Aide au développement: Qui délivrera l’Afrique de nos Bono? (Africans say No to Bono)

bonoL’assistance est vraisemblablement la pire des catastrophes de la région, car elle rend possibles l’explosion démographique, les règlements de comptes interethniques, le financement de la guerre, la corruption et l’indifférence aux problèmes sociaux, notamment la précarité sanitaire. Denis-Clair Lambert
Unfortunately, the Europeans’ devastating urge to do good can no longer be countered with reason. (…) The countries that have collected the most development aid are also the ones that are in the worst shape. (…) Huge bureaucracies are financed (with the aid money), corruption and complacency are promoted, Africans are taught to be beggars and not to be independent. In addition, development aid weakens the local markets everywhere and dampens the spirit of entrepreneurship that we so desperately need. As absurd as it may sound: Development aid is one of the reasons for Africa’s problems. If the West were to cancel these payments, normal Africans wouldn’t even notice. Only the functionaries would be hard hit. Which is why they maintain that the world would stop turning without this development aid. (…tons of corn are shipped to Africa … [corn that predominantly comes from highly-subsidized European and American farmers] … and at some point, this corn ends up in the harbor of Mombasa. A portion of the corn often goes directly into the hands of unsrupulous politicians who then pass it on to their own tribe to boost their next election campaign. Another portion of the shipment ends up on the black market where the corn is dumped at extremely low prices. Local farmers may as well put down their hoes right away; no one can compete with the UN’s World Food Program. (…) Why do we get these mountains of clothes? No one is freezing here. Instead, our tailors lose their livlihoods. They’re in the same position as our farmers. No one in the low-wage world of Africa can be cost-efficient enough to keep pace with donated products. In 1997, 137,000 workers were employed in Nigeria’s textile industry. By 2003, the figure had dropped to 57,000. The results are the same in all other areas where overwhelming helpfulness and fragile African markets collide. (…) If one were to believe all the horrorifying reports, then all Kenyans should actually be dead by now. But now, tests are being carried out everywhere, and it turns out that the figures were vastly exaggerated. It’s not three million Kenyans that are infected. All of the sudden, it’s only about one million. Malaria is just as much of a problem, but people rarely talk about that. (…) AIDS is big business, maybe Africa’s biggest business. There’s nothing else that can generate as much aid money as shocking figures on AIDS. AIDS is a political disease here, and we should be very skeptical. (…) So you end up with some African biochemist driving an aid worker around, distributing European food, and forcing local farmers out of their jobs. That’s just crazy. James Shikwati

A l’heure où, malgré les beaux discours, nos nouveaux dirigeants semblent être vite retombés dans les ornières de la Françafrique, à savoir le soutien des vieux dictateurs, les belles paroles et très peu d’actes concrets …

Financement d’énormes bureaucraties et de la corruption, culture de l’excuse, destruction des marchés locaux par un déluge de dons, inflation des chiffres et des problèmes, remises et effacements de dettes qui récompensent des décennies de gabegie et de corruption généralisée …

Les innombrables dégâts de l’aide internationale en Afrique, y compris dans ses récentes versions à la Bono, sont depuis longtemps connus et pourtant, inertie et intérêts des fonctionnaires de ladite aide obligent, elle continue inexorablement.

D’où ce cri de l’économiste kenyan James Shikwati, interrogé il y a deux ans par Der Spiegel: Pour l’amour de Dieu, arrêtez l’aide!

Extraits :

Unfortunately, the Europeans’ devastating urge to do good can no longer be countered with reason.

The countries that have collected the most development aid are also the ones that are in the worst shape.

Huge bureaucracies are financed (with the aid money), corruption and complacency are promoted, Africans are taught to be beggars and not to be independent. In addition, development aid weakens the local markets everywhere and dampens the spirit of entrepreneurship that we so desperately need. As absurd as it may sound: Development aid is one of the reasons for Africa’s problems. If the West were to cancel these payments, normal Africans wouldn’t even notice. Only the functionaries would be hard hit. Which is why they maintain that the world would stop turning without this development aid.

tons of corn are shipped to Africa … [corn that predominantly comes from highly-subsidized European and American farmers] …

… and at some point, this corn ends up in the harbor of Mombasa. A portion of the corn often goes directly into the hands of unsrupulous politicians who then pass it on to their own tribe to boost their next election campaign. Another portion of the shipment ends up on the black market where the corn is dumped at extremely low prices. Local farmers may as well put down their hoes right away; no one can compete with the UN’s World Food Program.

Why do we get these mountains of clothes? No one is freezing here. Instead, our tailors lose their livlihoods. They’re in the same position as our farmers. No one in the low-wage world of Africa can be cost-efficient enough to keep pace with donated products. In 1997, 137,000 workers were employed in Nigeria’s textile industry. By 2003, the figure had dropped to 57,000. The results are the same in all other areas where overwhelming helpfulness and fragile African markets collide.

If one were to believe all the horrorifying reports, then all Kenyans should actually be dead by now. But now, tests are being carried out everywhere, and it turns out that the figures were vastly exaggerated. It’s not three million Kenyans that are infected. All of the sudden, it’s only about one million. Malaria is just as much of a problem, but people rarely talk about that.

Shikwati: AIDS is big business, maybe Africa’s biggest business. There’s nothing else that can generate as much aid money as shocking figures on AIDS. AIDS is a political disease here, and we should be very skeptical.

So you end up with some African biochemist driving an aid worker around, distributing European food, and forcing local farmers out of their jobs. That’s just crazy!

SPIEGEL INTERVIEW WITH AFRICAN ECONOMICS EXPERT
« For God’s Sake, Please Stop the Aid! »
DER SPIEGEL
July 4, 2005

The Kenyan economics expert James Shikwati, 35, says that aid to Africa does more harm than good. The avid proponent of globalization spoke with SPIEGEL about the disastrous effects of Western development policy in Africa, corrupt rulers, and the tendency to overstate the AIDS problem.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Shikwati, the G8 summit at Gleneagles is about to beef up the development aid for Africa…

Shikwati: … for God’s sake, please just stop.

SPIEGEL: Stop? The industrialized nations of the West want to eliminate hunger and poverty.

Shikwati: Such intentions have been damaging our continent for the past 40 years. If the industrial nations really want to help the Africans, they should finally terminate this awful aid. The countries that have collected the most development aid are also the ones that are in the worst shape. Despite the billions that have poured in to Africa, the continent remains poor.

SPIEGEL: Do you have an explanation for this paradox?

Shikwati: Huge bureaucracies are financed (with the aid money), corruption and complacency are promoted, Africans are taught to be beggars and not to be independent. In addition, development aid weakens the local markets everywhere and dampens the spirit of entrepreneurship that we so desperately need. As absurd as it may sound: Development aid is one of the reasons for Africa’s problems. If the West were to cancel these payments, normal Africans wouldn’t even notice. Only the functionaries would be hard hit. Which is why they maintain that the world would stop turning without this development aid.

SPIEGEL: Even in a country like Kenya, people are starving to death each year. Someone has got to help them.

Shikwati: But it has to be the Kenyans themselves who help these people. When there’s a drought in a region of Kenya, our corrupt politicians reflexively cry out for more help. This call then reaches the United Nations World Food Program — which is a massive agency of apparatchiks who are in the absurd situation of, on the one hand, being dedicated to the fight against hunger while, on the other hand, being faced with unemployment were hunger actually eliminated. It’s only natural that they willingly accept the plea for more help. And it’s not uncommon that they demand a little more money than the respective African government originally requested. They then forward that request to their headquarters, and before long, several thousands tons of corn are shipped to Africa …

SPIEGEL: … corn that predominantly comes from highly-subsidized European and American farmers …

Shikwati: … and at some point, this corn ends up in the harbor of Mombasa. A portion of the corn often goes directly into the hands of unsrupulous politicians who then pass it on to their own tribe to boost their next election campaign. Another portion of the shipment ends up on the black market where the corn is dumped at extremely low prices. Local farmers may as well put down their hoes right away; no one can compete with the UN’s World Food Program. And because the farmers go under in the face of this pressure, Kenya would have no reserves to draw on if there actually were a famine next year. It’s a simple but fatal cycle.

SPIEGEL: If the World Food Program didn’t do anything, the people would starve.

Shikwati: I don’t think so. In such a case, the Kenyans, for a change, would be forced to initiate trade relations with Uganda or Tanzania, and buy their food there. This type of trade is vital for Africa. It would force us to improve our own infrastructure, while making national borders — drawn by the Europeans by the way — more permeable. It would also force us to establish laws favoring market economy.

SPIEGEL: Would Africa actually be able to solve these problems on its own?

Shikwati: Of course. Hunger should not be a problem in most of the countries south of the Sahara. In addition, there are vast natural resources: oil, gold, diamonds. Africa is always only portrayed as a continent of suffering, but most figures are vastly exaggerated. In the industrial nations, there’s a sense that Africa would go under without development aid. But believe me, Africa existed before you Europeans came along. And we didn’t do all that poorly either.

SPIEGEL: But AIDS didn’t exist at that time.

Shikwati: If one were to believe all the horrorifying reports, then all Kenyans should actually be dead by now. But now, tests are being carried out everywhere, and it turns out that the figures were vastly exaggerated. It’s not three million Kenyans that are infected. All of the sudden, it’s only about one million. Malaria is just as much of a problem, but people rarely talk about that.

SPIEGEL: And why’s that?

Shikwati: AIDS is big business, maybe Africa’s biggest business. There’s nothing else that can generate as much aid money as shocking figures on AIDS. AIDS is a political disease here, and we should be very skeptical.

SPIEGEL: The Americans and Europeans have frozen funds previously pledged to Kenya. The country is too corrupt, they say.

Shikwati: I am afraid, though, that the money will still be transfered before long. After all, it has to go somewhere. Unfortunately, the Europeans’ devastating urge to do good can no longer be countered with reason. It makes no sense whatsoever that directly after the new Kenyan government was elected — a leadership change that ended the dictatorship of Daniel arap Mois — the faucets were suddenly opened and streams of money poured into the country.

SPIEGEL: Such aid is usually earmarked for a specific objective, though.

Shikwati: That doesn’t change anything. Millions of dollars earmarked for the fight against AIDS are still stashed away in Kenyan bank accounts and have not been spent. Our politicians were overwhelmed with money, and they try to siphon off as much as possible. The late tyrant of the Central African Republic, Jean Bedel Bokassa, cynically summed it up by saying: « The French government pays for everything in our country. We ask the French for money. We get it, and then we waste it. »

SPIEGEL: In the West, there are many compassionate citizens wanting to help Africa. Each year, they donate money and pack their old clothes into collection bags …

Shikwati: … and they flood our markets with that stuff. We can buy these donated clothes cheaply at our so-called Mitumba markets. There are Germans who spend a few dollars to get used Bayern Munich or Werder Bremen jerseys, in other words, clothes that that some German kids sent to Africa for a good cause. After buying these jerseys, they auction them off at Ebay and send them back to Germany — for three times the price. That’s insanity …

SPIEGEL: … and hopefully an exception.

Shikwati: Why do we get these mountains of clothes? No one is freezing here. Instead, our tailors lose their livlihoods. They’re in the same position as our farmers. No one in the low-wage world of Africa can be cost-efficient enough to keep pace with donated products. In 1997, 137,000 workers were employed in Nigeria’s textile industry. By 2003, the figure had dropped to 57,000. The results are the same in all other areas where overwhelming helpfulness and fragile African markets collide.

SPIEGEL: Following World War II, Germany only managed to get back on its feet because the Americans poured money into the country through the Marshall Plan. Wouldn’t that qualify as successful development aid?

Shikwati: In Germany’s case, only the destroyed infrastructure had to be repaired. Despite the economic crisis of the Weimar Republic, Germany was a highly- industrialized country before the war. The damages created by the tsunami in Thailand can also be fixed with a little money and some reconstruction aid. Africa, however, must take the first steps into modernity on its own. There must be a change in mentality. We have to stop perceiving ourselves as beggars. These days, Africans only perceive themselves as victims. On the other hand, no one can really picture an African as a businessman. In order to change the current situation, it would be helpful if the aid organizations were to pull out.

SPIEGEL: If they did that, many jobs would be immediately lost …

Shikwati: … jobs that were created artificially in the first place and that distort reality. Jobs with foreign aid organizations are, of course, quite popular, and they can be very selective in choosing the best people. When an aid organization needs a driver, dozens apply for the job. And because it’s unacceptable that the aid worker’s chauffeur only speaks his own tribal language, an applicant is needed who also speaks English fluently — and, ideally, one who is also well mannered. So you end up with some African biochemist driving an aid worker around, distributing European food, and forcing local farmers out of their jobs. That’s just crazy!

SPIEGEL: The German government takes pride in precisely monitoring the recipients of its funds.

Shikwati: And what’s the result? A disaster. The German government threw money right at Rwanda’s president Paul Kagame. This is a man who has the deaths of a million people on his conscience — people that his army killed in the neighboring country of Congo.

SPIEGEL: What are the Germans supposed to do?

Shikwati: If they really want to fight poverty, they should completely halt development aid and give Africa the opportunity to ensure its own survival. Currently, Africa is like a child that immediately cries for its babysitter when something goes wrong. Africa should stand on its own two feet.

Interview conducted by Thilo Thielke

Translated from the German by Patrick Kessler

Voir aussi un passage de l’économiste de Lyon III Denis-Clair Lambert sur les effets pervers de l’aide extérieure à l’Afrique (Mondes francophones) :

Extraits :

L’Afrique a reçu pendant 45 ans plus de mille milliards de dollars, pour quel résultat!

Le transfert de ressources des contribuables occidentaux est en fait beaucoup plus important, car dans le même temps les gouvernements locaux empruntent massivement, à faible taux d’intérêt, aux organisations internationales et sur les marchés financiers. Comme les pays prêteurs ont coutume d’annuler périodiquement la dette des pays les plus pauvres, ces derniers empruntent à nouveau. La partie de l’assistance sans remboursement, qualifiée d’aide publique au développement, a très rarement servi au développement de ces pays. Ce pactole nourrit 40 à 60 % des dépenses budgétaires des pays bénéficiaires et souvent la moitié du revenu national. La plus grande partie de ces fonds est destinée au soutien budgétaire, ce qui est une incitation à pérenniser ou accroître le déficit des comptes publics.

Il y a tant de donateurs : en moyenne 30 dans les nations d’Afrique et un nombre équivalent d’organisations non gouvernementales, que le programme des Nations Unies finit par reconnaître une véritable gabegie (7). En Tanzanie l’administration est supposée contrôler 650 projets, qui bien souvent ont le même objet, et pour lesquels il faut rédiger des milliers de rapports et envoyer des centaines de missions. La coordination, l’évaluation, le suivi deviennent des missions impossibles tant pour le pays donateur que pour ce pays récepteur. On ne sait pas combien ces pays reçoivent, chaque donataire expédie des dizaines de missions dans 30 ou 40 pays et ces experts payés au « per diem » finissent par coûter très cher, mais ils remplissent les avions et les hôtels ! L’Union européenne ne fait pas mieux, elle remplit les avions : les chefs de projet changent tous les six mois, comme leurs interlocuteurs, et l’on reprend la procédure à 0. À quoi sert cette assistance ? D’abord à payer les fonctionnaires et la solde des soldats, à satisfaire leur demande d’équipements militaires, puis à honorer les dépenses somptuaires des dirigeants.

Quel est le pays africain qui a reçu l’assistance internationale la plus massive depuis 1960 ? L’Éthiopie, suivie par le Soudan, ont reçu de l’Amérique et de l’URSS, de l’Europe et de la Banque mondiale et du Fonds Monétaire International, puis des ONG une assistance massive et stratégique, comme l’Afghanistan en Asie. Ces deux pays étaient cependant dirigés par des dictateurs sanguinaires et farouchement anti-occidentaux. Aujourd’hui le premier bénéficiaire est le Congo-Zaïre, suivi par la Tanzanie et toujours l’Éthiopie.

au sud du Sahel saharien la moitié des États sont confrontés à des guerres intestines, l’autre moitié étant riveraine de ces pays sert de refuge aux civils et aux mouvements insurrectionnels

1. L’ASSISTANCE ET LA CORRUPTION

La corruption ne date pas d’aujourd’hui en Afrique, elle était très répandue dans l’Égypte pharaonique, l’empire romain et l’empire ottoman. L’assistance étrangère est en revanche un fléau récent. L’assistance structurelle déversée sur le continent africain a été le levain d’une corruption généralisée et d’une dépendance aussi complète que celle du statut colonial. Quand l’armée et les fonctionnaires ne peuvent être payés que sur l’argent de l’aide, quand tout investissement en dépend, il a peu de différences avec les transferts de la métropole à ses colonies. Tout comme la Martinique ou la Réunion, le Mozambique ou le Mali ne pourraient pas régler plus de 10 % de leurs importations par leurs recettes d’exportation. En fait, l’assistance est vraisemblablement la pire des catastrophes de la région, car elle rend possibles l’explosion démographique, les règlements de comptes interethniques, le financement de la guerre, la corruption et l’indifférence aux problèmes sociaux, notamment la précarité sanitaire.

Il faut avoir le courage de regarder en face le bilan de l’aide aux pays africains. Tibor Mende l’avait dénoncé il y a quarante ans : l’aide c’est comme un artichaut, que les intermédiaires épluchent feuille par feuille pour ne laisser qu’un reliquat minuscule à ceux qui en ont besoin. Les détournements de fonds ont commencé dès 1960 dans les pays donataires où une énorme bureaucratie et les conseillers du Prince ont prélevé leurs commissions, pour confier à leurs protégés africains la gestion et distribution de l’aide. Ces « indélicatesses » caractéristiques des caisses de coopération et de la politique africaine de la France ont progressivement contaminé les institutions similaires de Bruxelles et de Washington.

L’aide a été en Afrique la pépinière de la corruption qui ronge cette région. C’était inéluctable du fait que les nouveaux dirigeants des États indépendants, civils et plus souvent militaires, demandaient aux anciennes métropoles et aux organisations internationales de les soutenir, notamment par des ventes d’armement et par une assistance financière durable. Et tous les occidentaux s’y sont prêtés, surtout dans les années 1960/1990 quand nombre de régimes révolutionnaires se tournaient vers l’URSS et Cuba.

L’aide structurelle n’est pas un vecteur de développement économique.

Lord Peter Bauer (6), il y a un quart de siècle, avait proposé l’interprétation suivante : « L’Occident n’a pas provoqué les famines du tiers monde, car elles se sont produites dans des régions qui n’avaient pratiquement pas de commerce extérieur… Si l’on tentait de secourir en permanence la population à coup de dons gouvernementaux de l’Occident, tout effort d’y développer une agriculture viable se trouverait inhibé… L’Occident a réellement contribué à la pauvreté du tiers monde et cela de deux façons. D’abord, le comportement de l’Occident a beaucoup fait pour politiser le tiers monde. À la fin de la domination coloniale britannique, les interventions gouvernementales limitées furent abandonnées pour des contrôles officiels étroits sur la vie économique et les nouveaux États indépendants se virent présenter un cadre tout préparé pour des économies contrôlées par les gouvernements, voire pour instaurer un système totalitaire. L’aide officielle occidentale a également servi à politiser la vie dans le tiers monde. Deuxièmement, les contacts avec l’Occident ont contribué au déclin très prononcé de la mortalité, qui est à la base du rapide accroissement de la population et a permis à bien plus de pauvres de survivre ».

L’aide publique au développement atteignait 80 milliards de dollars en 2004 ; l’Afrique en recevait un tiers : 25 MM$. Il est trop facile de dire que c’est trop peu (0.25 % de nos richesses) et qu’il faudrait transférer deux fois plus. Ces ressources nourriraient davantage de corruption et non le développement économique. Périodiquement, on demande de doubler le montant de cette aide, les organisations internationales en font un objectif pour le millénaire et les militants revendiquent pour l’Afrique un nouveau « Plan Marshall ». Mais réfléchissons, l’Afrique a reçu pendant 45 ans plus de mille milliards de dollars, pour quel résultat !

Le transfert de ressources des contribuables occidentaux est en fait beaucoup plus important, car dans le même temps les gouvernements locaux empruntent massivement, à faible taux d’intérêt, aux organisations internationales et sur les marchés financiers. Comme les pays prêteurs ont coutume d’annuler périodiquement la dette des pays les plus pauvres, ces derniers empruntent à nouveau. La partie de l’assistance sans remboursement, qualifiée d’aide publique au développement, a très rarement servi au développement de ces pays. Ce pactole nourrit 40 à 60 % des dépenses budgétaires des pays bénéficiaires et souvent la moitié du revenu national. La plus grande partie de ces fonds est destinée au soutien budgétaire, ce qui est une incitation à pérenniser ou accroître le déficit des comptes publics.

Il y a tant de donateurs : en moyenne 30 dans les nations d’Afrique et un nombre équivalent d’organisations non gouvernementales, que le programme des Nations Unies finit par reconnaître une véritable gabegie (7). En Tanzanie l’administration est supposée contrôler 650 projets, qui bien souvent ont le même objet, et pour lesquels il faut rédiger des milliers de rapports et envoyer des centaines de missions. La coordination, l’évaluation, le suivi deviennent des missions impossibles tant pour le pays donateur que pour ce pays récepteur. On ne sait pas combien ces pays reçoivent, chaque donataire expédie des dizaines de missions dans 30 ou 40 pays et ces experts payés au « per diem » finissent par coûter très cher, mais ils remplissent les avions et les hôtels ! L’Union européenne ne fait pas mieux, elle remplit les avions : les chefs de projet changent tous les six mois, comme leurs interlocuteurs, et l’on reprend la procédure à 0. À quoi sert cette assistance ? D’abord à payer les fonctionnaires et la solde des soldats, à satisfaire leur demande d’équipements militaires, puis à honorer les dépenses somptuaires des dirigeants. Or l’aide, le plus souvent bilatérale, est depuis longtemps liée aux exportations occidentales : denrées alimentaires subventionnées par l’Europe et produits manufacturés, souvent trop coûteux pour un pays pauvre. Quant aux projets de développement et aux aides structurelles aux réformes, ils restent dans les tiroirs à l’état de rapports.

Quel est le pays africain qui a reçu l’assistance internationale la plus massive depuis 1960 ? L’Éthiopie, suivie par le Soudan, ont reçu de l’Amérique et de l’URSS, de l’Europe et de la Banque mondiale et du Fonds Monétaire International, puis des ONG une assistance massive et stratégique, comme l’Afghanistan en Asie. Ces deux pays étaient cependant dirigés par des dictateurs sanguinaires et farouchement anti-occidentaux. Aujourd’hui le premier bénéficiaire est le Congo-Zaïre, suivi par la Tanzanie et toujours l’Éthiopie. Sont-ils plus démocratiques ? On pense certes aux opérations d’urgence et de secours face à la famine, aux massacres ethniques et à la compassion des associations humanitaires, ce n’est pas l’essentiel, il s’agit surtout d’aide liée au déversement des surplus agricoles occidentaux, des biens d’équipement et de confort et aux ventes d’armements. L’assistance internationale a pour principale conséquence de transformer l’Afrique en une immense caserne, où la principale activité consiste à détruire et tuer… Dans les régimes militaires, l’aide alimentaire a été souvent détournée par l’armée et les équipes de secours des « french doctors » ont été régulièrement expulsées… Aucun de ces pays n’a présenté l’amorce d’un développement économique et d’une modernisation. Pourquoi ne pas aider les pays qui se redressent, font des réformes efficaces et luttent contre la corruption, au lieu de choisir les échecs les plus patents ? C’est un vieux dilemme de l’aide au tiers-monde, les pays riches n’ont pas le courage de choisir les bons élèves, ils prennent les plus mauvais !

On remarque que l’Afrique orientale anglophone, du nord au sud, a reçu l’aide la plus massive, il n’est pas inutile de préciser que les ventes d’armement y sont particulièrement importantes et que la contrebande des armes y est très intense. Ces pays ne sont pas nécessairement plus corrompus qu’en Afrique de l’Ouest, mais les circuits officiels et clandestins nourrissent un volume croissant de transactions. La corruption perçue par les milieux d’affaires est particulièrement forte au Soudan, en Éthiopie, et en Angola, elle n’en est pas moins généralisée dans les pays exploitant la rente du pétrole ou des diamants et même dans des pays tels que l’Afrique du Sud, le Maroc, l’Algérie, le Nigeria ou l’Égypte.

L’Afrique est une région pauvre et corrompue. Sa pauvreté est attestée par la faiblesse des revenus moyens plus particulièrement dans les zones rurales et les bidonvilles. Son degré de corruption doit être confronté à celui de l’Asie du Sud et de l’Amérique du Sud, où la corruption était beaucoup plus étendue il y a une génération. Les guerres interafricaines, la succession des coups d’État, le rôle prédominant de l’armée et les effets pervers de l’aide étrangère ont joué un rôle déterminant. Il suffit de rappeler qu’au sud du Sahel saharien la moitié des États sont confrontés à des guerres intestines, l’autre moitié étant riveraine de ces pays sert de refuge aux civils et aux mouvements insurrectionnels ; leur militarisation est inéluctable. Il faut alors une très solide tradition démocratique, comme jadis le Costa-Rica aux frontières du Nicaragua, pour préserver l’État de Droit.

16 commentaires pour Aide au développement: Qui délivrera l’Afrique de nos Bono? (Africans say No to Bono)

  1. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

  2. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

  3. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

  4. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

  5. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

  6. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

  7. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

  8. […] où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule […]

    J'aime

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :