port in Freetown on 14 August, there were 124 sick aboard. The epidemic did not peak, however, until the 18th, when 176 sailors were reported as sick in hospital or their bunks. Over the next two weeks ten crewmen died of pneumonia following influenza. We know this new and more deadly strain of flu was taken on board in southern England because the ship remained isolated from the time it set sail on 1 August until it made landfall on the 14th. According to its log, the Mantua took on no water, supplies, or crew during its two weeks at sea. Once it arrived at Freetown, the virus quickly spread to the mainland.141 From Freetown it diffused into the interior and down the coast of Africa. Ships that called in for coal at the British colony brought influenza to Cape Town in South Africa as well as the Gold Coast.142 New Zealand soldiers on their way to France also caught it there.143 This means that the mutated fatal strain of the virus must have come aboard at Plymouth just before 1 August.144

Plymouth harbour is located directly across the Channel from Brest, France, from where numerous transports carrying British and American troops plied the waters between the two ports during the summer of 1918.145 As the Mantua was carrying influenza from England to Africa, American ships had been making similar voyages back across the Atlantic. One of those ships probably arrived in Boston at about the same time as the Mantua made landfall in Africa.146 On 27 August, the first cases of the severe autumn wave of influenza were reported among American soldiers stationed at the city’s Commonwealth Pier.147 From there it began a rapid expansion outwards from Boston’s waterfront. Soon it was spreading through the city and into the neighbouring army camps. By the second week of September, Spanish flu had already spread across Massachusetts and upper New York State.148 In that week local newspapers across the north-east reported that the disease was widespread. By the 14th, it was raging in Newport News and Philadelphia.149 By then there were thousands of cases among Camp Devon’s soldiers outside Boston.150 Over the next few months, 675,000 Americans died of influenza or pneumonia.

While there are several theories which explain the origins of the 1918 influenza pandemic, the Chinese hypothesis makes the most convincing case and is supported by the strongest epidemiological and historical evidence. To be sure, the evidence remains circumstantial, but it can be nothing else in the absence of viable DNA evidence. Nevertheless, the Chinese origins theory connects many of the loose ends left by the European and American theories, while also linking history with our modern understanding of flu virology. Thanks to the work of Langford and of Pettit and Bailie, we know that in late 1917 a virulent respiratory disease of unknown origins with symptoms approximating both pneumonic plague and Spanish influenza erupted in the interior of northern China. The disease spread rapidly through terrain marked by few roads – 500 km in 43 days.151

While Foreign Office records show that Western officials on the ground assumed it to be pneumonic plague because of previous outbreaks of that disease (not in that region but in Manchuria), local Chinese officials denied that this was the case. The Western investigators dispatched to identify the microbes had difficulty obtaining samples of the plague bacteria, even from those who had died during the outbreak. Suddenly the outbreak ended in late spring, only to reappear the following autumn. When it did, internal correspondence shows that both Chinese and Western officials identified the disease as Spanish influenza rather than pneumonic plague – and they both linked it to the previous year’s outbreak. When flu reappeared in China the following year, it killed far fewer there than elsewhere in the world, indicating the possibility that a previous epidemic had provided some form of survivor immunity.

At the same time the war gave an opportunity for a localized outbreak of disease to spread beyond China. The mobilization of the Chinese Labour Corps moved tens of thousands of individuals from the region where the outbreak occurred, across North America to Europe. We know that the plague-like illness in China did appear among Chinese workers bound for Vancouver, while, at the same time, hundreds of labourers were put into quarantine for an unspecified disease in British Columbia during the winter of 1917-18. Finally we have the Chinese Hospital at Noyelles-sur-Mer in France which confirms the existence of a strange and deadly respiratory disease among Chinese workers in Europe – providing records that were unavailable to Edwin Jordan when he noted this same ‘curious’ respiratory disease in 1927.152 While the plague-like disease spread  across China, humans and pigs died at the hospital. The final link in the epidemic chain was the diffusion of the more virulent mutation of the disease from the Channel coast in the summer of 1918 which began just as deaths among Chinese labourers at the hospital subsided. A Chinese origins theory also best explains conflicting evidence uncovered by other researchers such as John Oxford and John Barry. Chinese labourers could easily have spread flu much earlier to Europe, linking the outbreak which Oxford identified at Étaples to a much larger chain of disease events. By the same token, the cases in Haskell, Kansas, could have developed as part of a much larger and earlier pattern, representing the diffusion of flu from military to civilian paths of infection. While this is entirely speculative, it suggests that ‘origin’ evidence might be seen as documenting separate moments when a new and emerging virus reached the public consciousness for a brief time only to disappear again. It also reminds us that new viral threats may emerge anywhere, and can develop over relatively long periods of time, erupting when long entrenched patterns of socio-economic activity begin to change.153

The Chinese origins theory best explains evidence that only falls into place when the disease is placed within its proper military context and the mobilization of peoples necessitated by the global nature of the Great War. For the first time massive numbers of people from previously isolated populations converged on the battlefields of Europe. The mobilization of the CLC may have allowed a new disease to spread in fits and starts from China, across North America, to Europe, where it mutated and then exploded along the sinews of war. In this way influenza followed the same path carved by previous epidemics. The result was the most deadly disease event in history.

19 Responses to Epidémies: Vers le retour de la « grippe espagnole » ? (Will the « Spanish flu » strike back ?)

  1. […] dites aujourd’hui « pandémies » telles que la grippe de 1918  dite « espagnole » (plus de victimes, avec quelque 60 millions – sur 1 milliard de malades soit la […]

    J’aime

  2. jcdurbant dit :

    WHEN THE WORDS OF THE PROPHETS ARE WRITTEN ON OUR SILVER SCREENS

    The movie’s ending scene is revealed to be « day one » of the MEV-1 outbreak. It shows a logging company disturbing a bat, which flies out of the forest and into a pig farm, carrying a piece of banana. The bat drops the fruit (presumably infected with the virus) and a piglet eats it. The pig is later sold to a wet market vendor, who then sells the butchered swine to a casino restaurant in Hong Kong. The chef prepares the pork before shaking hands with Emhoff, infecting her and kick-starting the pandemic.

    This is very akin to the way the Nipah virus spread to people in Malaysia and India. The 2003 SARS epidemic, which killed 774 people, started in a similar manner. Chinese horseshoe bats passed the virus to civets sold at a wet market. People caught it from the civets.

    In the case of the new coronavirus, the process was likely similar.

    « There’s an indication that it’s a bat virus, spread in association with wet markets, » Vincent Munster, a scientist at Rocky Mountain Laboratories, previously told Business Insider.

    More research is needed in the case of coronavirus to determine which animal served as the virus’ intermediary host. One group of scientists reported it could be snakes.
    The opening scenes of « Contagion » depict day two of the virus’ spread. A man in Hong Kong, China is the first to die from the illness, but a man in Tokyo and a woman in London die, too.

    By contrast, the first person to die of the new coronavirus, a 61-year-old Wuhan resident, didn’t die until 11 days after the first case was reported. The virus also didn’t spread outside of China until January 13, two weeks into the outbreak.

    Cases have been documented in 20 other countries beyond China.
    By day 29 of the pandemic in the movie, 26 million people worldwide were dead. Thursday was day 29 of the coronavirus outbreak, and more than 210 people have died.

    All of the people who have died from the coronavirus live in China.
    In « Contagion, » Emhoff’s husband, played by Matt Damon, survives the pandemic because he is immune to the fictional virus.

    But the concept of individual immunity doesn’t apply in the case of coronaviruses, Neil Ferguson, a disease outbreak scientist at Imperial College London, told The Telegraph.

    « [With the] flu virus you become immune, but there are lots of different viruses circulating, » he said. « Coronaviruses don’t evolve in the same way as flu with lots of different strains, but equally our body doesn’t generate very good immunity. »

    Paltrow’s character infects the Tokyo man who died on day two after blowing on dice he holds in his hands at a casino. She also passes it to a person who cleans up a glass she’d used and another who picks up her phone.

    In the case of 2019-nCoV, the coronavirus can only survive on surfaces for « a range of hours, » according to Nancy Messonier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

    « There is likely a very, very, very low, if any, risk of spread from products or packaging that is shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures, » Messonier said in a press conference on Monday.

    The coronavirus spreads via coughing, sneezing, or close contact between infected and healthy people.
    In « Contagion, » many infected patients experience seizures before dying. Wuhan coronavirus patients, by contrast, get coughs, fever, and pneumonialike symptoms.

    MEV-1 affects everyone equally in the movie — it kills the Emhoffs’ son as quickly as it kills Beth.

    But a study of 41 Wuhan coronavirus cases reported that the median age of those who have died is around 75. Many of those individuals had other health issues like high blood pressure, diabetes, and Parkinson’s disease.

    A second study of 99 coronavirus cases, published Thursday in the journal The Lancet, revealed that the average age of infected patients was 55.5.

    According to Chinese researchers in Hong Kong, one person with the new coronavirus can pass it to three to five others — a statistic called the virus’ R0 value.

    The researchers’ study has not yet been peer-reviewed, however. Officials at the WHO, however, estimate that the coronavirus’ R0 value is between 1.4 and 2.5 people.

    On day six of the movie’s MEV-1 pandemic, doctors discuss what the virus’ R0 value might be.
    Fictional officials at the CDC and WHO in the movie are able to identify Emhoff as patient zero of the MEV-1 pandemic. But patient zero of the coronavirus outbreak has yet to be identified.

    On December 31, Chinese officials alerted the WHO to several cases of an unknown pneumonia-like virus in Wuhan. By the next day, the number of cases had jumped to 41, so it’s unclear which patient first contracted the virus.

    No infected patients in « Contagion » recover from the disease. But so far, 143 people in China, Japan, and Australia have recovered from the coronavirus.

    According to Todd Ellerin, a doctor and contributing writer at Harvard Health Publishing, « many people recover within a few days » from the coronavirus.

    Adrian Hyzler, chief medical officer at Healix International, previously told Business Insider that children, elderly people, pregnant women, and those who are immuno-compromised are more susceptible to the coronavirus’ most severe complications.
    A fictional blogger in the movie, played by Jude Law, spreads misinformation, claiming that the MEV-1 virus was manufactured by drug companies to turn a profit.

    One homeland-security agent in the movie also wonders whether the virus is a terrorist weapon. Neither of those theories turn out to hold water.

    Misinformation has spread during the current outbreak as well — oregano oil will not cure it, nor will drinking bleach.
    The scenes in « Contagion » in which doctors identify similarities between the MEV-1 virus’ genetic code and DNA from bats and pigs are pretty realistic.

    The genetic code of 2019-nCoV virus has been mapped by scientists in multiple countries. The new coronavirus shares 80% of its genome with the coronavirus that caused SARS and also overlaps with other coronaviruses found in bats.

    Chinese public-health experts worked to quickly share that genetic information with researchers around the globe so that scientists could analyze how the illness is spreading and mutating, and which animals it came from.
    Doctors in the movie say a mutated strain of the MEV-1 virus killed hundreds of thousands of people on the African continent.
    contagion medicine doctor

    So far, 2019-nCoV has not mutated like that, though health experts say the virus has the potential to mutate.
    Currently, more than 50 million people across 16 Chinese cities are under some type of quarantine or travel restriction.

    Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the WHO, said on January 22 that efforts to quarantine cities could help Chinese authorities control the virus’ spread and « minimize the chances of this outbreak spreading internationally. »

    In « Contagion, » the CDC attempts to quarantine the city of Chicago; the Emhoffs’ home town of Edina, Minnesota; the Minnesota-Wisconsin border; and other places in the US.
    In « Contagion, » public-health officials trace the virus’ movement between infected people and those with whom they had close contact. This method, called contact tracing, is real and used by epidemiologists to trace outbreaks.

    The WHO defines contact tracing as the identification and follow-up of people who may have come into contact with a person infected with a virus.
    The biggest inaccuracy in the movie « Contagion » is how quickly scientists are able to develop and produce a vaccine.

    Researchers in « Contagion » are able to produce and distribute a small quantity of a vaccine in just 90 days.

    But Munster said that « if Wuhan were to explode, a vaccine best-case scenario is three-quarters of a year, if not longer. »

    Several companies, including Moderna, Novavax, and Inovio, have announced preliminary vaccine-development plans. But getting a vaccine to market has historically been an arduous, multi-year process (the Ebola vaccine took 20 years to make). None of the companies have provided expected timelines.

    ‘Contagion’ is now one of the most popular movies on iTunes because of the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak. Here’s how it compares to reality.
    Aylin Woodward
    Busisness insider
    31 Jan 2020

    https://www.businessinsider.fr/us/wuhan-coronavirus-stokes-fears-comparison-to-contagion-2020-1

    J’aime

  3. jcdurbant dit :

    Amid fears stoked by the coronavirus, « Contagion » — a 2011 movie about a pandemic with potentially eerie similarities to recent events — has been climbing up the iTunes rental charts, reflecting how people often use fiction as a means to process reality. Yet that film is only one example of a recurring theme in movies associated with such an outbreak, a longtime staple of science fiction that has always been informed by science fact…

    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/01/30/entertainment/contagion-and-pandemics-in-movies/index.html

    J’aime

  4. jcdurbant dit :

    WHAT CHINESE PROBLEM ?

    « I would say that the takeaway message of all of this is to keep your eye on China. »

    James Higgins

    The Spanish flu reached its height in autumn 1918 but raged until 1920, initially gaining its nickname from wartime censorship rules that allowed for reporting on the disease’s ravages in neutral Spain.

    Physicians began debating the origin of the pandemic almost as soon as it appeared, Higgins says, with historians soon joining them.

    France’s wartime trenches, ridden with filth, disease, and death, were originally seen as the flu’s breeding ground. The flu’s tendency to strike young adults was explained as the disease targeting itself to young soldiers in trenches. The theory also purported to explain how the illness spread from Europe to cities such as Boston and Philadelphia by pointing a finger at returning troop ships.

    A decade after the war, Kansas was identified as another possible breeding ground, due to reports of an influenza outbreak there that spread to a nearby Army camp in March 1918, killing 48 doughboys.

    But in his study, Humphries reports that an outbreak of respiratory infections, which at the time were dubbed an endemic « winter sickness » by local health officials, were causing dozens of deaths a day in villages along China’s Great Wall. The illness spread 300 miles (500 kilometers) in six weeks’ time in late 1917.

    At first thought to be pneumonic plague, the disease killed at a far lower rate than is typical for that disease.

    Humphries discovered that a British legation official in China wrote that the disease was actually influenza, in a 1918 report. Humphries made the findings in searches of Canadian and British historical archives that contain the wartime records of the Chinese Labor Corps and the British legation in Beijing.

    Sealed Railcars

    At the time of the outbreak, British and French officials were forming the Chinese Labor Corps, which eventually shipped some 94,000 laborers from northern China to southern England and France during the war.

    « The idea was to free up soldiers to head to the front at a time when they were desperate for manpower, » Humphries says.

    Shipping the laborers around Africa was too time-consuming and tied up too much shipping, so British officials turned to shipping the laborers to Vancouver on the Canadian West Coast and sending them by train to Halifax on the East Coast, from which they could be sent to Europe.

    So desperate was the need for labor that on March 2, 1918, a ship loaded with 1,899 Chinese Labor Corps men left the Chinese port of Wehaiwei for Vancouver despite « plague » stopping the recruiting for workers there.

    In reaction to anti-Chinese feelings rife in western Canada at the time, the trains that carried the workers from Vancouver were sealed, Humphries says. Special Railway Service Guards watched the laborers, who were kept in camps surrounded by barbed wire. Newspapers were banned from reporting on their movement.

    Roughly 3,000 of the workers ended up in medical quarantine, their illnesses often blamed on their « lazy » natures by Canadian doctors, Humphries said: « They had very stereotypical, racist views of the Chinese. »

    Doctors treated sore throats with castor oil and sent the Chinese back to their camps.

    The Chinese laborers arrived in southern England by January 1918 and were sent to France, where the Chinese Hospital at Noyelles-sur-Mer recorded hundreds of their deaths from respiratory illness.

    Historians have suggested that the Spanish influenza mutated and became most deadly in spring 1918, spreading from Europe to ports as far apart as Boston and Freetown, Sierra Leone.

    By the height of the global pandemic that autumn, however, no more such cases were reported among the Chinese laborers in Europe.

    Medical Evidence

    Humphries concedes that a final answer to the mystery of the Spanish flu’s origins is still a ways off.

    « What we really need is a sample of the virus preserved in a burial for the medical experts to uncover, » Humphries says. « That would have the best chances of settling the debate. »

    For the last decade, experts such as Jeffery Taubenberger, of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, have sought burial samples across continents, seeking to find preserved samples of the virus in victims of the outbreak.

    Taubenberger led a team in 2011 that looked at flu virus samples taken from autopsies of 32 victims of the 1918 outbreak.

    The earliest sample found so far was from a U.S. soldier who died on May 11, 1918, at Camp Dodge, Iowa, but the team is looking for earlier cases.

    A broad number of samples from flu victims before and after the pandemic might finally narrow down its origins. Essentially, scientists would need a genetically identified sample of the influenza’s H1N1 virus taken from a victim who died before the first widespread outbreak of the pandemic in spring 1918 to point to a time and place as the likely origin point of the pandemic.

    One from China in 1917, for example, would fill the bill.

    « I’m not sure if this question can ever be fully answered, » Taubenberger cautions, noting that even the origin of a smaller flu pandemic in 2009 still eludes certainty.

    Ultimately, « these kinds of [historical] analyses cannot definitively reveal the origins and patterns of spread of emerging pathogens, especially at the early stages of the outbreak, » Taubenberger said, of the new historical report.

    In the end, however, knowing the origin of the disease might provide information that could help stop a future pandemic, making the search worthwhile.

    « I would say that the takeaway message of all of this is to keep your eye on China » as a source of emerging diseases, Higgins says. He points to concerns about avian flu and the SARS virus, both arising from Asia in the last decade.

    The SARS outbreak claimed perhaps 775 lives in 2003, and avian flu A (H5N1) has killed 384 people since 2003, according to the World Health Organization, which is carefully watching for signs of an outbreak of the diseases.

    « We have seen a lot of emerging diseases travel around the world in recent decades, » Higgins says.

    History has a way of repeating, he says, and research into the origins of the 1918 flu could help prevent a scourge like that from happening again.

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/1/140123-spanish-flu-1918-china-origins-pandemic-science-health

    J’aime

  5. jcdurbant dit :

    LES EPIDEMIES, CA SERT AUSSI A FAIRE LA GUERRE

    « On jeta dans la ville ce qui ressemblait à des montagnes de morts, et les chrétiens ne purent s’en cacher, ni les fuir ni y échapper, bien qu’ils en aient déversé autant qu’ils pouvaient dans la mer. »

    Siège de Caffa

    https://www.lepoint.fr/histoire/petite-histoire-mondiale-des-epidemies-23-02-2020-2364017_1615.php

    J’aime

  6. jcdurbant dit :

    RETOUR DE LA VARIOLE (Il y a 60 ans: Ramenée par un soldat d’Indochine, la variole rappelle l’importance oubliée de la vaccination à des familles et à toute une région)

    La variole va se diffuser à la faveur du non-respect par nombre de familles de la vaccination contre la variole pourtant obligatoire depuis 1902. Dans les années 1950 des foyers de variole subsistaient en Afrique de l’Est, en Inde et en Indochine. D’où venait le père du petit Daniel. Sergent parachutiste, ce soldat soigné pour une tuberculose pulmonaire avait contracté la variole au début de novembre 1954 dans un hôpital de Saigon. Il a retrouvé sa famille le 15 novembre 1954.

    Une campagne massive de vaccinations est lancée. L’hôpital est isolé. Les maisons des malades sont désinfectées au formol.La rumeur enfle. Vannes devient une destination maudite. L’abnégation du personnel soignant est remarquable, mais l’épidémie va gagner le Finistère, avec une malade transférée à Brest. Sur 98 cas déclarés (dont 74 dans le Morbihan, 24 dans le Finistère), dont onze médecins (neuf dans le Morbihan), il y aura 16 décès à Vannes, 4 à Brest.

    La campagne de vaccination collective va permettre de stopper l’épidémie. L’épidémie diminue rapidement à partir du 19 janvier, avant de s’éteindre le 20 mars à Vannes et le 11 mai à Brest.

    https://www.ouest-france.fr/bretagne/vannes-56000/variole-en-1954-une-epidemie-frappait-vannes-3116697

    J’aime

  7. jcdurbant dit :

    IT’S THE CULTURE, STUPID ! (While after 1918, 1956, 1968, 2003, 2019, countless bird and swine flus and an umpteenth ban on China’s wildlife industry, the world waits for the next pandemic and the total eradication of many of the world’s endangered species, ending a trade that has such deep cultural roots not just for food but for traditional medicine, clothing, ornaments and even pets will be hard, experts say)

    « Eating wildlife, such as boar and peacock, is considered good for your health, because diners also absorb the animals’ physical strength and resilience. Wild animals are expensive. If you treat somebody with wild animals, it will be considered that you’re paying tribute. The trade might lay low for a few months … but after a while, probably in a few months, people would very possibly come back again. »

    24-year-old college student from southern Guangxi province, who her regularly visit wild animals restaurants with her family)

    « ‘I hurt my waist very seriously, it was painful, and I could not bear the air conditioner. One day, one of my friends made some snake soup and I had three bowls of it, and my waist obviously became better. Otherwise, I could not sit here for such a long time with you. »

    67-year-old Guangdong farmer

    « (Currently), the law bans the eating of pangolins but doesn’t ban the use of their scales in traditional Chinese medicine. The impact of that is that overall the consumers are receiving are mixed messages. »

    Aron White

    If the trade was quickly made illegal, it would push it out of wet markets in the cities, creating black markets in rural communities where it is easier to hide the animals from the authorities. Driven underground, the illegal trade of wild animals for consumption and medicine could become even more dangerous. Then we’ll see (virus) outbreaks begin not in markets this time, but in rural communities. »

    Peter Daszak (Ecohealth Alliance)

    « These animals have their own viruses. These viruses can jump from one species to another species, then that species may become an amplifier, which increases the amount of virus in the wet market substantially. When a large number of people visit markets selling these animals each day, the risk of the virus jumping to humans rises sharply. If this is part of Chinese culture, they still want to consume a particular exotic animal, then the country can decide to keep this culture, that’s okay. (But) then they have to come up with another policy — how can we provide clean meat from that exotic animal to the public? Should it be domesticated? Should we do more checking or inspection? Implement some biosecurity measures ? Culture cannot be changed overnight, it takes time. »

    Leo Poon (Hong Kong University)

    Although it is unclear which animal transferred the virus to humans — bat, snake and pangolin have all been suggested — China has acknowledged it needs to bring its lucrative wildlife industry under control if it is to prevent another outbreak. In late February, it slapped a temporary ban on all farming and consumption of « terrestrial wildlife of important ecological, scientific and social value, » which is expected to be signed into law later this year.

    But ending the trade will be hard. The cultural roots of China’s use of wild animals run deep, not just for food but also for traditional medicine, clothing, ornaments and even pets.
    This isn’t the first time Chinese officials have tried to contain the trade. In 2003, civets — mongoose-type creatures — were banned and culled in large numbers after it was discovered they likely transferred the SARS virus to humans. The selling of snakes was also briefly banned in Guangzhou after the SARS outbreak.
    But today dishes using the animals are still eaten in parts of China.
    Public health experts say the ban is an important first step, but are calling on Beijing to seize this crucial opportunity to close loopholes — such as the use of wild animals in traditional Chinese medicine — and begin to change cultural attitudes in China around consuming wildlife.

    The Wuhan seafood market at the center of the novel coronavirus outbreak was selling a lot more than fish.
    Snakes, raccoon dogs, porcupines and deer were just some of the species crammed inside cages, side by side with shoppers and store owners, according to footage obtained by CNN. Some animals were filmed being slaughtered in the market in front of customers. CNN hasn’t been able to independently verify the footage, which was posted to Weibo by a concerned citizen, and has since been deleted by government censors.
    It is somewhere in this mass of wildlife that scientists believe the novel coronavirus likely first spread to humans. The disease has now infected more than 94,000 people and killed more than 3,200 around the world.
    The Wuhan market was not unusual. Across mainland China, hundreds of similar markets offer a wide range of exotic animals for a range of purposes.
    The danger of an outbreak comes when many exotic animals from different environments are kept in close proximity.
    « These animals have their own viruses, » said Hong Kong University virologist professor Leo Poon. « These viruses can jump from one species to another species, then that species may become an amplifier, which increases the amount of virus in the wet market substantially. »
    When a large number of people visit markets selling these animals each day, Poon said the risk of the virus jumping to humans rises sharply.
    Poon was one of the first scientists to decode the SARS coronavirus during the epidemic in 2003. It was linked to civet cats kept for food in a Guangzhou market, but Poon said researchers still wonder whether SARS was transmitted to the cats from another species.
    « (Farmed civet cats) didn’t have the virus, suggesting they acquired it in the markets from another animal, » he said.

    Strength and status
    Annie Huang, a 24-year-old college student from southern Guangxi province, said she and her family regularly visit restaurants that serve wild animals.
    She said eating wildlife, such as boar and peacock, is considered good for your health, because diners also absorb the animals’ physical strength and resilience.
    Exotic animals can also be an important status symbol. « Wild animals are expensive. If you treat somebody with wild animals, it will be considered that you’re paying tribute, » she said. A single peacock can cost as much as 800 yuan ($144).
    Huang asked to use a pseudonym when speaking about the newly-illegal trade because of her views on eating wild animals.
    She said she doubted the ban would be effective in the long run. « The trade might lay low for a few months … but after a while, probably in a few months, people would very possibly come back again, » she said
    Beijing hasn’t released a full list of the wild animals included in the ban, but the current Wildlife Protection Law gives some clues as to what could be banned. That law classifies wolves, civet cats and partridges as wildlife, and states that authorities « should take measures » to protect them, with little information on specific restrictions.
    The new ban makes exemptions for « livestock, » and in the wake of the ruling animals including pigeons and rabbits are being reclassified as livestock to allow their trade to continue.

    Billion-dollar industry
    Attempts to control the spread of diseases are also hindered by the fact that the industry for exotic animals in China, especially wild ones, is enormous.
    A government-sponsored report in 2017 by the Chinese Academy of Engineering found the country’s wildlife trade was worth more than $73 billion and employed more than one million people.
    Since the virus hit in December, almost 20,000 wildlife farms across seven Chinese provinces have been shut down or put under quarantine, including breeders specializing in peacocks, foxes, deer and turtles, according to local government press releases.
    It isn’t clear what effect the ban might have on the industry’s future — but there are signs China’s population may have already been turning away from eating wild animals even before the epidemic.
    A study by Beijing Normal University and the China Wildlife Conservation Association in 2012, found that in China’s major cities, a third of people had used wild animals in their lifetime for food, medicine or clothing — only slightly less than in their previous survey in 2004.
    However, the researchers also found that just over 52% of total respondents agreed that wildlife should not be consumed. It was even higher in Beijing, where more than 80% of residents were opposed to wildlife consumption.
    In comparison, about 42% of total respondents were against the practice during the previous survey in 2004.
    Since the coronavirus epidemic, there has been vocal criticism of the trade in exotic animals and calls for a crackdown. A group of 19 academics from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and leading universities even jointly issued a public statement calling for an end to the trade, saying it should be treated as a « public safety issue. »
    « The vast majority of people within China react to the abuse of wildlife in the way people in other countries do — with anger and revulsion, » said Aron White, wildlife campaigner at the Environmental Investigation Agency.
    « I think we should listen to those voices that are calling for change and support those voices. »

    Traditional medicine loophole
    A significant barrier to a total ban on the wildlife trade is the use of exotic animals in traditional Chinese medicine.
    Beijing has been strongly promoting the use of traditional Chinese medicine under President Xi Jinping and the industry is now worth an estimated $130 billion.
    As recently as October 2019, state-run media China Daily reported Xi as saying that « traditional medicine is a treasure of Chinese civilization embodying the wisdom of the nation and its people. »
    Many species that are eaten as food in parts of China are also used in the country’s traditional medicine.
    The new ban makes an exception made for wild animals used in traditional Chinese medicine. According to the ruling, the use of wildlife is not illegal for this, but now must be « strictly monitored. » The announcement doesn’t make it clear, however, how this monitoring will occur or what the penalties are for inadequate protection of wild animals, leaving the door open to abuse.
    A 2014 study by the Beijing Normal University and the China Wildlife Conservation Association found that while deer is eaten as a meat, the animal’s penis and blood are also used in medicine. Both bears and snakes are used for both food and medicine.
    Wildlife campaigner Aron White said that under the new restrictions there was a risk of wildlife being sold or bred for medicine, but then trafficked for food. He said the Chinese government needed to avoid loopholes by extending the ban to all vulnerable wildlife, regardless of use.
    « (Currently), the law bans the eating of pangolins but doesn’t ban the use of their scales in traditional Chinese medicine, » he said. « The impact of that is that overall the consumers are receiving are mixed messages. »
    The line between which animals are used for meat and which are used for medicine is also already very fine, because often people eat animals for perceived health benefits.
    In a study published in International Health in February, US and Chinese researchers surveyed attitudes among rural citizens in China’s southern provinces to eating wild animals.
    One 40-year-old peasant farmer in Guangdong says eating bats can prevent cancer. Another man says they can improve your vitality.
    « ‘I hurt my waist very seriously, it was painful, and I could not bear the air conditioner. One day, one of my friends made some snake soup and I had three bowls of it, and my waist obviously became better. Otherwise, I could not sit here for such a long time with you, » a 67-year-old Guangdong farmer told interviewers in the study.
    Chinese authorities putting healthy people in field hospitals

    China’s rubber-stamp legislature, the National People’s Congress, will meet later this year to officially alter the Wildlife Protection Law. A spokesman for the body’s Standing Committee said the current ban is just a temporary measure until the new wording in the law can be drafted and approved.
    Hong Kong virologist Leo Poon said the government has a big decision to make on whether it officially ends the trade in wild animals in China or simply tries to find safer options.
    « If this is part of Chinese culture, they still want to consume a particular exotic animal, then the country can decide to keep this culture, that’s okay, » he said.
    « (But) then they have to come up with another policy — how can we provide clean meat from that exotic animal to the public? Should it be domesticated? Should we do more checking or inspection? Implement some biosecurity measures? » he said.
    An outright ban could raise just as many questions and issues. Ecohealth Alliance president Peter Daszak said if the trade was quickly made illegal, it would push it out of wet markets in the cities, creating black markets in rural communities where it is easier to hide the animals from the authorities.
    Driven underground, the illegal trade of wild animals for consumption and medicine could become even more dangerous.

    « Then we’ll see (virus) outbreaks begin not in markets this time, but in rural communities, » Daszak said. « (And) people won’t talk to authorities because it is actually illegal. »
    Poon said the final effectiveness of the ban may depend on the government’s willpower to enforce the law. « Culture cannot be changed overnight, it takes time, » he said.

    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/05/asia/china-coronavirus-wildlife-consumption-ban-intl-hnk/index.html

    J’aime

  8. jcdurbant dit :

    IT’S HERD IMMUNITY, STUPID ! (Around 60% of the UK’s population of 66.4 million will need to become infected with coronavirus for herd immunity to be achieved)

    « We think this virus is likely to be one that comes year on year, becomes like a seasonal virus. Communities will become immune to it and that’s going to be an important part of controlling this longer term. About 60% is the sort of figure you need to get herd immunity. »

    Sir Patrick Valliance (UK government’s chief scientific adviser)

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-millions-of-britons-will-need-to-contract-covid-19-for-herd-immunity-11956793

    The « Vaccine Knowledge Project » at Oxford University describes herd immunity as when it is difficult for infectious diseases to spread, because a high percentage of the population is vaccinated.

    This is because there are not many people who can be infected, meaning protection is given to vulnerable people such as newborn babies, elderly people and those who are too sick to be vaccinated.

    Therefore, in the absence of a mass vaccinations programme, for the UK population to gain herd immunity a large enough number of people will need to contract the virus and then recover.

    They should then be much less likely to get the virus – and less likely to spread it – than they were before.

    This can be described as « nature’s vaccine ».

    At the moment, each person who catches coronavirus is likely to pass it on to between 2.4 and three people.
    Sir Patrick Vallance suggests the population needs to build up immunity to coronavirus

    Most people will only experience a « mild » illness from COVID-19, according to Sir Patrick.

    He has estimated around 60% of the UK’s population of 66.4 million will need to become infected with coronavirus for herd immunity to be achieved.

    That means around 40 million people will need to catch it.

    The available evidence suggests 32 million, or 80%, of them would have mild symptoms; but around eight million people could become severe or critical cases and need treatment in hospital.

    How does herd immunity help?

    The key benefit of herd immunity is that it reduces the spread of a virus.

    Therefore, those who are most vulnerable to COVID-19 – such as the elderly or those with underlying health conditions – can be isolated from the risk of the disease during the peak of the coronavirus outbreak.

    How to contain a global pandemic

    Then, when the spread of the virus reduces and herd immunity is achieved, those isolation measures can be removed.

    Simply put, isolating the most vulnerable in the short-term – while the rest of the population build up immunity and, subsequently, the spread of the virus slows – should mean they will be much less likely to contract COVID-19 in the long-term.

    Sir Patrick has also suggested coronavirus could become a « seasonal virus » and « is likely to be one that comes year on year ».

    Herd immunity should help prevent coronavirus having such a big impact in the future.

    However, it is not currently known how long it will take for 60% of the population to be infected, as that figure hasn’t yet been reached in any country.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-what-is-herd-immunity-and-how-will-it-help-prevent-spread-of-covid-19-11956941

    J’aime

  9. jcdurbant dit :

    KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON WITH THE DEFENSIVE MEASURES (The more you adhere, the more you can keep infection in check and eventually the rate will go down – until China finally cleans up its act !)

    “In exponential growth models, you assume that new people can be infected every day, because you keep meeting new people. But, if you consider your own social circle, you basically meet the same people every day. You can meet new people on public transportation, for example; but even on the bus, after some time most passengers will either be infected or immune. You don’t hug every person you meet on the street now, and you’ll avoid meeting face to face with someone that has a cold, like we did. The more you adhere, the more you can keep infection in check. So, under these circumstances, a carrier will only infect 1.5 people every three days and the rate will keep going down. We know China was under almost complete quarantine, people only left home to do crucial shopping and avoided contact with others. In Wuhan, which had the highest number of infection cases in the Hubei province, everyone had a chance of getting infected, but only 3 percent caught it. Even on the Diamond Princess (the virus-stricken cruise ship), the infection rate did not top 20 percent. Based on these statistics, I concluded that many people are just naturally immune to the virus.The explosion of cases in Italy is worrying, but it is a result of a higher percentage of elderly people than in China, France, or Spain. Furthermore, Italian culture is very warm, and Italians have a very rich social life. For these reasons, it is important to keep people apart and prevent sick people from coming into contact with healthy people. Currently, I am most worried about the US. It must isolate as many people as possible to buy time for preparations. Otherwise, it can end up in a situation where 20,000 infected people will descend on the nearest hospital at the same time and the healthcare system will collapse. Israel currently does not have enough cases to provide the data needed to make estimates, but from what I can tell, the Ministry of Health is dealing with the pandemic in a correct, positive way. The more severe the defensive measures taken, the more they will buy time to prepare for needed treatment and develop a vaccine. In China, the number of new infections will soon reach zero, and South Korea is past the median point and can already see the end. Regarding the rest of the world, it is still hard to tell. It will end when all those who are sick will only meet people they have already infected. The goal is not to reach the situation the cruise ship experienced. The Diamond Princess was the worst case scenario. If you compare the ship to a country — we are talking 250,000 people crowded into one square kilometer, which is horribly crowded. It is four times the crowding in Hong Kong. It is as if the entire Israeli population was crammed into 30 square kilometers. Furthermore, the ship had a central air conditioning and heating system and a communal dining room. Those are extremely comfortable conditions for the virus and still, only 20 percent were infected. It is a lot, but pretty similar to the infection rate of the common flu. As with the flu, most of those dying as a result of coronavirus are over 70 years old. It is a known fact that the flu mostly kills the elderly — around three-quarters of flu mortalities are people over 65. To put things in proportion: there are years when the flu is raging, like in the US in 2017, when there were three times the regular number of mortalities. And still, we did not panic. That is my message: you need to think of corona like a severe flu. It is four to eight times as strong as a common flu, and yet, most people will remain healthy and humanity will survive.”

    Michael Levitt (American-British-Israeli biophysicist, Nobel laureate, Stanford)

    https://www.algemeiner.com/2020/03/13/corona-is-slowing-down-humanity-will-survive-says-biophysicist-michael-levitt/

    J’aime

  10. jcdurbant dit :

    QUAND LE VIRUS CHINOIS SE REVEILLERA (Avec seulement 80.000 malades sur 1,4 milliard d’habitants, la population chinoise dans sa très grande majorité n’a pas ‘rencontré’ le virus et n’est donc pas immunisée)

    « Lorsque l’épidémie est arrêtée de façon artificielle, elle repart dès qu’on réinjecte du virus. »

    Jean-Stéphane Dhersin

    Décision a été prise de laisser l’épidémie suivre son cours et de ne pas tenter de l’arrêter brutalement. Cela ne veut pas dire ne rien faire: les pouvoirs publics mettent désormais toute leur énergie à ralentir la propagation du virus pour éviter l’engorgement des services d’urgence. Il s’agit «d’aplanir» la courbe épidémique, en limitant les contacts entre les gens, notamment, pour l’étaler dans le temps. Allonger sa durée pour limiter son ampleur à un instant T. C’est le seul moyen de limiter l’engorgement des hôpitaux.Il faudra ensuite attendre, peut-être plusieurs mois, qu’un nombre suffisant de personnes soient infectées pour atteindre l’«immunité de groupe». Le seuil au-delà duquel le virus ne parvient plus à circuler, car il n’y a plus assez de gens à contaminer. C’est aussi la stratégie adoptée par la Grande-Bretagne et l’Allemagne, de manière plus officielle. Angela Merkel s’attend à ce qu’il faille que 60 à 70 % des Allemands soient infectés! Idem en Grande-Bretagne. On comprend mieux les mots soigneusement choisis par Emmanuel Macron pour préparer les Français. Ce n’est pas forcément un mauvais choix, entendons-nous. Les mesures drastiques prises en Italie avaient laissé croire pendant un temps que la France pourrait faire elle aussi le pari de l’endiguement. Il aurait fallu pour cela appeler au confinement de toute la population, fermer les commerces, limiter drastiquement les déplacements et mettre en place des systèmes coercitifs pour que ces mesures soient respectées. Cela revenait à tuer l’économie, bouleverser la vie démocratique en reportant les élections, et restreindre in fine la liberté des citoyens. Une décision d’autant plus difficile que le résultat serait resté incertain. Car si la Chine a réussi à éteindre la flambée du virus aujourd’hui, rien ne dit que le pays ne devra pas faire face à un «rebond» de l’épidémie dans les semaines ou les mois à venir. En effet, avec «seulement» 80.000 malades sur 1,4 milliard d’habitants, la population chinoise dans sa très grande majorité n’a pas «rencontré» le virus et n’est donc pas immunisée.

    «Lorsque l’épidémie est arrêtée de façon artificielle, elle repart dès qu’on réinjecte du virus», rappelle Jean-Stéphane Dhersin, professeur à l’université Sorbonne Paris Nord et directeur adjoint scientifique de l’Institut national des sciences mathématiques et de leurs interactions du CNRS. De nouveaux foyers épidémiques risquent de s’allumer à tout moment. Le virus est très contagieux et présente la particularité d’être aussi transmis par des personnes asymptomatiques, ce qui en fait un cauchemar pour la prévention. L’Italie, si elle parvient elle aussi à stopper l’épidémie, ce qui est loin d’être gagné, devrait faire face à la même situation …

    « La France mise sur l’«immunité de groupe» pour arrêter le coronavirus

    DÉCRYPTAGE – Sans le dire explicitement, le président de la République a opté pour une gestion au long cours de l’épidémie.

    C’est en lisant entre les lignes de l’allocution solennelle du président de la République jeudi soir que l’on peut se faire une idée du choix stratégique opéré en coulisse. En déclarant que l’épidémie de Covid-19 en cours était «la plus grave crise sanitaire qu’ait connue la France depuis plus d’un siècle», Emmanuel Macron s’est évidemment projeté dans l’avenir. Car avec 3661 cas identifiés et 79 morts jeudi, ce n’est pas la situation actuelle qui est dramatique, mais bien celle qui nous attend: des millions de personnes infectées, des centaines de milliers de cas graves, et des dizaines de milliers de morts potentiels.

    En d’autres termes, décision a été prise de laisser l’épidémie suivre son cours et de ne pas tenter de l’arrêter brutalement. Cela ne veut pas dire ne rien faire: les pouvoirs publics mettent désormais toute leur énergie à ralentir la propagation du virus pour éviter l’engorgement des services d’urgence. Il s’agit «d’aplanir» la courbe épidémique, en limitant les contacts entre les gens, notamment, pour l’étaler dans le temps. Allonger sa durée pour limiter son ampleur à un instant T. C’est le seul moyen de limiter l’engorgement des hôpitaux.

    Il faudra ensuite attendre, peut-être plusieurs mois, qu’un nombre suffisant de personnes soient infectées pour atteindre l’«immunité de groupe». Le seuil au-delà duquel le virus ne parvient plus à circuler, car il n’y a plus assez de gens à contaminer. C’est aussi la stratégie adoptée par la Grande-Bretagne et l’Allemagne, de manière plus officielle. Angela Merkel s’attend à ce qu’il faille que 60 à 70 % des Allemands soient infectés! Idem en Grande-Bretagne. On comprend mieux les mots soigneusement choisis par Emmanuel Macron pour préparer les Français.

    Ce n’est pas forcément un mauvais choix, entendons-nous. Les mesures drastiques prises en Italie avaient laissé croire pendant un temps que la France pourrait faire elle aussi le pari de l’endiguement. Il aurait fallu pour cela appeler au confinement de toute la population, fermer les commerces, limiter drastiquement les déplacements et mettre en place des systèmes coercitifs pour que ces mesures soient respectées. Cela revenait à tuer l’économie, bouleverser la vie démocratique en reportant les élections, et restreindre in fine la liberté des citoyens.

    Une décision d’autant plus difficile que le résultat serait resté incertain. Car si la Chine a réussi à éteindre la flambée du virus aujourd’hui, rien ne dit que le pays ne devra pas faire face à un «rebond» de l’épidémie dans les semaines ou les mois à venir. En effet, avec «seulement» 80.000 malades sur 1,4 milliard d’habitants, la population chinoise dans sa très grande majorité n’a pas «rencontré» le virus et n’est donc pas immunisée.

    «Lorsque l’épidémie est arrêtée de façon artificielle, elle repart dès qu’on réinjecte du virus», rappelle Jean-Stéphane Dhersin, professeur à l’université Sorbonne Paris Nord et directeur adjoint scientifique de l’Institut national des sciences mathématiques et de leurs interactions du CNRS. De nouveaux foyers épidémiques risquent de s’allumer à tout moment. Le virus est très contagieux et présente la particularité d’être aussi transmis par des personnes asymptomatiques, ce qui en fait un cauchemar pour la prévention. L’Italie, si elle parvient elle aussi à stopper l’épidémie, ce qui est loin d’être gagné, devrait faire face à la même situation.

    Plutôt que de gérer une épidémie en dents de scie, la France va donc essayer de contrôler une épidémie au long cours. De la «méchanceté» du virus et sa létalité dépendront en grande partie le bilan humain qu’il faudra dresser à la fin de la crise. En Chine, les autorités ont dénombré 20 % de cas graves. Selon des estimations, la mortalité serait comprise entre 0,5 et 1 %… La question du nombre de cas sans aucun symptôme n’est toutefois pas clairement tranchée et pourrait laisser espérer une situation un peu moins dramatique.

    À l’inverse, si les hôpitaux n’arrivent pas à absorber l’affluence de malades, le bilan humain pourrait s’envoler. D’où l’urgence de ralentir la propagation du virus. La fermeture des établissements scolaires, qui sont des accélérateurs des contaminations, va bien dans ce sens. De même que l’interdiction de tous les rassemblements de plus de 100 personnes sur tout le territoire prise vendredi. On peut en revanche s’interroger sur l’opportunité d’avoir maintenu les élections dans ce contexte, mais c’est là un arbitrage politique qui dépasse la seule science épidémiologique…

    https://www.lefigaro.fr/sciences/la-france-mise-sur-l-immunite-de-groupe-pour-arreter-le-coronavirus-20200313

    J’aime

  11. jcdurbant dit :

    ET LA DEUXIEME VAGUE ? (300 à 500 000 morts en cas d’absence d’endiguement: Cent ans après et grâce à nos mêmes amis chinois, la grippe de 1918 serait-elle de retour ?)

    « Avec des mesures fortes comme celles qui ont été prises samedi et une très forte implication de la population, on peut potentiellement éteindre la première vague. Mais dans la mesure où il n’y aura pas suffisamment d’immunité, qui ne peut être conférée que par la vaccination ou par une infection naturelle, il peut y avoir une seconde vague, et la question des mesures à prendre se reposera. C’est toute la difficulté de cette stratégie, qui n’avait jusqu’à présent jamais été envisagée pour un virus circulant de façon globalisée, en raison de son coût économique et social. »

    Simon Cauchemez

    « Le facteur limitant, ce ne sont pas les lits, mais le personnel soignant. Nous ne comptons pas les heures, mais nous manquons de médecins, d’infirmières et d’infirmiers. (…) Dans certaines zones, [identifier des patients zéro et des chaînes de transmission alors que le virus circule maintenant partout] n’a plus aucun sens. On va épuiser tout le monde à faire cela. Les Anglais sont beaucoup plus pragmatiques : ils ont compris que cette première bataille était perdue et qu’on allait se faire passer dessus. »

    Xavier Lescure (infectiologue à l’hôpital Bichat et membre du conseil scientifique)

    Le Covid-19 sera-t-il au XXIe siècle ce que la grippe espagnole a été au XXe siècle ? C’est en tout cas le scénario le plus alarmiste sur lequel a travaillé le conseil scientifique, ce groupe de dix experts mis en place mercredi 11 mars à la demande du président de la République Emmanuel Macron « pour éclairer la décision publique ».

    Selon ces modélisations confidentielles, dont Le Monde a eu connaissance, l’épidémie de Covid-19 pourrait provoquer en France, en l’absence de toute mesure de prévention ou d’endiguement, de 300 000 à 500 000 morts.

    Précision extrêmement importante : ce scénario a été calculé en retenant les hypothèses de transmissibilité et de mortalité probables les plus élevées, et ce en l’absence des mesures radicales de prévention et d’éloignement social qui viennent d’être prises. Dans ce cas de figure, entre 30 000 et 100 000 lits de soins intensifs seraient nécessaires pour accueillir les patients au pic de l’épidémie.

    Cette modélisation a été réalisée par l’épidémiologiste Neil Ferguson, de l’Imperial College à Londres. Son équipe a été sollicitée par plusieurs gouvernements européens pour établir différents scénarios de progression de l’épidémie. Elle s’appuie sur l’analyse de différentes pandémies grippales et l’évaluation de différentes interventions possibles pour endiguer la propagation d’un virus, comme la fermeture des écoles, la mise en quarantaine des personnes infectées, ou encore la fermeture des frontières.

    Les résultats pour la France ont été présentés jeudi 12 mars à l’Elysée. Quelques heures avant que le président ne prenne solennellement la parole devant les Français pour expliquer « l’urgence » de la situation.

    Il existe des incertitudes quant aux hypothèses retenues et au comportement du virus – pourcentage d’asymptomatiques, transmissibilité, impact des mesures de quarantaine – mais, « même en divisant par deux, trois ou quatre, c’est une situation très sérieuse », insiste Simon Cauchemez, l’épidémiologiste de l’Institut Pasteur qui a présenté ces modélisations. « S’il y a une situation où je serais heureux que les modèles se trompent, c’est celle-là », ajoute le scientifique, en insistant sur le fait que les observations de terrain coïncident avec les prédictions du modèle et ont tout autant concouru au processus de décision.

    Doublement des cas toutes les 72 heures

    Invité à réagir à ces chiffres, l’Elysée confirme que différentes modélisations ont été présentées jeudi matin puis jeudi après-midi à Emmanuel Macron par le conseil scientifique, mais qu’il n’existe pas de consensus parmi les scientifiques qui le composent.

    « Il y a eu plusieurs documents de travail qui ont été présentés, pas de document de synthèse, explique un conseiller du chef de l’Etat. On ne peut donc pas considérer qu’une étude fournie par l’un de ses membres reflète l’avis du conseil scientifique dans son ensemble. »

    C’est sur la base de ces échanges que le chef de l’Etat a décidé de fermer les établissements scolaires. « Mais si l’un des scientifiques avait mis son veto à l’une des mesures envisagées, cela aurait été pris en compte. Cela n’a pas été le cas », explique-t-on à l’Elysée.

    Ce conseil scientifique a été de nouveau consulté samedi matin par le premier ministre, Edouard Philippe, et le ministre de la santé, Olivier Véran. C’est à la suite de ces échanges, et devant l’accroissement du nombre de cas de Covid-19, que l’exécutif a décidé d’étendre les fermetures à tous les commerces non alimentaires hors pharmacies.

    « Mais les chiffres évoqués [de 300 000 à 500 000 morts en cas d’absence de mesures d’endiguement] sont infiniment supérieurs à ceux communiqués par le ministère de la santé, ils apparaissent disproportionnés », affirme l’Elysée.

    Synthèse des travaux du conseil scientifique

    Selon nos informations, le gouvernement devrait présenter au plus tard lundi une première synthèse des travaux du conseil scientifique, tels qu’ils ont été exposés samedi au premier ministre. « Nous avons demandé au conseil de nous rendre un document dimanche soir et nous le communiquerons lundi au grand public », explique-t-on au cabinet d’Olivier Véran. « Il y aura désormais un document publié après chaque réunion, reprenant les conclusions des membres du conseil scientifique », ajoute-t-on à l’Elysée. Une décision prise pour éviter les procès en dissimulation, qui fleurissent sur les réseaux sociaux.

    Ces estimations ont permis de réaliser que les premières dispositions prises par les autorités françaises pour tenter de freiner la vague épidémique – notamment les limitations des rassemblements et l’isolement des personnes âgées – s’étaient avérées insuffisantes.

    Le nombre de cas de Covid-19 double maintenant toutes les 72 heures et 300 personnes sont déjà hospitalisées en réanimation. Dans les régions où le virus est le plus présent, les services de réanimation font depuis quelques jours face à un afflux de patients graves, et redoutent de ne plus pouvoir tenir si le rythme de l’épidémie ne ralentit pas. Mardi 10 mars, le directeur général de la santé, Jérôme Salomon, a annoncé que 5 000 lits de réanimation étaient disponibles en France et 7 364 lits dans les unités soins intensifs. Mais ces capacités risquent d’être vite débordées.

    Dans l’urgence, des mesures de confinement exceptionnelles ont été annoncées par le chef de l’Etat et le premier ministre, dans deux allocutions prononcées à seulement 48 heures d’intervalle. Vendredi soir, la totalité des écoles françaises ont fermé leurs portes, et depuis samedi minuit tous les commerces, cafés, restaurants et cinémas ont aussi tiré le rideau.

    Avec le passage officiel au « stade 3 » de l’épidémie et ces dispositions exceptionnelles, valables « jusqu’à nouvel ordre », le gouvernement espère enrayer la propagation du virus et « sauver des vies quoi qu’il en coûte », a assuré Emmanuel Macron dans son adresse aux Français le 12 mars.

    Le premier tour des élections municipales n’a, en revanche, pas été reporté, et les bureaux de vote ont ouvert comme prévu dimanche, malgré les mises en garde de certains experts.

    « Ethique personnelle »

    L’impact de ces mesures exceptionnelles est difficile à chiffrer. « Les modèles suggèrent que cela peut être suffisant pour endiguer la première vague de l’épidémie, mais cela dépend beaucoup du comportement des gens et de la façon dont ils vont appliquer ces consignes », souligne Simon Cauchemez, en rappelant que, « dans un Etat qui n’est pas totalitaire, il s’agit d’une question d’éthique personnelle ». « Cela peut faire mentir le modèle dans un sens ou dans l’autre », a-t-il insisté, appelant chacun à participer à cet « énorme effort ».

    Cette dimension était au cœur du discours du premier ministre, Edouard Philippe, samedi soir : « Je le dis avec gravité, nous devons, tous ensemble, montrer plus de discipline dans l’application des mesures », a martelé le chef du gouvernement.

    « Tous ceux qui combattent la maladie supplient l’ensemble des Français d’appliquer les mesures annoncées » Martin Hirsch, le directeur général de l’AP-HP

    Dans tous les cas, l’effet de ces nouvelles mesures dites de « distanciation sociale » ne se fera pas sentir avant plusieurs semaines. « Compte tenu du délai d’incubation – cinq jours en moyenne – et de l’évolution de la maladie sur plusieurs jours, il faut s’attendre à une augmentation du nombre de cas graves au cours des deux-trois prochaines semaines », explique Simon Cauchemez.

    Lors d’une réunion de crise samedi soir, le modélisateur a présenté ce scénario à la direction de l’Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP). De nombreux établissements parisiens sont déjà à saturation, et des mesures d’urgence ont été prises en fin de semaine pour libérer de nouveaux lits, notamment en réanimation.

    « Tous ceux qui combattent la maladie soutiennent à 100 % les mesures qui ont été annoncées et supplient l’ensemble des Français de les appliquer intégralement pour éviter que les contacts se multiplient », a déclaré Martin Hirsch, le directeur général de l’AP-HP, lors d’une intervention au journal télévisé de France 2 samedi.

    Toute la difficulté consiste à calibrer la réponse, alors que les contours de l’épidémie sont encore mal définis. « C’est une situation nouvelle pour tout le monde. On n’a pas vu ce genre de choses depuis au moins une génération », souligne Simon Cauchemez. « Il faut qu’on s’y habitue tous : ce qui est vrai un jour ne le sera pas forcément le lendemain ou le surlendemain et il faut qu’on vive comme cela plusieurs mois », juge Xavier Lescure, infectiologue à l’hôpital Bichat et membre du conseil scientifique.

    Dans les hôpitaux, la tension est palpable. « Nous avons déjà 61 patients Covid hospitalisés, dont vingt en réanimation. Tous les lits sont occupés », constate M. Lescure. Lundi, il ouvrira la dernière aile de son service, soit dix-huit lits, pour accueillir les nouveaux malades. « Le facteur limitant, ce ne sont pas les lits, mais le personnel soignant. Nous ne comptons pas les heures, mais nous manquons de médecins, d’infirmières et d’infirmiers », s’inquiète l’infectiologue.

    Dans ce contexte tendu, il regrette que de précieuses ressources soient encore consacrées à identifier des patients zéro et des chaînes de transmission, alors que le virus circule maintenant partout. « Dans certaines zones, cela n’a plus aucun sens. On va épuiser tout le monde à faire cela », s’alarme-t-il. « Les Anglais sont beaucoup plus pragmatiques : ils ont compris que cette première bataille était perdue et qu’on allait se faire passer dessus. »

    D’autres médecins sont encore plus sévères. « La parole politique n’a pas été à la hauteur, juge Djillali Annane, chef du service de réanimation de l’hôpital Raymond-Poincaré de Garches (Hauts-de-Seine). Ce n’est donc pas surprenant qu’il n’y ait pas eu une très forte adhésion des Français aux mesures prises. Ils n’ont pas saisi l’urgence. Ils continuaient de se faire la bise dans la rue. Cela relevait de l’inconscience ! »

    Dans son établissement, le nombre de patients Covid augmente de 20 % à 30 % par jour, et rien que dans la journée de samedi quatre nouveaux cas ont été hospitalisés en réanimation. « Nous sommes armés pour affronter la vague dans les deux-trois jours qui viennent. L’enjeu est de tenir dans la durée », insiste-t-il.

    D’autant que les mesures prises par le gouvernement ne régleront sans doute pas la totalité du problème. « Avec des mesures fortes comme celles qui ont été prises samedi et une très forte implication de la population, on peut potentiellement éteindre la première vague », explique Simon Cauchemez. « Mais dans la mesure où il n’y aura pas suffisamment d’immunité, qui ne peut être conférée que par la vaccination ou par une infection naturelle, il peut y avoir une seconde vague, et la question des mesures à prendre se reposera, poursuit-il. C’est toute la difficulté de cette stratégie, qui n’avait jusqu’à présent jamais été envisagée pour un virus circulant de façon globalisée, en raison de son coût économique et social. »

    https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2020/03/15/coronavirus-les-simulations-alarmantes-des-epidemiologistes-pour-la-france_6033149_3244.html

    J’aime

  12. jcdurbant dit :

    A VOT’ BON COEUR, M’SIEURS DAMES ! (Oui, aidez-nous à vous envahir un peu plus, après les milliers et milliers de milliards et sans compter les millions de vies que depuis un siècle on vous fait régulièrement perdre avec nos pratiques d’un autre âge et notre système corrompu !)

    Lors d’un sommet virtuel entre les 20 plus grandes économies de la planète, Xi Jinping «a appelé les membres du G20 à réduire les droits de douane, lever les barrières (douanières) et faciliter les flux commerciaux», a rapporté l’agence officielle Chine nouvelle…

    https://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-eco/xi-jinping-appelle-le-g20-a-abaisser-les-droits-de-douane-pour-redonner-confiance-dans-l-economie-20200326

    J’aime

  13. jcdurbant dit :

    MAINTENANT NOUS SOMMES TOUS DANS LE MEME BATEAU (Et ça fait au moins 15 ans que la CIA nous avertit !)

    « Je rappelle d’abord que les rapports de la CIA étaient réguliers, ils avaient l’habitude d’y évoquer la situation géopolitique avec des questions comme « La Russie va-t-elle rester dans une semi-démocratie ou va-t-elle connaître un épisode autoritaire ? Ou d’autres questions comme « la Chine représente-t-elle une menace ?». Des questions pour lesquelles j’avais une certaine compétence. Les éditions Robert Laffont me demandaient alors d’écrire des introductions où je prenais position sur ce que racontait la CIA. Cela intéressait beaucoup de monde, c’était une idée très intelligente de la CIA. Au lieu d’envoyer ce genre de rapport à quelques personnalités triées sur le volet, l’idée était de s’adresser à l’opinion publique et de la prendre à témoin, de se mettre au service du public. (…) Je l’avais moi-même oublié, mais le terme « corona » apparaît dans ce texte écrit dès 2005. « Corona » est un terme codé qui était utilisé par les épidémiologistes en Amérique pour nommer ce qu’ils considéraient comme la pandémie ultime. De pandémie en pandémie, nous allions avoir une pandémie qui allait véritablement s’étendre à la Terre entière. Pourquoi ? Et bien parce que la mondialisation avait atteint un stade très avancé. La CIA mettait en garde, et j’étais plutôt d’accord. J’étais assez critique, non pas de la mondialisation que je considérais comme un phénomène inévitable et qui comporte de nombreux éléments très positifs, mais elle avait aussi des éléments négatifs. Par exemple, et c’était ce à quoi la CIA était déjà sensible, le fait que les Etats-Unis, pour des raisons de coûts de court terme, s’étaient complètement mis à la disposition de la Chine qui fabriquait pratiquement tous les produits pharmaceutiques dont l’Amérique avait besoin. Le pays avait quasiment tiré un trait sur son industrie pharmaceutique, qu’il faisait faire à l’étranger. La CIA disait dans ce rapport que ce n’était pas très sage. Dans mes commentaires à l’époque, j’abondais dans ce sens parce que je savais que la France avait la tentation de le faire aussi. Elle l’a d’ailleurs fait malheureusement. Il fallait maintenir un certain nombre de productions stratégiques et de stocks nécessaires sur place. (…) Parce que c’était déjà arrivé. Cela nous ramène aux livres de Tom Clancy qui lui aussi écrivait à partir de l’expertise de la CIA. Il racontait de manière effrayante une épidémie d’Ebola. Et effectivement, à l’époque, Ebola n’était pas du tout maîtrisé. Entre temps, les Instituts Pasteur et leurs équivalents ont trouvé le vaccin pour Ebola, ce qui est presque un miracle. Nous n’avons plus d’Ebola, mais nous avons cette maladie qui est à la fois effrayante parce que nous n’avons pas encore trouvé le vaccin mais beaucoup moins dangereuse du point de vue de la mortalité. (…) Il n’y a eu aucune réaction ! Aucune ! Parce que c’était un rapport parmi d’autres. Et certainement pas en France. On n’a rien fait de particulier et c’est vrai de tous les pays européens. C’était chacun pour soi et tout le monde était tout à fait insouciant. Il y avait un sentiment, comme toujours quand on avance, où on pense que cela n’arrive qu’aux autres. (…) Je pense que la CIA a voulu provoquer un choc émotionnel à ses lecteurs. Leur disant, si vous ne faites rien, ces drames viendront et ne viendront pas une fois mais à plusieurs reprises. C’est parfaitement possible, sauf que maintenant que nous avons connu cette période de pandémie mondiale avec la première conjoncture mondiale qui affecte la totalité de la Terre, cela peut changer la donne. C’est quand même renversant de penser que nous sommes tous, au même moment, au même endroit, arrêtés. Et là je pense aux mots de mon maître Louis Althusser qui avait lu cela chez Hegel, le philosophe allemand : « l’humanité avance toujours, mais toujours par sa négativité. » C’est-à-dire que c’est toujours par un phénomène négatif que des phénomènes par ailleurs massivement positifs arrivent, comme le fait que l’humanité est Une et que maintenant nous sommes tous dans le même bateau. Et bien pour y arriver, nous sommes passés par cette pandémie. (…) Les gens voient à quel point le repli, indispensable en ce moment pour prévenir l’épidémie, est grave pour les sociétés et pour les économies. Les gens sont certes préservés des pires fléaux, mais ils sont pauvres ! Ils sont appauvris comme nous le sommes aujourd’hui dans toute l’économie française par ces mesures de « containment » qui sont nécessaires. Toutes les entreprises qui font faillite ou toutes celles qui ont des dettes épouvantables, le voient bien aujourd’hui. Donc on comprend comment le protectionnisme, les circuits courts, etc… Ce sont surtout les cerveaux courts, les circuits courts ! (…) Nous sommes sur une pente ascendante. Je le sens. Pendant la guerre, on a vu tant de Français et de braves gens qui sans mot d’ordre d’organisations de résistance, encore à peine développées, ont eu les bons gestes. Cacher des juifs, cacher des résistants, cacher le ravitaillement que les Allemands pillaient de façon éhontée… Tout cela, ce sont des gestes de survie de la société qui ont fait une autre société en 1945. Nous avons eu une société beaucoup plus fraternelle et beaucoup plus courageuse dans laquelle des gens jeunes ont remplacé des gens trop âgés et qui ont insufflé ce qu’on a appelé « Les Trente Glorieuses ». Ce genre de phénomène, nous l’avons déjà connu. Et dramatiquement, puisqu’il s’agissait là d’une tragédie sans précédent. Vous imaginez le choc qu’a été 1940, pour une France qui se pensait encore comme une grande puissance mondiale. Et du jour au lendemain, cette chute ! Puis cette remontée avec le Général de Gaulle. Il n’y a pas de De Gaulle en France aujourd’hui même si je trouve que notre Président Macron se débrouille avec beaucoup de courage et beaucoup de sang-froid dans une situation très difficile. Et d’ailleurs les sondages le prouvent. Les Français se disent : « heureusement qu’il est là quand même ! ». Un certain nombre de querelles sont en train de s’éteindre et elles ne reviendront plus. Cette période de profonde amertume que vous voyez à travers le monde est en train d’être dépassée. (…) [les peuples] vont se tourner vers des hommes politiques rationnels qui n’ont pas raconté n’importe quoi, qui n’ont pas sombré dans l’hystérie, qui ne sont pas roulés par terre devant le public. Ils vont se tourner vers des hommes politiques, qui tout en étant des gens raisonnables, sont aussi des gens qui savent faire preuve d’autorité. L’autorité, ce n’est pas la dictature et c’est exactement ce qu’on souhaite aujourd’hui. On a bien vu aux Etats-Unis comment Franklin Roosevelt – dont les réactions n’étaient pas toutes très bonnes et qui n’était pas un homme exemplaire – a maintenu les Etats-Unis dans une démocratie où les élections se sont tenues, où la liberté d’expression n’était pas étouffée alors qu’il a mené la guerre la plus importante de toute l’histoire américaine et qu’il l’a gagnée. Cet exemple qui est aussi celui de Winston Churchill en Grande-Bretagne, c’est la preuve que les démocraties sont capables dans des circonstances exceptionnelles de faire les sacrifices et de manifester une certaine forme d’autorité sans sacrifier les libertés fondamentales. Nous sommes dans un monde pluraliste, un monde qui n’est pas encore unifié par une démocratie unique et généralisée, mais qui va dans le bon sens, c’est évident ! (…) Je vois par exemple que devant la difficulté que traverse le Moyen-Orient, nous avons une coopération, évidemment forcée et évidemment grommeleuse, mais qui naît aujourd’hui [entre] les Israéliens et les Palestiniens par exemple, parce qu’ils sont exactement dans le même bateau, que la maladie est la même. Il y a autant d’Israéliens qui voyagent aux Etats-Unis ou en Inde ou ailleurs qu’il y a de Palestiniens qui sont en contact avec des Libanais, et avec des Syriens ou des Iraniens, mais le résultat est le même, la maladie est dans tout Israël, et Israël est dans le confinement comme tout le monde, et ils sont en train de trouver une voie d’union nationale et un compromis. (…) Je pense que d’ici 2040, nous allons vers des transformations énormes. Hitler qui était très superstitieux croyait au Reich de mille ans, parce qu’un certain nombre de voyants lui avaient dit qu’après cette grande épreuve qu’est la guerre, il mènerait un monde millénaire et ce serait la grande époque de l’Allemagne. En fait l’Allemagne a explosé à la suite de ses folies et nous n’avons pas eu ce monde millénaire. Mais en même temps, ce qui est vrai, c’est qu’au lendemain de ces épreuves terribles auxquelles nous sommes confrontées, se préparait quelque chose d’autre. Et ce « quelque chose d’autre » est là maintenant. Nous sommes dans un monde qui va se libérer des hydrocarbures, qui va trouver des moyens de produire beaucoup plus proprement, qui a compris que la nature ne nous appartient pas… Bref ! Nous sommes dans un monde qui est en train de prendre connaissance d’un certain nombre de nos folies et notre grande folie, on la connaît depuis toujours, c’est la folie prométhéenne : celle qui a donné le feu aux Hommes, c’est bien ! Même de nous donner l’atome, c’était pas mal ! Mais avec des dangers très grands ! Ces dangers, nous en sommes enfin conscients, c’est cela qui se passe à l’échelle mondiale. »

    Alexandre Adler

    https://www.publicsenat.fr/article/societe/alexandre-adler-le-terme-corona-apparait-dans-un-rapport-de-la-cia-des-2005-181525

    J’aime

  14. jcdurbant dit :

    QUEL SENS DES PROPORTIONS ? (Par comparaison, la grippe saisonnière fait en moyenne entre 250.000 et 500.000 morts par an, selon des estimations de l’OMS)

    La pandémie grippale causée par le virus H1N1 pourrait avoir fait 15 fois plus de morts que les chiffres avancés jusqu’à présent et basés exclusivement sur des examens de laboratoires, selon des travaux publiés mardi par la revue médicale spécialisée The Lancet Infectious Diseases. Alors que l’OMS faisait jusqu’à présent état de 18.500 décès -confirmés avec des tests en laboratoire – entre avril 2009 et août 2010, une nouvelle étude modellisée avance une fourchette comprise entre 151.700 et 575.400 morts pour les victimes de la grippe H1N1 contractée lors de la première année qui a suivi la circulation du virus dans les différents pays. Par comparaison, la grippe saisonnière fait en moyenne entre 250.000 et 500.000 morts par an, selon des estimations de l’OMS. «Il s’agit d’une des premières études à fournir des estimations globales du nombre des décès provoqués par la grippe H1N1 et contrairement à d’autres estimations, elle inclut des estimations pour les pays d’Asie du sud-est et d’Afrique où les données sur la mortalité associée aux grippes sont limitées» note Fatimah Dawood, du Centre de contrôle et de prévention des maladies d’Atlanta (CDC), qui co-signe l’étude avec plusieurs autres chercheurs…

    https://sante.lefigaro.fr/actualite/2012/06/26/18487-deces-causes-par-grippe-revus-hausse

    J’aime

  15. jcdurbant dit :

    WHAT CHINA TRAVEL BAN ? (Guess who’s now supporting a racist and useless travel ban ?)

    “We have right now a crisis with the coronavirus, emanating from China. A national emergency worldwide alerts. The American people need to have a president who they can trust what he says about it, that he is going to act rationally about it. In moments like this, this is where the credibility of the president is most needed, as he explains what we should and should not do. This is no time for Donald Trump’s record of hysteria and xenophobia – hysterical xenophobia – and fearmongering to lead the way instead of science.”

    Joe Biden (Biden, Fort Madison, Iowa, Jan. 31, 2020)

    Downplaying it, being overly dismissive or spreading misinformation is only going to hurt us and further advantage the spread of the disease. But neither should we panic, or fall back on xenophobia. Labeling COVID-19 a foreign virus does not displace accountability for the misjudgments that have been taken thus far by the Trump administration. »

    Joe Biden

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/2020-election/biden-seeking-project-competence-amid-crisis-announces-coronavirus-plan-n1156946

    « Joe Biden supports travel bans that are guided by medical experts, advocated by public health officials, and backed by a full strategy. Science supported this ban, therefore he did too. Biden’s reference to xenophobia was about Trump’s long record of scapegoating others at a time when the virus was emerging from China and not a reference to the travel ban. »

    Kate Bedingfeld (Biden’s deputy campaign manager)

    Biden campaign says he backs Trump’s China travel ban
    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/04/03/politics/joe-biden-trump-china-coronavirus/index.html

    “The United States and other countries around the world have put in place unprecedented travel restrictions in response to the virus. These measures have not proven to improve public health outcomes, rather they tend to cause economic harm and to stoke racist and discriminatory responses to this epidemic. »

    Democratic Rep. Eliot L. Engel

    https://foreignaffairs.house.gov/2020/2/engel-statement-at-coronavirus-outbreak-subcommittee-hearing

    « This is a virus that happened to pop up in China. But the virus doesn’t discriminate between Asian versus non-Asian. In our response we can’t create prejudices and harbor anxieties toward one population. We shouldn’t have an antagonistic relationship with the Chinese. We should be working hand in hand. Besides the diplomatic blowback, the travel ban probably doesn’t make sense, since the outbreak has already spread to several other countries. »

    Rep. Ami Bera (D-Calif.)

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/02/04/coronavirus-quaratine-travel-110750

    « We need to seriously reexamine the current policy of banning travel from China and quarantining returning travelers. All of the evidence we have indicates that travel restrictions and quarantines directed at individual countries are unlikely to keep the virus out of our borders. These measures may exacerbate the epidemic’s social and economic tolls and can make us less safe. Simply put, this virus is spreading too quickly and too silently, and our surveillance is too limited for us to truly know which countries have active transmission and which don’t. The virus could enter the U.S. from other parts of the world not on our restricted list, and it may already be circulating here. The U.S. was a target of travel bans and quarantines during the 2009 flu pandemic. It didn’t work to stop the spread, and it hurt our country. I am concerned that by our singling out China for travel bans, we are effectively penalizing it for reporting cases. This may diminish its willingness to further share data and chill other countries’ willingness to be transparent about their own outbreaks. Travel bans and quarantines will make us less safe if they divert attention and resources from higher priority disease mitigation approaches that we know are needed to respond to cases within the United States. … We often see, when we have emerging disease outbreaks, our first instinct is to try to lock down travel to prevent the introduction of virus to our country. And that is a completely understandable instinct. I have never seen instances in which that has worked when we are talking about a virus at this scale. Respiratory viruses like this one, unlike others–they just move quickly. They are hard to spot because they look like many other diseases. It’s very difficult to interrupt them at borders. You would need to have complete surveillance in order to do that. And we simply don’t have that. »

    Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo (Johns Hopkins, Democrat House subcommittee hearing, Feb. 5 2020)

    https://foreignaffairs.house.gov/hearings?ID=41B2E5E9-E5F8-4869-94F0-019DB3DFD037

    NO FEAR AND STIGMA, PLEASE

    « We reiterate our call to all countries not to impose restrictions inconsistent with the International Health Regulations. Such restrictions can have the effect of increasing fear and stigma, with little public health benefit. So far, 22 countries have reported such restrictions to WHO. »

    WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus

    https://www.who.int/dg/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-technical-briefing-on-2019-novel-coronavirus

    https://www.voanews.com/science-health/coronavirus-outbreak/beijing-denounces-international-restrictions-planes-china

    WHAT NOT ONLY USELESS BUT TOO-LATE CHINA TRAVEL BAN ? (430 000 – 40 000 = 390 000)

    Since Chinese officials disclosed the outbreak of a mysterious pneumonialike illness to international health officials on New Year’s Eve, at least 430,000 people have arrived in the United States on direct flights from China, including nearly 40,000 in the two months after President Trump imposed restrictions on such travel, according to an analysis of data collected in both countries. The bulk of the passengers, who were of multiple nationalities, arrived in January, at airports in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Chicago, Seattle, Newark and Detroit. Thousands of them flew directly from Wuhan, the center of the coronavirus outbreak, as American public health officials were only beginning to assess the risks to the United States…Mr. Trump has repeatedly suggested that his travel measures impeded the virus’s spread in the United States. “I do think we were very early, but I also think that we were very smart, because we stopped China,” he said at a briefing on Tuesday, adding, “That was probably the biggest decision we made so far.” Last month, he said, “We’re the ones that kept China out of here.” But the analysis of the flight and other data by The New York Times shows the travel measures, however effective, may have come too late to have “kept China out,” particularly in light of recent statements from health officials that as many as 25 percent of people infected with the virus may never show symptoms. Many infectious-disease experts suspect that the virus had been spreading undetected for weeks after the first American case was confirmed, in Washington State, on Jan. 20, and that it had continued to be introduced. In fact, no one knows when the virus first arrived in the United States. During the first half of January, when Chinese officials were underplaying the severity of the outbreak, no travelers from China were screened for potential exposure to the virus. Health screening began in mid-January, but only for a number of travelers who had been in Wuhan and only at the airports in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York. By that time, about 4,000 people had already entered the United States directly from Wuhan, according to VariFlight, an aviation data company based in China. The measures were expanded to all passengers from China two weeks later…

    NYT

    https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2020/03/12/dr_anthony_fauci_travel_ban_to_china_absolutely_made_a_difference.html

    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/government-response-coronavirus-fauci-backs-trump-travel-ban/story?id=69557417

    WHAT BORDERS ?

    Sanders also slammed President Trump’s response to the coronavirus outbreak – and said that he would not consider closing the border, no matter what. « If you had to, would you close down the borders? » Baier asked, referring to efforts to stop the spread of coronavirus. « No, » Sanders replied flatly. He went on to condemn xenophobia and suggest that scientists would need to outline the appropriate approach…

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/bernie-sanders-fox-news-town-hall-michigan

    WHAT NO TRAVEL BAN ACT ?

    https://thehill.com/homenews/house/486825-gop-leaders-call-on-pelosi-to-pull-travel-ban-bill-over-coronavirus

    https://www.nytimes.com/…/opi…/china-travel-coronavirus.html

    J’aime

  16. jcdurbant dit :

    WHAT SOCIAL DISTANCING ? (With well under a million people spread across 77,000 square miles and a population density 200 times lower than New York City, South Dakota was practicing social distancing long before the Chinese virus came along)

    The prisoners were panicking in Pierre. On March 23, an inmate at the Pierre Community Work Center, South Dakota’s minimum-security prison for women, was taken to be tested for Covid-19. Her fellow prisoners decided they were doomed. At 8:43 p.m. they jimmied open an exterior door, and nine of them escaped into the night, fleeing the disease.
    The escapees were among the few Dakotans showing much sign of concern. Reading about China, New York and Italy, it’s tempting to believe the end times have come. Prairie people aren’t so apocalyptic.

    In February, government officials and newspaper columnists were mulling the possibility of riots and looting, as though the Great Plains were about to become the set of “Mad Max.” A few weeks later and things have settled. These days the mood is surprisingly relaxed. Chalk it up to a simple fact: South Dakota has seen few cases of coronavirus. As of April 3, it had some of the lowest numbers in the country, with 165 confirmed cases, two deaths, 57 recoveries and 4,217 negative tests.
    Perhaps something more elemental explains the lack of alarm. “Midwesterners aren’t really panickers,” says José-Marie Griffiths, president of Dakota State University. South Dakota is an agricultural state, a place where the foundation of local culture remains the old farms and ranches. People are taught from an early age to keep their feelings to themselves, work hard and expect that something will go wrong. A deadly pandemic threatening lives and livelihoods only confirms everybody’s worldview. The social expectation is impassivity.

    This sangfroid irritates some. “We’ve been sitting here for two hours listening to public comments, and the majority of them were against taking harsh actions,” complained Rapid City Mayor Steve Allender at a City Council meeting on March 22. Nonetheless, Rapid City did order the closing of some public businesses, even while Mr. Allender tried to reassure his constituents that he was not planning a citywide shutdown. Sioux Falls, on the other hand, has prohibited gatherings in bars, restaurants and city-owned property.

    With well under a million people spread across 77,000 square miles, South Dakota was practicing its own form of social distancing long before the coronavirus came along. Most of the state’s current measures are prophylactic, drawn more from national and international news than from anything local. What works in a big coastal city may not be helpful in a place like Custer, population 2,067. South Dakota’s population density is around 11 people per square mile. For comparison, New York City has more than 26,000 people per square mile.

    Even in a place where life moves slower, things are slowing down. “We are seeing huge increases at the state level in unemployment, people that do not have jobs, that are needing help to pay their bills,” Gov. Kristi Noem said on Thursday. Still, the rural Midwest may suffer less than other regions, with demand for livestock, wheat and corn likely to remain strong.

    It’s no consolation to the business owners and workers who are already suffering to say that things aren’t as bad as they could be, but the real effect on the state’s economy won’t be felt until summer. Tourism supports roughly 55,000 jobs in South Dakota, and last summer visitors spent $4.1 billion. Note that the total state budget in 2019 was only $4.9 billion.
    Tourists won’t be coming from overseas to see Mount Rushmore or the Badlands this year. Americans from other states might not risk visiting either. Hundreds of thousands could skip the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in August, which usually puts a bulge in state coffers. Businesses that cater to tourists typically carry winter losses in anticipation of summer sales. Their lines of credit are already stretched as far as they will go.

    For now, at least, South Dakotans seem to be pressing on in their usual way. After 150 years, something of the prairie—the open spaces, the distant horizons—has worked its way into the stoic souls and laconic speech of those who live here. People here know how to keep their distance. It comes naturally.

    By the end of the week, seven of the nine women who escaped the Pierre Community Work Center had been recaptured. The warden resigned, of course. But even at the women’s prison, life goes on pretty much as usual.

    Ms. Bottum is a civil-engineering student at the South Dakota School of Mines.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/social-distancing-comes-naturally-in-south-dakota-11585953135

    J’aime

  17. jcdurbant dit :

    CE QUI SEMBLE NOUVEAU, C’EST D’ABORD CE QU’ON A OUBLIÉ (Depuis 1918, tout était écrit)

    « La dernière confiance qui existait, c’était dans la science. Les politiques, c’était fini. Les médiatiques, c’était fini. Les profs, fallait voir. Nos étudiants à la rigueur, mais après, ça devenait compliqué ou seulement dans des émissions bordées où on est dans la connaissance et rien d’autre. Là, [les enseignants-médecins addictés à la tautologie de l’information en continu] ont réussi à suicider la science, les uns et les autres, sur les chaines d’information en continu. Et ils ont créé cette réaction anti-solution, anti-prévention, anti-adaptation. Du coup, on a eu le gouvernement à la godille. Entre zéro covid, tout le covid, pas le covid, on ferme, on rouvre, oh, mon dieu, il va se passer quelque chose. Et un drame: l’incompréhension culturelle de ce que c’est qu’un asympomatique. C’est à dire quelqu’un qui ne semble pas malade mais qui contamine beaucoup. Ca, on comprend pas ce que c’est. Et l’exponentiel. Nous, on est un pays de proportionnel. On a rationalisé la proportionnalité. L’exponentiel, on comprend pas ce que c’est. Et on comprend pas surtout le fait que ça puisse faire comme ça. Ca, c’est pas normal. Nous, on sait faire comme ça et ça nous parait très bien. Et du coup, on est toujours en retard de trois semaines sur tout. Parce qu’on a l’impression aujourd’hui de découvrir que la pandémie augmente ou baisse alors qu’en fait tout ce qu’on voit aujourd’hui date d’il y a trois semaines comme si on était en communication avec la planète Mars. »

    Alain Bauer

    J’aime

Votre commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur la façon dont les données de vos commentaires sont traitées.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :