Hong Kong: La montagne est haute et l’empereur est loin (Think local, blame national: countering Beijing’s strategy, Hong Kong protesters blame not the deviant but the too-obedient local servant)

12 novembre, 2014
 L’ordre public doit à tout prix être maintenu, non seulement à Hong Kong mais aussi partout sur la planète. Xi Jinping
Gouverner par la loi est un pilier fondamental pour la stabilité et la prospérité à long terme de Hongkong, a dit le secrétaire général du Parti communiste, cité par l’agence de presse officielle Chine nouvelle. Le gouvernement central soutient entièrement le chef de l’exécutif et son gouvernement pour gouverner, en particulier pour assurer l’autorité de la loi et l’ordre civil.  Xi Jinping
Vous ne montrez pas tant de nouveautés si vous ne voulez pas faire passer un message fort. Je visite des salons d’armement dans le monde entier et vous ne voyez pas ce genre de choses en libre accès. Cela n’arrive pas. Cela ne se passe pas comme ça normalement. (…) C’est comme si nous avions deux réalités – ou une réalité et un spectre. Le sommet de coopération est le spectre, tandis que le salon de Zhuahi est la réalité concrète et matérielle. William Triplett (ancien premier conseiller du Comité américain des relations internationales du Sénat et expert en sécurité nationale)
He wanted to present himself as someone from the grassroots, not linked to the tycoons… but people have been terribly disappointed. Joseph Cheng (City University of Hong Kong)
He is in daily communication with Beijing. C.Y. is a very obedient cadre. (…) Beijing would … lose face if they were to sack Leung in the near future, [but] it’s a foregone conclusion that C.Y. Leung has to go because he is a very divisive and very unpopular figure. Willy Lam (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
One of his nicknames is « 689 » — a sarcastic reference to the number of votes he obtained from the city’s 1,200-strong election committee, a group of people selected from the largely pro-Beijing elite. And Leung, a former surveyor and real estate consultant, has done little to dispel the prevailing view that he is Beijing’s lackey. A day after being elected as chief executive he paid a visit to the central government liaison office, Beijing’s outpost in the city and he was the first leader to make his inauguration speech in Mandarin — rather than the Cantonese that is spoken by most people in this former British colony. Despite this, Leung was not in fact Beijing’s first choice to become chief executive. The early favorite was Henry Tang, a bumbling former financial secretary best known for his penchant for red wine. But revelations that Tang’s home had an enormous basement which hadn’t been approved for planning permission, dubbed an underground palace, derailed his campaign. However, it was later discovered that Leung’s home in the city’s exclusive Peak neighborhood also had an illegal structure. Leung declared ignorance but it undermined trust in the city’s new leader from the get-go and helped earn him another nickname — « wolf. » The moniker sounds similar in Cantonese to his family name but also suggests a cunning political operator.His approval ratings have plummeted since 2012 and a plush toy wolf made by IKEA sold out across the city earlier this year as Hong Kongers, eager to use it as a tongue-in-cheek symbol of protest, snapped it up. A gigantic, enlarged effigy of Leung’s head, replete with lupine fangs, has also been a distinctive sight on the streets during the protests. For all his colorful nicknames, Harry Harrison, political cartoonist at the South China Morning Post, the city’s main English-language newspaper, says Leung is a difficult character to portray.(…) Those that do usually feature Leung sitting in his office with a picture of malevolent panda — symbolizing China — behind him. The reason, says Harrison, is that Leung is rarely out and about and has little public presence, coming across as aloof.(…) Leung has only appeared in public three times; twice for press conferences and once for a National Day flag-raising ceremony attended by dignitaries. Protest leaders have repeatedly called for him to go and refuse to negotiate with him, preferring a meeting with his number two — Carrie Lam. While Leung says he will not resign, many observers feel his days are numbered, with protesters setting up a makeshift tomb at the protest site. « Beijing would … lose face if they were to sack Leung in the near future, » says Lam at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. But « it’s a foregone conclusion that C.Y. Leung has to go because he is a very divisive and very unpopular figure. CNN
The compiled tweets (…) highlight a unique aspect of this protest compared to others across China. Many protests on the mainland condemn local officials for problems — including land seizures, environmental pollution, corruption, and employment discrimination — that citizens may perceive as stemming from noncompliance with central government policies. In contrast, the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong erupted in late September in response to a central government edict circumscribing universal suffrage in the 2017 local elections for chief executive. Not surprisingly, some Hong Kongers view Leung not as a local official improperly implementing Beijing’s directives, but as the opposite: Beijing’s obedient servant. For example, one tweet reads, « We don’t care if [the] thief executive steps down, he is just Xi Jinping’s puppet. » Several tweets referenced a CNN article that cast Leung as « Beijing’s lackey. » This sentiment is further reflected in the graffiti depicted below, which shows Xi, dressed in Mao-era attire, guiding Leung (as represented by the wolf, the Cantonese word for which sounds similar to Leung’s name) on a leash toward a crowd of yellow umbrella-wielding protesters. Thus while netizens call for Leung to step down, their opposition may ultimately be directed toward Beijing. (…) Of course, this comparison of sentiment toward the two leaders explores merely one aspect of the overall discussion surrounding the Hong Kong protests, much of which may not have been captured on Twitter. Moreover, the discussion on Twitter may have omitted or amplified certain voices; it is possible that a few key individuals may have disproportionately driven conversation targeting either Xi or Leung. In addition, the findings may reflect strategic calculations on the part of protesters who may have sought to avoid direct confrontation with Beijing by purposefully refraining from directly criticizing Xi. Still, when Hong Kong netizens took to Twitter to share their ideas and mobilize support, they revealed the profound disconnect that separates elements of Hong Kong society from their mainland counterparts. These netizens turned « think national, blame local » on its head by blaming « local » for appeasing « national. » For Beijing, that’s worrisome. Douglas Yeung, Astrid Stuth Cevallos

Et si, avec sa  culture propre, Hong Kong  arrivait à contrer Pékin sur son propre terrain ?

A l’heure où, Forum Apec oblige et à coup de décrets de jours de congé (pour réduire la pollution) et de déclarations apaisantes envers ses voisins, la Chine a mis temporairement en veilleuse son incroyable volonté de puissance …

Tout en lançant, au nez et à la barbe du prétendu chef du Monde libre, son propre projet de coopération économique régionale et un nouvel avion furtif

Et rappelant, au nom du « respect du droit » s’il vous plait, son soutien à son pantin de Hong Kong …

Faut-il, avec la revue américaine Foreign policy, voir dans l’insistance des manifestants de Hong Kong à dialoguer directement avec le pouvoir central  …

La subversion de la stratégie chinoise, jusqu’ici particulièrement efficace, de « pensez national et de blamez local »?

Où, loin de menacer les autorités de Pékin, la dénonciation des dirigeants locaux sert à les conforter au contraire.

Sauf que face à une région ayant sa culture propre et notamment sa langue et sa cuisine mais aussi son siècle et demi d’acculturation britannique (où nombre d’adultes « n’y parlent que difficilement le mandarin à tel point que les Chinois du continent doivent parfois leur parler en anglais ») …

Et comme le montre l’analyse par Foreign policy des twits émis à Hong Kong lors des récentes manifestations …

Le dirigeant local n’y est cette fois pas montré du doigt pour son non-respect de la loi nationale …

Mais au contraire pour sa trop grande obéissance !

Tea Leaf Nation
The Mountains Are High and the Emperor Is Far Away
Who do Hong Kong’s netizens blame for the city’s distress?
Douglas Yeung , Astrid Stuth Cevallos
Foreign policy
November 11, 2014

Shan gao, huangdi yuan — « The mountains are high, and the emperor is far away. »

This traditional Chinese saying alludes to local officials’ tendency to disregard the wishes of central authorities in distant Beijing. Indeed, many Chinese believe that social unrest in China occurs when corrupt or incompetent local officials fail to implement well-intentioned central government directives. Eager to deflect citizens’ complaints away from the regime and toward local officials, Chinese leaders have exploited this perception, adopting a strategy that Cheng Li of the Brookings Institution calls « think national, blame local. »

Does this conventional wisdom hold for the recent Hong Kong protest movement? Since Sept. 22, tens of thousands of protesters have flooded the streets, calling for universal suffrage in the 2017 chief executive election and the resignation of current Hong Kong Chief Executive Chun-ying Leung. According to Hong Kong’s Basic Law, the mini-constitution set in place when sovereignty of the former British colony transferred back to mainland China in 1997, Hong Kong must establish « universal suffrage » by 2017. But on Sept. 4, the central government in Beijing, under Chinese President Xi Jinping’s leadership, issued an edict declaring that candidates must be vetted by a Hong Kong committee stacked with pro-Beijing interests — effectively guaranteeing that pro-democracy candidates would not make the ballot. This move ignited the protests that have now roiled the Asian financial center for over six weeks, though Hong Kong authorities now seem to be making plans to clear out the protesters. A court injunction on Nov. 10 granted police the power to arrest protesters who do not cooperate, and on Nov. 11 Hong Kong’s number two Carrie Lam called on demonstrators to end the sit-in. The pro-Beijing Leung’s staunch support of China’s official position, as well as his alternately heavy-handed and evasive approach to the protesters, has vilified him among many of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy supporters.

Which political leader — the local Leung or more distant Xi — appears to be the foremost target of protesters’ discontent?

Measuring sentiment toward these two leaders in netizens’ Twitter posts can help answer this question. Many Hong Kong protesters have used social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to organize demonstrations and mobilize international support. Facebook and Twitter are blocked on the mainland, but these sites can be accessed freely in Hong Kong. (Although Hong Kongers also use Weibo, the mainland equivalent of Twitter, Weibo is less useful as a means of analyzing popular sentiment in this case because Weibo posts, especially those about sensitive topics like the Hong Kong protests, are subject to censorship.)

From Sept. 10 to Oct. 8, 38,000 tweets were tagged with the hashtags #UmbrellaRevolution or #OccupyCentral, and sent by users who either claimed to be located in Hong Kong or whose posts were geotagged within Hong Kong. Tweets were separated according to mentions of Xi or Leung (or Leung’s nickname, 689, a reference to the number of votes he received from Hong Kong’s 1,200 member election committee). This resulted in just fewer than 1,000 tweets mentioning either leader, with seven times as many tweets about Leung as about Xi. Tweets were processed using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), an automated content analysis software designed to link word usage to psychological states.

Nearly five times as many tweets about Leung conveyed negative sentiment as tweets about Xi. However, tweets about Xi were more negative in tone than those about Leung. As a percentage of total tweets about each leader, more tweets about Xi contained words conveying negative emotion (e.g., « angry, » « foolish, » « harm, » « lose, » « protesting, » « stupid, » « resign, » « thief ») than those about Leung. Moreover, compared to tweets about Leung, tweets about Xi on average contained a greater proportion of negative emotion words. In particular, words conveying anger (a subset of negative emotion words that includes swearing and words like « hate, » « liar, » and « suck ») were more prevalent in tweets about Xi than in tweets about Leung. (Note: A few hundred of these tweets were written in Chinese. When analyzed, the results appeared similar to those for tweets in English. Because LIWC was not designed to process Cantonese grammar and vocabulary, this analysis focuses on the English-language tweets.)
Hong Kong Twitter users discussing the protests may also have felt more distressed when writing about Leung and more disconnected when writing about Xi. Psychological research has found that use of first-person singular pronouns (e.g., « I, » « my ») is related to self-reflection, while use of third-person pronouns (e.g., « he, » « she, » « they ») suggests that those being referred to are somehow separate or different from oneself and one’s group — that is, they are seen as « others. » As shown above, tweets about Leung used higher rates of first-person singular pronouns than tweets about Xi. Along the same lines, tweets about Xi contained proportionally more third-person pronouns than tweets about Leung.

It is intuitive that Hong Kongers would feel more detached when writing about Xi and more personally affected when writing about Leung, who is both geographically and culturally closer to the protesters. Yet while negative opinion towards Xi may be more strongly felt, the disparity in number of posts about each leader suggests that disapproval of Leung is more widespread than disapproval of Xi. The « othering » of Xi in these tweets parallels a tendency among Hong Kongers to identify less as « Chinese » and more with their city.

The compiled tweets also highlight a unique aspect of this protest compared to others across China. Many protests on the mainland condemn local officials for problems — including land seizures, environmental pollution, corruption, and employment discrimination — that citizens may perceive as stemming from noncompliance with central government policies. In contrast, the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong erupted in late September in response to a central government edict circumscribing universal suffrage in the 2017 local elections for chief executive.

Not surprisingly, some Hong Kongers view Leung not as a local official improperly implementing Beijing’s directives, but as the opposite: Beijing’s obedient servant. For example, one tweet reads, « We don’t care if [the] thief executive steps down, he is just Xi Jinping’s puppet. » Several tweets referenced a CNN article that cast Leung as « Beijing’s lackey. » This sentiment is further reflected in the graffiti depicted below, which shows Xi, dressed in Mao-era attire, guiding Leung (as represented by the wolf, the Cantonese word for which sounds similar to Leung’s name) on a leash toward a crowd of yellow umbrella-wielding protesters. Thus while netizens call for Leung to step down, their opposition may ultimately be directed toward Beijing.

Of course, this comparison of sentiment toward the two leaders explores merely one aspect of the overall discussion surrounding the Hong Kong protests, much of which may not have been captured on Twitter. Moreover, the discussion on Twitter may have omitted or amplified certain voices; it is possible that a few key individuals may have disproportionately driven conversation targeting either Xi or Leung. In addition, the findings may reflect strategic calculations on the part of protesters who may have sought to avoid direct confrontation with Beijing by purposefully refraining from directly criticizing Xi.

Still, when Hong Kong netizens took to Twitter to share their ideas and mobilize support, they revealed the profound disconnect that separates elements of Hong Kong society from their mainland counterparts. These netizens turned « think national, blame local » on its head by blaming « local » for appeasing « national. » For Beijing, that’s worrisome.

 Voir aussi:

C.Y. Leung: Hong Kong’s unloved leader
Katie Hunt
CNN
October 3, 2014

Hong Kong (CNN) — Cunning wolf? Working class hero? Or bland Beijing loyalist?

C.Y. Leung, the Hong Kong leader whose resignation has become a rallying cry for the protesters that have filled the city’s streets this week, was a relative unknown before he took the top job in 2012.

As the son of a policeman who has used the same briefcase since his student days, his supporters said he would improve the lot of ordinary people in a city that has one of the world’s widest wealth gaps.

« He wanted to present himself as someone from the grassroots, not linked to the tycoons… but people have been terribly disappointed, » says Joseph Cheng, a professor of political science at City University of Hong Kong.

Beijing lackey?

One of his nicknames is « 689 » — a sarcastic reference to the number of votes he obtained from the city’s 1,200-strong election committee, a group of people selected from the largely pro-Beijing elite.

And Leung, a former surveyor and real estate consultant, has done little to dispel the prevailing view that he is Beijing’s lackey.

A day after being elected as chief executive he paid a visit to the central government liaison office, Beijing’s outpost in the city and he was the first leader to make his inauguration speech in Mandarin — rather than the Cantonese that is spoken by most people in this former British colony.

« He is in daily communication with Beijing, » says Willy Lam, an adjunct professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. « C.Y. is a very obedient cadre. »

Despite this, Leung was not in fact Beijing’s first choice to become chief executive. The early favorite was Henry Tang, a bumbling former financial secretary best known for his penchant for red wine.

But revelations that Tang’s home had an enormous basement which hadn’t been approved for planning permission, dubbed an underground palace, derailed his campaign.

However, it was later discovered that Leung’s home in the city’s exclusive Peak neighborhood also had an illegal structure.

Leung declared ignorance but it undermined trust in the city’s new leader from the get-go and helped earn him another nickname — « wolf. »

The moniker sounds similar in Cantonese to his family name but also suggests a cunning political operator.

His approval ratings have plummeted since 2012 and a plush toy wolf made by IKEA sold out across the city earlier this year as Hong Kongers, eager to use it as a tongue-in-cheek symbol of protest, snapped it up.

Villain?

For all his colorful nicknames, Harry Harrison, political cartoonist at the South China Morning Post, the city’s main English-language newspaper, says Leung is a difficult character to portray.

« C.Y., despite his pantomime villain appearance, hasn’t really turned out to be all that cartoonable, » he told CNN. « I’ve hardly featured him in any cartoons for months now. »

Those that do usually feature Leung sitting in his office with a picture of malevolent panda — symbolizing China — behind him.

The reason, says Harrison, is that Leung is rarely out and about and has little public presence, coming across as aloof.

His unease with ordinary members of the public has been on display this week.

Leung has only appeared in public three times; twice for press conferences and once for a National Day flag-raising ceremony attended by dignitaries.

Protest leaders have repeatedly called for him to go and refuse to negotiate with him, preferring a meeting with his number two — Carrie Lam.

While Leung says he will not resign, many observers feel his days are numbered, with protesters setting up a makeshift tomb at the protest site.

« Beijing would … lose face if they were to sack Leung in the near future, » says Lam at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

But « it’s a foregone conclusion that C.Y. Leung has to go because he is a very divisive and very unpopular figure. »

Voir également:

Pékin gonfle les muscles en arrière-plan du Sommet de coopération économique
Joshua Philipp

Epoch Times
11.11.2014

10 novembre 2014: le président américain Barack Obama écoute le Premier ministre australien Tony Abbott lors d’une rencontre bilatérale à Pékin. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Enlarge
10 novembre 2014: le président américain Barack Obama écoute le Premier ministre australien Tony Abbott lors d’une rencontre bilatérale à Pékin. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Analyse de l’actualité

Robert Gates, ancien Secrétaire américain à la défense de l’administration Obama,pourrait très certainement analyser pour le Président ce qui est en train de se passer cette semaine à Pékin, tandis que les représentants des armées du monde se sont rassemblés dans la ville méridionale de Zhuhai.

M. Gates avait rencontré les dirigeants militaires en Chine en janvier 2010 pour ce qu’il pensait être un dialogue amical et nécessaire. Près de 6 mois avant son voyage, il avait minimisé la menace de l’avion furtif J-20, en déclarant que la Chine ne le mettrait pas en service avant 2020.

Alors que Robert Gates se trouvait en Chine en 2010, le régime chinois avait procédé au premier vol d’essai du J-20.

La communauté de la défense internationale avait reçu ce geste comme un message à l’agressivité clairement marquée.

Le régime chinois semble vouloir reproduire le même jeu. Alors que l’attention du public et des médias du monde est tournée vers le sommet de Coopération économique de la région Asie Pacifique (CEAP) qui s’est tenu cette année à Pékin, le régime chinois a également organisé son salon aéronautique de Zhuhai qui a attiré tous les dirigeants d’armée et les patrons de la sécurité du monde entier.

Les médias officiels chinois répètent tous la même chanson: ce sommet de Coopération économique représente une étape importante et souligne le plus grand rôle joué par la Chine dans la politique mondiale. De Xinhua au Quotidien du Peuple en passant par le Global Times, le régime chinois est présenté comme un État puissant et pacifique prêt à étendre son influence. Les États-Unis, quant à eux, sont décrits comme un pays trouble-fête essayant d’empêcher la Chine d’atteindre ses objectifs légitimes.

Le régime chinois utilise donc le sommet de la CEAP pour présenter une image de paix mondiale et de prospérité tout en envoyant plus clairement que jamais un message d’agression et de puissance militaire à travers l’édition 2014 du salon aéronautique de Zhuhai.

«Vous ne montrez pas tant de nouveautés si vous ne voulez pas faire passer un message fort,» a commenté lors d’un entretien par téléphone William Triplett, ancien premier conseiller du Comité américain des relations internationales du Sénat et expert en sécurité nationale.

À Zhuhai, le régime chinois semble ne rien vouloir garder pour lui. Il a dévoilé plus d’une douzaine de systèmes d’armes à la pointe de la technologie qui pourraient défier la domination militaire américaine, y compris des armes que les spécialistes de la défense pensaient que la Chine était loin de pouvoir développer.

Parmi ces nouvelles armes se trouvent un missile supersonique anti-navire, des obus d’artillerie guidés par GPS, de nouveaux lasers tactiques, une nouvelle version d’exportation de son avion furtif et ses avions cargo qui pourraient aider le régime à étendre sa portée militaire.

«Je visite des salons d’armement dans le monde entier et vous ne voyez pas ce genre de choses en libre accès», s’est étonné M. Triplett. «Cela n’arrive pas. Cela ne se passe pas comme ça normalement.»

Selon M. Triplett, dans la même perspective que le vol d’essai du J-20 pendant sa visite en Chine en 2010, la présentation de tous ces nouveaux systèmes d’armes pendant que les dirigeants du monde se trouvent au sommet de la CEAP à Pékin envoie un message très clair.

«C’est comme si nous avions deux réalités – ou une réalité et un spectre», a analysé M. Triplett. Le sommet de coopération est le spectre, tandis que le salon de Zhuahi est la réalité concrète et matérielle.»

Comment interpréter Zhuhai

Pour démêler la réalité de la vitrine superficielle, il faudra que les États-Unis souhaitent comprendre le message adressé par le salon de Zhuhai.

Selon Richard Fisher Junior, membre éminent du Centre international de stratégie et d’évaluation, interpréter un événement comme Zhuhai a un certain prix pour le gouvernement américain.

Le Navy Times a révélé il y a quelques jours qu’un éminent dirigeant des renseignements de la Marine américaine avait été démis de ses fonctions pour avoir averti les dirigeants américains d’une menace militaire provenant de Chine. Le Capitaine James Fanell était directeur des opérations de renseignement et d’information de la Flotte américaine dans le Pacifique.

«En résumé, il a été averti que dire la vérité est une erreur», a expliqué M. Fisher, avant d’ajouter que le timing de cette décision a été perçue dans l’armée comme un signe que les pressions exercées par la Chine peuvent atteindre l’armée américaine.

«James Fanell est un analyste très respecté», a poursuivi M. Fisher. «La façon dont il est traité représente les risques auxquels sont exposés tous les Américains portant la responsabilité de dire la vérité au sujet de la Chine. Beaucoup d’entre nous avons souffert professionnellement parce que nous avons dit la vérité au sujet de la Chine.»

Dans l’ensemble, le régime chinois a donc présenté deux visages au cours du sommet de Coopération économique de la région Asie Pacifique qui vient de se dérouler à Pékin – un visage tourné vers le public et l’autre vers la communauté mondiale de la défense.

«Ces événements ne sont pas dus au hasard», a conclu M. Fisher. «Le régime chinois est très habile pour combiner plusieurs messages pour des audiences multiples. Cela est une pratique usitée dans l’histoire de la guerre psychologique.»

Version originale: While World Watches APEC, China Sends a Message

La montagne est haute et l’empereur est loin : introduction au Guangdong
Benoit Geffroy

Cette phrase est la traduction d’une maxime chinoise exprimant ce qu’on pourrait appeler « le paradoxe chinois » – ou au moins « un » paradoxe chinois. Pour dire les choses de manières douces, l’Etat chinois a une longue tradition autoritaire et centralisatrice. Il a toujours cherché à imposer son ordre jusque dans les marches les plus reculées de l’empire. Malgré tout, l’immensité du territoire a permis aux communautés locales de conserver une certaine autonomie. Ce proverbe signifie donc que malgré ses velléités dirigistes, la cour n’a pas toujours le bras assez long pour imposer sa loi sur l’ensemble du territoire. Ne prenez toutefois pas ces mots au pied de la lettre : il ne s’agit pas tant d’échapper à la loi que d’instaurer un équilibre tacite entre les directives nationales et les réalités locales.

Ces considérations sont particulièrement vraies en ce qui concerne le Guangdong. Le Guangdong est la province dans laquelle se trouve Guangzhou, plus connue à l’Ouest sous le nom de Canton. Pour ne pas trop vous dépayser, j’appellerai par la suite la province « cantonais ». De par son statue de Région Administrative Spéciale, Hong Kong n’appartient pas au cantonais. Elle se situe néanmoins sur ses côtes. Le nom de Shenzhen est peut-être familier à certains d’entre vous ; cette ville se situe aussi dans le cantonais. Elle est d’ailleurs collée au territoire hong-kongais.

Bien que d’un point de vue administratif Hong Kong n’appartienne pas au cantonais, elle en est en fait très proche, et ce pour des raisons culturelles. Pour oser une rapprochement hasardeux, on pourrait comparer le cantonais à la Bretagne. Les deux régions possèdent chacune une culture propre, à commencer par la langue et la cuisine. Elles ont enduré une phase de « colonisation » par la « métropole », qui leur a imposé sa langue et son identité nationale. J’arrête ici les frais en même temps que les déclarations discutables, mais l’idée est là.

Au premier rang des particularités de la province se trouve la langue. Je zappe la conférence sur les grandes familles de dialecte chinois, retenez juste que la langue cantonaise est plus éloignée du mandarin, la lingua franca imposée par les communistes, que le français ne l’est de l’espagnol. Parmi les autres différences, on peut noter la cuisine (mais chaque province chinoise a ses spécialités) ou l’architecture (je parle de l’architecture traditionnelle : à Canton comme dans les autres villes chinoises l’immeuble a gagné par K.O.).
La dichotomie qui sépare traditionellement le Nord et le Sud de la Chine joue aussi à plein. Ce sont les clans guerriers du Nord, habitués à un environnement rude, proches des nomades de la steppe mongole, qui ont fait l’unité de la Chine. Les peuples de Chine du Sud, commerçants dans l’âme, à la culture plus raffinée, admettent mal la tutelle du gouvernement central. Ce n’est pas un hasard si toutes les capitales dynastiques de la Chine se sont toujours trouvées dans la moitié nord du pays (à l’exception de celles des Song du Sud, chassés du Nord par les Jurchens puis par les Mongols).

Le cantonais étant la province cotière chinoise la plus méridionale, c’est naturellement là que les navigateurs européens débarquèrent au XVIème siècle. Ils furent accueillis par des commerçants plus qu’enclin au négoce, ce qui ne fit qu’accentuer l’ouverture au monde extérieur de la province. Au XIXème siècle, les Cantonais furent ainsi le fer de lance de l’immigration chinoise aux Etats-Unis. C’est aussi dans cette province qu’est né Sun Yat-Sen, l’homme qui abolit l’empire et proclama la république au début du siècle dernier. Autant de faits qui renforcent la réputation frondeuse de la région.

Retenez donc que le cantonais est une province à part en Chine, et ce par bien des aspects. Certains vont même jusqu’à affirmer qu’en cas de démocratisation de la Chine, un mouvement indépendantiste pourrait apparaître. Sans en arriver jusque là, il est indéniable que le Chinois cantonais n’est pas un Chinois comme les autres. Ces particularités ont été quelque peu nivellées par le régime central de Pékin. Les communistes ayant notamment imposer le mandarin à l’école, tous les Cantonais parlent aujourd’hui la langue commune. Ce qui ne les empêche pas de continuer à communiquer entre eux en cantonais.

C’est beaucoup moins vrai pour Hong Kong, qui n’est soumise aux oukases de Pékin que depuis dix ans : la majorité des adultes n’y parlent que difficilement le mandarin (à tel point que les Chinois du continent doivent parfois leur parler en anglais). Cependant il est difficile de tracer le contour de l’identité cantonaise des Hong Kongais, tant ceux-ci ont le regard tourné vers l’Occident.

Voir enfin:

Think National, Blame Local: Central-Provincial Dynamics in the Hu Era
Cheng Li
Leadership Monitor, No. 17
2007

The alarming statistics on public protests recently released by the Chinese authorities have led some analysts to conclude that the Chinese regime is sitting atop a volcano of mass social unrest. But these statistics can also reaffirm the foresight and wisdom of Hu Jintao, especially his recent policy initiatives that place emphasis on social justice rather than GDP growth. The occurrence of these mass protests could actually consolidate, rather than weaken, Hu’s power in the Chinese political establishment. Although Hu’s populist policy shift seems to be timely and necessary, it may lead to a situation in which the public demand for government accountability undermines the stability of the country. Under this circumstance, Hu’s strategy is to localize the social unrests and blame local leaders. This strategy is particularly evident in the case of Guangdong, which recently experienced some major public protests. An analysis of the formation of the current Chinese provincial leadership, including the backgrounds of 616 senior provincial leaders in the country, reveals both the validity and limitations of this strategy.

The ever-growing number of social protests in China has attracted a great deal of attention from those who study Chinese politics.1 Any comprehensive assessment of the political and socioeconomic conditions in present-day China has usually—and rightly so—cited Chinese official statistics on “mass incidents.” The annual number of these mass incidents in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), including protests, riots and group petitioning, rose from 58,000 in 2003 to 74,000 in 2004, and to 87,000 in 2005— almost 240 incidents per day!
These protests were often sparked by local official misdeeds such as uncompensated land seizures, poor response to industrial accidents, arbitrary taxes, and failure to pay wages. The frequency and number of deaths caused by coal mine accidents in the country, for example, were shamefully astonishing. Despite the recent shutdown of a large number of mines by the central government, in 2005 China’s coal-mining industry still suffered 3,341 accidents, which resulted in 5,986 deaths.2 Not surprisingly, these alarming statistics have led some China analysts to conclude that the current Chinese regime is sitting atop a volcano of mass social unrest.3
The issue here is not whether the Chinese government has been beset by mass disturbances and public grievances; it has, of course. The real question is whether thenew administration under the leadership of President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao will be able to prevent the country from spinning out of control. Two unusual phenomena have occurred since Hu and Wen assumed the top leadership posts in the spring of 2003. These two developments are extraordinarily important, but have been largely overlooked by overseas China analysts.
The Crisis Mode and the Need for a Policy Shift
The first development relates to the release of these statistics and the resulting crisis mode (weiji yishi). Hu and Wen intend to show both the Chinese public and the political establishment that there exists an urgent need for a major policy shift. It is crucial to note that all of these incidents and statistics made headlines in the Chinese official media during the past two or three years. Issues of governmental accountability, economic equality, and social justice have recently dominated political and intellectual discourse in the country. This was inconceivable only a few years ago when some of these statistics would have been classified as “state secrets.”
In direct contrast to his predecessor, Jiang Zemin, who was more interested in demonstrating achievements than admitting problems, Hu Jintao is willing to address challenging topics. More importantly, Hu has already changed China’s course of development in three significant ways: from obsession with GDP growth to greater concern about social justice; from the single-minded emphasis on coastal development to a more balanced regional development strategy;4 and from a policy in favor of entrepreneurs and other elites to a populist approach that protects the interests of farmers, migrant workers, the urban unemployed, and other vulnerable social groups.

These policy shifts are not just lip service. They have already brought about some important progress. For example, one can reasonably argue that Hu and Wen, more than any other leaders in contemporary China, are implementing the so-called western development strategy (xibu kaifa zhanlue) effectively. During the past five years, 60 major construction projects have been undertaken in the western region with a total investment of 850 billion yuan (US$105.7 billion).5 Additionally, a new industrial renovation project in Chongqing will have a fixed asset investment of 350 billion yuan (US$43.5 billion) in the next five years.6 Meanwhile, the so-called “northeastern rejuvenation” (dongbei zhenxin) and the “take-off of the central provinces” (zhongyuan jueqi), with direct input from Premier Wen, have also made impressive strides.7
During the past few years, Hu and Wen have taken many popular actions: reducing the tax burden on farmers, abolishing discriminatory regulations against migrants, ordering business firms and local governments to pay their debts to migrant workers, restricting land lease for commercial and industrial uses, shaking hands with AIDS patients, visiting the families of coal mine explosion victims, and launching a nationwide donation campaign to help those in need.8 These policy changes and public gestures by Hu and Wen suggest that current top Chinese leaders are not only aware of the tensions and problems confronting the country, but also are willing to respond to them in a timely, and sometimes proactive, fashion.
To a certain extent, the large number of social protests occurring in China today reaffirms the foresight and wisdom of the new leadership, especially its sound policy shift. In an interesting way, the occurrence of these mass protects could actually consolidate, rather than undermine, Hu and Wen’s power in the Chinese political establishment. This, of course, does not mean that the Hu-Wen leadership is interested in enhancing social tensions in the country. On the contrary, their basic strategy is to promote a “harmonious society.” In their judgment, the Chinese public awareness of the frequency of mass unrest and the potential for a national crisis actually highlights the pressing need for social stability in this rapidly changing country.
Localization of Social Protests and the Blame Game
The second interesting new phenomenon in the Hu era is that a majority, if not all, of these mass protests were made against local officials, government agencies, or business firms rather than the central government. During the past few years, there has been an absence of unified nationwide protests against the central authorities.9 This does not mean that the country has been immune from major crises on a national scale. In the spring of 2003, for example, China experienced a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, a devastating health crisis that paralyzed the urban life and economic state of the country for several months. The regime survived this “China’s Chernobyl” largely because new top leaders like Hu, Wen, and Vice Premier Wu Yi effectively took charge and confronted the challenge.
It is not a coincidence that protesters often state that their petitions are very much in line with Hu and Wen’s appeal for social justice and governmental accountability. The Chinese public, including public intellectuals, believe that the new national leadership has made an important policy shift to improve the lives of weaker social groups.10 In the eyes of the public, mass protests against local officials are well justified because these local officials refused to implement policy changes made in Zhongnanhai. In Heilongjiang’s Jixi City, for example, the municipal government delayed payment to a construction company for years; consequently, migrant workers employed by the company did not receive their wages. When Premier Wen learned of the situation in Jixi, he requested that the municipal government solve the problem immediately. However, the local officials sent a false report to the State Council, claiming the issue was resolved even though migrant workers remained unpaid. Only after both the Jixi protests and Wen’s request were widely reported by the Chinese media did the municipal government begin to pay migrant workers.11 A recent article published in China Youth Daily used the term “policies decided at Zhongnanhai not making it out of Zhongnanhai” to characterize this prevalent phenomenon of local resistance to the directives of the central government.12
In recent years, the Chinese public, especially vulnerable social groups, seem to hold the assumption that the “bad local officials” often refuse to carry out the right policies of the “good national leaders.” Apparently due to this assumption, mass protests often occur shortly after top leaders visit a region; protesters frequently demand the implementation of the socioeconomic policies initiated by the central government.13 To a great extent, the increasing number of protests in China today can be seen as a result of the growing public consciousness about protecting the rights and interests of vulnerable social groups. Additionally, a multitude of Chinese lawyers who devote their careers to protecting the interests of such groups have recently emerged in the country. They have earned themselves a new Chinese name, “the lawyers of human rights protection” (weiquan lushi).14
Chinese journalists have also become increasingly bold in revealing various economic, sociopolitical, and environmental problems in the country. To a certain extent, the Chinese central authorities encourage the official media to serve as a watchdog over various lower levels of governments. For over a decade, local officials have been anxious when reporters from China’s leading investigative television news programs such as Focus (Jiaodian fangtan) visited their localities. Many local leaders were fired because the media revealed either serious problems in their jurisdiction or outrageous wrongdoings by the officials themselves.
The Hu-Wen leadership’s appeal for transparency of information has provided an opportunity for liberal Chinese journalists to search for real progress in media freedom throughout the country. The Chinese regime under Hu Jintao is apparently not ready to lift the ban on freedom of the press just yet. In recent years, several editors of newspapers and magazines have been fired, their media outlets banned, and several journalists have been jailed.15 But at the same time, some Chinese scholars and journalists such as Jiao Guobiao, a journalism professor at Beijing University, and Li Datong, an editor of China Youth Daily, continue to voice their dissent, and have even sued the top officials of the Propaganda Department of the CCP Central Committee.16
An interesting recent phenomenon in the Chinese media is that some media outlets based in one city or province are often inclined to report the problems and misconducts of leaders in other cities or provinces. Some local officials have banned the media’s negative coverage of their own jurisdiction. But meanwhile, they have actually encouraged the practice of “cross-region media supervision” (meiti yidi jiandu). It isin their interest to have their potential rivals in other regions being criticized by the media, because any damage to their potential rivals’ career could enhance their own chance for promotion. This practice evidently damaged the interests of too many provincial leaders. In the fall of 2005, the authorities of 17 provinces, including Hebei and Guangdong, jointly submitted a petition to the central government, asking to ban the “cross-region media supervision.”17
The dilemma for Hu and his colleagues in the central leadership is that their populist policy shift seems to be timely and necessary on the one hand, but on the other hand it can lead to public demand for social justice, economic equality, and government accountability, all of which can undermine the political stability of the regime. Because of this dilemma, Hu’s strategy has been to localize the social unrest. For the sake of maintaining the vital national interest of political stability, local governments should assume responsibility and accountability for the problems in their jurisdictions. If there is social unrest or other crises, local leaders will be blamed. One may call this strategy of the Chinese central leadership “think national, blame local.”
An important component of this scheme is the new regulations on complaint letters and petition visits that were adopted by the State Council in May 2005. The new regulations emphasize “territorial jurisdiction” and the “responsibility of the departments in charge.”18 Chinese citizens who have complaints and petitions are not encouraged to come to the central government in Beijing. Instead, they are told to go through a step-bystep procedure, submitting their complaints and petitions to the appropriate local government level. In the words of an official of the State Letters and Visits Bureau, the new regulations aim to not only protect “the lawful rights of people with legitimate complaints,” but also to make “local authorities more accountable.”19 This new procedure will place political pressure on local leaders while enabling the central leadership to avoid blame.
The central leadership’s “blame game” has also been facilitated by an allocation of non-economic quotas for provincial governments. In February 2006, Li Yizhong, chair of the State Administration of Work Safety, announced that in order to reduce the number of coal mine explosions and other industrial incidents in the country, the central government would evaluate the performance of provincial governments not only by economic growth, but by four additional indicators: the industrial death rate per 100 million yuan of the GDP, the death rate of work accidents per 100,000 employees in commercial businesses, the death rate per 10,000 automobiles, and the death rate per one million tons produced by coal mines.20
The populist approach of the Hu-Wen leadership has generated or reinforced the public assumption that social protests occurred because local leaders did not comply with the policies of the central government, some officials were notoriously corrupt, and/or these local bosses were incompetent. In the eyes of many people in China, “blaming local” is well justified. Some local governments have constantly resisted the directives of the central government and violated national laws and regulations.
This phenomenon of local resistance to the central authorities is certainly not new to China. The Chinese saying, “The mountain is high and the Emperor is far away,” vividly epitomizes this enduring Chinese trend of local administration. However, the abuse of power by local officials for economic gain has increased during China’s market transition, especially since the mid-1990s when the land lease for commercial and industrial uses spread throughout the country.
A “Wicked Coalition” between Real Estate Firms and Local Governments
It has been widely reported in the Chinese media that business interest groups have routinely bribed local officials and formed a “wicked coalition” (hei tongmeng) with local governments.21 Some Chinese observers believe that various players associated with the property development have emerged as one of the most powerful interest groups in present-day China.22 According to Sun Liping, a sociology professor at Qinghua University, the real estate interest group has accumulated tremendous economic and social capital during the past decade.23 Ever since the real estate bubble in Hainan in the early 1990s, this interest group has consistently attempted to influence governmental policy and public opinion. The group includes not only property developers, real estate agents, bankers, and housing market speculators, but also some local officials and public intellectuals (economists and journalists) who behave or speak in the interest of that group.

24
This explains why the central government’s macroeconomic control policy (hongguan tiaokong) has failed to achieve its intended objectives. A survey of 200 Chinese officials and scholars conducted in 2005 showed that 50 percent believed that China’s socioeconomic reforms have been constrained by “some elite groups with vested economic interests” (jide liyi jituan).25 In the first 10 months of 2005, for example, the real estate sector remained overheated with a 20% increase in the rate of investment despite the central government’s repeated call for cooling investment in this area.26 In the same year, the State Council sent four inspection teams to eight provinces and cities to evaluate the implementation of the central government’s macroeconomic control policy in the real estate sector. According to the Chinese media, most of these provincial and municipal governments did nothing but organize study sessions of the State Council’s policy initiatives.27
In 2004, the central government ordered a reduction in land leases for commercial and industrial uses as well as a reduction in the number of special economic zones that were particularly favorable to land leases. As a result, a total of 4,735 special economic zones were abolished, reducing by 70.2 percent the total number of special economic zones in the country.28 But some local officials violated the orders and regulations of the central government pertaining to land leases. According to one Chinese study conducted in 2004, about 80 percent of illegal land use cases were attributed to the wrongdoings of local governments.29 According to an official of the Ministry of Land Resources, about 50 percent of commercial land lease cases (xieyi churang tudi) contracted by the Beijing municipal government and business firms in 2003 were deemed violations of the central government regulations.30
Not surprisingly, a large number of corruption cases are related to land leases and real estate development. For example, among the 13 total provincial and ministerial level leaders who were arrested in 2003, 11 were primarily accused of illegal pursuits in landrelated decisions.31 Meanwhile, a large portion of mass protests directly resulted from inappropriate compensation for land confiscations and other disputes associated with commercial and industrial land use. According to a recent study by the Institute of Rural Development of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, two-thirds of peasant protests since 2004 were caused by local officials’ misdeeds in the handling of land leases.32
It is of course unfair to assume that the local governments’ enthusiasm for property development in their localities is purely driven by the personal interests of corrupt officials. Conflicting views regarding the issue of land leases between the central authorities and local governments are largely a product of asymmetrical priorities and concerns. As a Chinese analyst recently asserted, “the interests of the local governments are not aligned with [those of] the central government.”33 At present, the central government is apparently more concerned about the “overheat” of the Chinese economy, especially the financial bubble of real estate in coastal cities. In contrast, local governments are more worried about the “coldness” in local investment, foreign trade, consumption, and domestic demand—this is what Zhao Xiao, a scholar at the Research Center of the Chinese Economy of Beijing University, calls the “four coldnesses,” which can be devastating for local economies.34
Since 1994, China has adopted a tax-sharing system (fenshuizhi) in which tax revenue is divided by both the central and local governments. This tax-sharing system is supposed to better define fiscal relations between the central and local governments, promote market competition among various players, stabilize the regular income of the local authorities, and provide an incentive for local governments to collect taxes.35 As a result of this taxation reform, 65 percent of state expenditure now comes from local governments. The economic status of China’s provinces differs enormously from one to the next. Generally, local governments, especially at their lower levels, have been delegated more obligations and responsibilities and less power in allocating economic resources than in the early years of the reform era.
The heavy financial burden on local governments has inevitably driven local leaders to place priority on GDP growth and other methods of creating revenue. The best short cut for local governments to make up for this fiscal deficiency, as some Chinese scholars observe, is to sell or lease land.36 Although local governments’ reservations about the macroeconomic control policy and other regulations adopted by the Hu-Wen leadership may be valid, top local officials are expected to demonstrate their ability to handle various kinds of crises on their own turf. The central authorities’ strategy of “blaming local,” the growing public awareness of rights and interests, and the increasing transparency of media coverage of disasters (both natural and man-made) all place the local leaders on the spot.
Troubled Guangdong in the Spotlight: Blaming Zheng Dejiang?
Perhaps the most noticeable case of the growing central-provincial tension is Guangdong under the leadership of Zhang Dejiang. Zhang, a native of Liaoning, was a protégé of Jiang Zemin and is currently a member of the 25-member Politburo. Born in 1946, he worked as a “sent-down youth” in the countryside of Wangqing County in Jilin Province between 1968 and 1970. He joined the CCP in 1971 and attended Yanbian University to study the Korean language in the early 1970s. After graduation he remained at the university as a party official. In 1978, Zhang was sent by the Chinese government to study in the economics department at Kim Il Sung University in North Korea. He returned to China in 1980 and served as vice president of Yanbian University. He later served as deputy party secretary of Yanji City, Jilin from 1983 to 1986, and vice minister of social welfare in the central government from 1986 to 1990.
According to some China analysts, Zhang Dejiang made a very favorable impression on Jiang Zemin when Zhang escorted him on a visit to North Korea in 1990.37 Two years later, at the age of 44, Zhang became an alternate member of the CCP Central Committee. Since the early 1990s, he has served as the party boss in three provinces, first in Jilin, then Zhejiang, and now Guangdong. As the second youngest member of the current Politburo, Zhang seems poised to play an even more important role in the years to come, especially counterbalancing the growing power of Hu Jintao. However, Zhang’s poor performance in Guangdong may jeopardize his chance for a membership in the standing committee of the next Politburo.
Ever since he assumed the post of Guangdong party secretary in the fall of 2002, what was once the wealthiest province in the country and the frontier of China’s economic reform has turned into a disaster area. When SARS erupted in Guangdong in the fall of 2002, Zhang and his colleagues in the Guangdong government denied its occurrence and thereby enabled the epidemic to spread throughout the public. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), most of the 8,422 cases and 916 deaths in 29 countries (excluding those in the PRC) can be traced to one infected Guangdong doctor who traveled to Hong Kong.38
Additionally, several major episodes of social unrest and contentious events in Guangdong received national or international attention during the past four years. The police brutality that led to the death of a migrant worker named Sun Zhigang in Guangzhou in the spring of 2003 caused outrage among China’s legal scholars and its public. As a result, the State Council abolished the urban detention regulations that discriminated against migrants.
Prior to Zhang’s 2002 arrival in Guangdong, the province hosted several of the most liberal and outspoken newspapers in the country, including the famous Southern Metropolis Daily, which later courageously broke the SARS cover-up in Guangdong and the police brutality case of Sun Zhigang. Four years later, these outstanding editors and journalists were either in jail or moved elsewhere. Under Zhang Dejiang’s watch, the newspaper’s editor-in-chief, Cheng Yizhong, and its general manager, Yu Huafeng, were arrested on corruption charges. Guangdong Province has become notorious for governmental crackdown on media freedom.
In 2005, Guangdong’s disasters frequently made headlines in China and/or abroad. Examples include two coal mine explosions in Meizhou that killed 139 miners, and an excessive discharge of hazardous chemicals from a state firm that contaminated the Beijiang River. The public was not promptly informed about the water contamination. Most seriously, peasant protests in Taishi Village in Guangzhou and Dongzhou Village in Shanwei resulted in violent conflicts between armed police and villagers. Local government officials sent hundreds of armed police to crack down on protesters during the Dongzhou riot. The police fired at the protesters and killed at least three people, injuring at least eight others.39
All these incidents and crises apparently damaged the public image of the Guangdong government, especially that of party boss Zhang Dejiang. It was widely reported in the Hong Kong and overseas media that Zhang admitted his mistakes and took responsibility in his report on the shootings of the Dongzhou riot and other incidents in Guangdong at a recent Politburo meeting.40 In addition, Zhang made a well-publicized speech in a provincial party committee meeting in January 2006, outlining the so-called three red lines.41 According to Zhang, three types of wrongdoing in the acquisition of rural land for construction are usually the triggering factors for social unrests. He requested that no construction could start if: it has not completely fulfilled the central government’s regulation, it has not reached an agreement with peasants on their compensation, or the compensation has not been delivered to the peasants. Any officials who crossed any one of these “three red lines” should be fired, according to Zhang.
Despite these policy prescriptions, social unrest and riots continued to occur in Guangdong in 2006. As an example, in early February, several hundred residents of two opposing villages in Zhanjiang used homemade guns and other weapons to fight against each other because of a land dispute. The local government sent one hundred armed police to crack down on the violent riot. Twenty-nine villagers were reportedly injured.42 According to some Hong Kong and overseas media sources, the frequency of the disasters in the province has led people in Guangdong to engage in a “campaign to cast out Zhang.”43 They argued that lower-level local officials as well as provincial chief Zhang should be held responsible and accountable for these incidents.
Some other Hong Kong–based Chinese newspapers, however, reported that it was unfair to place all the blame on Zhang’s shoulders. According to these newspapers, socioeconomic development in Guangdong under the leadership of Zhang has been very much in line with the policies of the central government. During his visits to Guangdong in 2004 and 2005, Hu Jintao endorsed both the development plan of Guangdong and the performance of Zhang.44 Although it is difficult to verify these rumors and speculations, conflicting reports highlight the tensions between various political players who have a stake in this important province. The complicated nature of central-provincial relations in the case of Guangdong has further clouded the situation.
Politics and Leadership in Guangdong: Past and Present
Guangdong Province has long been known for its demands for autonomy, which are based on its strong economic status and dialectic distinction. During the Nationalist era, Guangdong produced a significant number of political and military elites. However, since the founding of the PRC, there have been only a handful of national leaders who are native Cantonese. Furthermore, to prevent the formation of a “Cantonese separatist movement,” the central government often appointed non-Cantonese leaders to head the province. If a Cantonese leader became too powerful, the central authorities likely “promoted” that leader to the central government in order to constrain local power. For instance, Ye Xuanping, son of the late marshal Ye Jianying, built a solid power base in Guangdong when he served as the party boss in the 1980s. The growing economic and cultural autonomy of Guangdong made the central authorities nervous. After some negotiation, the central authorities promoted Ye to senior vice chair of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference.
It was also reported that in preliminary meetings before the 15th Party Congress in 1997, central authorities intended to replace the sitting party secretary Xie Fei, a Cantonese native, with a non-Cantonese Politburo member as the new party secretary of Guangdong. Local officials in Guangdong rejected that proposal. They insisted that top officials in Guangdong should be Cantonese even if they lost their representation in the Politburo.45 As a result of their stand, Xie Fei has remained in both Guangdong and the Politburo. It took almost a year for local officials to accept Li Changchun, a native of Liaoning and a Politburo member. Their eventual acceptance was largely the result of pressure from the central authorities as well as negotiation between the local and central governments. While serving as provincial leaders in Guangdong, Li Changchun and other non-Cantonese officials such as Wang Qishan (then executive vice governor of Guangdong), repeatedly claimed that they would continue to rely on local officials rather than bringing a large group of leaders from other regions to replace them.46
The fact that Zhang’s predecessor Li Changchun later moved to Beijing where he became a standing committee member of the Politburo seems to suggest that Zhang might also have a chance for further promotion. This, however, depends on whether Zhang will be able to control the province as effectively as his predecessor did.47 One of the most important tasks for Zhang as party boss of Guangdong, as Jiang Zemin told him bluntly, was to prevent Cantonese localism.48 The factional politics in the provincial leadership of Guangdong at present are arguably far more complicated than in the Li Changchun era. This further undermines Zhang’s power and authority in running the province.
Table 1 shows the backgrounds of the 24 most important provincial leaders currently in Guangdong. They include 1) all the Guangdong-based leaders who also hold membership on the 16th Central Committee of the CCP or the 16th Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CMDI), 2) all the standing members of the Guangdong provincial party committee, and 3) all vice governors. Table 1 demonstrates that all of them were appointed to their current positions within the last eight years, and 19 (79 percent) of them were appointed after 2002. All of these leaders are now between 50 and 61 years old.
Of these 24 leaders, 12 are native Cantonese, while four others began to work in Guangdong over three decades ago and can thus be considered locals (among them Head of Propaganda Department Zhu Xiaodan and Vice Governor You Ningfeng). Some of the remaining eight provincial leaders who were transferred from elsewhere have worked in the province for over a decade. As an example, Shenzhen Party Secretary Li Hongzhong, a native of Shandong who grew up in Liaoning, began to serve as a vice mayor of Huizhou, Guangdong, in 1988. Similarly, Chair of Guangdong Provincial Congress Huang Liman, a native of Liaoning, started to work as deputy chief of staff of the Shenzhen Party Committee in 1992.
Li, China Leadership Monitor, No. 17

Table 1
Backgrounds of the Provincial Leaders of Guangdong (as of February 2006)

Name
Current Position
Since
Born
Birthplace
Previous Position
16th CCM
Local/Transfer
Factional Network
Zhang Dejiang Huang Huahua Wang Huayuan Ou Guangyuan Liu Yupu Cai Dongshi Huang Liman Chen Shaoji Zhong Yangsheng Huang Longyun Li Hongzhong Hu Zejun Liang Guoju Lin Shusen Zhu Xiaodan Xiao Zhiheng Xin Rongguo Tang Bingquan Xu Deli You Ningfeng Li Ronggen Xie Qianghua Lei Yulan Song Hai
Party Secretary Governor Disciplinary Sec. Dep. Party Sec. Dep. Party Sec. Dep. Party Sec. Chair, Prov. Congress Chair, Prov. PPCC Exec. Vice Governor Foshan Party Sec. Shenzhen Party Sec, Head, Org. Dept. Head, Pub. Security Bur. Guangzhou Party Sec. Head, Propaganda Dept. Chief of staff, Party Com. Commander, Military Dist. Exe. Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor
2002 2003 2002 2002 2004 2004 2005 2004 2003 2002 2005 2004 2000 2002 2004 2001 2005 2003 1998 2000 2001 2002 2003 2003
1946 1946 1948 1948 1949 1947 1945 1945 1948 1951 1956 1955 1947 1946 1953 1953 ? 1949 1945 1945 1950 1950 1952 1951


Chute du Mur de Berlin/25e: Le Mur n’est pas tombé à Berlin (We were prepared for everything but not for candles and prayers)

9 novembre, 2014
https://da8y7eku82cdf.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/dgap_article_pictures/pictures/460x259/26101_460x259.jpg
http://www.lcr-lagauche.be/cm/images/solidarnosc.jpg
Hungarian and Austrian foreign ministers Gyula Horn and Alois Mock cut the 'Iron Curtain' on the Hungarian-Austrian border (May 2, 1989)
Bien entendu nous n’allons rien faire. Claude Cheysson (ministre français des relations extérieures, 15.12.81)
Nous étions préparés à tout, mais pas aux bougies ni aux prières. Horst Sindermann (membre du bureau politique du parti communiste est-allemand)
C’était l’envol de notre révolution pacifique, un véritable miracle. Ce jour-là, j’ai compris que tout allait changer, parce que le courage s’était installé de notre côté. Christian Führer (pasteur de Leipzig)
C’était des originaux, des marginaux. Angela Merkel
Une question lancinante pèse toutefois sur cette première partie de sa vie. Elle qui s’est posée par la suite en admiratrice de la liberté, pourquoi n’a-t-elle pas pris part aux mouvements civiques, y compris dans les semaines qui ont précédé la chute du Mur ? A l’époque, l’issue des manifestations était certes encore incertaine, et y participer comportait des risques. Mais elle aurait pu être tentée de partager avec d’autres sa défiance pour le système et son espoir d’un changement ? D’abord, elle ne partage pas grand-chose avec ces manifestants. « C’était des originaux, des marginaux. » Elle était un docteur en sciences physiques jouissant de la reconnaissance de l’institution. « Elle n’avait rien a faire avec eux », explique l’ancien Premier ministre est-allemand Lothar de Maiziere. Ensuite, la protestation venait généralement de personnes qui pensaient le régime est-allemand réformable et continuaient à croire dans une troisième voie entre socialiste et capitalisme. Or elle est convaincue du contraire. Enfin, on peut aussi penser qu’elle doute des vertus de l’activisme politique. La chute du Mur est un effet du système, une autodestruction plus qu’une victoire des opposants. Florence Autret
Tout au long du printemps et de l’été 1989, des ressortissants de RDA étaient, comme chaque année, venus passer leurs vacances en Hongrie (où ils pouvaient retrouver, le temps des vacances, leurs proches de RfA). A cette différence près que cette année, l’immense majorité d’entre eux refusa de rejoindre le pays où le régime d’Honecker se faisait de plus en plus dur. Résultat: plusieurs dizaines de milliers de citoyens de RDA se retrouvaient en Hongrie désoeuvrés et sans moyens financiers, donc à la charge de l’État hongrois. Budapest venait de signer la convention de Genève sur le droit d’asile pour défendre les Hongrois de Roumanie réfugiés en Hongrie. Le gouvernement hongrois s’est alors trouvé devant un dilemme: que faire de ces Allemands de l’Est qu’il n’était bien sûr pas question de renvoyer? Comment concilier les engagements de la Convention de Genève sur le Droit d’asile et les obligations du Pacte de Varsovie ? Par ailleurs, sur un plan purement technique, les installations du rideau de fer avaient considérablement vieilli et étaient à refaire pour la somme de… 50 millions de dollars. C’est alors que, sur la demande du gouvernement hongrois, une rencontre secrète avec Helmut Kohl et son ministre Genscher eut lieu le 25 août au château de Gilnitz, près de Bonn. Y étaient seuls présents: les deux chefs de gouvernement, leurs ministres des Affaires étrangères (Genscher et Horn) et leurs ambassadeurs. Les Hongrois font alors part à Helmut Kohl du dilemme auquel ils sont confrontés avec le sort des ces près de 80 000 Allemands de l’Est. Considérant le problème comme germano-allemand, ils interrogent Kohl sur sa réaction éventuelle s’ils les laissent sortir. Ému, Kohl les remercie, assure qu il les acceuillera et demande à ses interlocuteurs hongrois ce qu’ils attendent de lui en échange. Les Hongrois, prudents, renoncent à tout marchandage direct, de peur de compromettre le projet. Et par principe, le Premier ministre hongrois se refuse à monnayer le passage à l’Ouest de ces réfugiés, comme – dit-il – l’avait fait sans scrupules Ceaucescu en Roumanie avec ses ressortissants juifs et saxons. Toutefois, face à une probable pénurie en combustibles, les Hongrois obtiennent de Kohl une importante fourniture de charbon. Au préalable, une consultation avait eu lieu en mars pour tâter Gorbatchev sur leurs intentions d’ouvrir le parlement à un système pluraliste et d’ouvrir l’économie. Gorbatchev avait acquiescé (mais il n’avait pas encore été ouvertement question d’ouvrir la frontière). Sur le principe général, Gorbatchev déclarait ne pas vouloir se mêler des affaires hongroises (et allemandes), s’en tenant à la promesse laconique suivante: “Soyez assuré que, tant que je serai en poste, 56 ne se renouvellera pas”. Par contre, quant au désengagement de la présence militaire russe, Gorbatchev incita ses partenaires à la patience pour ne pas affaiblir sa position lors de négociations – alors en cours – sur le désarmement. Fait peu connu, c’est dès le 3 mars. soit six mois avant son ouverture officielle que Miklós Németh ordonna le démantèlement du rideau de fer. Mais sans trop de précipitation pour ne rien compromettre en alertant trop rapidement l’opinion, quitte à laisser bien en vue de la presse un tronçon de frontière en l’état. La suite des événements, nous la connaissons. Pierre Waline 
The initial gathering took place in 1981 when Pastor Führer invited people with concerns about peace and the arms race to meet at the Church late in the evening (possibly to avoid Stasi attention).  He expected maybe ten or so people to come and let off some steam. But to his astonishment ten times that number showed up. They were mostly young, many of them dissidents who were not getting along with the Communist government. (…) From this first event Führer would eventually arrange what he called ‘peace prayers’ to meet every Monday evening at 5 p.m. to pray for peace in both local and international situations of conflict. Later these prayers were sometimes followed by the people walking into the streets carrying candles to witness for peace and freedom. These were the largest and also the most peaceful of any such demonstrations in the GDR. A particular moment of tension occurred in May 1989 following a blatantly fraudulent election in which the Communist party claimed to have received 98% of the votes cast. The public was outraged at such a flagrant deception.  Calls for reform grew louder.  The police reacted by blocking all driveways to the church, seeking to shot down the Monday prayer meetings, which they determined had become a cover for political insurrection. Nevertheless the crowds only increased. On October 7, the GDR was due to celebrate its 40th anniversary. President Gorbachev, the author of the movement for openness and Perestroika, attended from the Soviet Union. Naturally the government did not want the occasion to be used for any kind of public expression of discontent. In Leipzig, for ten long hours police battered and bullied defenseless demonstrators who made no attempt to fight back. Many were taken away in police vehicles. In this heightened atmosphere, just two days later, Monday 9 October, the peace prayers were to be held.  The government warned protesters that any further demonstrations would not be tolerated. All day long, Führer told us,  the police and military tried to intimidate them with a hideous show of force. Schools and shops in the city were shut down. Roadblocks were built. The police had guns loaded with live ammunition. Soldiers with tanks were mobilized and surrounded the central area. Extra beds and blood plasma had been assembled in the Leipzig hospitals. Rumors from many reliable sources circulated that the government intended to use the “Chinese Solution” and repeat the massacre of Tienanmen Square in Beijing. To neutralize and perhaps disrupt the prayer meeting, 1ooo party members and Stasi went early on to the church. 600 of them filled up the nave by 2 p.m. But,as Führer described it in the brochure: They had a job to perform. What had not been considered was the fact that these people were exposed to the word, the gospel and its impact!   I was always glad the the Stasi agents heard the Beatitudes from the Sermon on the Mount every Monday. Where else would they hear these? So the stage was set, the actors assembled for the climatic Monday prayer service. Huge numbers came out to pray, not only at the Nikolai Church but at other churches throughout the city, which had joined the peace prayers. During the service, the atmosphere and the prayers were serenely calm. As he prepared to send the people out into the streets, Pastor Führer made a final plea to the congregation to refrain from any form of violence or provocation. The Sermon on the Mount was again read aloud. As the doors opened for the worshipers to depart, something unforgettable happened. The 2000 people leaving the sanctuary were welcomed by tens of thousands waiting outside with candles in their hands. That night an estimated 70,000 people marched around the main city streets. Though the police and the military were everywhere, Pastor Führer said: Our fear was not as big as our faith … Two hands are needed to carry a candle and to protect it from extinguishing. So you cannot carry stones or clubs at the same time. As the good pastor noted:  There were thousands in the churches. Hundreds of thousands in the streets around the city centre. But not a single shattered window. This was the incredible witness to the power of non-violence. … It was an evening in the spirit of our Lord Jesus for there were no winners and no defeated. Nobody triumphed over the other, nobody lost his face. There was just a tremendous feeling of relief. It was later reported that Horst Sindemann, a serving member of the Central Committee of the GDR, summed up both the extensive preparations of the authorities as well as their inability to know how to respond to the events of that evening: We had planned everything. We were prepared for everything. But not for candles and prayers. A month later the Berlin Wall was breached, and the whole Communist empire crumbled away. Roger Newell
Contrary to popular lore, the Berlin Wall did not fall on November 9, 1989. Nor did it fall in Berlin. It fell on October 9, some 120 miles away in Leipzig. First, civil courage – a rare quality in German history – had to dissolve the four-decade-old mental wall of East German fear. Only thereafter could the cement wall collapse in Berlin. Elizabeth Pond

Attention: un mur peut en cacher un autre !

En ce 9 novembre du 25e anniversaire de la chute du mur de Berlin (pardon: du « mur de protection antifasciste ») …

9 novembre qui avait vu aussi en 1918 l’abdication de Guillaume II puis cinq ans plus tard le putsch de la Brasserie d’un certain Hitler et quinze ans après, juste avant les festivités du Luthertag, les pogroms de la Nuit de Cristal

Qui se souvient comme le rappelait un article du Christian Monitor lors du 20e anniversaire il y a cinq ans …

Que ce n’est ni le 9 novembre ni même à Berlin que tomba le mur dit de Berlin …

Mais un mois plus tôt et à Leipzig à 200 km de là ?

Et qui se souvient que cette première révolution pacifique de l’histoire allemande fut en fait aussi une révolution protestante ?

Partie, avec notamment un pasteur protestant de Leipzig justement, le pasteur Christian Führer (dont on attend toujours, alors qu’il est décédé en juin dernier, la page dans le Wikipedia français) …

Qui, reprenant après Gandhi et King et avec ses Manifestations du lundi, le message non-violent du Christ  …

Avait progressivement réussi à reconstituer, près de 500 ans après les fameuses 95 thèses de Luther, le courage civique nécessaire …

Pour profiter, après les Polonais et les Hongrois, du flottement provoqué par la faillite du système soviétique et abattre enfin le mur de peur élevé par 40 ans de communisme et une dizaine d’années de nazisme ?

The Berlin Wall: what really made it fall
Extraordinary civil courage by the people of Leipzig on Oct. 9 first dissolved a crucial mental wall.
Elizabeth Pond
Christian Science Monotor
October 8, 2009

Contrary to popular lore, the Berlin Wall did not fall on November 9, 1989. Nor did it fall in Berlin. It fell on October 9, some 120 miles away in Leipzig. First, civil courage – a rare quality in German history – had to dissolve the four-decade-old mental wall of East German fear. Only thereafter could the cement wall collapse in Berlin. Here is how it happened.

When Valentine Kosch set out to join the Monday peace march in Leipzig on October 9, she expected to be shot by the massed East German security forces. She explained to her 6- and 3-year-old daughters that she was going to take a walk with friends so that teachers would be nicer to their pupils – an accurate enough description in her case. And she told her husband that if she did not return by 10 p.m., he should take their girls, move to Dresden, and start a new life there, where the two sisters would not be branded as children of an enemy of the state.

Like most East Germans in the decades after Soviet tanks suppressed the East Berlin workers’ uprising in 1953, Kosch was apolitical. Rather than fighting the constraints of the Communist system, she adapted to them, the better to shape her private sphere with a minimum of outside interference.

However, a few years earlier she had spontaneously introduced Montessori methods in the class she taught in the city school system. For this breach of the rules she had been demoted, in effect, to a classroom for special-needs children. She felt stifled by the rigidity of the educational bureaucracy. She was fed up.

The weekly peace vigils that Kosch joined had begun eight years earlier at the Nikolai Church in the medieval town center. It was just around the corner from the St. Thomas Church where Johann Sebastian Bach was once cantor, and where Martin Luther introduced the Protestant Reformation to Leipzig in 1539. The Monday peace prayers followed a joint call by young East and West German theologians for removal from German soil of both NATO and (more discreetly, if more daringly) Soviet nuclear weapons.

Christian Führer, one of the originators of the appeal, was then the new pastor at the Nikolai Church. He conceived of his mission as succoring all who came to him in need, whether believers or non-believers. He is still revered today as the unpretentious denim-jacketed hero of the 1989 transformation, one of those clerics who showed compassion for all, did not collaborate with the Stasi secret police, and conferred on the Protestant Church a moral authority that it alone possessed in the (East) German Democratic Republic (GDR).

Throughout the 1980s, the Nikolai peace vigils had attracted a loyal but tiny number of participants. In 1989 the ranks swelled exponentially as two separate strands of exasperation came together. The first movement consisted of modest reformers, like Kosch, who wanted to hold the GDR to its own constitution and laws and their provisions for fair elections and human rights. The second consisted of the growing number of East Germans who simply wanted to escape to the normality of West Germany’s casual freedom and opulence, in the wake of more than a hundred thousand compatriots who had in recent weeks abandoned country and possessions to flee west via Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland.

People in the two categories disdained each other, but Pastor Führer – while personally urging everyone to stay and build East Germany – opened the Nikolai haven to both persuasions. Indeed, he reconciled them to each other, in part through their common interest in his Monday updating of the list of those who shouted out their names as they were secretly hauled off to jail.

With our contemporary knowledge of the outcome, it is hard to recall just how much courage Kosch and her fellow marchers required 20 years ago to carry their candles on that disciplined hour-long walk around the old town, right past the Leipzig Stasi headquarters. At the time many in both East and West feared that although detente was blossoming in Europe, an anachronistic hard-line East German hierarchy could hang on for a long time (on the pattern, say, of North Korea today).

The Stasi – whose ranks maintained a much higher ratio in proportion to the population than Hitler’s Gestapo and SS ever enjoyed – still held tight control. And East German citizens still shared with the Bulgarians the reputation of being the most quiescent people in the Soviet bloc.

Moreover, there had been a nasty crackdown over the weekend. On October 7 and 8, security forces had detained several thousand demonstrators in Leipzig, Dresden, and East Berlin on the occasion of the GDR’s gala 40th anniversary. In Leipzig the watchdogs, tone-deaf to history, had even rehearsed plans to inter thousands of dissidents in new concentration camps. Hospitals had been stocked with extra blood plasma in preparation for a Monday-night clash, and Leipzigers knew it. The city’s security contingents, reinforced to 8,000 – only 2,000 short of the record turnout of 10,000 peace watchers the previous Monday – had been issued with live ammunition and ordered to use whatever means were required to suppress the “counterrevolution,” the most serious crime in the Communist books.

By all measures of the previous 36 years, this show of power should have sufficed to keep would-be marchers safely at home.

But what was the fallback if intimidation did not work this time? Throughout the day, as confrontation loomed, the Leipzig party leadership tried in vain to elicit new instructions from East Berlin party headquarters. Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra director Kurt Masur, theologian Peter Zimmermann, deputy city party secretary Roland Wötzel, and three others hammered out an urgent appeal for nonviolence, to be read in all the churches and broadcast on radio. Marchers braced themselves to hold each other back from any rash action or reaction.

At 6 p.m., the hour the Nikolai congregation was to leave the church and walk around the inner city ring, the top Leipzig party secretary made one last desperate phone call to East Berlin, to Egon Krenz, the deputy and heir apparent to veteran strongman Erich Honecker. Krenz had risen as high as he had by never sticking his neck out. This night was no exception. He equivocated and said he would have to consult the others.

After Leipzig party secretary Helmut Hackenberg hung up the phone, “a very, very long time passed,” said Wötzel later, recalling the eternity of the next few minutes. Then Hackenberg asked his deputies, “What do we do now?” One shot by a jumpy 18-year-old in the ill-trained factory militia, or one step too far by an angry marcher – or a Stasi provocation – could have triggered an explosion.

Under the circumstances, it was marginally less risky to nullify sacrosanct standing orders than to dare bloodshed that their superiors might later blame on them. The junior secretaries urged Hackenberg to disengage the security forces. He did so, by deploying them instead to guard official buildings (which were never under any threat). The Leipzig officials fully expected to be expelled from the party for taking such forbidden local initiative.

Yet their wariness about the new mood on the street was justified. Not only were the 10,000 of the previous week not scared away. Astonishingly, they were joined by 60,000 others who also cast aside their fear and walked past Stasi headquarters chanting, “Wir sind das Volk.” “We are the people.”

Germany’s first successful revolution in history was bloodless. Horst Sindermann, Speaker of the GDR rubber-stamp “parliament”, famously admitted later, “We were ready for everything – everything except candles and prayers.”

As Pastor Führer commented in an interview, reflecting on that night: “We were afraid day and night, but we had the courage of our convictions. The Bible had taught us the power of peaceful protest and this was the only weapon we had. … It still moves me today to recall that in a secular country, the masses condensed the Beatitudes in the Lord’s Sermon on the Mount into two words: No violence!”

Observant East Berliners and Eastern Europeans quickly realized that in Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev’s new era, if enough demonstrators turned out, the security forces would not shoot. Within weeks the East German, Czech, Bulgarian, and Romanian Communist leaders were all deposed.

“For the first time in my life,” confided a forty-something West German who had long been inured to the shame of the German failure to resist Hitler in the 1930s or to establish a republic in 1848, “I’m proud to be a German.”

ELIZABETH POND, a Berlin-based journalist, is the author of Beyond the Wall. Germany’s Road to Unification (Brookings).

Voir aussi:

Reflection on Pastor Christian Führer of the Nikolai Church in Leipzig
Roger Newell, George Fox University

Pastor Christian Führer of the Nikolai Church in Leipzig, the founding organizer of the famous peace prayers in the 1980s, died on 30 June, at the age of seventy-one. Not long ago, Professor Roger Newell of George Fox University, Newberg, Oregon took a party of students to visit sites of special significance in European Church history. One of their stops was in Leipzig, about which he reported as follows:

We were welcomed by the good Pastor who led us straight into the church, right up to the main altar, explaining that this was formerly reserved for the priests in centuries past, but now was open to everyone. There we got a short tour of the church building, its history and the tradition of music (including the link with J.S. Bach, who functioned mainly in the nearby Thomaskirche). Then he took us to the adjacent priests’ vestry, where he told us the story of his ministry beginning in the early 1980s.  He reminded us that it was a time of increasing tension between East and West. The Cold War’s trench cut Germany in half.  On both sides of the Berlin Wall, Germans grew increasingly anxious that Germany could become the battleground for Europe’s third war in this century.  At the same time, what was then the government of East Germany vastly increased its police-state controls through its secret policy (the Stasi) which deployed a huge force backed by unofficial collaborators to keep tabs on any possible opponents and dissidents.  It made for a highly oppressive situation where suspicion and mistrust reigned.

This was the brooding climate in which Pastor Führer opened the doors of the church to young people anxious to discuss such things.  The initial gathering took place in 1981 when Pastor Führer invited people with concerns about peace and the arms race to meet at the Church late in the evening (possibly to avoid Stasi attention).  He expected maybe ten or so people to come and let off some steam. But to his astonishment ten times that number showed up. They were mostly young, many of them dissidents who were not getting along with the Communist government.

Next, Führer described how he brought everyone right to the central altar, sat them on the floor of the church  and laid a large rough wooden cross on the floor in their midst. He asked everyone who wanted to raise a point to take a candle, light it, and speak to their concern as they placed their candle around the cross.  If the dissidents were surprised to find themselves at an old-fashioned prayer meeting, it was Pastor Führer’s turn to be surprised when every single person lit a candle, spoke a concern and shared in what turned out to be the most significant prayer meeting in the forty year history of the German Democratic Republic  The sharing continued past midnight as gradually the bare wooden cross changed into a cross glowing with light.  The mood of openness, freedom and acceptance was so life-giving that no one wanted to leave. It was a harbinger of things to come of which no one sitting there could have foreseen.

As I read later in the Nikolai brochure:

When we open the church to everyone who has been forced to keep silent, has been slandered or maybe even imprisoned, then no one can ever think of a church again as being simply a kind of religious museum or a temple for art aesthetics.  On the contrary, Jesus is then really present in the church because we are trying to do what he did and what he wants us to do today. This is the hour of the birth of the Nikolai Church–open for everyone–also for protest groups and those living on the margin of society. Throw open the church doors!   The open wings of the church door are like the wide open arms of Jesus: “Come unto me, everyone who is troubled and burdened, and I will relieve you! ”  And they came and they come!

From this first event Führer would eventually arrange what he called ‘peace prayers’ to meet every Monday evening at 5 p.m. to pray for peace in both local and international situations of conflict. Later these prayers were sometimes followed by the people walking into the streets carrying candles to witness for peace and freedom. These were the largest and also the most peaceful of any such demonstrations in the GDR.

A particular moment of tension occurred in May 1989 following a blatantly fraudulent election in which the Communist party claimed to have received 98% of the votes cast. The public was outraged at such a flagrant deception.  Calls for reform grew louder.  The police reacted by blocking all driveways to the church, seeking to shot down the Monday prayer meetings, which they determined had become a cover for political insurrection. Nevertheless the crowds only increased.

On October 7, the GDR was due to celebrate its 40th anniversary. President Gorbachev, the author of the movement for openness and Perestroika, attended from the Soviet Union. Naturally the government did not want the occasion to be used for any kind of public expression of discontent. In Leipzig, for ten long hours police battered and bullied defenseless demonstrators who made no attempt to fight back. Many were taken away in police vehicles.

In this heightened atmosphere, just two days later, Monday 9 October, the peace prayers were to be held.  The government warned protesters that any further demonstrations would not be tolerated. All day long, Führer told us,  the police and military tried to intimidate them with a hideous show of force. Schools and shops in the city were shut down. Roadblocks were built. The police had guns loaded with live ammunition. Soldiers with tanks were mobilized and surrounded the central area. Extra beds and blood plasma had been assembled in the Leipzig hospitals. Rumors from many reliable sources circulated that the government intended to use the “Chinese Solution” and repeat the massacre of Tienanmen Square in Beijing.

To neutralize and perhaps disrupt the prayer meeting, 1ooo party members and Stasi went early on to the church. 600 of them filled up the nave by 2 p.m. But,as Führer described it in the brochure:

They had a job to perform. What had not been considered was the fact that these people were exposed to the word, the gospel and its impact!   I was always glad the the Stasi agents heard the Beatitudes from the Sermon on the Mount every Monday. Where else would they hear these?

So the stage was set, the actors assembled for the climatic Monday prayer service. Huge numbers came out to pray, not only at the Nikolai Church but at other churches throughout the city, which had joined the peace prayers. During the service, the atmosphere and the prayers were serenely calm. As he prepared to send the people out into the streets, Pastor Führer made a final plea to the congregation to refrain from any form of violence or provocation. The Sermon on the Mount was again read aloud.

As the doors opened for the worshipers to depart, something unforgettable happened. The 2000 people leaving the sanctuary were welcomed by tens of thousands waiting outside with candles in their hands. That night an estimated 70,000 people marched around the main city streets. Though the police and the military were everywhere, Pastor Führer said: Our fear was not as big as our faith … Two hands are needed to carry a candle and to protect it from extinguishing. So you cannot carry stones or clubs at the same time.

As the good pastor noted:

There were thousands in the churches. Hundreds of thousands in the streets around the city centre. But not a single shattered window. This was the incredible witness to the power of non-violence. … It was an evening in the spirit of our Lord Jesus for there were no winners and no defeated. Nobody triumphed over the other, nobody lost his face. There was just a tremendous feeling of relief.

It was later reported that Horst Sindemann, a serving member of the Central Committee of the GDR, summed up both the extensive preparations of the authorities as well as their inability to know how to respond to the events of that evening:

We had planned everything. We were prepared for everything. But not for candles and prayers.

A month later the Berlin Wall was breached, and the whole Communist empire crumbled away.

Voir encore:

The Rev. Christian Fuhrer Extended Interview
November 6, 2009

Read a translation of the Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly interview at St. Nikolai Church in Leipzig with Pastor Christian Fuhrer:

In East Germany, the church provided the only free space in connection with the groups—people who wanted to discuss topics that were taboo, such as the refusal to serve in the army, military education. Everything that could not be discussed in public could be discussed in church, and in this way the church represented a unique spiritual and physical space in East Germany in which people were free.

Here [at St. Nikolai Church in Leipzig] we have said peace prayers since 1981 and every Monday since 1982. That was something very special in East Germany. Here a critical mass grew under the roof of the church—young people, Christians and non-Christians, and later those who wanted to leave [East Germany] joined us and sought refuge here.  The church became a very special place, and in particular the Nikolai Church, which we could describe like this: the church was finally on the side of the Lord, on Jesus’ side. In other words, it was on the side of the oppressed and not on that of the oppressors, with the people and not with those who had the power. The special experience we had here was that the people accepted Jesus’ message, especially the message of the Sermon on the Mount. We experienced in a very special way that everything that is written here is true. If you don’t believe, you won’t stay. The “comrades” did not believe, and they did not stay. “Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit.” “He pulls the powerful from their throne and lifts up the poor.” “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.” We experienced it just like that—the church as a refuge and a place for change, Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, no mention of paradise and redemption, but the daily bread in the reality of political hopelessness.

The special experience that we had during the years of peace prayers and then with this massive number of non-Christians in the church, which was exceptional, was that they accepted the message of Jesus. They grew up in two consecutive atheist dictatorships. They grew up with the Nazis who were preaching racism, the master race, prepared for war, and replaced God with Providence, as Hitler liked to say. They also grew up with the Socialists preaching class struggle and vilified the church by saying Jesus never existed, that’s all nonsense and fairy tales, legends, and your talk about nonviolence is dangerous idealism; what counts is politics, money, the army, the economy, the media. Everything else is nonsense. And the people who were brainwashed like this for years and grew up with that. The fact that they accepted Jesus’ message of the Sermon on the Mount, that they summarized it in two words—no violence—and the fact that they did not only think and say it, but also practiced it consistently in the street was an incredible development, an unprecedented development in German history. If any event ever merited the description of “miracle” that was it: a revolution that succeeded, a revolution that grew out of the church, remained nonviolent, no broken windows, no people beaten, no people killed—an unprecedented development in German history. A peaceful revolution, a revolution that came out of the church. It is astonishing that God let us succeed with this revolution. After all the violence that Germany brought to the world in the two wars during the last century, especially the violence against the people from whom Jesus was born, a horrible violence, and now this wonderful result, a unique, positive development in German history. That is why we are so happy that the church was able to play this role and enabled this peaceful revolution.

The most important thing for us was the power of prayer, which is still true today. We are not praying to the air or to the wall, but to a living God. We did not pray for the wall to come down. It was more comprehensive: [We were praying] for peace, justice, and the preservation of our creation. We addressed the very specific needs of human beings in our prayers, and God has blessed those prayers in such a way that nobody could have predicted. We went on, step by step. It got bigger and bigger, and in the end the prayers prevented us from drowning in fear and gave us the strength to face the opposition outside. In other words, more and more protests came from the church and spilled onto the street, combined with the strength that we got from our faith. The fear was very powerful, but our faith was more powerful than the fear, and the prayers gave us the strength to act. That is still the same today.

What motivated me was Jesus’ saying “You are the salt of the earth,” which means that you must get involved; you cannot stay in your church. You must get involved in this situation; the salt must be inserted in the wound, in the place that is not in order, that is sick. That’s where you must go. This thought to get involved in politics is a thought that Jesus already voiced in the parable of the Good Samaritan. Someone is beaten and lies there, those who beat him are gone, and now two people coming from temple are approaching, are looking the other way and walking away. Jesus says that they are guilty, not because—they did not do anything, they did not beat him, but they did not help him. If we just leave the world alone and do not get involved, we are just as guilty as those two, as Jesus said in that parable, who looked the other way and did not want to hear about it. You must get involved, because you are the salt of the earth.

[Dietrich] Bonhoeffer really impressed me with his philosophy in approaching the atheist, the non-Christian, with the Christian message in a way that is easy to understand. I first learned that from Jesus—the simple language. Jesus did not speak the language of the temple, but the language of the people. He talked about the mustard seed, the farmer, the worker in the vineyard, the jobless who are waiting in the marketplace, hoping to get hired. Those are all things that people can understand, and then he introduced the message of God’s love into this clear language. And Bonheffer said that we should apply Jesus’ language in such a way that it can be understood even if you were not born into the Christian tradition or into a Christian household. That was really impressive. In addition, the examples impressed me very much, the fact that people applied the Sermon on the Mount one-to-one. First, to put Christians to shame, it was a non-Christian and Hindu who did it: Mahatma Gandhi. Very much in the spirit of the Sermon of the Mount, he engaged in nonviolent resistance and freed his people from British colonialism, but gave his life for it, as did Jesus. He was shot in 1948. The second one was, thank God, a Christian: Martin Luther King. He prepared and executed this idea of nonviolence, peaceful resistance, in a wonderful way. It was a very tense situation, and the fact that it was possible for an African-American to become president of the United States today even exceeds Martin Luther King’s dream. Then it became our turn to apply the teachings of the Sermon of the Mount here in Leipzig. But you cannot forget to mention Nelson Mandela and Bishop Desmond Tutu. They have always impressed us. We felt that we were walking together with them to fulfill Jesus’ legacy.

The police were always very violent, especially on October 7th when they beat hundreds of people. With this violence they wanted to prevent people from gathering here, here in the church and on the plaza. They gradually increased the amount of violence, but achieved the opposite of what they expected. Especially on October 9th, they had created such a frightful scenario that they thought people would not dare show up here. Instead, even more people came. In church people had learned to turn fear into courage, to overcome the fear and to hope, to have strength, as I mentioned before. That was very important, and during those years and in particular during this frightful time, people overcame their fear. They did not bring their children, because you had to fear for your life. The children stayed at home. They came to church and then started walking, and since they did not do anything violent, the police were not allowed to take action. “We were ready for anything, except for candles and prayer,” they said. If the first group had attacked the police, the police would have known exactly what to do. You can see it on TV every night how police and armies react to demonstrators. That did not happen, and the officers and generals called Berlin and asked what they should do, but they did not get any instructions. Those in Berlin did not say anything, the officers here did not do anything, and thus the movement that did not result in any violence, as the people learned in church, began to spread, and that is when the following became clear in East Germany: This is the beginning of the end of East Germany. It cannot go on, the people got what they wanted. Peace prayers were held all over the country. When they saw the images from Leipzig on October 9th, they started demonstrations everywhere else. The crowds became larger and larger, and then [Erich] Honecker handed in his resignation, and on the 18th the politburo resigned. On November 9th, on this very important day, on this day the wall was overcome from the East. Those are experiences that you cannot learn in college, and I would like to summarize them as follows: the Nikolai Church was open to everyone. The church was open to all people, no matter if they were Christian or non-Christian. The next thing is that throne and altar do not belong together. That is a huge mistake that the church made during the past century. No, the street and the altar belong together, just as Jesus did not hide in the temple, but was mingling out in the street, in the houses and on the plazas. We as a church must go into the street and let the street come into the church. The church must be open to everyone. We can teach nonviolence as a practical application of the Sermon on the Mount, turn swords into ploughshares as in the Old Testament, open to all, as mentioned before, and we are the people. We have to learn to have a certain self-confidence, overcome fear, find our voice once again in church, approach bad situations with this self-confidence, be able to make changes within society, reject injustice, and refuse to go along, and I think what is important in all of that is the power of prayer. Without prayer we would not have changed anything, we would not have been able to overcome fear, we would not have had the strength to change things and to take the message of the Bible seriously, being able to interject yourself into a social reality, finding the message of Jesus and the Bible and applying it to the current situation, not uttering long sentences but finding the right word for the right situation, knowing how to act. For me the main criterion for action was: What would Jesus say in this situation? Then I came to the conclusion that we needed to do it the same way he would have done it.

The role of the church did not diminish, at least not here in the Nikolai Church. It continued. Huge protests against the war in Iraq, peace prayers involving many people to save jobs…It continued, but under different social circumstances. However, there are always certain peaks, unique times, such as October 9th. It was a peaceful revolution which was a unique process. You cannot expect that it will go on like that every day. What this revolution aimed to achieve was indeed achieved, and then people stepped back. The important thing to remember is that we did not do that to get people to join our church, but because it was necessary. That is what Jesus did as well. When he provided help, he never asked if that person went to the temple or if that person said all his prayers. He just realized that this human being needed help, so he helped. That is exactly how we did it. We never said “but you must return the favor,” the way it is done in politics and in the world. We created something, and the blessing continued for the people. The most important thing is that the church has to remain open. Whenever people need the church again, in everyday life or in very specific situations, they should find the church open. The church should be there for the people, the way Jesus intended. An inviting, open church without the expectation that people join; an inviting, open church offering unconditional love, just as Jesus did, and [we must] act in this spirit.

20e anniversaire de la « révolution » est-allemande
Les chrétiens de l’Est de l’Allemagne ont lancé une campagne marquant le 20e anniversaire de la révolution pacifique qui a permis de renverser le communisme, par une sculpture de lumière projetée sur les murs du parlement régional d’Erfurt.

Protestants

L’œuvre de l’artiste Ingo Bracke projetait des mots tels que « paix », « réconciliation », « non-violence » et « solidarité » sur le bâtiment qui autrefois abritait l’administration communiste du district d’Erfurt.
La sculpture comprenait des extraits de textes de l’Assemblée oecuménique d’avril 1989 qui avait rassemblé des délégués des principales Eglises de l’Allemagne de l’Est. Elle s’était tenue moins de six mois avant que le pays n’entre dans sa révolution d’automne. Alors que la République démocratique allemande (RDA) était encore sous un contrôle rigide du pouvoir communiste, cette Assemblée a demandé, entre autres, le vote à bulletin secret pour les élections, la liberté d’opinion et la liberté de déplacement, ainsi que le droit de former des associations indépendantes.
Il s’agissait de l’avertissement que les dirigeants communistes est-allemands refusaient de voir, a déclaré l’évêque Christoph Kähler, de l’Eglise évangélique d’Allemagne centrale, lors du lancement de la campagne le 29 avril. « Cela signifiait la fin de leur régime, à travers une révolution pacifique », a-t-il affirmé. « Les gens sont descendus dans la rue avec des bougies et ont protesté et fait part de leurs exigences. »
Pendant que la lumière était projetée sur le parlement, un montage sonore était diffusé, contenant des extraits des textes accompagnés de sons de cloches d’église et de fragments de musique du compositeur allemand Jean-Sébastien Bach.
La campagne de souvenir de la révolution porte le nom de « saint désordre ». Elle s’efforce non seulement de commémorer les événements de 1989, mais aussi de mobiliser les membres de l’Eglise afin qu’ils s’impliquent dans la politique en cette année d’élection générale en Allemagne.
Le soulèvement pacifique de 1989 en Allemagne de l’Est a parfois été qualifié de « révolution protestante », en raison du rôle majeur joué par les membres de l’Eglise et les manifestations de rue qui ont suivi des rassemblements extrêmement suivis de prière pour la paix et le changement dans les Eglises.
Les manifestations ont ouvert la voie à la chute du mur de Berlin et à la réunification de l’Allemagne en 1990.
Horst Sindermann, membre du bureau politique du parti communiste aurait déploré, après sa destitution : « Nous étions préparés à tout, mais pas aux bougies ni aux prières. »
L’Assemblée oecuménique qui s’est tenue en Allemange de l’Est avait été inspirée par le Conseil oecuménique des Eglises, qui avait appelé ses membres à agir pour promouvoir la justice, la paix et la sauvegarde de la création.
« L’Assemblée oecuménique était le fondement de nombreuses autres exigences et programmes politiques, qui ont été élaborés à l’automne 1989″, a déclaré l’évêque Kähler dans une interview avec le correspondant d’ENI, expliquant pourquoi la campagne du « saint désordre » était lancée pour le 20e anniversaire de l’Assemblée oecuménique. « Si nous n’avions pas eu ce travail préparatoire, nous n’aurions pas été capables d’agir aussi directement et pacifiquement que nous l’avons fait. »

Voir de plus:

Pourquoi Angela Merkel bouda la chute du Mur de Berlin
Florence Autret tente de percer la femme et la stratège derrière le sourire charmant, pour saisir ce que a permis à Angela Merkel de gravir les échelons de la politique fédérale aussi rapidement, et ce qui a guidé sa position de « mère austérité » sur la scène européenne. Extrait de « Angela Merkel. Une Allemande (presque) comme les autres » (1/2).
Bonnes feuilles
Atlantico
15 Juin 2013

Quand le Mur tombe, Angela Merkel a plus qu’un passé : elle a une histoire. A trente-cinq ans, elle a révélé des aptitudes, s’est forgé des convictions et inventé une méthode, un guide de survie pour tracer sa route dans la jungle du réel. La RDA est une école redoutable. Elle y a appris à exiger beaucoup d’elle-même et à ne pas trop attendre des autres, à avancer dans un environnement sinon hostile, tout au moins dangereux et arbitraire. Elle a acquis un sens de l’absurde qui ne la quittera plus. Elle sait limiter ses désirs a l’essentiel, a ne prétendre a rien qu’elle n’ait une chance d’obtenir, a arrêter ses « lignes rouges » avec précision, a la frontière de l’acceptable politiquement et du supportable moralement, à participer sans se compromettre, a se taire sans s’isoler.

Elle a appris à ne pas faire confiance, mais elle sait aussi qu’il faut parfois courir le risque d’être trompé pour que la vie soit supportable.

« Chacun a dû faire des compromis »
Elle sera déçue, mais pas surprise, quand elle découvrira que certains camarades du laboratoire d’Adlershof ont fourni des renseignements sur elle et fait verser à son dossier a la Stasi ses « critiques » à l’égard de la RDA. Quand on l’interrogera sur l’absence d’épuration systématique à l’Est, elle dira qu’il était souvent bien difficile de tracer une frontière entre ceux qui méritaient d’être sanctionnés et les autres dans la vaste « zone grise » des collaborateurs de la Stasi. La société n’était pas coupée en deux entre les courageux dissidents qui risquaient la prison ou l’exil, d’un côté, et la masse silencieuse et complice de ceux qui « font avec », de l’autre. La vérité était plus nuancée. « Il était très difficile de distinguer les “un peu” coupables des “très” coupables… Chacun a du faire des compromis, y compris moi », dira-t-elle.

Une question lancinante pèse toutefois sur cette première partie de sa vie. Elle qui s’est posée par la suite en admiratrice de la liberté, pourquoi n’a-t-elle pas pris part aux mouvements civiques, y compris dans les semaines qui ont précédé la chute du Mur ? A l’époque, l’issue des manifestations était certes encore incertaine, et y participer comportait des risques. Mais elle aurait pu être tentée de partager avec d’autres sa défiance pour le système et son espoir d’un changement ? D’abord, elle ne partage pas grand-chose avec ces manifestants. « C’était des originaux, des marginaux. » Elle était un docteur en sciences physiques jouissant de la reconnaissance de l’institution. « Elle n’avait rien a faire avec eux », explique l’ancien Premier ministre est-allemand Lothar de Maiziere. Ensuite, la protestation venait généralement de personnes qui pensaient le régime est-allemand réformable et continuaient à croire dans une troisième voie entre socialiste et capitalisme. Or elle est convaincue du contraire. Enfin, on peut aussi penser qu’elle doute des vertus de l’activisme politique. La chute du Mur est un effet du système, une autodestruction plus qu’une victoire des opposants.
Extrait de « Angela Merkel : Une allemande (presque) comme les autres », de Florence Autret, (Édition Tallandier), 2013. Pour acheter ce livre, cliquez ici.

Voir encore:

Causes de la construction du mur de Berlin

Wikipedia

Depuis sa création en 1949, la RDA subit un flot d’émigration croissant vers la RFA, particulièrement à Berlin. La frontière urbaine est difficilement contrôlable, contrairement aux zones rurales déjà très surveillées. Entre 2,6 et 3,6 millions d’Allemands fuient la RDA par Berlin entre 1949 et 1961, privant le pays d’une main-d’œuvre indispensable au moment de sa reconstruction et montrant à la face du monde leur faible adhésion au régime communiste2,3. Émigrer ne pose pas de difficulté majeure car, jusqu’en août 1961, il suffit de prendre le métro ou le chemin de fer berlinois pour passer d’Est en Ouest8, ce que font quotidiennement des Berlinois pour aller travailler. Les Allemands appellent cette migration de la RDA communiste à la RFA capitaliste : « voter avec ses pieds ». Pendant les deux premières semaines d’août 1961, riches en rumeurs, plus de 47 000 citoyens est-allemands passent en Allemagne de l’Ouest via Berlin. De plus, Berlin-Ouest joue aussi le rôle de porte vers l’Ouest pour de nombreux Tchèques et Polonais. Comme l’émigration concerne particulièrement les jeunes actifs, elle pose un problème économique majeur et menace l’existence même de la RDA.

En outre, environ 50 000 Berlinois sont des travailleurs frontaliers, travaillant à Berlin-Ouest mais habitant à Berlin-Est ou dans sa banlieue où le coût de la vie et de l’immobilier est plus favorable. Le 4 août 1961, un décret oblige les travailleurs frontaliers à s’enregistrer comme tels et à payer leurs loyers en Deutsche Mark (monnaie de la RFA). Avant même la construction du Mur, la police de la RDA surveille intensivement aux points d’accès à Berlin-Ouest ceux qu’elle désigne comme « contrebandiers » ou « déserteurs de la République ».

Comme tous les pays communistes, la RDA s’est vu imposer une économie planifiée par Moscou. Le plan septennal (1959-1965) est un échec dès le début. La production industrielle augmente moins vite que prévu. En effet, les investissements sont insuffisants. La collectivisation des terres agricoles entraîne une baisse de la production et une pénurie alimentaire. Les salaires augmentent plus vite que prévu à cause d’un manque de main-d’œuvre provoqué en grande partie par les fuites à l’Ouest. Un important trafic de devises et de marchandises, néfaste à l’économie est-allemande, passe par Berlin. La RDA se trouve en 1961 au bord de l’effondrement économique et social5.

L’auteur William Blum avance comme cause de la construction du Mur outre la captation de la main d’œuvre qualifiée de la RDA par l’Ouest, mais encore le terrorisme occidental qui aurait alors sévi en RDA9.

La construction du mur de Berlin

La construction du Mur, le 20 novembre 1961

Le 13 août 1961, la construction du mur de Berlin commence. Cette photo montre des hommes des « groupes de combat de la classe ouvrière » (Kampfgruppen der Arbeiterklasse), organisation paramilitaire est–allemande, sur le côté ouest de la Porte de Brandebourg qui se tiennent exactement sur la ligne de démarcation.
Le programme de construction du Mur est un secret d’État du gouvernement est-allemand. Il commence dans la nuit du 12 au 13 août 1961 avec la pose de grillages et de barbelés autour de Berlin-Ouest2.

Son édification est effectuée par des maçons, sous la protection et la surveillance de policiers et de soldats – en contradiction avec les assurances du président du Conseil d’État de la RDA, Walter Ulbricht, qui déclarait le 15 juin 1961 lors d’une conférence de presse internationale à Berlin-Est en réponse à une journaliste ouest-allemande10 : « Si je comprends bien votre question, il y a des gens en Allemagne de l’Ouest qui souhaitent que nous mobilisions les ouvriers du bâtiment de la capitale de la RDA pour ériger un mur, c’est cela ? Je n’ai pas connaissance d’un tel projet ; car les maçons de la capitale sont principalement occupés à construire des logements et y consacrent toute leur force de travail. Personne n’a l’intention de construire un mur11 ! »

Après trois heures d’attente, une vieille dame passée au secteur Ouest fait signe à ses connaissances restées à l’Est, 1961.
Ulbricht est ainsi le premier à employer le mot « Mur », deux mois avant qu’il ne soit érigé.

Si les Alliés sont au courant d’un plan de « mesures drastiques » visant au verrouillage de Berlin-Ouest, ils se montrent cependant surpris par son calendrier et son ampleur. Comme leurs droits d’accès à Berlin-Ouest sont respectés, ils décident de ne pas intervenir militairement. Le BND (Services secrets de la RFA) avait lui aussi reçu début juillet des informations semblables. Après la rencontre entre Ulbricht et Nikita Khrouchtchev lors du sommet des pays membres du Pacte de Varsovie (3-5 août 1961), le BND note dans son rapport hebdomadaire du 9 août : « Les informations disponibles montrent que le régime de Pankow12 s’efforce d’obtenir l’accord de Moscou pour l’entrée en vigueur de mesures rigoureuses de blocage ; en particulier le bouclage de la frontière de Berlin, avec interruption du trafic de métros et de tramways entre Berlin-Est et Berlin-Ouest. (…) Il reste à voir si Ulbricht est capable de faire accepter de telles exigences par Moscou, et jusqu’où. »

La déclaration publique du sommet du Pacte de Varsovie propose de « contrecarrer à la frontière avec Berlin-Ouest les agissements nuisibles aux pays du camp socialiste et d’assurer autour de Berlin-Ouest une surveillance fiable et un contrôle efficace. »

Le 11 août 1961, la Chambre du peuple (« Volkskammer »), le parlement de la RDA, approuve la concertation avec Moscou et donne les pleins pouvoirs au conseil des ministres pour en assurer la réalisation. Ce dernier adopte le 12 août un décret dénonçant la politique d’agression impérialiste des Occidentaux à son encontre. Un contrôle très strict des frontières séparant Berlin-Ouest et Berlin-Est est instauré13. Il décide de l’emploi des forces armées pour occuper la frontière avec Berlin-Ouest et y ériger un barrage.

Le samedi 12 août 1961, le BND reçoit l’information qu’« une conférence a eu lieu à Berlin-Est au centre de décision du Parti communiste est-allemand (SED) en présence de hauts responsables du parti. On a pu y apprendre que (…) la situation d’émigration croissante de fugitifs rend nécessaire le bouclage du secteur d’occupation soviétique et de Berlin-Ouest dans les jours prochains — sans plus de précisions — et non dans deux semaines comme il était prévu initialement. »

Dans la nuit du 12 au 13 août 1961, 14 500 membres des forces armées bloquent les rues et les voies ferrées menant à Berlin-Ouest. Des troupes soviétiques se tiennent prêtes au combat et se massent aux postes frontières des Alliés. Tous les moyens de transport entre les deux parties de la ville sont interrompus. En septembre 1961, des métros et des S-Bahn (réseau ferré de banlieue) de Berlin-Ouest continueront à circuler sous Berlin-Est sans cependant s’y arrêter, les stations desservant le secteur oriental (qu’on appellera désormais les « stations fantômes ») ayant été fermées.

Erich Honecker, en tant que secrétaire du comité central du SED pour les questions de sécurité, assure la responsabilité politique de la planification et de la réalisation de la construction du Mur pour le parti, qu’il présente comme un « mur de protection antifasciste »2. Les pays membres du pacte de Varsovie publient, le même jour, une déclaration pour soutenir le bouclage de la frontière entre les deux Berlin14. Jusqu’en septembre 1961, la frontière reste « franchissable » et parmi les seules forces de surveillance, 85 hommes passent à l’Ouest — imités en cela par 400 civils, dont 216 réussissent. Les images du jeune douanier Conrad Schumann enjambant les barbelés, ainsi que de fugitifs descendant par une corde en draps de lit ou sautant par les fenêtres des immeubles situées à la frontière marquent les esprits.

La construction du Mur autour des trois secteurs de l’Ouest consiste tout d’abord en un rideau de fils de fer barbelés. Les pavés des axes de circulation entre les deux moitiés de la ville sont retournés afin d’interrompre immédiatement le trafic15. Dans les semaines suivantes, il est complété par un mur de béton et de briques, puis muni de divers dispositifs de sécurité. Ce mur sépare physiquement la cité et entoure complètement la partie ouest de Berlin qui devient une enclave au milieu des pays de l’Est.

Les réactions à l’Ouest

Détails du Mur, 1989
Le chancelier fédéral Adenauer appelle le jour même la population de l’Ouest au calme et à la raison, évoquant sans plus de précisions les réactions qu’il s’apprête à prendre avec les Alliés. Il attend deux semaines après la construction du Mur avant de se rendre à Berlin-Ouest. Seul le maire de Berlin-Ouest Willy Brandt émet une protestation énergique – mais impuissante – contre l’emmurement de Berlin et sa coupure définitive en deux. Sa déclaration est sans ambiguïté : « Sous le regard de la communauté mondiale des peuples, Berlin accuse les séparateurs de la ville, qui oppressent Berlin-Est et menacent Berlin-Ouest, de crime contre le droit international et contre l’humanité (…)15 ». Le 16 août 1961, une manifestation de 300 000 personnes entoure Willy Brandt pour protester devant le Rathaus Schöneberg, siège du gouvernement de Berlin-Ouest.

Les Länder de la RFA fondent la même année à Salzgitter un centre de documentation judiciaire sur les violations des droits de l’homme perpétrées par la RDA, pour marquer symboliquement leur opposition à ce régime.

La réaction des Alliés tarde : il faut attendre vingt heures avant que les colonnes militaires ne se présentent à la frontière. Le 15 août 1961, les commandants des secteurs occidentaux de Berlin adressent à leur homologue soviétique une note de protestation contre l’édification du Mur16. Des rumeurs incessantes circulent, selon lesquelles Moscou aurait assuré les Alliés de ne pas empiéter sur leurs droits à Berlin-Ouest. Le blocus de Berlin a effectivement montré aux yeux des Alliés que le statut de la ville était constamment menacé. La construction du Mur représente ainsi une confirmation matérielle du statu quo : l’Union soviétique abandonne son exigence d’un Berlin-Ouest « libre » déserté par les troupes alliées, tel qu’il avait encore été formulé en 1958 dans l’ultimatum de Khrouchtchev.

Les réactions internationales sont ambiguës. Dès le 13 août, Dean Rusk, secrétaire d’État américain, condamne la restriction de la liberté de déplacement des Berlinois17. Les Alliés considèrent que l’URSS est à l’initiative de la construction du Mur entre sa zone d’occupation et celle des alliés comme l’indiquent les notes de protestation envoyées au gouvernement soviétique par les ambassadeurs américain et français18. Cependant, Kennedy qualifie la construction du Mur de « solution peu élégante, mais mille fois préférable à la guerre ». Le Premier ministre britannique MacMillan n’y voit « rien d’illégal ». En effet, la mesure touche d’abord les Allemands de l’Est et ne remet pas en question l’équilibre géopolitique de l’Allemagne. Après une lettre que Willy Brandt lui a fait parvenir le 16 août19, Kennedy affiche un soutien symbolique20,21 à la ville libre de Berlin-Ouest en y envoyant une unité supplémentaire de 1 500 soldats et fait reprendre du service au général Lucius D. Clay. Le 19 août 1961, Clay et le vice-président américain Lyndon B. Johnson se rendent à Berlin.

Le 27 octobre, on en vient à une confrontation visible et directe entre troupes américaines et soviétiques à Checkpoint Charlie. Des gardes-frontières de RDA exigent de contrôler des membres des forces alliées occidentales voulant se rendre en secteur soviétique. Cette exigence est contraire au droit de libre circulation, dont bénéficient tous les membres des forces d’occupation. Pendant trois jours15, dix chars américains et dix chars soviétiques se postent de part et d’autre à proximité immédiate de Checkpoint Charlie. Les blindés se retirent finalement, aucune des deux parties ne voulant enclencher une escalade qui risquerait de se terminer en guerre nucléaire. La libre circulation par le poste-frontière Checkpoint Charlie est rétablie. Paradoxalement, cette situation explosive, aussi bien à Berlin que dans le reste de l’Europe, va déboucher sur la plus longue période de paix qu’ait connue l’Europe occidentale.

Un pays, deux États

Les ressortissants de Berlin-Ouest ne pouvaient déjà plus entrer librement en RDA depuis le 1er juin 1952. L’encerclement est rendu plus efficace par la diminution des points de passage : 69 points de passage sur les 81 existants sont fermés dès le 13 août. La porte de Brandebourg est fermée le 14 août et quatre autres le 23 août. Fin 1961, il ne reste plus que 7 points de passages entre l’Est et l’Ouest de Berlin. La Potsdamer Platz est coupée en deux. Le centre historique de la ville devient progressivement un grand vide sur la carte, composé du No man’s land entre les Murs de séparation à l’Est et d’un terrain vague à l’Ouest23. Les conséquences économiques et sociales sont immédiates : 63 000 Berlinois de l’Est perdent leur emploi à l’Ouest, et 10 000 de l’Ouest perdent leur emploi à Berlin-Est2.

Le mur de Berlin est devenu dès sa construction le symbole de la guerre froide et de la séparation du monde en deux camps. Le 26 juin 1963, John Kennedy prononce à Berlin un discours historique. Il déclare « Ich bin ein Berliner » (« Je suis un Berlinois »), marquant la solidarité du Monde libre pour les Berlinois24. De plus, la construction du Mur donne une image très négative du bloc de l’Est et prouve de manière symbolique son échec économique face au bloc occidental. « Le bloc soviétique s’apparente désormais à une vaste prison dans laquelle les dirigeants sont obligés d’enfermer des citoyens qui n’ont qu’une idée : fuir ! Le Mur est un aveu d’échec et une humiliation pour toute l’Europe orientale »25. Le Mur sape l’image du monde communiste.

Le 17 décembre 1963, après de longues négociations, le premier accord sur le règlement des visites de Berlinois de l’Ouest chez leurs parents de l’Est de la ville est signé. Il permet à 1,2 million de Berlinois de rendre visite à leurs parents dans la partie orientale de la ville mais seulement du 19 décembre 1963 au 5 janvier 1964. D’autres arrangements suivent en 1964, 1965 et 196615. Après l’accord quadripartite de 1971, le nombre des points de passage entre l’Est et l’Ouest est porté à dix. À partir du début des années 1970, la politique suivie par Willy Brandt et Erich Honecker de rapprochement entre la RDA et la RFA (Ostpolitik) rend la frontière entre les deux pays un peu plus perméable. La RDA simplifie les autorisations de voyage hors de la RDA, en particulier pour les « improductifs » comme les retraités, et autorise les visites de courte durée d’Allemands de l’Ouest dans les régions frontalières. Comme prix d’une plus grande liberté de circulation, la RDA exige la reconnaissance de son statut d’État souverain ainsi que l’extradition de ses citoyens ayant fui vers la RFA. Ces exigences se heurtent à la loi fondamentale de la RFA qui les rejette donc catégoriquement. Pour beaucoup d’Allemands, l’édification du Mur est, de fait, un déchirement et une humiliation qui accentuent les ressentiments de la partition. Une conséquence inattendue de la construction du Mur est de faire renaître dans le cœur des Allemands l’idée de la réunification25.

Les deux parties de la ville connaissent des évolutions différentes. Berlin-Est, capitale de la RDA, se dote de bâtiments prestigieux autour de l’Alexanderplatz et de la Marx-Engels-Platz. Le centre (Mitte) de Berlin qui se trouve du côté Est perd son animation. En effet, l’entretien des bâtiments laisse à désirer surtout les magnifiques bâtiments situés sur l’île des musées, en particulier l’important musée de Pergame2. Poursuivant le développement d’une économie socialiste, le régime inaugure en 1967, dans la zone industrielle d’Oberschöneweide, le premier combinat industriel de la RDA, le Kombinat VEB Kabelwerke Oberspree (KWO) dans la câblerie. En 1970, débute la construction d’immeubles de 11 à 25 étages dans la Leipzigerstrasse qui défigurent l’espace urbain15. La propagande de la RDA désigne le Mur ainsi que toutes les défenses frontalières avec la RFA comme un « mur de protection antifasciste » protégeant la RDA contre l’« émigration, le noyautage, l’espionnage, le sabotage, la contrebande et l’agression en provenance de l’Ouest ». En réalité, les systèmes de défense de la RDA se dressent principalement contre ses propres citoyens.

Berlin-Ouest devient vite la vitrine de l’Occident. La réforme monétaire met fin à la pénurie et la reconstruction est bien plus rapide qu’à l’Est. Potsdamer Platz reste un lieu de souvenir. Une plate-forme panoramique permet de regarder par-dessus le Mur. Elle attire les visiteurs au cours des années 1970 et 198023. La partition fragilise cependant l’économie du secteur ouest. En effet, les industriels doivent exporter leur production en dehors de la RDA. De plus, pour éviter l’espionnage industriel, les industries de pointe s’implantent rarement à Berlin-Ouest26. La partie ouest se singularise à partir de 1967 par son mouvement étudiant, point de mire de l’opinion publique. En effet, la ville est traditionnellement une ville universitaire. La vie culturelle y est très développée.

Le 12 juin 1987, à l’occasion des festivités commémorant les 750 ans de la ville, le président américain Ronald Reagan prononce devant la porte de Brandebourg un discours resté dans les mémoires sous le nom de Tear down this wall!. Il s’agit d’un défi lancé à Gorbatchev, lequel est apostrophé à plusieurs reprises dans le discours27.

La chute du Mur

Manifestations le 4 novembre 1989 à Berlin-Est.

En 1989, la situation géopolitique change. Les Soviétiques annoncent leur retrait d’Afghanistan sans victoire. Au printemps, la Hongrie ouvre son « rideau de fer ». En août, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, membre de Solidarność, devient Premier ministre de Pologne. Certains observateurs pensent qu’une contagion de liberté va gagner aussi les Allemands28. À la fin de l’été, les Allemands de l’Est se mettent à quitter le pays par centaines, puis par milliers, sous prétexte de vacances en Hongrie, où les frontières sont ouvertes. En trois semaines, 25 000 citoyens de la RDA rejoignent la RFA via la Hongrie et l’Autriche. À Prague, à Varsovie, des dizaines de milliers d’Allemands de l’Est font le siège de l’ambassade de RFA29. En RDA, la contestation enfle. Les églises protestantes, comme celle de Saint Nikolai à Leipzig, accueillent les prières pour la paix. Elles sont le germe des manifestations du lundi à partir de septembre30. 20 000 manifestants défilent dans les rues de Leipzig le 3 octobre 1989. Mikhaïl Gorbatchev, venu à Berlin-Est célébrer le quarantième anniversaire de la naissance de la RDA, indique à ses dirigeants que le recours à la répression armée est à exclure31. Malgré une tentative de reprise en main par des rénovateurs du Parti communiste, les manifestations continuent : un million de manifestants à Berlin-Est le 4 novembre, des centaines de milliers dans les autres grandes villes de la RDA32.

Cinq jours plus tard, une conférence de presse est tenue par Günter Schabowski, secrétaire du Comité central chargé des médias en RDA, membre du bureau politique du SED, retransmise en direct par la télévision du centre de presse de Berlin-Est, à une heure de grande écoute. À 18h57, vers la fin de la conférence, Schabowski lit de manière plutôt détachée une décision du conseil des ministres sur une nouvelle réglementation des voyages, dont il s’avère plus tard qu’elle n’était pas encore définitivement approuvée, ou, selon d’autres sources, ne devait être communiquée à la presse qu’à partir de 4h le lendemain matin, le temps d’informer les organismes concernés :

Présents sur le podium à côté de Schabowski : les membres du comité central du SED : Helga Labs, Gerhard Beil et Manfred Banaschak.
Schabowski lit un projet de décision du conseil des ministres qu’on a placé devant lui : « Les voyages privés vers l’étranger peuvent être autorisés sans présentation de justificatifs — motif du voyage ou lien de famille. Les autorisations seront délivrées sans retard. Une circulaire en ce sens va être bientôt diffusée. Les départements de la police populaire responsables des visas et de l’enregistrement du domicile sont mandatés pour accorder sans délai des autorisations permanentes de voyage, sans que les conditions actuellement en vigueur n’aient à être remplies. Les voyages y compris à durée permanente peuvent se faire à tout poste frontière avec la RFA. »

Question d’un journaliste : « Quand ceci entre-t-il en vigueur ? »
Schabowski, feuilletant ses notes : « Autant que je sache — immédiatement. »33

Mur en partie détruit près de la porte de Brandebourg, un soldat surveille ce qu’il en reste, novembre 1989
Après les annonces des radios et télévisions de la RFA et de Berlin-Ouest, intitulées : « Le Mur est ouvert ! », plusieurs milliers de Berlinois de l’Est se pressent aux points de passage et exigent de passer34. À ce moment, ni les troupes frontalières, ni même les fonctionnaires du ministère chargé de la Sécurité d’État responsables du contrôle des visas n’avaient été informés. Sans ordre concret ni consigne mais sous la pression de la foule, le point de passage de la Bornholmer Straße est ouvert peu après 23 h, suivi d’autres points de passage tant à Berlin qu’à la frontière avec la RFA. Beaucoup assistent en direct à la télévision à cette nuit du 9 novembre et se mettent en chemin. C’est ainsi que le mur « tombe » dans la nuit du jeudi 9 au vendredi 10 novembre 1989, après plus de 28 années d’existence. Cet événement a été appelé dans l’histoire de l’Allemagne die Wende (« le tournant »). Dès l’annonce de la nouvelle de l’ouverture du Mur, le Bundestag interrompt sa séance à Bonn et les députés entonnent spontanément l’hymne national allemand35.

Cependant le véritable rush a lieu le lendemain matin, beaucoup s’étant couchés trop tôt cette nuit-là pour assister à l’ouverture de la frontière. Ce jour-là, d’immenses colonnes de ressortissants est-allemands et de voitures se dirigent vers Berlin-Ouest. Les citoyens de la RDA sont accueillis à bras ouverts par la population de Berlin-Ouest. Un concert de klaxons résonne dans Berlin et des inconnus tombent dans les bras les uns des autres. Dans l’euphorie de cette nuit, de nombreux Ouest-Berlinois escaladent le Mur et se massent près de la porte de Brandebourg accessible à tous, alors qu’on ne pouvait l’atteindre auparavant. Une impressionnante marée humaine sonne ainsi le glas de la guerre froide. .

Présent à Berlin, le violoncelliste virtuose Mstislav Rostropovitch, qui avait dû s’exiler à l’Ouest pour ses prises de position en URSS, vient encourager les démolisseurs (en allemand Mauerspechte, en français « piverts du mur ») en jouant du violoncelle au pied du Mur le 11 novembre. Cet événement, largement médiatisé, deviendra célèbre et sera l’un des symboles de la chute du bloc de l’Est.

Le 9 novembre a été évoqué pour devenir la fête nationale de l’Allemagne, d’autant qu’elle célèbre également la proclamation de la République en 1918, dans le cadre de la Révolution allemande de novembre 1918. Toutefois, c’est aussi la date anniversaire du putsch de la Brasserie mené par Adolf Hitler le 9 novembre 1923, ainsi que celle de la nuit de Cristal, le pogrom antijuif commis par les nazis le 9 novembre 1938. Le 3 octobre (jour de la réunification des deux Allemagne) lui a donc été préféré.

Voir enfin:

Les Hongrois et la chute du mur de Berlin
Du 11 septembre au 9 novembre 1989, deux mois qui ont fait l’Histoire
Luc Rosenzweig
Causeur
09 novembre 2014

Ce dimanche 9 novembre, les Allemands célèbrent le 25ème anniversaire de la chute du mur de Berlin. À cette occasion, figurent parmi les invités le chef d’orchestre hongrois Iván Fischer et son compatriote Miklós Németh, dernier Premier ministre – réformateur – de la Hongrie dite communiste. Une participation active, puisqu’Iván Fischer improvisera un discours et dirigera le concert de gala donné à cette occasion au Konzerthaus de Berlin dont il est le directeur musical.

Car les Allemands n’oublient pas. Si, lors de cette mémorable nuit du jeudi 9 au vendredi 10 novembre 1989, les jeunes Berlinois purent ouvrir des brèches dans le mur pour se retrouver enfin avec leurs frères de RDA, ils le doivent en partie aux Hongrois. Hongrois qui, quelques mois plus tôt, leur avaient ouvert la voie en cisaillant – en grande pompe devant les médias du monde entier – les barbelés du rideau de fer (27 juin) pour laisser finalement passer en Autriche les citoyens de RDA réfugiés sur leur territoire (11 septembre). 25 000 d’entre eux allaient ainsi franchir librement la frontière en moins de trois semaines pour rejoindre leurs proches de la RFA.

Résidant alors en Allemagne, je me souviens parfaitement de l’émotion qu’avait suscitée l’événement. Au point que le très prestigieux Karlspreis (Prix Charlemagne) fut remis dès l’année suivante en présence du chancelier Helmut Kohl à Gyula Horn, ministre hongrois des Affaires étrangères au moment des événements, dont le nom fut même donné aux rues de plusieurs villes d’Allemagne. Je revois également toutes ces Trabants débarquer les week-ends suivants à Francfort où je vivais.

Ces événements, désormais bien connus, ont été largement commentés et vont continuer à faire couler beaucoup d’encre. Probablement moins connus sont certains dessous de l’affaire récemment révélés par le principal acteur et le principal témoin des événements en Hongrie: Miklós Németh (alors chef du gouvernement) et son ambassadeur à Bonn István Horváth.

Tout au long du printemps et de l’été 1989, des ressortissants de RDA étaient, comme chaque année, venus passer leurs vacances en Hongrie (où ils pouvaient retrouver, le temps des vacances, leurs proches de RfA). A cette différence près que cette année, l’immense majorité d’entre eux refusa de rejoindre le pays où le régime d’Honecker se faisait de plus en plus dur. Résultat: plusieurs dizaines de milliers de citoyens de RDA se retrouvaient en Hongrie désoeuvrés et sans moyens financiers, donc à la charge de l’État hongrois. Budapest venait de signer la convention de Genève sur le droit d’asile pour défendre les Hongrois de Roumanie réfugiés en Hongrie. Le gouvernement hongrois s’est alors trouvé devant un dilemme: que faire de ces Allemands de l’Est qu’il n’était bien sûr pas question de renvoyer? Comment concilier les engagements de la Convention de Genève sur le Droit d’asile et les obligations du Pacte de Varsovie ?

Par ailleurs, sur un plan purement technique, les installations du rideau de fer avaient considérablement vieilli et étaient à refaire pour la somme de… 50 millions de dollars.

C’est alors que, sur la demande du gouvernement hongrois, une rencontre secrète avec Helmut Kohl et son ministre Genscher eut lieu le 25 août au château de Gilnitz, près de Bonn. Y étaient seuls présents: les deux chefs de gouvernement, leurs ministres des Affaires étrangères (Genscher et Horn) et leurs ambassadeurs.

Les Hongrois font alors part à Helmut Kohl du dilemme auquel ils sont confrontés avec le sort des ces près de 80 000 Allemands de l’Est. Considérant le problème comme germano-allemand, ils interrogent Kohl sur sa réaction éventuelle s’ils les laissent sortir. Ému, Kohl les remercie, assure qu il les acceuillera et demande à ses interlocuteurs hongrois ce qu’ils attendent de lui en échange. Les Hongrois, prudents, renoncent à tout marchandage direct, de peur de compromettre le projet. Et par principe, le Premier ministre hongrois se refuse à monnayer le passage à l’Ouest de ces réfugiés, comme – dit-il – l’avait fait sans scrupules Ceaucescu en Roumanie avec ses ressortissants juifs et saxons. Toutefois, face à une probable pénurie en combustibles, les Hongrois obtiennent de Kohl une importante fourniture de charbon.

Au préalable, une consultation avait eu lieu en mars pour tâter Gorbatchev sur leurs intentions d’ouvrir le parlement à un système pluraliste et d’ouvrir l’économie. Gorbatchev avait acquiescé (mais il n’avait pas encore été ouvertement question d’ouvrir la frontière). Sur le principe général, Gorbatchev déclarait ne pas vouloir se mêler des affaires hongroises (et allemandes), s’en tenant à la promesse laconique suivante: “Soyez assuré que, tant que je serai en poste, 56 ne se renouvellera pas”. Par contre, quant au désengagement de la présence militaire russe, Gorbatchev incita ses partenaires à la patience pour ne pas affaiblir sa position lors de négociations – alors en cours – sur le désarmement.

Fait peu connu, c’est dès le 3 mars. soit six mois avant son ouverture officielle que Miklós Németh ordonna le démantèlement du rideau de fer. Mais sans trop de précipitation pour ne rien compromettre en alertant trop rapidement l’opinion, quitte à laisser bien en vue de la presse un tronçon de frontière en l’état.

La suite des événements, nous la connaissons.

COMPLEMENT:

Tous les murs ne sont pas honteux
Commémorations et manipulations de l’Histoire
Causeur
12 novembre 2014

Mots-clés : Chine, Helmut Kohl, Israël, Mikhaïl Gorbatchev, Mur de Berlin, Winston Churchill

Les commémorations sont  révélatrices de l’état d’esprit d’un lieu et d’une époque : elles servent moins à transmettre aux contemporains les vérités du passé qu’à conforter les mythes et les préjugés des acteurs du temps présent. Celle qui vient de se dérouler à l’occasion de la célébration du vingt-cinquième anniversaire de l’ouverture (et non la chute) du mur de Berlin, le 9 novembre 1989 ne déroge pas, hélas, à cette règle.

Ceux qui n’étaient pas nés, ou trop jeunes pour percevoir le sens des événements survenus dans cette année charnière, sont aujourd’hui invités, par le bruit médiatique orchestré autour de cette commémoration, à penser que les Allemands de l’est, massés devant le «  mur de la honte » un beau soir de novembre, ont réussi à renverser l’ordre du monde issu de Yalta.

L’ouverture du mur serait dont la cause, et non la conséquence de la défaite historique du « socialisme réellement existant », dans laquelle l’Allemagne et son peuple auraient joué un rôle décisif. Tous les historiens sérieux savent que cela est faux, mais quel poids ont-ils face aux images qui symbolisent cet événement (ruée des Est-allemands vers Berlin-Ouest, Rostropovitch jouant du violoncelle devant le mur…) ?

S’il faut fixer une date marquant l’ouverture du rideau de fer dénoncé dès sa mise en place, en 1946, par Winston Churchill, c’est plutôt celle du 10 septembre 1989, lorsque le gouvernement communiste hongrois, dirigé par Miklos Nemeth, décida d’ouvrir totalement sa frontière avec l’Autriche. Pierre Waline a rappelé utilement ce point d’histoire à ceux qui l’auraient oublié…Cette mesure, qui permettait aux citoyens de la RDA de se rendre sans entraves à l’ouest, minait plus sûrement l’édifice berlinois que les maigres manifestations de dissidents contestant le pouvoir absolu d’Erich Honecker et de la Stasi. Sur le plan politique, un autre mur, celui de la théorie léniniste du rôle dirigeant de la classe ouvrière et de son parti, venait de voler en éclats en Pologne : pour la première fois depuis la Révolution d’octobre, un parti communiste et ses séides avaient été contraints de quitter le pouvoir pour faire place, en août 1989, à un gouvernement dominé par les partisans de Solidarnosc, dirigé par Tadeusz Mazowiecki. Ce n’est pas un hasard, si le 9 novembre 1989, le chancelier allemand Helmut Kohl se trouvait à Varsovie, négociant avec Mazowiecki l’amélioration du statut des quelques milliers d’Allemands ethniques restés en Pologne après l’amputation et l’attribution, en 1945, à la Pologne des provinces allemandes de Silésie, Poméranie et Prusse orientale… Si l’on me permet de faire un brin d’ego histoire, j’en veux encore à ce brave Helmut Kohl d’avoir abandonné brusquement à Varsovie la délégation de journalistes et d’hommes d’affaires qui l’accompagnait, et dont je faisais partie, pour s’envoler vers Berlin dès que la nouvelle de l’ouverture du mur fut annoncée…

Cette défaite du communisme n’est pas tombée du ciel, pas plus qu’elle n’a été l’œuvre d’un seul homme touché par la grâce, Mikhaïl Gorbatchev. La guerre froide, fruit de l’équilibre de la terreur instauré par la dissuasion nucléaire, avait déplacé l’affrontement « chaud » vers des champs de batailles exotiques, où le camp communiste avait volé de victoires en victoires : de la prise de pouvoir par Mao Zedong en Chine à la débâcle américaine au Vietnam, en passant par la révolution castriste à Cuba, la roue de l’Histoire semblait inexorablement tourner en faveur des héritiers de Marx et de Lénine. Les révoltes populaires hongroises, polonaises et tchécoslovaques avaient été écrasées par les chars russes (ou, pour la Pologne, par la simple menace de leur intervention). La stratégie occidentale se fondait sur un respect scrupuleux du statu quo en Europe, expliquée abruptement par Claude Cheysson, ministre des affaires étrangères de François Mitterrand : interrogé à la télévision en décembre 1981 sur une éventuelle réaction la prise de pouvoir en Pologne par le général Jaruzelski, il s’exclama : «  Bien entendu, nous ne ferons rien ! ».

Le tournant décisif fut opéré par Ronald Reagan, et sa conception manichéenne d’une politique extérieure américaine axée sur la lutte contre « l’empire du mal ». Bravant les foules pacifistes allemandes, il imposa, avec l’aide de François Mitterrand, le stationnement des euromissiles en Europe en 1983. Quelques années plus tard, se risqua au fabuleux coup de poker stratégique de «  la guerre des étoiles », projet de militarisation de l’espace, à vrai dire assez fumeux, mais pris au sérieux par le nouveau maître de l’URSS Mikhaïl Gorbatchev. Ce dernier, affaibli par l’enlisement de l’armée rouge en Afghanistan, et la catastrophe de Tchernobyl n’eut alors plus qu’un seul objectif : sauver ce qui pouvait l’être du pouvoir soviétique, fut-ce au prix de l’abandon des camarades au pouvoir dans le glacis occidental de l’empire… Ronald Reagan trouva un allié incarnant le « soft power » anticommuniste en la personne de Karol Wojtyla, alias Jean Paul II, dont l’accession à la papauté allait sauver l’opposition polonaise de la désespérance. Ni l’un, ni l’autre ne furent distingués par le prix Nobel de la paix, ce qui relève d’une injustice flagrante, au regard de ce qui survint plus tard, lorsqu’il fut décerné à un Barack Obama quelques mois seulement après son accession à la Maison blanche…

Le caractère emblématique du mur de Berlin permet aussi une disqualification éthique de tous les édifices, en béton ou non, visant à rendre étanche des frontières. Tout mur, ou obstacle physique à la libre circulation des humains, serait « honteux », selon les tenants de l’idéologie droits-de-l’hommiste intégrale : honteux le grillage entourant Ceuta et Mellila, honteux la barrière anti-immigration à la frontière sud des Etats-Unis, honteuse, enfin, la barrière de sécurité érigée entre Israël et les Territoires palestiniens. Seuls la  Grande Muraille de Chine et les restes du « limes » romain échappent à cet opprobre, car il y a prescription … Cet amalgame fait bon marché du caractère singulier, et historiquement inédit de la frontière interallemande entre 1961 et 1989 : une barrière étanche non pas destinée à protéger un Etat et une population des agressions extérieures, ou de migrations non désirées, mais un garrot pour arrêter l’hémorragie de ses propres citoyens ! Si honte il doit y avoir à propos des barrières frontalières modernes, ne serait-elle pas à mettre sur le compte des régimes et des potentats incapables de fournir à leurs sujets ou citoyens des perspectives de vie acceptables dans leur pays natal ? Est-il scandaleux de créditer les bâtisseurs de murs d’une certaine sagesse lorsque ceux-ci, comme la barrière de sécurité israélienne, conçue et mise en œuvre par Ariel Sharon est aussi, au delà dont son utilité sécuritaire immédiate, un signal d’autolimitation de ses prétentions territoriales ? Il y a très, très longtemps, les Hans édifièrent la plus imposante muraille jamais construite sur Terre pour se protéger des Xionju, ancêtres des Huns et des Turcs, qui s’empressèrent alors de dévaster l’Occident, pendant que la Chine développait la civilisation la plus avancée de l’époque. Et les Chinois d’aujourd’hui, totalement immunisés contre le virus de la repentance, en sont plutôt fiers.


Mort de Rémi Fraisse: Attention, une victime peut en cacher bien d’autres (Warning: inequalities may not be where they seem)

7 novembre, 2014
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/12/Kustodiyev_bolshevik.JPG
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/11/World_Income_Gini_Map_%282013%29.svg/800px-World_Income_Gini_Map_%282013%29.svg.png
Les fascistes de demain s’appelleront eux-mêmes antifascistes. Winston Churchill
Le coefficient de Gini est une mesure statistique de la dispersion d’une distribution dans une population donnée, développée par le statisticien italien Corrado Gini. Le coefficient de Gini est un nombre variant de 0 à 1, où 0 signifie l’égalité parfaite et 1 signifie l’inégalité totale. Ce coefficient est très utilisé pour mesurer l’inégalité des revenus dans un pays. (…) Les pays les plus égalitaires ont un coefficient de l’ordre de 0,2 (Danemark, Suède, Japon, République tchèque…). Les pays les plus inégalitaires au monde ont un coefficient de 0,6 (Brésil, Guatemala, Honduras…). En France, le coefficient de Gini est de 0,2891. La Chine devient un des pays les plus inégalitaires du monde avec un indice s’élevant à 0.61 en 2010 selon le Centre d’enquête et de recherche sur les revenus des ménages (institut dépendant de la banque centrale chinoise). Le coefficient de Gini est principalement utilisé pour mesurer l’inégalité de revenu, mais peut aussi servir à mesurer l’inégalité de richesse ou de patrimoine. Le coefficient de Gini en économie est souvent combiné avec d’autres données. Se situant dans le cadre de l’étude des inégalités, il va de pair avec la politique. Ses liens avec l’indicateur démocratique (élaboré par des chercheurs, entre -2.5 au pire et +2.5 au mieux) sont réels mais pas automatiques. Wikipedia
The trend of modern times appears to indicate that citizens of democracies are willing heedlessly to surrender their freedoms to purchase social equality (along with economic security), apparently oblivious of the consequences. And the consequences are that their ability to hold on to and use what they earn and own, to hire and fire at will, to enter freely into contracts, and even to speak their mind is steadily being eroded by governments bent on redistributing private assets and subordinating individual rights to group rights. The entire concept of the welfare state as it has evolved in the second half of the twentieth century is incompatible with individual liberty, for it allows various groups with common needs to combine and claim the right to satisfy them at the expense of society at large, in the process steadily enhancing the power of the state which acts on their behalf.  Richard Pipes (“Property and Freedom”, 2000)
It was one of the fastest decimations of an animal population in world history—and it had happened almost entirely in secret. The Soviet Union was a party to the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, a 1946 treaty that limited countries to a set quota of whales each year. By the time a ban on commercial whaling went into effect, in 1986, the Soviets had reported killing a total of 2,710 humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. In fact, the country’s fleets had killed nearly 18 times that many, along with thousands of unreported whales of other species. It had been an elaborate and audacious deception: Soviet captains had disguised ships, tampered with scientific data, and misled international authorities for decades. In the estimation of the marine biologists Yulia Ivashchenko, Phillip Clapham, and Robert Brownell, it was “arguably one of the greatest environmental crimes of the 20th century.” It was also a perplexing one. Environmental crimes are, generally speaking, the most rational of crimes. The upsides are obvious: Fortunes have been made selling contraband rhino horns and mahogany or helping toxic waste disappear, and the risks are minimal—poaching, illegal logging, and dumping are penalized only weakly in most countries, when they’re penalized at all. The Soviet whale slaughter followed no such logic. Unlike Norway and Japan, the other major whaling nations of the era, the Soviet Union had little real demand for whale products. Once the blubber was cut away for conversion into oil, the rest of the animal, as often as not, was left in the sea to rot or was thrown into a furnace and reduced to bone meal—a low-value material used for agricultural fertilizer, made from the few animal byproducts that slaughterhouses and fish canneries can’t put to more profitable use. Charles Homans
A l’image d’Astérix défendant un petit bout périphérique de Bretagne face à un immense empire, les opposants au barrage de Sivens semblent mener une résistance dérisoire à une énorme machine bulldozerisante qui ravage la planète animée par la soif effrénée du gain. Ils luttent pour garder un territoire vivant, empêcher la machine d’installer l’agriculture industrialisée du maïs, conserver leur terroir, leur zone boisée, sauver une oasis alors que se déchaîne la désertification monoculturelle avec ses engrais tueurs de sols, tueurs de vie, où plus un ver de terre ne se tortille ou plus un oiseau ne chante. Cette machine croit détruire un passé arriéré, elle détruit par contre une alternative humaine d’avenir. Elle a détruit la paysannerie, l’exploitation fermière à dimension humaine. Elle veut répandre partout l’agriculture et l’élevage à grande échelle. Elle veut empêcher l’agro-écologie pionnière. Elle a la bénédiction de l’Etat, du gouvernement, de la classe politique. Elle ne sait pas que l’agro-écologie crée les premiers bourgeons d’un futur social qui veut naître, elle ne sait pas que les « écolos » défendent le « vouloir vivre ensemble ». Elle ne sait pas que les îlots de résistance sont des îlots d’espérance. Les tenants de l’économie libérale, de l’entreprise über alles, de la compétitivité, de l’hyper-rentabilité, se croient réalistes alors que le calcul qui est leur instrument de connaissance les aveugle sur les vraies et incalculables réalités des vies humaines, joie, peine, bonheur, malheur, amour et amitié. Le caractère abstrait, anonyme et anonymisant de cette machine énorme, lourdement armée pour défendre son barrage, a déclenché le meurtre d’un jeune homme bien concret, bien pacifique, animé par le respect de la vie et l’aspiration à une autre vie.  A part les violents se disant anarchistes, enragés et inconscients saboteurs, les protestataires, habitants locaux et écologistes venus de diverses régions de France, étaient, en résistant à l’énorme machine, les porteurs et porteuses d’un nouvel avenir. Le problème du barrage de Sivens est apparemment mineur, local. Mais par l’entêtement à vouloir imposer ce barrage sans tenir compte des réserves et critiques, par l’entêtement de l’Etat à vouloir le défendre par ses forces armées, allant jusqu’à utiliser les grenades, par l’entêtement des opposants de la cause du barrage dans une petite vallée d’une petite région, la guerre du barrage de Sivens est devenue le symbole et le microcosme de la vraie guerre de civilisation qui se mène dans le pays et plus largement sur la planète. (…) Pire, il a fait silence officiel embarrassé sur la mort d’un jeune homme de 21 ans, amoureux de la vie, communiste candide, solidaire des victimes de la terrible machine, venu en témoin et non en combattant. Quoi, pas une émotion, pas un désarroi ? Il faut attendre une semaine l’oraison funèbre du président de la République pour lui laisser choisir des mots bien mesurés et équilibrés alors que la force de la machine est démesurée et que la situation est déséquilibrée en défaveur des lésés et des victimes. Ce ne sont pas les lancers de pavés et les ­vitres brisées qui exprimeront la cause non violente de la civilisation écologisée dont la mort de Rémi Fraisse est devenue le ­symbole, l’emblème et le martyre. C’est avec une grande prise de conscience, capable de relier toutes les initiatives alternatives au productivisme aveugle, qu’un véritable hommage peut être rendu à Rémi Fraisse. Edgar Morin
Est-ce que ces policiers se sont cantonnés à se déguiser en casseur ou est-ce qu’ils sont allés un peu plus loin ? Olivier Besancenot
Mais les policiers pris dans la tourmente ont un argument de poids. Preuve à l’appui, ils expliquent que les manifestants n’hésitent plus à publier les photos de leurs visages sur des sites « anti-flics » et que se masquer est le seul moyen pour eux de ne pas être identifiés. RTL
Depuis début septembre, les heurts entre forces de l’ordre et zadistes ont été particulièrement violents, au point que 56 policiers et gendarmes ont été blessés. La préfecture du Tarn a tenu plusieurs réunions avec les organisateurs de la manifestation dans un esprit de calme et, parallèlement, le ministre de l’Intérieur n’a cessé de donner des consignes d’apaisement. Malgré cela, nous avons très vite compris qu’une frange radicale de casseurs viendrait se mêler aux manifestants pacifiques. (…) Le préfet du Tarn, qui détient l’autorité publique, a fait appel aux forces de gendarmerie car il y avait des risques d’affrontement avec des contre-manifestants favorables au barrage. Il y avait aussi la crainte de voir des casseurs se rendre dans la ville proche de Gaillac. Enfin il fallait éviter le « piégeage » du site qui aurait compromis la reprise des travaux. (…) Ces munitions ne peuvent être utilisées que dans deux situations : soit à la suite de violences à l’encontre des forces de l’ordre, soit pour défendre la zone liée à la mission confiée aux gendarmes. Il faut que le chef du dispositif donne son aval à son utilisation, et celui-ci a donné l’ordre en raison des menaces qui pesaient sur les effectifs. Le tireur est un gradé et agit sur ordre de son commandant, après que les sommations d’usage ont été faites. Donc, je maintiens qu’il n’y a pas eu de faute de la part du gradé qui a lancé cette grenade.(…) Entre minuit et 3 heures du matin, ce sont 23 grenades qui ont été lancées. Environ 400 le sont tous les ans, c’est dire que les affrontements ont été particulièrement violents. J’ai vu des officiers, présents dans la gendarmerie depuis trente ans, qui m’ont dit ne jamais avoir vu un tel niveau de violence. Nous sommes face à des gens qui étaient présents pour « casser » du gendarme. Général Denis Favier (directeur général de la gendarmerie nationale)
Tanzania … with a relatively low Gini of 35 may be less egalitarian than it appears since measured inequality lies so close to (or indeed above) its inequality possibility frontier. … On the other hand, with a much higher Gini of almost 48, Malaysia … has extracted only about one-half of maximum inequality, and thus is farther away from the IPF. (…)  As a country becomes richer, its feasible inequality expands. Consequently, if recorded inequality is stable, the inequality extraction ratio must fall; and even if recorded inequality goes up, the ratio may not. Branko Milanovic
Branko Milanovic, Peter H. Lindert, Jeffrey G. Williamson (…) develop two new interesting concepts: the inequality possibility frontier, which sets the limit of possible inequality, and the extraction ratio, the ratio between the feasible maximum and the actual level of inequality. The idea in a nutshell is that the higher a society’s mean income, the more there is for the ruling class possibly to take. So how much of that have they actually been taking historically, and how does it differ from today?  Amidst a great deal of interesting discussion of the problems inherent in estimating incomes and their distribution in ye olden times, Messrs Milanovic, Lindert, and Williamson find that the extraction ratio in pre-industrial societies of yore were much higher than in pre-industrial nations today, although their actual levels of inequality (as measured by the Gini coefficient) are very similar. A really, really poor country may have a low level of actual inequality, since even the rich have so little. But they may have nevetheless taken all they can get from the less powerful. A richer and nominally less equal place may also be rather less bandit-like; the powerful could hoard more, but they don’t. Because potential and actual inequality come apart, measured actual inequality may therefore tell us less than we think. The Economist
Marx and Engels were pretty good economic reporters. Surveying the economic history literature, Milanovic finds that between 1800 and 1849, the wage of an unskilled laborer in India, one of the poorest countries at the time, was 30 percent that of an equivalent worker in England, one of the richest. Here is another data point: in the 1820s, real wages in the Netherlands were just 70 percent higher than those in the Yangtze Valley in China. But Marx and Engels did not do as well as economic forecasters. They predicted that oppression of the proletariat would get worse, creating an international – and internationally exploited – working class. Instead, Milanovic shows that over the subsequent century and a half, industrial capitalism hugely enriched the workers in the countries where it flourished – and widened the gap between them and workers in those parts of the world where it did not take hold. One way to understand what has happened, Milanovic says, is to use a measure of global inequality developed by François Bourguignon and Christian Morrisson in a 2002 paper. They calculated the global Gini coefficient, a popular measure of inequality, to have been 53 in 1850, with roughly half due to location – or inequality between countries – and half due to class. By Milanovic’s calculation, the global Gini coefficient had risen to 65.4 by 2005. The striking change, though, is in its composition: 85 percent is due to location, and just 15 percent due to class. Comparable wages in developed and developing countries are another way to illustrate the gap. Milanovic uses the 2009 global prices and earnings report compiled by UBS, the Swiss bank. This showed that the nominal after-tax wage for a building laborer in New York was $16.60 an hour, compared with 80 cents in Beijing, 60 cents in Nairobi and 50 cents in New Delhi, a gap that is orders of magnitude greater than the one in the 19th century. Interestingly, at a time when unskilled workers are the ones we worry are getting the rawest deal, the difference in earnings between New York engineers and their developing world counterparts is much smaller: engineers earn $26.50 an hour in New York, $5.80 in Beijing, $4 in Nairobi and $2.90 in New Delhi. Milanovic has two important takeaways from all of this. The first is that in the past century and a half, « the specter of communism » in the Western world « was exorcised » because industrial capitalism did such a good job of enriching the erstwhile proletariat. His second conclusion is that the big cleavage in the world today is not between classes within countries, but between the rich West and the poor developing world. As a result, he predicts « huge migratory pressures because people can increase their incomes several-fold if they migrate. » I wonder, though, if the disparity Milanovic documents is already creating a different shift in the global economy. Thanks to new communications and transportation technologies, and the opening up of the world economy, immigration is not the only way to match cheap workers from developing economies with better-paid jobs in the developing world. Another way to do it is to move jobs to where workers live. Economists are not the only ones who can read the UBS research – business people do, too. And some of them are concluding, as one hedge fund manager said at a recent dinner speech in New York, that « the low-skilled American worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. » At a time when Western capitalism is huffing and wheezing, Milanovic’s paper is a vivid reminder of how much it has accomplished. But he also highlights the big new challenge – how to bring the rewards of capitalism to the workers of the developing world at a time when the standard of living of their Western counterparts has stalled. Chrystia Freeland
At a very basic, agrarian level of development, Milanovic explains, people’s incomes are relatively equal; everyone is living at or close to subsistence level. But as more advanced technologies become available and enable workers to differentiate their skills, a gulf between rich and poor becomes possible. This section also gingerly approaches the contentious debate over whether inequality is good or bad for economic growth, but ultimately quibbles with the question itself. “There is ‘good’ and ‘bad’ inequality,” Milanovic writes, “just as there is good and bad cholesterol.” The possibility of unequal economic outcomes motivates people to work harder, he argues, although at some point it can lead to the preservation of acquired positions, which causes economies to stagnate. In his second and third essays, Milanovic switches to his obvious passion: inequality around the world. These sections encourage readers to better appreciate their own living standards and to think more skeptically about who is responsible for their success. As Milanovic notes, an astounding 60 percent of a person’s income is determined merely by where she was born (and an additional 20 percent is dictated by how rich her parents were). He also makes interesting international comparisons. The typical person in the top 5 percent of the Indian population, for example, makes the same as or less than the typical person in the bottom 5 percent of the American population. That’s right: America’s poorest are, on average, richer than India’s richest — extravagant Mumbai mansions notwithstanding. It is no wonder then, Milanovic says, that so many from the third world risk life and limb to sneak into the first. A recent World Bank survey suggested that “countries that have done economically poorly would, if free migration were allowed, remain perhaps without half or more of their populations.” Catherine Rampell
Considérez le mouvement actuel des indignados, le mouvement des (comme le slogan le dit) « 99% contre le 1% ». Mais si l’on demande où, dans la distribution du revenu mondiale, se trouvent ces « 99% » qui manifestent dans les pays riches, nous trouvons qu’ils sont dans la position supérieure de la distribution du revenu mondiale, disons, autour du 80e percentile. En d’autres mots, ils sont plus riches que les 4/5e des individus vivant dans le monde. Ceci étant, ce n’est pas un argument pour dire qu’ils ne devraient pas manifester, mais ce fait empirique soulève immédiatement la question suivante, celle dont traitent les philosophes politiques. Supposons, pas tout à fait de manière irréaliste, que la mondialisation marche de telle façon qu’elle augmente les revenus de certains parmi ces « autres » 4/5e de l’humanité, ceux vivant en Chine, en Inde, en Afrique, et qu’elle réduit les revenus de ceux qui manifestent dans les rues des pays riches. Que devrait être la réponse à cela ? Devrions-nous considérer ce qui est meilleur pour le monde dans son entièreté, et dire ainsi à ces « 99% » : « vous autres, vous êtes déjà riches selon les standards mondiaux, laissez maintenant quelques autres, qui sont prêts à faire votre travail pour une fraction de l’argent que vous demandez, le faire, et améliorer ce faisant leur sort d’un rien, gagner un accès à l’eau potable ou donner naissance sans danger, par exemple, des choses que vous avez déjà et tenez pour acquises ». Ou bien, devrions-nous dire au contraire que la redistribution doit d’abord avoir lieu dans chaque pays individuellement, c’est-à-dire que l’on redistribue l’argent depuis le 1% le plus riche vers les autres 99% dans le même pays, et, seulement une fois cela accompli, pourrions-nous commencer à envisager ce qui devrait se faire à l’échelle mondiale ? Un optimum global serait ainsi atteint quand chaque pays prendrait soin de lui-même au mieux en premier lieu. Cette dernière position, où l’optimum global n’existe pas en tant que tel mais est le « produit » des optimums nationaux, est la position de John Rawls. La précédente, qui considère l’intérêt de tous sans se préoccuper des pays individuellement, est celle de philosophes politiques plus radicaux. Mais, comme on le voit, prendre une position ou l’autre a des conséquences très différentes sur notre attitude envers la mondialisation ou les revendications des mouvements comme les indignados ou Occupy Wall Street.
Nous sommes souvent pessimistes ou même cyniques quant à la capacité des politiciens d’offrir du changement. Mais notez que cette capacité, en démocratie, dépend de ce que la population veut. Aussi, peut-être devrions-nous nous tourner davantage vers nous-mêmes que vers les politiciens pour comprendre pourquoi changer le modèle économique actuel est si difficile. Malgré plusieurs effets négatifs du néolibéralisme (que j’ai mentionnés plus haut), un large segment de la population en a bénéficié, et même certains parmi ceux qui n’y ont pas gagné « objectivement » ont totalement internalisé ses valeurs. Il semble que nous voulions tous une maison achetée sans acompte, nous achetons une deuxième voiture si nous obtenons un crédit pas cher, nous avons des factures sur nos cartes de crédit bien au-delà de nos moyens, nous ne voulons pas d’augmentation des prix de l’essence, nous voulons voyager en avion même si cela génère de la pollution, nous mettons en route la climatisation dès qu’il fait plus de vingt-cinq degrés, nous voulons voir tous les derniers films et DVDs, nous avons plusieurs postes de télévision dernier cri, etc. Nous nous plaignons souvent d’un emploi précaire mais nous ne voulons renoncer à aucun des bénéfices, réels ou faux, qui dérivent de l’approche Reagan/Thatcher de l’économie. Quand une majorité suffisante de personnes aura un sentiment différent, je suis sûr qu’il y aura des politiciens qui le comprendront, et gagneront des élections avec ce nouveau programme (pro-égalité), et le mettront même en œuvre. Les politiciens sont simplement des entrepreneurs : si des gens veulent une certaine politique, ils l’offriront, de la même manière qu’un établissement vous proposera un café gourmet pourvu qu’un nombre suffisant parmi nous le veuille et soit prêt à payer pour cela.
L’inégalité globale, l’inégalité entre les citoyens du monde, est à un niveau très élevé depuis vingt ans. Ce niveau est le plus élevé, ou presque, de l’histoire : après la révolution industrielle, certaines classes, et puis certaines nations, sont devenues riches et les autres sont restées pauvres. Cela a élevé l’inégalité globale de 1820 à environ 1970-80. Après cela, elle est restée sans tendance claire, mais à ce niveau élevé. Mais depuis les dix dernières années, grâce aux taux de croissance importants en Chine et en Inde, il se peut que nous commencions à voir un déclin de l’inégalité globale. Si ces tendances se poursuivent sur les vingt ou trente prochaines années, l’inégalité globale pourrait baisser substantiellement. Mais l’on ne devrait pas oublier que cela dépend crucialement de ce qui se passe en Chine, et que d’autres pays pauvres et populeux comme le Nigeria, le Bangladesh, les Philippines, le Soudan, etc., n’ont pas eu beaucoup de croissance économique. Avec la croissance de leur population, il se peut qu’ils poussent l’inégalité globale vers le haut. D’un autre côté, le monde est plus riche aujourd’hui qu’à n’importe quel autre moment dans l’histoire. Il n’y a aucun doute sur ce point. Le 20e siècle a été justement appelé par [l’historien britannique] Eric Hosbawm « le siècle des extrêmes » : jamais des progrès aussi importants n’avaient été réalisés auparavant pour autant de monde, et jamais autant de monde n’avait été tué et exterminé par des idéologies extrêmes. Le défi du 21e siècle est de mettre fin à ce dernier point. Mais les développements de la première décennie de ce siècle n’ont pas produit beaucoup de raisons d’être optimiste.
Il y a trois moyens pour s’y prendre. Le premier est une plus grande redistribution du monde riche vers le monde pauvre. Mais l’on peut aisément écarter ce chemin. L’aide au développement officielle totale est un peu au-dessus de 100 milliards de dollars par an, ce qui est à peu près équivalent à la somme payée en bonus pour les « bonnes performances » par Goldman Sachs depuis le début de la crise. De telles sommes ne seront pas une solution à la pauvreté mondiale ou à l’inégalité globale, et de plus, ces fonds vont diminuer dans la mesure où le monde riche a du mal à s’extraire de la crise. La deuxième manière consiste à accélérer la croissance dans les pays pauvres, et l’Afrique en particulier. C’est en fait la meilleure façon de s’attaquer à la pauvreté et à l’inégalité tout à la fois. Mais c’est plus facile à dire qu’à faire. Même si la dernière décennie a été bonne généralement pour l’Afrique, le bilan global pour l’ère post-indépendance est mauvais, et dans certains cas, catastrophiquement mauvais. Ceci étant, je ne suis pas tout à fait pessimiste. L’Afrique sub-saharienne a commencé à mettre de l’ordre dans certains de ses problèmes, et pourrait continuer à avoir des taux de croissance relativement élevés. Cependant, le fossé entre les revenus moyens d’Afrique et d’Europe est désormais si profond, qu’il faudrait quelques centaines d’années pour l’entamer significativement. Ce qui nous laisse une troisième solution pour réduire les disparités globales : la migration. En principe, ça n’est pas différent du fait d’accélérer la croissance du revenu dans un quelconque pays pauvre. La seule différence – mais politiquement c’est une différence significative – est qu’une personne pauvre améliore son sort en déménageant ailleurs plutôt qu’en restant là où elle est née. La migration est certainement l’outil le plus efficace pour la réduction de l’inégalité globale. Ouvrir les frontières de l’Europe et des États-Unis permettrait d’attirer des millions de migrants et leurs niveaux de vie s’élèveraient. On voit cela tous les jours à une moindre échelle, mais on l’a vu également à la fin du 19e siècle et au début du 20e siècle, quand les migrations étaient deux à cinq fois supérieures (en proportion de la population d’alors) à aujourd’hui. La plupart de ceux qui migraient augmentaient leurs revenus. Cependant il y a deux problèmes importants avec la migration. Premièrement, cela mènerait à des revenus plus bas pour certaines personnes vivant dans les pays d’accueil, et elles utiliseraient (comme elles le font actuellement) tous les moyens politiques pour l’arrêter. Deuxièmement, cela crée parfois un « clash des civilisations » inconfortable quand des normes culturelles différentes se heurtent les unes aux autres. Cela produit un retour de bâton, qui est évident aujourd’hui en Europe. C’est une réaction compréhensible, même si beaucoup d’Européens devraient peut-être réfléchir à l’époque où ils émigraient, que ce soit de manière pacifique ou de manière violente, vers le reste du monde, et combien ils y trouvaient des avantages. Il semble maintenant que la boucle soit bouclée : les autres émigrent vers l’Europe. Branko Milanovic

Attention: une victime peut en cacher bien d’autres !

En ce 97e anniversaire du coup d’Etat bolchévique qui lança une révolution et les flots de sang dont on attend toujours le Nuremberg

Et où, à l’occasion du décès accidentel d’un jeune militant écologiste contestant la construction d’un barrage dans le Tarn, nos zélotes de la philosophie la plus criminelle de l’histoire viennent jeter de l’huile sur le feu avec leurs insinuations conspirationnistes contre les forces de l’ordre

Pendant que nos philosophes auto-proclamés dénoncent la « guerre de civilisation » libérale qui aurait déclenché le « meurtre » (sic) d’un jeune « amoureux de la vie, communiste candide, solidaire des victimes de la terrible machine » …

Et que, dans nos écoles, pour défendre le droit des casseurs à attaquer la police à coup de cocktails molotov ou tout autre projectile potentiellement mortel,  des agents provocateurs issus du même mouvement criminel prennent en otage les études de nos enfants  …

Comment ne pas voir avec l’économiste serbo-américain Branko Milanovic …

Et derrière les indignations sélectives de nos enfants gâtés de Wall Street ou des plaines du Tarn …

Les véritables victimes de la mise au ban proposée …

D’un modèle capitaliste qui avec toutes ses tares n’a jamais sorti autant de monde de la pauvreté ?

Le Gini hors de la bouteille. Entretien avec Branko Milanovic
Branko Milanovic
Niels Planel
Sens public
23 novembre 2011

Résumé : Branko Milanovic compte sans doute parmi les spécialistes des inégalités les plus importants sur la scène internationale. Économiste à la Banque mondiale, il se penche sur les questions des disparités depuis plusieurs décennies. Dans son livre paru cette année, The Haves and the Have-Nots (Les nantis et les indigents), il réussit le tour de force de rendre accessibles au plus grand nombre des idées complexes sur les inégalités entre les individus, entre les pays, et entre les citoyens du monde dans un style attrayant. Pour ce faire, l’auteur illustre ses propos au travers de petites histoires (des « vignettes ») audacieuses et d’une incroyable originalité, dans lesquelles il répond à des questions fascinantes : les Romains prospères étaient-ils comparativement plus riches que les super riches d’aujourd’hui ? Dans quel arrondissement de Paris valait-il mieux vivre au 13e siècle, et qu’en est-il aujourd’hui ? Sur l’échelle de la redistribution du revenu au Kenya, où se situait le grand-père de Barack Obama ? Est-ce que le lieu de naissance influence le salaire que vous aurez au long d’une vie, et si oui, comment ? Qu’a gagné Anna Karénine à tomber amoureuse ? La Chine survivra-t-elle au mitan du siècle ? Qui a été la personne la plus riche au monde ? Reprenant également les travaux de Vilfredo Pareto, Karl Marx, Alexis de Tocqueville, John Rawls ou Simon Kuznets à une époque où la question des inégalités préoccupe de plus en plus, son ouvrage fait le pari d’éclairer un enjeu aussi ancien que passionnant. Branko Milanovic a accepté de répondre aux questions de Sens Public.

Sens Public – D’où votre intérêt pour le sujet des inégalités vous vient-il ?

Branco Milanovic – Depuis le lycée, et même depuis l’école élémentaire, j’étais toujours très intéressé par les enjeux sociaux. J’ai choisi l’économie précisément pour cela. C’était une science sociale et elle traitait de ce qui était probablement l’une des questions les plus importantes à l’époque : comment augmenter le revenu des gens, comment leur permettre de vivre de meilleures vies, dans de plus grands appartements, avec un accès à l’eau chaude, au chauffage, des rues mieux pavées, des trottoirs plus propres.

J’ai étudié dans ce qui était alors la Yougoslavie, qui avait un fort taux de croissance. Le bien être des gens (y compris celui de ma propre famille) augmentait chaque année ; atteindre un taux de croissance de 7-10% par an semblait presque normal. J’aimais l’économie empirique, et j’ai choisi les statistiques (dans le département d’économie). Dans les statistiques, on travaille beaucoup avec les questions de distributions. Et puis, soudainement, les deux intérêts que j’avais préservés, en l’état, dans deux compartiments séparés de mon cerveau, celui pour les enjeux sociaux, et celui pour les statistiques, se sont rejoints.

J’étais assez fasciné (j’avais alors vingt ou vingt-et-un ans), quand j’ai appris pour la première fois des choses au sujet du coefficient de Gini, Pareto ou de la distribution log-normale, et j’ai commencé à voir si les données sur les revenus que j’avais épouseraient la courbe. C’était une époque où l’on utilisait du papier et un stylo, une calculatrice à la main, pour chiffrer la taille de chaque groupe, leur part du revenu total, et pour appliquer une fonction statistique afin de voir si elle correspondait aux nombres ou non. Il me semblait que, d’une certaine manière, le secret de la façon dont l’argent est distribué parmi les individus, ou celui de la manière dont les sociétés sont organisées, apparaîtraient en face de moi. J’ai passé de nombreuses nuits à parcourir ces nombres. Je l’ai souvent préféré à aller dehors avec des amis.

S.P. – Combien de temps vous a pris l’écriture de votre livre sur l’inégalité, et où avez-vous puisé votre inspiration pour rédiger autant d’histoires aussi diverses (vos “vignettes”) ? Les économistes semblent souvent penser d’une manière très abstraite. En utilisant des exemples ancrés dans la vie quotidienne des gens (la littérature, l’histoire, etc.), quelle était votre intention ?

B.M. – Le livre a été rédigé en moins de cent jours, et cela inclut les jours où je ne pouvais pas écrire à cause d’autres choses que j’avais à faire, ou parce que je voyageais. Les meilleurs jours furent ceux où je rédigeais une, voire deux vignettes en moins de vingt-quatre heures. Ceci étant, toutes les idées pour les vignettes et les données requises existaient déjà. C’est pourquoi il m’a été possible d’écrire le livre aussi vite. C’est au cours des nombreuses années où je faisais un travail plus « sérieux » qu’une idée (qui deviendrait plus tard une « vignette ») me frappait, et je passais alors plusieurs heures ou journées à penser et calculer des choses pour lesquelles je ne voyais pas encore un moyen évident de publication. Le vrai défi a été de trouver un format qui permettrait de rassembler tous ces morceaux que j’aimais, et que les gens semblaient apprécier lorsque je les présentais à des conférences, dans un livre. Une fois que, avec l’éditeur de mon premier livre, Tim Sullivan, je parvins à la présente structure, où chaque sujet est introduit par un essai assez sérieux, assez académique, puis illustré par des vignettes, écrire le livre devint facile et vraiment plaisant. J’écris d’ordinaire facilement et rapidement et il me semble que je n’ai jamais rien écrit avec autant d’aise. Et je pense que cela se voit dans le texte.

J’ai tâché d’accomplir deux choses : prendre du plaisir en écrivant les vignettes, et montrer aux lecteurs que bien des concepts secs de l’économie n’ont pas pour sujet des « agents économiques » (comme on appelle les gens en économie), ou des « attentes rationnelles », ou des « marchés efficaces », etc., mais des personnes comme eux-mêmes, ou des personnes célèbres, ou des personnages de fiction. Et que, eux, les lecteurs, ont rarement fait cette transition, à savoir, réaliser que l’économie, et la distribution du revenu, ont vraiment pour sujet les gens, les personnes réelles : comment ils gagnent et perdent de l’argent, comment les riches influencent le processus politique, qui paye des impôts, pourquoi des pays prospèrent et déclinent, pourquoi ce sont toujours les mêmes équipes de football qui gagnent, et même comment une inégalité élevée a pu engendrer la crise actuelle. Ce sont là, je pense, des sujets qui nous concernent tous, fréquemment, au quotidien, et que les économistes rendent compliqués en utilisant un jargon impénétrable.

S.P. – En France, des écrivains comme Victor Hugo et Émile Zola ont produit une œuvre impressionnante sur les conditions sociales et les inégalités de leur époque. Et l’une des vignettes les plus fameuses de votre livre se fonde sur le roman de Tolstoï, Anna Karénine. Vous faites également référence à Orgueil et Préjugés, de Jane Austen… Est-ce que la littérature est un outil aussi efficace que l’économie pour comprendre, observer et expliquer les inégalités ? Et si oui, est-ce que la littérature est toujours une force puissante pour sensibiliser les gens aux inégalités dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, ou bien l’économie est-elle plus efficace pour cela ?

B.M. – La littérature européenne du 19e siècle, et la française en particulier, sont des trésors d’informations sur les sociétés européennes de l’époque et, de ce fait, sur la distribution du revenu. Les grands romans de cette période se préoccupaient de décrire les sociétés telles qu’elles étaient, de regarder les destins individuels dans le cadre d’ensemble de l’évolution sociale, et puisque l’argent jouait un rôle si important, les livres sont pleins de données détaillées sur les revenus, les salaires, le coût de la vie, le prix des choses, etc. C’est vrai de Victor Hugo (dont je connais moins bien les livres) mais bien sûr, également, de Zola et Balzac, ou Dickens. Je pense que la Comédie humaine de Balzac pourrait être aisément convertie en une étude empirique sur l’inégalité de revenu, et la mobilité sociale, au sein de la société française de l’époque. Balzac voyait bien sûr son œuvre comme un portrait de la société dans son ensemble. Orgueil et préjugés et Anna Karénine sont plus limités dans leur prisme (particulièrement le premier) mais ils se concentrent sur une chose qui me semble intéressante : le revenu au sommet de la pyramide de la richesse, les énormes différences de revenus entre ceux qui sont bien lotis et ceux qui sont extrêmement riches, et sur la position des femmes pour qui la seule voie vers une vie confortable et riche passait par le mariage. C’est pourquoi le mariage et l’argent, les « alliances » et les « mésalliances » avaient tant d’importance dans la littérature de l’époque.

Je ne connais pas bien la littérature d’aujourd’hui. Un changement clair me semble avoir eu lieu au cours du siècle dernier. L’objectif est moins de présenter une peinture de la société que de se concentrer sur les individus, leur vie intérieure. Je pense que par principe, une telle littérature est bien moins critique des arrangements sociaux, principalement parce qu’elle les considère comme acquis, ou, si elle est critique, les regarde comme reflétant un malaise humain de base, une condition humaine immuable. Pour prendre un exemple, j’ai aimé et presque tout lu de Sartre et Camus, mais vous ne trouverez presque aucun chiffre dans leurs livres sur combien untel gagne ou sur combien les choses coûtent. Ceci, malgré l’ostensible gauchisme politique de Sartre. De ce point de vue, Balzac était bien plus gauchiste que ce dernier. Pareillement, vous ne trouverez rien de tel dans les sept volumes de Proust malgré le fait que son œuvre est largement au sujet de la société et des changements de fortune (souvent, littéralement, des changements de richesses) parmi la classe aux plus hauts revenus. Mais savons-nous combien Mme de Guermantes gagne par an ? De combien est-elle plus riche que Swann ? Ou, d’ailleurs, quel est le revenu du père du narrateur ?

Je ne vois pas la littérature d’aujourd’hui comme une force puissante pour le changement. Je pense qu’elle a perdu l’importance qu’elle avait au 19e siècle en Europe, en Russie et aux États-Unis. Aujourd’hui, vous avez des hystéries au sujet de tel ou tel livre, et pas plutôt que le volume a été lu, ou plutôt semi-lu, il tombe dans l’oubli.

S.P. – Dans le paysage d’aujourd’hui, où voyez-vous les Tolstoï et les Austen – des auteurs et des artistes qui présentent une vue détaillée des inégalités ?

B.M. – Je pense que ce rôle a été « spécialisé » comme tant d’autres rôles dans les sociétés modernes. Il appartient maintenant aux économistes et aux philosophes politiques. Je vois ces deux groupes (combinés peut-être aux sociologues dans la mesure où ceux-ci sont désireux d’étudier des phénomènes sociaux sérieux plutôt que les menus détails du comportement humain) comme les personnes, peut-être mues par leurs intérêts professionnels, qui peuvent dire quelque chose au sujet des inégalités dans les sociétés où nous vivons. Et dire quelque chose qui ne soit pas simplement des « conjectures » ou des « sentiments », mais fondé sur une preuve empirique ou (dans le cas des philosophes politiques) sur une étude sérieuse et une analyse de la manière dont les sociétés peuvent ou devraient être organisées.

Pour être clair, j’aimerais donner un exemple. Considérez le mouvement actuel des indignados, le mouvement des (comme le slogan le dit) « 99% contre le 1% ». Mais si l’on demande où, dans la distribution du revenu mondiale, se trouvent ces « 99% » qui manifestent dans les pays riches, nous trouvons qu’ils sont dans la position supérieure de la distribution du revenu mondiale, disons, autour du 80e percentile. En d’autres mots, ils sont plus riches que les 4/5e des individus vivant dans le monde. Ceci étant, ce n’est pas un argument pour dire qu’ils ne devraient pas manifester, mais ce fait empirique soulève immédiatement la question suivante, celle dont traitent les philosophes politiques.

Supposons, pas tout à fait de manière irréaliste, que la mondialisation marche de telle façon qu’elle augmente les revenus de certains parmi ces « autres » 4/5e de l’humanité, ceux vivant en Chine, en Inde, en Afrique, et qu’elle réduit les revenus de ceux qui manifestent dans les rues des pays riches. Que devrait être la réponse à cela ? Devrions-nous considérer ce qui est meilleur pour le monde dans son entièreté, et dire ainsi à ces « 99% » : « vous autres, vous êtes déjà riches selon les standards mondiaux, laissez maintenant quelques autres, qui sont prêts à faire votre travail pour une fraction de l’argent que vous demandez, le faire, et améliorer ce faisant leur sort d’un rien, gagner un accès à l’eau potable ou donner naissance sans danger, par exemple, des choses que vous avez déjà et tenez pour acquises ». Ou bien, devrions-nous dire au contraire que la redistribution doit d’abord avoir lieu dans chaque pays individuellement, c’est-à-dire que l’on redistribue l’argent depuis le 1% le plus riche vers les autres 99% dans le même pays, et, seulement une fois cela accompli, pourrions-nous commencer à envisager ce qui devrait se faire à l’échelle mondiale ? Un optimum global serait ainsi atteint quand chaque pays prendrait soin de lui-même au mieux en premier lieu. Cette dernière position, où l’optimum global n’existe pas en tant que tel mais est le « produit » des optimums nationaux, est la position de John Rawls. La précédente, qui considère l’intérêt de tous sans se préoccuper des pays individuellement, est celle de philosophes politiques plus radicaux. Mais, comme on le voit, prendre une position ou l’autre a des conséquences très différentes sur notre attitude envers la mondialisation ou les revendications des mouvements comme les indignados ou Occupy Wall Street.

S.P. – Jusqu’à la fin, votre livre se refuse à entrer dans des considérations politiques sur l’inégalité. Quel est le rôle de la politique dans le combat ou le développement des inégalités ?

B.M. – Je voulais que mon livre reste relativement neutre par rapport à la politique d’aujourd’hui. Les livres de plaidoyer avec des titres longs et idiots ne font pas long feu. Ce sont des « éphémérides ». Qui se souvient aujourd’hui des livres qui, il y a vingt ans, nous mettaient en garde contre la prise de pouvoir mondiale du Japon et pressaient les gouvernements occidentaux de réagir ? Et avant cela, c’était l’OPEC, et encore avant cela, l’Union soviétique.

Réduire les inégalités sera un processus long et laborieux. Depuis la fin des années 1970, une large poussée des inégalités en Occident a eu lieu en conséquence d’un changement idéologique à l’avant-garde de laquelle se trouvaient des économistes comme Hayek et Friedman, et l’école de Chicago en général. Leurs prescriptions furent mises en œuvres par Margaret Thatcher et Ronald Reagan. A la même époque, Deng Xiaoping, suivant la même idéologie (« être riche, c’est être glorieux »), initia des réformes néolibérales similaires en Chine. Et à bien des égards, les réformes en Occident et en Chine ont eu un succès extraordinaire.

Mais elles ont échoué à offrir une société plus heureuse. L’argent, très inégalement distribué, a alimenté la corruption, permis un mode de vie ostentatoire, a rendu triviaux les soucis liés à la pauvreté des autres au travers de fausses organisations-jouets détenues par les riches, a réduit les services sociaux de base dans lesquels l’idée de la citoyenneté était ancrée, comme l’éducation et la santé. Les sociétés occidentales sont devenues beaucoup plus riches, mais, pour reprendre la raillerie de Thatcher, elles sont devenues bien moins sociétés : elles sont souvent seulement des collections d’individus en compétition mutuelle. La Chine est devenue immensément plus riche qu’en 1978, mais c’est l’un des quelques pays dans le monde où les gens sont de moins en moins heureux année après année, selon la World Values Survey. Et les mêmes programmes néolibéraux, mis en œuvre en Russie, après avoir presque détruit le pays, ont conduit à des augmentations massives de la mortalité, ils ont détruit les liens sociaux et les ont remplacés par du cynisme et de l’anomie.

Aussi, pour défaire certains de ces développements, il nous faudra des années de changement. Qui plus est, on ne voit pas même à l’horizon comment ces demandes pour du changement peuvent être traduites dans le processus politique, et comment les politiciens peuvent les utiliser pour gagner des élections. Parce que, tant qu’ils ne les considéreront pas comme des stratégies gagnantes, ils n’iront pas vraiment, l’un après l’autre, concourir sur cette plateforme. Obama a été une grande déception de ce point de vue. Il était chargé d’un mandat massif pour le changement mais a fait peu de choses.

Nous sommes souvent pessimistes ou même cyniques quant à la capacité des politiciens d’offrir du changement. Mais notez que cette capacité, en démocratie, dépend de ce que la population veut. Aussi, peut-être devrions-nous nous tourner davantage vers nous-mêmes que vers les politiciens pour comprendre pourquoi changer le modèle économique actuel est si difficile. Malgré plusieurs effets négatifs du néolibéralisme (que j’ai mentionnés plus haut), un large segment de la population en a bénéficié, et même certains parmi ceux qui n’y ont pas gagné « objectivement » ont totalement internalisé ses valeurs.

Il semble que nous voulions tous une maison achetée sans acompte, nous achetons une deuxième voiture si nous obtenons un crédit pas cher, nous avons des factures sur nos cartes de crédit bien au-delà de nos moyens, nous ne voulons pas d’augmentation des prix de l’essence, nous voulons voyager en avion même si cela génère de la pollution, nous mettons en route la climatisation dès qu’il fait plus de vingt-cinq degrés, nous voulons voir tous les derniers films et DVDs, nous avons plusieurs postes de télévision dernier cri, etc. Nous nous plaignons souvent d’un emploi précaire mais nous ne voulons renoncer à aucun des bénéfices, réels ou faux, qui dérivent de l’approche Reagan/Thatcher de l’économie.

Quand une majorité suffisante de personnes aura un sentiment différent, je suis sûr qu’il y aura des politiciens qui le comprendront, et gagneront des élections avec ce nouveau programme (pro-égalité), et le mettront même en œuvre. Les politiciens sont simplement des entrepreneurs : si des gens veulent une certaine politique, ils l’offriront, de la même manière qu’un établissement vous proposera un café gourmet pourvu qu’un nombre suffisant parmi nous le veuille et soit prêt à payer pour cela.

S.P. – Est-ce que l’inégalité est devenue une devise commune dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, ou bien la prospérité est-elle davantage partagée que par le passé ?

B.M. – L’inégalité globale, l’inégalité entre les citoyens du monde, est à un niveau très élevé depuis vingt ans. Ce niveau est le plus élevé, ou presque, de l’histoire : après la révolution industrielle, certaines classes, et puis certaines nations, sont devenues riches et les autres sont restées pauvres. Cela a élevé l’inégalité globale de 1820 à environ 1970-80. Après cela, elle est restée sans tendance claire, mais à ce niveau élevé. Mais depuis les dix dernières années, grâce aux taux de croissance importants en Chine et en Inde, il se peut que nous commencions à voir un déclin de l’inégalité globale. Si ces tendances se poursuivent sur les vingt ou trente prochaines années, l’inégalité globale pourrait baisser substantiellement. Mais l’on ne devrait pas oublier que cela dépend crucialement de ce qui se passe en Chine, et que d’autres pays pauvres et populeux comme le Nigeria, le Bangladesh, les Philippines, le Soudan, etc., n’ont pas eu beaucoup de croissance économique. Avec la croissance de leur population, il se peut qu’ils poussent l’inégalité globale vers le haut.

D’un autre côté, le monde est plus riche aujourd’hui qu’à n’importe quel autre moment dans l’histoire. Il n’y a aucun doute sur ce point. Le 20e siècle a été justement appelé par [l’historien britannique] Eric Hosbawm « le siècle des extrêmes » : jamais des progrès aussi importants n’avaient été réalisés auparavant pour autant de monde, et jamais autant de monde n’avait été tué et exterminé par des idéologies extrêmes. Le défi du 21e siècle est de mettre fin à ce dernier point. Mais les développements de la première décennie de ce siècle n’ont pas produit beaucoup de raisons d’être optimiste.

S.P. – Quel serait le meilleur moyen de limiter les inégalités dans un monde globalisé ?

B.M. – Il y a trois moyens pour s’y prendre. Le premier est une plus grande redistribution du monde riche vers le monde pauvre. Mais l’on peut aisément écarter ce chemin. L’aide au développement officielle totale est un peu au-dessus de 100 milliards de dollars par an, ce qui est à peu près équivalent à la somme payée en bonus pour les « bonnes performances » par Goldman Sachs depuis le début de la crise. De telles sommes ne seront pas une solution à la pauvreté mondiale ou à l’inégalité globale, et de plus, ces fonds vont diminuer dans la mesure où le monde riche a du mal à s’extraire de la crise.

La deuxième manière consiste à accélérer la croissance dans les pays pauvres, et l’Afrique en particulier. C’est en fait la meilleure façon de s’attaquer à la pauvreté et à l’inégalité tout à la fois. Mais c’est plus facile à dire qu’à faire. Même si la dernière décennie a été bonne généralement pour l’Afrique, le bilan global pour l’ère post-indépendance est mauvais, et dans certains cas, catastrophiquement mauvais. Ceci étant, je ne suis pas tout à fait pessimiste. L’Afrique sub-saharienne a commencé à mettre de l’ordre dans certains de ses problèmes, et pourrait continuer à avoir des taux de croissance relativement élevés. Cependant, le fossé entre les revenus moyens d’Afrique et d’Europe est désormais si profond, qu’il faudrait quelques centaines d’années pour l’entamer significativement.

Ce qui nous laisse une troisième solution pour réduire les disparités globales : la migration. En principe, ça n’est pas différent du fait d’accélérer la croissance du revenu dans un quelconque pays pauvre. La seule différence – mais politiquement c’est une différence significative – est qu’une personne pauvre améliore son sort en déménageant ailleurs plutôt qu’en restant là où elle est née. La migration est certainement l’outil le plus efficace pour la réduction de l’inégalité globale. Ouvrir les frontières de l’Europe et des États-Unis permettrait d’attirer des millions de migrants et leurs niveaux de vie s’élèveraient. On voit cela tous les jours à une moindre échelle, mais on l’a vu également à la fin du 19e siècle et au début du 20e siècle, quand les migrations étaient deux à cinq fois supérieures (en proportion de la population d’alors) à aujourd’hui. La plupart de ceux qui migraient augmentaient leurs revenus.

Cependant il y a deux problèmes importants avec la migration. Premièrement, cela mènerait à des revenus plus bas pour certaines personnes vivant dans les pays d’accueil, et elles utiliseraient (comme elles le font actuellement) tous les moyens politiques pour l’arrêter. Deuxièmement, cela crée parfois un « clash des civilisations » inconfortable quand des normes culturelles différentes se heurtent les unes aux autres. Cela produit un retour de bâton, qui est évident aujourd’hui en Europe. C’est une réaction compréhensible, même si beaucoup d’Européens devraient peut-être réfléchir à l’époque où ils émigraient, que ce soit de manière pacifique ou de manière violente, vers le reste du monde, et combien ils y trouvaient des avantages. Il semble maintenant que la boucle soit bouclée : les autres émigrent vers l’Europe.

Entretien réalisé et traduit de l’anglais par Niels Planel.

Voir aussi:
Workers of the Western world
Chrystia Freeland
Reuters
Dec 2, 2011

(Reuters) – Branko Milanovic has some good news for the squeezed Western middle class – and also some bad news.

Good news first: The past 150 years have been an astonishing economic victory for the workers of the Western world. The bad news is that workers in the developing world have been left out, and their entry into the global economy will have complex and uneven consequences.

Milanovic’s first conclusion is contrarian, at least in its tone. After all, with unemployment in the United States at more than 9 percent and Europe struggling to muddle through its most serious economic crisis since the Second World War, Western workers are feeling anything but triumphant.

But one of the pleasures of Milanovic’s work is a point of view that is both wide and deep.

Milanovic, a World Bank economist who earned his doctorate in his native Yugoslavia, has an intuitively international frame of reference. Both qualities are in evidence in « Global Inequality: From Class to Location, From Proletarians to Migrants, » a working paper released this autumn by the World Bank Development Research Group.

Milanovic contends that the big economic story of the past 150 years is the triumph of the proletariat in the industrialized world. His starting point is 1848 when Europe was convulsed in revolution, industrialization was beginning to really bite, and Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels published the Communist Manifesto.

Their central assertion, Milanovic writes, was that capitalists (and their class allies, the landowners) exploited workers, and that the workers of the world were equally and similarly oppressed.

It turns out that Marx and Engels were pretty good economic reporters. Surveying the economic history literature, Milanovic finds that between 1800 and 1849, the wage of an unskilled laborer in India, one of the poorest countries at the time, was 30 percent that of an equivalent worker in England, one of the richest. Here is another data point: in the 1820s, real wages in the Netherlands were just 70 percent higher than those in the Yangtze Valley in China.

But Marx and Engels did not do as well as economic forecasters. They predicted that oppression of the proletariat would get worse, creating an international – and internationally exploited – working class.

Instead, Milanovic shows that over the subsequent century and a half, industrial capitalism hugely enriched the workers in the countries where it flourished – and widened the gap between them and workers in those parts of the world where it did not take hold.

One way to understand what has happened, Milanovic says, is to use a measure of global inequality developed by François Bourguignon and Christian Morrisson in a 2002 paper. They calculated the global Gini coefficient, a popular measure of inequality, to have been 53 in 1850, with roughly half due to location – or inequality between countries – and half due to class. By Milanovic’s calculation, the global Gini coefficient had risen to 65.4 by 2005. The striking change, though, is in its composition: 85 percent is due to location, and just 15 percent due to class.

Comparable wages in developed and developing countries are another way to illustrate the gap. Milanovic uses the 2009 global prices and earnings report compiled by UBS, the Swiss bank. This showed that the nominal after-tax wage for a building laborer in New York was $16.60 an hour, compared with 80 cents in Beijing, 60 cents in Nairobi and 50 cents in New Delhi, a gap that is orders of magnitude greater than the one in the 19th century.

Interestingly, at a time when unskilled workers are the ones we worry are getting the rawest deal, the difference in earnings between New York engineers and their developing world counterparts is much smaller: engineers earn $26.50 an hour in New York, $5.80 in Beijing, $4 in Nairobi and $2.90 in New Delhi.

Milanovic has two important takeaways from all of this. The first is that in the past century and a half, « the specter of communism » in the Western world « was exorcised » because industrial capitalism did such a good job of enriching the erstwhile proletariat. His second conclusion is that the big cleavage in the world today is not between classes within countries, but between the rich West and the poor developing world. As a result, he predicts « huge migratory pressures because people can increase their incomes several-fold if they migrate. »

I wonder, though, if the disparity Milanovic documents is already creating a different shift in the global economy. Thanks to new communications and transportation technologies, and the opening up of the world economy, immigration is not the only way to match cheap workers from developing economies with better-paid jobs in the developing world. Another way to do it is to move jobs to where workers live.

Economists are not the only ones who can read the UBS research – business people do, too. And some of them are concluding, as one hedge fund manager said at a recent dinner speech in New York, that « the low-skilled American worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. »

At a time when Western capitalism is huffing and wheezing, Milanovic’s paper is a vivid reminder of how much it has accomplished. But he also highlights the big new challenge – how to bring the rewards of capitalism to the workers of the developing world at a time when the standard of living of their Western counterparts has stalled.

(Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

Voir également:

Thy Neighbor’s Wealth
Catherine Rampell
NYT
January 28, 2011

Who needs to keep up with the Joneses? What people really care about is keeping up with the Rockefellers. That’s the main theme of “The Haves and the Have-Nots,” an eclectic book on inequality that attempts to document the long history of coveting by the poor, and the grim consequences of that coveting.

THE HAVES AND THE HAVE-NOTS

A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality

By Branko Milanovic

258 pp. Basic Books. $27.95.
Written by the World Bank economist and development specialist Branko Milanovic, this survey of income distribution past and present is constructed as a sort of textbook-almanac hybrid. It revolves around three technical essays summarizing the academic literature on inequality, which are each followed by a series of quick-hit vignettes about quirkier subjects, like how living standards in 19th-century Russia may have influenced Anna Karenina’s doomed romance, or who the richest person in history was.

The first essay is a primer on how economists think about income inequality within a country — in particular, how it is measured, and how it is related to a country’s overall economic health. At a very basic, agrarian level of development, Milanovic explains, people’s incomes are relatively equal; everyone is living at or close to subsistence level. But as more advanced technologies become available and enable workers to differentiate their skills, a gulf between rich and poor becomes possible.

This section also gingerly approaches the contentious debate over whether inequality is good or bad for economic growth, but ultimately quibbles with the question itself. “There is ‘good’ and ‘bad’ inequality,” Milanovic writes, “just as there is good and bad cholesterol.” The possibility of unequal economic outcomes motivates people to work harder, he argues, although at some point it can lead to the preservation of acquired positions, which causes economies to stagnate.

In his second and third essays, Milanovic switches to his obvious passion: inequality around the world. These sections encourage readers to better appreciate their own living standards and to think more skeptically about who is responsible for their success.

As Milanovic notes, an astounding 60 percent of a person’s income is determined merely by where she was born (and an additional 20 percent is dictated by how rich her parents were). He also makes interesting international comparisons. The typical person in the top 5 percent of the Indian population, for example, makes the same as or less than the typical person in the bottom 5 percent of the American population. That’s right: America’s poorest are, on average, richer than India’s richest — extravagant Mumbai mansions notwithstanding.

It is no wonder then, Milanovic says, that so many from the third world risk life and limb to sneak into the first. A recent World Bank survey suggested that “countries that have done economically poorly would, if free migration were allowed, remain perhaps without half or more of their populations.” Mass-migration attempts are met with sealed borders in the developed world, which then results in the deaths of thousands of anonymous indigents journeying to promised lands only to be swallowed up by the Mediterranean or charred in the Arizona desert.

But while Milanovic demonstrates that inequality between countries is unquestionably toxic, he is less persuasive about the effects of inequality within countries. He frequently assumes that this kind of inequality is by its very nature problematic, but provides scant historical evidence about why, particularly if mobility is ­possible.

In general, mobility — and the policies that promote it — are given disappointingly little space. The same goes for how income inequality might affect the functioning of a democracy.

As a result of such blind spots, “The Haves and the Have-Nots” can feel somewhat patchy or disorganized at times. Milanovic’s more colorful vignettes, on the other hand, are almost uniformly delightful. No matter where you are on the income ladder, Milanovic’s examination of whether Bill Gates is richer than Nero makes for great cocktail party ­conversation.

Catherine Rampell is the economics editor at NYTimes.com.

Voir encore:

The frontiers of inequality
The Economist
Free Exchange | Washington, DC
Dec 6th 2007

AN inventive October NBER paper by Branko Milanovic, Peter H. Lindert, Jeffrey G. Williamson sets itself the task of « Measuring Ancient Inequality ». Therein the authors develop two new interesting concepts: the inequality possibility frontier, which sets the limit of possible inequality, and the extraction ratio, the ratio between the feasible maximum and the actual level of inequality. The idea in a nutshell is that the higher a society’s mean income, the more there is for the ruling class possibly to take. So how much of that have they actually been taking historically, and how does it differ from today?

Amidst a great deal of interesting discussion of the problems inherent in estimating incomes and their distribution in ye olden times, Messrs Milanovic, Lindert, and Williamson find that the extraction ratio in pre-industrial societies of yore were much higher than in pre-industrial nations today, although their actual levels of inequality (as measured by the Gini coefficient) are very similar. A really, really poor country may have a low level of actual inequality, since even the rich have so little. But they may have nevetheless taken all they can get from the less powerful. A richer and nominally less equal place may also be rather less bandit-like; the powerful could hoard more, but they don’t. Because potential and actual inequality come apart, measured actual inequality may therefore tell us less than we think. For example:

Tanzania … with a relatively low Gini of 35 may be less egalitarian than it appears since measured inequality lies so close to (or indeed above) its inequality possibility frontier. … On the other hand, with a much higher Gini of almost 48, Malaysia … has extracted only about one-half of maximum inequality, and thus is farther away from the IPF.
Likewise:

As a country becomes richer, its feasible inequality expands. Consequently, if recorded inequality is stable, the inequality extraction ratio must fall; and even if recorded inequality goes up, the ratio may not.
I have some serious philosophical qualms about they way the authors construct the idea of the inequality possibility frontier, and about the bias inherent in thinking of inequality as necessarily involving some kind of « extraction »–though I don’t doubt that as a historical rule it has. Nevertheless, this work contains the germ of an important advance in thinking about inequality.

First, it moves us away from the sheer craziness of thinking about levels of inequality in isolation from levels of income. Second, it moves us toward thinking about the relationship between the mechanisms of growth and the mechanisms responsible for patterns of income.

For example, robust property rights and effective constraints on predation by and through the state should help explain both economic growth and a falling or stable extraction ratio.

The great cause of inequality is political power. As the authors put it:

The frequent claim that inequality promotes accumulation and growth does not get much support from history. On the contrary, great economic inequality has always been correlated with extreme concentration of political power, and that power has always been used to widen the income gaps through rent-seeking and rent-keeping, forces that demonstrably retard economic growth.
The implication is that a system that limits political power, and keeps rent-seeking to a minimum, will tend to grow, other things equal. Now, my question is this: If there is a way to prevent the economic inequality that emerges through the process of economic exchange from translating into concentrayed political power, such that whatever level of inequality emerges over time is not in fact due to « extraction »–not due to predation, rent-seeking, or anyone’s rigging the system in their favour–then should it still worry us?

Who Was the Richest Person Ever?
Marcus Crassus, John D. Rockefeller, Carlos Slim, Mikhail Khodorovsky — who’s the richest of them all?
By Branko Milanovic, October 21, 2011

When the richissime decide to play a political role in their own countries, then their power there may exceed even the power of the most globally rich.

Mikhail Khodorovsky was richer, and potentially more powerful, than Rockefeller in the United States in 1937.

No stadium in Mexico, not even the famous Azteca, would come close to accommodating all the compatriots Mr. Slim could hire with his annual income.

Crassus’s income was equal to the annual incomes of about 32,000 people, a crowd that would fill about half of the Colosseum.

Comparing incomes from the past with those of the present is not easy. We do not have an exchange rate that would convert Roman sesterces or Castellan 17th-century pesos into dollars of equal purchasing power today.

Even more, what “equal purchasing power” might mean in that case is far from clear. “Equal purchasing power” should mean that one is able to buy with X Roman sesterces the same bundle of goods and services as with Y U.S. dollars today. But not only have the bundles changed (no DVDs in Roman times), but were we to constrain the bundle to cover only the goods that existed both then and now, we would soon find that the relative prices have changed substantially.

Services then were relatively cheap (because wages were low). Nowadays, services in rich countries are expensive. The reverse would be true for bread or olive oil. Thus, to compare the wealth and income of the rich in several historical periods, the most reasonable approach is to situate them in their historical context and measure their economic power in terms of their ability to purchase human labor (of average skill) at that time and place.

In some sense, a given quantum of human labor is a universal yardstick with which we measure welfare. As Adam Smith wrote more than 200 years ago, “[A person] must be rich or poor according to the quantity of labor which he can command.” Moreover, this quantum embodies improvements in productivity and welfare over time, since the income of somebody like Bill Gates today will be measured against the average incomes of people who currently live in the United States.

A natural place to start is ancient Rome, for which we have data on the extremely wealthy individuals and whose economy was sufficiently “modern” and monetized to make comparisons with the present, or more recent past, meaningful. We can consider three individuals from the classic Roman age.

The fabulously rich triumvir Marcus Crassus’s fortune was estimated around the year 50 BCE at some 200 million sesterces (HS). The emperor Octavian Augustus’s imperial household fortune was estimated at 250 million HS around the year 14 CE. Finally, the enormously rich freedman Marcus Antonius Pallas (under Nero) is thought to have been worth 300 million HS in the year 52.

Take Crassus, who has remained associated with extravagant affluence (not to be confused, though, with the Greek king Croesus, whose name has become eponymous with wealth). With 200 million sesterces and an average annual interest rate of 6% (which was considered a “normal” interest rate in the Roman “golden age” — that is, before the inflation of the third century), Crassus’s annual income could be estimated at 12 million HS.

The mean income of Roman citizens around the time of Octavian’s death (14 CE) is thought to have been about 380 sesterces per annum, and we can assume that it was about the same 60 years earlier, when Crassus lived. Thus expressed, Crassus’s income was equal to the annual incomes of about 32,000 people, a crowd that would fill about half of the Colosseum.

Let us fast-forward more closely to the present and apply the same reasoning to three American wealth icons: Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and Bill Gates. Carnegie’s fortune reached its peak in 1901 when he purchased U.S. Steel. His share in U.S. Steel was $225 million. Applying the same return of 6%, and using U.S. GDP per capita (in 1901 prices) of $282, allows us to conclude that Carnegie’s income exceeded that of Crassus.

With his annual income, Carnegie could have purchased the labor of almost 48,000 people at the time without making any dent in his fortune. (Notice that in all these calculations, we assume that the wealth of the richissime individual remains intact. He simply uses his annual income, that is, yield from his wealth, to purchase labor.)

An equivalent calculation for Rockefeller, taking his wealth at its 1937 peak ($1.4 billion), yields Rockefeller’s income to be equal to that of about 116,000 people in the United States in the year 1937. Thus, Rockefeller was almost four times as rich as Crassus and more than twice as rich as Andrew Carnegie. The people whom he could hire would easily fill Pasadena’s Rose Bowl, and even quite a few would have remained outside the gates.

How does Bill Gates fare in this kind of comparison? Bill Gates’s fortune in 2005 was put by Forbes at $50 billion. Income could then be estimated at $3 billion annually, and since the U.S. GDP per capita in 2005 was about $40,000, Bill Gates could, with his income, command about 75,000 workers. This places him somewhere between Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller, but much above the “poor” Marcus Crassus.

But this calculation leaves open the question of how to treat billionaires such as the Russian Mikhail Khodorovsky and Mexican Carlos Slim, who are both “global” and “national.” Khodorovsky’s wealth, at the time when he was the richest man in Russia in 2003, was estimated at $24 billion.

Globally speaking, he was much less rich than Bill Gates. Yet if we assess his fortune locally and again use the same assumptions as before, he was able to buy more than a quarter million annual units of labor, at their average price. In other words, contrasted with the relatively low incomes of his countrymen, Mikhail Khodorovsky was richer, and potentially more powerful, than Rockefeller in the United States in 1937. It is probably this latter fact — the potential political power — that brought him to the attention of the Kremlin.

Without touching a penny of his wealth, Khodorovsky could, if need be, create an army of a quarter-million people. He was negotiating with both the Americans and the Chinese, almost as a state would, the construction of new gas and oil pipelines. Such potential power met its nemesis in his downfall and eventual jailing. However, Russian history being what it is, the shortest way between two stints in power often takes one through a detour in Siberia. We might not have seen the last of Mr. Khodorovsky.

The Mexican Carlos Slim does Khodorovsky one better. His wealth, also according to Forbes magazine, prior to the global financial crisis in 2009, was estimated at more than $53 billion. Using the same calculation as before, we find that Slim could command even more labor than Khodorovsky at his peak: some 440,000 Mexicans. So he appears to have been, locally, the richest of all! No stadium in Mexico, not even the famous Azteca, would come close to accommodating all the compatriots Mr. Slim could hire with his annual income.

Another complication that may be introduced is the size of populations. When Crassus lived and commanded the labor incomes of 32,000 people, this represented one out of each 1,500 people living in the Roman Empire at the time. Rockefeller’s 116,000 Americans were a higher proportion of the U.S. population: one person out of each 1,100 people. Thus, in both respects Rockefeller beats Crassus.

Can we then say who was the richest of them all? Since the wealthy also tend to go “global” and measure their wealth against the wealth of other rich people living in different countries, it was probably Rockefeller who was the richest of all because he was able to command the highest number of labor units in the then-richest country in the world.

But when the richissime decide to play a political role in their own countries (which may not be the richest countries in the world, such as, for example, Russia and Mexico), then their power there may exceed even the power of the most globally rich.

Editor’s Note: This feature is adapted from THE HAVES AND THE HAVE-NOTS: A BRIEF AND IDIOSYNCRATIC HISTORY OF GLOBAL INEQUALITY by Branko Milanovic. Copyright Basic Books 2011. Reprinted with the permission of the publisher.

Voir enfin:

Rémi Fraisse, victime d’une guerre de civilisation

Edgar Morin (Sociologue et philosophe)

Le Monde

04.11.2014

A l’image d’Astérix défendant un petit bout périphérique de Bretagne face à un immense empire, les opposants au barrage de Sivens semblent mener une résistance dérisoire à une énorme machine bulldozerisante qui ravage la planète animée par la soif effrénée du gain. Ils luttent pour garder un territoire vivant, empêcher la machine d’installer l’agriculture industrialisée du maïs, conserver leur terroir, leur zone boisée, sauver une oasis alors que se déchaîne la désertification monoculturelle avec ses engrais tueurs de sols, tueurs de vie, où plus un ver de terre ne se tortille ou plus un oiseau ne chante.

Cette machine croit détruire un passé arriéré, elle détruit par contre une alternative humaine d’avenir. Elle a détruit la paysannerie, l’exploitation fermière à dimension humaine. Elle veut répandre partout l’agriculture et l’élevage à grande échelle. Elle veut empêcher l’agro-écologie pionnière. Elle a la bénédiction de l’Etat, du gouvernement, de la classe politique. Elle ne sait pas que l’agro-écologie crée les premiers bourgeons d’un futur social qui veut naître, elle ne sait pas que les « écolos » défendent le « vouloir vivre ensemble ».

Elle ne sait pas que les îlots de résistance sont des îlots d’espérance. Les tenants de l’économie libérale, de l’entreprise über alles, de la compétitivité, de l’hyper-rentabilité, se croient réalistes alors que le calcul qui est leur instrument de connaissance les aveugle sur les vraies et incalculables réalités des vies humaines, joie, peine, bonheur, malheur, amour et amitié.

Le caractère abstrait, anonyme et anonymisant de cette machine énorme, lourdement armée pour défendre son barrage, a déclenché le meurtre d’un jeune homme bien concret, bien pacifique, animé par le respect de la vie et l’aspiration à une autre vie.

Nouvel avenir
A part les violents se disant anarchistes, enragés et inconscients saboteurs, les protestataires, habitants locaux et écologistes venus de diverses régions de France, étaient, en résistant à l’énorme machine, les porteurs et porteuses d’un nouvel avenir.

Le problème du barrage de Sivens est apparemment mineur, local. Mais par l’entêtement à vouloir imposer ce barrage sans tenir compte des réserves et critiques, par l’entêtement de l’Etat à vouloir le défendre par ses forces armées, allant jusqu’à utiliser les grenades, par l’entêtement des opposants de la cause du barrage dans une petite vallée d’une petite région, la guerre du barrage de Sivens est devenue le symbole et le microcosme de la vraie guerre de civilisation qui se mène dans le pays et plus largement sur la planète.

L’eau, qui, comme le soleil, était un bien commun à tous les humains, est devenue objet marchand sur notre planète. Les eaux sont appropriées et captées par des puissances financières et/ou colonisatrices, dérobées aux communautés locales pour bénéficier à des multinationales agricoles ou minières. Partout, au Brésil, au Pérou, au Canada, en Chine… les indigènes et régionaux sont dépouillés de leurs eaux et de leurs terres par la machine infernale, le bulldozer nommé croissance.

Dans le Tarn, une majorité d’élus, aveuglée par la vulgate économique des possédants adoptée par le gouvernement, croient œuvrer pour la prospérité de leur territoire sans savoir qu’ils contribuent à sa désertification humaine et biologique. Et il est accablant que le gouvernement puisse aujourd’hui combattre avec une détermination impavide une juste rébellion de bonnes volontés issue de la société civile.

Pire, il a fait silence officiel embarrassé sur la mort d’un jeune homme de 21 ans, amoureux de la vie, communiste candide, solidaire des victimes de la terrible machine, venu en témoin et non en combattant. Quoi, pas une émotion, pas un désarroi ? Il faut attendre une semaine l’oraison funèbre du président de la République pour lui laisser choisir des mots bien mesurés et équilibrés alors que la force de la machine est démesurée et que la situation est déséquilibrée en défaveur des lésés et des victimes.

Ce ne sont pas les lancers de pavés et les ­vitres brisées qui exprimeront la cause non violente de la civilisation écologisée dont la mort de Rémi Fraisse est devenue le ­symbole, l’emblème et le martyre. C’est avec une grande prise de conscience, capable de relier toutes les initiatives alternatives au productivisme aveugle, qu’un véritable hommage peut être rendu à Rémi Fraisse.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Ultimate Global Antipoverty Program
Extreme poverty fell to 15% in 2011, from 36% in 1990. Credit goes to the spread of capitalism.
Douglas A. Irwin
WSJ
Nov. 2, 2014

The World Bank reported on Oct. 9 that the share of the world population living in extreme poverty had fallen to 15% in 2011 from 36% in 1990. Earlier this year, the International Labor Office reported that the number of workers in the world earning less than $1.25 a day has fallen to 375 million 2013 from 811 million in 1991.

Such stunning news seems to have escaped public notice, but it means something extraordinary: The past 25 years have witnessed the greatest reduction in global poverty in the history of the world.

To what should this be attributed? Official organizations noting the trend have tended to waffle, but let’s be blunt: The credit goes to the spread of capitalism. Over the past few decades, developing countries have embraced economic-policy reforms that have cleared the way for private enterprise.

China and India are leading examples. In 1978 China began allowing private agricultural plots, permitted private businesses, and ended the state monopoly on foreign trade. The result has been phenomenal economic growth, higher wages for workers—and a big decline in poverty. For the most part all the government had to do was get out of the way. State-owned enterprises are still a large part of China’s economy, but the much more dynamic and productive private sector has been the driving force for change.

In 1991 India started dismantling the “license raj”—the need for government approval to start a business, expand capacity or even purchase foreign goods like computers and spare parts. Such policies strangled the Indian economy for decades and kept millions in poverty. When the government stopped suffocating business, the Indian economy began to flourish, with faster growth, higher wages and reduced poverty.

The economic progress of China and India, which are home to more than 35% of the world’s population, explains much of the global poverty decline. But many other countries, from Colombia to Vietnam, have enacted their own reforms.

Even Africa is showing signs of improvement. In the 1970s and 1980s, Julius Nyerere and his brand of African socialism made Tanzania the darling of Western intellectuals. But the policies behind the slogans—agricultural collectives, nationalization and price controls, which were said to foster “self-reliance” and “equitable development”—left the economy in ruins. After a new government threw off the policy shackles in the mid-1980s, growth and poverty reduction have been remarkable.

The reduction in world poverty has attracted little attention because it runs against the narrative pushed by those hostile to capitalism. The Michael Moores of the world portray capitalism as a degrading system in which the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. Yet thanks to growth in the developing world, world-wide income inequality—measured across countries and individual people—is falling, not rising, as Branko Milanovic of City University of New York and other researchers have shown.

College students and other young Americans are often confronted with a picture of global capitalism as something that resembles the “dark satanic mills” invoked by William Blake in “Jerusalem,” not a potential escape from horrendous rural poverty. Young Americans ages 18-29 have a positive view of socialism and a negative view of capitalism, according to a 2011 Pew Research poll. About half of American millennials view socialism favorably, compared with 13% of Americans age 65 and older.

Capitalism’s bad rap grew out of a false analogy that linked the term with “exploitation.” Marxists thought the old economic system in which landlords exploited peasants (feudalism) was being replaced by a new economic system in which capital owners exploited industrial workers (capitalism). But Adam Smith had earlier provided a more accurate description of the economy: a “commercial society.” The poorest parts of the world are precisely those that are cut off from the world of markets and commerce, often because of government policies.

Some 260 years ago, Smith noted that: “Little else is requisite to carry a state to the highest degree of opulence from the lowest barbarism, but peace, easy taxes, and a tolerable administration of justice; all the rest being brought about by the natural course of things.” Very few countries fulfill these simple requirements, but the number has been growing. The result is a dramatic improvement in human well-being around the world, an outcome that is cause for celebration.

Mr. Irwin is a professor of economics and co-director of the Political Economy Project at Dartmouth College.

Voir aussi:

The Berlin Wall Fell, but Communism Didn’t
From North Korea to Cuba, millions still live under tyrannous regimes.
Marion Smith
WSJ
Nov. 6, 2014

As the world marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall on Nov. 9, 1989, we should also remember the many dozens of people who died trying to get past it.

Ida Siekmann, the wall’s first casualty, died jumping out of her fourth-floor window while attempting to escape from East Berlin in August 1961. In January 1973, a young mother named Ingrid hid with her infant son in a crate in the back of a truck crossing from East to West. When the child began to cry at the East Berlin checkpoint, a desperate Ingrid covered his mouth with her hand, not realizing the child had an infection and couldn’t breathe through his nose. She made her way to freedom, but in the process suffocated her 15-month-old son. Chris Gueffroy, an East German buoyed by the ease of tensions between East and West in early 1989, believed that the shoot-on-sight order for the Berlin Wall had been lifted. He was mistaken. Gueffroy would be the last person shot attempting to flee Communist-occupied East Berlin.

But Gueffroy was far from the last victim of communism. Millions of people are still ruled by Communist regimes in places like Pyongyang, Hanoi and Havana.

As important as the fall of the Berlin Wall was, it was not the end of what John F. Kennedy called the “long, twilight struggle” against a sinister ideology. By looking at the population statistics of several nations we can estimate that 1.5 billion people still live under communism. Political prisoners continue to be rounded up, gulags still exist, millions are being starved, and untold numbers are being torn from families and friends simply because of their opposition to a totalitarian state.

Today, Communist regimes continue to brutalize and repress the hapless men, women and children unlucky enough to be born in the wrong country.

In China, thousands of Hong Kong protesters recently took to the streets demanding the right to elect their chief executive in open and honest elections. This democratic movement—the most important protests in China since the Tiananmen Square demonstrations and massacre 25 years ago—was met with tear gas and pepper spray from a regime that does not tolerate dissent or criticism. The Communist Party routinely censors, beats and jails dissidents, and through the barbaric one-child policy has caused some 400 million abortions, according to statements by a Chinese official in 2011.

In Vietnam, every morning the unelected Communist government blasts state-sponsored propaganda over loud speakers across Hanoi, like a scene out of George Orwell ’s “1984.”

In Laos, where the Lao People’s Revolutionary Party tolerates no other political parties, the government owns all the media, restricts religious freedom, denies property rights, jails dissidents and tortures prisoners.

In Cuba, a moribund Communist junta maintains a chokehold on the island nation. Arbitrary arrests, beatings, intimidation and total media control are among the tools of the current regime, which has never owned up to its bloody past.

The Stalinesque abuses of North Korea are among the most shocking. As South Korea’s President Park Geun-hye recently told the United Nations, “This year marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, but the Korean Peninsula remains stifled by a wall of division.” On both sides of that wall—a 400-mile-long, 61-year-old demilitarized zone—are people with the same history, language and often family.

But whereas the capitalist South is free and prosperous, the Communist North is a prison of torture and starvation run by a family of dictators at war with freedom of religion, freedom of movement and freedom of thought. President Park is now challenging the U.N. General Assembly “to stand with us in tearing down the world’s last remaining wall of division.”

To tear down that wall will require the same moral clarity that brought down the concrete and barbed-wire barrier that divided Berlin 25 years ago. The Cold War may be over, but the battle on behalf of human freedom is still being waged every day. The triumph of liberty we celebrate on this anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s destruction must not be allowed to turn to complacency in the 21st century. Victory in the struggle against totalitarian oppression is far from inevitable, but this week we remember that it can be achieved.

Voir enfin:

The Most Senseless Environmental Crime of the 20th Century
Charles Homans
Pacific & Standard
November 12, 2013

Fifty years ago 180,000 whales disappeared from the oceans without a trace, and researchers are still trying to make sense of why. Inside the most irrational environmental crime of the century.

In the fall of 1946,  a 508-foot ship steamed out of the port of Odessa, Ukraine. In a previous life she was called the Wikinger (“Viking”) and sailed under the German flag, but she had been appropriated by the Soviet Union after the war and renamed the Slava (“Glory”). The Slava was a factory ship, crewed and equipped to separate one whale every 30 minutes into its useful elements, destined for oil, canned meat and liver, and bone meal. Sailing with her was a retinue of smaller, nimbler catcher vessels, their purpose betrayed by the harpoon guns mounted atop each clipper bow. They were bound for the whaling grounds off the coast of Antarctica. It was the first time Soviet whalers had ventured so far south.

The work began inauspiciously. In her first season, the Slava caught just 386 whales. But by the fifth—before which the fleet’s crew wrote a letter to Stalin pledging to bring home more than 500 tons of whale oil—the Slava’s annual catch was approaching 2,000. The next year it was 3,000. Then, in 1957, the ship’s crew discovered dense conglomerations of humpback whales to the north, off the coasts of Australia and New Zealand. There were so many of them, packed so close together, the Slava’s helicopter pilots joked that they could make an emergency landing on the animals’ backs.

In November 1959, the Slava was joined by a new fleet led by the Sovetskaya Ukraina, the largest whaling factory ship the world had ever seen. By now the harpooners—talented marksmen whose work demanded the dead-eyed calm of a sniper—were killing whales faster than the factory ships could process them. Sometimes the carcasses would drift alongside the ships until the meat spoiled, and the flensers would simply strip them of the blubber—a whaler on another fleet likened the process to peeling a banana—and heave the rest back into the sea.

The Soviet fleets killed almost 13,000 humpback whales in the 1959-60 season and nearly as many the next, when the Slava and Sovetskaya Ukraina were joined by a third factory ship, the Yuriy Dolgorukiy. It was grueling work: One former whaler, writing years later in a Moscow newspaper, claimed that five or six Soviet crewmen died on the Southern Hemisphere expeditions each year, and that a comparable number went mad. A scientist working aboard a factory ship in the Antarctic on a later voyage described seeing a deckhand lose his footing on a blubber-slicked deck and catch his legs in a coil of whale intestine as it slid overboard. By the time his mates were able to retrieve him from the water he had succumbed to hypothermia. He was buried at sea, lowered into the water with a pair of harpoons to weight down his body.

Still, whaling jobs were well-paying and glamorous by Soviet standards. Whalers got to see the world and stock up on foreign products that were prized on the black market back home, and were welcomed with parades when they returned. When a fourth factory ship, the Sovetskaya Rossiya, prepared for her maiden voyage from the remote eastern naval port of Vladivostok in 1961, the men and women who found positions onboard would have considered themselves lucky.

When the Sovetskaya Rossiya reached the western coast of Australia late that year, however, the whalers found themselves in a desert ocean. By the end of the season the ship had managed to round up only a few hundred animals, many of them calves—what the whalers called “small-sized gloves.” Harpooners on the other fleets’ catcher ships, too, accustomed to the miraculous abundance of years past, now looked upon a blank horizon. Alfred Berzin, a scientist aboard the Sovetskaya Rossiya, offered an alarmed and unequivocal summary in his seasonal report to the state fisheries ministry. “In five years of intensive whaling by first one, then two, three, and finally four fleets,” he wrote, the populations of humpback whales off the coasts of Australia and New Zealand “were so reduced in abundance that we can now say that they are completely destroyed!”

It was one of the fastest decimations of an animal population in world history—and it had happened almost entirely in secret. The Soviet Union was a party to the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, a 1946 treaty that limited countries to a set quota of whales each year. By the time a ban on commercial whaling went into effect, in 1986, the Soviets had reported killing a total of 2,710 humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. In fact, the country’s fleets had killed nearly 18 times that many, along with thousands of unreported whales of other species. It had been an elaborate and audacious deception: Soviet captains had disguised ships, tampered with scientific data, and misled international authorities for decades. In the estimation of the marine biologists Yulia Ivashchenko, Phillip Clapham, and Robert Brownell, it was “arguably one of the greatest environmental crimes of the 20th century.”

The Aleut, the Soviet Union’s oldest factory ship, works off the coast of Kamchatka in 1958. (Photo: Yulia Ivashchenko)
It was also a perplexing one. Environmental crimes are, generally speaking, the most rational of crimes. The upsides are obvious: Fortunes have been made selling contraband rhino horns and mahogany or helping toxic waste disappear, and the risks are minimal—poaching, illegal logging, and dumping are penalized only weakly in most countries, when they’re penalized at all.

The Soviet whale slaughter followed no such logic. Unlike Norway and Japan, the other major whaling nations of the era, the Soviet Union had little real demand for whale products. Once the blubber was cut away for conversion into oil, the rest of the animal, as often as not, was left in the sea to rot or was thrown into a furnace and reduced to bone meal—a low-value material used for agricultural fertilizer, made from the few animal byproducts that slaughterhouses and fish canneries can’t put to more profitable use. “It was a good product,” Dmitri Tormosov, a scientist who worked on the Soviet fleets, wryly recalls, “but maybe not so important as to support a whole whaling industry.”

This was the riddle the Soviet ships left in their wake: Why did a country with so little use for whales kill so many of them?

“It was a good product,” a scientist who worked on the Russian fleets wryly recalls, “but maybe not so important as to support a whole whaling industry.”
ONE AFTERNOON LAST APRIL, I visited Clapham and Ivashchenko at their home in Seattle, a century-old Craftsman overlooking the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood. When I rapped the mermaid-shaped knocker, the two scientists, who are married, appeared in the doorway together, a study in opposites. Ivashchenko is a 38-year-old willowy blonde of almost translucent complexion; Clapham, a 57-year-old Englishman with the build of a bouncer and arms sleeved in Maori tattoos, looks less like a man who studies whales than one who might have harpooned them 150 years ago.

At their feet was a lanky, elderly dog named Cleo, assembled from various shepherds and wolfhounds, whose fur Ivashchenko had shaved into a Mohawk earlier that day. “We’re going to dye it red,” she said matter-of-factly, as she went into the kitchen to put on a pot of Russian caravan tea. We settled into the book-crammed dining room (on one shelf I noticed a first edition of the 1930 Rockwell Kent–illustrated Moby-Dick). At the head of the table was a mannequin, dressed in a bustier and a Carnival mask.

Ivashchenko’s and Clapham’s research, when I’d first stumbled across it, had struck me as similarly eccentric. The papers they had published over the previous decade, as co-authors and with a handful of colleagues, nearly all concerned a single, obscure historical episode: the voyages the Soviet Union’s whaling fleets made in the middle years of the 20th century. On the most basic level, it was an accounting exercise, an attempt to correct the false records the Soviets had released to the world at the time.

But it was in this space, between the false numbers and the real ones, that the researchers’ work became engrossing in ways that had little to do with marine biology. In gathering the figures, the researchers had also gathered stories that explained how the figures had come to be—the scientist who had stashed heaps of documents in his potato cellar; the whaling ship captain accused of espionage; elaborate acts of high-seas tactical misdirection and disguise usually reserved for navies in battle. The authors, I realized, were assembling not just a scientific record but also a human history, an account of a remarkable collision between political ideology and the natural world—and a lesson for anyone seeking to protect the fragile ecosystems that exist in the world’s least governed spaces.

The first time I called him, Clapham explained that the work had begun around the time of the Soviet Union’s collapse, when an earlier generation of Russian scientists and their foreign colleagues began gathering the fragmented documentary records of the program. The Soviet Union had kept the records secret for years, and many had been lost; the scientists were reconstructing the numbers from files that had been left behind in obscure provincial repositories, or quietly preserved by the scientists themselves.

This was not quite what Ivashchenko had envisioned doing with her life. Growing up in Yaroslavl, a landlocked city northeast of Moscow, she pursued a career in marine biology in part because she imagined it would offer everything Yaroslavl did not: “tropics, dolphins, bikinis.” Instead, she told me, laughing, “I ended up with dusty reports.” On her laptop, she pulled up images of thousands of pages’ worth of files she had found the month before in a municipal archive in Vladivostok, the largest new cache of Soviet whaling documents anyone had discovered since the early 1990s. “We thought that all of this stuff had been shredded,” Clapham said. “There’s still some sensitivity—some of the people who did this are still around.” Instead, it turned out to be a matter of knowing where to look.

COMMERCIAL WHALING WAS BANNED just 27 years ago, but it is difficult to think of the industry as anything other than an exotic holdover from a long-receded age—to imagine anyone sailing a small armada of ships to the end of the Earth to kill an animal the size of a school bus whose flesh, to the uninitiated, would seem too gamey to eat. And yet as recently as the mid-20th century, the waters surrounding Antarctica—the most populous whale habitat on Earth, what the polar explorer Ernest Shackleton half a century earlier called “a veritable playground for these monsters”—were crowded with whaling ships not just from Norway and Japan but also Britain and the Netherlands. Farther north, Australian and New Zealander whalers, operating from shore-based stations, plied their own coastlines. There were so many of them that even in an era when marine ecosystems were poorly understood, the need for some sort of regulations became impossible to ignore.

In December 1946, representatives of the whaling nations gathered in Washington to draw up the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. “[T]he history of whaling has seen overfishing of one area after another and of one species of whale after another,” the treaty read, “to such a degree that it is essential to protect all species of whales from further overfishing.” The countries that were party to the treaty were limited to an annual quota set by the newly formed International Whaling Commission. But the science guiding the quotas was rudimentary at best, and it was only in 1960 that the IWC enlisted the help of three respected fisheries scientists to take the measure of the hunt’s impact.

One of the three scientists—the only one still living—was Sidney Holt, then working for the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Reviewing the data from the British and Norwegian fleets, Holt saw quickly that the quotas the IWC had set were vastly too high; both countries’ figures showed that whalers were traveling farther and farther in search of whales whose numbers were shrinking at an ominous pace. When the researchers turned their attention to the Soviet ships’ data, however, they were surprised to find that they looked nothing like the others. “We couldn’t make sense of it at all,” Holt told me recently. “It had no pattern. We didn’t know what the hell was wrong.”

In the following years, observers noticed other differences, too. The Soviet Union had many more ships in the Antarctic than any other country, sometimes twice as many catchers for each factory ship. And they worked differently, sweeping the sea in a line like a naval blockade. Holt had met Alexei Solyanik, the captain of the Slava fleet, on several occasions, and had dined with Soviet scientists onboard the country’s research vessels. (Friends of Holt’s who were well-versed in the Soviet crews’ liberality with their ships’ vodka supplies had instructed him to fortify himself with butter before coming aboard.) But, he recalls, “It never occurred to us in the 1960s that the USSR was falsifying the submitted catch statistics.” And even though later scientists had their suspicions, they were impossible to confirm without access to the Soviets’ own records—which would remain classified until 1993, when a Russian scientist named Alexey Yablokov made a remarkable confession.

Twenty-six years earlier, Yablokov, then a prominent Soviet whale researcher, had met a young American scientist named Robert Brownell at the Moscow airport. The two men had been corresponding for years, and Yablokov urged Brownell to stop by on his way back from a research trip to Japan. For the next three days, Brownell recalls, “Yablokov took me all over, showed me the museums. I asked if I could take photos; he said, ‘Go ahead. If you’re taking pictures of something you’re not supposed to, I’ll stop you.’”

Years later, in late 1990, Brownell’s colleague Peter Best was trying to track down data on right whale fetuses. Right whales were the first whale species to come under international protection, in 1935, and Best had been able to locate records of just 13 fetus specimens. On a hunch, he thought to ask Yablokov. Replying months later, Yablokov reported that he had records of about 150 fetuses. At first, Best recalls, he thought he had misunderstood: 150 fetuses would mean that the Soviets had killed at least one or two thousand members of the most protected whale species in the world.

In fact, it turned out to be more than three thousand. Brownell arranged for Yablokov—now the science adviser to the new Russian president, Boris Yeltsin—to make his confession public, in a short speech before a marine mammalogy conference in Galveston, Texas, in 1993. The catch records the Soviets had given the IWC for decades, Yablokov told the scientists in Galveston, had been almost entirely fictitious. Exactly how wrong they were Yablokov didn’t yet know. The Soviet fisheries ministry had classified its whaling data—even doctoral dissertations based on the numbers couldn’t be made public—and as a matter of protocol had destroyed most of the original records.

Yablokov and Brownell both began piecing together the real figures with the assistance of several scientists who had worked aboard the whaling fleets. (Brownell cheekily dubbed them the Gang of Four.) In some cases, they had preserved clandestine troves of documents for decades in hopes of eventually correcting the historical record. The false figures, they knew, had informed years of thinking about whale conservation and population science. It was possible that much of what scientists outside of Russia believed they understood was wrong.

The most valuable set of records came from the scientist Dmitri Tormosov, who had been stationed aboard the factory ship Yuriy Dolgorukiy beginning in the late 1950s. Tormosov had quietly instructed his colleagues to save their individual catch records—what they called “whale passports”—instead of burning them after the record of the season had been filed, as required by the fisheries ministry. When the collection grew into the tens of thousands of pages, Tormosov moved it into his potato cellar. The records covered 15 whaling seasons, and they allowed the non-Russian scientists to grasp, for the first time, the scale of the killing. Even scientists who for years had harbored suspicions of the Soviets were stunned by the true numbers. “We had no idea it was a systematic taking of everything that was available,” Best told me. “It was amazing they got away with it for so long.”

IN NOVEMBER 1994, A letter arrived at Brownell’s office in La Jolla, California. It was addressed from Alfred Berzin, the scientist who had chronicled the disappearance of the Antarctic’s humpbacks from the deck of the Sovetskaya Rossiya. Berzin had spent his entire career at a government laboratory in Vladivostok, and sailed with several Soviet whaling fleets; he and Brownell had known each other since the 1970s. Brownell remembers that Berzin, more than the other Soviet researchers, seemed burdened by what he had seen, and what he had failed to stop. “Nobody paid any attention to him,” Brownell told me. “I think that affected him.”

Berzin had not kept the volume of records that Tormosov had, but he did seem to have an unusually vivid recollection of the day-to-day details of whaling, and Brownell had once suggested that he write down what he remembered. But they hadn’t discussed the matter further, and Brownell was surprised to find in the envelope a short summary of a memoir Berzin was preparing.

Seven months later, a package arrived from Vladivostok, containing a manuscript written in Russian and bound in a hand-drawn cover. Berzin died the next year, and Brownell, who couldn’t read Russian and didn’t have the funding to have the manuscript translated, filed it away in his desk. It was only a decade later that he thought to give it to Yulia Ivashchenko, who had worked for him in the late 1990s on a research trip in the Russian Far East.

Ivashchenko’s translation—the work remains unpublished in Russian—appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Marine Fisheries Review, a small research journal published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, under the title “The Truth About Soviet Whaling: A Memoir.” It is an uncommonly urgent document, animated by Berzin’s understanding that he had witnessed something much stranger than a simple act of industrialized killing.

The Soviet whalers, Berzin wrote, had been sent forth to kill whales for little reason other than to say they had killed them. They were motivated by an obligation to satisfy obscure line items in the five-year plans that drove the Soviet economy, which had been set with little regard for the Soviet Union’s actual demand for whale products. “Whalers knew that no matter what, the plan must be met!” Berzin wrote. The Sovetskaya Rossiya seemed to contain in microcosm everything Berzin believed to be wrong about the Soviet system: its irrationality, its brutality, its inclination toward crime.

Berzin contrasted the Soviet whalers with the Japanese, who are similarly thought to have caught whales off the books in the Antarctic (though in numbers, scientists believe, far short of the Soviets). The Japanese, motivated as they were by domestic demand for whale meat, were “at least understandable” in their actions, he wrote. “I should not say that as a scientist, but it is possible to understand the difference between a motivated and unmotivated crime.” Japanese whalers made use of 90 percent of the whales they hauled up the spillway; the Soviets, according to Berzin, used barely 30 percent. Crews would routinely return with whales that had been left to rot, “which could not be used for food. This was not regarded as a problem by anybody.”

This absurdity stemmed from an oversight deep in the bowels of the Soviet bureaucracy. Whaling, like every other industry in the Soviet Union, was governed by the dictates of the State Planning Committee of the Council of Ministers, a government organ tasked with meting out production targets. In the grand calculus of the country’s planned economy, whaling was considered a satellite of the fishing industry. This meant that the progress of the whaling fleets was measured by the same metric as the fishing fleets: gross product, principally the sheer mass of whales killed.

Whaling fleets that met or exceeded targets were rewarded handsomely, their triumphs celebrated in the Soviet press and the crews given large bonuses. But failure to meet targets came with harsh consequences. Captains would be demoted and crew members fired; reports to the fisheries ministry would sometimes identify responsible parties by name.

Soviet ships’ officers would have been familiar with the story of Aleksandr Dudnik, the captain of the Aleut, the only factory ship the Soviets owned before World War II. Dudnik was a celebrated pioneer in the Soviet whaling industry, and had received the Order of Lenin—the Communist Party’s highest honor—in 1936. The following year, however, his fleet failed to meet its production targets. When the Aleut fleet docked in Vladivostok in 1938, Dudnik was arrested by the secret police and thrown in jail, where he was interrogated on charges of being a Japanese agent. If his downfall was of a piece with the unique paranoia of the Stalin years, it was also an indelible reminder to captains in the decades that followed. As Berzin wrote, “The plan—at any price!”

Berzin recalled seeing so many spouting humpbacks that their blows reminded him of a forest. Years later, he saw only blubber-stripped carcasses bobbing on the waves.
AS THE PLAN TARGETS rose year after year, they inevitably exceeded what was allowed under the IWC quotas. This meant that the Soviet captains faced a choice: They could be persona non grata at home, or criminals abroad. The scientific report for the Sovetskaya Rossiya fleet’s 1970-71 season noted that the ship captains and harpooners who most frequently violated international whaling regulations also received the most Communist Party honors. “Lies became an inalienable part and perhaps even a foundation of Soviet whaling,” Berzin wrote.

By the mid-1960s, the situation was sufficiently dire that several scientists took the unusual risk of complaining directly to Aleksandr Ishkov, the powerful minister of fisheries resources. When one of them was called in front of Ishkov, he warned the minister that if the whaling practices didn’t change, their grandchildren would live in a world with no whales at all. “Your grandchildren?” Ishkov scoffed. “Your grandchildren aren’t the ones who can remove me from my job.”

By then, there were too few humpbacks left in the Southern Hemisphere to bother hunting, and the Soviet fleets had turned their attention northward, to other species and other oceans—in particular the North Pacific. From 1961 to 1964, Soviet catches in the North Pacific jumped from less than 4,000 whales a year to nearly 13,000. In 1965, a Soviet scientist noted that the blue whale was “commercially extinct” in the North Pacific and would soon be gone entirely. “After one more year of such intensive catches,” another researcher warned of the region’s humpbacks, “whale stocks will be so depleted that it will be impossible to continue any whaling.” Berzin, who had sailed along the Aleutian Islands to the Gulf of Alaska and back aboard the Aleut in the late 1950s, recalled seeing so many spouting humpbacks that their blows reminded him of a forest. Scanning the same horizon from the deck of the Sovetskaya Rossiya years later, he saw only blubber-stripped carcasses bobbing on the waves.

In one season alone, from 1959 to 1960, Soviet ships killed nearly 13,000 humpback whales. (Photo: Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images)
On a 1971 voyage north of Hawaii, Berzin watched a catcher vessel systematically run down a mother sperm whale and her calf, betrayed by their telltale blows—two of them, huddled close together, one large and one small. The Sovetskaya Rossiya’s crew, it seemed to him, had become ghastly parodies of the Yankee whalers of the 19th century. “Even now,” he wrote in his memoir, “I can recall seeing the bow of a catcher moving through warm blue tropical waters, and a harpooner behind the gun, dressed only in bathing trunks and with a red bandana on his head, chasing, obviously, a female with a calf. … What dignity this was….” The last was a biting reference to a passage from Moby-Dick: “The dignity of our calling,” Melville wrote, “the very heavens attest.”

In 1972, the IWC finally passed a rule that conservationists had sought for years, requiring that international observers accompany all commercial whaling vessels to independently monitor their catches. The new system proved easy enough to circumvent—the Soviets arranged to have their fleets staffed with Japanese observers who were willing to look the other way as necessary. But by that point, Berzin later recalled, the country’s illegal whaling program had reached its inevitable conclusion anyway. It ended, he wrote, “simply because we killed all the whales.”

Clapham and Ivashchenko now think that Soviet whalers killed at least 180,000 more whales than they reported between 1948 and 1973. It’s a testament to the enormous scale of legal commercial whaling that this figure constitutes only a small percentage—in some oceans, about five percent—of the total killed by whalers in the 20th century. The Soviets, Dmitri Tormosov told me, were well aware of all that had come before them, and were driven by a kind of fatalistic nationalism. “The point,” he says, “was to catch up and get their portion of whale resources before they were all gone. It wasn’t intended to be a long industry.”

But if other countries had already badly pillaged the oceans before the Slava ever sailed from Odessa, scientists now believe that the timing and frenetic pace of Soviet whaling lent it an outsized impact. The Soviets did not lead the world’s whales to the precipice—but they likely pushed the most vulnerable of them over it. Bowhead whales in the Sea of Okhotsk, which were severely depleted by 19th-century whaling, are believed to be endangered today as a result of Soviet whaling. The IWC now charges the Soviets with delaying the recovery of right whale populations in the Southern Hemisphere by 20 years. Blue whales in the North Pacific, whose population had been reduced to an estimated 1,400 by the mid-1970s, now number only between 2,000 and 3,000. The condition of the populations of sperm whales in the Pacific, of which the Soviets killed more than any other species, is still uncertain.

Grimmest is the case of the North Pacific right whale, which appears to have been all but killed off by Soviet whalers over the course of three years in the mid-1960s. “The species is now so rarely sighted in the region,” Clapham and Ivashchenko wrote in 2009, “that single observations have been publishable in scientific journals. We cannot be sure, but it is entirely possible that when the few remaining right whales in the eastern North Pacific live out their lives and die, the species will be gone forever from these waters.”

This was the riddle the Soviet ships left in their wake: Why did a country with so little use for whales kill so many of them?
STILL, THE OCEAN IS a confounding place. In 2004, scientists from 10 countries set out in research vessels across the same North Pacific latitudes the Soviets had once hunted. It was the first comprehensive effort to measure the region’s humpback whale population, which had dwindled to just 1,400 animals by the mid-1960s. The findings, published five years ago, suggested that there were just under 20,000 humpback whales alive and well in the North Pacific—more than twice the previous estimate. The Antarctic humpback population, too, is believed to have rebounded to upwards of 42,000 animals—a steady recovery, if not a complete one.

The need to save the whales has been assumed for so long now, with such urgency, that the idea of some of them actually having been saved is oddly difficult to grapple with. And it’s true that many species soon may be as threatened by the vast changes imposed upon their habitat—the overfishing and climatic transformations that stand to upend entire ocean ecosystems—as they once were by the harpoon. Still, the cloud of existential peril has lifted enough that in 2010, the IWC began considering a possibility that not long before would have been unthinkable: ending the moratorium on commercial whaling.

The whaling nations lobbying for the change have been joined, improbably, by several countries that generally oppose commercial whaling, including the United States. These supporters point to the increasing number of whales that are being killed, in spite of the moratorium, by Norway, Iceland, and Japan. (Japan categorizes its hunting of minke and endangered fin whales in the Antarctic as “scientific:” Its whaling fleet is operated by the government-funded Institute of Cetacean Research, a research institution in little more than name that also supplies whale meat to the country’s seafood markets.)

Legitimizing whaling again under a carefully supervised quota system, the thinking goes, would be preferable to the uncontrolled status quo, allowing the IWC to once again exert some influence over where and how whales are hunted. “We think the moratorium isn’t working,” Monica Medina, the U.S. representative to the IWC, told Time in 2010. “Many whales are being killed, and we want to save as many whales as possible.” In other words, better to have the whalers inside a permissive system than outside a tougher one.

History is always studied with one eye on the present, and Ivashchenko brought up this argument when we spoke about her work. The lesson of the Soviet experience, she told me in Seattle, is that “you cannot trust an individual country to control its own industry. There’s always a temptation to violate the rules, to close your eyes [to] some problems.” (And although its catches today are a fraction of those of years past, the Japanese whaling fleet has come to echo the Soviets’ in its lack of connection to the marketplace; demand for whale meat in Japan is declining, and the government loses about $10 million a year on whaling subsidies.)

It’s difficult to look at the Soviet story and see anything other than a remarkable anomaly, one that seems wildly unlikely to occur again. But in a way, this is the point: If the same international regime that exists today allowed 180,000 whales to vanish without a trace, how can anyone reasonably expect it to notice two or three thousand missing whales tomorrow?

In the last pages of his memoir, Alfred Berzin wrestled with the relevance of his story—with the question of what purpose was served, exactly, by an unsparing account of something that had happened four decades earlier. “When I started to work on this memoir,” he wrote, “some serious people asked me: ‘Do you really need it?’” In answering them, he offered a quote from Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. “There can be no acceptable future,” Solzhenitsyn said, “without an honest analysis of the past.”


Société: Les limites de l’amitié (The limits of friendship: will online social networks replace offline friendships and turn us into basement-dwelling zombies ?)

2 novembre, 2014
Delousing scene ( Farmyard, detail, Jan Siberechts, 1662)
http://www.intercollegiatereview.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/gran_torino_2008_3.jpg
http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/life/2014/10/31/toronto_comparable_to_new_york_when_it_comes_to_street_harassment_advocate_says/listreetharassment2.jpghttp://www.52perfectdays.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/topless-beach-sign.jpgJ’ai plus en commun avec ces chinetoques qu’avec ma propre famille. Walt Kowalski (Gran Torino)
You have to learn how guys talk. Now watch how me and Martin communicate. We just throw it back and forth. You ready? Oh great, a Pollack and a chink. Afternoon, Martin, you dumb Italian prick. Walt, you cheap asshole, I should have known you’d come in, I was having such a pleasant day. Why, did you jew some blind man out of a few bucks, give him the wrong change? (…) And don’t lay down to people all the time. Always look a person in the eye. When you shake a man’s hand, you can usually tell where you stand with him. Barber scene (Gran Torino)
Sous le rapport de leurs contenus, les messages que nous nous adressons les uns les autres sont, le plus souvent, des banalités sans intérêt mais sous le rapport du chaud et du froid dans nos relations, ce sont des thermomètres ultra-sensibles, beaucoup plus importants que les paroles échangées. (…) Ce qui définit le conflit humain n’est pas la perte de la réciprocité mais le glissement, imperceptible d’abord puis de plus en plus rapide, de la bonne à la mauvais réciprocité. Ce glissement, on le remarque à peine, mais la moindre négligeance, le moindre oubli peuvent troubler durablement nos rapports. Le mouvement een sens inverse, de la mauvaise à la bonne réciprocité, exige au contraire beaucoup d’attention et d’abnégation. Il n’est pas toujours possible. (…) Dans plusieurs langues, le mot qui signifie le don, le cadeau, signifie aussi poison. Dans un univers encore très, très archaïque, tous les cadeaux, je pense, sont empoisonnés: leurs possesseurs initiaux ne donnent jamais que les choses qui empoisonnent leur existence et dont ils cherchent par conséquent à se débarrasser pour recevoir en retour des choses tout aussi utiles mais moins empoisonnées, du seul fait qu’elles viennent d’ailleurs. (…) Il est plus facile de vivre avec les femmes des autres que’avec les siennes propres. C’est là, je pense, l’origine de l’échange. (…) l’échange, aussi universel chez les hommes, est contraire à l’instinct animal, qui cherche toujours à se satisfaire au plus près, au sein de l’immédiat accessible. (…) Les différences artificielles protégeaient réellement les communautés archaïques, je pense, d’une mauvaise réciprocité toujours précédée et annoncée par l’accélération inquiétante de la bonne réciprocité. Récemment encore, en milieu paysan, des coutumes subsistaient, des habitudes anciennes sans doute, destinées à ralentir le rythme des échanges même les plus banals. (…) Si l’acheteur d’un veau à la foire du village sortait trop vite son porte-feuille, le vendeur l’invitait à boire un verre d’abord, au café du coin, afin de retarder (un peu, mais pas trop, bien sûr) le règlement de compte. Le double sens de cette expression, règlement de comptes, illumine la peur qu’inspire une réciprocité trop soudaine, déjà brutale. (…) notre monde a déjà supprimé avec les différences archaïques et traditionnelles tous les sacrifices sanglants qui visent à consolider celles-ci. Mais il a conservé et même multiplié les rites de bonne réciprocité qui existaient déjà dans le monde archaïque et qui sont destinés à empêcher la tendance des rapports pacifiques à glisser dans la violence. Plus que jamais nous nous répandons en salutations, protestations d’amitié, visites, festivals, cadeaux plus ou moins fréquents et précieux, etc. (…) Comme tous les rites bien sûr, [le rite du cadeau] vise à consolider les liens sociaux tout en contribuant à la bonne marche des affaires. On dit souvent que ce rite est manipulé par le grand business pour augmenter la consommation. C’est vrai, bien entendu,mais ce n’est pas toute la vérité. La preuve que le cadeau est un rite véritable, ce sont les règles strictes qui le régissent. Elles exigent un doigté extraordinaire dans l’exécution pour la bonne raison que, en fin de compte, elles se contredisent. Elles essaient de concilier l’impératif de la réciprocité et de l’égalité avec l’impératif de la différence qui n’est pas moins essentiel.(…) La prudence exige une équivalence des cadeaux aussi rigoureuse que s’il s’agissait d’un troc. Il faut s’imiter très exactement, mais en donnant une impression de grande spontanéité. Chacun doit convaincre son partenaire qu’en choisissant le cadeau qu’il lui donne, il obéit à une impulsion irrésistible, une inspiration foudroyante, étrangères aux calculs mesquins de la commune humanité. (…) Dans notre monde, comme dans tous les autres mondes du passé d’ailleurs, on n’échappe au Charybde de la différence insuffisante que pour tomber dans le Scylla de la différence excessive. Il ne faut pas s’étonner si les crises de dépression se multiplient chaque année lorsque revient la saison des cadeaux. Le drame, c’est que loin d’être imaginaire, l’angoisse suscitée par le cadeau est justifiée. Les sacrificateurs savaient tous, jadis, que plus un rite est efficace dans la réussite, plus il est redoutable dans l’échec. Si toutes les règles, même les plus byzantines, ne sont pas respectées, cette source de paix et d’harmonie que doit être le cadeau se métamorphose diaboliquement en une cause d’irritation infinie. René Girard (Celui par qui le scandale arrive)
Chez les Kwakiutl et d’autres tribus indiennes du nord-ouest, les grands chefs démontraient leur supériorité en distribuant leurs possessions les plus précieuses à leurs concurrents, les autres grands chefs. Ils essayaient tous de surpasser les autres dans leur mépris de la richesse. Le gagnant était celui qui abandonnait le plus et recevait le moins. Ce jeu étrange était institutionnalisé et il aboutissait à la destruction des biens que les deux groupes, en principe, essayaient de donner à l’autre, tout comme la plupart des groupes humains font dans toutes sortes d’échange rituel. D’immenses quantités de richesses étaient ainsi gaspillées dans des manifestations compétitives d’indifférence à la richesse, le but réel de cela était le prestige. Il peut y avoir des rivalités de renoncement plutôt que d’acquisition, de privation plutôt que de plaisir. A un moment, les autorités canadiennes ont rendu le potlatch illégal et nous pouvons bien comprendre pourquoi. Elles réalisaient que cette recherche de prestige collectif bénéficiait finalement seulement aux grands chefs et avait un impact négatif sur la grande majorité du peuple. Il est toujours dangereux pour une communauté de placer des formes négatives de prestige devant les formes positives qui ne contredisent pas encore les besoins réels des êtres vivants. Même dans notre société, il peut y avoir un aspect compétitif au don de cadeaux qui, dans le potlatch, devient exacerbé au-delà presque de la reconnaissance. Le but normal de l’échange de cadeaux, dans toutes les sociétés, est d’empêcher les rivalités mimétiques d’échapper à tout contrôle. Cependant, l’esprit de rivalité est si puissant qu’il peut transformer de l’intérieur même des institutions qui existent seulement dans le but de le prévenir. Le potlatch témoigne du formidable entêtement de la rivalité mimétique. Il pourrait être défini comme la tranche gelée de la crise mimétique qui devient ritualisée et finalement joue un rôle, mais à un grand coût, dans le contrôle et l’atténuation de la fièvre compétitive. Dans chaque société, la compétition peut assumer des formes paradoxales parce qu’elle peut contaminer les activités qui lui sont le plus étrangères, en particulier le don. Dans le potlatch, aussi bien que dans notre monde, la politique du toujours moins peut se substituer à la politique du toujours plus et finalement signifier la même chose. René Girard
Eastwood est-il croyant ? Tous ces films doivent un peu à la pensée chrétienne. Dans L’homme des hautes plaines (1973), son deuxième film, il représentait les sept pêchés capitaux dans une town isolée de tout, encerclée par une ceinture désertique. Dans Gran Torino, on peut le voir comme un ange pour Tao et sa famille. Le film possède des moments violents où la pusillanimité de certaines scènes reste choquante. Mais après tout, la passion du Christ dans l’Evangile ne dépeint-elle pas des actes de barbarie ? Eastwood met à mal la religion en proposant une réflexion et non par la facilité, quoique remarquable, comme dans Religolo (2008). Nous avons une figure de curé touchante à travers ce jeune tout juste sorti du séminaire. Il apprend de Walt et réciproquement. Le curé jure dans son église (« Jesus-Christ » dit-il à deux reprises) et chez Eastwood il se laisse aller à dire son sentiment envers cette bande de jeunes nihilistes : « They pissed me off like you » (Ils m’agacent comme vous). Ce n’est pas tous les jours que l’on voit un prêtre se comportant ainsi. On dirait Karl Malden dans Sur les quais (1954) d’Elia Kazan. Avec ce tandem Walt/jeune prêtre, nous avons un voyage et quel voyage ! Le jeune curé ne débite que des leçons de vies tout droit sorties de la Bible, du « petit manuel du curé » dixit le personnage d’Eastwood. Il se fait un ennemi en la personne de Walt. Il essaiera de lui faire entendre raison et de l’amener à se confesser suite à la promesse qu’il a faite à sa femme avant de mourir. Il tente de rentrer en contact avec Walt, de pénétrer son monde par ses propos candides propres à ceux qui ne connaissent pas le côté obscur de la vie. Walt refuse la rencontre. Il est hostile. Le curé insiste. Walt lui dit le fond de sa pensée, qu’il ne s’est jamais confessé et si jamais il devait le faire ce ne serait pas avec un jeune prêtre tout juste sorti du séminaire qui récite la Bible et ce n’est surement pas un jeune puceau de vingt-sept ans qui va lui apprendre ce qui est bon dans la vie. Le curé le reconnaitra dans son fort intérieur tout d’abord puis publiquement à la fin lors de l’enterrement de ce dernier. Il comprend qu’il est vain de pénétrer l’univers opaque de Walt ainsi. Mais s’il y a bien une leçon de la Bible qu’il sait mettre en pratique, c’est celle de la persévérance du Christ. Il fait de même. S’ajoute à cela qu’il se met à parler dans le même langage que Walt – par influence de cette force de la nature en qui il voit surement une figure paternelle forte. Il réussit à amener Walt à confesse. Mais le Macguffin, le prétexte qui fit entrer en contact ces deux mondes diamétralement opposés, ne dure que très peu de temps. Le plus important étant le chemin pour y arriver. Le curé a apprit, il le dit. Walt, quant à lui, ne croit plus quand une seule chose : chasser cette bande de malfrats du quartier. Dans son discours final lors des funérailles de Walt, on voit le jeune prêtre changé, grandi. Il a beaucoup appris de Walt Kowalski. Il se rend compte que l’empirisme et le pragmatisme importent autant que les lectures saintes. Son élixir est la compréhension. Pour prêcher la bonne parole, il faut vivre la vie et non se réfugier dans des écrits didactiques. Un autre discours sous-jacent au film est celui de la colère. Comment lutter contre la colère ? Eastwood prône l’extériorisation. Walt fait passer sa colère en détruisant les armoires de sa cuisine avec ses poings suite à l’agression de Sue. Il ne fera pas de mal physique aux coupables mais se sacrifiera, se sachant condamné par la maladie, pour apporter la paix dans le quartier. Nicolas Brénéol
Le renoncement au désir d’emprise et la construction d’une empathie réciproque peuvent se faire à tout âge. C’est ce que nous montre le film de Clint Eastwood : Gran Torino.  Un Américain d’origine polonaise nommé Kowalski incarné par Clint Eastwood, habite dans un quartier jadis largement polonais, mais dont la majorité des occupants est désormais asiatique.  Le film commence au moment où le héros perd un repère essentiel de sa vie avec le décès de sa femme. Confronté à l’ insécurité psychique qui en résulte, il n’éprouve d’empathie pour personne, pas même pour lui. Il ne se fait plus à manger et renforce des habitudes qui lui tiennent lieu de cadre sécurisant : tondre son gazon, astiquer sa vieille Ford  « Gran Torino » et… râler contre les nouveaux occupants du quartier. Ceux-ci sont des Hmong, un groupe d’Asiatiques qui se sont rangés du côté des Américains pendant la guerre du Vietnam et qui ont été rapatriés après la défaite. Il n’apprécie pas plus  Kowalski que celui-ci ne les apprécie. Aux insultes et jurons marmonnés en argot américain par le vieux solitaire répondent des malédictions proférées en vietnamien par une vieille grand-mère. Son manque d’empathie à leur égard mobilise leur agressivité et leur mépris en miroir. Kowalski crache contre ses voisins qui font de même. Enfin, un troisième protagoniste de l’histoire est incarné par une bande de Hmong qui terrorise le quartier. Ses membres sont évidemment dénués d’empathie. Ainsi chacun hait-il ceux qui lui paraissent différents, que ce soit par la langue, l’origine ethnique ou les coutumes. Le changement débute par un quiproquo. Le vieil homme est réveillé en pleine nuit par une bagarre. Il décroche son ancien fusil militaire et en braque le canon sur le front de l’un des combattants Hmong qui vient de rouler sur son carré de gazon : Les cons comme toi, en Corée, on les empilait par paquets de 100 pour faire des barricades. » Nulle trace d’empathie là-dedans, et certainement pas pour la victime de l’agression. Kowalski ne fait que défendre son espace. Mais le lendemain, il a  la surprise de découvrir de nombreux cadeaux sur les marches de son perron. Son intervention a sauvé un adolescent. Pour tout le quartier, occupé exclusivement par des Asiatiques, rappelons-le, c’est un héros ! Pas facile pour un ancien combattant de Corée, traumatisé et xénophobe, de se retrouver dans cette situation. La gentillesse de la communauté Hmong aura peu à peu raison de ses réticences. Il en accepte d’abord la nourriture, puis se prend de sympathie pour l’adolescent qu’il a sauvé. Il décide même de l’aider à avoir un métier et lui achète des outils. C’est le premier stade de l’empathie relationnelle : il se met à la place du garçon pour lui venir en aide. Dans une séquence suivante, Kowalski décide de lui apprendre la façon de parler en vigueur dans sa communauté d’anciens émigrés polonais et italiens. Il accepte alors que ce garçon se mettre à sa place , c’est-à-dire, vu la différence de génération, qu’il la prenne un jour. C’est le second stade de l’empathie relationnelle : la réciprocité. Enfin au cours du repas chez ses voisins asiatiques, un vieux monde désigné comme chaman par ses pairs révèle à Kowalski qu’il existe en lui une blessure secrète et lointaine qui continue à le ronger. Kowalski accepte cette intrusion dans son intimité psychique. Il accepte que ce chaman, qui est pour lui un inconnu, accède à des parties de lui qu’il tenait jusque-là cacher. Il ne vit cette intrusion ni comme dangereuse ni comme condescendante. Et il accepte d’en être éclairé sur lui-même. La preuve en est que cet événement va permettre à Kowalski de raconter lui-même sa blessure au jeune Hmong qu’il a pris sous sa protection. Pendant la guerre de Corée, il s’est lancé à l’assaut d’un nid de mitrailleuses dont les occupants avaient été tués, à l’exception d’un adolescent. Rendu fou de colère par la mort de ses camarades de combat, il a exécuté le garçon d’une balle dans la tête. Kowalski était-il sur le chemin de l’empathie au moment de son départ en Corée ? En tout cas, cette guerre abominable l’en a détourné. Les expériences extrêmes ont le pouvoir de faire prendre d’autres directions que celles qu’on pouvait croire solidement installées. On connaît des déportés réputés calmes et capables de supporter de nombreuses frustrations de la vie, qui sont revenus des camps à jamais incapable d’attendre : ils avaient perdu confiance dans la générosité du monde à leur égard. L’image d’un monde secourable, capable de répondre à leurs désirs, avait laissé place à une assistance persécutrice prenant un plaisir sadique à les faire souffrir. Difficile d’être empathique dans ces conditions-là… Comment faire alors pour vivre ensemble malgré tout ? Dans les sociétés démocratiques, les citoyens élisent des délégués qui se portent garants de l’établissement d’un pouvoir régulateur : la justice et la police sont appelées à jouer ce rôle. Comprenant que son propre désir de faire justice contre la bande des Hmong n ’est qu’un avatar du désir d’emprise qui monte les  diverses communautés les unes contre les autres. Kowalski décide finalement de mobiliser ces instances de régulation. Il le fait d’une façon tellement inattendue que je me garderai bien de la dévoiler au lecteur. Qu’il sache seulement que la signification de ce film, et même celle de l’œuvre entière de Clint Eastwood, s’en trouve bouleversée… Serge Tisseron
L’évolution, dans l’espèce humaine, n’a pas uniquement trié les « gros bras » ou les gros QI, mais également le développement d’un mode particulier d’intelligence, « l’intelligence machiavélienne ». Roger Guillemin
Chez les animaux, l’intelligence peut prendre plusieurs formes. On parle d’intelligences multiples. Dans le cas des abeilles et des insectes sociaux en général (fourmis, guêpes, termites), on parle d’intelligence collective ou d’intelligence « en essaim ». Pour d’autres, on parle d’intelligence « machiavélienne ». C’est le cas de certains singes capables de manipuler d’autres congénères. C’est aussi vrai chez certains moutons qui dirigent volontairement le troupeau vers des endroits escarpés. Enfin, on parle d’intelligence « culturelle »: les chimpanzés de la forêt de Taï en Côte-d’Ivoire utilisent des techniques de chasse individuelles différentes de celles pratiquées habituellement pour la capture de colobes (petits singes arboricoles). Alix Paugam
In cognitive science and evolutionary psychology, Machiavellian intelligence (also known as political intelligence or social intelligence) is the capacity of an entity to be in a successful political engagement with social groups. The first introduction of this concept to primatology came from Frans de Waal’s book « Chimpanzee Politics » (1982), which described social maneuvering while explicitly quoting Machiavelli. Also known as machiavellianism, it is the art of manipulation in which others are socially manipulated in a way that benefits the user. Wikipedia
The social brain hypothesis was proposed by British anthropologist Robin Dunbar, who argues that human intelligence did not evolve primarily as a means to solve ecological problems, but rather intelligence evolved as a means of surviving and reproducing in large and complex social groups. Some of the behaviors associated with living in large groups include reciprocal altruism, deception and coalition formation. These group dynamics relate to Theory of Mind or the ability to understand the thoughts and emotions of others, though Dunbar himself admits in the same book that it is not the flocking itself that causes intelligence to evolve (as shown by ruminants). Dunbar argues that when the size of a social group increases, the number of different relationships in the group may increase by orders of magnitude. Chimpanzees live in groups of about 50 individuals whereas humans typically have a social circle of about 150 people, which is also the typical size of social communities in small societies and personal social networks;  this number is now referred to as Dunbar’s number. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that the success of groups is dependent on their size at foundation, with groupings of around 150 being particularly successful, potentially reflecting the fact that communities of this size strike a balance between the minimum size of effective functionality and the maximum size for creating a sense of commitment to the community.  According to the social brain hypothesis, when hominids started living in large groups, selection favored greater intelligence. As evidence, Dunbar cites a relationship between neocortex size and group size of various mammals. However, meerkats have far more social relationships than their small brain capacity would suggest. Another hypothesis is that it is actually intelligence that causes social relationships to become more complex, because intelligent individuals are more difficult to learn to know. There are also studies that show that Dunbar’s number is not the upper limit of the number of social relationships in humans either. Other studies suggest that social exchange between individuals is a vital adaptation to the human brain, going as far to say that the human mind could be equipped with a neurocognitive system specialized for reasoning about social change. Wikipedia
One by one, the berms we’ve built between ourselves and the beasts are being washed away. Humans are the only animals that use tools, we used to say. But what about the birds and apes that we now know do as well? Humans are the only ones who are empathic and generous, then. But what about the monkeys that practice charity and the elephants that mourn their dead? Humans are the only ones who experience joy and a knowledge of the future. But what about the U.K. study just last month showing that pigs raised in comfortable environments exhibit optimism, moving expectantly toward a new sound instead of retreating warily from it? And as for humans as the only beasts with language? Kanzi himself could tell you that’s not true. All of that is forcing us to look at animals in a new way. With his 1975 book Animal Liberation, bioethicist Peter Singer of Princeton University launched what became known as the animal-rights movement. The ability to suffer, he argued, is a great cross-species leveler, and we should not inflict pain on or cause fear in an animal that we wouldn’t want to experience ourselves. This idea has never met with universal agreement, but new studies are giving it more legitimacy than ever.(…) most scientists agree that awareness is probably controlled by a sort of cognitive rheostat, with consciousness burning brightest in humans and other high animals and fading to a flicker — and finally blackness — in very low ones. (…) Among animals aware of their existence, intellect falls on a sliding scale as well, one often seen as a function of brain size. Here humans like to think they’re kings. The human brain is a big one — about 1,400 g (3 lb.). But the dolphin brain weighs up to 1,700 g (3.75 lb.), and the killer whale carries a monster-size 5,600-g (12.3 lb.) brain. But we’re smaller than the dolphin and much smaller than the whale, so correcting for body size, we’re back in first, right? Nope. The brain of the Etruscan shrew weighs just 0.1 g (0.0035 oz.), yet relative to its tiny body, its brain is bigger than ours.While the size of the brain certainly has some relation to smarts, much more can be learned from its structure. Higher thinking takes place in the cerebral cortex, the most evolved region of the brain and one many animals lack. Mammals are members of the cerebral-cortex club, and as a rule, the bigger and more complex that brain region is, the more intelligent the animal. But it’s not the only route to creative thinking. Consider tool use. Humans are magicians with tools, apes dabble in them, and otters have mastered the task of smashing mollusks with rocks to get the meat inside — which, though primitive, counts. But if creativity lives in the cerebral cortex, why are corvids, the class of birds that includes crows and jays, better tool users than nearly all nonhuman species? (…) In the case of corvids and other animals, what may drive intelligence higher still is the structure not of their brains but of their societies. It’s easier to be a solitary animal than a social one. When you hunt and eat alone, like the polar bear, you don’t have to negotiate power struggles or collaborate in stalking prey. But it’s in that behavior — particularly the hunt — that animals behave most cleverly. Consider the king of the beasts. « Lions do very cool things, » says animal biologist Christine Drea of Duke University. « One animal positions itself for the ambush, and another pushes the prey in that direction. » More impressive still is the unglamorous hyena. « A hyena by itself can take out a wildebeest, but it takes several to bring down a zebra, » she says. « So they plan the size of their party in advance and then go out hunting particular prey. In effect, they say, Let’s go get some zebras. They’ll even bypass a wildebeest if they see one on the way. » (…) For these kinds of animals, it’s not clear what the cause-and-effect relationship is — whether living cooperatively boosts intelligence or if innate intelligence makes it easier to live cooperatively. It’s certainly significant that corvids are the most social of birds, with long lives and stable group bonds, and that they’re the ones that have proved so handy. It’s also significant that herd animals, like cows and buffalo, exhibit little intelligence. Though they live collectively, there’s little shape to their society. « In a buffalo herd, Bob doesn’t care who Betty is, » Drea says. « But among primates, social carnivores, whales and dolphins, every individual has a particular place. » It’s easy enough to study the brain and behavior of an animal, but subtler cognitive abilities are harder to map. One of the most important skills human children must learn is something called the theory of mind: the idea that not all knowledge is universal knowledge. A toddler who watches a babysitter hide a toy in a room will assume that anyone who walks in afterward knows where the toy is too. It’s not until about age 3 that kids realize that just because they know something, it doesn’t mean somebody else knows it also. The theory of mind is central to communication and self-awareness, and it’s the rare animal that exhibits it, though some do. Dogs understand innately what pointing means: that someone has information to share and that your attention is being drawn to it so that you can learn too. That seems simple, but only because we’re born with the ability and, by the way, have fingers with which to do the pointing. Great apes, despite their impressive intellect and five-fingered hands, do not seem to come factory-loaded for pointing. But they may just lack the opportunity to practice it. A baby ape rarely lets go of its mother, clinging to her abdomen as she knuckle-walks from place to place. (…) Pointing isn’t the only indicator of a smart species that grasps the theory of mind. Blue jays — another corvid — cache food for later retrieval and are very mindful of whether other animals are around to witness where they’ve hidden a stash. If the jays have indeed been watched, they’ll wait until the other animal leaves and then move the food. They not only understand that another creature has a mind; they also manipulate what’s inside it. The gold standard for demonstrating an understanding of the self-other distinction is the mirror test: whether an animal can see its reflection and recognize what it is. It may be adorable when a kitten sees itself in a full-length mirror and runs around to the other side of the door looking for what it thought was a playmate, but it’s not head-of-the-class stuff. Elephants, apes and dolphins are among the few creatures that can pass the mirror test. All three respond appropriately when they look in a mirror after a spot of paint is applied to their forehead or another part of their body. Apes and elephants will reach up to touch the mark with finger or trunk rather than reach out to touch the reflection. Dolphins will position themselves so they can see the reflection of the mark better. (…) With or without mirror smarts, some animals are also adept at grasping abstractions, particularly the ideas of sameness and difference. Small children know that a picture of two apples is different from a picture of a pear and a banana; in one case, the objects match, and in the other they don’t. It’s harder for them to take the next step — correctly matching a picture of two apples to a picture of two bananas instead of to a picture of an orange and a plum.(…) If animals can reason — even if it’s in a way we’d consider crude — the unavoidable question becomes, Can they feel? Do they experience empathy or compassion? Can they love or care or hope or grieve? And what does it say about how we treat them? For science, it would be safest simply to walk away from a question so booby-trapped with imponderables. But science can’t help itself, and at least some investigators are exploring these ideas too. It’s well established that elephants appear to mourn their dead, lingering over a herd mate’s body with what looks like sorrow. They show similar interest — even what appears to be respect — when they encounter elephant bones, gently examining them, paying special attention to the skull and tusks. Apes also remain close to a dead troop mate for days. Empathy for living members of the same species is not unheard of either. « When rats are in pain and wriggling, other rats that are watching will wriggle in parallel, » says Marc Hauser, professor of psychology and anthropological biology at Harvard. « You don’t need neurobiology to tell you that suggests awareness. » A 2008 study by primatologist Frans de Waal and others at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta showed that when capuchin monkeys were offered a choice between two tokens — one that would buy two slices of apple and one that would buy one slice each for them and a partner monkey — they chose the generous option, provided the partner was a relative or at least familiar. The Yerkes team believes that part of the capuchins’ behavior was due to a simple sense of pleasure they experience in giving, an idea consistent with studies of the human brain that reveal activity in the reward centers after subjects give to charity. (…) All creatures may exist on a developmental continuum, [Hauser] argues, but the gap between us and the second-place finishers is so big that it shows we truly are something special. « Animals have a myopic intelligence, » Hauser says. « But they never experience the aha moment that a 2-year-old child gets. » (…) Ultimately, the same biological knob that adjusts animal consciousness up or down ought to govern how we value the way those species experience their lives. A mere ape in our world may be a scholar in its own, and the low life of any beast may be a source of deep satisfaction for the beast itself. Kanzi’s glossary is full of words like noodles and sugar and candy and night, but scattered among them are also good and happy and be and tomorrow. If it’s true that all those words have meaning to him, then the life he lives — and by extension, those of other animals — may be rich and worthy ones indeed. Time
Les suricates vivent dans de vastes terriers aux entrées multiples qu’ils ne quittent que dans la journée. Ce sont des animaux sociaux de 20 à 30 membres au sein d’une même colonie. Hors du groupe, les suricates sont voués à une mort quasi certaine. Les animaux du même groupe se toilettent régulièrement entre eux pour tisser des liens sociaux puissants. Le couple dominant exprime son autorité sur le reste du groupe en le marquant de son odeur. Les animaux de second rang toilettent alors le couple dominant et lui lèchent la gueule. Ce comportement se rencontre habituellement lorsque les membres du groupe se trouvent réunis après une courte période de séparation. La plupart des suricates d’un même groupe sont la progéniture du couple dominant. Les suricates ont un comportement altruiste au sein de leur colonie. Un ou plusieurs d’entre eux surveillent en sentinelles les autres membres qui creusent ou jouent entre eux. Lorsqu’un prédateur est repéré, l’alerte est donnée par un aboiement particulier. La bande se précipite alors pour se cacher dans un des terriers dont ils ont parsemé leur territoire. La sentinelle est la première à réapparaître du terrier à la recherche d’éventuels prédateurs. Elle aboie en continu pour maintenir les autres suricates dans leurs terriers. Lorsqu’elle cesse d’aboyer les autres suricates peuvent émerger en toute sécurité. Lorsque les jeunes ont moins de 3 semaines, des individus du groupe restent avec eux au terrier durant toute la journée8. Ces babysitters, qui ne sont pas nécessairement parents des jeunes, ne mangent pas de toute la journée pour surveiller le terrier et les jeunes. Comme tous les babysitters ne sont pas parents des jeunes qu’ils gardent, la théorie de la sélection de parentèle ne suffit pas. Récemment, ce comportement a pu être expliqué par la théorie de l’augmentation du groupe9. Ainsi, des membres du groupe non apparentés aux jeunes ont aussi intérêt à prendre soin de ces jeunes car les groupes les plus nombreux ont plus de chances de survie10. Les femelles qui n’ont jamais mis bas sont chargées d’allaiter les petits de la femelle dominante pendant que cette dernière est partie au loin avec le reste du groupe. Elles protègent également les jeunes des attaques par des prédateurs, souvent au mépris de leur vie. En cas d’alerte, les babysitters conduisent les petits dans les terriers et s’apprêtent à les défendre si nécessaire. Si la retraite sous le sol est impossible, elle réunit les petits et s’allonge par-dessus. Les suricates partagent volontiers leur terrier avec la mangouste jaune et l’écureuil terrestre, espèces avec lesquelles ils n’entrent pas en compétition pour la nourriture. Ils hébergent parfois des serpents… s’ils n’ont pas de chance. Cependant, ils peuvent mordre leur « invité » en cas de mésentente. À l’instar de plusieurs espèces, les jeunes suricates font leur apprentissage en observant et en mimant le comportement des adultes qui s’impliquent cependant dans un enseignement actif. Par exemple, l’adulte enseigne aux petits comment attraper sans risque un scorpion venimeux et lui arracher le dard avant de le manger11 Malgré leur comportement altruiste, les suricates tuent parfois un jeune membre du groupe afin d’accroître leur propre position sociale au sein de ce groupe12 Les suricates sont également connus pour se livrer à des jeux de société comme des concours de lutte et de course (dans le sens course à pied). (…) Un groupe de suricates peut mourir après l’attaque d’un prédateur, si le couple dominant est stérile, lors d’une disette ou d’une épidémie. La taille du groupe est variable. Lorsqu’il comprend un nombre trop important d’individus, il se disperse au loin à la recherche de nouveaux territoires pour se nourrir. Ou bien, à l’occasion d’une alerte, le groupe recherche un abri dans différents terriers. Le résultat en est une scission du groupe. Wikipedia
Child grooming comprises actions deliberately undertaken with the aim of befriending and establishing an emotional connection with a child, to lower the child’s inhibitions in order to sexually abuse the child. Child grooming may be used to lure minors into trafficking of children, illicit businesses such as child prostitution, or the production of child pornography. It is a behavior that is characteristic of paedophilia.  Child grooming involves psychological manipulation in the form of positive reinforcement and foot-in-the-door tactics, using activities that are typically legal but later lead to illegal activities.[citation needed] This is done to gain the child’s trust as well as the trust of those responsible for the child’s well-being. Additionally, a trusting relationship with the family means the child’s parents are less likely to believe potential accusations. In the case of sexual grooming, child pornography images are often shown to the child as part of the grooming process. To establish a good relationship with the child and the child’s family, child groomers might do several things. For example, they might take an undue interest in someone else’s child, to be the child’s “special” friend to gain the child’s trust.[citation needed] They might give gifts or money to the child for no apparent reason (toys, dolls, etc.). They may show pornography—videos or pictures—to the child, hoping to make it easy for the child to accept such acts, thus normalizing the behavior. They may simply talk about sexual topics. These are just some of the methods a child groomer might use to gain a child’s trust and affection to allow them to do what they want. Hugging and kissing or other physical contact, even when the child does not want it, can happen. To the groomer, this is a way to get close. They might talk about problems normally discussed between adults, or at least people of the same age. Topics might include marital problems and other conflicts. They may try to gain the child’s parents’ trust by befriending them, with the goal of easy access to the child. The child groomer might look for opportunities to have time alone with the child. This can be done by offering to babysit. The groomer may invite the child for sleepovers. This gives them the opportunity to sleep in the same room or even the same bed with the child. Actions such as online communication have been defended by suspected offenders using the so-called ‘fantasy defense’, in which those accused argue that they were only expressing fantasies and not plans of future behavior. In the U.S., case law draws a distinction between those two and some people accused of ‘grooming’ have successfully used this defense. Sexual grooming of children also occurs on the Internet. Some abusers will pose as children online and make arrangements to meet with them in person. (…) Sexual grooming of children over the internet is most prevalent (99% of cases) amongst the 13–17 age group, particularly the 13–14 years old children (48%). The majority of them are girls. The majority of the victimization occurs over the mobile phone support. Children and teenagers with behavioral issues such as higher attention seekers have a much higher risk than others. Wikipedia
‘Honestly we did have a lot of white dudes in this video, but for whatever reason it worked out that they would be the ones to say something just in passing, or from a distance off camera. This made their screen time fairly short by comparison, but the numbers were relatively similar. As the video says at the end, it was upwards of 100+ harassments, so obviously not everything was shown, otherwise we’d have a video that’s too long for internet attention spans. But really it was across the board, just about everyone said/did something while we filmed.’ The 18 scenes that we show is a very small portion of street harassment that goes on, because it is a small size. We got 108 reactions but after editing down, the two longest incidents [involving a black man and a Latino man] make up half the video.’ If we filmed for a much longer time, it would show the breakdown of New York City and a much wider demographic.’ Rob Bliss
If you look at any bird or mammal, never mind things as smart as primates, never mind things as doubly smart as humans… any bird or mammal has its biological inheritance, as it were, which gives the rules of how to play the game of life. But how those rules get played out on a day-to-day basis depends on how the animal assesses the particular circumstances – it has a lot of flexibility in how it should behave, it just has some guidelines provided by evolution, and some constraints. If you don’t have wings, you can’t fly… [But there’s still] lots of scope for social, environmental, demographic circumstances… and grim economics. (…) The way in which our social world is constructed is part and parcel of our biological inheritance. Together with apes and monkeys, we’re members of the primate family – and within the primates there is a general relationship between the size of the brain and the size of the social group. We fit in a pattern. There are social circles beyond it and layers within – but there is a natural grouping of 150. This is the number of people you can have a relationship with involving trust and obligation – there’s some personal history, not just names and faces. (…) This looked implausibly small, given that we all live in cities now, but it turned out that this was the size of a typical community in hunter-gatherer societies. And the average village size in the Domesday Book is 150. It’s the same when we have much better data – in the 18th century, for example, thanks to parish registers. County by county, the average size of a village is again 150. Except in Kent, where it was 100. I’ve no idea why. (…)The Dunbar number probably dates back to the appearance of anatomically modern humans 250,000 years ago. If you go back in time, by estimating brain size, you can see community size declining steadily. (…) [sociality]’s the key evolutionary strategy of primates. Group living and explicitly communal solutions to the problem of survival out there on the plains or in the forests… that’s a primate adaptation, and they evolved that very early on. Most species of birds and animals aren’t as intensely social. Sociality for most species hovers around pair-bonds, that’s as complicated as it gets. The species with big brains are the ones who mate monogamously… The lesson is that there is something computationally very demanding about maintaining close relationships over a very long period of time – as we all know! (…) We’re caught in a bind: community sizes were designed for hunter-gatherer- type societies where people weren’t living on top of one another. Your 150 were scattered over a wide are, but everybody shared the same 150. This made for a very densely interconnected community, and this means the community polices itself. You don’t need lawyers and policemen. If you step out of line, granny will wag her finger at you. Our problem now is the sheer density of folk – our networks aren’t compact. You have clumps of friends scattered around the world who don’t know one another: now you don’t have an interwoven network. It leads to a less well integrated society. How to re-create that old sense of community in these new circumstances? That’s an engineering problem. How do we work around it? The alternative solution, of course, is that we could evolve bigger brains. But they’d have to be much bigger, and it takes a long time. (…) Can we manage to have meaningful relationships with more than just the old numbers? Yes, I can find out what you had for breakfast from your tweet, but can I really get to know you better? These digital developments help us keep in touch, when in the past a relationship might just have died; but in the end, we actually have to get together to make a relationship work. In the end, we rely heavily on touch and we still haven’t figured out how to do virtual touch. Maybe once we can do that we will have cracked a big nut. Words are slippery, a touch is worth a 1,000 words any day. Robin Dunbar
What Facebook does and why it’s been so successful in so many ways is it allows you to keep track of people who would otherwise effectively disappear  In the sandpit of life, when somebody kicks sand in your face, you can’t get out of the sandpit. You have to deal with it, learn, compromise. On the internet, you can pull the plug and walk away. There’s no forcing mechanism that makes us have to learn. It’s quite conceivable that we might end up less social in the future, which would be a disaster because we need to be more social—our world has become so large. The amount of social capital you have is pretty fixed. It involves time investment. If you garner connections with more people, you end up distributing your fixed amount of social capital more thinly so the average capital per person is lower. (…) We underestimate how important touch is in the social world. Words are easy. But the way someone touches you, even casually, tells you more about what they’re thinking of you. Robin Dunbar
Few ideas from social science have burrowed their way into the public imagination like Dunbar’s Number, the famous finding that we humans can’t cope with a social circle much larger than 150 people. It’s little surprise that it’s proven so captivating. (…) The average size of modern hunter-gatherer communities, it’s been calculated, is 148.8. The average size of army companies through history, from the Romans to the USSR, hovers around 150. And the average number of people to whom Britons send Christmas cards, according to a 2003 study, if you count every member of each household receiving a card? 153.5. No wonder so many panic-merchants worry that online social networks will destroy society. To accumulate 1,000 Facebook friends, Dunbar’s Number suggests, is to violate a law as old as humanity itself.(…) For centuries – and especially since the Industrial Revolution – we’ve been uprooting ourselves from the communities in which we were born. But until recently, on arriving in a new place, you’d inevitably lose your ties with the one you’d left; you’d be forced to invest fully in a new social circle. These days, thanks to motorways and airliners, email and Skype, you need never cut those ties. You never leave your old life behind, so your emotional investments are scattered. Ironically (…), it’s precisely your continuing bonds with the people you’ve loved for longest that risk leaving you feeling alienated where you are. One consequence is that the people in your circle of 150 are far less likely to know each other. (…) For example, Dunbar’s research shows that people are more altruistic towards each other in dense social networks. Clarence and Lucretia might be firm friends – but all else being equal, they’re less likely to help each other out if they have no other firm friends in common. Why are densely linked friends better friends? The motives involved aren’t necessarily all that virtuous. Maybe they just feel more social pressure, and worry that mutual friends will judge them if they’re not nice. Even so, the effect is that in a dense network, an act of friendship is two things at once: an expression of an individual bond, and another stitch in a bigger social fabric. At the very least, it’s an argument for getting over your hang-ups about introducing your friends to each other. True, they’ll probably gossip about you at some point, but then that strengthens the social fabric, too. Oliver Burkeman
S’ils permettent d’entrer en contact plus facilement avec des individus que l’on ne connaît pas, ou qui sont géographiquement éloignés, les services comme Twitter ou Facebook n’augmentent pas pour autant le nombre d’hommes et de femmes avec lesquels il est possible d’entretenir des relations régulières. Car les réseaux sociaux ne permettent pas de surmonter les limites du cerveau humain. C’est en tout cas la conclusion passionnante d’une étude (.pdf) menée par Bruno Gonçalves, Nicola Perra et Alessandro Vespignani. Les chercheurs se sont intéressés aux travaux de l’anthropologiste britannique Robin Dunbar, qui a découvert en 1992 que les primates ont un nombre limité d’individus dans leur groupe sociaux, et que ce nombre est proportionnel à la taille du neocortex. Extrapolant cette trouvaille à l’homme, il concluait qu’un humain peut entretenir une relation stable avec environ 150 personnes au maximum. Ce qui est devenu le « nombre de Dunbar ». « Au-dessus de ce nombre, la confiance mutuelle et la communication ne suffisent plus à assurer le fonctionnement du groupe. Il faut ensuite passer à une hiérarchie plus importante, avec une structure et des règles importantes (on le voit par exemple à l’échelle d’un pays et de son gouvernement) », indique Wikipedia. Ce nombre se retrouve tout au long de l’histoire de l’Humanité dans des activités diverses comme la taille des villages de fermiers néolithiques, des unités militaires depuis l’armée romaine, ou les carnets d’adresse au 20ème siècle. C’est une constante de l’organisation sociale. Mais les réseaux sociaux sur Internet permettent-ils de dépasser ce nombre, grâce à l’assistance informatisée apportée au groupe ? Pour le savoir, Gonçalves et ses confrères ont étudié les liens noués entre 3 millions d’utilisateurs de Twitter pendant 4 ans, avec un volume total de 380 millions de tweets. (…) Lorsque les internautes commencent à « tweeter », le nombre de contacts avec lesquels ils discutent régulièrement augmente. Jusqu’à un point de saturation au delà duquel au contraire, le nombre d’échanges se resserre autour d’un nombre limité de contacts privilégiés. Or ce point de saturation se situe entre 100 et 200 « amis », c’est-à-dire précisément autour du nombre de Dunbar. (…) « Les réseaux sociaux n’ont pas changé les aptitudes sociales humaines (…) Même dans le monde en ligne les contraintes cognitives et biologiques opèrent comme l’avait prédit la théorie de Dunbar », conclut l’étude. Guillaume Champeau
Les grands singes sont surtout des as en matière de prévention des conflits, grâce à la pratique de l’épouillage ou « grooming ». Elle correspond, dans l’entreprise, à tous ces petits gestes qui consistent à dire bonjour, à parler de la pluie et du beau temps, pour avoir de l’échange social. Chez les primates, plus une espèce est évoluée, plus elle consacre du temps à ces attentions, et moins elle enregistre de conflits internes. Ce qu’il faut retenir : n’épouillez pas stricto sensu vos collaborateurs, ce serait mal vu ! Mais prenez soin de les saluer, de vous enquérir de leur travail (« Comment vas-tu ? T’en sors-tu sur le dossier Untel ? »). En privilégiant le dialogue, le fameux lien social, vous prévenez l’agressivité. (…) Années 1950, île de Koshima, Japon. Une femelle macaque nommée Imo se nourrit de patates douces que la population humaine, vénérant cette espèce, jette à son intention sur la plage. Pour débarrasser l’aliment des grains de sable, Imo a l’idée de nettoyer les patates douces dans la rivière. Plus tard, elle découvre que, en les lavant dans l’eau de mer, elle ajoute un petit goût salé fort ragoûtant. Imo vient d’innover. Mais voilà, chez les macaques, la hiérarchie est rigide, l’information circule verticalement et selon le lignage, jamais horizontalement. Imo va donc divulguer sa trouvaille à ses enfants, eux-mêmes en parleront à leur seule progéniture. Il faudra plus de cinq générations pour que l’ensemble des macaques de l’île en profitent ! Même genre d’aberration, chez les chimpanzés cette fois-ci. Pascal Picq se souvient d’un mâle ayant découvert comment ouvrir les noix de coco mais qui, devant le groupe, continuait à faire semblant de ne pas savoir, de peur que sa trouvaille ne soit accaparée par les dominants et qu’il n’en tire aucun mérite ! Ce qu’il faut retenir : plus un système est souple, plus les innovations peuvent se diffuser vite. Un patron a certes besoin d’une garde rapprochée, jamais de barons qui musellent la créativité des équipes. (…) Voici une histoire qui se déroule chez les babouins Hamadryas. Chaque matin, chez ces singes d’Ethiopie, il existe un rituel entre jeunes mâles arrogants pour décider de la direction à prendre afin de trouver un point d’eau. C’est à celui qui se dressera le plus haut devant le leader pour se faire entendre. Arrive la saison sèche. Aucun des jeunes mâles ne sait plus vers quelle orientation mettre le cap. L’heure est gravissime. L’épuisement des ressources pourrait conduire à la mort du groupe. C’est alors qu’un vieux mâle et sa femelle descendent de la falaise où ils ont élu refuge et se mettent à marcher dans une direction. Le reste du groupe les suit, dans le plus grand respect, car ils sont les seuls à pouvoir les mener vers une dernière source non asséchée. Ce qu’il faut retenir : dans l’entreprise, les seniors jouent le rôle de vieux babouins. Ils sont les dépositaires de l’histoire de la boîte. Leurs compétences peuvent se révéler extrêmement utiles en période de crise. Attribuez-leur une place de choix. Marianne Rey
A quelque espèce qu’il appartienne, un chef doit être reconnu , au sens premier du terme. Un orang-outang qui accède à cette dignité change physiquement. Certains macaques grandissent de quelques centimètres et grossissent de 3 à 5 kilos. Cependant, plus les singes sont évolués – comme les chimpanzés -, moins l’apparence physique compte pour dominer. Mais, même dans ce cas, le chef est le plus visible, il se poste sur une haute branche, il bombe le torse, il fait du bruit, il impressionne sa troupe, il s’entoure d’une bande de jeunes alliés et s’arroge des privilèges. Bref, il s’impose par son comportement, son regard, son hyperactivité. Sans hésiter, parfois, à menacer ses rivaux, à sanctionner ou intimider ses subordonnés : les gorilles frappent le sol avec leurs pieds ou leurs poings, tandis que les babouins haussent les sourcils. Les colères de chef se ressemblent toutes… (…) les singes sont polis! Ils se saluent rituellement tous les matins, le chef n’ayant pas le droit de déroger à cette règle sociale. Il doit répondre aux salutations de ses subordonnés, voire faire le premier geste : un regard droit dans les yeux, une tape amicale sur l’épaule ou une main tendue. S’il omet ce rituel, il risque d’y perdre sa popularité, et même son rang. Le salut n’est pas le seul moyen de souder la tribu : les singes passent beaucoup de temps en grooming, autrement dit en séances de toilettage ou d’épouillage mutuel. Ainsi, note Marie Muzard, ils favorisent la cohésion du groupe. Le plus groomé est, bien entendu, le chef. Tout un rituel dont l’auteur décrit la transposition dans les entreprises : poignées de main, visites impromptues, mots échangés au détour d’un couloir, pots de départ, réunions festives… (…)Plus une espèce est évoluée, plus elle consacre de temps au grooming, et moins elle enregistre de conflits internes! De fait, les macaques rhésus se livrent à cette activité pendant 7 % de leur temps, contre 30 % pour les macaques thibétanas : on constate vingt fois plus d’incidents chez les premiers que chez les seconds… (…) plus les sociétés de singes sont sophistiquées, plus le rôle du chef est limité et la créativité démultipliée. En dehors des périodes de crise – guerres intestines, menaces de prédateurs, sécheresse -, le chef chimpanzé n’est guère interventionniste. Sa sociabilité, son intelligence, sa détermination, son goût du risque l’ont conduit au pouvoir grâce à un réseau d’alliés. Mais, à l’inverse des macaques rhésus, dont la structure de pouvoir est pyramidale, le chef chimpanzé dirige une tribu décentralisée, dont les membres sont relativement autonomes. Les subordonnés peuvent partir chasser de leur côté. Avant de prendre quelque initiative que ce soit, le macaque rhésus consulte son chef. Le chimpanzé, lui, ne craint pas de se lancer dans des aventures et de quitter momentanément le groupe. La créativité d’un groupe de singes peu évolués, note Marie Muzard, est égale à celle de ses dominants. Alors que, chez les chimpanzés, elle est la somme de la créativité de tous ses membres. Il n’est pas surprenant que nos proches cousins soient plus habiles dans la fabrication d’outils que les macaques rhésus, par exemple, et que leur répertoire de parades soit nettement plus riche. Mais attention : la décentralisation comporte ses dangers. Habiles à nouer des alliances temporaires, les chimpanzés se livrent souvent des guerres fratricides pour la conquête de pouvoir. Aucun chef chimpanzé ne peut résister aux coalitions organisées par des subordonnés intelligents , écrit notre primatologue. Si vous appartenez au type patron-chimpanzé (…), surveillez votre entourage… Vincent Nouzille

Où l’on redécouvre l’importance de l’épouillage mutuel !

A l’heure des réseaux sociaux et des rencontres en ligne …

Mais aussi du cyberharcèlement, de la cyberpédophilie ou de la cybersollicitation d’enfants …

Comme du tranquille dénudement public voire de la véritable provocation

Retour, avec un récent article du New Yorker, sur les limites de l’amitié …

Qui, si l’on en croit les recherches de l’anthropologue et biologiste de l’évolution britannique Robin Dunbar et son fameux nombre de Dunbar

Se situeraient, taille de notre cortex oblige entre la musaraigne (au cerveau surdimensionné malgré sa minuscule taille) et le suricate (au petit cerveau mais au réseau social surdimensionné), autour de 150 individus avec lesquels on peut nouer des liens sociaux au même moment …

D’où la question de l’influence des réseaux sociaux …

Qui tout en multipliant nos possibilités de contacts mais aussi en nous privant de la synchronicité de l’expérience partagée comme de la dimension sensorielle du toucher …

Nous exposent, à taille de cerveau constante, au risque de saturation …

Mais d’où aussi la question, que semble oublier Dunbar en ces temps d’hypermixité sociale et ethnique, de la gestion de la violence …

Que tente de conjurer, comme l’a montré Girard avec son étude de l’échange de cadeaux, la multiplication de cette forme d’épouillage moderne que sont nos petits rituels quotidiens …

Pouvant aller, à l’image du film Grand Torino de Clint Eastwood et sans parler des habituels détournements et perversions, jusqu’à l’échange ritualisé d’insultes ou même à terme au sacrifice ultime et christique de soi …

The Limits of Friendship
Maria Konnikova
The New Yorker
October 7, 2014

Robin Dunbar came up with his eponymous number almost by accident. The University of Oxford anthropologist and psychologist (then at University College London) was trying to solve the problem of why primates devote so much time and effort to grooming. In the process of figuring out the solution, he chanced upon a potentially far more intriguing application for his research. At the time, in the nineteen-eighties, the Machiavellian Intelligence Hypothesis (now known as the Social Brain Hypothesis) had just been introduced into anthropological and primatology discourse. It held that primates have large brains because they live in socially complex societies: the larger the group, the larger the brain. Thus, from the size of an animal’s neocortex, the frontal lobe in particular, you could theoretically predict the group size for that animal.

Looking at his grooming data, Dunbar made the mental leap to humans. “We also had humans in our data set so it occurred to me to look to see what size group that relationship might predict for humans,” he told me recently. Dunbar did the math, using a ratio of neocortical volume to total brain volume and mean group size, and came up with a number. Judging from the size of an average human brain, the number of people the average person could have in her social group was a hundred and fifty. Anything beyond that would be too complicated to handle at optimal processing levels. For the last twenty-two years, Dunbar has been “unpacking and exploring” what that number actually means—and whether our ever-expanding social networks have done anything to change it.

The Dunbar number is actually a series of them. The best known, a hundred and fifty, is the number of people we call casual friends—the people, say, you’d invite to a large party. (In reality, it’s a range: a hundred at the low end and two hundred for the more social of us.) From there, through qualitative interviews coupled with analysis of experimental and survey data, Dunbar discovered that the number grows and decreases according to a precise formula, roughly a “rule of three.” The next step down, fifty, is the number of people we call close friends—perhaps the people you’d invite to a group dinner. You see them often, but not so much that you consider them to be true intimates. Then there’s the circle of fifteen: the friends that you can turn to for sympathy when you need it, the ones you can confide in about most things. The most intimate Dunbar number, five, is your close support group. These are your best friends (and often family members). On the flipside, groups can extend to five hundred, the acquaintance level, and to fifteen hundred, the absolute limit—the people for whom you can put a name to a face. While the group sizes are relatively stable, their composition can be fluid. Your five today may not be your five next week; people drift among layers and sometimes fall out of them altogether.

When Dunbar consulted the anthropological and historical record, he found remarkable consistency in support of his structure. The average group size among modern hunter-gatherer societies (where there was accurate census data) was 148.4 individuals. Company size in professional armies, Dunbar found, was also remarkably close to a hundred and fifty, from the Roman Empire to sixteenth-century Spain to the twentieth-century Soviet Union. Companies, in turn, tended to be broken down into smaller units of around fifty then further divided into sections of between ten and fifteen. At the opposite end, the companies formed battalions that ranged from five hundred and fifty to eight hundred, and even larger regiments.

Dunbar then decided to go beyond the existing evidence and into experimental methods. In one early study, the first empirical demonstration of the Dunbar number in action, he and the Durham University anthropologist Russell Hill examined the destinations of Christmas cards sent from households all over the U.K.—a socially pervasive practice, Dunbar explained to me, carried out by most typical households. Dunbar and Hill had each household list its Christmas card recipients and rate them on several scales. “When you looked at the pattern, there was a sense that there were distinct subgroups in there,” Dunbar said. If you considered the number of people in each sending household and each recipient household, each individual’s network was composed of about a hundred and fifty people. And within that network, people fell into circles of relative closeness—family, friends, neighbors, and work colleagues. Those circles conformed to Dunbar’s breakdown.

As constant use of social media has become the new normal, however, people have started challenging the continued relevance of Dunbar’s number: Isn’t it easier to have more friends when we have Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to help us to cultivate and maintain them? Some, like the University of California, Berkeley, professor Morten Hansen, have pointed out that social media has facilitated more effective collaborations. Our real-world friends tend to know the same people that we do, but, in the online world, we can expand our networks strategically, leading to better business outcomes. Yet, when researchers tried to determine whether virtual networks increase our strong ties as well as our weak ones (the ones that Hansen had focussed on), they found that, for now, the essential Dunbar number, a hundred and fifty, has remained constant. When Bruno Gonçalves and his colleagues at Indiana University at Bloomington looked at whether Twitter had changed the number of relationships that users could maintain over a six-month period, they found that, despite the relative ease of Twitter connections as opposed to face-to-face one, the individuals that they followed could only manage between one and two hundred stable connections. When the Michigan State University researcher Nicole Ellison surveyed a random sample of undergraduates about their Facebook use, she found, while that their median number of Facebook friends was three hundred, they only counted an average of seventy-five as actual friends.

There’s no question, Dunbar agrees, that networks like Facebook are changing the nature of human interaction. “What Facebook does and why it’s been so successful in so many ways is it allows you to keep track of people who would otherwise effectively disappear,” he said. But one of the things that keeps face-to-face friendships strong is the nature of shared experience: you laugh together; you dance together; you gape at the hot-dog eaters on Coney Island together. We do have a social-media equivalent—sharing, liking, knowing that all of your friends have looked at the same cat video on YouTube as you did—but it lacks the synchronicity of shared experience. It’s like a comedy that you watch by yourself: you won’t laugh as loudly or as often, even if you’re fully aware that all your friends think it’s hysterical. We’ve seen the same movie, but we can’t bond over it in the same way.

With social media, we can easily keep up with the lives and interests of far more than a hundred and fifty people. But without investing the face-to-face time, we lack deeper connections to them, and the time we invest in superficial relationships comes at the expense of more profound ones. We may widen our network to two, three, or four hundred people that we see as friends, not just acquaintances, but keeping up an actual friendship requires resources. “The amount of social capital you have is pretty fixed,” Dunbar said. “It involves time investment. If you garner connections with more people, you end up distributing your fixed amount of social capital more thinly so the average capital per person is lower.” If we’re busy putting in the effort, however minimal, to “like” and comment and interact with an ever-widening network, we have less time and capacity left for our closer groups. Traditionally, it’s a sixty-forty split of attention: we spend sixty per cent of our time with our core groups of fifty, fifteen, and five, and forty with the larger spheres. Social networks may be growing our base, and, in the process, reversing that balance.

On an even deeper level, there may be a physiological aspect of friendship that virtual connections can never replace. This wouldn’t surprise Dunbar, who discovered his number when he was studying the social bonding that occurs among primates through grooming. Over the past few years, Dunbar and his colleagues have been looking at the importance of touch in sparking the sort of neurological and physiological responses that, in turn, lead to bonding and friendship. “We underestimate how important touch is in the social world,” he said. With a light brush on the shoulder, a pat, or a squeeze of the arm or hand, we can communicate a deeper bond than through speaking alone. “Words are easy. But the way someone touches you, even casually, tells you more about what they’re thinking of you.”

Dunbar already knew that in monkeys grooming activated the endorphin system. Was the same true in humans? In a series of studies, Dunbar and his colleagues demonstrated that very light touch triggers a cascade of endorphins that, in turn, are important for creating personal relationships. Because measuring endorphin release directly is invasive—you either need to perform a spinal tap or a PET scan, and the latter, though considered safe, involves injecting a person with a radioactive tracer—they first looked at endorphin release indirectly. In one study, they examined pain thresholds: how long a person could keep her hand in a bucket of ice water (in a lab), or how long she could maintain a sitting position with no chair present (back against the wall, legs bent at a ninety degree angle) in the field. When your body is flooded with endorphins, you’re able to withstand pain for longer than you could before, so pain tolerance is often used as a proxy for endorphin levels. The longer you can stand the pain, the more endorphins have been released into your system.They found that a shared experience of laughter—a synchronous, face-to-face experience—prior to immersion, be it in the lab (watching a neutral or funny movie with others) or in a natural setting (theatre performances at the 2008 Edinburgh Fringe Festival) enabled people to hold their hands in ice or maintain the chair position significantly longer than they’d previously been able to.

Next, in an ongoing study, Dunbar and his colleagues looked at how endorphins were activated in the brain directly, through PET scans, a procedure that lets you look at how different neural receptors uptake endorphins. The researchers saw the same thing that happened with monkeys, and that had earlier been demonstrated with humans that were viewing positive emotional stimuli: when subjects in the scanner were lightly touched, their bodies released endorphins. “We were nervous we wouldn’t find anything because the touch was so light,” Dunbar said. “Astonishingly, we saw a phenomenal response.” In fact, this makes a great deal of sense and answers a lot of long-standing questions about our sensory receptors, he explained. Our skin has a set of neurons, common to all mammals, that respond to light stroking, but not to any other kind of touch. Unlike other touch receptors, which operate on a loop—you touch a hot stove, the nerves fire a signal to the brain, the brain registers pain and fires a signal back for you to withdraw your hand—these receptors are one-way. They talk to the brain, but the brain doesn’t communicate back. “We think that’s what they exist for, to trigger endorphin responses as a consequence of grooming,” Dunbar said. Until social media can replicate that touch, it can’t fully replicate social bonding.

But, the truth is, no one really knows how relevant the Dunbar number will remain in a world increasingly dominated by virtual interactions. The brain is incredibly plastic, and, from past research on social interaction, we know that early childhood experience is crucial in developing those parts of the brain that are largely dedicated to social interaction, empathy, and other interpersonal concerns. Deprive a child of interaction and touch early on, and those areas won’t develop fully. Envelop her in a huge family or friend group, with plenty of holding and shared experience, and those areas grow bigger. So what happens if you’re raised from a young age to see virtual interactions as akin to physical ones? “This is the big imponderable,” Dunbar said. “We haven’t yet seen an entire generation that’s grown up with things like Facebook go through adulthood yet.” Dunbar himself doesn’t have a firm opinion one way or the other about whether virtual social networks will prove wonderful for friendships or ultimately diminish the number of satisfying interactions one has. “I don’t think we have enough evidence to argue either way,” he said.

One concern, though, is that some social skills may not develop as effectively when so many interactions exist online. We learn how we are and aren’t supposed to act by observing others and then having opportunities to act out our observations ourselves. We aren’t born with full social awareness, and Dunbar fears that too much virtual interaction may subvert that education. “In the sandpit of life, when somebody kicks sand in your face, you can’t get out of the sandpit. You have to deal with it, learn, compromise,” he said. “On the internet, you can pull the plug and walk away. There’s no forcing mechanism that makes us have to learn.” If you spend most of your time online, you may not get enough in-person group experience to learn how to properly interact on a large scale—a fear that, some early evidence suggests, may be materializing. “It’s quite conceivable that we might end up less social in the future, which would be a disaster because we need to be more social—our world has become so large” Dunbar said. The more our virtual friends replace our face-to-face ones, in fact, the more our Dunbar number may shrink.

Maria Konnikova is a contributor to newyorker.com, where she writes a weekly blog focussing on psychology and science.

Voir aussi:

The trouble with modern friendship
‘Panic-merchants worry that online social networks will replace offline friendships, turning users into basement-dwelling zombies, unable to converse face-to-face’
Oliver Burkeman
The Guardian
31 October 2014

Few ideas from social science have burrowed their way into the public imagination like Dunbar’s Number, the famous finding that we humans can’t cope with a social circle much larger than 150 people. It’s little surprise that it’s proven so captivating. As Maria Konnikova explained recently in a New Yorker profile of the anthropologist Robin Dunbar, the way it pops up unbidden in wildly different contexts is almost spooky. The average size of modern hunter-gatherer communities, it’s been calculated, is 148.8. The average size of army companies through history, from the Romans to the USSR, hovers around 150. And the average number of people to whom Britons send Christmas cards, according to a 2003 study, if you count every member of each household receiving a card? 153.5. No wonder so many panic-merchants worry that online social networks will destroy society. To accumulate 1,000 Facebook friends, Dunbar’s Number suggests, is to violate a law as old as humanity itself.

Judging by the research, the panic merchants are wrong: social networks don’t replace offline friendships, or turn users into basement-dwelling zombies, unable to converse face-to-face. Nonetheless, Dunbar’s work does suggest something troubling about modern friendship. For centuries – and especially since the Industrial Revolution – we’ve been uprooting ourselves from the communities in which we were born. But until recently, on arriving in a new place, you’d inevitably lose your ties with the one you’d left; you’d be forced to invest fully in a new social circle. These days, thanks to motorways and airliners, email and Skype, you need never cut those ties. You never leave your old life behind, so your emotional investments are scattered. Ironically (and as a British transplant to New York, I speak from experience), it’s precisely your continuing bonds with the people you’ve loved for longest that risk leaving you feeling alienated where you are.

One consequence is that the people in your circle of 150 are far less likely to know each other. Or, as Dunbar writes, “Our social networks are no longer as densely interconnected as they once were.” Anyone who’s ever fled small-town life might respond: thank God for that. After all, “dense interconnectedness” in villages is what explains that claustrophobic sense that everyone’s always snooping on your business. Yet it turns out that when close friends know each other, good things happen. For example, Dunbar’s research shows that people are more altruistic towards each other in dense social networks. Clarence and Lucretia might be firm friends – but all else being equal, they’re less likely to help each other out if they have no other firm friends in common.

Why are densely linked friends better friends? The motives involved aren’t necessarily all that virtuous. Maybe they just feel more social pressure, and worry that mutual friends will judge them if they’re not nice. Even so, the effect is that in a dense network, an act of friendship is two things at once: an expression of an individual bond, and another stitch in a bigger social fabric. At the very least, it’s an argument for getting over your hang-ups about introducing your friends to each other. True, they’ll probably gossip about you at some point, but then that strengthens the social fabric, too.

Voir également:

Robin Dunbar: we can only ever have 150 friends at most…
Evolutionary anthropologist Robin Dunbar tells Aleks Krotoski why even Facebook cannot expand our true social circle: our brains just aren’t big enough to cope
Aleks Krotoski
The Observer
14 March 2010

Not many people have a number named after them, but Robin Dunbar lays claim to the Dunbar Number. Confusingly, no precise value has been attached to this figure, but a commonly cited approximation is 150 – and this is the number of people with whom we can maintain a meaningful relationship, whether in a hunter-gatherer society or on Facebook.

The director of the Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology at Oxford University is also the author of How Many Friends Does One Person Need? (Faber). It’s no surprise he’s an engaging companion.

What is evolutionary anthroplogy?

Evolutionary anthropology is the generic study of how we came to be modern humans – how our bodies came to be the shape they are, how our minds came to be the way they are.

So how much of our social behaviour is rooted in our biology?

All of it! [But] by that you must be clear that you don’t mean genetically rooted – so that we have no choice about the way we behave, we’re programmed in the way that an an amoeba is.

If you look at any bird or mammal, never mind things as smart as primates, never mind things as doubly smart as humans… any bird or mammal has its biological inheritance, as it were, which gives the rules of how to play the game of life. But how those rules get played out on a day-to-day basis depends on how the the animal assesses the particular circumstances – it has a lot of flexibility in how it should behave, it just has some guidelines provided by evolution, and some constraints. If you don’t have wings, you can’t fly… [But there’s still] lots of scope for social, environmental, demographic circumstances… and grim economics.

What does your work tell us about the way we interact socially?

The way in which our social world is constructed is part and parcel of our biological inheritance. Together with apes and monkeys, we’re members of the primate family – and within the primates there is a general relationship between the size of the brain and the size of the social group. We fit in a pattern. There are social circles beyond it and layers within – but there is a natural grouping of 150.

This is the number of people you can have a relationship with involving trust and obligation – there’s some personal history, not just names and faces.

And this is is the Dunbar number! How did you come up with this concept?

I was working on the arcane question of why primates spend so much time grooming one another, and I tested another hypothesis – which says the reason why primates have big brains is because they live in complex social worlds. Because grooming is social, all these things ought to map together, so I started plotting brain size and group size and grooming time against one another. You get a nice set of relationships.

It was about 3am, and I thought, hmm, what happens if you plug humans into this? And you get this number of 150. This looked implausibly small, given that we all live in cities now, but it turned out that this was the size of a typical community in hunter-gatherer societies. And the average village size in the Domesday Book is 150 [people].

It’s the same when we have much better data – in the 18th century, for example, thanks to parish registers. County by county, the average size of a village is again 150. Except in Kent, where it was 100. I’ve no idea why.

Has this number evolved at all?

The Dunbar number probably dates back to the appearance of anatomically modern humans 250,000 years ago. If you go back in time, by estimating brain size, you can see community size declining steadily.

Why did we evolve as a social species?

Simply, it’s the key evolutionary strategy of primates. Group living and explicitly communal solutions to the problem of survival out there on the plains or in the forests… that’s a primate adaptation, and they evolved that very early on.

Most species of birds and animals aren’t as intensely social. Sociality for most species hovers around pair-bonds, that’s as complicated as it gets. The species with big brains are the ones who mate monogamously… The lesson is that there is something computationally very demanding about maintaining close relationships over a very long period of time – as we all know!

How can we grow the Dunbar number?

We’re caught in a bind: community sizes were designed for hunter-gatherer- type societies where people weren’t living on top of one another. Your 150 were scattered over a wide are, but everybody shared the same 150. This made for a very densely interconnected community, and this means the community polices itself. You don’t need lawyers and policemen. If you step out of line, granny will wag her finger at you.

Our problem now is the sheer density of folk – our networks aren’t compact. You have clumps of friends scattered around the world who don’t know one another: now you don’t have an interwoven network. It leads to a less well integrated society. How to re-create that old sense of community in these new circumstances? That’s an engineering problem. How do we work around it?

The alternative solution, of course, is that we could evolve bigger brains. But they’d have to be much bigger, and it takes a long time.

What about the role of the web in this?

Can we manage to have meaningful relationships with more than just the old numbers? Yes, I can find out what you had for breakfast from your tweet, but can I really get to know you better? These digital developments help us keep in touch, when in the past a relationship might just have died; but in the end, we actually have to get together to make a relationship work.

In the end, we rely heavily on touch and we still haven’t figured out how to do virtual touch. Maybe once we can do that we will have cracked a big nut.

Words are slippery, a touch is worth a 1,000 words any day.

Voir encore:

La taille du cerveau détermine le nombre d’amis sur Twitter
Guillaume Champeau
Numerama
01 Juin 2011

Au début des années 1990, un anthropologue britannique avait découvert que la taille du neocortex imposait à l’homme une limite d’environ 150 individus avec lesquels il peut nouer des liens sociaux au même moment. Une étude américaine et italienne démontre que la même limite existe sur Twitter, et probablement sur tous les réseaux sociaux.

Et si au fond, les réseaux sociaux ne changeaient rien à la capacité des hommes à socialiser ? S’ils permettent d’entrer en contact plus facilement avec des individus que l’on ne connaît pas, ou qui sont géographiquement éloignés, les services comme Twitter ou Facebook n’augmentent pas pour autant le nombre d’hommes et de femmes avec lesquels il est possible d’entretenir des relations régulières. Car les réseaux sociaux ne permettent pas de surmonter les limites du cerveau humain. C’est en tout cas la conclusion passionnante d’une étude (.pdf) menée par Bruno Gonçalves, Nicola Perra et Alessandro Vespignani.

Les chercheurs se sont intéressés aux travaux de l’anthropologiste britannique Robin Dunbar, qui a découvert en 1992 que les primates ont un nombre limité d’individus dans leur groupe sociaux, et que ce nombre est proportionnel à la taille du neocortex. Extrapolant cette trouvaille à l’homme, il concluait qu’un humain peut entretenir une relation stable avec environ 150 personnes au maximum. Ce qui est devenu le « nombre de Dunbar ». « Au-dessus de ce nombre, la confiance mutuelle et la communication ne suffisent plus à assurer le fonctionnement du groupe. Il faut ensuite passer à une hiérarchie plus importante, avec une structure et des règles importantes (on le voit par exemple à l’échelle d’un pays et de son gouvernement) », indique Wikipedia.

Ce nombre se retrouve tout au long de l’histoire de l’Humanité dans des activités diverses comme la taille des villages de fermiers néolithiques, des unités militaires depuis l’armée romaine, ou les carnets d’adresse au 20ème siècle. C’est une constante de l’organisation sociale.

Mais les réseaux sociaux sur Internet permettent-ils de dépasser ce nombre, grâce à l’assistance informatisée apportée au groupe ? Pour le savoir, Gonçalves et ses confrères ont étudié les liens noués entre 3 millions d’utilisateurs de Twitter pendant 4 ans, avec un volume total de 380 millions de tweets. Puisque le nombre de « followers » (personnes qui nous suivent) et de « following » (personnes que l’on suit) n’est pas déterminant, le travail s’est concentré sur l’extraction de 25 millions de conversations entre les individus.

Lorsque les internautes commencent à « tweeter », le nombre de contacts avec lesquels ils discutent régulièrement augmente. Jusqu’à un point de saturation au delà duquel au contraire, le nombre d’échanges se resserre autour d’un nombre limité de contacts privilégiés. Or ce point de saturation se situe entre 100 et 200 « amis », c’est-à-dire précisément autour du nombre de Dunbar.

Ainsi le volume de messages envoyés vers un contact augmente avec le nombre des contacts établi jusqu’au point de saturation, puis l’utilisateur commence à négliger certains des contacts au profit de certains (graphique A). Par ailleurs, le nombre de réponses à des contacts qui envoient des messages sature autour de 250 personnes (graphique B).

« Les réseaux sociaux n’ont pas changé les aptitudes sociales humaines (…) Même dans le monde en ligne les contraintes cognitives et biologiques opèrent comme l’avait prédit la théorie de Dunbar », conclut l’étude.

Voir enfin:

Management
Pour être un bon manager, observez les grands singes
Marianne Rey
L’Entreprise
27/11/2009

Du chimpanzé à l’homme, il n’y a qu’un pas. Pour cultiver l’art de diriger et motiver, retournons à nos sources : ces primates tout sauf primaires. Et plutôt doués pour le travail en équipe. Entretien avec Pascal Picq, paléoanthropologue au Collège de France.

Les gorilles, babouins, macaques, bonobos sont nos cousins, les chimpanzés, nos frères. Et si nos meilleurs coachs en matière de vie de groupe, à commencer par le microcosme de l’entreprise, étaient ces grands singes vivant en petits clans ? C’est la vision du paléoanthropologue Pascal Picq. Chercheur au Collège de France, il conseille l’Association pour le progrès du management (APM) et fut un grand témoin de la dernière Académie des entrepreneurs, organisée par L’Entreprise et Ernst&Young. Il nous ramène aux origines du leadership… sans tomber dans le piège de l’anthropomorphisme.

1. Autorité : rappeler qui mène le jeu… par petites touches
Chez les grands singes, comme dans l’entreprise, l’autorité ne va pas de soi. Celui qui la détient doit sans cesse s’activer pour la réaffirmer. Prenons le cas de Mama, une femelle chimpanzé que Pascal Picq a longuement observée. Autour d’elle, les mâles se succèdent à la place de numéro 1. Mais aucun n’obtient cette place sans son assentiment. C’est donc Mama qui détient l’autorité dans le groupe. Comment parvient–elle à la conserver ? Tout simplement par la négociation. Un exemple : sur un tronc d’arbre, Mama rencontre Zola, laquelle bloque son passage et fait semblant de ne pas l’avoir vue. En clair, Zola défie l’autorité de Mama. Que va faire cette dernière ? Surtout pas rabrouer violemment la rebelle, ce serait prendre le risque d’une contestation bien plus forte. Elle s’arrête donc un moment, pour montrer qu’elle respecte la position de Zola, avant de lui faire comprendre qu’elle doit tout de même lui céder le passage.
Ce qu’il faut retenir : l’autorité se construit à travers des négociations subtiles, au jour le jour, qui laissent à chaque individu la place de s’exprimer. En réunion, donnez à chacun un temps de parole pour laisser cours à ses frustrations. On acceptera mieux que vous ayez le dernier mot.

2. Conflits : s’interposer vite et mettre du liant tous les jours
Passons rapidement sur le mode alternatif de règlement des conflits en vigueur chez les bonobos, la simulation de l’acte sexuel… Plus adaptable à l’entreprise : chez les chimpanzés, il revient au mâle dominant d’intervenir pour éviter que les conflits ne s’enveniment. Si une bagarre éclate, il se pose en juge de paix, se place entre les deux protagonistes et, hérissant les poils pour manifester sa prestance, effectue une démonstration de force. L’interventionnisme est une obligation découlant du pouvoir. Mais les grands singes sont surtout des as en matière de prévention des conflits, grâce à la pratique de l’épouillage ou « grooming ». Elle correspond, dans l’entreprise, à tous ces petits gestes qui consistent à dire bonjour, à parler de la pluie et du beau temps, pour avoir de l’échange social. Chez les primates, plus une espèce est évoluée, plus elle consacre du temps à ces attentions, et moins elle enregistre de conflits internes.
Ce qu’il faut retenir : n’épouillez pas stricto sensu vos collaborateurs, ce serait mal vu ! Mais prenez soin de les saluer, de vous enquérir de leur travail (« Comment vas-tu ? T’en sors-tu sur le dossier Untel ? »). En privilégiant le dialogue, le fameux lien social, vous prévenez l’agressivité.

3. Motivation : récompenser le bon chasseur pour en faire un exemple
Chez les chimpanzés, la reconnaissance des mérites s’opère autour de la chasse. Seuls ont droit à une part du « gâteau » ceux qui ont participé à la prise. Si le mâle dominant n’a pas été de la partie, on l’invitera quand même au festin, mais les plus beaux morceaux reviendront au meilleur chasseur, pas à lui. Le chasseur numéro 1 ne s’attribuera pas toute la gloire, il rendra hommage aux camarades l’ayant aidé à capturer sa proie, en partageant la viande avec eux. A la prochaine chasse, le chasseur d’élite, sachant que le mâle dominant ne s’attribuera pas tous les éloges, sera motivé pour un nouvel exploit. Quant aux autres chimpanzés du groupe, ils ne rechigneront pas à l’aider, car ils sauront que leurs mérites seront aussi reconnus.
Ce qu’il faut retenir : un salarié a besoin d’être valorisé pour le travail qu’il fournit. La rémunération n’est qu’une forme de réponse à ce besoin de reconnaissance. Pensez à un éventuel élargissement des responsabilités ou, simplement, à complimenter tous ceux qui font des efforts !

4. Motivation encore : favoriser les échanges de compétences
Nos frères, les chimpanzés, ont intégré depuis longtemps dans leur manière de fonctionner les échanges de bons procédés et la mutualisation des compétences. Comme dans l’entreprise, le partage des ressources doit être un jeu gagnant/ gagnant pour fonctionner à long terme. Que va faire un chimpanzé en possession d’une noix de coco mais bien embêté de ne pas savoir l’ouvrir ? Il va négocier un deal avec une femelle compétente : tu ouvres la noix de coco, je partage le fruit avec toi. Dès que l’intérêt du groupe est en jeu, les chimpanzés collaborent. Ils sont capables de mener une action collective extrêmement efficace et organisée, pour aller faire la guerre à un autre groupe, par exemple, ou pour la chasse. Les coopérations fonctionnent aussi pour renverser l’autorité devenue illégitime. Un mâle numéro 2 prend rarement le pouvoir seul. Il fait alliance avec le numéro 3. La récompense pour celui-ci ? Devenir numéro 2.
Ce qu’il faut retenir : briefez vos managers de proximité. Ils doivent veiller à ce que les membres de leurs équipes trouvent dans chaque mission un rôle à part entière et un intérêt à collaborer.

5. Innovation : écouter ceux qui osent travailler autrement
Années 1950, île de Koshima, Japon. Une femelle macaque nommée Imo se nourrit de patates douces que la population humaine, vénérant cette espèce, jette à son intention sur la plage. Pour débarrasser l’aliment des grains de sable, Imo a l’idée de nettoyer les patates douces dans la rivière. Plus tard, elle découvre que, en les lavant dans l’eau de mer, elle ajoute un petit goût salé fort ragoûtant. Imo vient d’innover. Mais voilà, chez les macaques, la hiérarchie est rigide, l’information circule verticalement et selon le lignage, jamais horizontalement. Imo va donc divulguer sa trouvaille à ses enfants, eux-mêmes en parleront à leur seule progéniture. Il faudra plus de cinq générations pour que l’ensemble des macaques de l’île en profitent ! Même genre d’aberration, chez les chimpanzés cette fois-ci. Pascal Picq se souvient d’un mâle ayant découvert comment ouvrir les noix de coco mais qui, devant le groupe, continuait à faire semblant de ne pas savoir, de peur que sa trouvaille ne soit accaparée par les dominants et qu’il n’en tire aucun mérite !
Ce qu’il faut retenir : plus un système est souple, plus les innovations peuvent se diffuser vite. Un patron a certes besoin d’une garde rapprochée, jamais de barons qui musellent la créativité des équipes.

Le rituel matinal
Qui doit saluer en premier ? Le chef ou le collaborateur ? Chez les macaques Rhésus, adeptes d’une hiérarchie très pyramidale, digne de l’armée, il revient toujours au subalterne de saluer en premier le dominant. Chez les chimpanzés, en revanche, le mâle leader s’attache tous les matins à répondre aux salutations, voire à faire le premier geste. Petite tape amicale sur l’épaule, regard franc… Sinon, il risque de perdre sa popularité, voire son rang ! A votre avis, quelle est l’espèce la plus évoluée ?
6. Seniors : miser sur l’expérience pour sortir plus vite des crises
Voici une histoire qui se déroule chez les babouins Hamadryas. Chaque matin, chez ces singes d’Ethiopie, il existe un rituel entre jeunes mâles arrogants pour décider de la direction à prendre afin de trouver un point d’eau. C’est à celui qui se dressera le plus haut devant le leader pour se faire entendre. Arrive la saison sèche. Aucun des jeunes mâles ne sait plus vers quelle orientation mettre le cap. L’heure est gravissime. L’épuisement des ressources pourrait conduire à la mort du groupe. C’est alors qu’un vieux mâle et sa femelle descendent de la falaise où ils ont élu refuge et se mettent à marcher dans une direction. Le reste du groupe les suit, dans le plus grand respect, car ils sont les seuls à pouvoir les mener vers une dernière source non asséchée.
Ce qu’il faut retenir : dans l’entreprise, les seniors jouent le rôle de vieux babouins. Ils sont les dépositaires de l’histoire de la boîte. Leurs compétences peuvent se révéler extrêmement utiles en période de crise. Attribuez-leur une place de choix.

Pour en savoir plus Maître de conférences au Collège de France, Pascal Picq a étudié les hominidés préhistoriques et les grands singes actuels pour mieux comprendre la vie des clans. Une leçon de management. Il a publié Les origines de l’humanité. Un ouvrage de référence codirigé par Pascal Picq et Yves Coppens : Aux origines de l’humanité – Le propre de l’homme , éd. Fayard, 52 euros.

Hominidés : un site internet d’informations sur l’évolution de l’homme de la préhistoire à nos jours.

Voir enfin:

MANAGEMENT
DES PATRONS ET DES SINGES
Vincent Nouzille
L’Expansion
15/04/1993

Après les sociologues, les psychologues, les graphologues, faut-il se tourner vers les primatologues pour mieux comprendre le mode de fonctionnement des entreprises? Sans tomber dans la caricature, le rapprochement entre le management des firmes et l’organisation des tribus de singes est assez instructif : l’exercice de l’autorité, les relations au sein d’un groupe humain vont chercher leurs archétypes très loin dans les replis des cerveaux. Et nos grands PDG, comme nos dirigeants politiques, empruntent souvent des traits aux chefs macaques ou chimpanzés. C’est à cette découverte amusée et détaillée que nous invite Marie Muzard, à la fois consultante en communication et primatologue, auteur d’un livre sur la jungle entrepreneuriale (Ces grands singes qui nous dirigent, Albin Michel).

Premier constat : à quelque espèce qu’il appartienne, un chef doit être reconnu , au sens premier du terme. Un orang-outang qui accède à cette dignité change physiquement. Certains macaques grandissent de quelques centimètres et grossissent de 3 à 5 kilos.

Cependant, plus les singes sont évolués – comme les chimpanzés -, moins l’apparence physique compte pour dominer. Mais, même dans ce cas, le chef est le plus visible, il se poste sur une haute branche, il bombe le torse, il fait du bruit, il impressionne sa troupe, il s’entoure d’une bande de jeunes alliés et s’arroge des privilèges.

Bref, il s’impose par son comportement, son regard, son hyperactivité. Sans hésiter, parfois, à menacer ses rivaux, à sanctionner ou intimider ses subordonnés : les gorilles frappent le sol avec leurs pieds ou leurs poings, tandis que les babouins haussent les sourcils. Les colères de chef se ressemblent toutes…

Deuxième observation surprenante : les singes sont polis! Ils se saluent rituellement tous les matins, le chef n’ayant pas le droit de déroger à cette règle sociale. Il doit répondre aux salutations de ses subordonnés, voire faire le premier geste : un regard droit dans les yeux, une tape amicale sur l’épaule ou une main tendue. S’il omet ce rituel, il risque d’y perdre sa popularité, et même son rang.

Le salut n’est pas le seul moyen de souder la tribu : les singes passent beaucoup de temps en grooming, autrement dit en séances de toilettage ou d’épouillage mutuel. Ainsi, note Marie Muzard, ils favorisent la cohésion du groupe . Le plus groomé est, bien entendu, le chef. Tout un rituel dont l’auteur décrit la transposition dans les entreprises : poignées de main, visites impromptues, mots échangés au détour d’un couloir, pots de départ, réunions festives…

Grooming. Michel Bon, ex-PDG de Carrefour, en tire des leçons de management : Je passais beaucoup de temps à visiter les magasins, écrit-il dans la préface. Je sais maintenant que j’y faisais ce qu’on appelle chez les singes le grooming, c’est-à-dire des attentions réciproques, et que c’est très important. Plus une espèce est évoluée, plus elle consacre de temps au grooming, et moins elle enregistre de conflits internes! De fait, les macaques rhésus se livrent à cette activité pendant 7 % de leur temps, contre 30 % pour les macaques thibétanas : on constate vingt fois plus d’incidents chez les premiers que chez les seconds…

Troisième leçon : plus les sociétés de singes sont sophistiquées, plus le rôle du chef est limité et la créativité démultipliée. En dehors des périodes de crise – guerres intestines, menaces de prédateurs, sécheresse -, le chef chimpanzé n’est guère interventionniste. Sa sociabilité, son intelligence, sa détermination, son goût du risque l’ont conduit au pouvoir grâce à un réseau d’alliés. Mais, à l’inverse des macaques rhésus, dont la structure de pouvoir est pyramidale, le chef chimpanzé dirige une tribu décentralisée, dont les membres sont relativement autonomes.

Les subordonnés peuvent partir chasser de leur côté.

Avant de prendre quelque initiative que ce soit, le macaque rhésus consulte son chef. Le chimpanzé, lui, ne craint pas de se lancer dans des aventures et de quitter momentanément le groupe. La créativité d’un groupe de singes peu évolués, note Marie Muzard, est égale à celle de ses dominants. Alors que, chez les chimpanzés, elle est la somme de la créativité de tous ses membres. Il n’est pas surprenant que nos proches cousins soient plus habiles dans la fabrication d’outils que les macaques rhésus, par exemple, et que leur répertoire de parades soit nettement plus riche.

Mais attention : la décentralisation comporte ses dangers. Habiles à nouer des alliances temporaires, les chimpanzés se livrent souvent des guerres fratricides pour la conquête de pouvoir. Aucun chef chimpanzé ne peut résister aux coalitions organisées par des subordonnés intelligents , écrit notre primatologue. Si vous appartenez au type patron-chimpanzé (voir ci-dessous), surveillez votre entourage…

LES GORILLES : DES CHEFS DE CLAN TRADITIONNELS Forte stature, voix tonnante, le chef gorille dirige sa tribu en despote démonstratif.
Le patron-gorille, lui, règne sur son entreprise – souvent familiale – en autocrate généreux, capable du meilleur comme du pire. Avant tout homme de terrain, il apprécie d’être au contact de ses troupes. Il veut être aimé, ne comptant ni ses récompenses ni ses colères quand on ne lui manifeste pas une totale dévotion. C’est le modèle archétypique et archaïque du patron français des trente dernières années, à la tête d’une PME ou d’un groupe familial. Il a aujourd’hui les tempes grisonnantes, comme le chef gorille a le dos argenté…

Exemples : Francis Bouygues, Antoine Riboud, Serge Dassault, Jean-Luc Lagardère, Robert Hersant, Jacques Calvet (ascendant rhésus).

LES MACAQUES RHESUS : DES DURS SOLITAIRES PRETS A TOUT Plutôt solitaire et froid, grand et lourd, le macaque rhésus gouverne de haut et sans partage une organisation pyramidale. Le patron de ce type se place volontairement au sommet d’une hiérarchie nombreuse, où il compte peu d’alliés. Il use des privilèges de sa fonction : bureau spacieux, voiture luxueuse, distance dans les contacts. Il se moque de sa popularité, choisissant d’être craint plutôt qu’aimé. Il préfère la réflexion à l’émotion, les rendez-vous aux discussions de couloir. Mais c’est un visionnaire conquérant qui n’a peur de rien, prêt à se battre, quitte à prendre des risques ou à faire le ménage : chez les rhésus, le chef peut mordre le rebelle… Plutôt issus des grands corps de l’Etat, ces patrons sont présents à la tête des grands groupes privés et publics, ou parmi les redresseurs sans états d’âme.

Exemples : Loïk Le Floch-Prigent, Alain Gomez, Bernard Arnault, François Pinault, No »l Goutard, Guy Dejouany (ascendant chimpanzé), Jérôme Monod (ascendant chimpanzé).

LES CHIMPANZES : DES STRATEGES MANIPULATEURS A la tête d’un ensemble décentralisé, le patron-chimpanzé n’affiche pas son statut : on a même parfois du mal à le reconnaître dans son groupe. Il s’impose – souvent temporairement – grâce à des alliés, qu’il n’hésite pas à manipuler pour étendre son influence ou préserver son pouvoir. Courtois et conciliateur, parfois même très convivial, il délègue beaucoup, y compris la gestion des conflits.

Il laisse surtout une grande liberté d’initiative et de créativité à ses subordonnés et alliés. Qui peuvent se coaliser à tout moment pour le renverser… Ce modèle de patron-chimpanzé se répand de plus en plus, notamment dans les entreprises en plein développement ou dans les multinationales comme IBM, Hewlett-Packard ou Shell.

Exemples : Jean-Louis Beffa, Lindsay Owen-Jones, Gérard Worms, Vincent Bolloré, Bernard Attali, Serge Tchuruk, Didier Pineau-Valencienne (ascendant rhésus).

Voir de même:

Une étude se penche sur les « groomers », les abuseurs sexuels qui passent par internet
La Libre Belgique
22 septembre 2011

Sciences – Santé Les « groomers », ces adultes aux intérêts sexuels déviants qui entrent en contact avec des mineurs via internet, sont généralement des hommes d’une quarantaine d’années et leurs victimes ont en moyenne treize ans, selon les résultats d’une étude européenne qui s’est penchée sur le phénomène du « grooming » dont les résultats ont été dévoilés jeudi à l’Université de Mons.

Les chercheurs de l’UMons, en collaboration avec leurs confrères britanniques, norvégiens et italiens, ont exploré, dans le cadre d’un projet financé par la Commission Européenne, les processus par lesquels des abuseurs sexuels sélectionnent et « grooment » des enfants et des adolescents via internet et ses réseaux sociaux ou d’autres technologies de communication telles que le gsm, les jeux vidéo. Les abuseurs sélectionnent par des approches diverses leurs victimes afin d’abuser d’elles sexuellement.

Le profil moyen du groomer est, selon l’étude, très souvent celui d’un homme, le plus souvent quarantenaire, au quotient intellectuel assez élevé (moy. 104). L’âge moyen des victimes est de 13 ans. On y retrouve 84 pc de filles et 16 pc de garçons, souvent en manque d’affection ou désinhibés mais sensibles à la non-dénonciation du groomer par chantage. Les jeunes «résilients» coupent, par contre, les ponts dès qu’ils comprennent qu’ils sont menacés.

L’étude universitaire a permis d’établir de véritables relations «auteur-victime» dans le grooming et de proposer des techniques de prévention, entre autres la prise de conscience des parents et éducateurs, la mise en place de programmes de sécurité, un environnement en ligne sécurisant et la mesure du risque pris par les agresseurs.

Le projet a par ailleurs montré que, contrairement à la Norvège et au Royaume-Uni, il n’existait pas en Belgique de législation spécifique pour les « groomers ». « On peut cependant intervenir légalement en Belgique dès qu’il y a incitation à l’acte sexuel », a indiqué Thierry Pham, du service de psychologie légale de la faculté de psychologie de l’UMons.

« Le phénomène est du grooming est encore peu connu, il y a peu de données disponibles. Le présent projet se veut introductif et est donc appelé à se développer », a conclu le professeur Pham.

L’étude s’est concentrée, notamment, sur les interviews d’enquêteurs belges, d’élèves d’écoles secondaires belges et de groomers des pays concernés par le projet européen.

Voir enfin:

Draguer des enfants sur le Net bientôt puni plus durement?
Pédophilie
—Des politiciens veulent rendre condamnable la sollicitation d’enfants sur internet ou carrément l’interdire. D’autres estiment que c’est difficilement faisable. Le débat est lancé avant la votation 18 mai prochain.

Pascal Schmuck, Zurich

Le Matin

08.04.2014
Les Suisses doivent se prononcer le 18 mai sur l’initiative populaire «Pour que les pédophiles ne travaillent plus avec des enfants», ce qui permet de rappeler que les prédateurs utilisent souvent internet pour approcher leurs victimes, via principalement les outils et forums de discussion (chat).

Dragués après trois minutes

«Les enfants et adolescents qui utilisent un Chatroom destiné au moins de 15 ans sont dragués après trois minutes en moyenne», explique Chantal Billaud, criminologue et adjointe à la Prévention Suisse de la Criminalité (PSC).

Ces méthodes destinées à tisser un lien avec la victime sont qualifiées de cyber-sollicitation (cyber-grooming) et assez vite, ces discussions prennent un tour sexuel, voire pornographique. L’enfant est ainsi habitué à parler de sexualité. Si certains prédateurs s’en contentent, d’autres cherchent à rencontrer leurs victimes.

«La loi ne peut rester à la traîne»

Cette prise de contact sur internet constitue encore une zone grise dans le droit, alors que l’envoi de textes ou d’images pornographiques est condamnable. Une majorité de la Commission des affaires juridiques du Conseil national veut durcir les règles et a donc lancé une initiative parlementaire.

Elle travaille sur un article qui condamnerait le grooming. «Internet offre toujours plus de possibilité pour abuser des enfants. La loi ne peut rester à la traîne», explique la conseillère nationale socialiste Margret Kiener Nellen au Tages-Anzeiger. Sa collègue PDC Barbara Schmid-Federer milite pour une interdiction et elle espère plus de succès qu’il y a trois ans, lorsqu’elle avait lancé en vain une proposition en ce sens.

Une lacune dans la loi

La commission équivalente du Conseil des Etats a refusé de justesse le texte de leur collègues du National. «La majorité a des doutes sur la faisabilité d’une telle interdiction», explique le président de la commission le PDC Stefan Engler. Il sera difficile de prouver qu’une personne qui contacte un enfant sur internet veut l’abuser.

Un avis que partage le conseiller national socialiste Daniel Jositsch. «On court le risque de condamner des gens qui n’ont encore rien fait.». Ce serait comme retirer le permis à tout acheteur de Ferrari par précaution pour l’empêcher de rouler vite. En outre, la condamnation du grooming ne déboucherait que sur des peines légères. «Une amende ou un sursis n’empêcherait que peu de pédocriminels de reprendre contact avec des enfants», estime l’élu.

Parmi les spécialistes, le sujet fait débat mais le Service national de coordination de la lutte contre la criminalité sur Internet (SCOCI) reconnaît une lacune. «Comme une rencontre précède de peu, voire accompagne l’abus d’un enfant, la pénalisation intervient trop tard», indique une porte-parole du Département fédéral de justice et police (DFJP). La mesure préventive pour la protection de l’enfant n’est pas assez mise en avant.

Un délit d’office

Le PSC se montre aussi prudent. «Il serait inimaginable dans la vraie vie de punir un homme ou une femme simplement pour avoir parlé avec un enfant sur une place de jeu», estime Chantal Billaud. On ne peut donc prévoir pour internet des lois plus dures que pour le monde réel.

Le PSC rappelle que la plupart des cas de grooming débouchent tôt ou tard sur un abus sexuel. Ce qui est condamnable pour autant que la victime porte plainte, rappelle la porte-parole. Et de proposer plutôt de faire de tout abus sexuel envers les enfants un délit automatique. Ainsi la police, sur une simple annonce, pourrait démarrer d’office une enquête.

Le parlement doit aussi se pencher sur ce sujet, une motion de Barbara Schmid-Federer ayant déjà été déposée. Le Conseil fédéral s’oppose pour le moment à une pénalisation du grooming ainsi qu’aux enquêtes d’office pour les abus sexuels envers les enfants. (Newsnet)

_______

Le «grooming», c’est quoi?
Le verbe anglais «to groom» signifie préparer. L’abus sexuel est toujours précédé par du «grooming», cette phase de préparation où le pédocriminel met en confiance le mineur afin d’agir plus librement ensuite.

Voir par ailleurs:

Inside the Minds of Animals
Science is revealing just how smart other species can be — and raising new questions about how we treat them
Jeffrey Kluger
Time
Aug. 05, 2010

Not long ago, I spent the morning having coffee with Kanzi. It wasn’t my idea; Kanzi invited me, though he did so in his customary clipped way. Kanzi is a fellow of few words — 384 of them by formal count, though he probably knows dozens more. He has a perfectly serviceable voice — very clear, very expressive and very, very loud. But it’s not especially good for forming words, which is the way of things when you’re a bonobo, the close and more peaceable cousin of the chimpanzee.

But Kanzi is talkative all the same. For much of his day, he keeps a sort of glossary close at hand — three laminated, place mat — like sheets filled with hundreds of colorful symbols that represent all the words he’s been taught by his minders or picked up on his own. He can build thoughts and sentences, even conjugate, all by pointing. The sheets include not just easy nouns and verbs like ball and Jell-O and run and tickle but also concept words like from and later and grammatical elements like the -ing and -ed endings signifying tense.

Kanzi knows the value of breaking the ice before getting down to business. So he points to the coffee icon on his glossary and then points to me. He then sweeps his arm wider, taking in primatologist Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, an investigator at the Great Ape Trust — the research center in Des Moines, Iowa, that Kanzi calls home — and lab supervisor Tyler Romine. Romine fetches four coffees — hot, but not too hot — takes one to Kanzi in his patio enclosure on the other side of a Plexiglas window and then rejoins us. Kanzi sips — gulps, actually — and since our voices are picked up by microphones, he listens as we talk.

« We told him that a visitor was coming, » Savage-Rumbaugh tells me. « He’s been excited, but he was stubborn this morning, and we couldn’t get him to come out to the yard. So we had to negotiate a piece of honeydew melon in exchange. » Honeydew is not yet on Kanzi’s word list; instead, he points to the glyphs for green, yellow and watermelon. When he tried kale, he named it « slow lettuce » because it takes longer to chew than regular lettuce.

The not-for-profit Great Ape Trust is home to seven bonobos, including Kanzi’s baby son Teco, born this year on June 1. Kanzi is by no means the first ape to have been taught language. The famous Koko, Washoe and others came before him. But the Trust takes a novel approach, raising apes from birth with spoken and symbolic language as a constant feature of their days. Just as human mothers take babies on walks and chatter to them about what they see even though the child does yet not understand, so too do the scientists at the Trust narrate the lives of their bonobos. With the help of such total immersion, the apes are learning to communicate better, faster and with greater complexity.

All the same, today Kanzi is not interested in saying much, preferring to run and leap and display his physical prowess instead. « Ball, » he taps on one of his glossary sheets when he finishes his coffee.

« Tell him you’ll get it for him, » Savage-Rumbaugh instructs me and then shows me where the necessary symbols are on a sheet I have in hand. « Yes-I-will-chase-the-ball-for-you, » I slowly peck out, chase being a word Kanzi uses interchangeably with get.

It takes me a while to find the ball in an office down the hall, and when I finally return, Savage-Rumbaugh verbally asks Kanzi, « Are you ready to play? » He looks at us balefully. « Past ready, » he pecks.

Humans have a fraught relationship with beasts. They are our companions and our chattel, our family members and our laborers, our household pets and our household pests. We love them and cage them, admire them and abuse them. And, of course, we cook and eat them.

Our dodge — a not unreasonable one — has always been that animals are ours to do with as we please simply because they don’t suffer the way we do. They don’t think, not in any meaningful way. They don’t worry. They have no sense of the future or their own mortality. They may pair-bond, but they don’t love. For all we know, they may not even be conscious. « The reason animals do not speak as we do is not that they lack the organs, » René Descartes once said, « but that they have no thoughts. » For many people, the Bible offers the most powerful argument of all. Human beings were granted « dominion over the beasts of the field, » and there the discussion can more or less stop.

But one by one, the berms we’ve built between ourselves and the beasts are being washed away. Humans are the only animals that use tools, we used to say. But what about the birds and apes that we now know do as well? Humans are the only ones who are empathic and generous, then. But what about the monkeys that practice charity and the elephants that mourn their dead? Humans are the only ones who experience joy and a knowledge of the future. But what about the U.K. study just last month showing that pigs raised in comfortable environments exhibit optimism, moving expectantly toward a new sound instead of retreating warily from it? And as for humans as the only beasts with language? Kanzi himself could tell you that’s not true.

All of that is forcing us to look at animals in a new way. With his 1975 book Animal Liberation, bioethicist Peter Singer of Princeton University launched what became known as the animal-rights movement. The ability to suffer, he argued, is a great cross-species leveler, and we should not inflict pain on or cause fear in an animal that we wouldn’t want to experience ourselves. This idea has never met with universal agreement, but new studies are giving it more legitimacy than ever. It’s not enough to study an animal’s brain, scientists now say; we need to know its mind.

Conscious Critters
There are a lot of obstacles in the way of our understanding animal intelligence — not the least being that we can’t even agree whether nonhuman species are conscious. We accept that chimps and dolphins experience awareness; we like to think dogs and cats do. But what about mice and newts? What about a fly? Is anything going on there at all? A tiny brain in a simple animal has enough to do just controlling basic bodily functions. Why waste synapses on consciousness if the system can run on autopilot?

There’s more than species chauvinism in that question. « Below a certain threshold, it’s quite possible there’s no subjective experience, » says cognitive psychologist Dedre Gentner of Northwestern University. « I don’t know that you need to ascribe anything more to the behavior of a cockroach than a set of local reflexes that make it run away from bad things and toward good things. »

Where that line should be drawn is impossible to say, since our judgment is clouded by our feelings about any given species. A cockroach likely has no less brainpower than a butterfly, but we’re quicker to deny it consciousness because it’s a species we dislike. Still, most scientists agree that awareness is probably controlled by a sort of cognitive rheostat, with consciousness burning brightest in humans and other high animals and fading to a flicker — and finally blackness — in very low ones.

« It would be perverse to deny consciousness to mammals, » says Steven Pinker, a Harvard psychologist and the author of The Stuff of Thought. « Birds and other vertebrates are almost certainly conscious too. When it gets down to oysters and spiders, we’re on shakier ground. »

Among animals aware of their existence, intellect falls on a sliding scale as well, one often seen as a function of brain size. Here humans like to think they’re kings. The human brain is a big one — about 1,400 g (3 lb.). But the dolphin brain weighs up to 1,700 g (3.75 lb.), and the killer whale carries a monster-size 5,600-g (12.3 lb.) brain. But we’re smaller than the dolphin and much smaller than the whale, so correcting for body size, we’re back in first, right? Nope. The brain of the Etruscan shrew weighs just 0.1 g (0.0035 oz.), yet relative to its tiny body, its brain is bigger than ours.

While the size of the brain certainly has some relation to smarts, much more can be learned from its structure. Higher thinking takes place in the cerebral cortex, the most evolved region of the brain and one many animals lack. Mammals are members of the cerebral-cortex club, and as a rule, the bigger and more complex that brain region is, the more intelligent the animal. But it’s not the only route to creative thinking. Consider tool use. Humans are magicians with tools, apes dabble in them, and otters have mastered the task of smashing mollusks with rocks to get the meat inside — which, though primitive, counts. But if creativity lives in the cerebral cortex, why are corvids, the class of birds that includes crows and jays, better tool users than nearly all nonhuman species?

Crows, for example, have proved themselves adept at bending wire to create a hook so they can fish a basket of food from the bottom of a plastic tube. More remarkably, last year a zoologist at the University of Cambridge — the aptly named Christopher Bird — found that the rook, a member of the crow family, could reason through how to drop stones into a pitcher partly filled with water in order to raise the level high enough to drink from it. What’s more, the rooks selected the largest stones first, apparently realizing they would raise the level faster. Aesop wrote a tale about a bird that managed just such a task more than 2,500 years ago, but it took 21st century scientists to show that the feat is no fable.

How the birds performed such a stunt without a cerebral cortex probably has something to do with a brain region they do share with mammals: the basal ganglia, more primitive structures involved in learning. Mammalian basal ganglia are made up of a number of structures, while those in birds are streamlined down to one. Earlier this year, a collaborative team at MIT and Hebrew University of Jerusalem found that while the specialized cells in each section of mammalian basal ganglia do equally specialized work, the undifferentiated ones in birds’ brains multitask, doing all those jobs at once. The result is the same — information is processed — but birds do it more efficiently.

In the case of corvids and other animals, what may drive intelligence higher still is the structure not of their brains but of their societies. It’s easier to be a solitary animal than a social one. When you hunt and eat alone, like the polar bear, you don’t have to negotiate power struggles or collaborate in stalking prey. But it’s in that behavior — particularly the hunt — that animals behave most cleverly.

Consider the king of the beasts. « Lions do very cool things, » says animal biologist Christine Drea of Duke University. « One animal positions itself for the ambush, and another pushes the prey in that direction. » More impressive still is the unglamorous hyena. « A hyena by itself can take out a wildebeest, but it takes several to bring down a zebra, » she says. « So they plan the size of their party in advance and then go out hunting particular prey. In effect, they say, Let’s go get some zebras. They’ll even bypass a wildebeest if they see one on the way. »

Last year, Drea conducted a study of hyena cooperation, releasing pairs of them into a pen in which a pair of ropes dangled from an overhead platform. If the animals pulled the ropes in unison — and only in unison — the platform would spill out food. « The first pair walked into the pen and figured it out in less than two minutes, » Drea says. « My jaw literally dropped. »

For these kinds of animals, it’s not clear what the cause-and-effect relationship is — whether living cooperatively boosts intelligence or if innate intelligence makes it easier to live cooperatively. It’s certainly significant that corvids are the most social of birds, with long lives and stable group bonds, and that they’re the ones that have proved so handy. It’s also significant that herd animals, like cows and buffalo, exhibit little intelligence. Though they live collectively, there’s little shape to their society. « In a buffalo herd, Bob doesn’t care who Betty is, » Drea says. « But among primates, social carnivores, whales and dolphins, every individual has a particular place. »

Self and Other
It’s easy enough to study the brain and behavior of an animal, but subtler cognitive abilities are harder to map. One of the most important skills human children must learn is something called the theory of mind: the idea that not all knowledge is universal knowledge. A toddler who watches a babysitter hide a toy in a room will assume that anyone who walks in afterward knows where the toy is too. It’s not until about age 3 that kids realize that just because they know something, it doesn’t mean somebody else knows it also.

The theory of mind is central to communication and self-awareness, and it’s the rare animal that exhibits it, though some do. Dogs understand innately what pointing means: that someone has information to share and that your attention is being drawn to it so that you can learn too. That seems simple, but only because we’re born with the ability and, by the way, have fingers with which to do the pointing.

Great apes, despite their impressive intellect and five-fingered hands, do not seem to come factory-loaded for pointing. But they may just lack the opportunity to practice it. A baby ape rarely lets go of its mother, clinging to her abdomen as she knuckle-walks from place to place. But Kanzi, who was raised in captivity, was often carried in human arms, and that left his hands free for communication.

« By the time Kanzi was 9 months old, he was already pointing at things, » says Savage-Rumbaugh. I witnessed him do it in Iowa, not only when he pointed at me to invite me for coffee but also when he swept his hand toward the hallway in a be-quick-about-it gesture as I went to get him his ball.

Pointing isn’t the only indicator of a smart species that grasps the theory of mind. Blue jays — another corvid — cache food for later retrieval and are very mindful of whether other animals are around to witness where they’ve hidden a stash. If the jays have indeed been watched, they’ll wait until the other animal leaves and then move the food. They not only understand that another creature has a mind; they also manipulate what’s inside it.

The gold standard for demonstrating an understanding of the self-other distinction is the mirror test: whether an animal can see its reflection and recognize what it is. It may be adorable when a kitten sees itself in a full-length mirror and runs around to the other side of the door looking for what it thought was a playmate, but it’s not head-of-the-class stuff. Elephants, apes and dolphins are among the few creatures that can pass the mirror test. All three respond appropriately when they look in a mirror after a spot of paint is applied to their forehead or another part of their body. Apes and elephants will reach up to touch the mark with finger or trunk rather than reach out to touch the reflection. Dolphins will position themselves so they can see the reflection of the mark better.

« If you put a bracelet on an orangutan and put it in front of a mirror, it doesn’t just look at the bracelet, » says Bhagavan Antle, director of the Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species in Myrtle Beach, S.C. « It puts the bracelet up to its face and shakes it. It interacts with its reflection. »

With or without mirror smarts, some animals are also adept at grasping abstractions, particularly the ideas of sameness and difference. Small children know that a picture of two apples is different from a picture of a pear and a banana; in one case, the objects match, and in the other they don’t. It’s harder for them to take the next step — correctly matching a picture of two apples to a picture of two bananas instead of to a picture of an orange and a plum.

« It’s called relations between relations, and it’s a basic scaffold of intelligence, » says psychologist Ed Wasserman of the University of Iowa. Last year Wasserman conducted a study that proved some animals have begun building that scaffold. In his research, baboons and — surprisingly — pigeons got the relations-between-relations idea, correctly identifying the proper pairings with a peck or a joystick when images were flashed on a screen.

Significantly, just as humans better understand an idea when they have a term to describe it (imagine explaining, say, satisfaction if the word didn’t exist), so do animals benefit from such labels. Psychologist David Premack of the University of Pennsylvania found that when chimps were taught symbols for same and different, they later performed better on analogy tests.

Beyond Smarts
If animals can reason — even if it’s in a way we’d consider crude — the unavoidable question becomes, Can they feel? Do they experience empathy or compassion? Can they love or care or hope or grieve? And what does it say about how we treat them? For science, it would be safest simply to walk away from a question so booby-trapped with imponderables. But science can’t help itself, and at least some investigators are exploring these ideas too.

It’s well established that elephants appear to mourn their dead, lingering over a herd mate’s body with what looks like sorrow. They show similar interest — even what appears to be respect — when they encounter elephant bones, gently examining them, paying special attention to the skull and tusks. Apes also remain close to a dead troop mate for days.

Empathy for living members of the same species is not unheard of either. « When rats are in pain and wriggling, other rats that are watching will wriggle in parallel, » says Marc Hauser, professor of psychology and anthropological biology at Harvard. « You don’t need neurobiology to tell you that suggests awareness. » A 2008 study by primatologist Frans de Waal and others at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta showed that when capuchin monkeys were offered a choice between two tokens — one that would buy two slices of apple and one that would buy one slice each for them and a partner monkey — they chose the generous option, provided the partner was a relative or at least familiar. The Yerkes team believes that part of the capuchins’ behavior was due to a simple sense of pleasure they experience in giving, an idea consistent with studies of the human brain that reveal activity in the reward centers after subjects give to charity.

Animal-liberationist Singer believes that such evidence of noble impulses among animals is a perfectly fine argument in defense of their right to live dignified lives, but it’s not a necessary one. Indeed, one of his central premises is that to the extent that humans and animals can experience their worlds, they are equals. « Similar amounts of pain are equally bad, » he says, « whether felt by a human or a mouse. »
Hauser takes a more nuanced view, arguing that people are possessed of what he calls humaniqueness, a suite of cognitive skills including the ability to recombine information to gain new understanding, a talent animals simply don’t have. All creatures may exist on a developmental continuum, he argues, but the gap between us and the second-place finishers is so big that it shows we truly are something special. « Animals have a myopic intelligence, » Hauser says. « But they never experience the aha moment that a 2-year-old child gets. »

No matter what any one scientist thinks of animal cognition, nearly all agree that the way we treat domesticated animals is indefensible — though in certain parts of the world, improvements are being made. The European Union’s official animal-welfare policies begin with the premise that animals are sentient beings and must be treated accordingly. This includes humane conditions on farms and in vehicles during transport and proper stunning before killing in slaughterhouses.
In the U.S., food animals are overwhelmingly raised on factory farms, where cattle and pigs are jammed together by the thousands and chickens are confined in cages that barely allow them to stand. But here too, public sentiment is changing. Roughly half of vegetarians list moral concerns as the chief reason for giving up meat. Still, vegetarians as a whole make up only about 3% of the U.S. population, a figure that has barely budged since before the days of Singer’s manifesto. And there are three times as many ex-vegetarians as practicing ones.

Even Singer doesn’t believe we’re likely to wake up in a vegan world anytime soon. For that matter, he doesn’t think it’s morally necessary. Eating meat to avoid starvation is all right, he believes, and some creatures are fair game all the time, provided they’re grown sustainably. « I think there’s very little likelihood that oysters, mussels and clams have any consciousness, so it’s defensible to eat them, » he says.

What’s more, we’re not going to quit using animals in other ways that benefit humans either — testing drugs, for example. But we could surely stop using them to test cosmetics, a practice the E.U. is also moving to ban. We could surely eat less meat and treat animals better before we convert them from creature to dinner. And we could rethink zoos, marine parks and other forms of animal entertainment.

Ultimately, the same biological knob that adjusts animal consciousness up or down ought to govern how we value the way those species experience their lives. A mere ape in our world may be a scholar in its own, and the low life of any beast may be a source of deep satisfaction for the beast itself. Kanzi’s glossary is full of words like noodles and sugar and candy and night, but scattered among them are also good and happy and be and tomorrow. If it’s true that all those words have meaning to him, then the life he lives — and by extension, those of other animals — may be rich and worthy ones indeed.

Voir enfin:

Viral ‘Catcalling video’ director denies editing out white men from clip – but admits ‘it was never going to be statistically accurate’
A hidden-camera clip released this week showed actress Shoshana Roberts being harassed by men on the street
She received a barrage of comments over ten hours from ‘What’s up, beautiful?’ to ‘Smile!’ – and even one man walking silently beside her for five minutes
Director Rob Bliss forced to deny clip was racially biased after he told Reddit fan ‘a lot of white dudes’ they had filmed did not make the final cut
He clarified that he edited out a lot of men from different racial backgrounds and the short clip was ‘statistically inaccurate’
Louise Boyle

Daily Mail

30 October 2014

The director of a video which showed a young woman being catcalled more than 100 times as she walked through the streets of Manhattan for ten hours has come under fire for the seeming racial bias of his film.

Director Rob Bliss filmed actress Shoshana Roberts, 24, as she walked through busy, New York City streets, wearing jeans and a T-shirt, while enduring a barrage of comments like: ‘What’s up, Beautiful?'; ‘Smile!’ and ‘God bless you, Mami…’. At one point, a man walks in step with her, silently, for five minutes.

The majority of men featured in the two-minute clip are black and Latino, a fact which Mr Bliss addressed on Thursday during a Q&A session on Reddit after the video garnered reams of media coverage

 One Reddit user, Murphyslol, remarked that almost all of the men on the video were black and asked the director if any white or Asian men harassed Shoshana.

Mr Bliss responded: ‘Honestly we did have a lot of white dudes in this video, but for whatever reason it worked out that they would be the ones to say something just in passing, or from a distance off camera. This made their screen time fairly short by comparison, but the numbers were relatively similar.

Director Rob Bliss (pictured) has come under fire for apparent racial bias in his viral video
‘As the video says at the end, it was upwards of 100+ harassments, so obviously not everything was shown, otherwise we’d have a video that’s too long for internet attention spans. But really it was across the board, just about everyone said/did something while we filmed.’

The response to the director’s remark drew heated responses.

Dr Welsana Asrat, a psychiatrist in Harlem, tweeted: ‘Rob Bliss’ biased catcalling video serves to support his ongoing gentrification campaign.’

Adam wrote: ‘Rob Bliss intentionally edited out the white men from that video to demonize PoC. He’s a professional gentrification proponent. It’s his MO.’

Automnia tweeted: ‘So this white guy, Rob Bliss, records a woman getting street harassment from loads of men, then cuts out most of the s*** from white guys.’

He also added: ‘Basically Rob Bliss is a rich white guy with a vested interest in portraying poor black men as the sole perpetrators of street harassment.’

MailOnline spoke to Mr Bliss on Thursday who defended his video, saying that his artistic decision to cap filming at ten hours ‘showed something that was realistic but statistically inaccurate’.

He said that although a number of white men were cut during the editing process – so were men of other races.

The director said that the number of white men in the video – roughly six – is representative of New York demographics, according to figures he quoted from Wikipedia.

Mr Bliss said: ‘The 18 scenes that we show is a very small portion of street harassment that goes on, because it is a small size.

‘We got 108 reactions but after editing down, the two longest incidents [involving a black man and a Latino man] make up half the video.’

He added: ‘If we filmed for a much longer time, it would show the breakdown of New York City and a much wider demographic.’

The director also pointed to the fact that there were no Asian men in the video – not to suggest that they didn’t harass women but ‘that’s what’s going to happen in a short-time span’.

Mr Bliss said he did understand why people would be angry at the perceived racial skew but added: ‘On this ten hour pass through, this was what we got. It wasn’t accurate.’

Hollaback!, the organization which teamed with Mr Bliss to promote the video, released a statement following the director’s comments on the racial skew today.

In part, it read: ‘First, we regret the unintended racial bias in the editing of the video that over represents men of color. Although we appreciate Rob’s support, we are committed to showing the complete picture. It is our hope and intention that this video will be the start of a series to demonstrate that the type of harassment we’re concerned about is directed toward women of all races and ethnicities and conducted by an equally diverse population of men.’

Miss Roberts was subject to 108 instances of catcalling during the filming of the video. In the two-minute clip, the majority of cat-callers are black and Latino – this individual is one of the white men included

The video struck a chord this week and instantly became a viral sensation. Since it was published on Tuesday, it has been viewed more than 17million times on YouTube.

The video was covered by bloggers and major news networks alike, leading to another disturbing consequence.

Miss Roberts, who is the subject of the film, has had multiple rape threats directed towards her.

Speaking about the experience of making the video, the 24-year-old told The Post : ‘I felt like crying and I have occurrences in my past of sexual assault, so I wasn’t even aware necessarily of all the times people were saying things to me.

‘I was just going over in my head and reliving, unfortunately, these memories while I was walking. I wanted to break down in tears.’

Emily May, executive director of Hollaback!, the anti-street harassment organization that put out the video, told The Washington Post: ‘We’ve had a number of rape threats and violent threats against Shoshana and we’re pulling those down as quickly as possible, but they exist.

‘That’s scary and I think what they’re trying to do is scare her and scare us into not speaking out about this. And both of us are saying no, we need to talk about this because if we don’t talk about this, if we don’t get this story out, then none of this is going to change.’

At no point did Roberts make eye contact with any of the men she passed or talk to any of them. That didn’t stop the comments from coming.

When she didn’t respond, one man told her: ‘Somebody’s acknowledging you for being beautiful. You should say thank you more!’

Miss Roberts said the number of comments the day the video was shot was nothing out of the ordinary for her.

‘The frequency is something alarming,’ she added.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2814745/Viral-Catcalling-video-director-denies-editing-white-men-admits-never-going-statistically-accurate.html#ixzz3Huy9E2fK
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


Islam: Le racisme doux des faibles attentes (The soft bigotry of low expectations: When killing Muslims becomes less offensive than criticizing their religion)

28 octobre, 2014
http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/popekiss.jpg

Beaucoup, violents ou pas, sont abreuvés par des sites qui montrent l’ennemi « croisé » ou « sioniste » dans son horreur destructrice, « tueur d’enfants et de civils »… Mais le point crucial est le retour qu’on leur fait faire au texte fondateur, au Coran, où les « gens du Livre », juifs et chrétiens, représentés aujourd’hui par l’Amérique, Israël et un peu l’Europe, sont qualifiés de pervers, faussaires, injustes, traîtres, etc. Certains leur citent des versets plus calmes, comme « Point de contrainte en religion », ou comme « Ne tuez pas l’homme que Dieu a sacré », mais c’est qu’ils vont voir de près dans le texte, ils vérifient et ils trouvent : « Ne tuez pas l’homme que Dieu a sacré sauf pour une cause juste. » Quant au verset du libre choix, ils le voient encadré de violentes malédictions contre ceux qui font le mauvais choix. En somme, on manque cruellement d’une parole ouverte et libre concernant les fondamentaux de l’islam ; et pour cause, ils sont recouverts d’un tabou, et toute remarque critique les concernant passe pour islamophobe dans le discours conformiste organisé, qui revient à imposer aux musulmans le même tabou, à les enfermer dans le cadre identitaire dont on décide qu’il doit être le leur (on voit même des juges de la République se référer au Coran pour arrêter leur décision…). Il y a donc un secret de Polichinelle sur la violence fondatrice de l’islam envers les autres, violence qui, en fait, n’a rien d’extraordinaire : toute identité qui se fonde est prodigue en propos violents envers les autres. Mais, avec le tabou et le conformisme imposés, cette violence reste indiscutée et semble indépassable. Récemment, dans Islam, phobie, culpabilité (Odile Jacob, 2013), j’ai posé ce problème avec sérénité, en montrant que les djihadistes, les extrémistes, sont au fond les seuls à crier une certaine vérité du Coran, portés par elle plutôt qu’ils ne la portent ; ils se shootent à cette vérité de la vindicte envers les autres, et même envers des musulmans, qu’il faut rappeler au droit chemin. Le livre est lu et circule bien, mais dans les médias officiels il a fait l’objet d’une vraie censure, celle-là même qu’il analyse, qui se trouve ainsi confirmée. Raconter ses méandres, ce serait décrire l’autocensure où nous vivons, où la peur pour la place est la phobie suprême : une réalité se juge d’après les risques qu’elle vous ferait courir ou les appuis qu’elle lui apporte. (…) La difficulté, c’est qu’un texte fondateur est comme un être vivant : dès qu’il se sent un peu lâché par les siens, il suscite des êtres « héroïques », des martyrs pour faire éclater sa vérité. Quitte à éclater le corps des autres. D’autres approches de cette « vérité » exigeraient un peu de courage de la part des élites, qui sont plutôt dans le déni. Pour elles, il n’y a pas de problème de fond, il y a quelques excités qui perdent la tête. Il ne faut pas dire que leur acte serait lié au Coran, si peu que ce soit. Le problème est bien voilé derrière des citations tronquées, des traductions édulcorées, témoignant, au fond, d’un mépris pour le Coran et ses fidèles. On a donc un symptôme cliniquement intéressant : quand un problème se pose et qu’il est interdit d’en parler, un nouveau problème se pose, celui de cet interdit. Puis un troisième : comment zigzaguer entre les deux ? Cela augmente le taux de poses « faux culs » très au-delà du raisonnable. Daniel Sibony
We are told again and again by experts and talking heads that Islam is the religion of peace, and that the vast majority of Muslims just want to live in peace. Although this unquantified assertion may be true, it is entirely irrelevant. It is meaningless fluff, meant to make us feel better, and meant to somehow diminish the specter of fanatics rampaging across the globe in the name of Islam. The fact is that the fanatics rule Islam at this moment in history. It is the fanatics who march. It is the fanatics who wage any one of 50 shooting wars world wide. It is the fanatics who systematically slaughter Christian or tribal groups throughout Africa and are gradually taking over the entire continent in an Islamic wave. It is the fanatics who bomb, behead, murder, or execute honor killings. It is the fanatics who take over mosque after mosque. It is the fanatics who zealously spread the stoning and hanging of rape victims and homosexuals. The hard, quantifiable fact is that the “peaceful majority” is the “silent majority,” and it is cowed and extraneous. Communist Russia was comprised of Russians who just wanted to live in peace, yet the Russian Communists were responsible for the murder of about 20 million people. The peaceful majority were irrelevant. China’s huge population was peaceful as well, but Chinese Communists managed to kill a staggering 70 million people. The average Japanese individual prior to World War II was not a war-mongering sadist. Yet, Japan murdered and slaughtered its way across Southeast Asia in an orgy of killing that included the systematic murder of 12 million Chinese civilians – most killed by sword, shovel and bayonet. And who can forget Rwanda, which collapsed into butchery? Could it not be said that the majority of Rwandans were “peace loving”? History lessons are often incredibly simple and blunt; yet, for all our powers of reason, we often miss the most basic and uncomplicated of points. Peace-loving Muslims have been made irrelevant by the fanatics. Peace-loving Muslims have been made irrelevant by their silence. Peace-loving Muslims will become our enemy if they don’t speak up, because, like my friend from Germany, they will awaken one day and find that the fanatics own them, and the end of their world will have begun. Peace-loving Germans, Japanese, Chinese, Russians, Rwandans, Bosnians, Afghanis, Iraqis, Palestinians, Somalis, Nigerians, Algerians and many others, have died because the peaceful majority did not speak up until it was too late. As for us, watching it all unfold, we must pay attention to the only group that counts: the fanatics who threaten our way of life. Paul E. Marek
Le fondamentalisme religieux (…) trouve son origine dans un mouvement de réveil protestant du début du XXe siècle aux États-Unis qui propage un retour aux « fondements » de la foi chrétienne au moyen d’un strict respect et d’une interprétation littérale des lois de la Bible. Un grand nombre d’études sur l’intégrisme religieux chrétien protestant aux Etats-Unis ont montré qu’il est fermement et constamment associé aux préjugés et à l’hostilité contre les minorités raciales et religieuses, ainsi que les groupes « déviants » tels que les homosexuels. En revanche, notre connaissance de l’étendue à laquelle des minorités musulmanes dans les pays occidentaux adhèrent à des interprétations de l’Islam fondamentalistes est étonnamment limité. Plusieurs études ont montré que, par rapport à la majorité de la population, les immigrés musulmans se définissent plus souvent comme religieux, s’identifient fortement à leur religion et participent plus souvent à des pratiques religieuses telles que prier, aller à la mosquée ou suivre des préceptes religieux tels que la nourriture halal ou le port du foulard. Mais la religiosité comme telle dit peu de choses sur la mesure dans laquelle ces croyances et pratiques religieuses peuvent être considérées comme « fondamentalistes » et sont associées à l’hostilité à l’exogroupe. (…) Comme les profils démographiques et socioéconomiques des immigrés musulmans et les chrétiens indigènes divergent fortement et puisqu’il est connu de la littérature que les individus marginalisés des classes inférieures sont plus fortement attirés par les mouvements fondamentalistes, il serait bien sûr possible que ces différences soient dues à la classe plutôt qu’à la religion. Cependant, les résultats de la régression tenant compte de l’éducation, situation du marché du travail, âge, sexe et état matrimonial des analyses révèlent que si certaines de ces variables expliquent la variation dans le fondamentalisme dans les deux groupes religieux, elles n’expliquent pas du tout ou même diminuent la différence entre musulmans et chrétiens. Une source d’inquiétude est que tandis que parmi les chrétiens l’intégrisme religieux est beaucoup moins répandu chez les personnes plus jeunes, les attitudes fondamentalistes sont aussi répandues chez les jeunes que chez les musulmans âgés. (…) Près de 60 % d’entre eux rejettent les homosexuels comme amis et 45 pour cent pense que les Juifs ne sont pas fiables. Alors qu’environ une personne sur cinq parmi les nationaux peuvent être qualifiées d’islamophobes, le niveau de phobie contre l’Occident parmi les musulmans – pour laquelle curieusement il y a aucun mot ; On pourrait dire « Occidentophobie » – est beaucoup plus élevé encore, 54 pour cent pensent que l’Occident cherche à détruire l’Islam. Ces conclusions sont en parfaite concordance avec le fait que, comme une étude de 2006 de l’Institut de recherche Pew l’a montré, près de la moitié des musulmans vivant en France, Allemagne et Royaume Uni croient en la théorie du complot selon laquelle les attentats du 11 septembre n’ont pas perpétrés par des musulmans, mais ont été orchestrés par l’Occident ou les Juifs. (…) Ces résultats contredisent clairement l’affirmation souvent entendue que le fondamentalisme religieux islamique est un phénomène marginal en Europe occidentale ou qu’il ne diffère pas du taux de fondamentalisme de la majorité chrétienne. Les deux affirmations sont manifestement fausses, comme près de la moitié des musulmans européens conviennent que les musulmans doivent retourner aux racines de l’Islam, qu’il n’y a qu’une seule interprétation du Coran et que les règles fixées par celui-ci sont plus importantes que lois laïques. Parmi les chrétiens de souche, mois d’un sur cinq peut être qualifié d’intégristes dans ce sens. (…) A la fois l’étendue de l’intégrisme religieux islamique et ses corrélats – l’homophobie, l’antisémitisme et « l’Occidentophobie » – devraient être de sérieux motifs de préoccupation pour les responsables politiques ainsi que les dirigeants de la communauté musulmane. Bien sûr, l’intégrisme religieux ne saurait être assimilée à la volonté de soutenir ou même de s’engager dans la violence religieusement motivée. Mais compte tenu de ses liens étroits avec l’hostilité à l’exogroupe, l’intégrisme religieux est très susceptible de fournir un terreau pour la radicalisation. Ruud Koopmans (WZB, Berlin Social Science Center, 2013)
Les guerres mondiales du XXe siècle sont considérées historiquement comme des guerres laïques centrées sur des intérêts politiques, géographiques et économiques. Pourtant, en Europe, 6 millions de Juifs ont été exterminés à la suite de siècles d’enseignement antisémite au cœur de la chrétienté médiévale. Depuis l’époque de Mahomet et pendant près de treize cents ans après, l’Islam a mené des guerres de religion contre des populations entières, forçant la conversion à l’Islam (à l’exclusion des Juifs et des chrétiens, connus comme « peuple du livre ») comme moyen de propager sa foi. (…) Le conflit israélo-arabe, même si apparemment centré sur un territoire, contient une puissante composante religieuse, en particulier autour de Jérusalem, dont des milliers ont été tués et beaucoup plus pourraient mourir si elle n’est pas résolu pacifiquement. Dans tous les cas, les convictions religieuses, qui a été appelée à plusieurs reprises, a amplifié un sens du droit aux terres et la richesse des autres. Cela pose la question : de quoi est vraiment fait la religion ? (…) Bien que techniquement, moins de 10 % de toutes les guerres jamais combattu étaient des guerres de religion, seuls quelques-uns n’a pas englober ou incarnent une composante religieuse ou le sentiment. De la même façon que nous soutenons les enseignements éthiques des religions, nous doit autant et à l’unisson condamner messagers autoproclamés et porte-parole du divin que fomenter des massacres au nom de Dieu. Car à moins que nous croyons que ce tout-Miséricordieux, paternel, épris de paix et jamais salutaire de Dieu veut pour ses fidèles s’entre-tuer en son nom, Nous devons conclure que les religions sont endommagées à plusieurs reprises pour opposer entre eux les enfants de Dieu. (…) Cela ne veut ne pas dire que l’approche intellectuelle a toutes les réponses, ne l’oublions rappel d’Einstein concernant les limites éthiques de la science. Car alors que l’Occident paie tout naturellement une grande attention à l’assassinat actuel au nom de Dieu dans certains États arabes, les nombres impliqués ne sont pas comparent à la 50 millions ou plus abattus dans la seconde guerre mondiale seule pour la plupart des chrétiens contre les chrétiens. Intellectuellement bent sociétés occidentales peuvent introduire la « civilité » de la guerre, avec les Conventions de Genève et autres règles par lesquelles le sang peut être versé. Mais leurs guerres, à ce jour, englobent une puissance destructive beaucoup plus grande que ne le font les conflits des autres peuples, notamment dans le conflit actuel des musulmans contre les musulmans au Moyen-Orient. Comprendre la violence dans le contexte plus large, l’Occident peut à certains égards être réellement plu éloignée de la réalisation de cet objectif. Alors que les péages de la mort de soldats sont faciles à diffuser, le quotidien de souffrance de millions de luxé, déshonoré et apatrides vies ne pas aussi facilement s’insère dans notre alimentation de nouvelles. L’Occident ne vit pas dans le cadre de l’histoire. Alon Ben-Meir
Quand on pense aux crimes de masse, le premier nom qui vient à l’esprit est celui d’Hitler. Ou alors Tojo, Staline ou Mao. Les totalitarismes du XXe siècle sont considérés comme la pire espèce de tyrannie de l’histoire. Cependant, la vérité alarmante est que l’Islam a tué plus que n’importe lequel d’entre eux et peut tous les dépasser combinés en nombre et en cruauté. L’énormité des massacres perpétrés par la « religion de paix » sont dépassent tellement la compréhension que les historiens même honnêtes n’en remarquent même plus l’échelle. Si l’on va un peu au-delà de notre vision tronquée des choses, on verra que l’Islam est la plus grande machine à tuer de l’histoire de l’humanité, sans aucune exception. (…) Si l’on additionne tout ça. Les victimes africaines. Les victimes indiennes. Les victimes européennes. Le génocide arménien. Puis le nombre moins connu mais sans doute assez grand de victimes de l’Asie orientale. Le djihad commis par les musulmans contre la Chine, qui a été envahie en 651. Les prédations du khanat de Crimée sur les Slaves, en particulier leurs femmes. Bien que les chiffres ne soient pas claires, ce qui est évident c’est que l’Islam est la plus grande machine de meurtre dans l’histoire sans aucune exception, ayant causé la mort de peut-être plus de 250 millions de personnes. Mike Konrad
Le problème que le révérend Schall fait ressortir dans sa tribune, c’est que nous ici en Occident et très certainement cette administration Obama, tentons de rationaliser et de nous débarrasser du problème. Nous ne parvenons pas à tout simplement accepter ce qui se passe, comme par le passé, sous nos yeux. Certes, il n’est pas question de condamner les musulmans. En revanche, il s’agit bien de dénoncer une idéologie politique théocratique impérialiste et totalitaire — ce n’est pas la violence au travail, les gars. Nous entendons toujours parler de « croisades » et pourtant personne ne veut parler de la manière dont l’Islam a cherché à se répandre, certainement pas par le prosélytisme pacifique — de l’ Afrique du Nord à l’Espagne (Al Andalusia) à la France (bataille de Poitiers) à la Méditerranée (bataille de Lépante) à Constantinople (Istanbul) dans les Balkans à Vienne en Inde hindoue de la Chine aux Philippines et aujourd’hui à Fort Hood au Texas et Moore en Oklahoma. Et pourtant nous avons des gens comme le directeur de la CIA John Brennan qui nous donne une définition éduclcorée du djihad ou B. Hussein Obama nous disant qu’EIIL n’est pas islamique. Allen West
Oecuménisme comme libéralisme, chacun à sa façon et à cause de leur attachement à la tolérance et la liberté d’expression, rendent difficile de rendre compte de ce qui se passe dans les États islamiques. (…) Les preuves ne manquent pas, tant dans la longue histoire de l’expansion militaire musulmane initiale que dans son interprétation théorique du Coran lui-même, pour montrer que l’État islamique et ses sympathisants ont fondamentalement raison. Le but de l’Islam, avec les moyens souvent violents qu’il utilise pour l’accomplir, est d’étendre son pouvoir, au nom d’Allah, au monde entier. Le monde ne peut pas être en « paix » tant qu’il n’est pas tout entier musulman. (…) Le jihadisme, si l’on peut l’appeler ainsi, est d’abord et avant tout un mouvement religieux. Allah accorde à la violence une place importante. C’est sur la vérité de cette position, ou mieux l’incapacité de la réfuter, que réside la véritable controverse. Un essai récent sur American thinker a calculé qu’au cours des années de son expansion, depuis ses débuts dans les VIIe et VIIe siècles, quelque 250 millions de personnes ont été tuées dans des guerres et des persécutions causées par l’islam. Rien d’autre dans l’histoire du monde, y compris les totalitarismes du siècle dernier, n’a été aussi meutrier. (…) Il est possible pour certains de lire l’Islam comme une religion de « paix ». Mais sa « paix », selon ses propres termes, signifie la paix d’Allah sur son territoire. Avec le reste du monde extérieur, elle est en guerre pour accomplir un but religieux, à savoir, que l’ensemble soumis à Allah dans la voie passive que spécifie le Coran. (…) Présenter les djihadistes et les dirigeants de l’Etat islamique comme de simples « terroristes » ou des voyous revient à utiliser des termes politiques occidentaux et ne peut que nous aveugler sur le dynamisme religieux de ce mouvement. (…) Les racines de l’Islam sont théologiques, une plutôt mauvaise théologie, mais toujours cohérente au sein de sa propre orbite et ses présupposés. Bref, l’Islam, dans sa fondation, est censé être, littéralement, la religion du monde. Rien d’autre n’a d’existence à côté. Il s’agit d’amener le monde entier à adorer Allah selon les canons du Coran. (…) Dans la doctrine musulmane, toute personne née dans le monde est musulmane. Personne n’a quelque droit ou raison de ne pas l’être. Par conséquent, tout individu qui n’est pas musulman doit être converti ou éliminé. Ceci est également vrai de toute œuvre littéraire, monumentale, et d’autres marques de civilisation ou d’États qui ne sont pas musulmans. Ils sont voués à la destruction comme non autorisés par le Coran. C’est la responsabilité religieuse de l’Islam pour accomplir sa mission assignée de soumettre le monde à Allah. Lorsque nous essayons d’expliquer cette religion en termes économiques, politiques, psychologiques ou autres, nous ne voyons tout simplement pas ce qui se passe. De l’extérieur, il est presque impossible de voir comment ce système coïncide en lui-même. Mais, une fois acceptés ses prémisses et la philosophie du volontarisme qui permet de l’expliquer et de le défendre, il devient beaucoup plus clair qu’il s’agit en fait d’une religion qui prétend être vraie en insistant sur le fait qu’elle réalise la volonté d’Allah, pas la sienne.(…) Si Allah transcende la distinction du bien et du mal, s’il peut vouloir ce qui sera son contraire demain, comme la toute-puissance d’Allah est comprise dans l’islam, il ne peut y avoir de discussion réelle qui ne soit autre chose qu’une trêve temporaire et pragmatique, un équilibre des intérêts et des pouvoirs. Chaque fois qu’on observe des incidents violents dans le monde islamique ou dans d’autres parties du monde causées par des agents islamiques, on les uns ou les autres se plaindre que presque aucune voix musulmane ne prend la parole pour condamner cette violence. Lorsqu’à l’origine le 9/11 s’est produit, il n’a pas été l’objet de condamnations mais de célébrations de l’intérieur du monde islamique. L’Islam a été considéré comme gagnant. Mais tous les érudits musulmans savent qu’ils ne peuvent pas, sur la base du Coran, condamner le recours à la violence pour l’expansion de leur religion. Il y a tout simplement trop de preuves que cet usage est autorisé. Le nier reviendrait à saper l’intégrité du Coran. De toute évidence, les ennemis de l’État islamique et ses alliés djihadistes sont non seulement les « croisés » ou l’Occident. Certains des guerres les plus sanglantes de l’Islam ont été son invasion de l’Inde hindoue où la tension reste marquée. Il y a aussi les efforts de musulmans en Chine. Les Philippines ont un problème majeur, comme la Russie. Mais l’Islam se bat aussi avec lui-même. Les luttes sunnites/chiites sont légendaires. Il est important de noter qu’une des premières choses de l’ordre du jour de l’État islamique, s’il réussit à survivre, est d’unir tout l’Islam dans son unité de foi. (…) Il y a ou y a eu des chrétiens et autres minorités au sein de ces États qui sont plus ou moins tolérés. Mais ils sont tous, comme les non-musulmans, traités comme des citoyens de seconde zone. Le mouvement islamique renouvelle ce côté puriste de l’islam qui insiste pour éradiquer ou expulser les non-musulmans des terres musulmanes. L’archevêque de Mossoul, en voyant son peuple exilé et tué et obligé de choisir entre la conversion et la mort, a révélé que ses bâtiments étaient détruits, avec les archives et toutes les traces de la longue présence chrétienne dans cette région. Il a averti que c’était la forme de traitement à laquelle devaient s’attendre tôt ou tard les nations occidentales. Il y a maintenant d’importantes et préoccupantes enclaves musulmanes dans toutes les régions d’Europe et d’Amérique comme centres de soulèvements futurs au sein de chaque ville. Il y a maintenant des milliers de mosquées en Europe et en Amérique, financées en grande partie par l’argent du pétrole, qui font partie d’une enclave privée qui exclut le droit local et applique la loi musulmane. Pourtant, nous pouvons nous demander : cet État islamique n’est-il pas après tout qu’une chimère ? Aucun État islamique n’a de possibilité sérieuse de vaincre les armées modernes. Mais, ironie du sort, ils ne pensent plus que des armées modernes seront nécessaires. Ils sont convaincus que l’utilisation généralisée du terrorisme et d’autres moyens de désordre civil peuvent réussir. Personne n’a vraiment la volonté ou les moyens de contrôler les forces destructrices que l’État islamique a déjà mis en place. (…) Enfin, l’affaire de l’État islamique et des djihadistes n’est pas seulement une menace découlant de la mission de l’Islam pour conquérir le monde pour Allah. C’est aussi une affaire de morale, rappelant que la vie en Occident est sas Dieu et décadente. Elle ne mérite pas sa prospérité et sa position. La mission de l’humanité est la soumission à Allah en toutes choses. Une fois que cette soumission est assurée, le domaine de la guerre sera aboli. Plus de décapitations ou d’attentats à la voiture piégée ne seront nécessaires ou tolérés. Aucune dissidence au sein de l’Islam ne sera possible ou permise. Tous seront en paix sous la Loi de l’islam. C’est là le but même de l’État islamique. C’est une folie d’y penser en n’importe quels autres termes. Révérend James V. Schall (traduction au babelfish)
Le langage comme ordre propre de l’humain s’inscrit dans le réel et le transforme. Il constitue l’un des points par lequel se situe le rattachement du pôle de la subjectivité à la collectivité. Ce que Freud a établi cliniquement… Il agit comme un opérateur, détermine les compréhensions du monde en ce que le monde est découpé par les possibilités du langage. La pensée n’est pas seulement exprimée par les mots, elle vient à l’existence à travers les mots. Ne pas distinguer entre terrorisme et résistance participe d’une anomie lexicale générale, destructrice des aptitudes à penser, conditions de l’autonomie et de la liberté. Une telle anomie est conséquence et vecteur d’une «carence éthique», comme on dit «carence affective». Elle habille de surcroît de la légitimité déclarative de «résistance» une réalité terroriste. Les confondre, c’est se faire affidé d’une terreur mortifère dans une déshérence complaisante, et saper le sens de l’esprit de résistance ; c’est disqualifier son éthique pratique par l’assimilation inclusive de pratiques terroristes. Et, du même coup, saborder le droit de résistance dans la civilisation, et la civilisation de ce droit. Gérard Rabinovitch
Bret Stephens claims that he has « yet to meet the Israeli mother who wants to raise her boys to become kidnappers and murderers » (« Where Are the Palestinian Mothers?, » Global View, July 1). Actually, every Israeli mother is legally obligated by the Israeli government to enter her sons and daughters into an institution that systematically kidnaps and murders. It’s called the Israeli Defense Force. Since 1948, the IDF has been creating mourning mothers for the longest occupation of war crimes and human-rights atrocities in human history. Its illegal and immoral actions have been denounced in more U.N. resolutions than any other country in the world. Mr. Stephens refers to West Germany’s « moral rehabilitation » and ironically suggests it for the Palestinian people. Yet, in an iconic visit last month, Pope Francis stood before Israel’s apartheid wall and placed his hand on Palestinian graffiti that in desperate broken English said: « Bethlehem look like Warsaw ghetto. » Since the disappearance of the three Israelis on June 12, at least eight Palestinian civilians have been killed in retribution and hundreds more imprisoned with no charges. One of the three Israelis was old enough to have already served in the IDF, and all three of them were on an illegal settlement on Palestinian territory. Israeli settlers have been engaging in some of the worst hate crimes in the conflict, notoriously known for pillaging mosques, attacking and even running over Palestinians, and vandalizing Palestinian property with calls for the death of all Arabs. On July 2, Palestinian teenager Mohammad Hussein Abu Khdeir was kidnapped, murdered and burned by an Israeli mob, and among many Israelis his death was celebrated. All facets of Israeli society, even up to the government, called for this sort of retribution, with Benjamin Netanyahu demanding « revenge » and Michael Ben-Ari calling for « death to the enemy. » While the call for justice is expected of any democratic country, what Israel is calling for is indiscriminate revenge. Amani al-Khatahtbeh (American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, Washington)
Il y a des islamistes qui s’opposent à Daech [l’Etat islamique]. Il y a même des islamistes, y compris salafistes, qui ont engagé le combat armé contre lui. Mais sur le front des idées ce combat reste étonnamment atone. Cela amène à se demander pourquoi les musulmans ne s’insurgent pas pour défendre leur religion, cette religion qui sert aujourd’hui à désigner des pratiques qui sont les plus criminelles de l’histoire de l’humanité. Pourquoi sont-ils incapables de dire clairement que ce n’est pas l’islam ? L’explication réside dans le fait qu’au niveau intellectuel il n’existe pas de différence importante entre un modéré et un extrémiste. Tous aspirent à établir durablement le règne de l’islam, dans des pays qu’ils ne voient que sous l’angle de leur [seule] identité islamique.  Le sens d’un tel règne de l’islam consiste en quelque sorte à rétablir un ordre qui aurait été dévoyé par les complots des colonisateurs et consorts. Les Etats-nations et toute notre histoire contemporaine sont considérés comme des phénomènes passagers, puisque notre vraie nature profonde résiderait dans une invariable islamique qui remonte [à la naissance de l’islam]. Cela nie toute évolution historique, alors que les musulmans ne sont devenus majoritaires au Moyen-Orient qu’après les croisades, que la majorité des Egyptiens étaient chiites à l’époque fatimide… Le règne de l’islam n’est donc pas mû par une vision de l’avenir, mais par le désir de revenir à un état originel où chaque chose est censée avoir été à sa place. Sur tous ces points, il n’y a pas de distinction réelle entre modérés et extrémistes. Il y a seulement ceux qui sont extrémistes (Frères musulmans), d’autres qui sont très extrémistes (les salafistes du Front islamique), d’autres qui sont encore plus extrémistes (Front Al-Nosra), et finalement ceux qui sont excessivement extrémistes (Daech). Il y a certes des islamistes qui sont modérés, mais ils sont dépourvus des bases intellectuelles qui leur permettraient d’affirmer la légitimité de leurs positions. Al-Hayat
Ces groupes meurtriers, d’après des travaux recoupés, obéissent aux mêmes règles de comportement : « On retrouve d’habitude, développe Jacques Sémelin, un tiers de “perpétrateurs” actifs, un tiers de “suivistes” et un tiers de “réticents” », le premier tiers entraînant les autres. C’est ce que l’on appelle l’« effet Lucifer », selon la formule du psychologue américain Philip Zimbardo  : les actifs l’emportent sur les indécis. Autre constante rendant le massacre possible : « Les perpétrateurs doivent persuader les exécutants indécis que les victimes, les innocents désarmés, sont des ennemis dangereux, et leur crime un acte légitime. C’est d’habitude le rôle de l’idéologie », poursuit Jacques Sémelin. Au terme de sa monumentale enquête, La Loi du sang. Penser et agir en nazi (Gallimard, 576 p., 25 euros), l’historien Johann Chapoutot synthétise en une formule terrible comment l’idéologie nazie a justifié le pire : pour « tuer un enfant au bord de la fosse » en croyant que cela relève de la « bravoure militaire », il faut d’abord en avoir fait un « ennemi biologique », un être nuisible qui menace d’entraîner la dégénérescence de la race. On sait l’ampleur des crimes qui ont accompagné cette idéologie eugéniste durant la seconde guerre mondiale. L’idéologie suffit-elle à expliquer que toute compassion, toute humanité, soit levée ? L’historienne Hélène Dumas, auteur du Génocide au village (Seuil, 384 p., 23 euros), a tenté de comprendre le drame du Rwanda en concentrant ses recherches sur une petite ville. Comment a-t-il été possible qu’entre le 7 avril et le début du mois de juillet 1994, de 800 000 à 1 million de Tutsi aient été tués par leurs voisins Hutu ? Elle a découvert sur place « un génocide de proximité », un cauchemar où ce sont les voisins, parfois des parents, qui ont mené le massacre avec d’autant plus d’efficacité qu’ils connaissaient la région, les cachettes, les maisons. Comment comprendre ? Hélène Dumas a notamment décrit un puissant mouvement de « déshumanisation », à la fois mental – médiatique, politique – et physique : « On a assisté à une animalisation des Tutsi. Avant le massacre, dans plusieurs médias, on les traitait de “cafards”, de “serpents”. Ensuite, on disait qu’on allait à la chasse aux Tutsi, avec des armes de chasse. Quand on les regroupait, on disait qu’on déplaçait un troupeau de vaches. » Car on n’assassine pas des animaux, on les abat. Pire, pour les déshumaniser jusqu’au bout, on les frappait jusqu’à ce qu’ils n’aient plus forme humaine. Animaliser, chosifier, défigurer l’autre : cela aide le criminel à se persuader qu’il ne massacre pas des visages, des vies. Qu’il ne tue pas des humains. Frédéric Joignot
La différence entre le monde arabe et Israël est une différence de valeurs et de caractère. Nos sommes devant un contraste entre la barbarie et la civilisation, de la dictature face à la démocratie, du Mal contre le Bien. Il fut un temps où il y avait un endroit particulier dans les profondeurs de l’enfer pour toute personne qui tuait un enfant intentionnellement. Aujourd’hui, ce meurtre est rendu « légitime » comme « lutte armée » des Palestiniens. Mais on oublie cependant que si une telle conduite est rendue légitime contre Israël, elle le sera partout ailleurs, du fait que des gens sont élevés et éduqués dans la croyance subjective que s’envelopper de bâtons de dynamite et de clous pour tuer des enfants, c’est servir Allah. Du fait qu’on a enseigné aux Palestiniens que tuer des Israéliens innocents fera avancer leur cause et qu’on les a encouragés à le faire, le monde entier aujourd’hui souffre de cette plaie qu’est le terrorisme, de Nairobi à New York, de Moscou à Madrid, de Bali à Beslan. Brigitte Gabriel
Compare the collective response after each harrowing high-school shooting in America. Intellectuals and public figures look for the root cause of the violence and ask: Why? Yet when I ask why after every terrorist attack, the disapproval I get from my non-Muslim peers is visceral: The majority of Muslims are not violent, they insist, the jihadists are a minority who don’t represent Islam, and I am fear-mongering by even wondering aloud. This is delusional thinking. Even as the world witnesses the barbarity of beheadings, habitual stoning and severe subjugation of women and minorities in the Muslim world, politicians and academics lecture that Islam is a “religion of peace.” Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia routinely beheads women for sorcery and witchcraft. In the U.S., we Muslims are handled like exotic flowers that will crumble if our faith is criticized—even if we do it ourselves. Meanwhile, Republicans and Democrats alike would apparently prefer to drop bombs in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and beyond, because killing Muslims is somehow less offensive than criticizing their religion? Unfortunately, you can’t kill an idea with a bomb, and so Islamism will continue to propagate. Muslims must tolerate civilized public debate of the texts and scripture that inform Islamism. To demand any less of us is to engage in the soft bigotry of low expectations. Aly Salem

Attention: un racisme peut en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’à l’instar de nos ados rivalisant de bêtises pour attirer l’attention mais aussi nul doute pour s’assurer de nouvelles recrues, les djihadistes redoublent de barbarie …

Et que lorsqu’ ils ne basculent pas dans la pire équivalence morale, nos belles âmes et médias multiplient les livres et les articles censés « expliquer l’inexplicable » …

Comment ne pas s’étonner avec  l’écrivain égypto-américain Aly Salem …

De cette étrange forme de « racisme des faibles attentes » …

Pour lequel il semble moins grave de bombarder des musulmans (de préférence par drones ou chasseurs-bombardiers interposés) …

Que de critiquer la religion qui légitime leurs exactions ?

Let’s Talk About How Islam Has Been Hijacked
I’m appalled by what is done in the name of my religion. Yet my American friends don’t want to hear it.
Aly Salem
WSJ
Oct. 26, 2014

This week a Canadian Muslim gunman went on a rampage in Ottawa, killing a soldier and storming into the Parliament building before he was shot dead. Authorities have since said he had applied for a passport to travel to Syria. Three Muslim schoolgirls from Colorado were intercepted in Germany apparently on their way to Syria, the base for attacks there and in Iraq by the terror group Islamic State, or ISIS. An Aug. 20 article in Newsweek estimated that perhaps twice as many British Muslims are fighting for ISIS as are serving in the British army.

What could possibly inspire young Muslims in the West to abandon their suburban middle-class existence and join a holy war? How could teenagers in Denver or anywhere be lured by a jihadist ideology—or are grisly videos of ISIS beheadings and crucifixions not enough of a deterrent?

What is so compelling about radical Islamism may lie within its founding texts. It is time we acknowledged the powerful influence these texts have had even on ordinary Muslims. The political ideology based on them has already dragged the Middle East back toward the Stone Age.

As a teenager growing up in Egypt in the 1980s, I liked to stroll through Cairo’s outdoor book market, fishing out little gems like an Arabic translation of “War and Peace.” One day I stumbled upon a book that shook everything I believed in.

The book was “In the Shadows of the Quran,” Sayyed Qutb’s magnum opus. The Egyptian writer, who died in 1966, remains arguably the most influential thinker in contemporary Muslim societies. He was the principal theorist of the Muslim Brotherhood and the intellectual impetus behind the Islamist parties it spawned. Qutb’s ardent disciples included Osama bin Laden and Ayman Zawahiri of al Qaeda. It is not an exaggeration to say that Qutb is to Islamism what Karl Marx is to communism.

Qutb’s brilliance as a theorist was in how he applied Western-style literary criticism to the Quran to interpret God’s intentions. He concluded that the reason for the Muslim world’s decline were external cultural and political influences that diluted Islam: The culprits included everything from Greek empiricism and liberal democracy to socialism, Persian poetry and Hegelian philosophy. The only path to an Islamic renaissance was to cleanse Muslim societies of these contaminants and restore Islam to its seventh-century purity.

Today, Qutb’s outlook—Islamism—is the dominant political ideology in most Muslim-majority countries, often taking root in vacuums where secular politics have never had space to develop. Polls by the Pew Research Center, such as 2013’s “The World’s Muslims” indicate that in many Muslim countries, the population is overwhelmingly in favor of veiling for women, the death penalty for leaving Islam and stoning as punishment for adultery; rabid anti-Semitism is rampant. The few exceptions to these statistics tend to be countries with a long history of militant secularism (like Turkey), or former communist states (Tajikistan, Bosnia, Albania, etc.) where religion was effectively wiped out of the public sphere. But Islamism is now growing even in those places.

The trend of history is being reversed. In Egypt, for instance, veiling was unheard of 50 years ago and was virtually extinct until the Islamists resurrected the practice in the 1970s. Today an estimated 90% of Egyptian women are veiled. In many other countries the veil—originally a tribal norm not a religious one—is now ubiquitous, as are views on apostasy in countries that were far more progressive 50 years ago.

Many of my fellow Muslims are trying to reform Islam from within. Yet our voices are smothered in the West by Islamist apologists and their well-meaning but unwitting allies on the left. For instance, if you try to draw attention to the stark correlation between the rise of Islamic religiosity and regressive attitudes toward women, you’re labeled an Islamophobe.

In America, other contemporary ideologies are routinely and openly debated in classrooms, newspapers, on talk shows and in living rooms. But Americans make an exception for Islamism. Criticism of the religion—even in abstraction—is conflated with bigotry toward Muslims. There is no public discourse, much less an ideological response, to Islamism, in academia or on Capitol Hill. This trend is creating an intellectual vacuum, where poisonous ideas are allowed to propagate unchecked.

My own experience as a Muslim in New York bears this out. Socially progressive, self-proclaimed liberals, who would denounce even the slightest injustice committed against women or minorities in America, are appalled when I express a similar criticism about my own community.

Compare the collective response after each harrowing high-school shooting in America. Intellectuals and public figures look for the root cause of the violence and ask: Why? Yet when I ask why after every terrorist attack, the disapproval I get from my non-Muslim peers is visceral: The majority of Muslims are not violent, they insist, the jihadists are a minority who don’t represent Islam, and I am fear-mongering by even wondering aloud.

This is delusional thinking. Even as the world witnesses the barbarity of beheadings, habitual stoning and severe subjugation of women and minorities in the Muslim world, politicians and academics lecture that Islam is a “religion of peace.” Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia routinely beheads women for sorcery and witchcraft.

In the U.S., we Muslims are handled like exotic flowers that will crumble if our faith is criticized—even if we do it ourselves. Meanwhile, Republicans and Democrats alike would apparently prefer to drop bombs in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and beyond, because killing Muslims is somehow less offensive than criticizing their religion? Unfortunately, you can’t kill an idea with a bomb, and so Islamism will continue to propagate. Muslims must tolerate civilized public debate of the texts and scripture that inform Islamism. To demand any less of us is to engage in the soft bigotry of low expectations.

Mr. Salem is an Egyptian writer based in New York.

Voir aussi:

Massacrer au nom de la foi
Frédéric Joignot
LE MONDE CULTURE ET IDEES
23.10.2014

Depuis juillet, la liste des massacres, des viols, des exécutions sommaires, des tortures, des brutalités associées à l’imposition de la charia (mains coupées, flagellations publiques) que commettent les combattants du groupe armé Etat islamique (EI), que ce soit à Tikrit, à Rakka, à Mossoul, ne cesse de s’allonger. Ses partisans tournent et diffusent eux-mêmes les vidéos de leurs exactions : égorgements, crucifixions, têtes plantées sur des grilles, balles dans la tête, charniers.

Sur certains de ces films, on voit de jeunes hommes frapper, humilier et tuer des civils par dizaines, à l’arme blanche ou d’une rafale de mitraillette. Sans hésiter, avec détermination. Ces photos de meurtriers de masse en rappellent d’autres, de terrible mémoire et de tous les temps : celles de la Shoah, celles du génocide des Tutsi au Rwanda, et tant d’images de guerres civiles, de guerres de religion où des tueurs dressés devant des fosses achèvent en souriant une victime désarmée – non coupable, non combattante.
La « sympathie » abrogée

Comment des hommes en arrivent-ils à tuer des vieillards, à enlever des enfants, à torturer des gens qui parfois sont d’anciens voisins ? A quoi pensent-ils à cet instant ? Où est passée leur humanité ? Qu’en disent les historiens, les psychosociologues, les théoriciens des idéologies, les philosophes et les anthropologues qui travaillent sur ces questions de la barbarie, du meurtre de masse et du passage à l’acte ?

L’éclipse de la compassion serait la cause première. Le philosophe Marc Crépon, auteur d’un essai sur Le Consentement meurtrier (Cerf, 2012), avance qu’« il n’y a pas de guerre, pas de génocide, pas d’abandon de populations entières à leur errance entre des frontières meurtrières qui ne soit possible sans une “suspension” de la relation à la mort d’autrui, un déni des gestes de secours, des paroles de réconfort, du partage qu’elle appelle ». Pour décapiter au couteau des hommes attachés, pour violer des femmes, il faut que soit étouffé le savoir que chaque humain possède sur la souffrance de l’autre, sur sa fragilité et sa mortalité. Et la première explication à cette « suspension » est autant psychologique qu’idéologique : seule une force supérieure, et donc un Dieu, pourrait l’autoriser.
« Se convertir, fuir ou périr »

Des hommes, de tout temps, se sont autorisés à massacrer en prétendant brandir le glaive de Dieu. C’est un constat historique effrayant. C’est aussi l’argument des partisans de l’EI. Ils se proclament en guerre sainte. Ils vont imposer, disent-ils, entre la Syrie et le Kurdistan irakien, un califat régi par la loi islamique sunnite. « Je promets à Dieu, qui est le seul Dieu, que j’imposerai la charia par les armes », expliquait, fin août, Abou Mosa, 30 ans, représentant de l’EI, dans un reportage vidéodu groupe américain de médias Vice News. Dieu, poursuivait-il, veut que les membres de l’EI chassent et tuent les yézidis, les Turkmènes, les shabaks, mènent la guerre aux chiites, chassent les chrétiens d’Orient ancrés sur cette terre depuis deux millénaires, « parce que ce sont des infidèles, des apostats, des ennemis de Dieu, de la religion et de l’humanité ». Ils doivent « se convertir, ou fuir, ou périr ». Pour eux, l’interdit de meurtre est levé. Alors, l’EI tue sans états d’âme, en masse. La « sympathie » de chaque homme pour la souffrance des autres hommes, révélée par un des pères des Lumières, Adam Smith, comme un élément constitutif de la nature humaine, est abrogée.

Depuis la découverte des « neurones miroirs » ou « neurones de l’empathie » par l’équipe du biologiste Giacomo Rizzolatti en 1996, nous savons que cette compassion est sans doute universelle. Grâce à leurs effets en retour, chaque homme ressent les émotions des autres « comme si » elles étaient siennes, au niveau d’un « vécu », sans même raisonner – avec empathie. Ces recherches permettent de mieux comprendre les sentiments de pitié, la culpabilité et la moralité.
Les guerres de religion se ressemblent dans l’horreur

Comment un dieu, l’être moral suprême, peut-il alors pousser un homme à en massacrer d’autres ? Auteur, avec Anthony Rowley, de Tuez-les tous ! La guerre de religion à travers l’histoire. VIIe-XXIe siècle (Perrin, 2006), l’historien israélien Elie Barnavi rappelle que « la religion ajoute à la guerre une dimension unique, qui la rend particulièrement féroce et inexpiable : la conviction des hommes qu’ils obéissent à une volonté qui les dépasse et qui fait de leur cause un droit absolu ». Quand elle est pensée comme « la seule vraie foi », la religion transforme l’innocent d’une autre Eglise (ou l’athée) en « infidèle » ou en « érétique », et le tueur en soldat de Dieu.

Elie Barnavi explique ce terrible tour de passe-passe : « Le guerrier de Dieu se bat pour faire advenir la loi divine, telle qu’elle a été formulée une fois pour toutes dans un Livre saint. Dans cette optique, l’infidèle est un obstacle qui se dresse sur le chemin du salut de tous, à éliminer de toute urgence, et sans pitié. »
une « tentative de génocide »

Un autre historien des guerres de religion, Denis Crouzet, avance que les comportements meurtriers de l’EI rappellent d’effroyables « actions de sanctification » lors du massacre de la Saint-Barthélemy (1572). Les guerres de religion, note-t-il, se ressemblent dans l’horreur. Il remarque, par exemple, une même confusion entre l’état de soldat et celui de croyant en armes : « Les armées de croisés du XVIe siècle étaient faiblement professionnalisées du fait des recrues, qui étaient plutôt des militants de la foi. Quand elles prenaient une ville, l’esprit de croisade reprenait le dessus avec l’appel au meurtre des “impurs” et des “démons”. » De même, l’EI est composé d’anciens soldats de l’armée de Saddam Hussein, de sunnites radicaux et de militants du djihad venus de plusieurs pays. Cet été, dans la province de Ninive, quand ils ont exécuté en masse des yézidis – une communauté kurdophone estimée à500 000 personnes en Irak –, ils ont affirmé que ceux-ci étaient des « adorateurs de Satan ». L’ONU a estimé, mardi 21 octobre, que ce crime pourrait constituer une « tentative de génocide ».
Des recrues de l’Etat islamique. Image extraite d’une vidéo postée sur YouTube, le 23 septembre.

Denis Crouzet signale d’autres similitudes : « Pour fanatiser les soldats croyants, il faut des chefs religieux charismatiques et des prédicateurs appelant à la croisade. A Paris, en 1552, le prédicateur François le Picart affirmait que les signes avant-coureurs du retour du Christ sur terre se manifestaient par l’athéisme, l’hérésie et l’Antéchrist se faisant adorer comme Dieu. » Pendant la Saint-Barthélemy, le prêtre Artus Désiré avance que « le pardon est un péché » et qu’il n’est plus temps de tergiverser avec le mal : 3 000 huguenots sont massacrés.

Pareillement, dans le califat autoproclamé par l’EI, le « calife » Abou Bakr Al-Baghdadi se présente comme un sayyed, un descendant du prophète. Il se fait appeler « commandeur des croyants » et délivre chaque semaine un prêche appelant au djihad, après avoir prié en public. Ses déclarations, à la fois mystiques et autoritaires – « Obéissez-moi de la même façon que vous obéissez à Dieu en vous » (à Mossoul, le 9 juin) –, sont reprises par les imams dans les mosquées et par les camions de propagande.
Des Saint-Barthélemy musulmanes

Un autre comportement meurtrier inhérent aux guerres de religion, explique Denis Crouzet, est de sanctifier l’espace avec l’exhibition des corps meurtris des infidèles. Lors de la Saint-Barthélemy,« on traçait dans la ville des parcours sanglants pour montrer à Dieu qu’une ville lui revient. Les cadavres des huguenots, parfois des voisins, sont transportés dans les rues, mutilés. Il s’agit pour les violents, soldats et civils unis, de resacraliser Paris, d’exprimer à travers les corps démantelés l’adhésion à la justice eschatologique de Dieu ». Les partisans de l’EI se sont fait une spécialité de ces mises en scène macabres, prétendument purificatrices, tout en dynamitant les autres lieux de cultes.

Nous assisterions ainsi, dans cette région du monde, à des Saint-Barthélemy musulmanes, des dizaines de milliers d’hommes se déclarant des soldats de Dieu pour tuer en masse d’autres croyants, souvent musulmans eux aussi, comme les chiites, majoritaires en Irak. Malek Chebel, spécialiste de l’islam, rappelle que, jusqu’à ces dernières années, « de nombreux chiites et sunnites faisaient ensemble le pèlerinage de La Mecque et vivaient côte à côte dans l’Irak de Saddam ». Cependant, ajoute-t-il, « il vaut mieux aujourd’hui ne pas être chiite dans tel quartier d’une ville d’Irak, et sunnite dans tel autre car, alors, il faut s’attendre à un double massacre à base religieuse ».
Crimes de masse

Dieu n’est pas toujours indispensable pour expliquer ces crimes de masse : d’autres analyses, militaires, psychosociologiques, politiques, nous éclairent. Au-delà d’une guerre sainte, c’est une guerre classique qui se déroule actuellement en Irak et en Syrie, et ces hommes qui tuent sans trembler ressemblent à tous les soldats du monde : ils exécutent un ennemi, ils obéissent à l’EI, un groupe armé décidé, avec son commandement, sa stratégie.

Elie Barnavi, ancien soldat de l’armée israélienne, Tsahal, rappelle dans ses Dix thèses sur la guerre (Flammarion, 144 p., 12 euros) que la « psychologie du soldat » consiste en « un englobement immédiat et sans restriction des individualités » par une autorité supérieure : il obéit. Et toute guerre, précise l’historien, « porte en elle, à des degrés divers, une certaine “barbarisation” des comportements humains ». C’est cette barbarie, stade extrême de la guerre, que nous voyons à l’œuvre aujourd’hui.

Mais si toute guerre est barbare, rappelle Barnavi, elle n’est pas totalement impunie. Depuis l’émergence du droit international humanitaire né avec le tribunal de Nuremberg (1945-1946), réaffirmé après les guerres dans l’ex-Yougoslavie (1991-2001), puis le génocide des Tutsi au Rwanda en 1994, tout conflit meurtrier doit respecter les lois de la guerre : « Traiter correctement les prisonniers, distinguer entre combattants et population civile, protéger celle-ci des affres du conflit, interdire les armes de destruction massive et, en dernier ressort, juger dans des tribunaux spéciaux les principaux auteurs de crimes de guerre et de crimes contre l’humanité », détaille Elie Barnavi. Or, l’EI ne respecte pas les règles internationales. D’après les rapports d’Amnesty International et de Human Rights Watch, l’organisation tue les non-combattants, pille les civils, enlève des femmes.
Les « vertiges de l’impunité »

Pour Jacques Sémelin, historien au CNRS et auteur de Purifier et détruire (Seuil, 2005), les militants de l’Etat islamique cèdent aux « vertiges de l’impunité ». C’est une autre analyse, plus politique, des exactions de l’EI. Ils jouissent du pouvoir conféré par les armes sur un territoire conquis. « La guerre sans règle devient une sorte de fête, d’ivresse de puissance, analyse-t-il. On se croit indestructible, car on donne la mort. On se prend pour Dieu. On est craint partout. Rien n’est plus grisant. »

Dans le reportage de Vice News, le combattant de l’EI Abou Mosa explique pourquoi il ne retourne pas voir sa famille. « Je suis en guerre permanente. Je ne suis jamais avec ma femme et mes enfants. Il y a des buts plus élevés. Il n’y aurait personne pour défendre l’islam si je restais avec eux. » Il préfère être avec ses « frères » et se battre pour « humilier [ses] ennemis ». Il dit encore : « Plus la situation est violente, plus on se rapproche de Dieu. » Jacques Sémelin commente : « A la paix, ils préfèrent l’état de guerre où tout devient possible, où ils libèrent leurs pulsions meurtrières et sont les maîtres. »

Au-delà du vertige d’être hors-la-loi, il y aurait donc un autre moteur à l’impunité, qui serait propre à l’humain : le plaisir de faire souffrir, de tuer, de violer, de régner. « Ces hommes ne se vantent pas de ce qu’ils font aux femmes. Ils ne racontent pas les crimes et les vols qu’ils commettent quand ils sont les maîtres du terrain », fait remarquer l’historien. Des reportages réalisés dans le Kurdistan irakien décrivent pourtant des jeunes femmes yézidies et turkmènes, de 13 ans à 20 ans, enlevées par centaines par l’EI, violées et revendues aux soldats. Les viols collectifs constituent un classique des périodes de massacre et de génocide.
On retrouve toujours les mêmes « matrices criminelles »

Pour Jacques Sémelin, il existe « un fond sadien » en l’homme, un « moi assassin » et jouisseur qui se libère dans les situations d’impunité et de conquête – Freud, dans Considérations actuelles sur la guerre et la mort, parlait déjà d’une pulsion primitive de meurtre. Et, selon l’historien, on retrouve toujours les mêmes « matrices criminelles » pour qu’il y ait passage à l’acte et meurtre de masse. On peut écrire « une grammaire du massacre », transhistorique et transculturelle, avec ces règles presque intangibles. Ainsi, les tueurs massacrent en groupe. « Ils constituent un “nous” contre un “eux” nuisible », au cours d’une opération identitaire, appuyée sur une idéologie totalitaire ou une religion intolérante. Ces groupes meurtriers, d’après des travaux recoupés, obéissent aux mêmes règles de comportement : « On retrouve d’habitude, développe Jacques Sémelin, un tiers de “perpétrateurs” actifs, un tiers de “suivistes” et un tiers de “réticents” », le premier tiers entraînant les autres. C’est ce que l’on appelle l’« effet Lucifer », selon la formule du psychologue américain Philip Zimbardo  : les actifs l’emportent sur les indécis.

Autre constante rendant le massacre possible : « Les perpétrateurs doivent persuader les exécutants indécis que les victimes, les innocents désarmés, sont des ennemis dangereux, et leur crime un acte légitime. C’est d’habitude le rôle de l’idéologie », poursuit Jacques Sémelin. Au terme de sa monumentale enquête, La Loi du sang. Penser et agir en nazi (Gallimard, 576 p., 25 euros), l’historien Johann Chapoutot synthétise en une formule terrible comment l’idéologie nazie a justifié le pire : pour « tuer un enfant au bord de la fosse » en croyant que cela relève de la « bravoure militaire », il faut d’abord en avoir fait un « ennemi biologique », un être nuisible qui menace d’entraîner la dégénérescence de la race. On sait l’ampleur des crimes qui ont accompagné cette idéologie eugéniste durant la seconde guerre mondiale.
« Un génocide de proximité »

L’idéologie suffit-elle à expliquer que toute compassion, toute humanité, soit levée ? L’historienne Hélène Dumas, auteur du Génocide au village (Seuil, 384 p., 23 euros), a tenté de comprendre le drame du Rwanda en concentrant ses recherches sur une petite ville. Comment a-t-il été possible qu’entre le 7 avril et le début du mois de juillet 1994, de 800 000 à 1 million de Tutsi aient été tués par leurs voisins Hutu ? Elle a découvert sur place « un génocide de proximité », un cauchemar où ce sont les voisins, parfois des parents, qui ont mené le massacre avec d’autant plus d’efficacité qu’ils connaissaient la région, les cachettes, les maisons. Comment comprendre ?

Hélène Dumas a notamment décrit un puissant mouvement de « déshumanisation », à la fois mental – médiatique, politique – et physique : « On a assisté à une animalisation des Tutsi. Avant le massacre, dans plusieurs médias, on les traitait de “cafards”, de “serpents”. Ensuite, on disait qu’on allait à la chasse aux Tutsi, avec des armes de chasse. Quand on les regroupait, on disait qu’on déplaçait un troupeau de vaches. » Car on n’assassine pas des animaux, on les abat. Pire, pour les déshumaniser jusqu’au bout, on les frappait jusqu’à ce qu’ils n’aient plus forme humaine.

Animaliser, chosifier, défigurer l’autre : cela aide le criminel à se persuader qu’il ne massacre pas des visages, des vies. Qu’il ne tue pas des humains.

À LIRE

« Les Guerriers de Dieu. La violence au temps des troubles de religion », de Denis Crouzet ( Champ Vallon, 2005).

« La Peur des barbares. Au-delà du choc des civilisations », de Tzvetan Todorov (Robert Laffont, 2008).

« Le sec et l’humide », de Jonathan Littell (Gallimard, 2008).

Voir encore:

Allocution de Brigitte Gabriel -journaliste chrétienne libanaise – Fondatrice de American Congress for Truth‏

Je suis honorée et fière d’être aujourd’hui parmi vous en tant que Libanaise parlant en faveur de la seule démocratie du Moyen Orient, Israël. J’ai été élevée dans un pays arabe et je voudrais vous donner ici un aperçu venant de l’intérieur du monde arabe.

J’ai grandi au Liban où on m’a enseigné que les Juifs étaient  » le Mal « , Israël  » le Diable  » et que nous n’aurions la paix au Moyen Orient que le jour où tous les Juifs seraient morts, engloutis dans la mer.

Quand les Palestiniens et les Musulmans du Liban ont déclaré leur Jihad contre les Chrétiens en 1975, ils ont commencé à les massacrer, ville après ville. Je me suis retrouvée dans un abri souterrain depuis l’âge de 10 ans jusqu’à 17 ans, sans électricité, mangeant de l’herbe pour survivre et, rampant sous les balles de tireurs embusqués, pour parvenir à un point d’eau. Ce sont les Israéliens qui nous ont sauvé au Liban. Ma mère a été blessée par un obus tiré par des « jihadistes » et elle a été transportée vers un hôpital israélien pour être soignée.

 Lors de notre arrivée aux « urgences » j’ai été frappée par ce que j’ai vu : des dizaines de blessés, des Palestiniens, des Libanais et des soldats Israéliens jonchaient le sol. On soignait les blessés en fonction de la gravité des blessures, ma mère avant un soldat israélien, étendu près d’elle. Ils ne tenaient compte ni de l’identité ni de la religion du patient, ils ne tenaient compte que de la blessure à soigner, et c’était nouveau pour moi !

Pour la première fois de ma vie j’ai vécu une compassion humaine qu’il ne m’a pas été donné de vivre dans la culture du pays où je suis née. J’ai vu des « valeurs nouvelles » appliquées par des Israéliens, capables de compatir pour un ennemi, dans les moments les plus difficiles. J’ai passé 22 jours dans cet hôpital et ces 22 jours ont changé toute ma vie et toute la vision que j’avais du monde extérieur, que je ne connaissais qu’à travers les médias libanais.

 J’ai réalisé que mon gouvernement m’avait « vendu » des mensonges grossiers sur les Juifs et sur Israël. J’ai réalisé aussi que si j’avais été une Juive au milieu d’un hôpital arabe, j’aurais été lynchée et jetée dehors au milieu des cris de joie et de « Allahou Aqbar » (allah est grand), retentissant partout dans le voisinage.

Dans cet hôpital, j’ai noué des amitiés avec les familles de soldats blessés, notamment avec Rina, dont le fils unique était blessé aux yeux. Alors que je lui rendais visite, un groupe musical de l’armée israélienne était venu remonter le moral des soldats blessés et ils ont entouré son lit en chantant. Rina et moi nous fondîmes en larmes et je me suis sentie de trop, esquissant un mouvement de sortie, mais Rina m’a retenue par la main, me rapprochant d’elle sans me regarder, « tu n’es pour rien dans tout cela… ».

Nous sommes restées ainsi quelques instants, pleurant la main dans la main. Comment ne pas comparer cette mère à côté de son fils unique au visage déformé par une explosion, capable d’aimer son propre ennemi, et ces mères musulmanes qui envoient leurs enfants se faire exploser en pièces, juste pour tuer des « infidèles »…

La différence entre le monde arabe et Israël est une différence de valeurs et de caractère.

Nos sommes devant un contraste entre la barbarie et la civilisation, de la dictature face à la démocratie, du Mal contre le Bien. Il fut un temps où il y avait un endroit particulier dans les profondeurs de l’enfer pour toute personne qui tuait un enfant intentionnellement. Aujourd’hui, ce meurtre est rendu « légitime » comme « lutte armée » des Palestiniens.

Mais on oublie cependant que si une telle conduite est rendue légitime contre Israël, elle le sera partout ailleurs, du fait que des gens sont élevés et éduqués dans la croyance subjective que s’envelopper de bâtons de dynamite et de clous pour tuer des enfants, c’est servir Allah. Du fait qu’on a enseigné aux Palestiniens que tuer des Israéliens innocents fera avancer leur cause et qu’on les a encouragés à le faire, le monde entier aujourd’hui souffre de cette plaie qu’est le terrorisme, de Nairobi à New York, de Moscou à Madrid, de Bali à Beslan.

On attribue les attentats suicide au désespoir de l’occupation. Ceci est un leurre. Je vous rappelle que la première attaque terroriste commise par des Arabes contre des Juifs en Israël a eu lieu 10 semaines avant la déclaration d’indépendance. Elle a eu lieu un dimanche matin, le 22 février 1948, anticipant cette indépendance. Trois camions piégés ont explosé dans la rue Ben Yéhouda à Jérusalem et 54 personnes sont mortes et il y eut des centaines de blessés.

Le terrorisme arabe n’est pas mû par le désespoir mais par une volonté farouche d’empêcher tout état juif dans la région.

Remarque du Collectif Arabes Pour Israël :

De temps à autre une voix s’élève pour défendre Israël. Encore faut-il qu’elle soit entendue et comprise. Brigitte Gabriel  est une journaliste chrétienne  libanaise .Elle est la Fondatrice de American Congress for Truth. Elle est née et a vécu presque toute sa vie au Liban et a passé son adolescence dans les abris anti-bombes. Elle témoigne de la façon dont le Hezbollah, la Syrie et l’Iran ont patiemment pris contrôle de son pays depuis plus de 30 ans, en terrorisant la population chrétienne. Brigitte Gabriel soutenait que « La différence entre le monde arabe et Israël est une différence de valeurs : c’est la barbarie contre la civilisation » .Pour elle le terrorisme arabe n’est pas dû au « désespoir » mais à la seule idée de l’existence d’un Etat juif.

Elle nous rappelle, par exemple, que le 22 février 1948, en prévision de l’indépendance d’Israël, une triple bombe explosa dans la rue de Ben Yehuda, qui était alors le quartier juif de Jérusalem. 54 personnes furent tuées et des centaines blessées. Ceci démontre à l’évidence que le terrorisme arabe n’est pas dû au « désespoir » de « l’occupation » mais à la seule idée de l’existence d’un Etat juif.

Voir encore:

Brigitte Gabriel on Radical Islam; Brigitte Gabriel’s Anti-Islam Message on Radical Muslims

Christiane Amanpour

CNN

March 8, 2011

SPITZER: Republican Congressman Peter King’s hearings into radical Islam have ignited a firestorm of protest. Critics say it’s nothing more than a witch-hunt and an improper effort to target an entire religion of nearly 1.6 billion people. Just as revolutions calling for freedom and democracy are sweeping across the Arab world.

Others say no, Islam is, in fact, a threat.

Joining us is one such voice. Brigitte Gabriel, author of, and I quote, « They Must Be Stopped. » She joins us from Washington.

Welcome to the show.

BRIGITTE GABRIEL, AUTHOR, « THEY MUST BE STOPPED »: Thank you, Eliot. Glad to be with you.

SPITZER: There was, as I’m sure you know, a front page article about you and your perspective on Islam just today. And I want to quote something you said in this article.

So I apologize for putting on my glasses, but you said, « America has been infiltrated on all levels by radicals who wish to harm America. They have infiltrated us at the CIA, at the FBI, at the Pentagon, at the State Department. They’re being radicalized in radical mosques, in our cities and communities within the United States. »

Now first, I’ve just got to ask you, because I read this and it harkened back to the worst form of McCarthyism of the 1950s. Who are these people? Where are the names and what proof do you have that there are people who are radicals trying to undo our society in these institutions of government?

GABRIEL: Well, I was talking about the Muslim Brotherhood project which has been presented as evidence in the Holy Land Foundation trial in 2007 in Texas, which is the largest ever terrorism trial taken by the United States government. And terrorism financing, where 108 guilty verdicts were handed down.

In that trial, a project written by the Muslim Brotherhood, a 100-year plan for radical Islam to infiltrate and dominate the West, was presented. The plan for North America was presented which was written in 1991.

In that plan, they discussed 29 front Islamic organizations for the Muslim Brotherhood set up in the United States, and now operating, infiltrating our government.

This is not an opinion. This is a fact that was presented in –

SPITZER: Brigitte –

GABRIEL: — in a terrorism case.

SPITZER: Brigitte, again, I want to drill down. I know about that case. I was a prosecutor — in fact, we were involved in generation of the evidence way back for that case.

You have not given me the name of a single individual — you list every major aspect of our government. The CIA, the FBI, the State Department. Name one person who you can say is infiltrated in those institutions by radical Islam since you were saying radical Islam is this fundamental threat to our security.

One person at those institutions.

GABRIEL: Well, there are people who are under investigation, and their names will not be released by the FBI just like the people who are wanted during Nidal Hasan. For a year. And they did not release his name. And they did not share intelligence. Because when once someone is being monitored you don’t discuss them publicly.

SPITZER: But Brigitte –

GABRIEL: But I can tell you that we have had guests to the White House, like al-Amoudi, for example, who has been a VIP guest for both the Democratic presidents and Republican presidents, who is now serving a 20-year — 23-year prison sentence.

You take Sami Al-Arian, for example, who also was a guest to the White House, who we found out is the head of the Islamic jihad in the United States.

There are cases and there are convictions where people have been already tried and either exiled like the Sami Al-Arian case, and only you find out about them after their trial has been over.

SPITZER: With all due respect you haven’t answered the question. Give me the name of a single person that you can say to the public. You’re quoted in the front page of « The New York Times » saying every major law enforcement organization in the United States has been infiltrated by radical Islam.

And now you’re saying you can’t give us a name because maybe they’re under investigation? Give us the name of one person.

GABRIEL: Well, I can give you one name. Hasham Islam who works at the Pentagon who actually ousted Stephen Coughlin, who was the highest authority on Islam at the Pentagon back a couple of years ago.

SPITZER: OK.

GABRIEL: Is a front for the Muslim Brotherhood.

There are many people like that operating and working within our government who are now being monitored by the FBI. Their names are not going to be released because they are being monitored.

SPITZER: All right. All right. We got one name in and we will follow up on that. I appreciate that.

Now I want to run a quotation, a piece of tape in which you made some kind of remarkable comments — I think kind of remarkable comments about Islam and the Arab world. And you said that — you’re contrasting the Arab world basically with everybody else.

Let’s run this tape, and then I want you to react to it, if you would.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GABRIEL: The difference between civilization and barbarism is the difference between goodness and evil. And this is what we’re witnessing in the Arabic world. They have no soul. They are dead set on killing and destruction.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

SPITZER: So Brigitte, I just want to make sure I’m understanding this. You’re saying the entire Arab world is dead set on destruction, has no respect for the rights that I hope you and I believe are central to our democracy here. And you’re saying this at the very moment that one of the most remarkable revolutionary moments in history is sweeping across North Africa and the Middle East.

Was that — is that your view?

GABRIEL: Well, actually, you are looking at an edited tape. This speech was given about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in which I was discussing the Hamas mother who sent her children to die, strapping bombs on their bodies, and saying, I already killed three, I have another seven, I’ll be willing to send them out to die, as well.

And I was talking about how Palestinian mothers are encouraging their children to go out and blow themselves up to smithereens just to kill Christians and Jews. And it was in that context that I — that I contrasted the difference between Israel and the Arabic world, was the difference between democracy and barbarism.

That’s how I made these comments, but obviously that clip was edited.

When we are looking at the — what’s happening in the Middle East right now, for example, the revolutions that we are witnessing in Egypt. The people in Egypt are taking to the streets because they are tired of the rule of Mubarak who has been in power for 30 years.

The people do want freedom. But the only people who will fill the hole are going to be the Muslim Brotherhood. We saw how Hamas used democracy to gain power in Gaza. We saw how Hezbollah used democracy to gain power in Lebanon.

What we are seeing right now in Egypt, what might have started as a revolution for peace, is going to be filled by radical Islamic Muslim Brotherhood that we already saw Al-Qaradawi came back to Egypt, gave the Friday prayer to a hero’s welcome.

It’s like watching again the — what happened in Iran in 1979 be replayed again in Egypt right –

SPITZER: Brigitte –

GABRIEL: Right before our own eyes.

SPITZER: Brigitte, with all due respect I don’t think anybody knows how any of these revolutions will play out. But the consensus is clearly that these are essentially secular, that they are pro- democratic, that they are pro-freedom, and that they are not Islamist revolutions. Of course, history will tell us 10 years from now who is right. With respect to the editing, you gave the speech with respect to events in Gaza, you’re your comments did not in fact relate only to Gaza and I’ll give you another quotation in a second.

Nobody has been more fervent in condemning terrorism, violence than I especially Hamas, is a terrorist organization to be condemned and dealt with harshly, but that’s not what you said.

I want to quote back to you something else you said and I don’t have a tape of this. This was an interview you gave and you said, « A practicing Muslim goes to mosque, prays five times a day, doesn’t drink, believes God gave him women to be his property, to beat, to stone to death. He believes Christians and Jews are apes and pigs because they are cursed by Allah. He believes it is his duty to declare war on the infidels because they are Allah’s enemies. That is a practice in Muslim. »

Is that your view of the entirety of the religion? And that’s where I’m trying to come to grips with sweep and breadth of your comments, and your lack of differentiation between radicals and extremists who exist in virtually all religions, and the enormous mass of those who believe in Islam.

GABRIEL: Well, also that quote was edited. Those words were not uttered in sequence the way you quoted them. And what I was talking about was about the difference between a devout Muslim who might fall into radicalism and the difference between a regular Muslim who is a moderate who does not subscribe to Sharia law.

Those who are adherent to Sharia law according to the Koran who are devout following the Sharia principle are the ones who believe that their women are their property. This is how Ayman al-Zawahiri believes, this is how Osama bin Laden believes, this is how Anwar al- Awlaki believes. This is how Imam Choudary believes.

This is how every radical who follows the exact commandment of the Koran and Sharia law believes. Those are the radicals and that’s what sets them apart from the moderates.

Obviously the moderates who believe in sending their daughters to study, to get an education, to gets a profession, not to cover with a hijab from head to toe, a man who believes his wife is his equal, not his property, is a moderate Muslim who does not subscribe to the ideology of al Qaeda.

Again, it’s amazing, Eliot — you know, I come from the media, you are in the media. We are both journalists, and we both — I was anchor for « World News, » and you’re an anchor for CNN.

We both know how easily journalists, or people and comments especially now with the Internet age, can take few words and either paste them together or edit them together to basically express their own point of view.

SPITZER: Brigitte, with — again, with all due respect, the entirety of your writing, the entirety of your comments and the entirety of your purpose in going out to speak and that has been fairly captured in the comments and the quotations that we have given to the viewers of the show tonight. And as you just said, you think a devout –

GABRIEL: Your opinion.

SPITZER: Somebody who is a devout believer in Islam, actually, you fairly captured their views about Jews and Christians being apes and pigs. You said if they’re devout, that’s what they believe.

So the question, again, that I have for you is, you — are you not sweeping with such a broad brush? Are you not failing that most critical, critical error of judgment which is to differentiate between those who are extremists, who have no judgment? And are you not picking the few to generalize about 1.6 billion people? And are you not feeding into the animus that at the end of the day is so destructive?

GABRIEL: Eliot, I come from the Middle East. I was born and raised there. I walk into a grocery store in Arlington, Virginia, and speak in Arabic and hear what they’re saying and understand it much differently that you would or anybody else.

And I can tell you how the Middle East and how the Muslim world and the Arabic world operates. So when I speak about certain things regarding the Middle East or their religion itself or how they talk about their religion, I hope that you would give me enough credit to know that what I’m talking about in warning what’s coming to the United States will be at least considered as someone who comes from the Middle East and understands the culture and can read the Koran in Arabic, the language in which it was written and recited in Arabic, as much as Osama bin Laden can recite it.

So what I’m telling you that what we in the West consider as a difference between radical Islam and a moderate Islam, when you listen to the (INAUDIBLE), for example, the prime minister of Australia, or when you listen to Imam Choudary telling you there is no radical Islam and moderate Islam, there’s only one Islam.

Believe what you’re enemy — at least what the radicals are saying because it is the radicals right now that matter. And it is the radicals who have declared war on the United States.

We must be very wise in understanding what our enemy is saying to us. They are not lying. They don’t have a hidden agenda. They’re being very clear in their messaging.

We are trying to translate and reflect our western values and standards on their words. And we better be very careful because we are playing with fire and the lives of millions of people if we do not learn how to differentiate between what the radicals and the devout do and say and what the moderates do and say.

ELIOT SPITZER, HOST: All right. I think you meant the prime minister of Turkey, not Australia, if I heard you properly with –

GABRIEL: Sorry. Exactly. SPITZER: Just to prove I was listening carefully to you. I just want you to know that. All right.

Voir enfin:

L’ISLAM EN DÉBAT

Ce que les islamistes « modérés » ont en commun avec l’Etat islamique
Il existe bien des islamistes « modérés » qui s’opposent à l’organisation Etat islamique. Mais leur contestation reste modeste parce qu’intellectuellement, ils partagent la même idée de la religion que les extrémistes.
Al-Hayat
Yassine Al-Haj Saleh
27 octobre 2014
Il y a des islamistes qui s’opposent à Daech [l’Etat islamique]. Il y a même des islamistes, y compris salafistes, qui ont engagé le combat armé contre lui. Mais sur le front des idées ce combat reste étonnamment atone.

Cela amène à se demander pourquoi les musulmans ne s’insurgent pas pour défendre leur religion, cette religion qui sert aujourd’hui à désigner des pratiques qui sont les plus criminelles de l’histoire de l’humanité. Pourquoi sont-ils incapables de dire clairement que ce n’est pas l’islam ?

L’explication réside dans le fait qu’au niveau intellectuel il n’existe pas de différence importante entre un modéré et un extrémiste. Tous aspirent à établir durablement le règne de l’islam, dans des pays qu’ils ne voient que sous l’angle de leur [seule] identité islamique.

Le sens d’un tel règne de l’islam consiste en quelque sorte à rétablir un ordre qui aurait été dévoyé par les complots des colonisateurs et consorts. Les Etats-nations et toute notre histoire contemporaine sont considérés comme des phénomènes passagers, puisque notre vraie nature profonde résiderait dans une invariable islamique qui remonte [à la naissance de l’islam].

Cela nie toute évolution historique, alors que les musulmans ne sont devenus majoritaires au Moyen-Orient qu’après les croisades, que la majorité des Egyptiens étaient chiites à l’époque fatimide… Le règne de l’islam n’est donc pas mû par une vision de l’avenir, mais par le désir de revenir à un état originel où chaque chose est censée avoir été à sa place.

Sur tous ces points, il n’y a pas de distinction réelle entre modérés et extrémistes. Il y a seulement ceux qui sont extrémistes (Frères musulmans), d’autres qui sont très extrémistes (les salafistes du Front islamique), d’autres qui sont encore plus extrémistes (Front Al-Nosra), et finalement ceux qui sont excessivement extrémistes (Daech). Il y a certes des islamistes qui sont modérés, mais ils sont dépourvus des bases intellectuelles qui leur permettraient d’affirmer la légitimité de leurs positions.

Pour être précis, les islamistes partagent quatre idées :
1) Le refus de séparer clairement la religion de la violence et de dire que la violence au nom de l’islam est illégitime. Par conséquent, personne parmi eux n’accepte entièrement la liberté religieuse, la liberté de changer de religion ou de ne pas en avoir. Sur ce point, il n’y a pas de rupture entre les “modérés” et Daech.
Les “modérés” sont incohérents quand ils s’opposent à la violence débridée de Daech sans s’opposer à la substantialité du lien entre la religion et la violence, ni à “l’application de la charia”, ni au projet de contrôler à la fois l’Etat et la société, à l’instar des organisations totalitaires.

2) L’imaginaire de l’empire. Cet imaginaire tourne autour de conquêtes, d’invasions et de gloire militaire. C’est un imaginaire de puissance et de domination, de héros et de sultans qui laisse peu de place aux aspects de la vie quotidienne, aux gens ordinaires et aux femmes. On n’a jamais procédé à une révision de l’Histoire pour dire que ces conquêtes islamiques s’expliquent par des contingences historiques, sans lien intrinsèque avec la religion.

3) Le mépris de l’Etat-nation. Ce qui compte aux yeux de tous les islamistes est la nation islamique [umma]. Les islamistes dissolvent les Etats existants dans l’umma, alors que ces Etats représentent l’intérêt général depuis plus d’un siècle et que l’umma a duré moins longtemps qu’eux. Est-ce que les islamistes “modérés” – les Frères musulmans syriens, par exemple – ont critiqué cet apatriotisme ? Pas un mot ! Pourquoi ? Parce qu’ils le partagent.

4) L’“application de la charia” est un autre point commun, qui s’ajoute à la coercition, à l’imaginaire de l’empire et au mépris pour l’Etat-nation. En l’absence de bases intellectuelles solides pour s’opposer aux extrémistes, les jeunes musulmans ont l’impression que c’est Daech et consorts qui représentent leur religion, et non pas les modérés inconsistants.

—Yassine Al-Haj Saleh
Publié le 26 août 2014 dans Al-Hayat (extraits) Londres


Polémique Zemmour: Zemmour respecte globalement l’approche qui est faite dans mon livre (When vice turns virtue: France’s Bill O’Reilly of letters taken to task for defending Vichy’s record)

23 octobre, 2014
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/blogs/morris/32-Jewish-Populations-Table.jpg
http://www.strangehistory.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/survival-in-jewish-europe.jpg
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Xd1Xz%2BRuL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
Paradoxe français (Simon Epstein)
http://prisons-cherche-midi-mauzac.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/vichy-et-la-shoah-le-paradoxe-francais.jpg
http://img.agoravox.fr/local/cache-vignettes/L300xH315/zemmour-le-suicide-de-la-france-2-3418e.jpg
Il n’est rien sur la terre de si humble qui ne rende à la terre un service spécial ; il n’est
rien non plus de si bon qui, détourné de son légitime usage, ne devienne rebelle à son origine et ne tombe dans l’abus. La vertu même devient vice, étant mal appliquée, et le vice est parfois ennobli par l’action.
Shakespeare (Père Laurence, II, 3)
The difference between virtue and vice is far less radical than we would like to believe. Sometimes the most effective goodness…is carried out by those who have already compromised themselves with evil, those who are members of the very organization that set the ball rolling toward the abyss. Hence a strange and frustrating contradiction: that absolute goodness is often surprisingly ineffective, while compromised, splintered and ambiguous goodness, one that is touched and stained by evil, is the only kind that may set limits to mass murder. And while absolute evil is indeed defined by its consistent one-dimensionality, this more mundane sort of wickedness, the most prevalent sort, contains within itself also seeds of goodness that may be stimulated and encouraged by the example of the few dwellers of these nether regions who may have come to recognize their own moral potential. Omer Bartov
On dit du fanatisme de quelques-uns que c’est l’arbre qui cache la forêt de l’islam pacifique, mais quel est l’état réel de la forêt en laquelle un tel arbre peut prendre racine? Abdennour Bidar
Plutôt que d’annoncer à ses millions d’âmes qu’ils vivent dans des pays soumis à des régimes totalitaires, religieux, obscurantistes, sans liberté, parqués jour et nuit dans des mosquées où on leur apprend à haïr la liberté, les femmes, la vie, les autres, la chaîne qatarienne al-Jazeera préfère crier haro sur Israël, sur l’ennemi sioniste, c’est à la fois un antalgique et un antidépresseur. Mohamed Kacimi
À en croire, par ordre d’entrée en scène, Enzo Traverso, Luc Boltanski et Arnaud Esquerre, Edwy Plenel, Philippe Corcuff, Renaud Dély, Pascal Blanchard, Claude Askolovitch et Yvan Gastaut: les années 1930 sont de retour. La droite intégriste et factieuse occupe la rue, la crise économique pousse à la recherche d’un bouc émissaire et l’islamophobie prend le relais de l’antisémitisme. Tous les auteurs que j’ai cités observent, comme l’écrit Luc Boltanski: «la présence de thèmes traditionalistes et nationalistes issus de la rhétorique de l’Action française et la réorientation contre les musulmans d’une hostilité qui fut dans la première moitié du XXe siècle principalement dirigé contre les juifs». Cette analogie historique prétend nous éclairer: elle nous aveugle. Au lieu de lire le présent à la lumière du passé, elle en occulte la nouveauté inquiétante. Il n’y avait pas dans les années 1930 d’équivalent juif des brigades de la charia qui patrouillent aujourd’hui dans les rues de Wuppertal, la ville de Pina Bausch et du métro suspendu. Il n’y avait pas d’équivalent du noyautage islamiste de plusieurs écoles publiques à Birmingham. Il n’y avait pas d’équivalent de la contestation des cours d’histoire, de littérature ou de philosophie dans les lycées ou les collèges dits sensibles. Aucun élève alors n’aurait songé à opposer au professeur, qui faisait cours sur Flaubert, cette fin de non-recevoir: «Madame Bovary est contraire à ma religion.» Il n’y avait pas, d’autre part, de charte de la diversité. On ne pratiquait pas la discrimination positive. Ne régnait pas non plus à l’université, dans les médias, dans les prétoires, cet antiracisme vigilant qui traque les mauvaises pensées des grands auteurs du patrimoine et qui sanctionne sous le nom de «dérapage» le moindre manquement au dogme du jour: l’égalité de tout avec tout. Quant à parler de retour de l’ordre moral alors que les œuvres du marquis de Sade ont les honneurs de la Pléiade, que La Vie d’Adèle a obtenu la palme d’or à Cannes et que les Femen s’exhibent en toute impunité dans les églises et les cathédrales de leur choix, c’est non seulement se payer de mots, mais réclamer pour l’ordre idéologique de plus en plus étouffant sous lequel nous vivons les lauriers de la dissidence. (…) Pour dire avec Plenel et les autres que ce sont les musulmans désormais qui portent l’étoile jaune, il faut faire bon marché de la situation actuelle des juifs de France. S’il n’y a pratiquement plus d’élèves juifs dans les écoles publiques de Seine-Saint-Denis, c’est parce que, comme le répète dans l’indifférence générale Georges Bensoussan, le coordinateur du livre Les Territoires perdus de la République (Mille et Une Nuits), l’antisémitisme y est devenu un code culturel. Tous les musulmans ne sont pas antisémites, loin s’en faut, mais si l’imam de Bordeaux et le recteur de la grande mosquée de Lyon combattent ce phénomène avec une telle vigueur, c’est parce que la majorité des antisémites de nos jours sont musulmans. Cette réalité, les antiracistes officiels la nient ou la noient dans ses causes sociales pour mieux incriminer au bout du compte «la France aux relents coloniaux». Ce n’est pas aux dominés, expliquent-ils en substance, qu’il faut reprocher leurs raccourcis détestables ou leur passage à l’acte violent, c’est à la férocité quotidienne du système de domination. (…) Au début de l’affaire Dreyfus, Zola écrivait Pour les juifs. Après m’avoir écouté sur France Inter, Edwy Plenel indigné écrit Pour les musulmans. Fou amoureux de cette image si gratifiante de lui-même et imbu d’une empathie tout abstraite pour une population dont il ne veut rien savoir de peur de «l’essentialiser», il signifie aux juifs que ceux qui les traitent aujourd’hui de «sales feujs» sont les juifs de notre temps. Le racisme se meurt, tant mieux. Mais si c’est cela l’antiracisme, on n’a pas vraiment gagné au change. Et il y a pire peut-être: l’analogie entre les années 1930 et notre époque, tout entière dressée pour ne pas voir le choc culturel dont l’Europe est aujourd’hui le théâtre, efface sans vergogne le travail critique que mènent, avec un courage et une ténacité admirables, les meilleurs intellectuels musulmans. (…) Pendant ce temps, tout à la fierté jubilatoire de dénoncer notre recherche effrénée d’un bouc émissaire, les intellectuels progressistes fournissent avec le thème de «la France islamophobe» un bouc émissaire inespéré au salafisme en expansion. En même temps qu’il fait de nouveaux adeptes, l’Islam littéral gagne sans cesse de nouveaux Rantanplan. Ce ne sont pas les années 1930 qui reviennent, ce sont, dans un contexte totalement inédit, les idiots utiles. (…) Autrefois, on m’aurait peut-être traité de «sale race», me voici devenu «raciste» et «maurrassien» parce que je veux acquitter ma dette envers l’école républicaine et que j’appelle un chat, un chat. Entre ces deux injures, mon cœur balance. Mais pas longtemps. Mon père et mes grands-parents ayant été déportés par l’État dont Maurras se faisait l’apôtre, c’est la seconde qui me semble, excusez-moi du terme mais il n’y en a pas d’autres, la plus dégueulasse. (…) J’attends d’avoir fini le livre d’Eric Zemmour pour réagir. Mais d’ores et déjà, force m’est de constater que ceux qui dénoncent jour et nuit les amalgames et les stigmatisations se jettent sur l’analyse irrecevable que Zemmour fait du régime de Vichy pour pratiquer les amalgames stigmatisants avec tous ceux qu’ils appellent les néoréactionnaires et les néomaurrassiens. Ils ont besoin que le fascisme soit fort et même hégémonique pour valider leur thèse. Le succès de Zemmour pour eux vient à point nommé. Mais je le répète, ce n’est pas être fasciste que de déplorer l’incapacité grandissante de la France à assumer sa culture. Et ce n’est surement pas être antifasciste que de se féliciter de son effondrement. Alain Finkielkraut 
Where both state and church refused to sanction discrimination—as in Denmark—internal resistance was highest. Where the state or native administrative bureaucracy began to cooperate, church resistance was critical in inhibiting obedience to authority, legitimating subversion, and/or checking collaboration directly. Church protest proved to be the single element present in every instance in which state collaboration was arrested—as in Bulgaria, France, and Romania…. The majority of Jews evaded deportation in every state occupied by or allied with Germany in which the head of the dominant church spoke out publicly against deportation before or as soon as it began. Unfortunately, the Netherlands (which I discuss extensively) did not react as would be predicted from the level of pre-war anti-Semitism. There was little leadership from the Queen and government in exile (nor from political leaders in the Netherlands) to the civil service bureaucracy which executed German orders. This led to high state cooperation in registering Jews. « The more efficient, and almost foolproof, method of Jewish identification was devised not in the Reich, but in the Netherlands, by a pre-war Dutch civil servant who traveled to Berlin with his superior’s permission to display his innovation to the Gestapo: ‘The Gestapo had pronounced his identity card even more difficult to reproduce than its German counterpart.' » Although there was early church protest in the dominant Protestant church, it was not a public nor vocal protest. Church leaders failed to inform their congregants of this as they did not read publicly their protest against the deportation of the Jews, deferring to a German request not to read it from the pulpit. Lacking leadership for resistance, the Dutch did not form a defense movement for people in hiding until the spring of 1943 when Dutchmen were threatened with deportation and forced labor in Germany. It was too late to help the Dutch Jews—by then less than half of them were left. Deák is correct that only about 20 percent of Dutch Jews were saved but he is wrong about the Bulgarian toll. About 20 percent of Jews under Bulgarian rule became victims, including the Jews in territories formerly in Greece and Yugoslavia occupied by the Bulgarian state, as he explains later in his review. Dr. Helen Fein
Helen Fein (…) rightly argues that pre-war anti-Semitism had significant influence on the fate of Jews under German occupation but, as she herself states, there were also many other factors, for instance the behavior of local church leaders, the attitude of the exile governments, and whether or not the country in question had an efficient bureaucracy. The latter, unfortunately, was the case in the Netherlands. Still, at least in my opinion, the most important factor for the treatment of Jews was whether or not a country in Nazi-dominated Europe was able to maintain a certain degree of sovereignty. In Italy, Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Finland, Vichy France, and Denmark, the governments used the Jews in bargaining with the Nazis and then with the Allies. The lives of Jews were sacrificed or spared depending on which of the two external forces the government wanted to please. In the utterly defeated countries such as Norway and the Netherlands, which were without a government and without any sovereignty, local bureaucrats and policemen did just what the Nazis wanted them to do in carrying out the elimination of the Jews. In other countries, parts of the native population assisted the Germans in killing or rounding up Jews, as happened in Poland, Ukraine, and the Baltic countries. As a result, the largest percentages of Jews survived in countries that were allied with Germany during the war. In Bulgaria, following a great deal of initial brutality and proclaimed anti-Semitic intentions, the pro-German government decided to spare the lives of Bulgarian Jews. The Germans were powerless to prevent this. As a result, so far as we know, not one of the 50,000-odd Bulgarian Jews was handed over to the Germans or killed at home, although many suffered badly in local forced labor camps. Helen Fein writes about Jews under Bulgarian rule; I wrote about the Bulgarian Jews. The 11,143 Jews that the Bulgarian regime handed over to Eichmann in 1943 lived in those parts of Greece and Yugoslavia that were occupied by the Bulgarian army; they were Yugoslav and Greek citizens and did not speak Bulgarian. The actions of leading Bulgarian officials toward the Nazis and the Jews remain a subject of intense controversy. Among them were Prime Minister Filov, Minister of Interior Gabrovski, Parliamentary Deputy Dimitur Peshev, and, most powerful and controversial of all, King Boris III. (…) We know less about Bulgaria during and just after the war than about most other European countries. Yasharoff, for instance, argues that his father, in defending Peshev, emphasized Peshev’s role as a savior of Jews and that this softened the verdict of his Communist judges. Tzvetan Todorov, the author of The Fragility of Goodness, the book I discussed in my review, believes otherwise. Yasharoff is convinced that Peshev personally ordered the local authorities to stop preparations for the deportation of the Bulgarian Jews in 1943; yet it is hard to believe that the vice-chairman of the National Assembly would have had such an authority, particularly in a country that Yasharoff calls a fascist state. But was Bulgaria truly a fascist country during the war? Yes, if we judge it by some of the actions of its police; no, if we consider that it had a functioning parliament with opposition parties, whose deputies often strongly opposed the government. However, because the government could take no major action in Bulgaria without the King’s consent, Boris III must bear responsibility both for the deportation of the Thracian and Macedonian Jews and for saving their Bulgarian counterparts. As a savior of some Jews and as the man responsible for the killing of others, Boris did not really differ greatly from such contemporary heads of state as France’s Marshal Pétain and Hungary’s Admiral Horthy. (…) The lesson of the Bulgarian story is best explained by Omer Bartov in The New Republic (August 13, 2001) when he writes: “The difference between virtue and vice is far less radical than we would like to believe. Sometimes the most effective goodness…is carried out by those who have already compromised themselves with evil, those who are members of the very organization that set the ball rolling toward the abyss.” Dimitur Peshev, who was a member of the ruling political party in Bulgaria and who voted for the original anti-Semitic laws, was such a person. István Deák
Georg Ferdinand Duckwitz, membre du parti nazi sans conviction semble-t-il, connaissait le Danemark avec lequel il avait travaillé avant guerre et parlait danois (il sera le premier Ambassadeur d’Allemagne au Danemark après guerre). Il laisse volontairement filtrer l’information -censée rester secrète- du projet de rafle et de déportation qui, à ses propres dires, lui est communiquée par Werner Best. Cela permet de prévenir du danger les populations juives lors de la cérémonie pour Roch Hachana dans les synagogues. Immédiatement, le Premier Ministre de la Suède, également informé, propose d’accueillir les Juifs du Danemark. Durant la nuit de ce qui devait être la grande rafle de plus de 6.000 juifs, moins de 500 (477 d’après Raul Hilberg, 481 d’après les documents du musée) seront trouvés à leur domicile, arrêtés et déportés à Theresienstadt. En grande majorité, les familles juives avaient été « mises à l’abri » par les voisins et les amis, chez eux. Le dimanche suivant (3 octobre) dans les églises du Danemark est lu un texte des évêques danois affirmant que la persécution est contraire à l’esprit de la religion. La grande majorité de la population danoise organisa alors, avec le concours des nombreux bateaux de pêcheurs et sous la protection de la police danoise, le passage des familles juives vers la Suède, en particulier depuis Helsingør (Elseneur). La ville suédoise qui lui fait face a alors vu doubler sa population (de 1.500 à 3.000 environ). Les transferts des personnes vers la Suède étaient payés par ceux qui le pouvaient. Lorsque les familles juives n’en avaient pas les moyens, certaines familles danoises aisées ont offert le financement. Des entreprises sont ainsi connues pour avoir participé de façon conséquente au sauvetage. Dans son livre The Miracle in Denmark: the rescue of the Jews, de 2007, Isi FOIGHEL -qui était alors un enfant- témoigne également de sa propre histoire et comment des inconnus ont payé pour son passage et celui de son frère, assuré par un garde-côte danois. Le mouvement de Résistance au Danemark a également mis en service des bateaux à travers un groupe appelé « The Sewing Club » proposant une traversée à prix modique. L’élément surprenant ensuite est le devenir des Juifs danois envoyés au camp de Theresienstadt (Terezin, près de Prague). En effet, ils n’ont pas, comme les 140.000 autres prisonniers ayant transité par Theresienstadt, été transférés dans d’autres camps –et à Auschwitz en particulier pour plus de la moitié d’entre eux, mais à l’inverse sont très majoritairement restés dans ce camp et revenus ensuite au Danemark après guerre. Les raisons sont assez floues. Pourquoi Werner Best les aurait-il protégés ? Il semble que Nils Svenningsen, au Ministère des Affaires étrangères danois (qui parlait et écrivait l’allemand) ait eu un rôle de premier plan, outre les manifestations de protestations émanant de toutes parts (du Roi bien entendu, de la Cour Suprème, des religieux, …). Nils Svenningsen ne cessa « d’interpeller » Best, réclamant des garanties, l’obligeant à une sorte de double-jeu, à tel point qu’Eichmann lui-même finit par venir à Copenhague (le 2 novembre 43). Celui-ci s’engagea alors sur la non-déportation des Juifs danois de Theresienstadt vers d’autres camps, ainsi qu’à l’autorisation de visites de personnel danois de la Croix Rouge. Durant « l’absence forcée » des Juifs danois, Hans Henrik Koch du Ministère des Affaires Sociales géra la question des logements inoccupés (des listes de biens furent établies, les loyers furent payés, …) de telle sorte que les familles les retrouvèrent à leur retour. Bien entendu il y eut des exceptions à ce tableau somme toute idyllique, elles furent néanmoins rares. L’attitude politique du Danemark fut parfois considérée comme discutable, elle parait aujourd’hui, avec le recul, surtout éminemment stratégique. Le pays signe un traité de non-agression en mai 1939 avec l’Allemagne… que celle-ci ne respecte pas, envahissant le pays en avril 1940. L’attitude politique du Danemark devient alors une forme de collaboration exigeante et raisonnée. En effet, se sachant incapable de résister à l’envahisseur (ni du point de vue du nombre, ni du point de vue de l’équipement militaire), le Danemark a sans cesse cherché une position stratégique de moindre mal qui soit tenable afin de réussir, sans entrer dans une opposition frontale qui ne pouvait que mener à la catastrophe, à imposer certaines conditions en échange d’une forme de coopération apparente. Ils ont ainsi réussi à imposer des exigences de première importance comme le refus de combattre aux côtés de l’Allemagne nazie et le refus de toute mesure discriminatoire envers les Juifs. Sonderkommando
Mon travail d’historien a simplement consisté à montrer comment 75 % des juifs vivant en France ont échappé à la déportation. Ce chiffre est connu des spécialistes mais pas des Français, comme j’ai pu m’en apercevoir au cours de mon enquête. Là où je romps avec l’explication mémorielle, c’est que le nombre de Justes français – 3 500 environ – ne peut pas expliquer à lui seul la survie d’au moins 200 000 personnes perçues comme juives. Je suis désolé de contredire, sur ce point, les présidents Jacques Chirac et François Hollande ! J’ai cherché à déplacer le regard des Justes, titre mémoriel certes important, vers ces hommes et ces femmes qui ont dû se débrouiller, plus ou moins bien, pour survivre au quotidien face à la persécution et aux arrestations.(…) Plusieurs facteurs individuels très importants entrent en compte, comme la nationalité : 90 % des Français juifs n’ont pas été déportés, contre 50 à 60 % des juifs étrangers vivant en France. Ce fut une découverte et une surprise pour moi. Les Français juifs étaient intégrés dans la société, ils parlaient français, avaient davantage de moyens financiers et pouvaient faire appel à de la famille, des amis, des voisins. Ils n’avaient d’ailleurs parfois pas conscience que la persécution pouvait les viser. La nationalité et les ressources n’expliquent cependant pas tout. C’est le point central qui se dégage de mes témoignages : une forme de solidarité fut indispensable. Prenons l’exemple de cet instituteur du nord de la France qui, voyant arriver à l’école un enfant avec l’étoile jaune, lui dit de partir avec ses parents dans le Sud, en zone dite libre, ce qu’ils feront. Là, ils seront accueillis jusqu’à la fin de la guerre par une famille d’agriculteurs. Cette famille a été reconnue comme Juste. Mais l’instituteur qui a pris quelques minutes pour parler à l’enfant juif a joué un rôle déterminant. Il ne s’agit pas d’un acte de résistance mais d’entraide. Cette solidarité des petits gestes s’est manifestée à travers quatre figures clés : l’ange gardien, l’hôtesse, le faussaire et le passeur. Ce pouvait être un agriculteur, un instituteur, une assistante sociale, un concierge, un employé des chemins de fer ou un prêtre. (…) Je souligne trois facteurs déterminants : les croyances religieuses, l’esprit républicain et le patriotisme. Le rôle pionnier des protestants est connu, en particulier à travers les pasteurs du Chambon-sur-Lignon (Haute-Loire) et la Cimade. Mais il ne faut pas oublier les initiatives précoces de catholiques comme l’abbé Devaux à Paris ou à Lyon le jésuite Pierre Chaillet, fondateur des Cahiers de Témoignage chrétien. On ne peut pas juger l’Église catholique sur le silence du pape Pie XII ou des Églises nationales : il faut aussi regarder les comportements de la base. La charité chrétienne envers son prochain l’a souvent emporté sur l’anti-judaïsme, la compassion envers les persécutés sur la stigmatisation. La protestation de Mgr Saliège, le 23 août 1942, a eu un effet multiplicateur et une dimension internationale méconnue, puisque notamment le New York Times s’en est fait l’écho. Il faudrait réévaluer notre mémoire collective sur le rôle de l’Église catholique, à l’image de Sylvie Bernay avec ses travaux sur les « diocèses refuges ». (…) Constater que 75 % des juifs de France ont été sauvés ne revient pas à exonérer le maréchal Pétain. Berlin avait stratégiquement besoin de Vichy – qu’il s’agisse du maintien de l’ordre ou de l’économie de guerre –, et Vichy aurait donc sans doute pu s’opposer aux déportations. Il n’en demeure pas moins, quelles qu’aient été les intentions d’un régime pratiquant l’antisémitisme d’État, qu’en soi, le maintien d’un appareil étatique a eu un effet positif pour la survie des juifs de France. Jacques Semelin
Il y a eu la France de Vichy, responsable de la déportation de soixante-seize mille juifs, dont onze mille enfants, mais qu’il y a eu aussi tous les hommes, toutes les femmes, grâce auxquels les trois quarts des Juifs de notre pays ont échappé à la traque. Ailleurs, aux Pays Bas, en Grèce, 80% des Juifs ont été arrêtés et exterminés dans les camps. Dans aucun pays occupé par les nazis, à l’exception du Danemark, il n’y a eu un élan de solidarité comparable à ce qui s’est passé chez nous. Simone Veil
À l’été 1943, quand Vichy a voulu dénaturaliser des juifs naturalisés après 1927, l’église catholique a menacé de protester publiquement. Et Vichy a renoncé à ce projet. Vichy aurait pu dire «non» en 1942 pour l’ensemble des juifs. Vichy n’a en rien sauvé des juifs. La France n’avait pas à livrer des juifs. Vichy a arrêté les juifs non seulement en zone occupée mais aussi en zone libre.  Klarsfeld (Actualités juives)
La droite mourut d’un crime majoritairement commis par la gauche (hormis les communistes, bien sûr, mais à partir de juin 1941). Eric Zemmour
[La thèse de Paxton] repose sur la malfaisance absolue du régime de Vichy, reconnu à la fois responsable et coupable. L’action de Vichy est toujours nuisible et tous ses chefs sont condamnables. (…) [Alain Michel] reprend, en l’étayant, l’intuition des premiers historiens du vichysme, et montre comment un pouvoir antisémite, cherchant à limiter l’influence juive sur la société par un statut des Juifs inique, infâme et cruel, et obsédé par le départ des Juifs étrangers – pour l’Amérique, pense d’abord Laval qui, devant le refus des Américains, accepte de les envoyer à l’Est, comme le lui affirment alors les Allemands -, réussit à sauver les « vieux Israélites français ». (…) Michel ne veut nullement réhabiliter Vichy. Il dénonce sans ambages ce statut des Juifs qui, dès octobre 1940, fait des Israélites des citoyens de seconde zone; mais il ose aller au-delà de l’émotion et de la condamnation légitimes, pour creuser les contradictions d’un pouvoir pétainiste et distinguer entre morale et efficacité politique, qui ne vont pas forcément de pair. Il glisse de la complexité dans une histoire qui appelle le manichéisme; il n’approuve pas les présupposés antisémites de Vichy, mais il reprend tout de même la ligne de défense de ses responsables à la Libération. Eric Zemmour
Quel rôle joua le régime de Vichy dans l’application de « la Solution finale de la question juive » ? Depuis trente ans, en France, l’affaire semble entendue : le régime de Vichy a été un complice actif du génocide perpétré par les nazis. Pourtant, face à cette thèse officielle, des pierres d’achoppement subsistent : comment expliquer, en effet, que 75% des Juifs vivant en France pendant la guerre aient pu échapper à la Shoah ? Et comment expliquer, aussi, que la France fut le pays d’Europe où les réseaux de sauvetage juifs furent les plus nombreux, les plus actifs et les plus efficaces ? Autant de « paradoxes français ». Fort d’une première étude sur les Éclaireurs israélites de France pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale et fin connaisseur des recherches internationales sur la Shoah, Alain Michel reprend le dossier à sa source. Il présente des chiffres et pose des questions qui dérangent. Ainsi, l’antisémitisme de Vichy, qui distinguait Juifs nationaux et Juifs étrangers, a-t-il vraiment poursuivi les mêmes objectifs que les nazis ? L’existence même du gouvernement de Vichy a-t-elle permis, ou non, de ralentir la machine génocidaire ? Peut-on expliquer l’ampleur des sauvetages, comme le fit le président Jacques Chirac en juillet 1995, par la seule action courageuse des Français qui auraient ainsi pallié les errements de leur gouvernement ? Des questions souvent ignorées du public français et des réponses qui bouleversent notre connaissance de la Shoah en France. Vichy et la Shoah
Je n’aurais pas fait la présentation de cette manière-là, concernant le chapitre sur la France de Vichy. Zemmour parle comme le polémiste qu’il est. Mais il respecte globalement l’approche qui est faite dans mon livre. (…) Ce n’est pas Pétain mais le gouvernement de Vichy. Cette politique – approuvée par Pétain – a été essentiellement menée par Pierre Laval, secondé par René Bousquet. Pétain était quelqu’un qui avait un vrai fond d’antisémitisme, qui n’existait pas, à mon sens, chez Laval et Bousquet. L’expression de Zemmour est maladroite. Il aurait fallu dire « entre 90 et 92% », et contrairement à ce qu’affirme Serge Klarsfeld, je ne pense pas que l’on puisse attribuer ces chiffres à la seule action des « Justes parmi les nations », mais principalement à la politique appliquée par le gouvernement de Vichy, qui a freiné l’application de la solution finale en France. (…)  Depuis le début des années 1980, il est très difficile d’exprimer des idées sur le plan historique qui vont à contre-sens de la pensée de Paxton. Certains chercheurs ont arrêté de travailler sur le sujet, car le poids de cette doxa les empêchait de travailler librement. C’est un problème sur le plan de la recherche historique. On peut être en désaccord sur ce que j’écris dans mon livre – considérer que la vérité est plus du côté de Paxton ou Klarsfeld – mais le débat historique doit être libre. Il ne l’est pas aujourd’hui en France. (…) Poliakov est revenu sur ses écrits en 1989, écrivant à nouveau que Laval n’avait jamais été antisémite. C’est l’historien de l’antisémitisme, je pense que l’on peut lui accorder un certain crédit. De la même façon, Hilberg a publié trois éditions de son livre. Il cite d’ailleurs Paxton et Klarsfeld à titre documentaire seulement, et jamais concernant leur analyse, ce qui montre bien son désaccord avec eux. (…) Dans son interview à Rue 89, il y a une série d’erreurs stupéfiantes, notamment sur les dates des déportations en France, où sur la durée de l’occupation en France et en Italie… Le gouvernement de Vichy avait bien sûr beaucoup de torts, était antisémite, mais je pense qu’il faut rééquilibrer la question et cesser de faire un récit en noir et blanc, qui diabolise Vichy et innocente les Français.  (…) Je pense que ce qui caractérise cette période, c’est avant tout l’indifférence totale des Français. Les gens n’avaient rien à faire du sort des juifs, cela ne les dérangeait pas trop, parce qu’il existait une ambiance antisémite en France et en Europe depuis les années 1930 environ. (…) Il y a encore des archives non utilisées, ni consultées. Il faut réfléchir à nouveau à ce qu’il s’est passé durant ces années, analyser l’action de Vichy avant de poser des condamnations absolues. Je déteste les dirigeants de Vichy et n’ait aucune sympathie pour ces gens-là, mais je suis historien et nous ne faisons pas un travail d’avocat à charge. Nous devons déterminer le cours des événements et ce qu’a été la vérité historique.(…) Le statut des juifs les a affaiblis quand la solution finale s’est déclenchée. Que cela ait eu des conséquences indirectes, c’est une chose, mais ce n’est pas pour ça que l’on peut dire que Vichy a sacrifié des juifs français. Le statut des juifs était antisémite, mais n’avait aucune volonté d’extermination. Il y avait en revanche une forte xénophobie vis-à-vis des juifs étrangers, et en répondant aux demandes allemandes pour livrer ces gens-là, Vichy s’est rendu complice de leur extermination. (…) La majorité des adultes étaient des juifs étrangers, et la question de leurs enfants s’est logiquement posée. Les Allemands se sont en effet aperçus qu’ils n’allaient pas remplir leurs objectifs et ont décidé d’incorporer les enfants, sur une idée de Theodor Dannecker, le bras droit de Eichmann à Paris. L’administration française n’a appris ces changements qu’au dernier moment, et elle a dû s’y plier en vertu des accords signés avec l’occupant. Cette question est donc directement liée à la volonté allemande, même si l’administration française a participé à cet acte absolument horrible. (…) Certaines conceptions sont devenues des classiques, et on les enseigne dans les écoles et à l’université. Contrairement à l’Allemagne, Israël ou les Etats-Unis, où des débats existent sur la question de la Shoah, tout le monde parle d’une même voix en France. C’est devenu un problème affectif et idéologique. Il faut rendre cette question à l’histoire, car même si la mémoire est évidemment très importante, elle ne doit pas empêcher l’histoire d’avancer. Alain Michel
Quand les déportations commencent, et surtout au moment de la rafle de décembre 1941 au cours de laquelle plus de 700 juifs, souvent des notables, y compris un sénateur, ont été arrêtés – pour une fois – directement par les Allemands, cela a été un scandale : tout le monde a pris conscience de la faiblesse du régime de Vichy. A partir de ce moment, du printemps 1942, mais pas avant, le régime s’efforce de laisser partir en premier les juifs étrangers et apatrides. Ce n’est pas une question morale, mais Laval et Pétain ont conscience de ce qui se joue en terme de souveraineté. Laval continue de dire que les réfugiés juifs font du mal à la France et explique aux Américains et autres, aux évêques ou aux pasteurs qu’il a l’intention de se débarrasser de ces étrangers… Il essaye alors de persuader les Allemands de prendre d’abord les étrangers et les apatrides. Les Allemands répondent : « Bon, on va faire comme en Belgique, on prend les étrangers d’abord. Mais comprenez bien qu’on prendra les Français plus tard… » Mais c’est leur bon vouloir. (…) Laval a obtenu un report. Mais sans qu’il n’existe d’accord : les Allemands ont accepté, de leur propre décision, de prendre les étrangers en premier. C’est donc ridicule de soutenir que Vichy a protégé les juifs de nationalité française : pendant les deux premières années, Vichy a fait tout son possible pour fragiliser cette population, les excluant des emplois publics, mettant des quotas dans certaines professions, confisquant leurs propriétés, bloquant l’accès à l’université de leurs enfants… Et quand vient l’heure des déportations, ces juifs sont horriblement fragilisés, encore plus susceptibles d’être traqués… Certes, Vichy a essayé sur le tard de sauver les apparences, en encourageant le report des déportations à plus tard… Mais il n’y a pas eu d’accord. (…)  En Italie, 16% ont été déportés. Les fonctionnaires italiens et les policiers italiens n’ont pas aidé à la déportation. Si l’Italie a été occupée plus tardivement que la France, l’occupation de l’Italie a duré longtemps après la libération de la France – le nord de l’Italie a été occupée deux mois de moins que le sud de la France, ce n’est pas beaucoup (septembre 1943 à mai 1945, contre novembre 1942 à août 1944 ndlr). (…) Ce chiffre de 25% de juifs déportés, dont de nombreux juifs français, est déplorable, il n’y a pas de quoi pousser des cocoricos. Je ne vois aucune raison de changer mon avis selon lequel le régime de Vichy a commis des actes terribles contre tous les juifs, y compris les juifs de nationalité française. Les livres [de Raul Hilberg et Léon Poliakov] sont très honorables, mais très anciens : ils n’avaient pas accès à l’ensemble de la recherche réalisée sur ces sujets. Alain Michel n’est pas un historien sérieux : on ne peut pas écrire ce qu’il a écrit si on a lu les textes de Vichy et les ouvrages récents sur l’application de ces textes. Robert Paxton
Pétain, quelles que soient ses intentions et la façon dont il se voit lui-même, est avant tout un instrument aux mains de Hitler. En traitant au moment de l’armistice avec le « vainqueur de Verdun », chef de l’armée française en 1918, le dictateur nazi donne aux Français le plus convaincant des professeurs de résignation. Jusqu’à l’offensive contre l’URSS déclenchée le 22 juin 1941, Hitler persécute les Juifs sans en tuer beaucoup, à l’exception de la Pologne occupée. L’ère des massacres systématiques s’ouvre avec l’invasion de la Russie, et débouche à la fin de 1941 sur la décision du meurtre de tous les Juifs accessibles aux griffes allemandes. La conférence de Wannsee, le 20 janvier 1942, planifie l’entreprise sous la direction de Reinhard Heydrich. Ce dernier séjourne à Paris du 5 au 11 mai, et s’entend avec un gouvernement Laval mis en place à Vichy par l’ambassadeur Abetz le 18 avril précédent. Après son départ, les discussions se prolongent principalement entre René Bousquet, chef de la police au ministère de l’Intérieur de Vichy, et Carl Oberg, chef des SS en France. Elles aboutissent à une entente suivant laquelle Vichy exerce une pleine autorité sur la police de zone nord, moyennant une participation à la déportation des Juifs. On se met d’accord pour arrêter d’abord les Juifs étrangers. C’est ainsi qu’ont lieu la rafle dite du Vel d’Hiv, le 16 juillet, et la livraison de 7000 Juifs parqués dans des camps de zone sud. En septembre, les SS demandent qu’on passe à la déportation des Juifs français et le gouvernement de Vichy renâcle en invoquant notamment l’opposition voyante du clergé catholique : l’archevêque de Toulouse, Mgr Saliège, a donné le branle le 23 août en dénonçant en chaire l’atrocité des rafles en zone sud (« Dans notre diocèse, des scènes d’épouvante ont eu lieu dans les camps de Noé et de Récébédou »). Soudain, le 25 septembre, arrive un contrordre, connu par une lettre de Knochen (l’adjoint d’Oberg) : les déportations de Juifs français sont provisoirement suspendues, par ordre de Himmler. Or le chef des SS a rencontré Hitler trois jours plus tôt et probablement pris cette décision en concertation avec lui. Il en ressort que, n’en déplaise à Zemmour, Vichy n’a pas convenu avec l’Allemagne que la persécution se limiterait aux Juifs étrangers. Le taux de survie très inférieur de ces derniers doit tout aux circonstances, et aux priorités de l’occupant. En septembre 1942, la montée en puissance des États-Unis pousse l’Allemagne à envisager l’occupation de la zone sud française, tandis que la situation sur le front russe et en Afrique du Nord ne permet guère d’en distraire des troupes : il faut simplifier au maximum la tâche des quelques divisions allemandes qui seront chargées du travail. Il sied d’autre part de redonner à Pétain un peu de lustre « national » afin qu’il prêche une fois de plus aux Français la résignation en prétendant défendre au mieux leurs intérêts. Il faut donc cesser d’isoler la question de la Shoah en France de celle des rapports de force mondiaux, comme d’attribuer à Vichy un rôle dans la survie plus importante des Juifs français. En revanche, il n’est pas juste non plus (comme le font Paxton et Serge Klarsfeld, justement critiqués sur ce point par Zemmour) d’attribuer cette survie à l’action salvatrice de la population française, en l’opposant radicalement au gouvernement. On en viendrait à prétendre que Vichy n’était pas dictatorial, ou pas en mesure d’imposer ses décisions à ses administrés. Titulaires ou non par la suite de la médaille des Justes, les Français qui ont donné un coup de main dans le sauvetage savaient que les autorités qui auraient pu s’y opposer n’y mettaient pas, du gendarme au ministre, autant de zèle que l’occupant, sinon sous une pression nazie directe ou avec l’espoir, à certains moments, d’obtenir quelque avantage en flattant les lubies raciales de cet occupant. Pétain l’impuissant n’a pas mis en sécurité le moindre Juif ; il n’a jamais fait que marchander en position inférieure, jouer avec des dés pipés par l’adversaire et accumuler des choix scabreux à visée immédiate. François Delpla
Paradoxically, Mr. Zemmour often exercises his right to free speech to endorse stricter limits on similar freedoms. He advocates a return to authorizing only Christian first names for children born in France, a restriction lifted in 1993; his ancestors in Algeria had adopted French names, he noted. And he hailed the ban on the public wearing of the full facial veil as a way “to oblige people to become authentically French.” “The state needs to do its job, which it’s always done, of imposing constraints,” he said. “For me, France is the ban on the veil.” He says that his views are those of a silent majority, French people who seek the return of the resplendent France of de Gaulle, a proud, imagined France unencumbered by the guilt of the post-colonial era. Efforts to integrate the country’s immigrant populations have plainly failed, he said, and the country ought to revert to the “assimilationist” approach he says it abandoned decades ago. “We believe that we have the best way of life in the world, the best culture, and that one must thus make an effort to acquire this culture,” he said. By contrast, he said, the notion of a country made great by the diversity of its people and values “is an American logic.” Asked why he believes in the superiority of the French model, he said only that “there is a singular art of living” in France. “For me, France is civilization with a capital ‘C,’ ” he added. The groups that have taken him to court have been urging an American social vision, he said. Yet, he added, they are not also willing to endorse American standards of free speech, and they oppose the taking of American-style ethnic statistics. “I’m taking — because they forced it on me — the American model, and I’m throwing the American model back in their face,” Mr. Zemmour said. “But in the name of French tradition.” NYT

Attention: une polémique peut en cacher une autre !

Alors que n’ayant pu le coincer sur  les chiffres de la délinquance ou l’implication massive et jusque là largement ignorée de la gauche dans la collaboration

C’est sur sa « défense de Pétain » dans son nouveau livre et véritable phénomène éditorial que nos donneurs de leçons patentés de l’antiracisme se ruent pour faire tomber l’empêcheur de tourner en rond gaullo-bonapartiste Eric Zemmour …

Comment avec l’auteur du livre sur lequel l’impétrant s’est appuyé, le rabbin Alain Michel …

Ne pas voir que, loin de défendre le régime vichyste et malgré une évidente maladresse de présentation, notre polémiste ne fait que reprendre une analyse largement déjà évoquée par d’autres chercheurs ?

A savoir que pour expliquer les quelque 75% de « sauvetage » des juifs français (à comparer par exemple avec les 20% des Pays-Bas ou les 30% du Pétain hongrois) …

Il entre probablement pour une part au-delà de l’indéniable action de la population dite des « Justes » et des circonstances d’une armée allemande de plus en plus menacée de surextension impériale

La stratégie vichyste, certes peu glorieuse et tardive de véritable « préférence nationale », de livraison aux nazis de ses juifs étrangers (leurs enfants nés en France compris) en lieu et place de la majorité des « vieux juifs français » ?

Mais peut-être surtout, comme l’ont bien montré les travaux d’Helen Fein ou Diane Wolf reprenant les chiffrages certes anciens d’Hilberg, le cas particulier d’un phénomène plus général pour le reste de l’Europe …

A savoir qu’entre un pays à résistance intérieure maximale avec refus de coopération tant de l’Etat que de l’Eglise comme le Danemark qui sauva quasiment tous ses juifs …

Et des pays à résistance minimale suite à l’exil ou la destruction systématique de leurs élites  comme les Pays-Bas ou la Pologne qui perdirent entre 80 et 100% de leurs juifs …

C’est dans les pays les plus collaborationnistes, autrement dit ayant conservé un certain degré de souveraineté nationale comme la Bulgarie qui sauva près de 100% de ses juifs nationaux au prix elle aussi de « ses juifs étrangers » (thraces et grecs des territoires qu’elle avait envahis) …

Mais gardé aussi une présence importante et active de leurs élites (notamment religieuses) …

Que les juifs ont finalement été les plus préservés ?

« Le livre de Zemmour ne me concerne pas »
Le JDD
13 octobre 2014

INTERVIEW – Historien français et rabbin vivant en Israël, Alain Michel est l’auteur de Vichy et la Shoah, enquête sur le paradoxe français, dont les idées sont largement reprises par Eric Zemmour. Il plaide pour que s’ouvre un « débat historique » sur la question, jugeant que le l’historiographie de la Shoah est figée en France.

Eric Zemmour reprend vos idées au service d’un ouvrage très politique et idéologique – Le suicide français. N’est-ce pas gênant pour l’historien que vous êtes?
Je ne suis pas responsable de l’utilisation que l’on fait de ce que j’avance, à partir du moment où l’on ne déforme pas ce que j’écris. Le livre d’Eric Zemmour reprend ses idées, ses approches, et cela ne me concerne pas. Je n’aurais pas fait la présentation de cette manière-là, concernant le chapitre sur la France de Vichy. Zemmour parle comme le polémiste qu’il est. Mais il respecte globalement l’approche qui est faite dans mon livre. Je n’ai pas à censurer quelqu’un en raison de ses idées tant que cela reste globalement dans le consensus démocratique.

Peut-on dire, comme Eric Zemmour, que « Pétain a sauvé 95% des juifs français »?
Non, ce n’est pas Pétain mais le gouvernement de Vichy. Cette politique – approuvée par Pétain – a été essentiellement menée par Pierre Laval, secondé par René Bousquet. Pétain était quelqu’un qui avait un vrai fond d’antisémitisme, qui n’existait pas, à mon sens, chez Laval et Bousquet. L’expression de Zemmour est maladroite. Il aurait fallu dire « entre 90 et 92% », et contrairement à ce qu’affirme Serge Klarsfeld, je ne pense pas que l’on puisse attribuer ces chiffres à la seule action des « Justes parmi les nations », mais principalement à la politique appliquée par le gouvernement de Vichy, qui a freiné l’application de la solution finale en France.

Existe-t-il une doxa paxtonienne (du nom de Robert Paxton, historien américain dont les recherches sur la France de Vichy font référence), comme le répète Eric Zemmour?
Oui, je pense qu’il a tout à fait raison de ce point de vue-là, malheureusement. Depuis le début des années 1980, il est très difficile d’exprimer des idées sur le plan historique qui vont à contre-sens de la pensée de Paxton. Certains chercheurs ont arrêté de travailler sur le sujet, car le poids de cette doxa les empêchait de travailler librement. C’est un problème sur le plan de la recherche historique. On peut être en désaccord sur ce que j’écris dans mon livre – considérer que la vérité est plus du côté de Paxton ou Klarsfeld – mais le débat historique doit être libre. Il ne l’est pas aujourd’hui en France.

«Je déteste les dirigeants de Vichy, mais je suis historien et nous ne faisons pas un travail d’avocat à charge»

Les ouvrages de Leon Poliakov (Bréviaire de la haine : le IIIe Reich et les juifs) et Raul Hilberg (La destruction des juifs d’Europe), auxquels vous vous référencez, sont anciens, et ont été écrits sans qu’ils aient eu accès à l’ensemble de la recherche sur le sujet, ce que vous reproche Paxton notamment…
C’est une inexactitude totale. Poliakov est revenu sur ses écrits en 1989, écrivant à nouveau que Laval n’avait jamais été antisémite. C’est l’historien de l’antisémitisme, je pense que l’on peut lui accorder un certain crédit. De la même façon, Hilberg a publié trois éditions de son livre. Il cite d’ailleurs Paxton et Klarsfeld à titre documentaire seulement, et jamais concernant leur analyse, ce qui montre bien son désaccord avec eux.

Que répondez-vous à Robert Paxton, qui affirme que vous n’êtes pas un historien sérieux?
Un historien sérieux n’est pas là pour distribuer les bonnes et mauvaises notes aux autres chercheurs. Il doit amener des faits. Dans son interview à Rue 89, il y a une série d’erreurs stupéfiantes, notamment sur les dates des déportations en France, où sur la durée de l’occupation en France et en Italie… Le gouvernement de Vichy avait bien sûr beaucoup de torts, était antisémite, mais je pense qu’il faut rééquilibrer la question et cesser de faire un récit en noir et blanc, qui diabolise Vichy et innocente les Français.

Que voulez-vous dire?
Je pense que ce qui caractérise cette période, c’est avant tout l’indifférence totale des Français. Les gens n’avaient rien à faire du sort des juifs, cela ne les dérangeait pas trop, parce qu’il existait une ambiance antisémite en France et en Europe depuis les années 1930 environ.

Qu’implique un « réexamen du régime de Vichy », que vous appeliez de vos voeux dans votre livre?
Il y a encore des archives non utilisées, ni consultées. Il faut réfléchir à nouveau à ce qu’il s’est passé durant ces années, analyser l’action de Vichy avant de poser des condamnations absolues. Je déteste les dirigeants de Vichy et n’ait aucune sympathie pour ces gens-là, mais je suis historien et nous ne faisons pas un travail d’avocat à charge. Nous devons déterminer le cours des événements et ce qu’a été la vérité historique.

«Il faut rendre la question de la Shoah à l’histoire»

Comment dire que Vichy a « protégé la majorité des juifs français », quand le statut des juifs de 1940 et 1941 les excluait de la plupart des professions et les condamnait à la misère, avec un statut de citoyen de seconde zone?
Le statut des juifs les a affaiblis quand la solution finale s’est déclenchée. Que cela ait eu des conséquences indirectes, c’est une chose, mais ce n’est pas pour ça que l’on peut dire que Vichy a sacrifié des juifs français. Le statut des juifs était antisémite, mais n’avait aucune volonté d’extermination. Il y avait en revanche une forte xénophobie vis-à-vis des juifs étrangers, et en répondant aux demandes allemandes pour livrer ces gens-là, Vichy s’est rendu complice de leur extermination.

Les enfants victimes de la rafle du Vel d’Hiv étaient, pour la plupart, nés en France et déclarés Français…
La majorité des adultes étaient des juifs étrangers, et la question de leurs enfants s’est logiquement posée. Les Allemands se sont en effet aperçus qu’ils n’allaient pas remplir leurs objectifs et ont décidé d’incorporer les enfants, sur une idée de Theodor Dannecker, le bras droit de Eichmann à Paris. L’administration française n’a appris ces changements qu’au dernier moment, et elle a dû s’y plier en vertu des accords signés avec l’occupant. Cette question est donc directement liée à la volonté allemande, même si l’administration française a participé à cet acte absolument horrible.

Vous estimez que l’historiographie de la Shoah est figée, que voulez-vous dire?
Certaines conceptions sont devenues des classiques, et on les enseigne dans les écoles et à l’université. Contrairement à l’Allemagne, Israël ou les Etats-Unis, où des débats existent sur la question de la Shoah, tout le monde parle d’une même voix en France. C’est devenu un problème affectif et idéologique. Il faut rendre cette question à l’histoire, car même si la mémoire est évidemment très importante, elle ne doit pas empêcher l’histoire d’avancer.

Voir aussi:

Jacques Semelin : « 75 % des juifs vivant en France ont échappé à la déportation »
Jacques Semelin, directeur de recherches CERI-CNRS, publie « Persécutions et entraides dans la France occupée » (1).
La Croix
21/3/13


L’historien analyse pour la première fois comment 75 % des juifs de France ont échappé à la mort.

En quoi votre ouvrage, riche de témoignages et d’archives, entend-il réévaluer notre regard sur l’histoire de la Shoah en France ?

Jacques Semelin : Dans notre mémoire collective, les juifs qui ont échappé à la mort sont ceux qui sont revenus de déportation. Mon propos n’est ni de minimiser l’horreur du génocide de 25 % des juifs de France ni de raconter une « histoire rose » du sauvetage des juifs en France. Mes témoins ont perdu des êtres chers durant cette période.

Mon travail d’historien a simplement consisté à montrer comment 75 % des juifs vivant en France ont échappé à la déportation. Ce chiffre est connu des spécialistes mais pas des Français, comme j’ai pu m’en apercevoir au cours de mon enquête.

Là où je romps avec l’explication mémorielle, c’est que le nombre de Justes français – 3 500 environ – ne peut pas expliquer à lui seul la survie d’au moins 200 000 personnes perçues comme juives. Je suis désolé de contredire, sur ce point, les présidents Jacques Chirac et François Hollande ! J’ai cherché à déplacer le regard des Justes, titre mémoriel certes important, vers ces hommes et ces femmes qui ont dû se débrouiller, plus ou moins bien, pour survivre au quotidien face à la persécution et aux arrestations.

Quelle part a joué l’entraide individuelle dans cette survie ?

Plusieurs facteurs individuels très importants entrent en compte, comme la nationalité : 90 % des Français juifs n’ont pas été déportés, contre 50 à 60 % des juifs étrangers vivant en France. Ce fut une découverte et une surprise pour moi. Les Français juifs étaient intégrés dans la société, ils parlaient français, avaient davantage de moyens financiers et pouvaient faire appel à de la famille, des amis, des voisins. Ils n’avaient d’ailleurs parfois pas conscience que la persécution pouvait les viser.

La nationalité et les ressources n’expliquent cependant pas tout. C’est le point central qui se dégage de mes témoignages : une forme de solidarité fut indispensable. Prenons l’exemple de cet instituteur du nord de la France qui, voyant arriver à l’école un enfant avec l’étoile jaune, lui dit de partir avec ses parents dans le Sud, en zone dite libre, ce qu’ils feront.

Là, ils seront accueillis jusqu’à la fin de la guerre par une famille d’agriculteurs. Cette famille a été reconnue comme Juste. Mais l’instituteur qui a pris quelques minutes pour parler à l’enfant juif a joué un rôle déterminant. Il ne s’agit pas d’un acte de résistance mais d’entraide.

Cette solidarité des petits gestes s’est manifestée à travers quatre figures clés : l’ange gardien, l’hôtesse, le faussaire et le passeur. Ce pouvait être un agriculteur, un instituteur, une assistante sociale, un concierge, un employé des chemins de fer ou un prêtre.

La religion a-t-elle joué un rôle dans cette solidarité ?

Je souligne trois facteurs déterminants : les croyances religieuses, l’esprit républicain et le patriotisme. Le rôle pionnier des protestants est connu, en particulier à travers les pasteurs du Chambon-sur-Lignon (Haute-Loire) et la Cimade.

Mais il ne faut pas oublier les initiatives précoces de catholiques comme l’abbé Devaux à Paris ou à Lyon le jésuite Pierre Chaillet, fondateur des Cahiers de Témoignage chrétien. On ne peut pas juger l’Église catholique sur le silence du pape Pie XII ou des Églises nationales : il faut aussi regarder les comportements de la base.

La charité chrétienne envers son prochain l’a souvent emporté sur l’anti-judaïsme, la compassion envers les persécutés sur la stigmatisation. La protestation de Mgr Saliège, le 23 août 1942, a eu un effet multiplicateur et une dimension internationale méconnue, puisque notamment le New York Times s’en est fait l’écho. Il faudrait réévaluer notre mémoire collective sur le rôle de l’Église catholique, à l’image de Sylvie Bernay avec ses travaux sur les « diocèses refuges » .

L’argument du nombre de Français juifs sauvés n’est-il pas, déjà, le principal argument des défenseurs du maréchal Pétain ?

Constater que 75 % des juifs de France ont été sauvés ne revient pas à exonérer le maréchal Pétain. Berlin avait stratégiquement besoin de Vichy – qu’il s’agisse du maintien de l’ordre ou de l’économie de guerre –, et Vichy aurait donc sans doute pu s’opposer aux déportations. Il n’en demeure pas moins, quelles qu’aient été les intentions d’un régime pratiquant l’antisémitisme d’État, qu’en soi, le maintien d’un appareil étatique a eu un effet positif pour la survie des juifs de France.

Qu’est-ce qui vous a conduit à travailler sur ce sujet ?

C’est Simone Veil qui m’a décidé, en 2008, à me lancer dans cette vaste fresque, opérant ainsi un lien entre mes deux domaines de recherches, la résistance civile et les massacres de masse. Le plus grand défi intellectuel et émotionnel consistait à articuler la grande histoire et les histoires individuelles. Mes rencontres avec les survivants m’ont porté pour raconter des histoires de vie, et finalement la vie au-delà de la souffrance.

(1) Les Arènes, Éd. du Seuil, 912 pages, 29 €.
RECUEILLI PAR LAURENT DE BOISSIEU

Voir encore:

Polémique Zemmour : « Vichy, une collaboration active et lamentable »
Robert Paxton
Le Monde
18.10.2014

Dans sa longue complainte sur le déclin de la France, Eric Zemmour laisse percer un mince rayon de lumière : au moins la France de Vichy parvint-elle à sauver 75 % des juifs de France du monstre nazi…

Il est difficile de croire qu’il a véritablement lu les statuts de Vichy concernant les juifs. Aucune « préférence nationale » n’y apparaît. Toutes les mesures de Vichy concernant les juifs visaient autant les citoyens français que les immigrés, mise à part celle du 4 octobre 1940 ordonnant l’internement des « ressortissants étrangers de race juive ». Certaines dispositions, il est vrai, furent prises afin d’exempter les vétérans de guerre et les juifs qui avaient rendu à la France des services particuliers (qui n’étaient pas nécessairement citoyens français), ainsi que des familles installées dans l’Hexagone depuis cinq générations. Dans les faits, toutefois, peu de personnes bénéficièrent de ces exemptions, et il arriva que certaines d’entre elles finissent par être déportées.

Le régime de Vichy appliqua ses mesures de restriction aux juifs avec zèle. Des chercheurs français établirent le chiffre précis de ceux qui furent exclus de la fonction publique et interdits d’exercer leur profession. La commission Mattéoli a déterminé très exactement combien d’entre eux furent victimes de spoliations. Les juifs français, davantage intégrés que les immigrés, ont particulièrement souffert de ces mesures. Lorsque les déportations débutèrent, ils étaient déjà extrêmement fragilisés par la perte de leurs professions et de leurs biens.

ANTISÉMITISME CULTUREL FRANÇAIS

Les juifs assimilés comme Léon Blum furent les cibles d’un opprobre tout particulier. Xavier Vallat, le premier commissaire général aux questions juives, brouillait la différence existant prétendument entre l’antisémitisme culturel français et l’antisémitisme racial allemand. Vallat était convaincu que des juifs comme Blum, bien que nés français, étaient fondamentalement incapables de devenir d’authentiques Français.

Tous les historiens ayant travaillé sérieusement sur la France de Vichy détectent un changement à l’été 1942. Lorsque la « solution finale » commença à être mise en œuvre en France, avec les arrestations de masse, et la séparation des mères de leurs enfants. Même ceux qui s’étaient récemment plaints du nombre trop élevé à leurs yeux d’immigrés montrèrent de la répulsion. Cinq évêques dénoncèrent ces arrestations. Pierre Laval, le chef du gouvernement, n’obtint qu’un report de l’arrestation des juifs français. Les Allemands acceptèrent de déporter en priorité les juifs étrangers, pourvu que la police française assure un nombre suffisant pour remplir les trains. Ils dirent toujours très clairement à Laval qu’ils finiraient par s’occuper des juifs français aussi. Il n’y eut jamais aucun accord, ni écrit ni oral, sur cette question.

En fin de compte, les Allemands s’emparèrent de tous ceux qu’ils purent, français ou non. Un tiers des 76 000 juifs déportés était des citoyens français, dont, il est vrai, des enfants nés en France de parents immigrés. L’extermination de 25 % des juifs de France ne fut pas une issue positive. La France avait bien plus de possibilités de dissimuler les juifs que la Belgique et les Pays-Bas, où la présence allemande était plus forte. L’exemple de l’Italie permet d’établir une meilleure comparaison. L’occupation allemande y débuta plus tard, mais se termina plus tard aussi, en mai 1945. Ne pouvant compter ni sur l’aide de l’Etat italien ni sur celui de sa police, les nazis ne furent en mesure de mettre la main que sur 16 % des juifs d’Italie. Si en France la police de Vichy participa activement aux arrestations, elle le fit avec de moins en moins de zèle à partir du début de l’année 1943.

Plus stupéfiant encore, le régime de Vichy envoya spontanément 10 000 juifs étrangers de la zone libre de l’autre côté de la ligne de démarcation pour les livrer à une mort certaine. Une telle mesure n’eut pas d’équivalent en Europe de l’Ouest, et n’en eut que peu en Europe de l’Est. On peut tenter d’expliquer ce zèle en l’interprétant comme une réaction à l’avalanche de réfugiés dans les années 1930. La France en accueillit proportionnellement plus que les Etats-Unis, mais pas davantage en nombre absolu, comme le prétend M. Zemmour. Après 1940, Vichy tenta de convaincre l’Allemagne de « reprendre » ses réfugiés. Au printemps 1942, Berlin obtempéra et put compter sur le plein concours de Vichy.

DES GENS DE BIEN

Bien comprendre la situation allemande permet de saisir l’importance pour eux de la collaboration policière française. Une constante pénurie de main-d’œuvre sévissait en Allemagne. Engagée dans des combats de grande ampleur sur le front de l’Est, elle comptait en France sur Vichy et sa police pour combler ce manque. Ce fait n’est pas de mon invention, contrairement à ce qu’insinue M. Zemmour ; il ressort avec évidence des archives allemandes. « Etant donné que Berlin ne peut pas détacher du personnel », écrivit le 7 juillet 1943 Heinz Röthke, l’officiel chargé de diriger les actions allemandes contre les juifs, « l’action [d’arrestation de juifs] devra être exécutée presque exclusivement avec des forces de la police française ».

Il existe, dans cette lamentable histoire, quelque chose dont il est permis de se féliciter. Je pense ici aux efforts que menèrent de nombreux Français pour venir en aide aux juifs, particulièrement aux enfants. Michael R. Marrus et moi-même leur avons dédié notre ouvrage paru en 1981, Vichy et les Juifs (Calmann-Lévy), car nous ne concevions pas que la critique de Vichy puisse équivaloir à une critique de la France et des Français (comme le pense Zemmour). L’aide humanitaire apportée aux juifs ne fut pas une spécificité française, mais elle joua un rôle important reconnu par Vichy qui traqua et arrêta parfois ces gens de bien.

Le livre d’Eric Zemmour rencontre le succès parce qu’il exploite avec habileté la peur du déclin. Le lecteur est porté par sa verve, son talent pour l’invective, son don de conteur et son goût de la provocation. Mais tout ce qui est abordé dans ce livre l’est au travers des verres déformants. Sa nostalgie de l’autorité masculine ne fait guère de proposition constructive pour surmonter les problèmes du moment. Je ne crois pas qu’ils seront nombreux à vouloir sérieusement revenir à l’époque d’avant 1965 alors que les femmes ne pouvaient ouvrir un compte en banque sans l’autorisation de leurs maris, un changement que Zemmour semble regretter. Une fois que l’énergie criarde de ce livre aura fait son petit effet, l’engouement du moment disparaîtra.

Vues de l’étranger, les idées noires exploitées par Zemmour ne semblent pas si exceptionnelles. Jadis puissance militaire et culturelle, la France en est venue à occuper une position certes honorable mais moyenne. Aucun Etat n’échappe au relâchement des liens nationaux et sociaux, au commerce mondialisé et à l’individualisme débridé. Aux Etats-Unis aussi, on redoute la déchéance. Le Tea Party est parvenu à bloquer le gouvernement fédéral. Le système électoral américain est archaïque. Le président n’est pas apprécié par la population. Un mouvement « néoconfédéré » vigoureux s’enorgueillit de la cause sudiste telle qu’elle fut défendue au cours de la guerre civile des années 1861-1865. Ce mouvement accuse les historiens qui critiquent la société esclavagiste d’être quelque peu antiaméricains. Eric Zemmour se sentirait chez lui en leur compagnie.

(Traduit de l’anglais par Frédéric Joly)

Robert O. Paxton, professeur émérite d’histoire Columbia University (New York)

Voir de plus:

Robert Paxton : « L’argument de Zemmour sur Vichy est vide »
Pascal Riché
Rue 89/Nouvel Obs
09/10/2014

style= »text-align: justify; »>Le système Eric Zemmour se nourrit de sa propre surenchère : chaque livre de l’essayiste doit aller plus loin que le précédent – vers l’extrême droite. Il est allé si loin qu’il en arrive, dans son dernier essai, « Le Suicide français » (éd. Albin Michel) – déjà un best seller – à prendre la défense de Vichy, ce sinistre souvenir français. S’il avait vécu à cette époque, Zemmour, issu d’une famille juive algérienne, aurait été déporté ou aurait vécu dans la terreur.

Mais qu’importe : il a choisi de reconsidérer le bilan de Pétain, qu’on aurait tort, selon lui, de classer dans la « malfaisance absolue ». Dans un passage de plusieurs pages de son livre, titré avec dédain « Robert Paxton, notre bon maître », l’essayiste s’en prend à ce qu’il appelle « la doxa paxtonnienne ». En 1972, dans son livre « Vichy France : Old Guard and New Order », traduit en français l’année suivante sous le titre « La France de Vichy » (éd. Seuil), l’historien américain a ouvert les yeux des Français sur leur propre histoire et sur les responsabilités du régime de Pétain dans la persécution et la déportation des juifs.

Mais selon Eric Zemmour, la thèse de Paxton, devenue « parole d’évangile », est idéologique :

« Elle repose sur la malfaisance absolue du régime de Vichy, reconnu à la fois responsable et coupable. L’action de Vichy est toujours nuisible et tous ses chefs sont condamnables. »
On peut la lire à l’envers : selon Zemmour, la malfaisance du régime de Vichy n’est pas absolue, l’action de Vichy n’est pas toujours nuisible, tous ses chefs ne sont pas condamnables…

Selon l’essayiste, si 75% des juifs ont été sauvés en France, c’est en grande partie grâce à « la stratégie adoptée par Pétain et Laval face aux demandes allemandes : sacrifier les juifs étrangers pour sauver les juifs français ». Tout en se gardant de réhabiliter ce régime, il invite à faire le distinguo, dans le jugement que l’on porte sur Vichy, entre « morale » et « efficacité politique ».

« C’est ridicule »
Pour combattre les thèses de Paxton, Zemmour s’appuie sur le livre du rabbin israélien Alain Michel, « Vichy et la Shoah. Enquête sur le paradoxe français » (éd. CLD, 2012), dans lequel ce dernier, né en France, s’emploie à essayer de démolir l’apport de l’Américain. Zemmour écrit :

« Il reprend, en l’étayant, l’intuition des premiers historiens du vichysme, et montre comment un pouvoir antisémite, cherchant à limiter l’influence juive sur la société par un statut des juifs inique, infâme et cruel, et obsédé par le départ des juifs étrangers – pour l’Amérique, pense d’abord Laval qui, devant le refus des Américains, accepte de les envoyer à l’Est, comme le lui affirment alors les Allemands –, réussit à sauver les “vieux Israélites français”. »

J’ai demandé, par téléphone, à Robert Paxton, professeur à l’université de Columbia, ce qu’il pensait de tout cela.

Rue89. Selon Eric Zemmour, votre regard sur Vichy est idéologique et manichéen : le régime aurait, à la différence de ce qui s’est passé dans d’autres pays comme la Hollande, permis de sauver de nombreux juifs français en sacrifiant les juifs étrangers…

Robert Paxton. Cet argument est parfaitement vide, de même que le livre d’Alain Michel sur lequel il s’appuie. Il suffit de lire les lois promulguées par Vichy entre 1940 et 1942, qui imposent des exclusions sur tous les juifs, y compris les juifs de nationalité française. Le statut des juifs qui les exclut des services publics ; l’instauration de quotas à l’université ; la loi du 22 juillet 1941 sur l’aryanisation des biens juifs… tous ces textes ne font aucune distinction entre juifs français et juifs étrangers.

Dans leur application, ces mesures frappent durement les juifs de nationalité française, car ce sont eux qui sont les plus impliqués : ce sont des instituteurs, des conseillers d’Etat, des officiers de l’armée… des gens qui ont des propriétés et qui sont les premiers à souffrir de l’aryanisation. C’est absurde de soutenir que Vichy a soutenu les juifs français pendant ces deux premières années.

Quand les déportations commencent, et surtout au moment de la rafle de décembre 1941 au cours de laquelle plus de 700 juifs, souvent des notables, y compris un sénateur, ont été arrêtés – pour une fois – directement par les Allemands, cela a été un scandale : tout le monde a pris conscience de la faiblesse du régime de Vichy.

A partir de ce moment, du printemps 1942, mais pas avant, le régime s’efforce de laisser partir en premier les juifs étrangers et apatrides. Ce n’est pas une question morale, mais Laval et Pétain ont conscience de ce qui se joue en terme de souveraineté.

Laval continue de dire que les réfugiés juifs font du mal à la France et explique aux Américains et autres, aux évêques ou aux pasteurs qu’il a l’intention de se débarrasser de ces étrangers… Il essaye alors de persuader les Allemands de prendre d’abord les étrangers et les apatrides. Les Allemands répondent : « Bon, on va faire comme en Belgique, on prend les étrangers d’abord. Mais comprenez bien qu’on prendra les Français plus tard… » Mais c’est leur bon vouloir.

Il n’y a pas d’accord avec les Allemands ?

Jamais. Laval a obtenu un report. Mais sans qu’il n’existe d’accord : les Allemands ont accepté, de leur propre décision, de prendre les étrangers en premier.

Robert Paxton et Bertrand Delanoë, lors de l’inauguration de l’exposition « Archives de la vie littéraire sous l’Occupation », hôtel de ville de Paris, le 11 mai 2011 (Michel Euler/AP/SIPA)
C’est donc ridicule de soutenir que Vichy a protégé les juifs de nationalité française : pendant les deux premières années, Vichy a fait tout son possible pour fragiliser cette population, les excluant des emplois publics, mettant des quotas dans certaines professions, confisquant leurs propriétés, bloquant l’accès à l’université de leurs enfants…

Et quand vient l’heure des déportations, ces juifs sont horriblement fragilisés, encore plus susceptibles d’être traqués… Certes, Vichy a essayé sur le tard de sauver les apparences, en encourageant le report des déportations à plus tard… Mais il n’y a pas eu d’accord.

Zemmour pousse l’argument selon lequel les trois-quarts des juifs ont survécu en France…

Il fait croire que c’est un bon chiffre. C’est un mauvais chiffre ! En Italie, 16% ont été déportés. Les fonctionnaires italiens et les policiers italiens n’ont pas aidé à la déportation. Si l’Italie a été occupée plus tardivement que la France, l’occupation de l’Italie a duré longtemps après la libération de la France – le nord de l’Italie a été occupée deux mois de moins que le sud de la France, ce n’est pas beaucoup (septembre 1943 à mai 1945, contre novembre 1942 à août 1944 ndlr).

Voilà le chiffre qu’on pourrait imaginer dans un pays où les Allemands doivent tout faire eux-mêmes, sans l’apport des policiers qu’ils ont eu en France…

Ce chiffre de 25% de juifs déportés, dont de nombreux juifs français, est déplorable, il n’y a pas de quoi pousser des cocoricos. Je ne vois aucune raison de changer mon avis selon lequel le régime de Vichy a commis des actes terribles contre tous les juifs, y compris les juifs de nationalité française.

Zemmour et Alain Michel s’appuient sur plusieurs livres : ceux de Raul Hilberg, Léon Poliakov…

Les livres des deux derniers sont très honorables, mais très anciens : ils n’avaient pas accès à l’ensemble de la recherche réalisée sur ces sujets.

Alain Michel n’est pas un historien sérieux : on ne peut pas écrire ce qu’il a écrit si on a lu les textes de Vichy et les ouvrages récents sur l’application de ces textes.

Voir encore:

Alain Finkielkraut : « L’analogie avec les années 1930 prétend nous éclairer : elle nous aveugle »
le Figaro
Vincent Tremolet de Villers
13/10/2014

LE FIGARO – Plusieurs ouvrages* qui sortent cet automne font la comparaison entre notre époque et les années 1930. Ils invoquent la crise économique, la montée des populismes, l’antisémitisme. Trouvez-vous cette analogie pertinente?

Alain Finkielkraut – À en croire, par ordre d’entrée en scène, Enzo Traverso, Luc Boltanski et Arnaud Esquerre, Edwy Plenel, Philippe Corcuff, Renaud Dély, Pascal Blanchard, Claude Askolovitch et Yvan Gastaut: les années 1930 sont de retour. La droite intégriste et factieuse occupe la rue, la crise économique pousse à la recherche d’un bouc émissaire et l’islamophobie prend le relais de l’antisémitisme. Tous les auteurs que j’ai cités observent, comme l’écrit Luc Boltanski: «la présence de thèmes traditionalistes et nationalistes issus de la rhétorique de l’Action française et la réorientation contre les musulmans d’une hostilité qui fut dans la première moitié du XXe siècle principalement dirigé contre les juifs».

Cette analogie historique prétend nous éclairer: elle nous aveugle. Au lieu de lire le présent à la lumière du passé, elle en occulte la nouveauté inquiétante. Il n’y avait pas dans les années 1930 d’équivalent juif des brigades de la charia qui patrouillent aujourd’hui dans les rues de Wuppertal, la ville de Pina Bausch et du métro suspendu. Il n’y avait pas d’équivalent du noyautage islamiste de plusieurs écoles publiques à Birmingham. Il n’y avait pas d’équivalent de la contestation des cours d’histoire, de littérature ou de philosophie dans les lycées ou les collèges dits sensibles. Aucun élève alors n’aurait songé à opposer au professeur, qui faisait cours sur Flaubert, cette fin de non-recevoir: «Madame Bovary est contraire à ma religion.»

Il n’y avait pas, d’autre part, de charte de la diversité. On ne pratiquait pas la discrimination positive. Ne régnait pas non plus à l’université, dans les médias, dans les prétoires, cet antiracisme vigilant qui traque les mauvaises pensées des grands auteurs du patrimoine et qui sanctionne sous le nom de «dérapage» le moindre manquement au dogme du jour: l’égalité de tout avec tout. Quant à parler de retour de l’ordre moral alors que les œuvres du marquis de Sade ont les honneurs de la Pléiade, que La Vie d’Adèle a obtenu la palme d’or à Cannes et que les Femen s’exhibent en toute impunité dans les églises et les cathédrales de leur choix, c’est non seulement se payer de mots, mais réclamer pour l’ordre idéologique de plus en plus étouffant sous lequel nous vivons les lauriers de la dissidence.

Si l’on poursuit l’analogie telle qu’elle apparaît dans ces livres, les musulmans sont considérés comme des «ennemis de l’intérieur». Comme on considérait les communistes en France, voire les juifs avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale… Que vous inspire cette comparaison?

Pour dire avec Plenel et les autres que ce sont les musulmans désormais qui portent l’étoile jaune, il faut faire bon marché de la situation actuelle des juifs de France. S’il n’y a pratiquement plus d’élèves juifs dans les écoles publiques de Seine-Saint-Denis, c’est parce que, comme le répète dans l’indifférence générale Georges Bensoussan, le coordinateur du livre Les Territoires perdus de la République (Mille et Une Nuits), l’antisémitisme y est devenu un code culturel. Tous les musulmans ne sont pas antisémites, loin s’en faut, mais si l’imam de Bordeaux et le recteur de la grande mosquée de Lyon combattent ce phénomène avec une telle vigueur, c’est parce que la majorité des antisémites de nos jours sont musulmans. Cette réalité, les antiracistes officiels la nient ou la noient dans ses causes sociales pour mieux incriminer au bout du compte «la France aux relents coloniaux». Ce n’est pas aux dominés, expliquent-ils en substance, qu’il faut reprocher leurs raccourcis détestables ou leur passage à l’acte violent, c’est à la férocité quotidienne du système de domination.

Vous pensez à l’essai d’Edwy Plenel Pour les musulmans?

Au début de l’affaire Dreyfus, Zola écrivait Pour les juifs. Après m’avoir écouté sur France Inter, Edwy Plenel indigné écrit Pour les musulmans. Fou amoureux de cette image si gratifiante de lui-même et imbu d’une empathie tout abstraite pour une population dont il ne veut rien savoir de peur de «l’essentialiser», il signifie aux juifs que ceux qui les traitent aujourd’hui de «sales feujs» sont les juifs de notre temps. Le racisme se meurt, tant mieux. Mais si c’est cela l’antiracisme, on n’a pas vraiment gagné au change. Et il y a pire peut-être: l’analogie entre les années 1930 et notre époque, tout entière dressée pour ne pas voir le choc culturel dont l’Europe est aujourd’hui le théâtre, efface sans vergogne le travail critique que mènent, avec un courage et une ténacité admirables, les meilleurs intellectuels musulmans. Voici deux exemples.

Abdennour Bidar: «On dit du fanatisme de quelques-uns que c’est l’arbre qui cache la forêt de l’islam pacifique, mais quel est l’état réel de la forêt en laquelle un tel arbre peut prendre racine?»

Mohamed Kacimi, en pleine guerre de Gaza, quand on tentait d’incendier une synagogue à Wuppertal et qu’étaient saccagés des magasins juifs à Sarcelles: «Plutôt que d’annoncer à ses millions d’âmes qu’ils vivent dans des pays soumis à des régimes totalitaires, religieux, obscurantistes, sans liberté, parqués jour et nuit dans des mosquées où on leur apprend à haïr la liberté, les femmes, la vie, les autres, la chaîne qatarienne al-Jazeera préfère crier haro sur Israël, sur l’ennemi sioniste, c’est à la fois un antalgique et un antidépresseur.»

Abdennour Bidar et Mohamed Kacimi répondent implicitement à Youssef al-Qaradawi, le président du Conseil européen de la fatwa et de la recherche et le guide spirituel de Tariq Ramadan comme de l’UOIF. Dans ses prêches sur al-Jazeera, celui-ci n’hésite pas à créditer Hitler de s’être débrouillé pour remettre à leur place les juifs arrogants. Il affirme par ailleurs que l’Islam ne doit pas conquérir l’Europe «vautrée dans son matérialisme et la philosophie de promiscuité» par la guerre, mais par l’influence.

Pendant ce temps, tout à la fierté jubilatoire de dénoncer notre recherche effrénée d’un bouc émissaire, les intellectuels progressistes fournissent avec le thème de «la France islamophobe» un bouc émissaire inespéré au salafisme en expansion. En même temps qu’il fait de nouveaux adeptes, l’Islam littéral gagne sans cesse de nouveaux Rantanplan. Ce ne sont pas les années 1930 qui reviennent, ce sont, dans un contexte totalement inédit, les idiots utiles.

Votre élection à l’Académie ferait écho à celle de Charles Maurras en 1938, lit-on, dans un de ces ouvrages…

Autrefois, on m’aurait peut-être traité de «sale race», me voici devenu «raciste» et «maurrassien» parce que je veux acquitter ma dette envers l’école républicaine et que j’appelle un chat, un chat. Entre ces deux injures, mon cœur balance. Mais pas longtemps. Mon père et mes grands-parents ayant été déportés par l’État dont Maurras se faisait l’apôtre, c’est la seconde qui me semble, excusez-moi du terme mais il n’y en a pas d’autres, la plus dégueulasse.

Dans la description de ce phénomène, on invoque une «droitisation» dont votre succès serait le symbole. La gauche et la France se «droitisent» de votre fait?

La gauche et la droite communient dans l’idolâtrie du progrès et dans le culte des nouvelles technologies. C’est à qui numérisera le plus vite notre pauvre école. Mais le paradigme prométhéen est épuisé. Il ne s’agit plus de changer ou de transformer le monde. Il s’agit de l’épargner et de sauver ce qui peut l’être. Ni la droite ni la gauche ne veulent se convertir à une pensée des limites et à ce que Hans Jonas appelait une «éthique de la conservation, de la préservation, de l’empêchement». Elles érigent en valeur le fait de l’innovation et avec zèle, ou fatalisme, elles accompagnent les flux économiques et les flux migratoires. Si elles se montrent récalcitrantes, l’Europe les remet très vite dans le droit chemin. Mais il y a en France des gens de toutes origines assez attachés à la civilisation française pour se considérer comme ses héritiers et ne pas vouloir dilapider cet héritage. Je suis de ceux-là.

Alain Juppé évoque, dans un chapitre qui compose le livre programme de l’UMP, «l’identité heureuse». Ce texte vous a-t-il convaincu?

L’identité malheureuse est un constat. L’identité heureuse est un slogan. Peut-être que, grâce à ce slogan, les voix de la gauche et du centre se reporteront sur Alain Juppé au second tour de l’élection présidentielle en 2017. Mais si tout suit son cours, les juifs seront de plus en plus nombreux à faire leur valise et le peuple continuera à se diviser en deux. Le périurbain pour les uns, les «quartiers populaires» pour les autres. Tout cela derrière le village Potemkine de l’identité heureuse. Est-ce la France que nous voulons?

Que vous inspire la polémique autour du livre d’Eric Zemmour: Le suicide français ?

J’attends d’avoir fini le livre d’Eric Zemmour pour réagir. Mais d’ores et déjà, force m’est de constater que ceux qui dénoncent jour et nuit les amalgames et les stigmatisations se jettent sur l’analyse irrecevable que Zemmour fait du régime de Vichy pour pratiquer les amalgames stigmatisants avec tous ceux qu’ils appellent les néoréactionnaires et les néomaurrassiens. Ils ont besoin que le fascisme soit fort et même hégémonique pour valider leur thèse. Le succès de Zemmour pour eux vient à point nommé. Mais je le répète, ce n’est pas être fasciste que de déplorer l’incapacité grandissante de la France à assumer sa culture. Et ce n’est surement pas être antifasciste que de se féliciter de son effondrement. ■

* Enzo Traverso, «La Fin de la modernité juive», La Découverte ; Edwy Plenel, «Pour les musulmans», La Découverte ; Luc Boltanski et Arnaud Esquerre, «Vers l’extrême, extension des domaines de la droite», Éditions Dehors ; Philippe Corcuff, «Les Années 30 reviennent et la gauche est dans le brouillard», Textuel ; Renaud Dély, Pascal Blanchard, Claude Askolovitch, Yvan Gastaut, «Les Années 30 sont de retour», Flammarion (sortie le 15 octobre).

Voir encore:

The Anti-Hero as Hero.(Review)
Omer Bartov
The New Republic
August 13, 2001
The Fragility of Goodness:
Why Bulgaria’s Jews Survived the Holocaust
By Tzvetan Todorov
translated by Arthur Denner
(Princeton University Press, 197 pp., $26.95)

Omer Bartov is professor of history at Brown University, and the author, most recently, of Mirrors of Destruction: War, Genocide, and Modern Identity (Oxford University Press).

The holocaust is ultimately about the abandonment of an entire people to the murder machine of a powerful state. What facilitated the genocide of the Jews was a combination of circumstances that made escape and rescue increasingly difficult, and made the work of the perpetrators astonishingly easy. The killing occurred within the context of a total and savagely brutal war. The perpetrators could rely on a modern state apparatus and a rich supply of well-trained and willing individuals from the police, the army, and other German state agencies. The German population of the Reich exhibited a distinct lack of interest in the Nazi regime’s genocidal policies, largely carried out east of the country’s expanded borders. The German occupation authorities rarely faced concerted opposition–and often found willing collaboration– among the officials and the population of the countries from which Jews were deported to the death camps or in which large- scale killing of Jews took place. Finally, for most of the war Germany’s enemies did not make the genocide of the Jews a major focus of their military, diplomatic, or propaganda efforts–indeed, they feared that doing so would enhance anti-Semitism among their own populations, or would be detrimental to their wartime and postwar policies.

If we wish to make a general statement about the moral dimensions of this historical event, in other words, we must conclude that it ranged between the radical evil of the planners and the executioners to the more commonplace variety of complicity and indifference, exhibited also by such obviously anti-Nazi institutions as the British Foreign Office and the State Department, which were loath to change their immigration policies, to let Jewish refugees into Palestine, or to act more directly and forcefully against Nazi genocide until late in the war. From what we know today about the ideological commitment and dedication to the task of such characters as Adolf Eichmann and the members of Reinhard Heydrich’s Reich Main Security Office, we can no longer speak about them as representative of the « banality of evil, » as Hannah Arendt suggested four decades ago. Conversely, on the basis of the massive historical research on the Holocaust that has been carried out in the intervening years, neither can we assert that the genocide of the Jews was a precisely planned and executed operation.

The intention to murder the entire Jewish population was finally articulated in late 1941, but the implementation of the genocide depended on myriad factors and circumstances. The very scale of the undertaking, the geographical scope, the complex political, diplomatic, cultural, and logistical issues involved, meant that any resistance, even of an ambivalent and inconsistent nature, might hamper the efficiency of the operation. It should be remembered that the killing of the Jews took place over a relatively short time, primarily between 1942 and 1944. By 1944, Germany was rapidly heading toward defeat, and everyone knew it. What is breathtaking about the Holocaust is the ability of Germany to have murdered so many people from so many countries with such stunning rapidity even as it was losing a horrendously destructive total war. But it is also true that any delay in the killing could have spelled the difference between death and survival, because the Nazis ran out of time just before they ran out of Jewish victims.

It is for this reason that on another moral scale–indeed, on the moral scale that is most urgent to those who try to extract lessons from the Holocaust–what really matters are the moments, however rare, in which a few shades of « goodness » were introduced into the general canvas of evil, opportunism, and indifference. These moments matter not because they made a significant difference in the general scheme of things: they did not. They matter because they illustrate that, all the contemporary (and subsequent) talk of inevitability notwithstanding, it was possible to make choices, and that the right choices made at the right time by the right people could make a difference for some of the victims. From these flickerings of goodness we are forced to conclude that, had they been more prevalent, they might have driven more of the darkness out of the historical canvas. They might have actually changed the picture.

But the lesson is not quite so simple or so edifying. For we also learn from such instances that the difference between virtue and vice is far less radical than we would like to believe. Sometimes the most effective kind of goodness–I mean the practical kind, the kind that can actually save lives and not merely alleviate the conscience of the protagonists–is carried out by those who have already compromised themselves with evil, those who are members of the very organization that set the ball rolling toward the abyss. Hence a strange and frustrating contradiction: that absolute goodness is often surprisingly ineffective, while compromised, splintered and ambiguous goodness, one that is touched and stained by evil, is the only kind that may set limits to mass murder. And while absolute evil is indeed defined by its consistent one-dimensionality, this more mundane sort of wickedness, the most prevalent sort, contains within itself also seeds of goodness that may be stimulated and encouraged by the example of the few dwellers of these nether regions who may have come to recognize their own moral potential …

Voir enfin:

Bookshelf
Book Review: ‘My Grandfather’s Gallery’ by Anne Sinclair
Paul Rosenberg’s far-sighted promotion of the avant-garde may have saved his family from the Holocaust.
Marechal Law
Hugh Eakin
WSJ
Oct. 10, 2014

In November 2013, German tax authorities revealed that they had found more than 1,200 works of art, many of them looted from Jewish collections during World War II, in the Munich apartment of an elderly recluse named Cornelius Gurlitt. The discovery of a fresh trove of Holocaust-era art, years after Germany was supposed to have addressed the issue, was shocking, and the story riveted the international media for weeks. Less noted, however, were Mr. Gurlitt’s aesthetic predilections: His collection included works by such leading figures of the Modern avant-garde as Picasso, Max Beckmann, Marc Chagall, Max Liebermann and Emil Nolde.

My Grandfather’s Gallery
By Anne Sinclair
Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 224 pages, $26
For decades it seemed, Mr. Gurlitt—whose father, Hildebrand Gurlitt, had been assigned by the Nazis to “acquire” Old Masters for the planned Führermuseum in Linz—had communed in his dusty apartment with the very artists Hitler rejected as “degenerate.” Among the first Gurlitt works to be identified was a 1921 portrait by Matisse, “Sitting Woman,” that had belonged to Paul Rosenberg, arguably the foremost French dealer in Modern art. In June 1940, just as the Germans were arriving in Paris, Rosenberg escaped to Portugal, and subsequently to the United States, leaving behind some 400 paintings that were later seized. In June of this year, a German task force declared that “Sitting Woman” rightfully belonged to Rosenberg’s heirs—the latest of dozens of works the family has reclaimed over the past half-century. It is said to be worth as much as $20 million.

Rarely has the cruel paradox of the Nazis’ art program been more directly in view. One of the most prominent Parisian dealers in the 1920s and 1930s, Paul Rosenberg (1881-1959) represented both Picasso and Matisse. As Anne Sinclair observes in “My Grandfather’s Gallery: A Family Memoir of Art and War,” his large gallery on the fashionable Rue la Boétie in the Eighth Arrondissement was “piled to the rafters with those ‘accursed’ or decadent works, the kind that the Nazis called entartete Kunst.” Yet German officials, together with their Vichy acolytes, recognized the Rosenberg gallery’s importance, and, soon after the fall of France in the summer of 1940, they were exploiting its inventory. There was no shortage of international buyers for Modern paintings during the war, and Nazi dealers like Gurlitt could easily trade such works in neutral countries like Switzerland for sought-after “Germanic” art or, as in the case of “Sitting Woman,” keep them for themselves.

Though it was written before the Gurlitt hoard came to light, “My Grandfather’s Gallery” suggests the extent to which the dark fate of Rosenberg’s inventory was also, fundamentally, a story about the art market. A well-known French television personality, Ms. Sinclair says that she had not been particularly involved in the hunt for missing paintings, noting that other family members have pursued them with greater zeal. (Armed with extensive records—which Rosenberg had presciently removed to London before the war—and decades of practice, the Rosenberg heirs have been among the most successful claimants of Nazi-looted art.) Nor, by her own account, did she have much interest in Rosenberg’s life until an unpleasant question from a French bureaucrat made her curious to find out “who my mother’s father really was.”

As a result, “My Grandfather’s Gallery” is less a systematic biography of a major art-world figure than what Ms. Sinclair calls “a series of impressionist strokes” about a man she hardly knew, inflected by her own, sometimes meandering thoughts. There are asides about French politics and oblique references to Ms. Sinclair’s recent travails as the wife of Dominique Strauss-Kahn, during whose house arrest in New York she wrote the book. (They are now divorced.)

Yet in shifting back and forth from the Vichy years to the early ’20s to the aftermath of the war, Ms. Sinclair offers revealing glimpses into what made the gallery such a prime target for the Nazis. Particularly suggestive is her sketch of Rosenberg’s relations to the avant-garde, which draws on the dealer’s four-decade correspondence with Picasso. From his own father, who sold works by van Gogh and Cézanne before they were popular, Rosenberg learned to mix bread-and-butter sales of traditional fare with bold investments in new art. Thus a brisk trade in 19th-century favorites in a seigneurial, Right Bank setting allowed him to support a growing stable of contemporary painters and to give them a kind of establishment pedigree. “If visitors were unsure about Braque or Léger,” Ms. Sinclair writes, “Paul invited them upstairs to see softer-contoured works by Edgar Degas, Pierre-August Renoir, or August Rodin.”

By the 1920s, Rosenberg had become not only Picasso’s chief representative and financial backer but also his neighbor, having persuaded the Spanish genius to live in haute-bourgeois comfort adjacent to the gallery—where Rosenberg could keep close watch on his production. At the same time, through a series of astute alliances, constant promotion and over-the-top, Gagosian-like shows, the dealer helped turn works by Picasso and Matisse into sought-after drawing-room commodities among the beau monde. “I need a large number of canvases for this winter,” Rosenberg wrote Picasso in one typically breathless letter from 1921 quoted by Ms. Sinclair. “I’m ordering 100 from you, to be delivered at the end of the summer.”

As with the art world today, there was big business, but also big risk. Other dealers had tried and failed with Picasso—among them not only Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, the gifted promoter of his early Cubist works, but also Rosenberg’s own brother, Léonce, who, though a pioneering supporter of the French avant-garde, was chronically insolvent. (Unmentioned by Ms. Sinclair, Braque famously punched Léonce before defecting to his brother’s more reliable firm.) Why was Rosenberg more successful? Scholars like Picasso biographer John Richardson regard him chiefly as a hard-driving entrepreneur who cannily raised prices, held on to inventory and diligently built markets in London, New York and across the Continent. Ms. Sinclair understandably prefers to see her grandfather conversing with “Pic” on a more intellectual plane, but she too wonders whether his retail acumen exceeded his appetite for artistic innovation.

More interesting, however, may be the international implications of Rosenberg’s shrewd dealing. Ms. Sinclair writes that in August 1940, having made it as far as Lisbon, Rosenberg obtained 21 visas to the United States, for himself and his extended family, at a time when very few were being issued. This, she coyly informs us, was thanks to the extraordinary intervention of “his old friend” Alfred Barr Jr., the well-connected director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Barr had tried for years to organize a major Picasso retrospective at MoMA, for which Rosenberg’s collaboration was essential. In 1939, after lengthy negotiations and then weeks spent with Rosenberg in Paris, Barr was able to secure the loans he needed. The result was the landmark exhibition in the winter of 1939-40 that cemented Picasso’s position at the center of the Modern movement. Ms. Sinclair doesn’t reveal whether the two men discussed the possibility of Rosenberg’s relocation to New York during their extensive time together on the eve of the war, but she writes elsewhere that “Barr was deeply grateful for Paul’s willingness to enable this momentous show.” (In fact, though she doesn’t mention it, family records gathered by Elaine Rosenberg, Ms. Sinclair’s aunt, show that Barr was one of several prominent Americans, including Harvard professor Paul J. Sachs, who vouched in 1940 for Rosenberg’s signal importance.)

Thus Rosenberg’s far-sighted promotion of the avant-garde may be ultimately what saved his family from the Holocaust—even as it made him a particular object of Nazi hatred. Back in Paris, the Rosenberg gallery, along with the apartment above it that the Rosenbergs had lived in, was transformed into the Institute for the Study of Jewish Questions, a propaganda office run by the Nazis that was designed, according to its own mandate, to “resolve, at all cost and by all means, the Jewish question in France.” Among its habitués, Ms. Sinclair notes, was Louis-Ferdinand Céline, the great Modernist writer and rabid anti-Semite, who complained that his books attacking Jews were not being sufficiently promoted in the institute’s bookshop.

But how convinced were the Nazis, really, when it came to their opposition to Modern art? As a recent exhibition at the Neue Galerie in New York made clear, some, like Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, initially saw Modernism as compatible with National Socialist ideology. Others, like the dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, had themselves been champions of the avant-garde before being drawn into the Nazi art program. The greater irony, of course, is that the international market that Rosenberg had spent two decades building provided a ready outlet for the Nazis’ plunder.

In an absorbing final chapter, Ms. Sinclair considers her grandfather’s response to this dark story. Because of the MoMA exhibition, his Picassos, at least, had escaped the war, and they helped him establish a flourishing trade in New York City. But he never gave up on his lost works and pursued justice in his own way. As early as the fall of 1945, Rosenberg arrived in Zurich to confront some of the Swiss dealers who had traded them; though he also filed lawsuits, Ms. Sinclair suggests that he preferred to “recover his paintings one by one, in a Monte-Cristo-style personal vendetta.” One wonders what he would have made of Cornelius Gurlitt and his Modern-art-filled apartment, which somehow escaped notice in the same city where the Nazis had put on the notorious 1937 “Degenerate Art” exhibition.

—Mr. Eakin is a senior editor at the New York Review of Books.

Voir par ailleurs:

Horthy, un Pétain hongrois
Joëlle Stolz (Vienne, correspondante)

LE MONDE DES LIVRES

23.10.2014

Au moment où la France, à cause du livre d’Eric Zemmour, Le Suicide français (Albin Michel), discute avec passion du régime de Vichy, un ouvrage éclaire le parcours de l’amiral Miklós Horthy, qui fut ­régent de Hongrie de mars 1920 jusqu’à octobre 1944. Allié d’Hitler et de Mussolini, il porte une part de responsabilité – jusqu’à quel point, telle est la question – dans la déportation de ses com­patriotes juifs, dont au moins 400 000 ont péri à Auschwitz.

Il a fallu attendre le regain d’intérêt pour la Hongrie, suscité par la politique nationaliste du premier ministre Viktor Orban, pour disposer enfin d’une biographie de Horthy en français. Elle est due à la plume alerte de Catherine ­Horel, spécialiste reconnue de l’Europe centrale. Sa prochaine parution en hongrois promet de chauds débats dans un pays où les historiens sont souvent invités sur les plateaux de télévision, tandis que les départements d’histoire des universités sont investis par des étudiants en majorité d’extrême droite. Plus que jamais, l’histoire y est un terrain explosif. On voit s’édifier partout des monuments déplorant le traité de Trianon, qui a amputé la Hongrie, en 1920, de 70 % de son territoire et de 3 millions de magyarophones. Apparaissent aussi des bustes de l’amiral Horthy, une mise à l’honneur qui, sans être ­encouragée par le gouvernement, est tolérée. L’un des prédécesseurs d’Orban, le conservateur Jozsef Antall, avait fait rapatrier, en 1993, les ­restes de Horthy, mort en 1957 au ­Portugal, dans la crypte familiale de Kenderes. Celle-ci est ­devenue le lieu d’un culte florissant qui rappelle la dévotion populaire de l’entre-deux-guerres, lorsque l’amiral semblait capable de rendre à la nation en deuil ses pro­vinces perdues.

Le « rapport douloureux à l’Histoire » caractérise toute l’Europe centrale, souligne Catherine ­Horel, elle-même d’origine hongroise, qui a déjà publié un ouvrage de référence : Cette Europe qu’on dit centrale (Beauchesne, 2009). De la Pologne aux Balkans, la région a été malmenée par les Turcs, les Autrichiens ou les Russes, et reste obsédée par la défaite face à des puissances étrangères. C’est à l’aune de cette mémoire victimaire qu’il faut évaluer le parcours de Horthy, souvent comparé au maréchal Pétain.

Tous deux sont des militaires aguerris, attachés aux vieilles ­valeurs – la terre ancestrale, la religion chrétienne – et prétendent faire don de leur personne pour éviter à leur pays des épreuves cruelles. Avec, dans les deux cas, une issue désastreuse : le « sacrifice » de Horthy n’évitera pas à la Hongrie d’entrer en guerre aux côtés de l’Allemagne et de tomber pour finir sous la coupe de l’Union soviétique. Sauf que Miklós Horthy, issu de la petite noblesse calviniste, n’a pas l’auréole du vainqueur de Verdun. Sportif accompli, portant beau mais personnalité médiocre, cet homme, né en 1868, a choisi la marine, carrière peu usuelle pour un Hongrois, ce qui lui a permis de voir le monde. La meilleure période de sa vie, à l’en croire, est pourtant les cinq ans qu’il a ­passés à Vienne, comme aide de camp de François-Joseph : l’empereur restera pour lui un modèle de discipline et de rectitude. La protection que François-Joseph a accordée aux juifs, dans la tradition des Habsbourg (il mettra deux fois son veto à l’élection, comme maire de Vienne, du tribun antisémite Karl Lueger), l’a sans doute marqué.

L’HOMME PROVIDENTIEL
Horthy n’était pas un fasciste – son régime est proche du « corporatisme » clérical de l’Autriche avant l’Anschluss –, mais farouchement anticommuniste. Malgré son dédain pour la politique, il accepte d’être l’homme providentiel qui va « sauver le pays du chaos », en 1919, après la République des Conseils de Bela Kun, d’inspiration soviétique, dont 36 commissaires sur 43 étaient juifs. Il couvre les graves exactions antisémites de la « terreur blanche » commises par les contre-révolutionnaires mais son premier geste, une fois régent, est de recevoir les dirigeants de la communauté juive. Il entérine, dès 1920, l’adoption d’un numerus clausus visant les étudiants juifs, mais ménagera toujours les industriels et les banquiers, qui assurent à la Hongrie une enviable prospérité.

Même lorsque le Parlement de Budapest introduit, en 1939, sous pression de Berlin, des critères raciaux en rupture avec le droit hongrois, Horthy et ses ministres les moins bellicistes (dont Pal ­Teleki, qui s’est suicidé en avril 1941 pour protester contre l’entrée en guerre avec la Yougo­slavie) croient pouvoir « donner le change » aux nazis, tout en évitant « l’inexpiable ». Malgré des restrictions croissantes, les juifs de Hongrie ont été relativement épargnés jusqu’au printemps 1944. Notables exceptions : la mort de 20 000 juifs « apatrides » déportés vers la Galicie en 1941, et les massacres commis par les troupes hongroises contre juifs et Serbes dans la Bacska, une province méridionale que le régime Horthy avait récupérée, comme le sud de la Slovaquie et l’est de la Transylvanie, par la grâce d’Hitler.

Une fois la Hongrie occupée sans résistance par la Wehrmacht, en mars 1944, police et gendar­merie redoublèrent de zèle, éradiquant en un temps record tous les juifs de province. Pour les défenseurs de l’amiral Horthy, celui-ci a au moins sauvé la plupart des juifs de Budapest, en stoppant, au début de l’été 1944, les déportations. Mais il aurait pu démissionner bien avant que les Allemands ne l’y contraignent, quelques mois plus tard : une sortie sans gloire, pour un homme qui a échappé au tribunal de Nuremberg, après guerre, surtout parce que Staline, lorgnant déjà sur la Hongrie, trouvait inopportun d’en faire un martyr.

L’Amiral Horthy. Le régent de Hongrie, 1920-1944, de Catherine Horel, Perrin, « Biographies », 496 p., 25 €.

COMPLEMENT:

27 octobre 2014
Vichy : l’élève Zemmour peut mieux faire !

L’historien François Delpla revient pour Herodote.net sur la polémique lancée par le journaliste Éric Zemmour concernant le rôle de Philippe Pétain dans la Shoah…
Dans son livre Le Suicide français, paru le 1er octobre 2014, le journaliste Éric Zemmour avance une thèse sur l’attitude du gouvernement de Vichy : la survie des Juifs français, dans une proportion bien plus grande que celle des Juifs étrangers présents sur le sol de France, serait due à l’action de Vichy, qui les a défendus tout en abandonnant les Juifs étrangers à leur sort. Il se réclame de trois historiens décédés (Poliakov, Aron, Hilberg) ainsi que d’Alain Michel, l’auteur d’un récent Vichy et la Shoah.

En revanche, il prend feu et flamme contre l’un des plus célèbres historiens de l’Occupation, l’Américain Robert Paxton, auteur en 1972 d’un livre traduit l’année suivante sous le titre La France de Vichy. Pétain et ses ministres y sont présentés comme des valets empressés à exécuter les ordres de l’occupant et souvent à les devancer, par affinité idéologique.

Zemmour ne nie pas que Vichy ait pris contre les Juifs français, dès l’automne de 1940, des mesures discriminatoires mais prétend que c’était pour des raisons patriotiques. Il fallait bien faire des concessions. C’est ainsi qu’on abandonna les Juifs étrangers comme on lâche du lest ; ce n’était ni glorieux ni moral mais conforme à la « raison d’État ». Inversement Paxton, dans ses livres et dans deux tribunes publiées en réponse à Zemmour, insiste sur la servilité de Vichy, son empressement à collaborer même quand on ne le lui demande pas et la fragilisation des Juifs français par les mesures de discrimination.

Or ce débat est largement anachronique. La recherche récente insiste sur deux points que l’histoire avait négligés :

- l’Allemagne nazie agissait avec méthode ; si la destruction des Juifs d’Europe (pour reprendre l’expression de Raul Hilberg) était l’un de ses objectifs principaux, elle cohabitait avec d’autres préoccupations ;

- l’occupation pendant quatre ans, sans grands remous, d’une grande puissance étrangère provisoirement vaincue, au sein d’une guerre plus large qui tourne de plus en plus mal pour l’occupant, est une entreprise des plus délicates, qui requiert doigté et vigilance.

Pétain, quelles que soient ses intentions et la façon dont il se voit lui-même, est avant tout un instrument aux mains de Hitler. En traitant au moment de l’armistice avec le « vainqueur de Verdun », chef de l’armée française en 1918, le dictateur nazi donne aux Français le plus convaincant des professeurs de résignation.

Jusqu’à l’offensive contre l’URSS déclenchée le 22 juin 1941, Hitler persécute les Juifs sans en tuer beaucoup, à l’exception de la Pologne occupée. L’ère des massacres systématiques s’ouvre avec l’invasion de la Russie, et débouche à la fin de 1941 sur la décision du meurtre de tous les Juifs accessibles aux griffes allemandes. La conférence de Wannsee, le 20 janvier 1942, planifie l’entreprise sous la direction de Reinhard Heydrich. Ce dernier séjourne à Paris du 5 au 11 mai, et s’entend avec un gouvernement Laval mis en place à Vichy par l’ambassadeur Abetz le 18 avril précédent.

Après son départ, les discussions se prolongent principalement entre René Bousquet, chef de la police au ministère de l’Intérieur de Vichy, et Carl Oberg, chef des SS en France. Elles aboutissent à une entente suivant laquelle Vichy exerce une pleine autorité sur la police de zone nord, moyennant une participation à la déportation des Juifs. On se met d’accord pour arrêter d’abord les Juifs étrangers. C’est ainsi qu’ont lieu la rafle dite du Vel d’Hiv, le 16 juillet, et la livraison de 7000 Juifs parqués dans des camps de zone sud.

En septembre, les SS demandent qu’on passe à la déportation des Juifs français et le gouvernement de Vichy renâcle en invoquant notamment l’opposition voyante du clergé catholique : l’archevêque de Toulouse, Mgr Saliège, a donné le branle le 23 août en dénonçant en chaire l’atrocité des rafles en zone sud (« Dans notre diocèse, des scènes d’épouvante ont eu lieu dans les camps de Noé et de Récébédou »). Soudain, le 25 septembre, arrive un contrordre, connu par une lettre de Knochen (l’adjoint d’Oberg) : les déportations de Juifs français sont provisoirement suspendues, par ordre de Himmler. Or le chef des SS a rencontré Hitler trois jours plus tôt et probablement pris cette décision en concertation avec lui.

Il en ressort que, n’en déplaise à Zemmour, Vichy n’a pas convenu avec l’Allemagne que la persécution se limiterait aux Juifs étrangers. Le taux de survie très inférieur de ces derniers doit tout aux circonstances, et aux priorités de l’occupant. En septembre 1942, la montée en puissance des États-Unis pousse l’Allemagne à envisager l’occupation de la zone sud française, tandis que la situation sur le front russe et en Afrique du Nord ne permet guère d’en distraire des troupes : il faut simplifier au maximum la tâche des quelques divisions allemandes qui seront chargées du travail. Il sied d’autre part de redonner à Pétain un peu de lustre « national » afin qu’il prêche une fois de plus aux Français la résignation en prétendant défendre au mieux leurs intérêts.

Il faut donc cesser d’isoler la question de la Shoah en France de celle des rapports de force mondiaux, comme d’attribuer à Vichy un rôle dans la survie plus importante des Juifs français.

En revanche, il n’est pas juste non plus (comme le font Paxton et Serge Klarsfeld, justement critiqués sur ce point par Zemmour) d’attribuer cette survie à l’action salvatrice de la population française, en l’opposant radicalement au gouvernement. On en viendrait à prétendre que Vichy n’était pas dictatorial, ou pas en mesure d’imposer ses décisions à ses administrés. Titulaires ou non par la suite de la médaille des Justes, les Français qui ont donné un coup de main dans le sauvetage savaient que les autorités qui auraient pu s’y opposer n’y mettaient pas, du gendarme au ministre, autant de zèle que l’occupant, sinon sous une pression nazie directe ou avec l’espoir, à certains moments, d’obtenir quelque avantage en flattant les lubies raciales de cet occupant.

Pétain l’impuissant n’a pas mis en sécurité le moindre Juif ; il n’a jamais fait que marchander en position inférieure, jouer avec des dés pipés par l’adversaire et accumuler des choix scabreux à visée immédiate.

François Delpla
L’auteur
François Delpla fait partie des historiens qui travaillent sans bruit, loin des modes et des écoles, et dont on s’inspire souvent sans toujours les citer. Ses travaux sur le nazisme et sa guerre ont débouché sur un premier livre, Les Papiers secrets du général Doumenc, en 1992.

Scrutant inlassablement la personne et les actes de Hitler, il met en lumière à la fois son intelligence manœuvrière et sa folie, grosse d’un antisémitisme extrême et spécifique.

Il publie prochainement chez son premier éditeur spécialisé en histoire, Perrin, une vaste synthèse intitulée Une histoire du Troisième Reich (en librairie le 6 novembre 2014). Sur Vichy il a publié Montoire (Albin Michel 1996) et Qui a tué Georges Mandel ? (L’Archipel, 2008). Nous avons par ailleurs fait la recension de son livre L’Appel du 18 juin 1940 (Grasset, 2000).

Son site http://www.delpla.org est l’un des plus riches parmi ceux des historiens en activité.

Voir enfin:

French Provocateur Enters Battle Over Comments
Scott Sayare SCOTT SAYARE
NYT
February 11, 2011
Paris

HE is perhaps France’s best-known professional provocateur, as much adored by the xenophobes of the far-right as he is reviled by immigrants, women and gays. But Éric Zemmour might also be misunderstood by his allies and enemies alike, a sort of hopeless intellectual whose nuance is lost in the sensationalist jumble of the media world he inhabits.

A slight man with a quick tongue and a fearsome intellect, Mr. Zemmour, 52, has made a career of speaking on the edge in a culture where the ideal of social harmony often takes precedence over freedom of speech. He can be heard daily on French radio, read weekly in the news media and seen all over television; he is routinely accused of racism, sexism, homophobia, fear-mongering and narcissism, or some combination thereof.

“I’m reviving the ‘French polemic’ in a world that’s on the one hand Americanized, and on the other, that people want to see sterilized by antiracism, by political correctness,” Mr. Zemmour said over coffee at the back of a dark Paris cafe. “That it is to say, where you’re not allowed to say anything bad about minorities.”

In comments that his critics have parsed and denounced and parsed again, he has spoken of a “white race” and a “black race,” decried what he sees as the feminization of society and called homosexuality a social disorder. Last month, though, his pronouncements for the first time brought him before a court, on charges of defamation and “provocation to racial discrimination.”In a televised debate last March he argued that blacks and Arabs were the targets of illegal racial profiling by the French police “because the majority of traffickers are black and Arab; that’s how it is, it’s a fact.” The same day, on another channel, he suggested that French employers “have the right” to deny employment to blacks or Arabs.

The comments surely do not rank among his most incendiary, and, however uncomfortable, the first point might well be true. Even the rights groups that brought the case acknowledge that France’s poor, immigrant populations account for a disproportionate amount of crime, if not a clear “majority,” in a country that does not keep official racial statistics.

MUCH to Mr. Zemmour’s delight, his three-day trial in January drew droves of supporters, including several prominent politicians, along with hordes of critics and a crush of reporters and photographers. His comments had already fueled months of controversy and hand-wringing; he was nearly fired from his post as an editorial writer at Le Figaro Magazine, and Canal+, the television station that broadcast his statement on traffickers, received a warning from the French audiovisual authority.

The intense reaction to Mr. Zemmour’s case — and more broadly, to Mr. Zemmour himself — seems a measure of the tensions in France around race, Islam and integration. And it speaks to the difficulty of discussing those issues in a nation that is committed constitutionally to treat every person simply as a “citizen,” with no acknowledgment of ethnicity, color or religion.

“When you describe reality,” Mr. Zemmour said at his trial, “you’re treated as a criminal.”

His critics say it is less a question of pronouncing realities than how they are pronounced.

“If he had said that there is an ‘overrepresentation of the immigrant population,’ there wouldn’t have been a trial,” said Alain Jakubowicz, a lawyer who heads one of the rights groups that brought suit. “There are the words that are said, and the words that are received, the words that are understood by listeners.”

“He has rights, of course, but he also has responsibilities,” Mr. Jakubowicz added.

From a young age, Mr. Zemmour said, he dreamed of becoming a “journalist-writer-intellectual” in the style of Voltaire, Émile Zola or François Mauriac and other outspoken, sometime-radicals like them. The ambitious son of Jewish Berbers who emigrated from French Algeria in the 1950s, Mr. Zemmour was raised near Paris and attended the elite Institut d’Études Politiques de Paris, known as Sciences Po. Later, after being twice denied admission to the even more rarefied precincts of the École Nationale d’Administration, which feeds the highest echelons of French power, he became a journalist, covering politics, and joined the newspaper Le Figaro in 1996.

Mr. Zemmour is a busy man. Beyond his books and novels, and the ceaseless interviews he gives, he presents a daily editorial on RTL, France’s most popular national radio station; co-hosts a debate program on news channel i>TELE; writes his weekly editorial for Le Figaro Magazine; and appears on a three-and-a-half hour talk show on Saturday nights on France 2, a state-owned television station.

PARADOXICALLY, Mr. Zemmour often exercises his right to free speech to endorse stricter limits on similar freedoms. He advocates a return to authorizing only Christian first names for children born in France, a restriction lifted in 1993; his ancestors in Algeria had adopted French names, he noted. And he hailed the ban on the public wearing of the full facial veil as a way “to oblige people to become authentically French.”

“The state needs to do its job, which it’s always done, of imposing constraints,” he said. “For me, France is the ban on the veil.”

He says that his views are those of a silent majority, French people who seek the return of the resplendent France of de Gaulle, a proud, imagined France unencumbered by the guilt of the post-colonial era. Efforts to integrate the country’s immigrant populations have plainly failed, he said, and the country ought to revert to the “assimilationist” approach he says it abandoned decades ago.

“We believe that we have the best way of life in the world, the best culture, and that one must thus make an effort to acquire this culture,” he said. By contrast, he said, the notion of a country made great by the diversity of its people and values “is an American logic.”

Asked why he believes in the superiority of the French model, he said only that “there is a singular art of living” in France.

“For me, France is civilization with a capital ‘C,’ ” he added.

The groups that have taken him to court have been urging an American social vision, he said. Yet, he added, they are not also willing to endorse American standards of free speech, and they oppose the taking of American-style ethnic statistics.

“I’m taking — because they forced it on me — the American model, and I’m throwing the American model back in their face,” Mr. Zemmour said. “But in the name of French tradition.”

It is a delicate distinction, one even his friends worry might well be lost on most people.

“He’s a very naïve guy,” said Éric Naulleau, a co-participant on the show on France 2, on a broadcast last year. “He has yet to understand the rules of the screen, Zemmour. He thinks he’s in a book where you can explain things, where you can step back.”

Like Mr. Zemmour, Yazid Sabeg, the government’s commissioner for diversity and equal opportunity, has been a prominent voice on France’s integration problems. An Algerian-born businessman, he is also the country’s foremost advocate for the legalization of ethnic statistics. But he denounced Mr. Zemmour’s statements about traffickers as inaccurate and calculated “to spread hate,” and he said he hoped to see him convicted.

“I’m for saying everything,” Mr. Sabeg said. “But not nonsense like this.”

Mr. Zemmour shrugged off Mr. Sabeg’s stance, and that of the plaintiffs in his case, as an absurd logical contortion. “They want the American model without the drawbacks of the American model, and that’s not possible,” he said.

“Maybe I’ll be convicted,” Mr. Zemmour said, with some satisfaction. “But they’ll never untangle themselves from their contradictions.”


Relativisme: Ne pas distinguer entre terrorisme et résistance participe d’une anomie lexicale générale (Where nothing is unspeakable, nothing is undoable)

23 octobre, 2014
http://static.newyorkcitytheatre.com/images/show/12212_show_portrait_large.jpg
https://media2.wnyc.org/i/620/372/c/80/photologue/photos/1097-346-The_Death_of_Klinghoffer_Chorus_8_c_Richard_Hubert_Smith%20(1).jpg
Je regarde comme impie et détestable cette maxime, qu’en matière de gouvernement la majorité d’un peuple a le droit de tout faire, et pourtant je place dans les volontés de la majorité l’origine de tous les pouvoirs. Suis-je en contradiction avec moi-même? Il existe une loi générale qui a été faite ou du moins adoptée, non pas seulement par la majorité de tel ou tel peuple, mais par la majorité de tous les hommes. Cette loi, c’est la justice. La justice forme donc la borne du droit de chaque peuple. Une nation est comme un jury chargé de représenter la société universelle et d’appliquer la justice qui est sa loi. Le jury, qui représente la société, doit-il avoir plus de puissance que la société elle-même dont il applique les lois? Quand donc je refuse d’obéir à une loi injuste, je ne dénie point à la majorité le droit de commander; j’en appelle seulement de la souveraineté du peuple à la souveraineté du genre humain. Il y a des gens qui n’ont pas craint de dire qu’un peuple, dans les objets qui n’intéressaient que lui-même, ne pouvait sortir entièrement des limites de la justice et de la raison, et qu’ainsi on ne devait pas craindre de donner tout pouvoir à la majorité qui le représente. Mais c’est là un langage d’esclave. Qu’est-ce donc une majorité prise collectivement sinon un individu qui a des opinions et le plus souvent des intérêts contraire à un autre individu qu’on nomme la minorité? Or, si vous admettez qu’un homme revêtu de la toute-puissance peut en abuser contre ses adversaires, pourquoi n’admettez-vous pas la même chose pour une majorité? Les hommes, en se réunissant, ont-ils changé de caractère? Sont-ils devenus plus patients dans les obstacles en devenant plus forts? Pour moi je ne le saurais le croire; et le pouvoir de tout faire, que je refuse à un seul de mes semblables, je ne l’accorderai jamais à plusieurs. (…) La toute-puissance me semble en soi une chose mauvaise et dangereuse. Son exercice me parait au-dessus des forces de l’homme, quel qu’il soit, et je ne vois que Dieu qui puisse sans danger être tout-puissant, parce que sa sagesse et sa justice sont toujours égales à son pouvoir. II n’y a pas donc sur la terre d’autorité si respectable en elle-même, ou revêtue d’un droit si sacré, que je voulusse laisser agir sans contrôle et dominer sans obstacles. Lors donc que je vois accorder le droit et la faculté de tout faire à une puissance quelconque, qu’on appelle peuple ou roi, démocratie ou aristocratie, qu’on l’exerce dans une monarchie ou dans une république, je dis: là est le germe de la tyrannie, et je cherche à aller vivre sous d’autre lois. Ce que je reproche le plus au gouvernement démocratique, tel qu’on l’a organisé aux Etats-Unis, ce n’est pas, comme beaucoup de gens le prétendent en Europe, sa faiblesse, mais au contraire sa force irrésistible. Et ce qui me répugne le plus en Amérique, ce n’est pas l’extrême liberté qui y règne, c’est le peu de garantie qu’on y trouve contre la tyrannie. Tocqueville
 Mal nommer les choses, c’est ajouter au malheur de ce monde. Camus
Là où rien n’est inqualifiable, rien n’est impensable. Alexander Bickel
Pour un journaliste de gauche, le devoir suprême est de servir non pas la vérité, mais la révolution. Salvador Allende
Mon livre est provoqué par le fait que dans le système médiatique, dans les milieux intellectuels, chez les académiciens, il est accepté de cibler l’islam et les musulmans en général comme notre problème de civilisation (…) De Claude Guéant à Manuel Valls, sous la dissemblance partisane, d’une droite extrémisée à une gauche droitisée, nous voici donc confrontés à la continuité des obsessions xénophobes et, particulièrement, antimusulmanes (…) Aujourd’hui, et cela a été conquis de haute lutte, nous ne pouvons pas dire sans que cela provoque de réaction – il y a un souci de civilisation qui serait le judaïsme, les Juifs en France – . Eh bien je réclame la même chose pour ces compatriotes qui sont au coeur de ce qu’est notre peuple. (…) Je ne défends pas ceux qui trahissent leur religion en commettant des crimes, je défends nos compatriotes qui n’y sont pour rien et qui sont en même temps stigmatisés ou oubliés. Edwy Plenel
Comme l’exemple d’usage chimique contre les populations kurdes de 1987-1988 en avait apporté la preuve, ces armes avaient aussi un usage interne. Thérèse Delpech
The public was misled for a decade. I love it when I hear, ‘Oh there weren’t any chemical weapons in Iraq’. Jarrod L. Taylor (former Army sergeant on hand for the destruction of mustard shells that burned two soldiers in his infantry company)
In September 2004, months after Sergeant Burns and Private Yandell picked up the leaking sarin shell, the American government issued a detailed analysis of Iraq’s weapons programs. The widely heralded report, by the multinational Iraq Survey Group, concluded that Iraq had not had an active chemical warfare program for more than a decade. The group, led by Charles A. Duelfer, a former United Nations official working for the Central Intelligence Agency, acknowledged that the American military had found old chemical ordnance: 12 artillery shells and 41 rocket warheads. It predicted that troops would find more. The report also played down the dangers of the lingering weapons, stating that because their contents would have deteriorated, “any remaining chemical munitions in Iraq do not pose a militarily significant threat.” (…) During 2003 and 2004, the United States hunted for unconventional weapons and evidence that might support the rationale for the invasion. But as the insurgency grew and makeshift bombs became the prevailing cause of troops’ wounds, the search became a lower priority for the rank-and-file. Some saw it as a distraction. (…)  In the difficult calculus of war, competing missions had created tensions. If documenting chemical weapons delayed the destruction of explosive weapons that were killing people each week, or left troops vulnerable while waiting for chemical warfare specialists to arrive, then reporting chemical weapons endangered lives. Many techs said the teams chose common sense. “I could wait all day for tech escort to show up and make a chem round disappear, or I could just make it disappear myself,” another tech said. The NYT
La France sera toujours aux côtés des artistes comme je le suis aux côtés de Paul McCarthy, qui a été finalement souillé dans son oeuvre, quel que soit le regard que l’on pouvait porter sur elle. Nous devons toujours respecter le travail des artistes. François Hollande
Most researchers tend to believe that an objective and internationally accepted definition of terrorism can never be agreed upon; after all, they say, ‘one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.’ The question of who is a terrorist, according to this school of thought, depends entirely on the subjective outlook of the definer. This article argues that an objective definition of terrorism is not only possible; it is also indispensable to any serious attempt to combat terrorism. A correct and objective definition of terrorism can be based upon accepted international laws and principles regarding what behaviors are permitted in conventional wars between nations. This normative principle relating to a state of war between two countries can be extended without difficulty to a conflict between a nongovernmental organization and a state. This extended version would thus differentiate between guerrilla warfare and terrorism. The aims of terrorism and guerrilla warfare may well be identical; but they are distinguished from each other by the targets of their operations. The guerrilla fighter’s targets are military ones, while the terrorist deliberately targets civilians. By this definition, a terrorist organization can no longer claim to be ‘freedom fighters’ because they are fighting for national liberation. Even if its declared ultimate goals are legitimate, an organization that deliberately targets civilians is a terrorist organization. Boaz Ganor
We are not criminals and we are not vandals, but men of ideals. Molqi (terroriste de « La Mort de Klinghoffer »)
Mon opéra traite la mémoire de Leon et Marilyn Klinghoffer avec dignité et condamne son exécution brutale. Il reconnaît au même titre les rêves et les souffrances des peoples israéliens et palestiniens, et ne tolère ni ne promeut aucune forme de violence, terrorisme ou anti-sémitisme. John Adams
Suppose the opera had been about a different murder and the Met offered an intense, two-sided operatic discussion of the desirability of the murder of, say, President Kennedy in a work called “The Death of JFK. ” Or a production about the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in which singers on the “side” of that assassination offer racist views in support of the murder. Or how about one on the death of one of the thousands of victims of the 9/11 attack that contained an extended operatic debate between her killers and herself about whether her death was justified. (…) Why then offer one that equates—sympathetically, no less—the murderers of Leon Klinghoffer with their victim? “Grievances” there may be on both sides in the Middle East conflict, but there was no moral justification for the murder of Klinghoffer. John Adams has defended his focus on the motivation of the killers by saying that it helps to explain “what in the mythology that they grew up with, forced them or dared them to take this action.” But the killers were not “forced” to murder Klinghoffer. Nor were they dared to do so. They chose to commit their crime. So did Lee Harvey Oswald, James Earl Ray and Osama bin Laden. We can expect no arias to be sung in their defense at the Metropolitan Opera, and there is no justification for any to be sung for the Klinghoffer killers. Floyd Abrams
Met Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has a constitutional and artistic right to produce whatever he wants. Yet showcasing this opera is equivalent to a college president’s inviting a member of ISIS, Hamas, or the Taliban to speak on campus because “all sides must be heard” and “all points of view are equally valid.” (…) “Klinghoffer” begs us to sympathize with the villains — terrorists. This is something new. “The Death of Klinghoffer” also demonizes Israel — which is what anti-Semitism is partly about today. It incorporates lethal Islamic (and now universal) pseudo-histories about Israel and Jews. It beatifies terrorism, both musically and in the libretto. Composer John Adams has given the opening “Chorus of Exiled Palestinians” a beautiful, sacred musical “halo,” à la Bach. “Chorus of Exiled Jews,” by contrast, is dogged, mechanical, industrial, aggressive — relentless, military, hardly angelic. This opera treats 6 million murdered Jews of the Holocaust as morally equivalent to perhaps 600,000 Palestinian Arabs who left during Israel’s founding. They were not murdered, not ethnically cleansed, but rather pushed to flee their homes by Arab leaders who told them they’d return as soon as the Jews had been slaughtered. “Klinghoffer” does not, of course, mention the at least 820,000 Arab, North African and Central Asian Jews forced into exile between 1948 and 1972. Nor that many Arabs didn’t flee. Today, Israel has 1.7 million Arab Muslim and Christian citizens, about 20 percent of its population. Jews are willing to live with Muslims and Christians — it is the Arab Muslim leaders who want to ethnically cleanse Jews and other infidels from allegedly Muslim lands. (…) The hijacking of the Achille Lauro was a 14-man Palestine Liberation Organization operation ordered by Arafat and Abu Abbas. Eight terrorists simply walked out of Italy, claiming a spurious diplomatic status. The rest received sentences that ranged from four to 30 years, with early releases. All were considered heroes across the Arab world. Choosing to stage “The Death of Klinghoffer” at the Met automatically confers upon it a prestige it does not deserve. The opera betrays the truth entirely and, in effect, joins the low-brow ranks of propagandists against Jewish survival. Phyllis Chesler
The opera’s problem is not that it proffers an anti-Semitic agenda, but that it drifts for far too long, indulging too many narrators and avoiding a point of view. The (mostly) fictionalized characters are chips floating on a torrent of events, carried toward destiny with no agency of their own. Only halfway through does the wheelchair-bound Klinghoffer emerge as the opera’s moral core, the one fully functioning human being. But then, of course, he’s killed. The creative team bridled at the dismissive term “CNN opera,” and in fact The Death of Klinghoffer more closely resembles the Nightline of the ’80s, the granddaddy of the moderated shout-down show. Evenhandedness in journalism can be a virtue; in opera, it’s such a colossal cop-out that audiences have trouble even recognizing its existence. (…) Perhaps they just got into the spirit of victimology that permeates the Middle East, but an opera that’s ostensibly about understanding has bred bullheadedness all around. (…) Actually, what’s astounding is that a group of right-thinking artists should turn a real-life episode of unthinking rage and appalling cruelty into a volatile work of art — and then sputter in disbelief when it triggers powerful reactions. Whether ­Adams & Co. like it or not, it is a shocking experience to hear a terrorist sing: ­“Wherever poor men are gathered, they can find Jews getting fat. You know how to cheat the simple, exploit the virgin, pollute where you have exploited, defame those you cheated, and break your own law with idolatry.” On the other hand, if you’re going to put Palestinian terrorists onstage, these are the sorts of sentiments they are going to express. In an interview for The John Adams Reader, a collection of essays edited by Thomas May, Sellars declared the music drama superior to journalism as a way of grasping current events, because it deals with motivation. “Opera is able to go inside to a place where the headlines aren’t going,” he said. “Whether it’s about suicide bombers or 9/11 or any of these events that have happened to America, the question that is not allowed to be asked to this day is ‘Why would people do this?’ That’s the question, of course, that drama asks.” Leaving aside the fact that reporters risk their lives and die on a regular basis to ask exactly that question, and often return with plausible answers, Sellars’s statement demands that we at least try to take Klinghoffer seriously as history. (…) In the opening choruses, each side gets a chance to state its case. Above a gently pulsing F-minor chord that glistens with passing dissonances, the “Chorus of Exiled Palestinians” recalls: “My father’s house was razed / In 1948 / When the Israelis passed / Over our street.” Within 30 seconds of the first downbeat, Adams and Goodman have already called down the ire of fact-checkers, who would point out that in 1948, it was the Arab nations that created a population of refugees by attacking Israel and starting a war. This is not a chorus of historians, however; it is the statement of a creation myth, sung by its inheritors. The “Chorus of Exiled Jews” follows, with more lugubrious minor-mode pulsations, more plangent harmonies and muffled strings. The symmetry is infuriating, suggesting that Shoah (the Holocaust) and ­Nakba (the Palestinian exodus) are equivalent calamities — that the Jews were victims of the first and perpetrators of the second, their suffering canceled by their sins. This is tendentious stuff, but is it anti-Semitic? (…) In its attempt to explain the bloodshed on the deck of the Achille Lauro, the opera reaches even further back, rewinding to the biblical stories of Hagar, Isaac, and Ishmael, the juncture where Jews split off from the people who would many centuries later become Muslims. As news analysis, this hardly improves on the sound-bite-­peddling experts who perform their shticks on cable. Sellars is wrong: Explaining historical events is not an opera’s job, and never has been. (…) Adams might have modeled this most political of operas on stirring Russian epics or Verdi rabble-rousers; instead he drew on Bach’s Passions, ritualistic settings of a religious tale that ends with an execution. In a famously prosecutorial Times article from 2001, the musicologist Richard Taruskin accused the composer of using the form as a front for pro-Palestinian propaganda. “In the St. Matthew Passion,” Taruskin pointed out, “Bach accompanies the words of Jesus with an aureole of violins and violas that sets him off as numinous, the way a halo would do in a painting. There is a comparable effect in Klinghoffer: long, quiet, drawn-out tones in the highest violin register … accompany virtually all the utterances of the choral Palestinians or the terrorists.” Taruskin is a formidable scholar who can pry succulent meaning from a two-note motif. Here, though, his interpretation is downright perverse, because he listens selectively and mistakes convention for content. If there is one character in Adams’s opera who expresses love and rage and doubt and sorrow in the space of a few ravishing measures, who is physically weak and morally strong, who pays with his life for the sins of others and is eloquent even after death, that person is Klinghoffer himself. The plush “aureole” of strings swaddles the aria that his dead body sings after it has been pushed overboard, sanctifying his memories of a house ravaged by war and weather. This moment of beauty, this shining crux, might actually be the most offensive thing about the opera, since a Jewish murder victim is conscripted to serve as a Christian symbol of redemption. (…) When the opera first opened, in 1991, many critics winced at the rhetorical and musical imbalance between the Palestinians, who delivered orotund abstractions, and the Jews, who chattered about trivia. It seemed as though Adams and Goodman were setting up a contest between freedom fighters and bourgeois materialists. (Most of the discussion focused on a scene in a New Jersey living room that has since been deleted and that I never saw.) But Newsday’s critic Peter Goodman pointed out that the differences mirrored the way each group saw itself: the Jews as unassuming but complicated people, appreciative of everyday pleasures and close, if fractious, families; the Palestinians as fearsome actors on a historical stage. “Are we to see the opera’s Jews — and by extension, all Americans — as wrong just because they bicker over trivialities?” Goodman asked. “Are Palestinians to be considered right because they are single-mindedly seeking revenge?” The opera captures the disjunction that has become depressingly familiar but no less horrifying in the 30 years since the Achille Lauro hijacking, the clash of the death wish with the cultivation of a peaceable life. There are grounds for disliking the opera, including its view of history, but to claim that it pits noble terrorists against nattering Jews is to listen with one ear closed. Justin Davidson
Tout gouvernement révolutionnaire exerce la tyrannie en se prétendant dépositaire d’une volonté générale qui, si elle pouvait se manifester, le renverserait, et qui le fait, d’ailleurs, dès qu’elle le peut. Les révolutionnaires sont toujours contre l’État jusqu’à ce qu’ils s’en soient emparés, puis pour l’État total après leur conquête du pouvoir. S’ils échouent dans cette conquête, ce qui fut le cas, ils se réfugient souvent dans le terrorisme, qui procède de la logique jacobino-bolchevique: une minorité se conçoit et se sacre majorité par l’imagination, et entend imposer par la violence ses vues à la vraie majorité. Comme celle-ci n’en veut nullement, la majorité imaginaire croit alors devoir agir par la terreur sur la majorité réelle. La seule différence est que les communistes agissent contre la démocratie du dedans de l’appareil d’État, et les terroristes en dehors de lui. Mais les uns et les autres sont des totalitaires parce que des révolutionnaires. Jean-François Revel
Où sont les routes et les chemins de fer, les industries et les infrastructures du nouvel Etat palestinien ? Nulle part. A la place, ils ont construit kilomètres après   kilomètres des tunnels souterrains, destinés à y cacher leurs armes, et lorsque les choses se sont corsées, ils y ont placé leur commandement militaire. Ils ont investi  des millions dans l’importation et la production de roquettes,  de lance-roquettes, de mortiers, d’armes légères et même de drones. Ils les ont délibérément placés dans des écoles, hôpitaux, mosquées et habitations privées pour exposer au mieux  leurs citoyens. Ce jeudi,  les Nations unies ont annoncé  que 20 roquettes avaient été découvertes dans l’une de leurs écoles à Gaza. Ecole depuis laquelle ils ont tiré des roquettes sur Jérusalem et Tel-Aviv. Pourquoi ? Les roquettes ne peuvent même pas infliger de lourds dégâts, étant presque, pour la plupart,  interceptées par le système anti-missiles « Dôme de fer » dont dispose Israël. Même, Mahmoud Abbas, le Président de l’Autorité palestinienne a demandé : « Qu’essayez-vous d’obtenir en tirant des roquettes ? Cela n’a aucun sens à moins  que vous ne compreniez, comme cela a été expliqué dans l’éditorial du Tuesday Post, que le seul but est de provoquer une riposte de la part d’Israël. Cette riposte provoque la mort de nombreux Palestiniens et  la télévision internationale diffuse en boucle les images de ces victimes. Ces images étant un outil de propagande fort télégénique,  le Hamas appelle donc sa propre population, de manière persistante, à ne pas chercher d’abris lorsqu’Israël lance ses tracts avertissant d’une attaque imminente. Cette manière d’agir relève d’une totale amoralité et d’une stratégie  malsaine et pervertie.  Mais cela repose, dans leur propre logique,  sur un principe tout à fait  rationnel,  les yeux du monde étant constamment braqués sur  Israël, le mélange d’antisémitisme classique et d’ignorance historique presque totale  suscitent  un réflexe de sympathie envers  ces défavorisés du Tiers Monde. Tout ceci mène à l’affaiblissement du soutien à Israël, érodant ainsi  sa  légitimité  et  son droit à l’auto-défense. Dans un monde dans lequel on constate de telles inversions morales kafkaïennes, la perversion du Hamas  devient tangible.   C’est un monde dans lequel le massacre de Munich n’est qu’un film  et l’assassinat de Klinghoffer un opéra,  dans lesquels les tueurs sont montrés sous un jour des plus sympathiques.  C’est un monde dans lequel les Nations-Unies ne tiennent pas compte de l’inhumanité   des criminels de guerre de la pire race,  condamnant systématiquement Israël – un Etat en guerre depuis 66 ans – qui, pourtant, fait d’extraordinaires efforts afin d’épargner d’innocentes victimes que le Hamas, lui, n’hésite pas à utiliser  en tant que boucliers humains. C’est tout à l’honneur des Israéliens qui, au milieu de toute cette folie, n’ont  perdu ni leur sens moral, ni leurs nerfs.  Ceux qui sont hors de la région, devraient avoir l’obligation de faire état de cette aberration  et de dire la vérité. Ceci n’a jamais été aussi aveuglément limpide. Charles Krauthammer
Suppose the opera had been about a different murder and the Met offered an intense, two-sided operatic discussion of the desirability of the murder of, say, President Kennedy in a work called “The Death of JFK. ” Or a production about the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in which singers on the “side” of that assassination offer racist views in support of the murder. Or how about one on the death of one of the thousands of victims of the 9/11 attack that contained an extended operatic debate between her killers and herself about whether her death was justified. Surely we recoil at all of these. They all would be protected by the First Amendment. The First Amendment is basically—and gloriously—content-neutral. It protects not only enduring works of art but also the dregs of human imagination, ranging from films of animals being tortured and killed to the publication of “Mein Kampf.” But it is inconceivable that the Metropolitan Opera would have chosen to offer the public any of the operas I have just hypothesized. Why then offer one that equates—sympathetically, no less—the murderers of Leon Klinghoffer with their victim? “Grievances” there may be on both sides in the Middle East conflict, but there was no moral justification for the murder of Klinghoffer. John Adams has defended his focus on the motivation of the killers by saying that it helps to explain “what in the mythology that they grew up with, forced them or dared them to take this action.” But the killers were not “forced” to murder Klinghoffer. Nor were they dared to do so. They chose to commit their crime. So did Lee Harvey Oswald, James Earl Ray and Osama bin Laden. We can expect no arias to be sung in their defense at the Metropolitan Opera, and there is no justification for any to be sung for the Klinghoffer killers. Suppose the Oxford Union proposed a debate on the topic of Mr. Adams’s opera and it was phrased this way—“Resolved that the killing of Leon Klinghoffer was justified.” Suppose you were asked to take the negative side of that debate and to argue that he should not have been murdered. Would you do so? I hope not. I hope you would say that the subject is not one on which any rational, let alone morally justifiable, debate is possible. One can argue passionately about the Middle East, Israel or Palestinians, but nothing makes the Klinghoffer murder morally tolerable. The great scholar Alexander Bickel recalled in “The Morality of Consent” (1975) that he had heard that in the tumultuous late 1960s a crowd had gathered outside an ROTC building at a great university, where members of the faculty joined students discussing “the question whether or not to set fire to the building.” The faculty members, Bickel surmised, took the negative, the matter was ultimately voted on, and the affirmative side narrowly won. Bickel’s conclusion: The “negative taken by the faculty was only one side of a debate which the faculty rendered legitimate by engaging in it. Where nothing is unspeakable, nothing is undoable.” That’s where I come out on the Met’s decision to offer this opera. What Prof. Bickel wrote applies here: Where nothing is unspeakable, nothing is undoable. Leon Klinghoffer’s murder was an unspeakable act. Period. His demise is not a proper subject of debate, only of mourning. And of how best to prevent future murderous attacks. Floyd Abrams
Pour la supposée sauvegarde de la Révolution, les robespierristes reprennent à leur compte les attributs de la tyrannie identifiée par Aristote. Dans ce retournement, la tyrannie, pourvu qu’elle serve le dessein révolutionnaire, cesse d’être ce à quoi résister, blanchie par l’idéologie qu’elle est censée servir. Si la résistance sui generis fait objection, obstacle, à la libido dominandi, la terreur, signal anticipé de la politique à venir de ses tenants, contredit de facto l’horizon émancipateur de tout projet de libération. Associée en réhabilitation à la perspective révolutionnaire, la terreur honnie regagne une légitimité scélérate. Elle revient en héritage chez les «attentateurs» anarchistes du XIXe siècle qui glisseront du «tyrannicide» strict à la négligence méprisante des victimes collatérales, puis à l’anonymat de victimes en masse en finalité attentatoire ; chez les nationalistes divers ; chez les bolcheviques – appel à la «terreur en masse» contre les ouvriers grévistes antibolcheviques. «Terrorisme» et «résistance» auraient dû se définir selon une logique ordinaire d’opposition et d’exclusion, à l’instar, par exemple, de «barbarie» et «civilisation». Ça s’est embrouillé. Pire, un adage d’un relativisme inconséquent a pris consistance : que le terrorisme pour les uns est la résistance pour les autres, ou inversement.
C’est dans cette contextualisation et à cette aune qu’il faut établir l’opposition en valeur absolue entre terrorisme et résistance. [La «confusion lexicale»] confond deux modalités de guerre, deux mentalités de combat. Il y a dans le terrorisme une «héroïsation de la violence» pour elle-même, voire de la mort en fonction d’idéaux, dont il tire gloire. Tandis que dans la résistance, il y a un «consentement» à la violence si elle est inéluctable. Notons d’ailleurs que le nom de résistance tel qu’il s’est constitué au cours de la Seconde Guerre mondiale inclut au côté des actions armées les actions non armées de résistance civile et de sauvetage des populations persécutées, pas moins héroïques que celle des partisans armés. Le terrorisme consonne avec les patterns mortifères de la modernité. Notamment l’objectif de la mort en masse de populations indistinctes, au moyen de tous les instruments possibles, détournés de leur fonction initiale. Quand bien même s’habillerait-il actuellement d’«enthousiasme» religieux d’apparences prémodernes, il en constitue un des aspects. De moyens encore limités dans un dessein illimité, il vise le meurtre en masse. Il véhicule la montée d’une kyrielle de personnages aux figures mentales archaïques. Omnipotence et destructivité constituent ses modalités et attributs flagrants. Elles ne sont pas antinomiques à cette modernité dans le versant sombre de laquelle elles trouvent accueil, relais, instruments. En tout cas, il n’est pas anodin d’observer la porosité entre groupes terroristes et diverses mafias et réseaux trafiquants qui s’imitent en violence et s’interpénètrent en intérêt. Pratiques d’intimidation, promotions internes réglées sur l’aptitude à la violence extrême, chosification des victimes désignées, se ressemblent. Même mépris pour les populations «civiles», celles adverses et celles dont les terroristes sont issus. Il est «totalitaire» si on veut le dire ainsi. A l’opposé, la résistance et ses fins : abattre la tyrannie, sous forme d’oppression ou d’occupation, sauvegarder quelque chose de la Menschlichkeit, du «sentiment d’humanité», éléments constitutifs d’une civilisation de vie, bornaient les moyens en retenue. La résistance ne se permet pas tout. La légitimité des moyens y était corrélée à l’équité des fins. Ce faisant, la résistance solidarisa des individualités dans un lien social peu exploré : la société éthique. Fût-elle provisoire… Le terrorisme invente des procédés de mort, y compris contre les «siens», la résistance sollicite des processus de solidarités, jusque chez ses adversaires.
Le langage comme ordre propre de l’humain s’inscrit dans le réel et le transforme. Il constitue l’un des points par lequel se situe le rattachement du pôle de la subjectivité à la collectivité. Ce que Freud a établi cliniquement… Il agit comme un opérateur, détermine les compréhensions du monde en ce que le monde est découpé par les possibilités du langage. La pensée n’est pas seulement exprimée par les mots, elle vient à l’existence à travers les mots. Ne pas distinguer entre terrorisme et résistance participe d’une anomie lexicale générale, destructrice des aptitudes à penser, conditions de l’autonomie et de la liberté. Une telle anomie est conséquence et vecteur d’une «carence éthique», comme on dit «carence affective». Elle habille de surcroît de la légitimité déclarative de «résistance» une réalité terroriste. Les confondre, c’est se faire affidé d’une terreur mortifère dans une déshérence complaisante, et saper le sens de l’esprit de résistance ; c’est disqualifier son éthique pratique par l’assimilation inclusive de pratiques terroristes. Et, du même coup, saborder le droit de résistance dans la civilisation, et la civilisation de ce droit. Gérard Rabinovitch

Attention: un terrorisme peut en cacher un autre !

En ces temps étranges où un simple arbre de Noël finit par être plus choquant qu’un jouet sexuel géant exposé en place publique …

Où un probable faux massacre d’enfants soulève plus de foules qu’un vrai

Où un prétendu mensonge sur les ADM d’un tyran et menteur notoire compte plus que l’utilisation passée desdites armes par ledit tryran sur sa propre population …

Où rappeler les exactions des membres d’une prétendue religion de paix vous voit accuser de stigmatiser toute une communauté

Et où, entre deux distorsions historiques, un opéra sur l’assassinat en direct d’un retraité juif-américain en chaise roulante transforme la victime en vulgaire passion chrétienne…

 Retour avec le philosophe Gérard Rabinovitch …

Sur cette équivalence morale qui, confondant démagogiquement la volonté du plus grand nombre avec la réalité, en arrive à assimiler terroristes et résistants …

Et nous condamnent, devant les périls qui montent, à l’anomie lexicale et éthique généralisée …

Gérard Rabinovitch: « Confondre terrorisme et résistance, c’est confondre deux mentalités de combat »
Edouard Launet

Libération

29 août 2014

IDÉES Le chercheur Gérard Rabinovitch dénonce la «confusion lexicale», et au-delà politique, entre les deux termes. Un amalgame entretenu depuis la Révolution française.

Aujourd’hui, ce qui est terrorisme pour les uns peut être résistance pour les autres, et inversement. Le chercheur Gérard Rabinovitch, dont les travaux sont au confluent de la philosophie politique, de l’histoire et de l’anthropologie freudienne, s’inquiète de cette confusion lexicale. Il en a analysé les origines et pointé les effets sur la société humaine dans un récent ouvrage.

Depuis quand parle-t-on de terrorisme et de résistance ?
L’usage du mot «résistance» remonte au milieu du XIIIe siècle. Au XVIe siècle, il prend une connotation politique. Avec la Révolution française, il se sédimente dans l’expression «droit de résistance à l’oppression» incluse dans la Déclaration des droits de l’homme de 1789 et dans celle de 1793. Le terme de «terreur», une peur extrême qui paralyse, on le trouve déjà chez Corneille. Puis il prend le sens de peur collective pour briser une population, en désignant l’ensemble des mesures d’exception et de liquidation instaurées entre la chute des Girondins [juin 1793, ndlr] et celle de Robespierre [juillet 1794]. Le terme de «terrorisme» désigna la politique de terreur de cette période, pointant l’emploi systématique de la violence pour atteindre un but politique, et celui des actes de violence qu’une organisation exécute pour impressionner une population et créer un climat d’insécurité. Quant à son inclusion dans la langue universelle, elle se fit à l’occasion de l’attentat de la rue Saint-Nicaise visant Bonaparte, perpétré par des chouans le 24 décembre 1800. Un baril explosif à mèche posé sur une carriole attachée à une placide jument constitua le modèle séminal de la voiture-piégée. Il manqua sa cible mais tua 22 personnes et en blessa une centaine.

«Terrorisme» et «résistance» sont donc entrés dans la sémantique politique moderne à la même période, mais à deux moments distincts de la Révolution. «Résistance» s’inscrit avant l’élimination des Girondins, «Terreur» est le fruit du Comité de salut public jacobin.

Comment le sens de ces termes a-t-il évolué ensuite ?
Pour la notion de résistance, tout est simple. Elle appartient à la logique interne éthico-politique antityrannique, congruente à l’humanisme de l’élan révolutionnaire de la première époque. Sa scène fondatrice : l’épopée biblique de la sortie de la servitude en Egypte. Son modèle pratique : les «codes» éthiques de combat en valeur absolue, acquis durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Pour la notion de terrorisme, tout se complique. Pour la supposée sauvegarde de la Révolution, les robespierristes reprennent à leur compte les attributs de la tyrannie identifiée par Aristote. Dans ce retournement, la tyrannie, pourvu qu’elle serve le dessein révolutionnaire, cesse d’être ce à quoi résister, blanchie par l’idéologie qu’elle est censée servir. Si la résistance sui generis fait objection, obstacle, à la libido dominandi, la terreur, signal anticipé de la politique à venir de ses tenants, contredit de facto l’horizon émancipateur de tout projet de libération. Associée en réhabilitation à la perspective révolutionnaire, la terreur honnie regagne une légitimité scélérate. Elle revient en héritage chez les «attentateurs» anarchistes du XIXe siècle qui glisseront du «tyrannicide» strict à la négligence méprisante des victimes collatérales, puis à l’anonymat de victimes en masse en finalité attentatoire ; chez les nationalistes divers ; chez les bolcheviques – appel à la «terreur en masse» contre les ouvriers grévistes antibolcheviques.

«Terrorisme» et «résistance» auraient dû se définir selon une logique ordinaire d’opposition et d’exclusion, à l’instar, par exemple, de «barbarie» et «civilisation». Ça s’est embrouillé. Pire, un adage d’un relativisme inconséquent a pris consistance : que le terrorisme pour les uns est la résistance pour les autres, ou inversement. Un «asile d’ignorance», aurait pu en dire Spinoza, qui dispense d’en identifier des critères distinctifs. En valeur de minimum éthique partageable pour l’espèce humaine.

Que nous dit la philosophie de ces deux notions ?
La philosophie politique, inséparable de l’éthique, ne peut les éviter. Sur son établi de travail, il lui faut prendre acte des désastres du XXe siècle, le «siècle des génocides»,«machine à liquider permanente», comme l’a nommé l’écrivain Imre Kertész. Terrorisme et résistance accompagnent la modernité politique. Or cette modernité est non univoque.

D’un côté, un idéal progressiste a porté – dans une marche précaire mais continue au XIXe siècle – des libertés diverses, arborescentes, sous le signifiant-maître de l’émancipation.

De l’autre, dans l’ombre de ce processus, dès la seconde moitié du XIXe, en interaction d’un scientisme rayonnant et d’un éventail d’idéologies politiques du ressentiment et de la haine, on observe l’apparition de tout un lexique imbibé d’exclusion et d’anéantissement dans un continuum sémantique mortifère : «racisme», «dégénérescence», «machine vivante», «vies qui ne valent pas la peine d’être vécues», «eugénisme», «extermination», «antisémitisme» entre autres… Ce lexique n’a pas été hétéronome aux mouvements d’opposition antidémocratiques de «gauche». Du côté des politiques coloniales, ce lexique trouve son pendant sur l’axe de la domination dans l’initiation de pratiques émergentes d’enfermement des populations en masse – «camps de concentration» durant la guerre des Boers – ou de massacres de masse planifiés – «extermination» des Hereros en Namibie. Leurs langages s’entremêlent en rhétorique. Ainsi s’est dessiné à travers l’Europe un «motif» de langage fortement chargé de morbidité dans lequel le nazisme fit son nid. Ainsi prit corps en précipité, dans l’ombre des avancées démocratiques, une réversion spirituelle. Les «attentateurs» terroristes ne manquèrent pas de contribuer à cette «ambiance», ni d’en être les jouets. Les deux guerres mondiales, en hubris de la «brutalisation» observée par l’historien George Mosse, accomplirent ces attendus, et inscrivirent une rupture symbolique dont nos sociétés restent entachées et tributaires. C’est dans cette contextualisation et à cette aune qu’il faut établir l’opposition en valeur absolue entre terrorisme et résistance.

Quelle est alors la nature de la «confusion lexicale» que vous pointez ?
Elle confond deux modalités de guerre, deux mentalités de combat. Il y a dans le terrorisme une «héroïsation de la violence» pour elle-même, voire de la mort en fonction d’idéaux, dont il tire gloire. Tandis que dans la résistance, il y a un «consentement» à la violence si elle est inéluctable. Notons d’ailleurs que le nom de résistance tel qu’il s’est constitué au cours de la Seconde Guerre mondiale inclut au côté des actions armées les actions non armées de résistance civile et de sauvetage des populations persécutées, pas moins héroïques que celle des partisans armés.

Le terrorisme consonne avec les patterns mortifères de la modernité. Notamment l’objectif de la mort en masse de populations indistinctes, au moyen de tous les instruments possibles, détournés de leur fonction initiale. Quand bien même s’habillerait-il actuellement d’«enthousiasme» religieux d’apparences prémodernes, il en constitue un des aspects. De moyens encore limités dans un dessein illimité, il vise le meurtre en masse. Il véhicule la montée d’une kyrielle de personnages aux figures mentales archaïques. Omnipotence et destructivité constituent ses modalités et attributs flagrants. Elles ne sont pas antinomiques à cette modernité dans le versant sombre de laquelle elles trouvent accueil, relais, instruments. En tout cas, il n’est pas anodin d’observer la porosité entre groupes terroristes et diverses mafias et réseaux trafiquants qui s’imitent en violence et s’interpénètrent en intérêt. Pratiques d’intimidation, promotions internes réglées sur l’aptitude à la violence extrême, chosification des victimes désignées, se ressemblent. Même mépris pour les populations «civiles», celles adverses et celles dont les terroristes sont issus. Il est «totalitaire» si on veut le dire ainsi.

A l’opposé, la résistance et ses fins : abattre la tyrannie, sous forme d’oppression ou d’occupation, sauvegarder quelque chose de la Menschlichkeit, du «sentiment d’humanité», éléments constitutifs d’une civilisation de vie, bornaient les moyens en retenue. La résistance ne se permet pas tout. La légitimité des moyens y était corrélée à l’équité des fins. Ce faisant, la résistance solidarisa des individualités dans un lien social peu exploré : la société éthique. Fût-elle provisoire… Le terrorisme invente des procédés de mort, y compris contre les «siens», la résistance sollicite des processus de solidarités, jusque chez ses adversaires.

Quels sont les effets de cette confusion ?
Le langage comme ordre propre de l’humain s’inscrit dans le réel et le transforme. Il constitue l’un des points par lequel se situe le rattachement du pôle de la subjectivité à la collectivité. Ce que Freud a établi cliniquement… Il agit comme un opérateur, détermine les compréhensions du monde en ce que le monde est découpé par les possibilités du langage. La pensée n’est pas seulement exprimée par les mots, elle vient à l’existence à travers les mots. Ne pas distinguer entre terrorisme et résistance participe d’une anomie lexicale générale, destructrice des aptitudes à penser, conditions de l’autonomie et de la liberté. Une telle anomie est conséquence et vecteur d’une «carence éthique», comme on dit «carence affective». Elle habille de surcroît de la légitimité déclarative de «résistance» une réalité terroriste. Les confondre, c’est se faire affidé d’une terreur mortifère dans une déshérence complaisante, et saper le sens de l’esprit de résistance ; c’est disqualifier son éthique pratique par l’assimilation inclusive de pratiques terroristes. Et, du même coup, saborder le droit de résistance dans la civilisation, et la civilisation de ce droit.

Quels enjeux de culture, alors ?
Freud achevant Malaise dans la civilisation exprime un doute sur qui l’emportera au final entre Eros et Thanatos. Reformulons-le ainsi : qui l’emportera entre éthique de vie et jouissance de mort ? L’alternative n’est pas réductible à la seule distinction entre résistance et terrorisme.

Dessin Yann Legendre
Recueilli par Édouard LaunetTerrorisme/ Résistance : d’une  confusion lexicale à l’époque des sociétés de masse de Gérard Rabinovitch éd. Le Bord de l’eau, 72 pp., 6,60 €.

Voir aussi:

Klinghoffer and the ‘Two Sides’ of Terrorism
Would the Metropolitan Opera offer a work called ‘The Death of Martin Luther King Jr.’ with racist views in support of the assassination?
Floyd Abrams
Oct. 15, 2014

The Metropolitan Opera in New York on Monday will present John Adams ’s opera “The Death of Klinghoffer. ” The organization’s decision to mount the production has already spurred protests, with more to come.

A too-brief summary: In 1985 Leon Klinghoffer, a 69-year-old disabled man, and his wife, Marilyn, were passengers on an Italian cruise ship, the Achille Lauro. The ship was hijacked by Palestinian terrorists, who shot Klinghoffer in the head and threw him overboard in his wheelchair.

John Adams is a serious artist, recognized as a leading creator of modern operas. “The Death of Klinghoffer,” first produced in 1991, contains a running debate between the killers—who voice a number of undisguisedly anti-Semitic slurs in the course of justifying their conduct—and their victim. Protesters are demanding that the opera be canceled; defenders couch their position, as has the New York Times , in terms of artistic freedom or—as one letter-writer to the Times put it—of helping us “understand the anger, frustration and grievances of other people.”

So, in Joan Rivers ’s much repeated phrase, can we talk? Some things are easy. Mr. Adams’s opera is protected by the First Amendment and so is the Metropolitan Opera in its decision to offer it. It would be a gross and obvious constitutional violation if government sought to bar the opera from being publicly produced or imposed any punishment for doing so.

Beyond that, canceling any public artistic performance because it expresses unpopular or even outrageous views is dangerous. I represented the Brooklyn Museum when then-New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani in 1999 sought to shut it down because he viewed some of its art—I use his language now—as “sick,” “disgusting” and sacrilegious. I argued then, successfully, that the mayor’s conduct violated the First Amendment.

But the controversy over the Adams opera cannot be dealt with by simple reference to the First Amendment or artistic freedom. Those who direct the Metropolitan Opera made a choice when they decided to offer Mr. Adams’s opera, and it is altogether fitting that they be publicly judged by that choice.

Suppose the opera had been about a different murder and the Met offered an intense, two-sided operatic discussion of the desirability of the murder of, say, President Kennedy in a work called “The Death of JFK. ” Or a production about the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in which singers on the “side” of that assassination offer racist views in support of the murder. Or how about one on the death of one of the thousands of victims of the 9/11 attack that contained an extended operatic debate between her killers and herself about whether her death was justified.

Surely we recoil at all of these. They all would be protected by the First Amendment. The First Amendment is basically—and gloriously—content-neutral. It protects not only enduring works of art but also the dregs of human imagination, ranging from films of animals being tortured and killed to the publication of “Mein Kampf.” But it is inconceivable that the Metropolitan Opera would have chosen to offer the public any of the operas I have just hypothesized.

Why then offer one that equates—sympathetically, no less—the murderers of Leon Klinghoffer with their victim? “Grievances” there may be on both sides in the Middle East conflict, but there was no moral justification for the murder of Klinghoffer. John Adams has defended his focus on the motivation of the killers by saying that it helps to explain “what in the mythology that they grew up with, forced them or dared them to take this action.”

But the killers were not “forced” to murder Klinghoffer. Nor were they dared to do so. They chose to commit their crime. So did Lee Harvey Oswald, James Earl Ray and Osama bin Laden. We can expect no arias to be sung in their defense at the Metropolitan Opera, and there is no justification for any to be sung for the Klinghoffer killers.

Suppose the Oxford Union proposed a debate on the topic of Mr. Adams’s opera and it was phrased this way—“Resolved that the killing of Leon Klinghoffer was justified.” Suppose you were asked to take the negative side of that debate and to argue that he should not have been murdered. Would you do so? I hope not. I hope you would say that the subject is not one on which any rational, let alone morally justifiable, debate is possible. One can argue passionately about the Middle East, Israel or Palestinians, but nothing makes the Klinghoffer murder morally tolerable.

The great scholar Alexander Bickel recalled in “The Morality of Consent” (1975) that he had heard that in the tumultuous late 1960s a crowd had gathered outside an ROTC building at a great university, where members of the faculty joined students discussing “the question whether or not to set fire to the building.” The faculty members, Bickel surmised, took the negative, the matter was ultimately voted on, and the affirmative side narrowly won. Bickel’s conclusion: The “negative taken by the faculty was only one side of a debate which the faculty rendered legitimate by engaging in it. Where nothing is unspeakable, nothing is undoable.”

That’s where I come out on the Met’s decision to offer this opera. What Prof. Bickel wrote applies here: Where nothing is unspeakable, nothing is undoable.Leon Klinghoffer’s murder was an unspeakable act. Period. His demise is not a proper subject of debate, only of mourning. And of how best to prevent future murderous attacks.

Mr. Abrams is a senior partner in the law firm Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP. This op-ed is adapted from a lecture to be given on Thursday night at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

Voir encore:

Opera v. truth: The fetid fouls of ‘Death of Klinghoffer’
Phyllis Chesler
New Yorl Post

October 19, 2014

I love opera. For almost three years, I regularly contributed to NPR’s “At the Opera.” I attend the Metropolitan Opera House as often as I can. But the decision to stage “The Death of Klinghoffer” represents an abdication of moral responsibility, political sensitivity and gravitas.

Met Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has a constitutional and artistic right to produce whatever he wants. Yet showcasing this opera is equivalent to a college president’s inviting a member of ISIS, Hamas, or the Taliban to speak on campus because “all sides must be heard” and “all points of view are equally valid.”

As a feminist, I wouldn’t boycott an opera because the female heroes are betrayed, go mad or are murdered. As in life, our great operas are tragedies in which the heroes die.

But, where there are heroes there are also villains.

The villain in Puccini’s “Tosca” is unmistakable: He is Scarpia, the police chief of Rome who tortures political prisoners and attempts to rape the great singer, Floria Tosca. We don’t get a backstory about Scarpia’s dysfunctional childhood, nor do we sympathize or identify with him.

He is a heartless villain and the opera doesn’t allow (let alone ask) us to pity or sympathize with him. We are meant to fear and despise him, perhaps even hate him.

“Klinghoffer” begs us to sympathize with the villains — terrorists. This is something new.

“The Death of Klinghoffer” also demonizes Israel — which is what anti-Semitism is partly about today. It incorporates lethal Islamic (and now universal) pseudo-histories about Israel and Jews. It beatifies terrorism, both musically and in the libretto.

Composer John Adams has given the opening “Chorus of Exiled Palestinians” a beautiful, sacred musical “halo,” à la Bach. “Chorus of Exiled Jews,” by contrast, is dogged, mechanical, industrial, aggressive — relentless, military, hardly angelic.

This opera treats 6 million murdered Jews of the Holocaust as morally equivalent to perhaps 600,000 Palestinian Arabs who left during Israel’s founding. They were not murdered, not ethnically cleansed, but rather pushed to flee their homes by Arab leaders who told them they’d return as soon as the Jews had been slaughtered.

“Klinghoffer” does not, of course, mention the at least 820,000 Arab, North African and Central Asian Jews forced into exile between 1948 and 1972. Nor that many Arabs didn’t flee. Today, Israel has 1.7 million Arab Muslim and Christian citizens, about 20 percent of its population.

Jews are willing to live with Muslims and Christians — it is the Arab Muslim leaders who want to ethnically cleanse Jews and other infidels from allegedly Muslim lands.

Contrary to all claims, the libretto is not even-handed. The villains have more lines.

For example, the terrorists command 11 arias — 12, with the “Chorus of Exiled Palestinians.” The Klinghoffers have two arias each, toward the end of the opera; add the exiled Jewish chorus and you have five arias for the innocent victims versus 12 for their victimizers.

And better lines: The Palestinians sing: “My father’s house was razed / in nineteen forty-eight / when the Israelis passed / Over our street.”

The Jews sing: “When I paid off the taxi, I had no money left.”

Indeed, the obsession with Jews and money is reminiscent of Nazi propaganda. The terrorist Rambo sings: “But wherever poor men / Are gathered they can / Find Jews getting fat . . . America / Is one big Jew.”

The terrorists tell us they are “men of ideals,” and that “this is an action for liberation.” Hah. In reality, they didn’t allow Marilyn Klinghoffer, who was exhausted and in pain from colon cancer, to lie down.

They forced the passengers to stand under the broiling Mediterranean sun for days and to hold live grenades.

Leon Klinghoffer had suffered several strokes. He lacked full use of his hands, his legs were paralyzed, his speech slurred — and this is whom Molqui murders and throws overboard with his wheelchair.

Only a dead and murdered Jew — “Leon Klinghoffer’s body” — is allowed to sing his death with some measure of grace (although most of the lyrics are incomprehensible).

The hijacking of the Achille Lauro was a 14-man Palestine Liberation Organization operation ordered by Arafat and Abu Abbas.

Eight terrorists simply walked out of Italy, claiming a spurious diplomatic status. The rest received sentences that ranged from four to 30 years, with early releases. All were considered heroes across the Arab world.

Choosing to stage “The Death of Klinghoffer” at the Met automatically confers upon it a prestige it does not deserve. The opera betrays the truth entirely and, in effect, joins the low-brow ranks of propagandists against Jewish survival.

Phyllis Chesler is a CUNY emerita professor of psychology. Her books include “Women and Madness” and “The New Anti-Semitism.” Her latest, “An American Bride in Kabul,” won a National Jewish Book Award.

Voir de même:

The Trouble With Klinghoffer Isn’t Quite What You Think
Justin Davidson

Vulture

10/21/2014

This piece originally ran on Sept. 21, 2014. Last night, The Death of Klinghoffer opened at the Met and was met, as predicted with protesters outside the auditorium — including former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani — and hecklers inside. Justin Davidson will have a full review of the opera later today.

Will an opera about terrorists ever not be timely? Can The Death of Klinghoffer ever stop incandescing? John Adams’s work had its premiere in 1991, when the events it was based on — the 1985 hijacking of the cruise ship Achille Lauro and the murder of an American passenger, Leon Klinghoffer — were still raw memories. In the years that followed, occasional new productions and weekly bursts of lethal fanaticism kept reactivating the arguments about the opera. Now that it’s finally coming to the Metropolitan Opera, Palestinian hijackers seem almost to belong to another era, before 9/11, before Iraq and Afghanistan, before anti-Jewish riots in Paris, before drone strikes, Iron Dome, and YouTube beheadings. Through all of that, Klinghoffer hasn’t lost its sting.
“This anti-Semitic opera viciously falsifies history to malign and incite hatred against Israel and the Jewish people,” the Zionist Organization of America recently declared. “The opera is a disgrace and should be canceled immediately.” That’s not going to happen, but, under pressure from the Anti-Defamation League, the Met’s general manager, Peter Gelb, did cancel planned broadcasts to movie theaters worldwide. The Guggenheim Museum scrapped a “Works & Process” performance of excerpts from the opera, citing a scheduling conflict. And audiences arriving at Lincoln Center for the opera’s Met premiere on October 20 will likely have to run a gauntlet of protesters.

I will be in the house with my mixed feelings, not out on the street nursing an ill-­informed certainty. I am eager to hear David Robertson conduct Adams’s very fine score, and to see whether Tom Morris’s staging can vanquish some serious dramatic flaws. I find Klinghoffer sporadically splendid, historically dubious, and politically troubling. I’m fine with that: Operagoers must be able to hold contradictory thoughts in their heads, because why else would they pay so much to complain with such addictive passion?
I don’t believe that this imperfect opera denigrates Jews, incites hatred, endorses libels, or casts collective blame. It doesn’t glorify terrorists or justify their crimes. What it does do is embed a spasm of thuggish violence in a broad historical context, a job that Adams, librettist Alice Goodman, and the original production’s director and all-around inspiration man, Peter Sellars, have fumbled badly. The opera’s problem is not that it proffers an anti-Semitic agenda, but that it drifts for far too long, indulging too many narrators and avoiding a point of view. The (mostly) fictionalized characters are chips floating on a torrent of events, carried toward destiny with no agency of their own. Only halfway through does the wheelchair-bound Klinghoffer emerge as the opera’s moral core, the one fully functioning human being. But then, of course, he’s killed. The creative team bridled at the dismissive term “CNN opera,” and in fact The Death of Klinghoffer more closely resembles the Nightline of the ’80s, the granddaddy of the moderated shout-down show. Evenhandedness in journalism can be a virtue; in opera, it’s such a colossal cop-out that audiences have trouble even recognizing its existence.

The opera has cast a resentful spell on its creators. Adams has spent years defending the thing. Goodman, who walked away from her Jewish upbringing halfway through writing the libretto to become a rector in the Anglican Church, complained that the project finished her opera career. “I couldn’t get work after Klinghoffer,” she told the Guardian in 2012. “I was uncommissionable.” Perhaps they just got into the spirit of victimology that permeates the Middle East, but an opera that’s ostensibly about understanding has bred bullheadedness all around. Penny Woolcock, who directed a powerfully realistic TV version for the BBC, expressed her surprise at accusations that had, at that point, been dogging the opera for more than a decade. “I find it kind of astounding that anyone would interpret it like that,” she told the Times. “And I would never have filmed it if I thought it was anti-Semitic. If the opera is about anything, it’s that we have to forgive the unforgivable. Otherwise, we’re lost as a species.”
One way to start the forgiveness cycle and rescue humanity might be to try empathizing with those who find the work upsetting, including, for example, Klinghoffer’s daughters. Actually, what’s astounding is that a group of right-thinking artists should turn a real-life episode of unthinking rage and appalling cruelty into a volatile work of art — and then sputter in disbelief when it triggers powerful reactions. Whether ­Adams & Co. like it or not, it is a shocking experience to hear a terrorist sing: ­“Wherever poor men are gathered, they can find Jews getting fat. You know how to cheat the simple, exploit the virgin, pollute where you have exploited, defame those you cheated, and break your own law with idolatry.” On the other hand, if you’re going to put Palestinian terrorists onstage, these are the sorts of sentiments they are going to express.

In an interview for The John Adams Reader, a collection of essays edited by Thomas May, Sellars declared the music drama superior to journalism as a way of grasping current events, because it deals with motivation. “Opera is able to go inside to a place where the headlines aren’t going,” he said. “Whether it’s about suicide bombers or 9/11 or any of these events that have happened to America, the question that is not allowed to be asked to this day is ‘Why would people do this?’ That’s the question, of course, that drama asks.” Leaving aside the fact that reporters risk their lives and die on a regular basis to ask exactly that question, and often return with plausible answers, Sellars’s statement demands that we at least try to take Klinghoffer seriously as history. Okay, here goes.
In the opening choruses, each side gets a chance to state its case. Above a gently pulsing F-minor chord that glistens with passing dissonances, the “Chorus of Exiled Palestinians” recalls: “My father’s house was razed / In 1948 / When the Israelis passed / Over our street.” Within 30 seconds of the first downbeat, Adams and Goodman have already called down the ire of fact-checkers, who would point out that in 1948, it was the Arab nations that created a population of refugees by attacking Israel and starting a war. This is not a chorus of historians, however; it is the statement of a creation myth, sung by its inheritors.
The “Chorus of Exiled Jews” follows, with more lugubrious minor-mode pulsations, more plangent harmonies and muffled strings. The symmetry is infuriating, suggesting that Shoah (the Holocaust) and ­Nakba (the Palestinian exodus) are equivalent calamities — that the Jews were victims of the first and perpetrators of the second, their suffering canceled by their sins. This is tendentious stuff, but is it anti-Semitic? In The New Yorker last year, the Israeli writer Ari Shavit, too, saw the dispossessed Palestinians of 1948 as heirs to the Jewish legacy of persecution: “[Brigade commander] Mula Cohen, standing by his command car, also watched the people of Lydda depart, carrying on their backs heavy sacks made of blankets and sheets. Gradually, they cast aside the sacks; they couldn’t carry them any farther. Old men and women, suffering from terrible thirst in the heavy heat, collapsed. Like the ancient Jews, the people of Lydda went into exile.”
In its attempt to explain the bloodshed on the deck of the Achille Lauro, the opera reaches even further back, rewinding to the biblical stories of Hagar, Isaac, and Ishmael, the juncture where Jews split off from the people who would many centuries later become Muslims. As news analysis, this hardly improves on the sound-bite-­peddling experts who perform their shticks on cable. Sellars is wrong: Explaining historical events is not an opera’s job, and never has been. The art form brims with inexplicable revolutions and preposterously fictionalized intrigue folded into rich and marvelous dramas. What matters is how vast events frame a human drama, translated into musical form. Don Carlo, for instance, is not about the Inquisition or a Flemish uprising, but about the relationship between a powerful father and a frustrated son.

Adams might have modeled this most political of operas on stirring Russian epics or Verdi rabble-rousers; instead he drew on Bach’s Passions, ritualistic settings of a religious tale that ends with an execution. In a famously prosecutorial Times article from 2001, the musicologist Richard Taruskin accused the composer of using the form as a front for pro-Palestinian propaganda. “In the St. Matthew Passion,” Taruskin pointed out, “Bach accompanies the words of Jesus with an aureole of violins and violas that sets him off as numinous, the way a halo would do in a painting. There is a comparable effect in Klinghoffer: long, quiet, drawn-out tones in the highest violin register … accompany virtually all the utterances of the choral Palestinians or the terrorists.” Taruskin is a formidable scholar who can pry succulent meaning from a two-note motif. Here, though, his interpretation is downright perverse, because he listens selectively and mistakes convention for content. If there is one character in Adams’s opera who expresses love and rage and doubt and sorrow in the space of a few ravishing measures, who is physically weak and morally strong, who pays with his life for the sins of others and is eloquent even after death, that person is Klinghoffer himself. The plush “aureole” of strings swaddles the aria that his dead body sings after it has been pushed overboard, sanctifying his memories of a house ravaged by war and weather. This moment of beauty, this shining crux, might actually be the most offensive thing about the opera, since a Jewish murder victim is conscripted to serve as a Christian symbol of redemption.Other critics, too, have suggested that, in his zeal to elevate a crime into an allegory, Adams treats the four terrorists as a single unit, an ensemble of noble creatures who lend the opera their point of view and whose music is threaded together by a common, elevated sound. This is simply not true.

We hear first from Molqi during the initial takeover, barking orders in choppy phrases while strings hack brutally at fragmentary, jagged motifs. He controls the situation, and the score, for barely a minute before pandemonium takes over. A passenger howls, the brass blares in fortissimo panic, and the orchestra breaks out into deafening tremors. Molqi takes advantage of a moment of terrified quiet to utter the lines that have provoked so much anti-Klinghoffer ire: “We are not criminals and we are not vandals, but men of ideals.” The PR-driven conflict in the Middle East is partly a war of terminology. What Molqi calls men of ideals, we would call fanatics; he says soldiers, we say terrorists. In the opera, nobody pays much attention to his declaration, and the spotlight quickly passes to the Swiss Grandmother, who’s trying to lull a little boy into believing that the whole scene is a marvelous escapade.

The terrorists talk very little among themselves. They are always hectoring, cajoling, persuading, or threatening, so we see them through the other characters’ responses. Molqi is obsessed with getting a reaction — from America, Syria, or the PLO — and the hectic jumbles of dissonances and agitated percussion express his frustration with the silence on the other end of the radio. It is he who shoots Klinghoffer in the head, and the violin’s high, drawn-out tone, which is abruptly snuffed out, signals not “numinous” nobility but the horrific suspension of time on the threshold between life and inflicted death. Bach has been banished from this passage; instead we’ve wandered into the murder scene from Alban Berg’s opera Wozzeck: the same spasm of ruthless madness, same wild percussion and clanging harmonies, same high, creepy violins. Adams and Berg both provide context for their characters’ lethal rages, and it has nothing to do with ideals. Molqi and Wozzeck are both the children of sick societies, and the only remedy they know is to lash out.
Effective propaganda strives to convince; in The Death of Klinghoffer, all attempts at persuasion are futile. The creators don’t just field two teams, but a collection of characters who inhabit separate worlds and sing past each other, unable to listen or learn. Molqi and the Swiss Grandmother shout past each other, the hijacker called Rambo swaps jeers and lectures with Klinghoffer, and the captain tries to save his passengers by drawing the pensive terrorist Mamoud into conversation. Nothing works, which is what makes it a tragedy.

Taruskin and others have focused on Mamoud’s nocturnal aria on the bridge. Musing and philosophical, he turns the short-wave dial and reflects on the songs that go scudding above the waves. The vocal line is warm and pliant, the orchestra a surface as phosphorescent as the sea. He unburdens himself to the captain: his suffering mother, his dead brother, the refugee camps. Touched, the captain responds in the same intimate murmur: “I think if you could talk like this sitting among your enemies, peace would come.” The terrorist’s aria, its tenderness and sophistication, raises the captain’s hope that Mamoud understands the sanctity of life, even though he has said he welcomes death. But it’s a bluff. Mamoud snaps that a negotiated peace would kill both him and hope. Then this terrorist, who only moments before was beguiling the captain with his soft, sung words, negates the possibility of talk with an Old Testament reference: “My speech is slow and rough,” he says. “Esau cannot argue.” Which is to say: He can, but he’d rather kill.

When the opera first opened, in 1991, many critics winced at the rhetorical and musical imbalance between the Palestinians, who delivered orotund abstractions, and the Jews, who chattered about trivia. It seemed as though Adams and Goodman were setting up a contest between freedom fighters and bourgeois materialists. (Most of the discussion focused on a scene in a New Jersey living room that has since been deleted and that I never saw.) But Newsday’s critic Peter Goodman pointed out that the differences mirrored the way each group saw itself: the Jews as unassuming but complicated people, appreciative of everyday pleasures and close, if fractious, families; the Palestinians as fearsome actors on a historical stage. “Are we to see the opera’s Jews — and by extension, all Americans — as wrong just because they bicker over trivialities?” Goodman asked. “Are Palestinians to be considered right because they are single-mindedly seeking revenge?” The opera captures the disjunction that has become depressingly familiar but no less horrifying in the 30 years since the Achille Lauro hijacking, the clash of the death wish with the cultivation of a peaceable life. There are grounds for disliking the opera, including its view of history, but to claim that it pits noble terrorists against nattering Jews is to listen with one ear closed.

The opera’s pivotal confrontation between humanism and barbarity comes roughly halfway through. When we finally hear from the title character, it’s in the form of a righteous lecture. “I’ve never been a violent man … but somebody’s got to tell you the truth,” Klinghoffer sings to the impetuous goon Rambo. The orchestra insists that we believe him. Timpani hammer out a series of falling octaves, triggering a solemn brass chorale and a cascade of running pizzicati. The mixture of march and flow, of plucked notes and sustained tones, and the tolling of open fifths give the aria its urgent nobility. “We’re human. We are the kind of people you like to kill” — these lines are a brave reproach from an ordinary man in mortal danger, with no weapon but his moral compass. The aria unnerves his tormentor, who spits out hate-filled clichés in jerky rhythms, while a spatter of plucked dissonances and jittery percussion illustrates his state of mind. Rambo is a caricature, a genuine opera villain. A synthesizer whines nasally like a noodling kazoo. He is not even lucid enough to be a fanatic. A disembodied choir, presumably inside his head, echoes his words (“Kneel! Beg!”) in syncopated interjections, muddying his speech into a psychotic soliloquy. When he’s done, and the synth’s obstinate loop runs out of juice, Klinghoffer is still there, still sane, still human. He uses the minutes he has left to console his wife in a few lilting phrases, gentle as a lullaby. The Palestinians boarded the ship proclaiming the glory of martyrdom, yet they wind up shuffling toward ignominious arrest, while the Jew from New Jersey, Leon Klinghoffer, meets the fate they claimed to want for themselves. As I listen to the final chord shimmering into silence, I wonder at the fresh waves of fury the score created, and whether the various factions will have any more success communicating than their armed counterparts fighting over biblical lands.

*This article appears in the September 22, 2014 issue of New York Magazine.

Voir par ailleurs:

L’islam modéré n’existe pas

Jean-François Revel

(extrait de l’Obsession anti-américaine, 2002)

Les deux mois qui ont suivi le déclenchement de la guerre islamo-terroriste contre la démocratie en général et les Etats-Unis en particulier auront été un banc d’essai fort intéressant et révélateur, puisque l’on a vu s’exacerber au cours de cette période les phobies et les mensonges de l’anti-américanisme traditionnel et du néototalitarisme.

Le plus épais de ces mensonges consiste, de la part des musulmans, à justifier l’islamo-terroriste en attribuant à l’Amérique une hostilité ancienne et générale à leur encontre. Or, dans le passé lointain ou proche, les Etats-Unis ont sans comparaison possible beaucoup moins nui aux pays musulmans que le Royaume-Uni, la France ou la Russie. Ces puissances européennes les ont souvent conquis, occupés, voire opprimés pendant des dizaines d’années et parfois plus d’un siècle. Les Américains n’ont en revanche jamais colonisé de pays musulman. Ils ne sont pas davantage hostiles à l’Islam en tant que tel aujourd’hui. Tout au contraire, leurs interventions en Somalie, en Bosnie, au Kosovo, de même que leurs pressions sur le gouvernement macédonien ont eu ou ont pour objet de défendre des minorités islamiques. J’ai rappelé plus haut qu’ils ne sont pas non plus la cause historique de l’émergence d’Israël, due à l’antisémitisme des Européens. La coalition de vingt-huit pays à laquelle ils ont fourni l’essentiel de sa force militaire contre l’armée irakienne en 1991 ne visait pas Saddam Hussein en tant que musulman, elle le visait en tant qu’agresseur. Cette coalition fut d’ailleurs formée à la demande de l’Arabie Séoudite, inquiète de la menace que représentait pour elle et pour tous les émirats le dictateur de Bagdad. On peut donc souligner qu’en l’occurence les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés ont défendu, là encore, un petit pays musulman, puisque l’Irak est en théorie laïc et puisque Saddam massacre volontiers à l’arme chimique les chiites du sud de son pays et les Kurdes du nord, eux aussi musulmans. Il est donc curieux que les musulmans américanophobes ne voient aucun inconvénient à ce que l’Irak, dont la population est majoritairement musulmane, attaque d’autres musulmans, l’Iran d’abord en 1981, puis le Koweït en 1990, selon les procédés de l’impérialisme belliciste le plus primitif. Aussi bien, en Algérie, depuis 1990, ce sont des musulmans qui massacrent d’autres musulmans. Combien il est étrange que les prétendus défenseurs des peuples musulmans n’en soient nullement scandalisés !
Les musulmans pourraient aussi éventuellement se rappeler qu’en 1956 ce sont les Etats-Unis qui ont arrêté l’offensive militaire anglo-franco-israélienne contre l’Egypte, dite « expédition de Suez ».

Un deuxième mensonge a été cultivé après le 11 septembre 2001, c’est le mythe d’un islam tolérant et modéré. Ce mythe est partagé en deux volets. Le premier relève de l’histoire des religions et de l’exégèse des textes sacrés. C’est l’affirmation selon laquelle le Coran enseignerait la tolérance et ne contiendrait aucun verset autorisant la violence l’usage de la violence contre les non-musulmans ou contre les apostats. Malheureusement, cette légende lénifiante ne résiste pas au plus sommaire examen du Livre saint de l’islam, qui fourmille, au contraire, de passages faisant obligation aux croyants d’exterminer les infidèles. Dans les discussions à ce sujet, ravivées de plus belle après les attentats, de nombreux commentateurs rappelèrent cette vérité, en citant force versets l’illustrant et la démontrant sans contestation possible. Je citerai, entre autress, le livre de Jacques Rollet, Religion et Politique (1) ou encore l’article de Ibn Warraq, « L’Islam, une idéologie totalitaire » (2). Ibn Warraq est un Indo-Pakistanais, auteur d’un livre retentissant intitulé Pourquoi je ne suis pas musulman (3). Depuis la publication de son livre, il doit vivre caché (comme, depuis 1989, Salman Rushdie, l’auteur des Versets sataniques, ou la Bangladaise Taslima Nasreen, qui osa protester, en 1993, contre la condition des femmes en pays d’islam). Repéré, Ibn Warraq se ferait abattre par ses infiniments tolérants ex-coreligionnaires. Il transcrit un chapelet édifiant de sourates coraniques, par exemple celle-ci (sourate IV, verset 76): « Tuez les idolâtres partout ou vous les trouverez. » C’est d’ailleurs le pieux devoir que n’ont pas manqué d’accomplir les bons musulmans barbus qui, le dimanche 28 octobre 2001, à Bahawalpur, au Pakistan, firent irruption avec des mitraillettes dans un temple protestant où se déroulait l’office, tuèrent le pasteur et seize fidèles (quatre enfants, sept femmes et cinq hommes) auxquels s’ajoutèrent plusieurs dizaines de blessés graes, dont une fillette de deux ans. Il y a, noyés permis cent quarante millions de musulmans, environ deux milions de chrétiens pakistanais, catholiques ou protestants, qui ne peuvent évidemment être, ni de près ni de loin, fautifs des méfaits que les fous d’Allah imputent à l’Occident. C’est donc bien et uniquement en qualité d’infidèles que ces victimes innocentes ont été assassinées. D’ailleurs, Ben Laden venait de lancer le mot d’ordre: « Tuez les chrétiens !  » Il a été entendu. Peu après, il a tourné sa prunelle meurtrière contre Kofi Annan, le secrétaire général de l’ONU, qualifié par lui de « criminel ». A propos de « victimes innocentes », il ne m’est pas revenu que la gauche européenne ait versé beaucoup de pleurs sur ces chrétiens pakistanais.

Ce qui dicte la vision du monde des musulmans, c’est que l’humanité entière doit respecter les impératifs de leur religion, alors qu’ils ne doivent eux-mêmes aucun respect aux religions des autres, puisqu’ils deviendraient alors des renégats méritant l’exécution immédiate. La « tolérance » musulmane est à sens unique. Elle est celle que les musulmans exigent pour eux seuls et qu’ils ne déploient jamais envers les autres. Soucieux de se montrer tolérant, le pape a autorisé, encouragé même, l’édification d’une mosquée à Rome, ville où est enterré Saint Pierre. Mais il ne saurait être question de contruire une église à La Mecque, ni nulle part en Arabie Saoudite, sous peine de profaner la terre de Mahomet. En octobre 2001, des voix islamiques, mais aussi occidentales, ne cessèrent d’inviter l’Administration américaine à suspendre les opérations militaires en Afghanistan durant le mois du ramadan, qui allait commencer à la mi-novembre. Guerre ou pas guerre, la décence – disaient les bien-intentionnés – impose certains égards pour les fêtes religieuses de tous. Belle maxime, sauf que les musulmans s’en tiennent pour les seuls exemptés. En 1973, l’Egypte n’a pas hésité à attaquer Israël le jour même du Kippour, la plus importante fête religieuse juive, guerre qui est restée dans l’histoire précisément sous l’appellation la « guerre du Kippour ».

Le deuxième volet du mythe de l’islam tolérant consiste à soutenir hautement que le gros des populations musulmanes désapprouve le terrorisme, et au premier rang l’immense majorité des musulmans résidents ou citoyens des pays démocratiques d’Europe ou d’Amérique. Les muphtis ou recteurs des principales mosquées en Occident se sont fait une spécialité de ces assurances suaves. Après chaque déferlement d’attentats meurtriers, par exemple en France en 1986 et en 1995, ou après la fatwa ordonnant de tuer Salman Rushdie en 1989 ou Taslima Nasreen en 1993 pour « blasphème », ils n’ont pas leurs pareils pour garantir que les communautés religieuses dont ils ont la charge spirituelle sont foncièrement modérées. Dans les milieux politiques et médiatiques, on leur emboîte avec empressement le pas, tant la crainte nous étrangle de passer pour racistes en constatant simplement les faits. Comme le dit encore Ibn Warraq, « la lâcheté des Occidentaux m’effraie autant que les islamistes (4). »

Ainsi, le quotidien Le Parisien-Aujourd’hui, dans son numéro du 12 septembre 2001, publie un reportage sur l’atmosphère de liesse qui a régné durant toute la soirée du 11 dans le XVIIIe arrondissement de Paris, où vit une importante communauté musulmane. « Ben Laden, il va tous vous niquer ! On a commencé par l’Amérique, après ce sera la France. » Tel était le type de propos « modérés » adressés aux passants dont le faciès semblait indiquer qu’ils n’étaient pas maghrébins. Ou encore : « Je vais faire la fête ce soir car je ne vois pas ces actes [les attentats de New York et de Washington] comme une entreprise criminelle. C’est un acte héroïque. Ca va donner une leçon aux Etats-Unis. Vous, les Français, on va tous vous faire sauter. » Ce reportage du Parisien n’a eu d’équivalent dans aucun autre organe de la presse écrite et fut passé sous silence par la quasi-totalité des médias. En tout cas, auditeur assidu, chaque matin, des diverses revues de presse radiophoniques, je ne l’ai entendu mentionner dans aucune d’entre elles, sauf erreur, ce 12 septembre.

Malgré l’imprécision des statistiques, on considère que la population vivant en France compte entre quatre et cinq millions de musulmans. C’est la communauté musulmane la plus nombreuse d’Europe, suivie, loin derrière, par celles d’Allemagne et de Grande-Bretagne. Si « l’immense majorité » de ces musulmans était modérée, comme le prétendent les muphtis et leurs suiveurs médiatico-politiques, il me semble que cela se verrait un peu plus. Par exemple, après les bombes de 1986 puis de 1995, à Paris, qui tuèrent plusieurs dizaines de Français et en blessèrent bien davantage, il aurait bien pu se trouver, sur quatre millions et demi de musulmans, dont une bonne part avait la nationalité française, quelques milliers de « modérés » pour organiser une manifestation et défiler de la République à la Bastille ou sur la Canebière. Nul n’en a jamais vu l’ombre.

En Espagne, des manifestations rassemblant jusqu’à cent mille personnes ont souvent eu lieu en 2001 pour honnir les assassins de l’ETA militaire. Elles se sont déroulées non seulement dans l’ensemble du pays, mais au Pays basque même, où les manifestants pouvaient craindre des représailles, quoique les partisans des terroristes y fussent effectivement très minoritaires, comme l’ont encore prouvé les élections régionales de novembre 2000.

Si, au rebours, les musulmans modérés en France osent si peu se manifester, la raison n’en serait-elle pas qu’ils savent que ce sont eux les minoritaires au sein de leur communauté et non les extrémistes ? Voilà pourquoi ils sont modérés… avec modération. Il en va de même en Grande-Bretagne, où l’on vit, en 1989, les musulmans, pour la plupart d’origine pakistanaise, se déchaîner pour hurler à la mort contre Salman Rushdie, mais où l’on ne vit aucun d’entre eux protester contre ces cris barbares. Après le 11 septembre, tel porte-parole qualifié des musulmans britanniques, El Misri, définit les attentats contre les World Trade Center comme des actes de « légitime défense ». Tel autre, Omar Bakri Mohammed, lança une fatwa ordonnant de tuer le président du Pakistan, coupable d’avoir pris positionent en faveur de George Bush contre Ben Laden (5). Chacun a eu beau tendre l’oreille, personne n’a entendu la moindre foule « modérée » islamo-britannique protester dans les rues contre ces appels au meurtre, parcqu’il n’en existe aucune, pas plus qu’il n’y a de foule « modérée » islamo-française. La notion que « l’immense majorité » des musulmans fixés en Europe serait modérée se révèle n’être qu’un rêve, ce qui fut mis spectaculairement en lumière durant les deux mois qui suivirent les attentats contre les Etats-Unis.

1. Grasset, 2001. Voir les propos de cet auteur dans Le Point du 21 septembre 2001, n°1514.
2. Marianne, 24 septembre 2001.
3. L’Âge d’homme, 1999.
4. Le Figaro Magazine, 6 octobre 2001. Qu’on me permette de renvoyer sur ce point à mon livre Le Regain démocratique, op.cit., chapitre XIIe: « Démocratie islamique ou islamo-terrorisme ? « 
5. Voir « Londres, les forcenés de l’Islam », Le Point, 2 novembre 2001, n° 1520.

Voir encore:

Alexis de Tocqueville
Tyrannie de la Majorité

extrait de
De la Démocratie en Amérique, vol I
(Deuxième Partie : Chapitre VII)

(1835)
Note

Un écrit magistral sur la tyrannie et le servilisme que la démocratie (c’est-à-dire la tyrannie de la majorité) entraîne partout et auprès de tout le monde.

Je regarde comme impie et détestable cette maxime, qu’en matière de gouvernement la majorité d’un peuple a le droit de tout faire, et pourtant je place dans les volontés de la majorité l’origine de tous les pouvoirs. Suis-je en contradiction avec moi-même?Il existe une loi générale qui a été faite ou du moins adoptée, non pas seulement par la majorité de tel ou tel peuple, mais par la majorité de tous les hommes. Cette loi, c’est la justice.
La justice forme donc la borne du droit de chaque peuple.
Une nation est comme un jury chargé de représenter la société universelle et d’appliquer la justice qui est sa loi. Le jury, qui représente la société, doit-il avoir plus de puissance que la société elle-même dont il applique les lois?

Quand donc je refuse d’obéir à une loi injuste, je ne dénie point à la majorité le droit de commander; j’en appelle seulement de la souveraineté du peuple à la souveraineté du genre humain. Il y a des gens qui n’ont pas craint de dire qu’un peuple, dans les objets qui n’intéressaient que lui-même, ne pouvait sortir entièrement des limites de la justice et de la raison, et qu’ainsi on ne devait pas craindre de donner tout pouvoir à la majorité qui le représente. Mais c’est là un langage d’esclave.

Qu’est-ce donc une majorité prise collectivement sinon un individu qui a des opinions et le plus souvent des intérêts contraire à un autre individu qu’on nomme la minorité? Or, si vous admettez qu’un homme revêtu de la toute-puissance peut en abuser contre ses adversaires, pourquoi n’admettez-vous pas la même chose pour une majorité? Les hommes, en se réunissant, ont-ils changé de caractère? Sont-ils devenus plus patients dans les obstacles en devenant plus forts?

Pour moi je ne le saurais le croire; et le pouvoir de tout faire, que je refuse à un seul de mes semblables, je ne l’accorderai jamais à plusieurs.

Ce n’est pas que, pour conserver la liberté, je crois qu’on puisse mélanger plusieurs principes dans un même gouvernement, de manière à les opposer réellement l’un à l’autre.
Le gouvernement qu’on appelle mixte m’a toujours semblé une chimère. Il n’y a pas, à vrai dire, de gouvernement mixte (dans le sens qu’on donne a ce mot), parce que, dans chaque société, on finit par découvrir un principe d’action qui domine tous les autres.

L’Angleterre du dernier siècle, qu’on a particulièrement citée comme exemple de ces sortes de gouvernements, était un État essentiellement aristocratique, bien qu’il se trouvât dans son sein de grands éléments de démocratie; car les lois et les moeurs y étaient ainsi établies que l’aristocratie devait toujours, à la longue, y prédominer et diriger à sa volonté les affaires publiques.

L’erreur est venue de ce que, voyant sans cesse les intérêts des grands aux prises avec ceux du peuple, on n’a songé qu’à la lutte, au lieu de faire attention au résultat de cette lutte, qui était le point important. Quand une société en vient à avoir réellement un gouvernement mixte, c’est-à-dire également partagé entre des principes contraires, elle entre en révolution ou elle se dissout.

Je pense donc qu’il faut toujours placer quelque part un pouvoir social supérieur à tous les autres, mais je crois la liberté en péril lorsque ce pouvoir ne trouve devant lui aucun obstacle qui puisse retenir sa marche et lui donner le temps de se modérer lui-même.

La toute-puissance me semble en soi une chose mauvaise et dangereuse. Son exercice me parait au-dessus des forces de l’homme, quel qu’il soit, et je ne vois que Dieu qui puisse sans danger être tout-puissant, parce que sa sagesse et sa justice sont toujours égales à son pouvoir.

II n’y a pas donc sur la terre d’autorité si respectable en elle-même, ou revêtue d’un droit si sacré, que je voulusse laisser agir sans contrôle et dominer sans obstacles. Lors donc que je vois accorder le droit et la faculté de tout faire à une puissance quelconque, qu’on appelle peuple ou roi, démocratie ou aristocratie, qu’on l’exerce dans une monarchie ou dans une république, je dis: là est le germe de la tyrannie, et je cherche à aller vivre sous d’autre lois.

Ce que je reproche le plus au gouvernement démocratique, tel qu’on l’a organisé aux Etats-Unis, ce n’est pas, comme beaucoup de gens le prétendent en Europe, sa faiblesse, mais au contraire sa force irrésistible. Et ce qui me répugne le plus en Amérique, ce n’est pas l’extrême liberté qui y règne, c’est le peu de garantie qu’on y trouve contre la tyrannie.


Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 317 autres abonnés

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :