Vieille Europe: it’s the culture, stupid!

L'horreur économique
Alexis de Tocqueville, writing about America, marvels at the relatively pure capitalism he found there. The greater involvement of Americans in governing themselves, their broader education and their wider equality of opportunity all encourage the emergence of the “man of action” with the “skill” to “grasp the chance of the moment ». Edmund Phelps
La domination du capitalisme empêche toute véritable démocratie. Seul l’Etat, appuyé sur un secteur public puissant, peut faire reculer la domination de l’argent. Alain Touraine

Faut-il s’étonner, en un pays qui réélit et plébiscite régulièrement les auteurs de pensées aussi fortes et profondes que « le libéralisme est pire que le communisme » ou « la guerre est toujours la pire des solutions », du sévère diagnostic du Dr. Phelps et « prix Nobel » d’économie de Columbia, sur notre vieille Europe (notamment la France, l’Allemagne et l’Italie) et son syndrome de pénurie d’emplois, basse productivité et faibles motivation et satisfaction des salariés?

Pour lequel il suggère une kyrielle de raisons qui tournent autour du manque de dynamisme, à la fois au niveau du modèle économique et institutionnel (qui pénalise l’innovation et l’esprit d’entreprise par la trop grande part de la bureaucratie, de l’Etat et des « partenaires sociaux » notamment les syndicats, entrainant surprotection des salariés, bas niveau d’éducation et secteur boursier peu fonctionnel) mais aussi des valeurs et des attitudes (manque d’ambition, initiative et responsabilité, indiscipline, manque d’individualisme, consensualisme, anti-commercialisme, conformisme, manque de goût pour la résolution de problème, trop grand sens hiérarchique).

Raisons qu’il appuie notamment sur les résultats d’un sondage choc sur les motivations comparées des chercheurs d’emploi:

« Motivés par les possibilités de promotion sociale (42% en France et 54% en Italie, contre une moyenne de 73% au Canada et aux États-Unis.); par les possibilités de prise d’initiative (38% en France et 47% en Italie, par comparaison avec une moyenne de 53% au Canada et aux Etats-Unis) ; par l’intérêt du travail (59% en France et en Italie, contre une moyenne de 71.5% au Canada et au Royaume-Uni) ; par la prise de responsabilité ou la liberté (57% en Allemagne et 58% en France par comparaison avec 61% aux Etats-Unis et 65% au Canada); prêts à obéir à des ordres (Italie 1.03, des 3.0 possibles, et l’Allemagne 1.13, par comparaison avec 1.34 au Canada et 1.47 aux Etats-Unis). »

Et qu’il attribue à une réaction contre les Lumières et le capitalisme, racines philosophiques auxquels il nous conseille, si nous voulons sortir de notre « sous-performance », de revenir …

Extraits:

The level of dynamism is a matter of how fertile the country is in coming up with innovative ideas having prospects of profitability, how adept it is at identifying and nourishing the ideas with the best prospects, and how prepared it is in evaluating and trying out the new products and methods that are launched onto the market.

A country’s economic model determines its economic dynamism. The dynamism that the economic model possesses is in turn a crucial determinant of the country’s economic performance: Where there is more entrepreneurial activity — and thus more innovation, as well as all the financial and managerial activity it leads to — there are more jobs to fill, and those added jobs are relatively engaging and fulfilling.

These institutions on the Continent do not look to be good for dynamism. They typically exhibit a Balkanized/segmented financial sector favoring insiders, myriad impediments and penalties placed before outsider entrepreneurs, a consumer sector not venturesome about new products or short of the needed education, union voting (not just advice) in management decisions, and state interventionism. Some studies of mine on what attributes determine which of the advanced economies are the least vibrant — or the least responsive to the stimulus of a technological revolution — pointed to the strength in the less vibrant economies of inhibiting institutions such as employment protection legislation and red tape, and to the weakness of enabling institutions, such as a well-functioning stock market and ample liberal-arts education.

Relatively few in the Big Three report that they want jobs offering opportunities for achievement (42% in France and 54% in Italy, versus an average of 73% in Canada and the U.S.); chances for initiative in the job (38% in France and 47% in Italy, as against an average of 53% in Canada and the U.S.), and even interesting work (59% in France and Italy, versus an average of 71.5% in Canada and the U.K). Relatively few are keen on taking responsibility, or freedom (57% in Germany and 58% in France as against 61% in the U.S. and 65% in Canada), and relatively few are happy about taking orders (Italy 1.03, of a possible 3.0, and Germany 1.13, as against 1.34 in Canada and 1.47 in the U.S.).

Perhaps many would be willing to take it for granted that the spirit of stimulation, problem-solving, mastery and discovery has impacts on a country’s dynamism and thus on its economic performance. In countries where that spirit is weak, an entrepreneurial type contemplating a start-up might be scared off by the prospect of having employees with little zest for any of those experiences. And there might be few entrepreneurial types to begin with.

There is the solidarist aim of protecting the « social partners » — communities and regions, business owners, organized labor and the professions — from disruptive market forces. There is also the consensualist aim of blocking business initiatives that lack the consent of the « stakeholders » — those, such as employees, customers and rival companies, thought to have a stake besides the owners. There is an intellectual current elevating community and society over individual engagement and personal growth, which springs from antimaterialist and egalitarian strains in Western culture. There is also the « scientism » that holds that state-directed research is the key to higher productivity. Equally, there is the tradition of hierarchical organization in Continental countries. Lastly, there a strain of anti-commercialism. « A German would rather say he had inherited his fortune than say he made it himself, » the economist Hans-Werner Sinn once remarked to me.

intellectual currents — solidarism, consensualism, anti-commercialism and conformism — that emerged as a reaction on the Continent to the Enlightenment and to capitalism in the 19th century. It would be understandable if such a climate had a dispiriting effect on potential entrepreneurs. But to be candid, I had not imagined that Continental Man might be less entrepreneurial. It did not occur to me that he had less need for mental challenge, problem-solving, initiative and responsibility.

Productivity in the Continental Big Three — Germany, France and Italy — stopped gaining ground on the U.S. in the early 1990s, then lost ground as a result of recent slowdowns and the U.S. speed-up. Unemployment rates are generally far higher than those in the U.S., U.K., Canada and Ireland. And labor force participation rates have been lower for decades. Relatedly, the employee engagement and job satisfaction reported in surveys are mostly lower, too.

The most basic point to carry away is that the empirical results related here lend support to the Enlightenment theme that a nation’s culture ultimately makes a difference for the nation’s economic performance in all its aspects — productivity, prosperity and personal growth.

Perhaps the way out — to go from unsatisfactory performance to high performance — will require not only reform of institutions but also a cultural shift that returns Europe to the philosophical roots that put it on the map to begin with.

Entrepreneurial Culture
Edmund S. Phelps
WSJ
February 12, 2007

The nations of Continental Western Europe, in the reforms they make to try to raise their economic performance, may prove to be a testing ground for the view that culture matters for a society’s economic results.

As is increasingly admitted, the economic performance in nearly every Continental country is generally poor compared to the U.S. and a few other countries that share the U.S.’s characteristics. Productivity in the Continental Big Three — Germany, France and Italy — stopped gaining ground on the U.S. in the early 1990s, then lost ground as a result of recent slowdowns and the U.S. speed-up. Unemployment rates are generally far higher than those in the U.S., U.K., Canada and Ireland. And labor force participation rates have been lower for decades. Relatedly, the employee engagement and job satisfaction reported in surveys are mostly lower, too.

It is reasonable to infer that the economic systems on the Continent are not well structured for high performance. In my view, the Continental economies began to be underperformers in the interwar period, and have remained so — with corrective steps here and further missteps there — from the postwar decades onward. There was no sense of a structural deficiency during the « glorious years » from the mid-’50s through the ’70s when the low-hanging fruit of unexploited technologies overseas and Europeans’ drive to regain the wealth they had lost in the war powered rapid growth and high employment. Today, there is the sense that a problem exists.

What could be the origins of such underperformance? It may be that the relatively poor job satisfaction and employee engagement on the Continent are a proximate cause — though not the underlying cause — of the poorer participation and unemployment rates. And high unemployment could lead to a mismatch of worker to job, causing job dissatisfaction and employee disengagement. The task is to find the underlying cause, or causes, of the entire syndrome of poorer employment, productivity, employee engagement and job satisfaction.

Many economists attribute the Continent’s higher unemployment and lower participation, if not also its lower productivity, to the Continent’s social model — in particular, the plethora of social insurance entitlements and the taxes to pay for them. The standard argument is fallacious, though. The consequent reduction of after-tax wage rates is unlikely to be an enduring disincentive to work, for reduced earnings will bring reduced saving; and once private wealth has fallen to its former ratio to after-tax wages, people will be as motivated to work as before.

An indictment of entitlements has to focus on the huge « social wealth » that the welfare state creates at the stroke of the pen. Yet statistical tests of the effects of welfare spending on employment yield erratic results. In any case, it is hard to see that scaling down entitlements would be transformative for economic performance. (Indeed, some economists see increased wealth, social plus private, as raising the population’s willingness to weather market shocks and helping entrepreneurs to finance innovation. I am skeptical.)

In my thesis, the Continental economies’ root problem is a dearth of economic dynamism — loosely, the rate of commercially successful innovation. A country’s dynamism, being slow to change, is not measured by the growth rate over any short- or medium-length span. The level of dynamism is a matter of how fertile the country is in coming up with innovative ideas having prospects of profitability, how adept it is at identifying and nourishing the ideas with the best prospects, and how prepared it is in evaluating and trying out the new products and methods that are launched onto the market.

There is evidence of such a dearth. Germany, Italy and France appear to possess less dynamism than do the U.S. and the others. Far fewer firms break into the top ranks in the former, and fewer employees are reported to have jobs with extensive freedom in decision-making — which is essential at companies engaged in novel, and thus creative, activity.

Further, I argue that the cause of that dearth of dynamism lies in the sort of « economic model » found in most, if not all, of the Continental countries. A country’s economic model determines its economic dynamism. The dynamism that the economic model possesses is in turn a crucial determinant of the country’s economic performance: Where there is more entrepreneurial activity — and thus more innovation, as well as all the financial and managerial activity it leads to — there are more jobs to fill, and those added jobs are relatively engaging and fulfilling. Participation rises accordingly and productivity climbs to a higher path. Thus I see the sort of economic model operating in the Continental countries to be a major cause — perhaps the largest cause — of their lackluster performance characteristics.

There are two dimensions to a country’s economic model. One part consists of its economic institutions. These institutions on the Continent do not look to be good for dynamism. They typically exhibit a Balkanized/segmented financial sector favoring insiders, myriad impediments and penalties placed before outsider entrepreneurs, a consumer sector not venturesome about new products or short of the needed education, union voting (not just advice) in management decisions, and state interventionism. Some studies of mine on what attributes determine which of the advanced economies are the least vibrant — or the least responsive to the stimulus of a technological revolution — pointed to the strength in the less vibrant economies of inhibiting institutions such as employment protection legislation and red tape, and to the weakness of enabling institutions, such as a well-functioning stock market and ample liberal-arts education.

The other part of the economic model consists of various elements of the country’s economic culture. Some cultural attributes in a country may have direct effects on performance — on top of their indirect effects through the institutions they foster. Values and attitudes are analogous to institutions — some impede, others enable. They are as much a part of the « economy, » and possibly as important for how well it functions, as the institutions are. Clearly, any study of the sources of poor performance on the Continent that omits that part of the system can yield results only of unknown reliability.

Of course, people may at bottom all want the same things. Yet not all people may have the instinct to demand and seek the things that best serve their ultimate goals. There is evidence from University of Michigan « values surveys » that working-age people in the Continent’s Big Three differ somewhat from those in the U.S. and the other comparator countries in the number of them expressing various « values » in the workplace.

The values that might impact dynamism are of special interest here. Relatively few in the Big Three report that they want jobs offering opportunities for achievement (42% in France and 54% in Italy, versus an average of 73% in Canada and the U.S.); chances for initiative in the job (38% in France and 47% in Italy, as against an average of 53% in Canada and the U.S.), and even interesting work (59% in France and Italy, versus an average of 71.5% in Canada and the U.K). Relatively few are keen on taking responsibility, or freedom (57% in Germany and 58% in France as against 61% in the U.S. and 65% in Canada), and relatively few are happy about taking orders (Italy 1.03, of a possible 3.0, and Germany 1.13, as against 1.34 in Canada and 1.47 in the U.S.).

Perhaps many would be willing to take it for granted that the spirit of stimulation, problem-solving, mastery and discovery has impacts on a country’s dynamism and thus on its economic performance. In countries where that spirit is weak, an entrepreneurial type contemplating a start-up might be scared off by the prospect of having employees with little zest for any of those experiences. And there might be few entrepreneurial types to begin with. As luck would have it, a study of 18 advanced countries I conducted last summer found that inter-country differences in each of the performance indicators are significantly explained by the intercountry differences in the above cultural values. (Nearly all those values have significant influence on most of the indicators.)

The weakness of these values on the Continent is not the only impediment to a revival of dynamism there. There is the solidarist aim of protecting the « social partners » — communities and regions, business owners, organized labor and the professions — from disruptive market forces. There is also the consensualist aim of blocking business initiatives that lack the consent of the « stakeholders » — those, such as employees, customers and rival companies, thought to have a stake besides the owners. There is an intellectual current elevating community and society over individual engagement and personal growth, which springs from antimaterialist and egalitarian strains in Western culture. There is also the « scientism » that holds that state-directed research is the key to higher productivity. Equally, there is the tradition of hierarchical organization in Continental countries. Lastly, there a strain of anti-commercialism. « A German would rather say he had inherited his fortune than say he made it himself, » the economist Hans-Werner Sinn once remarked to me.

In my earlier work, I had organized my thinking around some intellectual currents — solidarism, consensualism, anti-commercialism and conformism — that emerged as a reaction on the Continent to the Enlightenment and to capitalism in the 19th century. It would be understandable if such a climate had a dispiriting effect on potential entrepreneurs. But to be candid, I had not imagined that Continental Man might be less entrepreneurial. It did not occur to me that he had less need for mental challenge, problem-solving, initiative and responsibility.

It may be that the Continentals finding, over the 19th and early 20th century, that there was little opportunity or reward to exercise freedom and responsibility, learned not to care much about those values. Similarly, it may be that Americans, having assimilated large doses of freedom and initiative for generations, take those things for granted. That appears to be what Tocqueville thought: « The greater involvement of Americans in governing themselves, their relatively broad education and their wider equality of opportunity all encourage the emergence of the ‘man of action’ with the ‘skill’ to ‘grasp the chance of the moment.' »

The most basic point to carry away is that the empirical results related here lend support to the Enlightenment theme that a nation’s culture ultimately makes a difference for the nation’s economic performance in all its aspects — productivity, prosperity and personal growth.

It was a mistake of the Continental Europeans to think that they expressed the right values — right for them. These values led them to evolve economic models bringing in train a level of economic performance with which most working-age people are now discontented. Perhaps the way out — to go from unsatisfactory performance to high performance — will require not only reform of institutions but also a cultural shift that returns Europe to the philosophical roots that put it on the map to begin with.

Mr. Phelps, a professor at Columbia University, is the 2006 Nobel Laureate in economics.

Voir aussi sa contribution de juin dernier dans le Figaro sur « les deux capitalismes du monde occidental »:

Là où le système continental réunit des experts pour fixer la norme d’un bien, le capitalisme en autorise le lancement de toutes les versions.

Le monde occidental et ses deux capitalismes
Edmund S. Phelps (professeur d’économie politique à l’Université de Columbia à New York, il occupe la chaire McVikar)
Le Figaro
Le 22 juin 2006

Sciences po fête cette semaine le soixantième anniversaire de sa refondation par le Général de Gaulle et remet un Doctorat Honoris Causa à six universitaires de renommée internationale. Le Figaro s’associe à l’événement et publie leurs articles.Aujourd’hui, celui d’Edmund S. Phelps.

Le long ralentissement économique de l’Europe de l’Ouest continentale (le Continent) prend les proportions d’une crise. Si la croissance a retrouvé aujourd’hui un rythme quasi normal, le Continent a perdu beaucoup de terrain. Cette piètre performance soulève des questions d’économie politique qu’on pensait définitivement réglées il y a peu.

Les critiques du modèle social voient dans celui-ci le principal coupable du manque de vitalité et du faible taux d’emploi qui caractérisent le Continent. Cependant, diminuer prestations et cotisations sociales n’entraînerait pas de véritables transformations et conduirait seulement à grossir les rangs de la population active.

Je pense que le modèle économique du Continent est le premier responsable de cette situation affligeante que nous connaissons. C’est ce modèle économique, et non pas le modèle social, qui est la clé d’une réelle redynamisation. Il existe deux modèles économiques en Occident et celui du Continent est le moins favorable.

Les Etats-Unis, le Royaume-Uni et le Canada ont un système de propriété privée. Ce système se caractérise par une large ouverture aux nouvelles idées commerciales qui émanent d’entrepreneurs privés. Il se distingue aussi par la grande pluralité des points de vue des financiers et de ceux qui détiennent la richesse, ceux-là même qui sélectionnent les idées à cultiver par l’apport de capitaux et d’incitations nécessaires à leur développement. L’innovation vient pour bonne part d’entreprises déjà établies, comme les groupes pharmaceutiques, mais une part importante émane aussi des start-ups en particulier des plus jeunes et actives. Il s’agit du modèle de la libre entreprise.

L’Ouest de l’Europe continentale a introduit dans son système des institutions visant à protéger les intérêts des « parties prenantes » et des « partenaires sociaux ». Ces institutions comprennent, par exemple, la majorité, voire la totalité des composantes du système corporatiste de l’Italie de l’entre-deux-guerres : grandes confédérations patronales, grands syndicats et grandes banques (Une configuration qui perdure aujourd’hui en Italie et en Allemagne). Ce système entrave ou bloque de nombreux projets innovants, y compris ceux des start-ups. En matière d’innovation, ce système compte davantage sur la coopération des sociétés déjà établies avec les banques locales et nationales. Il s’efforce de compenser par la sophistication technologique ce qui lui manque d’esprit d’entreprise. Ce système n’est pas celui de la libre entreprise.

Ma thèse est que les économies de libre entreprise sont structurées de telle sorte qu’elles tendent à posséder davantage de ce que j’appelle le dynamisme : elles ont plus de dispositions aux innovations commercialement réussies. De nombreuses données statistiques montrent que les Etats-Unis, le Royaume-Uni et le Canada sont plus dynamiques que les trois grands pays du Continent, la France, l’Allemagne et l’Italie. A titre d’exemple, les salariés y font état d’une bien plus grande autonomie de décision dans leur travail que leurs homologues d’Europe continentale et dans les sociétés appartenant à de grands groupes performants, le taux de rotation du personnel est plus important.

La théorie moderne du dynamisme, initialement formulée par Friedrich Hayek dans les années 30, explique pourquoi le système de la libre entreprise, s’il est suffisamment pur, est nécessairement le système le plus dynamique. De nouvelles idées jaillissent du savoir-faire spécialisé du salarié le plus humble. La pluralité des expériences et des connaissances que les financiers mobilisent pour prendre leurs décisions donne à la plupart des entrepreneurs une chance de soumettre leurs idées à une évaluation éclairée. Le financier et l’entrepreneur n’ont pas besoin de l’approbation de l’Etat ou des partenaires sociaux, ils ne devront pas leur rendre de compte par la suite. Il est ainsi possible d’initier des projets qui paraîtraient trop innovants, insuffisamment transparents et trop incertains pour être approuvés par l’Etat ou les partenaires sociaux. Enfin, la pluralité des connaissances et des expériences que les managers et les consommateurs mobilisent pour décider quelles innovations tester et adopter est cruciale pour donner une chance aux plus prometteuses d’entre elles. Là où le système continental réunit des experts pour fixer la norme d’un bien, le capitalisme en autorise le lancement de toutes les versions.

Les bénéfices de ce dynamisme jouent un rôle essentiel dans la vie de tous. Le premier de ces bénéfices est une plus forte productivité qui augmente la qualité de la vie et, en accroissant les salaires, permet à ceux qui ont un emploi peu rémunéré d’échapper à un travail ennuyeux, éreintant et dangereux. L’autre bénéfice, comme l’indique l’expérience des Etats-Unis, est qu’il est profitable pour l’économie globale d’innover.

Un dynamisme actif, qui nourrit l’économie des nouvelles idées des entrepreneurs, transforme aussi le poste de travail. Pour les salariés, les difficultés qui se posent sont autant de stimulants et d’incitations à résoudre les problèmes et donc autant d’occasions d’investissement et d’épanouissement personnels. Cet effet peut être observé dans les données des enquêtes statistiques. Dans la pensée aristotélicienne, le désir d’un tel épanouissement intellectuel est universel. Et finalement, un lieu de travail plus gratifiant attirera davantage de travailleurs et réduira le chômage. Pour la plupart d’entre nous, le système de la libre entreprise est le seul à même de nous proposer des défis toujours renouvelés.

Le Continent et les Etats-Unis doivent bien évidemment s’attaquer au problème de l’exclusion, mais le Continent ne pourra renouer avec une économie de prospérité et d’épanouissement personnel qu’à la seule condition de déraciner les institutions qui font obstacle au dynamisme.

Voir enfin ce commentaire d’autres sondages:

Dans le Figaro Economie en date du 25 mars (…) on lit le commentaire de Pierre-Yves Dugua d’un sondage effectué par l’international GlobalScan pour le compte de l’université du Maryland[1]. Son article débute par ces propos sévères à l’endroit de la France : « On ne peut trouver au monde citoyens plus réfractaires à l’économie de marché et la libre entreprise que les Français. Ainsi, 36% seulement des sondés dans l’Hexagone estiment que l’économie de marché, c’est-à-dire ouverte à la mondialisation, constitue le meilleur système pour l’avenir. Par comparaison, 65% des Allemands, 71% des Américains, 74% des Chinois et même 56% des Keynians sont d’accord avec cette affirmation. Ce n’est pas nouveau, la France, plus que ses partenaires, redoute l’ouverture de ses frontières à la concurrence économique et sociale. Un précédent sondage réalisé l’an dernier par le German Marshall Fund a fait apparaître que 74% des Français reprochent à la libéralisation des échanges de ‘réduire le nombre d’emplois’. La proportion n’était que de 59% chez nos voisins allemands, pourtant aussi durement frappés par les délocalisations et un taux de chômage élevé. L’étude de l’université du Maryland souligne l’ampleur du décalage entre la France et le reste du monde. Avec une proportion de 50% des réponses données, la France est le seul des pays sondés dans lequel une majorité de l’opinion rejette l’économie de marché comme le fondement de la croissance à venir (…). En matière de protection des droits des travailleurs, les Français sont nettement plus intransigeants que leurs collègues allemands : 79% d’entre eux réclament plus de réglementation pour encadrer les grandes entreprises. Seulement 55% sont de cet avis en Allemagne. Tous pays confondus, WorldPublicOpinion.org observe par ailleurs que l’économie de marché reste très populaire auprès des personnes les plus pauvres (59%). Le libéralisme dominant de l’opinion en Inde, en Indonésie, au Kenya, au Nigeria peut faire réfléchir les altermondialistes européens.

(…)

Citant Bernard Poulet[2], Philippe Raynaud, professeur en science politique à Paris II, fait remarquer, dans un livre récent[3], < que la puissance relative de l’« extrême gauche » en France, avec ses frontières imprécises, n’aurait pas en elle-même une importance très considérable, si elle n’allait pas de pair avec ce fait notable : la permanence et la vitalité, dans la France d’aujourd’hui, d’une culture anticapitaliste ou même « antilibérale », que l’on croyait plus affaiblie après la fin des régimes communistes européens et le ralliement de fait des socialistes à l’économie de marché[4]. La vitalité de cette culture se manifeste d’abord par le considérable succès de livres (L’horreur économique de Viviane Forester, La Misère du monde de Pierre Bourdieu, Les Nouveaux Chiens de garde de Serge Halimi) ou de périodiques (Les Incorruptibles, Le Monde diplomatique) dont le principal propos est de dénoncer le « libéralisme » ou « la pensée unique », mais elle est également à l’origine de l’importance qu’ont pris en France les mouvements « altermondialistes » dont certaines figures comme José Bové jouissent d’une réelle popularité, très au-delà des milieux les plus militants. Minoritaire, cette culture n’en est pas moins à certains égards légitime, comme le montre la faveur dont elle jouit jusque dans des médias « généralistes » et même, pour certains, populaires[5]. Sa légitimité, sinon son influence, provient de sa capacité à présenter sous une forme incandescente et violemment polémique des thèmes ou des thèses très largement répandus au-delà de ses cercles militants, qu’il s’agisse de politique internationale (hostilité aux Etats-Unis et à Israël, renforcée par la « démonisation » de « Bush-Sharon », critique des institutions financières de la mondialisation ), ou encore de questions de mœurs ou de société (immigration, lutte contre le racisme, défense des sans-papiers, promotion des minorités sexuelles, etc.) ; elle s’inscrit parfaitement dans un contexte marqué, quelle que soit l’équipe au pouvoir, par une méfiance générale à l’égard du « libéralisme » – bruyamment refusé à gauche et très mal assumé à droite – qui est un des aspects les plus singuliers de la politique française[6].

Voir enfin:

Forget the crabwalk, France must move on
Roger Cohen
IHT
February 27, 2007

PARIS: You have to admire the straight lines in the French capital: Haussmann’s avenues, the pollarded trees as stern as sentries, the relentless Rue de Rivoli. Stand at the Place de la Concorde or the Invalides and what you get is civilization as geometry. The perfection gets under your skin and you wonder if you’ll always have Paris.

But French politics is another story, more crabwalk than linear exercise, more scuttling sidelong — a couple of meters forward here, one back there — than impetus toward a destination. There is movement, but seldom avowed and even more rarely celebrated.

Somewhere in its soul, it seems, France wants immobility.

Jacques Chirac, the outgoing president, understood that; he has delivered. A dozen years into his presidency it is still unclear whether he’s really a man of the right or left. His love-hate relationship with capitalism had produced privatizations and hymns to the state in equal measure. The market remains a semi-dirty word.

Quietly, very quietly, France under Chirac has continued its long slither down the catwalk toward a market economy, followed ever since François Mitterrand tried and failed a quarter-century ago to borrow from the Soviet economic plan.

But the country’s deities — the state, the functionary, the social model — and its demons — the entrepreneur, Anglo-Saxon capitalism, « neoliberal » competition — have not changed much for all that. France has a terrible, an irrational, fear of the very forces with which its leading global companies — L’Oréal, LVMH — live and thrive.

And here we are, less than two months from an election that, not before time, will usher into power a new generation, one for whom the Cold War was prologue, facing a seemingly perennial question: can this country whose global ambitions are oddly undiminished recover its vitality, its sense of purpose, its coherence?

The need is obvious enough. Opposition to the Iraq war will be Chirac’s legacy, but it does not an invigorated national identity make. Take most measures — unemployment, growth, national debt — and France lags.

Beyond the numbers, as Edmund Phelps, a Nobel Prize-winning economist, suggested in a recent interview in Le Monde, lurks a troubling loss of « vital élan, » the taste for change, and the readiness for intellectual challenge.

Unemployment, now at 8.8 percent, is the worst of inequalities. You feel that here — in the restive suburbs but also in young faces everywhere that look somehow numbed. While Germany, its longtime sidekick in capitalism with a Rhineland conscience, has absorbed 17 million East Germans, and Scandinavia has put people back to work without ripping out its safety net, France has merely tinkered with its failures.

Both of the leading presidential candidates, Nicolas Sarkozy on the center-right and Ségolène Royal on the center-left, are innovators in one critical sense. They do not hold the monarchical view of the presidency shared by Chirac and Mitterrand, two men who held themselves accountable only to a mystical idea of « La France. »

Not so for Sarkozy the modernizer, who wants to imbue Parliament with greater powers, and not so for Royal the mother, who wants the far-flung French family to be represented in forms of direct democracy that would create new accountability. As president, it seems, each would descend from the heights.

That’s positive; France has been trying to put the monarchy out of business for more than 200 years. But there the similarities end.

Sarkozy is attached to the Atlantic alliance, Royal less so. Sarkozy is drawn to the United States, although he’s curbing his enthusiasm in the name of electability; Royal has all the de rigueur reservations about the American « hyperpower. » It’s hard to imagine her in Palo Alto.

Sarkozy, the upstart, is tempted to walk straight; Royal, a product of the best political schools, has the old crabwalk deeply bred in her. He’s talking of circumventing the 35-hour week, streamlining cumbersome firing procedures and, odd notion, working more to earn more.

She wants to raise the minimum wage to fire consumption, that in turn will spur investment and output, but who pays for that and for much else is a mystery. Her strength seems to lie in the promise of a pain-free extraction of the French from their problems; she will take care of them, as the state always has.

« This is still a country that believes you build society from the state out, » said André Glucksmann, a political philosopher. « The French are record holders when it comes to suspicion of liberalism. I believe Sarkozy wants to break with 30 years of a failed model preserved by left and right. But Royal never talks of painful measures or a crisis being needed for change. »

She does occasionally talk approvingly of Tony Blair’s reinvention of the British left, a nod to ideas most powerfully represented in her Socialist Party by former Finance Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn. And Sarkozy, in the other direction, has taken to tipping his hat to the state and Gaullism. Each is reaching out.

Not fast enough, however, to arrest the rapid rise of François Bayrou, whose « social-economic » platform, avowedly mixing the best of left and right, of state and market, of competition and protection, of profit and solidarity, allows France to dream anew of the best of all possible Gallic worlds.

Bayrou has successfully triangulated the campaign. Whether he can triumph in it is another matter. A little bit of left and a little bit of right is what France has had for a long time. What it needs is a little bit of movement. At some level, more and more French people seem to be onto that.

France will always have a certain idea of itself. The perfect perspectives of the capital — the orb of the sun seen dead center through the Arc de Triomphe — declare that glorious notion.

But glory must be earned. It cannot be, or at least cannot forever be, an exercise in nostalgia. Getting reality and self-image more in line is what this election is really all about. Here’s looking at you, Paris.

COMPLEMENT:

Seuls 45% des Français voudraient « pouvoir travailler plus pour gagner plus »
LEMONDE.FR avec AFP | 02.03.07

Une majorité de Français (53 %) veulent avoir « leur durée de travail actuelle garantie par la loi », plutôt que « pouvoir travailler plus pour gagner plus » (45 %), comme proposé par le candidat UMP à la présidentielle, Nicolas Sarkozy, selon un sondage LH2 pour 20 minutes et RMC publié vendredi 2 mars.

Interrogées sur leur définition du travail, 78 % des personnes interrogées citent d’abord « un moyen de gagner sa vie », avant « une valeur importante à transmettre à ses enfants » (63 %), « une source d’épanouissement » (42 %), « le moyen d’être utile à la société » (28 %), « une source de fierté » (21 %).

« UN LIEU D’INJUSTICE » POUR 5 % DES SONDÉS

Seule une minorité des Français considère le travail comme « une source d’inégalités » (9 %), « des contraintes importantes » (5 %) et « un lieu d’injustice » (5 %). Le total des pourcentages est supérieur à 100 car plusieurs réponses étaient possibles à cette question sur le travail.

Ce sondage a été réalisé par téléphone les 23 et 24 février auprès d’un échantillon de 1 005 personnes, représentatif de la population française âgée de 18 ans et plus et constitué selon la méthode des quotas.

One Response to Vieille Europe: it’s the culture, stupid!

  1. […] La domination du capitalisme empêche toute véritable démocratie. Seul l’Etat, appuyé sur un secteur public puissant, peut faire reculer la domination de l’argent. Alain Touraine […]

    J'aime

Votre commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Google

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Google. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l’aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion /  Changer )

Connexion à %s

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur la façon dont les données de vos commentaires sont traitées.

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :